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COBB'S 



SPELLING BO.OKr 



BEING A 



JUST STANDARD - 



FOR PRONOUNCING 



THE ENGLISH LANGU'aGE .*' 

CONTAINING 

?fu» Hudinicnts of iho Englislj Language, arranged in CatcchcticdT t^roior ; 

Aiii Organization of the Alphabet^an E'Hv Sclieme of Spelling and Pro- 

it mciation, intermixed with Easy Reading Lessons ; to which arc 

AiUed Bome uoefui Tables, with the Names of Cities, Counties, 

Towns, Rivers, Lakes, &c. in the United Btntes; and a List 

of the Troper Names contained in the New Testament, 

and pronounced according to the best authorities. 

DESinSED TO TEACn 

THE ORTHOGRAPHY AND ORTHOKPY OF J. WALKER. 



BY LYMAN COBB, 

X'.rrUOR OF tub juvenile READEl:^^ SCHOOL DICTIONARY, BZPOBITOll, 
EXPLANA1M)RY ARITIIMUTICK, AND SEQCEL. 



Examine thoroughly and impartially, then judge. 



REVISED RDITION. 

ITHACA, N v.: 

rUBJJSHEl) BY MACK. ANDRUS, &, CO, 

No. GO OWEGO STREET 



. OttV amw of DislrJcl Court uf If.n Noi 




Rnovuiraa "ri Pamb in guned not hj wipriMi 
Ha ttial would win, mnit labovb for the pmoi 
>11Ilb□■theT0ntt^ ftom Uil*ng *> B, ^ 
Atteiiu, atlenslli, ■Mutei'stughdBgMa. 



I ^^t^—t, V'**^ 



j "o ■ .' / V -^ 

I Thh great and prominent objcis of n. Sp.Mliiw;-nook phonM bo to aid tl>.o pupil ii 
i tottrnim; to spell, pronounce, nnd rend t)i<; hiii^n.-tye with ease, accuracy, ana pre 
I cksion. 

! To eflbct this most Important ©bj^^ct. a ^polling IJ«M)k should contain nil, or nearl^ 
i all, tboiniiflt common and useful words ol ihe l;iiJijnyi?e, properly chissi-d. dividtf<t 

pronouuc^, and accented, exhibiting ihrou|[;hi>ut the d.Herent f>ir']iiig li^ssons ol 
' the varieties of vow^I nnd consonant sounds in the language, witli their peculiarilie 

accurately and minutely pointed out a: id OApb:ned. 

! This SpellinR-Book contains about twice .-is ninny words in the dlfTerput spc!lin| 

, 1e54K>DSLS any other, and nearly every primitive common word in the Inngunge 

Tlie great advantage of havinjr a lar^e anl oonjous number of words in a Sn-lUng 

Ikiok is. that nmctont lis, if hot nil, tlio childr n of our country obtain ull thoii 

i knowlcdfic of orthography from the Spm.i.iNoHoorc on}y ; for, wlien 111 y 1r,-ivo tlii 



b<X)k tluy nttonJ to hitfl;er, thi^uiili not more important studies, and nhnost mvaria 
bly neglect Hpellmg. Cliildren scnrcHy cv?r c.ons»i*i a Dictionnru for tlie i»)ilif»gra 
pliy of a word but for its jjronanciation nii-l di'IInition only; and lioncn lli«' nctua 



' necessity of extensive and well select'vl clas.-*. s of words in a .spelling- Rook 

Perhaps there l.s n ) branch of pihu atiou by which *he learned and lllitrratf are sc 

readily and so generally distin^iishrd, lu* that of spoiling. So nnivors'il 's thi 

j oondu'mnation of bad spelling, amouft all classf^s of citiz"ns, wlif^thor nri.f.'ssional 

.' (norcantilo, or mechanical, that no penvm. it is believ<'d, can be foimri who woulc 

, be willing to he identifled with it. Thesubjcct of orthography, Dierefon-, is of pri 

' raary importani'.o in tlie education of children, and shouhl enpage tlie fittctition ol 

: parents, and all teachers more espf^cially, since it may fjiirly be aspimu'd that om 

fAird ol the whole thnc spent in acquiring a useful education, is dt>v(t«'d to this 

• part'rular bi-anch. The Author of this work is fully aware that many men of edu 

cation and influence, consider the Spelling- Honk ixh an unimportant volume, bijneath 

their critical notice; and that the improssiun too genenilly pn-vails, that it is ofbul 

littk consoqueoce wJuit book is llrst placed in the hands of the puuil. It is c> ■:-*ain 

ly of gr-'at iiiip->rttmce that a correct and uniform system of laniiua^e should be 

adopted in our e^iuntry ; and how is this to be done, if a correct toundation be noi 

luid in the earliest blagcs of education 1 

Tlie •n"**-iJ importance of classification is not nropf^rly tmdcrstood or apprcciatec 
by niuny t<*ac!;»'i's. Spelling Is learned only by a repetition of the lrtt.;i-s which 
. compose a word until the associnti'^n of them is imprcsst^d noon tho niii.d ; and, 
■ witliout this classification the words, which an* pnniounccii so very diiU'mitlji 
from their net hoirraphy, and, of course. P'lpiire a greater rep'"t:tion to iini)ri'sa tht 
f_ : assocint ion cjf the letters upon the ininu, can not be so repeated to adv;nilai;e. IJy 
"" j- aaaocidt.on ami chissification we learn every thing ; as the way from on*; place tt: 
•' another, by r.8:;ociating in the mind the objects which we pass: the ai'i earam-.t'of a 
man's cor.iif»Mian»'R brings thinc:? and circumstances to the mind whirh were asso- 
ciatied with tlie countenance, and which had not been thought of from the timi; the 
i-ouiiti'nan.:e was seen, on a fonner f)Cca.*«ion, until it is seen ajfraiii. So in "^pi'lliMg. 
Wo Icnni tfi.'oith -graphy of a word by repeating the letters in connexion witli 
their somu^'.. until th»Mr orthography, wln'ther regular or ir rejrulnr. is t!ior< Highly 
imprcBi<<'.d np'-n tlie mind. Uy tlie use of a book in which tlie words are properly 
ciniised. the t'.-achcr can drill or txerase his scholars on the classes of words of 
•.difficult orihr.cniphy longer than on those which are of east/ ortlmgniiiliy. A 
systemntick ,!assi!icatif)n i:i spelling c ail not iail to aid the sciiolar in I'Miiiing to 
road or euunriatc roaaily.* 

The improvements in tlie classification of the words In Spell'ng-nnnk*', like all 
; other impnivernents, have been progrfissive. Thiw, for instance: hi the lirst at- 
tempt of this kind tht: words were class<'d with r'^jrard to tlip iMii.ilier of l"tt<'rs 
I in a word, if a monosyllable, or to the nuriib«^T of sylhib]«;< in each word, if a 'lisyyll'i- 
I ble, trisyllablf*. or pfjlysyllable, without any r^Kanl to ihc V(twelurfiinso a'ii>..unds: 
in the second attrmpl the word? wer^classod withrrcard tothr; viwcls-innilj but no 
regard was paid o tht* poculiarconsimantsournli: rand in thethini att iiipt tin- words 
are clas*»'d w.ih regard not only to their ac«('ntuati«n, Muniber .if >vll.ibl ■'<, and 
vowel somid.<, but also witri p'gard to th.'ir coMsonant sounds, llf-nV*- it will be 
ri'adily set-n tliat in the ordir of imprnviMin-nts mi Sp»;llin^ lJ.i<.k'.v, v\\v Vnv>v^^ v 
which all the varieties of vowel Mid ronsonaut w^vVvwVf. vvct aa ww^ax wvawwM "«j 
hccurati.'ly classed and noted Ik Uie besv uooV,. 



L 



• S..V' /Mfp fn 'fV-achi-rs. page. '.7. 



^^^^fu^^trntamammtw^^ ^mi%mm' >-• >» .-' •- 



'^r rrr ! 



Preface. 



I 



In theCLAssiFicATioMof thodifTerentsncllinglesBons in the following work, great ' 
I.»ain8 liavc been txikcn ; and, the eevcral leFsons are soamngcd throughout the book 
that tf.c scholar will be led on graduuliu from easy to difficult spelling, in strict 
accordance witl^ his natural progress and expanding capacities. 

The Rudimentd of the Language, or Principles of Pionunciation, are given, and 
all ihe peculiar vowel and consonant sounds are noted, and the reasons for each 
consonant suund, or its silence, are cleaily and minutely pointed out The form 
of queetton and answer has been adouted that the scholar may easily commit 
j tliein to memory. The Alphabet is analytically arranged in lessons, so that a part 
of the letters may be learned at once, and that the practice of teaching the letters bj 
course, all at one lesson, be abandoned. 

The words in the diflferent spelling lessons are in alphabetical arrangement from 
one figure to the ne^t, which, as a reference to orthography and pronunciation, 
answers the sauic purpose as a Dictionary, for anv one who is acquainted with the 
classi/ica lion of the diflTevent spelling lessons in the book. 

The I.«)K.'cina from page 20 to 37, inclusive, conijir/sc words of one, two, three, and 
four syllablt«, and which are easily spelled and pronounced from their containing 
I only the long and short sounds of the vowels, without silent lettcif, or words which 
\ are 8ubj''ct t" dillerent pronunciation or accentuation, or words proiiounccd alike 
but ppelled diflerently. 

The Lt-ssons from page 33 lo 81, inclusive, contain words of one, two, three, and 
four syllables, coinprising all the variotip»of tlie voxcel sounds, and silent letters, 
but no wnrd.s subject to diilcrent pronunciation or accentuation, as bow, conduct, 
&c. or words spelled differently and pronounced alike, as ale, ail, drc. Such 
words are all classed in tho filly-eighth chaptor, pages 129, 130, &c., wliere tiieir 
d'stinctive definitions ore given; wherejis, m ottier books, tiiose words are proniis- 
c'lounly interming'cd with other words tlirou'^hoiit tiie»book, causing great per- 
; plexity and embarrassment, both to scliolar antf teacher. 

The Lessons from page 83 to 123, inclu.«*ive, contain words comprising all the 
virietios of the consonant and vowel soimds, so classed that the learner will be led 
on gradually from easy to the more difficult combinations of letters. Those words 
in which cious, tioua, sion, tio7i, eiute, tiate, ice. occur, ore scpTrutnly clasr.rd 
whereby the perplexity and uncertainty, arising from a promiscuous ciassification' 
as in other books, are avoided. The same may be said of that class of words 
wliich are suhjirt to diff»rrent accentuation or pronunciation, and those which arc 
snelle.l dillorcntly and pronounced alike, and which in otlier works are intermin- 
al(»d throiighfuit the var ous lessons; but which m this are classed, as on pages 
i:4. 125, 12J, 127, 123, 129, 13(>. 131, 132, i:^3, Ac, with their distinctive definitions. 
These lessons are also laiger than those contained in any other Spelling- Book. 

Tlierc are many consonant sounds classed and noted in this book, not no ed in 
any previous Fpellinsr Book. All the words of the spelling lessons are so arr mged 
i:i classes, that the pronunciation of eacli word can be readily known and learned ; 
and no word is in a icrong lesson, or uselessly repeated. 

Wordif5, which are irregular in their pronunciation, or do not belong in any of 
the p.cceding classes, containing two or more peculiar consonant sounds, are I 
' ihi own together, with their pronunciation spelled, on pages 138,139, KG, 111, and 
J 42. 

Words which are pronounced In an improper and vulgar manner, on pages 113 
144, and 145. 

Words often spelled incorrectly, en page 145. 

The Pauses and Marks are explained more fully than usual, and in question and 
answer, ihuttl:ey may mere easily be coniniittea to memory, and their uses and 
af pi'catjon known, on pages 140, 150, and 151. 

The namf's of Places, Persons, and Fcriptnrc Proper Names, with their pronun- 
ciation noted, on pages 154, 155, 156, 157,158, 159,166, 161, 162, 163, and 104. 

The c^i"rect.ne5»s and utility of this work are submitted to the candour of teachers 
and parejits, believing that a fair and impartial comparison with other impelling 
Books, can not fail to secure to it a decided preference. 

Now rork, April 13, 1836. LYMAN COBR 



\ 



ff?n 



1 



RUDIMENTS OF 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

Q. Whtii is Language? 

A. Language, in an unlimited sense, indicates all sounds 
o\ characters, by which one person declares his ideas or 
ih. eights so as to be understood by another. Language is 
ho Jtwocal and written. 1 

Q. What is vocal Language ? 

A, It is the expression of ideas by the human voice, call- 
ed articulate sounds, 

Q What is an articulate sound ? 

A* It is an emission of the human voice, formed by the 
' orgaL ; of speech, in pronouncing letters, syllables, and 
wordii, and constituting the vocal Language, which is ad- 
dressi d to the ear. 
Q. What are letters? 

A, Letters are the marks of sounds, and the rudiments of 
vyritti 1 Language which are presented to the eye. 
Q, What is written Language ? 

A it is composed of letters, syllables, and words, which 
represent articulate sounds, 

Q. How many letters are there in the English Language ? 
A. Twenty-six; namely, A a, B b, C c, D d, E e, Ff, 
G g, Hh, I i, Jj, Kk,Ll, Mm, Nn, O o,P p, Q q, R r, 
Ss, Tt, Uu, Vv, Ww, Xx, Yy, Zz. 

Q. What are these letters called, when taken together? 
A, The English Alphabet. 
Q. llow is the Alphabet divided? 
A. Iwio voioels ^xiA consonants, 
Q. What is a vowel? 

A. It is a simple articulate sound that can be perfectly ut- 
tered by itself, without the assistance of any other letter, as 
a, e, o. 

Q, Wha^ is a consonant? 

A. It is a letter which cannot be fully sounded witliout 
the help of a vowel; as b, c, d, which are expressed be, ce, de, 
Q, Which are the vowels ? 

A. A, e, i, o, u, W is a vowel when it is immediately 
preceded by a, e, or o, in the same syllable. Y is always 
a vowel when it is in the middle or at the ejfid of a syllabUs.^^ 



6 Rudiments of the 

and some times at the beginning of a syllable, as in ber yU 
zeph yr. 

Q, How are the cofisonants divided ? 

A, Into mutes, semi-vowels, and liquids, 

Q. What are the mutes ? 

A. They are such as emit no sound without a vowel, as 3, 
d, k, p, t, and c and g hard. j 

Q. What are the semUvowels ? ! 

A, They are such as emit a sound, without the concur- 
rence of a .vowel, as /, j, s, t>, x, z, and g soft. 

Q. What are the liquids 7 

A, They are such as flow into, or easily unite with the 
mutes and semi-vowels, as Z, m, n, r. 

Q. What is a compound character ? 

A, It is two consonants united, which represent a distinct 
simple sound, as ch, sh, 

Q. How many are there ? 

A, Four ; ch, sh, th, and ng. 

Of the different sounds of the Vowels. 

Q. How many sounds has A ? 

A. Eight ; a long sound,' as in name ; a flat sound, as in 
par ; a long broad sound, as in salt; a short sound, as in 
glass ; a short broad sound, as in wad; the sound of e short, 
as in any ; the sound of z sliort in the unaccented termina- 
tion age, generally, as in cabbage; and sometimes the sound 
of w short when unaccented, as in liar. 

Q, How many sounds has E? 

A, Five ; a long sound, as in mete ; a short sound, as in 
met ; the sound of u short, as in her ; the sound of a long, 
as in ttite ; the sound oft short, as in England, 

Q. How many sounds has I ? 

^1. Fire; a long sound, as in fine; a short sound, as in 
fin; the sound of v short, as in bird; the sound of e long, 
in words of French original, when accented, as in caprice ; 
ihe sound of 'e short when followed by r, as in virtue ; in 
many words ending in ion, 6lc. i is a consonant, and has 
th.e same sound that y, consonant, would have in the same 
situation, thus mill-ion, pin-ion, are pronounced mil yun, 
pin yun,&LC. It should generally be pronounced like long 
weak e, when it ends an unaccented syllabic. 

Q. How many sounds has O ? 






I 



NB? 



I 

) English Language, 7 

I 

^1. Six; along sounds as in bone; the long sound of 
broad a, -as in born; the sound of broad a short, as in loss; \ 
the sDund o( u short, as in come ; the sound of oo proper or 
slender, as in move ; the sound of oo short, as in wolf. 

Q. How many sounds has U? 

A. Six ; a long sound, as in mtile ; a short sound, as in 
dun ; the sound of oo proper or slender, generally when pre- 
ceded by r, as in cruel ; the sound of oo short, or an ob- 
tuse sound, as in bull ;' the sound of i short, as in busy ; tlic 
sound of e short, as in bury. I/, or ew, at the beginning of 
words or syllables, when accented long, is pronounced as if 
y preceded it, as in t/5C, eunuck, pronounced yuse, yu-nuk. 

Q. How many sounds has W, when a vowel ? 

A, One, which is the same that u would have in the same 
situation, as in now, which is pronounced as if written nou. 
jit is never a vowel at the beginning of a word or syllable. 

Q. How many sounds has Y, when a vowel ? 

A. Three; a long sound, as in defy; a short sound, as 

in hymn ; the sound of long weak e, generally, when it end.3 

an unaccented syllable, unless it be immediately preceded 

by/, in which case it should be pronounced like long /, as 

in glorify. It should also be pronounced like long /, in 

the words multiply, occupy, prophesy. 

A\\ the prcct^ding sounds of t hi* vowels an* rpprcsentrd by difloronl figures 
in tne following work. Hut, the vowt'Ia have some irre^lar sounds, besides 
thost? already pnumeratffi, wineh an* not deJine<i by liffures. The words 
•ivjiith coiiUun them are classrd lt)<rether, in the lifly-ninth chajtter, and their 
pronunciation accurately jH)inted out. 

Of the Diphthongs. 
Q. What is a iiphfhoji^r? j 

A. It is the uni<!!i of two rnv:els, pronounced 1)V a siinpiel 
jini}Milsf of the vol' «•, s(» a? only to make one syllable. 
j Q. ! low many l%ini!s of diphthongs are there ? ' 

i A. 'd^TO ; prop' umI hrtprfprr. \ 

(J. ^Vhat is a /• r .lijditli'Ki:^ ? ' 

\. J; is that in ^ }i l),;!}i ilr = "W^' are sounded as 0/ in 






(I 



'■in\v many '/• dipl.;! > art- tlicre? 

. lur: oi\ I . •liitl '. If//. /.'</;, loviU how. 

' hat is an - ■ ' ■ ' 

I 

"'- that in -"/v /.■? is pounrhnl, as, 

<7/, oa in 




;8 Rudiments of the 

Q. How many improper diphthongs are there ? 

A. Twenty-two; ae, ai, au, aw, ay, ea, ee, ei, eo, eu, nr. 

cy, ia, ie, to, oa, oe, oo, ua, ue, ui, uy» 

In the following work, when the improper diphthongs are Ufiod, (aU the, 
\ proper diphthongs are sometimes improper^ except oy,) the vowels which 
' liave no s<iund are printed in Italick characters ; and those which are sounded, 
jarc printed in Roman characters, and their true sounds accurately pointed 
out by the figures. 

Of the different sounds of the Consonants, 

Q. How many sounds has B? 

A. One, unvaried sound, at the beginning, middle, and end 
of words, as in bake, number, rhubarb. It is silent before t 
in the same syllable, as in debt, debtor; it is also generally 
silent after m in the same syllable, as in larnb. 

Q. How many sounds has C ? 

A. Four ; a hard sound like A:, at the end of a syllable, and 
before a, o, u, k, I, r, and /, as in jiac cid, can^ coU cure^ 
stick, clown, crag, tract ; a soft sound like s, before e, t. and 
jr, as in/<2cc, civil, mercy ; the sound oi sh when it is lumie 
diately followed by ea, ia, ie, io, or eou^ and is immediattly 
preceded by the accent, either primary or secondary, as in 
ocean, social, species, spacious, saponaceous, pronounced 
o-shun, so'shal, spe-shez, spa-skus, sap-o^na-shus ; the 
sound of z, in discern, sacrifice, sice, suffice. It is silent in 
arbuscle, corpuscle, czar, czarina^ endict, muscle, victuals. 

Q. How many sounds has D ? 

A, Three; its proper sound, as in bold; the sound of cZ; 
when it ends an accented syllable, and is followed by u long, 
as in ed-U'Cate, pronounced ed-ju-kate ; and sometimes the 
sound of J, as in verdure, pronounced verdure* i 

Words which end in ed, immediately preceded by d or •, ' 
have ed sounded distinctly, as in bounded, pointed; and 
likewise, when another syllable is added to the word, ed. 
should be sounded distinctly, whether it be preceded by d,, t, 
or not, as in blessedness, designedly, deservedly, &c. When 
words which end in ed are used as nouns or adjectives, the 
termination ed should sometimes be sounded distinctly, as in 
the following : A learned man ; Blessed are they ; The 
learned ; The wicked people ; The wretched man, &c. ' 
When the termination cd is immediately preceded by a vowel, , 
or b, §•, Z, 771, n, r, flat th, r, z, or s, if it be sounded like 5r, \ 
llic is suppressed, and the d is added to the foretroino- syl- 1 



M^figltsk La7iguage» 9 

lable; as in delayed^ defied^ showed, sued, rubbed. Lugged, 
rolled, aiTiied, rained, poured, breathed, saved, blazed, raised, 
j)ronounced delayed, defi'd, shmo'd, su'd, rubbed, lugged, rolVd, 
aivi'd, rained, poured, hreaiK'd^ sav^d, blazed, raized. When 
the termination ed is immediately preceded by c,f, Jc, p, s, 
X, ch, sh, or qu, the e is suppressed, and the d is changed 
into t, as in tJie following, faced, stuffed, cracked, tripped, 
passed, vexed, vouched, flashed, piqued, pronounced faste, 
stuft, crackt, tript, past, vekst, voucht,^flasht, peckt. These 
observations ought to be circumspectly observed by every 
one who wishes to read and pronounce correctly and politely. 

It is silent in handkerchief, handsel, handsome, and in the 
first syllable of stadiholder, and Wednesdayy and when it is 
followed by g in the same syllable, as in badge. 

Q. IIow many sounds has F ? 

A, One, pure, unvaried souiul at the beginning, middle, 
and end of words, except in of, in which it has the sound 
of V, pronounced ov ; but when of is joined to tlie words 
here, where, there, the / retains its proper sound, as in here- 
of, whereof, thereof F is never silent. 

Q. IIow many sounds has G ? 

A, Two ; a hard sound at the end of syllables and words, 
and before a, o, «, Z, and r, as in gale, gone, gun, glue, grand ; 
a soft sound before e, i, and y, as in gem, giant, gyre. There 
'are exceptions to this last sound, which are cefined in the fol- 
lowing work, that is, where g is hard before e, i, and y. It is 
always silent before n in the same syllable, as in gnat, sign. 

Q. How many sounds has H ? 

A. One, which is no more than a forcible breathing before 
the succeeding vowel is pronounced, as in horse. It is 
always silent after r, as in rhomb, and at the end of a word 
preceded by a vowel, as in ah, oh. 

Q. How many. sounds has J? 

^4. One, and is perfectly uniform in its sound, whirli is 
that of soft g, except in hallelujah, in which it has the 
sound of y, J is never silent. 

Q. How many sounds has K ? 

A. One, which is that of hard c. It is always silent be- 
fore n, as in knife, and after c, as in publick. 

Q. IIow many sounds has L ? 

A. One, proper sound, as in lame* It is sometimes silent 



! 



I 



CLi^I 



10 Rudiments of the 

before/, m, v, k^ and d, as in coZf, caZm, calve, iDclk, would : 
ICy at the end of words, has the sound of a weak eZ, as in table, 

Q. How many sounds has M ? 

A* One, unchanged sound, as in mauy except in comp- 
troller, pronounced kon-tro-lur. Mis never silent. 

Q. How many sounds has N? 

A, Two ; a simple and pure sound, as in man, net ; a 
compound and mixed sound when it is followed by k, or 
hard c, in an accented syllable, as in thank, uncle, pronoun- 
ced thangk, ungkL It is silent at the end of a word when 
preceded by Z, or m, as in kiln^ hymn. 

Q. How many sounds has P 1 

A. It always retains its proper sound, except in clapboard, 
and cupboard, in which it has the sound of 6. It is always si- 
lent before n, and between m and t, and beforS 5 and t, at the 
beginning of words, as in pneumaticks, ptisan, tempt, psaln 

Q, How many sounds has Q ? 

A, One, which is that of k; it is always followed by v; 
and the u, in this situation, when not silent, is always pro- 
nounced like w, consonant, as in queen, pronounced kween, 
Q is never silent. 

Q, How many sounds has R? 

A, Thvo ; a roiigh sound, as in river ; a smooth sound, as 
in bard : re, at the end of words, has the sound of a weak 
er, as in acre. R is never silent. 

Q. How many sounds has S? 

A, Four ; a sharp hissing sound, as in sin ; a flat sound 
like z, as in was ; the sound of sh when it is immediately 
preceded by the accent and another 5 or a liquid, and is 
immediately followed by ia, ie, or io, as in cas-sia., Iran" 
sientj expulsion, version ; it sometimes has flie sound of 
sh when followed by u, as in censure, sensual, sure, &c.; 
the sound of zh when preceded by a vowel and the accent, 
and followed by ial, ier, ion, or ure, as in ambrosial, bra- 
sicr, fusion, rasure; and sometimes the sound oi zh when 
preceded and followed by u, as in usual, usury, &c. It is 
silent in aisle, isle, island, demesne, puisne, viscount, corps. 

Q, How many sounds has T ? 

A. Three ; its proper sound, as in time ; the sound of sh 
when it is immediately followed by ia, tc, or io, and the ac- 
cent either primary or secondary immediately precedes, as in 
nuptial, patient, faction, pronounced /ii/p-5^Z, pashent,fak' 



r/ 



\ 
I 



\ 



English Langitagi, 11 

shun; the sound of tsh when followed by lon^ u and the accent 
immediately precedes, as in nature, pronounced Tm-^^Aw re; it 
also has the sound of tsh when preceded by s or x, and fol- 
lowed by ia or io, and the accent precedes, as in fustian^ 
mixtion. It is silent when preceded by 5 and followed by le 
or CTi, as in bustle, hasten ; it is also silent in bankruptcy, 
billetdoux, Christmas, eclat, hautboy, mortgage / and when it 
is followed by ch in the same syllable, as in match, watch, ^c. 

Q. How many sounds has V ? 

A. One, its proper sound, which is that of flat /, as in 
vile. It is silent in one word only, which is scvennight, 
pronounced sennit. 

Q. How many sounds has W when a consonant ? 

A. One, which is nearly that of oo, as in water ; w before 
h, is pronounced as if it were written after it, as in ivhat, 
pronounced hwat. W is always a consonant when it be- 
gins a word or syllable, or when it is immediately preceded 
by d, s, t, or th. as in dwarf, swing, twine, thwack. It is 
always silent before r, as in wrap. 

Q. How many sounds has X I 

A, Three ; a sharp sound like ks when it ends a syllable 
with the accdnt on it, either primary or secondary, or when 
the accent is on the next syllable, if it begin with any con- f 
sonant except h, as in exercise, expense ; a flat sound like gz 
when followed by an accented syllable beginning with a vowel, 
or with h, as in exist, exhort, except in compound words, in 
which the primitive ends in x, as relaxation, taxation, vexa- 
tion, <fec. to which we may add the simples in our language, 
doxology, proximity ; the soimd of z, at the beginning of 
Greek names, as in Xenophon, Xerxes. 

Q. How many sounds has Y when a consonant ? 

A. One, which is nearly that of ee, as in youth. 

Q. How many sounds has Z ? 

A. Two ; its proper sound, as in zone ; the sound of zh 
j when preceded by a vowel and followed by ier or U7'c, and the 
accent precedes, as in glazier, azure. 

Of the different sounds of the Compound Characters. \ 
Q. How many sound has ch ? 

A.. Three ; the sound of tsh in words of English origin, as 

. in chin ; the Svound of sh when immediately preceded by the 

. fi'piids I or n, a? in milch,pinch, pronounced milsh,pi7isk, dixtd 

m words derived from the French ^ as in machine, pronounced 



AnoBBa 



;12 Rudiments o^ihe 

masheen ; the sound of ^ in ivords of Greek or Hebrew 
origin, as in echo. It is silent in drachm, schism, yachU 

Q. How many goimds has sh ? 

A. One, its proper sound, as in shad, 

Q. How many sounds has ih f 

A, Two ; a sharp sound, as in thank, think ; a flat sound, 
as in this^ that ; the h is sometimes silent, as in asthma^ 
isthmus, phthisick, phthisical, Thames, Thomas, thyme. 

Q. How many sounds has ng? 

A. Two ; a sharp or nasal sound, as in sing ; a flat sound 
like nj when followed bye at the end of a word or syllable, 
as in arrange, arrangement; in some words it is pronounced 
as if the ^ were doubled, as in anger, angle, singular ; it 
should always have its sharp sound when at the end of a 
word, as in reading, not readin. 

Of the Combinations. 

Q. What is a comhinafion ? 

A. It is two consonants united, which represent a certain 
sound, as gh, ph. 

Q. How many are there ? 

A. Three ; gh, ph, and sc. 

Q. How many sounds has gh ? 

A. One, which is that of/, as in cough, except in hough, 
lough, shough, pronounred hok, lok, shok; at the beginning 
of words, the h is always silent, as in ghost; and sometimes at 
the end of words, as in hvrgh; the g and h are both sometimes 
silent in the middle and at the end of words,as in7'/^/zf,A/^A. 

Q. How many sounds has 7?A? 

A. One, wliich is that of/, as in prophet, except in Ste- 
phcn and iiephcw, in which it has the sound oft?; in diphA 
thong and triphthong, the first A is silent ; the p and A are 
both silent in phthisick, phthisical. 

Q, How many sounds has sc ? 

A. Three ; the sound of /? before e, i, and y, as in scene, 
science, scythe ; the sound of sk before a, o, u, and r, as in 
scale, scorn, scull, scrap; the sound of sh when followed 
by ie or io, and the accent immediately precedes, as in con- 
science, conscious. 

Q. What sound should a alwn}? have in the diphthong 
au when unaccented 1 

A. A long broad sound. 

Q. Whatsound should a always have in the diphthong air ? 



\ 



■p 



English Languags. 



13 



A long broad sound. 

Wliat sound should w generally harcin the diph^&ng ew? 
The sound of u l(ffig> 

Key to the Pronmndatkn qfthe JblUwing Wvic 



Long. 
1 I 
In lait, pa tier. 

1 1 
InTnCj mete, 
1 1 
in. meet, JeeL 

1 1 
in time, ti tie, 

I I 
in no, no tiee, 

1 1 
in door, floor, 

1 1 

in tvne, mu sick, 

I m fetPf new, 

1 1 

in dry, defy. 

Flat A. 

in far, fa ther. 

Broad A long. 

in hall, va ter, 

mlH^l^irder. 
Short 

4 4 ' 

in hat, glau. 

4 4 

in metL ten ant. 

4 4 y 

n h'n, tim her, 
4 4 

in run, but ter, 

4 4 

in hymn, tyt tern. 
Broad A short 

5 8 

in wad, van der, 
in coat, mod em, 

Oo proper or slender. 
« • 

in 6oo7i, gloom y. 



0^ as in more, a do, 
l« . • • 

u,aBmrule, aeonte, 

Oo short 

t T 7 

00, as m good, wood, 
0, as in wolf, would, 
«, as in bull, hull ion, 

U short 
e^ as in her. 

9 8 • 

% as in bird, third. 
s s • 

0^ as in love, con duU, 

S . 8 8 

00, as m blood, Jtood. 

A long. 

8 8 8 

e^ as in veil, prey. 

£ long. 

10 n 10 
^ as in shire, ea price, 

E short 

11 II 11 

^ as in girl, vir gin. 

Diphthongs. 
Oi. 

0^ as in voiee, noise, 

Oy. 

0^ as in toy, cloy. 

Ou. 

oti, as in ou/, Icud. 
Ow 



oiff, asin6ov, how. 
Elucidation of ike Preceding Key, 

. What does a figure or number placed over a Towel 

esent ? 

• It represents a certain soinid. 




14 Rudinmnls ^f the 

Q. What does figure 1 represent? 

A. It T^reaents tbo long sound of a, ^, m, t, o, oo, « 
and y. 

Q. What does figure 2 represent^ 

A. It represents the flat sound of <i, as in far, 

^, What does figure 3 represent ? 

A, It represents the sound of broad a long, as in faZl ; 
sound of broad a long made by o, as in nor. 

Q. What does figure 4 represent? 

^. It represents the short sound of a, e, t, it, and y. 

*Q. What docs figure 5 represent ? 

il. It represents the short sound of broad a, as in wad ; 
short sound of broad a made by o, ajs in loss. 

Q. What does figure 6 represent ? 

A. It represents the sound of oo proper or slender, a 
moon ; the sound of oo proper made by o, as in move ; 
sound of 00 proper made by u, as in rule. 

Q. What does figure 7 represent 1 

A. It represents the sound of oo short, as in good ; 
sound of 00 short made by o, as in i^oZ/^; the sound of 
short made by tt, as in hull. 

Q. What does figure 8 represent 1 

A. It represents the sound of u short made by e, as in ht 
the sound of u short made by t, as in bird ; the sound o 
short made by o, as in love ; the sound of u short made 
00, as in &too^. 

Q. What docs figure 9 represent 1 

A. It represents the sound of a long made by e, as in z? 
'prey. 

Q. What does number 10 represent ? 

A. It represents the sound of s long made by t, as in sTi\ 
caprice. 

Q. What does number 11 represent 1 

A. It represents the sound of exhort made by i, as in g\ 
virtue. 

Q. How are eJtpA^Aon^aZ sounds defined? 

A. By the diphthongs being placed over them, whene 
they occur in the chapters. 

Q. How are the silent letters distinguished? 

A. By being printed in ItdLick characters. 

Q. What sound has 5 when printed in Italick 7 

A. The sound of z, as in refuse, pronounced refluse. 



' . is^.. 



> J h»S.fc>« ^w*^^ 






English Language^ 15 

In ih*.* fellowing ^ork, wboi Um trowel < end* a w«rd Of syliable^ and 
i* prt-otMicNj by a consonant, and printed in a Roman character, it serves 
'0 Kiigtlieii the preceding vowel in that syllable, aa in abate, confine- 
nicntj seduce, &c$ but in^all other cases when it ends a syllable it is 
;>ri:.te<1 in Italidc. When e ends a word or syllable, and is printed in an 
halicJc ciiaracter, immediately preceded by e or g^ the c should be pro- 
iiAunccd like 8, and the g should have its soil sound, as in notice^ arrange, 
I [;runounccd notis, arranje, 

N. B. In the chapters of the &Uowing work, which are intended for 
spelling lessons, d, t, x, and z, have their proper sounds, unless otherwise 
defined ; g has its soft sound before e, i, and y, unless otherwise defined 
by note or reference ; eh has th^ sound of tsh, unless otherwise defined by 
reference. The dififercnt sounds of th are tdao defined ; bb, dd, ff, II, ss, &c. 
are all printed in Roman chaiacters, notwithstanding one lettar alone 
would be sufficient to express the sound, 

Cf Letters, SyllahleB, Words^ and Sentences. 

Q, What do letters form? 

A. Syllables^ syllables form wordst and nrords form sen- 
tences, which compose a discourse. 

Q. What is a syllable ? 

A. It is a distinct sound utiered with asingle impulse of the 
voice^ and making a part of a word, or a word, as an^ man. 

Q. What is a word of one syllable called % 

A. A monosyllable ; a word of two syllables is called a dis- 
syllable ; a word of three syllables is called a trisyllable ; a 
word of foor or more syllables, is called a polysyllable. 

Q. How many kinds of words are there ! 

A. Four ; primitive, derivative, simple, and compound. 

Q. What is a primitive word ? 

A. It is a word which is not derived ; but constitutes a 
radical stock, from which other words are derived, as man, 
hope, charm. 

Q. What is a derivative word ? 

A. It is a word which is formed of the primitive, and some 
different termination, or an additional syllable, as manful, 
hopeful, charming, hopes, charms. 

Q. What is a simple word ? 

A. It is a word which cannot be divided without destroy- 
ing the sense, as man, child. 

Q. What is a compound word ? 

A. It is a word which is formed of two simple wo^<Xa»> -^^^n 
chimney-piece, ink-stand. 

Q. What is spelling f 



I 



16 Rudiments of 

A, It is the art of expressing toords by their proper let- 
ters ; or of rightly dividing wprds into syllables* 

Of Accent^ Emphasis^ and Cadence. 

Q. What is accent f 

A. It is a forcible stress of voice on a letter or syllable^ in 
order to distinguish it from other letters or syllables in the 
same word* If it fall on a vowsl, the sound of the vowel is 

1 
prolonged, as in &a ker: if it &11 on the consonant^ the sound 

4 
of the preceding vowel is short, as in hob it. Accent is ei-. 
ther primary or secondary. Primary accent is that which 
distinguishes one syllable or letter from the rest. Secondary 
accent is a less forcible stress of voice than the primary, 
which we frequently place on another syllable, in words of 
three or more syllables, in order to pronounce it more dis- 
tinctly and forcibly than we do the unaccented syllables. 

Q. What is emphasis ? 

A. It is a peculiar stress of voice, which is laid on a par- 
ticular word or words in a sentence, in order t6 distinguish 
them from the rest of the words in the sentence, on account 
of their importance. 

Q. What is cadence ? 

A. It is a depression or modulation of the voice in read- 
ing or speaking, which generally occurs at the end of the 
sentenco. 



As Orthography is the first step to all sdenoes, but more partieularl j to 
the English Lanmiage, it b highly important that a just knowledge of it 
should be attained by the student before he proceeds to the higher branches 
of education. This part of an education b evidently too much neglected 
in our common schools ; teachers, whether acquainted with it or not, are apt to 
think it of but little importance, and pass precipitately from it to other lessons; 
but this b certainly injudicious : a builmng cannot be elegant and perma- 
nent, unless erected on a good foundation. I have, therefore, as I tnis^ 
made an appropriate selection of questions and answers in Orthography for 
my young fnends, and I sincerely hope they will pay that attention to them, 
which b jmtlv due to the subject. 

Teachers should frequently exercise their papib in the foregoing ques- 
tions, so that they may be enabled to acquire a correct knowledge of the ru- 
diments of the LABgoage ; which b the foondatbn, and most essential part 
of literature. 



\ 



L 



f 



the English Language. 17 

ECrLBS FOR APCLLINa^ 

T%« Plurals of NoHm, Participlts, Present TWm and PreterU </ 
Fe7-6tf, /Atf Comparative and Superlative Degi-cea qf Adjectives, 

I. Tho«e words which end with y preceded by a consonant, change the y 
to i, as duly^ duties; marry, marries! guaranty^ guaranties s hun-y^ 
karri'id ;' kappy kippier^ kAppiest. In tlie present or imperfect Parti- 
ciple the y is retained, that i may not be doubled, as marryingy^ hurryin^. 

II. When y is preceded by a voweJ, it should not be changedfm the Piu- 
rals, Participles, Present Tense, ana Preterit, as joysy moneys^ attorneys^ 
valii^ys. delay s, pnys^ journeying, joumeytd^ cloyed i excq^t in /ay, payy ana 
say. which are formed laid, paidy said. 

III. Those words which end with y, preceded by a consonant, npon as- 
suming an additional syllable beginning with a consonant, generally change 

gto f, as mn-ry, merriment! happy^ happiness. But when y ia pr«*ceded 
y a vowel, it is seldom changed, aa joyful, enjoyment. 

IV. Monosyllables, and words accented on the last svUable, whicli end 
with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel double that consonant, 
when they take another syllable beginning with a vowel, as run^ running, 
admit, admitting, refer, referred. But if a diphthong precede, or the ac- 
cent is on the preceaing syflabla the consonant remains single, as rain, 
raining, toil, toiling, differ^ differing, benefit, benefited, prohwiif prohibit- 
ed, cleaner, cleanest! except the letter ^ which is generally doubled, 
whether the accent be on the last syllable or not, as travel, travelling, 
traveller! rival, rivalling, rivalled^ &c., and p in the ^'ordu iDorshipper 
worshipping, and leorshippecL 



TO TEACHERS. 

The practice of teaching a child to read before be is familiar with the 
orthography and pronunciation of words, is productive of great iniurv, and 
tends to retard rather than facilitate correct reading. No child should at- 
tempt to read until he is able to call or pronounce, at s^ht, the words most 
commonly met with in composition ; and, this can be more easily acouired 
by reading words in a judicious and analogical classification in a Spelhng- ^ 
Book, than in detached reading lessons. 

The teacher should practise the method of requiring the scholars to pro- 
nounce the words in each spelling column, at sight as a certain way to 
make good readers ; for if a child oe required to read or pronounce words, 
at sight, in a reading lesson before he has learned to sound or pronounce 
them 5cjoara^e/y in a ffpeZ/in^ column, at 8u;ht, he will hesitate; and, in 
most cases be confirmed in the habit of stammering. 

Reading is the enunciation or pronouncing of words by syllables; and, 
therefore, each syllable in a word should be as distinctly enunciated or pro- 
nouiicod, as if the whole lessons were composed of monosyllables. Hence 
^he importance of enunciating words at sight in spelling columns. Unless 
ehildren do acquire a correct and distinct enunciation of each syllable in 
, «peiling columns, they rcu^ely, if ever, acquire it in ^ter life ; tor in the 
I ;)ractice of reading, the pauses, emphases, cadences, &c occupy all, or 
) nearly all, their attention. 

I A thorough knowledge of spelling and prononciation can be obtained 
, only by a continual repetition of the letters and their sound, until the asso- 

B elation of the letters is deeply impressed upon the mind. 
This practice the Author pursued for vears, while engaged in the business 
if leaching, with results entirely satisfactory) and his experience imboid- I 
ens him to recommend it to those intrusted with the \caVc>;xc.^q»w ^\ >i^w<^. 

T 




di 



OROAVSBATIOX OF TBB ATiPHABBT. 



Boman 
IiBSSONI. 



A 

B 

I 
o 

U 

B 
O 
D 
P 
T 
V 
Z 



LK«MN IL 



a 

i 
o 
II 

b 

d 

P 
i 

T 

Z 



be cede pete ven. 
LBSSON III. 



a 
J 

K 



F 
L 
M 

N 
R 

S 



jo ja ka ku. 
LESSON IT. 



e 

J 

k 

q 

f 
1 

m 
n 

r 

8 



ef el cm em or en 
LsasoN r. 



H 
W 
X 
Y 



Italick Lettem 
LKsaoN I. 



A 
E 
I 
O 

u 

B 
C 
D 
P 
T 
V 

z 



LiseoN n. 



a 

J 
K 
Q 



LESSON IT. 



h* H 

wt W 

xt X 

yl y 

^ aitsh, t double ju, teks, 11 wi 



p 

L 
M 

N 
R 

S 



LESSON T. 



a 

e 

m 

% 


U 

b 

■€ 

d 

P 
t 

V 

z 



\£8S0N III. 



J 

k 

f 
I 

ni 

n 

r 

s 



h 

w 

X 

y 



ism 



m 



mt 



asB 


the English Language. 


19 




CHAPTER I. 








Lesson I. 






Lesson VIII. 




,ba 


da pa ta va 


za 


bla 


pla gla 


fia 


ibe 


de pe te ve 


ze 


ble 


pie gle 


fle 


bi 


di pi ti vi 


• 

Zl 


bU 


pli gli 


fli 


bo 


do po to yo 


zo 


bio 


plo glo 


flo 


bu 


du pU tU YU 


zu 


blu 


plu glu 
Lesson IX. 


flu 




LsssoN II. 








g» 


ka ja fa ha 


la 


cla 


sla bra 


dra 


*^ 


ke je fe he 


le 


cle 


ale bre 


dre 




ki ji fii hi 


li 


cU 


sli bri 


dri 


go 


ko jo fo ho 


lo 


clo 


slo bro 


dro 


g« 


ku ju fu hu 
Lesson ITL 


lu 


ciu 


sla bru 
Lesson X. 


dru t 


ca 


ma na ra sa 


wa 


pra 


tra gra 


fra 




me ne re se 


we 


pre 


tre gre 


fre 




mi ni ri si 


wi 


pri 


tri gri 


fri 


CO 


mo no ro so 


wo 


pro 


tro gro 


fro 


cu 


mu nu ru su 
Lesson IV. 


wu 


pru 


tru gru 
Lesson XI. 


fru 


by 


dy py ty vy 


zy 


era 


sta spa 


sea 


ky 


jy fy hy ly 


my 


ere 


ste spe 




nv 

9 


ry sy wy 




cri 


8ti spi 






Lesson V. 




cro 


sto Fpo 


SCO 


ab 


ad ap at av 


az 


cru 


stu spu 


scu 


eb 


ed ep et ev 


ez 




Lesson XII. 




ib 


id ip it iv 


iz 


sha 


cha swa 


tha 1 


ob 


od op ot ov 


oz 


she 


che swe 


the 


ub 


ud up ut uv 


uz 


shi 


chi swi 


thi 




Lesson YI. 




sho 


cho swo 


tho 


ag 


ak af al ac 


am 




Lesson XIII. 




eg 


ek ef ei ec 


em 


spla 


spra pha 


qua 


ig 


ik if il ic 


im 


sple 


spre phe 


que 


og 


ok of ol oc 


om 


spli 


spri phi 


qui 


«g 


uk uf ul uc 
Lesson VII. 


Uill 


splo 


spro pho 
Lesson XIV. 


quo 


an ar as 


ax 


chy 


dry fry gly 


ely 


en er es 


ex 


quy 


shy spy sty 
sply spry str^ 


try 


in 


ir IS 


ix 


thy 


€W^ 


on or OS 


ox 




%^ 


^<i-^ 

« 


un ur us 


MU 


^ 


^<JX 



m 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



CHAPTER II. 

I NoTB. A fimiro placed orer the first word of a column, shows the 
of the vowel in all ths words that follow in that column. 



Lesson L 
4 4 4 4 4 

cab bed bid bag big 
had fed did cag dig 
lad ted hid fag fig 
mad web lid hag pig 
sad wed rid rag wig 

Lesson U. 
4 4 4 4 

can men fan map 
man hen ran 
pan den tan 
vaa ten dan 

ban wen pen 

Lesson III. 
4 4 5 6 

bit bug fog 
hit mug log fop croj 
pit hug hog top got 
flit tug dog hop not 
wit dug bog lop lot 
fit lug mob sob hot 

Lesson IY. 
14 4 4 

bind band mend damp 
find land bend camp 



6 

mop rob 



kind hand lend 
mind sand send 
Lesson V 
4 4 4 

bent best 



lamp 
vamp 



brim pump 

trim trump 

skim Inmp 

swim bump 

grim stump 
Lesson VI. 

4 4 4 4 

brad belt glut smut 

clad melt grub drub 



lent pest 

rent nest 

tent lest 

went nest 



4 

felt 



4 

shut 



pelt milt 

jilt drab 

slut crab 

blab chub 
Lesson VII. 

1 1 

date tile 

fate mice 

prate dice 

hate nice 

tame file 

lame bile 

mate pile 

fade Tile 
Lesson VIII. 

1 1 

dale name 
gale fame 
same dame 
stale came 
mace rive 



lace 
face 



hive 
five 



trace drive 
Lesson IX. 
1 

blade 

shave 

trade 

blame 

shame 

broke 

smoke 

poke 

choke 

spice 

price 



4 

club 

hilt 

scab 

shed 

bled 

1 

dine 

pine 

fine 

wine 

wide 

bide 

side 

vice 

1 

bold 

gold 

sold 

fold 

hope 

rope 

pope 

slope I 

1 

slice 

twine 

swine 

shine 

brine 

slave 

save 

grave 

brave 

wake 

craze 



the English Language* 



re 

ire 

ne 

Lpe 

ute 

ine 

ne 



LIB8SON X. 
1 4 

shape crash 

stage plush 

rave flush 

shade blush 

age tusk 

trite hush 

tripe clump 



4 

raft 

ram 

rang 

mast 

mint 

plant 

cramp 



1 

vine 
slate 



6 

clog 
stop 
flog 
nod 



1 4 

snipe desk 
gripe pant 
Lesson XI. 
5 
frog 
clod 
plod 
rod 



21 

4 

sang 
rim 



5 

shod 
cog 
cot 
rot 



CHAPTER in. 





1 


I 


1 


ged 


bo ny 


clo ver 


fi nis* 


rent 


brave ly 


CO gent 


' di al 


)ex 


bri er 


CO Ion 


diet 


iril 


briny 


CO ma 


di ver 


by 


cadi 


era zy 


dole ful 


ker 


ca lif 


cri er 


do nor 


sis 


ca per 


cri sis 


do tal 


as 


caret 


cu bicA: 


do ter 


ped 


ca ter 


cu bit 


dra ma 


I ded 


ce dar 


de cent 


dra per 


1 zer 


ci dcr 


de ist 


dri er 


lus 


cli ent 


de mon 


dri ver 



Easy words of tv)o syllables^ accented on the first. 

. B. If the stress of voice fidl on aTOwel, the sound of the Towel is conse- 
quently lonff, and is marked by flgure 1. If the stress of Toice fidi en a 
consonant, Uie sound of the preceding yowel is consequently short, and is 
marked by figure 4. 

> figures are placed over the Towels in unaccented syllables ; it ought to be 
obwrved, however, that in unaccented syllables^ almost all vowdb are, 
generall;^, pronounced like i and u short 

or, is pronounced ur, tu tor, tu tur / 

er, is pronounced ur, ver, vur ; 

or, is pronounced ur, li or, U ur ; 

et, is inronomiced it, fer ret, Jbr rit» 
le figures are placed over the vowels of the accented syllables, and one 
figure denotes the sound of the vowels in the syllables which are thus pla- 
o&d under that figure, or which follow in that column, until another 
figure occurs. 

1 

dro ver 
du cal 
duel 
du ly 
du ty 
e dile 
e gret 
e ra 
fa tal 
fa ted 
fe male 
fe ver 

Those words which are used by our best writers and speakers, but are 
in Walker's large Dictionary, have on asterisk placed after them, when- ( 
r they occur in the following work. 

mSmmSmmmBmBamSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^ 




i 



22 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 

yer 
pa ccr 
pa gan 
pa pal 
pa per 
pa pist 
pa ver 
pe dal 
pe nal 
pe tal 
pi ca 
pi per 
pli ant 
plu my 
pin rai 
po em 
po et 
po ker 
po lar 
po nent 
po ny 
po ry 
po tent 
pre tor 
pro em 
pu ny 
pu pi} 
pu tid 
pu trid 
qua ker 
qua ver 
que ry 
qui et 
quo ta 
ra cer 
ra kish 
re al 
re bus 
re cent 
re gal 
re gent 



1 

ri dcr 
ripe ly 
ri ot . 
ri val 
ro man 
ro py 
ro ver 
sa cred 
sa go 
sa tan 
sa ving 
se cret 
se rum 
sha dy 
sha ker 
sha ver 
sha ving 
shi ny 
si lent 
sinus 
si zer 
si zy 
sla ter 
sli my 
sli ver 
smo ker 
smo ky 
sna ky 
so ber 
so fa 
so lar 
so ]o 
spi cy 
spi dor 
spi nal 
spi ny 
spi ral 
spi ry 
sto ic^ 
sto ny 
slo ly 



1 

stra ta 
stra turn 
stri king 
stri ver 
stu dent 
stu pid 
stu por 
su ct 
ta king 
tame ly 
ta per 
te por 
tidy 
ti ler 
ti ling 
time ly 
to paz 
to per 
to ry 
to tal 
tra der 
tri ad 
trial 
tri gon 
tri nal 
tro ver 
tu lip 
tu mid 
tu mult 
tune ful 
tu nicA: 
tu tor 
va cant 
va cate 
va grant 
va ry 
ve nal 
vi and 
vi brate 
vi per 



the English Language. 



23 



1 

vo cal 
vo lant 
vo ter 
wa fer 
wa ger 
wa ry 
wa ver 
wa vy 
wi ly 
wi ny 
wo ful 
za ny 
4 

ab bot 
ac me 
ac rid 
ac tor 
ad der 
adit 
ad vent 
after 
ag let 
al gid 
al um 
am ber 
am el 
an il 
an ticA: 
an vil 
ar id 
as pen 
as per 
atlas 
at om 
ax is 
bad ly 
bal lad 
bul last 
ban dit 
ban isli 
ban Tier 



4 

ban ter 
bap tist 
bar on 
bar rel 
bar ren 
bas set 
bat ter 
bav in 
bel dam 
bend er 
bet ty 
bev el 
bev y 
bid der 
big ot 
bUlet 
bit ter 
blabJber 
blad der 
bles sed 
bles sing 
blister 
blub ber 
blun der 
blus ter 
bran dy 
bras sy 
bum per 
bur net 
burn ing 
bur nish 
bur rel 
bus tard 
but ler 
but ment 
but ter 
bux om 
cab in 
cal id 
cal lat 
cam ber 



4 

cam el 
cam let 
can eel 
can cer 
can did 
can dy 
can ter 
cant let 
can to 
can ton 
cap tor 
car at 
car ol 
car rot 
car ry 
cas socA: 
cat mint 
cav il 
cen to 
central 
chaffy 
chan nel 
chant er 
chap el 
chap let 
chap man 
chap ter 
chil ly 
cin der 
city 
civ et 
civ ick 
civil 
clap per 
clar et 
cla« per 
clas sicj: 
clas sis 
clat ter 
clem ent 
clev er 



4 
elm ick 
clus ter 
clut ter 
craft y 
crust y 
cul ly 
cul prit 
cum ber 
cum in 
cur dy 
cur rent 
cur ry 
cur sed . 
cus tom 
cut ler 
cut ter . 
dal ly 
dan cer 
dap per 
den tal 
den tist 
des pot 
dex ter 
die tate 
dif fer 
dim ly 
din ner 
dip per 
dip tick 
dis tant 
dit ty 
diz zy 
drag net 
drag on 
dres ser 
drum mcr 
due at 
dul cet 
dul ly 
dun ner 
dusk y 



4 

dust y 
ed der 
ed dy 
el der 
em blem 
em met 
en ter 
en try 
envy 
ep ick 
cr rant 
ev er 
fab rici 
fac tor 
fag ot 
fan cy 
fel on 
fen cer 
fend er 
fen nel 
fenny 
fer ry 
fes tal 
fes ter 
fet ter 
fifty 
fillet 
fil my 
filter 
fin ny 
fis cal 
fitly 
fit ment 
flag on 
fian nel 
flat ter 
flinty 
flip pant 
flurry 
flus ter 



24 



m 



A Just Standard frr PrnvouvcJn^ 



4 

fran tidr 
frit ter 
ful gent 
fun nel 
fun ny* 
fur ry 
fus ty 
gad der 
gal Ion 
gal lop 
gam mon 
gam ut 
gan der 
gan za 
gar ret 
gelly 
gen der 
gen et 
gen try 
gib bet 
gin ger 
gipgy 
glad \y 
glas sy 
glim mer 
gilt ter 
graft cr 
gram mar 
grap nel 
gras sy 
grav cl 
grim ly 
grit ty 
»rum ly 
gul let 
gully 
gum my 
gun ner 
gus set 
gus to 
gusty 



gut ter 
liab it 
ham let 
ham mer 
hamp er 
hand cd 
han dy 
hap ly 
happy 
bar ry 
hatter 
bee ticA: 
hec tor 
hel met 
help er 
her ring 
hil ly 
hunter 
hurry 
husk y 

n bred 

n dex 
infant 

n rot 

n land 

nlet 

n ly 

n mate 

in ncr 

n stant 

nstep 
jabber 
jas per 
jester 
jun to 
justly 
kel son 
ken nel 
kim bo 
ladder 
lam bent 



4 

Ian rot 
land ed 
lap pet 
lat ter 
lem ma 
lem on 
lend er 
len til 
len tor 
lep er 
let ter 
level 
lily 
lim ber 
limbo 
lim it 
lim ner 
lim pid 
lim pit 
lin den 
lin en 
lin net 
lin tel 
litter 
liver 
liv id 
liv inff 
liz ard 
lum ber 
lump y 
lusty 
mad am 
mad ly 
mad man 
mag got 
mag net 
mal let 
mam mon 
man date 
man drake 
man ful 



4 
fiian Iv 

• 

man na 
marry 
mas sy 
mat in 
mat ter 
max im 
melon 
mem ber 
mend er 
men tal 
merit 
mer ry 
mes lin 
mil ler 
mim icA: 
minim 
mint er 
min um 
mitten 
mul let 
mun dane 
mun dicA: 
mur der 
mur mur 
musky 
muster 
must y 
mnt ter 
nap kin 
nappy 
nas ty 
never 
number 
pal lid 
pamper 
pan der 
pan try 
pappy 
par rot 
parry 



p}ii< tor 
pal ent 
pel let 
pen man 
pf^n ny 
pep per 
per ry 
pea ter 
pet ty 
pil fer 
pil lar. 
pip pin 
pis tol 
pis ton 
pity 
plan et 
plant er 
plat tor 
pi en ty 
plev in 
plum met 
plun der 
pres to 
prim er 
print er 
priv et 
priv y 
pub licA: 
pul vil 
pup pet 
puppy 
put ty 
rab id 
rafter 
ral ly 
ram mei 
ram part 
ran dom 
rant er 
rap id 
rav in 





the English Language. 


25 




4 


4 


4 


4 




shat ter 


splin ter 


tan gent 


turn piko 




shel ly 


stag nant 


tan ner 


ugly 
ul cer 




shel ter 


stag nato 


tas sel 


nt 


shil ling 


stam mer 


tatter 


um ber 


• 


shiv er 


stand ard 


tel ler 


um pire 


t 


sig nal 


stig ma 


tern per 


up per 




silly 


stingy 


ten ant 


ur gent 


t 


sil ver 


stud y 


ten der 


ut most 




sim mer 


stump y 


ten don 


ut ter 




sim pep 


stur dy 


tendril 


ramp er 


r 


sim ply 


sub urb 


ten et 


vap id 


t 


sin ful 


sud den 


ten nis 


vas sal 




sin ner 


suffer 


ten on* 


vast ly 




sis ter 


sul len 


ten ter 


vcl lum 




sit ting 


sul ly 


tes tato 


vel vet 




six ty 


sul tan 


tested 


vend cr 




skil let 


sul try 


tes ty 


ven om 




skip per 


sum mer 


tet ter 


ver y 


I 


slan der 


sum mit 


til ler 


ves sel 




Slav er 


sum mon 


tim brel 


ves tal 




slen der 


sun set 


tin der 


vie ar 




slip per 


sup per 


tin man 


vie tim 




slum ber 


sur ly 


tin ner 


vie tor 


T 


smat ter 


tab by 


tin sel 


villa 


r 


spat ter 


tabid 


tip pet 


vis ta 


mt 


spav in 


tablet 


tipsy 


vivid 


n 


spig ot 


tab ret 


. tram mel 


vulgar 


1 


spin ner 


tal ent 


trust y 


win ter 




spin ster 


tally 


tun nel 


wit ted 




spir it 


tal on 


tur ban 


wit tol 


n 


splcn did 


. tam per 


turn ip 


wit ty 



CHAPTER IV. 

isy words of two syllables^ accented on the second* 

If a Towcl, in an unaccented syllable^ stand alone^ or end a ajUable, 

its long sound, as in o ptn«, before ; yet as we do not dwell upon 
)wcl, the sound is weaker and shorter than when accented. 

1111 
» ab duce a bode ac cite ad duce 
a bide ab sume a cute %i^^^scisb 

c 




*;^6 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 



ad vice 
affy 
ago 
a like 
a live 
al ludc 
ally 
a lone 
a mate 
a maze 
apply 
a side 
a3 size 
as Slime 
a tone 
a wake 
a woke 
be came 
be fore 
be have 
be hold 
be side 
be take 
be tide 
be time 
cal ciiie 
ca nine 
col late 
col hide 
CO mate 
com bine 
com mode 
com mune 
com pete* 
com pile 
com ply 
com pute 
con cise 
con dole 
con duce 
con /jcle 




con futo 
con nive 
con note 
con sume 
con vene 
cor rode 
dc base 
de bate 
de cide 
de cline 
de duce 
de face 
de fame 
de file 
de fine 
defy 
de note 
de nude 
de ny 
de prave 
dc prive 
de pute 
de ride 
de rive 
de spite 
de vice 
de vote 
di late 
di lute 
dis pute 
di vide 
di vine 
efface 
e late 
e lope 
e hide 
em bale 
em base 
em brace 
em pale 
en tice 



1 

e rase 
e rode 
e spy 
e state 
e vade 
fore bode 
fore go 
fore see 
for gave 
for sake 
gri mace 
here by 
hu mane 
il hide 
il lume 
im bibe 
im pede 
im ply 
im pute 
in cite 
in cline 
in duce 
in flame 
in flate 
in fold 
in hold 
in nute 
in sane 
in vade 
in vite 
in voice 
July 
ma nure 
ma ture 
mis name 
mis place 
mis take 
mo rose 
ob late 
ob tuse 
o pine 



1 

pa role 
par take 
pis tolc 
po lite 
pol lute 
po made 
pro fane 
pn> fuse 
pro mote 
pro vide 
pro voke 
re buke 
re cede 
re cite 
re cluse 
re duce 
re fine 
re futc 
re late 
re ly 
re mote 
re pine 
re place 
re plete 
re ply 
re pute 
re take 
re tire 
re vile 
re vive 
re voke 
sa line 
se date 
se duce 
se rene 
sub lime 
sub side 
su preme 
sur vive 
ter rcne 
tra duce 



trans late 
un bind 
un bolt 
un fold 
u nitc 
un kind 
un lace 
un lade 
un like 
un safe 
un told 

4 
a bed 
a bet 
ab surd 
ad mit 
ad mix 
a dult 
a flat 
a las 
a men 
a mend 
a mid 
an nex 
an nul 
ap pend 
as sist 
at tend 
at tent 
at test 
oe clip 
be dust 
be gan 
be gun 
be held 
be best 
be reft 
ber lin 
beset 
be smut 
be spit 



m 



the English Language* 



4 

be trim 
cia bal 
ca det 
ca nal 
car tel 
com mend 
com mit 
com mix 
com pel 
con cur 
con nex 
con sist 
con tend 
era vat 
cur vet 
de bel 
de camp 
de cant 
de feet 
de fend 
de mit 
de mur 
de pend 
de sist 



4 

de vast 
dis pel 
dis plant 
dis sent 
dis tend 
dis til 
dis turb 
di van 
di vest 
e mit 
en camp 
en glut 
en list 
en trap 
e vent 
ex pend 
ex tend 
ex tent 
fo ment 
fbre fend 
forerun 
here at 
here in 
hotel 



im mit 
immix 
im pel 
im pend 
im plant 
im print 
in clip 
in cur 
in dent 
in fest 
in fleet 
inflict 
in ship 
in Sist 
in tend 
in tent 
in vent 
in vest 
ja pan 
la ment 
le vant 
mis hap 
mis pend 
mis print* 



4 

mis trust 
mo lest 
mo rel 
ob tend 
ob test 
00 cult 
oc cur 
of fend 
o mit 
per pend 
por tend 
por tent 
pre tend 
pre vent 
pro li^c 
pro pel 
pro tect 
rat an 
re but 
recant 
re fel 
refit 
re fund 
re lax 



27 

4 

re lent 
re mit 
re past 
re pel 
re pent 
re plant 
ro bust 
ro timd 
se dan 
se lect 
slier bet 
sub mit 
sub sist 
sus pend 
trans plant 
tre pan 
un bent 
un bred 
un fit 
un fix 
un furl 
un hurt 
un man 
un til 



;i 



CHAPTER V. 



Easy words of three syllables, the primary or full accent on 

the first syllahle, and the secondary accent on the third 

syllable. 

Note. Teachen of icheob ought to be very caieftil to point out to their 
pupils the piopNcr sound of every letter and pliable, (the unaccented 
sydablcs in paiticular ;) for a right pronunciatkui of the unaccented syl- 
lables constitutes the beanlgr of pronunciation, and tons a correct basis 
for their future improremoit 



A gen cy 
a gu ed 
a H as 
a re a 
bina ry 
bo la ry 
bo re al 



bo re as 
bra ver J 
ca den ey 
CO gen cy 
cu bi cal 
cu mu late 
cupola 



1 

de cen cy 
dei ty 
de vi ate 
di a dem 
di a gram 
di a mond 
di a per 



1 

di a ry 
do na ry 
dra per y 
du el list 
du pli cate 
du ri ty 
e gri ot 



^ 



28 

1 

fa tal ly 

fi nal ly 

fi nery 

fla gran cy 

flu en cy 
Jfolio 
b fra gran cy 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



fri ar y 
fru gal ly 
fu mi gate 
. fu ner al 
ga bi on 
ge ni al 
ge ni o 
ge ni us 
gi ant ly 
glo ri fy 
gra di ant 
gro cer y 
ho ra ry 
hu man ly 
i dol ist 
i dol ize 
i vor y 
ju ni or 
ju ni per 
la bi al 
la i ty 
le gal ly 
le ni ent 
li bra ry 
11 ma ture 
lo cal ly 
lu bri cate 
I hi cu brate 
; lu na cy 
j lu na ry 
I lu na tick 
i lu tan ist 
I me di ate 
J me di um 



1 

me ni al 
me te or 
mo ri on 
mu til ate 
mu ti ny 
no bod y 
no ta ry 
nu mer al 
nu tri ment 
o di um 
o do rate 
o pi um 
o ral ly 
o ri ent 
o ver plus 
pa pa cy 
pa pist ry 
pa tri ot 
pe ri od 
pi a net 
pie ty 
pi on y 
pi ra cy 
plu ral ly 
plu vi al 
po e try 
po per y 
po ten tate 
pre mi um 
pri ma cy 
pri ma ry 
pri ory 
pri va cy 
pu ri fy 
pu ri tan 
pu ri ty 
pu ru lent 
pu tre fy 
ra di ant 
ra di ate 
ra di us 



1 

ra pier 
re al ize 
re al ly 
re cen cy 
re cent ly 
re gen cy 
ro ta ry 
sa li ent 
sa pi ent 
se ere cy 
si lent ly 
so ber ly 
spo li ate 
sta tary 
stu pi fy 
su i cide 
to tal ly 
tu bu lar 
tu me fy 
tu te lar 
u ni on 
unison 
u ni ty 
iiri nal 
va can cy 
va gran cy 
ve ni al 
violate 
vi o lent 
vi o let 
vi o list 
vo cal Ijf 
vo tary 
wo ful ly 
zo di acAr 
4 

ab ba cy 
ab di cate 
ab le gate 
ab lu ent 
ab ne gate 



4 

ab so lute 
ab so nant 
ab sii nent 
ac ci dent 
ac cu rate 
ad a mant 
ad mi ral 
ad vo cate 
af flu ent 
ag o nize 
agony 
al CO ran 
al ge bra 
al i ment 
al li gate 
al ti tude 
am bi ent 
ami ty 
am nes ty 
am pli ate 
am pli fy 
am pli tude 
am pa tate 
am u let 
an a gram 
an ec dote 
an i mal 

■ 

an i mate 
an nu al 
an o my 
an te date 
an te lope 
an ti dote 
ap pe tite 
ap pli cate 
ar e ly 
ar ro gant 
ar ro gate 
at ti tude 
av o cate 
ban de let 



the English Language, 



1 



ban ish ment 
ban ter er 
bar on et 
bar on y 
bar ren ly 
bar ri er 
bar lis ter 
bat ter y 
ben e fit 
big a my 
big ot ry 
bil an der 
bil ber ry 
bit ter ly 
brev i ty 
brig an tine 
buf fa lo 
bur -gla ry 
but ter fly 
but ter nut* 
but ter y 
cab a list 
cab in et 
cal a mine 
cal a mus 
cal cu late 
cal e fy 
cal i ber 
cal i CO 
cal o mcl 
cal um ny 
can di date 
can did ly 
can di fy 
can is ter 
can ni bal 
can o py 
cap ti vate 
car ri er 
car ri on 



4 

cav al ry 
cav il ier 
cav i ty 
eel e brate 
chan cer y 
chap i ter* 
cim e ter 
cin na mon 
cit a del 
civ il ly 
clar i fy 
clar i ty 
clas si cal 
clem en cy 
cler i cal 
clev er ly 
clin i cal 
cred i bly 
crim i nal 
crit i cal 
cul mi nata 
cvl ti vate 
cor ren cy 
cur ri er 
cur sor y 
cur vi ty 
cus to dy 
cus tom er 
daf fo dil 
dal li er 
dec a gon 
dec o rate 
ded i cate 
del e gate 
den si ty 
dep re cate 
dep re date 
dep u rate 
dep u ty 
der o gat« 
des o late 



dcs pe rate 
des ti ny 
dcs ti tute * 
det ri ment 
dif fer ent 
dif & cult 
dif fi dent 
dig ni fy 
dig ni ty 
dil i gent 
dil u ent 
dim i ty 
dis pu tant 
dis so lute 
div i dend 
dul ci fy 
dul ci mer 
dul CO rate 
cb on y 
edify 
ed i tor 
effigy 
el e gant 
el e gist 
elegy 
el e ment 
el e vate 
elogy 
em bas sy 
em e raid 
emery 
em i grant 
em i grate 
em i nent 
em u late 
ene my 
en er gy 
en mi ty 
en ti ty 
ep i cure 
ep i gram 



4 

ep i sode 
cr e mite 
es cu lent 
es ti mate 
ev er y 
ev i dent 
ev i tate 
ex pe dite 
ex pi ate 
fab ri cate 
fab u list 
fac tor y 
fac ul ty 
fal la cy 
fam i ly 
fan ci ful 
fan ta sy 
far ri er 
fat i gate 
fee u lent 
fed er al 
fel on y 
fer u la 
fes ti nate 
fes ti val 
fig u rdl 
fig u rate 
fil a ment 
fin i cal 
fin i tude 
fish er y 
flat ter y 
ful gen cy 
ful mi nate 
fun da ment 
fus ti gate 
gal ax y 
gal lant ry 
gal Ier y 
gem i nate 



\ 



30 



1 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



' nm er al 
^on er ate 
: i^ran a ly 
'■ grail u late 
ii^rat i fy 
j grat i tude 
I grav i ty 
! j^un ner y 
>hab i tude 
hap pi ly 
heb e tate 
hec ti cal 
hep ta gon 
her aid ry 
her e sy 
her e ticA: 
hici or y* 
his tor y 
id i om 
id i ot 
\g no rant 
im i tate 
im mi nent 
im mo late 
im pe rate 
im pe tus 
im pie ment 
im pli cate 
im po tent 
"im pre cate 
im pu dent 
in ci dent 
' ill di an 
ill di cant 
in di cate 
in di gent 
in di go 
in do lent 
in du rate 
in dus try 
i/fn fa my 




4 

in fan cy 
in fan try 
in fi del 
injury 
in no cent 
in no vate 
in so late 
in so lent 
in sti gate 
in sti tute 
in stru ment 
m te ger 
in te gral 
in ter est 
in ter val 
in ti mate 
in tri cate 
ir ri tate 
it er ant 
it er ate 
jus ti iy 
lac ta ry 
lac te al 
lam i na 
lap i date 
lat er al 
lat in ist 
lat in ize 
lat i tude 
leg a cy 
len i fy 
len i ty 
lep ro sy 
lev i ty 
lex i con 
lib er al 
lib er ty 
lig a ment 
lin e al 
Im i ment 
lit a ny 

mssoEsmamm 



4 

lit er al 
lit er ate 
lit i gate 
lit ur ^ 
liv er y 
mac u late 
mag ni fy 
mag ni tude 
mal a dy 
mal a pert- 
man ci pate 
man ful ly 
man i fest 
man i fold 
man u al 
mar i gold 
mar in er 
med i cal 
med i tate 
mel o dy 
mem or y 
mer ri ly 
nier ri ment 
mil lin er 
mim i cal 
min er al 
min is ter 
min is try 
min u et 
mis ere ant 
mit i gate 
mit ti mus 
mul ti ply 
mul ti tude 
mun di fy 
mur der er 
mus ctt lar 
nay i gate 
neg 11 gent 
nul li fy 
nul li ty 



nun ner y 
nur ser y 
pal li ate 
pal pi tate 
pan o ply 
par a dox 
par a gon 
par al lax 
par al lei 
par a pet 
par a site 
par i ty 
par dy 
pas sen ger 
pas tor al 
pat ro nal 
ped ant ry 
ped es tal 
ped 1 ment 
pel i can 
pen al ty 
pen den cy 
pen e trate 
pen i tent 
pen u ry 
pep per mint 
pes ti lent 
pet ri iy 
pil lor y 
pit i ful 
plen a ry 
plen i tude 
plen ti ful 
prac ti cal 
prav i ty 
prev a lent 
priv i ly 
pub li can 
pub lish er 
pun gen cy 
rad i cate 



■Si 



the English Language, 



31 



4 

ram pan cy 
rap id ly 
rat i fy 
rec re ate 
rec ti fy 
rec ti tudo 
reg u lar 
reg u late 
rei e gate 
rein e dy 
ren o vate 
rep ro bate 
rev el ry 
rev er end 
rev o cate 
rib aid ry 
i rid i cule 
1 riv u let 
i run a gate 
i rus ti cal 
j rus ti cate 
i sac ra ment 
j sal a ry 
sat el Ute 
1 ."^at is fy 



4 

sec ta ry 
sec u lar 
sed i ment 
sen a tor 
sen sor y 
sen ti ment 
sen ti ncl 
sev er al 
sig nal ize 
sig na ture 
sig ni fy 
sil ver y 
sim 1 lar 
dim i le 
sim on y 
sim pli fy 
sin is ter 
slip per y 
spec u late 
splen e tic^ 
stam in a 
stim u late 
stip u late 
sub si dy 
suf fer er 



suf fo cate 
sum ma ry 
sum mon er 
sup pie ment 
sup pli ant 
sup pli cate 
sur ro gate 
tab e fy 
tab u lar 
tan ta lize 
teg u ment 
tem per ate 
tem po ral 
ten an cy 
ten den cy 
ten e ment 
ter ri fy 
tes ta ment 
tes ti fy 
tif fa ny 
trav el ler 
trin i ty 
tur bu lent 
tur mer ic^ 
tur pi tude 



4 

ur gen cy 
ur gent ly 
ut ter ly 
vac u um 
val u er 
van i ty 
ven er ate 
ven er y 
ver i fy 
vcr i ly 
ver i ty 
vet cr an 
vie tor y 
vil Ian y 
vin di cate 
vin e gar 
vit ri fy 
vit ri ol 
viv id ly 
viv i fy 
vul gar ly 
vul ner ate 
west er ly 
wil fill ly 
wit ti ly 



CHAPTER VI. 

Easy words of three syllahles^ the primary accent on the 



second. 



1. 

Ab do men 
a basement 
! a bate ment 
a bi ding 
a cu men 
ad he rent 
ad ja cent 
<id mi rer 
a dorer 
affie^ 
allegro 



1 



al lure ment 
al lu rer 
a maze ment 
ar ma da 
ar rival 
a tone ment 
bal CO ny 
bap ti zer 
be la ted 
bi tu men 
bra va do 



1 

ca iia ry 
CO e val 
CO he rent 
com pi ler 
com pli ant 
com pli er 
com po nent 
com pu ter 
con fine ment 
con so ler 

• 

con tri ver\ 



1 
ere a tor 
dc bate ful 
de bate ment 
de ba ter 
de CO rum 
de ere tal' 
de cri al 
de face ment 
de fa mer 
de fi ler 



de 1\ \Nsx 










fiSfi 



mmt 



32 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 



(le lu der 
de ni al 
de ni er 
de po nent 
de ri der 
die la tor 
di la tor 
di plo ma 
dis pu ter 
di vi der 
di vine \y 
en gra ver 
en tice ment 
en ti cer 
en vi ron 
e rase ment 
errata 
e spi al 
ge ne va 
he ro ick 
hi a tus 
hy 6 na 
i dea 
de al 
11 le gal 
in cite ment 
in duce ment 
in he rent 
in hu mail 
in va der 
in vi ter 
le gu men 
len ti go 
lum ba go 
man da mus 
nar ra tor 
oc ta vo 
oc to ber 
ome ga 
op po nent 
'pa na do 



'pa na do 



1 

pa ro tis 
per fu mer 
pol lu ter 
po ma turn 
po ta to 
pri me ro 
pri me val 
pro du cer 
pro fa ner 
pro po nent 
pro vi der 
pur su ant 
pur su er 
quan da ry 
re ci tal 
re fine ment 
re fi ner 
re fu tal 
re la ter 
re lu cent 
re sto rer 
re vi val 
re vi ver 
ro ta tor 
sa li va 
se date ly 
se du cer 
so na ta 
spec ta tor 
sub lu nar 
sul ta na 
su pine ly 
su preme ly 
sur vi ver 
tes ta tor 
tes ta trix 
trans la tor 
tri bu nal 
un hi as 
unduly 
un grate fill 



1 

un ho ly 
un time ly 
ver ba tim 

4 
a ban don 
ab er rant 
a bet ter 
a bun dant 
ac cus torn 
ad hib it 
af feet ed 
a mend ment 
ap par el 
ap pel lant 
ap pel late 
ap pen dam 
ap pen dix 
as sas sin 
as sea sor 
as sist ant 
a sun der 
at tend ant 
at tract or 
a ven ger 
ban dit ti 
be wil der 
bom bas tic^ 
bo tan ic^ 
cli mac ter 
CO hab it 
CO hib it 
col lect or 
com mit ter 
com pen sate 
con cur rent 
con dem ner 
con den sate 
con duct or 
con fis cate 
con sid er 
con sist ent 



4 

con suit er 
con sum mate 
con tern plate 
con tend er 
con\ tented 
con tin gent 
con tract or 
con trib ute 
cor rect ly 
cor rupt er 
ere den da 
de bel late 
de eant er 
de cem ber- 
de crep it 
de fend ant 
de fend er 
de liv er 
de mer it 
de tach ment 
de vas tale 
di dac ticA: 
di lem ma 
di min ish 
dis cred it 
dis cum ber 
dis cus ser 
dis pen ser 
dis sent er 
dis tern per 
dis til ler 
dis turb er 
di ur nal 
dog mat ic^ 
do mcs tick 
dra mat ic^ 
du el lo 
du en na 
ef ful gent 
e las tic^ 
el lip sis 



EP 



s» 



the English Language, 



33 



p ticA: 
bel lish 

pan nel 
im el 



in ces sant 
in clem ent 
in cul cate 
in cum bent 
in dig nanf 



:amp ment in dul gent 
hant ment in dul to 



urn ber 
emicit 
^en der 
g ma 
el op 
'en om 
at ic^ 
lb llsh 
at ick 
tas ticA: 
bid ding 
run ner 
tel ler 
let ick 
ois ticit 
)\i ter 
Dend ent 



in fan ta 
in flict er 
in hab it 
in her it 
in hib it 
in sip id 
in spect or 
in suit er 
in tend ant 
in tent ly 
in tes tate 
in trep id 
in trin sic^ 
li cif ic& 
n ag net ic^ 
n A lef ic^ 
r la lig nant 



me men to 
me tal licJr 
mo nas tic^ 
noc tur nal 
no vem ber 
ob ject or 
of fend er 
pa cif \ck 
pa ren tal 
pe dan ticft 
po lem ic^ 
pre cept or 
pre tend er 
pro hib it 
pro \i( icA 
pro tect or 
re dun dant 
re fresh ment 
re luc tant 
re mem ber 
re mit.ment 
re pel lent 
re plen ish 




4 

re plev y 
re pub lie A 
re pug nant 
re ven ger 
ro man cer 
ro man ticA; 
ro tun do 
sa tir icA: 
sa ran na 
Sep tem ber 
som nif \ck 
spe cif icA; 
sur ren der 
ter rif icA: 
to bac CO 
tor ment or 
^r«^s gres sor 
raa^brel la 
un CIV il 
unhan dy 
un hap py 
un just ly 
un wil ling 
u ten sil 






CHAPTER VIi: 

ry words of three syllables, the primary or full accent on 
le third sy: Idble, and the secondary accent on the first 
yllable. 



1 

I mode 
e cede 
)el lee 
us trade 
ti nade 
non ade 
tra vene 
tee 
a gree 
ar range 



1 

dis en gage 
dis e steem 
dis in cline 
dis re pute 
dis u nite 
dom i neer 
gaz ct teer 
im nia ture 
im po lite 
im por tune 



com mode in com mode 



1 

in com plete 
in tor cede 
in ter fere 
in ter lace 
in ter line 
in ter lope 
in ter vene 
in tro duce 
lem on ade 
mis ap ply 
mis be kv?^ 



1 

mis ere ate 
mis re AiQ 
mis re late 
o ver drive 
o ver go 
o ver prize 
o ver see 
o ver seen 
ver sleep 
o ver take 



V 



\ 



mm 



I ,1 1 



t w u^ c ij p M yim j 



» 



34 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



pat en tee 
per se vere 
re as sume 
ref u gee 
rep ar tee 
re u nite 
ser e nade 
su per fine 
su per scribe 
su per scde 
su per vene 



1 

un der go 
un der mine 
un der rate 
un der take 
vol un teer 

4 
ap pre hend 
com pre hend 
con tra diet 
dis af feet 
dis an nul 



dis en chant 
dis re spect 
in cor rect 
in di rect 
in tor diet 
in tcr mit 
in ter mix 
in ter sect 
man u mit 
o ver pass 
o ver run 



4 

o ver set 
o ver turn 
re ad mit 
rec ol lect 
rec om mei 
rep re hend 
su per add 
un der hanc 
un der sell 
un der stan 
vi lin 



Ea^y words of four 
the first syllable^ 
syllable. 

1 

A pi a ry 

a vi a ry 

cu li na ry 

ju di ca ture 

lu mi na ry 

me di ate ly 

mo ment a ry 

nu ga tor y 

nu nier al ly 

nu mer a ry 

nu mer a tor 

va ri e gate 

vi o la tor \ 

vi o lent ly 

4 

ab so lute ly 

ac cu ra cy 

ac cu rate ly 

ac ri mon y 

ad mi ral ty 
j ad ver sa ry 
I al i mon y 

al le gor y 
am a lory 



CHAPTER VIII. 

syllables, the primary or full accent 
and the secondary accent on the th 



an ti mon y 
ap plex y 
ar ro gant ly 
eel i ba cy 
ded i ca tor 
del i ca cy 
dif li cul ty 
dil a tor y 
em i nen cy 
em i nent ly 
em is sa ry 
ep i lep sy 
es ti ma tor 
ev i dent ly 
feb ru a ry 
ffen er al ly 
ig no min y 
ig no rant ly 
in ci den cy 
in so lent ly 
in ti ma cy 
in ti mate ly 
in tri ca cy 
in tri cate ly 



i 



in ven tor y 

an u a ry 

in e al ly 
lit er al ly 
lit er a ry 
lit er a ture 
man da tor y 
mat ri mon y 
mil i ta ry 
min a tor y 
min er al ist 
min is ter y 
mis eel la ny 
nav i ga tor 
nee ro man cy 
neg li gent ly 
pat ri mon y 
per e gri nate 
plan e ta ry 
preb en da ry 
pred a tor y 
pref a tor y 
prev a len cy 
prin ci pal ly 






5B9B 



the English Language, 



35 



pul mo na ry 
pur ga tor y 
rad i cal Ijr 
red o len cy 
sal u ta ry 
sec ond a ry 



sec re ta rj 
sed en ta ry 
sem i na ry 
scv er al ly 
tern per a ment 
tem per ate ly 



lem per a ture 
tem po ra ry 
ter ri tor y 
tes ti men y 
tran si lor y 
trib u ta ry 



CHArXER IX. 

Easy words of four syllahles^ the primary or full accent on 
the second syllable, and the secondary accent on the fourth 
syllable. 



Ab bre vi ate 
ac cu mu late 
ad ja cen cy 
a e ri al 
al le yi ate 
al lo di al 
al lo di um 
al lu vi al* 
al lu vi on 
an nu i ty 
ar mo ri al 
bar ba ri an 
ca cu mi nate 
cen tu ri on 
col le gi al 
col le gi an 
col le gi ate 
col lo qui al 
CO me di an 
com mu ni cant 
i com mu ni cate 
jTom mu ni ty 
; con gru i ty 
con nu bi al 
• con ve ni ent 
cor po re al 
ere du li ty 
cri te ri on 
de ca den cy 



1 

di lu ci date 
di lu vi an 
e Iti ci date 
e lu sor y 
em po ri um 
en CO mi um 
fu ne re al 
fu tu ri ty 
gar ru li ty 
gram ma ri an 
gra tu i ty 
he ro i cal 
his to ri an 
i de al ly 
il le gal ly 
i1 lu mi nate 
il lu sor y 
im mu ni ty 
im pe ri al 
im pi e ty 
im pu ni ty 
im pu ri ty 
in de cent ly 
ir ra di ate 
li bra ri an 
ma te ri al 
ma tu ri ty 
me mo ri al 
mer cu ri al 



1 

pal la di um* 
par tu ri ent 
pe cu li ar 
pic to ri al 
pro pri e tor 
pro pri e ty 
re ga li a 
sa ti e ty 
sa tu ri ty 
se cu ri ty 
60 bri e ty 
so ci e ty 
va cu i ty 
va ri c ty 
ve ne re al 

4 
a bil i iy 
ab surd i ty 
a cad e my 
ac eel er ate 
ac tiv i ty 
ad min is ter 
a dul ter ate 
a dul ter y 
a dun ci ty 
af fin i ty 
am bas sa dor 
a nal o gy 
«t wax ^ TCN.^ 



^ 



36 



A Just Standard for Ppoiymncing 



an tag o nist 
a rid i ty 
ar tic u late 
ar til ler y 
as per i ty 
a vid i ty 
bar bar i ty 
be at i {y 
beatitude 
be nef i cent 
be nev o lent 
bru tal i ty 
ca lam i ty 
ca lum ni ate 
cap tiv i ty 
car nal i ty 
ce leb ri ty 
cc ler i ty 
ci vil i ty 
CO ag a late 
CO in ci dent 
col lat er al 
com mem o rate 
com pet i tor 
com pul sor y 
con cav i ty 
con fed er ate 
con sid er ate 
con sist ent ly 
con sist or y 
con spir a cy 
con spir a tor 
con tin gen cy 
con tin u al 
e« pid i ty 
i rfe Ml i ty 
;decem^rate 
i de rliv i ty 
de fat i gate 
de gen er ate 
' de lib er ate 



de lin e ate 
de lir i urn • 
de prav i ty 
dex ter i ty 
di am e ter 
di rect or y 
dis par i ty 
di vin i ty 
ef fem i nate 
e lab o rate 
e lee tri cal 
e lee tri fy* 
e man ci pat« 
e pis CO pal 
e pit o mc 
e qiiiv a lent 
e quiv o cal 
e quiv o cate 
e rad i cate 
e vac u ate 
e van ge list 
ex ten u ate 
ex trem i ty 
fa tal i ty 
fer til i ty 
fes tiv i ty 
fi del i ty 
for mal i ty 
fni gal i ty 
gen til i ty 
ffram mat i cal 
ha bil i ment 
hos til i ty 
hu man i ty 
hn mil i ty 
i den ti cal 
i den ti ty 
il lit er ate 
im men si ty 
im pcd i ment 
in cur vi ty 



in dem ni fy 
in dem ni ty 
in dif fcr ent 
in fin i ty 
in hab i tant 
in san i ty 
in sin u ate 
in tel li gent 
in ter ro gate 
in vlg o rate 
ir reg u lar 
iu rid i cal 
le gal i ty 
le git i mate 
le vit i cal 
Ion gev i ty 
mag nif i cent 
ma lev o lent 
ma lig ni ty 
mc rid i an 
mil len ni wu 
mo ral i ty 
mor tal i ty 
mu nif i c-ent 
na tiv i ty 
ne ces si ty 
no bil i ty 
nu mer i cal 
ob lit er ate 
o bliv i on 
om nip o tent 
par tic u lar 
pi rat i cal 
po et i cal 
po lit i cal 
pon tif i cal 
pos ter i ty 
pre cip i tant 
pre die a ment 
pro fund i ty 
pro pen si ty 



the English Language, 



37 



• i ty 

r 
3 cal 

ty 

i can 

I cal 
cal 



ser vil i Xy 
se ver i ty 
sig nif i cant 
sin cer i ty 
so lem ni ty 
80 lid i ty 
sub liin i ty 
te mer i ty 
le pid i ty 
ti mid i ty 



tran quil li ty 
un lim it ed 
un man ner ly 
ur ban i ty 
u til i ty 
ra lid i ty 
ve nal i ty 
vi cin i ty 
vir gin i ty 
vi ril i ty 



CHAPTER X. 

7rds of four syllables, the primary or full accent on 
lird syllablCf and the secondary accent \m the first 
*le, 

4 4 

vlt ac a dcm ick 

BL ick ac ci dent al 

tor am bi dex ter 

dent an te mun dane 

. tus ar o mat ic^ 

I do at mo spher icA* 

ja cent ben e fac tor 
lit a tor cir cum val late 
i on dim ac ter ick 

ie ment com pli ment al 
ck con ti nent al 

mus con va les cent 

eet ly co ri an der 

per det ri ment al 

dis con tent ed 
tor dis in her it 

, tor dis re spect ful 

une ly en er get icA 

a ep i dem icA; 

le I^ CT a nes cent 

do fun da ment al 

Ion hyp crit icA: 

ce ti in ad ver tent 

I king in ci dent al 

ded in con sist ent 



in cor rect ly 
in de pend ent 
in di rect ly 
in flu en za* 
in nu en do 
in stru ment al 
in ter mit tent 
in ter reg num 
mal e fac tor 
man i fcs to 
mem o ran dura 
mon u ment al 
o ri ent al 
or na ment al 
pred e ces sor 
sac ra ment al 
sal ma gun di 
sys te mat ick^ 
un af feet ed 
un as sist ed 
, un der stand ing 
un ex pect cd 
u ni ver sal 
un sus pect ed 




■?w 



38 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 
CHAPTER XI. 



Difficult and irregular monosyllables, in which the soun 

of the vowels are accurately pointed out by thefigures, a 

the silent Icttets properly defined^ hy being printed 

Italick characters^ 

point out the different boui 
vowel a in particular. 



Note, Instructcrs 
of the vowels to their 



1 

Ace 

atd 

atm 

bake 

bane 

baste 

bead 

beak 

beam 

bean 

beard 

beast 

beef 

beeves 

bite 

blatn 

blaze 

bleach 

bleak 

blear 

bleat 

bleed 

blia^t 

blind 

blow 

blown 

board 

boast « 

boat 

bode 

bolt 

bratd 

brain 



1 

braze 
breed 
breeze 
bribe 
bride 
bnef 
\mgh\ 
broach 
brogtte 
cake 
care 
ease 
cave 
cease 
chafe 
chatn 
change 
cheap 
cheat 
cheek 
cheer 
cheese 
chide 
chief 
child . 
chine 
chives 
clafm 
clave 
clay 
cle^m 
clear 
cleat^ 
cleave 



should be very careful to 
pupUs, the sounds of the 


1 


1 


cloak 


dike 


coach 


dime* 


coast 


dive 


coat 
coax 


doge 
dole 


code 


dolt 


coke 


dome 


cold 


door 


colt 


dose 


comft 


doze 


cope 
cone 


dratn 
drake 


cove 
court 


dray 
dream 


crane 


drear 


crape 
crave 


droll 
drone 


cream 


drove 


crease 
creed 


dry 
duke 


creep 

croak 


dupe 
each 


crow 


ear 


cry 
cube 


ease 
east 



cure 

dace 

dare 

deal 

dean 

deed 

deem 

deep 

die 



eat 

eave# 

eel 

eke 

eve 

fatl 

fay 

fear 

feaal 



1 
fee 

feed 

feel 

few 

f/ef 

field 

f/end 

fierce 

fife 

fight 

flail 
flake 
flame 
flare 
flay 
fleak 
fleam 
fleece 
fleer 
fleet 
fli(7*t 
floor 
flow 
flovm 
flute 
fly 
foal 
foam 
foe 
foflis 
force 
ford 
ioxx 



1 

frail 

frame 

fray 

freak 

free 

fri^At 

fro 

froze 

fry 

fume 

gain 

game 

gave 

gaze 

g^st 

glaze 

gleam 

glean 

glebe 

gl^e 

glide 

globe 

gloto 

glue 

good 

goal 

goat 

gotfrd 

gram 

grape 

gray 

graze 







the English Lam.gu 


age 


■i 

39j 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


greet 


kite 


mope 


pore 


roll 


slain 


, grew 


^nee 


most 


pork 


rove 


slake 


grief 


^nife 


moi^ld 


post 


safe 


sleek 


grieve 


Anoll 


moi^lt 


poiflt 


sage 


sleep 


grind 


known 


mo7^rn 


preach 


saint 


sleet 


grade* 


lair 


nail 


pride 


sake 


sleeve 


gross 


laird 


neap 


priest 


say 


slide 


grove 


lake 


near 


probe 


scale 


sluice 


grow 


late 


neat 


prone 


scarce 


sly 


1 guidf^ 


lay 


niece 


prose 


scare 


smear 


gttile 


leagtie 


mgh 


pry 


scoat 


smile 


guise 


lean 


oaf 


puke 


scold 


smite 


haste 


leap 


oak 


pyre 


scope 


smote 


haze 


leash 


oats 


quail 


score 


snail 


heap 


least 


ode 


quake 


scrape 


snake 


heat 


leech 


old 


queer 


screak 


snare 


heave 


leer 


own 


quite 


scream 


sneak 


heed 


leet 


pace 


quote 


screen 


sneer 


hide 


lewd 


paid 


race 


scribe 


sneeze 


hind 


lice 


paint 


rail 


scroll 


snore 


hoar 


lie 


paste 


rake 


seat 


snoio 


hoarse 


liege 


pate 


range 


seek 


soak 


hoax* 


lieu 


pave 


rare 


shake 


soap 


hold 


life 


pay 


rate 


share 


source 


home 


liaAt 
like 


pea 


ray 


sheaf 


sown 


host 


peach 


reach 


sheep 


spade 


hove 


lime 


peat 


ream 


sheet 


spare 


huge 


line 


peep 


reap 


shield 


spay 


ice 


load 


pew 


rear 


shoal 


speak 


ire 


loaf 


pie 


reave 


shore 


spear 


jade 


loam 


pierce 


reef* 


shorn 


speech 


ijafl 


lute 


pike 


reel 


shote* 


speed 


!jay 


maim 


pint 


ride 


shoi0 


spew 


jeer 


may 


pipe 


rind 


shoii'n 


spike 


ijoke 


meal 


plagtfe 


ripe 


shnek 


Bphie 


jjolt 


meek 


plaint 


roach 


shrine 


spire 


! jufce 


mild 


play 


Toam 


siege 


spite 


;juRo 


mile 


plea 


roar 


si^rX 


spleen 


keel. 


mire 


plead 


roost 


skate 


splice 


1 keen 


mode 


plume 


robe 


skue 


sport 


fer^ 


mole 


ply 


rogue 


sky 


'8»\"t'Wv 



iO 


A Just Standard far Pronouncing 


• 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


spray 


sty 


vie 


caZf 


march 


brau?l 


spric/At 


SUd 


view 


caZm 


mark 


brau>n 


spry* 


SU2t 


vogwe 


caZve 


marl 


broad 


spume 


swain 


wa£f 


car 


marsh 


hvough^ 
caught 


spy 


sway 


weal 


card 


mart 


square 


sweep 


weave 


carle 


nard 


CdLW 


squeak 


siijord 


weed 


carp 


paZm 


chaZk 


squeal 


taint 


weep 


cart 


par 


claw 


squeeze 


taste 


wield 


carve 


parch 


cork 


squire 


tea 


wife 


charge 


pard 


corn 


stafd 


teach 


vnghX 
wild 


charm 


park 


corpse 


stain 


teagi^e 


chart 


parse 


cords 


state 


teal 


wile 


czar 


part 


CVfLW 


stave 


tea.9e 


wire 


dark 


psaZm 


craiol 


stay 


teat 


wise 


darn 


salve 


daub 


ste^im 


teenfi 


wo 


dart 


scar 


daw 


steed 


tie 


woad 


daunt 


scarf 


dawn 


steep 


i\ght 


wore 


for 


scarp - 


draw 


steer 


toad 


wove 


farce 


shark 


dratcm 


stewr 


toast 


yean 


farm 


sharp 


drawl 


stole 


tope 


year 


flat/nt 


smart 


dwarf 


stone 


tore 


yield 


gape 


snarl 


fall 


store 


torn 


yoke 


garb 


spar 


false 


stove 


trail 


zeal 


gaunt 


spark 


fault 


stoio 


train 


2 


guard 
haZf 


star 


flaw 


strain 


traipse 


ik 


starch . * 


for 


strange 


trait 


zilms 


haZve 


stark 


fork 


stray 


treat 


arch 


hard 


start 


form 


streak 


tree 


are 


hark 


starve 


(ough* 
frauc 


stream 


tribe 


arm 


harl 


tar 


street 


trine 


arms 


harm 


tart 


frfiughi 


stride 


trope 


art 


harp 


taunt 


gauze 


strife 


trow 


aunt 


harsh 


yard 


gawk 


strike 


try 


baZm 


haunt 


yam 


^aw 


stripe 


tube 


bar 


jar 


3 


gorge 


strive 


twain 


barb 


jaunt 


auZn 


rroat 


stroke 


tweak 


bard 


lard 


au'e 


lalt , 


stroll 


twice 


barge 


large 


baZk 


hatcBk 


strove 


type . 


bark 


lark 


bau?d 


^^^K * 


strow 


vague 


barm 


laugh 


born 


horii^;^ ; 


stupe 


veal 


bam 


mar 


bou^At 


horse ^'' 




Mk 



3 

scald 

scorch 

scorn 

SCTZW 

scra2(?l 

shaiwl* 

shatrm 

short 

small 

snort 

sord 

sort 

soi^^At 

spalt 

spair 

spaii[7l 

spaion 

sprai{?l 

squall 

staZk 

stall 

stork 




Iuigh';f> 



3 

storm 

strain? 

swarm 

ta/k 

Ull 

tau^^t 

torch 

vai^lt 

vaunt 

wnZk 

war 

ward 

warm 

warn 

warp 

wart 

wrought 

yawl 

yai^n 

4 

abb 



Language. 



1 


4 


4 


art 


blend 


bwild 


add 


bless 


bwilt 


and 


blest 


bulb 


ant 


bliss 


bulge 


apt 


bluff 


bulk 


af 


blunt 


bung 


ash 


blur 


bunn 


ask 


brac^ 


burgA 


asp 


bran 


burn 


bacA; 


brand 


burnt 


badge 


brass 


burse 


bang 


brat 


burst 


bask 


bricA 


bust 


bat 


hvidge 


buzz 


beg 


bring 


cant 


bet 


brisk 


cash 


bilge 


brunt 


cast 


bilk 


brush 


cat 


bill 


buc^ 


cafch 


blacA: 


bud 


chaff 


bland 


' budge 


champ 


blast 


buff 


chancct 



t I have giv^ the yowel a» when followed by nee, n/, «9, «/^ &c, ks short, 
and not its flat sound, as Mr. Webster, and others, have given it ; and 
likewise the vowel o^ in words wliere it is followed by s» or a and a mute 
con;jonant, I have given it the sound of broad a short, although Mr. Web- 
ster, and others^ have mvcn it the souiid of broad a long in tliis situation. 

Mr. Walker, (speaking of a when flat,) savs, " tlus sound of a was 
found before the nasal liquid n, especially when succeeded by c, i2, or /, 
as in danccy glance^ gi anty plants slander^ &c The hissing consonant s, 
was likewise a sitrn of this sound of a, whether doubled, as in ^lass^ lass^ 
&c. or accompoTiicd by t, as in cast, Jaat, Ac but this nronunciation of a 
seems to have l)ecn for some years advancing to the Miort sound of this 
letter, as heard in handy land, &c. and pronouncing the a in qfler, ans^ccr, 
haakety mast, &c. as long as in half, calf, &c. borders very closely on 
vulcHrity ;" he says, however, " that this was the sound formerly, is hi^rhly 
pnjfuable, iirom its l>cing still the sound given it by the vulgar, who arc 
generally the last to alter the cwnmon pronunciation.*' 

In siicakins of o^ he saya^ " this letter, like a, has a tendency to lengthen, 
when fbflowed by a Hquid and another consonant, or by s^ss^ox s and a 
niote ; bat this length of o seems every day more and more vulgar, arid as 
it would be gross to a degree to sound the a in casUe, mask, and plant, like 
thr a in palm^ paahn, 6oc. so it would be equally exceptionable to pronounce 
the in mow, and/irosi^ as if written moicse) JVavKt?^ 



42 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 




curse 



4 

drurfge 

drug 

drum 

ducA: 

duct 

dull 

dum5 

dunce 

dung 

durst 

dusk 

dwell 

earl 

earn 

ebb 

edge 

egg 
elf 

elk 

ell 

elm 

else 

end 

err 

erst 

e^ch 

fact 

fang 

fast 

fat 

fell 

fen 

fence 

feoff 

fern 

fe^ch 

fib 

fiU 

film 

fin 

fish 



4 

fiSt 

fix 

fiam 

flap 

flash 

flask 

flat 

flax 

fled 

fleJge 

flesh 

fling 

flint 

flip 

flinch 

flix 

flux 

fract 

fresh 

fret 

friend 

frill 

fringe 

frisk 

frush 

fun 

fund 

fur 

furze 

fuss 

fuzz 

gad 

gag 
gang 

gap 
gas 

gash 

gasp 

gem 

getme 

gVance 



4 

gland 

glass 

glen 

glib 

glimpse 

ynash 

gn^X 

graft 

grand 

grant 

grasp 

grass 

grin 

grist 

grit 

grurfge 

gruff 

grum 

grant 

gitess 

gulf 

gull 

gum 

gim 

rurge 

gush 

gust 

hac& 

ham 

hang 

ha« 

hash 

hasp 

hast 

ha^ch 

have 

head 

heJge 

held 



huril 
- hui 



hurt 



wi' ■<■■ 



"» 



!%€ English Language* 



43 



1 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


;n 


mess 


pence 


quilt 


scrub 


skill 


»? 


met 


perch 


quince 


scud 


skin 


ss 


midst 


perk 


quit 


scull 


skip 


ici 


milk 


pert 


racA: 


scum 


skulk 


mcifi: 


mill 


pet 


ramp 


scurf 


slab 


Cifc 


mince 


phiz 


rant 


search 


slacA; 


g 


miss 


phlegm 


rash 


sect 


slant 


m& 


mist 


picA: 


rasp 


sedge 


slap 


nee 


mix 


pill 


rat 


self 


slash 


pse 


much 


pimp 


realm 


serge 


sled 


sh 


muc^ 


pin 


rend 


serve 


sletfge 


3S 


mud 


pish 


rib 


shaft 


slept 


St 


muff 


pi/ch 


rich 


shag 
shall 


slid 


^ch 


mulct 


plafd 


ricfffe 


slim 


arn 


mull 


plan 


rift 


shah 


sJing 


(fgtf 


mulse 


pledge 
plucJ 


r»g 


sham 


slip 


ft 


mumps 


rill 


shelf 


slit 


g 


murk 


plug 


rinse 


shell 


slug 


S8 


musk 


plump 


np 


shift 


slung 


t 


must 


plunge 


risk 


shin 


sinr 


jA 


nec^ 


prance 


rub 


ship 


smacA: 


\ 


nerve 


press 


rug 


shred 


smell 


np 


next 


pricA: 


rum 


shrill 


sniclt 


^g 


nib 


prim 


run 


shrimp 


smerk 


u 


niclie 


prince 


rush 


shrub 


snag 


3 


nicii: 


print 


rusk 


shrug 


snap 


*p 


nip 


pri^m 


rust 


shun 


snafch 


}t 


null 


puff 


rut 


sict 


snub 


ck 


num& 


pulp 


sacA: 


sieve 


snuff 


U 


nurj}e 


puke 


samp* 


sift 


snug 


ng« 


nut 


pun , 


sash 


silk 


span 


rch 


nymph 


purge 


sat 


sill 


spn.9m 


rk 


pac/: 


purl 


scalp 


' sin 


specAr 


St 


pad 


purr 


scan 


since 


spell 


mpn 


pang 


pufsc 


scant 


sing 


spend 


ash 


paas 


pus 


scAism 


singe 


sperm 


a«k 


past 


quacA: 


scoufge 


sip 


spill 


au 


pafch 


• .quell 


scrsg 


sit 


spin 


at 


pearl 


quest 


scra^ 


«V!L 


'SS^ 


ji/di 


peck 


quick 


Rcratc^i 


^^l^ 


«\5^S>N. 


9Bh 


peg 


quill 


sct\^ 


%V\SSi 





I 

I 

i 



\ 



I 



WIWU I 



H 

4 

spread 
sprig 
•pring 
rung 
spttd 
spun 
spur 
spurn 
squib 
squint 
stab 
stac^ 
staff 
stag 
stamp 
stand 
stead 
stem 
step 
stern 
stie^ 
stiff 
still 
stilts 
stinff 
stint 
stitch 
strand 
strap 
stress 
strefch 
strict 
string 
strip 
slnicZr 
strung 
strut 
stub 
stuclr 
stud 
stuff 



A Just Standard fur Pronouncing 



4 

stun 

stung 

stunt 

such 

sucib 

sud^ 

sung 

»up 

surd 

surf 

surge 

swam 

sweat 

swell 

swept 

swerve 

swiA 

swig 

swill 

swing 

swii^ 



4 

(ouch 

tough 

tmek 

tract 

trance 

trap 

trash 

tread 

tret 

Iriciir 

trip 

trudfc 

trudge 

ttuss 

brust 

tub 

luft 

twk 

turf 

turn 

twelve 



4 

wedge 

weld 

well 

welt 

were 

wert 

west 

wet 

wici5r 

will 

wilt* 

win. 

wince 

wing 

wish 

wisp 

wifch 

wreck 

vren 

K^rist 

wrk 




swmge 


twig 


yam 


swum 


twin 


yelk 


swung 


twinge 


yel3 


tacifc 


t^vist 


yelp 


tang 


twit 


yerk 


task 


twi/ch 


yest 


tefnt 


urge 


yet 


tell 


urn 


young 


tempt 
tend 


vast 


zest 


vat 


•5 


tens^ 


vend 


bloc^ 


term 


vent 


blot 


test 


verb 


blotch 


text 


verse 


bob 


tick 


vest 


bond 


till 


vc^ch 


boss 


tih 


vex 


bo^ch 


tin 


waft 


bots 


tinge 


wag 


box 


Hp 


wax 


cl\op 



& 

eho()3 

eiock 

cost 

ecHLgh 

eroSc 

fross 

ero^eh 

doe^ 

dodgg 

doll 

dot 

drop 

dross 

HocJc 

flop 

fond 

font 

fosse 

fox 

koek 

from 

frost 

gloss 

god 

gone 

grog* 

grot 

hod 

^nob 

^oe^ 

loJge 

loft 

loll 

Jong 

loss 

lost 

moc^ 

mosqtie 

moss 

no/ch 



& 

off 

ofi 

on 

ox 

plot 

pocA: 

pod 

pocZge 

pomp 

pond 

pop 

pot 

prompt. 

prong 

prop 

F.OC^ 

romp 

scoff 

seoncf 

scotch 

shone 

shop 

^ot 

slop • 

SOCi^ 

soA 

sol* 

solve 

song 

sop 

spot 

squab 

stjuash 

squat 

stocA: 

strong 

swab 

swamp 

swan 

swop I 



sa 



i 




the English Language* 


45 


5 


6 


6 


7 


•ll 


mt 


toss 


fru/t 


shoe 


stood 


chirp 


bounce 


trot 


irloom 


shook 


wolf 


fir 


bound 


trottgli 


goose 


shoot 


wool 


firm 


boat 


wad 


gou^ 


sloop 


8 


kirk 


clouit 


wan 


groom 


soon 


birch 


quirk 


couch 


wand 


groove 


soot 


bird " 


skirt 


count 


want 


group 


soiq) 


blood 


twirl 


croucii 


was 


hoof 


spool 


bom6 


oi 


dou6t 


wash 


hook 


spoon 


come 


boil 


douse 


wasp 


hoot 


spruce 


dirge 


broil 


AvoMghi 


wast 


loo 


stool 


dirk 


choice 


flounce 


watch 


loof 


stoop 


dirt 


coif 


flout 


wrong 


look 


swoon 


firpt 


coil 


found 


yacAt 


loom 


swoop 


flirt 


coin 


fount 


yon 


loon 


tom5 


flood 


coit 


ground 


6 

• 


loop 


took 


front 


ibil 


grouse 


bloom 


loose 


,tool 


glove 


^roiii 
join 


grout 


book 


lose 


toMr 


her 


hound 


boom 


mood 


troop 


hers 


joint 


loud 


boon 


moon 


truce 


love 


joist 


lounge 


boor 


moor 


true 




loin 


lout 


boot 


mooae 


xoho 


r^omb 


moil 


mound 


hou^e 


moot 


idiom 


ront 


moist 


mount 


brood 


move 


whose 


shirt 


noise 


noun 


lirook 


nook 


woo 


shov^j 


oil 


ounce 


broom 


noon 


woof 


sir 


point 


ours 


choo^ 


ooze 


yoMr 


spirt 


poise 


oust 


coo 


owplie 


yours 


sponge 


roist 


out 


cook 


pool 


7 


stir 


soil 


pIou^rA 


cool 


poor 


bull 


wont 


spoil 


pouch 


coom 


proof 


bush 


word 


toil 


pounce 


coop 


prove 


couZd 


work 


voice 


pound 


coot 


prude 


foot 


world 


void 


pout 


crook 


prune 


full 


worm 


oy 


proud 


crude 


roof 


good 


worse 


boy 


round 


do 


rook 


goods 


worst 


cloy 


rouse 


doom 


roost 


hood 


wort 


coy 


scour 


droop 


root 


pull 


9 


hoy 


scout 


fiouk 


me 


push 


freight 


joy 


ftKo^t ^ 


food 


rule 


puss 


Ekeiu 


\o^ 


^ca^ss^ 


acoop 


shouZd 


tele 


Vwx^ 


^i3^<S^ 



46 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



on 


on 


&m 


•?0 


ow 


ovs 


snout 


sprout 


hlovne 


cowl 


frown 


owl 


sound 


stout 


brow 


crowd 


gown 


prowl 


sour 


tou^e 


brown 


crown 


growl 


scow* 


souse 


trounce 


browse 


down 


how 


scowl 


spouse 


trout 


clown 


drown 


howl 


town 


spout 


Touch 


cow 


drowse 


now 


▼ow 



CHAPTER Xn. 

Words of two syllables^ accented on the first. 

Note, Teachers should recollect that when the vowel e at the end of an 
unaccented syllable preceded by a consonant, is pnnted in a Roman chara^ 
ter, the preceding rowel in that syllable riiould be pronounced lonff, as in 
em-ptre, hem-i-sphere ^ but if it be printed in an JRcUick character, the pre' 
ccduig vowel in that syllable should be pronounced short, as in no-tice^! 
im-agc^ gen-u4ne. ^licn e ends an unaccented pliable, and is imme£*| 
ately preceded by a vowel which is not silent^ the vowel should bo pro- 
noun<^ long, as m a>gue, av-e-nue ; but if the vowel immediately procemiffl 
the e be silent, the vowel preceding that should be i^rt, as in ymil-ogue, 



cat-a-logtie» 
t 

Able 
a corn 
ague 
aid ance 
aid er 
ail ing 
air pump 
air y 
ale house 
an gel 
ba con 
batlifif 
bane ful 
bare ly 
bare ness 
ba sin 
hea con 
heard ed 
I beard less 

M bear er 

V beast ly 



I 

beat en 
bea ver 
beau ty 
bee hive 
bee tie 
be ing 
be som 
bible 
blind fold 
blind ness 
blu ish 
board er 
boast er 
boat ing* 
boat man 
bold ness 
bol ster 
bolt er 
ho rax 
how sprit 
brace let 



I 

brazen 
bride groom 
brief ly 
hright en 
bri^^t ness 
bro ken 
bro kef 
bu gle 
by word 
ea ble 
ca dence 
cai tiff 
earn brick 
eare ful 
care less 
cease less 
ee ruse 
chazr man 
cham ber 
chast en 
cheap ivesa 



child hood 
child ish 
cho sen 
ei pher 
ci tal 
claim ant 
clear ance 
dear ly 
clear ness 
clea ver 
ell mate 
cli max 
close ly 
close ness 
do vcn 
coal pit 
coarse ly 
coarse ness 
coast er 

CO \\ot\ 



cold ness 
coizl ter 
court ship 
era die 
ere dence 
cu rate 
cy cle 
c}^ press 
cy priis 
dai ly 
daen ty 
dai ry 
dat sy 
dan ger 
da ring 
da tive 
day book 
day break 
day hgki 



the English Language* 



471 



i deal ing 
; dear ly 
deep ly 
deep ness 
de ism 
I dew lap 
' dire ful 
di ver.9 
do lour 
do tage 
dray man 
drear y 
dry ly 
dry ness 
du ranoc 
du ring 
dying 
ea g\e 
east er 
cast ern 
east ward 
;ea «y 
je qual 
e v^n 
e vtl 
I fa \Ae 
i fail ing 

' faznt Iv 

• 

I faznt naes 
fat r ly 
' faa ness 
fa mou« 
fa vour 
fear (id 
I: fee blc 
feel Ing 
fi bre 
fferce \y 
fine nesB 
!j tihe ]y 
i^re arms 



I 

fire ball 
fire brand 
fire loc^ 
fire man 
fire wood 
fla vour 
fio rist 
fore man 
fore noon 
four teen 
fra cas* 
fra grance 
{la grant 
frail tv 
tree dom 
free hold 
free ly 
free man 
free neas 
free stone 
fri {\ay 
i'ro ward 
Iro zea 
fu tile 
ga blc 
gayly 
ge nus 
gno mon 
gold en 
grace ful 
grate ful 
grave ly 
greasy 
great ness 
grcc dy 
green ness 
greet ing 
griev ance 
greev ous 
grind stone 
gui dance 



hatr y 

has/ ea 

hast y 

hate ful 

ha ven 

hay mow* 

ha zel 

heal ing 

hear er 

hear ing 

hear say 

heat er 

high ness 

hind moBt 

hire ling 

hoar y 

hold er 

hoi ster 

home ly 

hu mid 

hy dra 

hymen 

hy phen 

hy son* 

ire ful 
jazl er 
jew el 
jews harp 
jut cy 
kind ly 
kind ness 
knight hood 
know ing 
la hour 
la ding 
ladle 
lame ness 
lead er 
lee ward 
le gton 
lewd nestt 



I 

li cense 
light en 
light ly 
light ding 
like ly 
liken 
like ness 
like wi«e 
lime kiln 
lime stone 
live ly 
li vre 
lo cate* 
lo cust 
lone some 
luke warm 
mat d en 
ma/n ly 
man ger 
man gy 
ma pie 
ma son 
meal y 
mean ly 
mea sles 
meet ing 
might y 
mind ed 
mind ful 
mi ser 
mi tre 
mo hair 
most ly 
motive 
mot^ld er 
mould ing 
mould y 
mourn er 
mourn ful 



1 



mute Iv 
nail cr 
name ly 
name sake 
na svl 
na tivc 
near ly 
neat ly 
neat ness 
need ful 
nee die 
need y 
ncM ter 
neu tral 
new ly 
nice ly 
ni tre 
ni trous 
no ble 
no bly 
no tice 
nui sance 
oat meal 
o dour 
ogle 
on iy 
o pen 
o'U'n er 
pae an 
patn ful 
patnt er 
paint ing 
pa rent 
paste board 
pa stry \ 
pa tron 
pave mcnt 
pay ment 
peace ful 






\ 




■ JMilJ I 

48 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 

peo pic 
ijpew ter 
I pha lanx 
pha ros 
I phe nix 
,pi ous 
ipi rate 
pla guy 
plain ly 
plain ncss 
plain tiff 
pli ers 
plu mage 
port age 
port al 
port er 
port ly 
por trait 
port res* 
post age 
po5y 
poult ice 
poult ry 
prat ne* 
j)ray er 
preach cr 
pre cept 
pri vate 
pro bat 
pro noun 
pure ly 
quo rum 
raz ment 
ra/n how 
reap er 
re gton 
re gress 
ri ile 
rujhi \y 
n pen 
fro gi/hh 



1 

rol ler 
8a chem 
safe ly 
safe ty 
sa turn 
sci ence 
sera per 
sea son 
see ing 
se quel 
shoul der 
si ding 
si lence 
sla vish 
spare rib 
spike nard 
spleen y 
spri^At'ly 
sta ble 
sta pie 
state ment* 
states man 
steel yard 
stee pie 
stew ard 
sti ile 
sti pend 
stram er 
stran gcr 
sutt er 
sweet en 
ta ble 
ta bour 
tat lor 
ta ken 
teach er 
ti dings 
tire some 
title 
to ken 
tow ards 



I 

trai tor 
trea son 
treat ment 
trea ty 
trifle 
tri umph 
tro phy 
ines day 
tu mour 
twi light 
ty rant 
ty ro 
u nit 
u rine 
u svLge 
use All 
vatn ly 
va pour 
vice ray 
vile ly 
vi tab 
watt er 
wake ful 
wa ken 
weak en 
weak ness 
wea ry 
wea se\ 
weav er 
wee vtl 
wi den 
wise ly 
tori ter 
wn ting 
year ling 
year ly 
yeo man 
ze bra* 
2 

zl mond 
ar bouT 



2 

arch er 
arc iick 
ar dent 
ar dour 
argue 
ar mour 
arm pit 
ar my 
arse niclr 
ar son* 
Art ful 
art is4 
art less 
baZm y 
bar ber 
bar gain 
bar ley 
bar ter 
bra vo 
caZm ness 
car cass 
card er 
car go 
car nage 
car nal 
car pet 
cart er 
car tri(2ge 
car ver 
char coal 
char ger 
char ter 
dark en 
dark ness 
dar ling 
faim er 
gar den 
gar land 
gar lie^ 
gar ment 
gat liet 



gar ivish 
gar ter 
har bour 
hard en 
hard ly 
hard nesi 
hard y 
har lot 
harm ful 
har ness 
harp er 
harsh ly 
harsh ness 
bars let 
harts horn 
har vest 
heark en 
heart y 
jar gon 
jaim dice 
lar board 
large ly 
laugh ter 
mar ble 
mar gia 
mar ket 
mar quia 
marsh y 
mar tyr 
mar vel 
ma ster 
par boil 
par eel 
parch ment 
par don 
par Icy. 
par lour 
pars ley 
pars nip 
par son 



mm 



the Engliah l^nguage^ 



m 



ncr 
ixidge 

:astn 
let 
p en 
p er 
p ness 
kle 
ry 

board 
YighX 

ry 
tie 

iy 

lish 

ness 

aish 

5r 
ost 
► 

pice* 
ays 
it 

pice 
\mm 
111 

ward 
lam 
dy 
der 
d side 
iron 
cus* 
fe way 
[ age 
; wood 
ner 
net 
nee 



eor sair 
cors let 
dsLugh ter 
dor mant 
drairer 
draw ing 
faZ con 
false hood 
false \y 
falter 
fatt cet 
fatilt y 
for feit 
for mal 
for mer 
for tress 
for ty 
for ward 
gViU dy 
gor geous 
gor gon 
hdiugh ty 
hor net 
horse man 
lat^^ful 
lair suzt 
law yer 
lord ly 
lord ship 
mor bid 
mom ing 
mor scl 
mor tal 
mor tar 
mort ffage 
mor tise 
n&ugh ty 
or bit 
or chard 
or der 
ord nance 



or gan 
or phan 
palsy 
pal try 
paw per 
psal ter 
qua drant 
qua drate 
quar ter 
quar to 
sau cer 
sau cy 
BtLU sage 
saw yer 
scorn ful 
short ness 
slhvgh ter 
sor did 
squa dron 
tatt rus* 
taw ny 
tor pid 
tor por 
tor sel 
tor toise 
vor tcx 
wal nut 
war ble 
ward en 
wa ter 
4 

ab bey 
ab scnce 
ac tive 
ac tress 
ad age 
ad dice 
ad die 
ad verb 
ad TeT«e 
ag ate 



4t 

al ley 
am bush 
am pie 
am ply 
an ise 
an nals 
an swer 
ap pie 
apt ly 
apt ness 
ash lar 
asthma 
baf fle 
hag gage 
bal ance 
band age 
bap iism 
bar rac^ 
bash ful 
bask et 
has tard 
bat tie 
bed lam 
bed post 
beg gar 
bel fry 
her yl 
bish op 
blem ish 
blud geon 
bram ble 
break fast 
bricA: kilTi 
brim stone 
brin die 
brisk ly 
bris tie 
brit tie 
buc^ et 

Y>\\elc \ct 



4 

bucA: ram 
buag et 
bttild er 
build ing 
bulk y 
bun die 
bur den 
bur doc^ 
bur gess 
bus He 
button 
cab bage 
cac^ le 
cam phire 
can die 
can dour 
can vass 
cap tjin 
cap tire 
car riage 
cas tie 
cat tie 
cav em 
cen sus* 
cen tre 
cer tain 
chal lenge 
chand ler 
chap lain 
checA er 
cher ish 
cherry 
cher ub 
cher up 
chic^ en 
chimney 
chis el 
cis tern 



B 



150 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



/ 



4 
clev y* 
clum sy 
coun try 
cuup le 
cmip let 
coiir age 
ci;ed it 
crcv ice 
crib bagc 
cric/c et 
crim 5on 
c:rip pic 
crit ic^ 
cruin blc 
crap per 
crys tal 
cucA: old 
cndg el 
cum frey 
cun ning 
cur die 
cur rant 
cur tain 
cus tard 
cut lass 
cyn icA: 
dac tyle 
dam age 
dam ask 
dam se\ 
dam son 
dan die 
dan druff 
dap pie 
das tard 
daz zle 
deaf en 
deaf ness 

deiftor 

del uge 

' m 1 



4 

dcs tine 
dim pie 
di^ nial 
dis talT 
dis tcnce 
dis trict 
ditto* 
doub le 
dread ful 
drib blc 
driv en 
due tile 
dud geon 
dwel ling 
dwin die 
early 
ear nest 
ec logue 
edit* 
ef fort 
cm hers 
em pire 
emp ty 
en gine 
en siyn 
en trails 
en voy 
cr mine 
es sence 
exit 
ex tant 
fam ine 
fam ish 
fash ton 
fast en 
fat ling 
far ret 
fer tile 
fer vent 
fer vid 
fer vouT 



4 

fickle 
fid die 
fjg ure 
fil bert 
fm ish 
flask et 
flat ness 
flesh y 
flex ile 
flimsy 
flour ish 
frag ment 
fran chise 
frcc^ le 
fresh en 
fresh et 
fret ful 
frfend ly 
friend ship 
frig ate 
frisk et* 
frus trate 
ful gour 
fum ble 
fur long 
fur lough 
fur nish 
fus ticA: 
gam brel 
gant let 
gen tile 
gen tie 
ger man 
ger und 
g/iast ly 
gin seng 
glis ^en 
glut ton 
grand child 
granite 
grapple 



4 

grid die* 
grls tie 
grum hie 
gud geon 
guilt y 
guin ea 
gyp sum* 
had dociS: 
hag gard 
hand ful 
han die 
hand saio 
han(2 sel 
hand some 
hand ^pike* 
hap pen 
har ass 
has socA: 
hat band 
hatch et 
hav ing 
hav ocA 
haz ard 
head ing 
hcav en 
heav y 
he?f er 
help ful 
help less 
hem lock 
hen roost 
her aid 
her bage 
her mit 
heron 
hucA: stcr 
hud die 
Aum ble 
ft,um. bly 



4 

husband 
hy* sop 
ill ness 
im age 
im post 
im pulse | 
in born ' 
in cest 
in come 
in flux 
in jure 
in rood 
in sect 
in sight 
in stance 
in voice 
in ward 
istA. mus 
jeal ojis 
jen ny* 
jeop ard 
jour nal 
jour ney 
jus tice 
just ness 
ker ncl 
ker sej 
ket tic 
kid nap 
kid ney 
kin die 
kin dred 
king dom 
kirch en 
kit ten 
Anap sac/fc 
hiMck le 
l&ck ey 



the English Language, 



61 



I 



4 

land mark 
land scape 
land tax 
Ian tern 
\a,tch et 
I lat tice 
; lav ish 
learn ed 
learn ing 
leav en 
leg ate 
leop ard 
lep rous 
lis ten 
lit tie 
lua tre 
lus trlng 
mal ice 
man age 
man like 
mar riage 
mattress 
mem brane 
men ace 
raer cer 
mer chant 
raer cy 
mer iqa^ 
mes sa^e 
mid die 
mid night 
milk pail 
milk pan 
milk y 
mill dam 
millet 
mill dtonc 
mill Btrel 
mir ror 
mifl chief 
mistress 



4 

muddy 
muffle 
mul lein 
mum ble 
mum my 
mur rain 
mus cle 
mush room 
musket 
mus lin 
mus tard 
mul ton 
muz zle 
nec^ lace 
ner vous 
ner ry 
nes tie 
net tie 
uig gard 
nim ble 
nim bly 
nip per« 
nour ish 
nurs ling 
nut meg 
pacit age* 
pac^ et 
pad die 
pad loc^ 
pal ace 
pam phlct 
par ish 
passage 
pas sing , 
pas slv^ 
pass port 
pas time 
pat tern 
pea9 ant 
ped ant 
peddle 



4 

pen ance 
pen sive 
per feet 
per 11 
per ish 
perjure 
person 
phaii tom 
pheo^ ant 
phren sy 
phys ick 
ipick axe 
pic^ ed 
picA et* 
pick le 
pigmy 
pii grim 
pil lage 
pim pie 
pin eer« 
pin nace 
pis mire 
piich er 
pi/ch fork 
piv ot 
plan tain 
plas ter 
plat form 
plea^ ant 
prat tie 
pref ace 
prel ate 
pre^ ence 
prln cess 
pr'is on 
pris tine 
pub lish 
pum ice 
pttn geat 
pun ish 
pur chase 



4 
pur liii9 
pur pie 
pur port 
pur pose 
piurs lain 
pur sy 
puz zle 
quic^ en 
quicA: ly 
quin sy 
quiv er 
rac^ et 
lad ish 
raf fli; 
ram ble 
rap ine 
ras cal 
rat tie 
rav age 
rav el 
rav ish 
read y 
recA: on 
red den 
ref uge 
rel ict 
ren ard 
rep tile 
res cue 
res in 
res pite 
rib aid 
rich es 
rich ly 
Tick cts 
rid dance 
rid die 
Tis en 
rough ly 
rough ncss 
rub bage 



4 

rub bish 
rud der 
nid dy 
ruffle 
rum ble 
rus tic^ 
rus tie 
sad die 
sa/m on 
sam pie 
sand ed 
safch el 
sav age 
scab bard 
seaf fold 
scan dal 
scant ling 
scop tre 
scis son 
scrab ble 
scram ble 
scrib ble 
scuffle 
scuip tor 
scur vy 
scut tie 
sec ond 
sel vage 
sem i 
sen ate 
sentence 
seraph 
ser mon 
ser pent 
ser vant 
ser vice 
ser vile 
set tie 
scv en 
shac^ le 
shan ty* 



T- 



■SS 



MMWa— 



4 

shek c\ 
sJicp herd 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing;' 



-1 



iicr 



iff 



iipping 
1 . L) irrecA 



f 



h-jffle 

iiul tiff 

t sicA: ness 



sicA" ly 



(J 
t 



t 



sim pl« 
sin cw 
six pence 
»ix teen 
skep tidlr 
skil fill 
sivim mer 
slut tish 
smug gle 
smut ty 
snuf fer* 
spoc/r \e 
spec tre 
spin die 
spit tie 
splen dour 
sput ter 
stad die* 
stand ing 
stand^ish 
stanza 
stead y 
stel lar 
ster il 
ster ling 
stif fen 
stiff ness 
still ness 
strag gle 
trict ly 
trip ling 



4 '"^ 

Strug gle 
stub ble 
stub born 
stuf fing 
stum ble 
stur geon 
sub stance 
sub tile 
suf frage 
8ul phur 
sum mons 
sun day 
sun dry 
sun rise 
sup pie 
sur face 
sur felt 
sur geon 
sur plus 
swel ling 
swim mer 
swin die 
syl van 
Rymp torn 
Byn od 
syn tax 
syr inge 
sys tern 
iacArle 
tac/: ling 
tac ticA:3 
tan sy 
tan yard* 
tariff 
tattle 
tav em 
tem pest 
tem pie 
tempt er 
ter rac€ 
ter ret* 



4 

tic^ ing 
tic^ et 
tic/: le 
til lage 
tim ber 
tim id 
tip pie 
tittle 
tractile 
traf ^ek 
trample 
tran script 
trap ping« 
tread le 
treble 
trem ble 
tres pass 
tres ses 
tres tie 
trib une 
trib ute 
troub le 
trump et 
trun die 
turn ble 
turkey 
tur tie 
tusean 
twen ty 
tym pan* 
um brage 
un der 
up land 
up roar 
up wards 
ur chin 
usher 
vac cine 
Tal itl 
val ley 
valour 



4 

Tal ue 
Tan daT* 
Tan ish 
Ten geance 
Ter bal 
Ter dant 
Ter diet 
ver juice 
Ter min 
T£rnal 
Tes per 
Tes tige 
Tig our 
Til lage 
tII lain 
Tine yard 
Tint ag^ 
Yis age 
vis it 
weap on 
wed dinff 
wed loci 
wel come 
western 
west ward 
wick ed 
wicA et 
wid geon 
wil ful 
Mdl ling 
wim ble 
wind lass 
wish ful 
wit ness 
wiz.ard 
v^rap per 
i&res tie 
wretch ed 
t&rist band 
torit ten 
young ster 



4 

zeal ot 
zeal ous 
zcph yr 

5 
bloc^ hea 
bios som 
bob bin 
bod ice 
bod kin 
bod y 
bond age 
bond man 
bon fire 
bon net 
bottle 
bot torn 
chop per* 
clos et 
cob ble 
oob bier 
cock le 
cock loft 
coc^ ney 
codfish 
eodg er* 
coffee 
cof fer 
coffin 
col ick 
col lege 
col umn 
com et 
com ick 
com ma 
com men 
com mon 
coip penc 
com plex 
con liux 
con scrip 
con stant 



the English Language^ 



5 

con sul 
con tra* 
con trite 
con vex 
cop per 
ccsp y 
cos set* 
cos tivg 
cost ly 
cot tage 
cotton 
cross ly 
croich et 
doc tor 
doc trine 
do^ ma 
dol lar 
dor ick 
dox y 
drop ping 
drop sy 
dros sy 
flor id 
flor in 
Xolly 
fon dltf 
fond nesB 
lop pish 
for age 
fore hefld 

j for exgn 

for est 

fos sil 

I fos ter 
frol ic^ 
frost y 
glos sy 
gob lin 

.. god desB 

j god like 



5 

gos ling 
gos pel 
g08 sip 
grog ram 
grot to 
grovel 
hob h\e 
hob by 
hog^ head 
hog sty • 
horn age 
^on est 
Aon our 
hop per 
hop pltf* 
hor rid 
hos xWe 
host ler 
hotly 
hov el 
jockey 
joe und 
jog gle 
jolly 
Arnot ty 
knowl edge 
lob by 
lo Jg er 



lodi 



ing 



lofty 
log book* 
log wood 
loz €nge 
model 
mod em 
mod est 
mon ster 
mon strous 
mor al 
mot to 
non plus 



5 

non sense 
non suit 
nos tril 
novel 
nov ice 
ob long 
oc tave 
odd ly 
offal 
offer 
office 
offing 
offset 
off spring 
often 
ol ive 
on set 
on ward 
op tic^s 
or ange 
ot ter 
pol ish 
pom pous 
pon der 
pop lar 
poppy 
por ridge 
pos se 
pot ash 
pot tage 
pot ter 
pot tie 
prob lem 
prod uct 
prof fer 
prog ress 
prol ogve 
prom ise 
prom;>t er 
prom;3t ly 
prop er 



5 

pros pect 
pros per 
prov erb 
prov ince 
prox y 
quar rel 
quar ry 
rob ber 
rob in 
rodlret 
rock y 
ros in 
rot ten 
soft en 
soft Jy 
sol ace 
sol der 
sol emn 
sol id 
sol stice 
solv ent 
son net 
sor rel 
sor rv 
spon dee 
spon sor 
squab ble 
squan der 
stoc^ ing 
stop page 
stop pic 
toe sin* 
tod dy* 
top ic^ 
tor rent 
tor rid 
trol lop 
trop icifc 
vol ley 
vol ume 
vomit 



53 

5 

wal let 
wan der 
wanton 
war rant 
wash board* 
wasp ish 
wa/ch cr 
wa^ch ful 
wrong ful 
UTong ly 
yon der 

6 
bloom y 
boo by 
boot y 
bo som 
bru tal 
cool cr 
cool ness 
coop cr 
crook ed 
cru et 
crut scr 
cm set 
fool ish 
fooU cap* 
frutt ful 
fruit less 
gloom y 
hook cd 
loose ly 
loos en 
loose ness 
lo ser 
moon light 
moon shine 
moor ing 
moor ish 
move ment 
mo ver 




64 

6 

00 zy 

poor ly 
poor ness 
pru dence 
pru dent 
I pru dish 
I pru ner 
! I'kw barb 
room 9Lge 
root cd 
root y 
ruby 
rudtf \y 
ru(I(! nes0 
ru in 
ru lor 
,ni mouT 
\ ru rill 
srru pic 
spoon fill 
t ru ant 

Iru Iv 

I ^ ' 
I ' 
\ni\ let 

I>ul loc^ 

• Iml Iv 

• 

'!>ii! rush 
ImiI wrtrk 
.!-;-^Iiol 

» 

I'li.'i'h or 

• >>!» i(»n 
i >.w ball 
: ».M hob! 

1 » I iuif 

■ '-'I umn 

' M >!ool 



A /iMl Standard for Pronouncing 




7 

fal ness 
good ly 
good nes8 
pud ding 
pul let 
pul ley 
pul pit 
worn an 
wood chucA:* 
wood en 
wood land 
wood man 
wool ly 
worst ed 

8 
blood shed 
blood y 
com bat 
come ly 
com nt 
com fort 
com ing 
com pass 
com nide 
con dt/it 
cov er 
cov crt 
cov ct 
cov vy 
dirl V 

• 

glov or 
jjov orn 
lion ry 
bov or 
lovo ly 
luv or 
lov ing 
mon day 
mon cy 
ov <'n 
pom inol 



8 
shor el 
sir up 
sloT en 
spongy 
stir rup 
won dcr 
won drous 
wont ed 
world ling 
world ly 
word y 
work man 
worm wood 
worm y 
wor ry 
wor ship 
9 

eigh teen 
ei^A ty 
hex nous 
neigh how 
we/yA ty 
11 

cir cle 
cir clot 
cir cud 
fir kin 
firm ly 
firm ncss 
skir mish 
s(|uir rcl 
nr gin 

01 

boil er 
c holer ly 
coin Jigc 
roinor 
foi blf 
ioin or 
joint oti 
joint or 



oi 

joint ly 
loi ter 
moist en 
noi sy 
oil y 

oint ment 
poig nant 
point ed 
point er 
poi son 
toil et 

oy 
boy ish 
coy ly 
joy ful 
joy ons 
loyal 
oy ster 
roy al 
voy age 

ou 
bound less 
boun ty 
coun ter 
coun ty 
douM ful 
dou5t less 
dour/A ty 
fioun der 
found er 
found ling 
found ry 
foun tain 
fnm 2v 
A our glass 
A our Iv 

• 

housff hold 
hoUv9 in^ 
mount ain 
out cast 
out orv 



ou 

out er 
out law 
out let 
out line 
out ra^e 
out set 
out side 
out ward 
pound age 
pound er 
round Iv 
scoun drd 
sound inia 
sound Iv 

• 

sound neiv 
sour ly 
sour nesi 
trou sen 
ow 
bow els 
bow er 
cow ard 
cow slip 
dow cr 
dow las 
do>vn cast 
down fall 
do\vn ri^ 
down wail 
down j^ 

dow.H'y 
drow sy 
pow der 
prow ess 
'x>w el 
row en^ 
show er 
tow el 
tow er 
town ship 
trow el 



tie English Language. 55 

CHAPTER Xm. 

dect Sentences^ of easy iwrds, calculated to teach 
Children to recul^ and at the same time to infuse 
into their tender minds some just ideas of their 
duty, and the rudiments of sanctity and virtue. 

Lesson I* 

liove that which is good, and shun vice. 
My son, do as you are bid, but do no ilL 
Rest in the Lord, and mind his word. 
The Lord is good, in all his works and ways. 
My son, hold fast the law that is good. 
You must not tell a lie, nor do hurt. 
Mark the man that doth well, and do so too. 
A bad man is a foe to the law. 

Lesson IL 

Help such as want help, and be kind. 
Hate no man, but love both friends and foes. 
A bad man can take no rest, day nor night 
Sin will lead us to pain and wa 
A bad Ufe will make a bad end. 
We must pray for them that hate us. 
We must love them that love not us. 
We must do as we like to be done ta 

Lesson IIL 

I will love the law and keep it. 
1 will walk with the just and do good. 
I will love ihee, O Lord, my strengtk 
He must live well that \vill die well. 
He doth live ill that doth not mend. 
In time to come we must do no ill. 
No man can say he has no sin ; 
Pot all men have gone out of th» ^^w^ • 



ife 



SSSBBSBBBBSSSB^BBBSSSBSSSSSi 

50 d Just Standard fer Pronouncing 

Lesson IY. 

A good boy will do all that is just ; he will flee from 
vice ; he will do good, and walk in the way of life. 

Love not the world, nor the things that are in the 
world ; for they are sin. 

I will not fear what flesh can do te me ; for my tnist is 
in Him who made the world : 

He is nigh to them that pray to him and praise his 
name. 

Lesson V. 

Be a good child ; mind your book ; love your school, 
and strive to learn. 

. Tell no tales ; call no ill names ; you must not lie, nor 
cheat, nor swear, nor steal. 

Play not with bad boys ; use no ill words at play ; 
spend your time well ; live in peace, and shun all strife. 

This is the way to make good men love you, and to 
save your soul from pain and wo. 

Lesson YI. 

He tliat speaks loud in school, will not leani liis own 
book well, nor let the rest learn theirs ; but those that 
make no noise will soon be wise, and gain much love 
and good will. 

If you have done wrong, own your fault ; for he that 
tells a lie to hide it makes it worse. 

He that tells the truth is a wise child ; but he tiiat te 
lies, will not be heard when he speaks tlie tnith. 

1\]()( k not the lame, or deaf, or dumb ; but be glad you 
'nre not .<o. ' * 



■Mk 



the English Language, 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Words of two aylldbles^ accented on the second. 



57 






1 

Abjure 
lab stain 
ab struse 
ac claf m 
ac c'u^e 
a chteve 
fic quaint 
ac quire 
ad here 
a dteu 
ad mire 
a dore . 
ad vi^e 
af fatr 
afford 
affray 
,af fric/At 
a fratd 
ag gneve 
a gree 
a greed 
allay 
al lure 
a mu^e 
;a nevr 
ap peal 
ap pcflr 
ap peo^e 
ap praise 
ap proach 
a ri^e 
a ro.se 
ar raigrn 
ar range 
ar ray 
ar rive 
as cribe 
a shore 



I 



1 

a sleep 
as pire 
as sat'l 
as si^ 
astray 
at tarn 
at tire 
au Btere 
a ware 
a way 
a twy 
bap tize 
be gmle 
behind 
be lie 
be h'ef 
be Iteve 
be loir 
be mocn 
be ni^n 
be reave 
be seech 
be side^ 
be stege 
be smear 
be 8tot£) 
be tray 
be tweeu 
be wail 
be ware 
be wray 
bias phcme 
bloe^ ade 
bo hea 
boot ee* 
bri gadc 
bro cade 
ca jole 

mmmmssssk 



cam pat^ 
ca naille 
can teen"* 
cap size* 
ca reer 
cas cade 
chas ti^e 
coach ee* 
code ade 
cohere 
colure^ 
com mute 
com pare 
com plain 
com plaint 
com plete 
com po«e 
com prise 
con ceal 
con ceit 
con ceire 
con elude 
con di^ 
con fuse 
con geal 
con si^ 
con spire 
con strain 
con straint 
con tain 
con trive 
con trol 
con voke 
cos tume 
ere ate 
dc cay 
de cease 
dti ceit 



de ceive 
de claim 
de clare 
de crease 
de cree 
de cry 
de feat 
de fray 
de grade 
de gree 
de lay 
de Mghi 
de lude 
de mure 
de my 
de plore 
de port 
de pose 
de range 
de scribe 
de scry 
de si^n 
de sire 
de spair 
de ta2l 
de tain 
de vise 
dis claim 
dis close 
dis cot^rse 
dis (lain 
dis cose 
dis grace 
dis gt^ise 
dis like 
dis may 
dis own 



dis please 
dis pose 
di vorce 
do main 
en close 
en croach 
en dear 
en due 
en dure 
en force 
en gage 
en grave 
en gross 
en \\gh% 
en rage 
en rol 
en slave 
en sue 
en tail 
en tire 
en treat 
e scape 
■e squire 
e steem 
ex "ceed 
ex change 
ex cijc 
ex cite 
ex claim 
ex elude 
ex pire 
ex plain 
ex plode 
ex plore 
ex pose 
ex pu<7n 
ex treme 




(>8 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



fore know 
fu see 
gen tcel 
grant ee 
gre nade 
im mure 
i iin pair 
iin pencil 
im plore 
iin pose 
im preyn 
im puf/n 
im pure 
in elude 
in deed 
in diyn 
in fuse 
in liale 
ill quire 
in scribe 
in snare 
in spire 
in ure 
ma lir/n 
mid lay 
nan keen* 
o blijje 
ob lit J we . 
ob scene 
ob scurc 
ob ta/n 
o paqTze 
op pose 
op pur/n 
or dain 
pa rade 
pa trol 
per ccive 
per spire 
per ta/n 
f/po ruse 



1 

per tray 
pre cede 
pre cise 
pre mise 
pre pare 
pre scribe 
pre side 
pre sumc 
pre vail 
pro cecd 
pro claim 
pro cure 
pro pose 
pro pugn 
l)ro rogtte 
pur sue 
pur suit 
rap pee* 
ra zee* 
re ceipt 
re ceive 
re claim 
re cline 
re course 
re deem 
re frazn 
re gazn 
re lay 
re lease 
re I/ef 
re 1/eve 
re ma/n 
re new 
re pa/r 
re pay 
re peal 
re peat 
re port 
re pose 
re pr/eve 
ro j)roach 



1 



1 



re quire 


un close 


re quite 


un fair 


le side 


un load 


re si^n 


im rol 


re spire 


un seen 


re store 


un tie 


re stra/n 


un wind 


re stramt 


un yoke 


re sume 


up brafd 


ro tain 


up hold 


re treat 


van dike* 


re tr/eve 


ven due* 


re veal 


2 


re vere 


a far 


re view 


a larm 


re vise 


a part 


sa Intc 


be haZf 


se cede 


ca tarrA 


se Crete 


ci gar* 


se cure 


com mand 


set tee 


de bark 


■ 

se vere 


de bar 


sha lote* 


de mand 


' sin cere 


de part 


sub dud 


dis arm 


sub scribe 


dis bark 


sue ceed 


dis card 


sup ply- 


dis charge 


sup port 


dis park 


sup pose 


em baZm 


sur mise 


em bar 


sur prise 


em bark 


sus pi re 


en largfi 


sus tatn 


g7zit ar 


trans cribe 


im part 


trans pire 


mam ma 


trans pose 


pa pa 


trus tee 


re gard 


un cham 


re mark 


un chaste 


re tard 


un clean 


un arm 



2 

un bar 
van guard 

3 
ab hor 
a broad 
ab sorb 
ac cord 
a dorii 
ap pal 
ap plai/d 
ap plai/se 
as saizlt 
a ward 
bash aw 
be c'diise 
be fall 
be sought 
con form 
de bai^ch 
de fa7/lt 
de form 
de friit^d 
e clai 
en i\otse 
de tort 
ex tort 
for lorn 
grant or 
in form 
in stall 
per form 
re call 
re morse 
re sort 
re tort 
re ward 
sub orn 
trans form 
un born 
un houghi 
un Uiugki 



tJie English Language. 



69 



ft 

sh 

east 

idge 

upt 

cind 

^ss 

ept 

;es3 

urse 

[uest 

^uU 

apt 

diet 

dress 

ept 

journ 

\udge 

just 

irance 

iect 

lict 

^ese 

irt 

ege 

lass 

lerctf 

lidst 

liss 

est 

:end 

lant 

perse 

sert 

jess 

ach 

ac^ 

empt 

ract 

ast* 

engc 



4 

a ver 
a Terse 
a vert 
be head 
be quest 
be witch 
bre vet* 



4 

de terge 
de test 
de tract 
di gress 
di rect 
di5 band 
di^ burse 



bur lesqwe dis cuss 

ca lash 6is gust 

CO act dis miss 

CO erce dis pense 
com mencedis perse 

con cern dis sect 

con demn dis tract 

con den^e dis tresfl 

con fer dis trust 

con fess di verge 

con ncct di vert 

con struct di vest 

con tcmn di vulge 



con tempt 
con tinge 
con verge 
con vince 
con vulse 
cor rect 
cor nipt 
de duct 
de fence 
de fer 
de ject 
de pict 
de press 
de scend 
de scenf 
de serve 
de spafch 
des sevi 
de tach 
de tect 
de ter 



e clipse 
ef feet 
e ject 
e Japse 
e Iect 
e merge 
en act 
en chant 
c nough 
en rich 
e quip 
e rect 
e vict 
evince 
ex eel 
ex cept 
ex cess 
ex pand 
ex pcct 
ex pel 
ex {)ense 



4 

expert 
ex press 
ex pungff 
ex tern 
fi nance 
ii nesse 
for bid 
fill fil 
ga zette 
gro tesqwe 
ha rangve 
her self 
him self 
im burse 
ini mcnse 
im merse 
in de6t 
in dulgs 
in ert 
in feet 
in fer 
in fringe 
in graft 
in sert 
in spect 
in stead 
in struct 
in ter 
in trust 
in verse 
in vert 
morass 
my self 
neg Iect 
ob serve 
ob struct 
ob vert 
offence 
op press 
our selves 
per l\^\>ii 



4 

per plex 
per sist 
per verse 
per vert 
pos sess 
pre diet 
pre fer 
pre serve 
pre tence 
pro fess 
pro tract 
re cess 
re dress 
re fer 
re fleet 
re Iresh 
re gret 
re hearse 
re ject 
re lapse 
re press 
re pulse 
re quest 
re sent 
re serve 
re sist 
re spect 
re strict 
re suit 
re tract 
re turn 
re venge 
re verse 
re vert 
ro mance 
sub duct 
sub serve 
sub stract 
sub vert 
sue cess 



1 



AIM 



>0 



A Jiist Standard for Pronouncing 



4 

su perb 
sup press 
3ur pass 
sus pect 
siis pense 
trans act 
trans cend 
trans gress 
trans mit* 
trans verse 
un apt 
un felt 
un hear^ 
un hinge 
unjust 
un learn 
un less 
un mask 
on pin 
un rig 
un twist 
un well 
up held 
up lift 
u ^urp 
5 

ab scond 
ab solve 
ac cost 
a cross 
a dojtt 
allot 
aloft 
along 
a non 
be gone 
be got 
be long 
be yond 
de coct 
i]c spond 



5 

de volve 
i\\s lodge 
dis solve 
em boss 
e volve 
ex tol 
for got 
here of 
here on 
in volve 
pro long 
re solve 
re sponse 
re volve 
un loc^ 
up on 
6 
ac crue 
a do 

ag grottp 
a loof 
a moi^r 
ap prove 
ba boon 
bal loon 
bam boo 
bas soon 
ba toon 
be fool 
be hoof 
be hoove 
be took 
buf foon 
ca boose* 
ca noe 
car toon 
car touch 
con tOMr 
de trude 
dis proof 
dip prove 





donb Ion 
dra goon 
en tom& 
fes toon 
fore doom 
gam boge 
hal loo 
bar poon 
here to 
imbrue 
im prove 
lam poon 
mis do 
mis rule . 
mis took 
moQ soon 
pa poose* 
pla toon 
pol tron 
ponton 
racA: oon 
ra g02^ 
re move 
re proof 
re prove 
sa loon* 
shal loon 
sur ioui 
tat t)0 
undo 
un moor 
un true 

7 
a foot - 

8 
a bove 
af front 
al longe 
a mong 
a mongst 
be come 



8 
undone 

9 
CO Aefr 
con vey 
in y^igh 
o hey 
par terre 
pur vey 
sur vey 
unveil 

11 
affirm 
con firm 
in firm 
un firm 

ot 
accoil 
ad join 
a droit 
a noint 
ap point 
a void 
ben zoin 
bur geois 
con join 
de void 
dis join 
dis joint 
em broil* 
en join 
ex ploit 
me moir 
pur loin 
r^ coil 
re joice 
sub join 
tur moil 

oy 
alloy- 
annoy 
de coy 



ey 
de ploy* 
de stroy 
cm ploy 
en joy 
ou 
a bound 
a bout 
ac count 
a ground 
a loud 
a mount 
an nounce 
a round 
a Toxxse 
as tound 
a vouch 
con found 
de nounctf 
de vour 
de vout 
dis mount 
e spouse 
ex pound 
mis count* 
pro nounee 
pro pQund 
re count 
re dou6t 
re dound 
re mount 
re nounee 
re sound 
sur mount 
sur round 
un bound 
un souiul 

(/ID 

al low 
a vow 
en dow 
re nown 



ike English Language. 61 






CHAPTER XV. 
Advice to Children, 

Lesson L 

Rise with the lark each day, for it id wrong to lose your 
time in bed. 

When you rise, pray to God to keep you from harm, 
and do the same wnen you lie down at night. 

Come to school clean and neat, play not by the way, 
nor let your voice be heard in the street. 

When you go to school, take your book and go to your 
seat ; make no noise, but strive to learn as fast as you can. 

Love him that loves his book, and speaks good words, 
and does no harm ; for such a friend may do you good all 
tlie days of your life. 

Be kind to all as far as you can, for you know not how 
soon you may want their help, and he that has tlie good 
will of all that know him, will not want a friend in time 
of need. 

If you want to be good, wise, and great, read with care 
such books as have been made by good and wise men ; 
think of what you read in your ppare hours ; be brisk at 
play ; but do not waste your time in bed. 

Be not proud of what you have, for fools may wear fine 
clotlies ; but a wise child is kno\vn by his words. 

Be not fiUse in thy words, but speak the truth at all 
times. 




62 A Just Standa/rd for ProTtoundng 

Let tKy words be few, and sin not with thy tongi 

■ Love God with all your heart, and serve him wi 
your might, so shall he bring you to joy and peace. 

There is but one God, who made the world. He 
tlie trees and plants to grow out of the ground, and v 
that live in it. 

He made both men and beasts that walk on Uie 
ti)e birds tliat fly in the air, and the fish that swim : 
sea. 

He made the sun, moon, and stars ; and all thm 
see are the works of his hands. 

Lesson IL 

My son, hear the words of thy father, and forsal 
. tlie law of thy mother. 

My son, keep my word, and lay up my precepU 
thee. Keep my commandments, and my law, as tl 
pie of thine eye. 

Bind them upon thy fingers; write them upo 
heai L 

My son, if sinners entice tliee to sin, consent tlio 

Walk not in the way with tliem ; refrain thy feet 
their path. 

A wise son hears the counsel of his father ; but a f 
son hears not rebuke. 

There h a way which seems right unto a man ; 
walk in it, is death. 

Go not in the way of evil men ; avoid it ; pass n 
it ; turn from it ; and pass away. 

Tlie upright shall inherit the land ; and the rig> 
shall remain in it 



the English Language. 

! Tlie wicked shall be cut off from the earth, and 
transgressor shall be rooted out of it 

Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? 

There is more hope of a fool than of him. 

Happy is tlie man that finds wisdom. 

Length of days is in her right hand, and in her 
hand, riches and honour. 

Her ways are pleajsant, and all her paths are peace. 



03 
tlie 



left! 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Words of three syllables^ the primary accent on the first 
syUahUf and the secondary accent on the third* 



1 

dan ger ous 
de cent ly 
de vi ous 
di a lect 



1 

A gue fit 

a ri e^ 

ba yon et 

beau ti ful 

beau ti fy 

bind er y* 

{blame a ble 

boat a bk* 

'bri ber y 

bu gle horn 

ca pa ble 

care ful ly 

care ful ness 

ica ve at 

cham bcr lain east er ly 

ichange a ble eat a ble 

icheer ful ly e go ti^m 

cheer ful ness e go tist 

child ish ness e qui nox 

cogii i acA* e ven er^ 



1 

fa Your lie 
fea 81 bk 
fi er y 
fla your cms 



di a logti^ "t^o li age 
di a phra^ for ci ble 
di ning room ford a \Ae 



di o cess 
drol ler y 
du bi ous 
du el liug 
du ra ble 
du ti ful 
ea 5i Iv 



CO pi ous 
^u ra ble 
cu ra cy 
cu ri ous 



e ven ing 
cu lo gize* 
eu lo gy 
cu pho ny 



for ger y 
fre quen cy 
fre quent ly 
fu gi tivc 
fu ri ous 
gay e ty 
glo ri ous 
glu ti nous 
grier ous ly 
hast i ly 
ho li ness 
hy dro gen 
i cic le 
i die ness 
jo vi al 
ju bi lee 
ju ry nvwv 



1 
ju ve nile 
%na ver y 
la zi ness 
li a ble 
like li hood 
live li hood 
lu era tive 
hi di crous • 
lu mi nous 
male con tent 
ma son ry 
mi cro scope 
mu ren ger 
mu SI cal 
mu ta ble 
mu tin ous 
news pa per* 
ni ce ty 
mghi in gale 
no ble ness 
no ti fy 
nu mer ous 
o dious 



&i 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 

o pen ing 

o pen \j 
o ver shot 
pa gan i^m 
pa per mill 
peace a ble 
pha e ton 
pi 0119 ly 
pla ca bla 
pla gta ri^m 
pla gia ry 
pleu ri sy 
pli a ble 
por ce lam 
pre am ble 
pre vi ous 
pro to type 
pu e rile 
qui et ly 
qui et nes8 
qui e tude 
ra di ance 
ra ta ble 
rea son er 
rea^son ing 
ri ot ous 
ri val ry 
ro guer y 
sale a ble 
se ri OU0 
size a ble 
sla ver y 
so ber ness 
spu ri ous 
stu di oua 
suit a ble 
tc di ous 
ti tie page 
u ni corn 
u ni form 
// ni verse 



va por ous 
ya ri ance 
Ta ri ous 
ve he mence 
ye he ment 
ve hi cle 
vi o lence 
waste ful ly 
wea ri some 
yeo man ry 
2 

al mon ry 
ar bi ter 
ar bi trate 
ar den cy 
ar dent ly 
ar gu ment 
ar ma ment 
ar mi stice 
ar mor y 
ar se nal 
ar tfer y 
art ful ly 
art ful ness 
ar ti choke 
ar ti cle 
ar ti fice 
bar ba ri^m 
bar ba rous 
Car di nal 
car nal ly 
car pen ter 
car pen try 
charge a ble 
charm ing ly 
gar den er 
gar den ing 
gt^ar di an 
har bin ger 
har le qi^in 
har mo nize 



2 

har mon y 
lar ce ny 
laugh a ble 
mar gin al 
mar ma lad 
mar tin gal 
mar vel lous 
par lia ment 
par ti cle 
par ti ^n 
part ner ship 
phar ma cy 
3 

al der man 
al ma nacA: 
Ett di ble 
atf di ence 
au di tor 
cau 5a tive 
cor po ral 
coc^o rate 
^^pu lence 
cor pu lent 
cor pus cle 
drai/7 ing room 
for mal ist 
for mer ly 
for mu la 
for ni cate 
for ti fy 
for ti tude 
gau di ness 
h^uah ti ness 
lai^dfa ble 
hiW ful ly 
mor tal ly 
mor ti fy 
or der ly 
or di nance 
or di nate 
or gan ist 



3 

or ga nize 
or na ment 
patf ci ty 
platf si ble 
por cu pine 
por phyr y 
por ti CO 
salt eel lar 
scor pi on 
sor cer y 
taZk a tive 
wa ter y 
4 

ab la tive 
ab ro gate 
ab sti nenc^ 
ac ci dence 
ac tive ly 
ad e quate 
ad jec tive 
ad ju tant 
af fa ble 
af flu ence 
af ter clap 
ag gran dize 
ag gra vate 
ag gre gate 
al CO hoi 
al i quot 
al ka li 
al ka line 
al pha bet 
am bi tude 
am o rous 
an a lyze 
an ces tor 
an ces try 
an o dyne 
an tc past 
an ti type 
an ti quuto 



the English Language. 



65 






le 

gue 

bate* 



ite 
ide 






anc6 

sk 

iphere 

ce 

le 

ige 

•ee 

lor 

tcr* 

il ness 

sk 

am ber 

ry 

dee 
on 
ag6 
;al* 
ness 
le mous 
le my 
d ness 
er buss 
n some 
ash 
; sticA: 
fi ment* 
corn 
'an 
,vay 
mere* 

a^t 
dine 



4 

cen tatt ry 
cer tain ly 
cer tain ty 
cer ti ij 
cham pi on 
chan eel lor 
char i ot 
char i ty 



ear nest ness 
ed i fice 
el e ganc6 
el e phant 
el o quence 
el o quent 
embry o 
em i nence 



chas tlse ment em per ess 
chas ti ty em pha sis 



cher u bim 

cher eril 

chiv al ry 

cit i zevL 

civ il ize 

cran ber ry* 

cred i ble 

cred it or 

crit i ci^e 

crit i ci«m 

crys tal line 

cul pa hie 

eur rently 

cur ri cle 

cur ry comb 

cus torn house ex o dus 

cyl in der ex qui site 



em pha size* 
emp ti ness 
emulous 
en ter pri^e 
en vi o\\$ 
ep aiglet 
ep i logtie 
ep i taph 
ev i dence 
ex ca yate 
ex eel lence 
ex eel lent 
ex e crate 
ex e cute 
ex i gence 



dec a logiie 
def er ence 
def i nite 
del i cate 
dem a gogve 
den i zen 
des ]g nate 
des po ti^m 
dex ter ous 
difference - 
dis ci pline 
dis si pate 



ex tri cate 
fkb u lous 
fal li ble 
fas ci nate 
feb ri fuge 
fel loii? ship 
fern i nine 
fer ri age 
fer ry man 
fer tU ize 
fer ven c 



fer vent ly 



I 



dres sing room flex i ble 
dys pep sy ftan ^WAft 



frat ri cide 
friv o lous 
^r be low 
gar ri son 
gen er ous 
gen tie man 
gen He ness 
gen u inc 
gin gcr bread 
grav el ly 
grav i tate 
girar an ty 
gun pow der 
hap pi ness 
haz ard ous 
heav i ness 
hem i sphne 
JAt i tage 
^Kr o ine 
her o ism 
hes i tate 
hid e ous 
hin der ance 
hum ble bee 
hum ming bird* 
hur ri cane 
hyp o crite 

g no ranee 

m pi ous 

m pu derce 
in di gence 

n do lence 

n fa mous 

n fer ence 

n ii nite 

n ilu ence 

n no cence 

n so Icnce 

n tel lect 

n ter course 









N 



mt 



mam 



66 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



4 4 

]Qa\ ous y par a bl0 
jeop ard y par a di(7m 
jes sa mine «par a disc 
kcr scy mere* par a graph 



las si tude 
lech er ous 
lib cr ate 
Jib er line 
lie or ice 
mac ca boy* 
mac^ er el 
maj es ty 
man ner ly 



par a phrase 
par a sol 
par ent age 
par ox ysm 
pai ri cide 
pass o ver 
pat ron age 
pat ro nise 
peas ant ry 



man age ment ped a gogue 
man u script ped i grce 
mas cu line pen i tcnee 
malAi cide « pen te cost 
med i cine 9^er e grine 
mer can tile -^)er fret ly 
mer chan di^e per fi dy 



mer ci ful 
mer cu ry 
mes sen ger 
met a phor 
min \a lure 
min strel scy 
mir a cle 



per fo rate 
per i gee 
per il ous 
per ju ry 
per ma nent 
per pe trate 
per qui ^ite 
mis chic vous per se cute 
mi.9 cr y per son age 

mul ti pie per son al 

musk mel on per son ate 
myr i ad 
mys ter y 
! nar ra tivc 
nee tar ine 



nvj a tive 

I o 

neg li gcnce 



per ti nence 
per ti nent 
per vi ous 
pes ti lenca 
pliy* i cal 
pic^ cr el 



iiaur ish ment pil grim age 
f/paJ a tine im\ na cle 

^ pal pa ble pleas anlry 
an to mime prof or cnce 



4 
prej u dictf 
pre5 by ter 
pre5 ent ly 
pres i dent 
prim i tive 
pri5 on er 
priv i lege , 
pun ish ment 
pyr a mid 
quer u lous 
rati ler y 
rasp ber ry 
rav en ous 
read i ncss 
rec og ni^e 
rec om pense 
rec on cile 
red o lence 
ref cr ence 
rel a tiT« 
res i dence 
Tcs i dent 
re5 i due 
res o lute 
ret i nue 
ret ro spect 
rev e nue 
rev er ence 
rev er y 
rAap 80 dy 
rhei o rick 
rig or ous 
sac ri lege 
sal 1 vate 
sas sa fius 
sat ir ise 
sat ur day 
scan da lous 
BCtt7 ew ^w 
Bern \ iouft* 
BCU «v "VAe 



4 

sen si tive 
ser a phim 
ser pen tine 
ser vi tude 
set tie ment 
Bex u al* 
sim pie ton 
sin fiUnesfl 
skel e ton 
skep ti ci«m 
spher i cal 
spir it ed 
stacZt hold er 
stig ma tize 
strat a gein 
stren u ous 
strep cr ous 
sub ju gate 
sub se quent 
sub Stan tive 
sub sti tute 
Bwhi \e ty 
sue CO tash* 
suf fer anctf 
sul phur J 
sup pu rate 
sus tc nancff 
syc a more 
syc o phant 
syl la ble 
syl lo gi^m 
sjTTime try 
sym pho ny 
83m a gogue 
tam a rind 
tan gi ble 
tan ta mount 
tcl e g*tiph 

Vow -aLXAe 



«li 



the English Language, 



der ness bot torn less 
na gant choc o late 
ni nate cod i cil 
•i ble cog ni zance 

•i bly col lo quy 

or ous col o ny 

t a ble com bi nate 
6 i tiv/? com e dy 
s mi grate com i cal 
jch er ous com mon er 
;ch er y com mon ly 
Q u lous com pe tence 
li cate com pe tent 
lb la some com pli cate 
np er y com pro mi^e 
bu lence con fer ence 
con fi dence 
con fi dent 
con flu ence 
con ju gal 
conjugate 
con se crate 
con se quence 
con so nant 
con Stan cy 
con stant ly 
con sti tute 
con ti nent 
con tra band 
con tra ry 
con vo cate 
cop per as 
cop per plate 
cop u late 
cop y book 
cor ner 
cor o net 
croc^ er v 
croc o difc 
doc tri nal 
doc u ment 



pen tine 
i cal 
an ni^e 
an ny 
. mate 
er ance 
a bond 
en tine 
sal age 
om ous 
bally 
ga loo* 
sa tile 
si fy 
li cal 
or ous 
ify 
ible 
i tarit 
(Icr i)»'ss 
Vniii fy 

J l»T drfy 

• 

it niat 



a nv 



WWVM 



dom i cil* 
dom i nate 
drop si cal 
fior id ness 
frol ick some 
front is ptece 
frost bit ten 
frost i ness 
glob u lar 
glos sa ry 
hal i but 
hoi ly hock 
hom i cide 
Aon est ly 
Aon est y 
hor ri ble 
hor ri bly 
Aos pi tal 
Ion gi tude 
moc ea sin* 
moe^ er y 
mod est ly 
mod est y 
modi fy 
mol li fy 
mon i tor 
mon u ment 
mor al ist 
mor al ize 
mor al ly 
nom i nal 
nom i nate 
nov el ty 
ob e lisk 
ob 11 gate 
ob lo quy 
ob sc qu'ies 
ob so lete 
ob sla c\e 

ob al\ TV^VCi 

ob VvtiVe 



67 

5 

ob vi ous 
oc cu pant 
oc cu py 
oc u lar 
of fer ing 
of ^ cer 
om in ous 
op er a 
op er ate 
op po siie 
op u lence 
op u lent 
or a cle 
or a lor 
or i fice 
or i gin 
or i son 
or rer v 
OX y gen 
pol i cy 
pol i ticks 
pol i ty 
pol y gram 
pol y pu«i 
pom pous ly 
pon der ous 
pop u lace 
pop u lar 
pop u late 
pop u lous 
por rin ger. 
po5 i live 
pas si ble 
pos si bly 

post !lU IT.OIIS 

pov or ty 
prob a ble 
proh a bly 




08 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



jirof li gate 
prof lu encc 
prom i nent 
prop a gate 
prop er ly 
prop er ty 
proph e cy 
propli e sy 
pros e cute 
pros e lyte 
pros o dy 
pros per ous 
prosti tute 
prot est ant 
prov en der 
prov i dence 
qu&d ru ped 
qual i iy 
qual i ty 
qual i \\es 
quan ti ty 
quar rel some 
scrof u la 
sol e ci^m 
sol em nize 
sol i tude 
soph is try 
soj>h o more* 
tol er ance 
tol er ale 



5 

top ical 
vuc a tive 
vol a ii\e 
wan ton ly 
war rant y 
wa^ch ful ly 
wa^ch ful nes8 
wa^ch tow er 

6 
bloom a ry* 
book sel ler 
cook er y 
crook ed ness 
cm ci h\e 
cru ci fix 
cru ci fy 
cm di ty 
cm cl ly 
cru el ty 
fool ish ness 
fruit ful ness 
gloom i ness 
pm der y 
rhexk ma ti^m 
rook cr y 
ru bi fy 
ru di raent 
m in ate 
ru in ous 
rumi nate 



6 
Bcm pu loni 

scni ti ny 

7 

bufrh er y 
8 

come li ness 
com pa ny 
con jur er 
con sta ble 
coF e nant 
cov er ing 
cov er let 
cove tous 
goy^.«m ess 
gi6^ ern ment 
Hon ej comi 
hon cy moon^ 
love li nes^i^ 
lovingly>>\ 
sov er eig^'^ 
won der ful' 
work man li 
work man sK 

9 

neigh bonr ly 
weigh ti ness 
11 

cir cu lar 
cir cu late 
cir cum else 



11 

cir cum flex 
cir cum sped 
cir cum 9tanc 
fir ma ment ' 

oi 
bois ter ous 
mole ty 
poi^ nan cy 
poi son ous 

oy 

ley al ly 
ley al tr 
roy al ist 
roy al ly 
roy al ty 

ou 
bound a ry 
boun ti ful 
coun sel loi 
Boun ter firit 
in ter plol 
t oinoQ 




ow er y 
cow ard ice 
cow ard ly 
pow der hon 
pow der mill 
pow er ful 
show cr y 



CHAPTER XVII. 

Words of three syUahles^ accented on the second. 



1 



1 1 

A bu sive ac quire ment al li ance 

ac cu ser a cute ness al lu sive 

a ch/eve ment ad he rence a iivwse ttkeikt 
ac quaint ance af fi ance ap \>ai tcivV 

f acquaint ed a gree ment ap pea4^\v mcis\ ^^ ^eat ^^ 



1 
ap pear ance 
ap prat^ f r 



ex Ireme ly 



the English Language^ 

1 1 1 

is sazl ant de light ful en trea ty 

18 Bign ment de mean our e qua tor 

IS 811 ming de port ment e va siva 

I sy lum de range ment* ex ceed ing 

it tain ment de si rous ex cite ment 

lu TO ra de tain der ex clu sive 

ie forehand diffu sive 

le hind hand di^ a ble 

»e ]/ev er dis ci pie 

•las phe mcr dis creet ly 

o e qual di^ dam ful 

:o he rence dis fa your 

:ol lu sivef di^ grace ful 

:oni pla cent dis po ^al 

;om p]i anc6 di vi ^or 

on ceal ment di vorce ment 

on ceit ed e lu sive 

on clu sWe en a ble 



69 



1 



pro VI so 
re deem er 
re fu sal 
re li ance 
re main der 
re pri sal 
re proach ful 



foi: bear ance re qui tal 
free ma son re tire ment 
grand ju ry* sc vere ly * 
ho ri zon short sight ed 

il lu mine sin cere ly 
im peach ment so no rous 



in clu sive 
in qui rer 
in qui ry 
in va sive 
in vet gle 



on do lenc/* en croach ment in ure ment 



on du cive en dan ger 
on ni vanc4 en dear ment 
on si^ ment en du ranee 
on tri vance en force ment 
on tro] ment en gage ment 
;or ro give en li^At en 
;re a tiye en 11 ven 
le ceti ful en no ble 
le ci pher * en rol ment 
le ci sive en tire ly 
le fi ance en ti tie 



in u tile 
je ho vaA 
mes si aA 
mis ta ken 
mis u sage 
ob scure ly 
pel lu cid 
pe ru ^al 
po lite ness 
pro po sal 
pro sa ick 



sub poe na 
sub sen ber 
sur pri sing 
tor na do 
tor pe do 
trans pa rent 
un a ble 
un ea sy 
un e qual 
un e ven 
un mind ful 

2 
a larm ing 
an tare ticA 
a part ment 
com mand ment 
CO part ner 



t The influence of secent on the sound of the vowelg does not appeal 
more perceptibly in any part of the lan^uage^ than in the syllables, col^ 
ram, conx and cor.^ When the accent, eitn(;r primary or secondary, is on 
Lheso syliablefs, as in collar^ comct^ consul corrigible^ colonnade^ corrcspond- 
entf &c the o has distinctly the sound of broad a short. But whrn the 
aconnt is on thejwccjacding syllable, the o, in colloquial pronunciation, slides 
into a Mund UKOoifmm tc, as in coUusvce^ commit^ convince^ corrupt, &c. . 
pronounced ifajr written cvdlusive^ cummii, cunvincCj currwpt^ i&jc, \x.\s^^^, 
true, that when these words are ptonouivcjed vXciw^ ^\>ii\ 5jtf3;^c«\j&*svx, 
enevf, and'predAaif the o preserves ucaiV^ \Va Ixw* %a>\\v\\\iv3N.'^^*^^a|^ 
5t> aSiB inmndbly into abort u the moment we \Hv\\ft \>asafc^atJ^A^>Sto. ^ns«»* 
od prmouDce them without prcmeditatvon. 



k 



y .L Jtim 



70 



ii Jkj/ Standard for Pronouncing 



2 4 

de part ment a briefg mentf 
cm bar go a bun danctf 
en lar^e ment ac cept anc« 
hard heart ed ac quit tal 
in car nate ac quit tanctf 
re gard ful ad diet ed 

ad jouiti ment 
ad jusi ment 
ad mit tanc^ 
ad vance ment 



re gard less 



4 

at tract ire 
a7/ turn nal 
bis sex tile 
ce phal iek 
clan des tine 
CO er cive 
col Icct ive 
com mit tee 



4 

de «ert er 
de struc tive 
de ter gent 
de ter mine 
di geslive 
di rect ly 
d\s as terf 
dis as troua 



ab lior rence 
a bor tire 



'%c cord ancc ad van tage 

ac cord ing af fran chise 

con cord ana; ag gres sor 

dis cord ant al ter nate 

di5 or der an gel ic^ 
en dorse ment an nat to* 

en dors er* ap prcn ticc 






e nor mous 
hy drau lick 
iin mor tal 
im I'or tance 
im por tant 
in lorni ant 
in stal ment 



as cend ant 
as plial tic^ 
as sem blage 
as sem ble 
as sem bly 
as 8688 ment 
as sist ance 



per form ance as sum;9 sit 
per form er at tach ment 
re cord er at tend ance 
un l^w fid at ten tive 



com pul sive di^ bur den 
con cem ing dis cour age 
con cern ment dis fig ure 
con cur rence di«i fran chise 
can sist ence dis gust ful 
con svmp tive dish ev el 
con tent ment dis man tie 
con tin gence dis mem ber 
con tin ue dis par age 
CO nun drum dis sem Ue 
con vul sire dis ser er 
cor rect ne^ dis tress foL 
cor nipt ly dis trib ute 
cor rupt ness dis trust fid 
cur mud geon dis turb anetf 
de camp ment di ver gent 
de cep tire ec cen trieib 
de feet ire ef feet ive 
de fen sive ef ful gence 
de scrip tive e ject ment 



t G has its soft sotind in ahridg-ment^ lodg-ing^ lodg-er, &c (nlihaB^ 
I at the eml of a a^Ilable,) as in the priinitivei, abridge^ 2o<^fif^ &c. fro 

j which they arc derived. 

t S^ in the nrefix d->, whrn either the primary or secondary accent u r 
it, is always sharj) and hisslFig, as in district^ dissolute, disohlige^ &c. f 
ee{)t in tin* word dismal^ in which it HhuuM Ite souiiiKhI like z : but whi 
the ufct-n* is on tlie second Ryllalilo, the » is either shurji or flnt, as it is fi 
lowed either by a vowel, or a sharp or flat conHunant ; thus disable^ ditttuA 
disease, diifhonca/, disorder. &c. have tiie * in dis flat like :, U'cause tl 
accent in n>>t on it, and a vowel iM'irinri tlH* next HvUnUe; hut disr.fiar^ 
discredit, disfitrour, disL-indurss, disynin", t/istftstt\ &ii. have the » ]*ha 
and liiHsinif, hi-i'suse a sharp omiki mm nl hi'«5ii':' ih** Kiii'reediii«,^j^cc*«RTi-'i» 
liiblc ; anil dinhnnd^ disdain^ tH.-Trtur. dl ]• .•■;;,i.'i\/-,/.';/r, &i:. liavc ll».; #| 
)liko 7, Uvanse th<',v ure siiccrcdril by ■• Mnl ■ • ii-.i>riiiiil in tiir snnn' si(u»| 



; 



*i 



^ 



■Di 



9S" 



the English Language* 



71 



ive 
m 

z zle 
gcncc 
gent 
; icJca 
irage 
Tj brance 
rv our 
n chise 
\e 

» ment 
ch 6on 
nal 
3ting 
3 sivf 
s cencc 
pate 

• sive 
1 sive 
3t ant 

t Jy 
*t ness 
s sive 
iss ly 
sive 
sive 
nal 
la* 

1 dance 
] den 
sic^ 

• nal 
tirJt 

as ticA: 
1 na 
r ic^s 
:rato 
nsf? Ijr 
feet 



m preg nate 

m pris on 

m pill sive 

n ac tive 

n cen tive 

n de5t ed 

n dul gence 

n fer nal 

n fringe ment 

n jus tice 
in 9truct ive 

n ten tive 

n ter ment 
m ter nal 

n ter pi«t 

n tes tine^ 

n vec tive 

n vent ive 

tal ic^* 
jo ban nes* 
long prim er* 
majes tic^ 
ma ter nal 
me an der 
mis man age 
mo las se^ 
mo mcntous 
mil lat to 
neg lect ful 
ob ject ive 
ob ^erv ance 
ob «erv ant 
ob «crv er 
ob struct ive 
oc cur rence 
of fen sive 
op pres sive 
pa ter nal 
per feet ive 
per mis sive 
per siai ance 



per spect Ive 
pi az za 
pi las ter 
j!;neu mat ic^ 
pes sen sive 
pre sent ment 
pre sump live 
pro duct ive 
pro gres sive 
pro mul gate 
pro phet icA: 
pro tect ive 
pru nel lo 
qui es cence 
re ful gence 
le hear sal . 
re luc tance 
re mem brance 
re mit tance 
re pent ance 
re p^g nance 
re pul sive 
re ^em blance 
re sem ble 
re 5ent ment 
re ^ist ance 
re spect ive 
re ten tive 
re venge ful 
rAeu mat IcA: 
sar cas iick 
se ques ter 
stu pen dous 
sub ject ive 
sub nris sive 
sub sist ence 
sub ver sive 
sue cess ful 
sue CCS sive 

Euacep Vvie 

■as 




trans ceno^nce 
trans gres sive 
tre men dous 
tri umph ant 
ty ran nic^ 
un cer iain 
un friend ly 
un luc^ V 
un pleas ant 
un rav el 
un rid die . 
un stectj 
un welj 
vin die' 

6 

a bol ish 
ac com plice 
ac C'jTii plish 
ac hioul edge 
a cros ticA: 
ad mon ish 
a pos tale 
a pes tie 
as ton ish 
he <;;otten 
CO los sus 
com po5 ite 
de mol isJi 
de mon strate 
de pos ite 
dis hon est 
dijT Aon our 
dis so\v ent 
im mod est 
im moral 
ira pos lor 
im prop er 
in con stant 
\tvs<iVs %\!\ 






xcsat ^^w 



\ 



n 



A Just Standard for Pronouncivg 



6 

re nfon strance re mo val 
re jnon strate un ru ly 



re pol ish 
re pQ5 lie 
re spon sive 
scle rot ick 
un god ly 

6 
ac cou tre 
ap pro val 
dis pro ver 
imprOT^ mentun cov er 
imprudence 9 

im pm dent con vey ance 
in tni sive o bet sance 
man oeu vre pur vey ance 



8 

at tor ncy 
be com ing 
be lor ed 
dis col our 
dis com fit 
dis cov er 
en com pass 
re cov er 





sur ve^ or 

11 
en cir cle 
ex tir pate 
in firm ness 

oi 
a droit ness 
ap point ed 
ap point ment 
em broi der 
en join ment 

oy 
an noy ance 
de stroy er 
em ploy er 
em ploy ment 



oy 
enjoy ment 

ou 
a bound ed 
ac count ant 
ac count ed 
cim found ed 
de vout ly 
en coun ter 
e spou 5ab 
ren coun ter 

ow 
al low ance 
a vow al 
em bow el 
em pow er 
en dow ment 



CHAPTER XVra. 

■ 

Words of three syllables, the secondary accent on the p 
syllable, and the prim-ary accent on the third. 



1 

Ad ver tise 
am a leur 
am bus cade 
ap per tatn 
as cer tatn 
bar ri cade 
cav al cade 
CO in cide 
col on nade 



1 

fric as see 
gas CO nade 
gt^r an tee 
here to fore 
in sin cere 



su per nse 
un a ware 
un be Hef 
vel vet een* 
2 



com mo dore 

coun ter si^ o ver load 

deb o na/r o ver reach 



in ter change dis em bark 
in ter pose dis re gard 
in ter weave 
mas^'qiier ado 4 

mu tin eer 



dis ap pear 
dis be lief 
dis be h'eve 
dis o blige 
en gi neer 
en ter tatn 
fore or datn 



ac qui esce 
ar ti sun 
CO a lesce 
con de scend 



o ver seer 

pre con ceive coun ter act 

pre en gage cour te nn 




pre ma ture 
pre or dam 
pri va teer 
ref er ee , 



dis con tent 
dis po« sesB 
in ter cept 
in ter nipt 



in ter sperse 
jac o net* 
non pa retl 
pre pos seM 
re com mentf 
rep re ^nt • 
sat in ctt* 
un con cen 
5 

cir cum toIti 
cor re spoad 
hoop ing cod 

6 
af ter noon 
dis ap prova 

Of 

dis ap point 
cor da roy* 



F 



t^tm 



the English Language. 73 

CHAPTER XlX. 
Lesson I. 



Let not reading cause you to neglect speTSng. Learn 
to spell and pronounce hehre you read much. 

Good spelling is the sure way to good reading ; there- 
fore, study spelling with the greatest care, until you can 
flpell all the words in this book, as soon as you hear them, I 
without seeing them. 

When you can spell well, you wiH soon become a good 
reader ; and as soon as you shall be able to read weD, you 
will be permitted to study grammar. 

Grammar will teach you what is meant by the parts of 
speech, and how to speak and write as you ought ; and 
without th« knowledge of grammar, your language will 
be incorrect, and you will always be marked by your 
friends as a poor scholar. 

Lesson II. 

[| A good book is like a good friend, it will teach us good 
j things ; bat bad books are like bad men, they will teach 

I us wrong things, and lead to sin and death. 
If we lead a good life, we shall have no reason to fear 
death ; hut if our ways be bad we must change them, or 
our end will be miserable. 

Our whole life le made up of homrs^ days, months, and 
years ; and if we wish the whole to be good, we must see 
that each part is good, and then our end will be happy. 

God made us to bless us, and he wiQ do so, if we love 
luin, and try to do all that is good, just, and true. We must 
1)6 kind to die poor ; we must feed and clothe them, and 
give them what they need if we can, and not let them suf- 
fer for want of our aid. 

God is the friend of the poor, and what we give to them, 
{ ^n lend to the Lord, which he will repay us. 
1 Virtue esalts a nation ; but sin is a reproach to any 
|i people. 




74 A Just Standard for Pronouncing 

Lesison til 

Remember this great truth, that God is the commo 
parent of ail mankind, and tliat, therefore, all men ai 
brethren, and what you do for others is all you have rei 
son to expect from them. 

Love labour. If you do not need its avails in healtl 
you may in sickness. Labour gives a relish and swec 
ness to your food, which all tlie spices of India cannot a 
ford, if you should be idle. 

The lazy man is a burden to himself; time bangs lib 
a great weight upon him. 

Proceed not to speak or to act before yjou have weighc 
your words, and examined the course of every step you ai 
to take ; so shall disgrace fly far from you, and in you 
liouse shame will be a stranger ; repentance shaU not visi 
you, nor sorrow disfigure your cheek. 

IVIen are born \vith two eyes,, but with one tongue, ii 
order that they should see twice as much as they say. 

The excesses of our youth are draughts upon our ch 
^^^) payable with interest, about thirty years after date. 



CHAPTER XX. 

Words of four syllahle^ the primary -accent on the fni 

syllable, and the secondary accent on the third. 

1 1 2 

A mi a h\e sea son a ble par ti cip le 

heaxi ti ful ly sea son a bly 3 

CO pi ous ly 8te re o typo nu di tor y 

cu ri ous ly va ri a ble cor pu len cy 

dan ger ous ly va ri ous ly dor mi tor y 

du ra ble ness 2 for mi da bl^ 

fa vour a bltf ar bi tra ry for mu la ry 

me li o rate ar bi tra tor hor ta tor y 

;nu mer a ble bar ba rous ly or di na ry 

»a tri ot ism mar ket a ble 4 

ea son a ble par don a ble ac cept a ble 

?a son a bJy par si mon y ac cli ma led* 



!^E» 



the English Language. 



75 



jji tan cy 
ml ra bk 
mi ra bly 
gran dize ment 
i has ter 

i ca bl« 

i ca bly 
swex a h\e 
te cham ber 
ti qua ry 
pli ca ble 

po site ly 
r go ma ster 
t e gov y 
t er pil lar 
r e mon y 
sir i ta ble 
;(1 it a ble 
m i nal ly 
t i cal ly 
: 80 ra ry 
% torn a ry 
XI age a ble 
i i cate ly 
3 pe rate ly 
3 pi ca ble 
■ fer ent ly 
r ni ta ry 

i gent ly 
) pu ta ble 
; so lu ble 
\ so lute ly 
{ syl la ble 
c gam ly 
i gi ble 

vi ous ly 

ti ma bk 

cpI len cy 

eel lent ly 

e era ble. 

o ra ble 



ex pli ca tive 
ex qui ^ite ly 
fan ci ful ly 
fash ton a ble 
fee u len cy 
fed er al ist* 
fig u ra tive 
gen er bus ly 
gen u ine ly 
id i ot ism 
ltd i ta tive 
im pi 0U8 ly 
ina po ten cy 
im pu dent ly 
in fa mous ly 
in fi nite ly 
in no cent ly 
in 6ti ga tor 
in sti tu tor 
in ter est ing 
lam ent a ble 
lib er al ly 
lib er tin ism 
lin e a ment 
man age a ble 
mar riage a ble 
mem or a ble 
mer ce na ry 
merci ful ly 
mis er a ble 
mis er a bly 
naT i ga ble 
pal at a ble 
pal li a tive 
pen e tra ble 
pen c tra tive 
pen i tent ly 
per emp tor y 
per ish a ble 
per se cu tor 
per son al ly 

mmmSSmSmmm 



plen ti ful ly 
pref er a ble 
pres by ter y 
pun ish a ble 
reg u lar ly 
reg u la tor 
rem e di less 
rep u ta ble 
res o lute ly 
rev er ent ly 
rev o ca ble 
sem i qua ver 
sem i vow el 
sep ar ate ly 
ser vice a ble 
slan der ous ly 
spec u la tive 
stren u ous ly 
8uf fer a ble 
tab er na cle 
tim or ous ly 
.treach er ous ly 
tur bu len cy 
ut ter a ble 
val u a ble 
ven er a ble 
vig or ous ly 
vin di ca tive 
vul ner a ble 
vul ner a ry 
6 

cog ni za ble 
com i cal ly 
com mend a ble 
com ment a ry 
com mis sa ry 
com mon al ty 
com pe tent ly 
conju gal ly 
con se quent ly 
con tro vet «^ 




76 



A Just Standard fur Pronouncing 



con tu ma cy 

con tu me ly 
cop u lu live 
or ol k. rv 

m 

hnu or ar\' 
//on our a b]« 
hnn OUT a bly 
hos pi ta bk 
mod cr ale Iv 
mon as ter y 
nom i na tivc 
ob sti na cy 
oh sti itatc ]y 
ol> vi 0U6 ly 



op er a live 
op po site ly 
or a tor y'\ 
])on der ous ly 
pos i live ly 
prof it a bif. 
prom 16 Aor y 
prom on tor y 
pros per ous ly 
prov i dent ly 
■ol i ta ry 
tol cr a bl£ 
toi er a bly 
voi un ta ry 



war rant a ble 

6 

com fort a bla 
cov £ tous l^' 
drom c da ry 
gov cm a bk 
bon cy bucJc Ic 
11 
cir cum spect ly 

ou 

boun li ful ly 
boun ti ful ness 

aw 
pow er fid ly 



t Tlie vowels £ and o, in the unaccented terminatianB er-y, ^j^k^h * 
drr. should \ic ])ronounced like u Bhoit ; thup or-c^-tor-yf nm-oii^ f 
gcr-y^ &A, should be pronounced ar-a-iuT'e, Hm^im-e, j^rrjur-e, (kA 
strict obeervuice of this xulc is a maxk of a iiolitc BpoBkaL 



! CHAPTER XXL 

f 

. Words of four syllables, the primary acocnt on ike seco 
syUcMe^ and the secondary accent on Uie fourth. 



Ab ste mi oub 
- ac cu SVL h\e 
ac cu s& tiy^ 
; a do ra h\e 
ad vi sdi bk 
' a ^ra ri an 
a gree able 
; a grree a bly 
! a inu zing ly 
:a me na hlc 
tin ui hi late 
a o ni an 
'ap jm rent iy 
.aj) pro pri bte 
ar te ri ai 
at tatn a bl^ 
HI/ re )] a 



a vail a hie 
ce le bri ous 
cen so ri ous 
dr cu i tous 
CO he ren cv 
com mo di ous 
com pa tri ot 
com pla cen cy 
com pu ta ble 
con ce« V a ble 
con clu sire \y 
con cu pi sccnce 
con ge ni al 
con ta gi OB 
con ta gi ous 
con tarn a ble 
con Te ni cncc 



cor ro sire ly 
cour a ge ous 
cu ta ne ous 
de cezt ful ly 
de ci sire ly 
defi na bl^ 
de li^^t ful ly 
de plo ra ble 
de ^ ra bie 
de Si rous ly 
de spl £a ble 
di5 dain ful ly' 
ebri ety 
e gre g$ oos 
en diet a ble* 
en ti cingly 
e nu mcr ate 



the Jtlji^^'lish JLanguagc* 




> ne ous 


re mu nerate 


Ejed ing ly 


re tr/ev a ble 


lu sivtf ly 


sa lu bri 0U3 


Li sdi h\e 


spon ta ne ous 


3 di encc 


suj) port a ble 


c di cnt 


sym pho ni ous 


3 ri encc 


Icr ra que ous 


•a ne ous 


trans pa ren cy 


ni ous 


un du ti All 


ma son ry* 


un e qual ly 


u i tous 


vc ne re ous 


no ni ous 


vi ca ri ous 


le di ate 


vie to ri ous 


nu la ble 


V9 lu mi nous 


►e ri ous 


2 


>Ia ca h\4 


CO part ncr ship 


•u ta bir 


in car cer ate 


I pa ble 


re mark a ble 


u sive ly 


re mark a bly 


} cen cy 
; ni ous 


3 > 

ac cord ingly 


I' man ly 


con form a ble 


w 

ri ous 


coil form a bly 


i live 


con form i ty 


di ance 


de bawch er y 


» ri ous 


de form i ty 


3 ri ab 


dis or dcr ly 


D di ous 


e nor mi ty 


te ri ous 


e nor mous ly 


ri ous 


im mor tal ize 


) rious 


in at^ gu lal* • 


•u ri ty 


in au gu rate 


qui ous 


in cor po rate 


in a ble 


in or di nate 


•0 bri ous 


sub or di nate 


e li on 


4 


iri ous 


a bun dant Ty 


pi ra ble 


ac ces si ble 


a ri ous 


ac rliv i ty 


u rable 


a cid i ty 


y a hie 


ad min is ItqAa 



ad mis si ble 
ad ver bi al 
ad ver si ty 
ad ver lise ment 
a dul ter ess 
a dul ter ine 
a dul ter ous 
a gil i ty 
a lac ri ty 
al ter nate ly 
»1 ter na live 
a mal ga mate 
am bas sa dress 
am big u ous 
am phib i ous 
a nal o gous 
a nal y sis 
a nat o mist 
an tip o de^ 
ap per te nance 
as cend en cy 
as par a gus 
as sas si nate 
as sim i late 
at ten tive ly 
at/ ster i ty 
be nef i ccnce 
be nev o lence 
be nig ni ty 
ca lam i tous 
calid i ty 
car niv o rous 
ca tas tro phe 
cen trif u gal 
cen trip e tal 
cer tif i cate 
cir cum fe rence 
CO in ci dence 
col lect ive ly 



■i9S 



78 



A Just Standard for PrtmouTicing 



com par a tivtf 
com par i son 
com pat i ble 
con dem na h\e 
con sec u tire 
con spic u ous 
con tern pla tivc 
con tcm/)t i hie 
con tig u ous 
con tin u anc« 
con trib u tivc 
con ver sa ble 
con vert i ble 
con vin ci ble 
cor rupt i ble 
de clar a tive 
de fin i tive 
de ist i cal 
de lir i ous 
de liv er ance 
de liv er y 
de riv a X\ve 
de struc tive ly 
de test a ble; 
de vel ope ment* 
di acr e sis 
di min u tive 
dis cour age ment 
dis crim i nate 
dis fran chi^e ment 
dis par age ment 
dis sat is fy 
dis sem i nate 
dis sim i lar 
dis til ler y* 
dis trib u tive 
di ver si fy 
; di ver si ty 
ih v'lsi h\e 
flocili ty 
'Cjac u hte 



e mas cu late 
em bar rass ment 
em be! lish ment 
e mer gen cy 
em phat i cal 
cm pyr e al 
en courage ment 
en fran chi^e ment 
en vel ope ment* 
e phem e ris 
e piph a ny 
e stab lish ment 
c ter nal ly 
e ter ni ty 
e vap rate 
e vin ci ble 
ex ces sive ly 
ex per i ment 
ex pres si ble 
ex tem«|^ ral 
ex tem po re 
ex ten sive ly 
ex ter mi nate 
ex ter nal ly 
ex trav a gance 
ex trav a gant 
fa cil i tate 
fa cil i ty 
fa nat i cism 
fra gil i ty 
fri gid i ty 
fu til i ty 
ges tic u late 
ner maph ro dite 
hy per bo le 
il lib er al 
il lus tri ous 
im mac u late 
im pen i tence 
kn p<m i tent 
im per a tWe 



ira per feet ly 
im per son al 
im per ti nence 
im per ti nent 
im per vi ous 
im prls on ment 
in ac cu rate 
in an i mate 
in clem en cy 
in crcd i biff 
in def i nite 
in del i ble 
in del i cate 
in die a tive 
in dlf fer ence 
in dig ni ty 
in dus tri ous 
in el e gant 
in fal li ble 
in fant i cide 
in fin i tive 
in fm i tude 
in flex i ble 
in gen u ous 
in grat i tude 
in her it ance 
in qui^ i tive 
in sen si ble 
in sen si bly 
in teg ri ty 
in telli gence 
in tem per ance 
in tem per ate 
in ter nal ly 
in ter pret er 
in tim i date 
in ves ti gate 
in vet er ate 
in vid i ous 



'the English Language, 



79 



)v er enoe 

er wax 
id e ous 
;iv i ous 
ility 
id i ty 
; nif i eence 
lev o Icncc 
ac u laus 
man age ment 
nif I eenoe 
es si tons 

re6 1 dence 
V ves i dent 
jtrep er ous 
nip o tcnce 
ish ion er 
lul ti ma 
lul ti mate 
eep ti h\e 
plex i ty 
spic a o\m 
ygamy 
cip i tanotf 
des<ti nate 
em i nenoe 
mod i tate 
par a live 
serv a tivc 
oras tin aie 
niii CU0U6 
vcr bi al 
:al i ty 
ep ta<;l0 
ip ro cate 

er ate 
>ect a ble 
pect ful ly 
3ect ive ly 
js ni tate 
il i ate 



re ver bar ate 
re ver si b\e 
ri die u lous 
Ti gid i ty 
Bcur ril « ty 
«ig nif i canoe 
«i mil i tude 
60 lil quy 
som nam bu li^ni* 
sta bil i ty 
fita tis ti cal 
<tei:iliiy 
«tu tpjd i ty 
sub ser vi ent 
«uc ees sive ly 
su per flu ous 
su per Ta tive 
€u prem a ay 
BUS cap ti b\e 
to bac CO nifit 
itri umph ant ly 
irl um .vi trate 
ty ran ni'Cal 
u nan i mous 
Am cer tcin ty 
un civ il ly 
un gen er ous 
un mer ci ful 
un wil ling ly 
ven tril o quism* 
ven tril o quist 
ver nac u lar 
vi cwta tude 
¥ul gar i ty 

a bom i uate 
ac com mo date 
ac com plish ment 
ac Arnoioi edg meut 
a nom a loun 
a nom a \y 



a non y mous 
ra poc a lypse 
« poc ry pha 
a pol o g*ze 
a pol gy 
a pos ta cy 
a pos ta ti25e 
a pos tro phe 
ap .prox i mate 
as ton iah ment 
aa trol o ger 
as trol o gy 
as tron o mer 
as tron o my 
ba rom e tcr 
-bi Qg ra .p}ier 
bi og ra pby 
eom mod i ty 
com ,pos i tor 
eon com i tant 
ooop er ate 
cor rob o rats 
cos mog ra pher 
COS mog ra phy 
do moc ra^cy 
de man stra h\e 
de mon stra tive 
de nom i nate 
de pop u lute 
de spoud -cw ey 
dis con so late 
dis /u)n est y 
c con o rav 
■e mol u ment 
em pov or iab 
e qiml i ty 
es po5 i lor 
ge og ra jphes 
ge og ra phy 
^ tJ c) ^v 



11 



iem 



MOH 



m 



80 



A Just Standard for Prmuiuncing 



5 

Iu3 tor i- ca? 
hy poc ri sy 
hy pot e nuse 
i dol a ler 
i dol a trou» 
i dol a. try 
im mod. er ate 
im mod esty. 
im pos si bfii 
im prob a ble 
im prop er ly 
in com pc tent 
in con.ti nence 
inoc u late 
in sol 7 en cy 
in tox i cate 
ma hog a- ny 
ma jor i ty 
me trop*o lia^ 
mi nor i ty 
mo nog a my 
mo nop o lize 
mo nop o ly* 
no sol o gy 
phe nom e noa 



pBi lol o gy 
phi los pher 
phi los o phy 
pre dom i naiit 
pre dom. i natc 
pre pon der ancc 
pre pos ter oua 
pre rjoga ihre 
pri or i ty 
prog nos ti cate 
pro nom i nal 
re spon si bfe 
fiy non y mous 
tau tolo.gy 
to pog ra phy 
tf pog ra phy 
un pop u. lar 
im war rant.ed. 
^^e^ bos I ty 
20 Of F& phy 
zo olo gy 
zo ot o my. 

ac cou tre ment 
ap pro ya blc 



buf fbon er y 
mi mov<? a Vtte 
un pro va Ble 
re mo va I5le 

8- 
ac com pa ny 
dis cov. er er 
dis cov er y 
mis gov crn mcnt 
re cov cr y 

11 
af fii m a. tiv^ 
con firm, a bl^ 
in firm a ry 
iji firm i ty 

01 

a void a lUe 
em broi der y 

di^ loy al ty 

OIL- 

ac comita-bl^ 
did coun te nance 

ow 
al low, &bl4? 



Words of four 
syllable^. 

I 

\ Ad van ta geoMB 
a<i ver ti ser 
ad ver ti «ing 
al ge bra ist 
des pe ra do-* 
di a pa son 
'di& ea a hie 
en ter tadn. meni 
euro pe suh 



CHAPTER XXIIv I 

syllahhsi the primary accent on iH§ tkitri 
and ike secondary acceni on the first 



I 

hy me ne al 
in ter fe re nee 
lig num vi toe 
mis de mean oi» 
mus ca va do* 
per se ve ranee 
re en force ment 
sac ri \e gioxxs 
super vvsoT 



I 

un be liev ec 
un dis pu ted 

2 
fiupcr car^gfo. 

ac qui es cenc^f 
ad a man tin^ 



ike English Language. 



4 

ilec iiok 
i heu siv6 
es cence 
re hen siv« 
van U\ge 
n tin ue 
lust ing 
ver tence 
en tive 
' rect ness 
pendenoe 
feo sive 
* mar nage 



in tro due ixwe 
jnet a ph3r« iok 
om ai pretf eaoe 
om ni pr€« e^ 
pre de ter mine 
Te im burse ment 
ret ro spect ive 
iin ac cent ed 
un der val ue 

5 
^ G6 iol ick 
<oT re s{M>nd ^nee 
cor re spond ent 




un be com iug 

ai 
dis ap point ment 
jec on Jioi tre* 

mis em ploy ment 
pen ny roy al 

010 

dia a vow al 



CHAPTER 



U of four syllables^ the primary accent on the fourth 
ay liable^ akd the secondary a^cenf on the first 



I 

i ot eer 
am pane 
r in duoe 

4 
aad veT't 



«n ie pe nuU 
,mis ap pre hend 
•jnis ^p Fe ^Bt 
fiiis un der stand 
mul ti pli cand 



4 

«ii per in tend 
ot 
av oir du pok 

on 
f u per a bomid 



CHAPTER XXiy. 



enesB will bringthee to poverty ; but by industry and 
^nce thou dialt be filled with Ivead. 
ealth obtained by deceit is soon wasted ; l^t he that 
irs by labour shall increase in ridie& 
the Uessifig of the upright, the city is exalted : but 
)verthrown by the mouth of the wicked. 
here no counsel is, the people fall^ but in the midet 
insellcn's there is safety. 

ain up a child in the way he diouM go^ and when 
old he will not depart from iL 

rrect thy son, and he wiU. ^^ liking ini^^j^94^\^*'^K^\^ 
lelighi to thy sold. 



H2 A Just Standard for Pronouncing 

The rod and reproof give wisdom ; but <i child le 
Iilinself will brmg his parents to shame. 

A prudent cluld foresees the evil, and is^ cautious ; 
the imprudent pass on and are punished. 

The eye that mocks at his feither, and" scorns to c 
his mother, the ravens of the valley diall pick it out, 
• the youngs eagle shall eat it. 

The wicked flee when no man pursues ;. but the rij 
cous are bold as a lion. 

The law of the wise is a fountain of lifcj. to depart { 
the snares of death. * 

The wisdom of the prudent i» to understand his wi 
but the folly of fools is deceit 

A wise man fears and. departs ftom evil ;' but the 
rages and is confident 

Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry ; for anger i 
only in the bosom of footev 

He tliat covers his sins will not prc^J>er ^ but he 
confesses and forsakes them will find mercy. 

Where there is no wood the^ fiife goes out ^ and w 
there is no tattler the strife ceases. 

A word fitly spoken, is like apples of gold in pictur< 
silver 



ADTICE. 

Bewaifj of close intunacy with those whose ton< 
are calumnious towards abnost every one except their j 
ent company, to which tliey are ever smooth and 
For he that commonly indulges himself in caltnnnia 
or lidiculing the absent^ plainly, shows his company \ 
they have to expect fxotxi him after he ISeaves them. 

Nevec laugh at the ignorance or mistakes of ot) 
Every person is liable to mistake in speaking, writing 
leading; thecelbrs,. as you do not wish to be laiighei 
yourself, do not laugh at the failings of otilers. 
would not hesitate in- saying tUaH \V Va ^xot>i^ v^ t\^=^ 
the bodily infirmities of persona. Is W wA. \«^cife^ 



the EngUah Language. 83 

n, to laugh at tlic erroiws of their education ? Certain 
X 4s. If aiiy of you Imve had greater advantages in j 
tlian others, you ought to be grateful to God, wiio 
e you talents and heakh, and to your parents, wlio 
3d you in the exercise of them in the attainment of 
education. But be not proud and iiaugiity because 
If education is superiour to that (A others, llememlicr 
t you were once as ignorant as they, and would, most 
bai:^ly, have remained so, had you been placed hi the 
le situation. Whenever you are applied to for inform- 
)n on any subject which you understand, impart it 
hout pride or ostentation, for a great display of pride 
\ ostentation is a sure indication of a weak mind. 
Prefer solid sense to vain wit ; study to be useful rather | 
in diverting ; commend and respect noUiing so much 
true piety and virtue. Let no Jest intrude to violate 
xl ]Hamiers \ never utter what may offend tlie cha^est 

• 

tie that openly tells iiis friends all that he thinks of 
m, must expect tliat they will secretly tell Ids enemies 
ich that they do not tliink of him. 



CHAPTER XXV. 

tlie foUowiBg chapter, g has its hard sound before €, t, 

mad y. 

hte.^^ln tlus and in (ho fofluwlns cluipteni tbe figures will show the 
sntod sylldjles, without any other uiTection. 

2 4 4 

par get^ dig ger gid dy 

tar get dreg gy gift ed 

4 drug get gig gk 

big gin drug gist gig let 

brag ger flag gy gild ing 

bug gy geld ing gim let 

crag ged gKer kin ging Aam* 

crag gy ^b bet ^ vx 
dag get g^>acAA 5g3*T»x\ 



I 


11 


ese 

'.k 
d 


gird 
girl 
girt 
1 




ea ger 


t 


gcw gate 




meff ger 




ti ger 
to ged 



84 

4 
hag gish 

teg gm* 
mug gisb 
muggy 
pig giD 
quag gv 
rag ged 
rig ging 
riggish 
rug ged 
scrag ged 
scrag gy 
shag ged 
shaggy 
slug gish 
snag ged 



A Just Standard for Pronoujudnff 



snaggy 

•priggy 

■tagger 

swag ger 

Bwaggy 
trig ger 
Vwig gen 
wag gtsb 
& 

boggy 
dog ged 
dogger 
dog gish 
foggy 
hog gish 
nog^» 



n 

flur dk 
^ ^ 

beget 
be gin 
for get 
for give 
BUS give 

en gird 

1 

ea ger ly 

ea ger ness 

gid di Ij 
gid di ness 
rag ged ness 
rug ged ly 



nig gjed ness 
scrag gi* ness 
slug grah nei 

^agg»y 

foggisess 
hog gish ly 
l»g ^er head 

be gmner 
be gin ning 
for get ful ^ 
for give ness 

pet ti fog ger 

4 
for get fol n 



In tbe following worda^ ^ fiaf its hard* fotmdi and' b^i^ mmiedist 

ceded by n and the accent, it is pronounced as if it were written twice. . 

anrgcTy an-guishf lan-guid^ «£n-^/ar, are pronounced as if writteivan^-^J 
ang-gwish^ lang-gwid, amg-g^iUar^ 



4 

An ger 
an gle 
an gler 
an gry 
an guish 
bun gle 
bun gler 
bun gling 
(Ian gle 
din gie 
fan gle 
fin ger 
hun ger 
hun gry 
jin gfe 
Ian guaffe 
i Ian gnid 
langoUi 



4 

Ian gnor 
lin ger 
lin go- 
Hn guist 
man gle 
man go 
min g\e 
san guine 
shin gle 
shin Ae9 
sm giy 
span gle 
sprin gle 
stran gle 
swin gle* 
tan gbr 
tin gLe 
iDran gte 



4 

youn ger 
yonn gest 
& 

eon ger 
con go* 
con gress 
Ion ger 
Ion gest 
stron ger 
stron gest 

mon ger 
mon grel 

1 
tri ftngte 

an gri Fy 
an gli ciM* 



an gK cUm 
an gu lar 
san gui fy 
sin gle ness 
singu lar 
snr cin gle 
nn guent* 
5 

con gre gate 
con gru ence 
eon ffni ent 

dis tin guish 
en tan gle 
ex tin guish 

4 
^ en tan glc 
in ter min glc 



ifiMi 



the English Languaf(§* 



85 



CHAPTER XXVI, 

he fbllowing chapter, when n b in an accented sylla- 
id Is Immediately followed by k^ q, or c, hard, it has a 
»und and mixed somid, as if it were followed by g hard, 
bank^ eon-quer, un-cle^ which are pronounced as ijf 
a hangky kong-kur^ ung-kU 

— ^Th© pnblishera of Walker's Dictionary in New- York, Albany, 
\ Cooperstown, Bellows Falls, Canandaigua, BaltimMie, and of the 
ictionary in Philadelphia, have not observed the tnze pronunciation 
r of the words in the following chapter. The publishers of the Phil- 
I large Dictionaiy, have obeyed the rule very ck)eely. 



4 

shank 
shrank 
shrink 
shrunk 
sink 
slink 
slunk 
spunk 
sunk 
tinct 
tink 
trunk 
wink 
4 

ank \e 
bank er 
bank rupt 
blank et 
can crine 
cank er 
crank le 
crank ness 
crink \e 
drink er 
drunk ard 
drunk en 
TjUnk lin 
fnmklj 



4 

frank ness 
ink stand* 
in quest 
punc to 
ran cour 
rank \e 
rank ly 
rank ness 
sprink \e 
tank ard 
tink er 
tink le 
tran quil 
trink et 
twink le 
twink ling 
un cle 
ran quish 
irrink le 

6 

con cave 
con clave 
con cord 
con course 
con qwcr 
con <\uesl 
S 

nvouV C7 



8 
monk ish 

4 
a dunqi/e 
dc funct 
di^ junct 
dis tinct 
em bank* 
en rank 
ex tinct 

4 

bank a ble* 
bank rupi cy 
drink a ble 
drunk en ly 
drunk en ness 
frank in cense 
in ere ment 
in cu bate 
in cu bus 
pan ere as 
ran cor ous 
sane ti fy 
sane ti tude 
sane ti ty 
svn CO pe 

WyR. ^V?^ \N5K^'*^ 



.fMi 



BBS 



86 



A JuM Standard for Pronouncing 



5 
con qwer or 

4 
com punct ive 
con junct ivd 
de lin quent 
di* junct ivtf 
dis tinct ive 
dis tinct \y 
dis tinct nesfi 



em bank ment* 
re lin quish 
sub junet ire 

4 
in dis tinet 

4 
sane ti mon y 

5 
con quer a ble 



de lin qucn cy 
di« junct ivc ly 
per func tor y 

4 
cal a man co 
in dis tinct Iv 
in dis tinct ness 

5 
un con qwer a ble 



CHAPTER XXVII. 



In the following chapter, the difTerent sounds of tK arc € 

hibited. 

In the follcnvig words, th 

1 2 

Both lath 

fatth path 

heath 3 

loath north 

ninth swath* 

oath that/; 

sloth thorn 

teeth thouaAt 

thane tlirall 

theme thwart 

thtef warmth 
th/eve 4 

ihigh breadth 

three breath 

thrice dearth 

thrive death 

throat depth 

throve earth 

3 fifth 

bath filth 

heartn frith 

t Th^ in the wofde cloth, lath, moth, mouth, oath, path, and swath, 
its %\mva sound wlien they are used in the ging[ciuir nomber, and its flat 90 
when tbey nit twed in tSie plural number, as in d/oihMt moths, dbc. 



has its first or 


sharp sound, 


as in thartk, thii 


4 


4 


6 


liath 


thrid 


troth 


health 


thrift 


6 


length 


thnll 


tooth 


pith 


thrum 


truth 


plinth 


ttirush 


fouih 


scath 


thrust 


8 


sixth 


thurn^ 


doth 


smith 


thump 


month 


snath* 


thwacA: 


quolh 


stealth 


tilth 


third 


strength 


twelfth 


thirst 


tenth 


wealth 


worth 


thafch 


withe 


11 


theft 


5 


birth 


thicit 


broth 


mirth 


tliill 


clotht 


ou 


thin 


froth 


south 


thing 


moth 


ow 


thrash 


thong 


thowl 


thread 


throb 


1 


threat 


throng 


e ther 



tJiC 



■• .ri 



<-<*"i i 



AHiiitmi 






SnSTVflBHl 



97 



All 

less 

teenth 

hly 

smith 

ly 

e 

.OS 

'ful 
is 

' idh 
th 

lor 
• thy 

ly 

ghi All 
(loin 

.eia 
,h le«|| 

I en 
i quake 

'ly 

^S 

\ck 
znth 

»y 
y 

hful 
hy 

hen 

0(1 

her 

ath 
nth 

I thrift 
^th en 
en 



4 
ihidir et 
thiri: ly 
tliic^ ness 
thiin bla 
thin ly 
thin ne%ii 
this t\e 
threat en 

thrifty 
thun der 
thur« day 
trip^ thong 
wealth y 

6 
froth y 
mothy 
6 

ruthful 
youth ful 

8 
month ly 
noth ing 
tfairfU y 
thir teen 
thir ty 
thor ouyh 
worth leas 
11 ^ 

Inrth day 
birth place 
birth xighX 

thou ^nd 

1 
de throne 
en throne 
north east 
south' east 

a thwart 
in thral 



\ 
(or\U wil!i 
here nviOi 
north west 
souUi west 

5 
be trotli 

cu 
through out 
1 

a the \8tti 
a the ist 
fatth ful ly 
fatth ful ness 
hy a cintii 
nine ti eth 
the a tre 
the o rem 
the o rist 
the or y 
thiev er y 
3 

fiu tho rize 
for ti eth 
or tho dox 
4 

am a ranth 
am e thyst 
ap a thy 
ap o tlie^m 
cath o lidr 
ep i thet 
eth i cal 
fif ti eth 
filth 1 ness 
lab yr inth 
leth ar gy 
meth o dist 
pen ny worth 
pleth or y 
six ti eth 
s^in pa thize 

mmmmsamBsm 



syin pa thy 
syn the sis 
twen ti eth 

S 

blood thirst y 
tliir ti eth 
thor ottgh ly 
9 
eigh ti eth 

1 
cu tliedral 
pan tlie on 
un faith ful 
u re thra 

2 
en thar tic^ 
le thar gick 

in thral m^nt 

4 
a can thus 
atli let ick 
ati then ticiS: 
me tlieg lin 
pa tliet ick 
syn thet ic^ 
un thrif ty 
3 

or tho e py 
or tho e pist 

4 
scv en ti eth 

5 
pol y the i«m 

1 
e the re al 
le vi a than 

4 
a nath e ma 
an tip a thy 
an tith e sis 



F 



ai 



A Just Standard for Pranouncing' 



a riih me tte^ 
I a 'I then ti cate 
.rn!i ihar i des 
mis an ihio py 
pu ren the ma 
])a ihet i cal 
pJiil an thro py 
phil an thro pisi 
the at ri cal 

5 
an thol gy 
aw thor i ty 
ca thol i mm 
ca thol i coa 



hy poth • BIS 
K thog rm {^y 
H thot o roy 
my tholo gy 
or thog ra phy 
the oc Fa cy 
the ol gy 
ther mom e ter 

4 
math e mat icA» 
not with stand ing 
aym pa thet vck 

& 
a path e ca ry 



am phi the a tre 
ap o the o U8 
the o lo gi an 

4 
ar ith met i cal 
a the ist i cal 
hy po thet i cal 
math e mat i cal 
oi tho graph i cal 

5 
bib li oth e cal 
or ni thol o gy* 

com mon wealth 



In the following words, th has its second or flat sound, a0 

that J this* 



1 

Bathe 
I blithe 
\ breathjB 

a' clothe 

3 hithe 
lathe 
4ithe 
loathe 
meathe 
scythe 
seeth 
swathe 
the^e 
thine 
tho^e 
though 
thy 
tithe 
T(7rithe 



4 

than 

that 

them 

Aen 

thence 

this 

thus 

witht 

booth 

smooth 

sooth 

9 
they 

ou 
thou 

1 

blithe some 
eloth ing 



t 

ei ther 
liea then 
loath some 
net ther 

farther 
far thest 
fkr thing 
fkther «, 
8 
northern 

4 
breth ren 
fathom 
feather 
fur ther 
gather 
hith er 
lath er 



4 

leath er 
neth er 
prith ee 
rather 
south em 
teth er 
there fore 
thither 
with er 

6 
broth el 
6 



8 
smother 
wor thy 

% 1 

be nea& 
be queaA 
withhold 

with draw 

4 
them sebre 
therein 
thy self 



smooth ly with in 
smoothness with stand 



8 
broth er 
moth er 
oth er 
poth er 



& 

there of 
there on 
ou 
with om 



/ 



m f TZ, in ilie vweAwUh^ when itVs iMcd bIoiu^oc '^Ece^xed ta Qth«r woid 
yhas itf Sat Bomutt as m wUh^ wUhin^ wUKstand ; VroX ^YiexwiiL S& ^odu^ 
io other worda^ it has its sharp sound, as Vti/oTiKwUlslusTevjItK. 



msmm 



m 



the llH^Uish 1 anguagt^ 

1 4 8 

hea th^n ish 'veath er codk ui oth tt 

hta then Um 8 un wor thy 

2 broth er hood 1 

fa ther less broth er \y un der neath 

fa ther ly moth er less 4 

4 moth er ly nev er the less 

fath om less moth er wort 8 

fur ther more oth er wi^ an iror thi ness 



I 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

William, tcU me how many mills make a cent? Ten. 
How many cents make a dime? Ten. How many 
dimes make a dollar ? Ten. How many dollars make 
an eagle ? Ten. An eagle is a gold coin, and the lar- 
gest which is coined in the Uniteid States. Dimes and 
dollars are silver coins. Cents are copper coins. These 
ore new species of coin. What is the ancient manner 
of reckoning money ? By pounds, shillings, pence, and 
farthings. 



REMARKS. 

The friendships of mankind can subsist no longer than 
interest cements them together. 

If men praise your efforts, suspect their judgement ; if 
they censure them, your own. 

\Ve ask advice, but we mean approbation. 

If you are under obligations to many, it b prudent to 
postpone the reccmipensing of one, until it shall be in 
your power to remunerate all, otherwise you will make 
more enemies by what you give, than by what you with- 
hold. 

Lnitation is the sincerest of flattery. 

If rich, it is easy enough to contoceal our wealth ; but 
if poor, it is not quite so easy to conceal our poverty. We 
shall find that it is less difficult to hide a thousand guineas 
than one hole in Qur coat 






■<)0 A JuMt Standcurdfor Pronouncing 

m 

He tliat can please nobody, is not so much to be pitied, 
OS he that nobody can please. 

None are so fond of secrets as those who do not intend 
to keep them; such persons co^et secrets, as a spend- 
thrift covets money, for the purpose of circulation. 

In all societies it is advisable to associate with die 
highest; not that the highest are always the best, but, 
if disgusted there, we can at any time descend ; but if 
we begin with the lowest, to ascend is impossible. In Um 
grand theatre of human life, a box ticket takes us through 
the house. 

We hate some persons because we do not know them; 
and we will not laiow them, because we Iiate tliem. 

Excess in apparel is a costly folly. The very trunminga 
of the vain would clothe all the destitute. 

If you are clean and warm it is sufficient ; for more 
robs the poor, and pleases the wanton. 

Believe nothing against another, but upon good author- 
ity ; nor report what may hurt another, unless it be a 
greater hurt to others to conceal it. 

As the branches of a tree return their sap to the root 
from whence it arose ; and as a river pours its streams 
into the se^i, whence its spring was supplied ; so a grate- 
ful man returns a benefit which he has received, and his 
heart is delighted therewith. 

It is ahnost as difficult to make a person uiUearn his er- 
rours, as his knowledge. Mal-informaiion is more hope- 
less than non-information ; for errour is always more busy 
than ignorance. Ignorance is a blank sheet, on which 
we may write ; but errour is a scribbled one, on which we 
must first erase. Ignorance is contented to stand still 
with her back to the truth ; but errour is more presump- 
tuous, and proceeds in the same direction. Ignorance 
lias no light, but errour follows a false one. The conse- 
quence is, tiiat errour, when she retraces her footsteps, 
[liofe farther to go, before she can arrive at tlie trutli, than 
'ignorance. How necessary, then, to obtain knowledge, 






Mio discard errour, and to dispel iguotauce. 




the English Language* 
CHAPTER XXIX. 



01 



In the following chapter, x has the sound of gz^ when fol- 
lowed by an accented syllable beginning with a vowel, or 
with A, as in ex-ait, ex-hale^ pronounced egz-alt^ egz-hale. 



1 
Ex hale 

3 
ex alt 
ex hai/st 
ex hort 

4 
ex act 
ex eni/)t 
ex ert 
ex ist 
ex ult 

1 
ex a men 



1 5 

ex hale ment ex ot ick 

3 1 

ex hai^st less anx i e ty 



ex or bi tant 
ex or di um 
4 



ex hort er 

4 
ex act \y 
ex act ness 
ex am inc 
ex am pie 
ex em plar 
ex er cent 
ex hib it 
ex ist ence 



ex XX be ranee ex an i mate 
ex u be rant ex as per ate 



ex u be rate 
lux u ri ance 
lux u ri ant 
lux u ri ate 
lux u ri ous 
ux o ri ous 
3 



ex ec u tive 
ex ec u tor 
ex ec u trix 
ex em pla ry 
ex em pli fy 
ex hil a rate 
5 



ex or bi tance ex on er ate 



CHAPTER XXX. 

In the following chapter, h is pronounced before w, though 
written after it . Thus, whale, whaU are pronounced as 
if written hwale, hwaL 



I 



1 

Whale 

wheat 

wheeze 

while 

whilst 

whine 

white 

why 

3 
wharf 

4 
whelk 
whelm 
whelp 
when 
whence 



4 

whet 

which 

whiff 

whig 

whim 

whin 

whip 

whipt 

whisk 

whist 

whit 

whiz 

whur* 

whurt 

5 
what 





where 

whey 

11 

whirl 

1 
wheat en 
whee die 
wheel wrighi 
whi lorn 
wbi ten 
white ness 
white wash 
whi ting 
whi tish 

4 



4 

wher ry 
whet stone 
whif lie 
whim per 
whim sey 
whin ny 
whip cord 
whip lash 
whip shw 
whip stocA* 
whis ker 
whis key* 
whis per 
whis tie 



% 



02 

11 

whirl pool 
whirl wind 

1 
where by 

4 
where a« 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



4 

where in 
6 
where of 

4 
whif fle tree* 
whim ei cal 



whip poor will* 

what er er 
when er er 
4 
o yer whelm 



CHAPTER XXXL 

In the following chapter, w at the end of a word is nlenti 
and the o preceding it has its Ion? sound, as in /eZ-insG 
wid-ow^ wiU'doWt pronounced /eZ-Za, t9u2-o, vnn^^ dee. 

The manner of pronouncing fel-low^ wid-oWf v>inrda9% 
felrlur, tot J-ur, w%7i-dur^ 6lc. is a barbarous corruption ol 
the language, and should be circumspectly aroided by evoy 
Instructer and person that wishes to pronounce correctly. 

yole — If I miitake not, I have hMid dibrj teadMiiii^ in pronouncing lb 
words ax-Tvw^ bar-roWt har-row, Ac give a its flat aomul : but thia is ctt 
tainly contnuy to analog, and ukewise to the authority of our oithoepU% 
tor they are all uniform m living aitoahoit aonnd in woids of thb claoi 



4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


ArroKJ 


far row 


min now 


willow 


fol lotp. 


bar row 


fur TOW 


nar rou; 


win dow 


hoi low 


bel low 


hal loir; 


shadow 


win now 


mor row 


bii lo?o 


bar row 


shal low 


yar row 


sor row 


cal low 


mar row 


spar row 


yel low 


sor roiot 


elbow 


meadow 


tal low 


5 


swal low 


fal loir; 


mel loir; 


wid ow 


bor row 


wal low 



CHAPTER XXXIL 

In the following chapter, i is a consonant when before i 
rowel and preceded by the accent, and is pronounced u 
y, consonant, would be in the same situation ; thus, al'ien, 
pin4i^, are pronounced a2e^eih ptn-yvn, &c. 



4 

Ai len ba^ io 
court ier bann ian 
fpar ier 5deU ium 
sav iour hll ious 



bill iard^ 
bill ion* 
briW lanl 

cull lOTV 



4 

hi lai 
gal iot 
|E;&\\ vaccd 



4 

niin ion 
pann ier 
^ill ion 



the English Languoffe* 



up ion 
fian 
in ion 
11 ion 
iU ion 
ji iel 
lion 
r ial 
nn ions 

iant 

ier 

1 ier 
n iard 



7 

buU ion 

8 

on ion 

1 

al ien ate 

brev ia ry 

pie ia des 

4 
brill ian ey 
mil iary 
▼al iant If 

1 
battalia 
be hay lour 



com mun ion 
pie be ian 

4 
bat tal ion 
ci vil ian 
com pan ion 
con viv ial 
do min ion 
fa mil iar 
mo dill ion 
o pin ion 
pa yil ion 
per fid iou8 
p08 till ion 



93 



ras call ion 

re bell ion 

re bell ious 

se ra^l io 

Ter mil ion 

1 

al ien a ble 

A 

fa mil iar ize 
fa mil iar ly 

1 

misbehaTiour 

1 
in al ien a ble 



CHAPTER XXXUI. 

John, tell me the number of days in a year? Three 
ndred and sixty-five. How many weeks in a year? 
fly-two. How many days in a week? Seven. What 
\ they called ? Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednes- 
Y^ Thursday, Frid^, Saturday. How many hours 
5 there in a day ? Twenty-four. How many minutes 
an hour? Sixty. How many seconds in a minute ? 
Kty. 

George, how is the year divided ? Into months and 
isons. How many are the months ? Twelve. What 
3 they called? January, February, March, April, May, 
ne, July, August, September, October, November, De- 
mber. 

Henry, how many barley corns make an inch? Three. 
)w many inches make a foot ? Twelve. How many 
it make a yard? Three. How many yards make a 
1 1 Five and a half. How many rods mnke a furlong ? 
>rty. How many furlongs make a mile ? Eight. How 
my miles make a league ? Three. How many inches L 
ike a cubit ? Eighteen. How yxvkk^ V«X. ^ssas^v^ -^ 
horn ? Six. 



94 A JiLsi Standard for Pronouncing 

Charles, how many gills niake a pint 7 Pour. How 
many pinL«» make a quart? Two. How many quaili 
make a gallon? Four. How many gallons make a 
barrel? Thirty-one and a half. How many gallooa 
make a hogshead ? Sixty-three. 



Did youth but know the pleasures tliat arise from mi 
early culture of the niind, I am led to believe they would 
not waste, in useless pursuits, the many hours they dft 
Ck)uld they be induced to become wise in season, the^ 
might escape those bitter regrets which await the idle and 
vicious. 

How many have I been a witness to, who would have 
given life almost to redeem mispent time, when they have 
seen othere of their age and rank in life, who, by maloDg 
virtue and a right use of time their first object, have risen 
to honour and riches in the world. 

Many a trap is laid to insnare the feet of youth. 

A little that a good man hath, is better than the riches 
of many wicked persons. 

All our comforts proceed from the Father of Goodn 

The earth is the I^rd^ and the fulness thereof. 

Return no man evil for evU. 

Follow not the ways of evil men, they are of those that 
rebel against the light ; they know not its ways, nor abide 
in its paths. 

He who formed the heart knows what passes within it 

We should be kind to all persons, even to those wlio axe 
unkind to us. 

Reveal your secrets to none, unless it be as much their 
interest to keep them, as it is yours they should be kept 

Vice stings us, even in our pleasures ; but virtue cab 
soles us, even in our pains. 

Of all the marvellous works of the Deity, perhaps there 
Mh nothing that angels behold with such supreme astcmiah- 
gment as a proud man. 



\ 



the Engiiah Language* 
CHAPTER XXXIV. 



05 



Wvrds of five syllables^ the primary accent on tJie second 
syllable^ and the secondary accent on the fourth. 



Ab ste mi ous I7 
ac cu mu la tor 
ac cu sa. tor y 
an ni hi la ble 
cen so ri ous I7 
com mo di ous ly 
com mu ni ca ble 



un par don a bk 

3 
in for mi da bla 
in or di na ey 

4 
ac CU8 torn a ble 
ad ver bi al ly 



com mu ni ca tire am big u ous ly 
con ve ni ent ly C4 lum ni a tor 



cour a ge ous ly 
e gre gi ous ly 
ex pe di ent ly 
for tu i tous ly 
gra tu i tous ly 
I har mo ni ous ly 
m me di ate ly 
m pe ri oas ly 
n ge ni ous ly 
n ge ni ous ness 
n glo ri ous ly 
n ju ri ous ly 
n nu mer a ble 
n va ri a ble 
n va ri a bly 
n vi o la ble 
la bo ri ous ly 
ma te ri al ly 
me lo di ous ly 
mys te ri ous ly 
no to ri ous ly 
op pro bri ous ly 
pe cu ni ar y 
pe nu ri ous ly 
iprc ca ri ous ly 
spon taneously 
un fa vour a ble 
un reason a ble 



com mem o ra ble 
com mem o ra tive 
com par a tire ly 
con fed er a cy 
con sid er a ble 
con sid er a bly 
con sid er ate ly 
con tern po ra ry 
con tin u ally 
CO tem po ra ry 
de clam a tor y 
de clar a tor y 
de fam a tor y 
de fin i tive ly 
de gen er a cy 
de lib er ate ly 
de lib er a tive 
de ter mi na ble 
de ter mi nate ly 
de ter mi na tire 
di min u tire ly 
dis crim i na tive 
dis pen sa tor y 
dis trib u tive ly 
ef fem i na cy 
e lab o rate ly 
ex clam a toi y 
ex plan a toT y 



ex tem po ra ry 
ex trav a gant ly 
he red i ta ry 
1 lit er a cy 
1 lus tri ous ly 
m pen e tra ble 
m prac ti ca ble 
n cen di a ry 
n def i nitc ly 
n dif fer ent ly 
n dis pu ta ble 
n dis so lu ble 
n dus tri ous ly 
n el i gi ble* 
n cs ti ma ble 
n ev i ta ble 
n ex o ra ble 
n flam ma tor y 
n ffen u ous ly 
n nab i ta ble 
n qui^ i tive ness 
n Sep ar a ble 
n suffer a ble 
n tel li gen cer 
n tel li gi ble 
n tem per ale ly 
n ter mi nable 
n teI u a ble 
n vet er a cy 
n vul ner a ble 
r reg u lar ly 
r rev o ca ble 
le git i ma cy 
mag nan i mous ly 
mag nif i cent ly 



N 



06 



A Just Standard for Ptonouncing 



par tic u lar ly 
po lit i cal I7 
pre cip i tan cy 
pre cip i tant ly 
pre lim i na ry 
pre par a tor y 
pro hib i tor y 
re cip ro cal ly 
ri die u lous ly 
sig nif i cant ly 



su per la tire ness 
un char i ta ble 
un fash ton a ble 
un mer ci ful ly 
vo cab a la ry 

5 
con sol a tor y 
de nom 1 na tor 
de rog a tor y 
in cor ri gi ble 



in hos pi ta ble 
in tol er a ble 
in vol un ta ry 
prog nos ti ca tor 
re po5 i tor y 
un war rant a Ue 

8 
re CO V er a ble 
un com fort a bk 
un gOY ern a bk 



CHAPTER XXXV. 

Words of five fyllables^ the primary accent on the third tl 
lable, and the secondary accent on the first and fifth. 



1 1 

Ad van ta geous ly in ex pe di ent 
ad ran ta geous ness in ex pe ri ence 



am bi gu i ty 
as si du i ty 
cer e mo ni al . 
cer e mo ni ous 
con sen ta ne ous 
con spi eu i ty 
con ti ^ 1 ty 
con ti nu i ty 
con tra ri e ty 
die ta to ri al 
dis a gree a ble. 
dis a gree a bly 
ed i to ri al* 



in gc nu i ty 
in Stan ta ne ous 
in sup port a ble 
in ter ja cen cy 
ir re tnev a ble 
mat ri mo ni al 
mer i to ri ous 
min is te ri al 
mis eel la ne ous 
no to ri e ty 
op por tu ni ty 
par si mo ni ous 
per i era ni um 



ex com mu ni cate per pe tu i ty 
by dro pho hi a per spi cu i ty 
im ma te ri ai 



im por tu ni ty 
im pro pri e ty 
in com mo di ous 
I in con veni ence 
in con ve ni ent 
fn ere du li ty 
'In ex cu sa ble 



post di lu vi an 
pres by te ri an 
pri mo ge ni al 
rec on cile a ble 
sub ter ra ne ous 
su per flu i ty 
su per ae de m 
ter ri Vo ti iV* 



tes ti mo ni al 
un con cetv a bk 

2 
per i car di um 

3 
e qui form i ty 
in con form i ty 
mul ti form i ty 
non con form i 9 
u ni form i ty 

4 
ac a dcm i cal 
af fa bil i ty 
al iment a*ry 
al pha bet i cal 
an a lyt i cal 
an ni ver sa ry 
ap pre hen si '^ 
ar gu ment a t^ 
at mo spher i ^ ^ 
car a van sa ry 
cir cum am bi 
cir cum nav i ^ 

CAT C\OT\ ^^^\. v'' 
com yc^V^xv ^ 



wmm 



4 



^^ l ^^5 l ?^H? 



ih J^Ji^ ImgHwc. 



'%I»|*I 7 « « W »»* ^' ^ 



97 



5 



con tra diet or j 
jCred i bil i ty 
Idem o «5rat ical 
jdi a met ri cal 
cBfl a bil i ty 
du ra bil i ty 
el e ment a ry 
' em ble mat i cal 
epi dem i cal 
j-e qua nim i ty 
|e qui lib rium 
. ev an gel i cal 
.fallibility 
; dex i bil i ty 
ge ne al o gy 
■ gen er al i ty 
ho8 pi tal i ty 
hyp o crit i cal 
il le git i mate 
im mo ral i ty 
im mor tal i ty 
im per cep ti bk 
im per cep ti bly 
in a bil i ty 
in ac tiv i ty 
in ad ver tent ly 
in ar tic u late 
in com pat i hie 
'■■ in con sid er ate 
I in con sisi en cy 
' in con sist ent ly 
in con test a ble 
incorrupt i ble 
in de pend ent ly 
in de ter mi nate 
in dis crim i nate 
in dis pen sa ble 
in dis pen sa bly 
Jindi vi^i ble 
jin ex pressible 
infidelity 




in enig Qif i c^ftfie 
in sig nif i cant 
in sin ceri ty 
in sta bil i ty 
in tre pid i ty 
in tro due tor y 
ir re ^Jst i ble 
lib er al i ty 
mag na nim i ty 
met a phy9 i cal 
o do nf er cms 
par al lei o gram 
par a ly t i cdi 
par a phras ti cal 
par ti dp i al 
per pen die u lar 
per so nal i ty 
platf si bil i ty 
pop u lar i ty 
pos si bil i ty 
pri mo gen i ture 
prin ci pal i ty 
prob a bil i ty 
prod i ffal i ty 
pu sil bn i mous 
reg u lar.i ty 
rep re hen si ble 
rep re ^ent a tire 
sat is fac tor y 
sci en tif i cal 
sen si bil i ty 
sim i lar i ty 
sys te mat i cal 
typ o graph i cal 
un in nab it ed 
un in tel li geint 
val e die tor y 
ver sa til i ty 
y\s i bil i ty 

5 
al le gOT i cA 



an a tom i cal 
an i mos i ty 
ap 03 tol i cal 
ar is toe ra cy 
as tro npm i cal 
cat e gor i cal 
cu ri OS i ty 
deu ter on o my 
di a bol i cal 
«c o nom i cal 
e qui pon der ance 
e qui pon der ant 
e qui pon der ate 
et y mol o gj 
ffcn er os i ty 
nor i zon tal ly 
in di^ ^oIt a ble 
in e qual i ty 
in ter rog a tive 
kx i cog ra pher 
me di oc ri ty 
met a phor i cal 
par a dox i cal 
pe ri od i cal 
phil o «oph i cal 
phra 56 ol o gy 
ster e om e try 
trig o nom e try 

4 
n ni ver sal ist* 
a ni ver pal ly 
a ni ver si ty 

6 
if re move a ble 

ot 
an a void a ble 

o« 
in sur mount a ble 
un ac count a ble 

<yw 



98 A Just Standard for Pronouncinff 

The following words have the primary accent on thefowrik\ 
syllable t and the secondary accent on the second, 
1 4 4 

Ab bre vi a tor a man u en sis pre ter im per feet 

ad min is tra tor an i mad ver sive super a bim daner 
ad min is tra trix an i mad yert er su per a bun dant 
mul ti pli ca tor ex per i ment al su per in tend enee 
un en ter tazn ing hi e ro glyph ick su per in tend eni. 

^ 4 mis rep re sent ed 5 

ab ra ca dab ra mis un-der stand ing an ti spa^ mod ict , 



> 



CIUrTER XXXVI. 

Who is she that Avith graceful steps, and with a livelj 
air, walks over yonder plain ? 

The rose blushes on her cheeks ; the sweetness of the 
morning breatliea fiom her hps ; joy, tempered with inno- 
cence and modesty, sparkles in her eyes ; and cheerful- 
ness of heart appears in all her movements. 

Her name is Health ; she is the daughter of ExerciBB 
and Temperance. 

Their sons inhabit the mountains and the plain. Th< 
are brave, active, and lively, and partake of all the beao-l 
ties and virtues of their sister. 

Vigour springs their nerves; strength dwells in thdr 
bones, and lalx)ur is their delight all the day. 

The eanploymcnt of their father excites their appetitei) 
and the repasts of their mother refresh them. 

To combat the passions is their deliglit ; to ronqiia 
evil habits their glory. 

Their pleasures are moderate, and therefore Uiey are 
durable ; their repose is short, but sound and undisturbed. 

Their blood is pure, their minds are serene, and the 

/: physician does not find the way to their habitation. 
I have seen the flower withering on the stalk, and its 
i blight leaves spread on the ground ; I looked again, and 
it sprung forth afresh ; the slem v?\sa ciowm^ >^^ x^ss* 
"^uds, and the sweetness iheteot fiSte^ Oci^ ^- 



the English Lans^agc, 09 

I ha^ve seen the sun set in the west, and the shades of 
:ig}it diut in the wide horizon : there was no colour, 
or sliape, nor beauty, nor inusicli: ; gloom and darkness 
roof^>ed around: I looked again, the sun broke forth 
oni the east, and gilded tlie mountain tops ; the lark 
>se to meet him from her low nest, and the shades of 
urk«iess fled away. 

I nave seen the insect, being come to its full extern, 
i.n|r>nsh, and refuse to eat : it spun itself into a tomb, 
nd was shrouded in the silken cone: it lay without j 
iet, or shape, or power to move : I looked again, it had 
xirst its tomb ; it was full of life, and sailed on coloured 
^ir^ through the soft air ; it rejoiced in its new bemg. 

Thus sha^ it be with thee, O man ! and so shall thy 
M be renewed. 

Thy body shall return to the dust from whence it came, 
»ut thy soul to God who gave it ; and if tliou art good, 
bou shalt be happy ever more. 

Who is he that comes to save from sin and eternal 
leath? 

He descends on a fiery cloud ; the sound of a trumpet 
loes before him : thousands of angels are on his right 
land. 

It is Jesus, the Son of God ; the Saviour of men ; the 
Hend of the good. I 

He comes in tlie glory of his Father ; Le hath received 
X)wer from on high. 

Mourn not, therefore, diild of immortality ! for the 
ipoiier, the cruel spoiler that laid waste the works of God, 
s subdued : Jesus hath conquered death : child of immor- 
ahty, mourn no longer. 



Never sport with pain and distress m any ot your 
imusements, nor treat even the meanest insect with wan- 
on cruelty. 

We may escape the censure of others, when we do 
vxong privately ] but we canned woSiSi ^'^ \^^v2»^^sr& ^^^^^ 
nir own mind. ^ 



S9 



mt 



100 



A Jh^t Standard for Pronouncing 

TJSU XLCHISL 



How &ir is the roeei what a beautiM flower ! 

In summer so fingrant and gay ! 
But the leaves are b^jHink^ to fade in an hour, 

And they wkher and die m a day. 

Yet the rose has one powerful virtue to beast 

Above all tlie flowers of the fleld ; 
Wlien its leaves are all dead, and its fine cdours losf^ 

Still how sweet a perfotne it will yield. 

So irail are the youth and the beauty of men, 
Though they look gay and bloom like the rose ; 

Yet all our fond care to preserve them is vain, 
Time kills them as fast as he goes. 

Then Til not be proud of my youth or my beauty, 
Shice both will soon wither and fade ; 

But gain a good name by performing my duty ; 
This will scent like the rose, when I'm dead. 



1 



CHAPTER XXXVIL 

Words of Ht ayttahles. 



fi 



Un Tea son a ble ness 

4 
dis in ter eet ed ness 
re ver ber a tor y 
un char i ta ble nesi 

6 
a bom i na ble ness 
in vol un ta ri ly 
un prof It a ble ness 

1 
cer e mo ni ous ly 
cer e mo ni ous ness 
dis a gree a ble ness 
im ma te ri al ly 
'/n eon ve ni ent Iv 



in cor po re al ly 
in Stan ta ne ona ly 
ir re me di a ble 
mer i to ri ons ly 
par si mo ni ons ness 
su per nu mer a ry 

4 
«] pha bet i cal ly 
an a lyt i cal ly 
di a met ri cal ly 
& in gen u ous ness 
em ble mat i cal ly 
hyp o crit i cal ly 
1^ git i ma cy ' 
in con sid «r a h\e 



the JBngUMh Language^ 



101 



on Bid er ate Ij 
e fat i ga ble 
18 fac tori \y 
om mend a tor 7 
ler an niu a ted 
[is crim i nate ly 
ji hab i ta ble 

5 
B gor i cal ly 
i torn i cal ly 
TO nom i cal ly 
e gor i cal ly 
cr rog a Hye ly 
«r rog a tor y 
a doxi cally 
1 o 9oph i cal ly 

8 
e COY er a hie 

1 
e«e da ri an* 
te di In yi an 
ad van ta geous ly 
ci plin a ri an 
cy clo pe di a 
tem po ra ne ons 
ber na to ri al* 
; er o ge ne ous 
di a to ri al 
id i ter ra ne an 
; des ti na ri an 

4 
te pre die a ment 

Words 
1 
: tem po ra ne ous ly 

1 
i tu di na ri an 
I e tn di na ri an 

4 
m mn ni ca bil i ty 
ma te ri al i ty 



ar if to crat i cal 
com pat i bil i ty 
con ge ni al i ty 
dia sat ia fac tor y 
dis mm i lar i ty 
di Ti« i bil i ty 
ex per i ment al ly 

fen er al is si mo 
i e ro glyph i cal 
immn tabil i ty 
im pos si bil i ty 
in com pre hen si ble 
in con tro vert i bU 
in cred i bil i ty 
in&llibttity 
in flex i bil i ty 
in sen si bil i ty 
in stm ment al i ty * 
in yi« i bil i ty 
ir reg u lar i ty 
ma te ri al i ty 
pe cu li ar i ^ 
pen e tra bil i ty 
per cep ti bil i ty 
re spec ta bil i ty* 
■u per in tend en cy 
BUS cep ti bil i ty 
uni versal ity 

5 
an te ri or i ty 
in fe ri br i ty 
sn pe ri or i ty 
qf seven syllables. 

im pen e tra bil i ty 
im prac ti ca bil i ty 
in com pat i biM ty 
in com pres si bil i tj 
in di m i bil i ty 
per pen die u lar i ty 
pre an te pe nul ti mate 



mmmMmiimiimMmmmmam 



A Just Bkmdairif&r Prdh&ufncing 



CHAPTER XXXVIII. 

In the following chapter« all the accented syllables end withj 
a vowel, and the c^ which follows the accented syllable,] 
has the sound of «, and the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced as if it ended with s^ thus, o-ctd is pronounced as-id. 

N. B. All the accented syliaBlM m the two following chapters are pxo- 
nounced short, end Teileheni iKbiiUI be veiy careful to havie theit sdlolttnil 
picnounce the voweb shuii in the aeecnted •yUable& when they n^ thenL 
4 4 14 -1—1 

thufl^ a-eidf M-«d^ not a-cid, aa4iL 

Note, — Some teachcitt are of opMion that c^ and g^ m the tiAib lbUb#iit|i 
chapters, ought to end the sooentod fyllables, thus, ac-idj mag-Ack, dbc; bit 
as e and g are hard when a^ the end of syllable, I think it would be nvf 
improper to deviate from the fetablSabed rule of language by eliding thest 
syllables with c and g. CHlldteh will readily l«un to prMiouncd' dil 
Towels short at the ei&l of syUabUai Ifthose^ who end thete {syllables wWf 
and g in spelling, do ft to avoid Ae ■bholar's giving the vowels a long BoUbi 
in B[)eUing, to them I would observe^ that tb remecty is wone tmin 
diMCtute* 



4 

Acid 
fa cile 
pla cid 
pla cit 
ta cit 
5 
do cile 
pro cess 
4 

a cid ness 
de ci mal 
de cimate 
la cer ate 
ma cer ate 
pa ci fy 
pre ci pic6 
re ci pe 
spe ci fy 
spe ci men 
ta cit ly 
vi cin agtf 
ri ci nal 



5 

do ci h\e 

4 
e li cit 
ex pH cit 
ii li cit 
im be cite 
im pli cit 
so u cit 

5 
in do cile 
4 

ne ces sa ry 
ne ces sa rie^ 

4 
an ti ci pate 
atf da ci ty 
ca pa ci tatid 
ca pa ci ty 
di la cer ate 
du pli ci ty 
e da ci ty 
explicitly 



4 

fe li ci tate 
fe li ci tous 
fe li ci ty 
fe ra ci ty 
f u ga ci ty 
im pli cit ly 
lo qua ci ty 
lu bri ci ty 
me di ci nal 
men da ci ty 
men di ci ty 
mor da ci ty 
mu ni ci pal 
nu ga ci ty 
o paci ty 
par ti ci pate 
per ni ci ty 
ra pad ty 
rus ti ci ty 
sa ga ci ty 
se qua ci ty 
feim pli ci ty 



4 

80 li cit or 
so li cit oua 
80 li cit reas 
so li ci tude 
tri pli ci ty 
ve ra ci ty 
ver ti ci ty 
vi va ci ty 
vo ra ci ty 

6 
atroci ty 
fe ro ci ty 
thi no oe roc 
ve lo ci ty " 

4 
du o dec! mo 
ec cen tri ci ^ 
e las ti ci ty 
e lee tri ci ty 
mu! ti pli ci ty 
per spi ca d.^ 
per ti na ci ty 



CHAPTER XXXIX. 



108 



{In the foUowing chapieri all the accented aylkblef end with 
• Toweli and the g, which follows the accented syllable, is 
pronounced sofllikej, and the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced as if it ended with j, thus ti-gtle is pronounced aj'iL 



4 

Agik 
di git- 
fragile 

leger 



pa gf^ani 

tra gidr 

Flgll 

5 

[lo gidr 

a gi tate 
fla ge let 

fri gid ly 
fri gid ndM 
le giblie 



4 

le gi bly 
le giff latb 
magical 
ma gistrate 
pa gebht rf 
pagi nal 
re gi cide 
re gi intfi 
re gimeht 
re gis ter 
ngid 
trage 
tra gi< 
ve ge tate 
▼i^ ance 
vi gil ant 
A' 

CO A tate 
logic*! 
pro ge ny 



4 

{ magine 
li ti fcUmfi 
pro di gioUtf 
re li gton 
reli gioint 
4 

le gi3 la dVe 
le gis la tOY 
le gis la turiB 
ve ge ta blf 
Ti gil ant fy 

ar mi ger ons 
bel li ge rant 
il le gi bfo 
in di ge nous 
11 ti gtoUs ness 
ori ginal 
o ri gi nate 
pro di gtioizs ly 



re fri ger ant 
re fri ger ate 
re li gfous ly 
Ter ti gin ous 

i ma gin a bid 
i ma gin a ry 
o ri gi nal ly 

4 
*b o ri gi hetf 
inu ci la gin Ova 
6 le a gin ous 

5 
an a lo gi cal 
as tro lo gi cal 
ge o lo gi cal* 
phil o I'o ^ cal 
tau to lo gi cal 

5 
ge ue a lo gi cal 



CHAPTER XL. 



I In the folloM^ing chapter, ck is pronounced like sh^ in an ac- 
cented syllable, when it is immediately preceded by the li- 
quids I or n, and in words 6f French origin ; and i when 
placed under number 10 is pronounced like long e, as in 
helch^ bsncAfi7Ki'Chi7i£t pronounced belsk^ benshn mar sheen. 



1 


4 


4 


4 


(/hai^e 


belch 


bunch 


flinch 


2 


bench 


clinch 


hunch 


haunch 


blanch 


drench 


inch 


lat^nch 


blench 


iilch 


lunch 


stanch 


branch 


finch 


milch 



mam 



104 

4 

pinch 
punch 
quench 
stench 
trench 
wench 
winch 
iffrench 

4 

bench er 
branch less 
branch y 
bunch y 
clinch er 
linch pin 
hmch eon 
pinch bec^ 
punch eon 
quench less 



A Just Standard for* Pronouncing 



4 

trench er 
tnmch eon 

1 
chamade 
chi cane 

4 
in trench 
re trench 

10 
antique 
bre vier 
ca price 
cashier 
fascine 
fatigt£e 
in trigi^ 
macmne 
ma rine 
pe liase* 



10 

police 
profile 
ravine* 
sordini 
ton tine* 
va lise* 

2 
char la tan 

4 
in trench ment 
re trench ment 

1 
deb •« chee 

10 
brig a dier 
buc a zders 
can non ier 
cap a pie 
capu chin 



10 
carbi nier 
caralier 
cfaan de lier 
diev a lier 
cor de lier 
fin an cier 
gab ardine 
gondo«« 
gren a dier 
mag a zine 
man da rin 
pal an qinn 
quar an tine 
tarn ba rine 
transmarine 

1 
chi ea ner y 

10 
ma chin er y 




CHAPTER XLI. 

the following chapter, ch is pronounced like X:. 



1 

o chre 

te trarcb 

tro chee 

2 

ar chives 

4 

an arch 

Christ en 

Christ mas 

chym ist 

dis tich 

ech o 

mas tich 

pas chal 

5 
mon arch 
8chol ar 



6 
Bchoon er* 

8 
stom ach 
1 

en cha rist 
hi e rarch 
pa tri arch 

arche Qrpe 
ar chitect 
ar chi traye 

harp si chord chrys a lis 

3 chrys o lite 

or ches tre chym i cal 

M chym is try 

lach ry mal 

al chy mist mach i nal 



4 

al chy my 
tn ar chy 
bac cha nal# 
each ex y 
cat e chi^ 
cat e cYiism 
cat e chist 
cham o mile 
char ac ter 
chris/ en dom 
christ en ing 



the English Language* 



105 



4 

h i n&te 
ech a xii«m 
mich oel mas 
gac cha rioe 
lech ni cal 

6 

chol er iek 
mon ar chy 

1 

arch an gel 
'€id me ra 
mofl che to 

4' 
cbro mat ic^ 



me chan \ck 
or ches tra 
scho las ticA: 

5 
cha ot id 
1 
hi e rar chy 

4 
char ac te rize 
mel an chol y 
6 
ol i gar chy 

cha me le on 
pa ro chi al 



SI 6 

ino nar chi cal chi rog ra phy 
4 cho rog ra phy 

al ch3rm i cal chro nol o ger 
an ach o rite chro nol o gy 
an ach ro ni^m chro nom e ter 
cha lyb e 9Xe ich nog ra phy 
chi mer i cal lo gom a chy 
chi nir ge on mo nom a chy 
chi rur ger y 1 

me chan i cal cat e chu men 

4 * 

y 1 pa tri ar chal 
sy nee do che '^ a 

5 cat e chet i cal 
chi rog ra pher en cha ris ti cal 



CHAPTER XLn. 

Who is he that has aoqnired wealth ; that has risen to 
poiwer; that has clothed himself with honour; that is 
spc&en of in the city with praise, and stands before the 
long in bis council? Even he that has shut out idleness 
fiom his houses and has said to sloth, thou art mine ene- 
{aty. He rises early aAd goes to rest late ; he exercises his 
mind with contemdation, and his body with action, and 
preserves the healta oif both. 

Tiie slothful man is a burden to himself; bis hours 
hang heavfly ppon his head ; he loiters about and knows 
not what he would do. 

His days pass away like the shadow of a cloud, and 
leave behind them no mark for remembrance. His body 
is diseased for want of exercise, he wishes for action, but 
he has no disposition to move. His mind is in darkness ; 
his thoughts are confuted ; he longs for knowledge, but 
he has no ap^ication. 

He would eat of the almond, but he hates the trouble of 
breaking its shell. 

His house is in disorder : his servants are wasteful and 
[riotous, and be runs on to ruiDi ; he sees it \vith bis 



f.J ■ " . '■ 
108 A Just Standxird for Froiimmcing 

eyes, he hears, he shakes liis head, and wishes ; but he 
has no reeolution, till ruin comes upon him like a whirl- 
wind, and shame and repentance descend with him to the 
grave. 



SELECT SENTENCES. 

To be good, is to be happy. 

Vice, sooner or later, brings misery. 

We were not made for ourselves only. 

A good person has a tender concern for the happiness 
of others. 

Modesty is one of the chief ornaments of youth. 

Deceit discovers a little mind. 

Cultivate the love of truth. 

No confidence can be placed in those who ape in the 
habit of telling lies. 

Neglect no opportunity of doing good. 

Idleness is the parent of vice and misery. 

The real wants of nature are soon satisfied. 

Boast not of the feivours you bestow. 

It is a great blessing to have pious and virtuous paients. 

The most secret acts of goodness are seen and appro- 
ved by the Almighty. 

Our reputation, virtue, and h£4>pine8S| greatly depend 
on the choice of our companions. 

Crood or bad habits, formed in youth, generally go with 
us through life. 

Our best fnends are those who tell us of our faults, and 
teach us how to correct them. 

If tales were not listened to, there would be no tale 
bearers. 

To take sincere pleasure in the blessings and excellent 
ces of others, is a sure mark of a good heart 

A kind word, nay, even a kind look, often affords com- 
fort to the afflicted. 

Every desire of the heart, and every secret thought, is 
f/known U-) hum who made us. 



the English Language. 



107 






He that cares for himseif only, has but few pleasures, 
and those few are of the lowest order. 

Partiality to self, often hides from us our own feults, 
while we see very clearly the same faults in otliers. 

Whoso regards dreams, is like him that catches at a \ 
siiadow and follows the wind. 

Commend not a man for Iris beauty ; neither abhor a 
man for liis outward appearance. 

If thou secst a man of understanding, get thee betimes 
junto liim, and let his precepts enlighten thy mind. 

liCt thy soul love a good ser\'ant, and defraud him not 
of liberty. 

Honour thy father with thy whole heart, and forget not 
Jthe sorrows of Uiy mother. 

How canst tliou repay them the tilings they have done 
fer diee? 



CHAPTER XLin. 

In ihe following chapter, e has the sound of sh when fol- 
lowed by ecz,2a, ie,to, orcottjandisimmediately preceded by 
the accent, as in o-cean, pronounced oshuit, &c. 



1 

Gra cious 
a cean 
80 cial 
spa cious 
spe ciout 

lus cious 

1 

gla ci al 
gla ci ate 
grm cious ly 

1 
a tro cious 
att da cious 
ca pa cious 
cms ta ceous 
e da cious 



1 

fal la cious 
fe ro cious 
fi du dal 
fu ga cious 
her ba ceous 
lo qua cious 
pro ca cious 
ra pa cious 
sa ga cious 
se qua cious 
te na cious 



pro vin cial 

so ci a ble 
so ci a biy 

1 
ap pre ci ate 
as so ci ate 



pro vin cial ism* 

6 
ex cru ci ate 

1 
ar gil la ceous 
con tu ma cious 



cf fi ca cious 
a tro cious ly in ca jm cious 
a tro cious ness per spi ca cious 
a« da cious ly per ti na cious 
con so ci ate per vi ca cious 
to pha ceous dis so ci ate sap o na ceous 

vi va cious e ma ci ate ^ ■} . 

1 fi du ci a rv 
vo ra CIOUS vo ra cious ly ^ -^ 

^ , ^ , brag ga do ci o 

CO er cion an nun ci ate i 

com mer cial- e nun ci ate fi e ri fa ci as 



108 



A Jujit Standard for Pronouncing 



CBXPTER XLEV. 

In the following chapteri s and 3c hare the sotmd ofshj whc 
followed by to, ie, or iOf and the accent precedes, as i 
cas-eua^ eon^^euma^ ^onomioeAkaaluske^ kon-shus, 6l 



4 

Man sion 
misdion 
pas sion 
pension 
ten sion 
ver sion 

5 

con science 
con scions 

4 

cas si a 
pas sion hie 
tran si ent 

6 



4 

as cen sion 
as per 8i<m 
a ver sion 
com mis sion 



e mis mon 
ex cnr sion 
ex pan sion 
ex i»res aiion 



com pas sion ex im uon 
com pres sion immer aioa 
com pul sion im pres sion 
con fes sion ija pul sion 



con ver sion 
con Yul sion 
de clen sion 
de pres sion 
de seen sion 
di men sion 



con scions ly dis cus sion 
con scions nesa di« mis sfon 
4 dis per sion 

ac ces sion dis sen sion 
ad mis sion di ver sion 
9g gres sion e mer sion 



in cnr sion 
in ver sion 
o nttsaion 
op pres sion 
per mis sion 
per ver sion 
po^ ses sion 
inre ton sion 
pro ces sion 
pro fes sion 



4 

re pul sion 
re ver sion 
sub mis sion 
sub yer sion 
euc ces sion 
sup pres sioi 
sus pen sion 
t^ greed, 

mis sion a n 
pas sion at€ 1 

4 
commission 
con gres sion 
pro fes sion f 

4 
appro hen si< 
in ter ces sio 



pro gres sion in ter mis ^o 
re mis sion rep re hen .si< 



CHAPTER XLY. 

In the following chapter* t has the aonnd of sk when k 
lowed by to, te, or to, and the accent immediately pi 
cedes, as in par-tial^ portient^ wuhtwUf pronounced pa 
shalf porshent^ Tno-ehun* 



1 

Mo tion 
na tion 
notion 
pa tienee 
pa tient 
por tion 
po tion 
gno tient 
ra tioD^ 



^"w 

^ 



1 

sta tion 
2 

partial 
3 

attc tion 
cav tion 
cau tious 
4 
ac tion 



4 

cap doB 
captious 
die tion 
fac tion 
fac tions 
fie tion 
fie tious 
firac tion 
firac tious* 



4 

fric tion 

men tion 

nup tial 

sec tion 

6 

op don 

1 
no tion al 
pa tient ]y 



famEaamsssBaaasaemmmm 
the En^liah Languagt. 



1 

ra ti o 
M ti ate 

2 

partial ly 
3 

eatf tbu0 ly 

[6 
optional* 

1 

lab lu tion 
ap por tioB 
ces sa tion 
d ta tion 
eom mo tion 
[com pie tion 
Icon ere tion 
ere a tion 
de vo tion 
dig en tient 
[do na tion 
da ra tion 
e mo tion 
e qua tion 
fii ce tiou» 
[for ma tion 
found a tion 
im pa tience 
lim pa tient 
lie gation 
jlo ca tion 
Imu ta tion 
1 no ta tion 
I ob la tion 
o ra tion 
plant a tion 
pol lu tion 
pri va tion 
pro ba tion 
pro la tion 
pro mo tion 
pro por tion 



pur ga tion 
quo ta tion 
re la tion 
ro ta tion 
sal ya tion 
Be ere tion 
sen sa tion 
so lu tion 
stag na tion 
trans la tion 
Ta ca tion 
Tex a tion 
vex a tious 
Ti bra tion 

2 
im par tial 

3 
a bor tion 
ex tor tion 

4 
ab rup tion 
ab strac tion 
af fee tion 
af flic tion 
as ser tion 
as sump tion 
at ten tion 
at trac tion 
col lee tion 
con cep tion 
con fee tion 
con struc tion 
con sump tion 
con ten tion 
con ten tious 
con trac tion 
con Ten tion 
con Tic tion 
cor rec tion 
cor rup tion 
ere den tial 



de cep tkm 
de due tion 
de fee tion 
de jec tion 
de scrip tion 
de set tion 
de struc tion 
detec tion 
de ten tion 
de trac tion 
di rec tion 
di rup tion 
dis sec tion 
db trac tion 
e jec tion 
e lee tion 
e rec tion 
e rup tion 
es sen tial 
e Tic tion 
ex cep tion 
ex trac tion 
in die tion 
in due tion 
in fee tion 
in fee tious 
in flee tion 
in flic tion 
in jec tion 
in scrip tion 
in ser tion 
in spec tion 
in struc tion 
in Ten tion 
ir rup tion 
li cen tious 
ob jec tion 
ob struc tion 
per cep tion 
per fee tion 
po ten tial 




4 

pre die tion 
|Mre emp tion 
pre scrip tion 
pre dump tion 
pre "^en tion 
pro c ic tion 
pro te tion 
pro trac tion 
pru den tial 
re ac tion 
re cep tion 
re demp tion 
re due tion 
re flee tion 
re stric tion 
re ten tion 
re trac tion 
se lee tion 
sen ten tious 
sub jec tion 
sub scrip tion 
sub Stan tial . 
sub strac tion 
trans ac tion 

5 
a dop tion 
de coe tion 
I 
hiAC tion eer 

1 
sta tion a rv 
4 

ac tion a bl« 
die tion a ry 

1 
ex pa ti ate 
fa ee tious ly 
im pa tient ly 
in gra ti ate 
in sa ti ate 
ne go ti ate 



I 



M 



110 



A JuH Standard for Pronouhcinff 



1 

pro por tion al 
pro por tion ftt« 

2 
im par tial ly 

4 
af fee tion at« 
in ten tion al 
li cen ti ate 
sub Stan ti ate 

1 
ab di ca tion 
ab er ra tioa 
ab ju ra tion 
ab ne ga tion 
ab ro ga tion 
ab so lu tioa 
ac cept a tion 
ac cla ma tion 
ac cu s9l tion 
ad mi ra tion 
ad o ra tion 
af feet a tion 
af firm a tion 
ag gra va tion 
ag gre ga tion 
al ter ca tion 
am bu la tion 
am pn ta tion 
an i ma tion 
ap pel la tion 
ap pli ca tion 
ap pro ba tion 
ar bi tra tion • 
at test a tion 
attgmenta tion 
ay o ca tion 
cal cu la tion 
eel 6 bra tion 
cir cu la tion 
com bi na tion 
com mend a tion 



com mu ta tion 
com. pan sa tion 
com pi la tion 
com pli ca tion 
com pu ta tion 
eon dem na tion 
con firm a tion 
con fis ca tion 
con fla gn. tion 
con form a tion 
con fu ta tion 
eon ju ga tion 
conjuration 
con se era tion 
con se cu tion 
con so la tion 
eon «tel la tion 
con ster na tion 
con sti tu tion 
con suit a tion 
con sum ma tion 
oon tem pla tion 
con tri bu tion 
con Yet sa tion 
con vo ca tion 
cop u la tion 
cor o na tion 
cor po ra tion 
cul ti va tion 
dec la ma tion 
dec la ra tion 
dec li na tion 
dec a ra tion 
dedi cation 
deg ra da tion 
dele gation 
dem on stra tion 
dep re da tion 
dep ri va tion 
dep u ra tion 
dep u ta tion 



1 

der 1 va tion 
der o ga tion 
des ig na tion 
des o la tion 
des pe ra tion 
des ti na tion 
des ti tu tion 
det est a tion 
de vi a tion 
diminu tion 
dis io ca tion 
dis pen sa tion 
dis pro por tion 
dis pu ta tion 
dis ser ta tion 
dis si pa tion 
dis so lu tion 
dis tri bu tion 
div i na tion 
dom i na tion 
el e va tion 
el o cu tion 
em i gra tion 
em u la tion 
es ti ma tion 
er o lu tion 
ex ca Ta tion 
ex cla ma tion 
ex e era tion 
ex e cu tion 
ex ha la tion 
ex hort a tion 
ex pect a tion 
cac pi a tion 
«c pi ra tion 
ex pla na tion 
ex port a tion 
ffen er a tion 
In ber na tion 
nab i ta tion 
il Ins tra tion 



■i 



the English Lan^age* 



mmam 



111 



im i ta tion 
m mo la tion 
m pli ca tion 
m port a tion 
im pu ta tion 
n c'li na tion 
n di ca tion 
n diff na tion 
n flam ma tion 
n form a tion 
in no Ta tion 
n spi ra tion 
in Bid la tion 
in 8ti ga tion 
in tti tu tion 
in ti ma tion 
in to na tion 
in vi ta tion 
in un da tion 
in Yo ca tion 
in vo lu tion 
ir ri ta tion 
lam ent a tion 
lib er a tion 
lim it a tion 
lit i ga tion 
man ci pa tion 
med i ta tion 
mit i ga tion 
mod er a tion 
nav i ga tion 
nom i na tion 
ob li ga tion 
ob sex ya tion 
DC cu pa tion 
op er a tion 
or di na tion 
OS ten ta tion 
OS ten ta tiou5 
pal li a tion 
pal pi ta tion 



1 
pen.e tra tion 
per fo ra tion 
per mu ta tion 
per pe tra tion 
per se en tion 
per spi ra tion 
pop u la tion 
prep ar a tion 
pre^ er va tion 
proc la ma tion 
prom ul ga tion 
prop a ga tion 
pros e cu tion 
pros ti tu tion 
prot est a tion 
prov o ca tion 
pub li ca tion 
rec ant a tion 
rec re a tion 
ref orm a tion 
ref u ta tion 
rel ax a tion 
rep a ra tion 
rep ro ba fion 
rep u ta tion 
T%s er ya tion 
re^ ig na tion 
res o lu tion 
res pi ra tion 
res ti tu tion 
res to ra tion 
ret ri bu tion 
rey e la tion 
rev o iu tion 
sal u ta tion 
Sep ar a tion 
seq ues tra tioa 
sim u la tion 
spec u la tion 
slim u la tion 
slip u la tion 



1 

sub li ma tion 
suf fo ca tion 
sup ])li ca tion 
sup pu ra tion 
ter mi na tion 
tol er a tion 
trans mi gra tion 
trans port a tion 
trib u la tion 
yal u a tion 
va ri a tion 
vin di ca tion 
vi o la tion 
vlf i ta tion 

4 
ben e die tion 
cir cum stan tial 
cir cum spec tion 
con fi den tial 
con se quen tial 
con tra die tion 
in sur rec tion 
in ter die tion 
in ter rup tion 
in ter sec tion 
in tro due tion 
ju ris die tion 
pen i ten tial 
pes ti len tial 
pre di lee tion 
pres i den tial* 
proy i den tial 
pu tre fac tion 
rec ol lee tion 
res ur rec tion 
rev er en tial 
sat is fac tion 
stu pe fac tion 
super scrip tion 

6 
e qui noc tial 



EM! 

112 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



e lee tlen %er* 

1 
in sa ti a bk 
in sa tl a bly 
ne go ti 41 ble* 
ne go ti a ting 
pro ba tion a ry 
pro por tion a b1i( con fed er a tion 
pro por tion a bly con fig u ra tion 



1 
cir euin lo cu tion 
cir cum val !a tion 
clas si fi ca tion 
«oag ula tion 
com mem o rd tion 
com mi^ er a tion 
com mn ni ca tion 



i 



ai* fee tion ate ly 
con fee tion a ry 
in ten tion al ly 

1 
con sti tu tion al 
ex e cu tion er 
rev o lu tion ist 

4 
con fi den tial ly 
res i den tiar y 

1 
ab bre vi a tion 
a bom i na tion 
ac eel er a tion 



eon dd er a tion 
con sol i da tion 
con tarn i na tion 
con tin u a tion 
CO op er a tion . 
cor rob o ra tion 
de gen er a tion 
de lib er a tion 
de line a. tion 
de nom 1 na tion 
de ter mi na tion 
dis crim i na tion 
dis fig u ra tion 
dis sem i na tion 
dis sim u la tion 



ac comjno da tion edi fi ca tion 
ac eu mu la tion e lee tion cer ing 



ad min is tra tion 
ag glu ti na tion 
al le vi a tion 
al lit er a tion 
a mal ga ma tion 
8in pli fi ca tion 
an ni hi la tion 
ap pro pri a tion 



e lu ci da tion 
e man ci pa tion 
e nu mer a tion 
e yac u i^ tion 
e vap o ra tion 
ex ten u a tion 
ex ter mi na tion 
for ti fi ca tion 



/ 



ap prox i ma tion ges tic u la tion 
ar gu ment a tion glo ri fi ca tion 

hu mil i a tion 
11 lu mi na tion 
in &u gu ra tion 
in cor po ra tion 
in oc u la tion 



ar tic u la tion 
as sas si na tion 
as sev er a tion 
as sim i la tion 
ca lum ni a tion 

mssBmsssssBm 



1 
in OS cu la tion 
in sem i na tion 
in sin u a tion 
in ter pre ta tion 
in ter ro ga tion 
in tox i ca tion 
in yes ti ga tion 
jus ti fi ca tion 
mod i fi ca tion 
mor ti fi ca tion 
mul ti pli ca tion 
or ga ni za tion 
pre cip i ta tion 
pre des ti na tion 
pre med i ta tion 
pro eras tin a tion 
prog nos ti ca tion 
pu ri fi ca tion 
qual i fi ca tion 
rat i fi ca tion 
re al i za tion* 
re cip ro ca tion 
rec om mend a tion 
re gen er a tion 
re it er a tion 
rep re sent a tion 
re tal i a tion 
sig nif i ca tion 
trans fig u ra tion 
va ri e ga tion 
ver si fi ca tion 

1 
con sti tu tion al ist* 
rer o lu tion a ry 

1 
nn con sti tu tion al* 

4 
plen i po ten tfa ry 

1 
ex com mu ni ca tion 
rec on cil i a tion 



h 



I the English Language. 113 

CHAPTER XLVL 

The tongue of the sincere is rooted in blfl heart ; hy- 
pocrisy and deceit have no place in hia words. 

He hhishes at a falsehood, and is confounded ; but in 
speaking tlie truth he has a steady eye. 

He supports the dignity of his cnaracter as a man ; and 
Bcoms to stoop to the arts of h3rpocrisy. 

He is consistent w^th Iximself, he is never embarrassed, 
he has courage to speak the truth ; but to lie he is afraid. 

He is far above tlie meanness of dissimulation ; the 
words of his mouth are the thoughts of his heart. 

Yet with prudence and caution he opens his lips ; he 
studies what is right, and speaks with discretion. 

He advises with friendship, he reproves with freedom, 
and whatsoever he promises, he will if possible perform. 

But the thoughts of the hypocrite are hid in his breast ; 
he masks his words with the likeness of truth, while the 
business of his life is to deceive. 

He laughs in sorrow, he weeps in joy, and the words of 
his mouth have not the interpretation of his heart. 

He works in the dark as a mole, and fancies he is safe ; 
but he blunders into light, and is exposed with his dirt on 
ibis head. 

He passes his days in perpetual constmint ; his tongue 
and his heart are forever at variance. 

O fool! the pains which thou takest to hide what 
thou art, are more than would make thee what thou| 
wouldst seem ; and the children of wisdom shall mock 
at thy cunning, when in the midst of security, thy dis- 
I guise is stripped off, and the finger of derision shall point 
thee to scorn. 



OBSERVTATIONS. 

A wise man will consider, not so much the present 
pleasure and advantage of a measure, as its fiiture conse- 
quences. 

Sudden and violent passions are seldom durable. 



114 A JuH Standard for Pronouncing 

Never ipeak of a man's virtues to his face, nor of 
his feults behind his back ; thus you will equally avoid 
flattery, which is disgusting, and slander, which is 
criminal. 

If you be poor, labour will procure you food and cloth- 
ing ; if you he rich, it will strengthen the body, invigorate 
the mind, and keep you from vice. Every person ought 
to be busy in some emplo3n:nent. 

We may as well expect thut GoJ will make us rich 
without industry, as that he will make us good and haj^y 
witliout our own endeavours. 

Some men read for the purpose of learning to write ; 
others for the purpose of learning to talk ; the former 
study for the sake of science, and the latter for the sake 
of amusement 

lie seldom lives frugally, wiio lives by chance. 

Small parties make up in diligence what they want in 
numbers. 

Were the life of man prolonged, he would become sucU 
a proficient in villany, that it would be necessary to drown 
the world again, or to bum it. 

Despotism can no more exist in a nation, until the 
liberty of the press be destroyed, than the night can hap- 
pen before the sun is set 

That virtue which depends on opinion, looks to secrecy 
alone, and could not be trusted in a desert 

More liave been ruined by their servants, than by their 
masters. 

It is safer to be attacked by some men, than to be pro- 
tected by them. 

The firmest friendships have beerP formed in mutual 
adversity, as iron is most strongly united by the fiercest 
flame. 

There are some men whose enemies are to be pitied 
much, and their friends more. 

Charity is a burden, if we caimot be allowed to express 
our gratitude. 

Do not insult the poor ; poverty entitles a man to [Hty. 

z ] I 



the J^nglish Langua§e* 



115 



<?HAPTER XLVTL 

lu the following cfkapter, aH Ifhe accented sylla1)Iea end with 
a vewelt and the c, wlifch fallows (he accented syllable, 
has '^ eoiind of sh^ and the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced -as if it ended with sh^ ttiwn pre-ciouSf qf-fi<i-ate, 
prmioimced preehrus^ <sf'fish-e'ale. 

NiJte, — Teaehen-Bhould have ihcir scholars observe the same rule m pro- 
naandng the accented syllables short, when they spcU them, in this and 
the Mlowing chapter, as in the thsrty-ei^th and thirty-ninth chapters. 



4 
Pre ciow 
spe cial 
vi eiottB 

4 

pre deus 1y 
spe eial ly 

4 
9u wpi eions 
ca prifdous 
4le fi cient 
de li jcious 
ef fi dent 
espe dal 



4 
ja di cial 
ju di cious 
1o gi cian 
ma gi cian 
ma li cious 
mvL a daR 
of fi cial 
of ii dous 
pa tri dan 
per ni eiotis 
fitly ^ cian 
pro fi cient 
•6^£dciit 



4 

ar fi fi cial 

av a ri cious 

ben e fi dal 

pol i a dan 

prcj M di dal 



«tis pi cion 
sns pi dous 

4 
de fi cien cy 
e spe cial ly 

«Ba H dons ly r^et o ri cian 
of a cial ly su per fi cial 
of fi ci ate 4 

of fi dous ly ar fi fi dal ly 
per iri cious iy av a ri cious ly 
^ro fi den jcy su per & cial ly 
suf fi cien cf 4 

«uf fi cleat }y ac a de mi dan 



CHAPTER XLVIIL 



In the fofiowing chapter, all <hc accented syllables end with 
a vowel, amd the f, which follows the accented syllabic, 
lias the sound of sh^ a;nd the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced as if il«aded with sk, thus, vi-H-atc, nd'tli'tion, in^i" 
H^ate, ptroBounced vtsh-e^atc, ad-disk-uvL, in-vdi-e-jcUeu. 

4 

Vi ti ate 

4 
ad di tion 
ag ni tion 
am hi tion 
am bi tious 
cog ni tion 
CO ml tiaj 
! con di tion 



-f on tri fion 
dis ere iiou 
e di tion 
fac ti (iaus 
fie ti ti(;us 
tia gi tious 
fira i tion 
in i tial 
nu tri tion 



#iu tri Cious 
par ti tjoa 
per di tion 
pc ti tion 
j>0 s\ tiojD 
pro pi fious 
se di tion 
se di tious 
sol st) tial 



tra di lion 
ven di tion 
vo 11 tion 

4 
Ad di tion a] 
am bi 6ous ly 
4;on di tion aJ 
in i ti ate 
no VI d aie 



iift 



i 

I « 

1 1 rao ti tion er 
\ pro pi ti ait« 

4 
<".h o li tioa> 
ac quiHtioii> 
ad mo ni tion 
ad Tea ti- iiouB 
am mu ni tioa 
ap pa ri tion 
ap po si tion 
eo a li tiott' 
com pe ti tion 
I com po n tion 



A JvMt Standard for Pranouncuig 



4 
dtef r ni tioiv 
dem o-]itio» 
d«p o si tiDtt 
dis peM.tio» 
dift qui n tioai 
eb ul H tion 
•r B di' tion 
tx lu l». tion> 
ex pe di tton 
ex pe di tious- 
ex po si tton< 
im po si tion 
ap po 51! tion. 



4 
prep'Ob^tien* 
pvo bi bi> tioA> 
prop e ai tion 
Eep e ti tion 
811 per sti tien 
sn pef St] tiou0 
snp po si tion 
tnin»po«t tion 

4 
coa di tion at fy 

4 
in ter po si tion 
sup po» i ti tiiwi 



CHAPTER XLHL 



In this dkapter, t has the sound of tsh when (bifewed bff 
long Uy and the accent precedes* ms^in /u^tts^rajMinf 
pronounced fu-tshurtf. ra^^'WiuTe^ i 



I^lbtB. — MiHiy speakeiB niBti^ the tnMpriBet{Kaof yunndta^aBdii* 

they ongbt to KcoUect that / never ha» the louiid of <«^ when in an aoce^ 
syllable : it is the afaeenoe o£ the eccent which caaees it to- siaile mto thi 
1 weakez soood tdL. 



Crea ture 
Cea ture 
fh ture* 
na ture 

3 

for tune 

tor tiure 

4 

cap ture 
cul ture 
frac ture 

es ture 
e ture 
nux tan 
Dur taiw 
p»s tare 



t 



4 

pus tuTe 
rap ture 
sup ture 
MatiUs 
Stat ure 
Stat ute 
struc ture 
Ten tare 
▼es ture 
▼uttare 
5 

pos ture 
II 

rir tof 
0t 
joiat wre 



of 


4 


moislnre 


petttkncf 


I 


pet nknl 


mn taal 


raptwr ous 


3 


fit ual 


fcf tttnale 


sum/ittteus 


4 


titular 


ac ^v at 


yen tor ous 


ac ' te 


& 


ap er ture 


pos tn Iftte 


een tnrj 


It 


flat u lem 


Tir tu 1^' 


flue In ate 


▼ir tu ous 


fiir ni ture 


1 


mat n rale 


iS na tore 


nAl>iT«2k 


^ 


paA tUTfii^ 


tOM I'Ot VliSk! 






the English Language* 



117 






ad veil tufs 
con jee ture 
de ben tuvo 
en rap ture 
in den ture 

1 
mu tu dlly 

3 

for tu nate ly 
4 

Ro tu ally 
ac tu.a nr 
ag ri cul tuce 
nat u ral ist 
nat u ral ize 
nat u ral ly 
spir it u jQus 
spirit u al 
Stat u a ry 
sump tu a rf 
tit.u la 1^ 

11 

yir tu al ly 
vir tu ous ly 

3 
im per tu nats 
un Tor tu nate 

4 
ac cent ti al 



accent 41 ate 
iadven.tur.er 
;ad yen tur oub 
«d Ten lure some 
ca .pit u lata 
*con grat u lant 
«con grat XI late 
«on jec luxal 
con nat u ral 
ron Btitu ent 
fcon temp Xu ons 
•ef feet u al 
« vent u.al 
3)a bit u al 
im pet u Qus 
in fat u ate 
j>er.petji al 
per pet ii ate 
pre«uinp-ia ovm 
tempest u.ous 
iu mult u ous 
un nat u ral 
yo lup tu aus 

ex pos tu late 

4 
man u fac ture 

4 
jgrat u la tor y 



-spir it Q al Im 
«pir it u al ly 

3 
.un for tu nate ly 

4 
con temp tu ous ly 
oon temp tuQus ness j 
-ef feet u al ly 
e vent u al ly 
ha bit u al ly 
>m pet u ous ly 
im pet u aus -Aess 
per pet u al ly 
pre sump tu ous ly 
pre sump tu ous ness | 
tu mult u a ry 
un nat u jral ly 
TO lup tu a ry 
yo lup tu ous ness 

4 
agrixul tu ral* 
1^ ri cul tu rist* 
in effectual 
In tel lect u al 
man u fac turer 
re ca pit u late 
«u per nat u ral 

5 
impetu osi ty 



CHAPTER L. 



Iu tbe following diapior, t has the «ouRd of tsh wlien folio w- 
kL by ia, or to, and preceded by Sf or x^ z% in fus-iilui^ 
Mix-tianf pronounced /i^-ri&Aan, mikii'tshun. 



4 

jBaB tion 

bes tiail 

fus tian 

\wix tien 

ques tioB 



ad mix tion 
am bus tion 
00 les tial 
com bus tion 
di ges tien 



sng ges tion 

•ques tion a ble 
4 

«n ques tion « ble 




A Jitti Stamdmrd fur Prommmcing 



CHAPTER LL 

In the foBowiog chapter* when d end»an accented syM^ 
and is immediately followed hj long «» it is prononneecl ~ 
if it were followed hjj ; and what the d is joined to ll 
succeeding syllaUe^i » prononnoed like jf t]Hls^ed4Kfli 
rer-dtfre^prononnceded^lrat«, ver-jure. 



4 
Ver dnre 

ar dUcno 

3 
Oraudnienetf 
fratf da lent 

4 
crednlon» 
educate 
grad nal 
grad nate 



4 

pendnknu 
pen dttlnm 

& 
modulate 
obdn rate 

1 
proce dare 

a 

6a«dalcnikr 

4 
grad a idly 



& 

oh dura ev 

4 
assid a ons 
in cred nbm 

4 
assidaonsly 
lejidaarj 

4 
mdlTid nal 

4 
kidlTidnalfy 



CHAPTER IM. 

In the foBoii^Bg chapter, b has Ae somid of M when hikffni 
hy long «» thus, ture, ceti-sure^ j^woamic^Askure^ceihAm^ 

4 

sensnalbt 

en su ranee sensaalfy 

4 I 
oom pres sore as sn red ly 

impreesure 4 

4 peninsak 

eeasuraUe 4 

ia8«.lated eeasaali^ 



I 

Sar» 
1 

sure 1 J 
sure ty 
4 

cen sore 
fis sure 
is sue 



4 
pres sore 
ten sure 

1 
a»8ar» 
easore 
4 

in su lar 
seasaaL 



€»APTER UlJL 



In the fotton^g ehApter^e has the sound of m^ wlM»preee 
ded by a Yowelt and followed hy to, fe« te^orlonf ii»asii 
In^svre^ vie-iom, pronounced li-zhtre^ vUhr^mu 
114 1 

Bra sie> let sure meoe ore ero si er 

clo Ban • net fleas ore u sa al 

J/b siaa la sure tiiMiawr% ^v^xm 

hosier n sure ^nmio^ tiv^t] 



u ai 

u ist 
zs u rer 
Z8 u ry 

1 

ra sioR 
he sioii 
usion 
he sion 

lu sion 
n po sure 
i clu sioa 
i fu sioB 
I tu sioa 

ro sion 
lu sion 
fu sion 
plo sion 

In the 

:ure 



Aȣkifflish Languagt. 



efftlSHMI 

en do sum 
e ro sion 
e ra. mon 
€x clu sion 
ex plo don 
ex po «ure 

il lu fttOA 

in fu sion 
in Ta sion 
oc ca sion 
per Ui sion 
per ya sioa 
pro fu sion 

4 
al lis ion 
col lis ion 
con cifl ion 
following words 
1 




4 

4c cuion 

da ris ion 
4is pleas wr9 
di vis Km 
e lis ion 
in cis ion 
mis pris ion 
pre cis ion 
pro vis ion 
re cis Um 
re vis km 

de tru sion 
ill tru sion 
ob tru sion 
pro tru sion 
1 



4 

cas u al ly 
cas ual ty 
caa u is try 
vis ion 1^ ry 

I 
am l»ro si a 
am bro si al 
mag ne si a* 
oc ca sion al 
un u su al 

4 
e lys i an 
e lys i um 
pro vis ion al 

cir cum cis ion 

I 
oc ca sion al ly 



gla zier 



u su al ly 

z has the sound of zh* 

1 1 

gra sner set zure 



CHAPTER LIV. 

On the Importance op Time. 

Hie first requisite for introducing order into the man- 

iiuent of time, is to be impressed with a just sense of 

value. 

if we delay till to-morrow what ought to be done to- 

r, we overcharge the morrow witli a burden which 

:s not belong to it. 

3ur minds should be accustomed, in our younger years, 

some employment, which may engage our thoughts, 

i AW thecapadtyof the soulata npet age. 

•Ae who performs every emjrfoyment in its due place and 

son, sufTers no part of time to escape without profit. 

i wc suffer the present time to be wa^ed, either in ab- 

ite idleness or frivolous employments, it will hereafter 

I for vengeance against us. 



-2l 



1 



120 A Just Standard for Pronaunsing 

As the season of youdi is die best time for knprove- 
mentr every precious^ hour of this short period should be 
husbanded with the most sacred care. 

A wise man counts his minutes; he lets no dme slip 
unin^roved by him ^ for time ia fife, which be makes 
long by a right use and application of it. 

A wise man uses time past for observation and reflec- 
tion ^ time present, for duty ;, and time to come, he leaves 
to Providence. 

Of ail prodigality, that of time isr the worst 

None but a wise man can employ leisure well^ and he 
that makes the best use of time, hath none to epaxe. 

Time is what we want most, but what we use worst ; 
for which we must all account, when time sbaU be no 
morcr 

The loss of wealth may be regaiiied, the loss of health 
may be recovered ; but that of time can never be recall- 
ed. 

Waste not the particles of time, for like particles of 
gold, they possess their separate value. 

Although past time ra gone, we may apply it to a 
very profitable purpose, if we lay hold of it while it re- 
mains in remembrance, and oblige it te contribute to fu- 
ture improvement. 

He who intends the improvement of his parts, must ex- 
actly mind the prudent spending of his time. 

The advantage of living do^ not consist in length of 
days, but in the right improvement of them. 

There is little need to drive away time by foolish di- 
versions ; it ffies away very swiftly, and when once gone, 
can never be recalled. 

It is a melancholy truth, that though among the tal- 
ents of our stewardship, time is the most valuable, yet, in 
general, we are more profuse and reg^rdles» oi it than of 
any other. 

Our season of improvement k short, and whether we 
use it or not, it will soon pass awayr How 
therefore, to improve the present tirne^ 



-a. 



tA'-,^ -• -*• M^kM • I' a^****-^---* *■' 



rr^ 



the Ehgluh Langutige» 

WHAT x^ cbuluxtt 

Tis not topoiise vfaen at my dpor 

A shiTeriiig brother stands ; 
To ask the cause that inade him pooTi 

Or why he help demands. 

Tis not to spurn that brother's prayer 
For faults he once has known ; 

Tis not U> kave him in despair, 
And say that i have none. 

The voice of CHABiTT is .kind- 
She thinketh nothing wrong : 

To every fault she seemeth blina 
Nor vaunteth with her tongue. 

In PENITENCE she placeth faith-— 

Hope sniileth at her door r 
Relieveth first— ^en softly saith, 

" Go, BROTHER, sin no more.** 




CHAPTER LV. 

Examples of the formation of the plural from the singular, 
' and oiher derivatives. 



1 

jBloiP 

bratn 

cake 

cape 

chain 

claim 

cry 

cube 

{door 

drove 

dry 

floor 

fiow 



1 

bloTT? 

bratn^ 

cakes 

capes 

chains; 

cJatmj^ 

cri^ 

cube^ 

door^ 

droves 

drie« 

floors 

£o«M 



1 

fly 

gale 

fpreen 

ffuide 

heap 

heave 

luve 

hope 

host 

lay 

leaf 

lipAt 

life 



1 

^ies 

gale« 

greens 

g7/{de^ 

heaps 

heaven 

hive« 

hopes 

hosts 

lays 

leaves 

li^Ats 

lives 



1 

name 

liew 

note 

pafint 

pay 

plague 

post 

robe 

saint 

scale 

side 

sky 

slave 



1 
names 
nsw^ 
notes 
paints 
pays 
plagifes 
posts 
robes 
saints 
scales 
sides 
skies 
slaves 






' * T i; r" r~- n-j-^-i 




A Just l^andardfor Pronouncing 



1 

smiles 
snows 
Bi&ins 
wires 
woes 



1 


1 


ikct 


ia e 


plsc€ 


pk 


6 


6 


box 


box 


fox 


fox 



CHAPTER LVL 

In the following chapter, the difTerent soondfl of the tttrmi- 

uation ed are exhibited. 



preceded Ij d otty thttd ii 
nronoUDCod [ 



Bratd ed 
ci ted 
da ted 
do ted 
fatnt ed 
fe/ist ed 
float ed 
gra ted 
lia ted 
mind ed 
seat ed 
Bta ted 
sutt ed 
tra ded 
watt ed 
2 
card ed 



2 

part ed 
start ed 

3 

halted 
salt ed 
sort ed 
4 

act ed 
ad ded 
dread ed 
fit tod 
grant ed 
hint ed 
melt ed 
wafl ed 

6 
want ed 



ac quaint ed 
en treat ed 
ex clu ded 
ex port ed 
import ed 
re peat ed 
re port ed 

2 
de part ed 
dis card ed 
im part ed 
re gard ed 

3 
ap plan d ed 
as satilt ed 
dc fraud ed 
es cort ed 



3 

re ward ed 

4 
ae cept ed 
a dapt ed 
af feci ed 
as cend ed 
col lect ed 
con duct ed 
con vict ed 
de scend ed 
dis band ed 
ex peci ed 
in struct ed 
in tend ed 
ob struct ed 
pre tend ed 
re pent ed 



Wben the tennination ed in immrdiately preceded by a vowel, or hj the 
flat oooBonantii, b, ^, /, m, n, r, flat M, «, jt, or «, if it be fiounded like ^, the 
e is supprcaacd in the pronunciation, and the d ia added to the forecoinff 
•y UafaliB, as in be-tra^f^ mor-W-ccf, JUiw-td^ m-ed^ ruh-htd^ beg-ged^ r3t<i 



iormtdt Tttin-tdy 4^ / ptODOODced bo-irode^ 
beggdf lamd^ rand. 



1 
Blazed 
cried 
dmin ed 
^fear ed 
fHoia ed 



9 



1 

haH ed 
la med 
na med 
pa red 
ratn ed 



1 

rat9 ed 
rolled 
saTed 
sued 

used 



Jlodty tude, Tubibdt 

S 

armed 
charm ed 
3 



V 



the English Language. 



123 



3 

warn fd 
.4 

beg red 
liTed 
rub b<;d 

5 

lodged 
<3o]y ed 

6 
mo vcd 
pro ved 

oi 
boil ed 
toil ed 

ou 
poured 

ow 
borwed 

1 
a bu ^ed 
ac cu «ed 



ac qmred 
a do red 
ad vi «ed 
amn^d 
ap pear ed 
ar ri ved 
as cri bed 
a vafl ed 
bap ti vA 
be Itev ed 
be steg ed 
be reav €d 
blao phe med 
chas ti sei. 
com bi ned 
eom mu ned 
con su med 
«on ve ned 
de fa med 
de fi led 
de pri ved 



pro ia ned 
re ¥1 led 

a lanned 
de bar red 
dis char gea 
en lar irea 

3 * 
a durn ed 
eon form ed 
de form ed 
in form ed 
in atall ed 
per form ed 
re call ed 

4 
a hndg ed 
ad journ ed 
con demn ed 
di vid i^ed 
ex pun ged 



4 

in frin ged 
re turn ed 
re ven ged 
sub aerv ed 

6 
die eolv ed 
in volv ed 
re eolv ed 

6 
hal loo ed 
im pro ved 

an noy ed 
em ploy ed 
en joy ed 

ou 
a roue ed 
de vour ed 

ow 
al low ed 
ea dow ed 



When the termination ed is immediately preceded by the sharp conso- 
nants, e,fj kj Pf «, X, ckf ahf OT ^tx, the e is suppressed in the pronunciation, 
and the cf is |m>n6unced 'ike t, and added to the foregoing sjUable, as in/a- 
cedf §tttff'-€df eraek-edf pass-ed, 4fc. ; pfonoonoedyof/e, •<hA krakt^ past. 



1 

Fa ced 

gra ced 
la ced 
tra ced 
2 

laugh ed 
mark ed 

3 
warp ed 

4 
class ed 
cracked 
dash ed 
flash ed 
pass ed 



i 

a ba sed 
de ba sed 
de ceos ed 
de fa ced 
die gra ced 
di vor ced 
em bra ced 
en for ced 
en gross ed 
en ti ced 
ef & ced 
« sea ped 
im peach ed 
in creos ed 
in du ced 



pro du eed 
re du ced 
re leas ed 
re proach ed 
se du ced 

2 
em bark ed 
re mark ed 

3 
de baiich ed 
ea dors ed 

4 
ad van eed 
as aessed 
at tach ed 



com men ced 
con vin ced 
die miss ed 
dis pen sed 
dis per sed 
en camp ed 
ex press ed 
im press ed 
op press ed 
pro fess ed 
sup press ed 

ou 
an noun ced 
pro noun ced 
re noun ced 



124 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



CHAPTER LVIt 

Tlie foHowing chapter eootaiiis allst of wdrds, in which thfi 
are two of the same orttiography, but of difTerent aeeei 
sound, and meaiungt aetording t^ their a^^licatioB. 

Tlie foUovdng WMrda axb Ndunl tdd Veils y^ttiA «W difierently aecMl 

Abte. — ^In ths JmivMowu^ diipten) wlien l^basits sharp sound, il 
printed in Moliekt but when il has its flat soond,. it is pxinted in Ronn 
and when g has its haid sounds tiie g is i»ed in the pnonunciatioi^ I 1 
wheij it hwttssdft tound, it is represented in the prehuBciation by J. 






i' 



WriiteU^ 

Foretaste 
retail 

di gesi 
pre fix 

augmenl 
tor roeni 

cs sajT 
exile 
ex port 
im porti 
iacreasa* 
per fUma 
pres age 
ref use 
sur name- 
trans port 

bom bardi 

dis cord 
es cort 
rec otd 

colltnigitis- 
com port 
con ct%Da 
eonfiifd 
console 
Hod nee 



IrouNs. 

Pronounced 

1 

fd^elaMe 
re tale 

1 
^Jesi 
prefiks 

airg meRl 
tor Bleat 
4 

eft sa 
eks il** 
dui port 
Im port 
vigkresa 
per fume 
pres saje 
sef use 
sur name 

T^ 

bum bard 

4 

£8 koni 
Kb kort 
Bek ord 

5 

kol leeg 
kottk port 
kong kirete 
kon ine 
kon sole 
prod dme 



VXSBS. 

Pronounced, 

tote taste 
ve tale 

4 
de jest 
■re fika 
4 
awg ment 
tor meaii 

I 
es sa 
eg zile 
ekii po^rt 
Import 
ia kxese- 
per fiwie 
pre sajie 
re fuze 
sur name 
tcans port 

a 

bum bard 

dbi kord 
es kort 

nekord 
I 
ko! leeg 
kom port 
ko>B krete 
kon fine 
kon sole 
pro dose 



■■■■■■■" 


^ English LtmgumgB. h 




NOUNS. 


TSRBS. 


lien 


Prorumnoti^ 

5 

kon sort 

4 

ab jekt 


Pranoummi. 

3 
kon sort 

4 
abjekt 


ori 


ct 


ract 


abstrakt 


abstrakt 


int 


ak sent 


ak sent 





affiks 


affiks 


ent 


sem ment 


se ment 


sint 


des kant 


des kant 


rt 


dez ert 


de zert 


ftnce 


€n tran06 


en transe 


act 


eks trakt 


eks trakf 


lent 


fer ment 


fer ment 


ress 


impress 


im preia 


nse 


in senstf 


in sense 


It 


in suit 


in suit 


[lit 


per mit 


per mit 


ent 


prez zent 


pre zent 


\ 


rebd 


re bel 


5Ct 


sub jekt 


sub Jekt 


Ct 


traj ekt 


tra jekt 


ler 


trans fer 


transfer 


ess 


an dress 


un dress 




4 


' OU 


)unt 


dis kount 


dis kount 




6 


4 


ct 


kol lekt 


kol lekt 


[nerce 


kommerie 


kom merse 


lact 


kom pakt 


kom pakt 1 


press 


kom press 


kom press i 


ert 


kon sert 


kon sert 


UCi 


kon dukt 


kon dukt 


ect 


kon fekt 


kon fekt 


ict 


kon flikt 


kon flikt 


erve 


kon senr 


kon senr 


sst 


kon test 


kon test 


ext 


kon tekst 


kon tekst 


ract 


kon trakt 


kon trakt 


rast 


kon trast 


kon trast 


ent 


kon vent 


kon vent 


erse 


kon verse 


kon verse 



1 



ne 



9tamAird Jwr Frtmouncinff 



Ronxs. 



I con vert 
con Tict 
object 
proj ect 
prot est 

com plot 

con Toy 

{com po«ai 

o vcr flow 
o ver throtr 

at tri bole 
depulchr* 



kon yert 
kon Tikt 
•bjekt 
proi ekt 
prot est 

koBI^ol 
5 

kon Yoj 

kompoan^ 
1 

O TUT fio 

o Tur thro 

4 

attre bote 

Sep pul knr 



coui ter muM koui tor nii#t 



conn termftud 
conn ter nunrdi 

mis con duct 
The ibllownig 

Written. 



konn tor mand 

konn tur martsk 

5 
miakondiikt 



4 
koB Ycrt 
kon Tikt 
objakt 
pro^t 
pra test 

kom plot 

kon ynff 

kom pound 

1 
o Turflo 

OTvr t&ro 
4-^ 

atlrib uta 
■e pnl kur 

1 
koontur miaa 

s 

konn tur mand 

konn turmartsL 

4 
mk kon dukt 



vorda are Nouns and Adjectives wiueh ^ 
differently accented. 



NOUNS. 

Pronowni^nL 
I 



ADJSCTITBS. 

1 





tk€ English Language, 



I* 



Some Verbs ending in se have the s pronounced like z, lb 
distingoiflh them from Ncmni of die same form and accent. 
These are the following. 

NOUl^ft. 

PronoitHdsd. 
1 



Written. 



Close 
grease 
rise 
use 

noose 

house 
mouse 

abuse 
dis use 
ex cuse 



klose 
greife 
rise 

yuse 

6 
noos 

Ott 

hotts 
mous 
1 

a buiie 
dis use 
eks kuse 



VERBS. 

Pronounced, 

I 

kloze 
grese 
rize 

3ruze 

6 
nooz 

ou 

houz 
moui 
1 
abuze 
dis uze 
eks kuze 



The following woras are Nouns and Verbs which are difier- 
enily pronounced, but ^accented alike. 



Written. 

Sheath 

tear 

wreath 

lives 

dove 

lead 

wind 

put 

mow 
sow 

mouth 

Itaven 

bel lows 



MOUNS. 

Pronounced. 

1 
sheth 
teer 

reih 
1 

livz 
4 

duv 
led 

wind 
4 
put 

iBOll 
SOU 

Ott 

mouth 
1 
ra vn 

4 

bel las 



VERBS. 

Pronounced. 

I 
sheth 
tare 

reth 

4 
livz 

1 
dove 
lede 

wind 

7 
put 

mo 
so 

Ott 

mouth 
4 
rav vn 

4 
bel loze 



^ 



128 



r 

I pred i cate 
sub 11 mate 



A Just Standard fur Promouncing 



WrUUn. 



NOUNS. 

Pronounced* 

4 
pred de kal 

sub le mat 

4 
pre sip pe tat 



TERBS. 

Prowmnced. 

4 
pred do kate 

sub le mate 

4 
pre sip pe tate 



pre cip i tate 

Tlie following words are Adjectires and Verbs which 

differently pronounced* 



Written. 
Live 
low 
bin der 
fre quent 
tar ry 
ab sent 
pros trate 
dif fuse 
low er 
sep ar ate 
mod er ate 
re gen er ate 



ADJECTITES. 

Pronounced. 

1 
live 

1 
lo 

1 
bin dur 

1 
fire kwent 

tar ra 
4 

ab sent 

5 
pros trat 

1 
dif fiise 
1 

lo or 
4 
sep ar at 

mod der at 

4 
re jen er at 



TERBS. 

Pronounced. 

4 

Ht 

Ott 

lou 

4 
bin dur 
4 
fire kwent 
4 

tar re 
4 
ab sent 

5 
pros trate 

diffuse 
ou 

louur 
4 
sep ar ate 

5 
mod der ate 

4 
re jen er ate 



The two following Nouns are subject to two difierent 
nunciations, as they are differently applied. 

NOUNb. Nouirs. 

ou 4 

Slough, slou, a deep miiy Blough, sluf^ the skin whi< 
11 place. serpent caatB 

1/ ou 6 

f/Gout, a febrile disease. Gout^ % iXtoii^ ^e<e^t^ 



the Engli^ Language. 



12b 



CHAPTER LVIII. 

|i The following chapter is composed of various words, in which 
there are two or more words of the same pronunciation, hut 
of different spelling and definition. 

Note. The words eontaliied fai the fellowmg chapter are not inserted in 

! the jneceding chapters^ as is usually the custom in books of this kind. It 

is Toy difficult for a scholar to distuignish the spelling of words wliich ajne 

pionoiinoed alike, but spelled difierently, when they are intermingled with 

other woids^ and not associated with their definitiona. 

N. B. The pronunciation of the first word in each suhdi- 
▼inon is written immediately afler it, which determines the 
pronunciation of all the words in that subdivision. 




AIB^ ak^ to pain, to trouble. 

Ak^ a kind of beer. 
JUir. tf& one of the dements. 

im, belbre, sooner than. 

Hflfa^ an inheritor. 
Am^ fle^ the walk in a choich. 

Pu, contraction of I wDL 

Isk^ an island, 
ale^ a small island in a river, 
the jfJTcterit of Eat. 
twice four. [security. 

'ftdli^balfl^ surety for debt; to give 

Bafe^ a pack of ^oods. 
But^ bate, an enticement; to aOure. 

Bat& strife ; to lessen. 
Biua^ bazo, coarse woollen cloth. 

Bays, garlands. 
Ban^ bare, naked ; to strip. 

Beu, a beast ; to suffer. [land. 
Bay, ba, a colou r ; an opening into the 

Bov, a Turkish govcmour. 
beaco, bectsh, the shore, the strand. 

Beech, a kind of tree. 
Beat, beet, a stroke ; to strike 

Heet, a kind of root. 
Bee, bee^ an iusfxit. 

Ejfl^ toexint 

nu, bo^ a uian of dress. [ways. 

Bow, an instnimcnt ; to bend Mdo- 
Beanx, 1)oze, plural of Beau, a man 
of drciM. [nient. 

Bows, pliirul of Bow, an uistru- 
; beer, a fcrmeniod liquor. 
ft a iuind carri&go on which the 
deadare — ' ' * ' 



1 
Blew, blu, the preterit of Blow. 

Bluc^ a kind of colour. 
Bloat, blote, to swell 

Blote^ to smoke. 
Boar, bore, the male swine. 

Bore, to make a hole ; the preterit 

oi Bear, to suffer, [of earth; 

Bole, bole, the body of a tree ; a idnd 

Boll, a rofind stalk or steuL 

Bowl, a basin, a round mass. 
Borne, borne, carried, supported. 

Bourn, a boundary, a limit 
Breach, brcctah, a gap^ dillrienoe^ an 
openiiif. 

Breech, tlie hinder part of a gun. 
Brake, brake, a fern ; nn instrument 
for breaking flax. 

Break, an opening; to {jart by foreo. 
Buy, bi, to purchase. 

By, near to. 
Cain, kane, a man*8 nanio. 

Cane, a shru^ ; a walking stick. 
Cede, seed, to yield, to resign. 

Seed, princif^ of production. 
Ceil, sce^ to cover the inner roof of a 
building. 

Seal, thesea-cal^ a- stamp; to fast- 
en with a seaL 

Seel, to close the eyes. 
Cere, seer, to cover with wax. 

Seictf, dry ; to bun^ 

8ecTf «L Y^^\vt\« 



^ 






carried to tho grave. I Chax^ -wcstV ^aiv«i\>V^^^^ 



130 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



Chaste, tshaste, pure, incorrupt. 

Cliased, tho ])n;terit of Cha^. 
Choir, kwire, a band of singers. 

Cluire, twenty-four sboets of paper. 
Cite, site, to summon, to quote. 

Site, a situation. 

Sight, tlie sense of seeing ; a y/iew 
Climo, klime, to ascend. 

CUme, climate, rcgioiu 
Close, kloze, to shut, to finish. 

Clothes, ^rments, raiment. 
Coal, koli% tiie common fossil fueL 

Cole, a man's name. j^ 

Coarse, korsc, not refined ; rude. 

Corse, a d^ body. 

Course, race, direction ; to run. 
Core, kore, the inner part of any tlung. 

Corps, a body of forces. 
Creak, kreek, to make a harsh noise. 

Creek, a small river; a bay, or 
cove. 
Dane, dane, a natiyo of Denmark. 

Deisu, to vouchsafe, to coRdesoend. 
Day, da, a part of time. 

Dey, a Moorish ^ovemoor. 
Dear, deer, costly, beloved. 

Deer, an animal 
Deuoo, duse, two. 

Dctiso^ an evil spirit. 
Dew, du, moisture on the ground. 

Due, owed, ritf ht, exact. 
Dire, dire, dreudful, horrible. 

Dier, one who colours cloth. 
Doe, do, the female deer. 

Dough, unbaked paste. 
Eye, i, the organ of sight; to watch. 

I, myself; personal pronoun. 
Fain, fane, gladly, chf«rfuL 

Fane, a consccnited temple. 

Feign, to dissemble. [fi^cble. 

Faint, font, languid, weary ; to grow 
Feint, a fiilse appeainuice. 
Fair, &rc, beautiful, just, gentle. 

Fare, food, price of passage, &c. 
Feat, feet, act, deed, ezpbit 

Feet, plural of Foot 
Faaze, fcez, to untwist the end of a 
rope. 

Foes, rewards paid to physiciaiiB or 
la^'yrrs. 
Fecn\ fude, fee, tenure. 

Fewl, quarrel, contention. 



Flea, flee, a small insect. 

Flee, to run from danger. 
Flew, fluj the preterit of Ply. 

Flue, hnt, soft lur or down, pi 
a chimney. 
Float, flote, to swim. 

Fkite, to skim. [ 

Fore, fore, anterior, that which o 

Four, twice two. 
Forth, forthf forward abroad. 

Fourth, the ordinal of four. 
Frays, fraze, <juarrels. 

Phrase, an idiom, mo<le of sp< 
FreesEC, freeze, to congeal with o 

Frieze, a coarse cloth ; a ter 

architecture. [pk 

Gage, gaje, to depone as a wag 

Gauge, a measure ; to meaniri 
contenta of a vesseL 
Gait, gate, tho manner and ai 
walking. 

Gate, a kina of door. 
Gear, goer, furniture, tracer 

Gere, a man's name. 
Glaire, glare, the white of an eg| 

GkuKL to dazzle irith great 8{ 
dour. 
Glows, gloze, doth gk)w. 

Gloze, flattery ; to flatter, [ci 
Goar, gore, any edging sewcki c 

Go er, one who goes. 

Gore, dotted blood. p 

Grate, grate, a partition male y 

Grea^ laige, noble. 
Grease, gresc, soft &t 

Greece, the name of a countrr. 
Greaves, greevz, armour for the u 

Grieves, doth grieve. 
Groan, grone, a lioarse dead woaa^ 
sigh deeply. 

Grown, advanced in growth. 
Hail, hale, drops of frozen rain; 
salute. 

Hale, sound, healthy, [the bi 
Hair, hare^ the natural covering 

Har^ a small quadruped. 
Hay, ha, dried grass. 

Hey, a word of joy. 
Heal, heel, to cure. 

Heel, a part of the foot 
^ear, heer, to listen. 

Here, in this place. 



Pii 



m 



the English Langvage. 



131 



dtc, elevation, 
was called, 
to cut 
olour. 

a man's Tuune, 
) hasten. 

elevated, supcrioar rogicm. 
p, rewanl for lervicet. 
r, more hiffh. [hide. 

!)rde, a hioifen tiwiuxe ; to 
a don or tribe, 
a farminfl iiutrument 
mddcn call. 

£c, {ilurai of hoe, a fiirmhig 
rument. 
8t4 ckinga. 
le, a hollow place. 
, all, total 
, the cheek, 
beat or clash. 

in instrument to open a lock, 
a wharf. 

ave, a dishonest man. 
centre of a wheel, [stance, 
need, to mingle any sub- 
want, ncocssitY. 
'«], to rest on the knee. 

temper by heat 

u, the preterit of Know. 

'rcsh, recent. 

lite, title of lumoor. 

the evening. 

\ to undcrstaml. 

tso. 

io7£, doth know. 

the organ of smelling. 

e^ to load, to heave out 

ilaccil. 

c, did He. 

1 narr.)w street 
ground enclosed. 

e side opposito to the wind. 
, part or a plant or book, 
illingly. 

k, to let in or out; a breach. 
I pot-herb. 
rz, to glean, 
legs, sediments. 
)v, liberty ; to depart 
jvillingly. 

, a muneal instrument 
teller of fidsehoods. 



Loon, lone, any thing lent 

Lone, 8c4itary, single. 
Lo, k)^ tee! behold! 

Low, not high, hombte. 
Lore^ lore, lesson, instmetioi^ 

Low cr, more low ; to brinff low. 
Made, made, participle of Mue. 

Maid, an unmarried woman. 
Mail, male^ armour ; a bag of post 
letters. 

Male, the he kind. 
Main, mane, prindpcd, chie£ 

Maine, the name of a State. 

Mane, hair on the neck of a horse. 
Maiao, maae^ Indian com. 

Maze^ a labyrinth. 
Mare^ inare, the female of honea. 

May or, the chief magistrate of a 

city. [drink. 

Mead, meed, a meadow ; a kind of 

Mede, a native of Medea. 

Meed, reward, gift 
Mean, meen, basc^ mediocrity. 

Mien, air, look, manner. 
Meat, meet, flesh to be eaten. 

Meet fit, proper ; to come together. 

Mete, to measure. 
Meer, meer, a lake, boundary. 

l^lere, pure, that or this (mly. 
Mew, mii^ a cage, an enclosure. 

Mue, to change featlicrs. 
Mewl, mule, to cry as a ctiiU. 

Mule, a kind of animal. 
Mews, mu«^ cages. 

Muse, deep thought ; to meditate. 
Might, mite, power,' strength. 

Mite^ a small insert, or particle. 
Moan, mone, to lament 

Mown, cut down. 
Moat, mote, a ditch for defence. 

Mote, a small particle. 
More, more, a greater quantity. 

Mow er, one who mows. 
Nay, na, no. 

Neigh, the voice of a horse. 
Oar, ore, an instrument to row with. 

(yer, contraction for over 

On^ metal unrefined. || 

Oh, Ob alas ! ' 

Owe^ to be indebted. 
Pail, nde^ a vessel. 

Pue, fiunt of lustre ^ an tmekMos^^ 



jSM^— — H»w— w wiil — j a nj i 



132 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



).■■■■ •U I »■- 



I 



Fun, pane, rafTcrinff, a penalty 

Pane, a aquare of glass. 
Pur, pare, a couple. 

PaK, to cut on*. 

l^r, a kind of fruit. 
Ptece, peese, rest, tranquillity. 

Piec(^ a part. 
Peak, peek, the top. 

Pique, ill will ; to ofiend. [somub. 
Peal, peel, a snocession of load 

Peel, the d^in or rind of any thing. 
Peer, peer, an equal ; a nobleman. 

Pier, the column of a bridge. 
Place, plase, situation. 

Plaioe, a flat fish. 
Plain, plane, smooth, leveL 

Planp, a jcinefB tool ; to smooth. 
Plait, plate, a fold in a garment. 

Plate, wrought silver, &c 
Pleas, pleez, excuses, pleadings. 

Pk»se, to delight 
Pole, pole, a long stafl^ a measufe. 

Poll, the heacT; a list of voters. 
Port, port, a harbour. 

Porte, the Turkish couit [plaud. 
Praise, praze, commendation ; toap* 

Prays, doth pray. 

Preys, booties, plunders. 
Pray, pra, to entreat, to supplicate. 

Prey, booty, plunder ; to plunder. 
Priesj prize, dotn pry. 

Pnwj, a reward ; to value. 
Q,uean, kween, a worthless woman. 

Cluccn, the wife of a kinff. 
Rain, rane, the water that mils firom 
the clouds. 

Reign, to rule as a king. 

Rein, part of a bridle, to restnin. 
Raise, raze, to lift, to exalt. 

Rays, beams of light. 

Raze, to destroy, to abolish. 
Read, reed, to peruse. 

Rcix], a plant, a small pipe. 
Reek, reck, to smoke. 

Wreak, to revenge. 
Rhone, rone, the name of a river. 

Roau, a colour. 
Rhyme, rime^ poetry; to agrao in 
sound. 

Rime, hoar frost 
I Hire, rise, a kind c^eseuleo. j^tain. 

Rise, the act of rising ; origmaL 



1 

Right, rite, just, proper. 

Rite, solemn act uf religion. 

Wright, a workman. 

Write, to express by lettersL 
Road, rode, the lii^I.way. 

Rode, the preterit of Ride. 

Row ed, did row. 
Roe^ ra^ the female of the hart 

Row, a lank } to urge a boat n 
oan; 
Roto, rote^ nMmory. 

Wrote, the preterit of Write. 
Rye, ri, an earuknt grain. 

Wry, crooked. [i 

Sail, am. a canvass sheet ; to pasi 

side, the act of selling. 
Scene, seen, place of action ; pari 
a play. 

Seen, participle of See, to befaoi 

Seine, a net used in fishing. 
Sea, see^ the ocean. 

See^ to observe, to behokl. 
Seam, seem, two edges joined tog( 
er; a scar. 

Seem, to appear. 
Seas, seei, ffieat waters. 

Sees, do&see. 

Seizes to lay hold of 
Sew, so^ to join by threads drawn n 
a needle. 

So^ thus ; in like maimer. 

Sow, to scatter seed. 
Sew er, sore, one that uses a neei 

Soar, toflTak>a [< 

Sore, tender to the touch ; an 

Sow er, one that scatters seed. 
Shear, sheer, to clip. 

Sheer, pure, clear. 

Shire, a county. 
Sicc^ size, the number six at dice. 

Sighs, doth sigh. 
^ Size, bulk ; to adjust 
^n, sinc^ a token. 

Sine^ a geometrical line. 
Sire, sire, a &ther. 

Sigh er, one who si^hs. 
Slaie, sla, a weaver's reed. 

Sla^, to kill. 

Sleigh,* a kind of carriage. 

Slev, to part into tlurcadL 
Sleielit, dlite, artful trick, dexterit; 

Slight, contempt ; to neglact 



tlte English Language, 



133 



89ew dui the preterit of Slay, ti> kiU. 

Shie,* to tiini round. 
Sloe, slo, the fruit of the black-thorn. 

Sk>w, not swift, dull [shoe. 

Sols, sole, the bottom of the foot or 

Sool, the immortal s^nrit of nmn. 
Stakes stake, a post fixed in the 
gromid; a wager. 

St^k, a slice of flesh } meal brofltd. 
Stair, stare, a rising step. 

Star^ to look wim wonder. 
Steal, steel, to take without liberty. 

Steel, iron refined and hardened. 
Stile^ stile, steps into a field. 

Style, manner of writing. 
Straight, strate, direct ; not crooked. 

Strait, a naricw pass. 
Suite, sweet) retinue, company. 

Sweet, luscious to the taste. 
Swear, sware, to declare upon oath. 

Sware, the preterit of Swear, to de- 
clare upon oath. 
Tail, tale, the hinder part of any thing. 

Tale, a narrative, a story. 
Tare^ tare, a weed ; an allowance in 
weight 

Tear, a rent ; to pull in pieces. 
Team, teem, beasts hameesed to 
draw. 

Teem, to bring forth. 
Toar, teer, water from the eye. 

Tier, a row, a rank. 
Thee, thoe, thyself. 

The, the dennite article. 
Their, thare, belonging to them. 

Thfre, in that place. 
Throe, <Aro, extreme agsny. 

Throw, to fiing, to cast. 
Throne, Mrone, a royal seat [cast 

Thrown, participle of Throw, to 
Thyme, time, a plant 

Hme, measure of duration. 
Tide, tide, ebb and flow of the sea. 

Ti ed, bound. 
Tire, tire, frimiture ; to fatigue. 

Ti er, one who ties. 

'Fyie, the name of a place. 
Toe, to, part of the foot. 

Tow, the coarse parts of flax and 
hemp ; to draw after. 
Tbld, toki, rdated. 

TbUcd,didtolL 



1 



T6i»j tole, to draw by degrees. 

Toll, a rate or tax ; to nng a belL 
Tray, tra, a kind of dish. 

T»cy, a three at cards. 
Troll, troie, to run round. 

Troul, to utter volubly. 
Veil, vale, a covering. 

Vale, a valley. 
Vain, vane, fruitless, mean^ 

Vane^ a weathercock. 

Vein, abkxxl vessel. 
Wade, wade, to walk in the water. 

Weigh ed, experienced. 
Wail, wale, to lament 

Wale, a riroig ^lart in cloth. 
Wain, yrane, a carriage. 

Wane, decrease ; to grow less. 

Wayne, the name of a person and 
place. 
Waist, waste, part of the body. 

Waste, desolate ; to spend. 
Wait, wate, to tarry. 

Weight, heaviness. 
Waive, wavc^ toputofij to relinquish. 

Wave, a billow. 
Ware, ware^ merchandise. 

Wear, to waste, consume. 
Way, wa, road, course, mrthod, Aa. 

Weigh, to balance, to examine. 
Weak, week, feeble, not strong. 

Week, seven days. 
Wean, ween, to put from the breast 

Ween, to imagine. 
Wheal, hweel, a pustule. 

Wheel, a circular body that turns 
round upon an axis. 
Ve, ye, plural of ThoxL 

Yea, yes. 
3 
Arc, ark, part of a circle. 

ArlL a TesseL 
Hart, nart, the male of the rse. 

Heart, the seat of life. 
3 
All, awl, the whole, total. 

Awl, a cobbler's tool 
Auffht, awt, any thing. 

Ouffht, to be obticrix] by duty. 
Bald, bawld, vend of hair. 

Bawled, cried aloud [dance. 

Ball, bawl, a round substance^ o 

Bawl, to cry out 



134 



A Just Standard f(9r Pronouncing 



Calk, kawk, to stop the leaks of a Alp, 

Cauk, a kind of spar. 
Call, cawl, to name^ tociyofiit 

Caul, a membrane. 
Cause, kawz, a reason, a motive. 

Caws, doth caw. 
Chord, kawrd, the string of a musi- 
cal instrumenL 

Cord, a small rope. 
Clause, khwz, partofaamtenea. 

Claws, the feet of a bird. 
Faun, fawn, a kindof rural deity. 

Fawn, a youn£ deer. 
Gall, gawl, the bile; to fret 

Gaul, the ancient name of Fiance. 
Hall, bawl, a court of justice^ a large 
room. 

Haul, to drag by violence. 
Hnngh, haw, a little meadow lying in 

a valley. 
Haw, the berry of the hawthorn. 
Pall, pawl, a kind of cloak. 

Paul, a man's name. 
Pause, pawz, a stop. 

Paws, the feet of a beast 
Wall, wawl,a fence of brick or ^ne. 

Wawl, to cry, to bowL 
4 
An, an, the indefinite article. 

Ann, a woman's name. 
Bad, had, ill, corrupt 

Radr, the prctent of Bid. 
Boon, \An, participle of Be^ to exist 

Bin. a re^wsitofy tor grain. 
Bell, 1m>11, a hollow amukUng vessel 

Belie, a gay ^ounff lady. 
Broad, bred, a kind of food. 

Brod, participle ofBreed. 
Bur, bur, thorough head of a plant 

Burr, the lobe or lap of the ear. 
But, but, only, excqit 

Butt, a vessel. 
Cask, kask, aberrpl. rhdmct 

Casque, armonr finr the nead { a 
Cell, sell, a small hot or cave. 

Sell, to di<;pose oC 
Censo, seustf, publick rates. 

Sense, apprehension of mind, rea- 
son, juuscnient [dollar. 
Cent, sent, Uie hundredth put of a 

Scent, odour; tosmelL 
Sent, jmrirdple of Send. 



Chough, tshuf!j akind of searbtrd. 

Chu^ a Uont down. ^ [mc 

Cinque^ nngk, a lave, in backgai 

l^nL a drain ; togodown. 
Clam, klam, a bivalve shell-fish, [h 

Clamm, to clog with glutinous m 
OeC klifC atenn in musick. 

Cliff a fteep rock. 
Dam, ann, the mother of bniteai 
con^ne. 

Damn, to condemn. 
Done^dun, participle of Da 

Dun, a colour ; dark, gloomy. 
Dost, dost, the second person of Dc 

Dost, fine partidee of dry earth, 
other matter. [oim( 

Drachm, dram, the eighth part of i 

Dram, a small quantity of vffJoU 
Gcst, je^ a deed, an actbn. 

Je^ any thing ludicroiw, to disc 
Gild, gild, to wash over with gold 

Guud, a society, a corporation. 
Crilt, j^t, participle of Gild. 

Gwlt, came, an ofibnoe. 
Guest, gcsf, a visiter. 

Guess ed, did guess. 
Heard, herd, tiie preterit of Hear, 
liflterL 

Herd, a number of beasts. 
Him, him, the oblique case of He. 

Hym, a spocirs of <Iog. 

Hymn, a divine song. 
In, in, within aoino place. 

Inn, a house of entertammmt 
Jam, jam, a conserve of fruits s 
wedge in. 

Jamb, ft post of a door. 
Joust, just, tilt, toumamoBlt 

Just, right, honest 
Kill, kill, to depriveofUfe. 

Kiln, a ikbrick formed todry tMlV 
Knag, nag, a hard knot 

Nag, a small horse. 
Knap, nap, to bite. 

Nap, a short sleep. 
Knit, nit, to weave with noedlea 

Nit, the egg of a bu&e. 
Lacki^ Iaki^%lh lack. 

Lai^looie, 
Lead, led. a soft hcavr motat 

Led, the pietcrit aSd participle 
Cioad. 



iHMMi 



(A« Engliah Language. 




135 



b^ lim, a member, a border, 
imn, to paint 
L8, lingks, ports of a chain, 
^iix, a spotted beast 
net, a texture woven with laxge 
interstices or meshes, 
ett,* clear of chai^goi^ reaL 
le, nun, not any, not one. 
ua, a female r^uso. 
, wun, loss than two, single, 
^on, the preterit of Win. 
n, plum, a kind of fruit 
lumb, perpendicular; a leaden 
weight on a line ; to adjust 
^ rap, a quick Mow { to strike, 
^rap, to fold together, 
il, rerl, the preterit and participle 
of Head, to peruse, 
ed, a colour, 
t, rest, case, quietness, 
^rest, to extort by force, 
jh, rctsh, to vomit, 
'retch, a wortliless person. 
s;, ring, a circle ; to sound. 
Mng, to twist 

ghf ruflj uneven, unpolished. 
uf)', a ruffle, [of Ring, to somid. 
ig, rung, the preterit aml-fiarticiple 
Trun^, the preterit «ind participle 
of Wring, to twist 
le, sum, a part, not many. ■ 
iim, the wnole of any thing, 
sun, a male child, 
on, the luminary of the day. 
lu, taks, small ntuls. 
ax, a rate, a chargei 
VB, terse, smooth, neat 
ierce, a measure, 
g, tung, the catch of a buckK 
Qnguo, the instrument of speech. 
^ verj, thcbrudL; to bend down, 
irge^ a dean's mace. 

t, not, a cluster ; to unite, 
ot, an luiverb, denoting negatkm. 
ott,* a quantity of throul- 
:, lok, an instrument to fisten 
doors or cbest& la place, 

icke, aman'sname; the name of 
>u^h, a take. [Scotland, 

skot, shot, paymenti a lustiveof 
iott, a man's name. 



Shock, shok, eztsznal violence. 

Shough, a species of shaggy dog. 
6 
Brows, brooz, doth brew. 

Bnuse^ a hurt ; to crush or mangle. 
Bruit, broot, rumour, noise. 

Brute, a creature \\ithom reason. 
Crews, krooa^ shipu' companies. 

Cruise, a voyage in search of plun- 
der; to Mul lor pluudnr. 
Hoop^ hoop^ any thuig circular; to 
bind or endoMO. [shout 

Whoop, a shout of pursuit; to 
Rheum, room, thin watery matter. 
- Rome, the ca|Mtal city of Italy. 

Room, space^ ipartment 
Rood, riooa, iburtn part of an acre. 

Rude, rough, uncivil. 
Threw, ^Aroo^ the pr*'tcrit of Throw. 

Through, from end to end. 
To, too, unto. 

Too, likewise, also. 

Two^ twice one ; a couple 
Yew, yoo^ a tree of tough wood. 

You, the oblique case of Ye. 
7 
Wood, wood, trees, timber. 

Would, the preterit of Will 
ou 
Bough, bou, a bmnch of a tree 

Bow, an act of reverence ; to oend. 
Flour, flour, the e<Uble part of grain. 

Flower, the blossom of a plant 
Foul, foul, filthy, impure. 

Fowl, a winged animal, a bird. 
Hour, our, sixty minutes. 

Our, belonging to us. 
Pour, pour, to let oat, to emit. 

Pow er, dominion, force. 
Rout, rout, a rabble ; to dissipate and 

put into confusion by defeat 
r Route, road, way. 

1 
A chor, a kur, a species of the herpes. 

A ere, a quantity of land. 
Bai ting, ba tin^ refreshment 

Ba tixig, aliating, deducting. 
Ci on, si un, a shoot from a mant 

Scion, a small twi^ taken from 
one tree to bo mgrafled into 
another. 

Si on the name of a mountain. 



I 



H 



136 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



Ceilinff, seel in^, the inner root 

Soaniur, placing the leaL 
Feo do], m dal, heTd from another. 
Feu dai, a dependance^ held of a 
Buperiour lord. 
Gra tcTy gra tur, a rough instrument 
to grate with. 
Great cr, larger. 
Ho ly, ho le, pious, sacred. 

Whol hr, totally. rfomkes. 

Leaver, levur, one who deserts or 

Lc ver, a mechaxucal power. 
Me ter, me tur^ a measurer. 

Me tre, poetical measure. [als. 
Mi ner, mi nur, one who digs for met^ 

Mi nor, less ; one under age. 
Pe ter, pe tur, a man's name. 

Pe tre, nitre. 
Pri er, pri ur, one who inquires too 
narrowly. 
Pri or, former, before. 
Rai sin, re zn, a dried grape, [bate. 
Reason, cauao^ prindplo; to de- 
Rai sor, ra zur, one who raises or Ms 
up. [with. 

Razor, an instrument to shave 
Sa tire, sa tur, a poem in which folly 
or wickedness is censured. 
Sa tyr, a sylvan god. 
Sa ver, sa vur, one who saves. 

Sa vour, a scent, odour. 
S^gn ior, seen yiir, a lord. 

Sen ior, one older than another. 
Trea ties^ tree tiz, negotiations. 

Trca tise, a discourse. 
'^ al, vi ul, a small bottle. [sick. 
Vi ol, a stringed instrument or mu- 
Weak ly, week le, feeble ; feebly. 
Week ly, once a week. 
2 
Mare schal, mar shal, a chief com- 
mander of on army. f 
Mar shal, thochiefotficerof arms; 

to arrange. 
Mar tial^ warlike. 
Mar ten, mar tin, a kind of swallow. 
Mar tin, a man's name. 
3 
Al tar, awl tur, a jplaoe on which of- 
ferings are laid ; the communion 
table. 
Alter, to change 



Au ger, aw gur, a carpenter's tool 

Au gur, to ccHSJecturo by signs. 

4 

Anchor, angknr, a heavy iron 

hold the ship; to rest on. 

Ank er, a liquid measure. 

Bettor, bet tur, one that lays befs 

WBgOSL 

Bet ter. more good ; to improves 
Ber ry, ber re, eny small fruit 

Bu ry, to inter the dead, to hide. 
Borough, bur ro^ a town with a cc 
poration. 

Bur row, a hole for xablHta. 
Cal lousyksl lus, hardened, insensib] 

Cal lus, an induration of the fibn 
Can non, kan nun, a large gun. 

Can on, a rule^ a law. 
Cast er, kast ur, one who caatsL 

Cast or, a beaver. 
Cel lar, sol lur, a ground room. 

Sel ler, one who sells. 
Ces sion, sesh un, the act of givfa 
wa^ ; resignation. 

Ses sion, the act of sitting. 
Cin gle, sinff gl, a girth for a hone. 

Sin gle, uone ; to separate. 
Col our, knl lur, hue ; to stain. 

Cul ler, one who {Hcks or choose 
Cous in, kuz zn. a near relation. 

Coz en, to cheat 
Cyg net, sig net, a young swan. 

§ig net, a seal 
Du cous, dis kus, broad, flat 

Dis cus, a quoit 
Fel loe, fel k>, the rim of a wheel 

Fel low, on associate. [ftngc 

Fil li^ fil lip^ a quick motion o[ tl 

Phil ip^ a man's name. \g 

Fun gous^ funggus, excrescent spo 

Pmi gui^ a mubhmom. [on 

Gal ley, gal le, a vessel driwi wl 

Cial ly,* a printer's case to leosr 
types^dkc. 
Gild er, gild nr, one whogUds. 

G«iild er,* a Dutch coin, valoe for 
cents. 
Juncate, jungkit, adKMMcakfl^ m 
deiiney. 

Junk el, to feast secrethr. \go»% 
Lat in, lattin, the ancient Homui k 

Lat ten, brass ; plates (tfinn CimM 



mssmmmm 



(te English Language* 



137 






L«B lefl, ksm, to dfnijhiih, to grow 
less. 
Lesmn, a ptbdBfki tLtkA, 
Lev ee, lev ve^ tf crowd' of aftendaiits. 
Levy, a rate; to niie m»i or 
money. 
Man ner, man nnfj IbMii, nyetliod. 
Man or, a lord's jtoMk^n, a do- 
main- fdliitnney. 
Man tel, man tl, work nuseu before a 

Man tlC| a kind of cloak. 
Met al, met t), a mineral aolMtance ; 
a hard compact bo^. 
Mettle, courage, epfirit 
Pal ette, jmI lit, a painter's bioonL 

Pal let, a small mean lied. 
Pan el, pan nil, a schedtde of Jmymen. 
Pan nel, a kind of rustick soddle. 
Paniek, panuik, a andden uid 
groukidlcM fear. 
P&n nick, a plant of the xn^IeC kind. 
Pisncil, pensil, an iiMlnmient for 
writmg or (Munting. 
Pen sile, nan^ing, suspended. 
Prac tice, prak tu, custom, the hahit 
of domg any thing. 
Practise, to do habitually. 
Rab bet, rab bit, a carpelrtei^s tooL 

Rab bit, a small fiiny ai^nid. 
Rigger, riggur, one who rigs or 
dresses.- 
Rig oor, severity, strictneife. 
Rom age, rum mij, a tumult, a bustle. 

Rum ma^, fD search places. 
Scituatc, Mttshuate, tiie name of 
a town. 
Situate, placed with respect to 
• any thing else. 
Sul4 le, sut tl, artful, cunning. 

Sttt t!r,* the neat weight 
S«c cour, suk kur, aseistance, relief ; 
to help. 
Suck er, a young shoot, a fish. 
Sul key,* sul ke, a carriage for one 
person. 
8di ky, sullen, morose. 
IVaTsil, tnvil, labour, toil; to br 
hour. 
Toivel, a jonmey; to paA ftom 
^ one pbce to another. 
WeaMi »! with ur, stato of the air. 
Weth er, a iheep. 



Chd er, kol lor, anger, nge. [lieck. 
Col lar, something put round the 
Docket, dukit, a ni6el tied upon 
goods. [rant 

06q net, a jMet eontainhig a war- 
Pttvf it, prof nt, gain, advantage; to 
Denent. 
Ptoph et, om who fjMiis, 
6 ' 
Crewel, kroo^ yam twisted and 
wound. 
Cm el, inhuman, barbarous, [ture. 
Rheum J, roome^ roll of diarp mds- 
Roomy, spadooa^ wide. 
cu 
C(^UTicfl,koun8il,atiassombly. [vise. 
Cocm ael, advice, direction j to ad- 
1 
Arfeur, iorreer, that which remains 
utijpaid. 
Ar'nen^ the last body of an army; 
Avail; avide^ profit, advantage; to 
profn. 
Avale, to let fiJl, to deinresa 
Chagrin, shagreen, iU numour; to 



Shagreen, the akin of a kind of fiaht 
Demean, de mene, to behave. 

0e mesne, a freehold. 
Dis creet, dis kreet, prudent, modest 

Discrete, distinct, disjunctive. 
En diet, en cRte^ to prosecute. 

Endite, to compose. 
4 
As cent, as sent, eminence, stecpneaei. 

Assent, an agreement [cncy. 
Con cent, kon sent, harmony, consi^ 

Consent, agreement, concord; to 
agree to 
Coquet, koket, to deceive in love. 

Coquette, a gay airy girl 

Sa vor y, sa vur e, a plant 
Sa vour y, pleasing to the smelL 

Asperate, asperate, to make rough. 

Aspirate^ to pronounce with rail 
breath. 
Cal en dair, kal en dur, a register. 

Cal en der, to dress doth. 
Prem ices, prem is siz, fhst fruits. 

Prem i scs, houses or lande^ ^uc« 




1^ 



A Jiut mandard for Prouimncing 



Cam pie nieiit, kcm pit ment, the fUI 

quuititj. [to flatter. 

Com pli mea^ ezpreMion of civility } 

Ce ta ceoms "^ ^ *lu»^ <^ ^ whale 

kind. ^ [hain. 

Se ta ceotu, briitlTy set with strong 

Comp trol icT, kontio lur, director, 

supervisor. 

Con trol ler, one that has the power 

ofgoverningi 

Conces sion, konsesh nn, the act of 

yieldii^; a giant 

Con ses sion, a sitting together. 

I Direct er, de lektnr, one whodirecta. 

j Di lect or, one who has authority 

over others ; an instructer. 
E lect or, e lekt ur, one who votes. 
E lect re, amber, a mixed metaL 
Intension, in ten shun, the act of 
forcing or stnuning any thing. 
Intention, design, purpose. 



In vont er, in vent nr, a devu 
teller of fictions. 
Inventor,afind«routof some 
new; aoontriver. 
4 
Per mis d bley per nus se bl, 
which may be mineled. 
Per mis si hk, that which m 
pennitted. 

Allegation,aIlega8hun.afl 
tion, a plea. 
Al 11 ga tion, an arithmetical r 
As pora tion, as pe ra shun, a m 
rough. 
As pi ra tbn, an ardent wish ; 
pronunciation. 

5 
De pos i ta ry, de pox e tur e 
with whom any thing is I 
intrust. 
De pository, the place wher 
thing is lodged. 



CHAPTER LIX. 

llie following chapter Is chiefly composed of irregular words which c 
properly w\un^ in any of the preceding chapters. I have, thei 
arranged them m this chapter, with the coixect pronunciation oppoi 
each word. 



Writtefk 


PrommncetU 


TVrUten. 


Pronounced 




1 




4 


Crate* 


krate 


thank 


thuigk 
tJangk 


eighth 


9.jUh 


think 


ewe 
fbige 


£^ 


y" 


t 


strew 


stro 


conch 


kongk 




4 


hough 
wxoth 


hok 


axe 


aks 


TOih 


does 


duz 




6 


draught 


draft 


brew 


broo 


gi" 


giU 


chew 


tshoo 


gifl 


pin 


crpw 


kroo 


girth 


gerfA 


rouge 


roozh 


once 


wunae 


shrew 


shio 


rath 


mlh 


shrewd 


shrood 


said 


sed 


sous 


soo 


.saitb 


wfith 


wound 


woond 


says 


eez 




ou 


sects 


sekts 


piow 


prou 


nor 


seks 


wound 


wound 



(Atf English Language 



139 



Wriuem. 

an dent 

apron 

bridal 

bridle 

jduhier 

jfeilure 
jsaiteni* 
Hautboy 
humour 
idle 
idol 
idyl 
iron 
Id and 
lucre 
na val 
I Da vel 
I no yean* 
pilot 
■ddSer 
specie* 
Upedee 
MFu count 
where Ibie 

gcorgirk 

nauaeoofl 

aloffl 
anxious 
any 
axiom 
banqw4 
bed clothei 
biacuit 
[brachial 
breech ea 
buffet 
buai nets 
bufly 
censor 
chal ice 
chancre 
chan crou« 
Ichriiitian 
cicely 
Icirriiil 
clanlnanl* 
loolonei 
ijme 



jPranoMiieidL 
1 

anetahcnC 
apum 
kndal 
hridl 
klotheyur 
esreai 
uMjun 
ntun 
DO boy 
yumur 
idl 
idul 
idil 
ium 
ileand 
lukur 
naval 
navl 
noyo 
pi hit 
aolejur 
apeuie 
■peahei 
▼1 Count 
hwarelbfe 
3 

jorjik 
nawahua 
4 

aloae 
angkahna 
enne 
akshum 
benffkkwet 
bedklose 
bis kit 
brakyal 
britahia 
bufm 
bisnea 
bisse 
sensor 
tshalis 
shangkur 
shangkrua 
kiistyuD 
aisle 
serkit 
Idabburd 
kurnel 
kunjuT 




WriiUn, 

cupboard 
cymbal 

lidi 

od 

bean 
flambesoz 
flexion 
fluxion 
fimctioo 
furnace 
galbws 
gamble* 
gambol 
ffrandeur 
hie cough 
ingresa 
mto 
javeliB 

Etion 
tuna 
ice 
liquid 
liquor 
mallows 
many 
maatiff 
medal 
meddle 
meaiu«ga 
minium 
missal 
miasile 
nephew 
palate 
pendant 
pendent 
phihiaick 
fwetty 
riband 
saffron 
sanction 
aauphire 
schedule 
seven nighl 
symbol 
thank fol 
traverse 
unction 
unto 
venison 
vict iials 



/^rofiMMieed;. 
4 

kubbnxd 

Bunbal 

ingfflish 

flam bo 

flamboze 

flekahun 

flukshun 

fungkahun 

flirnis 

gallua 

gambl 

gambul 

granjur 

hikkup 

inggrea 

in too 

javlin 

jungkahun 

lun^k tshusa 

likkwid 

likkur 

mal lose 

men ne 

mastif 

meddal 

meddl 

mes swajc 

minyum 

missal 

missil 

nev vu 

pal hit 

pen dant 

pendent 

tis nk 

pritte 

rib bin 

nfftim 

sangk shun 

saffir 

sed jule 

sen nit 

simbul 

lAangkful 

traverse 

unjrk shun 

un too 

venzn 

vittiz 



140 




ITrtttM. 


Pronounced* 
4 
▼Inyet- 


WriUmh. 


1 
anetsfaeoQtfe 


Vignette 


an dent Ij 


viSdncadtty 


wensde 


heauteoua 


buttheua 


wheth or 


hwethur 


brev latum 


breve ya tshoN 


wbith er 


hwithur 


hu mor oos 


^umurv 


whit low 


hwitlo 


irony 


inme 


i wo men 


wimroui 


irony 


iume 




5 


ream em 
rign teout 


lekweem 


Ian rel 


lorril 


ritsheTis 


ooxcx)mb 


kdnkoDM 


scenery 


seen ere 


seal lop 


akollup 

6 
kooicer 


soldiery 


sole jure 
2 
korbungkkl 


ooorier 


carbuncle 




7 


marrliioness 


mar shun es 


lagar 


shoogiv 




3 




1 


cordial 


korjeal 


although 


awl tho 


nauseate 


naw she ate 


assuage 


asswajo 




4 


bareaa 


fan ro 


ambergris 


am bur greet 


dmnpaign 


a^^n^ pand' 


anchorage 


angkuraje 


oonjQM 


konjun 


anchoret 


anckoret 
andi urn 


curtaSI 


kur tale 


andi ron 


demior 


dem yars 


anxiously 


angkshusla 
aklwatU 


dksiiade 


disBwade 


a qua tile 


encore 


ongkore 
fuiee 


aqueduct 


ak kwe dnkt 


fosU 


aquihno 
baietdooz* 


akkwe On 


galocbe 
Eazza 


eakeho 
huzza 


billedoo 


burial 


berreal 


{maintain 


mcntane 


busily 


bizzelo 


jmarkee* 


marker 


cap i fad 


kapetal 


ipersoadA 


perswidb 


capitol* 


kapetul 


routine 


rooteen 


oourteiy. 


kurtese 


1 suffice 


•uffize 


desuetude 


dcs swe tu<te 




« 3 


equipage 


ck kwe paje 


menage 


menazh 
4 


equity 
exerdso 


ekkwete 
ekscr size 


again 


agen 


exordse 


eks oroze 


1 a gainst 
Icourant 


agonst 
kur rant 


irridiron 
halcyoii 
handkerchief 


ffridi urn 
nal she un 


Icuiras 


kweFBS 


hang kur tsluf 


^cem 


dizzem 


hitherto 


hith ur too 


1 en ha nee 


enhonstf 


tiquefy 
liquidato 


Ilk kwe fi 


prednet 


presingkf 
kadril 


lik kwe date 


'qnadrille 


luxury 


lok shu re 


irenuss 


remiss 


maintenance 


men te nanas 




6 


massacrb 


mas sa kur 


eschew 


estshoo 


national 


nash un al 


intrude 


introod 


par amouir 


par ra moor 




oy 


passable 


passabl 


chamois 


fihamoy 


passible 


pat; aeU 




ov 


piteous 


pitsh e us 


profound 


profound 


plenteous 


plen tshe us 



9fi 



the English Language, 



WritUm. 

I»rinetpal 
principle 
punctQoi 
radical 
rad Ida 
mtional 
requiata 
aacrifice 
-Mncfaroniaic 
ItankAilly 
er di gria 
imetiioDa 

• 

chronical 
chronicle 
kvaiithnia 
[pGoaphonia 

Iboimleoiii 
|howili0i« 

lalle ffianee 
{Umtghty 
iiwialve 
ingredient 
mnrander 
niiiaelun 
peranaaiQn 
per em rive 

•baoiflaiaa 
|| already 
|i annex ion 
I bel lea let tree 
champign*on 
loom plez ion 
oomponction 
loonjiinofion 
connexion 
|de flax ion 
depNidant 
Idepend ent 
deaeendant 
deaoendent 
Nfiaeern ment 
die junction 
dia tine tion 
exchequer 
exeqiption 
cseroon 
;ex tine tion 



Prmumneed, 

4 
prinaepal 
prinaepl 
punf 1l tahu al 
xadaekal 
xaddekl 
raahunal 
rek wexit 
aalLkrefize 
aingkronixm 
ftille 




iner degreea 
nngk tSiuna 

krone kal 
krone kl 
IqgariMmx 
fbafoma 

bountabena 
hoaitxor 

1 
allejanae 
awl mite 



ingrejent 
marodor 
ma lenm 
per awazhon 
per awmrir 

4 
abriihan 
awl red de 
an nek ahon 
bel let tor 
aham pin ywn 
kom pm'shan 
komf!..1ik ahon 
Vxm JuJlgK ahun 
kon nek ahon 
deflukahnn 
depend ant 
de pend eoi 
deaendant 
deaendent 
diziem ment 
dix jrniffk ahun 
dia tingk ahun 
ekatahekor 
^ em ahon 
ccpBerahnn 
cka tingk ahon 



Wrmtm. 

m jnnc tion 
intaglio 
Hen tenant 
miKtia 
port man teaa 
punctilio 
sub June tkm 
together 
tnui A tion 
un guen tum* 
unthankful 

pro boa da 

bom bard ler 
bom ba ain 
oonnoiaaear 
roqoehum 

old decamp 
rea er voir 

etiqoeUe 

pantaloon 
rendesvoua 

ha mor ooa 1 j 

architecture 

aceeaaary 
aeeeaaor J 
cour teoualy 
e qui ta ble 
imagery 
punc tu al ly 
rational ly 
aanctuary 
aangwnary 
aingularly 
tri ayl la bie 

adagio 
ap por tion ment 
depred ate 
en thu ai aam 
en thu 81 aat 
obedience 
obedi ent 
tragedian 



141 

Prfmounctd, 

4 
in jungk shun 
in talyo 
lev ten ant 
mil Hah ya 
port man to 
punsk til yo 
aub jungk shun 
togeth ur 
tn^ nzb on 
un gwen turn 
un <Aangk fill 

5 
pro boa aia 

1 
bum bard eer 
bumbazeen 
ko nea aare 
lokek) 

3 
ade de kawng 
rez er vwor 

4 
eteket 

6 
pantaloon 
ren de vooz 

1 
yu mur ua le 

ar ke tek tshure 
4 

ak aea aa re 
ak aea BUT re 
kur tshe us le 
ek kwe ta bl 
im midjer re 
pungk tahu al le 
rash un al le 
aangk tahu a re 
aanggwenare 
sing cu lar le 
trissD la bl 

1 
ada je o 

apporoshunmeut 
de pre she ate 
en thxL zhe ozm 
en thvi zhe ast 
o be je ense 
o be jc ent 
tra jc de un 



142 



WriUtH, 



A Just Standard for Projiouncinff 



anUqmtj 
anzil laiy 
com pas 8ion ate 
compendious 
com pen di um 
dis cem i ble 
e ques tri an 
ex og ger ate 
in 1 qui tous 
in i qui ty 
ob ii qui ty 
om ni sci coco 
cm ni 8ci ent 
OP quench a ble 

dig soIt a ble 
dis solv i ble 
stc nog ra phy 

ad p la tion 
a^ ta tion 
al len a tion 
alter a tion 
con gre fp. don 
ed u cation 
eetu a tbn 
ex al ta tion 
ex ul ta tion 
flue tu a tion 
indu ration 
Ic giB la tion 
m«l u la tion 
punc tua tion 
re d ta tion 
min a tion 
rami nation 
■a cer do tal 
sit a a tion 
ve ge ta tion 

a qua for tis 



adacititious 
al togeth er 
com pre hen oon 
con ae seen sion 
eoD sci en tious 
ig no min ious 
; in qui si tion 
re gi ment al 
fsarzep titiouB 



Pivwwifedm 

4 
an tik kwe ta 
awg zil ya re 
kom pashunata 
kom pen je us 
kom pen je um 
dizzemebi 
e kwcs tre an 
egz aj er ate 
in ik kwB tus 
in ik kwo to 
ob lik kwe te 
om niah e enae 
om nish e ent . 
un kw^uh a bl 

dizzolTaU 
diz zohr e bl . 
steneagiaffr 

ad Ju la ahua 
aj eta shun 
alio yen a shun 
awl tur a shun 
kong gre ga shun 
cd ju ka sEuB 
es tshu a shun 
egz awl ta shun 
egz ulta shun 
fluk tshu a shun 
m dura shun 
Icj is la shun 
mod iu la sh»n 
pungktsfaaajbuD 
res seta shun 
rooinashun 
roo me na shun 
sascrdotal 
sit tshu a shun 
▼cj c ta shun 

3 
akkwafortk 

4 
adsetishus 
awl to gcth nr 
kom pre hen shun 
konae senshub 
kon sheenshus 
ignominyus 
ing kwe zish un 
rcj e ment al 
sur rep tish us 



WritteH, 



Pronouno§d, 
1 



chevaox define shevodefrMn 
le ger de maui lej ur de mane 
menagerie menazhuree 

re d ta tiVa res se ta teeve 

5 
mono^lkUe men no sil fat 1)1 
pol y syl la ble pol le sil la bl 

4 
dis ere tion a ry dis kiesh on an 
extinguish able ekstinggwishal 

bacchanalian bakkanalean 
con gre ga tion al konggregashun 

4' 
asafoctida Assafeteda 
au then ti oi ty aw th&a tia m to 
con san jpnn i ty kon sang ewin t 
par ti al 1 ty^ par she ale te 

punctuality pungh tahiii^et 



singularitjf 
taciturnity 

chronological 



singgulareta 
tase turnete 

kronoiqjekal 
hyp o choirdri aok hip po kon dniA 
ichthyology ik<Aeoloje 
phys 1 og no mtsi fizh e og no mist 
physiognomy fizheoenoma 

fizheoToje 
resepirosete 
1 
ak sen tahn adit 
an tisse pt ibiit 
as so she a shcm 
kapitsliulaahQ 
sershfl^iaxi 
kon so she a shn 
• nun she a ahoi 



log 

phys i <M o gy 

redprodty 

accentuatioa 

an ti d pa tion 

assodatieo 

capUulatioo 

certiorari 

consodji4lon 

• nunoLf.'ion 



ex aggera<tion egzajeraahun 

examination egzamenasfam 

exoneratioa egz on era shun 

i ma fpntL tion e mad jin a shun 

partidpatioA par tis se pa aba 

pro nunda tion pronunsheashi 

pro piti a tion pro fnsh e a shun 

renundation renunaheaahd 

arithmetician ari/^metishan 
char ac ta ns tick kar ak taristik 
math e ma ti dan medh e matidiai 
obediential obejeanshal 



wm 



CHAPTER JJL 



mm 
140 



The following (^pCcr is composed of wotdi which ue generally pro- 
r«ounced in ^A improper and vwgar manner, even hj many who priest 
to be wM 'g e < ^peaken. 

Nol^, — As (he words in ^ ftOawiiig chapter a|e contained in the jjiitp- 
I ceding chapten^ and the pfxipCT*' pronunciation of t]t^^ given, I have only 
I given the vifl^gir pronmi^ui|ipn of them in this cha|^. 



Proper, 


VuX^OT. 


Proper, 


VvJLgar, 
4 
klensn 


Bcfl 


bile 


clinch 


broO 


brile 


creek 


krik 


brooch 


brotshe 


cringe 


skrinj 


char 


tahore 


curse 


kU98 


chives 


sives 


dint 


dent 


chins 


tshime 


lar 


fur 


ck)7 


Ui 


film 


frJm 


diam 


dreeii 


fleam 


flem 


eilgn 


V 


^^ 


git 


ewe 


yo 


girth 


gert 


noise 


gnna 
histe 


naish 


naish 


fSt 


■ ^^^ 


hearth 


hurth or hath 


mn 


me 


hiss 


siss 


joint 


into 


tioma 


hum 


oist 


> 
me 

hi 


hoof 


hu(r 


Vnn 
loo 


^ 


ISf 


mils 


mild 


marsh 


mash 


oil 


ile 
peek 


nape 

pith 

purse 


nap 
pe<A 

kwinsk 


point 


innte 
kwate 


quench 


qnoU 


nd 


TCd 


tear 


rare 


rinse 


lense 


find 


rine 


risk 


resk 


seafDS 


skass 


roof 


wflT 


afaos 


shu 


shut 


shet 


sofl 


sile 


since 


scnf;c 


qnil 


spile 


sleek 


sUk 


SWDfd 


swofd 


soot 


sut 


yert 


yeest 


stint 


stent 




9 


stone 


stun 


.bleat 


blaat 


thin 


fil 


feam 


kn 


thrid 


thxcA 


mxTs 


sas 


tusk 


tush 




3 


whole 


hul 


hone 


hawse 


wune 


WIU 


1 

1 


4 


worst 


WU6t 


•ddiof 


Adz 


yet 


yit 


been 


ben 




6 


knit 


bust 


stamp 


stomp 


■Uch 


ketsh 


W/iip 


TO^ 






I 



144 


A Ju9t Standard for Pranem 


ncing 


*> * 


VvUnr, 
dooi 


hFroptf* ' 


Vvlgar 
lothur 


doM 


leather 


goal 


god 


mallowa 


niallua 

9 


ffum 
foam 


goom 
loom ' 


neoro 
pickaxe 


niggur 
peks aks 




on 


pincers 


pinshcn 


drought 


dtwUh 


pmchbeck 


pinshbak 


gown 
Hound 


pound 
noun 


pump ion ^ 
purs lain 


puii^'k in 
pusle 


oust 


loust 


pursy 


.ipusse 




1 


radish 


''reddish 


jdia trict 


deestrikt 


rath er 


ruthur 


duty 


jute 


rivet 


rib bit 


joiner 
lilach 


jme or 
latok 


salad 


sal tit 


shut tie 


shettl 


ointment 


inte ment 


smother 


^ smud dur 


panther 


panteur 


spikenard 


spignut 


poiacn 


pizn 


spoonful 


spun fill 


sen na 


seena 


steady 


stidde 


suppla 


supl 
takl 


steelyard 


stilyurdz 


taokle 


treble 


trib bl 




3 


wrestle 


rassl 


kernel 


kar nel 


wristband 


rizbun 


learning 


lam in 


yearling 


yur lin 


mer chant 


"' martshant 


yel low 


yallur 


partner 


pard nur 


yonder 


yundur 


salver 


■avurortervttr < 




5 


saucer 


sassur 


cause way 


kroe wa 


saucy 


sasse 


fallow 


fbl hir 


ir 


3 


laud a num 


lodlum 


annatto 


ortur 


poplar 


pop pi 
bothur 


copperas 


korpus 


poth er 




4 


pot lid 


pot led . 


apprentice 
astnma 


printis 


rosin 


roz urn 


azma 


solder 


sod dur 


bris ties 


brusabs 


tassel 


fossil 


carrion 


karrin 




7 


chim ney 


tahimfale 


pretty 


pntte 


cover 


kivur 




ou 


courte sy 
dan dnifr 


knrtohe 


cowslips 


kou Stops 


dandur 


drown ed 


dround id 


en gine 


m jine 


drowning 


dround ing 


errand 


arrant 


frouzy 


froue 


Aim sy 


slim se f 




1 


fur ther 


fur dur 


afraid 


«feerd 


gath er 


geth ur 


anoint 


aninte 


pining 
bin der 


gingshang 
hen dur 


appoint 
design 


ap pinte 
dcziiie 


homely 
jaun dice 
kettle 


hum ble 


euardian 
halloo 


gardeen 
hollo 
3 


fan dun # 
kittl 


hmpaag 


lam pun 


ca nal 


ka nawl 



s 



«^*<.-^w.-< 



"KKEhgthh Ldri^'nit^e. 



" •*•' 1 ^ *11 flW H WB 



HRB 






r 

tism 
^« 

7 
}e 

a 

no 
stanee 

1 



tly 



I 
Tient 

r chief 
bee 
mo 
m» 

I 

;Ion 

[ist 

ise 

nt 



»g|in 
agiMt 
Koyund 
be gratirii 

^& 

1 

gianart 
nimatEi 
• rfnjfgl 

narkBie 
S " 
Ibttetrikttde 

4 

band! urn 
ctidr^ ' 
■tdfindbe. 
anrkattfltMiM 
deputize 
deputizd 
Mute 
MLkwentlt 
Jin oral 
guTiirment 
CAtelrixide 
Saugknrtiliv 
bun U bee 
'harrefcane 
Injuriii - 
fikkvidi 
mnahmilynn 
me/Aodia 
uth xa tme 
rijement 
nndm dres 



JProper, 

whiffle tree 

nomi Bathe 

ap point ment 

pbtttto 

eabpoean 

attacked 
cori-aadiBr 
ex tempoie 
par titioa 
pre sorap tn oua 
tobaeee 
on gamtmi 
unsteady 

db appoint 

januaiv 
whortleber ly 

arithmetick 
electrify 
pre vent ito 
atnpendoua 
Iremendeva 

ob strep cr 008 

ague and fever 
pen ny roy al 

Gertioiari 

epporUinity 



^utgOT, 



hwippltree 
5 
nometiT 

I 
ap pinle Bkoit 
pola'mf ' 
ani pee taa 

attaktid 
kidlandur 
eks tern pore 
petiihun 
pre zuin shoa 
tobakkur ' 
an gtv^ ton 
nnstidde 

ienuare 
nukklberre 

4 
areMaie tik 
elskturiae 
pre Vent e tiv 
sta^Mendo us 
\n mendn VB 

ob stroptm hui 

ievumagu? 
pen na rial 

4 
aaahnrarur 
1 
op pur tahtt ne te 



following wonUf ^th many other$f ar§ Teryfnqueniljf tpdted in 

eomeUjf im writing, ^ "'' 



itefrise 
I 



eoOck 

die 

dots 

enclosa 

cneloswe 

endlct 

endictmept 

endite 

endonenent 



ensure 
ensurance 




faistructer 

Ke 

merchandiaa 

negotiate 

nepjuftKMi 

phiauy 

riband 

stanch 

wanahty 

wo 






146 A Just Standard for Pronoundng 

CHAPTER LXL 
RBYENGR 

Of aU the passions whidi invade the human iMreasti re- 
;irenge is the most direfiiL 

How much soever a person may suffer from injustice, 
he is always in hazard of suffering more fix)m the prose- 
cution of revenge. 

How pleasing soever revenge may appear, it always 
costs more to a generous mind than the purchase is worth. 

Revenge is a mean pleasure ; but to forgive is glorious. 

He who arrogates to lumself the right of vengeance, 
shows how little he is oualified to decide upon his own 
claims; since certainly ne demands what he would be 
un^villing to grant to another. 

He who retires to meditate mischiel^ and exasperate 
his own rage, may justly be numbered amongst the most 
.miserable of human bduigs. 

A passionate and revengeful temper renders a man 
unfit for advice, deprives him of his reason, and robe hhn 
of all that is great or noble in his nature. 

No principle is more noble than thai of forgiving in- 
juries ; and nothing so wicked or unprofitable as rancor- 
ous revenge. 

Hatred and cevenge are perpetual stings in the breast 
of those who harbour them. 

A gende and prudent reply to indecent and scurrilous 
language, is the most severe, though innocent revenge. 

Those who are ready to forgive injuries, are esteemed 
for their clemency and forbearance, whilst those who 
cherish revenge, are dreaded for the mischief they are 
capable of doing. 

He that watches for revenge lies in wait against him- 
self, and draws down miscluef on his own head. 

As he that can revenge an injury and will not, discovers 
a virtuous and magnanimous disposition of soul ; so he 
that can return a kindness and does not, ihows a mean 
Jjfand contemptible spirit 



the English Language* i iV 

The sweetest revehge is to do good to our enemies. 
By takiug nsvenge, a man is bat eyen with his enemy ; 
but in passing it over, he is superiour to him. 



THIS CUOSOO. 

Hail^ beauteous stranger of the wood, 

Attendant on the spring ! 
Now heaven repairs thy vernal seat, 

And woods thy welcone sang. 

Soon as the daisy decks the green^ 

Thy certain voice we hear ; 
Hast l^ou a star to guide thy path^ 

Or mark the rolling yeai 1 

Delightful visitant ! with thee 

I hail the time of flowers^ 
When heaven is fUPd wi^ musick sweet 

Of Urds among the bowers. 

The schoolboy wandering in the wood 

To pull the flowers so gay, 
Oft starts, thy curious voice to hear, 

And imitates thy lay, 

Sooa as the pea puts on the bloom, 

Thou fly'st the vocal vale ; 
An annual guest in other lands. 

Another spring to haiL 

Sweet bird ! thy bow€r is ever green. 

Thy sky is ever clear j 
Thou hast no sorrow in thy song, 

No winter in thy year. 

O ! could I fly, I'd fly with thee ; 

We'd make, with joyful vring, 
Our annual visit o'er the globe, 

Companions of the spring. 



-•* 



148 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 
CHAPTER LXa 

NUMBERS AND FIOVRSI. 



LetUn. 


Figwret. 


Namm* 


Numerieal Adja 


I 


1 


Qt^ 


first. 


|II 


2 


two 


second. 


;m 


3 


three 


third. 


!iv 


4 


four 


fourth. 


V 


6 


fiy« 


fifth. 


VI 


6 


«ix 


skth. 


VII 


7 


BeTen 


seventh. 


vm 


8 


eijht 


eighth. 


IX 


9 


Dine 


ninth. 


X 


10 


ten 


lendi. 


XI 


U 


eleTen 


eleventh. 


XII 


12 


twelre 


twelfth. 


XIII 


13 


thirteen 


thirteenth. 


XIV 


14 


fourteen 


fourteenth. 


XV 


16 


fifteen 


fifteenth. 


XVI 


16 


sixteen 


sixteenth. 


XVII 


17 


flerenteen 


seventeenth. 


XVIII 


18 


eighteen 


eighteenth. 


XIX 


19 


nineteen 


nhieteenth. 


XX 


20 


twenty 


twentieth. 


XXX 


30 


thirty 


thirtieth. 


XL 


40 


forty 


fertlelh. 


L 


60 


fifty 


fifUeth. 


LX 


60 


sixty 


Sixtieth. 


LXX 


70 


serenty 


seventictli. 


LXXX 


80 


eighty 


eightieth. 


XC 


90 


ninety 


ninetieth. 


C 


100 


one hundred 


one hundredt] 


cc 


200 


two hundred 


two hundredth 


ccc 


300 


three hundred 


three hundred 


cccc 


400 


four hundred 


four hundredl 


D 


600 


fire hundred 


five hundredt] 


DC 


600 


six hundred 


six hundredth 


DCC 


700 


seven hundred 


seven hundre( 


DCCC 


800 


eight hundred 


eight hundred 


DCCCC 


900 


nine hundred 


nine hundred 




1000 


one thouttand 


one thoueandt 


HOKX^CXXJX 1890 


S/Mk ^YifV^ftT*'^ CUtllt 


hundnd and twenty-n 



the English Language. 
CHAPTER LXIIL 



149 



OF THE PAUSES AND MARKS USED IN WRITING. 



A eofnms, 


t 


A caret. 


A seniicolen, 


ft 


A qnotatTon, 


A colon, 


• 
• 


A section. 


X period, 


• 


An index, 


A note of kiterrogatioiii 


r 


A paragraph, 


A note of exclamation, 


! 


The crotchets, 


A hyphen. 


- 


An obefisk. 


A parenthesis, 





An ellipsis. 


An apostrophe. 


» 


A brace. 


An asterisk, 


• 


A diaeresis^ 



A 

it, »t 



* 



1 



ELUCIDATION OF THE PRECEDING CHARACTERS 

AND MARKS. 

Q. What is the use of a comma? 

A. It is to stop the reader's roice the time of pronouncing 
one syllable. 

Q. Wliat is the use of a semicolon T 

A, To stop the voice the time of pronouncing two sylla- 
bles. 

Q. Wliat is the use of a colon? 

A. To stop the roice the time of pronouncing four sylla- 
bles. 

Q. What is the use of a period? 

A. To stop the voice the time of pronouncing six syllables. 

Q. Wliat is the use of a note of interrogation? 

A. It shows that a question is asked, and the end of the 
sentence preceding it should be read mlh a raised tone of 
roice, except when a question is asked, by who^ which, what, 
how, why, when, where, wherefore, which sentences should 
be read with a depression of the roice at the end of them. 

Q. What is the use of a liOte of exclamation? 

A. It is a mark of wonder, surpii^e, or admiration. The 
reader's roice sliould stop as long at an exclamation and in- 
terrogation as at a colon. 

Q. What is the .use of a hyphen? 

A. It is used in connecting compound words, as inkstand. 
It is also used when a word is divided, and the former part 
of the word is written at the end of one line, and the latter 
part of it, at the beginning of another. In this case, it 
rfiould always be placed at the end of the first line. 



mmtmtmmmmMm ^mmmimtiiitmm^ 



I 



150 A Just SUwdard fur Prfi/tovitclng 

Q, What is the use of a parenthesis \ 

A. It includes something explanatory: which, if omitted, 
would not obscure the sense. The words included in a pa« 
renthesis, should be read with a weaker tone of voice than 
the rest of the sentence. 

Q. What is the use of an apostrophe ? 

A. It is used to show the possessive case, as a man*s 
property. It is likewise used to show that some letter or 
letters are omitted, as l(n>*d for loved^ ^tis for it iSf ^lc 

Q, ^yhat is the use of an asterisk! 

A, The asterisk, obeUsk, and many other marks, are used 
to direct the reader to some note or remark in the margin 
or at the bottom of a page. 

Q. What is the use of a caret! 

A. It is used to show that sonie letter or word has beeri 
omitted through mistake. In this case, the letter or word 
should be inserted above the line, and the caret under it, thus.*] 

n fun 

maner; I love her fw moiestff and virtue. 

A A 

Q. What is a quota tioi.! „ 

A, Two invoitetl commas are placed at the beginning of 
a passage, whidi is qut^ied from some other author, and two 
apostrophes areplucdiat the conclusion of it ; as, " THeprop^ 
cr study of mankind is man,^* 

Q. What is the use of a section ! 

A, It is used to dividea discourse or chapter into less parts j 

Q. What is the use of an index! 

A. It points out a remarkliblo passage, or something tliat 
requires particular attention. 

Q, What is the use of a paragraph ! 

A. It denotes the beginning of a new subject 

Q. What is the use of the crotchets! 

A, They include a word or sentence which is intended 
to exemplify the foregoing sentence; or which is intended 
to supply some deficiency, or rectify iM»me mistake. 

Q. What is the use of an ellipsis ! 

A, It is used when some letters in k word are omitted; as 
k — ff for king: it is also Used to dcfnote an uncertain pause 
only; then, it is called a dash. 

Q. What is the use of a brace! 
f/ A. It i§ used to connect several linM or words together. 



mMik, 



the English Laiiguage, 



s 



151 



Q. VnaX is -Ac vae of a dmeresist 

^ It b put ov«r the latter af two rowels, to show that 
they belong to two distinct syllablefl; thus, Creator Israel. 

Q, What words «hould begin with a capital letter in wri- 
tingf 

A. Theiirst word of evezr look, -chapter, letter, note, or 
any other piece in writing.; the '\rst word after a period ; the 
appdlatiqns of the Deity., as Ia *df Jehovak, God, Messiah; 
proj)er names of persons, placi mountains, rivers, -ships, 
d&c as George^ Yorkf Alps, 6lc .every line in poetry^ ilic 
pronoun I, and (he intejjoction ^ every substantive and 
principal word in Uie titles of be '^, as Walker^ s Diction- 
ary o£^e English Language. 



«F THE ASBSSMIA1I0N8 Vh. ^ IN WRITING. 



A. Answer. 



Co. Con4^Vany, or Coonty^ 



A. A« S. Follow of4he Aincrl-Col. Colonel, or Collector 



can Academy. 

A. B. Bachelor of Arte. 

^bp. Archbishop. 

Acct. Account 

A. D. In -the year of ourl^ord. 

Al. Alabama. 

A. M. Master of Art0;4>efoFe 
noon; in the year i»f the 
world. 

Apr. Api41 

Att*y. Attornoy. 

Aug* August. 

Bart Barouet 
i bbl. Barrel. 

I B. D. Bachelor of Bh^iitfy. 
jB. V. Blessed Virgin. 

C. or cent a hun'ived. 

C. A. -6. f^cllow <if tiie tJon- 
nectlcut Academy. 

C^nt Canticles. 

Capt CJaptain. 

Chap. Chapter. 

duron. Chronicles. 

01 Clerk, or Clergyman. 



Com.'Commis8ionec, or Com- 
modore. 

Con. in opposition. 

Ct or 'Conn. Connoctioixt 

Const Cohf>tabIe. 

Cor. Corinthians. 

Cr. Credit, or Creditor. 

cts. cents. 

cwt Hundred Weight 

C. P. ^. li^e^per of the Privy 
Seal. 

C. -S. Keeper of the HScaL 

D. D. Doctor of Divinky. 
X>ea. Deacon. 

Dec. December. 
Del. Delaware. 
Dept Deputy. 
Deut I>€utcronon>y. 
Do. or Ditto, the same. 
Dr. Doctor, or Debtor. 
£. East. 

Eccl. Ecclosiastea. 
Ed. Edition. 
Eg. for example. 



\(iZ 



A Just Standard far Pronouncing 



I Eng. England, o» En^^lisb* 
Ep. Epistle.. 
Eph. EphesiJEiiM* 
Esq, Esqjuire^ 
Etc. and so forth. 
Esq. Esaias. 

Ex. ExampTe, or Exodnsk. 
Exr. Executor-. 
Feb. February. 
Fir. France,, or Prancrsw 



JL. Lk. D. DootoE o£ 

liond. London. 

Lon. Longitude. 

Lou*. Louisiana. 

L. S. Tlie pFace oftRa Seal 

^1. Marquis.. 

Maj. Majbn. 

Mass. Massachusetts^. 

Math.. Mathematickflw 

Math Matthaw.. 



F. R. S. Fellow of the KoyallM. B; Baclielor of FfiyaiiclL 
Society.. 

Gal'. GalatianH; 

Gen. General, or Genesis*. 

Gent. Gentleman. 

Geoi ©"eorge, or Gcorgfa, 

Gov. Governour. 

G. R.. Geoi^^ the King 
Heb.. Hebrews., 
hhd. Hogsheads 
Hon. Honourable^ 
Hund. Hundred. 
Ibid, in the. same placet, 
i. e..thatrs-.. 
id. the same: 
Ind. Indiana » 
lusu. Instant. 
Isaw Isaiah.. 
Ja. James.^ 
Jac. Jacobs 
Jan.. January^ 
Josh. Joshua.. 
K. King. 
Km. Kingdom^ 
KU Knight. 
I^. Lord,, or Lady. 
Lat Latitude^ 
lbs. Pounds* 
Lev. Leviticus; 
Lieu. LicutenanL 



M. D.. Doctor ofFhysick. 

p/id^ Marylaadl. 

Me. Mafne;^ 

Mr. Master,, or MIsttr; 

Messrs. Gentfemen, of Sirs. 

M. S. Manuscript.. 

MSS. Mamiscript6w. 

Mrs.f Mistres^t, ok MiMifl* 

N. Nofithi 

N. B. take notrce^ 

N. C. North CaroliiMk. 

N.. H.. New HaoipshiM.. 

N. J. New Jersey.. 

^fo. Nuuber*. 

Nov* N/xirembtr.. 

•N. S. New Style. 

N. W.T. North WeateraTi 

ritory* 
^. Y. New York. 
Objv GbjectioB. 
Obt. Obedient 
Oct. October., 
b. S Old Style. 
!Par]. PacIianicnL 
Pawnor Penn. Pennsyh'aiitak 
per. by th«> (as per y^nU p 

hundred) by ue yard,, I 

the hundred. 
Iper eenl. by the hundreds 



t la writing. Mrs. BhouM* be fnSxrd to tlic nam* o£ a manae^ hd 
end IVGss to t^ oft girl, or unmarried lady. 



the English Langf^offe, 

Pet Pelei. ISec. 'Secfioa* 

Phil. PfiiKp. 8en. Senator, o** Beiiioc 

Philom. a loTer of lenming. Sept September. 

P. M. Post Master, or after- Serg. Sergeant 



168 



nooB. 
P. O. Po«t Office. 
Post after* 
Prea. Preatdent 
Pro. in fiivour o£ 
Prod ProfecMior« 
P. S. Postscript 
Pa* Psalm. 

^ ^ueon, or Question, 
q. (L Aa if he should sav. 
q. L As 'much as ^ou please, 
q. 8. A. sufficient quantity. 
Regt; flegbter. 
Rep^ Hepresentatrre. 

Rev.tCe¥e1adon,orReirerend.{¥t Vermont 
Rt Hon. flight Honourable. (W. West 

. I. Rhode Island. 
S. South, or bulling* 
St Samt 
S. jC. Bouth Carolina. 



Servt Servant 

S. T. P. ProfSsfor of Diviirity. 

S. T. D. Doctor of Diyinity. 

ss. to wit : namely. 

Tenn. Tennessee. 

Thess. Thessalonians 

Tho. Thomas. 

ult the last 

U. S. A. United States of 

America. 
y. Of Vide. See. 
Va. Virginia. 
Via. =by way of. 
Viz. 40 wit; nameljr. 



Wm. Wilfiam. 
Wp. Worship 

EtWdght 
;c. and so iQr&. 



CHAPTER LXIV. 
AN ESTIMATION OP POVERTY. 

Am I poor? This xxmdition, rightly weighed, is not 
very bad. What is ^ooverty ? only the absence of a few 
unnecessary things, which pleajse wanton fancy ratlier than 
answer real need ; and without which nature is easily sat- 
isfied ; and which, if w« do not desire, we cannot want 
But what is it to wear coarse clothes, to feed on plain and 
simple food, to work and talce pains, tr sit or go in a lower 
plaoe, to have no heaps of cash, or hoa« Is of gain, to keep 
no retinue, to have few friends and no flatterers? It is a 
situation which has divers advantages, and manj con- 
veni^ices and comforts ccxmected with it 

Its happy fruits and aHisequences free us from many 
cares ana distractums, from many troubles and crosses 



^»^>^-*— I 1- IL . MI^MWW 



154 A Just Standard' far Pronouncing 

from many enctnnbranceS), temptations^ dtogera. and 
Unnpers of body. It Gees us from grievous mischie 
wliich wealth is exposed 

It mamtaihs health, industry^ and sobriety. It 
serves us from luxury, S}\tiety,. and ^oth. It dispose 
to act heartily,, move nimUy, and sleep, sweetly. It i 
to dispositions of. imnd, freedom and leisure to attea 
the study of truth,, and the acquisition oi virtue. 

It is a e4tuatio& which many have borne with diee 
ness, and which many very wise and eminently good 
have voluntarily embraced. 

It is allotted by divine wisdom ta most men ; the 
fofien endure it 

God has declared a specfal regard to persona in 
state^ The word of truth has pronoimced tliem hap{ 
havuig the gospel preachsd to them. Jesus Christ 
sanctiBed tliis state by partaking deeply of it; anc 
choo&ing the poor of this worid rich, in fiuth,. aiidhu 
the kingdom. 

Caa such a condition, then, be vecy k>alhBOii»-? 
it reasonably displease us? 

Ought we to murmur at it? should w&no^ from 
above consideratk>ns,, raAer be thankful for ilj. tfian < 
plain ? 



CHAPTER LXT. 

r 

The follbwihg chapter contains the nMnes of Statet^ CountiiMy T 
CUitBj Vitlcffesj Mountainty Lakc§y Rivert^ dbe. m the United State. 
pioiKMUiced according to tiw bee* anthoritieftaadcustoins. Theeame 
arc to be observed witli respect to the figuies and silent letters- i 
pnmunciation of the following^ words^.as.ol tlie woeds taken firoi 
DietionaiTii 



r 


3* 


tiatc» 


Yoxfe 


Jone< 


4 


Q,uecn» 


Berne 


TAame* 


Burke* 


Wale* 


Qhnok 


a 


GAent 


Bart 


Kent 



Bfi 



4f 


•r 


Sm^ 


noyd' 


Lynnt 
Menti 


Tre, 
1 


Phelps. 


Aroe well' 


WelU. 


Avon 


5 


Bladeft 


JTnox 


Batiibii(/ge 



wsm 



ike English Language 



155 



Um 

t«s 

'a 

i badgt 

UUIB 

TO 

O 

brook 

land 
rlXeM 
dca 
rer 

: ham 
ton 
Ltowa 
en 
m 
e 
n 

than 
•fteki 
; town 
Uhkvrqfi 
ihen 
in gcr 
enftdd 
en land 

mimah 
nea vilk 
iron 

stfburg^ 
met 

iCtftown 
3«burgft 
»U/)ton 

f wrgk 

HI 

den 

nh 

|ran 

on« 

kI vilk 

ro 

k) 

hatfk 

7ariL 

▼ bem 



Newiteld 

New town 

New popt 

Na{>kt 

PiVelana 

Plain field 

Poland 

Porter 

Portland 

%ieenstowa 

TteadMd 

Rica 
tSalem 
Say hroofc 
tSnovhiU 
tSodufl 
So km 
Stone ham 
Stou^A ton 
'Swecn* bai;g^ 
Swe 6cR 
Zanet viHe 
Wadetburgft 
Wakefield 
Wa^e« bn^Ji 
VfngkU town 

Argyfa 

Ann strong 

Barnard 

Bam8t«d 

Bar ton 

Carmd 

Charleitofi 

Ouurle* town 

daika biirgil^ 

daikftown 

dailu vUk 

Dari^ 

Hartford 

Hart land 

Hart wioft 

Mar low 

Mari^ 

ManbfSeU 

Paikncr 

Parma 

Sparta 

Staon ton 

TViitnton 



3 

11 fold 

Allburgk 

Alateod 

Attlram 

Ball^toR 

Com wall 

Dal ton 

Dorset 

George tovm 

XyfoAxm 

Haw ley 

Hon haa 

Horton 

TuawTBDce 

Norfolk 

Norway 

Nor wan 

Orleans 

Or woU 

Shanony 

St Lav renoe 

Tor but 

Waldbundk 

Wall kin 

Walpole 

Walton 

Ward«biu2ge 

Warnefr 

Warfiav 

Yoiktowa 

4 

Acton 

Ad ame 

Am boy 

Am herat 

Aah field 

Ash fold 

Becifcet 

Bedford 

Belcher 

Benton 

Bergen 

Berkflhiie 

Berfin 

Bland ford 

BloantaTiIfe 

Brad ford 

Bfan don 

Bran fold 

findge port 

Brii^town 

Bridpoft 



4 

Brimfteld 

Bristol 

Bmoewidk 

Butler 

Buxton 

fikw^ stone 

Ca2 ais 

Caldwen 

Camden 

CampbeH 

Camp ton 

Canton 

Casce 

Ca» well 

CatskiM 

Chance fovd 

Chaitham 

Chelnvbain 

Cheliea 

Chesh ire 

Church town 

Clarence 

CEaton 

Dam tnr 

Dan-obe 

Dan ville 

Delhi 

Den rcaili 

Denton 

DepCfoNt 

Derby 

Doughs 

Dresden 

Drummond 

Dud Vy 

Dur Aun 

Dulchess 

-EdgeMd 

E1& 

Elmore 

Enftold ^ 

Essex 

Felb point 

Ffshkffl 

Filch biirff% 

Flat land 

Flofcher 

Ffiji^tOQ 

Fhuhing 
Fried burgA 
GM way 
German 



156 



A JmH SUmdard far Pr09tmmcing 



4 
GHasgOMT 
Grafum 
Ghran viUr 
Ghttl lord 
Gurnet 
Haddanv 
Hadky 
Hamdenf 
Ham bur^A 
Hamp shire 
Hamp stead 
Hamp ton 
Han- cook 
Hectior 
Hemp field 
HUl5 dale 
Hins dale 
Had s^n 
Hunts burgA 
Hunts villc 
Hurley 
Hurl^e 
Jaeifeson 
Kings ton 
Lampr^ 
Lang don 
Lftces ter 
Len ox 
Undley 
lAs bon 
Li/ch field 
Lud low 
Lynd« bnrgA 
Lyn den 
Lynn field 
Mai den 
Med ford 
Mend ham 
Men don 
MUford 
Mil field 
MUt^^tt 
Mun cy 
Minden 
Malta 
Mur ray 
Nassau 
Nafohei 
Nelson 
NashTHk 
Paris 
Pern brok« 



4 
Penguin 
Pcnn5 bnrgA 
Pitts buf aS 
Pitts field 
Pitts ford 
Pitts town 
Platts burgl 
Plymp ton 
Preston 
Prince toor 
Pultn^ 
Pen field 
Prcb \e 
Perry 
Ran Gdlplk 
Raph oalt 
Read ing 
Red field 
Red hodc 
Rieh field 
Rich land 
Rich mond 
Itidge fieM 
Uidge vray 
Ridl«y 
Ri|^ky 
Rufi scl 
Rut land 
Sand u'ich 
Sand gate 
Bedgiffick 
Shar on 
Shel by 
Shef ffeld 
Shel burn 
Shel don 
Sheir burne 

?af ford 




n ccr 
.--ofMHd 
Stafford 
Stam ford 
Stan ford 
StTRn ford 
Straf ford 
Strat ford 
Stums towu 
Stur bridge 
Sttf field 
Suffo/k 
Sussex 

StttOQ 



4 

Sydney 
Tren ton 
Trux toB 
Tully 
Ulster 
Ver non- 
Vic tor 
Vincent 
Wen ly\m- 
West em 
West field 
West ford 
West ham 
West more 
Weston 
West town 
West port 
Waiis 
Willj burgA 
WindAam 
Wins low 
^rent ham 
Windsoff 
Wils<m 

5 
Bos ton 
Conwajr 
Florence 
Gloucester 
Gosport 
Hoi den 
Hoi land 
Hoi lis 
Hop kins 
Jo^ns burgA 
JoAn s^n 
Johns ton 
Johns town 
Loci: port 
Ogden 
Orange 
Oxford 
Pom fret 
Pomp ton 
Pompey 
Prov ince 
Rod: land 
RpclrhiU 
RQx1)ur^A 
Stoelrbni^e 
Stocitport 
TikMupsen 



Tomjp kflu 

Bloom field 
Covert 
Hosidt 
8cu>dacl 
Brook field 
Bfook IvA 

7 
VTolcon 
Wolf buTgA 
Woodbrwgf 
Woodstoc* 
Wor«» ler 

Bfons^ft 

ou 
Bound brook 
Bourbon 
LoudMk 

Bow doin 
Brown viHe 
Browns vill^ 
Crown Poiai 
Row ky 

Beff groire 
CapeFeor 
Le Ray 
LcHigbaf 
Long lake 
Mon roe 
Peru 

New York 

4 
Fay ette 
Fork Ann 
PortPenn 
Salt ash 
Steuben 
& 
Clermont 
Vermont 

Lago(» 
Yaxoo 

oi 
Detroit 
La moil 

Point 



ae 



the IHn^lish Ltanguagt* 



■J J'i"f fijg, 



It.'} 






LeRof 
1 

A ▼• rin 
Baker* fiald 
Bla deii# Inug^ 
BoiingbfolM 
Fabiw 
Fay etU villf 
Green caadtf 
Hi ats town 
Lanesborou^ 
L«w is buigA 
Lrw is ton 
Lewis town 

I Ma ry land 
New cas i\t 
I New iiiff ton 

! Ptttnt e3 Post 
Pc tpr« ])am 
Por ♦^r field 
Q,ua Kcr town 

JLla-ten ville 
Ste sens burgA 
Stp I'lirn town 
Steu b(Mi vilU 
Tru man« bur^A 
IJ ti ca 
•3 

Ar liri^r ton 
Kam sta h\e 
Car t4T« vill« 
Far niiiig ton 
liar pcffi ftcU 
liar win ton 
Mar \}\e town 
Marl bor ougk 
Mar tin« burgA 
Mar tint vilk 

3 

Albany 
Baltimore 
Dor chcs trr 
Georgia 
Wal sine hun 
Water lord 
Wa ter vUet 
4 

Ab er com 
Ab ing ton 
A I lent tfwn 
Am a zon 



Amaterdaoi . 
An do Tcr 
Ar u ba 
Ash bum ham 
At kin son 
Attica 
At a km 
Bar rets ton 
Bar ring ton 
Bat ten kill 
Bed minster 
Ben nington 
Ber narw town 
Berer Ij 
Bran dj wine 
Bridge wa ter 
Bnf &lo 
But ter field 
Butter nuts 
Car o line 
Cas ^le ton 
Caf t\c lown 
Cen tre ville 
Cliap cl hill 
Chc8 ter field 
Ches ter town 
Chit ten don 
('lar en don 
Clav er nek 
Cum her land 
Cum mington 
Dar i en 
Del aware 
DicA: in son 
Dun sta ble 
Ed in burg^ 
Rgg har doqx 
Eff re mont 
Elli cott 
El linff ton 
El lis DureA 
Em mits burg^ 
Es tAer town 
Ey anthara 
Ex e ter 
Fed er aU bargA 
Fer ristown 
Fish ere lield 
Fleming ton 
Fran cis burg/i 
Fred e ric^ 
Gal 1o way 



German tow« 
ihn ma nj 
Guil der land 
HacAr en mck 
Hac^ cts town 
Had don fSeU 
Hal loied 
Ham il ton 
Han nibal 
Hano Ter 
Har ring ton 
Har ris DUigA 
Harri son 
Haver (old 
Hel e na 
Hen ri co 
Her ki mer 
Hub bard ton 
Hunt er don 
Hunt ere town 
Huntington 
Hen der sen 
Jefferson 
Kil ling ton 
Lab m dor 
Lan sing burgA 
Lcb a non 
Leom in star 
Leon arde town 
Lexington 
Liberty 
Lich te nav 
Lim er ick 
Liv er pool 
Liv ing ston 
Lud loie ville 
Mad i son 
Man ches ter 
Man li us 
Middleftdd 
Mid die buigft 
Mid die sex 
Mid die town 
Min i sink 
Mex i CO 
Nan ti coke 
Nash u a 
Nev er sink 
PacA: ere fiwld 
Pat ter sen 
Pcli can 
Pen ning ton 



Phil ips burgA 
Parish viUe 
Per in ton 
Cluin A baug 
Read ing town 
Rens se lacr 
Sandisfteld 
Sandy hook 
San ta cruse 
Scipio 
Sen e ca 
Shcp Aerde fteld 
Shep Aords town 
Still wa ter 
Sun der land 
Sulli Tan 
Syr a cuse 
Tom pie ton 
Tjr ing liam 
West Iwr (mgh 
West more land 
West cr ley 
West min st<>r 
Wilks bar re 
WH ling tea 
WU lis ton 
Wil mington 
Wilson ville 
Win ches ter 
Wille bor o*igK 
Westchester 

5 
Box bor oi^A 
Gov en try 
Hoi lis ton 
HopkintoB 
JoAn sone buifA 
Mon ta gue 
Morris ville 
Mer ris town 
Or ange bnigA 
Or ange ville 
Otta was 
Ot ter creek 
Og dene burgA 
P^ tere town 
Prov ince town 
Prov i donee 
Robert son 
Robesen 
Roch es ter 
RocAingham 









- 




166 A Just Stamdardjor JhnmamHcing 




S 


1 


4 


4 




Rom Q Iw 


iNN^^fA mttlff 016 


Fatuel 


Baskenridjgi 




tThomwmUmn 


PbtonMoi^ 


PavtucAsC 


Germanffaiti 




WariTO km 


Pwaaidt 


Pan tux et 


KennebecA 




Warrington 


Shandakan 


Pre sums eoC 


Kitta ning 




Washing too 


Tioga 


Sanrhiskj 


Manahm 




6 


Wjomiiig 


F«tilhi 


Oleaii 




Bloom ingdale 


9 


SavannaA 


PowhaCten 




Bloom ing fnrrt 


Cacr narTon 


SarUb 


River hood 




CoopcEttovm 


Sagharbaor 


Tom big bee 


Surinam 




S 


S 


Uljssea 


Tnoatan 




Oyvmgton 


fioscavcn 


Drbanna 


S 




Stoning tan 


Clucknirgo 


Vien na 


daremool 




Somcraet 


CfaatauqiM 
KewOrliBdna 


West hainp ton 
West In (En 


libeioa 
Utawas 




Leu BvilU 


War warainc 


Wis CM art 


6 




Loa istofvm 


4 


5 


Bvx alooBt 




tfW 


Abac CO 


A1 gun kins 


Car icoo 




Row(ioffnham 


Ar kaaaaa 


Con hoc ton 


Cariboo 






Antfllea 


Corn wal lis 


Kidbapoo 




1 


Aahcut ncj 


HocAhocAin|^ 


Kinder book 




An cocui 


Augoata 


Mount morni 


Sca'eooak 




Amom 


AngualM 
Dark ham ileaj 


Owaaoo 


Sebaeocik 




Bermuda 


Psnobanot 


Water fea 




CajfUga 


Camil his 


6 


ec 




CaynU 


Ca^lo 


MisMMTl 


NWsrnaii 




I>e fiance 


Coxaadbia 


Posoom sotA 


•f 




Dn an«« Imif A 


Co has art 


Ti cocfaj 


Olsroy 




Vernier 
£u p&nita 


Columbus 


TadooanA 


4 




East hamptoB 


8 


At tie bor o«^A 




E aopiM 
El miim 


Foit F^i ward 


KewLmidoB 


Bnt tie hot aa^ik 




IlaTan na 


^ 


ElhcaaviBe 




Fair ha rtn 
■Ge ne^ 


Ken Vatrk t 
Longmfiadoii 


Port Rot al 
1 


Fred c rirlai borgA 
Fred <; ricAi town 






1 He no a 


Lo rniao 


Amuskeag 


Mid die hfx ough 
Rc&s se Idor viUe 






. Hon da ras 


hovcito 


Bdridfte 






Ja maioa 


Ma nal ling 


Cherokaa 


Shen andoaA 






livonca 


Mas hat taa 


Chilhowae 


1 






Too i «a 


Maroel Hm 


Geneaoo 


Aca Aa 






MaeJonm^ 


Matilda 


Oronoke 


An tonie 






Ma de» ra 


Miam i 


Paraguajr 


Batavia 






Ma boner 


Mi ner ra 


PoeonoM 


Jeraaaieaa 






Ma ho ning 


Mb sis ko 


Sal vadors 


Laoonia 






Mo ri aA 


Kan taskct 


9Rn 1 Boles 


Onta no 






K£wHa^i«i 


Kantuc&ct 


TenneaoBO 


Sent pro nivt 






O0>«dM« 


Nrwbcrfin 


Wyonoke 


^r"" 






OHio 


New Jersey 


a 






Onada 


New Lit ban 


AlbeomW 


Abitilas 






Oswego 


New Windanr 


3 


A meri ca 




Otaago 
Otaalid^ 


Odkmnl gm 


Chidtanv 


An gd ica 




Otis 00 


Monfroal 


An nap o fit 




O ween 


1^ taps 00 


4 


Bal div 1 a 




PH tacl:«l 


AbbeTiBe 


Co liim hi a 



(40 English Language^ 



OonneMicut 
Cor dil lor aK 
Ma haekamack 
NewLeb anon 
Ni agaia 
Per nam bu co 
To mis ca nlng 
Virginia 
Wap pac a mo 

5 

Co col i 00 
T ron de quot 
Wioomioo 

8 

Port Cov ing ton 
Mont comer 7 

Alva ra do 
Al le ga D V 
Ashteba la 
Can andatgna 



Cmdnna ti 
Cin dn na tns 
Pememra 
Dose a da 
Gren eae o 
Louisiana 
Mag da le na 
Mam a ka ting 
Mar a cat bo 
Mas sa chu setts 
Mem fire ma gojg 
Mon tezQ ma 
Mot ris se na 
On on da ea 
Pen sa cola 
Sara toga 
Tus ca rora 
Wy a lu ang 
Yo hoga ny 

Ca^A na wa ga 



Cataraqua 
Cat ta rau gua 

Nic a la gua 

Acapulco 
Al aoam a 
Cher ry Val ky 
Hen ri ct ta 
In di an a 
Mar ga rctta 
Mis as sip pi 
Oswegaich ie 
Sos que ban nah 
U na dil la- 

5 
An ti costi 
Hon sa ton uck 

6 
Am o noo sucA; 

6 
Jllppacano^ 




Amazo ni a 
Cal e do ni a 
Can e a de a 
Cazeno\i a 
Mo non ga li a 
Penn syl va ni a 
Pitts syi Ta ni a 

4 
Phil a del phi a 
Skan e at e lea 
1 
Mo non ga be la 
Ti con de ro ga 

Can a sc ra ga 

Can a jo bar te 
5 

Pas sam a quod dy 
1 

Win ni pis iogy 



In the foUawing werdsi whan the n is in an accented syllable, it is pro- 
nounced as if it w«re followed by g hard. 



4 

Rlanca 
BWnco 
Francois 



Frank fort 
Franklin 
Franks town 



4 

Lin co&i 

4 
Dun can» bargk 



Franklin ton 
Lancaster 
LincoAi town 



In the following words th has its first or sharp sound. 



1 
He<it:Si 

3 
Bath 
1 

A thol 
Gotham 
Ports m^mth 
Huths bmgA 

2 
Dart moutk 
Yar ni«uth 

3 
'Ncrth bridg# 
. North field 
i North port 
' North wood 
Thorn ton 
4 

Ac worth 
Bifthel 



4 

Fal mouth 
Plym outh 
Smith field 
Smith town 
Smith vilk 
South trark 
Tin nuuth 
Went worth 

i 
Mon mouUi 
Cor inth 
Wadtf wt^rth 

9 
Weymouth 

eu 
South ffeld 
South wicA 

1 
Northeast 
Soutlieost 



South hoAd 

1 

O gU thorp 

Ruth er ford 

3 
North bor ough 

4 
Beth a ny 
Beth te hem 
Itb aca 
Kil ling worth 
Mer e dith 
South ins ton 

North Sa lem 
Re ho Itcth 
South S(t Icm 

4 
North amp t<m 
North cas tie 



Pertb Am boy 
Pro tect wortii 
South amp ton 

10 
Cath a rine 

4 
E liz«belh 
North urn ber land 

ft 
Bar thol o m^w 

1 
Beth aba ra 
Carthage na 

5 
Chil ioothe 

4 
R lis a beth (own 

1 
North Car oii na 
South Car o li na 



wmmmmm 



! 



160 A Jm$1 StfindArd for Bromqfiincing 

la tiM ftlUwiag words, k is pronounced belbra tht n^ thei]^ xriUam 

'aft«r it. 
11 1 4 

Whit peine 
Whip pa ny 
Whit ting nam 
WhittWt^ 

In tb«Ml«wiBg wordb^ i before s ^emA, is a eonsonapt, and is pwaonacd 



Whale Uiy 
Whee ler 
Whee \oci 
White field 



White haO 
White creek 
WiutemaiBh 
White pkin« 



WhiteiftowB 
Whiting 

Wharton 



1 

Juniijw 

8 

Onii 



4 4 1 

Williamson Will iams town Aunl iua 

Will iams buxgi I AU»ntpel ier 

Will iams port A mel ia Phar aal ia 

In the following woid% tk haalheaomid of a&. 



Charlotte 
1 
ChaapUi 

Che raiM 



4 
Chemung 
Chowan 

3 
Char lottes town 
Char lottra viUe 



4 
Che hue to 

5 
KewRochelle 

I 
Chatfdiera 



4 
ACchigan 

Char le moot 
3 

Char le mont irilli 



% 

SScbrooa 

1 
Schodadk 
Schuyler . 
Schuylkill 

4 
Christopher* 



|» Hie following woidi^ ck has the sound flf A; 

4 

Jer i cho 



S 

Leehahar 

1 
Ischua 
4 

Schoharie 



Machanoy 
4 

8chenflcta4x 

4 
Ap a lach es 
Apalachy 
Lacha wax en 



Lach a wanna 
Lach a wan net 

4 
Apa lackian 
Archipdaflo 

Ap a ladi i oo la 



The flawing words do not properly bek»ig wUh the preceding woidf. 



Wriiim, 

Lisle 

Coey mans 
Green wkk 
Gor ham 
Isles burgh 

Har wiek 
Ipswich 
Smyr na 
Virgil 

Nor wiek 

Carlisle 

Mo 
iKosaeav 



/VmiowncedL 
1 
file 

1 
kwce 
greenQ 

So rum 
ezbuig 
4 

har in 
ipsij 



tbthI 
9 

aori^ 

karBU 

BOB 

loasr 




WriiUn. 

Cokes bo ly 
Newbniy 

Ahnsbttiy. 

Cioeio 
Dan bury 
Eng iish town 
Pii^neyytlle 

Exuna 
Long Island 
EUiodeMand 

Ca ran gas 
Cho nan go 
Domingo 



PronouneeeL 

1 
kokesber re 
nuber le 
8 

amzber re 
4 

sbero 
dan her re 
ingelisb town 

cgzyuma 
long ile and 
rode tie and 

4 
ka rang gas 
she nang go 
do ming go 




mmtm 



ihs English Language. 



WriUoL 

das ten bti rj 
Mid die ba 17 

Alexander 

Alexandria 

Con a wan go 



161 



4 

BQUi^lriand 
tnigzillo 

fllenoj 

BuberzepoTt 
4 
kan tar ber ro 



PfianounW. 

4 
gbnsnber ro 
■uddlber re 

al eflz an dre a 
Ikmi a wang go 



CHAPTER LXVL 

The feUowing is a fiat of the proper namea oontainod in the New Tcsta- 



1 

Crete 

Greek 

Jude 

Luke 

RAodet 

3 
Saul 

5 
Gog 
Jo^n 
I 

Abel 
Agar 
A mon 
A ram 
Aser 
Azor 
Balak 
Barak 
Booz 
Bozor 
Ca Da 
Ce dron 
Ce phaa 
Ce«ar 

Co 06 

Cosam 
Cy pms 
De maa 
Enon 
Egypt 
E sau 
Felix 
Gaia 
He ber 
He brew« 
Heti 
Ja son 



1 

JCiUS 

Joel 

Joab 

Jo ram 

Jo rim 

Joae 

Joaea 

Judaa 

JndaA 

Levite 

Linua 

Lucaa 

Magog 

Me nan 

My ra 

Nain 

Namn 

Neri 

Ne ro 

Obed 

Pharcz 

Phalee 

Phle goB 

Pilate 

Raca 

Rahab 

Ra ma 

RAesa 

RAoda 

Romant 

Sadoe 

Sala 

Sa lem 

Sa lim 

Sa moa 

Saron 

8ce va 

Si don 



1 

8&oa 
Troaa 
Zara 

Zenas 

S 
Carpoa 

Mar ecu 
Sar die 
Taraoa 

3 
Clauda 
C(Mrban 
Jordan 
Quar t«a 
4 

Ad am 
Addi 
Abba 
Annas 
Ab aofl 
Blaataa 
Crescent 
Clement 
Derbe 
Earom 
EaU 
Fea tua 
Gen tilet 
Her maa 
Her mon 
Herod 
Jan na 
Jambret 
Jan net 
Jasper 
Lyd da 
Lra tra 
Nympbas 



4 
Pat moa 
Perg^ 
Persia 
Prisca 
Rabbi 
Bai mon 

5 

Jop pa 
Police 
Sodom 
1 

Abraham 
A dria 
Cle o phas 
E lam ites 
Gabriel 
Ho ly GAoft 
Naaman 
Ne rous 
Pha rooA 
RAesima 
Si nai 
S 

Ar temas 
Bar nabas 
Bar sa bas 
Par me nas 

3 
Clatt (fi a 
Claudins 
4 

Am plias 
An ti pas 
Ar etas 
Bab y Ion 
Dam aris 
Did V mas 



El me dam 
El ymus 
Ep a phras 
Eph e sus 
Galilee 
Gallio 
Jer e ray 
Jeza bd 
Laz a rus 
Mae da la 
Mid i an 
Naz a renc 
NLi e vth 
Nin e vitcs 
Nic olas 
Pat ro Txis 
Per ga mos 
Phariste 
Phar i sect 
Pub li us 
Sad du cec« 
Sil o am 
Stephanas 
Syria 
Syr i ad 
Zieb edee 
Zeb u Ion 
5 
Jos a phat 
Sol o mon 
Troph i mus 

Abi a 
A bi ud 
Al phoua 
Azotus 
Bar jems 
Berea 









163 



A Jn9t SkM4ard/Br Fron^unciitff 



1 

Cai 
Cyienp 
EUas 
EUud 

ElMAfl 

E\\ bu luf 
Euphra tea 
Jen as 
Judea 
La 86 a 
Lcbbeas 
Me le a 
Met d as 
Mi letus 
Ome ga 
Ozias 
Pha nu el 
Phi lemon 
Phi letus 
Ro boam 
Sal mo ne 
Sa tome 
Sap phiim 

1 

Maath 
Thamaft 
Thcudaa 
ThaiB 
4 

Athen* 
Mat ihaa 
Mat that 

5 
Cor iDtH 

1 
Jo a than 

Par tm an* 



I 

Achira 
Achor 
iChu.za 
Obi 00 
E noch 
Laracch 
Mo loch 
Na cbor 
Ra chab 



Tlmalus 
TryplMBiie 
Try plioia 
Zelo tea 

4 
Abaddon 
A grip ^ 
Ar phaxad 
Augustus 
Banbbas 
Damascus 
Ersstus 

HOMBUft 

Joan na 
Ma nasseA 
NaasaoD 
Narcissus 
O lym pas 
Phil Up pi 
Prucilb 
Phy gei luB 
8a r^ta 
8e cuudus 



4 

Tertuilus 
Tyxannus 

5 
Apollos 
Qclpsse 
iSomprraA 

1 
Gadarenes 

1 

A labi a 
AFaUaiM 
Cy Tone ana 
Client us 
Demetrius 
Eli akim 
He rodiant 
Hero dies 
I coni urn 
Jerusalem 
Ly sa ni as 
Mcr cu ri us 
Sa ma ri a 
Tiberias 



i 

Aceldama 

Aayuijidsb 
Ab^ plup olis 
Aatipatris 
Beel v^ub 
Ca per na um 
Die capo lis • 
E roanuei 
Neapeiis 
Onesimus 
Pbil lipjn an* 
Samaritan 
Samaritan* 
Tro gyl li um 

5 
Diotrephee 
En roc (y don 
Her mog e ne« 
Ni cop o lis 
Philolo|u« 

Ab i le UB 
Ananiaf 



Bar (i meni 
KltWUA 

Ezekiftk 
Hy men e us 
Idu msa 
It u ro a 
Jiecooia^ 
Magdalene 

M^ele DA 
Nicode mua 

4 
Boanerges 

Lye a o ni a 

Hi e mpo Hi 
Oneophomi 

5 
A re op a gui 

Ei^iphroditw 
La odi cea 
Pa catiana 



In the fijUowing words, 

4 
Beth any 
Beth le hem 
Bethpliage 
£ph pha toa 
Gab ba tiia 
Mattatha 
Naza reth 
Sabaoth 
Scvth ian 
Tab i tha 
Timothy 

5 
Gol ff o tha 
Sob we net 



ih has its shaxp soijiid. 
1 



Mai thi as 
Thaddeus 

4 
Beth ea da 
Co rin thus 

1 
A the ni anj 
Bethaa i da 
Me tbu se ]ah 
8a la thi el 
Timo the us 

4 
Cof in thian« 
Ge net a reth 



Geth sem a ne 

5 
Bar tliol o mew 
The oph i his 

Dal ma nu tha 

4 
Blar au atha 

1 
E thi o pi a 
E thiopi ant 
Theasa Ionian 

1 
Ar i matbea 



In the following words, eh bjis the sound of A. 



1 

Sa nich 
Stachys 

4 
Char ran 
MaJ chua 
Mel chi 

I 
Bu tT chus 
AG cha d 



4 

An ti och 
Cen chre a 
Is aadiar 
Syn ti che 
Tych i cos 

5 
Proch o rus 

1 
Chal de an* 



Cho ra zin 
SUic che us 

4 
Ar chip pus 
Mei chia e docA 

1 
Ar cbc la »s 

3 
Ar Is tar chus 



mSSBBB 


the Engluh Language* 


163 


Uen. 


1 


nL 


WHUin. 


JPrcnounccctm 

1 
akaya 


us 




Adi* 


ia 


^ 


mgiir 
4 




Beatee 


eza vas 

4 


• 

la 


!&;» 




fiM 


• 

la 


piBidTa 
dflmashea . 


g9 


naggt 




Dalmatia 


A 


aihea 




Ephe 


dans 


e fe zhe ans 


apb«s 


kayaAf 




Galatia 


gal la shea 


tian* 


kzailieani 


Valiu 


aa 


sa In she a 


Y&^ 


In jaa 




Lv 




5 


cms 


ptnriktui " 


Cbloerians 


kolosheans . 

1 


Shi a 


afea, 




Cfppedoda 


kappa do ahea 


eon 


gid«un 

CH 




Same 


thraaa 
ITO. 


sa mo thm she a 




AFTER U 




The IbUowSog vatbe qpvBitt Vf^idaaiDes of 


^men. 




1 


4 


ft 


4 


)t 


Stl3 


AifM 


Crod fny 


8fm e on 


ie« 


Allen 


BlQlt9C9 


ValoitiiiB 




Joal 


Al^ 


fLohwtt 


5 


e« 


Jpnai 


Ambpoea. 


iTAomM 


OliTer 


2 


Jonaa 


AndsdPE 


6 


Solomoii 


irie* 


JoMph 


A^her 


Ren ben 


Joshua 


xk 


aeBMl 


Rafiis 


WashinctoQ 


J 


Len 


Beiwd 


1 


1 ^ 


orge 


Ljmaii 
Mo«et 


Bradford 


A bra ham B fi as II 


/ 


Daniel 


Asahel 


EUnir i 




Me dad 


Dannie 





Etidia i 


Iph 


Ptoter 


^beii 
Edgai 


Ardiilald JeaaA | 


m 


Silaa 


Bajenabaa UriaA 1 


A 


Simon 


Edmund 


4 


4 1 




TitiM 


Edvard 


Amaaa 


Ef84tU8 1 


ron 


S 


E4win 


AntAonj 


^ SilTrester i 


iram 


Arnold 


El dad 


Ben Ja min 4 1 
FredericA; Efiphtlet 1 


DOS 


Dar win 


Ezra 


laph 


3 


Fianda 


Gngory 


1 1 


la 


Austin 


Hen ry 


Harrison 


I E le a Mr tt 


leb 


Mor^^ 


Jeffiey 


lira el 


Ebeneier H 


vid 


Nocmaa 


Jeeae 


Jefferson HezekiaA II 


• 

I 


Walter 


Jttetae 


Lemuel 


JeremiaA 1 


>hroim 


4 


Leon aid 


Phineae 


Ke he mi aA 1 


uus 


Albert 


Rfeha 


Id 


$amQcI 


ObadiaA 1 



In the folloirins woiodk li^ hea it« sharp sound. 
1 16 

h Ka than The o dore Jan a than 

4 4 5 

ther Matthew Nathaniel Theophilus 



I -4 A Jsiat Standard for Pronovncin^ 

XuDCfi of TPHoan. 

114 4 4 

.:'..:it Aliat Nancj El oi Bor A.iBu4i 

ji Annft Sal}f SmilinB Cbaiai 

■ V TUT JLn nk ft Em i }j C3ib ril la 

■IkiuitA CvDtlaoe tthv Harntfl Lndn^ 

j Ku iijor Em ma Pol Ij 1 Me ]ui da 

; Pi-> n EfitAer 3 DaliU Rebecca 

; Lu rv Pnm cs Mar ga tbC Di a na Saaan naJk 

!>larV HBXina& 4 EJiaa 10 

}*hrt«r Hnleo jlfcanal Jean na LmIm 

;.Racbd Hnldaik AdaSne Mana 4 

Sa raik Lyd xa Car o fine Sopihia Hen li it la 

I Sawn Phil ill Deboxai Umk Jaliana 






In the foBowix^ ^ivdi^ ik haa its ahaxp aonnd. 

€ 9 4 4 

Roth Maitiia Cadiannf Ebsaliaik 



CHAPTER LXVin. 



Listen, fair daughtn* of inDocence, to the instractiora 
of prud^ice, and 1^ the {»«oept8 of truth sink deep into 
thy heart ; so shall the charms of thy mind add lustre to 
the degance of thy fonn ; and thy beauty, like the rose it 
resembles, shall retain its sweetness when its bloom u 
^ Slithered. 

It is a melancholy truth, that man too often prostitutes 
his boasted faculties to the destruction of female happiiieae:. 
How neroitsary. then, tc fortify your minds against tlie at 
tacka of such vile seducers ! Blemishes in female diarac- 
ters seldojn are eiTaoed. Not so with man. He tanaisheH 
Ills name and brightens it again. 

But if ^romun chance to swore from the strictest rulet 
of virtue, 

** Uuin ensues, reproach and endless shame, 
** And one false Etep forever blasts her £ime. 
*' ! 'I vain \^ith tears the loss she may deplore, 
" In ^air lookback to what she was before, 
'* She set5. like stars that £cdl, to rise no more.* 
Reiiieiiu»er (hou art nuide inan^s reasonable compao' 
itiji, ncii t];tf ?lave of his passions. The end €^ thy being 






t tha English Language. 1(>3 

'is to assist him in the toils of life, to sooth him with tiiy 
tendemesd, and to recompense his care with soft endear- 
ments. 

I Who is she that wins the heart of man, that subdues 
him to love, and reigns in his breast ? Lo ! yonder she 
walks in maiden sweetness, with innocence in her mind, 
and modesty on her ch«ek. Her hand seeks employ- 

. ment ; her feet delight not m gadding abroad. 

! She is clothed with neatness ; she is fed with temper- 

jance; humihty and meekness are as a crown of glory 

j encircling her head. 

When virtue and modesty enlighten her charms, she is 
beautiful as the stars of heaven. 

The innocence of her eye is hke that of the turde ; sim- 
plicity and truth dwell in her heart. 

She presides in the house, and there is peace ; she com- 
mands with judgement, and is obeyed. 

She arises in the morning : slie considers her affairs ; 
and appoints to her maidens their proper business. 

The care of her family is her delight ; to that she ap- 
[dies her study ; and elegance with frugality b seen m 
her mansion. 

! The prudence of her management is an honour to her 

I husband, and he hears her praise with a secret delight. 

! She informs the minds of her children with wisdom ; 

>he fasliions their manners from the example of her own 

' goodness. 

j The word of her mouth is the law of tlieu* youth, the 

i motion of her eye commands obedience. 

I In prosperity;^ she is not puiTed up ; in adversity, she 

j he^ the woimd^^ of fortune with patience. 

I The trollies of her husband are alleviated by her coun- 

jsels, and ^eetened by her endearments. 

I Happy is the man whose life is blessed with such a 

-partner ; happy is tlie child who calls her mother. 

That such may be tliy happy state, fair daughter of 

' America, listen to the directions of wisdom, and regulate 
iliy heart and life by the principles of piety and virtue. 

)HimmmmtmSmmmmSm w mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmkmAMBBB^BSSSSSStlSm 



COBB'S SERIES OF SCHOOL BOOKS,! 

NOW PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY THE PRINCIPAL 
BOOKSELLERS IN THE UMTED STATES. 

SPELLING COURSE 

Cobb's FURST BOOK, or Introduction to the Sp£Luife-BooK, &c I 
■ desigiis.'d for ihe usn of small children. This little work contains tha Al-l 
. phabct, nn-* tmsv words of one, two, and three syllables, in which there sre' 

no double vo vf>ls or consonants, or silent letters, and only the long and 

abort sounds of the vowola. 

Cobb's SPKLLINCi-BOOK, containing the rudiments of the English 
Lan^ua,'^e, arranged lu catechetical order; an organization of the Alphabet* 
a greater number o*^ spoiling lessons than are generally inserted in Spelling' 
, Books; many us.iul tables; and the proper names in the New Testament., 
Designed lo teach th'3 orthography and orthoepy of J. Walker. 

Cobb's EXPOSITOR, or Sequel to the Spellino-Booi^ oontaining' 
about tirdv* thousand of the most common words of the languiuge; in 
which lach word is accurately spelled, pronounced, divided, and expuined. , 
and the primary and secondary accent noted : to which arc prefixed, CoQ-j 
cise Piim:ii>!(<s of Pronunciation, and Rules for the Accentuation tnd Di-. 
vision of W tjrds. 

. Cobb's Abridgment of J. Walker's CRITICAL PRONOUNCING DIC- 
TION ARV. In this Dictionary, Mr. Walker's principles of orthography 
and pronunciation are strictly K)llowed; and, in addition, each wora is 
svstennricnily divided ; the secondary accent noted ; the plurals of nouns, .- 
the present tense and preterit of verbs, the participlea, and the variable ad* , 
jectives, are inserted; and all useless repetitions of words are avoided; to 
which are prefixed, Concise Principles of Pronunciation, and rules for ac- 
centuation and the division of words ; with an Appendix, containing a claip 
of words which aie in common use in this country, and not found in Walk* 
or' 8 Dictionary. 

READING COURSE. 

Cobb's JUVENILE READER, No. 1 ; contaimng intertatmg; moral 
and mstrucrive reading lessons, composed of easy words of one and cwr , 
syllables ; designed for the use of small children in families and scho^ 

Cobb's JUVENILE READER, No. 2; containing intereatinR moral, 
and instructive reading lessons, composed of words ot one, two, and thiw 
I syllables; designed, in connexion with No. 1, to accompany the SpeUiiiS* 
Book. 

. Cobb's JUVENILE READER, No. 3 ; containing interesting hUtorical. 

moral, and instructive reading leswna, composed of words of a greattf. 
* number of syllable's than the lessons in Nos. I and 2 ; and a greater variety . 
; of ccmpoaition, both in prose and poetry, selected from the writings of ihi 
I ocst Anicricun and English authors; with Observations on the Piindplea 

of Good Reading. 



Cobb's SEaUEL TO THE JUVENILE READERS; compriauig i 
i selection of Lessons in Prose and Poetry, from highly esteemtti Amencaa 
' and English writers. Designed for the use of higher claaaes in schools 

and Acadenues; and to unpresa the minds of youth with sentimaats of 

virtue and religion. 

Cobb's NORTH AMERICAN READER, containing a greater Tariftj 
and more extensive selection of pieces in Prose and Poetry than ara con* 
taincd in tho Sequel to the Juvenile Readers, from very highly cstaemed 

I I ■ ■ 11771 irr imTM iMaagaaagiiMiWwi^Ma— 



^ 



awrs r 



Notices. 167 

American and English writeri. Also OfosenrationB on GkK>d Reading : the De- 
claration o^ Independence ; the Constitution of tlie United States; Political 
Definitions] Variable Or ihoCTaphy ; Concise Principles of Pronunciation ; \ 
Rulea for tne Division of VVords; and the Rules tor Spelling the Plurals 
of Nouns, Participles, Present Tente, and Preterit of Verbs, and the Com 
parative and Superlative Degrees of Adjectives. Designed for the use of the 
highest Classes in Schools and Academies. 

ARITHMETICAL COURSE. 

Cobb's ARITHMETICAL RULES AND TABLES, designed for the 
use of small children in Families and Schools. 

Cobb's EXPLANATORY ARITHMETICK, No. 1; containing men- 
Lai, theoretical, and practical exercises, in the fundamental rules otArith- 
metick, viz. : Numeration, Addition, Substraction, Multiplication, and Di* 
vision ; in which the principles of each rule are fully and familiarly expressed ; 
and the reasons for every operation on the slate minutely and, clearly ex- 
plained ; and adapted to the understanding and use of small children, in 
f&milies and schools. 

Cobb's EXPLANATORY ARITHMETICK, No. 2: containing the 
Compound Rules; and all that is ncc^-ssary of every other rule in Arith- 
mctick for practical purposes and the transactions of business ; in which 
the principles of each rule are fully andfamiliarly expressed ; and the rea- 
sons for every operation on the slate minutely and clearly «)xplained ; and 
adapted to the understanding and use of larger children, in Schools and 
Academics. To which is annexed, a Practical System of Book-Keeping. 

Cobb's CIPHERING- BOOK, Nos. I <&3; containing all the sums and 
qnestionit for theoretical and practical exercises in Cfobb's Explanatory 
AriihmetidL, Nos. 1 & a. 



NOTICES. 

"Tills Spelling- Book has peculiar claims to attention. Mr. Cobb has* ovidsntly 
bestowed much attention on such subjects ; and his Bpclling-Book wears a for- 
midable air of authority from tim labour and research bv which it is chamcterixed. 
'Die lessons are unooinrnonly full and accurate. The whole workj indeed, is highly 
crcditablft to tlio author's intciligeacs and industry." — Amartcan Juurnul ef 

i Education. ■ 
"The author has certainly evinced great industry and research, and has shown 
liiipself woU acmiainted with tiie depurtoient in which he lias so dil gently labour- 
I *jd."-A'cti> York IHiMS. 

I " Cobb's 8pelling-Book is, we are confident, by far the n*ost correct ono at present 
• to be found.'*— C*etJe/a«d iOkio) Htrald. 

" W© have before us another work from the indefatlga]>>Ie pen of Mi'. Lyman.Cobb, f 
authorof the Spelling- Book, School Dictionary, 4rc. It is entitled "Cobb's Expoai- i 
ior, or Sequel to the 8po11ing-Book, containing about twelve thousand of the most ' 
common wonla of the langungo, accurately spelled, pronounced, divided, and ex- j 
plained," 6ic. The primaiT and secondary accent is particularly noted, and a ' 
charv^ter lor tlie latter introdnocd. The work is designe^I for the use of schools ; ' 
and tho labonroi the compilation lias been performed in such a manner as tohrin;; \ 
every word within the comprehension and capacity of a child who hns made con- i 
sideniole progress in spelling. It primists to be, as ths respective publications of [ 
the author tiavc been, a practical and useful work." — Albany Argus. 

"Mr. Cobb has recently published an A.bridgment of Walker's Dictionary, in the ! 
ttsunl 812C and form of dictionarr abridgments. We have gir-n the work some at- j 
tention, i-nd found It, in manr important respects, suiwriour to those that arc in i 
ordinary use. The plurals of nouni are given, and the preterits and participles of i 
verbs ; tho words are all divided into tyllnbles, and, for the first time, in any Die- ', 
tionary, liavcthe mark of the secondary accent."— lA S. ^Philadelphia) Gaxeltc 
" Mr. Cobb's School Dictk>nary sce.'Bs calculated to be very useful to cliildrcn and 
foreigners learning the language. He has followed Walker, and madu liis coinpila- [I 



£ 



— — i— BE I t ■ H ■I ggMBaBM^— BM^EgBta— a— ■ 

168 Notices. 

Uon from th« beft London •dUiom; addtaiff the plonJiof noani and pnlarlti of 
verbR, the participles and variable i^JeetiTea, dec. all which, to foreigneraeapestaDj, 
miMt obviously be of srcat aervice." — J^eia York Commercial Advertiser. 

" CoBB'ii JirvicNir^ Rbasbr, Nos. 1, 2, and 3. — ^Theae little volumes together form 
n iifricp (tf i>lrin«*ntary rending hooks, graduated to tiie capacitif^s and tastes of chil- 
dren. Tlic writer has been at aonic pains to arrange their different lessons in sach 
a manner iliat each precediiifr one shall prepare tlie pupil for the one that follows, 
both lis to orthoginpliT am' sul)jocf. 
I "Tiie practice, a» Mr. Cobb Justly remarlu in his preface, of giving children 
! dialogues between animals, Ac, containing statonionts and details of things, which 
i never did and never can Imppon, is as dwtruitivc of truth and intellcetualiniprove- 
' ment a*« it is contrary to tlie iirinciples of nature and pliiloscpiiy. Notwithstanding 
tlic gri>nt improvement, whicn, of late roars, lun taken pizicc in cliildren's books M 
instruction, tlierc was still a want of eumcntary works, ef a proper description, and 
the one before us, whicli is well calculated to supply the dcncioncy, must be found 
very useful in familii's and infant sch'Jols." — New xork American. 

" I'he selections are from wrlU.TS of acknawledged merit, and appear to ut to be 
made wi'.h judgement. 

"We are not aware of any reading book, f/nr beginners in schools, In which the 
number of syllables is limited as in the first and eecoad nmubers of this work."— 
New York Evening Pott. 

"The flrst book will be a valuable auxiliary to little cinrly-headed and roeT<cheek> 
ed gentlemen wtio plume themselves upon having passed ihrougli tho intrictle 
mysteries of the Alpiiabet 

" Tiic second book is adapted to children of a more advanced age, and may be 
very appropriatuly used by tliose who Ixave mastered tlio first It contains sevcnl 
stories, written in clear language, and inculcates useful morals. 

"The third claims a more serious notice. In it much instruction in the elements 
of natural nhiloanphy and historv is conveyed to the more advanced and inteUlgent 
reader. The brief chapters on the dog, alum, cork, the horso, heat, liooiiee, and 
light, ore prccipeiy tlie Kind of composition to be placed in tlie han(M of youth."— 
New York Mil ror. 

" Mr. Lyman Cobb, of New York, who hss been so succcssAil in tho compllalioa 
of a Dictionary and a t^pelling-Book, for sch(K>ls, has recently published a very small 
book, wliich lie calls "Ezplanatorv Arithmetick." It is entirely elementary, and hi 
arrangement and plan, takes a middle sround with reference to the worlds ofDaboU, 
Walsh, and Adams, and those of Pmith, Colburn, and Emerson. Tlie former, it 
will be recollected, gave rules, with few or no explanotinns. The latter omitted 
niles, and depended entirely on illustration. The attempt of Mr. Cobb is worth the 
notice of teachers. The mental operation, it has always appeared to us, required 
s(Mne visible sign, and some established rulos."— f/. S'. Gazette. 

This perics of School Books has become very popular, and is cenerallv used 
in many parts of the country. They are highly approved and much used in 
the cifica of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Albany, Pittsburgh, Buf 



this Series arc printed and sold to the amount of one hundred and i/ty 
thousand copies annually^ and tlie sales are daily increasing. Some or 
' all of this Series are in about one hundred and sixty ethoola in the city qf 
New York. March, 1836. 

PUBLISHED 

By B. &, ti. Collins, Harper & Brothers, Mahlon Day, Bartlett &,Raynor, 
and James Q% Shaw, Neie York ; Andnis &, Judd, Harf/ord, (^Jt.); R 
Olds, Neuark. (N. J.); B. Davenport, l\enton^ (N. J.); James Kay, Jr. J 
dfc Brother, Philadelphia} Joseph Jewett, Baltimore fO. Steele, Albany: 
Luke Louniis, PiUsbuvffh ; Mack dk Andrus, and David D. Spencer, 
Maca ; Chapman & Flnclcr, and Williams & Hunt. O.T/ord ; Birdsall & 
Huntley, FAmirai F. W. Ritter, Havana; Knowlton 6l Rice, Water- 
town; A. W. Wilcus, James Faxon dk Co., and O. G. S'ctle, Buffalo. 
(N. Y.): Spafforcf & Sterrett, iSrie ; Hickok &> Stark, Lc\ristownA?^.)\ 
Josiah Drake, Cincinnati; Horton J. Howard, !Sl. Clairsville ; J. R.A 
A. Linpit, y?anecrt//6; Rice db Parker, Cleveland; Spcncor ^ Confitld, 
Cuyahoga Falls, (Ohio.) ; S towel! A- Oriswold, Detroit ; H. Leavenworth. 
iSJr. Catharines, (U. C.) •, and C. Q. Pelton, 5^/. Thomas, (U. C.) 



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