(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Coal report of Illinois"

Alcove Jfo. 
Division 
Shelf Ko. 



BOOKS may be taken from the State Library by 
ttie members of^ the Geueral Assembly and 
Its officers, during the session of the Legislature. 
and at any time by the Governor, and the officers 
of the Executive Department of this State who are 
required to keep their offices at the seat of govern- 
ment, and the Justices of the Supreme and Appellate 
Courts. 

No person shall be allowed to take any book or 
property from the Library without executing a re- 
ceipt therefor, nor to take or detain from the Library 
more than two volumes of miscellaneous works at 
any one time. 

No miscellaneous works shall be detained more 
than two weeks. All Laws, Journals, etc.. taken by 
members of the Legislature, shall be returned at the 
close of the session. 

If any person injures, or fails to return anybook 
taken from the Library, within the time above 
mentioned, HE SHALL PORPEjr AND PAY TO 
THE LIBRARIAN, for the benefit of the Library, 
THREE TIMES THE VALUE THEREOF, or of the 
set to which it belongs. 

Any person, not above mentioned, who takes books 
or other articles from the State Library without the 
consent of the Librarian, will be prosecuied for 
larceny. 

Any person taking books from the State Library 
without reporting the same to the Librarian, or 
assistant, and causing the same to be properly 
charged upon the Register, will be prosecuted to the 
extent of the law. 

No entry of charge or return of books will be 
permitted to be made, except by the Librarian or 
assistant. 

Persons using books of the Library, will retm-n the 
same to the Librarian or assistant. 

JAMES A. ROSE, 
Secretary of State and ex officio State Librarian. 



mmki COPY 

00 HOT C«LATt 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL COAL REPORT 



PREPARED BY THE 



Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics 



1399. 



ALSO CONTAINING THE 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



Illinois Free Emplopent Offices 



August 2 to October 1, 1899. 



David Ross, Secretary, Springfield. 



ILLINOIS STATE LIBRARY ^^^^^ 



I 

3 1129 00784 446 7 



00 wn twwiwt 



SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
Phillips Bros. State Printers. 

1899. 



ILLINOIS STATE LIBRARY 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF LABOR. 

1S99. 

P. H. Donnelly, President, 154 W. 71st St., Chicago. 
Thomas D. Kelligar, Pana. 
Samuel M. Dalzell, Sprinu- Valley. 
Randolph Smith, Flora. 
L. W. Friboukg, Decatur, 

Secreiarii, 
David Ross, Springfield. 



STATE MINING BOARD 

1899. 

EiCHARD Newsam, President. Peoria. 
James Taylor, Edwards. 
Cochran Johnston, Spring Valley. 
Patrick McCann, Lincoln. 
Hugh Murray, M. E., Nashville. 

Secreta}\y, 
Eben Hovvells, Springfield. 



STATE INSPECTORS OF ^JINES. 

1^99. 

Hector McAllister. First District, Streator. 
Thomas Hudson. Second District, Galva. 
John W. Graham, Third District, Oaiiton. 
John E. Williams, Fourth District, Danville. 
Walton Rutledge, Fifth District, Alton. 
John Dun lop, Sixth District, Centralia. 
Evan D. John. Seventh District. Carbondale. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

North Side Office, 284 Chicago, Avenue, 

W. E. Goodman, Supt. 
Thos. Devenish, Asst. Supt. 
Mrs. J. C. ScHAUFEL, Clerk. 

South Side Office, 44 Congress St. 

Geo. W. Geary, Supt. 
•ToHN Felker, Asst. Supt. 
Miss Margaret E. May, Clerk. 

West Side Office, 28, Ogden Avenue. 
Fred E. Erickson, Sui^t. 
P. J. Meaney, Asst. Supt. 
Miss Lizzie Henneberry, Clerk. 



State of Illinois, 
Office of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 

Springfield, January 1, 1900. 

Honorable John R. Tanner, Governor of Illinois. 

Sir: — On behalf of the Board of Labor Commissioners I have the 
honor to submit herewith the Eighteenth Annual Report of the coal 
industry of this State, together with the First Report of the Illinois 
Free Employment Offices. 

David Ross, Secrciary. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Introductory, Eisrhteenth Annual Report— 189!» 1 

Statistics, Coal in Illinois VI 

Classification of Mines X 

The Output for the Year XVI 

Output by Counties XXIV 

Disposition of Output XXVI 

Distribution of Coal to Railroads XXXII 

The Possible Output of Existing M ines XXXVI 11 

Days of Active Operation XXXIX 

Averagre Value of Coal XLI 

Mine Employes XLII 

Prices Paid for Mining XLIV 

Aggregate Wages of Mine Employes XLVI 

Frequency of Wage Payments LI 

Machine Mining ' LII 

Consumption of Powder LVII 

Fatal Accidents LIX 

Non-Fatal Accidents ^ LXV 

Nationality of Coal Miners LXX 

Conclusion LXXIV 

RecapitulatioK by Districts LXX VI 

REPORTS OF STATE INSPECTORS OF MINES: 
First Inspection District— S'ec^or McAllister, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 3 

Fatal Casualties C 

Non-Fatal Casualties 8 

Statistics of Grundy, Kankakee, LaSalle, Livingston, and Will Counties 12 

Recapitulation by Counties 18 

Second Inspection District— r/!o/«as HudsoH. Inspector. 

Text of the Report 21 

Fatal Casualties 24 

Non-Fatal Casualties 28 

Statistics of Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island, Stark, and Wood- 
ford Counties , 32 

Recapitulation by Counties 48 

Third Inspection District- J^o/in ir. Graham, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 51 

Fatal Casualties 53 

Non-Fatal Casualties 55 

Statistics of Brown, Fulton, Hancock, Knox, McDonough, Schuyler, and Warren 

Counties 58 

Rec apitulation by Counties "'i 



XIV 

Fourth Inspection District— ^To 7; h E. Williams, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 77 

Fatal Casualties 81 

Non-Fatal Casualties 83 

Statistics of Cass, Logan, Macon, McLean, Menard, Tazewell, and Vermilion Counties. 86 
Recapitulation by Counties 94 

Fifth Inspection Disiyuct:— Walton Butledge, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 97 

Fatal Casualties 101 

Non-Fatal Casualties 104 

Statistics of Calhoun, Christian, Greene, Jersey, Morgan, Macoupin, Montgomery, 

Scott, Sangamon, and Shelby Counties 106 

Recapitulation by Counties 118 

Sixth Inspection District— ^To 7; h Dunlop, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 121 

Fatal Casualties 124 

Non-Fatal Casualties 129 

Statistics of Bond, Clinton, Madison, Marion, and St. Clair Counties 132 

Recapitulation by Counties 140 

Seventh Inspection District— ^ra)i D. John, Inspector 

Text of the Report 143 

Fatal Casualties 144 

Non-Fatal Casualties 147 

Statistics of Gallatin, Hamilton, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Perry, Randolph. 

Saline, Washington, and Williamson Counties 150 

Recapitulation by Counties 164 



Al'PENOlX. 
Reoister of Certificated— 

Mine Managers 169 

Hoisting Engineers 177 

Fire Bosses 185 

Mine Examiners 187 

Report of Inspection Pees— 

First District 188 

Second District 191 

Third District 193 

Fourth District 195 

Fifth District 197 

Sixth District 200 

Seventh District 203 

REVISED MINING LAW 206 

Other Mining Laws— 

Miners to be paid for all coal mined 235 

Qualification of miners 235 

Oils to be used in coal mines 236 

Wages of miners and laborers at coal mines liens on all property 237 

Weighing coal at the mines 23 



XV 

ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

lutroductory 241 

Law creatiug Free Employment Oflices L'42 

Work of the offices -^r, 

Wages paid to applicants 2l;t 

Character and number of ai)plications for eniployment and for help 251 

Ages of applicants 255 

Nationality of applicants 25^j 

Repokts of Superintendents. 

North Side Ofiice, H'. A'. Goodinati, Supt.— 

Text of the Report 258 

Applications for Employment and Help— Males 259 

Applications for Employment and Help— Females 261 

Recapitulation by Sex 2iil 

Expense Account 202 

South Side Office, Geo. W. Geary, Supt.— 

Test of the Report 263 

Applications for Employment and Help— Males 264 

Applications for Employment and Help— Females 206 

Recapitulation l)y Sex 266 

Expense Account 267 

West Side Office. Fred E. Erickson. Supt.— 

Text of the Report 26^8 

Applications for Employment and Help— Males 26S 

Applications for Employment and Help— Females 270 

Recapitulation by Sex 271 

Expense Account 271 

Summary of the work of the three offices 272 



INTEODUCTORY. 

EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL COAL KEPORT. 

1899. 



An examination of the p^eneral summary prepared from the reports 
submitted to this office by the State Mine Inspectors, for the year 
ended June 30, 1899, show, notwithstanding the general adoption of 
the shorter work day, that the percentage of increase of production 
considerably exceeds that of any similar period in the mining history 
of the State. 

This gratifying increase of production not only indicates a sub- 
stantial improvement in the trade conditions of the country, but 
what is as much to be desired, a comparative absence of strikes, lock- 
outs and suspensions. It is too much to expect that the mining in- 
dustry could at any time be absolutely free from strife. Where local 
contests have occurred they were caused either by an effort to com- 
pel compliance with the mining rates agreed upon at the State or 
inter-state convention of miners and operators, or for the equally im- 
portant question regarding the right to organize. In most instances 
both these issues were involved in the contention. 

Of the strikes that have occurred in the State, that at Pana, now 
happily settled, was the most significant, on account of the number 
of men affected, its duration, and the methods adopted by the em- 
ployers to defeat it. The lockout or suspension at that point began 
April 1, 1898, the date of the new contract year, and continued until 
October 10, 1899. The mine owners claimed that they were not rep- 
resented at the inter-state convention, which fixed a forty-cent rate 
for these mines, and therefore felt that they were not bound by its 
action. From the report of the miners' committee selected to nego- 
tiate a settlement, the question of the forty-cent rate was not so much 
considered as the many other local demands which the miners then 
insisted should be included in the settlement. At the conclusion of 



11 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

several interviews at which local matters alone were considered, the 
company officials surprised the committee with the declaration that 
they would not pay the price or thereafter treat with them as an 
organized body. 

Aggravated by local demands, which, in addition to the proposed 
increased mining rate were considered oppressive, the mine owners 
resolved to repudiate the scale, defied the power of the inter-state 
convention, and declared war on all forms of organized eflPort. For 
years prior to that time the Pana mine owners were practically 
masters of the situation. They encountered no opposition from their 
employes, and substantially named the mining price. Exempt from 
the restrictions of the union, the privilege operated in a double direc- 
tion — it gave them a decided advantage over their natural competi- 
tors in the market, while the additional employment furnished the 
men induced them to oppose affiliation with their brother craftsmen. 
In view of past immunities it was but natural that they should resent 
the interference of the union, supplemented as it was by the sym- 
pathy and support of outside employers. 

Shortly after the company had signified its purpose to resist the 
organization, preparations were made to import colored labor from 
the South. This course was accompanied by expected resistance, 
and notwithstanding the military precautions taken by the compan- 
ies, riots occurred from time to time, as a result of which many were 
injured and several lives sacrificed. While the operators considered 
they were imposed upon in being required to pay a mining rate very 
much in excess of former prices, and claimed the trouble there was 
the result of a conspiracy between outside miners and their employ- 
ing competitors, their employes, from the origin of the difficulty re- 
peatedly petitioned the mine owners to join with them in submitting 
their differences for adjustment to the State Board of Arbitration. 
These requests were rejected on the pretexts that the miners were 
not an incorporated and therefore not a responsible body; that under 
the provisions of the arbitration law the State could not enforce any 
award as against the employes, while they, as an incorporated body, 
might be held to answer in damages for a failure to abide by the 
board's decision. It was very apparent to those who endeavored to 
effect a settlement through such an agency, that the companies felt 
that in adopting such a course they would necessarily commit them- 
selves to a recognition of the miners' union; which at that stage of 
the conflict would prove more obnoxious and disastrous to the com- 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. Ill 

panies than to concede the rate contended for. After a stubborn 
conflict extending over eighteen mouths, the result at Pana was as 
complete and substantial a victory for the miners as that previously 
won at Virden. While the operators signed the forty-cent scale under 
protest, with the implied understanding and assurance that a more 
equitable price would be agreed to at future conventions, the most com- 
mendable feature of the settlement was the agreement on the part of the 
company to comply with all that the inter-state movement involved, the 
most important being the recognition of the union; the right of em- 
ployes to consider and adjust terms of employment through regularly 
selected committees. The settlement also carried with it the adoption 
of the eight-hour work day, and in fact all the other conditions em- 
bodied in the Chicago agreement. 

This gratifying conclusion of a protracted and regrettable conflict 
tends to demonstrate that, simple as the process of production has 
become, there is still a necessity for the services of men having ex- 
perience and special training in that line of industry. Regardless 
of the color of the skin, men without a recognized occupation, who 
can be purchased at so much a car load, constitute a source of ex- 
pense and danger to any community. Such investments are finan- 
cially profitable only when their importation disintegrates the ranks 
of the older miner. This effected, they are usually cast adrift and 
open for similar engagements in the same disreputable service. 
Where continued organized resistance, however, is maintained, as 
was exhibited in the contest at Pana, their presence but adds to the 
expense and embarrassment of their employers. 

The Pana experiment, like that at Virden, was costly beyond com- 
putation. Expensive to the mine owners, the miners, and to the 
State of Illinois. While all must and do regret the loss of life, 
property and business prestige, saying nothing of the bitterness such 
a contest engenders, the experience will not be without its value, if 
it burns the conscience with the fact that every species of wrong will 
inflict its certain and adequate punishment; that it is easier to deal 
with a friend than an enemy, and much better to furnish employ- 
ment for our own citizens than to form questionable contracts with 
the riff-raff of the world. 

While a great number of local strikes have been settled during the 
past year, on the terms demanded by the miners, that at Decatur 
was, next to Pana, the most important. Everything at one time in- 



IV STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

dicated a desperate struggle, but after the lapse of several months^ 
finding that the miners were still firm, the company capitulated and 
accepted all the conditions of the inter-state agreement. 

The only contest still being waged in the State is that at Carter- 
ville, in Williamson county. With the exception of about fifty men, 
the old miners have secured employment elsewhere. Those left, act- 
ing under the direction of the organization, will continue the strug- 
gle. Unlike some of the other contests, the company has made no 
effort to conciliate or conceal the cause of the difficulty. The ques- 
tion of mining rates has been somewhat eliminated, owing to tha 
company having advanced the price a fraction above that stipulated 
in the scale. The principal contention is the recognition of the 
union, a concession the company is not now disposed to make. 

The period covered by this report is generally conceded to be the 
most prosperous the trade has for some time enjoyed. The general 
revival of industry throughout the country has made possible em- 
ployment for all. In fact, in certain lines of production, there is 
and has been a visible shortage of labor. Particularly is this true in 
the mining regions where, for the first time in many years, the daily 
output of the mines proved insufficient to meet demands, 

Prior to the year 1883 information concerning the coal industry of 
this State was supplied through reports made by the inspectors ap- 
pointed by the county boards of supervisors, as provided for in the 
original act, in force July 1, 1872. This provision was not changed 
in the law as amended in 1877. From these sources, supplemented 
by the census reports, the data was collected from which the annual 
reports of the bureau were prepared. The development of the indus- 
try made necessary still further changes in the law, and the act was 
amended in 1883, which among other provisions, divided the State 
into five districts, and provided for the appointment by the Gover- 
nor, of five State Inspectors of Mines. During the session of the 
General Assembly of 1895 this provision was further amended, and 
the State divided into seven inspection districts, and providing for 
the appointment of as many State Mine Inspectors, and also requir- 
ing the owners or operators of coal mines to pay a fee of not less 
than six dollars nor more than ten dollars for each inspection or in- 
vestigation of a coal mine by a State Mine Inspector. 

The numerous amendments added at every session of the legisla- 
ture to the Act of 1883, resulted in such conflict and confusion as to 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. V 

impair the force and efficac}' of our mining' laws. Many of these 
amendments were made without regard to their efiect on former 
enactments; others were still further neutralized by the adverse opin- 
ion of the courts. In view of these contradictions, inconsistencies 
and ambiquities in the law, Gov. Tanner, in his message to the 41st 
General Assembly, recommended a general revision of our mining 
legislation. This work, involving nearly a year's labor, devolved 
upon this bureau. When the revision was completed it was sul)- 
mitted to representatives of the miners and operators, and, excepting 
a few minor changes, was approved substantially as prepared. It 
passed both branches of the General Assembly without a dissenting 
vote, and is admittedly one of the strongest and most consistent Acts 
that has found a place on our statute books. The Act took effect 
July 1, 1899, and appears as an appendix to this report, with a brief 
explanation of the essential features in which it differs from the Acts 
it supersedes. 

The value of these reports from a statistical standpoint practically 
dates from the establishment of the State inspection system. From 
the report of 1883 to the present one, material changes have taken 
place in this industry, affecting not only the volume but the method 
of production. The annual output has increased from ten million 
tons in 1883, to nearly twenty-three and one-half million tons in 
1899, an increase of 135 per cent. During this period the total num- 
ber of all classes engaged in the production of coal has increased 45 
per cent. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



STATISTICS OF COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899. 



The Commissioners of Labor, in presenting this, the Eighteenth 
Annual Report of the coal industry of Illinois, take this opportunity 
to congratulate all those engaged in the vocation, upon the comple- 
tion of a great and successful year's work. For some time past the 
mining interests of the country have presented a most discouraging 
aspect. Industrial depressions affect no interests so readily as that 
of coal mining. The source of steam suffers the first shock. It is 
gratifying to note the present unusual activity accompanied by an 
upward tendency in prices. The year 1900 opens auspiciously. 
With a continuation of the present happy relations, fostered through 
the plan of inter-state agreements between miners and operators, the 
future is filled with promise for the industry. 

The report contains the usual statistics of the coal production, to- 
gether with all contingent experiences and facilities for placing the 
product on the market. The seven State Inspectors of Mines collect 
and report on uniform blanks, furnished from this office, a full record 
of the conditions and experience of every coal mine in each of their 
respective districts. The specific information as to the operating of 
each mining plant is furnished by the operators, on blanks sent out 
by the inspectors, and returned to them, thus giving the most reliable 
information of the industry possible to be obtained. 

The main features of former reports have been followed in this, 
and furnishes a series of statistics uniform in all essential particulars. 
Some additional information concerning essential statistics of these 
industry are presented in this report, not heretofore collected. These 
relate (1) the nationality of the employes at the* mines in the State;. 
(2) the haulage of coal in the mines, and the number of horses or 
mules employed; (3) the total amount of wages paid all classes of 
employes, excepting office help. These features are tabulated in de- 
tail, and will be found in subsequent pages. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. VH 

la the following summary will be found most of the important | 
totals for the State for the year : 

Summary 1899. 

Number of counties producing coal 52 

Number of mines and openings of all kinds 889 

New mines or old mines re-opened during the year 131 

Mines closed or abandoned since last report 123 

Total output of all mines in tons of 2,000 pounds 23,434,445 

Number of shipping mines 322 

Total output of shipping mines, tons 22,531,356 

Number of mines in local trade only 567 

Output of local mines, tons 903,089 

Total tons of lump coal 17,427,598 

Total tons of other grades 6,000,847 

Total tons shipped 20,019,147 

Tons sold to local trade 2,321,040 

Tons consumed (or wasted) at the plant 1,094,258 

Average days of active operation for shipping mines 205.7 

Average days of active operation for all mines 174.0 

Average value per ton, all grades at the mines $0.7852 

Average value per ton of all lump coal at the mines $0.9186 

Average value per ton of other grades $0.4008 

Aggregate home value of total product $18,408,470 

Number of mines in which mining machines are used. 64 

Number of mining machines in use 440 

Number of tons undercut by machines 6,085.312 

Average number of miners employed during the year 26,449 

Average number of other employes 10,542 

Total employes 30,991 

Total wages paid all employes, excepting office help $14,616,555 

Number of men at work under ground 33,199 

Number at work on surface 3,792 

Number of horses and mules employed at the mines 3,529 

Average price paid per gross ton for all hand mining $0,471 

Average price paid per gross ton for machine mining $0.3134 

Number of kegs of blasting powder used 423,483 

Number of men accidentally killed 84 

Number of wives made widows 46 

Number of children left fatherless 155 

Number of men injured so as to lose a week or more of time. 597 

Number of gross tons mined to each life lost 278,982 

Number of employes to each life lost 440 

Number of grosss tons mined to each man injured 39,254 

Number of employes to each man injured 02 



YIII STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

A brief review of the totals here presented, compared with those of 
last year, will be of interest. Contrasted with last year, the number 
of mines and openings of every class is but eight more than in the 
preceding report, a variation somewhat less than that noted in former 
years. The number of shipping mines are less by six, while there 
has been an increase of fourteen in small or local mines, notwith- 
standing a reported reduction of 40,649 tons from the output of latter 
class of mines. The increase of nearly five million tons this year over 
last, was produced by the shipping mines. The number of counties 
from which coal was produced— fifty-two— remains unchanged. 

The possible output of all the mines in the State, as estimated last 
year was 121 per cent more than the actual output; on the same basis 
this per cent has been reduced nearly one-half, showing the possible 
increase in the capacity of all existing mines to be only 75 per cent 
more than the output of this year. 

Considered from a strictly commercial standpoint, the item of 
greatest interest attached to these returns is necessarily that affecting 
the annual production. In point of tonnage the year for which this re- 
port is made materially exceeds that of any former one. Comi^ared with 
that of 1898, the increase represents 4,835,146 tons, or 25 per cent. 

It would be manifestly misleading to figure the per cent of increase 
on the reported tonnage of last year, as the production for that 
period was nearly one and one-half million tons less than that of 
1897, the shortage being explained and accounted for by the general 
susjDension of mining operations, which reduced the tonnage for that 
year. Computed on the basis of the production for 1897, which, up to 
that time was the greatest in the history of the State, the percentage 
of increase is still much in excess of any former year. The output 
for 1897 was 20,072,758 tons— less by 3,361,687 tons, or 16 per cent' 
than that for the present year. This increase is more notable when 
it is considered that it occurred during the first complete year when 
the mine operators were confined to the limitations of the eight-hour 
work-day, and is another evidence of the general improvement in the 
industrial conditions of the country. 

The total number of employes this year shows an increase of 1,965 
over last, the whole number being 36,991. This is a relatively greater 
increase than that formerly rejaorted. 

The most notable feature aside from the total annual production, 
is the increase in tonnage cut by machines. While the number of 
machines in use has increased by 47, the product has increased from 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. IX 

3,41o,635 tons to 6,085, 362, or Slh per cent. The normal product of 
the machines was not fully represented last year, for the reason then 
assigned, that the suspension of 1897 was of longest duration at some 
of the largest machine mines. With all due allowance for this, the 
machine product has more than maintained the general ratio of in- 
crease throughout the State. 

The reported number of fatal accidents during the year is 84, 
which is nine more than that recorded for last year. The number of 
fatal casualties, however, is relatively less when compared with the 
total tonnage. Last year the loss was one life for every 247,991 gross 
tons: this year the proportion is one to 278,982 gross tons. These 
figures indicate the hazardous character of the mining industry. 
The laws relating to mining, supplemented by the vigilance of the 
inspection corps, has materially reduced the number of accidents, 
which, without such precaution, would certainly have occurred. Be- 
yond the general equipment of the mine, ventilation and the condi- 
tions of the haulage ways, the inspectors' jurisdiction does not ex- 
tend. It is from falls of rock or coal at the working face that the 
major portion of accidents arise. Some are no doubt traceable to 
the carelessness of the individual workman, but most of them, it is 
fair to presume, are the result of secret dangers incident to the busi- 
ness, which can not be forseen or guarded against. Losses sustain- 
ed in battle are heralded the world over, and subscriptions frequent- 
ly made for the support of the victim's widow and family. In the 
dark recesses of the coal mine the revelry of death goes constantl}^ 
on, and practically unnoticed. Few there are indeed, who, while en- 
joying the light of their firesides, are ever disturbed by the thought 
that with the consumption of every quarter of a million tons of coal, 
there is burned the flesh and bones of some unfortunate man. This, 
too, in addition to the numerous accidents which have become almost 
a daily occurrence. The more salient features of the coal statistics 
for this year will be better understood by an examination and com- 
parison of the tables here presented: 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Classification of Mines. 



Table I.- 


-Shipping and Local Mines, by 


Distr 


ids. 




DlSTRICT. 


Total. 


Shipping. 


Local. 


Mines. 


Men. Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


First 


8. 
185 
211 
87 
87 
104 
131 


7,498 
6.631 
1,799 
4.655 
6.401 
5,008 
4.999 


3.535,316 
3,326.000 
729, 132 
3,357,737 
4,810,626 
4,283.258 
3,392,376 


37 
45 
23 
37 
51 
72 
57 


7.125 
5.925 
1,178 
4,260 
6.163 
4,854 
4,763 


3,349,173 
3,077,381 
582,795 
3, 204, 156 
4,753,508 
4,222,094 
3,342,249 


47 
140 
188 
50 
36 
32 
74 


373 
706 
621 
395 
238 
154 
236 


186, 143 


Second 


248, 619 


Third 


146, 337 


Fourth 


153, 581 


Fifth. .. 


57, 11& 


Sixth 


61, 164 


Seventh. 


50 127 






The State... 


889 


36.991 


23,434.445 


323 


34,307 


22,531,356 


566 


2,684 


903,089 



Of the 889 mines in the State, 328 shipping mines produce 22,531,- 
356 tons of the entire output. Notwithstanding there has been an 
increase during the year of 14 local mines, they report a reduced pro- 
duction of over 40,000 tons. An increase of six in the number of 
shipping mines compared with last year, return an increase of 
4,575,795 tons. The product of the local mines is gradually disap- 
pearing as a factor in the industry. The percentages given in the 
the following table confirms this conclusion: 



Table II. — Percentages of Shipping and Local Mines, hij Districts. 



District. 


Shipping. 


Local. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 




44.05 
24.32 
10.90 
42.53 
58.62 
69.23 
43.51 


95.55 
89.35 
65.48 
91.51 
96.28 
96.92 
95.28 


94.73 
92.53 
79.93 
95.43 
98.81 
98.57 
98.52 


55.95 
75.68 
89.10 
57.47 
41.38 
30.77 
56.49 


4.45 
10.65 
34.52 
8.49 
3.72 
3.07 
4.72 


5.27 


Second 


7.47 


Third , 


20.07 




4.57 


Fifth 


1.19 


Sixth 


1.43 




1.48 






The State 


36.33 


92.74 


96.15 


63.67 


7.26 


3.85 







It will be observed that the mines representing those of a local 
character, comprising 64 per cent of the whole, furnish but 4 per cent 
of the entire product, and give employment to but 7 per cent of the 
total employes. Of the entire number, the shipping mines, compris- 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



ing but 36 per cent, employ 98 per cent of the men, and produce 96 
per cent of the annual output. The following table classifies the 
mines of the State according to their output : 
Table III. — Classification of Mines by Output and by Districts. 





Mines Producing— 


District. 


Under 1,000 
tons. 


1,000 and 

under 

10.000 tons. 


10,000 and 

under 
50,000 tons. 


50,000 and 

under 
100,000 tons. 


100.000 

tons and 

over. 


Total. 




No. 


Tons. 


No. 


Tons. 


No. 


Tons. 


No. 


Ton.*!. 


NO. 


Tons. 


No. 


Tons. 


First . 


25 
65 
151 
9 
20 
18 
58 


11, 774 
31,871 
50.508 
4,878 
9.814 
6,400 
22,337 


30 
80 
45 
44 
18 
20 
24 


86,270 
224,759 
110.926 
146.850 
72.563 
67, 187 
82,393 


9 
22 
11 
13 
10 
37 
21 


237,998 
424.210 
232,008 
282,817 
212, 119 
1.065,543 
422,422 


7 
7 
3 
9 

18 
IS 
15 


548.678 
534. 190 
187,772 
723,637 
1.339.936 
1.285.357 
999,354 


13 
11 
1 

12 
21 
11 
13 


2.650.596 
2.110.970 
147.918 
2.199,555 
3, 176, 194 
1.858.771 
1.865,870 


84 
185 
211 
87 
87 
104 
131 


3 535 316 


Second 

Third 


3,326.000 
729, 132 


Fourth 

Fifth 


3,357,737 
4,810.626 


Sixth 


4, 283, 258 


Seventh 


3,392,376 


The State. 


346 


137,582 


261 


790,948 


123 


2,877.117 


77 


5,618.924 


82 


14.009,874 


889 


23,434.445 



Compared with a similar classification last year, the most notable 
distinction is presented in the group of mines producing 100,000 
tons and over. The number in this class has increased from 49 re- 
ported in 1898, to 82 this year, and the production from 7,608,053 to 
14,009,874 tons. This indicates an unparalleled increase of 67 per 
cent in the number and 84 per cent in the product, emphasizing the 
rapid concentration of cajjital, and incidentally, the enlargement of 
industrial plants. In the following table of percentages is shown 
the relation of each of these groups to the total number of mines and 
product of the State : 

Table IV. — Percentages of the total Number and Total Output of 
Specified Classes of 2Iines. 





No. 


Output. 


Percentage of— 




No. 


Output. 




346 
261 
123 

77 
82 


137,582 

'.90.948 

2,877,117 

5,618.924 

14,009.874 


38.92 
29.36 
13.84 
8.66 
9.22 


0.58 


One thousand and less than 10,000 tons 


3.37 




12.28 


Fifty thousand and less than 100,000 tons 


23.98 




59.79 






Total . .. . . 


889 


23,434,445 


100.00 


100. 00 







ia<:.i.*?W-" 



^m-i 3M^ ^F*^HL 



XII STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The following table indicates the number of mines in the State 
which have been found in each of these classes for a series of years : 

Table V. — Number of Mines in Specified Groups for a Series of 
Seventeen Years. 



Number of Mines Peoducing- 



Under 
1,080 tons. 



1,000 and 

under 
10,000 tons. 



10,000 and 

under 
50.000 tons. 



50,000 and 

under 
100.000 tons. 



100,000 

tons and 

over. 



Total 
mines. 



Averages 

Percentages. 



273 
290 
280 
278 
272 
316 
301 
260 
239 
232 
252 
276 
280 
250 
244 
261 



133 
148 
143 
135 
141 
151 
139 
155 
161 
151 
140 
161 
145 
128 
120 
151 
123 
142.6 
17.22 



57.5 
6.94 



741 

778 



836 

855 



828 
190.00 



In this division of mines according to the output, it will be noted 
that, as compared with last year, the increase is confined to the second 
and fifth groups, particularly the latter, which shows a material in- 
crease over that of any former year. Following is a list of fifty-six 
mines in the State producing more than 100,000 and less than 200,- 
000 tons each: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



XIII 



Mines from ivhich more than 100,000 Tons of Coal and less than 
200,000 Tons have been delivered during the year 1899. 





Companies . 


Location. 


Tons. 






Ladd 




? 


Consolidated Coal Co. "Abbey" No. 3 






3 


Chicago, Wilmingrton and Vermilion Coal Co. No. 1... 


Seatonville 


18S. 082 








5 


Bigr Muddy Coal and Iron Co. No. 7 




170. 722 


6 


Coal Valley Mining Co. No. 2 ... . 


Sherwood. 


167 089 


7 








8 


Catlin Coal Co 


Catlin 


157, 760 


q 


Consolidated Coal Co. "Heinz' Bluff.'" .. 


Collinsville 


154 ''94 


10 


Consolidated Coal Co. No. 10 


Mt. Olive. 


150 934 


11 


Star Coal Co. No. 2 




149, 137 


1'' 


Big IMuddy Coal and Iron Co. No. 5 


Murphy^boro 


148 744 


13 








14 


LaSalle Co. Carbon Coal Co. No. 1 


LaSalle 




15 


Big Muddy Coal and Iron Co. No. 6 


Murphy sboro 


146 346 


16 


LaSalle Co. Carbon Coal Co. "LaSalle." 


LaSalle. . 


143 183 


17 






142, 574 


18 


McLean Co. Coal Co 




138, 098 


1«» 


LaSalle Co. Carbon Coal Co. "Union." 


LaSalle. 


135 902 


?0 






132, 689 


?1 


Western Coal and Coke Co, "Eden." 




132,245 


99 


Capital Cooperative Coal Co. No. 2 .. 


Springfield 


131 752 


?3 


Star Coal Co, No. 3 




131,479 


'■1 


Starne Coal Co 


Springfield 


131 458 


'S 


Big Muddy Coal and Iron Co. "Harrison" 


Murphysboro 


127,854 




Gardner and Wilmington CoaliCo. "B" 


Clark Clity 


127, 322 


97 


Hillsboro Coal Co 


Hillsboro 


1''7 035 


'8 






126. 677 


?9 


Alden Coal Co 




125, 664 


sn 


Coffeen Coal and Coke Co. . 


Coffeen.. 


125 000 


31 






124,629 


3? 






124,048 


33 


Horn Colliery Co. .. 


DuQuoin 


123. 829 


34 






122,815 


3=i 


Oglesby Coal Co 


Oglesby. .. 


122.543 


3fi 


Athens Mining Co. No . 2 

Muren Coal and Ice Co 




121,593 


37 


Belleville 


120, 000 




Consolidated Coal Co 


Missionfield ' 


118,965 



XIV 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

List — Concluded. 



Companies. 



Wabash Coal Co. No. 2 

Black Diamond Coal and Tile Co 

Consolidated Coal Co. "Gillespie." 

Brookside Coal Co. No.l 

Springfield Coal Mining and Tile Co 

Ohio and Mississippi Valley Coal Co. No. 2 

Illinois Central Coal and Salt Co. "St. John.". . 

Newsam Bros. "Kingston." 

Springfield Iron Co 

Wabash Coal Co 

Pittenger & Davis Mining and Mfg Co. "Big 4. 

Chicago-Virden Coal Co 

Chicago-Virden Coal Co. No. 1 

Chicago and Minonk Coal Co 

Sorento Prospecting and Manufacturing Co... 

Cantrall Cooperative Coal Co 

DuQuoin Union Coal Co. "Browning." 

DuQuoin Union Coal Co. "Enterprise." 

Total 



Athens 

lies Junction. 

Gillespie 

Grape Creek.. 
Springfield. .. 

Marion 

St. John 

Peoria 

Ridgely 

Dawson 

Centralia 

Auburn 

Virden 

Minonk 

Sorento 

Cantrall 

DuQuoin 

DuQuoin 



The following list of twenty-five mines produced more than 200,- 
000 tons during the year : 



Mines from ivhich more than 200,000 Tons of Coal have been deliv- 
ered during the year 1899, 



Companies. 



1» 


H 
P 




96 


8 


P.R. 


345 


3.6 


L.W. 


116 


6 


P. R. 


103 


3.2 


L.W. 


212 


7 


P.R. 


90 


7 




110 


6 


" 


200 


7 




342 


3.6 


L.W. 



Chicago, Wilmington and Ver. Coal Co. No. 1 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No.l 

Chicago, Wilmington and Ver. Coal Co. No. 2 

Braceville Coal Co 

Kelleyville Coal Co. No. 3 

St. Louis and Big Muddy Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co. No. 2 

Kelleyville Coal Co. No. 2 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 2 



Streator 

Spring Valley 

Streator 

Braceville 

Westville 

Carterville 

Glen Carbon 

Westville 

Spring Valley 



372,433 
331.757 
329,069 
316,353 
303,089 
.300,591 
293,559 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

List — Concluded. 



Companies. 



S 



Tons. 



Consolidated Coal Co. No. 6 Staunton 

Madison Coal Co. No. 5 MountOlive 

Taylorvllle Coal Co Taylorville 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 3 Spring Valley 

Westville Coal Co ! Westville 

HimrodCoalCo. No. 1 j Westville 

Wilmington Coal Mining and Mf g Co Diamond 



Big 4 Wilmington Coal Co 

Develin Coal Co. No. 1 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 8 

Mt. Olive and Staunton Coal Co. 

Madison Coal Co. No. 4 

Himrod Coal Co. No. 1 

Riverton Coal Co. No. 2 

Star Coal Co. 2 

Breese Coal Co 

Total 



Coal City.... 

Toluca 

Mount Olive. 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon. 
Westville.... 

Riverton 

Carbon Hill.. 
Breese.. 



P. R. 



L.W. 
P. R. 



L.W, 



P. R 

" I 



L.W. 
P. R. 



271.664 
268.077 
255.000 
252.810 
251,624 
250,440 
238,000 
230,232 
229,705 
225,419 
219,229 
218,697 
215,876 
208, 569 
207, 733 



Of the number here reported six produced over 300,000 tons. Last 
year only one mine in the State —the St. Louis & Big Muddy Coal 
Co., located at Car terville— returned a tonnage exceeding 300,000, and 
only six others whose output exceeded 200,000 tons each. 

The reduction in this class of mines, compared with that reported 
in 1897, was due to the suspension. This year 25 mines report an 
output exceeding 200,000 tons. 

Special interest attaches to the class of mines producing over 300,- 
000 tons, not particularly on account of their number so much as the 
reduced time of oiaeration caused by the observance of the eight -hour 
work-day. It is important in analyzing these returns, to consider 
the method of working, the depth of mine, and the thickness of the 
seam. The Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Company's mine 
No. 1 stands at the head of the list, with a production of 372,433 
tons. Following that is the Spring Valley Coal Company's mine Xo. 
1, with an output of 331,757 tons. The widest differences as to depth 
and size of seam are here presented. The mine at Spring Valley is 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



nearly four times the depth of that at Streator, while the size of the 
seam is less by more than one- half. 

This is by far the largest list of the kind ever reported. It con- 
veys a strong suggestion of the great struggle for supremacy which 
is everywhere apparent, and defines the policy of economics as char- 
acterizing modern industrialism. It is gratifying to know that the 
adoption of the eight-hour work-day has not seriously interrupted 
the process of accomplishing the most within the shortest space of 
time. 

The gains and losses in the number of mines in the several in- 
spection districts during the year are shown in the following table : 

Table VI. — Gain and Loss in Number of Mines, by Districts. 



District. 


Nunber 

of mines, 

1898. 


Number 

of new 

mines, 1899 


Number 
of aban- 
doned 
mines, 1899 


Number 

of 

mines, 1899 


Gain. 


Loss. 




86 
184 
217 

« 

79 
98 
123 


11 
25 
53 
2 
10 
13 
15 


13 
24 

59 
9 
2 

7 
7 


84 
185 
211 
87 
87 
104 
131 




2 




1 




Third 


6 






7 


Fifth 


8 
6 
8 




Sixth .... 




Seventh 








The State 


881 


129 


121 


889 


23 


15 


Net gain 


8 

















The Third inspection district, which, in point of production, is 
the least important in the State, returns the greatest number of new 
and abandoned mines. Operations, as a rule, in that field are confined 
to local or drift mines. Comparatively little capital is required 
and many openings are made merely to supply the owner and his im- 
mediate neighbors with fuel for the season. 

The Output for the Year. 
The aggregate tonnage of the State, with the percentages of lump 
and other grades of coal, is given by districts in the following table : 



COAL IN ILLINOI.-;. 

Table YU.— Output of the State, bjj Districts. 



XVII 





Total 
output. 
Tons. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Percentage of- 


District. 


Lump. 


Other 
errades. 


First 


3.535,316 
3,326,000 
729. 132 
3.357.737 
4.810.626 
4.283.258 
3.392.376 


2.677.359 
2.669.631 
600,280 
2.404,385 
3.480.311 
3,294,077 
2,301,555 


857.957 
656.369 
128.852 
953. 352 

1.330.315 
989. 181 

1.090.821 


75.73 
80.27 
82.33 
71.9 
72.35 
76.91 
67.84 


24 77 


Second 

Third- 


19.73 
17 67 


Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 


28.1 
27.65 
23.09 
32.16 


The State 


23.434.445 


17.427.598 


6.006.847 


74.37 


25.63 







Out of a total of 23,434,4io tons produced during the year ended 
June 30, 1899, 17,427,598 tons, or 74.37 per cent was lump coal, and 
the balance was coal of other grades. The Seventh district returas 
the smallest, and the third the largest percentage of lump coal. 
Aside from these the ratio for the State is substantially uniform. 
The First district shows the largest increase compared with the pre- 
ceding year, while the Fifth district more than maintains its record 
in returning the greatest outi3ut. 

In the table following the product of the districts and of the State 
for the present and preceding year is compared : 



Table YlU.—Outjnd of 1898 cmd 1899 Compared, hij Dis 


tricl^. 


District. 


Output. 1898. 
Tons. 


Output. 1899. 
Tons. 


Gain. 


Loss. 


First 


2,269.362 
2.551.110 
721.846 
2,572.059 
3.925.690 
3.459.932 
3.159,300 


3,535.316 
3.326,000 
729, 132 
3,357.737 
4.810.626 
4.283,258 
3.392.376 


1.325,954 
774.890 
7.286 
785, 678 
884, 936 
825.326 
233.076 








Third . 








Fifth 




Sixth. 




Seventh 




The State 


18.599,299 


23,434.445 


4.836.146 









-B C. R. 



XVIII . STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The increase of nearly 5,000,000 tons over the preceding year is 
quite evenly distributed. For the first time in the history of the 
State, every district reports an increase nearly in proportion to its 
total output, excepting the first, where the increase amounts to over 
a million and a quarter tons. This general distribution of business 
would seem to indicate that, from a competitive standpoint, the sev- 
eral districts, so far as prices and labor conditions are concerned 
have now reached a basis of substantial uniformity. 

A record of the total tons produced in the State for each of the 
years for which a report has been made by the bureau, is here pre- 
sented. 

Table IX. — Output of the State for Eighteen Years. 



Total 
output. 

(Tons.) 



Tons 
of lump. 



Tons 
of other 
grades. 



Percentage of— 



Lump. O^^,-. 



11,017,069 
12.123,456 
12,208.075 
11,834,459 
11, 175, 24J 
12,423,066 
14,328.181 
14,017,298 
15,274,727 
15.660,698 
17,062,276 
19,949,564 
17,113,576 
17,735.864 
19,786,626 
20,072,758 
18.599.299 
23,434.445 



9,115.653 
10,030,991 
10,101.005 
9,791,874 
9.246,435 
10,278,890 
11,855.188 
11,597.963 
12,638,364 
12,960,224 
14,730,963 
16,112,899 
13,865,284 
14,045.962 
14,210,024 
14,672.241 
14.208,795 
17,427,598 



107,070 
402,585 
928.806 
144, 176 
472.993 
419,335 



82.74 
82.76 
82.47 
80.77 
81.02 
79.25 
71.86 
73.10 
76.39 
74.37 



17.26 
17.24 
17.53 
19.23 
18.98 
20.75 
28.14 
26.90 
23.61 
25.63 



Prior to the year 1891 the grades of coal were not separated, when 
this information was required and supplied in the reports of the in- 
spectors for 1891, the ratio for the State was developed and applied 
to the product of the preceding nine years. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. XIX 

The quantity returned under the head of "other grades" has varied 
from 17 per cent in 1891, to 28 per cent in 1896. Last year it was 
24 per cent, while this year shows a slight increase over that figure. 
Under the prevailing system of paying miners on the basis of gross 
weight, this fluctuation is not important, especially where it does not 
reduce the quantity of salable coal or increase the waste. Until 
quite recently the exactions of the ordinary market were of such a 
character as to necessitate the greatest care in the handling of coal, 
and at many points various sized screens were used in its prepara- 
tion. Just what percentage of specially prepared coal is omitted or 
included under the miscellaneous designation of "other grades" is 
not apparent. It would seem from the above table that the adoption 
of the gross weight method has not, as some apprehended, resulted 
in an increased waste. In addition to the annual tonnage the fol- 
lowing table indicates the number of men engaged in the industry 
for each of a series of years: 

Tarle X. — Output of the State for 18 Years, and the Mines and 
Men Producing it. 



Mines. 


Men. 

! 


704 


20.290 


639 


23,939 


741 


25,575 


778 


25,946 


787 


25,846 


801 


26,804 


822 


29,410 


854 


30,076 


936 


28,574 


918 


32,951 



Tons. 



Mines. 


Men. 


839 


33.632 


788 


35,390 


836 


38,477 


874 


38,630 


901 


37,057 



Tons. 



11,017,069 
12,123,456 
12,208,0751 
11. 834, 459, 

11,175,241 

I 
12,423,0661 

14.328,181 

14,017,298 

15,274.727 

15.660,698 



35,026 
36,991 



17,(62,276 
19, 949, 564 
17,113.576 
17.735.864 
19,786.626 
20,072,758 
18.599,299 
23,434,445 
283,816,678 



An inquiry concerning the agency employed in the transportation 
of coal in the mines developed the facts set out in the following 
table: 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XI. — Showing the Haulage of Coal in the Mines in the 
State, and the Number of Horses and Mules Employed, hy 



Counties. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse or 
Mule. 


By Hand. 


T3 

-g 


County. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 
mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


III 

2; 


Grrundy . 










9 

1 
15 
4 

1 


1,255,787 
127.322 

1,626,052 
90,663 
27, 149 


13 
1 
26 
11 
2 


24,545 

1,696 
20,818 
26,585 

5.630 


209 


Kankakee 










42 


♦LaSalle 


1 


329,069 






278 


Livingston 






30 


Will 










8 














Total 


1 


329,069 






30 


3,126,973 


53 


79,274 


567 











* Mules are used at the C, W. & V. Coal Co. No. 2 mine to deliver the coal to the part- 
ing, from thence it is hauled to the bottom by electric motor. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse or 
Mule. 


By Hand. 


.1 


County.! 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 














9 
3 
2 
2 

28 

1 


1,398,319 
14,490 
246,306 
98.300 
424,880 
300 


10 
30 
9 

12 
25 
22 
20 


12,205 
76.775 
2.985 
21. 164 
40.360 
41,297 
23,997 


284 


Henry 










24 


♦Marshall 






1 
3 
6 


93,287 
377, 127 

279,458 


62: 








101 


* Peoria 






105- 








16 


Stark 










17 


Woodford 






1 


101,000 


1 


73,750 


36 














Total 






" 


1,750,872 


46 


1.256,255 


128 


218,783 


645- 











* At ten mines in these counties the coal is hauled from the face to the parting by mules'' 
from thence to the shaft or tipple by cable. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table AT. — Continued. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 



XXI 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse ok t>„ jj^.,^ 
Mule. ^y Hand. 


o 


County. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


III 


Brown 














15 
52 

5 

37 
50 

8 
15 


2,630 
38,598 

5.498 
43.214 
51,494 

6.920 
14,080 




Fulton 










26 


562.488 


153 












6 


Knox 














22 


McDonough 














11 


Schuyler 










3 


4,212 


S 


Warren 










3 


















Total 










29 


566, 700 


182 


1fi2.4.q2 


198 












1 





FOURTH DISTRICT. 



t Mules are used for gathering the coal from the working rooms. 
* Does not include 120,365 tons produced by four strip m-nes. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse or 
Mule. 


By Hand. 


■a 


County. 


No. 
mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


III 

z 


€ass 














2 


3,430 


1 


"t Logan 






1 




99,962 


2 
3 

10 
10 
45 


86,019 
197,048 

71.356 
427,939 


33 












34 


-j-McLean 






1 


138,098 






29 


Menard . 










52 


Tazewell 










109. 379 


?. 


2,639 


25 








2 


237.006 


1,863,296 1 


1 
1.200 252 














Total 






4 


475,066 


74 


2, 755, 037 


5 


7,269 426 










. 







XXII 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XJ.— Continued. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Hokse or 
Mule. 


By Hand. 


■a 
_ a 


County. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


III 












1 
4 


4,118 
452,339 




■ ■■■ 


4 


♦ PViritsf-inn 






2 


120, 120 






74 








8 
6 
7 
1 
2 
1 
4 
6 


14,370 
4.050 
3.420 
4,290 
4,800 
1,200 

20,617 
7,128 


8 
















3 


♦Macoupin 


1 


150,934 


1 


271,664 


12 
5 


1,220,656 
349,911 


231 
40 












2 








1 


131,752 


24 


1,950,620 


246 




















1 


98,637 


13 
















1 


150,934 


4 


523,536 


47 


4,076,281 


35 


59,875 


621 







* At two mines in Christian county, two in Macoupin and one in Sangamon mule.? are 
used to haul the coal from the working rooms to places convenient to be hauled by cable or 
electric motor to the bottom of the shafts. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse or 
Mule. 


By Hand. 




County. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


III 
2 








1 


1 
4 
13 

5 
65 


100.955 
433,378 

1,392,072 
382,846 

1,849,474 






17 












2 
13 


1,357 
11,905 


34 


Madison 










140- 




1 


111,271 






117 


St. Clair 










204. 


Total 


1 


111,271 







88 


4, 158, 725 


15 


13.262 


512 











COAL IN L LINOIS. 

Table X/.— Ccncluded. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT. 





By Electricity 


By Cable. 


By Horse ok 
Mule. 


By Hand. 


•s"^ 


County. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 
mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


To IS. 


Isl 


Gallatin 














9J 10.754 

-i "0 

9 4. 948 


14 
















4 












18 


870, 763 

33,207 

4.956 

874. 832 


146 
















8 












5 
20 






7 


Perry 






1 
1 


5 


4,590 


153 












131 374.^23 




Saline 










12 
4 

19 


91.588 

34.460 

1,077.215 


6 


2. 5fi0 


23 














8 


Williamson 










7 1..540 


150 
























93 


3,361,344 


38! 31.032 


557 




















Recapitulation of Haulage at Mines and Number of Horses and 
Mules Employed, by Districts. 





By Electricity, By Cable. 


By Horse or 
Mule. 


By H 


AND. ;=^ = 

i = 


Districts. 


No. 

of 

mines 


Ton-. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 

of 

mines. 


Tons. 


No. 
mines.! 


Tons. H £ 1 


First 


1 


329. oeo 






30 
46 
29 
74 
47 


3.126.973 
2.256.345 
566. 700 
2.755.037 
4.076.281 


53J 

■H 

182 
5 
35 

15 

1 
381 


:0,2\' 567 


Second .. ... 




850.872 


21S.7S3 645 


Third 








\C2.i3-J 198 








4 
4 


475. 066 
523,536 


7. 269 426 


Fifth 


1 

1 


150, 934 
111,271 


rO.ST5: 621 




88 4.269.996 
93 4.158.725 


13. 262; 512 


Seventh 






31.032! 557 




3 










The State 


591.274 


19 


1.849,474 


407 20.301,405 


456| 


571,927 3.526 

1 



Four strip mines in Vermilion county . 120,365 tons, not included. 



XXIV STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

From the above figures it will be noted that of the total product, 
but 591,274 tons were moved by electric appliances. These were lim- 
ited to LaSalle countj'^ in the First district, Macoupin county in the 
fifth, and Marion county in the Sixth. The amount hauled by the 
cable method was 1,849,474. Over 20,000,000 tons were hauled by 
horses and mules. The necessity for greater speed and economy in 
the transportation of coal will, to some extent, displace the old 
method of haulage. It cannot be entirely removed, however, the 
figures indicate that the services of the mule are as necessary in the 
mine as they used to be in the army. 

Output by Counties. 
While the entire coal production of the State comes from 52 
counties, the principal portion is obtained from a fraction of this 
number. Selecting the counties which produced over half a million 
tons, in proportion to their out put for the two years, 1898-1S99, 
afPords the following table: 

Table XII. — Relative Bank of the Principal Coal Producing 
Counties, 1899 and 1898. 



Rank. 



Counties 

Vermilion — 

Sangamon 

LaSalle 

St. Clair 

Macoupin — 

Bureau 

Madison 

Grundy 

Williamson. .. 

I'erry 

Jackson 

Peoria 

Pulton 

Christian 

Total 



Tons. 



s. 


Rank. 


867 


1 


572 


2 


939 


3 


474 


4 


674 


5 


524 


6 


977 


7 


332 


8 


755 


9 


422 


10 


711 


11 


698 


12 


084 


13 


459 


14 


488 





Counties 

Sangamon 

St. Clair 

Verinilion 

Macoupin 

LaSalle 

Williamson... 

Jackson 

Bureau 

Perry 

Grundy 

Marion 

Peoria ... 

Madison 

Pulton 

Total 



Tons. 



2,221. 
2,083. 
1.975, 
1,849. 
1.646, 
1.410. 
1,403. 
1,280. 
1.078. 

879. 

875. 

744. 

601, 

572, 
18.624, 



1,763,863 
1,600,752 
1,520,699 
1,264,926 
1,165,490 
915, 108 
911,194 



845,329 
796,249 
714,513 
640, 193 



14.198.374 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. XXV 

The general increase in production is observable in this table, 
from the manner in which it affects the number and rank of counties. 
Nine counties report over 1,000,000 tons, and two of them over 
2,(X)0,000 tons. Last year but five counties in the State produced 
over 1,000,000 tons. Vermilion county in the Fourth district leads, 
displacing Sangamon, while LaSalle county, in the First district, 
has gone from fifth to third rank. Fourteen counties in the State 
produced 18,(324,488 tons, or 79 per cent of the entire output of the 
52 counties. The following table presents in alphabetical order a 
list of the coal counties of the State, with the number of mines, men 
and tons reported for each: 



Table XIII. — Output of the State, hij Counties. 



County 

Bond 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun ... 

Cass 

<3hristian... 

Clinton. 

Piilton 

Gallatin 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton... 

Hancock 

Henry 

Jackson 

Jefferson. . 

Jersey 

Johnson 

Kankakee.. 

Knox 

LaSalle 

Liivingrston 

Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin. . 
Madison .... 



Dist.iMines. 



Men. Tons. 



County. 



Dist. 



Men. 



Tons 



30i 

3.0711 1 

20 ' 



283 
1,295 
85 
20 
25 
210 
167 
3,566 
314 
261 ! 

2.175 
1.295 



410,524 

4,118 

3.430 

572.459 

434, 735 

601,084 

16. 754 

14.370 

280.332 

640 

5,498 

91,265 

875.711 

33,207 

4,050 

4.956 

129,018 

43,214 

975.939 

117,248 

185,981 

197,048 

646.674 

403,977 



Marion 

Marshall 

McDonough.. 

McLean 

Menard 

Mercer 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

Peoria 

Perry 

Randolph — 
Rock Island. 

Saline 

Sangamon... 

Schuylei 

I Scott 

Shelby 

Stark 

St. Clair 

Tazewell — 
Vermilion ... 

Warren 

Washington. 

Will 

Williamson . 
Woodford.... 



1.133 

1.335 

486 

149 



18 


173 


26 


2,507 


11 


43 


4 


53 


7 


173 


.20 


" 82 


65 


2,125 


12 


214 


52 


2.824 



87 

100 

1.427 

442 



494.117 
342.578 
51.494 
209,454 
427,939 
496.591 
354.201 
4,800 
744,698 
879.422 
374,323 
41,597 
94, 148 
2,083,572 
11.132 
20, 617 
105, 765 
23,997 
1,849,474 
112,018 
2.221.867 
14,080 
34,460 
32, 777 
1.078,755 
174.750 



XXVI STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

LaSalle county represents the greatest number of employes; 3,566 
men are employed in 42 mines. The county employing the greatest 
number of men in proportion to the number of mines is Bureau in 
the Second district, nineteen mines furnish employment for 3,071 
men. The next in this class is Grundy, in the First District, whose 
22 mines give employment to 3,298 men. 

Disposition of Output. 
For the first time, in the report for last year, statistics were col- 
lected relative to the disposition of the output, representing the num- 
ber of tons shipped, tons sold to local trade, and tons consumed and 
wasted at the plant. It has been deemed advisable to continue this 
record, and the following table indicates the manner in which this 
year's product was disposed of. 



Table XIV. — Disposition of Outjyut, hy Districts. 



District. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

(and wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 


3.535,316 
3,326,000 
729, 132 
3.357.737 
4.810,626 
4.283.258 
3,392,376 


2,999,604 
2,877,142 
561.664 
2.746.842 
4.095.235 
3.673.703 
3.064,957 


438,152 
352.594 
149, 971 
504.031 
439.937 
282.887 
153,468 


97.560 
96,264 
17.497 
106,864 
275.454 
326.668 
173.951 


The State 


23,434,445 


20.019.147 


2.321.040 


1.094.258 







Compared with the preceding year the increase in the amount sold 
to local trade is but 171,232 tons, while the amount shipped has in- 
creased 4,422,259 tons, with an increase of 241,655 tons consumed 
and wasted at the plant, an amount relatively less than last year^ 
when the increased production is considered. In the table of per- 
centages given below, these facts are more distinctly set forth. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XV. — Percentages of Disi^osition, by Districts. 



District. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

(and wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


First 


84.85 
86.50 
77.03 
81.81 
85.12 
85.77 
90.35 


12.39 


'/ IF, 






Third 


20.57 ' 2.40 


Fourth 


15 01 1 3 18 


Fifth 


9.15 5.73 


Sixth 


6.60 
4.52 


7.63 


Seventh. .... 


5 13 








85.42 


9.90 


4.68 







According to this, 85 per cent of all coal is delivered on track for 
shipment, 10 per cent is disposed of at the mine, and 5 per cent con- 
sumed and wasted at the mine. The quantity reported in the last 
column has not, and possibly can not be separated, hence there is no 
means of determining what per cent of it is utilized and what represents 
loss. The per cent of absolute waste is exceedingly small, and illus- 
trates the care exercised in the management of the industry. The 
table following shows the disposition of the product by counties : 



Table XVI. — Disj^ositio)! of Output, bij Counties. 

FIRST DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons con- 
Tons sumed 
sold to local (and wast- 
trade. ed) at 
the plant. 


Grundy 


1.280.332 
129.018 

1,975.939 
117,248 
32, 779 


1,200,113 

118,888 

1,606,742 

52,812 

21,049 


49,403 

5,748 

315,522 

58.121 
9,358 


30,816 


Kankakee 


4,382 


LaSalle 


53,675 


Livingston 


6,315 


Will 


2.372 






The district 


3.535,316 
100.00 


2.999,604 
84.85 


438, 152 
12.39 


97.560 


Percentages 


2.76 







XXVIII 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XFJ.— Continued. 

SECOND DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

(and wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


Bureau . 


1,410,524 
91,265 
342,578 
496,591 
744.698 
41,597 
23,997 
174,750 


1.324.664 
28,473 
317,060 
452,515 
606,047 


45,931 
59,380 
18,242 
28,453 
120,552 
37.799 
23, 137 
19, 100 


39,929 




3,412 


Marshall . 


7,276 




15,623 




18,099 


Rock Island. 


1,165 


Stark 


860 




145.750 


9,900 






The district 


3,326.000 
100.00 


2,877.142 
86.50 


352,594 
10.60 


96,264 




2.90 







THIRD DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

(and wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


Brown 


2.6,30 
601.084 

5.498 
43.214 
51.494 
11, 132 
14,080 




2.630 
62.871 

1,160 
42,354 
17, 174 
10,002 
13, 780 




Fulton 


523,256 
4.338 


14, 957 








860 


McDonough.. .. 


33,120 
950 


1,200 




ISO 


Warren 


3C0 




729, 132 
100.00 


561.664 
77.03 


149,971 
20.57 


17,497 




2.40 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table A' F/,— Continued. 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 



XXIX 



County. 



Tons 
shipped. 



Tons con- 
Tons sumed 
sold to local (and wast- 
trade. ed) at 
the plant. 



Cass.. 

Logan 

Macon 

McLean 

Menard 

Tazewell 

Vermilion 

The district 

Percentages 



3,430 

185,981 
197,048 
209, 454 
427,939 
102,018 
2.221,867 



3,357,737 
100.00 



141,568 
65,327 
77, 169 

370. 750 

39, 305 

2,052,723 



2,746.842 
81.81 



3,130 
33,215 
126,617 
117,094 
37, 273 
69,827 ' 
116,875 j 
504,031 ! 
15.01 



11,198 
5,104 
15,191 
19,916 



106.864 
3.18 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons con- 
Tons sumed 
sold to local (and wast- 
trade. 1 ed^ at 
the plant. 




4,118 

572,459 

14,370 

4,050 

1,646,674 

354,201 

4,800 

2,083,572 

20,617 

105,765 




4,118 
50, 370 
14,370 

4,050 
74,994 




Christian 


483,760 


38,329 











Macoupin 


1,413,611 
298,131 


158.069 




42,564 13.506 


Morgan 


4,800 
227,698 




Sangamon 


1, 794, 636 
16,590 

88.507 


61,238 


Scott 


3.527 
13,446 


500 


Shelby 


3.812 






Thedistrict 


4,810,626 
100.00 


4.095,235 
85.12 


439,937 
9.15 


275,454 
5.73 













STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Table XFJ.— Concluded. 

SIXTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

Cand wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


Bond 


100, 955 
434.735 

1,403.977 
494, 117 

1.849,474 


79,796 
380, 700 

1.165,977 
448, 753 

1,598.477 


9,878 
25,437 
73,817 
27,324 
146, 431 


11,281 




28, 598 


Madison.. 


164 183 




18. 040 


St. Clair 


104. 566 






The district 


4,283,258 
100.00 


3.673.703 

85.77 


282.887 
6.60 


326 668 




7.63 







SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed 

(and wast- 
ed) at 

the plant. 


Gallatin 


16,754 
640 

875. 711 
33.207 
4,956 
879.422 
374,323 
94. 148 
34,460 
1,078.755 


10.021 


6,533 
640 
32,825 
8,400 
1,956 
33, 764 
23,944 
10,205 
10, 258 
24, 943 


200 






Jackson 


783,258 
22,407 
3,000 
801.694 
341.268 
8L 103 
19.000 
1,003.206 


59 628 




2.400 


Johnson.. 




Perry 


43 964 




9.111 


Saline. 


2 840 




5,202 


Williamson.. 


50 606 






The district 


3,392.376 
100.00 


3,064,957 
90.35 


153,468 
4.52 


173, 951 




5.13 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. XXXI 

Following is a recai^itulation of totals of the foregoing tables: 



Table XVII. — Recapitulation of Disposition of Total Output of 
Shipping Mines, bij Districts. 



District. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipping 
mines. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons to 
local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed ^!ind 
wasted 1 at 
the plant. 




3,535,316 
3,326.000 
729, 132 
3.357,737 
4,810,626 
4,283,258 
3,392,376 


3.349,173 
3.077,381 
582, 795 
3,204,156 
4,753,508 
4,222,094 
3.342.249 


2,999,604 
2.877,142 
561.664 
2,746,842 
4.095.235 
3.673,703 
3,064,957 


253,509 
111.166 
6.304 
353.916 
383 409 




Second 


89 073 


Third 








Fifth 


•>1A SCI 


Sixth 










' 1 ^'-.^o. 


The State 


23,434,445 


22,531.356 


20,019,147 


1.435,960 1,076,249 



As the shipping mines contribute 96 per cent of the output, 
disposition of their product is shown in the following table: 



the 



Table XVIII. — Disjjosition of the Ouipnt of Shipping Mines onli/ 
bij Districts. 



District. 



Total 
output of 
shipping: 



Percentage of— 



Tons 
shipped. 



Tons sold 
to local trade. 



Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at the 
plani. 



First 

Second 

Third 

fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State 

Percentages 



3,349.173 
3,077,381 
582, 795 
3.204,156 
4,753.508 
4,222,094 
3,342,249 



85.73 
86.15 
87.01 
91.70 



7.57 
3.61 
1.08 
11.05 
8.07 
5.29 
3.12 



2.54 
3.22 

5.78 
7.70 
5.18 



22.531.356 
100.00 



1.076,249 

4.78 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Distribution of Coal to Railroads. 
Following is a statement showing the number of tons of coal trans- 
ported by the railroads of this State, and the number of coal produc- 
ing counties through which they run: 



Table XIX. — Railroads ivhich have hauled the Coal Outjmt of the 
State, and the tonnage by Counties, contributed to each. 



Railroads and Counties. 


Tons 
received by 
each road. 


Total 
tons receiyed. 


Illinois Central- 


705. 102 
671,099 
661.669 
463.874 
463,281 
435,542 
432,224 
228,223 
88,507 
83.524 
73.662 
70. 783 
54.500 
35,760 
27,014 
25,990 
8,000 
6,025 

1,691.742 
298. 104 
11. 203 

762.657 

362, 115 

328,724 

214,531 

115,817 

33, 120 

17,303 

16,590 

4,338 

950 

61 

595. 703 
579. 102 
221.000 
187. 132 
35. 201 
32.330 
31,216 
30,471 
533 
400 




Perry 
















LaSalle 












Shelby 




Marshall 




































Chicago & Eastern Illinois— 


4,534, 779> 


WilIinm*4nTi 








Chicago. Burlington & Quincy- 


2,001.049 






Pnltnn 




Mof^or' 




Peoria 












Scott 
















Wabash- . 


1,856.206 


























Kankakee 








LaSalle 






1.713,088^ 


Elgin. Joliet & Eastern- 


1,033.916 

356.240 
302.856 
152.729 
101.481 
37.736 
33. 504 
21.049 
17.060 
49 


Chicago & Alton- 


1,033,916. 


















LaSalle 


















1.022.704 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XIX. — Continued. 



Railroads and Counties. 


Tons 
received by 
each road. 


Total 
tons received. 


Chicagro & Northwestern— 


830,805 

440,404 
252, m 
17,024 

380, 700 
207,696 
45,703 
]5,988 
7, 339 

238,711 
218.021 
1G3.97J 

173.849 
155,617 
142. Ill 
81.103 
18,549 
17,060 
3,000 
1,711 
1,599 

530, 209 
7,180 

191.700 
160,870 
91,250 
63,117 

8,072 

442,547 

6.025 

387,861 
11.204 
10.021 
7.800 

262, 729 
121.589 

S. 837 

208.954 

131.744 

9,541 

156, 616 
77,640 

8,337 
1.000 

237, 984 
2,333 




St. Louis. Peoria & Northern— 


830.805 






Sangamon 




Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern- 
Clinton 


710.322 


St. Clair 








Christian 








Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis— 


657.426 


Menard 




Sangamon 




Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis- 
Vermilion 


620,706 










Saline . . 








McLean 




Johnson 




LaSalle 




Grundy 




Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis— 

St. Clair 


594.599 


Marion 




Atchison, Topeka & Santa F6— 

Marshall 


537.389 


LaSalle • • 




Woodford. 




Grundy 








Terre Haute & Indianapolis— 


515.009 


Macon . . . 




Louisville & Nashville— 

St. Clair 


448.572 










Washington . . . 




Mobile & Ohio- 
Randolph 


416.886 


Jackson 




St. Clair 




Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific- 

LaSalle 


393, 155 






Marshall . ... 




Toledo, Peoria & Western— 

Peoria . ... 


350, 239 


Pulton ... 








Tazewell 




Rock Island & Peoria- 


243, 593 


Rock Island .. 






240.317 



-c C, R. 



XXXIV 



STATISTICS Of LABOR. 

Table J^iX.— Concluded. 



Railroads and Counties. 



Tons 
received by- 
each road. 



Peoria & Pekin Union- 
Peoria 

Tazewell 



Iowa Central- 

Peoria 

Fulton.... 



St. Louis, Chicago & St. Paul- 
Saugamon 



Toledo. St. Louis & Kansas City- 
Montgomery '. 

Bond 

Madison 



Wabash, Chester & Western- 
Perry 

Randolph 



Jacksonville & Southeastern- 
Macoupin 



Jacksonville & St. Louis- 
Bond 

Macoupin 

Mi'nTgomery 

Marion 



Indiana, Illinois & Iowa- 
Kankakee 

LaSalle 



Peoria, Decatur 
Logan 



Evansville— 



Toluca & Eastern- 
Marshall , 



Lake Erie & Western- 
McLean 

Tazewell 



Fulton County Narrow Gauge- 
Fulton 



Indiana, Decatur & Western— 
Macon 



Centralia & Chester- 
Washington 

Marion 



Litchfield, Carrollton & Western- 
Macou pin , 



Pawnee- 
Sangamon 



207,265 
28,705 



122, J 



117,000 
37, 778 
11,985 



130,595 

4,877 



81.0U4 



42.018 
25,017 

7,804 
1,585 



61,403 
2,000 


33,049 


32,295 


17,059 
9.600 


26.500 


18.076 


3,200 
425 



1,120 
152 



Total tons shipped by 35 railroads . 



SHIPPED BY WATER. 



Rock river. Henry county 

Illinois river. Peoria county 

Illinois and Michigan canal, LaSalle county. 
Mississippi river. Rock Island county 



11.170 
4.000 
1.104 



Total shipped. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



XXXV 



This information was collected for the first time in the Coal Re- 
port for 1898, and is continued here. There is but little change from 
last year in the order of these carriers, except the increase incident i 

to the enlarged production, and in this respect the principal coal roads 
have shared in nearly equal proportions. The first six roads carried 
12,161,742 tons, more than half of all the product shipped. Of these the 
Illinois Central, extending through eighteen of the principal coal 
counties, conveyed over four and a half million tons. The tonnage 
contributed by each county to the different railroads will be found 
in the table given below, followed by a statement of the names of 
railroads, number of counties and tons transported : 

Table XX. — Counties which have produced the Comynercial Coal of 
the State and the tonnage delivered to the several Railroads in i 
each. ' 



Counties and Railroads 



Tons 

delivered 
to 

each rail- 
road. 



Total tons 
shipped. 



Vermilion- 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois 

Wabash 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Sangamon- 
Wabash 

Illinois Central 

Chicago & Alton 

St. Louis, Chicago & St. Paul 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 

St. Louis, Peoria & Northern 

Pawnee ■ 

LaSalle— 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 

Illinois Central 

Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific 

Atchison. Topeka & Santa F6 

Chicago & Alton 

Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Illinois & Michigan Canal 

Wabash 

St. Clair— 

Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis 

Illinois Central 

Louisville & Nashville 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 

Mobile & Ohio 

Macoupin- 
Wabash 

Chicago & Alton 

St. Louis. Peoria & Northern 

Cleveland, Chicago, Cincinnati & St. Louis, 

Jacksonville Southeastern 

Jacksonville & St. Louis 

Litchfield. Carrollton <$: Western 

Bureau- 
Chicago & Northwestern 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 



,691,742 

187,132 
173,849! 



579, 102 
463, 281 
356.240 
168. 560 
163, 974 
45, 703 
17,624 
1521 



762.657 

435, 542 I 

208,9541 

160.870 

33,5041 

2,000! 

l,711i 

1,1041 



530, 
463. 
387, 
207, 



1,598,497 



1,413,611 



362.115 
131,744 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XX.— Continued. 



Counties and Railrsads. 


Tons 

delivered 
to 

each rail- 
road. 


Total tons 
shipped. 


Grundy- 


1,033.916 

101,481 

63,117 

1,599 












Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis 






1,200,113 


Madison— 

Terre Haute & Indianapolis 


442, 547 
440,404 
238.711 
32, 330 
11,985 


nhipno-n Ppnrin J^. St rionis 








Toledo St Louis & Kansas City 






1,165.977 


Williamson— 


705, 102 
298, 104 

671,099 
130,595 






Perry— 

Ulinnit! r!fintrnl 


1,003,206 








801,694 


Jacksra— 


661,669 
121, 589 

207,265 
156,616 
122, 349 
115,817 
4,000 


Mobile & Ohi(» 




Peoria— 


783,258 


Toledo Peoria & Western 












TllinniQ Rivpt' 






606,047 


Fulton- 


328, 724 
90, 392 
77,640 
26,500 

228, 223 
221,000 
18. 549 
J5.988 














Christian- 
Illinois Central 


523,256 


Wabash 














483,760 


Mercer- 


237,984 
214,531 

432,224 

7,339 

7,180 

1,585 

425 






Marion- 
Illinois Central 


452,515 










Jacksonville & St Louis 










448,753 


C inton- 


m. 700 

218,021 
152, 729 


Menard— 

Chicago Peoria & St Louis 


380,700 








370,750 


Randolph — 

Mfihilp ,& Ohio 


262,729 
73,662 

4,877 












341,268 


Marshall- 


191,700 
83, 524 
32,295 
9,541 






Tnliipn Xr F.nstprn 




. Phinatrn Rnpk I«lnnf1 Ji^ Pnfifin 






317. 0G( 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XX.— Continued. 



Counties and Railroads. 


Tons 
delivered 

to 
each rail- 
road. 


Total tons 
shipped. 


Montgomery- 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 


142.111 
117,000 

;ii,2ifi 

7,801 

91, 250 
54,500 

70, 785 
37,7a6 
3a, 049 




Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City. 




Wabas h 




Jacksonville tt St. Louis 




Woodford- 
Atchison. Topeka & Santa F6 


289. 131 


Illinois Central 




Logan- 
Illinois Central 


145, 750 






Peoria. Decatur &i E vansville ' ' " ' 




Kankakee- 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 


141.568 


61,403 
30.471 
27,014 


Wabash 








Shelby- 


118,888 


88, 507 


Saline- 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Bond- 
Jacksonville & St. Louis 

Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City 

McLean- 
Illinois Central . . . 


88.507 
81, 103 

79. 796 


81, 103 

42,018 

37,778 

25.990 
17.060 
17. 060 
17,059 


Chicago & Alton 




Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Lake Erie & Western 






77, 169 


Macon- 
Wabash 


35,201 
18,076 
6,025 
6,025 

35.760 

8.337 

8.072 

533 

61 

49 










Terre Haute & Indianapolis 

Livingston- 
Illinois Central 


65,327 


Toledo, Peoria & Western 




Wabash 














52, 812 


Tazewell- 
Peoria & Pekin Union 

Lake Erie & Western . . 


28. 705 
9,600 
1,000 


Toledo, Peoria & Western 






39, 305 


McDonough— 

Chicago Burlington <fc Quincy 


33, 120 




33, 120 


Henry— 

Chicago. Burlington & Quincy 


17,303 
11,170 

11.204 
11.203 


Rock Kiver 




Jefferson- 
Louisville & Nashville 


28,473 


Chicago & Eastern Illinois .... 






22. 407 


Will- 

Chicago & Alton 


21.049 




21,049 



Washington- 
Illinois Central 

Louisville & Nashville. 
Ceutralia & Chester 



Scott- 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 



8,000 


7,800 


3.200 



19.000 
16, 590 



XXXVIII 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XX.— Concluded. 



Counties and Railroads. 

* 


Tods 
delivered 

to 
each rail- 
road. 


Total tons 
shipped. 


Gallatin- 

Louisville & Nashville v 


10,021 






10,021 


Hancock- 


4,338 

3,000 

2,333 
300 


Johnson— 

Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis 

Rock Island- 


4,33? 
3, COO 








2,633 
950 


Schuyler— 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 


950 








20,019,147 









Illinois Coal delivered to Illinois Railroads — 1899. {On Cars for 
Transportation and to Locomotives for Consumption.) 



Railroads. 



Number 

of Tons, 

counties. 



Illinois Central , 

Chicago & Eastern Illinois 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 

Wabash 

Elgin, Joliet & Eastern 

Chicago & Alton 

Chicago & Northwestern , 

St. Louis, Peoria & Northern 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Louisville. Evansville & St. Louis 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 

Teri-e Haute & Indianapolis 

Louisville & Nashville 

Mobile & Ohio 

Chicsgo, Rock Island & Pacific 

Toledo, Peoria & Western 

Rock Island & Peoria 

Peoria & Pekin Union 

Iowa Central 

St. Louis, Chicago & St. Paul 

Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City 

Wabash, Chester & Western 

Jacksonville & Southeastern 

Jacksonville & St. Louis , 

Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 

Peoria, Decatur & Evansville 

Toluca & E astern 

Lake Erie & Western 

Pulton County N arrow Gauge 

Indiana, Decatur & Western 

Centralia & Chester 

Litchfield. CarroUton & Western 

Pawnee 



Total. 



4,534,779 

2,001.049 

1,856,206 

1,713,088 

1.033.916 

1,022,704 

830.805 

710,322 

657,426 

620, 706 

5:14, 599 

537, 389 

515,009 

448, 572 

416,886 

393, 155 

350, 239 

243,593 

240,317 

235,970 

212,741 

168,560 

166,763 

135,472 

81,004 

76.424 

63, 403 

33,049 

32,295 

26, 659 

26, 500 

18,076 

3,625 

1,120 

152 



20,002,573 



The Possible Output of Existing Mines, 
An inquiry addressed last year to the operators of mines, develop- 
ed the fact that the capacity of the plants, equipped as they then 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. XXXIX 

were, was more than double the actual output. The averat^e com- 
puted at that time for the State, showed that the output of the plants 
if continuously operated, could be increased 121 per cent. Assuming 
that the possible output as then reported, remained unchanged the 
following table reveals how this margin has been effected by the bus- 
iness of the present year : 

Table XXI — Comparison, of Actual Output tvith Possible Output 
of Existing Mines, hrj Districts. 



District. 


Output— 1899. 

(Tons.) 


Possible 

output, 1998. 

(Tons.) 


Per cent 
of possible 
increase. 


First 


3,535,316 
3.326,000 
729. 132 
3,357,737 
4,810,626 
4.283,258 
3.392,376 


5.121,710 
5,908,740 
1,272,500 
5,633,425 
9,537,550 
7, ISO. 900 
6, 428. 100 


44 87 


Second 


77 65 


Third 


74.52 


Fourth 


67 77 


Fifth ... 


98.26 




67.65 


Seventh 


89 49 








23,434,445 


41.0^2,925 


74.88 







Measured by the volume of this year's product, the estimated ca- 
pacity is but 75 per cent in excess of the actual outpnt. 



Days of Active Operation. 
The days of active operation for the several districts and the State 
for the year, is here presented : 

Table XXII — Days of Active Opeirdion, by Districts. 



District. 


AvERAOE Working Days 
OF All Mines. 


Average Working Days 

OF Shipping Mines 

Only. 




Mines. 


1 
Men. Days. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 




84 
185 
211 
87 
87 
104 
131 


7.498 188.2 
6.631 181.5 
1.799 146.3 
4,655 ! 199 
6.401 ' 190 
5,008 1 196.8 
4, 999 159 


37 
45 
23 
37 
50 

57 


7.125 
. 5.925 
1.176 
4,260 
6,151 
4,8^4 
4,762 


208 


Second 

Third 


211 

185 




221.6 


Fifth 


201.6 


Sixth 


201 


Seventh 


206.6 










The State 


889 


36,991 


174.6 


321 


34,253 1 205.7 









STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Taking all classes of mines, the average for the State is 175 days 
each; that for shipping mines is 206 days each. The days of opera- 
tion; like the increase in production, is more evenly distributed 
among the several districts than formerly. The lowest average is 
found in the Third district, accounted for in a measure by its num- 
erous small mines, and the greatest in the Fourth. The other five 
districts are practically uniform, with an average for the State of over 
200 days. An opportunity of comparing the average days of operation 
for a series of years is afforded in the following table : 

Table XXlll—Days of Active Operation, of Shipping Mines for 
a Series of Seven Years, by Districts. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State 



38 220 

26 228 

80 215 

56 251 

101 233 



161.5 
171 
182.9 
194.7 



159.4 
176.1 
173 

188.5 
192.6 



46 198 

27 157 

40 210 

50 197 

72 196 

49 164 

322 186 



183.2 
158.6 
207.7 
202.1 
194.8 
165.5 



185.5 



144.5 
171.1 
187.5 
190 
172.3 
170.6 
186.8 
T^7 



37 208 
45j 211 
23! 185 
37 221.6 



201.6 
201 
206.6 
205.7 



This table is confined to the shipping mines, and gives the num- 
ber on which each average is based. Everything being equal, the 
number of days of active operation would increase in proportion to 
the total production. A reduction of two-tenths in the length of the 
working day has not materially affected this ratio. It is ascertained 
that the average number of working days for this class of mines, was 
for the present year, 206 each, an increase over that of last year, of 
31 days. The addition of more than one month to the working time 
of this class of employes is reflected in the augmented production 
and the increased pay roll. For the first time since the panic of 
1893, the days of active operation exceed 200 for each of the mines 
included in the group here considered. 

The following list indicates the number of days lost in the several 
districts on account of local strikes. The protracted suspension at 
Pana, involving three large mines, explains the loss reported from 
the Fifth district : 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



XLI 



First District, days lost by strike . . . 
Second District, days lost by strike.. 
Third District, days lost by strike... 
Fourth District, days lost by strike. . 

Fifth District, days lost by strike 

Sixth District, days lost by strike 

Seventh District, days lost by strike. 
Total 



none 
1.57 




Average Value of Coal. 
Owners of coal mines who make returns to this office of the prices 
received for coal, report the average of all sales, which represents the 
actual price obtained for all coal sold. The prices thus reported are 
combined into averages, for counties, for districts and for the State- 
The following table exhibits the averages for the year for the dis- 
tricts and State: 



Table XXIV — Average Value of Co:d Per Ton at the Mine, hy 

Districts. 



District. 


Total tons. 


1 
Av. value Tons of 
per ton. lump coal. 


A V. value 
per ton. 


Tons 
of other 
tirades. 


Av. value 
per ton. 


First . . . 


3.535,316 
3.326.000 
729, 132 
3, 357, 737 
4,810,626 
4.283,358 
3,392,376 


$0.9532 

1.0427 

.9553 

.7664 

.8057 
.6972 


2.677.359 
2.669,631 
600.280 
2,404.385 
3.480.311 
3,294,077 
2,301.535 


$1,139 857.957 

1.191 658.369 

1.07 128.852 

.8513 953.3.52 


SO. 401 


Second 

Third 


.44 

.413 


Fourth 


.5.509 


Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 


.8215 
.7169 
.8224 


1 
1,330,315 .3456 

989,181 1 .295 

1.090,821 .3935 






The State 


23.434.445 


SO. 7852 


17.427.598 


SO. 9186 


5,968,862 ! SO. 4008 



The average value of lump coal per ton for the State, is found to be 
91.86, and that for other grades 40.08. The former rate varies from 
71.69 in the Sixth, to 1.191 in the Second district, and the latter, 
from 29.5 in the Sixth, to 55.09 in the Fourth district. The value of 
lump coal per ton is but a fraction of one per cent over that of last 
year. The value of other grades shows an increase of nearly 5 per 
cent. Only in this unimportant particular, is there a difference be- 
tween this and the preceding report. Fully 75 per cent of lump coal 
is contracted for the general trade. Most of these contracts were 



XLII STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

taken in the early portion of the year, at rates, it is fair to presume, 
much less than might now be obtained. Gains resulting from in- 
creased prices have been confined principally to that portion disposed 
of to the local trade. Competition for contract business tends to 
keep prices to a minimum. Local consumers have no protection 
from the fluctuation of the markets, while the great corporate bid- 
ders for coal, who could and should pay a higher rate, have fuel fur- 
nished at the lowest possible price. From an ethical standpoint, 
this arrangement conflicts with every known law of justice. In the 
table following, the average value of lump coal for a number of years 
is presented : 

Table XXV — Average Value of Lump Coal Per Ton at the Mine 
Jqr a Series of Eighteen Years, 1882-1899. 



Tons 

of lump coal 

produced. 


Average 

value 
per ton. 


9.115,653 


$1.51 


10,030.991 


1.48 


10, 101, 005 


1.26 


9,791,871 


1.17 


9, 246, 435 


1.10 


10,278,890 


1.085 


11,855.188 


1.123 


11,597,963 


1.078 


12,638,364 


1.019 



Tons 

of lump coal 

produced. 



Average 

value 
per ton. 



12,900,224 
14.730,963 
16,112,899 
13,865,284 
14,045,962 
13, 990, 924 
14,672.241 
14.208.795 
16,008,109 



1.025 
1.009 



It is encourrging to note, in the return for this and last year, a 
reaction from the constant downward tendency in prices. 



Mine Employes 
The following table shows the total number of all classes of mine 
employes for districts and the State: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XXVI. — Analysis of Employes, by Districts. 





All Employes, 


Districts. 


UNDERGROUND. 


Above 
ground. 






Miners. 


Day men. 


Boys. 


Total. 


Aggregate 


First. .. 


5.688 
4.920 
1.415 
3.056 
4.421 
3.583 
3.366 


913 

867 
178 
801 
1.099 
098 


425 

207 
49 
144 
168 
165 
137 


7,026 
5,994 
1,642 
4.001 
5.688 
4.446 
4.402 


472 
637 
157 
654 
713 
562 
597 


7,498 


Second 

Third 


6,631 
1.799 


Fourth 


4.655 


Fifth 


6.401 


Sixth 


5.008 


Seventh 


4.999 






The State 


26.449 


5.455 


1.295 


33. 199 


3.792 


36. 991 







Compared with a similar enumeration last year, the total number 
of employes has increased by nearly two thousand. Notwithstanding 
the reduced production of last year, the number employed in and 
about the mines exceded by 1,238 those employed in 1897, This 
unexpected increase was explained as resulting from the unusual 
demand for coal and men following the termination of the suspen- 
sion. The number of employes reported for each of seventeen years 
is given in the table below, by districts. 



Table XXVIL- 


-Employes for Seventeen Years. 




Year. 


First 
District. 


Second 
District. 


Third 
District. 


Fourth 
District. 


Fifth 
District. 


Sixth 
District. 


Seventh 
District. 


The 
State. 


1883 


7.566 

S 013 


3.211 1 4,070 
3.616 j 5,018 
3,391 I 5.213 
3.599 ; 4,870 
4.068 ! 4.903 
4,914 ! 5.250 
4,498 5,117 
4,099 5.171 
5.089 6.458 
4.865 6.453 
5.974 6.964 
6.714 ! 7.112 


4.417 
4,781 
4.950 
5,197 
4,934 
5.086 
5.679 
5,685 
5,881 
6.542 
7.021 
7.750 


4 675 






23. 939 


1884 .. 


4.147 
4,429 
4,567 
4,984 
5,537 
5,764 
5.361 
6.395 
6.200 






25, 575 


IS'iS '7 ifiS 






25, 446 




7.613 
7.915 
8.623 
9,014 
8.258 
9.128 






25. 846 


1887 . . . . 






26.804 


1883 






29.410 






30, 076 


1890 






28, 574 


1891 






32, 951 


1892 






33.632 


1893 


8,831 
10.280 


6.780 
6.621 






35,390 


1894 







38.477 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

TaUe XXFJJ.— Concluded. 



Year. 


First 
District. 


Second 
District. 


Third 
District. 


Fourth 
District. 


Fifth 
District. 


Sixth 
District. 


Seventh 
District. 


The 

State. 


1895 


9,644 
9,380 
7,632 
7,377 
7,498 


7,184 
7,103 
6,872 
6,799 
6,631 


6,607 
2.134 
1,635 
1,800 
1,799 


8,005 
4,467 
4,021 
4,030 
4,655 


7,190 
5.758 
5,672 
6,093 
6,401 






38, 630 


1896 


4,374 
4,100 
4,662 
5,008 


3,816 
3,856 
4.265 
4,999 


37,032 


1897 


33,788 




35,026 


1899 


36, 991 

















Prior to 1896 the average number of employes was based upon the 
highest number employed at any one time, and from this it would 
appear that the number employed had diminished since 1896. Tak- 
ing the level average for the past six years, including the present, a 
material increase is manifest, as appears from the following state- 
ment: 



Average Number of Employes for Years 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 
1898, 1899. 



1894 32, 635 

1895 31,962 

1896 33,054 



.35,026 



Prices Paid for Mining. 
In the preparation of tables reporting prices paid for mining, prior 
to the adoption of the present gross weight system, more or less con- 
fusion arose on occount of the various methods applied in different 
parts of the State. This was the result of paying miners on the 
basis of the screened ton. Fortunately, the mutual adoption by the 
operators and miners, of the present practice of paying for all coal 
mined on the gross basis, removed not only the necessity for numer- 
ous tables on this question, but makes more clear and simple the 
presentation of this important iDhase of the industry. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XXVIII. — Average Prices Paid for Mining hy Hand and 
ivith Maclmies, by Districts. 





Total 
tons. 


Mining by Hand. 


MINING 
MACHI 






GROSS-TON BASIS. 


.SCREENED-TON BASIS 


NES. 


District. 


Tons 

on which 

average 

is 

based . 


Average 

price 
per ton. 


Tons 
on which 
average 

is 
based. 


Average 

price 
per ton. 


Tons 
on which 
averrge 

is 
based. 


Average 

price 
per ton. 


First 


3.535,316 
3,326,000 
729. 132 
*3. 357, 737 
4,810,626 
4,283,258 
3,392,376 


3,493,240 
3,059,818 
556, 454 
2,135,401 
2,918,586 
2,113,304 
2.584,684 


$0,596 
.577 
.475 
.431 
.403 
.40 
.345 






42.076 

64,718 

25.471 

1,083,361 

1,892,040 

2,169,954 

807,692 


$0..37 


Second 


201,464 
147.207 
tl8,610 


$0,849 
.894 
.727 


.27 


Third 


.275 


Fourth 


.291 
.324 


Sixth 






329 


Seventh 






.281 










The State 


23,434,445 


*16.861,487 


80,471 


367, 281 


$0,861 


6,085.312 


SO. 3134 



* 120,365 tons mined and paid tor at St. 50 per day. 
t Forked coal. 

Of the entire output of 23,434,445 tons, 71.9 per cent was paid for 
on the basis of gross weight; 1.6 per cent on the basis of screened 
tons, and 5 tenths per cent was mined and paid for by the day, leav- 
ing 26 per cent as the product of machines, and paid for on the basis 
of gross weight. The per cent of screened coal and that paid for by 
the day is so small that it could safely be omitted in computing the 
average price paid for mining, and confirms the conclusion that the 
provisions of the agreement made between the miners and operators 
two years ago are being generally complied with. It will be observed 
that the rate for machine mining remains the same as last year, 
while the rate for hand mining has advanced from 44 to 47 cents per 
ton. As a matter of fact there has been no change in the price paid 
for hand mining during the present year. At the joint convention 
held in February last, the mining scale of 189S was continued. This 
seeming discrepancy is accounted for in the difficulty experienced 
last year in arriving at a correct average rate for hand mining, con- 
sequent on changing from the screened to the gross weight basis. 



xlvi statistics of labor. 

Aggregate Wages of Mine Employes. 
For the first time in these reports the operators of mines were 
asked to furnish the total amount of wages paid all classes of em- 
ployes except office help. With the exception of some local mines 
whose imperfect records would not permit of it, the request was 
promptly complied with. The following table shows the total num- 
ber of employes, average number of days worked, aggregate amount 
paid, and average wages per day and per year for all employes, ex- 
cepting office help. 



Table XXIX. — Showing the total number of employes, the average 
number of days worked, the aggregate amount paid for wages, 
and the average wages per day and per year for all employes, 
excepting office help. 



first district. 





Employes. 


a ^ 

1! 

> o 

< 


Total waeres paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


S3 

< 


It 


County. 


Miners 


Day 
men. 


Boys 


Total. 


> ftft 
< 




2.601 

89 

2.715 

208 

75 


448 
115 
706 
93 
23 


249 
6 

155 
13 
2 


3.298 
210 

3.576 
314 
100 


215 
198 
181 
167 
187 


$1,119,500 

100.787 

1.470.138 

111.458 

33.294 


$1 58 
2 42 
2 27 
2 23 

1 78 


$339 45 




479 94 


LaSalle 


411 11 




354 96 


Will 


332 94 






Totals and averages .... 


5.688 


1.385 


425 


7.498 


188 


$2,835,177 


$2 01 


$378 00 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table A^XJ A".— Continued. 

SECOND DISTRICT. 





Employes. 


1 
S 

3 

a ^ 

II 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


as 

< 




County. 


Miners 


Day 

men. 


Boys 


Total. 


< 


Bureau a 

Henry b 


2,271 
181 
524 
440 
633 
56 
10 
330 


670 
40 
134 
262 
170 
13 
3 
108 


9« 
6 
13 
56 
24 

4 


3.037 
227 
671 

758 
827 

13 
442 


192 
196 

» 

192 
214 
184 
191 
237 


$1,224,778 
79.111 
250.668 
364,015 
404. 010 
20.824 
1,696 
163,327 


$2 10 
1 78 

1 29 

2 51 
2 28 
1 64 

68 
1 60 


$403 21 
404 00 


Marshal! c 


373 57 




480 27 


Peoria e . . 


488 52 




301 80 


Stark ff 


130 46 


Woodford . 


369 52 






Totals and averages 


4,445 


1,400 


199 


6,044 


212 


$2,508,459 


$1 96 


$415 31 



a Eight mines employing 34 men, with an average of 145 days; amount of wages paid 
not reported. 

b Thirteen mines employing 56 men, with an average of 149 days; amount of wages paid 
not reported. 

c Eight mines employing 10 men, with an average of 113 days; amount of wages paid 
not reported. 

d Seveii mines employing 32 men, with an average of 185 days; amount of wages paid 
not reported. 



e Thirty-six mines employing 
paid not reported. 



men, with an average of 173 days; amount of wages 



/ Sixteen mines employing 80 men, with an average of 135 days; amount of wages paid 
not reported. 

S Seventeen mines employing 69 men, with an average of 184 days; amount of wages 
paid not reported. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 







Employes. 




1 

a 
< 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employees, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


P 

< 


11 

m 
< 


County. 


Miners 


Day 
men. 


Boys 


Total. 


Brown. . . . . ... 


30 
881 

22 
141 
257 

37 

47 






30 
1.200 

26 
167 
281 

43 

52 


91 
145 
161 
167 
127 
199 
174 


$2,665 
398.032 
5,740 
33,980 
55.471 
10,015 
13,980 


$0 98 
2 23 
1 37 
1 22 
1 60 
1 17 
1 54 


$88 83 




281 
4 

24 
15 
6 
5 


38 

2 
9 


331 69 




221 00 


Knox 


203 47 




197 40 


Schuyler .. . 


233 00 




269 00 






Totals and averages .... 


1,415 


335| 49 


1.799 


152 


519,883 


1 90 


$288 96 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XX7X— Continued. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 





Employes. 


a 
il 

< 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


?^Sft 


|a 


County. 


Miners 


Day 
men. 


Boys 


Total. 


> ftft 




15 
85 
268 
397 
279 
150 
1.766 


4 

37 
84 

167 
91 
50 

982 


1 

1 
26 

6 
17 
14 
69 


20 
123 

378 
570 
387 
214 
2,817 


190 
176 
224 

208 
233 
187 
193 


$3,945 
67, 121 
247,901 
264, 732 
163,273 
72, 774 
1,264.361 


$1 04 
3 10 
2 93 
2 23 

1 81 
182 

2 35 


$197 25 




545 70 




655 82 




464 44 


McLean 


421 89 




340 06 




439 09 






Totals and avarages.... 


2,960 


1.415 


134 


4,509 


201 


$2,084,107 


$2 31 


$465 06 



rt The Lincoln Coal Company's mine, employing 138 men, working 265 days, makes no 
report of wages paid. 

6 One mine employing eight men, working 150 days; amount of wages paid not re- 
ported. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 





Employes. 


a 

a ^ 

> o 
< 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


|i 

III 
III 


»a 

P- ftft 


County. 


Miners 


Day 

men. 


Boys 


Total. 


Calhoun . 


8 
570 
43 
18 
1,401 
345 
11 
1,874 
44 
107 


12 
277 

7 

2 
707 
155 

2 
582 

9 
59 


32 

67 
11 

51 

7 


20 
879 

50 

20 

2,175 

511 

13 
2,507 

53 
173 


201 
183 
183 
150 
157 
213 
218 
210 
222 
. 205 


$6, 177 

306,820 

14,370 

4,850 

849,621 

207,871 

5,700 

1,174,119 

22.429 

74,008 


$1 54 
1 91 
1 57 

1 62 

2 48 

1 91 

2 01 
2 23 

1 91 

2 08 


$308 85 




349 06 




287 40 




242 50 




390 63 


Montgomery 


404 84 




438 46 


Sangamon 


468 34 


Scott 


423 19 


Shelby 


427 79 






Totals and averages 


4,421 


1.812 


168 


6,401 


194 


$2,665,965 


$2 15 


$416 49 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table J^^X/X.— Continued. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 





Employes. 


1 

3 
a ^ 

< 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
cepting office 
help. 


P 

m 


II 


COUVTT. 


Miners 


Day 

men. 


Boys 


Total. 




Bond 


128 
349 
897 
600 
1,605 


48 
101 
348 
291 
470 


5 
26 
50 
36 

481 


181 
476 

1.295 
927 

2.123 


178 
187 
181 
198 
207 


$60,503 
251, 051 
678, 933 
271,620 
920,640 


$188 
2 82 
2 90 

1 42 

2 09 




Clinton a 

Madison 


527 42 
5''4 27 




293 01 


St. Clair 


433 65 


Totals and averages 


3,579 


1.258 165 


5.002 


190 


$2, 182. 747 


$2 30 


.S436 37 



a One new mine employing 6 men working 20 days not included. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



County. 



Miners 



Day 



Boys 



Total. 






Gallatin 

Hamilton 

Jackson a 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Perry b 

Randolph c 

Saline d 

Washington 

Williamson e 

Totals and averages. 



113j 
44 
26 

436 
1,491 



73 
11 

1,293 
85 
26 

1,327 
481 
153 
87 

1,422 



$15, 760 
900 

508.493 
30.707 
1.970 

491.481 

200, 151 
18. 173 
19.435 

533, 149 



4.958 1621 $1,820.2191 



$1 52 

1 20j 

2 07' 
1 60 

62 

I 
1 50 

1 90' 

ss! 

1 23 

2 91 
$2 40 



$215 93 
82 00 
393 31 
361 26 
72 69 
370 38 
418 19 
118 77 
223 39 
449 51 

S3J>8 64 



a Two mines employing 2 men, with an average of 170 days; amount of wages paid not 
reported. 

b Pour mines employing 9 men, with an average of 126 days; amount of wages paid rot 
reported. 

e Two mines employing 5 men, with an average of 110 days; amount of wages paid not 
reported. 

d Ten mines employing 20 men, with an average of 64 days; amount of wages i>aiil not 
reported. 

e Three mines employing 5 men, with an average of 28 days; amount of wages paid not 
reported. 

— D C. R. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XX/X.— Concluded. 



THE STATE. 





Employes. 


1 
S 
s 

si 
< 


Total wages paid 
all classes of 
employes, ex- 
ceptinsT olTice 
help. 


bus 

H 
III 

< 


li 


Districts. 


Miners 


Day 
men. 


Boys 


Total. 


ill 
< 


Fir^t 


4,445 

1,415 
2,960 
4,421 
3,579 
3,330 


1,385 
1,400 
335 
1,415 
1,812 
1,258 
1,491 


425 
199 
49 
134 
168 
165 
137 


7,498 
6,044 
1,799 
4,509 
6,401 
5,002 
4,958 


188 
212 
152 
201 
194 
190 
162 


$2,835,177 
2,508,459 
519,883 
2,096,671 
2,065,968 
2,182,747 
1,927,274 


82 01 
1 96 

1 90 

2 31 
2 15 
2 30 
2 40 


S378 00 




415 31 


Third 


288 96 


Fourth h 


465 06 


Fifth 


416 49 


Sixths 


436 37 


Seventh cF . 


388 98 








25,838 


9,096 


1,277 


36,211 


186 


$14,616,555 


$2 20 


$406 98 







a One hundred and five mines out of 185 in the district, employing 587 men, with an 
averasre of 165 days, did not report the amount of wages paid. 

h Two mines out of 87 in the district, employing 142 men, with an average of 206 days, 
<lid not report the amount of wages paid. 

c One mine out of 104 in the district, employine 6 men, with an average of 20 days, not 
included. 

d Twenty-one mines out of 131 in the district, employing 41 men, with an average of 88 
days, did not report the amount of wages paid. 

In the foregoing table the employes have been divided into three 
classes, as returned by the operators, viz: miners, day men, and 
boys. The average number of days is obtained by adding all of the 
days returned for each county, and dividing the result by the num- 
ber of mines in each. In arriving at the average wages per day, the 
total number of employes was considered per day and per year. 
From the returns made, only the aggregate wages paid all classes 
was given, and the total sums paid the respective classes could not 
be separated. Therefore the ascertained averages per day and per 
year, as reported, does not represent the actual wages received by 
either class. Taking the figures returned for the First district, and 
estimating the 1.385 day men as receiving $1.90 per day, and the 425 
boys as receiving 75 cents per day on the average of 188 days for the 
year gives $554,647 as their aggregate earnings. Deducting this sum 
from the total wages paid leaves $2,280,530 as representing the total 
wages paid to the 5,688 miners, or an average of $2.13 per day, or 
$400.44 for the estimated number of days. Similar estimates may be 
made for each of the other districts and the State. The difficulty of 
attempting to separate the earnings of the respective classes is still 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. LI 

further increased by the various and uncertain amounts paid to boys, 
the assumed average is probably to small to cover all grades of juve- 
nile labor. Besides, a certain per cent of those returned as day men 
are employed constantly through the year, while others engaged as 
day men are employed in making repairs during the interval when 
the plant is not operated. It will be observed that the average num- 
ber of days in the foregoing table varies from the average number in 
the district and other tables, and is accounted for from the fact that 
several mines in the different parts of the State,- neglected to make 
any return of the total wages paid, so that the fiigures here given 
can be considered only as an approximation to to the actual earnings 
of the miners and other employes. Following the rate paid for min- 
ing, and the total yearly earnings, it is important to know at what 
intervals wages are paid. The table following supplies this data : 



Table XXX. — Frcqucnrij of Wage Paijincnts, b>j Districts. 



District. 


Wages Paid Weekly. 


Paid 


Wages 
Semi-Monthly. 


1 
Wages 


Paid Monthly. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


First 


49 
59 

8 
37 

1 

19 
47 


347 
241 
24 

882 
20 
76 

138 


157.285 
64.533 
5,190 
433,060 
4.118 
21.340 
27.637 


35 
110 
201 

48 
86 
79 

77 


7.151 
5.728 
1.762 
3.761 
6,381 
4,900 
4.727 


3,378,031 
2.824,323 
720.335 
2.916.718 
4,806.508 
4.245.001 
3.312,853 


i 1 


Second 


16 
2 


662 
13 
12 


437 144 


Third 


3,607 




7,929 


Fifth 




Sixth ... . 


6 

7 


32 
134 


16, 917 




51,886 






The State ... 


220 


1,728 


713. 163 

1 


636 


34.410 22.203,769 

1 


33 


853 


517,483 



From the inception of united action among coal miners, next in 
importance to the demand for the abolition of the '"Truck Store," 
was the necessity for shorter intervals between pay days. Like the other 
conditions surrounding the mining industry years ago, there was a 
general lack of uniformity in this particular, the time varying from 
two weeks to, in some rare cases, over two months. The agitation 
for this reform was pressed, and partly through the influence of the 
union, sueceeded in securing the enactment of a law stipulating the 
periods within which wages should be paid. The corporations that 
resisted this action on the part of the General Assembly, procured a 



LII COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

hearing before the supreme court, which declared the law void, on 
the alleged grounds that it violated the sacred right of private con- 
tract. The sentiment in support of such a measure had, however, 
gone beyond the reach of the courts. Those who formerly opposed, 
it, became convinced that its concession would not, as some repre- 
sented, destroy the industry or demoralize their employes. This pre- 
liminary work in a measure prepared the mine owners for the de- 
mand that wages should be paid at least twice a month, and it be- 
came a part of the • contract made at the interstate convention of 
miners and operators. It appears from this table that, with 
the excejDtion of 85o men, all the employes in and about the coal 
mines of Illinois received their wages twice a month or oftener, and 
of the entire number, 1,728 were paid weekly. The extent of this 
practice is more clearly outlined in the following table of percentages 
for a series of years: 



Table XXXI. — Percentages of Mines, Men and Tons Affected by 
Specified Intervals of Wage Payments for a Series of Years, 



Year. 


Wages Paid Weekly. 


Wages 
Paid Semi-Monthlt. 


Wages Paid Monthly. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


1893 


67 
43 
31 

49 

46.78 
32.23 
24.75 


27.6 
11.7 
6,5 

7.8 
6.91 

4.67 


26.2 
9.7 
4.2 
5.3 
4.34 
4.99 
3.04 


25 

46 

57 

37.5 

39.04 

62.32 

71.54 


56 

66.6 

78.3 

74.6 

74.69 

90.25 

93.02 


50.4 
67.2 
74.4 

73.5 
73.71 
89.78 
94.75 


8 

11 

12 

12 

14.18 
5.45 
3.71 


16.4 
21.7 
15.2 
17.6 
18.4 
4.39 
2.31 


23 4 


1894 

1895 


23.1 
21.4 


1896 


21 2 


1897 


21. 9 


1898 


5.23 


1899 . . 


2 21 







From the above it will appear that 93 per cent of the men who pro- 
duce 95 per cent of the annual output, receive their wages semi- 
monthly. Those paid monthly represent but two per cent of the 
total employes, while five per cent are paid weekly. 



Machine Mining. 
The following table shows the number of mines in which machines 
were employed during the year, exclusively or in part, and the tons, 
mined in the several districts and the State : 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 



Table XXXII. — Number and Tonnage of Mining Machines, by 

Districts. 





Mines in Which Machines Are Used. 


District. 


EXCLUSIVELY. 


IN PART. 


TOTAL. 




Mines. 


Ma- 
chines. 


Tons. 


Mines., M^^-^l Tons. Mines. 
1 1 


Ma. 
chines. 


Tons. 










i; 9 42,076 1 
2 9 64.718 2 

. 2 4' 25.471 2 


9 
9 


42,076 










64, 718 


Third 








25.471 




1 

14 
21 


7 
138 
136 


251,624 
1,842,959 
2. o.=;o. OOfi 


8 591 831.737 9! 66 
1! 6 49.0811 15 144 
2 8 119-948 2S\ U4 


1. 0833, 61 


Fifth 


1,892,040 




2, 169. 954 


Seventh 

The State 


3 


19 323.115 


9: 45 


484.5771 12 


64 


807.692 


39 


SOOJ 4.467,704 


25 140 


1,617.608 64 

1 


440 


6.085.312 



Mines in which machines are used exclusively are confined to the 
central and southern districts. Compared with last year, there has 
been an increase of five in the number of mines usinu' machines ex- 
clusively, and an increase of fifty-four in the number of machines. 
The number of mines in which machines are used in part has in- 
creased by four, while the number of machines used is less by six. 
The tons delivered from the former class of mines has more than 
doubled, having increased during the year, from 2,140,387 tons to 
4,'467,604 tons. Mines using machines exclusively and in part have 
increased by 9, and machines by 4y over those reported for the pre- 
ceding year, and the product of such mines has increased from 
3,415.635 tons, to 6,085,812 tons. This remarkable increase in the 
mechanical product for the year is somewhat explained by the fact 
that a large number of machines reported last year had at that time 
been but recently introduced, and their influence on the tonnage is 
more apparent in this report. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



Table XXXIII. — Name and Number of Mining Machines in Use^ 
by Districts. 



District. 


2. 


is 


ft 


1 


d 
2. 


11 




9 


i 


First 




9 














9 






1 


2 

18 
3 
1 

11 


8 
2 

8 
5 








a 














i 




12 

97 
48 
23 


8 

64 
22 


18 

12 

8 


s 

5 
2 


2 
4 
6 


6 


66 


Fifth 


144 


Sixth 


144 


Seventh 


64 














The State 


180 


130 


39 


35 


23 


15 


12 


6 


440 







The above indicates the kind and number of machines in use, by- 
districts. There are eight less Harrison machines in use this year 
than last. The Ingersoll-Sergeant machines have increased from 
107 to 130; Jeffrey, from 27 to 39; Sullivan, from 16 to 35; Morgan- 
Gardner, from 6 to 15. In the preparation of a similar table last year,^ 
the number of Link-belt machines was given as 20; those of the Gen- 
eral-Electric, as 7. It was subsequently discovered that this was an 
erroneous classification, as there is no such machine as the "General - 
Electric." The number reported last year under this head should 
have been credited to the Link-belt, making the correct number 27. 
Eight machines of this make reported at Streator last year, and two 
at Reed City, are not included in the returns for this year. Of this 
class of machines, one has been added at Odin, three at Wolcott, and 
two at Farmington, making 23 in all, or a reduction of four from the 
number returned last year. The number of Yock machines has de- 
creased from 16 to 1 2. The following is a list of the mines in which 
machines are used exclusively, the kind of machine operated, and 
the number of tons mined, followed by a list of the mines in which 
a part only of the output is mined by machines: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Mines in Which Machines Are Used Exclusively. 



LV 



Company. 



Madison Coal Co., No. 2 

Consolidated Coal Co., No. 6 

Madison Coal Co., No. 5 

Taylorville Coal Co 

Westville Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co., No. 8 

Mt. Olive & Staunton Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co., No. 4 

Consolidated Coal Co., Abbey, No. 3 

No. 7 

Heinz Blufif 

" No. to 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., No. 6.. 

Odin Coal Co 

Hillsboro Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co , Gillespie.... 

Centralia Mining & Mf g Co 

O. & M. Valley Coal & M. Co., No. 2| 

Chicago-Virden Coal Co., No. 1 

Girard Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co., Trenton 

White Oak.. 

Trenton Coal <>c Light Power Co 

Glen dale Coal Co., No. 1 

Consolidated Coal Co., Hornsby.... 

Ohio Valley Coal & Coke Co 

Madison Coal Co., No. 3 

Oakland Coal Co 

Lebanon Coal & Mining Assn 

Consolidated Coal Co., No. 4 

Schurman... 

Troy 

" " Green Mt... 

Richland ... 



Location. 



Glen Carbon.. 

Staunton 

Mt. Olire 

Taylorville ... 

Westville 

Mt. Olive 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon . 

Collins 

Staunton 

Collinsville... 

Mt. Olive" 

Murphysboro 

Odin 

Hillsboro 

Gillespie 

Centralia 

Marion 

Virden 

Girard 

Trenton 

Marrissa 

Trenton 

Belleville 

Hornsby 

Spillertown .. 
Edwardsville 

Belleville 

Lebanon 

Belleville 



Troy 

Belleville. 



Henrietta Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co., Rose Hill... 
William McNeil & Co 



Edwardsville 

Belleville 

Bunker Hill.. 



Machines. 



Ingersoll-Serg'nt. 



Harrison 
Yock 



Ingersoll-Serg'nt. 

14 [Harrison 

Jeffrey 

Harrison 

Jeffrey 

Ingersoll-Serg'nt. 
Harrison 



5 LLink-Belt 

5 'Morgan-Gardner 
12 j Harrison 

6 Jeffrey 



Link-Belt 

8 Ingersoll-Serg'nt. 
12 
4 iHarrison 



8 Ingersoll Sere'nt. 

6 Chouteau 

1 'Sullivan 

10 'Harrison 

6 jSuUivan 

7 Ingersoll-Serg'nt 



Yock 

Harrison 



2 Morgan. Gardner.' 
2 Harrison 

.1 ■• I 



293, 559 
271, 664 
268.077 
255.000 
251.624 
225,419 
219,229 
218.697 
188,415 
160,104 
154,294 
150.934 
146.346 
142.574 
127.035 
113,907 
111.271 
110.843 
101.422 
83.425 
80.048 
76,040 
75.658 
74. 40O 
70, 344 
65,926 
56, 778 
.3i,406 
49. 177 
43,741 
41.';S0 
S'.i. 708 
:^T. 445 
34.756 
31,015 
24.015 
7.220 



LVI STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Mines in Which Machines Are Used Exclusively. — Concluded. 





Location. 




Machines. 






No. 


Name. 




William Jamieson & Co 


Raymond 


/ 1 

1 1 

2 


Ingrersoll-Serg'nt. 


} 4,290 




Golden Eagle 




Ingersoll-Sergr'nt. 


4.118 








300 


4, 467, 704 











Mines in Which Only Part of the Output is Cut by Machines. 



Company. 



Himrod Coal Co., No. 2 

Kelleyville Coal Co., No. 3 

Himrod Coal Co., No. 1 

Big Muddy C. & Iron Co., No. 1 

Harrison 
Soreuto Prospecting & Mining Co.. 

Kellyville Coal Co.. No. 2 

Athens Mining Co 

Gartside Coal Co.. No. 4 

Willis Coal & Mining Co 

Newsam Brothers 

Gartside Coal Co 

Brookside Coal Co., No, 1 

Moweaqua Coal Mining Co 

Gardner- Wilmington Coal Co 

Brookside Coal Co., No. 2 

Gartside Coal Co., No. 1 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., No. 7.. 

Glenburn Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co., Reineke 

Mt. Vernon Coal Co 

Muddy Valley Mining & Mf g Co ... . 

Whitebreast Fuel Co 

Reed City Coal Co 

Farmington Coal Co 

Total— 25 mines 



Westville. 



Murphysboro 



Sorento 

Westville 

Athens 

Murphysboro . 

Willisville 

Peoria 

Murphysboro . 
Grape Creek . . 

Moweaqua 

Clark City 

Grape Creek... 
Murphysborol , 

Herrins 

Glenburn 

Belleville 

Mt. Vernon.... 
Hallidayboro.. 
Dunfermline.., 

Wolcott 

Farmington . . . 



Sullivan . 

Jeffrey..., 
Harrison 

Yock 

Sullivan . 
Harrison 



IngersoU-Serg'nt, 
■Jeffrey 

IngersoU-Serg'nt, 



Link.Belt 

•Jeffrey 

IngersoU-Serg'nt, 

Morgan Gardner.. 

Harrison 

Sullivan 

IngersoU-Serg'nt. 
Morgan-Gardner , 
IngersoU-Serg'nt. 

•Jeffrey 

Harrison 

Jeffrey 

Sullivan 

IngersoU-Serg'nt. 

Sullivan 

Link-Belt I 



215,876 
178,956 

V 175,132 
107,921 
97,557 
94,455 
72, 102 
71,471 
60,000 
56, 666 

} 54,718 
53,335 
50,000 

} 49,081 
42,076 
40.000 
33,053 
28,305 
28,200 
25,543 
24,307 
23,433 
18, 321 
10, 000 
7,150 

1,617,658 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



LVII 



The former list contains five and the latter four more mines than re- 
ported last year, and evidences the gradual encroachment of this 
agency as a factor in production. 

Consumption of Powder. 



Table XXXIV. — Distribution of Podirer to Long-wall and Pillar- 
and-room mi^ies, by Districts. 



District. 


Tons 
pro- 
duced 
without 
powder. 


Long-wall 

MINES. 


PiLLAR-AND-KOOM 

Mines. 


All Mines. 




Kegs. Tons. 


Keg-. 


Tons. 


Kegrs. 


Tons. 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth* 

Fifth 


1,076,333 
1,786,211 
103,846 
178,810 
40,458 
25,983 


2,305 
615 



1.007 
100 


2,238,640 

1,980.029 

4,338 

460.873 

fii n?n 


22,397 
51,822 
22,945 

69,308 
100,637 
68,860 
79.260 


1,296,676 

1,345,971 

724,794 

2,896,864 
4,749,606 
4,283,258 
3,391,736 


24,702 
52,437 
22.945 
70,315 
100,737 
68,860 
79, 267 


3,535,316 
3,326,000 
729, 132 
3,357.737 
4,810,626 


Sixth 




4. 283, 258 


Seventh 


7[ Strip 640 


3.392.376 








The State 


3.211,6411 4,034 4,745,540 


415.229 


18,688,905 


419,263 


23,434,445 



* 1.007 kegs of powder weie used at 4 strip mines in Vermilion county. The product of 
these mines are classed long-wall. 

It will be observed that but a very small percentage of the total 
tonnage is reduced without explosives. In the three tables following 
will be found the average amount of powder used by the miners 
where the coal is mined before blasting, and where it is blasted from 
the solid, and the average number of tons produced by each method, 
for each keg of powder consumed: 

Table XXX\ .—Poivder Used in Mines Where the Coal is Under- 
cut Before Blasting. 



District. 


Kegs , 
consumed. 


Miners 
employed. 


Tons 
produced. 


Kegs 1 Tons 
per man.iper keg. 




7,392 
813 


3,668 
659 


1.683,086! 2.01 227.70 


Second 

Third 


306.714 1.23 377.26 


Fourth 

Fifth 

Si.xth 


17,591 
14,212 
17, 980 
25.059 


1,403 

2,351 
2.101 


1,259,433 12.54 71.59 
2.233,068 4.90 157.12 
2.191.949 7,60 121.91 


Seventh 

The State 


1,415,201| 11.93 56.47 


83,047 


13.084 


9,089.451 


6.34j 109.45 



LVIIl 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XXXVI. — Powder Used in Mines Where the Coal is Blasted 
Without Undercutting. 



District. 


Kegs 
consumed. 


Miners 
employed. 


Tons ^ 
produced. 


Kegs 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg. 


First 


15.389 
46,482 

45, 920 

83.725 
50.880 
54,208 


936 
1,722 
1.248 
2.427 
3.195 
2,581 


648,575 
1,069,558 

625,286 
1,509.866 
2.438,463 
2,065,326 
1,977,175 


16.44 
27.00 
18.38 
18.92 
26.21 
19.71 
22.60 


42.14 


Second 


23.01 


Third 


27.25 




32.88 


Fifth. 


29.11 


Sixth 


40.58 


Seventh 


36.47 






The State 


319,549 


14,507 


10,334,249 


22.03 


32.34 







Table XXXVII. — Powder Used in Mines Where the Coal is Both 
Blasted from the Solid and Undercut Before Blasting. 



District. 


Kegs 
consumed. 


Miners 
employed. 


Tons ^ 
produced. 


Kegs 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg. 


First 


1,921 
5,142 
6,804 
2,800 


202 
261 

413 

141 


127.322 9.51 


66.28 


Second 

Fourth 


163,517 
409,628 
98,637 


19.70 
16.47 
19.86 
16.39 


31.80 
60.20 


Fifth 


35.23 






Total 


16,667 


1,017 


799. 104 


47.95 







Aside from the increase resulting from greater production, the 
only important difference from a similar table published last year, is 
in the number of kegs consumed and tons produced in mines where 
the coal is undercut before blasting. Last year the report for this 
class of mines showed that 41,495 kegs of powderproduced 3,729,183 
tons of coal, an average of 89.87 tons per keg. This year 83,017 kegs 
were consumed, and 9,089,451 tons were produced, or an average of 
109.45 tons per keg. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



LIX 



Fatal Accidents in Mines. 
No question connected with the mining industry excites so much 
interest and sympathy as that relating to the number of men whose 
lives are sacrificed in the prosecution of the business. The loss is 
continuous, and, as the record shows, varies substantially with the 
extent of operations. Only at rare intervals, like the awful catas- 
trophe at Braidwood in 1883, where 69 miners were drowned, is the 
ratio materially disturbed. In point of production the present year 
eclipses that of any other in the history of the State. It also returns 
the largest death list, excepting the year of the Diamond disaster 
here noted. The number of fatal casualties that have occurred dur- 
ing the year, and their relation to the number of men employed and 
the number of tons produced, by districts, and for the State, is here 
presented: 



Table XXXVIIL— i^a/oZ Casualties, hij Districts, 1899. 



District. 


Number 
liilled. 


Number 

of 
employes. 


Number of 

tons of 
coal mined 


Number of 

employes 

to each 

death. 


Number of 
tons of coal 
mined to 
each death 


First. 


7 

12 
4 

14 
22 
14 


7,498 
6.631 
1,799 
4.655 
6,401 
5.008 
4,991 


3,535,316 
3,326,000 
729, 132 
3,357,737 
4,810,626 
4.283.258 
3,392,376 


1,071 
553 
450 
423 
457 
228 
357 


505, 045 
277, 167 


Second 

Third 


Fourth 

Fifth 


305.249 
343 616 


Sixth 

Seventh 


194, 694 
242,313 


The State 


84 


36.991 


23,434.445 


440 


278,982 



While the number of fatal accidents would seem to sustain a certain 
relation to the output for the State, the rule, however, does not hold 
good for the districts, as the number killed in the several districts 
has no apparent connection with the number of employes, or between 
the number employed and the tons i^roduced. The total number of 
fatal accidents for the year is 84, an increase of nine over those re- 
ported for 1893. An examination of the following table will show 
that, as compared with last year, the number of employes to each 
death is less, while the number of tons of coal mined to each life 



LX STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

lost is somewhat more. Considered from the standpoint of total ton- 
nage for the State, the proportion of fatal accidents is less than last 
year, while the number of days of active operation, which to some 
extent measured the dangers, exceeds those of any year subsequent 
to 1893. 

Table XXXIX— Fatal Accidents for 17 years. 



Number 
killed. 



Total 
number of 
employes. 



Total 
number of 

tons of 
coal mined. 



Number 
of em- 
ployees to 
each life 
lost. 



Number of 

tons of coal 

produced 

to each 

life lost. 



1890 
1891 



*134 
46 
39 
52 
41 
55 
42 
53 



Average 17 years , 



23,939 
25,575 
25,436 
25.846 
26,804 
29, 410 
30,076 
28,574 
32,951 
33.632 
35,390 
32, 635 
31,962 
33,054 
33,788 
35,026 



123,456 

208,075 
834,459 
175.241 
423,066 
328. 181 
017,298 
274,727 
660,698 
062,276 
949,564 
113,576 
735,864 
786,626 
.072,758 



.434,445 
,047,036 



179.6 

566 

652.4 

497 

654 

534.7 

716.1 

539.1 

549 

580 

513 

453.3 

426.2 

429.2 

489.7 

467 

440 



90,474 
265, 393 
303,448 
214,909 
303,002 
260,512 
333,745 
286,316 
261,012 
313,372 
289, 124 
237.688 
236.478 
256.969 
290,910 
247,991 
278,982 



473.7 



248.000 



*69 men drowned by the flooding of the Diamond mine. Braidwood. and 10 men killed by 
an explosion at Coulterville. 

The two tables following represent the number of fatal accidents 
for the year and for a series of years, and the causes producing 
them: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XL- 



-Faial Accidents, hij Causes, 1899, wiili Totals and 
Averages for Ten Years. 









District. 


1 

a 
1 


Cause. 


m 

Em 


1 


t 




j 

s 


1 


1 


Black 
Cages 
Explo 
Fallin 
Fallin 
Fallin 
Flying 
Gas .. 


damp 












2 


1 


2 38 




1 
6 


2 

1 
4 








1 


1 


5 95 










1 19 


^ coal and rock . 


2 


9 

1 


' 


14 

2 


9 

1 


60 !'> 














1 19 


coal 




2 


1 








3 57 




1 










Machi 
Pit cai 
Prema 
Railro 
Scalde 
Trapd 
White 
Unknc 
To 












3 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 


3 57 


-s . 




2 






2 


7 15 
























1 19 


d in sump 












1 19 


oor 




1 










1.19 




1 










1 19 


wn 






1 
14 

5 

19 
16 
16 
15 
25 
11 
20 
11 






1 19 


tals.1899 


7 I 12 




19 
10 
14 
15 
19 
10 
24 
12 
11 








84 
75 
69 
77 
75 
72 

57 
60 
53 


4 

4 
4 
4 

16 
10 
12 
11 
9 
10 


22 
8 

11 
4 


14 100 00 




1898 


11 

18 
16 
19 
17 
10 
15 
16 


10 

9 
11 
12 

9 

5 

1 

4 

5 
~78~ 

7.8 


17 


. 


' 1897 


5 


. 


1896 


10 i 




1895 








1894 








. 


1893 . . 










1892 










1891 








. 


1890 










Aggregates 








691 
69.1 


141 

14.1 


84 
8.4 


145 
14.5 


152 
15.2 


45 
4.5 


46 
4.6 













STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XLI — Fatal Accidents for Twelve Years, by Leading 

Causes. 



Cause. 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893 1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1 


ill 


























2 

4 
5 


92 
46 

5 
466 
46 
10 
31 
51 
13 
1 
25 
788 


0.25 




9 
2 


3 

4 

1 
26 
2 

1 


4 
4 

36 

5 
3 

1 


11 
4 

2 

33 
1 
1 
4 

2 


4 
4 

1 
28 
8 
3 
2 
6 
1 


6 
4 

48 
3 

3 
2 

1 


8 
8 

43 

5 

6 
2 


12 
38 


9 

5 


11 


11 
2 


11.67 




5.84 


■Coal and other things falling 


0.64 


Falling coal rock etc. 


33 
4 


41 
6 

1 
2 

7 

1 


46 
5 

2 

1 
1 


43 


^1 


59.14 






5.84 




1 
7 
2 

1 


1 

6 

1 
9 

84 


1.27 


Fire-damp and gas 




3.92 




6 

1 


5 


6.48 




1.65 


White damp 


0.13 


Other causes 
















~J5 


5 

77 


3 


4 
74 


3.17 




55 


42 


58 


60 


57 


69 


72 


100.00 















As noted in former reports, the majority of fatal accidents are 
•caused by falling coal and rock at the face of the workings, a source 
of danger to which the average workman is constantly exposed. 
While association with the ordinary risks which all miners assume, 
may, in time, develop a degree of indifference, the sources of danger 
are so numerous and uncertain, that most of the fatal accidents may 
safely be ascribed to causes unseen and therefore unpreventable, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XLII. — Perceniages of Fatal Accidents Caused bij Fidlhuj 
Roof or Sides, for Seventeen Years, by Districts. 



Year. 



First, becoud. Third. Fourth. Fifth. Sixth. Seventh 



1883 


8.9 


1884 


27.3 


1885 


60 


1886 


64.3 


1887 


71.4 


1888 


84.2 


1889 


57.1 


1890 


93.8 


1S92 


80 


1893 


88.2 


1891 


68.4 


1895 


50 


1896 


77.8 


1897 


72.7 


1898 


66.7 


1899 


85.7 



17 years. 55.3 



100 
83.3 



20 
50 
100 
60 

44.4 
58.3 
36.4 
44.4 
50 
33.3 



40. 



82.4 

66.7 

33.3 

45.5 

60 

50 

50 

80 

44.4 

45.5 

66.6 

50 

43.75 

75 
25 

50 



40 

75 

43 

58.3 

71.4 

46.2 

72.7 

63.6 

55 

54.5 



56.3 
18.8 
57.9 



100 

72.7 
50 
63 6 



65.5 



50 
40 
41.2 
64.3 



50 



The State. 



Total Per 
deaths, cent. 



30 

56.5 
51.3 
61.5 



67.9 

55 

49.1 

58.3 
50.7 
53.3 
66.7 
58.1 
60.7 
55.9 



The above presents a record for a period of seventeen years, of 
the percentages of all deaths which have befallen miners in this State, 
from falling coal in each of the several districts, and the table fol- 
lowing shows the occupation and conjugal relation of the killed: 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XLIII. — Occupation and Conjugal Relation of Killed. 





Districts abd Number of 
Fatal Casualities in Each 


1 

a 

s . 

CO 


Conjugal Re- 
lation. 


i 

O :r 


Occupation. 


Si 


o 






i 




P 


1 


"Si 


is 




it 


Cagers 












i! 


1 

1 

5 
d 


1 

1 
.... 

5 
2 
2 
36 

1 
1 

1 


2 

1 
1 

2 
26 

1 
1 








Check weighman . ... 










1 


.... 

1 




1 

1 


^ 












1 
1 

2 


^ 
























1 

2 


2 


5 S 


13 












32 


5 
4 
128 
3 
5 


7 


Machine helpers 










1 

9 


.! , 


6 


Miners 


7 


10 


4 


10 


13 

1 


J fi. 


14H 






1 

84 


4 


Stable boss 








1 




^ 












1 


.... 








1 


























1 
14 


46 


150 


1 


Totals 


7 


12 


4 


11 


14 


22 


189 







Of the 84 killed, 50 were married and 34 single. The former left 
46 widows and 150 children. We have here a total of 84 lives lost, 
and 189 persons left dependent, as a partial result of the years opera- 
tions—a loss not much less than that sustained by the government 
in its war to destroy Spanish domination in the western hemisphere. 
The following table, which concludes this branch of the subject, sets 
forth the essential details for each district, for the past seventeen 
years: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table XLIV. — Fated Accidents from Falls in Mines and from Oilier 
Causes, ivitJi Averages and Percentages for Seventeen Years. 



First. 



Second Third 



Sev- 
enth. 



1883. 

1881. 
1885. 



1889. 
1890. 
US91. 
1892. 
1S93. 
1891. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



75 

84 
1,100 



Averages , 



Percentages.. 55.31 44.7 



Non-Fatal Accidents. 
The tables following contain statistics relative to accidents of this 
class, showing the number hy districts for the present year, for a 
series of years, particular occupations of those injured, conjugal rela- 
tion of the injured, and the causes of accidents and time lost; also 
the percentages from year to year of men employed, tons produced, 
men killed and men injured: 



-E C. R. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XLV —Non-Fatal Accidents, by DistiHcts, 1899. 



District. 


Number of 

men 

injured. 


^^^^ 


Number of 
employes 

to one man 
injured. 


Number of 
tons of coal 
mined TO one 
man injured 


First 

Second 

Third 


148 
93 
17 

119 
68 
92 
60 

597 


i 
7,498 3,535,316 

6,631 3,326,000 

1,799 729,132 

4,655 - 3,357,737 

6,401 4 Sin 626 


51 
71 
106 
39 
94 
54 
83 


23,887 
35, 763 
42,890 
28,216 


Fifth . . .... 


70 745 


Sixth 

Seventh 


5,008 
4,999 


4,283,258 
3,392,376 


46,557 
56,540 


The State 


36,991 


23,434,445 


62 


39 '54 







Table XLVI. — Non- Fatal Accidents for Seventeen Years. 



Number of 

men 

injured, 



Total 
number 

of 
employes. 



Total 

number of 

tons of coal 

mined. 



Number 

of employes 

to one man 

injured. 



Number of 
tons of coal pro- 
duced to one 
man injured. 



1887. 
1888. 



Averages, 17 years.. 



231 


23,939 


197 


25,575 


176 


25,446 


171 


25,846 


180 


26, 804 


179 


29,410 


201 


30.076 


294 


28.5'.4 


367 


32, 951 


370 


33,632 


403 


35.390 


521 


32,635 


605 


31, 962 


672 


33,054 


518 


33,788 


438 


35. 026 


597 


36,991 


360 


30,653 



12,123.456 
12.208,075 
11,834,459 



11,175.241 


151 


66, 126 


12,423,066 


149 


69,017 


14,328,181 


164 


80,046 


14.017,298 


150 


69, 738 


15.274,727 


97 


51,955 


15.660.698 


90 


42,672 


17.062.276 


91 


46,114 


19.949,564 


88 


49,503 


17.113,576 


63 


32,848 


17.735,864 


53 


29.315 


19.786.626 


49 


29, 444 


20.072,758 


65 


38.751 


18,599,299 


80 


42.464 


23.434.445 


62 


39.254 


16.047.036 


85 


44,575 



52, 482 
61,970 
67,241 



Total injured 

Total employes 

Total tons 17 years. 
Average 



6,120 

521,099 

272 799,609 

524 tons 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



LXVII 



Table XLVII. — Non-Fatal Accidents by Occupation and Districts, 
with Totals and Percentages. 



Occupation. 


District. 


Totals. 


Per- 


First 


Second 


Third Fourth 

1 


Fifth 


Sixth 


Sev- 
enth. 


ages. 


BlHck^iiiith 


1 












1 
1 

1 


2 
8 
3 
1 

131 
1 

1 
1 
45 
1 
21 
24 
310 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 

4 

1 
1 
11 
4 
1 
4 
4 


33 


Cager< 


1 
1 


1 


1 

• 

1 


1 


1 


1 34 




.50 










17 


Drillers 










2 
24 


19 


.33 


Drivers 


33 
1 


10 


4 


17 


24 


21.94 


Fire boss 


















.17 












1 
4 


.17 


Laborers 




3 




31 
1 
1 
5 

53 




4 


7.54 






.17 


Loaders 








5 

20 

1 


8 


6 
5 
20 


3.52 


Machine men 




1 
66 


11 


4.02 




102 


51 93 




.17 












^ 




.17 


Pickers 


' 








1 


33 


Pumpmen 










1 

1 


.17 




2 












.50 












2 
4 


.33 


Shovelers 












.67 






2 








.33 


Stable boss 






1 










Superintendent 




1 

5 










.71 




1 




1 
3 


1 


1 


1 


1.85 




.67 


Trackman . 


1 










.17 




1 




1 


1 
2 






.67 






1 














.33 








1 








1 
1 i .17 












1 1 .17 


Totals 














.« 


93 


17 


119 


68 


92 


60 


597 


100.00 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XLVIII. — Conjugal Relation of the Injured and the Time 
Lost from Injuries. 



District. 


Total. 


Married. 


Single. 


Children 


Depend- 
ents. 


No. of 

men 

reported 

as losing 

time. 


Total 
days 
lost. 


Average 
days lost 
per man. 


First 


US 


82 
48 
11 
66 
27 
60 
35 


66 
45 
6 

53 
41 
32 
25 


142 
134 
31 
143 

72 
178 
82 


m 

182 
42 

213 
73 

238 

112 


137 

83 
17 
118 
63 
90 
47 


5,831 
3,661 
1,108 
5,324 
2,792 


42.6 




m 


41.1 


Third 

Fourth 


17 
119 
68 
92 


65 
.14 7 


Fifth 


44.3 


Sixth 


3, 147 i 35 


Seventh 


1 
1.460 ! 31 


The State.... 


597 


329 


268 


782 


1,061 


555 


23.323 


42 



Table XhlX.— Causes of Non-Fatal Accidents, hjj Districts 



Cause. 


District. 


The 

State. 


Per- 


First 


Second 


Third 


Fourth 


Fifth 


Sixth 


Sev- 
enth. 


ages. 


Cages . 


4 
93 


1 
60 


1 
6 


1 
2 
81 


2 
2 
24 
1 

4 
1 


1 
6 
51 


1 
20 


10 
13 
335 

11 

159 
8 
4 
38 


1.68 


Explosion of powder 

Falling coal and roek .... 


2.18 
56.12 

.17 




1 






1 


■ 


2 


.84 


Fire damp 


1 




.84 






2 


4 


4 




1.84 




2 




.33 


Machines 








2 
22 
3 


3 
19 

1 
6 


1 
25 
3 


8 


1.00 




40 


25 

1 

5 


7 
1 


21 


20.63 


Premature blasts 


1.34 




2 
4 

148 


.67 




8 


7 


6.36 






Totals 


93 


17 


119 


68 


92 


60 


597 


100.00 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Table Ij— Percentages of Non-FaUd Accidents Caused hij Fa 1 1 my 
Roof and Sides — Seventeen Years. 





Non-Fatal Accidents. 


Year. 


Non-Fatal 


ACCIDENT.S. 


Year. 


Total. 


Falling 
roof 
and 

sides. 


All 
Other 
causes. 


Per cent 
caused 
by fall- 
ing roof 
or sides. 


Total. 


Falling 
roof 
and 
sides. 


1 

Per cent 
All cau.sed 
other 1 by fall- 
causes, ing roof 
or sides. 


1883 


231 

197 
176 
171 


130 
135 
118 
109 


101 
62 

58 
62 
56 
67 

98 
140 


56.28 
68.53 
67.00 
63.74 
(58.88 
62.58 
64.17 
66.66 
61.85 


1892 


370 
403 


234 
254 

2<}1 


136 63.25 


1884 


1893 


149 63 03 


1885 


1894 

1895 


521 


227 56 43 


1886 


605 338 
672J 373 
518 :<ift 


267 55.87 


1887 


180 124 
179 112 

201 129 

i 
294 196 

367 227 


1896 


299 55, 51 


1888 


1897 


208 59.85 


1889 


1898 


438 
597 


252 


186 60.87 


1890 


1899 


335' 262 56 12 




Total ... 




1891 


fi 190 


3,670' 2,450 60.00 









Table LI — Total Number Killed and Injured, icith Percodages 
of all Accidents Occasioned by Falling Roof or Sides During 
Seventeen Years— 1883-1899. 



Year. 



Killed. Injured. Total. 



Pek Cent. 



Killed. Injured.! Total. 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1891 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

17 years 



231 

197 
176 
171 
180 
179 
201 
294 
367 
370 



6.120 



365 
243 
215 

1:23 
221 
234 
243 
317 
427 
427 
472 



30 

56.5 

51.3 

61.5 

68.3 

60 

61.9 

67.9 

55 

49.1 

58,3 
50.7 
53.3 
66.7 
57.33 
60.71 



55.91 



56.28 

68.53 

67 

63.74 

68.88 

62.58 

64.17 

66.66 

61.85 

63.25 

63.03 

56.43 

55.87 

55.51 



60.87 
56.12 
59.97 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table LII — Percentages of Increase and Decrease from Year to 
Year of Men Emjjloyed, Tons Frodnced, Men Killed and Men 
Injured. 



Year. 


Men Employed. 


Tons Produced. 


Killed. 


Injured. 


Increase 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 




6.83 




0.7 






65.67 
15.22 




14.72 


1885 


0.5 


3.06 
5.57 






10.66 


1886 


1.57 
3.71 
9.72 
2.26 




33.33 




2.84 


1887 




11.17 
15.34 


21.15 


5.26 




1888 







34.15 


0.56 


1889 




2.17 


23.64 


12.29 
46.27 
24.83 
0.82 
8.92 
29.28 
16.12 
11.07 




1890 


5.00 


8.97 
2.53 
8.95 
16.92 


26.2 
13.2 




1891 


15.31 
2.07 
5.23 















5.00 




1893 






21.05 
4.35 
4.17 
2.67 




1894 


7.78 
2.06 


14.22 






1895 




3.64 
11.56 
1.45 






1896 


3.42 

3.66 
5.61 








1897 






10.4 


8.04 


1898 




7.34 


8.7 
12.00 




15.44 


1899 




26.00 




36.3 













Nationality of Coal Miners and Coal Mine Employes. 
In the preparation of this year's report, the Mine Inspectors were 
requested to furnish this office with a list, showing the nationality of 
all classes of employes engaged in the coal industry. It will be ob- 
served that, of the total employes reported, 43 per cent are natives. 
Americans, English, Scotch and Irish comprise 62 per cent of all 
employes. Of the foreign speaking element, the German predomi- 
nates, representing 11 per cent of the employes. Of the entire num- 
ber, 861, or 2 per cent were returned as unknown. The table follow- 
ing presents the number and nationality of each in the several 
districts: 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table LIII. — Showing the Nationality 



Counties and Districts. 


i 

S 
< 




1 


ji 


i 


a 


J3 

1 


d 


Grundv 


69 

468 

90 

4 

842 


553 
25 

553 
70 
17 


230 

fi 


254 
6 

305 
19 
22 


126 
11 

89 
18 


156 
3 

298 
18 
1 


67 


1,020 


Kankakee 


61 


LaSalle 


161 


Livingston . ... 


30 


Will 


11 






First District . . .. 


1,218 


« 


. 606 


244 


476 


109 


1,283 








258 
86 
142 
380 
817 
79 
63 
49 

1,874 


291 
32 
24 

150 
77 
24 
11 
31 


162 
6 
28 
37 
22 
3 

19 


194 
18 
50 
29 
14 
2 
4 
16 


1 
8 
25 
5 
3 


167 
39 
63 
27 

176 
30 


11 


780 






Marshall 


15 


57 






p '. 


17 


9 


Roek Inland 




■^tark 






Woodford 


2 


33 


18 


40 








640 


279 


327 


91 


535 


61 


879 






Brown 


22 
875 

25 
104 
146 

35 

47 


3 
145 

1 
14 
99 


37 


5 
24 










Fulton 


41 


31 


1 


5 




7 
8 


3 

16 


1 
5 




1 




McDonough 




4 








5 






















Third District 


1,254 


264 


54 


53 


47 


35 


2 


5 






Ca^is 


9 
110 
36 
58 
294 
95 
1,181 


1 
30 
19 
20 
51 
37 
143 


7 

14 
15 

1 

79 


5 
11 
26 
30 
58 
16 
154 












3 
2 
4 
5 
2 
41 


86 
34 
37 
52 
51 
217 


4 
3 
4 







30 


McLean 

Menard 

Tazewell 

Vermilion 


4 
4 


68 


102 


Fourth District 


1,783 


301 


128 


300 


57 


477 


80 


140 






Calhoun 

Christian 


9 

739 

32 

6 

831 

361 

8 

1.252 

38 

94 


20 
15 
1 
107 
14 
3 
185 
7 
10 


16 

2 

64 
13 

76 

3 


3 
31 
2 
6 
118 
20 
1 
341 
3 
12 


3 

32 

12 


6 
34 
1 
5 
674 
30 






6 


12 


Jersey.; 






17 

5 


50 


Montgomery 


37 




55 


339 


20 


69 


Scott 

Shelby 




6 


3 


11 


Fifth District 


3,370 


364 


n. 


537 


.0, 


1.095 


51 


179 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



of (lU Employes at the Mines in the State. 



Counties and Districts. 






75 o 



I ^ 



Grundy 

Kankakee . 

LaS.ilIe 

Livingston. 
Will 



First District . 



3.298 

210 

3,570 



Bureau 

Henry 

Marshall — 

Mercer 

Peoria 

Rock Island. 

Stark 

Woodford . . . 



Second District. 



tsrown 

Fulton 

Hancock 

Knox 

McDonough. 

Schuyler 

Warren 



Third District 



Cass 

Logan 

Macon 

McLean . .. 
Menard — 
Tazewell .. 
Vermilion , 



Fourth District . 



3,071 
283 
681 
790 

1,133 
149 
82 
442 







j 


! 


1 


20 






i 14 




1 


879 








50 






1 






20 


Macoupin . 


207 
3 


.::.::.. 36 


1 37 


[ 1 


2.175 


Montgomery 


511 




1 


13 


Sangamon 

Scott 

Shelby 


32 



4 


6 


116 
■■■'29 


4 8 


4 


2,507 
53 
173 




6 




Fifth District 


250 


6] 


202 


55 


6,401 



-F C. R. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Nationality of Employes 
Table LIII. 



Counties and Districts. 


1 
1 




1 


i 


i 


i 


i 


1 


Bond 


15H 

182 
485 
659 
974 


5 
12 

87 
19 
250 


3 

8 
20 
20 
45 


4 
25 
72 
16 
46 


> 

1 

34 


10 
249 
226 
162 

684 


2 

2i 

9 
19 




Clinton. 


4 




124 


Marion 

St. Clair 


24 
43 








2,456 


373 


96 


163 


, 70 


1.331 


51 


195 






Gallatin 


68 
11 

1.080 
67 
20 

1.016 
359 
159 
43 

1,178 


1 
2 


1 




2 








:::::::: 




Jackson 


31 

4 

2 

100 

43 
4 
3 

45 


7 
4 


i3 

5 
4 

29 
25 
6 


9 


27 




128 




1 






Perry 


io 

4 

1 


77 
32 
3 
29 
15 


12 
6 


68 


















17 


5 


1 


138 






Seventli District 


4,001 


234 


60 


100 


29 


189 


19 


m 






The State 


15,580 


3,394 


1,412 


2,086 


645 


4.138 


373 


3.016 






Percentages 


43.12 


9.40 


3.« 


5.77 


1.79 


11.45 


1.03 


8.35 







A general recapitulation of all the principal totals presented by 
the returns from the seven inspection districts will be found in the 
following table. Succeeding this appears the reports of the State 
Inspectors for the several districts of the State, followed by an 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



at the Mines. 
— Concluded. 



Counties and Districts. 


11 


Hungarian. 


1 




•1 

1 


fi 

tag 




Total. 


















181 


Clinton. 


2 

79 













482 




8 


66 
12 

4 


12 
3 


63 
3 






1,295 








927 


St Clair. 





13 






2,123 










82 


21 


82 


15 


73 




5.008 






















73 


Hamilton 















11 
















1,295 
















85 


Johnson . 















26 




1 
1 




12 








1,336 






1 




486 


Saline 






::r::::::: 


173 








11 








87 










5 




1.427 


















2 


1 


23 




6 


4,999 




1 






975 


m 


2.133 


«, 


.« 


619 


861 


36,991 






Percentages 


..,0 


2.14 


5.9 


.35 


:.» 


1.71 


1 







appendix containinothe register of certificated mine managers: hoist- 
ing engineers; mine examiners; inspection fee accounts; the revised 
mining law and other acts relating to mining, also the reports of the 
Superintendents of the Free Employment Offices for a period of nine 
weeks to October 1. 1899. 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 

Table LIV. — Recapiiulation 

STATISTICS OF COAL MINING IN ILLINOIS 





a 
I 

o 

1 

a 

3 
2; 


Mines. 


Product. 


Values. 


Districts. 


i 

a 

a 



a 

3 
'A 


a 

_g 
'S 
a 


1 


m 

a 

I 


i 

a 
§ 

T3 

n 


1 

1 

a 


1 


1 1 
p. 

a 

a 


1 





'6 

IX) 




I- 


a. 

1 


II 

> 3 
|| 

< 


First 


5 

8 
7 
7 
10 

10 
52 


84 
185 
211 
87 
87 
104 
131 
889 


37 
45 
23 
37 
51 
72 
57 
322 


47 

140 
188 
50 
36 
32 
74 
567 


11 

25 
53 
3 
11 

13 
15 
131 


13 
24 
59 
10 
3 
7 
7 
123 


3.535,316 
3,326,000 
729,132 
3,357,737 
4,810.626 
4,283,258 
3.392,376 

23.434,445 

- 


2.677,359 
2,669,631 
600,280 
2.404,385 
3,480,311 
3,294,077 
2,301,555 
17,427,598 


857.957 

656,369 

128,852 

953,352 

1,330,315 

989, 181 

1.090,821 

6,006,847 


2,999,604 
2,877,142 
561.664 
2.746.842 
4.095,235 
3,673,707 
3.064,957 
20,019,147 


.?3. 368, 762 
3,475.973 
696,505 
2.573,100 
3.318.120 
2.653,912 
2,322,098 

18.408,470 


81.139 


Second 

Third 


1.191 
1.07 


Fourth 

Fifth 


.8513 
.8215 


Sixth 


.7169 


Seventh 

Totals .... 


.8224 
*$0.9186 



























* Average value of other grades, pef ton: First district. 59.6 cents; second district. 44 
cents; third district. 41.3 cents; fourth district, 55.09 cents; iifth district. 34.56 cents; sixth 
district. 29.5 cents; seventli district. 39.35 cents. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

I>ij Districts. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899. 



Employes. 




P 

III 

2; 




Wages. 


s 
i 

o 

I'd 
as 




Machines. 




Casual- • 

TIES. 




1 

o 

^% 


a 
o 


Average price 
paid per 
gross ton. 


Total amount of wages 
paid during the year 
to all employes ex- 
cepting oflScu help. 


a 

3 

a 
S 
o 
6 


3 

a 

1 

a 

3 


a 
s 

3 

OS 


1 


1 

3 

a 




S 

o 

a 


11 
1= 


2-3 
1^ 




5,688 


1,810 


$7,498 


188 


567 


$0,596 


$0.37 


§2,835,177 


27,002 


1 


9 


42.076 


7 


.« 


! 

3 18 


4,920 


1,711 


6,631 


181.5 


645 


.577 


.27 


2.508,457 


53.458 


2 


9 


64. 718 


12 


9, 


3; 12 

1 


1.415 


384 


1,799 


146.3 


198 


.475 


.» 


519,883 


23, 112 


2 


4 


25.471 


4 


17 


3 


8 


3,056 


1,599 


4.655 


199 


426 


.431 


.291 


2,084,107 


70, 924 


9 


66 


1,083.361 


11 


119 


5 


23 


4.421 


1,980 


6,401 


190 


621 


.403 


.324 


2,655,965 


100, 756 


15 


144 


1,892,040 


14 


68 


1 
9 33 


3,583 


1,425 


5.008 


196.8 


5.2 


.40 


.329 


2. 182, 747 


68,883 


23 


144 


2, 169, 951 


22' 92 


14 38 

1 


3,366 


1.633 


4,999 


159 


557 


.345 


.281 


1,820,219 


79.348 


12 


64 


807,692 


14 60 


9 


23 


26,449 


10,542 


36,991 




3,526 






$14,616,555 


423,483 


64 


440 


6,085.312 


84 597 


46 


155 








174.6 





♦SO. 471 


tSO.3134 












1 


















i 


■'i 





* Average price for 16.861.487 gross tons; average price for i 
8G.1 cents per ton. 

t Average price for 6,085.312 tons mined by machine. 120..; 
district and paid for at $1.50 per day. 



lining 367.281 screened tons. 
55 tons mined in the fourth 



-G C. R. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE SEVERAL 



State Inspectors of Coal Mines 



FIRST INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: Grundy, Kankakee, LaSalle, Livingston, Will. 
Hector McAllister, Inspector, Streator. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir:— In compliance with section 12 of the mining law of this State, I here- 
with submit the sixteenth annual report of the coal mines in the First Inspec- 
tion District, for the year ending June 30, 1899. This report presents tabu- 
lated statements showing the number of mines in operation, both shipping 
and local; the depth of coal below the surface; the geological number and 
thickness of the various seams; the number of new and abandoned mines; 
the total number of persons employed at each mine; the number of tons of 
lump coal, and of other grades, with the average value of both at the mines; 
the aggregate value of the total product; the number of kegs of powder used; 
the casualties in and around the mines; the number of widows and orphans, 
and the number of days of active operation in all mines in the district. 

The following is a summary of the statistics for the year: 



Total number of mines 

Number of shipping mines 

Number of local mines 

Number of new mines 

Number of abandoned mines 

Number of miners 

Number of other employes 

Total number of employes 

Number of fatal accidents 

Number of non-fatal accidents 

Number of wives made widows 

Number of children made fatherless 

Total tons of coal produced 

Tons of lump 

Tons of other grades 

Average value per ton of lump coal at the mine l 

Average value of other grades per ton 

Aggregate value of total product 

Average price paid per gross ton for hand mining 

Average price paid per gross ton for machine mining 

Average number of days of active operation 

Number of mines operated by hand mining 

Mines using machines 

Number of kegs of powder used 

Tons of coal cut by machines 

Number of machines in use 

Number of tons of coal shipped 

Tons sold to loi^al trade 

Tons consumed at the plant 

Tons of coal mined to each fatal accident 

Tons of coal mined to each non-fatal accident 

Number of employi^s per fatal accident 

Number of employes per non-fatal accident 



84 
37 
47 
11 
13 

lisio 

7,498 

7 

148 

3 

18 

3. 535, 316 

2.H77,359 

857,957 

81.139 

SO. 401 

S3. 368. 762 

SO. 596 

SO. 37 

188. 2 

83 

1 

27,002 

42,076 

9 

2,999.604 

438, 152 

97,560 

505, 045 

23.887 

1,071 

51 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Coal production by counties in the First District, with increase or decrease 
in each, for the years ended June 30, 1898, and 1899: 





Total Output of all Grades 
of Coal in Tons. 


Increase. 




Counties. 


1898. 


1899. 


Decrease. 




796.249 

84,632 

1,165,490 

122,087 
40, 904 


1,280,332 
129,018 

1,975,939 
117, 248 
32,779 


484,083 
44.386 
810,449 




Kankakee 




LaSalle 






4,839 


Will :: :.■■■■■::: 




8,125 










2,209,362 


3,535.316 


1,338,918 


12, 964 








1, 338, 918 


Decrease 


12. 964 












1,325,954 







The district shows an increase in output over that of 1898 of 1,325,954 tons, 
or 60.6 per cent. The largest increase is in LaSalle county, which is 810,449 
tons, or 69.5 per cent. Grundy county comes next with an increase of 484,093 
tons, or 60.8 per cent, and Kankakee shows an increase of 44,386 tons, or 52.4 
per cent. Will county shows a decrease of 8,125 tons and Livingston county 
4,839 tons. 

Neiv Mines .—GvViTL^y county. — The Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal 
Co. has opened a new mine in Grundy county, three and a half miles from 
Gardner. A town site has been located, which will bear the name of South 
Wilmington. About twenty houses have been built and many others are in 
course of construction. The shaft is 189 feet to the coal, which is No. 2 of 
the geological section; a new steel tower has been erected; the engine and 
boiler houses are covered with galvanized corrugated iron; a shaker screen 
has been put in, and the plant is in every way first class and intended for a 
large output. 

The Star Coal Co. has reopened its No. 1 mine at Carbon Hill, Grundy 
county. This mine was destroyed by fire two years ago. The company has 
erected a new tower, engine house, and all necessary out-buildings, and the 
plant has been put in first class condition. 

James Heather has opened a new mine near Morris. 

Tasdal Bros, have opened a new mine at Nettle Creek, about nine and a 
half miles northwest of Morris. 

John Telfer has opened a new mine near Morris. 

George R. Blair has reopened his No. 4 mine near Morris. 

William Wood has abandoned his mine at Morris and sunk a new shaft 
about 400 feet west of the old one. 

Milo E. Howe purchased the mine formerly operated by Charles Heather, 
but abandoned the same after operating it a short time. 

Thomas Fleming & Co. have purchased the mine formerly operated by 
William Laherty, near Morris. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. D 

La Salle county. — Price, Jones & Co., have opened a new mine one mile 
north-west of Streator. 

Bargreeu Bros., have opened a new mine one mile south-west of Streator. 

James Penman has opened a new mine one mile southwest of Streator. 

Dawson iS: Gray have opened a new mine near Streator. 

J. C. Dawson & Co., have opened a new mine at Deer Park. 

Livingston county. — A. W. Pank & Co., have opened a new mine two miles 
south of Streator. 

Abandoned 7)iines. — A. M. Barackman has abandoned his mine at Coalville, 
Livingston county, and purchased the mine formerly operated by Oscar 
Kimes, of the same place. He has put in a switch from the Santa Fe rail- 
road to the mine, and has also erected a new tower, put in a pair of hoisting 
engines and a fan, and now has the mine in first class condition, 

L. A. Munts & Sons have abandoned their mine at Streator and opened a 
new mine about one mile northwest of Streator, in Livingston county. 

Joseph Kilburn has abandoned his mine near Streator, in Livingston county. 

Edgar Hamilton has abandoned his mine near Streator, in Livingston 
couut5^ 

The Kimes Cooperative Co., opened a new mine in Coalville, but abandon- 
ed the same after operating about six months. 

The Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Co., has abandoned its "R" 
shaft near Braidwood, Grundy county. 

The Gardner Wilmington Coal Co., has abandoned its mine at Gardner, 
Kankakee county. 

The Pontiac Coal Co., Poutiac, Livingston county, has abandoned the No. 
2 seam; there being so many faults and slips in the coal, it would not pay to 
operate it, and have commenced developing seam No. 5 of the geological sec- 
tion. 

William Thomas & Co., have leased the mine formerly operated by D. W. 
Thorne, one-half mile west of Streator. 

Henry Wonders has leased the mine formei'ly operated byC. G. Darm, one 
mile south of Streator. 

Charles Kain has abandoned his mine at Deer Park, La Salle countj'. 

Prospective Mines. — The Campus Coal Co., has sunk a new shaft two miles 
north of Campus, Livingston county, on the Wabash railroad; the shaft is 
255 feet deep to No. 2 seam of the geological section; the coal is 3^^ feet 
thick. In sinking the company passed through a seam of coal 12 feet thick, 
4 feet above the 3^2 foot seam. At the present time the company is develop- 
ing the thicker seam. 

The Star Coal Co., of Streator, is now sinking a shaft near its No. 2 mine 
at Kangley, La Salle county, to the No. 2 seam, which is 210 feet below the 
surface. 

The Big Four Wilmington Coal Co., has sunk a slope at its "Marie" mine 
as a traveling way for the employes; there is also a good escape shaft at this 
mine. This company is now sinking a slope, dipping about 25 degrees, one 



b STATISTICS OF LABOK. 

mile from this mine. This will be a new departure from hoisting coal out of 
a vertical shaft in this district and the result will be looked upon with much 
interest. 

Improvements. — The Star Coal Co., at its No. 2 mine at Kangley, La Salle 
county, has sunk an air shaft at the face of the north workings, and has also 
made connections with an old shaft on the west side, which has greatly im- 
proved the ventilation of the mine. 

The Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Co., at Streator, has put in an 
electric haulage plant at its No. 2 mine. One locomotive is already in opera- 
tion, and the second one will be put in operation in a short time. 

The La Salle Carbon Coal Co., La Salle, has erected a new 14 foot fan of 
their own design, to take the place of the 10 foot fan formerly in operation at 
its Union mine, which has greatly improved the ventilation. A shaker screen 
has also been put in at this mine. 

Fatal Accidents. — September 16, 1898, John Robinson, a miner, aged 49 
years, married, was fatally injured by a fall of rock at the face of his room 
in the Star Coal Company's mine No. 3, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. De- 
ceased had cut up one side of the brushing and entered a wedge over the top, 
intending to take it down, but, it being quitting time, he went home, intend- 
ing to take it down in the morning. However, he neglected to do so, and 
commenced to load coal without examining the rock. About 10 a. m. the rock 
fell on him, crushing him so that he died about 3 p. m. He leaves a widow 
and six children, of whom two are dependent. 

This accident was due to his own negligence. With proper care in taking 
the rock down, or putting a prop under it, the accident would have been 
avoided. 

September 27, 1898, James Fairley, a miner, aged 22 years, single, was in- 
stantly killed by a fall of rock in the Star Coal Company's mine No. 3, Car- 
bon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased and his partner had been taking down 
some rock at the face, and were in the act of cleaning it away, when, with- 
out any warning, a great mass of rock fell on him, resulting as stated. 

October 27, 1898, Gus Downey, miner aged 45 years, single, was instantly 
killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room in the sixth right, northeast 
entry in the Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Company's mine No. 1, 
at Heenanville, La Salle county. Deceased and his partner had been notified 
that morning to put more props in their room, as there was a fault or slip in 
the roof, running diagonally across the face of the room, which they did be- 
fore commencing work. About 2 p. m. they fired a blast in the coal, return- 
ing immediately before the smoke had cleared away, when a stone fell on 
him, resulting as stated. 

January 16, 1899, Edward Wheelwright, miner, aged 60 years, single, was 
fatally injured by a fall of rock in his roadway about thirty feet from the face 
of his room in the Star Coal Company's No. 2. mine at Carbon Hill, Grundy 
county. Deceased was eating dinner at the time of the accident. A piece of 
rock fell on him, breaking one of his legs and seriously injuring him about 
the back. He died two days after receiving his injuries. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 7 

January 24, 1899, Otto Gribkos, miner, aged 30 years, single, was instantly 
killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room, in the No. 1 mine of the La 
Lalle County Carbon Coal Co., at La Salle. Deceased had taken off a break 
of coal, and instead of propping up his place where he had taken the coal 
out, which is customary in long-wall workings, the props being about six feet 
from the face, he commenced mining again, and just as he had got down to 
work, a large rock, weighing about 3,500 pounds, fell on him, killing him in- 
stantly. 

January 20, 1899, Peter Herman, miner, aged 48 years, married, was in- 
stantly killed by the ascending cage, about 3:30 p. m., in the Chicago, Wil- 
mington & Vermilion Coal Company's mine No. 1, at Heenanville, La Salle 
county. It appears from the evidence, that deceased, with fifty or sixty 
others was at the bottom of the shaft, waiting to go out at quitting time. 
The mine manager, Robert Jordan, gave the signal to the eager to quit, as 
thej' do not blow the whistle until four o'clock. The eager pulled the empty 
car off the cage and told the men to stand back; he then commenced to ring 
three bells, and while in the act of ringing, the men in the rear pushed the 
men in front onto the cage, when the cage was suddenly started and caught 
deceased between the cage and door head, killing him instantl.y. He leaves a 
widow and six children, all dependent. 

March IG, 1899, John Crossen, miner, aged 50 years, married, was instantly 
killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room in the Chicago, Wilmington & 
Vermilion Coal Company's mine No. 1, at Heenanville, La Salle county. De- 
ceased and his son had put off two blasts, and after waiting a reasonable 
time for the powder smoke to clear away, they returned to the face of the 
room. The son sounded the roof and thought there was no danger; but there 
was a slip running diagonally across the room at the face. The son told his 
father to stand back and he would take down the loose coal, but before he 
could do so, a large rock fell from the slip in the roof, killing the father in- 
stantly. Deceased leaves a widow and six children, two of whom are depen- 
dent. 

The tables of casualties follow, also the statistical tables by counties, giving 
in detail all infoi'mation regarding the industry in the district. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Hector McAllister, 
Streator, Illinois. State Inspector of Jlincs, First District. 



STATISIGS OF LABOE. 

Fatal Casualties— First District, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 





a 
— "5; 

3.S 


a 
p. 


Cause of Accident. 


1898. 
SepUG 


.John Robinson 


49 

45 

60 
30 

48 
50 


Miner 


Carbon liill. 
Streator. 


1 


1 


6 


'i 
1 

1 
1 

4 


3 

'7 
3 

13 


Falling rock 




Oct. 27 
1899. 

Jan. 16 
' ' 94 






Edward Wheelright... 
Otto Gribkos 


ESfe^^"- 








.. 




" 26 


Peter Herman .. .. 


Streator 


1 
1 

3 


1 
1 

3 


6 
6 

18 


Ascending cage 


Mar. 16 






Total— 7 















Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — First District, 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 




3 

1 
3 


Miner 


7 


Ascending cage — 
Falling rock 


1 
6 


Chi., W. &V. C. Co., 
LaSalle Co. Coal Co.. 


3 


LaSalle 

Streator 




1 
3 








,. 


7 


7 


7 















Non-Fatal Casualties— First District— July 1, 1899. 







03 












a 




a 


0) 




<D 


"C 








sx 


2 


t 


43 




cc 





a 


1 






1 




.... 




6 


4 
1 


1 






1 






1 






1 






1 










5 


1 












1 






1 






1 








6 


7 


1 








2 


2 


1 








2 


1 




3 


4 




5 


6 


i 







Character of Injury. 



July 



Sept 



P. Amote 

.John Smith 

J. Asmort 

Alix Kinkin 

Eli Williams 

George Stof an . . . 

Mike Imro 

Andrew Zunch... 

Con Hartnett 

Andrew Lotikath 

James George 

George Tomasko. 

John Kolorti ■ 

Wm. McLuckie .. 

John Gasper 

Ghas. Pihira 

Albert Johnson.. 
Chas. Anderson.. 
Martin Cugnot... 

Dan Davis 

William Beard... 
Wm. Kuniciah ... 

James Dunn 

William Jaeski... 

JohnKlousa 

John Klousa, Jr.. 



Carbon Hill. 

Streator 

Carbon Hill. 
Braidwood.. 

Kangley 

Heenanville 
Braceville... 

Streator! 

LaSalle 

Streator 



Kangley — 
Carbon Hill. 

Ivangley 

Braidwood.. 

Oglesby 

Braidwood,. 



Rockwell 
Streator . 
[iaSalle . . 



Leg sprained 

Shoulder injured 

Eye injured 

Leg injured 

Ribs broken 

Leg injured 

Thigh broken 

Leg injured 

Foot injured 

Leg broken 

Hand injured 

Foot injured 

Leg broken 

Back injured 

Arm injured 

Leg injured 

Head and back injured 

Leg injured 

Foot injured 

Leg broken 

Face cut 

Foot injured 

Hip injured 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — First District — Continued. 



Character of Injury. 



1898 
Sept 



John Jones 

Walter Hyson 

Andrew Hudak . . 

John Clark 

A. Komera 

Geo. Hepplewhite 

John Murphy 

Thos. Olver 

Mike Peters 

26 Mike Jennings . . . 
26 James Mulligan.. 

3 Chas. Thorne 

3 George Biros 

9 John Shema 

14 Frank Hula 

14 Gasperdino Rolla 

19 Alex Oyes 

23 John Gardner.. 

25 Mike Pack , 

25 A. A. Brown 

27|David Johnson., 
29!Jerome Stamful 
29 A. Balzarniia 
1 
5 
5 



Anton Cisgnik... 

James Feeney 

James Morison. . . 
Anton Nicholetta 

Chris White 

Fred Hardman... 

Nat Offergelt 

Barney Gado 

Alex Gilmour 

William Walker.. 

M. Fermee 

John Ratkey 

Pat Woods 

B.Beruo 



P. Ledger 

F. Marietta 

J. Borilla 

John Fi.sher 

Paul Filnito 

Allen Hill 

John McLean 

Peter Martin 

Joe Barto 

Isaac Painter 



3 Luis Bertino 

4i A. Perona 

7j LawrenceDropuh 
10 Joe Sinkula 



Pel). 



M. Famborine 

Thos. Mulligan... 

Geo. Ledger 

J. Holden 

Wm. Murray 

William Gaede... 

John Bidner 

Frank Delancy... 

Sam Monahan 

A. Holden 

25|A. Schorper 

30Mathew Reid 

SljMike Bognett.... 
2, John Chrishoure. 

7 Anton Vedech 

81 J. Pallerson 



Streator .... 

LaSalle 

Streator 

Diamond ... 
Carbon Hill, 
Braidwood.. 
Oglesby — 

LaSalle 

Kangley 

Pontjac 

Streator 



Coal City... 
Braidwood.. 
Kangley 

Braceville.'. 

Fairbury 

Ogl.'sby 

Kangley — 
Carbon Hill. 
LaSalle 



Carbon Hill, 
Diamond ... 
LaSalle 



Bracerille... 

Diamond 

Braidwood.. 
Carbon Hill. 

Streator 

LaSalle 

Carbod Hill. 



Braidwood.. 
Carbon Bill, 

Streator 

Carbon Hill, 
Coal City ... 



C. B. June. 
Braidwood.- 
Streator — 



Braceville .. 
Braidwood.. 

LaSalle 

Braidwood.. 
Carbon Hill. 
Braidwood.. 
Carbon Hill. 



LaSalle 

Streator 

LaSalle 

Braidwood. 
Coal City . . 
Carbon Hill 
Streator ... 
Kangley ... 
LaSalle 



Carbon Hill, 



*Still idle. 

t Not returned to work at this date. 



Hand injured 

Fingers crushed 

Foot crushed 

Thumb injured 

Back injured 

Knee injured 

Foot injured 

Leg broken. 

Hip injured 

Leg broken 

Hip injured 

Hand injured 

Face and hands burned 

Head and shoulder bruised. 

Foot crushed 

Hand crushed 

Foot crushed 

Leg broken 

Leg and thigh broken 

Face and hands burned 

Leg broken 

Finger smashed 

Foot injured 

Skull fractured, eye put out. 

Legs injured _ 

Foot bruised 

Finger injured 

Ribs broken 

Bones in hand broken 

Both legs cut off , 

Arm broken 

Back injured 

Body injured 



IjCollar bone broken 

li Wrist fiactured 

IjLeg broken 

. .iFoot injured. 



Thumb broken. 

Leg broken 

Hip injured 

Back bruised. .. 

Side bruised 

Foot injured 

Side bruised 

Back injured... 
Foot crushed... 



Leg broken 

Hand injured 

Hand bruised 

Collarbone broken. 

Finger crushed 

Side injured 



Foot injured 

Leg injured 

Leg and ribs fractured. 

Thumb crushed 

Foot bruised 

Knee injured 

Body scalded 



2 Leg injured 

..[Back injured — 

3 Side bruised 

. .IBack injured — 
..'Knee dislocated. 



10 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non Fatal Casualties — First District. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Character of Injury. 



Feb. 16 

" 18 

" 18 

" 18 

" 25 

" 25 

" 27 

" 27 

Mar. 5 

" 8 

" 8 

" 8 

" 13 

" 13 

" 15 

" 16 

" 17 

" 20 

" 20 

" 21 

'• 21 

" 23 

•• 27 

" 29 

" 30 

" 31 

" 31 

April 4 

•' 6 

" 6 

'• 10 

" 18 

" 18 

" 20 

" 21 

May 6 

'• 8 

" 11 

" 11 

" 12 

" 13 

" 31 

June 2 



Peter Rolando — 

Matis Spanns 

George Gordon... 
John Coekburn. .. 
Thos. Holliday... 
Henry Anderson. 

Chas. Rose 

D. Gilchrist 

Peter Barto 

Henry Pasko 

A. Dolinski 

Joseph Defash... 

R. Shorley 

Geo. Lisko 

Anton Sanmski.. 

Mat Molinski 

A'd'w Merenshok 
David M. Jones .. 
Marco Vaserilo... 
Andrew Slvan — 

J. Mollin 

M. Koskoski 

Lawrence Urlaw. 
JohnB. Puella... 

Joseph Komp 

John Mulligan... 

J. Belario 

Luke Freme 

Wm. Smedley 

Joe Mashoda 

Joe Sokup 

Thos. Alderson.. 

J. Hugno 

Jacob Kreniski. .. 

Jas. McVey 

John Poot 

A. Schonil 

M. Tervo 

Joe Cimera 

C. Pranzkewith.. 
Wni. Robinson... 
Thos. Mortimer.. 

John Stewart 

Mike Leonard 

John Gilderman.. 
Wm. Poppleton.. 

Henry Sheur 

John Moseley.;.. 

Wm. Moran 

August Belat 

Thos. Sheradon.. 

James Cassett 

Ed. Smith 

,lohu Aehuster... 
John Ponk 



Diamond. 
Streator . 



Totals. 



Braidwood. 
La Salle — 
Carbon Hill 

Oglesby 

30j 

26 Carbon Hill 
29!La Salle.... 
26j Carbon Hill 
35 Kangley ... 

44 Coal City.. 
35 Braidwood. 
251 Streator ... 
25lBraceville.. 
43 Clark City. 
40 

35 Coal City.. 
19 La Salle.... 

45 •' 

48 Braeeville.. 

52 La Salle 

34 Braeeville.. 

27 Carbon Hill 
40| La Salle.... 
28j Streator ... 
40 Diamond.. . 
23 Braidwood. 
17| 

4l!CarbonHill 
60 Peru 

53 La Salle.... 
23 Rutland,... 
43iCoal City.. 
38 Carbon Hill 
25 C. B. June. 
27iBraceville.. 
30: La Salle.... 
15 1 Braidwood. 
22|Diamond... 

22 1 Streator 

42|CarbonHill 



48iPeru 

16 Streator.... 

22 Fairbury . . . 
35l Clark City. 
2l!CarbonHill 

23 La Salle ... 



Streator .. 



81 67 142 201 



Back injured 

Hand injured 

Collar bone broken 

Shoulder injured 

Leg injured 

Foot injured 

Finger ci'ushed 

Shoulder broken 

Leg bruised 

Foot injured 

Back injured 

Foot injured 

Back injured 

Collar bone broken 

Eye injured 

Foot injured 

Foot injured 

Leg broken 

Leg broken 

Knee cap broken 

Arm bruised 

Foot and back bruised 

Shoulder and side bruised. 

Back bruised 

Leg bruised 

Head and chest injured 

Leg bruised 

Foot bruised 

Leg liroken 

Leg l)roken 

Leg injured 

LeL' injured 

Back injured 

Back injured 

Leg broke 

Spine injured 

Lea bruised 

Arm burned 

Arm broken 

Arm Jiroken 

Thumb crushed 

Finger injured 

Hand injured 

Ribs fractured 

Side injured 

Leg injured 

Back injured 

Hip injured 

Back injured 

Eye injured 

Shoulder injured 

Back and leg injured 

Back injured 

Foot injured 

Leg injured 



21 
21 
21 
12 

^18 

12 
10 

14 
5831 



t Not returned to work. 
* Still idle. 



Total men injured 

Not recovered July 1 , 1899 

Number recovered 

Time lost by men recovered 

Average time lost by men recovered 



148 

11 
137 
531 days 

42.6 " 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



11 



Reccqntulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — First District — 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Braceville 


8 


Braidwoofi ... 


18 


Carbon HilL. 


2r, 


Clark City.... 


3 


Coal City 


7 


Coal Br. Jc... 


2 


Diamond 


6 


Fairbury 




Heenanville.. 


1 


Kanffley 


9 


La Salle 


2fi 


Oglesby 


5 


Pontiac 


2 


Peru 


?. 


Rockwell 


1 


Rutland 


1 


Streator 


29 


Total 


148 



Nature of Casualty 



Colliery. 



Blachsmiths., 

Cagers 

Car trimmers 

Drivers 

Fire Boss 

Miners 

Pickers 

Roadman 

Timbermen .. 

Top man 

Trappers 



Cage 

Falling: coal 

Falling rock 

Falling timber... 

Fan belt 

Gas explosion 

Kicked by mu'.o.. 

Pit cars 

Powiler explosion 

Railroad cars 

Steam 



4 1 Acme Coal Co 

33!BracevilleCoalCo... 
60 Big4 

IjCahill,. James ! 

1 C. W. & V. Coal Co..' 

2 Gardner & VV. C. Co. 

1 La Salle Coal Co 

40 M. & H. Zinc Co , 

2 Oglesby Coa) Co 

2 Pontiae Coal Co [ 

2 Rutland Coal Co I 

Star Coal Co 1 

Walton Bros 

Wilm. M. &MfgCo.. 
William Howe & Co . 
William Maltby 



Table shoiving the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time Lost, with Average and Percentage— First 
District. 





1 

g 

3 


1 


"S 
X 


"5 

S 
ft 

6 


Time 


Lost. 


^., 


Nature of Ix.jrRiES. 


Total 
days. 


Aver- 
age 
days. 




Arm broken 

\rm injured 


i 

18 
17 


3 

2 
4 
3 
1 
11 

4 

6 

1 
1 
i 
3 

8 

8 

1 
2 
4 

1 
2 

1 


3 

""ii 

2 
1 

i 

10 

3 
3 


3 

16 
5 
5 

10 
5 

29 

""ie 

4 


I 
292 1 

53 
413 

87 
326 
131 

39 
726 

1571 
230 
421 
30 
151 
1681 
209 
538! 

1,567: 


97.3 

17.6 

23 

21.7 

65.2 

43. K 

19.5 

34.6 

15 

22.4 

25.5 

42 

30 

15 

28 

52.2 

25.2 

95.7 


2.03 
2.03 




12 16 




2.7 


Collar bone broken 


3.38 
2.03 




1.35 


Feet injured 


13 18 


Foot and back injured 






4.72 


Hand injured 


6.08 


Head and chest inju''ed 


.68 




.68 


Head and shoulders injured 


J 

9 

3 
2 


5 
15 

8 

"e 

1 

i 

3 
11 
1 
6 

1 
1 


.68 




4.05 




2.7 


Legs iniured 


14.18 




11.48 






Leg and ribs fraclure<l. ... 


ieo' 

34 
113 

177 


160 
38.5 
34 

22.5 
29.5 


.68 




1.35 




.68 


Shoujder injured 


3.38 
4.05 




.68 


Thumb injnreil 


«) 

63 
29 


40 
63 
29 


1.35 


Thumb broken 


.68 
.68 






Total averages and percentages. 


148 


82 


66 


201 


5.83l| 


39.04 


100.00 







12 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Grundy County — First District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

a 
pi 

:z; 


I 
§ 
o 

p. 


1 

n 

c 

11 


g 


6 






'u 

1 




2 

u 



i 

^ ft 


1 


X) 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


\ 

I 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


Braceville Coal Co., No. 4 

Frederick Schultz 

Wil. Star Coal Co., No. 5. 
Star Coal Co., No. 1 

No. 2 

No.3 

C. W.& V.Coal Co.,"R." 
Wil. C. M. & Mfg Co., No.4 
Bi? 4 Wilmington Coal Co 
Card. & Wil. C.Co.. No. 1 


Braceville 

Coal City .'.'.'.. 
Carbon Hill... 

Braidwood ... 

Diamond 

Coal City 

Gardner 

Morris! 


1033.2 

772.8 

1153 

113|3 
983 ■ 
993 
993 

105 3 
90l3 

2103 
603 
4012.8 
662.8 
242.6 
41I2.6 
70|2.4 
62I2.9 
80|3.2 
603 
202.8 
28;2.7 


2 

2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 


Sh. 


s: 

H. 


M. 


316,353 

2.000 

71,680 

12,596 

207, 733 

131,479 

35, 781 

238,000 

230,232 

11,933 

4,413 

2,340 

1,300 

1.319 

1,220 

3,000 

1,300 

2,700 

3,000 

450 

642 

861 


260,353 

1,890 

57.757 

10,122 

173,418 

110.164 

27,672 

200,000 

187. 163 

9,582 

4,113 

1,876 

900 

1,018 

1,020 

2.500 

1,200 

2; 800 
375 
552 
741 


56,000 

110 

13,923 

2,474 
34,314 
21,315 

8,109 
38,000 
43,069 

2.351 
300 


1? 


■James Heather 


464 


13 
14 


A. W.Telfer&Son 


400 
301 


15 


.James Bell 


200 


16 


William Wood 


500 


17 




100 


18 




120 


19 


William Laherty 


200 


?0 




75 




Georare R. Blair 


90 


r> 


Tasdal Bros 


97 


2.9 


120 




Totals 






1,280,332 


1,057,796 


222, 536 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 20. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 4. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 22. 



Kankakee County — First District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


FostofBce. 


Description. 


Output. 


"g 
3 
2 


T 

1 


".a 

o a 
a « 
•^■£ 


a 
1 

o 
6 

:^ 
1 

i 
1 


o 

o 

.a 


■a 
% 

o 

I 
o 

.a . 

a^ 

S ^ 

la 

02 


1 


Total • 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


1 
•> 


Gard.&Wil. CoalCo."B" 
William Treasure 


Clark City.... 


106 
63 


4.8 
2.8 


7 
2 


Sh. 


S. 

H. 


M. 


t 127,322 
1.696 

129.018 


78,361 
1,546 


48,961 
150 










79,907 


49,111 















































* Mined by machine, 42.076 tons at 37 cents per ton. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1899. 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



I'd 



Orundy County, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 
o 

2 

li 

^z 

4) a 

Oh 


3 

i 


a 

o 

! 
> 

o 


"1 
lid 

m 

hi 

ill 


t3 

a 

1 


U 

III 

3 a> S 


Acci- 
dents 


u 

s 


O <D 

li 
1^ 


1 
o 

II 


o 

>■ § 

11 
< 


1 

ii 

< 


i 

o 

p. 

a 

o 
< 


1 


1 
a 


3 

a 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

1 

1? 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 


$1 04 
1 75 
1 13 
1 04 
104 
1 04 
1 25 
1 04 
1 04 
1 61 

1 95 

2 25 
2 00 
2 00 
2 15 
2 00 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 


$0 25 
50 
64 

18 
18 
18 
28 
20 
25 
49 
70 
70 
70 
60 
70 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 


$284,767 

3,363 

74. 176 

10,972 

186,471 

118,408 

36,617 

215,600 

205,417 

16,579 

8,230 

4,546 

2,080 

2,217 

2,333 

5,400 

2,780 

5,901 

6,460 

904 

1,314 

1,763 


460 
5 
110 
65 
360 
326 

1 

430 
24 
12 

I 

2 
3 

7 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 


140 

61 
21 

41 

175 
90 

8 
3 

1 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

i 


600 

6 

171 

86 
426 
377 
357 
650 
520 
32 
15 
6 

3 
5 

8 
5 
6 

8 
3 

5 


$0 68 

68 
68 

68 
68 
68 
68 
1 07 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
1 20 
120 
1 20 
1 20 


S,M. 

;; 
w. 


269 
200 
298 
102 
269 
251 
62 
245 
236 
225 
262 
250 
300 
270 
175 
200 
150 
220 
200 
150 
270 
128 


$272,253 

1,660 

71,918 

12,696 

177,687 

110,514 

31,864 

191,264 

207,208 

11.626 

7,150 

3,408 

2,000 

1,643 

1,800 

3,960 

1.700 

3,000 

3,900 

400 

960 

889 


■■■342 

375 

1.085 

715 

■■■395 
144 

■■"25 


40 
1 
8 
10 
23 
18 
22 
40 
30 
6 


'2 

1 

3 


8 

13 
U 

"22 
3 








SI. 196, 549 


2,601 


697 


3,298 






•SI, 119, 500 


3,076 


209 


fi^ 




SI. 077 


SO. 2575 


$0.68.56 




215 



























Kankakee County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


ES. 


1 

3 


3 




n 




S2 


lAcci- 

DENTS 
















So 

._; 3 


a 

3 

5"? 




1 



'11 

1^^ 


•6 

1 








a a 

£a 

^ 




3 


3 

22 




if 


a 


1 






g 
3 


ll 


n 


go. 

11 


ft 




a 

"5 




^■3 




1 


111 


s 




Ill 

5 S 3 


1 


3 



:^ 


<3 


< 


< 


< 


< 


^ 


^ 


CU 




e 


« 


Z jfe 




1 


$1 47 


SO 56 


$142,509 


83 


119 


202 


$0 47 


.S.M. 


196 


S98.787 


2,081 


41!.. 


3 


2 


2 00 


50 


3,167 


6 


2 


8 


1 00 




200 


2,000 




1 


1^ 








8145,676 


89 


121 


210 






$100, 787 


2,081 


42 




$1 48 


$0.5577 


$0 4803 




19S 



















14 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



LaSalle County — First District — 1899. 









Description. 


Output. 




1 


is 


i 


-a 


-a 
§ 


^ 








1 

g 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


13 

1 
o 

a 
5 


^1 

Eh 


a 
•A 

'S 
o 

1 

o 


o 


03 


1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 








350 
440 
392 
390 
375 
96 
116 
86 
125 
110 
50 
20 
20 
50 
40 
55 
35 


3 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

8 

6 

5 

3 

6.6 

5 

4.8 

4.8 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

1 6 


2 

2 
6&7 

e&7 

2 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
7 


Sh. 

t 

D. 

Sh. 

Dr. 


St. 

?.• 

St. 

H. 

St. 

Ha. 

!: 




M. 
B. 

g; 

M. 
" 

M. 
M- 

•> 

B. 


81.000 
147,210 
143,183 
135,902 

89, 752 

372,433 

329.069 

149. 137 

36.977 

86. 166 

* 55.686 

1.782 

2.500 

535 

1.034 

4.146 

860 

1.641 

950 

650 

448 

200 

200 

275 

81.260 

122,543 

8,044 

t 30.000 

500 

350 

1,387 

t 80,134 

t 125 

200 

100 

700 

360 

325 

575 

675 

300 

3.625 


68,028 

122,588 

118,444 

111,796 

70,608 

178. 768 

213.895 

98.308 

30,690 

59.499 

55.686 

1,564 

2,000 

485 

834 

3,194 

740 

1,130 

790 

500 

448 

200 

150 

200 

67.532 

102, 119 

6,979 

30. 000 

400 

300 

1.040 

80, 134 

200 
100 
650 
300 
300 
500 
600 
250 
3.625 


12,972 


3 
4 
5 

e 

7 
8 
9 
10 


LaSalle C.C. Co., No. 1.... 

•' LaSalle.. 

Rockwell 

Union . . . 

C.,W.& V.Coal Co., No.l 

No. 2 

Star Coal Co., No. 2 


LaSalle 

Streator '.'.'.. 


24.622 
24,739 
24,106 
19, 144 
193,665 
115.174 
50,829 
6,287 
26,667 


11 
1? 


William Howe & Co 

Price & Jones 


2i8 


13 
14 
15 
16 


Nelson & Westerlund.... 
William Tbomas Coal Co 
.J. E. Buchanan & Sons... 
Thos. Sowerby & Co 


500 
50 
200 
952 
120 


18 
19 


L. A. Munts & Sons 


35 5 
204 

lit 

20 4.8 
50 4.8 
65 4 
500 2.10 
4641.... 
100'2.9 
120 2.10 
75,8.6 
75|8.6 
73|3.2 
3104.6 
45 2.4 
50 2 
60 2 
60 2.4 
60 2.4 
60|2.4 
452.4 
502.4 
55i2.4 
1254 


511 
160 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 


Allovray & Rushton 

Bargreen Bros 


150 






Dawson & Gray 


Ratland '.'.'.'. 
Oglesby .... 

Seneca 

Marseilles . . 
Kangley 

WilsmanV.!! 

LaSalle 

Ottawa 


50 


Piny Coal Co 


75 


E. Hakes 

Oglesby Coal Co 

Standard Coal Co 

Marseilles L. & W. P. Co. 

Chas. Scott 

John McNeil 

Wilsman Coal Co 

M. &H. Zinc Co 

U. S. Silica Co 


16, 728 
20,424 
1.065 

ioo 

50 
347 


James Planger 

.James McCullough 

Daniel Vazain 


50 

60 
25 


John Delbridge 


75 


G H Tisler. 


75 




Deer Park '. '. 


50 


42 


J. C. Dawson & Co 

Totals 










1,975,939 


1,435,699 


540, 240 
















































* Mine run. 

t Mine run consumed by the company. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 44. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 4. 

Number of new mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 42. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



15 



LuSalle County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Ej 


PLOYES. 


1 
a 


p 








X 0) 
3 


Acci- 
dents 
















bl 


a 

1 

31 


1 
p. 
o 






H 

h 






as 


o 


o 

4) 

3 




i 








1 

a 

3 


i 

'n 




> 3 


^1 


i 


o 
p. 

1 


SI 

Si 


11 
II 


ci 
o 


hi 
Us 


1 


^•9 
3i 

3 0) a 




1 


'/T, 


<) 


< 


< 


•«J 


< 


H 


Oi 


Oh 


Q 


tH 


M 


z; 


fe 


S5 


1 


SI 30 


$0 35 


$92,976 


150 


38 


188 


$0 63 


S. M. 


280 


$75,879 




17 




, 




1 26 


39 


164,063 


220 


88 


308 


63 




245 


130.592 




3( 


1 


3 


3 


126 


39 


158. 88S 


184 


62 


246 


63 


• ' 


266 


115.299 




26 




8 


4 


1 26 


39 


150. 264 


210 


63 


273 


63 




247 


116, 793 




27 




6 


.5 


1 26 


39 


96.432 


111 


43 


154 


63 




217 


75,010 




1,1 




7 


6 




45 


264. 130 


400 


102 


502 


47 


' ' 


273 


224,055 


5,754 25 


a 


9 




99 


45 


263.584 


440 


124 


564 


47 




250 


219, 099 


3.315 25 




15 


8 


98 


30 


115,591 


215 


50 


265 


47 




265 


108,008 


5,050 15 




7 


9 


104 


28 


33.678 


85 


21 


106 


68 


' ' 


275 


41,228 


445 i 




2 


10 


1 04 


18 


66. 679 


123 


55 


178! 47 




229 


60, 902 


882| la 






11 


1 OC 




55,68« 


54 


19 


7.1 


47 




296 


36,071 


550 6 




2 


12 


IOC 


40 


2.436 


8 


2 


1(1 


47 


' ' 


107 


1,470 










VA 


1 5C 


85 


3,425 


4 


1 


5 


60 


W. 


250 


1,675 










14 


1 25 


40 


626 


6 


1 


7 


47 




100 


401 










15 


1 25 


40 


1.123 


8 


1 


S 


47 


' ' 


144 


709 






.. 


.... 


Ifi 


1 40 


40 


4,852 


8 


1 


9 


47 




1,iO 


1.990 


80 




.. 




17 


130 


30 




2 


1 


a 


47 




200 


404 










IH 


1 35 


35 


1,704 


4 


1 


5 


47 


' ' 


130 


800 










14 


1 00 
1 50 


25 
50 


830 

825 


2 
2 




2 

2 


47 
47 




300 
125 


600 
462 










20 






.. 




21 


IOC 




448 


4 


2 


6 


47 


' ' 


40 


278 








.... 


22 


1 5C 




300 


2 




2 


47 




,50 


150 










23 


15C 


50 


325 


2 


1 


3 


47 




60 


150 










24 


150 


50 


337 


4 


1 


5 


47 


' ' 


40 


170 










25 


1 3C 


40 


94,482 


140 


36 


176 


63 


S. M . 


210 


78, ,326 


10 10 




I 


26 


1 22 


35 


131,734 


187 


93 


280 


63 




250 


113, 729 


10 26 




5 


27 


1 65 


50 


8.593 


21 


11 


32 


70 


' ' 


240 


8,593 


1 3 






28 


1 50 




45,000 


38 


7 


45 


77 


' ' 


;^oo 


2.500 


3 






29 


1 50 


50 


650 


3 


1 


4 


47 


W. 


200 


400 


20' 






HO 


1 50 


50 


475 


2 




2 


47 




251) 


300 


12 1 




.... 


SI 


1 50 


50 


1.733 


3 


1 


4 


75 




200 


1.300 


30! 




.... 


32 


1 00 




80, 134 


45 


29 


74 


40 


' ' 


264 


46,900 


2,6921 13 




5 


33 


1 00 




125 


3 


1 


4 


75 


' ' 


30 


100 


4 






34 


1 5C 




300 


2 






87 


■ ' 


80 


150 


6 







35 


1 50 




150 


2 




2 


88 


' ' 


40 


95 


4 






36 


1 5C 


60 


1,005 


3 


1 


4 


87.5 


' ' 


21)0 


685 


10 






'-^7 


1 50 
1 50 


60 
60 


486 
465 


2 




2 


1 00 
1 00 




150 
120 










38 


4 






39 


1 50 


60 


795 


2 




2 


1 00 




1.50 


600 


6! 






40 


1 50 


60 


945 


4 




4 


1 00 




150 


700 


12 






41 


1 50 


60 


405 


2 




2 


100 




100 


325 1 


4 






42 


85 




3.081 


6 


4 


10 


53 




150 


2,500' 


80 4 .. 










$1,850,758 


2,715 


861 


3,576 








$1,470, 138' 18, 980' 278 4I 74 




$1,101 


$0.4028 










$0 54.3 




181.1 

1 
















1 


i 



16 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Livingston County — First District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postofiice. 


Description. 


Output, 


1 


I 

O 

t-t 
o 

a 

Q 


1 

|| 

|| 


a 

o 
,-; 

1 
o 


-a 
o 

o 
CO 


a 
o 


o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades. 


1 


Pontiac Coal Co. 


Pontiac 

Fairbury 

Streator .".".' .'.'.■ 

Cornell .'...'.'.'. 
Streator 


464 
200 


2.8 


5 


Sh 

SI. 
Sh 

SI 


S. 

H. 

S. 
H. 


\ 

M. 

B. 
M. 


45,915 

7,101 

25,849 

11,798 

6,168 

* 7,371 

5,240 

800 

393 

1,900 

1,560 

1,000 

1,273 

1,300 

300 


30.837 

4,007 

17.233 

8,600 

5,022 

7.371 

3,704 

763 

303 

800 

1.360 

840 

900 

900 

300 


15 078- 


? 


Diamond Coal Co- 


3 094 


3 




180 ."S 


8,616 


4 
5 


Cooperative Coal Co 


165 
57 
75 
40 
64 
35 
60 
60 
34 

150 
50 


5 
4.6 

4.6 

4.10 
4.6 
3.6 
4 


3.198 
1,146 


6 

7 
8 

q 


Streator Clay Mf gr Co ... . 
R. Evans, Jr.. & Bros.... 
Thos. Edwards & Son.... 


37 
90 


10 

11 


Kimes Coop'ative Coal Co 
Burrell & Massy 


200 
200 


1^ 




160 


n 


Henry Singer . . 


373 


14 


A. W. Pauk & Co 


400 


15 




60 IS 






Totals 

















117,248 


82,940 


34.308 




Averages 









































*Mine run consumed by the company. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 17. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 2. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 4. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 15. 



Will Count]}— First District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


PostofiQce. 




DESCRIPTiriN. 






Output. 




g 
I? 


I 
o 

o 

p. 


o.g 

si 


a 
i 

o 
d 

'5 

c 
o 


o 
o 

Si 


§ 

A 
u 
O 

u 
o 

C 

II 

CO 


1 
o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


William Maltby 


Braidwood — 


60 
55 
63 


3 
2.10 

2.8 


i 

2 


Sh 


St. 
H. 
St. 


M. 


27.149 
4.000 
1.630 


16.876 
3.000 
1,141 


10.273 


2 
3 


Cooperative Coal Co 

Murphy, Keenan & Co... 


1,000 
489 










32.779 


21.017 


11. 762 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 3. 

Number of new places opened during the year. 1. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 3. 



COAL IX ILLIXOIS. 



17 



LiriiKjston Connhj, ISO'.) — Concludt'd. 







Values. 


Employes. 


i 


i 




.5 >. 




S.3 [A. el- 
s'" DENTS 


















2 




5ftC. 




S^ 








■- 
















|s 


I 


o 


II 


i 


T. 


o 


1 


12. 




1 


go 






1 

1 


if 


1 

11 


it 


= 2" 

Si 




o 
a 

o 

3 


a, a 


^ 


1 


=c = o 

0-0 


1 
g 






2.S 

S c 


1 

-1 
^1 


1 


^ 


< 


<: 


< 


< 


< 










Eh 


w 


^ ,=-l 


z 


1 


$1 05 


SI 05 


S48, 211 


85 


41 


126 


so 68 


S-M. 


295 


S53,283 


350 


^: 


. 


2 


1 45 


83 


8,378 


4 




ti 


50 


W. 


24( 


5,816 


14C 


21.. 




'A 


1 13 


66 


25.160 


25 


17 


42 


45 


IS-iM. 


192 


19,59i 


1,491 


7 .. 


2 


4 


1 40 


95 


15.078 


12 


11 


2.^ 


50 


W, 


23( 


10, 125 


445 


3I.. 




5 


1 11 


50 


6,147 


23 


11 


34 


47 


S-M. 


16!" 


5,29E 


7!- 


1 .. 




K 


1 25 
1 40 


■■"so" 


9,213 
6.044 


10 
12 




14 
16 


47 
60 


W. 


276 
150 


7,235 
4.000 


255 








i!.. 




8 


1 60 


50 


1,239 


3 




4 


47 




6(: 


61C 


16 


1 






9 


1 20 


40 


4,000 


3 




4 


47 




5(: 


30C 


6 


1 






10 


1 50 


50 


1.300 


4 




5 


47 




13(, 


70C 


30 


] 






11 


1 40 
I 50 


1 00 
50 


2.104 
1,340 


5 
3 




8 
4 


47 
47 


.. 


125 
160 


1.203 
750 


30 








12 


i!.. 




13 


1 50 


1 25 


1,817 
1.245 


3 




5 


60 




3()(] 


I.IOC 


24 


31.. 




14 


1 25 


30 


14 




18 


65 


' ' 


50 


1.21c 




]l.. 




15 


1 50 




450 


'' 






60 




75 


250 




1 












S131,726 


208 


106 


314 






Sill, 458 


2,865 


30 


4 




SI 21 


SO 86.2 










SO 56.23 





167 































TF/// County, i555— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


I 


j 




=1 

'C 




J_2 


Acci- 
dents 


















'A 


.£ 


-ss^ 




S'S 
























2S 
S5 





























"0 







1 


>s 


£ 

si 

a.5 


a 
^5 


1 




^s^ 
I1.S 

s^"? 


S 




OS 

a 






£ 


^1 




50 

i 


1 


'0 


11 


11 
II 


1 









0® ' 

U— a;' i 

5 5 a ^ 


■i 

3 

a 

o 


S5 


^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 




^ 


a. 


a 


Eh 


W 


Z ;::^| 2 


1 


$1 50 


$1 10 


836,614 


54 


18 


72 


$0 68 


S-M. 


275 


828,236 





6..i 5 


2 


2 00 


50 


6,500 


15 


4 


1£ 


100 




160 


3,30( 


I 




3 


1 75 


50 


2,241 


6 


3 


9 


68 




125 


1.85S 







.=; 








S45,355 


75 


25 


100 






S33, 294 




8 




$158.5 


$1 02.4 


SO 71.9 




187 




















1 





2 C. R. 



18 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation hy Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 






















ki • 




















































a 

-Sa 

1 






Counties. 


1 

a 

1 
a 


a 

u 

a 
"E 
n 


1 

a 

n 


a 


1 

a 




1 

p. 

s 


P. 


1 

! 

o 
a 


i 

p. 


11 
"its 

Sa 


Si 

ill 

a. 'r a 






























z 


c» 


S 


z 


<« 


H 


^ 


^ 


&H 


^ 


<! 


< 


Grundy 


22 


9 


13 


4 


2 


1,280.332 


1,057,796 


222,536 


1,200,113 


30.816 


$1,077 


$0.2575 


Kankakee 


2 


1 


1 






129.018 


79,907 


49,111 


118,888 


4.382 


1.48 


0.5577 


LaSalle 


42 

15 


19 

7 


3 

8 


4 

2 


6 
4 


1.975,939 
117,248 


1 435,699 
82,940 


540,240 
34,308 


1,606.742 
52,812 


53,675 
6,315 


1.13 
1.21 


0.4028 


Livingston 


0.862 


Will 


3 

Hi 


1 

37 


2 


1 
11 


1 
13 


32.779 


21,017 


11,762 


21,049 


2,372 


1.58.5 


1.024 








3,535.316 


2, 677, 359 


857, 957 


2, 999, 604 


97, 560 






Averages. 






















$1,139 


$0.40.1 

























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 86. 
Number of new mines or places opened during tlie year, 11. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 13. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 84. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



19 



First District— 1899. 















tH 1 — — 










Emploves. 


1 


S.2 

a 


£2® 


1 

o 


Si 


Casualties 


Machines. 


° : 


i 


£ 

O 


>- 






.L|l 

^2i = 




52 


o 


«M 


"S 


r^ 


"§ 


i"n 


o 








S o 


ii 
































4JM) 










£ ■ 












OJ-^ 


.Q 










— " 






TS 








U% 


s 




f? 




ftti 


3^5^ 


Sx 


III 




D 


S'wl S - 


52 


ti^ 




no, 


o 






o^ aj 






'a 






oS 


< 


"A 


z 


EH 


<A 


<J 


EH 


z 


2; 


W 




z 


2; 




1,196,549 


2,601 
89 


697 
121 


3.298 
210 


215 

198 


$0.6856 
0.4803 


$1,119,500 
100, 787 


3,076 
2,081 


209 
42 


3 


62 
3 








145, 676 


1 


9 


* 42,076 


1,849,456 


2,715 

208 
75 


861 
106 
25 


3.576 
314 
100 


182 
167 

187 


0.543 
0.562 
0.719 


1,470,138 
111.458 
33.294 


18,980 
2.865 


278 
30 
8 


4 


74 
4 
5 








131,726 








45, 355 














S3. 368. 762 


5.688 


1,810 


7.498 




$2,835,177 


27,602 


567 


7 


148 


1 9 


42,076 










188 


fO.59.6 
































Price paid for machiue mining, 37 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 21 



SECOND INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island, 
Stark, Woodford. 

Thomas Hudson, Inspector, Galva. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir:— In compliance with section 12 of an act of the General As- 
sembly, of the State of Illinois, defining the duties of State In- 
spectors of coal mines, and providing for the better preservation of the 
health and safety of persons employed in the coal mines of the State, I have 
the honor to herewith submit to you the sixteenth annual report of the coal 
mines located in the Second Inspection District, comprising the coal produc- 
ing counties of Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island, 
Stark and Woodford, for the year ended June 30, 1899. 

The tables accompanying this report contain the number of mines in the 
district, both local and those of the shipping class; the depth at which the 
coal is found in the various shafts and slopes; the thickness and the geologi- 
cal number of the seams; the number of miners and other employes above and 
below the ground, engaged in the coal mining industry of the district; the 
amount of powder consumed at each mine is given, with the number of days 
each mine has been in active operation during the year; the number of tons 
of coal produced is also given, with the selling price of the same, and the 
price paid per ton for mining; the number of fatal and non-fatal accidents 
that have taken place during the year are also given. In short, the tabular 
statements of this report contain about everj-thing that can be of interest to 
the general reader, and valuable to the statistician. 

The following table gives a summary of the number of mines, the num- 
ber of miners and other employes, tons of coal produced, accidents and ratios 
for thfe year: 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Number of shipping mines 

Number of mines in local trade 

Total number of mines 

Number of miners employed 

Number of all other employes (not including boys). 

Number of boys employed underground 

Total number of employes 

Total number of kegs of powder consumed 

Tons of lump coal produced 

Tons of other grades of coal produced 

Total product, tons 

Tons of coal shipped 

Tons of coal sold to local consumers 

Tons of coal csnsumed. or wasted, at the mines 

Average value of lump coal per ton at the mine 

Average value of other grades per ton at the mine. . 

Aggregate value of total product 

Average number of days of active operation 

Number of fatal accidents 

Number of non-fatal accidents 

Total number of accidents 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 

Number of employes to each non-fatal accident 

Tons. of coal produced to each fatal accident 

Tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident ... 

Tons of coal produced to each miner employed 

Tons of coal produced to each emplop^ (all classes) 



4,920 

1,501 

207 

6,631 

53,458 

,669,631 

656.369 

,326.000 

,877,142 

352, 594 

96,264 

SI. 191 

SO. 44 

,475.973 

181.5 

12 

93 

105 

553 

71 

277. 167 

35,763 

674 

502 



A table is also submitted giving the different notionalities and number of 
each employed at the various mines in the district. The table presented is 
approximately correct, absolute accuracy being well nigh an impossibilitj'. 









1,916 


English 


671 


Scotch 


312 


Irish 


386 


Welsh 


98 


German . . . . 


578 




70 




927 


Austrians . . 


170 




9 




852 


Belgians ... . 


181 




94 




345 


Danes and Norwegians 


22 


Total 


6,631 







A comparative table of the coal production by counties, in the district, with 
the increase or decrease in each, forjthe years ending June 30, 1898 and 1899, 
all grades, is here presented: 





Total Output of all 
Grades op Coal— in Tons. 


Increase. 






1898. 


1899. 




Bureau 


865,892 
159.049 
286.365 
384.345 
640. 193 
47.490 
21,936 
145,840 


1.410.524 
91,265 
342,578 
496 591 
744, P98 
41,597 
23,997 
174,750 


,544,632 




TT 


67 784 


Marshall 


56,213 
112,246 
104,505 












Rock Island 


5.893 




2,061 
28.910 




Woodford 








Total 


2.551.110 


3.326,000 


848.567 


73, 677 







*Neffroes 184. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Increase 848, 567 

Decrease 73. 677 

Net increase I 774. 890 



The counties of Bureau, Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Stark and Woodford 
show a combined increase of 848,567 tons, and the counties of Henry and Rock 
Island a combined decrease of 73,077 tons, leaving a net increase for the dis- 
trict of 774,890 tons, or 33.1 per cent. 

New Mines. — No new mines of the shipping class have been opened, nor 
have any of the same class been worked out or abandoned during the year. 
Many new local mines are opened up and others worked out during each 
year, but these changes are not thought to be of sufficient importance to note 
in this report. 

Fires. — A fire broke out at the top works of the Camp Creek Coal Com- 
pany's mine, operated by Hill Bros., at Cable, .Mercer countj', on the night of 
October 1*5, 1898, by which the engine room and boiler house were totally 
destroyed. From the fact that the workable coal in the mine was nearly ex- 
hausted the destroyed buildings have not been rebuilt. 

Scales. — Requisitions have been made on the State Inspector to test the 
scales at three mines only during the year. 

December 27, 1898, the scales at Reed City mine, operated by the Reed 
City Coal Co., located at Wolcott, Peoria county, were tested and found ap- 
proximately correct. The scales weighed correctly up to 2, GOO pounds, but 
at 3,000 pounds they were found to be 8 pounds light. 

February 27, 1899, the scales at Siebold Reent's mine, located at Kramm 
Station, Peoria county, were tested and found correct. 

May 16, 1899, the scales at shaft "B," operated by the Whitebreast Fuel 
Co., located at Ladd, Bureau countj'. were tested and found correct. 

At the Reed City and Ladd mines 100 pounds in U. S. standard weights 
were used; at Reent's mine no standard weights were available. To over- 
come this difficulty, miners, who knew their personal weight exactly,, were 
used. This method of using the miners as standard weights to test the scales 
on which their product is weighed, is, to say the least, unique, but it was the 
best that could be done under the circumstances. In all cases the weighman 
and check-weighman were present when the scales were being tested. 

Improvements. — Many minor improvements are made at the various mines 
in the district each year, of which no note is taken, as it is not thought to be 
necessary to record such in a report of this kind. 

The most costly and substantial improvements made during the year are 
those made by the Spring Valley Coal Co., at their mines located at Spring 
Valley, Bureau county. This company has, during the year, erected a Capell 
fan at No. 3 mine. All their three mines are now ventilated by Capell fans. 
The large volume of air created by fans of this type, combined with the large 
water gauge produced, goes far to solve the vexatious problem of ventil.ition 
in long-wall mines having long and contracted air courses, and in which a 
large number of men and animals are employed. The same company is also 



24 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

erecting a steel tower at No. 2 mine; they expect to have it completed about 
October 1, 1899. la the meantime the coal from No. 2 mine is being hoisted 
through No. 4 shaft. 

The Marquette Coal Co., of Marquette, Bureau county, has also made some 
verj- substantial improvements during the year. The main or hoisting shaft 
has been enlarged so that a larger mine car can be used, a new and more 
powerful winding engine and three new boilers are being set up, so that it is 
quite natural to expect a very respectable increase in the output of this mine 
in the very near future. An overcast has also been erected below, for the pur- 
pose of increasing and obtaining a better distribution of the ventilating current. 

The Devlin Coal Co., at Toluca, Marshall County, has put in double-decked 
cages during the year, and erected a new ventilating fan 20 feet in diameter 
to take the place of the smaller one in use heretofore. 

New Mines in Prospective. — The Alden Coal Co., located at Wanlock, Mer- 
cer county, has just completed the sinking of a new shaft. It is located 
about two miles south of the present Alden mine. A good seam of coal 4 feet 
3 inches thick was pierced at a depth of 140 feet, good machinery will be 
erected at once, and in all probability the mine will go into active operation 
about October 1, 1899. 

The sinking of a new shaft is also contemplated by the Spring Valley Coal 
Co., at Spring Valley, Bureau county. The new shaft will be located about 
one mile north of the present No. 2 mine; the tower will be steel, and the 
mine will be equipped with all the modern improvements known to the min- 
ing engineers of the present day. The ever increasing demand for coal made 
on this company has made the sinking of this shaft a necessity. 

Fatal Accidents — The following is a statement of fatal accidents that have 
taken place in the Second Inspection District during the year ending July 1, 
1899: 

July 12, 1898, Jonathan James, a miner, aged 63 years, widower, leaves 
two minor children, was killed almost instantly by being run over by a loaded 
pit car in shaft No. 1, operated by the Spring Valley Coal Company, at Spring 
Valley, Bureau county.^ Deceased, with two other miners, was riding 
on a loaded trip, contrary to the general orders of the mine manager, when 
he suddenly fell off the loaded car of rock on which he was riding, and a 
loaded ear of coal passed over him, crushing him severely on the body and 
neck. He died before he could be removed from the mine. 

July 13, 1898, Frank Samuelson, a miner, aged 16 years, single, was se- 
verely crushed by being caught under a fall of coal at the face of his working 
place in the Empire Coal company's mine, located at Gilchrist, Mercer 
county. Deceased was working with his father, drawing a pillar or "stump." 
He was in the act of shoveling loose coal from under some top coal that was 
hanging back, when about two tons fell off at a "water slip," striking the de- 
ceased, breaking his thigh and otherwise injuring him, from the effects of 
which he died before he could be removed from the mine. 

August 23, 1898, William Noble, acting as trapper, aged 20 years, single, 
was killed by having his head crushed between the trap door and door post 
in the Alden Coal Company's mine at Wanlock, Mercer county. The driver 



COAL 1\ ILLINOIS. 25 

was up the entry, at the bottom of which the trap door was located, 
gathering- a trip; he had left a loaded car standing at a switcli 
and gone into the room to pull out another one; while the driver was 
gone, the loaded car that had been left started down the slight grade. Noble 
iieard it coming, and supposing it to be the driver, opened the door just suf- 
ficient to put his head through, for the purpose, it is supposed, of telling the 
driver to hold up. The runaway came on, however, striking the slightly 
open door, and crushing the head of deceased between the door and door 
post. He died one and a half hours after the accident. 

October 4, 1898, John Wilkes, a miner, age 50 years, single, was injured by 
a fall of roof at the face of his working room in L. Potter & Sons' local mine, 
located near Orchard Mines, Peoria county. Deceased had just set up his 
drilling machine and was in the act of drilling a hole, when a slab of slate 
fell from the roof, striking him on the back. It was not thought at first that 
he was seriously hurt, but later developments proved that his spine had been 
injured, and he died from the effects of the injury January IGth, 1899, one 
hundred and days after the accident. 

October 6, 1898, Mathias Sherra, a miner, aged 42 years, single, was 
crushed by a fall of roof while in the act of brushing the roof of his working 
place in the Whitebreast Fuel Company's mine, located at Ladd, Bureau 
county. The piece of coal that fell on Sherra would weigh about tiOO pounds, 
WAS cone shaped, about one foot thick at the center and perfectly smooth all 
around the cone except one side, which was formed by the natural break in 
the roof, which takes place every two or three feet in long-wall mines. This 
might be justly termed an accident, as, according to the evidence, there was 
nathing prior to tlie casualty to indicate the dangerous condition of the roof. 
Sherra died about one hour after being injured. 

November 22, 1898, Andrew Coushman, a eager, aged 21 years, single, was 
killed instantly by being caught between the cage and side of the shaft, in 
shaft No. 1, operated by the Devlin Coal company, at Toluca, Marshall 
county. Deceased was employed as bottom eager. He had sent all the 
miners up, it being just after quitting time; himself and three company men 
were on the shaft bottom, ready to come up; deceased gave the proper signals 
and got the return signal back, the three company men got on the cage, de- 
ceased gave the final or starting bell and got on the cage also. When about 
25 feet up the shaft he leaned too far out and was caught by a bunton in the 
noitheast corner of the south cage-way, and drawn from the cage, falling 
back to the bottom of the shaft. When taken up he was dead, his jaw and 
neck being broken. 

December 5, 1898, August Carlson, a miner, aged 36 years, married, leaves 
a widow and one child, was killed instantlj' by being caught between the 
cage and side of the shaft in J. J. Flemraing^s local mine, atKewanee, Henry 
county. From the evidence given before the coroner's jury, an employe of 
the operator got on the cage at the top of the shaft to go below, it being 
about quitting time and nearly all of the fifteen miners were out of the mine, 
he called down the shaft, which is only 50 feet deep, and asked if all was 
clear below. Getting no response, he assumed that no one was at the bottom 



26 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

of the shaft and told the engineer to lower him down, and the cage was 
started; when the person on the decending cage got to the bottom he found 
deceased lying in the opposite cage seat dead, his skull being crushed and a 
leg broken. It is assumed, for it must rest on assumption, that the deceased, 
on reaching the bottom of the shaft, found the cage just moving away, and 
thinking he had time enough to get on, the cages run very slowly, made the 
attempt, and was caught between the bottom of the cage and door-heads, and 
drawn up a short distance to a wider part, falling from thence to the bottom 
of the shaft, as the person on the decending cage testified that he heard 
something fall to the bottom when he was a short distance down. 

January 2, 1899, Joseph Converso, a miner, aged 43 years, married, family 
supposed to be in Italj', was severely crushed about the head and body by 
being run over by a mule and two loaded pit cars in shaft No. 1, operated 
by the Devlin Coal Company, at Toluca, Marshall county. Deceased, in com- 
pany with two other miners, were coming from the working face to the shaft, 
a driver with two loaded pit ears was coming down the entry behind them, 
the driver whistled for them to get off the track. Two of them did so, step- 
ping to one side to let the cars pass. Deceased kept on, however, expecting, 
it is thought, to reach an opening to another entry a short distance ahead of 
him, when his light suddenly went out, he turned around in front of the mule 
and threw up his hands; the mule became frightened and jumped forward, 
knocking deceased down and dragging the two loaded pit cars over him. He 
died from his injuries 30 hours after the accideut. 

January 14, 1899, John O'Shaughnessy, a miner, aged 42 years, single, was 
severly crushed about the head and body by being struck with coal flying 
from a shot in Kingston mine, operated by Newsam Bros., at Kingston, 
Peoria county. Deceased was working in a room, which was driven in about 
35 feet from the entry, his partner had gone home and left him to fire three 
shots at quitting time; he had fired two shots and went back to light a third, 
and did so, but before he could get back to a safe place on the entry, the blast 
went off and coal flying therefrom struck deceased, causing the injuries from 
which he died about one hour after the accident. 

February 6, 1899, Abel Andreas, a miner, aged 20 years, single, was fatally 
burned by exploding a keg of powder in Collier's Cooperative Coah Mine at 
at Bartonville, Peoria county. Deceased, in opening a new keg of powder at 
the mouth of his room in the above mine, struck the top of the keg a heavy 
blow with a pick; the pick struck the edge or chime of the keg, and glancing 
down, a spark was generated, exploding the powder with above results. De- 
ceased was so severely burned that he died February 9, three days after 
the accident. 

March 2, 1899, Joseph Dailey, a miner, aged 60 years, single, was killed 
instantly by being struck with coal flying from a premature blast in Sholl 
Bros., No, 3 mine, located near Bartonville, Peoria county. Deceased was 
in the act of lighting a shot, blasting off the solid; the miner in the adjoining 
room was sitting in the cross-cut not more than twenty feet from Dailey, for 
the purpose of showing, or lighting him to a place of safety. The deceased 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



27 



lighted the squib and had scarcely turned around when the blast exploded, 
and the coal flying from the blast struck deceased, crushing his head and 
body, killing him instantly. 

April 24, 189!), Andrew Ketchraark, a miner, aged 47 years, leaves a widow 
and nine children, was killed instantly by being caught under a heavy fall of 
roof, at the face of his working room in the Miuonk Coal Company's mine, 
located at Minoak, Woodford county. Deceased had fired a blast in the 
brushing Saturday evening previous. The powder had struck a "smooth", 
and spread along the face, on the right hand side of the room; when he came 
to work on Monday morning he neglected to secure properly the powder 
shaken roof, there was only one M'op under it; shortly after he commenced 
work the weight of the roof seemed to have swung the prop, and the mass 
fell, crushing deceased under it. 

Following are the tables of fatal and non-fatal accidents, their causes and 
the nature of the injuries sustained; also, the regular county schedules of the 
second district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas Hudson, 
State Inspector of Mines, Second District. 

Galva, III. 



Fatal Casualities —Second District, 1899. 



Occupation. 



^ 5 X 



Cause of Accident. 



July 12 
July 13 
Aug. 23 
Oct. 4 
Oct. 6 
Nov. 22 
Dec. 5 



Jan. 2 
Jan. 14 
Feb. 6 
Mar. 2 
Apr. 24 



! 

Jonathan James 63 Miner Sprig Valley 

Frank Samuelson 1161 " .Gilchrist.... 

William Noble '26; Trapper .... Wanlock.... 

John Wilkes |50] Miner Orch. Mines 

Mathias Sherra 471 " Ladd 

Audi-ew Coushman ... 21 Cager iToluca 

August Carlson 36 Miner Kewanee.... 



Joseph Converse 

John O'Shaughnessy. 

Abel Andreas 

Joseph Dailey 

Andrew Ketchmark.. 



Totals 



Toluca 

Kingston . . . 
Bartonville. 



Pit ear 

Falling of coal ■ 

Trapdoor 

Falling of roof . 



Ascending cage.. 
Descending cage. 



1 Pit cars 

Flying coal 

.. Powder explosion. 

..Flying coal 

10 Falling roof 



Ti 



Total fatal casualities, 12. 



28 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapiiidation of Fatal Casualities — Second District, 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casuality No. 


Colliery. 


No. 




2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 








2 
3 




Gilchrist 

Kewanwee . . . 
Kingston — 
Ladd 


Miners 

Trapper 


10 
1 


Crushed by cage... 
Crushed by pit cars 
Crushed by trap d'r 
Exploding powder. 

Palling coal 

Falling roof 


Chicago MinonkC.C! 1 
Colliers Cooperative! 1 
Devlin Coal Co 2 




J. J. Fleming 




Orch. Mines. 
Spr'g Valley. 
Toliica 


Newsam Bros 

Potter & Sons 

SchoU Bros 




Wanlock! 


Spv'g Valley Coal Co 
Whitebreast Fuel Co. 










12 




1^ 


















Non-Fatal Casualities —Second District, 1899. 



T3 




d 










g 


2 



Character of Injury. 



July 
Aug. 



Sept. 



Michael Smith ... 

Peter Rica 

Mike Latz 

F. Feraro 

E. D. Mormon — 

Ed. Selburg 

Adam Bulkofskie 

Elmer Japper 

14 Lars Hansen 

16 John Raisbeck... 
16 Andrew Hagman. 
17|William McGary. 

18, Henry Crone 

19 J. A. Hoard 

24 

2T 

1 

7 

10 
14 



Wenona 
Toluca.. 



Wm. Townsley. 

Val. Macloski .. 

H. Howard 

Sam Shoppell.. 

Phillip Smith .. 

Joseph Arnold. 
15 Joseph Feraro.. 
19 John Simpson.. 
9John Richards. 
15 J Manda 

18 Wm. Burdett... 

19 P. Buttner 

201 Ralph Colver... 

25| James Rowe 

29iO. Weissenb'rger 

5 John O'Rourke .. 

5 John Rushkuski,. 

6[A. Elline 

14jVal. Beauhart.... 
161 Wallace Hoadley. 

ITtWm Essley 

ITJ.John Liddle 

2»' James Hooks 

23 J. Belsomine 

28 Ole Olson 



41 

38 Kingston 
18 Wolcott 
62 Spr'g Valley 
27 Sherrard ... 

39 Sheffield.... 
60 Spr'g Valley 

32Cable 

17Ladd 

ISMinonk 

36JTo]uca, 



Jan. 



4t Joseph Brocitus.. 

9 Al. Telerir 

10|Wm. Brutcavage. 

13'Martin Blum, 

15,Thos. McCall 

16, D. R. Evans 

21 Joseph Reodo.... 



Spr'g Valley 



Wolcott 

Sherrard ... 

Minonk 

Seatonville.. 
Spr'g Valley 
Seatonville.. 
Spr'g Valley 

Toluca 

Pottstown . . 

Wenona 

Ladd 

Toluca 

Ladd 



Minonk 

Toluca 

Roanoke — 
Sparlaud ... 
Gilchrist.... 
Spr'g Valley 

Toluca 

Coal Valley. 



35 Spr'g Valley 
45Toluca 



Minonk 

Spr'g Valley 

Ladd 

Ladd 

Marquette... 



Foot bruised 

Ankle sprained , 

Ankle bruised , 

Shoulder bruised 

Head bruised 

Leg broken , 

Leg bruised , 

Finger crushed 

Eye destroyed 

Ankle bruised 

Collar bone broken 

Ankle bruised , 

Foot crushed (amputated) 

Leg broken , 

Head bruised 

Collar bone broken , 

Leg broken , 

Leg broken ' , 

Collar Lone broken 

Leg broken 

Shoulder bruised 

Leg bruised , 

Leg bruised , 

Leg broken , 

Leg broken 

Leg broken 

Body bruised , 

Leg broken 

Foot crushed , 

Hand crushed 

Head cut 

Shoulder blade broken . . . , 

Knee crushed 

Body bruised 

Hips bruised 

Foot bruised , 

Arm bruised 

Leg broken 

Leg broken . . 

Leg bruised , 

Finger crushed , 

Foot bruised 

Ankle crushed , 

Finger cut off 

Hand crusbed , 

Jaw broken 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



29 



Non-Fatal Casualties— Seco)i<l District— Concluded. 







*j 






a 












r-, 










rs 


a> 








p 


'" 


« 








C/J 


O 


^ 



(.'harac-ter of Injury. 



Jan 

Feb 



21 1 John Liski 

28'Charles Stank.... 

6]john Coughlin... 

8j Joseph Minnett.. 
" lliFred. Capitani ... 

" ISjJohn Goiigh 

" 17: John Rogratti 

" 17 J. Pryimski 

■' 22:Georg:e Tackes... 

" 24|Wm. Knappe 

" 28[George Stocune.. 
Mar. 3 Hen'y Kolmorgan 

9;John Crane 

9 Louis Tesiro 

" lOThos. Barrowman 
•• 14 Alex. Malovich... 
" 16 Edward Price .... 

•• 21JobnKowatt 

" 24'A. Ueol 

•• 25|Bart. Biami 

" 29 J. Andrews 

" 29iAnd'w Hamilton.. 
•' 3i; Joseph Miller .... 

April 6 John Gribbin 

•• 8;G. Battistello 

8 Chas. Swarting: .. 

" 11 Peter Peach 

•' 18'Wni. McMullen... 
•' 19 George Winchell. 
■■ 19j Frank Shuraulski 
" 27:And'w Peterson.. 
28 Mike Levloski.... 

5, Julius Faneour. .. 

8 Joseph Erbland.. 
•' 91 Joseph McKay ... 

" 12 Emil Lebeau 

" 16jRich"d Albertson. 

•• 20, E. T. Trego 

" 20jThos. Lancaster. 

" 24 Chas. Vickery 

" 25 J. Higgins 

•' 26' B. Franklin 

" 27|W. Newburn 

" 31iWm. Dunaway. .. 

une 7 Jas. Gerard 

■' 20 Chris. Carson.... 
•• 26 J. Pirlilas 



|40|Minonk 

.32 Spr'g Valley 

24- • 

43 

30 

37 

27 



Minonk 

Spr'g Valley 

Ladd 

Ladd 

_. Elmwood.... 

39jToluea 

34 Bartonville . 

45Ladd 

34 Spr'g Valley 
44 Sherrard ... 
23 Spr'g Valley 

20 

54 

46 Kewanee 

23! Spr'g Valley 



May 



Toluca 
Spr'g Valley 

Toluca 

Spr'g Valley 
Marquette .. 

34;Weijoiia 

601 Toluca I 

15 Spr'g V^alley! 

321 •• I 

331 Elmwood.... 

261 •• 

35 Spr'g Valleyl 

35! 

2s; 

28| Roanoke — 

52iMinonk 

28 Wan lock.... 
22 Spr'g Valley 
24 Sherrard .... 
36 

34 Pekin 

18'Seatonville. 
50!Toluca 



Totals 



20l Marquette... 
45iCarbon Cliff 
32|Spr'g Valley 

~" Minonk 

Spr'g Valley 



3 
1 
3 

■•■4 

.... 
5 


4 
2 
4 

.... 

-2 
6 



Body bruised 

Leg broken 

Hand cut 

Ankle bruised 

Leg broken , 

Arm broken 

Hands and neck burned... 

Arm broken 

Leg broken 

Leg crushed (amputated). 

Foot bruised 

Leg broken 

Leg bruised 

Back bruised 

Foot bruised 

Body bruised 

Body bruised 

Body severely injured 

Finger broken : 

Body bruised 

Leg bruised 

Ankle broken 

Arm cut 

Leg broken 

Body bruised 

Hand bruised 

Thumb crushed 

Thigh bruised 

Thigh cut 

Body bruised 

Leg cut 

Leg broken 

Shoulder bruised 

Head cut 

Rack severely injured 

Knee bruised 

Toe crushed 

Leg bruised 

Back bruised 

Leg broken 

.\nkle sprained 

Hand cut 

Finger crushed 

Collar bone broken 

Arms bruised 

Collarbone broken 

Finger cut off 



'■ Still disabled. 





93 


Not recovered June 30. 1899 . . 


10 




83 




3,661 days. 


Average time lost per man recovered .. 


44.1 ■' 







so STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casnalties — Second District, 1899. 



Residence. 



Occupation. 


No. 


Cagers 


1 


Carpenters.... 


1 


Drivers 


10 


Laborers 


3 


Machine men. 


1 


Miners 


66 


Spraggers. ... 


2 


Supt., outside 


1 


Timbermen. . . 


5 


Trackmen — 


1 


Trip riders... 


2 




93 





Cause of Accident, 



Colliery. 



Bartonville... 

Cable 

Carbon Cliff.. 
Coal Valley... 

Elmwood 

Gilchrist 

Kewanee 

Kingston 

Ladd 

Marquette 

Minonk 

Pekin 

Pottstown 

Roanoke 

Spring Valley 
Seatonville.... 

Sheffield 

Sherrard 

Sparland 

Toluca 

Wanlock 

Wenona 

Wolcott 

Totals 



Fire-damp 

Cage , 

Rope 

Tipple 

Falling coal 

Falling rock 

Fell from shaft 
tower 

Pit cars 

Premature blast 
(dynamite) 

Rock car (on sur- 
face) 

Unloading machin 
ery (on surface).. 



Alden Coal Co 

Beharelle & Co 

Chicago & Minonk 

Coal Co 

C. VV. & V. Coal Co.. 
Coal Valley Mining 

Co 

Devlin Coal Co 

Elmwood Coal Co... 

Empire Coal Co 

Bates Bros.' mine... 
Marquette Coal Co.. 
Newsam Bros.' mine 
Patterson's mine — 
Reed City Coal Co... 
Roanoke Mining Co. 
Sheffield Mining Co. 

Silvis'mine 

Spr'g Valley Coal Co 
Wantling & Sons.... 

Wenona Coal Co 

Whitebreast Fuel Co 
Wolschlag's mine... 



Table Showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons In- 
jured, Dependeyits, Time Lo^t, with averages and Pencentages 
Second District, 1899. 





a 


-d 

I 

S 


6 

a 
ic 




Time Lost. 


Per cent 


Nature of Injury. 


Total 
days. 


Average 

days. 


of 
injuries. 


Ankles broken 


I 

7 
2 
3 
3 
9 
5 
1 
6 
3 
4 
1 
4 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
18 
1 
8 
4 
2 
1 
1 


""b" 
1 
3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

8 
...„. 

2 


1 
2 
1 

"h" 

•■"i" 
2 
3 
1 

1 
1 

...... 

10 
1 
4 

..L 

1 
1 








1 07 


Ankles injured 


23 

4 

10 
12 
17 
19 

7 

6 

4 

1 
...... 

'"s" 

3 
1 
J 
35 


211 
90 
62 
80 
262 
220 
50 
230 
80 
85 
200 
170 
45 

20 

30 

210 

1,115 


31.14 

45 

20 66 

26.66 

29 

44 

50 

38.33 

26.66 

21.25 
200 

42.50 

45 

22.25 

20 

30 
105 

62 


7 52 






Arms iniured 


3 23 


Backs iniured ... 


3 23 




9 70 






Eye destroyed 


1 07 


Feet injured. 


6 45 




3 23 


Fingers injured 


4 30 


Foot cut off 


1 07 






Hands and neck burned 


1 07 


Heads injured. 


4 30 


Hips injured 




Jaw broken 


1 07 


Knees injured 


2 15 


Legs broken.. 


19 35 








15 

8 
5 


162 
121 
59 
40 
30 


20.25 

30.25 

29.50 

40 

30 


8.60 




4.30 


Thighs injured 




Thuml) injured 


1 08 


Toe injured 


1 08 






Totals 


ea 


48 


45 


182 


3,661 


43.89 









32 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Bureau County — Second District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




1 
s 


1 

T 
1 

o 

a 
Q 


1 

1 

is 
11 


£ 

o 
d 
2; 

1 
o 


o 

1 


i 

.a 
3 

CO 


1 
3 

o 
a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 
3 
if 


Spring V. Coal Co.. No. 1 
No.2 
No. 3 
Whitebr'ast Fuel Co., "B" 
C.,W.&V. CoalCo..No. 1 
Marquette Coal Co . 


Spring Valley 
Ladil.. 


345 
342 
481 
465 
410 
302 
45 
25 

f. 
40 
40 
147 
150 
200 
148 
15 
?0 
64 


3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 

n 
ii 

1:6 

4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 


2 

2 
2 

6 
6 
6 

6 


Sh. 

SI. 

Sh 


s. 

Ho. 


M. 

*' 
B. 
M. 

B. 

M. 


331. 757 

284.892 

252.810 

195.904 

188.082 

124.629 

18,230 

827 

650 

540 

460 

360 

2.276 

2.234 

'992 

l!610 
914 


271.232 

227. 914 

202.248 

157. 138 

152.508 

116.929 

18.230 

827 

650 

540 

460 

360 

2.276 

2,234 

1,365 

992 

1,992 

1.610 

914 


60, 525 

56.978 
50.562 
38, 766 


5 
6 


Seatonville... 
Marquette 


35, 574 
13,700 


7 
8 


Sheffield Mining Co 

A. J. Higby 


Sheffield 

Princeton .... 




q 


Y. E. Williamson 




in 


John V Duncan 






John Paul 


6 " 




1' 


Peter Duncan. . 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


SI. 

Sh. 




13 


Wm. Smith & Son 




15 
16 
17 


George Heatheock 

Thos. Herrington 




18 


Tucker & McFall 


Neponset... .. 




IP 


Cyrus Riley 












1.410.524 


1.154,419 


256. 105 














.... 

i 








1 






....j.... 











Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 17. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 19. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



33 



Bitrccni Coinifi/, JS!)9 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1. 
o 


a 
o 


£ 


5 ° 




3^ 


Acci- 
dents 






0) 


o 


o 


>a 




s 

1 


a 

a 


1 


■3:r 1" 


1 

3 


^1 










o 
















ftca.s 










1 


S5 

1 


_3 

> . 

is 


i 


Si 

II 


2 
o 


1 

a 

1 


51 

■3 a 
si 


o ^ 


i 

1 


5_a g 


a 

o 


2.H 


i 


1 


z 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<: 


H 


0. 


£ 


Q 


H 


la 


^ 


^1 ^ 


1 


$1 25 


$0 40 


$363,250 


490 


141 


631 


•so 63 


kS-M. 


270 


$266,311 




53 


ll 


15 


?. 


1 25 
1 25 


40 
40 


307,683 
273.034 


454 
433 


149 
112 


603 
545 


63 

63 




271 
242 


242. 79S 




5ll 1 


8 


3 


212,254 




49 




5 


4 


1 U 
103 


39 
20 


189.541 
164, 198 


302 
300 


100 
92 


402 
39-.' 


63 
63 




293 
229 


174, 682 




37 
25 


1 


q 


5 


156, 746 




H 


6 


1 35 


41 


155,371 


237 


151 


3SH 


63 




215 


137.387 


1 40 




3 


7 


1 75 




31.902 


4C 


14 


53 


87.5 


M. 


3(H) 


24.782 


24 12 




1 


« 


1 50 
1 75 
1 65.5 
1 50 
1 62.5 
1 75 
1 75 




1.240 

690 

585 

3.983 

3.909 


3 
4 

2 
3 

5 
5 


1 

1 

1 

1 


4 

6 
3 
4 
2 
6 
6 


87.5 
87.5 
87.5 

1 00 

1 00 


W. 

S-,M. 


150 
100 
180 

too 

120 
160 
170 












9 




25 






10 






11 




3 




A?, 






1.S 








14 


2.713 


80 1 




15 


1 60 





2.184 


4 




6 


80 


• ' 


1.5=1 


1.660 


100 4 






16 


1 75 




1.736 


3 


3 


6 


1 00 


W. 


lOS 


4.000 


64 


2 






r; 


1 50 




2.98* 


4 


1 


5 


75 




240 


1,4:^6 




1 






IK 


1 50 
1 50 




2.415 
1.371 


1 


1 


5 
4 


75 
75 


S-M. 


200 
150 






1 
1 


■'! 




19 






















SI. 507. 768 


2.298 


m 


3.071 








$1,224,779 



368 




2l 






$1 22.4 




$0 37 










$0 63.5 


,. 




























-3 C. R. 



M 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Henrij Count ij— Second District— 1899. 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 30. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 7. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 33. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 






T 

q 


.a 
ft 
Q 


II 

1=2 


1 

6 
Z 

'So 






-3 



t 


In 

e. 

a 
Si 


1 



£ 


^ . 

il 
IS 

'.0 


1 
3 


1 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 Hprdipti noal r.n fir, U 




68 
52 
57 
25 
20 
72 
68 
56 
68 
70 


4 
4 
4 
3.6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3.6 
3.6 
3 

4.6 

4 

2.8 

3.4 

4 

4 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 

1 
3 

1 
1 
6 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 

D. 

Sh 

SI. 
Sh. 
Si. 

Sh. 

SI. 
D. 

SI. 

D. 

Sh. 

SI. 


S. 
Ho. 

s. 

Hd 
Ho. 

k 

Hd 
Ho. 

HO. 


M. 

i 

B. 
M. 


19,693 

7.795 

6,269 

1,153 

222 

6,480 

5,060 

4,448 

3,330 

2,556 

1.782 

1,400 

1,200 

880 

630 

600 

420 

608 

400 

240 

165 

2.266 

1,750 

1,308 

1,650 

970 

320 

9.250 

1,920 
3.320 
1,820 
1,200 
160 


18. 593 
7.445 
6.009 
1,053 
222 
6,280 
4.860 
4,298 
3,330 
2,500 
1,782 
1,400 
1.200 

630 

600 

420 

608 

400 

240 

165 

1,746 

1.400 

1,308 

1.650 

970 

320 

9,250 

1,920 
2,502 
1,820 
1,200 
160 




9 


No. 12 




350 


3 




260 


4 


McKrine & Reed ... 




100 


S 


\. W Murphy 




fi 


Philip H^nrv ;::::::::::: 


Kewaiiee 


200 


7 


Bernard Kirley 


200 


8 


.J. .1. Fleming 


150 


9 


Bates Bros 




rn 


\V. H. Lvle 


56 


11 


Mat Atkinson. 




Vf. 




Atkinson 

Briar Bluff ;:; 

Coal Valley... 

Cambridge ... 
Green River.. 

Geneseo 

Hawley 


40 
32 
55 
35 
40 
30 
20 
25 
60 
30 
40 
30 

45 

130 
32 
30 
30 




13 






14 


H. Kempin 




1.5 






16 


Ralph Todd 




17 


Gray & Son 




18 


Gus T. Schuiz 




19 


Joseph Pyle 




?0 


P. Malone«fc Son 




21 


Thos. Carter & Son 

James Kay 


520 


■>?? 


D. 0. Loy . 


350 


n 






'fi 


Donald & Flynn 




26 
27 

28 


Jeff Glenn 

Timothy Downing 

Stoddard & Summerson, 
Blossomburg. 




29 


John- Summerson, Bios 
somburg 




30 


Fred A. Kenady 


818 


31 






39 


M. Aldrich 




33 


John Rochford 












91,265 


87. 161 


4,104 




Averages 











































COAL IN I1,LIN0IS. 



35 



Hennj CoiDitij, 1899 -Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


ES. 


5 


a 


a 


II 




3"^ 


Acci- 
dents 
















a 


a 


2 




i 


5a 






^1 


^ 


•s 













u 

g 
5 


-a 

i! 


o 

3 


3 


Is 

11 


ft 

a 



1 

1 

1 




II 

a t, 
„ 


a 


> 
"0 




S3 

a 



|6 

3 

.a — 

||. 

Ill 




3 

s 


^ 


<1 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


cu 


X 


Q 


&^ 


w 


'A ^ 


'-c 




$1 20 


$0 40 


$22,751 


18 




45 


$0 80 


M. 


?75 


$17,400 
























80 




300 


6.200 










3 


1 63 


25 


9,859 


14 




16 


80 


S-M. 


300 


6.000 










4 


1 50 


15 


1,604 


3 




4 


80 




1.S0 


1.153 










5 1 50 




333 


2 




3 


75 


' ' 


100 






1 






6' 1 7=; 


95 


11 040 


16 




20 


1 00 




175 


8 51C 










7 


1 75 


25 


8,555 


12 




15 


1 00 




:i53 


7,182 










8 


1 75 


25 


7.558 


11 




12 


1 00 


• ' 


?=i0 


4,760 






1 




9 


1 75 




5,867 
4,389 


10 




1] 


1 00 




99(1 






1 






10 


1 75 


25 


5 




6 


1 00 




950 


3.457 










11 


1 75 




3,118 


4 




5 


1 00 


' ' 


240 


2,100 










1? 


1 75 




2,450 


4 




5 


1 00 




200 






1 






13 


1 75 




2,100 


4 




5 


1 00 




170 


1.300 




1 






14 


1 75 




1,540 


3 




4 


1 00 




18(1 






1 






15 


1 40 




882 


5 




6 


75 


W. 


70 


iri 




1 






1H 


1 75 




1.050 


2 




3 


1 00 




15(1 






1 






17 


1 50 





630 


3 




4 


87.5 




100 












18 


1 50 




912 


2 




2 


1 00 




200 






1 












600 












^'>o 






1 






20 


1 75 




420 


2 




3 


1 00 


" 


85 


280 




1 






',^1 


1 75 




288 


1 




2 


1 00 




85 






1 


. 




22 


2 00 


50 


3,752 


6 




7 


1 25 




200 


2,200 




1 






?3 


2 00 


50 


2,975 


5 




6 


1 25 


' ' 


18(1 


2,300 










24 


2 00 




2,616 


5 




6 


1 25 


S-M. 


220 


1,807 




1 












2,475 
1,455 






5 






175 




72 








?6 


1 50 




3 




3 


75 




165 












?,7 


1 50 




480 


2 




2 


75 


W. 


90 








^ 




29 


1 25 





11,562 


18 


10 


28 


* 55 


S-M. 


175 


7.750 


415 


5 










2,400 
5,427 








* 55 


• • 


150 




50 


J 






30 


1 87.5 


90 


8 


3 


11 


1 12.5 


" 


240 


3.793 


143 








31 


1 62.5 




2.957 


4 


1 


5 


87.5 


W. 


140 


1.120 


30 








32 


1 50 




1.800 


3 


1 


4 


75 


M. 


175 


1.200 


24 








33 


1 25 




200 


1 




1 


75 


W. 


85 


126 







1 










$135,284 


227 


56 


283 






$79. Ill 


734 


24 


1 




$1 53 


$0 47 


t$0 91 




177 




















1 



* Gross -weight. 
+ Per screened ton. 



36 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Marshall County — Second District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




i 

1 


T 
§ 

o 
ft 


1 

1| 
•si 


1 

o 
6 
Z; 
13 
'5 

o 


o 
o 

-a 


13 

a 

OS 

o 

i 

II 

'/3 


1 

3 

o 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

9 


Devlin Coal Co No. 1 

VVenona Coal Co 


Toluca 

Wenona 

Sparland 

Chillocothe... 
Sparland 


512 
555 
164 


2.8 

2.10 

2.6 

3.8 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

4 

3.10 

3.10 

3.08 


2 
2 
2 


Sh. 


s. 

Hd 


M. 
B. 

M. 


229,705 

93,287 

16,601 

1,252 

288 

200 

150 

125 

420 

250 

200 

100 


194,332 
70, 170 
14,879 
940 
288 
200 
150 
125 
420 
250 
200 
100 


35,373 
23. 117 


3 


Marquette Coal Co 


1,722 
312 


5 


Robert Ingram 




6 


George Chrisman 








7 










8 


Bernard Lanning 


• ' 






q 


.James Medearis 


Henry 






in 


William Horrocks 

William Bough . .. 








11 


' • 






^'> 


•Joseph Caley 










Totals 










342,578 


282,054 


60,524 













































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 14. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 12. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



MarshaU Countij, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 

1 
II 

-0.2 

in 


5 
§ 

a 
1 

P 


a 



1 


> 

1 

1 


Total wages paid during 
Ibe year to all employes 
excepting oflSee help. 


•6 

3 

1 

a 


1 


|l 

a 
11. 

aia 


Acci- 
dents 


1 

a 


o a> 

1 


O 

o 

0) 

1 

< 


o 

H 

< 


1 

a a 

si 
ra 

< 




P. 




"S 

a 


"s 
ts 

&, 


3 

§ 
2; 


1 

2 
3 
4 


,,25 

li 
1 20 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 

ill 

1 25 


$0 40 
46 
43 
50 

:::::;:: 


$257,064 

100,451 

20.038 

1,284 

360 

250 

187 

156 

525 

312 

250 

125 


346 

140 
35 
3 
•i 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


87 
50 
10 


433 
190 

1 


$0 63 
63 
63 

75 
75 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 


S-M. 
W. 


303 

257 
295 
300 
180 
120 
100 
100 
150 
100 
100 
50 


204,631 

29.416 

15,917 

704 


453 
2 

52 
10 
3 
3 

1 
7 
6 
7 


40 
18 
4 


2 


15 
3 
1 


«; 








fi 










7 










8 










9 






■■| 


in 










11 


125........ 

1 50 










1?, 


















2 








S38O.808 


534 


147 


681 








$250,668 


544 


62 






$1 26 SO 42 


$0 63 




171 




























38 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Mercer County — Second District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

3 


1 

§ 


D. 


1 

^ 


1 

6 

"^ 

'S 











1 


q 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

9 


CoalValley No. 1 

Coal Val'y Min'g C0..N0. 2 
Camp Creek Coal Co 


Sherrard 

Cable 


203 
60 
70 
H7 
36 


3.S 

2.6 
4.6 

2.6 




Sh. 

i 

D. 


S, 

Ho. 
Hd. 

H. 


?: 


167.089 

84. 374 

1,670 

1,540 

1,294 

472 

125,664 

96, 630 

3,270 

2,450 

2,000 

3,242 

2,026 

2,960 

630 

1.000 

280 


113,376 53,713 
57, 784 26. 590 


3 




1,160 
1,540 
1,294 

472 
82,002 
68, 370 
3,270 
2,400 
2.000 
3.242 
2,026 
2,960 

590 
1,000 

280 


510 








5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 


B B Peterson 


• ' 










Alden Coal Co 


Wanlock 

Gilchrist 

Preeraption .. 

Laoc ;.' 


135 
100 
60 
60 
48 
60 
40 
35 


43, 662 


Empire Coal Co. 


28, 260 






Peter Docherty 


50 


William Penman 






1-? 


W. P. Williams 


Hd. 


M. 
B_. 

M. 




1? 


G. W.Martin 






11 


Griffin Clay Mfg Co 

Peterson & Young 

Henry Cameron 


Griffin. 




15 




'^6 1 


40 


Ifi 


Violla 


30 


2.6 


1 
1 




17 




Millersburg .. 












496, 591 


343,766 152.825 










































1 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 17. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 2. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899,17. 



Peoria County — Second District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 




=4-1 


1, 

a « 


a 
1 

1 

'a 

1 

1 



13 




CO 


a 



I 


il 


13 

1 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
•> 


Newsam Bros., Kingston. 

" Star 

Newsam Bros., Hanna 
City 


Peoria 

Plona . 


18 
13 

25 
8 
10 
15 
10 
7 


3 4. 
3 4. 

1 4! 
) 4. 
) 4. 

4.' 


4 5 

2 5 

2 5 
1 5 
1 5 
1 5 

I 5 
I 5 
I 5 
I 5 
I 5 


SI. 
Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 

D. 
Sh. 


s. 
s. 

h; 


B. 


109.438 
41,226 

30.708 
76,300 
24,081 
56,667 
30, 172 
25,865 
17,580 
7.260 
2,620 


72,958 
29, 484 

21,472 

57.200 
22,800 
42,936 
21.057 
19,325 
17,580 
7,260 
2,620 


36,480- 
11,742 


3 


Peoria 


9, 236 


4 
5 
6 

7 


SchollBros.,No. 3 

" No. 1 

Wolschlag Coop. Coal Co 


19. 100 
1.281 

13.731 
9.115 


8 
q 


Royster & Zeigler 

Vicary Bros 


6.540' 


10 


P. p. Schmidt & Sons.... 
Ed. Mohn & Bro 








11 




13( 





COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



39 



Mei'cer Couniij, 1899— Conc\\x(\ed. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 



a 


ri 


^1 


'II 


Acci- 
dents 














i 

II 


a 
a 
- . 

a u 


> 

a 



lid 
a :^ 

!li 

III 






1 

a 

3 


p. • 

aS 

?! 

OS'S 

i! 


.a 
o 
o 

> . 

P 




3 

|« 

^0 


11 

II 




a 
S 

a; 



a 

a 




i 

1 



u 

a 

i 

S a; a 


1 


"a 

1 
a 


z 


<i 


< 


< 


< 


< 


^ 


0^ 


Du, 


^ 


e 


a 


Z 


=^ 


S5 


1 


$01 50 $0 87.5 


217. 0o3 


125 


103 


228 


$0 50* 


M. 


,.,« 


S135.489 


6,924] 25' 


5 


2 


15C 


1 00 


113. 26§ 


68 


92 


160 


60* 




175 


69.372 


2,216 14 


.. 1 


;^ 


1 2C 


50 


1.647 


12 


6 


18 


55* 


' ' 


55 


1,500 


80 1 3 




4 


1 5C 




2.310 


4 


1 


5 


75 






1.455 


65 1 




5 


I 5C 




1,941 


3 


1 


4 


75 




210 


1,262 


60! 1 




K 


1 50 
1 10 


■■■■56" 


708 
112.033 


1 
125 


■■■■39 


1 
164 


75 
45* 


S-M. 


220 

275 




15 

6. 288: 20 




7 


78,913 


. .. 
1 1 


8 


1 10 50 


89,337 


90 


73 


163 


45* 




246 


71,359 


4,0371 30 


1 1 


9 


1 00 





3.270 


5 


2 


7 


65 




^=.(1 




200 


....... 


10 


1 00 


50 


2.425 


5 




6 


65 


' ' 


180 




100! 1 




n 


1 00 




2,000 


4 




5 


65 




?.m 




100 1 


..1 


1? 


1 25 




4,052 


6 




7 


75 


' ' 


?m 




170 1 


..1 


i;^ 


1 25 




2,532 


4 




5 


75 


W. 


250 


1,331 


102 1 


..1 


14 


1 50 




4,440 


6 




7 


90 


M. 


250 


2. 66 J 


1 


..| 


15 


1 50 


25 


895 


3 




4 


1 00 


VV. 


106 


697 


15 1 




It! 


1 00 




1,000 


3 




4 


65 




125 




25 1 






1 50 




420 


2 






1 00 




100 




1 


















$558,839 


466 


324 


790 






S364, 012 


20.397, 101 


2 8 




$1 31 


$0 71 


t 
$0 47 7 


189 














1 1 





* Gross weight. 

t Averse for 475,427 gross tons. 

Average for 21. 161 screened tons. 74 cents per ton. 



Peoria Coimfy, 1899. — Continued. 









$0 90 


SO 25 


1 00 


35 


1 on 


35 


8.5 


30 


K5 


30 


75 


30 


R5 


20 


8(1 


20 


95 





1 0(1 




1 CO 





24.704 
54.350 
19.764 
36.321 
19.721 
16, 768 
16.701 
7,260 





• 










o 












■J- 


S 






g 


a 










!- ^n 




^■2 






~ © 






K 


c if 

a« 






O CS 








0-, 


a* 



1.30 


«» 


S-M. 


58 


45 




42 


45 




76 


45 




;w 


45 




49 


45 


M. 


35 


45 


S-M. 


39 


45 


' ■ 


25 


45 




12 


69 


" 


5 


69 





$69,924; 2.8fi4i 
28,608 1,557 



22.203 1.409 
41.965 3.08:^ 



1 I 

61 i; 



14.836, 
36.041 
14. 400 
14.80! 
11.950 
5.133 



935 

2.870 

1.251 

1.000 

700 

41S 

145, 



40 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Peoria County, 1899 — Concluded. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


£ 


1 
s 

p. 


1 

11 

°£ 


6 

§ 
1 
1 


^^ 






1 


II 

CO 


1 


n 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


12 Martin ,«. f-anp, 






4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.2 
4.4 
4.4 
4.4 
4.4 
4.4 
4.2 
4.4 
4.2 
4.4 
2.8 
4.6 
2.6 
4.3 
4.3 
4.6 
4.6 
4.3 
4 3 


5 
5 

I 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
2 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

I 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


D. 


Hd 
Ho. 
Hd 


B, 

M. 

M. 
B. 

M. 
B. 

M. 

B. 
M. 

B. 


1,820 

1.600 

1,464 

1.402 

1.284 

1,274 

1,200 

850 

720 

702 

3^892 

16, 984 

12,894 

8,390 

6.164 

5,666 

3,468 

1.120 

1.000 

53, 182 

36, 396 

34.430 

720 

660 

14.000 

13,8.58 

1.700 

1.000 

640 

615 

700 

480 

25.600 

10.000 

2.290 

8.365 

4,095 

1.084 

600 

600 

500 

2,512 

1,800 

1.000 

640 

620 

600 

200 


1.820 

1.600 

1,464 

1.402 

1,284 

1,274 

1,200 

850 

720 

702 

35, 192 

16.984 

12. 174 

7,940 

5,624 

5,666 

3.218 

1.120 

1.000 

48, 760 

26.300 

32. 120 

720 

660 

8,000 

10,666 

1,700 

1,000 

640 

615 

700 

480 

20. 600 

6.332 

2.290 

8,165 

4,095 

1,084 

600 

600 

500 

2.512 

1.800 

1.000 

640 

620 

600 

200 




13 
14 
15 
16 

11 


Richard Cody 




55 




.Tohii Birdois 








.'.'.'. 




Joos & Rumpel 

Fred Martin 




Sr-.hneider * Knnis 




19!Oook Bros. .. .... 








•^0 


James Lane 

John J. Saupe 

Collier Coop. Coal Co 

Bartonville Coal Co 








■>! 


•• :::::::::::: 


• • 1 • • 




i 

^4 


Bartonville... 
i ". 

•• 

Elmwood 

Woleott 

Pottstown .... 

Mapleton .'.'.'.'. 
Edwards . 


180 
100 
9b 

m 

215 
90 
112 

"80 
100 
32 


SI. 

^.- 

SI. 
D. 
Sh. 
D. 

Sh. 
SI. 
Sh. 

p. 

SI. 

Sh. 

D. 
Sh. 

D. 

Sh. 


^: 

M. 

S. 
Ho 

S. 
Hd 

S. 

Hd 

S. 

Ho. 
Ho. 

S, 

Ho. 

S. 
Ho. 


700 
720 


25 
26 
?7 


Wolland Bros 

Joseph Scholl &Sons.... 
White Coal Co 


450 
540 


28 
29 
30 


Geo. Keller & Sons 

Ed. Brown 


250 


31 
32 
33 


Elmwood Coal Co 

Ree.i City Coal Co 

Wantling& Son 


4.422 
10.096 
2.310 


S=i 


James Sleith 




36 


W. E. Foley 


6,000 


37 

H8 


German Coiip. Coal Co... 
L. Potter & Son 


3,192 


3<) 


R. Shreffler 




40 
41 
42 


A. Beharelle & Co 

D. B. Roberts '.'.'.'.'.'..'. 


160 2.6 

....1 4.3 
....1 4,6 
.... 4 6 




44 


C. B. Kramm & Son 

Howarth & Taylor Bros.. 
Mike Cu«ack 





4.2 
4.2 
4.2 


5,000 


45 
46 


Kramm 




3,668 


47 


Siebold Reents 

Jefford Bros 


4 2; 5 


266 


48 
44 


Kingston 

Princeyille ... 

Monica 

Duncan 

Chillicothe ... 
Brimfield 


"70 


4.6 
4 6 


5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 




50 


Robert Taylor & Sons.... 
W. G. Saunders. 


20 
70 
35 
30 
30 
40 
20 
40 
22 
50 


4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
3.6 
4.2 
4.6 
4.3 
4.6 




5'' 






53 
"14 


Martin Armentrout 

.Joseph ' 'rew 




55 


Phillip Tully 




56 


J. I. Aby 

John Jurdon 




57 


Trivoli 

Kickapoc 

Jubilee 




58 


W. H. Poole 




59 








Totals .. 






744.698 


599.925 


144. 773 



































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 61. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 6. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 8. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 59. 

*Both. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



41 



Peoria County, 18!)9. — Concluded. 



Values. 



as 



Si o 



Ot3 



9 « 

I i 

3 S 

O ^ =H 

il I 



. P.O. 



'Acci- 
dents 



$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

85 
1 00 . 
1 00 
1 00 

85 
1 00 . 
1 00 
1 00 . 

i 00 . 

1 30 

851 
1 lOi 
1 00 . 
1 00 . 



1 00 
1 00 
1 10 
85 
1 00 
1 00 



1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 
1 00 
1 50 
1 00 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 25 



$1,820 
1.600 
1,464 
1,402 
1.284 
1,2741 
l,200i 
8501 
720 
702! 
30,088 
16, 984 i 
12,3901 
8,007 
4,942 
5, 666 



1.120 

1,000 

65,377 

27,403 

36,371 

720 

660 

9,000 

9,701 

1,700 

1,000 

704 

522 

700 

4801 

18,0101 

7, 9821 

1,946 

6,562 

5.118 

1,626 



500 

3, 

1, 

1,500 
960 
930 
750 
250 



19 4 

i 1 

51 2 
5 1 
3 



S-M. 



45 

62.5 

45 

62.5 

45 



45 

75 

75 

62.5 

62.5 

75 

60 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 



S-M. 
W. 

S-M. 

W. 
S-M. 



W. 

S-M. 



112 

83 
70 
65 
60 
55 
50 
45 
34 
35 
1,754 
1,000 
645 
400 
3>2 
328 
120 
55 
40 



1,345 

476 



5,500 
"i'266 



2,010 
160 
38 
35 
2.000 
523 
80 
45 
23 
41 
25 
20 
9S0 
570 
130 
450 
248 
40 



2,540 
1,080 



* Average for gross tons: average price paid for 41,346 screened tons, 70 cents per ton; 
price paid for 64. 718 tons cut by machine, 27 cents per ton. 



42 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Bock Island County — Second District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




g 
3 


T 

1 

o 

.d 
p. 

Q 


1 

Is 

a a 


a 


6 

i 
S 

C5 




ft 
© 


.a 


la 
02 


1 


a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


John J. Pryce.Old Mine. 
No 1 


Coal Valley... 
Loding '.'.'. 


40 
25 

50 

80 

85 

"35 
30 
30 
50 
50 
40 
67 


3.6 

3.6 

3.6 
3.6 

3.6 
3.6 

3.6 
3 6 




SI. 
Sh. 

i 

SI- 
Sh. 

D. 

Sh. 
D. 

Sh. 


s. 
s. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 
S- 
Ho. 


B. 
M. 

M. 
B. 
M. 


4,970 

4.065 

2.580 

1,298 

1,040 

720 

520 

440 

260 

160 

6,502 

2.650 

1,496 

160 

6,570 

1,120 

480 

2,960 

1.200 

1.156 

500 

450 

300 


4.970 

4,065 

2,240 

1.298 

1.040 

720 

520 

440 

260 

160 

6,214 

2,500 

1.096 

160 

5,070 

1,120 

480 

2,820 

1,200 

1,156 

500 

450 

300 




2 


John J.Pryce, New Mine, 
No. 2 




3 


Black Diamond Coal Co.. 


340 


4 


James Sackville 




5 
6 

7 
8 


W. E. Wynn & Co 

Robert Summerson 

John r. Patterson 

Douglas Gregg' 




9 






in 


Jonathan Linsley. . .. 




11 


John Hynd 


288 


12 
1' 


Jamieson & Allison 

Loding Bros 


150 
409 


14 


B. G. Jamieson. 




I'l 


Sharp Silvis 


Carhon_Cliff.. 
Milam '.'. 


35 
60 

■■53 
48 
56 
70 
40 


S8 1 


1,500 


16 


Stone Bros 


3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
1.8 






17 


Froth e Bros. 




IS 


William Parker 


140 


1*> 


David Walsh 






''0 


Guckert Bros 


Hamptom .... 
Muscatine.'la! 




21 

99 


Fred Vonach 

Chas. Kleaver 




23 


Hayes Coal Co 


100 




Totals 






41.597 


38,679 


2,918 
























' 























Whole number of openings reported in 1898,20. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 6. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899,23. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



43 



Rock Island County, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 
1 

il 

as 

-c.a 

II 

a. 


a 
o 
3 

11 

3— . 


d 
o 

■cS 
1 

o 

i 

1 


to o o 

!i 


-73 

en 

1 


3^ 


Acci- 
dents 


a 

D 


<S>X3 

1 


0) 

■B 

o 
o 
_2 

> . 

II 

< 


o 

i 

< 


o 

■6 

•si 

if 

Si 
2. a 

< 


>> 

_o 

"E 

g 

<D 

O 
< 


2 
a 

S 


^1 

a a" 

3 (US 


■^ 

2 


1 

o 




$1 50 

1 50 

1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 40 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 75 


so 50 

'.hh 

.75 
.40 

^40 

no'vaV. 

'""iioo 


7.455 

6.097 

3,530 

1.947 

1.560 

1.080 

780 

660 

390 

240 

9.493 

3.862 

1.804 

240 

7,698 

1.680 

720 

4.230 

1.800 

1,734 

750 

675 

450 


13 

12 

6 
5 
4 

4 

i 

15 
5 
6 
3 

13 
4 
5 
7 
5 
3 
3 
2 
3 


3 

3 

1 
1 

1 

i 

i 

2 

1 

f 

i 

1 
1 
I 

1 


16 

15 

7 
6 
5 

5 
2 
2 
1 

16 
7 
7 
3 

16 
5 
5 
8 
6 
4 
4 
3 
4 


$0 75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

87.5 

87.5 

87.5 

87.5 

75 

87.5 

87.5 

3f 

87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 


w. 

S;M. 
S;M. 


200 

144 

150 
158 
155 
190 

70 
140 

80 
120 
208 
150 
120 

40 
275 
165 
100 
210 
200 
140 
180 
120 

50 


5.400 
4,651 
3,146 


200 

180 

85 
75 
50 
37 








., 








■A 








4 








5 






6 






7 










8 








f> 




12 

6 
320 
100 
109 
6 
195 
32 
18 
185 
50 
1 
16 




in 




■■| 


11 




•• 




I"* 






13 


i.i26 






14 






15 

Ifi 


4,861 




•• 




17 






18 










19 






- 




20 
21 


1,140 
500 




?.^ 




30 
















$59. 032 


125 


24 


149 






S20,824 


1,707 


16 


2 




SI 49 


$0 48 


SO 79 




151 























44 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Stark County — Second District — 1899. 



g 

1 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Outfit. 


1 

o 
o 

1 


1 

|s 
it 

11 
II 


g 

o 
d 
2; 

Is 

1 
o 
O 


o 
m 


■=* : 
o \ 

£ : 

o . 

u 


T3 

1 

% 
3 

O 

-a 
g 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Ton 

of 

other 

grades 


1 


George R. Watson 

James Higbie . .. 


Wyoming 

Modena 

Bradford ! ! ! ! ! 

Toulon..!!!!!! 

Elmira!!!!!!!! 
West Jersey.. 
Lombardville. 

Lafayette 

Castleton 


73 
45 
70 
20 

"56 
65 
60 
40 
50 
104 
138 
117 
60 
60 
45 

130 
30 

82 


4.6 

4.6 
4.6 

4.8 
4.6 

4.8 

4.3 

5 

4.6 

3.6 

5 


6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

I 
t 

6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 


Sh, 

k 

D. 

Sh. 


Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 


M. 
B. 

M. 


2,922 

2,446 

1,534 

460 

320 

240 

1,200 

950 

436 

295 

1,814 

900 

880 

1,800 

80 

2.680 

1.558 

1,272 

1,200 

1.010 


2,722 

2,446 

J, 334 

460 

320 

240 

1,000 

950 

436 

295 

1.814 

900 

880 

1,800 

80 

2,480 

1,558 

1,272 

1,200 

960 


200 


3 


Higbie & Robinson 


200 


5 


John Thurston 




6 

7 


Stephenson & Watson... 
Jesse Saville 


200 


8 


John Scott 




9 






in 






11 

13 


French & Peterson 

Charles Montooth 




14 


Henry Storey 




15 






Ifi 


J. M. Robinson 


200 


17 


John Catton 




18 






19 


John Leitch 




''n 


Bever Bros . 


50 




Totals 






23.997 


23, 147 


850 




Averages 






























""\" ' 











* Both. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 23. 

Number of new mines opened during the year, 1. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 4. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 20. 



C:OAL IN ILLINOIS. 



45 



Stark Countij, 1890 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


ES. 


1 

a 


J 


, 


■11 




II 


Acci- 
dents 
















I 
It 


11 


1 
o 

(E 

1 

O 

«8 


'11 

iil 


o 


as 

;l 

II 

•s? 
Ill 




1 
3 


p, • 

i 


1 

o 

1 


o 


1 


1 
p. 

2 

.a 


i 

o 

g 

o 




1 


2; 


<; 


< 


< 


<! 


< 


&H 


Dh 


Oh 


P 


H 


M 


Z j:^ 


2: 


1 


$1 25 




$3,402 


5 




6 


SO 75 


KM 


220 




15 


1 
1.. 




? 


125 
150 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 




3,057 

2,001 

575 

400 

360 


6 
5 
3 
1 
2 


• 


7 
6 
3 
1 
3 


75 
75 
75 




210 
160 
125 
155 

ion 




30 

27 


1 •• 




8 






4 




3' 1 




5 






■■ 




6 




3 




7 


1 25 




1,250 


3 




4 


75 




7m 




75 ll.. 




8 


1 25 




1,187 


4 




5 


75 


w. 


170 


S825 


17 1.. 




9 


1 25 




545 


3 




4 


75 




120 


327 


15 


1 .. 




11) 


1 25 




36S 


2 




2 


75 




100 




5 


1 •• 




11 


1 50 




2.721 


4 




5 


87.5 


' ' 


;^30 




120 


1 .. 




1? 


1 50 
1 50 




1.350 
1,320 


3 
3 




4 
4 


87.5 
87.5 




190 
180 




15 


1 •• 
1 .. 




13 






14 


1 25 




2,250 


4 




5 


75 


S-M 


^00 




25 


1 .. 




15 


1 25 
1 25 




100 
3.100 


1 
5 





1 
6 


75 
75 




70 
300 




3 

15 






16 






1 






IS 


1 50 




2:337 


3 




3 


75 


' ' 


265 




30 








17 


1 75 
125 
150 


■"$6'56 


2,226 
1,500 
1.465 


5 
2 
3 




6 
3 
4 


1 00 

75 
75 


" 


165 
260 
284 




80 


2 

1 
1 


11 




1f» 







20 


544 


10 











$31,905 


67 




82 






$1,696 


606 


17 






$1 36 


$0 50 










$0 78 




185 

































46 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 





Woodford County- 


-Second District 


— i859. 








Name of Operator. 


Postoflace. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 


T 
I 

Q 


1 

11 


o 
6 

1 

'51 

1 


o 

02 


n3 

a 
.a 
o 

o 

II 


1 

a! 

O 

a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Chicago & Minonk Coal 


Minonk 

Roanake 


552 
480 


2.8 
2.6 


2 
2 


Sh. 


S. 


M. 


101.000 
73.750 


80,000 
60,480 


21,000 


2 


Roanke Mining Co 

Totals 


13.270 




174,750 


140,480 


34,270 











































I 



Whole number of openings reported in 1998, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



47 



Woodford Count//, 1S09 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1, 
o 


a 


a 


li 






Acci- 
dents 
















2 


a 
a 

II 


o 
o 
1 

X 


tc o o 

Is « a 

o5 0) 


'6 

u 

1 

i 


a^ 
i° 

o a 

LI. 

iia 




1 

B 

3 


II 

o a> 

(OJS 

h 


1 

o 

1. 

f. Sad 


o 

n 

i 
II 


o 

II 

^ 

|i 
la 


1 

a 

I 


o 

■s 
a 

3 

o 


1 


"5 

H 

o 


2; 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<i 


H 


^ 


04 


O 


H 


M 


>5 


fe 


z 


1 


$1 20 


$0 50 


$106,500 


175 


78 


253 


$0 63 


S-M. 


26,5 


$99, 600 


50 


25 


1 


8 


2 


1 25 


20 


78,254 


155 


34 


189 


63 




212 


63.727 


7 


11 


1 


2 








$184,408 


330 


112 


442 






$163,327 


57 


36 


10 




$1 22 


$0 38 


$0 63 




238 








■■■■| 
















48 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 


Counties. 


1 

o 

a 
3 


a 

a 

a 

Q 

a 


1 
1 

a 


a 

z 


i 
§ 

X! 
<1 


1 

1 

p. 

1 


§ 

g 

o 

a 


o 
o 


i 

p. 

3 
a 


11 


IS 

Sa 


11 

|p. 

m 

< 


Bureau 

Henry 

Marshall 

Mercer 

Peoria 

Rock Island.. 
Stark 


19 
33 
12 
17 

59 
23 
20 
2 
185 


7 
3 
3 
5 

23 
2 

2 

45 


12 
30 
9 
12 
36 
21 
20 

140 


7 
1 
2 
6 
6 

25 


3 
2 
8 
3 
4 

24 


1,410.524 
91.265 
342.578 
496, 591 
744,698 
41,597 
23,997 
174, 750 


1,154,419 
87,161 
282,054 
343,766 
599,925 
38,679 
23,147 
140,480 


256, 105 

4,104 

60,524 

152,825 

144, 773 

2,918 

850 

34, 270 


1,324,664 
28, 473 
317,060 
452, 515 
606,047 
2,633 


39,929 
3,412 
7,276 
15,623 
18,099 
1,165 
860 
9,900 


$1 22.4 
1 53 
1 26 
1 31 

94.5 
1 49 
136 
1 22 


$0 37 
47 
42 
71 
30 
48 
50 


Woodford .... 


145. 750 


38 


Totals 


3,326,000 


2,669,631 


656 369| 2.877.142 


96, 264 
















Averages. 












$1 19.1 


$0 44 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 184. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 25. 
Number of mine s exhausted or abandoned during the year. 24. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 185. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



49 



Second District, 189!). 









1 tJ 


(- tjt 


bl r- 


S l-CT! 










Employ 


ES. 


i 


ft.S 
.9 

-as 




1 


«.5 


Casualties 


Machines. 


o • 




a 








2 'S 


^ 


3 • 
^1 


a 


O 


Ml 


2a 

H 


^1 


22 = 


1 

" 

^ 








s|i| 

«m3 - 





-2 2 


o 


c 


C. 


39 





i.^ 


'% 


»^s 






g >« 
2, 


ii 


ei a 




U Ti 






a>-« 


^Z^ 


•ru 


f" ■r''^ 
































































a 


as 


CS 




"? 


5^S 


a'i^ 


a^^ 









a ^ 


si 


6£« 








f>«S 


(>M 


















< 


12; 


2i 


H 


•4 


<! 


tH 


z 


S5 


W 


- 


/5 


:i5 


&H 


$1,507,768 


?. 998 


773 


3.071 


192 


.$0 63.5 


.$1,224,779 


368 


284 


2 


44 








135, 284 


?.?.! 


56 


283 


177 


*0 91 


b 79,111 


734 


24 


1 


1 








388.808 


,534 


147 


681 


171 


63 


c 250.668 


544 


62 




19 








558,839 


466 


324 


790 


189 


to 47.68 


d 364.042 


20. 397 


101 


2 


8 








609.929 


873 


260 


1,133 


» 


to 48.6 


e 404.010 


29. 045 


105 


4 


9 


2 


9 


§64.718 


59.032 


1^5 


24 


149 151 


79 


f 20.824 


1.707! 16 




2 








31. 905 


67 


15 


1 

821 185 


78 


a: 1.696 


i 
606 17 












1S4, 408 


330 


112 


442' 238 


63 


163.327 


57 36 


1 


10 


.... 






S3. 475. 973 


4.920 


1,711 


6.631 




S2. 508. 457 


' 

53.45S Glj 


12 


93; 2 9 


64. 718 


i 






181.5 


tSO 57.7 








......L... .... 




i 








i ' 1 1 1 i 



* Screened tons; gross tons, 55 cents per ton. 

t Gross tons. . 

g Price paid for machine mining, 27 cents per ton. 

a No report from 8 mines. 

b No report from 12 mines. 

c No report from 8 mines. 

d Xo report from 7 mines. 

e No report from 36 mines. 

f No report from 16 mines. 

S No report from 17 mines. 



4 C. R. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



51 



THIRD INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: Brown, Fulton, Hancock, Knox, McDonough, Schuyler, Warren. 
John W. Graham, Inspector, Canton. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois. 

Sir:— In compliance with section 12 of the mining law of the State of Illi- 
nois, I have the honor to submit the sixteenth annual report of the Third 
Inspection District for the year ended June 30, 1899. 

The following is a summary of the report as taken from the statistical 
tables: 



Counties producing: coal 

Total number of mines 

Number of shipping: mines 

Number of local mines 

Total tons of coal produced 

Total tons of lump 

Total tons of other grades 

Total tons shipped 

Total tons consumed at mine 

Total tons sold to local trade 

Average value of lump at mine 

Average value of other grades 

Aggregate value of total product 

Number of miners 

Number of other employes, including boys 

Total number of employ<§s 

Average number of days of active operation 

Number of kegs of powder used 

Average price paid for hand mining, gross , 

Average price paid for hand mining' screened. ... 

Number of fatal accidents 

Number of non-fatal accidents 

Tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 

Tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 

Number of employes to each non-fatal accident .. 



729, 132 

600.280 

128.852 

561.664 

17,497 

149.9a 

SI. 072 

0.413 

8696,505 

1,415 

384 

1,799 

146.3 

23,112 

S9.475 

0.894 

4 

17 

182.283 

42.890 

450 

106 



This report shows a small increase in tonnage over last year; Fulton county 
has an increase of 37,687 tons; also, Brown and Warren counties have a slight 



52 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



increase; the counties of Hancock, Knox, McDonough and Schuyler show a 
combined loss of 32,926 tons. The increase and decrease, by counties, is 
shown in the following^ table: 



Total Output, all 
Grades— Tons. 



Brown 

Pulton 

Hancock 

Knox 

McDonough 

Schuyler 

Warren 



Totals , 



1,940 
563,897 

5,600 
49.819 
77, 696 
11.149 
12,245 



721,846 



501,084 
5.498 
43,214 
51,494 
11,132 
14, 



729, 132 



6,605 

26,202 

17 



In^irease . 

Decrease 



40,212- 
32,926 



Net increase 



New Mines.— The Jarvis Coal Co., of Astoria, Fulton county, has sunk a 
new mine at that place for shipping purposes. The coal is about 6 feet in 
thickness and of the No. 5 seam; the company now employ about 30 men,, 
but will employ more as soon as the mine gets opened up. 

J. M. Laws, ol: Cuba, Falton county, is openima: a hew mine three miles 
east of Canton, on the T., P. & W. R. R., and will ship coal this fall. This 
is the No. 5 seam and the coal is about 4 feet 6 inches thick. 

Howat Bros., Canton, Fulton county, have sunk a new shaft at that place to- 
supply the local trade. 

The Quincy Coal Co., Colchester, McDonough county, has sunk a new shaft 
at that place, which is now in operation. 

The Colchester Coal and Mining Co., Colchester, McDonough county, is 
also sinking a new shaft to replace the old one, which is worked out. 

Abandoned Mines. — There are a great many small mines abandoned in this 
district every year, and new ones opened. The Carbon Coal Company's mine, 
St. David, Fulton county, is now abandoned, and the company has gone out 
of the coal business. The Norris Coal Co., Fulton county, has also abandon- 
ed its mine and gone out of the business. The mine at Bryant, Fulton 
county, still remains closed. It has not been worked for over four years. 
The company keeps the water pumped out and the mine otherwise in repair. 

Labor Troubles. — There has been very little ti'ouble between the miners and 
operators in this district during the year. The only trouble that caused a loss 
of time was at Breeds, in Fulton county. The miners working for P. W. 
Meehan, on the 5th of March, made a demand to be paid by gross weight. 
Mr. Meehan stated that he could not do so unless he could get a new lease 
from the owner of the land and build a new dump. The men still demanded 
gross weight; in consequence the mine was shut down and remained closed 
until July. Since then a new dump has been built and the mine opened up,, 
and gross weight paid for mining. About 25 men were idle 90 days. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 53 

3Iine Fires. — On the morning' of August 20, 1898, the boiler house at the 
Whitebreast Fuel Company's mine, Dunfermline, Fulton county, was dis- 
covered to be on fire. With hard fighting the fire was confined to tbe boiler 
room, which was entirely destroyed, together with the boiler fittings. A new 
boiler room has been built of fire proof material. 

Improcements. — The Farmington Coal Company, Farmington, Fulton county, 
has put in an electric plant at its mine to run two mining machines, also to 
light up their shaft bottom and entry roads. The company also put in two 
new boilers to run their electric plant. The machines in use at their mine 
are the Link-belt chain-cutter, and appear to give good satisfaction. 

Accidents. — The following is a detailed account of the fatal accidents that 
have taken place in this district during the year: 

August 8, 1898, John DeBow, miner, aged IM years, married, leaves a wid- 
ow, was found dead in C. P. Wager's mine, three miles west of Etherlej', 
Knox county, on the morning of the above date. Andrew DeBow, a brother, 
a,ud the deceased worked together in the mine. The deceased went to work 
in the morning and was followed by his brother about thirty minutes after- 
wards. When the brother went to the mine he could not find the deceased, 
and after looking for some time, returned to the house and got more help to 
look for him. After searching for some time they discovered an opening 
into an old mine that had been closed up because it was on fire. He was 
found in this mine dead. Apparently he had opened up this old mine to see 
if the fire was out, and had gone in and was smothered by the gas be- 
fore he could get out. This mine had been closed since last April. 

September 15, 1898, George Wynn, a miner, aged 46 years, married, leaves 
a widow and five children. While working in the Sunday Creek Coal Com- 
pany's mine. Middle Grove, was injured by a fall of slate, from the effects of 
which he died in about two hours. The deceased, with his son, went to work 
at the usual time, 7 o'clock a. m. There was about 6 inches of draw slate in 
his room that he wanted to take down, but wanted to load his car before tak- 
ing it down. The mine manager had told him to take it down the daj' before 
but he had not done so. This morning David McKinley, a miner, who worked 
in the next place, was there and wanted him to take the slate down, but he 
said he would load his car first. McKinley went to his own room and in a 
short time heard the deceased's son call out. On going to see what was the 
trouble, he found Wynn under the slate, which had fallen on him. He was 
taken out as soon as possible and was found to be hurt internally, from the 
effects of which he died about two hours afterward. 

September 20, 1898, John Flanagan, a miner, aged 55 years, married, leaves 
a widow and three children, was fatally injured by flying coal from a shot in 
the Norris Coal Company's mine, Norris, Fulton county, from the effects of 
which he died in one and a half hours after the accident. The deceased was 
working with his son in a room in the northwest entry. They had two shots 
to fire at noon. The son went down the roadway, when the father lighted 
one of the shots and followed him; when the shot went off, deceased returned 
and lighted the other one. His son, who was near, says that just as soon as 
the other shot was lighted it went off, the flying coal crushing his head. 



54 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



February 8, 1899, John Crawford, a miner, aged 24 years, single, was killed 
while working in W. Sherwood's mine, two miles east from Marietta, Fultoa 
county. In the forenoon W. Sherwood, John Crawford and Richard Snyder 
were all working together in a room close to the mouth of the mine. The 
room was worked in about 25 feet, and was about 16 feet wide. There were 
three props in the room, but the roof being soft near the crop of the coal, 
these props were not sufficient to hold it up and the roof fell on all 
of them, pinning the three men fast in a short time. One of the miners 
outside hearing their cries, brought assistance, but it was about 
two hours before they were all gotten oat. Crawford was the last to b© 
brought out and was found to be dead; the other two men were not seriously 
injured. When I visited the mine and made an examination I considered it 
unsafe and had it closed down, and it has remained closed to the present time. 

Following are the tables of fatal and non-fatal accidents, their causes and 
the nature of the injuries sustained, also the county schedules of the dis- 
trict. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John W. Graham, 

Canton. • State Inspector of Mines, Third District. 



Fatal Casualties— Third District, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 




Occupation. 


Residence. 


■6 


1 
■a 


a 

i 


a 
00 


a 

a 
0. 


Cause of Accident. 


1898 
Aug 8 


John DeBow 


34 
46 
55 
24 


Miner 

',\ 


Etherley.... 
Midrtle Gr'v 
Norris 


1 

1 


1 
1 


■5 
3 


i 

1 


1 
6 
4 

11 


White damp. 


Sept 15 

" 20 

Feb. 8 


George Wynn 

John Flannagan 

John Crawford 


Falling roof 

Flying coal 






3 


3 


8 



















Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties— Third District, 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 




1 
1 
1 

1 

4 




4 
4 




1 

1 
1 
1 

4 




1 


Marietta 




Falling slate 


.'Sherwood. William 

Sunday Creek Coal Co.. 


1 






1 






1 


Totals 






4 















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Non-Faial Casualties— Thh-d District, 1899. 



55 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


S 


1 


1 


a 


Character of Injury- 


11 


1898 
July 7 


Riip.no Stifrlicli. 


32 

1 


Dunfermline.. 
Middle Grove. 
Dunfermline.. 


.... 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

.... 


1 

1 
1 

:::: 
— 

"i 

"i 
.... 


31 


"5 


Foot injured 


ino 


Aug. 9 Scott Vaughn .... 
Oct. 5 Frank Deshane... 


Leg broken. 


110 




3(i 


'" 29 Ivan Bollinger ... 


26: Astoria 

65! Dnnffrmline.. 


r.ep- hrnken 


I'") 


Nov. 3 Joseph Horr 


llHand crushed 


87 


'• 9 W. F. Cadle 


42 
40 

i 

47 
42 


Frederick 

Dunfermline.. 

Colchester ... 


6 
1 

6 

1 

6 
5 

"2 
' i 
42 




•^3 


Dec. 1 Wm. Peters. 


Back injured 


inn 


'• 4 John Clayburgr... 


Face and arms burned 


48 
=59 


1899 1 
Jan 13 Wm. Ke*<nert 


Back hurt. 


140 






'>i 


Feb. 15 Larrie Anderson. 


leiMiddle Grove. 
43lC;olpliPstHr - 


Leg broken 


90 


Mar 9 D Shcrbine 




24 


•• 31 Noah ftr-ie-e- 


30 
57 
23 
32 


Dunfermline.. 
Middle Grove. 
Bryant 




39 


Apr. 20 


William Lewis ... 

H. N. Smith 

J. E. Bemley 




75 


May 3 


Foot injured. 


13 




Dunfermline,. 


1 
11 




I"! 








. 











Total men injured 17 

Total time lost 1. 108 days 

Average time lost per man 65 " 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Third District, 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. Cause of Accident. 


No. 


Colliery. No. 




1 
17 


Cager 


1 
4 
11 

1 

17 




2 
4 

1 
1 

17 




1 


Bryant 

Colchester ... 


Drivers 

Miners 

Trimmer 


Falling rock 


Colchester Coal Co 

Curry, A. L 


1 


Flying coal 


1 






?. 


Frederick 

Middle Grore. 


Powder explosion 

Railroad car. 


Sunday Creek Coal Co.. 
Whitebreast Coal Co.... 


3 

'9 

17 
















56 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table Showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time Lost, ivith Averages and Percentages. — Third 
District. 





Si 
s 


I 


"Si 
c 

02 


TO 

a 

0) 

<^ 

Q 


Time Lost. 


"o 03 


Nature of Injuries. 


Total 
days. 


Aver- 
age 
days. 


P 


' 


3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 


3 

2 

1 

i 

2 
1 

1 


2 

i 

i 

6 


12 
5 
6 

6 

3 
5 
5 

42 


264 
74 
48 

113 
23 

201 

325 
24 
36 


88 
37 
48 
57 
23 
67 
108 
24 
36 


17.6 


Bodies injured 

Face injured 


11.8 
5.9 
11.8 




5.9 


Hands injured 


17.6 
17.6 




5.9 


Wrist injured 


5.9 


Totals, averages and percentages 


17 


11 


1,108 


65 


100.00 



58 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 



Broivn Cowity — Third District, 1899. 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 16. 
Number of mines or places opened during the year, 5 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 15. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
a 


1 

8 

O 

"S. 


1 

Is 

ii 


i 

o 
6 
Z 

1 
1 


o 

s 

o 


t3 

a 

o 

o 

o 

IS 

72 


'6 
1 

o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 




H.Cronicle 


Ripley 

Mt. Slerling!; 

Damon 

Clapton'.!!!!!.' 


30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


D. 


Hd 




280 
220 
190 
190 
160 
200 
70 
200 
120 
160 
180 
170 
170 
120 
200 


280 
220 
190 
190 
160 
200 
70 
200 
120 
160 
180 
170 
170 
120 
200 






Douglas McClure 






















Huff & Hendricks 






George Ashbacker 

Samuel Bailey 










10 
11 


Shinnefleld & Price' 

Thomas Brady 




I' 







13 
14 


Thos. Redmond & Bro... 
Julius Gross 




15 
















2,630 


2.6.30 

















































COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



59 



Brown County, 1899. — Continued. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 


a 


d 


.si 




¥ 


Acci- 
dents 






















|ld 




as 








t^ 


4-{ 


'*-! 








a 
a 

II 


•^ 








a 

3 




5 

o 
o 

3 


33 

a 

it 


If 


1 

p. 

a 


o 

a 


2 

It 


2 

o 
o 


1 


1 

3 

1 

n 

a 


\l 

■Si 
§ga 




1 


^ 


<< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


0-1 


Oh 


Q 


H 


M 


^ r* 


z 


1 


$1 50 
1 50 




$420 
330 


I 




2 


$1 00 
1 00 


w. 


150 
110 


$280 
220 




















s 


1 50 
1 50 
1 50 




285 
285 
240 


2 
2 
2 




2 
2 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 




100 
100 

85 


190 
190 
160 








4 








5 










H 


1 50 
1 50 




300 
105 


3 
1 




3 
1 


1 00 
1 00 


" 


80 
75 


215 
70 










7 










H 


1 50 




300 






2 


1 00 




100 


220 










q 


1 50 
1 50 
1 50 




180 
240 
270 






2 
2 
2 


100 
100 
100 


;; 


60 
80 
90 


120 
160 

180 










10 










11 










I'' 


1 50 
1 50 
1 50 





255 
255 
180 






2 
2 

2 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


'• 


85 
85 
60 


170 
170 
120 










13 


.. . 








14 










If) 


1 50 




300 








1 00 


" 


100 


200 


























$3, 945 


30 




30 








$2,665 










$1 50 












$1 00 




91 

































60 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Fulton County— Third District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output, 




,0 
B 
Iz; 


T 

§ 

o 
.a 
& 

a 


I 

it 

o.g 

si 
II 


1 

o 

6 

'5 
o 
o 


■-• 

o 

a 
o 


'a 
% 

S3 

o 

I 

o 

IS 

/3 


1 
3 

u 
o 

a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
q 


Whitebreast Fuel Co., C. 
Whitebreast Fuel Co., D. 

Astoria Coal & M. Co 

JarvisC.al&MCo 

Sunday Creek Coal Co... 

Newsam Bros., lessee 

Farmington Coal Co 

Pindley Coal & Coke Co.. 
J. M. Laws 


Dunfermline . 

St. David 

Astoria 

Middle Grove. 
Parmington .. 

Cuba 


90 
60 
70 
50 

106 
85 

145 
67 
80 


5.6 
5.6 

4 
^6 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 


St. 

SI. 

H. 

St. 

? 

Hd 

Hp 
Hd 

Hp 
Hd 


B. 


147,918 

79, 743 

46,599 

9,000 

61,430 

22, 190 

35.062 

12, 032 

21,383 

14, 500 

3,500 

22,000 

9,200 

34,500 

18,248 

650 

4,280 

20,253 

2,900 

487 

4,132 

1,400 

900 

280 

80 

500 

1,120 

1,240 

1,140 

1,200 

320 

1,072 

520 

1,000 

820 

1,230 

320 

180 

85 

400 

100 

1,550 

320 

.300 

100 

170 

200 

350 

140 

200 

400 

500 

1,600 

1.670 

300 

680 

380 

700 

120 

50 


108,973 

57,216 

32.785 

7,000 

49,862 

15,690 

23,906 

8,020 

21,383 

12. 500 

2,800 

20,000 

9,200 

34,500 

18,248 

650 

4,000 

14,000 

2,400 

487 

3,632 

1,400 

900 

280 

80 

500 

1,120 

1,240 

1,140 

1,200 

320 

1,072 

520 

1,000 

820 

1.230 

320 

180 

85 

400 

100 

1,550 

320 

300 

100 

170 

200 

350 

140 

200 

400 

500 

1.600 

1.670 

300 

680 

380 

700 

120 

50 


38.945 
22,527 
13, 814 

2,000 
11,568 

6,500 
11.156 

4,012 


in 


Tayler & Peck, No. 1 

Taylor & Peck, No. 2 

P. W. Meehan 


" 


70| 4.6 
40 4.6 


2.000 


11 




5 " 


700 


19 


Breeds 

Fiatt 


70 
30 
50 
80 
80 
80 
112 
30 
30 

35 
35 
35 
35 
30 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
50 
60 
60 
60 
60 
40 
30 
30 
30 
45 
30 
30 
40 
40 
20 
40 
50 
50 
55 
55 
55 
35 
35 
35 


4.6 

4.6 

4 6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

5 

2.4 

3 6 

2.8 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

5 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

- .6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

4.6 

5 

2.6 

2.6 

5 

4.6 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

4 

4 

5 

5 

5 

2.4 

2.4 

2.6 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
2 

2 
2 
2 

5 


Sh. 

'• 

Dr. 

Dr. 


2.000 


n 


Oline & Shaw 




n 

15 


Canton Union Coal Co... 
Canton Coal Co 


Canton 

'' :::::::: 




16 
17 


HowastBros. Coal Co.... 


280 


18 




6,253 


19 


L9wry & Kinnowman.... 


Lewistown ... 

Leaman 

Lewist_own ... 

Canton 

ciiba.. .■;::.■::; 


500 






500 


?'> 


Isaac Bath. 




?3 






?A 






'^"i 


Joseph Gensell. 




?fi 


W. H. Chapman 




?,7 


P. McLinden 


5* " 

^ !! 

5|Sh. 
5 D-f . 

5 '• 
5 " 
5 " 
5! " 
51 SI. 
5!Dr. 




28 
'A9 


George Hollinsworth 




30 


E. E. Peck 




31 


Wni. Hughes . 




3? 






3^ 






31 


Wm. Chepping. . 




35 






36 






37 


Oliver Harris 




38 


Robert Ribley 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

2 


Sh. 




39 






40 




' ' 




41 


Timothy Yemm. 


> ' 




4? 


W. Wiliick 


Astoria 

Breeds.!'.!!!!! 
St. David 

Norris. . ! !! 




43 


John Perry 




11 


L. Hoopes 




45 




5i " 




46 


Win Sugo'ett • 


5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 

6 
5 
5 
5 
2 
2 


Sh. 




47 


VVm. J('rdan 




48 


L. R. Snyder 




49 
50 


Thomas Courtney 

James Woods. 




51 


James H. Straley 

R. Rodis 




5? 


Ipavia 

Fairview 

Avon 




53 






51 


W. A. Maple . . 




55 


George Overcash 




56 






57 






58 


Thomas Caldwell. 




59 


R. Stannard 






60 


Garrett Van Winkle 




Hn' B. 





COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



61 



Fulton Count ij, i8.9.9 —Continued. 



Z^ 



2 ® 

?ra 









Acci- 
dents 






$1 07 
1 04 
1 00 
1 00 

87.51 

1 00 ; 
102 : 

1 Oo 

80 ' 
1 00 I 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 

90 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

80 
1 12 
1 20 
1 30 
1 23 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

75 



] 10 
1 10 
1 10 
1 00 
1 50 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 



20 j 



$130. 515 

70,091 

39.001 

7,900 

45,017 

17,965 

28, 958 

9,223 

17, 106 

13, 100 

3.010 

20, 400 

11,500 

31,050 

18.248 

650 

4,112 

13.701 

2.788 

581 

5.2; 

1,750 

1,125 

350 

100 

500 

1.120 

1,240 

1,140 

1.200 

320 

1,070 

520 

1,000 

820 

1,230 

320 

135 

63 



100 
34 
23 
14 
17 
14 
33 
12 
71 

^t 

6 



380 

1.225 

210l 



$0 45 
45 
40 
40 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
60 
60 
60 



S-M 



1 25 
1 
1 25, 



$100,815 
53,463 
26,500 

7,410 
37,875 
14,680'i 
23,500; 

7,900; 
12,900 

9,420' 

2,580! 
12,400 

6,800: 

22.4001 

13.3001 

540| 

3,100 
11.300 

2,ooo! 

350 
4,0001 
l,250i 
850 1 
2701 
80 ! 
375 
720 



810 
225 
750 
370 
725 
560 
840 
200 
108 
51 
240 
60 

1,100 
260 
240 
65 
125 
135 
240 
100 
140' 
2751 
3701 

1.200- 

1,250 
225; 
470! 
270 

1.080 
165 
70 



3.100 

1.100 

1,267 

832 

52S 

360 

130 

800 

175 

1.250 

730 

30 


43 

1 

1) 

5' 

'§ 

4 
3 
2 

4 
4 
3 

1 


1 

•• 


8 
1 

1 

■■'■3 


800 
512 
145 


4 i '.'.'.'.'. 


40 




100 

70 




4 

1 
2 














25 








55 
60 


1 


.. 





50 
65 


1 






15 








42 
23 


1 






47 

33 
5U 


•> 






8 








3 








16 


i 






60 


1 















4 

9 


1 


" 




10 








15 








6 








9 








15 








25 


1 


.. 




















26 


















1 


■• 





3 


1 1 








62 



STATISTICS OF LABOR — Continued. 



Fulton County— Third District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


PostoflSce. 


Description. 


Output. 


s 


I 

i 

<v 


1 

l| 

o.S 



d 

z 

'So 
® 






p 



la 

02 


1 


n 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


61 


Geer & Kirkbride. 


Vermont 

Table Grove.. 
Dunfermline . 

Emon 


30 
40 
60 
60 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 


2.4 

2.4 

5 

5 

2.6 

2.6 

2.6 

2 6 

2.6 

2.6 

4 

6 

3.6 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.6 


2 

5 
5 
2 

1 

2 
2 
2 
6 
5 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Dr. 

Sh. 
Dr. 


Hp 


M. 
B. 
M. 

" 


480 
390 
200 
250 
400 
280 
320 
200 
240 
80 
2.400 
300 
440 
220 
300 
300 
240 
400 


480 
390 
200 
250 
400 
280 
320 
200 
340 
80 
2.400 
300 
440 
220 
300 
300 
240 
400 




62 


R. Dougherty 

Charles Maple 




di 


Charles Hall 




Ci 


J. W. Crouse 

Thomas Wilson, Jr 




66 

67 











Bluff pity'."." 

Farmington . . 

Summan 

Marietta 

Duncan Miiis. 




69 


Hartford Curlen 




70 












79 


Soloman Shaffer. . 


Hd " 




7S 




H? 


¥.: 




7/1 


J. W. Offord 




7*) 


S Keppell . . ... 




76 












78 


Marshall Bellen . .. 






Totals 






601.084 


478.329 


12.275 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898.87. 
Number of new mines opened during the year. 21. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899,78. 
Average price gaid per gross ton.43..'5 cents per ton. 
Price for machine mining, 27.5 per ton for 25.471 tons. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



63 



Fulton County, i85^/>— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 






bx« 




II 


A. ci- 

DENTS 


















1 

a 

o E: 
^ o 


c 


Bid 




3a 






p, • 


;-. 




1-1 










1 
a 

3 


sS 

o aj 

1! 


o 

Il 


3 

11 
g 




1 

a 

0) 
1 


o 
P. 

1 

3 


i 

Si 

II 


o 

o 
>> 

03 


'ai5 

■3— ' ■" 

:>: 

11 E 


1 
I- 



0, 



S 


1! 

a 

lis 

a|l 




o 


Z| <J 


< 


<J 


< 


< 


H 


a. 


D. 


G 


^ 


Ui 


z 


fe 


A 


61 


$1 50 




$720 


4 




4 


$1 00 


S-M. 


110 


$540 










6'' 


1 50 
1 00 




585 
200 


3 
1 




3 
1 


1 00 
60 




100 

ion 


430 
120 










63 


10 








64 


1 00 




250 


1 






60 




1,50 


150 


1? 








6=) 


1 25 
1 25 


:'.'.'.'.::: 


500 
350 


2 
2 




2 
2 


1 00 
1 00 




150 
100 


400 
280 










66 










67 


1 25 




400 


2 




2 


1 00 




1?,0 


320 










6S 


1 25 




250 
300 
100 


2 
2 
1 




2 
2 
1 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 




70 
100 
70 


200 
240 
80 










69 










70! 1 25 










71 


1 25 




3,000 


6 




7 


75 




220 


2,210 




1 






7? 


100 




30C 






2 


75 




SO 


225 










73 


1 25 




550 


3 




3 


75 




126 


390 


26 


J 






74 


1 25 




275 


2 




2 


1 00 




95 


220 










7'i 


1 25 
1 25 




375 
375 


2 
2 




2 
2 


1 00 
1 00 




110 
100 


300 
300 










76 











77 


1 25 




300 


2 




2 


1 00 




95 


240 










78 


125 




500 


2 




2 


1 00 




125 


400 
















3 13 








$30,669 


881 


319 


1,200 






$398,032 


31,214 


153 




$1 006 


$0 403 










$0 783 




145 




















1 1 





64 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Hancock County — Third District — 1899. 









Description. 


Output. 








rt 




-c 






















■li 





















1 






















Qj 




rr. 


•j;; 


.£3 












Name of Operator. 


PostoflSce. 


T 


it 


o 
6 

z 

1 

n 




O 


1 


Total 


Tons 


Tons 

other 
grades 








o 

"S, 


^1 


1 


o 


3 


tons pro- 
duced. 


of lump 
coal. 


























'A 






Q 


H 


C5 


CO |M 


g 










Merideth Bros 


Augusta 


50 
30 


2.6 2 


Sh. 


w 


M. 


4,338 
400 


4,338 
400 






Wm. Courtney 


2.6 


2 






M. F. Ray 


...... 


30 
30 
30 


2 6 
2.6 
2.6 


2 
2 
2 


Sh. 


" 




280 
240 
240 


280 
240 
240 






John Highland 






J. W. Marks 






Totals 






5,498 


5,498 






Averages 


















... 






























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 4. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 5. 



COAL IX ILLINOIS. 



65 



Hancock Count ij. i8.9.9— Concluded. 





Values. 


Emploves. 


1 

S 

o 

i 

1^ 


o 


a 


Total wages paid during 
the year to all employes 
excepting office help. 




SJ ! Acer- 
's tl DENTS 


a 


Is 

O <D 

Is 

< 


- 
1 
II 


o 


o 

li 

si 

2.9 
-< 


o 

S 

1 
< 


i 

o 
a 
£ 

o 


c 

S 

1^ 


"i 

1 
o 

> 
1 

1 


1 
o 

i 


Number of horses or n 
employed in or iiboi 
mine. 

Piital. 


z 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 


$135 
1 75 
1 T5 

1 75 

1 75 




$5,832 14 
420| 2 


2 

1 

i 


16 
3 

3 


$0 94 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


S.M. 


208 
190 
140 
140 
130 


$i,200 
580 
350 




1 
2l.. 

1!.. 

1 .. 
1 .. 


.... 








$7,862 22 

i 


4 


9R 






S5 740 




fi' 




SI 43 






10 95.3 


182 




|-:-- 




i i 


.1 








] 1 



—5 C. R. 



<^6 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Knoj' Counfij—lliird District— 1899. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 



1 


George W. Essex 


Soperville 


112 




1 


Sh. 


s. 


B. 7.900 


7.000 


900 


2 


Wm. Woodward 


Galesburg 


5(; 




1 


' ' 


Ho. 


" 1 3,810 


3.610 


200 


8 


Reed & Pendergast 


Soperville.... 


93 




1 




S. 


" i 3,300 


3,100 


200 


4 


G. W. Corsepius 


Gales))urg 


30 


3.6 


1 




Ho. 


" ! 1.850 


1,500 


350 


5 Charles Morgan 


Oneida 


30 




6 


SI. 




M. 400 


400 





61 James McGovern 




20 




6 


Sh. 




" I 2,350 


2,350 




7i George Clifford :... 




20 




6 


SI, 




1,257 


1,257 




8 John Jaeobson & Son 


Wataga 


30 




6 


I). 




800 


800 




9jLe-5ris Nordeen 




4.5 




6 


SI 






650 


650 




lOlTaylor Bros 




4,5 




6 


Sh. 


• ' 




3,300 


3,300 




llLuadeen& Preist 


Tenro 


4,5 




6 


SI 


' ' 




1,350 


1,350 




12 John Wel.-h 




45 




fi 




' ' 




877 


877 




13; James Nelson 


Knoxville 


45 


2.6 


2 


Sh. 




" 


520 


520 




14 Z. F. Dudley 




30 


2.6 


2 




• ' 




1,400 


1.400 




15, Nelson ct Anderson 


' ' 


30j 2.6 


2 


' ' 






600 


600 




16 Bowman Bros 


Yates City.... 


50 4 


6 


'• 


S. 




1.810 


1,086 


725 


17 Alonz" Emerk-k 


Farmington . . 


30 4 


6 




Ho. 




200 


200 




18' Wm. Raffle & Son 




30 4 


6 


' ' 






230 


230 




19;K. Prortor 


Elmwood 


30 4 


6 








280 


280 




20 Wm. Fish 


Appleton 


30 4 


6 


SI. 


" 




340 


340 




21, Eric Herkstrom 




301 4 


6 




' ' 




420 


420 




22, N. A.Anderson 


Wataga 


40 


4 


6 


Sh. 






3,400 


3,400 




23iA. Bankson 




20 


4 


6 


SI. 






2O0 


200 




24ljohn Dolan 




20 


4 


6 




' ' 




600 


600 




250. P. Wagher 


Etherley 


40| 4 


6 


1). 


Hd 




120 


120 




26,A]dgreeu ct Simons 


E. Galesburg. 


70! 2.4 


2 


Sh. 


Ho. 




30C 


300 




27 Wm. Allen 


Middle Grove. 


4(1 




5 


1). 




B. 


600 


600 




28 
29 






40 
40 




5 
6 


;; 




M. 


160 

480 


160 
480 




AbleDewit 




30 li. Loopman 


' ' 


40 




5 




' ' 


B, 


600 


600 




31iMelvin Mor.se 




4(1 




5 




' ' 




360 


360 




32 D. J. Foster 


Rapatee 


4C 


4 


5 








320 


320 




33T. Morse 





4(1 




5 






240 


240 




341 A. P. Boyer 


Etherley 


45 




6 




' ' 


M. 


280 


280 




,S5 


E. Peterson 




45 




6 








600 


6Q0 




36 


Joseph Thompson 




45 




6 




' ' 




680 


680 




37 


H. E. Banney 

Totals 


Abingdon .... 


45 


2 


2 








630 


630 






43,214 


40,840 


2.374 




Averages 
























I II 

03 t» 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 

of lump 

coal. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 34. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 11. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 8. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 37. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



67 



Knox County, 18'.)9 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


o 


Ji 




al 




2 2 '^ 


ENTS 
















■^ 




.2 


lid 




as - 






















^ 


ja 


o 


o 


T 






'3 


t 




■s 


«l 




1 


1 


ft 


3 

ll 

HI 


II 

li 


1 
g ■ 


i 
>> 

o 
"a 

g 


li 


1 


a 
o 

SI 

1 

o 

S3 


III 


3 
u 

1 

a 

o 


1% 

o a 

irai 


3 
§ 


■^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


Eh 


a. 


a. 


a 


^ 


W 


Z fr 


z 


1 


$1 25 


$1 00 


$9,650 


20 


5 


25 


$0 75 


S-IVT. 


190 


! 
$5,250 450 






2 


1 25 


1 00 


4.712 


8 


3 


11 


75 




20(i 


2. 708, 18( 






s 


1 25 


1 00 


4.075 


8 


2 


10 


75 




18(i 


2.600' 16C 






4 


1 25 


1 00 


2.225 


5 


2 


7 


75 




174 


1,657, 4( 






5 


1 00 




400 






2 


75 


W. 


14(i 


350 






6 


1 00 




2.350 


6 


1 


7 


76 


M. 


175 


1,580! 






7 


1 50 





1.885 


5 


1 


6 


75 




2()(; 


1,2301 






8 


1 12.5 




900 


4 




4 


75 


S M. 


m 


700i 


1 . 




9 


112.5 




731 


3 




3 


75 




171 


53C 








10 


1 12.5 




3.712 


7 


1 


h 


75 


' ' 


191 


2.480 








11 


1 00 




1,350 


4 


1 


.=. 


75 




14( 


1,08(] 








12 


100 




877 


3 


1 


4 


75 


' ' 


18(, 


70C 








18 


1 50 




780 


2 


1 


3 


1 00 




22(: 


58C 








14 


1 50 




2.100 


8 


1 


H 


1 00 




2()(; 


1,64C 








15 


1 50 




900 




1 


3 


■1 00 


' ' 


225 


45C 








Ifi 


1 50 


75 


2,172 


5 


1 


6 


75 


' ' 


221 


1.48C 









17 


1 25 




250 


2 


1 


:^ 


75 




15( 


20C 








\H 


125 




287 




1 


3 


75 




16( 


23C 








ly 


125 




350 


2 


1 


:i 


75 


' ' 


14( 


28C 








201 1 00 




340 


2 




2 


75 




14( 


29C 








2l! 1 00 




420 


3 




'A 


75 


' ' 


145 


35C 








22i 1 25 




4,250 


8 


1 


£ 


75 




23( 


2,75C 








23 


1 25 




250 






2 


75 




1V5 


165 








24 


1 25 




750 


3 




1 


75 




18( 


50C 








25 


1 25 




150 


2 




2 


75 




5( 


IOC 








2fi 


1 50 




450 


5 


1 


6 


1 00 




52 


24C 








27 


1 00 




60C 


2 




2 


75 




16( 


45C 


3h 






2H 


1 00 




160 


1 




1 


75 




101 


12C 


7 






2U 


1 00 




48C 






2 


75 




IK 


30C 








3(1 


1 00 




60C 


2 




2 


75 




15{ 


45C 


32 






31 


1 00 




36C 


1 




1 


75 




17t 


27C 


18 






32 


1 00 




32C 


1 




] 


75 




1601 24C 


16 






33 


1 00 




24( 


1 




1 


75 




17( 


18C 


12 






34 


1 00 




28C 


1 




1 


75 




17( 


20C 








i{5 


1 00 




60C 


2 




2 


75 




18( 


45C 








3B 


1 00 




68C 


2 




2 


75 




19( 


51C 








31 


1 50 




945 


3 




3 


1 00 




250 


630 















$51,571 




26 


167 








$33. 980 


951 


22 


1 1 




$1 20.9 


$0 92.3 










$0 76.7 





167 





















68 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 



McDonough County — Third District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffiee. 


Description. 


Output. 


£ 
s 


1 
I 

o 

JS 

"S 


J, 

"5 • 
§1 

o c 

ii 

Eh 


a 

6 
Z 

'So 
o 


o 
o 


■a 
a 

o 


i 
1 

o 

a 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


2 
3 


Colchester Coal &M. Co. 
Rippetoe & Rundle 


Colchester.... 

!! — 

Tennessee 

Macomb 

Industry...!.. 

Blandmviiie!! 

Doddsville .;; 
Vermont 




56| 2.9 
56: 2.9 
60' 2.6 
40, 2.4 
40[ 2.4 
40! 2.4 
40i 2.4 
40 2.4 
40 2.4 
40 2.4 
40 2.4 
4o! 2.4 
30| 2.4 
30 2.4 
50 2.4 
40 2.4 
30 2 4 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

i 

2 

2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

9 


■';■ 

p. 

Sh. 
p. 

SI. 
D. 

SI. 
p. 

Sh. 

D. 

Sh. 

V: 


s. 

Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 

;; 

Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 


M. 


16,500 
15, 340 
2,480 
128 
150 
195 
9an 


15, 400 
13,567 

2,230 
128 
150 
195 
290 
400 
400 
750 
200 
420 
114 
400 
75 
325 
325 

1,155 
425 
300 
800 
600 
502 
240 
510 
215 
460 

1,150 
120 
260 
375 
350 

1,400 
306 

1 

310 
175 
185 
300 
240 
78 
178 
230 
175 
320 
200 
400 
320 
400 


1, 100 

1,773 


4 


R. Laitz . 




5 






6 

7 


Wm. Martin 

VVm. Hodgson 




8 




"1 400 
" i 400 
"I 750 
"1 200 
" i 420 




9 

in 


Charles Blackley 

Wm. Robinson . 




11 


P. M. Haines 




i;' 






i;-! 


Newman Foster 




u 






400 

i 

1,155 
425 
300 
800 
600 
502 
240 
510 
215 
460 

1,150 
120 
260 
375 
350 

1,400 
306 
225 
98 
310 
175 
185 
300 
240 
78 
178 
230 
175 
320 
200 
400 
320 
400 




15 






16 
17 


A. Swanson 

Wm. Williams 




18 




30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
30 
30 


2.4 
2.4 

2.4 
2.4 

2^4 
2.4 

2^4 
2.4 

214 
2.4 

214 
2.4 

2A 

2.4 

2^4 




19 


John Zimmerman 




?i 






22 
?3 


Wm. Dickerson .' 




?4 


Ely Hillard 




'^'i 


Lewis Atkinson 




J^fi 






?7 






?S 


Baird & Sons 




'r^9 






30 






31 
3' 


Dull Bros 

Wardell Bros 




3'{ 






31 


W. H. Porter 




3n 






3fi 


A. E. Wilson 




37 


Curry Teel . 




38 






39 


Link Willey 




40 


Wm. Baker 




9 




41 




•' l| "> 




4? 










43 


Frank Burdick . . 


i.4 2 
2.4 2 


Sh. 
D. 




44 


Frank Taylor 




45 






4fi 


Thomas Wilson . . . 




•> 




47 


S Lamborn. 


2.4 
2.4 
2.4 


2 
2 




48 


Witchell Bros 




49 


Kirkbride Bros 




50 


Kirkbride&McIntire.... 
Totols 






51, 494 


48,371 


3 123 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 50. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 9. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 9. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 50. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



69 



McDonoiKjh County, 1S99. — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 

q 
o 

bl 
D..S 

II 


a 
o 

a 

II 


a 
.2 
Is 

Q. 

o 

1 

Q 


Total wages paid during 
the year to all employes 
excepting office help. 


1 

3 
1 

o 


ii 

ill 


Acci- 
dents 


1 


o m 
la 

-3l 


o 
o 

II 

<5 


o 

3 
^3 

11 

< 


o 

II 
11 

11 


1 

a 

u 

1 


o 

"E 

a 

"3 

1 


^ 


1 

a 
o 
25 


1 


$135 
1 35 
1 35 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 r,0 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 


$0 35 
35 
35 



••• 


$21,175 
18,936 

3,098 
192 
225 
282 
435 
600 
600 

1,125 
300 
630 
171 
600 
112 
487 
487 

1,7.32 
637 
450 

1,200 
900 
753 
360 
765 
322 

1,725 

a 
1 

2,100 
459 
337 
147 

5,1 

277 
450 
360 
117 
267 
345 
262 
480 
300 
600 
480 
600 


5« 
1 

4 

1 
5 

4 

1 
3 

5 
4 

I 

3 

2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 

1 

1 
3 

2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 

i 

3 
3 


8 
9 
4 





...... 




58 
59 
34 

3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
4 

5 

1 
3 
3 

5 
4 

3 
• 3 
2 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 

2 
2 

5 
3 

i 

2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 


$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 08 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

too 

100 
1 00 

1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


S;M. 


220 
189 
108 
100 
85 
85 
120 
140 
240 
185 
100 
!;0 
60 
90 
70 
100 
100 
200 
105 
135 
175 
200 
200 
120 
135 
80 
125 
240 
70 
125 
190 
160 
230 
100 
110 
100 
100 
110 
95 
90 
110 
60 
60 
110 
100 
110 
90 
185 
110 
180 


$18. 167 
17,500 
2,730 
128 
150 
195 
290 
400 
400 
750 
200 
420 
114 
400 

325 
325 

1,155 
425 
300 
800 
600 
502 
240 
510 
215 
460 

1,150 
120 
260 
375 
350 

1.400 
306 
225 
98 
310 
175 
185 
300 
240 
78 
178 
230 
175 
320 
200 
400 
320 
400 








1 












8 










/I 










5 










8 










7 










8 










q 








10 










11 










I'' 










13 
14 










l^i 










16 
17 
18 


1 








19 










?,n 










?i 










22 
?3 


1 








?i 










?5 










?16 










?7 










?8 










?P 










1? 

3? 




1 

1 






It 

35 




1 






36 

37 


' 


■■ 




38 
















HO 










:::;:. 






-f 








13 








44 
45 
46 

47 


i 

1 

1 


'.'. 




48 








49 








^0 












7. 










168, 958 


257 


24 


281 








S55, 475 




11 


3 




SI 40.3 


$0 35 










$1 00 





127 








1 

















1 



70 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Schuyler CounUj—Tliii'd District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 






Outfit. 




1 

i 


4^ 

T 

o 
o 


Is 05 

u a 
a =* 


1 

d 

1 
03 


i 

o 
o 

"S 

CO 


1 : 

o • 

o : 

i1 

02 


i 
1 

O 

-a 

a, 

g 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Ton 

of 

other 

grades 


1 




Kushville 

;; 


48 


4 
5 


5 
5 
5 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
5 


Dr. 

:: 

Sh. 


s. 

H. 

Hd 

St. 


M. 
B. 


2,130 
1.680 
1.332 


2.130 
1.680 
1 saa 




2 


William Portwood 

William Cummings 












1.200! 1.200 
1,000! 1-onn 


:::::::: 


■i 




Ray 


50 
50 
50 
50 
30 


2.3 
2 3 
2.3 
2 6 
9 S 




8 


Rufus Porter. . . 




280 
400 
1.100 
800 
460 
750 


280 




7 






400! 


8 




Frederick .... 
Littleton 

Frederick!'.!" 


i.iool 


q 


Jacob Backofen. 


800 . . 


10 




30 2.3 


460 






40 


5 


750 






Totals 






11.132 



11. 132 






Averages 











































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 10. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 4. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 11. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



71 



Schuyler Counttj, iS.9.9— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


i 

bjo 

IS 

a, 


1 




Total wages paid during 
the year to ali employes 
excepting oflice help. 

Kegs of powder usi-d. 

Number of liorses or mules 
employed iu or about the 


Acci- 
dents 


1 
a 


So 

!i 

< 


Average value of other 
grades. 


Aggregate value of 
total product. 


o 

i 

> 2 


1 

o 

a 

3 

U 

o 


i 

"S 

a 


2 
11 

O t£ 


i 

1 

o 

i 

o 

-5 


^ 


V 



2 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


$1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
125 
1 25 
125 
125 
125 
1 00 




$2,662 
1.680 
1.332 
1.290 
1,250 
350 
500 


6 

J 

2 


1 

i 


7 
5 
5 
4 

5 

3 
4 

4 


$0 75 

75 

75 

75 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

100 

1 00 

100 

75 


S-M. 220 
" 200 
" 234 

" 190 
W. 184 
" ! 140 

" 1 175 
■' 1 280 
•' 1 200 


$1.6501 114 

1.380 ill' 1 

1.100 73i 1 

980! 60 1 

"S::::::!:::::: 






7 


4751 :.. 






8 
9 


1. 375 3 
1.000! i 


i.iool ' 

8801 ! 


1 




10 
11 


575 
750 


I 




195 

175 


500' ' 

565! 6 


- 











$12,668 


37 


« 


43 








$10, 015 j ;J47; 3 






$l.'l38 




$0,841 




» 






















72 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Warren County— Third District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postofflce. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

£ 


1 

o 


I . 

Si 


i 

o 
6 

V 

1 

1 


'E 

o 

p. 
o 

1 


o 
o 

II 


0) 

1 

o 

1 
s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 






Alexis 

Monmouth ... 
Roseville. .'.'.'. 

Youngstown . 

Swan Creek . . 


70 
GO 
40 
55 
55 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 


4 

4 

4 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2,3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 


1 

1 
1 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Sh. 

SI. 
Dr. 


St. 
H. 
St. 
H. 

Hd 


M. 


4,500 

1,800 

1,600 

1,200 

1,500 

440 

200 

500 

80 

320 

140 

100 

900 

600 

200 


4,000 
1,800 
1,500 


500 


2 


.John .Siiiicox 


ioo 






1,2001 


5 
6 


Murphy & Redmond 

.J. G. Kidd 


1,500 

440 




G. H. Little 


200 


s 


Bryner Bros 


500! 


C) 




80 
320 
140 
100 
900 
600 
200 




10 
11 


Thomas Wearmouth 

Thomas Lee. . ... 





I") 




















Ti 


R Delaney 


•' 














14,080 


13.480 


600 




































i 









Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 16. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 2. 
Number of new mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 3. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1899, 15. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



73 



Wari^en Count}], 181)9 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


J_ 


1 


a 






'{■ 2 


Acci- 

DENT.S 






















^~ '-■ 




S s 






a • 


u 














sS 


1 


o 


o 

3 

Si 

i-5 


- 




i 


■i 


ci 


C 1^ 


■a 


s| 






1 

s 




1 


n 
li 


1 

a 

o 


1 

a 

g 


S.S 

"3 2 


11 


h 

> 

O 
m 




s 


is 

lis 




1 














o 










o 






z 


-< 


<< 


< 


< 


<tj 


^ 


Dh 


a. 


Q 


&^ 


w 


Z li- 


1^ 




$1 25 


SO 75 


$5,375 


7 




8 


$0 75 


S-M 


?fiO 


$3,500 


300 




1 




1 25 




2.250 


4 




5 


75 




210 


1,450 


150 


1.. 






125 


75 


1.950 


4 




5 


75 




180 


1.28C 


150 








175 




2.100 


5 




6 


1 12io 




210 


1,600 




]!.. 






175 





2,625 


5 




6 


1 12^2 




230 


1,800 




] .. 






2 00 
2 00 

2 00 
2 00 
1 75 
175 
175 





880 

400 

1.000 

160 

640 

280 

200 

1,575 

1,050 

350 


i 

2 
1 
1 
5 
3 
2 




2 

i 

1 
1 

5 
3 


1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 


\\ 


200 
120 
180 
100 
180 
160 
110 
200 
180 
100 


550 
250 
625 
100 
400 
175 
125 
1,125 

Its 
















































































































- 










$20, 832 


47 


5 


52 






$13. 980 


600 


3 


1 




$1 51.2 


SO 75 










$0 91.5 




.,s 

































74 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

JRecapitulation by Counties — 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 




1 


















a t" 


u <s> 












-c 




S 




°S 


5§ 


%^ 


Counties. 


i 

a 

g 

o 
u 

g 
5 


ID 

a 

g 

a 
3 


1 

i 

a 


1 
1 


a 

a 

a 
o 


2 

1 

a 
3 


1 
o. 
S 

o 

i 


1 

o 

a 


-a 


-Tj'g 

a "^ 
a-S 

il 


1! 

03 _a 


11 

1 




Z 


73 


i 


z\<i 


H 


^ 


&H 


Eh 


^ 


-< 


< 




15 

,8 


18 


15 
60 


5 
21 


6 
30 


2,630 
601,084 


2,630 

478,329 








$1 50 
1 00.6 




Fulton 


122.755 


523,256 


14.957 


$0 40.? 




5 
37 


1 


4 

37 


1 


8 


5,498 
43, 214 


5,498 
40.840 




4.338 




1 43 
1 20.9 




Knox 


2.374 


860 


92.3 


McDonough... 


50 


3 


47 


9 


9 


51.494 


48,371 


3,123 


33.120 


1.200 


1 40.3 


35 


Schuyler 


11 


1 


10 


4 


3 


11, 132 


11, 132 




950 


180 


1 13.8 




Warren 


15 


•• 


15 


2 


3 


14,080 


13,480 


600 




300 


1 51.2 


75 


Totals 


;^ii 


33 


1HH 


53 


59 


729, 132 


600,280 


128,852 


561, 664 


17, 497 






Averages 






















$1 07.2 


$0 41.3 




























Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 217. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 53. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 59. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 211. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



75 



Third Districi—ldi)9. 











i 


53 «^ 


t^* 


u. 


ro-a 












Employes. 


H 

.-2 3 


-5 S3 

'Hi 


-a 
o 


«i.9 

hi 
.,5 a 


Casualties 


Machines. 


o 






I 

1 
o 










^ 


^1 


O 


c 


a 


§s 


^H 


%t 


o 


a® 
^5 






«a!^ 


11 




;h 




'i 


Is 




^^'^ 




^ m 






I- " ■- 1; 


£"3 


^ 




yj? 




•S'S 


^i3 


"i 


£ 


%i%i 


-= 


Sl| 


H 


Hi; 


5 


aj o 


S2 


5^s 


a* 


11^ 




3 


S«i2: 


a :: 








o 








S =1 










<! 


'A 


^i 


H 


<J 


<) 


&H 


Z 


12; 


M 




Z 


2^ 


t.^ 


$3,945 


,S0 




30 


91 


$1 00 


$2,665 
















530.669 


881 


319 


1.200 


145 


78.3 


398,032 


21,214 


153 


3 


13 


2 


4 


' 25,471 


7,862 


22 
141 

257 

37 

47 

1,415 


4 

26 
24 
6 
5 


26 

167 
281 

52 


162 

167 

127.6 

199.4 

178.6 


95.3 

76.7 
1 00 
84.1 
94.5 


5.740 
33.980 
55, 471 
10.015 
13,980 


951 

347 
600 


6 
22 
11 
3 
3 












51,571 


1 










68, 958 


1 








12 668 








20,832 
















. 


$696, 505 


384 


1,799 






$519,883 


23, 112 


198 


4 


17 


2| 4 


25,471 










146.3 


t$0 89.4 











































Average price paid for mining 556,454 gross tons, 47.5 cents per ton. 
* Price paid for machine mining, 27.5 cents per ten. 
t Screened tons. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 77 



FOURTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: Cass, Log'an, Macon, McLean, Menard, Tazewell, Vermilion. 
John E. Williams, Inspector. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Biireau of Labor Statistics, Sprincjfield, Illinois: 

Sir: — One of the many duties incumbent on the State Inspectors of Mines, 
consists in keeping a detailed record of his services during the year, and to 
transmit the same to you in the form of an annual report. I herewith have 
the honor to submit the sixteenth annual report of the Fourth Inspection Dis- 
trict for the year ended June 30, 1899. This report gives tabulated 
statements, by counties, of the number of mines operated during the year; 
number of shipping mines, also those that are operated for local trade; num- 
ber of miners and other employes; the total output of all grades of coal; the 
average value of all the different grades of coal, and also the total value of 
the whole product of the mines; the casualties in and around the mine, both 
fatal and non-fatal; the average number of days of active operation; the 
quantity of powder used; the number of mining machines in use and the 
amount of coal cut by such machines; the kind of machines used and the 
kind of power used to operate them; the total tons of coal shipped; the num- 
ber of horses and mules employed in and around the mines; the price paid for 
mining, both hand and machine work: the number of wives made widows and 
the number of children left fatherless; the amount of coal consumed or 
wasted around the mines; the number of new mines opened, as well as those 
abandoned, together with the most important improvements at the mines 
made during the year; also the geological number of each seam of coal. 

The following summary is presented for the year: 



Number of counties producing coal 


37 




50 


Total number of mines 1 


87 




3.056 




1.599 


Total number of employes 


4.655 


Number employed above ground 


1,455 


Number employed under ground , 


3.200 
70. 924 


Tons of lump coal produced ' 


2.404.385 


Tons of other grades produced i 


953.352 
3.537.737 


Tons of coal shipped 


2,746.842 




504,031 







78 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Tons of coal consumed at mines 

Number of fatal accidents 

Number of non-fatal accidents 

Total number of accidents 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 

Number of employes to each non-fatal accident. . 

Tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 

Tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident. 
Average value per ton of lump coal at the mine. . . 

Aggregate value of total product 

Average number of days worked during the year. 



106,864 
11 
119 
130 
423 



305,249 

28.216 

$0.8513 

$2,573,100 



The present year has been one of general activity in the coal business, and 
there have been practically no strikes to interrupt this condition. The only 
trouble worthy of mention is the strike at the Decatur Coal Company's mine, 
at Niautie, Macon county. This mine was idle for nine month"?, on account 
of the miners insisting that it become a union mine, with all the conditions 
that go with such a mine. The Coal Company insisted that it was impossible 
to malce a profit out of the mine under the then existing conditions, and it 
would be impossible to continue operating the mine under the terms demand- 
ed by the union, as it very materially increased the cost of production. After 
nine months' idleness the mine resumed work as a machine mine, the com- 
pany in the mean time having put in an electric plant and installed a number 
of Jeffrey mining machines. As a result of the prolonged strike at Niantic 
the tonnage of Macon county will be nearly one-third less this year than last 
— quite a noticeable fact when compared with all the other counties compris- 
ing the Fourth District, which shows a considerably increased tonnage over 
last year. That the mines of this district are in a much safer and better 
condition, is evidenced by the small number of fatilities this year compared 
with the preceding year, notwithstanding there was 785,678 more tons of coal 
produced this year than last. This year the district produced 3,357,737 tons 
of coal, being 305,249 tons of coal mined for each life lost, and compares fav- 
orably with the older mining countries of the world. 

In all the larger mines of this district hand mining is being gradually super- 
ceded by machines, as evidenced by the increase in the number of machines 
and the tonnage cut by them. The inefficient and antiquated method of ven- 
tilating mines with a furnace is being rapidly displaced by the more improved 
mechanical method — that of a fan. There have been more fans placed in the 
mines in this district during the past year than was ever put up in the same 
length of time since the mine inspection service was inaugurated. Quite a 
number of small mines that are operated exclusively for local trade have dis- 
placed the old furnace with a steam fan, which greatly improves the ventila- 
tion of sucii mines. 

Mine Fires. — Early in the morning of August 5, 1898, fire was discovered in 
the boiler room of the Westville Coal Company's mine, Westville. Such rap- 
id progress had been made by the fire before being discovered that it was an 
utter impossibility to save the building, which served the double purpose of a 
boiler room and an engine room. The mine being operated exclusively by 
electric machines, the fire destroyed the large dynamo located in the engine 
room. Fortunately the fire did no damage to the hoisting engine and boilers. 
After a period of thirty-eight days a new brick engine and boiler room had 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 7 9 

been eoustriieted and work was resumed. There were 1^50 men employed in 
the mine at the time the property was destroyed. The building destroyed 
was a wooden structure valued at $1,000, partly covered by insurance. None 
of the workmen who were in the mine at the time of the fire were injured, as 
they were all hoisted out at the escape shaft. 

All the curbing? in the shaft, and all the top works at the mine of A. H, 
Bonnets, eight miles northwest of Danville, were destroyed by fire August 26, 
1898. The fire was communicated to the shaft from the furnace, with which 
the mine was ventilated. Prior to the time of the fire the mine was what was 
known as a gin-shaft, that is, all the coal was hoisted by horse power. The 
mine was at once retimbered from bottom to top, and new steam hoisting 
machinery was substituted for the old horse power arrangement; a new ten 
foot fan was placed in position, with which the mine is now ventilated. Two 
days before the fire I made an examination of the mine and pointed 
out the danger always attendant upon the use of a furnace in the 
mine, especially where it is connected to one end of the hoisting shaft. 
Work was resumed November 1, giving employment to ten men, the same 
number employed before the fire. For a small mine it is now a model one in 
every respect. 

On the night of October 6, 1898, a fire occurred at Hilliards' No. 2 mine, 
near East Peoria, Tazewell county, entirely destroying the pit tower. As 
there was no one around the mine at the time the fire broke out, it was im- 
possible to determine its origin, but it was believed to be the work of an in- 
cendiary. The top works were rebuilt as quickly as possible, and the mine 
resumed operation. Forty-two men were temporarilj^ thrown idle on account 
of the fire. 

Abandoned Mines. — The most important mine abandoned during the year 
was that of the Illinois Coal Mining Company, at Bloomington. This mine 
was a new one, having been in operation scarcely a year. The seam of coal 
being worked was four feet thick and of splendid quality; the condition for 
mining could hardly have been more favorable, and the selling price was all 
that could be desired. The property would undoubtedly have been a paying 
one. No reason was assigned as to why the mine was abandoned, but quite 
a number of the people of Bloomington suspected and concluded that the 
company had been bought out by the McLean Couuty Coal Co., which operates 
a mine, and the only one, in Bloomington. All of the machinery, which was 
of the very best kind, was removed to a new mine at Centralia. this state. 

The old slope at East Peoria, which has been in operation for a number of 
years, was abandoned on account of some litigation with the former owners. 

A shaft some two hundred feet deep, at Virginia, Cass county, that was 
operated in a small w^ay for local trade for a number of years, was found to 
be a non-dividend paying investment, and was accordingly abandoned early 
in the year. Several small mines near Danville, which were operated on a 
small scale for local trade, have also been abandoned. 

Neiv Mines.— Some five years ago a joint stock company, composed of 
wealthy farmers and representative business men, residing in and around 
€olfax, McLean county, sunk a shaft there to seam No. 6 of the geological 



so STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

section, which was found at a depth of 400 feet, and was a little over five feet 
thick and of a superior quality; but at that time there was no work don& 
other than to remove a little coal at the bottom of the shaft. Through amis- 
understanding of the different stockholders, the property became involved in 
litigation, causing a suspension ot operations, which continued until about a 
year ago, when the present owners, Messrs. Ewing & Pitt, of Bloomington, 
secured the property and equipped it with first class hoisting machinery, in 
connection with a tower that is intended for a large output. It will undoubt- 
edly be operated extensively in a short time. The mine is situated on the 
Kankakee and Bloomington division of the I. C. R. R., and the 
product will be shipped to Chicago and the northwest. About fifty men are 
employed at the present time. 

A small shaft sunk in East Peoria by the Enterprise Coal Company, and 
was at first equipped with a gin arrangement to hoist the coal. Mr. William 
Cruickshanks & Sons have bought the mine, and have displaced the gin with 
a small geared hoisting engine, which makes it one of the best mines in that 
vicinity. 

Escape Shafts. — The Himrod Coal Co., Danville, has completed its escape 
shaft, which is one of the largest in the State, and has equipped it with the 
necessary hoisting machinery to insure the safe and speedy removal of work- 
men in case of danger. It is 10x17 feet in the clear, over which a 20- foot fan 
has been placed for ventilation. 

The Brookside Coal Co., Grape Creek, has sunk a new air shaft at its No. 
1 mine, which greatly improves the ventilation. 

King & Grrosweiler, of Pekin, have completed sinking an escape shaft. 

Arthur Jones & Sons, of Catlin, have sunk a new escape shaft which will 
be connected as soon as possible with their old mine, and will be used 
for a hoisting shaft afterwards. 

Neiv Fans. — The Kelleyville Coal Co. Westville, has placed a 12 foot fan at 
its No. 2 mine; the mine is now ventilated by two fans that are both run at 
the same time, one of which is 16 feet in diameter and the other is 12 feet. 
The larger one is used to ventilate the east side and the smaller one to venti- 
late the west side. This method gre'atly improves the ventilation, as the mine 
had become too extensive, and employed too many miners for the one fan to 
force a sufficient amount of air through the workings. 

John 0. Connel, who operates a mine at Grape Creek, known as the Blue 
Bird mine, has thoroughly remodeled the top works, and has discarded the 
slow horse hoister and placed in its stead a pair of geared double hoisting en- 
gines for the speedy removal of the coal. He has also added a new 12-foot 
fan for better ventilation. 

Alfred Blake, East Peoria, has improved the ventilation of his mine by dis- 
carding the use of the furnace as a ventilator, and erecting a six-foot fan in 
its stead. 

King & Grosweiler, Pekin, have erected a new 8-foot fan of the Brazil type. 

Spangler & Miller, operating a small mine near Danrille for local trade, 
now use an 8 foot fan. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 81 

Fatal Accidentfi. — Geor'^e Sevillion, aged 35, single, was killed in room No, 
12, fifth east enti-y, in the mine of the Consolidated Coal Company, at Fair- 
mount, July G, 189S. Deceased had fired several shots the night before, 
which had knocked out several props, and he was engaged in resetting them 
when the accident happened. He was of English descent, and lived in Rose- 
dale, Ind. 

Charles Hughes, aged H-t years, single, was killed in the mine of the Athens 
Coal Co., Athens, July 22, 1898. by a fall of slate. Deceased, at the time of 
the accident was employed as a loader, and had gone into the entry to work, 
when he observed that the track was too far back from the working face. He 
had taken his tools to lay the track and had just commenced work when the 
roof fell on him, killing him instantly. The place had been marked "dan- 
gerous" by the mine examiner, but it was very apparent that deceased had 
made no examination of the place before beginning work. 

Frank Daniels, aged 25, single, was killed in A. Bonnett's mine, eight 
miles northwest of Danville, August 22, 1898, by a fall of roof. Parties work- 
ing in the next room to deceased had called his attention to the dangerous 
condition of the roof, just a short time prior to the accident, but he paid no 
attention to the friendly warning, with the result as above stated. 

October 8, 1898, John M. Rennick, aged .53 years a stable boss in the em- 
ploy of the Catlin Coal Company, Catlin, got on a cage which was standing 
at the lower landing, for the purpose of going down into the mine, but for 
some reason failed to give the engineer the proper signal; the engineer raised 
him up. He became excited and jumped off, falling back into the shaft, 
which is nearly 200 feet deep, killing him instantly. He leaves a widow and 
five children. 

George Ballanted, aged 27 years, was killed in room No. 32, sixth northeast 
entry in mine No. 2 of the Kelleyville Coal Co., October 26, 1898, by a fall of 
roof. He had discovered a bad rock in the room, and was making prepara- 
tions to secure the same for his own safety, when the I'ock suddenly fell, with 
the result as stated. He left a widow and three children in indigent circum- 
stances. 

Andrew Hasse, a miner, employed in the mine of the Citizen's Coal Co., 
Lincoln, met death on the evening of Nov. 23, 1898, by the inhalation of car- 
bonic oxide gas. At the regular shooting time deceased had fired a shot that 
had not sufficient amount of powder to blast the coal loose, and in mining' 
parlance had "whistled through the needle bole," giving off very little smoke 
but a considei-able amount of gas. In his haste to leave the mine with the 
other men he did not wait for the gas to be removed with the air, but went in 
to recharge the same hole. The evidence plainly showed that he understood 
the danger he was in, as he had retreated to the the cross-cut for fresh air 
before he had completed his task of recharging. He hastened back once more 
and commenced to tamp the hole, when he felt his senses leaving him. He 
made a frantic effort to reach the cross-hole again when he got bewildered 
out of the right road, where he was found by the night boss at about 7 p. m. 
He left a widow and three children dependent. 

-6 C. R. 



82 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



William Schoenbeck, a miuer engaged in drawing pillars at the Pawnee 
Coal company's mine, Westville, was killed by a fall of rock. The accident 
happened Oct. 19, 1898. He was aged 48 years, married, leaving a widow and 
three children. 

P. J. Franks, aged 60 years, single, resident of Westville, was killed in a 
room of the Kelleyville Coal company's No. 2 mine, January 19, 1899, by a 
fall of roof. 

James Mitehenson, aged 50 years, was killed at the working face of his 
room by a fall of coal, Nov. 7, 1898. He was a widower, leaving two child- 
ren. 

Charles Sablatrey, aged 57 years, was killed by a fall of coal in the No. 2 
mine of the Decatur Coal company, Decatur, Feb 4. 1899. He was a Poland- 
er by birth and left a widow and five children. 

Randolph Hudson, miner, aged 52, working in the mine of the Catlin Coal 
company, was instantly killed April 11, 1899, under the most peculiar circum- 
stances. Miners working in the adjoining room, on the right of him, had 
discovered a large loose rock at the face of his room, which he was in the act 
of taking down, and was engaged in knocking out a prop from under it. 
When deceased came to the cross-cut between the two rooms he was told to 
stay back or he might get hurt. He stood still for a few minutes in the cross- 
cut watching the progress made in getting the loose rock down. The person 
working at the rock left it for a moment for the purpose of getting a piece of 
rail with which to knock out the prop, when deceased rushed in, saying, 
"Let me strike it," which he did, when the rock, weighing fully six tons, fell 
squarely on him. He left two children dependent. He was a member in 
good standing, of the Odd-Fellows, who buried him with all the honors of 
that Order. 



Fatal Casualities — Fourth District, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


'6 
1 


i 


q 

2 


1 


a 


Cause of Accident. 


1898. 

July e'f^PnrVf^ Spirniinn 


?^ 


Miner 

Stable boss! 
Miner 


Fairmount.. 

Athens 








1 
1 

1 

1 
4 


6 
4 
4 

4 

e 

28 


Falling rock 

Falling rock 


July 22 


Clias. Hughes 


24 

25 
53 

48 
27 
50 

48 

60 
57 
52 


Aug. 22 














Oct. 8 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 26 

Nov 7 


John M. Rennick 

Wra. Schoenbeck 

Geo. Ballanted 

James Mitehenson 

Andrew Hasse 

P. J. Franks 


Catlm 

Danville.... 
Westville... 

Lincoln 

WpstviMf.. 


1 
1 
1 

1 

7 


i 

5 


5 
3 
3 

3 

'5 
2 

23 


Palling down shaft.. 

Palling rock 

Palling rock 

Palling coal 


Nov. 23 

1899. 


Suffocation by gas... 


Feb. i 
Apr. 11 


Ohas. Sablatery 

Randolph Hudson — 


iDecatur 

, Catlin 


Falling coal 

Falling rock 













COAL IN ILLINOIS. 83 

Recapiliiudivn Fatal Casualities Fourth District, 1800. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Athens 


1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

11 


Miner. . 


10 

1 


Falling coal 

Fallinsf down shaft 

Falling rock 

Suffocation by gas. 


2 

1 

1 
11 


Athens Coal Co 

Boniietts, A 

c'lti/,. ii~ (''..al rV,'. .'.]'. 

Cou>n\\,\:,\,;\ C.alCo 

Ui'caliir (;oal Co 

Kelleyville Coal Co.. 

l-'awnee Coal Co 

Westville Coal Co ... 




Blount 

Catliii 

Dunville 

Decatur 

Fail-mount... 

Lincoln 

Westville .... 


Stable boss... 


2 


Totals 


'' 


11 













Xoii-Fdtal Casualties— Fourth District, 1800. 




Character of Injury. 



■July 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Dec. 



13 James Cottrell . 

22 James Mitchell. 

23 M. Corrigan 

29 Geo. Strickler.. 

30 Chas. Poison 

1 Willis Dorsett 

6 Chas. Jen 
15 Henry Wright 
17iW. A. Stone 

18 Robt. Keefe 

19 Frank Morse 
24|l. N. Slade 
25; S. A. Smoot 

26 Chas. Casteel 

27 Lee Haskius 
27'M. Slade.. -- 

31 P. Hogan 

2 N. S. McCannon 

3 B. N. Babb 
3 Thos. Henry 
3 Calvin Lichman . 

3 John Jackson 

8 S. Roberts, 

10 Jas. Brytis 
12 .lohn Erricksou 

14 L. Errickson 
19 Mike Louder 
26 Chas. Long 

11 Peter Alvoid. .. 
22 John Bull 

26 ■ has. Ramsey 

31 Wm. Woodley.... 

3 Joe Norkys 

4 W. Kintz 

51 A. Merry 

7;.!. Daubow 

7 J. Courtney , 

8 Alf Hackney ... 

14 V. Montgerard. 

21 .M. Cohnan 

22, R. K. Fox 

28 F. Fletcher... . 
30 Perry Gritted . . 
18 S. Robprts 

15 Frank Woodard 
I'Grant Evans 
IjJohn G. Dawson 
liAbner Jenkins.. 
2 John Baum 
3jJohn Grear 
21 Sara Morse 
3IJ. Davis ... 



Back and head injured. 

Body injured 

Back injured 

Arm crushed 

Leg broken 

Back injured 

6 Hand crushed 

Hantl crushed 

1, 2 Shoulder bruised 

Back injured 

Body injured 

Foot injured 

Foot injured 

Back injured 

Back injured 

Hand injured 

Hand injured 

Hand injured 

Eye injured 

Collar bone broken 

Hip injured 

Hip bruised 

Hand injured 

Leg broken. 

Face injured 

Foot injured 

Ankle injured 

Leg broken 

Body injured 

Foot crushed 

Leg broken 

Leg injured 

Collar bone broken 

Finger injured 

Toe injured 

5| Foot injured 

3 Ankle injured 

3 Face injured 

2! Arm broken 

Face injured 

liFoot injured 

.] tHip injured ...'. 

ll 2 Back injured 

5^ 6 Pingor cut off 

Hand injured 

4 Thumb injured 

I'lHead injured 

2 Back injured 

2 Leg injured 

2| Fingc- broken 

3| Back injured 

Body injured 



84 STATISICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Character of Injury. 



W. P. Myers 

James Hill 

OUie Surdara .... 

D. Andrews 

Lewis Young: — 

Henry Crawford. 

Jasper Humble... 

Deacamp.; — 

Riley Martin 

J. Mantz 

Andrew Politus.. 



Feb. 20 
•• 23 

" 28 
Mch. 2 



" 10 
" 13 
" 15 
" 16 
" 19 
May 4 



ClateFertig 

Chas. Angle 

Wm. Hamilton... 

Chas. Easton 

Wm. Sontagr 

Krank Moss 

Paul Pause 

Willard Blue 

John Boda 

W.DeWitt 

Wm. Woodson ... 

Bert Stagner 

P.J. Ogden 

G. iMauritz 

James Dickson... 
Fred Bark ley .... 
Chris Pickens — 
Chas. Wascheck.. 
Gerorae Dickens. 
Geo. Jones 

D. Nevins 

Isaac Richie 

Barney Brady — 

Chas.Conroy 

Ino. Leichty 

Joe Gushkieck... 
Fhurman Rouse. 
Arthur Hille 

las. Apolegate... 

Frank Love 

Graut Evans 

Geo. Steele 

\ut.'. Young 

J. Blaze 

A. Hunter 

Henry Smith 

P. Anderson 

Tom Coxen 

A. E. Petty 

ftoy Williams.... 

C. Sharlen 

John Brooks 

Chris Schnaapt.. 
Anton Morich — 
Geo. W. Brewer.. 

.lohn Hall 

Manuel Slade — 

Cbris Long 

Geo. Goulding 

I. E. Hughes 

Henry Rowe 

E. P. Smith 

Joseph Gerrish.. 

E. A. Roger 

Wm. Homer 

J. Harbeskny 



Oakwood ... 
Westville... 
Missionfl'ld. 
Westville... 

Catlin 

Danville 



Westville... 

Catlin 

Bloomingt'n 
Westville 



Grape Cr' 
Danville . 
Westville 
Bloomingt'n 

Catlin 

Missionfl'ld, 

Lincoln 

Grape Cr'k., 
Westville... 



Colfax . . 

Danville 

Decatur. . 
Athens .. 
Westville 
Decatur . 



Danville ... 

Tallula 

Westville... 
Missionti'ld 
Grape Cr'k 
Westville.. 



Grape Creek 
Missionfl'ld. 
Grape Creek 
Missionfl'ld 



Danville . 
Grape Creek 
Westville.. 
East Peoria 
Westville.. 



Missionfl'ld 

Danville — 
East Peoria, 
Westvill 



Decatur 

Colfax 

.Missionfl'ld 
Westville., 
Danville ... 

Athens 

Greenview 



Westville., 
Bloomingt' 
Greenview 
Tolulu 



Head injured 

Back injured 

Head cut 

Arm broken 

Back injured 

Body injured 

3|Hips injured 

4 Arm broken 

Body injured 

Leg and ankle hurt. 

Body injured 



66 53 143 213 



Foot injured 

Hips injured 

Hips injured 

Arm crushed 

Leg broken 

Hand in,iured| 

Body injured 

Hip broken 

Finger injured 

Arm broken 

Leg cut off 

Back injured 

Back injured 

Arm injured 

Leg broken 

Leg injured 

Leg injured 

Rib broken 

Arm injured 

.\nkle injured 

Back injured 

Foot crushed 

Leg broken 

Leg injured 

Foot injured 

Body injured 

Toe injured 

Eyes injured 

Foot injured 

Fingers mashed 

Eye injured 

Arm bruised 

Leg broken 

Leg injured 

Foot injured 

Ankle fractured 

Leg broken 

Back and head injured. 

Toe cut off 

Back injured 

Foot injured 

Toe cut off ■ 

Leg broken 

Leg and foot injured... 

Ribs broken 

Foot injured 

Finger cut off 

Body injured 

Back injured 



Ankle broken . 
Ankle injured. 
Body injured.. 



Leg broken. .. 
Back injured . 



147 
46 
40 
65 

100 
10 
21 
24 
90 
10 

161 
28 

150 
35 
45 
18 



10 
100 
10 
13 
60 
15 
8 
21 
95 
120 
24 
18 



Not recovered June 30,1899. 



COAL IX ILLINOIS. 



85 



Total Dien injured 


119 


Not recovered July ] 1899. 


1 




118 


Time lost by meu recovered 


5.b21 days. 


Average time lost by men recovered 


44.7 •• 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — 1899. 



Residence. 



Occupation. No. Cause of Accident.] No. 



Colliery. 



No. 



Athens 

Bloomington, 

Catlin 

Colfax 

Danville 

Decatur 

Ease Peoria. 
Fairmount •. . 
Grape Creek 
Greenview. .. 

Lincoln 

Mission Held . 

Oakwood 

Talula 

Westville 



3 Cager 

4 Carpenter 

6 Dirtman 

5 Drivers 

12 Laborers , 

4 Leverman 

2 Loader 

3 Mach. help'rs 
12 Mach. ruau'rs 

3 Miners 

IStable boss... 
27 Timberman... 

1 Top men 

2T 
34 



ippt 
)llyi 



Trollyman. 
Truckman. 



Ax 

Caire 

Elevator 

Falling: coal 

Palling rock 

Palling: timber 

l|Plyin& coal 

2 Iron bar 

3i Kicked by mules. , 

53 Pit-cars , 

1 Powder explosion 

Premature blast.. 

Tail chain , 



1 Athens Coal Co 1 

llAuldridge Coal Co... 1 

IjBlake.A. C 1 

31jBrookside Coal Co... 8 

50 Catlin Coal Co 5 

1 Citizens Coal Co 1 

4|Colfax Coal Co 4 

Ij Consolidated Coal Co 19 

3iDecaiur Coal Co 3 

21iEast Peoria Coal Co. 2 

2| Economy Coal Co 2 

llGlenburnCoal Co.... 4 

2 Greenview Coal Co.. 3 

HimrodCoalCo 20 

Jones & Son 1 

Kellyville Coal Co... 24 

McLean Coal Co 10 

TallulaCoal Co 2 

I Wabash Coal Co 2 

Westville Coal Co.... 6 

119 119 



Table showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time Lost, with Averages and Percentages — Fourth 
District. 





1 




i 

a 


1 


Time 


LOST. 


'c ■/. 


Nature of Injurie-s. 


Total ^^^^r 






6 
5 
4 

16 

13 
2 
3 
3 

13 
3 
3 
8 
3 
1 
6 

12 

8 

1 

1 
1 
3 


3 
2 
2 

■■••J2 

9 
1 
2 

1 
8 
2 

3 


3 
3 

1 
4 
4 

1 
1 

5 

3 
5 

4 

8 
1 
4 
1 


12 

""'29 
30 
1 
3 
3 
42 
8 

■■■"is 

4 
3 

4 
10 

■■■"17 
5 
2 
4 


166 
257 
330 
10 
916 
689 
100 
36 
71 
340 
212 
76 
106 
29 
46 
156 


27.7 
51.4 
82.5 
10 

57.3 
53 
50 
12 
23.7 
26.2 
70.7 
25.3 
13.3 
9.7 
46 
2fi 


5.05 






Arms injured 


3 36 




84 




13 45 


Bodies injured 


10 92 




1.68 






face injured 


2 52 




10.93 




2 52 


Fingers injured 


2 52 


Hands injured. 


6 72 




2.52 








5.05 




896 S-' 9 


10.08 




100 
420 
118 
20 
16 
65 
59 


100 
50.3 
59 
20 
16 
65 


84 


Legs injured 


6 72 




1.68 


Shoulder injured 


84 


Thumb injured 


84 


Toe cut off 


84 




- 




2.52 












119 


61 


55 


213 


5.324 44.7 


100.00 











STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Cass Coitnty— Fourth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 






Outfit. 




1 

s 


T 
1 

o 
ft 


o.S 


a 

6 

'bl 

1 
CD 


o 
o 

02 


-a ; 

1 : 

O ■; 

ii 

CO 


1 
.a 

o 

rs 

a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Ton 

of 

other 

grades 


9 


J. G. &G. S. Russell 

Chris Nelson. .. .". . ... 


Ashland 

Chandlerville 


205 
30 


2.4 

2.10 


5 
5 


Sh. 


S. 
Ho 


M. 
B. 


2.150 
1.280 


1,8001 350 
1.2S0L_ 




Totals 


3,430 .3,080 350 




Averages 





































Whole number of openings reported in 189S, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 2. 



Logan County — Fourth District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


PostofBce. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

s 
1 


i 

o 
.a 

Q 


1 |l 




1 



i 

-a. 


1 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Lincoln Coal Co 


Lincoln. . 


285 
290 
360 


5! 5 


Sh. 


S. 


?: 


99,962 61,9771 37,985 


2 


Mtizens' Coal Mining Co 


Mt. Puiaski". 


5 
4 


5 
5 


74.019! 46.632 27,387 
12,000l 8,000! 4, COO 




Totals 




185.981 


116,609 


69 372 












































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 3. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



87 



Cdss Coinifij, 7.9.95— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


i 




a 


a"« 




a: <u 

|5 


Acci- 
dents 
















2 


g 

g 


1 




i 


« 






Is 


•v 


o 


o 


'T 








1 
a 




o 

P 


s 

tl 

^2 


if 


>> 

p. 

e 

£ 
o 


1 

a 

J 

o 




>5 '^ 

si 


a. 
o 

O 


1?| 

te O O 


a 
1 

D. 

o 


on 

lis 

sSa 


3 


1 

§ 


Zi 


< 


i: 


<: 


<j 


< 


EH 


Cu, 


Dh 


O 


H 


M 


2; 


fe| z 








$3, 250 


10 


4 


14 


$1 00 


S-M. 


^on 


$2, 480 










2 


1 75 




2.240 


5 


1 


6 


1 00 


W. 


180 


1,465 


64 


1 












$5, 490 


15 


5 


20 






$3,945 


64 


1 






$1 69 


$0 80 


$1 00 




190 
















1" 





Logan Count ij. 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


a 
_© 


a 


a 






Si 1 Acci- 
a" !dent3 
















"S 


o 

a 


o 


^1^ 








ft • 


t^ 




SH 












ad 


% 


o 


o 






a> 




cS 




'? 


o-^ 
































c 


"its 


o 


|1 


It 

?.2 


V3 

O 
ft 

a 


o 
ft 


II 

^a 




ft 

o 

1 


^^1 


a 

1 
a 


r of horses 
oyed in or 


"si 


1 

a 


^s 






■3 a 


t 




si 


ll 


o 

1 


III 


o 


.Sail ■■ <S 
a S a j ri i o 


'Z, 


<Jl 


<1 


<; 


'^ 


< 


H 


- 


a.. 


Q 


&H 


w 


^ i^, Z 


1 SI 10 


SO 40 


$82,369 


90 


4, 


138 


so 42.5 


S-M. 


265 


* 


3,400 


ul.l.... 




106 


40 


60,385 


70 


32 


102 


42.5 




182 


$58,571 


2,119 


10 11 1 


3 


90 


60 


9,600 
S152.354 


15 


6 


21 


51 




170 


8.750 


300 


3I.. 


1 




175 


S6 


;wi 




S67, 121 


5,819 


33 1 




SI 07 


SO 41.1 










SO 43.5 




205 






.[ i.... 
















1 





* Amount iiot reported. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Macon County— Fourth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
i 


1 

T 

1 

o 

f 


ti 

si 

II 


i 

6 
^: 

Is 

1 

1 


o 
o 

J3 


■a 

§ 

o 

o 

ii 


1 

o 
a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 

other 

grades 


1 

2 


Decatur Coal Co.. No. 1... 
!.' W No. 2... 


Decatur 

Niantic' '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


612 
614 
365 


4 

5 


5 

5 

5 


Sh. 


S. 


M. 
B. 


86,680 
88,680 
21,688 


69,344 
70,000 
17.677 


17,336 
18,680 
4.011 










197,048 


157.021 


40, 027 


































1 











Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 3. 



McLean County — Fourth District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
'o 

Q 


4. 

o o 

3=2 


o 
6 

"S 

o 

o 


'u 
o 


i 

o 

ii 


T3 

3 

o 

1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 


McLean County Coal Co. 

C. H. Hewitt Coal Co 

Colfax Coal Mining Co. . . 

E. Colfax Coal Co 

Illinois Coal Mining Co.. 


Bloomingt'n 

Chenoa 

Colfax 

Bloomingt'n 


541 
275 
400 
400 
400 


4&3 
4.6 
5.6 
5.6 
4 


2&5 
6 
6 
6 
5 


Sh. 


S. 


B.: 

M. 


138,098| 126,700 
12.000 9,500 
31.356 23.446 
3,000 2,000 
25.000 22.000 


11,398 
2,500 
7.910 
1.000 
3.000 




Totals . 


209,454 183.646 25.808 






















1 


■■"T"" 












] 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 3. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 5. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



89 



Macon Countij, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 
1 


J: 
1 


g 






II 

D 

a? 


Acci- 
dents 






^ 
















Ba 


1 


o 




M 




§ 




g 


T3®-S 


-o 


'n 






1 

a 


o a> 

it 


3 
? 

1 


1 

^1 


if 
si 

>5 


1 

P. 

a 
1 


1 
o 

a 
1 


in 

-0.2 


II 


p. 
o 

> 

1' 


::! 
lii 

ess 
111 


s 
o 


.2.S 
•Si 


"3 
% 


3 


■z 


< 


< 


<l 


< 


-< 


^ 


ii 


cu 


p 


H 


M 


:z; 


'^ 


2 


1 


$1 17 


$0 40 


S88.067 


■ 100 


42 


142 


.so 50 


w. 


300 


S135.000 




10 


1 




2 


1 17 


40 


89.372 


110 


44 


154 


50 




300 


100,000 




15 




3 


a 


60 


35 


2,010 


5S 


24 


82 


40 




74 


12, 901 


791 


9 


1 










S189. 449 


268 


110 


378 






S247, 901 


791 


34 


3 




$1 10.6 


SO 39.5 










$0 48.9 




224 
















I 
















McLean County. 1889 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1^ 




5 
a 


d 


WW 




S2 
3*^ 


Acci- 
dents 























^aa 




as 
























aS 


* 

^ 








<« 




9 




n 




-3 


s| 






1 
a 
3 


Si 
II 




1 


3 

n 

si 

M 


11 

sa 

si 

>5 



P. 

a 

1 




1 

a 
s 




5 

■ll 
^^ 
a 
a 



11 

a^ 


! 



o5 OJ 


3 
u 

1 

a 

s 


1= 

1 

3 o; C 




3 
1 


■^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


Oh 


aS 


G 


H 


^ ^ h 


■iz, 


1 
i: SI 10 


SO 70 


S147,349 


215 


65 


280 


*$0 60 


w. 


287 


8114,646 


i 

25, 18 




10 


2; 1 70 


1 10 


18.900 


15 


9 


24 


55 


S-M. 


30(1 


6.500 


450 2 






3 


99 


44 


26,691 


26 


23 


49 


42 




2H(I 


25. 627 


1,312 6 




4 


4 


90 


50 


2,30C 


8 


5 


13 


40 




150 


2.500 


150 3 






5 


1 20 


80 


28.800 


15 


6 


21 


55 


' ' 


150 


14.000 


25 












S224,040 


279 


108 


387 








$163,273 


1,962| 29 




14 




SI 12.6 


$0 67.7 










$0 56. l| 


233 






























* Upper seam 4 feet thick, 55 cents per ?i'oss ton; lower seam 3 feet thick, 65 cents per 
gross ton. 



90 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Menard Conniij— Fourth District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


a 


1 

Is 
o 

o 

1 

a 


1 

ll 
o.S 

II 

Eh 


5 
1 
c 
d 
Z 

i 

o 

1 


O 

P. 

o 


o 

o 

11 


i, 

1 

3 

o 

1 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 


Athen?! Mining Co 

Chic. & Kas. City Coal Co 
Wabash Coal Co 


Athens 

Petersburg'... 

Athens 

Tallula 


200 
155 

187 
18J 
170 

85 
100 

60 


5.6 

5.6 

5.6 

5.6 

6 

5-6 

6 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 


St. 

H. 

St. 

H. 


B. 

:: 


!l 121. 593 
59,745 
117,069 
29,000 
1,929 
5,589 
89,071 
2,124 


94,3311 27,262 
44,742; 15,003 
87 069 30 000 


4 


TallulaCoal Co 


26,022 2,978 


t) 


William Parkin 


Sweetwaier . 


1,529 400 


6 

7 
8 


S. Mountain Coal Co 

Greenview C. Mining Co. 
William Denton 


Petersburg... 
Greenview ... 
Petersburg . . . 


4,324 265 
59,381 29,690 
2 1?4I 


q 


M. A. Hohimer 


601 K 


1 438: 1 d.snl 


ifl 


F. M. Miller 


BO 


5 6 


381 


38l| 




Totals 














427, 939 


321,341 


106 598 




Averages 







































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 10. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 10. 
II Mined by machine, 71,471 tons, at 34 cents per ton. 



Tazewell Conntij— Fourth District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output, 


a 

z 


o 

'o 
.a 

1 

a 


1 

li 


1 

o 
d 
Z 

.1 

o 

1 


4^ 

s-< 

o 

& 

o 

1 


-a 

o 

s- 

o 

ii 

CO 


J 
o 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


A. C. Blake 


East Peoria .. 

Pekin 

East Peoria .. 

Pekin '.'. 




5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 

.SI. 

Sh. 


St. R. 


19,047 
5,526 
1 601 

20,000 

4,500 

400 

261705 
2,000 

24,000 
2,000 
4,000 


13,880 
5,526 


5,167 


?. 


Bohlander Bros 


130 


5 


H. 

St. 

H. 






s 


G. Gebelhausen 


1.56Ji 40 


4 

5 


E. Peoria Coal Co 


11,250 

4,500 

240 

1,575 

26. 705 


8,750 


6 

8 


King & Grosweiler 

Cruickshanks G Sons.... 


East Peoria . . 
Pekin. 


160 
664 


q 


Millard Bros 


1001 4 
lOOi 4.8 
65 4 


l,700i 300 


10 


L. Grant & Sons 


5Sh. 

5 SI. 
5Sh. 


20, 000 
1.700 
3,500 


4.000 


11 




East Peoria .. 


300 


12 


Groveland Coal Co 

Totals 


50 


4 


500 








112,018 


92, 137 


19,881 
















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 12. 
Number of mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, I. 
Whole number of open!iig< reported for 1899. 12. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



91 



Menard County, 1S99. — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 





a 


. 


1° . 




lules 
tthe 


1 
s 


H a 

O OJ 

|| 

S5 


o 
o 

a 

1. 

II 


k 


i 

2.S 


1 


1 

o. 

S 


i 

as 

!l 

ea 


i 


0. 



1 



'h'i 

32g 


3 




w 

sal 


s 


1 














o 
















'z, 


-1j 


< 


< 


< 


<< 


e2 


Q- 






H 


W |Z \^[ z 


1 


fO 76 


$0 20 


S77, 144 


116 


56 


172'sO 40.5 


S-l\l. 


240 


$69, 729 


2.804 


17; 1 


1 


2 


78 


26 


38. 799 


S(l 


3C 


110 


40.7 




143 


40. 745 


2.263 






H 


85 


30 


83.009 


9(1 


32 


122 


40.7 




279 


73.042 


4.123 


iil.. 


^ 


4 


90 


48 


24.849 


26 


14 


40 


40.7 


■ ■ 


313 


20. 204 


1,059 


2 


5 


1 50 


1 25 


2.795 


5 


3 


8 


*62.5 


IM. 


175 


2,219 


90 3..;.... 


6 


1 25 


50 


6.03S 


5 


3 


8 


40.7 


S-M. 


179 


4.. 526 


211 2...... 


7 


82 


51 


63.834 


65 


30 


95 


40.7 


" 


2(»() 


51. 969 


2.970! 16.. 1 3 


H 


1 00 




2.124 


4 


3 




t52,5 


W. 


175 
.300 


1.200 


138 


1 




9 


1 75 




2.516 


4 


1 


5 


50 


■ ' 


850 


120 


1 




10 


1 50 




572 


2 


1 


3 


50 




75 


24!r' 


20 


1 










S301.680 


397 


173 


570 






S264. 732 


13. 798 


52 


Ij 8 




$0 82.4 


$0 33.8 


SO 40.72 




208 





















* Riddled coal. 
t Forked coal. 
Average for 4.053 forked and riddled tons. 57.3 cents per ton. 



TazeiceU Connfy, 1899.— Concln&ed. 



Values. 



< 



Si 






a a' 

2 .2 

S s. 

M O 



Acci- 
dents 



SI 00 
1 10 
1 00 



1 80 
1 04 

85 

85 

1 00 

1 00 

1 CO 



815.172 


20 




31 


6.079 


7 


2 


9 


1.571 


3 


1 


4 


14.806 


28 


6 


34 


4.275 


7 


5 


12 


304 


6 


1 


7 


1.817 


10 


3 


13 


■>2 699 


30 


12 


42! 


1.670 


14 


9 


231 


22.000 


15 


8 


■2-i\ 


1.850 


6 


4 


101 


3.75C 


4 




6 


8^5.993 


150 


64 


214I 












45 
*72., 
*70 
45 
50 
*72 
45' 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 



S-M. 


212 




2401 


W. 


200 


S-M. 


2S0| 




1651 


\V 


150! 


S-M 


1201 




231 j 




50 



700 
325 

850 
150 

40. 
88!. 
,411 
1001 
,000 1 
100! 
200! 



Forked coal. 



92 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Vermilion Countij — Fourth District — 1899. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 



Output, 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 

of lump 

coal. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Himrod Coal Co. No. 1... 
No.2... 

Catlin Coal Co 

Kellyville Coal Co., No. 2 
No, 3 

Westville Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 



Economy Coal Co., No. 1 
Brookside Coal Co., No. 1 
' • No. 2 

■John O. Connell , 

Muncie Coal Co 

CTlenburn Coal Co 

France Bros., No. 1 

E. S.Gray 

L. E. Baker 

.) ohn Swanson 

S. M.Hodge 

A Jones & Sons 

Banting Bros 

Haskiu &■ Son 

Danville Brick & Tile Co. 

Maueh Bros 

M. C. Wilkinson 

H. Harris 

Evan J. J ones 

S. Parle 

William C. ShafPer. ... 

John K. Colburn 

John Auldredge 

Miller & Spangler 

William R. Auldredge 

William Ray 

John E. Lloyd 

J ames Thomas 

D. A. Jenkins 

Cunningham & Co. ... 
Starisbury & Watkins 

A. H. Bonnett 

Elisha Lloyd 

Jonah James 

H. Blakeney 

John Woodard , 

J. W. Horning , 

J. A. Allison , 

Otto Leveridge 

Marriage & Son 

Thomas Graham , 

Ed. Earle 

A. Humes 

Bushong Bros 



Catlin.... 
Westville 



Fairmount .. 
Missionfleld. 

Danville 

Grape Creek. 



Muncie. .. 
Glenbuin. 

Catlin 

Danville. . 
Oakwood . 
Danville. . 



Catlin 

Grape Creek 



Catlin.... 
Danville. 



Vandercook . 
Danville 



Blount 

Danville 

Grape Creek. 



Oakwood. ... 
Georgetown.. 
Danville 



Grape Creek. 
Georgetown.. 
Danville 



Totals 



Averages. 



Sh. 



250, 440 
215,876 
157,760 
288,035 
303,089 
251,624 
74, 734 
118, 
75, 437 
112.958 
75,306 
27. 021 
25,000 
124,048 
3, 

10,000 
1,500 
1,237 
6,997 
5. 
4,872 
1,500 
6,000 
5,350 
1, 
1,200 
1,000 
2,500 
2,120 
500 
2.000 
2,526 
4,000 
450 
7, 
2,665 
7,500 
2,000 
2,400 
8.000 
6 

1.200 

500 

400 

1,000 

950 

1,200 

500 

5.000 

1,200 

8,000 



177,060 
215,876 
127,597 

288,035 



251,624 

55, 409 



112,958 
75.306 
4,800 
25, 000 
11,050 
3,600 
4,000 
1,400 

991 
4,810 
4,727 
4,872 
1,000 
6,000 
4.280 

900 
1,200 

700 
1,700 
1,414 

500 
1,61 
2,0 
3,000 

400 
5,600 
2.000 
6,000 
1,500 
1.800 
7,000 
5,000 

600 
1,000 

400 

350 

900 

800 
1,000 

450 
5.000 
1, 200 
8,000 



73.380 

'so.'ies 



303,089 



19. 325 
30.844 
75,437 



22, 221 
■ii2.'998 



6,000 
100 
215 

2.187 
1,181 



500 



1,070 
400 



400 
505 

1,000 
50 

2,000 
665 

1,500 
500 
600 

1.000 

1,100 
200 
200 
100 
50 
100 
150 
200 
50 



1,530,551 691, 



»* Both. 
t Strip. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 60. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 8. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 52. 



COAL IX ILLINOIS. 



93 



Vennilioti Count ij, 1890 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


ES. 


1 

a 


1 




11 




JS^ 1 Acci- 

S^ DENT.S 































^6 


ta 












» 


s 


■XI 


■Se^ 


^ 


t- c 






a a 







5 S 


"9 




Si 


1 


a 




\ 


C^ 1 

i. 






O <B 


i 


k 




"E 


^ 


U 


^>i 





::! 


V 


-■' i 






>2 


> . 


n' 


«S 


3 


"S 


II 


5l 


1 




1 


IJ 




3 




II 


II 


ii 

> c 









1 


ill 


*© 

M 


isill 


a 



z 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 




Oh 1 O, 


Q 


Eh 


i^ 


^ 'f^ ^ 


1 


so 62.5 


$0 62.5 


§156,525 


no 


90 


200 


*$0 40 


S-M. 


252 


$138,461 


4,207 


40! 1 


7 


2 


62.5 




134.922 


75 


53 


128 






268 


121.253 


3.858 




13 


3 


90 


■■■■26" 


120.870 


115 


42 


157 


40 




287 


85, 606 


4,220 


17('2 


5 


4 


90 




259,231 


210 


131 


341 


* 40 


' ' 


240 


174.424 


4,088 


18! 2 


8 


5 




■••g^- 


187.915 


228 


100 


328 


* 40 


' ' 


243 


168.956 


4,044 


271 1 


16 


H 


■■"to" 




176, 137 


270 


71 


341 


t 




205 


122, 450 


3,150 


28|.. 


6 


7 


1 00 


■■■■36" 


61,207 


61 


30 


94 


40 


;; 


249 


47, 396 


3, 054 


7; 1 3 


8 


90 


40 


91,647 




250 


250 


? 




185 


62. 730 

43, 677 


1,200 


8 .. 16 


9 




70 


52.806 


■■■{25 


27 


152 


40 


" 


258 


2.400 


9 .. 2 


10 


""eh" 




73, 423 


105 


47 


152 


11 40 




248 


73,672 


1,912 


16 . . : 3 


It 


65 




48,949 


70 


35 


105 


Si 40 




248 


49,114 


1,408 


8I..I 5 


12 


93 


■■■■68" 


19,574 


60 


20 


80 


40 




185 


17. 552 


1,200 


4 .. .... 


13 


85 




21.250 


40 


13 


53 


40 




150 


13,000 


1,200 


3 .. 




14 


85 


""76" 


88,491 


125 


56 


181 


II 40 




261 


78.098 


3.112 




"i 


15 


1 OO 




3.600 


7 


3 


10 


1 66 




260 


2,750 


100 


2 '.'. 




16 


1 25 


■■■■75" 


9.500 


9 


3 


12 


40 


' ' 


260 


5,600 


300 






17 


1 00 


50 


1,450 


2 


2 


4 


50 


w. 


110 


900 


30 


1 '.'. 




18 


1 25 


25 


1, 300 


2 




2 


40 




170 


702 


30 


1 .. 




19 


1 12 


70 


6.918 


6 


3 


9 


40 


S-M. 


290 


3.500 


120 


2 .. 


.... 


20 


1 12 


62 


6,026 


4 


3 




55 


W. 


294 


4,780 


149 








1 00 




4,872 


7 


3 


10 


40 


S-M. 


243 


3,000 


178 


21 _ ' i 


22 


60 


■■■■'s" 


740 


2 




1 2 


40 




120 


970 
3,300 


25 


1 .. 




23 


1 00 




6,000 


3 


i 


4 


45 


M. 


323 


84 






24 


1 15 


■■■■51)" 


5,457 


5 


7 


12 


40 


S-M. 


200 


4,000 


260 


3 ;; 




25 


1 12 


75 


1,308 








40 


W. 


140 


964 








26 


1 00 




1.200 


6 




8 


40 




150 


Norep'rt 


'■■■56 


i 






27 


75 


■■■"so" 


615 


2 




2 


40 


' ' 


200 


550 


25 


1 






28 


1 25 


25 


2,325 


5 


3 


8 


40 




150 


1,040 


30 


5 






29 


1 00 


20 


1,555 


2 


2 


4 


40 


' ■ 


270 


1,500 


42 


1 


■■ 




30 


1 00 

1 00 


25 


500 
1,700 







4 


' .0 


'w"- 


120 
200 


210 
1.400 


19 
150 








31 


3 


i 


2:: 




32 


1 00 


18 


2.112 


3 


3 


6 


40 


' ' 


157 


1,840 


122 


|.. 




33 


1 10 


40 


3,700 


6 


2 


9 


40 


S-M. 


150 


2,830 


160 






34 


1 00 


50 


425 


2 


1 


3 


40 


W. 


100 


320 


2C 


1 •• 




35 


80 


40 


5,280 


10 


6 


16 


40 




280 


5,280 


215 


4!.. 




30 


1 00 


75 


2,499 


3 


4 




40 


S-M. 


200 


1.970 


80 


ij.. 




37 1 15 


80 


8,100 


12 


4 


16 


40 


W. 


300 


5,300 


200 


2 .. 




38 1 00 


87 


1,935 


8 


1 


9 


40 




150 


1,200 


40 






39 1 00 


50 


2.100 




2 


7 


40 




200 


l.SOO 


40 


21 




40 


1 00 


50 


7,500 


12 


4 


16 


40 




210 


5,800 


400 


2|'i| .... 


41 


1 00 


50 


5,550 


6 




8 


40 


• ' 


231 


446 


350 


2.. 




42 


1 00 


40 


680 


4 


2 


6 


40 


' ' 


100 


520 


40 


1 .. 




43 


1 00 


40 


1,080 


3 


2 


5 


40 




150 


800 


100 


1 .. 




44 


1 00 


25 


425 


2 


1 


3 


40 


' ' 


80 


300 


80 


I-- 




45 


1 00 


50 


375 


2 


2 


4 


§ 


' ■ 


10 


270 


75 


1 




46 


1 00 


50 


950 


3 


2 


5 


40 




120 


660 




i':: 




47 


1 00 


50 


875 


3 


2 


5 


40 


• ' 


125 


690 


85 


li.. 




48 


1 00 


40 


1,080 


4 


3 




40 


S.M. 


150 


830 


91 


I!-- 




49 


1 00 


50 


475 




3 


3 


I 


W. 


100 


350 




1.. 




501 ^0 




3.500 


■■"io 


4 


13 


40 


S-M. 


150 


350 


200 


1.. 




51 


70 




840 


4 


2 


6 


40 




100 


850 


60 


1.. 




52 


70 




5,600 


6 


2 


8 


40 




180 


600 


350 


■' 


» 










SI. 603, 094 


1.772 


1.053 


2,825 






$1,264,361 


43,449 


'>52 


91 




$0.77.39 


SO. 60. 55 










SO 40 




193 




' 

























.... 



* Price for machine mining, 30 cents per ton. 
t Price for machine mining, 23 cents per ton. 
Price for machine mining, 35 cents per ton. 
'i Miners paid SI. 50 per day for mining 120,365 tons. 
H Forked coal. 



94 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation hy Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 




















^ ,/ 


fl IK 


U 0) 






i' 






■d 




s 






2S 


^5 


Counties. 


a 

a 




1 
"3 




'3 


2 


Is 

a 


1 


i 


'S'a 


S5 


It 
It 




o 










1 


? 


a 
ft 


i| 


bia 






a 






a 












§1 


2-3 

ScM 


£1.2 






^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 








z 


CC 


^ 


•-i 


<J 


H 


H 


H 


&H 


EH 


<1 


•< 




2 


R 


2 






3,430 
185, 981 


3,080 
116, 609 


350 
69, 372 




300 
11. 198 


$1 69 
1 07 






141,568 






3 


3 








197,048 


157,021 


40, 027 


65, 327 


5,104 


1 106 


395 


McLean 


5 


4 


1 


2 




209,454 


183,646 


25,808 


77, 169 


15, 191 


1 126 


677 




in 


5 


5 






427, 939 


321,341 


106. 598 


370, 750 


19, 916 


824 


338 


Tazewell 


12 


4 


8 


1 




112,018 


92, 137 


19,881 


39,305 


2.886 


946 


445 


Vermilion 


52 

87 


18 
37 


34 

50 


3 


8 
10 


2,221,867 


1,530,551 


691,316 


2,052,723 


52,269 


7739 


6055 


Totals 


3,357,737 


2,404,385 


953,352 


2,746,842 


106,864 




























$0 8513 


$0 5509 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1898,94. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned duringthe year, 10. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899,87. 

Average price paid for mining 18,610 screened tons. 72 cents per ton; 120,365 tons mined 
and paid for at $1.50 per day. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



95 



FoKi-fh District— 1809. 













r s/. 


61 •' =- -ct: 












Employes. 




^ c 


~ >■ ~ 5 5 


Casualties 


Mac 


^IXE.s. 










Ji' 


^1 


lid 1 1 r. 










o ■ 




s 








Z || 


>> 




t 


o 




11 

^2 


1"^ 


f.lt '1 Ills 

22 = 1 -^ "w^-rt 






" 2 ~ 


i 


i£ 


"3 


"c 


a 


5s 


o 


i:^' N 


= ^2 






oil- 
s' o 


ii 


1^ 




!■? 


3 


l> 


li 




ll^ 


^ 


I 5 


WM 


.a 




fi 


cB 


a 




-^ 


ll£ i 11 ill 




s 




« '^ 


II 




















3.;- 


< 


2; 


2; 


H 


< 


<l 


^ ; ^ |z 


2 




'A 


z 


E-i 


S5, 490 


15 


5 


20 


190 


SI 00 


1 i 

$3,945 64; 1 












152, 354 


175 

268 
279 
397 


86 
110 
108 
173 


261 
378 
387 
570 


205 

233 
208 


435 
489 
504 
407 


1 
67.121 5,819 33 

247,901: 791 34 

i 
163,-73 1,962 29 

264,732113.798 52 


1 
1 

1 


1 
3 
14 
8 








189, 449 








224,040 








301,680 


1 


8 


71,471 


95, 993 


150 
1,772 


64 
1.053 


214 

2,825 


187 
193 


45 
40 


72.774 5,041 25 
1.264,36143,4491 252 


8 


2 

91 
119 








1,603,094 


8 


58 


1.011.890 


S2. 573, 100 


3.056 


1,599 


4,655 






$2,084.107 70,924 426 


11 


9 


66 


*1. 083. 361 










199 


SO 4315 


i 



































Average price paid for machine mining. 29.1 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



FIFTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1891). 

Counties: Calhoun, Chri-stiau, Greene, Macoupin, Montf^omery, Sangamon, 

Shelby, Scott, Jersey, Morgan. 

Walton Rutledge, Inspector, Alton, 111. 



Hon. David Rosy, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Si)ri)>fjfield, Illinois: 
Sir:— In compliance with section 12 of an act of the General Assembly, in 
relation to coal mines and subjects relating thereto, and providing for the 
health and safety of persons employed therein, I have the honor herewith to 
submit the sixteenth annual report of the Fifth Inspection District, for the year 
ended June 30, 1899. The tabular part of this report gives the number of 
mines in the district, both shipping and local; new mines and abandoned 
mines; the depth of coal below the surface; the thickness of the seams of 
coal, and the geological number thereof; the number of miners and other 
employes engaged in the mining industry of the district; the number of days 
each mine was in operation during the year; the number of kegs of powder 
used in mining; the number of accidents, fatal and non-fatal; the number of 
horses and mules employed in and around the mine; the number of tons of 
lump and other grades of coal produced, and the disposition made of the 
same, whether shipped, sold to local consumers, or consumed at the mine; 
the prices per ton paid for mining; the value of lump and other grades per 
ton at the mine; the number of coal cutting machines in use, the power used 
by coal cutting machines, the total tonnage cut by machines, the aggregate 
value of the total product; the number of mines using cable haulage, and 
electric haulage; the number of ventilating fans; and the number of shaking- 
or mechanical screens used at the mines. 



7 C. R. 



98 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The coal production, by counties, in the Fifth District, with increase or 
decrease on output in each, for the years ending June 30, 1898, and 1899, is 
shown as follows: 





Total Output of all Grades 
of Coal in Tons. 


Increase. 






1898. 


1899. 






4,893 

495,616 

8,520 

1,680 

1,264,926 

294,667 

1.800 

1,763,863 

21,337 


4,118 

572,459 

14,370 

4,050 

1,646,674 

354,201 

4,800 

2,083.572 

20,617 

105, 765 




775 




76,843 
5,85 
2,370 
381.748 
59, 534 
3,000 
319.707 




























Scott 


720 




37.377 










3,925,690 


4,810,626 


886,431 


1,495 






Increase 


886, 431 




1.495 




884, 936 







The following summary is given as a recapitulation of the principal facts to 
be found in the schedules of the various counties: 



Number of mines 

Number of shipping mines 

Number of local mines 

Number of new mines 

Number of abandoned mines 

Total output in tOQS of 2,000 pounds 

Tons of lump coal 

Tons of other ijrades 

Tons hipped by railroads 

Average value per ton of lump coal at the mine 

Average value per ton of other grades at the mine 

Aggregate value of total product 

Number of miners 

Number of other employes 

Total number of employes 

Average number of days worked during the year 

Total amount paid out in wages 

Number of kegs of powder used 

Number of horses and mules in and around the mines 

Number of coal cutting machines used 

Total number of tons cut by machines 

Number of fatal accidents 

Number of non-fatal at^cidents 

Number of tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 

Number of tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident — 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 

Number of persons employed to each non-fatal accident 

Number of mines using compressed air coal cutting machines. 

Number of mines using electric coal cutting machines 

Number of mines using cable haulage 

Number of mines using electric haulase 

Number of ventilating fans in the district 

Number of shaking or mechanical screens at the mines 



87 

51 

36 

10 

2 

,810.626 

. 480, 311 

,330,315 

,095,235 

$0.8215 

$0.3456 

,318,120 

4,421 

1,980 

6.401 

190 

,665.965 

100, 756 

621 

144 

,892,040 

14 

68 

343,616 

70.745 

457 

94 

11 

2 

4 

1 

56 

20 



The output of coal for 1899 shows an increase of 884,936 tons or 22.5 per 
cent over 1898. The district is still about 750,000 tons short of its normal out- 
put. In Macoupin county the mines on the C. & A. R. R. did not work much 
over one-half time. The Consolidated Coal Co's. mines No. 10 Mount Olive, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 99 

and the Hornsbj' mine at Hornsby, only worked one-half time, owing to re- 
pairs being made at these mines. The Carlinville Coal Go's mine only worked 
130 days, owing to the outer works at the mine being burned down; the loss in 
the county is about 350,000 tons for the year. The mines in Christian county, 
except the mine of the Taylorville Coal Co., only worked about one- half time, 
enrailing a loss to the county of about 50,000 tons. Montgomery sustained a 
loss of about 50,000 tons, Sangamon county about 25,000 tons. Most of this 
loss of tonnage was caused by the coal companies at Pana and the companies 
on the C. & A. R. R. refusing to pay the scale price, of 40 cents per ton 
gross for mining. 

Mine Fires. — At the Carlinville Coal Co.'s mine at Carlinville, on January 
2. 1899, a fire broke out on the upper landing. The tower, screens, elevator 
bins and housing around the tower were all destroyed. The mine was work- 
ing at the time. The men were safely taken out of the mine at the escape- 
ment shaft. A new plant has been erected on more modern principles very 
much superior to the old one. 

At the Girard Coal Co's mine at Girard the machine and blacksmith and 
carpenter shops were destroyed by fire June 1, 1899. They have not been 
rebuilt at this time. 

Escapement Shafts.— The Litchfield Mining & Power Co., of Litchfield, and 
the Edingburg Coal Co., of Edinburg, have finished their escapement shafts 
during the year. The Montgomery Coal Co., of Paisley, and the Citizens' 
Coal Co., at their "B" shaft in Springfield, will finish their escapement shafts 
in the near futuie. The Junction Mining Co., of Springfield, has made a 
through connection into the Black Diamond Coal & Tile Co.'s mine, which 
makes a second escapement for both of the&e mines. The Madison Coal Co., 
at its No. 5 mine at Mt. Olive, has made a through connection to the Con- 
solidated Coal Co.'s No. 10 mine, which also makes a second escapement for 
both of these mines. 

Improvements. — The Montgomery Coal Co., at Paisley, has put in a pair of 
first motion engines, also two boilers, with new engines and boiler houses. 
The engines and boilers were manufactured hj the Litchfield Car & Machine 
Co.. of Litchfield. 

The Consolidated Coal Co., of St. Louis, Mo., have installed an electric 
haulage plant at their No. 10 mine at Mt. Olive during the year. A generator 
of 100-kilowatt power, with suitable engine power to run it, has been erected 
on the surface. The locomotive in the mine weighs 10 tons, and is 80 horse 
power, a four wheel, straight geared for 26-inch gauge, with a draw bar pull 
of 3,750 pounds, at a normal speed of 8 miles per hour. It is fitted with arc 
lights and auxiliary kerosene lights. They have also introduced fifty 16-eur- 
rent pressure itfcaudescent protected lamps into the mine. In introducing 
the plant, 6,400 feet of new track was laid of 30 and 85-pound rail. The plant 
was installed by the Link-Belt Co., of Chicago, 111. 

Electric Mining Locomotives. — The Duncan Foundry & Machine Works, 
Alton, III., have just shipped the Westei'n Coal & Mining Co., for use in one 



100 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

of their mines, a mining locomotive of 3,000 pounds draw bar pull. This is 
the third locomotive the Duncan works have constructed for the coal com- 
panies. 

The first two were small, weig'hing 2,000 pounds, with a drum and rope at- 
tachment which enabled them to draw loaded cars from rooms running to the 
dip in a pitching vein. The locomotive remains in the entry while the cars 
are hauled from the room face by the rope. By the use of clutches, the 
motor is thrown into gear with the driving axle or drum, or both, as desired. 

The locomotive just shipped to Arkansas has an electric equipment fur- 
nished by the General Electric Co., consisting of 2-GE 61 motors, operated 
on a 250-volt line at a speed of 8 miles per hour. The locomotive exerts a 
draw bar pull of 3,000 pounds at full speed, and was designed by Mr. S. W. 
Farnham, mechanical engineer of the coal companies, to meet requirements 
in the coal companies' mines. Two similar machines are being constructed 
at Alton. 

The entries in the southwestern mines are often low and narrow, requiring 
specially designed locomotives to operate in them to advantage. For gauges 
of 35 inches and upwards, the main frame of the locomotive is placed inside 
the wheels, the width of a 36-inch gauge locomotive over all being about 46 
inches; the length, exclusive of bumpers, is 12 feet; the height above rail, 
exclusive of trolley, 42 inches. Motors with gear take up only 22 inches space 
along the axle. This enables a locomotive with frame outside the wheels to 
be constructed for track gauges as narrow as 24 inches. 

The locomotive can be controlled from either end with equal facility, hav- 
ing a commutating switch, by means of which the motors can be used in par- 
allel or series, as it suits the wish of the motorman to run at either full or 
half speed. In mine work, a series or parallel controller has often proved 
unsatisfactory, as on a bad track one pair of wheels frequently slip on the 
rails, and the motor without exerting any attractive effort produces a counter 
electro-motiye force which prevents the other motor from doinjj work. It is 
generally necessary, therefore, to start the motors in multiple, and if half 
speed is required, the current can be cut off momentarily after the locomotive 
attains moderate speed and the motors thrown into series. Compactness has 
been the main object in view in designing these machines. 

Prospective Mines. — The Madison Coal Co., of St. Louis, is putting down a 
hoisting and escapement shaft at Divernon, Sangamon county, on the line of 
the St. L.,P. & N. R. R. Both shafts are being sunk at onetime. This, when 
completed, will be one of the best plants in our State. A steel lower will be 
erected and all of the buildings used at the plant will be made fire-proof. 
The coal seam is on an average about 8 feet thick, having been proved by 
boring at a depth of 380 feet. Both shafts are made 9x18 feet in the clear. 
Iron stairways and platforms will be used for escapement in one compartment 
of the air or escapement shaft. The coal will be mined by electric coal cut- 
ting machines; the hauling done by electric motors. The mine will be opened 
out on the most approved principle for haulage and ventilation. The coal 
will be worked on the panel system. Everything is designed for a large daily 
output. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 101 

Fatal Accidents. — Art-hur Jones, a singfle man, a,i?ed 19 years, died July 11, 
1898, from an injury received in the Litchfield Mining and Power Company's 
mine, Litchfield. On July 8, 1898, Arthur Jones was taken into the mine by 
James and Louis Ramsey, for the purpose of seeing the mine, and see the 
miners work. James and Louis Ramsey, both being miners working in the 
mine, asked the mine manager to allow them to take Jones into the mine as 
they said they would look after him and see that he would come to no harm. 
The mine manager then allowed Jones to go into the mine. It appeal's that 
James Ramsev was setting props, and his son, Louis Ramsey, was sawing a 
prop and the boy, Jones, was sitting on a prop. A small piece of slate fell, 
striking Jones on the right side of his face. He did not seem to be seriously 
injured at first. James Ramsey and son took the boy out of the shaft and 
took him home. He died, however, July 11, 1898. The doctor stated that he 
died of hemorrhage of the brain. 

Amos Howett, a miner aged 42 years, was killed July IG, 1898, in the Riv- 
erton Coal Company's No. 2 mine; his death was caused by the running 
away of a mule with an empty trip of cars. The cars jumped the track and 
striking Howett hurting him internally, from which he died in two days. 

Thos. Price, a miner aged 47 years, was fatally injured July 18, 1898, in 
Spaulding Coal Company's mine, by a premature blast. The squib went off 
-as soon as the light was put to it, which fired the shot. Price was struck by 
flying coal, from which he died in two days. 

John Davis, a driver, aged 19 years, was killed September 2, 1898, in the 
Litchfield Mifting & Power Companys' mine at Litchfield by being crushed 
between a car and a prop. He was driving through the pass-way from the 
fourth north entry to the third north entry. There was a slight grade. From 
some cause he had failed to sprag the car. At the foot of the grade the car 
■jumped the track, crushing him between the car and a prop. 

James Rafferty, aged 32 years, and Joseph Mayfield, aged 23 years, were 
found dead September 2, 1898, in the Capitol Coal Company's mine, Spring- 
field. Rafferty and Mayfield were sent by the mine manager to clean out a 
portion of the air course on the main east entry. The air having become 
■charged with black damp where thej'^ were working, which caused their lights 
to go out. The men were trying to get to the main intake entry, where there 
was fresh air. They made a mistake and turned into an abandoned entry 
which was densely full of black damp. The damp struck them down. They 
were found dead at a point about twenty feet within the mouth of the old en- 
try, and about one hundred and fifty feet from the main intake air course. 

Fritz Hubert, miner, aged about 50 years, was killed September 19, 1898, 
in the Consolidated Coal Company's No. 10 mine at Mount Olive. Hubert 
was riding in the cars to his work in the morning. In passing along the 
south entry, some top coal had fallen in the entry; the cars run up against 
the top coal lying on the track. The driver unhooked the mnle. Hubert and 
two other miners got out of the cai's and passed over the fallen coal. From 
some cause Hubert turned back and was in the act of sounding the slate 
above where the coal had fallen. The slate came away very suddenly and 
■caught him. 



102 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Poilitt Brown, a miner aged 38 years, was killed October 7, 1898, in the 
Assumption Coal & Mining company's mine at Assumption, by a fall of rock 
in the face of the Long Wall work. He was in the act of taking down some 
coal at the working face; there was a slip in the coal which passed up into 
the rock. When the coal was relieved from the slip the rock fell and caught 
him. The slip could not be seen from the face of the coal. 

Andrew Malkis, a machine helper, aged 33 years, was killed Oct. 23, 1898, 
in the Taylorville Coal Company's mine, Taylorville. The machine runner 
had cut across the room and was working on the last cut, on the right hand 
side of the room. There was a large slip on the back of the coal that was be- 
ing cut. About thirty tons of coal suddenly fell away and caught him as he 
was shoveling away from the machine, killing him instantly, it was said he 
had a wife and two children in Russia. 

Oscar Flei-iing, miner, aged 58 years, was killed November 22, 1898, in the 
Consolidated Coal Company's No. 10 mine, Mount Olive. He was killed in 
the face of a room by top coal falling on him'. Top coal had been left up for 
about seven feet back from the face of the room. The coal had been shatter- 
ed by previous shots. Fleming was standing in a mine car prying off some 
coal left by the last shots at the face; when this coal fell it relieved the top 
coal, when it fell and caught him, pressing his head down on the end of the 
mine car, killing him instantly. 

Louis D. Davis, engineer, aged 34 years, was found dead in the dynamo 
room of the Hillsboro Coal Company, Hillsboro. The dynamo room was in 
the rear of the engine room, where the hoisting engines were -located. The 
engines were running away; had destroyed ropes, cages, etc. After the en- 
gines were stopped Davis' body was found near the pully wheel of the dyna- 
mo. His skull was fractured and life was extinct. After a week's session by 
the coroner's jury their verdict was that he came to his death from causes un- 
known to the jury. 

Henry Smith, miner, age not known, was injured by falling slate in the 
Penwell Coal & Mining Company's mine at Pana, December 5, 1898. He was 
working in the face of a room. Some slate fell and struck him on the back 
and shoulders. He was taken to St. John's Hospital, Springfield, Illinois, 
for treatment where he died December 12, 1898. 

Toby Gusti, miner, aged 50 years, was killed January 3, 1899, in the Bar- 
clay Coal and Mining Company's mine, Barclay. He was killed at the face 
of the entry by falling slate. He had prepared to set props to support the 
roof; he failed to do so until it was too late. 

Paul Lafis, miner, aged 50 years, was killed May 16, 1899, in the Spaulding 
Coal Company's mine, Spaulding. He was killed at the face of a room bj' a 
premature blast. 

Harvey Williams, miner, aged 25 years, was killed May 25, 1899, in the 
Springside Coal & Mining Company's mine, Pana, He was killed at the face 
of room No. 12 in the 1st north entry. There was a slip in the slate, also in 
the coal. He had set a prop under the slate, but too far back from the slip. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



io:j 



In takintj the coal off the slip the slate came away ami cautrht him. If the 
slip could have been seen, it is presumed he would have serurt-d the slate ijy 
timbering' under it. 

Following' will be found the tables of casualties and the statistical tables of 
the output by counties. 

Ivespect fully submitted, 

Walton Rutledge, 
Alton, Illinois. State Insjjector of 3Iineii, Fifth District. 

Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— Jul;/ 1, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 
(Town ) 




o 




'7. 


c 

1 


Cause of Accident. 


189S. 
July 10 


Amos Howett 


I"* 


Miner 

Driver ''!!!! 
Laborer 

Miner. 


Riverton ... 
Spaulding.. 
Litchfield... 
Springfield . 
Springrfleld. 
Mt Olive... 
Assumption 
Taylorville. 
Mt. Olive... 
Hillsboro... 


1 

1 
1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


6 .. 

3|.. 




Pit-rnr . 




47 
19 
32 

i 




Sept, 2 


John Davis 

Jas. Rafiferty 

Jos. Mayfleld 

Fritz Hubert 


'4 
5 


Pit-car 






Black damp . 


" 19 


F.illiny rock 


Oct. 7 

•' 23 

Nov. 22 

Dee. 3 

•' 12 






5 F«lliT.<r nf rnfk 


Andrew Malkis 

Oscar Fleming: 

Louis D. Davis 


33 
58 
34 


Ma. Hel 

Miner 

Ensmeer ... 
Miner 


2 

8 




3 
9 

3 

1 


Falling of coal 

Fallintr of coal 

Found d"d engr. room 


1899. 
Jan. 3 


TobiGusti 


50 


Barclay 

Spaulding .. 
Pana 


1 


1 


^ 


Falling rock 


May 10 
May 25 


Paul Lafls 


g\ '' ■ : 


1 




Harvey Williams 

Totals 




4 


Falling rock 









10 


9 


33 





Total fatal casualties— 14. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — FiftJi District — Julij 1, 1899 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casulty. No. ' Colliery. No. 


Assumption.. 

Barclay 

Hillsboro 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 


Driver 

Engineer 

Laborers 

Mach. helper. 


1 Black damp 2 A'smpt'n Coal <fc MCo 1 

1 Fallingcoal 2 Barclay Coal & M Co 1 

2 Falling rock 5 Capital Co-op CikWCo 2 

1 .Mine cars i 2 iConsolidat. d Coal Co 2 

9 Pr-enin.t.iire blast .1 2 ;Hi llshoro ( 'omI ( 'o . 1 










Riverton 

Springfield... 

Spaulding 

Taylorville ... 




|Pe.,wi-llCoal& MCo 1 
1 Riverton Coal Co.... 1 

Spaulding Coal (,'o.. 2 
ISprinside Coal M Co. 1 

Taylorville Coal Co.. 1 


Totals . . 


14 




u 


... 1 14 ! . .14 








1 i 



104 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— July 1, 1899. 



Character of Injury. 



Aug. 

Sep. 

Oct. 

Nov. 



Oct. 
Nov. 



Aug. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



John Vaughn 


•).) 


Nick hleibert 


3!S 




Is 


Johu Pritchard.. 


5ti 


Wni. McCattrey.. 


•!N 


hVed Dyer 


■4i> 


Jonu Pritchard.. 


56 


Victor Singer 


;w 


Andrev.' Clorba... 


4U 


Jos. Ainiit 


w, 


J \i AJdi-ri'^ 


if 


Jos. ,Iur,-k 





W. S< isl.V Jl 

Bert Meikie \2o 

liich ;\Ii-ichert... 21 
H. M. CrisweU...Uo 
Harvey Alex'nder'j:j 
Frauk Kaisuu.. 
• fas. .UclOvov... 

.lac Knrl 

Walter .M.ioie.. 
Chas. G:i-t(.n. ,. 
Henry .Jolnison 
Tony Beriuette 
Fritz Muentcich 
Ed Witleii 



Feb. 



Mar. 



1S99. 

Jan. 24 .John Hosvell 

•• :i4T(.uey S.^jl.ert ... 
■ 2i Fraidv O.selett.... 
b Virgil Bi-h..p ... 
17 Fred B-,!,,., 

26 .John Kr;,v,-^ 

27 Felix i;i:i :i-,k ... 
27Ja.s I'll. '..It 

: A. Toue 

) Wm. Loedel^er ... 

• Oscar Cartledge. 

• Peter Fagan 

> Frank Cartledge. 
) Wm. Mclntyre... 

) Wni. Stehliue 

' Peter Willing 

L Clis. L. Lisinberg 
) Robt. Mcllvaney. 

i r. A. IMper 

1 Frank Borg 

' L'ui-t Flemming. . 

Hes Knoewmiller 

Peter- R.-iiiinzauer 

Oliver ('aiiipbell. 

; Oi-ville Chapniaii 

■■ '. Wni. .^cheei-.xclikl 

" bl.Juliu Cov.d 

■• 1-l-las. >V. McCee... 

•■ lolFre.l Hoj'n 

July ;.i R(.)bt. Watt^ 

Oct. 7 lild H<>lv.-y 

Nov. ', Ed Mcyosern.... 
'• 2i y,M). Hartnian.... 
" 2b Frauk llarwood.. 

" 2> John Kurii.s 

Jan i;, Ed Upton 

■■ VJ J. -1. Dillon. Jr... 
Feb. 13 Arthur Vancill... 

2ji'l'lios. Ryan 

Mar. 10; Fred Snyder 

Juuel0!Wm Thomas 



\ sstimption 

Hornsby 

.Moweaqua.. 
Staunton . . . 

Hornsby 

Mt. Olive... 
Statmton . .. 

Barclay 

Moweaqua.. 
Staunton . . . 
Litchfield... 
Moweaqua.. 
Staunton . . . 
Mt. Olive .. 
Litchfield... 

Hillsboro'.;; 
Staunton ... 



Gillispie .. 
.Mt. Olive 

Pana 

Pana 



Mt. Olive. 
Staunton . 
Paisley... 



April 
May 1 



2t) 



J line 



Staunton ... 

(.Tillespie ... 
151 Hornsby.... 

jr,|Virdeu 

i'.i Staiintou . .. 
li; Lirchlleld .. 

-'"> \irden 

l^'LitidiMeld .. 
25|Movveaqua . 
'■ Mt. Olive... 

Gillespie ... 

Assumption 

Staunton ... 



billespie 
Mt. Olive 
Nil wood . 
Green Ridge 

Mt. Olive... 

Staunton ... 



Moweaqua.. 

Staunton . . . 
37lMt. Olive... 

44iPana 

il Hornbsy 

22 Ridgdly 

^2 Springfield . 

Ridgely 

Springfield . 

S tames 

Ridgely 

Springfield . 



.■Auburn 

Ridgely 

Springfield . 
Dawson 



Back injured . 
Head injured . 
Hand injured. 
Head injured. . 
Hand injured. 
Foot injured.. 
Arm broken.. . 
Foot injured.. 
Leg broken — 
Foot injured .. 
Ribs broken... 
Face injured.. 
Legs injured.. 
Ankle injured. 
Rib broken ... 
Hips injured.. 
Body injured.. 
Head injured.. 
Body injured.. 
BoJy injured.. 
Arm broken... 
Body injured . 
Body injured.. 
Body injured.. 

Leg broken 

Body injured.. 
Leg broken 



. . Body injured 

2 Leg injured 

. . Arm injured 

1 Body injuied 

..'Leg injured 

ejLegs injured 

. . Body injured 

.. Leg btoken 

. . Face injured 

1 Collar bone broken . 

2 Leg broken 

. . Body injured 

2 Leg injured 

4[Foot injured 

. . Back injured 

5 Body injured 

4 Ribs broken 

. .iLeg broken 

2 Head injured 

4I Ankle injured 

. .IPoot injured 

51 Body injured 

4 Body injured 

. . Hand injured 

. . Body injured 

5 Body irgured 

2 Arm injured 

5 Leg broken 

. . Foot injured 

. . Arm broken 

1 Leg broken 

. . Shoulder dislocated 

. . Arm broken 

. . Back injured 

. . Arm broken 

. . Body injured 

. . Fingers injured 

1 Hips injured 

1 Head injured 

1 Leg broken 

. . Leg injured 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



105 



Total number injured 

Number, time lost not reported 
Number reported losing time.. 

Total time lost 

Average time lost 



68 
5 

63 
2, 792 days 
44.3 '• 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Accidents — Fifth District — 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. Cause of Accident. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Assumption.. 

Auburn 

Barclay 

Dawson 

Gillespie 

'^reeu Ridge. 
Hillsl)oro .... 
Hornsby 

1 .iti-litiplfl 


2 
1 

1 




1 
24 

90 




10 
14 

"2 
3 


Assumption Coal Co. 
Barclay Coal Co 


7. 


Drivers 

Gripper 

Laborers 

Loaders 

Mach. helper. 
Mach. runner. 
Mine exam'er. 

Miners 

Picker 

Timberman .. 


Drill 




Falling coal 

Falling cross bar .. 
Falling down shaft 
Falling from car... 
Falling rock 


BrckDiam'dCoalCo 
Chicago- VirdenC. C. 
Citizen's Coal Co — 
Consolidated Coal Co 
Green Ridge Coal Co 
HillsboroCoalCo.... 

Junction Coal Co 

Litchfield M. & P. Co 


1 
2 
1 

30 
2 
1 


Flying coal 


1 




2 




5 


Moweaqua.... 

NilwnrvH 


Machine chain 

Mules 


Madison Coal Co | 2 

Montgomery Coal Co 1 




Pit cars 




Paisley 

Ridgely 

Springfield .. 

Starnes 

Staunton .... 
Yirden 


1 
4 
5 
1 
15 
2 






Powder explosion. . 
Premature blast.... 


Nilwood Coal Co 

PanaCoal ' o 

Sangamon Coal Co... 
Springfield Co. C. C. 
Springfield Iron Co.. 

Starnes ( oal Co 

Virden Coal Co 

Wabash Coal Co 


1 
4 

1 

\ 

3 
1 
1 


Totals.... 


68 


68 




68 




68 




■ 





Table Slioiving the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time Lost, with Averanges and Percentages. 





a 
:5 


i 

u 


to 
a 


a 


Time Lost. 




NatlkeIof Injuries. 


Total 
days. 


Aver- 
age 
days. 






5 
I 

2 

6 

1 

6 
3 


T 

7 

1 

i 

3 

3 
2 


1 
3 
1 
3 
10 

2 

5 
1 
3 
2 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 


4 

25 



4 

10 
10 
6 


,„ 


.. 


2.9 


Arm sbroken ... 


325 


65 


7.4 




451 23 
76 25 
574 33.8 
60' 60 


2.9 


Backs injured 


4.4 


Body injured 


25 
1.5 


Face injured 

Feet injured 

Fingers injured 

Hands injured 

Heads injured 

Hips injured 


55 
115 

25 

56 
140 

90 
825 
140 
135 

90 


26 

17.5 

25 

18.7 

28 

45 

91,7 

23.3 

45 

90 


2.9 
8.8 
1.5 
4.4 
7.4 
2.9 
13.3 


Legs injured. . 


8.8 




4.4 


Shoulder dislocated 


1.5 








63 


27 


41 


73 


2.792 


44.3 


100.0 







106 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Calhoun Countij— Fifth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output, 


1 


1 

1 

1 

O 

Q 


I . 

Us 

u 


1 

o 

6 

1 

1 
o 


o 

1 

if 

.a 


1 

.a 

;h 
O 
0) 

O 

II 


o 

n 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Thomas P. Brick Co 

Totals. 


Golden Eagle. 





2.4 


1 


D. 




M. 


4,118 


4,118 






4,118 


4,118 
















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 1. 



Christian County—Fifth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




1 
s 

Z 


*5 

1 

1 

P. 

Q 


i| 


i 

o 

i 

o 

1 


p. 


1 

o 

il 


1 

a 

8 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 
3 


Assumption Coal & M. Co 

Edinburg Coal Co 

Pana Coal Co., Nos 1 & 2 
Penwell Coal Mining Co. 
Springside Coal M. Co... 
Taylorville Coal Co 

Totals . 


Assumption.. 
Edinburg 


1003 

365 
720 
723 
723 
462 


3.6 

7 

7.6 

7.6 

7.6 

7.6 


'5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 

:: 


s. 




55.200 
9.450 

43, 163 
132,689 

76.957 
255.000 


38,640 
7,200 
21.204 
96. 163 
46. 007 
223,000 


16,560 
2,250 
21.959 




•• 


36. 526 


5 


' ' 


30. 950 


6 


Taylorville... 


32.000 




572.459 


432,214 


140.245 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



107 



Calhoun Counfij, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1, 




s 




1 

s 

;-! 





1^ 

P 

£* 
s 

•3? 
Ill 


Acci- 
dents 


1 

a 


as 

i 
1^ 


Average value of other 
grades. 

Aggregate value of 
total product. 


o 

ll 

H 


>> 
o 

p. 

.a 
o 

< 


o 
1 


i 
■3 3 

II 


S 
9 

a^ 


1 

p. 


> 

1 


1 


1 


■3 

s 




1 


$1 50 


1 $6,177 


8 


,. 


20 


* 


M. 


261 


$6, 177 


112 


4 


- 






1 $6. 177 


8 


12 


.. 






$6, 177 


112 


4 






$1 50 








261 






; 















1 





* Price of machine mining 4,118tons, 25 cents per ton. 



Christian Count ij, 1899 — Concluded. 



£2 



6^3 



I ^ 



a.e 






i£a 



Acci- 
dents 



$1 10 


$0 50 


100 


50 


65 


25 


65 


25 


65 


25 


75 


45 








$0 74.7 


$0 32.9 



*50,784 
8.325 
19.272 
71.637 
37-642 

181.650 

$369, 310 



52.5 S-M. 
40. 



S48.220 
7.320 
23,230 
59,050 
42.000 

127,000 

$306,820 



100 

294 
178 
776 
390 
1.200 



2.848 



* Price for machine raining 255,000 ton.s, 30 cents per ton. 



108 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Greene County— Fifth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffiee. 


Description. 


Outfit. 


1 

g 


X 

o 
o 
.a 
a. 
Q 


i . 

o.g 

'£ a 
a « 


s 

d 
Z 
■a 
•| 

1 


o 


^ i 

CS • 

^ : 
u '. 

o ■ 

o : 

II 

CO 


1 
o 

3 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 
4 

5 


.J. T. Revis, lessee 

E. Griffiths 

Thos. Griffiths, No. 1 

No. 2 

Hudson.Tucker & Co.(L) 


Roodhouse . . . 
Wiiitehall '.'.'.'. 

Roodhouse ... 


27 
50 
47 
50 
60 
20 
25 
20 


2.6 

2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 


i 

i 

1 
1 


Sh. 
SI. 


Ho. 
Hd 


M. 


3,100 
2,200 
4,100 
1,200 
2,250 
800 


3,100 
2,200 
4,100 
1,200 
2,250 
800 








600i 600 
1201 120 




s 


Alvirda Smith 






Totals 


14,370 


14,370 

























^^^^^^ 























* Pocket coal, cannel and bituminous. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 6. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 

Wnole number of openings reported for 1899, 8. 



Jerseij County— Fifth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffiee. 


Description. 


Output. 


s 


T 
I 

o 

.a 
p. 

Q 


!l 

o = 

11 


s 

O 

6 

Z 

'be 

o 
O 


u 
o 

1 

if 


n3 
CI 

o 

al 

la 

72 


1 
o 
1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Prank Hubener 


Brighton 

Delhi....;::::: 


24 
20 
25 
25 
26 
25 


3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
2.6 


5 
5 

1 

5 


Sh. 
D. 


Ho. 
Hd 


M. 


900 
480 
750 
520 
1.200 
200 

4,050 


900 
480 
750 
520 
1,200 
200 




3 


Ed Springman 

Andy Williams, lessee... 
M Fitzsimmons 




f; 






6 


Rich Motley 










4,050 


























■ 




1 

















Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 1. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 5. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



109 



Greene County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 
§ 


a 


fl 


■9^ 




"5 1 A. el- 
's*" DENTS 
















Si 

'Z si 

ap 

1 



3 

a 

li 
II 



1 

s 



1 

>> 


1=4 

Hi 


1 




S1i 

i! 

£ 

a 

!1 

a; ° • 

•2Sa 




1 

s 

3 


S a 

11 


o 
o 

II 


o 

It 

^1 


il 

^ i 


>> 

a 

a 


o 

1 


i 


'3 




z 


< 


<! 


< 


< 


■< 


Eh 


a( 


D- 


Q 


^ 


ti! 


z 


ta 


'^ 


1 


$1 25 




$3,875 


7 


1 


8 


$0 621^ 


S-M. 


205 


$3,000 




1 




.... 


2 


1 25 




2.750 


5 




6 


81 14 




220 


2,200 




2 




■A 


1 25 




5,125 


12 


1 


13 


6219 




225 


4,500 




1 






4 


1 25 




1.500 


4 




5 


62^2 




150 


1.200 





1|.. 




5 


1 25 




2,813 


fi 




7 


81 14 




200 


2,000 




1|.. 




6 


1 25 




1,000 


4 




5 


8II4 




150 


750 





1 .. 




7 


1 25 




7,500 


3 




4 


8II4 




220 


600 





iL. 




8 


1 25 




150 








81 '4 




yu 


120 




I-- 










$17,963 


43 




50 


1 




$14,370 




8i . 






$1 25 










1 
$0 70 1 


183 


















1 



















Jerseij Count/j, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 
1 

1 
li 

a-5 

I. -a 
Cl, 


1 i s 


.11 i 


a^ 

" a 

:l 

<^ u 
u ° 

a 

OJ 

s ° • 

aSa 
z 


ACCI- 
DENTS 


1 
a 

a 
55 


a • 

II 

<» 

1 

> a 
< 


JS 




it 

< 




k 

i 

< 




a| 
> s 


4 
1 

"a 

a 

u 
a> 

1 


1 

ft 

a 


a 
a 

II 
11 

04 


1 

s 



> 

1 



1 


Total wages paid di 
the year to all emp 
excepting office help 


3 
u 

1 

a 
'0 


1 


■i 
§ 


1 
2 
3 


$150 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 
1 50 




$1,350 
720 

1,125 
780 

1.800 
300 


4 
2 
3 
3 

4 
2 


1 

i 


5 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 


$0 87-5 

87.5 

fd 

87.5 
87.5 


S.M. 

" 


150 
130 
150 
160 
150- 
160 


.$1,000 
680 
850 
650 
1,500 
250 




1 

1 




:::: 












5 
6 




1 




.... 




















$6,075 


18 


2 


20 






$4,850 




3 






$1 50 






$0 87.5 





.5. 










1 















110 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Macouinn Count ij— Fifth District— 1899. 









Description. 


Output. 




1 


1 
■5? 


a 

i 


-3 


T3 

a 

/a 


'6 










Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


I 

i 


0.2 
So 


d 




© 

i 


1 

u 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


M 






■f^ 







,-^' 


a% 


T3 


1 




p 






ft 







cS 


r ® 


a 


j 




























z 






Q 


£h 


'^ 


cc 


yj 


^ 








1 


Con.'^ol Coal Co, 6 


Staunton 


3.2I 6 


5Sb. 


St. 


M. 


* 271,664 


195,337 


76. 327 








360| 6.8 


5 








* 160,104 


219,407 


40,697 


^ 


8 


Mt. Olive 


410! 8 


5 


' ' 






* 225,419 


163, 922 


61,497 


i) 


"10 


Gillespie 


431' 8 
355! 7 


5 








* 150.934 

* 113,907 


104,413 

87,629 


46, 521 


ii 


" Gillespie. 


5 " 


26,278 


6 


Hornsby 


388; 6.6 


51 " 






* 70,344 


55,204 


15, 140 


7lWm. Neal & Co.. lessee.. 


Bunker Hill.. 


250 5.6 


b ■' 






* 7. 220 


4,954 


2.266 


8 


Carliuville Coal Co 


Carlinville.... 


290; 6 


b " 




B. 


34,696 


19,042 


15,654 






Nilwood 

Greenridge... 


3251 6 
3501 6 


5 


•• 


•• 


13, 386 

59,b86 


10, 920 
35,290 


2,466 


10 


Greenridge Mining Co... 


5 


' ' 


24,396 






Girard 

Virden 


354 

320 


6.6 
7.6 


5 
5 






M. 


* 83,425 
82,970 


66, 398 
50,928 


17,027 




VirdenCoalCo 


32,042 


1H 


Cbi.-Virden Coal Co., 1... 




320 


7.6 


b 






M. 


* 101,422 


59,772 


41,650 


14 


Madison Coal Co . , 5 


Mt. Olive 


435 


8 


5 






'• =^268.077 


212,067 


56,010 


15 


Sam Curtis 


Rockbridge... 
Cbesterfleld . . 

Fosterburg . . . 
Cbesterfleld.. 


6b 
50 
50 
50 
50 
75 
10 


5.6 
5.6 
5.6 
5.6 
3.9 
5.6 




D. 

Sh. 


Ho. 
Ha. 

Ho. 


w 


610 
110 


610 
110 




Ifi 


•J T Harbaugh 








80] 80 

120 120 

1,440| 1,440 




IS 


Robt McCormick 




1<1 


W. H. A. Bodi 








960 
100 


960 
100 




21 


R.R. Davis 








1,646,674 


1, 188, 703 


457,971 




Averages 













































Whole number of openings reported in 1898,20. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 21. 
* Machine mined at 33 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Ill 



Macoupin County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


ES. 


S 






•^1 




3^ 


Acci- 

DENTa 
















a 

Ol 


a 
1 

§1 

IE 


1 




1 


as 






u 


.d 


o 


o 


■A 






5 


"^ el 


o 
o 

1 

ll 


go 
ll 


if 


1 

i 

u 
o 


1 

- 

o 


It 


o 
> 

o 
>> 


75 O O 

a 

c'5 i> 


1 

o 
a 


l.s 

% 
III 


% 




'A 


■<ii 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


a. 


cu 


Q 


^ 


w iz 


^ 


z 


^ 


$0 90 


$0 30 


$198,701 


150 


87 


237 




.S-M. 


238 


$118,789 


1,272 


17 




10 


•> 


90 


30 


119,675 


9S 


101 


20C 




" 


230 


81,593 


886 


19 






8 


90 


30 


165, 97£ 


lis 


122 


240 






228 


101,023 


931 


30 






4 


90 


30 


107,928 


130 


86 


216 






172 


74,777 


521 


30 






5 


95 


35 


92, 445 


84 


48 


132 






236 


64,450 


706 


15 






H 


95 


35 


57,743 


64 


42 


106 




" 


179 


41,675 


4341 IC 








1 12.5 


3C 


6,235 




5 


13 




vv. 


240 


6,000 


72 


2 






8 


90 


35 


22,626 


60 


23 


83 


$0 40 


SM. 


130 


24,449 


1,062 


10 






9 


75 


32 


8.97£ 


40 


11 


51 


40 




11(1 


8,990 


425 


5 






10 


75 


25 


32.567 


100 


25 


125 


40 




93 


48,260 


1,875 


1(J 






11 


75 


30 


54, 90^ 


100 


57 


157 






167 


49. 253 


1,399 


21 








75 


30 


47,809 


100 


28 


12S 


40 




195 


48,369 


1,965; 11 






1H 


70 


30 


54,335 


170 


76 


246 






126 


62,000 


1.301| 25 






14 


80 


35 


189,257 


16C 


60 


220 






263 


119,407 


1,035! 24 


... 2 


l-i 


1 25 




763 


4 




5 


75 


" 


14(1 


600 








1 


Ifi 


1 25 




138 


1 




1 


75 




75 


100 






.. 




17 


125 




100 


1 




1 


75 




70 


75 










IS 


1 25 




150 

1,800 


1 




1 


75 




80 


110 








19 


1 25 




6 




6 


75 


" 


120 


1,600 


^6 


i!.. 




?() 


1 25 





1,200 


4 




5 


75 




15(1 


1,000 












1 25 




125 


1 







75 




60 


100 
















$1 163 479 


1 401 


774 


2 175 








$849 621 


13 914 


231 


9 


37 




SO 85.9 


$0 31 










$0 40.6 




157 

































112 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Montgomery Countij — Fifih District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output, 


a 

2; 


1 

1 
o 
/a 
p. 
Q 


O CD 


s 

1 

o 

1 

1 

Sit 
o 

1 


'3 

o 
o 

CO 


1 
o 

o 

II 

03 


3 

o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 

I 

5 
6 


Coffeen Coal & Coke Co.. 

Hillsboro Coal Co 

Litchfield M. &M. Co.... 
Litchfield M. & P. Co ... . 

Montgomery Coal Co 

Wm. Jamison & Co. CD.. 


Coffeen 

Hillsboro 

Litchfield 

Paisley ....... 

Raymond 


53. 

684 
534 


8 

7.6 

3.6 

's" 

3.3 


5 
5 

5 


Sh. 


St. 


B. 

M. 

?.- 

M. 


125,000 
*127,035 
5,820 
52,020 
40.036 
t4,290 


75,000 
76.221 

4,200 
36,414 
24,540 

3.2L8 


50,000- 
50,814 

1, 620 
15,606 
15.496 

1,072 




354,201 


219,593 


134,608 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, e 
* Mined by machine at 33 cents per ton. 
t Mined by machine at 50 cents per ton. 



Morgan County— Fifth District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postofiice. 


Description. 


Output. 




f 
1 

i 


I 

M 

o.g 

ii 


1 

o 
6 
Z 

15 
.2 
bi 

o 

CD 


1 

.a 


o 
o 

11 

O} 


1 

J 
3 

u 

o 

C 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


1 




Murryyille ... 


70 
26 


4.6 
4 


5 


Sh. 


Ho. 


M. 


3,200 
1,600 


3,200 
1,600 




2 


W. r.Fisher 








4.800 


4,800 

















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 1. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



113 



Montgomerij County, 18')9. — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employ 


e:s. 


1 


a 




.2^ 




l^ 


Acci- 
dents 
















1 

-o.S 

II 


g 

i _ 

l! 


_o 

a 
o 

> 

o 

1 


-a a. .a 

III 
111 


1 

1 

ft 

O 


i| 

«o 

o fl 
O OJ 

Hi 

3 OJ S 




1 
a 

3 




o 
o 

1. 

It 


o 

3 

It 


si 


1 


o 

"S 

a 

"3 




3 

OS 


^i < 


< 


<1 


< 


^ 


&H 


Dh 


Q-, 


C 


H 


w 


Z 


fe, 


'Z 


1 


$0 75 


$0 40 


$76,250 


125 


69 


194 


$0 40 


S.M. 


280 


$72, 532 


3, 300 


18 






2 


75 


4C 


77,491 


75 


40 


115 






271 


74.220 


1,007 


11 


1 


1 


'A 


1 00 


5C 


5.01C 


20 


15 


35 


48 




90 


5,000 










4 


80 


4C 


35,374 


70 


22 


92 


40 


' ■ 


180 


30,210 


1,860 


6 1 


5 


5 


75 


25 


22,279 


47 


15 


62 


35 




19S 


21,910 


200 


31.. 


1 


(\ 


1 50 


30 


5,149 


8 


5 


13 






260 


4,000 

$207,871 












40 2 










$221,553 


345 


166 


511 




6,367 


7 




$0 78 


$0 38 










$0 39.31 





213 



































Mor 


gan 


County, 


1899.- 


-Concluded. 














Values. 


Employes. 




a 


. 


II 




II 


Acci- 
dents 


























a 

3 


O <u 

1 


■s 

> . 


o 

3 

i! 


1 

^a 


i 

o 

a 
1 


1 

n 


aj ii 
aa 

■on 

II 


a 
a 

1 


m 
a 

o 

1 
ti-i 
o 


"Is 


t3 

a 

tut 


^1 

03 , 
M O 

o3 

!l 
III 

3 <u a 


■^ 


1 

a 


^; <t: 


< 


< 


•^ 


<! 


H 


Oh 


3h 


Q 


H 


W 


"A 


tL^ 


Z 


, 


$150 




$4,800 


7 


1 


8 


$0 87^3 


S-M. 


225 


$3,700 




1 






2 


1 50 




2,400 


4 


1 


5 


8712 




210 


2.000 




1 


- 











$7,200 


HI 2 


13 


$0 87.5 




$5, 700 




2 






$1 50 














218 






















■ ■ ■ ( 











-8 C. R. 



114 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Sangamon County — Fifth District, 1899. 









Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

£ 


Name of Operator. 


1 

1 
o 

p. 


1 

S| 

o.g 
<3i a 

II 


1 

'51 
o 
o 


o 

1 


"3 
§ 

o 
o 

P 


1 
u 

a 


Total 
^^ce^I?- 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Auburn Coal Co 


Auburn 

Barclay.!.!!.. 

Cantrall 

Chatham 

Dawson 

lies Junction. 

Springfield... 

Pawnee 

PI. Plains .... 

Bissell 

Riverton 

Spaulding.... 
Springfield . . . 

Ridgely 

Springfield ... 


268 
280 
249 
213 
259 
259 
245 
250 
250 
324 
129 
220 
232 
238 
240 
210 
210 
205 
265 
250 
250 
250 
245 
150 
269 
150 


7.6 

7.6 

5.9 

6 

7 

5.4 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

7 

5.6 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.4 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.6 

5.6 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

1 

5 
5 
5 

I 

5 
5 
5 
5 

1 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 

:: 


S. 




15, 304 
102.457 

86.933 
100,916 

18, 150 
107.631 
116, 170 

68.501 

80,000 
8,900 
9.655 

62.250 
208.569 

91.864 

24,723 
131.752 

97.599 

78,493 
126,677 

70,496 
111, 167 
131.458 
108. 146 

68.771 

55. 790 
1,200 


11,050 
50.210 
74.237 
78,080 
12, 100 
70.343 
91.010 
50,414 
60,000 
6,675 
6,436 
46,688 
139.693 
85. 191 
21.776 
405.087 
70.678 
51,631 
98,739 
52,872 
95,982 
88,775 
65,000 
56.717 
37, 194 
1.000 


4,254 


2 
3 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

99 


C.-VirdenCoalCo.,No. 2. 

Barclay C. & M. Co 

Cantrall Coop. Coal Co... 
Murphy & Senseney (L). 

Wabash Coal Co 

Black Dia'd Coal & T. Co 

.Junction Mining Co 

Woodside Coal Co 

Horse Creek Coal Co 

Sp. & P. Plains Coal Co.. 
Clear Lake Coop. Coal Co 
Riverton Coal Co., No. 2. 

Spaulding Coal Co 

C. Coop. t;oal Co., No. 1.. 
C. Coop. Coal Co., No. 2.. 
Citizens' C. M. Co., "A".. 
Citizens' CM. Co.."B".. 

Sangamon Coal Co 

Springfield Coop. Coal Co 
Springffeld C. M. & T. Co 
Starns Coal Co . 


52.247 
12.696 
22.836 
6,050 
37.288 
25. 160 
18. 087 
20,000 
2,225 
3,219 
15,562 
68,876 
6.673 
2,947 
26,665 
26.921 
26.862 
27.938 
17.624 
15. 185 
42.683 


23 
94 


Springfield Iron Co. (L.) 
West End Coal Co 


R 

s 


idgply 

nringfield ... 
/illiamsville. 


43. 146 
12. 054 


'>'i 


Williams Coal Co 


^ 


18. 596 


26 


Gordon & Duncan 


Saulsbury .... 


200 




2.083,572 


1,527,578 


55. 994 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 25. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 26. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



115 



Sangamon Countij, 1899. — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 

1 


a 


a 


ai 1 


II 


Acci- 
dents 


















o 




3-2 • 




p4-> 




3 


B a 

t! 
1= 

|2 


o 
o 
» 

f . 
If 


a 

n 
It 

Mo 


1 


o 

g 

1 


1 

i 


-a 

II 


g 

g 

11 


o 
> 

1 


5-3 

M 

cc O O 


1 
u 

o 
o 


m O 

111 

3 4) C 




1 

a 
o 


2 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<i 


^ 


Oh 


a, 


Q 


^ 


M 


■Z, 


fe 


Z 


1 


$0 80 


$0 20 


$9,691 


19 


e 


25 


$0 40 


S-M. 


220 


$8. 322 


450 


3 






2 


70 


30 


50,821 


157 


43 


200 


40 




103 


50,000 


3,098 


15 






2 


80 


40 


64.468 


90 


25 


115 


40.7 




247 


52,106 


3, 133 


15 


i 




3 


70.5 


32 


63, 135 


70 


27 


97 


40.7 




275 


57.842 


3,526 


17 






5 


80 


40 


12.100 


30 


9 


39 


40 




144 


12, 600 


525 


4 






6 


70 


40 


64, 155 


86 


32 


118 


40.7 




209 


63, 700 


4.076 


12 






,7 


80 


40 


82,872 


86 


25 


111 


40.7 




193 


65. 139 


3.877 


17 






8 


80 


40 


47.566 


90 


19 


109 


40.7 




160 


42,6671 2,472 


7 






9 


85 


40 


59, 000 


85 


31 


116 


40.7 




200 


48,000 2,965 


15 






10 


1 25 


50 


9,456 


5 


2 


7 


40.7 




235 


6, 000 296 


2 






11 


90 


35 


6,919 


24 


10 


34 


40.7 




200 


6,237 375 


3 






VJ. 


75 


30 


39,685 


50 


19 


69 


40.7 




231 


3.270 1,992 


7 






13 


76 


49 


139,916 


163 


41 


204 


40.7 




223 


113,950 7,470 


17 


"i 




14 


80 


40 


70,822 


75 


23 


98 


40.7 




204 


61,020! 3,672 


10 


2 




15 


78 


35 


18,017 


20 


12 


32 


40.7 




218 


17, 014 i 907 


5 






16 


85 


40 


90,990 


95 


43 


138 


40.7 




2S9 


80.980 4,957 


9 


2 




17 


72 


25 


57,678 


70 


21 


91 


40.7 




197 


47,299 3.574 


8 






18 


72 


25 


43,890 


70 


18 


88 


40.7 




190 


38,448, 2,858 


6 


" 




19 


78 


36 


87.074 


110 


33 


143 


40.7 






85.000 4,370 


14 






20 


90 


35 


53,753 


55 


22 


77 


40.7 




200 


52,0001 3,240 


10 






21 


70 


45 


74, 020 


90 


34 


124 


40.7 




216 


64,226 3,705 








22 


85 


40 


91.532 


102 


39 


141 


40.7 




220 


■ 65,808 4.744 


■■■'ii 




"3 


23 


90 


42 


77,621 


100 


50 


150 


40.7 




296 


65,250 3.630 


19 




2 


24 


82 


31 


50,245 


80 


30 


110 


40.7 




175 


39,727 2.253 


9 






25 


80 


40 


37, 177 


50 


18 


68 


40.7 




230 


26.379 1.720 


8 






26 


1 25 


75 


1,400 


2 


1 


3 


40.5 




150 


1.200 40 




g 










$1,403,092 


1,874 


633 


2,507 






SI. 174, 119 '-'^ ^""^ 


246 


13 




SO 78.7 


$0 36.1 












SO 40.7 


210 
































116 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



ScoU County— Fifth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

3 

2; 


I 

1 


o.S 
II 


s 

1 


d 
Z 

'5t 

1 


P. 

CO 







1 
1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


other 
grades 


1 


Wm. H Bates & Co 


Winchester .. 
Alsey -- .:: 


96 
30 
25 
40 


2,6 
2,6 

2:6 


1 
1 

1 
1 


Sh. 
D. 


s. 

Hd 


?; 


18,715 
402 
720 
780 

20,617 


17,990 
402 
720 

780 

19,892 


725 


3 






/t 


John McGuire 








725 




Averages 




































. . 







Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 5, 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 4. 



Shelbij Countij— Fifth District~-1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output, 




a 


T 

Is 

§ 

o 

1 


I 
Is 

3=2 


a 

d 

'5 
o 
o 
O 


o 


a 
o 

p 
IS 

CO 


3 
a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

9 


Moweaqua C. M. & M. Co. 
John Richardson 


Moweaqua — 
Shelbyville... 

Mode .. . 


618 
90 
90 

100 
60 
60 
45 


5.4 
2.3 
2.3 
2.3 
2.3 
2,3 
2.3 


5 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 


Sh. 
D. 


4 

Hd 


* 
M. 


t 98.637 

2,250 

1,696 

720 

522 

1.620 

320 


'720 
'320 


40, 772 


3 


















6 


JohnH. Galligher 




7 


Robinson Cr'k 






Totals 






105.765 


64,993 


40, 772 

























" 























* Both. 

+ Mined by machines 49,081 tons, at 25.5 cents per ton. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 8. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 7. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



117 



Scott County, 28.95— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1^ 


a 




II 




%^ 


Acci- 
dents 
















■^ 


a 
a 

5« 

tt 
IE 


o 


■gia 


. 


as 






















1 

3 


aa 

0<D 

a 9 


o 
1 


_3 
> g 

la 

II 


i 


o 
p. 

a 

o 


1 

o 


S.S 

t> OS 


I 

> 

i 

o 

1 


SI 

Hi 


•a 

3 

1 

a 

o 

1 


.2 9 

Hi 




3 

.2 


:z; 


<JJ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


a. 


a. 


O 


H 


M 


^ 


&H 


z; 


1 


S) 30 


$0 50 


$23,750 


35 


9 


44 


$0 80 


S-M. 


302 


$20,130 


78,5 








•r^ 


1 50 
1 50 




603 
1,080 


2 
4 




2 
4 


1 00 
1 00 




126 
220 


500 
800 










8 










4 


1 50 




1.170 


3 




3 


1 00 




240 


1,000 
















- 








$26,603 


44 


9 


53 






$22,429 


785 








$1 32 


$0 50 










$0 81.8 




222 































Shelby County, iS55— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1, 


5 

3 


d 






|| 


Acci- 
dents 
















£ 


a 
% 

1 


1 

ft 
o 

1 
1 

o 

1 


SI 


•6 

o 
ft 

°o 
m 


'Si 

iti 




1 

a 

3 


Q, • 

aS 

i 


u 

2 
o 
o 

II 


o 

3 

n 
i 


1 

>a 


1 
o 
P. 

a 

o 


1 

i 


i 


3 
§ 


U; 


< 


<: 


< 


< 


5 


H 


Cu 


an 


Q 


^ 


M 


;z: 


u. 


^ 


1 


$1 o-> 


$0 48 


$80,329 


80 


61 


,., 


$0 42.5 


S-M, 


275 


$61,408 


2,800 


9 




5 


2 


2 25 




5,063 


10 




11 


1 37.5 




21N 


4,080 




1 






3 


2 25 





3,816 


4 






1 37.5 


' ' 


22(1 


3,000 


1 


1 






4 


2 25 
2 25 




1,620 
1.175 


4 
3 


1 




1 37.5 
1 37.5 


.. 


150 
200 


1,200 
800 










5 


1 


1 






6 


2 25 





3.645 


4 


1 




1 37.5 




210 


3,000 


1 


1 






7 


225 





720 


2 





2 


137.5 




160 


600 
















- 










$96, 368 


107 


fifi 


173 






$74 008 


2,805 


n 


5 




$1 18 


$0 48 










$0 54.4 




205 














i 








!■■ 





118 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 


Counties. 


S 

g 

o 

g 


'5 



1 


1 
° 

.9 
a 


1 

s 

Z 


1 

a 

1 

o 

i 


1 
1 


1 
p. 
S 
p 

o 

§ 


1 

o 
o 
a 


ft 
.2" 

a 


a 

1' 


Is 
1! 


Si 

lis 

< 


Calhoun 


1 

6 
8 
6 
21 
6 

6 
4 

87 


6 

13 

5 

5 

1 
1 
51 


1 






4.118 

572.459 

14,370 

4.050 

1,646,674 

354,201 

4,800 

2,083.572 

20,617 

105,765 


4,118 

432,214 

14,370 

4,050 

1,188,703 

219,593 

4,800 

1.527,578 

19,892 

64,993 








$1 50 

74.7 

1 25 
1 50 
85 
78 

,6. 

78.7 

1 32 
1 18 




140,245 


483.760 


38,329 


so 32.9 


Greene 

Jersey 

Macoupin 

Montgomery . 

Morgan 

Sangamon. ... 

Scott 

Shelby 


8 
6 
8 

1 

2 
1 
3 
6 
.36 


3 

5 

1 

1 
1 

11 


1 

1 
1 












457,971 
134,608 


1.413,611 
298, 131 


158,069 
13,506 


31 
38 


555,994 

725 

40,772 


1.794,636 
16,590 

88,507 


61,238 

500 

3,81^ 


36.1 
50 

48 


Totals 


4.810,626 


3,480,311 


1.330.315 


4,095,235 


275.454 






$0 8215 


$0 3456 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 79. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 11. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 87. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



11<) 



Fifth District— 189!) . 





Employes. 


o 
1 


1.1 

a 

■eg 


ftiG 


Casualties 


Machines. 


o • 




?. 








1) 


£ 


I ^ 




a 

a 


0) 

1 
o 


>. 


2a 

1 


a1 


i 


1 m 








1 


1 


52 


o 


q-i 


p. 


ss 


»fl 


1^^ 


o 


"£j 








" 


M 






U Hj 










u 














£■3 


s 


II 


<i> 

1 


ir, 


11 


-M 






-d 


1 


1.1 


^i 


-.% 


5ui-S 






o 






o^o 












o = 


< 


z 


^ 


H 


<jj 


<! 


^ 


'Z 


:z: 


W 


- N 


:^ 


rH 


$6, 177 


8 


12 


20 


261 




$6, 177 


.H . 




; 

1 


2 


4.118 


369.310 


570 


309 


879 


183 


SO 29 


306.820; 2.848 74 

j 


4 


6 1 


14 


* 255.000 


17,963 


43 


7 


50 


183 


70 


14. 370 8 










6,075 


18 




20 


150 


87.5 


4,850 3 












1,163.479 


1,401 


774 


2,175 


., 


40.6 


( 
849,62113.914 


231 


2 


37 


10 


i 
115 11.452,516 


221.553 


345 


166 


511 


213 


39.3 


? 207.871 6.367 


40 


2 


7 2 


7 


: 131.325 


7.200 


11 


?. 


13 


218 


87.5 


5.700 


9 












1. 403, 392 


1,874 
44 


633 

9 


2.507 
53 


210 
222 


40.7 
81.8 


1.174.119 73,925 
22, 429 785 


246 


6 


13 








26.603 










96.368 


107 


66 


173 


205 


54.4 


74,008 2,805 


13 




! 
5| ' 


6 


49,081 


$3,318,120 


4,421 


1,980 


6.401 


™ 


$0 40.3 


§2,665,965 J 00756 

( 
1 


621 


14 


68, 15 

L... 


144 


1.892,040 


1 






1 









* Price paid for machine mining. 30 cents per ton. 

t Price paid for machine mining. 33 cents per ton. 

I Price paid for machine mining. 25.5 cents per ton. 

Average price paid for machine mining for the district. 32.4 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



121 



SIXTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: St. Clair, Madison, Clinton, Marion, Bond. 
John Dunlop, Insjjector, Centralia. 



Hon. David Koss, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, III.: 

Sir: — in cooipliance with section 12 of the general mining law of the State 
of Illinois, I have the honor to submit to you the fourth annual report of the 
Sixth Inspection District for the year ended June 30, 1899, comprising the 
coal producing counties of St. Clair, Madison, Clinton, Marion and Bond. 

This report gives tabulated statements by counties of the number of mines 
operated during the year, showing the average number of miners and other 
employes; the total output of all grades of coal; the average value of coal at 
the mine, and the aggregate value of total product; the number of shipping 
and local mines; the casualuties in and around the mines; the average num- 
ber of days worked; the quantity of powder used; the number of machines 
in use, and the total tons produced by machines. 

The following summary, as taken from the statistical tables, is given for 
the year 1899: 



Number of counties in which coal is produced 

Total numl)er of mines ■ 

Shipping: mines 

Local mines ! 

New mines j 

Abandoned mines I 

Total tonnat?e 

Tons of lump coal 

Tons of other grades 

Tons shipped • 

Avei agre value of lump coal per ton at the mine | 

Aggregate value of total product i 

Num ber of ni iners I 

Numlier of otlier employes ; 

Total employes [ 

Average number of days of active operation for all mines 

Number of kegs of powder used 

Fatal accidents | 

Non-fatal accidents i 

Number of widows ■ 

Number of orphans 

Number of mines using machines.... 

Number of machines in use 

Total tons cut by machines 

Number of tons produced to each fatal accident 

Number of tons produced to each non-fatal accident I 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident i 

Number of persons employed to each non-fatal accident I 



104 
72 
32 
13 

7 

4.283.258 

3,294,077 

989, 181 

3,673,703 

SO. 7169 

S2. 653. 912 

3,583 

1.425 

5.008 

196.8 

68.883 

22 

92 

14 

38 

23 

144 

2. 169, 954 

194,694 

46, 557 

228 

54 



122 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Coal production by counties, with increase or decrease in each year for the 
yearo ended June 30, 1898, and 1899: 





Total Output of all Grades 
of Coal in Tons. 


Increase. 




Counties. 


1898. 


1899. 


Decrease. 


St Clair 


1,849.474 

1,403.977 

434, 735 

494.117 

100.955 


1,600.752 
630, 769 
417. 5S4 
714.513 
96. 314 


248. 722 
773.208 
17,151 









Clinton . .. 






220, 396 




4,641 








Total 


4,283.258 


3.459.932 


1,043,722 


220, 396 








1,043,722 


Decrease 


220, 396 












823, 326 













The counties of St. Clair, Madison, Clinton and Bond show an increase of 
1,043,722 tons over the output of last year, and Marion shows a decrease of 
220,390 tons, leaving the net increase for the district 823,326 tons, or 23.8 per 
cent. 

The reason for the decrease in Marion is that the general strike of 1898 con- 
tinued until December at Centralia, and at Sandoval to January 8, 1899, when 
work was resumed. 

The number of days lost on account of strikes at the above named places 
was 266, and 20 days were lost at Oden. At the present time the district is 
free from strikes, and the indications are that the year now entered on will 
show a large increase in production. 

During the last year the production of coal cut by machines has increased 
20 per cent. This increaseis due to the change of mining machines being placed 
where drills were formerly used, with one exception. Also the number of ma- 
chines being put in at other mines has increased 20 per cent over that of last year, 
and so long as present conditions remain the tendency is that each year will 
see more machines being put in. The reason for this apparent tendency is 
that section 1 of an act providing that all coal mined shall be paid for is be- 
iog complied with throughout the entire district. 

The percentage of fine coal produced by machines varies from 20 to 30 per 
cent. The percentage of fine coal produced by shooting off the solid varies 
from 33 to 45 per cent. 

From these figures it will be seen that the amount of saleable coal from 
machines is increased 15 per cent. Added to this the differential allowed 
varies from 17 to 19 per cent. With this enhancement in favor of machines, 
it will be seen that the time is not far distant when machines will be adopted 
in all mines that produce coal for commercial purposes. 

Improvements. — The schedules will show a small amount of coal taken 
out at New Baden and Germantown, Clinton county. The shaft at New Ba- 
den is only 6x9 feet; it is intended for an escapement shaft. It is expected 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 123 

that work will be commeuced on the main hoisting: shaft during September. 
The Gerniantowu Coal Co. has recently built up the top works at its mine and 
has commenced shipping coal. 

The Henrietta Coal Co., now known as the Penny Coal companj% has put 
down an escapement shaft and is making preparations to put a fan at the top 
of the same. The company has also equipped its mine with electric mining 
machines, installed by the Morgan & Gardner Electric company. The ma- 
chines are now working at a great disadvantage; the roof, which is soapstone 
varies in thickness from 6 inches to 2 feet and is very brittle, requiring props 
to be placed close to the face of the coal. 

The following companies have put electiic machines in their mines: The 
Tirre tSb Sous Coal Co., Lenzburg; the Johnson Coal & Mfg. Co., Marissa; 
and the Hippard Coal company, Belleville, all in St. Clair county. The Sor- 
rento Prospecting and Mining company, Sorrento, Bond county, has added 
to its plant two electric mining machines, put in by the Link-Belt Electric 
company. The Conrad Reinecke Coal company, Belleville, has replaced 
drills with electric cutting machines, put in by the Jeffrey Electric company. 

The Missouri t*c Illinois Coal company has put in three mining machines in 
the mine at Wilderman, where formerly air drills were operated. 

The Kalb Coal Co. of Mascoutah, has put in four mining machines where 
it formerly had air drills. 

Escapement Shafts. — The following escapement shafts have been put down 
during the year: The Trenton Coal, Light & Power company, Trenton, Clin- 
ton county, and the Hydraulic Press Brick company , known as the Indepen- 
dent Coal Co., CoUinsville, Madison county. 

The sinking of the escapement of the Kinmundy Coal company, Kinmun- 
dy, Marion county, is still in operation. The depth at present is nearly 700 
feet. 

The following escapement shafts caved in, owing to the severe winter, and 
the shaft timbers being a little decayed, but all have been reopened: the 
escapement shaft at Zildolph's mine, Marissa, St. Clair county, and one at 
the Brookside mine, Troy, Madison county, both owned by the Consolidated 
Coal Company. 

New Mines in Contemplation. — The St. Louis & O'Fallon Coal company has 
sunk a main and escapement shafts. It is located in what is called "Nigger 
Hollow," one and a half miles northeast of Bii-kner, St. Clair county. The 
size of the main shaft is 7^2x15 feet, and the escapement shaft 5x10 feet. 
This is the Belleville seam known as Number 6. 

The company is at present grading railroad bed to the mine and has pos- 
session of a right of way between East St. Louis and the mine. 

The Donke Bros. Coal & Coke Co., Belleville, St. Clair county, has started 
to sink a shaft. The size is 9x18 feet in the clear. It is the intention to equip 
it with all the modern and latest improved machinery, steel top works and 
electric mining machines, and to place their coal in the market over their 
own railroad. The shaft is located nearly two miles west of CoUinsville, 
Madison county. 



124 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fatal Accidents. — July 15, 1898, John Radenacher was instantly killed by a 
fall of slate in the Mt. Olive and Staunton Coal company's mine, Staunton, 
Madison county. Deceased was 32 years of aere and leaves a widow and five 
children. 

August 29, 1898, Louis Byman, a miner, working in the Heinz Bluff mine 
of the Consolidated Coal Co., Collinsville, Madison county, was killed by fall- 
ing clod. There were three men working in one place and they had three 
cars to load. The two cars on the inside were loaded and the car on the out- 
side was left unfinished. They then started to take down a piece of loose 
clod, but as they heard the driver coming for their cars, they started to finish 
loading the outside car. The deceased went underneath the loose clod, when 
it gave way, falling on him. His age was 33 years; he leaves a widow and 
one child. 

September 19, 1898, John Stiif , a miner in the Pittsburg mine of the Con- 
solidated Coal Co., Belleville, St. Clair county, was injured internally bj^ 
falling slate, and died three hours afterward from the effects of the same. He 
was 18 years of age and single. 

October 5, 1898, Ben Anderson, a miner in Madison No. 3 mine, of the Mad- 
ison Coal company, Edwardsville, Madison county; while working at the face 
of his room a piece of clod weighing nearly 1,000 pounds gave way and fell on 
him, killing him instantly. He had only been in this mine three days; his 
age was 36 years; he leaves a widow and three children. 

October 10, 1898, Ed. Floyd, a eager at the Independent Coal company's 
mine, Collinsville, Madison county, was standing at the bottom of the shaft 
waiting for the cage to land. A driver coming out to the bottom on the other 
side of the shaft cried "Look out for that car!" Floyd started to cross the bot- 
tom when the cage landed on him , fracturing his back. He was taken to a hospit- 
al in St. Louis, where he died .June 10, 1899. He was 35 years of age and single. 

October 12, 1898, John Kolar, a miner in the Heinz Bluif mine, of the Con- 
solidated Coal company, Collinsville, Madison county, was working at the face 
of a room, loading coal, when a piece of clod gave way which fell on him, 
causing instant death. His age was 46 years; he leaves a widow and one 
child. 

October 24, 1898, Frank E. Bayer, a top laborer, was killed at the Home 
Trade Coal company's mine, Edwardsville, Madison county. A car had been 
taken off the cage at the lower landing. After it was emptied the deceased 
started to push the car back on the cage, but got on the wrong track, and 
not taking any notice he pushed the car into the shaft, and was dragged down 
with it, causing his death. A bar was used for the purpose of closing the 
entrance to the shaft, but this had been taken down and deceased forgot to 
replace it. His age was 24 years. He leaves a widow and one child. 

October 27, 1898, Nick Loquitt, a miner in the Darrow mine of the O 'Fal- 
lon Coal and Manulacturing Co., St. Clair county, was injured by falling 
soapstoue; he was mining a shot in the top coal; the roof was known to be 
dangerous, and he was advised by the mine examiner to use extra precaution 
while mining. The soapstone gave way, falling on its outer edge, then fall- 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 125 

ing on him, squeezing iaim against the coal. He died 18 hours afterward. 
There were no bones broken and the attending physician said his death was 
caused by heart disease. 

November 17, 1898, John W. Reed, cheek-weighman at the Madison Coal 
company's No. 3 mine, Edwardsville, Madison county, was killed bj' falling 
down the shaft while with the top man on the ground landing. The engineer 
hoisted the cage with a loaded car; there being no one to put in stops for the 
cage to rest on, the engineer put on brakes, also steam to prevent it from 
lowering. The two men, going to the top landing, found the cage on a level 
with the floor. The top man, being first, went to the front end and put down 
the keeper. The deceased was at the rear end and began to push the car, 
when the front end went off the cage. The cage then started up- 
ward and the car fell back into the shaft, carrying the deceased with it. He 
was found lying inside of the empty ear, dead. His age was 53 years, and he 
leaves a widow and one child. 

November 18. 1898, Thomas Taylor, mine manager at Joseph Taylor's mine, 
'Fallon, St. Clair county, was instantly killed by falling roof. A squeeze 
was on in a part of the mine and he went to examine where the roof had 
come down. He was on top of the I'ock when another piece fell on him. 
No one was present but his son, who could not lift it off, and by the time help 
arrived he was dead. Diseased was 55 years of age and leaves a widow and 
three children. 

December 5, 1898, George Lowry, a loader, was killed in the South mine, 
operated by the Centralia Mining & Mfg. Co., Centralia, Marion county, by 
a fall of slate while working at the face, loading a car. A hole had been 
drilled in the right hand corner and had pierced the roof, striking a slip in 
the slate. This being unknown, deceased was working inside when it gave 
way, killing him and injuring his partner. His age was 25 years, he 
leaves a widow and two children. 

December 19, 1898, Joseph Straubinger, a miner in Conrad Straubiuger's 
mine, French Village, St. Clair county, was instantly killed by falling drift 
coal. He was 31 years of age and single. 

December 27, 1898, Frank Schindler, a miner working in the Mount Olive & 
Staunton Coal Go's mine, Staunton, Madison county, was killed by falling 
clod; he was wedging down a piece of clod and had only struck the wedge 
two blows when it fell striking edgewise on the floor, then rolled over onto 
him^ He lived only a few hours. Deceased was 43 years of age, and leaves 
a widow and seven children. 

January 12, 1899, Frank Houlle was engaged as top boss at the No. 2 mine 
of the Madison Coal Company, Glen Carbon, Madison county. In moving a 
railroad car, loaded with lumber, which had a defective brake, unknown to 
him until after it was started; deceased ran forward to a coal car immediately 
in front of the lumber car, to set the brake; while doing so the car with 
lumber bumped against the coal car knocking him off to the ground between 
the rails, with his right leg across the rail; before he could recover himself 
the front wheel passed over his leg about the knee, making amputation nec- 
essary; he died during the operation. He was 23 years of age and single. 



126 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

January 19, 1899, Adolph Beible, a miner, working in the Rentehler mine 
of the Mo. & 111. Coal Company, Belleville, St. Clair county, was seriously 
injured by a prop which was knocked out by falling coal at the face of his 
room: he died about two hours afterward. Deceased was 29 years of age, 
married, and leaves a widow. 

January 23, 1899, William Hopper, a machine helper, working in the Mount 
Olive & Staunton Coal Company's mine, Staunton, Madison county, had his 
left leg caught in the chain of the mining machine while in motion, mashing 
it so that amputation was deemed necessary. Death resulted the next day, 
half an hour after the amputation. He was 24 years of age and leaves a 
widow and two children. 

January 28, 1899, August Phillips, a miner working in the No. 4 mine of 
the Madison Coal Co., Glen Carbon, Madison county, in shooting the coal 
down the day before, props were knocked out, which should have been re- 
placed before commencing to load coal, as it was known that the roof was 
dangerous. Deceased wanted to load some coal before doing so, when the 
roof gave way, falling on him causing his death. He was 22 years of age and 
unmarried. 

February 2, 1899, William Fickert, a miner working in the Mount Olive & 
Staunton Coal Company's mine, Staunton, Madison county, was killed by a 
fall of slate at face of his room. His age was 50 years; he leaves a widow 
and six children. 

March 18, 1899, James Dubes, a miner, working in the Henrietta Coal Co's 
mine, Edwardsville, Madison county, was killed by falling coal. He and his 
partner were wedging coal down; they were on their knees doing this work 
when a piece of coal fell off the face of the room on deceased, rupturing a 
blood vessel; he died the next morning at three o'clock. His age was 34 
years, and leaves a widow and two children, 

March 29, 1899, Angelo Biado, a miner, working in the No. 4 mine of the 
Madison Coal Co., Glen Carbon, Madison county, was killed by a pit car. He 
was on his way home after his day's work. While traveling out the entry 
near the bottom of the shaft, a driver was coming out with a trip which was 
made up of three cars; at the place mentioned there is a small grade of one 
per cent in favor of the load; when the driver was about to make up with 
him he stepped aside to let the driver and trip pass; thinking the trip had 
passed, he stepped onto the entry, making his way out, when a car that had 
become uncoupled from the trip ran him down causing his death. He was 28 
years of age and single. 

May 8, 1899, Joseph Mowe, a machine helper in the Bennett mine, of the 
Lebanon Coal & Mining Association, Lebanon, St. Clair county, was killed 
instantly by a tunnel machine falling on him; the machine was reversed to 
bring back the thread bar and cutter, the braces* were loosened and the ma- 
chine was again given air to start cutting; it not being fastened down, the 
machine was tUrned over, falling on the deceased causing his death. He was 
22 years of age and single. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 127 

May 29, 1899, Wm. Risinger, a loader in the Odin Coal Co.'s mine, Odin, 
Marion county, while loading coal at the face of his room, a piece of top coal 
gave way. falling on him, causing internal injuries from which he died the 
following day. His age was 35 years; he leaves a widow and three children. 

Another fatal accident oceui-red, but the deceased was not an employe at 
the mine. June 21, 8899, Homer E. Wood, a boy, resident of Bethalto, while 
playing around the top at John James' mine at that place, fell down the 
shaft a depth of 76 feet, causing instant death. There seems to be doubt in 
the minds of some persons that were well acquainted with the boy, as to 
whether it was done intentionally or not. He was 15 years of age. 

It will be noticed in this report that a large number of the fatal accidents 
have occurred in Madison county, which may be partly due to the system of 
mining being changed during the year. The system of- mining prior to this 
year was, that a certain number of men were allowed after a machine, and 
each workman had special work to do; experienced men were selected to do 
the timbering and shooting, and inexperienced men did the loading; and, 
judging from the past record, it would seem that this brought good results, 
as only three fatal accidents were reported during the year 1897, and none in 
the year 1898. The present system is that the men do their own shooting and 
timbering, and the result, as will be seen from this report, is that men who 
had to timber And do their own shooting had no experience in that kind of 
work. The roof throughout the coal tield of Madison coutity is of a danger- 
ous nature; there is not a mine free from clod or soapstone, which varies in 
thickness from six inches to four feet, and is very brittle and full of slips; 
the greatest care has to be exercised in timbering the roof properly. 

It will also be noticed that the production of Madison county has increased 
upwards of 122 per cent over that of last year, and as a result has increased 
the responsibilities of the State Inspector, 

During the year I have visited Monroe, Effingham and Jasper counties. 
The coal in Monroe county is only local, and is found at Columbia and New 
Hanover; it is three feet in thickness, and has not been worked for two and 
a half years. In Effingham county there is no coal being mined. A seam 
was found on the bottom of the Little Wabash river, six miles from Effing- 
ham; it is about 48 inches in thickness; the seam is probably No. 15. 

In Jasper county, at Newton, the county seat, I found two small mines in 
operation. Coal has been mined at this place for the last six years. The coal 
is found in a ridge, the height of which is about 60 feet above the bottom 
lands on each side. The breadth of the ridge, where one of the mines is 
located, is only 100 feet. The ridge extends north and broadens out. The 
seam is 30 inches in thickness, and to measure from the top of the ridge to 
the coal seam, it will average 50 feet in depth. The number of the seam is 
probaly 16. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Dunlop, 
Slate Inspector of Mines, Sixth District. 

Centralia, III. 



128 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fatal (Jasualties — Sixth District — 1 899. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence 
(Town.) 


■6 
1 


i 

o 






1 


Cause of Accident. 


1898 
July 15 
Aug. 2ti 
Sep. 19 


John Radenacher 


32 
33 
18 
36 
35 
46 
24 
55 
53 
55 
25 
31 
43 

23 
29 
24 

22 
50 
34 

28 
22 

55 


Miner 

Oager 

Miner 

Laborer 

Miner 

Ch'ck w'h'g. 
M. m'g'r.... 

Loader 

Miner 

Top boss — 

Miner 

M. helper... 
Miner 

M. helper... 
Loader 


Staunton.... 
CoUinsville. 
Belleville... 
Edw'sville.. 
CoUinsville. 

Edw'sville.. 
O'Fallon.... 
Edw'sville.. 
Fallon.... 
Centralia ... 
French Vill. 
Staunton.... 

Glen Carbon 
Rentchler... 
Staunton.... 
Glen Carbon 

Staunton 

Edw'sville.. 
Glen Carbon 
Lebanon 






5 

1 

3 

'i 
1 
1 

3 
2 

■7 

6 
2 


i 
'i 

'i 

1 
i 

"i 

1 

7 


• • 
3 

'8 

i 
3 

'7 

3 

'4 
52 


Falling clod 


John Stiff 


Falling roof. 






Oct 10 


Ed Floyd 


Descending cage 


Oct 12 




Falling clod 


Oct. 24 
Oct 27 


Frank E. Boyer 

Nick Loquitt. 


FalUng down shaft.. 
Falling roof 


Nov 17 


John W Reed 


Palling down shaft 


Nov. 18 
Dec 5 


Thomas Taylor 

Geo Lowry 


Falling^roof 




Jos. Straubinger 

Frank Schindler 


• ' 


Dec. 27 


Falling clod 


Jan 19 


Adolph Beible 


R. R. car 


Jan. 23 






Jan 28 


A. Phillips 


Falling roof 


Feb 2 


Wm. Kickert 




Mch. 18 










May 8 
May 29 




Tunnel machine 




Odin 


1^1 


14 


3 
38 




Totals 





















Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casuality 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


BeUeviUe.... 
Centralia .... 
CoUinsville... 
Edw'sville.... 
l<rench Vill.. 
Glbu Carbon. 

Lebanon 

O'Fallon 

Odin 


3 

1 
3 
4 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 




1 
1 

21 
2 

13 

1 


Descending cage... 

Palling coal 

Palling clod 

Falling down shaft 

Falling roof 

Machine chain 

Pit car 


1 Centralia M. ^. M. Co 




Check w'gh'n. 

Loader 

Mach. helper. 
Miner. 


5 
2 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 


Consolidated Coal Co 
Henrietta Coil Co... 
Home Trade Coal Co 
Independence C'l Co 

Lebanon Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co 

iVIt. Olive-Sta't'nC.C. 
Mo. & 111. Coal Co.... 
Odin Coal Co 




Ming m'g'r... 
Top boss 








Tunnel machine... 




Rentchler 

Staunton 




O'Fallon Coal Co 

Strawbinger, C 

Taylor J . 










Totals.... 


22 


22 


22 


22 











COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Non- Fatal Casualties— Sixth District— 1899. 



129 



Date, 


Name. 


5» 
< 


Residence. 


.1 

u 
si 


i 


a 


a 

Q. 


Character of Injury. 


\l 

o 


1899 
July 7 Fred Ferguson... 


24 

26 
45 

22 
22 
33 
45 
38 
28 
44 
28 
18 
30 


Odjn 

Staunton 

Odin 

Heiutzville. 

Breese 

Odin 

Belleville... 
Edw'sville.. 

Marissa 

Belleville... 
Glen Carbon 


1 

\ 

: 
1 
1 

1 

'"i 

1 

"i 

"i 

1 
1 

i 

"i 

1 
1 


j 


1 

■ 

1 
5 

a 
5 

-s 




1 


•• 7|Cbas. Jones 






•' IslHyHerebache.... 






Aug:. 13 W. J. Montrey.... 


.... 

"i 
.... 

1 
"i 
"i 


4 
2 
4 

7 

'"9 


Back injured- 


30 








15| Peter Ardison 


Head injured 


40 


" 20 \Vm. Kuenckie... 




50 


'• 29Wm.Godder 






Sep. 19 Frank Wicka 


"io 
1 


1 Foot injured 


30 


'■ 20 John Slaby 


Back injured. 


28 


" 22Jno. Collins 


Collar bone broken 


30 


" 22 Arthur Wader.... 


Leg injured 


20 


" 29Eusrene Riga 


"2 
3 
6 


1 


Oct. IVV. J. Wilson 


20 Edw'sville.. 




60 


■■ 3 Jos. Tetter 






'• 4G. Weuceski 

4!Fred Ernest 


45 
40 
54 
21 
38 
38 
42 
40 

i 


CoUinsville. 

Belleville..'. 
Glen Carbon 
Belleville... 
Glen Carbon 
Belleville... 
Staunton — 

Virden 

Troy 


I 


Leg broken 


90 
60 


" 17 


Fred Slenteis.... 

Chas. Adcox 

Alex Fuger 

Henry Jenrick... 
Jos. (^umminars.. 


Leg broken 


80 


" IS 






" 22 


6 
4 


■■■3 

7 






•• 22 




4? 


" 24 


Body injured. 


PO 


" 29,Tlios. Chapman.. 




90 


29' Ed Lewis 


Head injured 


10 








Nov. 5 
" 11 


Ed Myers 


Glen Carbon 


1 

"i 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

"i 
.... 

1 

1 
1 

.... 

1 
.... 

"i 

.... 

1 

.... 
1 


1 

"i 


2 

1 

10 
9 

12 
4 

3 

8 


Hand injured '....'.'.'.'.'. 

Shoulder injured 


10 
10 


Chas. Coneoer... 


25 Trenton 

24!Od)n 

38, CoUinsville. 


'• 17 buther Pigg 






21 Chas. Kokuiski.. 


Head injured 


'0 


Dec. 5 Jacob Relhart.... 
•' SjThos. Hafkin.... 


43 

58 
57 
28 
25 
ii 
48 

32 
45 
20 


Centralia... 
Belleville... 

Glen Carbon 

Trenton 

CoUinsville. 

GlenCarbon 
Belleville.- 


1 
"i 

.... 

1 
1 

"i 
.... 

.... 

.... 
.... 

.... 

1 


9 

8 
11 
4 


Arm and leg broken 


90 


9' Jacob Schmidt... 






9!And. Selteurich.. 




40 


" 13 J as. Hubbard.... 


Ribs injured 


90 


" 20 


John Hetzel 

Chris Miller 


Foot injured 


40 


' ' 29 




14 


1899 
Jan. 6 






■■ 9jChas. Hacker 


6 


' 


Ribs injured 




10 John Scherer 




'-"OO 


11 Chas. Seagor 

;• leiSxl Bellville 

17|Wm. Henry 

' 20i Fred Hartcop 


33 Trenton 

26 Belleville... 
48| Staunton.... 
28iEdw'sville.. 
22i Centralia... 
17 (CoUinsville 


4 

1 
4 
1 


5 
2 


Leg broken 

Handinjured 

Foot injured 


90 
30 
20 


" 20;Ea Skates 




10 


" 20 
" 21 




Foot injured 

Finger injured . 


21 
12 


Fred Kehe 


30 
35 
51 

28 

>0 
55 
12 


Belleville... 
Centralia... 
CoUinsville. 
Centralia ... 
Belleville... 

Leuz Stat'n. 
Edwardsv'e 


■■■3 
.... 

■■"6 


"4 

8 

' 2 
"7 


■_' 24 Crist Brandhoos 




''O 


2>,E. Hutchison 

Feb. 1 Chas. Taber 


Foot injured 

Leg injured 


90 
'^0 


2 Frank Walsh 


Face injured 


40 


'' 4' James Collins.... 
14 David Traverse.. 
24 Chris Greenbust . 


Leg In-oken 

Ribs injured 


60 
30 
14 


" 25' Harry Poole 

■ 25 Peter Skein 

J' 27Thos. Harvey.... 


33 Sandoval ... 
30 
lllStaunton ... 

8'Belleville;!; 


21 
.... 


3 
2 


Body injured 

Body injured 


30 
30 
•'0 


Mar. 1 
" 4 
•' 6 


John Boisee 

Mike Holland .... 
David Allen. Jr.. 
:)asper Myers .... 

Hy Lamont 

Jas. Cunningham 

I. L Farris 

Geo. W. Farris... 
Bert Camron 


Head injured I 

Shoulders injured 

Arm bn.kon 


14 

14 
60 


'• 11 
" 12 


59' 
>A 

30 
i5' 

21! 


Centralia ... 
White Oak. 
Sandoval ... 
Sorento 


Body injunni 1 

Toes cur oil' 

Head injur.'d 

Body injured 

Body in.iur^'il , 

Bo ly injurefl 


21 
60 
30 
20 



-9 C. R. 



130 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Casiialities -Sixth District, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


•6 


"si 


3 


a, 
Q 


Character of Injury. 


i, 

il 


1899. 
Mar. 25 


John Seiple 

J. W. Lockhart... 

Paul Roman 

Carl Foft.ster 

Pat O'Hara 


22 
48 
28 
46 


Central City 
Glen Carbon 

Centralia . . . 

Sorento 

Central City 
Glen Carbon 
Odin 


.... 

"i 

1 
1 


1 
.... 

:::: 

.... 

1 

1 

1 

.... 

.... 


"5 

4 

3 
5 

""2 

1 


.... 


Leg injured 


20 


" 28 




?1 


April 4 


Hand injured 


10 




Leg broken. 


90 


•' 6 




g 


" 7 


Fred Steinman... 

•lohn Rebeck 

Prank Keeves 

Pat Kelly 

■John Campbell... 

Jno. Station 

Albert Schbreck'r 

Max Binder 

Chas. Mc Kinney. 

David Heary 

Lat' Lograu 

VVm.D^werf 

John Gill 


25 


Body injured 


10 


•' 10 


Pinarer injured . 


10 






20 


" 19 


99 


Glen Carbon 


"i 

"i 
1 

'"i 

1 
1 

1 

1 

60 


Collarbone broken 


4' 


May 4 


30 Sandoval ... 

20 Trenton .... 
47 Belleville... 
28'Edwardsv'e 
40iCentralia .. 
27l Edwardsv'e 
29;Glen Carbon 
23 

21 Centralia... 
bilLenzStat'n. 
2l;Edwardsv'e 
431 Belleville... 
361 Glen Carbon 

21|0din 

35 1 Cen trail a... 
45|0'Pall(m.... 
43 Collinsville. 
40, Glen Carbon 


Leg broken. 


60 




1? 


" 6 


Leg broken 


W 


•' 9 


Hand injured 


20 


" 10 




qo 


" 15 




''0 


" 22 


Body injured. 


21 


" 22 










30 


June 5 


J. G.Neverns 

Chas. Kinsr 

Jno. Hickman — 

J. A. Smith 

Dixon Crane 

Oliver Barnet .... 
Louis Scharchar . 

Louis Sims 

Peter Kobntz 


— 

■;■ 
.... 

32 


3 

"i 
4 

"■3 
■■3 

178 


Shoulder injured 


30 


" 7 




8 


" 12 




Head injured 


■^o 


" 14 


239 


Head injured 


10 


" 16 




?0 


" 17 


Back injured 


14 


" 20 










« 


•' 28 


Head injured 


10 

















Not recovered. 



Total men injured 

Number not recovered 

Number recovered 

Total time lost by men recovered.. .. 
Average time lost per man recovered 



3.147 days. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



13 



Eeccqyitulation of Non-F<it(d Casualties — Sixth District, 1899. 



Belleville.... 
Bennetts' M. 

Breese 

Central City. 
Centralia — 
CoUinsville.. 
Edwardsville 
Glen Carbon. 
Heintzvillo .. 
Lenz Station. 

Mari.ssa 

Odin 

O'Falion 

Sandoval 

Sorento 

Staunton 

Trenton 

Troy 

White Oak.. 
Worden 



Occupation. 



Cager I 1 

Drill, r.s I 2 

Drivers 24 

Fireman I 1 

Laborers i 3 

Loaders ! 7 

IMach. helpers! 4 
iVlach.runnersl 4 
Mine mgr. . 

Miners , 

Shooters 

Shovelers ., 
Timberman 



Cause of Accident. 



Cage 

Fallins: coal 

Fallinsr prop 

Falling rock 

Failing wire 

Pell fz-oni gangway 

Flying coal 

Kick d by mule 

Machine 

Machine chain 

Pit cars 

Powder explosion . 

Railrord cars 

Tie fall'g down shft 



Colliery. 



Belleville & O'F. C.C 
Bennett's mine ... 
Breese Coal Co ... 
Centralia M. & M. Co 
Consolidated Coal Co 

Crown Coal Co 

Dank Bros 

Glendale Coal Oo 

Hippard Coal Co 

Home Trade Coal Co, 
Independent ('oal Co 
Lumaghi Coal Co... 

Madison Coal Co 

Mo. &I11. Coal Co.... 
Mt. Olive &St L.C.C 
Muren Coal & Ice Co 
Oak Hill Coal Co.... 

Odin Coal Co 

Pettinger & Davis M. 

&M. Co 

Sandoval Coal V.o 

Skellett Coal Co 

Sorento P. & M. Co.. 

Taylor, Joseph 

Trenton C.L.&P.Co 



TaUle Shotcing tlie Nature of Injirries, NumJ)er of Persons In- 
jured, Dependents, Time Lost, with averages and Peucentages 
Sixth District, 1899. 



Natuke of [n-jury. 


g 







1 


Time 

Total 
days. 


Lost. 

Averarre 
days. 


Per cent 

of 
injuries. 


Ankles injured 


I 

1 . 
6 

f 

8 

1 

3l 
6 
1 . 


1 

■■■■5 
9 
1 
1 
4 
1 
4 

13 

1 
9 
3 
3 
3 


i 

1 

5 
2 

4 

1 

1 
4 

4 

3 


"12 
10 

27 
1 
2 
17 
6 
7 

38 
12 
42 
20 
16 
11 


?2 

102 
429 
114 

90 
271 

22 
100 
241 
210 
820 
274 

71 
108 

60 


10 
40 
90 
10 
17 

30.6 
38 
90 
33.9 
11 

14.3 
18.5 
105 
63 
39.1 
23 7 
18 
60 


1 09 






Arm and leg broken 


1 09 


Arms iniured 


1 09 






Bodies injured . 


15 23 


Collar bones broken. 


3 '6 






Feet injured 


8 7 


Fingers injured 


9 17 


















Legs injured 


7 6 


Ribs in.iured 


3.26 






Toes cut off .... ... 


1 09 






Totals 


60 


32 


238 


3.147 


34 2 


100 00 







132 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Bo7id County— Sixth District— 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postofifice. 


Description. 


Outfit. 


a 


1 

T 

§ 


1 

Is 

a * 
II 


a 

O 

d 
2 

1 

S. 
o 

O 


u 
o 

o 


■O ; 

§ : 
J5 : 
b : 
o • 

o : 

ii 


i 
1 

o 

a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Sorento P. and Mfg Co... 
Totals. 


Sorento 


380 


7.6 


6 


Sh. 


s. 


M. 


100,955 


58.960 


41.995 




100,955 


58,960 


41, 995 















































Price for machine mining. 94,455 tons. 33 cents per ton. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 2. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 1. 



Clinton County— Sixtti District— 1899. 









Description. 


Output. 


1 

a 

2 


Name of Operator. Postoffice. 


1 


I 

u 

II 


1 
1 

"o 





=6 

.a 

02 




la 


13 

to 
0: 




Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons |Ton8 

1 


1 

2 


Consolidated Coal Co ... . 
Trenton Coal- L. & P. Co. 
Breese Goal Co. 


Trenton 

Breese 

New Baden!!! 
Germantown.. 


333 
335 
400 
400 
324 
342 


.... 

8 
8 
4 


6 


s.». 


S. 


M. t 80,048 
•' t 75,658 
B. 203.998 


57, 734 

56,744 
181. 828 

53,477 
357 
753 


22.314 
18,914 
22, 170 


4 
5 
6 


Consolidated Coal Co.... 
*Muren Coal and lee Co. . 
Germantown Coal Co 




73,674 

357 

1,000 


20,197 
247 






434,735 


350,893 


83, 842 




Averages 






































1 



* Only in operation about one month at the date of this report. Cost of sinking the 
shaft, $14,000. 

t Mined by machines at 38 cents per ton. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 4. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 2. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



133 



Bond County, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 
S 

1 

hi 

11 

sg 


o 

a 

1 

l! 

a, 


'a 
o 

> 
1 
1 


11 
'If 

III 


1 

-O 
p: 
o 
ft 

o 

a 


a? 
lis 

ill 

2; 


Acci- 
dents 


1 




1 
o 

1 


o 




o 

ll 

Si 

2.S 


o 

ft 

i 

-a 
o 


o 
ft 

e 

■s 


fe 


3 

^5 


1 


$0,897 


$0,118 


$57,842 


128 


53 


181 


$0 40 


S-M. 


178 


$60,503 
$60,503 


1,425 
1,425 


n 

17 


- 


4 








$57,842 


128 


53 


181 




4 




$0,897 


$0,118 


$0 40 




17, 






















Clinton Count ij, 1899 -Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 
o 


a 


n 


.11 




_a)ja 


Acci- 

DEKTS 


























as 






a*— 


CD 


o 


o 






i 


a 

'a 




a * 


-d 






J 

a 

3 


;5a 

1 
SI 


1 


i 


11 

sa 


o 

ft 

a 


SB 

ft 

a 

1 


6J1 

« a 


II 


a 
o 

o 
a 


1^1 

111 


a 
o 
1 

a 

1 


ll§ 

aal 


i 


1 


^ 


<!; 


< 


< 


«i 


<3 


^ 


(i; 


a. 


Q 


H 


M 


z 


fe 


2 


1 


$0 80 


$0 40 


$55, 112 


50 


4,S 


93 




S-M. 


248 


$60,135 


447 


11 




2 


JJ 


90 


25 


55,798 


65 


31 


96 






142 


47.664 


5491 3 




2 


3 


65 


20 


122,622 


150 


2.S 


178 


$0 40 


' ' 


216 


100.000 


4,427 






1 


4 


65 


25 


39,809 


80 


20 


100 


40 


' ' 


184 


39,120 


1.493 


5 






5 


65 




232 


4 


2 


6 


40 




20 


* 


10 








6 


100 


50 


876 


4 


5 


9 


45 


M. 


144 


4,132 


50 




11 










$274, 419 


353 


129 


482 






$251,051 


6 976 


6i 


5 




$0,715 


$0,277 










$0 40 




159 
































* Not reported. 



134 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Madison Count y— Sixth District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


i 


X 

o 
o 

Q 


1 

Is 

a ^ 

it 


1 

o 
d 
Z 

■| 
o 


o 

1 

CO 


o 
o 

^ & 

03 


1 

u 
o 

a 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 


C. C. Co., \bbeyNo. .3.... 
Heinz Bluff.... 

Brookside 

Trov 


ColHnsville ... 
Troy 


146 

168 
278 

278 

mo 

275 
110 
217 
180 
292 
67 
4S 
50 
45 
100 
80 
30 
60 
85 
65 
70 
131 
180 
170 
160 
1S8 


7 

7 

6 

6 



G 

6.6 

6.6 

6.6 

5.6 

5 

5 

6 

2.6 

2.6 

2.6 

2.6 

4.6 

4 

3 

5 

7 

7 


6 
6 
7 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 

1 
1 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


s.^l- 


s. 
;; 

Ho. 
Ho. 


M. 

B. 

M. 
B 

M. 

B. 
M. 
B. 


* 188,415 

* 154,294 

26, 461 

* 39. 70S 

942 
1.037 

* 293,559 

* 56,778 

* 218,697 

* 219,229 

825 
200 
100 
85 

1,252 
171 
400 
100 
400 
200 
500 

4,833 

* 34,015 

2, 839 
99,918 
59.016 


144, 368 

122, 367 

19,793 

28, 464 

785 

640 

218,934 

43, 924 

177,045 

165,011 

825 

200 

100 

85 

1,2.52 

171 

400 

100 

400 

200 

500 

3,807 

27,808 

2, 103 

66,890 

39,344 


44.047 
31,927 
6 671 


4 




11,244 


5 


McDonald 

No. 12 


Wordeu 

Glen Carbon.. 
Edwardsville. 
Grlen Carbon.. 

Staunton 

Beth alto 


157 
397 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


Madison Coal Co., No. 2.. 

No. 3.. 

No.4.. 

Mt. 0. &S. Coal Co 

•John James 


74, 625 
12,854 
41,652 
54. 218 


IV 


W. R. Richardson 

Latlev Yeag'er 




Vi^ 






^4 


Sam McDonald, 


' • 




15 


Malloy & Bali 


North Alton.. 
Moro . . 




Ifi 


Nathan Sydall 




17 


.John Mclnallv 




IS 






l^t 


Charles Kabel .... 




20 
21 
22 
23 
?4 


Perry Meyer 

Amos Chalenfirsworth 

Home Trade Coal Co 

Henrietta Coal Co 


Bethalto 

Fosterburg.... 
Edwardsville. 

Collinsville... 


■■■i,'626 

6,207 
736 




Lumaghi Coal Co. 


33, 028 


26 


Independent Coal Co 

Totals 


19.672 




1,403,977 


1,065,516 


338 461 













































* Mined by machine, price paid 33 cents per ton. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 23. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 4. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 26. 



COAL IX ILLINOIS. 



135 



Madison Cointtij, 1S99 — Concluded. 





Values. Employes. 


d ton 


? 


- 


1=1 

Hi 


1 


1 

Is 

r >■ 


Acci- 
dents 


.a 
£ 


is 



i 


Average value of other 
grades. 

Aggregate value of 
total product. 

Average nuinlxr of 
miners enipluyi;d. 


All other eniployes. 
Total eniploye.s. 


I'ric'c paid per screene 
—hand mining. 




"5 


1 

o 


$0 65 
65 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 


SO 25 
25 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 
40 
35 
25 


$104,850 

87,520 

18,502 

27,268 

691 

670 

201.285 

42.477 

156,214 

115,861 

i.2;n 

300 

150 

106 

1.878 

256 

600 

150 

500 

SO) 

750 

4,320 

23,028 

3,443 

60,034 

31,476 


88 

71 

39 

32 

3 

3 

152 

32 

13S 

120 

5 

3 
3 

6 

3 

3 

40 
4 
96 
41 


60j 148 
31, 102 

19! 58 
251 57 

1| 4 

53: 205 
30' ■ 6-.' 




S-M. 


274 

267 
145 
199 
142 
13.) 
257 
236 
253 
228 
200 
60 
90 
30 
220 
60 
200 
50 
225 
90 
150 
30J 
26 i 

209 
212 


887. 071! 97.^ 
66.828 1,055 
20,586| 42; 
2-<,340j 3i' 
1. 163i 11 
l.3Ut! i: 
135.3481 l,8i- 
31.629 490 


2(1 
11 

,>• 
1 

~V 

IN 

K 

i 
1 

1 
J 

1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

3 
1 

iO 
3 

140 


2 
4 


3 
•J 


3 
4 
5 
6 

8 


SJ 40 

io 

40 


1 


9; 80 

10 62 

11 1 50 


47} 185 
(Ul 184 
1 6 




■■"i'6:i 


W. 


D4.11S 
95. 977 
1.237 

1511 
80 
S5 


1.6. '6 
1,91 J 

:2 


s 

7 


12 1 50 

13 1 50 

11 1 2.T 


li 2 -75! ••' 
1; 2 75 •■ 
1 4! 75I •' 


••i 




15 

l!) 

17 
18 
19 
20 

22 
23 
24 
25 

26 


1 50 
1 50 
i 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 

75 
1 ;i7 5 

70 

65 


'■■'so" 

35 

75 
40 
30 


1 
1 
1 

3 
15 

26 
11 


4 
7 
3 

4 

3 
4 

10 
55 
5 
122 
52 


I 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

75 
103 

7.=. 
50 

50 

40 


s_.-\i. 


1,2-,2| 

171 1 

4o:)I 

10.7| 

400| 6 

203' 

oi)0\ 

3.831 125 
17.5S1' 368 

3.413 

44.6J1 2.97.) 
32.4";S 1.3JJ 

8078.933 13,486 


..I 

1 
\ 


"i 
3 

"3 

I 








8833,845 


897 


398 


1.295 


39 




■SO 72.6 


SO .11 9 


•SO 41 




181 








1 



















1 





136 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Marion Counttj— Sixth District— 1899. 





Name of Opei-ator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output, 




1 


f 

1 

.a 


1 

a =« 
Is 


g 

6 
Z 

'S 

c 




'u 


1 


a 


la 

CO 




a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 Centralis M.& ]M.Co.,No.2 

2 Pitten?er & Davis Min- 
1 ing:& Mfy Co. (Big 4).. 

.3 Orlin ('r,«l Tn 


Centralia 

Odin .. ...... 


576 

637 
714 

609 
871 


6 

6 
7 
6 
4 
4 


6 

6 
6 
6 

t 


Sh. 

:: 


S. 


M. 

B 

M. 
B. 

M. 


* 111,271 

105. 779 

* 142.574 

85,079 
38,675 
10.739 

494,117 


82,892 

73,332 
95.049 
55,517 
27,558 
8.592 

342,940 




28,379 

32,447 

47,525 


4 
5 
6 


Saudoval Coal Co 

Kinmumlr Coal Co 

Salem Coal Co 


Sandoval 

Kinmundy — 
Salem 


29,562 
11,117 
2.147 

151,177 






i . 








1 








1 1 




1 1 









* Mined by machines, price paid 29 cents per ton. 
Whole number of openings reporteil in 1998. 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1S99, 6. 



St. Clair Countij—Si.rth District— 1899. 









Desckiptihn. 


Output. 












s 


4-: 1 a 
















o 


1 

Is 


1 


-r 


S 


i 










Name of Operator. i PostoflSce. 




°o ^ 


o 


o 




CS 


Total 


Tons 


Tons 


. 






z 


%-^ 


1 


ft 
o 


o 


3 


tons pro- 
duced. 


of lump 
coal. 


other 
grades 


s 






ft 


^*t 


1 


45 


il 


-o 














QJ 


















z 








H 


- 


-r. \-n 


rd 








1 Con. C.Co., Richland 'Belleville 


90 


8 


6 


Sh. 


s. 


.M. 


* 34,756 


28,608 


6.148 


2 " " Schureraan....! " 


125 


6 


6 








* 41, 780 


36, 758 


5,022 


3 " " Gartside.No. 4' " 


205 


6 


6 


' ' 






* 43.741 


36,765 


6,976 


4 '' " Green Mt ! " 


IfiO 


6 


6 






' ' 


* 37, 445 


32,223 


5.222 


5 " " Pittsburg ! " 


125 


6.6 


6 






B. 


14,994 


13.550 


1.444 


6' " " Rose Hill 1 " 132 


6 


6 






■ ' 


* 24, 015 


19. 148 


4,867 


7!" " Marissa Mari^sa ! 120 


6 


6 






' ' 


27,022 


22,265 


4,757 


8 " Whire Oak.... 


" 147 


6 


6 








* 76,040 


64. 108 


11,932 


10 


Oakland Coal Co 


Belleville 175 


6.6 


6 






M. 


* 54.406 
9,118 


46, 116 
7,060 


8,290 


Crown C. & T. (::o..No. 2. 


2.058 


ll|benzCo. & M'g Co, 


1 i85 


7 


6 






B. 


12. 101 


10, 125 


1.976 


12 Crown C. & T. Co., No. 4. 


1125 


7 


fi 


" 






83, 198 


69, 390 


13.808 


13!Con C.Co., Reitiecke.No.4i " 1 110 


6 


6 






' ' 


t 69,970 


56. 000 


13,970 


14 Highland Coal Co " 1 130 


6.6 


6 








35,295 


32, 293 


3.002 


15Belleville&0'FallonC.Co " 1120 


6 6 


6 








39,426 


31,007 


8,419 


leGleudale Coal Co., No. 1.. 




120 


6.6 


6 


' ' 




M. 


* 74,403 


55,300 


19. 100 


17 Glendale Coal Co., No. 2. . 




115 


6.6 


6 


' ' 






13, 165 


10.532 


2, 633 


18 
19 
20 


Oak Hill Coal Co 


;; ::::: 


187 
160 

75 


6 
6.6 

7 


6 
6 
6 


;; 




B. 

M. 


38, 305 
41,410 
39,630 


34,037 
35,389 
36,111 


4,268 




6,021 


Hinnard Coal Co 


3,519 


21 Donk Bros. Coal Co 






6 


6 


ID. 




M 


68,538 


59,437 


9.101 


2i Humboldt Coal Co 




100 


6.6 


6 


Sh. 






32,699 


21,800 


10.899 


23 Mo. & 111. C. Co., Wild'm'D 




90 


6 


6 


' ' 




" 


73, 784 


51.022 


22. 762 


24 


Mo. & III. C.Co., Preeburg 




128 


6 


6 








65, 100 


47,250 


17,850 



* Maihiiie mining, price paid b3 cents per ton. 
t Machine iniiiliig, 25,543 tons at 33 cents per ton. 



COAL IN Illinois. 



137 



Marion Counfij, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


ESIPLOYES. 


1 
p 

B 


5 
§ 

a 


1 

1 
1 

o 

X 


1|3 






Acci- 
dents 




n d 
o a> 

II 
il 


s 














's 

3 


s 

o 

if 


It 


13 

2.2 


1 
o 

0. 

a 

u 
o 


>> 

o 

o 


E 


a 

" o 


1-^ 


3 


a 

=1-1 "3 

o ? 

Ill 




1 
c 


:z; 


->3 


< 


< 


< 


< 


H 


O, 


a. 


Q 


Eh 


M 


^ S^l 2^ 


1 so 81 


so 30% 


S75,868 


■3. 


76 


206 




S-M. 


165 


$60,086 


,„ 


20 


1 


5 




81.9 


33.7 


70.993 


132 


86 


218 


$0 36 


" 


175 


59,236 


2.660 


36 




6 




75 


20 


80,791 


125 


72 


197 






28(1 


76. 989 


1.679 


24 


1 


V 




70 


17 


43.886 


160 




22S 


36 


' ' 


12(1 


42,042 


2,295 


27 




4 




85 


15 


25,091 


33 


13 


46 


41 


' ' 


25(1 


24,191 


925 


8 .. 






1 00 


50 


9,665 


20 


12 


32 


41 




200 


9,076 
$271,620 


152 


2 ..j .... 








$306,294 


600 


327 


927 





8,428 


117 2 22 




SO 78 


so 24.4 










$0 37 


198 












i 




1 


1 



St- Clair Couniii, 1899 — Continued. 









! I 

3 u 

M o 

O & 5H 

_, o m 

1. Q 



IN 

3 I) C 

Z 



Acci- 
dents 



SI 65 
65 
65 
65 
65 



10' 


65 


1' 


60 


12 


65 


13i 


60 


141 


73 


15 1 


67 


I61 


69 


171 


71 


18; 


65 


19, 


65 


20 


75 


21 


65 




62 


23 


70 


24 


70 



$20, 132 
25. 147 
25,641 
22,249 

9.168 
13,662 
15,661 
44,653 
35, 182 

5,309; 

6.371 
49,935 
34,997 
24,323 
22.550; 
45.224; 

8,846! 
23, 404 i 
24.5071 
28.666 
41.819; 
16.2401 
41.405' 
37, 537 i 



SO 40 
""46 



'i3 
26 


40 


35 


40 


48 


40 


53 


40 


99 


40 


30 


40 


64 


40 


69 


40 



204! 
243, 
13'i 

247; 
210; 
175 
243 
270 
234 



$15,400 
20, 172 
19.829 
15.652 
7.500 
9.6.38 
14.8721 
32, 518 
25.6011 
5. 909 
5,640 
51,485 
33.463 
17,062 
19,622 



324 
244 
247 

205! 
498 1 
136! 
675' 



2.0.34 


6l.. 


2 


360 


4l.. 




2271.. 






2471 


2-- 


i 


2,080 


6.. 


3 


1,447 


si.. 




758 


5|.. 




973 


2 .. 


'?. 



785 

255; 

1,016 



8. 2301 
18.572 

19, 041 1 1,0481 

20. 461 1 1,000; 

39.718, 1,714 

16.240 720! 

20,767! 2.410! 

3I,7Gll 1,658 



138 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



St. Clair Counfij, 1899.— Concluded. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 




i 
I 

§ 

o 


a =^ 


S 

sj 

'o 
6 

'Z 

■5 

'5 

c 





-a 

u 






■^ 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


25 

i 

2S 
2'.) 
30 
SI 


Mo. & 111. C. Co.. R'ntchl'r 

Leb. Coal & M. Ai?so 

J. Moser, Turkey Uill.... 

Wm. Ogrden & Bro 

Preeburg: Mf g Co 

Durch Hollow Coal Co . . . 
I. Kraiitz 


Belleville 

Lebanon 

Reut.-hler .... 

Preeburg 

Belleville' '.!;; 

Maris sa 

o-Paiion:::::: 

Casey ville.... 
Birkner 

Lenzbiirg 

Mascoutah ... 

Miiistadt...;;; 

New Athens.. 
Belleville 

Marissa 

Belleville 

Centerville ... 
French yill'ge 

Belleville 

Preeburg 

Belleville 

Smithton 

Casey ville 


130 
200 
110 
120 
130 
150 
55 
50 
120 
114 
186 
200 
210 

200 
200 
190 
191 
160 
175 
48 
46 
70 
180 
35 
66 
70 

75 
87 
55 
60 
50 

ioo 

20 
60 
30 
60 
90 
20 


6 
6 

6 
7 
7 
8 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 

7 

7 

7 

6 

7 

7 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6.6 

6 

6 
6 

6.C 
6 


6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
G 
6 
6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

I 

6 

6 
6 


SI. 

Sh. 

D. 

Sh 
SI. 
Sh. 

D. 


S. 


B. 
M. 
B. 


36,301 
*49. i77 
12.000 
12,600 
1,750 
32, 121 
1,163 
5. .300 
35,000 
12.248 
47.005 
62,600 
57, 150 

12, 512 
47,000 
32,000 
22,321 
70,000 
2,779 
14. 656 
3.126 
5.580 
120.000 
5,869 
2,489 
3,100 

28,800 

14,017 

3,500 

1,500 

5,008 

1,000 

4,944 

560 

12,000 

500 

400 

20, 400 

440 

120 

100 

1.849.474 


28.401 
40,080 
8.000 
8,400 
1.550 
24,S26 
1. 133 
4,800 
28,700 
12, 166 
32, 157 
52. 000 
45,720 

9,384 
39,000 
24,000 
18, 193 
51,000 
2.479 
8,106 
3. 126 
4,580 
80.000 

2", 489 
3,000 

24,000 

10, 254 

3.500 

1.500 

5.008 

1.000 

4.613 

■ 560 

12,000 

500 

400 

16,320 

440 

120 

100 

1,475,768 



7.900 
9,097 
4,000 
4,200 
200 
7,295 
30 


3^ 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 

52 
53 
54 
55 


Eb^l Bros 


500 




6,300 




•' '• 


82 


O'P. C. &M. Co..Darrow. 
Joseph Taylor, Taylor. . . . 
Joseph Taylor, Newtou.. 
Rubicon, Joyce & Griece. 


•• 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 

S. 
Ho. 

S. 

M. 
Ho. 

M. 
Ho 


M. 
?.• 

M. 
B. 

M. 


14,848 
10,600 
11,430 

3,128 


Walnut Hill Coal Co 

Suuiiuit Coal Co 


8,000 
8,000 


Trixe& Sons Coal Co.... 

Kolb Coal Co 

James Beaty 

Milstadt Coal Co 

Wm. Pistor 

Dutch Hill Coal Co 

Murcii Coal & Ice Co 

Taylor Bros 


4,128 

19.000 

300 

6,550 

■■'i'ooo 

40, 000 


Nicholas Weiss 






100 


Johnson Coal & Mfg Co., 
Briar Hill 


4,800 




3.763 


John Harst 








56 

57 
58 
59 


Conrad Strawbiuger 

Conrad Reeb 

Louis Grossman 

Frederick Murphy 

Benj. .Johnson 


331 


61 






e,'> 


Charles Hartman 


S. 1 " 


4,080 


63 




Ho. 


•• 




64 
65 


GrilHth & Warner 

J. C. Marshall .. . 








373,706 




Averages 






■ 











Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 63. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 7. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 5. 
W^hole number of openings reported for 1899, 65. 
* Machine mining, price paid 30 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



l.'^9 



St. Clair Countij, iS-9P.— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


on— 
nth- 


a 






CO <D 

—•2 


Acci- 
dents 
















t: 1 i 


.2 


-S 0.0, 




-1 






CL • 






<*-< 












II 

o ® 

§5 


o 

o 
<u 

3 




3 




if 


>■ 


P. 


4 

>> 


2 

p.a 


i?- 


g 



s paid < 
to all em 
office hel 


1 
3 
u 
-3 

a 



1 


is 

1-2 






1 

g 
3 


'1 




|1 
II 


11 





a 





-1 


1 


1 


otal wage 
the year 
excepting 


n 

lis 

3sa 


c3 




"Z, 


< 


■^ 


< 


< 


< 


H 


CL, 


cu 


.q 


^ 


tS 


iz; 


fe 


_^ 


25 


$0 70 


$0 25 


$21,855 


34 


13 


47 


$0 40 


S-M. 


168 


S18.622 


883 


4 


1 




26 


80 


50 


36,612 


70 


24 


94 






309 


29.506 


350 


11 


1 




27 


65 




6,200 


8 


4 


12 


40 


' ' 


200 


6,000 


300 2 






28 


65 


30 


6-720 


15 


4 


19 


40 




180 


6.300 


360 ! 2 






29 


75 


50 


1,262 


6 


2 


8 


■40 




60 


700 


701 1 






30 


70 


30 


19,566 


25 


7 


32 


40 


' ' 


180 


17.911 


584 j 5 






31 


75 


35 


859 


8 


2 


10 


40 


' ' 


250 


639 


30 








32 


1 GO 


50 


5,050 


6 


3 


9 


40 




300 


2,650 


240 








33 


70 


40 


22,610 


30 


9 


39 


40 


' ' 


175 


17,500 


845 








34 


65 


55 


7,952 


8 


3 


11 


40 


' ' 


240 


6,736 


350 








35 


80 


35 


30,921 


50 


12 


62 


40 




209 


25,242 


922 










75 


65 


45,890 


65 


14 


79 


40 


' ' 


182 


30.412 


l!322, 5 






37 


75 


65 


41,719 


60 


14 


74 


40 


" 


170 


28.916 


1,143 5 






38 


70 


25 


7,350 


20 


6 


26 


40 


• • 


90 


6,652 


70* 3 






39 


70 


35 


30, 100 


35 


8 


43 


40 


' ' 


200 


20.900 


400: 5!.. 




40 


65 


30 


18.000 


28 


7 


35 


40 




240 


12,250 


SOOi 31.. 




41 


65 


40 


13,476 


20 


6 


26 


40 


' ' 


261 


12,276 


l,116i 2I.. 




42 


65 


20 


36.950 


40 


19 


59 


40 


' ' 


225 


30,000 


2,000 51.. 




43 


1 25 


20 


3.158 


5 


2 


7 


40 


W. 


300 


1,667 


150 1 






44 


70 


50 


8,949 


22 


4 


26 


40 


S;M. 


175 


8,949 


1 






45 


1 00 




3.126 


5 


1 


6 


50 




230 


1,875 


2 






46 


80 


■■■■56" 


4,164 


11 


4 


15 


40 


' ' 


192 


5,170 


250! 1 






47 


65 


30 


64,000 


90 


11 


101 


40 


' ' 


260 


60,000 


3,000 3 






48 


1 00 




5,869 
2,489 


5 


2 


7 


40 


' ' 


310 


2, 934 


5I 1 






49 


1 CO 




4 


1 


5 


45 




275 


1.874 


40| 1 






50 


100 


■■■■56" 


3,050 


4 


2 


6 


40 


w. 


210 


1,555 


90l 1 






51 


60 


25 


15, 600 


20 


11 


31 


40 


S-M. 


200 


12,230 


1,200' 3 






52 


80 


50 


10.0S4 


8 


4 


12 


50 


M. 


210 


10, 084 


323 3 






53 


1 00 




3.500 


4 


2 


6 


40 


W. 


310 


1,601 


100! 1 






54 


80 




1.20U 


3 


1 


4 


40 




120 


1,200 


31 1 
240 3 






55 


75 


'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


3,756 


4 


2 


6 


40 


' ' 


261 


2,786 






56 


90 




900 


2 


1 


3 


50 




270 


600 


20 


1 






57 


75 


""25" 


3.541 


5 


2 


7 


55 


S-M. 


289 


2, 000 


71 


1 






58 


1 00 




560 




1 


3 


62 


M. 


70 


560 




1 






59 


CO 




7,200 


10 


3 


13 


40 


S-M. 


250 


6,000 


■■"156 


2 






60 


1 00 




500 




1 


3 


50 


M. 


180 


500 




1 






61 


1 00 




400 




1 


3 


50 




150 


400 




1 






62 


7U 


""ib" 


13, 056 


20 


6 


26 


40 


S-M. 


250 


10,000 


■■■■75 


2 






63 


1 00 




440 


1 


1 


2 


50 


M. 


200 


440 




1 






64 


1 00 




120 


2 




2 


50 


W. 


126 


120 


3 








65 


1 00 




100 


1 




1 


50| " 


je 


100 


2 














SI, 131.482 


1,605 


518 


2 123 


1 




S920, 640 


38, 568 


204 




22 




so 68 


so 31.7 










$0 40; 


206 


































140 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 




I 












. 




^ M 


a sn 


U (0 






n> 






'S 








a 
11 


£a 


.S5 


Counties. 


1 


i 

a 


1 




a 


1 


1 

ft 

a 

O 


1 

hi 


ri 


11 
§5 






1 
a 
3 


5 

a 
'o. 
a. 


o 

i 


a 


o 
5 


3 
3 


o 
a 


1 

a 


^1 
ft 


ii 


m 




2; 


rj\ ■m 


^1^ 




' ^ 


H 


H 


H 


< 


< 


Bond 


1 


1 






1 


100,955 


58, 960 


41,995 


79,796 


11,281 


$0 89.7 


so 11.8 


Clinton 


6 


6 




2 




434,735 


350,893 


83.842 


380,700 


28,598 


71.5 


27.7 


Madison 


26 


12 


14 


4 


1 


1,403,977 


1,065,516 


338,461 


1,165,977 


164, 183 


7?, 6 


31.9 


Marion 


6 


6 








494, 117 


342,940 


151, 177 


448, 753 


18,040 


78 


24.4 


St. Clair 


5 
_ 
104 


7 


18 
3', 


7 
IS 


5 

7 


1.849,474 


1,475.768 


373,706 


1,598,477 


104,566 


68 


31.7 




4, 283, 258 


3, 294, 077 


989, 181 


3.673,703 


326, 668 






Averages 






















$0 71.69 


$0 29 5 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 98. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 13. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 7. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 104. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



141 



Sixth District— 1899. 









t-t 


(- 6£ 


^^, 


0) i"^"^ 












Employes. 


CO 


S.9 

a 


% 


P. 




Casualties 


Machines. 


o : 




a 










£ 


^ 


v : 

H 


a 




i 


2a 

1 




«2® 


o 


lis 






3 2 


2 


t 


si 


o 


"c 


"S 


§s 


.'^fl 


l"c 


'o 






l®« 


"o 


li 








a 


® (U 




^ S'i: 














-S.S 






01 VU 










0) ■ 










0) S 






Xi 






oS.S 




-H '^ 






TS 






1.^ 




Si 


a 

3 


B2. 
3 n 


1 


^§ 


n 


lis 


as 

3 3 


III 




3 


3 3 




< 


^ 


^; 


H 


-5i,-, 


< 




;? 


;z; 


M 




^ 


z 


e 


$57,842 


128 


53 


181 


178 


$0 40 


$60,503 


1,425 


17 




4 


^ 


7 


* 94,405 


274,449 


353 


129 


482 


159 


40 


251,051 


6.976 


34 




5 


2 


20 


t 155,706 


883.845 


897 


398 


1,295 


181 


41.5 


678 933 


13,486 


140 


14 


39 


8 


67 


*1, 204, 695 


306,294 


600 327 


927 


198 


37 


271,620 


8,428 


117 


^ 


22 


2 


11 


X 253,845 


1,131.482 


1,605 518 


2,123 


210 


40 


920.640 


38,568 


204 


6 
22 


22 


10 


39 


* 461.303 


82.653,912 


3.oS3| 1,425 

i 


5,008 






$2,182,747 


68,883 


512 


92 


23 144 


§2,169.954 










196.8 


$0 40 


























i 









* Price paid, 33 cents per ton. 
t Price paid, 38 cents per ton. 
X Price paid, 29 cents per ton. 
2 Average price paid, 32.9 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



u;j 



SEVENTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1899. 

Counties: Gallatin, Haniilton, Jackson, Jetferson, Johnson, Perry, Ran- 
dolph, Saline, Washington, Williamson. 

Evan D. John, Insj^ector, Carboudale. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir: — In compliance with section ]2 of the general mining law of the State 
of Illinois, I have the honor to submit herewith to you the fourth annual re- 
port of the coal mines located in the Seventh Inspection District, as now de- 
fined, and the sixteenth of the general series for the year ending June 30, 
1899. 

The district shows an increase in output over that |of 189S of 233, 07G tons. 
The tabular statement herewith, gives the statistics of each county, showing 
the number of mines operated during the year, both shipping and local mines; 
the new and abandoned mines: the depth of coal below the surface; the total 
tonnage of all grades of coal; the value per ton at each mine, and the aggi-e- 
gate value of the total product, and the number of tons of coal produced by 
machines. 

The following summary gives the principal facts compiled from the sched- 
ules of the several counties: 



_ 


10 




131 




57 




74 




15 




7 




12 


Total tonnage 


3, 392, 376 




2,301,555 




1,090,821 


AffTetrate value of total product 


82,322,098 




SO. 769 




$0,295 


Number of miners.. 


3,366 




1,496 




137 




4,999 


\vera°'e number of day>< of oper^tiou for all min^s 


159 


Number of kess of powder used in blasting coal 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 


79,267 
»1 
14 




60 




9 




23 




64 




807.692 


Number of tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 


242.313 




56, 540 




357 




83 







144 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Prospective Mine. — The Sunnyside Coal Co. is sinking a shaft one mile west 
of Herrin, in Williamson county, on the Illinois Central Railroad. 

Abandoned Mines. — Two mines have been abandoned in Randolph county, 
three in Williamson county, and five in Perry county. The five mines aban- 
doned in Perry county were shipping mines; three of them belonged to the 
Duquoin Union Coal Co., one to the Jupiter Mining Co., all located at Du- 
quoin, and one a small mine at St. Johns. 

Fatal Accidents. The following is a detailed account of the fatal accidents 
that have taken place in the Seventh District: 

July 12, 1898, August Durbee, a miner, aged 33 years, married, leaves a 
widow and four children, was killed instantly by a fall of slate at the face of 
his working place in shaft No. 7 operated by the Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co.,. 
at Herrin, Williamson county. The deceased was working off a standing 
shot which was the only support to the broken roof; the piece of slate that 
fell on him would weigh fully three tons. 

July 21, 1898, William Rice, single, age 28 years, a miner employed at G. 
W. Brown's mine, Pinckneyville, was injured by falling clod at 8 a. m. and 
died when conveyed to the surface about 9:30 a. ra. The deceased was load- 
ing his ear, he heard the noise of the clod working loose, and, instead of 
staying at the face of his working place he made an attempt to come out and 
was caught. He knew of the dangerous condition of the place and had prom- 
ised the mine manager to timber the place before loading any more coal. 
The clod that fell would weigh about 3,000 pounds. 

August 25, 1898, John Dalton, a miner, age 22 years, single, was severely 
crushed by falling roof at the face of his working place in the Willisville Coal 
Co. mine, located at Willisville, Perry county, and died from the injuries 
received Sept. 2, 1898. At the time of the accident deceased was in a sitting 
posture at the right hand side of his working place, when a mass of roof 
weighing about 1500 pounds suddenly fell striking him with the above result as 
described. 

September 27, 1898, Jeo Mario, a miner, age 29 years, single, emoloyed at 
the Scott-Wilson Coal Co. shaft No. 2, Fredonia, Williamson county, \fras 
cleaning up a fall of slate that had come down the night before on top of 
so.ne loose coal; he sounded the roof before starting to work and made the 
remark that it was all right, but in a few minutes afterward a piece of roof 
weighing about 1000 pounds suddenly fell striking him on the back, he was 
taken to his boarding house and died from his injuries at 5:30 p. m. the same 
day. 

October 10, 1898, Alfred Reneson, trip rider, aged 22 years, married, leaves 
a widow. The deceased was engaged as a trip riderr his duty was to accom- 
pany the trip in on the engine plane to the inside partings and out again. He 
was riding on the front loaded car on the engine plane; the trip of cars was 
moviiag at an ordinary rate of speed, when the coupling between the first and 
second cars broke, throwing him and the car he was on against the side of 
the entry; he was killed instantly, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 145 

November IG, 1898, vValter Kenney, a machine helper. :if?e 22 years, single, 
a resident of Grand Tower employed in the No. 6 mine of the Big Muddy 
Coal & Iron company, Murphysboro, Jackson county. The deceased was at 
work at the face of his room shoveling the slack from a machine when a mass 
of coal weighing about two tons, fell on him, killing him instantly. 

November 24, 1898, Edgar McAlpin, laborer, age 23 years, married, leaves 
a widow and one child, was killed in the mine of the Ohio and Mississippi 
Valley Coal & Mining Co., Marion, Williamson county. The deceased was 
coming out of the shaft on the cage with four other men; when about 'lO feet 
up he lost his balance and fell into the west chamber and down the shaft. 
This was only his third day in the mine. 

December 21, 1898, James Vansage, miner, aged 33 years, married, leaves 
a widow and three children, was killed while at work in a pillar in the mine 
of the St. Louis & Big Muddy Coal Co., Carterville, Williamson county. He 
was working off some coal that had been shattered by a shot the night before 
when a piece of top coal weighing about 200 pounds fell, crushing his head 
against a pit-car which was close by. 

January 17, 1899, George Beck, a miner, age 40 years, married, leaves a 
widow and two childrea, was killed at the face of his working place about 3 
a. m., in the Willis Coal & Mining company's mine, Willisville, Perry county. 
Deceased had prepared three blasts, and when ready to fire placed the squib 
in the hole. He must have held his lamp near the powder part of squib, as 
he never moved until he was knocked back by the force of the shot; he was 
instantly killed. 

April 5, 1899, Benj. Hudgens, miner, age 47 years, married, leaves a widow 
and seven children, was injured at the Ledford mine, Saline county, at the 
face of his room by a fall of slate. He had tried that morning to take down 
the slate and failed. He then went to work under it without putting up tim- 
bers, and while at work the slate suddenly fell, striking him on the back and 
head. He died from the injuries received April 7, two days after the acci- 
dent. 

May 3, 1899, John Shanks, age 32 years, single, was instantly killed while 
at work loading his first car about 7:45 a. m., in room 32 on the (3th west en- 
try, north side, in the mine of the Horn Colliery Co., Duquoin, Perry county. 
The deceased had fired two shots the night before which knocked out eight 
props. A miner by the name of Jones was in the room at the time of the ac- 
cident and was just asking the deceased if the roof was all right. Before he 
could reply the roof fell, crushing his head against the pit-car, killliug him 
instantly. Jones escaped unharmed. 

May 8. 1899, Charles Harris, age 26 years, mai-ried, leaves a widow and one 
child, was killed at the top of the Sato Coal & Mining company's mine, Sato, 
Jackson county. The deceased was employed as top driver. There had been 
no work at the shaft this day. Deceased thought he would go into the mine 
and bring out some mining tools he had there. It was about 8 a. m. when he 
went down the stairway and brought the tools to the bottom of the shaft; he 
then went out and asked the engineer if he would get up steam and hoist his 
tools. It was agreed that the engineer would hoist them in the afternoon. 
—10 C. R. 



14() 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



About 2:00 p m. the engineer started up the engine. Harris walked to the 
top of the lower landing and stood there until the west cage came up which 
struck him on the head. He fell backward to the ground and died inside of 
a half hour afterward. 

May 11, 1899, Henry Beaver, miner, age 38 years, married, leaves a widow 
and three children, was killed while at work in room No. 1, fifth east entry, 
north side, in the Eden mine of the Western A. Coal & Coke Co., Sparta, 
RandoUh county. Deceased was getting ready to drill a hole, when sudden- 
ly the roof fell, striking him on the back. He died about 3 p. m., four hours 
after the accident. 

June 15, 1899, William Yates, age 24 years, married, leaving a widow and 
two children; was employed at the Horn CoUery Co's mine, Duquoiu, Perry 
county, as a night roadman. About 5 a. m., Yates was coming out, and on 
reaching the bottom he volunteered and went to help the pump man in his 
work. The pump would not take water. Yates got a piece of scantling and 
was prying at the suction pipe when his hold slipped and he fell into the 
sump and was scalded. The exhaust of the steam pump had been discharg- 
ing into the sump. He died June 17, two days after the accident. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Evan D. John, 

Carbondale, 111. State Inspector of Blines, Seventh District. 

Fatal Casualities — Seventh District, 1899. 



Date. 


Name. 


6 

< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


1 


o 


a 


a 


Cause of Accident. 


1898. 
July 16 

• • 9) 


Aueust Durbee 

William Rice 


33 

28 
22 
29 
22 
22 
23 
33 

40 
47 
32 


Miner 

Trip rider.!. 
Mai'h. helper 

Laborer 

Miner 


Herrin 

Pinckn'yv'e 
Willisville.. 
Predonia ... 
St. Johns ... 
Gr'nd Tow'r 

Marion 

Carterville.. 

Willisville.. 
Ledford .... 
DuQuoin ... 


1 

'i 

i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

9 


1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

9 


4 

i 

3 

2 
4 

i 

3 

2 

23 


-^ 


5 

'2 
4 

3 
4 

4 
3 

i 


Palling roof 

Falling roof 


Aug 25 


■lohn Dalton . 


Falling roof 


Sept. 27 
Oct. 10 
Nov. 16 

" 24 
Dec. 21 

1899. 
Jan. IT 






Alfred Reneson 

William Kenney 

Rdsfar Mc.Alpin 

James Vac sage ....... 




Palling coal 

Falling from cage ... 
Palling roof 

Premature blast 


April -^ 

May 3 


Ben.i. Hudgens 

lohn Shanks 


Palling roof.... 

Pal.ing roof 




Charles Harris 

Henry Beaver 

William Yates 




June 15 


38 Miner 

24 Laborer 


i-'parta 

DuQuoin — 


Palling roof 

Scalded in sump 





















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



147 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Seventh District, 1899. 



Residence. No. Occupation. No. Nature of Casualty No. 



Colliery. 



Carterville... 

DuQuoin 

Fredouia 

Grand Tower 

Her; in 

Ledfonl 

Clarion 

FiuckneyvUe 
St. Johns — 

Sato 

Sparta 

Willisville.... 

Totals.... 



li Laborers 

2 Mach. helper. 

ILMiners 

1 'I'op driver — 
ITrip ri.ler .... 
11 



I 1 



Ascendins: cage. 

Falling: cage 

Falling coal 

Falling roof 

Freniature blast 
Scalded in sump 



Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co 

Brown, G. W j 

1 Horn's Colliery Co i 

8 Illinois Cent. Coal & I. Co. 

II O. & M. Valley Coal Co...! 

St. L. & BigMuddy C. Co.i 

Sato Coal Co | 

Scott-Willis Coal Co 

Strickland Bros 

Western A. C. & C. Co 

Willis Coal Co 



Non-Fatal Casualties—Seventh District. 1899. 









m 


























v 










"S 




a 






s. 






ja 




s 


73 


o 


- 



Character of Injury. 



1898 



July 
•• 15 
" 16 
" 21 

Aug. 15 



Oct. 



Thos. Colombo... 17|Herrin 

Sylv'st'rGracianajSS Murphy sboro. 
Thos.M.Carapbell u8jPinckueyville 

Dan Greenlee 24jCarterville ... 

George White 24: Murphy sboro. 

■■ It) lohn Moi^e l26:Carterville ... 

■ • 20 Isreal Talley I28i Herrin ......... 

" 20 P. H. Qnigley....i2.3 " 

" 20, C. B.Wilson l27jMurphysboro. 

" 26; Louis Sate i33;Carterville ... 

Sept.l2 F. W. W. Philps.. 20|Murphysboro. 

" 28; William Grant... 36, Sparta 

SiSara Ronimics ... 25|Hallidayboro . 

15 John Knee •18|Murphysboro. 

24|Salvator Piazzia. 46 

28 H. Taylor 24 

28iNace Banks 45} St. John 

31] Frank Clayton... 37;Murpdysboro. 

!j. Batson .33 

" 16iWra. A. Wilson... 33 
" 16 Mont. Kindman.. 231 

" 17 Val Miller 31 DuQuoin 

" 24, George H. Putney 6liMurphysboro. 
" 30!Edward Hodgens'50 
Dec. 2jRa!ph Simpson. ..i26iHa)lidayboro. 

9 Albert Hoytan 45|.Sparta 

' ' 27| Joseph Costino. . . 23 Murphysboro. 
' • 28 James Walters. . . 341 



Nov. 



Jan. 



Feb, 



Peter Wagoner ... :46i 

C. C. Hurst kolHerrin , 

John Dickey |28 Sparta I 

Wra. Brokling.. .. 22|Hallidayboro. 

E. Ferges. '22, Herrin 

James Brewster. .'35| Murphysboro. 

.lohn M. Bandy.. .IsaiHerrin 

W. W. Holman...|46!Conant 

John Bornolt 40[Cart°rville.. . . 

John Meehan I48i. Murphysboro. 

Andrew Barker.. 1281 
Albert Boston.... 17 
Alonzo Balz |2l|Carterville 



. iHead injured 

3; Foot injured 

3j Back injured 

. I Body injured 140 

2j Finger broken 15 

. j Hand injured 14 

2jThumb injured 10 

. I Elbow injured 10 

2 Foot injured 10 

1 Leg broken 120 

., Foot injured 7 

. I Back injured 

. I Back injured 

7 Body injured j 7 



i;Body injured 

..'Hip injured 

11 Arm broken — 
ijFoot injured ... 

4; Hip injured 

6 Hips injured ... 
3 Fingers injured 
4jBaek injured. .. 
IjBack injured... 
6: Body injured... 



Leg broken. 
Leg injured .. 
Head injured. 
Foot injured.. 



5 Head injured 

... Hip injured 

. .. Ribs broken 

. .. Back injured 

. .. Head injured 

2 Leg injured 

2, Foot injured 

5jBody injured 

. . . Foot injured 

12] Back injured 

2|Back injured 

. . . jCollar-bone broken 
. . . I Ankle injured 



10 



Not recovered July 1. 1899. 



148 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District, 1899 — Concluded. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


1 

s 


6 

a 


2 


a 

a 

Q 


Character of Injury. 


i 

<B W 

Eh 


1899 
April 5 


T1innin<5 TTpIIv 


23 
31 

18 
22 
50 
21 
38 
25 


Johnston City 
Murphysboro. 


.... 
.... 


1 

"i 

.... 

.... 

"i 

1 
1 








8 


'• 10 Chas. Underwood 


5 


6 


Back injured 


4 


" 14[Wm- Boatwright 


Leg injured 


7 


" 14 Gordon Ferg:uson 
" 22.lohnRohfirt,s 




1 


Back injured 

Face and body injured 

Face and body injured 


15 

* 


" 22 


Frank Estee 

Mason Smith 

(Teorgre Davis 

Willis Byars 

kS.§Sl,:::::: 

E. E. Taylor 

Wm. (). Banion.. 
Robert Bradshaw 
William Duncan. 

Fred Duncan 

Harry Dale 

John Murphy 

Caesar Bruzette.. 

Totals 




1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

"i 

"i 

1 

35 


1 

5 
1 
2 
3 



1 


9 


14 


" 22 


Carterville.... 
Mnrnhvshnro. 


6 




10 


" 25 


2 
3 

112 


Knee injured 


7 


May 4 


38i 


Toe injured 


15 


'• 8 


38 
29 
27 
24 
18 
24 
25 
15 
42 
28 


DuQuoin 

Hallidayboro. 
Johnston City 
Murphysboro. 




7 


" 12 






" 14 


Body injured 


7 


" 19 




30 


June 2 


Head injured. . . . 


15 


" 3 


Body injured 


7 


" 12 




10 


" 16 


Head injured 


* 


" 16 


Head injured 


* 


" 23 




« 





















60 




13 


Number recovered 


47 




1.460 days 


Average time lost per man recovered 







* Not recovered July 1, 



Recajjitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh Distinct, 1899. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. Cause of Accident. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Carterville. 


6 
1 
2 
4 
6 
2 
32 


Blacksmith... 


1 
1 
1 
19 
4 
6 

I 

20 
1 

1 
1 

60 


Ax. 


1 
1 

11 

9 

1 

1 
25 
3 

60 


Big Muddy C. & I. Co . 

Brown & Barwell 

Brown, G. W 


35 








DuQuoin 


Carpenter 

Drivers 

Laborers 

Loaders 

Mach. helpers 


Ci'ossbar 


1 


Hoilidayboro. 


Palling coal 


Gartside Coal Co 


3 






?. 




Falling rock 


111. Cent. Coal & Salt Co 


9, 


Murphysboro 


Machine 


1 




Mules 

Pick 


4 




1 Miners" . ;■"' 


1 


Sparta.. 


3 
1 

60 


Pumpman 

Roadman 

Timberman... 


Pit-cars 


St. L. &Big M. C. Co.. 
Western A. C- & C. Co.. 
Williamson Co. C. Co... 


6 


St. John 

Totals. 


Premature blast 


2 
2 

60 













COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



149 



Table Showmg the Ndlure of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Depende ds. Time Lost, with Averages and Percentages. — Seventh 
District. 





1 
'A 


OS 


g 




a 


Time Lost. 


"o 00 


Nature of Injuries. 


Total 
days. 


Aver- 
age 
days. 


if 


Ankle injured 


1 

1 
13 

8 

1 

7 

1 

1 
7 
6 
1 

3 
1 
1 
1 


i 

8 

5 



i 

5 

1 

... ." 
2 
3 
1 

i 

1 


1 

5 

3 
1 

1 
2 

i 

5 
3 

1 

1 


i 

30 
22 



1 

5 
6 

'I 

3 
3 


14 
80 

175 

246 
10 
10 
14 
79 
90 
22 
14 
72 

229 
7 

300 
31 
42 
10 
15 


14 

80 

13.5 

30.8 

10 

10 

7 

11.3 
90 
11 
14 
10 
38.2 

7 
150 
10.3 
42 
10 
15 


1.67 




1.67 




21.66 


Body injured 


13.33 


Collar-bone broken. 


1.67 




1.67 


Face and body injured 


3.33 


Feet injured 


11.66 




1.67 


Fingers injured 


3.33 


Hand injured 


1.67 
11.66 


Hips injured. 


10 




1.67 




3.33 


Legs injured . 


5 




1.67 




1.67 


Toe injured 


1 67 








60 


35 


25 


n. 


1,460 


24.3 


100.00 







150 STATISTICS OF LABOK. 

Gallatin County — Seventh District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
a 


1 
1 

1 
1 

p. 
Q 


Il 

o.S 


s 

1 

Z 

J 

O 


-a 
o 

o 

i 

.a 

CO 


1 

S3 

o 
:2 


1 

1 
3 

o 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


^ Tons 

bf lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Equality Coal Co 


Equality 

Shawneetown 
Saline Mines. 


80 
30 
31 

20 

25 


4.10 
4 
4 

4.4 
4 fi 


5 

5 
5 
5 
5 




St 
Hd 


B. 


10,521 
1.200 
618 
400 
1,220 
1,200 
1,350 


10,021 

1,200 

618 

400 

1,220 

800 


50a 


2 
3 

4 
5 


Wm. H. Stader 

VVm. MeLain 

•John H. Underwood, No.ll 




6 




25'4.6 fil " 


10ft 


7 


iM. Carney 


35:4.6 
30 4.6 


fil " 


9nf)i don 


8 




6 
6 


•' 


145 j 120 
lOOj 100 


25 


q 




30 


4.9 












16.754 


15,429 


1,32& 




Averages 











































Whole number of openings reported in 1898,9. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899,9, 



Hamilton County — Seventh District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Des 


CRIPTION. 




Output. 




i 
1 


T 
g 

1 


1 

Is 


a 
1 

d 

1 
1 


o 

ft 
o 

03 


T3 

p 

.:? 
o 

o 

i% 


1 

CO 

o 

g 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
dixced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 




Flint 


8 
8 


2.6 


1 
1 


St 






400 
240 


400! 


2 


R. I. Yates 


Dalghreen.... 








s^-^l 




640 


640 

















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 2. 
Whole niimber of openings reported for 1899,2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



151 



Gallatin County, iSi/^^— Concluded. 

















1 


ja 




II ■ 


\lxi 








Values. 


Employes. 


§ 


"5 


ri 


N*^ 


DENTS 
















1 

Is 
■c'3 

■|| 

aj 5 


o 
5 

1 

O [S 

I! 


-.3 

s 

a 

CM 
O 
CO 
>1 

C4 


'If 

s 

ill 

o'Scu 






c 

2 


li 


o 

o 

ii 


SI'S 
^1 


o 


I 

g 

o 


1 

a 
3 


1 
h 

<» 
tin 
1J 


?! 

2.9 

lli 

5S£ 


3 


1 
a 
o 


Z 


ol 


<j 


^ 


< 


<l 


H 


Oh 


Dh 


« 


&H 


M 


Z 


b 


Z 


1 


$1 00 


$0 25 


$10,146 


30 


15 


« 


$0 50 


Mo. 


ISO 


$10,146 


» 





6.... 


?. 


1 00 




1,200 


4 




6 


50 


S-\i. 


150 


1.200 


75 








3 


1 00 




618 


2 




2 


62.5 


Wk. 


140 


618 


34 








4 


100 




400 






2 


50 


•• 


125 


40C 


20 








5 


1 00 




1,220 


3 


2 


5 


50 


S-.Vl. 


140 


1,220 


74 








fi 


1 00 


25 


900 


4 


1 


5 


62.5 


Mo. 


150 


900 


50 








7 

8 


1 00 


25 


1,050 


3 


1 


4 


62.5 


S-M. 


2110 


1.05C 


74 


1 




1 00 


25 


126 


2 




2 


62.5 


Wk. 


50 


126 


4 


1 




9 


1 00 




100 


^ 




2 


62.5 






100 


5 


1 










$15,760 


52 


21 


73 








$15, 760 


'''\ 


14 






$1 00 


$0 25 


$0 52.4 




142 





















Hamilton Count)/, 1899— Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 

a 


a 




II 




II 


Acci- 
dents 














■^ 


p 


o 


.5*aa 




= 3 






















as 

;2a 

si 

Pi 


0) 


o 


o 














U O 








1 

o 

1 


2 

11 


III 

n 

Ss 


a o 
s a 
^ 3 


I 

^ 

.2 3 


a 

o p: 
2^ 


o 

1 

o 


SI 


I 

a 






1 


Zi < 


<J 


< 


< 1 


<i ; H 


a^ 


3-1 


Q 


^ 


W 


Z ,:. 


z 


1 


$1 50 




$600 


si 




8 


$0 62.5 


Wk. 


75 


$600 


5 


I2' .... 


2 


125 




300 


3 




3 


62.5 






300 
$900 





! 2 — 








S900 


11 

i 


::: 


11 


SO 62.5 


4 .... 




$1 40 












152 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Jackson County — Seventh District — 1899. 









Description. 


Output. 






o 1 . 


1 

o 


-c 


a 

CS 

o 


^ 










Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


§ 


si 


c 
Z 

'5 


1 


o 

II 

■n 


o 

1 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


I 

3 
4 

5 

6 

8 

& 
1! 

13 
14 
15 


GartsideCoalCcNo. 1.. 

No. 3.. 

No. 4.. 

Biff Muddy Coal & Irou 

Co.. Fo.5 

Bis: Muddy Coal & Iron 

Co., No. 6 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron 

Co.,Ha"Tis,).i 

Wild & Gill. Willis 

E. 11,. t-'ooie .... 


Murpbysboro. 


121 

146 

148 

150 

150 

150 
130 
60 
35 
25 
22 
24 
30 
20 
85 
12 

49 
14 
20 
24 
30 
30 
30 


6.6 
6.6 
6.6 

6.6 

6.6 

6.3 

7 

2.8 

7.5 

7.5 

7.6 

6 6 

7 

7 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3.4 

3.6 

3.4 

3 fi 


2 

2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
2 


Sh. 
" 

D. 

Sh. 

D. 

•• 

Sh 


S. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 

S. 
Ho. 

Id 

Ho. 

Hd 

H^o. 

S. 




*36,053 
*61,335 
*67,575 

*148,744 

*146,346 

*127.S54 

12,870 

595 

200 

500 

560 

700 

600 

300 

10,200 

4,800 

17,000 

• 687 

600 

600 

540 

500 

300 

62.678 

300 

*172, 381 


32.963 
43. 186 
44,474 

104.569 

94,455 

72,289 

11,570 

476 

200 

500 

•560 

700 

600 

300 

10,200 

4,800 

16,000 
687 
500 
600 
540 
500 
300 

37,986 

300 

112,567 

893 


3,090 
18. 149 
23, 101 

44, 175 

51,891 

55,565 

1,300 

119 


VVm. C. Beard 

JohnC. Ritch 

J. H. Presson. . 


Carbondale ... 




Wm Mver 


Sato '.'.'.'. 




Oliver Bailev 




Henry Launders 




Sato Coal & Mininff Co .. 




16 Winnina' (1& .VJ Co.. Bia'4 




2 SI. 




17 


Murphysboro B. M. C. 

Co , No 5 




2 

2 
2 
2 

7 
7 
7 


Sh. 
SI. 
Sh. 

•SI. 

D. 

Sh. 


1 000 


18 








It 


C. y. Jones 




ioo 


?0 




Vergennes ... 

Oraville ..'.'.'.'. 
DeSoto 

Halliday))oro. 
Campbell Hill 










99 


H. Moos . 




38 






24 
?5 


Bisr Muddy C. & Coke Co 
Wi.'^lev & Dyer. 


60 9 

30 7 
166 8 


24,692 


26 
?7 


M. Valley M &MfgCo.. 


59,814 




Totals 




i 










875,711 


592,715 


282,996 




Averages ... 


























1 








i 







Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 21. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 6 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 27. 

* Machine mining, in part, a total of 521.645 tons at 29 ceuts per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



153 



Jackson County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


k 


a 




II 




_|.a 


Acci- 
dents 
















o5 si 


a 

11 


.2 
1 

a 
o 

1 

o 

1 


a^ 

■a o^ 

SI 

m 
III 


T3 

p 

o 


a 3 

i1 

Hi 

P a; fi 




.1 
s 

3 


1 


u 

o 
o 
P 

|l 


o 

n 

^2 


o 


1 

a 

.a 


a, 

a 

o 


3 


3 

a 
o 


2; 


-< 


< 


■< 


< 


<1 


H 


D-i 


Dh 


Q 


&H 


M 


;z 


■^ 


'A 


1 


$1 15 


$0 75 


§41,225 


25 


20 


45 


$0 36 


S-M. 


320 


$23,883 


350 


8 






2 


1 25 


75 


67,594 


50 


33 


83 


30 




20t 


43,847 


GOO 


7 




3 


3 


125 


75 


72,929 


40 


37 


77 


36 




250 


44,291 


650 


12 






4 


1 00 


50 


126,657 


108 


92 


200 


36 




253 


94,416 


1,417 


16 




10 


5 


1 00 


50 


120,401 


145 


60 


205 


36 




266 


72.993 


1,412 


18 


1 


14 


fi 


1 00 


50 


100,072 


115 


55 


170 


36 


" 


240 


63, 278 


1,380 


18 




5 


7 


100 


70 


12,480 


16 


S 


24 


36 




300 


8,760 


15(i 


2 






S 


1 50 


1 00 


834 


2 


1 


3 


75 


W. 


150 


583 


24 








9 
in 














30 




110 


t 










1 00 




500 


3 


1 




30 




182 


260 


21 










1 00 




560 


3 


1 




30 




132 


272 


50 








V' 


I 00 




700 




1 




30 




150 


385 


35 








];> 


1 00 




COO 


3 


1 




3 




182 


300 


50 








14 


1 00 




300 


2 


1 


3 


30 




182 


100 


30 




.. 




15 


1 00 




10,200 


20 


14 


34 


36 S-M. 


18S 


5,640 


402 


6 


1 


.... 


161 1 00 




4,800 


7 


5 


12 


36 




120 


660 


135 


3 


• • 




17 


1 15 


40 


■ 18,800 


27 


16 


43 


36 




209 


12.003 


500 


6 






18 


1 00 




6S7 




1 


2 


36 






444 


23 








19 


1 00 


75 


575 


2 


1 


3 


36 


' ' 


150 


300 


50 








V!0 


1 00 




600 


2 




2 


36 


' ' 


180 


200 


50 


1 








1 00 
100 




540 
500 


5 




2 


36 
36 


.. 


172 

200 


140 


48 
40 


1 






■??. 






?3 


1 00 




300 


2 




2 


36 


w. 


150 


150 


50 








2i 


75 


60 


43,305 


70 


37 


107 


36 


S-M. 


146 


38,419 


1.750 


13 






1^5 


1 00 




300 


4 


1 


5 


36 


' ' 


40 


240 


50 


1 






?6 


85 


35 


116,617 


170 


82 


252 


36 


' * 


236 


96.511 


6,337 


30 




4 


27 


1 25 




1,116 


^ 


1 


4 


36 


w. 


150 


420 
$508,493 


40 




2 










$743,392 


826 


469 


1,295 




15,657 


146 


36 




$1 00.6 


SO 52 


$0 36 




189 


























t Amount of wages paid not reported. 



154 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Jefferson County — Seventh District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


e 


1 

1 


1 
11 

i1 

a °5 


1 

O 

6 

o 
o 


o 

1 


1 

si 

o 

a; 

o 

11 


1 

o 

1 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


1 


Mount Vernon Coal Co. . . 
Q W. Shelton 


Mt. Vernon... 
Opdyke 


825 
6 


4.10 
1.6 


5 
12 


Sh. 

St. 


S. 
Ho. 


M. 
B. 


* 32.407 

800 

33,207 


22,4071 10,000 

800 






23,207 10.000 










































i 



* Machine mining 33 cents per ton, for 24,307 tons. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 2 



Johnson County — Seventh District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output, 


1 


I 

i 

o 

-a 


=4-1 " 

o.S 

a = 
II 


a 

o 
6 
Z 

^^ 
u 

o 
c 


o 

1 

El 


1 
o 

la 

72 


1 

o 
n 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


New Burnside Coal Co. . . 
D. J. Wallace 


New Burnside 


30 
20 
20 
20 
20 


3.8 
3.4 
3.4 
3.4 
3.4 


3 
3 
3 
3 


Sh. 
D. 


Ho. 
Hd 


B, 


3.000 
550 
600 
400 
406 


2,000 
550 
550 
400 
406 


1.000 


3 

4 


McMiehael & King 


50 



5 








Totals 






4.956 


3.906 


1,050 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898,5. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899,5. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



155 



Jejjfn-son Count ij, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 




Employ 


ES. 


1 

a 
o 


a 


a 






|| 


Accx- 

DEKTS 


















a 


.!:! 


las 




31:^ 






o • 




ttH 












a 


II 


43 

1 j 
> . 

11 


It 

i 


11 
11 


1 

p. 

S 

I 
o 


1 
® 

a 
S 

i 


S 

li 


1 

11 

a (^ 


2 

o 

01 

1 

o 

& 


o 
a 

o 


o n 

1 


_. 




Z 


< 


-^ 1 


< 


<1 


•< 


^ 


Oh 


Oh 


Q 


H 


400 


6 


^ 


z 


1 


$1 00 


$0 75 


$29,907 


50 


32 


82 


$0 40 


SM. 


240 


$29,907 






1 00 




800 


3 




3 


40 




200 


800 


5 


2 

8 


- 










$30 707 


53 


32 


85 






$30 707 


405 






$1 GO 


SO 75| . 










$0 40 




220 


















1 













Johnson Countij, 1899 -Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 

o 


i- 


q 


6XM 

'C o 




6j3 


Acci- 
dents 
















1 


a 

s 


1 


Co; 

■3= <" 


1 










is 


1 


tl-c 
O 


o 

4 


^2 








u 

M 

2 

3 


11 




~'t 
|1 
11 


■ad 
Si 


o 

a 

1 
o 


"o 


If 

li 


•5^ 


•B 

o 


^£a 

111 


i 
a 




=4-1 "S 

si. 

11= 

3 c 


1 


1 
1 


/:; 


<; 


< 


-< 


<1 


^ 


■^ 


V 


a. 


G 


H 


W 


z; 


fe 


12; 


1 


$1 00 


so 50 


.$2,500 


10 


6 


16 


so 37 


S-M. 


112 


$1,110 


80 








2 


1 00 




550 


3 




3 


65 




125 


300 


20 









3 


1 00 


50 


575 


2 




2 


45 




120 


100 


13 




..1 .... 


4 


100 




400 


2 






45 


" 


108 


120 




1 ..I .... 


5 


1 00 




406 




1 


3 


45 




140 


340 


14 


1 .. 


.... 








$4, 431 


19 


7 


26 








SI. 970 


139 


7 .. 
1 






81 08 


$0 50 


$0 42.4 


121 























156 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Perry County — Seventh District — 1899. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 



2& 



Output. 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 

of lump 

coal. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Du Quoin Union Coal Co., 

Browning 

Du Quoin Union Coal Co., 

Enterprise 

Du Quoin Union Coal Co., 

Egyptian 

John C. Porter. Lake 

Jupiter Mining Co., Eaton 
Horns Colliery Co., Horns 
Greenwood. & Davis, 

Greenwood 

Pope Mining (Jo 

Morris Bros, iz Co 

City Coal Co 

Thos. J. Howell 

HI. Central Coal & Salt 

Co., St. John 

M. P. Harvey 

Sim Coal & Coke Co 

Tamaroa Coop. Coa! Co.. 

G. W Brown 

Turner & Faust 

Henry Maasburg 

H. W. Duckwith 

Brown & Barwell 

William Barnard 

C. A. ([Cunningham 

Thomas Carter 

John E. Henson 

Willis Coal & M'n'g Co .. 



Du Quoin 



Totals... 
Averages . 



St. John 



Sunfleld 
Tamaroa 
Pinekneyville 



Conant. 
Cutler . 



Denmark... . 
Willisville'.'. 



52,000 

9.599 

5,000 

123,829 

54.000 
24,654 
24,000 
2,500 
3,000 

109,500 
400 
34,633 
9,600 
77,477 
16,000 
2,565 
1,000 
14,238 
27,427 
400 



55,000 
55.000 

27,000 
6,924 
5,000 

80,000 



15,230 
18.000 
1,250 
2,700 

74,200 
400 

23,914 
9,000 

46,487 

14,000 
2,565 
1,000 

14.2; 

25,61 
400 
300 
3:'5 

66,975 



45,000 
45,000 



25,000 
2,675 



43,829 

27.000 
9,424 
6,000 
1,250 



10.719 
600 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898,24. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 2. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899,25. 

Tamoroa Colliery Company on strike during the year. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



157 



Perry County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


i 


is 


n 


II 




•1 


Acci- 
dents 
















1 
II 

•O.S 


s 
1 

11 


o 

1 
o 

1 


'11 


'6 


u 

o a 

~1 






i 


o 


o 

^1 


o 

if 


o 

a 


i 
p. 









> ft 


^61 


SI 


^a 


o 


a 

o 


<v a 

o a 


1^ 

it 


a 


111 


i 


Its 

sal 


"cS 


"5 
I 


:z 


<Ji 


< 


< 


< 


< 


■ ^ 


a. 


Cu 


G 


^ 


w 


z 


fc 


^ 


1 


$0 80 


$0 30 


$57,500 


75 


60 


135 


$0 30 


S-M. 


175 


$63, 400 


2,211 


20 






2 


80 


30 


57,500 


64 


49 


113 


36 


■' 


175 


60,600 


2,121 


18 






3 


75 


20 


25,250 


23 


17 


40 


36 




165 


31,463 


1,242 


6 






4 


82.5 


25 


6,381 


30 


11 


41 


36 


\] 


108 


5,456 


384 


3 






5 


75 




3.750 


28 


10 


38 


36 




48 


3,200 


120 


6 






6 


75 


25 


70,957 


145 


40 


185 


36 


" 


250 


64, 100 


3,000 


18 


'2 




7 


95 


45 


37,800 


80 


37 


117 


36 


• • 


193 


23, 000 


l,550l 6 






8 


80 


37 


15,671 


29 


9 


38 


36 




225 


12,327 


625 


4 




"i 


9 


75 


15 


14,400 


40 


12 


52 


36 




201 


13.400 


1,200 


7 






10 


1 00 


90 


2,375 


4 


2 


6 


36 




264 


1.400 


50 








" 


1 25 


60 


3.555 


4 


1 


5 


36 


W. 


200 


2,400 


125 


" " 




12 


88 


35 


77,651 


100 


58 


158 


36 


SM. 


243 


75.000 


720 


18 


1 


2 


13 1 00 




400 


2 


1 


3 


36 




90 




15 


1 






14 


75 


40 


22, 223 


41 




63 


36 


" 


221 


19,894 


800 


9 






15 


70 


50 


6,60C 


14 


7 


21 


36 


M. 


220 


2,400 


300 


4 






16 


70 


20 


38,739 


85 


27 


112 


40 


IS-M. 


149 


41, 104 


2.126 


9 




"i 


17 


85 


50 


12, 900 


10 


6 


16 


40 


.M. 


200 


7,800 


550 


2 






18 


1 10 




2,822 


3 


3 


6 


40 


' ' 


190 


928 


89 








19 


1 10 




1,100 


3 


1 


4 


40 




160 


500 


43 








20 


72 5 




10,323 


20 


6 


26 


40 


SM. 


150 


7,119 


500 


3 




■"i 


21 


70 


io 


18, 156 


30 


8 




40 




275 


15, 190 


1,000 


3 






22 


1 00 




400 


1 


1 


2 


40 




150 




18 


1 






23 


1 00 




300 


1 


1 


2 


40 




130 


* 


14 


1 






24 


1 00 




325 


1 


1 


2 


40 




132 


* 


15 


i!.. 




25 


70 


20 


50,883 


85 


28 


113 


40 




300 


40,800 
$491,481 


2,000 
20, 818 


10 


2 










$537, 961 


918 


418 


1,336 




153 


6 


5 




$0 78 27 


$0 29 












SO 369 




185 

































* Amount of wages paid not reported. 



158 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Randolph County — Seventli District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
o 

p. 
<v 
Q 


1 

Is 


o 
6 

c 


u 
o 

o 

i 

72 


i 

o 

a CD 

la 


1 

a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 
8 


Western A. C. & C. Co., 

"Eden." 

Boyd C. &C. Co, No. 1.. 
■ ' •' No. 2.. 
Ill.Fuel&Pros.Co..No. 2 
'• No. 3 
Coult'rvilleMin.Co..No. 1 
Donk Bros. C. & C. Co.... 
Wm.Goalby& Sons.No 2 
Wm. Borders, "L. M'dy." 
Rosborough C. Co 


Sparta 

Coulterville '. '. 

Tilden 

Percy 


140 
80 
75 
37 
36 
370 
180 
70 
65 
30 
20 
18 
24 


6 
6 

1 
!■' 

6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
6 


6 

6 

t 

6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
6 


Sh. 
" 

:: 


S. 

Hd 
Ho. 


B. 


132,245 
74.401 
12.376 
5.813 
15,296 
25,091 
55,040 
26, 381 
14,000 
10, 773 
300 
400 
2,207 


109,222 
74,401 
12,376 
5,813 
15,296 
23,891 
48,384 
26,381 
14,000 
9,773 
300 
400 
2.043 


23.023 

■■■i,'266 

6,656 


q 






10 




i 666 








1' 


Dietrich Steamer 


' • 




n 




Blair 


164 




Totals 














374.323 


342,280 


3"^, 043 




Averages 












































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 15. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 13. 



( OAL IN ILLINOIS. 



159 



Randolph Coiiniij, lSi);> — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1 




fl 


II 




|5 


Acci- 
dents 


















£ 

11 



1 





otal wages paid du 
the year to all em pi 
exceptiuy office help. 


■6 

1 




£ 3 

li 

a> '-1 

go 

2.9 

'?! 

Its 

l££ 




3 




■s 

o 

1 

> . 

II 


L 
^5 


i 

n 

si 

^3 


1 

1 



1 

p. 






1 
a 




\^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 




a, 




« 


^ 


M 


Z fc 


Z 


1 


$0 65 


SO 25 


$76, 750 


107 


38 


145 


$0 40 


S-M. 


268 


S73, 022 


4,010 


11 1 


. 




80 




59.521 


50 


13 


63 


40 


" 


250 


37.200 


1,200 5:..i .... 


■A 


80 




9,901 


10 


4 


14 


40 




230 


6,188 


400 1 . . 




4 


67 




3,895 


7 


4 


11 


40 


' ' 


97 


3,720 


191 i 3.. 





5 


67 




10.24S 


10 


4 


14 


40 




177 


9.777 


383, 2|.. 




« 


75 


30 


18.27S 


28 


20 


48 


40 




227 


12,546 


6OOI 5'.. 




7 


65 


20 


.32,781 


44 


16 


6(1 


40 




25H 


29,458 


1,761; 4|.. 


.... 


8 


70 




18,467 


40 


9 


49 


40 




217 


12,970 


768 


3 .. 


2 


9 


65 




9,100 


31 


5 


36 


40 




145 


8.700 


200 


3.. 




10 


SO 


65 


8.468 


25 


12 


37 


40 


' ' 


16(1 


6.420 


600 


4.. 




11 


1 00 




300 


i 


1 




40 




10H 


J. 


12 


1 .. 




12 


1 00 




400 


2 


1 


3 


40 




112 


* 


17 


1.. 




13 


1 00 


50 


2.125 


3 


' 


4 


40 




200 


150 


91 


1 


1 










S250, 234 


358 


128 


486 




$200,151 10.233 




5 




$0 70.7 




SO 25.5 










SO 40 




182 






























* Amount of wages paid not reported. 



160 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Saline County — Seventh District — 1899. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 









a 








.^ 


'O 






o 


o 








ft 
.2 


o 






i{ 


is 




_2ft 


03 


n 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 

of lump 

coal. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grade* 



Davenport C.Co.,Ledford 
Harrisburg: M. & Coke Co 

J. B. Blackman 

Dorris & Evaus 

Strickland Bros 

Geo. Rilying 

Wm. Butler 

John Hawkins 

Teal& Williams 

H. A. Sittig 

John Chanery 

Charles Trammell 

A. C. Coydili 

Noah Stiff 

K M. Berry 

John Yates 

James Lyod 

Charles Hall 



Totals 



Averages. 



Harrisburgh. 



Ledf ord . . 
Stonefort. 



S. America ... 
Cottage Grove 



Sh 



62,943 
25.300 
1,140 
600 
900 
400 
120 
220 
280 
125 
110 
100 
25 
120 
175 
280 
1,110 
200 



55, 

15,000 
1,140 
600 
900 
400 
120 
220 
280 
125 
110 
100 
25 
120 
175 
280 
1.110 
200 



Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 15. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, ; 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899. 18. 



Washington County — Seventh District, 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoflace. 


Description. 


Outfit. 


i 


i 
I 

§ 
o 

ft 
Q 


1 

It 

a =: 

|l 


a 

c 
c 

z 

1 

•§ 

1 


o 

a 
o 


§ : 
.^ : 

o ■ 

£ ; 

o . 


i 

3 

a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 


Alexander Murray 

P.J. Breuggerman 


Nashville 

DuBois ....... 

Okawville .... 


425 
376 
296 
320 


5.6 
4.6 
5 6 
5.6 


6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 


s. 


B. 


15. 723 
5,627 

11.000 
2.110 


13.678 
5.000 
8.000 
1.760 


2,045 

627 

3.000 


4 


Okawville W. S. C.&Co. 


350 




34,460 


28,438 


6.022 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1899. 4. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



161 



Saline County, 1899 — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


1, 
o 


5 


c 


61 « 

.5^ 




2 


Acci- 
dents 
















p.a 

«a 


1 

a 

i 


O 

1 
o 

1 

o 


otal wages paid du 
the year to all enipl 
excepting office help. 


1 

-a 
& 
o 
s, 

o 

1 


a p 
s| 

I'o 
2.2 

111 




c 

i 
a 


o© 


0) 

o 
o 

1 

if 


o 

i 


>a 


1 
P. 

s 

u 

o 


1 

a 

3 

o 


1 




^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


F^ 


Q- 


a. 


a 


^ 


^ ^ 


:£ '^ 


1 


$0 75 


$0 40 


S44.763 


6S 


31 


99 


$0 30 


S-M. 


287 


$12,413 


3,000: 8 




2 


1 00 


6C 


21, ISC 


25 


9 


34 


30 




240 


3,337 


460: 3 




:< 


1 00 




1.14C 


3 


1 


4 


30 




10(1 


800 


20 Ij.. .... 


4 


1 00 




600 


2 


1 


3 


50 


W. 


92 






5 


1 00 




90C 


3 


1 


4 


50 




85 


585 


12 1 i: .... 


6 


1 00 




40C 


2 


1 


3 


50 


' ' 


82 




7 1 ..i .... 


7 


1 00 




12C 


1 




1 


50 




80 




3 .... 


8; 1 00 




22C 


2 





2 


50 




10(1 




6 1.. .... 


91 1 00 




28C 


2 




2 


50 


' ' 


110 




6 V..\ .... 


10 1 00 





125 






2 


50 


' ' 


45 




3 1 . . i . . . . 


11 1 00 





110 


2 




2 


50 




46 




3' '...... 


12 1 00 





100 


2 




2 


50 


' ' 


34 






13; 1 00 




25 


1 




1 


50 




2(1 




41 i .. 




14, 1 00 




120 


2 




2 


50 




32 




41 21.. 




15, 1 00 




175 


1 


2 


3 


50 




9(1 


65 


10! ll.. 




16, 1 00 




280 


2 






50 




102 


112 


7 11.. 




171 1 00 




1,110 


3 


2 


5 


50 




17(1 


786 


35! 1!.. 




18| 1 00 




200 


^ 




2 


50 




102 


75 


10; 1.. 


.... 






S71.848 


125 


48 


173 








S18, 173 


3,599 231 ll .... 


SO 81.8 


SO 52 










SO 31.1 




101 



















• 1 1 I 



Not reported. 



Washington County, 1899 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employ 


ES. 



a 

h 

1 




a 

a 

1 


1 

1 
> 


>tal wages paid during 
the year to all eniploy6s 
excepting office help. 


3 
u 


2 - 


Acci- 
dents 


.0 

a 

3 


A- 
D 

ll 


1 





<c 
3 

H 




_3 

If 


! 

^a 


1 

a 

1 





i; 

"3 


"5 


s 


^ 


< 


< 


<! 


< 


< 






i- 


^ 


&-< 


W jZ l:^, Z 


1 


so 85 


so 75 


S13.160 


22 


7 


29 


$0 40 


S-M. 


250 


,M». 


320 3 


1 




85 


50 


4,564 


10 


5 


15 


45 




16(1 


3.761 


2801 2 


. . 1 


3 


75 


371^ 


7,125 


25 


12 


37 


33 


M. 


i:^n 


5.000 


200! 3 


1 


4 


1 37I2 


1 I2I2 


2,814 


4 




6 


62if2 


W. 


195 


1.240 
S19.435 


70 
870 












$27,663 


61 


26 


87 




8 






$0 85.4 


$0 56.7 


SO 40 




ISl 

























-11 C. K. 



162 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Williamson County — Seventh District — 1899. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




1 

2 
2; 


1 

o 


1 

Is 

11 
II 


1 

6 

1 


O 

d 


T3 

i 

o 
o 

go 


•6 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

^^ 
other 

grades 


1 


St. Louis Big Muddy Coal 


Carterville ... 


90 
60 

65 

60 
80 
40 
40 
8 
22 

140 
40 

150 
25 
20 
20 

20 
25 
7 
8 
8 
80 
30 


5.6 
5.6 
5.6 

P 

3 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

1 

6 

I 


Sh. 

t. 

St. 
SI. 

D. 

St. 

Sh. 
SI. 


S. 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 

Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 
" 

S. 
Ho. 


Bl. 
M. 


300,591 
122,815 

82.286 

3,531 

61,261 

*110,843 

17.000 

500 

700 

*65.926 

tl70. 722 

1.000 

59.409 

400 

240 

1.500 

400 

230 

270 

80 

75 

85 

400 

1.800 


182.890 
66.570 

51.714 

53.850 

643 

3,531 

36, 757 

60.964 

9,350 

400 

700 

34. 703 

103.723 

800 

34.404 

400 

240 

1.500 

400 

230 

270 

80 

75 

85 

300 

900 


117,701 


1 

4 

5 
6 

7 

I 
!! 

12 
13 
It 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

23 
24 
25 
26 


Carterville Coal Co., Bun 
Scott-Wilson Coal Co.,No. 


56.245 
30, 572 


Scott-Wilson C. Co., No. 2 
Robt. Dick C. Co.. Dick.. 




22.198 


0. & M. Valley Coal and 

M. Co, No. 1, Snider.... 

0. &M. V. C.&M.C..N0.2 

C. Orchard C C, Goodall 

William Jack, No. 1 

William Allen. Strip 

Ohio Valley C. &C. Co .. 
Big M. C. & I. Co., No. 7. 
John Reid 


Marion 

Spillertown .. 
Herrings 

Lake Cr'kP.O 
Crab Orchard 

Absher 

Blairsville — 
Pulleys' Mill. 


24.584 

49.879 

7.6S0 

100 

"31,' 223 

66,999 

200 


Williams'nCo. C. CNo.l 


25,005 


L. F. Bowes 




Edgar Sparks 








W. C. Camnbell . . 




T. H Willford 




William Reid 

William Ritchie 




E W Notsinger 




S. C. Howells 


100 


J.D.Ward 


909 






1,078.755 


645,479 


433.276 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1898. 26. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 26. 

* Machine mining, price paid 23 cents per ton. 

t Machine mining, 28,305 tons, at 29 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



163 



Williamson County, 1899. — Concluded. 







Values. 


Employes. 


i 


5 




II 




II 


Acci- 
dents 


















a 




°1 


i 


25 






gs 




"S 


o 










a 

3 


o a 


o 

> . 

11 


3 

Ji 

It 
11 


S'5 

!! 


1 

a 

% 

o 


1 

g 

1 


2 

tie 
ft.2 

Si 


1 

I- 


o 

I 
1 

o 

33 


Isl 

111 


3 

S3 
1 

a 


»:<8 

a 

III 


3 


1 


V5 


<! 


<; 


< 


< 


< 


H 


a. 


Qh 




H 


M 


2; 


=- « 


1 


$0 70.5 


$0 33.3 


S168, 132 


226 


84 


310 


1 

so 30| S-M. 


304 


$156,240 


8,880 


42 


1 


6 


2 


85 


38 


77.958 


80 


59 


130 


30 •• 


i54 


61,242 


3,210 


20 






3 


80 


30 


50,543 


45 


22 


67 


3o; " 


283 


42,902 


1.411 








4 


80 


30 


49,739 


55 


34 


89 


30' " 


226 


38. 181 


1,624 


11 


1 




.=) 


55 




354 


5 


« 


13 


30 " 


42 


1,20(] 


,5(1 


1 






€ 


1 00 




3,531 


4 


^ 


5 


30 W. 


200 


1,553 


90 


1 






7 


70 


38 


35,041 


92 


28 


120 


30, S-M. 


129 


27,505 


1,651 


12|.. 




8 


70 


38 


61,629 


120 


85 


205 


•' 


200 


48.969 


1,626 


18; 1 




9 


SO 


25 


9,393 


22 


15 


37 


301 " 


150 


8.379 


439 


3 .. 




10 


J 00 


75 


475 


2 


1 


3 


40, W. 


60 


40C 


14 






11 


1 00 




709 


2 




2 


40 




120 


506 


3 


2 




12 


70 


36 


35,532 


35 


3SJ 


74 




S-M. 


185 


25,932 


90C 


9 .. 




13 G9 


55 


108,418 


170 


75 


245 


30 




275 


90, 946 


5,126 


121 1 


a 


14 


90 


50 


820 


3 


1 




45 


W. 


90 


60C 


4C 


1 .. 




15 


70 


30 


31.584 


55 


29 


84 


30 


S-M. 


130 


25.099 


1,42C 


5'.. 


2 


n; 






300 


3 


1 




45 


W. 


70 


20C 


IS 


2 




17 


1 00 




240 


3 






45 


' ' 


120 


125 


6 


1 .. 




IS 


1 00 




1.500 


3 


i 




45 




200 


1,OOC 


75 


2 .. 




19 


75 




300 


3 






45 




8(1 


30C 


15 






20 


1 00 





230 


2 






45 




75 


lOO 


12 .. 




21 


75 




203 


1 






45 




70 


3C 


24 1.. 




22 


75 




60 


2 






45 


' ' 


24 


X 


2 2!..'.... 


23 


75 




56 


1 






45 


' ' 


35 


X 


11 21. .[ .... 


24 


75 




64 








45 


" 


25 




2' 2I.. .... 


25 


1 25 


75 


375 


2 


1 




50 


•' 


.5(1 


240 


20 \..\ .... 


26 


1 25 


1 00 


2.025 


5 







50 




200 


1,500 


25, 1,.!.... 








$639, 202 


943 


484 


1 427 








S533 149 


■^6 624 150 4' 14 




SO 73.7 


.SO 37.7 










$0 30 


t'"" 





. .' .. .1 .1 .-- 





















X Amount of wages not reported. 



164 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 
























t-<B 




1 


aj 






-d 








It 
if 

li 


5S 


^5 


Counties. 


a 

S 
o 

S 


.i 

a 

bx 

a 
■£ 
a 

"n 


1 

.S 


1 


1 

a 

o 

i 


1 
p. 

s 


1 
a 

a 

o 

p 
o 


1 
1 

a 

o 


1 

a 


1! 

"tits 

!l 

> o 


li 




Z 


iTj 


^ 


^ 


<J 


^ 


^ 


&H 


^ 


H 


< 


< 


Gallatin 


9 


1 


8 






16,754 


15,429 


1,325 


10,021 


200 


$1 00 


so 25 




?. 




2 






640 


640 








1 40 




Jackson 


27 


12 


15 


6 




875,711 


592, 715 


282,996 


783,258 


59,628 


1 00.6 


52 


Jefferson 


2 


1 


1 






33.207 


23,207 


10.000 


22,407 


2,400 


1 00 


75 


'•<>hnson 


5 


1 


4 






4,956 


3,906 


1,050 


3.000 




1 00 


50 


i-erry 


25 


17 


8 


3 


2 


879,422 


572,597 


306.825 


801.694 


43,964 


78.27 


29 


Randolph 


13 


10 


3 




2 


374,323 


342,280 


32.043 


341.268 


9,111 


70.7 


25.5 


Saline 


18 


2 


16 


3 




94, 148 


76,864 


17,284 


81,103 


2,840 


81.8 


5. 


Washington.. 


4 


3 


1 






34, 460 


28,438 


6,022 


19,000 


5,202 


85.4 


56.7 


Williamson... 


131 


10 

"17 


16 

74 


3 
15 


3 

7 


1,078,755 


645, 479 


433,276 


1,003,206 


50, 606 


73.7 


37.7 




3, 392, 376 


2,301.555 


1,090,821 


3,064,957 


173.951 






Averages. 























$0 82.24 


$0 39.35 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1898, 123. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 15. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 7. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1899, 131. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



165 



Seventh District— 1899. 











CH 


5t tn 


turn 


u 


'OTS 












Employes. 


03 


2 a 




1 


^•9 


Casualties 


Machines. 


® : 




a 








(U 


OJ 


,5 


<D : 

n 


i 


O 


>> 


11 


si 




1 


-Is 






.2^ 
a| 

<m2 


2 

i 


g 


si 


o 


"c 


a 


gs 


o 




o 


©a® 






"S 


^ 


1- 

•2.H 






























<D 


(DsD 




Sfh 


















^ 




























Si 


a 


n 


n 


g;l 


S32 


Us 


as 


ag^ 


s 


"a 


3 s) 


i.2 


«l 


•< 


^ 


Z 


H 


<i 


< 


H 


2; 


^ 


s 




2; |2 


H 


$15. 760 


m 


21 


73 


142 


$0 52.4 


$15. 760 


936 


14 












900 


11 




11 


68 


62.5 


900 


7 


4 












743.392 


826 


469 


1.295 


189 


36 


* 508.493 


15.657 


146 


2 


36 


7 


41 


a 521. 64 


30, 707 


53 


32 


85 


220 


40 


30,707 


405 


8 






1 


5 


& 24.3 


4 431 


19 












139 


7 












537,961 


918 


418 


1.336 


185 


36.9 


t 491,481 


20.818 


153 


6 


5 


1 


4 


b 56.666 


250.234 


358 


128 


486 


182 


40 


t 200, 151 


10.233 


44 


1 


5 






..,. 


71.848 




48 








|l 18,173 

19,435 

g 533, 149 


3.599 


26 


J 


















40 


870 














639, 202 


943 


84 


1.427 


138 


30 


26.684 


150 


4 

14 


14 


3 


14 


c 205.074 


$2,322,098 


3,366 


1.633 


4.999 






$1,820,219 


79.348 


557 


60 


12 


64 


807.692 










159 


$0 34.5 











































* Two mines amount of wages paid not reported. 
t Four mines amount of wages paid not reported. 
t Two mines amount of wages paid not reported. 
!! Ten mines amount of wages paid not reported. 
? Three mines amount of wages paid not reported. 
a Price paid for machine mining, 29 cents per ten. 
b Price paid for machine mining, 33 cents per ton. 
c Average price paid for machine mining, 27.75 cents per ton. 
Average price paid for machine mining in the district. 28.1 cents per ton. 



APPEINDIX 



REGISTER OF CERTIFICATED- 
MINE MANAGERS. 
HOISTING ENGINEERS. 
MINE EXAMINERS. 

REPORT ON INSPECTION FEES. 

REVISED MINING LAW AND OTHER LAWS 

REPORTS OF FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



169 



REGISTER OF CERTIFICATED MINE MANAGERS, 
HOISTING ENGINEERS AND MINE EXAMINERS. 



Note— This list includes all the mine managers to whom eertitieates were 
issued prioi'to January 1, 1900. 

The names which are printed in italic are those who hold both certificates 
of service and subsequent certificates of competency acquired through exam- 
ination. 

The names which are followed by the abbreviation "ex." are those who 
have exchanged certificates of service for those of competency, without exam- 
ination, under the provisions of the amendment of 1895. 

The post office addresses here given are those recorded at the time the certifi- 
cate was issued, and in many cases are not the present addresses of the certifi- 
cate holders. 



MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CFRTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Adams, Charles T 

Adams .1 M 


Rosboro 

Wanlock 

Taylprville 

"• ::::::: 1 

Streator 


Ainsworth, Samuel 

Ainsworrh, Samuel, Jr 

Ainsworth. Thomas 




Elmwood 

Ladd 

Belleville 


Anderson James 








• ' 


Apblett, William R 


Springfield 


Atkinson, Edward 

Atkinson William 


Streator 

Murphysboro .... 

Braceville 

Spring Valley.... 

Barclay 

Fairmount 

Freeburg 

Edwardsville .... 
Petersburg 

Streator 

Mapleton 

Athens 

DuQuoin 

Bartonville 

Lincoln . 




Armstrous-, Thosmas J . . . . 




Archibald David 




Ax ford, Thomas 


Baker. Gustav 

Back, Thomas 






Ball. Edward. 












Barron. James, ex 


Cantrall 



Bartlett, Thomas, ex Cuba . 

Bashong, Andrew Danville. 

Harwell, John Marissa. 

Bates, ir. R Winchester. 

Bates, R. D 

Baumer. Fred 

Bauer. Valentine ... 

Baxter. William 

Beaghan. Peter 

Beattie, John 

Beatty, James 

Beatty, James H 

Becker, K. W 

Beharelle, Fred 

Bell, Richard 

Bell, William 

Belger, John 

Bengston. John A., < 

Bennett, James 

Bennett, John 

Berkstresser. W. A. 

Belts, Joseph E 

Bets, Charles C 

Bevard. John J 

Bevard, F. C 

Beveridge, David... 

j Beggs, Samuel, ex. . 

Biebel, Henry, ex... 

Biggins, James 

Bingham, Robert j O'Fallon 

Bird, George W iCoft'een — 

Birtin, Henry Pana 

Birtley, William P Springfield 



JIarquette . 

Clyde 

Ladd 

Cantrall ... 
Danville... 
Mascoutah 



Pinckneyville .. 
Orchard Mines. 

Gillespie 

Streator 

Nilwood 

Galva 

Odin 

Centralia 

DuQuoin 

Belleville 

DuQuoin 

Kinmundy 

Carterville 

Sorento 

Clark City 

Rentchler 

Sorento . 



170 STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

3Iine Managers — Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoface. 




Murphysboro .... 

New Athens 

Murphysboro 

DuQuoin 


Cruickshanks, Wm 

Cryer, J ames T 




Boettcher, F. J 


Spring Valley 


Boston, (t, W. 


Gumming, Ambrose B 

' Gumming, James P 

Gumming, John P 

Gumming, Thomas S 

Gumming, D. H 

Cunningham. Thomas 

Cunningham, Cormick 


Sparland . . 






Bottomely, Edward 

Bottomely, John 


Oglesby 


Braceville 

Gardner .... 


Bowers Robert 


Wenona i 

Braidwood 1 

Greenview 

Belleville 

Caseyville 

Marissa 

Glen Carbon 






Girard 


Bracken, James A 


Springfield 






Broekhouse, Samuel 

Brigham, \Vm 


Belleville 


Dale Henry 


Murphysboro 














Belleville 


Brown P M 


Parmington 


Daniels Samuel 










Bru"ckuer, Emil 


Staunton 


Davis, Caleb . ... 


Uollinsville.. 


Brneg2eman, George 


Belleville 


Davis J. H 


Cuba. 






Bulmer Benjamin. 


Muddy Valley.... 

Streator 

Colchester 

Peru 

Mt Olive 


Davis! P.J 

Davis. William 


Percy... . 




Litchfield 








Burke Georsre ex 


Davison, James . 


Sparta 


Burkhardt Joiin B 


Dawson Richard 


Athens 




Moweaqua 

Pottstown 

Pana 

Sorento 




Percy 




Denny, John J. 


Springfield.. 


Cairns -John 




Springfield 






Tuluca 














Campbell, William 


Dick. Robert 

Dickenson, James E 




Campbell, Prank J 


Athens 


Belleville 




Pinckneyville? 

Assumption 

Madisonville, Ky. 

O'Pallon 

Birkner. 


Danville 


Camphcil. H. J 

Canfield, R. A 


Dodd, William 

Dodge, H. N 

Donahoe, James 

Donald.son, William 

Donaldson, James W 


Gable 

St. David 


Carson, J. H 


Carterville 


Carter, Charles 


Kangley 






Peoria 








Carroll, John 


O'Pallon , 


Dooley, Harry 


Springfield 




Tilden 

Lenz Station 

Seatonville 












Cherry, John T 


Dougherty. Daniel. 


Virginia 






Muddy Valley.... 


Cherry, W. S 






Cheekin, David . 


Reed City 

Braceville 

Murphysboro .... 


Drake George 


Streator 






Pana 








Church, Henry M 


Dujf)ier J. W. 


Belleville 




Decatur 

Braidwood 

Decatur 

Troy 

Braidwood 

Kewanee 

Worden 

Barton ville 

O'Pallon 

Spring Valley.... 
















Odin 


Clayton, John P 

Clelland, Kobert 

Clifford, Michael J 

Coar Pirman 


Durkin, Michael 

Edwards, S. E 

Edwards, Thomas 

Ehret, Prank A 

Eller. William 

Emery, Charles 

Emery. Joseph 

English, Ralph 

English, Thomas 

Erwin, William 

Essex, George W 

Evans, (ieorge 

Evans, John Nine, ex 


Sunfield 

Centra] ia.. . 


Collier, Frank J 

Collins, Richard J,, ex 

Condis, Malcom 


Springfield 

Wesley 

Edwardsville 


Cooper, Charles 


Nilwood 


Belleville 

Mt. Olive 










Springtield 

Pana 

Grape Creek 

Marseilles 

Assumption 

Murpnysboro 

Virdcn 

Decatur 


Belleville 


Costello, Henry 

Costor, George 


Soperville 

Lincoln 




LaSalle 








Evans Albert E 


Streator 








Crampton, Edward 


Evan's, John 0., Jr 


Caseyville 


Crauch, J, E 

Crankshaw, Thomas 


Pagan, Michael.. 




C'righton Robert 


Chenoa 


Fagan Patrick T. 


Decatur 


Cruickshanks, John 


Parmington ' 


Fohl, Bernard, ex 


Belleville 



MINE, MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 171 

Ceiiijicaies of Com pete ncij— Continned. 



Name. 


Postoflice. 


Name. 


Postoffic. 




Gilchrist. 


Hall. Matthew 


Braceville 




Glen Carbon 

Barclay 

Danville 




Farnvsorth, Lawrence, ex. 
Felker John 


Halberf. J. A 


WestviUe 

Nashville 


Fellows Edward 


Streator 




Springfield 




Har.iin, Joseph H .... 




Ferguson. Walter 

Finfrack, M. M 


Braidwood 

Pana 


Harding, fi^nos 

Harding, Thomas F 

Hanling William 


Birkner 


Danville 




Decatur 

Kewauee 

LaSalle 

ColliDsville 

LaSalle. . . 






Harkes. William 

Haiper, .fohn 

n,irris,:,i. Earnest 

Harris. .11, J.din 

Harris. 111. John, ex 

Harri-..ii William 


Coal City 








Fletcher T V 


Vir.ien 




Odin 


Foley, George, ex 

Fdey. W. E 


MurphysboTo 


Mapleton 

Centr dia 

Murphysboro 

Lincoln 

Marion 

Braidwood 

Danville 

Lincoln 

Peoria 

Edwards ville 

Breese 


' Hartnian, Frank, ex 

Hartman Wm.. 


Murphysbor.i 

Freeburg.. 


Forsythe Robert. 


Fo'^ter William 


Haskins. George H 


Grape Creek 




Francis T L 


Heyes Henrv 


Streator 




Hebenstreit, Bruno 

Hebenstreit, E. W 

Hebenstreit. J. P 

Helfrich. Henry 








Freer James 




Friska. Jan 




Frit 7 Willinn) ev 


Henderson, Edward 

Henderson, Joseph 

Henderson. Thomas 

Henley.J.H 


Springfield 

Cml City 




Petersburg 

Riverton 

Ridge Prairie 

Springfield 

Golden Eagle 

Gilchrist 

Spring Valley.... 


Gafligan Michael 












Tildeu 


Gavin, Barney 


Henry Fre.leriek 


Kewaneo. 








Gell. Philip 


Henry, Philip 




Gibson, Michael 


Herior James 


Spring Valley 


GilbB/t f},i:c,iyl 


Hetherington, Benj. M 

Hickey. John 


LaSalle 


Giles V.'illiam 


Gillespie 


Springfield 




Gikdarist... :...:.. 


Hick« Rd J 


Glass, William H 


Higbee, A. W 




Goalbv.John F 


Gillespie.. 


Higbee James 




Goalby, William H.. ex.... 


Percy... 


Hill, Marshall 






Hillnrv. F.dwar.l 




Goddard. William 


Hinfl. .lobn A. 


Moline. 


Gohlcr W'lllhnn 


(^uba 








SpringfieM 


Holmes, Thomas F 

Horning, Charles A 

Houston, Robert 

Howell. Thomas H 

Howell D J 




Golden. William D 


Harrisburg 

Percy 




Gordon. Ephriam G 


Wanlock 

Staunton 

Virden ' 

Dunfermline 

Jacksonville ! 

Vir.ien 

Springfield 

Peoria 


DuQuoin 


Graham Hiram 


Howelis, El.en. 

Howells.T J 

Hoye,JnmeH 

Hoye, William 








Graham. Lfiuis A. 


Braidwood. 








Huddy. T. H 




Grant, Peter, Jr . 


Hudson, Thomas 


Etherlv 


Gratz Gottleib 


Hornsby 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Braceville 

.Marissa .. . 




Graniiick. Jul. M 






Gray Thomas R 


Hughes Hugh J 


Pana 


Green Arthur 




Litchfield 


Green, Joseph, ex 


Humnie. J. A 


Hillary 


Green, John W 


Springfield 

Edinburg 

DuQuoin.. 








Humphreys, Edward 

Hunt AUiert J . . .. 


Murphysboro 

Edwards 


Greenwood, John R 


Greenicood, Robert 








Collinsville 

Belleville 








Groom, John 


Issininghaus. William .... 


Lebanon . 






Litchfield 


Guest. Joseph, ex 

Guiney, James T 




Jackson Geo W- 




Braidwood 

Cable 

Sherrai-d 


Cable 


Haddick, .fohn, Jr 


J acobson, Charles P 

James, John 


St. David 

Mt. Olive .. 


Haddick, William ex 


Grape Creek 

Belleville 




Pana 

St. John 

Ladd 1 










Haile. George 


Jefford.R.H 


Kingston Mines.. 



172 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Mine Managers — Certijicates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 



Jefford, Thomas H., ex 

Jeffrey.Peter 

Jenking. Alexauder 

JenkiiiS. Thomas C 

Jerremire. William M 

John, Evan D 

Johnston, Cochran 

Johnston. Samuel 

Jolly. Thomas J 

Jones, (^harles 

Jones, David 

Jones, D. L 

Jones, Edward 

Jones, Harry D 

Jones, John H 

Jones, Logan 

Jones, T. L 

Jones, William 

Jones, William E 

Jones, William E 

Jones, William M 

Jordan, Robert 



Kingston 

Carterville ... 
Dunfermline . 
Murphysboro 

DuQvioin 

Soaulding 

Spring valley 

Oglesby 

Collinsville... 
Marissa 



Taylorville . . 

Oglesby 

Kiverton 

DuQuoin 

Marissa 

Ladd 

Marissa 

Sheffield .... 
Wesley City. 

Tamoroa 

Streator 



Kahle, Joseph i Coulter ville 



Dunfermline , 

Sherrard 

Braeeville — 

Streator 

Seatonville... 
Springfield ... 

Dnnville 

Dubois 



Litchfield. . 
Carbon Hill 
Centralia ... 
Braidwood . 



Kane, Charles H 

Kay, James 

Karrall, Edgar 

Keating, James A.. 

Keay, A. H. S 

Keay, John 

Kepfer. William ... 

Keil, Matthew 

Keil. Peter 

Kelley, Bernard 

Kelley.D. J 

Kelly, Frank S 

Kelly, Joseph G.,ex 

Kelley, Robert D ICarboii H 

Kelly, J. D.. Sr... 
Kempper, Henry. 
Kenny, Thomas .. 

Kerr, John 

Kidd. Alexander . 

Kidd, Andrew 

Kidd,W 

Kidd^Neuaene. .. 
Kienbush, David. 

Kirby, .James 

Kirehner. Frank . 
Kirkwood, M artin 
Klinginfus.Otto.. 
Kloever, Joseph.. 

Knies, Henry 

Kortkamp. William | Hillsboro 

Kramer. Anthony F jSato 

Krantz, Jacob Belleville 



Gillespie — 
Springfield. 
Rushville... 
Oglesby 



Ridge Prairit 



Lacour, August 

Laesser, Adolph 

Lander. Alexander, ex . 

Large, James M 

Laws, J. M 

Lawson,John 

Lawson, Thomas 

Ree, Robert 

Lee,Shellcross G 

Leming, W. C 

Lettsome, William 

Lettsome. Absalom 

Lewis, James 

Lewis. William 

Lindley, Richard 

Lindsay. John O 

Linsky.P. J 

Lister, James H 

Little, Thomas 

Lloyd, David J 



Bartonville. 
Belleville... 
Carterville . 

Athens 

Cuba 

Mt. Olive ... 
Lake Creek. 

Cable 

(Canton 

DuQuoJTi . . . 
Carbon Hill 



Bryant 

Streator 

Collinsville.... 

DuQuoin 

Braidwood 

Peters Station. 
Summerfield... 
Edinburg 



Edwards Station. 

Athens 

Belleville 

Berkner 

Belleville 

Pana 

Breese .. 



Lloyd, John E 

Lloyd, Thomas 

Long, Thomas 

Lord, John S 

Love, John W 

Lowery, Frank 

Lumaghi, Joseph . 
Lumaghi, Louis F. 



Maoke, P. H 

Malcolm, William J . . . 

Malloy, Henry E 

Malone, Frank 

Maltby, William 

Marland, John, Sr., ex. 

Martin, George 

Mason, Eli 

Mason, Mark, Jr 

Massie, John G 

Matthews, W. S 

Maxwell, Angus 

Mays, John F 

Medill, Duncan 

Meehan, Patrick 

Meehan, Peter 

Michaels, Theodore . . . 

Millard, John 

Miller,Edward 

Milburn, Thomas 

Middleton, James L... 

Michaels, Lewis 

Michaels. Otto L 

Miller, .Alexander 

Miller, Hugh 

Miller, William 

Milem.John 

Millett. Thomas 

Mills, T. J 

Mitchell. T.J 

Moflfat, K. E 

Moffat, Thomas 

Monaghan, Edward . . 

Moore, Samuel 

Morland. John,Jr 

Morin, Jermiah 

Morrin,D. A 

Morgan, George 

Morgan. Joseph 

Morris,G. W 

Morris, J. H 

Morris, James F 

Morris,P. K 

Morris, William M.... 

Morris, Joseph, ex 

Morris, Robert 

Morris-<ey, Thomas ... 

Morrison, D. H 

Morton, Andrew 

Morton, Sobert 

Moss, Thomas 

Mould, Thomas R 

Muir, Hunter 

Murphy.Jerry 

Murphy, John 

Murphy, Patrick 

iMurray, A 

Murray David 

Murray, Hugh 

Murray, J. H 

Murrie, Archibald — 



McAllister, Hector. , 
I McAnarney, James 
' McCann, Patrick ... 
I M'-Cleary, John 

McCleeryJ.anies .. 
I McClintock,John .. 



Danville 

Rentchler 

Wanlock 

Springfield 

Carbon Hill 

Orchard Mines. 
Collinsville 

Ledf ord 

Braeeville 

Decatur 

Pinckney ville .. 

Braidwood 

Weuona 

Farminston — 

Edinburg 

Sato 

Marissa 

Kinmundy 

Carlinville 

Pana 

Oglesby 

Breed.*? 

Williamsville .. 

Belleville 

Peoria 

Sorento 

Loceyville 

Sandoval 

Belleville 

Ridge Prairie .. 

Coal City 

Lenzburg 

Norris 

Collinsville 

Cable 

Pana 

Percy 

Carbon' HilV... 

."^pringfield 

Wenona 

Danville 

Springfield . ... 

Streator 

Lebanon 

Nashville 

Springfield 

ttoanoke 

Belleville 

Nashville 

Marion 

Lebanon 

Girard 

Virginia 

Staunton 

O'Fallon 

Etherley 

Chatham 

Braidwood 

Springfield 

Nashville 

Sparta 

Galva 

Centralia 

Streator 

Girard 

Lincoln 

Cantrall 

Kangley 

Murphysbnio .. 



MINE, MANAGERS. CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



173 



Certificates of Comj^etenctj — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


McCrindle. David 


Oglesby 


Pryce. John M 

Pugh. Daniel 

Pit lien, Charles 

PuUeu, James 


Coal Valley 


McDonald, Robert 


McDonald, William 


Braidwood 

Danville 

Edwardsville 

Sorento 

Springfield 

Murphysboro .... 

Marissa 

Spring Valley.... 
Coal City 




McFmbleii .T.is. 


Sorento. 


McF:n-laiid, William A 

McGrearhi.i, Robert 

McGiiniis,.Iohn 


Raby, Robert A 

Radford. Thomas, ex 


Cuba.. 




Cuba 


J/c (.'n u igal. Ikrnard 


Radtord, James 

Ifadfard. William T 


Springfield 




Decatur 

Collinsville 

Carbon Hill 

Girard 

Spring Valley.... 

Parniington 

Oarterville 




JIc Jxfriuni •/a Dies 


Ramsey, Charles J. 


Gillespie.. 


31cKillop Donald 


Bundle Jesse 


Birkner 


McLean, Robert 


Rarick. Phil. W 


Glen Carbon 


McManaman Patrick F 


Rauth, John 


Belleville 


McMorrovv Michael 


Rasniussen, James E 

Reagan, Daniel, 


Mineral 


McMath,GeorE:e . 


Muddy Valley.... 


McMurtie.A. B 


Reavley. Kobert 






Virden 


Odin 




Reed, W. M 

Reed \Vm B 


Girard 

Wilsman. 


Nael, Reese 


Reents, August 

Rec-e, Daniel 




Neal, Albert M 


Murphysboro .... 


Danville 


^\'al, William 


Reid, Andrew 


Springfield 


Needle.s,Thadeus.... 






Neil, Peter, ex. 


Bunker Hill 

Springfield 

Kingston 


Reillev. Edward 


Danville 






Belleville 


Newsam.John 


Kennison. Henry 


St. John 


Newsani , R ichard 


Orchard Mines... 
Kingston Mines.. 

Millstadt .'.■ 

Belleville 


Reynolds, William 


East Peoria 


New.sam, Thomas 


Rhodes, Jefferson. 


Pana 


Newsani. Thomas Jr 

Nesbit, Charles, ex 

Nevener,.Tohn 


Richardson. Joseph 

Richardson, Robert 

Ridgely, 0. L. 


Litchfield . 


Carteryille 

Mt. Olive 


Nicholson. George A 

McJiol.soii, William 


Cuba 


Ritchie Alex Sr 


Clinton 


Ritchie, A.,-lr 

Roberts, Benjamin D 

Roberts, John D., ex 

Robin.soE , Henry 

Robinson John T 


Trenton 


Nold, Fred 


Freeburw 


Streator 




Galva 

Spring Valley.... 
Toluca . 






Gardner 

Kingston Mines. . 


0'Beirne..John 




Pana 


O'Brien, John W 


Rodenburg. Charles 

Roe Samuel . 


Belleville 


O'Brien, John J 


Marquette 

Spring Valley.... 

Pana 

Spring Valley.... 

Braidwood 

Marquette 


Oglesby 


O'Brine, Patrick J.. 






O'Brine. William. 


Rogers, Josiali 


Braidwood 






Mount Olive 




RoUo, John 


Gillespie 


0'Leary..lohu . 


Rollo. William 


Pana 


Opie, William 












Oglesby 




Collinsville 

Barclay 

Murphysboro 

Assumption 

Braidwood 

Norris 


Rowland. Charles, ex 


Belleville 






Parker. Albert 








Rutledge, J.J 






Springfield 








Peart, Jolin .. 


Sangrelet. Marshall 

Sansom. Henry S., ex 

Sauer Frederick 








Peterf, J. D 


.Murphysboro. 

Spring Valley.... 
Minonk 


Mount Olive 






Phillips James 


Belleville 


Pick. Edward 














Picton, Joseph 


St. David 

Edinburg 

Murphysboro 


Schramm. Richard 

Scully. William J 


Bellevilh 






Poal. tJdgarE. 


Scurrah. Castling R 

Sec9r, Frederick D 






Odin 


Postle. John 


Braceville 

Belleville. 


St. John 


Powell. Albert E 


Sevan, Charier 

Sharp, Montgomery, ex ... 


DanvillH 


Powell, Evan 


Murphysboro 


Coal City 


Powell, David, ex 


Galva 


Powell, J E 




Shell, Joseph, ex 

Shields Frank D 




Powell, Thomas H 


Belleville 

Roanoke 

Gillespie 


Pana 


Powell. Samuel 


Sehuler. Charles 


(Gilchrist 










Sidall, James 

Siddle. John 




Prudent. Edward 


Centralia 


Edwardsville 



174 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

3Iine Managers — Certificates of Coj»pe/e^«c/y— Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Streator 

Canton 

Glen Carbon 

Spring Valley.... 
Springfield 

Collinsville 

O'F&Uen.... '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Equality 

Diamond 


Thornton James 


DuQuoin. 










Tolle. E. B 


Kingston Mines . 










Twomley, Edwin, ex 

Vallow. Charles 

Vandebur.John. ex 

Vicary. John, ex 

Vose, John 


Coal Valley 


Simpson, George A 

Simpson, George C 

Simposn. William J 


Kinmundy 




Lincoln 


Sisk A J 


Springfield 


Skinner, Alexander 














Astoria 

Wesley City 

Middle Grove .... 
Spring Valley — 

Sandoval 

Dawson 


Wallace. David 


Carterville 




Walland, Ed. S., ex 

Walschtag. Stephen 

Walsh, Patrick 

Walsh Peter P 


Bartonville 


Small, .James 

Smethurst, Nathan 

Smith, Alexander iM 

Smith David J* 


Peoria 

Springfield 

Pleasant Plains 


Walters, Wm. H 


Staunton 




Wanless, Isaac 










Smith, James L 

Smith. .lames L 


Mount Olive 






Wantlin" T.J .... 


Peoria 


Collinsville 

Bloomington 

Pana 

Athens 

Riverton 

Girard 


Wantliug. Thomas 

Walters, Thomas W 


Pottstown 




Ladd 


Smith, T. J 


Wyoming 






Sniit-h WillinniG 


Watts William 




Smith. W. J 


Webster Richard 


Collinsville 


Weeks Thomas 


Streator 


Sollenbeiger. Harry C .... 
Spires. Alfred 


Dunfermline 

Braceville 

Glen Carbon 

Belleville 

Colchester 

Streator 

Collinsville 

Spring Valley.... 


Weisenborn, F. E 


.\lt. Olive 




Pekin .....■.■.■.".■.■.: 


Staehle August 


Westwood, Albert.; 


Belleville 


Stanton. William E., ex — 
Steel, Alexander 




Wcxtivood, Thomas 


Belleville. 

Elm wood 




Whennen, Charles 


Oglesby 


Steel. Neal 




Collinsville 




Seatonville 

Peoria 

Springfield 

Collinsville 

St. Louis, Mo 

DuQuoin 

Moweaqua 

Seatonville 








White. Owen 


Seatonville 


Stockett. Howard N 


Wnitehead, Joseph 

Wild. James 


Parmington 


Stockett, Thos. R.,Jr 

Sf-nnlfT>ifln W TT 






VVilkinson Frank 


Westville 


Stoneburner, L. L 






Williams, James 

Williams Jeff 


Murphysboro 


Stratman, Henry, ex 


Springfield 

Edwardsville 

Coal City 

Millstadt 


Parmington . . . 








Williams, Louis 


Belleville 




Williams, Robert H 

Williams Walter 




Swansberg, John L 


Danville 




Williams W. W 


Hornsby 


Syson Prank 


Niantic 


Williamson, Wm 


Staunton 




Kangley 

Edvvards 






Wilson David 


Spring Valley 














Taylor Daniel 


Wilson H C 


Pekin 




Belleville 

Edwards 

Springfield 

O'Fallon 


Wilson, John B 




Taylor James 


Wilson John J 


Wesley City 




Wilson Robert 


Roanoke 


Taylor, Thomas, ex 

Taylor, Thomas, ex 


Wilson Thomas 


Morris. 


Springfield 

Coal City 


Wilson W R 


Reed City 


Winning, -James 


Uartervile 




Westville 

Ladd 

Collinsville 






Thomas John R.. 


1 Winterbottom, John 


Murphysboro 








Wittman Daniel 


New Baden 


Thoni«s Richard 


Ridge Prairie .... 

Bartonville 

DeSota 

Murphyshoro 

Sherrard 


Wolschlag, Stephen, ex.... 

Woods, William, ex 

Wright John 


Peoria 








Belleville 


Thompson', Robert C 

Thompson, Mark 


Wright, J. W 









MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. ] (5 

Mine Managers — Certijicaies of Competency — Concluded. 



Name. 


Poatofiice. 

Belleville 

Girard 

Braidwood 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Yates John. 


Zink, Peter A 


Belleville 




ZoUer, Robert H 




Youngr, Hugh G 







MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Adams Charles T 


Rosboro 

New Castle 

Streator 

Belleville 


Gilbert, Edward. 


Niantic . 


Aslopp. William H 

Anderson, Willia in 




Peoria 


Goodler, Wm 

(rolden Oeorae 


Cuba 

Spring: field 






Atkinson. Edwartl 


Streator 


Grant, David 


Pekin 




Petersburg 

Sunfleld 

Lincoln 

Cuba 

Cutler 

Winchester 

DiiQuoin 


Gray John 


Roanoke 




Green, Bohert 


Springfield 

DuQuoin 


Bailev Robert 


Greenwood, Bohert 

1 Grieve Peter 




Gritlith, William A 

1 




Bartlf tt, Thomas. 








Bates, W.II 


Cable 


Betz Charles C 


Haensel, Daniel 


Lenzburg: 




Pekin 




Bracken Jaines A 


Greenview 

Cutler 

Pinokneyville 

Grape Creek 

Danville 


Heinz, John L 


LaSalle 


Brown Jabez 


Howe, William 


Streator 








Bunting:, J. H. 


Hutton, James 

•Jenkins, Euerene. . . . 


Tallula. 


Bitshona, Andretc Jf 


Barton ville 




Jerremire, Wm. Jf 

Jones, David 




Cameron Duncan S 

Cape. Thomas 


Sorento 

Pairview 


Marissa 




Pleasant Plains.. 

Murphysboro 

Burtonville 

Nilwood 

Grape Creek 

O'Fallon 

RushviUe 

Edwards 

Fredonia 




Christie. David .... 




Collier Frank J 


Kidd, Andrew 


Weuona. 














Crawson Eliliu 


Klingenhagen. Henry 

Kramer. Anthony F 

Laumbattus. Philip H 

Lenze, Charles 

Lloyd, Hosea W 

i 

Mason. Mark.Jr 

Maule. Robert 


Belleville . 


Cummin^s, William 

Cusack, M . 


Sato 




Tamaroa 


Dale.John. . 


Belleville 




Harrisbur? 

CoUinsville 

DuQuoin 

Percy 

Carterville 

Belleville 

Crab Orchard.... 

Colchester 

West Belleville.. 
Spauldiug 

Decatur 


Sheffield 






Darisdti. Jfattlietc 






Sato 




Belleville 


Duifner J W 


Meehan, Patrick- 
Meehan. Peter 


Breeds 




Williamsville 




Meredith, (;. W 




Entsminger, Emanuel E.. 

Entwhistle. Robert 

Erwin, William 


Michaels. Lewis 


Belleville 


Miller, Nicholas 


Lebanon 


Miller. William 




jniem. John 


Norris 


MiUetf, Thomas 

)f<it't'att Til ma '■ 


CoUinsville 

Percv 




Bagaii Pa trick 


Mon nyh n n , Fdira rd 

Morin Jerrmiah 


Carbon Hill 

Danville 




Ladd 

Centralia 


Morton. Bohert 




Fortiiithe, Peter 


-.^fiirph 1/. John . 


Braidwood 


Forsythe Thomas 


McClreru, James 


Kanglev 


Fowler. Henry 

Frankin. Bernard 


Millersburg 

Lincoln 1 




McDowell, James A 


Grape Creek 



176 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Mine Managers — Certificates of Service — Concluded. 



Postoffice. 



McGonnigal, Bernard .. 
McKernan, James 

Neal, William 

Niiholsoyi, Williatn 

Noyd, Lewis 

Oexner, Wendelin 

Parkin. William 

Patterson, J. C 

Peart, John 

Pfander, Fred 

Pickett. Bobert 

Pool, Edgar E 

Price, David 

Price, James L 

Pullen, Charles 

Badford, William 

Bandle. Jesse 

Beynolds William 

Royster, Moses L 

Rusche. Christian 

Byan, James 



Spring Valley 
Collinsville... 

Murphysboro. 

Cuba 

Galva 



West Belleville. 



Sweetwater... 
Assumption. . 

Braid wood 

Peoria 

Canton 

Murphysboro. 

Fairbury 

Drnville 

Sorento 

C^ba 

Birkner 

East Peoria... 

Peoria 

East Peoria... 
Springfield. .. 



Schmidt, Prank P Limestone . . 

Shaw. Nuthan Kramm 

Smith, David P ! Dawson — 

Smith. Felix Breese 

Solomon, Robert ' Springfield. 

Spencer, George iDuQuoin. .. 

Stanway . George Blair 

Stark, Andrew , Galva 

Stewart, David J ,Seatonville. 

Stuhlsatz. Michael jKewanee 

Sutton, Thomas Millstadt.. . . 

Swan, Charles |Oakwood.... 

Swisher, James E ; St. David .. . 



Teif er, Alezander W j Morris 

Terrill, Thomas Colchester . 

Thompson, John DeSota 

Thornton, James DuQuoin. . 



Waugh, George, Sr Peoria 

Wanless, William Riverton 

West wood. Thomas 1 Belleville 

Wild, James, deceased — iMurphysboro. 
Wilkin, John B i Petersburg.. . . 



Williams, John 

Williams, John T.. 
Williams. Walter. 
Wilms, William — 



Sato. 
Coalville . . 
DuQuoin.. . 
Springfield. 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



177 



HOISTING 



ENGINEERS, HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF 
COMPETENCY. 



Notp:. — This and the following list include all the hoisting engineers to 
whom certificates were issued prior to January 1, 1900. The postoffice ad- 
dresses here given are those recorded at the time the certificates were issued, 
and in many cases ai'e not the present addresses of the certificate holders. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Breese 


Blake Albert 


Streator 




Lincoln 

Braidwood 

Taylorville 

Oglesby 

Rosboro 

Troy 

Seneca 

Collinsville 

Lincoln 

Elniwood 

Sparta 








Blue. Jesse 

i Black. Jas. A 


Norris 




Troy 


Alexander. Henry 

Alexander W A 


' Blomberg, Albert 

Billips Joseph M 


Sherrard 

Kewanee. 


Allen. C. E 


1 Boettcher, Alfred 

Bogrgs. Dow J 


Freeburg 


Allen C H . 


Kewanee 


Altraan H P 


1 Bohlen Henry E 


Mt Olive 






Odin 


Anderson W C 


t Boston. William H 


Murphysboro 






Carbondale 

Belleville 






Anthony John C. 


Belleviiie 

East Peoria 


Bradley. Simon 


Edwardsville.. .. 










Brasel. S. R 




Archibald David 




Bretz. Anton 


Germ an town.. 






Coal City 


Arru.«trong', C 


Muncie . 


Bromley, Georg-e, Sr 

Bromley, Georgre. Jr 


Catlin 






Kellyville 




Murphysboro 

Tilden 

Clarke City 

Colchester 

Lens Station 

Westville 




Atkin, Robert R . 


Brown, Georgre A 


lies Junction 








Averill. C. P 






Avery, William 


Bruse, Jamt-s. 


Athens 






Nashville 


Bailey. Jame.s F 


Buckley, Calvin. W 

Burlinson, Aaron . 


Sparland 

Percy 




Sparta 

Spillertown 

Westville 

Fairmount 

Murphysboro 

DuQuoin 




Coulterville 




Burreil. G. K 

Butcher,IThonia'< 




Baker. .lames E . 


Murphysboro. 


Baker C H. 


Butt. Thomas R 


Litchfield 




LaSalle 


Barber, C. E. 


Cagle, Alfred 




Barber. C. VV 




Barnhill. H. G 


Kinmundy 

Centralia 

Cable 

Fairmount 

Streator 

Mascoutah 

Mt. Olive 




Barr, Frank .. .. 


Cain Daniel 


Ridgely 








Barton. Charles W 


Cain. John 
















Beatty, Nepha 


Camp. John R 


Westville 


Becker, F. M 

Behrend, A D 


Sandoval 

Springfield 

Belleville...::::;; 

Danville 


Campbell. W. J 

Cantrell. H. T 


Coal City 

Farmington 


Beeby. William 


Carmiehael, Thos 


Sorinfffield 


Beese. John E., Jr 

Bell. Mark 


Carpenter, Charles 


Girard ::.. 


Berlin. Henry 

Bienert J. O 


Pana 

Spaulding 


Carrington. Eugene 

Car sell Hugh 


Moweaqua 

Moweaqua .. 


Bigelow. A. E 


Carter, Albert J 


Cutler 


—12 C. R. 







178 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hoisting Engineers, Certificates of Competencij — Continued. 



Chapman. J. B 

Chapman, William E 

Chester, David 

Chew, B. R 

Christ, Philip 

Clark, Christopher 

Clark, 0. N 

(Uark, John 

Clark, John 

Clark, Quintin 

Claudin, Josh 

Clickner, C. S , 

Clifford Michael 

Clifton, Wm. H 

Coatney, Grant 

Collinton, Chas 

Collingwood, Wm 

Collingwood, Albert E 

Collins, Walter 

Colton, George C 

Conley, John 

Connelly, J.J 

Conway, John 

Conway, Michael 

Cook, Wm. D 

Cooper, J. H 

Cornelius. Richard 

Cottle, Elmer 

■Cotton, George 

■Craig, Daniel 

■Croker, Edward 

Cruickshanks, Robert 

Cummings. George 

Cumraing, Geo. A. P 

Camming, Geo. P 

Cummings, Robert W 

Dalhour, Frank C 

Dana, J ohn W 

Daniel, -James 

Daniels, Joel 

Dankins, Thos. J 

Darrastader, William 

Davis, B, D 

Davis, Jas. A 

Davis, Chas. W 

Davis. Jackson 

Davis, E. E 

Davis, Frank 

Davis, Harry J 

Davis, James P 

Davis, John W 

Davis, John 

Davis, L. D 

Davison, Joseph 

Dawson, Van C 

Dawson, John C 

Deans, Robert 

Deaton, L. B 

DeBacher, Thomas 

Dee, Henry 

DeJarnett. Thomas 

Delmore, Frank 

Delorey . William 

Dent, William 

Dick, Robert 

Dillon, John 

Dixon, George 

Dodd, Sam'l H 

Dodwell, Edward J 

Doolin, E. W 

Dochring, Fred 

Donaldson, J. W., Jr 

Doolin, E.J 

Dougherty, Joseph 

Dowler. John 



Petersburg 

Salisbury 

Springfield — 

Carlinville 

Weuona , 

Decatur , 

DuQuoin 

Marquette 

Virden 

Braid wood 

Pekin 

Witt 

Kewanee 

Sparland 

Pairmount 

Belleville 

Greenview 

Springfield 

Mt. Vernon 

Carterville 

Streator 

Murphysboro , 
Collinsville. .. 

Ladd 

Westville 

Nilwood 

Pairmount 

Buffalo 

Halidayboro... 

Danville 

Marquette 

Middle Grove.. 

Pana , 

Gardner 

Sparland 

Sparta 

Staunton , 

Springfield — 
Belleville 

Braceville 

New Athens... 

Coffeen 

Hillsboro 

Edinburg 

Athens 

Auburn 

Lincoln 

Du Quoin 

Belleville 

Lake Creek 

Belleville 

Coffeen , 

Sherrard 

Spring Valley, 

Streator 

Belleville 

Tallula 

Elmwood 

Glen Carbon... 
Mt. Vernon — 
Springfield .... 

VVestville 

Diamond 

Sunfield 

Auliurn 

Wenona , 

Pottstown 

Decatur , 

Pontiac 

Mt. Olive 

Dunfermline ., 

Pontiac 

Taylorville .... 
Auburn 



Dowling. Ira F 

Drake, William 

Daffy. Glenn E 

Duncan, J. R 

Dunsmore, Thomas 

Dunstedler, William S. 
Dyer, Harry 



Eaton, A. C 

Easton.Geo 

Eccleston, John 

Eddy. Evermont 

Eastham, G. A 

Edwards, George, W. 

Elliott, Clarence , 

Elliott, H.H 

Edwards, Thomas... 

Ekis, Daniel B 

Ekis. Henry 

Emans, Ransom R... 

Ellis. Albert 

Elmore, V. M 

Emery, H. W 

English, Thomas 

Erisman, Jacob D 

Erisman. Jesse 

Estes. W. B 

Evans, Albert 

Evans, Thomas 

Evans. C. L 

Evans, Price 

Evans, W. E 

Eylman, Frank 



Fahay, John 

Falkeustien, George A. 

Parley, James 

Ferguson. John J 

Ferris, W. H 

Fillingham. Ji A 

Finnigan, Thomas J 

Fischer, Phillip 

Fisher, George 

Fisher, Patrick 

Fitzsimmons, Maurice . 

Flesher. A 

Fletcher, Henry A 

Foote, Charles 

Foote, William 

Fox, Frank L 

Forister. Robert 

Forister. William 

Fortney, John W 

Foster, A.J 

Fox, James B 

Fox, Thomas 

Prain, Austin 

Franklaud, Tim 

Freeman, M. F 

Freeman, E. F 

Frick, U. B 

Friend. J. W 

Frier, Jacob 

Friend, William L 

Friesland, C. M 

Fritz. Gustav 

Pry. D. W. 

Furguson, S. P 

Fusten. D. H 



Gately, James — 
Gates. William S. 
Gallagher. Peter.. 
Gaughan, James. 



Springfield ... 

Streator 

Collinsville, .. 

LaSalle 

Springfield ... 
Edwardsville. 
DuQuoin 



DuQuoin 

Willisville 

Streator 

Athens 

Girard 

Springfield 

Bryant 

Centralia 

Spring Valley. 

Springfield 

Ridgley 

Farmington . . . 

Cable 

Coffeen 

Greenville 

Streator 

Niantie 



Danville 

Glen Carbon... 

Spaulding 

Virden 

Bissell 

Danville 

Spring Valley. 



Decatur 

.Astoria 

iRiverton 

[Spring Valley. 

Marquette 

Canton 

Springfield 

Lenzburg 

Staunton 

Kangley 

Peru 

Taylorville 

Ladd 

Westville 



Assumption . . 
Murphysboro. 

Kinraundy 

Litchfield 

LaSalle 

Lincoln 

Ridge Prairie, 

Streator 

Shelby ville... 

DuQuoin 

Lake Creek... 

Collinsville 

Ormsby 

Collinsville... 

Salisbury 

Breese 

Clark City 

Strasburg — 
Murphysboro. 



Seatonville.. 
Kankakee .. 
Clark City.. 
Braidwood. . 



HOISTINCV LNCHNEERS. CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, 



179 



Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Competencu — Continued. 



Name. 



Geer, Beujamiu H 

Gelmour. Allan 

Geer. U. S 

Geyer, J. A 

Gibson. John 

Gillson. R. W 

Girfen, Henry 

Glaoken. Hu^h 

Gladders, William 

Goalby, Arthur A 

Goalby. B. F 

Goalby. Frank H 

Goddard. William H.. 

Gordon. E.J 

Gould. George 

Gowin, Frank 

CJrace, John T 

Graham, L. A 

Graham. Reuben 

Gray. Chas. H 

Greaves, Walter 

Green, Daniel 

Green. Thomas 

Green, Wm. H 

Greenhalgh, James ... 
Greenhalgh, W'illiam. 

Grice, Albert 

<Trieves, James 

Griffin, John O 

Groom, Alexander 

Groom, John, Sr 

Groom, James 

Groom, William 

Grubb, Michael 

Geistdorf or, Fred 

Guy, D. F 

Groom, John 



Wolcott.. 
Diamond. 

Pekin 

Wanlock. 
Sandoval 
Danville. 

Troy 

Coal City 



Percy. 



Stookey 

Spillertowu... 
Petersliurg ... 

Sato 

Green Ridge.. 

Kewanee 

Bloomington.. 

Virden 

Springfield... 

Ladd 

Braid wood.... 

Marissa 

Streator 

Hill^boro 



I Kewanee.. 
jBirkner... 
Kewanee.. 

Belleville. 



Herring, George P. 

Herring, J. P 

Hershaw. A. F 

Heskitt.John 

Hess. Edward B 

Hillard, James 

Hill.C. C 

Hill, C. W 

Hill, Embersou 

Hilmes, Henry 

Hobbs, Francis E.. 
Hogdson, Edward . 

Hodson, Moses 

Hoecker. Charles .. 

Hogan, Prank 

Holtkamp,Geo 

Hopper, George 

Hopper. H. H 

Herd, Alvin 

Hottinger, J 

House, C. 0| 

Howe, Chas 

Huggins, William . 

Huggins, J. A 

Hughes, John C 

Hull, Lee 

Humphrey, Chas,.. 



Riverton.... 

jDeSoto 

Springfield. 
Belleville... 



Irwin. Byron 

Irwin, John 

Irwin, Robert K. 
Isadore, George. 



.Odin 

.[Staunton 

. Al)ingdon 

. Ridgely 

. Morrisonville 

. St. David 

. iMarrissa 

, Pontiac , 

. iW'estville , 

. I Astoria 

.[Centralia 

. LMurphysboro 

. Smithboro 

.Glen Carbon... 

.Springfield 

.Breese 

.i Glen Carbon.., 

.Gillespie 

. Taylorville 

. Freeburgh 

. iSt. John 

.[Streator 

. iMurphysboro. 

.Streator 

.Springfield 

. IMurphysboro. 
. Edinburg , 



Pana 

Gillespie 
Pontiac... 
Rosboro . 



Hackett, Owen 

Haddick, William L. 
Haensel, Edward — 

Haensel, David 

Hagler. Charles 

Hale, William T 

Hall, G. R :... 

Hall. G. R 

Hamilton, Chas. E... 
Hamilton, James H.. 

Hampton. N. R 

Hand. P. L 

Handle, Ledlie 

Hanenstein. J. W — 

Hanes. W.J 

Hankins. John W 

Hanson, ^Villiam 

Kanvey, John J 

Hanvey. Robert 

Hanvey, William 

Happer Frank 

Harding. Enos 

Harper. Oscar 

Hardy. Thos. W 

Harris. J. W 

Hartman, Prank . 

Harvey, Wm. R 

Havel, Joseph 

Hawker. J. O 

Hayes . Arthur H 

Hayes, James 

Hayler. George L 

Head. JohnS 

Hendriek. C. W 

Hennegan. John F... 

Henry, Philip 

Heppard. (-Jeorge 

Herder. Walter 



Spaulding., 
Sherrard . . 
iLenzburg.. 



Fredonia 

Troy 

Colchester ... 

Nilwood 

Canton 

Sparland 

Murphysboro 

Peoria 

Taylorville ... 
Willisville.... 

Salem 

Sorento 

O'Fallon 

Collinsville .. 



Edwardsville 

Birkner 

Lebanon 

Dawson 

Springfield 

Murphysboro 

Wanlock 

French Village... 

Pana 

Danville 

Bloomington 

Murphysboro 

Assumption 

O'Fallon 

Wanlock 

Kewanee 

Belleville 

Edwardsville 



Jackson, William — 

Jacobs, George R 

Jacobs, James M 

Jacobs, W^illiam 

Jacobs, W., Sr 

Jeffrey, James 

Jeffrey, John 

Jenkins, John L 

Jenkins, T. E 

Jenks, W'illiam 

Johnson, John W 

Johusohn. J. S 

Johnson, Robert 

Johnson, W^illiam H . 
Johnson, William L.. 
Johnston. Joseph R.. 
Johnston, Thomas ... 
Johnston, Thomas B. 

Jones, George 

Jones, Henry E 

Jones, John P 

Jones, Jonathan, Jr.. 
Jones, Jonathan, Sr.. 

Jones, Joseph 

Jones, Logan 

Jones, Phelix E 

•Jones, William 

Jones, William 

Jordan. Robert 

Judd, Charles E 



. iMinonk 

. 'Elniwood 

. iMoweaqua 

.IMurphysboro.. 

.Peoria 

. IMarrissa 

.|Belleville 

.Danville 

. Athens 

. Bloomington... 

.Birkner 

. DuQuoin 

. Pawnee 

. Soperville 

. Spring Valley. 
.Pontiac 



jFreeburg.. 
'Belleville. 
Staunton . 
I Marissa... 



Staunton 

iMarissa 

jBarclay 

Marissa 

Braeeville 

Streator 

I Edwardsville. 



Keating, Edward F. 
Keating, Richard .. 
Kelley, James D — 
Kelley, Robert D... 

Kelly.Chas 

Kenady, Fred A — 

Kennedy. W. J 

Kerchner. Howard.. 
Kessick.Chas. W .. 
Kidd. Alonzo 



Carbon Hill .. 

I Streator 

(Cambridge ... 
i Edwardsville 

Belleville 

Decatur 

'Fairmount ... 



180 HOTSTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 

Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Coynpetency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postofiace. 


Kilbride, T. C 


Farmington 

Collinsville 

Germantown..... . 

Collinsville 

Ladd 


Marland, James 


Wenona. 


Killinger.C 


Marland William 


Sparland 


Killin^er Harry . 


Marshall Robert 


Murphysboro 




Martin, N. W 


Kimber, John . .. . . 


Marxer Louis J 


Milstadt 




Belleville 


Massie, J. T 


Belleville 








Willisville 


King, Alexander. Sr 


Carterville 

sraithboro. .;;;;!! 

Belleville 


Maule William 


Belleville 








King, L. B 


Mayor, J. W 




Kirsbner Frank 


Meadows William 












Klingenf us, Edward 




Michaels, Otto L. . . . 


Belleville 


Klinkner Frank 


Colfax 


Miller A. J P 






Assumptio 

LaSalle 


Miller, Hugh 






Miller, James 


Alma . 




Miller, T.H 






Miller, William C 




Larkin, James G 


Athens . 


Mills, Thomas S . 


Coal City 


Lavallier. U. S 




Moffat R E 






Cable 




Gillespie 

Springfield 


Lavne, J. W 


DeSoto . 


Moor.F.J. W 

Morck John 


Ledbitter, George 




Belleville 


















Leslie, George 


Gardner 

Braidwood 

Catlin 




Belleville 


Leslie, N, B 




Nashville 


Lewis, Alvin 


Morris. James 


Mt Olive 


Lindskey, Martin H 
















Linsky,James 


Braidwood 

Murphysboro'!!!'. 
Niantic 


Morrison Archie 


Oglesby 


Linsky, Patrick J 


Mulvany. A. T 




Belleville 


Lockhart, Louis 


Murphy Robert T. 


Norris 


Lockie, William 


Carterville 

Loding 






Loding, Chas A 


Murray, Hugh 


Nashville 


Loebel, Frank 


Trenton 


Murray .Joseph P 




Long, Noah B 


Pontiac 

Mt. Olive 




Minonk 


Lucbt,M. F 


Nagle Jake 




Lundeen, Prank W 


Galva 




Lundy J P 


Mt. Pulaski 

Ridge Prairie .... 

Percy 


Springfield 








Needham Daniel 










McAddams, John W 


Nentzel, Fred H 


Caseyville 


McCauley. Aaron 


Streator 


Newal Leroy. 


Sparland 

Belleville 


McConachie, Ed 




McCormack, James J 


Springfield 


Nichols. John . . 


Athens 


McCulles,G. L 


Nicol, Adolph 


Belleville 


McCunky, Tobias 


Assumption 

Springfield 

Pana 

Percy 

Murphysboro — 

Pana 

Lincoln 

Herrins Prairie.. 

Coal City 

Carbon Hill 




Galva 






Oglesby 


McDonald, W. H 




McDonald. William J 

McFarland, F. E 




McGittigan, Thomas 


O'Donnell. Michael 




McGowan, Edward 








Odin 


McKean, Andrew 




Streator 


McKean, .John 










Mt. Olive 


McKearnan, J. B 


Athens 


Ord S R 


Mt. Vernon 


McKee.C. L 


Lake Creek 

Belleville 

Carbon Hill 

Murphysboro .!!. 

Roanoke 

LaSalle 

Pinckneyville — 

Staunton 

Cofifeen 

Braceville 

Lebanon 

Braceville 

Braidwood 


Osborne, Benjamin 


Streator 






McLauchlan.P. T 


Otto, John . . 


Collinsviiie 










Paddock. W D 




McVey, Frank W 




Mc Vicar, Donald 


Pana 










Parks, James 


Streator 


Maasburg, H. C 

Mader Charles H 


Parker, Joseph M 

Patterson, R.J 


Murphysboro 






Mainwaring, James 


Pearce, H. L.. 


Cable 


Mair, Max .. . 


Peecher David 


Braidwood. 


Malcolm. Wra. J 




Marseilles 


Maltby, Edward 


Pemberton, C. H 


DuQuoin 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, 



ISl 



Hoisting Enrj 


'neers — Certifica 


k's of Compeiency. — 


Continued. 


Name. 


1 Postoffiee. 

i 


Name. 


Postollice. 




'"^nrif vrillo 


Sndii-r Gt-oi'"'f 


Murphysboro .... 


Petrea. J. W 


Vawdercook 

k'entralia 

— Herriij 1 

....I Athens 


SMlla<!e. H.-..rjre 

Salla.ie. J. E 

Saiuls. RolHit K 

."ravage, Richard 

Sawyers, Joseph 

Saylor, C. F 

Schait'er. Fred 

Schramm, Charles 

Scharinek. Frank 

Schmacker. Herman 


Pendergast, John 

Perrins, George H 

Philips. J M 

Piper. James 

Piper. Oliver G 

Piper. Joseph 

Pircher I'cter P . .. . 




Marissa 

Clarke City 


1 Staunton 

....iGlen Carbon 

'Sandoval 


Murphysboro 

Belleville 


Pitra Frank 

Pitt. Joseph 


....Odin 

....iTrentou 

Canton i 

Streator 


Edwardsville .... 

Glen Carbon 

Mt. Olive 


I'liiiuuer. L->enjamin — 
Plockcr, Henry 


Schroeder, Heurv 




....Pana 

....Belleville 

....ICaseyviUe 

! Seatonville 

.. iSpaulding 

— Lewiston 

....St. John 


Schnessell. Conrad . , 


Breese 


Powell Edwin 


Schumacher Chas 


Marissa 


Powell, b' C 


Schumm. Fred W 

Scott, J. W 


Gardner 


Pritchard H C 


Secor Fred D 


Odin 


Pusrh IJHiiiel 




Cantrall 








Puher R H 




Seller William .. . 


Ormsby 


Quick. A. T 

Quick, A. S. H 

Quighy. Henry 


Sato 


Sells. Chas. B 


Colfax 


.... Hallidayboro 

....iTroy 

Collinsville 

...iBloomington 

....'Marquette 

... IBraceville 

....Belleville 


Shroyer A. D 


Lincoln 






Raber. F. C 


Shriver, P. A 


Kinmundy 




Siddall John 


Belleville 


Radford. William T .. 












Raisbeck John 


Smith Edw'ard J 


Collinsville . 








Raudle William . 


Freeburg 


Smith, George W 


St. LiOuis, Mo 




— Staunton 








Smyth, CM 

Sneddon, John 






.... Mt. Olive 

... Lincoln 

. . . Niantic 


O'Falhai 




Sneddon. Richard 

Sneyd. James 

Sowerby. Miles 


Catliu 


Reading. Curtis 


Westville 


Reed John 




Willisville 


Reed W J 


... 'Janville 

Lincoln 

.. Pinckneyville . 


Mt Vernon 


Reetz, Herman 

Reeger John C 


Sparling. Charles 

Sparling, Henry 


Seatonville 




1 Springfield 

.... Toluca 

....(Belleville 














Stanford. J. W 


Pana 




■0 Fallon 


Missionfleld .. 


Reiinard, Jas. Ed 

Reichman George 


.... Grape Creek 


Stedman, Robert, Sr 

Steel EH 


Danville 

Salem 


Renni, Andrew 


1 Dumfermiine 


Steinheimer, Theodore — 


Lenzburg 


Repplinger H 


.... Belleville 

Glen Carbon 

Chenoa 


Steward L. A . 


Mt Vernon 






Carbon Hill 


Rhodes, Almon R 


Stewart, Peter 

Stoker, A. E 


Murphysboro .... 


Rice, CD 


— Harrisburg 


Buffalo 




....1 Murphy sboro .... 

— Staunton 

— IMoweaqua 

.... Coal City 






Richards. John T 

Richart. Lee 

Richmond. John E 


Stout, F. M 

Stout. W. E 

Stowell, G. W 

Streik, William 

Strivey, William 

Stroud, William 


Springfield 

Rutland 

Bloomington 

Helleville 

Taylorville 

Worden 


Riley.B. J 

Riley. Michael 

Rippitoe, J. G 


.... Cautrall 

Grape Creek 

.... Colechester 

....|Trenton 

... Litchfield 

.... Willisville 


Roberts, John 

Roberts, Jonathan 

Robinson Charles 


Struse, Henry H 

Stuthard, Geo. B 

Stuart, John 

Swartz, Fred 


Athens 

Westville 

Ladd 








Robinson, William A.. 


iToluca 




Rockey, Charles 

Rodgers Edward 






— iMurphysboro — 


1 Taylor. .^laek 

1 Tefft, Ernest 

Thexton, Henry 

\ Thomas, Fred 

Thompson, Fred 

■ Thompson. J. H 


Westville 




Mt. Olive 


Rohour, Michael 

Rowland Sidney G 


....1 Grape Creek 

Belleville 


Springfield 

Litchfield 


Roy. A. L 

Rovster Richard 


Collinsvilie 

....Peoria 

....Pana 

....Ashland 


Rushville 

Rutland 


Russell. Zeuas 

Rutlilf, Isaac 


Westville 

Marion 



182 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Competency — Concluded. 



Postoffice. 



Tibballs. E. A 

Travis, Aloazo 

Travis. William 

Tregoningr, Charles. 
Twoniby, Edward . . . 



Marion 

Fana 

Birkner 

Carterville . 
ICoal Valley. 



Vaughn. John 

Vandveer, Perry E . 
Vernon. .Tames 



[McLean 

■Taylorville 
LaSalle 



Waggoner, William F. 

Wagmire, James 

Waldron, Thomas 

Walker, John H 

Walker, Joshua 

Wallford. Noah 

Wallock, Charles 

Walsh, James D 

Walton. A. P 

Walton, Patrick 

Walton, Joseph 

Wantling, T. J 

Wandless. W. S 

Warner, Richard 

WasseJ, Anton 

Watson, Frank 

Wattawa. Joseph 

Watts. T.J 

Wente. Frank 

West. W. H 

Westwood, Albert 

Westwood. Edward... 
Wheatley. John W.... 

White, Henry 

White. Perry J 

White, Robert 



Raymond — 
Assumption , 

iPredonia 

Mt. Olive.... 



Hillsboro 

Braceville 

Auburn 

LaSalle 

Bureau Junction 

St. David 

Pottstown 

CoUinsville 

Troy 

Braceville 

Springfif^ld 

Belleville 

Elmwood 

Nashville 

Murphy sboro 

Belleville 

Birkner 

Coal City 

Riverton 

Springfield 

jLincoln 



Wickersham, J. R Lake Creek 

Wilkin, W. P Springfield .... 

Williams, Huston jSpaulding 

Williams, John Spring Valley. 

Williams, Thomas E |St. David 

Williams, Watson iVirden 

Williams. William H [Sherrard 

Williams, Wm. Hampton.. iMurphysboro . 

Williamson, Henry Coal City 

Williamson, William i " 

Wilson, David Birkner 

Wilson. WilliamH Middle Grove.. 

Wines. E. R i Springfield 

Wohlers, Henry Mt. Olive 

Woodward, J. R Streator 

Woolbright, D. A Centralia 

Woodworth. Peter Pekin 

Wright, William M Pana 

Wrigley, James CoUinsville 



Yates. John DeSoto. . . 

Yates, William Coal City 

Yehling, Fred H DuQuoin. 

Young, J. K Girai-d 

Young, James G Gardner.. 

Young, Robert | LaSalle . . 

Young, A. O. K jGirard 

Young, Peter J \ SpringfieL 

Young. W. L 1 DuQuoin . 

Youngquist, Frank j Sherrard . 



Zeigler, John 'lies Junction., 

Ziuk, Louis ; Belleville 

Zink, PeterA j " 

Zuriker, Lorens .Cable 



HOISTING ENGINEERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Postofiice. 



Ackerman. Jacob. 
Allen, William H. 
Anthony. John C. 



.[Belleville... 
. 'CoUinsville. 
., Belleville... 



Baiwair. .John 

Banker, Henry 

Bath, Ameston 

Beeby, William 

Bell, George E 

Benvennto, Charles 

Birkley,N. T 

Blue. Jesse 

Bonick, Andrew 

Bowman, George W. 

Brown, G. A 

Brubeck.J. W 

Bumann, Albert 



Campbell, Albert ... 

Campbell. James 

Carslon, Alexander . 
Carrington, Eugene 

Carter, Albert J 

Chitwood, William. . 

Clark, Charles M 

Cline, John 

Collins, John 



Braidwood ... 
Ridge Prairie 

Cuba 

Springfield ... 

Canton 

Toluca 

Cuba 

Norris 

Gilchrist 

Yates City.... 
lies Junction. 

Pawnee 

Springfield... 



Pottstown ... 
Coal City — 

Galva 

Moweaqua... 
Pinckneyville 

Glenburn 

DuQuoin 

jLaSalle 

iBirkner 



Cook.W. D 

Cotton, George 

Cox. John 

Craig, Daniel 

Crawson, William 

Crinigan, Barney 

Crocker, Edward 

Cruickshanks, Wm. A — 
Cumming, Robert H. L . . . 

Daley, Thomas 

Dauck, John 

Davenport, Thomas 

Davis, George W 

Davis, Thomas 

Davis, William H 

Davison, J. G 

Dawson, John 

Dawson, Thomas 

Dawson, V. C 

DeBacher, Thomas 

DeHass.B. L 

Dietrich. Philip 

Dillon, John 

Doe,R. P 

Dodd, Samuel 



Westville 

Hallidayboro .. 

Ledford 

Danville 

O'Fallon 

LaSalle 

Marquette 

Middle Grove . 
Sparland 

Diamond 

LaSalle 

New Castle 

Hanna City,... 

Swanwick 

Streator 

St. John 

Streator 

Spring Valley. 

Elmwood 

Tallula 

Freeburg 

AuDurn 

Glen Carbon... 
Pottstown 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 183 

Certijicates of Service — ^Continued 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postofllice. 


Ebel Au^u-it 


Belleville 


McCalster, Thomas 

McDonald, William H 


Muddy Valley.... 


Edwards. George W 

Egerton.J. O 


Springfield 

Colchester 

Springfield 

Soperville 

Glen Carbon 

Rutland 

Staunton 

Kangley 

Peoria 

Orchard Mines... 
Williamsville.... 

Nilwood 

Virden 

Okawville 

Nashville 


Pana 

Pleasant Plains . 


McMillen,W. M 

McWerthy.G.A 

Marshall, Robert 




Essex, George M 

Evans. Albert 

Everett. Charles 


Smithboro 

Yates City 




Mathaws George. 


DuQuoin 


Fischer George 


Mattern, Daniel 


Spring Valley 










INIatthews. William G 


Bartonville 

Spring Valley.... 




Maxwell. Fred 


Peoria 


filnqfnrrl Oliver 


Melvin t M 


Tamaroa . 










Miller William 


Streator 






Oglesby 




Mumford.E. A 






Murray .James H 


Galva 




Springfield 

Streator 

LaSalle 

Belleville 


Neal, Ambrose 




Grierson Jonn '• 






Barclay 




Neil,JohnH 


Bunker Hill 




Millstadt 

Spaulding 








Nicholson. George A 


Cuba 

Galva 


Hackett Owen 


Ogden, David 










Nilwood 

O'Pallon 


Rentcbler 


Hanson William 


Ogden, Samuel 


Mascoutah 




Petersburg 

Tamaroa 


Olson Aug . 


Kangley 


Harris.. J. T 


Osborne, Benjamin 

Ottinger, William 


Streator , 


Hayes John 


Riverton 


Catliu 




Sandoval 

Springfield 

Streator 

Spring Valley.... 
Sparta 






Hickox. Lee 










Peet Charles 


Marseilles 


Ichman. Frank . 


Pendergast, James 

Phillips. William 


Soperville 

Hallidayboro 




Picton Joseph 


Farmington 


















Prichlird.H.C 

Prichett,T. M 

Quails, Nevel 


Lewistown 


JacoIis.John P 


Orchard Mines... 

Murphysboro 

Petersburg 

Gilchrist 










Dubois 


Jeffrey. William 


Quick. A. T 

Raber, Louis 


Sato 






Jones. George W 


Riverton 

Muncie 




Jones. T. A 


Casey ville 




Cuba 

Hallidayboro 

Toluca 

Belleville 

Edwardsville 

Carterville 

Peru ■.■.::::;: 

Galva 


Radford James W 


Cuba 




Radford, W. T 












Redyard.John 


Odin 










Reid,A. B., Jr 




Kennedy W J 


Rennard. James E 


Westville 










1 Rice.B. F 




Kirby,Thos.,Jr 


Richmond. Edward B 


Winchester 




Pinckneyville .... 




Belleville 

Fairbury 

Galva 

Hallidayboro 

Pottstown 

Wanlock 

Kewanee 

Rentcbler 


Riley. Michael 










Langran. James 


Rogers, George 

Rogers. Henry 

Rude, Edmond 


Sunfield 

Braidwood 


Larson, Charles L 


DeSoto 




Sallade, George A 

Sanson T. J 




Lewes, Jacob H 




Lewis, William 


Chatham 


Lippert. AdolpU 


Carterville 




Coal City 




Schmacher, Charles 

Schramm. Charles 




Lumdberg. Erie 


Gaivl!^::::::::::;: 


Belleville 



184 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Service — Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoface. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Spring Valley.... 

Dawson 

Fredonia 

Marquette 

Gardner 


Wallace, Harry G 


East Peoria 




Warner, Andrew M 

Waymire, James 






Assumption 


Sheppard W C 


Wertwood, Edward 

Wheatley, RoUey 


Birkner 




DuQuoin 




White. Henry 


Kiverton 


Sorrels, D. H 


Ashland 

Willsville 

Bartonville 

Belleville 

Worden 

Springfield 

Oglesby 

Pinckneyville.... 

Bartonville 

Tamaroa 

Girard 


Williams Husten 


Spaulding 


Williams, Stephen P- 

Williams, Watson 






Barclay 








StrAiiH William 


Wood, Daniel A 


Colfax 




Woolbright, D. A 


Centralia 






Birkner 


Tanner. Henry 

Taylor, Benjamin 

Taylor, Willard W 

Tefft, Ernst 

Telfer,John K 

Thome, Martin 


Wormack, Charles A 

1 


Glen Carbon 






Morris 

Martinville 





FIRE BOSSES, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



185 



FIRE BOSSES HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY 



Note. — This and the following list include all the fire bosses to whom cer- 
tificates were issued prior to January 1, 1900. The postoffiee addresses here 
given are those recorded at the time the certificates were issued and in many- 
cases are not the present addresses of the certificate holders. 



Name. 



Postoffiee. 



Name. 



Postoffiee. 



Andrew, Thomas 
Argyle. Joseph..., 



Barlow. Harry — 

Bell. William 

Bluetield, Charles 
Boweu, Gwilym — 
Bullough. .James.. 
Bundy, John 



Campbell, Jtimes 

Cappin. Aaron 

Castillo. Henry 

Chadderton. John 

Champley, James 

Clark, Joseph B 

Craine, J. E., Jr 

Cunningham, David. 



Oglesby ! James, Johann 

Coal City ; Jenkin.s, T. C 

Jenninsrs, William. 

Jeten, T. F 

Lake Creek Jones, Benjamin J. 

Streator ; Jones, Morgan 

Coal City I Johnson, David 

Herrins ' Johnston, Samuel.. 

Girard Jordon, Robert 

Streator 



Kloever. Matthew 



.Grape Creek.. 
. iMurphysboro. 

.jAthens 

. I Roanoke 

. Coifeen 

. Litchfield 

. Oglesby 

• I •■ 

. Streator 



Assumption .. 

Wenona 

Pana 

Lenz Station . 

Wenona 

Hornsby 

Murphysboro 
Carlinsville... 



Dam rath, Frederick iVirden 

Davis. William Streator 

Dodge, H. X East Peoria. 

Doouier, P. J Westville. ... 



Edmunds. Morgan. . . . 
English, Thomas 



Farrand, Walter 



Lawson, Thomas... 
Lettsom. William.. 
Lumaghi, Louis F. 
Lyons, 3Iark 



Lake Creek. 

Seneca 

Collinsville 
Lincoln 



Mt. Olive i 

Streator 



Barclay. 



Galbraith, Patrick Coal City 

Galvin, Martin Assumption.. 

Gloss. Michael [Gardner 

Goehe, William Staunton 

Grabsuck, Emile ; " 

Graham, L. A Bloomington.. 

Gray, Henry Athens 

Green. J. W Springfield... 



McCranor, James... 
McCrindle, David . . . 
McDonald, William. 

McDill. James 

McEwen, Charles.. . 
McKillop. Donald... 

Maggo, Jacob 

Massie, J. G 

Middleton, J. L 

Miller, Alexander... 

Miller. G. W 

Morgan, E. T 

Morgan, Joseph 

Morris, John H 

Moss, Thomas 

Muentrich, J 

Muir, Andrew 

Murphy, John 



Girard 

Oglesby 

Braidwood... 
Assumption , 
Carbon Hill . 



Danville 

Belleville 

Salem. 

Ridge Prairie 

Pawnee 

Georgetown... 

Streator 

Wenona 

Staunton 



Nichols. Eli W. 
Nixou, Robert.. 
Nordner, C. K.. 



Springfield . 
Braidwood. . 



Dunfermline. 

Streator 

Athens 



Haddow, Thomas I Pana Olroyd. Peter W — 

Hardman, J. J 'Auburn j| Opp, Sherman W .. 

Harrison, James i Atiieus ;: 

Harrison, John ;Odin ji 

Haun, George Litchfield ii Payne, Emanuel. .. 

Henley, J. H Odin Peart. John 

Holden, Andrew Coal City !i Phillips, Ben.iamin 

Hopkins, Reese Litchfield 1 Pick, Edward 

Howells. George Staunton i Prince, Thomas — 

Hoye, William Braidwood U Prudent. Edward.. 



Westville. 
Sandoval . 



Litchfield.... 
Braidwood .. 

Kangley 

Central City. 
Mt. Olive.... 
Centralia. ... 



186 STATISTICS or LABOR. 

Fire Bosses — Cerf if cafes of Compctencij — Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Quinn, Bernard 

Raab, Rudolph 

Rae, Robert 


Bloomington 

[Carlinville 

jCarbon Hill 


Smith, James 

Spires, Alfred 

Steel, Daniel 


Streator 

Braceville 

Collinsville 


Stearus, James 

Stonburner, L. L 


Hallidayboro 


Reinnison Ht^nrv.. 


St Johns 




Reynolds, John 

Rhodes D R 


Streator 




Pana 


Coal City 










Ritson, Hugh 

Ryder. James H 


iFarmington 

: Pontine 

1 Lincoln i 






Schmid. Conrad 






Siddall.JohnW 

Siddell. James 

Smith, George A 

Smith, Henry 


1 Streator j 

: Streator 

jSandoval ! 

ISmithboro 


Whitecamper, Louis 

Williams. William E 


Lincoln 

Streator 


Winterbottom, John 


Sparta 



FIRE BOSSES HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Postoffice. 



Arnold, Stephen. 



Kangley . 



Bagshaw, George W. 
Blakeman, George... 

Borg. Prank 

Boulton , Henry 

Bough, William 

Brooks, Peter 



Virden 

Streator 

Alt. Olive . . . 
Coal City... 

Dawson 

Taylorville. 



Brown, John Streator. 



Caveny, Edward. 



Franzen, Mat Girard . 



Gray, William Streator 

Griffin. John i Niantic . 



Hall, John Herbert JMinonk.. 

Hoesfleld, Aaron jOglesby 

Hornanor, Paul Lincoln, 



Hughes, John. 
Humphreys, Wi 



Decatur ... 

Clark City. 



Jenkins, Rutland ;LaSalle.. 

I 

Kneper, David jGirard .. 

Kopps, August " .. 



Kortkamp. Carl... 
Kortkamp, Lewis. 



Lewis. Edward.. 
McDonald, M. E 



Ladd.... 
LaSalle . 



Moffet, Edward A Bartonville. 

Montgomery, John H Gardner 

Mooney, Arthur Kangley 



Girard . 



Schmidt, Ernest [Mt. Olive 

Schultz, John Diamond 

Shaw, Francis M Hallidayboro. 

Shopman, John 'Mt. Olive 

Siebenhawer, Wm LaSalle 

Solufskie. Hermann jDecatur 

Stewart, Samuel Coal City 



Taylor. Samuel. 
Thomas, David. 



O'Fallon. 
Canton... 



Wilson, Archie ■ Clark City. 

Wilson. John Gardner ... 

Wood, Henry Streator ... 



COAL IN ILLINOI!- 



187 



MINE EXAMINERS. 

Note.— The revised miuiug law of 1899 changed the title or name "Fire 
Boss" to that of of "Mine Examiner," and provided that those holding cer- 
tificates as Fire Boss could exchange the same for that of Mine Examiner. 
The names which are followed by the abbreviation "ex" have made such 
exchange. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Kangley 

Oglesby 

Gillespie. 


Kloever. Matthew, ex 


Pana 








Kramer, Frederick 

Lawson. Thomas, ex 


Centralia 


Baker Sharrd 






Lake Creek 


Lake Creek 




Barclay 


Blakemore. George 

Blenkinsopp, Thomas Jr.. 
Blue. J. W 


Streator 

Cable 

Grape Creek 

Springfield 

Mt Olive 




Westville 










Millet Thomas 


Troy 


Brennan, Patrick 


Toluca 


Monghan, T. P 

Morgan, E. T., ex 


Springfield 




Streator 


Georgetown 


Brooks Peter 


Taylorville. 

Odin 


Muentrick, John, ex 


Staunton 












Carr J W 


McLaughlin, John P 

Noll. Charles 


Auburn 


Case, William 


Diamond 




Casey, J ohn 


Williamsville 

Witt 

DuQuoin 




Cawley, William 


Olroyd. Peter W., ex 

Opp, Sherman W. ex 

Owens Evan 








Connolly, Terrance J 

Cook, Elijah 


Assumption 

Wanlock 


Springfield 

Canton 


Cook Thomas 


Belleville 

Fana 

Springfield 

Nilwood 

Streator 


Auburn 


Costello, Henry, ex 


Payne, Emanuel, ex 

Phillips. Benjamin, ex — 
Potter, Edward 

Rankin, Thos. A., ex 

Ready, Thos 


Westville 


Dacy William 


Sandoval 




Belleville 


Davis, Thomas 




Dowell, W. C 


Litchfield 




Mt Olive 


Springfield 










Reynolds, John, ex 

Roberts Evan 






Marrissa 

Petersburg 

Troy 

Westville 


Danville 






Mt. Pula&ki 


Farmer, James 






Felton, Harry 






Scott, Wm. J 


Springfield 






Gilchrist 








Gray, Henry, ex 


Siddall, Edward 


Streator 


Gray, William 

Gregor. Charles 

Griffiths, Evan 


Streator 

Springfield.. 

St. David 

Belleville 

Streator 

Virden 


Siddall, John W., ex 


Streator 


Smith, William 


Belleville 


Groom, Isaac 


Spires, Alfred 


Braceville 








Hart, Chas. J....... 


Stoneburner, L. L., ex 


Moweaqua 


Hayden,G. S 


Weuoua 

Litchfield 

Staunton 

Coffeen 

Peru 


Coal City . . . • 


Thorunt, Joseph, sr 

Tompkins. Frank 

Ward John G 




Howells, George, ex 

Jones, Ben. J. ex 




Streator 










Wilson, Henry, ex 


Pana 











188 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



Statement of tlie Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines of the 
Inspection of Mines, tlie Amount of Fees Charged and Paid, 
for the year ended June 1, 1899. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



a 


<u 










sh" 


0^ 


ss 


■il 






a a 


a " 


•z 




97 


S8 00 


152 


10 00 


14h 


8 00 


145 


8 00 


h 


6 00 


26 


6 00 


H7 


6 00 


555 


10 00 


570 


10 00 


5«(l 


10 00 


5«X 


10 00 


9 


6 00 


9 


6 00 


12 


6 00 


s 


6 00 


8 


6 00 


7 


6 00 


IfiO 


10 00 


1H2 


10 00 


175 


10 00 


IKO 


10 00 


20 


6 00 


;^5 


6 00 


20 


6 00 


9 


6 00 


13 


6 00 


18 


6 00 


15 


6 00 


15 


6 00 


465 


10 00 


.515 


10 00 


h' A 


10 00 


423 


. 10 00 


530 


10 00 


K A 


10 00 


450 


10 00 


KA 


10 00 


,516 


10 00 


29 


6 00 


440 


10 00 


7 


6 00 


7 


6 00 


8 


6 00 


8 


6 00 


7 


6 00 


8 


6 OC 


12 


6 OC 


15 


6 00 



July 7. 
Oct. 7, 
Jan. 4, 
April 6. 
Aug. 3. 
Oct. 31, 
Feb. 1, 
Sept. 22, 
Dec. 14, 
Mar. 13, 
June 21, 
July 28, 
Oct. 22, 
Feb. 2, 
May I, 
Feb. 2. 
May 23, 
July 12, 
Oct. 26, 
Jan. 13, 
April 27, 
July 18, 
Oct. 24, 
Jan. 10, 
April 24, 
Aug. 8, 
Nov. 1, 
Feb. 7. 
May 5, 
Aug. 12, 
Oct. 4. 
Oct. 28, 
Nov. 10. 
Jan. 6, 
Jan. 26. 
Feb. 8, 
Mar. 9, 
April 10, 
April 21, 
May 22, 
Aug. 8, 
Oct. 11. 
Jan. 9, 
April 19. 
Dec. 19, 
Nov. 26, 
Feb. 13. 
June 2, 



Acme^Coal Co 

Barrackman, A. M. 



1898 
1899 
1898|Braceville Coal Co. 



1898 Burrell& Reese. 
18981 Burrell, Wm 



1899;Buchannan, Ed. 
Bargreen Bros.. 
Cahill, James... 



Cooperative Coal Co. 



Cooperative Coal Co. 



Chicago, 



Will. & V. Coal Co. No. 2. 
No. 2. 
No. 1. 
No. 1. 
No. 2. 
No. 1. 
No. 1. 
N 0. 1 . 
No. 2. 



No. 1. 
Diamond Cooperative Coal Co 



Darm, C. G 

, J. C. & Co. 



Braceville 




Braidwood. 



Fairbury. 



Heenanville , 
Streator 



Pontiac . 



Streator 

Deer Park. 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 

First Disti'icf, Siatemeni — Continued. 



189 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Finn, Coraoany or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


S 

a . 


% 


1 

§ 

Si 


Oct. 21.1898 




Streator 


12 
11 

I 

8 
12 
15 
13 
18 

"e 

14 

8 
19 
190 

2T5 
52 
250 
29 
155 
8 
9 
11 
7 
164 
170 
175 
176 
60 
68 
78 
60 
7 
9 
9 
7 
6 
13 
8 
7 
6 
6 
6 
8 
11 
10 

190 
115 
257 
271 
258 
245 
170 
280 
FA 
244 
314 
276 
275 
225 
270 
155 
250 
6 
6 

44 
100 

90 


S6 00 
6 00 




Jan. 14, 18!>9 






July 25 1898 


Edwards Thoniai 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 












Feb. 1,1899 


• • 






Aug. 15 1898 


E^pley J T 


^Forris 




Nov. 28,1S9S 








Feb. 20, 1899 






May 24,1899 
July 25.1898 
Oct. 31,1898 
Feb. 1.1899 
June 22,1899 
May 24, 1899 
























8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 
6 00 

10 00 










Fleming, Thos. & Co. 


Morris 










Aug. 1, 1898 




Clarke City 

Gardner 

Clarke City 

Gardner 




Oct. 3,1898 


• . . • 




Nov. 15,1898 






Jan. 30,1899 


. . . . 


800 
10 00 




Mar. 20, 1899 


" 


Clarke City 


.. 


April 21, 1899 




6 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 

8oe 

8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




May 31,1899 




Clarke City 

Morris 




Aug. 15,1898 


Gilbride Frank 




Nov. 28.1898 








Feb. 20, 1899 


• • 


• • 




May 24. 1899 


• • 


• • 




July 11.1898 


Hakes, E 


Rutland 




Oct. 14, 1898 






Jan. 12, 1899 








April 17, 1899 




• ' 




July 15. 1898 


Howe, Wm. Coal Co. 


Streator 




Oct. 6, 1898 








Jan. 3, 1899 




' • 




April 5,1899 


' ' 






Nov. 29,1898 








Feb. 20,1899 








May 25,1899 


• • 






Nov. 29.1898 


HowcM.C 






Feb. 21. 1899 








Aug. 3, 1898 






6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 




July 25.1898 








Oct. 31, 1898 


Kimes. K. S 






Feb. 1,1899 








Feb. 20, 1899 








May 24,1899 








Aug. 15,1898 


Laherty, William 






Nov. 28,1898 
Feb. 20. 1899 

July 20,1898 


Laherty, William & Bro 






Laherty, William. 






LaSalle Co. Carbon Coal Co. LaSalle— 


LaSalle 




July 21. 1898 


Rockwell mine . 






Aug. 24.1898 








Aug. 25.1898 


LaSalle Co. Carbon Coal Co.. No. 1.. 
LaSalle 


• ' 




Nov. 18 1898 


LaSalle 




Nov. 11,1898 




10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 




Nov. 14,1898 


Rockwell 




Dec. 20, 1898 


LaSalle 






Jan. 25.1899 


No. 1 




Feb. 10. 1899 


Rockwell 






Feb, 14.1899 


Union 




Feb. 27, 1899 


LaSalle 




Mar. 16,1899 


No. 1 






May 2, 1899 


Union .... . . ... 






May 8, 1899 


LaSalle 






May 16. 1899 


Rockwell 






June 1,1899 


No. 1 






Oct. 29, 1898 


Love & Sons 


Wilsman 




Feb. 6. 1899 








July 18, 1898 


Maltby. William 


Braid wood 


Oct. 24, 1898 






Jan. 10. 1899 







190 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

First District, Statement. — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection 



Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operatinff Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

It 


1 


Maltby William 


Braidwood 

LaSalle 


54 

70 

70 

70 

70 

23 

28 

34 

14 

6 

6 

6 

6 

236 

231 

240 

234 

41 

98 

80 

125 

130 

7 

11 

15 

10 

10 

8 

8 

17 

11 

28 

25 

21 

91 

242 

274 

415 

PA 

81 

196 

415 

250 

100 

FA 

210 

254 

415 

110 

105 

170 

235 

415 

150 

21 

22 

21 

21 

6 

7 

8 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

8 
6 
7 
6 


$8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 


M & H Zinc Co 






• ' 






Marseilles 

Braidwood !!!!!.! 
Streator 




. . > > 




Nelson & Westerland 








t . 


• > 


' ' 




Oglesby 






> • 


' ' 






Otter Creels Coal Co 


Streator 


Pnntinp Pnnl Co 






• • 


' ' 


• • 


1 . 


» ' 






Pouk A W & Co 














' ' 








• • 














> > 




• • 


Star Coal Co No 1 


Streator 


' ' No 2 


Kangley 


No. 3 


Carbon Hill 

Spring Hill.; !!!!.■ 
Kangley 


No 2. 


No. 2 


No. 1 


No 2! ::::.:::::.. 


No. 2 


Carbon Hill 

Spring Hill.:::::: 

Carbon Hill 


. " No. 3 


No 1 


No.2 


No.2 

No. 3 


Carbon Hill 

Kangley 


No.2 


No. 1 


No 3: ; 


No.2 




No. 3 


Carbon Hill 


No2 :::::: 


No. 1 


Streator Clay Mf g Co 




1 . . . 




.4 . > 




Schultz Fred . 


Braceville 






Tasdall Bros . . 


Nettle Creek 




Telfer, A. W.. & Son 


















Thorne D W . . . 




Tisler G H 


Ottawa 


Treasure, William 


Essex 



April 24,1899 
Julv 13,1898 
Oct. 27, 1808 
Jan. 23,1899 
May 4, 1899 
Oct. 12, 1898 
Jan. 17,1899 
April 25.1899 
April 24, 1899 
July 28,1898 
Oct. 22, 1898 
Feb. 2. 1899 
June 15,1899 
Aus:. 10,1898 
Nov. 21,1898 
Feb. 23,1899 
April 15,1899 
July 6,1898 
July 8, 1898 
Oct. 11,1898 
Jan. 9,1899 
April 19,1899 
Oct. 21,1898 
Dec. 17,1898 
Feb. 4, 1899 
Feb. 2, 1899 
AprilI26, 1899 
Oct 12, 1898 
Jan. 14,1899 
Jan. 16,1899 
Aug. 26,1898 
Nov. 23,1898 
May 17, 1899 
June 16,1899 
July 22,1898 
Aug. 4,1898 
.*>fi'r. 19.1899 
Sept, 20,1898 
Sept. 27,1898 
Oct. 10, 1898 
Oct. 13,1898 
2, 1898 
10, 1898 
„.,„. 7.1899 
Jan. 18,1899 
Jan. 24,1899 
Feb. 16,1899 
Feb. 18,1899 
Mar. 10,1899 
April 7,1899 
April 28, 1899 
May 9,1899 
May 10, 1899 
May 19,1899 
July 16,1898 
Oct. 8, 1898 
Mar. 25.1899 
Jan. 9,1899 
Oct. 3. 1898 
Jan. 29. 1899 
April 26, 1899 
Aug. 15,1898 
Feb. 21.1899 
Aug. 16,1898 
Nov. 29,1898 
Feb. 21,1899 
May 24,1899 
May 1, 1899 
Oct. 22, 1898 
Dec. 28,1898 
Nov. 16,1898 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 

First District, Statement.— Concluded. 



191 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm, Person or Company 
Operating: ^line. 



Location of Mine. 



Aug:. 
Kov. 
Feb. 
May 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
May 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Alay 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
April 
Kov. 
Feb. 
May 
Feb. 



8. 1898; Walton Bros iFairbury 33 

36 

7,1899 " ; " I 42: 

5,1899 " '■ ! 34! 

23.1898 Wilminirton Bis Four Coal Co Coal City 428 

12.1898 '■ •• •• 450; 

9, 1899 " ' • • • ooOl 

26.1899 " " " 550; 

21,1898 Wilmington M. A: Mfg Co Diamond 1 46i| 

5, 1898 • ■ • ' I ■ ■ I 600| 



17, 



:8,1898:William ^Vood . 

20, 1899, 

24,1899 

2,1899 Wanders, J. H. 



Total SI 



.Mot-ris . 

Streator 



1898' Wilmington Star Coal Co iCoal City 1 115 

3,1898 ■■ ■' i ■■ I 120 

19,1899 " •• I " I 150 

20.1889 '• " : •• 155 



$6 00 1 
6 00 
6 001 
6 OOj 
10 00 
10 00: 

10 oo' 

10 oo; 

10 001 
10 00! 
10 00; 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



Aug. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

May 

Kov. 

Jan. 

INIay 

Feb. 

Jan. 

IMay 

Feb. 

June 

Aug. 

July 

Mar. 

June 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

June 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

Kov. 

Feb. 

May 

Kov. 

Feb. 

Kov. 

Kov. 

Jan. 

April 

July 

Kov. 

Mar. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Feb. 



24,1898jAldenCoalCo. 



Wanlock i 140 

1898 •• • •• 135 

1899 " " I 140 

1898 Armentrout. M ' Duncan ! 8 

1899 Atkinson, Mathew Kewanee I 7 

1898 Bates Bros < " I 9! 

1899 " i " 7i 

1898 Beharelle & Co. A (Orchard Mines... 6; 



Mapleton . . . 
Bartonville. 



Collier Coal Co iBartonville. 

Collier Coop. Coal Co ; 



Cusack, M [Edwards ... 

Cutler. F. H Princeville 

Devlin Coal Co Toluca 



1899, Ball Coal Co 

1899! Bartonville Coal Co 

18991 • ■ 

1899 Brandt. Wm Mineral 101 

1899 Black Diamond Coal Coal Co Coal Valley 6 

1898iCanip Creek Coal Co Cable 

18<9Coal Valley M. Co. Ko. 2 iSherrard ... 

18991 •• Ko. 2 

1899 '• No. 2 

1898 •' No. 1 ICable 

18981 " Ko. 1 I " 

1899| •■ No. 1 " 

1899| " No. 1 i " 

1898|Chi.,W. ^- V. Coal Co jSeatonville . 



Empire Coal Co Gilchrist 125 

'• 120 

I " 100 

Elmwood Coal Co ;Elmwood 125 

" 115 

I " 1145 



S8 00 
8 00 


S50 00 


8 00 
6 00 




6 00 




6 00 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 




12 00 


























8 00 




8 00 




10 00 




10 00 




10 00 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
800 
8 00 
8 00 


18 00 
















32 00 











192 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Second District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Opeaating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


p 

If 


11 

Co 


1 

ll 
a p. 


Feb. 24, 1899 


Eimwood Coal Co 


Eimwood 


$145 
110 
10 
18 
30 

8 
12 
30 
36 
35 
16 
18 

6 
30 
12 
12 
60 
26 
45 
10 
11 
10 
12 
20 
20 

6 

6 

10 
14 
30 

16 
8 
16 
12 
9 
260 
40 
315 
250 
60 
40 
260 
275 
275 
275 
270 
8 
20 
14 
10 
120 
55 
45 
55 
140 
135 
45 
55 
135 
40 
115 
35 

1 

45 
75 
60 
45 
30 


$8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
600 
6 00 
600 
600 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
600 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 0^ 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 




May 22 1899 






Oct. 15. 1898 


Fleming, J. J 






Feb. 18, 1898 






Dec. 9 1898 


Foley, W.E 


Mapleton 




May 4, 1899 






Jan. 3,1899 
Sept. 17,1898 
Nov. 17,1898 


Fairlie, James 

Grant, Peter. Jr 


Cambridge 

Peoria 


12 OO 






Mar. 10, 1899 




• ' 




Nov 15 1898 




Orchard Mines... 
Muscatine. la....! 










Aug. 18 1898 


Hayes Coal Co . . 




Nov. 7, 1898 


Henry. Philip 




May 1, 1899 






Sept. 6, 1898 


Herdien Coal Co. No. 12 

No. 14 

No. 12 

No. 14 

No. 12 

Higbee, James 

Higbee & Robinson 


Galva . 




Dec 24 1S98 


Kewanee 




Feb. 15,1899 






Mar. 27 1899 






June 5,1899 






Oct. 31,1898 






Jan. 19 1899 








Howarth & Taylor 












May 29 l'-99 








April 20,1899 








April 20. 1899 
Sept. 8 1898 








Kramm,C. B 


Edwards 










Feb. 24, 1899 


• > 


• • 




May 10,1899 




• • 






Kirby. Bernard 






May 1, 1899 






Jan. 7,1899 




Barton ville 

Cable 




Dec. 22, 1898 






Jan. 23, 1899 


Lyle W H 


Kewanee 


600 


Sept. 22.1.898 
Oct. 5, 1898 














Dec. 13. 1898 




Marquette 




Mar. 21.1899 






Jan. 20.1899 






April 7, 1899 








Sept. 20,1898 


Minonk C. & T. Co 














Nov. 20, 1898 




• ' 




Mar. 24.1899 








April 25,1899 




• ' 




Dec. 24, 1898 


McKane & Reed 


Galva 




Feb. 7. 1899 


Murray, J. H 




12 00 










Sept. 6, 1898 


McFall & Tucker 


Mineral 




Sept. 9. 1698 








Sept. 15.1898 








Sept. 16,1898 


• • 


• • 




Nov. 17.1898 








Dec. 20, 1898 


• ' 






Jan. 9,1899 


' • 


• ► 




Jan. 18.1899 


• • 






Feb. 3. 1899 


• ' 






Feb. 10, 1899 




' ' 




Feb. 28 1898 








April 15,1899 


• 4 






April 17,1899 


• • 






May 13 1899 


















Pryce.J. J 

Reid City C <fc M Co 


Coal Valley 

Wolcott 




Sept. 10,1898 




Dec 9. 1898 








Mar. 16,1899 


• • 






Mav 4,1899 








Sept. 16,1898 


Royster & Zeigler 


Peoria 





STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



193 



Second District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, fonipany or Person 
Operatintr Mine. 


Lotation of Mine. 


S3 
<U 

It 

r3 - 

2; 


1 

0^ 


1 

o 

If 


Dee, 2.189>s 


Royster & Zeigler 




30 
30 
12 
14 
12 
175 
200 
8 
11 
7 
250 
480 
450 
425 
580 
550 
600 
500 
550 
7 
12 
90 
65 
25 
40 
80 
14 
60 
25 
25 

20 

3(1 
70 
70 

51 

9 
7 
160 
200 
130 
350 
375 

"1 

45 
45 
45 
12 


$6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 

t; 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
C 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 OOi 
6 00 
6 00 










Nov I IS'js 


Reents, Geibokl 


Kramm . 


$6 66 








Jlav L".t IMI'J 


• . 1 ' ' 




Dec lij I's'JS 


Roanoke M Co 


Roanoke 


30 OO 


















.Sept 30 1S9S 


Schmidt Si Sons 


Peoria 




May 5.189.4 








July 14, isys 


Spring Valley < oal Co 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 3 

[' So. 2.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


Spring: Valley 

Orchard Mines... 
Bart9nville 




Oct. ll.lS'.t'S 








Oct. 12, 1S9S 




Jan 11 lb9;i 










Nov. 23 ]ii{tS 


No. 1 




Feb 22 189'.> 












Jan 17 lS9:i 


Sliefiler, R. D 
























May 9.1899 


" No 1 


' • 










May 23 1899 


'• No. 3 


• ' 




April 19,1899 


Silvis & Silvis 


Carbon Cliff 

Sheffield 




Sheffield M. Co 




June 9 1899 








16 1899 


Stoddard & Suraraerson 


Coal Valley 

Peoria 










\pri1 2' 1899 


Vicarv Bros .. . .... 




Dec ''7 1S98I 












Pottstown 

Bartonville !!!.'!!! 




Nov ■' 1S9S 






Jan 31 1S99 












July ;jO 1S!)S 


WoHaud Bros. . .. 










Oct. 4 1S9S 






Pel. 1 IS! til 












' • 








Ladd 




Jan 14 1S9:» 








May IH. is:i!» 


• • 






Williamson. /. 


Sheffield 




Nov 3 IS'.IS U'nl«<-hlMP-'« (;,ion C. On 






i^Iar. 17. 1S9!I 
June 3. isict 
Jan 23 1899 


• • 






• • 






Wnslpv Hpnrv 


Kewanee 










1 


Totals 


•-i 


SI, 180 00 


S178 00 



THIRD DISTRICT. 



.(uly 
Nov. 
.lany. 
.A.pril 



0( 



Dec. 
Mar. 
All?. 
Oct. 
J any, 



1898 Astoria C. & M. Co iAstoria 

189Sl •• " j 

lS99j " " 1 

1899' 
189S' 
189S' 
1899' 
1898 ! 
1898; 



.\lds:ren, E 

Anderson, N. A.. 



..|E. Galesburg. 
. .iWataga 



Bath, Isaac I Lewistown 

Back & Co.. Thos INorris 



S8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 

6 oc: 
6 oo; 

6 001 
6 00| 
6 00, 



-IH C. R. 



194 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Third Disirid, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

a . 
II 

-5 


1 

u 

a ^ 


1 


July 7, 1898 


Canton Coal Co 


Canton 


19 
19 
35 
32 

18 
30 
53 

^5^ 
25 
22 
16 
60 
60 
50 
.15 
12 
9 
10 

1 
g 

20 
30 
14 
10 
70 
5S 
52 
80 
17 
28 
37 
30 

9 
25 
32 

8 
25 

9 
11 

7 
30 
30 
38 
30 

7 

8 
25 
24 
25 

9 
23 
20 
24 
38 
57 

7 

8 
10 

9 

10 
9 
9 

10 

8 
23 


S6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 60 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Oct. 10, 1898 








Jan. 11.1899 




• ' 




Apr. 19,1899 


. . . . 






July 7,1898 








Oct. 4,1898 








Jan. 9 1899 


1 . . . . . 






Apr. 7. 1899 








Sept. 21,1898 


Cline & Shaw ... . . . . . 


Fiatt . 




Dec. 12,1898 








Feb. 24.1899 








May 9, 1899 




Galesburg 

Colchester 

Oneida.....'!!!!!!! 




July 7,1898 


Colchester C & M Co 




Oct. 18, 1898 






Jan. ■ 18, 1899 






Apr. 12,1899 






Dec. 16, 1898 






7.1898 


Cook & Gilmore 


Alexis 




Mar. 14.1899 








Dec. 2, 1898 




Galesburg 




Feb. 21,1899 






Nov. -29,1898 


Dudley, Z. F 




July 14,1898 




Colchester 

Soperville 

Farminston 




Apr. 11,1898 


Egerton Bros. 




Aug:. 8, 1898 






Dec. 2. 1898 






Feb. 22,1899 


. . 




May 15.1899 




6 00 




July 11,1898 


Farmington Coal Co 


8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Oct.. 11.1898 






Jan. 31, 1899 






May 11, 1899 


. . . . 




July 11,1898 


Findley Coal & Coke Co 




Oct. 11,1898 






Jan. 24,1»99 






May a, 1899 






•• 31,1899 


Howat Bros 

Jarvis, T. H 




July 22,1898 


Astoria . 




Feb. 6.1899 


Jarvis Coal Co 






Apr. 17,1899 








Dec. 14,1898 


Jacobson & Son., J 

Kerr W. M 


Wataga 




Aug. 16,1898 


Rushville 




Mov. 14.1898 









Feb. 7, 1899 


• ' • • 






May 19, 1899 








Aug. 12.18y8 


Laws, J. M 


Cuba 




Nov. 16,1898 







Feb. 23,1899 








Apr. 24,1899 








Aug. 30,189S 


Lowery & Kinnoman 


Lewistowu 




Nov. 4, 189e 




July 27,1898 


Meehan, P. H 




Oct. 31,1898 






6 00 




Feb. 16, 1893 


1 . . . 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 




July 15,189i: 








Oct. 19,189f; 








Jan. 19, 1899 


. . . . 


• ' 




Apr. 12.189E 








Nov. 25,1898 




Farmington 

Monmouth 

Alexis ! 




Jan. 23, 1899 






Dec. 6, 1895 






Mar. 13,189£ 




6 00 




Dec. 8, 1898 


McCartney. C._F 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Mar. 15,189£ 






June 22,1899 


11 . . 


• • 




Dec. 15, 1898 


McGovern, Jas 


Oneida 




Sept. 23,1898 


Nappin, David 


Farmington 




Nov. 25,1898 






Mar. 8, 1899 






May 2, 1899 


' • ' ' 




Apr. 28,1899 


NorrisCoalCo 





STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 

Third District, Statement — Concluded. 



195 



Date of 

Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine 


5 

u 

z; 


Inspection fee 
charged. 


i 


-Tune 


14, 1899 
2,1898 
9. 1899 
16. 1898 
13, 1898 

18. 1898 

17. 1899 
11. 1899 

1.1898 


Newsam Bros 

ParppH Thos: 


Farmington 

Canton 


i 60 
1 9 
12 
9 
20 
55 
70 
70 
15 
14 

J « 

' 52 

G5 

82 

1 70 

i 7 

i 8 

1 t> 

' 6 

25 

33 

35 

24 

8 
14 
14 
10 

11 
200 
240 
245 
220 

75 
100 
131 
140 
6 

16 

14 
8 


SS 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 

5 00 
8 00 
8 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 






T ■ 








Ross ct Woodward 

Kundle & Rippletoe 


Soperville 

Colchester 

Soperville 




.July 
Oct 












f^r- 


. . • > 




Reed & Peudergast 








May 


16. 1899 
30. 1898 
25. 1898 
30. 1898 
26. 1898 




Middle Grove'.!! 
Alexis ...!!! 




Sunday Creek C. Co 













f^j.- 




Simcox, John 




Mar. 


14. 1899 
22, 1899 
9. 1898 

19. 1898 
17,1898 

15. 1899 
22. 1899 














Aug. 
Aug. 


Taylor. James 

Taylor & Peck 






Cuba 








•* No. 1 

" No 1 






May 












May 
Dec 


24, 1899 

15. 1898 

21. 1899 

7. 1898 
2.1899 

8. 1899 
6, 1898 
6, 1898 

l:S 

18,1898 

3. 1898 

4. 1899 
6. 1899 
2. 1898 
1. 1898 


•' No. 2 


•• 








M-.r 










Turner Bros 


Lewistou 




Feb. 




Apr 








July 


Whitebreast Fuel_ Co 


Dunfermline — 
St David 












Apr. 






















#^^- 


1 • > . 




Wages Bros it Murphy 


Canton 

Soperville 

Galesburg 




Dec. 






Feb. 


22, 1899 
16. 1899 






Mnv 








Total .... 








S804 00 














FOURTH DISTRICT. 



Nov. 


12. 189S 


Mar, 


1. 1899 


Mav 


5, 1899 


Aug. 


23. 1898 


Dec. 


1.1898 


June 


6. 1899 


Dec. 


23, 1898 


Mar. 


21,1899 


Apr. 


4, 1899 


Ore. 


22, 1898 


Mar. 


23, 1899 


June 


7. 1899 


Oct. 


13. 1898 


( )ct. 


15. 1898 


Nov. 


23.1898 


J, in. 


31, 1899 


Feb. 


22, 1899 


Apr. 


22, 1899 


Mav 


15, 1899 


June 


20, 1899 



Athens 



AthensC'oal Co 

Bonnett, A. H.. !!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!! 
Blake. A.C.... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Bohlander Bros j Pekin 

Brookside Coal Co ; Grape Creek. 



Snider 

Pilot 

Blount.... 
E. Peoria , 



No. 1. 
No. 2. 



SIO 00 
10 001 
10 00' 
6 OOi 
6 OO! 
6 00 
8 00| 
6 00 

6 oo! 
6 oo; 

6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00. 



196 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fourth District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 






1 


Nov. 14,1898 




Grape Creek 

E. Peoria.. .. .. 


14 

9 
8 
14 
9 
82 
84 
108 
72 
8 
10 
130 
150 
170 
161 
190 
130 
66 
75 
94 
110 
80 

IS 

68 
72 
135 
156 
90 
110 
10 
10 
11 
40 
43 
40 
23 
185 
35 
125 
125 
14 
30 
70 
81 
35 
20 
48 
225 
118 
225 
230 
250 
190 
131 
225 
45 
40 
11 
40 
12 
252 
330 
310 
300 
320 
320 
272 
280 
8 


S 6 00 
6 00 




Mar. 4, 1899 






Mar. 20 1899 


Bacon Bros 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 

10 eo 

10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 


.. 


Mar. 22.1899 






....!!!!! 


Apr. 28,1899 








July 7,1898 


Consolidated Coal Co 


Fairmount 




Nov. 21,1898 






Mar. 16.1899 


• ' 




May 23. 1899 






Sept. 12,1898 






Mar. 20,1899 




E. Peoria 




Oct. 10, 1898 


Catlin Coal Co 


Catlin 




Mar. 6,1899 








Apr. 13,1899 


' ' 


' • 




Apr. 17, 1899 








Dec. 10. 1898 


Chicago & K. C. Coal Co 


Petersburg 




Feb. 8. 1899 






June 8, 1899 






Mar. 24,1899 






Nov. 30,1898 








Dec. 14, 1898 









May 11,1899 


' • 


• • 




Feb. 15, 1899 


Colfax C. & M Co 


Colfax 




June 16,1899 






Sept. 9, 1898 




Niantic 


$30 OC 


Sept. 22,1898 








Feb. 9. 1899 








Feb. 14, 1899 








May 2. 1899 


No 1 






May 3,1899 


No. 2 




Dec. 8, 1898 


Denton, Wm 


Petersburg 

Petersburg 

East Peoria 

Glenburn ... 




Feb. 7, 1899 


Denton, Wm 




Dec. 16, 1898 






Dec. 1.5,1898 


East Peoria Coal Co 




Feb. 20, 1899 






Mar. 20,1899 






May 12. 1899 


' ' 




Dec. 6, 1898 


Ellsworth J W 


10 00 
6 00 


30 OC 


Oct. 22. 1898 




Danville 


Feb. 2, 1899 






10 00 
10 00 

6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 




April 26, 1899 








Feb. 15, 1899 




Colfax 




June 16,1899 


East Colfax Coal Co 






Sept. 8, 1S9S 


Ureenview Coal ('o 


Greenviewl 

Pekin .......'. 




May 10. 1S99 






Dee. 22, 1898 


Grant & Sons, L 




Mar. 23,1899 
























Nov. 11, 1898 




\Ve.«tville 




Dec. 2. 1898 




East Peoria.!!.!!'. 
Chenoa 




Dec. 5,1898 


• • 




Mar. 7. 1899 


No.l 

No. 2 




Mar. 15,1899 




May 1,1899 






May 20, 1899 


;' No 1 




Mar. 21,1898 






May 31,1899 






Feb. 13. 1899 


Hewitt C. H 




Nov. 15,18'J8 


111. Coal & M. Co 


Blo,mington 


6 Ofl 


Nov. 2S, 189S 


Jenkins. D. A 

Kelly ville Coal Co 




Oct. 5, 1898 


Westville 




Nov. 10, 1898 




Pekin !!!!!!!! 




Nov. 12,1898 






Mar. 8. 1899 


No. 3 




Mar. 14. 1899 


No 2 




April 24 1899 






May 24, 1899 








No. 2 




April 28. 1899 


King & Grossweiler 





STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



197 



Fourfh District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 




Nov. 


16. 1898 


Dec. 


14, 1898 


Mar. 


24, 1899 


June 


29, 1899 


Dec. 


23. 1898 


Oct. 


21,1998 


Jnlv 


18, 1898 


July 


27, 1898 


Oct. 


3, 1898 


( )ct. 


11, 1898 


Mar. 


18. 1899 


April 10.1899 


Apri 


19, 1899 


June 


2. 1899 


Dec. 


16, 1899 


Feb. 


10. 1899 


May 


4,1899 


Apri 


6. 1899 


Sept. 


3,1^98 


Oct. 


14, 1898 


Jan. 


30, 1899 


Apri 


20, 1899 


Dec. 


16, 1898 


Feb. 


20. 1899 


Dec. 


21. 1898 


Dec. 


8, 1898 


Feb. 


7, 1899 


Apri 


7, 1899 


May 


9. 1899 


Feb. 


16. 1899 


July 


20, 1898 


Oct. 


7, 1898 


Dec. 


12. 1898 


Feb. 


4, 1899 


Mar. 


29. 1899 


May 


22. 1899 


May 


27, 1899 


Feb. 


6. 1899 


April 


8. 1899 



Lincoln Coal Co 



Little & Co., E.. 

Lloyd, E 

Muncie Coal Co. 



Mushbaugh, J 

McLean Co. Coal Co. 



Lincoln 110 

135 

135 



Peoria 

Danville . 
Muncie... 



Mt. Pulaski M. Co. 
O'Connell John,... 



Progressive Coal Co. 



Katliff,! 

South Mountain Coal Co. 



East Peoria... 
Bloomington. 



Mt. Pulaski . 
Grape Creek. 



Ashland — 
Petersburg . 



Tallula Coal Co Tallula .... 

LTnion Coal & M. Co IMt. Pulaski 

Westville Coal Co ' Westville.. 



Wabash Coal'Co., No. 2 . 



Athens 



sio ool 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 GO; 
6 00 
6 ool 
6 00| 
6 OOi 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

$1,030 00 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 



Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

April 

Oct. 

Feb. 

May 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

June 

Sept. 

June 

July 

Oct. 

Feb. 

April 

Feb. 

Feb. 



Auburn Coal Co. 



1898 

1899, 

1899 

1898 Assumption C. & M. Co 

1899 

1899 

1898:Barclay CoalCo 

1898 Barclay Coal & M. Co.. 

1899. •• * 

1899, 

1898 Bates & Co.. W. H 



Auburn 15 

1 15 



Assumption , 
Barclay '. 



Winchester... 
lies Junction. 
Black Diamond C. ct T. Co I Springfield ... 



25,1899 •' I 

21, 1899 Baker, Leroy Edinburg. . . . 

17. 1899: Bunker Hill C. Co I Bunker Hill. 



$6 Oo! 

6 00 

6 00. 

6 00 

10 00, 

10 00 

8 00 

10 00 

10 oo! 

10 00' 

8 00| 

6 oo: S6 00 

6 00 

8 oo! 

8 00! 

8 00: 

8 00, 

6 00 

6 ool 



198 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fifth District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

a . 

sa 
z 




1 


Aug. 11,1898 


Cantrill Coop. 
Capital Coop. C 

Carlinville Coa 

Cbathain Coal 

•• 
Cbicago-Virdei 

Citizens' C. & 

Clear LakeCo 
CoffeenC.,& C 
Consolidated C 


U. Co 


Cantrill 


40 

75 
80 
85 
60 
27 
25 
78 
25 
80 
25 
25 
50 
55 
59 
95 
90 
44 
34 
30 
30 
15 
135 
118 
170 
180 
175 
168 
120 
45 
122 
90 
90 
95 
81 
70 
82 

6J 
60 
75 
84 
120 
160 
155 
155 
68 
105 
91 
110 
125 
125 
120 
230 
225 
200 
202 
250 
270 
165 
245 
115 
150 
165 
170 
200 
220 
175 
12 
40 
70 


S6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 




Not. 2. 1998 








Jan. 17,1899 




• ' 




April 5,1899 








July 29,1898 


L Co. No. 2 


Springfield 

Carlinville .'.'.'.'.'.'. 
Chatham 





Sept. 7, 1898 


No. 1 




Nov. 14,1898 


No. 1 




' ' 14, 1898 


No. 2 




Feb. 6 1899 


No. 1 




6, 1899 


No. 2 

No. 1 




April 10, 1899 
10, 1899 




No. 2 




July 8, 1898 


ico.^ ;::::::::::::::: 










Dec 22 1898 


















Sept. 27 1898 


Co 




Dec. 5,1898 








Mar. 23,1899 








May 29 1899 








Sept. 22,1898 


1 C. Co 






Nov. 30,1898 


No. 2 : . ; 






Dec 13 1898 


No 1 






Jan. 9, 1899 


No. 1 






Aprili 12, 1899 


No. 1 


' • 




13 1899 


No 2 


Auburn 




Jan. 16, 1899 


No. 2 






July 28 1898 


M. Co A 


Springfield 

Bissell '..'.'.'.. 




28 1898 


B 




Nov. 15,1898 


a:::::::::::::;::: 




15 1898 


B 




Jan. 19, 1899 


B 




• ' 19, 1899 






April 26,1899 


A 




' • 26, 1899 


B 




June 22,1899 


B 




'• 23 1899 


A 




Sept. 7, 1898 


op C. Co 










Mar. 24 1S99 








May 31,1799 








July 7, 1898 
Oct. 10 1898 


Co 












Feb. 3, 1899 








May 2, 1899 








July 9, 1898 
Nov 16 1898 


oal Co.Hornaby 

; biiiespie!!!!!!!! 

No. S.... '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


Hornsby 
















July 13,1898 
Nov. 18,1898 
Feb. 2 , 1899 


Gillespie 












May 3 1899 






July 15,1898 


Mt. Olive 




Nov. 23,1898 


No. S 




Mar. 10, 1899 


No 8 




May 4, 1899 


No. 8 




Sept. 14,1898 


No. 6 




Nov. 17, 1898 


No. 6 






Mar 17 1899 


No 6 






April 20, 1899 


No. 5 






Sept. 23,1898 


No. 7 






Nov 17 1898 


No 7 






Mar. 16,1899 


No. 7 






April 21, 1899 
Nov. 23 1898 


No. 7 






No 10 


Mt. Olive 

Edinburg 

Girard ....'.'.'.'. .'.V. 




Mar. 9, 1899 


No.lO 




May 5, 1899 


No.lO 






Edinburg Coal 


Co 




May 26 1899 




July 18.1898:Qirard Coal Co 







STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



199 





Fifth District, Statement — Continued. 






Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


k 
11 


i 

ii 

"5 ^ 
a ^ 


a 
o 

ll 
go. 


Oct. 4, 1898 


Girard Coal Co . . . 


Girard 


125 
120 
110 
125 
125 
106 
118 
135 
70 
9 
75 
90 
82 
20 
^O 
55 
26 
55 
52 
220 
220 
180 
225 
60 
48 
160 
120 
116 
8 
20 
40 
40 
75 
41 
125 
160 
202 
210 
35 
110 
115 
200 
225 
9 
230 
10 
225 
15 
125 
125 
140 
95 
110 
94 
110 
90 
106 
120 
166 
80 
125 
93 
95 
69 
20 
25 
18 
110 
120 
110 
1 112 


$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 CO 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
G 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
G 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 GO 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 




Feb 15 1899 








April 0,1899 










' ' 




April 7,1899 










Hillsboro 




Nov. 25, 1898 






Jan. 27,1899 
May 15, 1899 
Aug. 12,1898 
Oct. 12, 1888 
Feb. 9, 1899 
ADril 25, 1899 
July G,I898 
G. 1898 














florse Creek Coal Co 


Pawnee . 




Junction Mining Co 


lies Junction 

Springfield 

Litchfield ..'.'.'.'.'.'. 
Mt Olive 








' ' 




Litchfield M. & M Co 




Litchfield M. & P. Co 




Nov. 21, 1898 






'• 21.1898 












April 4, 1899 






Aug r' 1898 


Madison Coal Co 






No. 5 


Paisley ...'.'.'.'..'.'.. 




Mar. 8, 1899 
May 6, ISW 
Dec. 2. 1898 
April 3,1899 
Dec. 1.1898 


No. 5... 




No.5 




.SI 2 00 








Moweaqua M. & Mf g Co 


Moweaqua 

Bunker Hi'lL 1 .■.".: 


20 00 


Mar. 22.1899 






May 16, 1899 






July 20 1898 


Neil Wm & Co 




Nov. 29,1898 






Mar. 27,1899 








May 8, 1899 
Nov. 29,1898 
Sept. 19,1898 
Dec. 14.1898 
Jan. 23.1899 
Mar. 3. 1899 
June 12,1899 
Oct. 7, 1898 
Mar. 3,1899 
June 14,1899 
Aug. 26,1898 














Penwell C. &">!. Co 


Pana 


3d 00 




























• • 


94 00 


No. i 


















Oct. 28, 1898 








Feb. 22, 1899 


No. 1 






' ' 23, 1899 


No. 2 






May 24, 1899 


No. 1... 






24, 1899 


No ^ 






Dec. 27, 1898 








Aug. 9, 1898 


Sangamon Coal Co 


Springfield 

Spauldiug 

Springfield".!!.'.'!! 




Nov. 12 1898 












April 28, 1899 






Aug. 30.1898 


SpauldingCoal Co 




Oct. 27, 1898 






Feb. 28. 1899 






June 2 1899 








Springfield C. M. i: T. Co 










Jan. 17,1899 







April 25. 1899 






Aug. 9, 1898 


Springfield Coop. Coal Co 





Nov. U,1898 




Feb. 20 1899 






April 27,1899 


Springfield & P. P. Coal Co '.'.'. 




Sept. 8, 1898 


Pleasant Plains.. 
Ridgely 




Oct. 31,1898 
April 11.1899 
















Nov 11, 1598 
Jan, 18,1899 
April 27,1899 












•■ 


•• 





200 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fifth District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operatinsr Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



July 


22.1898 




26. 1898 


Aug. 


31. 1898 


Dec. 


20. 1898 


Jan. 


23, 1899 


Mar. 


4, 1899 


June 


13, 1899 


Sept. 


1. 1898 


Nov. 


4. 1898 


Feb. 


7, 1899 


April 28. 1899 


Sept. 


20, 1898 


Oct. 


5, 1898 


Feb. 


21,1899 


May 


25, 1899 


July 


19, 1898 


May 


19, 1899 


Sept. 


12, 1898 


Dec, 


12. 1898 


Apri 


17, 1899 


Aug. 


26, 1897 


Oct. 


18, 1898 


Feb. 


22. 1899 


Mav 


23, 1899 


July 


29. 1898 


Oct. 


29, 1898 


June 


1. 1899 


July 


25. 1898 


Oct. 


26.1898 


Jan. 


30. 1899 


Ai.ri 


24, 1899 


July 


27, 189S 


Nov, 


1, 1899 


Feb. 


29, 1899 


May 


22, 1899 



Springfield Junction C. Co 
Springside C. & M. Co — 



lies Junction. 
Pana 



Starne's C. M. Co. 



Springfield. 



11 
63 
110 
110 
110 
105 
96 
110 
110 
120 

Taylorville C. Co |Taylorville I 245 

" 265 

245 
235 
16 
17 
34 
120 
120 



Thomas Pre.ssed Brick Co j Golden Eagk 

Virden Coal Co iVirden 



Wabash Coal Co. 



Williamsville Coal Co. 
Woodside Coal Co 



West End Coal Co. 



Total $1,644 00 



Dawson. 



Williamsville 
Springfield — 



$8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 1 
10 00' 

10 00; 

10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 

8 oo! 

6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 



SIXTH DISTRICT, 



Aug. 

Jan. 

May 

Aug. 

J an. 

Sept, 

Dec. 

April 

Nov. 

July 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 



Oct. 25, 



Nov. 
Nov. 



Dec. 



Advance Coal Co Marissa 



Belleville & O'Fallon C. Co. 
Breese Coal Co 



Beatty, Jas Mascoutah 

Consolidated Coal Co.— 

Pittsburg mine Belleville. . 

White Oak mine jMarissa. 



Trenton mine. 
Heintz Bluff mine. 

Rose Hill mine 

Schureman mine. . 

Abbey No. 3 

Troy mine 

Brooksidemine 

Breese mine 

Schureman mine... 
White Oak mine... 

Green Mt. mine 

Trenton mine 

Marissa mine 



Belleville. 



Trenton 

CoUinsvillc- 
Belleville... 

Collinsville. 
Troy 

Breese 

Belleville... 

Marissa 

Belleville... 

Trenton 

Marissa 



9 


S6 00 


6 


6 00 


h 


6 00 


45 


6 00 


26 


6 00 


175 


6 00 


175 


10 00 


16(1 


10 00 


8 


6 00 


12 


6 00 


35 


6 00 


10(1 


10 00 


72 


8 00 


20 


6 00 


.5(1 


8 OU 


122 


10 00 


55 


8 00 


54 


8 00 


90 


8 00 


,50 


8 00 


.50 


8 00 


,i5 


6 OOj 


l-'O 


10 00 


30 


6 oo! 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 

Sixth District Statement — Continued. 



201 



Date of Nanii,' of Firm. Company or Person 
Inspection. Operatiuj^ Inline 

i 



Location of Mine. 



[Consolidated Coal Co.— Concluded. 



Fel>- 6,1899, Pittshurgmine . 

ti.iwn'; Kneeht mine 

14, iv.ci (iarrside No. 4 mine.. 

liO, is:m Wiiitc ( >uk mine 

Mar. 9.18'.i9| KiclilaiHl mine 

Il,iyj9| BrL'esemiiie 

' * 24, ie99l Troy mine 

" 25,1899 Abbey No. 3 mine.... 

27,1899 Trenton mine 

29,1899 Rose Hill mine 

.May 11.1899 Heinz Bluff 

18, 189;it White Oak mine 

189HI Mari^samine 

, 18;i'.' (iartside. No. 4 mine 

. I89;i .\bl)cy, No. 3 mine 

.1898. Crown Coal & Tow Co. 
,1899 



June 

Sept. 
Feb. 
June 
Dec. 
May 
Mar. 
Au^. 
Feb. 
June 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Mar. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Aug. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Nov 

Mar. 

July 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Peb. 

Mar. 

May 

Mar. 

Augr. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

May 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

May 

-Augr. 

Feb. 

June 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Aus:. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

July 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 

July 

Nov. 
April 
Oct. 



1899 



CentraliaM. ^- Mf^. Co 
Donk Bros. Coal Co 



24, 

13, 
20, 
8, 
21, 189,->| Dutch Hollow Coal Co 

6, 1899| 
15, 
15, 



,1899 

,1898 Dutch Hollow Coal Co. 



Mari-ssa 

Belleville... 

Breese 

Troy 

Collinsville. 

Tretiton 

Belleville... 
C( llinsville. 
Marissa 



Belleville... 
Collinsville. 
Belleville... 



Centraha.. 
Belleville! 



Preeburff. 
Freeburg . 



1898; Dutch Hill Coal Co I New Athens.. 

1899! " •• 

1898^ Ebel. August I Belleville 

1898 Eureka Coal Co iMarrissa 

1899[ ' • " 

1898; Freeburg M. Co Freeburg 

1898 " ; • • 

1899} " I " 

1898] Glendale Coal Co i Belleville 

18981 •' •• 

1899, Glendale C.<.t M. Co., No. 2 " 

1899 •• No. 1 ! " 

18991 '• No. 2 i '• 

1899; '• No. 1 1 " 

1899!Germantown C. Co German town , 

1898[Hartman. Chas Belleville 

1899i " 1 " 

18981 Highland Coal Co " 

1898; " ! •• 

18991 " : •• 

189SiHippard Coal Co ' " 

1898' '• " 

I89'.» " " 

18l<9i " i '• 

189SJ Humboldt Coal Co , "' 

1899! •• I " 

l,s9;<; " I " 

189n Henrietta Coal Co j Ed wards ville 



15 

151 
45 
50 
26 
851 
60 
120 
75 
30 
90 
60 
30 
43 
120 
18 
SO 
75 
100 
155 
150! 



Home Trade Coal Co " 

Independent Coal Co Collinsville. 



Johnson Coal Co Mariss 



6, 1898 
14, 1899 

30. 1898 
11,1898 

24. 1899 

25. 1898 
17,1898 

20. 1899 

18,18991 " I 

23. 18981 Johnson C. et M. Co Belleville. 

6, 1898|Kalb Coal Co Mascouta.. 

^iM898l " I •• ... 

10.18981 ! 

12, 1898lKinmundy Coal Co iKinmundy 



SB 00| . 

6 00 . 

6 OOi. 

6 001. 

6 OOi. 

8 Ool. 

8 001. 
10 00 . 

8 00 . 

6 00 . 

8 00 , 

8 00:. 

6 OOi . 

6 00 . 
10 OOI . 

6 00 . 

8 00 . 

8 00 . 
10 00 
10 00 . 
10 00 . 

8 OOj . 

8 ool. 

8 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 OOj. 

6 OOi. 

6 OOi . 

6 OOl. 

8 OOj. 

8 OO!. 

6 ool. 

8 ool. 

6 ool. 

8 00!. 

6 00 

6 ool. 

6 OOi. 

6 OOi 

6 00'. 

6 OOl. 

6 00 . 

8 OO'. 

6 OOI. 

6 00 . 

6 ool. 

6 09'. 

6 GO;. 

6 00, . 

6 00 . 

6 00 

6 ool. 

6 00] 

6 ool. 

6 ool. 

6 OOL 

6 001. 

6 00 . 

6 00 . 

6 oo;. 

8 00 . 
8 ool. 
8 001. 
8 001. 



$18 00 



6 00 

'i8'66 



12 00 

'is'66 



202 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Sixth District, Statement. — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person. 
Operatin? Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


1 

la 


ID 

a 

■Bi 
E 

Wj3 


ll 

a a 


Feb. 1,1899 


Kinmundy Coal Co 


Kinmundy 


40 
57 
30 
60 
60 
18 
80 
96 
34 
20 
200 
129 
30 
200 
160 
85 
220 
210 
16 
20 
10 
80 
120 
140 
140 
40 
56 
58 
32 
45 

87 
91 
60 
6 
22 

2U 
25 
40 
45 
40 
130 
100 
150 
150 

10 
70 
58 
54 
168 
175 
17 
75 
50 
34 
17 
24 
30 
6 

33 
35 
17 
17 
25 
30 
100 
160 
150 
200 


$6 00 
8 00 




April 8,1899 










6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 

10 00 
10 00 

6 00 
10 00 
10 00 

8 00 




Dec. 20, 189S 








April 15,1898 








Lilldorf , D 


Marissa 

Collin-sville 

Belleville...!!!!.'! 


Oct. 11 1898 


Lumaghi Coal Co 




Mar 25 1899 












May 20 1899 








July 20,1898 


Madison Coal Co.. No. 2 

No. 4 


Glen Carbon 

Edwardsville'!!!! 
Glen Carbon 

Edwardsville'!!!! 
Glen Carbon 

Rentchler ..!..!.. 






Oct, 6 1898 


No 3 




Nov 1 1898 


No "> 


Jan. 30.1899 


'Z No. 4 




Mar. 14 1899 


No 3 




April 26, 1899 


No. 2 


10 00 




No. 4 


10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 

10 00 




July t; 189s 


Moser Jacob Coal Co 










April 24, 1899 
July 18 1898 






Mt Olive & Staunton C Co 




Nov. 4, 1898 








. • . . 




10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 




April 20, 1899 








Mo. ..V: 111. Coal Co 


Rentchler 










' * 15, 1898 
Jan. 24,1999 


" (Wilderman) 


Wilderman 

Rentchler 

Belleville.!!!!!!!! 




6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 




April 24 1899 




May 26.1899 
Sept. 20,1898 
Dec 13 1898 














8 00 


June 2 1899 






8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 












.Sept 26 1898 


Oak Hill Coal "Co 














• ' 


• • 




May 21 1899 










Oakland Coal Co 






Dec. 5 1898 








May 2 1899 




6 OOi - 


July 21,1898 




Odin 


10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 












Mar 7 1899 








May 16, 1899 


• • 


• • 




Ausr. 17,1898 
April 24, 1899 
July 5, 1898 














O'Fallon C. & M. Co 




Dec. 20 1898 






!!!!!!!!!! 


April 25, 1899 
Jan 1 1898 






Pittinger & Davis AT & M Co 


/ 'pnn-nlis 


10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 




April 29, 1899 
Sept. 19,1898 
Nov. 22,1898 




Belleville 












May 24 1899 




' • 


8 00 




Oct, 10, 1898 


Ruby C. & M. Co 


Caseyville 


6 00 


Aug. 27,1898 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
G 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
lU 00 




Dec. 2 1898 








Mar 4 1899 






April 7, 1899 


1 > 






Sept. 7,1898 
Jan. 9 1899 




Belleville 










Aug. 10,1898 

Dec. 10;i89S 
Jan. 13.1899 
Oct. 31,1898 
Mar. 20,1899 
June 27,1899 
Feb. 23.1899 




Smithboro 

Belleville 








Smithboro Coal Co 


Smithboro 






Sorento M & Mfg Co 
















Sandoval Coal Co 


Sandoval 





STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



203: 



Sixth Disfrid, Statement— Concluded. 



Date .)£ 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


i. 

i 

2; 


o - 

11 

a "^ 


1 


June 24.1899 
Jan. 9,1899 
Aug. 8, 1898 
Aug. 8,1898 
Oct. 10,1898 
Dec. 16.1898 
April 5,1899 
April 5,1899 
Nov. 14,1898 
Aug. 5. 1898 
Sept. 27,189', 
Dec. 15,1898 
Mar. 15,1899 
May 23,1899 
Aug. 19,1898 
Dec. 22.1898 
Mar. 27,1899 
Aug, 23,1898 
Nov '^S 189S 






200 
30 
65 

75 
65 
65 
70 

6 
5 
13 
25 
18 
25 
70 
96 
85 
25 
40 
40 


$10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 










Taylor, Jos., (Mentor) 


Ridge Prairie .... 
O'Fallon 














',\ 








■' fMptitnr) 


• • 






Belleville 


































TvcnfriM P r. .<.- P On 


Trenton 
















Walnnt VTil 1 Pnal On 


RirkrifT 






. > 




May 19,1899 








Totals 










SI, 338 00 


SS4 00 













SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



Oct. 24. 

July 15, 

Nov. 30, 

Feb. 2, 

April 10, 

Aug. 15, 

Mar. 13, 

Sept. 9. 

Oct. 27, 

•' 28, 

Nov, 22, 
Dec. 1, 1898! 

Feb. 4,18991 

" 6, 18991 

•' 15, 1899' 

Mar. 10,18991 

April 24,1899: 

May 26.1899! 
June 5,1899 

• • 22, 1899 

July 21,1898 

•• 21,1898 

Dec. 17, 1898 

•' 17, 

Feb. 3. 

3. 

June 24. 



I Barber & Bro \ Tamaroa. 

' Barnard, William I Cutler . . . 



1898 " 

1899! " 

1S99' " 

1898 Big Muddy C. k C. Co 

1S99 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 



DeSoto 



July 23, 
Nov. 30, 
Feb. 2, 
April 10, 
July 5. 
Nov. 29. 
Jan. 31, 
April 7, 
Aug. 24, 
Dec. 3, 
Feb. 4, 
April 11, 
Dec. 19, 
Sept. 10, 
Dec. 10, 



Big Muddy C. & I. Co., No. 7 Herrins 

(Harrison) Murphysboro 

No.6 

No.5 

No. 7 

(Harrison) 

No.5 

No.6 

No.7 

No.5 

(Harrison) 

No.6 

No.7 

Boyd Coal & Coke Co. No. 1 

No.2 

No. 1 

No.2 

No.l 

No.2 

No.l '• 

No.2 " 

Brown & Borwell Cutler 

Conant 



Herrins 

Murphysboro 



Herrins 

Murphysboro 



Herrins. 
Sparta .. 



1898 
1899, 
1899 
1899 
1899 

1898 : 
1898) 

1899 •" I •• 

1899 •• I " 

189S Brown .fc Son Pinckneyville. 

1898 •• ; 

1S99 " 

1899i " I 

1898i Burnside Coal Co I New Burnside . 

1898' Borders, Wm. R Percy 



18981 Brueggeman. J. F |Nashville. . 

1898 Carterville Coal Co ; Carterville 

18951 •' 



151 
161 
42 
42! 
45 
54 
1061 
125 
115 
106' 
150: 
150 
1301 
200 
120 
180 
l'<5: 
125: 
170 
200 
54 
99 
43! 
14 
48' 
15 
53 i 
18' 
20: 
32 1 



$6 001 

6 001 

6 00| 

6 00] 

6 00| 

8 OOi 

10 00 

10 CO 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

TO 00 

10 00 

10 00 1 

10 00: 

10 00 

10 00 1 

10 OOj 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

8 00: 

6 001 

6 00; 

6 001 

6 00' 

6 00! 

8 00 

6 001 

6 00! 

6 001 

6 00' 

6 00' 

6 00 

10 00' 

8 00 

8 00! 

6 00! 

6 00; 812 OG' 

6 00 

6 00 

6 00: 

10 00: 



204 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Seventh District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

c 

II 
sa 
z 


i 
ii 


1 

a "^ 


Feb. 21, 1899 


Carterville Coal Co 


Carterville 

Lake Creek'. ■.■.'. '.■.■. 

Tamaroa 


140 
120 
75 
55 
50 
17 
45 
40 
37 
25 
70 
104 
30 
125 
80 
45 
115 
79 
90 
65 
125 
15 
40 
38 
58 
63 
54 
75 
113 
16 
8 
58 
26 
60 
36 
53 
75 
30 
60 
75 
32 
75 
72 
26 
32 
36 
36 
130 
125 
90 
100 
160 
125 
200 
41 
35 
20 
13 
26 
17 
24 
24 
116 
135 
126 
60 
35 
46 
51 
40 


$10 00 

10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 

10 00 
6 00 

10 00 
8 00 
6 00 

10 00 
8 00 
8 00 




May 27,1899 






Aug. 22,1898 


Crawford, A. W 




Oct. 7, 1898 






Nov. 21,1898 






Jan. 16, 1899 






'• 27,1899 


Coulterville M. Co 


Coulterville 

Marion 




April 8,1899 






Mar. 15,1899 


Crab Orchard Coal Co 




June 1.1899 








July 18,1898 


DuQuoin Union Coal Co., Enterprise. 
Browning.. 
Egyptian.. 
Browning.. 
Enterprise. 
Egyptian.. 
Browning.. 
Enterprise. 
Browning.. 
Enterprise. 


DuQuoin . .. 




Aug. 10.1898 






Oct. 24.1898 






Nov. 17,1898 







Dec. 15, 1898 







Jan. 16,1899 




Feb. 17,1899 


' ' 




Mar. 7,1899 






April 29. 1899 




May 1, 1399 


• • 


8 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 

8 eo 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 


. 


Oct. 6, 1898 


Sparta 




May 23,1899 


DuQuoin Coop. Coal Co 






July 16,1898 


Donk Bros. C. & C. Co 


Tilden 




Oct. 8, 1898 








Jan. 23.1899 


' ' 


I • 




Mar. 6.1899 




• ' 




May 10. 1899 








Dec. 13.1898 




Harrisburg 

Ledford 




April 21. 1899 






Feb. 16,1899 


Dempster C. & M. Co 


Sato 


$6 00 


May 25,1899 


Dick Coal Co.. Robert 


Carterville 

Equality 




Dec. 14,1898 


Equality Coal Co 




Sept. 12,1898 


Gartside Coal Co. No. 1 . 


Murphysboro ..-.. 
Percy 




•• 12,1898 


No. 3 




Oct. 4, 1898 


No. 1 




• • 4, 1898 
' ' 12, 1898 
Jan. 28,1899 
Jan. 28.1899 
Feb. 18,1899 
April 17,1899 
• • 17, 1899 
May 26,1899 
Sept. 19.1898 
Dec. 20.1898 
Feb. 22,1899 
April 27, 1899 
Nov. 16,1898 
Jan. 30,1899 
May 8. 1899 
July 15,1898 


No. 3 




No. 4 




No. 1 




No. 3 








No. 1 








No. 4 




Goalby & Son. W. G 
















No. 2 




Greenwood & Davis 














• ' 




Horn Colliery Co 






SIov. 26.1898 








Jan. 25.1899 








June 3. 1S90 








Dec. 13, 1898 


Harrisburg C. & M. Co 


Harrisburg 

Roseboro 


24 00 


April 21, 1899 






July 27,1898 


111. Fuel & Power Co., No. 2 




Aug. 1, 1898 


No.3 






Dec. 2. 1898 


No. 3 

No, 3 






Feb. 9, 1899 




Mar. 20,1899 








May 5, 1899 


No. 3 






Dec. 28, 1898 


I. C. Coal & Salt Co 




Jan. 26, 1899 








April 6,1899 






July 29,1898 








• • 12. 1*98 
Dec. 5, 18y8 
July 26,1898 
Feb. 16, 1899 


Kuhn, A 


Dubois 










Murphysboro p. M. C. Co 


Sato 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



205 



Seventh District, St :itement— Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operatins^ Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



5*1 



DuQuoin 



Hallidayboro. 



July 6,1898'Morris Bros. & Co 

Dec. 16.189SI •• 

Fell. 24,isyi^ " 

May 2, Ih'.t'.t; " 

Aul'. 15. IH'M Muddy Valley M. & Mf^'. Co 

Oct. 11.18'.i8 ■■ 

la. ISDit; ■ ! 

16.1899, " L, , ... 

19, l89s:Murray, Hugh iSashville . . . 

8, lS99|Murray, Alex 

ll!l898Mt. \ ernon Co&VCo '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. JMt. Vernon. 

3,1S98 •• I 



Feb. 
May 
July 
Mar. 
June 
July 
Oct. 
Feb. 



8, 1899 



Marion 



Nov. 



No. 1... 
No. 2... 



Sept. 23.1898 Ohio Valley C & C. Co 

Dec. 23,18951 " 

Mar. IG, 18991 " 

June 2,18991 " 

25.1898 Ohio 6c Miss. V. C. & M. Co., 
25. 189S 

16.1899 " ! .. ••• 

2.1899 •■ i ^ :•• 

12.1898 Pope Mining Co jDuQuoin. 

19,1898, •' ;. 

27,18991 " , 

16.1899 " 

21,lh98 Porter, J. C , 

20,1899| " '„ 

20. 1898 Roseboro Coal Co ! Percy 

14.1899 " I 

26, 18981 Sato Coal & M. Co I Sato 

16,2899 •• : .. 



Mar. 
June 
July 
Nov. 
Jan. 
May 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
July 
Feb. 

July 30;iS98'Scott-Wilson Coal Co., N 

^ ' 5,1898 



. . Carterville. 



Oct, 

J 

May 



24, 1899 
11,1899 

Aug. 2.^,1898 

Oct. " 

Jan. 

April 

July 

Nov. 

Mar. 

May 

July 



No. 



St. Louis & Big Muddy Coal Co. 



Dec 
Feb 
May 



5. 1898 
15. 1899 

5. 1899 
5,1'- ^ ■ 
2. 1898 

14, 1899 

25 

14, 1898 Sun Coal & Coke Co. 
16, 1S598; 
24. 18991 
, 1899 



Nov. 2S. 1898 Turner & Faust Co ... . 



Pinckneyv: 



Murphysboro — 



Feb. 2,1899' 

April 8.1899 

Aug. 8.1898 Wild & Gill. 

Oct. 27.18981 " 

Mar. 9,18991 " 

May 27,1899 " „..,,. .,, 

Aug. 25,1898 Willis C. & M. Co Vy illisville. . 

Dec. 3.1898' " 

J an. 18. 1899 " 

April 11.1899 " I.. 

Feb. J. 1899 Western Anthracite Coal Co Sparta 

May 12,18991 " L ■ ,,■•-•,•• 

Mar. 15,1899 Williamson Co. Coal Co ILake Creek. 

June 1,1S99 " I 

Total I 



S8 001.... 
8 00, ... . 

8 oo:.... 

8 ou;.... 
10 00 .... 

10 00 .... 
10 00 .... 
10 00.... 

8 00|.... 
6 oo!.... 
6 00'.... 
6 00 .... 
6 oo'.... 
8 0U|.... 
6 00! . . . 
6 oo]..., 
8 OOi..., 
8 OOi... 
8 oo!... 
8 00 ... 
10 00,.. . 

10 oo:... 

6 OOj... 
6 OOi... 
6 OOl... 
6 00 ... 
6 OOL.. 
6 00, . . . 
6 00,... 
6 001... 
6 00 ... 
6 00... 
6 OOl... 
8 00 ... 
8 oo!... 
8 00 . . . 
6 00 ... 
8 00 . . . 
8 00 . . . 
8 00 . . . 
8 00 . . . 
10 00 
10 00 ... 
10 00... 
10 00 . . . 

6 00 . . . 

8 00 ... 

8 00,... 

8 00 ... 

6 00 . . . 

6 00, . . . 

6 OOI... 

6 OOi... 

6 00 . . . 

6 00 . . . 

6 00 . . . 

8 00 . . . 

8 00 . . . 

8 00 . . . 

8 00 . . . 
10 00 .., 
10 00!.., 

8 00'.., 

8 00'.., 



206 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 



Through the medium of the Bureau the representatives of the 
miners' and operators' organizations of this State, practically agreed 
upon the present revision of our mining law. It was enacted with- 
out opposition by both branches of the last general assembly, and 
became operative July 1, 1899. 

Aside from eliminating much that was ambiguous and inconsist- 
ent, resulting from numerous amendments to the old laws, many 
changes and some new features were added. The principal changes 
may be cited as follows: 

Requiring all mines, irrespective of their capacity, to be in charge 
of certificated mine managers, mine examiners and hoisting engineers, 
where the services of the last mentioned class are necessary; and 
authorizing the State Mining Board to revoke certificates. In addi- 
tion to the copies of the mine maps furnished the inspectors, one is 
required to be filed with the recorder of the county in which the 
mine is located. Every mine is required to have an escapement 
shaft or underground connection between it and some other contig- 
uous mine; changing the time within which such escapement or 
connection shall be made, from a maximum limit of two years, under 
the old law, to nine months in the case of the deepest mines. 

The number of men permitted to work in any mine not having an 
escapement, can not, under any circumstances, exceed ten, and then 
only for the purpose of completing the escapement or connection. 
This provision removes the limitation of the old law, which prac- 
tically placed all mines employing less than six men outside of the 
inspection service. Requiring each escapement shaft opened subse- 
quent to the law taking eflfect, to be provided with a substantial stair- 
way, set at an angle not greater than forty-five degrees, with hand- 
rails, platforms, etc. Inspection once a week of all escapement shafts 
and passageways leading thereto, or connections with contiguous 
mine. Changing the designation of fire boss to mine examiner. Giving 
the Board of Labor Commissioners the power to change Inspection 
Districts. Providing for the necessary traveling expenses of the in- 
spectors, and requiring the State to furnish, upon the requisition of 
the secretary of the Bureau of Labor, blanks, blank books, stationery, 
test weights, instruments, etc., for the use of the inspectors. Increasing 
the time of the sessions of the State Mining Board from 80 to 100 
days in each year, and the compensation from $3 to $5 per day, 



MIXING LAWS. 207 

•exclusive of necessary traveling expenses. Making it a misdemeanor 
for any operator or other employer of labor who refuses to furnish 
the agents of the Bureau with information concerning the wages or 
conditions of their employes. Authorizing the appointment by the 
board of supervisors or county commissioners, of county inspectors of 
mines in any county in the State where coal is produced; in the former 
Act county inspectors were authorized only in counties producing 
800.000 tons or more per annum. No room to be opened in advance 
of the air current, and cross-cuts not more than sixty feet apart. 
Operator to furnish safety lamps when required, also stretchers and 
blankets for the use of injured workmen. 

The above comprises the principal changes provided for in the 
IDresent law. They are all in the interest of the workmen, and pro- 
vide for a more perfect and effective system of inspection. As pre- 
viously noted, much of the labor incident to this revision, devolved 
^pon the Commissioners of Labor. They were aided in this work by the 
experience of other mining states and countries. While the period 
of its enforcement has been brief, it has thoroughly demonstrated 
the wisdom of the change, and fully rewarded the unselfish labors of 
those engaged in its preparation. The principal feature omitted 
from the old law is that relating to inspection fees. As amended in 
1^95, the law provided that the owners of coal mines should pay a 
fee for the inspection of their mines. This varied according to the 
size of the mine, and the number of men employed. By common 
consent of all parties in interest, this clause of the law was not in- 
cluded in the revision. It was the unanimous opinion that the State, 
assuming supervision over the coal mines, should pay the salaries of 
its inspectors, and defray the expenses incident thereto. 

Following is the text of the law as revised: 



STATISTICS OF LABJR. 



MINES AND MINING. 



COAL MINES. 

REVISION OF LAW RELATING TO COAL MINES. 



§ 1. (a) Maps or plans of mines, (b) surface 
surveys, (c) underground survey, (d) 
for every seam, (e) separate map for 
surface, (f ) dip, (g) copies for inspec- 
tors and recorders, (h) annual sur- 
veys, vi) abandoned mines, (j) special 
survey, (k) penalty for failure. 

g 2. Main shaft, (a) sinking, subject to in- 
spection, (b) passage way around the 
bottom, (c) gates at top, (d) general 
equipment. 

'i 3. Escapement shaft, (a) two places of 
egress, (b) unlawful to employ more 
than ten men unt:l escapement shaft 
is completed, (c) passageways to es- 
capement, (d) distance from main 
shaft, (e) buildings on surface be- 
tween shafts, (f) equipment, (g) ob- 
structions in, (h) inspection of, (i) 
communication with adjacent mine, 
unlawful to close. 

g 4. Engine and boiler house, location, fire- 
proof, equipment. 

§ 5. Powder to be stored in fire-proof build- 
ing. 

i 6. State Mining Board, appointment, duty, 
term, supplies, meetings, rules for 
examination. 

§ 7. (a) Examination, inspectors, (b) names 
certified to Governor, (c) appoint- 
ment, (d) examination of mine mana- 
gers, (e) hoisting engineers, (f) mine 
examiners. 

? 8. (a) Certificates issued by board, con- 
tents, (b) register of. (c) effect of, (d) 
foreign, (e) unlawful to employ any 
but certificated miners, (f) hoisting 
engineers, (g) mine examiners, ex- 
ceptions, mine managers to act as 
mine examiners, mine manager's cer- 
tificate exchanged for mine exami- 
ner's certificate, (h) cancellation of 
certificates. 



$ 9. Fees for examination and certificates. 
i 10. Compensation of board, secretary's- 
salary, how drawn. 

§ 11. (a) Division of State into inspection 
districts, (b) changes may be made 
in boundaries of districts, new dis- 
tricts. 

? 12. Inspectors, (a) bonds, (b) instruments- 
to be furnished by State, (c) duties, 
(d) authority to enter mines, (e) pro- 
cedure in case of objections, (f ) no- 
tices to be posted, (g) ex-offlcio sealer 
of weights, ih) State to furnish test- 
ing weights, (i) annual reports, (j) 
publication of reports, supplies fur- 
nished by Secretary of State, employ- 
ers of labor to assist in procuring 
statistics for publication, penalty for 
failure. 

§ 13. Compensation of inspectors, how- 
drawn. 

I 14. Removal of inspectors, petition for, 
hearing. 

I 15. Counties to appoint coiiuty inspectors 
as assistants, duties, must hold State 
certificate, compensation. 

I 16. Mine managers' duties. 

? 17. Hoisting engineers' duties. 

§ 18. Mine examiners' duties. 

§ 19. Ventilation, (a) amount of air to be 
kept in circulation, (b) measure- 
ments, (i) inspector may order men 
out of mine when air is insufficient. 

t 20. Powder or explosives, (a) prohibits 
storing in mines, amount allowed 
each man. care of while in mines, (b) 
manner of handling. (<•) none but 
copper tools to be u-^ed in charging. 
id) use of squibs, (e) exploding blasts, 
if) missed shots, (g) sprinkling dusty 
mines. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 



209 



? 21. Places of refuge to be cut in side wiiUs, 
size, distance apart, storintr material 
in prohibited. 

'i 22. Children and females prohibited from 
working:. 

? 23. Hoisting signals. 

'i 24. Weighing and-weighmen. (a) operator 
to furnish scales, (b) duties and 
oaths of weighmen, (c) check weigh- 
men permitted, paid by miners, 
duties. 

i 25. Boundaries, ten-foot limit, approach- 
ing old works. 

i 26. Notice to inspectors of accidents, sink- 
ing shafts, abandoning mines, etc. 

i 27. Accidents, (a) duties of inspectors, 
operator to keep record of on blanks 
furnished by inspectors, (b) coroner's 
inquest, (c) inspector to investigate 
cause of accident. 



(• 28. Men on cages, 'a) top and bottom man » 
(b) lights on landings, (c) speed of 
cages, tools and timber prohibited on 
except for repairs, (d) right of way 
for men to come out. 

'i 29. Safety lamps, (a) operator to furnish 
in case of fire damp, (b) care of. 

g 30. Operator to have on hand blankets, 
stretchers and bandages for use in 
case of accidents. 

§ 31. Caution to miners unlawful to injure 
shaft, safety lamp, instruments, etc. 

'i 32. Operators to post rules not inconsist- 
ent with this act. 

'i 33. Penalty for violation of any of the pro- 
visions of this act. 

§ 34. Defines terms, (a) mine, coal mine, (b) 
excavations or workings, (c) shaft, (d) 
slope or drift, (e) operator. (f) inspec- 
tor, (g) mine manager, (h) mine ex- 
aminer. 

An Act to revise the laws in relation to coal mines and subjects 
relafinfj thereto, and providing for the health and safety of per 
sons eniploijed therein. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: 



MAPS OR PLANS OF MINES. 

Maps Necessary, (a) That the operator of every coal mine in 
this State shall make, or cause to be made, an accurate map or plan 
of such mine, drawn to a scale not smaller than two hundred feet to 
the inch, and as much larger as practicable, oq which shall appear 
the name, the state, county and township in which the mine is loca- 
ted, the designatio.i of the mine, the name of the company or owner, 
the certificate of the mining engineer or surveyor as to the accuracy 
and date of the survey, the north point and the scale to which the 
drawing is made. 

Surface Survey, (b) Every such map or plan shall correctly show 
the surface boundary line of the coal rights pertaining to each mine, 
and all section or quarter section lines or corners within the same; 
the lines of town lots and streets, the tracks and side-tracks of all 
railroads, and the location of all wagon roads, rivers, streams, ponds, 
buildings, landmarks and principal objects on the surface. 

Underground Survey, (c) For the underground workings said 
maps shall show all shafts, slopes, tunnels or other openings to the 
surface or to the workings of a contiguous mine; all excavations, en- 
tries, rooms and cross-cuts; the location of the fan or furnace and 
the dire^jtion of the air currents; the loovtion of pumps, hauling en- 
gines, engine planes, abxnloued works, tire walls and standing 
water; and the boundary line of any surface outcrop of the seam. 

Map for Every Seam, (d) A separate and similar map drawn 
to the same scale in all cases, shall be made of each and every seam, 
— U C. R. 



210 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

which, after the passage of this act, shall be worked in any mine, 
and the maps of all such seams shall show all shafts, inclined planes 
■or other passageways connecting the same. 

Separate Map for the Surface, (e) A separate map shall al- 
so be made of the surface whenever the surface buildings, lines or 
objects are so numerous as to obscure the details of the mine work- 
ings if drawn upon the same sheet with them, and in such case the 
surface map shall be drawn upon transparent cloth or paper, so that 
it can be laid upon the map of the underground workings, and thus 
truly indicate the local relations of lines and objects on the surface 
to the excavations of the mine. 

The Dip. (/) Each map shall also show by profile drawing and 
measurements, in feet and decimals thereof, the rise and dip of the 
seam from the bottom of the shaft in either direction to the face of 
the workings. 

Copies for Inspectors and Kecorders. {g) The originals or 
true copies of all such maps shall be kept in the office at the mine, 
and true copies thereof shall also be furnished to the State Inspector 
•of Mines for the district in which said mine is located, and shall be 
filed in the office of the recorder of the county in which the mine is 
located, within thirty days after the completion of the same. The 
maps so delivered to the inspector shall be the property of the State 
and shall remain in the custody of said inspector during his term of 
office, and be delivered by him to his successor in office; they shall 
be kept at the office of the inspector and be open to the examination 
of all persons interested in the same, but such examination shall only 
be made in the presence of the inspector, and he shall not permit any 
copies of the same to be made without the written consent of the op- 
erator or the owner of the projDerty. 

Annual Surveys. (Jl) An extension of the last preceding survey 
of every mine in active operation shall be made once in every twelve 
months prior to July 1 of every year, and the result of said survey, 
with the date thereof, shall be promptly and accurately entered upon 
the original maps and all copies of the same, so as to show all 
changes in plan or new work in the mine, and all extensions of the 
old workings to the most advanced face or boundary of said workings 
which have been made since the last preceding survey. The said 
changes and extensions shall be entered upon the copies of the maps 
in the hands of the said inspector and recorder within thirty days 
after the last survey is made. 

Abandoned Mines, (i) When any coal mine is worked out or is 
about to be abandoned or indefinitely closed, the operator of the 
same shall make or cause to be made a final survey of all parts of 
such mine, and the results of the same shall be duly extended on all 
maps of the mine and copies thereof, so as to show all excavations 
and the most advanced workings of the mine, and their exact relation 
to the boundary or section lines on the surface. 

Special Survey, (j ) The State Inspector of Mines may order a 
survey to be made of the workings of any mine, and the results to be 
extended on the maps of the same and the copies thereof, whenever, 



REVISED MINING LAW. 211 

lu his judgment, tlio safety of the workmen, the support of the sur- 
face, the conservation of the property or the safety of an adjoining 
mine requires it. 

Penalty for Failure, (k) Whenever the operator of any mine 
shall neglect or refuse, or, for any cause not satisfactory to the mine 
inspector, fail, for the period of three months, to furnish to the said 
inspector and recorder, the map or plan of such mine, or a copy 
thereof, or of the extensions thereto, as provided for in this act, the 
inspector is hereby authorized to make or cause to be made, an accu- 
rate map or plan of such mine at the expense of the owner thereof, 
and the cost of the same may be recovered by law from the said oper- 
ator in the same manner as other debts by suit in the name of the 
inspector and for his use, and a copy of the same shall Ije filed by 
him with said recorder 

THE MAIN SHAFT. 

§ 2. Sinking Sub.ject to Inspection, (a) Any shaft in process 
of sinking, and any opening projected for the purpose of mining coal 
shall be subject to the inspection of the State Inspector of Mines for 
the district in which said shaft or opening is located. 

Passageway Around the Bottom, (b) At the bottom of every 
shaft and at every caging place therein, a safe and commodious 
passageway must be cut around said landing place to serve as a trav- 
eling way by which men or animals may pass from one side of the 
shaft to the other without iDassing under or on the cage. 

Gates at the Top. (c) The upper and lower landings at the top 
of each shaft, and the opening of each intermediate seam from or to 
the shaft, shall be kept clear and free from loose materials, and shall 
be securely fenced with automatic or other gates, so as to prevent 
either men or materials from falling into the shaft. 

General Equipment. ((/) Every hoisting shaft must be equipped 
with substantial cages fitted to guide-rails running from the top to 
the bottom. Said cages must be safely constructed; they must be 
furnished with suitable boiler-iron covers to protect persons riding 
thereon from falling oblects ; they must be equipped with safety 
catches. Every cage on which persons are carried must be fitted up 
with iron bars or rings in proper place and sufficient number to fur- 
nish a secure hand-hold for every person permitted to ride thereon. 
At the top landing, cage supports, where necessary, must be carefully 
set and adjusted so as to act automatically and securely hold the 
cages when at rest. 

THE escapement SHAFT. 

§ 3. Two Places of Egress, (a) For every coal mine in this 
State whether worked by shaft, slope or drift, there shall be provided 
and maintained, in addition to the hoisting shaft, or other place of 
delivery, a separate escapement shaft or opening to the surface, or aa 



212 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

underground communicating passageway between every such mine 
and some other contiguous mine, such as shall constitute two dis- 
tinct and available means of egress to all persons employed in such 
coal mine. 

The time allowed for completing such escapement shaft or making- 
such connections with an adjacent mine, as is required by the terms 
of this act, shall be three months for shafts 200 feet or less in depth, 
and six months for shafts less than 500 feet and more than 200 feet, 
and nine months for all other mines, slopes or drifts or connections 
with adjacent mines. The time to date in all cases from the hoisting 
of coal from the main shaft. 

Unlawful to Employ More Than Ten Men. (6) It shall be un- 
lawful to employ at any one time more men than in the judgment of 
the inspector is absolutely necessary, for speedily completing the 
connections with the escapement shaft or adjacent mine; and said 
number must not exceed ten men at any one time for any purpose in 
said mine until such escapement or connection is completed. 

Passageways to Escapement, (c) Such escapement shaft or open- 
ing, or communication with a contiguous mine as aforesaid, shall be 
constructed in connection with every seam of coal worked in such 
mine, and all passageways communicating with the escapement shaft 
or place of exit, from the main hauling ways to said place of exit, 
shall be maintained free of obstruction at least five feet high and five 
feet wide. Such passageways must be so graded and draiaed that it 
will be impossible for water to accumulate in any depression or dip 
of the same, in quantities sufficient to obstruct the free and safe 
passage of men. At all points where the passageway to the escape- 
ment shaft, or other place of exit, is intersected by other roadways or 
entries, conspicuous sign boards shall be placed, indicating the direc- 
tion it is necessary to take in order to reach such j)lace of exit. 

Distance From Main Shaft, (d) Every escapement shaft shall 
be separated from the main shaft by such extent of natural strata as 
may be agreed upon by the inspector of the district and the owner of 
the property, but the distance between the main shaft and escape- 
ment shaft, shall not be less than 300 feet without the consent of the 
inspector, nor more than 800 feet without the consent of the owner. 

Buildings on the Surface, (e) It shall be unlawful to erect any 
inflammable structure or building in the space intervening between 
the main shaft and the escapement shaft on the surface, or any pow- 
der magazine, in such location or manner as to jeopardize the free 
and safe exit of the men from the mine, by said escapement shaft, in 
case of fire in the main shaft buildings. 

Stairways or Cages. (/) The escapement shaft at every mine 
shall be equipped with safe and ready means for the jDrompt removal 
of men from the mine in time of danger, and such means shall be a 
substantial stairway set at an angle not greater than forty-five degrees, 
which shall be provided with hand-rails and with platforms or land- 
ings at each turn of the stairway. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 213 

In any escapement shaft which may, at the time of the passage of 
this act, be equipped with a cage for hoisting men, such cage must 
be suspended between guides and be so constructed that falling 
objects can not strike persons being hoisted upon it. Such cage must 
also be operated by a steam hoisting engine, which shall be kept 
available for use at all times, and the equipment of said hoisting 
apparatus shall include a depth indicator, a brake on the drum, a 
steel or iron cable and safety catches on the cage. 

Obstructions in Shaft, (g) No accumulation of ice, nor obstruc- 
tions of any kind shall be permitted in any escapement shaft, nor 
shall any steam, or heated or vitiated air be discharged into said 
shaft; and all surface or other water which tlows therein shall be 
conducted by rings or otherwise to receptacles for the same, so as to 
keep the stairway free from falling water. 

Weekly Inspections. (Ji) All escapement shafts and the passage- 
ways leading thereto, or to the works of a> contiguous mine, must be 
carefully examined at least onoe a week by the mine manager, or a 
man specially delegated by him for that purpose, and the date and 
findings of such inspection must be duly entered in the record book 
in the offices at the mine. If obstructions are foun d, their location 
and nature must be stated together with the date at which they are 
removed. 

Commun'ICATIOn with Ad.j agent Mine. (/) When operators of ad- 
jacent mines have, by agreement, established underground communi- 
cation between said mines, as an escapement outlet for the men 
employed in l)oth, the roadways to the boundary on either side shall 
be regularly patrolled and kept clear (jf every obstruction to travel by 
the respective operators, and the intervening door shall remain un- 
locked and ready at all times for immediate use. 

When such communication has once been established between con- 
tiguous mines, it shall be unlawful for the operator of either mine to 
close the same without the consent both of the contiguous operator 
and of the State Inspector for the district: Provided, that, when 
either operator desires to abandon mining operations, the expense 
and duty of maintaining such communication shall devolve upon the 
party continuing operations and using the same. 

the engine and boiler house. 

§ 4. Location, (a) Any building erected after the passage of 
this act, for the purpose of housing the hoisting engine or boilers at 
any shaft, shall be substantially fire-i)roof, and no boiler house shall 
be nearer than sixty feet to the main shaft or opening or to any 
building or inflammable structure connecting therewith. 

Brake on Drum. (6) Every hoisting engine shall be provided 
with a good and sufficient brake on the drum, so adjusted that it may 
be operated by the engineer without leaving his post at the levers. 

Flanges, (c) Flanges shall be attached to the sides of the drum 
of any engine used for hoisting men, with a clearance of not less than 
four inches when the whole rope is wound on the drum. 



214 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Cable Fastenings, (d) The ends of the hoisting cables shall be- 
well secured on the drum, and at least two and a half laps of the same 
shall remain on the drum when the cage is at rest at the lowest cag- 
ing place in the shaft. 

Indicatoe. (e) An index dial or indicator, to show at all times 
the true position of the cages in the shaft, shall be attached to every 
hoisting engine for the constant information and guidance of the en- 
gineer. 

Signals. ( / ) The code of signals as provided for in this act. shall 
be displayed in conspicuous letters at some point in front of the en- 
gineer when standing at his post. 

Gauges, (r/) Every boiler shall be provided with a steam gauge, 
except where two or more boilers are equipped and connected with a 
steam drum, properly connected with the boilers to indicate the steam 
pressure, and another steam gauge shall be attached to the steam pipe 
in the engine house, the two to be placed in such positions that both 
the engineer and firemen can readily see what pressure is being car- 
ried. Such steam gauges shall be kept in good order and adjusted 
and be tested as often at least as every six months. 

Safety Valves, (h) Every boiler or battery of boilers shall be 
provided with a safety valve of sufficient area for the escape of steam, 
and with weights and springs properly adjusted. 

. Inspection of Boilers. (/) All boilers used in generating steam 
in and about coal mines shall be kept in good order, and the operator 
of every coal mine where steam boilers are in use shall have said 
boilers thoroughly examined and inspected by a competent boiler- 
maker or other qualified person, not an employe, of said operator, as. 
often as once in every six months, and oftener if the inspector shall 
deem it necessary, and the result of every such inspection shall be 
reported on suitable blanks to said inspector. 

THE powder house. 

§ 5. All blasting powder and explosive material must be stored in- 
a fire-proof building on the surface, located at a safe distance from 
all other buildings. 



THE STATE MINING BOARD. 

§ 6. Manner and Purpose of Appointment, (a) For. the pur- 
pose of securing efficiency in the mine inspection service, and a high 
standard of qualification in those who have the management and 
operation of coal mines, the State Commissioners of Labor shall ap- 
point a board of examiners, to be known as the State Mining Board, 
whose duty it shall be to make formal inquiry into and pass upon th& 
practical and technical qualifications and personal fitness of men 
seeking appointments as State Inspectors of Mines, and of thos& 
seeking certificates of competency as mine managers, as hoisting en- 
gineers and as mine examiners. This board shall be composed of 



REVISED MINING LAW. 215 

five members, two of whom shall bo practical coal miuors; one an ex- 
pert mining engineer, and who shall, when practicable, be also a 
hoisting engineer, and two shall be coal operators. 

Date and Term of Appointment. (h) Their appointment shall 
date from Jnly 1, 1899, and they shall serve for a term of two years, 
or until their snccessors are appointed and qualitied; they shall or- 
ganize by the election of one of their number as president, and some 
suitable person, not a member, as secretary, after which they shall all 
be sworn to a faithful performance of their duties. 

Supplies Furnished by Secretary of State, (c) The Secretary 
or State shall assign to the use of the board suitably furnished rooms 
in the State House for such meetings as are held at the capitol, and 
shall also furnish whatever blanks, blank-books, printing and station- 
ery the board may require in the discharge of its duties. 

Frequency of Meetings, (d) The board shall meet at the capitol 
in regular session on the second Tuesday in Sej^tember of the year 
1899, and biennially thereafter, for the examination of candidates 
for appointment as State Inspectors of Mines. For the examination 
of persons seeking certificates of competency as mine managers, 
hoisting engineers and mine examiners, the board shall hold meet- 
ings at such times and places within the State as shall, in the judg- 
ment of the members, afford the best facilities tc the greatest number 
of probable candidates. Special meetings may also be called by the 
Commissioners of Labor, whenever, for any reason, it may become 
necessary to ajapoint one or more inspectors. Public notice shall be 
given through the press or otherwise, announcing the time and i:jlace 
at which examinations are to be held. 

Rules of Procedure, (c) The examinations herein provided for 
shall be conducted under such rules, conditions and regulations as 
the members of the board shall deem most efficient for carrying into 
effect the spirit and intent of this act. Such rules, when formulated, 
shall be made a part of the permanent record of the l^oard, and such 
of them as relate to candidates shall be published for their informa- 
tion, and governance prior to each examination; they shall also be of 
uniform application to all candidates. 

examinations. 

§ 7. For Inspectors, (a) Persons coming before the State Min- 
ing Board as candidates for appointment as State Inspectors of Mines 
must produce evidence satisfactory to the board that they are citizens 
of this State, at least thirty years of age, that they have had a practi- 
cal mining experience of ten years, and that they are men of good 
repute and teuiperate habits; they must also submit to and satisfac- 
torily pass an examination as to their practical and technical knowl- 
edge of mining engineering and mining machinery and appliances, 
of the proper development and operation of coal mines, of ventila- 
tion in mines, of the nature and properties of mine gases, of the 
geology of the coal measures in this State and of the laws of this 
State relatinsj; to coal mines. 



216 STATISTICS OF LABOR 

Names Certiffed to the Governor. (6) At the close of each ex- 
aminatioa for inspectors the board shall certify to the Governor the 
names of all candidates who have received a rating above the mini- 
mum fixed by the rules of the board as properly qualified for the 
duties of inspectors. 

Inspectors Appointed, (c) From those so named the Governor 
shall select and appoint seven State inspectors of mines, that is to 
say, one inspector for each of the seven inspection districts provided 
for in this act, or more, if, in the future, additional inspection dis- 
tricts shall be created, and their commissions shall be for a term of 
two years from October first: Provided, that any one who has satis- 
factorily passed two of the State examinations for inspectors, and 
who has served acceptably as State Inspector for two full terms, upon 
making written application to the board setting forth the facts, shall 
also be certified to the Governor as a person properly qualified for 
appointment. But no man shall be eligible for appointment as a 
State Inspector of Mines who has any pecuniary interest in any coal 
mine, either as owner or employe. 

For Mine Managers, (d) Persons coming before the board for 
certificates of competency as mine managers must produce evidence 
satisfactory to the board that they are citizens of this State, at least 
twenty-four years of age, that they have had at least four years prac- 
tical mining experience, and that they are men of good repute and 
temperate habits; they must also submit to and satisfactorily pass 
such an examination as to their experience in mines and in the man- 
agement of men, their knowledge of mine machinery and appliances, 
the use of surveying and other instruments, the properties of mine 
gases, the principles of ventilation and the specific duties and re- 
sponsibilities of mine managers, as the board shall see fit to impose. 

For Hoisting Engineers, (e) Persons seeking certificates of 
competency as hoisting engineers must produce evidence satisfactory 
to the board that they are citizens of the United States, at least twen- 
ty-one years of age, that they have had at least two years experience 
as fireman or engineer of a hoisting plant, and are of good repute 
and temperate habits. They must be prepared to submit to and sat- 
isfactorily pass an examination as to their experience in handling 
hoisting machinery, and as to their practical and technical knowledge 
of the construction, cleaning and care of steam boilers, the care and 
adjustment of hoisting engines, the management and efficiency of 
pumps, ropes and winding apparatus, and their knowledge of the 
laws of this State in relation to signals and the hoisting and lower- 
ing of men at mines. 

For Mine Examiners. (/) Persons seeking certificates of compe- 
tency as mine examiners must produce evidence satisfactory to the 
board that they are citizens of this State, at least twenty-one years 
of age, and of good rejDute and temperate habits. They must be pre- 
pared to submit to and satisfactorily pass an examination as to their 
experience in mines generating dangerous gases, their practical and 
technical knowledge of the nature and properties of fire-damp, the 



REVISED MINING LAW. 217 

laws of ventilation, the structure and uses of the safety lamp, and the 
Jaws of this State relating to safe<,niards against fires from any source 
in mines. 

CERTIFICATES. 

§ 8. Issued by the Board, (a) The certificates provided for in 
this act shall l)e issued under the signatures and seal of the State 
Mining Board, to all those who receive a rating above the minimum 
iixed by the rules of the board; such certificates shall contain the 
full name, age and place of birth of the recipient, and the length and 
nature of his previous service in or about coal mines. 

Register to be Preserved, (b) The board shall make and pre- 
serve a record of the names and addresses of all persons to whom cer- 
tificates are issued, and at the close of each examination shall make 
report of the same to the Commissioners of Labor, who shall cause a 
permanent register of all certificated i^ersons to be made and kept for 
public inspection in the oSice of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics 
in the State capitol. 

Effect of Certificates, (c) The certificates provided for in this 
act shall entitle the holders thereof to accept and discharge the duties 
for which they are thereby declared qualified, at any mine in this 
State, where their services may be desired. 

Foreign Certificates. ((/) The board may exercise its discretion 
in issuing certificates of any class, but not without examination, to 
persons presenting, with proper credentials, certificates issued by 
competent authority in other states. 

Unlawful to Employ other than Certificated Mine Managers. 
(e) It shall be unlawful for the operator of any coal mine to employ, 
or suffer to serve, as mine manager at his mine, any person wno does 
not hold a certificate of competency issued b}" a duly authorized Board 
of Examiners of this State: Provided, that whenever any exigency 
arises by which it is impossible for any operator to secure the im- 
mediate services of a certificated mine manager, he may place any 
trustworthy and experienced man, subject to the approval of the 
State Inspector of the district, in charge of his mine, to act as tem- 
porary mine manager for a period not exceeding thirty days. 

Unlawful to Employ Other than Certificated Hoisting Engi- 
neer. (/) It shall be unlawful for the operator of any mine to em- 
ploy, or suffer to serve, as hoisting engineer for said mine, any person 
who does not hold a certificate of competency issued by a duly au- 
thorized Board of Examiners of this State, or iDermit any other to 
operate his hoisting engine except for the purpose of learning to op- 
erate it, and then only in the presence of the certificated engineer in 
charge, and when men are not being hoisted or lowered: Provided, 
that whenever any exigency arises by which it is impossible for any 
operator to secure the immediate services of a certificated hoisting 
engineer, he may place any trustworthy and experienced man, subject 
to the approval of the State Inspector of the district in charge of his 
engines, to act as temporary engineer, for a period not to exceed 
thirty days. 



218 statistics of labor. 

Unlawful to Employ Other than Certificated Mine Examiners, 
(g) It shall be unlawful for the operator of any mine to employ, or 
suffer to serve, as mine examiner, any person who does not hold a 
certificate of competency issued by the State Mining Board: Pi'o. 
vicled, that any one holding a mine manager's certificate may serve 
as mine examiner. Any one holding a certificate as fire boss, on pre- 
sentation of the same to the State Mining Board, may have it ex- 
changed for a mine examiner's certificate. 

Cancellation of Certificates, (h) The certificate of any mine 
manager, hoisting engineer or mine examiner, may be cancelled and 
revoked by the State Mining Board whenever it shall be established 
to the satisfaction of said board that the holder thereof has become 
unworthy of official endorsement, by reason of violations of the law, 
intemperate habits, manifest incapacity, abuse of authority, or for 
other causes satisfactory to said board: Provided, that any person 
against whom charges or complaints are made shall have an oppor- 
tunity to be heard in his own behalf. And he shall have thirty days 
notice in writing of such charges. 

fees for examinations. 

§ 9. An applicant for any certificate herein provided for, before 
being examined, shall register his name with the secretary of the 
board, and file with him the credentials required by this act, to-wit: 
An affidavit as to all matters of fact establishing his right to receive 
the examination, and a certificate of good character and temperate 
habits signed by at least ten of the citizens who know him best in the 
place in which he lives. 

Each candidate, before receiving the examination, shall pay to the 
secretary of the board the sum of one dollar as an examination fee, 
and those who pass the examination for which they are entered, be- 
fore receiving their certificates, shall also pay to the secretary the 
further sum of two dollars each as a certificate fee. All such fees 
shall be duly accounted for by the board, and covered into the State 
treasury at the close of each fiscal year. 

PAY OF THE board. 

§ 10. The members of the State Mining Board shall receive as 
compensation for their services the sum of five dollars each per day, 
for a term not exceeding one hundred days in any one year, and what- 
ever sums are necessary to reimburse them for such traveling ex- 
penses as may be incurred in the discharge of their duties. 

The salary of the secretary shall be determined by the board, but 
shall in no case exceed the sum of one thousand dollars per annum, 
and he shall be reimbursed for any amounts expended for actual and 
necessary traveling expenses in the discharge of his duties. All such 
salaries and expanses of the board and of its secretary shall be paid 
upon vouchers duly sworn to by each and approved by the president 
of the board and by the Governor, and tha Auditor of Public Ac- 



REVISED MINING LAW. 219' 

counts is hereby authorized to draw his warrants on the State Treas- 
urer for the amounts thus shown to be due, payable out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

INSPECTION DISTRICTS. 

§ 11. Boundaries Defined, (a) The State shall be divided into 
seven inspection districts, as follows: 

The tirst district shall be composed of the counties of Boone, Mc- 
Henry, Lake, DeKalb, Kane. DuPage, Cook, LaSalle, Kendall, 
Grundy, Will, Livingston, and Kankakee. 

The second district shall be composed of the counties of JoDaviess,- 
Stephenson, Winnebago, Carroll, Ogle, Whiteside. Lee, Rock Island, 
Henry, Bureau, Mercer, Stark, Putnam, Marshall, Peoria, and Wood- 
ford. 

The third district shall be composed of the counties of Henderson,. 
Warren, Knox, Hancock. McDonough, Schuyler, Fulton, Adams, and 
Brown. 

The fourth district shall be composed of the counties of Tazewell, 
McLean, Ford, Iroquois, Vermilion, Champaign, Piatt, DeWitt, 
Macon, Logan, Menard, Mason, and Cass. 

The fifth district shall be composed of the counties of Pike, Scott,. 
Morgan, Sangamon, Christian, Shelby, Moultrie, Douglas, Coles, 
Cumberland, Clark, Edgar, Montgomery, Macoupin, Greene, Jersey,. 
and Calhoun. 

The sixth district shall be composed of the counties of Monroe, St. 
Clair, Madison, Bond, Clinton, Fayette, Marion, Effingham, Clay, 
Jasper, Richland, Crawford, and Lawrence. 

The seventh district shall be composed of the counties of Wash- 
ington, Jefferson, Wayne, Edwards, Wabash, White, Hamilton, 
Franklin, Perry, Randolph, Jackson, Williamson, Saline, Gallatin,, 
Hardin, Pope, Johnson, Massac, Union, Alexander, and Pulaski. 

How Changes May be Made. (6) Provided, that the Commis- 
sioners of Labor, may, from time to time, make such changes in the 
boundaries of said districts as may, in their judgment, be required in 
order to distribute more evenly the labors and expenses of the several 
inspectors of mines, but this provision shall not be construed as au- 
thorizing the board to increase the number of districts. 

CHAXGIJS IX THE BOCNDABIES OF lySPECTIOX DISTBICTS 
OF TEE STATE. 

At a meetins: of rhe Board of Commissioners of Labor held in .Tune. 1S99, under the pro- 
vision of Section 11 of the mining law, the boundaries of the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth 
Inspection Districts were changed and made as follows, to taice effect July 1, 1899: 

The Second District shall be composed of the counties of .Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winne- 
bago, Carroll, Ogle, Whiteside, Lee. Rock Island, Henry, Bureau, Mercer, Stark, Putnam, 
Marshall, Henderson. Warren and Knox. 

The Third District shall be composed of the counties of Hancock, McDonough, Schuyler. 
Fulton, Peoria, Tazewell, Adams, Cass, Mason and Menard. 

The Fourth District shall be composed of the counties of Woodford, McLean, Ford. Iro- 
quois. Vermilion, Champaign. Piatt, DeWitt, Macon, Logan, Christian, Shelby, Moultrie, 
Douglas, Edgar, Clark. Coles and Cumberland. 



220 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The Fifth District shall be composed of the counties of Brown, Pike, Scott, Morgan. 
Sangamon, Montgomery, Macoupin, Green, Jersey and Calhoun. 
The First, Sixth and Seventh Districts remain unchanged. 

DUTIES OF INSPECTORS. 

§ 12. Bond, (a) Those who receive appointment as State In- 
spectors of Mines mast, before entering upon their duties as such, 
take an oath of office, as provided for by the constitution, and enter 
into a bond to the State in the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars, 
with sureties to be approved by the governor, conditioned upoa the 
faithful performance of their duties in every particular as required 
by this act; said bond, with the approval of the governor endorsed 
thereon, together with the oath of office, shall be deposited with the 
Secretary of State. 

Instruments, (b) For the more efficient discharge of the duties 
herein imjjosed upom them, each inspector shall be furnished at the 
expense of the State, with an anemometer, a safety lamp, and what- 
ever other instruments may be required in order to carry into effect 
the provisions of this act. 

Examinations of Mines, (c) State Inspectors of mines shall de- 
vote their whole time and attention to the duties of their office, and 
make personal examination of every mine within their respective dis- 
tricts, and shall see that every necessary precaution is taken to insure 
the health and safety of the workmen employed in such mines, and 
that the provisions and requirements of all the mining laws of this 
State are faithfully observed and obeyed and the penalties for the 
violation of the same j)romptly enforced. 

Authority to Enter, {d) It shall be lawful for State Inspec- 
tors to enter, examine and inspect any and all coal mines and the ma- 
chinery belonging thereto at all reasonable times by day or by night, 
but so as not to obstruct or hinder the necessary workings of such 
coal mine, and the operator of every such coal mine is hereby re- 
quired to furnish all necessary facilities for making such examina- 
tion and inspection. 

Procedure in Case of Ob.jection. (d) If any operator shall re- 
fuse to permit such inspection or to furnish the necessary facilities 
for making such examination and inspection, the inspector shall file 
his affidavit, setting forth such refusal, with the judge of the circuit 
court in said county in which said mine is situated, either in term 
time or vacation, or, in the absence of said judge, with the master in 
chancery in said county in which said mine is situated, and obtain 
an order on such owner, agent or operator so refusing as aforesaid, 
commanding him to permit and furnish such necessary facilities for 
the inspection of such coal mine, or to be adjudged to stand in con- 
tempt of court and punished accordingly. 

Notices to be Posted. (/) The State Inspector of Mines shall 
post up in some conspicuous place at the top of each mine visited and 
inspected by him, a plain statement of the condition of said mine, 
-showing what, in his judgment, is necessary for the better protection 
^of the lives and health of jDersons employed in said mine; such state- 



REVISED MINING LAW. 221 

ment shall give the date of inspection and be signed by the inspec- 
tor. He shall also post a notice at the landing used by the men stat- 
ing what number of men will be permitted to ride on the cage at one 
time, and at what rate of speed men may be hoisted and lowered on 
the cages. He must observe especially that a proper code of signals 
l)etween the engineer and top man and bottom man is established. 
and conspicuously posted for the information of all employes. 

Sealer of Weights, (g) State Inspectors of Mines are hereby^ 
made ex-officio sealers of weights and measures in their respective 
districts, and as such are empowered to test all scales used to weigh 
coal at coal mines. Upon the written request of any mine owner or 
operator, or of ten coal miners employed at any one mine, it shall l)e 
his duty to try and prove any scale or scales at such mine against 
which complaint is directed, and if he shall find that they, or any of 
them do not weigh correctly he shall call the attention of the mine 
owner or operator to the fact, and direct that said scale or scales be 
at once overhauled and readjusted so as to indicate only true and 
exact weights, and he shall forbid the further operation of such mine 
until such scales are adjusted. In the event that such tests shall con- 
tlict with any test made by any county sealer of weights, or under 
and by virtue of any municipal ordinance or regulation, then the 
test by such mine inspector shall jprevail. 

Test Weights, (li) For the purpose of carrying out the j^rovis- 
ions of this act each inspector shall be furnished by the State with a 
complete set of standard weights suitable for testing the accuracy of 
tack scales and of all smaller scales at mines; said test weights to 
be paid for on bills of particulars, certified by the Secretary of State 
and approved by the Governor. Such test weights shall remain in 
the custody of the inspector for use at any point within his district, 
and for any amounts expended by him for the storage, transportation 
or hardling of the same, he shall be fully reimbursed upon making 
entry of the proper items in his quarterly expense voucher. 

Inspectors' Annual Reports. (/) Each State Inspector of Mine.^ 
shall, at the close of the official year, to-wit: after June 30, of every 
year, prepare and forward to the Secretary of the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics a formal report of his acts during the year in the discharge 
of his duties, with any recommendations as to legislation he may- 
deem necessary on the subject of mining, and shall collect and tabu- 
late upon blanks furnished by said Secretary all desired statistics of 
mines and miners within his district to accompany said annual 
report. 

Reports to be Published. (_/) On the receipt of said inspectors' 
reports the Secretary of the Bureau of Labor Statistics shall proceed 
to compile and summarize the same as a report of said bureau, to be 
known as the Annual Coal Report, which shall be duly transmitted 
to the Governor for the information of the General Assembly and the 
public. The printing and binding of said reports shall be provided 
for by the Commissioners of State Contracts in like manner and in 
like number as they provide for the publication of other official re- 
ports to the Governor. 



'AZ^l STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The Secretary of State shall furnish to said inspectors, upon the 
requisition of the Secretary of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
whatever instruments, blanks, blank books, stationery, printing and 
supplies may be required by said inspectors in the discharge of their 
official duties: said instruments to be paid for on bills of particulars, 
certified by the Secretary of State and approved by the Governor. 

It shall be the duty of every coal operator and every employer of 
labor in this State to attbrd to the State Commissioners of Labor, or 
their representatives, every facility for procuring statistics of the 
wages and conditions of their employes for the purpose of compiling 
and publishing statistics of labor and of social and industrial condi- 
tions within the State as required by law. Any person who shall 
hinder or obstruct the investigation of the agents of the commis- 
sioners, or shall neglect or refuse, for a period of ten days, to furnish 
the information called for by the schedules of the commissioners as 
provided above, shall be adjudged guilty of a misdemeanor and be 
subjected to a fine of one hundred dollars. 

PAY OF INSPECTORS. 

§ 13. Each State Inspector of Mines shall receive as compensa- 
tion for his services, the sum of eighteen hundred dollars per annum, 
and for his traveling expenses the sum actually expended for that 
purpose, in the discharge of his official duties, both to be paid quar- 
terly by the State Treasurer, on warrants of the Auditor of Public 
Accounts, from the funds in the treasury not otherwise appropriated; 
said expense vouchers shall show the items of ex^Denditures in detail, 
with sub-vouchers for the same so far as it is i^racticable to obtain 
them. Said voucher shall be sworn to by the inspector and be ap- 
proved by the Secretary of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the 
Oovernor. 

REMOVAL OF INSPECTORS. 

§ 14. Upon a petition signed by not less than three coal operators, 
<or\en coal miners, setting forth that any State Inspector of Mines 
neglects his duties, or that he is incompetent, or that he is guilty of 
malfeasance in office, or guilty of any act tending to the injury of 
miners or operators of mines, it will be lawful for the Commissioners 
of Labor of this State to issue a citation to the said inspector to ap- 
pear, at not less than fifteen days' notice on a day fixed, before them, 
when the said commissioners shall proceed to inquire into and inves- 
tigate the allegations of the petitioners; and if the said commission- 
ers find that the said inspector is neglectful of his duty, or that he is 
incompetent to perform the duties of said office, or that he is guilty 
of malfeasance in office, or guilty of any act tending to the injury of 
miners or operators of mines, the said commissioners shall declare 
the office of inspectors of said district vacant, and a properly qualified 
j)3rson shall be duly appointed, in the manner provided for in this 
act, to fill said vacancy. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 223 

COUNTY INSPECTORS. 

§ 15. The County Board of Supervisors or of Commissioners in 
counties not under township oi-f^-anization, of any county in which 
coal is produced, upon the written request of the Slate Inspector of 
Mines for the district in which said county is located, shall appoint 
a County Inspector of Mines as assistant to such State inspector; but 
no person shall be eligible for appointment as county inspector who 
does not hold a State certificate of competency as mine manager, and 
the compensation of such county inspector shall be fixed by the 
county board at not less than three dollars per day, to be paid out of 
the county treasury. 

The State inspector may authorize any county inspector in his 
district to assume and discharge all the duties and exercise all the 
powers of a State inspector in the county for wdiich he is appointed, 
in the absence of the State inspector; but such authority must be 
conferred in writing and the county inspector must produce the 
same as evidence of his powers upon the demand of any person 
affected b)'- his acts; and the bond of said State inspector shall be 
holden for the faithful performance of the duties of such assistant 
inspector. 



DUTIES OF MINE MANAGERS AND MINERS. 

§ 16. (a) The mine managers shall instruct employes as to their 
respective duties, and shall visit and examine the various working 
j)lace3 in the mine as often as practicable. He shall al^-ays provide 
a sufficient supply of props, caps and timber delivered on the miners' 
cars at the usual place where demanded, as nearly as possible, in suit- 
able lengths and dimensions for the securing of the roof by the 
miners, and it shall be the duty of the miner to properly prop and 
secure his place with materials provided therefor. 

Ventilation, (b) It shall be the duty of the mine manager to see 
that cross-cuts are made at ijroper distances apart to secure the best 
ventilation at the face of all working places, and that all stoppings 
along air-ways are properly and promptly built. He shall keep care- 
ful watch over all ventilating apparatus and the air-currents in the 
mine, and in case of accident to fan or machinery by which the cur- 
rents are obstructed or stopped, he shall at once order the withdrawal 
of the men and prohibit their return until thorough ventilation has 
been re-established. 

Air-currents and Outlet Passage-ways, (c) He shall measure 
or cause to be measured the air-current with an anemometer at least 
once a week at the inlet and outlet, and shall keep a record of such 
measurements for the information of the inspector. Once a week he 
shall make a special examination of the roadways leading to the 
escapement shaft or other opening for the safe exit of men to the 
surface, and shall make a record of any obstructions to travel he may 
encounter therein, together with the date of their removal. 



224 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Handling Explosives, (d) He shall give special attention to and 
instructions concerning the proper storage and handling of explos- 
ives in the mine, and concerning the time and manner of placing 
and discharging the blasting shots, and it shall be unlawful for any 
miner to fire shots except according to the rules of the mine. In 
dusty mines he must see that all hauling roads are frequently and 
thoroughly sprinkled. He must also see that all dangerous places, 
above and below, are properly marked, and that danger signals are 
displayed wherever they are required. 

Care of Ropes, Cages, Etc. (e) The mine manager or superin- 
tendent must have special attention given to the condition of the 
hoisting ropes; they must be carefully and frequently scrutinized. 
Before the men are lowered in the morning the soundness of thfr 
ropes must be tested by hoisting the cages. He must also have the 
cages, safety catches, pumps, sumps and stables examined frequently; 
he must have the mine examined every morning by the mine exam- 
iner before the men are allowed to go to work, and know that the top 
man and bottom man are on duty, and that sufficient lights are main- 
tained at the toj) and bottom landings when the men are being hoisted- 
and lowered. 

Early and Late Dqty. (/) The mine manager or his agent shall 
be at his post at the mine when the men are lowered into the mine- 
in the morning for work; he shall by some device keep a record of 
the number of men lowered either for a day or night shift, and he or 
his agent shall remain at night until all the men employed during 
the day shall have been hoisted out. 

May Have Assistants, (g) In mines in which the works are so 
extensive that all the duties devolving on the mine manager can not 
be discharged by one man, competent persons may be designated and 
appointed as assistants to the mine manager who shall exercise his 
functions, under his instructions. 

duties of hoisting engineers. 

§ 17. Constant Attendance, (a) The hoisting engineer at any 
mine shall be in constant attendance at his engine ot boilers at all 
times when there are workmen underground. 

Outsiders Excluded, (b) The engineer shall not permit any one 
to enter or loiter in the engine room, except those authorized by tlieir 
l^osition, or duties to do so, and he shall hold no conversation with 
any officer of the company or other person while the engine is in 
motion or while his attention is occupied with the signals. A notice 
to this effect shall be posted on the door of the engine house. 

Care of Engine and Boilers, (c) The engineer or some other 
properly authorized employe must keep a careful watch over the 
engine, boilerS; pumps, ropes and winding apparatus. He must see 
that his boilers are properly supplied with water, cleaned and in- 
spected at frequent intervals, and that the steam pressure does not 
excef^d the limit established by the boiler inspector; he shall fre- 
quently try the safety valves and shall not increase the weights on 



REVISED MINING LAW. 225 

the same; he shall observe that the steam and water i^auges are 
always in good order, and if any of the pumps, valves or gauges 
become deranged or fail to act he shall promptly report the fact to 
the proper authority. 

Signals. ((/) The engineer must thoroughly understand the es- 
tablished code of signals, and these must be delivered in the engine 
room in a clear and unmistakable manner, and when he has the sig- 
nal that men are on the cage he must work his engine only at the rate 
of speed hereafter specified in this act. 

Handling of Engine, (e) The engineer shall permit no one to 
handle or meddle with any machinery under his charge, nor suffer 
any one who is not a certificated engineer to operate his engine, 
except for the purpose of learning to operate it, and then only in the 
presence of the engineer in charge, and when men are not on the 
cage. 

duties of mine examiners. 

i^ 18. To Enter and Examine all Places, (a) A mine exam- 
iner shall be required at all mines. His duty shall be to visit the 
mine before the men are permitted to enter it. and, first, he shall see 
that the air-current is traveling in its proper course and in proper 
quantity. He shall then inspect all places where men are expected 
to pass or to work, and observe whether there are any recent falls 
or obstructions in rooms or roadways, or accumulations of gas or other 
unsafe conditions. He shall especially examine the edges and acces- 
sible parts of recent falls and old gobs and air-courses. As evidence' 
of his examination of all working places, he shall inscribe on the 
walls of each, with chalk, the month and the day of the month of his- 
visit. 

To Post Danger Notices, (b) When working places are discov- 
ered in which accumulations of gas, or recent falls, or any dangerous 
conditions exist, he shall place a conspicuous mark thereat as notice 
to all men to keep out, and at once report his finding to the mine 
manager. 

No one shall be allowed to remain in any part of the mine through 
which gas is being carried into the ventilating current, nor to enter 
the mine to work therein, except under the direction of the mine 
manager, until all conditions shall have been made safe. 

To Make Daily Record, (c) The mine examiner shall make a 
daily record of the conditions of the mine, as he has found it, in a 
book kept for that purpose, which shall be preserved in the office for 
the information of the company, the inspector and all other persons 
interested, and this record shall be made each morning before the 
miners are permitted to descend into the mine. 

VENTILATION. 

§ 19, Throughout every coal mine there shall be maintained cur- 
rents of fresh air sufficient for the health and safety of all men and 

—15 C. R. 



226 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

animals employed thefein, and such ventilation shall be produced by 
a fan, or some other artificial means. 

Amount of Air Required, (a) The quantity of air required to 
be kept in circulation and passing a given point shall be not less than 
100 cubic feet per minute for each person and not less than 600 cubic 
feet per minute for each animal in the mine, measured at the toot of 
the downcast, and this quantity may be increased at the discretion 
of the inspector whenever, in his judgment, unusual conditions make 
a stronger current necessary. Said currents shall be forced into 
every working place throughout the mine, so that all parts of the 
same shall be reasonably free from standing powder smoke and dele- 
terious air of every kind. 

Measurements, (b) The measurements of the currents of air shall 
be taken with an anemometer at the foot of the downcast, at the foot 
of the upcast, and at the working face of each division or split of the 
air-current. And a record of such measurements shall be made and 
preserved in the office, as elsewhere provided for in this act. 

Air Currents to be Split, (c) The main current of air shall be 
so split, or subdivided, as to give a separate current of reasonably 
pure air to every hundred men at work, and the inspector shall have 
authority to order separate currents for smaller groups of men, if, in 
his judgment, special conditions make it necessary. 

Ventilation of Stable, (d) The air current for ventilating the 
stable shall not pass into the intake air-current for ventilating the 
working parts of the mine. 

Self-closing Doors, (e) All permanent doors in mines, used in 
guiding and directing the ventilating currents, shall be so hung and 
adjusted so as to close automatically. 

Trappers. (/) At all principal door-ways, through which cars are 
hauled, an attendant shall be employed for the purpose of opening 
and closing said doors Avhen trips of cars are passing to and from 
the workings. Places for shelter shall be provided at such door- ways 
to protect the attendants, from being injured by the cars while at- 
tending to their duties. 

Cross-cuts, (g) Cross-cuts shall be made not more than sixty 
feet apart, and no room shall be opened in advance of the aircurrent. 

Stoppings, {h) When it becomes necessary to close cross-cuts 
connecting the inlet and outlet air-courses in mines generating dan- 
gerous gases, the stoppings shall be built in a substantial manner 
with brick or other suitable building material laid in mortar or 
cement, if practicable, but in no case shall they be built of lumber 
except for temporary purposes. 

Authority of Inspector. (/) Whenever the inspector shall find 
men working without sufficient air, he shall at once give the mine 
manager or operator notice and a reasonable time in which to restore 
the current, and upon his or their refusal or neglect to act promptly, 
the inspector may order the endangered men out of the mine. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 227 

POWDER AND BLASTING. 

§ 20. No blasting powder or other explosives shall be stored in 
*iny coal mine, and no workingman shall have at any time more than 
one twenty-tive pound keg of black powder in the mine, nor more 
than three pounds of high explosives. 

Place and Manner of Storing, (a) Every person who has pow- 
der or other explosives in a mine, shall keep it or them in a wooden 
or metallic box or boxes securely locked, and said boxes shall be kept 
at least ten feet from the track, and no two powder boxes shall be 
kept within tifty feet of each other, nor shall black powder and high 
explosives be kept in the same box. 

Manner of Handling, (h) Whenever a workman is about to 
open a box or keg containing powder or other explosive, and while 
handling the same lie shall place and keep his lamp at least tive feet 
distant from said explosive and in such position that the air current 
can not convey sparks to it, and no person shall approach nearer 
than five feet to any open box containing powder or other explosive 
with a lighted lamp, lighted pipe or other thing containing fire. 

Copper Tools, (c) In the process of charging and tamping a hole 
no person shall use any iron or steel pointed needle. The needle 
used in preparing a blast shall be made of copper and the tamping 
l)ar shall be tipped with at least five inches of copper. No coal dust 
nor any material that is inflammable or that may create a spark shall 
be used for tamping, and some soft material must always be placed 
next to the cartridge or explosive. 

Use of Squibs. ( //) A miner who is about to explode a l)last with 
a manufactured squib shall not shorten the match, saturate it with 
mineral oil nor ignite it except at the extreme end: he shall see that 
all persons are out of danger from the proljable effects of such shot, 
and shall take measures to prevent any one approaching, by shout- 
ing "fire!" immediately before lighting the fuse. 

Not More than One Shot at a Time, (e) Not more than one 
shot shall be ignited at the same time in any one working place, un- 
less the firing is done by electricity or by fuses of such length that 
neither of the shots will explode in less than three minutes from the 
time they are lighted. When successive shots are to be fired in any 
working place in which the roof is broken or faulty, the smoke must 
be allowed to clear away and the roof must be examined and made 
secure between shots. 

Missed Shots. (/) No person shall return to a missed shot until 
five minutes have elapsed, unless the firing is done by electricity, 
and then only when the wires are disconnected from the battery. 

Dqsty Mines, ig) In case the galleries, roadways or entries of 
any mine are so dry that the air becomes charged with dust, the oper- 
ator of such mine must have such roadways regularly and thoroughly 
sprayed, sprinkled or cleaned, and it shall be the duty of the inspec- 
tor to see that all possible precautions are taken against the occur- 
rence of explosions which may be occasioned or aggravated by the 
presence of dust. 



228 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

PLACES OF REFUGE. 

§ 21. Engine Planes, (a) On all single track hauling roads 
wherever hauling is done by machinery, and on all gravity or in- 
clined planes in mines, upon which the persons employed in the mine 
must travel on foot to and from their work, places of refuge must be 
cut in the side wall not less than three feet in depth and four feet 
wide, and not more than twenty yards apart, unless there is a clear 
space of at least three feet between the side of the car and the side of 
the road, which space shall be deemed sufficient for the safe passage 
of men. 

On every such road which is more than 100 feet in length a code 
of signals shall be established between the hauling engineer and all 
points on the road. 

A conspicuous light must be carried on the front car of every trip 
or train of pit-cars moved by machinery, except when such trip is 
on an inclined plane. 

Mule Roals. (b) On all hauling roads or gangways on which the 
hauling is done by draft animals, or gangways whereon men have to 
pass to and from their work, places of refuge must be cut in the side 
wall at least two and a half feet deep, and not more than twenty 
yards apart; but such places shall not be required in entries from 
which rooms are driven at regular intervals not exceeding twenty 
yards, and whenever there is a clear space of two and one-half feet 
between the car and the rib, such space shall be deemed sufficient 
for the safe passage of men. 

All places of refuge must be kept clear of obstructions, and no ma- 
terial shall be stored nor allowed to accumulate therein. 

boys and women. 

§ 22. No boy under the age of fourteen years, and no woman, or 
girl of any age shall be permitted to do any manual labor in or about 
any mine, and before any boy can be permitted to work in any mine 
he must produce to the mine manager or operator thereof an affidavit 
from his parent or guardian or next of kin, sworn and subscribed to 
before a justice of the peace or notary public, that he, the said boy, 
is fourteen years of age. 

signals. 

§ 23. At every mine operated by shaft and by steam power, means 
must be provided for communicating distinct and separate signals to 
and from the bottom man, the top man and the engineer. The fol- 
lowing signals are prescribed for use at mines where signals are re- 
quired. 

From the Bottom to the Top. One bell shall signify to hoist coal 
or the empty cage, and also to stop either when in motion. 

Two bells shall signify to lower cage. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 229 

Three bells shall signify that men are coming up; when return sig- 
nal is received from the engineer, men will get on the cage and the 
eager shall ring one bell to start. 

Four bells shall signify to hoist slowly, implying danger 

Five bells shall signify accident in the mine and a call for a 
stretcher. 

Six bells shall call for a reversal of the fan. 

From the Top to the Bottom. One bell shall signify: All ready, 
get on cage. 

Two bells shall signify: Send away empty cage. 

Pi'ovided, that the operator of any mine may, with the consent of 
the inspector, add to this code of signals in his discretion, for the pur- 
pose of increasing its efficiency or of promoting the safety of the men 
in said mine, but whatever code may be established and in use at any 
mine, must be conspicuously posted at the top and at the bottom and 
in the engine room for the information and instruction of all persons 
concerned. 

WEIGHING AND WEIGHMEN. 

§ 24. Scales, (a) The operator of every coal mine where miners 
are paid by the weight of their output, shall provide at such mine 
suitable and accurate scales of standard manufacture for the weigh- 
ing of such coal, and a correct record shall be kept of all coal so 
weighed, and said record shall be open at all reasonable hours to the 
inspection of miners and others interested in the product of said 
mine. 

Weighman. (6) The person authorized to weigh the coal and 
keep the record as aforesaid shall, before entering upon his duties, 
make and subscribe to an oath before some person duly authorized 
to administer oaths, that he will accurately weigh and carefully keep 
a true record of all coal weighed, and such affidavit shall be kept 
conspicuously posted at the place of weighing. 

Check Weighman. (c) It shall be permitted to the miners at work 
in any coal mine to employ a check-weighman at their option and at 
their own expense, whose duty it shall be to balance the scales and 
see that the coal is properly weighed, and that a correct account of 
the same is kept, and for this purpose he shall have access at all 
times to the beam box of said scales, and be afforded every facility 
for verifying the weights while the weighing is being done. The 
check-weighman so employed by the miners, before entering upon 
his duties, shall make and subscribe to an oath before some person 
duly authorized to administer oaths, that he will faithfully discharge 
his duties as check-weighman, and such oath shall be kept conspicu- 
ously posted at the place of weighing. 



230 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



BOUNDARIES. 



§ 25. Ten-foot Limit, (a) In no case shall the workings of any 
mine be driven nearer than ten feet to the boundary line of the coal 
rights pertaining to said mine, except for the purpose of establishing 
an underground communication between contiguous mines, as pro- 
vided for elsewhere in this act. 

Approaching Old Works. (6) Whenever the workings of any 
part of a mine are approaching old workings, believed to contain 
dangerous accumulations of water or of gas, the operator of said 
mine must conduct the advances with narrow work, and maintain 
bore holes at least twenty feet in advance of the face of the work, 
and such side holes as may be deemed prudent or necessary. 



notice to inspectors. 

§ 26. Immediate notice must be conveyed to the inspector of the 
proper district by the operator interested: 

First. Whenever an accident occurs whereby any person receives 
serious or fatal injury. 

Second. Whenever it is intended to sink a shaft, either for hoist- 
ing or escapement purposes, or to open a new mine by any process. 

Third. Whenever it is intended to abandon any mine or to reopen 
any abandoned mine. 

Fourth. Upon the appearance of any large body of fire damp in 
any mine, whether accompanied by explosion or not, and upon the 
occurrence of any serious fire within the mine or on the surface. 

Fifth. When the workings of anj^ mine are approaching danger- 
ously near any abandoned mine, believed to contain accumulations 
of water or of gas. 

Sixth. Upon the accidental closing or intended abandonment of 
any j)assageway to an escapement outlet. 

accidents. 

§ 27. Duty of|Inspector. (a) Whenever loss of life or serious 
personal injury shall occur by reason of any explosion, or of any ac- 
cident whatsoever, in or connected with any coal mine, it shall be the 
duty of the person having charge of said mine to report that fact, 
without delay, to the inspector of the district in which the mine is 
located, and the said inspector shall, if he deem necessary from the 
facts reported, and in all cases of loss of life, immediately go to the 
scene of said accident and render every possible assistance to those 
in need. 

It shall moreover be the duty of every operator of a coal mine to 
make and preserve for the information of the inspector, and upon 
uniform blanks furnished by said inspector, a record of all injuries 
sustained by any of his employes in, the pursuance of their regular 
occupations. 



REVISED MINING LAW. 231 

Coroner's Inquest, {h} If any person is killed by any explosion, 
or other accident, the operator must also notify the coroner of the 
county, or in his absence or inability to act, any justice of the peace 
of said county, for the purpose of holding an inquest concerning the 
cause of such death. At such inquest the inspector shall offer such 
testimony as he may be possessed of, and may question or cross ques- 
tion any witness appearing in the case. 

Investigation by Inspector, (c) The inspector may also make 
any original or supplemental investigation which he may deem nec- 
essary, as to the nature and cause of any accident within his juris- 
diction, and shall make a record of the circumstances attending the 
same, and of the result of his investigations, for preservation in the 
tiles of his office. To enable him to make such investigation he shall 
have power to compel the attendance of witnesses, and to administer 
oaths or affirmations to them, and the cost of such investigations 
shall be paid by the county in which such accident has occurred, in 
the same manner as the costs of coroners inquests are paid. 

MEN ON CAGES. 

§ 28. Top Man and Bottom Man. (a) At every shaft operated 
by steam power, the operator must station at the top and at the bot- 
tom of such shaft, a competent man charged with the duty of attend- 
ing to signals, preserving order, and enforcing the rules governing 
the carriage of men on cages. Said top man and bottom man shall 
be at their respective posts of duty at least a half hour before the 
hoisting of coal begins in the morning, and remain for half an hour 
after hoisting ceases for the day. 

Lights on Landings, (h) Whenever the hoisting or lowering of 
men occurs before daylight or after dark, or when the landing at 
which men take or leave the cage is at all obscured by steam or 
otherwise, there must always be maintained at such landing a light 
sufficient to show the landing and surrounding objects distinctly. 
Likewise, as long as there are men underground in any mine, the 
operator shall maintain a good and sufficient light at the bottom of 
the shaft thereof, so that persons coming to the bottom may clearly 
discern the cage and objects in the vicinity. 

Speed of Cages and Other Regulations, (c) Cages on which 
men are riding shall not be lifted or lowered at a rate of speed 
greater than six hundred feet per minute, except with the written 
consent of the inspector. No person shall carry any tools, timber or 
other materials with him on a cage in motion, except for use in re- 
pairing the shaft* and no one shall ride on a cage containing either a 
loaded or empty car. Xo cage having an unstal)le or self-dumping 
platform shall be used for the carriage of men or materials, unless 
the same is provided with some convenient device by which said plat- 
form can be securely locked, and unless it is so locked whenever 
men or materials are being conveyed thereon. Xo coal shall be 
hoisted in any shaft while men are being lowered therein. 



232 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Eights of Men to Come Out. (d) Whenever men who have fin- 
ished their clay's work, or have been prevented from further work, 
shall come to the bottom to be hoisted out, an empty cage shall be 
given them for that purpose, unless there is an available exit by 
slope or by stairway in an escapement shaft, and providing there is 
no coal at the bottom ready to be hoisted. 

SAFETY LAMPS. 

§ 29. Operator Must Furnish, (a) At any mine where the in- 
spector shall find that fire-damp is being generated so as to require 
the use of a safety lamp in any jaart thereof, the operator of such 
mine, upon receiving notice from the inspector, that one or more 
such lamps are necessary to the safety of the men in such mine, shall 
at once procure and keep for use such numberof safety lamps as may 
be necessary. 

Mine Manager Must Care For. (b) All safety lamps used for 
examining mines and for working therein shall be the property of 
the operator, and shall remain in the custody of the mine manager or 
other competent person, who shall clean, fill, trim, examine and de- 
liver the same, locked and in safe condition, to the men, upon their 
request, when entering the mine, and shall receive the same from the 
men at the end of their shift. But miners shall be responsible for 
the condition and propar use of safety lamps when in their posses- 
sion. 

stretchers and blankets. 

§ 30. At every mine where fifty men are employed underground 
it shall be the duty of the operator thereof to keep alw^ays on hand, 
and at some readily accessible place, a properly constructed stretcher, 
a woolen and waterproof blanket, and a roll of bandages in good con- 
dition and ready for immediate use for binding, covering and carry- 
ing any one who may be injured at the mine. When two hundred 
or more men are employed in any mine, two stretchers and two wool- 
en and two waterproof blankets, with a corresponding supply of band- 
ages, shall be provided and kept on hand. At mines where fire-damp 
is generated there shall also be provided and kept in store a suitable 
supply of linseed or olive oil, for use in case men are burned by an 
explosion. 

caution to miners. 

§ 31. It shall be unlawful for any miner, workman, or other per- 
son knowingly or carelessly to injure any shaft, safety lamp, instru- 
ment, air course or brattice, or to obstruct or throw open any air-way, 
or carry any open lamp or lighted pipe or fire in any form into any 
place worked by the light of safety lamps, or within five feet of any 
open powder, or to handle or disturb any part of the hoisting ma- 
chinery, or open any door regulating an air current and not close the 
same, or to enter any part of the mine against caution, or to use 



REVISED MINING LAW. 233 

other than copper needles and copper tipped tamping bars, or to dis- 
obey any order given in pursuance of this act, or to do any wilful! act 
whereby the lives or health of persons working in the mines or the 
security of the mine or the machinery thereof is endangered. 

§ 32. It shall be the duty of every operator to post, on the engine 
house and at the pit top of his mine, in such manner that the em- 
ployes in the mine can read them, rules not inconsistent with this 
act, plainly printed in the English language, which shall govern all 
persons working in the mine. And the i^osting of such notice, as 
provided, shall charge all employes of such mine with legal notice of 
the contents thereof. 

PENALTIES. 

§ 33. Any wilful neglect, refusal or failure to do the things re- 
quired to be done by anj' section, clause or provision of this act, on 
the part of the person or persons herein rec^uired to do them, or any 
violation of any of the provisions or requirements hereof, or any at- 
tempt to obstruct or interfere with any inspector in the discharge of 
the duties herein imposed upon him, or any refusal to comply with 
the instructions of an inspector given by authority of this act, shall 
be deemed a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not exceeding five 
hundred dollars, or by imprisonment in the county jail for a period 
not exceeding six months, or both, at the discretion of the court: 
ProvidciL that in addition to the above penalties, in case of the fail- 
ure of any operator to comply with the provisions of this act in rela- 
tion to the sinking of escapement shafts and the ventilation of mines, 
the State's attorney for the county in which such failure occurs, or 
any other attorney, in case of his neglect to act promptly, shall pro- 
ceed against such operator by injunction without bond, to restrain 
him from continuing to operate such mine until all legal require- 
ments shall have been fully complied with. • 

Any inspector who shall discover that any section of this act, or 
part thereof, is being neglected or violated, shall order immediate 
compliance therewith, and in case of continued failure to comply, 
shall, through the State's attorney, or any other attorney, in case of 
his failure to act promptly, take the necessary legal steps to enforce 
compliance therewith through the penalties herein described. 

If it becomes necessary, through the refusal or failure of the 
State's attorney to act, for any other attorney to appear for the State 
in any suit involving the enforcement of any provision of this act 
reasonable fees for the services of such attorney shall be allowed by 
the board of supervisors, or county commissioners, in and for the 
county in which such proceedings are instituted. 

For any injury to person or property, occasioned by any wilful 
violations of this act, or wilful failure to comply with any of its pro- 
visions, a right of action shall accrue to the party injured for any 
direct damages sustained thereby; and in case of loss of life by 
reason of such wilful violation or wilful failure as aforesaid, a right 
of action shall accrue to the widow of the person so killed, his 
lineal heirs or adopted children, or to any other person or persons 



234 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

who were, before such loss of life, dependent for support on the per- 
son or persons so killed, for a like recovery of damages for the in- 
juries sustained by reason of such loss of life or lives, not to exceed 
the sum of five thousand dollars. 

DEFINITIONS. 

§ 34. Mine: (a) In this act the words "mine" and "coal mine," 
used in their general sense, are intended to signify any and all parts 
of the property of a mining plant, on the surface or underground, 
which contribute, directly or indirectly, under one management, to 
the mining or handling of coal. 

Excavations or Workings. (6) The words "excavations" and 
"workings" signify any or all parts of a mine excavated or being ex- 
cavated, including shafts, tunnels, entries, rooms and working places, 
whether abandoned or in use. 

Shaft, (c) The term "shaft" means any vertical opening through 
the strata which is or may be used for purposes of ventilation or es- 
capement, or for the hoisting or lowering of men and material in 
connection with the mining of coal. 

Slope or Drift, (d) The term "slope" or "drift" means any in- 
clined or horizontal way, opening or tunnel to a seam of coal to be 
used for the same purposes as a shaft. 

Operator, (e) The term "operator" as applied to the party in 
control of a mine in this act, signifies the person, firm or body cor- 
porate who is the immediate proprietor as owner or lessee of the 
plant, and, as such, responsible for the condition and management 
thereof. 

Inspector. (/) The term "inspector" in this act signifies the 
State Inspector of Mines, within and for the district to which he is 
appointed. 

Mine Manager, (g) The "mine manager" is the person who is 
charged with the general direction of the underground work, or both 
the underground and outside work of any coal mine, and who is 
commonly known and designated as "mine boss," or "foreman" or 
"pit boss." 

Mine Examiner, (h) The "mine examiner" is the person charged 
with the examination of the condition of the mine before the miners 
are permitted to enter it, and who is commonly known, and has been 
designated in former enactments as the "fire-boss." 

Approved April 18, 1899, in force July 1, 1899. 



MINING LAWS. 23S 

The following laws relating to the mining industry were not 
affected bv the revision and continue in force: 

MINERS TO BE PAID FOR ALL COAL MINED. 

i 1. Miners to be paid in lawful money for I 2. Mine inspectors to investigate and en- 
all coal mined. force the law. 

i 3. Penalty for violation of this act. 

An Act to provide for the payment of coal miners for all coal 
mined by them, and providimj additional dnties for mine in- 
spectors. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the Stcde of Illinois, 
represented in the Genercd Assembly : That every person engaged 
in mining coal for any corporation, company, firm or individual, shall 
be paid in lawful money of the United States for all coal mined and 
loaded into the mine car by such person for such corporation, com- 
pany, firm or individual, including lump, egg, nut, pea and slack, or 
such other grades as said coal may be divided into, at such price as 
may be agreed upon by the respective parties. 

§ 2. It shall be the duty of the mine inspector to ascertain whether 
or not the provisions of section one of this act are being complied 
with in his district, and if he shall find that any corporation, com- 
pany, firm or individual are violating the provisions of section one 
of this act, it shall be his duty to at once have instituted suit in the 
name of the People of the State of Illinois, in some court of com- 
petent jurisdiction, for the recovery of the penalty provided for in 
this act, and it shall be the duty of the State's attorney of the county 
in which such suit is brought, when notified by the mine inspector, to 
prosecute such suit as provided by law in other State cases. 

§ 3. Every corporation, company, firm or individual violating the 
provisions of this act shall be fined not less than twenty-five nor 
more than two hundred dollars for each offense. [Approved June 3, 
1897. in force July 1, 1897. 



MINERS — QUALIFICATION OF. 



[iner desiring to work by himself in 
mine must have two years experi- 
ence. 



§ 2. Penalty for violation of this act. 



An Act in rehdion to the safety and the competency of coal miners, 
and to punish for infraction of the same 
Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That from and after the 
passage of this act every person desiring to work by himself in 
rooms of coal mines in this State shall first produce satisfactory evi- 
dence to the mine manager of the mine in which he is employed, or 
desires to be employed, that he has worked at least two (2) years 
with or as a practical miner. Until said applicant has so satisfied 
the mine manager of the mine in which he seeks such employment 
of his competency, he shall not be allowed to mine coal, unless accom- 
panied by some' competent coal miner, until he becomes duly 
qualified. 



286 STATISICS OF LABOR. 

§ 2. Any violation of section one (1) of this act shall work a for- 
feiture of the certificate of the manager of the mine where any such 
party or parties are emjployed. [Approved June 7, 1897, in force 
July 1, 1897. 



OILS TO BE USED IN GOAL MINES. 



? la. Quality of oils to be used, 
b Testing of oils, requirements, 
c How gravity obtained, 
d Allowances to be made, 
e All barrels or packages to be branded, 
f Other material may be used in place of 
oil. 



2a. Only oils described to be used. 
b Operators and miners liable for using 

other oils, penalty, 
c Quantity sold limited in five barrels, 

penalty, 
d Violations of the law, how prosecuted. 
e Inspector's duties, information to be 

filed. 



An Act to prohibit the use of certain oils in coal nmies, and pen- 
alties for infraction of same. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: a That only pure animal or 
vegitable oil, or other oil as free from smoke as a pure animal or vege- 
table oil, and not the product or by-product of rosin, and which shall 
on inspection comply with the following test, shall be used for illumi- 
nating purposes in the mines of this State: 

b All such oil must be tested at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The 
specific gravity of the oil must not exceed 24 degrees Tagliabue. 
The test of the oil must be made in a glass jar one and five-tenths 
inches in diameter by seven inches in depth. If the oil to be tested 
is below 45 degrees Fahrenheit in temperature, it must be heated 
until it reaches about 80 degrees Fahrenheit; and should the oil be 
above 45 degrees and below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, it must be raised 
to a temperature of about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, when, after being 
well shaken, it should be allowed to cool gradually to a temperature 
of 60 degrees Fahrenheit, before finally being tested. 

c In testing the gravity of the oil, the Tagliabue hydrometer 
must be, when possible, read from below, and the last line which ap- 
pears under the surface of the oil shall be regarded as the true read- 
ing. In case the oil under test should be opaque or turbid, one-half 
of the capillary attraction shall be deemed and taken as the true 
reading. 

d Where the oil is tested under difiicult circumstances, an allow- 
ance of one-half degree may be made for possible error in parallax 
before condeming the oil for use in the mine. 

e All oil sold to be used for illuminating purposes in the mines of 
this State shall be contained in barrels or packages branded conspicu- 
ously with the name of the dealer, the specific gravity of the oil, and 
the date of shipment. 

/ It is providf d, liowever, that any material that is as free from 
smoke and bad odor and of equal merit as an illuminant as a pure 
animal or vegetable oil may be used at the pleasure of mine opera- 
tors and miners. 



MINING LAWS. 237 

§ 2. a Any person or persons, firm or corporation which ships 
any oil contained in any barrel or barrels, package or packages, 
which are not branded as prescribed in section one of this act. said 
oil to be used for illuminating purposes in coal or other mines; and 
any person or persons, firm or corporation, which sells any oil other 
than that i^rescribed in section one, to be used for illuminating pur- 
poses in coal or other minas; 

h And any person or persons, firm or corporation having in charge 
the operation or running of any mine which, in a mine under his or 
its charge, uses or permits the use of any oil other than that pre- 
scribed in section one; and any miner or mine employe who uses, 
with a knowledge of its character, in any mine of this State, any oil 
other than that prescribed in section one of this act, shall be fined 
not less than five nor more than fifty dollars; 

c And any individual, firm, company or corporation which sells 
any oil other than that prescribed in section one of this act, in a 
quantity exceeding five barrels at one sale, to be used for illuminat- 
ing purposes in coal or other mines, shall be fined not less than 
twenty-five nor more than one hundred dollars. 

d Justices of the peace shall have jurisdiction to try any viola- 
tions of this act. Every person convicted of a second or other offense 
against this act, in addition to the fine before provided shall be sen- 
tenced to the county jail not less than ten days nor more than 
ninety days. 

e It shall be the duty of the inspector of mines in each district to 
notify the State's attorney of the respective county of any violations 
of the above provisions. And the State's attorney shall prosecute as 
in other cases of misdemeanors. [Approved April 30, 1895; in force 
July 1,1895.] 

§ 3. No claims made under this act shall be paid until after the 
exi^iration of the time in which to present such claims. And if the 
funds realized on the property seized be insufiflcient to pay the total 
claims presented, then such funds shall be prorated on such claims. 
[Approved June 21, 1895, in force July 1, 1895. 



WAGES OF MINERS AND LABORERS AT COAL MINES LIENS ON ALL 
PROPERTY. 

1 1. All laborers or coal miners have lien on all property for labor performed, how secured. 

An Act fo protect laborers and miners for labor performed in devel- 
oping and loorking in coal mines. 

Section 1. Be it enacted bij the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the Genercd Assembly: That every laborer or miner 
who shall perform labor in opening and developing any coal mine, 
including sinking shafts, constructing slopes or drifts, mining coal 
and the like, shall have a lien upon all the property of the person, 
firm or corporation owning, constructing or operating such mine, 
used in the construction or operation thereof, including real estate, 



:238 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



buildings, engines, cars, mules, scales and all other personal property, 
for the value of such labor for the full amount thereof, upon the same 
terms, with the same rights and to be secured and enforced as me- 
chanics' liens are secured and enforced. [Approved June 21, 1895, 
in force July 1, 1895. 



WEIGHING GOAL AT THE MINES. 



§4. 



Construction of scales by any person 
for fraudulent weighing or recording 
or connivance therein by weighman, 
penalty. 

I 5. Penalties for failure to comply with law 
or obstructing its requirements. 

§6. Repealing clause. 



? 1. Standard scales must be provided. 

? 2a. All coal must be carefully weighed, 
correct record to be kept for inspec- 
tion, 
b Weighman, oath to be posted at scales. 

i 3a. Miners may employ check-weighman, 
duties and privileges. 

b Check-weighman, qualifications, oath 
to be posted at scales. 

An Act to provide for the iveighing of coal at the mines, and to 
repeal a certain act therein named. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in tlie General Assembly: That the owner, agent or op- 
erator of every coal mine in this State at which the miners are paid 
by weight, shall provide at such mines suitable and accurate scales 
of standard manufacture, for the weighing of all coal which shall be 
hoisted or delivered from such mines. 

§ 2. a All coal so delivered from such mines shall be carefully 
we'ighed upon the scales as above provided, and a correct record shall 
be kept of the weight of each miner's car, wdiich record shall be kept 
open at all reasonable hours for the inspection of all miners or others 
pecuniarily interested in the product of such mine. 

b The person designated and authorized to weigh the coal aud 
keep such record shall, before entering upon his duties, make and 
subscribe to an oath before some magistrate or other officer author- 
ized to administer oaths, that he will accurately weigh and carefully 
keep a true record of all coal delivered from such mine, and such 
oath shall be kept conspicuously posted at the i)lace of weighing. 

§ 3. a It shall be lawful for the miners employed in any coal 
mine in this State to furnish a check-weighman at their own expense, 
whose duty it shall be to balance the scales and see that the coal is 
properly weighed, and that a correct account of the same is kept; and 
^or this purpose he shall have access at all times to the beam box of 
said scale, and be afforded facilities for the discharge of his duties 
while the weighing is being performed. 

b The agent employed by the miners as aforesaid to act as check- 
weighman shall, before entering upon his duties, make and subscribe 
to an oath before some officer duly authorized to administer oaths, 



MINING LAWS. 239 

that he will faithfully discharge the duties of clieck-weighman; such 
oath shall be kept conspicuously posted at the place of weighing. 
[As amended and approved June 16, 1891.] 

§ 4. Any person, company or firm having or using any scale or 
scales for the purpose of weighing the output of coal at mines, so ar- 
ranged or constructed that fraudulent weighing may be done thereby, 
or who shall knowingly resort to or employ any means whatsoever by 
reason of which such coal is not correctly weighed or reported in ac- 
cordance with the provisiinis of this act, or any weighman or check- 
weighman who shall fraudulently weigh or record the weights of 
such coal, or connive at or consent to such fraudulent weighing and 
recording, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon 
conviction, for each oft'ense be punished by a tine of not less than 
two hundred dollars ($2(X)) nor more than five hundred dollars 
($500), or by imprisonment in the county jail for a period not to ex- 
ceed sixty (60) days, or by both such fine and imprisonment, proceed- 
ings to be instituted in any court of competent jurisdiction. 

§ 5. Any person, owner or agent operating a coal mine in this 
State, who shall fail to comply with the j)rovisions of this act, or who 
shall obstruct or hinder the carrying out of its requirements, shall be 
fined for the first offense not less than fifty dollars (§50) nor more 
than two hundred dollars (S200( ; for the second offense not less than 
two hundred d.»llars (8200) nor more than five hundred dollars 
(8500), and for the third offense not less than five hundred dollars 
(8500) , or to be imprisoned in the county jail not less than six months 
nor more than one year: Provided, that the provisions of this act 
shall apply only to coal mines whose product is shipped by rail or 
water. 

§ 6. That an act entitled "An act to provide for the weighing of 
coal at the mines," approved June 14, 1888, in force July 1, 1888, as 
amended and approved June 29. 1885, in force July 1, 18S5, be and 
the same is hereby repealed. 

Approved June 16, 1887. in force Julv 1, 1^81. 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 2-41 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

1899. 



Considerable space was devoted in the last biennial report of this 
Bureau to a review of the operation of free employment offices. In 
support of the demand for a law providing for such agencies in 
Illinois, particular reference was made to the effects of similar legis- 
lation in other states and foreign countries where the system had been 
adopted. Much valuable data was obtained, all of which emi)hasized 
not only the wisdom, but the increasing necessity of the State at- 
tempting through such means to meet and alleviate the varied wants 
of the unemployed. Some of the principal reasons urged in favor of 
the State assuming such functions, was the direct benefit to the com- 
munity resulting from increased employment, without cost either to 
those requiring or desiring labor, and to protect those honestly seek- 
ing employment from the vicious practices of the private employ- 
ment system, which, to all intents and purposes, has its counterpart 
only in the padrone and thrives by imposing upon the ignorance ana 
necessities of the unemployed poor. 

Investigation has revealed instances where creatures devoid of 
conscience have opened employment offices, and taken fees required for 
registration, without even j)retending to secure employment. To 
the frequent eager inquiries of the robbed was repeated the same 
lie. Fortunately, all have not reached such villainous depths. In 
common justice to the modern pretentions of mankind, let it be 
said that the majority of private agents are willing to make some 
little effort in exchange for the last dollar of the applicant, and find 
no small measure of encouragement in the prospect that if successful 
in obtaining employment, they will later reap a rich reward through 
the well known method of graduated assessments upon the wages of 
— 16C R 



242 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

their victims. As a means of eradicating, or at least minimizing evils 
of this character, existing particularly in all great industrial cen- 
ters, the last General Assembly of this State enacted the following 
law : 

ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

An Act to create free employment offices in cities of certain designated popula- 
tions, and to provide for the maintenance, management and control of the same, 
and to prevent private imitations of the name of the same and regulating pri- 
vate employment agencies. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, represented 
in the General Assembly: That free employment offices are hereby created 
as follows: One m each city of not less than fifty thousand population, and 
three in each city containingr a population of one million or over, for the pur- 
pose of receiving applications of persons seeking employment, and applica- 
tions of persons seeking to employ labor. Saeh offices shall be designated 
and known as Illinois Free Employment Offices. 

§ 2. Within sixty days after this act shall have been in force, the State 
board of commissioners of labor shall recommend, and the Governor, with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a superintendent and 
•assistant superintendent and a clerk for each of the offices created by section 
1 of this act, and who shall devote their entire time to the duties of their re- 
spective offices. The assistant superintendent or the clerk shall in each case 
be a woman. The tenure of such appointment shall be two years, unless 
sooner removed for cause. The salary of each superintendent shall be $1,200 
per annum, the salary of such assistant superintendent shall be $900 per an- 
num. The salary of such clerks shall be $800 per annum, which sums, to- 
gether with proper amounts for defraying the necessary costs of equipping 
and maintaining the respective offices, shall be paid out of anj' funds in the 
State treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

I 3. The superintendent of each such free employment office shall, within 
sixty days after appointment, open an office in such locality as shall have 
been agreed upon between such superintendent and the secretary of the 
bureau of labor statistics as being most appropriate for the purpose intended; 
such office to be provided with a sufficient number of rooms or apartments to 
enable him to provide, and he shall so provide, a separate room or apartment 
for the use of women registering for situations or help. Upon the outside of 
each such office, in position and manner to secure the fullest public attention, 
shall be placed a sign which shall read in the English language, Illinois Free 
Employment Office, and the same shall appear either upon the outside win- 
dows or upon signs in such other languages as the location of such office shall 
render advisable. The superintendent of each such free employment office 
shall receive and record in books kept for that pui'pose names of all persons 
applying for employment or help, designating opposite the name and address 
of each applicant the character of employment or help desired. Separate 
registers for applicants for employment shall be kept, showing the age, sex, 



FREE EMPLOYMEXT OFFICES. 342 

nativity, trade or occupatioa of each applicant, the cause and duration o£ 
non-employment, whether married or single, the number of dependent child- 
ren, together with such other facts as may be required by the bureau of labor 
statistics to be used by said bureau: Provided, that no such special registers 
shall be open to public inspection at any time, and that such statistical and 
sociological data as the bureau of labor may require shall be held in confi- 
dence by said bureau, and so published as not to reveal the identity of any 
one: And, provided, further, that any applicant who shall decline to furnish 
answers to the questions contained in special iTgisters shall not thereby 
forfeit any rights to any employment the office might secure. 

I 4. Each such superintendent shall report on Thursday of each week to 
the State bureau of labor statistics the number of applications for positions 
and for help received during the preceding week, also those unfilled applica 
tious remaining on the books at the beginning of the week. Such lists shall 
not contain the names or addresses of any applicant, but shall show the 
number of situations desired and the number of persons wanted at each 
specified trade or occupation. It shall also show the number and character 
of the positions secured during the preceding week. Upon receipt of these 
lists, and not later than Saturday of each week, the secretary of the said 
bureau of labor statistics shall cause to be printed a sheet showing separately 
and in combination the lists received from all such free employment offices; 
and he shall cause a sufficient number of such sheets to be printed to enable 
him to mail, and he shall so mail, on Saturday of each week, two of said 
sheets to each superintendent of a free employment office, one to be filed by 
said superintendent and one to be conspiciously posted in each such office. A 
copy of such sheet shall also be mailed on each Saturday by the secretary of 
the State bureau of labor statistics to each State inspector of factories and 
each State inspector of mines. And it is hereby made the duty of said fac- 
tory inspectors and coal mine inspectors to do all tkey reasonably can to 
assist in securing situations for such applicants for work, and describe 
the character of work and cause of the scarcity of workmen, and to secure 
for the free employment offices the cooperation of the employers of labor in 
factories and mines. It shall be the duty of such factory inspectors and coal 
mine inspectors to immediately notify the superintendent of free employment 
offices of any and all vacancies or opportunities for employment that shall 
come to their notice. 

I 5. It shall be the duty of each such superintendent of a free employ- 
ment office to immediately put himself in communication with the principal 
manufacturers, merchants and other emploj-ers of labor, and to use all dili- 
gence in securing the cooperation of the said employers of labor, with the 
purposes and objects of said employment offices. To this end it shall be 
competent for such superintendents to advertise in the columns of daily news- 
papers for such situations as he has applicants to fill, and he may advertise 
in a general way for the cooperation of large contractors and employers in 
such trade journals or special publications as reach such employers, whether 
such trade or special journals are published within the State of 



244 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Illinois or not: Provided, that not more than four hundred dollars or as much 
thereof as shall be necessary, shall be expended by the superintendent of any 
one such office for advertising any one year. 

'i 6. It shall be the duty of each such superintendent to make report to 
the Siate bureau of labor statistics annually, not later than December first of 
each year, concerning the work of his office for the year ending October first 
of same year, together with a statement of the expenses of the same, includ- 
ing the charges of an interpreter when necessary, and such reports shall be 
published by the said bureau of labor statistics annually with its coal report. 
Each such superintendent shall also perform such other duties in the collec- 
tion of statistics of labor, as the secretary of the bureau of labor statistics 
many require. 

§ 7. No fee or compensation shall be charged or received, directly or 
indirectly, from persons applying for employment or help through said free 
employment offices; and any superintendent, assistant superintendent or clerk 
who shall accept, directly or indirectly, any fee or compensation from any 
applicant, or from his or her representative, shall be deemed guilty of a mis- 
demeanor, and, upon conviction shall be fined not less than twenty-five nor 
more than fifty dollars and imprisoned in the county jail not more than thirty 
days. 

I 8. In no ease shall the superintendent of any free employment office 
created by this act, furnish or cause to be furnished, workmen or other 
employes to any applicant for help whose employes are at that time on 
strike, or locked out; nor shall any list of names and addresses of appli- 
cants for employment be shown to any employer whose employes are on 
strike or locked out; nor shall such list be exposed where it can be copied 
or used by an employer whose employes are on strike or locked out. 

I 9. The term "applicant for employment'' as used in this act shall be 
construed to mean any person seeking work of any lawful character, and 
"applicant for help" shall mean any person or persoBS seeking help in any 
legitimate enterprise; and nothing in this act shall be construed to '^^i\i ihe 
meaning of the terra work to manual occupation, but it shall include pro- 
fessional service, and any and all other legitimate services. 

I 10. No person, firm or corporations in the cities, designattid in section 
1, of this act, shall open, operate or maintain a private employment agency 
for hire, or where a fee is charged to either applicants for employment or 
for help, without first having obtained a license from the Secretary of 
State, which license shall be two hundred dollars per annum, and who 
shall be required to give a bond to the people of the State of Illinois in 
the penal sum of one thousand dollars, for the faithful performance of the 
duties of private employment agent; and no such private agent shall prints 
publish, or paint on any sign, window, or newspaper publication, a name 
similar to that of the Illinois Free Employment Offices. And any person,, 
firm or corporation violating the provisions of this act, or any part thereof, 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be fined 
not less than fifty nor more than one hundred dollars. 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 2-45 

? 11. Wheuevei', in the opinion o£ the board of commissioners of labor, 
the superintendent of imy free einph)yment office is not duly dilijjent or 
enersjetie in the performance of his duties, they may summon such superin- 
tendent to appear before them and show cause why he should not be rec- 
ommended to the Governor for removal, and unless such cause is cleax'ly 
shown the said board may so recommend. In the consideration of such 
case an unexplained low percentage of positions secured to applicants for 
situations and help reg'istered, lack of intelligent interest and application to 
the work, or a general inaptitude or inefficiency shall be considered by said 
board a sufficient ground upou which to recommend a removal. And if, in 
the opinion of the Grovernor, such lack of efficiency can not be remedied 
bj^ reproval and discipline, he shall remove as recommended b}' said board: 
Provided, that the Governor may at any time remove any superintendent, 
assistant superintendent or clerk for cause. 

^ 12. All such printing, blanks, blank books, stationery and postage as 
may be necessary for the proper conduct of the business of the offices herein 
created shall be furnished by the Secretary of State upon requisition for the 
same made by the secretary of the bureau of labor statistics, 
. Approved April 11, 1899. In force July 1, 1899. 

By the provisions of Section 1 of the Act, free offices are confined 
to cities containing fifty thousand population, and authorizing three 
offices in each city containg one million population or over. This 
provision limits, for the present, the operation of such agencies to 
the City of Chicago. When the forthcoming census is taken, prob- 
ably other .cities in the State will show the necessary population 
entitling them to a free employment office. Aside from the 
many requirements of the law which are common to similar enact- 
ments of other states, some new and important features are added. 
Attention is particularly directed to the provisions of Sections 8 and 
10. In the former, the superintendent is prohibited from exhibiting 
any list of names and addresses of applicants for employment, to any 
employer whose workmen are on strike or locked out. This provision 
■was inserted from a consideration of the rights of organized labor, 
and justlv estops the State from becoming an agency in the hands of 
designing men, for the purpose of reducing wages. By the latter 
section, all persons, firni3 or corporations conducting a private agency 
for hire, are required to file a bond and pay a fee of 8200 par annum. 
It was believed that the effect of this provision would permit only 
the more reputable concerns to operate, and that they ultimately 
would disappear as a result of the free agencies. 

As required by Section 2 of the law the commissioners of labor 
recommended and the governor appointed the following named per- 
sons for the respective positions: 

North Side office, Wm. E. Goodman, Supt.; Thomas Devinish, Asst. 
Supt.; Mrs. J. C. Schaufel, Clerk. 



246 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

South Side office, George W. Geary, Supt.; John Felker, AssL 
Supt. ; Miss Margaret E. May, Clerk. 

West Side office, F. E. Erickson Supt.; P. J. Meaney, Asst. Supt.; 
Miss Mary Henneberry, Clerk. 

In conformity with the provisions of the law herein referred to, 
the Secretary of this Bureau, in conjunction with the Superintendents 
and their assistants, selected the following locations as being 
the most suitable to conduct the business of the free employment 
offices: 

North Side, 234 Chicago avenue. 

South Side, 44 Congress street. 

West Side, 28 Ogden avenue. 

These offices were opened with appropriate ceremonies Au- 
gust 2, 1899. Anticipating that the ordinary demands on such 
agencies in the City of Chicago would exceed those of any city 
where similar work had been undertaken, provision was made in the- 
law for two assistants to the Superintendent. Experience early dem- 
onstrated that the help provided was inadequate to perform the work 
and keep the detailed records required. Extra help was temporarily 
assigned, and very mnch to the regret of those charged with the 
preparatory work, some of the records and forms were reduced in 
order to bring the offices more nearly within their respective appro- 
priations. In view of the unexpected volume of business, the 
amounts allowed by the legislature for the maintenance of the 
respective offices should have been more than doubled. Under the 
circumstances a deficit can not be avoided if the departments are to 
continue, and the friends of this latest humanitarian departure must 
look to the next General Assembly to make good the shortage, pre- 
senting as a sufficient reason for the granting of the request, the 
splendid results of their brief existence. 

Section 6 of the law requires each superintendent to make report 
to the Bureau annually, not later than December 1, of each year, 
concerning the work of his office for the year ending October 1, of 
the same year, with a statement of the expenses of the same; said 
reports to be published by the Bureau in connection with its annual 
Coal Report. On account of the date on which these offices were 
opened, this report is but a partial one, covering only a period of nine 
weeks from August 2 to October 1, 1899, but is designated as the 
First Annual Report. From the returns made by the superin- 
tendents, it is shown that the following number of applications for 
employment were filed in each of the offices, to October 1, 1899: 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



247 



Table I. — The Combined Business of the Three Offices for Nine 
Weeks, August 2 to October 1, 1899. 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Offices. 


rlumber 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured . 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


North Side Office— Male^ 


2,909 
989 


1,189 
823 


1,720 
166 


2.688 
1,339 


1,499 


North Side Office- Females 


516 


Totals 


3.898 


2,012 


1.886 


4,027 


2,015 


South Side Office-Males 

South Side Office— Females . ... 


4,350 
1.331 


1,705 
1,150 


2,645 

181 


2,514 
1,751 


809 
60J 






Totals 


5.681 


2.855 


2.826 


4.265 


1,410 




2,566 
952 


S5B 
772 


1.708 
180 


901 
1,177 


43 


West Side Office— Females 


405 






Totals 


3.518 


1,630 


1.888 


2,078 


448 


Three offices, 9 weeks— Malc^ 


9,825 
3.272 


3.752 
2.745 


6.073 
527 


6,103 
4,267 


2,351 




1,522 






Grand totals 


13.097 


6,497 


6.600 


10,370 


3 873 




' 



From this table it will be observed that during the brief period 
embraced by the report there were received at all of the offices 9,825 
applications for male, and 3,272 for female employment, a total of 
13,097. During the same time the number of aiDplications for help 
filed were, for males, 6,103: females, 4,267, a total of 10,370. 

It is further shown that of the applications for employment, 3,752 
males and 2,745 females, or a total of 6,497, obtained situations 
through the agencies. The number of applications of both sexes for 
labor exceeds by 2,727 the applications for help, while the number 
furnished with positions is less by 3,873 than the entire number of 
those applying for help. This presents, on the one hand, a surplus 
of labor, and on the other, the evident inability of the offices to com- 
pletely furnish all the kinds of labor required. By far the greatest 
per cent of applications for labor unprovided for relates, as the 
superintendents' reports show, to positions of a somewhat confiden- 
tial nature, as clerks, watchmen, and others of a similar class. Of 
the entire number of male applications for employment, 38.2 per 
cent secured positions; while 62 per cent of all applications for male 



248 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



help were filled. Of the applications for female labor 84 per cent 
secured situations, and 64.3 per cent of all aj)plications for help of 
this class were filled. 

Combining both male and female applications for employment, it 
is shown that 50 per cent have been supplied with positions, and of 
all applications for help 62.7 per cent have been filled. 

Measured by the work performed, the South Side office ranks first, 
due principally to the fact of its location in the central or business 
section of the city. Compared with the North Side office, it received, 
during the nine weeks here considered, 1,783 more applications for 
employment of all kinds, and furnished 843 more situations. Of the 
4,027 applications for help received during this period at the North 
Side office, 2,015 remained unfilled, while of the 4,265 similar appli- 
cations made at the South Side office, but 1,410 remained unfilled. 
The per cent of i^laces secured through the West Side office is about 
equal to that of the others, although the number registering for em- 
ployment is considerably less. Of the total applications for employ- 
ment, positions were obtained for 51 per cent at the North and 
South Side offices; the West Side office secured places for 46 per 
cent of those applying for employment. 

In the following table of percentages is reported the positions 
secured and help furnished through each, and for all the offices. 

Table II. — Percentages of Positions Secured and Help Fiuniished, 
Both Male and Female. 





Percentages of Positions 
Secured Applicants for Em- 
ployment. 


Percentages of Help 
Furnished Applicants. 


Offices. 


Male. Female. 

1 


Both 
male and 
female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Both 

male and 

female. 


North Side 


40.9 
39.2 


83.2 
86.4 
81.1 


51 6 : 44 2 


61.5 
65.7 
65.6 


49.9 




50.3 
46.3 


67.8 
95.2 


66.9 


West Side 




78 1 






The three offices 


38.2 


83.9 1 49.6 

1 


61.5 


64.3 62.7 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 



249 



The compensation paid to applicants of l)oth sexes furnished 
employment, whether by the day, week or month, appears in the 
table following: 

Table III. — Aro-di/c IlV/^rs Pdid io Applicanlx Fin-nished 

Employment by I lie Three Ojjices, Aiujast :? io Oeloher 1, 18'J'J. 

MALES. 



Character of Occdpau 



Per day. 



Per week. Per month. 



8 to 12, 
5 to 15 
etc 12 



8 to 10 
5,6 to 12. 



Agents I 

Architects 

Bakers SI . 60 

Barl)ers ! 2.00| 

Barnnien \ i . 

Bartenders 

Bicycle workers i 

Bill clerks ! 

Blacksmiths I 2.25,2 50.3.50: \ 

Blacksmith helpers I 1.50 

Boilermakers 2.25 to 3.00i 

Bookbinders j 8 to 12; 

Bookkeepers i | 

Box makers i 1.75 to 2.25| 

Brass finishers 2.50 to .3. Oo! I 

Bricklayers \ 4.00; 

Bugrsry washers i 

Butchers 8 to 12l 

Butlers 6 to 10! 

Canvassers I \ t+6' 

Car builders 2.10j 

Car cleaners 1.60 | 

Candy makers 8 to 12 

Carpenters 2. 10. 2.ae, 2.50 . 

Cashiers 

Clerks 

Clerks and salesmen 

Coallieavers 1.75,. 

Coachmen . 

Collectors : 

Cooks 

Conductors 1.871-2, . 

Dishwashers I 

Draftsmen 

Drill press men 1.60|. 

Drivers 1.501. 

Druggists, clerks 

Electricians 

Elevator men 

Engineers 

Errand boys 

Exoress messenger 

Factory hands 

Florists 

Farm hands 

Folders 

Firemen 

Gardners 

Hod carriers 2.001 

Housemen 

Iron workers 2.00,2.50,3.50; 

Janitors 

Kitchen work 

Laborers 1.25,1.50, 

Laundrymen 

Lime mixer 

Machinists 2.25 to 3.00 

Merchants 

Molder helpers 1.50 to 2.00j 

Motermen 2. Id. 

Molders I 2.50 to 3.00, 

Nurses I ] 

Oilers 

Painters !!!!.'. '.'!;!'.!;.■;;;!!;!!'.!!!!'.!'.!!!'.!'.".!!! ''2;66; 2.50 to'siooi 

Paper hangers 2.00 to 3.00| 

Photographers ! i 



$16 to S20 

8 to 14 

7 to 12 

!*$15,$20.S25,S30 

6 to 12 *25 

9 to 12 

6 to 9' 



*4,5,6 to 
15 to 



6 to 
8 to 
6 to 



10 to 
8 to 



37 to 50 
25,40,60,65 



20,30,40,75 
*12 to 20 



250 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Average Wages Paid. — Table III. — Concluded. 
^L ALES— Concluded. 



Character of Occupations. 



Per day. 1 Per week. ; Per month. 



Plumbers 


S2.50to 4.00 






Polishers 


S12to 14 

*4to 5,9,10 

8 to 12,15 

9 to 15 




Porters 





















1.75 to 2.25 






9 to 15 
7 to 12 




Shipping clerk 






Solicitors 


3^25 to 4.00 


t 




■ 


Stenographers 


8 to 15 

8, 12 to 16 

8 to 12 

8 to 12 




Tailors 






Teamsters 






Timekeepers.. . 








2.00,2.75,3.25 
1.50 










I^oholsterers.. 


12 








*15 


Vise hands 




10.50 
*5,8to 12 




Waiters . . 










30 to 50 


Whitewasher 


':'' 








6 to 12 
9 to 14 










Wood finishers 


2.25 






8 to 12 











* With board. 
tWith commissions. 



t Commissions. 

i Twenty-five cents per hour. 



FEMALES. 



Character of Occvpations. 



Wages. 



Per day. 



Per week. ! Per month. 







$5 to $8 
8 to 12 
^7 to 12 

5.00 to 9.00 
3.00 to 4.50 
3.50 to 9.00 
*4.00to 10.00 
6.00 to 8.00 




Barbers 














8 


§ 


Cashiers 




Chambermaids . 




*$12 


Clerks 






Cooks 






Copyists. 








1.00 to 1.50 




Dishwashers 


*3.00to 5.00 
6.00 to 12.00 
3.00 to 6.00 

*2.50tO 5.00 
3.00 to 7 00 
2.00 to 6.00 
















General work 


















Janitresses 




20 to 35 


Kitchen work 




*4.00to 6.00 
5.00 to 8.00 

4.00,5.00,8.00 
*2.5J 3.00,9.00 

*4.00 to 5.00 
4.00 to 8.00 

■■*5:6o't6"7;66 

*3.00to 5.00 
6.00,8.00,12.00 










Laundresses 


1.00 to 1.50 




Nurses 
















Scrubwomen. 


1.00 to 1.50 
1.00 to 1.75 


*15 










Stenographers .. ... 






Teachers . 




40 






4.66 to 7-66 


*15 to 20 









* With board, $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 
t With board and room. 



+ In private family with board and room. 
i Commissions. 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



251 



Some idea of the diverse character of the service seeking emph^y- 
ment will be gathered from the following tables, which gives in detail 
the number of applications tiled for male and female labor at all of 
the offices, and the number and character of positions secured. 

Table IV. — Showing the combined ivork of the three offices; oppti- 
cations for employment filed and emploijment secured. Nine 
iveeks, August '^ to October 1, 1899. 

3yEA.I-.:ES. 





Applications for 
Employment Filed. 


Total. 


Employment 
Secured. 




Character of Occv}-ations. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 

Side 

Office. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 

Side 

Office. 


West 

Side 

Office. 


Total. 


Agents • 




2 


3 

49 
49 

i 

3 

6 
1 

27 
4 
3 
1 

16 


5 

49 
49 

4 

1 
30 
33 
121 
108 

6 
14 
24 
54 

3 

150 
6 

,1 

40 
10 

1 
3 
21 










Any occupation 








6 
5 


6 












5 


Architects 


3 


1 




















19 

i! 

2 

6 


8 
23 
96 
50 

5 

23 
24 


5 
2 
33 
3 


55 

6 


1 
3 

4 


8 


Barbers 


5 




88 




13 


Bellboys 




Bicycle workers 










Bill clerks 


ii 


2 


2 


■> 


Blacksmiths 


14 

46 
2 


15 


Blacksmith helpers 






1 

1 
89 
2 
1 
10 
9 
8 


2 

15 

1 
4 
15 

i 


















Bookkeepers 
































3 
16 
2 
1 
1 

13 


i 


4 

2 


6 


4 




8 


Butlers 


3 


Cabinet makers 


: 














1 
6 


2 










6 1 




7 




15 

2 




15 




2 

48 






169 

7 

26 






2 




59 
6 


62 

1 

I 


^3 


5 


6 

1 


24 




3 








Cashiers. 




24 




1 




1 


Chefs 








g------ 


2 

149 

25 


J 

463 
104 










Circular distributors 










1 
2 

6 


1 












2 


Clerks 


301 
37 


1 


19 


3 


2* 
11 




19 








1 
1 
34 


1 

59 

1 

171 

4 

4 

3 

122 

4 
20 
115 


1 












} 




Collectors 


] 


18 





' 


1 


2 


Cooks 

Coopers 


49 


97 


25 

1 
4 

I 


11 


52 


13 


76 






1 




1 










Cupola tenders 

Dishwashers 






1 
6 


1 


44 74 4 

1 21 1 
13 1 7 


40: 29 


75- 




A 




1 


Drivers 


115 











24 



252 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Tro?Vv of the Three Offices—Table JF— Continued. 





Applications for 
Employment Filed. 


Total. 


Employment 
Secured. 




Character of Occupations. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 

Side 

Office. 


West 
Side 
Office. 


North 

Side 

Office. 


South 

Side 

Office. 


West 

Side 

Office. 


Total. 






33 
75 


4 


33 

7 
75 

1 
60 

1 

121 

218 

282 

1 

200 

242 

168 

2 

1 

1 

7 

1 












3 






















1 

14 
2 












31 


15 




1 


1 


2 










1 

21 
66 
75 

94 

58 
50 

1 

1 












24 
49 
45 


76 

103 

162 

1 

10 

101 

61 

1 


6 
7 
24 


16 
11 
37 


2 
7 


24 




18 


Errand boys 


68 








96 
83 
57 

1 


10 
11 






10 


Farm hands. 


i3 


28 
1 


111 




25 
















Folders 




1 














































1 
2 


1 


Gardeners 


7 


1 

67 


2 


10 

67 


•1 


1 

3 


2 


Orocerv clerks 


3 






2 








1 

22 

13 
t>3 


1 
1 
22 
13 
279 












1 




3 


18 


3 


Hostlers 




18 


Wntel nlprks 














86 


130 


71 


36 


35 


142 








10 
112 

12 
730 


5 

229 

32 

1,302 


1 
98 
5 
439 
2 
4 
5 

80 

3 

7 


16 
439 

49 

2,471 

2 

18 
6 

22 

252 

3 

■7 
9 
4 
3 
2 
3 

31 
4 

11 

67 
154 
9 
7 
5 

25 

17 
297 

13 

53 
6 

20 

26 
241 

11 
100 

10 

1 

40 
13 
40 
10 


7 

9 

18 

534 






7 




14 

8 
1,089 


13 

4 
547 


36 




30 


Laborers 


2.170 








12 

16 
113 


6 

59 


5 


2 


1 


8 
















Machinists 


12 


18 


2 


32 










7 

3 

1 




1 




1 




2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
4 






2 

1 






2 








1 


























22 


5 
2 


1 


6 
1 


1 


8 


Oilers 


1 




11 
10 
43 

i 

1 

14 

6 
98 
10 
17 






33 
53 
6 
5 

7 

11 

146 


24 
58 
3 
1 
4 
4 

53 


7 


12 

8 
2 


4 
9 


16 


Painters 


24 




4 












1 


1 










Pr>li<shpr<! 










Porters 


41 
1 


71 
1 
2 


29 


141 




3 


2 




12 


24 
6 

111 
4 

39 
3 

7 

4 


























17 

104 

6i 

i 

28 
3 
30 

7 


27 


2 

6 


8 
3 
5 
1 
2 


10 


Salesmen 


26 

7 


36 




5 




1 


1 


3 




7 


2 


Silver men 




1 
1 


1 




12 
3 
6 
3 


1 
















Stewards 




1 


i 


1 


Stock farm hands 


1 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



253 



Work of the Three Offices—Table IF— Concluded. 





Applications for 
Employment Filed. 


Total. 


Employment 
Secured. 




Character of Occupations. 


North South 

Side Side 

Office. Office. 


West 

Side 

Office. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 
Side 
Office. 


Total. 


Stock keepers 








i 
15 

408 
3 


1 






Stone cutters 


1 
3 

3 
122 






















Tailors 


6 

5 

105 

1 


181 


1 






1 


Teachers 










64 


52 


45 


161 


Telegraphers 




rile roofers 















3i 29 
2i 2 




35 
5 

5 
2 

8 


i 


2 




2 


Tinsmiths 


1 


Tool makers 












1 






1 


Undertakers 


1 

2 1 








Upholsterers 






2 


2 




1 




1 


Vest makers 


1 






i 

n 

1 

106 

1 

470 

3 

93 
1 

10 
4 

35 
2 
49 








Vise hand'* 


13 

120 
3 






3 






3 










Waiters 

Watchmakers . 


70 




15 


58 


3 


76 




155 


i95 


11 
1 


3 


4 


18 


Whitewashers 


1 


Wholesale men. 


48 


45 


42 


3 


45 




1 
1 
4 




Window washers 


9 





i 


9 




9 


Wood linishers. 


1 




15 


20 
2 
24 




5 
4 


5 













Not classified. 


16 


9 


















Totals— 152 positions 


2.909 


4.350 


2,566 


9.825 


1.189 


1.705 


588 


3.752 



Table V. — Showing the combined work of the three offices, appli- 
cations for employment filed and employment secured. Nine 
weeks August 2 to October 1, 1899. 





Applications for 
Employment Filed. 


Total. 


Employment 
Secured. 




Character op Occupations. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 
Side 
Office. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 
Side 
Office. 


Total. 








6 

'i 

3 

1 

19 
193 
186 
3 
263 
6 
245 
26 














1 











Attendants i 












Barbers 




i 

' 












4 


3 
1 

1 
1 

10 
43 
16 
1 
56 

12I 

26 




















Canvassers 




2 
















1 






6 
44 

2 
75 


3 
106 
104 

i32 










si 


92 30 














Cooks .. 


99i i2i 78 


'98 


Copyists 




Daywork 


117 


24 i 54 

1 1 35 


78 


Dining room help 







35 



254 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Worl- of the Three Offices— Table T^— Concluded. 





Applications for 
Empotment Filed. 


Total. 


Employment 
Secured. 




Character of Occupations, 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 

Side 

lOffice. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 
Office. 


West 
Office. 


Total. 




14 


67 


17 
255 

7 
29 


98 

1 

124 
423 
26 
106 

110 
2 
3 

148 
46 
3 

1 

1 
3 

7 
91 
51 
204 

1 
38 

6 
169 

1 

1 


24 


62 


20 
345 

27 


106 




345 






16 
12 


i5 

298 


1 

1 


1 




25 

288 

50 


43 




298 




is 

423 
14 
44 

2 
57 


56 

8 

15 

is 

2 
3 

49 
46 










16 


3 

659 

3 


17 

i 

12 


36 




659 




4 
47 


4 




111 








40 


66 


32 


15 


ii3 




















Milliners 














Nui'ses . 


55 


44 


17 


17 


18 


52 








3 
1 
1 




3 






3 
















:::::::: 


1 

1 






















3 














7 

26 
21 


i7 

95 


7 
10 

t) 
43 


2 
33 

6 
13 


ii 

75 


9 




2 

8 
85 
1 
9 
1 
36 


43 




26 




131 








? 

112 


20 
4 

1 


1 


. .. 
1 


2 


1 


Teachers 




Waitresses 


67 


64 


26 


157 


































Totals— 48 positions 


989 


1,331 


952 


3,272 


823 


1.150 


772 


2,745 



It will be observed that of the 152 different male classes applying 
for employment, but comparatively few represent recognized trades or 
occupations; the greater portion of the unfilled applications are 
made by persons seeking places as clerks, bookkeepers, coachmen, 
collectors, salesmen, errand boys, watchmen, porters, etc. This 
rather numerous element illustrates the common tendency in human 
nature to appropriate the places involving the least physical exertion; 
they are also the most difficult to obtain, as those requiring such 
service hesitate about assigning strangers to the duties of positions 
of a somewhat confidential nature. Neither should it be assumed 
that all applicants in this class represent the unemployed. The 
superintendents in charge of these offices report that a considerable 
per cent were employed at the date of filing their applications, and 
hoped by so doing to secure better positions. By far the most 
numerous and needy class is that representing the common laborers 
for whose special benefit the offices were organized. An examination 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 2oO 

of the returns for this class of labor show that these demands have 
been quite fullj' met. Of the 2,471 laborers making application, 2,170 
were supplied with places. Daring the period covered by this re- 
port 1,557 more applications for help of this character were filed 
than were supplied, indicating an unusual demand for this class of 
service. 

It frequently occurs in the reports oi these offices, anil particu- 
larly in the table relating to female applicants, where the number 
furnished with particular places exceed the number applying for 
them. This apparent discrepancy is explained by applicants accept- 
ing other employment than that for which they made application . 
The tables following show the age periods of the different applicants: 



Table VI. — Age Periods of Male A2:>plicants for EmpJo>jment- 
Xine Weeks, August 2 to October 1, 1899. 




30 but 40 but i 50 but I 60 
under under under ■ years 
40 ! 50 I eo I and 
years. ! years, years, over. 



Not i 

re- ( 

ported. 





309 


i 1,163 
1 
1,392 


1 809 

1.116 

605 


395 
648 
431 


215 

484 : 
285 1 


17 




1 646 


64 


West Side 


i 
: 296 


56 


Totals 


1,251 


3,448 


! 2,530 


1,474 


984 1 


137 



Table VII. — Age Periods of Female Applicants for Emploijment- 
Xine Weeks, August 2 to October 1, 1899. 



Tender ~^ ''^^^ I ^*^ ^^* ' ^^ ^^"* ' ^^ ^'^^ ' ^^ 
on under under under I under years 

M \ r- 



Xot 1 



40 i 50 
years, t years. , year- 



60 
years. 



ported. 



Xorth.Side 

South Side 


1 156 

I 399 


338 
620 
349 


180 
272 ! 
228 


124 


40 
4 
47 




146 


989 
1,331 


West" Side 


183 


21 





952 








Totals 


738 


1,307 


680 


287 


91 


23 


146 


3,272 



256 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The table following shows the sex, number and nationality of 
those registering for employment: 

Table VIII. — Nationalitu of Applicants for Employment at the 
Three Offices— Nine [Veeks— August 2 to October 1, 1899. 





Males. 


Females. 


Nationality. 


North 

Side 

Office. 


South 
Side 
Office. 


West 
Side 
Office. 


Total. 


North 
Side 
Office. 


South 

Side 

Office. 


West 

Side 

Office. 


Total. 




1,497 


2,635 


1,^68 
3 
15 


5,700 

3 

190 

5 
102 
287 
108 
319 
97 
1,039 
30 
7 

72 
8 
575 
76 
84 
47 
3 
52 
197 
176 


401 


690 


590 


1,681 






Austrian 


21 
2 
4 

si 

i 

8 

506 

4 


154 


3 


6 




9 








62 

161 

57 
157 

84 
313 

26 


1 
36 
62 
39 
98 

5 
220 

7 

14 

17^ 
24 










Bohemian.. 


3 

8 
7 
24 
8 
125 


77 
36 
13 
52 
16 
81 
2 


1 
23 

i 

1 
65 


81 




67 




28 


English 


103 




25 


German 


271 


Greek • . .. .. 


2 


Hebrew 






9 
4 

119 
10 
37 
23 
3 
12 


49 

277 

55 
47 






3 


3 




3 
119 

i3 




3 




161 
11 
23 
37 


116 
1 


396 


Italian. 


12 




36 


Polish 










36 


4 

197 
52 




i7 


i 


17 




96 


Scotch 


30 


94 


15 


22 
2 

81 
4 


50 




2 


Swede 


247 

16 


107 
23 


9 

11 
4 


354 

48 
1 
6 
24 
213 


113 


194 




5 


Svrian 




Turk 


4 


13 










Welsh 






5 


5 




209 


147 




147 










Totals 


2,909 


4.350 


2,566 


9,825 


« 


1,331 


952 


3,272 







The most suggestive feature in connection with the facts here pre- 
sented is the striking preponderance of Americans. This class, it 
will be noticed, represents considerably more than one half the entire 
number of all other applicants combined. It is sometimes easier to 
discover a fact than to assign a reason for it. While the statistician is 
not expected to solve sociological problems, it is j)atent that what- 
ever the cause operating to produce these results, the American, in 
the modern process of industrial displacement, has been and is the 
principal sufferer. In certain specialized occupations he has sur- 
rendered to the superior force of his foreign competitor. 

While much of the hard, disagreeable work of the world has, in the 
ordinary course of industrial evolution, been committed to other 
hands, and many new avenues opened for the employment and utili- 
zation of native genius and energy, still the simple story of these 



FRKE EMl'LOVMENT OFFICE^;. 257 

figures burden the braiu with the iinprossion th;it, iu the struggle of 
human life, many have been iguorod and neglected, and not without 
regret is it noted, that in the world's busy places, seeking employ- 
ment, are found in greatest numbers, the representatives of a superior 
race. 

As a partial explanation of the excess of Americans, compared 
with other nationalities, applying for employment, it may be proper 
to suggest that they prcvlominate among the class of applicants seek- 
ing to obtain clerical positions, and probably represent the remnant 
of that portion of the population which years ago rushed to the large 
cities, in the hope of securing sinecure employment. They rank 
among the so-called educated classes whose wits have j)roved unequal 
to their wants, and whose necessities constitute a standing rebuke to 
that system of vicious instruction which induce men to regard the 
occupation of the common laborer as something less than honorable. 

Following will appear the reports of each of the three superin- 
tendents, showing in detail the work accomplished by them, from the 
date of opening the offices, August 2, to October 1, 1899. Following 
these will be found a general summary, giving the combined business 
of all of the offices. 



-17 C. R. 



258 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, 
North Side Office, 234, 2341^2 Chicago Avenue, 
Chicago, October 1, 1899. 
Hon. David Ross, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir: — In compliance with section 6 of the law establishing free em- 
ployment offices, I submit herewith the first report of this office, extending 
from August 2 to October 1, 1899. It will be noticed that the business of the 
office, during the brief period which it covers, has by far exceeded our most 
sanguine expectations. You will appreciate the fact that all the work done by 
the private employment offices is obtained principally through the medium of 
advertising in the Chicago newspapers; on account of our limited appropria- 
tion we have not expended anything in advertising. 

There are several things that in a way come into this office, outside of our 
regular work of procuring employment. The Civic Federation of Chicago 
have just found us out and are beginning to send us deserving people in 
search of employment, and I am happy to say that all that have been sent 
have been properly taken care of. The Bureau of Associated Charities of the 
city has sent us several cases, all of which were immediately cared 
for. There have been several other eases of one kind and another that have 
needed the most prompt attention in the way of charity, and all of the em- 
ployes of this office have at ®nce become interested. I am pleased to report 
that in every instance we have been able to give immediate relief without ex- 
tra expense to the State. 

In this report you will observe a great number of applications for help that 
we have not been able to fill. This is the old case of supply and demand, and 
in this particular the supply was very short. At times we have large demands 
for certain kinds of help, as at the present time we cannot supply molders, 
tinsmiths nor butchers to meet the demand. We are receiving calls from all 
over the country for this class of help. 

As the seasons change the demands for help in the several avocations 
change, and I believe if we had sufficient funds to enable us to use the news- 
papers for advertising purposes, we would be much better able to help the 
employer and employe. The only demands for help we have had that have 
remained unsupplied since the opening of this office is for farm hands and 
laborers; the principal trouble is, that Chicago farm hands do not know how 
to milk a cow, and every farm hand we have had a call for is wanted for this 
kind of work. 

While my experience in the employment agency work is limited, I think 
some changes in the law should be made, and shall take the opportunity of 
submitting some recommendations in my next annual report. Following this 
repoi-t will be found an itemized statement of the expenses incident to equip- 
ping and maintaining the office from August 2 to October 1, 1899. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. Goodman, Supt. 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



259 



NORTH SIDE OFFICE. 234 CHICAGO AVENUE. 

Table giving the Character of the Positions Applied for, both for Em- 
ploijnient and for Help, the Number of Positions Secured and the 
Number Remaining UnjUled: 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


A rchitpct 


, 




3 
6 
28 

2 








6 
31 

4 

24 
14 

2 










3 
2 
33 
11 
1 


3 
3 
33 
24 

7 






1 








3 
1 

46 

'! 

2 
2 
3 
16 

1 
2 
2 


13 




6 










Baker 


3 
16 

2 

1 


5 


6 


1 






























Butcher 




1 


1 


Butler 


i 




Bell bov 

























13 


R 


6 
3 

I 






2\ 2 
48! 13 


i 




35 


18 






15 


35 




3 
301 

7 
37 


3 

280 

7 

35 






2i 


15 




■ i^c\]\f^oic\v^ 




'Coachmeii 


2 
19 
11 


3 

40 
19 


1 




21 


.<:ooks 


1 49 
1 


38 
1 


8 


Companion 






75 


75 




1 





1 
1 
1 




Core maker 






:::::.::;: 


1 









•Chef 




1 
3 
32 


1 




; 


1 
24 




2 


Driver 


iis 

1 ■ 

44 

• 24 
49 
11 
45 


91 
1 
12 
3 
1 
4 
2 

18 
42 
14 

^1 

86 

46 
6 

1 " 

103 


8 








1 


1 




Drug-gist 

Dyer 

Dishwasher .. . 








41 
6 
2 
6 

28 

iis 

15 
9 
1 

70 
8 
9 

JS 
1.643 




40 


1 




6 




6 

7 














! 24 


4 


Florist 

Farm hand's .. 


! 83l 83 

961 10 
571 11 
71 1 
86 71 
10 7 

112| 9 
121 18 

730! 534 
12 5 


35 


Factory hands 


5 










Iron worker 


1 








196 


1,109 


Laundryman 




1 




1 

1 113 




i 

i 101 




^Machinist 


12 


is 1 



260 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 

North Side Office — Males — Concluded. 





Applications 
FOB Employment. 


Applications 
for Help. 


Chakacter of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


INumber 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




2 
1 

2 

16 
3 
4 
11 
43 
6 
98 
10 
17 
14 
10 
1 
1 
1 
3 
26 
6 
3 

3 

7 
12 




2 


10 
1 




Molder's helpers 


2 
1 


8 


Motormau. 


1 
2 
16 
3 
3 
11 
36 
6 
57 
9 
17 
14 
10 
1 
1 
1 
3 








Machine hands 


















1 


1 




Organ builder 




Painter 


7 


15 


8 


Polisher 




Porters ... 


41 
1 


51 
1 


10 


Pressman . 


I 


Printer 




Plumber 








Packer 








Plasterer 








Photographer. 
























Salesman . 


27 


117 


90 




6 
3 
7 
3 
7 
12 




Steam fitter 
















Steward 








Sawyer 








Solicitor 




4 
- 1 






1 




Teacher 


3 

122 

2 

2 


3 

58 
1 

1 




Teamster . 


64 
1 
1 
1 


79 

7 
2 

1 


15 




& 


Tinsmith 


1 








3 


3 




Tile roofer ... 




1 


i 




2 

1 
13 

1 




2 
1 

10 
1 














3 


2 








Vegetable man 


1 

11 
15 


1 
11 

18 

3 




Watchman . 


120 

28 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 

16 


109 
13 

1 
3 
1 

1 

1 
16 




Waiter 


a 


Window dresser 


1 


Wood finisher 


1 


2 






Window washer.. 










1 


10 


9 






Not classified 
















Total 


2,909 


1.189 


1,775 
55 


2.688 


1,516 


Positions secured applicants who applied 
for other positions 














Total 


2,909 


1,189 


1.720 


2,688 


1.516 


Selp furnished not applied for 


17 




2,909 


1,189 








Total— 104 positions 


1,720 


2,688 


1.499 







FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

North Side Office — Continued. 



2r,i 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Untilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




4 
67 




4 
.59 






Clerk 


n 


6 




Cooks 


mi 1 140 


a 


Chambermaid 


44 51 




48 



Companion 

Cashier 

Day work 

Dishwasher 

Factory work 

General work 

Governess 

Housekeeper 

Janitress 

Kitchen work 

Laundress 

Nurse 

Oflftce work 

Photographer 

Pantry work 

Printer 

Reception service. 

Second worK 

Seamstress 

Scrub woman 

Stenographer 

Solicitors 

Saleswoman 

Teacher 

Waitresses 



Totals 

Positions secured applicants who had applied 
for other positions 



Totals 

Help furnished not applied for. 



Totals— 29 positions. 



1 


291 
41 

27 
628 


5 
17 
12 
330 


22! 


6 


65 ..., 


78 
26! 
2 


12 
9 
2 


3 




55 
23 

1 ... 


12 
14 
2 


10 


3 


123, 


56 


1,339! 


521 



RECAPITULATION. 

North Side Office, October 1, 1899. 



Number 
Number of Posi- 
Filed. tions 
Secured. 



Number 
Unfilled. 



Applications 
FOR Help. 



Number Number 
Filed. 1 Unfilled. 



Males 


1 
2.909 

989: 


1. 189 
823 j 


1,720' 

166: 


l!339. 


1,499 


Females 


516 


Totals . 


3,898 


2.012| 


1.886 


4,027; 


2.015 







STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Expense Account North Side Office, to October 1, 1899. 



Office furniture 

Office safe 

Signs 

Moving safe 

Office rent, July 15 to October 1 

Postal cards 

Postage 

Insurance on property 

Janitor 

Clerical service 

Printing 

Telephone rent and tolls 

Expressage 

Rent, typewriter 

Office supplies and expenses,.. 

Total 



$551 50 


300 00 


41 60 


20 60 


175 00 


30 00 


50 00 


18 00 


37 50 


376 00 


4 50 


32 20 


1 35 


800 


35 76 


$1,694 01 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 2(i3 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES, 

South Side Ofpce, 4-1 Congress St. 
Chicago, October 1, 1899. 
PIox. David Ros.S, Secretarij Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir:— Complj'ing with section 6 of the act of the General Assembly creat- 
ing the Illinois Free Employment Offices, I beg to herewith submit the first 
report of the business of this office for nine weeks, August 2 to October 1, 
1899, together with some interesting data taken from the applications for em- 
ployment; also the expense account of this office for the same period. 

If there is any doubt as to the necessity of these offices, the following re- 
port should remove it from the minds of the most skeptical; a fair idea can 
be obtained for the need of offices of this kind by the general benefit con- 
ferred upon those whom they were designed to aid and benefit — the employer 
and employe. 

To those who were active in the work of encouraging and establishing these 
offices, there is every reason for congratulation, as the work they have ac- 
complished is ten-fold greater in volume than anyone could have anticipated, 
and it now seems remarkable that they remained so long unestablished. 

Many reasons wers advanced for the legislature taking this step; one of the 
main ones was the outrageous practices perpetrated on helpless working peo- 
ple by private agencies, robbing them of their last dollar and oftentimes 
sending them on long journeys in quest of employment that never existed. 
The State, in aiding and protecting this helpless class, has performed its real 
function, that of protection, in a most satisfactory manner. 

Recognizing the peculiar industrial conditions existing in all large cities, 
Chicago, while always the scene of industrial activity, has generally contained 
a large element of the unemployed, which can be turned into an undesirable, 
if not a dangerous class, when industrial equilibrium is disturbed. These 
free offices, in the procuring of employment for this class, will eliminate 
this in a great measure. 

As the work already performed has more than justified the creating of these 
free offices, many additional resources are needed to render them still more 
effective, and will no doubt be supplied by the next legislature. 

The apparent large number of applicants filing applications and failing to 
obtain employment is susceptible of explanation; when applicants have ap- 
plied for common labor they readily found employment, but when they ap- 
plied for some special position and would not accept any other, it was very 
difficult to secure such applicants the particular position applied for. 



264 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



It was found that many of these applicants at the time they applied for em- 
ployment were not idle, but their object in filing an application was to secure 
some better or more satisfactory employment. 

The daily newspapers, when these offices were opened, were very liberal 
in their news columns, giving us a great deal of advertising, which induced 
many people from the surrounding country and adjoining states to send ap- 
plications for employment in Chicago, which, under the law, we were com- 
pelled to register on our books. It is as hard to keep people from flocking to 
large cities as it is to keep the moth from the candlelight. The activity in 
the business of large cities appears to be the magnet that attracts people from 
the outside. 

The work of this ofiice, since its establishment, has been carried on with 
great difficulty, owing to the limited appropriation, as the expenses for main- 
taining the office two months will show. It was found necessary to have 
additional clerical help to properly carry out the law in regard to these offices, 
twenty-four hours after they were opened. 

Following is a report of the South Side office and the necessary expense of 
furnishing and maintaining the same from August 2 to October 1, 1899. 
Very respectfully, 

Geo. W. Geary, 

Superintendent. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES, 

SOUTH SIDE OFFICE, 44 CONGRESS STREET, CHICAGO. 

Table giving the character of x>ositions applied for, both for employ- 
ment and for help, the number of positions secured and the num- 
ber remaining unfilled. 

MALES. 





Applications for 
Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Number of Posi- 
Filed. tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Sg^tel 




2 

1 
8 
23 
96 
50 
5 

23 
24 
1 
1 
89 
2 
1 
10 
9 
8 
1 
6 
59 
6 




2 
1 

6 

23 
41 
44 
5 
21 
22 
1 
1 
89 
2 
1 
6 
7 
6 

I 
54 

4 
23 






Architects 








Bakers 


2 


3 


1 






Barmen 


55 
6 


57 
10 


2 




4 








2 
2 


1 




Blacksmiths 
















Bookkeepers 


























Bricklayers 


4 
2 
2 


56 

3 
3 


52 




1 




1 






Canvassers 


1 
5 
2 


2 
27 
3 
2 


1 




22 


Carriage workers 


1 


Cashiers , 


24 i 


1 



FREE EMTLOYMENT OFFICES. 



2G5 



South Side Office — Males — Concluded. 



Application? 
Fou Help. 



Chakacter of Positions. 



Number 
Filed. 



Number 
Unfilled. 




Clerks, 

Coachmen 

Collectors 

Cooks 
Disliwash 
Drafrsn.-i 
l)n 



Dry goods clerks i 

Electricians . 

Elevator men 

Engineers 

Errand boy 

Express messenger 

Factory hands 

Farm hand 

Florists 

FireniPii 

Fold 

Gardeners 

Grocery clerks 

Hod carriers 

Housemen 

Iron workers 

Janitors 

Kitchen work 

Laborer 

Laundry men 

Machinists 

Machine ban 

Merchants 

Molders' helpers 

Motormen 

Nurses 

Oiler 

Packers 

Painters 

Paper hangers 

Photographers 

Plumbers 

Polishers 

Porters 

Pressmen 

Printers 

Railroadmen 

Salesmen 

Shipping clerks 

Silvermen 

Solicitors 

Steamfitters 

Stenographers 

Stewards 

Tailors 

Teachers 

Teamsters 

Telegraphers 

Timekeepers, 

Tinsmiths 

Upholsterers 

Waiter 

Watchmen 

Wholesale men 

Window was he 

Wood workers 

Not classfied 

Totals 
Positions secured applicants who had ap 
plied for other positions 

Total— 90 positions 



2 


2 


1 .... 






6 


18' 


7 


"l... 

1 


27 




r- 


4 


ii.... 




3|.... 




52 


49 


50, 


14 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



SOUTH SIDE OFFICE — FEMALES. 





Applications for 
Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character of Posixioxi?. 


Number 
s P-iled. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




6 
1 

3 
1U6 
104 
132 

5 
67 
16 
12 
18 
423 
14 
44 

2 
57 
44 

7 
89 
26 
24 

9 

112 
1,331 




6 
1 

3 
14 
97 
11 
5 
5 
15 
11 
15 














Bookkeepers 
















Cashiers . .. 










92 


181 
11 
218 


89 


Clerks 


4 


Cooks 


97 






Dishwashers 


62 
1 
1 
3 
659 
3 

33 


iiel 54 


Dressmaker"? 


1 






1 

4 

820 

4 

123 







1 


Housework 


161 




11 
11 

25 
27 
5 
56 
20 
11 
8 
1 
48 


1 


Kitchen help 


90 


Lady's maid 






32 
17 

33 
6 
13 

1 


33 
5 

82 
8 
17 

1 


6 


Nurses . 


16 




3 




49 


Seamstresses 






4 












64 


88 


24 






Totals 


1,150 


417 
236 


1,751 


601 


Positions secured applicants who had ap- 
















1.331 


1.150 


181 


1,751 


601 







RECAPITULATION. 

South Side Office, October 1, 1899. 





Applications for 
Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 




Number 
Number of Posi- 
Filed. tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Males 


4,350 
1,331 


1,705 
1.150 


2,645 
181 


2,514 
1,751 


809 


Females 


601 








5,681 


2,855 


2,826 


4,265 


1,410 







FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



267 



Expense Account of South Side Office, August 2 to October 1, 1800. 



Rent for office from July 15 to October 1. 

Office furniture 

Carpenter work in fitting office 

Insurance on office furniture 

Fostagre . 



Signs and painting office. 

Toilet supplies 

Awning . 



Numbering machine and rubber stamps... 

Electric fan 

Wiring and equipment for ligbt and powei 

Rent for light and power 

Typewriter and desk 

Western Un ion, clock rent 

Rent for telephone 

Copy press and stand 

Water filter 

Janitor and miscellaneous supplies 

Salary for stenographer 

Salary for janitor 

Extra clerks 



$250 00 


500 17 


98 00 


11 45 


60 00 


44 10 


4 50 


k; 00 


18 40 


36 00 


40 82 


35 51 


62 00 


2 00 


42 70 


13 55 


3 00 


11 38 


SO 00 


30 00 


178 00 



Totals $1,539 



268 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES, 

West Side Office, 28 Ogden Avenue. 

Chicago, October 1, 1899. 
Hon. David Ross, Secretary, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 
Sir: — In compliance with section 6 of an act of the General Assembly cre- 
ating the Illinois Free Employment Offices, I have the honor to submit to you 
the first report of the work of this office, for nine weeks, August 2 to October 
1, ]899, also ray expense account. 

Very respectfully, 

F. E. Erickson, 

Superintendent. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

WEST SIDE OFFICE, 28 OGDEN AVENUE. CHICAGO. 

Table giving the character of positions applied for, both for employ- 
ment and for help; the number of positions secured and the num- 
ber remaining unfilled. 

MALES. 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character op Positions. 


Number 
Filed.. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




49 

49 
1 
3 
6 
1 

27 
4 
3 
1 

16 
2 

15 
2 
1 
4 

15 
1 

62 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 




3 
43 
44 

1 

3 
1 

23 
4 
3 
1 

14 
2 

15 
2 
1 
4 
9 
1 
2 

56 








6 

5 


6 
6 






1 








1 

3 

...... ^ 


1 
4 






1 






Bartenders 


6 


2 














Rill plprk« 










2 


5 


3 










1 


1 


























6 


6 












1 
6 
3 


1 




6 

1 










2 

2 

1 




r'nah hn\rc 
















Circular distributors 


i 


i 





FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

West Side Office — Males -Cuntinued. 



269 



Chakaiter of Positions. 



Clerical 

Coal miner 

Coachmen 

Coal weigher 

Collectors 

(Conductors 

Cooks 

Coopers 

Cupola tenders 

Core makers 

Dish washers 

Draftsmen 

Drill-press men 

Druggists 

Electricians 

Electrotypers , 

Elevator men 

Engineers 

Errand boys 

Factory hands 

Foremen 

Farm hands 

Flouring mill 

Foundry men 

Firemen 

Furnace tenders 

Gardeners 

Harness cleaners... 

Harness makers 

Housemen 

Hostlers 

Hotel clerks 

Ice cream makers .. 

Iron workers 

Janitors 

Kitchen work 

Laborers 

Lathers 

Laundry men 

Locksmith 

Machinists 

Masons 

Metal workers 

Nurses 

Oilers 

Packers 

Painters 

Paper hangers 

Photographers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers 

Porters 

Printers 

Punch press hands. 

Railroad men 

Railroad laborers .. 

Salesmen 

Sawyers 

Shipping clerks 

Shoemakers 

Steam fitters 

Stenographers 

Stock farm hand ... 

Stock keepers 

Stone cutters 

Tailors 

Teachers 

Teamsters 

Telegraphers 



Applications Applications 

FOR Employment. for Help. 



Number 
Filed. 



Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 



Number 
Unfilled. 



Number 
Filed. 



\ 

20! 

49j 
1 
ll 
31 

4i 
24 
24! 
6 
1 
20 
XQ-i 



2 ' i 


17 4 


1 


1 






61 






^I::::-::;;: 


2 


1 




1 


7 




33 5 




1 


...: 










') 







■ 


38| 3 

191 1 

1 


^i 


13 
4 





558 


" 


2 1 
1 










[ 


1 .......... 


4 

9 





2 






1 






31 


2 






8 








3 
5 




1 




2 








1 


















46, 1 



270 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

West Side Office— Males—Conclnded. 





Applications 

FOR EMPLOrMENT. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




3 

1 
2 
5 
1 
5 
4 
8 
195 
45 
20 

24 




3 

1 

191 
42 
15 






Tinsmiths 


































2 


". 










3 
4 
3 
5 
4 


4 
5 
3 
5 
4 


i 


Watchmen . 


1 














Not classified 


24 












Total 


2,566 


858 


1,825 
117 


901 1 43 


Positions secured applicants who had applied 


















2.566 


858 


1.708 


901 


43 







FEMALES. 





Applications 
for Employment. 


Applications 
for Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 




1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

10 

43 

16 

1 

56 

1 

128 

26 

17 

255 

7 

29 

1 

56 

8 

15 

13 

2 

3 

1 

49 

46 

] 

Vi 
95 
20 




1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

10 
13 
10 
1 






















Bottle labelers 

















Cash girls 








Cashiers 








Chambermaids . 


30 

6 


34 
6 


4 


Clerks 










78 


93 


15 




1 
74 






54 
35 
20 
345 




58 
37 
25 


4 




2 






5 






354 




7 

1 

39 
7 
3 






27 


28 


1 








17 
1 

12 
15 


17 
1 
13 
15 








Kitchen help 


1 








2 
3 

1 
31 
47 
1 
1 
6 
20 
18 






















18 


22 


4 


Office work 






















11 

75 
2 


11 

87 
3 




Second work 


12 


Stenographers 


1 



FREE EMPOYMENT OFFICES. 271 

West Side OJjUcc — Females — Concluded. 





L'OSITIONS. 


Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Charactek of 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- iNu 
tions i L'n 
Secured.! 

I 


niber 
filled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Teachers 






4 
21 

1 


1 
26 ... 


4 

i 






Waitresses 


28 






iits wiio 


ipplied for 




















Total 

Positions secured applies 
other position.s 


1)52 


772 


311 
131 


1,177 


405 


















952 


7721 


180 


1,177 













Recapitulation, West Side Office, October 1, 1899. 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 




Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


; i 

Number Number ^Jumbe^ 
Unfilled. Filed. Unfilled. 

1 


Males 


2,566 


S."iS 


1,708 
180 




Females 


952 1 772 


1 177 405 






Totals 


3,518 


1.630 


1.888 


2,078i 448 



Expense Account, West Side Office, August 2 to October 1, 1899. 



Rent of office, July 15 to October 1, 
Janitor, July 15 to October 1, 1S99.. 

Office furniture, etc 

Stenographer 

{jlerical work, extra 



S112 50 

75 00 

1,231 30 

15 oe 

SO 50 



Total. 



272 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



SUMMARY 



Of the Three Free Employment Offices for Nine WeelxS to October 
1, 1899, by Character of Positions. 



MALES. 



Character of Positions. 



Applications 
FOR Employment. 



Number 
Filed. 



Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 



Number 
Unfilled. 



Applications 
for Help. 



Number 
Filed. 



Number 
Unfilled. 



Agents 

Any occupation 

Apprentices 

Architects 

Auctioneers 

Bakers 

Ba"bers 

Barnmen 

Bartenders 

Bell boys 

Bicycle workers 

Bill clerks 

Blacksmiths 

Blacksmith helpers .. 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Boxmakers 

Brass finishers 

Bricklayers 

Butchers 

Butlers 

Cabinetmakers 

Canmakers 

Candy makers 

Canvassers 

Car builders 

Car cleaners 

( arpenters 

Carriage washers 

Cash boys 

Cashiers 

Chefs 

Cigarmakers 

Circular distributors. 

Clerical work 

Clerks 

Cachmen 

Coal heavers 

Coal miners 

Coal weighers 

Collectors 

Companions 







6 
6 




1 






10 


2 


7 


2 


9C 


2 


19 


6 






2 




?i\ 


16 


7 


6 






1 


1 






56 


52 


10 


2 


3 


1 










9 


2 


50 


35 


•A 


1 


64 


40 


4 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 
2 






18 


1 


13 


2 


40 


21 


76 


76 


4 


2 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICER. 271? 

Sdinnuiri^ of I he Three Offices — Continued. 
Males- Confirmed 





Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applicat'on.s 
for Help. 


Character of Positions. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Cooks 


171 
1 
4 
4 

.J 

4 

20 
il5 
33 

i 

CO 
2 

i2i 

218 

2S2 

200 

242 

1C8 

2 

io 

d7 


76 

i 

75 
2I 


95 
1 
4 
4 
2 
i\i 
4 

19 
91 
33 

75 

58 

97 
200 
214 

190 
131 
143 

1 
1 


107 


31 








3 


•> 








1 
114 




Disbwasbers 


3? 








i 

1 




Drivers 


«• 




2 























2 


i 




Electrical linemen 


6 








24 

18 

68 


20 

24 

99 


G 




7 




31 








io 

111 
25 


15 
151 
27 


■■■ ■ ,=> 




40 




4 


Flori«tt 









[ 


Folders. 




1 











i 


Furnace tender 


i 

- 


2 
3 
2 




8 
64 

"' i 





Grocery clerks 








1 
_1 

~i 
271 






1 ■« 

142 


52 
19 


49 


Hostlers 


4 

13 


1 


1-TntpI r'lprk< 






i58 

1 

5^ 

36 

3.727 


17 




1 




16 

439 

49 

2,471 

1« 


36 


10 


1 




18 




6 


Laborers 


1.557 




i S 


i() 

1 


2 




1 




( 

25-- 
3 

f 

I 

3 
31 

4 
11 

15^ 

1 1 




6 

22 

220 

3 

t 
3 
2 

3 
23 

3 
11 

130 

5 

4 

25 




Machine hands 


1 32 

1 i 

! 2 

1 

1 1 
1 it; 

24 

4 




35 


3 






^ erchants 

Aletal worker*^ 


1 
2 
10 

1 

24 

30 


;, 




8 


Motermen 

Music teachers 








1 










Packers 

Painters 


8 
12 
2 






Plasterers 


i 


1 




Polisbers 





IS C, K. 



274 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Siimmarg of the Three Offices — Continued. 
Males— Co7^cZ^afec?. 



Character of Positions. 



Applications 
FOR Employment. 



Applications 
FOR Help. 



Number 
Piled. 



Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 



Number 
Unfilled. 



Number Number 
Filed. [Unfilled. 



Porters 


297 
13 
53 
6 
20 
26 

241 
11 

100 
10 
1 
40 
13 
40 
10 


141 
2 


51 
6 

98 


201 
4 


60 




1 


Printers. 


2 








io 

36 
5 
3 
2 

1 






Railroad men 


io 

127 
5 
3 
2 

1 
6 







9i 


Sawyers 

Shipping clerks . 




Shoemakers 




Solicitors 

iSteamfitters 


39 

S 

9 


' 






1 
1 


1 




} 










7 
5 
3 

10 

12 

408 

3 


I 

3 

9 

12 

247 

3 


■ ::;::::■ 












7 

i86 




Tailors 

Teachers 


1 


6 




161 


25 






Tile roofers 




1 
2 
2 


1 




35 
5 
2 
5 
2 
8 


2 

1 


4 

2 

i 




Tinsmiths 


i 








1 


1 










2 

1 


2 

I 










i 

17 

1 
106 

1 
470 

3 
93 

1 
10 

4 
35 

.5 


1 
14 

1 
30 

1 
452 

2 
48 

1 

1 

3 
30 




Vise hands 


3 


2 








Waiters 


76 


86 


10 


Watchmen 


18 
1 
45 


19 
10 
50 
1 
12 
3 
5 
4 


1 

9 




5 




1 




9 
1 
5 
4 


3 




2 












49 












TotaN 


9.825 


3.752 


6.247 
174 


6.103 


2.368 


Positions secured applicants who had applied 




Help furnished not applied for 








17 














Totals for 9 weeks 


9.825 


3.752 


6.073 


6.103 


2.351 







FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE.S. 275 

Stnnmm'u of f/w Thrre Oj^rrs— Concluded.. 
FEMALES. 





Application.s 
FOE Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


Character ok Positionh. 


Number 
Filed. 


Number 
of Posi- 
tions 
Secured. 


Number 
Unfilled. 


Number Number 
Filed. Unfilled. 


Addresses 


6' 

l< .... . ... 


1 

14 

1 
3 

19 
27 
166 

■■ 

1.7 
5 

:yo 

2.3 






■ ■ 


AtteDdents 





Barbers 


14 













Bottle iabelers 


t= 





Canvassers 






i 


Cashiers 


19 
193 










263 93 
23' 4 


Clerks 


186 20 
263l ■'flS 




Cooks 


451, 153 


Copyists 


6 
245 






78 


87' 9 

37; 2 

182, 76 
699 354 




26 35 
98! 106 
255, » 

66 43 
288 298 

3 

124 36 
433 659 

26 4 
106 111 


Dishwashers 


Domestics 


Dressmakers 


Factory work 

General work. 


56 . 13 
628: 330 




i 


Housekeepers 

House work 


43 7 

820 161 




f, 

2 

25 

3 

1 
96 
46 


5 1 
201 91 


Kitchen help 


Lady's maids 


110 
2 
3 
1 

148 
46 






113 


131 18 


Mail-order help 


Matrons 







Milliners 


1 


Nurses 

Office work.. 


52 


ll ^ 




3 3 


Photographers 


1 

1 
3 

7 




T 

1 

56 

IS 

U 

1 

1.037 
510 


1 






i 








Reception service 


i 


Saleswomen ... 


a 


15 6 




91 43 






42 16 

159. 28 


Second work 

Solicitors 


204 

:38 


131 




4 




Teachers 




Waitresses 

Wrappers 


169 

1 
1 

3.272 


157 



2391 82 


Not classified 


2.715 




Totals 

Positions secured applicants who had applied 
for other positions 


4.267; 1.527 










Totals for 9 weeks 


3.272 


... 


5. 


4.267, 1.522