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Full text of "Cobb's Spelling Book: Being a Just Standard for Pronouncing the English ..."

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SPELLING BOOK, 

BKING A 

JUST STANDARD 

FOR PRONOUNCING 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 5 

COZTTAIKIKO 

The Itudittents of the Ehglish Lanfuoge, arranged In Oatechetieal OHeT; 

•n OrsMdsation of the Alphabet*; an Easy Scheme of Spelling and Fr»> 

nunciatioDi inlcnnixed with Easy Reading Lcssona : to which are 

added, aome Useful Tkbles, with the Namc^ of Citict, GonMiea^ 

Towna, Riven, I^akes, (kc. in the United Stales; and a list ef 

the Proper Names contained in the New Testament 

and pronounced according to the host autlioriticii. 

sssioKBD TO ruAxm 
THE (mTHOGlUPHY AND ORTHOEI*T OF J. WALKER. 

, BY LYMAN COBB, 

AOTHOM or TRC JWmSlUt BKADSSflt SCHOOL DICTIOVART, SJUOSkTOl^ 
akPLAITATORT ARXTHMJSTICK, SCQUIL, XOBTH AXfiRICAST 
BKADEB, AND CIPHRRING-BOOX, M08. 1 & 2. 




Enunine thoroughly and tihpartially, then Judge. 



REVISED EDITION. 



ITHACA, N. t, 

nuMtDANIIFI)ilU8HBDRYHACS,A1«]mi» * 
SUrmjfptd bp J. Omktr, JA» l^A. 

1843. 



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>M«Rd*e<ardlti(U>MorOancnM la IM y«)I33Bi>Tl.ritBn CoUm 



It uA Pamk ate gained not hj ourpiiie 
Ha (bat wonU win, miut iaboci for the prixe ; 
TSa Ihuathe joulli, from liiptDg A, R, C, 
Attain!, at Ungll^aMa■taI'■bigh<legn« 



PREFACE. 



Tm great amd prominent objects of s Spelling-Book •liouM be to aid the pnnil in 
learning to spell, pruaouucc, and read the language with eaae^ accuracy, aim pro- 
cision. 

To effbct this most important object, a S'pelling-Book should contain all, or nonrlv 

all, the iii-iat cttmiiion and useful words of tJie language, pruperlj classeu. dividetl, 

I prnnouiicoil, niiil :iccerit"(l, (exhibiting throughout tlie diifbrent spellins lessons nil 

> the variotics of vowol (uid consunnnt sounds in the language, with their pcculiur.lic';a 

\ sccurateiy un«l miimtoly pointed out ai^ explained. 

This SpeIlin*-U:iol< contains about twice as many words in the dlflbrent spollin:; 
i lesson:) us any .i]|ir>i', urid nei*rly every primitive common word in the lans^iiit^r. 
The )(rciit adviiiit{i<;c of Imvin^ a large and copious number of wohls in a ^^pl>iIi^;^• 
Book is, tltai iiino ttMittis, if not all, tiie chilur-n of our coimtry obtain ail tiioir 
knowlet]{;e of ortlio;eraphy from the SpsLi.iNa.BouK onlif ; for, when th >y leave ili i 
book tliey atf.Mid to Iti^ier, tliuugli not more important sttidles, and almost invari.-i- 
bly neg'oct spolliiis. Cldliiren scarcely ever consult a Dictionarv for tlie ortliofrra- 
piiy of a word but for its pronunciation and definition only; and hence tlie aiuiil 
necessity of citoM.^ive and woll selected clasiies of wonu in a Spellin<r-l)«iok. 
Perhaps thi*ro is iiu ii ranch of education by which the learned nml iU.tcrat»> an* so 
readily and so ^•fiicndly distinguished, as that of spelling. %) universal is the 
condcmuHtion of bad spollins;, among all clames of citizens, wh^her urofossiiund. 
mercantilf*. or niiJ4:iiaiiioul, tha' no person, it is believed, can be founu wlio wocM 
bo wjll.nx i«»be ide tili..'*! with it- Tiicsubject of orthograph|r, tlieref«#ro, is of jnj. 
mary unportunco in the odiicution o/* children, and should engage the atUMUion nf 
paynt*), and ail Kvicliers more especially, since it may fairly be assumed that out: 
third oX the wliotc time spont in acquiring a useful educatujn, is drvotei. lo this 
particular branch. The Autiior of this work is fully aware ti\at nianv men of (>dii- 
cation and inilnence, consider tlie Spelling- Book on an unimportmt votunip, biMirvitli 
tlicir critical notice ; and tliat the impression too generally prevails, that it is of lint 
little conse(pience what book is Anit placed In the hands of the pupil. It is c<>naiii- 
ly of great nnport'inciuhai a correct and uniform system of language should hf 
adopted in oiir country ; and liow is this to be done, if a correct foundution lu: w. 
laid in the earliest stages of education ? 

The great importance of clas8\fu:aUon is not properlf understood or appr<»ciateo 

by many teacliors. SfuMliUi; is learned only bv a repetition of the letter.-* wliir.i 

compose a word until the association of them b hnpressed uiion the m Hd ; and. 

witliont tliis cl.irts (li'ation the words, which are pronomicea so very ditl'trfMiiy 

j from tlicir orihogruf»!»y, and, of course, require a greater repetition Ui impn'.'js ih'.* 

I association of tlip li>n"r>- upon ihe mind, can not be so repeated to advaniatfo. Ily 

' association ami %'las!*iftcation we learn every thing; as the way from one place to 

 nnotlvn*, liy aiisocia-insj In fhemind the objects which we pass: thcaiiicanuici'of ,-. 

Kian'« eotmteuincf? br njr~^ things and circumstances to the mind whicfi w<*rf* asso. 

ciatetl witli tlic countenance, and which hail not been lliought of from the tiim^ tin' 

couileaanco was sc«mi, on a former occasion, nntll it is seen a<iain. ' Fo in Spe'lllitii 

We learn theoith »graphy of a word by repeating the letters in connexion ivrij 

tlieirsmmds until tli?ir ortlmrrapliy, whether regular or ir egiilar, is tlK)roii;:hlv 

liipres«jd up »n the mind. By tlie use of a book in which the words are prop-M ly 

classed, tijc teacher can drill nr exerdae his scholars on tlie classes of wonis ol 

difficult ortlioiirajihy longer than on those which are ef taty ortliogniphv. A 

systematick clis^sillcitiou in spelling con not fail to aid tlie scholar in learninjf to 

read or enunciate readdy.' 

The iinproveiuf uts in the classif.cation of the words in Bpelllng^Books, like all 
other improveiiieiits have uoen progresaivt. Thus, for instance; V* tiie flivt at- 
teinpr of tliis kind the wonls were classed with regard to the number «»f I»'Hpi-s 
in a word, if a uHmosyllahle. or to the number of syllables In each Word, if a tlissy lia- 
ble, trisyll d)1i\ or pdysy liable, without any regard to the vowel or conso niii simnds : 
in the second attompi Hie woiils were classed with regard tiitho vowel sounds hot no 
regani wa«« paiil c the peculiar consonant sounds : and in the third tUKinpt tlie won.- 
are rhtssed with rejfard not onl^ to their accentuation, number of syll«l»'i»^s. an.l 
vowel sounds, but also with regard to their consonant sounds. Ilenc* it w 11 ]••• 
readily seon that in the order «jf improvements In Spelling- Books, the hiio|« in 
which all the variPtM>s of vowel and consonant sounds are the must miuui>.'Iv iin:l 
accurately cla.ss»ed an I noted is the best book. 

! * See note to Teachers, page 17. 



i 



* 

preface, 

heCLA88inoATioMoft1ie^iflbrcnt«nc|lingl«>soas in tlie followinc work, freat 
have been taken ; and, the soveral lessons are ^oaminfod throusTioQlthe Dook 
le scholar will be led on graduallu from easy to dilficult apelliiig, in atrhcl 
ii«ice wiih his natural progress and expanding capacities. 

I Rudiments of the Language, or Principles of Pronunciation, are given, and 
i peculiar vowel and consonant aounds are noted, and the reaton* for eoch 
nam $otjind, or its aiUnee, arc clearly and minutely pointed out. The form 
Mttion and answer has been adopted that the scholar may easily couainit 
\o memory. The Alpliabet is analvtically arranged in leaeona, m that a part 
letters may be learned at once, ana lliat Ums practice of laaetaiiig the letters bj 
ij all m one UsBortf be aband(9ied. 

words in the dilTorent spelling lessons are in alphabetical •rranffement from 
cure to the next, whictjLfks a reference to onhography and pronunciation, 
'n the same purpose itt trvictionary, for any one who is acquainted with the 
^atu^ of ttMt dHl<srent spelling lessons in the book. 

Lessons from page 20 to 37, inclusive, comprise words (tf one, two^ three, and 
irTlables, and which are easily spell^ and pronounced from their containing 
lie long and short sounds of ttie vowels, without s.lent letters, or words wliicn 
btect to different pronunciation or accentuation, or words ]MtMX>unced alike 
elied diflfereotly. 

lieasoos from page 38 to 81, Inclusive, contain words of one, two, three, and 
fUablce, comprising all the varieties of the vowel sounds, and •ilent letters, 
) words subject to different pronunciation or accentuation, as b(ne, amduct^ 
r words spelled differently and pronounced alike, as a/e, ail, Sec. Such 

are all classed in the fifty-eighth chapter, pages lSf9, 130^ Ac, where their 
'.tive definitioift are given ; whereas, in other books, these word^ are promis- 
y intermingled with other words throughout tne book, causing great per- 
r and embarrasaroent, both to scholar anuteacher. 

Lessons from page 83 to 123, inclusive, contain words comprising all the 
ies of the consonant find vowel soi^ads, so classed that tlie learner wfll be led 
dualijr from easy to the more difflcult combinations of letters. Those words 
lish ei'0^«, (zoua, eion, Hon, eiate^ Hate, 4cc. occur, are separately classed, 
bf the perplexity and uncertainty, arising from a promiscuous classification, 
Dtlier books, are avoided. The same may be said of that class of words 
are subject to diflhrent accentuation or pronunciation, and those which are 
1 differently and pronounced alike, and which in other works are intennin- 
iroughout the various lessons ; but wliich in this are classed, as on pages 
(5, 126^ 137, 128^ 129, 130, 131, 133, 133. Ac, with their distinctive dellniUons. 
lessons are alsr Jarg^r Uian those contained in any other SpeUing-Book. 

re are many Kontonant sdnnds classed and noted in this hook, not noted In 
revious Spe*img-Book. AH the words of the spelling lessons are so arranged 
see, that the pronunciation of each word can be readily known and learned ; 
> word is in a wrong lesson, or uselessly repealed. 

xls, which are irregular in Uieir pronunciation, or do not belong In any of 
'cceding classes, containing two or more peculiar cmuufnant sounds, are 
n together, with their pronunciation spelled, on pages 138^ 139^ 140, 141, and 

rds which are pronounced in an improper and mUgar manner, on pages 143, 

Mi 1419. 

nds often spelled incorrectly, on page 146. 

Paitses and Marks are explained n^ore fullv than usual, and in question and 
r, that they may more easily be committea to memory, and their uses wid 
ation known, on pages 149, 150^ and 151. 

names of Places, Pennons, snd Scripture Proper Names, with their pronon- 
I neted, on pages 164, 155, 155, 167,158, ISd^liS, 161, 152, 163, and 161 

correctness and utility of this work are submitted to the candour of teachers 
arentff, believing tliai a fair and impartial comparison Wiih ocbtr Spelling- 
, can not fail to secure to it a decidedf preference. 



if 



w York, April 13, 1835. 



LYKANOOBa 



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9 



RUDIMENTS OF 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

i 

Q, 'Wh;ii\s Lap gnage? 

A, Language, in an unlimited sense, indicates all sounds \ 
or characters^ by which one person declares his ideas or . 
thoughts so as to be understood by another. Language is \ 
both vocal and written* 

Q, What is vocal Language f 

An Itis( the expression of ideaa by the human voice, call- • 
ed articulate sounds, I 

Q. What is an articulate sound ? j 

A> It is an emission of the human voice, formed by llie 
organs of speech, in pronouncing letters, syllables, and 
\words, and constituting the vocal Language^ which is ad- 

ii dressed to the ear. i 

Q. Wliatare letters t 
A. Letters are the marks of sounds, and the rudiments of 
vyri ten Language whjch are presented to the eye. ' 

Q. What is written Lar^f^i^e f 

A* It is composed oi letters, syllahles^ and words, which : 
represent articulate ikmnds. ' 

Q. Hojv many letters are there in the English Language. ? 
A. Tiventy-six ; pamely, A a, hb,C c, D d, E e, F f\ 
G g, Hh, I z, Jj, Kk,Ll, Mm, Nn, O o,Pp, ,Q q, R r, 
S5, Tt, Uu, Vv, Ww, Xx, Yy, Z z. \ 

Q. What are tliese letters called^ when ti^kea together?! 
A. The English Alphabet. I 

Q. How is the Alphabet divided? 
A. Into vowels and consonants. 
Q. What is a vowel? 

A, It is a simple articulate sound that ean be perfectly ut- 
tered by itself, without the assistance of any other letter, ns 
a, e, 0. 

Q. What is a consonant? 

A. It is a letter which cannot be fully sounded without 

thejyip of a vowel; as b, c, d, which are expressed be, ce, dc. 

Which are fhe vowels 1 

. A, e, I, 0, .14. W is a vowel when it is immediatrl)- 

ceded by a, e, or o, in the same syllable. Y is aKvn\ s 

owel when it is in the middle or at the end of a syllabic. 



MM 



Rudiments of the 

sometimes at the beginning of a 6yllab)«, as in her ^Z,|) 

h, yr, W 

!• How are tlie consonants divided ? 

I. Into mutes, scmi'Vowcls, and liquids^ |^ 

!. What are the mutes ? 

i. They are such as emit no sound without a vowel, aa h^ 

f p, f, and c and g hard. 

!. What are the semi'Vowels ? 

L. They are such as emit a sound, without tlie concur- 

7e of a vowel, as /, j, s, v, x, z, and g sofU 

h What are the liquids ? 

L. They are such as flow into, or easily unite witli the 

es and semi-vowels, as Z, m, n, r. 

j. What is a compound character f 

L. It is two consonants united, which rapresenta distinct 

pie sound, as chfsh. . 

I. How many ifrfe there ? 

L. Four ; chj sh^ th^ and ng. 

Of the different sounds of the Vowels* 

{• How many sounds has^|| 

L. Eight ; a long sounds siRn najiie; a flat sound, as in 
; a long broad sound, as in salti a short sound, as in 
ss ; a short broad sound, as in waSf-ihe sound of e short, 
n any ; the sound of t short in the unaccented termina- 
^ ^g^% generally, as in cabbage ; and sometimes the sound 
I short when unaccented, as in liar. 
h How many sounds has E ? 

if five ; a long sound, as in mete ; a short sound, as in 
- ; the sound of n short, as in her ; the sound of a long, 
n tete ; the sound of i short, as in England, 
2* 0ow many sounds has I ? 

i. Five; a long sound, as in fine; a short sound, as in 
; the sound of u short, as in bird ; the sound of e long, 
vords of French original, when accented, as in caprice ; 
sound of e short when followed by r, as in virtue ; in 
ny words ending in ton, iScc. t is a consonant^ and has 
same sound that y, consonant, would have in thje same 
lation, Aus milUion, pin-ion, are pronounced Ttui^vun, 
ytin, &c. It should generally be pronounced like 'long 
lie e, when it ends an unaccented syllable. | 

i. How many sounds has O ? \ 

WMsasssmssssmssmsmSsssssss^ 



English Language. 7 

A. Six ; a long sound, as in bone ; the long sound of 
broad a, as in bom; the sound of broad a short, as in loss; 
the sound of « short, as in come ; the sound of oo proper or 
slender, as in more ; the sound of oo short, as in wolf. 

Q. How many sounds has U? 

A» Sim; a long sound, as in mule ; a short sound, as in 
dun ; tha sound Sf oo proper or slender, generally when pre- 
ceded by r, as in cruel ; the sound of oo short, or an ob- 
tuse sound, as in buU ; the sound of i short, as in busy ; the 
sound of e short, as in bury. U, or eu^ at the beginning of 
words Of syllables, when accented long, is pronounced as if 
y preceded it, as in use^ eunuch, pronounced yuse, yu-^uk. 

Q. How many sounds has W, when a Vowel ? 

A. One^ which is the same that u would have in tne same 
siiimtion, as in notr, which is pronounced as if written nou. 
It is never a wnoel at the beginning of a word or syllable. 

Q. How many sounds has Y, when a vowel ? 

A^ Three ; a long sound, as in defy ; a short sound, as 

in hymn ; the sound of long weak e, generally, when it ends 

an unaccented syllable, unless it be immediately preceded 

by/, in which case it should be pronounced Kke long £, as 

in glorify. It should also be pronounced like long t, in 

the word& multiply, occupy, prophesy. 

All the preceding sounds of the rowels are represented by di^ient figuies 
in the fi>fiowing work. But the vowels have some irresuhr aound^ l^des 
those already enouaerated,' which are not de6ned by ngurea, Thu words 
which contain them are dasaed together, in the fifty-nintn chapter, and their 
pronunciation accurately pointed out. 

Of the Diphthongs. 

Q. What is a diphthong ? 

A. It is the union of two vowels, pronounced by a simple 
impulse of the voice, so as only to make onQ syllable* 

Q. How many kinds of diphthongs are there ? 

A. Two ; proper and improper. 

Q. What is a proper diphthong ? 

A. It is that in which both the vowels are sounded as oj in 
oiU 

Q. How many proper diphthongs are there ? 

A. Four ; oi, oy, ou, and ow, as in oil, boy, loud, how. 

Q. What is an improper diphthong ? 

A. It is that in which but one of the vowels'^is sounded* as 



Rudiments of the 

Q. Ilo^r many improper diphthongs^ are there? 

A. Tu)enty-tivo ; ac^ at, au, art?, ay^ ea, ce, ci, co, cu, cw, 

ia^ ic, 20, oa, oe, oo, ?/fir, ue^iit, uy, 

n the following work, whi'ii the improper lUplithonffs are used, (all thi» 
per diphthongj arc sojiu'tiiucs impruper^ except oy,) the vovvcla whirh 
'e no sound are priutLMj in Italick chanicters ; andlhose which are sound«Hl, 

printeil in Rotuan ciiuracterts, and their true aoundg aocuntely pointed 

by the llgures. 

Of the (liferent sounds of the Consonants, 

Q. How many sounds has Bt 1 * 

A, One, unvaried sound, at the beginning, middle, and end 
words, as in bake, nmnher, rhubarb. It is silent before / 
the same syllable, as in debt, debtor; it is also generally 
ent after m in the same syllable, as in lOfinb. 
Q, How many sounds has C ? 

A. Four ; a hard sound like k, at the end of a syllable, and 
fore a, o, u, k, 7, r, and t, as in fiac cid, can, cot, cure. ' 
ck, clown, crag", tract ; a soft sound like s, before e, i, and 
as in /occ, civil, mercy ; the sound oish when it is immc- 
Ltely followed by ea, ia, ie, io, or eou, and is immediately 
seceded by the accent, either primary or, secondary, as in 
mn, social, species, spacious, saponaceous, pronounced 
hun, so-sJial, spe-shez, spa-shus, sap'O-na-skus ; the 
ind of z, in discern, sacrifice, sice, suffice. It is silent in 
buscle, corpuscle, czar, czarina, endict, muscle, victuals. [ 
Q. How many sounds has D ? 

A. Three; its proper isound, as in 5oZ(£ ; the sound of rf/ 
len it ends an accented syllable, and is followed by u long, 
in ed-urcate, pronounced ed-ju-kaie ; and sometimes the 
md of J, as in verdure, pronounced ver-jure. 
Words which end in ed, immediately preceded by d or t, L 
ire ed sounded distinctly, as in bounded, pointed; and i 
ewise, when another syllable is added to the word, ed f 
luld be sounded distinctly, whether it be preceded by d, t, 
not, as in blessedness, designedly, deservedly^ &c. When 
rds which end in ed are used as nouns or adjectives, the 
mination ed should sometimes be sounded distinctly, as in 
following : A learned man ; Blessed are they ; The 
rned ; The wicked people ; The wretched man, 6lc, 
len the termination ed is immediately preceded by a vowel, 
\ g, I, m, n, r, flat th, v, z, or s, if it be sounded like z, j| 
e is suppressed, and the d is added to the foregoing syl- 1 



English Language* 9 

lable, as in delayed^ defied^ showed^ sued^ ruhhed^ lugged^ 
rolledj aiinedf rained, poured, breathed, saved, blazed, raised, 
pronounced delayed, defi'd, show'd, su^d,rttbb^d,lugg*d,roird, 
aivCi, rained, poured, breath'' d, sav'd, blaz'd, raized. When 
the termination ed is immediately preceded by c,f, k, p, s, 
X, ch, sh, or qu, the e is suppressed, and the d is changed 
into ^, as in the foWowiJig, farced, stuffed, cracked, tripped, 
ipassed, vexed, vouched, flashed, piqued, pronounced faste, 
stuft, crackt, tj^ipt, past, vekst, voucht, flasht, pcekt. These 
observations ought to be circumspectly observed by every 
one who wishes to read and pronounce correctly and politely. 

It is silent in handkerchief, handsel, handsoTfie, 9ind in the 
first syllable of stadtholddr, and Wednesday* and when it is 
followed by g in the same syllable, as in badge. 

Q. How many sounds has F ? 

A, One, pure, unvaried sound at the beginning, middle, 
and end of words, except in of, in which it has the sound 
of V, pronounced ov; but when of is joined to the words 
here, where, there, the / retains its proper sound, as in here- 
of, whereof, thereof F is never silent, 

Q. How many sounds has G ? 

A. Two ; a hard sound at the end of syllables and words, 
and before a, p, w, I, and r, as in gale, gone, gun^ glue, grand ; 
a soft sound before e, i, and y, as in gem, giant, gyre. There 
are exceptions to this last sound, which are defined in the fol- 
lowing work, that is, where g is hard before e, i, and y. It is 
always silent before n in the same syllable, as in gnat, sign. 

Q. How many sounds has H ? 

.A, One, which is no more than a forcible breatliing before 
the succeeding vowel is pronounced, as in horse. It is 
always silent after f, as in rhomb, and at the end of a w^ord 
preceded by a vowel, as in ah, oh 

Q. How many sounds has J ? 

A. One, and is perfectly uniform in its sound, which is 
that of soft g, except in hallelujah, in which it has the 
sound of y, J is never silent. 

Q. How many sounds has K? 

Am One, which is that of hard c. It is always silent be* 
fore n, as in knife^ and after c, as in publick, 

Q. Ifow many sounds has L? 

A* OnCf proper sound, as in la^me. It is sometimes silent 






10 Rudiments of the 

before/, m, r, k, and d, as in calf, calm, calve, walk, woiLld : 
le, at the end of words, has the sound of a weak el, &s in table. 

Q. How many sounds has M ? 

A, One, unchanged sound, as in inan, except in comp- 
troller, pronounced kon-tro'lur. Mis never silent 

Q. How many sounds has N? 

A, Two; a simple and pure sound, as in man, net; a 
compound and mixed sound when it is followed by A", or 
hard c, in an accented syllable, as in thank, uncle, pronoun- 
ced thangk, nngkl. It is silent at the end of a[ word when 
preceded by I, or m, as in kiln, hymn, 

Q, How many sounds has P ? 

A, It always retains its proper sound, except in clapboard, 
and cupboard, in which it lias the sound of &• It is always si- 
lent before 7?., and between m and f, and before 5 and t, at the 
beginning of words, as in pneumaticks, ptisan, tempt, psalm ^ 

Q. How many sounds has Q ? 

A. One, which is that of k ; it is always followed by u ; 
and the u, in this situation, when not silent, is always pro- 
nounced like w, consonant, as in queen, pronounced kwecn, 
Q is never silent. 

Q. How many sounds has R? 

A* Two; a rough sound, as in river; a smooth sound, as 
in bard: re, at the end of words, has the sound of a weak 
er, as in acre. R is never silent. 

Q. How many sounds hasS? 

A, Four ; a sharp hissing sound, as in sin ; a flat sound 
like z, as in was ; the sound of sh when it «si immediately 
preceded by the accent and another 5 or a hquid, and is 
immediately followed by ia, ie, or io, as in cassia, iran^ 
nent, expulsion, version ; it sometimes has ihe sound of 
?/i when followed by u, as in censure, sens7wi, sure, &c.; 
:he sound of zh when preceded by a vowel and ihe accent, 
md followed by ial, ier, ion, or ure, as in amht^osial, bra- 
ner, fusion, rasure; and sometimes the sound i4 zh when I 
preceded and followed by u, as in usual, usury. <V,c. It is 
iilent in aisle, isle, island, demesne, puisne, viscount, corps. 

Q. How many sounds has T ? 

A. Three ; its proper soimd, as in tijne ; the sound of sh 
when it is immediately ftdlowed by ia, ie, or to, and the ac- 
5cnt either primary or secondary immediately preced*-8, as in 
luptiai, patient, faction, pronounced nupshal, pash*iit,fak' 



English Language. 1 

shun; the sound ott^h when followed by long v and the accen 
immediately precedes, as in nature, pronounced nortshure; i 
also has the sound of tsh when preceded by s or x, and fol 
lowed by ia or lo, and the accent precedes, as in fustian 
mixtion. It is silent when preceded by s and followed by I 
or eit, as In bustle^ hapten ;. it is also silent in bankruptcy 
billetdouXf Christmas^ eclat^ hautboy, mortgage ; and when i 
is followed by ch ia the ^ame sylluble, as in match, watch, &€ 

Q. How many sounds has V ? 

A. One, its proper sound, which is that of flat /, as ii 
vile. It is silent in one word only, wjiich is sevennighi 
pronounced senniL 

Q. How many sounds has \V when a consonant ? 

A. O/ie,. which is nearly, that 0(00, as m water ; w befon 
h, is pronounced as if it were written after it, as in what 
pronounced hwat. W is always a consonant when it be 
gins a word or syllable, or when ii is immediately precedec 
by dy .9, t, or ifi, as in dwarf, swing, twine^^ thwack. It L 
always silent before r, as i|t wrap. 

Q. How many sounds his X ? 

A. Three ; a sharp sound like ks when it ends a syllabh 
with the accent on it, either primary or secondary, or whei: 
the accent is (hi the next syllable, if it begin with an}'- con- 
sonant except h, as in exercise, expense ; a flat sound like gz 
when followed by an accented syllable beginning wilh a vowel, 
or with /it, as in exist, eafhort, except in com^wund words, in 
which tlie primitive ends in x, as relaxation, taxation, vexa- 
tion, &c. to which we may add the simples in our language, 
doxology, proximity ; the sound of z, at the beginning of 
Greek names, as in Xenophm^ Xerxes. 

Qp How many sounds has Y when a consonant ? 

A. One, which is nearly that of ce, as in youth. 

Q. How many sounds has Z ? 

A. iTiDo ; its proper sound, as in zone ; the sound of zh 
when preceded by a vowel and followed by ier or ure, and the 
accent precedes, as in glazier, azure. 

Of the different sounds of the Compound Characters. 

Q, How many sounds has ch ? 

A, Three ; the sound of tsh in words of English origin, as 
in chin; the sound o( sh when immcdiatdy preceded by thcj 
liquids I or n, as in milch,pinch, pronounced milsh,pinsh, and \ 
in words derived from the French, as in machine, pronoimced i 



Rudimenis of the 

keen; the sound of k m words of Oreek or Bdffewl 

irij as in echo, tt is silent in dra^hm^ itkUn^ ywfkt* 

!. How many sounds has sh T 

.. On^ its proper sound, as in shad, 

!. How mahj sounds has thf 

« Two ; asharp sound, as in ^fik^ thdfik; a flat soimd, 

I thiSf that ; the A is sometimes , silent, as in o^Hto, 

muSf phthisick, phthisical^ Thames^ ThomaSn thyme. I 

\. How many, sounds has ngT 

. Tivo ; a sharp or nasal sound, as in sing ; a flat sound 

nj when foUo^d by e at the end of a word or syllable, 

I arrange^ arrangement; in so^ne words it is pronounced 

f the g were doubled, as 1^ anger^ angle^ singular ; it 

[lid always have iits 'sharp sound when at the end of a 

d, as in readings not reaaiu* 

Of the Conibinations. 
I. What is a combination ? 
I. It is two consonants united, which represent a certain 
id, as ghf ph. 
I, How many are there ? 
L. Three ; gh, pK and sc. 
\, How many sounds has gh f 
L. One^ which is that of/, as in coughs except in houghs 
rh, shough, pronounced hok^ loh sKok; at the beginning 
rords, the h is always silent, as in ghost; and sometimes at 
end of words, as in burgh; the g and h are both sometimes 
tit in the middle and at the end of words,asinft^ft<f/bt^A. 
I. How many sounds has ph f 

i. One, which is that of/, as in prophet^ except in Ste- 
n and nephew, in which iti4ias>the sound of v; in diph- 
ig and triphthong, the first h is silent ; the p and h are 
1 silent in phthisiek, phthisical* 
I. How many sounds has sc T 

L. T%ree .* the sound of s before e, i, and y, as in scene, 
nee, scythe ; the sound of sk before n, o, «, and r, as in 
ie, scorn, sculU scrap ; the sound of sh when followed 
ie or io, and the accent immediately precedes, as in con- 
\nce, conscious. 
I. What sound should a always have in the diphthong 
when unaccented ? 
i, A. long broad sound. 
h What sound should a always have in the diphthotig aw / 



BH 



Engtish Language. 



13 



A* A long broad sound. 

Q; Wfaftt iound should w genenlly have in the diphthong ewl 

A* The sound of u Iqng. 



Long. 

a, ai m lat^ pa per, 
I II 

e, aiinnic^ mgie, 
I 11 

1 1 1 

i, as ii) time, H tie. 
t t 1 

o, as in fu>, no <»ee. 
1,11 
00^ as in door, Jtoor. 
I 1 1 

It, as in fun^, muML 

eWf as in ./w, new. 

* . ' » 
^ as in </ry, de 



ilatA. 



s s s 

a, as in ^r,^ /Act. 

Broad A long, 
a, as in Aa&, im tfr. 
c^ asmiioni, ftorcfer. 

Short. 

4 4 4 

0, as In kat, glau, 

4 4 4 

e, as m men. ten ant, 

4 , < 4 

i^ as m tint iim bm, 

i 4 4 

u, as in run, but ter, 

4 4 4 « . 

y, as in Ayrnn, «y« #em. «^ 
Broad A short 

5 Si 

o, as in wid, wantkr, 

5 5 < 

0, as in co§t, mod em, 

Oo proper or slender. 

00, as m ftooit, ^2oom y. 

Elucidation of the Preceding Key* 

Q. What does at figure Of number placed over a Towe 
represent ^ 

ji. tt repijisents a certain sound. 



o, as in morc^ a do, 

I . < < 
II, 84 in Tuie, oe cruc. 

► Oo short.* 

7 f 1 

00, as in gocd,i»odd, 
«^ as i&wolft 'v)ouli0 

7 7 7 

n, as in kuU^ bull iom, 

U short. 
• a 

e^ as in her, 

8 8 8 

1^ ais in btrdf third, 

8 8 8 

0, as in fove, con duit, 

8 8 8 

00^ as in bloody Jlood, 

A long. 

8 8 8 * 

s^asin wtl^jMvy. 

E long. 

18 18 10 

^ as in ^hirCy ea price, 

£ short. 

II It 11 
j^ aa in girl^ vir gin, 

Dif^thonga. 

Oi. 

ot^ as in voice, Tioise, 
Ov 

^ ttH m tin/f day 
ou, as in eu/^ Umd. 

Ow 

[010, av A bcfWy hffw. 



Me 



SSBdB 



Rudiments of the 



What does figure 1 represent ? 
It represenu the long sound of a, e, ce, t, o, 00^ i^ lo. 

What does figure 2 represent 1 
ft represents the fiat sound of a, as in far. 
What does figure 3 represent ? 
[t represents the sound of broad a long, as in fall ; the 
of brgad a long made by o, as in iior. 
What does figure 4 represent? 
[t represents th^ short sound of a, e, t, v, apd y. 
What^oes figure 5 repi^esent ? 

[t represents the short sound of bruad a, as in wad; the 
sound of broad a made by o, as in loss. 
What docs figure 6 represent 1 

[t represents the sound of 00 proper or slender, as in ' 
; the sound of 00 proper made by 0, as in move ; the ! 
of 00 proper made by ir, as in rule. 
What does figure 7 represent 1 

[t represents the sound of 00 short, • to in good ; the j 
of 00 short made by 0, as in V)olf ; the sound of 00 | 
made by u, as in hull. 
What does figure 8 represent ? 
[t represents the sound of u short made by e, as in her ; \ 
und of u short made by t, as in hirdi the sound of u I 
made by o, as in love ; the sound of u short made by f 
in blood. 

What does figure 9 represent ? « 

[t represents the sound of a long made by 0, as in veily 

What does number 10 represent ? 

[t represents the sound of e long flfide by », as in shirty 

iVhat does number 11 represent? 

it represents the sound of e short made by t, as in girl^ 

How are diphthongal sounds defined ? 

3y the diphthongs being placed over tliem^ whenever 

€cur in the chapters. 

How are the silent letters distinguished ? 

3y being printed in Italick ciiaracters. 

What sound has s when printed m Italick ? * 

rhe sound of z, as in refuse^ pronounced j'e/V/ZfET. 



I 






k 




«■ 



English Language* 15 

In the foHowing work, when' the vowel e ends a woid or fytlabte, tnd j 
is preceded by a consonant, and pinted in a Roman character, it serves 1 
to lengthen the preceding vowel in that syllable, as in abate^ confine 
menif seduce^ &c. ; bat in all other eases when it ends a syllable it is 
printed in Italick. When e ends a word or syllabic, and is printed in an 
Jtalick character, immediately preceded by c or ^, the c should be pro- 
nounced like tf, and the.g- should have its soft sound, as in TuttieCf arrangfj 
pronounced no/i9, arr^r^, 

N. B. In tba chapters of the ibtlowing work, which are intendin] for 
spelling lessons, </, ^, :r, and z, have their proper sounds, unless otherwise 
denned ; g has its soil &ounil before e, i, and y, uftle^s otherwise defined 
by note or reference ; cA has the sound of Uh, unless otherwise defined by 
reference. I'be different sounds of tk are also defined ; bb, dd^ffy 11^99^ &/^ 
are all printed in Roman characters, notwithstlmding one letter aloiitf 
would be suilicient.te express the sound. 






Of Letters, Syllahles, Words, and Sentences. 

Q. What do letters form? 

A. Syllables, syllables form words, and words form sen' 
tences, which compose a discourse. 

Q, What is a syllable ? 

A. It is a distinct somid uttered with a single impulse of the 
voice, and making a part of a word^ or a \vord, as an, man* 

Q. What is a word of one syllable called ? 

A. A monosyllable ; a word of two syllables is called a dis* 
syllable ; a word of 4liree syllables is called a trisyllable ; a 
word of four or more syllables, is called a polysyllable. 

Q. How many kinds of words are there ? 

A. Four ; primitive, derivative^ simple^ and compound, 

Q. What is a primitive word ? 

A. It is a word which is not derived ; but constitutes a 
radical stock, from which other words are derived, as man^ 
hope, charm. 

Q, What is a derivative word ? 

A. It is a word which is formed of the primitive, and some 
different termination, or an additional syllable, as mavfuU 
hopefvl, charming, hopes^ charms* 

Q. What is a simple word ? 

A. It is a word which cannot be divided without destroy- 
ing the s<^nse, as m^n, child. 

Q. What is a compound word ? 

A. It is a word which is formed of two simple words, as 
\ chimney-piece, ink^stand. . ^ 

Q. What is spelling ? 



; Rudiments of 

A, It is the art ef expressing words by thdr proper i^^ 
rs ; or of rightly dividing worda into syUablea. ^ 

Of Accent^ Emphasis, and Cadence* 

Q. What is accent ? 

A. It is a forcible stress of voice on a letter or eyttahic^ kij 
rder to distinguish it from other letters or syllabUs in tlte\ 
ime word. If it fall on a vcwel^ the sound of the vowel is ' 

1 
rolongedt as in ha her: if it ftll on the consonant, the floundj 

f the preceding vowel is short, as in hah iU Accent is ei-^} 
ler primary or secondarifi Primary accent is that whiohj 
istinguishes one syllable or letter from the rest Secondary] 
ccent is a less forcible stress of voice than the primary, 
hich we frequently place on another syllable, in words oj 
\Tet or more syllables, in order to pronounce it more dis- 
nctly and forcibly than we do the unaccented syllables. 

Q. What is emphasis t 

A. It is a peculiar stress of voice, which is laid on a par- 
cular word or words ih a sentence, in order to distinguish 
lem from the rest of tlie words in the senten^S'e, on account 
f their importance. 

Q. What is cadence f 

A. It is a depression or modulat|oh :0f4he^ voice in read- 
ig or speaking, which generally oiecurs at the eai of tbe| 
entence. 



As Oithognphy ii the first gtep to all acieiioei, but more paiticululy to 
le Eftffliih Language, it is higfafy important that a just knowledge of it 
lould oe attained by the student before he proceeds to the higher branches 
f education. This part of an education is evidently too much ne^^ectod 
I our ooromon echoola; teachers^ whether aeauainted with it or not| are spt te. 
link it of but Kttle im^ioitance, and pass precipitately from it to other lesson*; 
at this is eeitaiilly InjutficiouB : a Wlmng cannot be elegant and nerma^^ 
ent, unless erected on a good foandation. I have, thraefinre^ aa j trusty 
lade an appropriate selection of questions and anawersin Orthography fer 
ly youn|[ mends, and I sineerely hope they will pay that attention to toeio^. 
hich is justly due to the subject 

Teachers should freauently exereiae their pupib in the ibr^mg qnes- 
ons, so that they may be enabled to aoqiuie a correct knowledge of the n»> 
inients of the Languagei whidii it the foundation, and most essential part 
r litemturc. 



 



. 






mmmrmmmmmmmBBtamaiaaaesssssaBssssssKaassssaBSSSBaB i i iii seaam 

the English Language. 1 

. RULES FOR SPEXUSCG 

T7i6 PluraU qf Nounty Participles^ Present Tense and PreUrit ( 
Ver6«, the Comparative and Superlative Degrees qf Adjectives, 

I. Those 1l^ ords which end ^^ith y precedod by a consonant, change the 
to i, as ditty^ duties! marry^ marries; guaranty^ guaranties t hurt] 
hurried ; happfg h/ippier^ happiest. la the present or imperfect Part 
ciple the y is retained, that i may not be doublod, as marryine^ hurryin) 

If. Wfen y is preceded bv a vowei. it should not be changed in the Pit 
rals, Participles, Present 'fenae. ana Preterit, as joys^ moneys^ attorney, 
valleys, delays, pay^^ journeyinsr^ jounuyed, cloyed i except in lay, pay, ao 
l«ay. which are formed laid, paid, said, 

I Itl. Those words which end with y, preceded by a conaoaant, upon m 
turning an adifitional syllable beginning with a consonants generally chang 
y to i, as merry, merriment i happy. Happiness, But when y is precede 
by a vowel, it is seldom changed, tiBjoyfiU, enjoyment. 

IV. Monosyllables, and words acceiiied on tne last syllable, which em 
with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double that oonsonani 
when they take another syllable beginning with a vowel, as run, runnini 
admit, aamitHng, refer, referred. But if a diphthonf prtMsede, or the ac 
cent is on the preceoing svUable, the consonant remams single, as rain 
raining, toil, toiling, dijfer, differing^ htnejil, benefited, prohibit, prohibit 
ed, cleaner, deanest! except the letter /, wliich is generally doubled 
whether the accent be on tne last syllable or not, as travel, travelling 
traveller^ rival, rivalling, rivalled, &c., and p in the words v>orshippe\ 
worshipping, and tporshipped. 



TO TEACHERSi 

The practice qf teaching a child to read before he is familiar with th< 
orthography an^ pronunciation of words, is productive of great iriiury, am 
tends to retardrr|iher than facilitate cor7•ec^ reading. No child should at 
tempt to read uriil he is able to call or pronounce, at eight, the words mos 
commonly met wjth in composition ; and, this can be more easily acauirec 
ov reading words in a judicious and analogical classification in a Spelling 

vS^u* '"^" *" detached reading lessons. 

The teacher should practise tne method of requuing the scholars to pro 
nounce the words in each spelling column, at sight, as a certain way U 
"f^ - I? • readers ; for if a child oe required to read or pronounce words 
^^ 'iRht, m a reading lesson before he has learned to sound or pronounce 
t&enn separately in a spelling column, at sight, he will hesitate ; and, ir 
most cases be confirmed in the habit of stammering. 
tK r "^ u the enunciation or pronouncing of words by syllables ; and, 
tnerefore, each syllable in a word should be as distinctly enunciated or pro- 
nounced, as if the whole lessons were composed of monosyllables. Hence 
^??,\°*P<>y»nce of enunciating words at sight in spelling columns. Unlesi 
>r!iir'^^ ^.acquire a correct and distinct enunciation of each syllable in 
rS«l.f *'?*""'•!)?» *«y rarelyi if ever, acquire it in after life ; for in th< 
»!^.i ^it J^^i'^Bi the pauses, emphases, cadenoea, &c occupy all, oi 

A fw"^ their attention. 
iiniifKi?"^ -^.^'^^^Rfi of spelling and pronunciation can be obtained 

ninl-^ a continual repetition of the Tetters and their sound, until the asso- 
rSu • '®"i?" '* ^^y impresseo upon the mind. 

ftf »? iP™^^^? J"* Author pursued for years, while engaged in the businesi 

en.? "*• With results entirely satisfactory) and his experience imbold- 
^ns mm to recommend it to those intrusted with the instruction of youth. 



oaoAiRZA,<nox or tboi az^kasit. 



RoniMi Letton. 


MidcLMm 


■H 


LBMON I.' 


LESSON I. 


1 


A a 


>1 


a 1 


E • 


E 


e  


I i 


I 


4 1 


P 


o 


^ 1 


p u 


u 


u 1 


LSMON II. 


LBssomL 


1 


B b 


B 


b 


C 





e 


D d 


J> 


d 


I P 


p 


P 


T t 


T 


i 


V V 


y 


if 


Z 2 


z 


Sf 


becedepeteveie. 






LK880N HI. 


LESSOR Qf. 




a g 


G 


g 1 


i 


J 

K 




Q, q 


Q 


7 II 


JDJtkaku. 




IB 


LESaOM IT. 


Lsssov vr. 


11 


F f 


F 


/ 1 


I, 1 


' L 


/ 1 


M m 


M 


Ht  < 


N . n 


N 


n 1 


B r 


R 


f 1 


S  


8 


« 1 1 


elHttktautt. 






UMMNr, 


LESSOMT. 




H h* 


H 


h 


W wt 


w 


w 


X xt 


X 


s 


Y yl ' 


T 


y 


••HAitdmiUe 


yvi,tdu,tiKL 


1 






BBBHUI 



fl 





/Ae English Lang^ 


uage. 


11 






CHAPTER I 


• 








Lesson L 




Lesson YTTL 




ba 


da pa ta va za 


bla 


pla gla 


ila 


'be 


de pe te' re 2e 


ble 


pie gle 


fle 




bi 


di pi tt vi zi 


bU 


pli gU 


m 




bo 


do po to TO 20 


bio 


plo glo 


flo 




bii 


da pu til Tu zu 


blu 


nlu glu 
Lesson IX. 


fia 






Lesson 1L 




' 




ga 


ka ja fa ha la 


ck 


sla bra 


d/a 






ke je fe he le 
ki ji fi hi H 


de 


sle bre 


dre 






cli 


sii bri 


dri 




go 


ko jo fo ho Jo 
ku jtt Ai hu hi 


elo 


slo bro 


dro 




S^ 


clu 


shi bra 


dru 






Lesson TH. 




LsstioN X. 




ca 


ma na ra sa wa 


pra 


tra gra 


fra 


1 


me ne re se we 


' pre 


tre gre 


fre 






mi ni ri si wi 


pri 


tri gri 


fri 




CO 


mo no ro so wo 


pro 


tro gro 


fro 




cu 


ma nu' ni su wa 


pru 


tra gru 
Lesson aI. 


fni 






Lesson IV. 


A 






by 


dy py ty vy zy 


era 


sta spa 


sea 




ky 


jy fy hy ly my 


ere 


ste spe 






ny 


ry sy wy 


cri 


sti spi 








Lesson V. « 


cro 


sto spo 


SCO 




ab 


ad ap at ar az 


cm 


sta spa 

IdBSSON Alt. 


SCU 




eb 


ed ep et er ez 








ib 


id ip it It iz 


sha 


cha swa 


tha 




lob 


od op ot ov oz 


she 


che swe 


the 




ub 


nd ap at nv uz 


M 


chi swi 


thi 






Lesson VL 


sho 


cho swo 


tho 




*ff 


ak af^ al ac am 




Lesson XIII. 






e« 


ek ef el ec em 


spla 


spra pha 


qaa 




»g 


ik if il ic hn 


sple 


spre phe 


que 




og 


ok of ol oc om 


spli 


i^ri phi 


qai 




., 


ok of al ac am 
Lesson YII. 


splo 


spro pho 
Lesson XIV. 


quo 




1 •' 


^ ar as ax 


chy 


dry fry gly 


sly 




en 


I er es ex 


Quy 
thy 


shy spy sty 
sply spry stry 


tiy 




in 


ir is ix 


swy 




on 


I or OS ox 


ce 


ge see 




un 


I ar as ux 


ci 


gi -ci 



 



^ 



Just Standard for Pronouncing 
CHAPTER 11. 

placed over the first word of a eoKiinii, shows the sooxi/f] 
,xvel in ail the words that follow in that ooluinn. 



hid 



I. 
4 

bag 
cag 
fag 
Iiag 
rag 
II. 



4 

big 

pig 
wig 



lJA 



r 

9 

r 

e 

r 

9 



4 

map 

lap 

sap 

tap 

cap 

5 

rob 

crop 

got 

not 

lot 

hot 












4 

^amp 
I^mp 
'iraxnp 



mp 



it 



ail> 



4 

glad 
shad 
brag 
drag 
flag 

1 

dote 
nota 
vota 
bone 
ton^ 
hone 
cone 
xpne 



1 

cage 
wage 

|page 

rage 

ape 

cape 

rape 

tape 



1 

slime 

prime 

crime 

chime 

space 

grace 

orace 

chase 

spake 

make 

(take 



4 4 

felt shut 

pelt milt 

jilt drab 

slut, crab 

blab . 4diub 
Lesson YIL 

1 1 

date tik 

fate mice 

prate dice 

hate nice 

tame file 

lame bile 

mate pile 

fade vile 
Lesson VIIL 



1 

dale 

gale 

same 

stale 

mace 

lace 

face 

trace 



1 

name 

fame 

dame 

came 

riye 

hive 

five 

drive 



Lesson IX. 
I 
blade 
shave 
trade 
blame 
shame 
broke 
smoke 
poke 
choke 
spice 
price 



4 

club 

hilt 

scab 

shed 

bled 

1 

dine 

pine 

line 

wine 

wide 

bide 

side 

vice 

1 

bold 
gold 
sold 

fold 

hope 

rope 

pope 

slope 

1 

slice. 

twine 

swine 

shine 

brine 

slave 

save 

grave 

brave 

wake 

craze 



the EngUsh LangU€Lge. 21 


Lesson X. 


114 4 


1 1 4 4 


vine snipe desk .sang 


lure «hape crush i^fl 


slate gripe^ pant rim 


purtf stftge plush ram 


Lesson XL 


tune rlrre Aut^h rang 


5 5,5 


wipe shftde blugh mast 


dog frofi^ shod 
slop cloa cog 


mute age tusk mint 


mine trite hush plant 


flofir plod cot 
nod rod rot 


nine tr^ chimp cramp 


CHAPtER III. 


Ea»y words cf two syllMes^ accented &n the first. 

I >Sr. fl. Tf tliA M^rem of w^u*a ^1 nn a vcfdn4. thA ■nnnd cflhm vnwukl la rivnim. 



quently lonfr, and it vuoked by fittUie 1. If the atfeii of Toioe fidl on t 
GODflonant, the sound <^ the preceding vowel ie conseqiienUy ehort, and it 
marked by figure 4. . 
No figures are placed over the vowels in unaccented syllafales ; it ought to In 
obMrved, however,' that in unaccented syllablefl^ alnmil all voMs are 
gcnecaU;^, pronounced liifie i and u short 

oi:, is pronounced ur^ tu.toTy tu iurg 

CTf u pronounced ur, o ver, q vur ; ^ 

Oft is pronounced wr, U ar] K nr ; 

etf i^pronounoed U, fir ret^ far rH, 
The figuiee ave placed ^er the vowels of the aeoented syllables^ and om 
figure denotes the sound of the vowels in the syllables which are thus |^- 
era under that figure^ or which follow in that column, until anothei 
figure oocuAKi 



1 

A ged 
agent 
a{>ex 
april 
baby 
baker 
ba sis 
bi as 
bi ped 
bla ded 
bla zer 
bo lus 



1 

bo ny 
brave \j 
bri er 
briny 
cadi 
ea lif 
ca per 
caret 
ca ter 
ce dar 
ci der 
cli ent 



1 

do ver 
CO gent 
CO Ion 
eo ma 
era ly 
cri er 
cri sis 
cu biciSr 
cubit 
de cent 
de ist 
demoB 



1 

fi nis* 
dial 
diet 
di vcr 
dole All 
do nor 
dotal 
do ter 
dra raa 
dra per 
dri er 
dri rer 



1 

dro ver 
du cal 
duel 
du ly 
dn ty 
e dile 
e gret 
era 
fatol 
fated 
female 
fever 



* Those words which are used by our best writers and speaken^ bat are 
not in Walker's larse Dictionary, have an asterisk placed after them, wh 
' ly occur in me following work. 



ever 



mmmmmmmmmmBaaBBBBaamBBBsmmBBm 
A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 

la bel 

la bent 

a dy 

la tenl 

a va 

a ver 

a zy 

egal 

[ibel 

1 on 

io cal 

u brieJb 

u eeot 

u eid 

la Bap 

14 rid 
ma jor 
ma ker 
ma trix 
ma troit 
ma zy 
mi ry 
mo dal 
mo dus 
mo ment 
mo pus 
mu cid 
mu ral 
na dir 
na ked 
navy 
ne gro 
no cent 
no ted 
o bit 
o men 
o pal 
o ral 
o val 
o ver 
o vert 



o yer 
pa cef 
pagan 
pa pal 
pa per 
pa pist 
pa ver 
pe dal 
pe pal 
pe tal 
pi ca ' 
pi per 
pli ant 
p]u my 
plu rm - 
po cm 
po et 
po ker 
po lar 
po nent 
po ny 
po ry 
po tent 
pre tor 
pro em 
pu ny 
pu pil 
pu tid 
pu trid 
qua ker 
qua ver 
que ry 
qui et 
quo ta 
ra cer 
ra kish 
re al 
re bus 
re cent 
re gal 
re gent 



1 

ri der 
ripe ly 
ri ot 
ri val 
ro wait 
ropy 
ro v«r 
flaored 
sago 
aa tan 
sa ving 
■e cret 
ae nim 
•ha dy 
aha ker 
9ba ver 
sha ring 

•1m. ny 
si Icfnt 
sinus 
si aer 
si zy 
sk ter 
sli my 
sli ver 
smo ker 
smo ky 
snaky 
so ber 
so fa 
so lar 
so lo 
spi cy 
spi der 
spi nal 
spi ny 
spi ral 
spi ry 
sto ick ^ 
sto ny 
sto ry 



vi per 
vi tal 



eemmi 



the English Language. 



1 

▼o cAl 
vo lanl 
vo tcr 
wa fet 

wa gel 
wa ry 
wa vei 
wa vy 
wi ly 
wi ny 
wo ful 
za ny 
4 

abbot 
ac me 
ac rid 
ac tor 
ad der 
adit 
ad vent 
after 
aglet 
al gid 
al um 
am ber 
am el 
an 11 
an ticit 
an vil 
ar id 
as pen 
as per 
at las 
at om 
ax is 
bad ly 
bal lad 
bal last 
ban dit 
ban ish 
ban ner 



4 
ban ter 

bap tist 
bar on 
bar rel 
bar ren 
bas set 
bat ter 
bar in 
bei dam 
bender 
bet ty 
ber el 
bevy 
bid der 
big ot 
billet 
bit ter 
blab ber 
bladider 
bles sed 
bles sitig 
blister 
blub ber 
blun der 
blus ter 
bran dy 
bras 5y 
bum per 
bur net 
burn ing 
bur nish 
bur rel 
bus tard 
but ler 
but ment 
but ter 
bux om 
cab in 
cal id 
cal lat 
cam ber 



4 

cam el 
cam let 
can eel 
can cer 
can^iid 
can dy 
can ter 
cant lei 
can to 
can ton 
cap tor 
carat 
car ol 
car 1^ 
car ry 
cas Boc^ 
cat mint 
cav il 
cen to 
cen tral 
chaf ff 
chan n'el 
cbant er 
chap el 
chap let 
chap man 
chap ter 
chil ly 
cm der 
city 
civ et 
civ ic* 
civ il 
chip per 
clar et 
clas per 
elas sic^ 
claB sis 
clat fer 
clem ent 
clev er 



4 
clinieS: 
clus ter 
clut ter 
enfiy 
crust y 
cul ly 
cul prit 
cum ber 
cum in 
curdy 
cur rent 
curry 
cur sed 
cus torn 
cut ler 
cut ter 
dal ly 
dandier ' 
dap per 
den (al 
den tist 
des pot 
dex ter 
die tate 
dif fer 
dim ly 
din ner 
dip per 
dip ticA: 
dis tant 
dit ty 
diz zy 
drag net 
drag on 
dres ser 
drum mer 
due at 
dul cet 
dully 
dun ner 
dusk y 



4 

dusty 
ed der 
ed dy 
el der 
em bieRi 
em met 
en ter 
en try 
en vy 
ep }ik 
errant 
ev er 
fab rick 
fac tor 
fag ot 
fan cy 
fel on 
fen eer 
fend er 
fen nel 
fen hy 
fer ry 
fes tal 
fes ter 
fet ter 
fifty 
ill let 
fil my 
filter 
fin ny 
fis cal 
fitly 
fit ment 
flag on 
fian nel 
flat ter 
flinty 
flip pant 
flurry 
flus ter 
flut ter 



i»i I * 



•J 



24 



A Just SUmdard far Ptownmcing 



4 

fran 
frittsr 
ful g«fll < 
fun nel 
fun ny* 
fur ry 
fus ty 
gad d«r 
gal Ion 
gal lop 
gain oioQ 
gam ui 
gan der 
gan aa 
gar ret 
gelly 
gen df^ 
gen ei 
gentry 
gib jbot 
gingor 

&»p»y 

glad ly 
glas »y 
glim nier 
glit ter 
grafter 
gram mar 
grap nel 
gras sy 
gravel 
grim ly 
grit ty 
grum ly 
gul let 
^1 ly 
^um my 
jun ner 
IMS set 
^us to 
^us ty 



St tor 
bU 
hamlet, 
hammer 
hampwr 
handed 
handy 
hapfy 
hap ,py. 
har ry 
hatter 
hec ticik 
hec tor 
hel«9)it 
help er 
her ring 
hilly 
hunt^ 
hurry 
husk y 
in bred 
index 
infiiat 
in got 
in md 
in let 
in ly 
inmate 
in ner 
in stant 
in step j 
jab ber j 
jas per ,. 
jest er . 
jun to *. 

j«9^Jy .. 

kel son , 
ken nel [ 
kim bo r 
ladder 
lam bent 



'h 



L 



4 

Ian eat 
landed . 

lappM 
hit t« 

lemona 
lem QfB 
lendver 
lentil 
len tot . 
leper 
let ter 
level . 
lily 
lim bef - 
Umbo 
limit 
lira per ^ 
limpid 
lim pit 
lin den 
Hn ea 
lin net . 
lintel 

Htter 
liver 
livid 
liv ing 
liz ard 
lumber 
lump y 
lusty 
mad am 
mad ly 
mad man 
mag got 
mag net 
mal let 
mam mon 
man date 
man drake 
man ful 



4 
iaunlf 
manna 
marsy , 
mas^ 
matin 
mat ter 
maxWtt 
mel ofi 
meiy ber 
mend^er. 
men t^ 
merit 
mer ry 
mes Im 
mil lej? . 
mim i^ 
minim 

rainter 
miniipi 

mitten 

mullet 

mun d«me 

mun dicii: 

mur der 

mur mur 

musky 

muster 

must y 

mutter 

nap kin 

nappy 

nas ty. 

never 

number 

pal lid 

pam per 

pander 

pan try 

pappy 

par rot 

parry 



4 

pastor 
patei* 
pellet 
pen 
pen^iy 
pepper 
perry 
pes ter 
pet ty 
pil fer 
piriar 
pip pin 
pis tol 
pis toa 
pity 
plan et 
plant er 
plat ter 
plen ty 
plev m 
plummy 
plun der 
prestQ 
primer 
print er 
privet 
priv y 
pub Ucifc 
pul vil 
pup pet 
puppy 
put ty 
rab id 
raf ter 
ral ly 
ram mer 
ram part 
ran doin 
rant er 
rap id 
rav in 



i 



the English La$iguag$, 



1^ 



4 

rec Unr 

rel ick 
rel ish 
rem na»i 
ren der 
ren net 
rillet 
rin^ let 
riv er 
riv et 
ruit ner 
rim net 
rus ftet 
rust y 
sal ad 
sal \y 
sal ver 
sal TO 
san dal . 
sand y 
sap id 
sappy 
sat in 
scant y 
scat ter 
seg meftt 
sef dom 
self ish 
sen na 
scv er 
sex ton 



4 
riiatlw 
shelly 
jihelter 
shillii^f 
shiy er 
siff nal 
silly 
sil rer 
sim mi^r 
simper 
sim ply 
sin ful 
sin ner 
sis ter 
sit ting 
six ty 
skil let 
skip per 
slan der 
Slav er 
slen der 
slip per 
slum ber 
smat ter 
spat ter 
spay in 
spig ot 
spin ner 
spin ater 
spir it 
splen did 



4 


4 


splin ter 


tangent 


stag nant 


tanner 


sUgn»te 


tas sel 


stam mer 


tatter 


stand ard 


teller 


stigma 


tern per 


stingy 


ten ant 


stud y 


ten der 


stump y 


ten don 


stur dy 


tendril 


suburb 


ten et 


sud den 


ten nis 


suffer 


ten on* 


sullen 


ten ter 


sul ly 


tes tate 


sul tan 


tested 


sul try 


tes ty 


sum mer 


tetter 


sum mit 


til ler 


sum mon 


tim brel 


sun set 


tin der 


sup per 


tin man 


sur ly 


tin ner 


tabby 


tin sel 


tabid 


tip pet 


tablet 


tip sy 


tab ret 


tram mel 


tal ent 


trust y 


tally 


tun nel 


tal on 


turban 


tam per 


turn ip 



4 

turn pike 
ugly 
m cer 
um ber 
wn pire 
up per 
ur gent 
utmost 
ut ter 
vamp es 
yap id 
yas sal 
yast ]y 
yel lum 
yel yet 
yend er 
yen om 
very 
yes sel 
yes tal 
vie ar 
vie tim 
yic toi 
vil la 
vis ta 
viv id 
vul gar 
win ter 
wit ted 
wit tol 
wit ty 



CHAPTER IV. 

Easy words of two sylloMes^ accented on the second* 

Note, If a irowel, in an umaccented syllable^ stand alone^ or end a tyllable, 

 1 1 

it has its long soand, as in o pintj hejbft ; yet as we do not dwell upon 
the vowel, the sound is weaker and shorler than when aocented* 

I 11 1 1 

A bate ab duee a bode ac cite ad duce 
a base a bide ^b sume a cute ad vene 

mmmsmmaaasasstaamm 



A Ju9t Standard for PronoancirLg^ 



1 
rice 

 

7 

ke 
▼e 

ly 

one 
nate 
naze 
p\y 
Bide 

\ same 
tone 
wake 
woke 
»e came 
)e fore 
>e have 
»e ho)d 
t)e side 
he take 
l>e tide 
*>e time 
cal cine 
«^«nin€ 

*=«1 lude 
••o mate 

com '^^^^ 

l:^"^ Pete* 
^'^'«^ pile 



1 

eon fute 
con nire 
con note 
con sume 
con rene 
cor rode 
de base 
de bate 
de cide 
de cline 
de duce ' 
de face . 
de fame 
defile 
de fine 
defy 
de note 
de nude 
de ny 
de prave 
de prive 
. de pute 
de ride 
de Tive 
de spite 
de vice . 
de vote 
di late 
di lute 
dis pute 
di vide 
di vine 
ef face 
e late 
e lope 
« lude 
^Jia bale 
^na base 
em brace 
impale 



en tice 



1 

e rase 
e rode 
espy 
e state 
e vade 
fore bode 
fore go 
fore see 
for gave 
for sake 
gri mace 
here by 
hu mane 
il lude 
il lume 
imbibe 
im pede 
im ply 
im pute 
in cite 
in cline 
in duce 
in flame 
in (late 
in fold 
in hold 
in nate 
in sane 
in vade 
ill vite 
in vokc 
July 
ma nure 
ma ture 
mis name 
mis place 
mis take 
morose 
ob late 
ob tuse 



1 

pa role 
par take 
pis tole 
polite 
pol lute 
po made 
pro fane 
pro fuse 
pro mote 
pro vide 
pro vokc 
rebuke 
re cede 
re cite 
re cluse 
re duce 
re fme 
re fute 
relate 
rely 
re mote 



re pme 
re place 
re plete 
reply 
re pute 
re take 
re tire 
re vile 
re vive 
re voke 
sa line 
se date 
sedace 
se rene 
sub lime 
sub side 
8u prente 
sur vive 
terrene 



I 

late 
bind 
bolt 

ttB fold 

11 nite 
im kind 
un lace 
un lade 
un like 
un sale 
un told 

4 
a bed 
a bet 
ab surd 
ad mit 
ftd mix 
adult 
a flat 
a las 
a men 
amend 
amid 
an nex 
annul 
ap pend 
assist 
attend 
at tent 
attest 
becHp 
be dust 
be gan 
beffun 
beheld 
behest 
bereft 
berlin 
beset 
be smut 









o pine 



tra duce be spit 



warn 



the English Language. 



4 

lie trim 
ca bal 
ea (let 
ca nal 
car tel 
com mead 
com mit 
com mix 
com pel 
con cur 
con nex 
con sist 
con tend 
era vat 
cur vet 
de bel 
de camp 
de cant 
de feet 
de fend 
de mit 
de mur 
de pend 
de sist 



4 
de vast 
dis pel 
dis plant 
dis sent 
dis tend 
dis til 
dis turb 
di van 
di vest 
e mit 
en camp 
en glut 
en list 
en trap 
e vent 
ex pend 
ex tend 
ex tent 
fo ment 
fore fend 
fore run 
here at 
here in 
ho tel 



4 

m mit 

m mix 
m pel 
m pend 
m plant 
m print 
n clip 
n cur 
n dent 
n fest 
n fleet 
n llict 
n ship 
n sist 
n ^end 
n tent 
n vent 
n vest 
ta pan 
la ment 
le vant 
mis hap 
mis pend 
mis print* 



4 

mis trust 
mo lest 
mo rel 
ob tend 
ob test 
oc cult 
oc cur 
of fend 
o mit 
per pend 
por tend 
por tent 
pre tend 
pre vent 
pro lix 
pro pel 
pro tect 
rat an 
re but 
re cant 
re fel 
re fit 
re fund 
re lax 



27 

4 

re lent 
re mit 
-re past 
re pel 
re pent 
re plant 
ro bust 
ro tund 
se dan 
•e lect 
slier bet 
sub mit 
sub sist 
sus pend 
trans plant 
tre pan 
un bent 
an bred 
on fit 
un fix 
un furl 
un hurt 
un man 
un til 



CHAPTER V. 

Easy words of three syllables, the primary or full accent m 

the first syllablcr and the secondary accent on the thin 

syllable, 
yote, Tcachen of gchoola ought to be very careful to point out to thci 
pupils the proper sound of every letter and syllabic, (the unaccentcH 
syllables in particular ;) for a right pronunciation of the unaccented syl 
lables constitutes the beauty of pronunciation, and fonns a correct basi 
for tlieir future improvement. 



1 

A gen cy 
a gu cd 
a li as 
a re a 
bi na ry 
bo la ry 
bo re ii 



bo re as 
bra ver y 
ca den cy 
CO gen cy 
cu bi cal 
cu mu late 
cu po la 



1 

de cen cy 
de i ty 
de vi ate 
di a dem 
di a gram 
di a mond 
di a per 



1 

di a ry 
do na ry 
dra per y 
du el list 
du pli cate 
du ri ty 

e mri ot 



SiV3fctt,-'r-rr:>— :!.- 



28 



A Just Standard for PYonouncing 



1 

fatally 
fi nal Iv 
^ nery 
tla gran ey 
flu en cy 
fo li o 
fra gran cy 
fri ar y 
fru gai ly 
fu mi gate 
fu ner al 
ga bi on 
ge ni al 
ge ni o 
ge ni us 
gi ant ly 
glo ri iy 
gra di ant 
gro cer y 
ho ra ry 
hu man ly 
i dol ist 
i dol ize 
i vor y 
ju ni or 
jjuni per 
la bi al 
la i ty 
le gal ly 
le ni ent 
li bra ry 
li ma ture 
lo cal ly 
lu bri cate 
lu cu brate 
lu na cy 
lu na ry 
lu na ticAr 
lu tan ist 
me di ate 
medi inn 



me ni al 
me te or 
mo ri on 
mu til ate 
mu ti ny 
no bod y 
no ta ry 
nu mer al 
nu tri ment 
o di urn 
o do rate 
o pi um 
o ral ly 
o ri ent 
o ver plus 
pa pa cy 
pa pist ry 
pa tri ot 
pe ri od 
pi a net 
pi e ty 
pi on y 
pi ra cy 
plu ral ly 
plu vi al 
po e try 
po per y 
po ten tate 
pre mi um 
pri ma cy 
pri ma ry 
pri or y 
pri va cy 
pu ri fy 
pu ri tan 
pu rity 
pu ru lent 
pu tre fy 
ra diant 
ra di ate 
ra di us 



ra pi er 
re al ize 
re al ly 
re cen cy 
re cent ly 
re gen cy 
ro ta ry 
sali ent 
sa pi ent 
sc ere cy 
si lent ly 
so ber ly 
spo li ate 
sta tary 
stu pi fy 
su i cide 
to tal ly 
tu bu lar 
tu nie fy 
tu te lar 
u ni on 
u ni son 
u ni ty 
uri nal 
va can cy 
va gran cy 
▼e ni al 
vi o late 
vi o lent 
vi o let 
vi o list 
vo cal ly 
vo tary 
wo All ly 
zo di ac^ 
4 

ab ba ty 
ab di cate 
ab le gate 
ab lu ent 
ab ne gate 



4 

ab so lute 
ab so nant 
ab sti nent 
ac ci dent 
ac cu rate 
ad a mant 
ad mi ral 
ad vo cate 
af flu ent 
ag nize 
ag o ny 
al CO ran 
al ge bra 
al i ment 
al li gate 
al ti tude 
am bi ent 
ami ty 
am nes ty 
am pli ate 
am pH fy 
am pli tude 
atn pu tate 
am u let 
an a gram 
an ec dote 
an i mal 
an i mate 
an nu al 
an o my 
an te date 
an te lope 
an li dote 
ap pe tite 
ap pli cat« 
ar efy 
ar ro gant 
ar ro gate 
at ti tude 
av o cate 
ban <}e let 



the English Language* 



29 



liao Uh ment 
ban ter er 
bar on et 
bar on y 
bar ren \j 
bar ri er 
bar ris ter 
bat ter y 
ben e fit 
big a my 
big ot ry 
bil an der 
bil ber ry 
bit ter ly 
brcv i ly 
brig an tine 
I] buf fa lo 
bur gla ry 
but ter Hy 
but ter nut* 
but ter y 
cab a list 
cab in et 
ca] a mine 
ca] a mut 
cal cu late 
cal e {y 
cal i ber 
cal i CO 
cal o mel 
cal um ny 
can di date 
can did ly 
can di fy 
can IS ter 
can ni bai 
can o py 
cap ti Tate 
car ri er 
car ri on 
cas ti gate 

mmmmSmmm 



4 

cay al ry 
cav il ler 
cay i ty 
eel e brate 
chan cer y 
cha|> i ter* 
cim e ter 
cin na mon 
cita del 
ciy il ly 
clar i fy 
clar i ty 
clas si cal • 
clem en cy 
cler i cal 
cley er ly 
clin i cal 
cred i bly 
crim i nal 
crit i cal 
cul mi nate 
cul ti yate 
cur ren cy 
cur ri er 
cur sor y 
cur vi ty 
cus to dy 
cus torn er 
daf fo dil 
dal li er 
dec a gon 
dec o rate 
ded i cate 
del e gate 
den si ty 
dep re cate 
dep re date 
dep u rate 
dep u ty 
der o gate 
ties o late 



des pe rate 
des ti ny 
des ti tute 
det ri ment 
dif fer ent 
dif fi cult 
dif fi dent 
dig ni fy 
dig ni ty 
dil i gent 
dil u ent 
dim i ty 
dis pu tant 
dis so lute 
diy i dend 
dul ci fy 
dul ci mer 
dul CO rate 
eb on y 
ed i fy 
ed i tor 
effigy 

c gant 

e gist 

e ment 
e yate 
el o gy 
em bas sy 
em e raid 
emery 
em i grant 
em i grate 
em i nent 
em u late 
ene my 
en er gy 
en mi ty 
en ti ty 
ep i cure 
ep i gram 



e 
e 
e 
e 



4 

ep i sode 
er e mite 
es cu lent 
es ti mate 
ey er y 
ey i dent 
ey i tate 
ex pe dite 
ex pi ate 
fab ri cate 
fab u list 
fac tor y 
fac ul ty 
fal la cy 
fam i ly 
fan ci ful 
fiin ta sy 
far ri er 
fat i gate 
fee u lent 
fed er al 
fel on y 
fer u la 
fes ti nate 
fes ti yal 
figu ral 
fig u rate 
fil a ment 
fin i cal 
fin i tude 
fish er y 
fiat ter y 
ful gen cy 
ful mi nate 
fun da ment 
fus ti gate 
galaxy 
gal lant ry 
gal ler y 
gem i nate 
gem i ni 



C8 



30 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



g:en er ate 
gran a vy 
gran u late 
grat i fy 
g**at i tude 
grav i ty 

gun ner y 
nab i tucie 
J^ap pi ly 
heb e tate 
hec ti cai 

her ala^;:^ 
her e sy 
her e tic>t 
hick or y» 
hia tor y 
id i om 
id i ot .- 
ig no rant 
iim tate 
[III «ai n^it 

x^ "*^ late 
^ P® ^te 

|0 Pe tus 

^1 pli cate 
^> P^ ^i^t 

^^^i dent 

t ^i cant 
^ jjcate 

I % rate 
.4^ try 



4 

in fan cy 
in fan try 
in fi del 
in ju ry 
in no cent 
in no vate 
in so late 
in so lent 
in sti gate 
in sti tute 
in stru ment 
in te ger 
in te gral 
in ter est 
in \^t val 
in ti mate 
in tri eate 
ir ri tate 
it er ant 
it er ate 
jus ti fy 
lac ta ry 
lac te al 
lam i na 
lap i date 
lat/ er al 
lat in ist 
lat in ize 
lat i tude 
leg a cy 
len i fy 
len i ty 
Jep ro sy 
lev i ty 
|ex i con 
lib er al 
lib er ty 
l?g a ment 
jm e al 

*J»^ i ment 
l»t a ny 



4 

lit er al 
lit er ate 
lit i gate 
lit ur gy 
liv er y 
mac 11 late 
mag ni fy 
mag ni tude 
mal a d:^ 
mal a perl 
man ci pate 
man ful ly 
man i fest 
man i fold 
man u al 
mar i gold 
mar in er 
med i cal 
med i tate 
roel o dy 
mem or y 
mer ri ly 
mer ri meat 
mil lin er 
mim i cal 
min er al 
min is ter 
min is try 
min u et 
mis ere asl 
mit i gate 
mit ti mu8 
mul ti ply 
mul ti tude 
mun di fy 
mur der er 
mus cu lar 
nar i ga4e 
neg li geni 
nul li fy 
nul li ty 



nun ner y 
nur ser y 
pal li ate 
pal pi tate 
pan o ply 
par a dox 
par a- spn 
parallax 
par al lel 
par a pet 
par a site 
par i ty 
par o dy 
pas sen ger 
pas tor al 
pat TO nal 
ped ant ry 
ped es tai 
ped i ment 
peli can 
pen al ty 
pendency 
pen e trate 
pen i tent 
pen u ry 
pep per mint 
pes ti lent 
pet ri fy 
pil lor y 
pit i fttl 
plen a ry 
plen i tude 
plen ti ful 
prac ti cal 
prar i ty 
prev a lent 
priv i ly 
pub li can 
pub lish er 
pun gen cy 
rad i cate 



the English Language* 



31 



4 

ram pan cy 
rap id \y 
rat i fy 
rec re ate 
rec ti fy 
rec ti lude 
reg u lar 
reg u late 
rel e gate 
rem e dy 
ren o vate 
rep ro bate 
rev el ry 
rev cr end 
rev o cate 
rib aid ry 
rid i cule 
riv u let 
run a gate 
rus ti cal 
rus ii cate 
sac ra ment 
sal a ry 
sat cl lite 
sat ia fy 



4 

sec ta ry 
sec u lar 
sed i ment 
sen a tor 
sen sor y 
sen ti ment 
sen ti nel 
sev er al 
sig nal ize 
sig na ture 
sig ni fy 
sil vcr y 
sim i lar 
sim i le 
sim on y 
sim pli fy 
sin is ter 
slip per y 
spec u late 
splen e iiek 
stam in a 
stim u late 
stip u late 
sub si dy 
suf fer er 



4 

suf fo cate 
sum ma ry 
sum mon er 
sup pie ment 
sup pli ant 
sup pli cate 
sur ro gate 
tab e fy 
tab a lar 
tan ta liie 
teg Q ment 
tem per ate 
tem po ral 
ten an cy 
ten den cy 
ten e ment 
ter ri fy 
tes ta ment 
testify 
tiffany 
trav el ler 
trin i ty 
tur bu lent 
tur mer icJr 
turpitude 



ur gen cy 
iir gent ly 
ut ter ly 
▼ac u um ^ 
val u er 
van i ty 
▼en er ate 
ven er y 
verify 
▼er i ly 
ver i ty 
vet er an 
vie tor y 
vil Ian y 
▼in di cate 
▼in e gar 
vitrify 
▼it ri ol 
vi^ id ly 
▼ivi fy 
▼ul gar ly 
▼ul ner ate 
west er ly 
wil fully 
wit tily 



CHAPTER VI. 

Easy words of three syUahleSf the primury accenS on the 

second* 



Ab do men 
a base ment 
a bate ment 
a bi ding 
a cu men 
ad he rent 
ad ja cent 
ad mi rer 
a do rer 
affi ed 
al le gro 



1 

al lure ment 
al lu rer 
a maze meni 
ar ma da 
ar ri val 
a tone ment 
bal CO ny 
bapti zer 
be la ted 
bi tu men 
bra ▼a do 



J 



1 

cana 

coeval 

CO he rent 

com pi ler 

com pH ant 

com pli er 

com po nent 

com pu ter 

con fine ment de fa m^r 

con so ler de fi ler 

con tri ver de fi ner 



1 

ere a tor 
de bate ful 
de bate ment 
deba ter 
de CO rum 
de ere tal 
de cri al 
de face ment 



32 



A JiLSt Stitndard for Pronouncing 



1 

(le hi der 
(le ni al 
de ni er 
de po nent 
(le ri der 
(lie ta tor 
di la tor 
di plo ma 
(lis pu ter 
di vi der 
di vine ly 
en gra ver 
en tice ment 
en ti cer 
en vi ron 
e rase ment 
errata 
e spi al 
ge ne va 
he ro ick 
hi a tus 
hy e na 
I dea 
i de al 
il le gal 
in cite ment 
in duce ment 
in he rent 
in hu man ' 
in va der 

invi ter 
le gu men 
len ti go 
lum ba go 
man da mu8 
nar ra tor 
00 ta vo 
ocio ber 
me gjn 
op ])o neot 

BAiiAcln 



1 

pa ro tis 
per fu mer 
poi lu ter 
po ma tum 
po u& to 
pri me ro 
pri me val 
pro du cer 
pro fa ncr 
pr(# po nent 
pro vi der 
pur su ant 
pur su er 
quan da ty 
re ci tal 
re fine ment 
re fi ner 
re fu tal 
re la ter 
re lu cent 
re sto rer 
re vi val 
re vi ver . 
ro tator 
sa li va 
se date ly 
se du cer 
so na ta 
spec ta tor 
sub lu nar 
sul ta na 
su pine ly 
su preme ly 
sur \\ ver 
testator 
tes ta trlx 
trans la tor 
tri bu nal 
un bi as 
un du ly 

lit! arm to Tn] 



un ho ly 
un time ly 
ver ba tim 

4 
a ban don 
ab er rant 
a bet ter 
a bun dant 
ac cus tom 
ad hib it 
af feet ed 
a mend ment 
a J) par el 
ap pel lant 
ap pel late 
ap pen dant 
ap pen dix 
,as sas sin 
as ses sor 
as sist ant 
a sun der 
at tend ant 
at tract or 
a ven ger 
ban dit ti 
be wil der 
bom bas tic^ 
bo tan \ck 
cli mac ter 
CO hab it 
CO hib \i 
jcol lec( or 
com mit ter 
com pen sate 
con cur reni 
con dem ner 
con den sate 
con duct or 
con fis cate 
con sid er 

Ot\n aict ain# 



4 

con suit er 
con sum mate 
con tem plate 
con tend er 
con tent ed 
con tin gent 
con tract or 
con trib ute 
cor rect ly 
cor rupt er 
ere den da 
de bcl late 
de cant er 
de cem ber 
de crep it 
de fend ant 
de fender 
de liv er 
de mer it 
de tach ment 
de yas tate 
di dac tic^ 
dilem ma 
di min ish 
dis cred it 
dis cum ber 
dis cus ser 
dis pen ser 
dis sent er 
dis tem per 
dis til ler 
dis turb er 
di ur nal 
dog mat ick 
do mes ticAr 
dra mat ick 
du el lo 
du en na 
ef ful gent 
e las i\dc 



att 



asa 



4 
el lip tick 
em liel lish 
c met ick 
crfi pan nel 
en amcl 
en camp ment 
en chant ment 
en cum ber 
en dem icA: 
en gen der 
e nig ma 
en vel op 
en ven om 
er rat ick 
e stab lish 
fa nat ic^ 
fan tas tic^ 
for bid dinff 
fore run ncr 
fore tel ler 
fre net ick 
he mis tic^ 
im bit ter 
im pcnd ent 



the English Language, 



in ces saat 
in clenn ent 
in cul cate 
in cum bent 
in dig nant 
in dul gent 
in dul to 
in fan ta 
in iiict er 
in hab it 
in her it 
in hib it 
in sip id 
in spect or 
in suit er 
in tend ant 
in tent \y 
in tes tate 
in trep id 
in trin sack 
!u cif ic^ 
mag net icA: 
ma lef ick 
ma lig nant 



me men to 
me tal licAr 
mo nas tici^ 
noc tur nal 
no vem ber 
ob jfect or 
of fend er 
pa cif icA: 
pa ren tU 
pe dan tici; 
po lemicA: 
pre cept or 
pre tend er 
pro hib it 
pro lif iciS: 
pro tect or 
re dun dant 
re fresh ment 
re luc tant 
re mem ber 
r« mit ment 
re pel lent 
re plen ish 
re pleV in 



33 

4 

re plev y 
re pub lick 
re pug nant 
re ven ger 
ro4nan cer 
ro man ticA; 
ro tun do 
8a tir ic^ 
sa Tan na 
«ep tem ber 
«om nif icA; 
spe cif icA: 
sur ren der 
ter rif icA: 
to bftc CO 
tor ment or 
trans gres sor 
um brel la 
un civ il 
un han dy 
un hap py 
un just ly 
un wil ling 
u ten sil 



CHAPTER VH. 

Easy words of three syllables, the primary or ftdl accent or 
ih^ third sy2l(ible, and the secondary accent on the firs, 
syllable, 

I 11 1 

in com plete 
' in ter cede 



A I a mode 
an te cede 
ap pel ]ee 
bal us trade 
! bas ti nade 
can non ade 
con tra vene 
dev o tee 
dis a gree 
dis ar range 



dis en gage 
dis e steem 
dis in cline 
dis re pute 
dis u nite 
dom i neer 
gaz et teer 
im ma ture 
im po lite 
im por tune 



dis com mode in com mode 



in ter fere 
in ter kce 
in ter line 
in ter lope 
in ter vene 
in tro duce 
lem on ade 
mis ap ply 
mis be have 



mis ere ate 
mis re cite 
mis re late 
o ver drive 
e ver go 
o ver prize 
o ver see 
o ver seen 
o ver sleep 
ver take 
pal i sade 



A Just Standard for Projiouncing 



1 

t en tee 
T se vere 

as sume 
f u gee 
p ar tee ^ 

u nite 
r e nade 
I per fine 
1 per scribe 
1 per sede 
I per vene 



un der go 
un der mine 
un der rate 
un der take 
vol un teer . 

4 
ap pre hend 
com pre hend 
con tra diet 
dis af feet 
dis an nul 



dis en chant 
dis re spect 
in cor rect 
in di rect 
in ter diet 
in ter mit 
in ter mix 
in ter sect 
man u mit 
ver pass 
o ver run 



4 
o Ter set 
o ver turn 
re ad mit 
rec ol lect 
rec om mend 
rep re hend 
su per add 
un der hand 
un der sell 
un der stand 
yi o Un 



]asy words of four 
the first syllahUj 
syllable* 

L pi a ry 
vi a ry 
u li na ry 
a di ca ture 
u mi na ry 
ae di ate ly 
30 ment a ry 
lU ga tor y 
u mer al ly 
u meic a ry 
ML mer a tor 
a ri e gate 
i o la tor 
i o lent ly 

b so lute ly 
c cu ra cy 
c cu rate ly 
c ri mon y 
d mi ral ty 
d ver sa ly 
1 i mon y 
I le gor y 
m a tor y 



CHAPTER VIII. 

syllables^ the primary otfull accent on 
and the secondary accent on the third 



4 

an ti mon y 
ap o plex y 
ar ro gant ly 
eel i ba cy 
ded i ca tor 
del i ca cy 
dif fi cul ty 
dil a tor y 
em i nen cy 
em i nent ly 
em is sa ry 
ep i lep sy 
es ti ma tor 
ev i dent ly 
feb ru a ry 
gen er al ly 
ig no min y 
ig no rant ly 
in ci den cy 
in so lent ly 
in ti ma cy 
in ti mate ly 
in tri ca cy 
in tri cate ly 



in ven tor y 
jan u a ry 
lin e al ly 
lit er al ly 
lit er a ry 
lit er a ture 
man da tor y 
mat ri mon y 
mil i ta ry 
min a tor y 
min er al ist 
min is ter y 
mis eel la ny 
nav i ga tor 
nee ro man cy 
neg li gent ly 
pat ri mon y 
per e gri nate 
plan e ta ry 
preb en da ry 
pred a tor y 
pref a tor y 
prev a len cy 
prin ci pal ly 



(Ae English Language* 



3S 



pul mo na ry 
pur ga tor y 
rad i cal \y 
red o len cy 
sal u ta ry 
sec ond a ry 



sec re ta ry 
sed en ta ry 
sem i na ry 
sev er al \y 
tern per a ment 
tem per ale ly 



tem per a ture 
tem po ra ry 
ter ri tor y 
tes ti mon y 
tran si tor y 
trib u ta ry 



CHAPTER IX. 

Easy words cffour syllables, the primary orfuU accent oi 
tM second syllable^ and the secondary accent on thefourtt 
syllable. 



Ab bre vi ate 

ac cu mil late 

ad ja cen cy 

a e ri al 

al le vi ate 

al lo di al 

al lo di urn 

al lu vi al* 

al lu vi on 

an nu i ty 

lar mori al 

I bar ba ri an 

ca cu mi nate 

cen tu ri on 

col le gi al 

col le gi an 

! col le gi ate 

I col lo qui al 

CO me di an 

com mu ni cant 

com mu ni cate 

com mu ni ty 

con gru i ty 

con nu bi al 

con ve ni ent 

cor po re al 

ere du li ty 

cri te ri on 
Hj J 



1 

di lu ci date 
dl lu vi an 
e lu ci date 
e lu 8or V 
em po ri um 
en CO mi um 
fu ne re al 
fu tu ri ty 
gar ru li ty 
gram ma ri an 
gra tu i ty 
he ro i cal 
his to ri an 
i de al ly 
il le gal ly 
il lu mi nate 
il lu 8or y 
im mu ni ty 
im pe ri al 
Im pi e ty 
im pu ni ty 
im pu ri ty 
in (ie cent ly 
ir ra di ate 
li bra ri an 
ma te ri al 
ma tu ri tv 
me mo ri al 

M^ ^_ ^.. ^ m1 



pal la di um* 
par tu ri ent 
pe cu li ar 
pic to ri al 
pro pri e tor 
pro pri e ty 
re ga li a 
sa ti e ty 
aa tu ri ty 
se cu ri ty 
80 bri e ty^ 
80 ci e ty 
va cu i ty 
va ri e ty 
ve ne re al 

4 
a bil i ty 
ab 8urd i ty 
a tod e my 
ac eel er ate 
ac tiv i ty 
ad min is* ter 
a dul ter ate 
a dul ter y 
a dun ci ty 
af fin i ty 
am bas ea dor 
a nal o gy 



maama 



1 



"•»«"^F*^Pi»»"*#S 



36 



A Just Standard far Pronouncing 



4 

an taff o nist 
a rid 1 ty 
ar tic u late 
ar til ler j 
as per i ty 
a vid i ty 
bar bar i ty 
be at i {y 
be at i tude 
be nef i c«nt 
be nev o lent 
bru tal i ty 
ca lam i ty 
ca lum ni ate 
cap tir i ty 
car nal i ty 
ce leb ri ty 
ce ler i ty 
ci vil i ty 
CO ag u late 
CO in ci dent 
col lat er al 
com mem o rate 
com pet i tor 
com pul sor y 
con cav i ty 
con fed er ate 
con sid er ate 
con sist ent ly 
con sist or y 
con spir a cy 
con spir a tor 
con tin gen ey 
con tin u al 
cii pid i ty 
deb^'^-ty 
de Ct. A\ vi rate 
de cliv l ty 
de fat i gate 
i^e gen er ate 
de lib er ate ^ 



4 

de lin e ate 
de lir i um 
de praT i \j 
dex ter i ty 
di am e ter 
di rect or y 
difl par i ty 
di vm i ty 
ef femi sate 
e lab o rate 
e lee tri cal 
e lee tri fy* 
e man ci pate 
e pis CO pal 
e pit o me 
e qiiir a lent 
e quir o cal 
e qulT o cate 
e rad i cate 
e rac u ate 
e Tan ge fist 
ex ten u ate 
ex trem i ty 
fa tal i ty 
fer til i ty 
fee tir i ty 
fi del i t^ 
for mal i ty 
fru gal i ty 
geu til i ty 
gram mat i cal 
ha bil i ment 
ho8 til i ty 
hu man i ty 
hit mil i ty 
i den ti cal 
i den ti ty 
il fit er ate 
im men si tjf 
im ped i ment 
in cm'yi ty 



n dem ni fy 
n dem ni ty 
n dif fer ent 
n fin i ty 
n hab i tant 
u san i ty 
n sin u ate 
n tel li gent 
in ter ro gate 
n yig o rate 
r reg u lar 
iu rid i cal 
le gal i ty 
le git i mate 
le vit i cal 
Ion gev i ty 
mag nif i cent 
ma ler o lent 
ma lig ni ty 
me rid i an 
mil len ni um 
mo ral i ty 
mor tal i tv 
mu nif i cent 
na tiv i ty 
ne ces si ty 
no bil i ty 
nu mer i cal 
ob lit er ate 
o blir i on 
om nip' o tent 
par tic u lar 
pi rat i cal 
po et i cal 
po lit i cal 
pon tif i cal 
pos ter i ty 
pre cip i tant 
pre die a ment 
pro fund i ty 
pro pen si ty 



ike Engli^ Language. 



97 



pros per i tjr 
ra pld i tj 
re ality 
re cip ro cal 
re pA I ty 
re pub K can 
ro tund i ty 
sab bat i cal 
sa tan i cal 
se ren i ty 



8Mr tH i ty 
ae rer i ty 

•if nif i txM 
sin eer i ty 
•o- km ni ty 
80 ltd i ty 
inib lim i ty 
te mer t ty 
te pid I ty 
tl mid i ty 



tian qui! K ty 
un lim it ed 
ttB man ner !y 
ur ban i ty 
u til i ty 
va lid i ty 
Te nal i ty 
vi cin 1 ty 
vir gin i ty 
virility 



CHAPTER X. 

Easy teord^ of four syUabh^ytke pTimary orfuVL acceiU an 
the Mfd sylMhi and the secondary accent an the first 

syllal^^* 

4 '4 



1 

Af ii da rit 
al ge bra iek 
al ]i ga lor 
an te C6 dent 
appa ra tut 
Imsti nado 
cir curii j« cent 
com ment a tor 
dan de )1 em 
dis a grcie mexit 
el e gi ac'/r 
jig no ramus 
in dis creet ly 
in ter lo per 
lit cr a ti 
me di a tor 
mod era tor 
op por fune ly 
pan a ce a 
phil o me la 
ren e ga do 
sem I CO Ion 
sper ma ce ti 
un der ta king 
un di vi ded 



ac a dem ic^ 
ac ci dent al 
am bi dcx ter 
an te muh dane 
ar o mat icA: 
at mo spher ic^* 
ben e fac tor 
cir cum v&l late 
dim ac ter ic^ 
com pli ment at 
con ti nent al ' 
con va les cent 
CO ri an der 
det ri ment al 
dis con tent ed 
dis in her it 
dis re spect ful 
en er get Ic!^ 
ep i dem idc 
ev a nes ccftt 
fmi da ment al 
hyp o crlt icA: 
tn ad ver tent 
in ci dent al 
in con sist ent 



In cof rect ly 
in de ^end ent 
in di rect ly 
in flu en za* 
in nu en do 
in strti ment al 
in ter mit tent 
in ter reg niim 
mal e fac tor 
man i fes to 
mem o ran dma 
mon u ment al 
o ri ent al 
or na ment al 
pred e ces sor 
sac ra ment al 
' sal ma gun di 
8ys te mat ick*^ 
tn af feet ed 
tin as sist ed 
tm der etand ing 
UTi ex peel ed 
tt ni ver sal - 
tm sus pect ed 
nti BUS pect ia^ 



38 



A Ju9t Standard far Pronouncing 



CHAPTER. XL 

DifficuU and irregular managyltdbleSf in whick &ie sounds 
of the wnoelf are accurately pointed eut by the figures^ and 
the siient leitere property dejin^t by being printed iv\ 
italick ckaraoterg. 

Note. InfltifictailB sliwild bt ve i y u i w frite point out the dUktcnt wcmiuls 
)f the vowebtotMr y«pi^ tbo waimdmoS Um ysmel a in pAitkular 



1 

Ace 

[ltd 

nim 

l)ake 

bane 

baste 

bead 

beak 

beam 

bean 

beard 

beast 

beef 

beeve* 

bite . 

blatn 

blaze 

bleach 

bleak 

blear 

bleat 

bleed 

hVighi 

blind 

h\ow 

blown 

board 

boast 

boat 

bode 

bolt 

biatd 

}>ratn 

bray 



1 

braaw 

breed 

breQzs 

bribe 

bride 

brief 

hrighX 

broach 

brogue 

cake 

care 

cade 

cave 

cease 

chafe 

chatn . 

change 

cheap. 

cheat 

cheek , 

cheer 

cheese 

chide 

chfef 

child 

chine 

chived 

clatm 

clave 

clay 

clean 

clear 

cleat* 

cleare 



1 

elottk 

eooeb 

eooet 

«oat 

coax 

code 

€Okt^ 

cold 

colt 

eo«i& 

eope 

cone 

core 

^eottrt 

erane 

^rape 

crave 

cream 

crease 

creed 

creep 

croak 

crow 

cry 

ctibe 

cure 

dace 

dare 

deal 

dean 

deed 

deem 

deep 

die 



I 

m^ 

^me* 

divm 

doge 

dole 

dott 

dome 

door 

dose. 

doze 

dmn 

drake 

dray 

dream 

drear 

droQ 

drone 

drove ' 

dfy 

duke 

dupe 

each . 

ear 

ease 

eoat 

eat 

eaves 

eel 

eke 

eve 

fatl 

fay 

fear 

feast 



1 

fee 

ieed 

feel 

few 

fief 

field 

fiend 
fierce 

fife 

&ghi 

fiire 

flail 

flake 

flame 

flare 

^ay 

ileak 

fteam 

fleece 

ficer 

fleet 

fl^or 
flow 
floirn 
flute 

fly 

foal 

foam 

ioe 

foZks 

force 

ford 

fort 



1 

Iratl 

fk'a.ne 

fray 

freak 

free 

ftighi 

fro . 

froze 

fry i 

fii^e 

gai'jft. 

game 

jfave 

gaze 

ghofii 

glaze 

gleam 

g\e<m 

gli^be 

glee 

glide 

globe 

glow 

glau 

goad 

goall 

goal 

gourd 

gram 

grape 

gray 

graze 

green 






i 




the English Language. 


3^. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


greet 


kit^ 


mope 


pore 


roll 


slain 


grew 


knee 


most 


pork 


rore 


slake 


grzef 


knife 


mot/Id 


post 


safe 


sleek 


gn'eve 


;tnoll 


raoult 


potfk 


sage 


sleep 


grind 


knoicti 


mouTtL 


preock 


saint 


sleet 


grade* 


latr 


nail 


pride 


mke 


sleeve 


gross 


laird 


neap 


priest 


say ^ 


slide 


grove 


lake 


near 


prol>e 


scale 


sluice 


grow 


late 


neat 


prone 


scarce 


sly 


gwide 


lay 


mcce 


prose 


scare 


smear 


gttile 


league 


ni^ 


pry 


•coat 


smile 


guise 


lean 


oaf 


puke 


•cold 


smite 


haste 


leap 


oak 


pyre 


•cope 


^ smote 


haze 


leasfi 


oats 


quail 


•core 


snail 


heap 


least 


ode 


quak« 


•crape 


snake 


heat 


leech 


old 


queer 


screak 


snare 


hearie 


leer 


own 


quite 


scream 


sneak 


heed 


leet 


pace 


quote 


flcreeb 


sneer 


hide 


lewd 


paid 


race 


scribe 


sneeze 


hind 


lice 


paint 


rail 


scroll 


snore 


hoar 


Me 


paste 


rak« 


•eat 


snow 


hoarse 


liege 


pate • ^ 


van^ 


•eek 


soak 


hoax* 


lieu 


pave 


rare 


8liak« 


soap 


hold 


life 


pay 


rate 


ftere 


source 


home 


liaAt 
like 


pe« 


ray 


nheai 


sown 


host 


peach 


readi 


fdieep 


spade 


hove 


lime 


peat 


ream 


fiheet 


-spare 


huge 


line 


peep 


reap 


flhield 


spay 


ice 


load 


pew 


rear 


shoal 


speak 


ire 


loaf 


pie 


reave 


•hore 


•pear 


jade 


loam 


pierce 


rec^ 


•horn ^ 


speech 


jail 


lute 


pike 


reel 


shote* 


speed 


jay 


maim 


pint 


ride 


•how 


•pew 


j«er 


may 


pipe 


rind 


•hotra 


spike 


joke 


meal 


plague 


ripe 


shriek 


spine 


jolt 


meek 


plaint 


roach 


shrine 


spire 


juice 
June 


mild 
mile 


play 
plea 


room 
roar 


Miege 

^gh 


spite 
spleen 


keel 


mire 


plead 


roast 


skate 


' splice 


keen 


mode 


plume 


robe 


skutf 


sport 


keep 


mole 


ply 


rogue 


•ky 


sprain 



10 


A Just 


Standard for Pronouncing 




1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


spray 


sty 


vi« 


caZf 


march 


bratol 


spri^Ai 


sue 


view 


ca/m 


mark 


bmioa 


spry* 


suit 


vogue 


caZve 


inftrl 


broad 


spume 


swatn 


waif 


car 


marah 


broughi 
c^Lught 


spy 


sMkray 


weal 


. card 


mart 


square 


sween 
stroru 


weave 


carle 


Bard 


CaT9 


squeak 


weed 


carp 


pa/m 


cliaA: 


squeal 


tatni 


weep 


cart 


par 


cluw 


squeeze 


taste 


wield 


carve 


parch 


cork 


squire 


tea 


wife 


charge 


pard 


corn 


statd 


leach 


wiehi 
wild 


charm 


park 


corpse 


staiu 


teagtfe 


. chart 


parse 


cord^ 


state 


teal 


wile 


czar 


part 


craic 


stave 


tea^ 


wire 


dark 


jDsa/m 


crav^I 


stay 


teat 


wi^e 


darn 


salve 


dattb 


steam 


teen^ 


wo 


dart 


sear 


dau; 


steed 


tie 


woad 


dai^nt 


scarf 


daion 1 


steep 


iighX 


wore 


far 


scarp 


dratff 


steer 


toad 


wove 


farce 


shark 


dnwn 


stcvr 


toast 


yean 


^ farm. 


sharp 


draiffl 


stole 


tope 


year 


ilavat 


smart 


dwarf 


stone 


tore 


yield 


gape 


snarl 


fall 


store 


torn 


yoke 


garb 


spar 


false 


stove 


tratl 


zeal 


gaunt 


spark 


fault 


stow 


train 


2 


guard 


star 


flaw 


strain 


tratpse 


aA 


haif 


starch 


for 


strange 


tratt 


aim^ 


haZve 


stark 


fork 


stray 


treat 


arch 


hard 


start 


form 


streak 


tree 


are 


hark 


starve 


(ought 


stream 


tribe 


arm 


had 


tar 


fraud 


street 


trine 


arms 


. harm 


. tart 


fraught 


stride 


trope 


art 


harp 


taunt 


gauze 


strife 


trow; 


at^nt 


harsh 


yanl 


gawk 


' strike 


try 


baZm 


haunt 


yam 


gtutw 


'stripe 


tube 


bur 


jar 


3 


gorge 


strive 


twntn 


barb 


jaunt 


au/n 


groat 1 


! stroke 


tweak 


bard 


lard 


aire 


halt 


1 stroll 


twice 


barge 


large 


baZk 


haum 


! Strove 


type 


bark 


lark 


batod 


hawk 


: strow 


vague 


barm 


laugh 


bom 


horn i 


stupe 


veal 


barn 


mar 


bought 


ho.-se ! 



RS 





the English Language, 


4 


3 


a 


3 


4 


4 


4 


jQW 


scald 


storm 


act 


blend 


bf/ild 


lai/d. 


scorch 


strain 


add 


bless 


bmlt 


la'U? 


scorn 


swarm 


and 


blest 


bulb 


lawn 


scraii? . 


taZk . 


ant 


bliss 


bulge 


lord 


scrai^l 


tall 


apt 


bluff 


• bulk 


mali 


shawl*. 


^/^ughX 


a^ 


blunt 


. bung 


mat^l 


shatimi 


tat^ 


ash 


blur 


bunn 


maio 


short 


torch 


ask 


braci? 


burgA 


morn 


, sniall • 


vault 


asp 


bran 


burn 


morse 


snort 


vavnl 


bacfc - 


brand 


burnt 


n&ught 


sord 


waZk 


bad^ 


brass 


burse 


nor 


sort 


war 


bang. 


brat 


burst 


or 


SOUCfht 


ward 


bask 


hricA: 


bust 


orb 


spalt 


warm 


bat 


bridge 


buzz 


p»w 


spatd 


warn 


beg 


bring 


«ant 


paic^n 


spaii?! 


warp 


bet 


brisk 


cash 


qua/in 


spaion 


wart 


bilge ' 


brunt 


€ast 


quarf 


sprat£il 


WJSM^X 


bilk 


brush 


cat 


mw 


squall 


yawl 


bill 


bucAr 


catch 


salt 


staZk 


yatDn 


bladt 


bud 


chaff 


satrc^ 


stall 


4 


bland 


budge 


champ 


saw? 


stork 


abb 


blast 


buff 


chancet 



t I ksve given thevowc] a, when followed \iy tvct^ n/, w, st^ &c. its shorty 
and not iti flat sound, as Mr. Webster, and others, have given it ; and 
likewise the vowels, in words where it is jK^Uowed by «« or « and a mute 
'Consonant, 1 have given it the sound of broad a short, although Mr. Web- 
ster, and Others, have ^ven it the sound of broad a long in this situation. 

Mr. tValker, (speaking of a when flat,) savts, '*tms sound of a was 
found be£)te the nasal liquid n, especially wnen succeeded by c, c^ or /, 
as in darvce^ glancCy grants plant, dander^ dus. .The hissing consonant s, 
was likewise a sign of this sound of «, whether doubled, as in glass, laes^ 
<&c. or accompanied by ^, as in tatt, Jhst^ &c. but this pronunciation of a 
seems to have been for some yeais advancing to tihe short sound of this 
tetter, as heard in fiand, land, t&c "and jnroiiQuncinff the « in lifter, answer^ 
basket^ TRosty &c. as Ipng as in iialf, calf, Jbc Sofden very closely on 
vulgarity ;'' he says, however, **that this was Uie sound formerly, is highly 
probable, from its being still the sound ^ven it by the vulgar, who arc 
generally tfie last to alter the coimnim pronunciation." 

In speaking of «, he sa^^s, " this k«tter, Hke a, has a tendency to lengthen, ' 
when followed by a tie aid and ^another consonant or by «, 98, or » and a 
mute ; but this length of o seems every day mote and more vulgar, and as 
it would be gross to a degree to sound the a in caaile, nuuk, and plant, like 
the a in pa/tn, psalmy &c. so it would be equally exceptionable to pronounce 



^ ^ ^ tt 



42 



A Just Standard fur Proiiouncing 



4 

chant 

chftt 

checJt 

chess 

cheid 

chic^ 

chill 

chin 

chinls 

chip 

chit 

chudr 

churc)i 

churl 

churn 

clacit 

clan 

clang 

clap 

clash 

clasp 

class 

cieauM 

cleft 

clic^ 

cling 

clip 

clucA: 

,cracA: . 

craft 

ciag 

ci<ani 

crash 

crept 

crest 

crib 

criciir 

crimp 

cringe 

crisp 

crump 



4 

crust 
crutch 
cub 
cud 
cuff 
6un 
cup 
curb 
curd 
curl - 
curse 
^ curT0 
cut 
dab 
dance 
dash 
deml 
deaf 
de&t 
dec^ 
delf 
dell 
delve 
dense 
dill 
dim 
diu 
ding 
din? 
dip 
dish 
disk 
di/ch 
draff 
dread 
dredge 
dregs 
drew 
ddriCI 
4riU 
4rip 



. 4 

arudge 

drug 

drum 

ducA 

duct 

dull 

dum^ 

dunce 

dung ^ 

durst 

dusk 

dwell 

earl 

earn 

ebb 

edge 

egg 
elf 

elk 

ell 

elm . 

else 

end 

err 

erst . 

elch 

fact 

>ng 

Ufii 

fat 

fell 

f^n 

fence ' 

feoff 

fern 

fefch 

fib 

fill 

film 

^n 

fish 



4 

fist ' 
fix 
ilam 
flap' 
flash 
^ flask 
flaV 
flax' 
fled 
fledge^ 
flesh ^ 
fling 
flint 
flip 
flinch 
flbc 
flux 
fract 
fresh 
fret 
fr/end 
frill 
fringe 
frisk 

frush 
fun 
fund 
fur 

furze 
fuss 
f\izz 
gad 

gang 

gap 

gas 

gash 

gasp 

gem 

germe 

glance 



N 



4 

gland 

glass 

glen 

glib 

glimpse 

yna«h 

(/nat 

gruft 

grand ^ 

gvant 

grasp 

grass 

grin 

grist 

grit ^ 

gru^ 

grulT 

grum 

grunt 

guess 

gulf 

gull 

gum 

gun 

gur^ 

gush 

gust 

hacA 

ham 

hang 

ha« 

hash \ 

hasp 

hast 

hatch 

have 

head 

hedgie 

held 

hell 

helm 



4 

helfi 
helve 
hem 
hemp 
hence 
Aerb 
hearse 
Jbill 
hinge 
hint 
hip 
his 
hi98 
hilch 
huff 
null 
hum 
hung 
hunt 
hurl 
hurt 
husk 
hut 
ill 
imp 

itch 
jacA: 
jerk 
jel 

jttcfge 

H 

jvimp 

jut 

keg 

ken 

kern 

ketch 

kidb 

kid 





the English Language. 


43 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


in 


mess 


pence 


quilt 


scrub 


skill 


ing • 


met 


perch 


quince 


scud 


skin 


;iss 


midst 


perk 


quit 


scull 


skip 


Aick 


milk 


pert 


rac^ 


scum 


skulk 


macA 


miU 


pet 


ramp 


scurf 


slab * 


acA: 


mince 


.phiz 


rant 


search 


slacAr 


ag 


miss 


phle^ 


rash 


seci 


slant 


am& 


mist 


mek 


rasp 


sedge 


slap 


ance 


mix 


pill 


rat 


self 


slash 


lapse 


much 


pimp 


^ realm 


serge 


sled 


ash 


mucib 


pin 


rend 


serve 


sledge 


lass 


mud 


pish 


rib 


shaft 


slept 
slid 


last 


muff 


pitch 


rich 


shag 
shall 


ia^ch 


mulct 


phid 


ridge 


slim 


learn 


muQ 


plan 


rift 


Shalt 


sling 


ledge 


mulse 


pledse 


w« 


sham 


slip 


left 


mumps 


plucS 


rill 


shelf 


sUt 


leg 


murk 


plug 


rinse 


shell 


slug 


less 


musk 


plump 


rip 


shift 


slung 


let 


must 


plunge 


risk 


shin 


slur 


licib 


nedk 


prance 


rub 


ship 


smacAr 


lift 


nerre 


press 


rug 


shred 


smell 


limp 


next 


pridb 


rum 


shrill 


smelt 


ling 


nih 


prim 


run 


shrimp 


smerk 


lint 


niche 


prince 


rush 


shrub 


snag 


lip 


nidb 


print 


rusk 


shrug 


SAap 


lisp 


nip 


priem 


rust 


shun 


snatch 


list 


null 


puff 


rut 


sicA; 


snub 


lucik 


numb 


pulp 


sacA: 


sieve 


snuff 


lull 


nurse 


pulse 


samp* 


sift 


snug 


lungff 


nut 


pun 


sash 


silk 


span 


lurch 


nymph 


purge 


sat 


sill 


spa^m 


lurk 


pacA: 


purl 


scalp 


sin 


spec^ 


lust 


pad 


purr 


scan 


since 


spell 


lympb 


pang 


purse 


scant 


sing 


spend 


mash 


pass 


pus 


se^i^m 


singe 


sperm 


mask 


past 


quac^ 


scourge 


sip 


spill 


mass 


patch 


quell 


scrag 


sit 


spin 


mat 


pearl 


quest 


scrap 


six 


spit 


match 


pecAr 


quic^ 


scratch 


sketch 


splint 


mesh 


P«f 


quill 


scrip 


&kiff 


split 



44 


A Just Standard for Pronouncing 


I 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


S 


spread 


stun 


touch 


wedge 
weld 


chops 


off } 


sprig 


stung 


tough 


cloci 


oft 


spring 


stunt 


trac^ 


well 


cost 


on 


spr4ing 


such 


tract 


welt 


cough 
crodr 


ox 


spud 


suc^ 


trance 


were 


plot \ 


spun 


sud^ 


trap 


wert , 


cross 


pocAf 


spur 


sung 


trash 


west 


cro/ch 


pod 


spurn 


sup 


tread 


wet 


doc^ 


podge 


squib 


surd 


tret 


\v\ck 


{iodg& 


pomp 


squint 


surf 


inch V 


will 


doll 


pond 


stab 


surge , 


trip 


wilt* 


dot 


pop 


stacA: 


swam 


truc^ 


win , 


drop 


pot 


staff 


sweat 


trudge 


wince 


dros« 


prompt 


stag 


swell 


truss 


wing 


fioc^ 


prong 


stamp 


swept 


trust 


wish 


flop 


prop 
rocir 


stand 


swerve 


tub 


wisp 


fond 


stead 


swift 


tuft 


wifch 


font 


romp 


stem 


«wig 
swill 


tun 


wreck 


fosse 


scoff 


step 


turf 


wren 


fox 


sconce 


stern 


swing 


turn 


lyrist 


frocA: 


scotch 


gticA: 


switch 


twelve 


writ 


from 


shone 


stiff 


swinge 


twig 


yam. 


frost 


shop 


still 


swum 


twin 


yelk 


gloss 


shot 


stilts 


swung 


twinge 


yell 


god 


slop 
socA: 


sting 


tacib 


twist 


yelp ••» 


gone 


stint 


tang 


twit 


yerk 


gfo^ 


soft 


stitch 


task 


twitch 


yest 


grot 
hod 


sol* 


strand 


teint 


urge 


w 

yei 


solve 


strap 


tell 


urn 


young 


A:nob 


song 


stress 


temDt 
tend 


vast 


zest 


kaoeJc 


sop 


itre/ch 


vat 


5 


lodge 


spot 


jtrict 


tense 


vend 


blocj: 


loft 


squab 


(tring 


term 


vent 


blot 


loll 


squash 


(trip 


test 


verb 


blotoh 


long 


squat 


itrucA: 


text 


verse 


bob 


loss 


stocj: 


(trung 


ticjk 


vest 


bond 


lost 


strong 


itrut 


till 


ve^ch 


boss 


mock 


swab 


;tub 


tilt 


vex 


bofch 


mosque 


swamp 


liuck 


tin 


waft 


hots 


moss 


swan 1 


itud 


tinge 


wag 


box 


notoh 


swop 1 


ituff 


tip 


wax 


chop 


odd 


tong« 1 







the English Language. 


41 


5 


6 


6 


7 


11 


0U 


toss 


fruet 


shoe 


, stood 


chirp 


bounce 


trot 


^loom 


shook 


wolf 


fir 


bound 


troi/gh 


goose 


shoot 


wool 


Arm 


bout 


jwad 


gouge 


sloop 


8 


kirk 


cloud 


wan 


groom 


soon 


birch 


quirk 


couch 


wand 


groove 


soot 


bird 


skirt 


count 


want 


growp 


soup 


blood 


twirl 


crouch 


wa« 


hoof 


spool 


bomft 


ot 


dou&t 


wash 


hook 


spoon ^ 


come 


boil 


douse 


wasp 


hoot 


spruce 


dirge 


broil 


drought 


wast 


loo . 


stool 


dirk 


choice 


flounce 


wa^ch 


loof 


stoop 


dirt 


coif 


flout 


i^rong 


look 


swoon 


first 


coil 


found 


yac^t 


loom 


swoop 


flirt 


coin ' 


fount 


yon 


louA 


tQm& 


flood 


coit 


ground 





loop 


took 


front 


foil 


grouse 


bloom 


loose 


tool 


glove 


groiii 


frout' 


book 


lo^ 


tot^r 


iier 


join 


lound 


t)oom 


mood 


troop 


hers 


joint 


loud 


boon 


moon 


truce 


love 


joist 


lounge 


boor 


moor 


true 




loin 


lout 


boot 


moose 


who 


r^mb 


moil 


mound 


bouse 


moot 


whom 


ront 


moist 


mount 


brood 


move 


whose 


shirt 


noise 


noun 


brook 


Qook 


woo 


shove 


oil 


ounce 


broom 


noon 


wooF 


sir 


point 


ours 


choose 


oo^ 


yowr 


spirt 


poise 


oust 


coa 


oa^phe 


yours 

• 


sponge 


roist 


out 


cook 


pool 


7 


stir 


soil 


plough 


cool • 


poor 


bull 


wont 


»poil 


pouch 


coom 


proof 


buish 


word- 


toil 


pounce 


coop 


prove 


CoWd 


work 


voice 


pound 


coot 


prude 


foot 


world 


void 


pout 


crook 


prune 


fuU 


worm 


oy 


proud 


crude 


roof 


good 


worse 


boy 


round 


do 


rook 


goods 


worst 


cloy 


rouse 


doom 


roopt 


hood ^ 


wort 


coy 


scour 


droop 


root 


pull 


9 


hoy 


scout 


tlook 


rue 


push 


(reight 


joy 


shout 


food 


rule 


puss 


skein 


toy 


shroud 


tool 


. iiroop 


sliouZd 


tet^ 


troy 


. slouch 



46 



A Just Standard for Pronouvcing 



ou 


ou. 


ow 


. ow 


ow 


ow 


snout 


sprout 


blowzc .^ 


cowl 


frown 


owl 


sound 


. stout 


brow 


crowd 


gown. 


prowl 


sour 


louse 


brown 


crown 


, growl 


scow* 


souse 


trounce 


browse 


down 


how 


scowl 


spouse 


trout 


clown 


> drown 


howl 


town 


spout 


vouch 


cow 


drowse 


now 


vow 



CHAFTER Xlt 

Words of two syllables^ aeceniad on the first. 

Note. Teachers shoidd recollect that wtien the vowel e at the eml of an 
unaccented syllable preceded by a consonartt, is printed in a Roman charac- 
ter, the preccdintr vowel in that - .sy.llfible should be pronounced lone, as in 
em-pirc, Acm-i-»pA/;re ;, but it'it.bc printed in an Itdick character, ttle pre-^ 
ceding vowel in that syllable should be pronounced short, as in no-tic£, 
ini-ngi;, gen-u-ine. When e eAils an unaccented syllable, and is immetU- 
ately pi«ceded by a vowel which h not silent, the vowel -should be pro- 
nounced long, as ID a-gue, av-e-nne ; but if the v^wel immediately pte^eding 
the e be silent, the vowel preceding that shoyid be short, as in prol-og^uc, 



cat-a-logue. 



i 

Able 
a corn 
a gue 
atd ance 
atd er 
a/l ing 
air pump 
air y 
ale house 
an gel 
ba con 
bail iff 
bane ful 
bare ly 
bare ness 
ba sin 
3ea con 
)eard ed 
}eard less 
year er 
)ecest ly 



1 

beat en 
bea ver 
beau ty 
bee hive 
bee tie 
be ing" 
be som 
bi ble 
blind fold 
blind ness 
blu ish 
board er 
boast er 
boat ing* 
boat man 
bold ness 
bol ster 
bolt er 
bo rax 
boTz? sprit 
brace let 



1 

bra zen 
bride groom 
bnef ly 
hngki en 
hnghi ness 
bro ken 
bro ker 
bu gle 
by word 
ca ble 
ca dence 
cat tiff 
cam bricA: 
care ful 
care less 
cease less 
ceruse 
chair man 
cham ber 
chas< en 
cheap ness 



1 

€hild hood 
child ish 
cho sen 
ci pher 
ci tal 
claim ant 
clear ance 
clear Iv 
clear ness 
clca ver 
cli mate 
cli max 
close ly 
close ness 
clo vcn 
coal pit 
coarse ly 
coarse ness 
coast er 
c6 coa 
Co hort 



1 

cold ness 
cowl tcr' 
cowrt ship 
era die 
ere dencf 
cu rate 
ey cle 
cy press 
cy prus 
dai ly 
datn ty 
dai ry 
dat sy 
dan ger 
da rin^ 
da tive 
day book 
day break 
day Mght 
day time 
dea con 



the English Language. 



A 



deal ing 
d'*a ly 
deep ly 
deep nes9 
<le i^m 
dew lap 
dire ful 
di yers 
do lour 
do' tage 
dray man 
dre<ir y 
dry ly 
dry ness 
du ranee 
dn ring 
dy ing 
ea gle 
east er 
cast ern 
east ward 
ea ^y 
e qual 
c vcn 
e vil 
fa ble 
fatl ing 
fa/nt ly 
j famt ncss 
fair ly . 
fair nes^ 
fn motis 
fa vour 
fear ful 
fee bic 
feel ing 
fi bre 
fierce ly 
;fine ness 
fine ly 



1 

fire ball 
fire brand 
fire lock 
4re man 
fire wood 
fla vour 
fio rist 
fore man 
fore noon 
fot^r teen 
fra cas* 
fra grance 
fra grant 
frail ty 
free dojn 
free hold 
free ly 
free man 
free nesa 
free stone 
fri day 
fro ward 
fro zen 
fa tile 
ga ble 

gayly 
ge nus 
gno mon 
gold en 
grace ful 
gratc'ful 
grave ly 
greasy 
great ness 
gree dy 
green ness 
greet ing 
griev ance 
griev ous 
grind stone 



1 

hair y 
hasf in 
hast y 
hate ful 
ha ren 
h^y mow* 
ha t£\ 
heal mg ' 
hear er 
hear ing 
hear saj^r 
heat tr 
high hess 
hind most 
hireling 
hoar y 
hold er 
hoi ster' 
home :ly 
hu mid 
hydra 
hymen 
hy phen 
hy son* 
ire ful 

jail er 

jew el 

jews harp 

jui cy 

kind ly 

kind ness 

kmghi hood 

know ing 

la hour 

la ding 

ladle 

lame ness 

lead er 

lee ward 

le gion 
i^-Tj 



li ceJMe 
Wghi en 
li^;^tl:jr 
Wghx ning 
like ly 
liken 
like ness 
like "wi^e 
linie kiln 
Kme stone 
live ly 
K vre 
lo eate* 
lo cust ' 
lone some 
hike warm 
maid en 
main ly 
man gcr 
mangy 
ma pie 
ma son 
meal y 
mean ly 
mea s\cs . 
meet ing 
mighi y 
mind ed 
mind ful 
mi ser 
mi tre 
mo hatr 
most ly 
mo tive 
mot^Id er 
mot^id ing 
moi^Id y 
mourn er 
mourn ful 
movrn ing 



1 

mute ly 
nail 6r 
name ly 
name 8ftk< 
na ^1 
na tire 
near ly 
neat ly 
neat ness 
need ful 
nee die 
need y 
neu ter 
nfeu tral 
new ly 
nice ly 
ni tre 
ni trous 
no ble 
no bly 
no tice 
nui sance 
oat mea) 
o dour 
ogle 
on ly 
o pen 
ovm ef 
ptfe an 
pain fill 
paint er 
paint ing 
pa rent 
paste boar 
pa stry 
pa tron 
pave ment 
pay ment 
peace ful 
pea cocAr 



48 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 

people, 
pew ter 
pha l&nji 
pha roB 
phe nix 
pi ous , 
pi vate 
pla g«y 
plain iy 
plain ncs8 
plain iiff 
pli er« 
plu mage 
port age 
port al 
port er 
port ly 
por trait, 
port ress 
post ag^ 
po^y 
poult ice 
poult ry 
prat rie* 
pray er 
preach er 
pre cept 
pri vate 
pro bat 
pro noun 
pure Iy 
quo rum 
rai ment 
rain how 
reap er 
re gion 
re gress 
ri fle 

rigrAt ly , 
ri pen 
ro guish 



1 

roller . 
saeh«in 
safe ly 
safe ty 
sa turn. 
8ci ence, . 
sera per 

860 SOti 

«eeing . 
se quel 
shottl der 
si cljiig 
si lence 
sla yish. 
spare rib 
spike nard 
spleen y 
sprioAt ly 
sta ble 
sta pie 
state ment* 
states man 
steel yard 
stee pie 
stew ard 
sti fle 
sti pend 
strain er 
stran ger 
sut't er 
sweet en 
table 
ta bour 
tai lor 
ta ken 
teach er 
ti ding^ 
tire some 
titl^ 
to ken 
toto ard^ 



1 
trai tor 
trea son 
treat i^ent 
trea^ 
Idfle 
tri umph 
tro phy 
tue« day 
tu mour 
twi li^t 
ty rant 

tyro . 
u nit 
u rine 
u «age 
use ful 
vain ly 
va pour 
vfce roy 
vile ly 
vi ioXa 
wait er 
w^ke ful 
wa ken 
weak en 
weak ness 
wea ry 
wca se\ 
wea"^ er 
wee vil 
wi den 
wise ly 
tori ter 
wn ting 
year ling 
year ly 
yeo man 
ze bra* 
2 

aZ mond 
ar bour 



2 

arch er 
are tieit 
ar dent 
ar dour ' 
argue 
ar mour 
arm pit 
•rmy_ 
arse mcx. 
ar son* 
art ful 
art ist 
art less 
baZm y 
bar ber 
bar gaih 
bar wy 
bar ter 
brii vo 
caZm ness 
car cass 
card er 
car go 
car nage 
carnal 
car pel 
cart er • 
car trrcZge 
carver 
char coal 
char ger 
char ter 
dark en 
dark ne«f 
dar ling 
farm er 
gar den 
gar land 
gar Hc^ 
gar ment 
gar ner 



2 
gar nlsK 
ffarlcr 
har bour 
hard en 
hard Iy 
hard ness 
hard y 
har lot 
harm fiil 
har ness 
harp cr 
harsh ly 
harsh ness 
hars let 
harts horn 
har vest 
heark etk 
heart y 
jargon 
|B«n dice 
lar board 
hrge Iy 
laugh ter 
mar ble 
liiar gin 
mar ket 
mat quis 
marshy 
ftiar iyt 
mar vel 
ma ster 
par boil 
par eel 
parch mem 
par don 
par ley 
par lour 
pars ley 
pars nip 
par son 
part ly 



p 



■B 



an 



s 



^English Language. 



4{ 



3 

partner 
par indg^ 
par ly 

sar easm 
scar let 
sharp en 
sharp et 
sharp nesf 
spar kle 
sparry 
star boi^rd 
starli^At 
star ry 
startle 
tar dy 
tar nish 
tart ness 
var nish 
3 

al der 
al most 
al so 
i all spice^ 
al wBi^s 
au dit 
vlu spice 
au iumn 
aw All 
au7k \vard 
bal sam 
I bai£? dy 
I bor der 
j broad side 
1 cal dron 
1 catt cus* 
! csLUse wny 
! cord Hge 
cord wood 
cor ner 
cor net 
cor nice 



it 



3 

Gor satv 
cors let 
dsiugh ter 
dor mant 
dnwer 
drato ing 
fa/ con 
false hood 
false ly 
fdter 
fatf cet 
faftlt V 
for felt 
for mal 
for mer 
for tre^s 
for ty 
for ward 
gatf dy 
gor geous 
gor gon 
hsLugh ty 
hor net 
horse man 
law ful 
law sutt 
law yer 
lord ly 
lord ship 
mor bid 
morn ing 
mor sel 
mor tal 
mor tar 
morf gage 
mor tise 
rwugh ly 
or bit 
or chard 
or der 
ord nance 



or gan 
or phaift 
pal sy 
paltiy 
pa?^ per 
7>:ial ter 
qua drant 
qua drate 
quar ter 
quar to 
sail cer 
8a« cy 
sati sage 
saw yer 
scorn ful 
short ness 
sl&ugh ter 
sor did 
squa dron 
ta7Z rus* 
taw ny 
tor pid 
ter por 
tor scl 
tor toi^e 
vor tex 
Mral nut 
war bic 
ward en 
wa ter 
4 

ab bey 
ab sencc 
ac tivc 
ac tress 
ad age 
ad dice 
ad die 
ad verb 
ad verse 
ag ate 



4 

al ley . 
ambush 
am pie 
am ply 
an ise 
an nab 
an swer 
ap pic 
apt ly 
apt ness 
ash lar 
astA ma ' 
baf fie > 
bag gage 
bal aiice 
band age 
bap tisin 
bar racA 
bash ful 
bask ct 
has tard 
bat tie 
bed lam 
bed post 
beg gar 
be! fry 
ber yl 
bisli op 
blem ish 
blud gfon 
bram ble 
break fast 
bric^ kWn 
brim stone 
brin die 
brisk ly 
bris t\c 
brit tie 
buc^ ct 
buc^ le 
bucA: ler 



4 

buc^ ram 
hudg ct 
bv/ikl er 
hvWd ing 
bulk y 
bull die 
bur den 
bur docA 
bur gcss 
bus tie 
but ton 
cab bage 
cacAr le 
cam phire 
cair'die 
can dour 
can vass 
cap tain 
cap tive 
car rxavre 
cas tie 
cat tie 
cav crn 
ecu sus* 
cen tre 
cer tain 
chal lenge 
chaml ler 
chap lain 
check er 
clicr ish 
clier ry 
cher lib 
cher ftp 
ch'ici en 
chiin ncy 
chi^ el 
f is tern 
cit run 
clam our 
cl«r gy 



mmmmm^BBammBsmBBBmaaBBSBBBBBs^ 
A Just StMidard far Pranauncinff 



30 



4 

clcTy* 
clam^ 
country 
coupk 
coup lel 
courage 
credit 
crcv ice 
cribbage 
ericlr et 
crim son 
crip pie 
crit icib 
crum ble 
cnip per 
crys ul 
cucJKr old 
cudg el 
cum frey 
cun ning 
cur die 
cur nnt 
cur tain 
CU8 tard 
cut laas 
cynicA: 
dac tyle 
(lam age 
dam ask 
dam«el 
dam son 
dandle 
dan druff 
[lap pie 
das tard 
daz zle 
deaf en 
deaf ness 
de&t or 
del uffe 
rlem 1 



4 

deatine 
dUmpltf 
dismal 
dia tair 
diatanee' 
dis trict 
ditto* 
double 
dread fu] 
drib ble 
driven 
due tile 
dud geon 
dwel ling 
dwindle 
early 
ear nest 
eclogue 
edit* 
effort 
em bere 
empire 
empty 
en gine 
en si^n 
en traile 
envoy 
er mine 
es sence 
exit 
extant 
famine 
famish 
fash ton 
fast en 
fat ling 
fer ret 
fer tile 
fer vent 
fer vid 
fer vour 



4 

fielrle 
fiddk 
figure 
filbert 
fin ish 
flasket 
flatness 
fleshy 
flex iie 
flim«y 
flourish 
frag ment 
fran chi^e 
fredl le 
fresh en 
fresh et * 
fretful 
fn'end W 
friend ship 
frigate 
frisk et* 
frus trate 
ful gour 
fum ble 
fur long 
fur lough 
fur nish 
fus tick 
gam brel 
gant let 
gen tile 
gen tie 
ger man 
ger und. 
g^tly 
gin seng 
glis ten 
glut ton 
grand child 
gran ite 
grapple 



grisde 
grum ble 
gud geon 
guilty 
gtfin ea 
gyp sum* 
had dodb 
^ggi^rd 
hand ful 
handle 
handsaw 
hand sel* 
hand some 
hand spike* 
happen 
har ass 
has soclr 
hatband 
hatch et 
hairing 
hav oac 
haz ard 
head ing 
heav en 
heavy 
hetf er 
help ful 
help less 
hem locit 
hen rootft 
her aid 
Aer bage 
her roit 
heron 
huck ster 
hud die 
Aum ble 
hum bly 
hun dred 
hurtful 



4 
huff band 
hys son 
Ul 



im age 
im post 
im pulse 
in bom 
in cest 
in come 
in flux 
in jure 
in rood 
in sect 
in si^At 
in stance 
in voice 
in ward 
istAmus 
jeal ous 
jen ny* 
jeop ard 
jour nal 
journey 
jus tice 
just ness 
ker nel 
k*^r sey 
ket tie 
kid nap 
kid ney 
kin die 
kin dred 
king dom 
kitoh en 
kit ten 
Anap sacA 
AmucA le 
lacA: cy 
lam [>ass 
land ing 
lanu lord 






I 



i 



9Be 



BBB 



Stt 



the English Language* 



61 



I 



land mark 
land scape 
land tax 
Ian tern 
la/ch et 
lat tice 
lav ish 
learn ed 
learn ing 
leav en 
leg ate 
leop ard 
lep rous 
lis ten 
lit tie 
lus tre 
lus tring 
mal ice 
man age 
man like' 
mar riage 
mat tress 
mem brane 
men ace 
mer cer 
mer chant 
mer cy 
mer matd 
mes sage 
middle 
mid ni^At 
milk pail 
milk pan 
milky 
mill dam 
mil let 
mill stone 
min strel 
mir ror 
mis chief 



4 

mud dy 
muffle 
mul lein 
mum ble 
mum my 
mur rain 
mus cle 
mush room 
mus ket 
mus lin 
mus tard 
mut ton 
muz zle 
nec^ lace 
ner vous 
^er vy 
nes tie 
net tie 
nig gard 
nim ble 
nim bly 
nip per« 
nour ish 
nurs ling 
nut meg 
pacAr age* 
pacA; et 
pad die 
pad lode , 
pal ace 
pam phlet 
par ish 
pas sage 
pas sing 
pas sive 
pass port 
pas time 
pat tern 
peasant 
ped ant 



#i»«k« 



^>j ji. 



pen ance 
pen sive 
per feet 
per il 
perish 
per jure 
person 
phan torn 
pheio^ ant 
phren *y 
phy5 ic^ 
pic/Sr axe 
pidred 
picA: et* 
picA; le 

pigmy 
pi] grim 
pillage 
pim pie 
pin c&ta 
pin nace 
pi^ mire 
pitdi er 
pi^ch fork 
pivot 
plan tain 
plas ter 
plat form 
pleas ant 
prattle 
pref ace 
prel ate 
pres ence 
prin cess 
prison 
pris tine 
pub lish 
pumice 
pun gent 
pun ish 



4 

pur 1ms 
pur pk 
purport 
pur pose 
purer lain 
pur sy 
pttzrie 
quidr en 
quidt ly 
quin sy 
quiver 
racAret 
rad ish 
raffle 
ram ble 
rap ine 
ras cal 
rattle 
ravage 
rav el . 
ravish 
read y 
recA:on 
red den 
ref uge 
rdict 
renard 
rep tile 
rescue 
resin 
respite 
rib aid 
rich es 
rich ly 
ricA: ets 
rid dance 
riddle 
risen 
rough ly 
rough 



4 
rubbtrii 
rudder 
rud dy 
ruffle 
rumble 
rus ticilr 
rus tie 
saddle 
saZm oa 
sample 
sanded 
sateh el 
savage 
scab bard 
scaf fold 
scan dal 
scant ling 
sceptre 
scis sors 
scrabble 
scramble 
scribble 
scuffle 
sculptor 
scurvy 
scuttle 
second 
sel vage 
semi 
sen ate 
sentence 
ser aph 
sermon 
serpent 
ser vant 
service 
servile 
settle 
seven 
■hacArle 



A Just Stgmdard for Pronounvin 



ff 



\ 



i 

ekel 
ep herd 

er iff 
Ippin^r 

\p wreck 
uffle 
ut tie 
:kW 

k ness 
n pk 
lew 
: pence 
: teen 
ep ticiib 
ilful 
immer 
It tUh 
mggle 
lut ty 
uf fer^ 
eckle 
ec trc 
in die 
it tie 
len dour 
ut ter 
id die* 
md ing 
md ish 
mza 
;ad y 
il lar 
T il 
r ling 
ffen 
ff ness 
1 nera 
iggie 
ict ly 
p ling 



4 

Strug gle 
stub ble 
stub boni 
stuf fing 
stum ble 
stur geon 
sub stonoe 
sub tile 
suf frage 
sul phur 
sum motif 
sun day 
sun dry 
sun li^e 
sup pie 
sur fa^ 
sur feit 
sur geon 
sur plus 
swel ling 
swim mer 

 

swin die 
«yl van 
symp torn 
syn od 
syn tax 
syr inge 
sys tern 
tackle 
tac^ ling 
tac ticArs 
tan $y 
tan yard* 
tariff 
tattle 
tay em 
tem pest 
tern pie 
tem;9t er 
ter race 
ter ret* 



4 

ticA: ing 
ticJSrel 
ticAr le 
til lage 
timber 
timid 
tipple 
tittle 
trac tile- 
traf fidk 
trample 
tran script 
trap pinge 
treadle 
treb le 
trem ble 
tres pass 
tres aes 
tres He 
trib une 
trib ute 
troub le 
trump el 
trun die 
tum ble 
tur key 
tur tie 
tuscan 
twen ty 
tym pan* 
um brage 
un der 
up land 
up roar 
up warde 
ur chin 
usher 
vac cine 
val id 
val ley 
val our 



4 

val He 
van dal* 
vanish 
ven geance 
ver bal 
ver dant 
ver diet 
ver juice 
ver niin 
ver nal 
ves per 
ves tige 
vigour 
vil lage 
vil lain 
vine yard 
vint age 
vis age 
vis it 
weap on 
wed ding 
wed lock 
wel come 
west em 
west ward 
wicA: ^d 
wicA: et 
wid geoa 
wil ful 
wil ling 
wim ble 
wind lass 
wish ful 
witness 
wizard 
torap per 
wren tie 
loretch e^ 
T&rist bai^ 
lorit ten* 
young lifer 



4 

zealot 
zeoi cms 
zeph yr 

5 
blociGr head 
bids som 
bob bin 
bod ice 
bod kin 
bod y 
bond age 
bond man 
bon fire 
bon net 
hot tie 
hot torn 
chop per* 
clos et 
cob ble 
cob bier 
cocit le 
cocir loft 
codbney 
codfish 
codg er* 
coffee 
cof fer 
coffin 
col ick 
col lege 
column 
com et 
comicA^ 
com ma 
com ment 
com mon 
com pend 
com plex 
con flux 
con ircript 
con stant 









the English Languagt. 



53 



5 

COR 8Ul 

con tra* 

con trite 

con vex 

copper 

cop y 

cos set* 

cos tive 

cost ly 

cot tage 

cotton 

cross ly 

cro/ch et 

doc tor 

doc trine 

dog ma 

dol lar 

doridir 

dox y 

drop ping 

drop sy 

dro8 sy 

florid 

flor in 

fol ly 

fon die 

fond ness 

fop pish 

for age 

fore head 

for eii^n 

for est 

fos sil 

fos ter 

frol icAr 

frost y 

glossy 

gob lin 

I god dess 

god like 
I 1 



5 

gos ling 
gos pel 
gossip 
grog ram 
grot to 
grovel 
hob ble 
hob by 
hog« head 
hog sty 
hom age 
Aon est 
hon our 
hop j)er 
hop pie* 
horrid 
hos tilev 
host ler 
hotly 
hov el 
jocitey 
jbc und 

jog glc 
jolly 

Arnot ty 

know] edge 

lob by 

lodg er 

lodg ing 

lofty 

log book* 

log wood 

loz enge 

model 

mod em 

mod est 

mon ster 

mqn. strons 

mor al 

mot%o 



5 

non sense 
non sutt 
nos tril 
novel 
nov ice 
ob long 
oe tave 
odd ly 
offal 
offer 
office 
effing 
offset 
offspring 
oft en 
ol ive 
on set 
on ward 
op iAckn 
or ange ' 
ot ter 
pol ish 
pom pouB 
ponder 
pop lar 
poppy 
por riage 
pos se 
potash 
pot tage 
pot ter 
pottle 
prob lem 
prod net 
prof fer 
prog ress 
prol ottue 
prom ise 
prompt er 
prompt ly 



pros pect 
pr68 per 
prov orb 
prov ince 
prox y 
quar rel 
quar ry 
rob ber 
rob in 
rodret 
rociy 
ro^ in 
rot ten 
soft en 
soft ly 
solace 
sol der 
sol emn 
sol id 
sol stice 
solv ent 
son net 
sor rel 
sorry 
.spon dee 
spon sor 
squab ble 
squan der 
stodir ing 
stop page 
stop pie 
tocsin* 
tod dy* 
top ick 
tor rent 
torrid 
trollop 
trop idt 
volley 
▼ol mne 



5 

wal let 
wan der 
wan ten 
war rant 
washboojrd* 
wasp ish 
waich er 
walchfid 
irrongftil 
irronffly 
yon der 

6 
bloom y 
boo by 
boot y 
bo eom 
brutal 
cool er 
cool ness 
cooper 
crook ed 
cm et 
cmt ^er 
cm set 
fool ish 
fooU cap* 
frutt ful 
fratt less 
ffloom y 
nook ed 
loosely 
loosen 
looseness 
lo ^er 
moon Mghi 
moon smne 
moor ing 
moor ish 
move ment 
mo ver 



the English Language. 65 

CHAPTER XIIL 

Sdect Sentences^ of easy words^ eaktdcUed to teach 
Cfhildren to read^ and cU the same time to infuse 
into their tender minds som^ just ideas of their 
dtUyi and the rudiments, of samUity rnnd virtue. 

Lesson L 

Love that which is good, and shun vice. 
My son, do as you are bid, but do no ill. 
Rest in the Lord, and mind his word. 
The Lord is good, in all his works and ^^ys. 
My son, hold fast the law that is good. 
You must not tell a lie, nor do hurt« 
Mark the man that doth well, und do eo loa 
A bad man is a ibe to the law. 

Lesson IL 

Help such as wa^it help, and be kind. 
Hate no man, but love both friends and Ams. 
A bad man can take no rest, day nor night 
Sin will lead us to pain and wo. 
A bad life will make a bad end. 
We must pray for them that hate us. 
We must love them that love not us. 
We must do as we like to be dcme ta 

Lesson ni« 

I will love the law and keep it 
I will walk with the just and do good« 
I will love thee, O Lord, my strength. 
He must live well that will die well. 
He doth live ill that Mh not mend. 

oq^il 
No man can say he ha^ip si]l|(. 



In time to come we mtet do ^ ill, 

lasAo sii 

V*f)r nil vfxfiTi linvp. <rnnA Mnnf Jitt wav. 



54 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing' 



6 

DO zy 
poor ly 
poor nes8 
pru dence 
pru dent 
pru dish 
pruner 
rhubarb 
roomftfs 
root «d 
rooty 
ru by 
rude ly 
rude ness 
ru in 
ru Icr 
ni monr 
rural 
scru pie 
spoon ful 
tru ant 
truly 

7 

bul let 
bul lock 
bully 
bul rush 
bul wark 
bushel 
bush y 
bufch er 
cuclroo 
cush ion 
foot ball 
foot hM 
foot ing 
fo«t man 
foot step 
foot stoo} 
ful ler 
fully. 



T 

ful ness 
good ly 
good ness 
pud ding 
pul let 
pul ley 
pul pit 
worn an 
wood chttc^* 
wood en 
vrood land 
wood nan 
wool ly 
worsted 

8 
folood shed 
blood y 
«oml»at 
come ly 
com fit 
com fort 
com ing 
com pass 
com rade 
con d«it 
cover 
COY ert 
cov at 
COT ey 
dirty 
gloy er 
ffOY em 
honey 
hor er 
love ly 
lov er 
lorinff 
mon QOf 
mon ey' 
oven 
pern md 



8 
shov el 
sir up 
slov en 
spongy 
stirrup 
won der 
won droQs 
wont ed 
world Kng 
world ly 
word y 
work man 
worm wood 
wormy 
worry 
wor i^ip 
9 

ei^h teen 
eigh ty 
het nous 
neigk boar 
vreigh ty 

11 

cir cle 
cir clet 
cir cus 
fir kin 
firmly 
firm ness 
skirmish 
squir rel 
vir gin 

ai 

boil er 
choice ly 
coin age 
coiner 
foi fale 
Jokier 

joint er 



joint ly 
loi tor 
moisi en 
noi «y 
oil y 

oint ment 
poi^ nant 
point ed 
pointer 
poi son 
toilet 

oy 

boy ish 
coyly 
joy ful 
joy ous 
loyal 
oyster 
roy al 
voy age 

o« 
bound le8» 
boun ty 
coun ter 
conn t^ 
douftt fol 
dou6t less 
dough ty 
fioun der 
found er 
fomid ling 
found ry 
foun tain 
firouzy 
Aour fflass 
hour ly 
hovMbdd 
h<^tiig 
mount dtttt 
outcast 
outcry 



on 

out er 
out laid 
out let 
out line 
out rage 
out set 
out side 
out ward 
pound age 
pound er 
round ly 
scoun drel 
sound mgs 
sound ly 
sound ness 
sour ly 
sour ness 
trou sers 
ow 

boweb 
bow er 
coward 
cow slip 
dower 
dowks 
downcast 
downfiiU 
down ripi^t 
downwar-4 
downy 
dow ry 
drow^v 
pow der 
prowess 
rowel 
row en* 
show er 
towel 
tow er 
town ship 
trowal 



the English Language* 0| 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Select Sentences^ of eeisy words ^ ealeulated to teaa 
Children to read^ and at the same time to infus 
into their tender minds some just ideas of thei 
dviy^ and the rudiments, of sanctity and virtue. 

Lesson L 

Love that which is good, and diun vice. 
My son, do as you are bid, bat do no iU. 
Rest in the Lord, and mind his word. 
The Lord is good, in all his works and Unyn, 
My son, hold fast the law that is good. 
You must not tell a lie, nor do hurt^ 
Mark the man that dotb well, and do ao toa 
A bad man is a foe to the law. 

Lesson II. 

Help such as want help, and be kind. 
Hate no man, but love both friends and foes. 
A bad man can take no rest, day nor night 
Sin will lead us to pain and wo. 
A bad life will make a bad end. 
We must pray for them that hate us. 
We must love them that love not us. 
We must do as we like to be done ta 

Lesson IU, 

I wfll love the law and keep it 
I will walk with the just said do good« 
I will love thee, O Lord, my strength. 
He must live well that will die weS. 
He doCh live ill that ^jfth not mend. 
In time to come we mtftt do w ilL 
No man can say he haste sijk),, 

"CrtT nil mmnn \\uxrtk trnnt* l#iPVi# -t^ut xtrfktr 



A Juit Standard for Pronouncing 



Lesson IY. 

A good boy will do all that is just ; he will flee from 
ice ; he will do good, and walk in the way of life. 

Love not the world, nor the things that are in the 
orld ; for they are sin. 

I will not.fear what flesh can do to me ; foimy trust is 
I Him who made the world : 

He is nigh to them that pray to him and praise lus 
ime. 

Lesson V. 

Be a good child ; mmd your book ; lOve your school, 
id strive to learn. 

Tell no tales ; call no ill names ; you must not lie, nor 
leat, nor swear, nor steal. 

Play not with bad boys ; use no iH words at play ; 
end your time well ; live in peace, and shun all strife. 
This is the way to make good men love you, and to 
ve your soul from pain and wo« 

Lesson VI. 



He that speaks loud in school, will not learn his own 

ok well, nor let the rest learn theirs ; but those that 

ake no noise will soon be wise, and gain much love 

id good will. 

If you have done wrong, own your faulty tx he that 

Is a lie to hide it makes it worse. 

He that tells the truth is a wise child ; but he that tells 

s, will not be heard when he speaks the truth. 

Mock not the lame, or deaf, or dumb ; but be glad you 

l^not so. 



the EngUah Language, 



57 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Words of two syllables^ accented on iht second* 



1 



Ab Jure 
ab statn 
ab struse 
ac c\ntfa 
ac cu6*e 
a chteve 
ac quaint 
ac quire 
«d here 
a dt'eu 
'ad mire 
a dore 
ad vi^e 
af faf r 
af ford 
af fray 
af {right 
a fratd 
ag gn'eve 
a gree 
a greed 
al lay 
al lure 
amu^e 
a n^w 
ap peal 
ap pear 
ap pea^e 
ap praise 
ap preach 
a rise 
a ro^e 
ar rat^ 
ar range 
ar ray 
ar rive 
as cribe 
a shore 



ii' 



1 

a sleep 
as pire 
as sail 
as si^ 
a stray 
at tain 
at tire 
9iU stere 
a ware 
a way 
a wry 
bap tize 
be ,gttile 
be hind 
be lie 
be lief 
be Heve 
be lo'W 
be nioan 
be ni^n 
be reave- 
be seech 
be sides 
be siege 
be smear 
be stow 
be tray 
be tweett 
be watl 
beware 
be wrsLif 
bias pheme 
bloc^ ade 
bohea 
boot ee* 
bri fade 
bro cade 
ca jole 



cam par^ 
ca naiile 
can teen* 
cap size* 
ca reer 
cas cade 
chas ti^e 
coach ee* 
coc^ ade 
CO here 
CO lure5 
com mute 
com pare 
com plain 
com plaint 
com plete 
com po^e 
com prise 
con ceal 
cort ceit 
con ceive 
con elude 
con di^n 
con fuse 
con geal 
con sign 
con spire 
con strain* 
con straint 
con tain 
con trive 
con trol 
con yoke 
cos tume 
ere ate 
de cay 
de cease 
de ceit 



de cetvc 
de claim 
de clare 
de crease 
de cree 
de cry 
de feat 
de fray 
de grade 
de gree • 
de lay 
de light 
de hide 
de mure 
de my 
de plore 
de port 
de po^e 
de range 
de scribe 
de scry 
de sign 
de sire 
de spa^ 
de tatl 
de ta^in 
de vise 
dis claim 
dis close 
dis cottrse 
dis daiu 
dis ease 
dis grace 
dis |vise 
dis like 
dis may 
dis own 
dis play* 



dis please 
dispose 
di Tbrce 
do main 
en close 
en crottch 
en dear 
en due 
en dure 
en force 
en gage 
en grave 
en gross 
en liyAt 
en rase 
en rof 
en slave 
en sue 
en tatl 
en tire 
en treat 
e scape 
e squire 
e steem 
ex ceed 
ex change 
ex cise 
ex cite 
ex clatm 
ex elude 
ex pire 
ex plain 
ex plode 
ex plore 
ex pose 
ex pngn 
ex treme 
forbear 



id 



A Ju3t Standard for Pro7U}uncing 



ore know 
u^ee 
:en Icel 
;rant.ee 
:re nade 
in mure 
m pair 
in peach 
n plore 
m po^e 
m pre^n 
m pu^n 
m pure 
11 elude 
1 <leed 
1 digit 
1 fu^e 
1 hale 
1 quire 
1 scribe 
1 snare 
1 sprre 
1 ure 
la H^n 
lis lay 
an keen* 

blige 
b Hque 
b scene 
b scure 
b tarn 

paqtte 
p pose 

P pvign 

r da/n 
i rade 
J trol 
2r ce/ve 
Bi; spire 
3r tarn 
3 ru^e 



por tray 
pre cede 
pre cise 
pre mlve 
pre pare 
pre scribe 
pre side 
pre ^ume 
pre vail 
pro ceed 
pro clazm 
pro cure 
pro po^e 
pro pu^rn 
pro rogtte 
pur sue 
pur suit 
rap pee* 
razee* 
re ceipi 
re c^ive 
re cla/m 
re cline 
re course 
re deem 
re fraen 
re ffatn 
re fay 
re lease 
re Itcf 
re Jieve 
re matn 
re new 
re pair 
re pay 
re peal 
re peat 
re port 
re po^e 
re prteve 
re'proach 



1 

re quire 
re quite 
re tfide 
re^iyn 
re spire 
re ^tore 
re strata 
re fltraxnt 
re «ume 
re tain 
re tre^t 
re trieve 
re veal 
re vere 
re view 
re vise 
sa lute . 
se eede. 
se Crete 
se cure 
set tee 
se vere 
sha late* 
sin cere 
sub due 
sub scribe 
sue ceed 
«up ply- 
sup port 
sup po^e 
surmise 
8ur pri^e 
8us pire 
BUS tain 
trans cribe 
trans pire 
trans po^e 
trus tee 
un chain 
un chaste 
un clean 



un clo^e 
un fair 
un load 
un rol 
un seen 
un tie 
un wind 
un yoke 
up braid 
up hold 
van dike* 
ven due* 

2 
a far 
a larm 
a part 
be haZf 
ca tarrA 
ci g\r* 
com mand 
de bark 
de bar 
de mand - 
depart 
disarm 
dis bark 
dis<»urd 
dis charge 
dis park 
em baZm 
em bar 
em bark 
en large 
gvit ar 
im part 
mam ma 
pa pa 
re gard 
re mark 
re tard 
un arm 



2 

un bar 
van gitard 

ab hor 

^ broad 
ab sorb 
ac Gord 
a dorn 
ap pal 
ap plated 
ap plaice 
as sault 
a ward 
bash nw 
be cattle 
befall 
be soughi 
con form 
de battch 
de fanlt 
de form 
de fraud 
• cla^ 
en dorse 
de tort 
ex tort 
for lorn 
grant oi 
in form 
install 
per forn« 
re call 
r» morse 
re sort 
re tort 
re ward 
sub orn 
trans form 
un born 
un bought 
un tB^ugkt 



r 



the English Language. 



b\ 



I 



4 

abaft 
abasb 
a breitftt 
^hxMge 
ab rupt 
ab scind 
a byss 
ac cept 
ac cess 
ac curse 
ac quest 
acquit 
a dapt 
ad diet 
ad dre«s 
a dept 
ad journ 
ad yxdge 
ad just 
ad vance 
affect 
af flict 
aggress 
a lert 
al lege 
a iriass 
a meree 
a midst 
a miss 
ar rest 
as cend 
a slant 
as perse 
as sert 
as sess 
at taeh. 
at tacAr 
at tempt 
at tract 
a vast* 



aver 
a verse 
a vert 
be hetfd 
be quest 
be wi^ch 
bre vet* 
bur lesqiie 
ca lash 
CO act 



CO erce 
com mence 
con cem 
con demn 
con dense 
con fer 
confess 
con nect 
con struct 
con temA 
con tein^t 
con tinge 
eon verge 
con vtnce 
con vulse 
cor rect 
cor vttpt 
deduct 
de fence 
de fer 
de ject 
de pict 
de press 
de scend 
de scent 
de serte 
de spa^ch 
de« eert 
de taeh 
de tect 

A^ 4. 



4 

de terge 
de test 
detract 
di gress 
di rect 
di^ band 
dis^ burse 
dis cuss 
dis gust 
d\8 miss 
dis pense 
dis perse 
dis sect 
dis ttact 
dis tress 
dis trust 
di verge 
di vert 
di vest 
divulge 
e clipse 
effect 



eject 
elapse 
e lect 
e merge 
en act 
en chant 
e nough 
en rich 
e quip 
e rect 
e vict 
c vince 
ex eel 
ex cept 
ex cess 
ex pand 
ex pect 
ex pel 



4 

ex pert 
ex ])re3S 
ex pnnge 
ex tern 
fi nance 
fi nesse • 
for bid 
fulfil 
ga zette 
gro tesque 
ha mngue 
her self 
him self 
im burse 
m niense 
m menie 
n de5t 
n dutge 
nert 
nibct 
n fer* 
n fritige 
n graft 
n sert 
n spect 
n stead 
n struct 
n ter 
pn tru»t 
n verse 
n vert 
moras* 
my self 
neg lect 
ob serve 
ob struct 
ob vert 
offence 
op press 
our Belves 



4 

per plex 
per sist 
per verse 
per vert 
po^ ses9 
pre diet 
pre fer 
pre 5ervc 
pre tence 
pro fess 
pro tract 
re cess 
se dress 
re fer 
re fleet 
re fredh 
re gret 
re hearSe 
re ject 
re lapse 
re press 
re pulse 
re quest 
re eent 
re eerve 
re sist 
re spect 
re strict 
re suit 
re tract 
re turn 
re venge 
re verse 
re vert 
ro mance 
sub (hict 
sub serve 
sub stract 
sub vert 
sue cess 



) 



A Just Standard for PronMncing 



4 

I perb 
ip press 
ir pass 
M pect 
IS penstf 
-ana act 
-ans cend 
*an8 great 
runs mit* 
rana verae 
napt 
tn felt 
in heard 
tn hingtf 
in just 
in leara 
in less 
in mask 
in pin 
in rig 
in twist 
in well 
ip held 
ip lift 
1 $urp 
5 
lb scond 
ib so\yrc 
ic cost 
\ cross 
i dopt 
»llot 
ft loil 
ft long 
ft non 
be gone 
be got 
be long 
be yond 
(le coct 



5 
de yoIt^ 
di« lodge 
dU eolve 
em boss 
e Tolve 
ex tol 
for got 
here of 
here on 
in voire 
pro long 
re folve 
re spoBse 
re volve 
un loci 
up on 
6 
ac crue 
a do 

ag gretip 
a loof 
amour 
ap prove 
ba boon 
bal loon 
bam boo 
bas soon 
ba toon 
be fool 
be hoof 
be hoove 
be took 
buffoon 
ca boose* 
ca noe 
cartoon 
car totfch 
con tour 
de trade 
dis proof 



6 

doub Ion 
dra goon 
en vouib 
fes toon 
fore doom 
m boffe 



£ 



al loo 
bar poon 
h««to 
im brue 
im prove 
lam poon 
mis do 
mis rule 
mis took 
mon soon 
pa poose* 
pla toon 
pol trvn 
ponton 
raccoon 
ra gout 
re move 
re proof 
re prove 
sa loon* 
shal locm 
sui tout 
tat too 
un do 
un moor 
un true 

7 
a foot 

8 
a bove 
af front 
al longe 
a mong 
a mongst 



8 
mi done 

CO Keit 
convey 
in vet^A 
o bejf 
par terre 
pur vey 
sur vey 
unveil 

U 
affirm 
ron firm 
in firm 
un firm 

oi 
accoil 
ad join 
a droit 
a noint 
appoint 
a vQid 
ben zoin 
bur geois 
con join 
de void 
di^ join 
di^ joint 
em broil 
enjoin 
ex ploit 
me moir 
pur loin 
re Cf»il 
re joice 
sub join 
tur moil 

Of 
alloy 

annoy 



ey 

de plojr^ 
de stroy 
em plojT 
enjoy 
r ou 
a bound 
a bout 
ac count 
a ground 
a^dud 
a%iottnt 
dlfh'ounce 
a round 
a rou^« 
as toutid 
a vouch 
con found 
de nounce 
de vonr 
de vout 
i\\s mount 
e spouse 
ex pound 
mis count* 
pio nounce 
pro pound 
re count 
re dou&t 
re dound 
re mount 
re nounce 
re «ound 
sur mount 
sur round 
un boun<l 
un sound 

ov> 
al low 
a vow 
en dow 

1* A n rkTirt« 



r 



mmmamBaamasmsssii 

tk» EagUah Language, 61 



C3HAPTER XV. 
Advice io Children. 

Lesson I. 

Rise with &e lark each day, for it is wrong to lose youi 
time in bed. 

When you rise, pray to God to keep you from harm 
and do the same when you he down at night. 

Come to school clean and neajt, play not by the way 
nor let your voice be heard in the street. 

When you go to school, take your book and go to youi 
seat ; make no noise, but strive to learn as fast as you can 

Love him that loves his book, and speaks good words 
and does no harm ; for such a friend may do you good al 
the days of your life. 

Be kind to all as far as you can, for you know not hoin 
90on you may want their help, and he that has the goo< 
will of all that know him, will not want a friend in timt 
of need. 

If you want to be good, wise, and great, read with car 
such books as have been made by good and wise men 
think of what you read in your spare hours ; be brisk a 
play ; but do not waste your time in bed. 

Be not (NToud of what you have, for fools may wear fin 
clothes ; but a wise child is known by his w^rds. ^ 

Be not false in thy words, but speak the truth fX al 

times. ^ 

1 

mmssssssssssaasssssssss^^ 



92 A Just Standard far Pronouncing 

Let thy words be few, and sin not with thy tongue. 

Love God with all your heart, and serve him with al 
^our ir;ght, so shall he bring you to joy and peace. 

There is but one God, who made the world. He made 
tlie trees and plants to grow out of the ground, and worms 
that Uve in it 

He made both men and beasts that walk on the eartb, 
Lhe birds that fly in the air, and tne fish that swim in the 
sea. 

He made the sun, moon, and stars ; and all things vtt 
see are the works of his hands. 

Lesson H. 

My son, hear the words of thy fatlier, and forsake not 
the law of thy mother. 

My son, keep my word, and lay up my precepts with 
thee. Keep my commandments, and my law, as the ap- 
ple of thine eye. 

Bind them upon thy fingers ; write them upon thy 
heart. 

My son, if sinners entice thee to sin, consent thou Bot 

Walk not in the way with them ; refirain thy feet fiom 
their path. 

A wise son hears the counsel of his fiitber ^ but « foolish 
son hears not rebuke. 

There ss a way which seems right unto a man ; bat to 
walk in it, is death. 

Go not in the way of evil men; avoid il ; pass not by 
it ; turn from it ; and pass away. 

The upright shall inherit the land ; and the righteous 

diaJI rfkmnin in tf 



the English Langiiage, 



63 



The wicked shall be cut off from the earth, and the 
transgressor shall be rooted out of it. 

Seest tluMi a man wise in his own conceit? 

There is more hope of a fool than of him. 

Happy is tlie man that finds wisdom. 

Length of days is in her right hand, and in her left 
hand, riches and honour. 

Her ways are pleasant, and all her patlis are peace. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Words of three syllables^ the primary accent on the Jirst 
syllahle^ and the secondary accent on the third* 



1 

A gue fit 

a ri e« 

ba yoil et 

beau ti ful 

beau ti fy 

bind er y* 

blame a h\e 

boat a ble* 

bri bcr y 

bu gle hora 

ca pa h\e 

care ful ly 

care ful ness 

ca ve at 

cham ber lain east er ly 

change a h\e eat a ble 

cheer ful ly e go ti^m 

cheer ful ness e go tist 

child ish ness e qui nox 

cogrn i ac/f* c yener* 

CO pi ous 

cu ra ble 

cu ra cy 

cu ri oun 



dan ger ous 

de cent ly 

de vi ous 

di a lect 

di a logi/e 

di a phra^m 

di ning room ford a ble 



1 

fa your ite 
fea si ble 
fi er y 
fia your ous 
fo li age 
for ci ble 



di o cess 
drol ler y 
du bi ous 
du el ling 
du ra ble 
du ti ful 
ea ^i ly 



e yen mg 
eu lo gize* 
eu lo gy 
eu phony 



for ger y 
fre quen cy 
fre quent ly 
fu gi tiye 
fu ri ous 
gay e ty 
glo ri ous 
glu ti nous 
grtev ous ly 
hast i ly 
ho li ness 
hy dro gen 
i cic le 
i die ness 
jo vi al 
ju bi lee 
ju ry man 



ju ve nile 
Ama ver y 
la zi ness 
li a ble 
like li hood 
live li hood 
lu era tive 
lu di crous 
lu mi nous 
male con tent 
ma son ry 
mi cro scope 
mu ren ger 
mu SI cal 
mu ta ble 
mu tin ous 
news pa per* 
ni ce ty 
ni^At in gale 
no ble ness 
no ti fy 
nu mer ous 
o di ous 
o dor ous 



Wmm. 



wm 



^ 



A Just Standard far Pronouncinff 



I 

> pen ing 
3 pen ly 
a ver shot 
pa gan ism 
pa per mill 
peace a ble 
plia c ton 
pi ous ly 
pla ca ble 
pla gta mm 
pla gia ry 
plcii ri sy 
pli a ble 
por ce lam 
pre am ble 
pre vi ous 
pro to type 
pu c rile 
qui et ly 
qui et neas 
qui e tude 
ra di ance 
ra ta ble 
rea son er 
Tta son ing 
jjri otous 
|!ri val ry 
*|ro gifcr y 
' sale a ble 
se ri ous 
size a ble 
sla vcr y 
so ber nets 
spu ri ous 
stu di ous 
suit a ble 
te di ous 
ti tie page 
u ni corn 
u ni form 
. u ni verse 



va por ous 
va ri ance 
va ri ous 
ve he roence 
ve he ment 
ve hi cle 
vi o lence 
waste ful ly 
wea ri some 
yeo man ry 
2 

al raon ry 
ar bi ter 
ar bi trate 
ar den cy 
ar dent ly 
ar gu ment 
ar ma ment 
ar mi stice 
ar mor y 
ar se nal 
ar ter y 
art ful ly 
art ful ness 
ar ti choke 
ar ti cle 
ar ti fice 
bar ba rism 
bar ba rpus 
car di nal 
car nal ly 
car pen ter 
car pen try 
. charge a ble 
charm ing ly 
gar den er 
g»r den ing 
gi/ar di an 
bar bin. ger 
har le qvin 
har mo nize 



2 

har mon y 
lar ce ny 
laifgh a ble 
mar gin al 
mar ma lad 
mar tin gal 
mar vel lous 
par lia ment 
par ti cle 
par ti san 
part ner ship 
phar ma cy 
3 

al der man 
al ma nacAc 
au di ble 
aix di ence 
an di tor 
cau 5a tive 
cor po rul 
cor po rate 
cor pu lence 
cor pu lent 
cor pus cle 



or ga nize 
or na ment 
patfci ty 
plau 5i ble 
por cu pine 
por phjrr y 
por ti CO 
salt eel lar 
fecor pi on 
sor cer y 
talk a tive 
wa ter y 
4 

ab la tive 
abrp'^gatc 
ab sti nence 
ac ci dence 
ac live ly 
ad eyquaie 
ad yfk tive 
a(} JQ tant 
af & b|e 
af fin ence 
af ter dap 



al CO hoi 
al i quQt 
al ka li 
al ka line 
al pha bet 



drai/> ing room ag graa dizc 

for maV iM , ftg-^ra vale 

for mer ly 

for mu la 

for ni cate 

for ti fy 

for ti tude 

gau di ness 

\\^ugK ti ness am bi tude 

laud a ble . am o rous 

. an a Ijrze 
an CCS tor 
an ces try 
on o dyne 
an te padt 
an ti type 
an ti ouate 



lai0 ful ly 
mor tal ly 
mor ti fy 
or der ly " 
or di nance 
or di Date 
or «aa.iat 



the English Language* 



aph ri^n 
iij) o gee 
»p o hgue 

^ up pro bate* 

11 a p polite 

t|up ti tude 

ll ar a ble 
ar ro ganc« 
as te nak 
at mo sf^re 
av a rice 
ar enu^ 
ar er age 
ax le tree ' 
bach e lor 
bal 08 ter* 
bash djitmn 
hns i fisk 
bed cham ber 
beg gar y 
ben e fic«. 
ben i «an 
bev er agkj. - 
bib li car 
bit ter netm 
bias phe mous 
bias phe my 
bles sed ness 
blun derboss 
bur den some 
cal a bash . 
can die stici 

, can ton ment* 

I cap ri corn 
car a ran t 
car a way 
obls si mere* 
cat a logue 
cat a ract 
eel an dine 



4 

cen tau ry 
eer tain ly 
cer tain ty 
cer ti fy 
eham pi on 
chan eel lor 
char i ot 
char i ty 



ear nest ness 
ed i fice 
el e gance 
el e phant 
el o quence 
el o quent 
embry o 
em i nence 



chas ti^ ment em per ess 



chas ti ty 

cher u bim 

chev eril 

chiv al ry 

eit i zen 

ciy il ize 

cran ber ry* 

cred i ble 

cred it or 

crit i cise 

crit i ci^m 

crys tal line 

cid pa ble 

cur rent ly 

cur ri cle 

cur ry com& 

cus tom house ex o dus 



em pha sis 
em pha size* 
evap ti ness 
em u lous 
en ter pri^e 
en vi ous 
ep au let 
ep i logiie 
ep i taph 
ev i dence 
ex ca vate 
ex eel lence 
ex eel lent 
ex e crate 
ex e cute 
ex i gence 



cyl in der 
dec a \ogue 
def er ence 
def i nite 
del i cate 
dem a gogi^ 
den i zen 
des ig nate 
des po ti^m 
dex ter ous 
dif fer ence 
dis ci pline 
dis 81 pate 



ex qui ^ite 
«x tri cate 
fab u lous 
fallible 
fas ci nate 
feb ri fuge 
fel low snip 
fem i nine 
fer ri age 
fer ry man 
fer til ize 
fer ven cy 
fer vent ly 



dres sing room ilex i ble 






U1^ 



65 



frat ri cide 
frir lous 
fur be low 
gar ri son 
gen er ous 
gen tie man 
gen tie ness 
gen u ine 
gin ger bread 
grav el ly 
grav i tate 
guar an ty 
gun pow der 
hap pi ness 
haz ard ous 
heay i ness 
hem i sphere 
her i tage 
her o ine 
her o ism 
hes i tate 
hid e ous 
hin der ance 
Aum ble bee 
hum ming bird* 
hur ri cane . 
hyp o crite 

g no ranee 

m pi ous 

m pu dence 

n di gence 

n do lence 

n fa mous 

n fer ence 

n fi nite 

n flu ence 

n no cence 

n so lence 
in tel lect 
intercourse . 






w 



rmm^pym^imm 



m 



60 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



4 

jeal ous y 
jeop ard y 
jes sa mlnf 
ker sey mere* 
las si tilde 
lech er ous 
lib er ate 
lib cr tin^ 
lie or ice 
mac ca boy* 
macA: er el 
maj es ty 
man ner ly 
man age ment 
man u script 
mas cu line 
mat ri cide 
med i cine 
mer can tile 
mer chan di^e 
mer ci ful 
mer cu ry 
mes sen ger 
met a phor 
min \a ture 
min strel sey 
mir a cle 
mis chte rout 
m\$ er y 
mul ti pie 
musk mel on 
myr i ad 
mys tcr y 
nar ra tlve 
nee tar ine 
neg a tire 
neg li genee 
nour isn ment 
pal a tine 
pal pa ble 
pan to mime 



4 

par a ble 
par a diym 
par a dise 
par a graph 
par a phrase 
par a sol 
par ent age 
par ox ysm 
par ri cide 
pass o ver 
pat ron age 
pat ro ni^e 
pea^ ant ry 
ped a gogtte 
ped i gree 
pen i tence 
pen te cost 
per e grine 
per feet ly 
per fi dy 
per fo rate 
per i gee 
per il ous 
per ju ry 
per ma nent 
per pe trate 
per qui ^ite 
perse cute 
per son age 
per son al 
per son ate 
per ti nence 
per ti nent 
per.vi ous 
pes ti lence 
phy^ i cal 
picA: er el 
pil grim age 
pin na cle 
pleo^ ant ry 
pref cr ence 



4 

prej u dice 
pre5 by ter 
pre* ent ly 
pre* i dent 
prim i tive 
pri* on er 
priv i lege 
pun ish ment 
pyr a mid 
quer u \o\x^ 
rail jer y 
rasp ber ry 
rav en ous 
read i ness 
rec og nise 
rec om pense 
rec onjcile 
red o lence 
ref er ence 
rel a tive 
re* i dence 
re* i dent 
re* i due 
re* lute 
ret i nue 
ret ro spect 
rev e nue . 
rev er ence 
rev cr y 
rAap so dy 
rAet o ric^ 
rig or ous 
sac ri lege 
sal i vate 
sas sa fras 
sat ir i*e 
sat ur day 
scan da bus 
scav en ger 
sem i tone* 
sen si ble 



4 

sen si tive 
ser 4 phim 
ser pen tine 
ser vi tude 
set tie ment 
sex u al* 
sim pie ton 
sin All ness 
skel e ton 
skep ti ci*m 
spher i cal 
spir it ed 
staeft hold er 
stig ma tize 
strat a gem 
streau ous 
strep er ous 
sub ju gate 
sub se <]^uent 
sub Stan tiva 
«ub sti tute 
%\kh% ie ty 
sue CO tash* 
suf fer ance 
8ul phur y 
sup pu rate 
8US te nance 
isyc a more 
syc o phant 
syl la ble 
syl lo gi*m 
83rm me try 
sym pho ny 
syn a gogve 
tarn a rind ^ 
tan fp, ble 
tan ta mount- 
tel e graph 
tel e scope 
tern per ance 
ten a ble 



the English Language. 67 

5 5 6 

tea dcr ness bot torn leM dom i cil* ob vi ims 

ter ma gant choc o late dom i nate oc cu pant 

ter mi n^te cod i cil drop si cal oc cu py 

ter ri ble cog ni zance flor id ness oc u lar 

ter ri bly col lo quy frol icA: some of fer ing 

tim or ous col o ny front is prece of fi eer 

tract a ble com bi nate frost bit ten om in ous 

trans i tive com e dy frost i ness op er a 

trans mi grate com i oal glob u lar op er ate 

treach er ous com mon er glos sa ry op po site 

treach er y com mon ly hal i but op u lenc« 

trem u bus com pe tence hoi ly hocA: op u lent 

trip li cate com pe tent hona i cide or a e\e 

troub le some com pli cate hon est ly or « tor 

trump er y com pro mi«e Aon est y or i iice 

tur bu lence con fer ence hor ri ble or i gin 

tur pen tine con fi dence . hor ri bly or i «on 

typ i cal con fi dent ^s pi tal or rer y 

tyr an ni^e con fiu ence Ion gt tude ox y gea 

tyr an ny con ju gal moc ea sin* pol i cy 

ul ti mate con ju gate mode er y pol i tkch 

ut ter ance con se crate mod est ly pol i ty 

vag a bond con se quenoe mod est y pol y gram 

val en tine con s6 nant mod i fy pol y pus 

vas sal age con stan cy mol li fy pom pNOUs ly 

ven om pus con stant ly mon i tor pon der ous 

ver bai ly con sti tute mon u meat pop u lace 

vcr ga loo* . con ti lient mor al ist pop u lar 

ver sa tile con tra band mor al ixe pop u late 

ver si fy con tra ry mor ml ly pop u lous 

ver tt cal con vo cate nom i nal por rin ger 

vig or ous cop per as nom i nate pos i tive 

vil i fy cop per plate nov el ty pos si ble 

vis i ble cop u late ob e lisk pos si bly 

vi^ i tant cop y book ob li gate post hu mous 

wil der ness cor o ner ob lo quy por er ty 

wil ling ly cor o net ob se qvatB prob a Ue 

3res ter day croc^ er y ob so lete prob a bly 

5 croc o dile ob sta cle prob i ty 

bot a nist doc tri nal ob sti nate prod i gal 

bot a ny* , doc u ment ob vi ate prod i gy 



58 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



)rof li gftttf 
)ror lu ence 
)rom i nent 
>rop a gate 
)rop er ly 
^rop er ty 
3roph e cy 
iroph e sy 
)ros e cute 
pros e iyte 
proa o dy 
pros per ohs 
pros ti tute 
prot est ant 
prov en der 
prov i dence 
([uad ru ped 
qua! i fy 
qua) i ty 
qual i i\es 
quan ti ty 
quar rel some 
scrof u la 
sol e ci«m 
sol em nize 
sol i tude 
soph 18 try 
soph more* 
tol er ance 
tol er ate 



6 

top i cal 
voc a tive 
vol a tile 
wan ton ly 
war rant y 
wa^ch ful ly 
watoh ful ness 
wa^ch tow er 

6 
bloom a ry* 
book sel ler 
cook er y 
crook ed ness 
cm ci ble 
cru ci fix 
cru ci fy 
cru di ty 
cru el ly 
cru el ty 
fool ish ness 
fruit ful neas 
gloom i ness 
pru der y > 
thevL ma ti«m 
rook er y 
ru bi fy 
ru di ment 
ru in ate 
ru in oils 
rumi nate 



6 

scru pu lous 
scru ti ny 

7 

bu^ch cry 
8 

come li ness 
com pa ny 
con jur er 
con sta ble 
cov e natit 
cov er ing 
cov er let 
cove tous 
gov em ess 
gov ern ment 
hon ey comfr 
hon ey moon 
love li ness 
lov ing ly 
sov er ci^ 
won der ful 
work man Kke 
work man ship 

9 

Xieigh hour ly 
-weigh ti ness 
11 

cir eu lar 
cir cut late 
cir cum else 



11 

cir cum (Lex 
cir cum spect 
cir cum stance 
fir ma ment 

01 

bois ter ous 
moi e ty 
poiy nan cy 
poi son OU3 
oy 

loy al ly 
ley al ty 
roy al ist 
roy al ly 
roy al ty 

Otf 

bound a ry 
boun ti ful 
coun sel lor 
eoun ter feit 
coun ter plot 
mount ain ous 

010 

bow er y 
cow ard ice 
cow ard ly 
pow der horn 
pow der mill 
pow er ful 
•how er y 



CHAPTER xvn- 

Woria of fhrec syllables^ accented on the second. 



i 1 1 

A bu «iv# ac quine ment al li ance 

ac cu /set a cute nesa al lu sive 

a chtev<9 ment ad he renee a rou^e ment 

ac quatnt ance af fi ance ap pft rent 

ac quatnt ed pL gree ment ap peach ment ar rear a^e 



ap pear ance 
ap pnis er 
ar rat^ ment 
ar range ment 



IS 



the English Language. 



6! 



11 I 

as. saiT. mt de lighi ful en trea ty 
as sic^i nient de mean our e qm tor 
as s\i tYiing de port mer.t e va sive 
a gy lum de range meat* ex ceed ing 

ex cite ment 



1 



at u&zn mant de ^i rous 
aw ro ra de ta/n der 

be forehand diffu sive 
he hind liard d'ls a ble 
be I^ev er dis ci pic 
bias phe nier dis creet ly 
CO e qua I di^' dain ful 
CO he rence dis fa vour 
col lu sivt;f di^ grace ful 
com pla cent dis po ^al 
com pli ancc di vi sor 
conceal ment di vorce meat 
con ceit ed e lu siy« 
con clu sivc en a ble 



ex clu sive 
ex treme ly 



pro VI so 
re deem er 
re fu ^al 
re li ance 
re main der 
re pri ^al 
re proach ful 



for bear ance re qui tal 
free ma son re tire ment 
grand ju ry* ee vere ly 
ho ri zon short sight ed 

il lu mine sin cere ly 
im peach meat so. no rous 



in clu sive 
in qui rer 
in qui ry 
in va sive 
in vet fie 



coi^ do lence en crooch ment in ure ment 



con du cive en dan ger 
con ni vance en dear ment 
consign ment en du ranee 
con tri vance en force ment 
con trol ment en gage ment 
cor ro sive en li^At en 



ere a tiv€ 
de cett ful 
de ci pher 
de ci sive 
de fi ance 



en li ven 

en no ble 

• 

en rol ment 
en tire ly 
en ti tie 



in u tile 
je ho vaA. 
mes St aA 
mis ta ken 
mis u ^ge 
ob scure ly 
pel iu cid 
pe ru sal 
po lite ness 
pro po sdl 
pro sa iciS: 



sub poe na 
sub scri ber 
sur pri «ing 
tor na do 
tor pe do 
trans pa rent 
un a ble 
unea sy 
un e qual 
un e ven 
un mind ful 

2 
a larra ing 
an tare ti^ 
a part ment 
eom mand mei 
eo part ner 



t The infhicnce of accent on tlie sound of the vowveh does not appci 
more perceptibly in any part of the langmge, than in the syllables, c< 
com, eoTt, and €or. When the accent, eitber primary or secondary, is c 
these syllable^ as in collar, cornet^ eonaulf corrigible^ colonnade^ correspom 
ent, &>c. the • has distinctly the sound of broad a short. But when tl 
accent is on the succeedin;;r syllable, th» o^ in coUoquial pronundation, slid 
into a sound like short «, as in ccUusite^ commit, convince, compt, & 
proneunced as if written cullusive, cummit; cunvince, currupL &c It 
true, that wiicn these words are pronounced alone with delilMiratio 
energy, and pnecision, the o preserves nearly its true sound ; but it seen 
' to slide'i.nscnsiblv into short u the moment we unite these words with otner 



1 .- 



^j:*-*: 



m 



wmmm 



70 



A Just Standard far Pronouncivg 



de part ment 
em bar go 
en krge ment 
hard heart ed 
in car nate 
re gard ful 
re gard less 

ab hor reikce 
a bor tire 
ac cord ance 
ac cord ing 
con cord ance 
dis cord ant 
dis or der 
en dorse ment 
en dor» er* 
e nor nu>us 
hy dratt licA: 
im mor tai 
im por tance 
im por tant 
in form ant 
in 8tal ment 
per form ance 
per /brm er 
re cord er 
un law ful 



a hridg mentf 
a bun dance 
ac cept ance 
ac quit tal 
ac quit tance 
ad diet ed 
ad journ ment 
ad just ment 
ad mit tance 
ad vance ment 
ad van taore 
af fran chi^e 
ag gres sor 
al ter nate 
an gel ic^ 
an nat to* 
ap pren tice 
as cend ant 
as phal tic A: 
as sem blage 
as sem ble 
as sem biy 
as sess ment 
as sist ance 
as sum/> sit 
at tach ment 
at tend ance 
at ten tire 



at tract ire 
ai£ turn nal 
bis sex tile 
ce phal icA: 
clan des tine 
CO er cive 
col lect ive 
com mit tee 
com pul sire 
con cem ing 
con cem ment 
con cur rence 
con sist ence 
con sump tive 
con tent ment 
con tin gence 
con tin ue 
CO nun drum 
con vul sive 
cor rect ness 
cor rupt ly 
cor rupt ness 
cur mud geon 
de camp ment 
de cep tire 
de feet ive 
de fen sire 
de scrip tive 



4 

de ^ert er 

de struc tive 
de ter gent 
de ter mine 
di gest ive 
di rect ly 
Ais ad terf 
di^ as trous 
di^ bur den 
dia cour age 
dis fig nre 
dis fran c\\\st 
di^ gust ful 
dish ev el 
di^ man tie 
di^ mem her 
dis par age 
dis sem ble 
dis sev er 
dis tress ful 
dis trib ute 
dis trust ful 
dis turb ance 
di ver gent 
cc cen imk 
ef feet ive 
ef ful gence 
e ject ment 






t (y has its soil sound in ahrtdg-mentj lodg-ing^ lodg-er, ^bc (althmigh 
at the end of a syllable,) as in the primitives) ahrit^ todge^ ^dc fioin 
which they are denved. 

t S^ in the prefix di», when cither the primary or secondary accent if on 
it, is always sharp and hissing, as in district^ dissolute^ diacbUge^ &^ <^' 
cc|it io the word dismal^ in which it shoukl lie sounded like z: but when 
the accent is on the second syllable, the s is either sharp or flat, as it is f^'' 
lowed either by a vowel, or a sharp or flat consonant ; thus diaaJ^ disattfft 
disease, dishonest, disorder, &c. have the s in dis fiai like x, liecause the 
accent is not on it, and a vowel begins the next syllable ; but ditehargti 
discredit, disfavour, diskindness, dispense, distaste, Ac have the » shsn* 
and hissing, because a sharp consonant begins the soooeedinff accented ^^l* 
l.^blc: and disband, disdain, disgrace, disjoin,disvalve, &c.liave(ihe'nat 
like 2, because they are susof'cded by a flat cont>unant in the same jiitttati"" 



m 



m 



the English Language* 



71 



4 
e led ive 

e ley en 
em bes afe 
,e mer genee 

\^. mer gent 
jen dit \ckn 
'en comr age 
{|en cum brance 
I en deav our 
en fran chi^ 
e pis tie 
!e quip ment 
-es cufch eon 
e ter nal 
ex cept ing 
ex ces sire 
;ex ores cence 
iex cul pate 
;ex cur sive 
|ex pan Ave 
,ex pectant 



mpn^ on 
m pul aire 
in jc tive 
in cen Ure 
n de5t ed 
n dul gence 
n fer nal 



4 4 4 

m preg aate per apeet ire trmiia etad enee 



pi az za trans gies sive 

pi las ter tre meit dous 

;9neu mat icAs tri umph ant 

po« 5es sive ty ran iiicA: 

pre ^ent ment un cer tain 

pre snmp tive un frteiid \y 

pro duct ive un lucA: y 



n fringe ment pro gres sire un pleoe ant 



ex pen sive 
ex pert ly 
ex pert ness 
ex pres sive 
ex press- ly 
ex ptll sire 
ex ten sive 
ex ter nal 
flo til la* 
for bid dance 
for bid den 
fo ren sicAr 
fra ter nal 
gi gan tic^ 



n jus tice 
n struct ive 
n ten tive 
n ter ment 
n ter nal 
in ter pret 
n tes tine^ 
n vec tive 
n vent ive 
tal icAr* 
jo ban ne^ * 
long prim er< 
majes ticA: 
ma ter nal 
me an der 
mis man age 
mo lasjse^ 
mo ment ous 
mu lat to 
neg lect ful 
ob ject ive 
ob «erv ance 
ob ^erv ant 
ob sexv er 
Qb struct ive 
oc cur renee 



gym nas ticA; of fen sive 
ho stn na op pres sive 



hys ter icArs 
111 lu8 trate 
tjim mense ly 
im per feet 



pa ter nal 
per feet ive 
per mis sive 
per sist ance 



pro nUil gate un rav el 
pro phet ie^ un rid die 
pro tect ive 



pru nel lo 
qui es cence 
re ful gence 
re hear sal 
re luc tance 



un stead y 
un wel come 
vin die tive 

6 
a bol ish 
ac com pliee 



re mem brance ac com plish 
re mit tance ac Arnotol edfge 
re pent ance & cros tic^ 
re pug nance ad mon ish 
re pul sive a pos tate 
resemblance dposde 
re «em ble as ton ish 
re^entm^it be gotten 



re «ist ance 
re spect ive 
re ten tive 
re venge ful 
rAeu mat icA: 
sar cas iitk 
se ques ter 
stu pen dous 
sub ject ive 
sub mis sive 
sub sist enee 
sub rer sitre 
$uc cess ful 
sue ces sive 
su per nal 
sus cep tive 

msammssmm 



CO los sus 
com po« ite 
de mol ish 
de mon stratc 
de po« ite 
di^ Aon est 
di« Aon our 
di^ 5o1t ent 
im mod est 
im mor al 
im pos tor 
im prop er 
in con stent 
in solv ent 
la con icAr 
ma son icA:* 



the Etiffl^ Ltaigvaga, 73 

CQilPTia'XIX. 

to ^iS and ^roimttiee bel[)r ydu' read mircli« 

Good qpeUing is tlie euro v^^ to*good>6ad^; there- 
fore, jKudy^epieffiiig^ith'the gteatesi 0^ can 
speU att the words in this book, as soon a^ you heiur them, 
without seeih^th^tn. 

When you can {g)efl well, ycfr wiH ^kxk bocoixiQ a good 
reader; ted««so^'a^yoU simtt&e kldlelo^^ 
will be p«!mitt)ed to sliady gramtri^r. 
_Graiiiiinar wM' ieach you what id meant by the parts of 
speedi^ and bow" to^ speak and write* sts you o«^ht ; and 
^vit4lolft ibe iai^wtedge df ^grainifidT) your language will 
be kiodrrtet, «^ you wiU* idways be maifc^ by youi 
fiienda us a poor sdxobtr. 



6' 



LlissON n. 

A good book fr like Hk good friend,' ft wIB'Mc^ us good 
things ; but bad books are like bad men, they will teach 
us wrcnlf things, and kad^o. sin aad^ death. 

H we lead a good life, we sliall ha^^ Itio reason Id feai 
death ; b(Xt if dUr ways be bad we must change Uieni, oi 
[our end will be ttuserable. '>'"'- 

Our whde life .is made up of hours; days, months, and 
yeafs ; and tf we wish the wbofoto be good, we ti^usl sec 
that each part is g^bd, and then wm end will be hiEtppy. 

Gdd made vm to bless us, and he wiH do so, if ^e love 
him^andtfy to iifo all that is good, just, tod true. Wethusi 
be kind to die poor ; we must feed and clothe themj and 
give tfiem what they need if we can^ ahd not let them suf- 
fer forwant of our aid. 

God is the friend of the poor, and what we give to them, 
we laid to the Lord, whic^ he will repay us. 

Virtue exalts a nation ; but ain ia a rqi^oech to any 
people. 



74 A Jhu$ SkmiaHfat Frammmcinff 



Ranonber Uw giwt tralh, thai God m the cofnmon 
lareiH of all maafirfj nd Ihat, AaanSop^ .^ nmi are 
treUiren, and wbaft yon do fat olh iro »all yen lictve irea- 
^3n to oxpect fimn ^en. 

Love labour, tt jmM do boI need, its a¥aib m faeolth, 
^ ou may in aicknesB. Labour ffma a relisb and 9weei- 
less to your ibod, whicli aH the 8|Hcc8Lof India cannot ai- 
furd, if yoii dMuU be idk. 

Tb^ lazy ini|n B a hvden to hinaelC; tima. hangs like 
\ great weight upon hinpt 

Proceed not loapei^ or to Adj. belbve you have weighed 
your wQgdSf and ex^nuued the course of eviecy stj^ you are 
Lo take ; so ahaH diagmQe % iar from yau« and in }'our 
Uouse ishame will be aatmiger ;. repentant sliaU not visit 
y oil, nor sorrow disfigmni your cheek. 

Men are bora with two ^es, but with one tongue, in 
>rder that they should see twice as much as they say. 

The excesses of our youth are draughts upon our old 
ge, payable wjth loleieat, about thirty yeciup alter date. 



CHAPTER XXi ' 

7ord$ of fimr ^yUMeSf lib frtmary aectnt^ o» tJt 
syuMCf end the SMomkry accent o» the Mrdf^ 

1 % 

mi a Ue ' ee« sob a bfe par ti eip \e 

aw ti ftti 1y 8e« son a biy 3 

» pi OU0 ly flte re • tjrpe an di tcnr y 

I ri 0U8 ly va ri a Ue cor pu len ey 

n ger ous ly va ri ous ly dor mi tor y 

I ra h\e ness 2 for rai da ble 

vour a ble ar bi tra ry for mu la ry 

3 li rate , ar bi tra tor hor ta tor y 

ir.cr a bl6 bar ba rous ly or di na ry 

tri ot i^m mar ket a bU 4 

{ son a ble par don a bk ' ac cept a ble 

i son a bly par si mon y ac cli ma ted* 



the English Language^ 



75' 



; t 



ad jutan cy 
ad mi ra ble 
ad Rvi ra h\j 
ag gi-afi dize tnenl 
a) a Iiatf \ct^ 
am i ca b1^ 
am i ca biy ' 
an sirer a bk 
an te eham b^r 
iin ti qua ry 
up })li ca ble 
ap po «ite ly ' 
bur go ma stei* 
cat e g<*r y 
cat er pil lar 
cer e mon y 
char i ta bltf 
cre<i it a ble • ' 
crini i nal ty 
crit i ca] ly 
cur so ra ry 
CU8 torn a<ry 
(iam age able . 
del i cate ly 
de6 pe rate ly. 
lies pi ca ble 
[lif fereAiiy 
:Jig ni la ry 
ilil i geflt ly 
Jis^pu U Jble . 
lis so lu ble 
lis so lute ly 
lis syl la ble ^ 
;1 c gnnt \f 
jI i gi ble 
;n vi 0U8 ly 
;s li ma ble 
rx eel lencv 
!X eel lent ly 
!X e era ble 
X o ra ble 



ex pli ca tiv« 
ex qui site ly 
fell ei ful ly 
teh tun a ble 
fee u len cy 
fed er al ial* 
fig u «a tive 
gen er 0U8 ly 
gen u xtie Ij 
id i ot \8ta 
imitatiTe 
im pi ovis ly 
im po ten cy 
imjNi (Wiii^y 
in ft moufl ly 
in fi nite ly 
in no^-eent ly 
h« ftti ga tor 
inetivHiKir 
in ter eat ing 
lam ent a ble 
IH» er al ly 
.lib«rikiisw 
Iin e a meal 
man age- « 'Hie 
mar riage a bk 
mem wt a ble 
mer ee na ry 
nierei ful ly 
mieerable 
mie er a bly 
nav i fa ble 
pal ai a bk 
pal ti a tive 
peR#tni bk 
pen e tea tire 
pea i tent ly 
per emp tor y 
per iah a bk 
per se cu tor 
per iO|» al ly 



plen tiful ly 
pref er a ble 
ptee by ter y 
ptin ish a bk 
regu lar ly 
reg u la-tor 
rem e di less 
rep u ta ble 
ree o lute ly 
rev er ent ly, 
rev o ca bk 
eem i qua ver 
sem i vow el 
•epar ate ly 
ser vice a bk 
elan der oua ly 
spee u la tive 
stren u^ ous ly 
8uf fer a ble 
tab er na cle 
ttm or ov» ly 
ireacK er ou« ly 
turbtfleli ey 
vt ter a ble 
val u« bk 
▼en er a bk 
▼ig or eus ly 
TIB di ca tive 
¥ul aer a ble 
irulnera ry 
6 

eog ni za ble 
com i eal \y 
eom mend a bk 
«on ment a ry 
com mis sa ry 
aom mon al ty 
com pe tent ly 
conjugal ly 
con se quent ly 
con tro ver »y 



« 



A JvH Btaghdard for Pronouncing 



'omparA life- 
)om par i son 
:oiii pat i ble 
:on dem va bk* 
:on seen tw - 
on spie u oiu 
on tem pla t^e 
on lem/H i Ue . 
on tig u ous 
on tin a incv 
on trilb Q tire 
on rer sa bl^ . 
on Tert i bl« 
'on vki ei bltf , 
:or n^kt i hk 
le clar a tire 
le iin i tiw 
ie ist i aa 
^e lir i aw 
ie lifr «r nnce 
Jcliv «ry. 
(ie rir a lore 
ie stnie tkwe ly 
detestable 
de rd ape Hleiit* > 
di oer e sis 
di mia u live 
discour ajre mefttr 
dis crim t nats 
dis franclu^ m^Qi 
dis par sge flieot 
diil sat i» fy 
dis semi jiata ^ 
dis sim i ktr 
dis til ler 7* . 
dis trib a lir^ 
di rer ci fy 
di rer si tjf 
di vitfibW 
do cil i ty 



e mas ea hte 
em bar raas ment 
em bel H^ me*! 
emer«:gen4;y 
em phat l. cal ^. 
em pyr e al . 
eo covrafi&ment 
en fwpnt&isfi. maaA 
en vel ope meal* 
e phem e ris 
epiph a^ny 
e stab lish m^ni 
e ter nally . 
e ter m ty 
e vap o rate 
e vi« ci bk 
ezcesslrely > 
ex pe^M^Aenl 
ex pras si bk 
ex tem po ral 
ex tem po re - 
ex ten sky^ ly • . 
ex ter mi sate 
ex ter nsl)y 
ex trar a-fpiocc 
ex trav a gipi r 
fa cil- i tate 
^ cil i ty . • ' 
& nftt i ci^m • 
fira gil i ty 
fri gid i4y . 
fu til i ty ^ 
ges ticrU-kle 
her mapb lo dita 
by per, bo le ^ 
}1 lib er al 
il lus tri am 
im mac u ktc 
im pen i tence 
im pen i tent 



im per faetty 
im persi^'al 
im per ti nence 
ira per ti neot 
im per vi oas 
im pris oa mefit 
in ac en vale 
in an i mate 
in clem aa ey 
in erad i Ue 
indefi mte 
indelibk 
in del i cat^ 
in die a tive 
in dif far eace 
in dig ai ty 
in dustiivas 
in el e gaai 
infal libk 
in fant i eak 
in fin i tire 
in ftn i tude 
in flex i Ui 
in gan u mml 
in mt t tade 
in her i% anee 
in (|tti« i tlve 
in sen si bk 
in sen « Vfy 
in teg ri ^y 
in tel li §efiw 
in tem per ans^ 
in tem par at« 
in ter ml ly 
in ter prat ar 

in tim i d^ 
in Tes ti gftts 
in vet erate 
invid ious 
in vin ci bk 

■n VI o I Mm 



2S 



the English Language* 



79 



ir tev er endi; *^ 
i tin er ant 
la pid e oiur 
las etv i iHi9 
lo eal i tf 
lucidiQr " ^' ' 
mag nif i 'ccin€8' 
ma I<ev o lence 
mi rac ti loits '- 
mis man age meaX 
mu nif i eeace 
ne ces «^ tous ' 
non refr i &^etisit ' 
nonretfide&l ' ^' 
ob strep erovmr^ 
omnipotenee 
pa risk M>tt er 
pe milU ma 
pe nul ti nittte 
pereep-Mtfle * ' 
perplexity * 
perspicudus * 
po lyga my 
pre cip i tane^ ''^ 
predestinate' 
pre em i neici 
pre med i tate 
pre par a tiiw 
pre^ervativf 
pro eras Un ate 
pro mis cu cm 
pro ver bi al 
rascality^ 
re eep ta ele 
re ctp ro eale 
re it er ile 
re speet a ble 
respect folly 
re t^eci ive ly 
resuscitate * 



' ire yer ber >le 

Ye Yer n ble 

li die u lotts 

rigid fty 

•currili'ty 

vkg nif i canfce ' 

similitude' 

ao lil o quy 

som Bam bu Mraft"* 
' ata bH i if 

sta tis ti cal 

sterili^ 

stupidity 

sub servient 

"Successively 

su per flXL am 

su per la tivc 

su prem a cy 

sus cep ti ble 
' to bac CO nist> 

triumph ^iitly 
^tri um vi rate 

ty ran ni cal 

u naH*! ntous 

yiVL cer tain ty 

un civ il ly 

un gen er ous 

aft mer ciifal ^ . *: 

un wil liug ly 

veu tril o quism* 

ven iril o quist * 

ver nao u lar 
^i cissi tude 

vulgarity 

abomi Aate 
ae com mo date 

'■ ac com plish ment 
ac hei&m\ edg meat 
a nom a bus 



i non y motel 
a poc a lypse^ 
a poc ry pha 
a pol o g[ize 
i» pol o gy ' 
a pos ta cy 
a pos ta tize 
a pos tro phe 
ap pr»x i mate 
as ton i3h'ment 
as trol o ger 
tB trol o gy • 
as tron 6 mer 
tis troH my 
ba rom e ter 
%i og ra p^li^ 
bi og ra phy , 
com mod i ty 
-^eom pos i tor 
eon com i taiii 
Co op er ate 
tor rob oTate 
C05 mog ra pher 
eoa mog ra phy 
democracy 
de mon stra ble 
de mon stra tive 
de nom i nate 
do pop u late 
de spend en cy 
dis'con do late 
dis Aon est y 
economy 
e mol u ment 
em pov er ish 
e qual i ty 
ex po$ i tor 
'ge og ra pher 
ge og ra phy 
ge ol o gy 



*>^ «a1 • M««k 



Ak tt«^%W* ' «« 1m^ 



<w<k yvm *% ^1 






mBBtmm 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



his tor i eal 
hy poc ri sy 
hy pot e njitse 
i (io) a ter 
i dpi a trous 
i (lol a try 
im mod er nit 
im mod esty 
im pos si bU . 
im prob> bU 
im prop er ly 
in com pc te»t 
in con ti netioe 
tti oc u late 
in solv en cy 
in tox i cale 
ma hog a ny 
ma jor i ty 
me trop o lis 
mi nor i ty 
mo nog a my 
mo nop e. jize 
mo nop4> ly* < 
no ^ol o gy 
phenom e no£ 



5 

ihi lol o.gy 
phi los o pher 
phi los o phy 
pre dom i nant 
pre dom i oate. 
pre pon der ance 
pre pos ter ous 
pre roga tiv^ 
pri or.i 4y 
prog nos ti cate . 
pro nom i nal 
te spon si \Ae 
•sy non y mous 
i/oM to] a gy 
to pog ra phy. • 
typography . 
iin pop u bf 
nn war ra^t ed . 
ver bos i ty 
»o og ra {xhy ^ 
lUi o\offf. 
■ao ot my 

6 
ac cotf tre laeiii . 
ap pro va h]e 



bufloMier^ 
im move a h\e 
im pro va hlc 
fe mo Ta iAe 

8 
Ac com pa ny 
dis coy er er 
itis cor er y 
mis gov ern ment 
re coy er y , 

11 
nf firm a tive 
con firm m h]e 
In firm .a wy 
itt ^m^ixy 

oi 
M, Toid m ble 
jam bnoi dery. 

* oy . 
dit loy al ty , 

ou 
«c coQoi a ble 
dls eoifn te nanc^ 



.«1 lew a hlc 



Words of four 
syllabht 

I 

ki\ ran ta geovs 
id ver ti set 
id ver ti «ing 
il ge bra ist 
les pe ra do* 
li a pa son 
lis en a ble 
sn ter tatn ment 
?u ro pe an 



CHAPTER XXH. 

syUableSt the primary acMtt on Ae ihtri 
and the secondary accent mi the first* 



1 

hy me ne al 
in ter fe renc^ 
lig num vi toe 
mis de mean or 
mus ca ta do* 
per se ve mnce 
re en force ment 
sac ri le gtous 
su per vi ^or 



1 
HO bo hev er 
im dis palod 

•itper cMrgo 

me qiu ^ eenea 
ad a man tine 
al i ment al 
an a lep tic^ 



miaimammm 



tit^ EngUah Lemgwige. 



81 



- .•♦ ^ ... 
ap o plec tielr 

ap pre hen stv^ . 

CO a les cence 

com pre hen sive 

dis ad tan tage 

(lis eon tiii u^ 

ev er last ing 

n ad ver tenee 

n at ten tive 

n cor tecl^ntS8. 

n de pend enee 

n of fen silre 

u ter mar riage 



inet.aphy^ipA. 
Qitt ni pre^ en^ce 
pm ni pre^ ent 
pre de ter mine 
re im burde ment 
ret ro spect ive 
itti ae ceiit ed 
un der val ue 
.* & • 

ap OS tol ic^ 
cor. re spoiid enee 
ear re sptnid &^t ; 



Imh; i.xoa tt^l^ • 
par CL gor icjr 
pliil Q soph itk ^ 
8 . . 
un be, com ing 

dis ap point nient 
rcc oij Boi tre* 

\ oy 
me^ em pldy tnent 
pen ny roy al 

&w 
dis a yow )al 



CHAPTER XXrti: 



Words 6f f&vT syllables, the primary nccenton the fourth 
syllable^ and the secondary accent on the first* 



Chaf i ot^er 
el e earn pane 
RU|)«r induce 

4 
an i mad rcrl 



anie pe nuh. 
mis ap pre hend/ 
mis rep re sent 
mis un der stand 
mul ti pli cand 



super in tend 

.ar oir du poi$ 

ou 
su per a bound 



CHAFER XXIV. 



Idlfiiie99.wlll briBg4hee to poirerty ; hiMrby industry And 
prudence thou shall be fiUed with bread. 

Weslth obtained by deceit is soon wasted ; but he that 
gatliers by labour shall mprease in r4chea!« 

By the Ueaai^]^ of thq upright, tlie city is exaked; but 
it is overthrown by the mouth of thie wicked. 

Where no counsel is, the peo{de foil ; but in the midst 
of counsellors there is safety. , 

Train up a chil<{ ii^ the way he sliou^ go, and when 
he is old he will not depart from it. 

Correct thy son, and he >viU give thee rest, jreo, he will 
give delight to thy soul. 



^ A Just Standard for Pronouncing 

The rod and reproof give wisdom ; faul a, child* left to 

limself win brii'ig liis parents to sTmme. 

A prlidcnt cliild foresees the evil, aiid is cautioiis ; but 
he imprudent [kvss on rind nre piinfslied. 

The eye timt mocks at his father, and scorns to obey 
lis mbther, the ravens of the valley shall pick it out, 4Uk1 
he young eagle ^mll eat it. j 

Tiie wi<;k^ il«,e when no man pursues; but the rig-lit-! 
?ous are bold as a lion. ; . 

Tlie Hw of tiie wise is a fountain of life, to depart from. 
the smires of death. 

The wisdom of tlie prudent is to understand his ^'ays : 
but tiio folly of fools is deceit 

A wise man fears and departs from eifil ; but tlie fool 
rages and is confident. | 

Be not hasty in tliy spirit to be angry; for anger restsj 
3nly in flie bosom of fools. ' 

He that covers his sins will not prteper ; but lt« tliat 
confesses and forsakes lliem will find niercy. 

Where there is no wood the Hre goes out ; and where 
there is no tattler Uie strife ceases. 

A wokI fitly spoken, is like ap|ilte of gold in pictures of 
silver. 



ADVICE. 



Beware of close intimacy with those wh^xse tongties 
are calumnious towards almost every one except their pre:)- 
ent company, to whicli they are ever smoolli and fair. 
For he that commonly iiidulges himself in calunniiatiiig 
or ridiculing the absent, ptainly shows his com|xihy what 
they have to expect from hini after he leaves them. 

Never laugh at the ignorance or mistakes of others. 
Every person is liable to mistake in speaking, writing, or 
reading ; tlierefore, as you do not wish to be lauglied nt 
yourself, do not laugh at tlie failings of others. You 
woukl not hesitate in saying that H is wrong to ridicule 
the bodily infirmities of persons. Is it net luilieconiinor 



■BagSBMaMBBBaBBBBaBSBBBSgaBBBBB^^ 

the English Language. Bo 

then, to hxigh st the errouis of their edncation ? Certain- 
ly^ U is. If any c^ you have had greater advasitD^es in 
life than others, you oi^^bt to be grateftii to God« who 
gave you talents and health, and to your parents, who 
aided you in the exercise of them in the attninmeiit of 
an education. Bui be not proud and haughty because 
your education is superiour to that of oiherB. Remember 
that yoii were once as ignorant asf they, and would, most 
probably, have r^nain^ so, had y^u been placed in the 
same sitUiatioii., \VWiever you are applied to for inform- 
ation on any subject which you untdeietand, inwart it 
without prids or ostentatioii, for a greaidisplay of pride 
and ostentation is a sure indication of a ^weak mind. 

Prefer solid sense io vain wit ; study to be useful rather 
than diverting ; commend and re^oeet nothing so much 
as true piety and virtue. Let no jest intrude to violate 
good manners; never utier what may ofifend the chastest 
ear, . 

He that openly tebs his friends all tliat he thinks of 
them, must expect thai they will secretly tell hi»^eneinies 
much that ^hey do not thuik of him. 



CHAPTER XXV. 

In the fofilowiag ehapter, ff has its hard sound before e, U 

and y. 

N^e^^n UiM and in tfae Mowinff cha|it«M^ tiie figum will show Uie 
accentcf] sy&afales, without any otiifsr direction. 

1 11 2 4 4 

Geese gird par get* dig ger gid dy 

4 girl tar get dreg gy gift ed 

gecA: girt 4 drug get gig gk 

I ?^ld 1 big gin drug gist gig let 

<^et ea ger brag ger flag gy gild ing 

^ift gew gate - bug gy gefd ing girn let 

! gig me« ger crag ged ghet kin ging Aam* 

! s^mp ti ger > crag gy gib ber giv er 

M\ye to sred daff irer oib bous s\z zard ^^ 



qp4 



A Just Skaidard for Prctfunincing 



4 
hag fiib 

Wfgy 
teg gin* 
mug gish 
mug gy 

pig giH 
quaggy 
rag ged 
rig ging 
riggi«h 
rugged 
9crag ged 
scraggy 
shag ged 
shaggy 
sivtg gish 
8»^g ged 



«w« gy 
»ti«g^? 

stag ger«. 
ftwag ger 
8lvag pr 
triff ger 
tHig gen 

^^gg^^ 

4>oggy 
doggpd 
dog ger 
dQg gifih 

hoggim 
Dog gm . 



U 

girdM 

4 



be get 
begin 
for get 
for give 
mis give 

11 
ten gird 
1 

ed ge^ly ^ 
eo^geciieafl 
4. 

^d dijy» 
gid di nesa 
rag ged aes^ 
riigged ly 



rof gednew 

fCrag^ness 

f big guih oess 

waggery 

5 

tog gi ness 

bog gish ly 

log ger bead 

%e gjin ner 
be gin ning 
for get fid 
fbr five ness 
4- 
pet ti fog ger 

4 

for get fulness 



ire- 
m 



In Che fi^wiiur vordfl, ^ has it9 hazd «>und^ and bemg imaoedicteljrp 
ced«d by n arid tm lioce^i, U k pionoiiileed as if it wer6 wmten twice: Tni 
an-g^<Mtr^tetiift,,/af^jpitiBr!^ Mn-^oT) aw pnwounead aa if wiitlan wngifer^ 
ang-gwishf lang-gwid^ nnf^rgular* 



4 

An ger 
an ^ 
an gler 
an gry 
aii guish 
bun gle 
bun gler 
bun gling 
dan ffle 
din gie 
fan gle 
fin ger 
Kun geir 
hun gry 
iin gle 
Ian guage 
Ian g^id 
Ian guish 



4 

Ian guor 
Iin ger 
Iin go f 
Iin giust 
man gle 
man go 
min gle 
san guine 
shin gle 
shin ^es 
sin gfy 
span gle 
sprin gle 
stran gle 
swin gle* 
tan fAe 
iimgie 



youn ger 
youn gest 
5 

con ger 
con go* 
con gress 
Ion ger 
Ion gest 
stron ger 
stron gest 

mon ger 
DM^grel 

1 
tri an gle 
4 

an gri ly 
an gli ci^e* 



an gli dem 
an gu lar 
san gui fy 
sin gilt ness 
sin gu lar 
siir ein gle 
tin gu ent* 

eon gre gate 
eon gru enc« 
con gru ent 

distinguish 
ete tail gle 
ex tingoiflb 

dis en tan gl^ 
in ter min gl^ 



the Mnglish Language. 

i 

CHAFfVR XXVI. 

In the fMdmihf chapteiv ivtitYt nhin^n iiMcente6 sylll 
ble, and is tmmediately followed by kj q, or c, ^rd, it bas 
compound and tbix^d sound, oaf if it were followed by g hari 
as in lafkAv ccn^qiier^ utkIc, which tire pronottoCed a^ i 
writtien ban^:, kofn^-kuTj ufig-HL^ 

IVote.'^'imm fdmAm ef WyHefa^Dtofiditai^ in New-Tiwk, Albftil 
Hartfoitl, Coopentown, BeHows F^ik^ Canandaigua, Baltimore^ and of tl 
small Dictionary in PliiladelBbi% have not observed the trtte pAnunciati<i 
of man^ of the words in tbtf m>twin^ Chapter, t^e publishers of the Phi 
adclphia large Dictionary, have observec) the rule \ery closely. 



4 - 

Bank 
blank 
blink 
brink 
bunk* 
chink 
clank 
clink 
crank 
drank 
; drink 
dnmk 
flank 
frank 
hank 
)iunks 
jink 
I kink* 
lank 
link 
mink* 
pink 
plank 
prank 
prink 
punk 
rank 
I sank 



4 

shank 
shrank 
AHnk 
shrunk 
sink 
slhik 
slunk 
spunk 
sunk 
tinci 
tink 
tfuttk 
wink • 
4 

aifkle 
bank er 
bank nipt 
blank e< 
can erhie 
cank €t 
crank \e 
crank ness 
crink Ic 
drink er 
drunk ard 
drunk en 
frank lin 
frank ly 



4 

frank ness 
ink siand[^ 
in quest 
punc to 
rancour 
' rank le 
ritnk ly 
i^nk ness 
s^nk 1 
tank ard 
tink er 
thikb 
trad qui! 
Irink et 
twinkk 
twink ling 
un cla 
ran quish 
i^ink le 
5 

con cave 
con clave 
con cord^ 
con cottrse 
con qtier 
con quest 

8 
monkey 



8 
. xzu)nk ish 

d dunque 
' de funct 
disjunct 
, dis tinct 
, em bank* 
eh rank 
ex tinct 
- 4 

bank a bl<;* 
' bank rupt cy 
' drink a ole 
drunk en ly 
drunk eii ness 
frank in cens€ 
in ere ment 
in cu bate 
in cu bus 
pan ere as 
ran cor mis 
sane ti fv 
sane ti tude 
sane ti ty 
syn CO pe 

con cave ness 
con cu bine 



A Just Standard for Pronounciiig 



» }> -Mi * 



>n ^er or 

4 
im punct bf^ 
111 junct iye 
e Kn <iueul; . 
i$ junct ivt 
is tiiict ive 
is tinet \y 
is Uiict 



4 

tin tMUikdMitft 
r« lin quish 
Mib junct iv^ 

^ . . 4. . 
i|i 419 tilled 

4-. ,.' •• 
Mno ti motii y 

5 



de lia qiten cy 
dU junct ivr ly 
. per fittic tor y ' 

.-.4 . 
calftiiMm.eo « 
ia dis iinct ly 
in dis ii^t neM 

5 
un efw q««r a ble 



CHAPTER iXVU. . 

r ' • ' 

1 the iblidwing chapter, the different sounds of th are ex- 

hibiled. 



the fbHowing^'Wor^ Vi baus lU first gr iha/p 8ound| •• in thank^ think. 

6 

troth 



1 

oth 

tth 

eath 

ath 

nth 

ith 

oth 

eth ^ 

lane 

leme 

lief 

iieve 

[\gh 

iree 

iriee 

I rive 

roat 

rove 

ith 

mrth 



2 

lath 

path 

3 

north - 
swath* 
thai0 
(horn 
thonaAt 
thrall 
thwart 
warmth 

4 
breadth, 
breath 
dearth 
death 
^epth 
earth 
fiah 
filth 
frith 



bath 

health 

length 

pith 

plinth 

«eath 

aixth 

,fmtth 

«na|h* 

stealth 

strength 

tenth 

thatch 

thcfl 

thicA 

thill 

thin 

thing 

thrash 

thread 

Ihreat 



4 , . 
tlm4 .. 

thrift 

thrill 

tiirum 

thrush 

thrust " 

thui^& . 

thnrap^ 

thw:^ciE^ 

dhh 

twelflh 

wealth 

withe 

5 
broth 
xjlotht 
froth . 
nro^ 
thong, 
throb 
throng 



tooth 
tnith 
yovtb 
6 

doth 
month 
quoth 
third 
thirst ^ 
worth 
11 

birth 
mirth 
&u 

south 
ow 
tXowl 
1 
e ther 






t 7^, in the woide doiKf laltii mothf mouthy oalh, path^ and iwath^ has 
; sharp floufid when they are uscti in the angular number, and ita fiat sound 
hcntn(<y Hre naed in the plural number, as in cloths^ moths, &c. 



the English Language* 



91 



1 

fatth ful ' 
faith less 
four teenth 
fourth ly 
gold smith 
heath y 
le the 
pa thos 
sloth ful . 
ihe sis 
thiev ish 
ze nitii 
3 

au ihot 
swar thy 
thorn y 
thought ful 
thral dora 
4 

an them . 
breath less 
dip/t thoDf 
earth en 
e«rth quake 
earth ly 
eth ic^s 
eth nic^ 
fif teeath 
fifthly 
(ilth y 
health ful 
health y 
length en 
meth od 
pan iher .; 
pith y 
sab bath ^ 
sev cnth 
spend thrift 
strength en 



4 

^ic^ et 
thici ly 
thick ness 
thim b\e 
tliln ly • 
thfn ness 
this th 
' threaten ' 
•thrifty 
. than dei* 
' thur* day 
trIpA thong 
wealth y 

5 
froth y 
moth y 
6 

ruth ful 
yovih M 

8 
month ly ^ 
noih iiiig 
ihir»t y 
thir teen 
. thir ty 
thor ough 
worth Lsss 
11 

birth day . 
birth place 
birth right 

thou «and 

1 
de throne 
en throne 
north east 
south east 

3 
a thwart 
in thral 



4 

forth with 
here with 
north west 
south west 

5 
be troth 

au 
throti'yA out 
1 

a the i^m 
a the ist 
fatth ful ly 
fa/th ful ness 
hy a einth 
nine ti eth 
the a tre 
the o rem 
the Grist 
the or y 
ihier er y 
3 

»u tho rize 
for tl eth 
or tho dox 
4 

am a rantk 
i^m • thyst 
ap a thy 
ap Q'thegm 
cath o licAr 
jepi thet 
eth i cal 
^fUeth 
iilth i ness 
lab yr inth 
leth ar gy 
meth o dist 
pen ny worth 
pleth or y 
six ti eth 
svm tut thize 



nfm pa thy 
syn thc^ sis 
tweit ti eth 

blood thirst y 
thir ti eth 
thor ough ly 

eigh ti eth 

1 
ca tbedral 
pan the on 
un fa£th ful 
u re thrA 

tk ihsT tick 
le thar gick 

3 
in thral ment 

4 
a caucus 
ath let icAr 
ail then ttcAr 
me theg lin 
pa thet icA: 
•yn thet ic^ 
unthrifty 
3 

or the e py 
or tho e pist 

4 
sev en ti eth 

5 
pol y the i^m 

1 
e the re al 
le ri a than 

4 
anath a ma 
an tip a thy 
an tith a sis 



.'. In. 



 'f*'-'-" '. '■ |».'«?«=F= 



iS 



A Just Standard for Proiwuncin 



sr 



-4 . 

a rith me dci(: 
nu then ti cate 
can th^r i de^ 
mis an thro py 
pa ren the sis 
pa thet i cal. 
phil an thro py 
phil an thropist 
the at ri cal 

5 
an thol o gy 
•du thor i ty 
cu thol i ci^m 
ca thol i con 



hy poth e ns 
li thog ra phy 
ti tkot my 
mythology 
or thog ra phy 
^i0ocmoy 
the ol o gy 
t^er mem e ter . 

4 
m»ih e .mat icib 
net \vitti stand ing 
»ym pa thet ick 

5 
a poth 9 ca ry 



ap^phi the-^ txB 
ap o the o aiv . 
tn« o ]q gi an 

4 
i^rith meii e^l 
H die ist i cal 
hy po thet i cal 
math e mat i cal 
or tho graph i cal 

5 
bib li oth e cal 
or ni thol o gy* 

eom moB weaiih 



In the fullo^ng worcU, tk has its second ar flat soundf as ii 

that, this. 



1 . 
Bathe 

blithe 

breathe 

clothe 

hithe . 

lathe 

lithe 

loathe 

nieathe 

scythe 

seeth 

swathe 

the«e 

thine 

tho^e 

ihou^^ 

thy 

tithe 

u'rithe 



4 / 
than 
tliat 
them 
then ' 
thence 
this 
thus 
witht • 

6 
booth 
smooth 
eooth 

9 
the^f 

ou 
tHon 

1 
blithe 9<m6 
cioth ing 



1 

ei ther 
hea then 
loath some 
net ther 

2 

hr ther 
far ihest 
&r thing 
fiither 

3 
nor them 

4 
breth ren 
&thom 
feath er 
fur ther 
gather 
hith er 
lath er 



4 

leoi^er 
nether 
piilh ee 
tather 
a^utheni 
leth er 
there foi^e 
Either 
with er 

5 
broth el 

6 
amoo^ ly 
nnoollinesa 

8 
broth er 
Bf oth et 
0th er 
poth er 



S 
amoth er 
wor thy 

1 
beneotii 
be queoth 
^^hoM 
3 
wi^ dratff 

4 

diemselw 
there in 
thyself 
wlA fin 
with stand 

6' 

the^e of 

theyeoA 

ou. 

withotil 



^ ,^, in the word wUh^ when it is used alone or prefixed to other wordf, 
lus Ms flat 1011110, as in with, wUhin, withstand ; but i^en it is rabiobod 
to othi^r words, it has it« Irhnq) eoond, as m/orUufUk, herewUk, 



I 



mmmmmmmma^mmmmmmmamaeammmmBBBemsmm 

the JEnflish Lanffpqge. 89 



hea thcii ish /eaih er cocA ftit oA ^ 

hea thfn i^m 6 tm War tliy 

•2 broth cr hood 1 

fh thfnr Itof broth er )y tttt 4«r iiMth 

tfathcrly^ molh «r1eM 4 

4 ntoth^^rly ntver die less 

fathom tew • mother worl 8> 

fur ther m^e ^oih erwiee im iror tbi Qeei 



CHAPTER XXTHL 

WSIiMiiy leil me hmr many m& Hudce a cent 1 Ten. 
ITow many oento make. a dime? Ten. How many 
dimes make a dollar ? Teii» How many dollars make 
au engle? Ten. An^t^agle i^ a. .gold Qd% and the lap 
gert wlikh i» coined in &e UniCed SMf». Dimes and 
dollars are piltrer coins. Qent«f ace^ copper coins. These 
are. new species, of Goin.. Wha;*^ is Xne ancient manner 
of reckonuig money ? By pounds^ shillings} pence, and 
fanhings. 



REIVURKS. 

The friendships of mankind can dubsiit no longer than 
interest ceme^its them tqgetlier. 

If jncn praise' your efforts, su^^ct their jodgemenl ; if 
diey censure them, your own. 

We ask advice, but we mean approbation. 

If you are under obtigationd to many, it is* prudent to 
postpone the recompensing of one, until it snail be in 
your power to remunerate all, otherwitie you will make 
more enemies by what you giv^, than by what you with- 
hold. 

Imitation is the sincerest of flattery. 

If rich, it is easy enough to cohceal our wealth; but 
if poor, it is not quite so easy to conceal our poveity. We 
shall find that H is less difficult to hide a thousand guineas 



lk»^ ^^^ U^h 



■n^l— 







A Just Standard for Prdnouncing 



He that caa ph^se nolKxly, is not so much to be J^U^ 
s he that poJ^j;<:an please. ^ 

None (ue so &nd of sea'«t^.^ ^ilipa^ who do not intend^ 
> keep tham{ mich persons <:oye^ ^ecrels, a%a sf{iiand« 
irift covets money, for the facitf^owoC circulation. - 

In ii4i BociotiB»%it is adykni»lfl<lir associate with the 
ighest; not that the highest am tahvays tbriiest) bat, 

disgusted, thfere'j we can at^ify 4ilne desdMMi*, but if 
'e begin with the lowest, t& {iscend is impossible. In thcj 
rand theatre of hlHyifi.^ ^e, a|)ox tiokei takes us through | 
le house. 

We hate softv^ jiersons foeCCKme we id^ not It^miir tima ; 
nd we ^vi^ not know than-, luecttlBtt \ve haite tfa«na. 

Elf cess ifi aj^paM id a^dy foUy. The^ varyHriiiuxuRgBl 
f the vain wotild dodie at! the ^dbitkute. 

If you are tleto' fiiiid waiim kis eu^ient; for inocej 
)bs the po&ty tmd'pteases (^ -v^antoo: :» 

Beireve notiiilig Kgafkist anottier, buC upon gmxl author* 
y ; nor rejxjrt wlittt may hurt anotlier^ <i»tdess it be a 
reater hurt to others to conceal it. 

As the branches of a tree return thtir tap to the root 
om whence it arose ; and as v^ river pours its streams 
ito the sea, whence* its sprkig^ was supplied ; so a grate- 
d man r<^MirH3 a beiiej^t which he has received, aiid his 
eart is delighted therewith. 

It if) £ijjai08t a^difficult tq make ci person unlearn his er- 
>urs, as his knowledge. Mai-information is more hope- 
ss than non-iiifi^»mlion f for enoiir U aKv9-yj5 more busy 
lan jg^prancf;. Ignpranqe i^ s^ bWk ^t^eet^ on wliich 
e mp.y write ; but errqvir is a scribbled on^, pi\ which we 
lu^ first efase. . IgDoranoe is contented tp stand still 
ith her ba^ck to the truth ; but errour is morje presmiip- 
lous, and proceeds in the same direction. Ignorance 
[is no light, but errour foUqw^ a fal^e pp^ The conse- 
lencQ is^ tha^ ^rrour^ wh^n she. retrace her footst^^, 
PUB farther to go, before she can arrive at the truUi, tlw) 
:n<)r$i^(2e. How i^eces^ary^ tiien, to obtain knowledge, 
• discard errour, and to dispel ignorance.. 



CHAPTER XXIX. 



01 



In the followin^f diapter, x has the sonnd of gz^ whmi fol- 
lowed by at^ accented syllable beginning with a yowel, or 
with A, as in ex-alt, ex-hale, pronounced egz-alt, egz-hale 



I 
Ex hale 

3 
ex alt 
ex hattst 
ex hort 

4  
ex act 
ex einpt 
ex ert 
eK ist 
exvAt- . 

I 
ex ft men 



1 ^ , 

f $ ^ale ment . ex ot icl^ 



ex hatfst leisi^ 
ex kort-eTv '^ 

4 
iex act ly 
ex act n^ss 
ex &m iiie 
<ex am pk 
ex imk plar 
•x er cs^frt 
«ji h^it 
^, is4^i^6« 



ex or bi tant 
1 ex or di um 

anx i e tj 4 

ex u bk ranc^ ex an i mate 
ex u be r^t e^ 9s per ate 



ex n be rate 
lux u ri ahc(i 
lux u ri ant 
kini rf ate 
lax n Ti 9IM 
n* o rt t)t» 
8 



ei[ ec 1$ tire 
ex ec u toi" 
ex ec u trix 
ex eaipla iy 
ex em pK fy 
exhii a Fate 
6 



e^>r bi \tme^ jf^.Qiier a$e 



. CHAPTER XXX, . 

' In tlie following chapter, h is pronounced befol'e Wf though 
wrttten after it- Thtis, whidei '^aU are'*J>roiiounced as 
if writien kwale, hwttt. 



I 


4 


While 


whfet 


wheat 


which 


wheeze 


whiF 


while ' 


whig 


whikt 


wbim 


whine 


whin 


whitij 


whip 


Avhy 


whipt 


3 


whislc 


wharf 


whist 


4 


' whit 


whelk 


whiz 


whelm 


whur* 


whe^p 


whurt 


whcB 


6 


whence 


what 



9 

where 

whey 

11 

whirl • 

1 

wbee die 



4 

wher rjr 
whet stone 
^hif fte 
whim per 
wliim sey 
whin ny 
whip pord 



wheel v^righi whip lash 



whi lom 
whi ten 
white new 
whitd wasii 
whi ting 
whi tish 

4 
whor ret 



whip sat& 
whip stocA* 
whis ker 
wliis key* 
whis per 
whis tie 
whit flter 
wlik tl0 



2 


A Just Standard for 


Pnmouncing 


1 


4 


4 


rhirl }>ool 


where In 


whip poor will 


rhirl wind 


5 


1 


where of 


what ev er 


rlicre by 


4 


when cr cr 


4 


whif flc tree* 


4 


rhere m 


whim 9\ cal 


rer whelm 



. CHAPTER XXXI. 

n the following chapter, w at the end of a word is silent, 
and the o preceding it has its Ions soundi m in fel-low, 
wid'QWf wm-dow, pronounced /eMo, wid^f lotfi-io, d&c 

The manner of pronouneing feUhtOf wtf-ovs iinn^^2oso, 
?Z-7tf2?« md^r^ ynn^ttr^ &c. is a bapbermis eomiption of 
lie language, and eheuld be circumspedly wroided by erery 
nstructer and person that wishes to pfonowiee correctly. 

JVbfe— If f mistake fiot, { huTe heard manj teaehen^ in proncmncin^ the 
'orda ar-row, bar-rovot har-rowt &.C give a ita flat soiumI : bat thia la oer* 
linly eontiarY to analogy, and likewiM to the authonij of our orthoepisCa, 
»r they a» all unifonn in g|iving a its shoit aoiind in woida of thia daaa. 





4 


4 


4 


5 


iTXOW 


. iar row 


min nQV> 


wil low ' 


fol low 


arrow 


fur row 


. nar row 


win dow 


bol low 


el loto 


hal low 


'shadow 


win now 


mor row 


il loi0 


harrow 


shal low 


yar row^ 


sor row 


al low 


marrow 


spar row 


yel low . 


8or row« 


1 how 


meadow 


tal low 


5 


swal low 


il low 


mel low 


widptfF 


borrow 


wal low 






CHAPTER XXXIL 

n the following chapter, i is a consonant when before a 
vowel and preceded by the accent, and is pronounced as 
y, consonant, would be in the same situation ; thus, oZ-ten, 
pin-ion, are pronounced ale-yen, pin-yvn-t &c. 



l1 ien ba^ io 
ourt ier bann ian 
lav ier ftdell ium 
av iiwiT bil ions 



4 

bill iard« 
bill ion* 
brill iant 
cull ion 



4 

filial 
gal iot 
gall lard 
mill ion 



4 

min Ion 
pann ier 
pill ion 
pin Ion 



the English Language* 



puoijp ton 
rufi* lan 
ru nn Ion 
scall ion 
scull ion 
span iel 
trill ion 
triv ial 
irunn ion^ 
val iant 
viz ier 
5 

c»ll ier 
pen iard 



7r 
bid9 ioA • 

8 

on iqii . 

1 

al ien ate 

brev ia ly 

pie ia de^ 

4 
britl lan cy 
mil ia rjr 
▼al iant \y 

1 
bat till fa 
be hay lour 



1 

cmo mun ion 

pie be itn 

. 4 . 
bjit ^ ion ... 
ci vii ian 
com pan ion 
con viv ial 
do min ion 
& mil iar 
mo din ion 
pin ion 
pa ril ion 
per fkMoinr 
pos till ion 



93 

4 
fas call ioii 

re bell ion 

re bell ioua < 

«e ra^Mo 

▼er mil ion 

1 

al ien a ble 

4 
fii mil iar ize 
fa mil iar ly 

1 
misbehaviour 

1 
in al ien a ble 



CHAPTER XXXIIL 

Jolit), tell me the number of dayaii^ a year? Three 
hundred and aixty-five. How many wedcs in a year? 
Fifty-two. Haw many days in a week? Seven. What 
are they called ? Sunday, Monday, Tuesday) Wednes- 
day, Tlijuraday, Friday, SaCiflrday. How many hours 
are theka in a day 7 TweMy-lbitir. How many mmutes 
in an hour? Sixty. How many seeDBda in a minute ? 
Sixty. 

Qeorge, famv u the year divided ? Into months and 
seasons. How many are die months ? Twelve. What 
are they called? January, Fdmiary, March, April, Ma})j 
June, July, August, Sept^nba*, Qet(^)er, November, De- 
cember. 

Henry, how many barky corns make an inch ? Three. 
How many inches make afoot? Twdive, How many 
feet make a yard? Thsee^ How many yards make a 
rod ? Five and a half* How many rods make a furlong 7 
Forty. Howmaay fiKloag^ms^eamMe? Eight How 
many miles mate a league ? Three. How many inches 
make a cubit? Eighteen. How many feet make a 



««« A %>% 0^% 



c*:«. 



H5 

114 A Jast Standard for Pronotmcinff 

CyhaiiBs, how many gills make a pinti Four. How 
luajiy pkHs mafeft a qiion? Two* How many qnam 
make a galk>n? Four. How many gallons make a 
barrel? Thirty-one and a half. How many galloiR 
make a hog^ead ? Sixty-'three. 



Did youth but know the pl^i^ren that arise from an 
early culture of the mind, I am led to believe they would 
not waste, in useless pursuits, tb^ many iiours tiiey do. 
Gould tliey ,be induced to. become wise in season, they 
might escape tHose bitter regrets wliidi await the idle aiid 
vicious. 

How many have I been a witness to, who would have 
[jiven life ahnost to redeem mlspent time, when tliey have 
seen others of their age and rank in Bfc, whg, by making 
virtue and a right use of tune their first object, have risen 
to honour and riches h» tlie world. 

Many a trap is laid to insnare the fe^ of youilu 

A little tliai a good man bath, is better than tlie riclies 
of noany wicked piersona 

All our<»mfcrt8 proceed from the Father <rf Goodness. 

The eartli^is the Lord's^ find the fulness thereof. 

Return na maoevil fer evik^ 

Follow not the ways of evil men, they are of those tlw^ 
rebel {gainst the light ; they know not its ways, nor abide 
in its patlis. 

He who fbrmea the heart knows what passes within it 

We should be kind to all persons, even to tliose who are 
unkind to us. 

Reveal your secrets to none, unless it be as much theu 
interest to keep them, as it is yours they should bci kept. 

Vice stmgs us, even ia our pleasures; but virtue con- 
soles u^, even in of^ pains; 

Of all the marvelious works of the Deity, perhaps tbci«| 
is nothing that angels behold with such supreme ast(»i)sn- 
tnent as a proud man. 



 







m 



m 



the En§^isk l4tMgwt§^ 
CHAPTER XXXIV. 



wmmm 

06 



Wards ^f ^96 sylUbteSf the, primary accent om iheeecand 
eyUailCf 4md 4he eeaonmry a^fcetU on ike fourths 



1 

Ab 8te mi oils \y 

ac camu k tor 

ac cu «a tor y 

an ni hi la \Ae 

cen so ri ovs Ijr • 

com mo di oos \f 

com i»u ni ea ble 

com mu ni ca tive am Ih( v^iis \y 

con ve ni ent \y ea lum n! a tor 



an pay don a bis 

in .or mi da bis 
inordtfia cy 

4   
ac eus torn t bis 
ad Ter bi al ly 



cour a gt ions Vf 

e grs 1^ ous \y 

ex pe di ent ly 

for tu i tous ty 

gra tu i tour ly- 

har mo ni oils ly 

im m^ di ati; ly 

im pe ri dus ly 

in ge ni ons fy 

in ge ni omi ivsss 

in glo ri oos ly 

in /u rt otts ly 

in nn mer a bfe ^ 

in va ri a bk 

in va ri a bly 

4n vi o ht h\e 

la bo ri oils ly 

ma ,te ri ally 

me lo di ous ly 

mys te n otM ly 

I no to ri ons ly 

'op pro bri ous ly 

' pe CIS ni ttt y 

pe nu ri ons ly 

pre ca ri ons ly 

spon ta ne ous ly 

, un fa vour a bis 
I..- - - ui^ 



com mem o ra bis 
com mem o ra tsrs 
com par a five ly 
COB ibd 6^ a ey 
con sider a ble - 
con sid er a bly 
con sid er ate ly 
con tern po rary 
con tin u al ty 
CO tern po ra ry 
de clam a tor y - 
de clar a tor y 
defamatory 
de fin i tivs ly 
de gen er a cy 
de lib er ate ly 
de Kb er a five 
de ter mi na bl« 
de ter mi nate ly 
de ter mi na iive 
di mln u lite ly 
dis crim i na tire 
dis pen sa tor y 
dis trib o tire ly 
ef fbm i nacy 
e lab a rate ly 
ex clun a tor y 






ex tem po ra ry 
ex trav a gattt ly 
he red ttir Ky 
il lit er a cy 
il his iri. ons ly 
im pep e tra bis 
im prac ti ea ble 
in cen diary 
in defi nit^ly 
indifferently 
in dis pn ta bis 
in dis so lu bis 
in'-dits td sus ly 
in sligi bis* 
ines ti ma Us 
in ev i ta bis 
in ex o ra bis 
in flam ma tor y 
in gen ii ous ly 
in hab i ta bte 
in qiiis t tivs ness 
in Sep ar a bis 
in suffer a bis 
in tel H gen cer 
in tel H gi bis 
in tem per ate ly 
in ter minabis 
in val u a bis 
in vcter acy 
in vul ner a bis 
ir reg u lar ly 
ir rev o ca bis 
le git i Dna cy 
mag nan i mous ly 
mag nif i ceni ly 
mi rac u Ions ly 



-t . 



)6 



A Juwt BHmdapd far Ptoivo^imcing 



I* . 



>ar tic u lar \y 
ToKtteall^ 
)re cip i tftfi eV 
)re cip i taut If 
)re Itm i mi ry 
)rep«r a i^ y 
)ro hibitor }r 
■e cip ro cal \j 
i die ti l(n» ly 
lig Aif i cam if 



8U per la \xte ness 
uHChafi^Me - 
nil iaiih iMi * U» 
un mer ci fal \f 

consolatory, 
d«nomi n»t^r ^ 
(te rog a tor y . 
in e&t ri p l»le * . 



in hos pi ta bk 
inlDl^able • 
in ^r^Wi^tf 
prog nos ti e^ tor 
re ]rt>«it#ey 
itn war ttivt a bl0 

8 ' . . •- 
recov M'ftMc 
un cfifeiiliarl'a blc 
un tgoT em tt l»le 



■^dl^Hl^ftM 



Words offiv0 si^lahlesr^ priniaryi, accent <m tk^ third syl- 
lahh^ o/b4 t& 9^cfmdary £ifC$stU m the fir $^ and ^tK 



•1 . • I 

V.d van ta igeavmly in ex^pe dieikl 
id van ta goouMue»M in ex pe ri eno^ 



im bi fB i ty 
LS si du i ty 
:er e mo ni ai 
;er emam om» 
;on sen ta ne ovm 
;onspi-^ul ty 
;o» ti gu i ty 
;on ti iitii i ty 
;on tra ri e 1^ 
lie ta to rl ai 
lis a gree a.ble 
lis agreeably 
)d i to ri al* 



in g«iiui ly^ 
in stanta oe ous 
in sapport abie^ 
in ter jdisen ey 
ir retriev,ft>bk 
mat n nio m ^ 
Bier i lo ri ooa- 
minis teiial. 
mis cei la ite ovn 
no to ri e ty 
op por tu m ty 
par si mo nt otis 
per i era ni um 



}X com mu m eatc per petui ty 
ly dro pho bi a per spi en t ty 



m ma te ri al 
m por tu ni ty 
m pro pri e ty 
n com mo di ous 
n con ve ni cncc 
n con ve ni eftt 
n ere du H ty 
n ex cu sa bk 



post di lu vi an 
pre9 by te ri an 
pri mo ge ni al 
rec on cile a bk 
sub ter ra ne ous 
su per flu i ty 
su per se de as 
ter ri to ri al* 



tes ti ma ni %i 
un em ee«v a bl« 

per rear diusn 

3 
cqm Ibrm i ty 
in ii#ft.i(»ym i ty 
mul tk §ormi tf 
non c«a form i fl^ 
u ni lormt ly . 

4 . 
aca dem ical 
affa bil i ty 
a] i ment a ly 
a] pha bet i cul 
an a ly t i cal 
an ni ver sa ry 
ap pre hen si bk 
ar gu raent a five 
at mo spher i eal 
car a van sa ry 
cir cum am bi ent 
cir cum nav i gate 
circnni spect ive ly 
com pre hen si ble 



He BnglUih Lmguegt^ 



COR tra diet <ft f 
cred f bU i ty 
dem ocnitietf 
di a met ri cat 
fRsaMltrf 
dunbili^ 
el e ment a ry 
em bfe mat i ca} 
cpideiiiieal 
e qua nim i ty 
e qui lib ri urn 
eT an gel i oal 
fallibility 
, ilex i bil i ty 
ge ne al o gy 
gen er al i ^ 
hos pi tali ty 
hypo eiitieal 
IHe git i mate 
im mo ral i ty 
im mor tal 1 ty 
im per cep ti ble 
imper e^ti bly 
in «^ bil i ty 
in ac tiv i ty 
in ad yer tent ly 
in ar tic a late 
in com pat i blc 
in con ^id er ate 
in con sist en cy 
in eon {(iai ent ly 
I in con test a ble 
in cor nipt i ble 
in de pefid ent ly 
in de ter mi nate 
in dis crim i nate 
in dis pen sa ble 
in dis pen sa bly 
in di ns i bl^ 
in ex pres si ble 
in fi del i ty 



la 1^ nif i eanee 
in iig nif i cant 
insincerity ^ 
ilialaMIi^ 
intrepidity 
in tro dtic lory 
iri^abtibfe 
Kberality 
mag na mm i ty 
met a phy^ i cal 
o do Tif er ous 
par al lei o gfram 
paralytica! 
par a phras ti eal 
par ti dp i al 
per pen die u kr 
perioiial i ty 
pla« ti bil i ty 
pop u lar i ty 
pot si bil i ty 
primogeni twc 
prin ci pal i ty 
prob a HI i ty 
prod i gal i ty 
pu sil Ian i mous 
reg u lar i ty 
rep re hen si ble 
rep re «ent a tire 
sat is file tor y 
sci en Hf i cat 
sen si bil i ty 
sim i lar i ty 
sys te flMt i cal 
typ o ^ph i eal 
un in nab it ed 
un in tel li gent 
val e die tor y 
ver sa til i ty 
Ti« i 141 i ty 

6 
al le f^or i cal 



an a torn f eal 
an i mos i ty 
ap 09 toi i cal 
ar is toe racy 
as tro iiom i cal 
cat egor i cal 
e« ri> OS i qr 
deu ter on o my 
di a-bcd icat^ 
ec o nom i cal 
e qui pon der anee 
e qui pon der ant 
e qui pon der ate 
et y raoi o gy 
feneros ity 
nor i zon tal ly 
India soIt a ble 
ine qaal ity^ 
in ler rog a tive 
lex i cog rapher 
me di oc ri ty 
met a phor i cal 
par a dox i cal 
pe ri od i cal 
phil b eoph i cal 
phra ee ol o gy 
ster e om e try 
trig o nom e try 

a ni vet sal ist* 
tt ni Ter sal ly 
« ni ¥er si ty 

% 
k re more a ble 

Of 

wa a Toid a ble 

ou 
in snr mount a ble 
un ac count a ble 

(no 
dis al low a ble 



)S A Just Skjif^dard for Pronaunctpg 

TliefoUawi^g words have the frimarti accent <m,ike femrth\ 
^Uahl^^ and the secondary accent oji the seconcL 

I 4 4 

ib bre ri a tor a man u en sU . , pre ter ini per feci 

id min is tra tor an i mad ver nve 8U per a.bua dance 

id min is tra trix.. an 1 mad yeri er sa per a bim.dant 

ntd ti pli ca ter . ex per i i|ient %i .. su per in tend ence 

jn en tor taming bi e ro giyph idc, 8u per in tend, em 

4 mis rep re seat ed - & 

ibraeadabra . misun^erstandingan tispM mod icJt 



CHAPTER XXXVI. 

.   
Who is site Uiat with graceful steps, and tiith a lively 

lir, walks over yonder |^bia? 

The rose btuahes on her Gheeka; the sweetness of the 
fnornitig breaihes frem her lips^ ioy, tempened with inno- 
cence and modesty, sparkles in har eyes; andcheei^il- 
fiess of heart appears in all her movements. 

Her haine is Health ; siie is the daughter of Bxerdse 
md Temperance. 

Their sons inhabit the mountains and the piain. They 
ir^ brave, aaivc, and lively, and partal^e of all the beau- 
ieg and virtues of their sister. 

Vigour springs their qerves; strength dwells in their 
jones, and labour is ilieir delight all the day. I 

The employment of tlieir lather excites, their appetites, 
md the repasts of their mother refresh them. 

To combat the passions is their deligbi; to conquer 
svil habits thek glory. 

Their pleasures are modraate, and therefore they are 
lur'able ; theif re|9ose 19 shorty but fiOtmd and undiBtuiijed. 

Their blood is pure, their minds are serene, and the 
physician does not find the way to their habitation. 

1 have seen the flower withering on the' stalk, and hs 
oi'\ghi leaves spread on the ground ; I looked again, aud 
it sprung forth afresh ; the stem was cro\vned _with new 
l)udtf, and the sweetness thereof fiBed the air. 



the English Language. ^ 90 

I have seen the ^un. set m tljie we«t, and the shades of 
night shut in the wide horizon : there . was no colour^ 
nor shape, nor beauty, nor mnaick ; gloom and darknesi 
brooded around: I l<;)oked again, the sun broke fortl^ 
from the east, and gilded the mountain tops } the lark 
rose to meet him from her low nest, and the shades of 
darkness fled away. 

I have seen the insect, being come to its full extent,, 

I kmguish, and refuse to eat : it spun itself into a tombJ 

[and was shrouded in the silken cone: it lay without: 

feet, or slmpe, or power to move : I looked again, it had! 

burst its tomb : it was full of life, and sailed on coloured 

wings through the soft air ; it rejoiced in its new beiiftg. 

Thus shall it be with diee, mani and so shall thy 
life be renewed. 

Thy body shall return to the dust from whence it came, 
but thy soul tp God who gave it ; and if thou art good. 
^ thou shalt be happy ever more. 

Who is he tliat comes to save from sin and eternal 
death? 

He descends on a fiery cloud ; the sound of a trumpet 
i^oes before him : tliousands of angels are on his right 
hand. 

It is Jesus, the Sou of God ; the Saviour of men ; the 
friend of the good. 

He comes hi the gloi7 of liis Father ; he hatli received 
power from on high. 

Mourn not, tlierefore, child of immortality ! for tlic 
i^poiler, the cruel sjwiler that laid waste the works of God, 
is subdued : Jesus hath conquered death : child of immor- 
tality, mourn no longer. 



Never sport with pain and distress in any of your 
amusements, iuh- treat even the meanest insect with wan- 
ton cruelty. 

We may escape the cetisure of others, when we do 
wrong privately ; but we cannot avoid the reproaches of 



tmm 



EHBI 



1^ 



immK^mimm 



00 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



How fair is the jrose, what a beautiful iBower ! 

In summer so fragraut and gay ! 
But tlie leaves are beginning to fade, in an hoiiTi 

And they wither and die ip a da^. 

Yet the rose has one powerful virtue to boast 

Above all the flowers of the Seld ; 
IVhen its leaves are all dead, and ito fine colours losit 

Stilt how sweet a perfume it wiU yield. 

So frail are the youth and tlie beauty of men, 
Though Uiey look gay and bloom like the rose ; 

Yet all our fond care to preserve them b vain, 
Time kiUs them as fast as he goes. 

Then rU not be proud of my youth or my t)ea^iyJ 
Since both will soofi wither and fade ; 

But gain a good name by performing my duty ; 
This will scent like ttM rose, when I'm dead. 



I 



I 



Ur rea «oii a h\t ness 
4 

di^ in ter est ed ness 
re vcr ber a tor y 
un char i ta bk ness 

6 
a bom i na bl^ ness 
in vol un ta ri ly 
an prof it a ble ness 

1 
cer e mo ni ous ly 
cer e mo ni ous ness 
dis a gree a ble ness 
im ma te ri al ly 
in con ve ni ent ly 



CHAPTER XXXVn. 

Words of six s^lMet, 

1 
in cor po r* al ly 
in Stan ta n^ ous ly 
ir re me di a bk 
mer t to ri ous ly 
par si mo ni ous ness 
su per nu liier a ry 

4 
al pha bet i cal ly 
an a lyt i cal ly 
di a met ri eal ly 
dis in gen u ous ness 
em ble mat i cal ly 
hyp o crii i cal ly 
11 le git i ma cy 
in con sid er a ble 



the English Language. 



101 



ineoiidd^rMtljr 
indeftlifabk, 
aatbfiic tori ty 
recon mend • tor y 
lu per an du u ted 
in dis aim i natd ty 

ua in habitable 

6 
al le i^or i cml ly 
an a torn i cal I y 
as tro nom i au ly , 
cat e i^or i cal ly 
in ter rog a tive ly 
in ter rog a tor y 
paradozl calljr 
phil aojik i cal ly 

8 
ir re cor er a ble 

1 
a bece da ri an* 
an te di lu vi an 
dis ad Tan ta f eous ly 
disci pliQ anan 
en cy elo pcdi a 
<x tern po ra ne oua 
gu ber na to Q al* 
bet er a g^ no ous . 
media toHal 
med i ter la^ne an 
pre das ti na ri an 

4 
an te pre die a meni 

Words 

I 
Ex tarn po ra ne one ly 

1 
lat i tu di na ri an 
▼aletudittarian 

4 
com ma ni ea bil i ty 

im niA tA ri a1 i iv 



ar k to erat i cal . 
com pat i bi) i ty. 

c6n ge ivi al i ly 
dis aat 18. factor y 
dis sim i lar i ty 
dtrltfi bili ty 
. ex per iinentally . 
gen er al is si mo 
hi e ro giyph i cal 
im mil ta bil i ty 
I im pos si bil i ty 
in com pre ban arbk 
< in con tro vert i blc 
in cred i bil i ty 
in fal U bil i ty 
. in flex i bil i ly 
in sen si bil i ty 
in stru ment al i ty 
in VIS i bil i ty 
ir reg u lar i ty 
ma te ri al i ty 
pe cu 11 ar i ty 
pen e tra bil i ty 
per cep ti bil i ty 
re spec ta bil i ty* 
su per in tend en cy 
. sus cep ti bil i ty 
u ni ver sal i ty 

5 
an te ri or i ty 
in ib ri or i ty 
su pe ri or i ty 
of seven syllables. 

im pen e tra, bil i ty 
im prac. ti ca bil i ty 
in com pat i bil i ty 
in com pres si bil i ty 
in di vi^ i bil i ty 
per pen die u lar i ty 
nrA ATI te ne nul ti m&ta 



[00 A Just Si4indardfor Prmi&uncing 



I 



How fair is the jrose, what a beautiful flower ! 

In summer so fragrant and gay ! 
But t)ie leaves are beginning to fade in an hoiUTi 

And they wither and die i^ a da^. 

Yet die rose has oi^e powerful virtue to boast 

Above aQ the flowers of the field ; . 
When its leaves are all dead, and its fine colours IobI 

Stilt ho\V sweet a perfume it will yield. 

So frail are the youth and tl>e beauty of men, 
Thoi^gh they look gay and bloom like the rose ; 

Yet all our fotid care to preserve them is vain, 
Time kiHs them as fast as he goes* 

Then VVL not be proud of my youth or my h^viy^ 
Since both will soon wither and fui^ ; 

But gain a good name by performing my duty ; 
This will scent like the rose, when I'm deiMi. 



CHAPTER XXXVH. 

Wiyris of six syllMef^ 
1 1 

Uu rea son m hk ness in cor po m al ly 

4 in Stan ta n? 0us ly 

lis in ter est ed ness ir re me di a bk 

re ycr ber a tor y mer i to ri ous ly 

Lin char i ta bk ness par si mo ni ova ness 

6 so per nu mer a ry 
i bom i na ble ness 4 

n vol un ta ri ly al pha bet i c«l ly 

in prof it a ble ness an a lyt i cal ly 

1 di a met ri cal ly 

ser e mo ni ous \y dis in §ak u mm n^ts 

cer e mo ni ous ness em ble mat i cal ly 

lis a gree a ble ness hyp o cril i cal ly 

im ma ta ri al ly il te git i ma cy 

in con ve ni ent ly in con sid er a ble 

mmsmm 



mmm 



the English Language. 



101 



itieoiittdcrssely 
indefiilipible, 
sat ifl&e tori ly 
recom mend a tor y 
su per an nu u ted 
in die trim i nate ly 
uninhabitable 

5 
al le gor i eal ly 
an a torn i cal ly 
as tro non^ i cuti ly . 
cat e gor i cal ly 
in ter rof a tive ly 
in ter rog a tor y 
par a dox i cally 
phil o joph 1 cat iy 

8 
ir re cor er a bk 

1 
a bece da ri an* 
an te di lu vi an 
dis ad ran ta meoua ly 
dis ci plin a n an 
en cy elo pe di a 
ex tern po ra ne oua 
gu ber na to n al* 
het er a go na ons . 
media toii al 
med i ierianean 
pre desti narian 

4 
an te pire die a ment 

Wards 
I . 
Ex tem po ca ne (Hifl ly 

1 
lat i tu di na ri an 
valetudinarian 

4 
com ma ni ca bil i ty 

im nrtik Ia rS «1 i tv 



ar ie to ccat i cal . < 

com pat ibili ty 

c<m ge ni al i ty 

dis eat is. factor y 

dis aim i lar i ty 

dirl^r bill ty 

ex per i mentally . 

gen er al is si mo 

hi e ro glyph- i cal 

im mu ta bil i ty 
I im pos si bil i ty 

in com pre hen srble 
^ in con tro vert^ble 

in ered i bil i ty 

infallibility 

in flex i bil i ty 

in sen si bil i ty 
> in stru ment al i ty 

in VIS 1 bill ty 
. ir reg u lar i ty 

ma te ri al i ty 

pe cu 11 ar i ty 

pen e tra bil i ty 

per eep ti bil i ty 

re spec ta bil i ty* 

su per in tend en cy 
. sus cep ti bil i ty 

universality 
5 

an te ri or i ty 

in ie ri or i ty 

su pe ri or i ty 
cf ssven syllahles. 

im pan e tnv bil i ty 
im prac. ti ca bil i ty 
in com pat i bil i ty 
in com pres si bil i ty 
in di vi^ i hit i ty 
per pen die u lar i ty 

nrA an te ne nul ti matfi 



103 



A Just Standard for Pron^nncing 
CHAPTER XXXVIH. 



\ the foUowkig e)Mf>tefv all the accented ^yflMbhrn end wit}i 
a vowel, and the e^ which ^oUowf the adeemed ajrllftble, 
has the sound of «, and the accented sylteble m prenoun* 
ced as if it ended with ir, thus, o-ctd is pitMlottttced — ^^ 



N. B. AHthcaeeenliedfylhlifesiii the two <i >Hu <wi ag ,dn|>Kynwe mo- 
liounced shoft, vid Teacben sImmiU be very euefiil to lUw their ochoian 
monounce the vowels short in the oeocnted sylkbles| wlien tb^ spell them, 

4 4 14 

thus, a-cw/^ da4d^ net a*<«lc^ ot-iri. 

Notc-^-Saiat t^vchers «re of opfaiion that c, and |r^ in the two following 
chapters, ought to end the oocentexTsyHabieo, thus, an-kd^ unAg^-idc. Ac ; but 
as c ami g are hard when at the end of sylbibles, I think it would oe very 
bnproner to deviate hma tile ostabliriied rule of faui|ai9e b^ cpdinf liieae 
syllables with c i^d g» Children will readily learn to ptonounce the 
vowels short at the end of syUeibles. If those, who end iheae syOablea with e 
and g in spelling, do it to avoid the scholar's giving thfvowobi a long oound 
in spelling, to them I would observe, that tba rtii/fdf is* WofiO tlui tlie 



4 

Acid 
fa cife 
pla cid 
pla cit 
ta cit 
5 

do ciltf 
pro cesa 
4 

a cid ness 
de ci mal 
de cimate 
la cer ate 
mit cer ate 
pa ei (y 
pre ci pice 
re ci pe 
spe ci (y 
spe ci men 
ta cit ]y 
vi cin affc 
vi ci nal 



B 
do ci h\e 

4 
elicit 
ex pH cit 
11 li cit 
iin be cile 
im pli cit 
so Mcit 

5 
indocile 

4 

lie c<$0 8ft fy 
ne ces sa riea 

4 
an tt ei pate 
ati da ci iy 
ea pa ei tate 
ca pa ci Ijr 
di la cer at» 
du pli ci ty 
e da ci tf 
exptieitty 



4 
fe li ci tate 
fe li oi tons 
fell ci ty 
fe ra ci if 
fu ga ci ty 
im pli cit Iy 
lo qna ci ty 
lu bri ci ty 
me di d nal 
men da ci ty 
men di ci ty 
mor da ei ty 
mu ni ci pal 
nu ga ci ^ 
o pa ci ty 
par ti d pate 
per ni d ty 
ra pa ci ty 
rus ti ci ty 
fHt ga ci ty 
se qua ci ty 
sim pli ci "^ 



4 

so li dt or 
aoKdtmis 
so li cit resa 
io li d tilde 
Irii^dty 
ve ta ei ty 
ret ti d ty 
W vadty 
f*o radly 

i 
atrod ty 
$dto t^ty 
rhi no ce roa 
>relo dtjT 

4 
duodecimo 
eeeeE trid ty 
e las ti ci ty 
e leclri d ty 
BNd ti 1^ d ty 
per spi ca ci ty 
per ti nadty 



■f"WPPTWW^ 



tlie English Language, 103 

CHAPTER XXXIX. 

In th^ following chapter, all the accented sjrUables end with 
a voWel, and the g, which follows the accented syllabic, is 
pronounced sod like 7Vand the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced aB if it ended wilh j) Ituis a*gtle is pronounced aj-il, 

4 4 4 4 

A gile le gi bly i ma gine re fri ger ant 

di git le gis late li ti fftous re fri ger ate 

fra gile ma gi cal pro di giona re li gtous ly 

fn gid ma gs traie re li g>on ver ti gin cms 

ie ger pa geaat ry re li gtoiw 4 

ma gtcib pa gi nal 4 i ma gin a ble 

pa geAiK regi eide le gis k tire i ma gin a ry 

pi geoii re gi men le gis la tor o ri gi nal ly 

ri gid re g> ment le gis la ture 4 



si gii re gn ter ve ge la ble ab o ri gi nes 

tra giei ri gid ly vi ^ ant ly mu ci la gin ovta 

VI gil tra go dy 4 o le a gin ous 

5 tra gi eai ar mi ger avm 6 

lo gicir ve ge tate bel U gie rant an a lo gi cal 

4 vi gii ance il le gt bk as tro lo gi cal 

a gi tate vi gil ant in di ge nous ge o lo gi cal* 

da ge let 6 H ti gious nessj^il o lo gi cal 

fri gid ly . co gi tate o ri gi nal. tau to lo gi cal 

fri gid neu lo gi ead o ri ffi aate 5 

le gi ble pro ge ny pro £ gtoiM )y ge ne a lo gi cal 



CHAPTER XL. 

In the foUa^ng chapter, ch is pronounced like sh, in an ac- 
cented syflable, when it is immedialely preceded by the li- 
quids i or 11) and in words ofFrtHck origin; anjj i when 
fvlaced under number 10 is pronouneed Eke long e, as in 
belek, befickf ma-chMW, pronouncad heUk^ henshj morsheem 



1 


4 


4 


4 


Chaise 


belch 


bunch 


flinch 


2 


bench 


clinch 


hunch 


haunch 


blanch 


dreneh 


inch 


launch 


blennh 


fikh 


lunch 


stanch 


branch 


finch 


milch 



04 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



4 

Hiich 
>unch 
[uench 
tench 
reiich 
vench 
vinch 
i^rench 
4 

)£iurh er 
oranch less 
oranch y 
sunch y 
i^linch er 
iinch pin 
luuch ^on 
pinch heck 
punch eon 
Ljuepch less 



4 

trench. er 
truDch eon 

1 
cba made 
chi cans 

4 
in trench * 
re trench 

iO 
an iiqne 
bre vicr* 
ca price 
ca Ahier 
fas cine 
fa iigue 
in trigoe 
machiae- 
ma rine % 
pe-lisse* :- 



10 

police 
pro ilk 
ra vine* 
sor dine 
ton tine* 
va Use* 

2 
char la tao 

4 
in trench ment 
re trench ment 

1 
rleb att chee 

10 
brig a dier 
hue a nier$ 
can non ier 
cap a pie 
cap u chill 



10 
carbt nicr 
cav a Iter 
chan de lier 
dieir a lier 
cor de Her 
fin an cier 
gabardine 
gon do lier 
gren a dier 
mag a zine 
man da rin 
pal an qidn 
quar an^ tine 
tarn ba rtne 
trans ma rine 

1 
chi ca ncr y 

^ 10 
ma chin er j 



CHAPTER XLL 



In the following chapter, cA is pronounced lilieXs. 



1 

Ache 
Christ* 
chyle 
scheme 

4 
cha«m 
chri«i9 

6 
schooj* 

1 
chaos 
cho ral 
cho nis 
e poch 
eu nuch 
i i chor 
U laoh 



1 

o chre 
te trarch 
tro chee 

a 

ar chites 
4 

an arch 
chrisi en 
iphris^ mas 
i:hyin ist 
dis tich 
ech o 
mas tich 
pas chal 

6 
mon arch 
schol ar 



6 

schooner* 
. 8 
atom ach 

X 

eu cha rist 
hie rarch 
pairi arch. 

ar die type 
ar chi tect 
ar chi trave 






4 

al diy my 
an ar chj 
bac cha naU 
each ex y 
teat e chi«e 
cat e chi^a 
cftiediisl 
cham o mile 
char ac 4er 
chris^ en dom 
Christ en ing 



harp si chord chrys a lis 



or ches tre 

4 

al chy mist 



chrys o lite 
chym i cal 
chym is try 
ladi ry mal 
mach i nal 



mnm^mmmmmmemmammmmmmmm 
the English Language. 



m 



105 



mach i nate 

-I . 

mech a nism. 
mich <zel mas 
sac cha rine 
tech ni cal 

5 

chol er \ck 
moa ar cYiy 

1 
arch an gel 
cht me ra 
mos che to 

4 
chro mat ick 



me chan \ck 
or ches tra 
scho las ticj: 

5 
cha ot ick 
1 
hi e Tar chy 

4 
char ac te rize 
mel an ehol y 
5 
ol i gar chy 

1 
ch&^aie le on 
pa ro chi al 



9 

mo nar chi cal 

4 
iX chym 1 cal 
an ach o rite 
an ach ro ni^m 
cha lyb eate 
chi mer i cal 
chi rur ge on 
ehi rur ger y 
me chaft i cal 



sy nee do che 

6 

chirogntpher 



chi rog ra phy 
cho rog ra phy 
chro nol o ger 
chro nol o gy 
chro nom e ter 
ich nog ra phy 
lo gom a chy 
mo nom a chy 

1 
cat e chii men 

2 
piei tri ar chal 

4 
cat e chet i cal 
eu cha ris ti cal 



OHAPTEE XLIL 



Who is he thai has acquired wealth ; that has risen to 
power ; that has clotlied himself with honour ; tliat is 
spoken of in the city with praise, and stands before the 
king in bi^ eoundi? Even be that has shut out idleness 
from his bouse, and has said to sloth, thou art mine ene- 
my. He rises early and ^foes ta rest late ; he exercises his 
mind with contenmlation, and bis body with action, imc) 
preserves the health of both. 

The slothful man is a burden to himself; his hours 
hang heavily upon his head ; he loiters about and kno\\'s 
not what he would do. 

I His days pass away Mke the shadew of a cloud, and 
leave behind them no mark for remembrance. His body 
is diseased for want of exercise, he wishes for action, but 
lie has no disposition to wxyvt. His mind is in darkness ; 
his thoughts are confused ; he longs fon knowledge, but 
he has no application. 

He would eat of the almond, but he hates the trouble of 
breaking its shell. 

His house is in disorder : his servants are wasteful and 



•ty%f/%««r« «k%-«4-l V%i 



4^\ «•««**« • 



mt^n^r% i# 



 «T«4 Ik Itli.- 



100 A Jus^ Standard for Pronouncing 

eyes, he hears, he shakes tiis head, and wishes ; but he 
has lio resolution, till ruin comes upon him like a whirl- 
wind^ and shame and repentance descend with him to the 
grave. 



SELECT SENTENCES. 

 

To be good, is to be happy. | 

Vice, sooner or later, bring* mv^ry. 

We were not made for ourselves only. 

A good persc»i has a tender concern for the happiness 
of others. 

Modesty is one of the chief ornaments of youdi. 

Deceit discovers a little mind. 

Cultivate the love of truth. 

No confidence can be pluced m tiiose who are in the 
habit of telling lies. 

Neglect no opportunity of doing good. 

Idleness is the parent of vice and misery. 

The real wants of nature are soon satisfied. 

Boast not of the favours you bestow. 

It is a great blessing to have pious and virtuous parents. 

The most secret acts of goodness are seen and appro- 
ved by the Almighty. 

Our reputation, virtue, and happiness, greatly depend 
on the choice of our companions. 

Good or bad habits, fonned in youth, generally go with 
us through life. 

Our best friends are tliose who tell us of our faults, and 
teach us how to correct them. 

If tales were not listened to, there would be no tale 
bearers. 

To take sincere pleasure in the blessings and excellen- 
ces of otiiers, is a sure mark of a good heart. 

A kind word, nay, even a kind look, often affords com- 
fort to the afflicted. 

Every desire of the heart, and every secret thought, is 
known to liim who made u>'. 



^€ English Language. 



lOT 



He that car^ for hknscif only,' haa but few pleasures^ 
and tliose few are of the lowest order. 1 

Partiality to self, often hides from us our own &ult8,{ 
while we see very clearly the same faults in otliers. 

Whoso regards dreiuns, is like hini that catches at a^ 
shadow and follows tlie wind. 

Commend not a man for his beauty ; neither abhor ft 
man for his outward appearance. 

If thou seest a man of understandings get thee beliniee; 
unto him> and let his precepts enlighten thy mind. 

Let thy soul love a good servant, and defraud him not 
of liberty* 

Honour (hy fatlier with tliy whole heart, and forget not 
the sorrows of tliy nfwtlier. 

How canst thou repay them the things they have dofie 
for thee? 



GHAPTER XLHI. 

In the folloiring ehiipter, c has the sound of sh when fol- 
lowed by eo, to, ie, to, or eo», and is immediately preceded by 
the accent^ as in o^cean^ pronounced o^kun^ &c. 



I 
6ra ciaufl 
o cean 
80 cial 
spa cious 
spe cious 

lus eious 

1 
gla cl al 
gla ci ate 
gra eious If 

1 
a tro cious 
att da cious 
ca pa cious 
crus ta ceous 



fal la ctoiis 
fe ro cious 
fi du cial 
fu ga cious 
her ba c^us 
lo qua cious 
pro Ca cious 
ra pa cious 
sa ga cious 
se qua cious 



pro Vin tiki 
1 

so ei a ble 
so ci a bly 

1 
ap pre ci ate 
as so ci ate 



«•« <^ai» 



te na cious 

to pha ceous dis so ci a(e 

vi va cious e ma ci ate 

TO ra cious vo ra cious ly 

4 4 

CO er cion . an nun ci ate 

i*Am miAi* n\ik\ » mm ^i oim 



^ro Tin cial i^m* 
6 

ex cm ci ate 

I 
ar gil la ceous 
con to ma cious 
ef (i ca cious 
a tro cious ly i" pa pa cious 
a tro cious ness per spi ca cious 
a« da cious ly l>er ti na cious 
con so ci ate per ▼» ca cious 

sap o na ceous 

1 
fi du ci a ry 

« A ^ r» ^: ... 



lOQ 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 
d^APTER XLIY. 



[n the foBowing chapter, s and sc have the sornid of ^^ whenj 
foWoweA by iOf te, or to^ and the accent precedes, as in 
caS'Si'^ con^cUms^ pronounced Icash'she'^ kon-shus, &c. 



4 
Man sion 
mission 
pas sion 
pen sion 
ten sion 
ver sion 

5 

con science 
con scions 

4 

cas si a 
pas sion ate 
tran si ent 

5 



4 

as een sion 
aspersion 
a rev sion 
cornmis sion 
com pas sion 



4 

e mis sion 
ex cur Stan 
est pan sion 
ez pres sion 
ex tension 



con fes sion 
con rer sion 
con rul sion 
de clen sion 
de pres sion 
de seen sion 
di men siim 
con scions ly dis ens sion 
con scions ness di» mis sion 
4 dis per sion 

dis sen mon 
di ver sion 
e mer sion 



com pres sion im mer sion 
com pul sion im pres sion 



ac ces sion 
ad mis sion 
ag gres sion 



im pul sion 
in cur sion 
in ver sion 
o mis sion 
op pres sion 
per mis sion 
per ¥er laon 
'pos seA sion 
pre ten sioti 
pro ces sion 
pro fes sion 
pro gres sion 
re mis sion 



re pul sion 
re ver sion 
snb mis sion 
sub rer sion 
sue ces sion 
sup pres i»ion 
sus pen sion 
trans grcs sion 
4 

mis sion a ry 
pas sion ate ly 

4 
commissioner 
congressional 
pro fes sion al 

4 
apprehiension 
in ter ces sion 
in ter mis sion 
rep re lien sion 



CHAPTER XIiV. 

In the following chapter, t has ^e sound of sh when fol- 
lowed by to, te, or to, and the accent immediately pre- 
cedes, as in pap-Haif pa^iient^ fno4ion, pronounced par- 
shal, porshentf fMhBMm* ^ ^ 



1 


1 


4 


4 


l\Io tion 


station 


cap tion 


fric tion 


na tion 


2 


cap tious 


men tion 


no tion 


partial 


die tion 


nup tial 


pa tience 


fac tion . 


sec tion 


pa tient 


a«e don 


Ike tious 


B 


por tion 


can tion 


fie tion 


op tion 


po tion 


oa« tious 


lie tious 


i 


quo tient 


4 


frae tion 


no tion al 



mmHanMm 



lAe English Language- 



1 

ra it o 
sa ti aM 

2 
lYarUalijr' 

3 

op tioi^ tx^ 
1 

ab Itt tion ' 
ap por tiom > 
ces ifi^ Yion 
ci taCkM 
com mc^ Udh 
coin pl^ tidli 
can ere tlon 
i^reatioti. 
tie VD tlafT 
clis cu tient 
do lia fioit 
du ra tion 
e mo tion 
k; qua timr 
fa ce tioot 
for ma tk>n 
found a tioti 
Im pa tieil^' 
[m pa ti«m 
le gatioA 
lo ca tion 
BU tifc tioii^ 
lo tation 
}h la tbn 
»ra tion 
^antation 
>ol lu tkm 
Mri ira tion 
^roba ttatt 
|tro la tion 
^o mo tion 



ptftrjgn tion 
t^iio ta tioti 
JN^iation 
foi^ tioit 
aal ira tion 
ie ere tion 
ienih tion 
io Hi tion 
Itag na tion 
trans liltion 
\tL ca tldii 
rex a don ' 
Vex a tiotts 
tl Jbrti tion 

2 
iiv partial 

8 
a bor tion 
ex (or tion 

4 
a)> Ttip tioti 
ab 6tra^ tion 
af fee tion 
af flic tion 
-ai set tion 
M sum;' tion 
at ten tion 
attra€ tipn 
cd lee tion: 
can cep tion 
eon fee tion 



iSe ciep tion . 
)i(^ due t!dn 
defection 
de jee tioil 
6i scrip tioki 
dtr set tioA 
destnic tion 
d* tec tion 
de ten fioft 
de-trac tldn 
direfdtfoit 
di tup tion 
^is S4^ tion 
dis trac tfon 
'eje6 trdtt 
e kc tibil • 
e rec tiorir 
^ rup UcTrt 
Hfes sen ^.t^' 
c y\6' ticin 
' ex cep tion 
ex trac tion 
in die t?on 
inddefion , 
infection . 
in fee ti^tt^ 
in Hce tioii 
in; fife tion « 
in j(9C tion 
in gcrip tiitVn 
insertion 



edn Btruc tion in spec tioh 
con sump tion in strtte tion 

in ten tion 
ir rup tion 
11 cen tiou9 
objection 
ob strue tion 
per cep tion 
per fee tion 

TW% fttrt'^l 



con ten tion 
cdti ten tious 
oon trae tion 
eon ran tion 
eon Tie tion 
eor rec tion 
cor mp tion 

rMi Apart rial 



fti 



• 

4 

t^ ettip tljDn 
pre 9crip tion 
pr% inmp tion 
pre' ven tion 
pro dfiiVi tion 
^r&tet tion 
pro tM i^oti 
pttf den tidl 
re ac tidn 
re tep (ion 
fib demjE> tioh 
re dm* tf ofn 
re flee tloii 

/ re 6trtc tion 
r^ ten tion 
f e trac tion 
&e lec tton 
sent^n iioitt 
subjec iloii 
sub scrip tioh * 
sub stain tial 
sub striic tion 
trans ic tion 

B 
ii db|^ tion 
de coe t)on 
I 
itttefton^^r 

f 
sta if on a ff 
4 

ae tfon d bla 
die t!on a rf 
1 

. expaitiate 
fa 6e tious If 
im pa tient ly 

. in gra ti atl$ 
in sa ti ate 



no 



A Just Standcird far Pranowiicing 



I 
propor tlonfd 
pro por tton atf 

2 
im par tial ly 

4 
af fee ^oQ ate 
in ten tion al 
11 cen ti ate 
sub Stan ti ate 

1 
ab di ca UoQ 
ab er ra tion 
ab ju ra tion , 
ab ne jra tion 
ab ro ga tion 
■ab so lu tion 
ac cepta tion 
ac cla ma tion 
ac cu ^a tion 
ad mi ra tion 
ad o ra tion 
af feet a tion 
af iirm a, tion 
ag gra va tion 
ag gre ga tion 
al ter ca tk)n 
am bn la tion 
am pu ta tion 
an i ma tion 
ap pel la tion 
ap pli ca tion 
ap pro ba tion 
ar bi tra tion 
at test a tion 
ai/gmenta tion 
av ca tion 
cal cu la tion 
eel e bra tion 
cir cu la tion 
com bi na tion 

mm menil • f\t\r\ 



. 6901 mn ta tion ~ 
com pen sa tion 
com pi la tion 
eom pli ta tion ^ 
com pu ta.tion 
qon nem na tion 
con 'firm a tion 
confia ca tion 
eon ila g;ra tion 
con form a tion 
oon filiation 
£on ju ga tion 
eoaju ra tion . 
con/8e era tion. 
cen ae eu tion 
,con «o la tion 
«on stel la tion 
con sier na ti6n 
eon sti tu tion 
con suit a tton 
oon sum ma tidn 
con Imp pla tion. 
coft tn bu tion 
eoB vet aa tion < 
con TO cation 
C9p u la tion 
cor o na tion 
eor po ration 
cul ti Ta tion 
dec .la ma tion 
dec la ra tion 
decli na ti^^ 
dec ra tidn 
ded i ca tion . 
dejr ra da tion 
dele ga tion , 
dem on stra tion 
dep re d«( tion 
dep ri ra tion 
dep n ra tion 



1 

d«ir.i va tion 
der o ga.tion. 
des ig na tion 
des la tiMi 
fle$ pe ra tion 
dettti na tioa 
dea ti tu tiou 
det est a tion 
de vi a tion 
dim i na tion 
dis ie ca tioA 
dispen 8a ti<Mi 
dis pro por tie9 
dis pu ta tion 
dis ser ta tion 
diasipa tion 
dis sp lu tion , 
dis tri.bu iiqn 
div i iia tion 
dom i na tion 
el e va tion 
el o €u tion 
em i gra tion 
am H la tion 
es ti ma tion 
ev o lu tion 
eJC ca va tion 
ex cla ma' tion 
ex e era tion 
ex ecu tion 
ex ha la tion. 
ex hort a tioA 
•X pect a tion 
ex pi a tion 
ex pi ra tion 
ex pla na tion 
ex port a tion 
gen er a tion 
gtt ber na tion 
hab i ta tion 

i1 luA tra tinn - 



ike English LmguagC: 



im i ta tion 
im mo la tion 
im pli ca tion 
im port a tion 
Im pu ta tion . 
in cii na tii^n 
In di ca tion 
in di^ na tion 
in flam ma tiOn 
information 
in no va tion 
in spi ra tion 
in stal'la tion 
in sti ga tion 
in sti tu tion ' 
in ti ma tion 
in to na tion 
in vi la tion 

 

in tin da iion 
in vo ca tion 
in vo lu tion 
ir ri ta tion • 
lam ent a tion 
lib er ii tion 
11 m it a tion 
lit i ga tion 
man ci pa tion 
med i ta tion 
niit i ga don 
mod er a tion 
nav i ga tion 
nom 1 na tion ' 
ob li ga tion 
ob «er ra tioa 
oc cu pa tibn 
op era tion 
or di na tion 
08 ten ta tion 
OS ten ta tious 
pal li a tion 
pal pi ta tion 



1 

pen e tni tion 
perfo ration 
permu ta tion 
per pe tra tion 
per se cu tion 
per spi fa tion 
pop u la tion 
prep ar a tioii 
pre« er va tion 
proc la ma tioii 
prom ul ga tion 
prop a ga tion 
pros e cu tion 
pros d tu tion 
prot est a tion 
pr6v o ca don 
pub li ca tion 
rec ant a tion 
rec re a tion 
reform a don 
'refutation 
rel ax a don 
rep a ra tion 
rep ro ba don 
rep u ta tion 
re« er va tion 
re« ig na don . 
res lu tion 
res pi ra don 
res ti tu don 
res to ra don 
ret ri fou tion 
ren^ e la tion 
reY o lu tion 
sal u ta tion 
sep ar a tion 
seq ues tra tion 
sira u la tion 
spec u la tion 
sdm Q la tion 
stip u la tion 



1 




sub li ma tion ' 
suffoca tion 
sup plica tion 
sup pu ra tion 
ter mi nh tion 
toleration 
trans mi gra don 
trans port a don 
trib u la tion 
val u^ a tion 
va ri a tion 
vin di ca tion 
vi o la tion 
vis i ta tion 

4 
ben e die don 
cir cum stan ditl 
eir cum spec tion 
con ii den tial 
con se (]uen tial 
contradiction 
in sur rec tion 
in ter<iiction 
in ten r«(« aon 
in ter sec don 
in tro due tion 
ju i*is die tion 
pen i ten tial 
pes ti len tial 
pre di lee tion 
pre« i den tial* 
prov i den tial 
pu tre fkc tion 
ree ol lee don 
re$ ur rec tion 
rev er en tial 
sat is fac tion 
stu pe fae tion 
super scrip don 

5 
e qui noc dal 



I 



112 



m ^ m. ^ lu i j i" i . n 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing' 



'A'.'iV ^J^l i.»,.,,j4.,^ii- 






e lee tiun c«r* 

1 
in sa ti a ble . 
in sa ti.a My 
ne go ti a bV* 
rie go ti a ting 
I pro ba tion a ry 
pro por tion « pic. 
pro por tion H bly 

4 
Jif fee tion ately 
con fee tionji ry 
in ten tion al ly 

\ 

con 9ti tu tiqn al 
ex e cu tion er 
rev lu ticoi ist 

4 
con fi den.tial ly 
res i deu |iar y 

1 
ab bre yi a iiot^ 
a bom i na tion 
ac eel er a tidn 
ac conn mo da tion 
ac eu mu la tion 
ad min is tra tioii 
ag glu ti na \\qi\ 
al le vi a tion 
a] lit er a ti0n 
a mal ga ma tion 
am pM ft ^ fioa 
an ni h| la tion 
ap pro pari a ikoxi 
ap pro3( i ma tion 
ar gu m^if|t s^ tioq 
ar tic u lu tion 
as sas si na (ioi^ 
as sev er a tloa 
as $im i la tion 
ca luni ni a tion 



1 

cir cum lo cii tiQ» 
cir cmn val la tian 
clas si fk ea tion 
coagulation 
com. mem o ra tiqn 
com mi^ er a tion 
com niuni ca ticua 
eon fed er a tion 
con fig u ra tion . 
con aid er a tion 
con sol i da tion 
con tarn i na tion 
coil tin tt a tion 
CO op er a Uoii 
cor rob o ra tion 
de gen era tion  
de lib er a tion 
de Un e a tion 
de nom i na tion 
de ter mi na tion 
dis crim ina tion 
difl fig u ra tion 
i\U sem i na tion 
dis sim u la tion 
ed:i fica tipn 
e lee tion eer ing. 
e lu ci da tion 
e man ci pa tion 
e nu mer a tion 
e vac u a tion 
e vap ra uox^ 
ex ten u a tion 
ex ter mi sJia tion 
for ti fi ea tion 
ges tic u la tion 
glo ri fi ca tion 
hu mil i a tion 
11 In mi na tion 
in au gu ra tion 
in cor po ra tion 
in oc u la tion 



1 



in OS cu UUon 
in sem i na tipa 
in sin u a tion 
in ter pre ta tion 
in ter fo ga tion 
in tox i ca tion 
in ves ti ga tion 
jus ti fi ca tion 
mod i fi ca tion 
mor ti fi ca tion 
mul ti pU ea tion 
or gj^ niza tion 
pre cip i t|a tim 
pre des \i na tion 
pre med i ta tioB 
pro craa tin ft tion 
prog nos ti qa tion 
pu ri fi ca tion 
qual i fi ca tion 
rat i fi ca tiqn 
re al i za tion*^ 
re cip ro ca tion 
rec om mend a tion 
re gen er a tion 
re it era tion. 
rep re ^enta Uon 
re tal i a tion 
sig nif i ca tion 
trans fig u ra tion 
ra ri e ga tion 
ver si fi ca tion  

.1 
con sti tu tion al ist* 
rev o lu tion a ry 

I 
un con 8iti tu tion al* 

4 
plen i po ten tia ry 

1 
ex com mu.ni ca tion 
rec on cil i a tion 



the EngKsk Language. 113 

■CHAPTER XLYI. 

The tongue of the sincere is rooted in his lieart ; hy- 
pocrisy and deceit liave no place in his words. 
! He blushes at a lakehood, and is eoufoimded ; but in 
i speaking the truth he h;aa a steady eye, 
I He supports the dignity of his character as a man ; and 
I scorns to stoop to the arts of bypooisy. 
I He is consistent with himself, he is never embarrojBsed, 
he has co^^age to speak the truth ; but to lie he is afraid. 

He is far abdve the meannes^^ ct dissimulation ; the 
words of his mouth ai;e thethoughts of his heart. 

Yet w*th prudence and caution he opens bis lips.; be 
studies what is right, and speaks with discreticm. 

He advises with friendship, he reproves with freedom, 
jand i^hdtsoever he promises, he will if poesiUe perform. 
i But the tboi^lUs of the hypocrite are iud in his breast ; 
he masks his words with the bkenessof titith, while tlie 
I business of h^ life is to decdve. 

' He laugl)s in sorrpw» he weqw in joy, and the words of 
I his mouth have not the kiterpretation ^ his heart 
i He works in tlie dork as a mole, and fmycm he is safe ; 
I but lie blmiders into light, and is exposed with his dirt on 
ibis head. , ^ 

He passes bis days* in perpetual constraint ; his Umgue 
and his heart are ibrever at variance 

fool! the pains which thou takest to hide wliat 
thou art, are more than would imkt thee what thou 
wouldst seem ; and tlie chiklren of wisdom «hall mock 
at thy cunning, when in the midst of security, thy dis- 
guise is ptrfpp^ off, And th^ finger of deriakM^ shall poiiit 
thee to acim. 



OBSEBVATION& 

A yfim man wffl consider, not so much the present 
pleasure and advantage of a measure, as its future conse- 
quences. 

0»-_.lJ IJ _-i^l^*^A 1 _1J1 J-- 1 t 



1 14 A Jusi Standard for Pronouncing 

Never speak ' of a mail's riftiies to his face, nor of 
lib faults beirind his back ; tlius you will equally avoid 
ifatiery, wbieh k disgusting, and skmder, which is 
criminal. 

If you be poor, labour wiH procure jou food and doch- 
ing; ; if you be ficb, it wiH.strengtIien the body, invigorate 
ilie tniiM}, and keep you from vice* Every person blight 
to be busy in some employment. 

We n\ay as well expect that God will make us rich 
without industry, as that he will make us good and hi^y 
without mtf own endeavours. 

Some iT^en read for the purpose of learning to write ; 
oihen^ for the purpose of learning to talk ; (ho former 
study for the sak^ of science^ and the latter hr the sake 
of amMsement.'* 

He 9ek)o»i Uvea fhigaMy, who lives by chance. 

Sfnatl parties ma(e |vp in diligence what they wunt in 
niunbersi 

Were the life of man prolonged, he woiiM beoonse such 
a pfoioieiit in vMlany, thai it would be necessary to drown 
the world again, or to burn it; 

Beftpolism can no more exist in a nation, 'wtil the 
liberty of the piess be destioyed, than the night c&o hap- 
pen before the sun is set • « 

Tfeiitt vktue which depend^ on opinion, looks to tecrecy 
abi^e, and could not be trusted in a desert 

More have been ruined |)y their servants, than by their 
mastera. 

it is fKihr to he attacked by some men, than to be pro- 
tected Wy tbam. 

Tli^ flmie^ fifcnAshipB have been Ibrnitd in mutual 
advenity, as i^ron is ipost strongly united by ihe fiercest 
flattie. 

There are some men whose enemies are to be pitied 
much, and dieir frie^ m^re* 

Cb^t/Jft n Ijwd^, if we «fmi0t,bi9,^QV^ tatqwess, 
Qur graijUide. j 

t^ not insult the pcpr ; poverty entitles a man ta|Hty* j 



lb EngliO, 



lage. 



iia 



CHAPTER KLYH. 



In the fellowin| chapter, all the accented 8yllitt>les end with 
a vowel, and the c, which follows the accented syllable, 
has the sound of ah^ and the accented syllable i%proaoun«' 
ced as if it ended with shy thus pre-cious, oj'fi<i'€Ue, 
pronounced presh^uSf of-fish-e-ate. 

iVbite.-r-Tfiieh«ni diauld have thdz scholanobierve the mom rule m pn>- 
noondng the accented (grjrBahlee shorty when they spell them, in this and 
the raming ehapter, as in the thirty-eighth ani| thirty-ninth chapters. 



4 

Pre dous 
spe cial 
yi clous 

4 
pre cious ly 
spe cial ly 

4 , 
tLU spi cious 
ea pri cious 
de A cient 
d« iieioMi 
effi dent 
eape eial 



ju di dal 
iu di cious 
lo f^ clan 
ma gi cian 
ma li cious 
mudetan 
offifial 
of fi cious 
pa tri ciaa 
per ni cious 
pliy d dan 
pro a dent 
fluf ft dent 



suspicion 
(^us pi cious 

4 
de fi den ey 
e spe cial ly 



ar ti & cial 
ay a ri cious 
ben e fi dal 
pal i ti cian 
prej u di cial 



ma fi dous ly rAet o ri cian 

of fi dal ly su per fi dal 
of fi ci ate 4 

of fi cious ly ar ti fi cial ly 
per ni dous ly ay a ri cious ly 

pro fi den ey su per fi dal ly 
sufficiency 4 

sufficiently academician 



CHAPTER XL VIII. 



|ju the following chapter, all the accented syllables end withj 
a ypwel, and the U. which follows the accented syUal)Ie» 
has tl^. spvnd of shj and the accented syllable is pronoun- 
ced 1^1 irit ended with sh^ thus, vi-ti-nie^ ad'H'tian^ iro-i^ 
ii^aie^ pronounced tishre^aie^ adrdish-uih inHsk^'oie^ 



4 
Vitiate 

4 
ad di tion 
agni ttoA 
am blli#» 
am bi timil 
cog ni ism 
CO mi tial 
eoi»4i4tal 



eon tri tion 
dis eve- lion 
editimi 
fiu;titi«tia 

fictittttUB 

fiafiiiima 
frttitiiwi 
ini tiat 
no tdi iDft 



4 

nu tri tiouf 
par ti tion 
per di tm 
pe ti tion 
po d tion 
pro pi tious 
se di tion 
se di tio^s 
sol sU tiftl 



4 

tra di tion 
yen di ^mn 
yo li tien. 

4 
ad di tiM&a) 
am bi tkMM ly' 
con di tion al 
ini ti ale 
no yi tiala 



116 



A Just Standard for Pronoumdng 



prmc ti tton er 

pro pi ti ate 

ab o li tion 
ac qui s\ tion 
ad mo ni tion 
ad ven ti tious 
am mu ni tion 
ap pa ri tion 
ap po si tion 
CO a H tion 
com pe t! tion . 
com po si tion 



def i m tion 
dcm' o li tion 
dep o si tion 
dis po si tion 
dis qui si tion 
eb ul li tion 
er u cK tion 
fix hi bi tion 
ex pe di tion 
ex pe dS tious 
ex po si tion 
im po si Uon 
op po «i Uon 



pvepo«i tion 

pro hi bi tion 
prop o n tion 
rep e ti tion 
8U per 8ti tion 
8U per sti tious 
sup po si tioh 
trans po si ties 

4 
con di tion al \y 

4 
in ter po ti tion 
sup pas i tt tious 



CHAPTER XLIX* 



In this chapter, t has the sound of tsh when foHowed by 
long V, and the accent precedes, as in fvAurt^ rajhturcr 
pronounced fu-tshure^ rajhtskure. 

Note^-^ykny speal^ miatake the true prineifrie of this rak^ and pro-' 

] nounce op-por'tu-ni-ty, tuta-day^ ^, op-ftor-Uhu-^ia^Ci Ukux-de^ ^. \ Init 

thev ougnt to rpoollect that / never has the sound of Uk when in an aocrotrd 

syluble : it is the abaenoe of the aceent which cauaes il to afide into the 

weaker sound Ulu 



Crea tare 
fea ture 
fn ture 
na ture 

3 

for tune 

torture 

4 

cap toie 
cul tore 
|frac ture 
s ture 

ec t«re 

nax tui« 
-nur tare 
tore 



le4 



4 

pus tule 
rap ture 
rup ture 
Stat ue 
Stat ure 
Stat ute 
struc ture 
▼en ture 
res ture 
▼ul ture 

pos tore 

11 
nr tpe 

oi 
jointure 



Of 



mobtura 

1 
mu tu al 
3 

for tu nate 
4 

ac tu al 
ac tu ate 
ap er tnre 
cen tuTjr 
flat tt lent 
flue tu ate 
fur ni tore 
maturate 
nat u rat 
pas turage 



4 

pet u lance 
pet u lant 
rap tur ous 
rit ual 
sump tu ous 
tit ular 
▼en tur ous 

5 

postulate 
11 

▼ir tail 
▼ir tamn 

1 
in tiature 

3 
mis for tune 



Lajiffuaff 



117 



atl ven tvr-d 
con. jec lure 
lie ben tura 
en rap ture * 
in a en ture 

1 
mu tu al ty 
3 

for ca ntte ly 
4 ^ 

ac tu at ]y 
ac tu a ry 
ag ri eu] ture 
iiat u ral ist 
nat u ral ize 
nat u ral ly 
spir it^u oua . 
jspir itiU al 
jStat ua ry 
; sump tu a ry 
;Lit u la ry . 

{ vir tu al ly 
' vir tu oua fy 



im por tu nate 
un for tu nate 

4 
ac cent Q al 



ac cent u ate 
ad ven tur er 
ail ven tur cms 
ad ven ture some 
ca pit u latp 
con grat u lant 
con grat u late 
con jec tu ral 
cot] nat u ral 
con atit u ent 
con temp tu*ous 
ef feet u al 
e vent u al 
ha bit u al 
impetuous ^ 
in fat u ate 
per pet u al . 
per pet u ate 
pre aump tu ous 
tern pesi u ous 
tu mult u pus 
un nat u ral 
vo lup tu ous 

ex pos tu late 

4 
man u fac ture 

4 
grat u la tor y 



8^ir it u al lie 
spir it u al ly 

3 
un for tu nate ly 

• 4 
con temp tu ous ly 
con temp tuous ness 
cf feet u al ly 
e vent u al ly 
ha bit u al ly 
im pet u ous Jy 
im pet u ous uess 
per pet u al ly 
pre sump tu ous ly 
pre sump tu ous ness 
tu mult u « ry 
un nat u ral ly 
vo hip tu a ry 
vo lup tu ous ness 

. ^ 4 
ag ri cul tu ral* 
ag ri cul tu rist* 
in ef feet u al 
in tel lect u al 
man u fac tu rer 
re ca pit u late 
su per nat u ral 

5 
im pet u OS i ty 



CHAPTER L. 



In the following chapter, I has the sound of tsh when follow- 
ed by ft^, or io^ and preceded by ^, or r, as in fus-Haih, 
miX'Hon^ proiiouncqa/t^-^sAan, miks'tshun. 



4 


' 4 ,• . . 


4 


Bas tion 


ad mix tion 


sug ges tion ^ 


bes tial 


ambus tion 


4 


fus tian 


Q» lea tial 


que« tion a ble 


mix tion 


c^m bus tion 


4 


ques tion 


di cation 


un ques tion a hie 



118 



A Just standard for Pronouncings 



CHAPTER LI. 

In the following chapteri when d ends an accented syllable, ' 
and IS imoiediately followed by loag «, it is pronounced as 
if it were followed by j ;' and when the d is joined to the 
succeeding syilable,it is pronounced like j; tthis, ed'U-caXe^ 
ver-dure, pronounced ed^ju-katCf veT'jurc* 



4 

Ver dure 

2 

ar du ous 

3 . 
frai/ du lence 
frau du lent 

4 
,cred u bus 
jed ucate 
igrad ti al 
grad u ate 



4 

pen du lous 
pen du lum 

5 
mod u late 
ob du rate 

1 
pro ce dure 

3 
fratt du lent ly 

4 
grad u. al ly 



obdu racy 

4 
as sid u otts 
in cred u loiu 

4 
as sid u ous ly 
residua ry 

4 
in di Tid u al 

4 
in di Tid u al Iv 



CHAPTER Lir. 

In the following chapter, s has the sound of aA when followed 
by long tu thus, sure^ ceu'Sure^ pronounced a^urev cen'shurr. 



1 


4 


1 

1 


4 


Sure 


pres sure 


as su ranee 


sen su al ist 




ten sore 


en su ranice 


sen su al ly 


sure ly 


1 


4 


1 


sure ty 


assure 


com pres sure as su red ly 


4 


eii sure 


im pres sure 


4 


cen sure 


4 


4 


penijdsa.la 


(is sure 


in su lur 


cen su ra ble 


4 


is sue 


sen sual 


in su la ted 


sen su al i ty 



CHAPTER Llll. 

In the ibllowlng chapter, s has the sound ni zh when prece- 
ded by a vowel, and fbUowed by ia^ te, to, or long Uj as inj 
lei'Snre^ vis'ion^ pronounced le^xkure^ w,xk^un. 
114 1 

Bra sier let sure raeos ure cro si er 

clo sure o sier pleas use u su al 

fu sion ra sure irean ure u su rer , | 

ho sier u stnre tIs iott u su ry 



-^ »- - .^ — 






T^ 



TS? 



1^ 



the English Language. 



tlfBmm? 



119 



4 

cas u al I 
ca0 11 iat 
treos u rer 
irea« u ry 

1 
a bra alon 
ad he itoB 
al Ittrion 
CO he sion 
col lu sion 
com po sar^ 
con.clu fiiion 
! con fu bion 
con tu sion 
^ cor ro sioit 
de lu sion 
dif fti 8ton 
di^ plo Jion 

In the 
1 
A zttre 



efiuafon 
en do ture 
e ro sion 
t Va aioii 
et clu sfon 
ex plia mn 
ex p0 sure 
il )u sion 
in fu sion 
in va sion 
CfC c% sion 
per tu sion 
per va sioii 
pro fu sion 

al Us ion 
col I!i ion 
con cts ion 



1  

de cis ion cas u al ty 

dens ion . cas ual ty 

dis pleas ure cas n is try 



di vis ton 
e lis ioii 
in cis ion 
mis pris i<m 
pre eis ion 
pro vis ion 
re cis ion 
re vis idn 
6 . 
de tru sion 
in tru ^on 
ob tru sion 
pro tru sion 
1 



ns ion a ry 

1 
«n bro si a 
am bre si al 
mag ne si a* 
ocGit sioh al 
un u su al 

4 
e lys i an 
e lys i urn 
pro vis ion al 

4 
feir cum cis ion 

1 
oecasiim ally 



usual ly 
following words z has the sound of zh. 

1 1 1 

gla zier gra zier set zure 



CHAPTER LIT. 
On the Importance op Time. 

The first requiske for intrcducing order into the ttma 
agement of time, is to be impressed with a just sense of 
its value. 

If we jlelay till to-raorrow what ought to be done Uy 
d?ly, \vt overcharge the morrow with a burden which 
docs not belong to it 

Our minds should be accustomed, in our younger years, 
to some employment, wliich may engage our thoughts, 
and fill the capacity of the soul at a riper age. 

Hfe who performs every employment in its due place and 
season, sufiers no partT)f time to escape wnthout profit. 

If we suffer the present time to be wasted, either in ab- 
solute idleness or nrivolous employments, it ynH hereafter 
call for vengeimce against us. 



120 Jmti Siandarifor Fraiumncing 

Am dM seaan of youth is tbe best time fbr improYe- 
meat, ercry poDcioas hour of this ahoit |ttciod di^uld be 
hudnnded vMh tbe most ncred care. 

A WMS man oouots liis mioutes ; be lets no tioie slip 
animproved by him ; iior tiine k Iiibi which lie i^akea 
longby m. i^jpht use and applicaini of it > 

A wBe wmk unt tine pest fiv •beenretioiK tod vifle& 
tiaii ; CBne peeseut, for duty. ; end tno to eontfe, he keves 
to Ptoridenoe. 

Of aB predigdity, that of time is the troist 
None but a wke man can employ leisure weD, and he 
thai makes the best use of time, halli none to sfxare. 

Time is vrhal we want most, but what we use worst; 
for which we must all account, wh^R time shall be no 
more. 

Tbe ksstif wealth maqr be rqpsuiied, the loes of healtli 
maj be lacewered ; but that fA time can never be ncdl- 
ed. 

Waste not the particles of time, for like particles of 
gukL they possess tlieir separate value. 

Although past time is gione^ %v& may apply it to a 
\i~ery profitabk purpose^ if we lay hdd of it whUe it re- 
mains in remembrance, and oblige it to contribute to fu- 
ture improvemenL 

He who intends tlie improvement of . his pait% must ex- 
acxl y mind the prudent spending of his time. 

The advaiiUige of living does not consist in li^^gtb of 
vki ys« but ia the right improvement of them. 

Tiiere is little need to drive away time by foolish di- 
v^r^ions ; it dies awiiy very swiftly, and when once gone, 
con never be recalled. 

It b a melancholy truth, that though among the tal- 
ejtts of our stewardship, time is the most valuable, yet, in 
general, we are more profuse and rq^ardkss of il tbsn of 
anv other. 

ihir seoaon of improv^ooiait is diort, and whether we 
use it or not, ii w iU soon pass away. How necessary, 
horefore, to improve the present time. 



ike EkCfflisk Language. 

Tis noC l» pctnse Vfhm at my 4oor 
A ahivering brolher fstands ; 

^ ask the cause that made him ffbcM*^ 
Or why he help demands. 

'TIS not to spam thtt Mctfiei^d pfay«t 
For faults he once has known ; 
not to leave him in despair. 
And say that I have none. 

I 

The voice of charity is kind— ^ 
She tliinketh nothing wrong ; 

To every fault she seemed) blindi 
]^or vaunteth with her tongue. 

In PENITENCE she pkceth ^aitb«^ 
Hope smiletli at tier door .; 

Believeth firs6 — then softly saith, 
'^ Goi BAOTH£R« slu Up motei** 



n\ 



CHAPTER LV. 

ft 

Example^ of Ithe formatidn of the plural froffi theetn^lar^ 

and other derivatives. 



I 
ISiatm 
bratn 
cake 
cape 
chain 
daim 
cry 
cube 
door 
drove 
dry 
floor 
flow 



t 

bknr^ 

brains 

cakeii 

cap^s 

chaitiitf 

clainijr 

crie^ 

cubto 

door^ 

droves 

dries 

ilOTPS 



1 

fly 

«•*• 
green 

guide 

neap 

heavd 

hive 

hope 

host 

leaf 
WghX 
life 



1 



galetf 

greens 

guides 

heaps 

heaves 

hives 

hopes 

hosts 

lays 

leaves 

li^Ats 

lives 



1 

name 
nnr 

note 

paint 

pay 

plago^ 

post 

robe 

sat'nt 

scale 

Bide 

sky 

slave 



1 

name^ 
nelvs 
notes 
patnts 

F»y« 

plagues 

posts 

robes 

saints 

scales 

skies 



122 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing ' 



1 


«1— . 


4 


.4- 


.. ^ t . - 


1 


sinlle 


smiles 


camp 


camps 


face 


fa ce» 


snow 


snows 


flaflc 


ilair^ 


piari» 


pla ce«r 


'tain 


tifurur 


lamp 


;amM 


o 


5 


wife 


wive« ^ 


map 


maps 


box 


box es 


wo 


woe^ 


plant 


plants 


fox 


. fox es 



CHAPTER LVI. 

In the following chapter, the different somids of the lerml- 

nation ed are exhibited. 

When the tennination ed is immediately preceded hj d cft, fStut $d \» 
eoimded Uifltinetly, aa mbrcadred^ paint-ed^ prono\inooabrarded^fatkt&€d. 



I 



1 

Bratd ed 
ci ted 
da ted 
do ted 
faint ed 
feast ed 
float ed 
gra ted 
ha ted 
mind ed 
seat ed 
stated 
soft ed 
tra ded 
watt ed 
2 
card ed 



2 

part ed 
start ed 

3 
halt ed 
salt ed 
sort ed 
4 

act ed 
ad ded 
dread ed 
fitted 
grant ed 
^int ed 
melt ed 
waft ed 

5 
want ed 



ac quaznt ed 
en treat ed 
ex clu ded 
ex port ed ' 
im port ed 
re peat ed^V 
re ported 

2 
de part ed 
dis card ed 
im part ed 
re gard ed 

3 
ap plar/d ed 
as saY/It ed 
de frai/d ed 
es cort ed 



3 

re Ward ed 

ac cept ed 
a dapt. ead 
affected 
as cend ed 
col lect ed 
con duct ed 
4Son yici ed 
d^ scend,ed 
d|^ band ed 
ex peet ed 
In struct ed 
in tend ed 
ob struct ed 
pre tend |d 
re pent ei 



When the termination ed is immediately preceded by a vowel, or by the 
flat oonsonantS) 6, g^ 1^'*^% t^ flat ^ v, z, or «, if it be sotindcd like s^ the 
c is aappnM0ed in the pronunciation, and the d is added to the foregoing 
syllable, as in be-iray-ed^ mar-ri-edy jiow-ed^ avL-ed^ rttihbed^ beg-ged^ roilrcdi 
la-mcdi rain-ed^ 4^ ; pronounced be-trade^ mar-rid^ Jtotie, nuU^ rubbd, 
beggdf lamdf rand. 



1 

Bla zed 
cri cd 
dram cd 
fear ed 
floio ed 



1 

hati ed 
la med 
na mffd 
pa Ted 
rain ed 



1 

rat5 ed 
roll ed 
sa red 
su ed 
u^ed 



2 

arm ed 
charm ed 
3 

call ed 
formed 



the Englmk JjangtKige. rS 

3 1 1 4 

warn ei tat qui red pro fa n«d in frin ged 

4 a do red re ri led re turn ed 
beg ffed ad ri ^d 2 re yen ged 
Hv ed a mu ^ed a larm ed sub serr ed 
rubbed ' appeared debarred 5 

5 / ar ri ved dis ehar gea di^r^lred 
\odg ed as erl bed en lair ged in volv ed 
solr ed .a vail ed 3 re siAr ed 

6 bap ti zed a dorn ed 6^ 

moved behaved conformed hallooed 

pro ved be steg ed de form ed im pro ved 

oi be reav ed in form ed oy 

boil ed ^* bias phe med in stall ed an noyf4 

toil ed ^ ' chas ti «ed , per form ed em pioy ed 

ou com bi ned re call ed en joy ed 

poured , com mu ned 4 r ou . 

ow con su med 9 bri% ed a routed 

bow ed conpre ned ad journ ed de rotir ed 

1 de £a med con demn ed ow 

a bu sed de fi led di vul ged al low ed 

ac cu eed ydepri ved ex pun ged en dow ea 



When the teimhuition ed is immedialely ifMceded bj the eharp oonso 
nants, e./^ k^ j»,^ x^ch, »h^ ot ^ the eienip{>reeiied in the pnmu&datkmj 
and the d is pronounceil like /, and added to the foregoing syuabfei as in^ 
cedj ttuff-ed^ erack^ed^ pMhcdf ^$. ; pronounoedy^^ £iift^ krakt, foH, 

11 1 4 

Fa ced a ba sed^ pro du ced com men ced 

gra ced de ba sed re du c^d con vin ced 

la ced de ceos ed re leas ed die miss ed 

tra ced de fit ced / reproach ed dis pen sed 

2 di^ gra ced se du ced dis per sed 

laugh ed di vor ced 2 ^ en camp ed 

mark ed em bra ced em bark ed ex press ed 

3 en for ced re mark ed im press ed 
warp ed en groaaed 3 op press ed 

4 en a ced de bauch ed pro fess ed 
class ed ef fa ced en dors ed sup press ed 
cracAred ' escaped 4 ou 
dash ed im peach ed ad van ced an noun ced 
Hash ed in creoa ed as sess ed pro noun ced 



mp 



» 



BSBwS 



msmmBmmsest 



i Sn i WMj 



iijr i <i i i > y*i i l il»«ii n i W *'^^ 



12A 



A Just Standard for Pronguncing 



WriiUnm^ 



CHAPTER LYII. 

Th« fQllovring chtpler contains »\\%% pf wordUy in which tbere 
ar« two of the same orthography, \)iit of ilifferent accent, 
soundt And meaning, according to their applicaticm* 

The following wonl* are Kouns «nd Verhi which ice ^iiflTerently aocenlcd. 

Soie. — ^In the four foHcwing ehi^itert, when th haa ijut sharp ««iuiil,. it is 
printixl in Jfta2»«ie ; hot when it haa its flat sptind, it is printed in Roman : 
ttiid when g haa its KanI acmtl, iSb» g ia i|ped in the pronunciation ; hut 
wtiea i^liBiiiliaaftiouod, it ia tepiaidnted in the |»oiHiiiciatioa by/. 

HoUifa. vaafta. 

Pr^nouwcei. Pronounced. 

. forf teste 

re taie 
4 ' « 

dejesi *^ 
pre fiks ' 
4 

awg ment , ^ 
tor meni ' 

.. es sa 
Of sile 

V ^ks «prt 
un pAri 

. in krlfe 
per ftrnie 
pre saje 
refiBEe 
siir name 
trans porl 

S 
bun bard 
3 

dis kord 
etkort 
re kord 
1 
kol )eeg 
, kom port 
kon kreto 
konfine 
kon sole 
pro duse 



Fore taste 


fore taste 


re tail 


re tale . 
di jest 


di jest 


pre fix 


^re fiks ' 


augment 


a wg ment 


tor moitl 


tor me^it 


es say- 


es sa 


ex ile 


. «k»ite 


ex purl 


oksport 


an port 


.import 


in areiMO> 


ing kreae 


|ier fvme 


per fume 


pres ago 


pres sftje 


ref use 


refuse 


siirnaiBO 


snr naliio 


trans poli 


train port 

4 
biitt hard 

4 

«dis kord 


bom bard 


dis cord 


es cort 


es kort 


rec ord 

•I* 


rek ord 
5 
kol leeg  


col league 


com port 


kom port 


con Crete 


kong krete 


con fine 


kon fine 


con sole 


kon sole 


prod uce 


prod duse 



I 



ii 



IMM 



mmammmem 



BfiBfiBBH 



the English Language. 1! 



WrUten* 

con sart 

ab ject 
ab street 
ac eent 
aftix 
cem ent 
descant 
lies ert 
en trance 
ex tract 
far ment 
Im-press 
in cense 
in sult^ 
per jn^ 
pres ent 
reb el 
sub ject 
traj ect 
trans fer 
un dress 

dis count 

col lect 
com merce 
coin pact 
com press 
con cert 
con duct 
con feet 
con iiict 
con nerve 
con test 
con text 
con tract 
con trast 
con vent 



n 



NOUNS, 

PromowtcetL 

5 

konsort 
4 

ab jekt 

ab strakt 

ak sent 

af fiks 

sem ment 

des kant 

del ert 

en transe 
*' eks trakt 

fer ment 

im press 

in sense 
- in suit 
^er mit 
•^prez zent ^ 

i^bel 
I subject 
t«aj «kt 
triuM fer 
un dress 

4 
dis kount 

5 
kol lekt 
kommerse 
kom pakt 
kom press 
kon sert 
kon dukt 
kon fekt 
kon ilikt 
kon senr 
kon test 
kon tekst 
kon trakt 
kon trast 
kon vent 



VBRBS. 

Pronouneed4 
3 

kon sMTt 
4 

abjeki 

ab strakt 

ak sent 

af fiks 

se ment 

des kant 

de zert 

en transe 
, eks trakt 

ferment 

impress 

in sense 

in suit 

per mit 

pre zent 

re bel 
*'iAlbjokl 

tra jekt 
4ftinis fer 

un dress. 

dis kount 

4 
kol lekt 
kom merae 
kom pakt 
kom press 
kon sert 
kun dukt 
kon fekt 
kon flikt 
kon senr 
kon test 
kon tekst 
kon trakt 
kon trast 
kon vent 







m A 


Jugt Skmd^rd for Promouncing j 


Wrium^ 


NOUNS. 

Pronouno^ 


VERBS. 

Pronounced^ 

4 

kon vert 
kon vikt 
objekt 
projekt 
pro test 


con vert 
con vict 
object 
proj ect 
prot est 


. ikon vertv 
kon vikt 
objekt 
proj ekt 
prot est 


com plot 


9 

kom plot 


kom^plot 

Atf 


con Toy 


kon voy 

6 
kom pound 


kon ^y 


com pound 


kpmfound 

t 


o vcr flow ' 
ver throw 


e vur flo vir flo 
vur thro o vur lAro 

at tre bute at trib i^ ^ 
seppidkur t^pulkur f 

koun tur mine - •mvm, tur mkie^ ; 

koun tur manH ^ ^ kfun tur mawi ; 
• .^koun tur m^rtsb ». koun tur martah j 

mis kon di^t mis kon dukt 

words are Nouns i^nd Adjectives whick ar« 
.4iflerently accented. 

NOUNS^ ADJECTIVES. 

Pranouno^i, Pronounced. 
1 * ' 


at tri bute 
aep vl chre 

coun t6r mine 

coun ter mand 
COUB ter march 


mis con duct 
The foHowiaf 

WriUen. 


sSupiae 


«u pine 

3 


supine 

4 


august 


> «w gust 


aw gust 
me nute 

gal lant 

pre sedent 

4 
invalid 


minute 


minnit 

4 

in stingkt 


instinct 


gallant 


gallant 
pres se deni 
in va leed, . . 


pre ee dent 


invalid . 



^ffw 



the English Languoiffe, 



m\ 



Some Verbs ending in se have the 9 pronounced like Si to 
distinguish them from Noons of the same form and aeQent«j| 
These are the following. 





MOVNS* 


▼BRBS. 


Writtm^ 


Prommmmd, 

1 
klose 


Pronounc0i. 

1 
klose 


Glos# 


grease 


grese 


greze ; 


rise 


rise 


nze ' 


use 


iruse 


jvae 




6 


6 


nqose 


noos 


nooz 




i, ou 


ou 


house 


hous 


hoixz 


mouse 


mous 
1 
a buse ^ 


mom 
1 
abuze 


abuse 


dis use 


f dis use ^' 


dis nze 


excu^H^ 


eksk^use 


eks kuze 


The following woMs are Kounii and T^rbs which are 




entljr pronoqm^, but accented alike. 


t 


" Pronounced. 
1 ' 
sheth 


rCMis. 


Wntkn^ 


Pronouncedi 

1 
'sltetb 


Sheatl^V 


tear \ 


f teer 


tare 


wreath 1 

hves 


reth 
, 1 


^reth 
♦4 


livz 


livz 




4' 


r 


dore, 


, du7 


dore 


13^ ' 


led 
wind 


lede 
wind 


 


4 


7 


* 


put 

4 W^ 


t 


mow 


moil 


ma 


sow 


sou 


so 




«tt 


OK 


mouth 


mmUh 


mouth 




1 


4 


raveia 


ra vn 


savrn 




4 


4 


h«l lows. 


faiJkia 


JmiIIosa 



128 



^3S. 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



WHtUn. 

pred i cate 
Bub li mate 



NOUNS. 

^Pronounced* 

4 
pred de kai 
tub le mat 

4 
pre sip petal 



VERBS. 

Pronounced* 

4 
pred de kate 
sub le mate ' 

4 
pre sip pe tate 



pre cip i tate 

The following words are Adjectives and Verbs which arc 

t differentia pronounced* 



Live 

low 
hin der 
fre quent 
tar ry 
ab sent . 
pros tratci 
dif fuse 
lower 
separate 
mod er ate 
re gen er ate 



APJKCTIVES. 

Pronounced* 

1 
live 

1 

hin dur 

I 
fee kwent '*. 

"2 

ta/re 

4 

ab sent 

pros trat 

diffuse 
• 1 
laur 
4 
sep ar at 

mod der at 

4 
re jen er at 



m0 







mod der ate 

4 
re jen er ate 



«i 



The two following Nonns are subject to two different p^ 
nundationst as they are differently applied* 

NOUNS. NOUNS. 

ou , ' 4 

Slought alouy a deep miry Slought fl]uf» the skin which 

place. serpent caats oi 

ou 6 . 

fintyl* • febrile disease. Gottf, a strong desire. 



the English Language, 



1^ 



CHAPTER LVIIl 

The following (ihtptep is eomposed^of yarioiM-wepdSf in wtnchl 
there are two or more words of the same pronunciationjbut j 
of diflerent spelling and definition. 

Note, The words contained in the tofibimng efaapfew an not inMrted in 
the pTccetltng. ehaptf rst.fw wiuiiatly tfie custom in books of thb ldnd« It 
Is very difficult for ^scholar to distinguish the speUing of woida. wliieb mre 
IHonounood alil^v iMit. sp^Utad diiaSaiehtiy, whm tiny ure mtana^n^ad wiUi 
other wordi^ ai^ not dsaooiftted with their delinitioBSw 

N»B. The pf onnneiatson of the first word in eacli«ibdi-l| 
'vifiion is wn*tten iinmediateiy after it, which determinei the' 
pronunciation of all the words in that suhdivision^ 



Bail, baie^ 

Bale» a 
Bait, liate,^ 

Bate, strife ; 




nvcr» 



[security, 
►bt; to give 



Ail, ak, to poin, to trouble. 

Ale, a kind of beer. 
.4ir, are^ one of the clementB.. 

Ere, before, sooner than. 

Heir, m inheritor. 
Aisle, il^ the watk in 'a churetu 

ril^ oontractXHi of I wtif. 

hAe^ an island. ^^ ^ 
Ait, ate, a small i^Kd 

Ato, the V^^fttit of 

Eight, twi^ four. 
,y for 
ofg, 

tsnticeiBcnt; to aUare* 
; to lessen. * 
Baize, baze, cdintea. woollen cloth. 

Bays, garinnds. 
Bare, bare, nake«(; tt»8>np. 

Sear, a beast; tosulfi^r. [Umd. 
B%,ba|ifij[ibuf; an opening mto the 

Bey,jj|jRrkish govemrmr. 
Bead^Htsh, the shors^ ^ BtKwidk 

Bc#lf a kind of tree. 
Beat, boBt, a steoke; to strike. 

Be«(^ a kind of root. 
Bee, bee, an insect 

Be, to exist 
Bieau, bfl^ anuH»oldTesB. fwi^ 

Bow, an inalmimisnt; to bead side- 
Beaux, boxe, ploni of BiBa^ a man 
of dress. fment 

Bows, plural of Bow, an iintru* 
Beer, beer, a fermented Ikjuor. 

Bier, a hand carriage on wMch the 



Blew, blu, the preterit of Btow. 

Blue, a kind of colour. 
Bloat, btote^ to swell. 

Blote, to smoke. 

Boar, bore, the male swine. 

' Bore^to make a hole; the mterit 

of Bear, to suffer, [breai^ 

Bole^ bole^ the' body of a tree; a land 

Boll, a round s^qk or stem. 

Bowl, a ba^n, a round mass. 
Borne, borne, carried, supported. 

Bourn, a boundary, a hmit 
Breach, Iveetsh, a gapj differenoe, an 
opening. 

Breech, the hinder port of a gun. 
Brake, brake,' a fern ; an instrument 
fo^brealung flax. 

Break, an opening; to pait by Ibioe. 
Buy, bi, to purchase. . 

By, near to* 
Cain, kaiie, a man's name. 

Cane, a shrub ; a walking iti^ 
Cede, seed, to yield, to resign. 

Seed, principle of production. 
Ceil, seel, to cover Uie inner roof of a 
building. 

SiBal, the setHadC a stamp; toftst- 
en with a seal. 

Seel^ to close the eyes. 
Ceve, seer, to oover with wax. 

ScKsr, dry ; to bum. 

Seer, a proi^et 

Sere, withered. 
Chair, tshare, a moveable seat 



^^i.. 



A. J. 



J 



ii 



130 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



1 



ChaaCe^ tshttite, ime, inoomipL 

ChKwd, tliB pntoric of Chtae. 
Choir^ kwirci a Innd of singera. 

^uire, twenty-four ftheets of paper. 
Cite, nt^ to summon, to quote. 

Site, a situation. 

Sight, the sense of fleeiiig ; a view. 
Climb, klime, to ascend. 

Clime, dimatcL region. 
CloBe, kkne, to shut, to finish. 

Clothes, garments, raiment. 
Coal, kole, the common fossil fiieL 

Cole, a manf s name. 
Coarae, korae, not refined; yade. 

Corse, a dead body. 

Course, race, direction ; to run. 
Core, kore, the inner part of any thing. 

Corps, a body of forces. 
Creak, kreek, to make a harsh noise. 

Creek, a small river; a bay, or 
> cove. 
Dane, dane, a native of Denmark. 

Deun^ to vouchfufe, to ooii Jesoend. 
Day, £, a part of time. 

Dey, a Moorish govemo^r. 
Dear, deer, costly, belovod. 

Deer, an animat* 
Deuce, duse, two. 

Deose, an evil spirit 
Dew, di), moisture on thegrouait 

Due, owed, right, exact 
Dire^ dive, dreadful, horrible. 

Dior, one who colours doth. 
Doe, do, the female deer. | 

Dough, unbaked paste. 
Kye, i, the organ of sight; to watch. 

I, myself; oersonal pronoun. 
Fain, une, gladly, cheerful 

Faiu^, a consecrated temple. 

Fei^ to dissemble. [feeble. 

Faint, &nt, languid, weary; to grow 
Feint, a fiilse appearance. 
Fair, £ure, beautiful, Just, gentle. 

Fare, food, price of passage,. Ac 
F^nt, feet, act, doed, exploit 

Feet, l^ural of Foot 
Feoze, &ez^ to untwist the end of a 
rope. 

Foes, rewards paid to physicians or 
lawyers. 
Food, fudc, fee, tenure. 

Feud, quarrel, contention. 



Flea, flee, a small insect 

Flee, to, mn horn duigitf . 
Flew, 6u,'the preterit oTFly. 

Flue, lint, soft fiir ordown, pipeof 
a chimney. 
Fknt, flote, toswun. 

FkiCe, to skim. [fiist 

I^ore, fdre, anterior, that which coma 

Four, twice two^ 
Forth, ferM, forward abroad. 

Fourth, the ordinal of four. 
Frays, fraze, quarrels^ , 

Phrase^ an idiom, mode of speech. 
Freeze, fr^eze^ to congeal with culd. 

Friexe, a ooooe doth ; a terra in 

4 architecture. [pl<^- 

GttM, gajc^ to depone as a wager, a 

Gaoge, a measuie; to measuie the 
contents of a veaseL 
(oait, gate^ the manner and air of 
walking. 

Gate, a kinuof door. 
Gear, goer, furniture, tiafiea. 

Gere, a man*8 name. 
'Glaire, glare, ti|Bwhite of an egg. 

Glaro, t^aaw with great ^en- 

GbwBigl 

Ghnc,fi 
Gear,' gore. 

Goer, one 

Gore, cbtted bbod. 
Grates gmte, a partition made'wich 

Great, large, noble. 
Grease, grese, soft fiit 

Gkeece, the name oft <^untrra 
Gffeaves, greevz, armourHfta mjfu 

Grieves,! doth grieve. ^Bjk 
Groan, ^roncL a hoarse deai^Kid ; to 
sigh deeply. wV 

Grown, advanced in giowtfa. 
Hail, hale, drops of fisaen lain ; to 
■dote. 

Bale, sound, kealthy. ' [the head. 
Hair, hare, the natural covering of 

Uare^ a smaH quadruped. . 
Hay, ha, dyieU gam. 

Hey, a word of joy. 
Heal, heel, to otira. 

Heel, a part of the ibot 
Hear, heer, to Helen. 

Here, in this place. 




[doth. 
atwcd upon 

[bars. 



mmm 



Heiffht hite, 

Hew, ha, to cut 
Hufl^ookmr. 

Hugh, aman^iaaine. . ' 

Hip., hi, to hasten. 

High, elevat^ supetbur legibn. 
Hire, Aive, levnud for gervioet. 

Hiflher, more high. [hide. 

Hoeid, horde, t hidden treasure ; to 

Honle, a clan or tribe. 
Hoe, ho^ a fiuming instnunent ' 

Ho^ a sudden call 
Hoes, hoxe, plural of hoe^ a luming 
instrument 
Hose, stocfcinss. 
Hole, hole, a houow plaoe.^ 

Whole, all, total. 
Jole, jole, the cheek. 

JoU, to beat or clash. 
Key, ke, an instrument to open a lodL 

Q,uay, a wharC 
Knave, nave, a dishonest man. 

Nave, centre of ajrheel. [stance; 
Knead, need, to flingle any sub- 
Need, want, ncQ|<^tii^« 
Kneel, neel, torespon Se knee. 

Neal, to tempv by OMt. 
Knew, tttt, the preteriiiB Know. 

New, fres^ recent. 7 
Knight, nite^title of Ifofiour. 

Night, the evening. ' 
Know, tto^ to understand. 

No, not sa 
Knows, noze, doth know. 

NosCy AejrgRn of smelling. 
Lade, lafI%S0#d, to heave out 

Laii 
Lain, lijB did lie. 

Lanfl^ narrow street 
Lica, lee, ground enclosed. 

Lee; the nde opposite to the wind. 
>af, leef; part ota plant or book. 

Lje^ willingly, 
^•ak, leek, to let in or out; a breach.- 

Leek, a pot-herb, 
^ease, leex,jto glean. 

Lees, dregs, sediments.- 
..eave, leev, liberty \ to depart 

Lieve, willingly, 
^yre, lira, a musical instrument 

* I .-ti— , .e £.1 1. i_ 



tie &^luk Language. 



131 



Lone, solRaiy, Angle. 
LoL lev see ! behold I 

Low, not high, humHe. 
LorOj lore, lesson, instmctbn. 

Lower, more low; to bring low. 
Made, made, participle of MiSdb. 
Maid, an unmarried woman. 
Mail, male, arrnour; a bag of post 
letters. 
Male, the he kind. 
Main, mane, principal, chief. 
Maine, the name of a State. 
Mane| hair on the nock of a horse. 
Maize, maze, Indian com. 

Maze, a labvrinth. 
Mara, mare, tfie female of honest 
May oi, the chief magutraie of a 
city. Jdrink. 

Mead, meed, a meadow ; a kind of 
Mede, a ndive of Medea. 
Meed, reward, gift 
Mean,*meen, hose, mediocrity. 

Mien, air, look, manner. 
Meat, meeti flesh to be eaten. 
Meet, fk, proper ; to oome together. 
Mete, to measure. 
Meer, meer, a lake, boundary. 

Mere^ pure, that or this only. 
Mew, mu, a cage, an enclosure. 

Mue, to change feathers. ' 

Mewl, mule, to cry as a child. 

MuJe^ a kind of animal 
Mews, muze, cages. 

Muse^ deep thought ; tomrditate. 
Might, mite, power, strength. 

Mite, a small insect, or parlide. 
Moan, mone, to lament 

Mown, cut down. 
Moat, mote, a diteh for defence. 

Mote, a small particle. 
More, more, a greater quantity. 

Mow er, one who mows. 
Nay, na, no. 

Neigh, the voice of a horse. 
Oar,>ore^ an instrument to row with. 
<>er« contraction for over 
Ore, mctai unrefined. 
Oh, 6^ alaB ! 

Owe, to be indebted. 
PatV nale^ a vessel 






las 



A Jmt Sttmitrdfor Pnmmmcing 



Vm^ ft sqoaie of ^Inp. 
Pftir, piare, Aooude. 

PiiTe,to€iJtQfr. 
i Peur,ftlilndaranut. 
E^MCp, foaM, feat, tnrti^Ulitjr. 

Pieec^ u ptit. 
Peak, Y^y iheiop. 

Pi^ue, ill will; 4o offend, {aoanda. 
Peal, peel, a suoceanoii of loUd 

Peel, the akin or rind of any thing. 
Peer, peer, an equal } a MoMeiMB. 

Her^ the oohnim of a bridge. 
Pbre, plaae» aitiiatkm. 

Pfauee, a flat fish. 
Plain, pbiue,' smooth, Istd. 

Plane, a jdinei's tool; tomaolh. 
Phut, plttte> a fold io % gannent. 

Plate, wrought silver^ Ac. 
Pleaa, < pleez, exeuaes, pleadinga. 

Please, to delight. . 
Pole, pole, a knttf ataflj a measure. 

Poll, the hMcT; a list of ^tera. 
Port, port, a harbour. 

Pofte, the ^rurkish oourt (plauil. 
ftaise^ pfi»e,OQinBieiifdEUion; to ap- 

t^ys, doth pnty. 

Preys, booties, plunders. 
Pray, pni, io «ntraat, to suppltcste. 

Piey, booty, olundeir*^ to plunder. 
Pries, prise, dodi piy. 

Pni^ a fsxvaru ;' to value. 
Cluean,- kween, a worthless woman. 

Ctucen, the w;le of a k^ng. 
Rain, Mne. the v^er that IdlB from 
ih^ ckmdsL 

It^ci 4 "Hie as a king. 

Kein, ijurtdf a.bn(Ue, tuveatrain. 
Raise, raze, to lift, to exalt 

Rays,- beama of light 

Razi6, to destroy, to abt^h. 
Read, reedj- to peruse. . 

Recd^ a plant, a small pipe. 
Reek, reek, to snioke. 

Wreak, to revenge. 
Rhone, vone, the name bf a river. 

Roan, aoobur. 
Rhyme, rime^ poetry; fo agree in 
sound. 

.Rime, hoar freat 
RiG«^ riae, a kind of «aeilleiit|[rain. 



Rite, aelenmact^fiaBgiaB. 

Wright, a workroga. 

Write, to express by AcAIms. 
Road, rode, the 1iiflbw»v. 

Rode, the pretoot ^ Ride. 
'Rowod, did row.. 
Roe, ro, the female «£ the luvt 
' JBD^w, a rank ; to wifgt a baal with 

oara. 
Rote^ rote, memory. 

WMtej the fHKterit of Wiita. 
Rye, ri, an esculent i^rain. 

Wiy, cMked. \\ 

Sail^ sale, a canvass sheet; to paas by 

Sale, the actof aelting. 
Scene, seen, placoof aiition ; pwrt of 
a play. •; 

Seen, participle of ^ee, to heboid. 

Seine, a net used in fbiliiiig. 
flea, see, tlie ooean. 

See, to observe, to behold. 
Seam, seem, two odges joiiksd tclgelk 
er;B 

Seem, to api 
Seas, seeZf {OMKyvatera. 

Sees, d<}t1 

Seize, td Ihy hoU of. 
Sew,so,toiiiii by tnreftdi drawn avifh 
a nMJIe. f 

So^ thus f^ Kke flumnar. 

Sow, to sci&er aeed. 
Sew er, sore, one that usee a ueedle. 

Soar,'to fly aloft fcer. 

Sore, t)pRc(cr to the touch ; ^ ul 

Sow er, one that ^ 

Shear, shoer, to 

Sheer, pure, clenr 

Shire, a county. flkuC 

Sicej size, the numbar sixiPbew 

Sighs, doth sigh. 

Size, bulk ; to adjust 
Sign, sine, a token. 

Sine, a geometrical Ihia. 
J%K, sire, a fiither. 

Sigh er, one who sighs. 
Slaie, sla, a weaver's i^Md.' 

Slay, to kill 

Sleigh,* a kind of carriage. 

Sley, to part into thread 
Slei^t, sUte, artful trick, dexleVlty. 




to tne toucn ; |M1 ' 
iiatfcgtiBrs se4b 

Jenr. ^» . T 



ikt J^Utk Lttfignage* 



li 



SIo#, ittil MHfl, 4ttlL ]tlio«. 

s90Qi| iTO inuiioiiM fpmt tn msii. 
Stake, ibdB^ a ]MIII ts^ll fn ^ 

^iwiiid; a^Migtsf. 

OMBak, A iKii^torfiellh t iMwt iMii^ 
Stair, tftaic^ a rising atelsi 

Stare^ lo Mk wfiiiiViMdfiir. 
Steal, alttt, lot*lteWMkotttt9iMt)^. 

SIM, iton f«6n^ Mid Hii^tted. 
Skf^ ittile, M^ Hrtb al|et(L 

Style, Bfoittier of wtftffl(:. 
Sti^^ht, ilnte, dif«ct ; Ml hooked. 

S(Mit, h fi«tK)«r |mM. 
Suite, ««reM, l^oe, toihpiitiy. 

Sweot, !u8clbU6 to the ta«te. 
Swear, aWtii^ todeelkre upon oath. 

SuttVe, lhept«teritof Siytfur, to de- 
cbte Qpon dhth. 
Tail, taie^ the hinder |)&rt6f toy thing. 

Tak, a narratitt^ a sU^iY. 
Tarei tare, a weed ; an alfowan^ee in 
weight* 

Tekr, a rent ; to pull iti ^Viec^k 
Team, teein, boasta kameiised to 

diaw. 
. Tctem, to bring f( 
Tear, tcer, Wat^rfi 

Tier, a rriw, a 
Thee, thcc, thyself. 

The, the dr/mite piicAe. 
Thf4r, thare, belonginglo ihHUL 

'tlicrcf i^k^p>jace. 
1'hroe, thw^l^ike ftgotrf . 

Throw, to-flitig, to enfet. 
Throiic, j(|iTone, a tafidiiealL (east. 

Thrown, pMdpIe of Tbrb#» to 
Thy(ne,tTnk>,fti)liint 

l^iine, mdiiiureofdttnrtkm^ 
Tide, tide, elfii am) iflowaf th«fleft< 

Tied, bound. 
Tire,tiiv,fumituf«; to&llgiie. 

Ti er, otte IfrhortJwi. 

Tyre, i\\t wtrhe tff a pbrn* 
Toe.to, iHinoftheftM. 

Tow, the coarse parts of fltx and 
hemp; to^Mwaftar. 
ToM,tbML#tati^. 



•tt II t 1* 1 . II 



Toll, araffclArtejflii&iiiMU. 

Trey, a tbrriftkt nikt^ 
Tn^ ffttlB^ tdtun tobni. 

Tioul, to utter tiiiuMy. 
tMI, iraie, It CG^iwg* 

y ale^ a valley. 
Vain, vane, f niitlMs, llMfeli. 

Viitte, aweatheXoodL 

Vein, a blood veimA, 
W^e, wade, to walk in thie nmMt. 

Wei(^ ed, experienoed. 
Wail, walb, to liuttent 

Wrie, a rising f ifitt in doth. 
Walki, wane, a carnage. 

Wane, decKase ; tagnfwiebt. 

Wayne, l9ie name or a person ai 
|)laoe. ' 
Waist, waste, part of the body. 

Wttte, desolate ; to spend. 
Wait, wate^ to tan^. 

Weight, heaviness. 
Waive, wave, to put oflj t» 

Wave, a billow. 
Wate, ware, merchandise. 

Wear, to waste, consume. 
Way, wa, ro^d, course, method, Ac 

Weigh, ^^lance, to examine. 
WeaS, wefA; feeble, not stiong. 

Week, seven days. 
Wean, ween, to put ttcm the bfea«t 

Ween, to imagine. 
Wheal, hwoel, a pustule. 

Wheel, a circular body that 
round upon an axi*. 
Ve, ye, phimi of Thou. 

Yea, yes. 
2 
Arc, ark, part of a drele. 

Ark, a vessd. 
Hart, hart the male of the roe. 

ileiiHjtheseatoflife. 
8 
AH, awl, the wllole, total. 

Awl, a cobbler's tool 
Atifffht, awt, any thin^. 

OmfihiLt to be obliffid by duly. 
Baid,tiawld, void of hair. | 

Bawled, cried akmd. fdaiK9ik| 

Ban, bawl, a nmnd inhHltM^ 



mtwMf* 



'».••»,' 



3 
Datk, KawK, to utisff tiw laatti of • ibip. 

Caiik, A kind offpai; 
Dall, caw], to tmne, tporyout. 

Caul, a membnne. 
Zlauie, kawz, a reaami, a motive. 

Caws, doth caw. 
[;honl, kawrd, the atring of a BHUfr- 
cal inBtrunieiit 

Cord, a amallrope 
clause, klawz, pert of a sentence. 

Claws, the feet of a bird. 
Paun, fawn, a kindof rural deity. 

Fawn, a young deer. 
Sail, gawl, the hue; toffet. 

Ga^ the ancient name of France. 
Hall, hawl, a court of juftice, a large 
room. . 

Haul, to draff by violence. . 
Ilaugh, haw, a little meadow lying ii> 

a valley. 
Kaw, tbelierryof thte hawthorn. 
Pall, pawl, a kind o^<^eak. 

Paul, a man's name. 
Pause, pewz,a8top. * 

Paws, the feet of a beast . 
IVftll, wawl, a fence of brick or stone. 

Wawl, to cry, to howl. 
4 
in, an, the indefinite Mticle; .. 

Ann, a woman's na^i * 
Brnl, Iwd, ill, corrupt. 

Bade, the prptont of Bid. 
Been, bin, participle of Be, to exist 

Bin, a repository for grain. 
Boll, liell, a hollow sounding vessd. 

Belle, a gay young lady. 
Bread,' brttl, a kind of foci 

Bred, participle of Breed. 
Bur, bur, the rough head of a plant. . 

Burr, the lobe or lap of the ear. 
But, but, only, except. 

Butt,' a vessel. 
C^ask, kask, a barrel. [helmet 

Casque; iirmpur (w the head ; a 
^eW, sell, a ftnall hut or cave. 

Sell, to disjfwse of. 
Cense, sensf, pfililick rates. 

Sense, appreheMsion of mini), rea- 
son, judgement [dollar. 
Cent, sent the hundredth put of a 

Scent odour: tosmclf. 

Sent participle of SenA 



(moo. 



Chufl^ a Uunt dowpk. 
Cin^ue^ <iiigk, a five, in 

Sink, a dnitn i tofo dowo. 
Cl«n,klam,abifiilv»idicit4Ui. [tor 

Claifim, to cleg with ghiti^Mis mat- 
Cle^ kliff, frtcimin nuMMcfc. 

Clifiia<steeprock. 
Dam, dam, the mother of brulai; to 
confine. 

Baron, to condemn. 
Done, dun, participle of Do. 

Dun, a cotqur ; ilark,. gkxmj* 
Dost,, dust) tho^ipeood peiwuioifDoi. 

DuAi^ pailMea or<iry wilh, or 

cwt matter. [ounce. 

Drachm, dram, th« eighth part of anf 

DnuQ, a small quantity^cSf iqiirifii 
Gest) jest, a deed, an eetioii. 

Japt, any thing ludicfeDia^ te div«L< 
Gild, ^i|d,^to Wash over %itii gold 

GuiUi, a sqciet}^ d coinoratioiiiL 
Gik, gilt, paWcipie ofxTikl. 

Guilt, n^e^i^ oliKinte. 
Guest ^st, a 

Guess ^ did gui . 

efl, the prekit of Iter, tot 




mber of beasts 
oblique caae oiUtt* 
es of dog. 
e song, 
e place. 

feiitertainnienf. 
niserve of 



, ^^^^^qp," 



Heard, he^ 
tistc 

Herd, a 
Him, him, 

Hym,a 

Hymn, a 
In, in, withii 

Inn, a hou: 
Jam, jam, a ^niserve of fiMi; to 
wedge in.' 

Jamb, a post pf 
Joust, just, tilt, tournament 

Just, right, holiest ^ ^ 
Kill, kill, to deprive of life. 

Klin, a fabrickibrmedlodiy Uteiga 
Knag, nag, ahardjmot 

Nag, a small home. 
Knap, nap, to Mte. 

Napi a ^ort sieep. 
Knit nit, to weave with needles- 
Nit, the egg of a k>use. 
Lacks, laks, doth lack. 

La^, loose. 
Lead, led, a soft hearvy metal 

L^d, the pretextt ind paxtidpk 
Lead. 



mm0mtmmi^mm 



warn 



^ English Language* 



185 



\ABi\ Hnv a OMttiber, al^^rder. 

Limn, to paint 
i:ankiv tingkR, imrte of s chain. 

Lynx, a spotted beast. 
Net, Twi^ a texture woven with large 
intenticps or hieshes. 

N«tt,* clear of charges, real. 
None, nun, not any, not one. 

Nan, a female recluse. 
One, wan, less than two, fdngle. 

WwT, the preterit of Win. 
Plum, plum, a kintl of fruit. 

Pltunlt, iierpemlicular ; a leaden 
weight on a Uile ; tu adju^ 
Rap, rap, a quicfarUowiu'tostrike. 

Wrap, to fold together. 
Read, red, the preterit and participle 
of Read, to peruae. 

Red, a colour. 
Real, rest^ ea^, quietness. 

Wrest, to extort by force. 
Retell, retahi to vdhiit. 

Wretch, a worihlos^rson. 
Rinff, ring, aciral^; to sound. 

Wring, to i%vg(>^ ' 
Rough, rufl^' un<^vcn,'nnpolished. 

KuA| a rufHe. [of iQUng, to sound. 
Rung, rung, the prctcrit'and participle 

Wrung, the preterit ^nd participle 
ofWring, to twist 
Some, sum, a part, not many. 

Sum, the wnole o^ny thmg. 
Son, suh, n male ch\^^ 

Sun, the luminnr^R'the day. 
Tacks, taks, small naus. 

Tax, a rate, ^ charge. 
Terse, terse, smooth, neat 

Ticrre, a meacur^ 
Tong, tung, the ci^ of a buckle. 

''Uongue, the in^Vument of speech. 
Ve^Q, verj,thebpik; to bend down. 

Viige, a dean'a mace. 
5 * , 

Knot, no^ a cluster; to unite. 

Not, an adverb, denoting negation. 

Not!.* s quantity of thread 
Lock, lok, an instrument to fasten 
doors or chests. ta place. 

liOcke, a man's name ; the name of 

Lough, • lake. [Scotland. 

Scot, wot, shot, payment; a native of 



5 



Shock, sbok, external vieleace* 
Siiough, a species of shaggy dog. 

Brews, brooz, doth btew. 

Bruise, a hurt; to crush ormangle. 
Bruit, broot, rumour, noise. 

Brute, a creature without leaaon. 
CreivK, krooz, ships' ccmipanies. -^ 

Cruise, a voyage in search of jiluiv- 
der ; to Hail for plunder. 
Hoop, hoop, any thing citcalar$ to 
bind or enclose, [shout 

Whoop, a aliout of pursuit ; to 
Rhcuin, room, fhin wateiy mattef. 

Rome^ the capital city <»f Italy. 

Room, space, apartment 
Rood, roofl, fburtn {Art of an acre* 

Rude, rough, uncivil. 
Threw, Mroo, the preterit of Throw. 

Through, from end to end. 
To, too, unto. 

Too, likewise, also. 

Two, twice one; a ^uple. 
Yew, yoo, a tn»e of tough wood. 

Vou, the oblique case of Ye. 
7 
Wood, wockI, trees, timber. 

Would, the preterit of WiU. 
ou 
Bough, bou, a liranch of a tree. 

. Bow, an act of wverence ; to bend. 
Flour, flour, the edU)Ic part of grain. 

Ploxf er, the blost^m of a plant 
Foul, foul, nithy, impure. 

Fowl, a winged animal, a bird. 
Hour, our, sixty minutes. 

Our, belonging to us. , 
Pour, pour, to let out, to emit 

Pow er, dominion, force. 
Rout, rout, a rabble ; to dissipate and 
put into confusion l^ defeat 

Route, road, wav. 
1 
A chor, a kur, a species of thQ herpes. 

A ere, a quantity of land. 
Bai ting, ba tini;, refVcshment 

Ba ting, alwtjng, deduetine. 
Ci on, si un, a shoot from a iMant 

Scion, a small twig taken from 
one tree to be ingrafted into 
another. 



OI a1 



* X-'_ 



1S6 



A Jufit Standard for Ptonouncing' 



1 






Ceil in|, md Ut^ l|ie inmer lo^C 

ami iitf, placing th^ veiJ. 
Ki*o dal, tu ual, h^ from another. 

Fvu dal, a (lepenUance, held of a 

' caperioar kaoL 
Gm ter, gia tur, a rough iofltnuneBt 
to grato with. 

^real ei, brger. , 
Ho ly, ho le^ pip"^ sacred. 

Whol ly, totally. [forttkes. 

Le^¥^, bviir, one who deeeita or 

Lb ver, a mechanical power. 
Me teiv me tur, a measurer. 

Me tre, poetical measure. [als.. 
Mi ner, nu nur, one who digs fax meC^ 

Mi iior, less t omi imder age. 
Pe Icr, pe tur^ a man's name. 

P(S tre, nitrsk 
Brier, pri ur, one who inqiuree too 
narrowly. 

Pri or, former, before. 
Rai sin, re zn, a dried grapis. [bate. 

Reaaon, causey principle; to de- 

Rai ser, la zur, one who raises ot lifta 

up. [with. 

Razor, an instrumeni to shave 
Sa tire, sa tur, a poem in which fotty 
or wickedness is censured. 

6b tyr, a ^Ivap god. 
Sa ver, sa vur, one who saves. 

Sa TOur, a aeent, odour. 
Soign ior, seen ypr, a lord. • 

^n ior, one dder than another. 
Tree ties, tree tiz, negotiations. 

Trea tise^ a disoounie. 
Vi aj, vi ul, a small bottle. h''^^ 

Vi ol,,a stringed instrument of mu- 
Weak ly, week Ic, feeble i Sae\Ay, 

Week ly, once a week. 

Male schal, mar shal, m chief com- 
mander of an army. 
Mar shal, the chief officer of arms ; 

toj^muige. 
Mar tial, warlike. 
Mar ten, mar tin, a kind of swallow. 
Mar tin, a man's name. 

a 

Al tar, 9wl tur, a jplace on 'which of- 
Mngs are laid : theoonmiunion 
Ubie. 



Al *A» *^ ^L..^— ^ 



Augei^f^ gqr, « oupNlteir^ tool 
Au gur, to conjeetufe by signs. 

Anchor, angkur, a. heavy iron to 
hold tl;^ f)hip ; ^ rest on. 

Ank er, % l^wd meai^ire. 
Bet tor, bet tuZ| one tha^ lays bets oi 
wagen. 

Better, more good ; to improve 
Ber ry, ber it, any small ihiit. 

Bo ry, to inter the dead, to bide. 
Borough, bur ro^ a town with a oor- 
poiation. 

Bur row, a hole A>r rabbits. 
Cal lous^kaJ kiSi hardened, insensiblr. 

Cal lus, an induration of the fibius. 
C^ non, kan nun, a large gun. 

Can on, a rule, a law. 
Cast er, kast ur, one who casta. 

Castor, a beavti;* 
Cel kr, sel lur, a ground room. 

Sel Icr, one wh^ yells. 
Ces sion, aeth un, the act of giving 
way s resignation. 

Scs si<m, the 4flot sitting. 
Cin gle, mng ^#|gurih fi>r a hone. 

Sin gle, do3i : ft>separate. 
Col our, kiifw, hue; to stain. 

Cul ler, MB who picks or 
kuik, ai 



,v * 



Cous in, KUMi, a near 

Coc en, to {heat V 
Cyg net, aig nA a youpg 

Sig net, a mA 
DiscouS)di8lflfbroad,flat ^ 

pis cus) a qubu 
FVl be, fel k>| theri^of%wlM^ 

FH low, an lUMOoate. * |fingi*r. 
Fil K^ fil lip, a Quick motlaQ of thf 

Philip, a niMiname. ^ [gy. 
Fun goUB^ fiinggl^ excreapent, sufn- 

Fun gtia, 9 maJnoom. ^rs. 

(aalley, galle, a vessel driven vrith 

Gal ly,^ a printei% case to reonw 
types, Ac. 
Gild «r; gild ur, 009 who giUsi 

Guild cr,* % Ihit^ coin, value fiMty 

Junfa^ jungkil|fchflipecak% any 
delicacy. 
Junk et, to feast soereth^ [guagr. 
Lat in, kt tin, the ancient Roman Ian- 

I -* A I ^i_A #f *: 1 



the EngHsk Lan^age* 



13' 



to diminish, to gn»w 



4 

leiHk 
Letflon, a precept, a task. 
Levee, lev ve, a crowd of attcndaiAs^ 
Levy, a rate} to raise men or 
money. 

Man ner, man nur, form, method. 
Man or, a lonl*b jurisdiction, a do- 
main, [chimney. 
Man tel, man t^ woric raised before a 

Man tie, a kind of cloak. 
Met al, met tl, a mineral substance ; 
a hard compact body: 
Mettle, courage, spirit 
Pal ette, pal lit, a painter's lioard. 

Pal let, a small mean bed. '- 
Pan el, pan inl, aschedute ofjurymen. 
Pan nel, a kind of rustick saddle. 
Pan ick, pan nik, a sudden and 
groundless fear. 
Pan nick, a plant of th^ millet kind. 
Pencil, jpennl, an instrument for 
wrttmff or {Minting. 
Pen si)e,lian^ng, suspended. 
PractiGe,pnikti%,cnstom,.the habit 
of domg uty it^g, 
Prac tise; to do Imptuany. 
Rab bet, nd) bit, a f^trjpenter's toot 

Rab bit, a small tirny animal. 
Rigger, riggur, oiie who rigs or 
dresses. , 
Rigour, severity, strictness. 
R3m agCy 4«im mij, a tumult, a bustle. 

Run^Vh^e, to search plaoes. 
Scitii|^ sittshuate, the name of 
iRown. 
Situate, placed with respect to 
any thing elsa't 
Snbtje, sutti, artftrt; cunning. 
5g[ut tie,* the n^at weight 
Sue eoiu^, suk kiur, assistance, relief $ 
to ndp. 
Suck er, a yung shoot, a fish. 
Sul kiey,* sulnLe^ a carriage lor one 
penop. 
Sm ky, sullen, morose. 
Tray ail, travil| labour, toil; to la* 
jboor. 
Travel, a journey; to pass from 
one plapa to another. 
Weath er, wejth ur, state of the air. 

««r-Ai. -t 



5 

Choi er, kbl lu^ anger, r^ge. [rieck.! 

Col lar, something put round the 

Docket, dokit, a label tied upon 

goods. [rant 

Doq uet, a paper containing a war* 

Profit, prof nt, gain, advantage) to 

benefit 

Proph et one who foretela. 

6 ' 

Crewel, krooil, yam twisted and{ 
woimd. 
Cruel, inhuman, barbarous, [ture. 
Rheumy, roome, full of sharp inois-{ 
Roomy, spacious^ wide, 
ou 

Coun cil, koun sil, an assembly, [vise. I 
Coun sel, advke, direction ; to ad« 
1 
Arrear, arreer, that which remains 
' unpaid. 

At riere, the lost body of an army. 
Avail, a vale, profit, advantage; toj 
profit 
A vale, to let fall, to depress. 
Chagrin, shagreen, ill numour; toj 
vex. 
Sha green, the skin of a kind offish 
De mean, de mene, to Itehave. 

De mesne, a freehold. 
Discreet, diskreet, prudent, modest 

Dis crctc, distinct, disjunctive. 
En diet, en dite, to prosecute. 
Endite, to compose. 
4 
As cent, as sent, eminenee^ steepness. I 
Assent, an agreement [ency. 
Con cent, kon sent, harmony, consist- 
Con sent, agreement, coiic^; to] 
^ agriee to 

Coquet, koket, to deceive in love. 
Coquette, a gay airy girl. 
1 • 
Sa vor y, sa vur e, a plant 
Sis vour y, pleasing to Uie smelL 
4 

As pe rate, as pe rate^ to make rough. 
Aspirate^ to pronounce with roll] 
breath. 
Cal en dar, kal en dur, a register. 

Cal en der, to dress (AdtK 
Prem ices, prem is six, fiiat fhiltaL 



m 



A Jmit. Standard far Prori^ncing 



fnoAti^y. [to flayer. 

I Cvm i4i we*^ «i:preMiop pf dvilitj i 

Ce|ac«a«%ii»tfi4Mt9i of th^ whale 
. )uimL [hiaiif . 

Se ta eeptti) hriBtly, wt with strong 
I Comp tiol ler, Icon Uo lur, dinelor, 
iupervtflor. 
Coll tml If r, 0110 1!^ hvi th|» {i^Wer 
ofgo^wming. 

|Cop^#kiii,^mieihiiO» t^ W^tof 
yielding ;«gnM)t 
Con aeanoDy ft«iuing ^eiher. 
I Di foct er, de xiekt ur, one '«%o clirecta. 
tifem^fxfy Kxm who haa^uthoiity 
over othetB { an inrtructer. 
I £ led 9r, e lekt ive, one who irqlea, 
E led re, ai^ber, a mixed metal 
ln|0ii|poil, iat^nabuni the ad of 
(orcingor dr^imng any thing. 
In ten tbn, doRign, purpose. 



teller of ficdona. 
In venti9r||i6ndero9|qf fatnethiti^ 
HrWi #P<n>tnver. 

i 

Per mit d ble^ per mia f^ b|i ^*i 

which via ^m miiurled. 
Per nun fi wv 'Ji9^ wnkli m^ ht 

•*"^ I 

Alkgatiapi, «]|0||f^^l|, mffirma 

tiPtti«plf!e. 
Al B gation, ^ ypQiqidicM nile. 
As po ra tioii, 1^1 pe i|( 9|)^ # 199^ 

lottgh* 
As pi ra tip% m a^deii| flfh i a Aill 

prommoifiicm. 

Qp pen i t)i ry^ depwftwe, one 
with whom fny ihiqg 19 lodged 
iptritd. 
D^ DOS i tor y, the pbqe tHisre any 
tning is kvlgfd. ' 



CHAPTER LIX 

The following chapter is ehiefly composed of irmgular words which 4o no^ 
properly belonc in any of the pneeding chiipters. I haYs^ tlMPefeieJ 
anamed tbera in this chapter, with theo^rred prommdatiGQ oppodte to 
each word. 



WrUUti. 


1 
krate 


WHtkn. 


4 
«ilan|^ 


Crate^ 


thank 


eighth 


eyttjk 


thiok 


ewe 


£* 


y«* 


? • 


4x09 


sfaro 


conch 


keii|k 


axe 


4 


widh 


hoir 


does 


.m 




6 . 


dni^fat 


draft 


Ivew 


htoo 


pB- 


ff 


chew 


trfiee 


«h* 


gertft 


rouge 


leoih 


3 


Md 


shiew* 

ihrewd 

eem 


ihip 
eoo 


«i« 


^^^f* 


we«il 


^ -1>™»W 


says 


e« 




OB 


•«?IP 


eekis 

1__ 


?^!!La 


P"*, 



iJic Enf^lish L(mgu4i\g€» 



131 



1 


I 

anetehint -. 


anciMit 


apron 


•py? 


.bridal 


bridal 


i bridle 


bridl 


jrlothier 


klotheyur 


fiulim . 


egreaa 
. fiJeyiirt 


gaitcrt* 
1 haul boy 


bo boy 


ihuoKMir 


, yunmr 


idls 


idl 


idol . 


idul 


idyl 


idU 

9 


iron 


lum < 


islaad 


lie and 


lucre 


ihikur 


naval 


naval 


na vtf . 


navl 


noyeau* 


no ye 


pi kit 


pi lut 


lolffier 


aolejur 
•peibe 


■pectu^ 


■peciea 


apeihef 


via count 


vikount 


wlieralbve 


hwaiefore 


georgkk 


iOfjik 


nauaeoua 


' nawihtts 

r 4 

•lose 


aloes 


anxiow 


angkihoa 


any 
axiom 


cnne 


idishum 


banquet 
beddotbv 


bangkkwil 
bedUoM 


biscdt 


Uakit 


braehial 
breech <« 


Iffikval 
hritahis 


baffet 


Imf fit 


bliiineii 


bis ma 


buay 


bttM 


cenaof 


aenaor 


chaike 


triialis 


chanen 


AnifLV 


chaneiiow 


ahangkiQ* 


chriati^ 


kiiatyim 


CKel^ 


able 


|ciTG& 


flerkit 


b^ 


Uabbnid 
kurnel 


Wconjuioi 


kanjw 



cop-koaid 

cymbil 

enffliik 

raCod 

wUttbeau 

ibunbefia 

flexion 

fluxion 

ftmcUoa 

fiir nace 

gal tows 

0unblsj* 

gambol 

nan dew 

piccoag^ 

mgiess 

into 

|avelin 

junctiea 

'June turn 

lettuoe 

liquid 

liquor 

malkmf 

manjjr 

mastiflT 

medal 

meddk 



miniimi 

misaal 

misffle 

nephew 

palate 

pendant 

pendsnt 

^thiakli 

|inl^ 

lib and 

nffron. 

fanertwi 

•dmlele 

seven nl|^ 

symbol 

thank iU 

timveise 

unetion 

onto 



iP^eneunfMl. 
4 

kub ban) . 

simbat 

uu[2ttsh 

flunbo 

flamboae 

flekshun 

flak shun 

AtngkahuD 

fiirnis 

gallus 

gamU 

gambol 

granjur 

Bkkup 



in too 
javtin 
jungkahim 
NKi^ktBlittie 

likkwid 

fikkor 

mallose 

menne 

mastif 

meddal 

meddl 

mes swiye 

nun yon 

mis ml 

missil 

nevvu 

pallet 

pendant 

pendent 

lis 



IKitto 
lib bin 
nfftim 
sMigkshan 
safSr 
asdjole 
■en nit 
flmbiil 
aangkiU 
tmvefse 
rkshon 



victQals 



mi 

vensn 

vifttls 



BBan 



m 



mmmam 



I 



140 



IJrrfRlBII. 

vignelto 

werlnetdty 

whether 

whither 

whH low 

women 

laa lel 
cox comb 
scallop 

coarier 

sapir 

althoojfh 

a9 0i|age 

ban^li 

eliaropoign 

conjure 

curtail 

dernier 

dissuaiie 

encore 

fa Ml 

galoche 
IIZ9I 

muntain 
inarkee* 
per made 
routine 
■of flee 

mepe^ 

agalB 

a gained 

coarani 

cuiraa 

diaeera 

enhnnet 

preeinct 

qiiadrilk 

leniM 

eaebcv 
in trade 

ehiniob 



A Just Standard far Pronouncing 



4 

▼in yet 
weiilde 
hweihnf 
hwith ur 
hwitlo 
wtm mhi 
5 

lofiil 

ftofcs home  
akoi lap 

6 
keoreer 

.7 
fhbognr 

awl tho 
aaswaie 
bu ro 

sham pone 
kon jure 
kur tale 
dem yare 
dis swade 
ongkote 
fbtee' 
galoahe 
has a 
mentane 
markee 
per swade 
100 teen 

fUffitt 

S 

4 

• gen 

agenst 

kurrant 

kweraa 

.dizsem 

^nhanae 

mesingkt ' 

bdril 



"" 6 
^atfihoo 
^troed 

tfmmoy 

Ott 



anciently 

tieau tc oae 

brevtatttie 

hu inor oos 

irony 

irony 

reqaiem 

righ/eook 

scenery 

soldiery 

carbunde 
nuurchion «!«e 

cordial 
nauseate 

ambergris 

anchorage 

an cho rrt 

and i ron 

anxiously 

a qua tile 

que duet 

ft am line 

btiletdottz* 

burial 

busily 

capital 

capitoi* 

courtesy 

desuetude 

equipogp 

oqoity 

ezercie* 

oxorciae 

gridiron . 

haleyon 

handkerchief 

hitherto 

liquefy 

li qui dale 

luxury 

nndntenaiiee 

massftcie' 

natioiiai 

paranuar 

passable 

pesdble 

piteous 



ftjk ««*tt^ 



"fOMWUOim 

1 

•ne tsbent le 
bn teheus 
breve ya Islmre 
yu mur Us 
I rune 
I ume 
re kwceta 
riteheus 
•ecnere 
sole jure 

8 

karbungkkl 
nutf sfaunee 

3 

korjeai 
nawdieote 
4 

amburgfMS 
angkoraje 
angkofeC 
and! urn 
angksliosle 
akkwatil 
okkwedokt 
akkweHn 
bUledoo 
berreal 
bbsele 
kapetal 
kapetnl 
kurteee 
desfw«tads 
ekkwepaJB 
ekkwete 
ekeereiae 
eksoraiye 
gridium 
halshemi 
hang knr tshif 
luthurtoe 
UkkweH 
likkwadale 
hakahure 
men te noiMir 
aMMsakvr 
Baahm»il 
BorfanMKit 
passabi 

pitsheue 



^1. 



t.i ,«.. 



mmm 



priucij^e 
{ttinctuti 
radicjU. 
r.id ijcic 
ra tion al 
re qui site 
sacri^ce 
syH cbroiMm 
thank tul ty . 
; ver <ii grit 
j anc ttt out .. 

chroni^l 
chranidd 
togaritlumi 
phoA pho TQM 

bounteous 
ihowh; 



tkc EngltBk Lmgnage^ 



alle gianpB 
at mighty 
assuautft . 
ingretfieat • 
ma rautler 
niU8emn 
per sua tdoii 
I jier aua iiv« 

ab acis wm, 
alreadjf 
! aa nex ion 
i bel lea let tica 
I ch:tin pign on 
i com plex i(Mi 
i compunction 
I con June tion 
I con nex ion 
de fhix ion 
I de pend ant 
I de pend ant 
i do 8cen4 ant 
'; de flcend ent 
' dis cern meot 
disjunction 
I tiis tine tion 
i ex cKeq aer 
I ex cmp tion 
I ox er tion 



Prommne$dk 

4 
panaepi^ 
prin se pi 
pungk tslui al 
rad de kal 
nildeki 
raffaunal 
wk wezit 
sak krefize 
singJcroniiDi 
<AangkAiIle 
ver ae greea 
unffktwnna 

krone ka! 
krone kl 
legaritins 
fosfonia 
«tt 

beuntsbens 
boaitaoir ' 

d le janse- 
awl mi te 
aaswa siv 
ingrejent 
marodur 
muae vm 
perswaxkon 
per swaMT 

4 
abaiKhnn 
awl tvd de 
an nek simin 
bellettur 
aham pin yun 
kom piek, fbun 
kom ponffk ahnn 
konjnngxahun 
konnekafaim 
de fluk f hnn 
dependant 
dependent 
deaendant 
desendent 
dis lern ment 
dis jttngk akttn 
dAi tin^ shun 
ckita&kur 
egxemahnn 

ershun 



Wrmau 

injunctioja 
in fagl io 
lieutenant 
tniUtia 

port man Uiau 
pun^ til io 

sub junction ' 
together 
tiansttion 
unguen tum^ 
un thank fiii 

piohoicia 

bam bafd iec 
bombasi{i 
con noia aenr 
10 ^M^ laure , 

aid decamp 
leser ^poir 

etiqaelte 

pan te loon 
rendenvottt . 

hnmoronaly 
ar cfai tec tune 

aeeeaaaiy 

acoeaaory 

eourteooaly 

eqintebl^ 

imagery 

punctually 

rationally 

aanctuaiy 

sanguinaiy 

aingnlarly 

triayikbi 



adagio 

apportion 

depndato 

en tbtt fi asa 

enthnaiait 

obedienca 

obedient 



HI 

. /"ronouiiccdL 
4 
in jungk ahuii 
in talyo 
le? ten ant 
mil lish ya 
port man to 
pun^ktilyo 
anb jungk shun 
togethur 
tianazhnn 
tragwentum 
on/Aangkful 

5 
pioboasis 

1 
bum bardeer 
bumbaaeen 
konesaaie 
lukelo 

3 
ade de kawng 
merywor 

4 
ateket 

6 
paiitakwn 
len de voos 
1 
yumniusle 

ar ke lek tshure 
4 ; 

aksesMie 
ak sea BUT re 
kur tshe us le 
ek kwe te U 
im mid jer re 
pttngktehualk 
nahunalle 
aangk tehu a re 
aang gwena re 
rfng gu laria 
tnasSbbl 

1 
• dajeo 

appofeahunmeiii 
(w ^re she ate 
on tha xhe axm 
en ^uxheast 
obejeenae 
o be 10 ent 

« S_ .1 



1 



14'i 



WfUUn, 



A Jmt Standard for Front>uncing 



an ti qm ty 
auz il la 1^ 
coin pni non ate 
com pi^ di cMie 
com pen di urn 
(1m cent i bi« 
e quefitri an 
ex ajjf per ate 
in i qui tons 
in i fjiii ty 
ob li ({ut ty 
om ni flci cnce 
om ni sdent 
un quench a ble 

(lis woUr a ble 
dis iolv ibie 
ate nog ra phy 

ad u la tion 
a gi ta tion 
niwa a tiofi 
al ter a Uon^ 
COR gre ^ tion 
ed u ca tion 
es tu a tiofi 
ex a| ta tion 
e^ 1^ ta tkm 
flue tu a tion 
in du ra tion 
le gi» la tion' 
mra u la tion 
piinc tu a tiim 
recitation 
ni in a tion 
ru mi na tion 
sa cer do tal 
mt u a tion 
ve ge ta tion 



a qua for tk 

•dadtitious 
al togeth er 
com pre hen ^n 
con de seen aon- 
con aei en tioos 
ig no min ioua 
inquisition 
re gi roent ai 

flnv mil li ^Miia 



Prenmawed. 

4 
aQtikkwete 
awg zil ya re 
kom paeb nn ate . 
kom {icn j« ua 
kom peri jeum 
dizzcraebl 
e kwea tre tn 
egz aj erVtc 
in ik kwettta; 
inikkwetp 
ob tik kwe te 
oninisheens^ 
om nUh e ent 
un kwenah a bl 

5 
diz zoIv,a bl 
dizzolvebl 
itenbggraffe 

nd ju bt shttn 
aj e ta shlin 
fuc jcn a slum 
"awl tur ii shun 
kong gie ga sluiii 
ed ju ka uTiini 
en tahaa shun 
egz awl ta »liun 
egz ui ta shun 
fluk tshu a shun 
in dtt ra shiin 
kj is la shun 
mod juk shun 
pungK tabu a shun 
rps se ta shun 
roo in a shun 
roo me na shun 
saa er do tal 
sit tshu a shun 
Tcj e ta shun 

3 
akkwafortis 

4 
adsetishus 
awl to geth nr 
kom lire fien shun 
kon ae sen shun 
kon sheen shus 
ig no min yua 
in^kwezishutt 
rej e ment al 



a»w «M 



n 4t£alk •*« 



WriHtn, 

che vaux de.fi 
k^ ger de mnin 
liMmAgerie 
re ci ta tiVe 



monosTlta tile 
pol y ay t h Me 

discr^ttbnaiY 
extinguisha ole 

bacchanalian . 
con gre ga tion al 

aaa foet i da 
au th^ ti ci ^ 
con san ^tiin i ty 
parti all ty 
pmiA tu ai i ty 
singularity 
taciiurni ty 

chron o lo gi cal 
hyjifochoh driaok 
ich thy ol gy 
phys 1 o^ no mist 
phys i og no m^ 
j)hys i (3 o gY 
reel pro city 



accentna ^n 
an ti ci pa tion 
as so a A tion 
ca pit u la tieti 
cer ti o ra ri 
con so ci a tion 
e nun ci a tion 
ex ag gera tion 
ex am i na tbn 
exoneration 
i ma gin a tion 
par ti d pa tion 
pro nunciatien 
pro {>i tf a tion 
re niMi ct a tinn 
sane tt ii ca t|on 

arithmetician 
char ae te ris tide 
mathematician 



Pfonmmettl- 
1 
ahev o de fi^eeze 
1^ QT de miuie 
men azbliree 
res se ta tceve 

5 
monnosil iaU 
poIleaUkbl 

4 
dis kffvh «n a re 
eka ting gwiah a bl 

bakkanalean 
konggregaahona^ 

4 
aaaafi^edt 
aw then tls se te 
kon sanggwin e te 
par she al e te 
pQi^tsknalete 
nng gu fer e te 
tase turnete 

kron olcj e kal 
hippokmiidreak 
ilc. Me ol o je 
fizh eogndmist 
fizh e 02 no me 
fizhe ol oje 
rese proaete 
1 
ak sen tshn a shun 
an tis se pa shun 
as so she a ^un 
ka pitsh nia ahon 
acrsheonri 
k->n soshetahwi 
e min sheaahun 
egz aj era shun 
egz am e na shun 
egasmi ermahun 
e mad jin a ahun 
par tia se pa ahun 
^ non dlT. than 
pro pish e a ahun { 
re nun she a ahnn 
aangk te fe ka ahun 

ari/Ametishan I 

karakteriitik 

nuk/Aematishan 



ihe EmglUk Langtiage^. 



143 



CUAVtER LX. 

TIm Mowing clispl«r » oomp^iBd of wonb which an feiwra^f pio- 
Dooncrd in Ian impraper and 9iu^4rmaiiiiei^ ereii bgr many .who jNn;/^ 
to be correct spnakera. ^ 

Note, — ^Af the wonia ki the Ibnoiritig diapter are eblttainad in th6 jp^ 
oeilini; chapten, and Ihe prtf^fer pronoDcifltii>ii of iliem given, I hm ttiiy 
given tbh inil^ar pronunciations them in thb chapter* 
Propitti, 

4 

BUI 

broU 

brooeti 

char 

chivca 

chine 

cloy 

tlAdtt 

edge 

ewe 

gvoin 

hoiflt ^ J 

je«t jeiMt hearth hurtii or haili 

join 

joiMt 

' * « 

iOISt 

loin 
loo ' 
mile 
oU 

^ 

point 
quoil 
rear 
rind 



■hoe 

Mil 

•pofl 

■woid 

yeat 

bM 
learn 

nuoe 
hofaa 



I, ad dice 
Ibeen 
IbufH 
Icateb 



Vvig^T, 


Proper, 


FWgvr. 


1 




4 


Ute 


elinch 


UenA 


brile 


creek 


krik 


brotabe 


cringe 


■kriij 


Uhova 


cnne 


kn« 


msm 


dint 


dent 


tahiioM 


fiir 


Air 


^ 


Jim 


fefan 


drcon 


lieam 


ikm 


fj« 


get 


gii 


3^^. 


girth 


gert 


gnno 
hi«te 


hafah 


dh 


MMt 


hearth 


hnrthor 


ine 


hiM 


aSaa 


, iiue 


home 


hum 


;iiite 
ine^ 
hi 


hoof 


huff 


^. 


^ 


mild 


matsn 


maah 


ila 
peek 


nape 
pith 


nap 
pefft 


pleeC 
pinte 
kwate 


pom 

quench 

rid 


KIrinih 
red 


tare 


rinaa 


renee 


fine 


riak 


Itfdt 


fkaaa 


tM 


fiiir 


aha 


■hut 


ahtt 


iife 


■inoB 


iC9ii# 


tpilo 


■lock 


■Bk 


awoid 


flOOt 


ant 


yeret 


■tuit 


atent 


3 
blaat 


<ono 
thin ' 


iton 
fil 


lam 


thrid 


Itod 


na 


tuik 


toah 


3 


wholo 


hal 


hawie 


wonie 


^rtia 


4 


wont 


wuat 


ada 


y«* 


yit 


ben 


* 


ft 


bait 


■tamp 


t;tomp 


kotili 


wiap 


WP 



mmm 



miHv 



mP 



M 


A JyMt SUt^taH \ 


f&rPNm 


^TDpCfa 






«l 


W^er 


Mil 


|ofl|.' ^ ■'.'•' ^ 


malkma 


un 




negro 


oogfal 


dj^MlA 


pMchM 


►wn 
lund 


Kf " 


pump 10* 
puiaiaiyi 


Ml 


wm 


pur ay 




'^ ' • •■ -J 


mdiui 


sciki 


^^Hilit 


lath er - 


»ty 


'•,«>«•■. 


rivet 


iner 


, ittB or 


aalad 


lach 


ahutllf 


ntmnl 


" hiwinmn -' 




mther 


piDtiiur ' V 


i^ptkenaid 


Haon 


ptm 


apoonfut, 


IX na 


'■* i^eiia- 


stcsMiy 


ippl0 


Z^ 


aleelyaiiil 


ckle . 


treble 


'•• 


% " • 1 


wrestle 


^Tid 


karnel 


wiuthtod 


ftminf 


km in 


year&ig 


ercham 


aMrlahimt 


yal km 


irtner ' 


paidttut 


yondct 


Met 


aaTvroraavYiir 




liioer 


aaaiil > 


cause wat 


lucy 


W8»'. 


ikllQW ' 




3 


laudanum 


inatto 


«r|iir 


pother 


►pperai 


korpm 




4 


potW 


)preiiti6B 
thma 


pr&tli 

' as-iM 


rosin 
solder 


istlcfl 


hmals 


tasael 


irrion 


karifai 




Limney 


tohimllc 


pPBfff 


'ver 


Uvv 




•urtetT 
ID draff 


kortahe 
dandor 


dfovni tfi 


igine 


In jfaw 


drowning 


rand 


ariaait 


iroosEy 


may 


dBmaa 




rther 


ftvdor 


a^aid 


ther 


gnCh Of 


anoint 


nwng 
nder 


pngi^r 
hen dor 


appoinV 
desisn 
guardian 
halloo 


»mely 


humble 


an dice 

•ttle 


jandm 
kitll 


nifjQsa 


famparx « 


canal 



Whfc. . 

mal lua 

pinshuri 
pinahUik 
P«nfllL?n 
pus'Je 
' puase 
reddish 
ruth or 
rib Hi 
saim 
shett^ 
smwidur 
ajngnot 
Sfmn ful 
stklde 
stil ynrdy 
tribN 
rassi 
rbbun 
yur Un 
yallur 
yundtkr 

5 
krbswa 
fot Inr 
lodlum 
jpoppl 
botiiur 
polled 
roz urn 
iNMldur , 
iossf) 

1 
putte 

ou 
kou8lo|ie 
dround id 
(Ground ui^ 
(roue 
1 • 
a feerd 
aninte 
appinie 
dezine 

far de^n 
ullo 

ka nawl 



ike English Language, 



mm 



145 



aguiMt 

beyond 
grufige 

in 



; rhpii ma tirta 
surcingle 

mercury 

fiictiCa<le 

and i ron 
ST erftge 
oH aiidine 
circumitenoe 
depute 
depoteit 
dcpfi.ty 
ire queftt \y 
gen er al 
gov eminent 
mtitude 
hand kerchief 
hum ble bee 
hnrrleane 
injurious 
lie or ice 
muakmelon 
methedist 
olh er wise 
re gi ment 
unaress 



ftgjin 
aginft 
be]rtmd 
ften^A 

in Hid 

1 
gran i|ie 
til ma in 
flinnggl 

mar ku i« 

3 ' 
fitttetriKMle 

4 

hand i um 
evurij 
kA Un (&ie 
8ur kum sfcenae 
^eputize 
depu tizd 
debute 
ftekkwentle 
jin ur al 
guv ur ment 
ptatetshude 
nang kurtahur 
bum bl bee 
harrekane 
in jur us 
lik kur ish 
muf h mil ymi 
me/Aodis 
xUh urwaxe 
rij e ment 
un dur drca 



whifAitne 

mm i native 

ap pCiint mc^it 
ix> tato 
•ubpoeiia 

attacked 
CO ri an der 
ex tem poie 
par li tioii 
pre sump tu out 
tobac<A> ' 
un guen turn - 
un stead y 

dtaappant 

jan ti a ry 
whor tie ber ly 

a ritfa me tick 
c lee tri ^ * 
pre vent ive 
stu pen doQs 
tremendous 

obstreperous 

a gue and fever 
fen ny royal 

certiorari 

op por tn ni ty 



!l 



Vutgat. 

hwippltree 

5 
Bom e tiv 

1 
apptntement 
'potaftir' '• 
supjinna 

• 4 
attaktid 
kiti liin^ur 
eks tfm i^ore 
pc ilsn un 
pr^tuirishus 
to.bakknr 
an gwintum 
un stld de 

dkappitite 
4 

jcn u a re 
liokld'berre 

4 
a re^ me tik 
e lekturixe 
^ tent e tir 
stiipendtt'us 
tre men da us 

fe vurna^ 
pen ne ri 
- 4 
sashurarur 

op pur triiti ne te 



\^ 



Thefittmrtng worcb^ ^Uh many othen^ are veryjrtquenily spelled inr 

corneUy in vtiting. 



Addico 

ankle 

buduiier 

camphire 

cbevauxdeMse 

chymical 

chymifltry 

ckar 

clinch 

cobbler 



eolick 

die 

dule 

enekise 

encloaoftt^ 

endict 

endietmfliit 

endite 

endorse 

cndoissBicut 



ensure 

ensurance 

enterprise 

epaulet 

%ot 

felon 

germe 

gimlet 

mqusie 

inqoiiy 



instrufstcr 

lie 

hiorchandise 

negotUti 

negotfatioB 

phreiisy 

'nband 

stanch 

wanranty 

wo 



146 A JuH^ Standard for Pr(mouncinff 

CHAPTER-LXL 
REVENGE. 

Of all the passions which invade the human breast, re- 
venge is the most direful. 

Uo^* much soever a person may sufTer from injustice, 
lie is always in hazard of suflTering nK)rQ from tlie proee- 
L'ution of revenge. 

How pleasing soever revenge may appear, it aJways 
costs more to a generous mind than the purchase is wortti. 

Revenge is a mean pleasure ; but to k)r^ve i« gbrioiis. 

lie vflro arrogates to hm^^lf the riglU of vengeance, 
i?ha\vs how nitle he is ({ualiiied to decide upon his own 
ckiims; since certainly, h^ detnands what lie would be 
unwilling to grant to another. 

He who retires to meditate mischief, and exaspecate 
his o\!v^i rage, may justly be niuiibered amengst tlie must 
ruiserable of human beings. j 

A passionate and revengeful temper rendeE» a man! 
unfit for advice, deprives Wm of his reason, and robs him ! 
uf all that is great or noble in his nature. 

No principle is more »oble than that of forgi^wg in- 
juries ; and nothing so wicked or unprofitable a?^ rancor- 
ous revenge. 

Hatred and revenge are perpetual stings in the breast 
of those who harbour them'. 

A gentle and prudent reply to indecent and scmrilbus 
language, is the most severe, though innocent revenge. 

Those who are ready to forgive injuries, are esteemed 
for tlieir clemency and forbearance, whitst those who 
cherish revenge, are dreaded for the mischief tliey are 
capable of doing. 

He that watches for revenge lies in wait against him- 
6elf, and draws down mischief on his own head. 

As he that can revenge an injur]iiand will not, discovers 

a virtuous and magnanimous disposition of soul ; so he 

I ihat can return a kindness and does not, shows a mean 

land contemptible spirit. ; 






iw^ ^aH M 



the English Language. 147 

The sweetest revenge fe to do good to our enemies. 
By taki«g revmige, a man is but evcm with Ids enemy ; 
but in passing tt over, lie is superiour to him. 



THB C1J0&OO. 

Hall, l^eamteoiis stranger of die wood, 

At<(«rKknt on the spring ! 
Now heaven repairs thy vernal seat. 

And MX)ods tliy welcome sing, 

Soon as the daisy decks the green, 

Thy certain voice we hear ; 
Hast thoti a star to guiile thy path, 

Or mark the rolling year 1 

Delightful visitant ! witi) chee 
I hail the time of flowers, ' 

When heaven is filFd with musick sweet 
Of birds among the bowers. 

Tl>e edioolboy wandering ia the wood, 

To pMll the flowers so cay, 
Oft starts, thy curious voice to hear, 

A«id imitates thy Iay« 

Soon as the pea puts on the bloom, 

Thou fly'st the vocal vale ; 
Ail annual guest in other lands, 

Afiother spring to hail 

Swe^ bird ! diy bower is ever gre^ 

Th}' sky is ever clear ; 
Thou hast no sorrow in thy flong, 

No winter in thy year. 

! could I fly, rd fly Avith thee ; 

We'd make, with joyftil wing, 
Our annual visit o'er the globe, 

(Ainipanions of the spring. 



148 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 
CHAPTER LXn. 



NUMBERS AND FIQVBfjBS, 



1 

3 
4 

5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
IQ 
11 

n 

13 

14 

15 

W 

17 

18 

Id 

20 

30 

40 

50 

60 

70 

80 

90 

?00 

200 

300 

400 

500 

(500 

700 

80O 

DCCCC 9oa 
1000 



LeiterK 

I 

II 

III 

IV 

V 

VI 

VII 

Vlfl 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII 

xiii 

XIV 
XV 
XVI 
XVII 

xviu 

xix 

x.^ 

XXX 

XL 

L 

LX 

LXX 

LXXX 

jxc 

ICC 

ccc 
cccc 

D 
DC 
DCC 
DCCC 



N 



Names, 

one 

two 

tbree 

lour 

five 

six 

seven 

eighl 

nine 

ten 

eleven 

twelve 

thirteen 

fourteen 

aheen 

sixteen 

seventeen 

^hteen 

nineteen 

twenty 

thirty 

forty 

fifty 

sixty 

seventy 

eighty 

ninety 

one hisndred 

two hundred 

three hundred 

four hundred 

fire hundred 

six hundred 

seven hundred 

eight hundred 

nine hundred 

one tnouiMind 

one thoiis*an^ eiuhl 



Sumirkid Adjgiiires. 

first 

second* 

ihinL 

fourth* 

fift^« 

sbcthw 

seventh. 

eigk^. 

ninth. 

tentii. 

elevehih. 

twelfth. 

thirleeiitlu 

fourteenth. 

fiftieenth. 

sixteenth. 

seventeenth. 

eighteenth. 

nineteenth. 

twentieth. 

thirtieth. 

fortielli/ 

fiftieth. 

sixtieth. 

seventieth. 

eightieth. 

ninetieth. 

one hundredth. 

two himdredlh. 

tliree hnndrcdth. 

four linndredth. 

five hundredth.^ 

six hundredth.^ 

seven hundredth. 

eight hundredth. 

nine hundredth. 

one thousandth. 

hanilred ttntl turtily-nme. |{ 



the English Language* 149 

CHAPTER LXIII. 
OF THE PAUSES AND MARKS USED IN WRITING. 

AJ 

ct >'! 

i 

n 

[] 
t 



A comma, 


.♦ 


A caret. 


A seinicoioiit 


• 


A quotation* 


A colon,. 


• 
• 


A section, 


A perioiU 


« • 


An inde;c, 


A noi9 of interrogaticmt 


? 


A paragraph. 


A note of exclamation, 


• 


The crotchets. 


A hypheot 


m 


An obelisk, 


A parenthesis. 





An ellipsis, 


An apostrophe. 


9 


A brace, 


An asterisk, 


• 


A diaeresis, 



i 



ELUCIDATION OF THE PRECEDING CHARACTERS 

• AND MARKa 

Q, What is the use of a comma? 

.4. It is to stop the reader's voice the time of pronouncing 
one syllable. 

Q. What is the use of a semicolon? 

A, To stop the voice the time of pronouncing two sylla- 
bles. 

Q. What is the use of a colon? 

A. To stop thoToice the time of pronouncing four sylla- 
bles. 

Q. What is the use of a period? 

A, To stop the voice the time of pronouncing six syllables. 

Q, What is the use of a note of interrogation? 

A. It shows that a question is anked, and the enl of the 
sentence preceding ii should be read with a raised tone of 
voice, except when a question is asked, by who^ wkich^ what, 
how, why, when, where, whcreforcy which sentences should 
be read with a depression of the voice at the end of the*7. 

Q. What is the use of a note of exclamation? 

A, It is a mark of wonder, surprise, or admiration. Tlie 
reader's voice should stop as long at an eycJapiaUon and in- 
terrogation as at a colon. 

Q. What is the use of a hyphen? 

A. It is used in connecting compound words, as inkstand. 
It is also used when a wofd is divided, and the former part 
of the word is written at the epd of oneline* 4tnd tiie latter 
part of it, at the beginning of another. In this case, it 



" i 'i « " ■""" "I I I  " li n iii m iii m il mr i i r nj i » 

l£0 A Just Standard far Pronouncing' 

Q. What is the use of a pareiinesis? 

A. It iaclmles soinetliing; explanatory ; which, if omiUed, 
would not obscure the sense. The wonln inclu^letl in a. pa- j 
renthcsis, should be ^ead with a weaker toife of toke tluiii { 
the rest of the sentence* 

Q. What is the ii9e of an apostrophe ? 

A, It is used to ffhow the possessrre case, a« a miah's 
property. It is likewise Used to show that 9t)me }ett>ei' or< 
letters are omitted, as'^ou'rf'for loved^ *ti8 fwrti iSf dtc. 

Q, What is the use of an asterisk? 

A, The asterisk, obelisk^* and many otiier mark^, are nsed 
to direct the reader to sonte note or remark in the m^gin 
or at the bottom of a page. * m 

Q« What is the use of a caret! f 

A, hh used to show that some letter or word has been! 
omitted through mistake. In this case, the letter or word ' 

should be insM^rted above the line, and tlie caret imder it, thus, ' 

n ^ her * 

jiianer; Hove her for modesty and virtve, 

A A 

Q. What is a quotation? 

A, Two inverted commas are phiced at the beginning of 
a passage, which is quoted from some other author, and two 
apostrophes are placed at the conckision of it ; as, ** Theffrop' 
er study of mankifid is man.^^ 

Q. What is the use of a section ? 

A, It is used to divide a discourse or chapter into less parts. 

Q, Wltat 18 tkc use of an index? 

>i. It pi^ints oKt a remarkable paissage, or soinetlling that 
requires particidar attention. 

Q. What is the use of a paragraph ? 

A* ft denotes the beginning of a new subject. 

Q. What is the use ofthe crotchets? 

A^ They include a word or senteirce Which is iiitetutcd 
to exempliiy the foregoing sentence ; or which is intended 
to supply some deficiency, or rectify some mistake. 

Q. What is the use of an envpsis t 

A, It is used when some letters in a word are omitted; m 
k — g for kinff: it is also used to denote an uncertain p««se 
only; then, it i» called a dash.> 

Q. Whart is t^euse of a brace? 

A. It. is used to Connect several lines or words together. 



i 



the English Language. 



151 



Q. What is the use of a diaeresis? 

A* It is put over the latter of feiro vowels^ to show thai 
they belong to two distinct syllables; thus, Credior Israel, 

Q. What words should begin with a capital letter in wri- 
Ung? 

A. The first word of erery book, chapter, letter, note, or 
any other piece in writing; the first word after a period ; the 
appellations of the Deity, as Lord, Jehovah, Ood, Messiah; 
proper names o{ persons, places, mountains, riviers, ships, 
^Lc as George, York, Alps, &c.; every line in poetry; the 
pronoun I, and the inteijection O; every substantive and 
principal word in the titles of books, as WalJcer^s Diction' 
ary of the English Language. 



OF THE ABBREVIATIONS USED IN WRITING. 



A. Answer. 

I A. A. S. Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Academy* 
A. B. Bachelor of Arts. 
Abp. Archbishop. 
Acct. Account. 
A. D. In the y«arr of our Lord; 
A I. Alabama. 
A. M. Master of Arts v before 



Co. Company, or County. 
Col. Colonel, or Collector. 
Com. Commissioner, or Com- 
modore. 
Con. in opposition. 
Ct or Conn. Connecticiit. 
Const. Constable. 
Cor. Corinthians. 
Cr. Credit, or Creditor. 



noon; in the ytfar of Ihects. cents. 



world. 
Apr. April 
•Atty Attorney. 
Aug. August 
Bart. Baroaat. 
bblJBarrel. 
B. D. Bachelor of Dtvhlity. 

B. V. Blessed Virgin. 

C. or cent a huncked. 

C. A. S. FeHow of thiB Coia< 
necticut Academy. 

Cant Canticles. 
|Capt Captain. 
I Chap. Chapter. 
jChrOn. Chronieies. 
I CI. Clerk, or Clergyman. 



cwt Hundred Weight. 
C. P. S. Keeper of the Priv) 
Seal. 

C. S. Keeper of the Seat 

D. D. Doctor of Dirmity. 
Dea. Deacon. 

Dec December. 
Del. Delaware. 
Dept Deputy. 
Deut Deuteronomy 
Do. or Ditto, the same. 
Dr. Doctor, or Debtor. 

E. East 

Eccl. Ecclesiaeles. 
Ed. Edition. 

[Eg* for example. 



3 A Just Standard for Pronouncing 




ig. England, or English* 


h, L. D. Doctor of Laws. 




[i, Epii^tle. 


Lomi. London. 




ill. Kphesians* 


Lon. Longitude* 




iq. Escpiire. 


Lou. Louisiana. 




ic. cind so forth. 


L. S, The place of the Seal. 




sa. Esaias. 


M. Murt^uis. 




IC. Example, or Ej^oduf^. 


Maj. Major. 




'cr. Executor. 


Mass. Massachusetts. 




t)b. February. 


Math* Ma thematic ks. 




r. France, or Francis. 


Mat^ Matthew. 


. 


. H. 8. Fellow of Uie Royal 


M. B« Bachelor of Fhysick. 




Society. 


M. D. Doctor of Fhysick. 




al. Galatians 


Md. Maryland. 




en. General, or Genesis, 


Me. Maine. 




ent. Gentlcnian. 


Mi*. Master, or Mister. 


1 


CO. George, or Georgia. 


Messrs. Gentlemen,^r Sirs. 




ov. Governour. 


M. S. Manuscript. 




• R. George the King 


MSS. Manuscripts. 




eb. Hebrews. 


Mrs.t Mistress, or Missis. 




ul. Hogshead. 


N. North. 




on. Honourable. 


N. B. take notice. * 




[und. Hundred. 


N. C. North Carolina. 




)id. in the same ploce^ ' 


N. H. New Hampshire. 




e. that IS. 


N. J. New Jersey. 




. the same. 


No. Number. 




ul. Indiana* 


Nov. November. 




1st. Instant. 


N. S. New Stvle. 




ia. Isaiah. 


N. W. T. North Weeteru Ter- 




1. James. 


ritory. 




IC. Jacob. 


N. Y. New York. 




in. January. 


Obj. Objection. 




9sh. Joshua. 


ObtObedienU 




.. King. 


Oct. October. 




m. Kingdom. 


O. S Old Style. 




t. Knight 


Farl. Parliament 




. Lord, or Lady. 


Pa. or Penn. Pennsylvania. 




at. Latitude. 


per. by the, (as per yartl, per 




»s. Pounds. 


hundred) by the yard, by 




ev. Leviticus. 


the hundred. 




leu. Lieuteni»nl» 


per cent by the hundred. 




t In writinf^, Mre. shoukl be prcfi 


xed to the name of a married fauly, 




id Miss to tlttt ofa girl, (Mr unmaffi 


eJlady. 





the English Language* 



15 



Pet. Peter. 

Phil. Philip. 

Philom. a lover of learning. 
P. M. Post Master^ or after- 
noon. 
P. O. Po«t Otece. 
Post, after. 
Pres. Preindent 
Pro. in farour oil 
Profi Prc^sso^ 
P. a Postaeript. 
Ph. Psalm. 

Q. Queen, or Question, 
q. d. As if he should say. 
q. i. As much as you please. 
q. 8. A sufficient quantity. 
Regr. Register. 
Rep. Representisitite. 
Rev. Revelation;or RIeverend. 
Rt. Hori. Right ndiiotii^blie. 
R. I. Rhode Island. 
S. South, or Shiltiilg. 
St. Saint. 
S. C; Sottdt Cavolimu 



Sec. Section. 

Sen. Senator, 6r Senior. 

Sept. September. 

Serg. Sergeant - 

Servt. Servant. 

S. T. P. Profetesorof Divinity 

S. T. D. Doctor o f Divimty. 

ss. to vHt : namely 

Tenn. Tennessee. 

Thess. Thessalonians. 

Tho. Thomas. 

uiuthe last. 

U. S. A. United States of 

America. 
V. or Vide.. See. 
Va. Virginia. 
Via. by way of. 
Viz. to wit ; namely. 
Vt. Vermont. 
W. West. 
Wm. William. 
Wp. Worship 
wt. Weight. 
ice. and tfo forth. 



CHAPTER LXIV. 
AN ESTIMATION OP POVERTY. 

Am I poor? This condition^ rightly weighed, is noi 
very bad. What i^ poverty ? only the absence of a few 
unnecessary ihing^ wbicli please wanton fancy ratlier iiutn 
answer real need ; aiiid without which nature is easily sat- 
isfied ; aftd which, if we do not desire, we cannot want. 
But what is it to wear coarse clothes^ to feed on plain and 
simple food, to work and take pams, to sit or go m a lowei 
place, to have no heaps of cash, or hoards of gain, to keef 
no retinu6, to have few friends and no flatterers? It is a 
situation which has divefs advantages, and many con- 
veniences and comforts eotoected with it 

Its hdppy fruits and consequences free us from many 
caret Ud distractions, fram many troybies and crosses. 



.i,!:j.,.ill j  



154 A Just Standard for Pronouncing ! 

j 
from many encumbrances, temptations, dangers, and^is--: 

tempers' of body. It frees us from grievous miscliieb to) 

which wealth is exposed. 

It maintains health, itidustry, and sobriety. It pre-; 
serves us from luxury, satiety, and sloth. It disposes lisj 
to act heartily, move nimbly, and sleep sweetly. It leads 
to disposiiipiw of mitid^ freedom and leisure to attend toj 
tiie study of truth, and the acquisition of virtue. 

It is a^kuation which many have borne with cheerful- 
ness, and which many very wise and eminently good men 
have voluntarily embraced. 

It is allotted by divine wisdom to mtst men ; the best 
often endure it 

God has declared a speclaif legard to persons in this 
state. The word of tri'th lias pronounced them liappy in '• 
having the gospel preaclied to them. Jesus Christ \n\s] 
sanctified this state by paitaking deeply of it 5 and by 
choosing the poor of this world rach iii faith, and heirs of 
the kingdom,. 

Can such a conditkmy tlien, be very Ipathseme ? ('an 
it reasonably displease us i 

Otight we to murmur at it? shoiidd we not, from tne 
above considerations, radier be thankful for it, tlian coni- 
plai^i? 



The following chapter eontaiiu the names of Sftffet, OwtUietr, 7W7t», 
Cities^ VUlagu, MountAinsi Lakea, River; 4m* in *tie United SttUeaf and 
pronounced according to the best authorities and ciuitoins. The same ruios 
are to be oltscrved with resixsct to th^ figures and silent letters in the' 
pronunciation of the following words, as of the words taken from tlie 
Dictionary, 

4 ay 

Kings Floyd 

Lvnn Troy 

l^ntz 1 

Phelps Ame wcD 

Wells A von 
5 ' Bladen 

ifnoz Rain liriifge 



1 


3 


Gates 


York 


Jone* 


4 


Ciueen* 


BenM 


Tkemet 


Burk« 


Wale« 


Glynn 


2 


Qhent 


Bart 


Kent. 



!>r*" 



the English Lemguage, 



155 






1 
Bolton ^ 
BTeton 
Bra tin 
Cadix 

Ca naan 

Cairo 

Cato 

Cole brook 

Cort land 

Deer field 

Dry den 

Dover 

Kao. ham 

Ros ton 

Kost town 

Raton 

E den 

E rt^ 

Erin 

Evr« ham 

Fatr field 

Free town 

Gold« bufgA 

Go ahen 

Grain ger 

Grren lieid 

Green himl 
\ Guy« bufgA 
; Green buah 

Ciatnea ville 
^Hebron 
I }ivxs burgA 
I If o «*cr 
j Hughs Ujfgh 
, J;\n\cs Umn 
\ Jones biirg& 
I KncniA ton 
I Kort ^^nt 
; lyee« hVLTgk 
j Le high 
'. Le on 
'< Ley clcn 
' Li ma 
I Lo gan 
' I^y on* 

Mead vilte 

Me ro 
: M\ lo 
, Mo IniiPk 
I Sew ark 






Newbtti 
New (Set 
New town 
Newport 
Naplet 
Pike land 
Pbtn field 
Poland 
Porter 
Port land 
Q,ueenetown 
Readfseld 
Reed«boTgA 
Ri ca 
Sale^ 
Say brook 
Snow hill 
So dus 
So Ion 
Stone hura 
StoiMfA ton 
Sweucw hvLTgh 
' Swe den 
Zane« ville 
Wadet ImrgA 
Wakefield 
Waynes hnrgh 
Wruf/its town 

Argyle 
Ann strong 
Bar nard 
Barn stcd 
Bar ton 
Car rael 
Charleston 
Charle* town 
Clarks hurgh 
Clarkfl town 
darks vilie 
toerliy 
Hart ford 
Hart Innd 
Hart wieAr 
Mar low 
Mar nie 
Marsh field 
Pa/mer 
Par ma 
S|iar ta 
6tatcn ton 

Taiin tftn 



3 

Alfind 
AH barnh 
Alflteoa 
Alt bum 
Ballston 
Com wall 
Dal ton 
Dor set 
George town 
Gro ton 
Hate ley 
Hore ham 
Horton 
Lair r«nce 
Norlblk 
Nor way 
Nor waJk- 
Orleans 
Or well 
Shat0 ny 

St. Laiorence 

Tor Iwt 

Wal<l barBr^ 

WaUkitt 

Wal pole 

Wal ton 

Wanb bridge 

War ner 

War saw 

York town 

4 

Acton 

Ad am« 

Am boy 

Am hc«( 

Ash field 

Ash foni 

BecA et 

Bed ford ' 

Bel cher 

Ben ton 

Bcr gen 

Berk shire 

Ber lin 

Bland lord 

Blounts vilie 

Brad ford 

Bran don 

Bran ford 

Bri</gc port 

Brirfgc town 

Brill mrt 



BrimfiaU 
Bristol 
Brun«wid(i 
Butler 
Bux ton 
BlacAr stone 
Cal ais 
Cald well 
Camden 
Campbell 
Camp ton 
Can ton 
Casco 
Cas well 
Cats kill 
dunce Ibid 
Chat ham 
Chelnitf ham 
Chcl sea 
Chesh ire 
Church town 
Clar ence 
din ton 
Dan by 
Dan ube 

Dan ville 
Delhi 
Den mark 

Den ton 

DefA font 

Der by 

Dong las 

Drc« den 

Drum mond 

Dud ley 

Dur ^m 

Du/ch ess 

E</{re field 

Kl lis 

El more 

En field 

Essex 

Fel}« point 

Fish kill 

Fifoh hurgft 

Flat land 

Fleich cr 

Flints ton " 

Flush ing 

Fried huTQh 

Cral way 

G«»r mnn 



IB I 

156 

4 

Slasgov 
3raf ton 
3raa viH^ 
3«il ford 
3ur net 
[fail dam 
[lad W 
Ham flen 
lam bur^A 
iamp shire 
iamp stead 
lamp ton 
ian cock 
lec tor 
lemp field 
iili5 dak 
iins dale 
luds^n 
Iiints burgA 
lants ville 
luritfy 
lurl gate 
acA's<7n 
LJng5 ton 
iam prey. 
«ang don 
<etees ter 
ten ox 
iind ley 
lis bon 
•Ucb field 
•ud lov 
lyndtf buil^ 
•/Q den 
•vnn field 
lal den 
led ford 
fend ham 
Icn don 
[il ford 
[il field 
Li I t^ii 
[un cy 
tin den 
[al ta 
[ur ray 
as satt 
a/ch es 
el son 
ash vilk 
ir is 
em broke 



Am 



j1 Just'Stattdard for^Pronouneing 



4 

Pen gnin 
Pennj bmrA 
Pitts barg£ 
Pitts field 

''■ Pitu ford 
Pitu town 
Plaits burg* 

i Piymp ton 
Prcs ion 

'Princeton 
Pult nrjr 

' Pen field 

/Preble 
Per ry 

. Ran aolph 
Raph ocjfe 

• Reofl ing 
Red field 
Red hook 
Rich field 

. Rich land 
 Rich mond 

'Rid^eMM, 

Ridge way 
. Rid ley 

Rip ley 

Rus aei 

Rut land 
> Sand irich 
. Sand gate 

• Sciig wiek 
Shar on 
Shel by 
Shef field 
Shel barn 
Shel don 

 Sber burne 
Spaf ford 
Spen cer 
Spring field 
Stafford 
Stam ford 
Stan ford 
Stran ford 
Straf ford 
Strat fora 
Stuui; town 
Stur bridge 
Suf field 
Suf foZk 
Sussex 
Sutton 



»■.. 



4 

Svdnef 
Tren ton 
Truztoii 
Tal hr 
Uls ter 
Ver non 
Vic lor 
Vm cent 
Wen ham 
•West em 
WeslfMd 
West ford 
Westlutni 
West more 
rWes ton 
West town 
West port 
Wil lis 
Wills burg* 
WindAwn 
Wins low 
WreathaxA 
Wind jor 
Wilson 

5 
Boston 
Con wjaf 
Flopener 
Glouccs ter 
.Gosport 
Hoi den 
Hoi land 
Hoi lis 
Hop kinj 
JoAni bnrgA 
JoAn SOB 
JoAns ton 
JoAn5 town 
LocAport 
Ogden 
Or ange 
Oxford 
Pom fret 
Pomp totk 
Pom jfey 
Prov mc« 
RocAlpnd 
RocAhill 
Rox bur^A 
StocA bri^^e 
StocAport 
TAcmips^a 



/romp kin« 

;Bloom Held 
'<5o rert 
'Ho sici^ 
»Scooducl; 
^rook field 
•Brook h'n 
' 7  '• 
Wol colt 
WolfbbvgA 
Woodbriip 
'Woodstoec 
t^Worees ler 

8 
Mon i^n 

'Bound brook 
^'Bour bon 
*LondMi 

ato 
Bow doin 
Brown ville 
BrowttMiU^ 
Crown Foint 
RowW 
1 
Bell giore 
Cape Fesr 
LeRur 
Lom^bur 
Long lake 
Mon roe 
Peru 

Hnr York 

4 
Fay ette 
FortAnfi * 
Port Penn 
Salt ash 
Stmben 
5 
Oler moni 
Ver moofr 

6 
Lagoon 
Tazoo 

ai 
De troit 
La moil 
West Point 



$ke Enffliak Language. 



137 



LeR^ 
I 

A verill 
Ba ken fiteld 
Bla Aew hurgh 
Kol ing broke 
Pa faiuB 
Kay ette vllfe 
Green caa fie 
Hi ata town 
Lane* bor otLgh 
L^w ia buTg4 
Lew is ton 
(^w is town 
Ma ry land 
New cas i\e 
New ins ton 
Paint ed Post 
Po ten ham 
Per ter field 
Gtua ker tt)wn 
Sla tere ujis 
Ste vene oUrgA 
Ste phen town 
Steu ben viil« 
Tru mane burgii 
Utica 
•2 

Ar ling ton 
Harn atable 
Car ter« ville 
Far ming ton 
Har pere £(eld 
Har win ton 
Mar ble town. 
Mari bor wig ft 
Mar tine burgA 
Mar tine vilk 

3 

Al ba ny 
Bal ti more 
j Dor ches ter 
Greor^a . 
Wal sinff bam 
Water ford 
Wa ter vl Jet 
4 

Ab er com 
Ab ing ton 
Al Icne town 



Araaterdtm 

An do Yep 
Ar u ba 
Ash bum ham 
At kin sen 
Attica 
Avtkm 
^arretatcm 
Bar ring ton 
Bat ten kill 
Bed minister 
Ben nington 
Ber nanw tbwn 
BcY er ly 
Bran dy wine 
Bridige water 
Buffiilo 
But ter field 
Butternuts 
Car 6 line 
Cas de ton 
Cas fie town 
Cen tre ville 
Chap el hill 
Ches ter field 
Ches ter town 
Chit ten den 
Clar en doii 
Clever acAr 
Cum ber land 
Cum mington 
Dar ten 
Delaware 
DicA: in son 
Dun sta ble 
Ed in burgA 
Egg har wur 
Egremont 
Elli cott 
£1 ling ton 
£1 lis DurgA 
Emmits burgA 
Es tAer town 
Evaneham 
Exeter 

Fed er ale bnrgft 
Per ris town 
Fish er« field 
Flem ing ton 
Francis burgA 
Frederick 



Ger Hum town 
Ger many 
Guil der faiid 
Hac^ en sacAr 
HacA: eu town 
Haddonfiidd 
|Ial loie el 
Hamilton 
Han ni bal 
Han o ver 
Har ring ton 
Har ris buigA 
Har ri son 
Hav er fonl 
Hcl e na 
Hen ri co 
Her ki mer 
Hub bard ton 
Hunt er don 
Hunt ere town 
Hunt ing ton 
Hen der sjn 
Jef fer son 
Kil ling ton 
Lab ra dor 
Lan sing burgA 
Lebanon 
Leom in ster 

Leonard* town 
l^x ing ton 
Lib er ty 
Lich te nau 
Limeridt 
Liv er pool 
Liv ing ston 
LudkMoviUe 
Madi son 
Man ches ter 
Man li us 
Mid die field 
Mid die buigA 
Mid die eex 
Mid die town 
Min i sink 
Mex ico 
Nan ticoke 
Nashu a 
Nev er sink 
PacA ere field 
Pisitterson 
Peli can 



4 

Phil ins buigA 
Vnx ish ville 
Per in ton 
duin e haug 
Read Ing town 
Rcns se loer 
San die f^ld 
San dy hook 
San ta cruse 
Scip io 
Sen e ca 
Shep ^cnU fwld 
Shep Affidf town 
Still wa ter 
Sun der land 
Sul li van 
Syr a cuse 
Tem pie ton 
Tyr ing ham 
West bor ough 
West more land 
Wcei cr ley 
West i«iu ster 
Wilks bar re 
Wil ling ton 
Wil lis ton 
Wil mington 
Wil son ville 
Win ches ter 
Will« bor ov^A 
West ches ter 

5 
Box bor wigh 
Cov en try 
Hoi lis ton 
Hop kin ton 
JoAn son« burgA 
Mon ta gue 
Mor ris ville 
Mor ris tewn 
Or ange burgA 
Or ange ville 
Ot ta was 
Ot ter creek 
Og dene buigA 
Pot ter« town 
Prov ince town 
Prov i dcnre 
Rob ert son 
Robeson 
Rochester 



n r. 



._ I . 



168 



mKmammm 



mm 



A Just Standard far Pronouncing 



5 

Roma h]s 
T^>m u town 
Warren ton 
War ring ton 
Waab ing ton 

Hloom ing dale 
Bloom ir.g grove 
(^oop ei# town 

8 
Cov ing ton 
Ston ing ton 
Som er iiet 

ou 
Lou is viRtf 
Lou itttown 

010 

Bow doin ham 
Pow nal burgA 

An GO cus^ 
Aufo ra 
Bcr mu da 
Cay u ga 
Cay u ta 
De fi anc6 
Du aneff hargh 
Dc ruj ter 
Eu. i>hra ta 
E sontis 
K\ mira 
Fair hft ven 
Ge ne va 
Ge no a 
Hon du ras 
Ja mat ca 
Li vo nia 
t^u i «a 
Mac do nough 
Ma det ra 
Ma ho ney 
Ma ho ning 
Mo ri ah 
Sew Ha ven 
D gee chee 
Ohio 
Oneida 
Os we go 
Dt fle go 
OtaeUck 
vVespo 



1 

Pot^j^ Jceep fjs 
Po to madb 
PasaaicA 
Shan da ken 
Tioga 
Wy o ming . 

Caer nar von 

Doscato en 
Chic kau go 
Cba tau que 
New Or Ican« 
War war sljig 

4 
Aliecco 
Ar kan saa 
An til les 
Aah cut ney 
Attguata 
Au ffua ^us 
Bark ham stead 
Ca mil lu3 
Ca val lo 
Cox sacA te 
Co has set 
Co lum bus 
East hnmp ton 
Fort Ed ward 
Ha van na 
Ken tuc^ y 
Long mead ow 
t<o rfinzo 
Lorct to 
Ma nal Ung 
Man hat tan 
Mar eel Itfa 
Ma tU da 
Mi am i 
Mi ner va 
Mis sis ko 
Nan tas ket 
Nan tiicA: et 
New ber lin 
New Jer sey 
New Li* bon 
New Wind «>r 
Oak mul gee 
O tisco 
Piatapeoo 



4 

Ptitnxirt 
Pau tucA; et 
Pautuz et 
Preaunwoot 
San dus ky 
SatflU 
Sa van na^ 
SavUIa 
Tom big bee 
U lys ses 
Vt ban na 
Vi en na 
West hamp ton 
West In die^ 
>VisGa««et 

5 
A! gon kins 
Con hoc ton 
. Com waf lis 
Hoc/r hock ing 
Mount mor ris 
was CO 
Pc nob scot 

6 ^ 
Mis sou ri 
Po soom sucA; 
Ta CO chy 
Ta dod sacA; 

8 
New Lon don 

oy 
Port Roy al 

1 
Am us keag 
Bel vi dere 
Cher o kee 
Chil ho wee 
Gen esee 
O ro noke 
Paraguay 
Po CO moko 
Sal va dore 
Sem i noles 
Ten nes see 
Wy o rtoke 

2 
Al be marte 
3 
ChicA: a satff 
Mon tre al 
. 4 



Baskenrid^ 
German flato 
Ken lie hedfc 
Kit ta ning 
Manahaa 
O Ie4in 
Pow hat tan 
Riv er head 
. Sur i nam 
Yucatan 
5 
Clar e mont 
. Tib e n>n 
U ta was 
6 
Bux a loons 
Car i coo 
Car i boo 
KicA: a poo 
Kin der hook 
Scate cook 
Scb a cook 
Wa ter loo 

Niv er nds 

oy 
Oleroy 
4 

At tie bor ougk 
Brat tie bor ough 
El li cott ville 
Pred e ric/rs bui^A 
Fred e ridts town 
Mid die bor ou^A 
Rens se loer ville 
Shcn an do aA 

1 ; 

A ca di a 
An to ni o 
Ba ta via 
Jc ru sa lem 
Laconi a 
Onta ri o 
Sem pro tii 
Su pe a onr 

4 
A bit i Um 
A mer t ca 
An gel i ca 
An nap o lb 
Baldiv i a 



the English Langttage. 



Con ncdicut 
Cor Uil Icr as 
Ma hoc/r a muck 
New Lcb a non 
Niaga ra 
Per nam bo oo 
To mis ca ning 
Vir gin i a 
VVap {NIC a roc 

5 
Co col i CO 
I run dc quot 
Wi com i CO 

8 
Fort Cov ing ton 
Mont gpmer y 

Al va m do 
A\ le ga nv 
Ash tc l)u 1^ 
Can an dai gua 



Cin cin nn ti 
Cin cin na tus 
Dcm e ra ni 
Des c a da 
Gen e 86 o 
•Louistyna 
Mag da !f% na 
Mum a ka ting 
Mar a cat Ix) 
Mafsachu setts 
Mem fre ma gog 
Mon te zu Bia 
Mor ris se na 
On on da <ra 
Pen Al 00 la 
Sar a to ga 
Tus ca ro m - 
Wy a lu sing 
Yo i)o gaBy 

Cn^^ ne wa ga 



Cat a ra qua 
Cat ta rati gus 
Nic aragua 

Ac a put CO 
Al a ))am a 
Cher ry Val lej 
HcH ri et ta 
In di an a 
Mar ^a ret ta 
Mis SIS sip pi 
Os we ga/ch ie 
Sus que ban iiaA 
U na dil la 
5 ^ 
An ti cos ti 
Hou 8a>ton iidk 

6 
Am o noo suoX; 

6 
Rippa-cano« 



159 



Am a zo nf a 
Caledonia 
Can e a de a 
Cazeno\ia 
Mo non ga li a 
Penn syl va ni a 
Pitts syl va ni a 

Phil a del phi a 
Slum e at e lea 
1 
Mo non ga he la 
Ticondeioga 

Canaseiaga 

Gttiajoharie 
5 

Funmaqnoddy 

1 
Win ni pb i o gy 



In the following wonls, when the n is in an accented syllable, it is pro- 
nounced as if it were followed by g hard. 

4 ' 4 4 4 

Plan ca Frank fort Lin coin Frank lin ton 

Blanco Franklin 4 Lancaster 

Fran coif Franks tqwn Dun can« burgft Lin coAi town 

In the following words (k lias its fijrst or sharp sound. 



1 
Heath 

2 
Bath 
1 

Athol 
Go tham 
Ports mouth 
Ruths burgA 

Dart mouth 
Var mouth 

3 
North bric/ge 
North field 
North port 
North wood 
Thorn ton 
4 
Ac worth 



4 

Fal mouth 
Plym outh 
Smith tu*ld 
Smith town 
Smith ville 
South trark 
Tin month 
Went worth 

5 
Mon mouth 
Cor in(h 
Wadi worth 


Weymouth 

<m 
South ft'eld 
South vnck 

I 
Northeast 



South hold 

I 

Ogle thorp 

Ruth eribrd 

3 
North bor ough 

4 
Beth a ny 
Beth le hem 
Ith aca 
Kil ling worth 
Mer e dith 

North Sa lem 
Re ho both 
South Sa lem 

4 
North amp ton 



Perth Am boy 
Pro tect worth 
South amp ton 

10 
Oath a rioe 

4 
E liz a beth 
North um her land 

5 
Bar thol o mew 

1 
Beth a bam 

Chili oothe 

4 
E lb a beth town 

I 
North Carolina 



95 



tK) 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



the IbUowing words, h is pronoanood before the le, though written 

after it. 



/hate 1*7 
rhee ler 
r'hcf'locJ(r 
/hitc field 



White hall 
Wliite craelc 
White iDsrih 
White plauit 



Whites town 
Whiting 

Wharton 



4 

WhH patne 
Whip pa ny 
Whit ting ham 
Whittksey 



I the foUowing wordi^ t belbie a ?ewel, is a eanaonant, and is prommnoed 

likey. 

4 4 1 

Will bih Ami Will iam* town Au rei ius 

Will mat buigA 1 Mont pel ier 

WHl ianw port A md ia Phar sal ia 

In the following wordi^ ch has the sound of jA. 






I 
iinius 



n vm 






2 

harlotte 
1 
hampiaJB 

3 
he ravw 



4 4 

Che mung Che hoc to 
Chow an 5 

a N«w Roeh elle 
Cliar lettes town 1 

Char lottM viHe Chau di ere 



Mich i sati 
** 5 
Char Ic raont 

2 
Char le mont Til!c 



6 

cliiX)on 

1 
cho (kidEt 
chuy Km* 
ckayl ki& 

4 
hris to pfaen 



In the IpUowing wonls ch has the sound of ifc. 

4 

Jer i cho 



Locha bar 

1 
Isehua 
4 
Schoharie 



Macha noy 

4 
Sche nocta dy 

4 
Ap a hch, et 
Apalachy 
LAcha waxen 



I.Ach a wan na 
Lach a won ne* 

4 
Ap a lach i an 
Archipelago 

Ap a lach i co la 



The ibifewing words do not piopeily belong with the jweoeding wofds. 

PronoutuetL 

1 
kokes ber re 
nu ber re 
2 

amzber PD 
4 

sisero 
dan ler re 
ing crlish town 
pini^ne vill 

1 
cgzyuma 
Imgileand 
rode ile and 

4 
ka rang gas 
shenanggu 
do ming go 



Vritten. 

isle 

09y mans 
Iroen wich 
lor ham 
iles burgh 

ar wich 
M wich 
inyrna 
ir'gil 

for wich 

ar It^ 
lorcnu 
nsiirfta 



Pronounced, 
1 
file 

1 
kwee mans 
green ij 
go rum 
uezburg 

hariij 

n»u 

smer na 
ver jil 
5 
norrij 

karlile 

moro 

rosso 



Wriiten, 

Cokes bu ly 
Newbu ry 

Alms bury 

Cice ro 
Dan bury 
Eng lish town 
Pinck ney ville 

Ex una 
Long Isl and 
Rhode Island 

Caran gaa 
Che nan go 
Domingo 



the English Language* 



161 



Wrilien. 

New EIng land 
Traxilhi 

Tl li nw 

Now bu ly poit 

Can terbuiy 



Pronounced^ 

4 
nu in^ gland 
tnigzil iQ 

oy 
U le noy 

1 
nu ber re port 

4 
kui tar ber ro 



WrUteru 

Glas ten bu 17 
Mkl die bu ry 

Al Gx an der 

Al ex an dri a 

Con a wan go 



Pronounced, 

4 
gUs sn ber re 
mid dl ber re 

4 
al egz an dur 

al egz an dre a 

kon a wang go 



CHAPTER LXVL 

The fellotvikig is a list of the proper names contained in the New Testa- 
ment. 



I 



1 
Crete 
Greek 
Jude 
Luke 
R^odet 

3 
Saul 

5 
Gog 
Jo^n 

1 

Abel 

A jjar 

A mon 

A ram 

A ser 

A zor 

Balak 

Barak 

Booz 

Kozor 

Ca na 

Cedron 

Cephas 

Ce«ar 

Coos 

Cosam 

Cy prus 

Demas 

P. non 

Egypt 

K sau 

Felix 

Gaza 

Hebrr^ 
He brewt 
HiUi 
Jn Mon 



1 

Je^us 
Joel 
Joab 
Jo rain 
Jo rim 
Jose 
Joses 
^udas 
Ju daA 
Le vite 
Li nus 
Lucas 
Magog 
Me nan 
My ra 
Nain 
Na um 
Neri 
Nc ro 
Obed 
Pha rez 
Phalec 
PhJe gon 
Pilate 
Raca 
Rahab 
Rama 
, RAesa 
ABAoda 
^Romant 
^Sadoc 
Sala 
Salem 
Salim 
Sa mo6 
Sanm 
See va 
Si dun 



1 

Si on 
Troas 
Zara 
Ze nas 

t 
Car pus 
Marcus 
Sar d^ 
Tarsus 

3 
Clau da 
Cor ban 
J6r dan 
duar tU9 
4 

Ad am 
Addi 
Abba 
An nas 
As SOS 
Blastas 
Crescent 
Clem ent 
Per be 
Esfom 
Esli 
Fes tus 
Gen tilcf 
Her mas 
Her mon 
Herod 
Jan na 
Jambret 
Jan net 
Jasper 
Lyd d^ 
Lvs tra 



4 

Pnt mos 
Perg:a 
Per sis 
Pris ca 
Rabbi 
Sal mon 
Samson 
5 
Joppa 
Pol lux 
Sod om 
1 

A bra ham 
A dri a 
Clo o phas 
E lam ites 
Ga bri el 
Ho ly G/iost 
Na a man 
Ne re us 
Pha TQoh 
RAegi um 
Sinai 
2 

Arte mas 
Barnabas 
Bar sa has 
Plur me nas 

S 
Clau di a 
Claudius 
4 

Am pli as 
An upas 
Ar etas 
Bab y loa 
pam aris 
Did V mus 



EI mo dam 
El y mus 
Ep a phras 
Eph e sus 
Gal i lee 
Gal li o 
Jer c my 
Jcza bd 
Laz a nis 
Mag da la 
Mid i an 
Naz a rene 
Nin c seh 
Nin e vitcs 
Nic o las 
Pat robes' 
Per ga mos 
Phar i see 
Pharisees 
Pub li us 
Sad ducees 
Sil oain 
Stej>h a nas 
Syria 
Syrian 
Zcbedee 
Zeb u Ion 
5 
Jos a phat 
Solomon 
Troph i mus 

Abia 
A bind 
Al phe us 
A 9) tus 
Baf^etos 
Be lea 



2 



A Just Standard for Pronouncing 



I 

I nan 
re lie 
lias 
li irJ 
nc aft 
i bu \un 
I |)lini Ui» 
SI as 
de a 
ee a 
bbcus 
LI loa 

i kitus 
im; ga 

la nu«l 
li le mon 
li le tus 

bo am 
i\ mo ne 

1 io nie 
ip phi ra . 

1 

[aalh 

lieu (kM 
ha^ 

ttienf 

[at than 

[at tbat 

5 

or intli 

I 

^atboiii 

2 

ftrthiiM 



Lchim 
.ckor 
huza 
hioa 
: noch 
amcch 
Io Uxh 
rachbr 
la chab 



1 

Timelus 
Try phe no 
Try piio sa 
Ze Io iea 

4 
A Ixid don 
A grip pa 
Ar phax ad 
Au gus los 
Ba rab bui» 
Da inas cua 
E ras tus 
Ho mn na 
Jo an |ia 
Ma naa »ek 
C^aa^iton 
Narcissus 
O lym pas 
Phil Up pi 
Pris cil la 
Phy gel Itts 
Sa repta 
Se cun dus 

In the following words, 

4 
Beth a ny 
Belh le honi 
.Beth pha ge 
Eph plia tlta 
Gab hatha 
Mat ta tha 
Naz a vrtii 
Sab a oth 
Scythtaa 
Tal>itha 
TimotlMr 

5 
Gol ffo tha 
Sos 3m ma 



4 

Tertullus 
•^fy ran nus 

5 
A jiol los 
Co kiBse 
Go nx>r ra& 

1 
Gad a renet 

1 
A ra bia 
A ra bi an* 
Cy re ne ans 
Cy n. ni us 
Demetrius 
E H a kim 
He ro di an« 
He lo di as | 
I CO ni uro 
Jerusalem , 
Lysa nias 
^lcr cu ri us 
Sa ma li a 
I'i be ri as 



A eel da ma 
A min a dat> 
AmphipoUs 
An tip a tris 
Be el K bub 
Ca i)er na urn 
De capo lis 
E man u el 
Ne ap o lis 
Onm imus 
Pkillipjpi an* 
Sa mar i tan 
Sa mar i tan« 
Tro gyl li um 

Di ot re phe« 
E\x roc ly don 
Her mog e ne« 
Ni cop o lis 
Phi lol ogus 

Ab i le ne 
Ananias 



Bar ti me us 
EKseHS 
Kz e ki arf 
lly men e us 
Id u me a 
It u re a 
Jeeo niaA 
Mag da tone 
Mytele ne 
Nic u de mus 

4 
Boanerges 

Lye a otai a 

4 
Hie rape lis 
Onesiphoms 

5 
A re op a gus 

Epaphroditus] 
Ijaodi eea 
Pacatiana 



ik has its sharp 

1 
Matthias 
Thad de us 

4 
Beth G* da 
Ca fin thus 

1 
A the ni an« 
Bethaaida 
MethuaelaA 
8a la thi el 
Timothe us 

4 
Cor in ihiana 
Genetarcth 



souad 



Geth sem ane 

5 
Bar thol o new 
The o<di i lua 

1 
Did ma nu tha 

4 
Mar an ath a 

1 
E thi o pi a 
£ thi o iii ana 
Tbesaaloni 

1 
Art ma the a 



In the feUowing woids, ch has tlie sound o£k. 



1 

Saruch 
Stadm 

4 
Char ran 
Mai chut 
Melchi 

I 
Katyehns 
Mtehael 



4 

Antioch 

Cendwea 

lasaelur 

Snitiche 

Ijchicus 

6 
Psochoraa 

1 
Chaldaana 



CIto 



Ban 



Ar chip pus 
MolehUedflo* 

1 
Ar chela us 

9 
Aria tar efana 



S9QBB 



She English Language. 



WriiUn. 
Ga ins 

Lybia 
Nag g« 

Asia 
Ca ia phti 
Ore ti am 
Phry gia 
Por ci u* 

Apphia 
Gut o on 



1 

Gilet 
JaiBM 
Job 
Milet 

% 
Charle« 
Clark 

3 
I George 
Paul 

4 
Ralph 
5 
JoAn 
1 

Aason 
I A hiaiB 
A ino0 
A «aph 
A n 
Ca leb 
David 
E U 
£ phraim 



I 4 
Seth 
I 1 
Lutlwr 



Prmiiranecd, 

1 
gayi]9 
nigur 

libya 
nagge 

a:die a 
ka ya fas 
kre she aiis 
fri jea 
pore she us 
4 

af « a 
giilenn 



Achaia 
£aaiaa 

PiMdia 

Dal ma ti a 
R phe ti ans 
Ga lati a 
Sa leu ci a 

Co los ii ans 

Cap padoci^ 
Sa mo thm ci a 



161 

Pronounced, 

1 
akaya 
eza yas 

4 
pi sid ya 

dal ma she a 
c fe zhe anx 
gal la she a 
aalu she a 

5 
kolosheaoz 

1 
kap pa do she a 
aa tno thn she a 



CHAPTER LXVIL 

The following are the most usual names of incn. 



1 

Jabez 

Jare/ 

Joel 

Jo naA 

Jo has 

Joseph 

Lew IS 

Levi 

Ly man 

Mo«os 

Me dad 

Peter 

Silas 

Si man 

'Htus 

Arnold 

Darwin 

3 

Ana tin 

Morgan 

Nor man 

Walter 

4 

Albert 



4 

Al fred 

Allen 

Al vin 

Ambrose 

An drew 

Ashcr 

Ben net 

Ber nard 

Brad fonl 

Dan iel 

Den nis 

Egbert 

Edgar 

Edmund 

Edward 

Edwin 

El dad 

Ez ra 

Francis 

Hen ry 

Jeffrey 

Jesse 

Justus 

Lesnard 

Ridiard 



5 


4 


Godfrey 


Sim eon 


Nor ace 


Vol en tine 


Robert 


5 


TAomas 


Oliver 


6 


Solomon 


Reuben 


Josh ua 


Rnfus 


Wash ing ton 


1 


1 


A bra ham 


Eli as 


Asa hcl 


Elisor 


2 


EUsha 


Archibald 


JosiaA 


Barnabas 


UriaA 


4 


4 


Amasa 


E rastus 


An tAony 


^ vester 


Ben ja min 
Frederidfc 


4 


EUphalet 


Gregory 


1 


Horn SOB 


Eleaxer 


Israel 


Ebcneier 


Jefferson 


HezekiaA 


Lemuel 


JeremiaA 


Phineas 


Ke he mi aA 


Samuel 


ObadiaA 



Inlfae foHoiwiur wenla th has itp sharp BomndL 
1 1 5 

Ka than The o dore Jon % Ihan 

4 4 5 

Jiat tfaew Na than id The oph i lus 





A Jiu^t Standard for 


Pronouncing 








Nunct of womon. 






4 


4 


4 


4 




Alicf 


• Nan cy 


El ea nor 


Amanda 




An na 


Sal ly 


Em i line 


Cla ris sa 


r 


An nis 


5 


Em i ly 


Cha ril la 


ih 


Can dace 


01iv(? 


Har ri ct 


Lu cin da 


Ace 


Emma 


Polly 


1 


Me Hn da 


ra 


E<»t^r 


3 


Delilah 


Re becca 


y 


Frances 


Margaret 


DJ a na 


Susan naA 


y 


Han naA 


4 *. 


Eliza 


10 


i>e 


Hel en 


Ab a gail 
A<i a une 


Jemi ma 


Louisa 


hel 


HuhlaA 


Mari a 


4 


ih 


Lytl ta 


Car o line 


So phi a 


Hen ri et ta 


\n 


Phil lis 


Deb ni^ 


Ur au la 


Juliana 



In the following words, th has its sharp sound. 

2 4 4 

Martha Catharine ElKabcth 



CHAPTER LXVIII. 

LN ABDRSSS TO TOtrTBFirZ. FSKAXiSS. 

listen, fair daughter of innocence, to the instnictions 
)rudence, and let the precepts of truth sink deep into 
heart ; so shall tlie charnns of thy mind add lustre to 
elegance of thy form ; and thy beauty, like the rose k 
uTibles, shall retain its sweetness when its bloom is' 
hered. 

i is a melancholy truth, that man too often prostitutes 
boasted faculties to the destruction of female happiness, 
w necessary, then, to fortify your minds against the at- 
ks of such vile seducers ! Blemishes in female charac- 
j seldom are effaced. Not so with man. He tarnishes 
name and brightens it again. 

But if tvomaii chance to swerve from tiie strictest rules 
^riitue, 
" Ruin ensues, reproach and endless shame, 
" And oiie false step forever blasts her fame. 
"In vain with tears the loss she may deplore, 
^' In vain look back to what she was before, 
'' She sets, like stars that fall, to rii^e no more.'* 
Uemember thou art made man*s reasonable compan- 
I, not the slave of his passions. Tbe end of thy being 



the English Language. KJS 

Is to astsist him in the toils of life, to sooth him with thy 
tenderness, and to recompense his care with soft endear- 
ments. 

Who is she that wins tlie heart of man, that sul^diies 
him to Jove, and reigns in his breast ? Lo ! yonder she 
walks in maiden sweetness, with innocence in her mind, 
and modesty on her cheek. Her hand seeks employ- 
ment ; her feet delight not in gadding abroad. 

She is clothed with neatness ; she is fed with temper- 
ance ; humility and meekn'^ss are as a crown of gtory 
encircling her liead. 

When virtue and modesty enlighten her charms, she is 
beautiful as the stars of heaven. 

Tlie innocence of her eye is like that of the turtle ; sim- 
plicity and truth dwell in her heart. 

She presides in tlie house, and there is peace ; she com- 
mands with judgement, and is obeyed. 
I She arises in the mornipg : she considers her affairs ; 
I and appoints to her maidens their proper business. 
I The care of her family is hei delight ; to that she ap- 
J plies, her study ; and elegance with frugality is seen in 
her mansion. 

Ttie prudence of her management is an honour to her 
husband, and he hears her praise with a secret delight. 

She informs the minds of her chiMh*en with wisdom ; 
A\Q fashions tlieir manners from the example of her own 
goodness. 

The word of her mouth is the law of tbeir youth, the 
motion of her eye commands obedience. 

In prosperity, she is not puffed up ; in adversity, she 
heals the wounds of fortune with patience. 

Tiie troubles of her husband are alleviated by her coun- 
sels, and sweetened by her endearments. 

Happy is the man whose life is blessed with such a 
partner ; happy is the child who calls her mother. 

That such may be thy happy state, fair daughter of 
America, listen to the directions of wisdom, and regulate 
thy heart and life by the principles of piety and virtue. 






COBB'S SERIES OF SCHOOL BOOKS 

NOW PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY THE PRINCIPAL 
BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

SPELLING COURSE. 

Cobb's FIRST BOOK, or Intjkoouction to thb Spblliko-Book, &c 
designed for the use of small children. This Httle work contains the At 
phabet. and easy words of one, two, and three syllables, in wkiich there an 
11 ) doiiblft vowels or consonanis> or silent letters, and only the long am 
:«hori sounds of the vowels. 

Cobb's SPELLING-BOOK, containinsr the rudiments of the Englisl 
Lnnq^iiage, arrangied in catedietical order; an organization of the Alphabet 
1 i?reoier number of spelling lessons than are generally mserted in Spellinj< 
tiooks; many useful taWes; and the proper names in the New Testanieiii 
Designed to teach the orthography and ortlioepy of J. Walker. 

Cobb's EXPOSITOR, or Sbqfel to thb Spelunc-Book, containini! 
.■u»o;it twelve Uiousand of the most common words of the language; lii 
which each word is accurately spelled, pronounced, divided, and explainedi 
ipd the primary and secondary accent noted i to which are prefixed, Con 
•ise Pnnciples of Pronunciation, and Rules for the Accentuation and Di- 
vision of Words. 

Cobb's Abridgment of J. Walker's CRITICAL PRONOUNCING DIC^ 
TIONARY. In this Dictionary, Mr. Walker's principles of orthograi.liy 
Mid pronunciation are strictly followed ; and, in addition, each word id 
o!V8t4MHatically divided; the secondary accent noted; the plurals of nouns 
[he present iense and preterit of verbs, the participles, and the variable ad- 
ie( rives, are inserted; and all useless repetitions of words are avoided; to 
which are prefixed. Concise Princinles of Pronunciation, and rules for ac- 
centuation and the division of words ; with an Appendix, containing a class 
of words which are in common use in this country, and not foimdM^Walk-J 
cr s Dictionary. --^^ 

READING COURSE. ' 

Cobb's JUVENILE. READER, No. 1 ; containing interesting, moral, 
u ''is^ruc^ve read miT lessons, composed of easy words of one and two 
syllables ; designed fw the use of small children in families and schools. 

Cobb's JUVENILE READER, No. 2; containing intcreating, moral, 
rind uiJ.tniriive read'mg lessons, composed of words of one, two, and thn^ 
jyllablwj; designed, in conftexion with No. !, to accompany the Spelling- 

,nS."»l'^ifnH^Iir«r^'^,V^ READER, No. 3} containing interesting, historical, 
moral, and insirurtive reading lessons, composed of words olf a greater 
.ui.nber of .syllables than the lessons in Nos. 1 and 2; and a greater ^riety 
;.f composition, both in prose and poetry, selected frim the Sgs of tie 
ofaood Reading ^^^^ ^"'*'°"' "^^^ Observations on the Prindfies 

Cobb's SEQUEL TO THE JUVENILE READERS ; comprisins a i 
st»!ecrion of Lessons in Prose and Poetry, from highly esteemSiASan 

'^inrd u, the Sequel to the Juvenile Readers, from very highly estLmcd 



Notices. 167 

American and EBglish writers. Also Observations on Good Readinf; ; the De- 
claration uf InrfHjuidence ; the Cunstitutiun ut the United 8(Hti)«: PuhtioHl 
Definitions: VlBme Orthography ; Concise Principles uf PrunuRciatioii ; 
dufed for the Uivision of Words; and the Rules fur Spelling the Plu ais 
of Nouns, Participles, Present Tense, and Preterit of Verbs, and the Com- 
parative and Superlative Degrees of Adjectives. Designed for the use of the 
iiighest Classes m Schools and Academies. 

ARITHMETICAL COURSE. 

Cobb's ARITHMETICAL RULES AND TABLES, designed for the 
use of small children in Families and Schools. 

Cobb's EXPLANATORY ARITHMETICK, No. 1 ; containing men- 
tal, theoretical, and practical exercises, in the fundamental rules ot Arith- 
meti'ck, viz. : Numeration, Addition, Substracuon, HiTultiplication, and Di- 
vision ; in which the principles of each rule are fully and familiarly expressed ; 
and the reasons for every operation on the slate minutely and clearly ex- 
plained ; and adapted to the understanding and use of small children, in 
families and schools. 

Cobb's EXPLANATORY ARITHMETICK, No. 2; containing iht 
C)inpot]nd Rules; and all that is necessary of every other rule in Arith- 
in 'tick for practical purposes and the transactions of business; in which 
the principles of each rule are fully and famiharly expressed ; and the rea- 
M!is for every operiation on the slate minutely and clearly explained ; and 
idipled to tne understanding and use of larger children, in Schools ano 
Academies. To which is annexed, a Practical System of Book-Keeping. 

Cobb's CIPHERING-BOOK, Nos. 1 &,2; containing all the sums and 
questions for theoretical and practical exercises in Cobb's Explanatory 
Arithmetick, Nos. i & 2. 



NOTICES. 

"This Spelling Book, has peculiar claims to attention. Mr. Cobb has evidently 
bestowed much attention on such subjects; and liis Spelling- Book wcanj n for- 
midable air of authority from the labour and research hv whicli it iMclHimcterizr^d. 
The lessons are uncommonly full and accurate. The wliole work, indeed, is liighlr 
criHlitflble to the auUior's intelligence und industry."— ilmencan Journal iif 
EdueiMnn, 

"Tlie author has certainly evinced great industry and research, and has shown 
himself well acquainted with the dcparlincnt in which he has so diligently labour- 
ed."— -ycio York THmea. 

" Cobb's Spelling- Book Is, we are confident, by far the mostCorrect one at present 
to be found."— C/cDctond (OAto) Herald. 

" We ha^c before us another work fromtheindefatigablepenof Mr. Lyman Cobb, 
autliorof the 8pcIling-Boo'<c, School Dictionary, Acp. k is entith?d "Cobb's Exposi- 
tor, or Sequel to ilie Spelling- Book, coutainins about twelve tliousanU of tli<> most 
common worilsof the langu'ge, accurately spelled, pronounced, divided, and ex- 
pi ined," ice. The primal^ and secondary accent is particularly nof'd, nnd n 
character for the latter intrtiduced. Tlie Work is designed for tiie use of schrMtIs : 
and the labout «if the compHation \\r» been performed in such a manner ns lobrin'.' 
every word Witliin the comprehension aniicapacity of a child who his made con- 
siderahle progress in spelling. It pr •niises to be. as the respective publications of 
the author have been, a practical and useful work."— AMany Atgua. 

"Mr. Cobb has recently published an Abridgment of Walker's Dictionary, in- the 
usual size and form of dictionary abrid^mcnbi. Wo liave given the work some at- 
tention, and found it, in many important rc-pccts, suiHsrirsir to tlmsn ttiat' nre iti 
ordinary use. The plurals oi noun« are given, and tlie prcti-'its and p.'irticipI«'R of 
verbs; the w^nls are all divided into syllables, and, for the first 'iine. in any Dic- 
tionary, have the mark ol* ttic secondary accent''— C/". S. (PhilddHj^ia) Outetu. 

"Mr. Cobb's School 0lctioiiary seems calculated to bn very useful Uicliildren nnd 
fureiirners learning the langua^. lie has followed Walker, and made his coniuila- 



166 Notices. ^ 

lion from tiie beat l/Hidon edition* : mttiing t!i« phiniteof naam aod |M »tg iHB of 
v>>rb«, the participles ou<J vanaUhsndjoctives, Ace., s.ll whiclu \a^mfp^r.%tti^ec\9\\7, 
iniwl obvioiii*)y be of gretft service."— iVete Yor* Commerd^K^Eerguer. 

"Cobb's JrvBsrOii Rbadbb, Nor. I, 2, and 3.— Tlieav liUle vonnes together fom 
A ficries of elementary reading books, grndunted to ttiecapnciticiTliiid tastes of chil- 
dren. The writer lias been at some pains to arrange their dilTcnent leBsons in such 
B manner ihat each preceding one shall pceparethe (/upil for tlie one thai follows, 
both as to orthograpiiT and snbjecL 

"The practice, as Mr. I'obb Justly remarlu in his preface, of fiiring children 
di.iliigiies b«>twccn animals. Sec., cimlalning statements ami details of thii gf, which 
never did and never can happen, is as destnictiveof Iniih and intellectual toipn>ve- 
inent ns it is contrary to U>e principles of nature and philosophy. Notwitlistnudini! 
the great hnprovement wliich, of late vrars, h^is taken place in childrei/s books of 
instruction, tliere was still a want of elementary works, of a pm|ier description, am! 
the one before us, which is well calculated to supply the deiiclency, must be found 
very useful in families and infant 8ch>>oIs/'— iVete York Anmriean. 

"The seleclhms are from writers of acknowledged merit, and appear to us to be 
niad»^ wi h judgcincni.' 

" We are not aware of any reading hook, for beginnere in schoofei, in which the 
nuint>er of syllables is liinilcd as in tiie drst aad second iiumbera of UiiB work."" 
Xttr York Evening Pott. 

'The Arst book will beHvahuibleanxiliary to little curly- beaded and msy-clieek- 
ed gentlemen who plume themselves upon having passed ihrough the intricate 
inysiei'ics of the Alplaibet 

" The second book is adapted to chlldrea of a more advanced age, and may be 
very apprnpriately used by those who have mastered the first It contains sevtral 
stories, wrUtRti in clear language, and incnlcates useful morals. 

"The tidrd claims a more serious notice. In it much instruction in the elements 
of no iiral philosophy and history is conveyed to the niire advanced and intelligent 
ri>adf*r. Tne bfiei chouters on the dog, Mliini, cork, the horse, heat, licorice, and 
hcht are precisely the Kind of comiiosition lo be placed in the liands of youth." — 
AVff Ywk Mirror. j 

"Mr. Lyman Cobb, of New York, wlio has been so snccessfal in the compilation ' 
of a Dictionary and a t^pelling>ll(X)k, for sch >o1k, has recently publishet! a very small 
borik, wtiich he calls "uplanatitry Ariihraetick." It is entirely elementary, and in i 
nrra> goment and plan, takes a iniiltllc ground with reference to'the works of Uaboll, I 
\V{il.<:h, and Adams, aid those of Kmitli, Colbum, and Emerson. The former, it 
will be recollected, gave rules, witli few or no explanations. I'lie latter omitted i 
rule's, and depended entirely on iihwitrrition. The aiti-mpt of Mr. Cobb is worth tfie ! 
notice of teacliers. Th^ii^ental oiieralion. it has always appeared lo OS, required j 
some visible sign, and some established rules."— (/. & Gazette. \ 

This serks o*"** yhool Books has become very popular, and is cenerally iisefJ 
in many i the country. They are highly approved ami much wsetJ w 

theciti.^' ew York, Philadclphin, Baltimore, Albany, Pittsburgh, Biif 
fnio, Tre. tn, Princeton, New Krunswick, Newark, Hudson, Lancaster, 
iScr. &c. Some or all ot the books of this Series are printed, in tiptnty-onr 
(iiObrent places in the United States, and two in Upper Canada. Sunie ot 
this Series are printed and sold to the amount of one hundred and fijlf 
thousand copies annually^ and the sales are daily increasing. Some or 
all of this Series are in about one hundred and sixty sdi&9U in the city oj 
New York, March, 1835^ 

PUBLISHED 

By B. &. S. Collins, Harper&> Brothers, Mahlon Day, Bartlett &. Raynor« 
and James G. Shaw, New York; Andrus &, Judd, aart/ord^ (Ct); R. 
Olds, Newark^ (N. J.) ; B. Davenport, TVcnton, (N. J.) j James Kay, Jr. 
<& Brother, Phitadelphia ; Joseph Jewett, Baltimore ; 0. Steele, Albany ; 
Luke Loomi^ Pittsburgh ; Mack & Andnis, and David D. Spencer. 
rthaca ; Chapman db Flagler, and Wiiltamsd^ Hunt, Ox^/M; Birdsall d^ 
Huntley, EimiraS P. W. Ritter, Havana j Knowlton db Riee^ Water*, 
toion; A. W. Wilcus. Janiefl Faxon &• (;.'o., and O. G. Steele, Buffalo^ 



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