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Full text of "Coast artillery targets and accessories, February 27, 1908, revised June 15, 1909, revised October 29, 1913"

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No. 1991 



COAST ARTILLERY TARGETS 
AND ACCESSORIES 



( THREE PLATES) 



FEBRUARY 27, 1908 
REVISED JUNE 15, 1909 
REVISED OCTOBER 29, 1913 
REVISED AUGUST 21, 1917 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

Microsoft Corporation 



No. 1991 



COAST ARTILLERY TARGETS 
AND ACCESSORIES 



( THREE PLATES) 



FEBRUARY 27, 1908 
REVISED JUNE 15, 1909 
REVISED OCTOBER 29, 1913 
REVISED AUGUST 21, 1917 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 



A3 



War Department, 
Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 

Washington, August 21, 1917. 
This manual is published for the information and government 
of the Regular Army and National Guard of the United States. 
By order of the Secretary of War : 

William Crozier, 
Brigadier General, Chief of Ordnance. 

6288—17 (3) 



365261 



LIST OF PLATES. 



Drawing 

No. 



Plate I. Seacoast target, small, model 1917 39-2-3 

II. Seacoast target, pyramidal, model 1917 39 1-3 

III. Seacoast target, triangular, model 1917 39-4-11 

(4) 



COAST ARTILLERY TARGETS AND ACCESSORIES. 



Plates I, II, and III. 

The seacoast target, small, model of 1917, is to replace the smaller 
target, model of 1910. 

Two pyramidal targets are provided, the one shown on drawing 
39-4-3 is to be used for the greater ranges and more severe weather 
conditions ; the triangular target is intended for use at lesser ranges, 
especially where the maximum towing speed is desired. 

All three targets were designed in accordance with results obtained 
from a number of experimental targets made up originally in Long 
Island Sound and later given exhaustive tests by the Coast Artillery 
Board at Fort Monroe. 

It is not thought to be expedient to specify the conditions under 
which each target is to be used but to allow the coast defense com- 
mander the greatest latitude in the solution of the problems which 
confront him. 

SEACOAST TARGET, SMALL, MODEL OF 1917. 

This target has a base of two running timbers 3 by 12 inches by 
29 feet braced by three cross planks 2 by 10 inches by 10 feet notched 
into the running timbers. A prow cleat 1 by 12 inches by 2 feet is 
attached to the front end of each running timber by means of two 
prow-cleat brackets. The two towing irons are attached to the 
outside of the two running timbers at the prow. 

The superstructure is a vertical rectangular frame 10 by 24 feet 
consisting of three upright masts and two longitudinal boards. 
Each mast consists of two 1 by 4 inch boards nailed together at right 
angles and supported on the cross planks in pillow blocks. The top 
of each mast is braced by four guy ropes two of which are attached 
to each running timber. All guy ropes are made of one-eighth inch 
diameter flexible wire sash cord and are supplied with 4 inch turn- 
buckles. The center mast is extended 6 feet above the rest of the 
superstructure in order to provide a sight rod which is painted in 
alternate bands of white and red, each band 1 foot 6 inches wide. 

A twine net, 0.5 square mesh, of No. 15 twine, is strung between 
the three masts. This net is bound with a 15-thread 0.625 diameter 
manila rope on four sides, and is secured to the masts and longitu- 
dinal boards by means of screw hooks. A piece of vermilion bunting 
will be issued with each target to be fitted to the target at the post. 

(5) 



The wood work is spruce or yellow pine, and is given two coats of 
red-lead paint, except that the white bands of the sight rod are 
painted with white-lead paint. 



SEACOAST TARGET, PYRAMIDAL,, MODEL OF 1917. 

The base of this target is composed of three parallel running tim- 
bers, two cross planks notched into the running timbers, and a prow 
cleat. Two mast boards are bolted to the middle running timber and 
are nailed together at the top. They are braced with 1 by 4 inch 
boards to the middle running timber. Guy ropes made of one-eighth 
inch flexible wire sash cord run from the mast boards to the front 
and rear of each of the outside running timbers. These guy ropes are 
supplied with 4-inch turnbuckles, and should be kept taut in order to 
prevent straining or dislocating the mast boards. The cover of 
the target extends to within 3 feet 8 inches of the base and is made of 
vermilion bunting. It is tied to one-half inch diameter manila ropes 
which lead from the front and rear ends of the outside running 
timbers to the top of the mast where they pass through a hole in the 
mast boards. Two towing irons are supplied at each end of the tar- 
get to permit of towing two or more targets at once. 

All of the woodwork of the pyramidal target is of spruce or yellow 
pine painted with two coats of red-lead paint. 

SEACOAST TARGET, TRIANGULAR, MODEL OF 1917. 

This target has a base of two running timbers 3 by 12 inches by 
14 feet, braced by two cross planks 2 by 10 inches by 10 feet, the 
cross planks being notched into the running timbers. The super- 
structure consists of two target legs, one of which is attached at the 
center of each cross plank by means of target-leg blocks. The target 
legs are set at angles of 22° with the vertical and are nailed together 
at the point where they cross. The superstructure is braced by two 
guy ropes made of flexible-wire sash cord, which are attached by 
nut eyebolts to the target legs near the point where they cross and 
to each of the running timbers. Each guy rope is supplied with a 
4-inch turnbuckle. The right target leg is made 4 feet longer than 
the left target leg and has the part above the point of attachment 
of the left target leg painted in alternate bands of white and red, 
each 12 inches broad, to furnish a suitable aiming point. A piece 
of vermilion bunting is attached to the two target legs by tacks and 
leather washers and extends from 15 inches below the bottom of the 
sight rod to 5 feet above the running timbers. The towing irons are 
attached to the outside of the running timbers at the prow. 



The woodwork is spruce or yellow pine, and is given two coats of 
red-lead paint except that the white bands on the sight rod are 
painted with white-lead paint. 

PRESERVATION AND CARE OF TARGETS. 

When not in use the targets should be placed on skids about 1 foot 
from the ground and, if practicable, out of the wind. 

The towline, nets, and the bridles will be removed from the targets 
when out of use. 

Care will be taken to see that the targets are painted with sufficient 
frequency to preserve them from deterioration. 

TOWLINES, BRIDLES, ANCHORS, ETC. 

The towline is not a part of these targets. The length of the tow- 
line varies for different districts. (See current target practice circu- 
lar for allowance of towlines, targets, etc.) For attaching the tow- 
line to the targets, bridles of manila rope are used. The bridle is 
made of 0.75-inch diameter rope and has two branches of 20 feet 
each. A thimble in the middle is provided for the attachment of the 
towline to prevent the target from towing sideways. 

The anchor furnished is 100 pounds in weight. 

Two streamers, made of scarlet woolen serge, are authorized for 
each post where target practice is held ; one for use on the towing tug 
and one for use on shore. (See drawing 39-5-1 for streamer.) 

CARE AND PRESERVATION OF TOWLINES AND BRIDLES 

Great care is necessary to preserve rope that has been wet with 
salt water from rapid deterioration. All rope should be removed 
from the targets and coiled when not in use. Before coiling it should 
be dried, and after coiling should be stored in a dry building. 

SUPPLY OF TARGETS, ACCESSORIES, SPARE PARTS, ETC. 

The allowances of spare parts of targets are given on Plates I, II, 
and III. 

The permanent equipment is liable to change from time to time by 
War Department orders. 

The upkeep of the articles forming the permanent equipment in 
and the supply of the spare parts to the various coast defenses will be 
attended to by the commanding officers of the following ordnance 
establishments, to wit : 

Watertown Arsenal: All in the Northern, Central, and Sandy 
Hook Armament Districts and the Canal Zone. 



8 

Augusta Arsenal : All Coast Defenses of the Southern Armament 
District. 

Benicia Arsenal : All Coast Defenses in the Western and Hawaiian 
Armament Districts. 

Manila Ordnance Depot: All Coast Defenses in the Philippine 
Armament Districts. 

Requisitions for target material will be forwarded to the com- 
manding officers of the above ordnance establishments by department 
ordnance officers for action. 

Was Department, 

Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 
Washington, August 21, 1917. 

February 27, 1908. 

Revised June 15, 1909. 

Revised October 29, 1913. 

Revised August 21, 1917. 

Form No. 1991. 

Ed. Aug. 21—17—2,000. 



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Gaylofd Bros. 

Makers 
Syracuse N*. 




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