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Full text of "Coal report of Illinois"

ILLINOIS STATE LIBRARY. 

A-o ^Tr43S 



Alcove iN'o. 

Division X.^ ? .^ • 3 3 

Shelf JVo L - 0. 3 co-p 



BOOKS may be taken from the State Library by 
the members of the General Assembly and its 
offlcers during- the session of the Legislature, 
and at any time by the Governor, and the ofB- 
cpvs of the Rxecutive Department of this State who 
are required to keep their offices at the seat of g^ov- 
ernment, and the Justices of the Supreme and Ap- 
pellate Courts. 

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property from the Library without executing- a re- 
ceipt therefor, nor to take or detain from the 
Library more than two volumes of miscellaneous 
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members of the Legislature shall be returned at the 
close of the session. 

If any person injures, or fails to return any book 
taken from the Library within the time above men- 
tioned, HE SHALL FORFEIT AND FAY TO THE 
LIBRARIAN, for the benefit of the Library, 
THREE TIMES THE VALUE THEREOF, or of the 
set to which it belongs. 

Any person, not above mentioned, who takes books 
or other articles from the State Library without 
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larceny. 

Any person taking books from the State Library 
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Persons using books of the Library will return 
the same to the Librarian or assistant. 

JAMES A. ROSE, 
Secretary of State and ex-offlcio State Librarian. 



COMPLtMrKjT-^i op 



^<t^i^^. 



V-Odd, 



^^ SECRETARY. 






^ 


DATE DUE 












L 


2?; MAR 


2 72S«2 




























































































































Demco, Inc. 38-293 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL COAL REPORT 



Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics 



I 9 O 3 

42438 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IHinois Free Employment Oices 



YEAR ENDED OCT. 1, 1903 



David Ross, Secretary, Springfield, 



, ill .„„ 

3 1129 00114 3106 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL; 
Phillips Bros.. State Primtees. 

1904. 



^ i i^{i\:. ■' ; L 'LH:^^.'.u\^ V. 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF LABOR. 
1903. 



George L. Pittenger, President, Centralia. 
Edgar F. Wills, Decatur. 
Frank B. Mott, Galesburg. 
Randolph Smith, Flora. 
M. H. Madden, Chicago. 

Secretary, 
David Ross, Springfield. 



STATE MINING BOARD. 
1908. 



Richard News am, President, Peoria. 
William Atkinson, Murphysboro. 
Lee Kinoaid, Athens. 
Daniel Reeoe, Danville. 
Andrew Flesher, H. E., Taylorville. 
Secretary, 
Eugene A. Pearse, Springfield. 



STATE INSPECTORS OF MINES, 
1903. 



First District. 
Hector McAllister, Streator. 

Second District, 
Thomas Hudson, Galva. 

Third District. 
James Taylor, Peoria. 

Fourth District. 
Thomas Weeks, Bloomington. 

Fifth District. 
Walton Rutledge, Alton. 

Sixth District. 
John Dunlop, Centralia. 

Seventh District. 
Evan D. John, Carbondale. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



CHICAGO. 

North Side Office, 259-261 North Clark st., Turner Hall Building. 

D. M, Brothers, Supt. 

Thos. Devenish, Asst. Supt. 

Miss Selma Bostrum, Clerk. 

South Side Office, 429-431 Wabash Avenue. 

George W. Geary, Supt. 

Angus A. Barnes, Asst. Supt. 

Miss Margaret E. May, Clerk. 

West Side Oefice, Southwest corner Canal and Randolph Sts. 

S, P. Revere, Supt. 

P. J . Meaney, Asst. Supt. 

Miss Lizzie Henneberry, Clerk. 

PEORIA. 

Office, Masonic Temple. 

Edward E. Walker, Sitpt. 

David Conigisky, Asst. Supt. 

Charles S Easton, Clerk. 



State of Illinois, 
Office of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
Springfield, Jan. 1, 1904. 
Hon. Richard Yates, Governor of Illinois : 

Sir: — I have the honor, on behalf of the Board of Commissioners 

of Labor, to submit herewith the twenty-second annual report of the 

coal industry of the State for the year ended July 1, 1908, together 

with the fifth annual report of the Illinois Free Employment offices. 

Very respectfully, 

David Ross, 

Secretary. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Introductory 1 

Summary 4 

Classification of mines 5 

The large mines of the State 12 

Number of mines , 17 

Shipping mines 18 

Graded output for the year 30 

Mines, men and tons 33 

Haulage in the mines S5 

Output by counties 37 

Disposition of the output 40 

Days of active operation 56 

Average value of coal 58 

Mine employes 60 

Prices paid for mining 62 

Payment of wages 63 

Earning of miners 64 

Machine mining 66 

Powder used 71 

Fatal accidents in mines 71 

Non-fatal accidents 80 

Recapitulations by Districts , 87 

Production, shipping and local mines 88 

Value of different grades and powder used 89 

Disposition of output 90 

Hand and machine mining and prices paid 91 

Value of all grades per ton 92 

Employes and days of operation 93 

Physical character of coal mines in Illinois by counties 94,121 

Value of mining plants, acres of land owned and loased 121 

Underground haulage 122 

Illustration s of underground haulage 123 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF STATE INSPECTORS- 

Hector McAllister. First District 134 

Thomas Hudson, Second District 135 

James Taylor. Third District 136 

Thomas Weeks. Fourth District 137 

Walton Rutledge. Fifth District 138 

John Dunlop. Sixth District 139 

Evan D. John. Seventh District 140 



XIV CONTENTS. 

ANNUAL REPORTS OF STATE INSPECTORS OP MINES- 

FiEST INSPKCTIOK DISTRICT— ^«c<or McAlHster, Inspector. 

Textof the report 143 

New mines 1** 

Abandoned mines 145 

Changes of ownership 145 

Improvements 145 

Prospective mines 145 

Explosions of gas in Cardiff coalmine 146 

Plat of Cardiff mine 150 

Fatal accidents— description of 151 

Tables of fatal and non-fatal casualties 153 

Statistical tables by counties 168 

Recapitulation by counties 168 

Second Inspection District— Thomas Hudson, Inspector. 

Textof the report 170 

New shipping mines 172 

Shaft tower destroyed by fire 172 

Improvements 173 

New and prospective mines 173 

Escapement shafts 174 

Fatal accidents -description of 174 

Tables of fatal and non-fatal casualties 177 

Statistical tables of counties 180 

Recapitulation by counties : 196 

Third Inspection District— ./a w«s Taylor. Inspector. 

Textof the report 198 

Litigation 200 

Days employed in mines 200 

Powder explosion at Athens 200 

Plats of Athens mine 202 

Fatal accidents, description of 203 

Tables of fatal and non-fatal casualties 204 

Statistical tables of counties 208 

Recapitulation by counties 228 

Fodrth Inspection District— T/iomas Weeks, Inspector. 

Text of the report -' 230 

New mines 231 

Prospective mines 231 

Abandoned mines 232 

Escapement shafts • 232 

Improvements - 232 

Business changes 233 

Fatal accidents, description of 233 

Tables of fatal and non-fatal casualties 239 

Statistical tables of counties 244 

Recapitulation by counties 256 

Fifth Inspection District- TToKow JRutledae, Inspector. 

Text of the report 258 

General improvements during the year 260 

Mine fire 260 

New and prospective mines 261 

Explosions in mines 262 

Plat of mine. Victor Coal company. Pawnee 265 

Plat of mine. Auburn & Alton Coal company. Auburn 266 



CONTENTS. XV 

Fatal accidents 267 

Tables offatal and non-fatal casualties 269 

Statistical tables of counties 274 

Recapitulation by counties 286 

Sixth Inspection District— J^oftn Bunlop. Inspector. 

Text of the report 289 

Condition of mines 291 

Improvements 291 

New mines 292 

Blast explosions 293 

Plat of mine, Sandoval Coal company, Sandoval 294 

Fatal accidents 295 

Tables of fatal and non-fatal casualties 298 

Statistical tables of counties 302 

Recapitulation by counties 312 

Seventh Inspection District— j&»aM D. John, Inspector. 

Text of the report 314 

Fatal accidents 315 

Table of fatal and non-fatal casualties 318 

Statistical tables of counties 322 

Recapitulation by counties 338 

APPENDIX. 
Register of Certificated— 

Mine managers 345 

Hoisting engineers 360 

Mine examiners 371 

Illinois agreement, minlns prices and conditions, 1904-06 376 

ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES- 

Introductory 7 

Record of the four offices 8 

Applications for employment 10 

Applications for help 14 

Positions secured 17 

Leading occupations 26 

Classified occupations 28 

Age periods 34 

Conjugal conditions 40 

Nationality 47 

Reports of Superintendents- 
North Side OpriOE— D. M. Brothers, Superintendent. 

Textofreport 61 

Expense account 62 

Applications for employment and'help 62 

South Side Office— 6^80. W. Geary , Superintendent . 

Text of report 65 

Expense account 66 

Applications for employment and help 66 

West Side Office— iS. P. Revere, Superintendent. 

Text of rep ort 69 

Expense account 70 

Applications for employment and help 70 

Peoria Office— Edward E. Walker, Superintendent. 

Text of report 73 

Expense account 74 

Applications for employment and help 74 

Law— 

Free employment offices 77 

Private employment agencies 7 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



Statistics of Coal in Illinois for the Year Ended 
June 30, 1908. 



Practically the same tendencies that have marked the recent 
growth of our manufacturing interests are revealed in the develop- 
ment of the coal mining industry. It would be strange, indeed, were 
this not true when we consider the essential dependence of the work- 
shops of the nation upon the sources of furnishing its fuel. Coal 
has been defined as "unburned fire," and that country (like our own) 
whose mountains and plains cover almost an illimitable supply, is 
destined sooner or later to become the leader in all the world's affairs. 
To-day the United States stands at the head of the manufacturing 
nations, a position which it has reached largely through the utiliza- 
tion of our vast coal deposits. It is a singular fact that the year in 
which England surrendered first place as a manufacturing power, 
put the United States in the lead as a coal producer. In the great 
struggle for international trade, England is hampered, not because of. 
her fiscal policy, or, as has been alleged, through the restrictions im- 
posed by trade unions, but on account of the ever increasing expense 
of producing the fuel necessary to operate her mills and factories. 

Industrial supremacy requires not only plenty of coal, but that it 
be supplied at the lowest possible price, Fortunately this nation is 
in a position to meet each of these conditions, which explains in a 
measure the fact that, while representing in point of population but 5 
per cent of the earth's inhabitants, nearly 85 per cent of all the man- 
ufactured goods used by a billion and a half of people are now made 
here. It is not to be wondered at that the plans and purposes of this 
republic should cause some uneasiness in every European council. 



2 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

It must be apparent to the average observer that the simple methods 
of a quarter of a century ago would be entirely inadequate to meet 
present demands. 

Industry has been reorganized on a broader and stronger basis. 
Vast capital through corporate enterprise has been successfully oper- 
ated. In no other way could the present aud prospective industrial 
situation be controlled. American enterprise has proved equal to 
every emergency. With every additional demand has come the means 
to meet it. It may surprise some to be informed that the large in- 
dustrial concerns of the country have not, to the extent that many be- 
lieve, destroyed or absorbed the small producers. The great institu- 
tions of our land, whose power the thoughtless fear, have come in 
obedience to extraordinary demands; demands which the smaller 
class of so-called competitors would be powerless to supply. This 
statement is fully confirmed in the history of Illinois coal mining. 
With increasing demands came greater concentration of capital and 
consequently better equipment. 

The controlling purpose of modern mine owners is to produce the 
greatest quantity of coal in the shortest space of time. To this end 
every conceivable device calculated to expedite production and mini- 
mize cost has been adopted. To a very great extent machines have 
been substituted for men. Much of present day progress is directly 
attributable to the enterprise of the men charged with the manage- 
ment of great coal interests. So broad is the plan on which the 
industry is now manipulated that in order to equip an ordinary mine, 
a capital of at least $100,000 is required. Mines have recently been 
sunk in this State representing an investment of nearly double that 
.sum. This class of mines embrace all the latest improvements; first 
motion engines, box car loaders, steel towers, electric motors, coal 
washers, detaching-hooks for hoisting cables, and in the thicker seams, 
machines for undercutting and drilling coal; while even the job of the 
little trapper boy is threatened on account of the installation of auto- 
matic trap doors. The purpose of the present system is not alone 
to meet the pressure of modern trade demands, but also to more thor- 
oughly protect the interest of human life. Mechanism is the order 
of the age. The highest forms of civilized society are invariably 
found in the machine-using nations. Workers for wages should be 
the last to object, as it is only at the few points of our earth where 
machinery is applied to industry that the compensation for human 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 3 

toil rises above the simple wants of animal life, Contention should 
be directed, not against the machine, but in favor of a more equitable 
division of its profits and the benefits it confers. 

During the 18 years that the writer worked in the mines of this 
State, he always felt that the man who invented a machine to take 
his job would have justly earned his gratitude as well. It is most 
gratifying to note that the old time opposition of labor unions to the 
introduction of labor saving machines is fast disappearing. But it 
may be asked, in what way does this evolution affect the small oper- 
ator? His functions have in no way been interfered with. He is 
still doing business at the side station or on the country by-road» 
meeting as best he can the limited demands made upon his primitive 
plant and supplying the wants of a class of people which the greater 
concerns are unable to reach. In the present report of the coal in- 
dustry, out of a total of 938 mines and openings of all kinds in the 
State, 580, or nearly two-thirds, belong in the non-shipping or local 
group From a total production of nearly 35,000,000 tons, the aggre- 
gate product of the 580 local mines was less than one and a half 
million tons. While this is but a small per cent of the total product, 
it would appear that the small operator is still doing business and in 
no serious danger of losing his occupation. The fact is still further 
emphasized in our statistics of manufactures. Of the 45,475 manu- 
facturing establishments in this State, as shown by the last census, 
26,899, or 58.1 per cent, were shops whose products represented a 
value of less than $500, More than 70 per cent of all our manufac- 
turing plants employ less than 40 men each. That class of our citi- 
zens who iiave suffered all the spasm of populistic nightmare, fearing 
the ultimate results of corporate enterprise in this country, should 
take renewed courage from the facts these figures reveal. Pessimis- 
tic protests will avail nothing. Declamation, while it may furnish 
exercise for the lungs, is powerless to interrupt, much less stop, the 
current of economic tendencies. Opportunities for individual effort 
will continue to enlarge, but it is upon the great combinations, both 
of labor and capital, that we must depend to maintain our industrial 
supremacy. 

In the matter of coal production, Illinois is second only to Penn- 
sylvania, while in respect to development, management and equipment 
of its mining properties, it stands in a class of its own. Its history 
is a fair reflection of the wonderful progress made along many lines 



4 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

during recent years. Proud as we all might be of present accom- 
plishments, there is reason for the hope that, in the absence of any 
serious industrial depression, the immediate future will register a 
still more significant advance. 

The following summary presents the salient totals of the report 
for this year: 

Summary for the Year Ended June 30, 1903. 

Number of counties producing coal 53 

Number of mines and openings of all kinds 933 

New mines, or old mines reopened during the year 109 

Mines closed or abandoned since last report 91 

Total output of all mines in tons of 2,000 pounds 34,955,400 

Number of shipping or commercial mines 353 

Total output of shipping mines, tons 33, 676, 637 

Number of mines in local trade only C80 

Output of local mines, tons 1,278.863 

Total tons of mine run coal 10,373,098 

Total tons of lump coal .-. 15,874,609 

Total tons of egg coal 995,163 

Total tons of nut coal 1,755,704 

Total tons of pea coal 4,540.421 

Total tons of slack coal 1,416.495 

Total tons shipped from the mines 30.084,387 

Tons supplied to locomotives at the mines 1,117,243 

Tons sold to local trade 2.316,814 

Tons consumed (or wasted) at the plant 1,436,956 

A\{erage days of active operation for shipping mines 222 

Average days of active operation for all mines 191 

Average value per ton. all grades, at the mines SI 06 

Average value per ton of mine run coal at the mines $1 00 

Average value per ton of lump coal "at the mines $1 35 

Average value per ton of egg coal at the mine $1 27 

Average value per ton of nut coal at the mine $.0948 

Average value per ton of pea or screenings coal at the mine SO 63 

Average value per ton of slack coal at the mine $0 32 

Aggregate home value of total product $36,695,972 

Number of mines in which mining machines are used 68 

Number of mining machines in use 522^ 

Number of tons undercut by machines 7.646,777 

Number of tons mined by hand 27.115.510 

Average number of miners employed during the year 34,904 

Average number of other employes under ground 8,523 

Average number of boys employed underground 1.276 

Average number of employes above ground 6,111 

Total employes 49,814 

Number of men at work under ground 44.703 

Number at work on surface 5,111 

Average price paid per gross ton for hand mining, shipping mines S.0564 

Average price paid per gross tonlfor machine mining $.0434 

Number of kegs of powder used for blasting coal 806,334 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 4.527 

Number of men accidentally killed 156 

Number killed inside of the mines 155 

Number killed outside of the mines 1 

Number of wives made widows 93 

Number of children left fatherless 286 

Number of men injured so as to lose a month or more of time 410 

Number of gross tons mined to each life lost 224.118 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 5 

Number of employes to each life lost 320 

Number of deaths perl.OUO employed 3.13 

Number of gross tons mined to each man injured 85,274 

Number of employes to each man Injured 122 

A comparison of some of the totals in the foregoing summary with 
those of last year will be interesting. The number of mines for 
which returns have been made is 938. This is 18 more than last 
year. The mines engaged in the local trade only number 
5S0. This is three less than last year. The total number of 
tons of coal produced, all grades, was 34,955,'400, being an increase 
of 4,934,100 tons over last year. The number of shipping mines in- 
creased from 332 last year to 353 this year, being 6.33 per cent. The 
total output of this class of mines was 33,676,537 tons, or an increase 
over last year of 17 per cent. The output of the 580 local mines was 
1,278,863 tons, being an average of 2,205 tons to each mine. The to- 
tal number of men employed during the year was 49,814, being an 
increase of 3,809 over last year. The average number of days for the 
shipping mines was 222. This is 12 days of an increase over last 
year. 

Classification of Mines. 

The following table presents the totals, mines, men and tons, for 
both shipping and local mines, for the year, by districts: 

Table 1. — Mines, Men and Tons, Shipping and Local Mines, hy 
Districts, 1903. 



District 


Total. 


Shipping. 


Local. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


First..: 


74 

181 
243 
87 
101 
113 
134 


7.717 
6.860 
4.363 
6.771 
8.393 
8.354 
7.356 


3.748.651 
3.245.781 
2.708,350 
4.772,284 
7.070.903 
7.734.831 
5.674,600 


34 
25 
50 
45 
46 
83 
70 


7.340 
6.072 
3,355 
6.319 
8.139 
8.179 
7,090 


3.553.136 
2.991.168 
2,319.691 
4.573.052 
6.990,197 
7.656.451 
5.592,842 


40 
166 
193 
42 
55 
30 
64 


377 
788 
1.008 
452 
254 
175 
266 


195,515 


Second 

Third 


254,613 
388.659 


Fourth 

Fifth 


199.232 
80, 706 


Sixth 


78, 380 


Seventh 


81.768 


The State. 


933 


49.814 


34,955.400 


363 


46. 494 


33,676,537 


580 


3.320 


1.278.863 



STATISTICS OF LABOB. 



Almost the entire increase in the tonnage over last year is found 
to be in the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh districts. 

The following table presents the percentages of mines, men and 
tons, shown in table 1: 

Table 2, — Percentages of Mines, Men and Tons, all Mines, and of 
Shipping and Local Mines, 1903. 





Peeckntagks. 


District. 


All Mines. 


Shipping. 


Local. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


First 


19.40 
26.05 
9.32 
10.83 
12.11 
14.36 
100.00 


16.60 
13.77 
8.76 
13.59 
16.85 
16.77 
14.76 


10.72 
9.29 
7.75 
13.66 
20.23 
22.13 
16.23 


46.96 
13 81 
20.68 
51.72 
46.64 
73.46 
62.24 


96.11 
88.61 
76.90 
93.32 
96.97 
97.91 
96.38 


9.,,. 
92.16 
86.65 
96.83 
98.86 
98.98 
98.56 


».» 

86.19 
79.42 

48.28 
64.66 
26.65 
47.76 


4.89 
11.49 
23.10 
6.68 
3 03 
2.09 
3.62 


5.22 




7.84 


Third 


14.35 




4.17 


Fifth 


1.14 


Sixth 


1.02 




1 44 






The States 


100.00 


100.00 


37.83 


93.34 


96.34 


62.17 


6.66 


3.66 







The percentages here presented reveal that the shipping mines, 
while 38 per cent of the number in operation, employ 93 per cent of 
the men, and produced 96 per cent of the coal for the year. The 
local mines represent 62 per cent of the mines, 7 per cent of the men 
and 4 per cent of the tonnage. The amplitude of the shipping or 
commercial mines in the production of coal is presented in the fol- 
lowing table of percentages, shown by districts, and for the State, 
for a series of ten years: 

Table 3. — Percentages of the Tonnage of Shipping Mines of the 
State for a Series of Ten Years, by Districts. 



The 

State. 



1902 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1898 
1897 
1896 
1896 



First. 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Seventh. 


94.78 


92.16 


85.66 


95.83 


98.86 


98.98 


95.96 


94.93 


91.89 


85.54 


95.36 


98.82 


98.73 


98.37 


96.68 


89.38 


85.98 


94.65 


98.65 


98.64 


97.63 


95.81 


89.14 


87.18 


95.47 


98.39 


98.84 


96.47 


94.73 


92.63 


79.93 


95.43 


98.81 


98.67 


98.52 


91.35 


88.61 


78.59 


93.69 


99.12 


98.48 


98.11 


97.29 


92.99 


78.91 


95.20 


99.32 


98.65 


97.82 


96.2 


92.6 


78.9 


95.1 


99.2 


98.7 


96.6 


93.7 


86.8 


90.6 


99.0 


91.3 






93.8 


83.0 


91.7 


98.8 


93.7 











96.34 
96.01 
95.84 
95.64 
96.16 
94.93 
96.53 
96.26 
93.48 
94.10 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. I 

Only two of the districts show less than 90 per cent of the coal 
produced by this class of mines, during these years; the second dis- 
trict for five years and the third for eight years. For the State, the 
percentage of the output of shipping mines for the ten years has 
never been less than 93 per cent. 

A further presentation of the attainments of these mines is shown 
in the following table: 



Table 4. — Muies, Men and Tons, with Percentages for a Series 
of Ten Years. 





Totals— All Mines. 


Pbrcentages. 


Years. 


SHIPPING. 


LOCAL. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. Tons. 


1903 .. . 


933 
916 
915 
920 
889 
881 
853 
901 
874 
836 


49.814 

46.005 
44.143 
39,384 
36.991 
35,026 
33. 788 
37.032 
38,630 
38,477 


34,955,400 
30.021.300 
26,635.319 
25.153.929 
23.434,445 
18,599,299 
20.072,758 
19,786.626 
17,735,864 
17.113,576 


37.83 
36.28 
36.17 
35.11 
36.33 
37.49 
36.38 
36.62 
36.50 
38.16 


93.34 
93.05 
92.71 
92.16 
92.74 
92.30 
92.72 
76.11 
80.70 
81.20 


96.34 
96.01 
95.84 
95.64 
96.15 
94.93 
96.53 
96.26 
93.48 
94.10 


62.17 
'63.72 
63.83 
64.89 
63.67 
62.51 
63.62 
63.38 
63.50 
61.84 


6,66 
6.95 
7.29 
7.81 
7.26 
7.70 
7.28 
23.89 
19.30 
18.80 


3 66 


1902 


3 99 


1901 




1900 


4.36 


1899 


3 85 


1898 


5.07 


1897 


3.47 


1896 . 


3 74 


1895 


6 52 


1891 


5 SO 







This table shows the totals of mines, men and tons for a series of 
ten years, with the percentages of each for both the shipping and 
local mines It will be observed that, for the ten years, the percent- 
ages of mines, men and tons, of the commercial or shipping class of 
mines, has been quite uniform in each grouping. 



8 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The grouping of all the mines of the State by tonnage, and by 
districts, is shown in the following table: 

Table 5 — Oroiiping of Mines hy Tonnage and Districts, 1903. 





Tonnage of Mines Producing— 


District. 


Under 
:i,000. 


1.000 

and under 

10.000. 


10,C00 

and under 

50,000. 


50.000 

and under 

100.000. 


100,000 

and under 

200.000. 


200.000 
and over. 




No. 


Tons. 


No 


Tons. 


No. 


Tons. 


No 


Tons. 


No. 


Tons. 


No 


Tons. 


First 


17 

84 
112 
11 

43 

8 
38 


8.938 
30.232 
48.422 

6.246 
14,999 

4.4€0 
13.381 


24 
73 
79 
41 
11 
29 
36 


70.796 
180. 195 
235.638 
140,588 

30,678 
110.207 
103.240 


7 
11 
36 
8 
4 

28 
26 


143,107 
213,789 
882,949 
208.240 
100,492 
1.009,425 
838.341 


7 
1 
10 
9 
1] 
22 
15 


507,107 
86,812 
687.810 
665.430 
921,987 
1,512,333 
1.063.716 


16 

6 
6 
11 
21 
16 
11 


2.312,391 
983.401 
863,531 
1.449.710 
2,937.158 
2,326,286 
1.524,960 


6 


706, 312 


Second 

Third.. .. 


1,751,352 


Fourth 

Fifth 


7 
11 
10 

8 


2.302.070 
3. 065, 589 


Sixth 


2,772 120 


Seventh 


2.130.962 


The State. 


313 


126,678 


293 


871,342 


120 


3.396,343 


75 


5.445.195 


87 


12.387.437 


45 


12,728,405 



The tendency in most of the districts is to an increase in the num- 
ber of mines producing 50,000 tons and over. The grouping of the 
mines as shown in table 5, is presented in another form in the fol- 
lowing table, showing the percentages of mines and tonnage in each 
classification. 



Table 6- 



■ Classification of Mines as to Tonnage, ivith Percentages 
of Mines and Tons, 1903.' 





No. 

of 

mines. 


Tonnage. 


Percentage of 


Mines Producing— 


Mines. 


Tons. 




313 

293 
120 

75 
87 

45 


126.678 
871.342 
3.396.343 
5.445.195 
12,387,437 
12,728.405 


33.12 
31.61 
12.94 
8.09 
9.39 
4.85 


.36 


One thousand and less than 10 000 tons 


2.49 




9.72 


Fifty thousand and less than lOO 000 tons . . 


15.58 


One hundred thousand and less than 200.000 tons .. 


35.44 
36.41 







The mines producing 50,000 tons and over, represent only 22 per 
cent of the number of mines, but contributed 87 per cent of the out- 
put, It will be seen that the mines producing 200,000 tons and over, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



9 



while representing only 4.85 per cent of the total number, produced 
36 41 per cent of the total tonnage. The grouping of mines by out- 
put for a series of 21 years is shown in the following table: 

Table 7. — Number of Mines in Specified Groups of Tonnage for a 
Series of Ttventy-one Years. 



Number op Minks Pkoducinq- 



Under 
1.000 tons. 



1. 000 and 

under 
10.000 tons. 



10.000 and 

under 
50,000 tons 



50.000 and 

tinder 
100.000 tons 



100.000 and 

under 
200.000 tons 



200,000 

tons and 

over. 



Total 
mines. 



209 
262 
286 
316 
320 
327 
321 
398 
403 
332 
282 
312 
319 
330 
346 
351 
346 
340 
313 
314 
313 



233 
273 



278 
272 



232 
262 
276 
280 
250 
244 



The number of mines with an output of 100,000 tons, and over, 
has increased 20 per cent over last year; while the number of mines 
producing less than 100,000 tons and more than 10,000 tons, has de- 
creased 14.47 per cent. The number of mines having an output of 
less than 10,000 tons has increased only 5 per cent. Of this latter class 
of mines a division is made, showing the number of mines whose pro- 
duct is less than 1,000 tons. However, grouping the mines return- 
ing a product under 10,000 tons, it is found that the number has only 
increased 7.44 per cent in the past ten years. 



10 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The following table shows the percentages of this grouping of 
mines for the 21 years: 

Table 8. — Percentages of Mines in Specified Grouping of Tonnage 
for a Series of Twenty-one Years. 





Total 

Minks. 


Peeoentagks op Minks Producino— 


Ybae. 


Under 
1,000 tons. 


1,000 and 

under 
10,000 tons. 


10.000 and 

under 
50,000 tons. 


50,000 and 

under 
100,000 tons 


100,000 and 

under 
200.000 tons 


200,000 

tons and 

over. 


1883 


639 
741 
778 
789 
801 
822 
851 
936 
918 
839 
788 
836 
859 
874 
853 
881 
889 
920 
915 
915 
933 


32.71 
35.36 
36.76 
40.05 
39.95 
39.79 
37.59 
42.52 
43.79 
39.69 
35.91 
37.08 
36.43 
38.90 
40.56 
39.84 
38.92 
36.96 
34.21 
34.32 
33.55 


36.47 
36.84 
37.27 
35.49 
34.71 
33.09 
37.00 
32.16 
28.32 
29.44 
29.44 
29.07 
.33.29 
30.66 
29.31 
27.70 
29.36 
32.07 
33.66 
28.74 
31.40 


20.81 

19.97 

18.38 

17.11 

17.60 

18.37 

16.28 

16.56 

17.54 • 

17.76 

16.24 

19.62 

16.65 

14.88 

14.07 

17.14 

13.84 

13.37 

13.65 

16.61 

12.86 


6.10 
5.13 
5.14 
5.58 
5.24 
5.71 
6.44 
5.77 
5.67 
7.03 
10.92 
8.25 
7.33 
8.35 
9.26 
9.76 
8.66 
7.61 
8.63 
8.31 
8.04 


1.56 
2.16 
2.32 
1.39 
2.25 
2.43 
2.34 
2.56 
4.03 
4.89 
5.71 
5.26 
5.25 
6.61 
4.81 
4.77 
6.41 
7.06 
6.34 
7.87 
9.33 


2.35 


1884 


.64 


1886 

1886 


.13 

.38 


1887 


.25 


1888 


.61 


1889 


.35 


1890 . 


.43 


1891 


.65 


1892 


1.19 


1893. 


1.78 


1894 


.72 


1895 


1.05 


1896. 


1.60 


1897 


1.99 


1898 


.79 


1899. 


2.81 


1900., 


2.93 


1901 


3.61 


1902.. . 


4.15 


1903 


4.82 







It will be seen that very little variation has occurred in the num- 
ber of mines in each of the groups, producing under 100,000 tons for 
the years shown in the table. For the past five years, however, the 
number producing 100,000 tons and over has increased 63 per cent. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



11 



The grouping of mines by tonnage, for 12 years, is shown in the 
following- table: 

Table 9 — Grouping of Minesi by Tonnage for a Series of Twelve 

Years. 





Tonnage of Mines Producing— 


Year. 


Under 
1,000 tons. 


1.000 

and under 

10.000. 


10.000 

and under 

50.000. 


50.000 

and under 

100.000. 


100.000 

and under 

200.000. 


200.000 
and over. 




Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


1892 


147.777 
121,636 
137.607 
151,430 
141,690 
150,445 
161,622 
137.682 
154.318 
227.419 
161. 058 


1.058.078 
726. 199 
702,623 
866.019 
807.148 
773.526 
692.149 
790.948 
969.424 
838.989 
7R.^ mi 


4.134.259 
3.132.499 
4.022.545 
3.609.918 
3.265.822 
3.162.713 
3.785.962 
2.877.117 
3.255.570 
3.393.827 
3.694.890 
3.396,343 


4.293.472 
6.179.487 
4,742,267 
4,416,969 
5,049,694 
5,693,193 
6.351.613 
5.618,924 
5,009,326 
5,796.953 
5,376,350 
5.445.195 


6.855.091 
6.291.966 
6.035.094 
6.346.937 
6.557.545 
6.778.374 
5.898.596 
7.443.023 
8.995.963 
8.008.897 
9.923.538 
12.387.437 


2.373.599 


1893 


3. 497. 778 


1894 


1.473.550 


1896 


2.344.591 


1896 


3. 962. 435 


1897 

1898 


4.514.507 
1.709.457 


1899 


6.566.851 


1900 


6. 769, 328 


1901 


8,370,234 


1902 . . 


10,101,867 


1903 


126.678 ! 871.342 


12.728.406 











The tonnage here shown in the mines, classed as to their capacity 
of production, shows but little change in the tons produced by the 
mines in the different groups of less than 100,000 tons. 



aUKSlMlilMS!. 



12 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The following table gives the total tons of all mines with the per- 
centages of each group for 12 years, as follows: 

Table 10 — Percentages of Tons Produced by Specified Grouping of 
Tonnage for Twelve Years. 





Total Tons 


Peeckntagb of Tons Produced by Minks Producing— 


Ykabs. 


Under 
1.000 
tons. 


1,000 and 

nnder 
10.000 tons. 


10,000 and 

under 
60,000 tons. 


60.000 and 

under 
100.000 tons 


100. 000 and 

under 
200.000 tons 


200.000 tons 
and 
over. 


1892 


17.862,276 
19,949,564 
17,113.576 
17.735.864 
]9, 784, 334 
20,072.758 
18.699,299 
23,434.446 
26,153.929 
26.635.319 
30.021,300 
34,956 400 


.82 
.61 
.80 
.85 
.72 
.75 
.87 
.59 
.61 
.86 
.54 
.36 


6.92 
3.64 
4.11 
4.88 
4.08 
3.85 
3.72 
3.38 
3.86 
3.15 
2.54 
2.49 


23.15 

15.70 
23.50 
20.36 
16.51 
15.75 
20.36 
12.28 
12.94 
12.74 
12.31 
9.72 


24.04 
30.98 
27.71 
24.91 
25.52 
28.37 
34.16 
23.97 
19.92 
21.76 
17.90 
15.58 


32.78 
31.54 
35.26 
35.79 
33.14 
28.79 
31.71 
31.76 
35.76 
30.07 
33.06 
35.44 


13.29 


1893 


17.53 


1894 


8.61 


1895 


13.22 


1896 


20.03 


1897 


22.49 


1898 


9.19 


1899 


28.02 


1900 


26.91 


1901 


31.43 


1902. 


33.65 


1903 


36.41 







Referring to both tables nine and ten, it will be seen that the mines 
producing over 50,000 tons have furnished a very large proportion 
of the coal for each of the years represented. 

The Large Mines of the State. 
To bring more prominently to notice the class of mines whose pro- 
duct is over 100,000 tons, two tables are presented — one showing the 
list of operators and the location of the mines whose product is 
100,000 tons and less than 200,000; the other is a list giving the 
names and location of mines that report an output of 200,000 tons 
and over. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



13 



The tables follow: 

Table 11 — Mines from which more than 100,000 tons and less than 
200,000 tons of coal have been delivered during the year WOS. 



Companiea. 



Chicago. Wilmington & Vermillion Coal Co. No. 1... 

Royal Coal Co., Royal 

Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co. No. 2 

Consolidated Coal Co. No, 10 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Whitebreast Coal Co. of Illinois E 

Muren Coal & Ice Co, No. 1 

Southern Illinois Coal Mining & Washing Co. No. 2.. 

Illinois Third Vein Coal Co. B 

Southern Illinois Coal Mining & Washing Co. No. 3.. 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 5 

LaSalle County Coal Co., Union 

Capitol Co-operative Coal Co 

LaSalle County Coal Co. No. 1 

Greenridge Mining Co 

SorentoCoal Co 

New Virginia No. 1 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 4 

LiaSalle County Coal Co.. LaSalle 

VirdenCoalCo 

Coal Valley Mining Co. No. 2 

Springfield Coal & Mining Co. No. 4 

Bracevllle Coal Co. No, 5 

LaSalle County Coal Co., Rockwell 

HlllsboroCoalCo 

Acme Coal Co. No. 1 

Alden Coal Co. No. 2 

The Jones & Adams Coal Co 

Kelleyyille Coal Co. No. 4 

McLean County Coal Co 

Springfield Coal & Mining Co. No. 5 

White Walnut Coal Co. No. 7 

St. Louis & O'Fallon Coal Co 

Chicago. Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Co. No. 2.... 
Springfield Coal & Mining Co. No. 3 



Streator 

Belleville 

Maryville 

Mt. Olive 

Collinsville 

Dunfermline 

New Baden 

Marlon , 

Ladd 

Marion 

Spring Valley 

LaSalle 

Springfield 

LaSalle , 

Uirard 

Sorento 

Lake Creek 

Seatonville 

LaSalle 

Virden 

Sherrard 

Springfield 

Bracevllle 

LaSalle 

Hillsboro 

Streator 

Wanlock 

Catlin 

Danville 

Bloomington 

Springfield 

Pinckneyville , 

Belleville 

South Wilmington 
Springfield , 



14 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 11 — Continued. 



Latham Coal Co 

Springfield Go-operative Coal Co 

Maplewood Coal Co., Black Hawk 

Biff Four Wilmington Coal Co. No. 3 

Penwell Coal Co. No. 1 

Greenvlew Coal & Mining Co 

Spaulding Coal Co. No. 1 

Trenton Coal Co 

West End Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co.. Abby No. 3 

Monmouth Coal Co 

Wabash Coal Co 

Brookside Coal Mining Co. No. 2 

Carterville Coal Co.. Burr 

Davenport Coal Co. No. 1 

Consolidated Coal Co.. Heinz Bluff 

Springfield Coal & Mining Co. No. 1 

Star Coal Co. No. 2 ■ 

Chicago* Big Muddy Coal Co. No. 1 

Muren Coal & lee Co. No. 1 

Cantrall Co-operative Coal Co 

Carllnville Coal Co 

Sangamon Coal Co 

Walnut Hill Coal Co 

KernsDonneiwald Coal Co. No. 1 

Roanoke Coal & Mining Co 

Lincoln Coal Go • 

Oglesby Coal Co. No. 1 

Wilmington Coal Mining & Manufacturing Co. No. 4 

WoodsideCoal Co 

Republic Iron & Steel Co 

Kolb Coal Co. No. 1 ■ 

Taylor & Kavanaugh No. 5 

Wenona Coal Co. No. 1 ■ 

Williamson County Coal Co. No. 1 

Sprlngside Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co. No. 3 

Mrs. E. Hakes No. 2 



Lincoln 

Springfield... 
Farmington... 

Coal City 

Pana 

Qreenview.... 

Spaulding 

Trenton 

Springfield... 
Collinsville... 

Canton 

Athens 

Danville 

Carterville ... 

Ledford 

CollinsvUle... 

Riverton 

Streator 

Marion 

Belleville..... 

Cantrall 

Carllnville ... 
Springfield... 

Belleville 

Worden 

Roanoke 

Lincoln 

Oglesby 

Diamond ..... 
Springfield... 
Springfield... 
Mascoutah ... 
Carbon Hill.. 

Wenona 

Lake Creek.., 

Pana 

Edwardsvllle 
Rutland 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table ii— Concluded. 



15 



Companies. 



Wabash Coal Co 

Willlamsville Coal Co 

Sandoval Coal Co. No. 1 

NjBW Ohio Washed Coal Co. No. 1 

Spauldine Coal Co. No. 2 

Pana Coal Co 

Auburn & Alton Coal Co 

Western Anthracite Coal & Coke Co. 
Big Four Wilmington Coal Co. No. 2. 

Horn's Colliery Co 

Wilmington Star Mining Co. No. 6. ,. 

Economy Coal & Mining Co 

Madison Coal Co. No. 7 

Whitebreast Fuel Co. of Illinois. C. . . 
Total tons 



Dawson 

Selbytown 

Sandoval 

Carterville ... 

Bissell 

Pana 

Auburn 

Sparta 

Coal City 

Duqnoln 

Coal City 

Danville 

Glen Carbon.. 
Dunfermline. 



110,312 
109, 627 
108,016 
107,683 
107,131 
107,401 
107, 126 
107,011 
106,683 
106,161 
105,856 
101.000 
102.881 
101.617 
.387,137 



Table 12. — Mines from which more than 200,000 tons of coal have 
been delivered during the year 1903, 



Companies. 



il 




ia 
|| 

So 


i 


277 


.. 


7 


H. 


257 


no 


9 


H. 


272 


210 


7 


H. 


252 


292 


7.11 


M. 


268 


137 


6 


H. 


270 


637 


6 


H. 


218 


320 


7.6 


M. 


273 


210 


7 


H. 


272 


170 


8 


H&M 


278 


512 


2.8 


H. 


272 


312 


3.6 


H. 


261 


315 


3.6 


H. 


211 


318 


8 


M. 


272 


90 


8 


H. 


213 


292 


6 


M. 



Kelleyville Coal Co. No. 3 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. No. 7 

Kelleyville Coal Co. No. 2 

Chicago. W. & V. Coal Co 

Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co. No. 1 

Pittenger & Davis M. Mfg. Co. No. 3-1 

Chicago Virden Coal Co. No. 1 

Westville Coal Co 

Kelleyville Coal Co. (Hlmrod) 

Devlin Coal Co. No. 1 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 2 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 1 

Madison Coal Co. No. 6 

Kelleyville Coal Co. (Pawnee) 

Staunton Coal Co. No. 1 



Danville 

Herrin 

Danville 

Thayer 

Collinsville... 

Centralia 

Virden 

Westville 

Danville 

Toluca! 

Spring Valley 
Spring Valley 

Divernon 

Danville 

Staunton 



118. 351 
110.298 
106,218 
103,758 
393,800 
391, 176 
361,513 
316, 191 
311,769 
336,017 
333,832 
327, 116 
306,812 
306,622 
301,613 



16 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table i2— Concluded. 



Companies. 






Chicago W. & V. Coal Co. No. 1 

Jones & Adams Coal Co 

Chicago & Carterville Coal Co. No. 1. . . . 

CentraliaM. & Mfg. Co, No. 2 

Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 3 

Marquette Coal Co. No. 1 

Chicago Virden Coal Co. No. 2 

Springside Coal Co. No. 1 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. No. 6 

Springfield C. &M. Co. No. 2 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 6 

MadisonCoalCo. No. 2 

Madison Coal Co. No. :4 

Madison Coal Co. No. 5 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. (Harrison). 

DonkBros. G. & C Co. No. 3 

Springfield C. & M. Co. No. 6 

Breese Coal & Mining Co 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 8 

Muddy Valley M. & Mfg. Co. No. 1 

Victor Coal Co 

Odin Coal Co 

LumaghiCoal Co. No. 2 

Christian Co Coal Co. No. 1 

St. Louis & Big Muddy Coal Co . . . 

Empire Coal Co. No. 3 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 7 

Chicago. W. & V. Coal Co. No. 2 

Cardiff Coal Co. No. 1 

Willis Coal & Mining Co. No. 1 

Total tons 



S.WilmlngtoD 
Springfield . . . 

Herrin 

Centralia 

Spring Valley 
Marquette — 

Auburn 

Herrin 

Murphysboro. 

River ton 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon.. 
Glen Carbon.. 

Mt. Olive 

Murphysboro. 

Troy 

TaylorvUle... 

Breese 

Mt. Olive 

Hallidayboro. 

Pawnee 

Odin 

Colllnsville... 
Taylorville.... 

Dewmaine 

Gilchrist 

Staunton 

Streator 

Cardiff 

Willlsville.... 



H. 

H. 
H&M 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 
H&M 

H. 

M. 

M. 



H. 

H. 

H&M 



Table 1 1 presents 87 mines which produced 100,000 and less than 
200,000 tons each, aggregating 12,387,487 tons. Table 12 shows 45 
mines, each of which produced over 200,000 tons, the total product 
of these mines being 12,728,405 tons. In this table is also presented 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



17 



the number of days each mine was in operation, the depth of the 
coal seam below the surface, the thickness of the seam and the man- 
ner of mining, whether by hand or by machine, or by both. It will 
be noticed that four of the mines in table 12 had each an output of 
over 400,000 tons, three in Vermilion county and one in Sangamon. 
Last year only one mine exceeded -100,000 tons. 

Eleven of these mines produced over 300,000 tons; the number was 
seven last year. This leaves 34 mines yielding an output of over 
200,000 toDS. 

The working time of these 45 mines was an average of 2'19,2 days 
each; this is 27 days more than is shown for all the shipping mines. 
In 28 of these mines the coal was mined by hand, in 12 by machines 
and in five by both hand and machine. The combined output of 
these large producers was 25,115,842 tons, or 71.85 per cent of the 
total tonnage of all mines in the State. 

Number op Mines. 

The gain and loss in the number of mines, each year, varies but 
little. Every year shows about 100 or more new mines opened and 
alike number closed or abandoned; these are all of the smaller or 
local mines. 

The following table presents the record for the year by districts: 

Table I'S—Gain and Loss in Number of Mines 1902-1903, 
by Districts. 





Total 

number 

of mines, 

190:'. 


Number 

of new 

mines 

opened 

1903. 


Total. 


Number 

of mines 

abandoned 

1903. 


Total 

number 

of mines 

1903. 


Year 1903. 


DiSTBIOT. 


Gain. 


Loss. 


First 


77 
176 
241 
8i 
99 
111 
127 


8 
26 
25 
18 

9 
11 
12 


85 
202 
266 
102 
108 
122 
139 


11 
21 
23 
15 

7 
9 

6 


74 
181 
243 

87 
101 
113 
134 








5 
2 
3 

2 
2 

7 




Tliird 








Fifth 




Sixth 




Seventh 








The State.... 


915 


109 


1.024 


91 


933 


21 


3 



All of the districts show a gain in the number of mines excepting 
the first, which shows a loss of three mines. The net gain for all 
mines is 18 over last year. 
-2C. 



18 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The record of the opening of new mines and the closing of worked 
out or abandoned mines for a series of 14 years is presented in the 
following table: 

Table 14 — Total Number of limes, also the Number Opened and 
Closed, also the Gain and Loss for 14 Years. 









Number of Mines. 






Ybar. 


At begin- 
ning of 
Year. 


Opened. 


Closed. 


Qain. 


Loss. 


At Close 
of Year. 


1890 


851 
936 
918 
839 
788 
836 
874 
901 
853 
881 
889 
920 
915 
915 


176 
92 
59 
69 
156 
116 
142 
70 
120 
129 
147 
138 
111 
109 


94 
110 
138 
120 
108 

78 
115 
118 

92 
121 
116 
143 
111 

91 


82 




936 


1891 


18 

79 
51 


918 


1892 






1893 




788 


1894 


48 
38 
27 


836 


1895 




874 


1896 .. . 




901 


1897 


48 


853 


1898 


28 
8 
31 


881 


1899 




889 


1900 




920 


1901 


5 


915 


1902 . . . . 




916 


1903 


18 




933 












1.634 


1.555 


280 


201 









Here is shown that during the 14 years covered by the table 1,634 
mines have been opened, while during the same period 1,555 have 
been closed or abandoned, leaving a net gain of only 79 mines, 

Shipping Mines. 
The same plan or arrangement of the tables adopted last year is 
followed in this report, that is, to classify the shipping mines and 
the local mines separately. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



19 



The following table presents a list of the shipping or commercial 
collieries of the State for the year, giving the names of operators, 
number and location of mines, total output and disposition of same: 

Table 15 — A List of the Shipping or Commercial Collieries of 
the State, Arranged According to Output, 1903. 





1 

a 

o 

1 

g 

s 


Postoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 


<v 

1 

"a 
o 

3 

a 

3 

o 
1 

Eh 


Disposition of 
Output. 


Name of Operator. 


S 

ll 

a o 


ill 

Ml 

m 
Jill 




20 
6 
3 

1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 

1 

5 
1 

4 

5 
1 
4 


Belleville 

Colllnsville... 
Pairmount ... 

Gillespie 

Hornsby 

Marissa 

Mission Field. 

Mt Olive 

Staunton 

Trenton 

Troy 


2.037,014 


1. 798. 743 


238,271 




..do 

..do 


210.852 
464.476 
80, 455 
77.859 
51.862 
48. 101 
75.918 
425.529 
467. 166 
83.970 
50.826 


192.074 
412.020 
73.248 
55.348 
43,711 
44.541 
70. 175 
396.264 
397. 168 
69. 974 
44.220 


18.778 
62,456 
7,207 
22,511 
8,151 
3,560 
5,743 
29,265 
69,998 
13,996 
6.606 


..do 


..do 


..do 


..do 


..do 


.do 


..do 


..do 


..do 


Kelleyville Coal Co 


Hlmrod 

Westville 

Seatonville.,.. 
Spring Valley 


1.714.434 


1.667.681 


46,853 




..do 


244.769 
1.369.665 


342. 324 
1.325.257 


2,445 
44. 408 


..do 


Spring Valley Coal Co 


1.294.056 


1.222.310 


71,746 




..do 

..do 


174.443 
1,119.613 


162.066 
1.060.244 


12,377 
59,369 


Madison Coal Co 


6 




1.273.757 


1.161.171 


112,586 






..do 

..do 


1 Divernon 

1 Edwardsvllle. 
3 Glen Carbon . 
IMt. Olive 


306.842 
112.262 
608.661 
245.992 


293.977 
100. 140 
558,461 
208.593 


12,866 
12, 122 
50,200 
37,399 


..do 

..do . 




Chicago. Wilmington & Vermillion Coal Co. 


5 




1.257.934 
417.909 
406.267 
403.758 


1.177,587 
403.393 
382. 176 
392.018 


80,347 
44,516 
24.091 
11.740 


..do 


S Wilmino't.'n 


..do.... 


2 Streator 

J Thayer 


..do 



20 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 15 — Continued. 





i 

a 

a 

u 

a 


Postoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 


i 
1 

o 
3 

a. 

3 

o 

1 


Disposition op 
Output. 


Name op Operator. 


3 

IB bi 

9 O 


m. 




6 
2 

1 

2 




1.083.782 


960,972 


102.810 




Rlverton 

Springfield... 
Taylorville ... 


..do 


387.902 
462.812 
233.068 


368, 897 
439.663 
172.522 


19.005 


do . 


23 269 


..do 


60.546 


Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co 


943.624 


904.861 


38 773 




Herrin 

Murphysboro. 




.do . . 


440,298 
503.326 


426.399 
478.452 


13. 899 


..do 


24.874 


Donk Bros Coal & Coke Co . . 


867.960 


833.480 


21 4S0^ 




Belleville .... 
CollinsvlUe... 

Maryville 

Troy 




.do 


31,660 
393.800 
196.200 
236.300 


30.400 
386,480 
188.700 
227. 900 


1 260 


..do 

do, 


7.320 
7 600 


..do 


8.400 






" 730.064 
269.889 
96.622 
364.543 


705.343 
264,691 
90.230 
35t>.422 


24.711 


do 


Auburn 

Chatham 

Virden 

LaSalle 


5 198 


..do 


5,392 


..do 


14,121 




690.777 
447,273 


623. 196 
429. 161 


167,581 
18, 122 






Catlin 




do 


156,368 
290,906 


161.416 
277. 736 


4 952 


..do 


Springfield... 

Marion 

Centralla 

Westville 

Toluca 


13. 170 


Southern Illinois Coal Mining* Washing Co 
Pittenger & Davis Co 


433.974 
391.176 
346, 194 
336.047 
328.108 


423.684 
256.127 
338.354 

284.540 
243,093 


10. 290 

135 049 


Westville Coal Co 


7.840 


Devlin Coal Co 


51 507 


Willis Coal & Mining Co 






Bryden 

DuQuoin 

WllUsville.... 




..do 


64.458 
62.439 
201.211 


62.686 
60.182 
120,325 


1.872 


..do 


2. 267 


..do 


80.886 


Mnren Coal & Ice Co 


318,337 


278,993 


39 344 




Belleville .... 
New Baden... 




..do 


124,061 
194,276 


104,161 
174.832 


19. £00 


..do 


19,444 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 15 — Continued, 



21 











Disposition of 








1 

til 


Output. 




s 


ill 














« 


Postoffice 


93 






Namk of Operator. 


a 

o 


address and 

location of 

mine. 


O 
I 


11 




!S 




§ 


£•« 


s^g* 




1 




3 


p^ 


qo o-M 














• 


Z 






Eh 


H 



Staunton Coal Co 

Whltebreast Fuel Co. of 111 

Marquette Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Chicago & Cartervllle Coal Co 

Centralla Mining: & Manufacturing Co 

Lumagrhi Coal Co 

Sunnyslde Coal Co 

Big4 Wilmlneton Coal Co 

Coal Valley Mining Co 

..do 

..do 

Spauldine Coal Co 

..do 

. do 

Wabash Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Breese Coal & Mining Co 

Muddy Valley Mining & Mfg. Co 

Victor Coal Co 

Newssm Bros 

..do 

..do 

Odin Coal Co 

Christian County Coal Co 

St. Louis & Big Muddy Coal Co 

Empire Coal Co 

KolbCoalCo 

Cardiff Coal Co 

Wilmington Coal Mining & Mfg. Co... 



Staunton 

Dunfermline . 

Marquette.... 

Sparland 

Herrin 

Centralla 

Collinsville... 

Herrin 

Coal City 

Cable 

Sherrard 

Bissell 

Spaulding.... 

Athens 

Dawson 

Breese 

Hallidayboro. 
Pawnee 

Farmington . . 

Peoria 

Odin 

Taylorvllle... 
Dewmalne.... 

Gilchrist 

Mascoutah ... 

Cardiff 

Diamond 



304.643 


291,141 


13.499 


297.002 


287,944 


9.058 


281.001 
270.472 


262,953 
257.984 


18.048 
12.488 


10.529 


4.969 


5.560 


277.898 


265. 137 


12.761 


272.905 


185.164 


87.741 


267,445 


260.299 


7,146 


266.304 


243.818 


22,486 


251.696 


239,655 


12.041 


250.874 


240.466 


10. 408 


86.812 


83.080 


3.732 


164.062 


157. 386 


6.676 


248.440 
107,431 


246,490 
106.431 


1.950 
950 


141.009 


140.059 


1,000 


242.751 


2?8.073 


14,678 


132,439 


125.355 


7,084 


110.312 


102.718 


7.594 


231.001 


185.601 


45,400 


.228.885 


152,219 


76,666 


228,190 


221.490 


6,700 


221,679 


206,697 


15.082 


36.462 


33.000 


3.462 


185.217 


173.597 


11.620 


218.713 


193.954 


19, 759 


216,815 


211.767 


6.048 


213,040 


200.242 


12. 798 


211,218 


207.030 


4.138 


206,595 


152.196 


54. 399 


201,556 


192.912 


8.644 


198, 756 


190,192 


8.664 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 15 — Continued. 



Namb of Opkrator. 



PostofSce 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition of 
Output. 






O m u 08 
H 



Royal Coal Co 

New Ohio Washed Coal Co 

Missouri & Illinois Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Citiiens' Coal & MiningCo 

Weaver Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Illinois Third Vein Coal Co 

Carterville Coal Co 

Wilmington Star Mining Co 

Capitol Cooperative Coal Co 

Taylor & Cavanangh 

Oreenrldge Mining Co 

Joseph Taylor 

Sorento Coal Co 

New Virginia Coal Co 

VlrdenCoalCo 

Braceville Coal Co 

Hillsboro Coal Co 

Acme Coal Co 

Alden Coal Co 

McLean County Coal Co 

White Walnut Coal Co 

St. Louis & O'Pallon Coal Co . ... 

Latham Coal Co 

Springfield Cooperative Coal Ce. 

Maplewood Coal Co 

Penwell Coal Co 

Greenview Coal & Mining Co 

Hlppard Coal Co 



Belleville.., 
Carterville 



Belleville. 
Willlsville 
Springfield . . . 



Duquoln . 
PinckneyvUle 

Ladd 

Carterville .. 
Coal City.... 
Springfield . . 
Carbon Hill . 

Girard 

O'Fallon 

Sorento 

Lake Creek.. 

Vlrden 

Braceville ... 
Hillsboro.... 

Streator 

Wanlock 

Bloomlngton 
Pinckneyville 
Belleville..., 

Lincoln 

Springfield.. 
Farmington . 

Pana 

Greenview .. 
Belleville.... 



197, 

194,787 
193,923 



190, 100 
180,307 
188.211 



190,394 
3,529 



163.814 
181.298 



127,265 
60,253 



122,298 
59.000 



185,674 
181,991 
179.419 
178, 927 
178, 198 
176,000 
175,050 
166,841 
163,285 
158,980 
168, 326 
158.070 
165,122 
150,851 
150,339 
146, 194 
146, 108 
145,817 
141. 766 
141,064 
140,6461 



182,267 
176,334 

82,976 
166, 639 
174,479 
164,609 
168,000 
170,037 
142,772 
155,547 
146,285 
118,757 
148,680 

25,000 
115.325 
147, 179 
137,396 
117, 102 
143,697 
113,346 
126,809 
97, 739 



7.200 
14,480 
6,712 



5,413 

299 

25,364 

6.220 

4,967 

1.253 

19.095 

4,400 

9,340 

99,016 

13,880 

4.448 

13,589 

8,000 

5,013 

23,069 

7,738 

12,695 

39,669 

9,490 

130, 122 

36,526 

3,160 

8.798 

29,006 

2,220 

28,421 

14,266 

42,806 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 15 — Continued. 



28 



Name of Operator. 



Poatoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition of 
Odtpdt. 



a 
"OS 



a o 



P O 0*J 
Q X u 08 

H 



Trenton Coal Co 

West End Coal Co 

Star Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Monmouth Coal Co 

Brookside Coal & Mining; Co 

Davenport Coal Co 

Chicago & Big Muddy Coal & Coke Co 

Cantrall Cooperative Coal Co 

QlendaleCoal Co 

Carllnville Coal Co 

Sangamon Coal Co 

Walnut Hill Coal Co 

Kerns Donniewald Coal Co 

Roanoke Coal & Mining Co 

Lincoln Coal Co 

Oglesby Coal Co 

Woodside Coal Co 

Republic Iron & Steel Co 

Gartside Coal Co 

Wenona Coal Co 

Williamson County Coal Co 

Sprlngslde Coal Mining Co 

Mrs. E. Hake 

Willlamsville Coal Co 

Sandoval Coal Co 

PanaCoal Co 

Auburn & Alton Coal Co 

Western Anthracite Coal & Coke Co .. 

Horns Colliery Co 

Economy Coal C 



Trenton , 

Springfield... 

Carbon Hill ., 

Streator 

Canton 

Grape Creek.. 

Ledford 

Marion 

Cantrall 

Belleville 

Carlinville ... 
Springfield... 

Belleville 

Worden 

Roanoke 

Lincoln 

Oglesby 

Springfield ... 

..do 

Murphysboro 

Wenona 

Lake Creek... 

Pana 

Rutland 

Selbytown.... 

Sandoval 

Pana 

Auburn 

Sparta 

Duquoin 

Danville 



140.462 
139,400 
137,856 
8,788 
129.068 



115,236 
105,742 
134,800 
8.507 
126.293 



137,209 
131.861 
130,722 
127,693 
122.637 
122,650 
122,576 
121.313 
121,213 
120,982 
119,679 
119.662 
118,761 
118,009 
117, 932 
117,795 
113,427 
113,325 
112.389 
111.580 
109.627 
108,016 
107.404 
107, 126 
107,014 
106.451 
104,000 



127,861 
114. 622 
126,368 
98, 160 
107.450 
103, 292 
115,167 
118. 038 
116.422 
100.526 
90.000 
108. 615 
80.809 
61.087 
101.853 
97. 181 
106.110 
107,221 
102.980 
76.627 
96,512 
61.922 
97,096 
103,514 
99, 951 
78.000 



24 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 15 — Continued. 



Name of Operator. 



PostofQce 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition of 
Odtput. 



ao 



S b h 

o n u « 
H 



Citizens' Coal & Mining Co 

Harrisburgr Mining & Coal Co 

The Moweaqua Coal Mining & Mfg. Co 

Barclay Coal & Mining Co 

Sholl Bros 

Montgomery County Coal Co 

Jefferson Coal Co 

Litchfield Mining & PowerCo 

Athens Mining Co 

Assumption Coal & Mining Co 

Clif con Coal Co 

Lenz Coal & Mining Co 

Decatur Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

Greenwood-Davis Coal Co 

Clover Leaf Coal & Mining Co 

Lebanon Coal & Mining Assn 

Estate James Cahill 

Chicago & Herrin Coal Co 

Applegate & Lewis 

QirardCoalCo 

Walschlag Cooperative Coal Co 

Coulterville Mining Co 

Lake Superior Coal Co 

..do 

..do 

John O'Connell Coal Co , 

Clark Coal & Coke Co 

Norris Coal Mining Co 

Belleville & O'Fallon Coal Co 

Robert Dick Coal Co 



Lincoln i. 


98.335 


70,652 


27.683 


Harrisburg... 


97.000 


90.000 


7.000 


Moweaqua 


95.742 


66.370 


29.372 


Barclay 


95.451 


69,976 


25.475 


Peoria 


90.500 


88. 700 


1,800 


Paisley 


89.615 


82.995 


6.520 


Springfield... 


89.390 


85.500 


3.890 


Litchfield .... 


88.613 


64,091 


24.622 


Athens 


87.806 


82,203 


5.603 


Assumption.. 


85.468 


69.730 


15.738 


Harrisburg... 


82.000 


80,200 


1.800 


Belleville 


81.541 


80.541 


l.OOO 




78.917 


55.548 


23.399 






Decatur 


46.366 


31.000 


15.366 


Niantic 


32.591 


24,548 


8.043 


Duquoln 


77.442 


71,000 


6,442 


Cofifeen 


76.859 


72.595 


4,264 


Lebanon. 


75.563 


65.603 


10.050 




72.000 
71.144 


35.000 
68.878 


37.000 


Herrin 


2,266 




70.643 
67.608 


66,003 
58.951 


4.640 


Qirard 


8,657 


Peoria 


67.477 


66.566 


911 


Coulterville . . 


67.05-! 


61.349 


16.703 


• 


65.917 


62.280 


3.637 






Belleville 


15.062 


13.462 


1.600 


Duquoln 


50.856 


48.818 


2.037 


Grape Creek.. 


65.296 


62.664 


2.632 


Peoria 


63. 792 


62.792 


1.000 


Norris 


63.377 


51.453 


11.924 


Belleville 


62.995 


50.489 


12.606 


Carterville... 


61.236 


60, 141 


1.095 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

T'able 25— Continued. 



25 



Name of Opkratob. 



Postofflce 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition of 
Output. 



a o 



Hawarth & Taylor 

Daniel Zildorph 

Valley Coal Mining Co 

Borders Coal Co 

Colfax Coal Co 

Gardner-Wilmington Coal Co 

Oakland Coal Co 

Henrietta Coal Co 

East Cuba Coal Co 

Summit Coal Co 

PontiacCoal Co 

Ruby Coal Co 

Edward Little 

TildenCoalCo ..: 

Dutch Hollow Coal Co 

Crystal Coal Co 

Illinois Fuel Co 

Superior Coal & Mining Co 

Skellet Coal Co 

O'FallonCoal & Mining Co 

Johnson City & Big Muddy Coal & M. Co. 

Charles Hartman 

Marlon Coal Co 

Scripps Coal Co 

Oak Hill Coal Co 

Collier Cooperative Coal Co 

Tirre & Sons Coal Co 

Eureka Coal Co 

Soper & Co 

Goalby Bros. Coal Co 

Illinois Zinc Co 

Highland Coal Co 



Edwards 

Marissa 

Belleville 

Marissa 

Colfax 

Clark City..., 

Belleville 

Edwardsville 

Cuba 

Belleville 

Pontlac 

Casey ville.... 
East Peoria .. 

Tilden 

Freebnrg 

Tilden 

Sparta 

Bellevilla..... 

.. do 

O'Fallon 

Lake Creek... 

Belleville 

Marlon 

Astoria 

Belleville 

Bartonvllle... 
Lenzburg — 

Marissa 

Cutler 

Percy 

Peru 

Belleville 



61,133 

60,S30 

60,000 

69,200 

69, 189 

58. 195 

67,788 

66. 63 J 

65,908 

65,782 

55,650 

55, 

64,000 

53. 294 

51,'!66 

49.768 

49,486 

49,232 

49,018 

48, 476 

48,353 

48,010 

48,000 

47,762 

46,985 

46,733 

46,620 

46,235 

45,994 

45.792 

44,979 

44,914 



60,283 
59,576 
69,000 
65,450 
43, 198 
47,318 
55, 260 
45.067 
33,709 
65,062 
33.000 
63,000 
64,000 
49,607 
49,000 
49.418 
38,246 
47,932 
42,984 
45,550 
45,553 
43,810 
47,600 
43,872 
43,462 
46. 133 
35,220 
42,860 
31,191 
44,057 
44,683 
38, 706 



26 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

Table 15 — Continued. 



Nit MB OF Operator. 



Poatoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition or 
Output. 



a o 



Rosborouirh Coal Co 

Tallnla Coal Co 

Weaver Coal & Coke Co . ... 

Bailey Bros. Coal Co 

Sunlight Coal Co 

Kewanee Coal & Mining: Co 

Adam Kuhn 

Dawson & Fulton Coal Co.. 
Gallatin Coal & Coke Co. ... 

Silvis Mining Co 

Johni%on Coal Co 

South Mountain Coal Co 

Vlckery Bros 

Enterprise Coal Co 

Murphy. Keenan & Co 

DeSoto Coal & Washing Co 

Theodore Michaels 

Mauck Bros 

Canton Union Coal Co 

Farmington Coal Co 

Etherly Coal Co 

Reentz Bros 

Carterville District Coal Co 

C. B. Kramm & Bro 

W. E. Foley 

Old Kentucky Coal Co 

Newbent Coal Co 

Morris Bros 

Qermantown Coal Co 

DbbenCoal Co 

Humboldt Coal Co 

Saline County Coal Co 



Sparta 

Tallula , 

Nilwood..... 

Sunfleld 

Freeburg.... 
Kewanee .... 

Dubois 

Sparta 

Equality 

Carbon Cliff. 

Marissa 

Petersburg.. 

Peoria 

Rentchler ... 
Braidwood . . 

DeSoto 

Belleville.... 

Danville 

Canton 

Farmington . 

Etherly 

Kramm 

Marion 

Edwards 

Mapleton 

Tamaroa 

Pana 

Duquoln 

Germantown 

Pekin 

Belleville.... 
Harrisburg.. 



44.875 

43.280 

42,420 

41.750 

40, 199 

39.460 

39,000 

37,296 

35,487 

35,210 

35, 118 

34.804 

34,260 

34, 126 

33,1 

32,800 

32, 131 

31,3S6 

30,834 

30,383 

30,360 

29,700 

28.726 

28,600 

26.820 

26,729 

26,663 

26, 146 

25,076 

25,000 

24,840 

24,215 



44.240 


635 


38,865 


4,415 


34, 710 


7,710 


39,500 


2,250 


34,607 


5,592 


32,460 


7,000 


36.000 


4,000 


36,030 


1,266 


30,931 


4,556 


34.085 


1,125 


31,638 


3,480 


24, 780 


10, 024 


33,000 


1,260 


33,245 


880 


24, 921 


8,195 


30.000 


2,800 


30,455 


1,676 


8,500 


22,886 


35,000 


6,834 


29,076 


1,307 


29,210 


1,140 


29,300 


400 


27, 697 


1.128 


28,400 


200 


26,820 




24, 614 


2,115 


23,260 


3,403 


24. 706 


440 


20.306 


4,770 


26.000 




20,235 
23,000 


4.605 
1.216 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table i5— Continued. 



27 



Name or Operator. 



Postoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition or 
Odtpct. 






a o 
H 



Lake Erie Coal & Minlne Co... 

Peter Grant & Son , 

James Walker 

Advance Coal Co 

Fred Murphy 

Little Muddy Coal Co 

Sunbeam Coal Co , 

East Peoria Coal Co 

Mnncie Coal Co 

Elmwood Coal Co 

Monarch Coal & Mining Co .... 
Petersburg Coal Mining Co .... 

German Coal Co 

Beggs-Davis Coal Co 

Trutter Coal Co 

Third 7ein Coal Co 

Atlas Coal Co , 

Valley Coal Co 

Jefferson County Fuel Co 

Rippetoe & Rundle 

Essex & Fritz 

..do 

..do 

Canton Coal & Mining Co 

Chicago & Carbondale Coal Co 

Mlllstadt Coal Co 

New Moon Mining Co , 

Chicago-Coultervllle Coal Co . , 

Wyoming Coal Co 

A. M. Barrackman 

A E. Powell & Co 

Bunting Bros 



East Peoria.. 

Peoria 

Mapleton 

Marlssa 

Belleville 

Tamaroa 

Belleville 

East Peoria .. 

Muncie 

Elmwood 

Farmington... 
Petersburg... 

Peoria 

Fairbury 

Pleas't Plains 
Orchard Mine 

Galva 

Petersburg... 
Mt. Vernon... 
Colchester.... 

Parrville 

Cuba 

East Bryant. 
Carbondale... 

Millstadt 

Duqnoln 

Coulterville,.. 

Wyoming 

Streator 

Coulterville... 
Grape Creek.. 



21.220 
20,935 
20.600 
20.000 
20,000 
20,000 
19. 707 
19. 226 
18.900 
18,210 
18. 198 
17.816 
17.670 
16.830 
16.698 
16.420 
15.888 
15.000 
16.000 
14.428 



13.691 

8.681 
4.907 



12.000 
12.000 
12.000 
11.991 
11, 126 
11.000 
10.928 
10.487 
10.351 



21.220 
17.090 
20. COO 
18.400 
15.000 



19,226 
15.000 
16. 120 
16.015 
15.063 
11.228 

1.182 
13.000 
16.200 
11.851 
13,400 

1.000 
13.983 



13.481 



4.800 



11. 

11.000 
lO.OOO 
7.127 
9.307 
9.600 
9.101 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 15 — Continued. 



Name or Opkratok. 



Postoface 

address and 

location of 

mine. 



Disposition of 

OUTPDT. 



Home Coal Co 

Donnelly & Koenucke Coal Co.... 

New Coal Co 

Merideth Bros 

Spoon River Coal Co 

Dutch Hill Coal Co 

Qlgby. Cusack & Edwards 

GallatiaCoal Co 

Lilliman Coal Co 

Raymond Coal Co 

The Berwick Coal Co 

Oakwood Coal Co 

George R.Watson 

Kinmundy Coal Co 

Salem Coal Co 

North Wilmington Coal Co 

France Bros 

Terminal Coal Co 

Yates City Coal Co 

Star Coal Co 

Rodell & Mitchell 

♦Middletown Coal Co 

Mofifatt Coal Co 

Strait Coal Co 

Briar Bluff Coal Co 

Carterville & Big Muddy Coal Co 

Interstate Coal & Mining Co 

Hardy Harris & Sons 

James Thompson 

B. B. Peterson 

Alex Anderson & Sons 

Benj. Davis & Son , 



Mt. Pulaski... 


9.060 


2.259 


Carterville... 


8.259 


7.689 


Harrisbnrg... 


8.007 


7.769 


Augusta...... 


7.70O 


7,700 


Ellisvllle 


7,635 


5.900 


New Athens.. 


7.143 


4,350 


Edwards 


6.890 


6,890 


Qallatia 


6.825 


2.960 


Cable 


6,400 


5,100 


Raymond 


6.345 


1,273 


Chenoa 


6,300 


1,750 


Oakwood 


6.103 


3.000 


Wyoming 


5.958 


4,040 


Kinmundy ... 


6,923 


2.687 


Salem 


6,316 


782 


Seneca 


6.241 


1.080 


Fairmount.... 


6.000 


300 


Edwardsvllle. 


4.796 


4,556 


Yates City.... 


4,576 


2.604 


Vandercook . . 


4,600 


2,260 


Wataga 


4,447 


2.055 


Middletown .. 


4,200 




Sparta 


4.171 


4.078 


Pinckneyville 


4,000 


2.000 


Briar Bluff... 


3.395 


2.395 


Carterville... 


3.250 


3.100 


Worden 


3,000 


2,640 


Ealrmount.... 


2.500 


300 


Grape Creek.. 


2,450 


2,000 


Cable 


2,400 


1.200 


Streator 


1.862 


1,311 


Streator 


1.773 


730 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table i5— Concluded. 



29 





i 

a 

a 

o 

1 

i 


Postoffice 

address and 

location of 

mine. 


"3 

o 

"3 

o 


Disposition of 
Output. 


Name op Operator. 


g 

ll 

~" 00 


HI 

ii 




353 


Danville 

New Douglas. 

Danville 

Equality 

Grape Creek.. 
Grape Creek.. 
Deer Park.... 
Grape Creek.. 
Fancher 


1,600 

1.210 

1.205 

1.063 

1.060 

900 

700 

675 

200 


ISO 

475 
390 
888 
700 
900 
65t 
450 
120 


1.350 
735 
815 


Clover Coal & Mining: Co 


Kistler & Bookmsinn 


East Side Coal Co 




John Hall ... . 


360 


John Lietard 




50 
225 
80 


Blue & Henry 


Chas. Michaels 






Total 


33.676.537 


30.084,387 


3,592,150 





* This is a shipping mine but report does not show amount shipped. 

The foregoing list presents 260 operators, of which 215 are corpor- 
ations, 25 firms and 20 individuals, who manage or operate 858 mines, 
and have handled 83,676,587 tons of coal; the tonnage represents 
96 84 per cent of the total output of the State for the year. Of the 
total output of these mines 30,084,887 tons or 89.88 per cent was 
loaded on to cars at the mines for shipment, leaving 10,67 per cent, 
which was sold to the local trade or consumed and wasted at the 
mines. 

The Consolidated Coal company again leads the list this year with 
20 mines and an output of 2,087,014 tons. The Kelley ville Coal com- 
pany, Spring Valley coal company, Madison Coal compnny, Chicago, 
Wilmington and Vermilion Coal company, and Springfield Coal and 
Mining company follow respectively, with outputs exceeding 1,000,000 
tons, making six companies showing a production of over 1,000,000 
tons. Last year there were only four companies with this large ton- 
nage. 



30 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Graded Output for the Year. 
The performance of the mines of the State this year was 84,495,400 
tons, apportioned as to grades as shown in the following table: 

Table IQ—Outjnd of the Shipping and Local Mines of the State, 
with Tons of the Different Grades of Coal, by Districts— 1903. 





Total 

O0TPUT— 

Tons. 


Tons op the Different Grades of Coal. 


District. 


Mine 
Run. 


Lump. 


Egff. 


Nut. 


Pea or 
Screen- 
ings. 


Slack 
Wa^^te. 


First 


3,563.136 
2.991.168 
2.319.691 
4.573,052 
6,990.197 
7,656,451 
5.592,842 


388.981 
211.812 
561,926 
2,952.037 
2.048,172 
2,241,257 
1,492.903 


2.066.789 
2.071.610 
1,241.339 
1.088,180 
3,233,670 
3,861,289 
1,606,949 


165,979 
97.220 
43.051 
36,068 

106.752 
27,340 

615,968 


122.269 
46.161 
123, 250 
128,591 
238.918 
316,612 
765,692 


718.530 
307.494 
247.490 
231.495 
979. 788 
972.618 
1.020.971 


90,588 




256.841 


Third 


102. 636 




136.681 


Fifth 


382.897 


Sixth 


237,335 




190,459 






Shipping mines ... 
Local mines 


33.676,537 
1,278,863 


9.897.087 
476.011 


15,169,856 
704,653 


992, 378 
2,785 


1.741.393 
14,311 


4,478,386 
62,045 


1,397.437 
19,058 








34,955.400 


10.373,098 


16,874,509 


995. 163 


1,765.704 


4,640,431 


1,416.495 







The increase in the product of the shipping mines is 16.83 per 
cent over that of last year; the tons of the different grades are dis- 
tributed nearly the same as the year before, although there is a large 
increase this year in the tons of slack or waste coal. The tonnage of 
the local mines has increased only 6.88 per cent over last year. The 
slack or waste coal of the local mines is 61 per cent less than returned 
last year. 

This division of the different grades of coal produced is further 
set forth in the following table of percentages: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



31 



Table 11— Percentages of the Total Output of the Different Grades 
of Coal, Shipping and Local Mines, by Districts 





Pkr Cent 

OF 

Total 
Gutpdt. 


Percentages ok the Different Grades of Coal. 


District. 


Mine 
Run. 


Lump. 


Egg. 


Nut. 


Peatir 
Screen- 
ings. 


Slack 

or 
Waste. 


First 


10.55 
8.88 
6.89 
13.58 
20.76 
22.73 
16.61 


10.95 
7.08 
24.22 
64.55 
29.30 
29.27 
26.69 


58.17 
69.26 
53.51 
23.80 
46.26 
50.43 
28.73 


4.67 
3.25 
1.86 

.79 
1.53 

.36 
9.23 


3.44 
1.54 
£.31 

2.81 
3.42 
4.14 
13.69 


20.22 
10.28 
10.67 
5.06 
14.01 
12.70 
18.26 


2 65 


Second : . 


8 59 


Third 




Fourth 


2 99 


Fifth 


5 48 


Sixth 




Seventh 








Shipping mines... 


100.00 


29.39 


45.04 


2.95 


6.17 


13.30 


4.15 




100.00 


37.22 


65.10 


.22 


1.12 


4.85 









It will be seen that the sixth district produced nearly one- fourth 
of the tonnage of the State. The third district shows the lowest per 
cent. The fifth, sixth and seventh districts combined furnished 
60.10 per cent of the total output of the shipping mines. This is the 
fourth year that the total tonnage of the State has been divided into 
difPerent grades in these reports. 

The following table presents the record for the four years, giving 
the total tons and the percentages: 

Table 18. — Total Output of the Different Grades of Coal, all 
3[ines, for Four Years, with Percentages. 





Total 
output- 
tons. 


To.vs of the Different Grades of Coal. 


Year. 


Mine run. 


Lump. 


Egg. 


Nut. 


Pea or 
Screen- 
ings. 


Slack 

or 
Waste. 


1900 . 


25.153.929 
26,635.319 
30.021.300 
34.955.400 


5.554,637 
6.882.740 
6,986,204 
10.373.098 


13,927.899 
13.321,124 
15.041.673 
15.874.509 


495.637 1.323.582 
486 596 1 217 127 


2,811,520 
3.667.591 
4.604,232 
4.540.431 


1.040,874 
1 060 111 


1901 


1902 


680. 985 




1,121,750 
1.416,495 


1903 


995. 163 


1.755.704 


Percentages : 
1900 




22.08 
25.84 
23.27 
29.70 


55.37 
50.01 
50.10 
45.41 


1 97 




11.18 
13.77 
15.34 




1901 . . 




1 83 * S7 


3.98 
3 74 


1902 




2.27 
2.84 


5.28 
5,02 


1903 















32 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The most noticeable change is the increased percentage of mine 
run coal over preceding years, and the decrease in lump coal. 

The following is a comparative table of the output of all mines for 
three years, by districts: 



Table 19. 



■Output for the years 1901, 1902 and 1903, Compared 
by Districts. 





Total Output— Tons. 


Gain 
1902 
over 
1901. 


Gain 
1903 

over 
1902. 


PbeckntagesofI^ain 


District. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1902 
over 
1901. 


1903 
over 
1902. 


First 


3.568,198 
2.770.413 
1.985.206 
3.253,160 
5.116.501 
5.796,556 
3.815.253 


3.729,721 
3,101,516 
2,113.163 
3,939.861 
6,213,386 
6,211,817 
1.378,600 


3,718,651 
3,215,781 
2,708,360 
1,772.281 
7.070,903 
7.734.831 
5.671.e00 


161.526 
331. 103 
128.258 
686, 701 
796.882 
115,261 
533.217 


18,927 
111,266 
291,887 
832,120 
857,517 
1,192,981 
1,296,100 


1.53 
12.06 
21.57 
21.1 
11.71 

7.6 
12.22 


.51 


Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 


1.55 
12.22 
21.13 
13.80 


Sixth 

Seventh 


23.92 
29.60 


The State 


26.635,319 


30,021,300 


31,955.100 


3.385,981 


4,931,100 


12.71 


16.13 



Each district shows a gain for 1902 over 1901 and 1903 over 1902. 
The most prominent gain for this year over last, is shown in the 
fourth, sixth and seventh districts. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



33 



Mines, Men and Tons. 
The following table presents in totals, the mines, men and tons, for 
a series of 22 years: 

Table 20. — Output of the State for Tioenty-tivo Years and the 
Mines and Men Producing the Same. 



Tear. 



Mioes. 



Men. 



Total Tons of 

output, j ^,?°V 
(Tons.) '"™P- 



Tons 
of other 
grades. 



Percentage of- 



Lump. 



Other 
grades. 



1886, 
1887, 



1900. 
1901. 
1902. 



915 
927 



20,290 
28.939 
25.675 
25,916 
25.816 
26.804 
29.410 
30.076 
28. 574 
32,951 



38,477 
38,630 
37,057 
33. T88 
35.026 
36. 991 
39.384 
44.143 
46.005 
49.814 



11,017.069 
12.123.456 
12.208,075 
11,834,459 
11,175.241 
12.423,066 
14,328,181 
14,017,298 
15,274.727 
15.660.698 
17.862.276 
19.919.664 
17.113.576 
17,735,864 
19,786,626 
20.072.758 
18.599.299 
23.434,445 
25.163.929 
26.635.319 
30.021.300 
34,955,400 



9,115,663 
10,030,991 
10,101,005 
9.791,874 
9,246,436 
10,278,890 
11,855,188 
11.597,963 
12,638,364 
12,960.224 
14,730.963 
16.112.899 
13.865,284 
14.045,962 
14, 210. 024 1 
14,672,241 
14.208.7951 
17, 427, 598 1 
13,927,899 
13,321.124 
15,041,673 
15.874.509 



901.506 
092.466 
107.070 
402.585 
928.806 
144, 176 
472,993 
419,335 
636.363 
700.474 
131,313 



82.74 
82.76 I 
82.47 j 
80.77 
81.02 I 



689.902 


79.26 


576.602 


71.86 


400.617 


73.10 


390.504 


76.39 


006.847 


74.37 


226.030 


44,63 


314, 195 


60.01 


979.627 


60.10 


080,891 


45.41 



17.26 
17.24 
17.53 
19.23 
18.98 
20.75 
28.14 
26.90 
23.61 
25.63 
55.37 
49.99 
49.90 
54.59 



This table also shows the separation of the tonnage into lump and 
other grades, with percentages for each for 14 years. 



-8 C 



34 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The record of the number of men employed and tons produced, 
with percentages of gain or loss, is presented for 22 years in the fol- 
lowing table: 

Table 21 — Total Number of Men and Total Tons Produced, with 
Percentage of Gain or Loss for Twenty-two Years. 





Men. 


Total output. 
Tons. 


Percentage of Men. 


Percentage op Tons. 




Gain. 


Loss. 


Gain. 


Loss. 


1882 


20,290 
23.939 
25.575 
25.946 
25,846 
26.804 
29,410 
b0.076 
28,574 
32,951 
33,632 
35,390 
33,477 
38.630 
37,057 
33.788 
35.026 
36,991 
39,384 
44, 143 
46,005 
49,814 


11.017,069 
12,123,456 
12.208.075 
11.834.459 
11.175,241 
12.423,066 
14,328.181 
14.017,298 
15,274,727 
15,660,698 
17.862.276 
19,949.564 
17,113.576 
17.735.864 
19,786,626 
20.072,758 
18,599.299 
23,434,445 
25,153,929 
26.635,319 
30.021,300 
34,955,400 










1883 


17.98 
6.83 
1.35 




10.04 
.70 




1884 






1885 




3.06 


1886 


.39 




6.67 


1887 


3.71 
9.72 
2.26 


11.17 
15.34 




1888 






1889 




2.17 


1890 


"» 


8.97 
3.53 
14.06 
11.69 




1891 


15.32 
2.07 
5.23 
8.72 
.40 




1892 






1893 






1894 




14.22 


1895 




3.64 
11.56 
1.45 




1896. .1 


4.07 
8.82 




1897 






1898 


3.66 
5.61 
6.47 
12.08 
4.22 
8.28 


7.31 


1899 




26.00 
7.34 
5.89 
12.71 
16.44 




1900. . 






1901 






1902 






1903 













It will be seen that the number of men employed show a gain 
every year excepting four, while there is a gain of tonnage every 
year excepting five. The gain in the number of men employed this 
year over the number employed in 1882 is 145.50 per cent, while the 
gain in the number of tons produced in the same period is 217.28 
per cent, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



85 



The tonnage of the State, produced in the several districts, is pre- 
sented by percentages in the folloririg table for a series of 13 years : 

Table 22^ Percentages of the Tonnage of the Total Output of the 
State, produced by each District, for a Series of 13 Years. 





Districts 


Year. 


First. 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Seventh. 


1891 . . ... 


19.69 
19.36 
17.02 
15.69 
15.12 
15.34 
14.64 
11.88 
15.08 
14.72 
13.40 
12.42 
10.73 


9.20 

9.70 
10.03 

9.95 
11.25 
13.60 
13.64 
13.71 
14.19 

9.75 
10.40 
10.34 

9.29 


17.84 
18.26 
17.03 
17.99 
16.65 
3.18 
2.87 
3.89 
3.11 
7.94 
7.45 
8.04 

'■« 


28.27 
28.65 
28.99 
30.23 
31.65 
14.17 
14.53 
13.83 
14.33 
14.05 
12.22 
13.12 
13.65 


25.00 
24.03 
26.93 
26.14 
25.03 
23.70 
24.95 
21.10 
20.53 
19.15 
20.33 
20.70 
20.22 






1892 






1893 












1895 






1896 


19.08 
17.73 
18.60 
18.28 
20.81 
21.76 
20.79 
22.13 


10.93 


1897 


11 64 


1898 


16.99 


1899 


14.48 


1900 . ... 


13 58 


1901 


14 44 


1902 


14.59 


1903 


16 23 ■ 







Five of the years shown in this table, the state was divided into 
only five districts, while for the other eight years there are seven dis- 
tricts. For this year the fourth, sixth and seventh districts show an 
increase in tonnage over last year, while the other four districts show 
a decrease. This year the collieries in the fifth, sixth and seventh 
districts produced 58.58 per cent of the total output of the state. 

Haulage in the Mines. 
The method of haulage in the shipping mines is shown in the fol- 
lowing table, by districts: 



36 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 23 — Haulage of Coal in the Shipping Mines of the State, 
by Districts, 1903. 





Elkotbicity. I Cable. i Horse. 


Hand. 


Various. 


District. 




Tons. 


oi 


Tons. 




Tons. 


^1 
1^ 


Tons. 




Tons. 


First 






1 

4 
3 

7 
5 


700 

522,371 

229,586 

^ 905, 169 

844,561 


28 
12 
44 

32 
36 
80 
65 


3,154,789 
1,812,790 
1.926,913 
2,199,161 
4,795,10* 
6.926,259 
4,596,355 


2 

7 
1 


3,635 

49,488 
7.700 


3 *.<{S4.ni2 




2 

1 
2 
6 


606.519 

141,064 

249,170 

1.350.532 






Third 


1 
4 


tl4. 428 




U. 219, 531 


Fifth 








Sixth 






3 


J730, 192 


Seventh 


4 


961.000 


1 


35.487 


















The State.. 


14 


3,308,285 


21 


2,537,895 


297 


25,411,371 


10 


60,825 


11 


2,358.163 


1902 


10 


2,258,293 


15 


2,626,182 


288 


22,036.531 


7 


30,329 


12 


1,873.415 



*Cable and Horse. 

tDogs. 

JCable. Electricity and Horse. 

The last line in the table gives the mines and tons of the same 
class of mines for last year. The haulage of coal by electricity has 
increased more than a million tons over last year. In the fifth dis- 
trict, this system of haulage is nearly double that of last year; in the 
fourth district the same system has decreased more than one half. 
Haulage by electricity is reported for the first time in the second 
district. 

The foregoing showing of haulage in mines is further set forth by 
percentages in the following table: 

Table 24. — Percentages of Mines and Tons Showing Haulage for 
the years 1902 and 1903. 





Percentages op Minks Using and Tons Hauled by- 


Year. 


electricity. 


CABLE. 


HORSE. 


HAND. 


VARIOUS, 




Mines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Tons. 


1902 


3.02 
3.97 


7.83 
9.82 


4.52 
5.92 


9.11 

7.54 


86.75 
84.13 


76.45 

75.46 


2.10 
2.83 


.ll! 3.61 


6.60 


1903 


.18 


3.12 


7.00 


Increase ( + ) | 
Decrease (— )j 


+40.00 


+46.49 


+40.00 


-3.36 


+3.12 


+16.31 


+42.35 


+100.54 


-8.33 


+25.87 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



87 



It will be noticed that haulage by electricity has increased over 
last year 40 per cent in the number of mines and 46.49 per cent in 
tons hauled. The percentage of haulage by horses or mules shows 
that this system largely prevails both as to number of mines and tons 
delivered. 

Output By Counties. 

The 17 counties which have each produced over 500,000 tons of 
coal during the past five years, are presented in the following table: 

Table 25. — Relative Rank of the Comities of the State Producing 
500,000 Tons of Coal or over for a Series of Five Year>i. 



County. 


a 


Tonnage 
1903. 


a 
ea 
as 


Tonnage 
1902. 




Tonnage 
1901. 


a 

05 

3i 


Tonnage 
1900. 


p 


Tonnage 
1899. 




2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

' 

10 
U 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

17 


4,386.626 

3.134.679 

2.893,233 

2.711.767 

2.551.587 

2.223.055 

1.8)7,555 

1.778,302 

1.457.935 

1.036,496 

1.031,751 

1.002.047 

972.284 

926.563 

920.716 

870,518 

648.070 

30.423.084 


1 
2 


3.672,989 
2.578.553 


1 
2 
4 
6 
7 
3 
5 
8 
9 
14 
13 
11 
10 
16 
12 
16 
17 

17 


2.919,223 

2,618,847 

2,003.780 

1.605.960 

1.696.081 

2,115,319 

1.833,661 

1,549,056 

1,293.092 

646,400 

664,278 

829.326 

911.245 

678.482 

710.582 

644,664 

563.603 

22.982.499 


1 
2 
3 
9 
6 
6 
4 
7 
8 
14 
13 
11 
10 
15 
12 
16 
17 

17 


2.519.911 

2.253.883 

2.030.954 

1.133.607 

1,441.650 

1.848,796 

2.027.864 

1.338.231 

1,299.863 

665,439 

680,653 

840.814 

8S3.311 

652,662 

727,737 

536,601 

601,065 

21.382.041 


2 
4 

1 
9 
7 
6 
3 
6 
8 
13 
10 


2.083.672 


St. Clair 


1.849.474 




3 2.fiSfi.371 


2,221.867 




5 
6 
4 

7 
8 
9 


2,013,692 
1.956.271 
2.075.253 
1.894,610 
1.732.813 

1 3S3 .'{.'{fi 


1.078.766 


Madison . . 


1,403,977 


Macoupin 


1,646,674 


LaSalle 


1,975,939 


Bureau ... 


1,410.624 


Grundy 


1,280.332 




10 889.679 
14 789. 625 


601, 084 




879.422 




11 

12 


881. 8:i 

853 nR6 






11 

14 
12 


875. 711 


Christian 


15 725.088 
13 824.270 

16 72d. 4fi2 


572.459 


Peoria 


744. 698 






Mercer 


17 
17 


602,722 
26.156.511 






Total— Counties 


14 


18,621.488 







This is the fourth year that each of these counties have supplied 
over a half a million tons of coal, the lowest this year is 648,070 tons: 
their total tonnage represents 87 per cent of the entire output of the 
State, and is an increase of 26 per cent over the tonnage of the same 
counties in 1900. Sangamon county, for the fourth year, ranks as 
number one, with 4,386,526 tons, being 1,251,847 tons more than St. 
Clair county, ranking next highest in the list. 



38 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 26, following, presents the 53 counties of the State produc- 
ing coal; giving the number of the district in which situated; the 
total number of mines, men and tons in each county, and the same 
data for both shipping and local mines: 

Table 26— Coal Producing Counties of the State, Giving Number 
of Districts, Mines, Men and Tons, of Shipping and Local 
Mines -1903. 



Dis- 
trict. 



All Mines. 



Mines. Men. Tons 



Shipping Minks. 



IMines. Men. Tons 



Local Minks. 



Mines. Men. Tons 



Bond 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun 

Cass 

Christian ... 
Clinton . ... 

Fulton 

Gallatin 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton ... 
Hancock.... 

Henry 

Jackson 

Jefferson ... 

Jersey 

Johnson 

Kankakee .. 

Knox 

LaSalle 

Livingston . 

Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin... 
Madison .... 

Marion 

Marshall ... 
McDonough 



1 


180 


176.000 


10 


11 


1.585 


20 


1,053 


1.778.302 


1 


20 


1.928 


: 


13 


2.807 


8 


1.413 


926. B63 


6 


941 


870.518 


63 


1.677 


1.036.196 


9 


129 


16.100 


7 


26 


1,497 


22 


3.203 


1.157.935 


2 


6 


700 


6 


38 


11.310 


31 


338 


130.663 


23 


1.355 


972.281 


2 


33 


15. 100 


6 


15 


2.790 


6 


12 


2.615 


1 


145 


68. 195 


11 


279 


81.575 


35 


3.617 


1,877.555 


14 


615 


319.360 


4 


190 


373,251 


3 


272 


130, 798 


22 


2,695 


2,223.055 


31 


2.915 


2.551.587 


6 


1.116 


1.002.017 


15 


907 


165.079 


56 


213 


13,391 



1.101 

911 

1,481 

97 



3.101 

567 

190 

163 

2.617 

2.826 

1.146 

877 

63 



1.751.929 



923.563 
870.518 
966.721 
36,660 



1.135.527 



7.700 
68.733 
959, 26« 
15,000 



58, 195 

39,373 

1.737.699 

288.599 

373.251 

78.947 

2,210.323 

2. 622. 

1.002.047 

460,003 

14.428 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 2^— Concluded. 



39 





Dis- 
trict. 


All Mines. 


Shipping Minks. 


Local Mines. 


County. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 




4 
3 
2 

5 
5 
3 

7 

7 

7 
5 
3 
5 
4 
2 
6 
3 


3 

16 
16 

6 

2 

69 
26 
14 
17 
16 
30 
15 
18 

8 
22 
69 
16 
60 

3 
19 

3 

2 
31 

1 


396 

667 

932 

632 

13 

1.323 

1.763 

586 

161 

455 

4.909 

69 

72 

212 

138 

3.172 

333 

3.718 

18 

52 

92 

107 

2.907 

270 


220,611 

492.328 

648,070 

420, 312 1 

3.8401 

920.716 

1.031.751 

478,125 

85,700 

354.172 

4.386.526 

15.734 

23.370 

108.149 

39.406 

3.134.679 

185,535 

2,893,233 

4,800 

13,986 

67,956 

35.616 

2.711.767 

119.679 


3 

8 
6 

5 


S96 
618 
876 
632 


220,611 
476.409 
628.962 
420.312 










8 
10 


49 

66 


15.919 


Mercer 


19.108 






Morgan 

Peoria 


2 

50 
6 
3 

16 
10 
2 
15 
18 
6 

20 
16 
11 
34 
3 

19 
2 
1 
10 


13 
342 

29 
14 
107 
31 
49 
69 
72 
67 
79 
86 
133 
254 
18 
52 
30 
7 
39 


3.840 


19 
20 
11 

1 
6 
28 




981 

1.734 

572 

51 

424 

4,860 


734,987 
1,027,031 

469.235 
35.210 

348.769 
4.359.562 


185. 729 


Perry . 


4.720 


Randolph 

Rock Island.... 
Saline 


8,890 
50,490 
5,403 


Sangamon 

Schuyler 


26.964 
15, 734 


Scott 








23,310 


Shelby 


2 
2 

53 
5 

26 




145 

59 

3,086 

200 
3,464 


95. 942 
16,958 

3,085.279 
119.446 

2.761.059 


12,207 


Stark 


22,448 


St. Clair 

Tazewell 

Vermilion 

Wabash 


49.400 

66.089 

132. 174 

4.800 










13. 986 


Washington 

Will 


1 
1 
21 


62 

100 

2,868 

270 


39.000 

33.116 

2,697,993 

119,679 


18,956 
2.500 


Williamson .... 
Woodford 


13,774 




~58~ 


3.320 




53 Counties. 


933 


49.814 


34,955,400 


353 


46.494 


33.676.537 


1,278,863 



The foregoing table fully sets forth the coal industry of the State, 
giving the localities wherein this very important and assiduous 
branch of the state's wealth and resources is being developed, and 
carried forward. Illinois is second in rank of the coal producing 
states, and has been for many years, Pennsylvania being first. 

In these 53 counties 49,814 men were employed during the year, 
two of the counties, Sangamon and Bureau, each employed over 
4,000 men; four counties, Vermillion, LaSalle, Grundy and St, Clair, 
each employed over 3,000 men; three counties, Madison, Williamson, 



40 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



and Macoupin eaoh employed over 2,000 men. The nine counties 
here named employed 31,189 men, or 62.61 per cent of the total num- 
ber employed in all the counties. 

Referring to the tons produced in each county, as has been stated, 
Sangamon county leads all other counties with an output of 4,386,526 
tons. This output exceeds that of the State of Missouri for this year 
by 121,198 tons. The combined output of six counties, Sangamon, 
St, Clair, Vermilion, Williamson, Madision and Macoupin, each ex- 
ceeding over 2,000,000 tons, produced 17,900,847 tons, being a larger 
tonnage than any State excepting West Virginia and Ohio. 

Disposition of the Output. 
The following table presents the disposal of the product by districts : 



Table 27 — Disposition of the Output of Shipping Mines, by Dis- 
tricts, also Local Mines. 



District. 


Total 

output of 

all grades— 

Tons. 


Tons 

shipped 

from mines. 


Tons 

supplied to 

locomotives 

at mines. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons 

used and 

wasted 

at the mines 


First 


3.553.136 
2,991.168 
2.319.691 
4.573.052 
6, 990. 197 
7.656,451 
5.592,842 


3.092.974 
2.766.006 
2.168.685 
3.960.498 
6.197.834 
6.800.290 
5,098.100 


119,268 
49.661 
42.424 
192.159 
183.149 
303.984 
205.045 


180,216 
72,352 
49,214 
278,129 
361,409 
189.582 
75.129 


160.679 


Second 


103,149 


Third 


59, 368 




142,266 


Fifth 


247. 805 


Sixth 


357,595 




214.568 






Shipping mines 

Local mines 


33.676,537 
1.278.863 
34.955.400 


30.084.387 


1.100.690 

16.553 

1,117.243 


1.206.030 
1.110.784 
2,316.814 


1,285,430 
151,526 


The State 


30.084.387 


1, 436, 956 







The total tons loaded on oars at the mines for shipment was 
80,084,387; this is 4,410,118 tons more than was shipped last year. 
The tonnage of shipping mines supplied to the local trade was 12 
per cent more than last year. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



41 



Reduced to perceatagee the follow! ag table presents the results: 

Table 28 — Percentages of the Output of Shipping and Local Mines, 
also Percentages of the Distribution, by Districts, 1903. 





Pkrokntagkb op- 


District. 


Total 
output. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
to locomo- 
tives. 


Tons 

sold to 

local trade. 


Tons 
consumed 
or wasted 

at the 
mines. 


First 


10.55 
8.88 
6.89 
13.58 
20.75 
22.74 
16.61 
100.00 
100.00 


87.05 
92.47 
93.49 
86.61 
88.66 
88.82 
91.15 
89.33 


3.36 
1.66 
1.83 
4.20 
2.62 
4 03 


5.07 
2.42 
2.12 
6.08 
5.17 

2 iS 


4.52 




3.45 


Third 


2 56 


Fourth 


3.11 


Fifth 


3.55 


Sixth 


4.67 


Seventh 


3.67 1.34 
3.27 3 59 
1.29 1 86 86 


3.84 


Shipping mines 

Local mines 


3.81 
11 85 













The following table shows the total tons produced by shipping 
mines with the percentages of distribution for four years, also the 
output of local mines and percentages of distribution of local mines: 

Table 2^— Total Output of the Shipping Mines of the State, also 
Percentages of the Distribution for Four Years. 

SHIPPING RUNES. 





Perckntagbs of— 


Year. 


Total 
output. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives. 


Tons 

sold to local 

trade. 


Tons 
consumed 
or wasted 

at the 
mines. 


1900 


24,056 996 
25.526.816 
28,824.750 
33,676.537 


8,.33 

88,34 
89.07 
89.33 


3.42 
3.46 
3.30 
3.27 


5.12 
4.12 


4.13 


1901 


4.08 


1902 


3.74 3.89 


1903 


3.59 3.81 









LOCAL MINES. 



1900 


1.096.933 
1,108,503 
1.196,550 
1.278.863 




5.66 
5.84 
1.54 
1.29 


85.57 

... 

89.05 
86.86 


8.77 


1901 




7.54 


1902 




9.41 


1903 




11.86 









42 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Referring to the shipping mines, it will be seen that the changes 
are very slight from year to year in the dispositioa of the output of 
these mines. The most notable change in this regard, of the local 
mines, is the decline for the past two years in the quanity of coal 
furnished to locomotives, and the increase this year in the tons con 
sumed or wasted at the mines. 

From this table it will be seen that from 87 to 93 per cent of the 
tonnage of each district is loaded onto cars and shipped from the 
mines, while for the state the tons shipped and supplied to locomo- 
tives at the mines is 93 per cent of the total output of the shipping 
mines. 

The total tonnage of coal produced in each county and its distri- 
bution is shown in the following table, by districts: 



Table 30. 



-Disposition of tJie Output of Shipping Mines by Counties 
and Districts. 







FIRST DISTRICT. 








County. 


©a 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 
wasted at 
the mines 




12 

1 

14 
6 

1 


1,435.527 
68. 195 

1.737.699 
288.599 
33. 116 


1,339.167 
47.318 

1.443.332 
238.236 
24.921 




29.300 

1,926 

112.195 

29.694 
7.100 


67.060 


Kankakee 




8,951 


LaSalle 


108.179 
11.089 


73. 993 




9,580 


Will 


1.095 






The district 


3. 


3.553,136 
100.00 
195.515 


3.092,974 
87.05 


119.268 
3.36 

875 


180.215 

6.07 

74, 104 


160. 679 


Percentages 


4.62 




40 


120,536 









GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 50— Continued. 



48 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



County. 


o a 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 

wasted at 
the mines 




7 
3 
3 
3 
6 
1 
2 


1.751.929 
58,733 
39.373 
160.003 
628.962 
35.210 
16, 958 


1.648,600 
46.696 
33.869 
386,690 
602,426 
34.085 
13.640 


15.939 


26.463 
11.C37 

3.924 
18,707 

9,378 
325 

2,518 


60,927 


Henry 


1,000 


Knox 


920 
31.179 
1,623 


660 


Marshall 


23,427 


Mercer 


15.535 


Rock Island 


800 


Stark 


800 






The district .... 


26 


2,991.168 
100.00 
254.613 


2.766.006 
92.47 


49.661 
1.66 


72.362 

2.42 

241,699 


103. 149 


Percentages 


3.45 




156 


12.914 











THIRD DISTRICT. 



County. 


o a 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 
wasted at 
the mines 




16 

1 
1 
8 
19 

5 


966.721 
7.700 
14,428 
476.409 
734.987 
119,446 


894,962 
7.700 
13,983 
426.475 
706. 119 
' 119,446 


33. 102 


14.368 


24. 289 


Hancock 




McDonough 






446 


Menard 


3.377 
5.945 


25,479 
9,367 


21,078 


Peoria 


13, 556 


Tazewell 














50 


2.319.691 
lOO.CO 
388,659 


2,168,685 
93.49 


42,424 
1.83 


49,214 

2.12 

388,359 


59. 368 




2.56 


Local mines. ., 


193 


300 











44 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 5(?— Continued. 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 



County. 



Total tons. 



Tons 
shipped. 



Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 



Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 



Tons con- 
sumed or 
wasted at 
the mines 



Christian 


26 


923,563 
373,251 

78,947 
220,611 

95.942 

2,761,059 

119.679 


759,757 
300,307 
55,548 
69,948 
66,490 
2,607,922 
100,526 


70,807 
21^370 


46,249 
39,826 
23,399 
88,208 

9,850 
62,500 

8,098 


46, 750 


LoGTan . . 


11,749 






McLean 


46.152 
14.551 

34.000 
5.279 


16,303 


Shelby 


6,061 


Vermilion 


56,637 


Woodford . . . 


5,776 






The district 


45 


4.573.052 
100.00 
199,232 


3.960,498 
86.61 


192.159 
4.20 


278.129 

6.08 

191,447 


142,266 




3.11 




42 


7,785 











FIFTH DISTRICT. 



County. 




Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

lo*c°al 
trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 
wasted at 
the mines 




13 
6 
28 


2.210,323 

420,312 

4,359.562 


1.965.710 
367,239 

3,864.885 


83.645 
3.320 
96. 184 


65,720 
34,789 
260,900 


96, 248 


Montgromery .. .. 


14,964 


Sangamon 


137,593 






The district 


46 


6.990.197 
100.00 
80.706 


6.197,843 
88.66 


183.149 

2.62 

15.678 


361.409 

6.17 

59,458 


247,805 


Percentages . . . 


3.65 




65 


6.570 









SIXTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


o a 

1^ 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 

wasted at 
the mines 


Bond 


1 
6 

17 
6 

53 


176,000 iBH.ono 




4.000 
14.382 
36.228 
52.749 
82.223 


4.000 


Clinton 


870,518 
2,522,607 
1.002.047 
3.085.279 


754.509 
2,364.940 

740.226 
2.782.615 


36.000 
35.135 
148.672 . 
89.277 


65. 627 


Madison 


98,304 


Marion 


60.600 


St. Clair 


131. 164 






The district 


83 


7.656.451 
100.00 
70.380 


6.800.290 
88.82 


308.984 
4.03 


189.682 

2.48 

75.590 


357,595 




4.67 


Local mines 


30 


2,790 















COAL IN ILLINOIS 


• 




45 






Table 30- 


-Concluded. 










SEVENTH DISTRICT. 






County. 


o a 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons 
supplied to 
locomotives 
at the mines 


Tons sold 

to 

local 

trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed or 

wasted at 
the mines 


Gallatin 


2 


36,550 


31,819 


1,616 




1.982 
63 329 


Jackson 


8 


959, 261 


836, 110 


65 151 


1 371 






15,000 


1.000 


6,000 


8,600 
29, 927 






20 


1,027.031 


860, 177 


111,138 




Randolpli 


11 


169,235 


130,126 


9,600 


7,092 


22. 117 


Saline 


6 


318.769 


318.151 


16. 200 


9,638 


1 580 




1 


39,000 


35, 000 




2.000 


2.000 
97.871 




21 


2.697.993 


2.581.817 


2.707 


12.598 






Tiie district 


70 


6. 592. 812 


5. 098, 100 


206 015 


76 129 


211 568 


Percentages 




100.00 


91.15 


3.67 


1.31 


3.81 




61 


81,768 






80. 127 


1.631 











The foregoing gives the coal operations in each county for the 
year, so far as relates to the tonnage and its disposure. The third, 
second and seventh districts show the largest percentages of coal 
shipped. 

Following as a sequence to the preceding exhibit regarding the 
disposition of the year's production of coal, the following table is 
presented: 



46 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 31. — Railroads which have hauled the Coal Output of Ship- 
ping Mines of the State and the Tonnage Contributed to each 
Road, by Counties — 1903. 





Railroads and Counties. 


m 

a 

a 
>.< 

a 

s 


Tons Rhceivkd 
BY Each Road FOR— 


Percentagk- 


1 

a 


Shipment. 


Locomo- 
tives. 


Shipped. 


Supplied 
to locomo- 
tives. 


1 


Illinois Central— 20 counties 


91 


7.390.485 


373.550 


100.00 


100.00 






12 
20 

8 
6 
6 
16 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

26 


1.637.968 
831.330 
752.481 
739.444 
702. 138 
700.728 
463.438 
424,057 
258,623 
208,593 
186,609 
160.261 
97.i81 
66.370 
49. 448 
35.000 
33.000 
25. 353 
15.500 
.2.960 

3.222,817 


2.707 
33.841 

4.031 
148.572 
65.454 
33. 120 

2,798 


22.16 
11.25 
10.18 
10.01 
9.50 
9.48 
6.27 
5.74 
3.50 
2.82 
2.53 
2.17 
1.32 
.89 
.67 
.47 

■s 

.21 

.04 

100.00 


.72 






9.06 






1 07 






39.77 










Perry 


8 87 






.75 










Christian 


10,675 
26.904 
19.570 


2 86 






7.20 






5.24 










Marshall 








Shelbv 


14.651 
17,652 


3.90 




McLean 


4 73 












3.675 


.98 




Kankakee 














tialine 






2 


Chicago & Eastern Illinois— 2 counties.. 
Vermilion ... . 


10.000 


100.00 




17 
9 

_33 


2.275.968 
946.849 

2,814.314 


10.000 


70.62 
29 38 


100.00 








^ 


Chicago & Alton — 9 counties 


19.841 














14 

i 

2 

1 
3 
2 

1 
1 

28 


1.695.154 
758.254 
172, 374 
113.698 
24,921 
24.356 
17.240 
6,259 
2.067 

2.203.658 


8.541 


60.23 

26.94 

6.13 

4.04 

.89 

.87 

.61 

.22 

.07 

100.00 


43. OS 



















Logan 


1.800 


9.07 




Will . 






LaSalle 
















McLean 


9.500 


47.88 








4 


Wabash— 10 counties 


93.256 


100.00 






10 
4 

3 
2 

1 
2 

1 
1 


811.218 

716.286 

326. 782 

226.914 

62.164 

32,298 

19.715 

4.391 

2.640 

1.250 


25.800 
38.279 
25.857 


36.81 

32.50 

14.82 

10.30 

2.82 

1.47 

.90 

.20 

.12 

.06 


27.66 






41.05 




Christian 

Vermilion 


27.73 




3.320 


3.66 


















Kankakee 








Madison 








LaSalle 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 31 — Continued. 



47 





Kailkoads and Counties. 


a 

a 

u 

a 

a 
7: 


Tons Rkcbivkd 
BY Each Koad fob- 


Pkrcknmaqe— 


1 
a 

1 


Shipment. 


Locomo- 
tives. 


Shipped. 


Supplied 
to locomo- 
tives. 


6 


Chlcaeo. BurL & Qaincy— 15 counties.... 
Fulton 


37 


1.978.627 


30.297 


108.00 


100.00 




7 
7 
2 
6 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

12 


646.552 

528.469 

355.660 

173.993 

101.207 

56. 102 

40,000 

31.845 

13.983 

13.610 

7.700 

3.200 

2,604 

672 


9.465 
999" 


32.68 

26.71 

17.97 

8.79 

6.11 

2.84 

2.02 

1.76 

.71 

.69 

.39 

.16 

.13 

.04 


31 24 
















Peoria 








4,155 












Bond 
















McUonough 








Stark 
















Montgomery 


























15, 678 


51.75 


6 


Elgin. Jollet & Eastern— 1 county 


1.306.081 


100.00 




12 

6 


1,306,081 
1.278.412 




100.00 
100.00 




7 


Chicago & Northwestern— 1 county 

Bureau 

Chicago. Peoria & St. Louis— 4 counties 


16.814 


100.00 


8 


15 


1.278,412 
1,137,950 


16.814 
49.149 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 
100.00 




i 

5 
5 
1 

13 


519,393 
287,310 
254,101 
77. 146 

1.085.663 


5.231 
40,641 
3,377 


45.64 
25.25 
22.33 
6.78 

100.00 












Menard 


6 87 








9 


Baltimore & Ohio-S-W-5 couiuies 


72,696 


100. CO 




4 

5 
1 
i 

1 

15 


559,371 
328,662 
115.929 
80,919 
782 

966,064 


36,000 

289 

23.602 

12,805 


51.62 
30.27 
10,68 
7.46 
.07 

100.00 






St. Clair 


40 
















Marion 




10 


Louisville & Nashville— 2 counties 

St. Clair 


44.494 


100.00 




13 
2 

12 


934,245 
31.819 

839,781 


42.848 
1,646 

108,803 


96.71 
3.29 

100.00 






Gallatin 


3 70 


11 


Chi., Rock Island & Pac— 5 counties 

LaSalle 


100.00 




5 
1 
4 
1 

1 

20 


318.211 
257,984 
246,766 
11,851 
1,969 

838.623 


108.179 


37.89 
30.72 
29.39 
1.41 
.59 

100.00 


99.42 




Bureau 




Mercer 


624 


58 










Marshall 






12 


Cleveland. Cin.. Chi. & St. L.-8 counties. 
Saline 


73.176 


100.00 




5 
2 

6 
2 
2 

1 

13 


315,491 
229.280 
105,040 
99.059 
58,423 
25.000 
6,250 
80 

807,277 


16.200 


37.62 
27.34 
12.53 
11.81 
6.97 
2.98 
.74 
.01 

100.00 


2' 14 










Vermilion 


24.6o6 
12.803 
10,673 


32 80 




Macoupin 


17 50 




Christian 






Tazewell 






McLean. . 


9,500 


12 98 




LaSalle 




13 


Southern Railroad Co —3 counties 

St. Clair 


16,799 


100.00 




11 

1 
1 


611,139 

195, 138 

1,900 


11.799 


75.70 

24.17 

.13 


70 ^4 




Clinton 






Jefferson 


5,000 


29.7' 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 5i— Continued. 





Railroads and Countibs. 


a 

a 
1 

1 


Tons Received 
BY Each Road for— 


Percentage- 


1 

a 

s 

2; 


Shipment. 


Locomo- 
tives. 


Shipped. 


Supplied 
to locomo- 
tives. 


14 


St Louis, Troy & Eastern— 1 county 


3 


803.080 


1.200 


100.00 


100.00 




3 
6 


803,080 
635.728 


1,200 
22,822 


100. oo' 
100.00 


100.00 


15 


Vandalia Llne-2 counties 


100.00 






~~5 

1 

9 


527,978 
7,750 

495.368 


22.822 


98.55 
1.45 

100.00 


100.00 








16 


Mobile & Ohio-4 counties 


77.018 


100.00 






4 

2 
2 
1 

10 


227,841 
133,972 
123.555 
10,000 

435.645 




45.99 
27.05 
24.94 
2.02 

100.00 














i'erry 

St Clair 


76,518 
500 

35,108 


99.36 
.65 


17 


Atchison, Topeka & SantaF6-5 counties 
Marshall 


100.00 




1 

2 

1 
3 
3 

6 


203,610 
107,921 
100,526 
15,846 
7,742 

284.436 


29,829 


46.74 
24.77 
23.07 
3.64 
1.78 

100. CO 


84.96 










Woodford 


6,279 


is.oi 










IS 


Indiana. Illinois & Iowa-4 counties 








2 

1 
2 

1 

6 


173.858 
56, 102 
36,902 
17.574 

278. 062 




61.12 
19.73 
12.97 
6.18 

100.00 














LaSaHe ••• 














19 


Iowa Central— 2 counties 


2.945 


100.00 




• 


4 

2 

10 


173,748 
104,314 

270.395 


2.945 


62.49 
37.51 

100.00 


100.00 




r^eoria. ............. 




20 


Toledo, Peoria & Western-4 counties... 


29,491 


100.00 




5 
3 
1 

1 

6 


142,751 
124,712 

1.750 
1,182 

269.627 




52.79 

46.12 

.65 

.44 

100.00 








22,077 


74.86 












7,414 
3.000 


25.14 


21 


Peoria & Pekin Union-2 counties 


100.00 




4 
2 

1 


215,627 
54,000 

221,490 


3.000 


79.97 
20.03 

100.00 


100.00 








22 


Pawnee— 1 county 


1.200 


100.00 






1 
4 


221,490 
201. 190 


1.200 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 


23 


Toledo. St. Louis & Western-4 counties 






1 
1 
1 

1 


128,000 

72.595 

475 

120 

80.930 




63.62 

36.08 

.24 

.06 

100.00 






















Shelby . 






24 


Toluca, Marquette & North'n-l county. 
Marshall 


1.350 


100 00 




1 
2 


80,930 
67.239 


1,360 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 


2fi 


St. L, & Belleville E. Ky. Co.-l county. 
St Clair 






2 
3 


67,239 
46.696 




100.00 
100.00 




26 


Lake Erie & Western— 2 countI«s 


9,600 


100.00 




2 
1 


40.446 
6,250 




86.62 
13.38 






McLean 


9,500 


ioo.oo 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 51— Concluded. 



49 





Raileoads and Counties. 


00 

1 

a 

1 

a 
z 


Tons Received 
BY Each Road for— 


Pkrcentagk— 


a 

53 

z 


Shipment ^-o-- 


Shipped. 


Supplied 
to locomo- 
tives. 


27 


Illinois Southern— 1 county 




42.324 


9.600 


100.00 


100.00 








42.324 
37,936 


9.600 
3.084 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 
100.00 


28 


Alton Terminal— 1 county 




Madison 


=^ 


37.936 
36.194 


3.084 
4.800 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 


29 


Wabasii, Ciiester & Western— 1 county.. 


100.00 




36.194 
34.086 


4.800 


100.00 
100.00 


100 00 


30 


Davenport. R. I, & Northwst'n- 1 county 
Rock Island 












34.085 
31.265 




100.00 
100.00 




31 


Qalesburff & Great Eastern— 1 county... 
Knox 


920 


100 00 






31.265 
19.384 


920 
1.560 


100.00 
100.00 


lOO.OO 


82 


Fulton County Narrow Gauge— 1 county. 
Fulton 


100.00 




3 
2 
2 

1 


19.384 
16.310 
16.310 
5.165 


1.560 
3.266 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 


33 


Gin.. Hamilton & Dayton-1 county 


100.00 




3,266 
1.503 


100.00 
100.00 


100.00 


31 


Quincy. Carrollton & St. Louis— 1 county 
Macoupin. 


100.00 




1 


5.165 


1.603 


100 00 


100.00 












30.082.301 
2.086 


1.117.243 








Shipped by water. III. & Michigan Canal. 




















30.084.387 


1.117.243 















The Illinois Central railroad passes through 20 of the coal produ- 
cing counties of the State, and during the year hauled 7,390,485 tons 
of coal to the markets. Williamson county again leads in the ton- 
nage delivered to this road. The Chicago and Eastern Illinois railroad 
hauled the next largest tonnage, the product of only two counties. 
One of these counties, Vermilion, contributed the largest tonnage 
shipped by any one county over one road. 

The 34 railroads represented in this table hauled 30,082,301 tons 
of coal to market during the year, being the product of 358 mines 
located in 40 counties. This enormous tonnage of only one'product 
of the State, handled by less than one-third of the railroads of the 
State, may be better understood by a comparison with other traffic 
tonnage, handled by all the railroads in Illinois. The comparison 
clearly entitles the application of the epithet sometimes quoted, ' 'That 
Coal is King." From the report of the Railroad andJWarehouse 
—4 C 



50 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Commissioners of Illinois for the year ending June 'SO, 1903, it is 
found that for the year the freight tonnage traffic of the 118 railroads, 
classified as "products of agriculture," which includes grain, flour, 
other mill products, hay, tobacco, cotton, fraits and vegetables, and 
other articles, aggregated 18,886,828 tons; and the further total ton- 
nage classified as the "product of animals," which includes live stock, 
dressed meats, other packing house products, poultry, game, fish, 
wool, hides, leather and other articles, aggregated 6,098,649 tons. 
These two classified products of the State, which include 13 dis- 
tinctive items, besides two miscellaneous items of over 400,000 tons, 
originating in the State, together with the freight tonnage of like 
products received from connecting lines of railroads, all combined 
make a grand total of 24,935,477 tons transported by the 118 railroads 
of the State. As previously shown, the coal produced during the 
year by 353 mines, located in 40 counties, was 30,082,301 tons, and 
hauled by 34 railroads, and is an excess of 5,146,824 tons, or 20.65 
per cent, over the combined tonnage of agricultural and animal pro- 
ducts of the State, including the tonnage of like products received 
from points outside of Illinois. 

The additional importance of the supply of coal furnished by this 
State and transported to the markets of the country is set forth in 
the following table: 

Table 32 — Counties which have Produced the Commercial Coal of 
the State and the Tonnage Delivered to the Several Railroads 
in each for Transportation, 



Counties and Railroads. 



SM 




o 




** 03 


Tons 


oS 


delivered 


fl-^ 


to each 


pS 


railroad. 


Z 




41 




1.695.154 


14 


10 


811.218 


8 


762,484 


5 


287.310 


1 


221.490 


4 


80.919 


2 


16.310 


bZ 




934.245 


13 


20 


831.330 


11 


611.139 


5 


328.662 


2 


67.239 




10.000 



Total tons 
shipped and 
percent to 
each road. 



Sangamon— 6 roads 

Chicago & Alton 

Wabash 

Illinois Central 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Pawnee 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern .. 
Cincinnati, Hamilton A Dayton ... 

St. Clair-6 roads 

Louisville & Nashville 

Illinois Central 

Southern R R 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern .. 
St. Louis & Belleville Electric Ry 
Mobile* Ohio 



3.864.885 

43.87 
20.99 
19.47 
7.43 
5.73 
2.09 
.42 



33.68 
29.88 
21.96 
11.81 
2.41 
.36 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 52— Continued. 



51 



Counties and Railroads. 



Tons 

delivered 

to each 

railroad. 



Total tons 
shipped and 
per cent to 
each road. 



Vermilion— 3 roads , 



Chicago & Eastern Illinois 

Wabash 

Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis. 



Williamson— 2 roads. 



Illinois Central 

Chicago & Eastern Illinois 



Madison— 7 roads 



St. Louis. Troy & Eastern ... 

Vandalia Line 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis . 

Illinois Central 

Alton Terminal 

Wabash 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western 



Macoupin— 7 roads. 



Chicago & Alton 

Wabash 

Illinois Central 

Chicago. Burlington & Qulncy 

Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. 

Chicago. Peoria & St. Louis 

Quincy, Carrollton & St. Louis 



Bureau— 4 roads . 



Chicago & Northwestern 

Cnicago, Kock Island & Pacific. 
Chicago. Burlington & Quincy . 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 



LaSalle— 8 roads , 



Chicago. Burlington & Quincy 

Illinois Central 

Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific 

Atchison. Topeka & Santa F6 

Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 

Chicago & Alton 

Wabash 

Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. 



Grundy- 3 roads 



Elgin, Joliet & Eastern 

Chicago & Alton 

Atchison. Topeka & Santa F6. 



Fulton— 4 roads 



Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 

Toledo. Peoria & Western 

Iowa Central 

Fulton County Narrow Gauge . 



Perry— 3 roads . 



Illinois Central 

Mobile &Ohio 

Wabash, Chester & Western. 



Jackson— 2 roads. 



Illinois Central. 
Mobile & Ohio . 



2.275,968 
226.914 
106,010 



1,637.968 
946,849 



803,080 
527,978 
519,393 
463, 138 
37,936 
2.610 
475 



758.251 
716,286 
208.593 
101.207 
99.059 
77.146 
6,165 



1.278.412 
257. 981 
66. 102 
56.102 



528,469 
424.057 
318.211 
107.921 
36.902 
24.356 
1,260 



1,306.081 
17.240 
15.846 



646.552 
124.712 
104.314 
19,384 



700.728 
123.555 
36. 194 



702, 138 
133,972 



87.27 
8.70 
4.03 

2.684.817 

63.37 
36.63 

2.354,940 

31.10 
22.42 
22.06 
19.68 
1.61 
.11 
.02 

1.865,710 

38.57 
36.44 
10.61 
6.15 
5.04 
3.93 
.26 



77.55 
15.65 
3.40 
3.40 



36.67 
29.42 
22.08 
7.49 
2 66 



1.339.167 

97.53 
1.29 
1.18 

891.962 

72.24 
13.93 
11.66 
2.17 



50,477 

81.43 
14.36 
4.21 



83.98 
16.02 



52 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 32 — Continued. 



i 

a 


Counties and Railroads. 


ii 


Tons 

delivered 

to each 

railroad. 


Total tons 
shipped and 
pei* cent to 
each road. 


n 


Christian — 4 roads 


8 




759 757 






326,782 
258,623 
115,929 
68,423 












Illinois Central 


34 04 




Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 


15 26 








11 


Clinton — 2 roads 


764,609 






559,371 
196.138 










ISouthern Ry. 


25 86 


16 




740.226 


Illinois Central 


739.444 

782 




19 


99 89 








10 


Peoria — 4 roads 


706. 119 






216,627 
173.993 
173.748 
142,751 




11 






Chicaso, Burlington & Quincy 


24 64 














17 


Mercer — 2 roads .... ...... 


602.426 
59 01 




Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 


355.660 
246,766 




Chicago Rock Island & Pacific . . . 


40 96 


18 


Randolph — 3 roads..... 


430 426 




Mobile & Ohio 


227,841 
160,261 
42,324 








52.94 




Illinois Central 


37 23 




Illinois Southern .. . . .. 


9 83 


19 




426.476 




254,101 
172,374 






69.58 












386. 690 




Atchison, Topeka & Santa F^ 


203,610 
97. 181 
80.930 
4.969 








62 65 






26.13 






20.93 




Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 


1 29 


21 




367. 239 


Cleveland Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 


229.280 
72,595 
62, 164 
3,200 








62 43 






19.77 




Wabash 


16 93 




Chicago Burlington & Quincy 


87 


22 




318. 451 


Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 


315,491 
2.960 








99.07 






.93 


28 


rintrnn — 2 roads 


300 307 




186.609 
113.698 






11 


62.14 




Chicago & Alton 


37.86 


24 




238, 236 


Indiana Illinois & Iowa .. 


173.858 
33.(00 
19.715 
7.742 
2.067 
1,182 
672 








72 98 




Tllinnia r!«ntrnl 


13 85 






8.27 




Atchison Topeka & Santa F6 


3 25 




Chicago & Alton . 


87 






.60 




Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 


.28 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 52— Continued, 



58 



1 

a 

B 


Counties and Railroads. 


ii 


Tons 

delivered 

to each 

railroad. 


Total tons 
shipped and 
per cent to 
each road. 


'5 




2 




168. 000 






128.000 
40.000 








76.19 






23.81 


?fi 


Tazewell — 3 roads 


119,446 




Peoria & Pekln Union 


54.000 
40.446 
25.000 








45.21 




Lake Erie & Western 


33.86 






20.93 


97 


Woodford— 1 road 


100. 526 




Atchison, Topeka & Santa F6 


100.526 








100.00 


?8 




69.948 




Illinois Central . 


49,448 
6.250 
6.250 
6.250 
1,750 








70 68 




Chicago & Alton 


8.94 




Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 


8.91 




Lake Erie & Western 


8.94 






2.50 


■"} 


Shelby— 2 roads 


66, 490 






66,370 
120 








99.82 




Toledo St Louis & Western 


.18 


'lO 




65,618 






32,298 
15,500 
7.760 








58.16 




Illinois Central 


27.90 




Vandalla Line 


13 95 


SI 




47. 318 




Illinois Central 




25.353 
17,574 
4,391 








53.58 




Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 


37.11 




Wabash 


9 28 


S? 


Henry — 2 roads..... . 


16. 696 




Chicago, Burlington & Qnlncy 


34,845 
11.851 








71.62 




Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 


25.38 


3S 




35, OOO 




Illinois Central 


35.000 








100.00 


34 


Rock Island — 1 road . 


34.085 




Davenport, Rook Island & Northwestern 


34.085 








100.00 


85 




33.869 




Galesburg & Great Eastern . .. 


31.265 
2,604 








92.31 






7.69 


Sfi 


Gallatin— 1 road ...... 


31.819 




Louisville «& Nashville 


31,819 








100.00 


37 


Will— 1 road 


24.921 




Chicago & Alton . . 


24,921 








100.00 


RR 




13.983 






13, 983 








100.00 


1<» 


Stark— 1 road ... .. 


13.640 




Chicago, Burlington & Qulncy 


13, 640 






2 


100.00 



54 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 32— Concluded. 



1 


Counties and Railroads. 


II 


Tons 

delivered 

to each 

railroad. 


Total tons 
shipped and 
per cent to 
each road. 


40 


Hancock — 1 road 


1 
1 

1 
1 




7 700 






7.700 




41 


Jefferson — 1 road . .. 


1 000 




Southern Ry. Co 


l.OOO 


100 00 










30,082.301 






Shipped by water 




2,086 




LaSalle— Illinois and Michigan Canal 




2,086 














30,081.387 













This is the fourth year Sangamon county has been at the head of 
the list of counties supplying the largest tonnage of coal for shipment. 

In 1899 Vermilion county was at the head of the list, shipping the 
largest tonnage of coal; this county has also, for the past five years, 
supplied the largest tonnage to any one railroad for shipment; this 
year it contributed to the' Chicago & Eastern Illinois railroad 
2,275,968 tons, being 87.27 per cent of the total output shipped from 
the mines of the county. Sangamon county is next with 1,695,154 
tons to the Chicago & Alton railroad, and is closely followed by Will- 
iamson county, which gave 1,637,968 tons to the Illinois Central rail- 
road for transportation. 

A final showing of the enormous and notable operations of the 34 
railroads in handling and transporting the coal product of the State, 
the tonnage of which is many hundreds of times greater than any 
other one product of Illinois, is shown in the following table: 

Table 33 — Illinois Coal Delivered to Illinois Railroads at the 
Mines for Shipment and for use on Locomotives— 1903. 





Railroads. 


Number op— 


Tons Delivered 

TO Bach 
Railroad for— 


Total 


1 

i 

2; 


Coun- 
ties. 


Mines. 


Ship- 
ment. 


Loco- 
mo- 
tives. 


tons. 


, 


Illinois Central 


20 
2 
9 

10 


91 
26 
33 

28 


7,390.486 
3.222.817 
2.814,314 
2.203.658 


373.550 
10.000 
19,841 
93. 256 


7.764.035 


?. 


Chlcagro & Eastern Illinois 


3,232.817 


8 




2, 834, 155 


4 


Wabash 


2.296,914 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 55— Concluded. 



Number of— 



^;?l^^klne8. 



Tons Delivered 

TO Each 
Railroad roR— 



Chicaffo, Burlington & Quincy ^.. . 

Elgin, JoHet & Eastern 

Chicago & Northwestern 

Chicago. Peoria & St. Louis 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 

Louisville & Nashville 

Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific 

Cleveland. Cincinnati. Chicago & St. Louis 

Southern Railroad 

St. Louis Troy & Eastern 

Vandalia Line 

Mobile* Ohio 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 

Indiana. Illinois & Iowa 

Iowa Central 

Toledo. Peoria & Western 

Peoria & Pekin Union 

Pawnee 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western 

Toluca. Marquette & Northern 

St. Louis & Belleville Electric Railway Co. 

Lake Erie & Western 

Illinois Southern 

Alton Terminal 

Wabash, Chester & Western 

Davenport, Rock Island & Northwestern . . 

Qalesbnrg & Great Eastern 

Fulton County Narrow Gauge 

Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton 

Qaincy, Carrollton & St. Louis 

Total. 31 railroads 

By Water. Illinois & Michigan Canal 

Total, State 



Ship- 
ment. 



1,978,627 

1,306,081 

1,278,412 

1,137,950 

1,085,663 

966,064 

839, 781 

838,623 

807,277 

803.080 

535,728 

495,368 

435, 645 

284,436 

278,062 

270,395 

269.627 

221,490 

201,190 

80,930 

67,239 

46.696 

42.324 

37,936 

36. 194 

34.085 

31.266 

19,384 

16,310 

5,165 



Loeo- 
mo- 
tives. 



30,297 



80,082,301 

2,086 

30.084.387 



16,814 
49, 149 
72,696 
44,494 
108.803 
73,176 
16.799 
1,200 
22, 822 
77,018 
35, 108 



2,945 
29,491 
3,000 
1,200 



1,360 



1.560 
3,266 
1.501 



1,117.243 



Total 
tons. 



2,008,924 

1,306,081 

1,295,226 

1,187,099 

1,158,359 

1,010,658 

918,684 

911,799 

824,076 

804,280 

558,650 

672. 386 

470,763 

284,136 

281,007 

299.886 

272.627 

222.690 

201.190 

82.280 

67,239 

56. 196 

61.924 

41,020 

40,994 

31.085 

32. 185 

20.914 

19,676 



31,199,644 



56 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Here, in a concise form, is to be seen the list of railroads handling 
and transporting the one greatest tonnage product of Illinois. The Illi- 
nois Central railroad has handled 7,390,485 tons, or 25 per cent of this 
immense tonnage, which alone would require 6,158 trains, or 17 trains 
every day in the year, of 30 cars each, with each car carrying 40 tons 
of coal. The coal handled by these 34 railroads and delivered to 
their locomotives at the mines aggregates 31,199,544 tons. 

Days of Active Operation. 
The following table gives the number of mines and men, and the 
days the collieries were in operation, by districts: 

Table 34, — Days of Active Operation, by Districts. 







Mines. Mbn and 


^VERAQK Working Dats. 




District. 


ALL MINES. 


SHIPPING EINKS. 


LOCAL MINES. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 


First 


74 
181 
243 

87 
101 
113 
134 


7.717 
6.860 
4.363 
6.771 
8,393 
8.354 
7.356 


219.47 
173.98 
177.60 
202.35 
219.36 
216.76 
183.47 


34 
26 

50 
45 
46 
83 
70 


7,340 
6.072 
3.355 
6.319 
8.139 
8.179 
7.090 


251.06 
243.24 
222.67 
210.00 
224.40 
224.69 
200.78 


40 
156 
193 
42 
55 
30 
64 


377 

788 
1.008 
452 
254 
175 
266 


194.17 




160.66 


Third 


164.41 


Fourth 


191.30 


Fifth 


187.06 


Sixth 


194.90 


Seventh 


148.31 






The State 


933 


49.811 


192.10 


363 


46.494 


221.82 


580 


3.320 


170.72 







The number of working days at all mines, and at the shipping and 
local mines, has increased considerable over last year. Observing 
the number of days the shipping mines were in operation, it is found 
there has been an increase of 11.62 working days over last year. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS, 



57 



The following table gives the number of days of active operation 
of the shipping mines for a series of 11 years, by districts: 

Table 35. — Days of Active Operation of Shipping Mines for a 
Series of Eleven Years, 





First, 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Skventh 


The 


State. 


Ykah. 


i 


>> 

5 


a 

i 


5 


i 

a 

i 


1 


i 

a 

i 


1 




i 

a 


>> 


a 

i 


m 
Cx 

5 


00 

a 

s 


1 


1893 


.S8 


220 


26 


228 


80 


215 


56 


261 


101 


233 










301 


229,6 


1894 


3S 


161.5 
159.4 


26 

28 


171 
176.1 


81 
66 


182.9 
173 


63 

61 


194.7 

185.5 


90 
94 


186.9 
192.6 










295 
278 


183.1 


1895 










182.2 


1896 


38 


166 


46 


198 


27 


157 


40 


210 


60 


197 


72 


196 


49 


164 


322 


186 


1897 


36 


166.9 


46 


183.2 


19 


168.6 


36 


207.7 


60 


202.1 


73 


194.8 


61 


166 5 


310 


185.5 


1898 


39 


144.6 


48 


171.1 


21 


187.5 


39 


190 


61 


172.3 


72 


170.6 


69 


186.8 


329 


174.7 


1899 


37 


208 


46 


211 


23 


185 


37 


221.6 


60 


201.6 


72 


201 


57 


206.6 


321 


205.7 


1900 


44 


238 


20 


234 


65 


201 


34 


210 


44 


219 


73 


217 


53 


197 


323 


214 


1901 


» 


235.5 


26 


202 


53 


188 


33 


185.7 


46 


207 


77 


223.6 


57 


182.4 


331 


204.4 


1902 


33 


246.2 


25 


237.8 


56 


209 


34 


208.5 


46 


213.7 


80 


210.7 


58 


177.7 


332 


210.2 


1903 


3. 


251.06 


25 


243.24 


50 


222.67 


45 


210.00 


46 


224.40 


83 


224.69 


70 


200.78 


353 


221.82 



The average working days these 353 mines were in operation dur- 
ing the year was 221.82, The highest average 261.06 days was 
reached in the first district, the lowest 200.78 days in the seventh. 



58 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Average Value of Coal, 

The following table gives the average value per ton of the difiPerent 
grades of coal, by districts: 

Table 36 — Total Tons and Average Value of the Different Grades 
of Coal at the Shipping and Local Mines, by Districts— 1903, 
1902, 





All Grades. 


Mine Run Coal. 


Lump Coal. 


DiSTKICT. 


Total tons. 


Average 

value 
per ton. 


Total tons. 


lAverage 

value 
per ton. 


Total tons. 


Average 

value 
per ton. 


First 


3.553,136 
2,991,168 
2.319,691 
4,573.052 
6,990,197 
7,656,451 
5.592,842 
33,676,537 
28.824.750 


$1,315 
1.371 
1.167 
1.044 
0.967 
0.849 

SI. 032 
0.942 


388.981 
211.812 
561.925 
2,952.037 
2.018.172 
2.241.257 
1.492.903 
9.897.087 
6.752.680 


$1,571 
1.380 
1.093 
0.974 
0.951 
0.879 
0.932 

$0,982 
0.90 


2,066,789 
2.071.640 
1.241,339 
1.088,180 
3,233.670 
3.861,289 
1,606,949 
15.169,856 
14.198,500 


$1 662 


Second 


1 573 


Third 


1.414 


Fourth 


1 304 


Fifth 


1.176 


Sixth .. 


1 01 


Seventh 


1 166 


Shipping mines, 1903 

Shipping mines, 1902 


$1,275 
1.173 


Local mines, 1903 .. 


1,278,863 
1,196.550 


$1,621 
1.38 


476,011 
233.524 


$1,405 
1.174 


704,653 
843.173 


$1,713 


Local mines, 1902 


1.542 







Table '6Q— Total Tons and Average Value of the Different Grades 
of Coal at the Shipping and Local Mines, by Districts — 1903, 
i902— Concluded, 





Egg Coal. 


Nut Coal 


Pea Coal. 


Slack Coal. 


DiSTEIOT. 


Total 
tons. 


Av. 
value 
per ton 


Total 
tons. 


Av. 
value 
per ton 


Total 
tons. 


Av. 
value 
per ton 


Total 
tons. 


Av. 
value 
per ton 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 


166.979 
97.220 
43.051 
36.068 

106.752 
27.340 

615.968 


$1,596 
1.670 
1.400 
1.509 
1.107 
0.739 
1.124 


122.269 
46, 161 
123,250 
128,591 
235,918 
316.612 
765.592 


$1,317 
1.135 
0.863 
1.136 
0.944 
0.638 
0.973 


718.630 
307.494 
247.490 
231.495 
979.788 
972.618 
1.020.971 


$0,535 
0.668 
0.626 
0.620 
0.530 
0.378 
0.603 


90.588 
256.841 
102.636 
136,681 
382.897 
237.336 
190.459 


$0,253 
0508 
0.408 
0.283 
0.362 
0.132 
0.273 


Shipping mines. 1903. 
Shipping mines. 1902. 


992.378 
677.079 


$1,269 
1.022 


1.741,393 
1,562,659 


$0,946 
0.764 


4.478.386 
4.542.777 


$0,527 
0.471 


1.397.437 
1.091.055 


$0,307 
0.228 


Lociil mines. 1903 .... 
Local mines. 1902 .... 


2.785 
3.906 


$1,677 
1.478 


14,311 
23,797 


$1,089 
1.10 


62.045 
61.455 


$0,704 
0.676 


19.058 
30.695 


$0,272 
0.322 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



59 



This is the second year that a separation, of the selling value of 
the different grades of coal of shipping and local mines, has been 
made, in these reports. It will be seen that the average value per 
ton for all grades of coal at the shipping mines increased 9 centS' 
over the value for last year; the value per ton for the different grades 
increased: for mine run coal 8 cents, lump 10 cents, egg 25 cents, nut 
18 cents, pea 6 cents, and for slack 8 cents. At the local mines the 
value for all grades of coal, increased over last year 14 cents per 
ton, for mine run 23 cents, for lump 17 cents, egg 10 cents, and pea 
coal ]3 cents; nut coal decreased 1 cent per ton and slack 5 cents. 

The division of the different grades of coal produced at the mines 
is continued in this report. For every year up to 1900 the value per 
ton of lump coal at the mines was the only grade quoted in these 
reports, and was mainly the only grade quoted in the markets. 

The table giving the tonnage and value per ton of lump coal for a 
series of 22 years follows: 



Table H7 — Average Value of Lump Coal per Ton at the 
for a Series of Twenty-two Years— 1882-1903. 



Mine 



Year. 



Tons 


Average 


of lump coal 


value 


produced. 


per ton. 



1883 

1884 

1885 

1885 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

* Shipping mines 



9.115,653 


$1.51 


10,030,991 


1.48 


10.101,005 


1.26 


9.791,874 


1.17 


9,246.436 


1.10 


10.278.890 


1.085 


11,855,188 


1.123 


11.597.96S 


1.078 


12.638.364 


1.019 


12,900.224 


1.008 


14.730.963 


1.029 



1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 



Tons 

of lump coal 

produced. 



Average 

value 
per ton. 



16.112.899 


$1,025 


13,865.284 


1.009 


14,045,962 


0.932 


13,990.924 


0.899 


14,672,241 


0.852 


14.208,795 


0.918 


16,008,109 


0.9186 


13,927.899 


1.099 


13,321.124 


1.181 


14.198.500 


1.173 


15.169.856 


1.275 



60 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



This year 45 per oent of the output of shipping mines was returned 
as lump coal; this proportion of lump coal has only been exceeded, 
as produced by all mines, twice during the 22 years, namely, in 1893 
and 1899. Keferring to table 36 and the corresponding table for last 
year, the following percentages for shipping mines are derived: 





Yeab. 






Perckntages of— 








Mine Run. 


Lump. 


E... 


Nut. 


Pea. 


Slack. 


1902 


23.43 
29.39 


49.23 
45.05 


2.35 
2.95 


5.45 
5.17 


15.76 
• 13.29 


3.78 


1903 


4.15 







Mine Employes. 
The following table gives the classification of those employed in 
and about the mines, by districts: 

Table 38 — Classification of Employes in the Shipping Mines, by 
Districts, with the Employes in Local Mines, 





All Employes. 


Above 
ground. 




District. 


Miners. 


Other 
employes. 


Boys. 


Total. 


Total. 


First. 


5,486 
4,405 
2,356 
4.235 
5,561 
5.644 
4.605 


1,129 
1,064 
565 
1,263 
1,624 
1,384 
1,386 


179 

95 
91 
187 
250 
255 
177 


6,794 
5,564 
3.012 
5.685 
7.335 
7,283 
6,168 


646 

508 
343 
634 
804 
896 
922 


7.340 




6,072 


Third 


3,355 


Fourth 


6.319 


Fifth 


8,139 


Sixth 


8,179 


Seventh 


7,090 






The State 


32,292 
2,612 


8,315 

208 


1,234 
42 


41,841 
2.862 


4,653 
468 


46.494 




3.320 






Total 


34,904 


8,523 


1.276 


44,703 


5,111 


49,814 







The shipping mines account for 93.33 per cent of the total number 
of employes, and 92.51 per cent of miners proper; 97.56 per cent of 
other employes and 96.71 per cent of the boys employed at the mines. 
The total number of employes at shipping mines has increased 3,687 
or 8.61 per cent over last year. 

The^following table gives the total [number of employes at all the 
mines of the State for a series of 21 years, by districts: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



61 



Table 'S9— Employes in Coal Mines of the State for a Series of 
Twenty-one Years, by Districts. 



Districts. 



First. 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


Fifth. 


7,566 


3.211 


4,070 


4.417 


4.675 


8.013 


3.616 


5,018 


4,781 


4,147 


7.463 


3.391 


5,213 


4.950 


4,429 


7.613 


3,599 


4.870 


5.197 


4,567 


7.915 


4,068 


4,903 


4.934 


4,984 


8,623 


4,914 


5,250 


5.086 


5,537 


9.014 


4,498 


5,117 


5.679 


5.764 


8.258 


4,099 


5,171 


5.685 


5,361 


9,128 


5,089 


6.458 


5.881 


6.395 


9,572 


4,865 


6,453 


6.542 


6.200 


8,831 


5,974 


6,964 


7.021 


6.780 


10.280 


6,713 


7,112 


7,760 


6.621 


9,614 


7,184 


6,607 


8,005 


7.190 


9,380 


7.103 


2.134 


4.467 


6,758 


7.632 


6.872 


1.635 


4.021 


5,672 


7.377 


6.799 


1,800 


4.030 


6,093 


7,498 


6.631 


1,799 


4,655 


6.401 


7,722 


5,693 


3.864 


5.545 


5.983 


7,872 


6.306 


3.760 


6.950 


6.837 


8,035 


6,683 


4,268 


6.679 


7,664 


7.717 


6,860 


4,363 


6.771 


8.393 



Sixth. Seventh. 



The 
State. 



1901 
1902 



4,374 

4.100 
4.662 
5.008 
6.885 
6,871 
7.929 
8,364 



3,816 
3.856 
4,265 
4.999 
4.692 
5.647 
6.947 
7,356 



23. 939 
25, 575 
25,446 
25,846 
26,801 
29.410 
30.076 
2S.574 
32.951 
33.632 
35.390 
38.177 
38,630 
37,032 



39.381 
11. 113 

46,005 
49,814 



The first district shows a decrease of 318 in the number employed, 
all the other districts show an increase ranging from 277 in the sec- 
ond district to 1,409 in the seventh, making a net increase of 8,809 
for the year over last year. 



62 



statistics of labor. 
Prices Paid fob Mining. 



The average prices paid for mining coal during the year, both for 
hand and machine mining, is set forth in the following table: 

Table 40 — Ave^-age Prices Paid for Mining by Hand and with 
Machine at Shipping and Local Mines, by Districts — 1903. 





Mining by Hand. 


Machine Mining. 


District. 


Shipping Mines- 
Gross Weight. 


Local Mines-Screened. 


Gross Weight. 




Tons. 


Price 
per 
ton. 


Tons. 


?rice 
per 
ton. 


Tons 
paid for 


Tons. 


Price 
per 
ton. 




3.653,136 
2.986,183 
2.319,691 
4,459,632 
4,512,793 
3,801.878 
4.408.701 
26.042,014 


$0,737 
0.723 
0.587 
0.629 
0.508 
0.4944 
0.604 
0.57 


183,186 
254,613 
388.159 
192,232 
67.684 
78.380 
76,952 
1.241,105 


$0,671 
0.93 
0.76 
0.61 
0.775 
0.607 
0.53 

$0,734 


tl2.330 






Second 

Third 


»4,985 




500 
§7,000 

111,268 




Fourth 

Fifth 


tll3,420 
2,489,258 
3,854,673 
1,184,541 


$0,476 
0.435 


Sixth 


0.4337 


Seventh 


4.406 


0.43 


Thebtate 


25.504 


7.646,777 


$0.4337 



* Paid by the day. 

1 75,918 tons paid by the day, 

I Paid $2,28 per day to April 1 and $2.56 per day to June 30, 1903. 

« Paid $2.50 per ton. 

H Paid $2.00 per ton. 

In computing these averages the two agreements as to prices of 
mining between the miners and operators, covering the fiscal year of 
this report, were considered. That is, it was assumed that three 
parts of the tons of coal returned by the operators for the year, from 
July 1, 1902, to June 30, 1903, was mined under the contract price, 
going into effect April 1 , 1902, and one part was mined under the 
agreed price taking effect April 1, 1903. This explanation will ac- 
count for the rate of mining per ton found in table 40. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



68 



Payment of Wages, 
The time of the payment of wages to miners and other employes 
in and about the coal mines of the State is shown in the following 
table: 



Table 41 — Frequency of the Payment of Wages at Shipping and 
Local Mines, by Districts — W03 . 











Payments 


Made. 








District. 


Wkekly. 


Skmi-Monthlt. 


Monthly. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


First 








34 
21 

60 
40 
46 
83 
70 
344 
325 


7.340 
5.958 
3.355 
6.284 
8.139 
8.179 
7,090 
46.315 
2. 045 


3.663.136 
2.953.875 
2.319.691 
4.562.427 
6,990.197 
7.656.451 
5.592.842 
33.628.619 
898,932 








Second ... 


3 


74 


21.405 


1 


« 


15, 888 


Third 






6 


35 


10,625 








Fifth .. . 








Sixth 










































8hippinff mines. 
Local mines 


8 
261 


109 
1.203 


32.030 
352,622 


1 
4 


40 

72 


15,888 
27.309 


The State 


259 


1,312 


384. 652 


669 


48.390 


34,527,651 


5 


112 


43,197 



This table reveals that 97.45 per cent of the operators of shipping 
mines paid their employes semi-monthly; this embraces 98 per cent 
of all the employes at all the mines, and 96 per cent of the total 
tons of coal produced. 



64 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The following table shows the percentages of mines, men and tons 
of all the mines and time of the payment of wages for a series of 11 
years : 

Table 42 — Percentages of Mines, Men and Tons in Reference to 
Payment of Wages, for a Series of Eleven Years. 



Year. 


WAaKS Paid Wkkkly. 


Wagkb 
Paid Semi-Monthlt. 


Wages 
Paid Monthly. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


1893 


67 
43 
31 
49 

.a.,8 

24.76 

33 

28.85 

47 

27.76 


27.6 
11.7 
6.6 
7.8 
6.91 
5.36 
4.67 
4.12 
2.79 
4.66 
2.63 


26.2 
9.7 
4.2 
6.3 
4.34 
4.99 
3.04 
2.67 
1.44 
1.84 
1.10 


25 

46 

57 

37.5 

39.04 

62.32 

71.54 

64.8 

70.60 

62.13 

71.70 


66.6 
78.3 
74.6 
74.69 
90.26 
93.02 
95.04 
97.03 
96.12 
97.14 


66.4 

67.2 

74.4 

12 

73.71 

89.78 

95.76 

96.48 

98.44 

98.06 

98.78 


8 
11 
12 
12 

14.18 
6.45 
3.71 
2.2 
.55 
.87 
.54 


16.4 

21.7 

15.2 

17.6 

18.4 

4.38 

2.31 

.48 

• 18 

.33 

.23 


23 4 


1894 




1895 


21.4 


1896 


21 2 


1897 


21 9 


1898 


6.23 


1899 


2.21 


1900 


.59 


1901 


.12 


1902 


.1 


1903 


12 







Earnings of Miners. 
Taking the returns of the operators of shipping mines, giving the 
number of miners employed, the number of days the mines were in 
operation, and the total tons produced, the following showing is 
made as the approximate accomplishments of the hand miners for 
the year: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



65 



Table 48 — Hand Mining, Earnings of Coal Miners, in Shipping 
Mines, for Year ended June 30, 1903— hy Districts 



District. 


a 

a 

o 

1 

1 


i| 

u 
< 


1 

a 

01 

a 
o 

1 


i 

Is 

i. 

si 

< 


s 

a 
"5 

s 


1 

1' 


"a 


1! 


si 

i 


First 


6.339 
4.405 
2.296 
4.039 
3.939 
2.628 
3.232 


251.1 
243.2 
222.7 
217.7 
223.1 
214.3 
256 


3.543,648 
2,986,183 
2,307,691 
4.365.714 
4.487.666 
3.159.364 
3.604.962 


$0,737 
0.7226 
0.5665 
0.5292 
0.6077 
0.4945 
0.5036 


$2,611,669 
2,157,816 
1,307,307 
2,310,336 
2,278.388 
1,562,305 
1,815.459 


663.73 
678.36 
1,005.09 
1,080.89 
1,139.29 
1.202.19 
1,115.40 


$489 17 
489 86 
569 38 
572 01 
578 42 
683 07 
561 72 


2.65 
2.79 
4.61 
4.96 
5.11 
5.61 
4 35 


$1 S5 


Second 


2 01 


Third 


2 66 


Fourtli 


2 63 


Fifth 


2 65 


Sixth . . .. 


2 72 


Seventh 


2 19 






The State 


26.878 


224.1 


24.455.228 


$0.5699 


$14,043,280 


944.63 


$542 67 


4.22 


$? 42 


1902 


24.229 
22,206 


209.85 
203 


20,616,155 
18,227.130 


$0.5645 
0.669 


$11,638,120 
10.372.670 


850.88 
821 


$480 34 
467 11 


4.06 
4.04 


$2 29 


1901 


2 30 











In this table the figures for the years 1902 and 1901 are added for 
comparison. 

Machine Mining. 

The extent to which machine mining was carried on in the State 
for the year is set forth in the following table, by districts: 



-5 C 



66 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



Table 44. — Machine Mining — Mines, Men, Machines, Tons, 
Districts— 1903. 









Mines in Which 


Mach 


INBS ABE 


UsEr 








BX0LU81VELY. 


IN PART. 


TOTAL. 


District. 


i 

a 

i 




1 


Tons. 


a 

i 




Tons. 




i 

.9 

1 


Tons. 


First 
































1 


1 


4.986 


1 


1 


4.985 


Third 












Fourth 


1 

11 
20 

1 


98 

2.O0O 

2.274 

6 


2 
123 

166 
1 


76.918 

1.990.862 

2,325.872 

400 


2 
2 
18 
12 


6 
16 
132 

75 


37.502 

498.396 

1.528.701 

1.184.141 


3 

13 
38 
13 


8 
139 
298 
76 


113.420 


Fifth 


2. 489, 258 


Sixth 


3.854.573 


Seventh 


1.184,541 






The State 


33 


4.378 


292 


4.393.052 


35 


230 


3 253.725 


68 


522 


7.646.777 


1902 


34 
29 
38 
39 


4.811 
3.499 
3.883 


308 
280 
272 
300 


4.460.025 
3.761.270 
3,765.601 
4,467.704 


30 
34 
29 
25 


156 
184 
158 
140 


2.037,094 
2.015.369 
1.817.993 
1.617.608 


64 
63 
67 
64 


46t 
464 
430 
440 


6 497 123 


1901 


5,776.639 


1900 


6,683,594 


1899 


6. 085. 312 







To this table for the year is added the same data for the four pre- 
ceding years. The total tons mined by machines is the largest in 
five years, and exceeds that of last year by 1,149,654 tons, this excess 
being at mines where machines are used only in part for cutting 
coal. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



67 



The name and number of mining machines used during the year 
and the number in use for the previous four years, is presented in 
the following table: 

Table 45. — Name and Number' of Mining Machines in Use, by 
Districts— 1903. 







S 




•2 

«8 






a 


















=T^ 






=5^ . 


fl 


a 






District. 


s 




> 


d 




1 




a 


ca 

a 


* 
a 


"m 




w 


ca 


s 


>H 


1-5 


ffi 


o 


J 


CQ 


^ 


Second 
















1 






1 


Fourth 








5 








1 




2 


8 


Fifth 


81 


18 




6 


4 


15 


1 




14 




139 


Sixth 


68 
29 


67 
10 


68 
14 


1 
3 


27 


24 
11 


32 


4 

9 


7 




298 




76 










The State 


178 


95 


82 


15 


31 


60 


33 


15 


21 


2 


622 


1902 


1«0 


133 


86 


22 


28 


32 


20 


29 


3 


2 


465 


1901 


178 


132 


3.'? 


32 


24 


33 


13 




19 




464 


1900 


197 


119 


40 


19 


5 


30 


*t 




19 




430 


1899 


.80 


130 


35 


16 


12 


39 


♦6 




23 




440 







♦Choteau. 

There were no machines used in the First and Third districts dur- 
ing the year. The Choteau machine seems to have dropped out of 
use since 1900, when only one of this name was reported. Inadvert- 
ently the name of the Link-Belt machine was omitted from this table 
in the report of 1902. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The mines in which the coal is cut exclusively by machines is pre- 
sented in the following table: 

Table 46 — Mines in which Machines are Used Exclusively. 



Company. 



Chicago, Wilmington & Ver. C. Co 

Madison Coal Co 

Staunton Coal Co. No. 1 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 6 

Madison Coal Co. No. 2 

Madison Coal Co. No. 1 

Madison Coal Co. No. 6 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 8 

Lumaghl Coal Co. No. 2 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 7 

Consolidated Coal Co. No. 10 

Mnren Coal & Ice Co 

Sorento Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co. Abby No. 3. 
Consolidated Coal Co., Heinz Bluff 

Walnut Hill Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Lebanon Coal & Mlnlnir Ass'n 

Valley Coal & Mining Co 

Oakland Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co., Green Mt.. 
Consolidated C. Co.Gartside No. i 

Superior Coal & Mining Co 

Consolidated Coal Co.. Schureman 
Consolidated Coal Co., Richland... 
Consolidated Coal Co.. Rose Hill.. 

Consolidated Coal Co.. Knecht 

Wm. Neil&Co 

Thomas Press Brick Co 

Gas Blair Big Muddy Coal Co 

Total— 33 Mines 



Thayer 

Divernon 

Staunton 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon 

Glen Carbon 

Mt. Olive 

Mt. Olive 

Collinsville 

Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

New Baden 

Sorento 

Collinsville 

Collinsville 

Belleville 

Trenton 

Gillespie 

Mission Field.... 

Lebanon 

East St. Louis... 

Belleville 

flornsby 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Belleville 

Bunker Hi'.l 

Golden Eagle.... 
Murphysboro 



Jeffrey 

f 4 Link Belt. 
15 Jeffrey.... 

Jeffrey 

/4 Yock 



1 10 Harrison 

Ingersoll-Sergeant . 
Ingersoll-Sergeant . 
Ingersoll-Sergeant , 
Harrison 



Sullivan 

Harrison 

( 17 Harrison 

1 1 Herzler-Hennlnger. 
Yock 



Ingersoll-Sergeant. 
Harrison 



ISSulllvan \ 

1 3 Herzler-Hennlnger. f 



Butler , 



Harrison 

J 4 Ingersoll-Sergeant. 
1 1 Herzler-Henninger. 



Harrison 

Harrison 

Hersler & Henninger.... 

f 3 Harrison (. 

( 1 Ingersoll-Sergeant. i 

5 2 Harrison • 

(1 Yock / 

Harrison 



Harrison 

Harrison 

Ingersoll-Sergeant. 
Ingersoll-Sergeant. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



69 



The foregoing accounts for the performance of 292 machines in 
mines where coal is cut entirely by this process. The achievement 
of these machines was at 33 mines, cutting 4,393,052 tons of coal. 
The most extensive work done by machines at any one mine during 
the year was at the Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion company's 
mine at Thayer, Sangamon county, by ten Jeffrey machines, cutting 
403,758 tons. 

The foregoing is supplemented by the following table, giving a list 
of the mines where only a part of the coal is cut by machines: 



Table 47 — Mines in tvhich only Part of the Output is Cut by 
Machines. 



Maohinks. 



No 



Name. 



Chicago- Virden Goal Go 

Big Muddy Goal & Iron Co. No. 6 

Biff Muddy Coal & Iron Co.(Harrlson) 

Odin Goal Co 

Southern 111. G. M. & W. Co., No. 3..,. 

Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co 

Royal Coal Co 

Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co 

Hlllsboro Coal Co 

Chicaffo & Carterville Coal Go 

Trenton Coal Co 

Kerns-Donewald Goal Co 

Madison Coal Go 

Southern 111. G. M. & W. Co., No. 2.... 

Glendale Coal Co., No. 1 

MurenCoal &:ice Co 

Chicago & Big Muddy C. & C. Co 



Vlrden 

Murphysboro, 
Murphysboro 

Odin 

Marlon 

Colllnsville... 

Belleville 

Colllnsville... 
Hillsboro 

Herrln 

Trenton 

Worden 

Edwardsville. 

Marlon 

Belleville 

Belleville | 

Marion i 



Link-Belt 

Harrison 

Harrison 

j3 Jeffrey 

(4 Link-Belt 

Goodman 

f 4 Goodman 

12 Sullivan 

f 15 Sullivan 

1 3 Ingersoll-Sergeant 

Sullivan 

Morgan-Gardner 

(3 Jeffrey 

< 3 Morgan-Gardner . . 
(2 Goodman 

Ingersoll-Sergeant 

Jeffrey , 

Ingersoll-Sergeant 

Jeffrey 

HerzlerHenninger . . . . 

Jeffrey 

Jeffrey 



358.493 
246,269 
234.038 
213.041 
182.400 
169.400 
168.100 
167.362 
139. 903 

138.361 

138. 162 
112.416 
112.200 
99.716 
69.900 
67.831 
66.113 



70 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 47— Concluded. 



Company. 


Location. 


Machines. 




No. 


Name. 


Tons. 




Belleville 

Murphysboro. 

WilHsville 

Belleville 

Moweaqua.... 

Belleville 

Marion 

Mascoutah ... 

Marissa 

O'Fallon 

Belleville 

Marion 

Murphysboro. 

Marissa 

Belleville 

Lake Creek... 

Tolnca 

Pan a 


2 
8 
2 
6 

* 
5 
4 

1 

1 


("2 Jeffrey ) 




Lenz Codl & Mining Co 


< 1 Morgan-Gardner... V 
.1 Link-Belt J 


64, 136 




Gartside Coal Co., No. 4 


Ingersoll-Sergeant 

f 5 Sullivan ) 


60,300 


Willis Coal & Mining Co.. No. 1 

Oak Hill Coal Co 


12 Goodman j 


52, 200 
38, 945 


Moweaqua Coal & Mining Co 




35,652 
35,385 


Hlppard Coal Co., No. 2 


fSHerzler-Henninger.") 
-i X Harrison > 




u Sullivan ...;!!!;!!;;] 


Southern 111. C. M. & W. Co.. No. 4.... 


Sullivan 


35 145 


Kolb Coal Co 


f 3 Herzler-Hennlnger. 1 
llHarrison J 


33,493 




Johnson Coal Co 


Link-Belt 


31,999 
31.062 
30,452 
27, 750 


O'Fallon Coal & Mining Co 




SkelletCoal Co 


Jeffreys 


Cartervllle District Coal Co 


Sullivan 


Gartside Coal Co.. No 3 ... 


Ingersoll-Sergeant ...... 

Herzler-Hennlnger 

Herzler-Hennlnger 

Harrison. 


25,774 
25,743 
19 105 


Eureka Coal Co 


Belleville & O'Fallon Coal Co 


Johnston City & Big Muddy C.&M. Co 


16 075 


Devlin Coal Co 




4,985 
1 850 


PenwellCoal Co 


Goodman 


Totals— 35 mines 






3, 253, 725 











In the foregoing table is shown the work of 230 machines in 35 
mines, cutting 3,253,725 tons of coal. The greatest number of tons 
cut by machines in this list was by 10 Link-Belt machines at the 
Chicago- Virden Coal company's mine at Virden, Macoupin county, 
cutting 358,493 tons. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



71 



Powder Used. 
The powder used in blasting coal is presented in the following 
table, by districts: 



Table ^'d— Distribution 


of Powder Used in All 3Iines 


hy Districts. 






Powder Qskd 


IN Blasting Coal. 




District. 


Mines 


Men. 


Kegs. 


Tods of Coal 


Kegs 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg. 


First 


38 
76 
160 
66 
70 
105 
134 


6.194 
1,469 
3.784 
5.889 
8.308 
8.278 
7.335 


46,952 
40.673 
122.562 
114,002 
191,348 
140.383 
150,391 


2,654,936 
853.247 
2.624.320 
4.362,760 
7,056.225 
7.711,321 
5.674.600 


9.04 
27.88 
32.4 
19.33 
23.03 
16.96 
20.45 


56.55 


Second 


20.98 


Third 


21.41 




38.27 


Fifth . 


36.88 


Sixth 


54.93 




37.73 






The State 


639 


40.267 


806.311 


30. 937. 409 


20.02 


38.37 


1902 


657 
685 
621 
436 


36,669 
34 670 
29,677 
13,240 


637,448 
477,612 
490,713 
201,286 


26.666.523 
16.283,180 
19.979,219 
7.345.157 


17.4 
13.82 
16.5 
15.2 


40.01 


1901 


31.09 


1900 


40.71 


1899 


36.4 







The quantity of powder used this year for blasting down coal was 
806,311 kegs or 20,157,775 pounds, which equals 10,079 tons of this 
explosive. This immense quantity of powder consumed during the 
year is 168,863 kegs or 26.5 per cent more than reported as used last 
year. The results obtained from this seemingly prodigal use of 
powder varies but little from former years; for the State it was 38 
tons per keg and 20 kegs per man. The best results derived in the 
thicker seams was in the sixth district, being 55 tons per keg and 17 
kegs per man. The totals for four preceding years are given in the 
same table. 

Fatal Accidents in Mines. 

This year the number of fatal accidents, occurring in and about 
the mines, is unprecedented in the history of coal mining in the 



72 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 



State. The following table, compiled from the reports of the several 
inspectors, gives the information in condensed form. 



Table A9— Fatal Casualties, 



Districts— 1903. 



Total 

num 

bar 

killed. 



Under Above 
gr'und gr'und 



Number 
OF Employes 



Under Above 
gr'und gr'und 



Total 
number 
of tons 
of coal 
mined. 


Number 
of em- 
ployes 
to each 
death. 


Rate 


3.748.651 


a.. 


a.. 


3,246,781 


624 


1.6 


2,708,350 


485 


2.1 


4.772.284 


Z26 


4.4 


7.070.903 


323 


3.1 


7.734.831 


261 


3.8 


6.674,600 


307 


3.3 


34,955.400 


2,648 


3.1 



Number 
of tons 
of coal 
mined 
to each 
death. 



First , 

Second.... 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State .... 



26 
32 
23 
152 



7.127 
6,245 
3,909 
6.080 
7,650 
7,422 
6,370 
44,703 



5,111 



166, 194 
295,071 
300,928 
159,076 
271,919 
241.713 
236.442 
224,073 



* Caught by cage. 

+ One falling smoke s'ack; one fa'.ling down shaft. 

t Falling down shaft. 

The total number killed during the year was 156. This is 57 or 
57.58 per cent more than reported for last year, or the preceding 
year, the same number being reported for both years. The number 
killed this year is also larger than for any other year in the history 
of coal mining in this State. 

For the year 1883 there were 184 persons reported killed; however, 
in that year two deplorable calamities occurred, one at Braidwood, 
where C9 men were drowned by the flooding of the Diamond mine; 
the other at Coulterville, where 10 men were killed by an explosion. 
With this single exception coal mining in the State for 20 years has 
been exempt from any calamity involving the death of so large a 
number of persons. This year, however, is to be recorded five unfor- 
tunate disasters in our coal mines, whereby 29 men were killed. 
Oct. 13, 1902, a blast explosion occurred in the mine of the Victor 
Coal company, Pawnee, Sangamon county, killing three men; Feb. 
25, 1903, a blast explosion occurred in the mine of the Auburn and 
Alton Coal company at Auburn, Sangamon county, killing three men; 
March 13, 15 and 16, 1903, a gas explosion occurred in the mine of 
the CardifiP Coal company. Cardiff, Livingston county, killing nine 
men; March 23, 1903, a blast explosion occurred in the mine of the 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



73 



Athens Coal company, Athens, Menurd county, killing six men; 
March 81, 1908, a blast explosion occurred in the mine of the Sando- 
val Coal company, Sandoval, Marion county, killing eight men. Not- 
withstanding these ill-fated accidents, the number killed this year 
has increased largely over that of any previous year. The increase 
of fatal casualties in mines has been general in all parts of the State. 
In the First and Seventh districts the increase over last year was 60 
per cent; in the Second, 57 percent; in the Third, Fourth and Fifth, 
58 per cent; in the Sixth, 68 per cent, In the reports of the several 
inspectors may be found a description of these casualties in detail. 
The fatal accidents for 21 years are shown in the following table: 



Table 50 — Fatal Accidents for 21 Years. 



Year. 


Number 
killed. 


Total 
number of 
employes. 


Total 

tons of coal 

miaed. 


Number 

of 

employ6s 

to each life 

lost. 


Rate 
per 

1.000. 


Number of 

tons of coal 

produced 

to each life 

lost. 


1883 


134 
46 
39 
52 
41 
55 
42 
53 
60 
57 
69 

. 

75 
77 
69 
75 
84 
94 
99 
99 
156 


23.9;i9 
25, 575 
25.436 
25.846 
26,804 
29.410 
30.076 
28.574 
32.951 
33,632 
35. 390 
32.635 
31,962 
33,054 
33,788 
35,026 
36,991 
39, 384 
44. 143 
46,005 
49,814 


12.123.456 
12.208.075 
11.834,459 
11,176,241 
12,423.066 
14.328.181 
14.017,298 
15.274,727 
15.660.698 
17.062.276 
19,949,564 
17.113,576 
17,735,864 
19.786,626 
20.072,758 
18,599,299 
23,434,445 
25, 153, 929 
26.635,319 
30.021.300 
34, 955, 400 


179.6 

566 

652.4 

497 

654 

534.7 

716.1 

539.1 

549 

580 

613 

453.3 

426.2 

429.2 

489.7 

467 

... 

419 
445.9 
464.7 
319.3 


5.6 
1.8 
1.6 
2.0 
1.5 
1.9 
1.4 
1.9 
1.8 
1.7 
1.9 
2.2 
2.3 
2.3 
2.0 
2.1 
2.3 
2.4 
2.2 
2.2 
3.1 


90. 474 


1884 ... 


265,393 
303, 448 


1885 


1886 


214,909 


1887 


303 002 


1888 


260. 512 


1889 


333. 745 


1890 


286. 316 


1891 


261.012 


1892 


313.372 


1893 


289, 124 


1894 


237,688 


1895 


236.478 


1896 .. 


256.969 
290 610 


1897 


1898 


247,991 


1899 


278,982 


1900 


267, 596 


1901 

1902 


269,044 
303, 245 


1903 


224, 073 






Averages for 21 years 


73.7 


33.354 


18.550.741 


452.6 


2.2 


251,657 



74 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The rate of killed per 1,000 employes, for this year, is 3.1. This is 
the highest rate since the year 1888. Omitting that year, the rate is 
2.1 per 1,000 for the 21 years, or 2.2 per 1,000 for all the years. 

The fatal casualties by causes and by districts, for this year, and 
for 14 years, is shown in the following table: 



Table 51- 



-Fatal Accidents by Causes for 1903, with Totals and 
Averages for 14 Years. 





1 

o 
H 


Districts. 


1 


Causbb. 


2 


1 

CO 


i 

XI 


i 






xi 


1 


5 


Blast explosions 


25 
6 
1 

1 
77 
2 
2 
2 
8 
18 
11 
3 






6 


2 


9 


8 
1 

1 


2 
1 


16 05 






2 


3.85 




0.64 


Falling smoke stack ., 








1 
20 




0.64 




13 


6 


3 


' 


16 


12 

1 

1 


49.36 


Falling down shaft 


1.28 


Fallinsr timber 


1 

8 
1 
I 






1 




1.28 




1 






1.28 












5.12 


Pit cars 


2 




4 


3 
5 

1 


4 

2 


4 

3 


11.63 




7. OS 


Powder explosion 






2 


1.92 












...... 




Totals, 1903 


166 
99 
99 
94 

84 
75 
69 

„ 

75 
72 
69 
57 
60 
53 


24 
15 
11 
18 
7 
12 
11 
18 
16 
19 
17 
10 
15 
16 


11 

7 
9 
7 
12 
10 
9 
11 
12 
9 
5 
1 
4 
6 


9 
6 
4 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
16 
10 
12 
11 
9 
10 


30 
20 
21 
24 
11 
19 
10 
14 
15 
19 
10 
24 
12 
11 


26 
17 
17 
22 
14 
5 

19 
16 
16 
15 
25 
11 
20 
11 


32 
19 
22 
11 
22 

8 
11 

4 


24 
15 
16 

7 

17 
5 
10 


100.00 


Totals. 1902 




Totals, 1901 




Totals, 1900 




Totals, 1899 




Totals, 1898 ... 




Totals, 1897 




Totals, 1896 








Totals, 1894 








Totals. 1893 









Totals, 1892 




Totals 1891 
























Aggregates, 14 years 


1.139 


209 


112 


108 


240 


234 


129 


107 






81.4 


14.9 
15.42 


8.0 
10.09 


7.7 
5.31 


17.1 
19.78 


16.7 
T8.06 


9.2 
17.18 


7.6 
14.21 




Percentages. 8 years. 1896-1903 


100 00 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



75 



The first, fourth, fifth and sixth districts account for over 70 per 
cent of the fatal casualties for the past eight years. 

The fatal casualties by leading causes have been continued in 
these reports from year to year, and are presented in the following 
table for a series of 16 years: 



Table 52 — Fatal Accidents for 


16 Years, 


by Leading 


Causes. 




Leading Causes. 


Tears. 


s 

Sg 

11 


ill 

O 


1= 


a 

o 
■a 


If 
it 




1 


1 

o 


1 


1888 


9 
3 
4 

11 

4 
6 
8 
12 
9 
11 
11 
4 
17 
3 
13 
47 


2 


33 

26 
36 
33 
28 
48 
43 
38 
41 
46 
43 
51 
51 
57 
55 
77 


3 


5 
4 

3 
2 

5 
2 
2 
7 
4 
1 


11 
11 
15 
18 


1 
2 


2 

3 
3 
3 

6 
6 
3 
6 
9 
7 

25 
5 
6 


66 


1889 


42 


1890 


53 


189J 


60 


1892 


57 


1893 


69 


1894 


72 


1895 


75 


1896 


77 


1897 . .. 


69 


1898 


75 


1899 


84 


1900 


94 


1901 


99 


1902 


99 


1903 


166 






Totals 


172 
13.91 


59 

4.77 


706 
57.12 


57 
4.61 


36 
2.91 


106 

8. 58 


17 
1.38 


83 
6.72 


1,236 


Percentages 16 years . . 


100. CO 



Observing the line in the table giving the tolals for this year, it 
will be seen that three of these causes, namely: blasts and explosions, 
falling coal and rock and pit cars, bear the greatest proportion, ac- 
counting for 91 per cent of all the fatal casualties for the year, while 
for the 16 years these same causes were liable for 80 per cent of the 
number killed. 



76 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The next presentation is a table showing the fatal and non-fatal 
casualties for the year, caused by explosions, falling coal, rook or 
slate, and from all other causes: 



Table bS— Fatal and Non-Fatal Accidents, Caused by Explosions, 
Falling Coal and Rock, and all Other Causes. 





Casoaltiks. 


Percentages. 


Totals. 


Percent- 


Cause. 


Fatal. 


Non- 
fatal. 


Fatal. 


Non- 
fatal. 


ages. 




28 
11 


20 
3 
12 
12 
164 
199 


17.96 
7.06 


4.88 
.73 

2.93 
40.00 
48.63 


48 
14 
12 
14 
241 
237 


8.48 


Blasts, premature ... . .... 


2.47 




2.12 




2 

77 
38 


1.28 
49.36 
24.36 


2.47 


Falling coal and rock or slate 


43.68 
41.88 






Total 


166 


410 


100.00 


109,00 


666 


100.00 







The fatal and non-fatal casualties make a total of 566 for the year, 
27.56 per cent were fatal and 72.44 per cent were non-fatal. The first 
four items in the table, the results of explosions, accounts for 26.28 
per cent of the fatal casualties and 11.46 of the non-fatal, while fall- 
ing coal and rock represents 49.36 per cent of the killed and 40 per 
cent of the injured. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



77 



A comparative table follows, showing the fatal casualties in mines 
by districts, with those of other causes, for a series of 21 years: 

Table 54 — Fatal Accidents from Falls in Mines and from Other 
Causes, loiih Averages and Percentages for Twenty- one Years. 















DiSTRIOl 














h 

11 


o 

-J 

li 






First. 


Second 


Third. 


Fourth 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Sev- 
enth. 


M 


Ybar. 


1 


i 

U 3 

5 


1 


i 

o 


1 


s; 

■S ^ 

5 


I 


J 

5 




1 

1' 


1 


® 

li 


i 


o 




1883 


7 
6 
6 

10 
16 
8 
15 
10 

15 

13 

8 

14 

8 

8 

6 

13 

9 

9 

14 

212 

10.1 

57.3 


72 
6 
4 
5 
4 
3 
6 
1 
5 
2 
2 
6 
8 
4 
3 
4 
1 
6 
2 
6 

10 
158 
7-5 
42.7 


68 
3.2 
48.2 


3 
3 
2 

4 
2 
4 
2 

2 
4 

5 

' 

5 
5 
8 
4 
6 
2 
5 
73 
"3^ 
51.8 


13 

8 
2 
6 
3 
6 
3 
8 
4 
5 
8 
5 
7 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
5 
3 
96 
4.6 
54.5 


5 
4 

4 
6 
2 

' 
2 

5 

6 

4 

6 
9 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
I 
6 
80 
3.8 
45.5 


11 
4 

9 
8 
2 
5 
6 
5 
6 
8 
6 

10 
7 
8 
10 
15 
9 

16 
14 
10 
22 
191 
9.1 
62.4 


16 

10 

115 
5.5 
37.6 


8 
6 
3 

7 
10 
6 
8 
7 

11 
6 
16 
10 
9 
3 
11 
3 
7 
8 
6 
5 
7 
15K 

7.4 
48.9 


12 
2 
4 

5 
4 
7 
3 
4 
9 
5 
9 
5 
7 

13 
8 
2 
7 

14 
12 
12 
19 
163 
7.8 
51.1 










40 
29 
20 
32 
2b 
33 
26 
36 
33 
28 
48 
43 
38 
41 
46 
43 
51 
51 
67 
55 
79 
857 
40.8 
55.4 


94 

17 
19 
20 
13 
22 
16 
17 
27 
29 
21 
29 
37 
36 
23 
32 
33 
43 
42 
44 
77 
691 
32^ 


134 


1881 










46 












39 


1886 










52 


1887 










41 












5S 


1889. 


.... 




.... 


— 


42 


1890 


53 












6& 












57 


1893 










6» 


1891 










72 












75 


1896 


4 
8 
4 
14 
5 
14 
13 
15 
77 
3.7 
59.7 


3 
4 

8 
6 
8 
6 

n 

52 
2.5 
40.3 


5 
2 
7 
9 
4 

10 
8 
12 
57 
2.7 
53.3 


5 
3 
10 
5 
3 
5 
7 

12 

50 

2.4 

46.7 


77 


1897 


69 




75 


1899 


84 


1900 


94 


1901 


99 




99 


1903 . . 


166 


Twenty one years 


1.548 
73.7 


Percetases 


100.00 



Referring to the line of totals, it will be seen there have been 1,548 
killed during the 21 years, being an average of 78.7 for each year. 
Of this total number killed, 857, or 55.86 per cent was due to falls in 
the mines. Observing the districts, it will be seen that, with the ex- 
ception of the second and fifth districts, all the others show over 50 
per cent killed by falls in the mines. 



78 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The following table gives the percentages by years and by districts, 
and shows more fully the fatality from falls in mines: 

Table 55 — Percentages of Fatal Accidents Caused by Falling Roof 
or Sides for Twenty-one Years, by Districts. 





District. 


The State 


Yeae. 


First. 


Second. 


Third. 


Fourth. 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Seventh. 


Total 
deaths. 


Per 
cent. 




8.9 
27.3 


100 
83.3 


82.4 
66.7 


62.5 
44.4 


40 

75 






134 
46 


30 


1884 






56.5 


1886 

1886 

1887 


60 




33 3 


69 2 


43 






39 


51.3 






45.5 


89 


58.3 






52 


61.5 


71.4 


60 


60 


66 


71.4 






41 


68.3 


1888 


84.2 


20 


50 


62.5 


46.2 






55 


60 


1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 


57 1 


33 3 


60 


75 


72.7 






42 


62 


93 8 


20 


80 


45 5 


63 6 






63 


67.9 


66 7 


50 


44.4 


50 


65 






60 


55 


80 


100 


45.5 


33.3 


54.5 






57 


49.1 


1893 

1894 

1895 


88 2 


60 


66 6 


60 


64 






69 


69.6 


68.4 
50 






62 6 


66 6 






72 


58.3 


58.3 


43.75 


46.67 


56.3 






75 


50.7 


1896 


77.8 


36.4 


75 


57.1 


18.8 


100 


50 


77 


53.3 


1897 


72.7 


44.4 


75 


100 


57.9 


72.7 


40 


69 


66.7 


1898 


66.7 


50 


26 


79 


60 


50 


41.2 


75 


58.1 


1899 


85.7 


33.3 


60 


81.8 


50 


63.6 


64.3 


84 


60.7 


1900 


72.2 


42.9 


40 


66.7 


36.4 


45.5 


57 


94 


54.3 


1901 


81.8 


44.4 


25 


66.7 


29.4 


63.6 


66.7 


99 


57.6 


1902 


60 


71.43 


83.33 


50 


29.41 


68.42 


53.33 


99 


66.66 


1903 


58.33 


54.55 


33.33 


73.33 


26.92 


46.88 


50 


156 


50.64 


21 years . 


57.3 


48.2 


64.5 


62.4 


48.9 


59.7 


53.3 


1.548 


55 4 



In the final column of the table will be found the percentages each 
year for the 21 years. The highest per cent from falls was reached 
in 1893; the lowest is shown for 1888. The average is 55.4 per cent 
for each year covered by the table. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



79 



The following table gives the occupations and conjugal relations 
of the killed, by districts: 

Table 56 — Occupation and Conjugal Relation of the Killed. 





Districts AND 

Number of Fatal 

Casualtibs in Each. 


1 

a 

3 . 

©J* 


CONJDGAL Rela- 
tions. 


Occupation. 




1 


"6 
5 




^ 

£ 


i 


a 


OS 


1 

35 


o 

> 


a 

1- 
2 

C3 


■a 

u 




1 










1 
....1.... 


16 

113 

2 

156 


1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
4 

1 

73 

3 

2 
97 


10 

40 
69 


2 


4I 6 




1 
1 

1 




.... 


1 




2 


7! 9 






.... 1 




2 




4 

1 


* 


2 


3 


7 

: 

11 


13 


















16 
24 








3 




1 


1 
2 




15 




















6 
















1 
27 




Miners 


21 


5 




22 


14 


69 


222 


260 
















2 

1 
I 
26 


1 
1 

32 




11 
4 


14 


Trnr-kmiin 








2 




Trapper 
















1 
~9 


~30 


2 
93 


5 
280 






24 


11 

1 


342 







There are 16 occupations represented in this table of fatalities. 
One hundred and thirteen, or 72.44 per cent, of the killed were min- 
ers, and 16, or 10 per cent, were drivers, Of the total number, 97, or 
62.18 per cent, were married, leaving 98 widows and 280 children. 
The total number left dependent to earn a livelihood for themselves 
is 842. 



80 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Accidents 
The non- fatal accidents for the year are shown in the following 
table, by districts: 

Table 57 — Non-Fatal Accidents, by Districts — 1903. 





a 

25 


Employed. 


NUMBUB 

Employed. 


ll 

-a 


1 

X 

ll 
^a 


ii 

:!l 

lis 

4! 


1 

1 


Ml 

ill 

l«a 


District. 


ll 


13 

a 

IS 

< 


•6 
D 


a 
® p 


First 


73 
62 
16 
73 
68 
63 
56 


73 
60 
15 
73 
66 
63 
53 


2 

2 
3 


7.127 
6,245 
3.909 

6.080 
7.550 
7.422 
6.370 


590 
6<5 

454 
691 
843 
932 
986 


7.717 
6.860 
4.363 
6.771 
8.393 
8.354 
7.356 


3.748.651 
3.245,781 
2.708.350 
4.772.284 
7,070.903 
7.734.831 
5.674.600 
34.955.400 


105 
111 
291 
93 
122 
132 
131 
121 


9.6 
9.0 
3.4 
10.7 
8.1 
7.5 
7.6 


51.351 




52.351 


Third 


180.556 


Fourth 

Fifth 


65.373 
103. 984 


Sixth 


122. 775 


Seventh 


101.332 


The State 


410 


103 


7 


44,703 


5.111 


49.814 


8.2 


85.257 



This table accounts for 410 men injured in and about the mines 
during the year, all of whom suffered a loss of 30 days or more of 
time, the ratio being 8.2 per 1,000 employed. The rate in the third 
district is less than half as shown for the fifth, sixth and seventh dis- 
tricts, and about one-third less than the first, second and fourth die- 
triots. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



81 



The record for non- fatal accidentB for 21 years is shown in the fol- 
lowing table: 

Table 58 — Non- Fatal Accidents for 21 Years. 



Year. 



Number 


Total 


of men 


number of 


Injured. 


employes. 



Total 

number of 

tons of coal 

mined. 



Number of 
employes 

to one man 
Injured. 



Rate 
per 

1,000. 



Number of 

of tons coal 

produced 

to one man 

Injured. 



1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901. 

1902 

1903 

Average, 21 years 



231 


23,939 


197 


26.675 


176 


25.446 


171 


25.816 


180 


26,804 


179 


29.410 


201 


30,076 


294 


28,674 


367 


32,951 


370 


33.632 


403 


35,390 


521 


32,635 


605 


31,962 


672 


33,054 


518 


33, 788 


438 


35,026 


597 


36.991 


611 


39.384 


422 


44, 143 


406 


46,005 


410 


49,814 


379 


33,354 



12,123,456 
12,208,075 
11,834,459 
11,175,231 
12,423,066 
14, 328, 181 
14.017.298 
15,274,727 
16,660,693 
17,062,276 
19,949.564 
17,113,576 
17,735,864 
19,786,626 
20,072,758 
18,599.299 
23,434,445 
25,153,939 
26,635,319 
30,021,300 
34,955,400 
18. 550, 741 



104.6 

127 

121 



9.6 
7.7 
6.9 
6.6 
6.7 
6.1 
6.7 
10.3 
11.1 
11.0 
11.4 
16.0 
18.9 
20.3 
15.3 
12.5 
16.1 
15.5 
9.56 
8.8 
8.2 
11.8 



52,482 
61,970 
67,241 
66,126 
69,017 
80,016 
69, 738 
61,935 
42,672 
46, 114 
49,503 
32.848 
29,315 
29, 444 
38,751 
42,464 
39,254 
41,168 
63, 117 
73,944 
85,257 



48,940 



This is the third year that the non-fatal accidents have been re- 
corded for those only who have lost 30 days or more of time on ac- 
count of injuries received. Previous to the year 1901, the record 
was for all who lost one week or more of time from injuries. 



-6 C 



82 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The following table presents the non-fatal accidents, by occupa- 
tions : 



Table 59 — Non-Fatal Accidents hy Occupation and Districts 
with Totals and Percentages. 





Districts. 


Totals. 


gs 




First. 


Second 


Third. 


Fourth 


Fifth. 


Sixth. 


Seventh. 


2^ 










1 








1 

1 

13 
97 
2 
2 

19 
6 
9 
3 
228 
2 
1 
1 
I 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
2 
4 
1 
3 


24 


Carpenters 








1 
4 
23 






24 




2 
10 


2 

10 


1 


1 

20 

1 
2 


2 
17 


2 
16 

1 






23.66 












1 








Laborers . 


1 


5 


3 


2 


6 
5 

1 


4 64 
















1 
1 
29 


7 
2 
27 

1 
1 


2.20 


Machine helpers . 










73 


Miners 


54 


43 


10 


43 

1 


22 


55.61 




49 


Motorman 










24 


Oiler 










1 
1 
1 




0.24 
















24 


Roadmen . 




1 




1 


1 




98 


Sinker 




1 
1 


0.24 


Spraggfer 














24 








2 




















' 




0.24 




2 
2 

1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1.47 




0.49 








' 


2 






98 




1 








0.24 




1 








2 




0.73 
















Totals 


73 


62 


16 


73 


68 


63 


56 


410 


100.00 







This table shows 25 distinct occupations in which the men were 
engaged who sufiPered from injuries. Two of the occupations, miners 
and drivers, account for 79.27 per cent of the whole number, leaving 
20.73 per cent distributed amongst those in the 23 other occupations, 
which is less than one per cent to each. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



83 



The conjugal relationship of the injured is shown in the following 
table. 

Table 60 — Conjugal Relations of the Injured in Non-Fatal 
Accidents, and Time Lost, by Districts. 



District. 


Total. 


Married 


Single. 


Children 


Depend 
ents. 


Number 
recov- 
ered and 
losing 
time. 


Total 
days 
lost. 


Average 
days lost 
per man. 


First 


73 
62 
16 
73 
68 
63 
56 


37 
33 

35 
37 
34 
36 


36 
29 
6 
38 
31 
29 
20 


108 
103 
26 
31 
86 
73 
72 


134 
136 
39 
66 
122 
106 
105 


.0 
60 
11 
73 
60 
61 
43 


3.697 
3,088 
451 
6.270 
2.214 
2.972 
2.056 


61.6 


Second .... 


61 7 


Ttilrd 


41 




85.9 


Fifth . ... 


36 9 


Sixth 


48 7 




47.8 






The State 


410 


221 


189 


499 


708 


358 


20.746 


68.0 



This table reveals that of the 410 men injured, 221 were married, 
and 189 were single; that the married men had 708 dependents, being 
an average of over three persons to each family; these families had 
to be supported and cared for on an average of 58 days or nearly two 
months, with the additional expense attendant to sickness and suf- 
fering. 



84 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 



The following table gives the causes chargeable for these casual- 
ties: 

Table 61 — Causes of Non-Fatal Accidents, hy Districts. 





Districts. 


The 

State. 


Per- 


Cause. 


First. 


Second Third. 


Fourth 


Fifth 


Sixth. 


Sev- 
enth. 


cent- 
ages. 






1 


1 
4 


2 

2 


7 
6 

1 
1 


2 
2 

1 


3 


13 
12 
12 

1 
1 
5 
7 

1 

34 

164 
12 
1 
4 
5 

128 
3 
2 


3.17 






2.93 


Cage 


2 


3 


2.93 


Chute 


0.24 


Chisel 








' 






0.24 




1 






2 

1 

2 
13 
2 


2 

2 


3 


1.22 


Explosion powder. 




1 


1 


1.71 








0.24 


Falling coal and other 
things 


4 

48 


16 
22 

2 


4 
3 
1 


3 

35 
3 


2 
24 
2 


3 

19 
2 

1 

1 
22 


8.30 


Palling coal and rock 

Flying coal 


40.00 
2.93 






0.24 


Machines 












2 
24 


0.98 


Mule 




1 

11 
3 


1 


2 

24 


1 
31 


1.22 


Pit car 


15 


31.22 




0.73 




1 






1 






0.4» 


Plank 


1 
1 










0.24 


Rails loading 














0.24 
















0.24 


Track 


2 












0.4» 




















73 


62 


15 


73 


6S 


63 


66 


410 


lOO.OO 







The final column of the table reveals that falling coal and rock, in 
the mines, accounts for 40 per cent, and pit cars, in the mines, for 31 
per cent of these accidents. With the exception of the third district » 
in which comparatively a small number of these accidents occurred, 
there is but a small variation in the numbers shown in the other dis- 
tricts; the first and fourth showing the largest number. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



85 



The record of these non-fatal accidents has been published from 
year to year, and are shown in the following table for 21 years: 



Table 62 — Non- Fatal Accidents from Falling Roof and Sides, 
and Other Causes, with Percentages Caused by Foiling Roof — 21 
Years . 





Non-Fatal Acoidrnts. 


Year. 


Non-Fatal Accidents. 


Year. 


Total. 


Falllnsr 

roof and 

sides. 


All 
other 
causes 


Per cent 
caused 
byfall- 
Ingr roof 
or sides. 


Total. 


FalUne 

roof and 

sides. 


All 

other 
causes 


Per cent 

ins roof 
or sides. 


1883 

1886 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 


231 

197 
176 
171 
180 
179 
201 
294 
367 
370 
403 


130 
.3. 
118 
109 
124 
112 
129 
196 
227 
234 
254 


101 
62 
68 
62 
66 
67 
72 
98 
140 
136 
149 


66.28 
68.63 
67.00 
63.74 
68.88 
62.58 
64.17 
66.66 
61.86 
63.25 
63.03 


1894 

1896 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

Totals... 


621 
605 
672 
618 
438 
697 
611 
422 
406 
410 
7.969 


294 
338 
373 
310 
262 
335 
323 
233 
198 
ISO 
4,614 


227 
267 
299 
208 
186 
262 
288 
189 
208 
220 
3,356 


56.43 
55.87 
56.51 
59.85 
60.87 
66.12 
62.86 
55.21 
48.77 
46.34 
57.90 



It will be noticed that the casualties from falling roof and sides in 
the mines is less than for any year since 1889, however, the number 
from this one cause shows an average of 58 per cent for the 21 years. 

A further record has been published in these reports from year to 
year, showing the total number of fatal and non- fatal casualties, with 



86 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



the percentages of each class of injuries, attributable to falling coal 
and sides in all the mines. The table follows: 

Table 68 — Total Number Killed and Injured with Percentages of 
all Accidents Caused by Falling Roof or Sides for 21 Years — 
1883-1903. 



Year. 


NUMBBB. 


Per Cent by 
Falling Roof and Sides. 




Killed, 


Injured. 


Total. 


Killed. 


Injured. 


Total. 


1883 


134 
46 
39 
52 
41 
55 
42 
53 
60 
67 
69 
72 
75 
77 
69 
75 
84 
94 
99 
99 

156 


231 
197 
176 
171 
180 
179 
201 
294 
367 
370 
403 
621 
605 
672 
618 
438 
597 
611 
422 
406 
410 


366 
243 
216 
223 
221 
234 
243 
347 
427 
427 
472 
693 
680 
749 
587 
513 
681 
705 
523 
506 
566 


30 66.28 


47.7 


1884 


66.5 

51.3 

61.5 

68.3 

60 

61.9 

67.9 

55 

49.1 

69.6 

68.3 

50.7 

53.3 

66.7 

57.33 

60.71 

54.3 

56.43 

66.65 

60.64 


68.63 

67 

63.74 

68.88 

62.58 

64.17 

66.66 

61.85 

63.26 

63.03 

66.43 

55.87 

55.61 

59.85 

60.87 

56.12 

52.86 

56.21 

48.77 

46.34 


66.26 


1886 


64.18 


1886 


63.23 


1887 


68.77 


1888 


61.97 


1889 


63. 7» 


1890 


66.86 


1891 


60. 8» 


1892 


61.36 


1893 


63.98 


1894 


56.82 


1895 


55.59 


1896 


56.27 


1897 


60.65 


1898 


60.34 


1899 , . . . 


56.68 


1900 


53.1 


1901 


55.45 


1902 


50.1 


1903 


47.63 








1.548 


7,969 


9,617 


66.4 


57.90 


57.48 







This final table brings the matter of accidents in mines to a close 
in this report. The record here shown is both creditable and satis- 
factory, it also speaks well for the general management of the mines 
in this State. Observing the final column in this table, it will be 
seen that the per cent of the fatal and non-fatal accidents from falls 
in mines, is less this year than for any one of the 21 years of the 
published history of coal mining in the State. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



87 



The percentages of increase or decrease in men employed, tone 
produced, and the killed and injured, is presented in the following 
table: 



Table 64 — Percentages of Increase and Decrease from year to year 
of Men Employed, Tons Produced, Men Killed and Men Injured 
for a Series of 21 Years . 



Men Employed. 



Increase 



De- 
crease. 



Tons Pkoduckd. 



Increase 



De- 
crease. 



Increase 



De- 
crease. 



Increase 



De- 
crease. 



1883 to 1884 


6.83 


1885 




1886 


1.67 


1887 


3.71 


1888 


9.72 


1889 


2.26 


1890 




1891 


15.31 


1892 


2 07 


1893 


5.23 


1894 




1895 




1896 


3 42 


1897 


2.22 


1898 


3.66 


1899 


5.61 


1900 


6.47 


1901 


12.1 


1902 


4.21 


1903 


8.28 



7.78 
2.06 



3.06 
5.57 



11.17 
15.34 



8.97 
2.53 



3.64 
11.56 
1.45 



26.00 
7.34 
5.88 
12.71 
16.44 



65.67 
16.22 



26.2 
13.2 



21.05 
4.35 
4.17 
2.67 



8.7 
12.00 
1.19 
7.4 
7.4 
67.58 



12.29 
46.27 
24 83 
0.82 
8.92 
29.28 
16.12 
11.07 



36.3 
2.35 



8.04 
15.44 



The final line gives the record for this year: the number of men 
employed has increased 8.28 per cent; the tons produced 16.44 per 
cent; the number killed 57.58 per cent, and the number injured only 
one per cent. 

Recapitulations. 
Six distinct recapitulation tables follow showing the general to- 
tals derived from all the mines in the State. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



These totals are for the shipping and local mines and for both, by 
districts, and give a general view of the different features of the min- 
ing industry of the State for the year 1903. 



Table 65 — The State — Recapitulation by Districts — Shipping and 
Local Mines, Counties and Production, 1903. 





i 
§ 


Num- 
ber of 
mines. 


Total tons 

of coal 
produced. 


Graded PROonoT-ToNS op- 


Minks. 


Mine- 
run. 


Lump. 


Egg. 


Nut. 


Pea. 


Slack or 
waste. 


First 


6 
5 
1 


74 
34 
40 


3.748,651 


617,697 


2.116,105 


167.725 


123.647 


730.940 


92.546 






Shipping . . . 

Local 


3.553,136 
195.515 


388,981 
128,716 


2,066,789 
49.317 


165.979 
1.746 


122.269 
1.378 


718.530 
12 '410 


90.588 
1.948 


Second 


8 


181 


3,246,781 


211.812 


2,302.632 


97.220 


46.161 


331,115 


256,841 


Shipping ... 
Local 


7 
8 


25 
156 


2,991.168 
254,613 


211.812 


2.071.610 
230.992 


97.220 


46.161 


307,494 
23,621 


256.841 


Third 


8 


243 


2.708.350 


645.854 


1.534.998 


43.051 


124.699 


249,018 


110.730 


Shipping ... 
Local 


6 
8 


60 
193 


2.319.691 
388.659 


561.925 
83.929 


1.241.339 
293.659 


43.051 


12.3.260 
1.449 


247,490 
1.528 


102.636 
8.094 


Fourth 


7 


87 


4,772,284 


3.033.400 


1,180.829 


36.368 


135. 3C9 


246.150 


140.228 


Shipping ... 
Local 


7 
4 


46 
42 


4.673.052 
199.232 


2.952.037 
81.363 


1.088.180 
92.649 


36,068 
300 


128,591 
6.718 


231.495 
14.655 


136.681 
3.547 


Fifth 


9 


101 


7.070.903 


2.102.570 


3.251.427 


106.752 


239,765 


985,488 


384.911 


Shipping ... 
Local 


3 

8 


46 
65 


6,990,197 
80, 706 


2.048.1,72 
54.398 


3.233,670 
17,757 


106,752 


238.918 
837 


979.788 
6.700 


382.897 
2.014 


Sixth 


5 


113 


7,734,831 


2.306,492 


3,867,289 


27.340 


318.695 


976.680 


238.335 


Shipping ... 
Local 


6 
2 


83 
30 


7.656.461 
78.380 


2.241.257 
65.235 


3,861,289 
6,000 


27.340 


316.612 
2.083 


972.618 
4.062 


237. 335 
1.000 


Seventh 


11 


134 


6.674.600 


1.655.273 


1,621,228 


516.707 


767.438 


1.021.040 

1.020.971 

69 

4,640,431 


192,914 


fc«hipping ... 
Local 


8 
11 


70 
64 


5.692.842 

81.768 


1.492.903 
62.370 


1.606.949 
14.279 


515.968 
739 


766.692 
1.846 

1.756.704 


190,469 
2,455 


The State 


53 


933 


34.955.400 


10.373.098 


16.874.509 


995.163 


1.416.495 


Shipping ... 
Local 


41 
46 


353 

580 


33.676.537 
1.278,863 


9.897.087 
476,011 


15.169.866 
704.653 


992.378 

2.785 


1.741.393 
' 14.311 


4,478.386 
62.045 


1.397.437 
19.058 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



89 



Table Q6—The State — Recapitulation by Districts^ Value of 
Different Grades of Coal— Powder Used for Blasting Coal. 





Aggregate 
value of 

total 
product. 


Agorkgatk Vauie of the 
Coal at the 


Different Grades of 
Mines. 


li 


Districts 
AND Minks. 


Mine-run. 


Lump. 


Egg. 


Nut. 


Pea or Slack 
screen- or 
ingi. waste. 




First 


$5,017,666 


$826,101 


$3,344,372 


$267,817 


$162. 436 


$393,650 


$23,390 


46.952 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$4,673,545 
344. 121 


$612,193 
213. SOS 


$3,228,458 
115.914 


$264,849 
2.968 


$161,058 
1.378 


$384,097 
9,463 


$22,890 
600 


42.919 
4.003 


Second 


S4. 549. 030 


$292,352 


$3,692,415 


$162,325 


$52,410 


$219,021 


$130,507 


40.673 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$4,099,723 
449.307 


$292,352 


$3,259,712 
432.703 


$162,326 


$52,410 


$202,417 
16,604 


$130,507 


35.068 
6.606 


Third 


$3,266,632 

$2,707,786 

558.846 


$721,365 
$614. 141 
107.224 


$2,201,178 


$60,269 


$108,407 


$130,686 


$44,737 


122.662 


Shipping.... 
Lociil 


$1,764,854 
446.324 


$60,259 


$106,421 
1.986 


$130, 163 
623 


$41,948 
2.789 


107.798 
14. 764 


Fourth 


$5,052,715 

$4,776,287 

276.428 


$2,980,657 

$2,878,044 

102,613 


$1,671,991 


$54,739 


$153,283 


$153,635 


$39,410 


114.002 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$1,515,815 
156. 176 


$54,439 
300 


$146,223 
7.060 


$143,134 
9,601 


$38,632 

778 


110,234 
3,768 


Fifth 


$6,868,170 


$2,026,308 


83.832,859 


$117,126 


$226,613 


$525,798 


$139,466 


191,348 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$6. 747. 406 
120.765 


$1,945,292 
81.016 


$3,801,777 
31.082 


$117,126 


$225,667 
1.046 


$519,184 
6.614 


$138,459 
1.007 


188.844 
2.504 


Sixth 


$6,602,755 

$6,602,021 

100.734 


$2,062,990 


$3,910,469 


$20,215 


$213,530 


$367,220 


$28,331 


140.383 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$1,973,862 
89.128 


$3,902,239 
8.230 


$20,215 


$211,187 
2.343 


$366,237 
983 


$28,281 
50 


138,576 
1.808 


Seventh 


S5. 339.001 

$5,214,643 

94,361 


$1. 474. 176 


$1,891,130 


$581,735 


$747,442 


$616,019 


$28,472 


150.391 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$1,399,393 

74, 783 


$1,874,539 
16.591 


$580,612 
1.123 


$745,685 
1.757 


$616,008 
41 


$28,406 
66 


147.581 
2.810 


The State 


$36,695,972 


$10,383,949 


$20,544,414 

$19,337,394 

1.207,020 


$1,264,216 

$1,259,825 

4,391 


$1,664,121 

$1,648,551 

15.67C 


$2,404,959 

$2,361,240 

43.719 


$434,313 

$429, 123 

5,19C 


806.311 


Shipping.... 
Local 


$34,761,410 
1.944.662 


$9,715,277 
668.672 


771.049 
35.262 



90 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 61— The State — Recapitulation hy Districts, Disposition of 
the Output— 1903. 



Districts and Minks. 



Distribution of the Output— Tons. 



Shipped 
from mines. 



Supplied to 

locomotiyes 

at mines. 



Sold to 
local trade. 



Consumed 

and wasted 

at mines. 



First 


3.092,974 


120. 143 


254.319 


281,215 




3.092,974 


119,268 
875 


li0,215 
74. 104 


160.679 
120.536 


Local 


Second 


2.766,006 


49,661 


314,051 


116.063 


Shipping 


2.766.006 


49,661 


72.362 
241, 699 


103, 149 


Local 


12,914 


Third 


2.168.685 


42,424 


437,573 


69,668 


Shipping 

Local 


2,168,685 


42,424 


49, 214 
388.359 


59,368 
300 




3.960.198 


192. 159 


469.676 


150,051 






Shipping 

Local 


3.960.498 


192. 159 



278.129 
191.447 


142,266 

7.785 


Fifth 


6.197.834 


198.827 


420. 867 


263,375 




6.197.834 


183, 149 
15,678 


361.409 
69.458 


247. 805 


Local 


5.570 


Sixth 


6.800.290 


308.984 


265.172 


360.385 


Shipping 

Local 


6,800,290 


308.984 


189.582 
76.590 


357.595 
2.790 




5.098.100 


205,045 


155.256 


216, 199 






Shipping 

Local 


5,098.100 


205.046 


76.129 
80.127 


214,568 
1,631 


The State 


30.084.387 


1.117.243 


2.316.814 


1.436.956 








30.084.387 


1.100,690 
16.653 


1.206,030 
1. 110. 784 


1.285,430 


Local 


151.526 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



91 



Table 68— The Staie— Recapitulation by Districts, Hand and, 
Machine Mining, Prices Paid Machines— 1903. 





Tons Mined bt- 


Average Price ' 
Paid pie Ton for- 


Machines. 


AND Mines. 


Hand. 


Machine. 


Hand 
mining. 


Machine 
mining. 


Number 

of mines 

u^ing. 


Number 
In use. 


First 


3,748.651 




$0,734 










3.553,136 
195.515 





$0,737 
0,671 








Local 










Second 


3.240.796 


4,985 


$0,755 


* 


1 


1 


Shipping 


2,986.183 
254,613 


4,985 



$0,723 
0.93 


* 


1 


1 


Local 




Third 


2.708,360 




$0,595 










2,319,691 
388,659 




$0,667 
0.76 








Local 










Fourth 


4,658.864 


113,420 


$0.63 


$0,475 


3 


8 


Shipping 


4,459.632 
199.232 


113,420 


$0,529 
0.61 


$0 475 


3 


8 


Local 




Fifth 


4.581.645 
4.512.793 

68,852 


2,489,258 


$0,511 


$0,435 


13 


139 




2,477,404 
11,854 


$0,508 
0.775 


$0,435 
0.46 


11 
2 


137 


Lccal 


2 


Sixth 


3,880,258 


3,864,673 


$0.4976 


$0.4346 


38 


298 


Shipping 


3,801,878 
78,380 


3.854,673 


$0.4945 
0,607 


$0.4337 


38 


298 


Local 




Seventh 


4,490,069 


1,184,641 


$0,603 


$0,426 


13 


76 


Shipping .... 


4,408,701 
81,358 


1,184,141 
400 


$0,504 
0.63 


$0.43 
0.44 


12 

1 


75 


Local 


1 


The State 


27.308,623 


7,646,717 


$0,564 


$0,434 


67 


619 




26,042,014 
1,266.609 


7,634,623 
12,254 


$0,655 
0.725 


$0,434 
0.45 


68 


522 

















« Day work. 



92 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 69 — The State — Recapitulation by Districts, Value of Coal 
per Ton, 1903. 





Avbragk Value Graded Coal at the Mines. 


Districts 
AND Minks. 


All 
grades. 


Mine 
run. 


Lump. 


Egg. 


Nut. 


Pea. 


Slack. 


First 


$1,339 
1 315 
1.760 


$1,596 
1.571 
1.662 


$1,550 
1.662 
2.360 


$1.60 
1.596 
1.70 


$1,314 
1.317 
1.00 


$0,538 
0.535 
0.762 


$0 263 


Shipping 


263 


Local 


I 0.257 




$1,402 
1.371 
1.765 


$1.38 
1.38 


$1,602 
1.573 
1.869 


$1,670 
1.670 


$1,136 
1.135 


$0,661 
0.658 
0.702 


$0,529 


ShlpDlnsf.. . 


629 


Local 




Third 


$1,206 
1.167 
1.44 


$1,117 
1.093 
1.266 


$1,434 
1.414 
1.616 


$1.40 

1.40 




$0,869 
0.863 
1371 


$0,626 
0.526 
0.343 


$0 404 


Shippine 


0.408 


Local 


0.332 




$1,059 
1.044 
1.39 


$0,983 
0.974 
1.257 


$1,416 

1.301 
1.681 


$1,506 
1.509 
1.00 


$1,133 
1.136 
0.909 


'$0,620 
0.620 
0.647 


$0,281 


Shipping.... 


0.283 


Local 


0.23 


Fifth 


$0,971 
0.967 
1.49 


$0,964 
.951 
1.489 


$1,179 
1.176 
1.75 


$1,097 
1.107 


$0,945 
0.944 
1.25 


$0,533 
0.530 
1.16 


$0,362 


Shipping 


0.362 


Local 


0.50 


Sixth 


$0,854 
0.849 
1.28 


$0,894 
0.879 
1.366 


$1,011 
1.01 
1 372 


$0,739 
0.739 


$0.67 
0.638 
1.125 


$0,376 
0.378 
0.244 


$0,132 


Shipping 


132 


Local 


0.06 


Seventh 


$0,941 
0.938 
1.16 


$0,948 
0.932 
1.167 


$1,166 
1.166 
1.142 


$1,126 
1.124 
1.60 


$0.97 
0.973 
0.944 


$0,603 
0.603 
0.60 


$0,273 




0.273 


Local 


0.25 


The State 


$1.05 
1.032 
1.521 


$1,001 
0.982 
1.405 


$1,294 
1.275 
1.713 


$1.27 
1.269 
1.577 


$0,948 
0.946 
1.089 


$0,629 
0.627 
0.704 


$0,307 


Shipping 


0.307 


Local 


0.272 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



93 



Table 70 — The State — Recapitulation by Districts, Employes, 
Days in Operation, 1903. 









Employks 








Districts 
. AND Minks. 


Miners. 


Others 
under 
ground. 


Boys 
under 
ground. 


All 
above 
ground. 


Total. 


days of 
operation . 


First 


5,766 

5.486 

280 


1.168 

1.129 

39 


193 
179 
14 


590 
516 
44 


7.717 

7.340 

377 




ShipplDfif 


261 


Local 


194 




5,068 

4.405 

663 


1.082 

1.064 

18 


96 
95 


616 

508 
107 


6.860 
6,072 

788 




Shipping 


243 
161 


Local 


Third 


3.198 

2,356 

S42 


607 
565 
42 


104 
91 
13 


454 
343 
111 


4.363 
3.355 
1.008 


177 






Local 


164 


Fourth 


4.565 

4,235 

330 


1.321 

1.263 

68 


194 

187 

7 


691 
634 

57 


6.771 

6.319 

452 


202 


Shipping 


210 


Local 


194 


Fifth 


6.755 

5.561 

194 


1.640 

1.524 

16 


255 

250 

6 


843 
804 
39 


8,393 

8.139 

254 




Shipping.. 


924 


Local 


187 


Sixth 


5.770 

5.644 

126 


1.396 

i.as4 

12 


266 
255 

1 


932 
896 
36 


8.354 

8.179 

175 


217 






Local 


196 




4.782 

4.605 

177 


1.409 

1,386 

23 


179 

177 

2 


986 
922 
64 


7.356 

7.090 

266 




Shipping ... .... 


201 


Local 


148 


The State .... 


34.904 
32.292 
2.612 


8,523 
8.315 

208 


1,276 

1.234 

42 


5.111 
4.653 

458 


49.814 
46.494 
3.320 


192 


Shipping 


222 


Local 


171 







94 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Physical Character of the Coal Mines in Illinois. 
The following presents the physical oharaoteristios of the coal 
mines in Illinois. This showing of the mines of the State will here- 
after appear as a distinctive feature of these reports. The table for 
ready reference is arranged by counties alphabetically, giving the 
geological number of the seams of coal; the depth of the coal in feet, 
below the surface; the thickness of the seams, in feet and inches; the 
kind of opening of each mine; the power used to bring the coal to 
surface; the method of the underground workings; the system of the 
underground haulage; the process of mining the coal, and the total 
tons produced at each mine. 

Table 11— Physical Character of the Coal Mines of the State, hy 
Counties— 1903. 







BOND 


COUNTY. 
















Name of Operatob. 


Postoflace 

address of 

mine. 


PHYSiCAii Character of Mines. 




1 

a 


a 

s 
a 

1. 
11 
%% 
5 


f 
1 

IJ 
1^ 


1 
1 

a 
i 

11 


u 
© 


I 

o 

i 

2 

il 

oo 

03 


s 

ft 

s 

a o 


a 

II 

(CO 

^£ 

p 

Pd 


6 
a 

a 

U 

a 

o 

1 


Total 
tons. 






Sorento 


6 


380 


7.6 


Sh. 


St. 


p. R. 


M ... 


M... 


176.000 









BROWN COUNTY. 

























1,685 




J.J. Llndsey 


Ripley 

.. do 




30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 


2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.0 


Df. 




P.^R. 





Hd.. 


250 






210 




John Geisler 


Mt Sterling.. 

S't^fcin^:: 

.. do 


140 




I J Friday 


135 






132 






125 




o Adamq 


do ::::::::: 


120 






.. do 


118 


q 


P F Lewis 


.. do 


90 


10 


E Powers 


do 


85 








ISO 



























COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

BUREAU COUNTY. 



95 



Name of Operator. 



Po8toffice 

address of 

mine. 



Physical Charaotek of Mines. 


o 


■0 


1 




« 


a 
08 


* 



^ 


.0 


1) 


A 




ja 


^ 


". 


a 


a 

s 
a 


1 
1 


5 
1^ 


S 


a 
1 





■in 


1 




j 


a-S 


^ 

d 


11 


■5 

^a 


il 


a 


































25 


a 




w 


32 


J 


td 


Cd 



Total 
tons. 



20 mines. 



Spring Valley Coal Co., 2. 
Spring Valley Coal Co., 1. 
Spring Valley Coal Co., 3- 

Marquette Coal Co.,1 

Illinois 3d Vein Coal Co.f 
Spring Valley Coal Co.. 6. 
Spring Valley Coal Co., 4. 
William Masters & Son... 

Mattiiew Duncan 

Ratcliflf Bros 

Thomas Herrington 

William Smith & Son 

William Brandt 

George Heathcock 

Edward Donahue 

Noah Hodgett 

John V. Duncan 

A.W.Walton 

C. W.Riley 

Tlskilwa Coal Co 



Spring Valley 

.. do 

..do 

Marquette .... 

Ladd 

Spring Valley 
Seatonvllle... 

Sheffield 

.. do 

..do 

Princeton .... 

.. do 

Mineral 

Princeton 

Sheffield 

Mineral 

Sheffield 

Princeton .... 

Sheffield 

Tiskilwa 



St 



L.W, 



Hd.. 



M ... 
Hd.. 



333,832 

327, 146 

272.637 

270,472 

187.401 

185.998 

174.443 

3,906 

3.448 

3,150 

2.600 

2,472 

2,444 

2,236 

1,770 

1.400 

1,100 

1,06S 

540 

240 



CALHOUN COUNTT. 



1 Thomas Press Brick Co 



Golden Eagle. 1 90 2.4 SI.. St.. P. R, 



M .. 



CASS COUNTV. 



11 Wm. Shore. Westwood. 
2 Charles Nelson 



...IChandlerville 
... ..do 



40 3.0 
40 3.0 



Sh. 



Bo 



1,605 
1.202 



CHRISTIAN COUNTY. 

























926, 563 




Springfield Coal M. Co., 6.. 
Christian County C. Co.. 1. 
fenwell Coal Co 


Taylorvllle... 


5 
5 
h 
5 
5 

5 


Z 

723 
720 


7.6 

3.0 
7.6 

7.0 


Sh. 


St.. 


p. p. 

L W. 

P-..R- 


E-M. 
M ... 
E.... 
C... 

e.... 

M ... 


H ... 


233,068 




Pana 


141 766 




Sprlngside Coal Co 


.do.:::.::::: 


112,389 






.. do 


107, 404 


K 


Assumption C. & M. Co 

Newbent Coal Co 


Assumption.. 

Pana 

Edinburg 


85.468 
26.653 
3.000 









96 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 72— Continued 

CLINTON COUNTY. 









Physical Charaoteb 


OF Mines. 






4-1 




Hi 




S 
















Postofflee 


1 




I 


•E 


a 








a 
a 


Total 




Namk of Opbeator. 


address of 


p 


1 


'^ 


»- 


* 


d. 




■uy 


2 


tons. 






mine. 






«-r 










s^ 














o 


























w-O 




1 • 












i 

a 






k 


11 


<D a 

" a 


00 


Is 

«J3 


!i 


li 


S 




























z 






05 


Q 


H 


CO 


00 


J 


w 


tfl 


























870.518 


, 


Breese Coal & Mln. Co .... 


Breese 




400 


7.0 


Sh. 


at. 


p. R. 


M-E. 


H... 


231.001 


?. 


Consolidated Coal Co 


Coilinsville .. 




400 


7.0 




" 






M ... 


' ' 


195,743 


8 


Muren Coal & Ice Co.. 1.... 


New Baden... 




■m 


S.O 


" 


' ' 








M ... 


194,276 


4 


Trenton Coal Co 


Trenton 




•m 


5.6 


" 










B-M. 


140,452 


g 


Consolidated Coal Co 


do ... 




m 

342 


5.6 " 


•• 






" 


i.-.v. 


83, 970 


6 


Germantown Coal Co 


Germantown.. 


6.0 








25.076 



PULTON COUNTY- 

























1,036.496 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Whitebreast P. Co. of 111., E 
MapiewoodC. Co.,Bl. H'k. 

Monmouth Coal Co 

WhitebreastF. Co. ofIll.,(- 
AppIe^ate & Lewis, W. 8h. 

Norris Coal Mining Co 

E. Cuba Coal Co., East Sh. 
Scripps Coal Co 


Dunfermline.. 
Farmington .. 

Canton 

Dunfermline.. 
Cuba 




90 
110 
150 
90 
80 
185 
80 
67 
110 
50 
145 
80 
67 
50 
70 
35 
70 
44 
22 
24 
100 
60 
80 

■■46 
25 
75 
12 
80 
55 
21 
40 
20 

50 
60 
24 
50 
80 
40 
50 


5.0 
4.0 
4.0 
5.0 

n 

6.0 
4.0 
4.6 
4.0 
4.6 
4.0 
5.0 
4.6 
4.2 
4.6 
4.6 
5.0 
4.6 
2.6 
4.6 
4.6 

'b"0 
4.6 
2.5 
4.4 
4.6 
2.6 
4.6 
2.6 
5.2 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
5.0 
4.6 


Sh. 

ik: 

Sh! 

1 

Dr. 

Sh. 
Si.. 
Dr. 


St.. 
Hd 

ii 

Hd 

Hd 
St.. 
Hd 

IV 


P.;R. 

p.;r: 


M 


.-• 


H ... 

.! 


195.355 
146.817 
137. 209 
101.647 
70.643 


6 

7 


Norris 

Cuba.. 


63.377 

55. 908 


H 


Astoria 

Parmington . . 

Canton 

Parmington .. 

Canton 

Parmington . . 
East Bryant.. 

Parrville 

EUisville 

Cuba 


47.762 


9 
10 
11 


Newsam Bros., Maplewood 

Canton Union Coal Co 

Parmington C. Co 


36.462 
30.834 
30. 383 


1' 




28.000 


13 
14 


Monarch Coal Mining Co..l 
Central Coal Mining Co.... 


18.198 
12,000 
8,684 


16 

17 


Spoon River Coal Co 

Essex & Fritz 2 


7,535 
4.907 




A. M. Everly 


Canton 


3,600 






3.441 


Of) 


W E Anderson 


Canton 

Lewistown ... 

Canton 

.. do 


3.200 






3,100 


99 


Murphy Bro 


2.610 


9^ 


I'homas Parcell .... 


2,300 


35 


Product of 12 small mines. 
H. A. Rumbel. Eclipse 


do 


2 000 


.. do 


1,690 


St. David 

Lewistown ... 

Pairview 

Canton 

Lewistown ... 

Astoria 

.. do 


1,620 






1.620 


w 


A J Gannett 


1.520 


40 


Wersterfieid & Co 


1.440 






1.372 


4? 


Surprise Coal Co 


1,300 


n 




1.021 


44 

4fi 




do . :. 


1.012 


E P Moran 


St David 

Pairview 

Canton 

St. David 

Pairview 

Canton 


1,003 


Ifi 


R E Gould & Co 


900 






810 


48 


L. K. Snider 

Jacob Cleary 


800 
640 


50 


^°rMa^yaiK"?.^.\°:::::::: 


610 

too 


52 


A. Anderson 


Pairview 


507 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

FULTON COU:<TY- Concluded. 



97 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Charactkr op Mines. 




1 

a 


o 
1 

i 

a 

0) a, 


T3 

a 

T 

1 


1 

P"- 

Ja « 
H 


o. 
o 

« 
.a 


1 

ii 
1^ 


.2 

h 


a 

(D O 


i 

a 
« 

a 
2 

a 

o 


Total 
tons. 


!>3 






6 
5 
6 
5 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 


50 
80 
26 
60 
5b 
50 
70 
60 
70 
50 


4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
5.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 


Dr. 

SI.. 
Dr. 


Hd 


P.-R. 


M... 


Hd.. 


£00 
480 
400 
40O 
360 


fi4 


Martin & Son 


Canton 

St. David 

Kairview 

St. Dsvid 

Falrview 

Breeds 

Norris 

Breeds 

Fairvlew 


F)5 


Wm Jordan . 


fid 


L. W. Davla 


f)7 


Abraham Bath 


f>8 




59 


J. K hiley, 2 


2t0 
120 
110 
ICO 


fiO 


H. B. Doyle 


61 


John Wagner. 


6? 


George Prowl 


ffS 


W. H Jones . 


32 









GALLATIN COUNTY. 

























46. 400 

35.487 
2,000 
2, (.00 
1.950 
1,C63 




Gallatin Coal & Coke Co., 1 
John Anderson, 1 


Equality 

.. do . . . 


5 
6 


80 
20 
60 
31 
30 
30 
30 
36 
30 


4.8 
4.4 
4.6 
4.0 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 


Sh. 
SL. 

Sh. 

Si,. 


St.. 
M. 

St.. 
M.. 


P.-R. 


Rope 
Id ... 


Hd.. 




Ratley & Co.,1 


.. do 




Wm. H. McLain. 1 


.. do 




East Side Coal Co., 1 

Leon Vogt. 1 


"do.::::::: 

Shawneetown 
Saline Mines. 
do 


8 


Stroner & Co., 1 

K J Mitchell. . .. 


800 
760 
500 


9 


A. G. Smith 


.. do 









GREENE COUNTY. 



























1 


Dill Coal Co 


Roodhouse ... 
.do 


P't. 
1 
1 

P't. 

1 
1 


60 
60 
60 
60 
30 


:::: 


Sh. 

SI. 
Dr. 


H.. 


P.;R 




Hd.. 


1 920 


? 


Ed. Griffith ... 


1.080 


3 


Ed. Axley 


.. do 


4 


Soloman & Sturman 

Geo. Parks 


Greenfield.,.. 


200 
192 


6 




Roodhouse ... 
.. do 




7 


Pred Strang 


65 









—7 C 



98 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

GRUNDY COUNTY. 





Name of Operator. 


PostofBce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Character of Mines. 




1 


Li 

a 

s 
a 

.1. 

11 

C5 


1 
I 

I 
§ 

■ass 


1 

T 

1 

11 

11 


o 

s 

o 

Si 
CO 


£ 

o 
.a 


rs 
§ 

1 

la 


1 
11 


i 

a 

S) 

a 

i 
a 

Li 

§ 


Total 
tons. 




22 mines 




















1.457.935 

298.007 
163.285 
149.902 
145.013 
118.662 
114.960 
106.683 


1 

2 
3 
4 

6 
€ 

7 


C.W. & V.Coal Co.. 1 

Bracevilie Coal Co.,5 

C.W & V. Coal Co.. 2 

Big Four Wilm. Coal Co.. 3 
Wllm'gton C.M.&Mfg.Co..4 

Taylor & Cavanaugh,5 

Big Four Wilm. Coal Co.. 2 
Wilmington Star M. Co.. 6.. 
Wllm'gton C.M.&Mfff.Co., 5 
Wilmineton Star M. Co.. 6.. 

Taylor & Cavanaush,4 

Star Coal Co..l 

Espley & Handwark 

Vlorris-Csrbon Coal Co .... 
William Wood 


S. Wllm'gton. 
Bracevilie.... 
S. Wllm'gton. 

Coal City 

Diamond 

Carbon Hill.. 
Coal City 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


195 
103 
200 
85 
105 

90 
90 
110 
101 
75 
113 
50 
51 
61 
40 

41 
50 
40 
97 


3.5 

3.2 

i'.h' 

3 
3.0 
3.0 
i.O 
SO 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
2.4 
3.0 
2.9 
2.8 
3.2 
2 8 
2.6 
2.10 
3.0 
2.9 


Sh. 

SI.. 
Sh. 

Sh'. 
SI.. 


St.. 

;; 

St.. 
Hd 


L.W. 
P.7R. 


M... 

'• 
Hd.. 


Hd.. 

!! 

Hd.. 


9 
10 
11 


Diamond 

Coal City 

Carbon Hill.. 
.. do 


80.094 
79.818 
61.459 
8 783 


13 
14 


Morris 

.. do 


toVl 

3 629 


IF) 


.. do 


3 S'O 


16 


Mitchell & Bros 


.. do 


2,280 


17 


Franli Gilbrlde 


.. do 


2.150 
1 995 


IS 


John Cryer. Jr 


.do 


19 


James Bell 


"do.::::::::: 


l!953 


?n 


Fleming & Byrns .......... 


.. do 


1 450 


?i 


R Blair 


::do : :: 


1 000 


?,?. 




.. do 


662 











HAMILTON COUNTY. 





2 mines 




















700 




J. R Yates... 


Dalgren 

Flint 


P't. 


8 
8 


2.0 
2.0 


St.. 




St 








1 


600 


2 










100 















HANCOCK COUNTY 





6 mines 




















11 340 


1 


Meredith Bros 


Augusta 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


.::: 


:::: 


if.: 

Sh. 


Ho. 


P.-R. 


Hd.. 


Hd.. 


7.700 

1.220 

860 


? 


C. H. Ellis 


8 


Geo. Worley 


. do 


4 




.. do 


810 


5 


G. Jones 


.. do 


410 


6 


Geo. Wllley 


. do 


340 











GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

HENRY COUNTY. 



99 





Name or Operator. 


Postofflce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Character of Mines. 




1 


a 

3 

a 

H 
.2 . 

■3 


•a 
a 

1 

I'i 
1^ 


1 
T 

a 

"■^ 
^ c 

Si* 


■5 


"S 

Xi 

to 




.a 

a 
% 

h 
1° 


a 

'Si 



u 

a 

3" 


a . 

t 

Si 


.a 
a 

<D 

a 

u 


1 


Total 
tons. 
























130.663 


1 
? 


Kewanee Coal Mining Co.. 1 

Atlas Coal Co.. 1 

Kewanee Mining & Mfg. Co 
Kewanee Coop. Coal Co ... . 

HerdienCoal Co.. 15 

Fred Kenady 


Kewanee 

yalva 


6 
6 
1 
3 
3 
6 
6 


101 

64 
70 
6U 
60 
130 
68 
L'5 
35 
65 
15 
35 
66 
20 
20 
25 

"35 

"36 
58 
12 
15 
16 
16 

"46 

"is 


4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
2.8 
4.0 
3.0 
2.8 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4 
2.8 
4.0 
4.0 
3.6 

1:1 
4.0 
4.4 

3.6 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.6 
4.0 
4.0 
2.6 


Sh. 

SI.. 
Sh. 

81.. 
Sh. 

SI.. 

Dr. 
Sh. 
Or. 

Sh. 

SI.. 

Dr. 

SI.. 
Dr. 
SI.. 
Dr. 


St.. 
Ho. 

%. 

Ho. 

St.. 
Ho. 

Hd 

k. 

Hd 


P.;R. 

•• 


gd-:: 
SdV. 


Hd.. 


39.460 
15,888 


3 


Kewanee 

.. do 


16.000 
11,808 


li 


Galva 


11.300 


fi 


Cambridge... 

Kewanee 

Briar Bluff... 

Atkinson 

Kewanee 

.. do 


4.174 


7 


Bates Bros 


3.400 


8 


Briar Blnff Coal Co 


3.396 


q 


Wm. Q. Kay 


2.860 


10 




2.644 


11 


Mat Atkinson 


2.480 


19 


Ab. Hodgett 


do 


2.400 


n 




.. do 


2,020 


11 


Henry Kumla 


Atkinson 

Kewanee 

.. do 


1,800 


1f> 


KalpbTodd& Son 


1.800 






1,680 


17 


Kobert Kay 


Briar Bluff... 

Atkinson 

.. do 


1,600 


18 


Charles Stlner 


1,400 

784 


•"O 


Max Qroy 


Kewanee 

.. do 


720 


?t 


North Main Coal Co 


600 


?"> 


J. W. Kershaw 


Briar Bluff... 

Kewanee 

.. do 


600 


'^ 


P, Maloen & Son. 


600 


?4 




480 


*"> 


Thomas Carter & Son 


.. do 


380 


■'fi 


R E. Maloen. 


do 


360 


?7 




.. do 


360 


?H 


John McCaffrey.... 


. do 


320 


oq 


Richard Golden. 


do 


180 


^n 




.. do 


160 


si 


John Woodbury 


Green Kiver.. 


120 









Gas engine. 



100 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 —Continued. 

JACKSON [COUNTY. 



Name of Opkkatob. 



Postoffice 
address of 



Physical Character op Minks. 



1-: 



"O 


«' 






C8 


■3 


^ 


a,s 


^ 






u 




1 * 




1 u 


C8 


« 


fa 


Sf» 










O h 




J 


a 



^5 "C 



Total 
tons. 



23 mines . 



BlgM. C. & I. C0..6 

B. M. C. & I. Co. Harrison. 
M. V. Mining & Mfg. Co. 1. 

(4art8lde Coal Co.. 4 

Willis Coal & Mining Co.,2. 

Gartslde Coal Co.. 3 

Desoto Coal & Wash. Co..l. 
Chicago & C. Coal Co . I... 

J. C. Presson, 1 

E.Sponsler. 1 

Sebert Phillips, 1 

Robert Poole. I 

W. H. Mevers. 1 

Schmtd gall Coal Co . 1 

M. M. Thompson Coal Co..l 

D. Dawson 

O. R. Moss 

John Herman 

Gus Blair B. M.Coal Co... 

W. B. Campbell 

P. Williams 

John Campbell 

H. R. King 



Murphysboro. 

.. do 

Halidayboro.. 
Murphysboro. 

Bryden 

Murphysboro. 

DeSoto 

Carbonbale... 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

Murphysboro. 
Carbondale... 
Murphysboro 
Carbondale... 
Campbell Hill 
Vergennes — 

Oravllle 

Murphysboro. 
Campbell Hill 
Vergennes.... 

..do 

Campbell Hill 



264.073 
239,253 



64,468 

39.057 

32.800 

12.000 

1,900 

1.80a 

1.40» 

1,340 

1,150 

1,024 

1.00O 

811 

691 

600 

400 

400 

260 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



2 mines. 



Jefferson Co. Coal Co., l...|Mt Vernon. 
Sophia A. Shelton, 1 Opdyke 



2514.10 
12 1.6 



ShlSt.lP.-R. 
St. St. St.. . 



IHd.. 



16,000 
100 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

JERSEY COUNTY. 



101 



Name of Opbbator. 



Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 



Physical Charactkb of Minks. 



° a 

II 

O "a 

o 

— . o 

OS 

51-35 
3 a 



► fl 



■55 



Total 
tons. 



6 mines. 



L.A.Miller.... 
Cairns & Budd. 
L. Waerenslass. 
E. Springman.. 

E. Harnish 

M. Burns 



Brighton. 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 



2,790 



922 
720 



JOHNSOiV COUNTY. 

























2,646 


^ 


Dill & Wallace. 1 


New Burnside 
.. do 


2 
2 
2 
2 


30 
20 
20 

an 


3 4 
3.4 
3.4 
3.4 
3.4 


SI;. 


Bo. 


P.-R 


M,... 


Hd.. 


1.200 


? 


McMichael & King, 1 


646 


3 


A.. J. Edwards & Co.. 1 


do .. 


400 


4 


.. do 


200 


5 


T. Draton & Co., 1 


.. do 


21 20 


200 















KANKAKEE COUNTY. 



1 Gardner- Wllm. Coal Co., B. 



Clark City. 



2 


130 


3.0 


Sli. 


St. 


L.W. 


M&C 


Hd.. 



102 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

KNOX COUNTY. 





Name of Operator. 


PostoflBce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Chabagtkb of Mines. 




1 

55 


o 

1 

B 

p 
a 

li 


■a 

1 


1 

T 

s 

at 

V 

I 

■SI 


CO 




1 

u 

"S 

! 

1° 


a. 
Is 


4J 

a 

a 
« 

.9 

§ 

a 

1 
w 


Total 
tons. 




41 mines 




















84,675 

30,350 
4.676 
4,447 
3.610 
3.500 
3,060 


1 

2 


Etherlv Coal Co.. 2 

Yates City Goal Co., 1 

Rodell & Mitchell 


Etherly 

Yates City.... 

Wataga 

Soperville.,.. 
.. do 


6 
5 
6 

1 
1 
6 
6 

t 
t 

3 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
6 
1 
6 
6 
3 
6 
1 
3 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

2 

6 


36 
91 

64 
100 
106 
68 
30 
47 

"30 
38 

■47 

30 
37 
50 
20 
50 

"24 

16 
20 

"26 
40 

16 
40 


2.3 
4.6 

4.4 

4.6 
2.8 

4.6 
4.6 

4.4 

2.8 

2.8 
2.8 

1.8 


SI. 
8h. 

81. 
Dr. 

5l. 

Sh. 
Dr. 

Sh. 

Dr. 

Dr. 

Sh. 

Dr. 

SI.. 

Sh. 
Dr. 


Ho. 

St.. 
Ho 

St.. 

Ho. 

Hd 
Uo. 

St.. 
Hd 
Ho. 

St. 

Ho 

Hd 
Ho 
St.. 
Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 
H? 

Hd 

.. 


P-R. 


Mule 
Hd.. 


Hd... 


4 


Keed & Pendergast 


6 

7 


Galva Co«l Co.. 1 


Wataga 

Oneida 


8 




2.636 
2,132 
2,120 
2,040 
1 946 


q 


Cbas Simpson 


Wataga 


10 


John Walsh 


11 

1' 


Jacob Crutz 

N C.Anderson.. 


Yates City.... 
Knoxville .... 

Wataga 

Yates City.... 
. do 


in 




1,904 
1,800 
1,640 


14 


Gus Dalton 


15 




16 




Wataga 

Victoria 

Oneida 

Knoxville .... 

Victoria 

Soperville .... 
Wataga. ... 

Victoria 

Knoxville 

Victoria 

Galesburg.... 

Knoxville 

Farmington .. 

Ktherly 

Waiaga 

Ooeida 

Wataga 

Victoria 

Abingdon .... 

Victoria 


1,500 
1 200 


17 


W. P, Moore 


18 


T. B. McGovern 


1,200 


19 




1.200 
1 112 


'0 


Edward ReLsted 


?\ 




l.OlO 


?'' 


Nodine & Son 


800 


"? 


John Todd . 


600 


?4 




480 


?5 


Atnbrose King 


4S0 


26 

?7 


William Woodward 


450 
440 


?h 


Wm. H. Welker 


426 


9q 


Cook & Dvmaniles . 


400 


80 




400 


SI 


Cbas. IVIorgan 


300 


S** 




208 


33 




200 


34 


Product of four mines in 
CedarT. P 


2.800 


35 


Product of four mines in 
Copley T. P 


7S0 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 71 — Continued. 
LaSalle county. 



103 









Physical Character ov Mines. 






o 


1 


T 


£ 




1 


1' 

S 


6 
a 




i 

a 
z 


Name op Operator. 


PostoflBce 

address of 

mine. 


B 

3 

a 
1 

li 


• 

1 

1 

1^ 


i 
II 


u 

u 

o 
t) 
o. 
o 

ja 

CO 


a 
1 

1° 


"5 
o 

si 
J" 


II 

ii 

Si 


u 

o 

a 


Total 

tons. 
























1,877.655 


2 
3 
4 


C. W. & V. Coal Co.. 2.... 

C. W. & V.Coal Co.. 1 

LaSalle Co. Coal Co.. Union 
LaSalleCo. Coal Co., 1.... 
LaSalle Co. C'l Co.. LaSalle 
LaSalle Co.C.Co., Rockwell 

Acme Coal Co., 1 

Star Coal Co.. 2 

OelesbyCoalCo.,1 

Mrs. E. Hake9.2 

M. & H. Zinc Co 


Streator 

.. do 

LaSalle 

.. do 


7 
2 

2 
2 


116 
96 
375 
440 
392 
390 
110 
86 
464 
500 
310 


6.0 
8.0 
3.6 
3.6 
3 6 
3.6 
6.6 
5.0 
3.6 
2.9 


Sh. 

Dr. 

Sh 

S .. 
Sh. 

SI.. 
Sh. 

Dr. 

:: 

Sh. 
Dr. 


St.. 

:: 

St.. 

Ho. 
St . 
Hd 
St.. 

Ho. 
Hd 


P.-_R. 
L.W. 

P.-R. 

L.W. 

P.-R 
L.W. 

P.-R. 

L.W. 
P.-R. 


Hd.. 
M_... 

Hd.. 

C... 
Hd .. 


Hd.. 

Hd.. 
Hd.. 

Hd .. 


206,749 
199.519 
182.107 
178.935 


f) 


.. do 




8 


.. do 


162 963 


7 
8 


Streator 

.. do 


168.326 
129.168 


9 
10 
11 


gSlsa:;:::: 

LaSalle 

Peru . 


118,761 
111,680 
96,891 


1? 


Estate Jas.Cahill, Cahill... 


350 3 


72 001) 


18 


Deer Park.... 
Marseilles.... 

Streator 

.. do 


130 

120 
35 
40 

112 
51 
30 
40 
35 
60 

125 
60 
75 
60 
35 
35 
55 

60 
45 


3 
2.10 
5.0 
5.0 
3.0 
5.0 

\i 

4.0 
2.4 
8.6 
2.4 
4.6 
4.6 
2.4 
2.4 
2.0 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 


44,979 


14 

15 


Marseills Coal Mining Co.. 


15.656 
9,639 


Ifi 




5,400 


17 
18 


N. Wilmington Coal Co., 1. 
T. B. Smith & Son 


Seneca 

Streator 

Kangley 

Streator 

.. do 


6,241 

2.080 


49 
20 


Lewis Evans 

Oscar Kines 


2,000 
1,480 
1.100 


22 
23 
24 
26 

26 
7.1 


Jame'» McCullough 

J.C.Dawson 

Meyer & Hendee 

JodnMcNcil 

Rineer & Hachtetter 

Alloway & Stevie 


Ottawa 

Deer Park.... 

Ottawa 

Kangley 

Ottawa 

t:treator 

. do 


SOO 
-00 
650 

too 

600 
600 


?8 


William Thomas & Co 

WilliamMetz 


500 


?9 


Ottawa 

.. do 


410 


30 


L. U. Brewer 


400 


31 


■Tohn Taylor 


do .. 


350 


3? 




.. do 


300 


83 




.. do 


200 


81 


Daniel Vazaine 


do 


^00 


35 


T. B. Farrell 


.. do 




200 











104 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

LIVINGSTON COUNTY. 





Name of Opkbatoh. 


Postofflee 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Chabaotkr of Mines. 




1 
s 

a 


o 

a 

p 

a 

.2 . 
11 


■a 
a 
(g 

T 

8 

a"" 


f 

1 

go 

<M rn 
O (C 

00 J3 

S.S 

.H o 


o 
« 

xi 

XI 


s 

Si 

a 

1 


1 

at 


a 

a . 
11 
ll 
II 


6 

a 

a 

<D 

s 

o 

•o 


Total 
tons. 




14 mines 




















319,350 

201.556 
55.650 

16.830 
10 948 




Cardiff Coal Co.. 1 

ton Bros 

Fairbury Cooperative Co .. 
A.. M. Baraekman, Barack- 

man 


Cardiff 

Pontiac 

Fairbury 

.do 


2 
5-2 

6 

? 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 


255 
446 

180 
165 

35 

75 
60 
40 
57 
65 
30 

fS 

45 


12 & 3 
5.2 

5.0 
6.0 

4.0 
4.6 
4.8 
4.0 
4 
4.0 
6.0 
4.6 
4.0 
4.0 


Sh. 


St.. 
Hd 


P.-R. 


Hd.. 


Hd.. 

:: 




Streator 

.. do 


10 928 




Streator Clay Mfg, Co 


10 650 




.. do 


2,317 




Edward E. Evans 


.. do 


2.080 




Alex. Anderson & Sons.... 


.. do 


1.862 




.. do 


1.773 




Streator Aqueduct Co 


.. do 


1.680 






"do:::::::::: 


1.200 




Wm. J. McMlUen 


.. do 


9912 




John Westerlnnd 


"do:::::: : : 


88 











LOGAN COUNTY. 





4 mines 




















373 251 


1 


Latham Coal Co, I 


Lincoln 

.. do 


5 
6 
6 

5 


290 
285 
290 
36U 


5.0 
5.0 
5.0 
4.0 


Sh. 


St.. 


P.-R. 


c..:;: 


Hd.. 




?. 


Lincoln Coal Co , 1 


119 662 


3 


Citizens' Coal Mining Co. 1 
Home Coal Co.. 1 


.. do 


98. 336 


4 


Mt. Pulaski... 


9,060 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



105 



Table 71 — Continued. 



MACON CODNTY. 









Physical Chabacter or Minks. 






o 


a 

as 


1 




i 






§■ 






Name or Opkratot:. 


Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 


5 

a 

a 


T 


1 




a 

OS 

1^ 




a 
si 


a 
1 


Total 
tons. 










o 


Ov 


s. 












i 
a 






5 

ii 


OS 


II 




i1 




is 

p1 


a 




























55 






25 


=i 


H 


CO 


u 


nJ 


a 


aa 




























1 


Decatur Coal Co., 2 


Decatur 


6 


fi14 


4 


Sh, 


St. 


L.W. 


M ... 


Hd.. 


61,851 


2 


Decatur Coal Co., 1 


., do 


,5 


61? 


4 n 












46.356 


8 


Decatur Coal Co.. 3 


..do 


6 


365 


6.0 






P.-R. 


" 




32.591 









MACOUPIN COUNTY, 



22 mines , 



Chicago-Virden Coal Co. 
Consolidated Coal Co.. 6 

Madison Coal Co.. 5 

Consolidated Coal Co.. 8 
Consolidated Coal Co., 7 
Consolidated Coal Co.. 1( 
(4reenridff6 Mining Co.. 

Vlrden Coal Co 

Carlinville Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co ... 

GirardCoalCo 

Consolidated Coal Co ... 
Weaver Coal & Coke Co 

Wm Neil&Co 

Davis Bros 

W. A. Bode 

17[G. B. Loper 

18 Luekine Bros 

19 Dugeer & Tully 

20 Geo. Haroaugh 

21 T. R. Rands 

22,Jardon& Lansford 



Virden 

Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

.. do 

Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

Girard 

Virden 

Carlinville ... 

Gillespie 

Girard 

Hornsby 

Nilwood 

Bunker Hill.. 
Chesterfield... 

.. do 

.. do 

Fosterburg.... 
Scottsville ... 
Chesterfield... 

.. do 

Bunker Hill.. 



Sh. 



St. 



flo. 



P.-R. 
P.-R. 



364.543 

256.406 

245.992 

229.654 

210.760 

195.875 

178,927 

165.841 

122. 576 

77,859 

67.608 

51,862 

42,420 

6,926 

1,8C0 

1,050 

954 

842 

480 

420 

140 

120 



106 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

MADISON COUNTY. 





Name op Opkeator. 


Fostofflce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Chabaotkb op Mivks. 




a 


o 

u 

B 
a 

1 


1 

T 

¥ 


1 

T 

a 

03 

11 

2* 

H 


o 

s 

o 


o 

ja 

a 
1 


S3 

a 
o 


?! 


1 

a 

a 

1 

o 
a 

03 

m 


Total 
tons. 


























1 
2 
3 
4 


DonkBros. C. & C. Co.. 1.. 

Staunton Coal Co. ,1 

Madison Coal Co. .2 

Madison Coal Co. ,4 

Donk Bros. C. & C. Co.. 3.. 

Lumashi Coal Co , 2 

Donk Bros. C. & C. Co.. 2.. 

Con. Coal Co., Abbey 3 

Con. Coal Co.. Heinz Bluff. 

Kerns-Donnlewald, 1 

Madison Coal Co ,3 

Henrietta Coal Co 


Collinsville .. 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon.. 
..do 


6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
1 
1 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
1 
6 
6 
6 
1 
6 


137 

292 
110 
130 
273 
227 
227 
146 
168 
270 
217 
217 
278 
160 
131 
171 
120 
275 
80 
60 
85 
85 
437 
65 
65 
80 
70 
45 
160 
75 
48 


6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
5.0 
6.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
70 
6.0 
6.0 
5.0 
7.0 
4-6 
7.0 
4-6 
6.0 
2.0 
•^.0 
4.0 
5.0 
5.0 
4.0 
4.0 
2.0 
3.0 
5.0 
6 
2.0 
6.0 


Sh. 


St. 
Ho. 


P.;R. 

:: 
:: 


M.v 


»■■■ 

H ... 
M ... 

Hd.. 


393.800 
304.643 
253.300 
252.479 


5 




236.300 
217.802 
196.200 


6 

7 


Collinsville... 
,. do 


8 


.. do 


139.063 
129.670 
120.982 
112,262 
66 630 


9 
10 
11 
1? 


.. do 

Worden 

Edwardsville. 
.. do .. 


18 


Con. Coal Co..Brookslde... 

LumaghlCoal Co.l 

Edwardsville H. T. C. Co.. 
Bullock Coal Co 




50. 826 


14 
15 


Collinsville... 
Edwardsville. 
Collinsville... 
Edwardsville. 

Worden 

North Alton.. 
.. do . 


49,643 
9.800 
5,049 


17 


Terminal Coal Co 


4 796 


18 
19 


Interstate C. & Min. Co.... 


3,000 
2,210 
2,000 
1.400 


?n 


Frank Kortcamp 


^1 


(4eo. Kabel 




?.?. 


Wm. Backs 


Carpenter 

New Douglas. 

Bethalto 

.. do 


1,281 


23 
?4 


The Clover Coal Mining Co. 


1.210 
1,200 


?.S 


John Spencer..... 


1,200 


2H 


Peter Sydall 


North Alton.. 
Fostersburg.. 
Moro 


1,2C0 


?.l 


James Hill 


1,080 


?.H 


Sam McDonald 


1 000 


29 
30 


John K. Mitchell 

P. R. Fredericks 


Prairietown... 
Upper Alton.. 
Moro. ... 


1,000 
360 


31 


W.Richards 


20O 











MARION COUNTY. 

























1,002,047 


1 
?. 


Pittenger& Davis. 3.4 

Centralla Min. & Mfg. Co . 2 

Odin Coal Co., 1 

Sandoval Coal Co., 1 


Centralia 

.. do 


6 
6 

I 

4 

4 


637 
576 
714 
609 
871 
885 


6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
4 


Sh. 

:: 


St. 


P.-R. 


E.... 
CM 

yi... 


Hd,.. 

Mule 
Hd.. 


391,176 
272, 906 


3 


Odin 


218 713 


4 

5 


Sandoval 

Klnmundy.... 
Salem 


108.015 
6,923 


6 


Salem Coal Co 


6 315 











COAL IN ILLINOIS, 

Table 7i— Continued, 

MARSHALL COUNTY. 



107 





Name of Opeeator. 

■ 


Postofflce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Chabaotee of Minks. 




a 


o 

a 

a 
a 

is 


1 

T 

1 

1^ 


1 

T 
a 

la- 
's a 

S c 
n— ' 
^■^ 


o 

_o 


2 
o 

Xi 

i 
ll 

o o 
33 


s 

o 

1. 
Ji 


* 

Tit. 
08 g 

ja— 

is 
II 


i 

a 

a 
id 

s 
a 

•a 

1 


Total 
tons. 
























465. 07» 


] 


DevHn Coal Co 1 


Toluca 

Wenona 

Sparland^ 




612 

555 
64 


2.8 
2.10 
2.6 


Sh. 


St. 
Hd 


L.W. 
P.^R. 


M. ... 

Hd.. 


Hd.. 


336,047 


a 


VVenonaCoalCo.l 


113.427 
10.529 






1.500 


K'ranlr A ftnrr 


do 


610 




Chlllicothe... 

Sparland 

.. do 

Henry 

.. do 


600 






520 




W. E. Frisble 

William Horrocks. Jr. 

William Bough 


410 
286 
280 
203 








200 


Louis Nlghswonger 


Sparland 

Henry ........ 


192 
120 


William Lopeman 


.. do . 


120 











Mcdonough county. 



— 






^ 


i 












43.394 


1 


Rippetoe & Randle, 38 


Colchester.... 
. do 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 


60 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
50 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
60 
50 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 


2.6 
2.4 
2.4 
2.6 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2 4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 


Sh. 
Dr. 

1^: 

8h. 
Dr. 

^: 

Sh. 

Sh. 
Dr. 

Sh. 
Dr. 

Sh. 
Dr. 

Sh. 
Dr. 


Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 
Hd 

Ha 

Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 

nd 

St.. 
Hd 


P.-R. 


Doe.. 

Hd.. 
Dog.. 
Hd.. 

Dog:.. 

Hd.. 

Dogr.. 

Hd.. 
Dos.. 

Hd.. 
Dog.. 

Hd.. 


Hd.. 

:: 

•• 

" 

:: 


14.428 
3.224 


3 




do :::;:"!.. 


2. 765 




.. do 


2.08O 


5 


Williams Coal Co 


do 


1.60O 


.. do 


1.609 






. do 


1.501 


y 




do 


1,222 






.. do 


1.000 


10 


Thomas E. Wilson 


. do 


l.OOO 


.. do 


962 






.. do 


905 


1? 




Bushnell 

Colchester.... 

Macomb 

Industry 

Colchester.... 


760 








Ti 




672 












600 






480 


19 


Jamps Gordon* Sons 


do 


461 


Tennessee.... 
Colchester.... 

LaHarpe 

Colchester.... 


420 


?1 




416 


?■> 






9-^ 


Andrew Nelson 


i^.? 




Andrew Swanson 




•)5 


do 


320 






industry 








?22 


?H 




Colchester.... 
.. do 


300 








30 
31 




do 


260 




Macomb 

Colchester.... 
. do 


245 


8'' 


Wayland Bros 




S'1 


Kichl«nd Laitz 


^*2 


34 


Wm Hudson 


"do" 





108 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Table 7i— Continued. 
Mcdonough COTJUTY-Concluded. 



Name of Operator. 



Poatoffice 

address of 

mine. 



Physical Ch.* 


o 


"3 

a 


I 












5 


1 


i 




ti 




03 


"C 


s 
a 






o 










I. 


li 


a ^ 


1 


O <£ 




cS 










3 


Q- 


H 


tB 



Total 
tons. 



T. L. Bowman , 

W. C. Stoneking. ..., 

Putt Bros , 

Simon Kosch 

D. E. Perry 

Geo. Mordue 

Wm. Robinson 

J. S. Vowter , 

Darrah Bros , 

Wm. Webster , 

AndrearA Newnker 

Chas. Kost , 

Klnff& Peck 

Wm. Hoar 

A. A. Wagle 

Frank Vogler 

Joseph Bunt 

Guy &Co 

Amos Ebben , 

Wilson & Thornton . 

•Tohn Betson , 

John Larson 



Industry 

Siesta 

Colchester 

Macomb 

Colchester.... 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

Blandinsville 

Colchester 

Bushnell 

Macomb 

Colchester 

.. do 

.. do 

Siesta 

Colchester — 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 





40 


2.4 




40 


2.4 




30 


2 4 




40 


2.4 




40 


2.4 




40 


2.4 




4(1 


2.4 




4(1 


2.4 




4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


•^ 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


40 


2.4 


2 


40 


2.4 


2 


4(J 


2.4 


2 


4(1 


2.4 


2 


40 


2.4 



Hd.. 

Dogr.. 
Hd.. 
Dog.. 



Hd. 
Dog 
Hd. 

Dog. 



Hd.. 
Dog. 



Hd 



205 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
116 
110 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
80 
80 
70 
68 
60 
60 
40 



MCLEAN COUNTY. 

























220,611 


1 

2 
8 


McLean County Coal Co..l 

Colfax Coal Co.. 1 

Berwick Coal Co..l 


Bloomington.. 

Colfax 

Chenoa 


2&5 
6 
6 


541 
400 
275 


3.6 

5.6 
4.0 


Sh. 


St.. 


L.W. 

e.-R. 


S:;:: 


Hd... 


165.122 
69.189 
6.300 









MENARD COUNTY. 

























492, 328 


1 


Qreenvlew Coal & Mln.Co. 
Wabash Coal Co 


Greenvlew.... 

Athens 

do . .. 


5 
5 

I 

6 
5 
6 
6 
5 
6 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 


109 
187 
200 
185 
85 
90 
85 
165 
210 
170 
60 
60 
80 
80 
80 
75 


6.0 
6 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 


Sh. 

" 

s"i'. 

Sh. 


St.. 
Hd 


p.; 


R. 


Hd.. 
M ... 
Hd.. 


Hd 


• 


141.064 
132.439 


•^ 


Athens Mining Co 


87. 806 


4 


Talula Coal Co 


Talula 

Petersburg... 

.. do 

.. do 


43.280 


5 
6 
7 


South Mountain Coal Co... 
Petersburg Coal Mining Co 
V^aliey Coal Co 


34.804 
17.816 
15.000 


H 


G F Johnson 


Mlddletown.. 
.. do 


5.240 


q 




4.200 


10 
11 


Arthur Wainwright 

Wm Denton 


Sweetwater .. 
Petersburg... 

.. do 

.. do 


2.759 
2.640 


12 


Joseph MuUegram 

Chas. O'Neill 


2.040 
l.SOO 


11 


Duncan Coal Co 


Tice 


610 


15 






520 


18 


Peter Becker 


Petersburg... 


510 

















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

MERCER COUNTY. 



109 









Physical Charaotkk 


OF Ml 


NKS. 






O 


T3 

a 


1 

7 


*^ 


o 

J3 


•a 
§ 


.2 

a 


6 

a 

a 














g 


k, 






ij 








Name of Operator. 


address of 
mine. 




^ 


» . 


o 


3) 


"S 




o 
2 


Total 
tons. 


a 






h 




■?|-c 


o 


SI 

«ja 




il 


a 
s 

"2 




































■a ^ 


ja 












/5 






25 


Q 




a? 


33 


u3 


M 


M 






16 mines 






1 












648.070 

211,218 
164.062 


1 


Empire Coal Co.,3 . . 


Gilchrist 




110 


1 ? 


Sh 


St 


P-R 


M 


Hd 


2 


Coal Valley Mining: Co.. 2.. 


Sherrard 




20:i 


3.6 








C... 




■A 


Alden Coal Co, 2 


Wanlock 




VAS 


4.fi 












158. 070 


i 


Coal Valley Mining Co.. 1.. 


Cable 




fiC 


4 


' ' 


' ' 








86,812 


F) 




.. do 










Ho 




Hd 




6.400 
4 lOO 


6 


Peter Docherty 


Pre-emotion 




18 


4 




sr 








7 


\rthur Jones 


vioi^... . :: 




3S 


4 


" 










2.940 


8 


W. P. Williams 


Aledo 




fih 


4 


" 


Ho 








2.448 


q 


B. B. Peterson .. . 


Cable.. 




40 

48 


r^ 












2.400 
2,400 


10 


Wm. Penman 




11 


Q. W. Martin 


Lace 




?() 


4 


SI 


' ■ 








2,250 


12 


Josepii Williams 


Preemption.. 




35 


4 


Sh 










2.000 




J. B. Martin 






68 
?8 


4 

?. fi 




.. 










14 


S.J. Young: 


(irlffln 


620 


15 


M. Beers & Son 


Cable 




IS 


3 


,S1 


• ' 








260 


18 


U.S. Clay Mfff. Co 


Griffin 




35 


2.6 


Sh 










20O 









MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 























Hlllsboro Coal Co .. 


HlUsboro 

Paisley 

Litchfield 

Coffeen 

Raymond 


6 

5 

1-5 


440 
634 
68» 
634 
434 


7.6 
8.0 
5.0 
8.0 
3.3 


Sh. 


St.. 


P.;R. 
L.W. 


S;;;: 


M 


Montgomery Coal Co. 

Litchfield Mining & P. Co. 
Clover Leaf Coal & M. Co. 
Raymond Coal Co 


Hd.. 







420,312 

158. 9S0 
89.516 
88,613 
76.859 
6.345 



MORGAN COUNTY. 



P. Waestaffe... 
Jacob Stocker. 



MurryvlUe..., 
Arenzville.... 



3.120 

720 



110 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Table 71 — Continued. 

PEORIA COUNTY. 



Name of Operator. 



PostoflQce 

address of 

mine. 



Physical 


Character of Minks. 


o 


1 


1 


^' 


£ 







£ 
a 


.Q 


i 


1 

f1 




s 


s 


S.!j 


a 


= 


T 

g 


1 








11 

1 p 


.a 

a 










■3 J 


li 


0,0 

2^ 





o & 






ci 


























i 





H 


GO 


33 


J 


m 


Dd 



Total 
tons. 



69 mines. 



Sholl Brothers, 3 

Mewsam Bros., K mine 

Wolschlae Co-op. Coal Co. . 

Clark Coal & Coke Co 

Howard & Tayl ir 

Newsam Bros.. R mine — 

Collier Co-operative C. Co. 

vickery Bro-i 

H'. P. Schmidt & Sons. 1,3.. 

New<am Bros.. H mine 

Re^nts Bros 

C B. Kramm & Bro... 

Newsam Bros.. S mine 

W E. Foley 

Peter Grant & Son, Exc'r, 1 

I ames Walker 

Elmwood (Joal Co 

German Coal Co 

Winters Coal Co 

Third Vein Coal Co 

P. P. Sehmidt & Son. .2.... 

Treasurer Coal Co 

Standard Coal Co 

Hillard & Snedden 

Ball Coal Co 

Gigby, Cussack & Edwards 

Adams Coal Co 

Geo Keller & Sons 

s. Hurst 

.Jefford & Bro 

White Coal Co.. 1 

Limestone Coal Co 

Mahn Coal Co 

•Joseph Crew 

«;mith Miller 

Mann Bros 

Wantlinff & Burdett ... 

A. W. Highee 

Taylor & Sons 

H. Goodman 

lohn Birdois, 1 

Wm. Kelley 

L. -chneider, 1 

Pair Oak Coal Co.. II. ... 

H Durant 

Geo. Rattleback 

W. H. Poole 

W. E. Hamilton 

Oscar Graves . 

lamps Pemble 

Martin & Lane 

Chas Carroll 

William Berry 

64 Cluskpy & Simons 

55 Geo. Mulvaney 



Peoria 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

Edwards .... 

Peoria 

Bartonville.. 

Peoria 

.. do 

.. do 

Kramm 

Kdwards .... 

Peoria 

Mapleton — 

Peoria 

Mapleton 

Elmwood 

Peoria 

Bartonville.. 
Orchard Mine 

Peoria 

Pottstown ... 

Peoria 

.. do 

Btrtonville.. 
Edwards — 

Peoria 

Bartonville.. 

.. do 

Kingston — 

Peoria 

.. do 

..do 

Chtllicothe.. 

Mapleton 

Peoria 

Pottstown ... 
Prlnceville .. 

.. do 

Mapleton — 

Peoria 

Brimfield.... 

Peoria 

.. do 

Brimfield.... 

.. do 

Kickapoo .... 

Mapleton 

Duncan 

Klmwood 

Peoria 

Duncan 

Monica 

.. do 

Brimfield .... 



4.4|Sh. 
4.4 •' 



Ho 



920,716 

90.500 

71.609 

67,477 

63.792 

61,133 

55.565 

46.733 

34,260 

31,659 

30,466 

29, 700 

28.600 

27,577 

26.820 

20.935 

20.600 

18,240 

17.670 

17.400 

16,420 

16,415 

11.695 

10.260 

9,210 

8,660 

6 890 

6.240 

5.771 

4.840 

4.648 

4,248 

4.112 

4,056 

3,648 

3.400 

3.210 

2,307 

2,150 

2,014 

2,000 

2.000 

2,000 

1.820 

1.800 

1.620 

1.410 

1,400 

1,320 

1.260 

1,260 

1.200 

1.110 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 7i— Continued. 

PEORIA COUSTY-Conehtded. 



Ill 



Name of Operator. 



PostofiBce 

addrest of 

mine. 



Physical 


CHi 










o 


3 


:t! 




























.0 

a 


^ 


a 


■a 




1 






a 










6 
« 


u 

m c 


s 

1 


.^^ 


£>S3 


-^1= 


















ja 





Q 


r- 


» 



II 



Total 
tons. 



D. T Sanders & Sons. 

David Roberts 

Ogilen Hayes 

Wm. Ciarkson 

S. A. DIoore 

Wm. Blacfe 

Wm. Johnson 

R. Ciarkson 

Joseph Marie 

Chas. Abys 

E. C. bnyder. 

Chas. Kingsley 

Chas Evins 

Fred Martin 



Glasford... 
Mapleton . . 

.. do 

Edwards... 
Brimfl-ld.. 
Smithville. 

Hanna 

^Ita 

Pottstown . 

Laura 

Edwards... 

.. do 

Laura 

Peoria 





90 


4.6 




16U 


4.4 




•A'i 


4 4 




H,") 


4.0 




4U 


4.6 




60 


4 6 




50 


5,(1 




90 


4.6 




90 


4.4 




50 


4.6 


5 


HO 


4.0 


5 


HO 


4.4 


e 


60 


4.6 


' 


50 


4.4 



Ho 



640 
630 
620 
610 
510 
510 
4>iO 
420 
410 
3S0 



PERRY COUNTY. 





. 




















1,031,751 


1 


Willis Coal & Mining Co., 1 
White Walnut Coal Co.. 1.. 


WillisviUe.... 
Pinckntyville 
DuQuoin . — 

.. do 

.. do 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

t 

6 
6 
6 


80 
90 
80 
85 
38 
90 
90 

41 

122 
80 
62 

220 
25 

282 
86 
50 

30 
82 
24 
24 
35 
35 
20 
20 


6 

6 
7 
6 
6 
6 

" 

6 

6 

5.6 

6 

5.6 

6.6 

5.6 

6 

6 
6 
5.6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6.6 

6.6 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 

SI. 


St.. 


P.;R. 


El... 

t::. 


H&M 
Hd.. 


201,211 
150,851 
106,451 


4 

5 


Weaker Coal & Coke Co., 1. 
Greenwood-Davis C'l Co., 1 
Willis Coal & Mining Co., 3 

Weaver Coal Co., 4 

Lake Superior Coal Co., 
Pope mine 


87,096 
77,442 




. do 


62,439 


7 
8 


Pinckneyville 

DuQuoin 

Cutler 


60, 253 
47, 105 


q 


Soper & Co , Barnard 

Bailey Bros. Coal Co., 3.... 
Weaver Coal Co , 3 


45,994 


10 
11 


Sunfleld 

DuQuoin 

Taniaraa 

DuQuoin 

Tamaroa. 

UuQuoln 

Coulterville.. 
Pinckneyville 
DuQuoin 

.. do 


41.760 
36, 077 


12 
13 
14 

15 
16 


Old Kentucky Coal Co., 1.. 

Morris Bros., 1 

Little Muddy Coal Co., 1... 

New Moon Mining Co., 1... 

Cbicago& Coulterville Coal 

Co,l 


26,729 
25.146 
20.000 
11,991 

11.125 


17 

18 
19 


Strait Coal Co . 1 

Weaver Coal Co.. 2 

Lake Superior Coal Co,, 


4.000 
4,092 

3,750 


20 


Mis-ouri&lll.CoalCo.,l.. 
Wilson (feSnoffard 


WillisviUe ... 
DuQuoin 


3.529 
2,800 


?' 




800 


?3 


Gruner & Jeuner 


Pinckneyville 
.. do 


400 


?A 


Roe&Co 


400 


?5 


B. F. Glass 


WillisviUe.... 
fyets 


200 


?6 


Christopher Heifsung 


120 









112 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

RANDOLPH COUNTY. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Charaotbr of Minks. 




1 

1. 


1 

a 

a 

li 

35 


a 

OS 

1 

T 

1 


1 

I 
i 

1-2 

11 


t 


s 
1 

i 

k 

O 


1 

ft 
O 

h 


£ 

a . 

.6 

11 

\Z 

(B O 

|| 

w 


J 

a 

3 

a 

o 

g 

td 


Total 
tons. 
























478, 126 




West'n A. C. & C. Co..Ed'n 
Coulterville Mining C0..I.. 

TildenCoal Co.. 1 

Crystal Coal Co., 1 


Sparta 

Coulterville.. 

Tllden 

^do 


6 
C 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 


140 
320 
180 
208 
70 
30 
36 
80 
176 
96 
72 
135 
24 
20 


6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
5.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.1 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 


Sh. 


St.. 










1 

2 
3 
4 


P.; 


R. 


M, 




Hd 


,.. 


107. OU 
67,052 
63,294 
49,768 
45.7S2 


6 


Rosborough Coal Co.. 1 


Sparta 

.. do 


44,876 
44.213 


8 
9 


Davison & Fulton C. Co.. 1. 
A.. B. Powell* Co.. 1 


.. do 

Coulterville.. 

Sparta 

.. do 


37.296 
10.487 
7.290 




Illinois Fuel Co.. 4 

Moffat Coal Co.. 1 

dan Rtn.Tmn.v 1 


6,273 


12 

:3 


.. do 

Blair 


4.171 
1,200 


John & Geo. Meyers, 1 




400 





















ROCK ISLAND COUNT?. 

























86,700 


1 

9 


SilvisMiniDgCo.,2 

J J Bryce & Son 


Carbon Cliff.. 
Coal Valley... 
. do 




91 
60 
50 
60 
20 
75 
60 
60 
50 
40 
20 
70 

"is 

16 


3.8 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
3.6 
3.0 
3.C 
3.6 
3.6 
3.0 
3.0 
3.6 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 


Sh. 

SI.. 
Sh. 

SI;. 


St.. 

Ho. 

St.. 

Ho. 

St. 
Ho 

Hd 
Ho 


P.; 


R. 


M... 
FTd , 


Hd 


^.. 


36.210 
21.264 


^ 


^ackvllle & Bros 






12.000 






Loding 

Coal Valley... 

ffi'.:::;::: 

Carbon Cliff.. 

Loding 

Coal Valley... 
.. do 


7.714 


6 


Stoddard & Summerson... 


2.809 
2.360 


7 


wm Parker::::::::::"!!!; 


1.645 


H 


Stone Bros 


880 




Qribbin & Fields 


300 


10 
1] 


Black Diamond Coal Co.... 
D L Edwards 


274 
230 






:: do :::::::::. 


200 


It 


Fred Vonacli 


Hampton 

Coal Valley... 

Mollne 

Hampton 

Coal Valley... 


200 






200 






184 


16 


Guckert Bros 


160 






80 














__ 











COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

SALINE COUNTY. 



113 



Name of Operator. 



Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 



Physical Charaotkk of Mines. 



® 




S 








1 


it 


o 

Si 


a 








-o 


a 






■wrr- 


I 


* 






OQ 















ja oil 
^ I 



^a 

•r i:, H ° 



I ^ 
« o 
Mid 

II 



Total 
tons. 



mines. 



Davenport Coal Co., 1 

HarrisburgM. & C. Co.,1. 
Clifton Coal Co., Clifton- 
Saline County Coal Co., 1. 

The New Coal Co., 1 

GftllatluCoal Co.,1 

C. M. Leeper, 1 

Loyd & Evans, 1 

GillShelton.l 

James Yates, 1 

H. P. Slttig,! 

Hudgens & Reeder,! 

Andy Cogdill, 1 

R. M. Barry. 1 

John Ward,l 

lyiaggle M. Sisk,! 



Ledford 

Harrisburg... 

.. do 

..do 

.. do 

Gallatin 

Eldorado 

.. do 

Cottage Grove 

.. do 

Stonefori 

.. do 

.. do 

Cottage Grove 
Mltchellsville 
Cottage Grove 



8h 



Hd 



364,172 

130. 722 

97.0C0 

82,000 

24,215 

8,007 

6,826 

2,693 

1,500 

250 

250 

200 

200 

100 

100 

60 

50 



SANGAMON COUNTY. 





30 mines 




















4.386,626 




C, W. & V. Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co., 6 




Thayer 

Divernon 

Springfield.... 

Auburn 

Rlverton 

Pawnee 

Springfield... 
do 


\ 
5 
\ 

6 
5 

6 

\ 

5 
5 


292 
318 
250 
259 
232 
324 
240 
245 
250 
250 
250 
238 
150 
230 
213 
265 
260 
245 
269 
269 
220 
268 
269 
249 
210 
205 
255 
240 
129 
160 


7.11 
8.0 
5.9 
7.0 
5.9 
7.6 
5.9 
5.9 
5.9 
5.9 
5.9 
5.9 
5.9 
6.9 
6.0 
5.9 
5.9 
6.9 
5.2 
6.6 
5.9 
7.6 

?.§ 

5.9 

M 
5.9 


Sh 


St.. 


P.; 


R. 


E.... 

§.::: 

M_... 

S;-:; 

C... 
M„. 

E.... 
M,... 

;; 

" 


M_... 
Hd.. 


403,758 
306, 842 






290, 905 




Chicago-Virden Coal Co.. 2. 
Springfield C. & M. Co.,2.. 


269.889 
268.650 
228.190 




Capitol Co-Op. Coai Co 

Springfield (J. & M Co 4 


181,991 
164, 032 




Springfield 0. M- Co.. 5.... 
SprlngfleldC. &M. C0..3.. 
Springfield Co Op. Coal Co 

Spanlding Coal Co.,1 

West End Coal Co 


.. do 

::^S :::::::::: 

Spauldine 

Springfield... 

Rlverton 

Cantrall 

Springfield... 
.. do 


162.430 
146,350 
146,108 
141.009 
139, 400 




SprlngfleldC. &M. Co.. 1.. 
Cantrall CoOp. Coal Co... 
Sangamon Coal Co 


129.262 
122,637 
121,313 




Woodside Coal Co 


118 009 




Republic Iron & Steel Co.. 
Wabash Coal Co.. 1 


.. do 


117,932 




Dawson 

Selbytown.... 

Bissell 

Auburn 

Chatham 

Barclay 

Springfield... 
.. do 


110,312 


23 
?4 


Wllliamsvilie Coal Co 

Spanlding Coal Co.,2 

Auburn & Alton Coal Co... 
Chicago Virden Coal Co., 3 
Barclay C. & M. Co 


109,627 
107,431 
107,126 
95, 622 
95.451 


25 


Citizens C. & M. Co.. A .... 
Citizens C. & M. Co., B .... 
Jefferson C & M. Co 


94. 924 
94, 284 


?7 


. do 


S9, 390 


28 


Lincoln P. CM Co .::.::: 


"do.:::.:.::: 


25.696 


?I9 




Pleasant Pi's. 
Salisbury 


16, 698 


80 


J. p. Gordon 


1,268 













-8 C. 



114 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

SCHUYLER COUNTY. 





Name op Operator. 


PostoflBce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Charagtbb of Mines 




1 


o 

1 

B 

p 

a" 


1 

T 

1 

5-3 

Q 


t3 

T 

B 
a 

1 

h 
II 


'u 
© 

1 


si 

ii 
P 


s 


i! 


Total 
tons. 




15 mines • .... 


















16.734 


\ 


Wm Cmnmlnffs.. 


Rushville 


6 
2 
2 


48 
50 

^ 

40 
40 
60 
60 
50 
34 
50 
60 
30 
35 
35 


4.6 
2.6 
2.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
4.6 
2.6 
2.6 
4.6 
2.3 
2.3 


Si.. 
D^ 

Si.. 
Dr. 

Sh. 
Or. 


St.. 
Hd 

Ho. 

1? 

Ho. 
Hd 

ii 


P.-R. 


M,... Hd 

!'. ! 


2,639 


2 


R IT Harris! 


21000 






!!'do':::::::::: 


2,000 


\ 


Robert Kerr. 


Rnshvllle 

Pleasant View 

Rnshvllle 

Frederick .... 
Ray 


2,000 






l!^ 


^ 


Williams & Clark 


1,038 


1 


Hedrlck & Wetmore 


871 
869 






Pine Grove... 
Pleasant View 

Littleton 

Frederick 

.. do 


747 


10 


V L Roosa 


620 






530 


1' 


John W Hamilton 


400 


liJ 


F W Croxton 


320 






220 


if) 


Geo Edwards 


200 












SCOTT 


COUNTY. 








13 mines . 


















23,370 


2 


Wm. H.Bates & Co 

John McGuire 


Winchester... 
Alsey 




96 

"60 
90 

"46 


2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 


Sh. 
Dr. 
Sh. 

Dr. 




P.-R. 


M... Hd 


16.778 
1.136 


3 
4 

5 
6 

1 




Winchester... 
.. do 


1106 




967 


P McQuire 


Alsey 


927 




Neelyville .... 

Exeter 

Winchester... 

Chapln 

Exeter 

Bluffs 


800 


Six & Peake 


660 


8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
IJ 




480 




420 


Ed Ramft 

Ohas Priest & Co 


354 
245 




Exeter 

. do 


140 


E Yardlne 


130 




.. do 


120 


15 
16 




Winchester... 

Winchester'.".! 
Chapin 


110 




108 




80 


18 


Wm Wlndendorf 


20 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

2\ihle 71 — Continued. 

SHELBY COUNTY. 



115 





Nauk op Operator. 


Postoffice 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Character of Minks. 




c 

S 
a 

1 


o 

a 

3 

a 

h 

23 


•T3 

T 

a" 


1 
1 

s 

I 

II 

.a B 


o 

1 

a 


o 

-a 

a 

It 

oo 
33 




"3 

II 

OP 


i 

a 

<D 

a 
1 

a 

o 
■a 
a 


Total 
tons. 




Smlnes 




















108. 149 


?. 


f.Tirce-.*."^'-.!t?:'.' 


Moweaqua.... 
Shelbyvllle... 

Plndlay 

Shelbyvllle... 
Mode 


5 

16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


618 
108 
80 
80 
68 
100 
98 
60 


6.4 

1.8 

2.4 

2 

2 

1.8 

2 


Sh. 

;; 

Dr. 


St.. 
Ho. 

Hd 


P.-R. 


M.... 
Hd.. 


HM. 
Hd.. 


95.742 
8,520 




Weitick Bros., 1 

Mike Brophy, >.. 


3,296 
2 500 




W. F. Gallagher. 1 


1,500 






Shelbyvllle... 






Jesse Bowman. Klondike . . 
Charles Michaels 


391 


8 


Fancher 


200 









STARK COUNTY. 































39, 406 


1 
?, 


Wyominsr Coal Co.. 1 

Geo. R. Watson 


Wyoming 

.. do 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


124 
92 
45 

104 
76 
60 
80 

120 

100 
40 

"52 
136 
140 

"ih 

■"24 
25 
35 


4.3 

4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 

4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.3 

4.6 
4.6 

3.6 


Sh. 

Dr. 

Sh. 

Dr. 

i- 

Sh 


St.. 
Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 

is- 

Ho. 


P.; 


R. 


Hd 


,.. 


Hd 


,.. 


11,000 
6,958 


8 


Elmlra 

Bradford 

Wyoming 

Modena 

Wyoming 

.. do 


2,880 
2,800 
2.690 
1 910 


4 


S. French 


6 
6 


Robinson & Watson 

John Scott 


7 


James Hirbee 


1 640 


8 






q 


Newton & Howard 


Bradford 

Modena 

West Jersey.. 

Modena 

Lombardville. 

Bradford 

Toulon 

Wyoming 

Modena 

Wyoming 


1 412 


in 


Ben Smith 


1 400 


11 




1,320 


1? 


W. C. Bennlck 


800 


18 




800 


14 






15 


Bert Balentlne 


680 


16 




640 


17 


James K. Fuller 


440 


1R 


Fred Charlston ... 


280 


19 




180 


?n 


John Price 


.. do 


168 


21 




:: do ..:::::::. 


140 


?,?. 


F. L. Kelm 


Lafayette 


102 





















116 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

ST. CLAIR COUNTY. 



Name of Operator. 



PostoflBce 

address of 

mine. 



Physical 


Chabaothr of Mines. 




















a 


1 




£ 


§ 


"3 


s 


a> 




1 


£ 


ja 


p 


a 


a 


a 


1 


a 




a' 


.5 


-6-^, 


* 
















q 




































o<„ 








1 ® 


OS 


si 






« 


^1 




1 * 

(D O 


a 

o 

"2 




5 ^ 




























O 


Q 


E- 


(D 


a 


J 


m 


m 



69 mines. 



Royal Coal Co.. Royal 

St. L. & O'Fallon Coal Co., 1 
Muren Coal & Ice Co.. 1.... 

Walnut Hill Coal Co 

Kolb Coal Co.. 1 

Madison Coal Co., 7 

Missouri & Illinois Coal Co 

Joseph Taylor, Mentor 

Glendale Coal Co., 1 

Kolb Coal Co., 2 

Lenz Coal Co., Harmony... 

Joseph Taylor. Taylor 

Lebanon Coal & Mia. Ass'n 

Hlppard Coal Co.. 2 

Htppard Coal Co., 1 

Belleville & O'F. Coal Co.. 
Daniel Zlldorph. Marissa.. 
Valley Coal & Mining Co.. 

Borders Coal Co 

Oakland Coal Co 

Summit Coal Co 

Ruby Coal Co 

Dutch Hollow Coal Co 

Consol. Coal Co., Green Mt. 
Consol.Coal Co., Qartside,4 
Superior Coal & Min. Co.. 

Skellet Coal Co 

O'Fallon Coal & Min. Co.. 
Consol.Qoal Co., White Oak 

Chas. Hartman 

Consol. Coal Co., Schurman 

Oak Hill Coal Co 

Tirre & Sons Coal Co.. 
Mo.& 111. Coal Co., Freeburg 

tfiureka Coal Co 

Mo. & 111. C.Co., Wildermau 

Highland Coal Co., 1 , 

Sunlight Coal Co., 1 

Johnson Coal Co 

40 Enterprise Mining Co 

41 I'heo. Michaels, Pittsburg 

42 Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co 

43 Consol. Coal Co., Richland 

44 Glendale Coal Co., 2 

46 Humboldt Coal Co 

46 Consol. Coal Co., Rose Hill 

47 Advance Coal Co 

Fred Murphy 

49 Suburban Coal Co 

60 Lake Superior Coal Co 

51 Millstadt Coal Co 

62 Abel Bros 

63 Frank Sargent 

64 Consol. Coal Co., Knecht.. 
55 Dutch Hill Coal Co 



Belleville 

. do 

.do 

. do 

Maseoutah .... 
Glen Carbon.. 
Kentchler — 

O'Fallon 

Belleville 

Maseoutah.... 

Belleville 

O'Fallon 

Lebanon 

Belleville 

do 

do 

Marissa 

East St. Louis 

Marissa 

Belleville 

do 

Caseyville.... 

Freeburg 

Belleville 

do 

do 

do 

O'Fallon 

Marissa 

Belleville 

.. do 

.. do 

Lenzsburg.... 

Belleville 

Marissa 

Belleville 

.. do 

Freeburg 

Marissa 

Rentchler 

Belleville 

.. do 



.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

Marissa 

Belleville.... 

.. do 

.. do 

Millstadt .... 
Belleville.... 

.. do 

.. do 

New Athens. 



Sh. 



St. 



P.-R, 



Hd 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

ST. CLAIR COUNTY-ConcJMded. 



117 



Name of Opkratob. 



PoatofiBce 

address of 

mine. 



Physical Chabacter of Min 


E8. 


o 


1 


1 




0) 

2 


09 


"5 


s 




« 


1 


£ 


s 


p, 


a 


a 


5 


* 


a 












r1 








a 


— 


-o-E 


a 


p 
a 


1 
•3 


s 
■s;^ 




5 
2 




§1 


J3 
OS 


It 


fin 


li 


■7 


II 


li 

a o 


is 
II 


a 

o 

•a 


















C5 


Q 


^ 


CO 


a 


ij 





W 



Total 
tons. 



Taylor Bros 

Tower Grove Coal Co 

John Harst 

James Beaty 

Wm. Pistor 

Reeb Bros 

Georgetown Road Coal Co. 

Lewis Grosman 

Brennen & Co 

Dietrich Bros 

Benj. Johnson 

Davies & Co 

Kltchie&Co 

Jos. Smith 



Belleville 

.. do 

.. do 

Mascoutah.... 

Millstadt 

Belleville 

.. do 

High Prairie.. 
Caseyville.... 
Fayetteville... 
High Prairie.. 
FrenchVill'ge 

.. do 

High Prairie.. 



a,") 


6 


Sh. 


St., 


P.- 


R. 


M 


... 


Hri 


.. 


140 


6 


















fi,") 


6 


' ' 


' ' 














175 


7 


















4« 


6 


' ■ 


' ' 














;oo 


7 




Ho. 














66 


6 




' ' 














20 


6 
6 


Dr. 


.. 














6(1 


7 


Kh 


St.. 














20 


6 


















65 


5 
6 
6 


Dr. 


Ho. 















5. COO 

5. COO 

4.500 

4.600 

3.500 

2.0C0 

2. COO 

1.000 

800 

800 

800 

EOO 

too 

500 



TA?EWELL COUNTY. 





16 mines 




















185.535 


2 

a 


Edward Little, Hilliard 1.. 

U bben C oal Co 

Lake Erie Coal Mining Co. 
Edward Little, Hilliard 2.. 


Peoria 

Pekin 

Peoria 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


100 
125 
90 
100 
85 
50 
100 
100 
90 
65 
80 
100 
90 
90 
70 


« 


Sh. 

Sh. 


St.. 

Ho. 

St. 
Hd 

St.. 


P.; 


R. 


M._ 


• 

: 


Hd 

1 


_.. 


34.000 
25,000 
21.220 


4 


do 


20.000 


5 


.. do 


19, 226 


6 


A. G. Cummings 


East Peoria... 
Pekin 


14,833 


7 


Grossweller CoalCo 


14.250 


fi 




8.000 


q 


Backinff Bios 


East Peoiia. .. 

.. do 

..do 

Pekin 

East Peoria... 

.. do 

do 


6,510 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


Wm. Cruickshank & Son .. 

B. &B. CoalCo 

Bolander Bros 

G Gablehauser 

Manhattan Coal Co 

P. Seffer 

Eastern Coal Co 


6,326 
5,589 
4,800 
3.640 
1,322 
520 


16 


do 


300 




• 























VERMILION COUNTY. 





60 mines 


L .. 
















2.893.233 




KellyvilleCoalCo..3 

Kellyvllle Coal Co.. 2 

Westville Coal Co.. 1 

Kellyvllle Coal Co..Himrod 
Kellyville Coal Co., Pawnee 
The Jones & Adams Co., 2. 
Kellyville Coal Co.. 4 


Danville 

.. do 


■\ I 


212 
210 
210 
170 

90 
168 

90 


7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
8.0 
8.0 
6.0 
7.0 


Sh. 


St. 


P.-R. 


M... 
C... 


Hd.. 

Hi"; 


448.354 
406.248 




Westville.... 

Danville 

.. do 


346. 194 
344.769 
306,622 






156,363 




Danville 


155,265 



118 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

VERMILION COUNTY-(7oncZuded. 



Name of Operator. 



PostoflBce 

address of 

mine. 



Physical. 


Charaotkr of Minks. 


o 




® 






03 


"3 


a 


® 




1 


in 


ja 


b 


a 


a 


J3 




fl 


T, 


, 


.2 


u 


0) 


a 


T 

1 


S^ 


o 


1 




11 

ja * 


fl 


li 


5^ 


a— 




.^1 

-Sja 


^a 


1 >. 

11 


'3 


o aj 










A O 




.5 
















O 


Q 


H 


(» 


HI 


>J 


W 


M 



Brookside Coal M. Co., 2... 
Economy C. & M. Cc.Econ 
Consolidated Coal Co.,Fair- 

mount 

Consolidated Coal Co., Mis- 

slonfield 

John O'Connell Coal Co., 

Blue Bird 

KellyvllleCoalCo.,5 

Mauck Bros.. 1 

E. S. Gray. 3 

Muncle Coal Co., 1 

S. Parle, land 2 

Bunting Bros. 1 

D. A. Jenkins. Riverside .. 
Danville Brick & Tile Co.. 

Stanbury & Watklns, 1 

Oakwood Coal Co., 1 

William Sehafer, 1 

Jacob Thompson, 1 

Henry Dettman, 1 

Prance Bros.. 1 

Carter Bros., 1 

Star Coal Co.. 1 

8. M. Hodge & Son, 1 

A. Jones & Sons.l 

Joe Mack, 1 

Miller & Spangler. 1 

J. A. Hume, 1 

A, H. Bonnett. 1 

James Thomas. 1 

M. C. Wllklnson.l 

John R. Colburn, Klondike 

Hardy Harris & Sons. 4 

James Thompson, 1 

Wm. Stine, 1 

Morln & Mobaker, 1 

David Lovall. 1 

Joe Bales, 1 

Wm. Winhaur. 1 

L. S.Miller. 1 

Kistler& Bookman. 1 

Haskins & Sons.l 

John Hall.l 

Ram & Bryan Bros., 1 

J. A. Jones, 1 

L. E. Baker.l 

John Leitard, 1 

P. L. Brannaman, 1 

Evan J. Jones. 1 

A. Prederickson, 1 

Blue & Henry, 1 

Llewellyn & Co., 1 

John Swanson.l 

John Woodard, 1 

S. E. Bryant, 1 



Danville . 
.. do 



do 



.. do 

.. do 

DanvllleR R.l 

Danville 

Mnncie 

Danville 

Grape Creek.. 

Danville 

.. do 

.. do 

Oakwood 

Vermilion 

Grape Creek.. 
Mine Valley.. 
Pairmount ... 
DanvilleR.R.8 
Vandercook .. 

Danville 

Catlin 

Danville R. R. 

Danville 

.. do 

Blount 

S. Danville... 

Danville 

Vandercook .. 
Pairmount ... 
Grape Creek.. 

Danville 

.. do 

Humrlck 

Danville 

..do 

DanvilleR.R.8 
Danville R. R. 
Grape Creek.. 

.. do 

.. do 

Humrlck 

Oakwood 

Grape Creek.. 

Danville 

Catlin 

Danville 

Grape Creek.. 
DanvilleR.R.8 

.. do 

Oakwood ... 
Grape Creek 



40 


7.0 


85 


6.0 


208 


5.0 


.... 


6.0 


40 


6.6 


60 


7.0 


60 


6.0 


100 


6.0 


200 


5.6 


60 


6.0 


20 


7.0 


4(1 


6.0 




5.6 


HO 


6.0 


HO 


6.0 


65 


6.0 


6C 


7.0 


BC 


6.0 


5(: 


6.0 


U\ 


6.0 


6(J 


6.0 


S(l 


6,0 


51 


6.6 


5(1 


6.0 


1ll(] 


6,0 


fid 


6.0 


10(1 


6.0 


10(1 


6,0 


1(1 


6 


60 


6.0 


6(1 


6.0 


6C 


7.0 


6(1 


6.0 


8(1 


6.6 




6.0 


80 


6.0 


60 
10 


\\ 


6(1 


6.0 


4(1 


6.0 


5(1 


7.0 


5(1 


7.0 




6.0 


6(1 


6.0 


6(1 


7.0 


6(1 


6.0 


fid 


6.0 


5(1 


6.0 


6(1 


7.0 


7(1 


6.0 


H5 


fi.O 


60 


5.6 


60 


7.0 



St. 



Stp 



Ho. 



St., 



P.-R. 



Stp. 



Sip.. 
P.-R. 



C-M 
C 



Hd 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table 71 — Continued. 

WABASH COUNTY. 



119 





Name op Opkbatob. 


Postoflice 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Character op Mines. 




1 

a 

9 


o 

1 

a 

a 

■3 

'SJa 

<D 
5" 


* 
1 

T 

■3 
g _ 

P 


1 

k 
s 

!i 
11 

f 


s 


I 



i 
2 

ll 


•0 
I 


1 

1! 

II 

Dd 


a 

a 

a 

1 

a 

03 

w 


Total 
tons. 














^ 










4.800 


1 


Couch. Adams & Co 

A. G. Keen 


Mt. Carmel... 
.. do ..» 


15 
15 
11 


16 


3.0 
3.0 
3.9 


Sh. 


Ho 


P.-R. 


M... 


Hd.. 


2.600 
1,200 


s 


William Batson 


Keensburg... 


1.000 









WARREN COUNTY. 





19 mines 




















13, 986 


1 


H. J. Rohr 


^^fo''.:::::::: 


1 
1 
2 

1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


40 
67 
60 
30 
70 
48 
69 
10 
12 
10 

"is 


,.0 

4.0 
4.0 
2.6 
2.6 
2.0 
2.0 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 

1:1 

1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 


Sh. 

SI.. 
Dr. 

SI. 
Dr. 


St. 
Ho. 

Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 


P.-R. 


Hd.. 


Hd.. 

" 


3,986 


? 




2,010 


R 




.. do 


1,200 


4 


J. C. Lewis . -.. 


Roseville 

Monmouth ... 
.. do 


1,200 


5 


w.wGiiroy. ::;::: :..::::: 


910 


6 


3d[urphy & Redmond 


640 


7 


John Selkirk .. 


do . .. 


500 


8 


Willis Clayton 




480 


q 


Thomas Caldwell 


. do 


440 


10 
11 


Thomas Wearmouth 

Chas. Miller 


Youngstown . 


400 
360 


1? 


Thomas Smith 


Avon 


320 


13 




Younffstown . 


300 


11 




280 


15 


J. G. Kidd 


Roseville 

Monmouth ... 
Avon 


280 


16 




240 


17 


Thos. E. Delaney 


192 


18 


.. do 


148 


1"» 




Swan Creek.. 


10 









WASHINGTON COUNTY. 









• 
















57.956 






DuBois 

Nashville 

Okawville.... 


6 

6 
6 


296 
425 
350 


5.6 
5.6 
6.6 


Sh. 


":;■ 


P.-R. 


M.,.. 


Hd.. 




1 


39,000 


? 


Huifh Murry , 1 


17. 356 


3 


Okaw viile Coal Co 


1.600 









WOODFORD COUNTY. 



1 Roanoke Coal Minlne Co.,1 Roanoke 



2 4801 2.6 Sh. St . L.W. M ... Hd 



120 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 7 J— Concluded. 

WILL COUNTY. 





Name of Opkbator. 


Postofflce 

address of 

mine. 


Physical Charaoteb of Mines. 




1 


1 

s 

a 

"3 
.2 . 

11 

25 


a 

S3 

1 

T 
■3 

§ 


! 
la 


1 


1 

i 

1 


1 

S 
1 
g 

li 


i 


s 

a 
1 

a 
s 

a 


Total 
tons. 




2 mines 


* 


















35 616 


I 


Murpliy, Keenan & Co.. 2. . 


Braidwood.... 
.. do 


2 
2 


63 
3 


2.8 
3.0 


S_h. 


St.. 


L.W. 


M... 
Hd.. 


Hd.. 


33.116 

2.m 









WILLIAMSON COUNTY. 





31 mines 




















2,711,767 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 


Bier Muddy Coal & I. Co., 7 
Chi. & Carterville C. Co., 1. 

Sunny Side Coal Co.. 1 

St. L. & Big Muddy C. Co.. 

i2:lll:8aS{:tS:8S::i: 

New Virginia Coal Co., 1... 
Carterville Coal Co.. Burr. 
C. & BlgM.Coal&C. Co.,1 
Williamson County C. Co.l 
New Ohio Wash. Coal Co.. 1 
New Ohio Wash. Coal Co.. 2 
Chicago & Herrin C Co.. 1.. 
Robert Dlek Coal Co.. 1.... 
So. 111. Coal M. & W. Co., 4. 

Carterville Coal Co.. 2 

J. C. & B. M. Coal M. Co.. 1 

Marion Coal Co.. 1 

Carterville Dlst Coal Co, 1 
Donely & Koenecke C. Go, 1 


Herrin 

.. do 

.do 

Dewmain 

Marion 

.. do 


6 


140 
180 
145 
90 
80 
102 
119 
60 
81 
150 
65 
70 
161 
81 
22 
90 
208 
49 
94 
110 
40 
80 
30 
40 
10 
25 
22 
20 
20 
30 
22 


9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
8.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
8.6 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
8.0 
9.0 
7.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
5.6 
5.6 
5.6 
5.6 
2.8 
5.6 


Sh. 

;; 

SI.. 
Sh. 

St.. 
Dr. 


St.. 
Ho. 


P.-R. 


E.... 
M.,.. 


Hd.. 

H?: 

H-M. 
Hd.. 

H-M. 
Hd.. 

H-M. 
Hd.. 
H-M. 
Hd.- 


440,298 
277,898 
266.304 
213.040 
188.511 
186,603 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
1?! 


Lake Creek... 
Carterville.... 

Marlon 

Lake Creek... 
Carterville.... 
.. do 


175,050 
131,057 
127,693 
113,325 
107,683 
87. 104 


13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 


Herrin 

Carterville.... 

Marlon 

Carterville.... 
Lake Creek... 

Marlon 

do 


71.144 
61.236 
58.860 
55,600 
48,353 
48,000 
28.726 


20 
?,1 


Carterville.... 
.. do 


8,259 
4,873 


?? 


Carterville & Big M. C. Co.l 


. do . 


3.250 


Z3 


.. do 


2,443 


?4 


John Reed 


Herrin 

Marion 

Crab Orchard 
.. do 


2,000 


?l> 


W. P.Allen 


1,800 


26 
?,1 


Ensminger & Rentfro 

T. M. Moatsinger 


1,268 
400 


'8 


Willford & Downs. 


do 


300 


m 




.. do 


300 


an 


J. Prichett 


Hudgens 

Crab Orchard 


200 


31 


W. S. Tarpley 


200 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



121 



The foregoing showing is summarized by the geological seams, 
giving the number of mines and the total tonnage produced from 
each seam. 

Table 72 — Summar/j of the Physical Character of the Coal Mines 
of the State, Geological Number of ISearii, Manner of Working, 
Kind of Openings and Tons Produced. 



Geologi- 
cal 


Number 

of 
counties 


Number 

of 
mines. 


Manneb of Wobking 


Chakactbr of Openings. 




number 

of 
seam. 


LODff 

Wall. 


Pillar 

and 

Room. 


Strip. 


Shaft. 


Slope. 


Drift. 


Strip. 


Tons. 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
14 


15 

20 
2 
2 

23 
20 
10 
1 
1 
1 
3 


90 

170 

9 

3 

240 

290 

111 

1 

2 

7 

10 


1 
36 

5 


89 

133 

9 

3 

235 

290 
106 

1 
2 
7 
8 


1 

5 
2 


46 
67 
5 
2 
161 
221 
76 
1 
2 
6 
6 


12 
38 

35 
24 
11 


32 
64 

4 
1 

:: 

19 


1 
6 


955,434 

5.871.564 

15.084 

12.558 

11.832.976 

11.669.586 

4,573.625 

1 000 


15 








3 EOO 


16 
Pocket.... 




2 


1 


2 


12.407 
7.376 


Totals. .. 




933 


42 


883 


8 


693 


122 


210 


8 


34 956,400 















Value of Mining Plants and Acres of Land Owned ok Leased. 

In collecting the statistics of coal mines for this year, the schedules 
sent to operators included the following — Value of plant ; total value 
of buildings; total value of machinery, including wagons, carts, tools 
of all kinds, live stock, etc. ; total value of shaft, including sinking, 
curbing, timbering, roadways, cars, haulage and all equipments un- 
der of ground; number of acres of ground owned; number of acres of 
ground leased for coal rights. 

The majority of the operators failed to fill out the schedules, so 
that it was impossible to tabulate the results of the inquiry in a sat- 
isfactory manner. The returns made, however, have been condensed 



122 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



more than was intended and are presented by districts, in the follow- 
ing table: 
Table 73 — Plant Values, with Acres of Ground Owned and Leased. 





Mines and Value of Buildings. 
Machinery and Shafts. 


Acres or Ground. 


District. 


s 


Buildings. 


1 


Machinery 


s 


Shaft. 


i 


Owned 


1 
g 


coal right 
and royalty. 


First 


27 
47 
134 
30 
19 
48 
44 


$ 57 670 

90.098 
159,943 

62. 107 
178. 100 
143,393 
199.440 


27 
45 
131 
20 
19 
46 
50 


$214,212 
122.365 
219,930 
72,875 
299,800 
268,785 
279.395 


30 
47 
134 
31 
19 
51 
62 


$391,721 
239.501 
507.440 
361.775 
733.000 
577.870 
512.855 


17 
21 
55 
35 
24 
30 
31 


6.974 
2.435 

4.788 
1.178 
1.095 
2,089 
8.200 


21 
33 
44 
23 
23 
50 
33 


5.039 




20.846 


Third 


11,281 


Fourth 


9,724 


Fifth 


18,319 


Sixth 

Seventh 


11,634 
9.718 






The State.... 


349 


$920,751 


338 


$1,477,362 


364 


$3,324,162 


213 


26.769 


227 


86,561 



In this presentation it is to be understood that all the operators 
giving the value of buildings, did not give the value of machinery, 
nor of the shaft; the same is true of the operators giving the value 
of machinery or of the shaft, and omitting the value of the buildings; 
some, however, reported the value of the entire plant, and also gave 
the acres of ground owned or leased. Therefore in reading the table 
each statement is to be considered separately. 

It will be seen in the last line of the table that 849 operators re- 
ported the value of their buildings, which aggregates $920,751; that 
338 operators gave the value of machinery at their mines, aggregat- 
ing a value of $1,477,362; and 364 returned the value of their shafts 
at a total of $3,324,162; also that 213 operators reported owning 
26,759 acres of land, and 227 operators having leases of coal rights 
on 86,561 acres of land. 

Underground Haulage. 
Modern civilization depends upon the facility with which the pro- 
ducts of labor can be distributed, Countries lacking advanced means 
of transportation, are now, and must continue to remain, in a back- 
ward condition. It is a source of some gratification to know that the 
coal industry not only supplies the power necessary to every form of 
mechanical transportation, but that its earliest developers were the 
first to devise methods for conveying the product to near by markets. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 123 

During the latter part of the 17th century the mine owners of Dur- 
ham and Northumberland, England, built coal roads to points of 
shipment on the Tyne and Wear. These consisted of two parallel 
lines of wooden beams or trams fixed to the ground and furnished 
with flanges to prevent the cars from derailing. This is the first re- 
corded attempt at surface transportation. About the year 1700 cast- 
iron rails fastened to cross ties were substituted for the wooden 
beams, and later the flanged wheel was substituted for the flanged 
rail, and the linking together of two or more cars, left to be solved 
only the problem of a more rapid or powerful means of locomotion . 

Richard Trevethick secured in 1802 a patent for a steam locomo- 
tive, to be used in the haulage of coal, that performed the work for 
which it was designed. The invention was not generally used , 
because of a mistaken idea entertained by the engineers of that day 
that the steam locomotive could not acquire speed or draw a heavy 
load unless provided with cogged wheels working on a corresponding 
rack along the rails. It remained for Mr. Blachett, a coal proprietor, 
to expose the errors of the engineers, and to demonstrate in the year 
1811, that a locomotive with smooth wheels running on smooth rails 
could draw heavy loads even up modern inclines. The only remain- 
ing obstacles were the power and means of speed. These were later 
met and overcome through the inventions of Stephenson and others . 

From the efPorts of the early English mine owners thus came the 
suggestion, which applied to the wider wants of present life, has 
given us the wonderful railroad system of our time. 

The purpose, however, of this statement is to show that a similar 
evolution has taken place in the matter of underground transportation . 
For over 100 years after the completion of the surface experiments 
referred to here, it was the universal practice in the mines of Great 
Britian to harness men and women, much after the manner of animals 
to-day, to draw wagons or other receptacles used for the transporta- 
tion of coal. The following illustrations furnish a clear idea of the 
progress that has been made in methods of underground transporta- 
tion. They fully describe every phase from the human harnessed to 
a "slipe" containing a few hundred pounds, to the modern electric 
motor, capable of hauling 50,000 tons. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



125 




In some parts of Europe, as recently as the 18th century, men and 
women were employed in underground haulage in coal mines, as shown 
in the above illustration. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



127 




COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



129 




The Old Indispensable. 




THE GUNCKEL PATENT 

CASLE. HAULAGE SYSTEM 



-9 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



131 




COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



133 




GOODMAN MOTOR. 



134 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 




Hector MoAllistee— Inspector, First District. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Whitehaven, Camberland county, 
Bcgland, in 1864, and is now 58 years old. 

He entered the coal mines at the age of eight years, at Blayden, county Dur- 
ham, England. In 1864 he came to the United States working as a miner in 
Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, for one year. In 1865 he moved to Illinois, 
and worked in the mines near Belleville until 1869, when he accepted a posi- 
tion at Streator.lwhere he worked until 1897. Ten years of this time he was 
mine manager of the Chicago, Wilmington & Vermillion Coal company. 

He was appointed State inspector of mines for the first district of Illinois 
in 1897 by Gov. John R. Tanner, which position he holds at the present time. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 135 




Thomas Hudson— Inspector, Second District. 

The original of the above picture was born in the county of Northumber- 
land, England, in 1846, and is now 58 years of age. He attended the schools 
in the mining districts of Northumbria until he was 13 years of age, when he 
commenced work in the collieries of the Bedlington coal company, going 
through the regular courses from trapper boy to miner. 

He came to the United States in 1871, locating in Henry, Marshall county, 
Illinois. After working two years in the coal mines at Galva, and operating 
a local mine at Henry, he moved to Streator, LaSalle county, where in 1873 
he engaged with the Vermillion coal company as a miner, and remained in 
the employ of that company for ten years. In 1883 the General Assembly 
passed an act creating the office of State inspectors of coal mines in lUliois, 
dividing the State into five districts, also providing for the examination of 
candidates for inspectors by a board of examiners. For some time previous 
to the passage of this act, Mr. Hudson had been a close student of mining 
literature, hence, he was fairly well versed in the technical as well as the 
practical knowledge of coal mining. At the first examination held by the 
board he successfully passed the examination, and was at once appointed by 
Gov. John L. Hamilton, as State inspector of coal mines for the second dis- 
trict. He at once transferred his residence from Streator to Galva, the latter 
being more centrally located in the district. Since 1883 he has been reap- 
pointed and commissioned by every Republican Governor, and now holds a 
commissisn under Governor Yates. 



136 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 




James Taylor— Inspector. Third District. 

This inspector was born in Heywood, Lancashire, England, in 1853, and is 
now 51 years of age. 

In 1873 he came with his parents to the United States, locating at Eltnwood, 
Peoria county, Illinois. Here he obtained work in the coal mines in that 
locality. In 1876 he moved to Kan?as, but returned to Illinois in 1880 
and began work in the mines at Edwards as a miner. In 1882 he was 
appointed to the position of county mine inspector of Peoria county. While 
occupying this position, he was selected as mine manager for one of the mines 
at Edwards, where he remained for five years. In 1887 he was appointed 
State inspector of mines for the third district by Governor Oglesby, and re- 
appointed to the same position by Governor Pifer. In 1890 he resigned as 
State inspector, to eugage in the coal mining basiuess at Edwards. In 1898 
he was appointed a member of the State mining board, serving until 1901, 
when he was again appointed State inspector of the third district by Governor 
Yates, and by him reappointed in 1903, and is now serving in that position. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



137 




Thomas Weeks— Inspector, Fourth District. 

Inspector Weeks was born at Kates Hill, Worcestershire county, England, 
in 1850, and is now 54 years of age. 

In 1861 his father and family emigrated to the United States, settling in 
Kewanee, Illinois. He attended school in England until he was ten years of age. 
At the age of 14 years he began working in the coal mines, and he has worked 
there continuously ever since, occupying the various positions from miner to 
mine manager. In 1895 he engaged with the Colfax coal and mining com- 
pany, at Colfax, as mine manager, where he remained until 1901, when he 
was appointed by Governor Richard Yates as State inspector for the fourth 
district, and now holds that position. 



188 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 




Walton Rutledgk— Inspector, Fifth District. 

The original of the above picture was born at Haswell, coanty of Durham, 
England, in 1835. 

At the age of 14 years he began working in the coal mines at that place. 
After about a year he was transferred to the surveying division, working with 
the mine examiners a part of the time. In 1854 he came to the United States, 
locating in the anthracite coal region, where he worked as a miner for two 
years. He came to Illinois in 1856, and settled in Alton, which has been his 
home ever since. Here he worked in the mines until May, 1864, when he en- 
listed in company D, 133rd regiment, Illicois infantry as first sergeant. Af- 
terwards, in the same year, he raised a company which was mustered into 
the 144th regiment, and served as first lieutenant to the close of the war of 
the rebellion. After the close of the war he again went to work in the coal 
mines near Alton. At the same time he was chosen as seeretaiy of the Mi- 
ners' Benevolent organization, embracing the states of Illinois, Indiana and 
Missouri, serving the organization for two years. During the session of the 
constitutional convention of 1870, he was active in securing a clause in the 
constitution providing for a police regulation for the coal mines of the State. 
In after years he was a member of a committee of miners to formulate a min' 
ing law for the State. After several attempts to secure such legislaticn he, 
with others, was finally successful iu securing the passage of a mining law at 
the session of the general assembly of 1879, but which provided for county 
inspectors only. In 1883, after the passage of the law creating State in- 
spectors of coal mines, he passed in the first examination for inspectors and 
was appointed inspector for the fourth district. He was reappointed succes- 
sively each term and held the position until 1894. In 1897 he was again ap- 
pointed inspector, and is now serving in that capacity. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 139 




John Donlop— Inspector. Sixth District. 
The above picture is a likeness of John Dunlop, who was born at Amuck 
Lodge, Parish of Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland in 1864. He attended the public 
schools at that place for seven years, and when 12 years of age he commenced 
work in the coal mines, following in the various positions from drawer to 
more advanced occupations. During the years up to the time he was 22 years 
of age, he attended night schools, taking up the courses as advanced by the 
government in the science and art department, which included mining engi- 
neering, thereby receiving a technical as well as a practical knowledge of 
coal mining, for which he secured four diplomas in the different branches 
studied. At the age of 22 years he came to the United States, locating in In- 
diana, where he remained for a fewyearf, after which he removed to Illinois. 
In 1892 he successfully passed the examination before the State mining board 
as mine manager, and engaged in that capacity with a large operator in Mar- 
ion county, remaining at the same place for five years, in 1897 he took the 
examination for State inspector of mines, and was appointed to that position 
for the sixth district by Governor John R. Tanner, and was reappointed by 
Governor Richard Vfates. He now resides with his family in Centralia. 



140 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 




Evan D. John— Inspector. Seventh District. 

Evan D. John was born in Measteg, Glanmorgan Shire, South Wales, in 
1861. Like most of his countrymen in those days, he was deprived of an 
early education. At the age of eight years he began working in the mines at 
that place as a trapper boy, and continued working in the coal mines of his 
native land until 1880, when he came to this country. His first work here 
was in a shaft at Murphysboro, Illinois. Sinee then he has worked in Ihe 
coal mines of Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, New Mexico and Indian Territory. 

In 1886 he held his first position as mine manager at Centerville, Iowa. In 
1888 he c&me to Springfield, Illinois, and took charge of the mining machines at 
the mine located at Spaulding. Shortly afterwards he accepted the position of 
mine manager, and later, superintendent at the same mine, continuing until 
1892, when he accepted a similar position at the mine at Barclay, remaining 
at this mine until 1897, when Gov. John R Tanner appointed him State in- 
spector for the seventh district, which position he has held ever since. His 
residence since his appointment as inspector has been at Carbondale. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE SIVKBAL 



STATE INSPECTORS OF COAL MINES 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 143 



FIRST INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 



Twentieth Annual Report. 
Counties— Grundy, Kankakee, LaSalle, Livingston, Will. 
Hector McAllister, Inspector, Streator. 



Hon. David Koss, Secretary, 

State Bureau oj Labor Statistics, Springfield, III. 

Sir — In compliance with section 12 of an act of the General Assembly of the 
State of Illinois, defining: the duties of the State inspectors of coal mines, and 
providing for the health and safety of persons employed therein, I herewith 
submit the 20th annual report of coal mines in the first inspection district for 
the year ended June SO, 1903. 

The district comprises the coal producing counties of Grundy, Kankakee, 
LaSalle, Livingston and Will. The report comprehends tabulated state- 
ments, giving the number of mines in operation, both shipping and local; the 
depth of the coal below the surface; the thickness of the different seams, and 
their geological number ; the number of new mines opened, also the number aban- 
doned during the year; the total number of persons employed at each mine; 
the number of tons of mine run, and the different grades of coal produced; 
the different prices per ton paid for mining; the value per ton of mine run 
and other grades of coal at the mine, with the aggregate value of the total 
product; the number of kegs of powder consumed for blasting coal and for 
other purposes; the number of casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, that have 
occurred in and around the mines; also the number of wives made widows, 
and the number of children left fatherless, caused by the fatal accidents; 
also the number of days of active operation of all the mines in the district. 

The following summary gives the most important facts of the district for 
the year: 

Total number of mines 74 

Number of shipping mines ^ 34 

Number of local mines 40 

Number of new mines 8 

Number of abandoned mines H 

Number of mfiiers 5, 766 

Number of other employes 1,758 

Number of boys under ground , 193 

Total number of employes 7, 717 



144 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Number of fatal accidents 24 

Number of non-fatal accidents 73 

Number of wives made widows 14 

Number of children left fatherless 49 

Total tons of coal produced, all mines 3.748,651 

Tons of mine run 617,697 

Tons of lump 2,116,106 

Tons of egg 167,725 

Tons of nut 123,647 

Tons of pea or screenings 730,910 

Tons of slacker waste 92,536 

Averaee value per ton of lump at shipping: mines $1.57 

Average value per ton of mine run at shipping mines $1.66 

Average value per ton of egg at shipping mines $1.60 

Average value per ton of nut at shipping mines $1.32 

Average value per ton of screenings at shipping mines $0.67 

Average value per ton of slack at shipping mines $0.26 

Aggregate value of total product, all mines $5,017,666 

Average price paid per gross ton for hand mining, shipping mines $0.74 

Average number of days of active operation, shipping mines , 251 

Number mines operated by hand mining 74 

Number of kegs of powder used for blasting coal 46.962 

Numberiof kegs of powder used for other purposes 1,972 

Number of steam boilers in use at mines, horizontal 123 

Number of tons of coal shipped 3,092,974 

Number of tons supplied to locomotives at the mines 120,143 

Number of tons sold to the local trade 254,319 

Number of tons consumed at the plant 281,215 

Tons of coal mined to each fatal accident 156.194 

Tons of coal mined to each non-fatal accident 76,503 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 322 

Number of employes to each non-fatal accident 106 

The following Statement gives the Coal Production, hy Counties, in 

the First District, with the Increase or Decrease in each, for the 
Years ended June 30, 1902 and 1903, 





Total Output op all 
Grades of Coal in Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


CODNTIKS. 


1902 


1903 


Grundy 


1.383,336 

51.901 

1.891.510 

348.291 

51.686 


1,457,935 
58. 195 

1.877.555 
319.350 
35.616 


74.599 
6,294 




Kankakee 






16.956 






28.941 


\y^jll .. 




16.070 








Total 


3.729.724 


3,748.651 


80.893 
18,927 


61,966 















The counties of Grundy and Kankakee show an increase of 80,893 tons 
while the counties of LaSalle, Livingston and Will show a decrease of 61,96& 
tons, leaving a net increase of 18,927 tons for the district over the output of 
1902 and an increase of 180,453 tons over that of 1901. 



New Mines. 

William Merlz, John Taylor, James Edson and Ringert and Hoehstetter 
have opened new mines south of Ottawa in LaSalle county. 

Oscar Kimes has opened a new mine southwest of Streator, LaSalle county. 

The North Wilmington Coal Co. has opened a new mine at Seneca, LaSalle 
county. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 145 

George Blair has opened a new mine near Morris, Grundy county. 
John Westerlund has opened a new mine one mile south of Streator, Livings- 
ton county. 

Abandoned Mines. 

John Westerlund and J. E. Buchanan have abandoned their mines south- 
east of Streator, LaSalle county. 

The Standard Coal Co., Seneca, has abandoned its mine, LaSalle county. 

John Marshall has abandoned his mine near Leanore, LaSalle county. 

Samuel Myers has abandoned his mine north of Kangley, LaSalle county. 

F. M. Fishburn has abandoned his mine south of Ottawa, LaSalle county. 

John Telfer, Corcoran Bros., Mitchell Bros., and Nelson Bros, have aban- 
doned their mines near Morris, Grundy county. 

The C. W. & V. Coal Co., of Streator, has abandoned the upper seam in 
its No. 1 mine at Heenanville; this seam is known as No. 7 of the geological 
section. The company is now opening out No. 2 seam of the geological sec- 
tion. This seam is being developed on the long- wall system and the conditions 
are favorable for a first- class mine. 

Changes op Ownership. 

■ Taylor ^and Cavanaugh have purchased the mines at Carbon Hill, Grundy 
county, formerly operated by the Star Coal Co. 

Mitchell Bros, have purchased the mine formerly operated by James 
Heather, near Morris, Grundy county. 

Beggs, Davis & Co. have leased the mine formerly operated by Walton 
Bros, at Fairbnry, Livingston county. 

Improvements. 

Mrs. Emerson Hakes, Rutland, LaSalle county, has taken the cage out of 
the air shaft at her mine and in its place erected a substantial stairway. 

The LaSalle County Carbon Coal Co., at its union mine, LaSalle, and 
James Cahill, Peru, have taken out the old ladders, formerly in these mines, 
and replaced them with well constructed stairways. 

Prospective Mines. 

The C. W, & V. Goal Co., Streator, is sinking a new shaft to No. 2 seam 
near its No. 2 mine, Streator, LaSalle county. 

The Wilmington Star Mining Co. is sinking a new shaft one mile west of 
its No. 6 mine, near Coal City, Grundy county. 

The Braeeville Coal Co. is sinking a new shaft half a mile west of its No. 5 
mine, Braeeville, Grundy county. 

The Big Four Coal Co. is sinking a new shaft one mile northwest of its No. 
2 mine. Coal City, Grundy county. 

—10 C 



146 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The Rixon Coal Co. of Chicago, is sinking a new shaft one mile east of 
Braceville, in Will county. 

The Jol let- Wilmington Coal Co. is sinking a new shaft near Braidwood, 
Will county. 

The Johnson Cooperative Coal Co. is sinking a new shaft two miles west of 
Fairbury on the Toledo, Peoria & Western railroad, in Livingston eouinty. 

The Diamond Cooperative Coal Co., Pontiac, Livingston county, is sinking 
a new shaft a quarter of a mile west of the city, on the Illinois Central rail- 
road. 

The Manhattan Goal Co. of Chicago, is sinking a new shaft one mile west 
of Cornell, Livingston county. 

The Star Coal Co. is sinking a new air shaft at the face of the workings at 
its No. 2 mine, Kangley, LaSalle county. 

The Cardiff Coal Co., Cardiff, Livingston county, has opened out a new 
mine about a half a mile west of the one destroyed by an explosion of gas as 
reported elsewhere. The hoisting and escapement shafts are each 8h, by 
I7I2 feet in the clear; both contain three compartments; two of the com- 
partments of the escape shaft are for air, and the other for the escapement 
of men by a cage in the shaft in place of a stairway. The third compartment 
in the main shaft contains stairways as an additional means of escape. The 
depth of the hoisting shaft from the surface is 224 feet. The hoisting engines 
were built by Crawford and McCrimmon; they are first motion, each cylinder 
is 24x36 inches, with a 6-foot drum. There are four boilers, two are water 
tube 175 horse power each; the other two are tubular, 150 horse power each. 
Both the main and escape shaft engines are set in brick buildings, all other 
buildings of the plant are covered with galvanized corrugated iron, making 
them as near fire proof as possible. The tower will be 70 feet high, built of 
structural steel. The Humble detaching hook will be used on the cages and 
in addicion thereto, there will be a device for preventing overwinding, at- 
tached to the hoisting engine. The general design for the tower and dump 
structure were made by George S. Rice, general superintendent of the com- 
pany, and is being built by the Wisconsin Bridge Co. The fan is 7x14 feet, 
high speed, with steel plate blades, and casing, no wood whatever being used 
in its construction. The shaking screens are double throughout. An Ot- 
tumwa box-carloader will be placed for the outer dump track, The cages 
will be double decked, steel rail guides will be used in the main shaft. 
Everything in the construction of this plant is for the handling of a large 
output. 

Four Explosions of Gas at the Mine of the Cardiff Coal Co., Car- 
diff, Livingston County. 

The first explosion in the Cardiff mine, which occurred March 13, 1903, 
whereby three persons lost their lives, was caused by gas igniting at a gob 
fire in the old workings down the south slope, which had been abandoned 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 147 

over a year ago. This mine is situated on the Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, and 
the Wabash railroads, in the northeast corner of Livingston eounty, and is 
owned and operated by the Cardiff Coal company. The shaft is 240 feet deep 
to a 12 foot seam of coal; six feet lower there is a 3 foot seam. When the 
upper seam was worked out at this point, the south slope was commenced in 
the lower seam, and the rooms were driven at right angles to the rooms in 
the upper seam at the location of the gob fire in the lower seam. The strata 
between the two seams caved through, thus forming a chimney or draft for 
the fire. I received a message from Cardiff the morning of the day of the 
explosion to come at once, but owing to the time of trains leaving Streator, 
I did not arrive there until about 5 o'clock in the afternoon. Everything 
was right on top, the fan was running at the regular speed. 

George S. Rice, general superintendent, and Benjamin Phillips, mine exam- 
iner, went with me down the shaft. We examined very carefully the section of 
the mine where the explosion occurred, but could not find any indication of 
tire damp. We therefore came to the conclusion that men could safely go 
down and repair the stoppings that had been destroyed by the force of the 
explosion, and thus restore ventilation in the mine. 

There were 15 men in the mine when the explosion occurred, all at work 
building and repairing stoppings in the upper seam, intending thereby to 
smother the gob fire burning in the lower seam. Two of the men were work- 
ing on the third southeast entry, two on the third northeast entry, two at the 
mouth of the south slope, and two at each of the rooms, one, two and three 
west of the south slope; two men were bailing water in the seventh and 
eighth southeast entry. 

The two men working at the third southeast entry, James Hewitt and John 
McClusky, were instantly killed by being thrown against the entry rib by the 
force of the explosion. The two men at the third northeast entry were not 
injured; the men working at the south slope and in rooms one, two and three, 
together with the night boss, were all knocked down by the force of the ex- 
plosion, but none of them injured, excepting the night boss, H. M. Dodge, 
whose shoulders were bruised. Two of the men working on the south slope 
went east, the other men went west, and reached the hoisting shaft, here they 
met the two men from the third northeast. There were four other men miss 
ing. All the men at the hoisting shaft went in search of the two men, who 
Were working at the south slope. They were found laying about 50 
feet east of the south slope, having been overcome by the after damp. James 
Barra, miner, was dead, and the miner with him was unconscious, but was 
soon revived after being taken to the fresh air. 

By this time the night engineer had given a general alarm; Thomas Roberts, 
mine manager, soon had a rescuing party at the mine. The party descended 
the escapement shaft, (there had been a cage connected with this shaft;) they 
found ten men near the hoisting shaft and near the mule stable. It may be 
well to state here that at this time a part of the hoisting engine was broken, 
and had not been repaired. After the explosion the men were taken out of 
the mine, while others of the rescuing party made further search for the miss- 



148 STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

ing men. The bodies of Hewitt and MeCInsky were found at the third south- 
east, both were dead. They were conveyed to their homes. The rescuing 
party made further search for the two water bailers; when the party reached 
the fifth southeast they were forced to return, for the reason that the ventila- 
tion had been cut off. The men began at once erecting temporary stoppings 
between the intake and the return airways, and soon had the ventilation es- 
tablished. It was now about 9 a. m.; the two missing men, water bailers, 
came down the main east entry and went out at the escape shaft. 

At the time of the explosion, midnight, these two water bailers were eat- 
ing supper on the fifth east parting; a cloud of dust came to the parting, and 
they had to retreat to the eighth southeast entry, although the air was cut 
off from them. They were also cut off from the after damp; they made 
several attempts to go out during the night and about 9:00 o'clock, as stated, 
they succeeded in getting out; the mule they had been working was found 
dead on the parting. The next day, Saturday the 14th, in the afternoon, in 
company with Mr. Phillips, mine examiner, I made a thorough examination 
of the mine. We especially examined the south slope to the third southeast 
where the explosion took place, but could not find any indication of fire 
damp. At this time men were working in the mine, repairing stoppings so 
as to establish ventilation, and also to close up the old workings. 

The second explosion occurred Sunday evening, March 15, about 5:20 
o'clock. Six men were in the mine at the time, building and repairing stop- 
pings. 

W. H. Parker, superintendent, and Thomas Roberts, mine manager, with 
several others, volunteers, made preparations to go down the shaft; when 
about half way down the cage caught in the slides, owing to some broken 
timbers, caused by the force of the explosion. Considerable time was lost 
before the party reached the bottom of the shaft. William Humphreys was 
found alive at the bottom of the air shaft. He was taken home, and at once 
received medical attention. The rescuing party followed down the back entry 
to the south slope, where the men had been working. They found the dead 
bodies of Anton Hassell and Anton Jeokoski; further search was made for 
the other three men, but they could not be found. The party was forced to 
abandon the search at this time on account of the bad condition of the air. 

It was now getting towards morning, and the rescuers concluded to wait 
for my arrival at Cardiff. I arrived at the mine about 9:30 o'clock Monday, 
the 16th, just at the time when the third explosion was taking place. This 
was decidedly the most violent explosion that had occurred; the force of the 
explosion blew down the pulley wheels, and knocked down part of the tower 
at the air shaft, and also forced through the end of the engine house. A. M. 
Michaels, head carpenter, was struck on the breast with a piece of flying 
timber, injuring him seriously; he died about noon the same day. 

I concluded at once that it would be very foolish and inconsiderate, that 
other lives should be sacrificed, as the explosions seemed to be occurring at 
frequent intervals. Under these conditions, it was apparent that further 
effort to secure the bodies of the three men— James Hutchinson, William 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 149 

Aldersonand A. Wilson— whom the rescuers had failed to find, was hopeless, 
and would evidently result in further loss of life. I ordered the shaft to be 
flooded with water. During the time occupied by the men digging the ditch, 
both hoisting and escapement shafts were covered over to stop the circulation 
of air and thereby smother the fire. 

At 2:37 p. m. the same day, Monday, March 16, the fourth explo- 
sion occurred, the force of which blew the covering off of both shafts. The 
ditch having been completed at this time, the water was let into the air shaft. 

The fifth and last explosion occurred about 7:30 p. m. the same day; about 
half an hour afterwards smoke was discovered coming out of the hoisting 
shaft. The shaft timbers had been set on fire, and all combustible material 
around the top works was burning. 

The engine house was completely destroyed by tire, although it was cov- 
ered with corrugated iron. The heat coming out of the shaft was intense, 
warping the steel tower, and rendering it a total wreck. 

About 11:30 p. m., the shaft timbers having been consumed by the fire, the 
shaft caved in, letting in the surface around the top for a radius of about 20 
feet, leaving the tower hanging at an angle of about 45 degrees. The shaft 
and all property was a total loss, and the mine has been abandoned. 



150 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 




:note 

Pull lines Upper Vein workings (Thick Vein) 

ito 20 ft, of Sandstone (t Shale seperate Lower & Upper Veins 

Dashed lines Lower Vein workings 

Arrows. — >-Direction of Air currents prior to^Gob fire 

® 1,2,& 3, Location of bodies, when found after first explosion 

of March 12 1903 

■-^ Gob tire 

PLAT-CARDIFF COAL COMPANY'S MINE. CARDIFF. LIVINGSTON COUNTY. (See 
text First District.) 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 151 

Fatal Accidents. 

July 9, 1902, Antonia Graeeie, miner, aged 50 years, married, was killed at 
the face of his working: place in No. mine of the Wilmington Star Mining 
company, Coal City, Grundy county. De«eased leaves a widow and two 
cnildren in Italy. 

July 9, 1902, John Cherry, miner, aged 21 years, single, was killed by a 
premature blast in the Pontiac Coal company's mine, Pontiac, Livingston 
county. 

Sept. 23, 1902, A. Brochine, miner, aged 40 years, single, was injured by a 
fall of coal at the face of his working place in the Oglesby Coal company's 
mine, Oglesby, LaSalle county. His injuries were considered slight at the 
time of the accident, as he walked from the face to the bottom of the shaft. 
However, he died the following day. 

Oct. 6, 1902, Gregor Zora, miner, aged 45 years, married, was killed by a 
fall of rock in No. 4 mine of the Big Pour Coal company, Carbon Hill, Grundy 
county. He leaves a widow and four children dependent. 

Oct. 8, 1902, John Janks, miner, aged 52 ynars, married, was instantly killed 
by a fall of coal at the face of his working place in the LaSalle mine of the 
LaSalle County Carbon Coal company, LaSalle county. He leaves a widow 
and six children, four dependent. 

Nov. 7, 1902, Isaac Gustive, miner, aged 16 years, single, was instantly 
killed by a fall of rock at the face of his working place, in No. 4 mine of the 
Wilmington Coal Mining and Manufacturing company. Diamond, Grundy 
county. He was working with his father when the accident occurred. 

Nov. 27, 1902, John Kelcie, miner, aged 26 years, married, was killed by a 
fall of coal in the mine at Clark City, of the Gardner- Wilmington Coal com- 
pany, Kankakee county. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Dee. 9, 1902, Michael Vercemak, miner, aged 16 years, single, was instantly 
killed by a fall of coal at the face of his working place, in No. 2 mine of the 
C, W. & V. Coal company, Streator, LaSalle county. He was working with 
his father when the accident occurred. 

Dec. 24, 1902, John Smith, miner, aged 35 years, single, was injured by a 
fall of rock at the face of his working place, in Ihe Pontiac mine of the Pon- 
tiac Coal company, Livingston county. He was mining at the time, when a 
small piece of rock fell on him. He was taken to his home, where he died 
two days after receiving his injuries. 

Jan. 23, 1903, Andrew Bovalar, miner, aged 38 years, married, was killed 
by a fall of rock at the face of his working place, in the C, W. & V. Coal 
company's mine at Heenanville, LaSalle county. He leaves a widow and 
four children. 

Feb. 6, 1903, Joseph Samecek, miner, aged 56 years, married, was killed by 
a fall of rock at the face of his working place, in No. 6 mine of the Wilming- 
ton Star Mining company, Coal City, Grundy county. He leaves a widow. 



152 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Feb. 11, 1903, Fred Coleman, driver, aged 23 years, single, was fatally in- 
jured in No. 1 mine of the LaSalle Carbon Coal company, LaSalle county. 
He was walking in front of a loaded car when his foot caught in the frog, the 
car coming on top of him, breaking his back. He was taken to the hospital 
in LaSalle, where he died of his injuries April 15, two months after the acci- 
dent occurred. 

Feb. 24, 1903, Dominic Carmel, miner, aged 26 years, single, was killed by 
a fall of rock at his working face, in the Braceville Coal company's No. 5 
mine, Grundy county. 

March 7, 1903, James Baker, miner, aged 52 years, married, had his back 
broken by a fall of rock in the Oglesby mine of the Oglesby Coal company, 
LaSalle county. He was taking down coal when the rock fell on him. He 
died on April 3, nearly one month after receiving his injuries. He leaves a 
widow and two children. 

March 13, 1903, an explosion of gas occurred in the mine ot the Cardiff Coal 
company, Livingston county, which resulted in the death of three men— James 
Hewitt, driver, aged 23 years, single; John McClusky, miner, aged 23 years, 
married, leaves a widow and one child; and James Barra, miner, aged 41 
years, married, leaves a widow and four children. Barra and McClusky were 
building a stopping at the third southeast, where the force of the explosion 
was the greatest. They were thrown against the side of the entry and in- 
stautly killed. The explosion was caused by gas igniting at a gob fire, which 
had taken place in the old workings down the south slope. The men, at the 
time of the explosion, were putting in stoppings to seal off the old works from 
the main road. 

March 15, 1903, a second explosion occurred at the same mine, when five 
men were killed, namely: Anton Hassell, miner, aged 38 years, married, 
leaving a widow and three children; Anton Jeokoski, miner, aged 23 years, 
single; William Alderson, miner, aged 28 years, married, leaving a widow 
and two children; A. Wilson, miner, aged 51 years, married, leaving a widow 
and seven children; and James Hutchinson, miner, aged 46 years, married, 
leaving a widow and eight children. The last three named are buried in the 
mine— their bodies could not be found by the rescuing party. There were 
six men in the mine when the second explosion occurred, at work repairing 
the stoppings between the entries in order to restore the ventilation, which 
the first explosion had destroyed. William Humphreys was the only one of 
the six men taken out alive. 

March 16, 1903, a third explosion occurred at this mine, the force of which 
was so great that some of the timbers were blown off of the top of the air 
shaft. A. W. Michael, a carpenter, was struck in the breast by a piece of 
flyiag timber, which caused his death three hours afterwards. He was 38 
yfars of age, and leaves a widow and four children. The company caused 
the mine to be flooded with water immediately after the last explosion, and it 
will not be reopened. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



153 



May 29, 1903, James Kerovsky, miner, aged 48 years, married, was killed 
by a fall of rock at the face of his working place, in the South Wilmington 
No. 1 mine of the C, W. & V.Coal company, Grundy county. He leaves one 
child dependent. 

The tables of the fatal and non-fatal casualties follow; also the statistical 
tables, by counties, of the output, prices and values and other detailed infor- 
mation regarding the coal industry in the district. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Hector McAllister, 
State Inspector of Mines, First District, Streator. 

Fatal Casualties —First District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




00 

i 


i 
i 


n 


2 
fl 

Q. 

Q 


Cause of Accident. 


1902 
July 


9 
9 
25 
6 
8 
7 

27 
9 
24 
23 
6 
11 
24 
7 

13 
13 
13 
15 
16 
15 
16 
15 
16 
29 


Antonia Graceie .... 
John Cherr'p 


so 

21 
40 
46 
52 
16 
26 
16 
35 
38 
56 
23 
26 
52 
23 
23 
41 
38 
23 
28 
51 
46 
38 
48 


Miner 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

..do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

.. do 

Driver 

Miner 

.. do 

Driver 

Miner 


Coal City... 
Pontiac 






2 


'i 

"i 
'i 

i 

1 

i 
i 

9 




Falling rock 




■5 

6 
'2 

■5 

1 

■3 

'2 
6 
4 

■3 

8 
9 
5 

1 

61 


Premature blast .... 


Sept. 




Oglesby .... 








Falling coal 


Oct 


Qresror Zora 


Carbon Hill. 

LaSalle 

Diamond ... 
Clark City.. 






4 
6 


Falling rock 




John Janks 


Failing coal . 


Nov. 


Isaac Wustine 

John Kelcie 






Falling coal 


Dec. 


Michael Vercemak.. 


.. do 












Falling rock 


&. 


Andrew Bovalar .... 

Joseph Samecek 

Fred Coleman 

Dominic Carmel .... 

James Baker 

James Hewitt 

JohnMcClusky 


Heenanville 
Coal City ... 
LaSalle 






4 


.. do 

.. do 

Pit car 


Mar. 


Braceville... 
Oglesby .... 
Cardiff 






2 


Falling rock 

.. do 

Gas explosian.. ---.. 




do 






1 
4 
3 


do 




.. do 


.. do 


.. do 




Anton Hassell 

Anton Jeokoskl 

William Alderson... 
A. Wilson 


do . .. 


.do 


do 




do 


do 


do 




do 


.. do 


\ 

15 




2 

7 
8 
4 
1 


.. do 




;; do :;:;:::; 


.. do 


.. do 




James Hutchinson.. 

A. M. Michaels 

James Kerovsky.... 

Total-24 


.. do 


.. do 


.. do 


May 


Carpenter .. 
Miner 


.. do 

S.Wilm'ng'n 


Flying timber 

Falling rock 




14 49 





















Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — First District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Ca.snalty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Coal City 


2 

2 
2 

24 


Driver 


2 
1 
21 


Falling rock. 


8 
6 
8 

1 
1 
1 

24 


Star Mining C. Co. No. 6 


1 






? 


Oglesby 


Gas explosion 

Pit car 


Oglesby mine 


?. 


cfrbonH 1 




LaSalle Co. C. & C. Co.. 
LaSalle No. 1 




LaSalle 


Flying timber 

Premature blast 




Diamond 


LaSalle B 




Clark City 


LaSalle No 2 










Heenanville 


Pontlac No. 1 




Braceville.... 

Cardiff 

S.Wilmington 

Total 


Pontiac No. 6 

Pontiac No. 5 

Pontiac No. 4 

Cardiff 

S. Wilmington No. 1 .... 


?4 













154 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Casualties — First District — July 1, 1903. 



Character and Cause 
of Injury. 



1902 
July 3 
10 
11 

15 



Aug. 



16 
Sept. 4 



Oct. 6 
9 

10 
16 
20 
21 



7 

11 
13 
21 
26 
26 
26 
26 

Dec. 1 
26 
1903 

Jan. 7 
21 
28 
30 

Feb. 2 



19 
21 
Feb. 28 
Mar. 9 
12 
12 



Apr. 2 
2 

7 

11 
20 
22 
24 



Thos. Doherty ... 

John Fenaw 

Peter Wahl 

Frank Lucas 

And'w Miarcinko 

M. Muichllli 

William Clelland 

E. Garrison 

W. Betoa 

Nick Lochr 

W. Geelec 

William Granger. 

Martin Baker 

John Eleck 

F. Kreda 

John Reay 

Chas. White 

Joe Macovels 

Pat McDermot... 
Suaflne Corsine.. 

P. Grubick 

J. Pansegrnallsh .. 

Andrew Bolt 

John Cave 

James Lynch — 

Ale±. Patterson.. 
William Fallen .. 
Robt. Robertson . 
Anton Gegibus... 

Thos. Smith 

Hector Dennison. 

V. Balbuiot 

L. Hadosky 

M. Wozrshosky.. 
Anton Horstirla.. 

John Griffith 

B. Columbus 

John Hemolkie .. 

S. Monlewich 

Thos. Snoden .... 

M. Riordan 

John McClernan. 

D. Selloto 

Anton Renetti ... 
Jos. Groshlnski.. 

R. McLean 

F. Teskir 

John Spreat 

John Vlra 

John Morrell 

Steve Dowell .... 

John Jargeeli 

Henry Spaeat.... 
H Wodarchek.... 
Martin Krattlck.. 
John Barron 

V. Crone 

Jas. Kossio 

John Wissou 

S. Curehar 

P. Sammon 



Braidwood . 
S Wilm'ton 
Streator .... 



Heenanvllle 
S. Wilm'ton 
.. do 



Streator 

S. Wilm'ton 



LaSalle 

.. do 

S. Wilm'ton 

Oglesby 

Braidwood . 

.. do 

Streator 

LaSalle 

Braidwood.. 

LaSalle 

Clark City.. 

LaSalle 

.. do 

Braidwood.. 
Streator .... 



..do 

Diamond ... 
S. Wilm'ton 
Diamond ... 
S. Wilm'ton 
Streator .... 

.. do 

Carbon Hill. 
Kangley .... 

LaSalle 

.. do 



Streator 

Braidwood.. 

.. do 

Minonk 

Streator 

Per* 

Kangley 

.. do 

S. Wilm'ton 

LaSalle 

S. Wilm'ton 

LaSalle 

.. do 

S. Wilm'ton 

Diamond 

Braidwood.. 
S. Wilm'ton 

LaSalle 

.. do 

Peru 

Streator .... 



S. Wilm'ton 
Carbon Hill. 

Kangley 

S. Wilm'ton 
..do 



Arm injured; falling rock 

Back injured; falling rock.... 
Back and hip injured; falling 

rock 

Back and hip injured; falling 

rock 

Finger injured; falling coal .. 

Leg injured; falling coal 

Thumb amputated by falling 

coal 

Leg Injured; falling rock 

Collar bone broken; falling 

rock 

Foot bruised; falling rock 

Back bruised; falling rock 

Thumb bruised; falling coal,. 

Back injured; pit car 

FootiDJured; pick 

Leg broken; failing rock 

Leg bruised; pit car 

Arm broken; cage 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Ankle dislocated by pit car . . . 

Leg injured; falling rock 

Finger injured; pit car 

Back injured; falling coal 

Finger injured; falling rock.. 
Hip and ribs injured; falling 

timber 

Ankle sprained; slipping on 

rail 

Leg broken ; pit car 

Hand injured; falling coal 

Leg broken; pitcar 

Foot bruised; falling coal 

Knee bruised; falling rock ... 

Leg broken; pitcar 

Leg injured; pitcar 

Arm injured; falling rock 

Back injured; falling coal .... 
Foot injured; cage 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Knee bruised; falling rock.... 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Collar bone broken; timber... 

Ankle sprained; pitcar 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Back bruised; falling rock.... 

Hand bruised; pitcar 

Leg bruised ; pick 

Hand injured ; pit car 

Arm broken; pitcar 

Head cut; falling coal 

Finger injured; falling rock.. 

Finger injured; falling rock.. 

Arm injured; falling rock 

Hand broken; falling coal.... 

Leg broken; pitcar 

Body bruised ; pit car 

Head cut; falling coal 

Hand and face burned: ex- 
plosion of gas 

Foot injured; falling rock 

Shoulder injured; falling rock 

Back injured; falling rock 

Shoulder injured; falling rock 

Back and hip injured; falling 
rock 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



155 



Non-Fatal Casualties— First District — July 1, 1903— Concluded . 



Date. 


Name. 


<3 


Residence. 




a 


i 


1^ 


Character and Cause of 
Injury. 


® . 

P 


May 7 
11 
16 


ames Martin 

John Vallentuo.. 
Joe Bartholomew 
N. Hellenberir.... 
Oscar Solberff.... 
Joseph Hozie 

Henry Larkin.... 
8. Montls-wich... 

Peter Clauson 

Stephen Roth.... 
Joseph Glvens. .. 
Fred Rodzinskl.. 

Totals— 73 .... 


68 
37 
20 
17 
30 
24 

29 

48 
39 
55 
27 
50 


LaSalle 

S. Wilm'ton 
.. do 




2 

36 


1 
3 

"i 

■■■| 

■■'6 
108 


1 

4 

■"5 

1 
1 

"i 

4 

4 

"e 

131 


Leg: broken: falling coal 

Back injured; falling rock.... 

Arm broken; falling coal 

Toes broken; falling rock 


35 


18 
20 


Peru 

Streator .... 
Henanville. 

Bracevllle.. 

Minonk 

HeenanviUe 

Peru 

Kangiey 

LaSalle 


"i 

37 


40 


26 


Collar bone broken; falling 
rock.... ... ... 


, 


27 

, 30 

June 1 

3 

28 
30 


Leg broken; falling timber... 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Ribs broken; falling timber.. 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Leg broken; falling rock 


* 
30 

1697 















Not recovered July 1. 1903. 



Total men Injured 

Not recovered July 1, 1903 

Number recovered July 1. 1903 

Time lost by men recovered 

Average days lost by men recovered 



3.697 days 
61.6 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties— First District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualties. 


No 


Colliery. 


N.. 


Braceville 


16 

11 

73 


Drivers!!!!.'.'! 

Laborer 

Miners 

Timber men.. 

Top men 

Trip rider .... 
Trapper 


2 

10 
1 

64 
2 
2 
1 
1 


Palling coal 


36 

2 
1 

16 
2 

1 


Acme.. 


3 






Bracevllle 


3 


Carbon Hill... 


Falling timber 


CahlU, James 


1 


Clark City.... 


c.w.&v. :::.!!!!!!!! 


?.H 


Diamond 


Gas explosion 

Pit cars 


E. Hakes 


? 


HeenanviUe., 


Gar. Wilm. Coal Co 

LaSalle C. C. Co 


1 




By pick 


15 


LaSalle 

Minonk 

Oglesby 


Slipped on rail 


Murphy-Keenan Co 


2 
2 




Sfiffi'c^S'rM'frci:; 


? 


Streator 

S.Wilmington 

Total . 


7 
73 













156 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table Showing the Number and Nature of Non-Fatal Casualties, 
Conjugal Relations and Time Lost — First District— 1903. 



Nature of Injuries. 


1 

a 

s 
2; 


i 


.2 

DO 


9 

(D 

P. 

5 


TiMB Lost 






Total 
days. 


Average 
days. 


Arm broken 


3 
3 
2 

6 
1 

16 


4 

1 
...... 

2 
3 

...... 

2 
1 
1 
1 
S 
11 
1 
...... 

1 
i 


3 

3 

1 

...... 

1 

2 
3 
2 

1 
3 

...... 

3 

6 

...„. 


...... 

5 

16 

5 

...... 

9 
16 

...... 

4 
1 
3 
6 
6 
40 
4 
...... 

3 
5 


191 
152 
117 
52 
393 
^132 

70 
256 
246 

49 
124 

65 

38 

30 
68 
328 
1,147 
30 
86 
36 
49 
40 


63.66 

60.66 

58.3 

62 

43.66 

66 


4 I 










Ankle dislocated 


1 37 


Back iDJured . 


12 33 


Back and hip 


2.74 


Body braised 


1 37 




23.33 

61.2 

40.9 

49 

41.3 

65 

38 




Foot injured 


6.85 


Finsrers Id jured . 


6.86 




1.37 






Hand and face burned.... 


1 37 


Head cut ... 


2 74 




1.37 


Hip and ribs injured 


30 

34 

55.33 

71.7 

30 

43 

35 

49 

40 


1 37 




2.74 




8.22 


jeff broken 


22 00 


Jibs broken 


1.37 


Shoulder injured 


2,74 


Thumb amputated . . 


1 37 


Thumb injured 


1.37 


Toes broken 


1.37 






Total 


73 


37 


36 


134 


3.697 


50.64 


100.00 







* Still idle. 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Grundy County — First District — 1903. 





Naub of Operator. 


POSTOFFICB 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


a 


H 


a 


b 
<D 

a 

i 


a 






a 


1 
? 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

C.W. & V.Coal Co., 1... 

Braceville Coal Co., 5 

C.W. & V.Coal Co.. 2.... 
Big Four Wilm. Coal Co.. 3 
Wilmington C. M. & Mfg. 

Co., 4 

Taylor & Cavanaugh. 5 . . 
Big Four Wilm. Coal Co. 2 
Wilmington Star Mining 

Co.. 6 


"<. Wilmington 
Coal City 

Diamond 

Carbon Hill.. 
Coal City 

.. do 


298,007 
163.285 
149.902 
145.013 

118,662 
114.960 
106.683 

105.856 

80.094 

79,818 
64,469 

8.788 


893 


181,084 
127,607 
80,873 
108,499 

95,002 
89,409 
68,248 

40,732 

65,577 

61,165 
46,501 
6,558 


66.886 




60, 144 
35.678 


^ 




40,040 
6.783 


■"i.oii 


28 989 


i 

6 


256 


28.464 
23.660 


fi 








25. 551 


7 




3.436 


13.824 
42.269 


21.176 


8 


1.320 


21.536 
14, 517 


9 


Wilmington C. M. & Mfg. 
C0..5 

Wilmington Star Mining 

Taylor &"Cavanaugii,"4'.!! 
Star Coal Co.. 1 

Totals 


Diamond 

Coal City 

Carbon Hill .. 
.. do 


10 
11 


371 




3,803 


14.479 

17. 958 


1? 


29 







2 201 














1.485.527 


2.869 


971.255 


106, 145 


60.907 


294.351 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

Espley & Handwark 

Morris Carbon Coal Co .. 
William Wood 


Morris 

.. do 


4,079 
3.529 
3.320 
2,280 
2,150 
1,995 
1.953 
1,45« 
652 
1,000 

22,408 




3.000 
3.229 
2.020 
1.800 
2.025 
1.895 
1.603 
1.300 
620 
875 

19,367 






1.079 


•> 








300 


3 


..do 








300 


4 


Mitchell Bros 


"do;::::::::: 








480 


f> 


Frank Gilbride 


.. do 








126 


6 


John Cryer, Jr 


. do 








100 


7 


James Bell . . . 


do 








350 


8 




.. do 




160 


q 


Henry Teidall 


do 








32 


10 


R Bean 


do 








125 




Totals 












3.041 




Totals— 22 mines.. 




1,457.935 


2.869 


990.622 


106,145 


60.907 


297.392 



Mines in 1902, 25. 
New mines. 1. 
Abandoned mines. 4. 
Mines in 1903. 22. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



159 



Grundy County — First District — Concluded. 



3 

o 
o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output 


d 

o 

1 

P. 

o 

> 

1 

"S 

m 
1 


■a 

1 

>, 
a 

a 

a 


1 

a 

1 

o a 

V 03 

'u-O 


73 

II 

li 


Acci- 
dents. 




s 
> 

El 

<: 


1 

a 

H 

< 


o 

a 

o 

< 




Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


2 

Id 


h 

ill 

OoaS 


■i 

2 

o 

a 

a 
Z 


§ 

a 

o 

II 


s 


$376,337 
203.006 
189.369 
181.240 

162.828 
139.965 
133,013 

126.265 

104.791 

104.819 
73.962 
10. 387 


428 
225 
203 
216 

267 
219 
146 

157 

160 

120 
131 
141 


111 

84 
55 
45 

49 
66 

47 

70 

36 

87 
46 
28 


539 
309 
268 
261 

316 
276 
193 

227 

196 

207 
177 
169 


274. 746 
155.547 
128.647 
141.223 

113.098 
103.312 
98.432 

103.971 

77,094 

72.363 
62.227 

8.507 


1.967 
2.395 
8,217 

3.564 
3.465 
4.561 

5.091 
50 


21.294 
5.343 

13, 138 
3.790 

2.000 
8.193 
3.690 

1.885 

3.000 

2.361 

2.232 

231 


297 
278 
273 
225 

220 
251 
242 

264 

276 

268 
268 
27 


298.007 
163,285 
149.902 
145.013 

118.662 
114,960 
106,683 

105.856 

60.094 

79.818 
64.459 
8,788 


$0 81 
81 
81 

: 

81 

81 

81 

81 
81 
81 


f:ffi 

2.500 
164 

2.228 
132 
132 

615 

2.652 

230 
70 


1 

1 

1 
2 

"l 


.0 
2 

6 

6 

1 

.... 

3 

""i 


1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 
7 

8 

9 

10 
11 












$1,795,012 


2.413 


714 


3.127 


1.339.167 


29.300 


67.060 


260.2 


1.435.527 


$0 82.6 


12.453 


6 


29 




$8,261 


10 
10 
8 
7 
6 
5 
5 
5 
6 
3 


1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


11 
11 

10 
8 
8 
6 
6 
6 
6 




4.079 
3,529 
3.320 
2,280 
2,150 
1,995 
1.963 
1.450 
652 
1.000 


:::::::: 


200 
225 
251 
200 
210 
225 
210 
200 
180 
195 


4.079 
3,629 
3.320 
2.280 
2.150 
1.995 
1.953 
1.450 
652 
1.000 


$116 
1 15 
1 55 
1 55 
1 55 
1 45 
1 55 
1 55 
1 65 
1 55 








1 


8.492 










2 












6.382 












5.694 










5 


4.817 










a 


4.483 










7 


3.710 










8 


1.892 








C) 


2.519 








* 


in 














$53,402 


64 


12 


76 




22.408 




209.6 


22.408 


$1 40 82 










$1,848,414 


2,477 


726 


3.203 


1,339.167 


51.708 


67.060 




1,457.935 




12.453 


6 


29 





160 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Kankakee County — First District — 1903. 





Namk or Operator. 


PO8T0FPI0K 

Address 

OF Mine. 




Output of Mink in Tons. 




1 
i 


5 


d 

S3 
u 


1 


Ed 


i 


1 


1 


SHIPPING MINK. 

Gardner-Wilm. Coal Co.. 


Clark City.... 


68.196 
68.195 


12.782 
12. 782 


27.448 





1,353 


16.612 




27,448 




1.353 


16.612 















Mines in 1902, 1. 
Mines in 1903. 1. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



161 



Kankakee County — First District — Concluded. 



1 

o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


o 

OS 

o 
® 

1 
i 


a 

08 
Xi 

>> 

■o 

a 

00 

a 


.2 

1 

If 

1! 

Oh 


1. 

ss 
si 

^! 

■=0 

li 

3 3 


Acci- 
dents. 




® 

s 

> 

MS 

11 

<1 


h 
H 

> o 

< 


4S 

(>> 

o 

■s 
a 

s 

I 

< 


2 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment aud sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 


b 

lie 


•3 

u 

a 


a 

o 

a 

is 


a 

z 


$80,929 


75 
75 


70 


145 


47. 318 


1.926 


8.951 


250 


68,195 


$0,814 


352 


1 


1 


1 


$80,929 


70 


145 


47.318 


1.92C 


8.951 


260 


68, 195 


$0,814 


352 


1 1 





11 c 



162 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

LaSalle County — Firsii District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOPFICK 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Output 


OF Mine in Tons. 




u 

.0 

a 


3 


i 

a 




ex 




|1 


1 


SHIPPIKG MINKS. 

C. W. & V.Coal C0..2... 

C..W,& V.Coal C0..I... 

LaSalle Co. C. C. Co.. 

Union 


Streator 

.. do 

LaSalle 

.. do 


206,749 
199.519 

182. 107 
178,935 

166.771 

162.963 
158.326 
129,068 
118.761 

111.680 

72.000 

44,979 

5.241 

700 


328 


122.879 

84.784 






83 542 


? 




22.838 


91 897 


3 


147.636 
7.649 

58.054 

5,921 




3 


LaSalle Co. 'C* C.'CoV. 
LaSalle 


139.216 

80.229 

96.439 
86. 114 
78.005 
74,663 
90,595 

62,000 


3.973 
32. 160 


1.902 

8.306 

852 
12.217 
4.462 
3.049 


26. 195 


5 


.. do 


20. 182 
27.601 


6 


LaSalle Co. C. C. Co.. 
Rockwell 


.. do 


7 


Acme Coal Co.. 1 

<tar Coal Co., 2 

Oglesby Coal Co.. 1 


Streator 

do 


59,995 
35 527 


8 


11.074 

22,615 


9 

in 


Oglesby 

Rutland 


18,434 
20.985 

10.000 


11 


Estate James Cahill. Ca- 
hlll 


■■"ii'gTO 






1? 


111. Zinc Co.. Deer Park.. 
N. Wilmington Coal Co.,1 
J. C. Dawson. Deer Park. 

Totals 


. do 








19 


Seneca 

Deer Park.... 


4.566 






675 


14 


700 




















1.737.699 


298.956 


919.490 


36. 123 


53.626 


429.506 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

Matthiessen & Hegeler 
Zine Co.. M. & H. Zinc 
Co 


LaSalle 

Marseilles.... 
Streator 


96.891 
15,656 

9,639 

5.400 

2.080 

2,000 

1.480 

1.100 

500 

500 

600 

800 

600 

650 

200 

200 

400 

30O 

200 

350 

410 

139.856 


96.891 
15.656 










2 


Marselles Coal Mining 
Co.. Marseilles 










3 


Mounts Bros., Mounts 


6.291 

3.600 

1.387 

400 






3.248 




Wm. G. Francis, Francis. 
T B Smith & Son 








1,800 
693 


5 


do 








6 




Kangley 

Streator 

do 


1.500 
1.480 






100 


7 


Oscar Kimes 








H 


Haar Bros 


800 
400 
400 






300 


q 


Alloway & Stevie 


.. do 








100 






. do 









100 


11 


JohnMcNeil 


gtTaSr.:::::: 

.. do 


600 









1' 


James McCullough 

Ringer & Hoehstetter.... 
Myer & Hendee 


775 
600 
650 
200 
175 
350 
300 
200 
300 
375 

17.203 






25 


IS 










11 


do 










15 


T. B. Farrell 


.. do 










16 


Daniel Vazalne 


.. do 








25 


n 


L. W Brewer 


do ... 








60 


18 


William Saxby . . .. 


do 










19 




.. do 










'O 




. do .... 








50 


?1 


William Mertz 


do 




' 




35 




Totals 




116.127 








6.526 








1.877.555 


415.082 


936.693 


36, 123 


53,626 


436, 031 











Mines in 1902. 35. 
New mines, 6. 
Abandoned mines, 6. 
Mines in 1903, 35. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



163 



LaSalle County — First District— Concluded. 



o 


Employes. 


Disposition 

Output. 


or 


1 

a. 

o 

<D 
1 

i 

Q 


a 
.a 

s 

1 

a 

1 


s 

a 
2 

1. 

04 


li 

li 

OP 

2; 


Acci- 
dents. 




► 

fi 


u 

<D a 

P 


1 
1 
i 

1 

o 

5 


-3 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

o 


h 
ill 

o a 
§§5 


3 

1 
a 

s 
Z 




ll 


i 

a 
1 


$206,345 
180.346 

276 834 


237 
261 

290 
293 

224 

228 
210 
198 
179 
175 

120 

59 
20 
6 


72 
101 

102 

83 

85 

72 
70 
57 
105 
64 

42 
36 
8 
4 


309 
362 

392 
376 

309 

300 
280 
255 
284 
239 

162 
95 
28 
10 


376.837 
195.339 

135,562 
171.947 

284.413 

162,963 
118, 757 
126.293 
108.615 
102. 980 

57.000 

44.585 

1.080 

650 


8.608 
20 

41.659 
1.361 

18.808 


11,304 
4.169 

4.887 
6,627 

9,060 


268 
220 

282 
288 

247 

269 
267 
249 
224 
236 

265 
302 
240 
60 

258.2 


206. 749 
199.519 

182, 107 
178,935 

166,771 

162.963 
158.326 
129,068 
118.761 
111,580 

72.000 

44,979 

5,241 

700 

1.737.699 


$0 58 

58 

76 
76 

76 

76 

58 
58 
76 
76 

76 

76 

1 00 

58 

$0 7032* 


3.445 
6,650 


1 
1 


2 

9 

5 
3 

3 

5 
3 
4 
2 
2 

3 
41 


1 
2 


284.271 
260.680 




1 
1 


4 

5 


192.255 
166.059 
179.237 
142.725 

113. 500 


16,607 

■"3."584 
6.000 

13,000 

62 

3.486 


22, 962 
2,775 
6.562 
3,600 

2,000 
332 
675 
50 


3.166 
9.210 


"2 


7 

8 
9 
10 






11 


83.211 

11.584 

630 


1.371 

48 
20 


6 


12 
13 

14 


S2. 352. 196 


2.500 


901 


3.401 


1.551.611 


112.195 


73.993 


23.910 




S164.715 


47 

40 

10 
8 
6 
6 
3 
4 
2 

2 
4 
3 
3 
2 

3 
3 

2 
3 


33 

16 

1 
3 
2 

1 

i 

1 


80 

56 

11 
11 

8 
7 
3 
5 
2 
2 
3 
5 
3 
3 
2 
2 

1 

2 
2 
3 


8,5 


3,486 


92.550 
15.656 


292 

255 

300 
200 
177 
160 
180 
200 
160 
140 
2S0 
200 
190 
180 
120 
130 
160 
150 
140 
120 
130 


96,891 

15.656 

9.539 

5,400 

2.0S0 

2,000 

1,480 

1,100 

500 

500 

600 

800 

6U0 

650 

200 

200 

400 

300 

200 

350 

410 


$0 40 

1 15 

58 

58 

64 

64 

58 

68 

58 

58 

58 

1 10 

1 10 

1 20 

1 25 

120 

1 20 

1 20 

1 20 

I 20 

1 20 


2.950 






1 


17.210 




9,539 

6.400 

2.080 

2.000 

1.480 

1.100 

500 

500 

600 

800 

600 

650 

200 

2U0 

400 

300 

200 

350 

410 








S 






214 
42 


.... 






3 398 




5 


3.420 






2,072 










7 


1 750 




8 






^ 


1.030 






1.030 










10 


1 0''0 




50 






11 


;.562 




1" 


1.200 










1'^ 


1 300 










11 


600 
























735 




17 


750 












500 










19 


800 










?n 


962 


























$239,844 


157 


59 


.216 
3.617 


875 
1. 552. 386 


30.775 
142.970 


108. 206 
182.199 


184 


139.856 


$0 5577 


3.274 






2.657 


660 




$2,592,010 




1.877.555 




27. 174 


6 


40 





♦ Average of two contract prices, 58 and 82 cents. 



164 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

Livingston County — First District — 1903. 





Name of Opkratob. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mink. 


OuTPDT OF Mine in Tons. 


i 
1 


s 

1 


d 

* 
a 

i 


d 

a 




2; 


a 
'a 6 

11 






SHIPPING MINES. 

Cardiff Coal Co., 1 

Pontiac Coal Co . Pontiac 
Beees Davis & Co.. Wal 

tonBros.... 

A. M. Barackman, Bar- 


Cardiff 

Pontiac 

Pairbury 

Streator 

do 


201.656 
55.650 

16,830 

10.928 

1,862 
1,773 


40.520 
30,100 

.3,204 

551 


95.587 
15. 100 

8,643 

7.360 

1.382 
1.182 


23.711 


28 
1.450 

1.697 


41.710 
9. 090 

3.286 

3.017 




Alex. Anderson & Sons, 
Pleasant Htll 






480 




Benjamin Davis & Son, 1 
Totals 


do 








591 
















288.599 


74,375 


129.254 


23.711 


3.175 


58.084 




LOCAL MINES. 

FairburyCoop. Coal Co.. 
Streator Clay Mfg. Co.,.. 


Pairbury 

Streator 

do 


10,948 
10.650 
2.317 
2.0h0 
1,200 
1.680 
882 
994 

30,751 


""io'eso 


5.476 


1,746 


1,378 


2,348 




1.545 

1,560 

900 






772 






.. do 








520 














300 




Streator Aqueduct Co 




1.680 
259 










.. do 


518 

748 






105 




William J, McMillin 

Totals 


do 






246 
















12.589 


10.747 


1.746 


1.378 


4,291 








319,350 


86,964 


140,001 


25.457 


4.553 


62,375 











Mines in 1902. 13. 
New mines. 1. 
Mines in 1903. 14. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



165 



Livingston County — First District — Concluded. 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 

a 

1 

o 

1 

o 

OS 

Q 


1 
a 

a 


a 

a 

o 

n 

2 

ti 

il 

<D a 


Is 

1 


ACOI- 
DKNT8. 




o 

B 

11 

as 

<1 


1 

il 

< 


1 

a 
® 

1 

< 


"3 

o 

H 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


•3 
1 

a u 
5^ 


r 

si. 


"3 
1 

a 
z 


i 

o 

II 


1 


$291,007 
64.460 

23.753 

19.733 

3.556 
2,394 


263 
90 

26 

31 

6 

6 


79 
33 

13 

17 

1 
2 


342 
123 

39 

48 

1 

8 


192.912 
36.675 

8.596 

9,101 

1,311 
730 


4,837 
14,475 

7,334 

1.569 

451 

1.028 


3,807 
4.500 

900 

258 

100 
15 


192 
250 

251 

225 

190 
195 


201.556 
56.650 

16.830 

10,928 

1,862 
1,773 


$0 58 
58 

68 

58 

58 

58 


3.671 
1.000 

963 

500 

50 
50 


9 
2 


.... 




$404,903 


422 


145 


567 


249,325 


29.694 


9.580 


217 


288,699 


$0 63+ 


6,234 


11 






$16 807 


10 
14 
9 
5 
4 
3 
3 
6 


12 
3 


22 
19 
11 
6 
5 
4 
3 
8 




10.948 


"io.'eso 
"i.'eso 


192 
304 
225 
200 
180 
291 
176 
160 


10,948 
10,650 
2,317 
2.080 
1.200 
1,680 
882 
994 


$0^60 

70 
58 
68 

75 
58 


480 
97 
30 
40 
30 
6 
11 
45 




14,377 
3.013 




?. 




2.317 

2,080 
1.200 


3 


3,432 






1,950 






2.150 






1.415 




882 
994 




1.731 












S44.875 


53 


25 


78 




18.421 


12.330 


216 


30,761 


$0 6271 


739 




.... 




$449, 778 


475 


170 


645 


249.325 49.115 


21,910 




319,350 




6.973 


„[.... 





* 12.330 tons mined by the day at $2.28 per day to April 1. 1903. and $2.66 per day to July 
i. 
+ Average of two contract prices, 58 and 81 cents. 



166 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

Will County— First District— 1903. 





Name of Opbrator. 


POSTOFFIOE 

Address 

OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


1 


3 

i 


a 




i 

Z 


1 




SHIPPING MINE. 

Murphy, Keenan&Co.,2 
Totals 


Braldwood.... 


33,116 




19,312 




3,208 


10. 666 










33.116 




19.342 




3,208 


10,566 




LOCAL MINKS. 

O'Connor & Co.. 2 

Totals 


Braid wood.... 


2,600 
2.500 




2,000 
2.000 






500 












"eoo 








35.616 




21,342 




3.208 


9,971 













Mines in 1902-3. 
Abandoned— 1. 
Mines in 1903-2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



167 



Will County — First District — Concluded. 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 

Output. 


a 
.2 

2 
1 

1 
1 


1 

S 

1 

a 

a 


o 

a 
o 

03 

n 

1 

a. 


ii 

2 


Acci- 
dents. 




P 

ii" 
11 


1 
2 2 

s| 


1 
a 

1 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 


ill 


"3 

3 

0-1 

o 

a 

3 

z 


a 

o 
a 

o 

ats 

2; 


.s 
a 

9 


$40, 605 


76 


24 


100 


24,921 


7,100 


1.095 


263 


33. 116 


$0,825 






2 












S40.50O 


76 


24 


100 


21.921 


7.100 


1,095 


263 


33,116 


$0,825 




.... 


2 




86,000 


6 


1 


7 




2.500 




80 


2,500 


$1 00 






















$6,000 


6 


1 


7 




2,500 




80 


2.500 


$1 00 










$16,606 


82 


25 


107 


24.921 


9,600 


1,095 


80 


35,616 


$1 00 






2 













168 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation hy Counties- 





a 
'p. 
a 

il 

z 


1 
1 

1 


Production of Different Grades in Tons. 


1 


COUNTIBS. 


3 


1 


til 


+3 


i 

a 
o 

03 
Hi 


i 
s 

CO 


1 

"3 

< 


Grundy 

Kankakee .... 

LaSalle 

Livingston . . . 
Will 


12 

1 
14 
6 

1 


1.435.527 
58, 195 

1,737.699 
288,599 
33, 116 


2.869 
12,782 
298.956 
74.375 


971.255 
27,448 
919.490 
129.254 
19.342 


106.146 

36.123 
23.711 


60.907 
1.353 

53.626 
3.175 
3.208 


266.967 
1.686 

390,931 
49.475 
9.471 


27.384 
14.926 
38.574 
8.609 
1.095 


$1,795,012 

80.929 

2.352.196 

404.903 

40.506 




Totals and 
averages.. 


34 


3,553.136 


388.981 


2.066.789 


166.979 


122.269 


718.530 


90.588 


$4,673,545 



Recapitulation hy Counties- 





















— 




a 


i 


Production of Different Grades in 


Tons. 


1 












« 




o 

















M 






Counties. 


1 


1 














"3 




cw 












2 


^ 


_ 
























<I> 


1 


g 










S 


s§ 








« 


Oi 

a 


^ 


3 




J4 






z 


E-i 


S 


J 


m 


Z 


a. 


» 


<! 




10 


22.408 




19.367 






3.041 




$53. 402 


LaSalle 


21 


139,856 


116. 127 


17.203 






6.526 




239,844 


Livingston... 


8 


30.751 


3 12.589 


10. 747 


1.746 


1.378 


2.343 


1.948 


44.875 


Will 


1 


2.600 




2.000 






60O 




6,000 










Totals and 




















averages.. 


40 


195.616 


128.716 


49.317 


1.746 


1.378 


12,410 


1.948 


$344,121 


Totals district 




















—all mints.. 


74 


3.748.651 


617.697 


2.116.106 


167.726 


123.647 


730.940 


92.636 


$5,017,666 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



169 



First District — 1903 — Skipping Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


ag 


Tons Mined 


Pricks 
Paid Per 


II 

a«? 

fl-ow 
25 


3 
00 

a 
3 
2; 


2 


£ 


i 
i 

o 

5 


i 


1 

Is 

■ga 
11 

1- 


if 

&> 

» o 

i»a 

1= 






•6 

a 

t» 


1 

>> 

OQ 


Ton for— 




a 

o 

1 
a 

9 

•z 


ti 

a 

a 

w 


tit 
a 
a 

a 

1 


1 

a 

3 


2.413 


714 


3.127 


1.339.167 




29.300 


67.060 


260 


1.435.527 




$0,826 




12.453 


6 


29 


76 


70 


145 


47,318 




1.926 


8,951 


250 


58.195 




.825 




362 


1 


1 


2,500 


901 


3.401 


1.443.332 


108. 179 


112. 196 


73,993 


258 


1.737,699 




.703 




23.910 


6 


41 


422 


145 


667 


238.236 


11.089 


29.694 


9.580 


217 


288,699 




.63 




6.234 


11 




76 


24 


100 


24,921 




7.100 


1.095 


263 


33.116 




.825 








? 








24 




5.486 


1.854 


7.340 


3.092.974 


119.268 


180.216 


160.679 


251 


3,653.136 




$0,737 




42.949 


73 



i^tVs^ District — 1903 — Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition op Output. 


i 

II 

d as 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 
Paid Pee 
Ton for— 


If 


1 

Is 

3 

i 

a 
3 
2 


"■s 


. 


1 
i 
c 

5 



< 


5 


^a 

11 
1^ 


11 

Si 
«a 


•3 
1 


Id 


a - 

il 

1' 


■6 

a 

ja 
>, 

OQ 


OS 

a 

3 

a 

QQ 


— ■ 


a 

a 



a 

3 

z 


ti 

a 
"a 

a 


tit 

"a 

a 

« 
a 

1 
g 


1 
1 

1 

a 
3 
z 


64 


12 


76 






22 408 




209 


22. 408 


' 


$1 408 










157 


69 
25 


216 

78 




875 


30. 775 
18.421 


108.206 
12.330 


184 
216 


139.856 
30.751 




.557 
.627 




3.264 
739 


•• 




53 






6 


1 


7 






2.600 




80 


2.500 




1.00 




















- 




280 


97 


377 




875 


74. 104 


120,536 


194 


195.515 




$0,671 




4.003 


.. 


5.766 


1.961 


7.717 


3.092.974 


120.143 


254.319 


281,216 




3.748,651 








46.952 


24 


73 



170 STATISTICS OF LABOR 



SECOND INSPECTION DISTRICT— 190H. 

Twentieth Annual Report. 



Counties: Bureau, Henry, Knox, Marshall, Mercer, Rock Island, Stark, 
Warren. 

Thomas Hudson, Inspector, Galva. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, III. : 

Sir — In compliance with section 12 of an act of the General Assembly of 
Illinois, defining the duties of State inspectors of mines, and providing: for 
the preservation of the health and safety of persons employed in the coal 
mines of the State, I have the honor to herewith submit to you the twentieth 
annual report for the year ended June 30, 1903, of the coal mines located in 
the second inspection district, and contained in the coal producing counties 
of Bureau, Henry, Knox, Marshall, Mercer, Rock Island, Stark and Warren. 

The tabular part of the report sets forth the number of mines in the district, 
local and commercial; the number of miners and other employes at the dif- 
ferent mines; the number of days worked at each mine; the quantity of pow- 
der consumed; the number of accidents, fatal and non fatal, that have taken 
place, and the causes producing the same; the number of tons of lump and 
other grades of coal produced; the prices per ton paid for mining; the value 
per ton of lump and other grades of coal at the mines; also the disposition 
that is made of the product, whether shipped, sold to local consumers, or used 
for steam purposes at the mines. In fact about everything is set forth in the 
tables that is likely to be of interest to the general reader or to those who 
take a special interest in the mining industry of the State. 

Several new questions were submitted to the operators in the schedules sent 
out for this report, namely: "Total value of mine buildings; total value of 
machinery, including wagons, carts, tools of all kinds, live stock, etc.; total 
value of shaft, including sinking, curbing, timbering, roadways, cars, haul- 
age, and all equipments under ground; number of acres of land owned; num- 
ber of acres leased for coal rights." The answers received from the opera- 
tors in this district to these questions are far from satisfactory; some have 
given the desired information while others have failed or refused to make any 
reply. Many of the answers are presumed to be correct, others have given a 
ump sum amount or stated evasively in round numbers, etc., thus giving an 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



171 



appearance and creating a suspicion that the answers are not intended to be 
accurate, therefore rendering the information worthless from a statistical 
standpoint. 
The following summary is presented for the year ended June 30, 1903: 

Total number of mines 181 

Number of shipping mines 25 

Number of mines in local trade 156 

Number of miners 5, 068 

Number of others underground, including boys 1.177 

Number of employes above ground 616 

Total number of employes 6,860 

Number of kegs of powder consumed for blasting coal 40,673 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 1,700 

Tons of lump coal produced 2.302.632 

Tons of all other grades produced 943,149 

Total tons produced 3,245.781 

Tons of coal shipped 2.766.006 

Tons sold to local trade 314.051 

Tons consumed at the mines 116.063 

Tons supplied to locomotives at mines 49,661 

Average value of lump coal per ton at the mines $1,602 

Aggregate value of the total product $4,549,030.00 

Average number of days of active operation, shipping mines 243 

Average price per gross ton for hand mining, shipping mines $0 74 

Number of fatal accidents 11 

Number of non-fatal accidents 62 

Total number of accidents 73 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 624 

Numoerof employes to each non- fatal accident Ill 

Rate of fatal accidents per 1.000 persons employed 1.6 

Tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 295,071 

Tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident 52,351 

Tons of coal produced to each miner employed 610 

Tons of coal produced to each employ^, all classes 473 

Total number of steam boilers in use at the mines 146 

Number of electric motors in use for haulage underground 3 

Following is a comparative table showing the product, in tons, of each 
county in the district, with the loss or gain for the years ending June 30, 
1902 and 1903: 



Counties. 


Total Product of all 
Grades of Coal-in Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1902. 


1903. 


Bureau 


1.732,813 
113.697 
89.208 
441,643 
602,722 
84, 100 
24,799 
15,534 


1.778,302 
130.663 

84,675 
465, 079 
648,070 
85, 700 
39,406 
13.986 


45.489 
16,966 










4,633 


Marshall . 


23.436 
45.348 
1.6C0 
14,607 












Stark 




Warren.. .. .... 


1.546 








Totals 


3.104.516 


3, 245. 781 


147.446 


6,181 




147,446 


Decrease.. . . .... 








6.181 










141.266 













172 STATISTICS OF LABOR. ' 

The counties of Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Mercer, Rock Island and Stark 
combined show a gain over the year previous of 147,446 tons. The counties 
of Knox and Warren show a loss of 6,181 tons. This leaves a net gain in the 
district for the present year over the year previous of 141,265 tons. 

New Mines. 

Four new mines of the shipping class have gone into operation during the 
year; two of them are new mines and have been sunk during the year, and 
two have been transferred from the local to the shipping class, by having side 
tracks and railroad connections added to their equipment. The Wyoming 
Coal company opened one of the new mines; it is located on the line of the 
C, B. & Q. R. R. north of Wyoming, Stark county, and began operations in 
October, 1902. The shaft is 124 feet deep, the seam is No. 6 of the Illinois 
section, and contains, in great profusion, the "clay-slips," "horseback" and 
other irregularities usually to be found in ttiat seam. The machinery, includ- 
ing the ventilating fan, is new and of modern construction. However, the 
irregularities in the coal seam mentioned, make it very improbable that the 
mine will be a large producer. 

The Yates @ity Coal company has sunk a new shaft on the line of the C, 

B. & Q. R. R., about 1^ miles east of Yates City, Knox county, and com- 
menced operations early in 1903; this seam is No. 5 of the Illinois section 
and is about S^iz feet thick. The conditions at this mine were not satisfactory, 
however, and the company sunk the shaft to a lower seam, probably No. 2; 
this seam is about 2 feet 8 inches thick, and, as usual with this seam, the coal 
is of good quality. The machinery, including a shaker screen and ventila- 
ting fan, is new and up to date. It is quite difficult, however, to operate suc- 
cessfully a thin seam of coal, especially when in close proximity, as in this 
case, to coal seams nearly double the thickness. 

George R. Watson, Wyoming, Stark county, has constructed a track to 
connect his local mine with the C, B. & Q. R. R. This changes the mine to 
the shipping class. The facilities, however, for producing coal are limited, 
and the output will not greatly exceed that heretofore produced. 

The local mine heretofore operated by Tim. Downing, Briar Bluff, Henry 
county, has been connected by a side track with the St. Louis division of the 

C, B. & Q. R. R. This coal seam is quite thin, and no great increase in the 
output of the mine can be expected. 

There have been no mines of the shipping class worked out nor abandoned 
during the year. 

Shaft Tower Destroyeb by Fire. 

On the night of October 26, 1902, the tower and engine room and boiler shed 
of the Sackville Bros, local mine, near Coal Valley, Rock Island county, 
were destroyed by fire; the loss was about $1,500. The property was fully 
insured. New buildings were created and completed in about ten days after 
the fire. 



coal in illinois. 173 

Improvements. 

Substantial and costly improvements have been and are now being made at 
several of the Spring Valley Coal company's mines in Bureau county. 

The wooden tower at the No. 3 shaft of this company has been torn down 
and a costly steel structure erected. Double-decked cages have been put in 
and everything possible done to increase the hoisting capacity of the mine. 

At Seatonville. where shaft No. 4 is located, a new shaft is being sunk, 
similar in size and construction to shaft No. 5 at Dalzell. When the shaft is 
completed a steel tower will be erected; also a Capell ventilating fan will be 
put in, and in all probability this will become one of the largest coal produc- 
ing mines in Bureau county. 

At shaft No. 5, Spring Valley, a large coal washing plant has been erected, 
with a capacity of 100 tons an hour. 

The Illinois Third Vein Coal company, Ladd, Bureau county, has erected a 
coal washing plant with a capacity of 50 tons an hour. Both washers here 
mentioned are the Link Belt Machinery company's pattern. The company 
will also erect at this mine a new Capell ventilating fan. This fan should 
have been put in some time ago. The company claims that the destruction 
of the faetoiy at Pittsburg, Pa., has caused the delay. The old fan now in 
use is almost a mechanical wreck, and is quite insufficient for the proper ven- 
tilation of the mine. The mine, therefore, is in a rather disgraceful condition 
so far as ventilation is concerned. 

New and Prospective Mines. 

A new coal producing county in this district will, in all probability, be 
added to the list of counties in the report for 1904. The St. Paul Coal com- 
pany has secured a large tract of coal land at or near Granville, Putnam 
county. The sinking of a shaft was commenced in July, this year, and the 
first shaft ought to be down early in January, 1904. The shaft will be about 
480 feet in depth to seam No. 2; the coal will be from 3 to 3j4 feet in thick- 
ness. If the opening up of this mine proves to be satisfactory, it is more 
than probable that several shafts will be sunk in this county. The Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Co. are constructing a branch road from Davis 
Junction, in Lee county, to this mine, giviag an outlet for the product of the 
mines in this section to the coal consuming centers of the great Northwest. 

The Alden Coal company, Wanlock, Mereer county, has sunk a shaft one 
mile west of Viola, in that county; the shaft is 140 feet deep, and will go into 
active operation about Oct. 1, 1903. 

A new shaft has been sunk about one mile east of Coal Valley, Rock 
Island county. A side track will be constructed to connect the mine with the 
Rock Island and Peoria branch of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific system. 
The shaft is about 60 feet deep, and will probably go into active operation 
about Oct. 1, 1903. 

Among the substantial improvements that have been made at the mines*in 
this district, during the year, mention is made of the electric motors that 
have been installed for underground haulage purposes. Two have been put 



174 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



in at the Devlin Coal company's mine at Toluca, Marshall county, and one at 
the Marquette Coal company's mine at Marquette, Bureau county. The mo- 
tors at Toluca are of the Westinghouse make and will weigh about eight tons 
each. The motor in the Marquette mine was made by the Goodman Manu- 
facturing company and weighs about ten tons. Both types are doing excel- 
lent work. 

Escapement Shafts. 

The following escapement shafts, with their respective depths, in feet, have 
been sunk during the year: 



Operator. 


Location of Mine. 


Depth 
in feet. 


Yates City Coal Co 


Yates City 


78 










.. do 


124 


Bowman Bros 


Yates City 


36 






70 


North Main Coal Co 


Kewanee, 


55 


Kewanee Mining & Mfg. Co 


. . do 


40 









Fatal Accidents. 

The following is a statement, in detail, of the fatal accidents that have 
taken place during the year ended June 30, 1903. 

August 27, 1902, Peter Dolan, furnace man, aged 70 years, married, was 
injured by a fall of roof at the face of a working room in the Etherley Coal 
company's mine No. 2, located at Etherley, Knox county, and died Sept. 7, 
11 days after the accident. 

Part of the duty of the deceased was to mine the coal with which the fur- 
nace was supplied; he was engaged in this work when the roof began crack- 
ing, and giving evidence of caving in; while in the act of pushing the pit car 
out of the room, the roof fell, pinning him underneath. He was unable to 
extricate himself, and was not found for several hours; his injuries were 
comparatively slight, and his death was due, more to old age and the shock, 
than to the injuries received. He leaves a widow and grown up family. 

Sept. 12, 1902, Andrew Marchetti, miner, aged 38 years, single, was killed 
instantly by a fall of roof at the face of his working place in the Sprin'g Val- 
ley Coal company's mine No. 4, at Seatonville, Bureau county. A piece of 
roof fell, knocking him down and disengaging a prop; his partner attempted 
to rescue him, but before he could extricate the deceased, the roof commenc- 
ed cracking and showing signs of caving in, caused probably by the removal 
of the prop; his partner ran to a place of safety, when suddenly a large mass 
of roof, about three tons, fell, crushing the deceased underneath. 

Sept. 19, 1902, Martin Rodgers, miner, aged 55 years, married, was severely 
crashed on the breast and back by a fall of coal at the face of his working 
place in the Marquette Coal company's mine at Marquette, Bureau county. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 175 

The deceased was in the act of undermining, when a piece of coal 5 feet 
long, 3^ feet wide and 15 inches thick, suddenly fell, striking him on the 
breast and squeezing him against the building. If the deceased had taken 
the precaution, and set a sprag against the piece of coal, as should have been 
done, this accident would not have taken place. He leaves a widow and one 
child in Russia. 

Oct. 21, 1902, Robert Freeland, top man, aged 63 years, married, was killed 
instantly, by having his head crushed and neck broken, being caught between 
the bottom of the cage and the lower landing at the Wyoming Coal company's 
mine, Wyoming, Stark county. This mine, at the time of the accident, had 
just been sunk; eight miners were employed driving the entries and opening 
up the mine. The deceased being a top man, was at work on a temporary 
platform, about 12 feet below the top landing, where the coal was being 
delivered. The north cage was at the top landing, when the deceased gave the 
signal to the engineer to hoist, then he walked to the shaft and kneeling down 
commenced a conversation with a man at the bottom of the shaft; in this 
position his head projected forward over the shaft, the cage descended strik- 
ing him with the result as described. He leaves a widow and two children. 

Nov. 7, 1902, Joseph Trompinski, miner, aged 46 years, married, was struck 
on the head and shoulders by a fall of roof at the face of his working place, 
in the Spring Valley Coal company's mine No. 3, Spring Valley, Bureau 
county; he died from the injuries six days after the accident. The deceased 
was working with his son, a young man about 17 years of age; a piece of 
roof about 300 pounds in weight, fell from between the props striking the 
deceased with the result described. It was hot thought that this accident 
would terminate fatally but, with other complications, his death ensued. He 
leaves a widow, presumably in Russia, and two sons in this country. 

Nov. 21, 1902, James Chevantoue, a company man, aged 35 years, married, 
was fatally crushed through the breast and body, being run over by a loaded 
pit car in the Spring Valley Coal company's mine No. 2, Spring Valley, 
Bureau county. The deceased was engaged in "brushing" a cross road and 
had pushed a car loaded with rock out of the cross road onto the straight 
entry. A car loaded with coal had been started from the face of the straight 
entry, and came swiftly down the gradient behind the deceased, knocking 
him down, and running on to him with fatal results. He leaves a widow and 
four children. 

Nov. 29, 1902, David Curran, a bottom eager, aged 44 years, married, was 
fatally injured in the spine, close to the back of the neck, by falling into the 
sump, at the Spring Valley Coal company's mine No. 2, Spring Valley, 
Bureau county. The deceased had put a car on the cage and rang the signal 
bell to hoist, before he had placed the guard or keeper in position; the cage 
started and he attempted to throw the guard into position with his foot; his 
shoe or trousers' leg was caught by the guard or cage, drawing him up to the 
door heads; he fell backwards into the sump or cage seat, a distance of 16 
feet, fracturing the bones of the vertebra. He died five days after the acci- 
dent. He leaves a widow and five children. 



176 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Dee. 8, 1902, William A. Hunter, miner, aged 36 years, married, was severely 
crushed about the head by coal flying from a blast, in the Silvis Mining com- 
pany's mine No. 2, near Carbon Cliff, Rock Island county. The deceased 
was "driving entry," and had prepared a blast; another miner was opening 
a room from the entry behind and had prepared two blasts. It was their 
intention to light the three shots at once; the miner in the room lighted both 
of his shots, the deceased failed to get the fuse of his shot lighted, and had 
to leave the face because of the shots in the other room being lighted. The 
shots in the room exploded but the entry shot did not explode; the deceased 
thought the fuse had not burned and returned for the purpose of lighting it, 
when about eight feet from the face the shot exploded with results as stated ; 
death ensued from the injuries 12 hours after the accident. He leaves a 
widow and four children. 

April 16, 1903, John Rutka, a company man, aged 38 years, single, was 
killed instantly by a fall of rock in the Spring Valley Coal company's mine 
No. 2, Spring Valley, Bureau county. The deceased in company with four 
or five other company men, was engaged in taking about four feet of shale 
or rock from the side of an entry to make, what is know as, a "lye" or dou- 
ble parting. The shale was hanging quite loose from the side of the entry in 
large masses. From some cause or want of due caution, the deceased stood 
in front of the loose mass, when a large block of it suddenly fell, knocking him 
down and completely covering him over. When extricated, life was extinct; 
his neck was broken and body severely crushed. 

May 28, 1903, Mike Caveglia, miner, aged 47 years, single, had his back 
broken, and body severely crushed by a fall of roof at the face of his working 
place in the Spring Valley Coal company's mine No. 3, Spring Valley, Bu- 
reau county. The deceased and his partner were at work in the mine when 
a large mass of roof, about 2 feet wide at each end, 5 feet wide through the 
center, 14 feet long and 14 inches thick fell from a horizontal "smooth," 
striking the deceased and causing instant death. 

June 30, 1903, Joseph B. Curtis, driver, aged 22 years, single, was severely 
crushed and had his back broken by being struck with loaded cars in the 
Empire Coal company's mine No. 3, Gilchrist, Mercer county. The deceased 
was coming out of the main north entry with a trip of four loaded cars, 
riding on the front end of the trip; he was seated on a triangular shaped 
seat made of heavy strap iron, which was attached to an iron brace-rod pass- 
ing across the end of the pit-car; the rod suddenly broke, throwing him in 
front of the cars. An examination of the brace-rod showed that it had been 
welded at the point of fracture, and that the weld was faulty, and would re- 
duce the transverse strength of the rod fully one half. 

The tables of fatal and non-fatal accidents follow, also the county tables o£ 
the mines in the district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas Hudson, 
State Inspector oj Mtnes, Second District, Galva, III. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Fatal Casualties — Second District — July 1, 1901 



177 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence 
(town) 


t 


i 

o 


a 


a 


a 
■a 
a 
& 

0) 

Q 


Cause of Accident. 


1902 
Aug 27 


Peter Dolan 


70 
38 
55 
63 
46 
35 
44 
36 

38 
47 
22 


Furn'ceman 

Miner 

.. do 

Top-man 

Miner 

Co-man 

Cager 


Etherley.... 
Seatonvlile . 
Marquette.. 
Wyoming... 
Sp'g Valley. 

.. do 

.. do 


1 
i 

1 

1 
1 
1 


1 




"l 

1 
1 

1 

4 


1 

'i 

3 
3 
5 
6 

;; 

2, 


Falling roof 


Sep. 12 


Andrew Marchetti .... 

Martin Rodgers 

Robert Freel»nd 

Joseph Trompinski... 

James Cherantone 

David Curran 


Falling coal .'.'.".'.'.' '.'.'.'. 


Oct. 21 
Not 7 


Descending cage 

Falling roof 


21 


Pit car 


29 


Falling into sump 


Dec 8 


Wm. A. Hunter 

II 


Miner 

Co-man 

Miner. . 


Carbon Cliff 

Sp'e Valley. 
.. do 


Flying coal .. 


1903 
Apr. 16 

May 28 




MlkeCaveglia 

Joseph B. Curtis 

Total— 11 . . 


Falling roof 




Driver 


Gilchrist ... 


7 


'- 


17 





















Recapitulation of Fatal Accidents — Second District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of casualty. 


No. 


Colliery, 


No. 


Carbon Cliflf 


11 


Cager 


1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 

11 


Caught by descending 

cage (on surface) 

Caught, loaded pit cars 
Coal flying from blast .. 
Fall of coal 


1 
2 
1 

5 

1 

11 


Empire Coal Co 

Etherley Coal Co.... 
Marquette Coal Co... 

Silvis Mining Co 

Spring Valley Coal 
Co 


, 


Etherley 

Gilchrist 

Marquette.... 
Seatonville 


Company men 

Driver 

Furnace man. 

Miners 

Top-man 


1 
1 


Spring Valley 
Wyominsr .... 




fi 


Fell into sump, or cage 
seat 


Wyoming Coal Co... 


1 






11 













12 C 



178 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



Non-Faial Casualties — Seco7id District— July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


Residence. 


i 


.2 

u 
a 


a 

u 

2 

IS 




Character and Cause of 
Injury. . 


1 
1 . 

ll 


1902 
July 23 
24 


Magnus Guerin.. 30 
Joseph Jacoba... 20 

Ben Wilds 58 

Thos. Yurich 35 

Anton Recke 32 

Mike Rock 28 

John Bregga 35 

Steve Boliline.... 28 

PaulOnuth 27 

William Hall 33 

J Lindra ... 30 


Spr'g Valley 
Toluca 




1 
1 

■"i 

■"i 
1 

■"i 

1 

.... 

1 
'"i 


"3 
■"2 

.... 

3 
2 

.... 

6 

"4 
"6 


"4 
"3 

"i 
2 
4 
3 

"2 

6 

■■"6 

" 7 
1 
5 
2 

4 

6 
2 

■■■5 
3 

■■'6 

7 

■"7 

"3 

7 

2 

■"6 
6 
7 
4 
4 
6 

.... 

■'"i 
3 

136 


Arm broken: falling coal 

Fool bruised; cage 


63 
80 


Aug.^1 


Cable 


1 


Leg bruised; falling roof 

Eye injured; flying coal 

Bip injured; falling roof 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Arm broken ; falling roof 

Shoulder crushed; pit car.... 
Leg broken; pit car 


^ 


14 
21 
25 
2fl 

28 


Dalzell 

Spr'g Valley 
Seatonville. 

Toluca 

Dalzell 

Sherrard ... 
Wenona .... 
Spr'g Valley 


1 

"i 

1 
1 
1 


30 
120 

60 
120 
150 


Sept. 4 
22 


Fingers cut oflf; falling roof.. 
Body bruised; flying rock.... 
Body bruised; pit car 


40 
60 


Oct. 4 


Speri Obirnia.... 16 
Vincent Kachke.. 23 

Mike Riva 32 

Peter Bernardine 64 
Chas. Conway.... 19 
Louis Telesfera.. 23 
A. Griffin 50 


60 


Fingers crushed; unl'd'g rails 
Collar bone brok'n; fall'gcoal 
Breast injured; falling roof... 
Ankle bone br'k'n; fall'g pl'nk 


40 


27 
27 


Dalzell 

.. do 

Ladd 


1 

1 


65 
70 
66 










16 


Loding 

Spr'g Valley 

Dalzell 

Ladd 

Toluca 

Spr'g Valley 

Cable 


1 

1 
1 
1 


Hand burned; premature bl'st 
Arm broken; pit car... 


fiO 


18 


Battista Bergarse 20 

AlbinRichl 48 

BoekerSilvesta.. 33 
J. Yurich 39 


36 


Dec. 1 


Collar bone brok'n; fall'gcoal 
.. do 


70 
36 


3 


1 

1 
1 
1 

.... 

.... 

] 
1 
1 
1 
.... 

""i 

1 
1 
] 

.... 

29 


4 

1 

3 

"3 
4 

1 

•••4 

2 

■"6 

6 

■"6 

■"2 

6 

■■■4 

6 

€ 
3 

a 

4 

.... 
"2 

103 


Jaw broken; falling coal 

Leg broken; coal rolling down 


100 


13 


Wm. Keenan 36 

Thos. Wanless... 23 
G Baier .. .. 48 


76 


18 


Face and arms burned; prema- 
ture blast 






Wenona .... 
. do 


1 


S6 


19 


Leg broken ; falling coal 




1903 


Joe Klaharn 19 

Peter Matroda ... 16 

John Pevotti 35 

Joe Bruek 45 

Martin Petrlsk... 43 

Thos. Murphy 25 

Joe Sieman 19 

J as. Pavellties... 45 

John Anisone 37 

Gus Samuelson.. 23 

Wm. Allard 40 

Edward Studer.. 56 

Calvin Goflf 20 

JohnBrellnski... 14 

FredTuttle 20 

Clyde Hamilton.. 17 

L. Matidio 17 

Basqualia Vespa. 42 
FrederlcoPozza.. 23 
John Osborne.... 44 
Geo. Arbuckle.... 48 

J. Lesllskl 45 

Peter Howie 26 

John Robertson.. 55 
Joe Bernardo .... 30 
John Donaldson.. 56 

Fred Masters 40 

Fred Hoeber 34 

Herman Johnson. 45 
Walter Beattie... 56 

JohnRogalski.... 40 
John O. Dowd.... 23 
Mike Mulligan... 50 
Anton Gusino.... 35 

Selano LoUi 50 

Pat O'Rourke ... 28 
Louis Biogrola... 39 

Totals 


34 




Spr'g Valley 






i?n 


6 


Thigh broken; falling coal.... 
Hand crushed; falling roof... 

Leg broken; falling roof 

Foot bruised; cage..... 


140 


10 
10 
13 


Spr'g Valley 

.. do 

Toluca 

Spr'g Valley 

Toluca 

.. do 

Spr'g Valley 
Kewanee ... 
Coal Valley. 
Marquette . . 
Wenona 

Spr'g Valley 
.. do 


1 

■■'i 

1 

.... 

1 


60 
60 
40 






86 


20 
23 


Ankle broken; falling coal.... 
Ankle bruised; falling coal... 


160 
30 
8? 


27 
28 
30 
Feb. 10 
11 


Leg broken; falling roof 

Arm broken; flying coal 

Thigh bruised; pit car. 


80 
100 
30 


Foot bruised; fallingroof 

Jaw broken; falling roof 


42 
40 
30 




Leg bruised; fallingroof 

Ankle broken; falling coal 

Finger cut oflf; falling roof.... 
Breast crushed; falling coal.. 
Breast bruised; kicked by a 
mule 


60 


19 
25 


Toluca 

Dalzell 


1 


30 


28 
Mar. 9 


Spr'g Valley 
.. do 

Wenona .... 
Wanlock.... 
Sherrard.... 

Dalzell 

.. do 

ar^:::: 

Kewanee 

Cable 


1 
1 

1 
.... 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


30 


9 
14 


Toe cut oflf; fallingroof 

Leg broken; pit car 


48 
106 


18 
20 
20 
30 
Apr. 11 
13 
22 


Ankle bruised; falling roof... 
Hand injured; falling coal.... 
Ankle crushed; falling coal... 
Back injured: fallingroof.... 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Leg broken; fallingroof 

Leg and collar bone broken; 


34 
40 
70 
30 

75 








60 


May 27 


Toe broken; falling coal 

Back injured; pit car ... 






Spr'g Valley 
Marquette.. 
Spr'g Valley 

.. do 

Ladd 

Dalzell.. 


.... 

1 




10 
12 
12 
12 
25 


Thumb cut oflf; falling coal... 

Leg bruised; falling coal 

Back crushed; falling coal.... 
Ankle injured: falling coal... 
Leg broken ; falling coal 








~33 


3086 






■ 







Not recovered July 1. 1903. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



179 



Total number injured 

Not recovered July 1. 1903 

Recovered June 30. 1903 

Time lost by men recovered 

Average days lost by men recovered 



62 
12 
60 
3.086 days 
61.72 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Accidents — Second District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Cable 


3 

1 
9 
2 
5 
1 
2 
1 
3 
17 
11 
1 
5 
1 

62 


Car trimmer.. 
Company men 

Drivers 

Dumper 

Laborer 

Miners 

Top cagers ... 
Track layer... 


10 
43 

62 


Caught by cage 

Caught by pit cars... 

Caught by tipple,.... 

Coal rolling down 

chute 


3 
11 

1 

1 
22 
16 

1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
62 




1 


CoalValley::: 
Dalzell 


Coal Valley Mining Co.. 
Devlin Coal Co 


6 
11 


Kewanee 

Ladd 


111. 3d Vein Coal Co 

Kewanee Coal Co 

Marquette Coal Co 




Lodlns 






Marquette.... 
Seatonvllle... 

Sherrard 

Spring Valley 






Kicked by mule 

Premature blast 

Rock flying from 
blast 


Silvia Mining Co 

Spring Valley Coal Co.. 
Watson's Mine 


27 


Toluca 


Wenona Coal Co 




Wanlock 

Wenona 

Wyoming 

Total 


Struck by flying coal. 

Struck by plank 

Unloading rails 


6? 













Table Showing the Number and Nature of Non-Fatal Casualties, 
Conjugal Relations, and Time Lost — Second District — 1903. 



Nature of Injuries. 




1 


a 


1 

a 

0) 

Q 


Time Lost. 


^ 




Total 
days. 


Average 
days. 


So 


Ankles broken and crushed 


7 
5 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 

4 

15 
2 


6 

1 

...... 

1 
3 
3 

..... 

3 

1 

1 

...„. 

1 

...... 


1 
4 

1 
1 
1 

...... 

1 
3 
3 

...... 

1 
7 

"i" 

1 
1 


30 
7 


310 
292 


68.00 
58.40 


11.28 
8 06 






Backs injured 


5 

3 
16 
10 

...... 

4 

16 
3 

5 

"32" 

1 
...... 

2 


30 
110 
100 
170 

90 

36 
141 
145 
160 

30 
140 

60 
911 
120 
170 


30.00 
65.00 
50.00 
42.60 
90.00 
36.00 
36.00 
36.25 
53.33 
30.00 
70.00 
50.00 
60.80 
120.00 
85.00 


4 84 


Bodies injured ... 


3 24 




4.84 
4 84 


Collar bones broken 


Eye injured. 


1 61 


Face and arms burned 

Feet in jured 


1.61 
6 45 






Hands injured 

Hips injured 

Jaws Droken 

Leg and collar bone broken 


4.84 
1.61 
3.23 
1 61 


Legs broken and injured ...... . 


24 20 




1 61 


Thighs broken and Injured 


3 23 


Thumb cut off 


1 61 




48 


48.00 








Totals, averages and percentages .... 


62 


33 


29 


136 


3.086 


61.72 


100. oe 



180 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Bureau County — Second District — 1903. 





Namk of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 
ADDRESS 

OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


CD 

z 


1 


a 

I 
a 

S 


fi. 

a 
5 


i 


"3 


a 




SHIPPING MINES. 

Spring Valley Coal Co., 2 
Spring Valley Coal Co.l 
Spring Valley Coal Co.. 3 
Marquette Coal Co.l .... 
111. 3d Vein Coal Co.. B... 
Spring Valley Coal Co., 5 
Spring Valley Coal Co.. 4 

Totals 

LOCAL MINKS. 

Wm. Masters* Son 


Spring Valley 

.. do 

.. do 

Marquette 

Ladd 


333.832 
327. 146 
272.637 
270,472 
187.401 
185.998 
174,443 


14.117 
18.626 
5.937 
6,982 
6.385 
1,102 
3,830 


266,917 
255,072 
221,385 
139,540 
144.814 
150,814 
135,985 


"gi.'iis 


742 
8,095 
8.926 


52,056 
45,352 
36.390. 
26,802 
36,202 




Spring Valley 
Seatonville... 

Shpffield 

do 




5.332 


28,750 
34,628 












1.751.929 


56.979 


1.314.527 


97,148 


23,095 


260,180 


1 


3,905 
3,448 
3,150 
2,600 
2,472 
2,444 
2,236 
1,770 
1,400 
1,100 
1.068 
540 
240 




3.905 
3,448 
3,000 
2,600 
2.472 
2,394 
2,236 
1,770 
1,400 
1.100 
1,068 
500 
240 








9 










Ratcliffe Bros 


. do 






160 




Thos. Herrington 

Wm. Smith & Sons 


Princeton .... 
do 


















Mineral 

Princeton .... 

Sheffield 

Mineral 

Sheffield 

Princeton .... 

Sheffield 

Tiskilwa 






60 




George Heathcoek 

Edward Donahue 


































ll 


A W Walton 










C. W Riley 






40 














Totals 










26.373 




26. 133 






240 




Totals— 20 mines . . 




1,778.302 


56.979 


1.310.660 


97, 148 


"23^ 


260.420 



Mines in 1902. 18. 
New mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 20. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



181 



Bureau County — Second District — Concluded. 



as 
o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 
o 

g 
« 

p. 

o 

1 
1 
o 
>, 

5 


1 

XI 

>> 

J3 

s 

a 

a 


o 
d 
2 

<n 

2 

11 

■73 a 

la 

is 


1 

<u ^ 

a '^ 

3 3 


Acci- 
dents. 




a 

11 

11 


1 

is 

1! 

< 


1 

I 
« 

e 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship 
ment and sap- 
plied to locomo 
tlves at mine. 


1 

o 

■V 

Id 


E- 


3 

o 

a 

3 

S5 


a 

O 

a-s 

3cw 


J3 

a 

a 
z 


$139,257 
431.289 
362.762 
435.399 
247.881 
246.795 
220.702 


553 
535 
499 
415 
408 
234 
308 


190 
162 
139 
115 
151 
104 
154 


743 
697 
638 
530 
659 
338 
462 


324.870 
302. 700 
267.432 
257.984 
169,081 
180.406 
162.066 


■■i4.'766 

■■■2."858 
4.520 
1.010 
3.315 


8.962 
9.686 
6.205 
9.630 
13.800 
4.682 
9.062 


272 
261 
236 
280 
226 
297 
275 


333.832 
327. 116 
272.637 
270.472 
187. 401 
185,998 
174,443 


$0 76 
76 
76 
16 
76 
76 
76 




3 


8 
4 

3 
2 
6 
11 

1 


1 




















$2,384,085 


2.952 


1.015 


3.967 


1.664.539 


26.463 


60.927 


264 


1,751.929 


80.776* 




J 


34 




$6 834 


10 
9 




11 
11 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 
6 
8 
4 
5 

i 




3.905 
3,448 
3.000 
2,600 
2,472 
2,394 
2,236 
1,770 
1.400 
1.100 
1.068 
500 
240 


m 

50 

40 


260 
200 
250 
208 
200 
200 
270 
200 
150 
220 
200 
150 
80 


3,905 
3.448 
3.150 
2.600 
2.472 
2.444 
2.236 
1.770 
1.400 
1.100 
1.068 
540 
240 


$100 
1 00 

87»s 
1 00 
1 00 

8712 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 








1 


6.896 










?, 


4 575 










3 


5.200 




160 
80 


.... 




4 


4.944 




5 


4.214 
4.472 




B 




60 


.... 


.... 


7 


3.540 




8 


2.450 










9 


2.200 

2.136 

915 










10 




70 






11 


600 










13 














S48. 976 


71 


16 


86 




26. 133 


240 


192 


26.373 


$0 97 


370 




34 










$2,433,061 


3.023 


1.030 


4.053 


1.664.539 


52.596 


61. 167 


264 


1.778.302 




370 


7 





Average of two contract prices, 76 and 82 cents. 



182 



STATISTICS OF LABOB. 

Henry County — Second District — 1903. 





Name of Opkbatok. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 
Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


s 

a 


3 


d 
g 
i 
9 

i 


a 


til 
be 


s 


a 

11 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Kewanee Coal & Min. Co.l 

Atlas Coal Co.. 1 

Briar Bluff Coal Co 

Totals 


Kewanee 

Galva 

Briar Bluff... 


39,450 
15,888 
3,395 




25.450 
15.288 
2,946 






14,000 


2 




100 


600 
450 












58,733 





43,683 




100 


14,960 


1 


LOCAL MINKS. 

Kewanee Min. & Mfg. Co. 
Kewanee Co-op've C'l Co. 
Herdien Coal Co. 


Kewanee 

.. do 


15,000 

11,808 

11,300 

4,174 

3,400 

2,860 

2,644 

2,480 

2,400 

2,020 

1,800 

1,800 

1,680 

1,600 

1,400 

784 

720 

600 

600 

600 

480 

380 

360 

360 

320 

lis 

120 
71.930 


:::::::: 


10,000 

11,308 

10,800 

2.774 

3.000 

2,260 

2.604 

2.480 

2.400 

2.020 

1,320 

1,800 

1,400 

1.600 

1,200 

784 

720 

500 

600 

600 

480 

380 

360 

360 

240 

180 

160 

120 






5,000 


?. 






600 


H 


Galva 






500 




Fred Kenady 


Cambridge... 

Kewanee 

Atkinson 

Kewanee 

.. do 






1.400 


f> 






400 


fi 


Wm. Q. Kay 






600 


7 








40 


8 










q 


A.b. Hodgett 


.. do . .. 








in 


Dixon & Martin 


.. do 












Atkinson 

Kewanee 

.. do 






480 




Ralph Todd A Son 








13 






280 






Briar Bluff,.. 

Atkinson 

do 








Ifi 


Charles Stlner 






200 


16 














Kewanee 

do 








18 


North Main Coal Co 






100 


11 


J W Kershaw 


Briar Bluff... 

Kewanee 

. do 










P. Maloen & Son 








'1 


Ted Carter 








99 


Thos Carter & Son 


do 












.. do 








?1 


Joseph Stanley 


do . .. 








?5 




.. do 






80 






.. do 








. do .... 








'8 




Green River.. 










Totals 













62,350 







9,580 








130.663 




106,033 





100 


24,630 








1 





Mines in 1902, 35. 
New mines. 3. 
Abandoned mines, 7. 
Mines in 1903, 31. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Henry Countij — Second District —Concluded. 



183 



Employes. 


Disposition of Got- 








PUT. 




u. 






"Ills 


« 


^s 


J5 

s 


a 




1 


t 


a 2 






^^"g^a 


s 


s^s 


si 


i4 






1* 


Sil 




«& 


=5 


ons 
cars 
men 
plie 
tlve 


b2 














<i 


<i 


EH 


H 


H 


H 



1 


•a 
o o 


Acci- 


CO 


DKNTS. 


o 

so 






a 


i 










^a 


^n 


tt-i 


<M 




























°? 




ll 


Ss 


ai! 


a 




3 3 


3 


0-, 


z 


z 


z 



32, 450 
11,851 
2,395 



6.500 
3,537 
1,000 



8,000 

11,458 

10,900 

3,874 

3,250 

2,660 

2.544 

2.400 

2,400 

2.020 

1. 

1.800 

1. 

1. 

1.200 

784 

720 

500 

600 

600 

480 

380 

360 

360 

320 



^,950 
73, 



39, 450 
16,888 
3,395 



15,000 
11,808 
11.300 
4,174 
3.400 
2,860 
2,544 
2,480 
2,400 
2, 
1, 
1, 
1, 
1, 

1.400 
784 
720 



71.930 



130,663 SO 74 



$0 65 
1 12*2 
1 04 

90 
1 12I3 
1 50 
1 12I2 
1 12^2 
1 12»2 
1 12»2 
1 50 
1 12^3 
1 12^2 

75 
] 50 
1 00 
1 I2I2 

65 
1 00 

1 12^2 

1 I212 

1 I2I2 

1 12^2 

1 1212 

66 

1 12I2 

1 I2I2 

1 00 



Average for two contract prices. 



184 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Knox County — Second District — 1903. 





Name of Opkbator. 


POSTOFPICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 
i 


■5 


a 

s 
s 

i 


p. 

a 


ii 

bt 

H 




en 

|l 

ii 


1 


8HIPPIKG MINES. 

Etherly Coal Co., 2 

Yates City Coal Co., 1.... 
Rodell & Mitchell 

Totals 


Etherly 

Yates City.... 
Wataga 


30.350 
4,576 
4,117 

39.373 


8,232 
93 

8.325 


17.196 
3.512 
3,987 

21,995 






1.622 


2 
3 


72 


552 


317 
160 




72 


552 


~:iis 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

Reed & Pendergast 


Soperville.... 


3,610 

3,500 

3,050 

2,908 

2,636 

2.132 

2.120 

2,010 

1,916 

1,901 

1,800 

1,640 

1,500 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1.112 

1,010 

800 

600 

480 

480 

450 

440 

126 

100 

100 

300 

208 

200 

2,800 

780 




3,280 

3,200 

2,700 

2.908 

2.536 

2,132 

2,120 

1.810 

■ 1.882 

1.851 

1.600 

1.160 

1.500 

1.200 

1.200 

1.080 

1.112 

960 

800 

600 

180 

480 

150 

110 

332 

400 

400 

300 

208 

200 

2.800 

780 






360 


?: 






300 


3 


lialvaCoal Co., 1 

George Clifford 


Wataga 

Oneida 

.. do 






350 






















Chas. Simpson 


Wataga 

Truro . 










John Walsh. 












Yates City.... 
Knoxville .... 

Wataga 

Yates City.... 
.. do 






200 




N. C. Anderson 






61 








50 










200 




Bowman Bros 






180 




Hamilton Taylor . 


Wataga 

Victoria 

Oneida 

Knoxville .... 

Victoria 

Soperville.... 

Wataga 

Victoria 

Knoxville .... 

Victoria 

Galesburg 

Knoxville .... 
Farmlngton.. 

Etherly 

Wataga 

Oneida 

Wataga 

Victoria 

Abingdon .... 

Victoria 










W. F. Moore 










T. B. McGovern 








16 


Lundeen & Nelson 

Edward Rensted 






120 


17 








18 


August Peterson 






50 


19 


Nodene & Son 








m 


John Todd 








?\ 


George juane 








?? 


Ambrose King 








?3 


Wm. Woodward 








?A 


James Nelson 








?5 


Wm. M. Wellser 






91 


?fi 


Cook & Dymanites 

N. A. Anderson 








?.l 








?8 


Ohas. Morgan. 








29 










30 


Villiam Nelson 








31 


Product from four mines 
in Cedar township 

Product from four mines 
In Copley township 

Totals 








38 


















15.202 




12.931 






_^.268 




Totals— 11 mines.. 




81. 575 


8.325 


67.929 


72 


552 


7.697 








1 







Mines in 1902, 35. 
New mines, 11. 
Abandoned mines. 5. 
Mines in 1903. 11. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Knox County — Second Distric 



185 



-Concluded. 



5 

o 
o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 
S. 

2 

S 

o 
> 
1 
o 


1 

>> 

x> 

a 

a 

a 


o 

a 
o 

2 

ex . 

u 61 

ti 
1^ 


It 
§3 


Acci- 
dents. 




i 

< 


1 

il 

<3 


1 
o 

o 

i 

£ 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo 
tives at mine. 






© 

1 

a 
1 


a 

il 

z 


1 


$43,012 
7,309 
6.609 


50 
18 
12 


17 
8 
3 


67 
26 
15 


30. 130 
2,604 
2,055 


20 
1.672 
2.232 


200 
300 
160 


1244 
130 
240 


30.350 
4,576 
4.447 


$0 65 
62 
93 


■"300 


1 




1 

2 












$56,930 


80 


28 


108 


34,789 


3.924 


660 


205 


39.373 


$0,678* 


300 


1 






56, 740 


8 
12 

1§ 
6 

5 

6 
3 

12 


2 

\ 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

i 

1 


10 
15 
6 
12 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
7 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

i 
! 
I 

2 
12 




3,500 

3,200 

2,700 

2.908 

2,636 

2.132 

2,120 

1.840 

1.882 

1.854 

1.600 

1.440 

1.500 

1,200 

1.200 

1.200 

1.112 

960 

800 

600 

480 

480 

450 

440 

426 

400 

400 

300 

208 

200 

2.800 


140 
300 
350 

200 

64 
50 
200 
200 

50 




260 
150 
270 
200 
200 
240 
230 
260 
208 
160 
180 
260 
220 
185 
150 
160 
170 

72 
150 
140 
150 
150 

70 
180 
140 

70 
120 
100 

80 

80 

150 


3.640 

3.500 

3,050 

2.908 

2.536 

2.132 

2,120 

2,040 

1,946 

1,904 

1,800 

1.640 

1,500 

1,200 

1.200 

1,200 

1,112 

1,010 

800 

600 

480 

480 

450 

440 

426 

400 

400 

30O 

208 

200 

2,800 


$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

8712 

87^2 
1 00 
1 25 
1 00 
100 
1 00 

90 
100 
1 00 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 25 
100 
1 00 
1 25 

75 

8712 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 

1 25 


200 
160 






1 


6.550 




? 


4 900 






3 
4 


5,816 


::::::;::. 








4,438 










5 


3 198 










6 


3.180 










7 


3,780 











8 


3 796 











q 


3,269 











in 


3.300 










11 


2,270 








12 


2.250 










13 


2,100 










14 


1,800 










15 


2,190 










16 


1.946 










17 


1,946 










18 


1,400 










19 


1,050 










''0 


960 










?1 


840 






.... 




?' 


787 




9^ 


880 










?4 


569 










^S 


600 










'6 


600 










?7 


525 
312 






.... 


28 
?9 


300 




30 


5,880 










34 


1,170 






6 




780 




80 


780 


75 








SR 






. . 








$79,341 


148 


23 


171 




43. 648 


1.554 


184 


45.202 


$1 02 


360 








$136,271 


228 


61 


279 


34.789 


47.572 


2.214 


m 


84.575 




660 


. 1 







• Average of two contract prices. 



186 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Marshall County — Second District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 

B 


1 


a 

a 

a 

i 


a 
p 

J3 


en 


s 




1 


SHIPPING MINES^ 

Devlin Coal Co., 1 

Wenona Coal Co.. 1 

Marauette Coal Co 

Totals 


Toluca 

Wenona 

Sparland 




336.047 
113.427 
10,629 


100,464 

■■■i;362 


188.475 
84.765 
7,807 






47 118 


2 
8 




3,707 


24,955 
1,360 












460,003 


101.816 


281.047 




3,707 


73.433 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

R. G. Ingram 


Sparland 

.. do 


1.500 
640 
600 
520 
410 
286 
280 
208 
200 
192 
120 
120 




1.500 
640 
600 
520 
410 
286 
280 
208 
200 
192 
120 
120 








2 


Frank A. Barr 








8 


Ed. Bennett 


Chillicothe... 

Sparland 

do 








4 


Cyrus Wright 








fi 


W. E. Friable.. 








H 


William Horrocks. Jr .... 
William Bough 


Henry 

.. do 


::".::! 






7 








8 


Bernard Lanning 


Sparland 

Henry 

Sparland 

Henry 








» 








10 


Louis Nlghswonger 

Joseph Caley... 








11 








^?. 












Totals 












6.076 




5,076 










Totals— 15 mines.. 




465.079 


101,816 


286, 123 




3,707 


73,433 











Mines in 1902, 17. 
Abandoned mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 15. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Marshall County— Second District— Concluded. 



1ST 



s 

o 
o 


Employes. 


Disposition 
Odtpct. 


OF 


1 

p. 


1 
1 
■s 

>> 
Q 


1 
s 

1 

a 

n 
§ 


a 
2 

II 


11 

P. U 

El 
ll 

30 


Acci- 
dents. 




1 

■3 

as 

r 


a . 

3 2 


1 

i 

5 


-3 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


OS 

5 

!i 


h 


5 
"S 

1 

a 

z 


§ 

a 
"S 

ll 


. 
1 

a 

3 
z 


$447, 166 


469 
165 
23 


136 
71 
14 


604 
236 
37 


234.789 
97. 181 
4.969 


5,487 
8.621 
4.599 


14.841 

7,625 

961 


278 
264 
233 


331.062 
113,427 
10.529 


$0 76 
76 
76 






11 

5 


1 


196,888 






?. 


18.043 






3 






— 


16 




$661,097 


667 


220 


877 


417.869 


18.707 


23,427 


258 


465,018 


$0,775* 






S2. 260 


4 

6 

4 
3 
3 

i 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 


:::::: 






1.500 
640 
600 

208 
200 
192 
120 
120 


:::::::: 


230 
140 
100 
130 
120 
86 
160 
200 
80 
60 
90 
100 


1.500 
640 
600 
520 
410 
286 
280 
208 
200 
192 
120 
120 


$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

IS 
IS 

75 

'§? 

1 25 
100 


20 
50 
50 
12 
22 
16 






1 


960 




?. 


900 




3 


780 






615 






572 






420 




7.... 




260 






400 




10 

8 


.... 




240 




10 


300 






210 




8 


.... 


.... 


1^ 








$7,907 


30 




30 




5. §76 




148 


6.076 


$0 99 


203 








$669,004 


687 


220 


907 


417,869 


23.783 


23.427 




460.094 




203 




16 





* Average of two contract prices. 



188 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Mercer Comity— Second District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOPFIOE 

Address of 

Mink. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 
a 

25 


73 


d 
g 

2 

i 


a 

a 






a 

1 




SHIPPING MINES. 

Empire Coal Co., 3 

Coal Valley Mining Co., 2 

Alden Coal Co., 2 

Coal Valley Mining Co., I 


Gilchrist 

Sherrard 

Wanlock 

Cable 


211,218 
164.062 
158.070 
86.812 
6.400 
2.400 


■■29.'952 

9,150 

990 


133,962 
86,596 
86.080 
68. 164 
6.000 
1,800 




4.092 
2.712 
6,659 
4,244 


78.164 

44.802 
56.181 
23.414 


Cable 


400 




Cable 






600 


Totals 












628,962 


40.092 


372,602 




17.707 


198.561 


1 
2 
3 


LOCAL MINES. 


Preemption .. 
Viola .. 


4,100 

2,910 

2,448 

2,400 

2,260 

2.000 

1,900 

620 

250 

200 


:::::::: 


3.800 

2.640 

2.448 

2.400 

2. 250 

2.000 

1.900 

580 

200 

200 






300 








300 




Aledo 










Preemption .. 
Laoc 








5 


G W Martin 










Preemption .. 








7 
8 










(5 T Vniinc 


Griffin 

Cable 






io 








SO 


in 


U.S. Clay Mfg. Co 

Totals 


Griffin 


















19,108 




18.418 






690 








648.070 


40.092 


391.020 




17,707 


199.261 











Mines in 1902. 17. 
New mines. 1. 
Abandoned mines. 2. 
Mines in 1903. 16. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



189 



Mercpv County— Second District — Concluded. 



05 
1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 

OnTPDT. 


p 

o 

1 

a 

o 

> 
o 

i 


T3 

a 

<s 

.o 
a 

a 

a 


1 
1. 

a 


ii 

a m 


Acci- 
dents. 




ii 

tit p. 
< 


1 

> o 
•< 


1 
1 

i 

u 

<B 

O 
< 


i 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


o 

o 


^13 

Sis 

» a 


5 

1 

a 
1 


a 

o 
a 

o 

ll 

2 


i 


$256,828 

246,425 

194,266 

132,623 

9.160 

3,000 


184 
121 
148 
63 
10 
4 


87 
131 

78 
48 
2 

1 


271 
251 
226 
111 
12 
5 


207.080 
157,480 
149,579 
83,610 
5,100 
1,200 


2,384 
3,022 
1.892 
80 
1,000 
1,000 


1,764 

3,560 

6,599 

3,122 

300 

200 


256 
263 
252 
269 
230 
250 


211.218 

164.062 

158,070 

86,812 

6,400 

2,400 


$0 60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 


11,438 
8,661 
9,813 
2,507 
150 
80 


1 


'■■3 

1 
3 




S842.302 


630 


346 


876 


604,049 


9,378 


15,636 


253 


628.962 


$0 615* 


32,649 


1 


7 




$5,850 


6 
6 

2 
8 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 






3.900 
2,740 
2,488 
2,400 
2,250 
2,000 
1,900 
620 
250 


200 
200 

200 


200 
175 
180 
172 
200 
173 
175 
130 
50 
15 


4,100 

2,940 

2,448 

2,400 

2.250 

2,000 

1,900 

620 

250 

200 


$0 8712 
8712 
87>2 
8712 
871^ 
8712 
8712 

1 00 

1 00 
8712 


220 
135 
145 
140 
140 
75 
80 
35 








4.110 






3,672 






3,600 






3,375 






3,000 






2.850 






i;045 






537 






350 


10 






in 










$28,389 


47 


9 


66 




18,508 


600 


176 


19, 108 


$0 88 


980 








J870, 691 


577 


355 


932 


604,049 


27,886 


16, 135 




648,070 




33,529 


1 


7 





Average of two contract prices. 



190 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Roch Island County — Second District — 1903. 





Name op Operatob. 


POSTOFFICK 

Address of 
Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


-3 


a 

3 

a 

i 


3 


1 


*3 
1 


a 
ll 

1^ 


1 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

SilvlsMining:Co..2 

Totals 


Carbon Cliff.. 


35.210 




27.386 






7,824 












35,210 




27.386 






7,824 




LOCAL MIMES. 


Coal Valley... 


21.254 

12,000 

7,714 

2,809 

2.360 

1,646 

880 

300 

274 

230 

200 

200 

184 

160 

80 

200 


:::::::: 


17.004 

8,710 

6.588 

2.809 

1.960 

1.600 

880 

300 

224 

230 

200 

200 

184 

160 

80 

200 






4,260 










3,290 


!) 


John Hynd & Sons 

Stoddard & tiummerson.. 


Lodinff 

Coal Valley... 

Lodine 

Milan 

Carbon Cliff.. 

KJ?aiiey::: 






1,126 


{ 















400 


^ 


Wm Parker 






45 


7 





















Black Diamond Coal Co.. 






60 














do 








19 


Fred Vonach 


Hampton 

Moline 

do 




























15 


Wm Wooley 








16 












Totals 












50,490 




41,329 






9,161 








86,700 




68,716 







16.986 















Mines in 1902, 16. 
New mines, I. 
Mines in 1903. 17 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



191 



Rock Island County — Second District — Concluded. 



o 

II 

blO. 

< 


Employes. 


Disposition of Out- 
put. 


§ 

! 

1 

Q 


•6 
§ 

s 

1 

a 

S 




a 
2 

Z 

k 

11 

Is 


1 . 
II 

l| 

a^ 
3 3 


Acci- 
dents. 




1 

a 

sl 
ga 


i 


■3 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mines. 


■3 

a 
s 

2 

=1 




i 

08 

1 

a 
3 
z 


a 


i 
i 

2; 


$46,666 


37 


17 


64 


34.085 


325 


800 


263 


35.210 


$0 60 


1.271 


1 


1 


1 


$46,656 


37 


17 


64 


34,085 


325 


800 


263 


35.210 


$0,616 


1.271 


1 


1 




$33,682 


24 
16 
10 


6 
8 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


30 
23 
13 

2 




20,964 

11.840 

7.614 

2.809 

2.185 

1.600 

880 

300 

254 

230 

200 

200 

184 

160 

80 

200 


300 
160 
200 

i76 

145 

26 


182 

205 
300 
160 
225 
220 
175 
90 
25 
170 
80 
100 
60 
45 
60 
70 


21.264 

12.000 

7.714 

2.809 

2.360 

1.645 

880 

300 

274 

230 

200 

200 

184 

160 

80 

200 


$0 60 

60 

60 

80 

60 

70 
100 
1 00 

87ifl 
100 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 


1.100 
750 
360 
70 
100 
60 
20 
30 
10 


::;: 


1 


1 


171759 




? 


12.761 




8 


5'?^^ 





4 

5 


2.822 




6 


1.760 




7 


600 




8 


361 




9 


460 




10 


350 




12 


.... 


.... 




400 




1? 


368 




4 


.... 




11 


320 






140 




6 
6 




:::: 


16 


300 




16 








$91,711 


83 


24 


107 





49.490 


1.000 


193 


60.490 


$0 64 


2.518 




1 




$123,267 


120 


41 


161 


34.085 


49.816 


1.800 


263 


85.700 




3.789 


1 


2 





Averacre os two contract prices. 



192 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Stark Coimty — Second District — 1903, 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOPFICB 

Address 

OF Mine. 


Output op Mine in Tons. 


1 


1 


d 
g 
i 

i 


a 

3 


1 


2; 


1- 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Wyoming Coal Co.,1 

George R. Watson 


Wyoming 


11.000 
6,958 


2,000 
2:600 


6.000 
1.400 




1,000 


2,000 
1,958 




Totals 












16,958 


4,600 


7.400 




1,000 


3,958 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 


Elmlra 

Bradford 

Wyoming 

Modena 

Wyoming 


2,880 

2,800 

2,690 

1,940 

1,640 

1,456 

1,412 

1,400 

1,320 

800 

800 

680 

680 

640 

440 

280 

180 

168 

140 

102 


:::::::: 


2.600 
2,400 
2,666 
1,872 
1.560 
1.406 
1.312 
1.400 

'•g 

800 
600 
600 
640 
440 
280 
180 
168 
140 
102 






280 


i 








400 


^ 


Robinson & Watson 

John Scott 






24 








68 










80 


ft 


Isaiah King 






60 


7 


Newton & Howard 

Ben Smith 


Bradford 

Modena 

Weat Jersey.. 

Modena 

Lombardville 

Bradford 

Toulon 

Wyoming 

Modena 

Wyoming 






100 


8 








q 


John Catton 








10 


W C Rennick 


















10 


Chas Montooth.. .. 






80 


1? 


Bert Balentine 






80 














JasK Fuller .■;■■■;: 








If! 


Fred Charlston 






























19 




do 








'n 




Lafayette 










Totals 










22,448 




21.286 







1.162 




Totals — 22 mines.. 




39.406 


4.600 


28,686 




1,000 


6.12» 











Mines in 1902, 21. 
New mines, 6. 
Abandoned mines, 5. 
Mines in 1903, 22. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Stark County — Second District — Concluded. 



193 



1 


Employbs. 


Disposition of 

OUTPDT. 


§ 

1 

o 
1 
1 
o 


•6 


o 

2 


Si 

S 3 


Acci- 
dents. 




a 
"a 
> 

as O 

El 


1 
<D a 


j 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo 
tlves at mine. 


O 
o • 


11. 


Xi 

c» 

Xi 

n 

a 

00 

1 


2 

u 

11 

1^ 


■3 

s 

"o 

a 
3 


§ 

a 


ll 


1 

a 
3 
2; 


J16.000 
7.679 


35 
12 


8 
4 


43 
16 


9.600 
4,040 


1.000 
1.518 


400 
400 


160 
200 


11.000 
5,958 


$0 75 
80 


400 
148 


1 


"i 


1 
2 


$23,679 


47 


12 


69 


13.640 


2.518 


800 


180 


16,958 


$0 77* 


548 


1 


1 




$1,690 


2 
3 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


7 

10 
6 
5 
5 
6 
5 
6 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 




2.830 

2.800 

2,640 

1.940 

1,600 

1,456 

1,412 

1,400 

1,320 

80O 

800 

680 

680 

640 

440 

280 

180 

168 

140 

102 


60 

60 

40 


280 
200 
260 
220 
220 
142 
220 
170 
260 
200 
160 
180 
100 
200 
130 
100 
80 
70 
60 
50 


2,880 

2,800 

2.690 

1,940 

1.640 

1.456 

1.412 

1,400 

1.320 

800 

800 

680 

680 

640 

440 

280 

180 

16S 

140 

102 


$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 CO 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 60 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 


50 
94 
50 
125 
35 
37 
40 
40 
38 
25 
22 
60 
12 
10 
6 
4 
2 
4 


.... 




I 


6,200 




2 


4.677 






3,327 




ii 


2,770 






2.837 




a 


2 724 




7 


tm 






2,610 




q 


11200 




10 


1.800 






1, 240 2 




19 


940 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 




n 


960 










660 








In 


420 








16 


270 










252 








18 


210 


1 




19 


163 










•)() 
















$39,070 


66 


13 


79 




22,308 


140 


190 


22. 448 


$1 00 


644 









$62,749 


113 


25 


138 


13.610 


24,826 


940 


180 


39.406 




1,192 


1 


^ 





Average of two contract prices. 



—13 C 



194 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Warren County— Second District — 1903, 





Name op Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output op Mine in Tons. 


j 


5 
^ 


a 

2 
S 

i 


0. 

a 
S 




^ 

^ 


1 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

H.J. Rohr 


Alexis 

.. do 


3.986 

2,010 

1:200 

1.200 

940 

640 

600 

480 

440 

400 

360 

320 

300 

280 

280 


.::::": 


3.506 
2.000 
1.200 
1,200 
940 
640 
500 
480 
440 
400 
360 
320 
300 
280 
280 
240 
192 
148 
40 






480 


?. 


Gllmore & McKahn 

John Slmcock 






40 


3 


.. do 








4 


J. C. Lewis .... 


RoseviHe 

Monmouth ... 
.. do 








f> 


W. W. Glldroy 








n 


Murphy & Redmond 

John Selkirk 








7 


do 








8 


Willis Clayton 










q 


Thomas Caldwell 


.. do 








10 


Thos. Wearmouth 

Chas. Miller 


Youngstown.. 








11 








1? 


Thos. Smith 


Avon... 








n 


Thos. Lee 


Youngstown.. 








14 










If) 


J. G. Kidd 


Roseville 

Monmouth ... 








16 


Andrew Welch . 


i40 








17 




192 
148 

40 










18 


Amos Singleton 


do 








19 




Swan Creek.. 




















13.986 





13.466 






520 















Mines in 1902. 17. 
New mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903. 19. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



195 



Warren County — Second District— Conolnded. 



■s 


Employes. 


Disposition or 
Output. 


a 

! 

> 

I 

o 

m 

5 


Tons mined by hand. 


o 

d 
o 

la 

<D a 

1^ 


tl 

1 

ll 


Acoi- 

DKNT8. 




>• 

Its 

it 

< 


1 

is 

if 

> o 

< 


Pi 

_o 

"S 

a 

(O 

® 

< 


5 

H 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment' and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


"3 
1 

o 

1^ 


Pi 
III 


1 

o 

s 

.a 

a 

D 


a 
o 

II 


.o 

a 

3 


$5,451 


I 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

...... 

■••' 


6 
6 
4 
7 
6 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 

1 




3.786 
1,840 
1,200 
1.2O0 
940 
640 
500 
480 
410 
400 
350 
320 
300 
280 
280 
240 
192 
148 
40 


200 
200 


280 
200 
225 
182 
160 
160 
160 
150 
150 
150 
250 
230 
200 
180 
120 
144 
100 
lOO 
60 


3,936 

2,040 

1,200 

1,200 

940 

640 

500 

480 

440 

400 

360 

320 

300 

280 

280 

192 

'!§ 


$0 75 
75 
75 
175 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 75 
1 50 
1 50 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
150 
1 50 
1 50 
150 
1 50 


120 
120 








3,020 






1,800 




40!'" 




3,900 










2,350 












1,280 






1,000 












960 












1,110 












1,000 












900 












800 












750 












700 












700 












600 












480 












370 












100 










19 














$27, 261 


45 


7 


52 




13,586 


400 


'" 


13,986 


$1 10 


290 















196 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Recapitulation hy Counties- 





it 

a 

a 

a 
S 

o 

H 


1 


Production of Different Grades in Tons. 


-5 
o 


Counties. 


g 
a 

a 


a 


^ 

H 




a 
o 


1 


o 

2 

"5 
> 

as 

< 


Bureau 

Henry 


7 
3 
3 
3 
6 
1 
2 


1.751.929 
58.733 
39.373 
460,003 
628.962 
35.210 
16.958 


56,979 

8,326 
101,816 
10,092 

4.600 


1.314.527 
43.683 
24,995 
281.047 
372.602 
27,386 
7.400 


97.148 
72 


23,095 

100 

552 

3.707 

17.707 


119,400 
14,950 
5,429 
57.631 
98,302 
7,824 
3,958 


140.780 

15,802 
100.259 


$2,384,085 
85.074 
56,930 


Marshall 

Mercer 

Rock? Island.. 
Stark 


661.097 
842.302 
46,556 




1,000 


23,679 


Totals and 
averages 


25 


2,991,168 


211,812 


2,071.640 


97.220 


46.161 


307,494 


256.841 


$4,099,723 



Recapitulation by Counties — 























« 


1 


Production of 


Different Grades in 


Tons. 


1 












s 




















a 






Counties. 


z 

o 


1 


g 


d 






1 


5 


as 

> 

II 




^1 


o 


a 


■^ 




s 


?. 


-, 


as 




z; 


H 


a 


J 


E)^ 


z 


Q- 


t» 


< 


Bureau 

Henry 

Knox 




26, 373 




26, 133 






240 




$ 48,976 


28 


71 930 




62, 350 






9.580 




136.652 


38 
12 


45.202 
6,076 
19. 108 




42,934 
5 076 







2.268 




79,341 


Marshall 

Mercer 

Rock Island.. 






7,907 


10 




18, 418 






690 




28, 389 


16 


50.490 





41,329 






9,161 




81,711 


Stark 

Warren 


20 


22 448 




21 286 






1.162 




39.070 


19 


13,986 





13.466 






520 




27.261 








Totals and 




















averages 


156 


254.613 





230.992 






23,621 




$449,307 


Total district 
—all mines.. 


181 


3.245,781 


211,812 


2,302.632 


97.220 


46, 161 


331.115 


256,841 


$4,549,030 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



197 



Second District — 1003 — Shippiny Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


i 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 


^^ 


r. 


■ij 


















Paid per 
Ton For— 






£ 


i 




i 


^1 


"3 


■a 

H 






lis 










s 

o 

1 


1 
i 


i 


II 


-a 

as 

11 


1 

1 


II 

il 


II 

ii 




I 


bi 

B 

H 

a 


a 

a 

1 

a 
1 


aSg 


1 
5 


1 
1 

a 

3 


2; 


< 


H 


H 


h" 


H 


H 


<J 


CQ 


CD 


m 


g 


z; 


z 


z 


2.952 


1.015 


3.967 


1,648,600 


15.939 


26,463 


60,927 


264 


1,751,929 




$0.76 






7 


34 


102 


29 


131 


46,696 




11.037 


1,000 


233 


58,733 




0.74 




400 




2 


80 


28 


108 


33.869 


920 


3,924 


660 


205 


39,373 




0.678 




300 


1 




657 


220 


877 


385,690 


31.179 


18,707 


23,427 


268 


455.018 


4,985 


0.76 


* 






16 


630 


346 


876 


602.426 


1.623 


9,378 


15,635 


253 


628.962 




0.615 




32,549 


1 


7 


37 


17 


« 


34.085 




325 


800 


262 


35.210 




0.60 




1,271 


1 


1 


47 


12 


69 


13,610 




2.618 


800 


180 


16.958 




0.767 




548 


1 
11 


1 


4.405 


1.667 


6,072 


2.766.006 


49,661 


72,352 


103, 149 


243 


2,986,183 


4,985 


$0,723 




35,068 


61 



Second District — 1903 — Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


! 
% 

< 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 
Paid per 
Ton For— 




r. 

(Si 

1 

a 

3 

z; 


-i 


f 


1 

p, 

Si 

o 

< 




11 


il 

Si 

ii 


1 

ii 


73 

fl - 
-a fl 

la 

§1 

|i 


'6 

a 

OS 

Jfl 


a 
1 

a 


g 


1 

a 
■s 

1 
1 


&< 

a 
'3 

a 

si 

w 


di 

a 
a 

a 

a 

1 

S 


§ 

a 

1 

a 

a 


71 


15 
34 
23 

9 
24 
13 

7 


86 
207 
171 
30 
66 
107 
79 
52 






26, 133 
62,950 
43,648 
5,076 
18,503 
49.490 
22,308 
13,586 


240 
8.980 
1,654 

600 

1.000 

140 

400 


192 
141 
184 
148 
141 
109 
190 
166 


26,373 
71,930 
45,202 
5,076 
19, 108 
50,490 
22,448 
13,936 




$0.97 
1.01 
1.016 
986 
0.88 
0.635 
1.00 
1.10 





370 
240 
360 
203 
980 
2.518 
644 
290 






173 








148 








30 








47 








83 






1 


66 








45 
















663 


126 


788 
6,860 






241.699 


12.914 


161 


254.613 




$0.93 




5.605 


1 


5,068 


1,792 


2.766,006 


49.661 


314,051 


116.063 




3.240.796 


4.935 






40.673 


11 62 










« 


Day 


work. 



























198 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



THIRD INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 

Twentieth Annual Report, 

Counties: Cass, Folton, Hancock, McDonough, Menard, Peoria, Schuyler, 

Tazewell. 

James Taylor, Inspector, Peoria. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois. 

Sir:— Complying with section 12 of an act of the General Assembly, I have 
the honor to submit the twentieth annual report of the coal mines located in 
the third inspection district. The coal producing counties of this district are 
Cass, Fulton, Hancock, McDonough, Menard, Peoria, Schuyler, and Tazewell. 

The tabular part of the report gives the number of tons of coal mined; the 
number of kegs of powder consumed ; the number of boys over 14 years of 
age, working in the mines, also the number ot miners and other emploj6s; 
the number of shipping and local mines; the aggregate value of the total 
product at the mines; the thickness of the coal seams, with the geological 
number and the depth of the seams below the surface; the number of cas- 
ualties, fatal and non- fatal; the number of mines, old, new and abandoned; 
the total tons of the different grades of coal produced and the number of 
days of active operation during the year. 

The total number of mines in the district is 243, of this number 50 are ship- 
ping mines and 193 are local mines. 25 new mines have been opened during 
the year. Of the 50 shipping mines, Pulton county has 16, Hancock 1, 
McDonough 1, Menard 8, Peoria 19, Tazewell 5. 

The total number of employes in and about the mines was 4,363, of whom 
3,198 are miners; 607 day men, working underground; 454 employed above 
groucd, and 104 boys employed in and about the mines. 

Of the 25 new mines in the district 6 are in Fulton county, 1 in Hancock, 
11 in McDonough, 3 in Menard, 2 in Peoria and 2 in Tazewell. There have 
been 23 mines abandoned during the year, 10 in Fulton county, 1 in Hancock, 
2 in McDonough, 5 in Peoria, and 5 in Schuyler. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



199 



The following table shows the number of shipping and local mines in each 
county, and the total tons produced: 



COUNTT. 


Shipping Minks. 


Local Mines 


Number 


Total tons. 


Number. 


Total tons. 


Cass 






2 
47 

5 
55 

8 
53 
15 
11 


2,807 




16 

1 
1 
8 
19 


966. 721 
7,700 
14,428 
476.409 
734,987 


69. 775 


Hancock 


3.640 




28. 966 


Menard 


16.919 


Peoria 


185.729 




15. 734 




6 


119.446 


66,089 






Totals 


60 


2,319,691 


193 


388, 659 



The product of ail the mines in the district was 2,708,350 tons; the shipping 
mines supplying 86 per cent and the local mines 14 per cent. 

The output by counties, showing the increase or decrease in each, is shown 
in the following table: 



Counties. 


Total Product 

OP All Grades of Coal 

—in Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




1902 


1903 




Cass 


2,100 


2.807 


707 

146,817 

5,030 






889,679 1.036.496 
6,310 11.340 
49.271 43.394 
438.768 i 492,328 
824,260 j 920,716 
18.240 \ 15.734 
184,835 1 185,535 
2 413 463 1 2 70S 3S0 




Hancock 




McDonougli . »... . 


5,877 




53.560 
96,456 




Peoria 






2,506 




70O 
303,270 




Totals . ■ 


8,383 











Increase in tons 

Decrease In tons 

Net increase in tons 



303, 270 

8.383 

294,887 



200 STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

The total number of mines in the district in 1902 was 241; the total number 
of employes 4,268, and the total number of tons of coal produced was 
2,413,463. For the year 1903 the total number of mines in the district was 
243; the total number of employes 4,363 and the total output of coal 2,708,350 
tons. Hancock and Schuyler counties show a decrease of 8,383 tons, leaving 
a net increase of 294,837 tons. 

Litigation. 

April 6, 1903, I entered suit against Edward Little, Peoria, for operating 
his Hilliard No. 1 mine without a certificated mine manager. The court 
found him guilty as charged, placing his fine at $50 and costs, which he paid. 

I also secured an injunction closing Little's Hilliard No. 2 mine, until such 
time when he would comply with my recommendations, to place the mine in 
lawful condition. This injunction was in force until June 1, 1903. 

Dogs Employed in Mines for Hauling Cars. 

In McDonough county mines 31 dogs are employed for drawing empty and 
loaded cars of coal to and from the mines, to the bottom of the shaft or to 
the mouth of the drifts. 

On one of my visits to the mine of Rippetoe and Rundle, at Colchester, I 
was very much interested in observing the intelligence exhibited by one of 
these animals. The driver with his dog was returning from the bottom of 
the shaft, the dog drawing an empty car, on arriving at the summit of the hill, 
the dog, without any instruction, jumped into the ear and rode with the driver 
down the incline to the level below, arriving at the bottom the dog jumped 
out of the car and palled it up the grade on the opposite side to the working 
face. 

I am unable to classify the different kinds of dogs that are in use at these 
mines. Under thelhead of haulage in the mines (page 127) is shown a mastif 
hitched to a car of coal, which it has just drawn out of the mine. 

I do not esteem so highly, the value of dogs, in consideration of their mere 
usefulness to the miner or to the operator, as 1 do other domestic animals : 
the horse, pony and mule; yet the dog to a greater degree beyond that of 
any other animal, has become the humble friend and companion of man, 
seeming actually to have knowledge to be delighted with the joys, or, to sym- 
pathize in the sorrows, of his master. On this account it is, that he is alike 
"The pampered minion of royalty and half starved partaker of the beggar's 
crust." 

Powder Explosion at Athens. 
In company with Richard Newsam, president of the State Mining Board, 
G. R. Charlton, Menard county mine inspector, Thomas Hannah, former 
county mine inspector, with John Garrity, mine manager and Moses Cooper, 
mine examiner of the Athens Coal company's mine, I made an inspection of 
the mine, operated by the Athens Coal Mining company, in which six miners 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. * 201 

lost their lives on the morniDg of March 23, 1903, by an explosion of powder. 
Mr. Newsam and myself were the first to arrive at the face of the workings, 
where the men were killed. 

Our investigation there showed that six shots had been fired in the tenth 
south entry, also in a crosscut, which was being made between the ninth 
and tenth south entries; the latter from the tenth south entry side. Three 
shots had been fired in the tenth south entry and three in the cross-cut. One 
shot in the cross-cut had blown through into the ninth south entry. 

From the testimony given by Mr. Westton it was learned that this particu- 
lar shot in the cross cut had been prepared on Friday, March 20, three days 
previous to the explosion; that he, Westton, had assisted Fred Impkey, one 
of the killed, to charge and tamp this shot, Friday night, and had left Imp- 
key to fire it, and he supposed Impkey did fire it at that time. This shot in 
the cross cut had been drilled to within a few inches of being through into the 
ninth south entry; the length of the drill hole was 7^, feet; the shot did not 
blow the tamping, and enabled us to measure the length of the hole, which 
had contained powder, also to measure the length of the tamping, and make 
an estimate of the amount of powder which had been used in preparing this 
shot. 

As stated the drill hole was 7H feet long; there was 16 inches of tamping 
left in the holes, this we drilled out, leaving 6 feet of the drill hole, which 
had been filled with blasting powder. 

Allowing that 1 cubic foot of powder will weigh 62.5 pounds, we would 
have contained in this drill hole, which was 6 feet in length and 284 inches in 
diameter, 14.2 pounds of blasting powder. Assuming the foregoing as a basis 
in estimating the amount of powder used in the five shots that were fired the 
morning of the explosion, we would have in "dead drill holes" alone 12^ 
feet. The cubical contents of these drill holes would be 825 cubic inche, and 
would contain 29 pounds of blasting powder. 

However, taking into consideratian the length of the drill holes as meas- 
ured, it was found that the drill holes on the left hand rib of the tenth south 
entry was 6^ feet long, and that the one on the right hand rib of the same 
entry was 7 feet long, while the one in the center of the rib showed 3^2 feet 
of dead hole. The drill hole on the left hand rib of the crosscut was Qh, feet 
long, and the one in the center 2>^ feet dead. Therefore the conclusion is 
reached, after very careful measurements and calculations, that there must 
have been fully one and one-half kegs or 37 pounds of powder used and ex- 
ploded in firing these five shots. 

In addition to the powder exploded in these shots, as described, a portion of 
a keg of powder had been left on the tenth south entry, about 70 feet from the 
face of the entry; this would increase the quantity to fully 50 pounds of pow- 
der exploded in the tenth south entry. This entry was only 7^ feet wide 
and 6 feet high; the cross cut was 6X feet wide and 6 feet high. There was 
of course a lack of room for the rapid expansion and dissipation of the heat 
produced by the firing of these tight shots. The force of the powder was ex- 
pended in creating velocity and the velocity thus created put in motion the 



202 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



smoke or carbonic oxide gas produced by the incomplete combustion of the 
powder, consequently carrying the flame a long distance, which, in this in- 
stance was from 500 to 600 feet. It was found that gas had settled in the 
ninth south entry, beyond the last cross cut, but none was found at any other 
place. In the last named entry there was very little indications of an ex- 
plosion. In the tenth south entry was found every indication to justify the 
forming of an opinion that the explosion was caused by the shot fired in this 
entry. 



NORTH 



VWt^ 






§ 1 § 



3". 3 






nr ^— B»ok K, 



in Main East 



j^n 



r 1st West , 



'^ 



1st Kast -} 

2Qd East 1 



> H 
H I 

d 

o 

2 



VL^ 



m 



203 




Fatal Accidents. 

The following is a detailed statement ot the fatal accidents that have taken 
place in the third district during the year ended Jane 30, 1903: 

Jan. 6, 1903, William Johnson, helper, aged 31 years, married, while work- 
ing with the timberman in the Wabash Coal company's mine, Athens, Menard 
county, was injured by falling slate. His injuries proved fatal, as he died 
Feb. 3. He leaves a widow. 



204 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



March 23, 1903, Six miners were killed by the explosion of "windy shots," 
in the mine of the Athens Coal company, Athens, Menard county, as follows: 

Fred Impkey, aged 33 years, married, leaves a widow and one child. 

Ed Corndorf , aged 35 years, married, leaves a widow and four children. 

David Myers, aged 55 years, married, leaves a widow and four children. 

August Neal, aged 48 years, married, leaves a widow and four children. 

John Radquneski, aged 34 years, married, leaves a widow and three children. 

•James Patrick, aged 25 years, single. 

Juae 27, 1903, William Mushbaugh, miner, aged 51 years, single, was 
crushed and instantly killed by falling roof, from a slip, in Little's mine at 
Wesley City. Deceased was deaf and, to a certain degree, was dumb. It is 
presumed he did not hear the cracking of the roof before it fell on him. His 
room was well timbered, showing that he was a very careful miner. 

June 30, 1903, Alex. McKenzie, timbermaa, aged 64 years, married, received 
injuries by falling roof, at theMaplewood Coal company's mine, Farmington, 
Fulton county, resulting in his death about two hours afterwards. He was 
the timbermaa of the mine and had been in the employ of this company over 
two years. The mine examiner had reported to the mine manager that a fall 
of slate had occurred in No. 2 south entry, on the west side. The mine man- 
ager sent McKenzie and his helper to attend to the matter. The two men had 
cleaned away the slate and were at work propping up the clod temporarily, 
while preparing the permanent support. They had part of the support under 
the clod and, while in the act of driving a cap piece over a prop, the roof 
gave away, crushing McKenzie to the floor, the prop lying across his back. 
The deceased was conscious and talked freely, though in great pain. He died 
about 20 minutes after being carried to his home. His backbone was broken 
near its juncture with the hips. He leaves a widow and five grown up 
children. 

The tables of fatal and non fatal accidents, also the county tables of the 
output of coal of the district follow:— 

Respectfully submitted, 

James Taylor, 
Peoria. State Inspector oj Mines, Ihird District. 

Fatal Casualties — Third District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


i 
< 


Occupation. 


Residence 
(town). 


i 
1 

s 


i 


£ 

2 

1 


* 
a 

XI 


§ 

■a 
a 
« 

a, 

Q 


Cause of Accident. 


1903 




31 
33 
35 
55 
48 
34 
25 
51 
64 


Miner 

do 


A-thens 

. do 




1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


i 

4 

4 
4 
3 


l 

2 


1 
2 

I 


Falling roof 


Mar. 23 


Fred Impkey 


Explos'n, windy shot. 


23 


Ed Ccndorf 


do 


do 


do 


23 


David Myers 


.. do 


.. do 


.. do 






do . 


. do 


.. do 


23 


Jno. Radquneski 

Jas. Patrick 


.. do 


:: do :::::::: 


.. do 


23 


.. do 


.. do 


.. do 




Wm. Mushbaugh 

A-lex McKenzie 

Total— 9 


..do 

Timberman 


Wesley City 
Farmington 


"i 

7 


i 

7 


2 
18 


To 




30 


.. do 













COAL IN ILLINOIS, 205 

Recapitu laiion of Fatal Accidents — Third District— July 1, 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No 


Nature of Casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Alliens 


7 

1 

9 


Miners 

limberman... 


8 
9 


Explos'n. windy shot 
Falling: of roof 


6 
3 

9 


Wabash Coal Co.. . 




Wesley City.. 


Athens Coal Co 

Kd Little 


6 




Maplewood Coal Co 


1 













Non Fatal Casualties — Third District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


1 


■3 
a 
55 


a 

5 


11 

si 

z 


Character and cause of 
injury. 


1 

1 

11 


1902 
Oct. 8 

8 
10 

12 


Wm. Owen 

Geo. Herln 

Jas. Wilson 

feSfc::::: 

Olexand. Lebas.. 
Fred Fisher 

Wm. Chaney 

Macheal Backs... 
Aug. Gunshesa.. 
Daniel Reeves.... 

Paul Jerkins 

Wm. Turner 

J. Shabatka 

J.T.Smith 

Total— 15 


22 
30 
32 

16 
45 
36 
27 

21 
46 
25 
16 

26 

46 

27 
29 


Reed City... 

Pekin 

Wesley City 

Reed City... 

Peoria 

Pekin 


.... 

1 

1 
1 


:::: 


26 


■"3 

2 

7 
6 

■"3 

"4 

2 
2 

4 

39 


Lee broken; falling: roof 

Wrist broken; premature shot 

Wrist broken; flying coal 

Head and shoulders bruised 
by door; windy shot 


71 
60 

24 


12 
Dec. 3 


Ankle bruised; falling rock.. 

Leg bruised; falling rock 

Shoulder and body injured: 

ribs broken; windy shot 

Ribs broken; pit car 


40 
40 


27 
1903 
Jan. 20 


Peoria 

Reed City... 
Bartonvllle. 

.. do 

Kingston... 


1 
.... 

1 


60 
30 


Feb. 17 


Body burned by shot .... .. 


36 


Mar. 6 
21 


Back injured; falling slate ... 

Leg and arm broken; falling 

roof . .... 


30 


23 


Face and hands burned; windy 
shot 






Bartonvllle. 

Reed City... 
F arminsrton 


1 
.... 

9 


* 


May 26 


Shoulder bruised; premature 
blast 


30 


June 29 


Body bruised; falling roof.... 
Arm broken: falling roof 


30 
451 















Not recovered July I, 1903. 



Total men injured 

Not recovered July 1, 1903 

Number recovered July 1, 1903 

Time lost by men recovered 

Average days lost by men recovered 



15 
4 
11 

461 days 
41 



206 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Accidents — Third District — July 1, 

1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty. 


Mo 


Colliery. 


No 


Reed City 


2 

1 
2 
3 

1 

1 

"is 


Miners 

Driver 

Shotflrers.... 

Gripper 

Tlmberman .. 


10 
16 


Falling roof 


4 

\ 

3 
2 

1 

1 

1 

15 


Newsam Bros.. 




Premature blast 

Plying coal from shot 
Firing windy shot.... 


Ubben Coal Co 




Wesley City.. 
Peoria 


Ed. Little 




Third Vein Coal Co 




Kingston 

Athens 

Farmington .. 


Caught between roof 
and car 


Sholl Bros 




Treasure Coal Co 

MapletonCoal Co 

Athens Coal Co 




Shotblow'g through 
pillar 






Palling slate 










1ft 













Table Showing the Number and Nature of Non-Fatal Casualties, 
Conjugal Relations and Time Lost — Third District — 1903. 





1 
i 


'6 


6 

"Si 


i 

a 

1 


Time Lost. 


cent of 


Nature of Injctriks. 


Total 
days. 


Aver- 
age 
days. 


juVles. 






■"2 


:::: 








* 




6 
7 
6 
3 
4 
2 
2 


131 
24 

80 
90 
36 
30 


65.30 
24.00 
40.00 
45.00 
36.00 
30.00 


1.81 


Head and shoulder injured 


.99 




1.81 




1.81 


Body burned by blowing shot . . . . . .. 


99 




.99 






Face and hands burned . . . 






» 




4 

6 


30 


30.00 


.99 






Body braised . . 


30 


30.66 


.99 






Total 


15 


9 


6 


39 


451 


30.1 


101.8 







208 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Cass County — Third District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFIOB 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Odtput OF Mine in Tons. 


s 


1 


d 

2 

a 


1 










LOCAL MINES. 


Chandlerville 
.. do 


1.605 
1.202 

2,807 


_.^ 


1.605 
1.202 

2.807 








•> 


Charles Nelson 




































Mines In 1902, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 2. 





Fulton County — 


Third District— 1903. 








Name of Operator. 


postofpice 
Address 
OF Mine. 


OuTPDT OP Mine in Tons. 


i 

a 

p 

2 


■3 

1 


a 



t^ 
a 
§ 


d 

a 








j. 
1 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Whitebreast Fuel Co. of 
Illinois, B 


Dunfermline.. 

Farmington .. 
Canton 

Dunfermline.. 

Cuba 


195.356 

145.817 
137,209 

101,647 

70.643 
63.377 

55,908 
47,762 

36,462 
30.834 

30.383 
18, 198 
12.000 
8.684 
7.535 
4,907 


14. 182 

1,749 

860 

39,203 

15.835 
5.181 

30.834 
1,832 

2.219 
2.216 

"i.'eeo 


142,315 

99, 155 
58,200 

62.328 

32,761 
41.317 

18.603 
29,432 

23,710 
23.751 

1?:IS 

9.000 
8,684 
4,680 
4.907 


3,791 
29, 756 


444 

1.020 
19. 184 

7.673 

6.14B 
5.635 

4,168 
5,631 

7.292 


38,414 


2 


Maplewood Coal Co., 
Black Hawk 


40, 102 


3 
4 


Monmouth Coal Co 

Whitebreast Fuel Co. of 
Illinois, C 


29. 209 
2,443 


5 


Applegate & Lewis. West 


16.902 


6 

7 


Norris Coal Mining Co... 

East Cuba Coal Co., East 

Shaft 


Norris 

Cuba 


11.244 

2.303 


n 


Scrlpps Coal Co 


Astoria 

Farmington •• 
Canton 

Farmington.. 
do 


10. 967 


9 


Newsam Bros.. Maple- 


6.460 


10 
11 


Canton Union Coal Co... 

Farmington Coal Co.. 

Nickel Plate 


7.083 




3.333 


6,293 


12 
13 
14 
15 


Monarch Coal &M. Co.,1 
Central Coal & M. Co 


4! 648 


East Bryant.. 

Parrville 

Ellisvllle 

Cuba 






3.000 








Spoon Klver Coal Co 






1.185 










Totals 












966, 721 


116,771 


578.716 


33,647 


69.426 


179.263 





















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



209 



Cass County — Third District — Concluded. 



■3 






Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 
1 

1 


•6 


a 



1 

o"* 

«^ 
is 

li 

a a 


AOOI- 

DKNT8. 




1 

(► 
< 


1 

ii 

i! 

0- 



ft 

i 



5 


. 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


. 1 



i. 




1- 

ill 

111 


Tons mined by ban 

Price paid per gros 
hand mining. 


3 


1 

a 

s 

2; 


§ 

a 


II 

25 


E 
2; 


$3, 210 


6 

4 


2 

1 


8 
6 




1.605 
1.202 




275 
210 


1.605 
1.202 


$1 00 
1 00 


75 






2,404 




60 


.... 


9 








$5, 614 


10 


3 


13 




2.807 




243 


2.807 


Si 00 


135 


.... 















Fulton County — Third District — Continued. 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition- 
Output. 


OF 


5 




u 



a 



1^ 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 



















1 


> 
1 



1 
a 


w 

2 

i! 

<s a 
a 03 


li 






« 

a 

1 

a 

bi a 


1 

a . 
300 

«£ 

S.9 
£3 


1 

1 

1 



« 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 

■0 
1» 


Pi 




1 

a 


§ 

a 


ll 


1 

a 






















a a a j a*; 




<! 


< 


< 




^ 


H 


H 


Q 


H 


a. 


2 i^lz 


2; 


$250,873 


129 


60 


189 


190,489 


648 


4.217 


253 


195.355 


$0 56* 


8,524 






1 


180.790 


150 


51 


:oi 


143.597 


400 


1.820 


258 


145.817 


56 


7,565 


li 1 


?. 


148, 228 


106 


64 


170 


134, 109 


600 


2,500 


271 


137.209 


56 


5-953 


3 


133.390 


94 


68 


162 


97.455 


909 


3.283 


234 


101.647 


66 


4.627 .... 




4 


73.282 


78 


40 


118 


68.303 


160 


2.190 


200 


70.643 


56 


2.840 .... 




B 


76.770 


75 


33 


108 


60,918 


1.000 


1.460 


tl98 


63,377 


56 


2.760!.... 




6 


60.085 


68 


22 


90 


63.486 


119 


2.303 


202 


55.908 


56 


1.933 .... 




7 


53.805 


51 


24 


75 


43.872 


1,427 


2.463 


252 


47.762 


56 


1.371|...-. 




8 


39,381 


40 


23 


63 


33.000 


2.000 


1.462 


203 


30.462 


56 


1.855.... .... 


9 


45, 106 


45 


14 


59 


25.0C0 


5.834 




280 


30,834 


56 


1,316.. ..!.... 


10 


34.698 


40 


18 


58 


29,076 


799 


508 


190 


30.383 


56 


1.703 


11 


19.698 


24 


15 


39 


16,015 


467 


1.716 


244 


18, 198 


56 


922 


1? 


16.650 


60 


48 


108 


11,80C 




2C0 


76 


12,000 


56 


565' 


U 


14, 068 


4 


2 


6 


8,684 






260 


8,684 


56 


2111 




10.!»S2 


14 


6 


19 


7.46C 




75 


160 


7,535 


56 


350 ....;.... 


1ft 


8,5^7 


10 


6 


16 


4.800 


15 


92 


250 


4.907 


56 


210!.... .... 


16 


$1,166,233 


988 


493 


1.481 


928.064 


14,368 


24.289 


230 


966,721 


$0 575 


42.62«l ll 1 




























— 





* To April 1. 1902, 56 cents; April 1 to July 1. 1903. 62 cents. 
t Three months idle on account of cyclone June 10. 

—14 C 



210 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fulton County — Third District — 1903 — Continued. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 
ADDRESS 

OF Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 

a 


"a 


2 

a 

i 


a 






a 

1 




LOCAL MINKS. 

Surprise Coal Co 


Astoria 

..do ... 


1.300 

1.012 

1.021 

1.690 

1.440 

28.000 

480 

3.600 

3.2O0 

2.610 

2.300 

610 

260 

110 

l.OOO 

400 

360 

800 

1.620 

3.441 

600 

120 

1.372 

3.100 

1,620 

32 

100 

1.520 

300 

507 

400 

900 

640 

500 

810 

2.000 

69.775 


1.300 
600 

■"s.'ioo 

5.000 










9 


Temple Gelselman 


• 1.012 

1,021 

1,690 

1,440 

28,000 

480 

3,600 

3,200 

2,610 

2..S00 

610 

260 

110 

1,000 

400 

360 

800 

1,620 

3,441 








T 


.. do 








4 


K A Kumbei :::::::"; 


.. do 




5 


Westerfield & Co 


Canton 


















7 


^lartin & Son............. 


.. do 








^ 


A M Everley 


. do .. 








9 




.. do 








10 


Marphy Bros ........... 


.. do 








11 


Thomas Parcell 


.. do 








1? 


Joseph McLaughlin 

J R Riley 


.. do 




13 


Breeds 

.. do .... 








11 










15 




St. David 

.. do 


















17 


Abraham Bath 


.. do .... 








18 


L. R. Snider 


"do":::::::: 








19 




.. do 








'0 


Wm Roddis 


Ipava 








?1 


D. S. Mayall 


.. do 








?? 


H B. Doyle 


Norris 

Lewistown ... 
.. do 


120 
1.372 








9^ 


Yockum & Son 






















.. do 


1.620 
32 

100 
1.520 
300 
507 
400 
900 
640 
500 
810 
2.000 

64.775 








•'H 


AT H James 


Fairview 

., do 








?7 














.. do 








•jq 


T H Travers. 


. do . 








30 




.. do 










L. W Davis 


., do 








S' 


R B Gould & Co. 


.. do 








T^ 




do 








SI 












S5 


a K. Barrere 


Canton 










Product of 12 small mines 
Totals 












— 








Totals— 63 mines.. 




1,036.496 


120.771 


643.490 


33.547 


59,425 


179.263 



Mines in 1902. 67. 
New mines. 6. 
Abandoned mines. 10. 
Mines in 1903. 63. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Fulton County — Third District — Concluded. 



211 



"3 
o 

<M 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 

o 

<D 

o 
« 

Q 


■6 
a 

X3 

•o 
a 

a 
1 


o 

n 
O 

a 


1« 

E§ 
as 

a a 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 




J 

< 


1 

a . 

H 

< 


1 

a. 
S 

<u 
u 

01 

Si 
5 


3 
^ 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


2 


ill 


1 

a 

a 
2; 


a 
o 

a 

o 

ll 


1 
a 

a 
Z 


$1,625 


8 
2 
4 
5 
5 

35 
4 
6 

10 
4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
3 

6 
5 
8 
4 
1 
12 
7 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
1 
3 


2 

i 

1 

8 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 

2 

1 


10 
3 
4 
6 
6 

43 
5 
7 

11 
5 
5 
6 
3 
2 
2 
3 

6 
6 
9 
5 

1 

13 
9 
3 

1 

4 
2 
1 

2 
4 
3 

1 
3 




1,300 

1.012 

1.021 

1,690 

1,440 

28,000 

480 

3,600 

3,200 

2,610 

2,300 

610 

•260 

no 

1.000 

400 

360 

8U0 

1,620 

3,441 

600 

120 

1,372 

3.100 

1,620 

32 

100 

1.520 

300 

507 

400 

900 

640 

*500 

810 

2.000 


:::::::: 


50 
140 
120 
156 
150 
250 

80 
300 
160 
140 
200 
130 

66 

90 
120 

65 
100 

70 
112 
300 

60 

70 
191 
200 
160 

12 

30 
230 

70 
280 

80 
115 
100 
180 
130 
110 


1,300 

1.012 

1,021 

1,690 

1,440 

28,000 

480 

3.600 

3.200 

2,610 

2,300 

610 

260 

110 

1,000 

400 

360 

800 

1.620 

3,441 

600 

120 

1,372 

3,100 

1.620 

32 

100 

1,520 

300 

507 

400 

900 

640 

500 

810 

2,000 


$0 62 
70 
1 25 
fcO 
80 
62 
87 «2 
87*2 
87 »3 
8712 
8712 
8712 
62 
62 
80 
80 
80 
62 
80 
80 
62 
80 
80 
82 
82 
82 
75 

8712 
871a 
75 
75 
75 
8712 

■■"87^^ 

75 


30 
30 

■■■'eo 

65 
625 
40 
180 
128 
100 
92 
41 
10 
4 
45 
27 

5§ 
61 
136 
18 


:::: 


:::: 




2, 024 




•> 


2,042 




■] 


3,380 






2,160 




f; 


35,000 













5 400 




fi 


4.000 




I 


3.262 




10 


2 875 




]1 


763 






390 




I'l 


165 




11 


1,260 






500 




16 


450 




n 


l.OOO 






2,026 




IS 


6 161 




•"O 


760 






150 






2,401 




78 
200 
80 
2 
5 


'.'.'.'. 


:::: 




3,875 






3,iJ40 




•>5 


40 






125 




97 


1.900 






375 




13 




.... 


29 


6ii4 






600 




22 








1,125 




t"' 


800 




45 
25 
32 
100 


:::; 


:::; 


33 


625 






1,215 




?5 


3,000 












...... 






$94,827 


169 


27 


196 
1,677 




69.775 




102 




$0 74 


2.332 








$1,261,060 


1,157 


620 


928,064 


84. 143 


24,289 




1,036,496 




44, 956 


1 


^ 





' 600 tons mined by day. 



212 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Hancock County — Third District — 1903. 





Namk of Operator. 


POSTOPFIOK 

Address 
OF Mine. 


OuiPDT OF Mine in Tons. 


1 


1 


a 
g 

s 

i 


a 

a 

p 


Ed 


i 


ii 

1 


1 


SHIPPING MINK. 

Meredith Bros 


Auffusta 

Augusta 
.. do 


7.700 


7,700 












LOCAL MINKS. 

C.H.Ellis 


1,220 
810 
860 
310 
410 

3.610 


1.220 
810 
860 
340 
410 












L. Bennett 














.. do 












Geo. Willey 


.. do 












S. Jones 


.. do 













Totals 














3.640 
















11,340 


11,340 



























Mines in 1902. 6. 
New mines. 1. 
Abandoned mines. 1. 
Mines in 1903, 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



218 



Hancock County — Third District — Concluded 



5 

o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 

o 

1 

1 

o 

m 

1 


1 

1 

a 

n 

a 


I 
1. 

Ji 

0^ 


u 

k 
11 


Acci- 
dents, 




11 


1 

as 

1% 

1° 


i 

5 


, 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


§ 
2 

ll 


a 

lis 

«. a 


5 

o 

z 


o 

ii 

z 


i 
i 

z 


i 

$13,475 10 


2 


12 


7.700 






208 


7.700 


$125 








1 








1 

$2,4401 6 

1.620 6 

1,720 4 

680! 3 

820| 3 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 






1.220 




202 
210 
220 
110 

200 


1,220 
810 
860 
310 
410 


$125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 






810 
860 
340 
410 










































$7,280 21 


6 


26 




3.640 




188 


3.610 


$1 26 










S20 765 ^'' 


7 


38 


7.700 


3,640 






11,340 


























_ 



214 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

McDonough County — Third District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFPICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 
^ 


d 
2 


d 

a 


i 
m 


3 


a 

il 

s-1 


1 


SHIPPING MINK. 

Rippetoe & Rundle 

LOCAL MINES. 

John Pearson 


Colchester.... 

Colchester ... 
.. do 


14.428 


12.023 








2.405 


1 


480 
2.080 
60 
320 
240 
70 
100 
50 
300 
120 
100 
1.000 
905 
110 
321 
100 
68 
250 
416 
360 
120 
80 
260 
720 
500 
205 
240 
120 
1,501 
2,765 
3,224 
1.600 
1.509 
120 
461 
245 
672 
1.222 
100 
120 
600 
210 
300 
320 
962 
400 
116 
1.000 
208 
80 
40 


........ 




480 
2,080 
60 
320 
240 
70 
100 
60 
300 
120 
100 
1.000 
905 
110 
321 
100 
68 
250 
416 
360 
120 
80 
260 
720 
500 
205 
240 
120 
1.501 
2,765 
3.224 
1,600 
1,509 
120 
461 
246 
672 
1,222 
100 
120 
600 
210 
300 
320 
962 
400 
116 
1.000 
208 
80 
40 








2 


.John Nee 








3 


Wilson & Thornton 

Anton Lokoslk 


.. do 








4 


.. do 








5 


Wayland Bros 


.. do 








fi 


Guy «& Co 


.. do 








7 


Kin&& Peck 


.. do 








8 




.. do 








9 




.. do 








10 


D. E. Perry 


.. do 








11 


Wm. Hoar 


do 








12 


Michal Humes 


.. do 








n 


O. Baird & Co 


.do 








14 


Wm. Webster 


do 








15 


Andr^-w Swanson 

A. A. Wagle 


.. do 









16 


.. do .. . 








n 


Amos Ebben 


do 








18 




.. do 








19 


John Rudee 


.. do . 








20 


Andrew Nelson 


do 








21 




.. do 








2? 


Joseph Bunt 


.. do 








23 


Eli Hilliard 


do 








24 




.. do 








25 




..do 








26 


Putt Bros 


do 








27 


Richard Laitz 


.. do 








28 


J. S. Vowter 


.. do 








29 


Atkinson Bros 


do 








30 


John Wilson 


.. do 








31 


Burney & Co 


. do ... 








3? 


Williams Coal Co 

R. Oldham 


do 








33 


.. do 








34 




.. do 








35 


James Gordon & Son 

Chas. Porter 


do 








36 


Macomb 

.. do 








37 










38 


Wm. Edington 


do 








39 


Chas. Kost . . . 


do 








40 




.. do 








41 


Jackson Gilllgan 


Industry 

do 








4^ 


r. L Bowman 








43 




.. do 








44 


Wm. Baker 


..do... . 








45 


J. C. Teei 


do 








46 


Clay Nudd... 


LaHarpe 

Blandinsville. 
do 








47 








48 


Thos. E. Wilson 








49 


W. E. ^toneking 


Siesta 








50 


Frank Vogler 


.. do 








51 


John Larson 


Colchester.... 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



215 



McDonough County — Third District — Continued. 



1 

o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 
o 

1 

1 
1 

o 
08 

Q 


08 

a 
S 

1 


i 

00 

2 

M . 

11 

01 a 

2 OS 

'Cja 

0, 


i 

as 


Acci- 
dents. 




s 

l 

11 


1 

a 

S5 

ga 
< 


1 

"E 

a 

Si 
o 

< 


3 

o 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo- 
ttves at mine. 


1 

o 

-a 

1^ 


h 

ill 


o 

a 

3 

2 


d 

% 

3<.- 

z 


a 

s 
z 


$21,641 00 


56 


7 


63 


13,983 




445 


151 


14,428 


SI 00 






1 


1 


$ 960 


8 

10 
10 

10 

3 
4 

2 

6 
2 
1 
1 


i 

i 

3 

i 

i 

i 






480 
2,080 

60 
320 
240 

70 
100 

50 
300 
120 
100 
1,000 
906 
110 
321 
100 

68 
250 
416 
360 
120 

80 

260 

720 

500 

205 

240 

120 

1,501 

2,765 

.3,224 

1.600 

1,509 

120 

461 

245 

672 

1,222 

100 

120 

600 

210 

300 

320 

962 

400 

116 

1.000 

208 

80 

40 




150 
208 
35 
140 
185 
60 
70 
65 
240 
75 
85 
240 
275 
40 
175 
60 
20 
180 
180 
190 
30 
80 
130 
180 
180 
168 
155 
SO 
214 
216 
280 
200 
216 
60 
200 
95 
140 
240 
55 
50 
160 
120 
160 
110 
140 
100 
100 
300 
104 
50 
30 


480 
2,080 
60 
320 
240 
70 
100 
50 
300 
120 
100 
1.000 
905 
110 
321 
100 
68 
250 
416 
360 
120 
80 
260 
720 
500 
205 
240 
120 
1,501 
2,765 
3.224 
1,600 
1,509 
120 
461 
245 
672 
1,222 
100 
120 
600 
210 
300 
320 
962 
400 
116 
1,000 
208 
80 
40 


$1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
125 
1 26 
1 25 
125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 12^2 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 75 
1 37^2 
1 25 
125 
125 


•:::: 








4.1fc0 




V 


90 




3 


480 






360 




ty 


105 





8 


160 








7 


75 










H 


460 










9 


180 













in 


150 




11 


1,500 


11 
10 
13 












1.357 










n 


165 










14 


481 










15 


160 










19 


102 










17 


375 










IS 


624 










19 


540 










'0 


180 










'1 


120 










•>•> 


390 










?3 


1.080 












750 










""> 


307 










?6 


360 










?7 


180 










?8 


2.251 




99 


4.147 










SO 


4,836 










'^l 


2.400 








3? 


2,263 










"V^ 


ISO 










34 


691 


:::::::::: 


^5 


428 










'fi 


1,176 










37 


2,444 




38 


175 




S9 


210 




40 


1.050 










41 


367 










4? 


526 




43 


560 












1,683 










4S 


1.000 










46 


290 










47 


2,250 










18 


364 










49 


140 










50 


70 










51 



216 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

McDonough County^Third District — Concluded. 





Name of Opkkator. 


POSTOFPICE 
ADDRESS 

OF Mine. 

• 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


a 


1 


P 

3 
a 

i 




^ 
W 


3 


Si 


62 
53 
61 


LOCAL uiVKS—Co?icluded. 


Colchester.... 

Bushnell 

do 


216 
760 
100 
420 

28.966 


:::::::: 


216 
760 
100 
420 

28.966 
























65 


XTITgrlHIa Rrna 


Tennessee.... 








Totals 

















43.394 




40,989 








1.960 















Mines in 1902. 47. 
New mines. 11. 
Abandoned mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903. 56. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



217 



McDonough County — Third District— Concluded. 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition op 
Output. 


9 

2 

2 

S 

© 

> 
1 

o 

00 

1 


1 
>, 

Xi 

rs 

a 


o 
a 
2 

u . 

i 

II 


It 
1 

3 

a» 

s s 
2 


Acci- 
dents. 




1 

Is 

II 

ttCk 


J3 

il 

<D a 

< 


1 

a 

O 
< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

P 


ii| 

V a 


a- 
3 

o 

1 

a 

s 


§ 

o 
u 

u 

•z, 


1 

a 

z; 


$ 378 


2 




2 
3 

5 




216 

760 
100 
120 


■::::::: 


120 

208 
an 


216 

760 
100 
120 


$1 26 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 








62 


1.330| 3 

175' 1 











63 










61 


735 


6 




12fi 








66 


















$17,916 


172 
228 


8 
25 


180 
213 




28.966 
28.966 


115 


136 




28.966 














13.983 


13. ! 91 


-^^ 












$69,686 















218 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Menard County — Third District— 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 

Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


o 


d 

s 

u 

s 

i 


a 
5 




+3 




•> 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

Greenview C. & M. Co ... 
Wabash Coal Co 


Greenview.... 

Athens 

do .. 


141, OKI 
132,439 

87.806 
43.280 
34,804 
17,816 
15.000 
4,200 

476,409 


■■53:657 

35, 709 
33, 357 

18,645 
10,274 
15.000 

166,042 


111,341 
53.215 
32.254 

7,159 
10,018 

3,953 


""I'M 


3,346 

4,488 

4.325 

181 

536 


26.377 
21,679 


^ 


Athens Mining Co., 2.... 
TallulaCoal Co 


15 518 




Tallula 

Petersburg.... 
.. do 


2,580 


6 


South Mountain Coal Co. 
Petersburg Coal Mln. Co. 
Valley Coal Co 


6.137 
3,053 




.. do 




8 


Middletown Coal Co 

Totals 


Middletown . . 



4,200 
222. 140 










1,004 


12,879 


74.344 




LOCAL MINES. 


Middletown . . 
Sweetwater .. 
Petersburg.... 
do 


5,240 

2,759 

2,640 

2,040 

1,600 

610 

520 

510 


::::■.::; 


6,240 

2,059 

2,640 

2,040 

1,600 

610 

520 

510 








2 
3 


Arthur Wainwright 

Wm. Denton 




700 




{ 










Fi 


Charles O. Neill 


.. do 








6 


Duncan Coal Co 


Tice. 








7 












8 




Petersburg.... 










Totals 










15.919 




15,219 




700 










492,328 


166.042 


237,359 


1,004 


13,579 


47.902 











Mines in 1902, 13. 
New mines, 3. 
Mines in 1903, 16. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



219 



Menard County — Third District —Concluded. 

























eS 


















o 


<D 






S 








Disposition 


OF 


a 






'U 


Acci- 






Employes. 


C 


UTPDT. 








§ 


dents. 


















as 


-o 
























o 

> 


a 

as 

a 


II 
•3 a 










ii 

0) a 


1 




loaded on 
for ship 
and sup- 
to locomo- 
at mine. 


"a 

s 


ill 


5 

o 


a 




MO 


fi 


! 




ons 

cars 

ment 

plied 

tlves 


il 


ill 


O 
OS 


i 

a 


•=5 


11 


a 

3 


0) ■ 

13 


a 

a 


< 


<! 


< 


H 


H 


EH 


^ 


Q 


H 


a. 


Z 


'A 


A 


'^. 


$139,225 


120 


44 


164 


126,809 


3.607 


10,649 


275 


141.064 


$0 497* 


6.210 








129,970 


100 


3H 


139 


125,355 


2.595 


4.488 


244 


132.439 


497 


5.529 


1 






110.461 


70 


36 


106 


82,203 


2,729 


2.874 


228 


87.806 


497 


3.862 


e 


1 




44.383 


50 


22 


72 


38,865 


3,315 


1,100 


250 


43.28C 


497 


1.995 


.... 






33.889 


33 


IS 


51 


28,157 


6.847 


800 


256 


34.804 


497 


1.444 








21.770 


25 


12 


37 


15.063 


1.986 


767 


240 


17,816 


497 


942 









19.600 
7.350 


20 


Q 


29 
20 


13.400 


1 200 


400 


230 


15.000 
4.200 












15 


5 


4,200 




120 


497 


150 


.... 




8 


$506,548 


433 


185 


618 


429.852 


25.479 


21,078 


230 


476.409 


$0 512 


20.822 


7 


1 




$9. 170 


3 


2 
2 


8 
8 
8 
7 
6 
4 
4 




5.240 
2.759 
2.640 
2.040 
1.600 
610 
520 




230 

240 
210 
212 
200 
180 
200 


5.240 
2.759 
2.640 
2,010 
1,600 
610 
520 


$0 67 
67 
67 
67 
67 
67 
67 


215 
110 
120 
100 
84 
32 
26 


:::: 


:::: 


1 


4.683 




2 


4,620 






3.570 






2,800 






1,067 






910 






892 






5 




510 




195 


510 


67 


27 




.... 




$27,683 


37 


12 


49 




15.919 




208 


15.919 


$0 67 


714 


1^ 


■•-- 




$534,231 


470 


197 


667 


429.852 


41.398 


21.C78 





492.328 




21,536 


7 


1 





* Two prices have been paid for mining during this fiscal year— $0 497 and $0 556. 



220 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Peoria County — Third District — 1903, 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICB 

Address 
OF Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


S 
^ 


9 

B 


0, 

a 




1 


a , 
"3* 


1 

•> 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

ShollBros.,3 

Newsam Bros.,K 

Wolschlag Cooperative.. 
Clark Coal & Coke Co... 

Howarth & Taylor 

Newsam Bros., R 

Collier Cooperative C. Co 


Peoria 

.. do 


90.500 
71,609 
67,477 

eilill 

55,565 
46,733 
34,260 
30.466 
29.700 
28.600 
27,677 
26,820 
20.935 
20.600 
18.240 
17.670 
16.420 
6,890 

734,987 


50,000 
"67 "477 

■■44,' 420 

"i'soo 
"\h',m 


22,600 
45,830 


8. SCO 


"ii,'322 


9,500 
11,467 


3 
1 






do 


38,275 
47,579 
35,561 
1.420 
33.000 
19.803 
23,000 
27,000 
16,925 
23.820 
13.967 
20,000 
16. 120 






25. 517 


6 
6 

7 


Edwards 

Peoria 

Bartonville... 

Peoria 

.. do 




i3.554 
11,114 


's.m 

893 








1.260 


q 


Newsam Bros.,H 




6.093 


4.570 


10 


Kramm 

Edwards 

Peoria 

Mapleton 

R. R. 1. Peoria 

Mapleton 

Elmwood 

Peoria 

Orch'd Mines 
Edwards 


4,200 




C. B. Kramm& Bro 

Newsam Bros., S 

W.E.Foley 

Peter Grant & Son 

Jas Walker 






1,600 


12 
13 




5,615 


5,137 
3.000 


14 
15 




348 


6,620 
600 


16 


Elmwood Coal Co 






2,120 


17 

18 
19 








Third Vein Coal Co 

Qigby,Cusack& Edwards 

Totals 


15.200 
6.890 

406.890 






1,220 








8,500 


50.946 


86.684 























COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



221 



Peoria County — Third District — Continued. 



OS u 



Employes. 


^ 


















a 


a 




3 . 








u 




S« 


'^4 






= S 


03 






o 


<! 


<! 


H 



Disposition o» Odt- 

PUT. 



» . -Q o a 

^ « a 5 « 

o u a P.4J 



H « 2 

o as O 

a gja 
o «« 



til tit 



"5 



^, 






<u 




Is 


Acci- 


DKNTS. 


fto 








00 t: 


t 


a 


■^3 


<w 


iW 








° o 


O 
















•^"S 






a^ 


a 


a^ 






s<S 


z 


z 


Z 



77,599 
72.723 
63.872 
59.473 
53,615 
40.230 



41,300 
28.824 
37.230 
21.416 
30.300 
25,240 
20.320 
31,254 
10.335 



$876,908 712 269 



88.700 
67,809 
66,566 
62,792 
60.283 
52,265 
46, 133 
33,000 
27.466 
29,300 
28,400 
26,057 
26,820 
20,035 
20.000 
16, 120 
17, 228 



360 

2,000 

120 



1,450 

1,800 

791 

1,000 





850 


1.200 


2.100 




600 


1,260 




1,700 


1.300 


200 


200 




200 


200 


1,320 




900 




600 




2, 120 


217 


225 




220 



$0 66* 
56 
66 
56 
66 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
66 
66 
56 



6.343 
3,346 
4,598 
3,183 
3,300 
2,883 
2,336 
2,120 
1,607 
1,600 
1,520 
1,263 
1.320 
1,206 
1,200 
920 
865 
130 



$0,575 39.075 



222 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Peoria County — Third District — 1903 — Concluded. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOPFICE 
ADDRESS OP 

Mini. 


Output op Mink in Tons. 


1 




g 

i 


a 


til 


a 
2: 


'5 * 


1 


LOCAL MINKS. 

Wantlmgr& Burdett 


Pottstown .... 
Bartonville... 
.. do 


2.307 

11.695 

8.661 

17.400 

5.771 

640 

3.400 

1.320 

2.000 

840 

965 

890 

1.260 

2,150 

2,014 

3,648 

4,648 

1.800 

4.248 

4.112 

1.820 

2.000 

4.056 

1,200 

31,659 

16,415 

1.400 

3.210 

9,210 

1.410 

860 

1.620 

2.000 

510 

6.240 

460 

4,810 

1.110 

620 

380 

360 

1.260 

410 

320 

630 

160 

420 

510 

610 

10,260 


■■"i.'iis 

1?,400 

840 

■"i,'266 

3i2 

■*3i.'659 
16,415 


2.307 
10. 819 
6.677 








? 






876 


3 


Ball Coal Co 






666 


4 


Winters Coal Co. . .. 


.Ido 








fi 


Geo. Keller «fe Sons 

David Roberts 


.. do 


5.771 
640 
3.400 
1,320 
2.000 








fi 


Mapleton 








7 


Smith Miller 








8 




.. do 








9 


H. Goodwin 


.do 








10 


D. T. Sanders & Sons.... 


Glasford 

Monica 

.. do 








11 


965 
890 








1? 


Cluskey & Simons 

Oscar Graves . ..... 








IS 


Duncan 

Prlnceville... 
. do 








14 


A. W. Hlgbee 


2,000 
2,014 
3,648 
4.648 
1.800 
«,140 
3,432 
1,820 
2.000 
3.640 
1.200 






150 


If) 










16 


Joseph Crew 


Chlllicothe ... 

Kingston 

R. R. 1. Peoria 








17 










18 


Pair Oak Coal Co 

White Coal Co 








1<^ 






108 


30 


Limestone Coal Co 

It. Schneider 


.. do 






680 


?1 


. do 








?' 


John Blrdois. 


do 




?IS 


MohnCoal Co 


.. do 






104 


'4 




R^R. I'Peoria 
.. do 








?f) 


F. P. Schmidt & Sons, 1.. 
F. P. Schmidt &Son8.2.. 
W. H. Poole 








!1fi 










?7 


Kickapoo 

Peoria 

.. do 


1.400 

3,210 

9,210 

1,410 

860 

1.620 

2.000 

510 

6,240 

46U 

4,840 

1,110 

620 

380 

360 

1.260 

410 

320 

630 

160 

420 

510 

610 

10.260 








'8 


Mann Bros 








i^9 


Hlbberd & Snedden 

George Rattleback 

George Mulvaney 








80 


Brimfleld 

do 








31 








3? 




.. do 








83 




.. do 




3<l 


Wm. Johnson . . 


Hanna 

Peoria 








3fi 










8H 










37 


S. Hurst . . 


Bartonville... 

Duncan 

Edwards 

do 








38 


Chas Carroll 








39 










40 


E. C. Snyder 








41 


Chas Klngsley 


do 








4? 




Elmwood 

Laura 








43 


Charles Abys 








44 


Charles Evins 


do 








45 




Mapleton 

Peoria 

Pottstown.... 

laffi'i!:;:: 

Peoria 


















47 


Joseph Marie 








48 


Wm. Black 








49 


S.A.Moore 








RO 


Standard Coal Co 

Totals 


















185.729 


68.044 


115.201 






2.484 








920.716 


250.111 


522,091 


8.500 


50.946 


86,684 











» To April 1, 1902. 56 cents; from April 
Mines in 1902. 72. 
New mines, 2. 
Abandoned mines, 5. 
Mines in 1903, 69. 



to July 1. 1903. 62 cents. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Peoria County— Third District — Concluded. 



228 



1 

o 


Employes. 


Disposition 

OUTPDT. 


OF 


1 
1 

o 

1 

o 

a 

1 


1 
s 
s 

a 

00 

a 
5 


a 
2 

aa 

-co 


OS 

ll 


Acci- 
dents. 




« 

a 

1 

II 

< 


li 

<D a 

•< 


1 

a 

» 
< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


■5 
1 

2 


11. 


5 

"S 

•s 

1 

z 


a 

u 

ll 


i 

S3 

a 

s 
Z 


$ 3,460 
16,557 
12.000 


16 
15 

3 

16 
16 

IG 

a 

12 


\ 

2 

1 

6 
2 

1 
1 

i 

5 

2 
1 

2 
2 
I 

1 
1 
1 

2 

i 

1 

i 

i 

i 

2 


8 

20 
9 

19 
7 
4 
6 
4 
6 
3 
4 
4 
6 

11 
8 
6 

14 
9 
6 
6 
4 
3 
7 
4 

21 

17 
5 
8 

18 
6 
4 
5 
7 
2 

12 
2 
6 
6 
2 
1 

2 
2 
3 
5 
2 
2 
4 
14 




2.307 

11.695 

8.105 

17.400 

5.771 

640 

3.400 

1.320 

2,000 

840 

965 

890 

1.260 

2,000 

2,014 

3,648 

4.648 

i.m 

4.140 

3.432 

1,820 

2,000 

3,952 

1.200 

31.659 

16.415 

1.400 

3.210 

9,210 

1.410 

860 

1.620 

2.000 

510 

6.240 

460 

4.840 

1.110 

620 

380 

360 

1.260 

410 

320 

630 

160 

420 

510 

610 

10,260 


566 

150 

108 

680 

ioi 


230 
220 
236 
268 
264 
180 
225 
100 
120 
105 
200 
210 
240 
300 
225 
230 
116 
230 
234 
280 
182 
210 
130 
180 
280 
134 
200 
120 
200 
300 
169 
210 
220 
110 
200 
170 
200 
210 
115 
100 

90 
220 
120 
110 
200 

40 
160 
120 
210 
230 


2.307 

11.695 

8.661 

17.400 

6.771 

640 

3,400 

1.320 

2.000 

840 

965 

890 

1.260 

2.150 

2.014 

3.648 

4.648 

1.800 

4.248 

4.112 

1.820 

2.000 

4,056 

1,200 

31.659 

16.416 

1,400 

3.210 

9,210 

1.410 

860 

1.620 

2.O0O 

510 

6.240 

460 

4.810 

1,110 

620 

380 

360 

1.260 

410 

320 

630 

160 

420 

510 

610 

10.260 


$0 62 

62 

62 

62 

62 
1 00 
1 00 

62 

62 

62 

87i2 

8712 

871a 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

62 

62 

871a 

62 
1 00 
1 00 

62 

62 

62 

62 
1 00 

62 

62 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 

62 
1 00 

75 
1 00 

75 

75 
1 00 
1 00 
100 

75 

56* 

56* 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 

56* 


173 
912 
674 
800 

25 
135 
60 
65 
40 


'.'.'.'. 


"i 






9 




3 


21.750 

8.657 

960 








^ 




6 


5.100 
1 980 








H 


3.000 
1 050 




q 




1(1 


1.447 
1.335 
1 890 




11 




















H 


3,038 










14 


3.021 
6 472 




60 
71 
200 
130 
320 
200 
30 
41 
123 


:::; 


:::: 






16 


6,972 




17 






6 237 




11 


5,318 
2.730 
3 000 




?n 








99 


5,876 






1.800 
39 674 




90.... 
1,244 .... 

8621 


"l 




95 


20.519 






2 100 








Of 


4,815 




68 
260 






98 






2 115 




?r 


11290 












2 430 










V 


3.O0O 












765 












9 360 




810 






% 


690 






7.260 




210 








1,665 




^H 


930 




30 
15 
12 




;;;; 


39 


570 






640 




11 


1,890 






615 










1^ 


480 












945 
240 




31 
6 
12 


E 










630 




17 


765 






915 










(9 


15, 390 




460 


.... 


.... 


50 








$258,658 


276 


66 


342 




185.729 


1.600 


185 


185. 729 


$0 69 


8,397 




1 




$1,135,566 


988 


147 


1.323 


712.064 


195.096 


13.656 




920. 716 




47.472 




~To 





224 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Schuyler County — Third District — 1903. 





Namb of Operator. 


POSTOFFIOB 

Address 
OF Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


i 

1 


1 


a 
g 


si. 

a 
5 


bi 



z 


1 


J 


LOCAL MINES. 


Rashville .... 
PleasantVlew 


2.639 

1,280 

320 

620 

630 

400 

871 

2,000 

■ 869 

2,000 

1,038 

2.000 

220 

200 

747 




2,339 
1,280 
320 
620 
530 
400 
871 
2,000 

2.000 
1,038 

2.000 
220 
200 

747 






300 












^ 


F W Croxton 








} 


V T. Rnnsn 


do 












Littleton 

Frederick 

do 








(\ 


John W. Hamilton 

Hederick& Wetmore.... 








7 








Ray 








q 




do 








10 




do 








Williams & Clark 

Rnhnrt ivAAr 


Rushville 

do 








!•> 








13 


O A AlnvnnrlAr 


Huntsville ... 
. do 
















15 




Pine Grove... 


















16,734 




15.434 






300 
















Mines in 1902, 20. 
Abandoned mines. 5. 
Mines in 1903. 15. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



225 



Schuyler County— Third District — Concluded. 



5 


















o 


£ I 




o 


Employes. 


Disposition 

OCTPUT. 


OF 


o 




a 
o 


•S . ! Acci- 

5« 1 DENTS. 


















2 

o 

1 
1 

o 


OS 

S 

1 

a 


i 

IS 

la 


II 

a$ 






is 

SI 


1 

a . 

li 

2a 


1 

a 

1 


'n 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


OS 

o 

s 


SI. 

Ha 
» a 

a-B 0) 


o 

1- 

11 


ll 


1 

a 


ttlO. 


>o 




o 








O 




3=3 1 S 






< 


< 


< 


H 


H 


EH 


H 


Q 


H 


a. 


Z |Z 


Z 


z 


$2,691 


6 


2 


8 




2.339 


300 


160 


2,639 


$0 55 


104 








1,280 


3 




i 




1,280 




200 


1,280 


75 


34 








320 


?. 




3 




320 




80 


320 


75 


12 








620 


4 

3 
2 

4 




5 
4 
3 
5 




620 
530 
400 
871 




120 
160 
65 
160 


620 
530 
400 
871 


75 
100 
8712 
8712 


25 








795 






500 












1.088 




40 








2.750 


4 
4 

6 




6 
5 

7 




2.000 

869 

2,000 




250 
190 
70 


2,000 

869 

2,000 


76 
1 00 

75 










1.303 












2.760 












1.401 


6 




7 




liosa 




78 


1.038 


6212 


46 








3.000 


4 




5 




2,000 




100 


2,000 


75 


70 








410 


2 
2 
4 




2 
2 
4 




220 
200 

747 




100 
80 
170 


220 
200 
747 


1 25 

1 00 
1 00 










300 












1.120 
























$20, 360 


56 


13 


69 




15.434 


300 


132 


15.734 


SO 76 


m 















—15 C 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Tazewell County— Third District— 1903 





Name of Operatok. 


POSTOFFICK 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 


1 


s 
a 


1 




+5 


ill 

H 


1 
«> 


SHIPPING MINES. 


Peoria 

Pekin 


34.000 
25.000 
21.220 
20,000 
19.226 

119.446 


33,000 
20,000 
21,220 
19.000 
4.825 

98.045 








1 000 


Ubben Coal Co 


4.000 






1,000 


3 


Lake Erie Coal & M. Co.. 


Peoria 

.. do 














1.000 


6 




. do 


9,871 
13.871 






4.630 


Totals 










7.530 


J 


LOCAL MINKS. 
RatitArn nniil Co 


East Peoria... 
.. do 


300 
6,325 

14.833 
1,322 
6.589 
3.6*0 
520 

14,250 
4,800 
6.510 
8,000 


504 

281 

■"i'ioo 
■"s.'ooo 


300 
6.073 

10. 307 
1.041 
3.726 
3.240 
520 

11.100 
4,800 
6.610 










Wm. Cruickshank & Sons 
A G- Cumniinffs . .-.-. 






252 


^ 


. do 




462 


3.560 


) 




do 






B & B. Coal Co 


.. do 




287 


1,576 






. do 


400 


7 


F Seffer 


do 










(4rossweiler Coal Co 


Pekin 






1.050 










10 




East Peoria... 
Pekin 






11 


r. ^4rj4nt J^ SnnQ 


1 




Totals 












66, 089 


10.8S5 


47.617 


749 


6.838 




Totals — 16 mines 




185,535 


108.930 

1 


61.488 


i 749 


14.368 










1 





Mines in 1902. 14. 
New mines. 2. 
Mines in 1903, 16. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Tazewell Counly — Third District — Concluded. 



227 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition of Out- 
put. 


a 




a 

o 


^3 


Acci- 
dents. 




<w 












as 

1 

O 

1 

o 
w 
>1 


08 

XI 

pfi 
rs 
ID 

a 
1 
a 


® a 

n 

^ o 


® a 

8 

it 






1 
II 


1 

a 

11 


g 

ID 

^1 


n 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mines. 


"5 
1 
2 


ns consumed 
nd wasted at 
he mines. 


1 

o 
u 

a 


a 


1 

a 










O-M 


O 08« 


« 


o 






a 




a 


< 


<i 


< 


^ 


^ 


H 


H 


Q 


^ 


0.4 


z 


z; 


25 


T, 


$33,750 


45 


15 


60 


34.000 






191 


34,000 


$0 56 


1.770 








25.400 


45 


10 


66 


25,000 






254 


25, 000 


60 


1,100 




2 




21.220 


27 
18 


3 

7 


30 
25 


21.220 
20. 000 






255 
160 


21,220 
20. 000 


56 
66 


901 

597 


.... 


"*? 




19. 750 








22.861 


22 


8 


30 


19,226 






205 


19,226 


56 


909 
















$122,981 


157 


43 


200 


119.446 






213 


119.446 


$0 57 


5.277 


I 


3 




$ 450 










300 




90 


300 


$0 56 


136 








9.204 


16 




19 




6,325 




180 














18.003 


21 


10 


31 




14.833 




250 


14,833 


56 


759 






8 


1.913 


3 




4 





1.322 




103 


1,322 


56 


103 






4 


6.342 


6 




8 





5.589 




243 


5.589 


56 


211 






5 


4,960 


8 




10 




3 710 


. 


200 


3 740 


56 


163 






^ 


780 


4 
6 




5 
8 




520 
14.250 




110 
231 


520 
14.250 


56 
60 










26. 662 




429 






R 


8.400 


6 




10 




4,S0O 




200 


4,800 


60 


200 






9 


9.755 


16 




19 




6,510 




181 


6.510 


56 










10. 000 


15 




19 




8,000 




200 


8,000 


66 


400 






11 








$96,479 


101 


32 


133 




66.089 




181 


66,089 


SO 57 


2.856 








$219, 460 


258 


38 


833 


119,446 


66, 089 






185,635 




8.133 




q 










1 " 





228 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Recapitulation hy Counties- 









Production of Different Grades in 


Tons. 


1 




in 

1 


■a 

3 


























» 




o 

<D 








































"5 


Counties. 


n 


£ 












« 


> 




O 


§ 


















'A 


5 


s 


6. 


bt 


*3 


o 










o 




fl 


tx 








enfi 




2 


H 


§ 


J 


Ec] 


z; 


a. 


» 


-< 


Fulton 


16 


966. 721 


115.771 


578.715 


33,547 


69,425 


111,224 


68.039 


$1,166,233 




1 


7.700 




7,700 










13,475 


McDonough.. 
Menard 




14.428 
176.409 




12.023 






1,960 


445 


21.641 


8 


166.0*2 


222,140 


1.004 


12,879 


47,902 


26.442 


506.518 


Peoria 


19 


734.987 


182.067 


106,890 


8.600 


50,946 


79.874 


6.710 


876.908 


Tazewell 


6 


119.446 


98.045 


13.871 






6.530 


1.000 


122,981 








Totals and 
averages 


50 


2,319,691 


561.925 


1,241,339 


43,051 


123.250 


247.490 


102.636 


$2,707,786 



Recapitulation hy Counties — 





a 
1 

o 

a 

3 


1 

i 


Production of Different Grades in Tons. 


5 
2 


Counties. 


a 

(S 

a 


6. 

1 


iii 


3 


bi 

o 
fl 

£ 
g 

o 

CS 


i 
I 

o 

55 


o 

0) 

3 

is 

si 

blO. 

< 




2 
47 

5 
55 

8 
50 
15 
11 


2.807 
69. 775 

3.610 
28.966 
15,919 
185,729 
15.731 
66. 089 


5,000 

68,011 
10,885 


2.807 
61.775 

3.640 
28.966 
15.219 
115,201 
15.431 
47.617 










$ 5,614 


Falton 

Hancock 

McDonough.. 

Menard 

Peoria 

Schuyler 

Tazewell 










91,827 










7.280 










17,945 




700 






27, 683 


876 


1.608 

300 

6.186 


258, 658 






20,360 





749 


652 


96,479 


Totals and 
averages 


193 


388.659 


83.929 


293.659 




1.119 


1.528 


8.094 


S558.846 


Total District 
—all mines.. 


213 


2,708,350 


615,851 


1.534.998 


43.051 


124,699 


249.018 


110.730 


$3,266,632 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



229 



Third District— 1003— Shipping Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


08 

o 

1 . 
ag 

ii 

< 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 
Paid Pkr 


is 

asg 


3 
oo 

3 
a 

s 
2i 


JO 

"in 


K 


< 


"3 


h 

11 




"3 
o 

o 
2 

o • 


1^ 


■6 
a 


1 

a 
>> 

OQ 


Ton for- 


i 


a 

1 
o 

1 

1 


u 

a 

"a 

a 
1 


p 
"3 

a 

<B 
P 

1 


OS 

1 
1 


988 


m 

2 

7 

185 

269 

43 


1.481 
12 
63 

m 

981 
200 


894.962 
7.700 
13.983 
426,475 
706.119 
119,416 


33. 102 


14,368 


24.289 


230 
208 
151 
230 
221 
213 


966, 721 
7,700 
14, 428 
476.409 
731,987 
119.446 







$0,575 
1.25 
1.00 
0.512 
0.575 
0.57 




42.624 


1 


1 


56 
433 
712 






445 
21.078 
13.556 








1 


3.377 
5.915 


25,479 
9,367 





20,822 
39.075 

5.277 


7 

1 

9 


1 
9 
3 












2.366 


« 


3.355 


2.168.685 


42.424 


49.214 


59.368 


223 


2.319,691 




$0,567 




107.798 


15 



T/i?rd District— 1903— Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


CO 
3! 

£ ° 
»p 


Tons Mined. 


Pricks 
Paid Per 


is 

is 

z 


33 

a; 
.c 

g 


J 


2 


"S 

a 

1 


1 


ii 
If 


ii 


"oi 
1 

o 

-a 

la; 

si 


-OP 

aa 
il 
1' 


■6 

a 

OS 

.p 
>> 

CQ 


6 
a 
3 

a 

oa 


Ton for— 


s 


a 

1 

a 

s 
2; 


u 
p 

p 

a 

•a 
p 

08 


a 

a 
1 


2 

p 

© 

p 

1 

a 

3 

z 


10 


3 

27 
5 
8 
12 
66 
13 
32 


13 
196 

26 
180 

49 
342 

133 






2.807 
69.775 

3.610 
28.966 
15.919 
185,729 
15. 431 
66.089 


300 


213 
172 
188 
136 
208 
185 
132 
181 


2.807 
69.775 

3.610 
28.966 
15, 919 
185.729 
15.731 
66,089 




$1.00 
0.74 
1.25 
1.25 
0.67 
0.69 
0.76 
0.57 




135 
2.332 






















172 

37 




















711 
8.397 

330 
2.856 


; 




276 








56 








101 
















842 


166 


1.008 






388.359 


300 


164 


388.659 




S0.76 




14.761 




3.198 


M« 


4.363 


2.168.685 


42,424 


437.573 


59.668 




2.708,530 






122562 


9 


15 



230 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



FOURTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 

Twentieth Annual Report. 



Counties— Christian, Logan, Macon, MeLean, Shelby, Vermilion, Woodford. 
Thomas Weeks, Inspector, Bloomington. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois. 

Sir — In compliance with section 12 of the mining: law, defining the duties 
of the State Inspectors of mines, I have the honor to submit the twentieth 
annual report of the coal mines of the Fourth Inspection district. This report 
gives the number of mines operated in each county during the year; the new 
and abandoned mines; the depth of the coal below the surface; the thickness 
of the seams, and the geological number; the nature of the opening, shaft, 
slope or drift; the power used, steam, horse or hand; the system of haulage; 
the number of hand or machine mines; the number of shipping or local 
mines; the total tonnage of all grades produced; the average value per ton of 
the different grades at the mine, and the aggregate value of the product; the 
number of employes above and below ground; the number of tons shipped 
on cars, supplied to locomotives, sold to the local trade, and consumed or 
wasted at the mines; the tons mined by hand and machine, and the prices 
paid per ton for mining; the number of fatal, and non-fatal accidents, and 
the number of widows and orphans of those killed. 

The following is a summary of the facts contained in the report: 

Number of counties producing: coal 7 

Number of mines 87 

Number of new mines 18 

Number of abandoned mines 15 

Number of shipping mines 45 

Number of local mines 42 

Total tons of coal produced in the district , 4,772,284 

Tons of mine run 3.033.400 

Tons of lump coal 1,180,829 

Tons of egg coal 326,368 

Tons of nut coal 135.309 

Tons of pea or screenings 246.150 

Tons of slack or waste 140,228 

Aggregate value of total product $5,052,715 

Total number of all employes 6.771 

Number of miners 4,565 

Others underground 1, 321 

Boys underground ~ 194 

All above ground 691 

Tons shipped on cars 3,960,498 

Tons supplied to locomotives 192,159 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 231 

Tons sold to local trade 469,576 

Tons consumed and wasted at mines 150,051 

Average number of days of active operation, shipping mines 210 

Tons mined by hand «, 658, 864 

Tons mined by machine 113,420 

Number of kees of powder used foi- blasting coal 114,002 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 336 

Number of fatal accidents 30 

Number of non fatal accidents 73 

Number of widows 17 

Number of children orphaned 52 

Number of tons coal mined to each fatal accident 159,078 

Number of tons coal mined to each non-fatal accident 65,374 

Number of mines using machines 3 

Number of machines 8 

Number operated by electricity 6 

Number operated by steam 2 

Number of steam boilers 158 

Number of horizontal boilers 149 

Number of upright boilers 9 

New Mines. 

The Kellyville Coal company has sunk and equipped a new shaft which will 
be known as No. 5. It is located about three miles northeast of Westville, 
Vermilion county. 

After two unsuccessful attempts and the expenditure of a large sum of 
money, the Manufacturers & Consumers Coal company of Decatur, has com- 
pleted the sinking of a shaft, situated on the Illinois Central railroad, about 
one mile north of the Sangamon river, in Macon county. The shaft is per- 
fectly straight, 600 feet deep, and well timbered; the coal seam is number 
five and is four feet thick. The company is opening the mine, room and pil- 
lar, and contemplate putting in mining machines. The fan is in position and 
the work of completing the tower, engine house, and boiler room is being 
pushed as rapidly as possible. The intention of the management is to make 
this a model mine. 

The Electric Coal company of Danville, has sunk a new mine, which is 
now in course of development; it is about 100 feet deep to the No. 7 or what 
is called the Danville seam; the tower i? finished, also the engine house, and 
boiler room; the engines and other machinery are also in place. The escape 
and air shafts are completed and the fan for ventilation is in position. Every- 
thing about this mine, in the way of equipment, is first class and up to date. 
The mine is located on the Big Four railroad, four miles west of Danville, 
Vermilion county. 

The Tower Hill Coal Mining company has just finished sinking a shaft at 
Tower Hill, Shelby county. The seam reached is number five and is 8^ feet 
thick, at a depth of 802 feet. 

Prospective Mines. 

The Westville Coal company is sinking a shaft about one mile north of its 
present mine in South Westville, Vermilion county. 

E. S. Gray of Danville, is sinking a new shaft about sis miles west of Dan' 
ville, Vermillion county, on the Big Four railroad. 

The Blue Mound Coal company is sinking a shaft at Blue Mound, Macon 
county, on the Wabash railroad about ten miles southeast of Decatur. 
These are all to be opeiated as shipping mines. There are a number of new 



232 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

local mines beine: opened in Vermilion and Shelby counties, but, as about;the 
same number have been abandoned during the year it is unnecessary to par- 
ticularize. 

Abandoned Mines.' 

The Moultrie County Coal company, Lovingfton, Moultrie county, after ex- 
pending considerable money, time and labor in an attempt to sink a shaft, 
at that place, finally abandoned the project, and sold its interest to the Pru- 
dential Mining company of Danville. 

The latter company expect to commence sinking operations some time in 
the future. 

The Brookside mine No. 1, operated by the Brookside Coal company has 
been abandoned. 

Escapement Shafts. 

Escapement shafts have been completed as follows: 

The Kellyville Coal company, Danville, at its No. 4 and 5 mines; the John 
O'Connell Coal company has sunk an additional escape and air shaft at the 
Blue Bird mine. Grape Creek; the Latham Coal company, Lincoln, after a 
good deal of trouble with sand and water, and at a big expense has fie ally 
succeeded in completing the escapement shaft at its mine. 

Improvements. 

The Westville Coal company, Westville, Vermilion county, has changed the 
system of haulage, from mule to electric. The company has also put in two 
six-ton motors of the Morgan- Gardner type, and can now handle the output 
of the mine with ease. 

The Penwell Coal company, Pana, Christian county, has changed the sys- 
tem of haulage underground, and have put in the Goodman Electric system. 
The company has built an addition to the engine room for the dynamo and 
engine. The engine is 147 horse power indicated, of the McEwen type, 17x16 
inches bore. The dyamo is a six pole multipolar, 125 Kilo Watt, Goodman 
generator, driven by a belt. The motors underground are of the Goodman eight 
ton type, developing 75 horse power, and are geared to eight miles an hour. 
Two motors are in operation, one on the east and one on the west side of the 
mine. The main haulage ways are lighted by electricity, east and west, the 
plant is a success in every particular. 

The Pana Coal company, Pana, Christian county, has also changed its sys- 
tem of haulage, from endless rope to electric. The engine is of the McEwen 
type 17x16 inches bore, and 150 horse power direct, connected to a Goodman 
Dynamo, which is a 125 Kilo Watt, multipolar generator. The underground 
motor is of the Goodman 12-ton type, developing 200 horse power. It is 
geared to 12 miles an hour. This plant for some reason is not as successful 
as was expected, but no doubt all diffiaulties will be overcome in a short time. 

The Citizens' Coal Mining company, Lincoln, Logan county, has sunk an 
additional chamber at its mine, alongside the main shaft, and down to the 
lake of water, that was encountered, in order to reduce the pressure, and 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 283 

drain the water out of the main shaft. The company has retimbered the up- 
per part of the hoisting shaft, also raised and repaired^ and put a new foun- 
dation under the tower. 

There have been some improvements in the general condition of many mines 
during the year, especially in ventilation, and the safety of traveling roads. 
The operators as a rule have shown a disposition to live up to the require- 
ments of the law, when attention has been called to anything that was con 
trary to its provisions; in only one instance was it necessary to resort to ex- 
treme measures; that was in the case of the Muncie Coal copapany, Muncie, 
Vermilion county. This mine was in a very poor and dangerous condition. 
The management, after repeatedly promising to put the mine in shape, failed 
to do so, uatil "forbearance ceasing to be a virtue," I then instituted pro- 
ceedings in the circuit court of Vermilion county to close the mine, until 
the company was willing to comply with the law. An injunction was issued 
agaiost the company by Judge Thompson of that court, Nov. 19, 1902, and 
the mine was closed. After a few days the company asked permission to re- 
open the mine and resume work, promising at the same time to comply with 
all the requirements demanded if allowed to resume work; permission was 
given, conditional, that the mine be put in good shape and that the company 
report progress of work being done to the county mine inspector, once every 
week; this was done for some time when the company again became dilatory 
and neglectful; however, a letter issued by the court, cautioning the company 
as to the provisions of the injunction, had the desired effect, and repairing 
was resumed. The injunction is still in force, but in a short time the condi- 
tion of the mine will be such that it can be dissolved. 

Business Changes. 

Jan. 1, 1903, the Himrod Coal company, Danville, disposed of its two mines 
in Vermilion county, the Pawnee and Himrod, selling the same to the KelJy- 
ville Coal company, of that city. 

The Taylorville Coal company, Taylorville, has disposed of its mine at 
Taylorville, selling to the Springfield Coal Mining company, Springfield, San 
gamon county. 

The Weaver Coal and Coke company is now operating the Springside mine 
of the Springside Coal Mining company, of Pana, Christian county. 

The North mine of the Pana Coal company, after being abandoned for eight 
years, has been reopened and is being operated by the Newbent Coal com- 
pany, of Pana, Christian county. 

Fatal Accidents. 

The number of fatal accidents has increased in this district from 20 in 1902 
to 30 in 1903; about two thirds of the whole number are from falls of rock and 
coal. This increase can be accounted for in several ways— first, the increased 
activity in the mining business over the preceding year; second, the failure 
of the miners to properly secure their working places, and taking unwar- 
ranted risks in order to get a few more tons of coal; the failure of the oper- 



284 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

ators to maintain discipline amon? the workmen and the enforcement of the 
law, requiring employt^s to properly secure their working places; the mine 
manager usually contenting himself by telling the miner what he thought was 
necessary for his safety, and the miner doing what he was told not to do, just 
as he might choose. 

July 9, 1902, Joseph Yutsnukis, aged 24 years, and John Zihawicys, asred 33 
years, both miners, and single men, were billed by a fall of rock between nine 
o'clock and midnight in mine No. 2 of the Brookside Coal company, Grape 
Creek, Vermilion county. The men were turning a room and had driven the 
neck ten or twelve feet oflE from the entry; they knew of the dangerous con- 
dition of the roof but failed to secure it; as a result both men lost their 
lives. 

July 18, 1902, Thomas Edwards, engineer, married, was instantly killed by 
a falling smoke stack at Lovington, Moultrie county. The dec sased was in 
the employ of the Moultrie county Coal company, which was sinking a shaft; 
the men were engaged placing the hoisting machinery; the boiler was in 
position, and the stack was being raised. Edwards was overseeing the work, 
and was in the act of putting a rope around the stack to raise it into position. 
He placed the hitch below the centsr of gravity, consequently when the stack 
was raised from the ground it overbalanced the top, striking one of the guy 
ropes, breaking it, and letting the stack and pole fall to the ground. In at- 
tempting to escape, Edwards became confused and ran directly undtr the 
falling stack, with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and one child. 

July 28, 1902, John Murray, miner, aged 46 years, married, was fatally in- 
jured by a fall of coal while at work in the cross cut off of the main west 
entry in the Christian county Coal company's mine, Taylorville. Murray had 
fired a shot on the right hand side of his place, in the top coal; the bottom 
coal had been taken out three days previous; part of the top coal remained 
up on the left hand side. The morning of the accident Murray went under 
this coal to mine, preparatory to firing another shot; while doing so a lump 
of coal weighing about 1,000 pounds, fell, crushing him underneath, death 
resulting one hoar afterwards. He leaves a widow and six children. 

Aug. 22, 1902, John H. Taylor, driver, aged 27 years, married, in the employ 
of the Himrod Coal company, Himrod, Vermilion coanty, was killed by a fall 
of rock and timber. The deceased had been working an extra shift at night, 
and was on his way out with another driver, having finished their work. The 
companion driver attempted to have his mule pass between a loaded car and 
the side of the entry; the spreader caught on a leg, which was supporting a 
cross-bar, pulling it oat, and letting down a large amount of rock. Taylor 
was standing close to the car, and was caught under the rock, with the result 
as stated. He leaves a widow and two children. 

Oct. 17, 1902, Albert Holcomb, driver, aged 21 years, single, employed at 
the Himrod Coal company's Himrod mine, Himrod, Vermilion county, while 
putting sprags in a trip his clothing caught on a car, dragging him quite a 
distance, when he was crashed between the cars and the rib. He died two 
days after the accident. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 235 

Oct. 25, 1902, Lenodias MeNutt, topman, aged 35 years, married, was fatally 
injured at the Penwell Coal cpmpany's mine, Pana, Christian county. The 
particular duty assif^ned to MeNutt was sanding props into the mine, during 
the day, also to send down feed for the mules. The props and feed are put on 
the cage at the lower landing; the feed is loaded into a pit-car and pushed 
onto the cage; a short pair of rails are used to connect the track on the sur- 
face with the cage; these rails are secured in place by clamps. McNutt was 
placing the rails in position, preparatory to sending down the feed; the end 
of one of the rails projecting over the shaft was struck by the descending 
cage, causing the other end to fly upwards, which, striking him on the chin 
and side of the head, fractured his face, and at the same time throwing him 
into the car on the cage, here his head coming in contact with the covering 
of the cage, fractured his skull. Death resulted five hours after the accident. 
He leaves a widow and five children. 

Oct. 27. 1902, Dominick Beldona, miner, aged 25 years, single, was in- 
stantly killed by a fall of rock in the mine of the Colfax Coal company, Col- 
fax, McLean county. Deceased had fired a shot two days previous on the 
right side of his room, which knocked out all of the props on that tide except 
the roadside props, for a distance of 12 or 15 feet. During the interval from 
Saturday, the 25th, to Monday, the 27th, some slate had fallen and a large 
mass had become loosened at the point where the props had been knocked 
down; the mine examiner had notified Beldona and his brother, who worked 
with him, of the condition of their room, and had contracted with them to re- 
move the slate and secure the loose rock above; while at work a large mass 
of rock suddenly fell, crushing deceased beneath. 

Oct. 27, 1902, William Goss, miner, aged 37 years, single, employed at the 
Himrod mine of the Himrod Coal company, Himrod, Vermilion county, was 
instantly killed, being struck by an empty mine car. Goss and eight other 
men were waiting at the bottom of the shaft to ascend, having finished their 
day's work. There were several loaded pit cars on the track at the bottom of 
the shaft, the empty ear being in front of them. The loaded cars were struck 
by a trip of three other loaded cars that came down the hill on the southeast 
main entry; the empty car was forced rapidly onto the men at the bottom of 
the shaft, sweeping them into the cage seat, the car following them, instantly 
killing Goss and injuring severely the other eight men. 

Nov. 4, 1902, William Lakes, miner, aged 32 years, was killed by a fall of 
rock in the Himrod Coal company's mine, Himrod, Vermilion county. De- 
ceased, with his partner, was engaged in widening the third southeast entry, 
for the purpose of extending the double parting. After taking the coal off, a 
ledge of rock was left hanging, about two feet thick, which they failed 
to prop securely; the rock suddenly fell with the result stated. He leaves a 
widow and two children in Russia. 

Nov. 5, 1902, William Graham, timberman, aged 53 year?, married, in the 
employ of the Economy Coal company, Danville, Vermilion county, was 
fatally injured by being caught between the cage and shaft timbers. De- 
ceased, with other men, was engaged in taking timber cff of the cage; after 



ZdD STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

the timber was unloaded, the signal was given to the engineer to take away 
the cage. Graham attempted to cross over, and was crushed, death resulting 
four hours after the accident. He leaves a widow and four children. 

Nov. 18, 1902, Anton Slaus, miner, aged 45 years, was instantly killed in 
room 4 on the fifth west southwest entry it the Himrod Coal company's mine, 
Himrod, Vermilion county. The mine examiner had discovered some loose 
rock in this room, extending back some 10 or 12 feet from the face; he 
marked the rock and entered it on the record book, also recommended that 
some props be set under the rock before any work was done in the room. 
The assistant mine examiner, when commencing work the morning of the 
above date, instructed one of the timbermen to proceed to room 4 and notify 
the men working there to at once put their room in a safe condition, by set- 
ting props under the loose rocks; the men promised to do so, but, notwith- 
standing there was a sufficient number of props in their room, they failed to 
set any of them and worked all day under the loose rocks. In the meantime, 
they had prepared two shots to be fired at quitting time, one near the left 
side of the room, the other about 12 feet to the right, or near the center of the 
room. At 3:.30 p. m. the men lighted the shot on the left side of the room; 
after this shot had exploded, they returned to the room to fire the remaining 
shot. Slaus told his partner to stand at the road-head and show him light 
while he lighted the shot; instead of going to the right side of the room he 
went to the left where the first shot had been fired, over which was the loose 
rock, when a mass of rock about seven feet long, four feet wide and one and 
a half feet thick, fell on him with the result stated. He leaves a widow in 
Russia. 

Dec. 20, 1902, John McNavitch, miner, aged 48 years, married, employed at 
the Taylorville Coal company's mine No. 1, Taylorville, Christian county, was 
fatally injured by a fall of clod in room 50 on the sixth east entry. Deceased 
left his own room and went to room 50 for the purpose of getting some pow- 
der due him from a man named Switzer, working in that room; Switzer was 
tamping a shot on the right side of his room and directly under some loose 
clod. He asked McNavitch to help him tamp the hole, and he would then get 
him the powder; before they had finished tamping, the clod, which was about 
ten feet long, three feet wide, and four and one half inches thick, fell on 
them, fatally injuring McNavitch and breaking Switzer's leg. The deceased 
leaves a widow and five children, 

Dec. 22, 1902, John Michor, night man, aged 22 years, single, employed in 
the Pana Coal company's mine, Pana, Christian county, was instantly killed 
by falling down the shaft of mine No. 1. Deceased and another man were 
taking off the water box. To place or remove the water box, a pair of skids, 
about 14 feet long, are used; these skids are run on rollers over the shaft 
until the ends rest on the opposite sill, when the water box is pushed on them 
and connected to the cage. Michor and his partner had been sent out of the 
shaft to take the water box from the cage; they had disconnected the box and 
had put the skids across the shaft, and lowered the box onto them; the box 
in some manner could not be moved; while they were trying to pull it off. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 23 

Miehor went to the opposite side to push the box, the skids moving at the 
same time, the ends slipped from the sill, the water box tipped over knocking 
deceased into the shaft and falling with him to the bottom. 

Dec. 31, 1902, Stanis Stakoski, miner, aged 26 years, single, employed in the 
McLean County Coal company's mine, Bloomingtou, Mi^Lean county, was 
fatally injured by a fall of coal and slate, from the effects of which he died 
two days afterwards. Deceased had only commenced work in this mine the 
day before the accident; the second day his partner not being in, he was 
working alone, and had just begun mining when a piece of coal about seven 
feet long, two feet wide, with about eight inches of elate sticking to it, fell 
on him with the result as stated. He was a native of Poland. 

Feb. 3, 1903, Dominick Bertoglis, miner, aged 45 years, employed in the 
Kellyville Coal company's mine No. 3, Westville, Vermilion county, was 
instantly killed while loading a car of coal. A boulder fell out of the roof, 
striking him on the head and body. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Feb. 5, 1903, John Coalburg, miner, aged 44 years, married,'. employed at the 
Kellyville Coal company's mine No. 3, Westville, Vermilion county, was in- 
stantly killed by falling coal. Deceased, with his partner, had just started 
to turn a room off of the 10th north entry; while in the act of throwing tamp- 
ing into a drill hole, a large mass of rock fell on him with the result as stated. 
He leaves a widow and seven children. 

Feb. 10, 1903, Abe Harrison, miner, aged 38 years, etnployed in mine No. 
5, of the Kellyville Coal company, Westville, Vermilion county, was fatally 
injured by a fall ot rock while at work in the second northwest entry. 
Deceased was loading a car of coal when a large rock fell, injuring him so 
severely that he died a half hour afterwards. He was a widower and leaves 
three children. 

Feb. 13, 1903, Louis B. White, mioer, aged 42 years, married employed at 
the Colfax Coal company's mine, Colfax, McLean county, was instantly kill- 
ed by a fall of a rock while working in his room. Deceased was loading coal 
into a pit ear when a large piece of rock, nine feet long, five and a half feet 
wide, and six ioches thick at one edge, tapering to three ini^net^, suddenly 
tell on him, crushing him beneath. The mine examiner had reported the 
room in a safe condition that morning. It was well timbered to within six 
teet of the face, and gave no indications of any loose rock. This appears to 
have been an unavoidable accident. He leaves a widow and seven children. 

Feb. 26,1903, Charles Packel, miner, aged 30 years, married, employed in 
mine No. 3 of the Kellyville Coal company, Westville, Vermilion c )uuty, was 
instantly killed by a fall of rock in the face of room No. 13 in tbe 11th north 
entry- The accident was caused by a roll or rock fault, running across the 
face of the room. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Feb. 27, 1903, James Dann, miner, colored, aged 26 years, married, em- 
ployed at the Westville Coal company's mine No. 1, South Westville, Vermil- 
ion county, was instantly killed by a fall of rock. Deceased and his partner 
were drawing pillars in the sixth north entry, when a large mass of rock, 
about 12 feet long, two to three feet thick, and eight feet wide, fell striking 
him. He leaves a widow. 



238 STATISTICS or labor. 

March 9, 1903, Charles Golden, miner, agred 32 years, single, employed in 
the Westville Coal company's mine No. 1, South Westville, Vermilion county, 
was fatally injured by a fall of rock. Deceased was in the act of tamping a 
shot when a large rock, which was cut loose by a coal slip, fell on him crush 
ing him so severely that he died before he could be taken out of the mine. 

March 17, 1903, John Camiant, driver, aged 23 years, married, employed in 
the Kellyville Coal company's mine No. 2, Westville, Vermilion county, was 
crushed between a loaded coal car and the coal rib, sustaining internal injur- 
ies from which he died April 14, 1903, Deceased was coming down hill with 
his trip of loaded cars; in some manner his light was extinguished, the mule 
crowding him off of the tail chain, and throwing him between the car and 
rib. He leaves a widow and two children. 

March 28, 1903, Magnus Nelson, miner, aged 62 years, married, employed 
in mine No. 1, of the McLean County Coal company, Bloomington, McLean 
county, was injured by a fall of coal. He had fired a shot, which failed to 
break the coal down; he then started to undermine the coal and while doing 
so it fell on him, crushing him about the hips, and body, and injuring him 
internally. He died April 1, 1903, leaving a widow and three children, one 
child dependant. 

April 6, 190.'{, George Baron, miner, aged 24 years, single, employed at 
Kellyville Coal company's No. 3 mine, Westville, Vermilion county, was in- 
stantly killed by flying coal from a shot. Deceased and his partner had pre 
pared four shots which Baron remained to fire; his partner going out of the 
mine to order timber for their next day's work. Baron had fired three of the 
shots, and had gone back into the room to fire the fourth. It is not known 
whether he became confused from the smoke of the other shots, and could 
not find his way out, or that he lighted the squib too short, and the shot ex- 
ploded before he could get out of the way. 

May 8, 1903, William Peters, miner, aged 60 years, single, was fatally in- 
jured by the premature explosion of a powder blast in the mine No. 1 of 
Christian County Coal company, Taylorville, Christian county. About noon 
the deceased and his partner proceeded to fire two shots; one on each side of 
their room; one of the shots was fired and Peters went back to fire the other. 
It is not known exactly how the last shot was ignited, whether the squib was 
defective or the deceased, being an old man, became nervous, from the smoke 
of the other shot, he lighted the match too close to the powder, however, the 
shot exploded before he could reach a place of safety, injuring him so severe- 
ly that he died five hours afterwards. 

May 12, 1903, Robert Elliott, miner, aged 47 years, employed in the Kelly- 
ville Coal company's mine No. 3, Westville, Vermilion county, was instantly 
killed by a fall of rock. He leaves a widow and one child. 

May 15, 1903, Joseph Barber, miner, aged 38 years, single, employed in 
mine No. 1 of the Westville Coal company, S juth Westville, Vermilion county, 
was instantly killed by a fall of rock, while working in his room. He leaves 
his mother dependant. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



289 



May 23, 1903, Charles Edwin Cook, driver, aged 30 years, married, employ- 
ed in the Kellyville Coal company's mine No. 3, was fatally injared by fall- 
ing under a loaded pit car. Deceased was riding on the tail chain, when a 
lump of coal on the track threw him off and in front of the trip, the first car 
passing over him. He died May 27, 1903, leaving a widow and two children. 

June 6, 1903, Charles Roberts, miner, aged 52 years, single, was fatally 
injured by a fall of rock in mine No. 3 of the Kellyville Coal company, West- 
ville, Vermilion county. The accident occured about about 2:00 p. m., he 
died five hours afterwards. 

In conclusion i desire to return my sincere thanks to the several county 
mine inspectors for their able assistance during the year and especially to 
Daniel Reece of Danville, Vermilion county, and H. C. Newcomb of Pana, 
Christian county. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas Weeks, 
State Inspector of Mines, Fourth District, Bloomington. 



Fatal Casualties —Fourth District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


■3 

08 

5 


1 
5 




x> 


a 

1 


Cause of Accident. 


1902 
July 9 


Jos. Yutnulils 

Joiin Zraawicys 

Thomas Edwards 


24 Miner 


Grape Creek 
.. do 




.. 


.. 


" 


'2 
7 
3 

'6 

■3 
5 

1 
4 

2 
8 
3 
8 
3 
1 

'2 
2 

'2 

1 
3 


Falling rock 




33 
34 
46 

35 
25 
37 
32 
53 
45 
48 
22 
26 

45 
44 

38 
12 
30 
33 
32 
23 
62 
24 
60 
47 
38 
30 
52 


.. do 

Engineer ... 

Miner 

Driver 

.. do 

Topman .... 

Miner 

..do 

.. do 

Roadman... 

Miner 

.. do 

Roadman ... 
Miner 

.. do 

.do ... 




18 

28 


Lovington.. 
Taylorvllle.. 

Himrod 

Westville... 

eana 

Colfax 


1 

1 
1 

i 




1 

6 
5 


Falling smokestack.. 


Aug:. 22 


JohnH. Taylor 




Oct. nlAlbert Holcomb 

25!Lenodias McNutt 

27 OnniinlAk Rpildona... 


Pit car and rib 

Descending case 

Falling rock 

Pit car fall'gc'ge seat 

Falling rock 

Ascending cage 

f'alling rock 

Palling clod 

Falling down shaft.. 
Falling coal 


27 
Nov. 4 

5 
18 


William Goss.^. 

William Lakes 

William Graham 

Anton Slau*! 


Westville... 

Himrod 

Danville.... 

Himrod 

Taylorvllle.. 
Pana 


i 

1 
1 
1 




4 

'5 


Dec. 20 
22 


John McNavitch 


31 


Stanis Stakoski 

Domlnick Bertoglis... 

John Coalburg 

Abe Harrison 


Bloomingt'n 

Westville... 
. do 


1 
1 

i 

1 
1 




1 

7 
3 

7 
2 

•• 


1903 
Feb. 3 




5 




10 


.. do 

■•do 

.. do 

.. do 


Grape Creek 

Colfax 

Westville... 
.. do 


. do 


13 


L. B. White 

Charles euckel 


.. do 


26 
27 


.. do 

do 


Mar. 9 


Charles Golden 


.. do 

Driver 

Miner 

.. do 

..do 

.. do 

.. do 


.. do 


do 


17 


Kellyville... 
Bloomingt'n 
Kellyville .. 
Taylorvllle. 
Westville... 
.. do 


1 
1 

i 


;• 


1 
3 

i 




28 


Magnus Nelson 

George Baron......... 


Falling coal 


Apr. 6 


Powder explosion 

..do 


May 8 


William Peters 

Robert Elliott 


12 


Falling rock 


15 


Joseph Barber 


do 


25 


Chas Edwin Cook .... 
Charles Roberts 

Total— 30 . 




.. do 


m 




2 




June 6 


Miner 


.. do 


Falling rock 






17 


17 


52 



















240 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Accidents— Fourth District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Grape Creek.. 

Lovington 

Taylorville.... 
Himrod 


3 

11 
2 

2 
2 

~30 


Miners 

Engineers.... 

Drivers 

Topmen 

Koadmen 


22 
1 
4 

1 
2 

~30 


Palling rock 


17 
~30 


BrooksideNo. 2 

Moultrie County C. Co.. 
Christian County C. Co. 
Himrod C. Co 


„ 


Falling smoke stack. 


J 


Palling pit car 

Palling down shaft.. 
Crushed between car 


5 


Penwell C. Co 






Colfax C. Co 




Colfax 

Danville 

Bloomlneton.. 
Kellyville 






Struck by cage 

Powder explosion 

Run over by car 


Taylorville C. Co 

PanaC.Co 




McLean County C. Co... 
Kellyville C. Co 


2 
9 




Weatville C. Co. 


3 


Total 




30 











Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — July 1, 1903. 



Character and Cause 
of Injury. 



1902 

July 1 

12 

15 

16 

24 
2S 
Aug. 1 
1 
5 
12 

12 
13 
26 

Sept.lS 
17 
17 
19 
20 
27 

Oct. 10 
17 
20 
29 
31 

Nov. 8 
15 
17 

22 
Dec. 3 



20 
29 
1903 
Jan. 



Robert Jones . 
Joseph Jones. 
August Buck. 
J. W. Bell .... 



Thomas Ramsey. 
John Pearson ... 
A. J. Myerpeter. 
Ruddy Poster... 

Gum Kelly 

Robert Hinson.. 



Frank Miller 

Robert Cook 

William Roberts- 
August Langfelt. 
Bales Chaimes... 
James French — 
Venango Martin . 

•lohn Sturz 

George Huff 

Steve Groves — 

James Stack 

J. J. Ryan 

E. Gray 

Oscar Meny el .... 

John Joqulnt 

B. Bently 

Harry Clingan... 



Peter Resmon.... 
John Thompson.. 

John Watson 

Joseph Polkimis . 
Joseph Sponish.. 
John Schwetzer.. 
Oscar Erricson .. 
W. T. Starks . 



Isaac McKee . 
William Boyd 
Samuel Simmons 
Edward Powers 

Zeno Strin 

Herbert Jones ... 
FredGIUis ... 



Danville. 
Lincoln.. 
Danville. 
Lincoln.. 



S. Danville. 

Pana 

Moweaqua.. 

Pana 

Danville — 
. do 



Himrod . 
Grape Creek 

Pana 

Decatur — 

Himrod 

Danville.... 
Assumption 

Liincoln 

Georgetown 

Lincoln 

Colfax 

Roanoke.... 
WestvlUe... 

Lincoln 

Kellyville .. 

Lincoln 

Grape Creek 

Westvllle.. 
Kellyville . 

.. do 

Westvllle.. 

.. do 

Taylorville 

Bloomingt'n 

Georgetown 

Westville... 
Kellyville .. 
Grape Creek 
Decatur 
Kellyville .. 
Catlin... 
Danville 



Hand injured by pit car 

Leg broken; falling slate 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Eye put out, face burned; 

powder explosion 

Leg broken by pit car 

Foot bruised between pit cars 

Eye cut; flying rivet head 

Leg broken by pit car 

Hip injured by pit car 

Hips and back injured by pit 

cars 

Leg broken; falling rock 



Ankle sprained; falling coal.. 

Foot injured; falling coal 

Leg broken; falling rock 

.. do 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Body cut; falling coal 

Arm broken; falling rock 

Leg broken; falling slate 

Hips Injured; pit car and mule 

Leg broken by pit car 

Hips Injured; pit car and rib. 
Ankle fractured; falling slate 

Foot crushed: falling rock 

Knee-cap injured by cage 

Leg broken, face injured; fall- 
ing rock 

Body crushed; falling slate... 
Finger mashed; pit car wheel 

Foot injured; pit car 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Leg broken; flying coal 

Leg broken by falling clod — 

Leg in j ared by tail chain 

Body injured; falling timber. 



Leg broken; falling rock . 
Foot injured; falling rock 
Leg broken; falling rock... 
Legs both broken; falling coal 
Back injured; falling rock.. 
Shoulder dislocated; pit car 
Leg broken; falling rock — 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



241 



Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — July 1, 1903 — Concluded. 



Date. 


Name. 




Residence. 


•6 

s 


_a3 
"S 
a 


1 

s 


11 


Character and Cause 
of Injury. 


i 
jl 


1903 
Jan. 23 


Joseph Klever ... 
William Sanders. 

Peter Ward 

Elmer Thomas... 
James Donavon.. 

Wm.Resinskis... 
Thomas Burn.... 

Abe Willis 

John Leverenz... 
Joseph Russian.. 

James Hughes... 

JohnGarber 

Frank Cotton 

Walter Heckle... 
Frank Holmgrew 

William Clor 

Peter Tonilla 

John Wasigr.Jr... 

BernitSanlt 

Edward Brewer.. 

James Murray ... 
Edward Smith... 
Stan Robazuski.. 

S Z Magee 

Walter Harris.... 

Frank Holycross. 
George Baker.... 

George Pescuhas. 
William Duck.... 

Merrit John 

L, B.Jones 

Totals 


19 
34 

76 
36 
35 

18 
45 
22 
53 
36 

35 
34 
30 
17 
31 
40 
35 
20 
30 
22 

30 
66 
30 
34 
30 

38 
45 

40 
30 
35 
36 


Pana 




1 

1 

"i 

1 
.... 

1 

1 

1 
.... 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

38 


"i 

"2 
■"*3 

"2 

"2 

.... 
31 


2 

"3 

""l 

4 

"i 

1 
1 

3 

1 
3 

1 
1 

"i 

2 
66 


Hip dislocated; falling rock.. 

Leg broken; pit car 

Foot injured; falling coal 

Foot Injured; falling rock .... 
Arm broken; coal falling 
down shaft... 


60 


27 


.. do 




^•"i 


Feb. 5 
11 
11 


Decatur .... 

Kellvville .. 
Pana 


1 

1 


120 
30 




Bimrod 

Moweaqua.. 
Westville... 
Danville.... 
Westville.. 

Lincoln 

Danville.... 
.. do 


.... 
.... 

1 


% 


13 

15 

Mar. 3 


Body crushed; pit 
Eye Injured; chip c 
Arm broken; pit ca 
Face and hand Inju 
Leg broken, should 


:ar and rib. 
f chisel ... 


60 

35 


5 
11 


red by shot 
er bruised; 


125 


12 

17 
31 


Back injured; falling slate ... 

Hip injured by pit cars 

Body injured; pit car and rib. 

Thumbcut off bycar wheel... 

Foot injured; falling rock 

Ankle dislocated by mule 

Wrist dislocated; falling coal. 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Ribs broken; pit car and tim- 
ber 

Finger Injured; falling prop.. 

Chest injured; kicked by mule 

Leg injured; falling rock 

Finger bruised by sprag 

Head and body cut; falling 
from cage ^ 


180 
45 


Apr 8 


Paua 




60 


15 

17 

24 

May 1 


Danville.... 

Pana 

Assumption 


.... 


40 
30 
67 


7 






90 


18 


Coltax . 




25 
25 
June 3 
6 
6 


Grape Creek 

.. do 

Westville... 
Danville.... 
Grape Creek 

Westville... 
Pana 

Kelly ville .. 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


30 
45 
30 
30 
30 

42 


8 
12 


Leg broken by pit cars i 

Hip broken and leg bruised;] 
falling coal 


90 
90 


15 
16 


Back injured; falling rock.... 

Leg broken by pit car 

Leg broken; falling rock 

Shoulder injured by pit car...| 


46 
150 


26 
26 


Westville... 
Danville.... 


1 
1 

3I> 


90 
30 

6270 
















Total n 
Not rec 
Recovei 




73 


jvered July 1.1903 
•ed July 1,1903 .. . 








73 






6.270 days 
85 9 


Average time lost hv nifin rp 


covered 















-16 C 



242 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 



Eecapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Danville.- 


13 
11 

\ 
12 
2 

73 


Drivers 

Miners 

Blacksmiths.. 

drippers 

Laborers 


20 
43 

73 


Falling slate 


21 
10 

23 
73 


Kelly's No 2 


13 






Citizens' C. Co 








Kelly's No. 3 




Moweaqua. . . . 


Falling clod 


PanaC. Co. 


3 


Himrod 






? 








7 


Decatur 


Trapper 

Engineer 

Mineexamin'r 
Switch tender 
Timberman... 


Powder bum 


Blue Bird C. Co 


2 


Assumption .. 


Rivet head 


Penwell C. Co 


6 




Chisel 




R 


Colfax 


Cage 


Assumption C. Co 

Westville C. Co 


2 


RoanoRe 


Tail chain .... 


6 


Westville 


Mule kick 


Colfax C. Co 


VI 


Kellyville 




Roanoke C. Co 

Lincoln C. Co 




TaylorvUle ... 


Sprag 


2 


Bloomlngton.. 
Catlin 


Falling timber 


Tayiorville C. Co 

McLean County C. Co .. 
Brookside No. 2 


1 




3 




Jones & Adams 

Mauck Bros 


2 
1 




I»l«.?.-.!^.?:::::::: 


3 
1 






1 




Kelly's C. Co 




Total .... 




73 













Table Showing the Number and Nature of Non- Fatal Casualties y 
Conjugal Relations and Time Lost — Fourth District — 1903. 





J2 

a 




9 


1 

a 


Time Lost. 


a-2 




Total 
days. 


Average 
days. 




Leg broken 


26 
3 

1 
8 
5 

1 

2 

1 
3 
1 
6 
3 

2 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


8 
2 

1 
5 
3 

'.'1'. 

1 

1 
3 
3 

"2 

1 

...... 

1 

...... 


18 

1 

...... 

2 

1 

...... 

z. 

3 

...... 

...... 

..... 

1 



15 

5 

1 
10 

4 
...... 

...... 

2 
1 
8 
6 
...... 

1 
...... 

1 

"h" 


2.971 
420 
36 
660 
285 
50 
90 
110 
30 
177 
165 
373 
135 
60 
60 
405 
60 
30 
125 
67 
30 
42 


114.7 
140 

35 

70 

66.5 

60 

90 

55 

30 

59 
156 

62.1 

45 

60 

30 
135 

60 

30 
125 

67 

30 

42 


35.62 




4 11 


Hand injured 


1.37 


Foot injured 


10 96 




6.85 




1.37 


Hip broken 


1.37 




2.74 




1.37 


Atm broken 


4.11 




137 




8.21 


Fingers Injured 


4.12 




1 37 




2.74 


Back injured 


4.12 


Shoulder dislocated 


1.37 




1.37 




1.37 


Wrist dislocated . 


1.37 




1.37 




1.37 








73 


35 


38 


66 


6,270 


85.9 


100.00 







244 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Christian County —Fourth District — 1903. 





Name of Operatob. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 
Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 
a 

.0 

55 


1 


s 

2 

i 

a 

i 


d 

a 


Ed 


Z 


01 




SHIPPING MINES. 

Springfield Coal M. Co... 
Christian County Coal Co 
Pen well Coal Co 


Taylorville... 
.. do 


233,068 
216.815 
141.766 
112,389 
107,404 
85.468 
26,653 


44.896 
69. 737 
24.373 
58,466 
8.688 

"i4.i62 


147.262 
120.630 
56.663 
29.041 
44.036 
42,958 
6.384 


eii 

6,417 

3.262 

142 


2,350 
1,687 
19,071 


38,560 
24, 147 




Pana 


.SS 212 






.. do 


8.227 13,393 






.. do 


19, 352 3.i. 287 




Assumption C. &M. Co.. 
Newbent Coal Co 


Assumption... 


15.557 


26,953 
6 107 




Totals . . 












923,563 

3.000 
926,563 


220.222 
3.000 


446,973 


10.436 



66, 244 


179,689 


1 


LOCAL MINE. 

Edlnburg Coal Co 

Totals — 8 mines. 


Edinburg 
















223.222 


446,973 


10,435 


66 244 


179,689 











Mines in 1902, 6. 
New mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 8. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Christian County — Fourth District — Concluded. 



24.5 

























es 


















o 


a; 


















a 








Acci- 






Employes. 


C UTPDT. 








§ 


dents. 
























»g 






O 














o 
® 

> 


S 

>> 
.a 

1 


la 


if 

2S 






> 
"So 


1 

a . 


i 

1 

a 




loaded on 
for shlp- 
and sup- 
to locomo 
at mine. 


2 


Ml 


3 

o 


o 




al 




1 


i 


ons 

cars 

ment 

plied 

lives 


=1 


X a 


o 

no 
OS 


a 

o 




an 


a 

3 


la 


a 

s 


< 


< 


< 


H 


^ 


H 


H 


Q 


H 


£ 


z 


■z. 


Z 


25 


$196,335 


182 




275 


211,308 


15.542 


6.218 


249 


233,068 


$0 49 


6.396 


1 


1 


1 


248.403 


166 


fid 


226 


211.767 


1.271 


3.777 


186 


216,815 


49 


7.117 


2 




2 


148,608 


lee 


75 


226 


118,635 


13.402 


9.728 


174 


139.916 


49 


750 


1 


5 


3 


118,047 


132 


49 


181 


107.221 


1.568 


3.600 


15C 


112.389 


49 


420 


.... 


3 


4 


87.962 


118 


62 


IHC 


88.653 


5.883 


12.868 


126 


107.404 


49 


492 


1 


3 


6 


166.459 


112 




181 


69,730 


8.583 


7,155 


209 


85,468 


65ifi 


186 


.... 


2 


6 


26.182 


76 


58 


133 


23.250 




3,403 


55 


26,653 


49 


220 


.... 




7 


$990,896 


936 


466 


1,401 


830.564 


46.249 


46,750 


182 


921.713 


$0 515 


16.581 


5 


14 




7,600 


10 


2 


12 




3.000 




100 


3.000 


49 


100 






1 








$998,396 


945 


- 


1.413 


830.564 


49.249 


46,750 




924.713 




15.681 


5 


14 





246 STATISTICS or labor. 

Logan County — Fourth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POBTOFFIOK 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 

1 




i 

a 
P. 


ft 

a 
5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


SHIPPING MIlfKS. 

Latham Coal Co 


Lincoln 

do 


146, 194 

119,662 

98,335 

9,060 

373,251 


146.194 
36.000 
41,301 

222.495 










9 


Lincoln Coal Co 


54,747 
39,334 

4,774 

98.855 


900 
6,416 


10.000 
3,910 
1.200 

15.110 


19 916 


8 


Citizens' Coal Mining Co. 
Home Coal Co 


.. do 


8,274 


4 


Mt. Pnlaski... 


2.186 






30.375 











Mines in 19C2, . 3 
New mines. 1. 
Mines in 1903. 4. 



Macon County — Fourth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice 
Address 
of Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 

a 


1 


d 

s 

i 


a 


3 

H 




s 

a 

H 

il 

a, 


1 

2 


shipping minks. 

The Decatur Coal Co.. 1.. 
The Decatur Coal Co.. 3.. 

Totals 


Decatur 

Nlantlc 


46.356 
32.591 


13,401 
746 


26,802 
24.337 




3,000 
4,973 


3,153 
2.535 




78.947 
61.851 


14, 147 
15,023 


51,139 
30.046 




7,973 
3,782 


6.688 


1 


local mines. 

The Decatur Coal Co.. 2. . 

Totals — 3 mines. 


Decatur 


3.000 




130.798 


29,170 


81,185 




11, 755 


8.688 











Mines in 1902, 3. 
Mines in 1903, 3, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



247 



Logan County — Fourth District— Concluded. 



1 


EMPL0TK8. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 

"S 

0. 



1 
1 



i 


•6 

§ 
ja 

x> 

"2 

a 

a 

(D 

fl 




a 


Si 

sg 

■CJa 


as 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 




<s 
p 
■3 

!i 

•< 


i 

<B a 

> 



a 

i 

u 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo 
lives at mine. 


1 

2 

EH 


-2* 

Pi 
III 


1 



1 

a 


§ 



ii 


1 
i 

2i 


$120,610 
153.845 
122, 799 
12,277 


126 
83 
75 
24 


72 
63 
46 
9 


198 
138 
121 
33 


137,396 
93.600 
88.422 
2.259 


5.189 
21.162 
7.970 
5.504 


3,600 
4,900 
1,943 
1.306 


250 
200 
262 
115 


146.194 

119.662 

98.335 

9.060 


$0 63 
53 
53 
66 


6.564 

3.900 

3.270 

475 






2 
3 
4 


$109,531 


310 


180 


490 


321.677 


39.825 


11.749 


207 


373.251 


$0 548* 


14.209 









Macon County— Fourth District — Concluded. 



Employes. 



Disposition op 




Output. 












1 
1 


adao 


"3 


"«« 


ded c 

r Shi 
nd su 
locom 
mine. 


1 
2 


.^i 


i^'^s^ 


2 


i-a 


« 








siill 


s'^ 


aS.S 


c^ 










H 


H 


Q 



u bl 

« a 



a « 

S3 



Acci- 
dents. 



$73,710 
37.324 


60 
33 


41 
19 


$111,034 
82.649 


93 
80 


60 
39 


$193,683 


173 


99 



101 31,000 
52 24.548 



15.356 
8.013 




250 
191 


23,399 
51.851 




221 

250 


75.250 











46,356 
32,591 



51,851 
130.798 



$0 64 

47 



1,475 
1.476 



1.476 



* Average of two contract prices, 53c from July l,1902,to Apr. 1,1903; 59c from Apr. 1, 
to July 1. 1903. 



248 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

McLean Couniy — Fourth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFriCE 

Address 
OP Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


3 


a 

« 

a 


a 

s 
J 






1 


1 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

McLean Co. Coal Co 

Colfax Coal Co 


Bloomington.. 

Colfax 

Chenoa 


155. 122 
59, 189 
6.300 


9.100 
21.984 
1.500 


112.340 
19.767 
3.000 


1,022 
4.206 


19,538 
667 
900 


13, 122 
12,565 


8 


Berwick Coal Co 






Totals— 3 mines 






220.611 


32,584 


135,107 


6,228 


21,106 


26,687 











Mines in 1902. 3. 
Mines in 1903. 3. 



Shelby County — Fourth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


postoffiok 
Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 

1 


3 
5 


i 


a 

1 


Ed 


S 


a . 
■32 

if 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

MoweaquaC.M.& Mfff.Co 
Charles Michaelis.l 

Totals 


Moweaqua 

Fancher 


95.742 
20O 


21.635 


34,649 
200 


13.989 


12. 122 


13.447 












95.942 


21.635 


34.849 


13.989 


12, 122 


13.647 




LOCAL MINKS. 

B F Stretch 


Shelbyville... 

Findlay 

Shelbyville... 
Mode 


3,520 
3,296 
2,500 
1.500 
1.000 
391 


3,520 












Widlck Bros 


3.096 

2.500 

1.500 

800 

391 




200 












W F Qallatfher 












Shelbyville... 




















Totals 












12.207 


3.520 


8.287 




200 






Totals — 8 mines... 




108. 149 


25,055 


43. 136 


13.989 


12.322 


13. 647 















Mines in 1902. 8. 
Mines in 1903, 8. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



249 



McLean County — Fourth District— Conclnded. 



* 

^ 


Employes. 


Disposition ot Out- 
put. 


1 




1 


Is 


Acci- 
dents. 




o 














-6 

1 
§ 


§ 








1 

II 

si 


n 




3 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mines. 


1 

2 


h 

SS5 


1 

> 

08 
O 


1 

■e£ 


ii 

33 


1 
o 

1 

a 

3 


a 
o 
a 

"o 

Ii 


1 
i 


< 


< 


<J 


H 


H 


H 


in 


Q 


H 


Oi 


z 


Z z 


^ 


$217,848 


200 


80 


280 


63.000 


79.000 


13. 122 


300 


155.122 


$0 71 




2 


1 


1 


80. 336 


65 


29 


94 


61.350 


5.25S 


2.581 


304 


59. 189 


63 


2.381 


2 




a 


10. 140 


10 


12 


22 


1.750 


3,960 


600 


BOO 


6.300 


70 


1.000 






3 


$308. 324 


275 


121 


396 


116,100 


88.208 


16.303 


301 


220.611 


$0,696 


3.381 


4 


3 





Shelby County — Fourth District — Concluded. 



2 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


a 


2 



1 

1 


i 

0« 

s 
1 

a 


Price paid per eross ton for 
hand mlnlnsr- 


I| 

Si 
'J 

is 

Z 


Acci- 
dents. 




CD 

3 

•3 

Ii 
11 


1 

1 


1 

1 

«> 

1 

< 


H 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

o 

T3 


1" 
11 ■ 

B a 

211 


3 

OS 

«M 

1 

z 


i 

ii 


z 


$120,667 
400 


104 

1 


40 


144 

1 


80.921 
120 


'■'S 


5.051 


202 

160 


60.090 
200 


$0 59 


3,200 




2 
... 


? 










$121,067 


105 


40 


146 


81.041 


9.850 


5.051 


_202 


60,290 


$0 55 


3,200 




2 




$8,800 
8.140 
6,250 
3,000 
2.400 


10 
14 

7 
8 
10 

4 




12 
17 
10 

9 
14 

5 




3.520 
3.196 
2.500 
1.500 
800 
391 


ioo 

266 


250 
144 
150 
225 
200 
90 


3.520 
3.296 
2.500 
1.500 
1.000 
391 


$1 50 
1 37^2 
1 50 
1 25 
1 60 
1 6212 






1 










fi 










3 










4 










5 










6 














$29,568 


53 


14 


67 




11.907 


300 


176 


12.207 


$1 44 




= 


2 




$150,635 158 


64 


212 


81,041 


21,757 


5.351 




72.497 





3.200 





$2 00 per day. 



250 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Vermilion County — Fourth District — 1903. 



Name of Operator. 



postoffick 
Address 
OF Mink. 



Output of Mink in Tons. 






shipping mines. 

Kelleyville Coal Co., 3... 
Kelleyville Coal Co.. 2... 


Danville 

.. do 


Westville Coal Co.. 1 

Kelleyville Coal Co 

Kelleyville Coal Co 


Westville 

Danville 

.. do 


Jones & Adams Co., 2 


Catlin . .. 


Kelleyville Coal Co.. 4... 
Brookside Coal M. Co., 2. 


Danville 

.. do 


Economy Coal & M Co .. 


do : : 




.. do 


Consolidated Coal Co 


.. do 


John O'Connell Coal Co.. 


. do 


Kelleyville Coal Co., 5... 


.. do 




.. do 


Muncie Coal Co 


Muncie 










Prance Bros 


Fairmount.... 


Star Coal Co 




Hardy Harris & Sons .... 
J ames Thompson 


Falrmount.... 
Grape Creek 




Danville 


Klstler & Bookmann 


.. do 


•John Hall 


Grape Creek. 




.. do 


Blue & Henry 


.. do 


Totals 









265 
861 

000 1 
.4551 
.918 
.296 

.176 



448,354 
406,248 
302.194 
344,769 
306,622 
37, 169 
155,265 
87.779 
104,000 
4.896 
75,334 
62,664 
52,793 



2.761. 



900 16,000 



4.600 



25.000 



93.571 
'23,'36i 



1,798 



17,000 
2,000 
6,212 
4,600 
4,000 



1.600 

2,300 

1,500 

786 



243,292 



1,489 

'"m 
'"hob 



150 



26 
4.180 



19.000 



16,345 
684 
834 



2.653 
1,603 



400 
160 



179 
60 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



251 



Vermilion County — Fourth District — Continued. 



Employes. 



Disposition of 

Output. 



"D.a© 

O U P O-M 



•sa 



a/ 


Acci- 
dents. 
















|s 


2 


a 


^J3 








u 


2° 


o 


O 




L. 














as 


a 


ai; 




s 




z 


Z 


z 



$421,453 

381.873 

322.912 

324.083 

288.226 

164.558 

145.949 

119.270 

114.400 

86.521 

82.324 

62.822 

49.740 

28.443 

24.375 

10,559 

7.952 

6.597 

5,625 

2.880 

2.913 

3.O0O 

1.517 

1.257 

1.125 



6 
5 
6 
7 
3 
6 

3.464 



434.743 
392.230 
338.354 
342.324 
301.726 
151,416 
153.761 
127.861 
102.000 
73.248 
70. 175 
62.664 
52, 793 
8.500 
15.000 
4. 

3.000 
300 
2.250 
300 
2.000 
160 
390 
700 
900 
450 

2.641.922 



8.018 
3.000 



4.172 
2 

1,798 



13,607 
6,000 
4,840 
2.445 
4,896 
4,952 
1,504 
4,000 
2.000 
3.035 
5.141 
834 



22.886 

2.600 

6,671 

3,103 

4,350 

2,050 

1.900 

300 

1.350 

815 

360 



225 
62.500 



448.354 
406, 248 
316, 194 
344,769 
306,622 
156,368 
155,265 
131,861 
104,000 
80, 455 



65.296 
63, 176 
31.386 
18.900 
10,354 
6,103 
5,000 
4,500 
2,500 
2,450 
1,600 
1.205 
1.060 
900 
675 



$0 49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 



9,000 

9,000 

9,500 

8,480 

6,855 

5,533 

3,600 

4,396 

4.000 

3.967 

644 

2.081 

2,000 

1,036 

1,200 

330 

300 

140 

176 

66 



242 2,685,141 $0,505*72,388 20 43 



* Average of two contract prices— 49c from July 1, 1902, to April 1, 1903; 55c from April 1, 
1903. to July 1,1903. 



252 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

Vermilion County — Third District — Continued. 





Name of Opkkator. 


POSTOFFICK 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Odtput 


OF Mine in Tons. 




1 

1 




a 

2 
S 

s 


a 


&3 


-J 
s 


If 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

E. S. Gray 


Danville 

.. do 


30.000 

12,000 

9,094 

7,000 

7.000 

6.050 

6,004 

5.000 

5.000 

4,015 

3,787 

3,514 

3,183 

3,050 

3,000 

2,800 

2,700 

2,609 

1,700 

1,684 

1,600 

1,525 

1.500 

1,060 

1,019 

800 

775 

743 

600 

587 

400 

175 

1,000 

1.200 


30,000 
4,000 

i'ooo 










?. 


S.Parle 


5.666 

6,594 






3.6c6 

2.500 


3 


D.A.Jenkins 


.. do 






4 


Danville Brick & Tile Co. 

Stanbury & Watkins 

William Schafer 


.. do 






fi 


.. do 


4.600 
3,200 
6.004 






2.500 
1 040 


fi 


Vermilion Hts 
Grape Creek.. 
Mine Valley.. 
RRS.D'nville 

Danville 

Catlln 

D'nville,RRl 
.. do 


985 




825 


7 


Jacob Thompson 




f" 


Henry Dettman 


5.000 
1.000 
1,000 

417 
3.514 
3,183 

300 








<J 


Carter Bros 


2.660 
1.815 
1.898 






1.340 
1,200 


10 


S. M. Hodee & Son 

A. Jones & Sons 






11 




757 


715 


12 


Joe Mack 




IS 


Miller & Splaneler 

J. A. Hume 










14 


.. do 


2.000 
3,000 


300 




450 


15 


A. H. Bonnett 


Blount 

r.„°vf,r!'.':: 

Vandercook .. 

Danville 

.. do 




16 


James Thomas 


2,800 








17 


M. C. Wilkinson 


2,000 
1.578 
1,134 

1,684 

1,600 

900 

1,500 

1,060 

1,019 

400 

600 

483 

450 

587 

300 

150 

1,000 

1.200 




300 
248 
283 


400 


18 


John R. Colburn.. . 


521 


262 


19 


Wm. Stine 




2C 


Morin & Mobaker 






21 


David Lovall 


Humerick 

Danville 

D'nvilie,RR8 
Grape Creek.. 

Humerick 

Danville 

Catlin 










22 




100 




150 




2^ 


S. S.Miller 




24 


Rain & Bryan Bros 

J. A. Jones 








179 


25 










26 


F L. Brannaman 








400 


27 


Evan J. Jones 




'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


100 
73 


75 


2^ 




Danville 

D'nville,RR8 

Danville 

Oakwood 

Grape Creek.. 

Oakwood 

Grape Creek.. 






2fl 


Llewellyn & Co 




150 


3C 


John Swanson 










31 


John Woodard 








100 


32 


S. E. Bryant 










33 


L. E. Baker 










34 


Haskins & Son 












Totals 












132. 174 


59.820 


54.316 


300 


2.736 


16.002 




Totals-60 mines.. 




2,893.233 


2.470,547 


297.608 


300 


6.916 


117,862 


__ 









Mines in 1902, 69. 
New mines, 15. 
Abandoned mines. 
Mines in 1903, 60. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



253 



Vermilion County — Third District — Concluded 



o 
o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 

OOTPUT. 


1 

o 
> 
1 

o 


1 

a 

a 

a 


Price paid per gross ton for 
hand mining. 


ll 

as 


Acci- 
dents. 




UP 

taa 
< 


1 

a . 

§5 

< 


S 
< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

o 

73 

a £ 


ill 


"5 

o 

1 

a 

s 


a 
o 

a 

o 

ll 


1 

a 

3 

z 


$30,000 


40 
9 

15 
6 
8 
3 
2 
8 

10 

2 

6 
3 
2 

2 


10 


50 
14 
21 

12 

10 

10 
10 

10 




30,000 
12.000 
9.094 


"'i',m 

30 

300 

30 

75 


IS 

300 
300 
270 
280 
300 
200 
180 
285 
260 
150 
121 
150 
150 
225 
150 
253 
151 
156 
150 
150 
200 
200 
150 
300 
120 
235 
112 
120 
90 
90 
130 
125 


30,000 

12.000 

9.094 

7.000 

7.000 

6.050 

6,004 

5,000 

5,000 

4,015 

3.787 

3.514 

3,183 

3,050 

3,000 

2,800 

2,700 

2.609 

1,700 

1,684 

1,600 

1,525 

1,500 

1,060 

1,019 

800 

775 

Ui 

600 

587 

400 

175 

1,000 

1,200 


$0 49 
55 
66 

65 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
49 
49 
49 
49 
55 
55 
50 
53 
49 
49 
49 
49 


'•g 

360 




.... 


1 


16,650 




?. 


13. 280 




3 


7.000 




4 


9,625 




7.000 

6,050 

6.004 

5.000 

5.000 

4,015 

3.757 

3.614 

3.183 

2,760 

3 000 

2,770 

2.700 

2.609 

1.700 

1,684 

1.6C0 

1,525 

1,500 

1.060 

1,019 

800 

700 

743 

600 

687 

400 

175 

1,000 

1.200 


90 
170 
15U 




.... 


5 


7,227 




6 


7,505 




7 


6 250 




8 


6.628 




170 
130 
150 
200 
170 

23 
200 

85 


.!!. 


:::: 


9 


4,682 




in 


4,861 




11 


4.392 




i?i 


2.866 




18 


3.665 




14 


3.750 




15 


2,800 




16 


3 475 




17 


2.794 




74 
45 
45 




:::: 


18 


2.164 




19 


3.368 




?0 






?A 


1 769 










?,? 


1.875 










^3 


1 326 




55 
49 
49 
55 
49 
49 
49 
75 
75 
49 
55 








?A 


1 274 










?H 


'780 




20 
23 
35 
24 
35 
14 
15 
40 
40 




;::: 


26 


670 




27 


865 




2S 


90S 




29 


880 




SO 


650 




81 


194 




32 


1,250 




S.'i 


1.600 




84 








$156,711 


187 


67 


254 




124.689 


7,485 


193 


132.174 


$0 52 


3.668 








$2,817,753 


2.494 


1,224 


3,718 


2,641,922 


187, 189 


64,122 




2,817.315 




76,056 


20 


43 





$2.50 per day. 



254 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Woodford County— Fourth District— 1903. 





Name of Operatoe. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 
Mine. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 


* 


S3 
g 

a 
g 


d 

a 

J 






1" 


1 


SHIPPING MINE. 

Roanoke Coal Mining Co. 


Roanoke 


119.679 
119,679 


30.327 
30.327 


77.965 
77.965 


— — 


1.857 
1.857 


9,530 

"g^'eio 











Mines in 1902. 1, 
Mines in 1903. 1. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



255 



Wobdford County - Fourth Dis/Wc^— Concluded. 



la 
o 

o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 

OUTPCT 


a 

1 

o 

1 

<! 

i 


a 

* 

Si 

s 
I 

a 

1 


1 

i 

11 

« a 

a- 


^§ 
»^ 
S| 

^1 

as 

3 3 

z 


Acci- 
dents. 




1 

> 
a> • 


a 

!i 

> O 


1 

i 

s 

o 
5 


■5 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
plied to locomo 
tlvps at miriP. 


.1 

o 

2 
o . 

sl 


h 

ill 

ill 


IS 

sS 

o 
<u 

a 

3 

z 


a 
§ 

o 

ll 

Z 


1 

a 

3 

z 


$174,593 


210 


60 


270 


106.805 


8.098 


5.776 


213 


119,679 


$0 76 






1 




8174, 393 


210 


60 


270 


105.806 


3.098 


5.776 


213 


119.679 


$0 775* 






1 













ci^ * Average of two contract prices. 76 cents from 
April 1. 1903. to July 1, 1303. 



ily 1. 1902, to April 1, 1903; 82 cents from 



256 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Eecapitulation by Counties- 





a 
o 

a 


1 

1 


Production op Different Grades in Tons 


o 


Counties. 










a 


2 


1 




li 


i 


d 

s 

s 


ft 

a 
5 






OS 


55 


5*i 
< 


Christian 




923,663 


220, 222 


446,973 


10.435 


66,244 


113,742 


65,947 


$ 990,895 


Logan 




373.251 


222.495 


98,856 


6.416 


15.110 


24, 169 


6.206 


409,531 


Maeon 




78,947 


14. 147 


61,139 




7.973 


6,688 




111.034 


McLean 




220.611 


32.581 


135.107 


5.228 


21.106 


12.629 


14.058 


308.324 


Shelby 




95,942 


21.535 


31,849 


13, 989 


12, 122 




13.447 


121.067 


Vermilion 


26 


2,761.059 


2,410.727 


243.292 





4.150 


71.613 


31.247 


2.661.042 


Woodford .... 


1 


119.679 


30.327 


77.965 




1,857 


3.751 


6,776 


174.393 


Totals and 
averages 


45 


4.673.052 


2,952.037 


1,088.180 


36.068 


128,591 


231,495 


136.681 


$4.776.28T 



Recapitulation by Counties- 



COUNTIES. 



Sa 



Produotiok of Different Grades in Tons. 



Christian 

Macon 

Shelby 

Vermilion .... 

Totals and 
averages 

Total district 
—all mines 



3.000 
51.851 
12.207 
132. 174 



.772.284 



3,000 
15,023 

3.620 
59.820 



30.016 
8,287 
54.316 



81.363 



92.649 



3,033,400 



1,180.829 



36.368 



2.736 



6.718 



135.309 



246.160 



$ 7.60O 
82.649 
29.568 
166.711 



S276.428 



$5,062,715 



One local mine abandoned in Edgar county. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



257 



Fourth District — 1903 — Shippiiuj Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Output. 


iA 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 


ll 1 .:-: 


























a. 


i 




1 


ii 




rs 
"t 


'° 






Ton Fok- 


03 


08 

a 


« 


















■"S 


« 




^ 
















a 






Ofl 


^s 


o 


ga 


'1§ 






ti 


a 




"m 


^ 


1- 

s 


9> 
U 

.a 
o 


^ 


II 

n u 

a o 


Si 


t3 


1 i^ 
1 si 

ft 


"' a 


■6 
a 

J3 


a 
1 


[a 

a 

T3 


a 

a 
f. 




3 
1 

£ 


1 

a 




















OB 








z 


< 


E-i 


H 


H 


H 


H 


< 


a: 1 OD 


X 


S 


z 


z 


z 


935 


466 


1.40, 


759.757 


70,807 


46,219 


46. 750 


182 


921,713 


1,850 


$0,515 




15.581 


6 


14 


310 


180 


490 


300.307 


21,370 


39.825 


11,749 


207 


373,251 





.518 




14.209 




7 


93 


60 


153 


55.548 




23.399 




221 


78,947 




.57 




1.476 






275 


121 


396 


69.948 


46, 152 


88.208 


16,303 


301 


220,611 




.696 




3.381 


4 


3 


105 


40 


145 


66.490 


14,551 


9.850 


5.051 


202 


60, 290 


35,652 


.55 


$0,475 


3.20D 




2 


2.307 


1.157 


3.464 


2,607.922 


34.000 


62,600 


56.637 


255 


2,685,141 


75.918 


.505 


* 


72.388 


20 


43 


210 


58 
2.084 


270 


100.526 


5.279 


8,098 


5,776 


213 


119,679 




.775 







t29 




4,235 


6.319 


3.960.498 


192.159 


278.129 


142,266 


210 


4.459.632 


113.420 


$0,529 


$0,476 


110,234 


70 



Fourth District — 1903 — Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition op Output. 


s 


ToNsM 


ined. 


Prices 


ta 


,: 


.« 
















Paid per 
Ton For— 




3 


_ ■ 


t 


1 




OS 


6g 


"oS 


T3 






2 


<B 








a 






a ■ 


















Ub 






a 

a 


i 

® 
1 


"H 


M 


11 

Si 

si 


i 

•a 
a £ 




II 

® a 


i 


6 

a 


a 

3 


a 

a 

a 
1 


^=2 
o) a 

a£s 


5; 

_2 

a 


a 


a 

1 

a 






























Z <JJ 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


-t! 


OQ 


M 


W 


S 


z 


z 


z 


10 


2 


12 






3,000 




100 


3 000 




iO 505 


1 

1 inn 






80 


39 
14 

67 


119 
67 
254 






61.851 
11,907 
124,689 


300 
7.485 


250 
176 
199 


51.851 

12.207 

tl32. 174 





.64 
1.44 
.52 










63 














187 









3.668 


30 












330 


122 


452 






191.447 


7,785 


194 


199.332 




$0.61 




3.7€8 


3 


4.565 


2.206 


6,771 


13,960,498 


192, 159 


469.576 


150.051 




4.658.864 


113.420 






114,002 


1? 










* Day labor. 


















t One man k 


illed at Lovingt 


on. Mo 


ultrle 


count 


y. See F 


atal A 


ccidei 


-t Taole. Fourth 




7,000 


ons u 


Ined at S 


2.50 per 


day. 





















17 C 



258 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



FIFTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 

Twentieth Annual Report. 



Counties— Bro WD, Calhoun, Green, Jersey, Macoupin, Montgomery, Mor- 
gan, Sangamon, Scott. 

Walton Rutledge, Inspector, Alton. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Til. 

Sir— In compliance with the statute of the State, defining the duties of the 
State Inspector of coal mines, 1 have the honor to herewith submit the 20th 
annuai;report of the coal mines in the fifth inspection district, for the year 
ended June 30, 1903. The tabular statements in this report show the number 
of mines, also the number of new mines, and the number of abandoned 
mines; the number of shipping mines and local mines; the total output in 
tons of 2,000 pounds; the production in tons of the various grades; the aver- 
age value of coal per ton at the mines, with the aggregate value of the total 
product; the number of miners and other employes in and around the mines; 
the number of accidents, both fatal and non-fatal that have occurred during 
the year; the number of tons of coal loaded on the cars for shipment; the 
number of tons supplied to locomotives, the number of tons sold to the local 
trade and the number of tons consumed or wasted at the mines; the tons of 
coal mined by hand and the tons mined by machines; the number of kegs of 
powder used for blasting coal and for other purposes; the value of the differ- 
ent grades of coal per ton at the mines, and the prices paid per ton for min- 
ing. 

The following is a summary of the various tables found in the report: 

Number of mines , 101 

Number of new mines 11 

Number of abandoned mines 9 

Number of shipping mines 46 

Number of mines in local trade 65 

Total tons produced 7.070,903 

ToDSof mine run coal 2.102,570 

Tons of lump coal 3.251,427 

Tons o<' egrg coal 106,752 

Tons of nut coal 239,755 

Tons of screenings (pea) coal , 985,488 

Tons of slack or waste coal 384,911 

Average value of mine-run coal, shipping mines $0.95 

Average value of lump'coal at the mine, shipping mines $1.18 

Average value of egg coal, shipping mines $111 

Average value of nut coal, shipping mines $0.94_^ 

Average value of screenings (pea) coal, shipping mines $0,535 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



259 



Average value of waste or duflf. shipping: mines SO. 362 

Aggregate value of total product, all mines $6,868 170 

Number of miners 6,755 

Others employed underground 1,519 

Boys emyloyed underground 256 

Employes above ground S43 

Total number of employes 8,393 

Tons loaded on cars for shipment 6,197,834 

Tons supplied to locomotives at mines 198,827 

Tons sold to local trade 420,867 

Tons consumed or wasted at mines 253,375 

Average number of days In operation, shipping mines 224 

Tons mined by hand 4,581,645 

Tons mined by machines 2,489.258 

Price paid per ton for hand mining at shipping mines from July 1, 1902, to Apr. 1 

1903 $0,497 

Price paid per ton for hand mining at shipping mines from Apr. 1, 1903, to July 1, 

1903 $0,557 

Average price paid per ton for hand raining at shipping mines $0,507 

Price paid per ton for machine mining from July 1, 1902, to April 1, 1903, at 

shipping mines $0.42 

Price paid per ton for machine mining, shipping mines, from Apr. 1, 1903, to July 

1,1903 $0.48 

Average price paid per ton for machine mining, at shipping mines $0,435 

Number of kegs of powder used for blasting coal 191,348 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 20 

Number of fatal accidents 26 

Number of nonfatal accidents 68 

Total number of accidents 94 

Number of employes to each fatal accident 323 

Number of employes to each non-fatal accident 123 

Tons of coal produced to each fatal accident.. 271,958 

Tons of coal produced to each non fatal accident 103,984 

Number of steam boilers used at the mines 204 

Number of coal cutting machines 139 

Number of coal cutting machines operated by compressed air 104 

'Number of coal cutting machines operated by electricity 35 

Number of mines using electric haulage 5 

Number of traction motors ' 4 

Number of third rail motors 1 

Number of mines using tail rope haulage 3 

Number of mines using endless rope haulage 2 

Rate of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed 3.1 

Comparative table showing the output of the several produeingr counties in 
the district with the loss or gain in each for the years June 30, 1902, and 
June 30, 1903. 





Total Odtpdt of 

All Grades of Coal 

IN Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




1902 


1903 


Sangamon 


3,672.987 
2,075.253 
419,810 
23, 937 
3.429 
9,491 
3.310 
3.053 
2,116 


4,386,526 
2,223,055 
420,312 
23,370 
4.928 
4.497 
3.840 
2,790 
1,585 


713.539 

147,802 

502 














667 




1,499 


Greene 


4.991 


Morgan 


530 


Jersey 


263 
531 










Total .... 


6.213.386 


7.070.903 


863,872 


6,355 





Total net Increase. 



260 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The district shows an increase of 857,517 tons, which is largely due to San- 
gamon county. This county alone gives an increase of 713,539 tons. Macou- 
pin county shows an increase 147,802 tons. 

General Improvement in and About the Mines During the Year. 

The Consolidated Coal company, St. Louis, Mo , has done an extensive 
amount of grading in the underground works of its No. 10 mine. Mount Olive, 
Macoupin county, and has retimbered both the No. 8 and No. 10 shafts. 
New dump cages have also been put into these mines. 

The Weaver Coal and Coke company, Nilwood, Macoupin county, has re- 
timbered the hoisting shaft of its mine at that place from top to bottom. 

The Greenridge Mining company, Greenridge, Macoupin county, has put 
two new boilers in its mice. 

The Girard Coal company, Girard. Macoupin county, has put in new boilers, 
retimbered the air shaft from top to bottom, put up a new boiler house, im- 
proved the tower and has put in new track scales. 

The Chicago- Virden Coal company, Virden, Macoupin county, has put in 
two new boilers at its No. 3 mine at Chatham. 

The Auburn and Alton Coal company, Auburn Sangamon county, has put 
in a 20-foot fan at the air shaft of the mine and built a brick fan house. 

The Victor Coal company, Pawnee, Sangamon county, has put in a 20-foot 
fan at the air shaft of its mine and built a brick fan house. 

The Springfield Coal and Mining company, Springfield, Sangamon county, 
has put in two new boilers at its No. 4 shaft, and has retimbered parts of its 
No. 2 and No. 5 shafts. The company has also put in a 20 foo*: fan at its 
No. 1 shaft and built a brick fan house. 

The Springfield Cooperative Coal company, Springfield, Sangamon county, 
has erected a new 20-foot fan at its mine, which has largely increased the 
ventilation. The company has also put in two new boilers. 

The Spaulding Coal company, Spaulding, Sangamon county, has put in 
new dump cages and shaking screens, and improved the tower of its No. 2 
mine at Bissell. 

The Montgomery Coal company, Paisley, Montgomery county, has put in 
new dump cages, shaking screens and improved the tower of its mine at that 
place. 

The Madison Coal company, has retimbered the air shaft of its No. 5 
mine at Mt. Olive, Macoupin county, and put up a new tower at the 
escapement shaft. 

The Barclay Coal and Mining company has installed the Morgan third rail 
motor for hauling, in its mine at Barclay, Sangamon county, and has also 
rebuilt the tower at this mine and put in a weighing hopper. 

Mine Fire. 
Shaft, Tower, Engine and Boiler House Destroyed by Fire. 
The top works of the Sangamon Coal company, were destroyed by fire 
February 21, 1903. The engine house, boiler house, carpenter and blacksmith 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 2fil 

shops were burned and the fire extended down into the hoisting shaft, burning 
the curbing which caused the top part of the hoisting shaft to cave in; a num- 
ber of men were working on repairs in the night shaft. They came out 
through the stairway at the escapement shaft. The mine is now working as 
usual. A steel tower has been erected and brick buildings have been erected for 
the engine, boiler, carpenter and blacksmith shops. A new pair of first 
motion engines, 18 by 32 inches, built by the M^n& Foundry and Machine 
shop, Springfield, 111., have been put in for hoisting. The plant on the tur 
face is now first-class in every particular. 

New and Prospective Mines. 

A new mine has been sunk on the line of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & D:iy 
ton railroad, about two and one-half miles east of the corporate limits of the 
city of Springfield, Sangamon county, by the Tuxhorn Coal company. It is 
intended by the owners to make this a model shaft. The main hoisting shaft 
is now down, and through the coal; the air and escapement shafts are not 
dovn but will be started in the near future. 

A new shaft in Sangamon county, two miles north of the State Fair 
grounds, is being sunk. It is on the line of the Chicago & Alton railroad. 
The name of the company is the Cnicago and Springfield Coal company. Tois 
is a fine location for a shaft and it is the intention of the owners to equip the 
plant in first-class style. 

A new shaft is being sunk on the line of the Chicago & Alton railroad, about 
one and three-fourths miles south of Sherman, Sangamon county. The name 
of the new firm is the Peabody Coal company. It is the intention of this 
company to put up a plant for a large output; a steel tower will be erected 
and all the latest modern appliances put up to handle large quan-ities of 
coal at a minimum cost. 

A new shaft is being sunk about two miles west of the city of Virden, 
Mticoupin county. Connection to the mine will be made by a spur from the 
Chicago, Burlington & Qaincy railroad. The company will be known as the 
Royal Colliery company. The hoisting, air and escapement shafts are being 
sunk simultaneously. 

A new shaft is being sunk about two and one-half miles south of Gillespie, 
Macoupin county. The name of the firm is the Superior Coal company. Tne 
company intends to go largely into the coal business; plans are made for three 
different shafts, all the latest improvements for the handling and mining of 
coal will be introduced. A town site has been laid out. 

The Consolidated Coal company of St, Louis, Mo., is sinking a new shaft 
at Staunton, Macoupin county. The shaft is located about one and one-half 
miles northwest of their old No. 5 mine; a spur will be run to the mine from 
the Wabash railroad. It is the intention of the company to make this mine 
first-class in every particular. It will be known as No. 14. 

Plans and specifications are being made for a new shaft at Cora, on the line 
of the Chicago, Pdoria & St. Louis railroad. It is about eight miles north of 
Springfield. This company is ineorporated unier the name of the Cora C jal 
and Mining company. 



2ibZ STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

A new coal company has been incorporated since the last report, under the 
name of the Springfield Coal and Mining company. This company has bought 
the mines of the Riverton Coal company, Starnes Coal company, Black 
Diamond Coal company, and the Junction Mining company. The president 
of the company is J. A. Agee; D. D. Shumway, general manager; Wm. A. 
Jess, secretary and treasurer. The Riverton mines will be known as Nos. 1 
and 2; the Starnes' mine as No. 3; the Black Diamond mine as No. 4, and the 
Junction mine as No. 5. 

Kortkamp Coal company, recently formed, is sinking a new shaft on the 
line of the C, C, C. & St. L. R. R.,two miles east of Hillsboro, Montgomery 
county. The company expects to reach the coal early in July of this year. 

The Nil wood Carbon Coal company of Nilwood, Macoupin county, has sold 
its mine. The mine will hereafter be operated by the Weaver Coal and Coke 
company. 

Explosions in Mines During the Year. 

There have been two explosions in the mines in this district during the past 
year, caused by "windy" shots. 

The first explosion occurred at the mine of the Victor Coal company, Paw 
nee, Sangamon county, Oct. 13, 1902, at firing time, about 4:00 o'clock in the 
afternoon, whereby two men and a boy lost their lives. 

The explosion was in room 17 of the first east entry on the south side of the 
shaft; the room, at the face, was 27 feet wide extending 97 feet back from the 
entry. The entrance to room 17, was 1,336 feet from the hoisting shaft, 160 
feet from the face of the entry, and 750 feet from the air shaft. 

The fan was blowing air down the air shaft at the time of the explosion at 
the rate of about 28,400 cubic feet per minute, and this quantity of air was 
passing the mouth of room 17. 

A large shot had been fired on the right hand side of this room, the shot 
was 7 feet wide at the heel and 9 feet wide at the toe; the drill hole was 8 feet 
deep. This was an unusually large shot, consequently there must have been 
a very large quantity of powder used in preparing the blast. On examination 
after the explosion the coal was found to be cracked on the rib also at the 
drill hole, and slightly cracked at the back of the shot, but the coal was not 
dislodged. 

About 33 feet back from the faoe of room 17 a cross-cut was being driven 
to the right to connect with room 18, however, this room had fallen in; the 
cross-cut was being driven to strike the face of room 18. 

A second shot had been fired about the same time on the right hand side of 
this cross cut, this shot had blown its tamping; it had been drilled into the 
solid and there was no chance for it to dislodge the coal. About 14 inches 
was blown off the face at the hole; the shot also blew through into room 18, 
a distance of 16 feet. 

These two heavy shots going off at about the same time evidently produced 
the explosion, and both shots striking each other at right angles, caused the 
carbonic oxide gases from the shots to ignite from the flames. The burning 
vapor issued out of the room, and along the first and second entries. Two 
cross cuts were open at the face of these entries; five stoppings between the 
entries were blown down, which was a very fortunate occurrence, as it per- 
mitted the expanding of the blast at the face of the entries. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 263 

The concussion was felt very heavily at the bottom of the hoisting shaft; 
most of the miners were congregated there waiting to be hoisted to the sur- 
face, and unmistakeably the blowing out of the stoppings gave vent to the 
flames, and force of the explosion, otherwise the blast would certainly have 
killed most of the men congregated at the bottom of the hoisting shaft. 

W. D. Overcash, who fired the shot in room 17 was found dead about 300 
feet back from the entrance to this room; his body was severely burned and 
bruised. 

Michael Yoji was found dead in the second east entry, presumably had 
been suffocated by the after damp. 

The boy, Frank Isaacs, was found at his trap door, 950 feet from the 
entrance into room 17; this door was on the first east entry on the north side 
of the shaft; it seems that the boy had been in the act of opening the door 
to let a trip pass tarough, and that the force of the explosion caught the door 
and crushed his body between the door and the post of the door frame; his 
body was so bruised that he died shortly afterwards. 

The second explosion was in the Auburn and Alton Coal company's mine, 
at Auburn, Saugamon county. This explosion ocimrred Feb. 25, 1903, at 15 
minutes to 7:00 o'clock, p. m., and resulted in the killing of two shot firers 
Matt Donelly, and Thomas McLaughlio, and one driver Walter Davis, six 
mules were also killed. The explosion took place- in the second working 
room, on the second south entry. This room was very dry and dusty; two 
large blasts had been fired in this room; one on the right hand side in the 
lower part of the coal seam , and the other in the top coal , that had been left up 
and back from the working face. Both of these shots had been largely over- 
charged with powder, and must have been fired almost simultaneously, as the 
blown coal was nearly all reduced to slack or flue coal. 

The carbonic oxide gases given off by these shots, took flre from the flame 
of the shots; the force of the blast raising the fine dry coal dust in the room, 
and with the dust from the shots, which also ignited, greatly intensifying the 
explosion. 

The flame from these blasts passed through a cross cut into the room 
adjoining where other shots had been previously fired; the gases from these 
shots also took fire, which, with the force of the explosions and flame?, passed 
out into the entry. Near the mouth of the room, in which the explosion took 
place, and on the entry, a box containing powder, was blown to pieces, the 
powder exploding greatly increased the force of the blast. Two mine ears 
standing on the entry were blown to pieces. The fan was blowing a direct 
current of air down the air shaft; about 16,000 cubic feet per minute was 
passing in the flrst and second south entries; the force of the blast went 
against this current of air, and forced the doors off of the top of the air shaft; 
fortunately however, the fan was located back from the air shaft and was not 
damaged. The flames following the explosion passed out on the return entry 
for a distance of 600 feet, the bodies of the two shot firers, Mathew Donelly and 
Thomas McLaughlin, and the driver, Walter Davis, were found at this point. 



264 STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

The force of the explosion had evidently hurled these men a great distance 
along the entry as their bodies were terribly mangled and burned. A dead 
mule was found at this point. The after damp coming from the explosion, 
killed five mules in the stables near the bottom of the hoisting shaft. 

In view of these accidents as described, and the loss of life thereby, it 
would seem very desirable and important that both the mine owners and 
miners, take up this matter with the manufacturers of blasting powder, and 
urge and insist that a powder be produced that will not engender or give off 
a flame of sueh volume, and that will be much safer to use in blasting coal. 
If this matter be neglected, there is great danger that other explosions may 
take place, attended with unusual loss of life. However, the most important 
line of action is to devise at an early day, some means to put an immediate 
check to the reckless and extravagent use of powder, which has developed in 
the last three years. 

All coal should be undercut or sheared before blasting, except in machine 
mines, where very little shearing or undercutting is done. In former years the 
miner used his pick to undercut or shear the coal so as to give the shots a 
chance to blow the coal; at the present time the pick is very seldom 
used. 

In blasting off of the solid, one-third of the coal is generally slack or fine 
coal, and from 80 to ICO pounds of the fine dust is given off by each shot, 
which makes blasting extremely dangerous, where tight shots are fired. 

The recent joint action of the operators and mine workers in securing an 
amendment to the mining law regarding the quantity of powder to be used in the 
preparation of shots is very commendable, and will prove a valuable aid to 
the mine management in preventing the reckless use of powder; no possible 
law or set of laws, however, will instruct an inexperienced miner or give him 
good judgment in locating his shots, or teach him how much powder to use 
in preparing a shot. 

A hole may be drilled and charged according to law and yet be exceedingly 
dangerous: blown out shots are frequent, and so called windy shots are 
almost of daily oeeurance in this district. 

The recent amendment to the mining law as regards blasting, will be of 
little valae unless operators, mine officials, inspectors and miners determine 
that it must be enforced, for their mutual protection, and for the best 
interests of all persons working in the mines. 

During the last three or four years the work of blasting down the coal has 
been done in a reckless and dangerous manner; in a number ot mines in the 
district, viz: Victor Coal company; Auburn and Alton Company; Chicago- 
Virden Coal company at Auburn and Chatham, and the Cantrall Cooperative 
Coal company ; at these mines the employes were afraid to be in the mine during 
blasting time, hence the operators and miners have agreed to employ shot firers, 
from two to four men at each of those mines, to fire all the shots, after all other 
emplo5?6? are out of the shaft. Any shot not properly placed to blow down 
the coal in a safe condition will not be fired by the shot firers. This has im- 
proved the conditions at these mines. However, the life of the shot firer is 
always in danger. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



265 



r-JLj 




nnnaa 

—. p5^ W^ SoT^iliT^ ' i 



^ o o o ^ 
*» a. a. 5" 3 



o SJ. 3 ? 



;:;. &. 




STATISTICS OF L^BDR 



O Main Shaft 

n Air SImft 

X Room 2 and point of explosion 

A Bodies of three men found 

B Fiue mules killed 




PLAT-AUBURN & ALTON COAL GO'S MINE. AUBURN. 
SANGAMON COUNTY. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 267 



Fatal Accidents. 



The following is a detailed statement of the fatal accidents, which have 
occurred in the fifth inspection district for the year ending June 30, 1903: 

July 2, 1902, Charles Moore, miner, aged 24 years, single, was killed in 
Barclay Coal and Mining company's mine, Barclay, Sangamon county, by 
a premature blast. 

July 16, 1902, Edward Bradley, driver, aged 22 years, single, was crushed 
by mine cars, in the Chicago- Virden Coal company's mine. No. 2, Auburn, 
Sangamon county; he died July 25, 1902. 

Aug. 2, 1902, James Marsh, driver, aged 32 years, married, was crushed be- 
tween mine cars, at the Victor Coal company's mine, Pawnee, Sangamon 
county, and died the same day. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Aug. 28, 1902, John Mullen, miner, aged 28 years, married, was injured by 
a premature blast, in the Cantrall Cooperative Coal company's mine, Can- 
trail, Sangamon county; he died two days afterwards, leaving a widow. 

Sept. 5, 1902, Bert Qaamma, driver, aged 18 years, single, was killed in the 
Madiaon Coal company's mine No. 1, Divernon, Sangamon county, by being 
crushed by a mine car. 

Oct. 13, 1902, William D. Overcash, miner, aged 40 years, single, was killed 
in the Victor Coal company's mine. Pawnee, Sangamon county, by an explo- 
sion caused by improper blasting. 

Oct. 13, 1902, Micheal Yoji, miner, aged 30 years, single, was killed in the 
Victor Coal company's mine, Pawnee, Sangamon county, caused by improper 
blasting. 

Oct. 13, 1902, Frank Isaacs, trapper, aged 14 years, was kill in the Victor Coal 
company's mine, Pawnee, Sangamon county, by an explosion, caused by 
improper blasting. 

Oct. 21, 1902, Daniel Raey, miner, aged 46 years, was killed in the River- 
ton Coal company's No. 2 mine, Riverton, Sangamon county, by a premature 
blast. He leaves a widow and four children. 

Nov. 5, 1902, John Roberts, miner, aged 46 years, single, was killed in the 
Trutter Coal company's mine. Pleasant Plains, Sangamon county, by falling 
clod. 

Nov. 12, 1902, William Travel, miner, aged 41 years, married, was killed 
in the Montgomery Coal company's mine. Paisley, Montgomery county, by 
falling clod. He leaves a widow and four children. 

Nov. 19, 1902, Fred Furrkamp, loader, aged 19 years, single, was killed in 
the Consolidated Coal company's mine No. 6, Staunton, Macoupin county, 
by falling coal and clod. 



568 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Dec. 3, 1902, William H, Skiner, miner, aged 56 years, married, was killed 
in the Greenridge Mining company's mine, Greenridge, Macoupin county, 
by falling coal and slate. He leaves a widow and four children. 

Dec. 16, 1902, N. Bicascis, miner, aged 30 years, single, was killed in the 
Riverton Cjal company's mine No. 2, Rivertoc, Sangamon county, by a pre- 
mature blast. 

Jan. 9, 1903, John Marquis, miner, aged 23 years, single, vvas killed in the 
Consolidated Coal company's mine No. 7, Staunton, Macoupin county, by 
falling coal aud slate. 

Feb. 6, 1903, George Harris, surface laborer, aged 21 years, married, was 
fatally injured, being caught by a falling prop, at the Madison Coal company's 
mine No. 6, Divernon, Sangamon county. His death occurred one week 
after the accident. He leaves a widow. 

Feb. 25, 1903, Mathew Donelly, shot firer, aeed 38 years, married; Thomas 
McLaughlin, shot firer, aged 51 years, married, and Walter Davis, driver, aged 
25 years, single, were killed by anexplosionin the Auburn and Alton Coal com- 
pany's mine, Auburn, Sangamon county. The explosion was caused by the 
excessive use of powder, abd the rapid firing of shots. Tne gases liberated 
by the powder and the fine coal dust given off by the shots at the working 
faces, taking fire, causing a very serious explosion. Donelly leaves a widow 
and four children, and McLaughlin a widow and three children. 

Feb. 27, 1903, August Motley, miner, aged 48 years, married, and Thomas 
McDonald, miner, aged 36 years, married, were both killed in the Springfield 
Coal and Mining company's No. 4 mine, Springfield, Sangamon county. 
They were suffocated by gases given off from shots tbeyhad just fired. 

March 28, 1903, Walter Sheehan, miner^ aged 26 years, single, was killed 
by a premature blast in the Jones and Adams Coal company's mine, Spriag- 
field, Sangamon county. 

April 8, 1903, Emil Stein, loader, aged 21 years, single, was killed by a fall of 
slate, in the Consolidated Coal company's No. 7 mine, Staunton, Macoupin 
county. 

April 24, 1903, John Painer, miner, aged 30 years, married, was killed by 
the explosion of a keg of powder in the Cnicago-Virden Coal company's mine 
No. 3, Chatham, Sangamon county. Ha leaves a widow and one child. 

May 8, 1903, Jacob Price, timberman aged 38 years, married, was fatally 
burned by an explosi3n of fire damp in the Chicago, Wilmington and Ver- 
milion Coal company's mine, Thayer, Sangamon county. He died May 14, 
1903. He leaves a widow and three children. 

June 15, 1903, Joseph Scattergood, eager, aged 26 years, married, was in- 
jured by coal falling down the shaft and striking him on the head. The ac- 
cident occurred ia the Wabash Coal company's mine, Dawson, Sangamon 
county, he died Jane 19, 1903. He leaves a widow and two children. 

The regular tables of fatal and non- fatal accidents and the county schedules 
follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walton Rdtledge, 
State Inspector of Mines, Fijth District, Alton. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Fatal Casualties — Fijth District — July 1, 1903. 



'269 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Occupation. 


Residence 
(town) 




c 


S 
!2 




5 
■= 

Q. 
5 


Cause of Accident. 


1902 
July 2 

16 


Ohas. Moore 


24 

r> 

:8 
lb 
40 
iO 
14 
46 
46 
41 
19 
5ii 
30 

23 

38 
51 
25 

48 

36 
26 
21 
30 

38 
26 


Miner 

Driver 

.. do 

Miner 

Driver 

Miner 

. do 


Barclay 

Auburn. 








1 
1 

:: 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 
i 

1 

i 

'i 

1 

IS 


2 
1 

'5 
'5 
'5 

'i 

6 


Premature blast . . .. 


Ed Bradly 


•Pit cars 


Aug. 2 

28 

Sep. 6 


J as. Marsh 

John Mullen 


Pawnee 

Cantrall .... 
Divernon... 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 




iPremature blast 

Pit cars. 




W D. Overcash 

Mich. Yojl . 




13 


.. do 








.. do 


13 




Trapper .... 

Miner 

..do 

.. do 

Loader 

Miner 

.. do 

..do 

Fop laborer. 
Shot flrer... 
.. do 


do 


do 


21 


Dan Kaey 


River ton.... 
P. Plains .... 


1 


1 


4 


Premature blast 


Nov. 6 


John Koberts 

Wm. Travel 


Falling clod 


12 


Paisley 

•Staunton ... 
Qreenridge. 


1 
i 


1 

i 


4 
"i 


Fallingcoal 


16 


Pred Furthamp 

VVm.H. Skinner 

N. Blcsacis 


Palling coal and clod 
Falling coal and slate 


1903 
Jan. 9 




Staunton ... 
Divernon... 

Auburn 

.. do 


1 
1 

1 


i 
1 


■5 
3 




Feb. 6 


(^eo. Harri-s 


JPalllngprops 


25 






25 


Thos. McLaughlin 


4 .. do 


25 


Driver 

Miner 

.. do 


.. do 


'4 

1 

4 
3 


.. do 


27 
27 


August Motley 

Thos. McDonald 

Walter Sheehan 


Springfleld . 
.. do 


1 

1 


1 
1 


3 


Suffocated, smoke 

and gas 

.. do 


Mar 2b 


do 


. do ... . 


Premature blast 




Loader 

Miner 

Timberman. 
Cager 


Staunton ... 
Chatham ... 

Thayer 

Dawson 


"i 

1 
1 

13 


i 

1 
1 

13 


i 

3 
2 

30 




24 


John Painer 


Fxplo,«ion, keg of 


May 8 




powder 


June 16 


Joseph Scattergood... 
Total— 26 


HCoal falling down 
shaft 



















* Died July 25. 1902. 
+ Died Aug. 2. 1902. 
X Died Aug. 30, 1902. 
8 Died Feb. 13. 1903. 
II Died May 14. 1903. 
V Died June 19.1903. 



270 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualties. 


No 


Colliery. 


No. 


Barclay 

Auburn 

Pawnee 

Cantrall 

Divernon 

Rlverton 

Pleas. Plains. 

Paisley 

Staunton 

Greenridge... 
Springfield... 

Chatham 

Thayer 

Dawson 


2f 


Miners 

Drivers 

Trappers 

Loaders 

Topmen 

Shot flrers.... 
Timberman... 
Cager 


14 
4 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


Premature blast 


5 
3 
6 
2 
3 

1 

1 
1 

2 
26 


Barclay Coal Co 

Chicago-Virden Coal Co 

Chlcago-Virden Coal 

Co., No. 3 












Falling coal 


Victor Coal Co 






Cantrall Coop. Coal Co. 
Madison Coal Co.. No. 6. 

Riverton Coal Co 

Trutter Coal Co 




Falling prop 




Powder explosion.... 








Suffocation 


Montgomery Coal Co ... 

Consolidated Coal Co.. 

No.6 








Greenridge Mining Co.. 

Consolidated Coal Co.. 

No.7 






Auburn & Alton Coal Co 
Springfield Coal «& Min- 
ing Co.. No. 4 

Springfield Coal & Min- 
ing Co No 6 . .. 






Springfield Coal & Min- 
ing Co.. No. 7 






Jones & Adams 

Chicago, W. & V. Coal 
Co 




Totals .... 


Wabash Coal Co 


?fi 















Non-Fatal Camialties— Fifth District— July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


i 


6 


1 

Id 
O 


§1 
1' 


Character and Cause of 
Injury. 


5*0 


1902 
July 7 

10 


Robt. Bailey 

Adolph Kanton .. 
Joe Trickelton ... 
Tony Ketchmarik 
Geo. Stutzman... 

K.R.Hart 

Matt Bowers 

Chs Hefley 

Hy Gitterly 

Jas W. Muir 

Leo Harris 

Patrick Shea 

Jas. January 

John Davis 

Fred Haase 

John Dick 

John Fiek 

Peter Green 

Dan Reese 

Pra'k McCormick 
Peter Cerverich.. 
Wm. Sparling.... 
Sam Chambers... 
Frank Patterson. 

Hy Tickert 

Peter Edwards... 

B. Booslnger 

Geo. Reay 

Walter Sheen.... 

Geo. Holman 

Ric Martin 


60 
22 
20 
24 
29 

40 
20 
30 
22 
41 
24 
20 
28 
33 
18 
40 
43 
3S 
60 
28 
4U 
40 
20 
23 
46 
49 
53 
21 
26 
40 
16 


VIrden 

Mt. Olive... 




"i 
1 

"i 
.... 

"i 

1 
1 

"i 

"i 

1 

"i 

1 
1 


:::: 


■■■3 

"i 

"3 

■■■5 
4 

■■'8 
'"2 


Body bruised ;premature blast 
Body bruised; falling slate.... 
Body bruised; falling coal 


30 
30 

88 


26 
Aug. 24 


Girard 

.. do 

Hillsboro... 
Spaulding . 
Hillsboro... 
Mt. Olive... 

Auburn 

Divernon... 
Springfield. 
PI. Plains... 
Virden 


.... 


60 


Body scalded; bursting steam 


6' 


28 
Sept. 2 
5 
9 
16 
19 
24 
27 
Oct 13 


Body bruised: fall'lngcoal 


90 
65 


Body bruised; falling coal.... 

Body bruised; pit cars 

Body bruised: pit cars 

Foot mashed: pit cars 

Head bruised; kicked by mule 

Leg broken; falling slate 

Leg broken; falling slate 


40 
32 
62 
48 
42 
65 
55 


13 
13 
13 


Staunton ... 

Pawnee 

.. do 

.. do 




SS 


Body burned; windy shot .... 
Kody burned; windy shot .... 
Body burned; windy shot .... 
Bodv burned; windy shot — 

Leg broken; mule pit car 

Body burned: windy shot .... 
Body burned; windy shot — 


49 
50 
37 


13 
13 
13 
13 
18 
18 
18 
18 
20 
21 
24 
24 
2i 


.. do 

Auburn/.... 

Pawnee 

.. do 

Chatham .'.'. 
Staunton ... 
Mt. Olive... 
Gillespie.... 

Thayer 

Springfield . 

.. do 

Mt. Olive... 


:::: 


45 

49 
MO 


Leg broken' pit car 


fi' 


Hand mashed; falling rock... 
Body bruised; falling slate... 
Fingers mashed: wagon chute 


40 
35 
30 
90 


Leg fractured; pit car 

Body bruised;premature blast 
Arm broken: pit car 


32 
35 
38 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



271 



Non-Fatal Casualties— Fifth District — July 1, 1903— Conclnded. 



1902 
Oct. 27 
29 
Nov. 4 



Dec. 



Feb. 4 
5 
23 

Mar. 7 
30 

Apr. 20 

May 8 
8 
13 
13 
16 
22 
29 

.June 17 
17 



Residence. 



John Lancaster.. 

Prank Llsjak 

ttoy Turner 

Thos. Tayler 

Frank Hammond. 

Wm. Sharve 

Geo. Sanders 

M. McFaddon.... 

Sam Tarrant 

Jacob Yates 

John Schreier — 
John Streigler ... 

Thos. Jones 

Sam H. Kucker .. 

Louis Mina 

C. Sassmanha'a'n 
Thos. NuKgrett ... 
Geo. W. Hall 

AdolphHaux 

Leon Rogers 

A. S.Roberts 

Wm. Hill 

A. Fezganizky ... 
Herman Bentrup. 

Qus Ralun 

Fritz Haase 

J. Berritte 

J. T. Merriman... 

D. G. Jones 

Chas. Wenner.... 
August Alsvede.. 
Otto Neldrick.... 
Clyde Sprowell... 

E. Barkus 

John Manclute... 

Wm. Morgan 

Ed Reese 

Totals 



Staunton 
Vlrden... 
.. do 



.. do 

.. do 

Aaburn 

.. do 

Virden 

Springfield, 
Divernon... 
Mt. Olive... 
Virden 



Gillespie.. 
Auburn... 



Greenridge. 
Mt. Olive... 

Virden 

Nilwood .... 



Auburn 

.. do 

Hillsboro.. 



Virden 

Divernon... 
Staunton ... 

.. do 

.. do 

Mt. Olive... 
Carlinville.. 

Thayer 

Staunton ... 

.. do 

.. do 

Divernon ... 

.. do 

Hillsboro... 
Springfield, 
.. do 



Character and Cause of 
Injury. 



Arm broken; pit car 

Eye put out; mine pick 

Arm broken, face burnt; elec- 
tric wire 

Leg broken; pit cars 

Leg and hip broken; pit car.. 
Body bruised; falling coal.... 
Collar bone broken; pit car... 

Arm broken: pltcar 

Body bruised; flying coal 

Arm bruised; pit car 

Foot mashed; box car loader. 
Toe cut off ; pit cars 



Ribs broken; pit cars 

Hands and face burned; windy 
shot 

Body bruised; flying coal 

Body bruised; pit car 

Ankle dislocated: pit cars.... 

Collar bone broken: falling 
clod 

Body burned; windy shot 

Booy burned; windy shot .... 

Spinal column fractured; fall- 
ing roof 

Foot mashed; cage 

Finger mashed; pit car 

Leg broken; falling slate 

Body bruised; falling coal 

Collarbone broken; pltcar... 

Arm bruised; pltcar 

Body bruised; pit car 

Body burned; firedamp 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Body bruised; falling slate... 

Ankle dislocated; pit car 

Hip fractured; pit car 

Body bruised; pltcar 

Leg broken; pltcar 

Leg broken; premature blast. 

Body bruised:premature blast 



86 122 2214 



Not recovered July 1, 1903. 



Total men injured 68 

Not recovered July 1, 1903 9 

Number recovered July 1, 1903 59 

Time lost by men recovered I 2,214 days 

Average days lost by men recovered I 38 



272 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Accidents — Fifth District— July 1, 

1903. 



Residence. No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of casualty. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


1 
Vlrden m 


Miner 


29 
23 

~68 


Premature blast 

Palling slate 


30 
2 

~68 


Chic. & V. Coal Co. No. 1 4 


Mt Olive 


7 
8 


Driver 

Laborer 

Maeh. runner. 
Trapper 


Consol. Coal Co. No. 6 .. 
Consol, Coal Co. No, 8... 
Consol. Coal Co. No. 10.. 
Consol. Coal Co. No. 7... 
Consolidated Coal Co... 
Chic.-V. CoalCo. No. 2.. 




Auburn 

Girard 

Hillsboro 


Palling coal 




Falling clod 




Falling roof 




Spauldiag.... 2 


Pit cars . 




Carpenter .... 






Springfield... 
Pleasant Pl'ns 


6 
1 
9 
6 

~68 


Mule 




Pumpman — 
rimberman .. 
Mach. helper. 
Koadman 


Windy shot 


Hillsboro Coal Co 

Spaulding Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co. No 6. 
Spauld'g Coop. Coal Co 
Trutter Coal Co 








Pawnee 






Mine pick 




Gillespie 

Tliayer 

Greenrldge,.. 

Nilwood 

Carlinville.... 


Electric wire. 






Victor CoalCo 




Car loader 


Chic,-V Coal Co. No. 3.. 
(•hlc.,W.& V.Coal Co.. 

Jones & Adams 

Spaulding C. & M. C. Co 
Virden Coal Co 




Cage 












Total 


GreenridgeM. &C. Co.. 

Weaver Coal Co 

Auburn & Alton C'l Co. 
Carlinville Coal Co 


68 











Table Showing the Number and Nature of Non-Fatal Casualties, 
Conjugal Relations and Time Lost — Fifth District— 1903. 





1 

a 

3 


^ 
^ 


6 
a 


■a 


Time Lost 






Total 
days. 


Average 
days. 


P 




12 

1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
30 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 


4 

2 

2 

"23" 
...... 

1 
...... 

1 
1 


8 

1 

...... 

1 

2 
7 
2 

...... 

3 

2 


10 
...... 

16 
2 


507 
32 
32 
40 

2b9 


56.3 

32 

3i 

20 

67.4 


17.65 




1.47 




1.47 




2.94 


Poot 


7.35 




1.47 




■■77" 
...... 

1 
...... 

2 


64 
629 
162 


32 

23.8 

81 


2.94 


Body 


44.11 




2,94 


Back '.' 


1.47 


Ribs 


60 
42 

168 
62 

127 


30 
21 
42 
31 
41.2 


1.47 


Head 


1.47 




6.88 




2.94 


Collar bone 


4.41 


Total 


68 


37 


31 


122 


2,214 


32.6 


100.00 







—18 C 



274 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Brown County — Fifth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFXOE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


i 

a 

13 


3 


s 


a 




2: 


1 

|8 




LOCAL MINKS. 


^!^^lv::::::. 


260 
210 
140 
135 
132 
126 
120 
118 
90 
85 
160 


260 
240 
140 
135 
132 
126 
120 
118 
90 
85 
160 

1,685 












•J. McCleary 












John Gelsler 


Mt. Sterling.. 

Ripley 

Mt. Sterliner.. 
.. do 












J.J.Friday 












Sam Bailey 












L. Howard 












Geo. Adams 


do 














.. do 












P.F.Lewis .!::::'.:::::!: 


.. do 










in 


E Powers 


do. :::: 


























Totals . 

















1.686 



















Mines in 1902. 14. 
Abandoned mines. 
Mines in 1903, 10. 
* Strip mines. 



Calhoun County — Fifth District — 1903, 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffiok 
Address 
of Mine. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 
a 

2 


3 


a 
g 


a 
5 


em 


i 




1 


LOCAL MINK. 

Thomas Press Brick Co.. 
Totals — 1 mine .. 


Peruque, Mo. 


4,928 


4,928 






















4.928 


4.928 
















.... 









Mines in 1902. 1. 
Mines in 1903, 1. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Brown County — Fifth District — Conoluded. 



275 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 

o 

> 

1 

o 

■1 


1 

.o 

■2 

a 

a 

1 


1 

s ^ 

Sa 

11 

a< 


ll 

1 

as 


Acci- 
dents. 




1 

ii 

bin 
< 


1 

a . 

s E 
a « 
<i> a 

II 


t 

1 
s 


^ 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

; 

1^ 


a'H® 

EH 


"3 

2 

.a 

a 

z 


g 

ii 


1 

a 

a 


$437 










260 
240 
140 
135 
132 
125 
120 
118 
90 
85 
ISO 






250 


SI nn 










420 








240J i 65 

140 1 00 
136; 1 00 
132 1 00 










245 
















286 
















231 
















218 








125 
120 
118 
90 
86 
160 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 










210 
















206 
















167 
















148 














10 


262 
































$2,774 


11 




11 




1,686 






1,686 


SI 09 

























Calhoun County — Fifth District — Concluded. 



'o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 

1 


1 

.a 

>• 

A 

a 

a 

1 
5 


•2 
a 
2 

II 
11 


ll 
1 

SI 

11 

S 9 

25 


Acci- 
dents. 




% 

"3 

ii 
ll 


1. 

* o 


1 

a 

o 

5 


i 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


2 

1^ 


Hi 

E- 


3 

o 

a 

2; 


§ 

II 


1 

a 
1 


$4,928 


14 


6 


20 






•4,928 


292 






164 






1 











C$4,9?8 


14 


6 


20 






4.928 


292 




























' 





• All coal consumed at brick plant. 



276 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Greene County— Fifth District— 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOPFIOK 

Address of 
Mini. 


Output op Mine in Tons. 


i 
a 
2; 




i 
§ 

i 


o. 

a 


bt 




1 


1 


LOCAL MINKS. 

Dill Coal Co 


Roodhouse ... 
do 


192 
80 
65 


1.920 
1.080 
960 
200 
192 
80 
65 










9 


Ed Griffiths 












S 




.. do 










\ 


Solomon & Sturman 

Geo Parks 


Greenfield.... 
do 










5 










6 




Roodhouse ... 
do . .. 










7 


Fred Strang 


























4,497 


4.497 


























Mines in 1902. 7. 
New mines, 2. 
Abandoned mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903. 7. 



Jersey County — Fifth District — 1903, 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICK 

Address 
OF Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 
i 


5 
^ 


a 

2 

1 
i 


Q. 


1 


« 
^ 


a 

gi 




local mines. 
L A Miller 


Brighton 


922 
720 
392 
336 
252 
168 

2.790 


922 
720 
392 
336 
252 
168 

2,790 
























L. Wagrenfiflass 


.. do 














do 














.. do 














do:::; 












Totals — 6 mines 






























Mines in 1902, 8. 
Abandoned mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903. 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



277 



Greene County — Fifth District — Concluded. 



•s 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 

o 

1 

o 
« 

1 
o 

O) 

as 
Q 


a 

gs 
J3 
>■ 

■s 

a 

a 


1 

til . 
k. it 
« a 

il 

gg 


11 




Acci- 
dents. 




1 

il 

r 


1 
is 

< 


i 
1 

< 


"3 
1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


o 


a 

i|| 

« a 

Eh 


5 

o 

a 

s 


a 

II 

z 


a 



z 


$2,880 


I 


1 


9 
5 
4 
4 

2 

1 




1.920 
1.080 
960 
200 
192 
80 
65 




240 
200 
216 
60 
120 
66 
50 


1,920 
1,060 
960 
200 
192 
80 
65 


$0 76 
8712 
8712 

75 

Ik 

8712 










1,620 




? 


1,440 










3 


400 












381 










<5 


120 










(; 


97 










7 








$6,942 


21 




26 




4,497 




136 


4.497 


$0 81 























Jersey County — Fifth District — Concluded 



5 


















o 










o 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


§ 






^-i 


Acci- 
dents. 




o 












2 
S 

o 
S 

>> 


1 

s 
1 

a 


2 

a 

IJ 


ll 

So 

a^ 

d 9 






* 
It 

(B-e 


a . 

X 

II 


4g 
1 

a 
® 

1 




ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 
5 


g|j 
» a 

og5 


-3 

1 


o 
a 

o 

11 


1 
1 


< 


<1 


•«j 


^ 


H 


H 


H 


Q 


Eh 


Q. 


Z 


Z 


Z 


z 


$1,383 






3 




922 




220 


922 


$1 00 








1 


1,080 


2 


:::::: 


i 

2 




720 
392 
336 
262 
168 




210 
140 
120 
90 
60 


720 
392 
336 
262 

168 


1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 








? 


688 










1 


504 












378 










6 


252 










6 














$4. 185 


12 


3 


15 




2.790 




140 


2.790 


$1 00 




.... 

















278 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Macoupin County — Fifth District — 1903. 





Name op Opbbator. 


POSTOFPIOK 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Output op Mine in Tons. 




1 

1 


H 


a 


d 

a 


1 


a 


ll 

p 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Chicago- Virden Co'I Co.,1 
Consolidated Coal Co.. 6.. 

Madison Coal Co., 5 

Consolidated Coal Co., 8.. 


Virden 

Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

.. do 


364,643 
256.406 
246,992 
229.654 
210,760 
196.875 
178. 927 
165.841 
122.576 
77.859 
67.608 
51.862 
42,420 


13,676 
122,205 
36.286 
102,979 
60.026 
50.558 
139.276 
50,752 
90,436 
23,477 
41.394 
6,587 
8,910 


215,262 
92,255 

161,293 
90,496 

127,051 

112.450 
23.236 
66,336 
20, 160 
36.625 
17,351 
33,448 
26,402 


2,847 


42.816 


90,062 

48, 946 


3 


885 

767 

640 

""I'M 


3.191 

6.202 
2.901 
8,187 

"iejesi 

2.260 

185 

2.622 

1.038 


46,338 
30. 977 


S 
6 

7 
8 


Consolidated Coal Co., 7. 
Consolidated Coal Co.. 10 
Greenridge Mining Co... 
VirdenCoal Co 


Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

Girard 

Virden 

Carlinville.... 

Gillespie 

Girard 

Hornsby 

Nllwood 

Bunker Hill.. 
Chesterfield . . 


30.015 
24.680 
16,776 
32. 169 


9 
10 
11 


Carlinville Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co.... 
Girard Coal Co 


9.720 
17.672 
4,487 


12 
13 


Consolidated Coal Co.... 
Weaver Coal & Coke Co. 

Totals 

LOCAL. MINES. 

Wm. Neil & Co 


10, 789 
7,108 












2,210,323 


735.461 


1.022.264 


6,993 


84.886 


360.729 




6,926 
1.800 
1.050 
964 
842 
480 
420 
140 
120 

12.732 


■"i.'soo 

1,050 
954 
842 
480 
420 
140 
120 

~5^ 


5,407 




837 


682 




Davis Bros 






W. A. Bodl ... 














.. do 














Posterbnrg... 
Scottsville.... 
Chesterfield... 
.. do 












Dugger & Tally 
























T R. Rands 










q 


Jarden & Lansford 

Totals 


Bunker Hill.. 












5,407 




837 


682 




Totals-22 mines.. 




2.223,055 


741,267 


1.027,661 


6,993 


85. 723 


361,411 



Mines in 1902, 19. 
New mines, 3. 
Mines in 1903. 22. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



279 



Macoupin County — Fifth District — Concluded. 





Emplotbs. 


Disposition of Odt- 

PDT. 


d 

a 
2 
S 

o 
% 

I 
o 

w 

1 


i 

03 
Si 

a 

a 

a 


Price paid per erosa ton 
for hand mlnlnir. 


11 

P 
ll 

s ^ 
2 


ACCI- 

DBNT8. 




1 

1 


i 
< 


"3 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tiyes at mines. 


1 

o 

It 


"2* 

ill 


5 

o 

1 

i 




1 

a 

2 


$443,672 
230, 064 


287 
177 
119 
148 

148 


153 
102 
106 
88 

R1 


440 
279 


350.422 
237 nas 


6.220 

6.88H 

855 

463 

646 

7.638 

2.035 

10.933 

12.870 

3.233 

7.609 

1.122 

5,220 


7.901 248 
12.481 245 
9,610! 246 
9,290 226 


6,050 


49 A 56c 


4,102 
1,337 

882 

867 
1,106 

811 
6.543 
5.528 
4,916 

442 
2,544 

258 
1,103 


■"2 


5 
"2 




223.095 
207. 978 


226 i 2aS 497 








236 
229 
212 
228 
192 
149 
138 
134 
75 
110 


219.911 
198.408 
176,363 
174.497 
146.908 
104,796 
68, 151 
58.970 
43.711 
34.710 








197 673 


11,706 
11,884 
2,413 
8,000 
4.910 
6,475 
1,029 
7,029 
2,490 


220 
210 
193 
215 
245 
130 
176 
170 
204 








181.612 
160,594 
142,444 
135.359 
79. 316 


136 7K 








166 
135 
110 
95 
90 
40 
80 


62 
57 

43 
44 

35 
30 


178.927 
165.841 
122.576 


49 & 55c 

49 & 55c 
49 & 55c 


■'i! i 

.... 1 
....1 1 

....[ 2 
....1 2 


in 


85.905 
55.619 
41.084 


67,608 


49 & 55c 


p 


42.420 


49 & 55c 




1 


13 


$2,184,416 


1.731 


916 


2.647 


2.049,355 


65.720 


95,248 


210 


583,422 


$0,505 


30.439 


4 


33 




$10 849 






15 
8 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 




6.926 
1.800 
1.050 
954 
842 
480 
420 
140 
120 


:::::::; 


252 
147 
160 
120 
180 
140 
126 
40 
30 






85 






1 


2.700 




1,800 
1,050 
951 
842 
480 
420 
140 
120 


$0 75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
76 
75 
75 


?, 












R 


1 431 










4 


l!263 










5 












6 


630 










7 


210 










8 


180 










9 














S19.058 


34 


14 


48 




12.732 




133 


5,806 


$0.76 


65 








$2,203,973 


1,765 


630 


2.695 


2,049.355 


78.452 


95,248 




589,228 




30.604 


4 


34 





STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Montgomery County — Fifth District — 190S, 





Name of Operator. 


postoi-fice 
Address 
OF Mine. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 


i 


a 

a 

i 

i 


J 


bi 


*5 

S5 


a 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Hlllsboro Coal Co 

Montgomery Coal Co 

Litchfield Mining & P. Co 
Clover Leaf Coal & M. Co 
Raymond Coal Co 


Hlllsboro 

Paisley 

Litchfield .... 

Cofleen 

Raymond 


168,980 
89,615 
88.613 
76.859 
6.346 

420.312 


13,495 
9,015 

10,409 
5,077 

37,996 


98,769 
63,100 
45.668 
68.216 
5.200 

270.953 


"i'M 


11.766 
4,200 

"'2."635 


34,950 
13.200 
25.168 
10.931 
1.145 




7,368 


18.601 


85, 394 











Mines In 1902, 6. 
Mines in 1903. 5. 



Morgan County — Fifth District — 1903, 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffiok 
Address 
of Mink. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 

a 

2 


1 
^ 


a 
g 
§ 

a 




1 


1 


bt 

i 


1 


LOCAL MINES. 

P. Wagstaffe 


Murryville ... 
Arenzville.... 


3,120 
720 


3.120 
720 










9 


Jacob Stocker 












Totals — 2 mines ...... 













3.840 


3,840 

























Mines in 1902, 2. 
Mines in 1903. 2. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



281 



Montgomery County —Fifth District — Concluded. 























5 
2 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 




o 

a 




Acbi- 

DKNT8. 






















a® 






o 












1 


>> 

s 


aid per gross 
minlner. 


3 






> 


1 

a . 

!i 


i 




loaded on 
for shlp- 
and sup- 
to locomo 
at mine. 


"3 

2 


1^ 


"oS 
O 


a 

o 




^5 

SI 


29 


i 


i 


ons 

cars 

ment 

plied 

tives 


X(I> 

si 


ill 


03 


a 

a 

o 


11 


an 

a 3 


a 




5-3 
13 


5 

a 

3 


<! 


< 


< 


H 


H 


H 


&H 


Q 


H 


£ 


z 


z 


15 


z 


$170,745 


119 


52 


171 


146,285 


7.411 


5.284 


222 


19.077 




1,289 




4 




86. 163 


167 


67 


m 


82,995 


4,320 


2.200 


145 


89.515 




656 




.... 


2 


91.311 


90 


21 


111 


67, 411 


16,722 


4,480 


245 


88,613 


* 


3,713 






3 


73, 161 


68 


31 


9S 


72,595 


1.864 


2,400 


239 


76,859 


» 


2. 383 




.... 


4 


8.875 


12 


6 


17 


1,273 


4,472 


600 


250 


6.345 


$0 74 


32 


.... 


.... 


5 


$430,255 


466 


176 


632 


370,559 


34,789 


14,964 


220 


280,409 


$0 51 


8,072 


1 


4 





* 49 and 55 cents. 



Morgan County — Fifth District — Concluded. 



2 


Employes. 


Disposition or Out- 
put. 


d 

o 

1 

o 

1 

1 

i 

Q 


a 

08 

.d 
>> 
.a 

a 

1 


OiOS 

1^ 


<B 

ll 

as 

Z 


Acci- 
dents. 




ll 
11 


i. 

i! 

> o 


i 

5 


■i 
1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mines. 


1 
1 

1 


111 


1 

© 

a 

s 
2; 


a 

o 
a 

o 
1-3 

a^ 

z 


a 
z 


$4,680 
1.620 


9 
3 


, 


10 
3 




3,120 
720 




275 
240 


3,120 
720 


$0 87Ju 
1 50 


130 
36 










? 








$6, 300 


12 


' 


13 




3.840 




257 


3,840 


$0 99 


166 


.... 













STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Sangamon County — Fifth District — 1903, 





Name or Opebatob. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mink. 


Odtput of Mine in Tons. 


u 
a 

i 


"3 
1 


1 


a 


61 




s 

a . 

$ 

Ol, 


1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

Chicago. Wilm. & V. Co.. 

Madison Coal Co.. 6 

Jones & Adams Coal Co.. 
Chlcago-VirdenC C0..2.. 
Springfield C.&M.C0..2. 
Victor Coal Co. . . 


Thayer 

Spri^ngfield"; 

Auburn 

Riverton 

Pawnee 

Springfield... 

.. do 

..do 

.. do 

. do 


403.758 
306,842 
290.905 
269,889 
258.650 
228, 190 
181,991 
164,032 
152,430 
146,350 
146, 108 
141,009 
139, 400 
129,252 
122,637 
121,313 
118,009 
117,932 
110,312 
109,627 
107,431 
107, 126 
95,622 
95,451 
94,924 
94,284 
89,390 
16,698 


2,377 
12,507 
85, 165 
54, 100 
36.886 
52,600 
2l,7E0 
90,624 
84,644 
64.480 
48,210 
22,636 
75,800 
55,382 
24,447 
67,010 
76,800 
53,587 
26.656 
70.627 
19, 456 


172,073 
193,389 
146, 461 
123, 346 
146,694 
89,370 
85, 106 
48,318 
51.388 
56, 128 
60,120 
114,416 
50,340 
49,216 
73.343 
37,457 
25,861 
41,969 
41.566 
9.000 

fiR.217 


68,624 
41807 

'3:833 

i6;85i 


■■■3;679 

9,665 
3.848 
4,444 
18,411 
27, 702 
2,636 
430 
272 
11,670 


160.784 
93,060 
50,714 
84.762 
70.626 
68, 409 


7 
8 
9 

10 
11 


Capitol Co-op. Coal Co.... 
Springfield C.&M.C0..4. 
Springfield C.&M. Co.. 5. 
Springfield C. & M. Co.. 3. 
SprlngfleldCo-op. C. Co.. 

Spaulding Coal Co.. 1 

West End Coal Co 

Springfield C.&M. Co.. 1. 
Cantrall Co-op. Coal Co.. 

Sangamon Coal Co 

Wood side Coal Co 


36.682 
22.554 
15.968 
25,470 
26, 108 


1' 


Spaulding.... 
Springfield ... 

Riverton 

Cantrall 

Springfield... 
..do 


3,957 


13 
14 

16 
16 
17 





3.740 
1.154 
4.443 
2.729 
2,248 
4,792 
18,097 
7,000 


9,520 
23,400 
20.404 
14, 117 
13. 100 


18 


Republic Iron & Steel Co 

Wabash Coal Co.. 1 

WllliamsvilleCoalCo.... 
Spaulding Coal Co.. 2.... 
Auburn & Alton Coal Co. 
Chicago- Virden C. Co.. 3. 
Barclay Coal & M. Co.... 
Citizens' Coal M. Co. A.. 
Citizens' Coal M. Co.. B.. 
Jefferson Coal M. Co 


"do::;:::.:;. 


17,584 


19 
20 
?1 


Dawson 

Selbytown.... 

Bissell 

Auburn 

Chatham 

Barclay. 

Springfield ... 
. do 


23,993 
23,000 
2:728 


?? 


83, 374» 14. 774 






8,978 


9^ 


25,890 
16,688 
39, 788 
26,672 
32,320 
4,939 


43, 742 
61,071 
33,938 
43,361 
36.810 
6.959 






26,990 


1 

?fi 


'i'seg 

1,807 


3,019 
2,665 
3.687 


14,673 
16,064 
18.867 


97 


do 


20 260 


?s 


PI. Plains 

Springfield... 
Salisbury 






4:800 




Totals 

LOCAL MINES. 

Lincoln Park Coal M. Co. 










4.359.562 


1.274,716 


1,940.463 


92,391 


135.431 


916.562 




25.696 
1.268 


6,314 

1.268 


12,360 






7. 032 












Totals 












26.964 


7.582 


12,350 
1.952,813 






7.032 




Totals— 30 mines.. 




4,386,626 


1,282,297 


92,391 


135,431 


692.942 



Mines In 1902. 30. 
Mines In 1903. 30. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Sangamon County — Fifth District— ConclxxAed. 





Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


d 

a 
■2 

o 
1 

1 

"S 

s 


1 

a 

a 
1 


2 

i 

II 

04 


1 

is 

25 


Acci- 
dents. 




9 

a 
1 

tun 


1 

li 

1! 

t- o 


1 

p, 

i 
u 

o 

< 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
ftlves at mine. M. 


1 

2 

m 6 

|2 


o a 


2 

o 
1 


i 
I-- 

Z 


i 

i 


$351,089 
253,766 
264.641 
278,441 
215,528 
224,668 
189,624 
140,297 
134,283 
124,877 
147.620 
166. 173 
143.662 
109.846 
124.662 
106.262 
118.989 
118,434 
93,409 
87,896 
125,298 
96.300 
96, 197 
101, 196 
110,635 
113,364 
90, 103 
16.338 


220 
133 
188 
231 
196 
156 
125 
126 
115 
129 
120 
120 
115 
122 

90 
134 

94 
102 

90 

76 
125 

76 

'§5 

70 
26 


97 
87 
103 
48 
54 
62 
71 
57 
34 
40 
40 
68 
60 

40 
41 

1 

35 

28 

i 

15 


345 
246 
286 
318 
299 
204 
119 
187 
186 
186 
164 
160 
155 
180 
140 
181 

\il 
IS 

163 
111 
154 
130 
129 
121 
98 
40 


392.018 
293. 977 
277,735 
264,691 
249,339 
222,690 
101,776 
154,948 
147, 182 
137,423 
117. 102 
140.059 
116.453 
119,558 
118,815 
115,167 
106,609 
61,087 
102, 718 
76,627 
106.431 
97.096 
90.230 
69.976 
90. 903 
91.959 
85.500 
13.000 


5.186 
3.415 
6,866 
2,600 

"'2,m 

64,920 
6,397 

^•s 

26,232 
460 

19,297 
4,168 
1,600 
3,746 
7,800 

51.602 
3.697 

11,000 

600 

8.500 

2,273 

20, 142 
2,862 
1,062 
2,870 
2,978 


10, 164 
9.450 
7.306 
2.698 
9.311 
3,000 

16.295 
2:687 
2.398 
8.737 
2.774 
600 
3.660 
5,526 
2,322 
2,400 
3,600 
5,343 
3,897 

22.000 
600 
1.630 
3.119 
5,333 
1.159 
1.263 
1,020 
720 


252 
244 

268 
192 
236 
220 
280 
220 
210 
205 
240 
238 
210 
215 
261 
173 
269 
245 
197 
300 
240 
234 
168 
268 
211 
198 
280 
240 






3.970 
2.765 

10.668 
9,498 

10.128 
9.496 
6.872 
5.760 
6.360 
5,604 
6.823 
4.871 
5.599 
5.616 
5.620 
5.041 
4.650 
4.716 
6.073 
4.386 
4.469 
2.960 
4.189 
3.386 
4.004 
3.636 
3.350 
836 




2 
6 
4 

6 

■"6 
.... 

.... 
2 

""2 

1 

"i 


1 






?. 


296.906 
269.889 
258.660 
228,190 
181,991 
164,032 
152,430 
146.360 
146. 108 
141.009 
139.400 
129.252 
122.637 
121.313 
118.009 
117,932 
110,312 
109,627 
107,431 
107, 126 
96,622 
95,461 
94,924 
94,284 
89.390 
16.698 


t 


3 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 


$4,132,735 


3,374 


1,486 


4.860 


3.961.069 


260,900 


137.593 


232 


3.618,962 




150333 


21 


31 




$36 784 


28 
2 


18 
1 




46 
3 




26.054 
1.268 


642 


205 
180 


25,696 
1,268 


i" 


1.029 
72 






1 


1.902 




2 








$38,686 


30 


19 


49 




26.322 


642 




26,964 




1.101 








$4,171,421 


3.404 


1.605 


4.909 


3.961.069 


287.222 


138.236 


193 


3,676.926 


$9 612 


151431 


21 


31 





* From July 1. 1902. to April 1. 1903. mining price, 49.7 cents. From April 1. 1903. to July I, 
1903, mining: price, 65.7 cents. 

t From July 1. 1902. to April 1. 1903. minine price. 49 cents. From April 1. 1903. to July 1. 
1903. mining: price. 66 cents. 

1 1.168 tons mined at $2.00 per day. 



284 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Scott County— Fifth District— 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 
Mine. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 


1 


a 
g 

a 

i 


a 
5 


a 


1 


1 




LOCAL MINES. 

Wm. H. Bates & Co 


Winchester... 


15.678 
1.135 
1.106 
957 
927 
800 
560 
480 
420 
354 
245 
140 
130 
120 
110 
108 
80 
20 

23.370 


15.678 
1.135 
1.106 
957 
927 
800 
660 
480 
420 
354 
246 
140 
130 
120 
110 
108 
80 
20 

23, 370 




















^ 


Chas McAlwee 


Winchester... 
do 










n 


Wm ft P«rknr 












P. McQuire 












(; 


Fred Meyers 


Neelyville.... 

Exeter 

Winchester... 

Chapin 

Exeter 

BlufiEs 










7 


Six & Peake 






















q 


Fred Brockhonse 










10 


Ed Ramft 












Chas. Priest & Co 

Ed Berry 










19 


Exeter 

.. do 










13 


























IS 


Wm Benson 


Winchester... 

Exeter 

Winchester... 
Chapin 










16 


Wm Kunds 






















18 


Wm Mindendorf 








































COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



285 



ScoU County —Fifth District— Concluded, 



«2 

610 

as 



Employes. 


Disposition 

OUTPDT. 


OF 


1 

1 

o 

1 

■s 

Q 


1 

1 

< 


a 


i 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

S 

03 "^ 

a 2 


i| 
ill 











fr--. 


Acci- 


o 












to 






g 


«^ 






S5 


;^3 


5 


a 
o 
s 










-sa 


»-£ 




u 


=1 




a 


11 


"ZM 


ss 


a 




Hi 


Z 


Z 


z 



$25,086 


30 
3 
3 


11 

...... 



i 


41 


15,678 






300 
225 
215 
2nn 


15,678 
1,135 
1.106 
957 
927 
800 
560 
480 
420 
354 
245 
140 
130 
120 
110 
108 
80 
20 


$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


699 
45 
42 
37 
35 
34 
22 
20 
20 
]6 
10 




:;:: 




1,816 
1,770 


1,135 

1,106 

957 

927 

800 
560 
480 
420 
354 
245 
140 
130 
120 
110 
108 
80 
20 










1,531 






1.483 




210 

200 

125 

140 

142 

160 

100 

1 86 




l!280 






896 






768 






672 






566 




10 


392 






224 






208 






75 
70 
60 
50 
65 
15 




192 






176 






173 






128 






32 












$37,392 


60 


12 


72 


15.678 


7,692 




146 


23,370 


81 00 


1,008 


.... 


.... 





Mines in 1902, 13. 
New Mines, 5. 
Mines in 1903, 18. 



286 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



RecnpUulation by Counties — 





i 

a 


s 


Peoddotion of Different Qbades in 


rONS. 


1 












m 




o 






a 














e 


Counties. 


1 












S 


1 


S 
* 




0-1 


00 










£ 


^ 


o . 
























1 

S 


2 




t 


M 


♦i 


o 


o 


II 




9 






a 


td 










2 


^ 


a 


J 


Ee) 


Z 


a! 


t» 


"U 


Macoupin .... 


13 


2.210,323 


736,461 


1,022,264 


6,993 


84,886 


228,642 


132.087 


$2,184,415 


Montsomery. . 


5 


420.312 


37,996 


270,953 


7,368 


18.601 


63,222 


22. 172 


430.265 


iSangramoD.... 


28 


4.359.562 


1,274.716 


1.9^0,463 


92,391 


135,431 


687,924 


228.638 


4.132.735 


Totals and 




















averaees 


i6 


6.990.197 


2,048.172 


3.233.670 


106.762 


238.918 


979.788 


382.897 


$6,747,405 



Recapitulation by Counties — 





a 

1 

M 

09 

ii 


1 

n 
1 


Produotion of Different Grades in 


Tons. 


1 ^ 


CODNTIES. 


i 
hi 

a 


P. 

n 
5 




+5 


1 

i 


1 

o 


1 

> 

11 

< 


Brown 


10 


1.685 


1.685 













$2,774 




1 


4.928 


4,928 












4,928 


Oreene 


7 


4.497 


4,497 












6.942 


Jersey ........ 


6 


2,790 


2,790 












4.185 


Macoupin .... 


9 


12,732 


5,806 


5,407 




837 


682 




19,558 


Morgan 


2 


3.810 


3,840 












6.300 


Sangamon .... 


2 


26, 964 


7,582 


12, 350 






5,018 


2,014 


38.686 


Scott 


18 


23,370 


23.370 












37,392 
















Totals and 

averages 


55 
101 


80.706 


51.398 


17,757 




837 


5.700 


2.014 


$120,766 


Totals district 
—all mines.. 


7,070.903 


2.102.670 


3.251.427 


106,752 


239.755 


9S5.488 


384.911 


16.868.170 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



287 



Fifth District— 1903 — Shipjnng Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Odtpdt. 


1 


Tons Mined. 


Pricks 


L« 


i 










•0 

"S 






Paid Per 
Ton for— 


ri 
©s 


5 






4b 




1 


ii 


-3 


1^ 






s 






a 

a 
a 


1 




■= 


•go 


11 

OS 

00© 

°°a 


S 

s 

2 

• 


if 


1 


.a 


J 


•5 

a 

•a 
g 


a 

a 

s 


^1 


"3 

1 


n 
1 

a 





























z 


< 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


-^J 


OQ 


CQ 


W 


S 


!5 


^ 


z; 


1,731 


916 


2,647 


1.965.710 


83.645 


66.720 


95, 248 


210 


683.422 


1.626,901 


$0,505 


JO. 435 


30,439 


4 


.3 


466 


176 


632 


367.239 


3.320 


34. 789 


14,964 


220 


280.409 


139, 903 


.61 


.43 


8.072 


1 


4 


3.37* 


1.486 

2.678 


4,860 


3.864,886 


96.184 


260.900 


137.693 


232 


3.648.962 


•710,600 


.508 


.436 


160,333 


21 

26 


31 


6.561 


8.139 


6.197.834 


183.149 


361.409 


247,805 


224 


4.512,793 


2.477.404 


$0,608 


$0.4S5 


188.844 


68 



Fifth District— 1903— Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition op Output. 


•a 
© 

If 

S"i3 

< 


Tons Mined. 


Prices 


if 

25 


i 
■3 

3 

1 
a 


J" 


f, 


4 

i 

1 


-3 


i 

a 

"Si 

M 
1' 


i 

S3 
°° 

1° 


1 

2 
•o 
Id 

S2 
5- 


-on 

1 


•6 

1 

>> 


6 
a 

1 

a 
>> 

CQ 


Ton for— 


g 


a 

1 

55 


1 

a 

a 

1 

DP 


fit 

a 

a 
a 
« 

a 

1 


1 
a 

s 
1 

a 
z 


11 


14 

19 
12 


11 

20 
26 
15 
48 
13 
49 
72 






1,586 


*4.928 
6t2 


144 

292 
194 
172 
161 
257 
193 
183 


1.685 




$1.00 



.8. 
1.00 
.75 
.99 
.512 
1.00 










14 






'•» 


$0.37 


164 






?1 






4.497 

2,790 
12.732 

3,840 
26.322 

7,692 


4.497 




12 






2.790 
5.806 
3,840 
26.964 
23.370 












34 
12 






6.926 


.60 




65 

166 
1.101 
1.008 


•• 


•• 


30 










60 




15.678 












194 


60 
2,638 


254 




15.67S 


59,468 


6,670 


187 


68,852 


11.864 


SO. 735 


$0.45 


2,604 
191,348 






6.765 


8,393 


6.197.834 


198,827 


420.867 


253,375 




4,681.645 2.489,258 






26 


68 



All coal consumed at brick plant. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 289 



SIXTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 

Eighth Annual Report. 



Counties— Bond, Clinton, Madison, Marion, St. Clair. 
John Dunlop, Inspector, Centralia. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau oj Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois. 

Sir— In compliance with an act of the General Assembly of this State, de- 
fining the duties of the State inspectors of coal mines, and providing for the 
better preservation of the health and safety of persons employed in the mines 
of the State, I have the honor to herewith submit to yon the eighth annual 
report of the sixth inspection district, for the year ended June 30, 1903. 

The coal producing counties of the district are Bond, Clinton, Madison, 
Marion and St. Clair. 

This report gives tabulated statements by counties, of the number of mines 
operated, the names of companies operating the same, and the postoffiee ad- 
dress of the mines; the depth of coal below the surface, and its thickness; the 
geological number of the seam; a description of the plants of the different 
mines, showing their methods and systems of producing coal; the total out- 
put of all grades of coal and the disposition of the same; the aggregate value 
of the output at the mines; the number of miners and other employes; the 
tonnage mined by hand, also by cutting machines; the number of mines using 
machines and the number of machines in use; the number of kegs of powder 
used in blasting coal; the number of steam boilers used at the mines; the 
number of fatal and non-fatal accidents, and the number of widows and chil- 
dren left dependent. 

The following is a summary taken from the statistical tables' for the fiscal 
year, 1903: 

Number of counties in which coal is produced 6 

Number of mines 113 

Number of new mines H 

Number of abandoned mines g 

Number of shipping: mines 83 

Number of local mines 30 

Total tonnaee 7,734,831 

Tons of mine run 2, 306, 492 

Tons of lump coal 3,867,289 

Tons of other grades 1, 561, 050 

Tons shipped 6,800,290 

— 19 C 



290 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Tons supplied to locomotives 308.984 

Tons sold to local trade 265,172 

Tons consumed and wasted at mines 360,385 

Aggregate value of total product $6,602,775 

Number of miners 5,770 

Number of other employes 2,584 

Total number of employ6s 8,354 

Average number of days of active operation, shipping mines 225 

Number of kegs of powder used for blasting coal 140,383 

Total number of minesusing machines 38 

Number of machines in use 298 

Number of machines operated by electricity 38 

Number of machines operated by compressed air 260 

Total tons cut by machine 3,854.573 

Total tons mined by hand 3,880.258 

Number of motors in use 8 

Number of mines using electric motors 5 

Number of mines using rope haulage 2 

Fatal accidents 32 

Non-fatal accidents losing 30 days time 63 

Number of wives made widows 19 

Number of children made fatherless 57 

Number of tons produced for each fatal accident 241,713 

Number of tons produced for each nonfatal accident 122.775 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 261 

Number of persons employed to each non-fatal accident 133 

The following shows the coal production by counties, with the increase and 
decrease in each, for the years ending June 20, 1902 and 1903: 





Total Output op all, 
Geadks of Coal in Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




1902 


1903 


St. Clair 


2.578,553 

1.956.271 

881,821 

724,462 

100,740 


3.134.679 

2,551.587 

1,002,047 

870,518 

176,000 


556.126 
595.316 
120.226 
146,056 
75.260 




Madison 








niint-fin 




Boii(j 








Total 


6.241.847 


7.734.831 


1.492.984 









The district shows a net increase of 1,492,984 tons, all the counties show 
ing an increase; Madison and St. Clair counties especially, show over half a 
million tons each. 

Complete returns were not obtained from the Sorento Coal company on 
account of a change in the management, the old company retaining all the 
books and records. 

In the summary it will be found that there has been a large increase in the 
amount of machine mined coal, which is almost one-half of the output, while 
for 1902 the machine mined coal was only 35 per cent of the total product. 
The number of mines using machines has increased from 33 for 1902 to 38 in 
1903, and the number of machines has increased from 243 to 296, an increase 
of 53 machines. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 291 

The number of machines operated by compressed air was 258 and by elec- 
tricity 38. In this connection, a decided advantage is gained, where the 
power is electricity in operating mining machines, also in having electricity 
applied to mechanical haulage in the use of electrical motors. The number 
of mines using electric motors at the end of the present year was five, and 
the number of motors in use eight. Other companies are making prepara- 
tions to place motors in their mines. 

Although the district shows an increase in production over last year of 24 
per cent, it will be noticed that the fatal accidents have increased in a much 
greater ratio, the increase being 68 per cent. One of the reasons for this in- 
crease is due to an explosion in the mine at Sandoval, March 31, where eight 
men lost their lives; deducting this number it will be found that the propor- 
tion of fatal accidents to the production of coal would be small, and the ratio 
per 1,000 persons employed would only be four-tenths of an increase over 
last year. I regret to say that the cause of a large number of lives that have 
been sacrificed in the mines in the past year can be traced to carelessness on 
the part of the persons themselves and a lack of discipline. The rules and 
regulations in operating mines are openly violated, as a close perusal into 
the cause of the accidents will show. 

Condition op the Mines. 

In making examinations of the mines during the year, one of the greatest 
difl&culties met with is to get those in charge of the mines to have cross-cuts 
put through at the proper distances, as required by law, and in having them 
closed again so that the ventilation can be kept close to the working places. 
There are very few exceptions where I have examined a mine, that this re- 
quirement is not included in my recommendations. 

Daring the last year a great deal of my time has been taken up in examin- 
ing scales; my greatest trouble has been where the scales are not accurate, 
sometimes one of the corners of the table will weigh from five to ten pounds 
heavy or light, and the demand will be made to have it weigh correctly; at 
the same time an agreement has been made, that no less than 50 pounds shall 
be placed to the credit of the persons sending out the coal. In other words, 
where scales show over 25 pounds and less than 75 pounds the miner is given 
50 pounds. 

Improvements. 

The Staunton Coal Co., Madison county, has put in a 22foot fan at its No. 
1 mine, which has more than doubled the quantity of air. The company has 
also placed two new boilers, 6x18 feet, having 70 three inch flues; prepara- 
tions are also being made to put in electric haulage. 

The Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co. are making preparations to install elec- 
tric haulage. 

The Johnson Coal Co., Marissa, St. Clair county, has put in electric haul- 
age. 

The Breese Coal Co. at Breese, Clinton county, has put in two electric 
motors and are placing a 20-foot fan to increase the ventilation. 



292 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The Sandoval Coal Co., Sandoval, Marion county, has put in tail-rope haul- 
age at their No. 1 mine. The company has commenced operations putting 
up a steel tipple at its No. 2 mine, anda20-£oot fan has also been put in this 
mine. 

The Oak Hill Coal Co., Belleville, St. Clair county, has rebuilt the top 
works at its mine. 

The Dutch Hollow Coal Co., Freeburg, St. Clair county, has leased the 
mine of the Advance Coal Co. at Marissa, and bought.the Oakland Coal Co.'s 
mine, Belleville. The mines are still known and operated under the old 
name. 

New MiNfis. 

The Staunton Coal Co. is sinking its No. 2 mine which is located two miles 
east of the No. 1 shaft. 

The Lumaghi Coal Co., Collinsville, has sunk a new mine at that place. 
It is known as No. 3. The company contemplate putting up a steel tipple at 
this mine. 

The DeCamp Fuel Co. of St. Louis, Missouri, is sinking a new shaft two 
miles south of Staunton in Madison county, located on the Wabash railway. 

The old mine known as McDonald, located one mile north of Worden, 
Madison county, which was formerly leased by the Consolidated Coal Co, and 
abandoned five years ago, has been reopened by the Inter-State Coal Co., 
Worden. All the top works have been rebuilt; the old top works were 
burned down a few years ago. The company hasjnstalled mining machines 
opeiated by compressed air. J. B. Rutledge, president of the Trenton Coal 
Co. , Trenton, Clinton county, is also president of this new company. 

Joseph Taylor is sinking a new shaft one mile south of his Mentor mine, 
O'Fallon, St. Clair county, located on the East St. Louis & O'Fallon Electric 
railway. 

The Kolb Coal Co., Mascoutah, St. Clair county, is sinking a new shaft 
one mile west of Lenzburg, located on the Illinois Central railroad; this 
makes three mines for the company in this district. 

John Maule, Belleville, St. Clair county, has commenced sinking a new 
shaft near Shiloh, four miles east of Belleville, located on the Southern rail- 
way. 

Mr. Meeker of Marissa, has commenced sinking a shaft two miles south of 
White Oak, St. Clair county, located on the Illinois Central railroad. 

A new company known as the Buxton Coal Co. have commenced sinking a 
shaft at Buxton, Clinton county. If conditions prove to be favorable, the 
shaft now being put down will be used as the escapement shaft. 

The Beatty Coal Co., Mascoutah, St. Clair county, has sunk a shaft on the 
Louisville & Nashville railroad, two miles west of Mascoutah; the depth is 
90 feet, thickness of coal 6X feet. It is intended as a machine mine. The 
company has installed new air compressors and have also put in three min- 
ing machines, one each— Harrison, Sullivan and Ingersoll. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 298 



Blast Explosion. 



This explosion occurred in the mine of the Sandoval Coal Co., at Sandoval, 
Marion county, March 31, 1903, killing eight noen. The explosion originated 
in the 5th west entry; the hole had been drilled, charged and fired by the 
night shift. When the shot was fired the tamping was blown out without 
bringing down any coal. John Gichino, one of the victims of this explosion, 
was on the day shift and was told by his partner about the shot; Gichino 
then drilled the hole deeper, making it six feet and seven inches in depth. 
Tbe hole was charged almost full of powder, as a cartridge 12 inches in length 
was found in the cross-cut. It was estimated that nearly 12 pounds of powder 
was used in this shot, and it was charged in the solid coai. When the shot 
was fired it blew out the tamping and caused the explosion. The force of 
this shot did not make a crack in the coal. When it is considered that the 
potential energy of one pound of powder is equal to 480-foot tons, it can 
readily be understood the force and destruction that would follow the explod- 
ing of ten or 12 pounds of powder when fired out of a hole facing a roadway. 
All the men killed and injured by this shot were on the entry, in direct line of 
the force from the shot, which accounts for the large number killed; most of 
the men killed were on their way to the bottom of the shaft. Three of the 
men killed were sitting at the entrance of the entry where the explosion oc- 
curred, the stoppings on each side of the trap door were blown on to them, 
killing one instantly, one lived two hours, the other eight days; five were 
brought out dead. Three drivers were severely injured by this explosion, 
losing three months' time. Suits were entered against the company for 
damages, aggregating $69,000, but agreements having been made all suits 
were withdrawn. 



294 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



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COAL IN ILLINOIS. 295 

Fatal Accidents. 

July 25, 1902, J. L. Baker, miner, aged 38 years, married, employed in the 
No. 3 mine of Pittenger & Davis Mining & Mfg. Co., Centralia, was killed by 
a fall of slate at the face of his room. He leaves a widow and four children. 

July 26, 1902, Ed, J. Long, miner, aged 35 years, married, employed in the 
Abbey Mine No. 3 of the Consolidated Coal Co., CoUipsville, was killed by a 
fall of slate. He leaves a widow and two children. 

Aug. 22, 1902, William Painer, driver, aged 22 years, married, employed in 
the Rentchler mine of the Missouri & Illinois Coal Co., was jammed between 
his trip and a car that had become uncoupled from a trip going out to the bot- 
tom of the shaft ahead of him. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Aug. 27, 1902, William Heinckel, machine helper, aged 25 years, single, 
employed in mine No. 2 of the Muren Coal & Ice Co., New Baden, Clinton 
county, while assisting the machine runner to undercut the coal in a room 
that had been partially shot, some loose coal gave way, falling on him, 
breaking his back. He died 63 days after the accident. 

Sept. 17, 1902, Matthew Weimer, miner, aged 59 years, married, employed 
in the "Nigger Hollow" mine, operated by the St. Louis & O'Fallon Coal 
Co., Belleville, was killed by a fall of slate. He leaves a widow and six 
children dependent. 

Oct. 2, 1902, Reece Evans, assistant miner, aged 15 years, employed in 
mine No. 3 of the Donk Bros. Goal & Coke Co., Troy, Madison county, fell 
from the ascending cage, falling to the bottom of the shaft; there were men 
on the cage at the same time, but did not notice him fall, and never missed 
him until getting off at the top landing. 

Oct. 10, 1902, Fred Wieserman, miner, aged 37 years, single, employed at 
Donk Bros. Coal Co.'s No. 1 mine, Donkville, Madison county, was killed by 
a fall of slate at the face of his room. 

Nov. 5, 1902, Joseph Lesher, miner, aged 18 years, single, employed in the 
"Nigger Hollow" mine of the St. Louis & O'Fallon Goal Co., Belleville, 
while drilling a shot that had misfired, his drill coming in contact with 
sulphur in the coal, the powder was ignited, causing the shot to explode burn- 
ing and injuring him by flying coal, causing his death. 

Nov. 8, 1902, Charles Becker, a miner, aged 45 years, married^ employed 
in the Green Mount mine, Belleville, operated by the Consolidated Coal Co., 
was killed by a fall of slate. He leaves a widow and six children. 

Jan. 10, 1903, G. B. Harris, miner, aged 42 years, married, employed by 
the Odin Coal Co., Odin, Marion county, was killed by a fall of coal. He 
tried to wedge the coal down, but had stopped working and commenced load- 
ing his car,. when the coal gave way, and caught him. He leaves a widow 
and five children. 

Jan. 13, 1903, Joseph Smith, miner, aged 21 years, single, employed in the 
mine of the Consolidated Coal Co., Breese, Clinton county, was killed by a 
fall of sulphur rock, a short distance from the face of his room. He was a 
son of Mine Manager Felix Smith of that place. 



296 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Jan. 14, 1903, Ed. Bayles, eager, aged 45 years, employed in the Staunton 
€oal Co.'s No. 1 mine, Staunton, Macoupin county, while putting a car of 
coal on the cage, it went ofE of the rails; he went on to the cage to replace 
the car, and while doing so the engineer hoisted the cage. Deceased was 
caught between the cage and side of the shaft, and dragged for a distance of 
80 feet. When the cage was signaled to stop the body fell to the bottom of 
the shaft, breaking three boards that covered the bottom of the shaft, killing 
him instantly. He leaves a widow and two children. 

Jan. 15, 1903, John Hassel, miner, aged 24 years, single, employed in the 
Oakland mine of the Oakland Coal Co., Belleville, was killed by a fall of 
rock.. 

Jan. 15, 1903, Benjamin Allen, miner, aged 32 years, married, employed in 
the Rubey mine of the Rubey Coal Co., near Caseyville, while mining coal 
on the top that had been shot, the slate gave way, falling on him causing his 
death. He leaves a widow and one child. 

Jan. 20, 1903, (George Sartarn, miner, aged 41 years, married, employed in 
the Wilderman mine of the Missouri & Illinois Coal Co., Belleville, was killed 
by flying coal from a shot. He was on his way home, was traveling through 
the back entry; when exactly opposite where a shot had been prepared in a 
room running parallel with the entry a piece of coal struck him on the head. 
The hole had been drilled almost through the pillar. He leaves a widow and 
three children. 

Jan. 23, 1903, August Weisenger, miner, aged 27 years, married, employed 
in Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co.'s No. 1 mine, Donkville, met his death by 
being electrocuted. He had been in the habit of fastening empty powder 
kegs with wire to a live electric wire. This time when coming out of his 
room, he had forgotten that he had attached a keg to the live wire, he sat 
down on the keg, falling backward, bringing his head in connection with a 
return wire, thus making a short circuit; when found by his companion he 
was dead. He leaves a widow. 

March 4, 1903, Frank Flidel, miner, aged 47 years, married, employed in 
the Staunton Coal Co.'s mine No. 1, Staunton, Madison county, was killed 
by a fall of clod and coal at the face of his room. He leaves a widow. 

March 5, 1903, Everett Turner, miner, aged 22 years, married, employed 
in the mine of the Odin Coal Co., Odin, Marion county, was killed by a fall 
of slate at the face of his room. He leaves a widow, 

March 9, 1903, George Brendle, miner, aged 49 years, married, employed 
in the Donk Bros. Coal & Coke Co.'s No. 3 mine, at Troy, Madison county, 
was killed while mining off a standing shot He mined into a slip in the roof, 
thus cutting away the support, the roof gave way, falling on him^ causing his 
death. He leaves six children dependent. 

March 31, 1904, L. F. Lemay, miner, aged 45 years, married, leaves a 
widow and five children; Henry Newhouse, miner, aged 19 years, single; 
Albert Newhouse, miner, aged 50 years, married, leaves a widow and three 
children; Charles Lewis, miner, aged 36 years, married, leaves a widow and 
two children; Frank Dairo, miner, aged 38 years, married, leaves a widow 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 297 

and two children; John Gichino, miner, aged 30 years, single; Joe Bianco, 
miner, aged 35 years; single; John Bartels, miner, aged 29 years, married, 
leaves a widow and two children. 

These eight miners were killed by the explosion of a blown- out shot, in the 
mine of the Sandoval Coal Co., Sandoval, Marion county. 

April 13, 1903, Jesse Phillips, driver, aged 18 years, single, employed in 
the Staunton Coal Co.'s No. 1 mine, Staunton, Macoupin county, was killed 
while bringing out a trip. Deceased was sitting on the front end of the car, com- 
ing to a low place on the entry where he should have gotten off of the car, 
he was jammed between the car and roof. He was dead when found. 

April 18, 1903, John Thomas, miner, aged 41 years, married, employed in 
the mine, operated by the Royal Coal Co., Belleville, St. Clair county, was 
killed by a fall of coal at the face of his room. He leaves a widow. 

May 1, 1903, Richard Thompson, miner, aged 40 years, married, employed 
in the Madison Coal Co.'s No. 4 mine, Glen Carbon, Madison county, was in- 
stantly killed while loading a car of coal at the face of his room; a piece of 
clod weighing nearly 2,000 pounds fell on him. He leaves a widow and five 
children. 

May 20, 1903, Jos. Beattie, shooter, aged 32 years, married, employed in 
the "Nigger Hollow" mine, operated by the St. Louis & O'Fallon Coal Co., 
Belleville, St. Clair county, was killed by a premature shot. He leaves a 
widow and three children. 

May 25, 1903, F. Messinger, tracklayer, aged 62 years, married, employed 
in the Madison Coal company's No. 4 mine. Glen Carbon, Madison county, 
was fatally injured by being jammed between empty pit-cars. He died June 
1, 1903, and leaves a widow. 

June 4, 1903, Louis Beckemeyer, engineer, aged 19 years, single, was killed by 
the falling of a bucket full of rock and clay, which was being hoisted out of the 
shaft of a new mine being sunk by the Buxton Coal company, Buxton, Clin- 
ton county. The engineer was hoisting a bucket full of dirt to the top, and 
before the top man had shoved the truck under the tub, the engineer had 
lowered the tub, striking the end of the truck, which tilted, causing the 
contents of the tub to fall back into the shaft, which was 200 feet deep, with 
the result stated. The deceased was a son of August Beckemeyer, president 
of the company, and was to be employed as an engineer, but as the law re- 
quires that engineers must hold a certificate, a certificated engineer was em- 
ployed and in charge. Deceased had gone down the shaft to assist the men 
at the bottom; this was the first time he had gone down the shaft. 

Rudolph Kramer was severely injured by the same accident. 
Respectfully submitted, 

John Dunlop, 
State Inspector of Mines, Sixth District, Centralia. 



298 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fatal Casualties —Sixth District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


i 

< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


05 




a 
£ 

2 






Cause of Accident. 


1902 
July 25 


J. L. Baker 


38 
35 
22 
25 
59 
15 
37 

11 

42 
21 
46 
24 

i 

47 
22 
49 
45 
19 
50 
36 
38 
30 
35 
29 
18 
41 
40 
32 
62 
19 


Driver 

M. helper... 

Miner 

.. do 

:: 3; :::::::: 

.. do 


Central City 
CollinsvUle. 
Mascoutah.. 
New Baden. 
Belleville... 
Troy 


1 
1 

1 

i 




4 

2 

'6 


i 

'i 

1 
1 

•• 

i 
i 

"1 

1 

i 

i 
10 


4 

? 

'4 

"4 

6 

"3 

'2 
4 

1 

1 
1 
6 
6 

4 
3 
3 

■3 

'6 
4 

1 

70 


Falling slate 


26 


Ed. J Long 


.do 


Aug. 22 




Pit car 


27 


Wm. Heinckel 


Falling coal 


Sept.l7 


Matthew Weimer 

Reece Evans 


Falling slate .. 


Oct 2 


Falling cage 


10 


Fred Wiesernaan 


DonkvUle .. 
Belleville... 


'i 
1 




3 
5 


Falling slate 


Nov. 5 




8 




Falling slate 


1903 
Jan. 10 


G. B. Harris 


..do 

.. do 

.. do 

::S :::::::: 

.. do 

::^S :::::::: 

.. do 

..do 

.. do 

.. do 


Odin 

Breese.. 


Falling coal 


13 


J as Smith 


Falling slate 






Staunton... 
Ward Stat'n 
Casey ville.. 
Belleville... 
Collinaville. 
Staunton. 1. 

Odin 

Troy 

Sandoval... 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




2 

i 

:■ 

■9 

5 




15 


John Hassel . . ..... 


Falling rock 


15 


Benj. Allen 


Falling slate 


20 


Geo. Sartarn 


Flying coal 


Mar. "i 
5 
9 


Aug. Welsenger 

Frank Flidel 

Everett Turner 

Geo. Brendle .... 


Electrocuted 

Palling clod and coal. 

Falling slate 

Falling soapstone.... 


31 






31 


Henry Newhouse 

Albert Newhouse 

Chas Lewis 




31 


.. do 


.. do 


1 

I 




3 


.. do 


31 


do 


. do 


.do 


31 




.. do 


.. do 


.. do 


31 


John Gichlno 


. do 


.. do 


.. do 


31 


Joe Bianco 


do 


.. do .. 








..do 


31 




.. do 

Driver 

Miner 

.. do 

Shooter 

Tracklayer. 
Engineer ... 


.. do 

Staunton ... 
Belleville... 
Glen Carbon 
Belleville... 
Glen Carbon 


1 

'i 

1 
1 

1 




2 

'5 
3 


"do:::::::::::::::::: 


Apr. 13 

18 


Jesse Philipps 

John Thomas 


Pit car and roof 

Falling coal . ... .. 


May 1 


Rich Thompson 

Jos. Seattle 




20 


Premature blast 


25 


Ferd Messinger 

Louis Bekemeyer* 

Total— 30 


Pit cars 










22 


19 


57 


hoisting bucket.... 













Not Included la other tables. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Accidents— Sixth District — 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty, [no. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Central City 


1 
2 

1 

\ 

1 
2 

\ 

1 
1 
8 
2 

32 


Miners 

Drivers 

Mach. helper.. 

Shooter 

Track layer .. 


27 

2 
1 

1 
1 

32 


Falling slate 


9 
32 


Pittenger & Davis No. 3 

AbbyNo.3 

Renchler Mining Co .... 
Muren Coal Co 




CollinsvUle .. 






Mascoutah .. . . 


Falling rock 




New Baden... 


Falling soapstone.... 
Falling clod 




Belleville 


St. L. &0'FallonC. Co. 










Donkville .... 


Cage 


Donk's No. 1 




Odin 


Premature shot 


Green Mt. Coal Co 

Odin Coal Co 








Staunton 


Explosion 


Consolidated Coal Co... 
Staunton No- 1 




Ward Station. 






Caseyville.... 


Oakland Coal Co 




Glenn Carbon 


WildemanCoal Co 

Sandoval Coal Co 




Total 


Madison Coal Ca. No. 4 . 


2 













COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



299 



Non-Fatal Casualties— Sixth District — July 1, 1903. 



Name. 



Character and Cause 
of Injury. 



1S02 
July 11 
14 
14 
14 
16 

23 

24 

24 
24 

Aug. 19 
27 

Sept.15 
18 
27 



Oct. 



John Globmeyer. 

Hy Bieble 

Fred Kuhn 

Albert Kohler.... 
Jos. Hellrusey ... 

Roy Gammon .... 

Wm. Giles 



Hy Beacorly 

Joseph Charley .. 
Richard Myrtle... 

W. Ricks 

G. Burton 

Chas. Bodhenski. 
D. Q. Morrell 



Frank Lusch 



24 

29 

31 

Nov. 1 



5 

7 

21 

Dec. 19 

20 
22 
26 
29 
30 
1903 
Jan. 13 
14 
14 
19 

19 



Hy Dietrich 

Sam Blattner .... 

A. Linzen , 

Adam Meter 

Jos. Boggs 



A. Podesto 

James Louis 

Hy Rueter 

Hy Tucker 



Wm. Curtis .. 
Ed Taylor.... 
John Welser 



M. M. Lee ...., 

Ben Forsyth.' 

T. Lacesa 

Wm. Needier. 
August Fox .. 
Dominlck Qerdlla 
Jos. Folts 



Clarence Llttrell 
Frank Sturge .... 

Wm. Bub 

Henry Foppe 



A. C. Jones 



Feb. 



Apr. 



Jack Grantume.. 
Stanley Hawley. 

John Stahl 

Evan Patriot.... 



Sam Randolph. 



Martin Flatman. 
Albert Zether... 



Frank Day 



Hy Wheeler 

Wm. McFadden. 
Fred Backes 



Mascoutah.. 
Rentchler .. 
Belleville... 

Marlssa 

Collinsville. 



Odin 



Collinsville. 

Staunton ... 
Trenton .... 
Central City 
New Baden. 
Staunton ... 
New Baden. 
Donkville .. 



Odin 

Belleville... 
Preeburgr ... 
Centralla ... 
Glen Carbon 
Donkville .. 

.. do 

Edw'rdsv'le 
Centralia.... 
Belleville... 



Odin 

Centralla 
Lenz Statl'n 

Freeburg., 



Centralia.... 
Donkville.. 

.. do 

Collinsville 

Troy 

Rentchler . 



Centralia 
Staunton ... 
.. do .... 
Germant'wn 



Odin.... 

Collinsville. 

Odin 

Centralia.. 
Belleville. 



Centralia.. 



.. do 

Freeburg , 



Sandoval . 



.. do 

.. do 

Centralia . 



Leg broken; falling rock... 

Body bruised; pit cars 

Foot Injured; pit cars 

Body injured; falling coal.... 
Ankle Injured; jumping into 

car 

Body Injured; pit car and 

props 

Face and hand burned; ex- 
plosion of gas 

Body Injured; pit cars 

Foot Injured; pit car 

Body injured; falling slate... 
Leg injured; falling coal .... 
Foot injured; electric machine 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Spinal cord injured; falling 

clod 

Finger amputated; falling 

slate 

Ribs broken; falling coal 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Body burned; gases from shot 
Leg broken; fallin? coal.. 
Fingers amputated; pit car 

and rail 

Leg broken; falling coal... 
Leg fractured: flying coal. 
Hip injured; flying coal ... 
Finger amputated; falling 

slate 

Ankle broken; falling coal ... 
Hand mashed between pit cars 
Ankle fractured; falling coal 

and slate 

Leg fractured; thrown from 

pit car 

Foot injured; trip of cars .... 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Foot crushed; loaded pit cars 

Leg broken; tail chain 

Leg broken; falling clod 

Collar bone broken; pit cars.. 



Arm injured; pit cars 

Back Injured; lifting car.. 

Body injured; cage 

Back and ribs injured; falling 

slate 

Face and hands injured; drill 

Ing out a shot 

Leg broken; pushing pit car. 

Foot injured; motor 

Leg broken; falling coal 

Arm broken; mule and pit 

cars 

Arm broken; knocked down by 

windy shot 

Body Injured; windy shot.... 
Leg and knee injured; fall 

ing slate 

Body burned; explosion; bad 

shot 

.. do 

.. do . 

Body Injured between car and 

rib 

Finger amputation; electric 

machine 



300 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Casualties — Sixth District — July 1, 1903 — Concluded. 



Date. 


Name. 




Residence. 


a 


a 


i 

2 


a 
® 

z 


Character and cause of 
injury. 


I 

2 


May 8 
12 
13 
14 
20 
23 


?o^s^.-KZn;::: 

Chas. French 

Mose Perry 

Qeo. Snodgraas.. 
I. Handoleso 

John Shields 

H. Arrowsmith .. 


53 
47 
45 
30 
26 
41 

25 
24 
23 
40 
21 
32 


Edw'rdsv'le 
Centralia... 

.. do 

.. do 

Sandoval... 
Staunton ... 

Centralia... 

Odin 

Glen Carbon 

.. do 

Belleville... 
.. do 


1 

1 
1 

"i 
.... 

1 
1 

34 


1 
"i 

~l9 


7 
3 

2 

■"2 

"3 

■"8 
73 


8 
4 
3 
3 

1 
3 

.... 

"4 

1 
9 

106 


Hand injured; falling slate... 
Foot Injured; falling slate... . 

Leg injured; falling rock 

Body injured between cars ... 

Body injured; falling slate... 

Head and Internal injuries; 

falling slate 


40 
35 

75 
30 
20 

40 


June 5 
8 
16 


Leg broken falling from trip. 
Ankle injured; falling coal... 
Body injured; falling coal.... 
. do . 


* 

20 
30 


16 


John Vitkooke... 
M. Haflfstatter.... 
Frank Finklein .. 

Totals 


40 


25 
29 


Jawbone fractured; pit cars. 
Collar bone broken; pitcars.. 


40 
30 

2972 















Total men injured 


63 


Not recovered July 1, 1903*... 


2 




61 


Time lost by men recovered 


2,972 days 




48.7 







Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Accidents — Sixth District — 1903. 



Residence. No. Occupation. No Nature of Casualty. No 



Mascoutah ... 

Rentchler 

Belleville 

Marissa 

Collinsville... 

Odin... 

Staunton 

Trenton 

Central City.. 
New Baden... 

Donkville 

Freeburg 

Centralia 

Glen Carbon.. 
Lenz Station. 

Troy 

Germantown., 
Edwardsville, 
Sandoval 



Miners 

Drivers 

Mine ex'min'r 
Mach. runner. 
Mach. helper. 
Trip rider .... 

Laborer 

Cage helper .. 
Stable boss... 

Motorman 

Track layer. . . 



Falling rock 

Loaded trip 

Cars 

Falling coal 

Gas explosion 

Falling slate 

Electric machine 

Falling clod 

Flying coal 

Spraging 

Cage 

Drilling shot 

Shot explosion ... 

Motor 

Windy shot 



St. Clair Co. C. Co 

Sandoval C. Co 

Odin C. Co 

Madison C. Co. No. 3.... 
Pittenger & Davis, No. 3 
Centralia M. & Mfg. Co.. 

No.2 

Staunton C. Co. No. 1... 
Madison C. Co. No. 4.... 

Royal C. Co 

Summit C. Co 

Heppard C. Co. No. 2.... 
Pittinger& Davis, No. 4. 
Lumaghi C. Co. No. 2 ... 

Germantown C. Co 

Rentchler C. Co 

Con. Coal Co 

Abby Coal Co. No. 3 

DonkCoalCo. No. 1 

Sunlight C. Co 

Madison C. Co. No. 7 — 
Dutch Hollow Coal Co.. 

Highland Coal Co 

Muren Coal Co 

Centralia M. & Mfg. Co., 

No. 4 

Borders Coal Co 

Pittsburg Coal Co 

Lumaghi C. Co. No. 4... 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



301 



Recap itulaiion of Non-Fatal Casualties, Nature of Iv juries, 
Covjugal Relations and Time Lost— Sixth District — 1903. 





.a 

s 

9 


"6 

a 


in 
a 


a 

1 


Time Lost. 


Per 
cent of 


Nature of Injuries. 


Total 
d»y«. 


Aver- 
age 
days, 


in- 
juries. 




12 

4 
13 
7 
3 
6 
3 
1 
4 

2 
2 
4 

1 




7 

"7 
4 

"2 
1 

■"3 
'"3 


10 
10 
IC 
13 
11 
15 
2 
4 
7 
1 
9 

10 
1 
3 


610 
177 
770 
235 
200 
207 
120 
150 
135 
174 
70 
60 
124 
40 


42.6 
44.1 

59.3 
33.4 
66.6 
34.3 
40.0 

150.0 
33.3 

174.0 
35.0 
30.0 
31.1 
40.0 


1»0 




6.3 


Body 


20.6 




11.1 




4.7 


Ankle 


9.5 




4.7 


Spine -•-• 


1.6 




6.3 




1.5 




3.1 


Collar bone 


3.1 




6.3 


ffl";::::::::;;"::":""::::"::::::::::::::::::::::. 


1.5 


Total 


~63 


36 


~37 


106 


2.972 


46.3 


100.0 







302 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Bond County — Sixth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFPICE 

Address of 
Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


i 
i 


H 


g 

i 


a 

5 


til 
Ed 


1 


1 




SHIPPING MINK. 

Sorento Coal Ccal Co 

Totals .. .. 


Sorento 


176,000 


59.750 


93,000 






23 250 












176.000 


59.750 


93.000 






23 250 















Mines in 1902, 1. 
Mines in 1903. 1. 



Clinton County — Sixth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice 
Address 
OF Mink. 




Output of Mine in Tons. 




1 

a 

a 
z 


1 


d 
g 

1 


Pi 

1 


tt 

til 


s 
'Z 


St 
a 


1 

?, 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Breese Coal & Mfg. Co... 


Breese 

Colllnsville .. 
New Baden... 

Trenton 

.. do 


231,001 
195, 743 
194,276 
140,452 
83, 970 
25.076 


118,173 
146,927 

■"i,'945 
9,055 


58,582 
34.702 
154,682 
98.316 
57.334 
6,630 


■"i,"242 

1.471 


24.026 
468 
16.437 
11.236 
550 
1.080 


30.220 
13. 646 


3 
4 


Muren Coal & Ice Co 


23. 157 
30.900 


5 




22.899 


6 


Qermantown Coal Co 

Totals 


Qermantown.. 


6.840 




870, 518 


276, 100 


410,246 


2.713 


53,797 


127. 662 











Mines in 1902, 6. 
Mines in 1903, 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



303 



Bond County — Sixth District — Concluded. 



■3 



Employes. 


Disposition of 
Odtput. 


a 

1 



<B 

i 

1 


1 

s 
1 

a 

1 


a 
2 

bg . 

il 

S§ 

Oh 


11 

1 

11 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 




a 

II 


a . 

1! 

> 

< 


1 

a 


■3 

1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


2 

|1 


1" 

h 
i|| 

ill 

Eh 


■5 

! 



i 


§ 
! 

Il 

2; 


i 


$169. 141 


108 


72 


180 


168.000 


4,000 


4,000 


250 




$0 4312 


1,760 






1 








$169,141 


108 


72 


180 


168.000 


4,000 


4,000 


250 






1.760 


.... 


.... 











Clinton County — Sixth District — Concluded. 























1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


1 






d 





Acci- 
dents. 





















1 


P 


as 










" 




Bd on 

ship 

sup- 

ocomo 

ine. 


« 


"S* 










1 

a . 


1 









t-. 







0) q 


il 


•3 


a 


a 




II 


11 

ga 


a 

1 


. 


ons load 
cars for 
ment an<3 
plied to 1 
tives at m 




ill 

a 

no.3 





a 

a 


i 


11 




a 




11 


1 

a 




>© 






S-S 


oe83 







tja 






a<H 


s 


< 


<! 


-Sj 


H 


^ 


H 


Ch 


Q 


H 


cl, 


•z 


•z 


z 


z 


$184,259 


175 


30 


205 


221.601 


7.000 


2,4C0 


300 


231,001 


$0 55 


5,000 






1 


163,601 


150 


40 


190 


188.561 


2.047 


5,135 


207 


195,743 


49 


4,18H 






2 


174, 779 


120 
100 


36 

70 


156 
170 


174,832 
115.235 


1.350 
1,000 


18.091 
24,217 


290 
222 






2,400 
SOO 




2 


'^ 


135,992 


2,366 


54 


4 


69,692 


82 
60 


53 
25 


135 

85 


69,974 
20.306 


2,005 
980 


11.991 
3.790 


202 
146 






515 
1,200 




■'"i 


F) 


17,363 


25, 076 


54 


6 


$745,686 


687 


254 


941 


790,500 


14.382 


65.627 


228 


454,120 


$0 50.8 


13, 104 




3 





304 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Madison County — Sixth District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Odtpdt of Mine in Tons. 




1 

a 


i 


i 
§ 


a 
5 


be 


i 


Si 

a 


1 
2 
3 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

Donk Bros. C. & C. Co., 1 

Staunton Coal Co., 1 

Madison Coal Co.. 2 

Madison Coal Co.. 4 

Donk Bros. Co. Co. Co.. 3 

Lumaghl Coal Co., 3 

Donk Bros. Co. Co. Co.. 2 
Con. Coal Co.. Abbey, 3.. 
Con. C. Co., Heinz Bluff. 
KernsDonnlewald C.C, 1 

Henrietta Coal Co 

Madison Coal Co.. 3 

Con. Coal Co., Brookside 

Lumaffhi Coal Co., 1 

Terminal Coal Co 

Interstate Coal & Mg. Co. 
The Clover Coal Mg. Co . 

Totals 

LOCAL MINES. 

Edwardsvllle Home 
Trade Coal Co 


Collinsville .. 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon.. 
.. do 


393,800 
301.643 
253.301 
252.479 
236,300 
217,802 
196.200 
139,063 
129.670 
120,982 
56,630 
112.262 
50.826 
49,643 
4,796 
3,000 
1,210 

2,522.607 


65.900 
59.762 
6.414 
94,174 
60. 300 
12,246 
60, 700 
74. 942 
84. 197 
16,480 

"i'sie 

33 
17,113 

4,556 

■"i,'2i6 

562,343 


194, 100 
168,937 
177,539 
107,248 
120,400 
153,675 
79,800 
43,389 
32,674 
71,073 
35, 120 
81,573 
31,762 
25,341 


744 

310 

■■■i,*420 

291 

693 


6,200 
24,307 
414 
401 
5,070 
6,867 
2,100 
8,641 
6.132 

lo! 190 
1.078 
4.712 
3,230 


127,600 
51,637 
68.190 
50. 346 


5 


Troy 


50,530 


6 

7 

^ 


Collinsville .. 

.. do 

.do . 


43,594 
53, 600 
12.091 




"do::::;;;;:: 


6.667 


10 

11 


Worden 

Edwardsvllle. 
.. do 


22.469 
11.320 

25,004 






13, 626 


14 

Ifi 


Collinsville .. 
Edwardsvllle. 

Worden 

New Douglas. 

Edwardsvllle. 
Collinsville .. 
North Alton.. 
.. do 


3,969 
240 


16 


1,800 




800 


400 




1,324,431 


3,458 


91.102 


641,273 


1 


9.800 
5.049 
2,210 
2,000 
1,400 
1,281 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,080 
1,000 
1.000 
360 
200 

28.980 


6,660 
3,644 
2,210 
2,000 
1,400 
1,281 
1,200 
1,200 
l,iOO 
1,080 
1,000 
1.000 
360 
200 

24.435 






668 
1,016 


2.572 


■> 


Bullock Coal Co 






390 


g 






















6 




Moro 










Wr>i Rar»k«i 


Carpenter .... 

Bethalto 

do 










7 
8 






















Peter Svdall 


North Alton.. 
Fosterburg... 






















11 












John E Mitchell 


Prairietown .. 
Opper Alton.. 










13 
14 


IT T? FrnHprinkQ 




















Totals 









1.583 


2,962 




TotalB-3l mines.. 




2,651.587 


686.778 


1,321.331 


3,458 


92,685 


431,213 



Mines in 1902, 28. 
New mines, 7. 
Abandoned mines. 4. 
Mines in 1903. 31. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



305 



Madison County — Sixth District — Concluded. 



o 


Employes. 


Disposition 
Output 


OF 


1 
d 
.2 

1 ! 

1 
>> 

1 ^ 


1 

1 

s 
s 

a 


[1 

i- 
II 


!i 
ill 

ill 

a a 


Acci- 
dents, 




01 

a 

1 

U 
11 




1 


^ 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 


F 

111 


o 

1 

s 

p 


a 


a 



ii 


1 
i 


$295,480 
228. 534 


316 
211 
140 
150 
190 
140 

.« 

85 
42 
97 

6 
15 

6 


136 
102 
67 
50 
124 
102 
103 
76 
48 
44 
17 
61 
26 
33 
6 
17 
4 


452 
313 
207 
200 
314 
242 
210 

III 

'11 
146 
68 
130 
12 
32 
10 


387.680 
296,376 
228.981 
237,255 
2;i7,900 
215.162 
188,700 
123.003 
123,278 
116.422 
103,224 
45,067 
44.22C 
45. 137 
4,556 
2,640 
475 


120 
2,108 
3,509 

■■'i'soo 
"■■i,"566 

4,223 
483 
2,455 
2,975 
9,763 
3,648 
3.240 

404 


6,000 
6,160 
20,811 
15,224 
6,600 
2,640 
6,000 
11.837 
6.909 
2,105 
6,063 
1,800 
2.958 
1,266 
240 
360 
331 


26S 
213 
237 
237 
232 
291 
200 
252 
207 
247 
275 
223 
231 
209 
141 


224.400 


, 


8.334 

1.852 

1,565 

1.748 

5,077 

1,860 

8.335 

928 

944 

1,352 

1,054 

1,888 

1,128 

2,231 

191 

150 

100 

38.737 


2 
3 

"2 
2 

10 


6 
6 

"3 

"2 
.... 

■"2 

"i 
1 

21 


1 


187.087 






^ 


209,981 








263,370 
169. 760 


236,300 


* 


6 


156.905 
113.309 


28,848 


* 


7 


108.081 






q 


112.961 
67, 144 

87,408 
47,936 
39, 109 
5,072 
2.520 
2,420 


8,567 
62 
56,630 
50,826 
49.643 
4,796 
3.000 
1,210 


t 

* 

t 

$0 75 
$0 506 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 


$2,087,071 


1.810 


1.016 


2.826 


2,390.075 


36.228 


96.304 


224 


664.282 




$11,201 


12 




18 




8.900 
4.659 
2.210 
2.000 
1.400 
1.281 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 
1,080 
1.000 
1.000 
360 
200 


900 
390 


300 
290 
240 
200 
200 
200 
200 
182 
200 
180 
200 
200 
100 
150 


9.800 
5.049 
2.210 
2.000 
1,400 
1.281 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 
1,080 
1,000 
1,000 
360 
360 


$0 64 
60 

1 25 

1 15 
88 

1 00 
875 
875 

125 
875 
875 
875 

100 
876 


295 
123 


.... 


.... 




6 832 






3,978 






3,600 












2,100 




16 

60 




'.'.'.'. 




1.921 
1.600 






1,600 












2.100 












1 620 




4 
4 

25 

1 




:::: 


in 


1.500 






1.600 




1? 


630 




18 


300 




u 














$40,282 


64 




89 




27.690 


1.290 


202 


29,140 


$0 79 


617 









$2,087,369 


1.874 


1.041 


2.915 


2.390,075 


63.918 


97.594 




693,422 




39.264 


10 


21 





* From July 1, 1902, to April 1, 1903. mining price. 49 cents. From April 1. 1903, to Jaly 
1, 1903. mining price, 55 cents. 

t From July 1. 1902. to April 1. 1093. mining price. 55 cents. From April 1, 1903, to July 
1, 1903, mining price. 61. 

t From July 1. 1902, to April 1, 1903. mining price. 54 cents. From April 1, 1903. to July 
1, 1903, mining price, 60 cents. 



-20 C 



306 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Marion County — Sixth District — 1903. 





Namk of Opkratoe. 


POSTOPFIOK 

Addbess 
OF Mink. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 


3 


a 
g 


1 




4i 




1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Pittenger & Davis M. & 

Mfg. Co.. 3 and 4 

CentrallaM. &M.Co.,2.. 
OHIn Ponl Cn 


Centralia 

.. do 

Odin 


391.176 
272.905 
218.713 
108.016 
5.923 
6.315 

1.002.047 


101.081 
44.837 
57.740 
108.016 
5,923 
6,315 

322.911 


178.949 
167.866 
109.697 


17,165 


8.148 
17.186 

22,981 


86,833 
53.016 
28,392 




SandoTal 

Klnmandy.... 
Salem 




Klnmandy Coal Co 






















446.412 


17,166 


48.318 


167.241 











Mines in 1902, 6. 
Mines in 1903. 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. .807 

Marion County— Sixth District — Concluded. 



5 

2 


















fi 


% 






Ehplotes. 


Disposition 

Output. 


OF 


§ 




§ 


l-i 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 






























o 














(S 


"H 


00 








c 




1 

h 


e 




aded on 
tor ship- 
and sup- 
t> locomo- 
t mine. 


! 


1- 


1 

1 
1 


J3 

n 


i 

2-3 


11 


1 

o 


§ 

a 
o 




at O 


«a 






o-- «« 


o ■ 


0^-2 






139 


K«2 


u 


u 


u 


^b 


ga 


® 

.£3 


"3 


ons 

cars 

ment 

plied 

tives 




c3 a 


o 


a 


e^ 


11 


1 


II 


1 


iaft 






o 




oost! 






■Cja 


DP S 






< 


< 


<! 


H 


H 


H 


H 


a 


^ 


0. 


Z |Z 


Z 


Z 


$310,317 


263 


m 


391 


343,720 


16,666 


30,890 


270 


391,176 


$0 45 


10.487 


1 


10 


1 


225.424 


190 


104 


294 


246. 143 


17.801 


8.961 


255 


272,906 


45 


7.537 




4 


2 


196.426 


167 


13 


2jC 


198,964 


10.860 


8,908 


293 


6.672 


46 


2,121 




7 


3 


108,016 


137 


46 


182 


96,512 


3,498 


8.005 


175 


108.015 


45 


4,043 




4 


4 


7.108 


21 


17 


St 


2.687 


781 


2.466 




5,923 


56 


97 






5 


8,778 


7 


4 


11 


782 


3.253 


1,280 


193 


6.316 


56 


87 


.... 


.... 


6 


$856,059 


765 


381 


1.146 


888.798 


62,749 


60.600 


198 


789. C06 


$0.<52 


24,372 


11 


26 





308 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

St. Clair County — Sixth District — 1903. 





Name op Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 




Output 


OF Mine in Tons. 




1 

2 


i 


i 

1 


a 




4i 


|-1 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Royal Coal Co.. Royal.... 
St. Louis & O'Fallon C.C 
Muren Coal & Ice Co.,1.. 


Belleville 

.. do 


197,300 
150,339 
124,061 
121,243 
117.799 
102.881 
98,076 
97,125 
91,200 
88,796 
81,641 
81,073 
75,653 
70, 770 
69,775 
62,995 
60,9.30 
60,000 
69,200 
67,788 
56,782 
55,000 
51,766 
50,891 
49.324 
49,232 
49.048 
48.476 
48. 101 
48,040 
47,335 
46,985 
46.620 
46.567 
46,235 
45.751 
44,944 
40,19P 
35,118 
34, 125 
32,131 
31,660 
30,255 
28,450 
24,810 
24, 144 
20,000 
20.000 
19,707 
15,062 
12,000 
8,900 
7,143 


37,800 
150,339 
! 24, 061 


136.200 






23. 300 


? 








3 


.. do 










i 


Walnut Hill Coal Co 

KolbCoalCo.l 

Madison Coal Co.. 7 

Missouri* Illinois C.C. 
Joseph Taylor. Mentor... 

GlendaleCoalCo.. 1 

KolbCoalCo..2 

Lenz C. «fe M.C., Harmony 
Joseph Tay lor. Taylor ... 
Lebanon Coal & M. Assn 

HlppardCoal Co., 2 

HlDpard Coal Co.,1 

Belleville &0'FallonC.C. 


:: do .::::: . 


96 692 




12.279 
6.816 
6.173 
9.165 
14.266 
16,900 


12 272 


6 

6 
7 
8 
q 


Mascoutah ... 
Glen Carbon.. 
Rentchler .... 

O'Fallon 

Belleville 

Mascoutah ... 

Belleville 

O'Fallon 

Lebanon 

Belleville 

.. do 


41,681 
21,153 

35,720 
6. 310 


55. 199 
61,327 
51,519 
61,310 
71.800 
71.117 
18.938 
12.365 
62.885 
11.612 
26.660 
18.580 
20.615 
10.000 
27.160 
19.535 
18.583 
22.000 
38.825 
36,358 
35, 131 









11.900 
11.228 

1.682 
15. 180 

6 500 


in 


"■■26,'369 
61,233 

■■■■i6,'989 
33,738 

""3i,'626 


11. 619 


11 






12, 231 


12 
13 
14 


■3,'778 


4,130 
6,011 


3,316 
12.816 
18. 139 


If) 




397 
1,725 


8 980 


16 
17 


..do 

Marissa 

East St. Louis 

Marissa 

Belleville 

.. do 


9.690 
5! 795 


18 


Valley Coal & Mining Co. 
Borders Coal Co 




5,000 
950 


15.000 


19 


22,600 
33,982 
32,651 
is: 000 


8.200 
1.271 


?n 


Oakland Coal Co 


?i 


Summit Coal Co..... 






1 515 


?' 


Ruby Coal Co 


Caseyville.... 

Freeburg 

Belleville 

.. do .. 




8,000 
2.000 


7 000 


?» 


Dutch Hollow Coal Co... 
Con. Coal Co.. Green Mt. 
Con. Coal Co., Gartslde 4. 
Superior Coal & M. Co... 
Skellet Coal Co 


10.911 


'1 


4,831 
5.027 
19,232 
3,195 
16,792 
42,240 
21,744 
7,938 
431 
5,300 
13,311 
16.827 
18.221 
7.852 
7.695 
6.192 
5.215 


9.705 


?f) 






9.166 


?fi 


.. do 






?7 


.. do 


36,661 
20,945 

2,683 
19,796 
30.111 
38.997 
31. 120 
24.412 
23.959 
19.367 
27.999 
28,427 
23. 140 
25,460 
29,240 
10,900 

8.597 
24.300 


**"226 


1.588 
7.630 


7.701 


28 
?9 


O'Fallon Coal & M, Co... 
Con. Coal Co., White Oak 
Chas. Hartman 


O'Fallon 

Marissa 

Belleville 

do . . . 


3.883 
3. 178 


'in 






3 600 


SI 


Con. Coal Co.,Schureman 
Oak Hill Coal Co 






9 256 


3? 


.. do 




2,131 


6.123 


3S 


Tlrre& Sons Coal Co.... 
Mo, &111. C. CFreeburg 


Lenzburg .... 

Belleville 

Marissa 

Belleville 


10. 200 


34 

S5 




7.118 
1.479 


1.696 
1,970 


Ifi 


M. & I. C. C.Wilderman 
Highland Coal Co.. 1 


8,163 


37 




1.313 

1.191 

610 


7.750 


38 
39 


Sunlight Coal Co. 1 

Johnson Coal Co 


Freeburg 

Marissa 

Kentchler .... 

Belleville 

.. do 


2.886 
5.146 


40 


Enterprise Mining Co ... 
Theo.Mlchaels, Pittsburg 
Donk Bros. Coal & C. Co. 
Con. Coal Co.. Richland.. 
Glendale Coal Co.. 2 


3.430 






2.535 
160 


356 


1' 


18. 100 
17.327 

■■■■26.'26i 

2.132 

■■■'n.'ooo 

19.307 
2.032 


2.200 


4? 


do 


1.331 


44 


.. do 






4,160 






.. do 






4,636 


46 


Con. Coal Co., Rose Hill. 


.. do 

Marissa 

Belleville 

do .... 


16,492 
16.000 






eizM 


47 






5,000 










3,000 


49 


Suburban Coal Co .. 








400 


nn 


Lake Superior Coal Co .. 

Mlllstadt Coal Co 

Con. CoalCo..Knecht.... 
Dutch Hill Coal Co 

Totals 


.. do 

Mlllstadt ..... 

Belleville 

New Athens.. 


9.60O 
12.000 
5.180 
5.O0O 






3.630 










59 


2.166 






1,254 


F)3 




2.113 












3.085.279 


1.020.153 


1.687.200 


4,004 


123.395 


350.527 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



309 



St. Clair County — Sixth District — Continued. 



Employks. 




















a 


Qi 




l m 


a 




( h 


s 




ga 




?, 






o 


< 


< 


H 



Disposition 


0, 


d 


OOTPDT. 




3! 




S 


a 


1 


loaded 

for s 

and 

to loco 

at mln 


2 


p. 










si ill 


S£ 


?s^ 


^ 


H 


H 


H 


Q 









o 


* 




a 
o 


'h 


Acci- 
dents. 








00 






O 


o^ 
















II 


S 

OS 


a 




O >i 






-sa 


^n<=l 






11 


ax 


a 


II 


•Cja 


a 3 


3 




cu 


=* 


z 


z 



120 


22 


142 


190. ICO 




7,200 


278 


29, 200 




2.201 


1 


2 


116 


30 


145 


148,329 




2,010 


300 


150.339 


* 


5.018 


3 




85 


26 


110 


114. 161 


2.340 


7,660 


285 


56.230 


* 


1.690 






61 


19 


83 


118.038 


105 


3,100 


264 






1,100 


.... 




73 


26 


99 


105,184 


5.898 


6,717 


294 


81,306 


* 


2,915 


.... 




75 


22 


97 


99.993 


728 


2,160 


2W) 


102,881 


* 


3.016 


.... 


1 


68 


19 


87 


96.206 


188 


1,682 


200 


98,076 


* 


2.296 


1 


3 


76 


26 


101 


89.330 


3.220 


1,575 


22S 


97,125 


* 


2,121 






82 


26 


107 


84.600 


3.100 


6,50C 


225 


21.300 


* 


1,250 






62 


9 


71 


87,596 




1.2CC 


210 


88.796 


* 


2.960 





.... 


6U 


22 


82 


80.541 




1,000 


24C 


17.105 


* 


1.200 






57 


21 


78 


76.568 


3.570 


1,935 


196 


81.073 


* 


2.087 


.... 




60 


40 


100 


65.603 


1.860 


5,200 


21C 






963 


.... 




60 


20 


70 


63.570 




7,200 


200 


35.386 


* 


1.207 




1 


54 


32 


86 


62.278 


980 


6,617 


225 


69.776 


* 


2.111 




.... 


56 


16 


72 


60.489 


9.220 


3,286 


212 


13.890 


» 


1.301 


.... 


.... 


41 


16 


57 


59.576 


729 


625 


193 


60.930 


* 


1,531 






35 


13 


48 


69. 000 




1.000 


200 






600 






38 


12 


60 


55.450 


3.100 


660 


162 


69. 200 


* 


1.805 




il 


47 


18 


65 


55, 260 


221 


2,301 


288 






132 


1 




40 


15 


56 


65.062 


120 


600 


208 


55.782 


» 


1,584 




' 1 


40 


17 


67 


53.000 


200 


1.800 


238 


55.000 


* 


1,760 


1 




4(J 


11 


51 


49.000 


766 


2.000 


200 


51.766 


* 


1,296 




1 


22 


15 


37 


47. 197 


6 


3.691 


240 







311 


i 




14 
21 


8 
18 


22 
42 


44.242 
47. 932 


93 


1.989 
1.300 


236 
225 






312 
653 




.... 






50 


16 


66 


42.981 


610 


6.1^4 


261 


18.596 


* 


797 






61 


18 


69 


45.550 


1.314 


1.582 


192 


17.121 


* 


816 






30 


21 


61 


46.3U3 


114 


2.684 


225 


18.101 


* 


905 


.... 


.... 


27 


8 


36 


43.840 


4.000 


200 


270 


18,010 


* 


616 


.... 




30 


17 


47 


43,718 


161 


3.456 


223 






273 






28 


10 


38 


43, 452 


853 


2.680 


268 


8,040 


» 


630 


.... 




36 


14 


50 


35,220 


9.300 


2.100 


216 


16,620 


* 


1.073 






la 


12 


55 


44,862 


9 


1.696 


172 


16,567 


* 


1.218 




1 


46 


IS 


5S 


42.860 


1.576 


1.800 


180 


20,192 


* 


801 




.... 


29 


12 


41 


13.913 


78 


1.760 


210 


16, 751 


» 


1.30S 


1 




2fc 


13 


41 


39,820 


1.281 


840 


290 


14.911 


* 


929 




i| 


36 


8 


11 


31.607 


1,000 


6.692 


250 


10. 199 




i.too 


.... 


1 


24 


12 


31) 


31.638 




3,480 


250 


3.119 


* 


350 






20 


9 


2S 


33, 215 


150 


730 


228 


34, 125 


* 


960 


.... 




22 


7 


29 


30,165 


1,320 


356 


280 


32, 131 




915 


.... 


i 


50 


21 


71 


30, 40C 




1,260 


182 


31,660 


* 


600 






i 


9 

8 


35 
36 


22! 850 


110 
3.000 


2,452 
2,600 


198 
198 






269 
720 




.... 


28, 150 


• 


20 


9 


29 


20.235 


1,105 


500 


265 


21,810 


* 


315 




.... 


2(J 


9 


29 


23,024 




1,120 


222 






166 


.... 


.... 


2(J 


9 


29 


18, 40C 


l.OOD 


600 


150 


20,00C 


* 


6O0 






14 


5 


19 


15,00C 


5.00c 




250 


20.0CC 


» 


60C 






W 


4 


14 


19.a01 




400 


100 


19,701 


* 


3O0 




.... 


30 


S 


3S 


13.462 


1,30C 


30C 


12a 


15,062 


* 


162 






26 


6 


31 


10,601 


1,00c 


500 


260 


12, OOC 


* 








14 


S 


22 


7,99S 




901 


IOC 






74 






20 


9 


29 


4.360 


2,113 


350 


90 


7,113 


* 


286 






2.274 


812 


3.086 


2.871,892 


82,223 


131.164 


223 


1.891 170 


* $0,505 


60.602 


9 


11 



























AyeraKS of two contract prices, 19 and 65 cents. 



310 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

St. Clair County— Sixth District— 1903. 





Name of Opkbatoe. 


POSTOPFICB 

Address op 

Mink. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 

i 




a 
S 
S 

§ 


a 
5 




4i 


1 . 




LOCAL MINES. 

Abel Bros 


Belleville 

.. do 


9.000 
9.G0Q 
5,000 
5. GOO 
4,600 


6.000 
4,000 
5,000 
4.800 


2,000 
4,000 






1,000 


? 


Frank Sargent 




500 


60O 


^ 


Taylor Bros 


do." 








4 


Tower Grove Coal (Jo .... 


.. do 








200 




.. do 










f; 


James Beatty. 


Mascoutah ... 

Mlllstadt 

High Prairie . 
Caseyvllle.... 
Payetteville.. 
Belleville 

FrenchViif'ge 
High Prairie . 
PreachlVill'ee 
High Prairie . 


4.5001 *.100 
3, 600 ». 500 








400 


7 
















1,000 

8i0 

800 

2,000 

2,000 


1,000 

800 

800 

2,000 

2 nnn 










q 


Brennen & Co 










in 
























19 


Georgetown Road C. Co . 










n 


500 600 
800 Rnn 






















if> 


Ritchie & Co 


60C 
500 

49.400 


500 
500 

40.800 


::::;::': 








16 


Jos Smith 












6.000 




loo 






Totals 




2,100 




Total8-69 mines.. 




3.134,679 


1,060,953 


1,593,200 


4.004 


123,895 


352.627 



Mines in 1902, 70. 
New mines, 4. 
Abandoned, 6. 
Mines in 1903, 69. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



311 



St. Clair County— Sixth District — Concluded. 



2 


Employ 


IS. 


Disposition 

OUTPDT. 


OF 


1 

o 

1 
o 


s 

£i 
I 

a 

m 
5 


1 

i 

la 

1-^ 


13 

Si 

11 

an 

a 3 

2; 


Acci- 
dents. 




a 

11 


1 

a . 

S DO 

n 


1 

(0 

1 


, 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo 
tlves at mine. 


1 

2 
•a 
Id 




1 

© 

i 


ii 

z 


1 
a 
3 
25 


$ 8.040 
11 626 


8 
6 
6 
6 
3 
3 
7 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 




1§ 

6 

I 

6 
9 
3 
3 
5 
5 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 




8,600 

5;ooc 

5,000 
4.600 
4,000 
3,500 
1.000 
800 

2,000 
2,000 
500 
800 
600 
500 


500 
500 

500 


260 
250 
260 
200 
260 
200 
200 
200 
150 
130 
260 
260 
100 
100 


9,000 

9.000 

5.000 

5,000 

4.500 

4,500 

3.500 

1,000 

800 

800 

2.O0O 

. 2.000 

600 

800 

500 

600 


$0 49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
75 
66 
60 
54 
60 
50 

+176 
60 

+1 75 


216 
240 




:::: 


1 




? 


6,260 




222 .... 
160.... 
266 .... 

■■"20 .'.'.'. 
20 .... 
20 .... 


3 


6 000 




4 


6 760 




6 


5.412 




fi 


6 250 




7 


1 260 




8 


1.000 




9 


1 000 




10 


2.600 
2.500 




40 
40 
10 
2 




11 








Vf, 










n 


1.000 






.... 


14 


625 




10.... 

lOJ.... 


16 


626 






100 


16 








$60,452 


62 


24 


86 




47.900 


1.600 


181 


49,400 


$0 60 


1,291 .... 






$2,704,510 


2,339 


836 


3,172 


2.782.615 


130. 123 


132,664 




1.943,870 




61,893 


9 


14 





t Per day. 



312 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





a 
1 
1 
o 

H 

2; 


n 

i 


Pkoduotion op Diffkrknt Grades in Tons. 


5 
1 


CODNTIKS. 


1 


a. 

a 
3 




a 


a 
o 


s 


<D 

s 

1 

li 
H 

< 


Bond 


1 
6 

17 
6 

53 

83 


176.000 

870,618 

2.522,607 

1.00?, 047 

3.086.279 


69.750 
276.100 
562,343 
322,911 
1,020,153 


93,000 
410,246 

1.324.431 
446.412 

1.587,200 






21,855 
100,690 
431,261 

87,529 
331,293 


1,395 
26.972 
110.022 
79. 712 
19.234 


$169 141 


Clinton 

Madison 

Marlon 

St. Clair 


2.713 
3.458 
17. 166 
4.004 


63.797 
91. 102 
48.318 
123.395 


745.686 
2.087.077 

856.069 
2.644.058 


Totals and 
averages 


7.666.451 


2,241,267 


3.861,289 


27.340 


316,612 


972,618 


237.335 


$6,602,021 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





















„ 








Production of Different Grades in 


Tons. 


1 




"3 


■13 

i 










s 




o 
« 






■o 










a 




9 


Counties. 


11 


2 

a 
S 

1 


a 

a 
u 

9 

a 


a 


g 


"3 


o 


s 

o 


ll 




^ 


&H 


S 


J 


ca 


z 


a. 


rn 


■< 


Madison 


14 


28,980 


24.435 






1,583 


2.962 




$40,282 


St. Clair 


16 


49,400 


40.800 


6,000 




500 


1.100 


1.000 


60,452 


Totals and 




















averages 


30 


78.380 


65.235 


6,000 




2,083 


4.062 


1.000 


$100,734 


Totals district 


















-all mines.. 


113 


7,734.831 


2.306,492 


3,867.289 


27,340 


318.695 


976.680 


238.356 


$6,602,766 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



313 



Sixth District — 1903 — Shi^jping Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition 


OP Output. 


09 
S? 


Tons Mined. 


Pricks 


%B 




t 


















Paid per 
Ton Foe— 


OS 


% 


- 


?, 


i 




08 


^1 




H 






OS 










I 

a 

9 


ft 
i 

1 




^a 


*-a 

11 
sa 


1 

ii 


11 
§1 

si 


Ii 

Oct 


•a 

a 

OS 


a 
1 

a 
>• 


•a 
a 

1 


a 
a 

a 
1 




1^ 

ill 
11 


z 


< 


^ 


H 




EH 


H 


««3 


OQ 


QQ 


w 


s 


5= 


za 


lOR 


V. 


180 


168.000 


■■ 


4.000 


4,000 


250 




176,000 




$0,436 


1.760 






687 


254 


941 


754.509 


36.000 


14,382 


65,627 


228 


454,120 


416.398 


$0 508 


.45 


13, 104 


2 


3 


1.810 


1.016 


2.826 


2.354.910 


35. 135 


36.228 


96.304 


224 


664,28? 


1.858. 325 


.506 


.435 


38,737 


10 


21 


765 


381 


1.146 


740.226 


148. 572 


52, 749 


60,500 


198 


*789,006 


213.011 


.452 


.38 


24, 372 


11 


26 


2.274 


812 
2.535 


3.086 


2,782.615 


89,275 


82,223 


131,164 


223 


1,894,470 


1.190.809 


.505 


.435 


60,602 


9 
3. 


14 


5,614 


8.179 


6.800.290 


308,984 


189,582 


357,595 


225 


3.801,878 


3.854.573 


$0.4945 


$0.4337 


138,575 


63 



Sixth District — ^.905 — Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition 


OP Output. 


B 


Tons Mined. 


Pricks 


i| 


i 


« 






















Paid per 


o^ 




- 


« 


i 




i 


Is 


"3 


'i 


o 






Ton For— 


OS 


9 


s 






« 


a 
a 

1 

a 

9 


1 
i 

ja 


t 


■Sa 

•Oft 


-a 


1 
S 

0*i 


II 

§1 
si 


11 


1 

Si 


a 

a 


H 

a 

a 

1 


a 

a 
§ 

1 




oe 
1 

a 

9 


v. 

1 

9 


z 


< 


H 


H 


^^ 


H 


H 


<J 


OQ 


CD 


w 


s 


2; 


'^ 


^ 


64 


25 
24 


89 






27,690 
47, 900 


1,290 
1,500 


211 

182 


28,980 
49,400 




$0.79 
.50 




517 
1.291 


- 




62 
















IZ 




126 


49 


175 






75.590 


2.790 


195 


78,380 


$0,607 





1.808 




5,770 


2,584 


8,354 


6,800,290 


308,984 


265. 172 


360,386 




3,880,258 


3.854,573 







140,383 


32 


63 



314 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



SEVENTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1903. 

Eighth Annual Report. 



Counties— Gallatin, Hamilton, Jackson, JefEerson. Johnson, Perry, Randolph, 
Saline, Wabash, Washington, Williamson. 

Evan D. John, Inspector, Carbondale. 

Hon. David Ross, 

Secretary State Bureau oj Labor Statistics, Springfield, III. 

Sir— In compliance with section 12 of the general mining law of the State, 
I have the honor to submit the eighth annual report of the coal mines in the 
Seventh Inspection district, for the year ended June 30, 1903. This district 
comprises the coal producing counties of Gallatin, Hamilton, Jackson, Jef- 
ferson, Johnson, Perry, Randolph, Saline, Wabash, Washington and Wil- 
liamson. 

The report shows tabulated statements giving the number of mines in opera- 
tion in each county, both shipping and local; the number of new and aban- 
doned mines; the total number of persons employed at each mine; the total 
tons produced and the different grades, consisting of lump, mine run, egg, 
nut, pea, or screenings, and slack or waste coal; the average value of each 
grade and the aggregate value of the total product; the fatal and non-fatal 
casualties in and around the mines; the number of wives made widows, and 
the number of children left fatherless by the fatal accidents; the average 
number of days worked; the quantity of powder used; the number of mining 
machines used, and the total tons of coal cut by machines; the total number 
of tons produced by hand mining: 

Number of counties producing coal 11 

Total number of mines 134 

Number of shippins mines 70 

Number of local mines 64 

Number of mines abandoned during the year 6 

Number of new mines opened during the year 12 

Number of mines using machines 13 

Number of machines in use 76 

Tons of coal cut by machines 1,184.541 

Tons of coal mined by hand 4,490,059 

Total tons of coal produced 5,674.600 

Tons of mine run 1.555,273 

Tons of lump 1.621,228 

Tons of effg 616.707 

Tons of nut.... 767,438 

Tons of pea or screenings 1, 021, 010 

Tons of slack or waste ; 192.914 

Aggregate value of total product $5,339,004 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 315 

Average value of mine run coal per ton at mines $1,167 

Average value of lump coal per ton at mines $1,142 

Averaire value of egg coal per ton at mines $1.60 

Average value of nut coal per ton at mines $0 944 

Average value of screenings per ton at mines $0.60 

Average value of slack or waste coal per ton at mines $0.26 

Number of miners 4,782 

Number of other employes under ground 1.409 

Number of boys employed under ground 179 

Number of employes above ground 986 

Total number of employes 7. 356 

Average number of days of operation for shipping mines 201 

Number of kegs of powder used In blasting coal 147,681 

Number of kegs of powder used for other purposes 413 

Number of fatal accidents 24 

Number of nonfatal accidents 56 

Number of widows 14 

Number of children made fatherless 61 

Number of tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 236,442 

Number of tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident 101,332 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 307 

Number of persons employed to each non- fatal accident 131 

FATAL ACCIDENTS. 

September 27, 1902, Chas. Jacobs, miner, aged 28 years, married, was in- 
stantly killed by a premature blast at his working place in mine No. 1 of the 
Willis Coal & Mining Co., Willisville, Perry county. He leaves a widow and 
one child. 

October 21, 1902, Howard Jones, miner, aged 14 years, working with his 
father as a miner, was killed by being run over on the main entry, by loaded 
mine cars in No. 7 shaft of the Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Herrin, William- 
son county. 

Nov. 18, 1902, John Bush, sinker, single, employed by the New Coal com- 
pany, Harrisburg, Saline conoty, was killed by falling out of the sinking 
bucket to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 30 feet. 

Nov. 21, 1902, Henry Maloney, miner, aged 50 years, married, was killed 
while working in a pillar by a fall of coal in the Harrison mine of the Big 
Muddy Coal & Iron company, Murphrysboro, Jackson county. He leaves a 
widow and ten children. 

Nov. 24, 1902, John Haggard, miner, aged 40 years, and his son, Lsroy 
Haggard, aged 14 years, were severely burned by the explosion of a tight 
shot in the mine of the Williamson County Coal company, Lake Creek, Will- 
iamson county. The son died two days after the accident, the father died 
Dec. 4. Deceased and his son had finished their day's work, and started 
for the bottom of the shaft, through the third north entry; when but a short 
distance from the face of the entry, John Fehrenbaker, who was working in 
a room next to the face of the entry, lighted a shot; when the shot exploded 
the blaze shot out of Fehrenbaker's room and back onto the entry, a distance 
of 200 feet, burning Haggard and his son severely and causing their death. 
Fehrenbaker's shot was drilled 8 feet deep and was charged with over 6 feet 
of powder. The hole was planted in such a manner that any other result 
than a blown-out shot was improbable. John Haggard leaves a widow and 
four children. 



316 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Nov. 29, 1902, Robert Hankins, eager, aged 27 years, single, employed at 
the Dawes shaft of the St. Louis Big Muddy Coal company, Dewmaine, Will- 
iamson county, was severely injured by a piece of coal falling dowa the 
shaft, striking him on the head; he died at Cairo about three weeks after the 
accident. 

Dec. 9, 1902, Lewis Colombo, miner, aged 40 years, married, was killed by 
a fall of top coal at his working face in the mine of the Sunnyside Coal 
company, Herrin, Williamson county. He leaves a widow and three children. 

Jan. 1, 1903, Chas. Coats, miner, aged 42 years, married, was killed by a 
fall of slate at his working place in the mine of the Chicago & Big Muddy 
Coal company, Marion, Williamson county. He leaves a widow and seven 
children, two dependant. 

Jan. 2, 1903, John Hager, miner, aged 61 years, married, was killed by a 
fall of slate, while at work in a pillar in the shaft of the Greenwood Davis 
Coal company, Duquoin, Perry county. He leaves a widow and six children. 

Jan. 16, 1903, Alonzo Haney, driver, aged 28 years, married, was killed at 
No. 6 mine of the Big Muddy Coal & Iron company, Murphysboro, Jackson 
county. He was caught and pushed into the samp at the bottom of the shaft 
by two loaded pit- cars falling on him in the sump. He leaves a widow and 
one child. 

Jan. 16, 1903, Chris. Brandthrost, miner, aged 56 years, married, was in- 
stantly killed by a premature blast in his room in the mine of the Hugh Mur- 
ray Coal company, Nashville, Washington county. He leaves a widow and 
seven children. 

Jan. 24, 1903, C. H. Jones, miner, aged 52 years, married, was killed by a 
fall of slate in his room in the mine of the Big Muddy Coal & Iron company, 
Herrin, Williamson county. He leaves a widow and two children. 

Jan. 30, 1903, Thomas Campbell, mine examiner, aged 63 years, married, 
was severely injured by a fall of top coal and slate; he died Feb. 1, and 
leaves a widow and two children. 

Feb. 2, 1903, John Barker, eager, aged 21 years, single, employed at the 
mine of the Chicago & Coulterville Coal company, Coulterville, Perry county, 
was killed by being caught between the end of the ascending cage and the 
side of the shaft; he was dragged up the shaft a distance of nearly 300 feet. 

Feb. 18, 1903, Otis Hale, driver, aged 17 years, single, was killed by being 
crashed between a mine car and the side of the entry, in mine No. 2 of the 
Southern Illinois Coal Mining & Washing company, Marion, Williamson 
county. 

March 10, 1903, Newton Watkins, miner, aged 35 years, married, was 
killed by a fall of slate at his working face in mine No. 1 of the Willis Coal 
& Mining company, Willisville, Perry county. He leaves a widow and three 
children. 

March 16, 1903, J. R. Alexander, miner, aged 50 years, married, was killed 
by being crushed by trip of empty mine cars in the Dawes shaft of the St. 
Louis & Big Muddy Coal company, Dewmaine, Williamson county. He leaves 
a widow and two children. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 317 

May 1, 1903, George Stabl, driver, aged 23 years, single, was killed by 
falling under a loaded mine car coming out of the first west entry in the 
mine of the White Walnut Coal company, Pinckneyville, Perry county. 

May 25, 1903, James Campbell, miner, aged 20 years, married, was killed 
by a fall of slate at the face of his working place in the mine of the Horn 
Colliery company, DuQuoin, Perry county. Deceased had fired a shot and 
went back to see if it had been successful; while at the face of his room a 
large piece of slate fell with the result as stated. He leaves a widow. 

May 26, 1903, Alfred Williams, miner, aged 36 years, married, was killed 
by being struck on the head and body by coal flying from a blast fired 
through the pillar of the adjoining room, in the Dawes mine of the St. 
Louis & Big Muddy Coal company, Dewmaine, Williamson county. He leaves 
a widow and one child. 

June 2, 1903, James Haneline, miner, aged 33 years, married, was killed 
by a fall of slate at the face of his working place in the shaft of the Chicago 
& Carterville Coal company, Herrin, Williamson county. He leaves a widow 
and two children. 

Jane 4, 1903, Robert Stricklin, machine runner, aged 37 years, married, 
was killed by a fall of coal in shaft No. 4 of the Gartside Coal company, 
Mnrphysboro, Jackson county. Deceased was running a machine in room 36, 
second north entry, when about a ton of coal fell on him with the result as 
stated. He leaves a widow and six children. 

June 10, 1903, H. C, Alexander, miner, aged 28 years, single, was killed by 
a premature blast at the face of his working place in the second north entry 
in the mine of the White Walnut Coal company, Pinckneyville, Perry county. 

The tables of the fatal and non-fatal accidents follow, also the tables of 
counties in the district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan D. John, 
State Inspector of Mines Seventh District, Carbondale. 



318 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — July 1, 1903. 



Date. 


Name. 


i 

< 


Occupation. 


Residence 
(town). 




1 


i 

1 


6 

"Si 

a 




Cause of Accident. 


1902 
Sept.27 
Oct. 21 


Ghas. Jacobs 

Howard Jones 

John Bush 


28 
14 


Miner 


Wlllisville.... 


1 


1 


1 


8 


53 


Premature blast 


.. do 






Sinker 

Miner 


Harrisburg... 

Lake Creek... 
.. do 


1 


1 


5 




Nov 18 


Falling from sinking 




John Haggard 

Leroy Haggard.... 
Henry Maloney.... 
Robert Hankins... 
Lewis Colombo.... 

Chas. Coats 

John Hager 

AlonzoHaney 

Chris. Brandthrost 

C. H.Jones 

Thos. Campbell ... 
John Barker 


40 
18 
50 
27 
40 

t\ 

28 

66 
52 
63 
21 

17 

50 
35 
23 

20 
36 
33 
37 
28 


bucket into shaft... 


21 


do 


. do 


21 


.. do 


Murphysboro. 


1 


1 


10 










Dec 9 


Miner:::::::." 


Herrin 

Marion 

DuQuoln 

Murphysboro. 

Nashville 

Herrin 

Lake Creek... 
Coulterville.. 

Marion 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


3 

7 
6 

7 
2 
2 


Falling coal and slate 


1903 


.. do 




2 


do .::: 


Falling coal and slate 


2 


Driver 

Miner 


Run over by loaded 


16 


Premature blast 


24 


.. do 






Examiner 

Cager 


.. do 


Feb 2 


Caught between cage 


18 


Driver 

Miner 


and side of shaft... 


Mar 10 


J. R. Alexander.... 
Newton Watkins.. 
George Stahl 

James Campbell... 
Alfred Williams... 
James Haneline ... 
Robert Stricklin... 
H. C. Alexander . . . 


Dewmaine.... 
Willi-sville.... 
Pinckneyville 

DuQuoIn 

Dewmaine.... 

Herrin 

Murphysboro. 
Pinckneyville 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

16 


1 
1 

1 

16 


2 
3 

'2 
6 

67 


and side of entry... 
Falling coal 




.. do 


Fallingslate 


May 1 


Driver 

Miner 


Fell under loaded 
mine car 






26 


do 


Flying coal from shot 




do 


Fallingslate 


4 
10 


Mach. runner. 
Miner 


Fallingcoal 

Premature blast 





















Becapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — 1903. 



No. 



Occupation. No. 



Nature of Casualty. No j 



Colliery. 



No 



Wlllisville.... 

Herrin 

Harrisburg... 
Lake Creek... 
Murphysboro. 
Dewmaine.... 

Marlon 

DuQuoln 

Nashville 

Coulterville... 
Pinckneyville 



Miners 

Sinker 

Cagers 

Drivers 

Examiner 

Mach. runner, 



Premature blast ... 

Mine cars 

Falling down shaft 

Shot explosion 

Fallingcoal 

Fallingslate 

Cage 

Flying coal 



W. C. &M. Co 

B. M.. C. & I. Co. No. 7 

The New C. Co 

W. Co. C. Co 

Harrison , 

Dawes C. Co 

Sunny side C. Co 

C. B. M. C. Co 

Greenwood 

Coulterville C. Co. ... 
I. C. M. & W. Co. No. 2 
8. M. C. & I. Co. No. 6. 

Murray C. Co 

S. LC. M. &W. Co.... 
W. C. &M. Co. No. 1.. 
White Walnut C. Co... 

HornC. Co 

GartsideN. 4 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 319 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — July 1, 1908. 



Date. 



July 2 
b 

16 
19 
26 
28 
30 

Aug. 26 

S'pt. 16 
16 

17 
Oct. 7 



23 

26 

Nov. 18 

24 

24 

21 

28 









ii 














« 












55 


a 




o-c 


S 


OJ 


o 


Z 



Milo Winchester. 
John Roberts 



Dec. 1 
6 

7 

18 

2U 

22 

1903 

Jan. 9 



26 
Mar. 21 



7 
11 

13 

May 8 

25 



TanoMerlo 

William Williams 
Peter Trucano... 
Hueb Forsythe.. 

F.M.Gray 

Van Churob 

Clarence McNeal. 
Samuel Good 



William French.. 
Henry Pessina... 

Peter Peterson... 
Nicholas Goalby. 

Qeorgfe Kiner 

Lewis Branco 

M. C. Cheers 



W. A. Pettlngren. 

Jos. Vandygraph 

Robert Bush 

John Hartman... 

Clar'nce Haggard 

J. H. Werr 

Simon Gale 



William Ealum.. 

Andy Mal«udrow 
Albert Summers. 
Sam. Russell 



Prank Hall 

William Bowman 
Chas. Webb 



William Aiken. 

O. Boles 

Chas. ferrin 



John Biggs 

George Tribbels. 

Paul Varazarla... 
John Wirchem... 

Albert Boston.... 

Burt. Wright 

Qeorge Riddec... 
Clar'nce Holeman 

O. R. Stiff.... 



John Williams. 
Hugh earner. .. 



R, J. King 

Fred Elliot 

Lewis Nodglln.. 



Ed.Tlndall 

Thomas Harper. 



Herrin 

DuQuoin... 
Wlilisville.. 

Herrin 

Hallld'yb'ro 
DuQuoin..., 

.. do 

Murph'sb'ro 



Herrin , 

Wlilisville. 



Plnckneyv'e 
Murph'sb'ro 

DuQuoin 
Murph'sb'ro 

Herrin 

Murph'sb'ro 
Hallld'yb'ro 

C oulterville 

Equality... 

Harrisburg 

Lake Creek 

do 



Hallld'yb'ro 
Dewmanie 



Murph'sb'ro 

. do 

Willisville 



DuQuoin ... 
Harrisburg 
St. Johns... 



Herrin . 
Marlon. 
.. do ... 



.. do 
..do 



Murph'sb'ro 
.. do .... 



..do 

DuQuoin 

.. do 

Plnckneyv'e 



Harrisburg 



DuQuoin . 
Herrin .... 



Plnckneyv'e 

Herrin 

Willisville. 



Herrin 

St. Johns.. 



Character and Cause 
of Injury. 



Bruised Internally ;fairg slate 
Leg and hand hurt;fairg slate 

Arm broken; falling roof 

Back injured; falling coal 

Leg broken: failing coal 

roe mashed; falling coal 

Toe cut off; falling slate 

Leg bruised; falling slate and 

coal 

Back bruised; falling coal 

Ribs broken; fell in engine 

room 

Hip Injured; falling slate...'.. 
Body Injured between car 

and face of coal 

Arm Injured; falling coal. 

Toe bruised; falling coal | 

Arm injured; kicked by mule.; 
Shoulder injured; fall'gcoal.i 
Arm broken; flying coal from 

shot 1 

Ribs broken; caught under 

cage 1 

Leg broken; pit car and mine. 

door 

Back injured; falling from! 

sinking bucket i 

Body burned; explosion tight 

shot 

Body burned ; explosion tight 

shot 

Spine injured; falling cage... 
Body bruised; collision mine 

cars 

Leg broken; derailment of 

pit car 

Leg broken; falling slate 

Body Injured: pit car 

Shoulder and neck bruised 

between car and mule 

Back sprained: hoisting cage 
Legs broken; falling slate.... 
Thumb cut off spragging 

mine car 

Leg cut off ; railroad car 

Arm broken; pit car 

Head bruised; falling off mine 

car 

Leg broken; collision mine 

cars 

Leg broken: unloading mln 

ing machine 

Body bruised; mine car 

Body injured; mine car jump 

Ing track 

Body bruised; falling coal.... 

Leg broken; mine car 

Leg bruised: falling coal 

Shoulder dislocated: falling 

slate 

Face burned; explosion from 

shot 

Finger mashed; mine car 

Body bruised between car and 

mule 

Body bruised; mine car 

Foot bruised; mine car 

Finger broken and back 

bruised; falling timbers... 
Hips bruised; collision mine 

cars 

Back Injured; falling slate... 



820 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — Concluded . 




Not recovered July 1, 1903 



Total number injared 

Not recovered July 1, 1903 

Recovered July 1.1903 

Time lost by men recovered 

Average days lost by men recovered 



S6 
13 
43 
2.056 days 
47.8 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District— 1903. 



Residence. 


No. 


Herrin 


10 


DuQuoin 


fc 


Willlsvllle.... 


i 


Hallidayboro. 


■i 


Mnrphysboro. 


u 


Plnekneyville 


■i 


Coulterville.. 


2 


Equality 


1 


Harrlsburg... 


3 


Lake Creek .. 


2 


Dewmanle.... 


1 


Elkvllie 


1 


St. Johns 


2 


Marlon 


4 


Totals 


66 



Nature of Casualty. 



No. 



Colliery. 



Miners 

Drivers 

Engineers.... 

Loaders 

Cagers 

Sinkers 

Spragers 

Laborers 

Yardmen 

Mach. runner 
Timbermen .. 



Falling slate .... 

Palling roof 

Palling coal 

Plying coal , 

Engine 

Cars 

Mule 

Cage 

Falling bucket . 
Shot explosion . 

Spraging 

M. Machine 

Palling timber . 

Chain 

Fell down shaft 



B. M..C. &,LCo 

Egyptian 

W. C. &M. Co. No. 1... 

T. C. H. Coal Co 

M. V. M. & M. Co 

Pope mine 

QartsldeNo. 3 

Sunnyside 

White Walnut 

Harrison 

Coulterville Coal Co... 

Equality Coal Co 

New Coal Co 

W.C.C.Co 

B.M.. cV&'l.'Co.'NoVe! 

Jupiter No. 1 

Saline Coal Co 

I. S. M. C. W. Co. No. 2 

Jupiter No. 4 

QartsldeNo. 4 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



321 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties by Nature of Injuries- 
Conjugal Relations and Time Lost — Seventh District — 1903. 



Nature of Injuries. 


X) 


1 


a 


S 

a 
Q 


Time 


Lost. 






Total 
days. 


Arerag* 
days. 




Body , 

Lee .... 


18 


11 




26 
13 

"ii"' 
11 


670 
133 

lf§ 

32 
110 

100 

109 

* 

90 
30 
30 
50 


36.0 
38.1 
59.1 
56.2 
10.2 
27.2 
50.0 
33.2 


32.1 
7 1 






Arm broken 


5 3 


Arm . 


6 3 






Ribs 


3 6 


Shoulder. 


6 3 






Fingers 


22.2 
15.0 
30.0 
60. 


7 1 


H«ad . 


3 6 






Hip 


3 6 






Totals, RTerages and varcentages 


66 


36 


20 


105 


2.056 


36.8 


100.0 



Not recovered. 



—21 C 



322 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Gallaiin County — Seventh District — July 1, 1903. 





Namk op Operator. 


POSTOFFICK 

Address 

or Mink. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


i 

a 
2 


1 


a 

g 
« 
a 


a 
Si 


1 


9 

2 


IB 

U 


1 

2 


SHIPPING MINES. 


Eqnality 


35.487 
1.063 


365 


21.960 
60O 




2,666 


10.607 
463 


Totals 












36.650 


365 


22,560 




2.665 


10.970 




LOCAL MINKS. 


Equality 


1,950 
2,000 
2.000 
860 
750 
800 
500 


1.950 

2,000 

2.000 

850 

75e 

800 
500 






















Ratlev & Co 


do 












Shawneetown 






















^rnncr /& Pn 


Saline Mines.. 
.. do 
























Totals 














8,850 


8.850 












Totals — 9 mines . 




45,400 


9,216 


22,650 




2.665 


10. 970 











Mines In 1902. 8. 
New mines. 1. 
Mines in 1903. 9. 



Hamilton County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOrPICK 

Address 
OP Mink. 


Output op Mink in Tons. 


a 

B 

2 


3 
^ 


d 
g 

i 


a 




1 




1 
2 


LOCAL MINKS. 

I R Yates 


Dahlgren 

Flint 


600 
100 


600 
100 


































700 


700 

























Mines in 1902, 2. 
Mines In 1903. 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



323 



Oallatin County — Seventh District— Conclnded. 



s 








Disposition 


OF 







a 


s 

1-3 



Acci- 




■^ 


Employes. 


Odtput. 










dents. 


















08 












o 














1 

* 




26i 

bifl 


11 






« 

a , 
■3 


1. 









"5 
1 


3-0 


i 


§ 




S« 


u 


i 




h^tl 





ill 






aa 

■a -a 


^3 






























u 


bt 




p 


1 



i 


ons 

cars 

ment 

plied 

tlvea 




« a 



>> 


a 

n 
a 


Si? 


11 


a 


it 


5 

a 




^ 







o<-> 
















s 


< 


< 


5 


H 


^ 


H 


H 


Q 


H 


£ 


z 


z 


z 


z 


$33,240 


56 


30 


afi 


32.577 


1,103 


1,807 


163 


35,487 


$0 61 


1,195 




1 


1 


922 


5 


6 


11 


888 




175 


40 


1.C63 


51 


38 


.... 




2 


$34,162 


ei 


46 


97 


33.466 


1,103 


1.982 


102 


36,550 


$0.61 


1,233 


.... 


1 




$1.9S0 


6 




7 




1,950 




175 


1,960 


$0 61 


60 




.... 


1 


2,500 


6 




8 




2,000 




180 


2.0C0 


51 


100 






? 


2,500 


6 




8 




2,000 




180 


2,000 


51 


100 






3 


850 


2 
2 




2 

3 
2 




850 
750 
800 




100 
2C0 
180 


850 
750 
800 




25 
30 
30 






4 


760 




fS 


800 




6 


600 


2 




2 




500 




102 


500 




22 






7 








$9,850 


25 




32 




8.850 




160 


8.850 


$0 51 


367 


.... 






$44,012 


86 


43 


129 


33,465 


9,953 


1,982 


163 


45,400 




1,600 


.... 


1 





Hamilton County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



5 



















0/ 




1 


Employeb. 


Disposition 
Output. 


or 


a 
•2 




S 


■0 
5 


Acci- 
dents. 




© 












11 


§ 

.a 
t» 

.0 

a 

a 

a 


« 








1 


1 

ii 

«<-i 


i 
i 






ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


"5 
1 

1. 

s 


a 
si. 

:H 


Oi 



1 



2 

i 

s§ 


0^ 

1 

as 




a 


i 
Ii 


1 
a 










0*J 





















^ 


< 


•< 


H 


^ 


EH 


H 


Q 


EH 


£ 


z 


z 


z 


z 


$9G0 




4 


4 




600 




:oo 


600 




8 






T 


166 




2 


2 




too 




26 


100 




2 






? 








1,050 




6 


e 




700 




63 


700 




,0 









324 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 

Jackson County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name of Opkbator. 


POSTOFFICK 

Addbbss 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


1 


1 


a 

i 


a 




4i 


I. 


1 

•> 


SHIPPING MINB8. 

B. M. C. &I. Co.. 6 

B. M. C. & I. Co., Harrison 
M. V. M. AMfs:. Co.,1.... 

Gart«ld«Co»lCo.,4 

Willis C. &M. Co.. 2 

Gartside Co»l Co.. 3 

Desoto C. & W. Co.l.... 
Chi. & Carbondale C Co.,1 

Totals 


Murphysboro. 

.. do 

Hallidayboro. 
Murphysboro. 

Bryden 

Murphysboro. 

Carbondale '.!. 


264,073 
239,2*3 
228.885 
78,718 
64,418 
39,057 
32,800 
12,000 


34, 744 

923 

14.788 

"58,"6i2 

"ii'ooo 


109,938 
121,396 
134.290 
48.717 
6.167 
26.210 
18.400 


20,789 




98,608 
116,934 


3 
4 

5 


395 


14,783 
14,679 


64,629 
15,442 
1,289 


6 

7 




5.172 
16,400 


7,685 














959,264 


120.467 


462.698 


21,184 


50.934 


304.581 




LOCAL MINIS. 

Gus Blair 


Murphysboro. 
. do 


400 

1,024 

1,340 

1,800 

1,400 

1.00« 

1,900 

1,160 

691 

260 

200 

680 

154 

811 

400 

13.020 


400 

1.024 

1.340 

1,800 

1,400 

1,000 

1,900 

1.150 

691 

260 

200 

^~i55 










9 


Schmidgall Coal Co 










•^ 


Robert Poole 


do 














Carbondale... 






















1 


M. M. Thompson Coal Co 


do 












.. do 














"do!:: : 










q 


R Moas 


Vergennes ... 












F. Williams 










11 


John Campbell . .. 


do::::""" 










1' 




OraTllle 

Campbell Hill 


5M 
154 
811 
400 

1.866 










H, R King 








14 


D Dawson 








16 


W R Campbell 


do 










Totals 














Totals— 23 mines.. 




972,284 


131,622 


463.963 


21,184 


50,934 


304,571 















Mines In 1902, 24. 
New mines, 2. 
Abandoned, 3. 
Mines in 1903. 23, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



825 



Jackson County — Seventh District— Conclnded. 



$270, 



SI. 010. 233 



Disposition or Out- 
put. 






iso. 



O u fl 0*J 

H 






1 




Acci- 


05 


dents. 1 


o 
so 


0DT3 
ttK 




H 


§ 










a 


■«s 




^ 


11 






o 


t^ 


o 




,-a 


^^ 


s 


S-s 




a:: 


a 


il 




3 3 


3 


£ 


55 


^ 


z 



250.239 
228, 2U 
207, «73 
71,386 
62,586 
30, 487 
30,000 
11,000 

891.561 



4.871 



13,834 
11,040 
18,964 
7.352 
1.454 
7.685 
2.400 



17,804 
5,215 
228.885 
18, 438 
64.458 
13,288 
32,800 
11,000 



$0 51 
5t 
51 
61 
51 
51 
51 
51 



$0 51 



2,205 
2,000 
8,500 

665 
1,896 

532 
2,010 

300 



18. 108 



1,536 

2.010 

1,800 

1.400 

1,000 

1.900 

1.150 

691 

250 

200 

626 

231 

1.217 

600 



400 

824 

1,265 

1,800 

1,400 

l.OOO 

1,900 

1,150 

691 

260 

200 

500 

154 

811 

400 



$0 71 
92 
51 
51 



16,210 



12.746 



12.620 $0 61 



$1,025,443 



891. S«4 



* 4,406 tons mined by day. 



326 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Jefferson County — Seventh District — 1903, 





Name op Operator. 


POSTOFFIOE 

Address of 
Mine. 




OUTP0T OP Mine in Tons. 




55 


^ 


i 

s 


a 




1 


a 

1 


1 


SHIPPING MINK. 

Jefferson Couaty Coal Co 

LOCAL MINE. 


Mt. Vernon... 
Opdyke 


15.000 
100 


8.000 
100 


4,000 




1,500 


1.500 
















15, 100 


8,100 


4,000 




1,600 


1,500 











Mines in 1902, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 2. 



Johnson County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name or Operator. 


postoffice 
oV^nI^ 


Odtpht of Mine in Tons. 


s 

i 


1 


2 

a 


1 






S 
I* 




LOCAL MINES. 

Dills & Wallace 


NewBurnslde 
.. do 


1,200 
200 
645 
200 
400 

2,645 


1,200 
200 
fi4i 

290 
400 

2,S46 












McMichael& Kine 












A. J. Edwards & Co .... 


do 














.. do 














.. do 










































Mines in 1902, 5. 
Mines in 1903. 5. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



327 



Jefferson County — Sevenih District — Concluded. 





EUPLOYCS. 


Disposition of 
Odtput. 


a 

o 

1 

« 

1 
o 

I 


•6 

1 
s 

1 

a 


o 
1 

OS 

I 

a 

• a 

1- 


1 

11 

It 

£^ 

11 
s d 


Acci- 

DINT8. 




* 

1 

MP 


u 

D 

k 

« a 

Sa 


1 

a 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 

go « 

1-' 


n 
III 


3 

o 

h 

a 




a 

o 

jl 

■z, 


1 

a 

25 


$14,876 
150 


24 


7 
2 


31 
2 


6.000 


8,500 
100 


600 


165 


16.000 
100 


$0 67 


400 
2 




.... 


1 












$1S.026 


24 


9 


33 


6.000 


8.600 


500 


165 


16. 100 


JO 57 


402 


.... 







Johnson County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



3 
















o 


£ 






1 


Employes. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


§ 




a 

o 


!^^ 


Acci- 
dents. 




© 












g 

o 

2 

1 


•6 

1 

s 

a 
8 


c a 


11 

11 






0) 

S 

i 


1 

a . 
P 


a 

e 




ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

L 


Sll 


1 
"S 

a 




© 

11 


1 

a 

d 


< 


< 


«J 


^ 


H 


H 


H 


Q 


H 


D- 


Is 


z 


A 


z; 


$1,200 
200 


3 




3 




1,200 
200 
645 
200 






1.200 




40 








i 

2 




2 
S 

2 








200 
645 

2oa 




7 
20 

7 




".'.'. 




546 









8 


200 










400 


2 




2 




400 






400 




14 


* 


m: 












$2,545 


12 




12 




2.645 






2.645 




88 













828 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Perry County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mine in Tons. 


z 




i 


d 


i 




1 

|5 


1 

2 
it 


SHIPPING MIKES. 

Willis C«al&Min'g Co. 1 
White Walnut Coal Co... 

Horn Colliery Co 

Weaver Coal 4 Coke Co.. 
Greenwood- DaviiC. Co.. 
Wllli»Coal&Min'sCo..3 

Weaver Coal Co., 4 

Lake Superior Coal Co.. 
Seper & Co 


Willisvllle.... 
Pinckneyv'le. 

DuQuoin 

.. do 

.. do 


201,211 
150,851 
106,451 
87,096 
77. 442 
63.419 
60.251 
47,105 
45,994 
41.750 
36.077 
26.719 
26,146 
20,000 
11,991 
11, 125 
4,000 
4,092 
3,750 
3,529 


177.066 
74, 120 
106,451 
11,529 
2,000 
624 
11,109 

1.000 
6,058 

20,000 

4.000 
4,092 
3,750 
3.539 


16,087 
61.757 


■■■2.'582 


2.012 


6.037 
12.392 


4 
5 


26.029 
34.721 
30.695 
31.817 
31.403 


14.625 
2.000 
11.864 


16.424 

17.488 

6.143 

272 


18,489 
21. 233 


6 


.. do 


13. 113 
17.055 
15, 702 


7 
8 


Pinckneyv'le . 

DuQaoin 

Cutler 

Snnfield 

DuQuoln 

Tamaroa 

DaQuoin 

Tamaroa 

DuQuoin 

Coulterville . . 
Pinckneyv'le. 

DuQaoin 

.. do 


q 








10 
11 
1? 


Bailey Bros. Coal Co 

Weaver Coal Co., S 

Old Kentucky Coal Co , . . 
Morris Bros 


30.000 
17.305 
23,113 
18. 163 


""i'oii 


600 
420 


10.250 
10.253 
3,606 


1H 






4 640 


14 


Little Muddy Coal Co.... 

Now Moon Mining Co 

Chi. & Coulterville C.C... 








15 
16 


6,595 
6.957 





2,398 


3.998 
1 277 


17 








IS 


Weaver Coal Co , 2 

Lake Superior Coal Co . 
Missouri & 111, Coal Co... 

Totals 










19 










m 


Wllllsville.... 
























1,027,0S1 


477.655 


312. 5ei 


33.112 


45.767 


187.945 




LOCAL MINES. 


Pinckneyv'le . 
.. do 


400 
400 
2,800 
800 
260 
120 


40O 

400 

2,800 

800 










•> 


Roe&Co 










3 


Wilson & Snoflfard 


DuQuoin 




















S 


R.F. Glass 


Wiilisville.... 
Pyatt 


200 
120 








6 


Christopher Helfsnng... 
Totals 




















4,720 


4.400 


320 














1.031.761 


482,055 


382.882 


33.112 


46.757 


137. 945 











Mines in 1902. 23. 
New mines. 3. 
Mines In 1903,26. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



329 



Perry County —Seventh District — Concluded. 



•3 










Out- 






a 
o 




Acci- 




2 


Employes. 




PDT. 




o 




n 


^5 


dents. 




« 














* 


■o 


o 


oS 






« 


1 
« ■ 

II 

61 l-i 


a 

ii 


1 


■3 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mines. 


1 

2 

•a 

"^ 
at 


V 


1 

03 
O 


s 

>> 

a 

a 


II 


eg 

is 
Is, 

li 


1 
o 

a 


a 
§ 


1 

a 








o 




















< 


< 


< 


H 


^ 


^ 


H 


" 


H 


Q- 


^ 


z 


25 


■z, 


$198,213 


188 


111 


299 


196.843 


868 


3.500 


269 


149,011 


$0 56 


5,791 


2 






119. 128 


110 


36 


146 


148.446 


806 


1,60C 


234 


150,851 


55 


4,82C 


2 




2 


95.806 


100 


55 


166 


99,951 


6.500 




m 


106,451 


51 


2,600 


1 




3 


73,900 


117 


69 


186 


83,654 


1.544 


1,898 


161 


87,096 


51 


2,140 


... 




4 


115,371 


84 


39 


123 


71,000 


3.O00 


3.442 


280 


77,442 


51 


1,60C 


1 




5 


61.970 


91 


46 


187 


60, 182 


617 


1.640 


201 


62.439 


51 


1.840 






6 


60, 687 


90 


57 


147 


69.000 


262 


991 


129 


60.253 


61 


1.808 


.... 




7 


39,251 


61 


20 


81 


46,272 


103 


730 


264 


47. 105 


51 


1.407 






8 


45.991 


60 


12 


62 


38, 994 


6.00C 


l.OOO 


2O0 


45,994 


55 


1.53C 


.... 




9 


35,225 


fiO 


1H 


6« 


39,500 


1.500 


750 


229 


41,750 


51 


1,000 






10 


29, 685 


54 


40 


94 


34.842 




1.23S 


158 


36,077 


55 


1.03C 






11 


23, 125 


31 


14 


46 


24.614 


1.079 


1,036 


162 


26, 729 


61 


1,039 


.... 




12 


22,056 


22 


16 


3S 


24. 706 


240 


200 


262 


25,146 


51 


1,500 






13 


20,000 


30 


13 


43 


18.600 


1.000 


400 


185 


20.000 


51 


1,200 






14 


15, 387 


12 




18 


7.427 


2,564 


2,000 


185 


11,991 


51 


236 


... 




16 


9.888 


13 




19 


9,807 


869 


949 


171 


11,125 


55 


299 


1 




16 


4.000 


8 




12 


2,000 


1.800 


200 


160 


4,000 


55 


12C 


.... 




17 


4,092 


8 


20 


28 


3.802 




290 


195 


4.092 


51 


212 






18 


3.750 


10 




15 


2.S46 


1,146 




117 


3,760 


61 


134 






19 


3.529 


10 




18 


8.230 


29 


270 


66 


3.529 


55 


77 


.... 




20 


$970,960 


1,139 


595 


1,784 


914,516 


29.927 


22.189 


207 


974,831 


$0 526 


30, 281 


7 


19 




$ 608 


2 

2 
10 


1 

1 
2 


i 

12 




400 

400 

2.800 




80 
80 
80 


400 

.a 


$0 56 
61 


15 
15 
120 






1 


600 




? 


3,500 




3 


1,000 


3 
2 
2 


3 

1 




6 
S 

2 




800 
200 
120 




96 
40 
60 


800 
200 
120 


61 
55 
65 


20 
8 
6 




:::: 


4 


300 




n 


180 




6 








$6. 180 


21 


8 


29 




4.720 




70 


4,720 


$0 632 


188 




.... 










$977,140 


1,160 


603 


1,763 


974.516 


84.647 


22.189 




979,551 





80.464 


' 


19 





330 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Randolph County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name op Operator. 


postoffice 
Address 
OF Mine. 


Output op Mink in Tons. 


£1 

a 




1 


a 

i 


p. 

a 




1 


g 

Ij 


1 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Western Anth. C. & C. Co 
Conlterville Mining Co... 
Tilden Goal Co . 


Spsrta 

Coulterville.. 

Tilden 

do 


107. OU 
67.052 
53.294 
49.768 
45, 792 
44.875 
44. 2U 
37.296 
10.487 
5.273 
4.171 




89,000 
25,928 
32,978 
24,884 
2.109 






18,014 




16,029 
11.388 
16,589 
40,664 
44,875 
12.085 
30.745 
93 
5,273 
4.171 






25, 095 


9 




1.195 


7,733 


n 


Crystal Coal Co 


8.295 










1,284 


1.735 




Rosboroueh Coal Co 

lUinoisFuelCo. No. 3.... 
Davison & Fulton C Co.. 

A. E. Powell & Co 

Illinois Fuel Co. No. 4.... 
Moffat Coal Co 


Sparta 

do 




7 


26,788 
6,094 
7,69J 






5,340 


8 


.. do 




235 


222 




Coulterville.. 
Sparta 


2,702 


10 




















Totals 














469,235 


181,912 


215.473 




2.714 


69,136 




LOCAL MINKS. 

Boyle Coal Co 


Sparta 

Blair 


7.290 

1,200 

400 


7,290 

1.200 

400 










•> 












3 


John & George Meyer.... 
Totals 


Percy 






















8.890 


8,890 












Totals — 13 mines 




478. 125 


190,802 


215.473 





2,714 


69, 136 











Mines in 1902, 12. 
New mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 14 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



331 



Randolph County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



1 


Employes. 


Disposition 
Output. 


OP 


1 




s 
s 


1 


Acci- 
dents. 


















« 


•o 




ao 








o 














o 
o 


§ 

1 

a 

3 


1 


1 

11 









J 

It; 


I 


i 
1 


H 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sap- 
piled to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 

-a 


3; 


1 

o 

1 

a 


O 

a-s 


a 


tiO> 


> o 




o 


o*-> 






o 


'U'O 


a s 








< 


< 


< 


H 


^ 


H 


^ 


Q 


H 


£ 


Z 


z 


z, 


z 


$93,601 


80 


40 


120 


103.614 


1,800 


1.700 


175 


107.014 


$0 65 


2,700 








42.426 


20 


17 


37 


61.349 


2,703 


13.000 


280 


67.062 


65 


90« 








46.803 


5C 


24 


74 


49,607 


600 


3.087 


178 


63. 291 


56 


1.170 








43.132 


42 


18 


60 


49,418 


350 




200 


49.768 


55 


1.S3G 


.... 






39.028 


4(1 


12 


52 


44,067 




i.736 


244 


45, 792 


56 


1,32a 


.... 






40,388 


60 


14 


64 


44.240 


220 


415 


218 


44,876 


65 


1,783 








38.366 


43 


13 


56 


43,073 


120 


1.020 


227 


44,21it 


55 


1.287 








30.846 


33 


14 


47 


36,030 


1,266 




162 


37,296 


55 


1,331 


.... 






8.451 


12 


4 


16 


9.887 




600 


170 


10,487 


55 


490 








4.2IS 


fi 


7 


15 


4,773 




500 


117 


5,273 


55 


172 








4.688 


24 


7 


31 


4,078 


33 


60 


40 


4,171 


55 


172 


.... 






I390.741 


402 


170 


672 


410,026 


7.092 


22. 117 


197 


469.236 


$8 55 


13.168 








$9,812 


4 


4 


8 




7.290 





275 


7.290 


$0 55 


200 




— 


1 


1.200 


2 


1 


3 




1 200 




120 


1,200 


55 


46 






9 


400 


2 


1 


3 




400 




100 


400 


55 


Is 






8 








S11.442 


8 


6 


14 




8.890 




165 


8,890 


$0 55 


261 


.... 






$102,183 


410 


176 


586 


440.026 


15.982 


22. 117 




478, 125 




13,419 


.... 


.... 





332 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Saline County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name op Operatoe. 


POSTOFFICE 

Address of 
Mink. 


Odtpdt of Mine in Tons. 


1 

i 


1 
5 


i 


a 


fa 


. 


3 

1^ 


1 

2 
3 


SHIPPING MINES. 

Davenport Coal Co 

Harrlsburg: M. & Coal Co 


Ledford 

Harrlsburg:... 


130.722 
97.000 
82.000 
24,216 
8.007 
6.825 


114,722 
67.000 
59.800 
14, 630 
8.007 
6.826 


8.000 
15.000 
9.000 
4,843 




4,000 
7.000 
5.800 
2.42i 


1:8 

7.400 


4 


Saline County Coal Co... 

New Coal Co 

QallatU Coal Co 


.. do 


2,421 


f, 


"do:: ::::: 




6 


Oallatlft 
























Totals 




318.769 


270,884 


36.843; 


19.221 


21,821 




LOCAL MINES. 

C. M, Leeper 


Eldorado 

do 


2,693 
1,600 
200 
200 
100 
60 
100 
260 
260 
60 


2.693 
1.600 
200 
200 
100 
50 
100 
260 
260 
60 










7 


Loyd & Evans 










^ 


H P Slttiff 


Stonefort 

.. do 






















F) 


Andy Coedlll 


do . 










f, 


Maeffie M Siak 


Cottage Grove 










7 


R. M. Barry 










8 


QUI Shelton 


do :: 










q 




do 










in 




Mltchellville.. 












Totals 












5,403 


5.403 












Totals — 16 minss 




354,172 


276.287 


36,843 




19.221 


21,821 











Mines In 1902. 16. 
New mines. 2. 
Abandoned mines. 2. 
Mines In 1903. J6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



'sm 



Saline County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



o 


Employks. 


Disposition of 
Output. 


2 

S 

o 

<D 

o 

i 


Tons mined by hand. 


1 

a 
3 

I 
1 

a. 


It 

SI 

^? 

a a 


Acci- 

D1NT8. 




1 

11 


il 

p 


a 

I 

J3 

o 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo 
tives at mine. 


2 

il 

H 


1= 
11. 

i| 

o a 

§§5 


1 

o 

1 
a 

fl 


il 


fl 


$107 578 


112 

80 

15 
10 


31 
30 
21 

!l 

7 


143 

59 
27 
17 


130.722 
90.000 
80.200 
23.000 
7.769 
2.960 






210 
237 
203 
200 
92 
130 


130.722 
97.000 
82.000 
24.215 
8.007 
6.825 


$0 51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 


3.200 
3.700 
2.800 
l.OOO 
300 
270 


.... 


■"i 

1 
1 




85.500 
73.016 
25.426 
8.007 
5.801 


5.000 

700 

3.600 


2, coo 

1.8U0 

615 

266 




$305,328 


304 


110 


424 


334.651 


9.538 


4.680 


163 


348.769 


SO 51 


11.270 


1 


3 




$3,366 


4 
6 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 


3 
3 

i 


7 
9 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 




2,693 

1.500 

200 

200 

100 

•a 

250 
260 
60 




200 


2.693 
1.600 
200 
200 
100 
50 
100 
250 
250 
60 


$0 50 
50 
50 


135 
76 
6 
6 
4 
2 
4 

10 
10 
2 




:::. 




1,500 




•> 


200 








^ 


200 










100 








n 


50 








f; 


100 








7 


250 










250 








9 


75 




















$6,091 


24 


7 


31 




6.403 




200 


5.403 


$0 50 


254 








S311.419 


328 


127 


455 


334.651 


14. 941 


4.680 




354.172 





11.624 


1 


3 





334 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Wahash County —Seventh District — 1903. 





Name of Opkkator. 


PosTorncE 
Address 
OF Mine. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


1 


1 


a 


1 


Ee) 


^ 


z 


a . 


1 

2 
3 


LOCAL MINES. 


Mt. Carmel... 


i,:oo 

2,600 
1,000 


1.200 
2,600 
1.000 










Couch. Adams & Co 










Keensburg... 






















4,800 


4.800 

























Mines In 1902, 3. 
Mines in 1903. 3. 



Washington County — Seventh District — 1903. 





Name of Operator. 


POSTOFFIOE 

Address of 

Mink. 


Output of Mink in Tons. 


J 
i 

z 






P. 

a 


bi 
^ 


Z 


rn 

•Si 

1 


1 


SHPPiNG mink. 
Adam Kuhn 


DuBois 

Nashville 

Okawviile.... 


39.000 


10.800 


25.000 






4.000 




LOCAL MINES. 


17, 356 
1.6O0 

18.956 


2,133 
1,600 

3.733 


11.603 




1,431 


2.189 


2 


Okawviile Coal Co 

Totals 






11.603 





1.431 


2.189 








57.956 


13.733 


36,603 




1.431 


6,189 











Mines In 1902, 3. 
Mines in 1903. 3. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



335 



Wabash County— Seventh District — Concluded. 



2 

o 


Emplotis. 


Disposition or 

OUTPOT. 


1 

2 

S 

o 

1 

a 


T3 

XI 

"S 

a 

a 

oo 

a 


1 

1 

a 

2 

a 

Oh 


li 

is 

i 

2 


Acci- 
dents. 






t 

2«> 

S| 

< 


1 
< 


a 

X) 


1 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


1 

2 

2 

o • 

il 


1- 


■3 
o 

1 

a 

a 
Z 


li 


1 

a 



z 


$1,320 


3 
4 

2 


2 

5 


5 

8 
6 




1.200 
2.600 
1.000 






1,200 
2,600 
1,000 




45 
S6 
40 


.... 


:::: 




2 860 








? 


1.100 








8 












S5 280 


9 


q 


18 




4,800 






4,800 




181 


.... 








1 











Washington County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



1 


Employks. 


Disposition or 
Output. 


o 

1 
? 

1 
o 

I 


i 

a 

a 

1 


o 

1 

i 


1 

1 

Is, 

11 



2 


ACCI- 
DENTS. 




9 



M0 

So 
<3 


1 

0K 

>• 

II 

< 


1 

i 

X3 
O 


i 


Tons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup 
piled to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


•5 

1 

2 

|| 


1 


O 

u 

a 



z 


II 

z 


1 

1 


136.000 


45 


17 


62 


35.000 


2,000 


2,000 


240 


39.000 


so 61 


1.500 






J 


$17,961 


18 
3 


8 

1 


26 
4 




16, COO 
1.600 


1,356 


210 


17.356 
1.600 


$0 51 
61 


495 
46 


...: 


:::: 


1 


1.600 




? 












$19,661 


21 


9 


30 




17.600 


1,356 


240 


18.956 


SO 61 


541 


1 






■$56,661 


66 


26 


92 


35.000 


19,600 


3.356 




67.956 




2,041 


1 


.... 





336 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Willmmson County — Seventh District — 1903. 



Namk of Operator. 



postoffick 
Address 
OF Mink. 



Output of Mink in Tons. 



S2 



1 

•> 


SHIPPING MINKS. 

BigMuddyC. &I. Co.,7. 
Chi. & Carterville C. Co. 

Sunny Side Coal Co 

St. L. &BlKMuddyC. Co. 
So. 111. C. M & W. Co., 2. 
So. III. C. M. & W. Co., 3. 
New Virginia Coal Co.... 
Carterville Coal Co., Burr 
C. & B.M.Coal & Coke Co 
Williamson County C. Co 
New Ohio Wash C. Co.. 1. 
New Ohio Wash C. Co., 2. 
Chicago-Herrin Coal Co. 

Robert Dick Coal Co 

So. 111. C. & M. W. Co , 4. 


Herrin 

.. do 


440,298 
277,898 
266,304 
213,040 
188,511 
186,608 
175.050 
131,057 
127,693 
113.325 
107,683 
87,104 
71,144 
61,236 
58,860 
65,600 
48,353 
48,000 
28,726 
8.269 
3.260 


119,432 
70, 176 
2,130 
22.804 
3,609 
755 
30,8»S 
4,063 
668 
78.435 

" i.'848 
16. 162 
3,082 
7.600 
6,394 
18.000 
28,726 
8,219 
3,250 


98.769 
54.588 
61,129 
45,952 
42,684 
36.248 
40.018 
18,872 
28.904 
7.962 
9,491 
7,839 
13.538 
11.271 
9.268 
12,000 
9,885 
10,000 


28,156 
31,046 
45,844 
34,324 
45,049 
52,019 
21,617 
44,822 
30,693 

9,240 
24,252 
20,083 
17,246 
11,271 
16,594 
12,000 

8,468 
10,000 


180,887 
99,491 

136,098 
84.470 
31,241 
28,738 
22, 073 
16, 120 
12,774 
1,871 

"■5;758 
■9,*695 

■"i'ess 

6,600 


13,056 
22, 598 


3 
4 

6 


do 


31,103 


Dewmaine.... 
Marion 


25,490 
66,528 
68,843 


7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 


Lake Creek... 
Carterville.... 

Marion 

Lake Creek... 
Carterville.... 

.. do 

Heriin 

Carterville.... 

Marion 

Carterville.... 
Lake Creek... 
Marion 


60,504 
47, 180 
61,654 
17,817 
73,940 
59,232 
32,759 
22,542 
21,821 
24,000 
15.911 
3,600 


19 
20 
21 


Carterville Dljt. Coal Co. 
Donnelly-Koenecke C.Co 
Carterville & B. M. C. Co 

Totals... 




Carterville ... 






























3.697.993 


423.620 


508.423 


461,672 


642,801 


661,477 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


local minis. 
Richard Hampton 


Carterville.... 

Herrin 

Carterville,... 

Cr*ab Orchard 
do 


2.443 

2,000 

4:873 

1.800 

1,258 

200 

300 

300 

400 

280 


463 

2,000 

4,873 

1,800 

1,258 

200 

300 

300 

400 

200 


491 


739 


415 


336 












W P Ali^n 










Ensmunger & Rentfro... 


















njmiPnrrl Xr rinvrnv 


do 
























do 










J. Pritehett 


Hudgens 












Totals 


13.774 


11.794 


491 


739 


415 


335 




Totals — 31 mines 




2,711,767 


435,414 


608.914 


462.411 


643,216 


661,812 











Mines in 1902. 29. 
New mines, 2. 
Mines in 1903, 31. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



337 



Williamson County — Seventh District — Concluded. 



1 
















o 


® 




Employes. 


Disposition 
Output. 


OF 


s 


§ 


t^ 1 Acci- 

5 « i DENTS. 


















2 


■6 1 "S 


^g| 




5*5 


1 

a . 

II 


1 
i 
i 

1 


■3 


ons loaded on 
cars for ship- 
ment and sup- 
plied to locomo- 
tives at mine. 


"3 

o 


F 
11. 


1 

1 

o 


QS mined by har 

ce paid per gros 
and mining. 


mber of kegs oi 
sed for blasting 

mber of fatal. 


fl 

ll 


1 

a 


blC^ 


►■o 




o 


S-e 


o«-3 




o 1 tiJa 


P3 P 






< 


< 


< 


H 


H 


H 


H 


Q 


H 1 0- 


z 1 z. 


Zi 


z, 


$426,696 


242 


96 


338 


426,399 


2.763 


11.136 


267 


440, 298 $0 48 


12.768 


2 


3 


1 


274,457 


170 


86 


266 


266.472 


1.490 


9.936 


227 


189.637 48 


6,44!{ 


1 


3 


2 


276.744 


m 


«H 


268 


243.818 


966 


21.621 


222 


266.301 48 


7.922 


1 


3 


3 


218.063 


195 


129 


324 


201.614 


1.310 


10, 116 


233 


213.040 


48 


8,47(! 


3 


1 


4 


172.416 


86 


62 


148 


185.361 


300 


2.850 


194 


88, 795 


48 


2.634 


1 


3 


6 


169.036 


74 


48 


122 


181, 163 


5O0 


4,94C 


189 


4.203 


48 


2,231 




2 


6 


131.387 


76 


29 


104 


170.037 




6.013 


300 


176.050 


48 


7,100 


.... 




7 


105.003 


87 


60 


147 


127.267 




3,800 


248 


131,057 


48 


3,300 






8 


127.700 


106 


62 


167 


126.368 




1,326 


215 


61.680 


48 


2,971 


1 




9 


91.407 


131 


71 


202 


106.110 


2.540 


4.676 


237 


113 325 


48 


3.516 


3 




10 


72.998 


86 


38 


133 


100, 103 


1.160 


6.420 


210 


107.683 


48 


2,461 


.... 




11 


59,926 


90 


3ft 


126 


80.204 





6,90G 


176 


87.104 


48 


2.385 




.... 


12 


57,267 


55 


33 


88 


68.878 


650 


1.616 


160 


71.144 


48 


2.1661.... 


1 


13 


60.109 


60 


20 


80 


60.141 





1.096 


265 


61.236 


48 


1.560 .... 




1< 


52.726 


30 


26 


55 


57. 160 


200 


1.600 


187 


23.715 48 


8101.... 


.... 


16 


48.84G 


46 


29 


75 


65.000 





600 


210 


66,600 


48 


1,6801.... 




16 


401290 


35 


69 


94 


45.553 


300 


2,600 


20(1 


32.278 


48 


1,.S75 




1 


18 


61.300 


42 


23 


65 


47.600 




600 


20S 


48,000 


48 


1.120 






17 


34.470 


30 


11 


41 


27.697 


300 


828 


12C 


976 


48 


376 






19 


8.25S 


20 


16 


35 


7.689 


120 


460 


15(1 


8,259 


48 


26!i 






?,() 


3.260 


8 


3 


11 


3.100 




150 


50 


3,250 


48 


110 




.... 


21 


92.482.344 


1.846 


1.022 


2.868 


2.687.524 


12.598 


97.871 


210 


2,132.433 


$0 48 


71.631 


12 


17 




$2,835 
2.000 


2 


4 






2.443 




312 


2.443 


$0 48 


60 








4 


3 






2.000 




90 


2,000 


60 


100 


■ 






6.579 


3 


4 






4.873 




20C 


4.873 


50 


125 








2.88fl 




4 






1,800 




20C 


1,800 


50 


12 








1 258 


3 








1.258 




103 


1.258 


60 


36 








200 


1 


1 


2 




200 




45 


200 


48 


18 








300 


2 




2 




300 




60 


300 




20 








300 


2 
2 
2 


i 

1 


2 
3 
3 




300 
400 
200 





60 
120 
60 


300 
400 
200 




20 
12 
12 


:::: 


— 




400 




q 


3.260 




in 








817.002 


21 


18 


39 




13.774 




126 


13. 774 


$0 496 


416 


.... 






12,499,346 


1.867 


1,040 


2.907 


2.687.624 


26.372 


97.871 




2.146.207 




72.046 


12 


17 





—22 C 



338 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





a 
a 

OQ 

o 

II 

Z 


« 


Peoduotion o» Differknt Grades in Tons. 


1 


CODNTIKS. 


2 
« 

a 


6. 

a 


1 


1 


1 

s 

1 


* 
1 

1 


o 
« 

mo. 


Gallatin 

Jackson 

Jefferson..... 
Perry . .. 


2 

8 

1 

11 

6 
1 
21 


36,660 
969,264 
15,000 
1.027.031 
469,235 
348,769 
39,000 
2.697.993 


365 
120.467 
8.000 
477,655 
181,912 
270,884 
10,000 
423.620 


22.550 
462.098 
4.000 
332.662 
216.473 
35.843 
25.000 
508.423 


21.184 
33.112 


2.665 
60.934 

1.500 
~ 46. 757 

2.714 
19.221 


8,602 
270.682 
1,500 
118.683 
50, 191 
12.021 
4.000 
555.489 


2.468 $ 34.162 
33,999 1,010.233 

14.875 

19.262 970.960 


Randolph 

Saline 

Washington.. 
Williamson .. 


18.942 390.741 

9.800 305.328 

36.000 


461.672 


642.801 


105.988 2.482,344 


Totals and 
averages 


,0 


5,592.842 


1,492.903 


1.606.949 


515.968 


765, 692 


1.020.971 


190,459, $5,244,643 

1 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



839 



Seventh District— 1903 — Shipping Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition 


OF Odtput. 


i 


Tons Mined. 


Peicks 


S| 


»: 


« 












1 






Paid Per 
Ton fob— 


«.. 03 

h 


1 

u 

1 

a 


00 


2 


1 

1 

o 


i 


i 

II 
II 


li 

OS 


-3 

1 

5 

2 

o • 

a £ 


il 

il 

si 

at 




1 

43 


8 


1 

a 

o 

1 

a 


i 
a 

a 


a 
"3 

a 


1 

i 






o 














Ix 


03 






p 




z 


< 


H 


H 


H 


H 


EH 


< 


CQ 


CQ 


n 


g 


z 


Zi 


2; 


61 


36 


97 


31,819 


1.646 


1,103 


1.982 


163 


36,560 




».M 




1.233 




1 


784 


618 


1.302 


836.110 


66.454 


4.371 


63.329 


199 


392.883 


666,381 


.61 


$0. 


133 


18. 1G8 


3 


16 


24 


7 


31 


1.000 


5,000 


8,800 


600 


166 


16.000 




.57 






400 




•• 


1.139 


696 


1,734 


860,477 


114,433 


29.927 


22.189 


196 


974,831 


52.200 


.526 


. 


8 


30.281 


7 


19 


402 


170 


672 


430,426 


9,600 


7,092 


22.117 


197 


469,235 




,BS 






13, 158 






m 


i?n 


424 

62 


318,461 
35,000 


16,200 


9.538 
2.000 


4.680 
2.000 


196 

240 


348,769 
39,000 




.51 
.61 






11.270 
1.600 


1 


1 


45 1 17 










1.846 


1.022 
2.485 


2.868 
7.090 


2,584,817 


2.707 


12.598 


97,871 


210 


2.132.433 


665,660 


.48 


.41 


71.631 


12 
23 


17 


4.605 


6,098.100 


205,045 


75. 129 


214,668 


201 


4,408,701 


1. 184. 141 


$0,604 


$0.43 


147.681 


66 



340 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





1 

a 

-3 

1 

o 
1 

s 



S5 


I 

1 


Production of Diffkrknt Grades in Tons. 


1 


Counties. 


2 


J 




2: 


1 

ct 

I 


1 

o 

1 


1 

11 

< 


Gallatin 


7 

2 
15 
1 
5 
6 
3 
10 
3 
2 
10 


8.850 
70O 
13,020 
100 
2.545 
4.720 
8.890 
6.403 
4.800 
18.956 
13.774 


8,860 
700 

11,156 
100 
2,546 
4,400 
8.890 
5.403 
4.800 
3,733 

11,794 








1 


$ 9,850 


Hamilton 












1,060 




1,866 










16,210 












160 


JohuBon ...... 








. 




2,646 




320 




! 




6.180 












11.442 


galine 












6.091 


Wabash 












5.280 


Washlngrton . 


11,603 
491 


739 


1,431 
415 






2.189 
266 


19. 561 


Williamson .. 


69 


17,00^ 


Totals and 
averaares 


64 


81.758 


62.370 


14.279 


739 


1.846 


69 


2.466 


$94,361 


Totals district 
—all mines.. 


m 


5,674.600 


1,566.273 


1.621.228 


616,707 


767,438 


1.021.040 


192.914 


$6,339,004 



COAL IN ILLINOIS, 



341 



Seventh District — 1903 — Local Mines. 



Employes. 


Disposition of Odtpdt. 


9 o 


Tons Mined. 


Pricks^ 
Paid .Pke 


S-oS 
2; 


.2 
13 

1 
a 

3 




£ 


i 


i s 


^1 

1^ 


1 
2 

2 

|1 


§a 
11 


•6 

QQ 


1 

.a 

CQ 


Ton for— 


— • 


.S 

a 
■g 

1 
a 

s 
2; 




o 

o a 

"Sa 

11 


ti 

a 

a 
a 

•a 
§ 


1 

a 

a 
« 

a 

1 


1 

i 
Z 


25 


7 
6 
17 
2 



8 
6 
7 
9 
9 
18 


32 
6 
53 
2 
12 
29 
14 
31 
18 
30 
39 






8.850 
700 
12.745 
100 
2.546 
4.720 
8.890 
6.403 
4.800 
17.600 
13.774 


275 



1,356 



160 
100 
119 

I 

70 
166 
200 

240 
187 


8.850 
700 
12.620 
100 
2.645 
4.720 
8.890 
6.403 
4.800 
18.956 
13.774 




$0.51 

t 

*.61 

t 

t 
.532 
.55 
.50 

t 
.61 
.496 




$0 44 


367 
IQ 

ROH 


•• 

1 

1 














36 






400 










1 2 




12 











183 
261 
254 
181 
541 
415 




21 










8 










24 










9 










21 










21 




















177 


89 
2.674 


266 






80.127 


1.631 


148 


81.358 


400 


$0.63 


$0.44 


2.810 




4.782 


7.356 


5.098.100 


205.046 


156.256 


216.199 




4.490.059 


1.184.541 







150,391 


24 56 



* 4,406 tons mined by day. 

t Price paid for mining not given. 

I Average number of days not given. 



APPENDIX 



REGISTER OF CERTIFICATED- 
MINE MANAGERS. 
HOISTING ENGINEERS. 
MINE EXAMINERS. 



AGREEMENT AS TO MINING PRICES AND CONDITIONS 
IN ILLINOIS, APRIL 1, 1904 TO MARCH 31, 1906. 



Illinois Free Employment Offices 

FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



345 



MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF 
COMPETENCY. 

Note— This list includes all the mine managers to whom certificates have 
been issued prior to Jan. 1, 1904, 

The names which are printed in italic are those who hold both certificates 
of service and subsequent certificates of competency acquired through exami- 
nation. 

The names which are followed by the abbreviation "ex " are those who 
have exchanged certificates of service for those of competency without exami- 
nation, under the provisions of the amendment of 1895, names followed by 
the letter "d" are deceased. 

The postoffice addresses here given, and in all the lists following, are those 
recorded at the time the certificates were issued, and in many cases are not 
the present addresses of the certificate holders. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Rosboro 

Wanlock 

Taylorville 

TaylorvUle 

Taylorville 

Streator. 

Collinsville 

LaSalle 

Elmwood 

Ladd 

Streator 

Belleville 




DuQuoin 

Cantrall 


Adams, J. M 


Barron. James, ex........ 


Alnsworth. Samuel 

Alnsworth, Samuel, Jr 

Alnsworth, Thomas 


Barrowman. James 

Bartlett. Thomas, ex 

Bashong, Andrew 


Braldwood 

Cuba 

Danville.. 






Marissa' 


Alexander. .J 


Bates, W. H 


Winchester 


Allen, David T 


Bates. R D 


Winchester . 








Anderson, James 


Bauer, Valentine 


Clyde 




Baxter, William 


hadd .:::.::. :::::: 








A.ngel. Hiram 


Belleville 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Peoria 

Coal City 


Beattie Richard. .. 


Murphysboro 


Aneell. Charles 




Danville 


Apblett. William R 


Beaty, James 


Mascoutah 


Appleby, John E. 


Beatty, James H. 


Mascoutah 






Peoria 




Streator 

Murphy sijo'ro'"." 

Bracevllle 

Spring Valley.... 






Atkinson, J. G 


Becker. P. W 


Pinokneyvllle.... 


Atkinson, William 


Beese. John 

Beharrelle, Fred 

Bell, Richard 




Atkinson, William 


Orchard Mines... 




Gillespie 




Bell, William 

Belger, John 

Beltz Andrew. 




Archer. John 


Barclay 

Girard 

Fairmount 

Preeburff 

Edwardsvllle .... 
Petersbure 

Streator i 

Mapleton | 

Athens 


Nilwood 


Ash. T. G 


Harrisburg 




Bengrston. John A., ex 

Bennett, James... .. 


Galva 


Archibald, David 


Odin 


Ax, John... 


Bennett John 


Centralia 




Berkstresser, W. A 

Berry, Jessiar 






Green view 






Belleville 


Baker. Gustav. 


Betz Charles G 










Bailey, William 


Bevard, F. C 


Carterville 




Duquoin 

Bartonville 

Coflfeen 

Braldwood 

Bryant 1 




Ball Edward 




Clark City 


Barlow, Henry 


Biebel Henry ex 


Rentchler 


Barnes, James.. 






Barnett, Oliver 


Bingham, Robert 


O'Fallon 



346 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Coffeen 

Pana 


Clark. Qulnton 










Birtley. William P 


Springfield 

Murphysboro 

Divernon 

East Peoria 

Cable 

New Athens 

Murphysboro .... 

DiiQuoin 

Oglesby 

Oglesby 

Wenona 

Braiilwood 

Braidwood 

Fairmount 

(•Jreen^'lew 

Belleville 

Virden 


Clark. John . . . .. 


Decatur 


Blair. Gus 








ClHlland. Robert 




Blaukeuship, Wm. F 


Clifford, Michael J 


Kewanee 


Blenkinsopp, Thos.N.... 




Worden 


Boettcher, F. J 


Collier. Frank J 


Bartonville 




ColllQS. Richard J., ex 

Combs, James W 


O'Fallon 


Boston James 


Kewanee 




Comford.L 




Bottomly, John 


Condis. Mulcom 


Spring Valley. . 


Bowers, Robert 


Conlty, Patrick 


DuQuoin 






Nilwood 








Beyer, J. A 


Condon. Ch'irles H 


HannaCity 








Brennan, John I 


Conrad. William. 


Springfield ... 


BrennaD, Patrick 


Toluca 


Costello Hennry 


Pana 


Bres8men. William 


Sp'ingfleld 

Caseyville 


Castor. George 


Grape Creek 


Brockhouse, Samuel 


Corrigan, James. 


Marseilles ... 


Brigham. William . 


Courtney, jHmes D 


Westville 




Taylorville 

Glen Carbon 

Pinckneyville 

Coal City 




Brown, John 


Uox, Eugene. 


Centralla 










Craine. B. S 




Brown, William P 


Pontiac 

Murphysboro 

Farmlngton 

DuQuoln 


Crampton, Edward 

('rauch J E 


Murphysboro. .... 


Brown, James B.. . 


Vlrdeu 




Craukshaw, Thomas 

Crankshaw, William 

Crighton Robert 




Browning, J. M 


Decatur 


Brueckner. Emil 


Staunton 

Belleville 

St John 

Muddy Valley.... 




Brueggeman, George 

Bulmer, John, ex 


Crowder, Richard A 

Cruicki-hankH, John 

Cruickshanks. Walter E.. 
Cruickshanks. William.... 
Cryer, James T 


Moccasin 

Farmlngton 


Bulmt-r, Benjamin 


K Peoria. 




Middle Grove.... 


Burdett, J. P 


Colchester 

Springfield 

Pt-ru 


Soring Valley 


Butzke. Frank.. 


Cummlng. Ambrose B 

Cummlug, Jiimes P 

CummlDg, John P 


Sparland.. .. 






Burkhardt, John B 


Mt. Olive 

Pottstown 

Pana 


Bracevllle 




Cummlcg, 'Jhamas S 


Gardner 








Cunningham, Thomas 

Cunningham. Cormick... 


Girard 


Cameron. David J 


Springfield 




Sorento 

Sandoval 

Athens.. 

Pinckneyville.... 

As«umptlon 

Decatur 

Madisonville, Ky. 

Gillespie 

Colfax 


LaSalle 


Cambell. William 


Daenzer Anton 




Campbell, Frank J 




Campbell Thos M 'd ) 


Belleville 








Campbell K. W 


Dale, John. 


Kredonia 


Canfleld, R. A. 




Belleville 


Carroll, A. W 


Daniels, Samuel 


Belleville 


Carlson. Andrew 


Daniels. Alexander 

Dauney William 


Henry ...... ...... 


Carson J. H . 


O'Fallon 

Wolcott 

BIrkner 


Lincoln 




Davis. Calib 


Colllnsville 


Cirter, Charles 


Davis, J H 


Cuba 




Birkner 

Gillespie 

O'Fallon 








Davis, P J 


Percy 


Carroll, John, (d) 


Davis, William 


Litchfield 


Carylon J 


Oglesby 

Shelbytown 

Tllden 


Davi.« William H 


Streator 








Catheart. Matthew, ex. 


Davison, James 


Soarta 


Center George H 


Hallidayhor.o 

Lenz Station 

Spaulding 

Greenvlew 

Seatonville 

Seatonvllle 

Streator 

Pleasant Plains.. 
Reed City 


Davenport. John. 


Harris burg 






Kelleville 


Chambers, William 


Dawson, Daniel 


Campbell Hill.... 


Charlton. George B 


Dawson. Richard 






Cherry. James 


Deaton, Abraham L 

Deeney George H 


Mlddletown 


Cherry. W S 


Farmlngton 














Chivera, Joseph 


Bracevllle 

^spumptlon 

Murphysboro 

MariHsa 


Devlin, Henrv 


Toluca 






Spring Valley.... 








Church, Henry M . .. . 


Dick, Robert 


DuQuoin 


Clark, Martin 


Decatur 

Decatur 


Dickenson. James E 

iDickerson. J. L 


Belleville 


Clark. IiJdward 


Danville 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



Ml 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Dodd. William, (d) 


Cable 

61. David 


Frew. Archibald 










Carterville 


Frlska. Jan. . . . 


Edwardsville 




Fritz. William, ex 














Carterville 

.Springfield 

(jlenburn 

Chicago 

Kruidwood 

Danville 








Dooner. P. J 


Gafflgan. Patrick J 

Gallhraiih, George 

Garrlty Juhn 


Springfield 


Donnelly P H 


Tamaroa 




Klverton 




Gaul,HenryJ 

Gavln, Barrney 


Kidge Prairie .... 


Doutihertv Daniel 


Virginia . 


Springfield 




Mu.ldy Valley.... 

Briar Bluff 

Streator 

Grape Creek 

Paua. 








Gell, Philip 


Gilchrist 


Drake lieorge 


Gibson. Ml' hael 


Spring Valley.... 




Gilbert. ±]dward 


Niantlc 








Kinmundy 

Belleville 


GllchrlvT. John W 


Gilchrist 


Duffner, J. W 


Glass, William H 


Pana 


Duncan Charles 


Streator 


t^luck, Wes C 

Goalby. JohnP 

Goddard, Beig'amln B 

(4oddaril. William 

Oolder, William 

Golden, George 

Golden. William D 

Gorsuch, K H 


Spring Valley 




Springfield 


Gillespie 






Durkin. Mii-hael 


Sunfleld 

Braidwood 

Salem 

(^eutralia 


.. do 




Cuba 






Edwards, S E 


do 




Springfield 


.. do 




Goodall, George 

Gordon, Ephrlam G 

Grabuck. Eniil T 

Grabuck, H H 

Graham, Hiram 




Ehret Frank A 


Wesley 

Edwardsville .... 


Wanlock 


Eller William 


Staunton 




. do 


Empry, Joseph 


Belleville.... 


Virden 




("Jraham, Juhn W 










Essex George W 


Soperville. ....... 


Graham, William 


Virden 








Harrisburg: 

i-aSalle 




Marion 


Evans .John Nine ex 


Grant. Peter, Jr 


Peoria 




OPallon 

Bisaell 

Streator 

Norris 

Harrisbure 

Caseyville 

Spring Valley.... 

Decatur 

-treator 


Gratz, Gottleib 






Granili<k, Jul. M 


Belleville 


Evans Albert E . 


Gray. Thomas R . ... 


Springfield . 




Gray. Peter 


Pana 


Evans. William H 


Green. Arthur 


Hraceville 


Evans Juhn O Jr 


Green W H .... 


Belleville . .. 






Marissa 




Green, John W 


Springfield 






Belleville 








Fa'rbairn, Thomas 


(Greenwood. John R 

Greenwood, Robert 


Edinburg 




Gilchrist 

Glen Carbon 

Barclay 

Spauldine 

Danville 

Streafor ..... 








Farnsworth. L»wrence,ex 


Grelve Peter, Jr 

Griffin, John 

Grlnrod. William E 

Groom. John 

Grosspltch. August 

Guest, Joseph, ex 

Guest. John 

Guiney. James T 

Haddick. John.Jr 

Haddick. William, ex 

Haddow, Thomas 

Hagerton. Joseph 

Halle. George 


do 


Farn worth, Thomas J... 


Cantrall 

Belleville 


Fellows, Edward 


do 




Reed City 

Braidwood 

DuQuoin 


.. do 


Ferguson, Walter 


. do 


Ferguson, William 


do 


Picher, A W 


Worden 

Pana 




Finfrock, M. M 




Flavel, Jonah 


DuQuoin 

Decatur 






Cable 






Fletcher. John 


LaSalle 

Colllnsvllle 

.. do 


Pana ... 






Fletcher, 'P. C 


Ladd 


Fletcher, William 


. do 


Hall, John 


Sherrard 




LaSalle 

Mapleton 

Centralis 

Murphysboro 

Lincoln 


Hallemeuer, Julius, ex — 
Hall. Matthew 




Foley. W. E 


Braceville 


Forsythe, Peter 


Halnsel, Daniel . . 


I<pnzhurg 




Halbert. J. A 


Wpi>tville 


Foster. William 


Hamilton. Thomas 

Hanriwright, James 

Hanley. John H 

Hannah, Thomas 

Hardin, Joseph H 

Harding. Enos 


Nashville 


Poster. -lames .. .. 


Marion 

Belleville 

Braidwood 

Danville 

Lincoln 


Virden 


Fohl, Bernard, ex 

Francis, T. L- 

Frazee. William H 


Springfield 

lies Junction 


Franken, Benard 


Birkner 



848 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Certificates of Compe/ewc^/— Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffiee. 


Name. 


Postoffiee. 


Hardingf, Thomas F 


Danville 


James, Johan 


Grape Creek 


Hardingr, William 


Lebanon . 


Jaques, William 


Belleville 




Murphysboro — 

Coal City 

-Springfield 

Colchester 

"'treator 




.. do 


Harkes. William 


Jetford, R. H 


Kingston Mines.. 


Harper. William J 


Jefford, Thomas H., ex.... 








Harrison, Earnest 


Jenkins, Alexander 

Jenkins, David 


Dunfermline 


Harrison, John 


Virden 

Odin 


South Danville.. 




Jenkins. Thomas C 

Jenkins. J. A 

Jenkins, John L 






Murphysboro .... 
Athens 




Harrison James. 


Falrbury 




Seatonville 

Murphysboro 

Freeburg 


Jirrimire, William M.... 








Hartman, Wm 


j John, Evan D 


Spauldlng 


Haselton, F. D 


Spauldlng 

tfrape Creek 

Glen Carbon 

Belleville 


Johnson, William ..... 


Danville 


Haskins. George H 

Hauck. Fred 


Johnston, Cochran 

' Johnston, Samuel 


Spring Valley.... 
Oglesby 


Hawkins, Sidney 


1 Johnsron, William 


Marlon 






Collinsville 


Hebenstrelt, Bruno 


Staunton 


Jones. Charles 


Marissa 


Hebenstreit E W 


do 


Jones, David ., . 


.do 




.. do 

.. do 




Taylorvllle 








Helple. Walter. 


DeSoto . . .. 


Jones. Edward 


Oglesby 


Helfrlch, Henry 








Henderson, Edward 


Springfield 

Coal City 


Jones, John H 


DuQuoin 


enderson, Joseph 


Jones, Logan 


Marissa 




Marlsaa 




Oglesby 




New Athens 

Nlantlc 

Tllden 


Jones, T. L 

Jones, William 


Ladd 


Heniev, Richard . 


Marissa. 






Sheffield 




Kewanee 

Pontiac . 






Henry, John T . 


Jones, William M 


I'amaroa 


Henry, Philip 


Kewanee 

Sife^'"'^:- 


Jordan, Robert (d) 




Hertot. James 




letherington. Benj. M 








Coulterville 




Springfield 

Sherrard 






Hicks, Rd. J.... 


Kaney, John 


Centralia 


Higbee. A. W 


Kay. John 












Hill. Marshall 


Carterville 

Colchester 

Mollne 

Tilden. 


Karral. Charles.... 


Westville 


Hillary. Edward 


Karrall, Edgar 


Braceville 






Hissonar. t!harlea 


Keay, A. H. S 

Keav John 


Seatonville 


Hoffman John 


DuQaoln 

Lincoln 

Harrlsburg 

Percy 

DuQuoin 

.. do 

Rraeevllle 

DuQuoin 

Braldwood 

do 


Springfield 




Keefer, William 




Hornlngf, Charles A 


Kell, Matthew 


Dubois 


Houstan Robert 


Kell, Peter 


do 






Litchfield 


Howell, D.J 


Kelley, D. J 


Carbon Hill 


Howells Eben (d) . 


Kelly, Frank S ... 


Centralia 


Howells. T. J 

Hoye, tfames 


Kelley, Joseph G.,ex 

Kelley, Robert D 


Braidwood 

Carbon Hill 


Hoye, William . 


Kelley, J. D.,Sr 


. do 


Hoddy.T.H 






Gillespie 


Hudson. Thomas 


Etherly 

Braidwood 

.. do 


Kenney. Thomas 


Springfield 


oghes, James 


Kerr, John . ............... 


RushvlUe 






ogfesby ;.".:::: 




Pana 

LitchQeld 






Hughes, John J 


Kidd W 


Ridge Prairie 




Hillary 

Breese 

Murphysboro .... 

Edwards 

Tallula 

Athens 

Pontiac 

Lebanon 

Litchfield 

Cable 

St. David 

Mt. Olive 




.. do 




Kienbus-h, David 




Humphreys, Edward 


Killingsworth, C 


Pinckneyville 


Hunt Albert J 


Klncaid Lee 


Athens 






.. do 




KIrchner, Frank 


Belleville 




Kirk wood Martin 


Birkner 






Belleville 


Irwin, James M 


Klinglnfus, Emil 

Kloever. Joseph 


.. do 


Issinghaus, William 

Izat, William 


Pana 

Seatonville 






Breeze 




Kortkamp. Wm 


Hillsboro 


Jackson, George W 


Kramer. Anthony F 


Sato 

Belleville 


James. John 


Kreppert, Wm 


Springfield 



[INE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



349 



Certificates of Competency — Contiuned. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 


Lacour Ausrust 


Bartonvllle 

Belleville 

Cartervlile 

Worden 


Moffat, Thot 


Percy 




Monaghan, Edward 


Carbon Hill 






Launoe Fraiiic 


Moore, Alexander J 

Moore, Samuel 


Springfield 




Athens 


Chicago 




Cuba 


Moreland, John, Jr 






Mt. Olive 


Pehin 




Lake Creek 

Harrisburg 

Cable 


M or in, Jeremiah 


Danville. 




Morln.D. A 


.. do 






Lee Kobtrt 


Sherrard . .. 


Morgan, Joseph 


Streator 




Canton 

Cahie 




Lad d ?..::::::::;: 










Springfield 

DuQuoin 

Carbon Hill 

.do 


Morris. J. H 


Nashville . . . 








Lettsome, William 


Morris. P K 


Roanoke 




Morris, Wm. H 


Belleville .... 




Sparta 




Nashville 


Lewis James 


Bryant 

Streator . .. 


Morris, Robert 


Marion 


Lewis William 


Morrissey, Ihomas 

Morrison. D. H 

Morton, Andrew 


Lebanon . 


Llndley, Richard 


Collinsvllle 

DuQiioin 

Braidwood 

Peters Station ... 

Peoria 

Summerfleld 

Kdinburg 

Barclay 

Danville 


Girard 


Lindsay. John . 


Virginia 


Linsky. P. J 


Morton, Robert .. 


.. do .... 






Little Peter 


Mould, Thomas R 


O'Fallon 


Little Thomas 


Murdock, John . 


Breeds 


Lloyd, David J 




Etherly 


Lloyd. Rowland R . 


Munster. Anton........ 


WestviUe 






Chatham 




Rentehler 

Wanlock 




Braidwood 


Lloyd, Thomas. 


Murphy. Patrick 


Springfield . .. 




Springfield 

Vlrden 


Nas-hville 








Love John W 


Carbon HiU 

Orchard Mines... 

Collinsvllle 

. do 


Murray, J H 


Galva 




Murrie, Archibald 


Centralia 




Mustard, Geo 


Norrls 


Lumaghi Louis F 


McAllister, Hector 


Streator 


Macke.P. H 




McAnarney, James 

McCann, Patrick 


Girard 


Malcolm, Wm. J 


Braceville 

Decatur 


Lincoln 


Malloy. Henry E.(d) 


McCleary, John 


('antrall .... 


SorlDgfield 

Pinckneyville.... 

Braidwood 

Mascoutah 

Wenoca 

.. do 






Malone, Frank . . 


MrClintock. John 


Murphysboro .... 


Maltby.Wm.(d) 


McCraner, Jfts 

McCriddle. David 


Girard 






Marland John Jr 


McCullough, W. P 


Mapleton 




McDill. Jas 


Pana 




McDonald, Robert 

McDonald, Wm 




Martin, Chas . 


Middle Grove .... 

Farmlneton 

Edinburg 


Braidwood 






Danville 


Mason, Eli 


McFarland, Wm. A 

McGeachen, Robert 

McGlnnis. John 


Edwardsvllle .... 


Mason, Mark Jr 


•Jato 


Sorento. .... 


Massie.Jobn G 


Marlsga 

Kiomundy 

Carlinville 

Belleville 

Pana 




Matthews, W. S .. 


McGunnigal, -John 


Murphysboro .... 




McGunnieal, James 

MeGunigal. Bernard 

McKean, Isaac 




Maule, Alexander 


'prine Valley.... 


Mays. John F.. , , 


Coal City 


Medill Duncan 


Oglesby 


McKoown, Frank . 


Decatur ... 






Collinsvllle 


Mtehan. Peter .. 


WilMamsville.... 
Belleville 


McLearn, Archibald 


.. do 






Millard. John 




Ava 


Miller. Edward 


Sorento 


McLauffhIin, John 


Girard 




Ijoceyville 

Sandoval 

Belleville 

.. do 




.. do 


Mldrileton, Jaa. L 


McManamon. Patrick F... 

McMorrow. Michael 

McMath. George 


Spring Valley.... 


Michaels, Lewis . 


Farming' on ... 


Michaels. Otto L 


Cartervlile 


Miller, Alexander...' 


Ridge Prairie .... 
Coal City 


McMurtle.A. B 

McWhinney. Andrew 

McMorrow. Thomas 

McNabb. Wm 




Miller, Hugh . 


Vlrden 


Miller. Wm 


Lenzburg 

Pawnee 




Miller, Geo. W 


Athens 


Miller, John K 


Stannton 

Norrls 

Collinsvllle 

;<pr1ng Valley.... 

Cable 

Pana 

Percy 






Milem. John 




Millett. Thos 




MlJIhonse. John Q 


Neal, Albert M 


Murphysboro .... 


Mills T J 


Neal. Wm 


do 


Mitchell. T. J 






Moffat, R.E 


Neeson, Richard 


Divernon 



350 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Certificates of Competency — Contmued. 



Name. 


Postoflace. 


Name. 


Poatoffice. 




Bunker Hill 


Radford, William 


Cuba 


Newcomb. H C 




Springfield 


Sprlngfleld 


Radford. William T 






Braidwood 




Orchard Mines... 
Kingston Mines.. 


Ramsey. (Charles J 


Gi'lespie 


Newsam. Richard, Jr 




Karick. Phil. W 


Glen Carbon 








Belleville 


Nesblt. Cbarlea, ex 


.Mill«tadt 

BnilPvllle 

DuQuoin 

Cutia 


Rasmussen. James E 


Mineral 

Kingston 






Muddy Valley.... 


Nicholson, (-Jftorge A 

Nicholson Wm 


Reavlev, Robert 


Riverton 


do 


Kedyard John 


Odin 








Belleville 




Rellevllle 


Reed W M 


Girard 




Reed. Wm B 


Will-man 










NorJness. C. K 


Gir^rd 

Streator 

''prlnff Valley ... 




Danville 


Reid Andrew 


Springfield ....... 














O' Beirne .Joliii 


Keimann John 


Belleville 










\larqa«tte 

KellHville 

Spring Valley.... 
Pana 


Reynolds, William 

Reynolds John 






Streator ...... 






Pana 


O'Briae VVui 


Richards. John 


-Murphysboro .... 




■Spring Valley.... 

Rraidwood 

Pai'l-y 

Marquette 

-Sandoval 


Richardson, Joseph 

Richardson, Robert 

Rldeley. O. Li 

Ritchie, Alex . Sr 


Litchfield 




Cartervllle 


O'Counor. Patrick P 


Mt. Olive 

( linton 


OniH Wm 


Ritchie. A. Jr 


Trenton 






Owens Robert 


Marlon 

Coilinsvllle 

Barclay 

Muri>hysboro .... 
Assumption 


Koberts. Benjamin D 


Streator 




Collln^ville 




Roberts, lohn 0.,ex 

Roberts, Thomas D 






. do 


Passent Wm C 


Gardner 










Rcbinson. 1.. B 




Pnvn« HhtvoV 


Pana 




Bratdwood 

Pana 


Rodenburg, Charles 

Roe -'amuel 


Belleville 


Penwell. U T 


Oglesby 


Percell Thomas 


N rris 

Murphyshoro .... 
Spring Valley.... 
Minonk 


Roe Thomas 


do 






DuQuoin 


Pettier Moses 


Rogers, Joslah 


Braidwood 


Phillirm .l!im«<t 


Roeers Llewellen 


do 










-Spring Valley.,.. 

St. David 

Farmington 

Harrisburg 

Edinburg 

i4ermaDtown 

Murohysboro .... 






Plcton, Joseph 


Rollo William 


Pana 






Pierson Robert ........... 


Ross David 


Oglesby 


Pierce William 




Kingston Mines.. 




Rowland. Charles, ex 

R'lndle, John C 


Belleville 


Pool E<1aar JS 


Colchester. 




Rumlle, William 


Pekln 




Brar^eville 

Belleville 

Murphvsboro .... 

Bracevllle 

'^ato 








Ru-ledge.J. J 

Ryan Jameg (d) 




Powell Evan . ...... 


Spritigfield 






N. Springfield.... 


Powell J E 


Sangrelet. Marshall 

Sanders. John M 






Belleville 






Roanoke 

Gillespie 

Toluca 


Mount Olive 


Prince Thomas 


Hanna City 


Proctor Michael J 


•<arsom Henry S., ex 


Streator 




Centralia 

Coal Valley 

St John 


Belleville 






Coal City 


Pugh Daniel 


"^chroll Joseph 


Bart on vi lie 


Pullen. Charles 


Litrhfleld 

Sorento 

Banonville 

Cuba 

Bloomington 




Belleville 








Pye William 


Schellschmidt. Ernst 

Scully WilllHra J 


East Peoria 








Scurrah. Castling R 

Secor. Frederick D 

Seddon, Thomas 


Braceville 

Odin 


Radford. Thomas, ex 


Paisley 



MINE MANAGERS, OERTIFIOATEE OF COMPETENCY. 

Certificates oj Competency — Continued. 



851 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


PostoflBce. 




St. John 




Millstadt 




Danville 


Swausberg. John L. 

Swar.hout. J. e 


Dauville. 




Gillespie 






Peoria 




Sharp. Montgomery, ex.. 


Coal City 






(4alva 






Bartonvllle 

Pana . . 




Shields Krauk D 


Tattersall. George 


Seneca 




Gilchrist 




Edwards 




Pana 


Taylor, Daniel 

Taylor, Henry 






.Streator 


Belleville 


Siridle John 


Edwardsville .... 


Taylor, James. . 


Edwanls 








Simmons Thomas 


Canton 


Taylor. Thomas, ex 

Taylor. Thomas, ex 


O'Pallon 




<->lenCarb(in 

Spring Valley.... 
Springfield 










Thaln. James ... .... 


Riverton 




Tbom, Alexander, ex 

Thomas, H 




Simpson, George C 


. do 


Westviile 


Simpson, William J 


Collinsville 

.. do 


Thomas. J. G 


Spring Valley.... 
Ladd 


Simpson, Thomas 


O'i^'allon 


Thomas. T. J 


Collinsville 


Slsk. A.J 














Skinner, Uavid (d) 


do 


'I'homas, Richard 


Riiige Prairie 




.. do 












DeSoto 


Skelton. A. H 


Coal City 


Tijompsion, Kobert C 


Murphysboro. 


Sloan, KdwardC 


Wesley City 

Middle (4rove .... 
Spring Valley.... 










Smethurst. Nathan ... . . 


Thorand. Joseph 


Treuton 








Smith. Dnvid P 


Dawson 


Tolle, E. B . 

Tregoning, Walter. 


Kingston Mines.. 


Smith Felix. 


Btrkner, 


Murphysboro 




l.aSalle 


Twomley. Edwin, ex 


Coal Valley 










Mount Olive 

Kast Peoria 


Ulrlch. Casper 










Tllden 




Collinsville. 

Springfl-ld 

Bloomington 

Pana 


Vallow. Charles 








Smith. Joseph.... ......... 


Kinmundy. 




Vandebur. John,ex 










Smirh William Q 


Rlvertnn 


Viearv. John, ex 


Liocoln. ......... 


Smith W H 


HilNboro 


Vose John 


Springfield 


Sraifh, Thomas 


Belleville 


Wagner, I . 


Smith W. J 


Girard 

Virden 




Sneddon Richard 


Mapleton 






Wallace. David 




Sollenherg-er, Harry C 


Dunfermline 

Springfield 

. do .. 


Walland Ed. S.. ex 


BHrtonville 


Soloman. Peter fl 


Walschtag, Stephen 

Walsh, Patrick 


Peoria 


Spires Alfred 


Braneville 

Glen Carbon 

Belleville 

'^-oleh«ster 

Hallidayboro 

-iato 


SprlDgSeld 




Walsh, Peter P. 




Staehle Augrust 


Walters, Wm. H 


Staunton ......... 


Stanton William E ex 


Wanless, Wm H 


Rive^'ton . 




Wantling, T. J 

Wantilng. Thomas 

Walters. Thomas W 




Stelner. Benjamin 


Pottstown ........ 




fiadd 




rollin.sville 

Spring Valley.... 

Centralia 

Seatonville 

Peoria 




Steel Jumes 


Warren, James M 


Herrin 


^reel Neal 


Watson Gporge R 


Wyoming 

Danville 




Wntkin*. W. J 


Stirral Jamps.. ....... . 


Watts. Thomas J 


Elmwood. 




Springfield 

r;olllnsville 

St Louis, Mo.... 




.. do 


Stockett. Lewis 


Weher. Henrv 


Murphysboro, .... 


Stocket. Th'^s R. Jr... 


Webster, Richard 


Collinsville 








Stoneburrer. L. L 

Stnrrle Ari^hibald 


Moweaqua 

■^patonville 

Sprtnefield 

Canton 

Pdwardsville 

Coal City 


Welsenhorn. P. E 

Wenneborg Otto 


Mt. Olive 

Springfield. 






Pekin 


Straley, Peter 


Westwood, Albert 


Bplleville 








Strickland. John 


Westwood, Thomas 


Belleville 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Competency — Concluded. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 


Wheatcraft. James 




Wilson H. C 


Pekin 


Oglesby 


Wilson. John B 


Sparta 




Colllnsvllle 


Wilson, John J 


Wesley City 




Wilson, Kobert 






Belleville 

Virden 

Seatonvllle 

FarmlDgton 

Murphysboro 

St. David 

Weatvilie 


Wilson, William 


Middle Grove .... 


TIThlfa Minhaal 


Wilson, Thomas 


Norrls 






Sparta 


Whitehead, Joseph 


Wilson W R 


Reed City 


Winneberg, W 


Springfield 




Winning, James 


Cartervllle 






.. do 




Wlnterbottom. John 

Winters, Samuel P 

Wlttman, Daniel 


Murphysboro .... 




Mnrphysboro 

FarmlDgton 


Bartonvllle 


^SrWWama At^ff 


New Baden 




Walschlag, Stephen, ex... 
Wood H»'nry 


Peoria 




Belleville 

Uirnrd 


Streator 


Williams, Robert fl 


Woods, William, ex 

Worthington. Willard 

Wright. John 


Morris 


DuQuoIn 

Edluburg 


DuQuoln 




Belleville 




Wright, J. W 


Kingston Mines.. 




Staunton.. ...... 






WlUaon Hiram E 


Carbondale 






Belleville 




Coal City 


Young, Htram 


Glrard 




Murphysboro .... 
Spring Valley .... 

KinmuDdy 

Carbon Hill 

Carbondale 


Young. Hugh Q 


Braidwood 




Zlnk, Peter A 










Belleville 




ZoUer, Robert H 


Braidwood 









MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OP SERVICE. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 




Rosboro 

New Castle 

Belleville 




Colllnsvllle 




Davison. Matthew 


DuQuoln 




Deans . Hf-nry .............. 


Percy 






Cartervllle 


Atkinson. Edward 

A'rfnrd ThnmaX . .. 




Duffner. J. W 


Belleville 


Petersburg 

Sunfleld 


Enstmlnger. Emanuel E.. 

Entwhistie, Robert 

Erwin. William 






Crab Orchard.... 
(Colchester 


Bangart, Henry (d) 




West Belleville... 


Cuba 








Cutler 






Winchester 

DuQuoin 






Fletcher, Adam 


Ladd 




Pckin 


Fnrsythe, Peter 


Centralis 


Bracken. James A 


Qreenvlew 

Cutler 




.. do 


Fowler. Henry 


Millersbure 


Brown Thomas M ....... 


Pickneyville 

Grape Creek 

Danville 


Franklin, Bernard 

Gilbert Udward 


Lincoln 


BuDting.J. H 

Bushong, Andrew M 






Niantlc 






Peoria 




Goodler. Wm 


Cuba 


Cameron, Duncan S 






Springfield 


Kalrvlew 


Graber, Henry 


Orchard Mines .. 




Pleasant Plains.. 
Murphysboro .... 

Bartonvllle 

Ntlwood 


Grant, David 


Pekin 




Gray, John (d) 


Roanoke 




Oreen. Robert 


Springfield 




Greenwood. Robert 

Grieve, Peter 


DuQuoln 




Grape Creek 

O'Fallon 


Collinsville 




Qrlfflth, William, A 

Haddick Robert 


Colona 


CummlDgs, William 


Rushville 












Cable 












Streator 


Davenport, John 


Harrisbursr 


Helnz,JohnL 


LaSalle 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 558 

Certificates of -Serf ice— Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postofllce. 


TTnwn Wlllinm 


Streator 

Braidwood 

Tallula 

Golden Eagle 

Bartonville' 

DuQuoin 

Marlssa 


Oexner, Wendelln 


West Belleville.. 




Parkin, William 








Hallentntuer, Julius 


Sweetwater 


Patterson. J. C 


Assumption 

Braidwood 




Pfander. Fred 


Peoria 




PicKett. Robert 






Pool, £ldgar E 


Murphysboro 




Bartonville 

Wenona 

Ridge Prairie.... 

Kewanee 

Belleville 

Sato 

Tamaroa 

Belleville^ 

Sheffield 

Sato 

Belleville 

WiluamsViVle.;!!! 

Augusta 

Belleville 

Lebanon 

Lenzbure 

Norris 

CollinsviUe 

Percy 

Carbon Hill 

Danville 

Virginia 

Braidwood 

Kangley 

Mtnard 

Grape Creek 

CollinsviUe 

Marphysboro .... 


Price, David 


Fairbury 






Danville 








Kldd, Andrew 

Kidd, Neuaene 

Kirley. Bernard 

Eiingenbagen. Henry 

Kramer, Anthony F 




Cuba 




Birkner 


Reynolds. William 


East Peoria 

Peoria 


Laumbattua. Philip H.... 
Lecze. Charles 


Rusche. Christian (d) 


East Peoria 


Schmidt. Frank P 










Shaw. Nathan 

Smith, David P 




Mason Mark Jr 


Dawson 




Smith, Felix 




Meehan Patrick 






Meehan Peter 


Spencer, George 


DuQuoln 






Bl«lr. 






Galva 


Miller Nicholas 


Stewart David J .. ..... 


Seatonville 


Miller, William 


Stuhlsatz. -Michael 




Milen John 


Stittoti. Thomas 


Mlllstsdt 


Milleit 2'homas 


Swan Charles 


Oakwood 






St. David 


Monaghan. Edward 


Teifer. Alexander W 

Terrill. Thomas 


Morris 








Thompson, John 


DeSoto 




Thornton James.... 


DuQuoin 


McDonald Daniel . 


Waugh. George. Sr 

Westwood, Thomas 




DcDowell. James A 

McKernan James 


Peoria 

Belleville 








Williams, John 


Sato 


Neal William 


Williams John T .... 


Coalville 










Galva 


Wilms William 


Springfield 









MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY AT MINES 
EMPLOYING NOT TO EXCEED TEN MEN. 



Postoffice. 



Aby, J.J 

Adams, J. M 
Aldrage. John. 
Aldridge. William R. 

Aldrlch. M. M 

Ahlgren, Emll 

Alexander, Orie A — 

Allen, James T 

Allen. W. P 

Allison. John 

Allison, Elmer 

Anderson, Alexander. 

Anderson, Lee A 

Anderson, N. C 

Anderson. M. H 




Lanra . 
Denmark . 
Danville , 

do 
Geneseo , 

Kewanee 

HuntsvUle 

Pleasant View. 

Spillerton 

Loding 

Danville 

Sato 

Streator 

Ottawa 

Knoxville 



Anna, Charles 

Argus. Leonard 

Ascraft, J. W 

Atkinson, Amos 

Atkinson. M 

Atkinson. Chas. W. 
Axley, Edward 



Backling William. 
Backofen, Jacob.. 

Bailey, Oliver 

Baird, W. C 

Balrd. Oswald... 
Baker. L.C 



Wataga 

Belleville.. 

Mayton 

Colchester. 
Kewanee .. 
Colchester. 
Roodhouse 



East Peoria. 
Lilttletown... 
Carbondale.. 

.. do 

Colchester... 
Oakwood 



-23 C. 



354 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Mine Managers {Ten Men), Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Baker. William H 


Industry 

Ottawa 

Danville 

North Alton 

Ablnerdon 

Colchester 

Streator 

Palzo 

Bryant 

Kewanee 

Lewlstown 

St. David 

Henry 

Pekin 

Danville 

Cable 

Farmington 

Ottawa 

Morris 

Pleasant View... 

CartervUle 

Chillicothe 

Winchester 


Carlson, Andrew F 

Carroll. C.E 

Carrel. A. J 

Carter, Elmer 








Bales. Joseph ij 


DuQuoin 


Ball Samuel 


Camden 




Carter. Joe 




Barber, William 


Carson. Charles H 


Flatt ... 


Bargreen Charles 


Carrlson, George 


Colchester 








Barter. Charles 


Casteter, William 


.. do 


Bates Geo. H 


Catton, John 


West Jersey 

.. do 








Chadwick. E 


Oak Hill 


Baush William 


Charllngsworth. Amos C. 
Chesney, Alonzo T 


Fosterburg . 




Ava 






Beers M. A .■:■.■.::":; 


Chipping. W 


Canton 


Beever J H 


Chorlton, James. . . . 


French Village... 




Christman, Charles W .... 
Clark, James A 


Bell James 


Equality 

Brimfield 


Bell Charles 


Clark, J. H 




Clarkson, William H 

Clarkson. Lorenzo 




Bennett Fred 


Klckapoo 


Benson William 


Cliff ordrGeo.L..: ........ 


Oneida 




Cody. Richard 






Monica 

Macomb 




Galesburg 

Vandercook 


■Rnrrv W .T 


Colburn, John R 


Berry, R. M 


Cottage Grove... 

Castletown 

do 




Brlmfleld 




Colwell. H 






Colwell. George 


S?kTo^T;::::::: 




Colchester.. 








tSi?^''^ 


Birdois D 


Peoria 


Cook, James K 




.. do 


Cook. W.H 


Alexis 




Leaman 

East Peoria 

Equality 






Blessingf Georse 


Cooper, Albert W 


Petersburg . 






Plnekneyville.... 


Blotevagal. William 

Blue J W 








Grape Creek 


Coulson, Poster 


Wyoming 


BKEd„;::::::::: :::::::. 






Bode W H. H 


Chesterfield 

Preemption 

Vergennes 

Wataga 

Pilot 


Cryer, John H 


Morris 


Boden Ed 


Crew, Joseph 


Chillicothe 


Boldwyn. f. W 


Croxton, FredW 








.. do 


Ronnetf- A H 


Crozica, E 


Etherly.. 




Yates City 

Etherly 

Danville . . 






Boyer. A. P...... 


Cunningham, Lewis 

Cunningham. R. A 

Cummings. Wm. M 

Curtiss. Sanford 


Danville 

Cutler 


Brandt, William 


Mineral 

Grape Creek 

Danville 


Rushvllle 


Brannan James 


Rockbridge 




Cutler, P. H 


Princeville 


BroDhy.*M 


Shelby ville 

Ottawa 


Dainty. Jabez 




Brown John .......... 




Brown S C 


Lewlstown 


St. David 




Dalton, Isam 


Yates City 




1J1?I,£"'.'::::: 

Streator 

Collinsville 

Colchester 

Danville 


Daniel, Jay 


Danville 




Daugherty. Robert T 




Buchanan. B. M 


Ablngaon 






Davis. T 




Rntitino' C .T 


Davidson, Thomas 


Griffin 










Bnrk W W 


Conant . ....... 


Dawson, J. C 

Deaven, Camille 


Deer Park Glen.. 




Colchester 


Orchard Mines... 










Brighton 


Dempsey. G. F 


Equality 




Frederick 

Littleton .... 






Denton, Fred 


Petersburg 

Norrls 








Dickson. Wm. W 


Colchester. ....... 


Cagdall. A. C 




Deitrich, Phillip 


Preeburg,. .... . 




Dills, Martin 






White Hall 

Roseville 








Dixon, J. E 


Kewanee 


Campbell. Francis A 

Cameron. Henry 


Viola 


Dodds. T 


Lafayette 


.. do 


Doering, Wm. F 


East Peoria 



[INE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



355 



Mine Managers {Ten Men), Certificates of Competency— Continued 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


PoBtcffice. 


Dolan, Peter 


Wataga 


Gllllgan, Jackson 


Industry 

Briar Bluff 




Truro 

Preemption. 

Campbell Hill.... 

Canton 

Vandercook 

Danville 

Knexvllle 

Kewanee 

Tennessee 

Sheffield 




Dougherty. P 


Golden, James...... 


Kewanee 


Doweir Allen B 


Goode, Joseph .... . 


Lombardville 




Goudy, W. S 


Brimfield. 


Draper, A. L 


Grant, August 


Kewanee 


Dryer, Andrew .... 


Greear, William 


Coal Valley '. 


Dudley. Z. F 


Grice. Albert 








Dull E B 


Griffiths, Thomas W 

Griffiths D 


White Hall 




Caseyvilie..!!'.!." 

Grape Creek 

Brimfield 






Durrant, H 


Brimfield 


Griggs. Allison ... 


Durham Simon . 


Canton 


Grim David Jr 


Victoria 


Dunsford, Charles 


Absher 


Grossman, Louis 


Smithton 




Belleville 


Grosweiler, Joseph Jr 


Pekin 




Carbon Cliff 


Ebel, August 






Edison, James 


Ottawa 


Guckert, P. P 


Hampton 

Plnckneyville.... 
Colchester 


Edwall, C W 


Qalva. 


Gurten Louis 








Edwards, T.J 

Edwards. Geo 


Crab Orchard.... 

Huntsvllle 

Coal Valley 

New Burnside ... 
Kewanee. 






Wyoming 

Colchester 


Edwards. A G 


Hall. John ! 


Elmwood, A B 


Hall John 


Grape Creek!!!!!! 

Dunfermline 

Newton 




KnoxvUle 

Caseyvilie 

Farmington 


Hall. Charles 


Elliott, James 


Hall, Geo. W 


Emerick Alonzo. 


Hamilton John W 


Frederick 






Enslnlnger. E. E 


Crab Orchard.... 

Colchester 

Belleville 


Handly, John L . . . 


Coal Valley 

OkawvlUe 


Entwlsble. W 




Erhardt, Anton 


Harnisch, Ernest 


Brighton 


Ernst, Frank 


St. Johns 


Harrington, Frank. 


Farmington 


EspieyfjT ::::::::::::::: 


Morris 




Essex. G. W 


Soperville 

Streator . 


Ha rls, A.J 

Harris Oliver 




Evans, Ed E 


Canton 








Catlin 


Evans, W. L 


Cottage Grove ... 
Lewistown 

Cambridge 

Monica 

Plnckneyville.... 
Truro . 


Harrman, John 


Peoria 


Eynman, Albert 


Harvey John 


Murphysboro .... 

Grape Creek 

Truro 




Hasklns, Alfred 




Havens, Bert 
















Helntz, A. F 

Hendee Isaac 


Siekapoo 

Bernadotte 


Fink. Prank 


Fish. William 






Fisher. W 


Murray vllle 

Brighton 


Hennemann, Charles 


Belleville 


Fisher Alclde 


Oraville 






Flynn, William 


Briar BlufE 

Equality 

Jolchester 

Carbondale 

Lewistown 

Streator 

Catlln. 


Herrlngton, Thomas 

Herseman. Herman 

Hewitt. William B 




Forester, W. M . 


East Peoria 




Poster. Thurman 


Hews W B 


Canton 


Fox. Thomas . 


Hickson David 


Ottawa. 

Princeville 

Tilden 






Francis. C. W 


Hissong, Charles 




Danville 

Bradford 

Sparland . ... 


Hibbard. Geo. A 






HiiiardiE .„:..:.:..:..:.: 


Colchester 

Carbondale 

Salisbury 

Frederick 

Colchester 

Danville 


Frisby, E. 


Hillier Walter T. 


Frost, Michael 


Danville 

Kay 

Modena 


Hind, Robert 






Fuller. James K 


Hoar William 




Mode 

Morris 

l^arbon Cliff 

Kewanee 


Hodge, S. M 




Hodge, John W 


Rushvllle 


Gallagher. W. F 


Hodge, Benjamin A 


Danville 






Gainey, Thomas 


Hodgson, Wm . .. 




Garland, Samuel. 


Hogercamp, Walter 


Pontlao 

Petersburg 

Henry 

tfodena 




Brighton 

Liewlatown 

Peoria 






Glebelhausen, Qus E 


Howard Charles 




Sparta 








Colchester 

Belleville 


Gillette, Charles 


Elmlra 


Hurst. John '. 



356 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Mine Managers {Ten Men), Certificates of Competency— Continned 



Postofaoe. 



Name. 



Postoface. 



Isackson, Martin,... 

Isaacson, P. O 

Ingram, Kobert H... 

Irwin, J«me8 

Ivans, W. L 



Jacobs. John 

Jacquot. Augustare... 

Jack, John 

Jamieson, E. J 

Jamieson. Guy 

Jarrell. Miles 

Jayne, Richard 

Jenkins, D. A 

Jenner, A. T 

Johnson, C. E 

Johnson, Cornelius P. 

Johnson, J 

Johnson, Benjamin... 

Johnson, J. E 

Jones, W. L 

Jones, O. S 

Jones. W. W 

Jones. A. J 

Jones, A. H 

Jones. James H 

Jones, John L 

Jones, Jock son 

Jones, W. H 

Jones, Wm J 

Jones. Evan A 

Jones, Arthur .' 

Jones, Thomas 

Joos. Conrad 

Jordan. Will 

Jordan, John L 

Jordan. E. S 

Joubost, Qporge 

Jourdan, Wm. L 



Kabel, Herman 

Kavanaugb. J. A 

Kay, James 

Kay. William H 

Kay, Bert 

Kay. Robert 

Kelly, Thomas 

Kear, George Q 

Kearney, John 

Keen, A, G. 

Kempin, Henry 

Kerr. William 

Kershaw, J. W 

Kidd. J 

Klelhorn. William C. 

King. Ambrose L 

Kilgore. William T... 

King. Joseph 

King, Henry R 

Kingston. Paris 

Klmes. Oscar 

Kipling. William 

Klingenfus, Emll 

Knoth. John 

Kortkamp. A 



Lamay. David 

Lamb. Edwin 

Lambert. Austin H. 

Lane, James 

Laity. Richard 

Laurer, Nick 



Wataga 

.. do 

Sparland 

Green River... 
Cottage Grove. 



Wataga 

Danville 

Marion 

Loding 

.. do 

Cottage Grove. 

Cuba 

Danville 

Kinckney ville . 

Canton 

Middletown 

Parmington ... 

Smithboro 

Dunfermline .. 

Bradford 

Sato 

Bradford 

Peoria 

Colchester 

Streator 

Peoria 

Winchester 

Catlin 

Kewanee 

Catlin , 

Viola , 

Peoria , 

.. do 

St. David....... 

Trivoli 

Newton 

Grayvllle , 

Smithton 



More 

Colchester 

Atkinson 

Morris 

Atkinson 

Briar Bluff 

Grape Creek... 

Sparland 

Shelbyville.... 
Priendsvllle... 

Kewanee 

RushviHe 

Briar Bluff.... 

Roseville 

Shawneetown.. 

Victoria 

New Burnslde. 

Pekln 

Campbell Hill. 

Kquallty 

Streator 

Colchester 

Belleville 

Roodhouae 

North Alton... 



Monica 

Kewanee 

Keensburg 

Peoria 

Colchester 

Plnckneyville . 



Lealard, John 

Lee, Thomas 

Lee, James 

Leeper, Charles W.. 
Lewis, Charles E... 

Lewis, Wallace 

Liewrance. B 

Lillman. Alfred 

Lincoln, E 

Linden, P 

Ltndbeck. P 

Lingast. L 

Little, George 

Little, John T 

Little, J. H 

LIttlefleid, Joseph.. 

Lloyd, Elisha 

Lloyd. Benj. P 

Lockaue. David L... 

Lodging. E.... 

Loper. J. B 

Lord. James 

Lowry. Samuel 

Lor. D. O 

Lucking. Edward J. 
Lyons, Maxwell 



Mable. William 

Mahler, G. W 

Malone, Harry 

Mallergren, James W. 

Mansill, Richard 

Martin, William, Sr... 

Martin, G. W 

Martin, J. B 

Martin,J. W 

Martin, Fred 

Martin, John H 

Martin, Patrick 

Martin, William, Jr.... 

Marriage. Joseph 

Marxer, Joseph 

Marley. Richard 

Marshall, G. A 

Marshall. J. C 

Mason. Frank A 

Massey, Jesse 

Matsinger, Theodore.. 

Mauck, Joseph 

Mauck. L. P 

Medearls, Jas 

Melker, B. F 

Melvin, Leo 

Melven. R 

Meller, Louis 

Memmer, L 

Mercy. Geo 

Merrill, R M 

Mescher. W. T 

Miller, Ge' rge A 

Miller, ^"ilas 

Miller, Eliza 

Miller, Smith 

Miller, L. S 

Miller, Geo. A 

Mitchell, Robert T 

Mobaker. John 

MoJloy. John 

Montooth. Chas 

Moorman, Mark., 

Morrison, Alva 

Moore, Nanly 

Moore, W. F 

Morrison, D. D 



Grape Creek. 
Youngstown. 

Alexis 

Equality 

Galesburg 

Cambridge .. 
Youngstown. 

Cable 

Kewanee 

Canton 

Wataga 

Grape Creek. 

Roseville 

Roodhouse ... 

.. do 

Brimfield 

Danville , 

.. do , 

Lewistown ... 

Loding 

(Jhesttrfield.. 

Galva 

Lewistown ... 

Atkinson 

Fosterburg.. . 
Coal Valley... 



Fairview 

Ray 

DuQuoin 

Petersburg 

Kock Island... 

Colchester 

Laoc 

.. do 

Farmington ... 

Peoria 

Canton 

Peoria 

Colchester 

Grape Creek,. 

Millstadt 

.Atkinson 

Cuba 

Caseyville 

Carbondale — 

Streator 

Crab Orchard. 
Danville 

do 

Henry 

Danville 

Kewanee 

do 

Brighton 

Canton 

St. David 

Campbell Hill. 

LaHarpe 

Danville 

Grape Creek... 



Mapleton 

Urape Creek.. 

Danville 

Prairletown .. 

Danville 

North Alton.. 

Bradford 

Illinois City.. 

Modena 

Saline Mines. 

Victoria 

Danville 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY 857 

Mine Managers {Ten Men), Ceriificaies of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoflace. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Morris, Geo. J 


Millersburg 

Oneida 

Colchester 

Etherly 

Verffennes 

Danville 

Atkinson 

Streator 

Belleville 

Monmouth 

Canton 

Kewanee 


Perry. D. E 

Peters, Bernard 

Peters, M. 


Colchester 










Mosher. Charles 


Peterson, August 


Soperville 


Moss Oliver 


Phillips Sebirt 


Carbondale 


Morton. T. J 




Cable 








Munts Wm. 


Price, Benjamin . 


Kewanee . 




Pickett. George 


Danville 






Millatadt 


Murphy Chas. H 


Polonlus George 


Colchester 








Mustard. Elijah 


Poore. William 


Kickapoo 

Briar Bluff 


Muzzy William H 


Peoria 

Carbondale 

Ottawa 

Bethalto . ... 


Posten, M. W 

Porter, William H 


Myers, W. H 




Myers. Geo 


Portwood, James 


Lewlstown 


Myers, Perry . .. 


Potter. L 


Mapleton 










McAnnaily, Jno 


Nonh Alton 

Alexis 

Colchester 

Ottawa 

More . 


Presson, J. A 

Price, John 


Carbondale 


McCartney C T ... 


Wyoming 




Proctor, Christopher 

Pyle. Joseph F 




McCullough, Jas 


Kewanee 


McDonald Samuel 


Raddlebeck, Jossph 

Raffee Robert . 




McElwee, Charles P. 

McQovern, T. B 


Winchester 

Oneida 

do 


Brimfleld 


MoGovern S .. .. 


Farmington 




Alsey 

Winchester 

Alexis . . 






McGuire, Patrick 


Rands, Thomas 


Chesterfield 


McKahan Sam'l R . .. 


Ratcllffe Arthur. 


Neponset 




Galva 






McKeen. William H 

McLatn, William H 


Danville 

Equality 

New Burnside... 

Streator 

WUIiamsfleld 

Griffin 

Colchester 

Knoxville 


Ray,A. B 


ratlin 


McMiehael. T M 


Ray, William 


Danville 


McMillin, William J 


Rayborn, George 


Winchester 




Reed. William 


Soperville 


McNeil. William 


Rennick, William C 

Reed W. B 


Modena 




Wilsman 








Nee John J 




Belleville 


Nelson James 


Keid. J. Thomas 


Saline Mines. 




Streator 

Ottawa 

Morris 

Chandlerville .... 

Catlin 

Sparland 




Nelson, Nels 


Reiff, Jacob 




Nelson, John S. . . . 


Reeves John 


Hudgens 




Revis, J. H 




Neville, William 


Renshaw, John 


Eden 


Newell J 


tteese Lemuel 


Streator 




Khoades. Benjamin 

Ribley. R 


Shelbyville 


Newton, Geo. H 


Toulon 

Elwood 

Sparland 

Wataga . ... 


Cuba. 


Nlbbelln. John 




■^heloyville 


Nighswronger, Asa 

Nodeon, E. W 


Richardson. William 

Richards Thomas. 


Moro •. 

Ottawa. . .... 


Norris. Floyd 


DuQuoln 






Nozley. Alfred 


Richard, George 


French Village... 


Nyde, John E 


Rlegels Adolph 


Golden Eagle .. 




Danville 

Stonefort 

Bluffs 

Winchester!!!!!!'. 

Danville 

Princeville 

Sato 

Shefiaeld 


Riley. J R 


Breeds 




Riley, Michael 


Braid wood 


O'Daniel. Arthur 


Riley Cyrus W 


Mineral 


Owens. Orbly G 








Kinger, Benjamin.... 


Morris 




Robbins. J. W 


Glasford 


Pahlman. H 


Robinson Benjamin 

Robinson. William 

Robinson, J.M 




Parker. William 


(Colchester 


Parker, W.G 


Elmlra 


Parr, Joseph 


Robinson, Robert .... 


do 


Parthan, M 


Roberts Evan D 


Streator 








Payne. Charles C 


St John 


Roberts. Henry F .. . 


Modena 


Pearson. William M 


Astoria 


Roddis. Charles 




Peck,E. E 


Rodell. Frank 




Pendergdst, John 


Soperville 

Streator 

Preemption 

Belleville 

Osceola 


Rogers. David . . 


Kickapoo 






Alexis 




Ronk, G H 




Penn, George 


Rook. John. 


Brimfleld 


Ferkins.John E 


1 Roosa. V. L 


Pleasant View ... 



358 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Mine Managers {Ten Men) ^Certificates of Competency — Continued, 



Name. 


FostofBce. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Rose, James.. 


Equality 

South Danville... 

Ashland 

Danville 

CoalValley 

Laura 


Swanson, Andrew 


Colchester . .. 






Danville 


Ryan, Philip 






Russell, JohnR 


Swafford, William 


DuQaoin 










Tatter soil, George 




Sample. John 


Seneca.... 




Monica 

Peoria 

ara::::::::::: 

Canton 

Danville 

Millstadt 

Kickapoo 

Braceville 

Modena 

Monmouth 

Belleville 

Summam 

Danville 

E. Peoria 

Pekin 

Cottage Grove... 
Chandlerville.... 

Carbon Cliff 

Roodhouse 

Monica 




Belleville 








Savill Charles A 


Taylor, Francis .. 


Blandensville , 














Schaffer, William 


Telfer. JohnK 


Morris 


Schmidt Ausfust . 


Telfer John W 


do 






.. do 


Schultz. Fred 


1 Thompson, Jacob... 


Grape Creek 


Scott, John. . . 


Thompson, James F, 

Thompson, Joseph 

Thompson. Joe. 


Ray 


Selbrick. J 

Sergent, Frank 


Etherly 

Grape Creek 


Shafer. Solomon. . 


Thomas William 


Streator 






Danville 


Sherrett, James 


Thomas, George 


Sheffield 


Shreffler. R D 


Thurston John H 


Wyoming 




Todd, Ralph 




Shore, William 


Todd, Geo, B 


Catlin 


Sllvis. S 


Todd John 


Victoria ... . 






Grape Creek 


Simons, William H 


Tompkins. C. S 

Tompkins. Harvey 

Towner, L. H 


Mineral 


Sincox, John 


Alexis 


St David.. . 




Bluff City 








Simpson, Joseph 


Youngstown 


Tucker Charles. 


Mineral 


Silting, H. P 








Centre Station... 
Atkinson 


Tucker, P. F 

Tulk,M.B 

Tully, P. F 




Smith, John 


Colchester 


Smith, A. J 


Saline Mines 

Colchester 

Princeton 


Brlrafield 


Smith, J ames 


Turner. George . 


.. do 


Smith. B. F 


Twlney, William A 

Tygett. John 


Shelbyvllle 


Smith, John 


Frederick 

Streator 


Carbondale 


Smith. Thomas B 


Ty a, H 


Wataga 






St Dfvid.:: :::..:: 






Underwood. J. H 

Vandyke William . 




Sowerlv. Joseoh 


Streator .......... 




Spangler Charles 


Danville. 


Equality 


Sparks, Charles 


Crab Orchard.... 

Astoria 

Victoria 


Sparks, Edgar 




Spencer. Charles 


Canton 








Springman, Ed 


Brighton 

Equality 

Macomb 

Cuba 


Vaughn, William 


Jubilee 


Stader, W. H 


Vaughn. Elijah 


.. do 


St. Clair, James A 






SteavenP, Isaac... 


Vezain. George 


Ottawa 


Staton, Joseph. 


Pekin: 


Vickery. Henry 


Potts town 




Cuba 






Stine, William 


Danville 

Colchester 

.. do 






Stone, Isaac .... 










.. do 






Stone, Thomas . 


Carbon Cliflf 


Wainwright, Arthur 


Sweetwater 








Canton 

Norris 

Roseville 

Shelbyvllle 

French Village... 

Rushville 

Pleasant View ... 
Shawneetown.... 

Breeds 

CoalValley 

.. do 

Cable 

.. do 


Wallis. D. J 




Straley, James H.... 


Walsh, John 


Truro 


Straud, Charles 


Walsh John 


Milan 










Ward, J. D 


Pulley's Mill 


Stockton O. F 


Watkins W. J 


Danville 






Wyoming 

Colchester 


Strong. J. P 


Wayland. James 


Snggett, William 


Welmer, J. R 

Wearmouth. Thomas 

Webster. William 








Summerson, Robt 


Colchester 


Swanson, Axel 


Weiss. W 


Belleville 


Swanson, Otto 


Welford.T. H 


Absher 



INE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENXY. 



359 



3Iine Managers {Ten Men) , Certifcntes of Competency — Concluded. 



Postoffice. 



West. John C 

West, John A 

Westerlund, John 

Whalen. M., Jr 

W heelhouse, Samuel D . . . . 

White, Charles F 

White, Charles 

White, M.C 

White. Henry 

White, Wm. J 

White, John A 

Whynn. Wm. E 

Wilkinson. M. C 

Wilcock. Wilson 

Williams. Joseph 

Williamson, Andrew 

Williams, James F 

Williams, Jerome 

Williams, Joseph 

Williams. W.J 

Williams. W. P 

Willis. Alex 

Wilson. George 

Wilson. John 

Wilson, A.E 

Wilson, Thomas E 

Wilson, Joseph 



Pine Grove..., 

.. do 

Streator 

Colchester 

Rashvllle 

Danville 

Wyoming 

Pawnee 

Elmwood 

Bartonville... 

Frederick 

Coal Valley... 

Danville , 

Astoria 

Mode 

N. Alton 

Kewanee 

Tiskllwa 

Preemption .. 

Colchester 

Laoc 

Oravllle 

West Jersey... 

Colchester 

Macomb 

Blandlnsvllle. 
Swan Creek... 



Wilson. Anthony.... 
Wlllstead. Thomas. 

Winchouse, W 

Wlrmlng. Robert.... 

Wlsley, H. C 

Wiseman, Ernst 

Wonderllng. Henry 
Wood. Benjamin.... 
Woodcock. Wm. H.. 

Wood. Sam'l 

Woodbury. John.... 

Woods. James 

Woodard. John 

Woodward, W 

Wonders. Henry 

Worthlngton, H 

Wren, T. K 

Wright, Joseph 

Yerman, Timothy... 

Young, John A 

Young. S. J 

Zink, Q. W 



Danville , 

Rio 

Danville 

Sato 

Vergennes 

Peoria 

Danville 

Pinckneyville. 

Etherly 

Saline Mines... 
Green River... 

St. David 

Oak wood 

Soperville 

Streator 

. do 

Morris 

Falrbury 

Cuba 

Carterville 

Griffin 

Peoria 



360 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



HOISTING ENGINEERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF 
COMPETENCY. 



Note — This list includes all the hoisting engineers to whom certificates 
have been issued prior to Jan. 1, 1904. 



Name. 



Postoffice. 



Abcock.C.F 

Ablen. Henry 

Adams, Nelson 

Adams. Wm. H 

Ainsworth, Samuel, Jr.... 

Aitken. T. G 

Alexander, Henry 

Alexander. W. A 

Allen. David 

Allen. C.E 

Allen, C. H 

AUgood, William , 

Altman. H. P 

Anderson, Henry 

Anderson, J. F 

Anderson, W. C 

Anderson. Norman A.. 

Anderson, Z B 

Anderson, Chas, E 

Andrews. Solomon 

Anthony, John C 

Appleby. John 

Appleton, Thomas 

Archer, Joseph 

Archibald, David 

Armentrout. Martin 

Armstrong,C 

Armstrong. William C 

Ashman, Joseph 

Atkin, RobertR 

Atwater, Stephen , 

Averill. C. P 

Avery, William 

Ax, Henry 



Bailey, James F 

Baiwir, John 

Bailey, Robe 

Baird, Robert 

Baker, Darius N 

Baker, F 

Baker, James E 

Baker, C H 

Balser, Henry 

Balsmith. Edward 

Barnhill, H. Q 

Barnhill. Oscar B 

Barber, C. E 

Barber. C. W 

Barber. William G 

Barr, Frank 

Barton, C. W 

Barton, Charles W .... 



Nilwood 

Breese 

Lincoln 

Braidwood ... 
Taylorville ... 

Tilden 

Oglesby 

Koseboro 

ollinsville .. 

Troy 

Seneca 

Springfield... 
Collinsville .. 

Lincoln 

Pinckneyville 

Elmwood 

Princeville ... 

Sparta 

Belleville 

Girard 

Belleville 

East Peoria.. 

Virden 

Barclay 

Freeburg 

Duncan 

Muncie 

Marion 

Murphysboro 

Tilden 

Clarke City... 
Colchester.... 
Lenz Station. 
Edwardsville 



Westville.... 
Braidwood... 

Sunfleld 

Sparta 

Spillertown . 
Springfield,. 
Westville.... 
Pairmount .. 
Springfield.. 
Assumption , 
Klnmundy .. 

Herrin 

DuQuoin 

do 

Tilden 

Centralla — 

Cable 

Fairmount ... 



Bateman, Harry 

Bateman, R 

Bates, Thomas W 

Bath, Ameston 

Banmgartner, Geo. J .. 

Beard, Charles A 

Beatty, James H 

Beatty, Nepha 

Becker, Fritz 

Becker, F. M 

Behrend, A. D 

Beeby, William 

Beese, John E., Jr 

Bell, Chris 

Bell, Mark 

Bell. Frank 

Belts, Joseph E 

Beltz, A 

Bennight. J. E 

Bently, George 

Benvenuto, Charles . .. 

Berkley, N. T 

Bertln. Henry 

Bienert, J. O 

Bigelow, A. E 

Biggs, W. A 

Blake, Albert 

Blackmaij, Ben 

Blalock, Charles F 

Blair, George 

Blue. Jessie 

Black, Jas. A 

Blfimberg, Albert 

Billlps. Joseph M 

Boden J 

Boettcher, Alfred 

Boggs, DowJ 

Boggs, E. W 

Boggs, G. W 

Bohlen, Henry E 

Bohlander, Edward.... 

Bolton, Mark 

Bookstaver, Jos 

Bonstead, W. P 

Boots, James Franklin 

Boring, Frank L 

Bostio. William H 

Boawell, William 

Bolles, Wm 

Bottomley, B.. 

Boul, Leonard 

Bradbury, R. D 

Bradenburg. F 



Murphysboro 
Murphysboro 

Winchester 

Cuba 

Edwardsville 

Streator 

Mascoutah .... 

..do 

Mt Olive 

Sandoval , 

Springfield... 

..do 

Belleville 

Sherrard 

Danville , 

Tallula , 

Belleville 

Equality 

Pawnee 

Springfield .... 

Dawson , 

Cuba 

Pana 

Spanlding 

..do 

Herrin , 

Streator 

Dawson 

Niantic 

Streator 

Norris 

Troy , 

Sherrard 

Kewanee , 

Gilchrist 

Freeburg 

Kewanee 

Galva , 

Galva 

Mt Olive 

Pekln 

Gilchrist 

DuQuoln 

Coal City 

Germantown . . 

Odin 

Murphysboro . 
Dunfermline .. 

Auburn 

Paisley 

Belleville 

Carbondale.... 
Belleville 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



361 



Certificates of Competency— ConiinMed. 




Name. 


Postoflace. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Edwardsville 

Pektn 


Clark. John R 


Vlrden 




Clark, John 


.. do 




Vlnien 

Ccntralia 

Germantown 

Belleville 

Coal City 




Braidwood 


Brasel.S. K 


nimiflin .Tnnh 


Pekin 


Clayton, William 


Collinsvllle 




Clickner, C. S 

Clifford. Miehael 


Witt 




Kewanee 


Bromley. George, Sr 

Bromley, George, Jr 


Catlin 


Clifton William H 


Sparland 


Kellyville 

Coffeen 

ilea Junction 




LaSalle 


Coatney. (4rant 


P^airmount 






Princeville 


Brown, H. L 




Belleville 


Springfield 

Moweaqua 


Collingwood, Wm 


(ireenview 




Collingwood, Albert E.... 

Collins, Walter 

Collins, John 


Springfield 




Mt. Veruon 






Blrkner 




Sparta 




Cartervllle 




Colwell. W. P 




Brueggemann, Micliael A. 


Belleville 

Nashville 

Athens 




Colfax 


Compton. Stephen B 

Con ley. John 


!Sorento 




Streator 




Connelly. J. J 


Murphysboro 




Brereton 

Qreenvlew 

DeSoto 


Collinsvllle 


Bureress. Charles E 




badd 


Cook G. E 


Hallidayboro 








Westville 




Coultervllle 

Collinsvllle 

Ledford 

Farmlneton 

WlUiamsville .... 

Murphysboro 

Litchfield 

LaSalle 

Marion 


Cooper, J. H -■... 


Nilwood 


Bullock William 


Cornelius. Richard 


Fairmount 




Buffalo 


RnrrAll (4 K 


Cotton, George 


Halidayboro 






Ledford 




Cox. William 


Rutland. 


Rnft Thnmaq R 


Craddock, Robert 


Auburn 






Kangley 






Danville 






.. do 






Harrisburg 






Marion 








LaSalle 




do 








Pottstown 

Pana 


Crouch. Millard F 


Nilwuod 


Cameron. Daniel 

Camp, .Jolin R 

Campbell. A 

Campbell. Fred 

Campbell T 


Cryder James F 


Divernon 


Westville 


Cruickshanks. Robert 

Cruickshanks, John 

Cruickshanks, William A. 
Cruthers, Zina B 


Middle Grove.... 
East Peoria 


Sorento 

Coal City. 


do . .. 


Taylorville 


Campbell. W. J 

Cantrell, H. T 




Cummings. George 

Cumming. Geo. A. P 

Cumming. Geo. P 


Pana 


Farmlneton 


Gardner 

Sparland 


Carmichael, Thos 


Srf.'.".;::::;: 

Freebnrg 

Moweaqua 

.. do 

Cutler 

Barclay 

Sorento 

.. do : 


Cummings. Robert W 


Sparta 




Princeville 


Carr Robert H 


Cutler Scott 


DuQaoin 


Carrlngton. Eugene 

Carsell, Hugh 

Carter. Albert J 

Carter, W. E.. 

Caudle, James F 




Glen Carbon 




Staunton 




Yates City 


Daly, Thomas 


Diamond . 


Cearing. Samuel A 

Chapman, J. B 

Chapman. William E 

Charpenter, Joseph 

Chesney. 

Chester. David 

Chew, Oliver 

Chew, B. R 

Chitwood, William H 

Chorlton. Thomas 

Church, Van L 

Church William 


Springfield 

Petersburg 

Salisbury 

Braidwood 

Breese 






Belleville 




. do 






Darmstader, William 

Dave,R J 

Davenport. Thomas 

Davis B D 


New Athens 


Springfield 

Sato 

Carlinville 

Catlin 

Blrkner 


GlenCarbon 

Harrlsburg 

Coffeen 


Davis, Carl 

Davis, C, E 

Davis Frank 


St. John 


Divernon 

St. John 


Marissa 


Davis.Jas. A 

Davis Cha". W 


Hillsboro 


Christ. Philip 

Clark, Corey 

Clark. Christopher 

Clark! C N.... 

Clark, John 




Edinburg 


Coal City 

Decatur 

DuQuoin 

Marquette 


Davis Jackson 


Athens 


Davis. E. E 

Davis Frank 




Lincoln 


Davis. Harry J 


DuQuoln 



862 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Competency —OoniiwiQ^.. 



Name. 



PostoflSce. 



Postoflce. 



Davis, James P 

Davis, John W 

Davis, John 

Davis, L. D 

Davis, Thomas. , 

Davison, John G 

Davison, Joseph 

Dawson, Van C 

Dawson, John C 

Day. Benj. F 

Deans, Robert 

Deaton, L. B 

Deaton. William S.... 
DeBacher, Thomas .. 

Decker, William 

Dee, Henry 

DeJarnett, Thomas... 

Delmore. Frank 

Delapp, Robert E 

Delorey, William 

Dent. William 

Derrington, Walter... 

Denten. O N 

Denton. William 

Devlin, Francis 

Dick, Robert 

Dillon, John 

Dillon. William 

Dixon, Frederick W.. 

Dixon. George 

Dodd, Samuel H 

Dodwell, Edward J... 

DooliD, E. W 

Dochrine, Fred 

Douck. John 

Donaldson, J. W., Jr.. 

Donnelly, J 

Doolin. E. J 

Dougherty. Joseph... 

Dove.C. W 

Dowler, John 

Dowllngr, Ira F 

Downing. Robert D... 

Drischel. Fred W 

Drake. William 

Dray, John 

Drenn&n, L. H 

Daffy, Glenn E 

Dagg, B. A 

Duncan, J. R 

Dunn, L. A 

Dunn, William L 

Dunsmore, Thomas,. . 
Dunstedler, William i 

Durham. James D 

Dyer. Harry 



Easley, H 

Eaton, A. C 

Easton, George 

Eccleston, John 

Eddy, Evermont 

Eastham. G A 

Edwards, George W. 

Elliott, Clarence 

Elliott, H.H 

Edwards, Thomas... 

Ekis. Daniel B 

Ekis, Henry 

Emans. Ransom R... 

Ellis, Albert 

Elmendorf. E 

Klmore, V. M 

Emery, H. W 



Belleville 

Lake Creek 

Belleville 

Coffeen 

Belleville 

St. John 

Sherrard 

Spring Valley. 

Streator 

Peoria 

Belleville 

Tallula 

Greenview 

Elmwood 

Oglesby 

Glen Carbon... 

Mt. Vernon 

Springfield 

Willisville 

Westville 

Diamond 

Herrin 

Coffeen 

Petersburg — 

Clark City 

Sunfield 

Auburn 

..do 

Springfield 

Wenona 

Pottstown 

Decatur 

Pontiac 

Mt. Olive 

LaSalle 

Dunfermline... 

Springfield 

Pontiac 

Taylorville 

Glen Carbon... 

Auburn 

Springfield.... 

Bartonville 

Taylorville 

Streator 

Troy 

Blue Mound... 
Colllnsville ... 

.. do 

LaSalle 

DaQaoln 

Clark City 

Spr'ngfield.... 
Edwardsville. . 

Lake Creek 

DuQuoin 



Taylorville. ... 

DuQaoin 

Willisville 

Streator 

Athens 

Girard 

Springfield 

Bryant 

Centralia 

Spring Valley. 
Springfield .... 

Ridgely 

Farmington.... 

Cable 

Belleville 

Coffeen 

Greenville 



English, Thomas.. 
Erisman, Jacob D.. 

Erlsman. Jesse 

Estes, W. B 

Evans, Albert 

Evans, Roderick B. 
Evans. Thomas,... 

Evans. C. L 

Evans, Price 

Evans. W. E 

Eytman, Frank.... 
Eydman, Henry 



Fabry, A 

Fahay, John 

Falkenstein, George A.... 

Farmer. Frank 

Farley, James 

Farwood. L C 

Fenton, M. H 

Ferguson, J. B. 

Ferguson, John J 

Ferren. Edward 

Ferris, W.H 

Filligham.J. A 

Finnigan, Thomas J 

Finegan, Wm. H 

Fischer. Phillip 

Fisher, George 

Fisher, Patrick 

Fitzsimmons, Maurice.... 

Flesher. A 

Flesher, O 

Fletcher, Henry A 

Fletcher, 1. W 

Fogerson, Andrew 

Foote, Charles 

Foote, Wm 

Forister. Robert 

Forister, Wm 

Fortney, John W 

Foster, Albert 

Foster, A. J 

Fox, Frank L 

Fox, Fred. 

Pox, Wm 

Fox, James B 

Fox. Thomas 

Frain, Austin.... 

Prankland. Tim 

Freeman, M. F 

Freeman. E. F 

Frick, U. B 

Friend. J. W 

Frier. Jacob 

Friend, E. A 

Friend, Wm. L 

Friesland, C. M 

Fritz. Gnstav 

Fry. D. W 

Ferguson. S. P 

Fusten, D. H 



Gahl, FredT 

Galutia. C. M 

Gomber. H. H... 

Gandy. James W 

Gaskins. Asa 

Gately, Bernard 

Gately. James 

Gasnell. George W 

Gates, Wm, S 

Gallagher. Peter 



Streator 

Niantic 

..do 

Danville 

Glen Carbon... 

Girard 

Spaulding 

Virden 

Biasell 

Danville 

Spring Valley. 
Coulterville... 



Bracevllle 

Decatur 

Astoria 

Bloomington... 

Rlverton 

Springfield. ... 

Streator 

Dlvernon 

Spring Valley. 

Barclay 

Marquette 

Canton 

Springfield 

.. do 

Lenzburg 

Staunton 

Kangley 

Peru 

Taylorville 

Clay City 

Ladd 

Springfield.... 
Central City... 

Westville 

.. do 

Murphysboro. . 

.. do 

Kinmuudy .... 

Elmwood 

Litchfield 

Assumption 

Middle Grove.. 

Taylorville 

LaSalle 

Lincoln 

Ridge Prairie. 

Streator 

Shelbyville.... 

DuQaoin 

Lake Creek — 
Collins vllle ... 

Ormsby 

Collinsville ... 

.. do 

Salisbury 

Breese 

Clark City 

Strasburg 

Murphysboro.. 



St. John.... 
Carterville.. 

Ziegler 

Peoria 

Harrisburg . 
Diamond — 
Seatonvllle,, 

Herrin 

Kankakee .. 
Clark City.. 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, 



363 



Certificates of Comi^etevcy — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Braldwood 

Wolcott. 








Haddlck. Wm. L 


Sherrard 




Pekln 

Wolcott 

Diamond 

Danville 

Wanlock."..!...!.. 
Sandoval 

Coal City . ! 




Lenzburg 




Jaensel, David 


..do 




Hagler. Charles 


Fredonla 




Hale. Wm. T 


Troy 








Geyer J A 


Haley. Edward 


Klnmundy 




Hall.G. R •.... 


Colchester 




Hall. G. K 


Nilwood 




Hamilton, Chas. E 


Canton 


Gilmore J E . .... 


Hlllsboro 

Danville 

Troy 

Coal City 


Hamilton. James H 

Hampton. N.R 

Hand. P. L 


Sparland 


Gilson. K. W 


Murphysboro — 




Peoria 




Hanvey, John 


Collnsville 






Handle. Ledlie. 


Taylorville 


f^lnHqnn K 


DuQuoin 


Hanenstein. J. W 


Willisville 






Hanes. W. J 


Salem 




Edwardsvllle .... 

Wllllamsville 

Riverton 

Percy 

.. do 

Stookev 

Belleville 

Splllertown 

Lake Creek 

Pana 

Herrin 

Petersburg 

O'Fallon. 




Sorento 


r4lAnnnn Philln 


Hanson, William 


O'Fallon 






Colllnsville 




Hanvey. Robert. 

Hanvey. William 

Haddicks, Frederick H.... 
Happer, Frank 


.. do 


GoalbyiB. P :": 

Qoalby Prank H .... 


.. do 

Cable 


Goalby W A 


Edwardsvllle — 


OnrlHarH Wm H 


Harding. Enos 


Birdner 




Harms. Heike 


Petersburg 


Goforth Wm 


Harper, Oscar 


Lebanon 


Golliher H 


Hardy, Thomas 


Springfield 


Gordon. E.J 








Oglesby 




Lincoln 

Springfield 

Sato 

Green Ridge 

do 




Decatur 




iarrls, J. W 


Springfield 




larrls. W. C 


Nilwood 


Gowln, Curtis 


Hartman, Frank 


Murphysboro 


Hartman, John F 

Hartwell, A. Lincoln 


.. do 




Kewanee 

Bloomlngton 

Springfield 

Taylorville 

Vlrden 

Pekln 


Marion 


Graham. L. A 


.. do 




.. do 


Graden Orville B 


Harvey, M. F 


DuQuoin 




Hartman, W. H 


Coultervllle 




Harvey. Wm. R 


Wanlock 




Springfield 

do 


Havel, Joseph 

Hawker. J. O 

Haworth, William 


French Village... 


C^raxr f^hno R 


Pana 


GreaveS' Walter 


Ladd 

Caaton 

Braldwood 

Wilmington 


Sandoval 




Hayes, Arthur H 


Danville 




Hayes James 


Bloomington 




Hayler, George L 


Murphysboro 


Green. R. A 








Heidinger, F. C 


Mt. Olive 






O'Fallon 


Greenhalgrh, Jame8 

Greenhalsh. William 


Hlllsboro 


Hennegan, John F 


Wanlock 


..do 

Pontiac 

Greenvlew 


Henry, Philip 




Heppard, George 


Belleville 




Herder, Walter 


Edwardsvllle 






Belleville 








Odin 


f4rlpA Alhnrt 


Kewanee 


Herring, J. P 


Staunton 














Ridgely 






Hess. Edward B 


Morrisonville .... 




Belleville 

do 








Hi lard, James 


St. David 




.. do 


Hi lery, John 






. do 


Hlll.C. C 

Hlll.C.W 

Hill Emberson 


Marissa 




.. do 


Pontiac 






Westville 








Astoria 




DeSoto 


Hlnes, P 


Toluca 


Guy.D.P 

Gurick Howard 


Springfield 

Litchfield 


Hindman,Mllo 


Herrin 


Hobbs, Francis E 


Centralia 


Gurick L E 


do 


Hodgson, Edward 


Murphysboro .... 






Hodson. Moses 


Smithboro 



364 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Postoffice. 



Postof&ce. 



Hoecker. Charles 

Hogan, Prank 

Holland, Arrhar J . .. 

Holland. Miner 

Holtkamp, Geo 

Hooper, George 

Hooper, H. H 

Hopper, G 

Hopper, Shelby 

Horton. William T... 

Hord, Alvin 

Hottinger. J 

House, C. O 

Howe, Chas 

Hubbard, G. W 

Huff.L 

Huggans, R. D 

Huggins. William ... 

Huggins, J. A 

Hughes. William A.. 

Hughes. John C 

Hull. Lee 

Humphrey, Chas .... 
Humphrey, W. P 



Isom. Wm 

Ing. George M ... 
Ingles. Orle W... 

Irwin, Byron 

Irwin, John 

Irwin, Robert K . 
Isadore, George.. 
Isadora, Charles. 



Jackson. William 

Jacobs. George R... 

Jacobs, James M 

Jacobs, J. P 

Jacobs, William 

Jacobs, W. Sr 

Jamison, John 

Jeffrey, James 

Jeffrey, John 

Jenkins. John L 

Jenkins. T. E 

Jenka. Wlliiam 

Johnson, James J 

Johnson, John W 

Johnson. J. S 

Johnson, Robert 

Johnson, S 

Johnson. W.IC 

Johnson. William H. 
Johnson. Wi Ham L . 
Johnston, Joseph R.. 
Johnstone. Thomas.. 
Johnston. Thomas B 

Jones, George 

Jones, Henry E 

Jones. John P 

Jones. Jonathan, Jr . 
Jones. Verning L.... 
Jones. Jonathan Sr.. 

Jones. Joseph 

Jones, Logan 

Jones, Felix E 

Jones, Thomas 

Jones. William 

Jones, Wlliiam 

Jones, John 

Jones. James W 

Jones. John 

Jordan, Robert 

Judd, Charles E 



Glen Carbon . 
Springfield,.., 

Mt. Olive 

(Jarterville 

Breese 

Glen Carbon . 
Gillespie 

-Jlen Carbon . 

Catlin 

Hornsby 

Taylorville.,... 

Freeburg 

St. John 

Streator 

Springfield.... 

Canton 

Streator 

Murphysboro 

streator 

Springfield.... 

. do 

Murphysboro 
Edinburg , 



DuQuoin 

Marlon 

Glen Carbon 

Pana.. 

Gillespie .... 

Pontiac 

rtoseboro 

Sparta 



Minonk 

Elmwood 

Moweaqua 

BartonvUle 

Murphysboro . 

Peoria 

Petersburg 

Marlssa 

Belleville 

Danville 

Athens 

Bloomington .. 
Taylorville.... 

Birkner 

DuQuoIn 

Pawnee 

St. John 

Marion 

Soperville 

Spring Valley. 

Pontiac 

.. do 

Freeburg 

Belleville 

Staunton 

Marissa 

.. do 

Barclay 

Marissa 

Staunton 

Marissa 

Barclay 

Muncle 

Marissa 

BracevlUe 

Grape Creek . . 

Pana 

Marissa 

Streator 

Edwardsville . 



Kalebaugh, Clinton H. 

Karney, Emory O 

Keating, Edward F.,.. 

Keating. Richard 

Kelley. James D 

Kelly, Martin 

Kelley, Robert D 

Kelly, Chas 

Kelly, N 

Kelly. Richard V 

Kemper, Christian .... 

Kenady, Fred A 

Kennedy, W.J 

Kearney. John 

Kerchner, Howard 

Kerchner, John 

Kerns. Samuel J 

Keasick. Chas. W 

Kidd. Aionzo 

Kilbride. T. C 

Killinger. C 

Ktlllnger. Harry 

Killinger. John 

Kimball. Joel L 

Klmber, John 

King. John 

Kingerfas. Wm 

Kinghom, John 

King, Alexander, Sr... 
King, Alexander, Jr... 

King.L B 

Kirby, Thomas. Jr 

Kirshner. Frank 

Klaus, Louis 

Klingenfu?*. Edward... 

Klinkner, Frank 

Knapp. Enoch 

Koombs. James 

Krully. Andrew 



Lambert, George W 

Lambert, Wm 

Lanham. John W 

Larkin. James G 

Laughrey, Jonathan P. 

Lavalller. D. S..... 

Lawson. Goorge. 

Layne. J. W 

Ledbitter, George 

Leek. Carroll 

Leeper, C. W 

Lehman. Philip 

Lemons. J. L 

Leslie. G. Lutton 

Leslie. George 

Leslie. N. B 

Lewis. Alvin 

Lindsay. J 

Linrtskey, Martin H 

Lindstrom. O.^car.. .... . 

Linsky. James 

Linsky. Patrick J 

Little, G. E 

Little, Peter 

Little, Thomas 

Lockhart, Lewis 

Lockie, G. O 

Lockie, William 

Loding, Chas. A 

Loehel. Frank 

Loeffier. Adolph E 

Long. Noah B 

Lozln. P 

Lucht. M. F 

Lucey, Michael 



Astoria 

Hallidayboro. 

Streator 

..do 

Carbon Hill.. 

Toluca 

Carbon Hill .. 

Streator 

Petersburg... 

Cantral 

Belleville 

Cambridge ... 
Edwardsville. 

Peoria 

Belleville 

.. do 

Springfield.,.. 

Decatur 

Falrmount ... 
Parmtngton .. 
Colllnsville .. 
Germantown.. 
(Colllnsville .. 

Hlilsboro 

Ladd 

Carterville ... 

tselleville 

Staunton 

Carterville 

..do 

Smlthboro 

Peru 

Belleville 

.. do 

.. do 

Colfax 

Assumption.. 

Marion 

BracevlUe 



LaSalle 

Mlddletown .. 

Danville 

Athens 

Carbon Cliff.. 

Chenoa 

Cable 

DeSoto 

"*orento 

Hallidayboro. 

Equality 

Lebanon 

Girard 

Rutland 

Gardner 

Braidwood — 

Catlin 

Oglesby 

Streator 

Sherrard 

Braidwood 

.. do 

Edwardsville. 

Peoria 

Murphysboro. 

Nlantic 

Carterville.... 

.. do 

Loding 

Trenton 

O'Fallon 

Pontiac 

Lincoln 

Mt, Olive 

Ridgely 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 365 

Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoflice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Lundeeu. Frank VV 


Galva 


Miller, James 


Alma 


Lundy. J. P 


Mt. Pulaski 

Ridge Prairie.... 
Herrin 


Miller. T. H 




Liundley. Kalph 


Miller William C 


Rentchler 




MIUh, Thomas S 


Coal City 

Spaulding 










Plncknesville.... 
Staunton 


Mitchell. E. R 




Mize. Walter 


Pana ... 


Maasburg. H. C 


Mockbee. Luther... 


Niantlc 


Mader, C'harlesH 


Mohm. E. 


Peoria 


Manley Leo 


Cofifeen . 


Morehouse. Charles L 

MoflFat. R. E . 


nnnvilln 


Mainwaringf, James 


Braceville 

Lebanon 


Cutler 


Mair, JMax 


Moffatt John 


So. Wilmington.. 


Malcolm VVm J 


Braceville 

Braldwood 

Percy 

Hallidayboro 


Molash A 


Maltby. Edward 




Gillespie....;;.!!; 


McAddams. John W 


Moor. P. J.' W 








McCann. David 






McCartney, C. P 


Alexis 

Streator 

Auburn 


Morgan John C 


Springfield 






McConachle, Ed 


Morris. A.. 






Springfield 


Morris, J 




McCulley. G. L 






McCun sky. Tobias 


Assumption 

Taylorville 

Springfield 

Pana 


Morris. George, 


Belleville 


McCurdy. J 




Nashville... 








McDonald. VV. H 


Morris. William 


do 


McDonald, William J 


Percy 

Carbon Hill 

Murphysboro 

fana 




Harrisburg 

Lebanon 


McDonald, Peter G 


Morrisey. Thomas. 


McFarlHnd, P. E 




Oglesby 


McGittlgan. Thomas 




McGowan, Edward 

McGowan. J. K 


Lincoln 

Herring Prairie.. 


Mulvaney. Christopher 


Edwards 


Mclntyre, A. D 




Belleville. 


McKean, Andrew 


Coal City 

Carbon Hill 

Coal City 


Muren, Joseph L. . 


do 


McKean, John 


Murphy Robert T 


Morris 






Parmington 

Springfield 


McKearnan, J. B 


Athens 


Murphy, James P 


McKee C L 


Lake Creek 

Belleville 

Carbon Hill 

.. do 

Pleasant Plains.. 
Danville 


Murrie Archie 


McKeerman, John 


Murray. Robert 


Coal City 


McLauchlan. P. T 


Murray. Christopher C.... 


Gillespie 








McMlllIn, W. M 


Myers. Henry 


Minonk 


McMurtry. P 


Vlrden 


Myers Peter W 


Carllnvllle 


McNall, Albert 


Mt. Vernon 

Murphysboro 

Clark City 

Coulterville 

Roanoke 

La6alle 


Nagle. Jake 


McPherson. James 

McQuade. J 


Springfield 

Carlinville 


McNeil. S 


Neal. Ambrose 


McVey. Prank W 


Neil John H 


CartprvilJA 


McVicar. Donald 










Negley. Ollie K . 




Marland, William 


Sparland 

Murphysboro 

Toluca 


Neilson, James W 


Sparta 


Marshall. Robert 




Martin, Benj'imln 


Nenizel. Fred H 


Caseyville 


Martin. N.W 


Marlon 








Milstadt 

Kelleville 






Massie, J. T 


Nichols. John 




Mason E 


Winchester 


Nlckerson. James K 

Nicol, William 


Colfax 






Matthews, C 


Wllllsvllle 

Belleville 

Peoria 

DuQuoin 

.. do 


Nicol. Adolph 


do 


Maule, William 




Galva... 


Maxwell, Fred 


Norborn, Frank 


.. do 


Mayor, A. W 


Norrls, James J 


Murphysboro 

DuQuoin 

Oglesby 

Springfield 


Mayor. J. W 






Ledford 

Belleville 

Tamaroa 




Mechaelis, Edward 

Melvln Elmer . . ..'. 


Norfleet, Thomas M 

O'Brien. Terry 


Meng. Georee W 

Mercer, L. W 


Freeburg 

St. John 


Decatur 


Messersmith. Fred 


Athens 


O'Donnell. Michael 


.. do^ . 




WiUiamsville 

Trenton 

Belleville 

Centralia 

Braceville 


Ogden. William 




Meyer. Henry 


Ogden. Samuel 




Michaels, Otto L 






Miller. A. J. P 


Olson. August 


Streator 


Miller, Hugh 


O'Neal. James 


.. do 



366 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Certificates of Competency— Cont'inxied. 



Ople. Frederick 

O'Riley. Wllber 

Ord. S. R 

Ormiston R • 

Osborne, BeDJamm.... 

Oaburn. Glen L 

Otte. John 

Outhouse. John 

Paddock. W. D 

Fadden.J. W 

Parks. James 

Parker, Joseph 

Patterson, R. J 

Patterson. T..... 

Patterson. W. M. 

Pankey, James M 

Patton, Frank L 

Pearce, H. L 

Peecher, David 

Peet. Chas....... 

Pemberton, C. U 

Perkes, Ephraim 

Petrea, J. W....^ 

Peters, Alonzo L 

Petro, Mike..... 

Pendergast, John..... 
Perrins, George i± — 

Peyla, George 

Pierson, Chas 

Plerson. Jos 

Pierson, Thomas 

Phillips.J. M....J..... 
Plnkerton. JohnG.... 

Piper, James.. 

Piper, Oliver G 

Piper, Joseph 

Pircher, Peter P 

Pitra, Frank 

Pitt. Joseph 

Piatt, J. A.... 

Plenty, Geo. R ....... 

Plimmer. Benjamin. 
Plocker. Henry. .^.. 
Pointer. Edward H.. 
Poole. Edward A — 

Powell, Edwin 

Powell, P. C.. 

Prescott. G. A 

Price. Thomas 

Price. Daniel D...... 

Prlckett. Thomas M. 

Prltchard. H. C 

Pugh. Daniel 

Pullen. R.H 

Pulver, R. H 



Quails, Nevall... 
Quick. A. T,„... 
Quick. A. S. H^. 
Quick. SeibertT. 
Quigley. Henry.. 
Qulnn. Joseph ... 



Raber, P. C 

Raber, Louis...... ^. 

Radford, William T. 

Rafter. Michael 

Rafter. James P 

Ralsbeck. John 

Randle. Caleb 

Randle. William 



Mt. Olive 

Grape Creek 

Mt. Vernon 

Danville 

Streator 

do 

Collinsville 

Johnson City — 



Pana 

Spring Valley... 

Streator 

Murphysboro ... 

.. do 

Gillespie 

St. Louis, Mo.... 

Equality 

Springfield 

Cable 

Braidwood 

Blarseilles 

DuQuoin 

Sopervllle 

Vandercook 

Peoria 

Braceville 

Centralla 

Herrln 

Braidwood 

Harrisburg 

..do 

.. do 

Athens 

HannaCity 

Worden 

Staunton 

Glen Carbon ... 

Sandoval 

Odin 

Trenton 

Springfield 

Canton 

Streator 

Pana 

Belleville 

Lake Creek 

CaseyviUe 

SeatonvlUe 

Centralla 

Spaulding 

Redlich 

Niantic 

Lewistown 

St. John 

Sorento 

Centralia 



Dubois 

Sato 

.. do 

Pinckneyville., 
Halidayboro... 
Springfield 



Troy 

Collinsville... 
Bloomington. 
Marquette .... 
Spring Valley 
Braceville — 

Belleville 

Freeburg 



Rasor, J. D 

Rasch, Aug. F 

RatclifEe A 

Rawson, Grant I 

Rawllngs, Alex N 

Ray,Hugh 

Keagan, William 

Reatz. Hans 

Reading. Curtis 

Record. L. A 

Reed. John 

Reed. W.J 

Reetz. Herman 

Reeger. John C 

Reeise. William M.... 

Reid. Robert 

Reid. Archibald 

Reid Andrew B 

Reiddlinger. Peter M. 
Reidberger, Wm. J... 

Rellly. Henry 

Reimann, John 

Remeiius, Jacob 

Rennard. Jas. Ed 

Relchman. George.... 

Rennl. Andrew 

Rennie, James 

Renter, August 

Repplinger,H 

Reyabek. Joseph 

Rhodes. Almon R 

Rhoades, Ashley 

Rlce.C. D 

Rice. James M 

Rice. Moses....;. 

Richards, John T 

Richart, Lee.......... 

Richmond. JohnE.., 

Riley. B.J 

Riley. Michael 

Rippltoe. J. G 

Ritchie, John 

Roach, Samuel 

Roberts, Charles 

Roberts. Edward J... 

Roberts, Frank L.... 

Roberts, John 

Roberts, Jonathan... 

Robinson, Charles... 

Robinson, J. A 

Robinson, William A 

Rockey, Charles 

Rodgers. Edward.... 

Rogers, Geo. R 

Rodgers, Finnel 

Rode. Henry 

Rohe, Herman J 

Rchour, Michael 

Rosan, Ben 

Rowland, Samuel J.. 

Rowland, Sidney G.. 

Roy, A. L 

Royster, Richard .... 

Rude, Edmund 

Russell, Zenas 

Rutlift, Isaac 

Ryan, Lawrence 



Staunton 

Trenton 

Sheflaeld 

BelleviUe 

Cantrall 

Wanlock 

Mt. Olive 

Lincoln 

Niantic 

Rutland 

Herrin 

Danville 

Lincoln 

Pinckneyville.. 

Roanoke 

Moweaqua 

Springfield 

DuQaoin 

Peoria 

Dubois 

Toluca 

Belleville 

O'Fallon 

Grape Creek... 

Trenton 

Dunfermline.... 

..do 

Mt. Olive 

Belleville 

Glen Carbon.... 

Chenoa 

Taylorville 

Harrisburg 

Sunfleld 

Murphysboro... 

Staunton 

Moweaqua 

Coal City 

Cantrall 

Grape Creek.... 

Colchester 

Trenton 

Tamaroa 

LaSalle 

Kangley 

Lake Creek — 

Litchfield 

Willisvllle 

Wenona 

Riverton 

Toluca 

Peoria 

Murphysboro.. 

Sunfleld 

Murphysboro . 

Sherrard 

Alexis 

Grape Creek , . 

DuQuoln 

Divernon 

Belleville 

Collinsville.... 

Peoria 

DeSoto 

Pana 

Ashland 

Decatur 



Sadler, George 

Sallade, George 

Sallade. J. E 

Sands, Robert K.... 
Sangrelet. C harles . 
Savage, Richard.... 



Murphysboro. 

Chatham 

..do 

Marissa 

Litchfield 

Clarke City... 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, ci61 

Certificates of Comjietenc ij — Coniinned. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 
















Murphysboro .... 


Saylor, C. F 


Murphysboro .... 
Belleville 






Stocks, H. .:...:;::::::::::: 






Pekin 






Schramm Charles 


Belleville 


Stone Frank 






Edwardsvllle .... 

Glen Carbon 

Cartersvllle 

Mt. Olive 






Schmacker, Hermcn ...... 


Storm, Edwin 


Worden 


Schoolcraft, L 


Stout. F M 


Springfield 






Schroeder, Henry 


..do 


Stowell, G. W 


Bloomlngton 

Belleville 


Schnessel. Conrad . 


Breese 


Streik Wm 








Pinckneyville.... 
Taylorvil'e 


Schumacher, Chas 


Marissa 


Strlvey, Wm 


Schumm Fred W . 


Gardner 


Stroud Wm 


Worden 




Marissa 

Colchester 

Braceville 

Odin 

Cantrall 




Springfield 

Athens 


Scott. J. W 


Struse, Henry H 


Scurrah. Castling R 

Secor, Fred D 


Stuthard , George B 

Stuart, John 


Westville.:::::::: 

Ladd 


Seeman, JohnC 


Sullivan, S 

Surber. Alexander H 

Swartz, Fred 


Harrlsburg : 

Danville 

Toluca 


Seeman George A. 


do ... 


Seldel, Fred 


Kinmundy 

Ormsby 

Colfax 


Seller, William 






Sells, Chas. B 






..do 






Shafer, James M 


Girard 

Carterville 

Spring Valley.... 
Athens 


Taylor Mack 


Westville::::::::: 

Tamora 


Shanklln, A. S 


Taylor, Wm. W 






Blssell ""' 


Sheehan, Peter 


Teaters C N 


Taylorvllle :: 

Mt. Olive 




Willisville 

Fairmount 

Lincoln 

Springfield 

Kinmundy 

Belleville: 

..do 






Temple, James C 






Terry. W. F 


Litchfield 






Raymond::::::::: 

Rushville.. 


Shrlver. P. A 


Thexton, Henry 


Siddall, Herbert 






Slddall. John 






Siddall, Levi 


..do 


Thomas Charles 


DeSoto 


Simmons. H 


Murphysboro .... 

Glen Carbon 

Carbon Cliff 

Streator 

Carterville 

Gilchrist 


Thomasberry. Hiram A ... 
Thompson, Wm. H 


DuQuoin 


Sinclair, Guy S 




Silvls. Thomas S 














Tlbballs. E. A 


..do 




Wyoming....::::: 

Tower Hill 

Danville 

Springfield 


Smith, Chas. H 


Seiieca 


Titus, C B . 


Smith. Edward J 


Collinsville 

Virginia 

St. Louis. Mo 

Danville 


Tindall J L 


Smith, George W 




Smith, George W 




Smith, P 






Smith, S 


Marseilles 

Collinsville 

Murphysboro .... 

Lincoln 

Danville 

O'Fallon . 




Carterville 


Smith, Robert 




Smith, Firth 


Tumblenson, Sinclair 

Turner, Geo. W 


centraiia... :::::: 


Smithmeyer, Anton 


Smyth, CM 


Twomby Edward 


Coal Valley ...::: 


Sneddon, John 


Vallow. P. Oliver 




Catlin 


Kinmundy 

McLean 


Sneyd. James 


Westville 

Georgetown 

Willisville 

Eilisville 

Mt. Vernon 

Seatonville 


Vaughn John 






Sowerby. Miles 


Vaughn. Wm M 


RHirnrHa 




Vand veer, Perry E 

Vernon, James.... 


Taylorvllle.:::::: 

LaSalle 


Sparks, J. L 












Spiller. Elijah 


Hallidayboro 

Farmington 

Pontiac 

Toluca 


Raymond 

Assumption 

Fredonla 

Spauldlng 

Mt. Olive 


Spence, Elmer 


Wagmire, James 


Sprout, J. W 


Waldrom Thos 


Stanfel, Martin 




Stanford, J. W 


Pana 

Wanlock 

Colchester 

Missionfield 

Danville 

Salem 

Lenzburg 

Spring Valley.... 
Mt. Vernon 


Walker, John H 


Stanforth. F 






Stanton, Wm. E 


Wallare, Henry Q 




Stedman, Edgar 


Waller, Wm. F 


Marlon 

Springfield 

Hillsboro 

Bracevllle 

Auburn 

LaSalle 


Stedman. Robert, Sr 


Waters, Robert 


Steel. E.H 


Wallford, Noah 


Stelnheimer. Theodore.... 


Wallock. Chas 


Stephen, C. H 




Stewart. L. A 


Walton, A. F 



368 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Certificates of Competency — Concluded. 



Name. 


Poatoffiee. 


Name. 


PostolBce. 


Walton Hugh 


Norris 

Bureau Junction. 

St, David 

Pottstown 

Collinsville 

Troy 

Farmineton 


Williamson, Henry 


Coal City 






Walton, Joseph 


Wills, Henry E 


Harrlsburg 


WantUng T J 


Wilson David. 


Birkner 






Middle Grove 


Warner, Richard 


Wilson, James 


Springfield . 






Norris 








Watson, Frank 


Springfield 

Riverton 


Wohlers. S. Henry 


Mt. Olive 


Watson M 


Wood Daniel A 


Colfax 




Belleville 

Elmwood 


Woodward. J. R 

Woolbright, D. A 




Watts. T.J 


Centralla... 




Dunfermline 

Greenvlew 

Harrlsburg 

Nashville 

Sprlnefield 

Murphysboro .... 

Herrin 

Streator 

Belleville 

Birkner 

Belleville 


Pekin 








Welch, Benjamin 


Wormack. Chas.A 


Glen Carbon . .. 




Wright, Thos. G 


Belleville 




Wright, Wm. M 




West, W H 


Wrigley, James 


Collinsville . . . 


West. Ollie 


Yates, John 








Weatwood. Albert 


DeSoto 






Coal City 








Wevmouth .John 


l^'oinfS'-:::::: 


Young, J K 


Girard 










Tower Hill 

Riverton 

Springfield 

Lincoln 

Lake Creek 

Springfield 

Sandoval 

Spaulding 

Spring Valley.... 

St. David 

Virden 




LaSalle 


White Henry 


Young. A. K .. .. 


Girard 


White, Perry J 






White, Robert 


Young. W. L 


DuQonin 


Wlckersham J. R. 


Yonnghusband, L.... ,. 


Coal City 


Wilkin. W. P 


Youngquist, Frank 




Williams. Andrew D 












Belleville 


Williams Watson 


Zink Louis. . ........... 


.. do 




ZInk, Peter A 


.. do 


Williams, Wm. H 


Sberrard 

Murphysboro 


Zuriker, Lorenz., .......... 


Cable 


Williams, Wm. Hampton.. 







HOISTING ENGINEERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Belleville 


Chltwood. Willlnm 






Collinsville 

Belleville 

Braidwood 

Ridge Prairie.... 

Cuba 

Springfield 

Canton 


Clark. Charles M 


DuQuoin 

LaSalle 




Cllne, John ................ 










Cook, W D 




Baiwir John 


Cotton, George 


Hallidayboro 






Ledford 


Bath Ame^ton... 


Craig. Daniel 


Danville. 


Beebv William 


Crawson. William 


O'Fallon 




LaSalle 








Birkley N T 


Cuba 


Cruickshanks. Wm. A 

Cummlngs, Robert H. L... 


Middle Grove 


Blue, Jesse 


Norris 

Gilchrist 


Sparland 








Yates City 

lies Junction 

Pawnee 

Springfield 

Pottstown 

Coal City . ... 


Dauck, John 


LaSalle 


Brown, G. A 


Davenport. Thomas 


New Castle 


Brubeck. J. W 






Davis. Thomas 


Swanwick 




Davis, William H 




CampbeU Albert 


Davison, J. G 

Dawson. John 


St. John 

Streator 




Dawson, Thomas 


do 


Carlson Alexander 

Carrlngton. Eugene 

Carter. Albert J 


Galva 

Moweaqua' 

Plnckneyvllle 


Dawson, V. C 

DeBacher. Thomas 

DeHaas. B. L 


Spring Valley.... 

Elmwood 

TdUnla 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



369 



Certificates of Service — Continued. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 






Lewis. William 




Dll'on John 


Auburn 


Lipperl, Adolph 


Kewanee 


Doe. K. P 


Glen Carbon 

Pottstown 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Colchester 

Springfield 

Soperville 






Dodd. Samuel 


Love. William 


Virden .... 




Lumdtierg Eric 


Galva 




Marshall. Robert. .. . 




Edwards. George W 


7ate3 City 








Ekls. Daniel B 




Spring Valley.... 
Marion 


Essex, George M 


1 Matthews. C 

1 Matthews. William G 




Glen Carbon 

Rutland 










Staunton ■ 


Maxwell. Fred 

1 McCalster. Thomas 

I McDonald. William H 

McLean. John.. 


Peoria 

Muddy Valley.... 
Pana 


Fisher, Patrick 


Kangley 

Peoria 

Orchard Mines... 
Williamsville.... 

Nllwood 

Virden 

OkawviUe 

Nashville 

Springfield 

Streator 

LaSalle 


Pleasant Plains 




McMillen. W. M 


Danville 




McWerthy. G. A 


Smithboro.. 


Gaudy. James W 


Melvin. T. M 


Tamaroa 


Qlasford, Oliver 


Mfiemjohi!::::: ;:::::::: 

Miller. Wm 


Spring Valley.... 


Glenam. Philip 


Graham, J. A 


Morrison. Archie 


Oglesby 


Graham. Reuben 


Mumford E A 










Greaves. Allen 






Grey, David F. 






Barclay 

Bunker Hill 


Grlmshaw. Joseph 


Nell. John H. 


Groom John. 


Belleville. 


Nellson J W 


Sparta 

Cuba 

Galva 




Mlllstadt 

Spaulding 

Predonia 

Nllwood 

O'Pallon 


Nicholson. George A 

Nord.JohnE 


Haas, Jacob 


Ogden, David. 








Hagler, Charles 


Rentchler 


Hall, George R . 


Ogden Samuel 








Kangley 1. 

Streator 


Harms. Helke 


Petersburg 

Tamaroa 

•iandoval 

Springfield 

Streator 


Osborne. Benjamin 

Octlnger William 


I arris J. T. 


Catlin 




Pankey John M 




Hickox. Lee 




Howe. Charles 


Equality 

Marseilles . 




Spring Valley.... 

Sparta 

..do 


Peet. Charles 


Ichman, Frank 


Pendergast. James 

Phillips William 


Soperville 

Hallidayboro ... 

Farmington 

do 






Isadore, George 


Picton. Thomas H 




[ 

Minonk 1 

Orchard Mines... 

Murphysboro 

Petersburg 1 

Gilchrist 

Marissa 

Riverton 

Muncle 






Prichard. H. C 


Lewlstown 


Jackson. William 


Prichett.T. M 


Nlantic 


Jacobs John P 


Quails. Nevel .. 








Jamison. John 


Dubois 


Jeffrey, William 


Quick A T 


Sato 


Johnson. Edgar W 


Raber Louis 




Jones T. A . . 


Casey ville 

Cuba.... 




Cuba 

Hallidayboro 






Radford. W. T 


Bloomlngton 






Keirney, E 














Belleville 

Edwardsvllle 

Carterville 

. do 


Reld.A. B.Jr 




Kennedy. W J 




King, Alexander, Jr 


Reum. Charles H 




King John 


Rice. B. K 

Richmond. Edward B 


Harrlsburg 

Wiu.-h^sf^r 

Pinck.iHyviJle 

^Vesiville 


Kirby, Thos., Jr 


Peru 

Galva 

Belleville 

Fairbury 


Klau«, Liouis 


Riley Michael 




Roach. Samuel 


Tamaroa 




Rogers. George.. . 


Suufield 


Langran. James... 


Rogers Henry 




Larson. Charles L 


Galva . 




DeSoto 


Lathan. William H 

Lewes. Jacob H 


Hallidayboro 

Pottstown 







-24 C. 



370 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Service — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Sallade George A 


Chatham 

Carterville 

Coal City 


Tefft Ernst 


Girard 




Telfer. John K 


Morris 


Sawyers, Joseph 


Thome, Martin 


Martinville 




Marissa . .. 


Wallace, Harry Q 






Belleville 

Spring Valley.... 

Dawson 

Fredonia 

Marquette 

Gardner .... 




Seeback. Joseph 


East Peoria. 


Sexton LaFayette . . 


Warner. Andrew M 


Wenona. 


Seymour. A.J 

Sheppard. W. C 




Wertwood, Edward 

Wheatley. Rolley 


Birkner 


Sburm Fred 


DuQuoin 




Virginia 

Ashland 

Willisville 

Bartonville 

Bellerille 

Worden 






Sorrells. D. H 


Williams, Husten 


Spaulding 


Sowarbv Miles 


Williams. Stephen P 


Wyoming 






Streck. William 


Willis, Harry 

Wood, Daniel A . ... 


New Castle 


Stroud William.. . ... 


Colfax 




Springfield 












Tanner, Henry 


PinckneyvUle.... 

Bartonyille 

Tamaroa 


Wormack, Charles A 

Zeigler , John 


Glen Carbon 


Taylor Benjamin .. .. 


lies Junction 













MINE EXAMINERS, CERTIFOATES OF COMPETENCY. 



371 



MINE EXAMINERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF 
COMPETENCY. 



Note— The revised minine: law of 1899 changed the title or name "Fire 
Boss" to that of "Mine Examiner," and provided that those holding certifi- 
cates as Fire Boss could exchange the same for that of Mine Examiner. 

The names followed by the abbreviation "ex." have made such exchange. 
Those by "d" are deceased. 



Po3toffice. 



Adams, WilHamM.. 
Adrlen, Charles H.. 

Alexander. John 

Amberger, Joseph . 

Andree, John W 

Anderson. James... 
Andrew, Thomas — 
Andrew. Thomas — 
Archibald, George.. 
Armstrong. George. 

Argyle. Joseph 

Arnold, Stephen 

Asbery, E 

Asbery, J. B 

Atkinson. John Q... 
Avery, William 



Back, Robert 

Baker. Sherrard 

Bafeer. Robert , 

Baker, Samuel G , 

Baldwin, J. F 

Barkley. George , 

Barlow, Harry 

Baugh, William 

Beecham, William 

Beekman, Theodore 

Bell, Arthur 

Bell. William 

Berry. W. C 

Betson. Roht 

Bertison. William 

Blehl. Charles 

Bigelow. G 

Blair. Herbprt M 

Bluefield. Charles 

Blakemore. George 

Blenkinsopp, Thomas, Jr. 

Blue, J. W 

Booth. Enoch 

Borg. Frank 

Bowen. Gwilym 

Boyer. John 

Brennan. Patrick 

Brennan. John B 

Brewer. Emery A 

Brown, Ben F 



Centralia 

Hanna City.. 

Cable 

Chatham 

Ureeuview .., 

Marlon 

Oglesby 

Kangley 

Green Kidge, 

Kiverton 

Coal City 

Oglesby 

Salem 

Salem 

Cable 

Belleville..... 



Farmington.. 

Gillespie 

Auburn 

.. do 

Equality 

Greenvlew 

Lake Creek... 

Dawson 

Cardiff 

Glen Carbon.. 
Carterville.... 

Streator 

Staunton 

Farmington.. 

(Janton 

Belleville 

Spaulding 

Centralia 

Coal City 

Streator 

Cable 

Grape Creek. 
Springfield... 

Mt. Olive 

Herrin 

Falrmount 

Toluca 

Virden 

Mt. Pulaski... 
Bryant 



Brown, Mathew 

Brown. Archibald 

Brooks, Peter 

Brynn. William 

Hullough, James 

Bundy, John 

Bumgartner, Andrew J. 

Burnett, J 

Burnett. Thomas 

Burns. James. Sr 

Burns. J 



Campbell, Robert 

Campbell, James 

Cannon. John 

Capet, Moses 

Cappln, Aaron 

Carlson. Andrew 

Carr, J. W 

Carroll, Anthony W 

Carter, James 

Carter. Samuel 

Carylon. J 

Case. William 

Casey, James 

Casey. John 

Castillo. Henry 

Chadderton. John 

Champley. James 

Clark. Joseph B 

Cralne. J. E.. Jr 

Cunningham, David 

Champley, James, ex 

Condon. Charles H 

Connolly. Terrance J 

Cook. William 

Cook. Elijah 

Cook. Thomas 

Cooper. Moses 

Costello, Henry, ex 

Cowley, William 

Crichton, Lawson 

Connaughton, Edward.. 

Cox, E 

Cox. W. E 

Cox. Will M 

Cumming, J. M 



Springfield.... 

Streator 

TaylorvlUe.... 

Virden 

Girard 

Streator 

Barclay 

Hallidayboro.. 

.. do 

Springfield.... 
Spring Valley. 



Witt 

Assumption ., 
Marquette .... 

Coal City 

Wenona 

Colfax 

Odin 

Gillespie 

LaSalle , 

Bracevllle 

Oglesby 

Diamond 

Selbytewn 

Williamsville 

Pana 

Lenz Station . 

Wenona 

Hornsby , 

Murphy«boro. 

Qarllnville 

Wenona 

Hanna City 

Assumption... 

DuQuoln , 

Wanlock 

Belleville 

Athens 

Pana 

DuQuoin , 

Taylorville.... 

Belleville 

Centralia , 

Centralia , 

Kdwardsville , 
East Peoria..., 



372 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


PostofBce. 




•Springfield 

Odin 

Lanton .• 

Virden 

Belleville 

Astoria 

Springfield 

Nilwood 


Hardman, J.J 

Harrison, James 




Tlollnta PhnrlpiH 


Athens 






Odin 


Damrath. Frederick 






Hamilton, David 


Assumption . 






O'Fallon 




Hand Wright. J 


Virden 




Haisfleld. Aaron 


Ogle.^by.. 


Davis William 


Streator 


Hart. Chas. J 


Virden 








Athens 

Streator 

Taylorville 

Sandoval 

raylorville 

Roanoke 

Reatchler 

Sparta 

East 'eoria 

We'<tville 


Basel ton. F 


Springfield. 


Davis, William 


Harvey. C. M 


Willlamsville 

Belleville 


Davison. William D 


Hayden. Q. S 


Wenona .. 


Glen Carbon 








Dawklns. William £ 


Hardin, Hiram H ... 

Harvey Frank . .... 


Divernon 

Springfield 


Dodge, H.N 

Doonier. P. J 






Hillery. T 


Sherrard ... 


Danville 


Havwood Joseph 


Centralia. 




Hellery. G M 






Mt. Olive 

Streator 

Pekin 


Hemmersbach. Peter 

Henley J. H. 


Farmington 

Odin 




Henderson. Alexander 


Springfield 


English. Thomas 




Herbert. Albert W 






Marissa 








Hlnes. William 


Rutland. . 




Hlppard W. J . 


Belleville 






Norris 


n'arroll .Tnhn R 


Springfield 


Hooper, Geo 


Winchester 








Picker P ill 


.do 


Hold en. Andrew 


Coal City 


Fiellingham, John E 


Peoria 


Hookins. Reese 


Litchfield 


Petersburg 


Howell, J 


Carterville 










Tilden 


Hoye, William 


Braidwood 








Herrin 




Elmwood 


Hughes, John 


Decatur 


Fremgen. C.J 

ITrAmp'PTl P W 


Glen Carbon 

Glen Carbon 

Springfield 


Hutchinson, Ralph 

Jackson John 


Barclay 








Marion 




James Jonah 


Grape Creek 










Assumption 

Carterville 


Jenkins. Richard 

Jenkins, T. C 


LaSalle 


Galligher.J. M 


Murphysboro 






Jeten.T. F 


Roanoke 




Glen Carbon 

Centralia 

Westville 


Ogle»by 


Getteman. b 


Johnston, Samuel 

Johnson James N 


..do 

Carterville . . 




Belleville 

Gardner 




Oglesby 








rinoVia WTillinm 


Jones Thomas 


Sebanon 




Herria 




Springfield 








Graham, b. A 


Bloominaton 

Gillespie 

Athens 

Streator 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Coal City 


Jones, Benj. J 


Coffeen 




Litchfield. 




Jones. Robt. R 


Oglesby 




Jones, Wm. Hy 


Catlin 






Streator 




Kane.J.M 










Springfield 


Springfield 








Pai^l^y 

St David 

Centralia 

Belleville 

Streator 

Pana 


Kaveny, John K 


Troy 




Kenney, Wm 


Snarland 










Kldd, S. A 


Oglesl.y 


Guy, John 


Kingsley. 6 


Kingston .Mines.. 


Kiugsley. T 


Kingston Mines.. 


Haddow. Thomas.... 


KiUingworth. Chas. H 

Kloever, Matthew 


Kiii.-kneyville.... 
Pana 



MINE EXAMINEES, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 

Certificates of Competency —Continued. 



373 



Name. 


Po^^toffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Knapp Charles 


Seatonville 


McKlllop, Donald 


Carbon Hill 


Knles. Harry 








Lincoln 

Breese 


McKenzie, Alex. C 






McKlnuie, Hugh (d) 

McLaughlin. John P 

Mc Bride. George 

McKall. John. 








Kortkamp, Karl 


Hillsboro 

do .... 


Mabcoutah. . 


Kortkamp Liouis 


Springfield 




Cectralia 

Springfield 

Lebanon 

Worden 








McLean. Wm. F 




Krump Chas 










Lamar Prank 


Naylor, T. W 


. do 




Springfield 

Hallidayboro 

Cable 

Lake Creek 

Ledford 

?eneca 

Gillespie 

Springfield 

Barclay . 


Neal, Edward 

Neil, A 








Lawson, John . 


Nell. Warren 


Danville 




Neil. P. C 


Gillespie 






Lettsom Wm 


Nesbit. Charles L 


Freeburg 








Lehwald. Herman 


Nichols. Eli W 


Dunfermline . 


liloyd, Rowland K. 


Nixon, Robert .. 


Streator 


Longshore. Harry A 

Lockharc. James M 


DuQuoin 

Sunfield..: 

Centralia 

Colllnsville 

Lincoln 

Centralia 

Mascoutah 

Glen Carbon 

LaSalle 

Danville 

Belleville 


Nordner, C. K 

Noll. Charles 


Athens 

Springfield . 


liOrdon Michael 


Noll. Peter 


Belleville 




Nordman. Ferdinand 

Nye.C. L 

O'Connor. Patrick F 

Olroyd. Peter W 




Lyons, Mark 


Decatur. 


Manees, Charles 


Paisley 












Martin. William 


Owens, Evan .... 


Auburn 




Parker. -Toseph .... 




Massie. Alfred N 




Massie, J. G 


Carbon Hill 




Riverton 

Glen Carbon 

Staunton 




Litchfield 






.. do 


Meyer, B 


Peart, John . 


Braldwood 










Mldyett, Jesse 


Hallidayboro 

Troy 

Farmlngton 

DuQuoin 

Hanna City 

6alem 


Pettigrew, J 


.. do .. . 


Millett. Thomas 






Mitchell. Elijah R 


Hhillips, Benjamin 

Pick, Edward 




Mitchell. T 


(;entral City 




Pickon. Felix 


Danville 


Middleton, J. L 


Pickton, John W 


Farmlngton 


Miller, Alexander .. 


Ridge Prairie.... 

Glen Carbon 

Staunton 

Pawnee 


Plerard. Edward . . 


Co8l City 


Millar, C .. 


Pinson Samuel 




Miller, John K 


Preval. Fred 


Springfield 


Miller. G. W 


Poole. Robert H 


Edinburg 


Mofleat, A. S 


Sparta 

Springfield 

Springfield 

Harrisburg 

Assumption 

-pringfleld 

Glen Carbon 

Clark City ■• 

Centralia 

Georgetown 

Streator 




Belleville 


Monghan. T. P 


Potter E 


Hanna City R R 


MoDson. Charles 


Price. John B 


No 1 




Marissa 


Moran. Thomas 


Price Wm 


Braceville 


Morgan. Daniel S 




Mt. Olive 








Mountjoy, John H 














Alorgan. Joseph . 


Raab, Rudolph 




Morris. John H 


Wenona 

Staunton 

do 




Moss, Thomas 


Carlinville 


Muentrich, J 


Raop George 


■^oringfied 




Warden 

Muucie 

Sprlngfieid 

Braldwood 

Westvllle 

Odin 

Rlrard 

Oglesby 

Brairtwood 

Assumption 

Carbon Hill 






Munster. James........ 


Kae, Kobert 


Carbon Hill 


Muir, Andrew 


Rankin. Thomas A 


Westvllle 




Sprinefleld. 








McCall, Maurice R 


Reid Andrew 


Springfield . 




Kehg. Charles 


Belleville 


McCrlndle, David 


Rennison, Henry 


St John 


McDonald, Wm 






McDlll. James 




Danville 


McEwen, Charles 


Reynolds, David 


Muncie 



374 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Certificates of Cora^e/enc^— Concluded. 



Name. 


1 
Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postofflce. 


Rhodes, D. R 


Pana 

Westville 

Springfield 

Farmlngton 

Pontiac 

Belleville 

Streator. 






Rhodes. J. L 


Taublee, E. E 


HiUsboro 


Rice Geo 


Thaine, James 


Litchfield 






Coal City 


Rider. James H 


Thomas, John R 


Spring Valley 


Richard James 


Thomas. W. J . 


do 


Richardson Thos 


Thorunt. Joseph. Sr 

Thursh. David Z 


Trenton 




Danville 

Mt^Pulasli; .■."■■.'.■ 


HannaCity 


Robinson, Thomas J 


Thursh, David S .... 










Titler. William L 




Rolandelly, C. D 


Clarke City 

Virden 

Peoria. . 


Tompkins. Frank . . 


St David :' 




Valew. Edward 






Glen Carbon 


Sanrs C ... 


Vallow. Ellis 


Kinmundy 

Litchfield 


Savage. Mike 


Lincoln 

Barclay 

Lincoln 

Staunton 

Spaulding 

Springfield 


Vlt. Charles 


Scattergood, John 














Schmidt, A. R 


Wall. J. E 


Divernon 


Schrayer, Moses 


Ward. John G. 


Streator 






.. do 


Scoby, Ray 


Gilchrist 

Freeburg 

Sandoval 

Glen Carbon 

Odin 


Ward. Wilson 


Paisley 








Seidl. Frank J 


Wendler, Adelbert 




Self, J..:.- ...:.:.:::::.": 


Westwood.F. T 




Secor T D 


Whalen, Michael. 


Greenridge 




Spring Valley 

Streator 






SlddalJ, Edward 


Whitecamper. Louis 

Whitehead, Edward 

Wilkinson, George R 

Wetherili. James 


Lincoln 


Slddall. John W 


.. do 




Siddail. James 


.. do 


Bissell 


Sine. C. A 


HerrlH 


Ladd 


Smith, Geo. A 






Sparta 

Glen Carbon 


Smith, G. T 


Dawson 


Willard. Charles S 

Williams, James 


Smith, Henry 


Smithton 

Taylorville 

Glen Carbon 

Streator 


Oglesby 


Smith, William H 


Williams, T.J 


Cardiff 


Smith, John P 


Williams. Anthony 

Williams. William H 

Williamson. Jacob H 


Centralia 


Smith, James . .. .. 


Edinburg 




Bissell 




Troy 

Herrin 

Belleville 

Chatham 

Centralia 

Braceville 

do . 


.. do 


Smith John H 


Wilson Henry, ex 


Pana 


Smith. William 


Wilson. J. M 




Sneddon. Michael 


Williams. William E 

Wilson. Henry 


Streator 


Sollis John 


Pana 




Winterbottom. John 

Winterhottom. J. G 

Wood William 




Spiers. E 


.. do 


Steel Daniel 


Colllnsville 

Centralia 

do . 


Streator 




Worthington. Hillard 

Wright. David 




Steel, Neal 


Carllnvllle 


Stearns James 


Hallidayboro 

Sorento 

Braceville 

Glen Carbon 

Wlllisville 

Streator 

Cuba 

Coultervllle 

Canton 

Kewanee 


Wright William C .. .. 


Centralia 


Stonburner. L. L 

Slow Michael 


Yemm. William ... 

Zink. P. J 




Stelber. Anton 

bteines, Benjamin 


Gillespie 


Stevens. Walter 




Stevens John 


Belleville 


Stewart, John T 

Stirrat, James. 















MINE EXAMINERS, OERTIFIOATES OF COMPETENCY. 375 

MINE EXAMINERS. CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Postofflce. 



Name. 



PostofBce. 



Arnold, Stephen 

Bagshaw, George W. 
Blakeman. (ieorgre .. 

Bore. Frank 

Boulton. Henry 

Bough. William 

Brooks. Peter 

Brown, John 

Caveny , Edward 

Davis. Thomas 

Franzen. Mat 

Gray. William 

Griffin. John 

Hall. John Herbert.. 
Hoesfield. Aaron — 

Hornanor. Paul 

Hughes. John 

Humphreys. William 

Jenkins, Rutland — 

Eneper. David 



Eangley ... 

Virden 

Streator ... 
Mt. Olive.. 
Coal City .. 
Dawson ... 
Taylorville 
Streator ... 

Pana 

Nllwood ... 

Girard 

Streator ... 
Niantic. ... 

Mtnonk 

Ogiesby .... 

Lincoln, 

Decatur ... 
Clarke City 

LaSalle, ..., 

Girard 



Eopps. August..., 
Eortcamp. Carl... 
Eortcamp, Lewis 



Lewis. Edward 



Girard.... 
Hillsboro. 
.. do 



Ladd, 



Moflfett, Edward A |BartonviHe. 

Montgomery. John H Gardner 

Mooney. Arthur Eangley 

McDonald. M. E ILaSalle 



Ross. S. H Girard 



Schmidt. Ernest ... 

Schultz, John 

Shaw. Francis M... 

Shopman. John 

Siebenhawer. Wm. 
Sloufskie. Hermani 
Stewart, Samuel... 



Taylor. Samuel , 
Thomas. David . 



Ward. Robert.. 
Wilson. Archie. 
Wilson. John... 
Wood. Henry .. 



Mt. Olive 

Diamond 

Hallidayboro. 

Mt. Olive 

LaSalle 

Decatur 

Coal City 



O'Fallon. 
Canton. .. 



Streator 

Clarke City. 

Gardner 

Streator — 



376 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



ILLINOIS STATE AGREEMENT 



BETWKKN THB 



Illinois Coal Operators' Association and the United Mine Workers of Illinois 

From April 1, 1904, to March 31, 1906. 



Whereas, A contract between the opera- 
tors of the competitive coal fields of West- 
ern Pennsylvania. Ohio. Indiana and Illi- 
nois, and the United Mice Workers of Amer- 
ica, has been entered into at the City of 
Indianapolis. Indiana. March 21. 1904. fixing 
a scale of mining prices, day wages and con- 
ditions, for certain base points therein set 
forth, to continue in force and effect for two 
years from April 1, 1904. and 

Whereas. This contract fixes the pick 
mining price of bituminous mine run coal at 
Danville at fltty-two (52c) per ton of two 
thousand (2.000) pounds; therefore be it 

Besolved, That the prices for pick-mined 
coal throughout the state for two years be- 
ginning April 1. 1904, shall be as follows: 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Streator, CardifiP, Clarke City and asso- 
ciated mines, including Toluca thick | 

vein $0.61 ' 

(Note.— The matter of the clay parting 
at Streator to be referred to sub-dis- 
trict convention for adjustment.) 
Third vein and associated mines, in- 1 

eluding third vein at Streator. includ- i 

ing twenty-four inches of brushing... .79 [ 
Wilmington and associated mines, in- 
cluding Cardiff long-wall and Bloom- I 
ington thin vein. Including brushing. .84 t 

Bloomington thick vein 74 j 

Pontiac. including twenty-four inches 

of brushing 84 ; 

Pontiac top vein 61 

Marseilles. Seneca and Morris (Re- I 

ferred to a .joint committee of two 
miners and two operators, who shall ' 

take action prior to May 15. 1904. the 
scale to be in force from April 1. 1904, I 

and in default of an agreement the 
matter shall be referred to the two ! 

state executive boards.) 
(Note.— See Morris and Seneca Local 
Agreements.) 
Cornell, long- wall, third vein conditions .79 
Cornell, room and pillar 69 I 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

Danville, Westvllle, Grape Creek and 
associated mines in Vermilion county.$0.52 

THIRD DISTRICT. 

Springfield, Dawson and associated 

mines 52,', 

Lincoln and Niantic 66 

Colfax 56 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Mines on C. & A. south of Springfield, 
to and including Carlinvllle; includ- 
ing Taylorville. Pana. Tower Hill, 
Litchfield, Hillsboro, Witt (Paisley), 
Dlvernon and Pawnee 62 

Assumption long-wall, including twen- 
ty-four inches of brushing 68!4 

Assumption upper vein, including twen- 
ty-four Inches of brushing 87 

Moweaqua. room and pillar 56 

Decatur, long-wall, present conditions.. .67 

Decatur, room and pillar (Referred to 
the state president of the United Mine 
Workers and the commissioner of the 
Illinois Coal Operators' Association 
to fix the mining price, and if they 
cannot agree by May 1st it shall be 
taken up by the state executive 
boards; the rate so determined to be a 
part of this contract.) 

Raymond, referred for local settlement. 

FIFTH DISTRICT. 

Glen Carbon, Belleville and associated 
mines, to and Including Percy, Pinck- 
neyville, WillisviUe and Nashville 52 

Coal five feet and under 57 

SIXTH DISTRICT. 

DuQuoln. Odin. Sandoval, Centralia 

and associated mines 48 

Salem and Einmundy 63 



MINING PRICES AND CONDITIONS. 



877 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Mount VernoD 53 

Jackson county 48 

(AH coal five feet and under, five cents 
extra per ton; this not to apply to 
lower bench, nor rolls or horsebacks.) 

Lower bench, Jackson county, for shlp- 
plnar mines, miners to carry fourteen 
Inches brushing 61 

Saline county 48 

(Saline county question of low coal 
referred to joint sub district for ad- 
justment.) 

Williamson county 46 

EmHTH DISTRICT. 

Fulton and Peoria counties, thin or 
lower vein (third vein conditions)... $0 79 

Fulton and Peoria counties. No. 5 vein. 59 

Astoria. No. 5 vein (Fulton and Peoria 
counties conditions) 59 

Fulton and Peoria counties. No. 6 vein 
(with Kewanee and Etherley condi- 
tions, undercutting and wedging the 
coal; and if they can not obtain mem- 
bers of the U.M. W. of A. to mine the 
coal under these terms and condi- 
tions. It shall be the privilege of the 
operators to call for a meeting of the 
joint executive boards of the miners 
and operators, and said joint execut- 
ive boards shall fix a rate for shooting 
coal in that seam) 68 

Gilchrist. Wanlock, Cable, Sherrard 
and Silvis mines, 63 cents per ton. 
with last year's conditions. In case 
of deficient work, where miner and 
mine manager can not agree as to 
compensation, the mine committee 
shall be called in, and, if they cannot 
agree, the dispute shall be carried up 
under the 13th clause of the present 
scale 

Kewanee, Etherley and Wyoming 68 

Pottstown, No. 1 seam, scale to be the 
same as Gilchrist and Wanlock, ex- 
cept in the brushing of the top: that 
shall be settled by the sub-district. 

Colchester, referred for local settle- 
ment. 

Pekin, shipping mines only, mining 
rate and dead work scale to be re- 
ferred to President Perry, Commis- 
sioner Jus tl, one member of the U.M, 
W. of Illinois, and one member of the 
Illinois Coal Operators' Association, 
to be appointed by the respective or- 
ganizations, together with such fifth 
party as they may agree upon, whose 
decision shall be made by a m8.iority 
vote, not later than May 1, 1904, and 
be effective for two years from April 
1, 1904 ; such decision to be based upon 
the competitive and mining condi- 
tions, between such mines and ship 
ping mines in the Peoria district. 
{Note: See Pekin shipping mines local 

agreement.) 

NINTH DISTRICT. 

Mount Olive, Staunton, Gillespie, 
Clyde, Sorento, Coflfeen and Worden, 
and mines on the Vandalia line as far 
east as and including Smithboro, and 
on the B. & O. S. W. as far east as 
Buxton $0 52 

Coal five feet and under 57 



NO INCREASE IN COST EXCEPT AS 
PROVIDED. 

First. The Indianapolis Interstate Con- 
vention, having adopted a mining and un- 
derground day labor scale. In effect April 1, 
1904, no changes or conditions shall be Im- 
posed in the Illinois scale for the coming 
two years that increase the cost of produc- 
tion of coal In any district in the State, ex- 
cept as may be provided. 



EMPLOYES EXEMPTED FROM JURIS- 
DICTION CF U. M. W. OF A. 

Second. No scale of wages shall be made 
by the United Mine Workers for mine man- 
ager, mine manager's assistant, top fore- 
man, company weighman. boss drivers, 
night boss, head machinist, head boiler- 
maker, head carpenter, night watchman, 
hoisting engineers. The authority to hire 
and discharge shall be vested in the mine 
manager, top foreman and boss driver. The 
term "assistant" shall apply only to such as 
are authorized to act In that capacity. The 
night watchman shall be exempt when em- 
ployed in that capacity only. The terms 
"head carpenter" and "head machinist" 
shall apply only to such as have general 
charge of carpentry or machine work at two 
or more mines, or at one mine and one or 
more washing plants. 



NO MARKET RESTRICTION. 

Third. Any operators paying the scale 
rate of mining and day labor under this 
agreement shall at all times be at liberty to 
load any railroad cars whatever, regardless 
of their ownership, with coal, and sell and 
deliver such coal in any market and to any 
person, firm or corporation that he may 
desire. 



QUALITY OP MINE-RUN COAL. PUSH- 
ING COAL BY MINERS PRO- 
HIBITED. 

Fourth. The scale of prices for mining 
per ton of 2,C00 pounds, run-of-mine coal 
herein provided tor. is understood in every 
case to be for coal practically free from 
slate, bone and other impurities, loaded in 
cars at the tace, weighed before screening; 
and that the practice of pushing coal by the 
miners shall be prohibited. 



MINING AND SHOOTING TO BE AC- 
CORDING TO STATE MINING LAW. 

Fifth, (a) Whether the coal is shot after 
being undercut or sheared by pick or ma- 
chine, or shot without undercutting or 
shearing, the miners must drill and blast 
the coal In accordance with the State mining 
law of Illinois, in order to protect thereof 
and timbers and in the interest of general 
safety. Any miner who persistently violates 
the letter or spirit of this clause shall be 
discharged. 

(b) The system of paying for coal before 
screening was intended to obviate the many 
contentions incident to the use of screens, 
and was not intended to encourage unwork- 
manlike methods of mining and blasting 
coal, or to decrease the proportion of 
screened lump, and the operators are hereby 



378 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



guaranteed the hearty support and coopera- 
tion of the United Mine Workers of America 
in disciplining any miner who from Igrnor- 
ance or carelessness, or other cause, fails to 
properly mine, shoot and load his coal. 



PENALTIES FOR LOADING IMPURI- 
TIES. 

Sixth In case slate, bone. clay, sulphur 
or other impurities are sent up with the 
coal by the miner, it shall be the duty of 
whomever the company shall designate as 
Inspector to report the same, with the esti- 
mated weight thereof, and the miner or 
miners so offending shall have such weight 
deducted from the established weight of the 
car. and for the first offense in any given 
month shall be fined 50 cents; for the second 
offense in the same month he or they shall, 
at the option of the operator be fined $2.00 or 
suspended for two working days; and for 
the third, or any subsequent offense in the 
same month, or in malicious or aggravated 
CHses tor the first, or any subsequent 
offense, the operator may indefinitely 
suspend or discbarge. 

The company weighman shall post in a 
conspicuous place at the pit bead tbe names 
of all miners dealt with hereunder. 

The Inspector designated by the operator 
shall be a member of the D. M. W. of A., 
but in the discharge of the duties herein 
specified shall not be subject to the jaris 
diction of the local union or president or 
pit committee, and against any miner or 
committeeman seeking in any way to em- 
barrass the inspector in or because of the 
discharge of such duties the provisions of 
the miners' State constitution shall be in- 
voked, and in addition he shall at the option 
of the operator be suspended for two work- 
ing days. 

In case it shall be alleged by either the 
local representative of the miners, or by the 
operator, that the inspector is not properly 
performing his duties hereunder, it shall be 
so reported to the miners' sub-district presi- 
dent, who shall, within 24 hours after the 
receipt of notification, take it up with the 
superintendent of the company for adjudi- 
cation; and. If it shall be found that the in- 
spector is not faithfully performing such 
duties, he shall be discharged or transf er^-ed 
to other duties, as the operator may elect. 

The proceeds of all fines hereunder shall 
be paid to the miner's sub-district treasurer, 
and under no circumstances shall any such 
fines be remitted or refunded. 



PAY DAYS AND STATEMENTS OF ! 
ACCOUNT. 

Seventh. The miners of the State of Illi- j 
nois are to be paid twice a month, in lawful 
money, the balance due them, the dates of , 
pay to be determined locally, but in no event i 
shall more than one-half month's pay be re- ' 
tained by the operator. When any number 
of men at any mine so demand, statements 
will be issued to all employes not less than 
24 hours prior to pay-day. The miners and 
operators shall decide locally as to the form 
and manner in which statements shall be 
Issued. No commission will be charged for 
wages advanced to employes between pay- 
days, but any advances between pay-days 
shall be at the option of the operator. 



POWDER-PRICE AND QUALITY. 

Eighth. The price for powder per keg shall 
be SI. 75. The miners agree to purchase their 
powder from the operators, provided it is 
furnished of standard grade and quality: 
that to be determined by the operators and 
expert miners jointly, where there is a dif- 
ference. Powder is to be delivered at the 
face when requested. 



BLCKSMITHING. 

Ninth. The price for blacksmithing for 
pick mining shall be 610 of a cent per ton 
for room and pillar work, and 12^ cents per 
day per man. or 25 cents per month, for long- 
wall for pick and drill sharpening. 



OIL. 



Tenth. It is understood thatllthere is no 
asreement as to the price of oil. 



INSIDE DAY WAGE SCALE. 

Eleventh. Pursuant to the Indianapolis 
agreement, of March 21. 1904. the inside day 
wage scale shall be as follows: 

Tracklayers $2.42 

Tracklayers' helpers 2.23 

Trappers IM^ 

Bottom Cagers 2.42 

Drivers 2.42 

Trip riders and grippers 2.42 

Water haulers and machine haulers.. 2.42 
Tlmbermen, where such are employed 2.42 
Pipemen. for compressed air plants .. 2.36 
Brushers In long-wall mines, third 
vein and Wilmington fields, north- 
ern Illinois 2.42 

Other company men in long-wall 
mines of third vein and Wilmington 

fields, northern Illinois 2.23 

All other inside day labor 2.23 

Provided, that all classes of underground 
day labor not specified above, whose rates 
have been fixed locally, shall be reduced 5.56- 
per cent 

DEFINITION OF EIGHT-HuaP DAY 
FOR MINERS. 

Twelfth. The above scale of miniDg 
prices is based upon an eight hour workday, 
and it is definitely understood that this shall 
mean eight hours work at the face, exclusive 
of noon time, six days a week, or forty-eight 
hours in the week, provided the operator de- 
sires the mine to work, and no local ruling 
shall in any way affect this agreement, or 
impose conditions affecting the same. 

OVERTIME FORIDAY LABOR. 

Any class of day labor may be paid, at the 
option of the operator, for the number of 
hours and fractions thereof actually worked, 
at any hour rate based on one eighth of the 
scale rate per day: Provided, however, that 
when the men go into the mine in the morn- 
ing they shall be entitled to two hours' pay 
whether the mine hoists coal two hours or 
not, except in the event that they volunta- 
rily leave their work during this time with- 
out the consent of the operator, they shall 



MINING PRICES AND CONDITIONS, 



879- 



forfeit such two hours' pay; Proviaed, fur- 
ther, that overtime by day laborers, when 
necessary to supply railroad chutes with 
coal by nifjht or Sunday, where no regular 
men therefor are exclusively employed, or 
when necessary in order not to impede the 
operation of the mine the day followlne:, aud 
for work which cannot be performed or 
completed by the regular shift durlnsr regu- 
lar hours without impeding: the operation of 
the mine, may be performed and paid for at 
the same rate per hour. 



DgTIES AND LIMITATIONS OF PIT 

COMMITTEE. ADJUSTMENT OF 

DISPUTES AND GRIEVANCES. 

Thirteenth, (a) The duties of the pit 
committee shall be confined to the adja^r 
ment of disputes between the pit boss and 
any of the members of the United Mine 
Workers of America working in and around 
the mine, for whom a scale Is made, arisintr 
out of this agreement, or any sub-district 
agrreement made In connection herewith, 
where the pit boss and said miner, or mine 
laborers, hare failed to agree. 

(b) In case of any local trouble arising at 
any shaft throutrh such failure to agree be- 
tween the pit boss and any miner or mine 
laborer, the pit committee and the miners' 
local president and the pit boss are empow 
ered to adjust it; and. in case of their disa- 
greement. It shall be referred to the super- 
intendent of the company and the president 
of the miners' local executive board, where 
such exists, and shall they fail to adjust it— 
and in all other cases— it shall be referred to 
the superintendent of the company and the 
miners' president of the sub-district; and 
should they fall to adjust it. It shall be re- 
ferred in writing to the officials of the com- 
pany concerned and the state officials of the 
U. M. W. of A. for adjustment, and In all 
such cases, the miners and mine laborars 
and parties Involved must continue at work 
pending an investigation and adjustment, 
until a final decision is reached in the man- 
ner above set forth. 



WHEN DAY MEN ARE TO BE FUR- 
NISHED BY PIT COMMITTEE. 

(c) If any day men refuse to continue at 
work because of a grievance which has or 
has not been taken up for adjustment in the 
manner provided herein, and such action 
shall seem liteely to Impede the operation of 
the mine, the pit committee shall immedi- 
ately furnish a man or men to take such 
vacant place, or places, at the scale rate in 
order that the mine may continue at work: 
and it shall be the duty of any member, or 
members, of the United Mine Workers, who 
may be called upon by the pit boss, or pit 
committee, to Immediately take the place or 
places assigned to him or them In pursuance 
hereof. ■ 



DUTIES AND LIMITATIONS OP PIT 
COMMITTEE. 

(d) The pit committee, in the discharge of 
its duties, shall under no circumstances go 
around the mine for any cause whatever, un- 
less called upon by the pit boss or by a miner 
or company man who may have a grievance 
that he can not settle with the boss; and, as 



its duties are confiued to the adjustment of 
any such grievances, it Is understood that 
its members shall not draw any compensa- 
tion except while actively engaged in the 
discharge of said duties. Any pit commit- 
teeman who shall attempt to execute any 
local rule or proceeding in conflict with any 
provision of this contract, or any other made 
in pursuance hereof, shall oe torthwiih de 
posed as committeeman. The foregoing 
shall not be construed to prohibit the pit 
committee from looking after the matter of 
membership dues and initiations in any 
proper manner. 

(e) Members of the pit committee em- 
ployed as day men shall not leave their 
places of duty during working hours, except 
by permission of the operator, or in cases 
involving the stoppage of the mine. 



RIGHT TO HIRE AND DISCHARGE 

(f) The right to hire and discharge, the 
management of the mine, and the direction 
of the working force, are vested exclusively 
in the operator, and the U. M. W. of A. shall 
not abridge this right. It is not the inten- 
tion of this provision to encourage the dis- 
charge of employes, or the refusal of em- 
ployment to applicants because of personal 
prejudice or activity in matters afPectingthe 
U. M. W. of A. If any employ^ shall be 
suspended or dl-icharged by the company, 
and It is claimed that an Injustice has been 
done him. an investigation to be conducted 
by the parties and In the manner set forth In 
paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section shall 
betaken up promptly, and. if it is proven 
that an injustice has been done, the operator 
shall reinstate said employ^ and pay him 
full compensation for the time he has been 
suspended and out of employment; pro- 
vided, if no decision shall be rendered with- 
in five days the case shall be considered 
closed, in so far as compensation is con- 
cerned, unless said failure to arrive at a de- 
cision within five days is owing to delay on 
the part of the operator, in which case a 
maximum of ten days' compensation shall 
be paid. 



(e) It is understood and agreed that there 
shall be no more than three members on the 
pit committee at any one time. 

ES OUTSIDE DAY WAGE ^CALE. 

Fourteenth. The wages now being paid 
outside day labor at the various mines In 
this State, less a reduction of 5 55 per cent, 
shall constitute the wage scale for that class 
of labor during the life of this agreement: 
Provided, that no top man shall receive less 
than $1.91 per day. 



FATAL ACCIDENTS AND FUNERALS. 

Fifteenth. In the event of an instantan- 
eous death by accident In the mine, the 
miners and underground employes shall 
have the privilege of discontinuing work 
for the remainder of that day; but work, at 
the option of the operator, shall be resumed 
the day following and continue thereafter. 
In case the operator elects to operate the 
mine on the day of the funeral of the de- 
ceased, as above, or where death has re- 
sulted from an accident in the mine, tbe 



380 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



individual minera and underground em- 
ployes may. at their option, absent them- 
selves from worK for the purpose < £ attend- 
ing such funeral, but not otherTrise. And 
whether attending sucl'^ funeral or not, each 
member of the Q M. W. of A. employed at 
the mine at which the deceased was em- 
ployed, shall contribure 50 cents and the 
operator $25.00 for the benefit of the family 
of the deceased, or his legal representatives, 
to be collected through the office of the 
company. In the event that the mines are 
thrown idle on account of the miners' or 
other employes' failure to report for work 
in the time intervening between the time of 
the accident and the funeral or on the day 
of the funeral, then the company shall not 
be called upon for the payment of the $25.00 
above referred to. 

Except in case of fatal accidents as above, 
the mine shall in no case be thrown Idle be- 
cause of any death or funeral: but in the 
case of the death of an employ^ of the com- 
pany or member of his family any Indi- 
vidual miner may. at his option, absent him- 
self from work for the purpose of attending 
such funeral, but not otherwise. 

RESPONSIBILITY FOR TIMBERING 
AND DEAD WORK. 

Sixteenth, (a) The scale of prices herein 
provided shall include, in ordinary condi- 
tions, the work required to load coal and 
properly timber the working places in the 
mine, and the operator shall be required to 
furnish the necessary props and timber in 
rooms or working face. And in long-wall 
mines, it shall include the proper mining of 
the coal and the brushing and care of the 
working places and roadway according to 
the present method and rules relating there- 
to, which shall continue unchanged. 

(b) If any miner shall fail to properly 
timber, shoot and care for his working place, 
and such failure has entailed falls ot slate, 
rock and the like, the miner whose fault has 
occasioned such damage, shall repair the 
same without compensation, and if such 
miner fails to repair such damage he may 
be discharged. 

Any dispute that may arise as to the re- 
.sponsibillty under this clause shall be ad- 
justed bv the pit committee and mine fore- 
man, and in case of their failure to agree, 
shall be taken up for settlement under the 
13th section of this agreement. 

In cases where the mine manager directs 
the placing of cross bars to permanently se- 
cure the roadway, then, and in such cases 
only, the miner shall be paid at the current 
price for each cross bar when properly set. 

The above does not contemplate any 
change from the ordinary method of tim- 
bering by the miner for his own safety. 



CHECK OFF. 

Seventeenth. The operators will rec- 
ognize the pit committee in the discharge of 
Its duties as herein specified, but not other 
wise, and agree to check off union dues, as- 
sessments and fines from the miners and 
mine laborers, when desired, on proper in- 
dividual or collective continuous order, and 
furnish to the miners' local representative a 
statement showing separately the total 
amount of dues, assessments and fines col- 
lected. When such collections are made. 



card day shall be abolished. In case any 
fine is imposed the propriety of which Is 
questioned, the amount of such fine shall be 
withheld by the operator until the question 
has been taken up for adjustment and a de- 
cision has been reached. 



EMERGENCY WORK AND ORDINARY 
REPAIRS. 

Eighteenth. The operators shall have 
the right in cases of emergency work or or- 
dinary repairs to the plant, to employ in con- 
nection therewith such men as, in their judg- 
ment, are best acquainted with and suited to 
the work to be performed, except where men 
are permanently employed for such work. 
Blacksmiths and other skilled labor shall 
make any necessary repairs to machinery 
and boilers. 



CONSTRUCTION AND EXTENSIVE RE- 
PAIRS. 

Ninteenth. The erection of head frames, 
buildings, scales, machinery, railroad 
switches, etc.. necessary for the com- 
pletion of a plant to hoist coal, all being In 
the nature ot construction work, are to be 
excluded from the jurisdiction of the United 
Mine Workers of America. Extensive re- 
pairs to or rebuilding the same class of work 
shall also be included In the same exception. 
The employes thereon to be excluded as 
above, when employed on such work only. 



PENALTY FOR ABSENCE FROM 
WORK. 

Twentieth. When any employ^ absents 
himself from his work for a period of two 
days, unless through sickness or by first 
having notified the mine managers and ob- 
tained his consent, he may be discharged. 



MACHINE DIFFERENTIAL, 

Twenty-first, (a) Except at the basing 
point, Danville the differential for machine 
mining throughout the State of Illinois shall 
be seven cents per ton less than the pick 
mining rate. It being understood and 
Hgreed that the machine mining rate shall 
include the snubbing of coal either by pow- 
der or wedge and sledge, as conditions may 
warrant, where chain machine is used; but 
it is understood that this condition shall not 
apply where two men have and work in one 
I place only In the same shift, except at the 
option of the miner; and it shall also be op- 
tional with the miner which system of snub- 
bing shall be followed. The division of the 
machine mining rate shall be fixed in joint 
sub-district meeting. 



SHEARING MACHINE AND AIR OR 
ELECTRIC DRILLS. 

(b) The established rates on shearing ma- 
chines and air or electric drills as now exist- 
ing, shall remain unchanged during the en- 
suing two years. 



MINING, PRICES AND CONDITIONS 



^81 



RULbiS FOK USE OF CAGE BY EM- 
PLOYES. 

Twenty-second. Any underground em- 
ploy6 not on hand so as to go down to his 
work before the hour for commencine: work, 
shall not be entitled to go below except at 
the convenience of the company. When an 
employ^ Is sick or injured he shall be given j 
a cage at once. When a cagt' load of men 
comes to the bottoni of the shaft who have ; 
been prevented from working by reason of j 
falls or other thing.s over which they have [ 
no control, they shall be given a cage at 
once. For the accommodation of individual 
employes, less than a cage load, who have | 
been prevented from working as above, a , 
cage shall be run mid-forenoon, noon and I 
mid-afternoon, of each working day; pro- 
vided, however, that the foregoing shall not 
be permitted to enable men to leave their 
work for other than the reasons stated above. 



SHAFT SINKING. 

Twenty-third. The scale for sinkers shall 
be two dollars and eighty-seven cents, and 
for shift leaders three dollars and eighteen 
cents per day. 

The scale for top men handling dirt at 
sinking mines shall be the same as that of 
dumpers In the sub-district in which the 
mine is being sunk. 



DEFINITION OF EIGHT-HOUR DAY 
FOR DAY LABOR. 

Twenty-fourth All classes of day labor 
are to work full eight hours, and the going 
to and coming from the respective working 
places is to be done on the day hand's own 
lime. All company men shall perform what- 
ever day labor the foreman may direct. An 
eight-hour day means eisjht hours' work in 
the mines at the usual working places, ex- 
clusive of noontime, for all classei of inside 
day labor. This shall be exclusive of the 
time required in reaching such working 
places in the morning and departing from 
same at night. 



DRIVERS-RULES TO GOVERN. 

Drivers shall take their mules to and from 
the stables, and the time required in so do 
ing shall not include any part of theday'-< 
labor; their time beginning when they reach 
the ch«nge at which they receive empty 
cars— that is. the parting drivers at the shaft 
bottom and the inside drivers at the part- 
ing—and ending at the same places: but in 
no case shall a driver's time be docked while 
he is waiting for such cars at the points 
named. The inside drivers, at their option, 
may either walk to and from their parting 
oriHke with them, without compensarion. 
either loaded or empty cars, to enable them 
to ride. This provision, however, t-hall not 
prevent the Inside drivers from bringing to 
and taking from the bottom regular trips, if 
so directed by the operator, provided such 
work is done within eight hours. 



HARNESSING AND UNHARNESSING 
MULES. 

The methods at present existing covering 
the harnessing, unharnessing, feeding and 
caring for the mules, shall be continued 
throughout the life of this agreement: but 
in cases where any grievances exist in re 
spect to the same, they shall be referred to 
the sub-district meetings for adjustment. 

When the stables at which the mnles are 
kept are located on the surface and the 
mulen are taken in and out of the mines 
daily by the drivers, the question of addi- 
tional compensation therefor, if any, is to be 
left to the sub-districts affected for adjust- 
ment at their joint sub-district meetings. 



YARDAGE AND DEAD WORK. 

Twenty-fifth. All yardage and dead work 
on which a scale has been established shall 
be reduced 5.66 per cent. 



OPERATOR TO KEEP PLACES DRY AS 
PRACTICABLE. 

Twenty-«ixth. (a) The company shall 
keep tne mine in as dry condition as practi- 
cable by keeping the water off the road and 
out of The working places. When a miner 
has to leave his working place on account of 
water, through the neglect of the company, 
they shall employ said miner doingcompany 
work when practicable, and provided that 
said miner Is competent to do such work, or 
he will be given another working place until 
such water Is taken out of his place 



WHERE TRACK IS LAID BY 
OPERATOR, 

(b) Where it is au established condition 
or agreement that the track shall be laid by 
the company, and a miuer has to leave his 
working place on account of such track not 
being laid through the neglect of the com- 
pany. It shall employ said miner doing 
company work when practicable, provided 
said miner is competent to do such work, or 
he shall be given another place until -uch 
time as such track is laid in his place. 



AMBULANCES, BANDAGES, ETC, 

Twenty-seventh. The operators shall keep 
suflQcient blankets, oil, bandages, etc., and 
provide suitable ambulance or conveyance 
readily available at each mine to properly 
convey injured persons to their homes after 
an accident. 



EQUAL TURN. 

Twenty-eighth. The operator shall see 
that an equal turn is oflFered each miner. and 
that he be given a fair chance to obtain the 
same. The checkweighman shall keep a 
turn bulletin for the turn-keeper's guidance. 
The drivers shall be subject to whomever- 



:382 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



the mine manager shall desienate as turn- 
keeper In pursuance hereof. 

In mines where there is both hand and 
machine mininff. an equal turn shall mean 
approximately the same turn to each man in 
the machine part o£ the mine, and approxi- 
mately the same turn to each man doing 
hand work, but not necessarily the same to 
each hand miner as to each man working 
with the machines. 



CONTRACT NOT TO BE VOIDED BY 
^MINERS' CONSTITUTION OR RULES. 

Twenty-ninth. This contract is In no case 
to be set aside because of any rules of the 
U. M. W. of A. now in force or which may 
hereafter be adopted; nor is this contract to 
be set aside by reason of any provision in 
their national, state or local constitutions. 



NO LOCAL DEMANDS. 



There shall be no demands made locally 
that are not specifically set forth in this 



agreement, except as agreed to in joint sub- 
district meetings held prior to May 1, 1901. 
Wh«re no sub-districts exist, local griev- 
ances shall be referrred to the United Mine 
Workers' state executive board and the 
mine owners interested. 



UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA 
DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Hbbman C. Perry, 

President. 

Wm. E. Smith. 

Vice-President. 

W. D. Ryan, 

SecretarvTreasurer. 



THE ILLINOIS COAL OPERATORS' 
ASSOCIATION. 

O. L. Garrison, 

President. 



E. T. Bent, 
Springfield. 111.. April 4, 1904. 



Secretary. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS 



Illinois Free Employment OBlces 



Year Ended October 1, 1908. 



DAVID ROSS, Secretary, SpriDg6eId. 



RADEbl[™°JJcouRaL)69 



SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 
Phillips!Bros., State Printers, 

1904. 



ILLINOIS FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



CHICAGO, 



North Side Office, 259-261 N. Clark St., Turner Hall Building 

D. M. Brothers. Supt,. 

Thos. Devenish, Asst. Supt. 

Miss Selma Bostrum, Clerk. 

South Side Office, 429-431 Wabash Avenue. 

Q-EORGE W. Geary, Supt. 

Angus A. Barnes, Asst. Supt. 

Miss Margaret E. May, Clerk, 

West Side Office, S. W. Cor. Canal and Randolph Sts 

S. P. Revere, Supt. 

P. J. Meaney, Asst, Supt. 

Miss Lizzie Henneberry, Clerk. 

PEORIA 

Office, Masonic Temple. 

Edward E. Walker, Supt. 

David Conigisky, Asst, Supt. 

Charles S. Easton, Clerk 



PREFACE. 



The law creating the Illinois Free Employment Offices requires 
that the reports of the superintendents in charge of those offices be 
published in connection with the Annual Coal Report of the Bureau. 
In addition to this, it has been considered expedient, in view of the 
general interest manifested in the work of the offices, to publish a 
limited edition in the form here presented. Copies of this edition 
can be secured on application to the Secretary of the Bureau, David 
Ross, Springfield, or to the superintendent of either of the offices. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

Illinois Free Employment Offices 

I 9 O 3 

(Established August 2, 1899.) 



This is the fifth annual report of the Illinois Free Employment 
offices for the year ended Oct. 1, 1908. 

The work of these offices still continues successfully ; their popu- 
larity with working people seeking employment and persons desiring 
to employ help is unabated. The superintendents of the offices re. 
port that they have not only their regular customers wanting help, 
but receive many additional requests from large employers of labor, 
as well as from numerous persons needing only one person, man or 
woman, a boy or girl. 

The following table shows the result of the work of the four offices 
from the date of their organization to Oct. 1, 1903: 





Applications for Employment. 


Applications fob Help. 


Year. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
positions 
secured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number Number 
filed. unfilled. 


»1899 


13.097 

37.285 
27.605 
41.900 
43.610 


6,497 
31.218 
23.996 
40. 181 
39.227 


6.600 
6.067 
3.609 
4.719 
4.283 


1C,370 
35,642 
28.124 
47.497 
47,559 


3.873 


1900 


4.324 


1901 . 


4.128 


1902 


7,316 


1903 


8.382 






Total. . . ... 


166,397 


141,119 


26.278 


169.092 


27,973 







• Nine weeks. 

The total number applying for employment at the close of the fifth 
year was 166,397; of this number 141,119 or 84.81 per cent were se- 
cured positions. The total number filing applications for help was 
169,092, of which 83,46 per cent were supplied with the help sought 
for. 



b STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

THE RECORD OP THE FOUR OFFICES FOR THE YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 

1, 1903. 

The combined aohievement of the offices ia securing positions for 
applicants for employment is a trifle less than last year, although 
some of the offices exceeded the record of that year. 

The following table gives the record of all the offices for the year: 



Table 1 — Showing the Combined Business of the Four Offices for 

the year. 





Applications for 
Employment. 


Applications 
FOE Help. 


Offices. 


Number 
filed. 


Number of 
positions 
secured. 


Sflte¥. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 


North Side Office— Males . . . 


6,019 
4.065 


6,883 
3,965 


136 
100 


7,648 
5.264 


1.765 
l!289 


North Side Office— Females 






Totals 


10.084 


*9.848 


236 


12.902 


3,054 


South Side Office— Males 


11,835 
6.666 


10,798 
5,394 


1,037 
272 


12,087 
7,480 


1 289 




2,086 






Totals 


17.501 


1 16, 192 


1,309 


19,567 


3.376 


West Side Office-Males 


6.470 
2,431 


6.001 
2,012 


1,469 
419 


5,379 
2,974 


378 


West Side Office— Females 


962 






Totals 


8.901 


t7.0l3 


1.888 


8,353 


1.340 


Peoria Office— Males 


5,090 
1,934 


4,653 
1,521 

§6. 174 


437 
413 

850 


4.832 
1,905 

6,737 


179 


Peoria Office — Females . 


384 






Totals 


7.024 


563 


Total Males— Four Offices 


29.414 
14.096 


26.335 
12,892 


3,079 
1,201 


29,946 
17,613 


3 611 


Total Females-Four Offices 


4,721 


Grand totals 


43,510 


1139.227 


4,283 


47,659 


8 332 







* Of this number 191 males and 169 females, a total of 
plications filed last year. 



were secured positions on ap- 



t Of this number 53 males and 70 females, a total of 123, were secured positions on appli- 
cations filed last year. 

t Of this number 417 males and 18 females, a total of 435, were secured positions on appli- 
cations filed last year. 

§ Of this number 16 females were secured positions on applications filed last year. 

H Of this number 661 males and 273 females, a total of 934, were secured positions on ap- 
plications filed last year. 

The final line of the table shows that during the year 43,510 reg- 
istered as applicants for employment, and that 47,559 employers reg- 
istered as seeking to employ persons willing to work. By reference 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



to the bottom notes of the table it will be seen that 934 applications 
for employment were brought forward from applications filed last 
year; of these 66] were males and 273 females. 

These applications brought forward increase the total applications 
handled to 44,444; of this number 30,075 or 67.67 per cent were males 
and 14,369 or 32.33 per cent females. Of this total number applying 
for employment 39,227 or 88.26 per cent were provided with positions; 
of these, 26,335 or 87.56 per cent were males and 14,369 or 89.72 per 
cent weje females. 

Directing attention to the applications of employers, it is shown 
that 47,559 registered as wanting to employ labor; of this number 
29,946 or 62.97 per cent was for male help and 17,613 or 37.03 per cent 
for female help. Continuing the comparison, it is found that, of the 
47,559 employers applying, 82.48 per cent were furnished the help 
sought after; 87.94 per cent of the applications for male workers 
were supplied and 73 20 per cent of the females. 

The following table presents the percentages of each office and for 
the four offices: 



Table 2- 



■Percentages of Positions Secured and Percentages of 
Help Furnished, both Male and Female. 



Office. 


Pkrcentaok of Positions 

Skcorkd 

Applicants fob Emplotmknt. 


Percentage of Applications 

FOR 

Help Furnished. 




Males. 


Females. 


Both 

sexes. 


Males. 


Females. 


Both 
sexes. 


North Side Office 

South Side Office 

West Side Office 


91.67 
90.79 
70.85 
91.41 


93.38 
93.96 
82.02 
77.82 


94 09 
91.82 
73.90 
87.67 


76.92 
89.34 
92.97 
96.30 


76.47 
72.11 

67.65 
79.84 


76.33 
82.75 
83.96 




91.64 






The four offices 


87.28 


89.62 


88.01 


87.94 


73.20 


82.48 



The percentages here shown for positions secured for applicants 
for employment are confined to the work of the offices for the fiscal 
year, while the percentages of the applications for help furnished in- 
clude the numbers furnished employment brought forward from last 
year. 

Of the Chicago offices the North Side office furnished the largest 
percentage of positions secured for males, and the South Side office 
the largest for females. For applications for help the West Side 
office supplied the largest per cent of males and the North Side office 
the largest per cent of females, while the Peoria office, in this respect, 
exceeded any of the others. 



10 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The work of all the offices in placing applicants for employment in 
positions shows increased percentages over last year, while for help 
supplied the percentages are somewhat less. Following is the show- 
ing: 



PERCENTAGES. 





Positions Skcubed. 


Help Fubnishkd. 


YEAR. 


Males. 


Females 


Both 
sexes. 


Males. Females 

1 • 


Both 
sexes. 


1802 


84.86 
87.28 


89.24 
89.62 


86.28 
88.01 


88.16 78.36 
87.94 73.20 


84.60 


1803 


82.48 







While the percentage of positions secured to female applicants 
somewhat exceeds that for males, the percentage of female help fur- 
nished employers falls considerably below that of males. 



APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT. 



The table following gives the applications for employment by 
classified occupations for the four offices for the year: 



APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT. 

Table 3 — Work of All the Offices — Three in Chicago, One in 
Peoria — Receiving Applications for Employment. 

Males. 



h 


Occupations. 


Applications fob 
Employment to Ofeioes— 


Total. 


i 


North 
Side. 


side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 




Grand totals .. 


10,084 


17,501 


8,901 


7.024 


13,5.0 




Males 

Females 






6.019 
4.065 


11.835 
5.666 


6.470 
2.431 


5,090 
1.934 


29.414 
14,096 






6.019 


11.835 
32 


6.470 
34 


5,090 

2 
19 


29.414 


1 


Agents . 


36 


2 






53 


3 






7 


7 


4 


Attendants. 


"":::::. 


6 

1 

17 
7 
16 


1 
24 


2 


■ 6 




2 


30 


61 


6 




1 


7 


Barbers • 




3 
143 
23 
6 
1 
15 
12 
14 


1 

113 

2 


5 


8 




63 
12 


336 


8 




44 






22 


11 


Bill posters . . 




1 


12 




106 


13 
5 
3 


15 

1 
16 

1 


149 


13 




18 


14 


Boilermakers 


6 


38 


16 






1« 


Bookbinders 




2 


i" 


3 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table 3— Continued. 



11 



ft 


Occupations. 


Appltoations for 
Emplotmbnt to Offices— 


Total, 


i 

2; 


S' 


' South 
Side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 


17 




2 


42 
4 
11 


11 


11 


66 


18 




4 


19 


Boxmakers- . . 








11 


20 




392 


62 
2 
4 


9 


463 


21 






2 


22 


Boys beJl 




31 
47 

98 




36 


23 








47 








2 


93 
3 
9 

79 
14 


193 


26 






3 


26 






68 


10 


87 


27 


Boys factory 




79 


28 






38 


39 
7 


91 


29 






8 


^n 


Bricklayers 




3 
4 

23 
6 
6 
6 


3 


31 


RridcA hnildnrn 








4 


32 




2 
3 


7 


7 


39 


33 


Butlers .. •• 


9 


3i 




1 


4 


11 


36 






6 


36 








1 

16 
38 


1 


37 




10 
178 






26 


38 


Carpenters •• 


61 
16 
24 


29 


306 


39 




16 


40 




2 


15 





41 


41 




2 



2 


42 


Cashiers 




3 
3 
2 

18 
2 
3 

1 
22 




3 


43 






1 




4 


44 






■.:;.::."■.■. 


2 


45 






2 
1 




20 


46 


Clerks bill 






3 


47 






4 

13 
2 

1 


7 


48 


Clerks dry soods 




1 
14 
8 


16 


49 






38 


50 






9 


51 






16 

27 
83 


16 


62 






43 
41 


1 


71 


53 




66 


180 


64 


Clerks stock 


3 
15 
34 


3 


55 




31 


29 
46 


10 
8 
31 
11 
27 
2 
2 
16 


85 


66 


Coal miners . . 


88 


67 






31 


68 




2 
57 


all 

6 


19 
90 


43 


69 


Cooks . . . 


487 


60 




7 


•1 


Conductors 


5 
11 


3 

1 
4 


10 


62 




3 


31 


63 




4 


64 






11 

8 

679 

3 




11 


66 






2 
33 


14 

b3 


24 


66 




50 


815 


67 




3 


68 






2 

39 
113 

I 
29 
42 
16 
30 




2 


69 


Drill pressmen 


3.1 




12 
24 


56 


70 




1 


453 


71 




1 


72 


Electricians 




16 
110 


2 


47 


73 
74 

75 


Elevatormen 


13 


165 




16 


Engineers . 


16 


45 


24 

1 
206 
122 

2 

48 

1 
1 


114 


76 




1 


77 


Factory hands 


650 
99 


382 

368 


698 
179 


1.936 


78 




768 


79 


Filers 


2 


80 


Firemen 


■ 13 


81 
16 


67 


209 


81 


Florists 


17 


82 








1 










5 

1 
6 


6 


84 










1 


86 


Gardeners ..•• 


3 


28 
10 


9 


45 






10 


87 








2 
2 
12 


2 


88 






17 




19 


89 


Harvest hands 









12 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 3 — Continued. 



Occupations. 



Applications for 
Employment to Officks- 



North 
Side. 



South 
Side. 



West 
Side. 



Peoria. 



Horseshoers . 






1 
28 
64 
20 
56 

3 
3,310 

3 
19 

1 

2 




Hostlers 




39 
567 


3 
44 

10 
46 
15 
2.862 
377 
2 


Houseinen 


235 

1 

66 

48 

2,453 


Iron workers .. 




216 

210 
1,908 
2,604 


Ki tclieiiworli 


Laborers 




Lathe hands 


4 






2 . 


80 


6 

1 


Linemen 


Machine hands .. 


3 
164 


9 
40 
2 


79 
96 


Machinists 


37 


Cdassagre workers 








2 








1 


Merchants 




1 




Metalworkers 




1 




Millers 




3 


1 
2 
16 


Millwrights 




1 
9 


Molders 




8 
2 


Models 






1 






Nurses . . . 


6 


3 
43 

5 
22 
16 






4 


21 


Oilers 




Packers 


29 
82 


52 
62 
6 

8 




Painters.. 


12 


Paper hangfers 


Pantrymen..... 


3 


1 


2 

8 




Paper cutters 






I 
1 
2 


Pattern makers 












1 
25 




Pin setters 






Piano makers . 




2 




Pipe fitters 






1 








1 

1 


Plumbers 


1 




2 


Polishers, metal 


8 




i 

150 

1 


3 

126 
1 
3 
4 

10 
1 

21 




Porters 


1,001 


60 






2 
4 




Printers 


1 












6 
23 




Salesmen ..... 


1 


41 

1 










1 
2 


Shoemakers 


1 


3 
6 

13 
4 

11 
293 








Solicitors 


3 
1 
2 
13 


3 
3 
2 


30 
6 
3 


Steam fitters 






Stock keepers 


2 




Supers . . 




26 
9 












Stone masons 




2 

1 




Stovemen... .... 






4 


raiE!^:::::;:::;:::::::::::::;::;::::: 


1 


8 

5 

221 

1 








Teamsters . 


419 


112 


142 








3 

1 
1 




Tinsmiths 




14 


2 


Tool makers 








8 




Truckmen 




9 


14 


Ushers 




20 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



13 



Table 5— Concluded. 



Occupations. 



Applications fob 
Employment to Offices— 



North 
Side. 



South 
Side. 



West 
Side. 



Peoria. 



Upholsterers 

Walters 

Watchmen 

Weavers 

Welghmen... 

Whltewashers 

Window washers 

Wood choppers 

Wood workers 

Yardmen 

Misceilaneons— not classified. 



217 

2 



Females. 







4.065 


6.666 


2.431 


1,934 


14,096 




Addressers 




J 






11 




11 








5 


2 


6 


3 


Attendants . 






2 


1 






1 
4 




1 


5 


Booklieepers 


7 


3 
11 

5 
12 
17 


18 


32 


e 


Bottle labelers . 


11 










i 

8 
12 

5 
55 

5 

93 
86 


6 


s 


Cashiers 


2 

18 


13 
9 


35 


9 


Clerks 


66 






5 


11 


Chambermaids.. . 


278 

2 

321 

412 


487 


200 

1 

137 

171 

78 
95 


1,020 


12 




8 


13 


Cooks 


520 

168 

7 


1.071 


14 




837 






8 


16 


Dining room help 


122 

289 


104 
101 

7 


304 


17 




517 


1,002 






7 


19 


Domestics 






398 
1 

408 
11 


398 


20 










1 


21 


Factory work 


94 


187 


80 


769 


22 




11 


23 


General housework 


1,612 


1.446 
1 
13 


898 


3.956 


21 


Governesses .. . . 


1 


2 


2S 


Hall girls 




13 


26 


Hotel help 






10 
63 

8 
43 

2 
30 


10 


27 




67 

8 

313 


119 
4 

489 
1 

228 
6 


70 

1 

103 

1 
77 


319 


28 




21 


29 


Kitchen help 


948 


30 




4 


^1 


Laundresses 


47 


282 


32 




6 


33 




2 
72 


1 
30 


1 

18 
27 
59 
11 

2 


4 


31 


Nurses 


62 


182 


36 




27 


4 




10 
27 


75 
91 


io 

50 


154 


37 
38 


Pantry work 


179 
2 


?«) 






3 
5 

517 
23 
100 




3 


40 


Saleswomen 


6 
100 
19 
153 




13 
3 

23 

66 
4 

53 
1 


24 




308 
51 
15 


928 


42 


Seamstresses.... . 


116 


43 




334 






4 


45 


Stenographers. . .. . 


11 


43 


9 


116 ■ 


46 


Tailors 


1 


47 


Teachers- not stated 

Telephone operators 




2 


1 


3 


48 


6 
6 
1 


6 


49 










6 


50 


Waitresses 


66 


520 


89 

1 


676 


51 


Wrapper bundle 


1 


52 








8 


8 


h 


Not stated . . 


7 




B3 


60 













14 



STATISTICS OP LABOR 



It will be noted that the 29,414 male applicants represented 171 
occupations, while the 14,096 applications by females stand for 52 
occupations The total number of applications registered was 43,510, 
of these the North Side office recorded 23.18 per cent, the South Side 
office 40.22 per cent, the West Side office 20 46 per cent and the 
Peoria office 16.14 per cent. 

APPLICATIONS FOR HELP. 

The following table gives the applications made by employers 
seeking to obtain help: 



APPLICATIONS FOR HELP. 

Table 4 —Work of all the Offices — three in Chicago, one in Peoria 
— Receiving Applications for Help. 

Males. 



Occupations. 



Grand totals 



Males..., 
Females 



Totals, males. 



Agents 

Apprentices 

Attendants 

Bakers 

Baker's helpers 

Barbers 

Barnmen 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Bill posters 

Blacksmiths 

Blacksmith helpers. 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Bootblacks 

Boxmakers 

.. ,Boys 

19 Boys, bell 

20 jBoys.bus 

Boys, cash 

Boys, delivery 

Boys, elevator 

Boys. errand 

Boys, factory 

Boys, office 

Brass finishers 

Bricklayers 

Bridge builders 

Butchers 

Butlers 

Cabinetmakers 

Calclminers 

Candy makers 

Carpet layers 

Canvassers 



Applications fob Help 
TO Officks— 



North 
Side. 



South 
Side. 



West 
Side. 



7,648 
6.264 



6C4 



12,087 
7.480 



12,087 



8 

129 

13 

4 

1 

18 
11 
23 
2 
6 
4 
8 



5.379 
2.974 



5,379 



6.737 



4.832 





2 


6 


17 


1 


1 




13 


1 




1 




14 


109 


2 


2 


6 








3 


7 


6 




7 


14 


2 


1 






68 


8 


1 









29,946 
17.613 



20 
22 
2 
36 
1 
9 
321 
26 
10 
1 
156 
17 
62 
2 
9 
4 
8 
640 
40 
1 
65 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 

Table 4 — Continued. 



15 





Occupations. 


Applications foe Help 
TO Offices— 


Total. 


^ 


ffi' 


South 
Side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 


37 


Carpenters 


213 
2 


69 
23 


15 
16 


12 


299 


88 
39 
40 


Carriage and wasroD washers 


41 




3 


3 


Cashiers ....... 




3 
3 
2 
22 
4 




3 




Checkers 








3 


il 










2 


Cleaners harness.. 




2 




24 


Clerks, bill 






4 


«6 

46 

49 
50 
51 
52 
63 






1 


2 
7 

1 


4 


Cllfirkai drv cooda 




7 






7 


5 


13 


Clerks hotel. 




1 






9 
21 




9 






1 




22 


Clerks stock. 




2 


2 




31 
32 
60 


ii 

21 
70 


2 
6 
6 
24 


44 


Coachmen 


8 
32 


67 


54 

57 

60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 




158 




24 


Collectors 


I 

62 


4 

299 
6 


7 
66 


12 


Cooks 


23 


460 




5 


Conductors . 


6 
18 




5 

1 
6 


10 




3 


13 


35 




5 


Deckhands 




14 

651 

2 

7 




14 




65 


30 


60 


786 




2 


fH«trihntorH 






14 
11 
18 
2 


21 




5 

384 


56 


17 


Drivers 


9 

79 
16 


469 


R^leptriVinnq 


11 


Elevatormen 


12 
10 


7 
7 


98 


70 
71 
72 
73 
74 




9 

1 
177 
110 

2 

26 

1 


42 






Factory hands . 


764 
116 


468 

488 


630 
173 


1,929 




887 


Filers 


2 


76 
76 
77 

78 

IS 

81 
82 

86 

1? 

88 

91 
92 
93 
94 
96 
96 

U 

99 
100 
101 




8 


63 
14 


20 


116 




15 


Foremen 




1 

1 
2 


1 














3 


26 

7 


8 


39 


Gas fitters 


7 




3 


1 




4 


Glaziers 




2 
2 
12 
3 
35 
12 
31 
31 
2,951 
388 
1 
3 


2 




5 


22 




29 






12 


Hostlers . •= 




J§ 


28 
34 
15 

26 

1 
3.408 


66 




246 


847 




27 


Janitors . ... 


61 

51 

3,303 


180 

205 

2,240 

2)740 


298 




288 




11, 905 




3,128 




4 

3 

2 

199 


3 
1 

10 
32 


8 




69 
7 

42 
2 
3 


76 




19 




23 


296 




2 








1 
2 
9 


4 


Millwrights 


1 
16 




3 


Molders . . 


34 
2 


32 


91 




2 


Motormen 


2 






2 






5 






5 


103 
104 




2 
32 
108 


2 
4 

9 


5 


9 


Packers 


39 

53 
8 
7 


75 






10 


ISO 


106 
107 




8 


Pantrymen 


4 


i 


2 


14 



16 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 4 — Continued. 



c 


Occupations. 


Applications fob Help 
TO Ofpicks— 


Total. 


.a 

a 
z 


North 
Side. 


South 
Side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 


108 








1 






109 


Panwashera 






6 










24 
3 

17 
912 




24 


111 




i 








112 








17 






147 
1 


104 
1 
3 


52 


1.215 


114 


Presaers 




116 










116 


Printers 


1 


3 
6 
29 














118 








16 

1 


46 


















3 

6 

28 
3 
6 
293 
25 






121 
















4 

'i 
2 
15 


6 


29 
4 
1 


67 




Steamtitters 


9 


124 




8 


125 






308 










25 


127 






1 


3 


4 


128 






8 

6 

1 

196 

1 
23 
8 


8 












6 


130 


Teachers 














543 


78 


137 


954 






1 


133 










23 


134 










8 








4 


14 


18 


136 


Ushers 




20 
17 
584 
25 


20 


137 






1 
32 
7 


3 
11 
2 
4 


21 


138 




28 
11 


655 


139 


Watchmen . 


45 


140 




4 


141 
142 


Whifnnrnshprq 


205 






205 


Window washers 


250 
16 


iii 




367 


143 








16 






32 
4 

28 


3 
14 
323 


9 
61 


44 


145 




222 


301 


146 




351 













Females. 











26 




25 


2 






10 


3 

4 


13 


3 








4 










1 


1 


5 


Bookkeepers 

Bottle labelers •... 


4 


2 


3 


9 


g 


35 
15 


15 






6 

1 
14 




1 
9 
6 
2 

51 

3 

134 

28 


21 


8 




6 
■ 6 


16 


9 


Clerks 


6 


32 






2 






336 

410 
414 


582 


190 


1.159 


12 




4 




Cooks 


660 

172 

5 


125 
43 


1,329 






657 


15 




5 






216 
333 


80 
95 


123 
92 
4 


419 


17 


Dishwashers 


583 


1,103 


18 




4 


19 








879 
500 
15 


879 






259 


260 


49 


1,068 


21 


Folders circulars 


15 


22 




2.049 


2.433 

1 
15 


1.058 


5,540 








1 


24 


Hall girls 








15 


25 


Hotel help .... 






7 
46 


7 


:6 


Housekeepers 


71 


146 


43 


306 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



17 



TaftZe 4— Concluded, 



OOCOPATIONS. 



Applications foe Help 
TO Offices— 



North 
Side. 



Sonth 
Side. 



West 
Side. 



Peoria. 



27 




8 
393 


3 
681 

2 
284 

4 




4 

69 
2 
26 


16 


28 


Kitchen help .. 


120 


1 153 


29 




4 


30 


Laundresses 


70 


S9 


469 


31 


Linen rooni help 


4 


32 




2 

88 






2 


33 


Nurses 


75 


28 


16 
24 

a 

15 
2 


207 


34 




24 


35 




7 
30 


49 
104 




67 


36 


Pantry work ...... ...^ 


40 


189 


37 




2 


38 






2" 




2 


39 


Saleswomen 


5" 

145 
67 
181 




10 
10 
14 
60 
6 


15 


40 




578 
24 
145 


330 
53 
26 


1,063 




Seamstresses 


148 






412 




Silver girls 


6 




Solicitors 




6 

7 




6 






6 


2 


10 

I 


24 




Telephone girls 


] 




Teachers not stated . ... 


1 






1 


48 








8 
1 
3 


8 


49 


Waitresses 


186 


735 


125 


997 


SO 




3 


61 








1 
128 


1 


62 


Miscellaneous, occupation not stated.. 


ir 






141 











The total number of applications for help during the year was 
47,559; of this number 29,946 were for male help, represented in 145 
occupations, and 16,613 for female help in 51 occupations. Of the 
total number of applications for help, the North Side office received 
27.13 per cent, the South Side 41.14 per cent, the West Side 17.56 
per cent, the Peoria office 14.17 per cent. 



POSITIONS SECURED. 

The table following is a counterpart of the two preceding tables, 
and gives the positions secured by all of the offices during the year: 



18 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 
POSITIONS SECURED. 



Table 5 — Work of all the Offices, Three in Chicago and One in 

Peoria. 

Males. 



s 


OCCDPATIONS. 


Positions Skcurbd by Offices— 


Total. 


i 


North 
Side. 


South 
Side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 




Totals 


9,84B 

6.883 
3.966 


16.192 

10. 798 
6.394 


7.013 

6.001 
2.012 


6,174 

4.663~ 
1.621 


39.227 




jyiales . . 


26.336 




Femalea 


12.892 




Total males .. •.. 


6,883 

6.692 

191 


10.798 

10.746 

63 


6.001 

4,684 

417 


4.653 
4.663 


26.335 




Males 


26,674 




Positions filled from previous applica- 
tions 


661 








13 




2 
17 

13 


15 


2 






4 

1 


21 










2 




Bakers . 


1 


20 


34 


5 


Bakers* helpers 


1 
1 

12 
2 

4 


1 








3 
121 
12 

4 
1 
12 
11 
13 
2 
6 
4 
8 


109" 
2 


4 


7 




1 


299 


8 




24 






10 
J] 






1 


MlR*»lcQm1th«; 


106 


3 

2 

1 


7 
1 
14 


127 


12 
13 
14 


KlnplrQTnlfh hAlnpr4 


14 






28 






2 








2 


1 


9 


16 

17 






4 










8 




376" 


63 


8" 


436 


19 
20 




29 
43 

96 


29 








■ 


43 






1 


78 
3 
7 

72 
12 
1 


176 


22 
23 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
36 
36 
37 
38 

f. 

41 
42 
43 
44 

46 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
61 
62 






3 






60 


6 


73 






72 






33 


6 


61 


Brass finishers 




1 


RripklftVftr^ 




3 
4 
17 
4 
3 
6 




3 










4 




2 
2 




6 


26 






6 






3 


6 








6 








1 
16 


1 




10 






26 




16 
51 
23 




15 




i72 

1 


10 
14 


12 


246 


Carriage and wagon washers 


38 


2 


2 






3 
3 

2 
18 
2 

1 




3 










3 










2 






2 




20 


Otarka hill . 






2 








2 
7 
1 
1 


3 








7 






7 


6 


13 






1 


Playb-o riffino 




8 
21 




8 






1 




2'i 






2 


2 




27 
25 


10 
21 


6 


38 


Coachmen 


8 


69 



PBEE EMPLOYMENT OPPIOES. 

Table 5 — Continued 



19 





/ 

OcCnPATIONB. 


Positions Seoored by Offices— 


Total. 


a 

3 

z 


gSI' 


South 
Side. 


West 
Side. 


Peoria. 


S3 






44 


6 
21 


32 


82 


61 
55 






24 


Collectors 


37 


1 

267 
5 


1 

66 


12 






14 


384 


57 
58 




5 


Conductors 


6 
11 




3 
1 
4 


8 






3 


1 


16 


60 
61 




4 






11 

636 
7 
2 




11 




44 


23 


60 
14 


753 


63 
64 

65 
66 




21 








2 




5 
312 


1 
47 


11 

18 
2 


17 


Drivers 


1 
9 
78 
14 


378 


67 
68 
69 


R|pptrir»1an<> 






10 

8 


7 

4 


95 




9 

163 

110 

2 

25 

1 


35 


70 
71 
72 




1 




618 

84 


373 
313 


486 
126 


1,639 




662 


Pliers 


2 


74 




8 


62 
14 


19 


114 


76 
76 
77 


Florists 


15 






1 


1 






24 

7 


7 


32 


78 
79 
80 
81 

82 






7 








2 
2 
12 
3 
35 
10 
31 
12 
2.839 
376 
1 
3 


2 






17 




19 








12 


Uostlers 




35 

520 


23 
27 
14 
20 
1 
3.052 


61 


83 

81 
86 




206 


788 




24 




45 

38 

2.415 


i78 
199 


271 


86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
91 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 




250 




10. 171 




2,913 




4 

2 

1 
153 


3 

1 
9 
22 


8 




69 

7 
27 
1 
3 


75 




17 




21 


223 




1 


Millers • ••-• 






2 
9 


4 








2 


Molders 




7 
2 


5 


21 


Models 




2 




1 






1 




5 






6 




1 

26 
78 


2 
2 
6 


5 


8 




39 
61 
4 

7 


67 




9 


144 


103 
101 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 




4 




3 


1 


2 
6 


13 




6 






24 

8 
891 




24 


PnH«h(»r«i mntnl 








8 




137 


89"' 

2 


52 


1.169 




2 


Printftra ""* 


1 


3" 

6 
13 




4 








6 








16 
1 


29 










1 


114 
115 






6 
3 
12 
3 

A 

26 




5 










3 




2 

1 

12 


2 


28 

4 
1 


44 


117 
118 
119 
120 




8 






6 






284 








25 






1 


3 


4 








8 
6 

1 
191 


8 


123 


Tailors 








6 


124 
125 










1 


Teamsters 


416 


76 


m 


813 



20 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 

Table 5— Concluded. 



Occupations. 



Positions Skourbd by Officks- 



North South West 
Side. Side. Side. 



126 


Tinsmiths. 




12 

8 






12 


127 










8 








2 


14 


16 


129 


Ushers . 




20 
10 
649 
23 


20 


130 








3 

11 
2 
2 


13 


131 




21 

7 


27 

7 


608 


132 


Watchmen 


39 


133 


Weavers .. .. 


2 


134 




161 






151 






233 
3 


89 




322 


136 


Wood choppers 






3 


187 




23 
3 
16 




9 
61 


32 


nl 


Yardmen .. 


220 


12 
194 


296 


139 


Miscellaneous not classified 


210 













Females. 





Total . . 


3.965 

3.796 
169 


5.394 
5.82. 


2.012 

1,994 
18 


1,621 

1,505 
16 


12 892 




Females 


12,619 




From previous applications 


273 










10 






2 


Asrents . 




4 


2' 

2 
3 


6 


8 








2 




2 








5 


Bottle labelers . ...... 




11 

6 


11 


g 










5 








5 
4 


7 
4 
2 

42 
3 
83 
28 


12 


B 


Clerks 


12 


4 


24 


9 


Collectors 


2 






257 


471 


170 


940 








12 


Cooks 


302 
401 


601 

168 

2 


89 
40 


976 


13 


Day workers.... 


637 








16 


Dining room help 


113 

277 


67 

79 


88 
79 
4 


268 






516 


960 








18 


Domestics 






386 
373 
11 


386 






80 


181 


41 


675 








21 


General housework 


1.574 


1.333 
1 
12 


860 


3,767 








1 




Hall girls 










24 


Hotel help 






6 
33 

4 
42 

2 
21 


$ 






49 

8 

301 


69 
3 

489 
1 

225 
4 


26 


177 






16 


27 


Kitchen help . 


103 


935 


28 




3 


29 


Laundres ses 


36 


69 


361 


30 
31 






Matrons 


1 
58 






1 






59 


19 


10 
20 
11 
10 
2 


146 






20 


34 


Office work 


4 

23 


43 

89 




68 






38 


160 






2 


37 
38 






1 








5 

89 
11 
132 




8 
3 
9 

51 
4 

10 

6 

1 
3 


13 


39 


Scrub women 


505 
18 
100 


308 

35 

10 

....... 


906 


40 


Seamstresses 


73 






293 




Silver girls 




43 


Stenographers. 


2 


6 




19 


44 




1 


45 










6 


46 


Waitresses 


64 


616 


89 


669 






3 


48 








1 
60 


1 


49 


Miscellaneous, occupation not stated.. 


6 















FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



21 



This table records the net results of the year's work of the four 
oflBoes, showing that a total of 89,227 persons were secured positions 
for employment, thus supplying a like number of persons seeking 
help. Of this number 26,385 were males distributed in 188 different 
occupations, while 12 892 were females placed in 48 different occu- 
pations. 

The proportion of this work performed by the four offices was, for 
the North Side office 25.11 per cent; South Side 41.28 per cent; West 
Side 17.88 per cent, and Peoria office 15.78 per cent. For a closer 
comparison of the work of the four offices the following table of per- 
centages is presented: 





Pbboentaqks of— 


Offices. 


Applications 

for 
Employment. 


Applications 


Positions 
Secured. 


North Side 


23.18 
40.22 
20.46 
16.14 


27.13 
41.14 
17.56 
14.17 


25 11 


South Side 


41.28 




17.88 


Peoria 


15.73 






Total . .. . 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 







The following table presents the combined work of all the offices 
for the year, showing the applications filed for employment and help 
and the positions secured in all the occupations represented, also the 
percentages secured to each class of applications: 

Table 6 — Number of Applications for Employment, Applications 
for Help, Positions Secured, Also Percentages of Positions Se- 
cured Applicants for Employment and Applicants for Help. 





Occupations. 






Number 

posi- 
tions se- 
cured.! 


Percentages 

OF— 




Applications 

FOR- 


Posi- 
tions se- 
cured 
appli- 
cants for 
employ- 
ment. 


Posi- 
tions 
filled ap- 


z 


Employ- 
ment. 


Help. 


plicants 
for help. 




Grand totals 


43.510 


47,559 


*39.227 


88.01 


82.48 




Males 


29,414 
14.096 


29.946 
17.613 


+26.335 
tl2.892 


87.28 
89.52 


87.94 




Females 


73.20 






29,414 


29.946 


26.336 


87.28 


87.94 








1 


35 
53 

7 


20 
22 


15 
21 


42 86 
41.51 


75.00 


2 




39.62 


3 


Artists 





22 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 

Table ^—Continued 



Occupations 



Appications 

FOR— 



Bmploy- 
ment. 



Help. 





Pebckntages 




OF— 


Number 






of 


Posi- 




posi- 


tions se- 


Posi- 


tions se- 


cured 


tions 


cured. 


appli- 


filled ap- 




cants for 


plicants 
for help 




employ- 




ment. 





Attendants 

Bakers 

Bakers' helpers 

Barbers 

Barnmen 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Bill posters 

Blacksmiths 

Blacksmith helpers 

Boilermakers 

Boilermakers' helpers 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Bootblacks 

Boxmakers 

Boys 

Boys, bell 

Boys, bus 

Boys, cash 

Boys, delivery 

Boys, elevator 

Boss, errand 

Boys, factory 

Boys, office 

Brass finishers 

Bricklayers 

Bridge builders 

Butchers 

Butlers 

Cabinet makers 

Calciminers 

Candy makers 

Canvassers 

Carpenters 

Carpet layers 

Carriage and wagron washers 

Carriage painters 

Cashiers 

Checkers 

Cigarmakers 

Cleaners, harness 

Clerks, bill 

Clerks, drug 

Clerks, dry goods 

Clerks, grocery 

Clerks, hotel 

Clerks, oflBce 

Clerks, shipping 

Clerks, general 

Clerks, stock 

Coachmen 

Coal miners 

Coal passers 

Collectors 

Cooks 

Coopers 

Conductors 

Coremakers 

Dairymen 

Deck hands 

Dishwashers 

Distributors 

Draughtsmen 

Doormen 

Drill pressmen 

Drivers 



149 
18 



66 
4 

11 

463 
35 
2 
47 
193 
3 
87 
79 
91 



7 
16 
33 

9 
15 
71 
180 

3 

85 
88 
31 
43 
487 

7 

10 
31 

4 
11 
815 
24 

2 

3 
66 
453 



2 


2 


100.00 


100.00 


35 


34 


66.64 


67.38 


1 


1 


100.00 


100.00 


9 


4 


80.00 


44.44 


321 


299 


88.99 


93.15 


26 


24 


54.56 


92.31 


10 


9 


40.91 


90.00 


1 


1 


100.00 


100.00 


156 


127 


85.24 


81.41 


17 


14 


77.77 


94.44 


52 


28 


73.68 


53.85 


2 


2 


66.66 


100.00 


9 


9 


13.64 


13.64 


4 


4 


100.00 


100.00 


8 


8 


72.72 


72.72 


640 


436 


95.46 


68.03 


4U 


29 


82.86 


72.50 


i3" 


91.49 


78.18 


182 


176 


90.67 


96.64 


3 


3 


100.00 


100.00 


139 


73 


83.91 


62.52 


72 


72 


91.14 


100.00 


93 


51 


56.04 


54 84 


1 


1 


12.50 


100.00 


4 


3 


100.00 


75.00 


4 


4 


100.00 


100.00 


27 


26 


64.10 


92.58 


8 


6 


66.66 


75.00 


7 


6 


51.64 


85.71 


6 


5 


83.33 


83.33 




1 


100.00 


100.00 


52 


26 


100.00 


50.00 


299 


245 


80.07 


81.94 


17 


15 


93.75 


88.24 


41 


38 


92.68 


92.68 


3 


2 


100.00 


66.66 


3 


3 


100.00 


100.00 


3 


3 


75.00 


100.00 


2 


2 


100.00 


100.00 


24 


20 


100.00 


83.33 


4 


2 


66.66 


50.00 


4 


3 


42. 86 


75.00 


7 


7 


46.66 


100.00 


13 


13 


34.21 


100.00 


1 


1 


11 11 


100.00 


9 


8 


63.33 


88.88 


22 


22 


30.99 


100.00 


44 


38 


21.11- 


86.36 


2 


2 


66.66 


100.00 


67 




65.41 


88.06 


168 


82 


93.19 


51.90 


24 


24 


77.42 


100.00 


12 


12 


27 91 


100.00 


460 


384 


78.86 


85.33 


6 


6 


71.43 


100.00 


10 


8 


80.00 


80 00 


36 


16 


51.61 


45.71 


6 


4 


100.00 


80.00 


14 


11 


100.00 


78.67 


786 


753 


92.39 


95.80 


21 


21 










2" 


2 


66.66 


100.00 


17 


17 


30.36 


100.00 


469 


378 


83.44 


82.35 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table ^—Continued. 



23 





Occupations. 


Applications 

FOR— 


J^umber 

posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


Pkroentaqks 

OF- 


^ 


Posl- 
tions se- 
cured 
appli- 
cants for 
employ- 
ment. 


Posi- 
tions 
Qlled ap- 


a 

a 


Employ- 
ment. 


Help. 


plicants 
tor help. 


71 
72 




1 

47 

165 

16 

114 

1 

1.936 

768 

2 

209 

17 

1 

6 

1 

45 
10 










Electricians .. 


11 

98 


11 

95 


23.40 

57.58 


100.00 


73 
74 
75 




96 94 








42 
1 

1.929 

887 

2 

116 

15 


36 

1 

1.639 

662 

2 

114 

15 


30.70 
100.00 
84,66 
86.20 
100.00 
64.55 
88.24 


83.33 






100.00 






84.97 


78 




74.63 






100.00 


80 


Firemen 


98.28 


SI 




100.00 


82 
83 








1 
1 
39 
7 
4 
2 
29 
12 


1 


20.00 


100.00 


8* 
86 






Gardeners • 


32 

7 


71.11 
70.00 


82.05 


86 


Gasfitters 


100.00 


87 
88 






Glaziers . 


2 
19 
12 

1 

70 

900 

31 

372 

276 

10.533 

2.984 

25 

1 

89 

i 

83 

71 

103 
162 

14 
25 

1.337 

J 


2 

19 
12 


ioo.oo 

100.00 
100.00 


ICO. 00 


89 




65.52 






100.00 


91 
92 








66 

847 

27 

298 

288 

11,905 

3.128 

8 


61 

788 

24 

274 

250 

10. 174 

2,913 

8 


87.14 
87.56 
77.42 
73.66 
90.58 
96.59 
97.62 
32 00 


92.42 






93.03 


94 




88.88 






91.95 






86.81 


97 

98 


Laborers ., 


85.46 
93.13 






100.00 


z 








76 


75 


94.27 


98.68 


102 
103 








19 
296 


17 
223 


18.68 
66.17 


89.49 






76.36 


105 
106 
107 
108 
















Ma^hanipa 












2 


1 


100.00 


60.00 


109 
110 






Millers - 


4 
3 
2 
91 
2 
6 
9 


4 

2 
2 
21 

1 
5 
8 


100.00 
66.67 

100.00 
63.64 

100.00 
55.56 
11.27 


100.00 






66.67 






100.00 


113 


Molders 


23.08 






50.00 


116 




100.00 


116 


Offipn holn 


11.27 


117 
118 


oners !.. 




Packers 


76 

"§ 

14 

5 

1 


67 

144 

4 

1 


65.05 
88.89 
66.67 
92.86 
62.60 


■"89.33" 


119 




80.00 






50.00 


121 




92.86 


122 




100.00 


123 
124 
126 
126 
























Pin setters 


24 


24 


96.00 


100.00 


127 
128 
129 




























4 
17 








131 




8 


100.00 


47.06 


132 
133 


Pnlfahnra nnf atittoil 




Porters ............. 


1.216 
2 

\ 


1.169 


87.43 


96.21 


I34 
135 






Pressmen . .. 


• 


60.00 
44.44 


66.67 


136 




100.00 


137 


Punch press hands 







24 



STATISTICS OF LABOR 

Table ^—Continued. 



Occupations. 


Applications 

FOE— 

^^^^^' Help. 


Number 
of 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 


Perokntaqks 
op- 


posi- 
tions 

secured 
appli- 
cants for 

employ- 
ment. 


Posi- 
tions 
filled, ap- 
plicants 
for help. 




7 
86 
1 
1 
5 
6 
49 
U 
18 
306 
2 
2 

i 

9 

9 

5 

894 

1 

3 

17 

1 

8 

23 

20 

15 

690 

132 

2 

1 

161 

356 

3 

40 

319 

415 


6 
45 
1 


6 
29 
1 


85.70 
33.72 

100.00 


100.00 






Samplers 


100 00 


Sawyers 






5 
3 
67 
9 
8 
308 


5 
3 
44 
8 
6 
284 


100.00 
50.00 
81.63 
57.14 




Shoemakers 


100 oo 




65.67 






Stenographers. . 

Stockmen ... 




92.81 


92 21 


Stock keepers 
















4 

25 
8 
6 
1 
954 
1 


8 
6 

1 
813 


80.00 
96.15 
88.89 
66.67 
20.00 
90.94 


100.00 






Surveyors 


100 00 


Tailors 


100.00 






Teamsters 


86 22 






Time keepers 








Tinsmiths 


23 


12 


70.59 


62 17 








8 
18 
20 
21 
655 
46 

4 


8 
16 
20 
13 
60S 
39 

2 


100.00 
69.57 

100.00 
8t>.67 
88.12 
29.65 

100.00 


■"io5'6o"* 


Truckmen..... 


88 89 


Ushers 


100 00 






Waiters 


92 82 


Watchmen . .. 


86 67 




50.00 


Weighmen 




Whitewashers . 


205 
367 
16 
44 
301 
351 


151 
322 
3 
32 
296 
210 


100.00 
90.45 

100.00 
80.00 
92.79 
50.60 


73 66 






Wood choppers 


18 75 


Wood workers 


79 73 




98 34 


Miscellaneous, not classified 


59.83 


Females 


14,096 

11 
6 
2 


17.613 

25 
13 
4 
1 


12,892 

10 
6 
2 


89 52 

90.91 
100.00 
100.00 


73.20 




40.00 


Agents 


46 15 


Attendants 


50 00 


Barbers 




Bookbinders 


1 

32 

11 

6 

35 

56 

5 

1.020 

8 

1.071 

837 

8 

304 

1.002 

7 

398 

1 

769 

11 

3.956 

2 

13 

10 








Bookkeepers 


9 

15 

21 

16 

32 

12 

1.159 

4 

1,329 

657 

6 

419 

1.103 

4 

879 


5 
11 

6 
12 
24 

n 

940 

3 

975 

637 

2 

268 

950 

4 

386 


16.63 
100.00 
83.33 
34.^8 

42.86 


65 56 


Bottle labelers 


73 33 


Canvassers 


23 81 


Cashiers 


75 00 


Clerks 


75.00 






Chambermaids 


92.16 
37.50 
91.04 
76.12 
25.00 
8S.16 
91.81 
57.15 
96.99 


81.10 
75.00 


Cooks 


73.36 


Dayworkers 


96 96 


Oemonstrators 


40 00 




63.96 


Dishwashers 


88.13 


Distributors 


100 00 




43.91 


Dressmakers 




P'actory work 


1.068 

15 

5.540 

1 

16 
7 


676 
11 

3.767 
1 
12 
6 


87.78 
100.00 
9b. 22 
50.00 
92.31 
60.00 


63 20 




73.33 




68.00 


Governesses 


100 00 


Hall girls 


80 00 


Hotel help 


85.70 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 

Table ff— Concluded. 





GCODPATIONS. 


Applications 

FOR— 


Number 
of 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 


PEROKNTAaES 
OF— 




Posi- 
tions 
secured 
appli- 
cants for 
employ- 
ment. 


Posi- 
tions 
filled, ap- 


s 

1 


Employ- 
ment. 


Help. 


plicants 
for help. 


28 




319 

21 

948 

4 

382 

6 

4 

182 

27 

154 

179 

2 

3 

24 

928 

116 

334 

4 


806 

15 

1.153 

4 

469 

4 

2 

207 

24 

67 

189 

2 

2 

16 

1.063 

148 

412 

6 

6 

24 


177 

16 

935 

3 

351 

4 

1 

146 

20 

68 

160 

2 

1 

13 
905 
73 
293 
4 


55.49 
71.43 
9«.63 
75.00 
91.88 
66.67 
25.00 
80.22 
74.08 
37 66 
89.39 

100.00 
33.33 
54.17 
97.52 
62.93 
87.72 

100.00 




29 


Janltresses ................. 


100 00 


30 




81.09 


31 






32 


Laundresses ....... . 


75 27 


33 




100.00 


34 


Matrons 


60 00 


85 


Nurses 


70 58 


36 




83 33 


37 


Office work 


86 57 


38 


Pantry work 


84 66 


39 




100 00 


40 


Reception service 


50 00 


41 


Saleswomen 


86 67 


42 






43 


Seamstresses .. 


49 32 


44 


Second work ...... . 


71 12 


45 


Silver girls , 


66 67 


46 


Solicitors 




47 




ii6 

\ 

6 
6 

676 
8 

1 
60 


19 


16.38 


79.17 


48 


Talloresses 




49 


Teachers, not stated . .. . . 


1 

S 

997 
3 
1 

141 








60 




1 
6 
659 
3 
1 
55 


16.67 
100.00 

97.49 

37.50 
100.00 

91.67 


100 00 


61 


Vegetable cleaners 


75 00 


52 


Waitresses . . . 


66 10 


63 




100 00 


54 


Wrappers 


100 00 


55 




39.01 









* Includinsr 934 applications filed previous year. 
t Including 661 applications filed previous year. 
X Including 273 applications filed previous year. 

In the reading of the two percentage columns of this table it will 
be interesting to note the large proportion of positions secured to 
applicants seeking employment, also to employers seeking help. A 
selection has been made of 28 leading occupations for males, and 20 
for females, showing in condensed form in the following table the 
work accomplished by all the offices: 



Zb STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 7 — Summary of the Leading Occupations, Showing Appli- 
cationfi for Employment and Help, With Percentages. 

Males. 



Occupations. 



Applications 

FOB— 



Employ- 
ment. 



Grand total , 

Males 

Females 

Males 

Barnmen , 

Bell boys and other occupations 

Blacksmiths 

Carpenters 

Clerks, all kinds 

Cooks 

Dishwashers and kitchen work.. 

Drivers 

Elevator men 

Engineers 

Factory hands 

Farm hands , 

Firemen 

Housemen , 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Laborers, railroad 

Machinists and helpers , 

Packers , 

Painters 

Porters 

Stockmen ; 

Teamsters 

Waiters , 

Watchmen 

Whltewashers 

Window washers 

Yardmen , 



Help. 



Number 
of 
posi- 
tions 

secured 



Pebokntagbs— 



Securing Securing 
work. help. 



40.772 


45,096 


36.619 


89.81 


81.20 


27.022 


27,960 


24.220 


89.63 


88.62 


13. 750 


17.135 


12.399 


90.17 


72.36 


27.022 


27.960 


24.220 


89.63 


86.62 


336 


321 


299 


88.99 


93.16 


1,000 


1,226 


882 


88.20 


72.00 


149 


156 


127 


85.24 


81.41 


306 


299 


245 


80.07 


81.94 


341 


106 


96 


28.15 


90.57 


487 


450 


384 


78.85 


85.33 


1.091 


1,074 


1,003 


91.93 


93.39 


463 


459 


378 


83.44 


82.36 


165 


98 


95 


67.58 


96.94 


114 


42 


35 


30.70 


83.33 


1.936 


1,929 


1,639 


84.66 


84.97 


768 


887 


662 


86.20 


74.63 


209 


116 


114 


54.55 


98.28 


900 


847 


788 


87.56 


93.03 


372 


298 


274 


73.66 


91.95 


10.533 


11,908 


10,174 


96.59 


86.46 


2.984 


3,128 


2,913 


97.62 


93.13 


428 


315 


240 


56.07 


76.19 


103 


76 


67 


66.05 


89.33 


162 


180 


133 


88.89 


80.00 


1,337 


1.215 


1,169 


87.43 


96.21 


306 


308 


284 


92.81 


92.21 


894 


954 


813 


90.94 


85.22 


690 


665 


608 


88.12 


92.82 


132 


45 


39 


29.55 


86.67 


161 


205 


151 


100.00 


73.66 


366 


367 


322 


90.45 


87.74 


319 


301 


296 


92.79 


98.34 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table 7— Concluded. 



27 



Females. 



Occupations 



Applications 

FOB— 



''mJSr- Help. 



Females 

Chambermaids 

Cooks 

Day workers 

DininGrroom help 

Dishwashers 

Domestics 

Factorywork 

General housework 

House keepers 

Kitchen help 

Laundresses 

Nurses 

Nurse girls 

Office work, bookkeeping 

Pantry work 

Scrub women 

Seamstresses 

Second work 

Stenographers 

Waitresses 



116 
334 
116 
676 



17.136 
1.169 
1,329 

667 

419 
1.103 

879 
1.068 
5,640 

306 
1,153 

469 

207 
24 
78 

189 
1,063 

148 

412 
24 

997 



Number 
of 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 



Pebckntaqes- 



Securlng Securing 
work. help 



12.399^ 
940 
975 
637 
268 
950 
386 
675 
3,767 
177 



93.17 



92.16 
91.04 
76.12 



87.78 
95.22 
55.49 



80.22 
74.08 
33.87 



This classitication accounts for a total of 40,772 or 98.71 per cent 
of all the applications filed during the year. For the applications 
for help 45,095 or 94.82 per cent are also represented. The fourth 
and fifth columns of the table show the percentages of positions se- 
cured and help furnished. It will be noticed that the large percent- 
ages here presented reflects almost the entire business of the offices. 

The next table presents a classification of the occupations, nine 
classes for males and seven classes for females, giving the number 
and percentages of applications for employment and for help, also 
the number and percentages of positions secured in each class. 



28 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 8 — Classified Occupations of Applicants for Employment, 
Positions Secured and Applications for' Help in the Four Offices, 
with Percentages in Each Class. 

Males. 



Classification of 
ocoopations. 



Percent 
asrea 

of each 
class. 



Positions 

Seoubed. 



Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 



Applications 
FOR Help. 



Percent- 

agres 
of each 

class. 



Males 


29.414 




26.336 
661 




29.946 












Total 
















25.674 










1.162 


100.00 


1,009 


100.00 


1,266 

6 
887 
15 
39 
12 
308 


100.00 






4 

768 
17 
45 
12 

306 


.35 
66.67 
1.48 
3.90 
1.04 
26.56 


4 
662 

M 

12 
284 


.40 
66.61 
1.49 
3.16 
1.19 
28.15 


.40 




70.76 


Florists 


1.18 




3.08 




.96 


Stockmen 


24.33 


Clerical 


430 


100.00 


111 


100.00 


123 


100.00 






66 
3 
7 

15 
180 

38 
9 

15 

71 
3 

18 
2 
3 


15.35 

.70 

1.63 

3.49 

41.86 

8.84 

2.09 

3.49 

16.51 

.70 

4.18 

.46 

.70 


9 
2 
3 

7 

?! 

1 
8 
22 
2 
6 


8.11 
1.80 
2.70 
6.31 
34.23 
11.71 
.90 
7.21 
19.82 
1.80 
5.41 


9 
4 
4 
7 
44 
13 
1 
9 
22 
2 
8 


7.32 


Clerks, bill 




Clerks drug 


3.25 




6.69 


Clerks, general 


35.77 


Clerks grocery 


10.67 




.81 


Clerks, office 


7.32 




17.89 




1.63 


Stenographers 


6.60 






Timekeepers 










Commercial 


607 


100.00 


425 


100.00 


666 


100.00 


Agents 


S5 
47 
193 
91 
26 
3 
4 

43 
24 
3 
2 

86 
1 
49 


6.77 

7.74 
31.80 
14.99 

4.28 
.60 

7".08 

3.95 

.60 

.33 

14.17 

.16 

8.07 


16 
43 
176 
61 
26 
3 
3 
12 
21 
2 


3.53 

10.12 

41.18 

12.00 

6.12 

.70 

.70 

2.82 

4,94 

.48 


20 
55 
182 
93 
52 
3 
3 
12 
21 
2 


3.60 




9.89 


Boys, delivery. 


32.73 


Boys, office 


16.73 




9.35 




.64 


Checkers 


.54 




2.16 




3.78 


Doormen. 


.36 








29 
44 


'f. 

10.35 


46 
1 
67 


8.09 


Samplers 


.18 


Solicitors 


12.05 


Domestic Service 


4,654 


100.00 


3.972 


100.00 


4,287 


100.00 


Attendants 


2 
9 
16 

487 
815 
900 
276 
14 


.04 

.20 

.35 

10.69 

17.90 

19.76 

6.06 

.31 


2 

6 
15 
384 
753 

788 


.05 

.16 

.38 

9.66 

18.96 

19-84 


2 
8 
17 
460 
786 
847 
288 
14 


.05 


Butlers 


.19 




.40 


Cooks 


10.49 


Dishwashers 


18.33 




19.76 




6.74 


Pantrymen 


.32 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table 8— Continued. 



29 



Classification or 
Occupations. 



Applications 

FOB EMPLOYMKNT. 



Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class- 



Positions 
Skcured. 



Domestic Service— Conc'M, 

Panwashers 

Porters 

Walters 



Manual Labor. 



Coal passers 

Laborers -• 

Laborers, railroad 



Professional 

Artists 

Druggrists . 

Nurses 

Surveyors . 
Teachers... 



Trades . 



Bakers 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Blacksmiths 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Boxmakers 

Brass finishers.... 

Bricklayers 

Bridge builders... 

Butchers 

Cabinet makers ... 

Calciminers 

Candy makers 

Carpenters 

Carriage painters. 

Cigar makers 

Coal miners 

Coopers 

Coremakers 

Deck hands 

Dril press men.... 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Firemen 

Gasfltters 

Glassworkers .... 

Glaziers 

Harness makers . 

Horseshoers 

Ironworkers 

Lathe hands 

Lathers 

Laundrymen 

Machine bands... 

Machinists 

Masons, stone.... 
Metal workers — 

Millers 

Millwrights 

Molders 

Packers 

Painters 

Paper cutters 



31 
10,633 
2.984 



Number. 



1.169 
687_ 

13.111 



2.362 

61 
6 
44 

22 
149 



.23 

77.75 
22 02 



24 
10, 174 
2.913 



2.58 
.21 

1.87 
.93 

6.31 

1.61 
.13 
.47 
.34 
.13 
.17 

1.65 
.47 
.25 
.04 

12.97 
.08 
.08 

3.73 
.30 

1.32 
.47 

3.37 

4^83 

8.85 

.43 



Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 



.13 
29.43 
14.78 



Percent- 



.18 
77.60 
22.22 



.08 

.80 

.04 

1.32 

1.06 

.04 

3.77 

3.85 

14.27 

.08 

.04 

.16 

.13 

1.40 

4.36 

6.86 

.04 



35.72 
57.14 
7.14 



6 

1.215 

655 



15.057 



11.905 
3.128 



100.00 

2.19 

.26 

1.64 

.58 

8.17 

1.80 

.13 

.51 

.06 

.19 

.26 

1.61 

39 

32 

.06 

16.76 

.13 

.13 

5.27 

.32 

1.03 

.71 

1.09 

.71 

2.25 

7.33 

.45 



.16 
79.07 
20.77 



2.027 



35.72 
57.14 
7-14 



.13 



1.64 
.51 



4.82 
1.09 
14.34 



.26 
.13 
1.35 
4.31 
9-26 



2 

168 

5 

35 
14 
17 
11 
42 
116 
7 
4 
2 



1.73 
.44 

1.28 
.49 

7.70 

2.56 
.10 
.39 
.05 
.20 
.20 

1.33 
.34 
.30 
.05 
14.75 
.15 
.10 

7.79 
.25 

1.73 
.69 
.84 
.54 

2.07 

5.72 



76 
19 
296 



3.76 

.94 

14.60 



.20 
.16 

4.49 

3.70 

8.88 

.05 



30 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 8 — Continued, 





Classification of 

OCCnPATIONS. 


APPIilOATIONS 

forEmplotmknt. 


Positions 
Seoubid. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


1 

2 


Number, 


Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 


Number. 


Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 


Number. 


Percent- 
ages, 

of each 
class. 


46 
47 
48 
49 
60 
51 
62 
63 
64 
55 
56 
67 
68 
69 


Tbadbs- Concluaed. 


6 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
4 
8 
4 
2 
6 
9 
10 
7 

6 
14 

9 

1 
17 

1 
15 


.26 

.04 
.13 

.17 
.34 
.17 
.08 
.21 
.38 
.43 
.30 
.04 
.25 
.59 
.38 
.04 
.72 
.04 
.63 


4 


.26 


8 


.39 
















Pipefitters 


































4 
17 


.20 




8 


.61 


.84 


Polishers, not slated 








2 
3 
4 


.10 




2 
4 


.13 
.26 


.15 


Printers 


.20 


Fanch press hands 




6 


.39 


6 


.30 


60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 

70 


Oav^ara 






3 
8 
6 


.19 
.61 
.39 


3 
9 
6 

1 
23 


.16 




.44 




.30 




.06 




12" 


.77 


1.13 








13 
21 
2 
32 


.84 
1.36 

.13 
2.06 


21 


1 04 








,5 


.08 
1.69 


4 
41 


.20 


Woodworkers 


2.17 




Thamrportation 


2.092 


100.00 


1.782 


100.00 


2.060 


100 00 








1 
2 


336 
41 

86 

165 

1 
70 

1 
894 

8 
23 

5 


16.06 

1.96 

4.06 

.48 

21.65 

7.89 

.05 

3.35 

.05 

42.73 

.38 

1.10 

.24 


299 
38 
59 
8 
378 
95 
1 

61 
1 
813 
8 
16 
5 


16.78 

2.13 

3.31 

.45 

21.21 

6.33 

.06 

3.42 

.06 

45.62 

.45 

.90 

.28 


321 
41 
67 
10 

469 
98 

66 
2 
954 
8 
18 
5 


15.66 


Carriage workers 


2.00 






3.27 


4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 




.49 




22.39 




4.78 




.05 


Hostlers 


3.22 


Motormen 


.10 
46.53 




.39 


12 
13 




.88 


Truckmen 


.24 






4,638 


100.00 


3.696 


100.00 


4.566 


100.00 




Annrnntlces 




1 


53 

1 
1 

18 
1 
4 
463 
35 
2 
3 
87 
79 
20 
1.936 
2 
1 
6 
1 
372 
1 
2 
2 
1 


1.14 
.02 
.02 

.09 

9.98 

.76 

.04 

.06 

1.88 

1.71 

.43 

61.74 

.04 

.02 

.11 

.02 

8.02 

.02 

.0* 

.04 

.02 


21 
14 


.57 
.03 
.03 
.38 


22 

1 
17 


.48 




.02 


3 
4 

6 
6 
7 

I 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

!l 

17 




.02 


Blacksmith's helpers 

Boilermakers' helpers .... 


.37 


4 

436 
29 


.11 
11.80 

.78 


4 

640 

40 

1 

3 

139 

72 

24 

1.929 

2 


.09 


30yS 


14.02 


Boys bell 


.88 




02 


Boys elevator 


3 

20 


.08 
1.98 
1.95 

.54 
44.36 

.06 


.07 




3.04 




1.58 


Cleaners harness 


.53 




42.25 




.04 








1 


.03 


1 

1 

298 


.02 




.02 


Janitors 


274 


7.42 


6.53 


20 
21 
22 
23 


























Mechanic 












FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table 8— Continued. 



81 



Applications 

FOB EMPLOTHBNT. 



Positions 

Sboubed. 



Classifications of 
Positions. 



MisoBLLANBons— Concluded 

Merchant 

Models 

Office help 

Oilers 

Pin setters 

Stovemen 

Supers 

Ushers 

Watchmen 

Weifirhmen 

Wholesale men 

Window washers 

Wood choppers 

Yardmen 

Not classified 



Percent 
aees 

of each 
class. 



Number. 



I 


.02 


2 


.04 


71 


1.63 


6 


.11 


25 


.64 


5 


.11 


26 


.66 


20 


.43 


132 


2.85 


1 


.02 


16 


.35 


507 


10.94 


3 


.06 


319 


6.88 


416 


8.96 



Percent- 
acres 

of each 
class. 



Applications 
FOR Hblp. 



Percent- 

aeres 
of each 

class. 



473 

3 

296 

210 



.11 
.67 
.64 
1.06 



12.80 

.08 

8.01 

5.68 



6.69 
7.69 



Females. 







14,096 




12,892 
273 


1 


17.613 
















Total 


















12,619 












302 


lOO.OO 


82 


100.00 


100 


100.00 










32 
154 

116 


10.60 
50.99 
38.41 


6 
68 
19 


6.10 
70.73 
23.17 


9 
67 
24 


9.00 


2 


Office work 


67.00 


3 


Stenographers 


24.00 




Commercial 


181 


100.00 


96 


100.00 


158 


100.00 




Addressers 




J 


11 
11 
6 
35 

U 

5 
8 
7 
24 


6.08 
6.08 
3.31 

19.34 
6.08 

30.94 
2.76 
4.42 
3.87 

13.26 


10 
11 
6 
12 
11 
24 
2 
2 
4 
13 


10.42 
11.46 
6.21 
12.50 
11.46 
26.00 
2.08 
2.08 
4.16 
13.55 


25 
15 
21 
16 
16 
32 
2 
6 
4 
15 
6 

1 


16.83 


2 
3 
4 


Bottle labelers 


9.49 




13.29 


Cashiers.. 


10.13 


6 


Circular folders 


9.49 
20 -iS 


Collectors 


1.27 






3.17 


9 


Distributors 


2.53 


10 
11 


Saleswomen. . . 


9.49 


Solicitors 


3.80 




6 


3.3i 
.56 


1 

1 


£.04 
1.04 


.63 


Wrappers 


.63 




Domestic Serviob 


12.433 


100.00 


11,461 


100.00 


16.746 


100.00 






1.020 

1.071 

837 

304 

1,002 

398 

3.956 

13 

10 

319 

948 

382 

6 


8.20 

8.61 

6.73 

2.45 

8.06 

3.20 

31.82 

.10 

.08 

2.67 

7.62 

3.07 

.05 


940 
975 
637 
268 
950 
386 
3.767 
12 
6 
177 
935 
3SJ 


8.20 

8.50 

5.56 

2.31 

8.29 

3.37 

S2.87 

.10 

.05 

1.54 

8.16 

3.06 

.04 


1,169 

1,329 

657 

419 

1.103 

879 

5.640 

15 

7 

306 

1,153 

380 

93 


7.36 


Cooks . 


8.44 






4.17 




Dlningf room help 


2.66 




Dishwashers 


7.01 






6.58 




General housework 

Hall girls 


36.19 
.10 






.05 


10 


Housekeepers 


1.94 


jj 


Kitchen help. 


7.32 






2.41 


13 


Llnenroom elrls 


.59 



32 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table 8— Concluded. 





Classipioations of 
Positions. 


Applications 
FOB Employment. 


Positions 
Sbodbbd. 


Applications 
fob Help. 


1 
a 

s 
2 


Number. 


Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 


Number. 


Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 


Number. 


Percent- 
ages 

of each 
class. 


14 


DoMKBTio Sbbtick— Conerd. 


27 

179 

2 

3 

928 

334 

4 

6 

676 

8 


.22 
1.44 

.02 

.02 
7.46 
2.69 

.04 

.05 
6.44 

.06, 


20 
160 

905 
293 

669 


.17 

1.39 

.02 

.01 

7.90 

2.66 

.04 

.05 

5.75 

.03 


24 

189 

2 

2 

1.063 

412 

6 

»l 

3 


.16 


15 






16 


Pastry cooks. 


01 


17 




.01 


18 




eire 


19 


Second work 


2 62 


20 


SUversirl. . 


04 


21 
22 


Vegetable cleaners 


.06 


23 


Washerwomen 


.02 




Pebsonal Sebvice. . 


18 

2 
8 
4 
4 


100.00 

11.11 
44.45 

22.22 
22.22 


^ 


100.00 

22.23 
33.33 
33.33 
11.11 


14 

4 
4 
4 

2 


100 00 


1 




28 57 


2 


Companions.. . 


28 57 


3 




28.57 


4 


Matrons 


14.29 




Pbofessional 


187 


100.00 


147 


100.00 


209 


100.00 








1 


2 


1.07 
97.33 
1.60 


146 


.68 

99.32 

• -• 


1 

207 

1 


.48 


2 




99.04 


3 


Teachers 


.48 




Xbades 


119 


100.00 


73 


100.00 


149 


100 00 








1 










1 


.67 


2 


Bindery girl 


1 

1 
116 

1 


f, 

97.48 
.84 








3 












4 




73 


100.00 


148 


99.33 


5 


Talloresses 






Miscellaneous. 


856 

6 
769 
21 

60 


100.00 

.70 
89.84 
2.45 
7.01 


761 

6 
675 
15 
55 


100.00 

.60 
89.88 
2.00 
7.32 


1.237 

13 

1.068 

16 

141 


100 00 


1 


Agents 


1.05 


2 


Factory work 


86.34 


3 


Janitresses . 


I 21 


4 




11.40 









FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

The foregoing table is recapitulated as follows; 



3B 



Table 9— Classified Occupations {Male and Female) , with Per- 
centages, 





Sex and Classes 
OF Occupations. 


Number of oc 
cupatlons iu 
each class. 


Applications 
FOR Kmployment. 


Positions 
Seocred. 


Applications 
for Help. 


a 


Number 


Per- 
centaeres 


Number. 


Per- 
centaerex 


Number. 


Per- 
centages 




Males 




29,414 


100.00 


26, ii35 
661 


100.00 


29,946 


lOj.OO 












Total 

Agricultural 

Clerical 






















26.674 








1 

2 


6 
13 
14 
11 
3 
6 
70 
13 
38 


1,162 

430 

607 

4,654 

13,518 

31 

2,382 

2,092 

4.638 


3.92 
1.46 
2.06 
15.48 
46.06 
.11 
8.03 
7.11 
16.77 


1,009 

111 

425 

3,972 

13, 111 

14 

1.655 

1.782 

3,696 


3.93 
.43 
1.66 
15.47 
51.07 
.05 
6.06 
6.94 
14.39 


1,266 

123 

556 

4,287 

15,057 

14 

2,027 

2,050 

4.566 


4.23 
.41 




Commercial 

Domestic service. 

Manual labor 

Professional 


1.86 
14.31 

60.28 

.06 

6.77 


8 
9 


Transportation ... 
Miscellaneous .... 


6.84 
16.25 






14,096 


100.00 


12,892 
273 


100.00 


17.613 


100.00 




Not classified 








Total 






















12,619 








1 


Clerical 


3 
13 
23 
4 
3 
6 
4 


302 

181 

12,433 

18 
187 
119 
856 


2.14 
1.28 
88.20 

.13 
1.33 

.85 
6.07 


82 
96 
11,461 
9 
147 
73 
751 


.66 

.76 
90.82 

.07 
1.17 

.58 
5.95 


100 
158 
15,846 
14 
209 
149 
1,237 


.66 


2 
3 
4 

5 
6 


Commercial 

Domestic service. 
Personal service.. 
Professional 


.90 
89.40 
.08 
1.19 
.85 


7 


Miscellaneous .... 


7.0-' 



It is shown here that of the 29,414 male applicants for employment, 
46 per cent registered for some kind of manual labor. This percent- 
age is the same as recorded last year. This same class of employ- 
ment accounts for 51 per cent of the positions secured, and repre- 
sents 50 per cent of the employers. 

Domestic service accounts for the next highest number, represent- 
ing 15 per cent of the applications for employment, the same for 
positions, and 14 per cent of the applications for help. 



—3 E. 



84 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



For females, domeBtic service is represented in 23 different occupa- 
tions, and accounts for 88 per cent of the applications for employ- 
ment, and 89 per cent for help, also representing 91 per cent of the 
positions secured. 



AGE PERIODS OF APPLICANTS. 



The following table shows the age periods of applicants for em- 
ployment by classified occupations: 

Table 10— Age Periods of Applicants, by Classified Occupations. 



Males. 



i 


Classification of Occupations. 


Under 
20 yrs. 


20, but 
under 
30 yrs. 


30, but 
under 
40 yrs. 


40. but 
under 
50 yrs. 


50. but 60 yrs. 
under and 
60 yrs. over. 


Not 

je- 

ported. 




Males— 29.414 


3.598 


10,920 


9,276 


3.599 


1,164 


204 


653 










448 

1.612 

965 

573 


1.586 
4.696 
2,711 
1.927 


1.394 
4.139 
1.953 
1.790 


1.063 
1.136 

707 


767 
189 
117 
91 


150 
25 
13 
16 


611 






38 




West Side Office 


4 




Peoria Office 






Aqricoltdral .. .. 


126 


474 


419 


120 


11 


1 


1 












3 
335 
10 
16 
8 
103 


1 

292 

4 

16 

1 
105 










2 




55 


79 
3 
10 


7 






3 














3 


1 




5 


Harvest hands 


3 

68 




6 


Stockmen 


28 


1 




1 






67 


210 


99 


45 


6 


2 






Bookkeepers 






6 


22 
2 

3 

9 

102 

13 
8 

31 
2 
6 
8 
2 
2 


26 
1 
3 
4 

31 
13 


9 


3 


1 


1 




Clerks bill 










1 
1 

20 
7 










Clerks dry goods 


1 
24 
5 
1 
20 
1 
1 
9 












3 
















Clerks hotel 












15 


4 




1 










10 


Clerks office .. 


5 

1 


3 








11 






















13 


Timekeepers 




1 












Commercial 


372 


135 


67 


28 


3 


1 












13 
47 
193 
91 
3 


14 


5 


2 






, 


1 


Boys, cash 








2 


Boys delivery 














3 




















13 
1 
4 

17 

10 
2 
2 

61 
1 

20 


8 

1 


2 








5 


Cashiers 








6 
















2 
13 


16 

1 


6 


1 


1 




8 


Distributors . .. .. 




9 












10 
















Salesmen 

Samplers 


8 


16 


11 


1 






12 






13 


Solicitors 


1 


20 


7 


1 






14 



















FBEE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table No. i (9— Continued. 



35 



© 


Classification of Occupations. 


Under 
20yrs. 


20. but 
under 
30 yrs. 


30. but 
under 
40 yrs. 


40, bat 
under 
50 yrs. 


50, but i 60 yrs. Not 
under and re- 
60 yrs. over, ported. 






447 


1,291 


1.416 


916 


366 


85 


14 








1 

2 






I 

342 

287 

101 

3 

171 


1 
3 
1 

73 
70 
19i 
61 
2 












4 

9 
181 
308 
168 
71 
6 
4 
286 
255 




















4 




7 

61 
16 
27 

1 

127 
205 


23 
34 
181 
16 


1 




5 








50 


2 


7 
8 


















10 




466 
6£ 


m 


34 


9 


11 


Waiters 


3 






750 


5,011 


4.896 


1.695 


599 


49 


549 








1 


1 
403 
346 


23 
3,696 
1.292 


4 
3.659 
1.232 


2 

1.691 

102 


1 
586 
12 








49 


549 


3 


Laborers, railroad 










20 

3~ 

1 
6 
7 
3 


9 
4 


2 










Artists 






























Nurses 




2 
2 

1 


i 






















Teachers 




1 












176 


1,039 


780 


294 


63 


12 


8 










1 

1 
6 
8 
1 
3 
1 
1 


13 
2 
23 
11 

67 

20 
2 
6 
7 
1 
1 

10 
3 
4 
1 

56 


28 
2 

14 
2 

65 

12 


14 


4 




1 








3 


Bartenders 


2 

1 

25 
3 








4 














1 






g 






















3 

i" 

2 

20 
4 
2 












Brass finishers 


1 
1 
1 
6 
2 




















1 1 


Bridge builders 


2" 














2 






2 






14 


Calciminers 






















16 


Carpenters 


2 


153 
2 


66 


29 


10 




17 


Carriage painters 








1 


1 
28 

3 
12 

9 
29 
31 
38 
113 

6 














41 
3 
7 
2 
4 
4 
5u 
70 
3 
1 
6 


16 

1 


3 






•^0 


Coopers 












12 








■<;2 


Decli hands 










2'i 


Drill pressmen 


23 
11 














1 
20 
9 
2 
1 
2 

4 








25 


Engineers 


6 
2 


1 




v(5 


Firemen . . 


15 












28 


Glaziers 










29 




1 


10 


1 














31 


Ironworkers 




16 
18 


11 
6 








'i'' 




2 












1 
4 
3 
61 
2 








H4 


Laundrymen 


13 
32 
9 


40 
48 
162 


31 

8 
102 






1 


US 


Machine hands 












3 






3 


IMasons, stone 






ii8 


Metal workers 




1 












Millers 




2 

1 
16 


2 
1 
2 








40 


Millwrights 




1 

13 








41 


Molders 


2 









36 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table i6>— Continued. 



i 


Classification of Occupations. 


Under 
20 yrs. 


20. but 
under 
30 yrs. 


30. but 
under 
40 yrs. 


40, but 
under 
60 yrs. 


50. but 
under 
60 yrs. 


60 yrs. 
and 
over. 


Not 
re- 
ported. 


42 


Trades- Concluded. 

Packers 


8 
5 


61 
88 
1 
4 


27 
38 


6 
28 






1 


43 




1 


1 


44 




4ft 


Paper hanerers 




1 
1 
1 

1 


1 








46 












47 




1 




1 








48 


Pipefitters 








49 


Piano makers 




2 

1 
1 
3 
2 

5"' 

5 
8 
4 
1 
3 
6 
5 
1 

10 
1 
6 


" 








50 


Plasterers 














51 




5 


2 










62 


Polishers, metal 










58 




2 

1 










fi4 




1 










55 


Pressmen 










56 


Printers 


1 
6 

1 


3 

1 
2 








... 


57 













68 


Roofers 










59 












60 






1 
8 
2 


2 








61 


Steamfitters 










62 


■ Tailors 




2 








6» 












64 


Tinsmiths 




5 


1 






1 


65 












66 




1 


6 

1 
10 


2 
1 

6 








67 


Weavers 








68 


Woodworkers 


1 


21 


2 














209 
37 


1.175 

146 
29 
45 
4 

348 
92 


652 

84 
10 
34 

5 
26 
39 

1 
33 


130 

60 
2 
6 
1 

10 
8 


15 
9 


— — 




1 






2 


Carriage washers 




8 




1 










Conductors 












65 
26 


4 








Elevatormen 

Engine wipers 
















4 


25 
1 
3 
463 
7 

12 


6 


2 









Motormen 




10 


Sectionmen 




2 

308 










11 


Teamsters 


74 

1 
1 


48 






1 













13 


Truckmen 


10 












Miscellaneous . . 


1.451 


1.565 


1.039 


369 


92 




54 


68 




Apprentices 


1 


44 


9 












2 


Bakers' helpers 




1 








3 


Bill posters 




I 
5 
1 










4 


Blacksmith's helpers 

Boilermaker's helpers 

Bootblacks 


13 

456 
35 
2 
3 

87 
79 

"524" 












5 












6 












7 


Boys 


7 












H 


Boys, bell 












9 


Boys, bus 















10 
















11 


Boys, errand 














12 


Boys, factory 














13 
14 


Cleaners, harness 

Factory hands ... 


11 

645 
2 


8 
488 


144 


■■"32" 


■■■■39' 


64 


15 


Filers 




16 


Flour packers 




1 

l" 

132 
1 










17 






4 


""41' 








18 


Furnace tenders 




■■"15 


5" 




19 




18 


161 




20 


Linemen 




21 


Massage workers 




1 










'Zi 


Meat cutters 




1 










23 














24 


Merchants 






1 








25 


Models 




2 

27 








i6 


Office help 


28 


14 


i 


i 







FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

Table iO— Continued. 



H7 



6 
Z 


Classlflcation of Occupations, 


Under 
20 yrs. 


20. but 
under 
30 yrs. 


30. but 
under 
40 yrs. 


40. but 
under 
50 yrs. 


50. but 60 yrs. 
under and 
60 yrs. over. 


Not 
re- 
ported. 


27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 


MisoKLLANEOUS— Concluded. 


1 
25 


3 


1 






















2 

10 
4 

23 


3 
2 
2 
27 

1 

2 

114 

1 

106 

134 












14 
14 




















WatchDQen . 


46 


27 


9 




33 
34 

00 










4 

22 


10 

328 

2 

125 

179 












41 






2 














■ 23 
55 


65 
37 


7 
10 


1 


2 


38 


Mi^t /tluoalflpH 











Females. 





r'emales— 14,096 


2,981 


5.273 


2,913 


1.497 


359 


169 


904 




North Side Office 


910 
908 
590 
573 


1,453 

2.419 

668 

733 


429 

1,667 

445 

372 


290 
564 
435 
108 


141 
50 

121 
47 


163 
1 
4 

1 


678 




South Side Office . 


57 






169 




Peoria Office 






Uleeical 


165 


110 


23 


2 






2 


I 




93 
67 


22 
52 
36 


5 
6 
12 












1 
t 






2 


3 


Stenogaaphers 












83 


76 


14 


4 


2 




2 








I 


8 
9 


2 










1 














3 




3 

1 


2 

1 


1 








9 
9 

28 
1 
1 
3 
9 
5 
1 


23 
2 

24 
1 
5 
4 

12 




1 


5 
6 










ClerKs 


3 
2 

2 


l" 


1 


j 








8 
9 
















10 
11 
12 




3 


















Wrappers 










.... 




Domestic Skkviob 


2.067 


4,723 


2.765 


1.471 


350 


169 


888 










122 
24 
6 
60 
129 
50 
1.079 
1 
1 


528 
277 
143 
160 
270 
169 
1.918 
10 
5 

84 

149 

151 

4 

2 

90 

1 

2 

228 

160 

1 

3 

377 


225 

404 

215 

82 

180 

54 

712 

2 

2 

81 

210 

147 

1 


126 

233 

127 

1 

200 
48 
205 


13 
54 
59 


■•**99" 


6 




Cooks 


79 






188 






1 




Dishwashers 


36 
32 
20 


1 


156 






42 






21 




Rail (ylria 






39 
50 
177 
38 


12 
20 
55 
4 


i" 

32 


18 






16 




Kitchen help .. .. 


113 
37 
1 
25 
29 


212 






6 
























36 

1 


11 


4 




9 












1 
43 
96 
3 
3 
244 












sis 

45 


212 

1 


40 


1 


89 






42 


























22 




49 
4 


1 
2 






5 


23 


Washerwomen 


1 


























38 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table i^— Cunoluded. 



d 
Z 


Classification of Occupations. 


Under 
20yrs. 


20. but 
under 
SOyrs. 


30. but 
under 
40yrs. 


40. but 
under 
50yrs. 


50. but 
under 
60yrs. 


60 yrs. 
and 
over. 


Not re- 
ported. 




Personal Service 


2 


8 


6 


2 


















1 


1 
1 


i" 

4 


1 
2 










2 


Companions 


1 








3 


Lady's maids 








4 


Matrons 





3 


1 










Professional . 


76 


75 

1 

71 
3 


22 
21 




6 


4 





4 


1 


Governesses 




2 


Nurses . . 


76 


6 


4 




4 


3 


Teachers 








26 


57 


26 


6 


2 




3 




Bindery gfirls 




1 




1 












2 




1 
25 












3 




55 

1 


25 


6 


2 




3 


4 


Tailoresses 






MiSOELLANEODS 


562 


225 


57 


6 


1 




5 








1 


1 

523 

2 

36 


.J 

6 
20 


2 
46 
10 










2 


Factory work 


2 
3 
1 


1 




< 


3 




1 


4 








3 














FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



39 



The foregoing table is summarized in the following table: 

Table 11 — Summary of Age Periods of Applicants by Classified 
Occupations. 



Sex and Classes of 
Occupations. 


i 
ill 


Totals. 


Under 
20 yrs. 


20. but 
under 
ao yrs. 


30. but 
under 
40 yrs. 


40. but 
under 
50 yrs. 


50. buti60 yrs. 
under and 
60 yrs. over. 


Not 
re- 
ported. 


Males 




29.414 
14.096 


3.698 
2,981 
12.23 
21.15 


10.920 
5.273 
37.12 
37.41 


9.276 
2.913 
31.54 
20.66 


3.699 
1,497 
12.24 
10.62 


1,164 
359 
3.96 
2.65 


204 
169 
0.69 
1.20 


653 






904 






2.22 


Percentages— females. 






6 41 


Males— 

Agricultural 

Clerical ... 


6 
13 
14 
11 
3 
5 

13 

38 


1.152 

430 

607 

4.654 

13.648 

31 

2.362 

2.092 

4.638 


126 
67 
372 
447 

760 



176 

209 
1.461 


474 

210 
135 
1,291 
6,011 
20 
1.039 
1,175 
1.566 


419 

99 

67 

1.416 

4.895 

9 

780 

652 

1.039 


120 
45 
28 
916 
1,695 
2 
294 
130 
369 


11 

3 
385 
599 



1 
2 
1 

85 
49 


1 
J 


Commercial 

Domestic service .. 
Manual labor 


1 

14 
649 




53 
15 
92 


12 
54 




Transportation .... 
Miscellaneous 


11 

68 


Females— 
Clerical.... 


3 
12 
23 
1 
3 
4 
4 


302 
181 
12,433 
18 
187 
119 
856 


165 
83 
2.067 
2 
76 
26 
662 


110 
76 
4.723 
8 
75 
57 
225 


23 
14 
2,765 
6 
22 
25 
57 


2 
4 

1.47i 
2 
6 
6 






2 


Commercial 


2 

350 


169 


2 


Domestic service .. 


888 


Professional 

Trades 


4 

2 




4 

3 


Miscellaneous 


5 



Referring to the percentages shown here it will be seen that from 
20 to 30 years, 37 per cent represents both males and females. Of 
the total males. 20,196 or 68.66 per cent were between the ages of 20 
and 40 years; 16.89 per cent over 40 years, and 12.23 per cent under 
20 years. Of the females 8,186 or 58.07 per cent were between the 
ages of 20 and 40 years; 14.37 per cent over 40 years, and 21.1-5 per 
cent under 20 years. 

Manual labor accounts for 91 per cent of the males under 50 years 
of age, while domestic service represents 89 per cent of the females, 



40 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



CONJUGAL CONDITIONS. 

The following table shows the conjugal conditions of the appli- 
cants, both male and female, by classified occupations: 

Table 12 — Conjugal Conditions, Members of Trades Unions, Days 
Tdle, and Number Willing to Accept Work Out of City. 



Classification of Occdpations. 









>M 




Conjugal, 






Conditions. 


2 






a> . 


•c 














"S 


'c.a 


|o 


s 




'oQ 


0*J 


a« 


-o 


k. 


J, 


»-S 




« 


e 


(C 


«.2i ■ 


(D m 














al 


a 


ag£ 


at 




p h 


s 


3 B-O 


s« 


> 


'z 


•z 


Z 


Z 


-«J 



MALES- 29.414 



North Side Office 
South Side Office 
West Side Office.. 
Peoria Office , 



Agkioultural- 



Dairymen 

Farm hands ... 

Florists 

Gardeners 

Harvest hands 
btockmen 



Clbrioal— . 



Bookkeepers 

Clerks,, bill 

Clerks, drug 

Clerks, dry goods , 

Clerks, general 

Clerks, grocery ... 

Clerks, hotel 

Clerks, office 

Clerks, shipping.. 

Clerks, stock 

Stenographers 

Stockkeepers 

Timekeepers 



COMMEBCIAL- 



Agents 

Boys, cash 

Boys, delivery 

Boys, office 

Canvassers 

Cashiers 

Checkers 

Collectors 

Distributors... 

Doormen 

Draughtsmen . 

Salesmen 

Samplers 

Solicitors 



6,511 



2.079 

2.046 

940 

1.446 



3.940 



5,530 
3,644 



305 



2,000 
2.357 
1.028 
1.504 



J9_| 



343 
1.624 



33 




2 


1 


5 




6 




56 


16 


41 




2 


2 


9 


2 


20 


12 


2 










i 



24 


1 




....... 


10 


5 


3 




2 




22 


1 


6 





FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFIOES. 

Table i2— Continued. 



41 



Classification of Occupations. 



Domestic Skbvice- 



Attendants ... 

Butlers 

Carpet layers. 

Cooks 

Dishwashers . 
Housemen — 
Kitchenwork . 
Pantrymen ... 
Pan washers . 

Porters 

Walters 



Manual Labor - 



Coal passers 

Laborers 

Laborers, railroad 



Professional— 



Artists 

Druggists 

Nurses 

Surveyors 
Teachers . 



Bakers 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Blacksmiths 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Box makers 

Brass finishers 

Bricklayers 

Bridge builders ... 

Butchers 

Cabinet makers . .. 

Calcimlners 

Candy makers 

Carpenters 

(Carriage painters 

Cigar makers 

Coal miners 

Coopers 

Core makers 

Deck hands 

Drill pressmen... 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Firemen 

Gasfltters 

Glaziers 

Harness makers .. 

Horseshoers 

Iron workers 

Lathe hands 

Lathers , 

Laundrymen 



Conjugal 


o 




Conditions. 








<D • 


2 


^ 






S§ 




a 







a§ 


■o 


u 


S3 


JnS- 


ss 


tt 


•2 73 


^ 


•°fl?, 


■sv 


S 


al 


a 


aS£ 


a* 


S 




3 


S3 0.T3 


9^ 


> 


•z 


z 


Z 


Z 


<J 



725 
776 
230 
12 
7 
1.204 



26 
7.900 
2.804 







21 




137 


19 


74 


1 


126 


3 


26 


6 


2 





3.046 



1.131 



442 
72 



135 
..... 



42 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table i5— Continued. 



Classification of Occupations. 



Conjugal 
Conditions. 


o 
2 

il 


6 

2 

OS 

1 

<3 


a 

U 


® 

a 


Ill 

2 



Teades— Cowciwded. 

Machine hands 

Machinists 

Masons, stone 

Metal workers 

Millers 

Millwrights 

Molders 

Packers 

Painters 

Paper cutters 

Paper hangers 

Pattern makers 

Photographers 

Pipefitters 

Piano makers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers 

Polishers, metal 

Polishers, not stated. 

Pressors 

Pressmen 

Printers 

Punch press hands . . 

Roofers 

Sawyers 

Shoemakers 

Steamfitters 

Tailors 

Telegraphers 

Tinsmiths 

Toolmakers 

Upholsterers 

Weavers 

Woodworkers 



Transportation , 



Barnmen 

Carriage washers , 

Coachmen 

Conductors 

Drivers 

Elevator men 

Engine wiper 

Hostlers 

Motormen 

Section men 

Teamsters 

Trainmen 

Truckmen 



CdlSCKLLANEOUS 



Apprentices 

Bakers' helpers 

Hill posters 

Blacksmiths' helpers.. 
Boilermakers' helpers. 

Bootblacks 

Boys 

Boys, bell 

Boys, bus 

Boys, elevator 



6 

329 
133 

1 



5 

622 

7 

13 



3.718 

62 



3 




1 




12 


12 


31 


2 


77 


56 


3 


2 


1 




4 




1 








2 


1 




2 


3 


J 


5 


3 


7 


3 




1 


3 


4 


4 


1 


6 


3 


7 


1 


11 


3 


6 


6 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



43 



Table i2— Continued. 



Classification of Occupations. 









' ONJUGAL 






Conditions. 


" 


« 




.S^ 


■c 












e— : 










■o^ 






a ^ 




■s: 


a? 


■a 


^, 




^-L 




? 










1'. 


x> 


•°a? 


.o-S 


« 


a 


agi: 


as 




s^ 


s 


oo-a 




t' 


z 


z 


Z 


z 


f. 



liscshhASEOVS— Concluded. 

Boys, errand 

Boys, factory 

Cleaners, harness 

Factory hands 

Filers 

Flour packers 

Foremen 

Furnace tenders 

Janitors 

Linemen 

Massage workers 

Meat cutters 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Models 

Office help 

Oilers 

Pin setters 

Stovemen 

Supers 

Ushers 

Watchmen 

Weighmen 

Wholesalemen 

Window washers 

Wood cutters 

Yardmen 

Not classified 



FEMALES 14.096 



North Side Office . 
South Side Office 
West Side Office . 
Peoria Office 



Clerical. 



Bookkeepers .., 

Office work 

Stenographers 



Commercial . 



Addressers 

Bottle labelers .. 

Canvassers 

Cashiers 

Circular folders. 

Clerks 

Collectors 

Demonstrators.. 
Distributors..... 

Saleswomen 

Telephone girls. 
Wrappers 



Domestic Service 3.610 



1.093 
499 



87 
79 
17 
1.622 
2 
1 
3 
1 
262 
1 
2 



10,276 



2.746 
4.767 
1.338 
1.435 



Chambermaids 154 

Cooks I 317 

Day workers 



877 
1.155 



3.194 



101 
213 
913 



44 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table i2-Concladed. 





Classification of Occupations. 


Conjugal 
Conditions. 


a| 
II 

Z 


00 

>> 

as 

■a 

1 

< 




1 

a 


i. 

a 

n 

•z 


p 

1 

a 

9 

z 


"^1 

111 

z 


11 

z 




DoMKSTic Seb,\ice— Concluded. 


35 
461 
lU 
433 


269 

538 

287 

3.613 

13 

6 

117 

595 

266 

6 

26 

116 

1 

3 

290 

331 

1 

6 

609 

12 


20 
369 

12 
167 




18 
16 
8 
15 
3 
1 

10 
22 
20 


68 






50 


(i 




57 






358 






1 


q 


Hotel help 


4 
202 
353 
116 


I 

77 
312 
127 




1 






141 






226 


1"> 




87 


13 




2 






1 
33 

1 






3 

22 
5 
6 

18 

13 
3 
3 

16 
2 




IFi 


Pantry work 


4 




19 


Ifi 




1 


17 
1H 








1 




638 
3 


798 




71 


19 




10 


20 


mivor c^irla 






















67 

7 


41 
6 




206 


?3 


Washerwomen 






Personal Service 


2 




11 






6 


7 


1 


Att.Anrlanta 


1 
1 
1 
3 


1 

7 
3 

1 






5 

18 
16 

7 












1 


3 
4 








2 


Matrons 


2 




1 




Professional 


37 


150 


15 




26 


50 








2 

116 

2 






6 

23 
250 


2 






36 

1 


15 




16 


3 


Teachers 


2 




Trades 


18 


101 


21 




31 


7 


1 
«> 






1 
1 
98 

1 




._._ 




1 










7 

32 
9 




^ 


Seamstresses . 


18 


21 




6 


4 


Tailoresses 






Miscellaneous 


81 

2 

10 
16 
26 


772 

1 

729 
6 
31 


50 

2~ 
32 
13 

3 


— — 


38 

6 
30 
17 
118 


57 








•) 


Factory work 


16 








4 


Not stated 


n 









From the reading in detail of the foregoing table much informa- 
tion may be derived by those interested in social economics. The 
following summary is presented: 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICER. 



45 



Table IH—Summary of the Conjugal Conditions, Members of Trade 
Unions. D(iys Idle, and Number Willing to Accept Work Out of 
the City, with Percentages. 



Occupations. 


Totals. 


Conjugal 
Conditions. 


o 

ao 

i| 

II 

z 


ii 

< 


2^ 


Sex and Classification 
of Occupations. 


III 


IS 

z 


II 

SO 
a <D 
Z 


III 

z 


!l 

il 
z 


Males 


171 

53 


29.414 
14.096 


6.511 
3.820 
22.14 
27.10 


22,903 
10.276 
77.86 
72.90 

887 

305 

510 

3.814 

10.730 

1.397 
1.521 
3.718 


6.889 
3.299 


2.335 
7.94 


8 
6 


14.938 
2.011 
50.79 
14.27 






Percentages— females 






Males- 


6 
13 
14 
11 
3 
6 

68 
13 
38 


1.162 
430 
607 

13,548 
31 
2.362 
2.092 
4.638 


265 
125 

97 • 
740 
2.818 

10 
965 
571 
920 


289 
176 
102 
710 

3.046 
16 

1.131 
560 
859 


15 
34 

19 
386 
614 

672 
421 

274 


37 
30 
38 
28 
29 
26 
33 
36 
65 




Clerical 


229 
132 
2,159 
8.333 
23 
962 
6''1 


Commercial 


Domestic service 






Trades 


Transportation 


Miscellaneous 


1.545 


Females- 

Clerical . . . 


3 
12 
23 
4 
3 
4 
4 


302 
181 
12,433 
18 
187 
119 
856 


14 
21 
3,640 
6 
37 
18 
84 


288 
160 
8.793 
12 
160 
101 
772 


11 
6 
3.194 
2 
15 
21 
50 





47 

28 
17 
14 
26 
31 
38 


42 

32 

1.816 

7 
50 

7 
57 


Commercial 




Personal service. 


Professional 









Of the 29,414 males, 6,511 or 22 per cent were married, having 
6.88 dependant children, a fraction over one child to each man; 2,885 
or 8 per cent are reported as belonging to trade unions, this is nearly 
three times as many as were reported last year. 

The average number of days of idleness is eight, which is over 
one- fifth given for last year; 14,988 or 51 per cent registered as will- 
ing to accept positions outside of the cities. 



46 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



As to the females, it is found that of the 14,095 registered as seek- 
ing employment, 3,820 or 27 per cent were married, having 3,299 
dependant children; this is less than one child to each woman. The 
average time of idleness to each was six days; the number willing to 
accept work outside of the cities was 2,011 or 14 per cent. It is quite 
remarkable to note the approximate proportion of the married and 
single of both males and females. 

Table H— Nationality of al^ 



J 

a 

D 
Z 


Classification of Occupations. 


d 

a 
< 


1 
< 


§ 

1 
1 


O 


1 

Q 


a 
H 


A 


Co 
C5 




Males 


14,152 


216 


343 


467 


286 


898 


247 






North Side Office 






1.765 
3,946 
3.652 
4.789 


3 

169 
29 
15 


14 

258 

69 

2 


12 

379 

73 

3 


98 
143 
45 


337 
402 
146 
14 


40 
165 
26 
17 


1.070 




South Side Ofliee 

West Side Office 


2,073 
963 




Peoria Office 


159 






487 


14 


28 


36 


15 


66 


3 


163 




Dairymen 






3 

346 

4 

15 
12 
107 




















14 


14 


21 
2 
3 


16 


45 

1 
2 


i 

1 


105 










Gardeners 




2 


9 










Stockmen 




12 


10 




17 


1 


43 






251 


1 


4 


19 


3 


27 


3 


58 








1 


38 
3 
5 
13 
85 
22 
8 
4 
48 
3 
18 
2 
2 






3 




6 




7 




(Jlerlis. bill 








3 


Clerks, drug 








1 






1 
















2 






1 


4 


8 
2 


2 


11 
4 
1 
2 

3 


2 


31 


6 


Clerks grocery 


7 


7 


















2 
4 




...... 


3 


g 


Clerks, shipping 






7 


10 




























12 


Stockkeepera 
















13 


Timekeepers 




















460 




2 


23 


1 


27 


3 


28 




Agents 




1 


13 
28 
166 
75 
21 
1 
3 
34 
18 
1 
1 
68 
1 
40 






7 
3 
6 
3 


1 


6 
2 
4 
3 
2 


1 




2 








3 


3 






2 




4 


Boys, office 




5 










6 














7 


Checkers 










' 






8 


Collectors 












t 


9 








1 




2 






10 


Doormen 








11 


Draughtsmen ... 
























2 




4 


2 




13 










14 


Solicitors 








1 





3 




























FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



47 



NATIONALITY. 



The following table presents the nationality of all applicants by 
classified occupations. 



Applicants for Employment — Males. 



.a 


1 


i 

Si 
® 




a 

s 
03 


1 

>■ 

(S 

a 
a 

1 


1 




"5 


1 


o 
a 

i 


i 

1 
1 


o 


1 

a 

s 
. Z 


2.753 


477 


651 


275 


114 


342 


355 


1.730 


156 


143 


740 


585 


29.414 




902 

1.209 

634 

8 


68 
357 
66 

7 


62 

416 

171 

2 


19 

120 

134 

2 


12 
42 
51 
9 


12 

326 

3 

1 


3 
253 

95 

4 


545 

1,116 

240 

49 


4 

126 
22 
4 


1 

137 

5 


695 

"io" 

5 


367 
198 
20 


6.019 
11.835 
6.470 
6.090 




85 




35 


4 


1 


64 


29 


87 


16 


2 




29 


1.152 




























768 
17 
45 
12 

306 


J 


35 
1 




21 


3 


1 


37 


14 


61 
3 
6 


15 


'1 




19 


2 
3 


5 




1 
















2 




















5 


14 




13 


1 




17 


15 


17 




1 




8 


6 


16 


1 


5 






1 


13 


19 




4 




6 


430 












2 












4 


4 




1 




1 


66 
3 

,1 

180 
3'* 

9 
15 
71 

3 
18 

2 

3 


1 














2 



























3 


























4 


ii 


1 


' 






1 


7 


6 
3 




3 




4 


5 








6 
























7 


1 




1 










2 
4 










8 


1 








2 








1 


9 




















10 


























11 


























12 






1 




















13 


24 








2 




17 


17 




1 




2 


607 














4 












2 
3 

6 
2 


1 
4 
7 










35 
47 
193 
91 
26 
3 
4 
43 
24 
3 
2 
86 
1 
49 


1 


4 




















2 


6 














1 






3 


i 
















4 
























5 


1 
























6 


























7 


2 














2 








1 


8 


1 












1 










9 


1 






















10 






















1 


11 


1 








1 




2 2 








12 


















13 










1 




i i 










14 































48 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 14— 



Classification of Occupations. 



1 


d 

_2 


1 


ja 


ji 


.g 
















si 








< 


CQ 


O 


Q 


H 


fc. 






Domestic Service. 



Attendants.... 

Butlers 

Carpet layers. 

Cooks 

Dishwashers- 
Housemen.... 
Kitchenwork . 
Pantrymen... 
Panwipers — 

Porters 

Waiters 



Manual Labor. 



Coal passers 

Laborers 

Laborers, railroad. 



PRORE88IONAL., 



Artists 

Drugeists . 

Nurses 

Surveyors., 
Teachers... 



Bakers 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Blacksmiths 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Boxmakers 

Brassfinishers .... 

Bricklayers 

Brideebuilders — 

Butchers 

Cabinet makers... 

Caiclminers 

Candy makers 

Carpenters 

Carriage painters. 

Cigarmakers 

Coal miners 

Coopers 

Coremakers 

Deck hands 

Drill press men... 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Firemen 

Gasfitters 

Glaziers 

Harness makers.. 

Horseshoers 

Iron workers 

Lathe hands 

Lathers 

Laundrymen 

Machine hands 

Machinists 

Masons, stone 



2 

6 

10 
211 

187 
318 
111 

6 

7 

827 

379 



16 

5,147 

875 



.877 

3 
,399 
AIL. 

2 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



49 



Continued. 





1 




ua 

1 


a 
* 

(6 


a 
1 


A 


4J 


1 


CO 

1 


i 
1 

.2 

a 


•6 
1 

i 


j 


J 

a 

1 


188 


44 


81 


53 


17 


70 


49 


396 


75 


42 


2 


139 


4.664 




























2 

9 

16 

487 

815 

900 

276 

14 

8 

1.337 

690 






























I 


3' 

15 

2 


1 
7 

38 
16 
6 








1 
8 
14 
14 


18 
109 
96 
37 

1 












18 
20 
76 
23 


2 
18 
16 

3 


1 
13 

1 
1 


U 
22 
11 

7 


4 

37 

16 
2 


14 
12 
13 

1 




26 
24 
32 
6 
2 


















1 
15 








35 
15 


22 

1 


14 


14 


1 


16 
3 


9 
2 


99 
36 


2 


1 
1 


81 

19 


10 

11 


1,790 


373 


342 


145 


63 


111 


127 


793 


49 


52 


722 


251 


13.548 




5 






2 
109 
34 


2 
45 

16 






3 

589 
201 










31 
10.533 
2.981 




1.283 
602 


93 
2S0 


178 
164 


49 
62 


90 
37 


25 
24 


20 
32 


722 


211 

40 


2 
3 




2 












1 










31 




























2 






















7 

9 
9 

5 


1 
























2 

















1 










3 
























4 


























5 


120 


7 


48 


15 


5 


24 


40 


139 


6 


14 


2 


23 


2.362 










1 






2 


4 








1 


61 
6 
44 

22 
149 
38 
3 
11 
8 
3 
4 
39 
11 
6 
1 
306 
2 
2 
88 
7 
31 
11 
56 
47 
114 
209 
10 
2 
19 
1 
31 
26 

8^ 
91 
337 


J 




















6 






















1 


3 






2 
14 








6 
2 


1 
17 

1 










23 







1 


12 




1 




6 


6 
6 
























7 
















2 










8 








2 








9 


2 






















10 


1 

























11 


2 




2 






1 




..... 
2 




1 




1 


12 
































14 
























15 


7 





9 


1 


1 


3 


3 


19 




1 




4 


16 
17 










2 


















2 






2 




9 


10 




10 


















20 


2 


























































^ 








4 
4 

4 










23 




1 








3 

7 


...... 


1 








3 


2 
5 










i 




20 


i 










26 















































2 








1 


2 










29 




























i 








3 








1 


31 
32 













































3 




1 








2 


4 












2 

















35 


6 


!.. 


8 


3 






2 


9 


1 





...!.. 


2 










2 1 37 



-4 E 



50 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table U- 



i 


Classification of.Occupations. 


2, 


1 


1 
i 

fiQ 


'i 


i 
1 


ID 

1 


1 


si 


38 
39 
10 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
60 
51 
62 
63 
64 
55 

11 

68 
69 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
88 


Trades— ConcZwded. 


25 
•45 

59 

11 






























2 












..... 

3 
13 


...... 

1 






3 






1 


4 
1 


..... 


17 




26 




















1 




1 















































































1 










3 












2 






























.'".'. 




Printers 












2 
















1 




1 


5 w T7 or a ' 
















1 






1 




3 








2 














1 


6 
















TinamiiUs 


1 








2 




3 














26 




2 










5 














Woodworkers 




1 




10 




1 


1 




Transportation 


1.123 


6 


4 


39 


8 


99 


3 


274' 






167 
22 
45 
8 

278 
76 

36 


4 


2 


12 
2 


2 
1 


21 
3 
14 


2 


31 


2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 




4 








9 












3 

9 


2 

1 


8 
4 


...... 


42 








20 










Hostlers 


1 


1 






1 




12 
























2 




463 
8 
18 


1 


1 


13 


2 


47 




151 






Truckmen 










1 




3 






2,438 


26 


64 


75 


43 


178 


47 


661 








1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 


45 















2 




1 




1 
7 
1 
1 
233 
25 
2 
3 
52 
79 
5 
1.090 
2 






















2 




1 




6 




















6 

1 


;;;:;; 




Boys 




1 






65 


Bovs bell 


2 




3 






























3 


4 




3 




7 






Cleaners harness 


1 
18 


1 
21 


2 

14 


■26" 


I 
77 


1,1" 


2 




266 
























3 






1 
1 
















Janitors 


i59 


1 1 


3 


3 1 2 ' 22 1 3 ' 60 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



51 



Continued. 



1 


1 
Italian. 

• 


i 

1 

1 


1 


1 




1 

a 

1 


1 
1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 

1 

3 




1 


1 

a 

a 


























1 

4 
3 

33 
103 
162 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
4 
8 
4 
1 
6 
9 

10 
7 
1 
6 

14 
9 
1 

17 
1 

15 
2 

40 


88' 




















































40 


3 












• 












41 


2 










6 
3 


2 
1 


21 
20 








2 

1 


42 




6 









1 




1 


43 










44 


























46 


























46 



























47 


























48 



























49 



























fiO 


























51 








1 


















52 
























53 


























54 


























65 
















1 
1 











56 






1 


















57 






















68 


























59 


























60 


1 

























61 
















2 










62 
























63 


2 














3 










64 
























65 






2 


1 








1 










66 




















67 
















1 










68 


222 


3 



20 

4 
2 
4 


2 


7 
3 


8 


34 


157 


4 


16 


6 


57 


2,092 




27 
2 


7 


12 
1 


10 
2 

7 


3 


11 

1 


5 


13 

1 
2 


336 
41 
85 
10 
453 
165 
1 

70 
1 
S 
894 
8 
23 


1 
2 


4 








3 


2 
















4 


81 


2" 


2 

2 


i" 


1 


1 


li 


21 
29 


1 






11 

1 


6 


2 


4 




6 








7 






2" 








2 


10 








1 


8 
















9 






2 
2 










1 
77 










10 


100 




1 


3 




4 






1 


28 


11 








12 




1 
























13 


308 


47 


121 


45 


19 


74 


46 


341 


7 


12 


8 


78 


4.638 












2 




1 


3 










53 

1 
1 

18 
1 
4 
463 
35 
2 
3 
87 
79 
20 
1.936 
2 
1 
5 
1 
37 i 


1 


















2 


























3 


2 














1 










4 
























5 




2 






















6 


63 


2 




2 






78 
1 






1 


13 


7 


3 










8 
























q 


























10 


7 












7 


4 










11 






















12 


1 


7"' 


3 

46 






2 
16 


"ie" 


2 

87 










13 


130 


28 


7 


i 


4 


2 


43 


14 
15 


























16 






1 
....... 




















17 


6" 




4 


....... 


■Jl" 




5 


"si" 




...^.. 


..__.. 


"io" 


18 
19 



52 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 14— 



i 
i 


Classsification of Occupations. 


1 


d 
1 


d 

es 

1 
Xi 

o 

30 


1 


.d 

1 


d 


j 


12 

05 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
82 

i 


Miscellaneous— Concluded. 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

60 
4 

23 
5 
14 
19 
55 














































1 




































1 


















1 


1 






6 


Oiler« 










1 
















1 


























4 


■ 


1 


4 










1 








3 




6 


1 


21 








1 




10 
138 


2 








1 
31 


"z 






15 


17 
3 

16 
6 




119 


17 








133 
261 


...... 


17 
3 


4 

6 


19 
10 


3 
3 


46 


S8 


Nnt plnssiflprl 


61 







Females. 





Females 


5.576 


37 


279 


157 


95 


207 


75 


1.991 




North Side Office 


1.156 
1,112 
1.490 
1.818 


■■37" 


16 
234 
29 


13 

95 
49 


40 
38 

'1 


110 
85 
10 
2 


7 

52 
13 

3 


606 






1.067 






262 




Peoria Office 


56 




Clerical 


256 








8 




10 


2 


11 






27 
121 
108 






1 
7 








3 












8 
2 


...... 


6 


3 


Stenographers 







3 




nOMMTtRfllAT. 


164 






4 




2 


3 


6 














11 
11 
5 
29 
11 
51 
5 
7 
7 
21 
6 








































1 
1 




















1 


4 
















Clerks 






1 




1 




2 




Pnll«f>fnr« 




















1 






Distributors 


























1 


1 


















12 


Wrappers 







1 












Domestic Service 


4.286 


37 


262 


142 


90 


175 


63 


" "3 
1.892 




Chambermaids 






417 
339 
234 
221 
249 
156 
1.340 
2 


1 

1 


4 

8 
18 


11 
11 
6 


3 
2 
11 
2 
19 
10 
21 


12 
38 
16 
5 
6 
2 
26 
3 


2 

'1 

...„ 

16' 
3 


206 




Cooks 


178 






118 






24 






4 

"ie" 


117 
7 
41 


6 

8 
27 


181 




Domestics 


66 
590 




Hall girls 





FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



53 



Continued. 



J 


i 
2 


J 

t 

O 


1 
1 


1 


a 
V 

a 

'J5 


1 


CO 




1 


3 
1 

i 


1 


•= 
S 


s 

9 

z 


























2 
2 

! 

2 
71 

6 

1§ 

132 

1 
16 

rj 

416 


20 
















1 










21 

























?« 


























23 


























24 


























26 






1 




1 














1 


26 
















27 




1 






















?N 
























29 
















2 










ao 
























31 


17 


1 


2 


2 




2 




11 




1 




3 


32 

31 


2 














1 
80 










34 


80 


29 


19 


2 


2 


21 


6 








6 


35 










36 


17 
29 


7" 


18 
12 


2 

7 


1 


19 


2 

6 


16 
7 


"*i"' 


4 

2 


1 

2 


2 


37 
38 











Females. 



2.470 


22 


433 


156 


13 


202 


138 


1.663 


37 


24 


16 


506 


14.096 




1.081 

1.026 

334 

29 


5 
14 

3 


»1 

86 


16 
116 
23 


4 
8 

1 


28 

171 

3 


32 
84 
18 
4 

6 


676 

1,024 

47 

16 

2 


1 

33 
2 
1 


1 

19 
2 
2 


13 

"i" 


262 
202 
42 


4.065 
5.666 
2.431 
1.934 

302 




6 












1 


1 










































1 


...... 


32 
164 
116 


1 


4 












6 


2 






2 


1 














...... 











8 


1 










1 










1 


181 


















































11 
11 
6 
35 
11 
56 
5 
8 
7 
24 
6 


1 


























2 


























3 


























4 


























6 
























1 


6 
























7 


























8 


























9 














1 












10 
























11 


























1 


12 


2.425 


19 


407 


138 


13 


201 


126 


1.591 


36 


24 


14 


492 


12.433 




126 
243 
260 
23 


i" 

4 

3" 

3" 


37 
30 
26 
6 

20 
27 
129 


6 
3 
8 


1 

1 


11 
12 
19 


13 
14 
2 
8 
6 
6 
26 


137 

128 
74 

'?i 

661 
1 


1 

2 

1 

...... 


3 
4 

3 

1 
1 


4 

...... 

1 


27 
38 
32 
4 

34 
11 
197 


1.020 

1.071 
837 
304 

1,002 
39S 

3.956 
13 


2 


171 

81 


19 
4 

29 


3 

3" 




17 
3 

88 




722 
3 


16 


6 


8 



54 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table 14— 



a 


Classiflcation of Occupations. 


a 
< 


g 
1 


< 


a 

08 

1 




i 

a 


JO 

1 
a 


1 


^2 

a? 
few 

05 


9 


Domestic Service— ConeJuded. 
Hotel help 


10 
190 
178 
126 
2 

26 

68 

2 

3 

174 

160 

4 

6 

372 

7 
















10 




...... 


2 

19 
6 


7 
6 
14 


2 

11 

...... 


8 
13 
4 


1 

2 

1 


29 


11 
12 


Kitchen help 

Laundresses 


172 
67 


13 






14 
















15 


Pantry work . ..... 




1 


6 




12 


4 


•— 25" 


16 






17 


















18 


Scrubwomen 


ii 


31 


10 
10 


4 


5 
12 


3 
2 


175 


19 


Second work , 


24 


20 


Silver girls 








21 


V^egetable cleaners 
















22 


Waitresses . . 




9 


22 


2 


13 


9 


42 


23 


Washerwomen 








17 




1 














Attendants 












1 


2 
8 
3 
4 
















2 


















3 


Lady's maids 

Matrons 




1 












4 
















Professional 


90 




2 


2 


2 


11 


3 


24 








1 


1 

86 
^_3_ 

101 










1 
10 






2 


Nurses 




2 


2 


2 


3 


24 


3 


Teachers 






Trades 








1 


2 


4 


6 




Bindery girls ... 










1 


1 
















2 


















3 




99 

1 








1 


2 


4 


6 


4 


Talloresses 












Miscellaneous 


662 




14 


1 


2 


7 




52 








1 


10 
49 










1 
6 




1 


2 • 


Factory work 




13 


1 


2 


47 


3 




4 


4 


Not stated 




* 



























FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



55 



Concluded. 



j 


a 


E 


i 


1 


1 

a 

1 

CO 


1 


1 

00 


1 


1 


a) 

S 

i 


1 


1 


i 

i 


























10 

319 

948 

382 

6 

27 

179 

2 

3 

928 

334 

4 

6 

676 

8 


9 


86 


6" 


3 

67 
6 


2" 

62 

1 






8 
16 
14 


24 
124 
36 


..... 


2 
2 


1 

6 


5 

48 
6 


10 


198 
99 


2 


24 
4 


11 

1? 


1 








13 
















1 
18 










ti 


36 




3 








6 




2 




4 


15 










16 


"'279' 




■'"so" 

10 


5" 




"23" 


..... 

2 


'125" 
64 


..... 







■■28" 
14 


17 
18 


•36 






19 
















20 


























?1 


107 





4 








4 


48 








44 


22 



















23 


























18 






















































2 
8 
4 
4 


1 


























? 



























































4 


16 




6 


1 




1 


4 


24 








2 


187 






































2 

182 

3 


^ 


16 




6 


1. 




1. 


4 


24 








2 


2 










3 






2 










2 




1 


1 
1 119 


















































1 

1 

116 

1 


1 


























? 






2 










2 








...!. 


s 






















4 


26 


3 


18 


16 






1 


44 


1 




I 


9 


856 




































6 

769 
21 
60 


. 


19 


3 


18 


16 






1 


40 
4 


1 




1 


2 


? 








^ 


o 




















7 


4 



























53 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



This table is recapitulated by ocoupations and presented in the 
Table 15 — Summary of the Nationality of all 



Sex and Clasaiflcatlon of Oecupatlons. 


i 


1 


a 
1 


1 

a 


1 
Q 


«> 

n 


ja 


is 

1 


Males 


14.162 
6.576 
60.38 
41.08 


216 
37 

.77 
.27 


343 

279 
1.22 
2.05 


477 
157 
1.69 
1.16 


286 

95 

1.02 

.70 


898 
207 
3.20 
1.52 


247 

76 
.88 
.55 


4,265 

1.991 
15.18 
14.67 


Females 




Percentagres-Females 


Males- 

Asrlcaltural 


487 

251 

460 

2.062 

6.038 

17 

1.276 

1.123 

JJ38_ 

256 
164 
4.286 
17 
90 
101 
662 


14 

1 

55 
105 


28 
4 
2 

56 
155 


36 
19 
23 
94 
150 
1 
40 
39 
75 


15 
3 
1 

81 
109 

26 
8 
43 


65 
27 
27 

157 

232 
6 

108 
99 

178 


3 

3 

3 

106 

64 
3 

15 
3 

47 


163 


Clerical 


68 
28 
787 


Commercial. 


Domestic Service 




1.877 




Trades 


9 
6 
26 


30 
4 
64 


416 






Miscellaneous 


661 


Fkmalks— 

Clerical 






8 

4 

142 


90 


10 

2 

175 


2 
3 
63 


n 










Domestic service . .. 


37 


262 
2 


1 892 


Personal service 






2 


2 
1 
2 


11 
2 
7 


3 
4 




Trades . . . 


(S 


Miscellaneous 




14 


1 


62 







Referring to the males^it'is shown that of the total number (29,414) 
740 are classed as miscellaneous, and 558 as not reported, or a total 
of 1,825 which deducted from the total gives 28,089 divided among 
the 18 different nationalities represented. 

Four of the nationalities account for 82.30 per cent of the total 
number: Americans 50.38 per cent; Germans and Hollanders 15.18 
per cent; Irish 9.80 per cent; and Swedes 6.94 per cent; this leaves 
17 70 per cent represented by the 14 other classes. 

Regarding the females, 16 are classed as miscellaneous, and 506 
not reported, a total of 522; deducting this number gives 13,574 dis- 
tributed among the 18 nationalities. 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



57 



following table: 

Applicants for Employment, by Classified Occupations. 





1 

5 


1 


1 


« 

a 
06 


1 

OS 

a 


ji 


« 

1 

CO 


I 


• 


9 
§ 

i 


■6 
o 

! 

o 

2: 


1 


2.762 


477 


652 


264 


114 


312 


355 


1.950 


166 


143 


740 


585 


29.414 


2.470 


22 


433 


165 


13 


202 


138 


1.663 


37 


24 


16 


506 


14.096 


9.80 
18.20 


1.70 
.16 


2.32 
3.19 


.94 
1.14 


.41 
.10 


1.22 
1.49 


1 26 


6 94 


56 


51 








1.02 


12.25 


.27 


.18 








85 




36 


4 


1 


54 


29 


87 


15 


2 




29 


1.162 


16 


1 


6 






70 


13 
17 

19 


19 
17 
396 


75 


1 

1 
42 


2 


6 

2 

139 


430 


24 




2 

17 


607 


188 


41 


81 


53 


4.554 


1.790 


373 
2 

7 


342 


145 


63 


111 


127 


793 

1 
139 


19 


52 


722 


251 


13.648 
31 


120 


18 


15 


6 


24 


40 


6 


14 


2 


23 


2.362 


222 


3 


20 


2 


7 


8 


84 


157 


4 


16 


6 


67 


2.092 


308 


47 


121 


45 


19 


74 


46 


341 


7 


12 


8 


78 


4.638 


5 












6 

1 
126 


2 






1 


192 


302 


















181 


2.426 


19 


407 


138 


13 


201 


1.591 


36 


24 


14 


12.433 


























18 


16 




6 
2 
18 


1 




1 


4 


24 
2 
44 








2 


187 










119 


25 


3 


18 






1 


' 





' 


866 











Here also four of the nationalities aooount |for a large proportion 
of the total number; Americans, 41.08 per cent; Irish, 18.20 per cent; 
Germans and Hollanders, 14.67 per cent, and Swedes 12,25 per cent, 
in all 86.20 per cent. __ 

It will be noticed that^the females p<^eking domestic service repre- 
sent a very large proportion in this table, the number registering 
their nationality being 11,927 or 87.87 per cent of the total. 

Of this large number "the Americans are ',4,236 or 35.94 per cent; 
Irish, 20,88 per cent; Germans and Hollanders, 15.86 per cent; 
Swedes, 13.34 per cent, aggregating a total of 10,194 or 85.47 per cent. 

The reports of the superintendents follow: 



K^EIPOieTS 



SUPERINTENDENTS 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 61 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NORTH SIDE ILLINOIS FREE 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 259 AND 261 NORTH CLARK 

STREET, CHICAGO-1903. 

(D. M. Brothers. Superintendent.) 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir — In compliance with section 6 of the law establishing free emplopment 
ofl&ces, I beg to submit the fifth annual report of the business of this office, 
covering the period from Oct. 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903, together with the ex- 
pense account for the same period. 

Since the removal of this office to the present location, which is much bet- 
ter than that formerly occupied, the inviting appearance apparently com- 
mending itself to the general public, which is demonstrated by the fact that 
orders are now and have been coming in since our removal, from parties who 
formerly did not know of the existence of the office. The great advantage of 
its location for advertising purposes is essentially valuable. 

While the business of the last year on a whole has increased numerically 
in no small amount, the value and character of the applicants and positions, 
with reference to higher grade and permanency, is still more marked. Ap- 
plications for help and positions arrive from nearly every state in the Union, 
and it is very noticeable at this season of the year that nearly 50 per cent of 
our applicants for work have just arrived in the eity, coming from California, 
Indiana, New York and other distant states. It is not to be wondered at that 
many people are out of employment during the winter season in Chicago, 
when one sees the great number of people who flock here from all over the 
country, expecting to secure remunerative positions. 

I believe it necessary to continue advertising through mediums which reach 
employers; it is easy enough to get applicants for positions, but more diffi- 
cult to get employers to place their orders. It is, however, gratifying to re- 
port that many of the largest employers of labor are now seeking their help 
through these offices, and they seem to be recognized as permanent and use- 
ful departments of the State. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Brothers, Superintendent. 



62 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Statement of Expenses of the North Side Free Employment Office, 
from Oct 1, 1902, to Sept. SO, 1902. 



Office rent 


. . . $850 00 


City directory 


7 00 


Telephone and toll service 


201 56 


Clerk hire 


199 98 


Mineral water 


15 25 
24 00 


Expenses of trips to Springfield of 
superintendent 

New furniture and linoleum and 
moving 

New partitions, carpenter work and 


120 60 


Stenographer's serTices 


630 00 
375 00 


405 66 


Toilet supplies 


24 00 






103 22 

104 42 


311 72 






12 60 


Postage and ezpressage 


174 76 


Rental of typewriter and desk 

Total " 


48 00 


Advertising 

Insurance 

Plumbing andlrepairlng 


441 19 

18 00 
in SR 


$4.107 60 







Annual Report of the Chicago North Side Free Employment Office, 
to the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Jor the Year Ended Oct. 
1 , 1903— Applications for Employment and Help, Positions Se- 
cured, and the Number Remaining Unfilled. 





Classification of Occupations. 


Applications 
foe Employment. 


Applications 
FOB Hklp. 


1 

2; 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 


1 


Males 
Bakers 


2 

63 
12 
1 

106 
5 
2 

392 
2 

i 

2 


8 

1 

106 


1 
6 
4 


69 
9 

128 
8 




2 


Barnmen 


12 


3 












6 


Blacksmiths 


1 
6 
2 
17 


23 


e 




g 










8 


Boys various occupations 


375 
2 

1 
27 

26 


664 
2 

4 

.?i 

2 
31 
32 
60 

1 
62 
6 

II 

6 
884 
12 

10 

754 


189 


9 


Butchers . ... 






Butlers 


.1 


2 


11 


Canvassers 


26 


12 




6 

29 
6 


41 


1? 






14 


Clerks — various occupations 


4 


15 




7 






60 


17 


Collectors 


2 

67 
6 
11 
60 
6 
316 
13 
16 
650 


1 
37 

6 
11 
44 

6 
312 
10 

8 
618 


20 




18 


Cooks 


26 


19 






20 


Coremakers 




7** 


21 


Dishwashers . .. 


6 


11 


22 






23 


Drivers 


3 
3 

7 
32 


72 


24 


Elevatormen. ..... 


2 


25 




2 


26 


Factory hands 


136 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

North Side Office — Continued. 



63 





Classification of Oocdfations. 


Applications 
FOB Employment. 


.VPPU0ATIOH8 

FOB Help. 


1 

a 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 


27 




99 
13 
3 


84 
8 


16 
6 
3 


"i 

3 

3 

5 

246 


82 J 












8 


30 


Glass workers .. ... 




3 


31 










6 




236 

48 

2.463 

4 

2 

i4 


206 

45" 

38 
2.416 
4 
2 
1 
163 


29 
1 

10 
10 
88 


89 


33 










61 

61 
3.303 
4 
8 
2 
199 
1 

16 
2 
2 

32 

108 

4 

1 


16 


35 


Kitchen work 


13 


36 




888 


37 












1 


89 


Machine hands 


2 
11 


1 






46 






1 


42 


Molders 








16 


43 




4 

.29 

82 
3 
1 
1 
160 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
2 

13 

1 

419 

26 

12 
161 

23 
3 

22 


3 




1 


41 


Office help 


8 
8 
4 


1 


45 


Packers 


6 






SO 






1 


48 




1 
1 
13 


1 


49 


Polishers — not stated 






60 


Porters 


137 


147 

1 

1 


10 


61 




i 






1 










64 














2 
1 

1 
12 


4 
2 
2 
16 


2 


66 


Steamfltters 


1 


67 




1 

4 
6 
5 


1 






3 


59 


Tailors 




60 




416 
21 
7 
151 
23 
3 
16 


613 
28 
11 

206 
32 
4 
28 


128 






7 


62 


Watchmen 


4 


63 




64 


^1 






9 


65 


Yardmen 




1 


66 




6 


12 




Total — males.. 






6.019 


6.692 
191 


327 
191 


7.648 


1.966 




Positions secured, previous applica- 


191 




Total for year 


6.019 








6.883 


136 


7.648 


1.765 


1 


Females. 

Bookkeepers. 


7 


2 


6 


4 

6 

1 

14 

336 

1 

410 

414 

216 

333 

259 

2.019 

71 

»l 

70 
2 

88 
7 


2 






6 


3 


Cashiers 


2 

18 

278 

2 

321 

412 

122 

289 

94 

1.612 

67 

8 

313 

47 

2 

72 

10 




2 
6 
21 

.i 

11 
9 
12 
14 

?l 


1 






12 
257 

362" 

401 

113 

277 

80 

1,674 

49 

8 

301 

36 

1 

58 

4 


2 






79 


6 


Companions 


1 


7 




114 






13 


g 


DininsT room help 


103 


10 




66 






179 


12 


General housework 


476 


13 




22 








16 


Kitchen help 


12 
11 

1 
14 

6 


92 


16 




34 








18 


Nurses 


30 


19 


Office work 


3 



64 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

North Side Office — Concluded. 





Classification of Occupations. 


Applications 
fob Emplothknt. 


Applications 
for Help, 


1 

1 


^T£" 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


?nT& 


Number 


Number 
unfilled. 


20 


Pantry work. . 


27 

6 

100 

19 
163 

11 


23 

6 
89 
11 
132 

2 


4 

1 
11 

8 
21 
9 


30 

6 

145 

.11 

6 

1 

136 

13 


7 


21 










56 


23 


Seamstresses 


46 


24 




49 


26 




3 


26 


Teachers, not stated 


1 


27 




66 

7 


54 
6 


12 
2 


82 


28 


Miscellaneous, occupatioii not stated.. 

Total— females 

Positions secured, previous applica- 
tions 


8 




4,066 


3,796 
169 


269 
169 


6.264 


1,464 
169 














4,065 


3.966 


100 


6,254 


1.296 









FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 65 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SOUTH SIDE ILLINOIS FREE 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, 429 WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO-1903. 

(Qkorgb W. Gkart. Superintendent.) 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary Bureau o) Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 
Sir— Complying with section six of the act of the General Assembly creating 
the Illinois Free Employment ofl&ces, I herewith submit the fifth annual re- 
port of the business of the South Side Office for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1903, together with the expense of maintaining the office for the same period. 
The great benefit conferred upon employers of labor and those seeking em. 
ployment, through this office, can hardly be compiled in figures. When you 
consider the necessity of getting reliable help when you need it, or when yoa 
procure a position, whereby you are enabled to sustain yourself and family 
without cost, this great benefit can not be told, excepting from the numerous 
letters that we receive, testifying to the gratitude of the writers as to the 
benefits of these offices to the general public. 

The press still manifest a very friendly feeling towards these offices, which 
adds materially to their success. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. W. Geary, Superintendent, 



—5 E 



66 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Statement of the Expenses of the South Side Office from Oct. 1, 
1902, to Sept. 30, 1903. 



Salary of male clerk $875 00 

Salary of female clerk 720 00 

Salary of stenographer 630 00 

Salary of .iacitor 420 00 

Rentof office 995 00 

Telephone and toll service 82 00 

Telegraph service 1' 90 

Light and power 57 49 



Ice 18 30 

Advertising 400 00 

Postage and expresaage 300 00 

Office furniture, repairs and clean- 
ing 174 00 

Office supplies and sundries 202 40 

Total $4,892 09 



Annual Report of the Chicago South Side Free Employment Office 
to the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the year ending 
Oct. 1, 1903— Applications for Employment and Help, Positions 
Secured, and the Number Remaining Unfilled. 



Classification of Occupations. 



Applications 
FOR Employment. 



Number 
filed. 



Number 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 



Number 
unfilled. 



Apllioations 
FOB Help. 



Number 
filed. 



Number 
unfilled. 



Males 

Agents 

Artists 

Bakers 

Barbers ■ 

Barnmen 

Bartenders 

Bench hands 

Bill posters 

Blacksmiths 

Blacksmiths' helpers 

Boilermakers 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Bootblacks 

Box makers 

Boys, bell 

Boys, cash 

Boys, delivery 

Boys, errand 

Boys, office 

Bricklayers 

Bridge builders 

Butchers 

Butlers 

Cabinet makers 

Calciminers 

Carpet layers 

Carpenters 

Carriage and wagon makers 
Cashiers 



32 


13 


19 


18 


7 
30 




7 
10 




20 


21 


3 
143 


3 
121 




8 
129 


22 


23 


12 


11 


13 


6 


4 


1 


4 


1 
15 


1 
12 




1 
18 


3 


12 


11 


1 


11 


14 


13 


1 


23 


2 
42 


2 
6 




2 
6 


36 


4 
11 


4 

8 




4 

8 


3 


31 


29 


2 


40 


47 


43 


4 


55 


98 


96 


2 


103 


68 


60 


8 


124 


38 


33 


5 


70 


3 


3 




4 


4 


4 




4 


23 


17 


6 


19 


6 


4 


2 


4 


6 


3 


3 


4 


6 
16 


5 
15 


1 

1 


,? 


61 


51 


10 


69 


24 


23 




23 


3 


3 




3 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 

South Side Office — Continued. 



67 



Classification of Occupations. 



Checkers 

Clffar makers 

Cleaners, harness . 

Clerks, bin 

Clerks, drug 

Clerks, dry groods.. 
Clerks, grocery — 

Clerks, office 

Clerks, shipping... 
Clerks, not stated . 

Coachmen 

Coal miners 

Collectors 

Cooks 

Coopers 

Core makers 

Deck hands 

Dishwashers. 

Doormen 

Distributors 

Drivers 

Electricians 

Blevatormen 

Engineers 

factory hands 

Farm hands 

Firemen 

Florists 

Gardeners 

Gas fitters 

Harness makers . .. 

Hostlers 

Housemen 

Janitors 

Kitchen work 

Laborers 

Laborers, railroad. 

ijaundrymen 

Machine hands 

Machinists 

Massage work 

Merchants 

Millers 

Molders 

Models 

Nurses 

Packers 

Painters 

Paper hangers 

Pantrymen 

Photographers 

Pin setters 

Plumbers 

PoKdhers 

Porters 

Pressmen 

Printers 

Roofers 

Salesmen 

Shoe makers 

Section hands 

Solicitors 

Steam fitters 

Stenographers 

Stockmen 

Supers 

Surveyors 

Tailors 

Teachers , 



Applications 
FOR Employment. 



Number 
filed. 



3 

1 
22 
15 
27 
Hi 
29 
46 
11 
313 

6 

3 
11 
679 

3 



16 
110 
45 
382 
368 
81 
16 
28 
10 
17 
39 
567 
216 
210 



Number 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 



8 
.001 
2 
4 
6 

23 
3 
5 

13 
4 

11 
293 

26 
9 
8 
5 



21 
10 
21 
44 

4 

267 

6 

3 

11 

636 

2 

7 

1 

9 

78 

14 

373 

343 

62 

14 

24 

7 

17 

35 

520 

178 

199 

1.868 

2.537 

69 

7 

27 



Number Number 
unfilled, filed. 



Number 
unfilled. 



3 
2 
22 






4 
2 




21 
11 
21 

70 

299 

14 

651 




1 


1 


26 


32 




3 

15 









79 
16 
468 
488 
63 
14 
26 
7 
22 
35 
533 
180 
205 
2,240 
2,740 



7 




42 


15 


2 
3 


1 


34 
2 


27 


5 




39 




53 
8 

7 


2 
4 






24 




3 

17 
912 


3 
9 
21 


3 




6 




29 
3 


16 


6 




28 


16 


5 
293 
25 


1 
21 


8 




6 




1 





68 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



South Side Office — Concluded. 





1 
Classification op Occupations 


Applications 
FOB Employment 


Applications 
FOB Help. 


1 

a 
1 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 






221 
1 

11 
8 
20 
11 
611 
62 
217 
3 
241 


191 


30 

1 
2 


196 

23 
8 

20 

17 
584 

25 
260 

16 
222 


6 






1 


102 


Tinsmiths •• •• 


12 

8 
20 
10 
649 
23 
233 
3 
220 


11 


103 






104 
106 


Ushers 






1 
62 
39 
14 


7 


106 




35 






2 


108 


Window washers 


17 


109 




13 




21 


2 




Totals males 






11,835 


10.745 
53 


1,090 
53 


12,087 


1.312 




Positions ' secured, previous applica- 


53 




Total for year 










11,835 


10.798 


1.037 


12.C87 


1.289 


1 


Females. 


5 
1 
1 

13 

9 

187 

520 

168 

7 

617 

187 

1,146 

1 

13 

119 

4 

189 

1 

228 

6 

62 

75 

91 

3 

6 

517 

23 

100 


4 


1 
4 
1 
8 
6 
16 
19 


10 
2 


6 






2 








4 


Cashiers . 


5 
4 

471 

501 

168 

2 

515 

181 

1,333 

1 

12 

69 

3 

489 

1 

225 

4 

59 

43 

89 

1 


6 

6 
682 
660 
172 

6 

683 

260 

2,133 

1 

15 
146 

3 
581 

2 
284 

4 
76 
19 
101 

2 


1 






2 


6 


Chambermaids 


111 


7 


Cooks . 


169 


g 




4 






5 

2 

6 

113 


3 


10 




68 






79 


12 


General housework 


1,100 


13 






Haifewl!^^::::":»:»":::"i""i;''" 


1 
50 


3 


15 


Housekeepers . . 


77 


16 






17 




92 






I 




3 
2 
3 

32 
2 
2 
5 

12 
5 


69 


20 
21 








16 






6 


23 


Pantry work 


16 


21 


RpppntlATi sftrvipft 


1 


25 
26 








505 
18 
100 


578 
24 

115 
6 
7 


73" 


27 




6 


28 




46 


29 
30 






6 




43 

520 


6 


37 
2 
5 


1 


31 
32 






Waitresses 


51S 


735 


220 






5.666 


5.324 
70 


342 

70 


7,180 


2.156 




Positions secured, previous applica- 
tions 


70 






5.666 


5,394 


272 


7.180 


2,086 









FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 69 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WEST SIDE ILLINOIS FREE 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, CORNER CANAL AND RANDOLPH 

STREETS, CHICAGO-1903. 

(S. p. Revkbe. Superintendent.) 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 
Sir— In compliance with section six of an act of the General Assembly of the 
State of Illinoislcreating the Illinois Free Employment offiees. I herewith sub- 
mit the fifth annual report of the business transacted in this office for the 
year ended Sept. 30, 1903, together with the expense account for the same 
period. 

The following report will give in detail the work of this office for the time 
herein stated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. P. Revere, Superintendent. 



70 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Statement of the Expenses of the West Side Illinois Free 
Employment Office from Oct. 1, 1902, to Sept. 80, 1903. 



Kent of office 


SBio no 


Expense of trips to Springfield. .. 

Advertising 

Postage 

Miscellaneous 

Total 


.. $ 90 GO 


Janitor 270 00 


488 60 




50 00 


100 00 


Telephone service 


138 10 


. . • 74 80 


Ice 

Qas 


33 65 

26 18 


. $1,827 83 


Towel supply 


16 50 





Annual Report of the Chicago West Side Free Employment Office, 
to the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the Year ended Oct. 
1, 1903 — Applications for Employment and Help, Positions Se- 
cured, and the Number Remaining Unfilled. 





Classification of Occupations. 


Applications 
FOB Employment. 


Applications 
FOR Help. 


i 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se 
cured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 




Males. 


1 
34 

17 

16 
13 

11 

62 

10 
39 

29 
16 




1 
30 






2 


Apprentices .............. 


4 

1 


5 

1 


1 


3 










5 




5 


Bakers helpers . 


1 
12 
2 
4 
3 
2 
1 


1 
1 

14 
2 
5 
3 
6 
7 




6 


Barbers 










5 
5 

12 

10 
3 
2 
1 
9 
9 
4 
2 
1 
4 

33 
7 
7 
1 

19 
1 
1 


2 


8 


Bartenders. 




9 




1 


10 






11 


Blacksmith helpers..... 


3 


12 




6 


13 






14 


Bookkeepers 


2 
53 


2 
68 




16 


Boys ... 


16 


16 


Boys bell 




17 


Boys, bus 




1 
1 
8 
11 


1 






1 
6 
6 




19 




2 


20 


Boys, office 


6 








22 


Butchers 








23 










24 


Carpenters .... 


10 
14 


16 
16 


5 


25 




2 


26 


Checkers 














28 




2 


2 




29 


Clerks bill 


1 




30 


Clerks, drug. 




1 


1 






14 




1 
9 

8 




32 




6 


5 




33 


Clerks, hotel 





FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



71 



West Side Office — Continued . 



Classification of Occupations. 



Applications 
FOR Employment. 



Applications 
FOB Help. 



Number 
filed. 



Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cnrerl. 



Number Number 
unfilled filed. 



Number 
unfilled. 



Clerks, shipping: 

Clerks, not stated 

Coachmen 

Coal miners 

Coal passers 

Collectors 

Compositors 

Cooks 

Coopers 

Conductors 

Core makers , 

Dishwashers , 

Draughtsmen 

Drill pressmen 

Drivers 

Druggists 

Electricians 

E levatormen 

Employes, wholesale house. 

Engineers 

P'actory hands 

Farm hands 

K'lremen 

Foremen 

Furnace tenders 

Gardeners 

Glass workers 

Horseshoers 

Hostlers 

Housemen 

Ironworkers 

Janitors 

Kltchenwork 

Laborers 

Laborers, railroad 

Lathe hands 

Lathers 

Laundrymen 

Machine hands 

Machinists 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Metalworkers 

Millwrights 

Molders 

Nurses 

Office help 

Oilers 

Packers 

Painters 

Pantrymen 

Paper cutters 

Pattern makers 

Photographers 

Piano makers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers 

Polishers, not stated 

Porters 

Pressers 

Pressmen 

Printers 

Punch press hands 

Roofers 

Salesmen 

Sawyers 

Shoemakers 

Solicitors 

Steamfitters 



113 

1 
29 
42 
16 



4 

485 

125 

19 

1 



1 

2 
6 
6 
24 




1 
1 










23 


9 






13 

30 


12 

7 


1 

56 




9 






7 






173 
20 

1 

I 

1 


3 

45 
48 

1 


1 
1 


28 
34 
16 
26 
1 
3.403 


5 

7 

1 
6 


356 


3 






1 
10 
32 




1 
10 














32 


27 


2 






4 
9 

1 
1 


2 
3 


1 






















104 
3 


— 16 
■ 1 

-^ 1 






















6 


^~ 4 



72 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

West Side Office — Concluded. 





Classification or Occupations. 


Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOB Help. 


1 

a 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 


103 


Stenosraphers . . 


1 
1 

112 

i 

109 

13 

393 




2 
2 

1 






104 




















106 


Stovemen . 


. ,1 


1 
78 




107 




36 
3 
1 

1 
7 

8 
38 

20 

6 

1 

199 


2 








109 


Tinsmiths. 








110 














2 


4 
1 
32 

7 


2 


112 


Upholsterers ........ 




113 


Walters .. .. 


27 

7 


5 








115 


Weighmen . 




116 




89 


117 

3 

14 

323 


28 






3 


118 


Yardmen . 


12 
194 


2 


119 


Miscellaneous not classified 


129 




To*al males 






6,470 


4.584 

417 

5.001 


1.886 

417 

1,469 


5.379 


795 




Positions secured, previous applica- 


417 




Qrand total 


6.470 


5,379 


378 


1 


Females. 

Addressers 


11 


10 


1 


25 
1 


15 


2 


Barbers 


1 






3 
11 

5 
12 
17 
200 
1 
137 
171 
1 
78 

3^ 

1 

408 
11 

1 
70 

1 
103 

1 
77 

1 

30 
10 
50 
308 
51 
15 

9 

1 
89 

1 
53 

2,431 




3 








11 
5 


15 
15 


14 


5 






10 


6 




12 
13 
30 

1 

48 
131 

1 
11 
16 
12 

1 
35 




7 


Clerks 


4 

170 


6 
190 


2 


g 


Chambermaids ;. 


20 


9 






10 


Cooks 


f> 


125 
43 


36 


n 


Day workers . .... 


3 


12 






13 


Dininfir room helD.. .. 


67 
79 
386 


80 
95 

879 


13 


14 


Di'^hwashers . . .. 


16 


15 




493 








17 


Factory work. 


373 
11 


500 
15 


127 


18 




4 


10 




1 
44 

1 




20 


Housekeepers 


26 


43 


17 


21 






22 




103 


120 


17 






1 
8 
1 
11 
10 
12 




24 




69 


89 


20 








26 


Nurses 


19 


28 


9 


27 






28 


Pantry work 


38 
308 
35 
10 
1 


40 
330 
53 
26 
2 


2 


29 


Scrubwomen.. 


22 


30 




16 
5 
8 
1 


18 


31 




16 


32 


Stenographers.. . 


1 








34 




89 

1 
80 

1,994 

18 


125 

1 
128 


36 










36 


Miscellaneous, occupation not stated.. 
Total females 


3 

437 
18 


78 




2,974 


980 




Positions secured, previous applica- 


18 




Grand total 










2.431 


2,012 


419 


2.974 


962 









FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 73 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PEORIA ILLINOIS FREE 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, 1903. 
(Edward E. Walker, Superintendent.] 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, III. 

Sir— Complying with section six of an act of the General Assembly relating 
to Illinois Free Employment offices, I herewith submit the third annual report 
of the business of this office, together with an itemized expense account for the 
year ending Oct. 1, 1903. 

This report will differ very little from that of last year, showing a slight 
increase in the number of positions secured and applications filed for help. 
It has been impossible to secure the necessary help to fill the applications 
filed. 

It is gratifying to know that the work of this office has met with favorable 
commendation from the public. The number of employers who are patron- 
izing this office is steadily increasing, showing that a public employment 
office in ihis city should be a permanent institution. 

The following report will show in detail the work of this offi3e. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Edward E. Walker, 

Superintendent. 



74 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Statement of the Expenses of the Peoria, Illinois Free Employment 
Office at Peoria, for the Year ending Oct. 1, 1903. 



Rentof office $695 00 

Stenographer 630 00 

Advertising 311 68 

Telephone and toll service 119 08 

Extra office work 105 00 

Postage and express 77 55 

Purniiure 139 30 

Janitor service and cleaning offices 39 20 

Ice 21 00 

Electric light and supplies 22 36 



Telegraph and messenger service . $19 67 
Distributing employment office re- 
ports 7 50 

Towel supply 13 20 

City directory 6 00 

Sign painting and lettering 22 25 

Miscellaneous 158 39 

$2,386 08 



Annual Report of the Peoria Free Employment Office, to the State 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the Year ended Oct 1, 1903 — 
Applications for Employment and Help, Positions Secured and 
the Number Remaining Unfilled. 





Classification of Occupations. 


Applications 
FOR Employment. 


Applications 
FOB Help. 


1 
i 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
of posi- 
tions se- 
cured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 




Males. 


2 
19 

1 
24 

1 
113 

2 
15 

16 

11 
9 
79 

14 
3 
1 
7 
4 
1 

16 

38 
2 
4 

13 
2 
1 
1 
3 


2 

17 

13 




2 
17 

1 
13 








2 




3 


Attendants 








ii" 

4 










6 




109 
14 


109 
2 

7 
1 
14 




7 










8 




9 


Blacksmith helpers 




10 




2 
1 

10 
1 
7 

15 
2 
2 










12 




72 
78 

12 

16 
12 


1 
8 
72 
78 
7 

12 
3 
1 
6 
3 

16 
12 
3 
2 

7 

1 
1 




13 


Boys 










15 


Boya delivery 




16 












18 


Boys elevator 




19 








20 


Butchers 


1 
1 










22 






23 










26 




25 




1 


26 




2 

6 

1 
















29 


(Ilnrkq hntpl 




30 
31 


Plorlca aVilnninfy 


1 
1 




Clerks, stock 


2 


2 





FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



75 



Peoria O^ct^— Continued. 





Classification of Occdpations. 


Applications 

FOR EMPLOTMBNT. 


Applications 
FOK Help. 


1 
i 

z 


Number 
filed. 

1 


Number 
posi- 
tions 

secured. 


Number 
unfilled. 


Number 
filed. 


Number 
unfilled. 


I 


Coachmen 

Coal miners 


16 
34 
19 
90 
3 
1 
4 

63 

14 

12 

24 

2 

24 

1 

206 

122 

2 

48 

1 

1 

9 

2 

2 

12 

3 

44 

10 

46 

15 

'•PI 

2 
6 
1 
37 
2 
1 
2 
16 
24 
12 
2 
8 
1 
2 

60 
41 
1 
30 
6 
3 
4 
142 
2 
14 
3 
18 
13 
2 
11 
62 

6.090 


8 
32 

7 
66 

3 

1 

50 
14 
11 
18 
2 
9 
1 
163 
110 
2 
26 


7 
2 

12 
24 


8 
32 
7 

66 

5 

1 

5 

50 

14 

11 

18 

2 

9 

1 

177 

110 

2 

25 




34 

35 
36 
37 
3!J 
39 
40 
41 


Collector 

Jooks 


2" 








Dairymen 

Dishwashers 

Distributors 

Drill pressmen 


3' 

i" 


» ^ 


42 
43 
44 

46 

46 
47 

48 


Drivers 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Engine wipers 

Factory hands 

Farmhands 

Fliers 


\b" 

43' 

12 

23 


ii " 


60 
61 
52 
63 
63 


Florists 

Flour packers 

Gardeners 

Glaziers 

Harness makers 


1 

7" 

2 
2 
12 
3 
35 
10 
31 
12 
2.839 
376 
1 
3 


2 


1 

8" 

2 

2 

12 

3 

35 

12 

31 

31 

2.951 

388 

1 

3 


i" 


64 

56 
56 
57 
68 
69 
60 
61 
62 


Harvest hauds 

Hostlers 

Housemen 

Iron workers 


9" 

ii" 


2*' 


Kitchenwork 


3 
23 
1 

1 
2 
1 
16 
2 


ii5** 


Laborers, railroad 

Lathe hands 




64 
66 


Linemen, not stated 

Machinists 


2i" 


23** 


2** 


66 


Meat cutters and slaughterers 

Millers 

Millwrights 

Molders 


i" 

2 

9 

6 
9 
2 

6 


i*' 

2 
9 
6 
10 
2 
5 





^i 






68 
69 


7 

'i 

3" 

1 
2 




70 
71 
72 
73 

74 


Office help 

Painters 

Pantrymen 

Pan washers 

Pipefitters 


1 


75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 


Plumbers 

Porters 

Salesmen 

Samplers 

Solicitors 

Steam fitters 


52 
16 

28 
4 

1 

ii" 


8 
25 

2" 

2 
2 

11 
2 


52 
16 
1 

29 
4 
1 
3 
137 

ii" 


i" 


81 
82 
83 
84 
84 


Stenographers 

Stovemen 

Teamsters 

Tinsmiths 

Truckmen 


6** 


86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 


Upholsterers 

Waiters 

Watchmen 

Weavers 


11 
2 
2 
9 

61 
4.653 


7' 

11 

2' 


11 
2 

4 
9 

61 
4.832 


2 * 


Yardmen 

Total males 


1 
437 


179 


1 
2 


Females 


1 
2 
18 


2 
2 
3 




3 
4 

3 


1 


Attendants 




2 


3 


Bookkeepers 







76 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Peoria Office — Concluded. 



Classification op Occupations. 



Number 
Number posi- 
flled. tlons 
secured. 



Number 
unfilled 



Applications 
for Hklp. 



Number 
filed. 



Number 
unfilled. 





1 

8 
12 

5 
65 

6 
93 

.?S 

101 

7 

10 
63 

8 
43 

2 
30 

1 

18 
27 
69 
11 

2 
13 

3 
23 
66 

4 
63 

6 

1 

6 

8 




1 
1 
8 
3 
13 
2 
10 
68 
16 
22 
3 
39 
38 
4 
30 
4 
1 


9 
6 
2 
51 
3 
134 

1 

4 

49 
1.058 

7 
46 

4 
59 

2 
26 


1 


Cashiers 


7 

4 

2 
42 

3 

83 
28 
88 
79 

4 
41 
860 

6 
33 

4 
42 

2 
21 


2 


Clerks 


2 






Chambermaids 


9 






Cooks 


51 








36 




13 


Distributors 






8 




198 


Hotel help 


1 




13 






Kitchen help 


17 


Lady's maid 






9 

1 
8 
7 
48 


5 








10 
20 
11 
10 
2 
8 

I 

61 

4 
10 

1 


16 
24 
11 
15 

2 
10 
10 
14 
60 

6 
10 

1 


6 




4 


Office work 






5 






Saleswomen 


6 

ii'" 

16 


2 




7 




6 


Second work 


9 


Silver girls 


2 




43 
6 




Telephone girls 

Tailoresses 








6 

1 
3 


8 
1 
3 


2 


Waitresses, .... 






Washerwomen 


6 




Total females 




1.934 


1,605 
16 


429 
16 


1,905 


400 


Positions secured, applications previ- 
ously filed 


16 


Grand total ..... 


1,934 


1,521 


413 


1.905 


384 







FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 



7T 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES IN CERTAIN CITIES. AND PRIVATE 
EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES IN ALL CITIES. 



i 1. Creation of oflaces In certain cities— 
purpose-name. 

§ 2. Officers— how appointed— salaries. 

i 3. Duties of superintendent— registers- 
special registers not open to inspec- 
tion. 

i 4. Reports to Bureau of Labor Statistics 
—circulation of reports. 

? 5. Correspondence with employers of 
labor— advertising. 

i 6. Annualreports— collection of statistics. 

§ 7. No fee to be charged— penalty for ac- 
acceptlng fee. 



§ 8. "Applicant for employment" and "ap- 
plicant for help" defined. 

i 9. Private agencies to be licensed— license 
fee— bond— restriction as to name 
and sign— register— registration fee. 

i 10. Commissioners of Labor to enforce act 
—prosecution of violations— penalty. 

I 11. Private employment agency defined. 

§ 12. Disposition of fees and fines. 

g 13. Printing, blanks, supplies, etc., to be 

furnished by Secretary of State, 
g 14. Repeal. 
§ 15. Emergency. 



An Act relating to employment offices and agencies. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, 
represented in the General Assembly: That free employment 
offices are hereby created as follows: One in each city of not less 
than fifty thousand population, and three in each city containing a 
population of one million or over, for the purpose of receiving appli- 
cations of persons seeking employment, and applications of persons 
seeking to employ labor. Such offices shall be designated and known 
as Illinois Free Employment Offices. 

§ 2. Within sixty days after this act shall have been in force, the 
State Board of Commissioners of Labor shall recommend, and the 
Governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a 
superintendent and assistant superintendent and a clerk for each of 
the offices created by section 1 of this act, who shall devote their 
entire time to the duties of their respective offices. The assistant 
superintendent or the clerk shall in each case be a woman. The 
tenure of such appointment shall be two years, unless sooner re- 
moved for cause. The salary of each superintendent shall be fifteen 
hundred ($1,500) dollars per annum, the salary of such assistant sup- 
erintendent shall be one thousand two hundred ($1,200) dollars per 
annum. The salary of such clerk shall be one thousand ($1,000) dol- 
lars per annum, together with proper amounts for defraying the 
necessary costs of equipping and maintaining the respective offices. 



78 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

§ 3. The superintendent of each such free employment office 
shall, within sixty days after appointment, open an office in such 
locality as shall have been agreed upon between such superintendent 
and the secretary of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as being most 
appropriate for the purpose intended; such office to be provided 
with a sufficient number of rooms and apartments to enable him to 
provide, and he shall so provide, a separate room or apartment for 
the use of women registering for situations or help. Upon the outside 
of each such office, in position and manner to secure the fullest public 
attention, shall be placed a sign which shall read in the English lan- 
guage. Illinois Free Employment Office, and the same shall appear 
either upon the outside windows or upon signs in such other lan- 
guages as the location of each such office shall render advisable. 
The superintendent of each such free employment office shall receive 
and record in books kept for that purposes [purpose], names of all 
persons applying for employment or help, designating opposite the 
names and addresses of each applicant, the character of employment 
or help desired. Separate registers for applicants for employment 
shall be kept, showing the age, sex, nativity, trade or occupation of 
each applicant, the cause and duration of non- employment, whether 
married or single, the number of dependent children, together with 
such other facts as may be required by the Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics to be used by said bureau: Provided, that no special registers 
shall be open to public inspection at any time, and that such statis- 
tical and sociological data as the Bureau of Labor may require shall 
be held in confidence by said bureau, and so published as not to re- 
veal the identity of any one: And, provided further, that any ap- 
plicant who shall decline to furnish answers as to the questions con- 
tained in special registers shall not thereby forfeit any rights to any 
employment the office might secure 

§ 4. Each such superintendent shall report on Thursday of each 
week to the State Bureau of Labor Statistics the number of applica- 
tions for positions and for help received during the preceding week, 
and the number of positions secured, also those unfilled applications 
remaining on the books at the beginning of the week. It shall also 
show the number and character of the positions secured during the 
preceding week. Upon receipt of these lists, and not later than 
Saturday of each week, the secretary of the said Bureau of Labor 
Statistics shall cause to be printed a sheet showing separately, and 
in combination, the lists received from all such free employment 
offices. 

§ 5. It shall be the duty of each such superintendent of a free 
employment office to immediately put himself in communication 
with the principal manufacturers, merchants and other employers of 
labor, and to u^e all diligence in securing the cooperation of the said 
employers of labor with the purposes and objects of said employ- 
ment offices. To this end it shall be competent for such superin- 
tendents to advertise in the columns of newspapers, or other medium, 
for such situations as he has applicants to fill, and he may advertise 
in a general way for the cooperation of large contractors and em- 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 79 

ployers in such trade journals or special publication as reach such 
employers, whether such trade or special journals are published 
within the State of Illinois or not. 

§ 6. It shall be the dutyof each such superintendent to make re- 
port to the State Bureau of Labor Statistics annually, not later tban 
December first of each year, concerning the work of his office for the 
year ending October first of the same year, together with a statement 
of the expenses of the same, including the charges of an interpreter 
when necessary, and such report shall be published by the said 
Bureau of Labor Statistics annually with its coal report. Each such 
superintendent shall also perform such other duties in the collection 
of statistics of labor as the secretary of the Bui'eau of Labor Statistics 
may require. 

§ 7. No fee or compensation shall be charged or received, directly 
or indirectly, from persons applying for employment or help through 
said free employment offices, and any superintendent, assistant su- 
perintendent or clerk, who shall accept, directly or indirectly, any 
fee or compensation from any applicant or from his or her represent- 
ative, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, 
shall be fined not less than twenty- five nor more than fifty dollars 
and imprisoned in the county jail not more than thirty days. 

§ 8. The term "applicant for employment," as used in this act, 
shall be construed to mean any person seeking work of any lawful 
character, and "applicant for help" shall mean any person or persons 
seeking help in any legitimate enterprise; and nothing in this act 
shall be construed to limit the meaning of the term work to manual 
occupation, but it shall include professional service, and all other 
legitimate service. 

Private Employment Agencies. 

§ 9. Privave employment agencies.] No person, firm or cor- 
poration in this State shall open, operate or maintain a private em- 
ployment agency for hire, or where a fee is charged to either appli- 
cant for employment or for help, without first obtaining a license for 
the same from the State Commissioners of Labor. Such license fee, 
in cities of fifty thousand (50,000) population and over, shall be fifty 
dollars ($50) per annum. In all cities containing less than fifty 
thousand (50,000) population a uniform fee of twenty- fite dollars 
($25) per annum will be required. Every license shall contain a 
designation of the city, street and number of the building in which 
the licensed party conducts said employment agency. The license 
together with a copy of this act, shall be posted in a conspicuous 
place in each and every employment agency. No agency shall 
print, publish or paint on any sign, window or insert in any news- 
paper or publication, a name similar to that of the Illinois Free 
Employment Office. The Commissioners of Labor shall require 
with each applicant for a license a bond in the penal sum of five 
hundred dollars ($500) , with one or more sureties, to be approved by 
the said commissioners, and conditioned that the obligator will not 
violate any of the duties, terms, conditions, provisions or require- 



80 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

ments of this act. The said commissioners are authorized to cause 
an action or actions to be brought on said bond in the name of The 
People of the State of Illinois for any violation of any of its con- 
ditions, and they may also revoke, upon a full hearing, any license » 
whenever in their judgment, the party licensed shall have violated 
any of the provisions of this act. It shall be the duty of every 
licensed agency to keep a register, in which shall be entered the 
name and address of every applicant. Such licensed agency shall 
also enter into a register the name and address of every person 
who shall make application for help or servants; and the name and 
nature of the employment for which such help shall be wanted. 
Such register shall, at. all reasonable hours, be open to the inspec- 
tion and examination of the Commissioners of Labor or their agents. 
Where a registration fee is charged for receiving or filing applica- 
tions for employment or help, said fee shall in no case exceed the 
sum of two dollars ($2), for which a receipt shall be given, in 
which shall be stated the name of the applicant, the amount of the 
fee, the date, the name or character of the work or situation to be 
procured In case the said applicant shall not obtain a situation or 
employment through such licensed agency within one month after 
registration as aforesaid, then said licensed agency shall forthwith 
repay and return to such applicant, upon demand being made 
therefor, the full amount of the fee paid or delivered by said ap- 
plicant to said licensed agency, provided that such demand be 
made within thirty (30) days after the expiration of the period 
aforesaid. No agency shall send or cause to be sent any female 
help or servants to any place of bad repute, house of ill-fame or 
assignation house, or to any house or place of amusement kept 
for immoral purposes. No such licensed agency shall publish or 
cause to be published any false or fraudulent notice or advertise- 
ment, or to give any false information, or to make any false promise 
concerning or relating to work or employment to anyone who shall 
register for employment, and no licensed agency shall make any 
false entries in the register to be kept as herein provided. No 
person, firm or corporation shall conduct the business of any employ- 
ment office in, or in connection with, any place where intoxicating 
liquors are sold. 

§ 10. It shall be the duty of the Commissioners of Labor, and the 
secretary thereof, to enforce this act. When informed of any viola- 
tion, it shall be their duty to institute criminal proceedings for the 
enforcement of its penalties before any court of competent jurisdic- 
tion. Any person convicted of a violation of the provisions of this 
act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be fined not less than 
fifty dollars ($50) nor more than one hundred dollars ($100) for each 
offense, or by imprisonment in the county jail for a period not ex- 
ceeding six (6) months, or both, at the discretion of the court. 

§ 11. A private employment agency is defined and interpreted to 
mean any person, firm or corporation furnishing employment or help 
or giving information as to where employment or help may be se- 
cured, or who shall display any employment sign or bulletin, or 



FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICES. 81 

through the medium of any card, circular or pamphlet, offering em- 
ployment or help, shall be deemed an employment agency, and sub- 
ject to the provisions of this act, whether a fee or commission is 
charged or not: Provided, that charitable organizations are not in- 
cluded. 

§ 12 All money or moneys received from fees and fines shall be 
held by the said Commissioners of Labor, and shall constitute a fund 
for the purpose of enforcing the provisions of this act; and the said 
commissioners shall, at the end of each fiscal year, make an account 
of said fund and pay into the State Treasury whatever balance shall 
remain after paying the necessary disbursements for the purpose of 
enforcing the provisions of this act. 

§ 13. All printing, blanks, blank books, stationery and such other 
supplies as may be necessary for the proper conduct of the business 
of the offices herein created shall be furnished by the Secretary of 
State upon requisition for the same made by the superintendents of 
the several offices. 

§ 14. All acts and parts of acts in conflict herewith are hereby 
repealed. 

§ 15. Whereas, an emergency exists, therefore this act shall take 
effect and be in force from and after its passage. 
Approved May 11, 1903, in force May 11, 1903.