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Full text of "The collection of ancient Greek inscriptions in the British Museum. Edited by C.T. Newton"

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THE COLLECTION OF 



ANCIENT GREEK INSCRIPTIONS 



IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM 



PART II 



EDITED BY 



C. T. NEWTON 



KEEPER OF THE GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES 



AT 



THE CLARENDON PRESS, OXFORD 
1883 



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PREFACE. 



The first Part of 'The Collection of Greek Inscriptions in the British Museum/ published in 1874, 
contained those found in Attika. In editing the Part now published I have followed the geographical 
arrangement adopted by Bockh, placing first the inscriptions from the Peloponnese, after which follow 
those from Northern Greece, Macedonia, Thrace, the Kimmerian Bosporos, and the islands of the 
Greek Archipelago. 

All the inscriptions from the island of Kalymna, and most of those from Rhodes, Kos, and 
Lesbos, are now published for the first time. 

I have to acknowledge the very valuable aid I have received in preparing this Part from 
Mr. A. S. Murray and Mr. Cecil H. Smith, Assistants in the Department of Greek and Roman 
Antiquities, who have carefully collated the uncial texts with the original marbles, and revised every 
sheet as it passed through the press, contributing at the same time valuable suggestions as to the 
decypherment and interpretation of certain very difficult inscriptions. 

Part III, edited by the Rev. E. L. Hicks, and now in the Press, will contain the inscriptions 
from Priene, Ephesos, and lasos. 

C. T. NEWTON. 



CONTENTS OF PART II. 



PAGE 

Chapter I. INSCRIPTIONS FROM MEGARA, ARGOLIS, LAKONIA, 

KYTHERA, ARKADIA . . . . . . i 

Chapter II. INSCRIPTIONS FROM BOEOTIA, THESSALY, CORCYRA, 

MACEDONIA .17 

Chapter III. INSCRIPTIONS FROM THRACE AND THE KIMMERIAN 

BOSPOROS 34 

Chapter IV. ISLANDS OF THE AEGEAN : THASOS, LESBOS, SAMOS, 

KALYMNA, KOS, TELOS, RHODES, KASSOS, KARPATHOS 46 

Chapter V. MELOS, DELOS, lOS, SIPHNOS, TENOS .... 141 

Chapter VI. KRETE, CYPRUS . . . . - 151 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN PART H. 



Plate I, Fig. i. FACSIMILE OF No. CXXXVII 
Plate I, Fig, 2. FACSIMILE OF No. CXXXIX - 
Plate I, Fig. 3. FACSIMILE OF No. CLVII 
Plate II, Fig. i. FACSIMILE OF No. CLXV "^ 
Plate II, Fig. 2. FACSIMILE OF No. CLXVII 
Plate III. FACSIMILE OF No. CLXVI . 



To FACE Page 3. 



To face Page 29. 



To FACE Page 30. 



Woodcut of INSCRIPTION ON BRONZE VOTIVE HARE, No. CCXXX, Page 53. 



m. 



du 



ilo- 



in 



Notice to Binder. 



Insert the four pages of Inscription CCCLXXVII 
between pages 146 and 147. The two with upright 
Greek characters to come first, those with sloping 
Greek characters to follow, according to the number- 
ing of the lines in the Inscription. 



n 



THE FOLLOWING WORKS HAVE BEEN QUOTED IN AN ABBREVIATED FORM. 

Abhandlungcn der koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin. Berlin, 1815; in progress. 

Annali dell' Institute di Corrispondenza Archeologica. Roma, from 1839; in progress. 

Archaologische Zeitung, Denkmaler und Forschungen. Berlin, from 1849; in progress. 

Archives des Missions Scientifiques et Littdraires. Choix de rapports et instructions publi6 sous les auspices du 
Ministre de I'lnstruction Publique et des Cultes. Paris, 1850-56, and 1864 (deuxi^me s^rie) ; in progress. 

'AOrfvaiov, (Tuyypafifia irfpioSiKOf, 'AOrivrjcrLv, 187a; in progress. 

Ausgrabungen zu Olympia, hcrausgegeben von E. Curtius, &c. Berlin, 1876-1 881. 

Berichte iiber die Verhandlungen der koniglichen sachsischen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig. Philo- 

logisch-Historische Classe. Leipzig, 1849 > '"^ progress. 
Bulletin de Correspondance Helldnique. Athens and Paris, from 1877 ; in progress. 
Bullettino dell' Institute di Corrispondenza Archeologica. Roma, from 1829; in progress. 
Bulletin Arch^ologique de I'Athenaeum Fran9ais. Paris, 1855. 

Bulletin Historico-Philologique de I'Acaddmie Imp6riale des Sciences de St. P^tersbourg. St. P^tersbourg, 1850; in 
progress. 

Brondsted, P. O. Voyages et Recherches dans la Gr^ce. Paris, 1826-1830. 

Cauer, P. Delectus Inscriptionum Graecarum propter dialectum memorabilium. Lipsiae, 1877. 

(C. I.) Bockh, Corpus Inscriptionum Graecarum. Berlin, 1828-1853. 

(C. I. A.) Corpus Inscriptionum Atticarum consilio Academiae litterarum regiae Borussicae editum. Berlin, 1873 ; in 
progress. 

Classical Journal. London, 1810-1829. 

Compte Rendu de la Commission Impdriale Arch^ologique. St. P^tersbourg, i860; in progress. 

Daremberg, Ch., et Saglio, Edm. Dictionnaire des Antiquit^s Grecques et Romaines. Paris, 1873 ; in progress. 

'E(prj/xepi9 'Ap-)(a.io\oyiKfj, . . . eKSiSo/jLivr] Kara ^acriXLKrjv Siarayi^y iinb Trjs 'Ap)(^aioXoyiKfJ9 ' ETriTp&Trrfs. 'Adrji'ijaiy, 

1837-1870- 
Ephemeris Epigraphica, Corporis Inscriptionum Latinarum Supplementum, edita jussu Instituti Archasologici Romani. 

Roma, 1872 ; in progress. 

Facsimiles of Manuscripts and Inscriptions published by the Palaeographical Society. Edited by E. A. Bond and 
E. M. Thompson. London, 1873; in progress. 

Foucart-Lebas*, Voyage arch^ologique en Grece et Asie Mineure. Paris, 1848; in progress. 

Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, hcrausgegeben von der koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften. Gottingen, 1824; 
in progress. 

Greek Inscriptions, the Collection of Ancient, in the British Museum. Edited by C. T. Newton. Part I, Attika, 
edited by E. L. Hicks. Oxford, 1874. 

Hermes, Zeitschrift fiir classische Philologie. Berlin, 1866; in progress. 

Jahresbericht iiber die Fortschritte der classischen Alterthumswissenschaft : hcrausgegeben von Conrad Bursian. 
Berlin, 1875; in progress. 

Journal of Hellenic Studies, published by the Council of the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies. Lon- 
don, 1880 ; in progress. 

Leipziger Studien zur classischen Philologie, hcrausgegeben von G. Curtius, L. Lange, O. Ribbeck, H. Lipsius. 
Leipzig, 1878 ; in progress. 

Melanges Greco- Romains de I'Acad^mie Imp^riale des Sciences de St. Petersbourg. St. P6tersbourg, 1855 ; in progress. 

Memoires de I'Academie Impdriale des Sciences de St. Petersbourg. St. Petersbourg, Vll" sdrie, 1859; in progress. 

Mnemosynt, Bibliotheca Philologica Batava, collegerunt H. T. Karsten, &c. Nova Series. Lugduni Batavorum, 1873; 
in progress. 

Mittheilungen des deutschen archaologischen Institutes in Athen. Athen, 1876; in progress. 

Mova-dof Kal Bi^XioBrjKrj ttjs EvayyeXiKrjs Z)(oXfjs. Zfivpyr), 1876; in progress. 

Neue Jahrbiicher fiir Philologie und Padagogik, hcrausgegeben von A. Fleckeisen. Leipzig, 1831 ; in progress. 

Nouvelle Revue Historique de Droit Fran9ais et Ftranger: publid sous la direction de MM. Laboulaye, Dareste, &c. 
Paris, 1877; in progress. 

Numismatic Chronicle and Journal of the Numismatic Society. Edited by J. Evans, W. Vaux, and B. V. Head. 
London; ist series, 1836-1860; 2nd series, 1861-1880; 3rd series, 1881; in progress. 

PaySmpa: a-vyypamia TrepioSiKov . . . ZvvraKTai : A. P.' P ay Ka^rjs, K. riaTrapprjyoTTovXos, N. Apayov/xr)^. 'Ev 'AOrjvais, 
1851 ; in progress. 

<PiXi(TTa>p : (Tvyy pafifia TrepioSiKov (f>iXoXoyiKw Kal natSaycoyiKoy, ^KSiSofKi/of virb Z. KovfiavovSov k. t. X. 'Ev 'A drjvais, 
1861-1863. 

<t>tXoXoytKbs ZvXXoyos. Tov iv KcouaTavTiuovnoXei 'EXXtjpikov 'PiXoXoyiKov ZvXXoyov rii. mpicroiOtvTa. 'Ev K<ov- 

(TTavTiPovnoXd, 1865 ; in progress. 

Philologus, Zeitschrift fiir dasklassische Alterthum, hcrausgegeben von E. von Lcutsch. Gottingen, 1846; in progress. 

Proceedings of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of London. London, l'85i ; in progress. 

Revue Archeologique. Paris, 1844-1859. Nouvelle S^rie, from i860; in progress. 

Revue de Legislation Ancienne et Moderne, Fran9aise et Etrang^re, publi6e sous la direction de MM. Laboulaye, 
&c. Paris, 1 870-1 873. 

Rheinisches Museum fiir Philologie. Neue Folge, Frankfurt am Main, 1871 ; in progress. 

Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature. Second Series. London, 1843; in progress. 

Waddington-Lebas*, Voyage archeologique en Gr^ce et Asie Mineure. Paris, 1848 ; in progress. 

* The different portions of this work are quoted under the names of the separate authors, thus, Foucart-Lebas, Waddington-Lebas. 



PART 11. 



CHAPTER I. 

INSCRIPTIONS FROM MEGARA, ARGOLIS, LAKONIA, 

KYTHERA, ARKADIA. 



CXXXVI. 

Two fragments of white marble found at Megara. a is broken on three sides. On the left side it has been roughly tooled by 
a modern hand, probably to fit it as a jamb for a door or window. Height, i ft. 5 in. ; width, 6 in. b is broken on all four 
sides, and has been similarly tooled at the sides. Height, i ft. 3^ in. ; width, 65 in. a is probably from the upper part of 
the stone, of which the original size cannot be guessed. Brought from Greece by Percy Clinton, Viscount Strangford. 
C. I. 1052 b. p. 920. 

b. 



10 



IS 



a. 

oNoloX- 
oIETAIPoAEI 
TANEIoNEPn 
NAYTolSiEKEXEl 
KAinPolENoYX 
inNAAIoNYXAN 
A0IXMAEITOIX 
EAiriNinN 

PEXBEYTAFKI 

nNolNoPliiNox 

AXOYXIAXKAI 

AlAAEroMENoY'* 

< EXOAITANEKE 

oXKAlANANEIiX 

\EKAITANXnP/ 

TflNKAIAXYAoi 

NTIKOIN 

oYMEN 
TETn 
T 



10 



15 



I o N Y X I c 
X E N K - 
K E X E I P ^ 
IKOXIKAITOIX'' 
PAinN 
lAoioNTEXK 

XoiNoPinNA 
NOOAHMoNP 
XTEIPoYKAITo 
TAIXHTEIPAi 
3YNKAITANPC 
oXXPHXMoX 
oYXToiXENToi 
ANTEXYNPE 
ATAPPorErP 
XINAYTAXKAIK 
IPEPOIEIMEN 
ToX<J)lAIPP 



a. 



ovoioi 



eSlo^e ra iroXn ^kiraivkcrai roiis Sduas . . . KaX(<rai 8k avTois Kal im ^(fia 



fii 



Trpvh 






iTafewf f (TTi 71 av Koivav ecrriay , 



f avToTs eKe^dlpiav 

. Kal vpo^kvovs . . 

OiVoTrl/co^a, Aiovvaav . 

. \fr^d.(pLcTna el toi x . 

. n }lfSicoy Tcof ? . . . . 



«5 



. r]ay Qvaia^ Kal 

. SiaXfyofievov 

nape^\f(T6ai rai/ fK(^\(ipiat> 

. OS Kal dvaviwa 

. S\ Kal rap ^(opalf . . . 
. T(ov Kal davXo^v .... 



7r]/)«rj8€i/Tay ;c 
Oil' Olfonicovos 



20 



(Pfrl KOti^coi' dya6S)v ? 
. OVfliV 

. . TfTCB 

, . . T 



MEGARA — ARGOS. 



b. 



. l^iovva-io .... 

. , . CtiVKT .... 

. . iKodi Kal ToTs 

. . paiwv , 

. (f\iKoL ovrei k , 

. . OivoTTimva . . , 

. 'AKajv&oStjftov ? , 

. aTftpov Kal TO , 



The subject of this inscription is not clear. We 
have in a, lines 2, 7, a decree of the city, then 
mention of a truce, kKiyeipta lines 4, 13, npS^ffoi 
line 5, irpea-^evrai line 9, sacrifices line 11. If the 
restoration of lines 2, 3, given above, is correct, 
the persons invited to the Prytaneion would pro- 
bably be the irpfo-^iVTai of line 9. 

In <5, line 3, I have restored /uerej/fexf'pa on the 
authority of the Olympian inscription 'E(pr}/iep. 
'ApxaioX. No. 3487, line i. See Dittenberger, in 
Archaol. Zeitung, 1877, p. 98, No. 65; ibid. 1878, 
p. 98, Nos. 161, 164, 165; 1879, p. 56, Nos. 240, 
244. fiereKexfipoy is the interval between two Olym- 
pian iKi^eipiai. The iKix^ipta in our inscription may 



i.'^ 



. . TO, lEcoTfipa 

. ovv Kal Tau TToTXir . . . . , 

• "y XP^'^h°^ 

. ovs ToTi kv Toi 

. TJdy re <Tvvy^pap.iiivav 1 
Karja ra TTpoyeyp^^afifieva . , 

. aif avTas Kal k 

. 7rfnoiei/i€y[os or 01 

. Tos 0(Ai7r7r 1 



be the sacred truce at the Olympic festival. This 
would explain the davXia, which seems to be con- 
ferred on some territory, a, line t6. 

6, line 12, an oracle, xPWh-o^, is referred to. 

Bockh supposes the Oinopion, d, line 7, and a, 
line 6, to be the son of Dionysos who is connected 
with a Chian myth, but there is no reason why this 
should not be a proper name, as in C. I. 41 21. This 
is the more probable as Aiowadu, a, line 6, can only 
be the accusative of Aiowa-as. 

The ra ImTfipa, b, line lo, is very probably the 
Artemis Soteira worshipped at Megara. C. I. 1063 ; 
Pausan. i, \ 40, 2 ; compare ibid. 44. 7. 



CXXXVII. 

On a bronze helmet discovered by Morritt, in 1795, in the bed of the Alpheios, near Olympia. Bequeathed to the Museum by 
Mr. R. P. Knight. C. I. 29, and i, p. 885; Classical Journal, i, p. 328; Walpole, Travels, p. 588, No. 53; Welcker, Sylloge 
Epigr. p. 172, No. 123. 



For the uncials see Plate I, Fig. i. 
TapyTerlof dviQiv r<o AiFt tS>v Kopiv666iv 



This helmet, like that dedicated by Hiero at 
Olympia, C. I. No. 16, must have crowned a trophy 
which commemorated a victory gained by the Ar- 
gives over the Korinthians. 

Tdpyfioi. Compare the dedication on a bronze 
shield recently found at Olympia, Tdpydoi d\yi6iv^ 
Archaol. Zeit. 1879, p. 149, No. 297, and the Olym- 
pian epigram, Pausan. v, § 25, 5. 

dvtOiv. So irr Pind. Pyth. iii, 65, riGiv for hiOea-av, 
and other instances, see Ahrens, De Dialect. Dor. 
p. 317- 

In this as in other Argive inscriptions we have 
the <p, and the D for A. In this inscription from 
the use of two separate punches, the P and D 
appear like <p. See Bockh loc. cit. On the Argive 
alphabet see Kirchhoff, Studien, 3rd ed., p. 84, pi. i, 
col. 14. 

This inscription, like many archaic ones, is metrical. 



and forms an irregular Iambic senarius as Bockh 
shews. 

ra>v Kopiv666(v. ' From the spoils of the Ko- 
rinthians.' 

According to Pausan. vi, § 19, 9, the Megarian 
Treasury at Olympia was erected to commemorate 
a victory over the Korinthians, in gaining which 
they were assisted by the Argives. Hence it has 
been conjectured that the inscription on the helmet 
refers to that same victory, and was dedicated long 
afterwards. But of this there is no evidence, nor 
do we know when the victory was gained by the 
Megarians. It is certain that their Treasury, the 
ruins of which have been recently identified (Aus- 
grabung. iv, pi. 34, p. 37), was erected some time 
after this event. Bockh places this inscription 
about Olymp. 60 ; Kirchhoff classes it about Olymp, 
80. 4. 



HgL 



r A (/) r 



J 




o 



I A V ^ @ ^ r^ 



T o I D I ^ 



o 



K^ 



9 O D 



K ® o e ^ t^ 



Rg2 






fl^ 



AA/E©EICE 

TOipoB 
OF 

opo4 

AlOVo 









o 



>^ 




F,^3. 




^l^(>/\Tp^T•/|>^h^^|•|?:r^^T•^(t^!^ 

f^i^'f •rt^; i/N /\'\K\i/i A ic ^^P^^^T•N^^^T^^•• 
^(/\K•l|>A|^T•|:^!l>^n>^•l:^Irp^^^•^MT^t: 

•\i*T*\ i\/T Nt/r^ < r "^ ' "^ ' 



ARGOS— LAKONIA. 



CXXXVIII. 

Round the felly of a bronze wheel with four spokes 4 inches in diameter. Purchased in 1880. Said to have been found 
near Argos. 



> 






/. 



•<r 



^ 



^•Evy 



Uul 
O 
Uj 



7"^ FavaKCp e/ii . EvS . . . y dviOriKe. 



The Lexicons give dvaKo^ as another form of Ava^, 
compare (pvXaKos for cpvXa^. The wheel is evidently 
an offering dedicated in gratitude for the winning 
of a chariot-race. The FdvaKos can hardly be any 
other Deity but Zeus himself, and if the wheel was 
found near Argos, as is believed, the Victory it 



commemorates was probably gained in the Nemean 
Games. The name of the dedicator may be Eu- 
damos or Eudamas. The form of the dedication 
is unusual. After kfii we must understand SS>pov or 
some such word. 



CXXXIX. 

On a stelfe of white marble. Height, i ft. 10 J in.; breadth, iij in. Found in the ruins of the Temple of Poseidon on Cape Taenaros, 
Lakonia, near which is the chapel twv aylav ' AiratiaTwv. Presented by Dr. S. F. Mullen, R.N., 1880. 

For the uncials, see Plate I, Fig. 2. 

'AveOrjKe I t£ floHoiSdlvi] | Oedprjs I KXfoyiurj \ . "Etpopoi | Aato)(^oi ; eiraKofos) 'ApioXvay. 



The sign a in POBOIAA has the value of the 
rough breathing and is the equivalent of I. For 
other instances of the occurrence of this sign be- 
tween two vowels in the Lakonian dialect, see Roehl 
in Mittheil. d. deut. Inst, in Athen, i, p. 230, p. 232 ; 
Dressel and Milchhofer, ibid, ii, p. 319; Foucart- 
Lebas, Pt. 11, ^ iv, Nos. 255 a, 255 <^. In this in- 
scription while the t is still used for X and the ® 
retains its archaic form, this is not the case with 
the ^. According to Kirchhoff, Studien, 3rd ed., 
p. 145, pi. ii, col. 7, this inscription would be later 
than Olymp. 76. 

The purport of this inscription is similar to that 
of four others found on the same site. See Foucart- 
Lebas, Pt. 11, § iv, Nos. 255 a, d, c ; Kirchhoff, in 
Hermes, iii, p. 449, and Studien, 3rd ed., p. 145 ; 
Foucart in Bullet, de Corn Hell^n. iii, p. 97. 



All these inscriptions record the consecration of 
slaves by their masters to Poseidon, by which act 
they became hierodules or servants of the God in- 
stead of serving a mortal. As these dedications did 
not involve enfranchisement by sale, as at Delphi 
and elsewhere, no surety, pe^aimrrip, was needed ; 
but we find instead, in these Lakonian inscriptions, 
an 'E(f)opos named, whom we may consider a func- 
tionary of the temple, not the well-known Spartan 
magistrate, see Foucart- Lebas, loc. cit. p. 134. 

The indKooi here is a witness, see Hesych. s. v. 
In the other dedications from the same site there 
are two kiruKooi. 

On the site of the temple of Poseidon on Tae- 
naros, see Bursian in Abhandl. d. bayer. Akad. 
Phil. CI. vii, pp. 773-95- 



CXL. 

Upper part of sepulchral stele, in red marble, surmounted by a pediment with akroteria and a double volute scroll in the 
tympanon ; the left side broken away. Height, 7Jin. ; breadth, 7^ in. Mykenae. Inwood Collection. 



XAIPE 

Xaipe 



LAKONIA. 



CXLI. 



On a tablet of white marble, on which are sculptured in relief various articles of female toilet. Brought from Lakonia by George, 
fourth Earl of Aberdeen, and presented to the Museum by George, fifth Earl of Aberdeen. Height, 3 ft.; width, 2 ft. 9I in. 
C. I. No. 1467, Guide to Groeco-Roman Sculptures, Pt. ii. No. 11. 



AN0OYCH 

AAMAINEToY 

YnOCTATPIA 

AfOovcrr] AafiaiveTOV imoaTdTpia. 



This and the following inscription were found by 
Lord Aberdeen built into a ruined Byzantine church 
at Sklavo-khori, formerly thought to be the site of 
Amyklae. But Loschcke has shown by the evidence 
of an inscription (Mittheil. d. deutsch. Institut. in 
Athen, iii, pp. 164-71), that the town of Amyklae 
was probably situated in the neighbouring village, 
Mahmud Bey, and its temple of Apollo on the 
height called ' Ayla KvpiaK-ij. (See Bursian, Geogr. v. 
Gr. ii, p. 130 ; Leake, Travels in the Morea, i, p. 144.) 
We may therefore adopt Lord Aberdeen's suggestion 



(Walpole's Memoirs, p. 456), that these marbles were 
originally dedicated in the temple of Dionysos at 
Bryseae, which Leake (Travels in the Morea, i, p. 188) 
places at the neighbouring village Sindnbey. (See 
Bursian, ii, p. 131 ; Curtius, Peloponnesos, ii, p. 251.) 
The meaning of vvoardTpia, as Bockh points out, 
may be inferred from Hesychios, s. v. a-Tdrpia, which 
he explains as e/nrXeKTpia ; compare Schol. Aristoph. 
Eccles. 1. 737, KOfMfLcoTpia [e/i7rXeAcr/3ta, tj Koap.ovaa ras 

ywatKas. We may, therefore, translate here, 'an 
under-tirewoman.' 



CXLII. 

On a tabfet of white marble, on which are sculptured in relief a number of articles of female toilet. Height, 2 ft. 4 in. ; width, 
3 ft. 6 in. Found with CXLI an/e, at Sklavo-khori, in Lakonia. C. L 1466; Guide to Grseco-Roman Sculptures, 
Pt. ii, No. 12. 






?E/ 



/ 



< 



O 



/CXa 



av. Ayr)Ta Ai'Tindrpov iepua 



Among the objects sculptured on this and the 
preceding tablet are shoes, a hair net, bottles for 
unguent, a mirror, combs ; in the centre of the relief 
is sculptured a phiale, round which is the dedication. 
(See the description of the reliefs in the Guide, loc. 
cit.) It is to be presumed that the mundus muliebris 
dedicated by the priestess Claudia Ageta in this ta- 
blet, and the similar objects dedicated by Anthousa, 
had been used by these functionaries in their sacred 
ministration. 

According to Pausanias, iii, § 20, 4, certain Mysteries 



were celebrated in the temple of Dionysos at Brysea; 
to which women only were admitted. 

This worship of Dionysos at Bryseae may be con- 
nected with the cult of Dionysos Brisaios at Brisa 
in Lesbos. C. L 2042; compare ibid. 3160, 3161, 
3176, 3190 ; Bullet, de Corresp. Hell^n. iv, p. 445. 
The Brisaian Mystae dedicate a bronze seal to Ota- 
cilia, wife of the Emperor Philip ; see Proceedings 
of Soc. Ant. Lond. ii, p. 265. This seal is in the 
British Museum. (See Guide to Bronze Room, 
p. 46, No. 48.) 



LAKONIA — GYTHEION. 



OXLIII. 

On a slab of red marble Height, i ft. 7^ in.; breadth, ii^ in. Obtained by the late Colonel William M. Leake at Gytheion, 

in Lakonia, and presented by him in 1839. 



LHA 

EirPA 

A(}>ONTOr 

5 VIGINANKAIA 

.ON I onoNTAZAro 
^AA^lorY^orp^o5:AAMl 

fvllOS 

-.fcOlAAKEAAIMONIOZIAT . OZA 
10 xYTONrPAMMATflNKAOnZE rAcjJl 

EinOGAMEIATPEYZriNAIATOrnA 
t-NTETAITEXNAIOTGENOZAEYTEPONKA 
lONTEAPiZTONTANMEnZTANKATAAOrAI 
NOZTnNTEAPXONTnNKAITAZnOAEOZA 
15 TENETOnOOAMEKAIEPrOAABHZAZKA 

KAHOHYnOTOYAAMOTKAIAIETHXPONONA 
AENOZnAPAMEENTETAITEXNAITAAIKAl 
ETOiZXPEIANEXOYZiNZnOYAAZKAI(j)iAC 
©ENEAAEinnNEIZTOnAZINIZOZEINAIKA 
20 nAOYZIOIZKAIAOYAOIZKAIEAEYGEPOIZ 

NAZTPOcJjAIAEKAinAPEniAAMIAIAinEnol 
K0C()0NA . . ZAYTONAIATETHPHKEAIIOZriNO 
TEXNAZAIMETAXEIPIZETAIKAITAZIAIAZ 
AITAZAMETEPAZnOAEOZKAIANENKAHTON 
25 lAZINAIATETHPHKENEAEYGEPIONnPO" 

\IAIKAIANTANAnANTHZINnOIOYMENC 
AAAEIANAPIZn(})PONIKAinEnAiAEY/v» 
niBIAAAAEAACJJPiniGEnPHNTANn 
VAENANENTAIZEIZ<}>OPAIZEnANr 
30 AniAnPEANIATPEYZEINOAPAMET 

AYTONYnEPMETPnNAMETOIZAlK 
KAAOKArAGIAZKAITAZEIZTAN 
MnNEVNOIAZTEKAI(t>IAOZTO 
TANAnOAEIIINAIAnANTflNnOlO 
35 V\OZAnEYXAPIZTnNENnAZINTOIl 

<IOIZAAMIAAAIKATEIAHc})nZEYNC 
«<PXONTATAinOAEIAMfiNKAIAIAn 
NOZnAPAITIONriNOMENONENTET 
ENnANTITniBininPOiENONA^ 
40 iKEKAIEYEPTETANTAZnOAEOZA 

PXETfiAVTnirAZTEKAIOIKIAZEN 
TAAAAA(j)IAANGPnnAKAITIMIAny 
-OIZAAAOIZnPOIENOIZKAlEYEPrETA 
ZYOAPXEITANAEnPOIENIANTA^ 
45 lEniZTPATArOYBlAAAANATPAtAN 

xAANAIGINANANAGENTHNEIZTONE 

-ONTAZAroPAZTonoNonnznAzih 

EAAMIAAAKAAOKATAGIAZKAIEY^ 
AEnZAMflNEIZTOYZEYEPrETAZ 
60 lA EIAEMHANAGHZONTIOIE<J)OPOI 

DnZrErPAnTAIYnOAIKOIEZTHZAI 
KAlAAAniTjaiGEAONTirOTIAPAXMAZAI 
IPETOYZKAIMHEZTnnPOBOAIMOZ 



LAKONIA— GYTHEION. 



Tra 



01 Se t<f)opoi oi eirl crTparayov tov Seiuos] eiypa 

dvaypa'<^dvTa>v dvriyp'^atpov tov- 

5 TOV TOV yjracpiafjLaTos els aTd\av\ XiQivav Koi d- 

vaOevTdiv eh Tbv eirnpaveo'TaJTOi' tottov Tcis dyo- 
pdi, a 8e kmypa<f)i] aSe eoTO), 'Aa^KXaniov imovpybs Aa/ii- 
dSas .... Xeoy AaKtSaino^ios, 

'EneiSfi Aa/iidSas . . . .] Xeoy AaKeSai/iovioi lai^p'^is d- 
10 TToaTaXefTCOv wpos ? aluroi/ ypa/j,/j.dT(ou, KaOws k->^d(f>i- 

crrai Jet no6' dp.€ laTpivaav, Slo, tov na- 

pucryjqcrOai avTov\ tv re to, Ttyva ovOeybs SfvTfpov Ka- 
To. So^av Sap-odyov ? re dpicrTov, Tav piyicrTav KaToKoyo^ 
npo(Tiroiovpi\vo^ twv Tt dp-^ovTWv koi Tas noXfos d- 
15 pwf Sap6<Tto9 ejyiveTO nod' ape, Kal kpyoXa^-qo-a^ Ka[i- 

ptW kiri\KXrj6r] vwo tov Sdpov Kai SteTrj y^povov d- 
vaa-Tp^fioj/ievos nap' apk tv re to, Ttyva Th SiKai- 
a napei(T)(r]K]e roTs \puav i^ovaiv, (rnovSds Kal ipiXo- 
aropyiai ovlBef eXXeincoi' e/y to ndaiv icros elvai >ca[t 
20 nfvrjcTi Kaij nXov(Tiois Kal SovXois Kal eXev6epois 

Kal ^ivoLS, a\va<TTpo<pa. S\ Kal napeniSapia a nenoi- 
rjTai dKO^KOcp^^p^ofa [deh ai)Tov SiaTeTrjprjKe, d^ios yivo- 
pivos Tai re] re^i'ay ay peTayeipi^iTaL Kal ray t'^iay 
narpiSos kIuI ray dpeTepas noXeos Kal dvkvKXrjTov 
25 atjTOV kv n'^dcTiv SiaTeT-qprjKei', kXivOkpiov 7r/3o[y 

dnavTas K^al StKaiav tolv dnavTrjcriv noiovpev(^s, 
KaOms e7r(/3]aXXet dvSpl a-d)^povi Kal nenatSevp^evo)^ 
e\nl BtdSa Se Aa^pm 6fO)pmi> Tav 'n\6Xiv 
k^anopov'hikvav kv Tats eiacfiopats e7ra»'y[etXaro 
30 ro) Sd'lpcp Scopeav laTpevaeiv nap' dpiT^kpav 

TToXtr] avTov, inreppeTpoiv dpk Tols Sii^aiw- 
pacnv'\ ? KoXoKdyaOias Kal Tai els Tdv ^oXiv 

oihiwv eivoias re Kal <piXocrTc^pyias 
pfyicrlTav dnoSei^iv Sid ndvToov noic^vpevos, 
35 Si a>v 6 Sd'hios dnevxapia-Tmv kv ndaiv tois 

Koi\vois ? AapidSa, KaretX T/^cby evvJ^vv avrov 
vnldpxovTa to. noXei dp5>v Kal Sid TrTaj'roy 
dyaOov Tihos napaiTiov yivopevov ev re T^ais <Tvp<po- 
pats Kai\ kv navTi rS /S/w, npo^evov a[yroj' 
40 mnoirjlKe Kal evepyeTav Tas noXeos d^pav Kal 

iwajpxerft) avTm yds re Kal oiKias et^KTtja-is 
KUi] Ta dXXa (f>iXdvdpama Kal Tipia n^dvTa ocra 
Kai\ Tois aXXois npo^kvois Kal evepyera[jy ray no- 
Xeoly vndpxei, Tav Sk npo^eviav Ta^vTav oi (.(fiop- 
45 01 o\i knl (TTpaTayov BidSa dvaypd^^av^Tes els 

<rralXa«/ XiOivav dvaOevTWv els tov e^ni^avkcr- 
tolWov Tas dyopds Tonov oncos ndcriv ^(fiavepbv fj 
TOV rle AapidSa KaXoKdyaOias Kal iv\yoias Tas 
no\X((os dpmv els tovs evepykras ^iinopva- 
p]a- el Se pfj dvaOrjcrovTi oi e<popOL ^avTa Ka- 
6a>s yeypanTai, vnoSiKoi e(rT(oa-a\y Kal tZ Sdpa> 
Kal aXXo) ro) QtXovTi noTi Spa\pds Si [aKoaias ? 
TrpSy aVpeTovs Kal pfj effTco npo^oXipos. 



50 



This is a decree conferring the proxenia on Da- 
miadas, a Lacedaemonian, for his services as a 
physician to the city of Gytheion. The upper part 
of the marble evidently contained a previous decree 
of which only a few concluding words, lines 1-8, 
remain. The date of the lower decree is fixed 
approximately by the mention (line 28) of the Stra- 
tegos Biadas. This name occurs among the epony- 
mous Strategi of the league of Lakonian cities, 
called Eleuthero-Lakones, who are mentioned in 



an inscription from Gytheion published by Sauppe, 
Getting. Gelehrte Anzeigen, 1865, Nachricht, p. 461, 
and afterwards by Foucart in Lebas, Pt. ii, ^ 4, 
No. 242 a. The date of this inscription is thought 
to be about B.C. 86, and the Strategi whom it 
mentions, including Biadas, are assigned by Foucart 
to some period between B.C. 100 and 86. (See 
Lebas, ibid. pp. iii, 112.) 

The number of letters in each line of our in- 
scription varies from 38 to 44. For the first 24 lines 



LAKONIA. 



the right side of the marble is perfect, therefore the 
restoration must be entirely supplied on the left 
side. 

Line 9. d![7ro(TTa\iyTcoi> Trpbs aji^roc ypa/ifjidT<op. If this 
restoration is correct, Damiadas was invited to be 
the public physician of Gytheion by letters from the 
demos. 

Line 13. rav fityia-Tai/ AcoTaXoyAfc. The meaning 
of this word here may be inferred from the following 
sentence in a Senatusconsultum, C. I. 5879, lines 
8—10, onats {mep tS)U koXw veTrpay/j.evcoi' inr avraiv [(cat 
dv8pa\^a6r]iidT(tiv e/y to. Sr]n6aia npdy/xaTa rd 17/ilrepa 
KaraXoytj avrmv yiyrjrai. ' That their gOod deeds 

and public services may be taken into account.' If 
we suppose KaraXoydv to be used here in the same 
sense, the verb to be supplied in the following line 
would be 7rpo(r7roiov//e]foy, or some such equivalent. 

Line 15. Here and in line 13 I have supplied 
Sa/ioa-io? because it is the official title of a physician 
serving a city under a contract, as was the case here. 

Kai ipyoXa^7]a-as. Compare Xenoph. Memor. iv, ^ 2, 5, 
Tois fiovXofj.€vois napd Trjs woAewy iaTptKOf kpyov Xa^iiv. 

Line 2 I . imroi^Tai . . .] Kocpova . . y avrov SiarfTrjpriKe. 
These letters are perfectly clear. I have restored 
dKa\K6(f)[p)oi'a [ae]y, supposing the lapidary to have 
omitted the p. The context seems to require some 
such adjective before avTOf. 

Line 27. (ca^my €7rt^]aXXet, ' as becomes.' Compare 
the Kretan inscription in Bullet, de Corn Hellen. iv, 
p. 354, hne 16. 

Line 28. Aacppim. The name of this month occurs 
in an inscription from Erineos in Doris (Curtius, 
Anecd. Delph. No. 28). K. F. Hermann in his 
Monatskunde, p. 67, supposes it to be an .^tolian 
month corresponding with the Delphic Beo^evios 
(August), but its occurrence in this inscription 
proves it to have been one of the Lakonian 
months, of which eleven were previously known. 
It seems connected with Aa(ppta as an epithet of 
Artemis in Kalydon (Pausan. iv, J 31, 6 ; vii, § 18, 6), 
and in Kephallenia (Anton. Liberal, c. xl). We also 
find an Apollo Adcppios in Strabo, x, p. 459. In 
the inscription from Kalymna, No. ccxcix, pos^, we 
have the month 'EXd^pio^, and at Elis K. F. Her- 
mann, Monatskunde, gives 'EXd<f)tos. See Pausanias, 
V, ^ 13, 5, and vi, § 20, i. This was a month in the 



spring probably corresponding to the ' EXaiprj^oXtcoy of 
the Attic Calendar. Heuzey, in Rev. Archdol. xxxi, 
p. 260, places a month "Afpios third in order after 
December in a calendar of Thessalian months 
arranged on the evidence of inscriptions. This is 
evidently the same month, and the Abbd Duchesne, 
by whom, according to Foucart, the inscriptions at 
Larissa and Krannon on which it occurred were 
transcribed, may have failed to read the initial A. 

6e(opa>v rdf 7r[oX(»' (^aTTopovyievau kv rafy fl<7(f)0paTs. 
In the decree already referred to (Lebas, 242 a) it 
is stated that in the year when Biadas was Strategos 
two Roman citizens of Gytheion through their per- 
sonal influence persuaded the Roman Commissioners, 
Publius Autronius and Lucius Marcilius, to remit the 
levy of men and other imposts with which they had 
taxed the city. The eia-<j>opa[ mentioned line 29 must 
refer to such imposts. 

Line 52. t« BeXovn. Here letters have been cut 
out and replaced by others : Spax/ids Si\^aK0(ria9 ? 

Line 53. vpbs aj/peroi/y, sc. SiKaards. Before a 
special jury, chosen ad hoc. 

irpo^bXiij.0%. It is to be presumed that ypa^'j or 
dp.ipa must be understood here, as the inscription 
ends with this word. The npolSoXri in Athenian law 
was an indictment before the ekklesia, which in 
some cases preceded a judicial trial (see Meier, 
Attisch. Process, p. 272). In this case the decree 
provides that the jurisdiction should be summary, 
and that no such previous formality .should be 
required. At Athens, when public functionaries 
were prosecuted for maladministration, it was ne- 
cessary to open the proceedings either with an 
eisangelia or a probole (see Meier, ibid. p. 574). 
In the case of the ephori of Gytheion this preliminary 
step was dispensed with. Decrees honouring physi- 
cians for their public services are not uncommon. 
See C. I. 1897, 4315 «; C. I. A. ii, pt. i, p. 424, 
No. 256(5, and ibid. Nos. 186, 187; Weil in Mittheil. 
d. deutsch. Inst, i, p. 238 ; Perrot, Explor. Arch^ol. 
de la Galatie, i, p. 48, No. 27; see his remarks on 
public physicians and compare Rangabe, ii, p. 35. 
The Due de Luynes' bronze tablet from Dali in 
Cyprus is now read as a decree in favour of the 
physician Onasilos and his kinsmen for public ser- 
vices. See Ahrens in the Philologus, xxxv, p. 28, 



CXLIV. 

Lower part of a slab of white marble. Height, loj in.; breadth, i ft. loj in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

IG I 

PAAei4)GeNTAHNKA 
AOTCIMCOCAONTATONAI 
TONnACINAlOAOVeTO 
6 HBOYAHTONeYGPreThN 

Tra^aXeKpOfUTa tjv Ka 

^ilXoTei/zwy Sovra rhv ai 

. . . TOf trdaiv Si SXov €ro[fy 
17 ^ovX^ rby (vepytTrfy. 

Fragment probably from a dedication in honour of some public benefactor. 



LAKONIA. 



CXLV. 

On a stelfe of white marble, both sides perfect, but broken at top and bottom. Height, 8\ in.; breadth, pi in. Lakonia. 

Inwood Collection. 

Al 

EXE(t>YA02 
A0PK05 
<1)IAI5TIAA5 

5 ropriPFA 

<J)IAETI5 
ZIMIAA5 



ai 

AopKOS 
0LXl(TTlSaS 

5 ropyimra 

^PlXfTli 

'ExefvXoi occurs, C. I. 1706. For 'EKf<pvXos in a Lakonian inscription, see Foucart-Lebas, Pt. ii, 

§ 4- No. 255 a. 



OXLVI. 

On a slab of white marble. Height, loin. ; breadth, i ft. af in. From Asomatos or Liternes in Maina. C. I. 1498; 

Pouqueville, ed. 1820, v, p. 170, No. lo. Inwood Collection. 

fTENTEKAIEHH 
KONTAETWNME 
rACHMAKAA¥nTEI 
EYTYXONOIKONO 
5 MONnOAAHN<t>IAI 
HNnOPICANTA 

nkvTi Kal i^riKovTa kratv fj.eya crfjiia KaXvimi 
EvTvypv OLKOvonov TToXXriv ^iXirjv wopicravTa. 

Bockh thinks that the office of oIkovo/ios here is not a public one, though there were public oiKouofioi at 

Sparta and elsewhere. Compare C. I. 2088. 



CXLVII. 

From heading of a stelb of red marble. Height, 6^ in. ; breadth, 7 in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

EKKAHU 
'^OJAAP 
TNO" 



CXLVITI. 

On a sepulchral stelfe of marble in colour like palombino. Height, io| in. ; breadth, 7| in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

MEAAHOIO2: 
inPYPIAN 

MeXcivdios Zcowvpicoi/ 
There have been no more letters on the stone. 



LAKONIA. 



CXLIX. 

On a slab of white marble, much stained by London smoke; the edge is broken on both sides, but the inscription does not 
seem to have lost any letters. Height, 8f in. ; breadth, 6^ in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

KYPAHA 

NTcoevr 

ATHPMA 
P(0NIO 
5 Y 

KvparravTQ) OvydTtjp Mapatvtov 

This inscription is evidently sepulchral. On the j branches is incised. This candlestick shews that this 
right of the Y in line 5 a candlestick with eight ] is a Jewish monument. See C. I. 9903, 9923. 



CL. 

Fragment of the top of a stelb in red Lakonian marble, surmounted by a pediment. Rather more than half the right side of the 
slelfe is wanting. The letters are large as if from a heading. Height, 6 J in.; breadth, 4I in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 



CLI. 

On a votive tablet of white marble, on which in very low relief are three female figures moving to the left in single file towards 
an altar or cippus. In their right hands they each hold out a wreath. The hindermost figure being smaller in scale must 
be an attendant. The letters are much worn. The name of the dedicator was on the left side of the tablet, now wanting. 
Height, 10^ in. ; breadth, 11 J in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

i'KAieYXAN 

Tov 8ilvoi\ kot' (iiydv 



OLII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, right side and top preserved. Width, 7| in. by 2 J in. by i J in. Lakonia. Inwood Collection. 

A0T04>IA-n. 
-Y^AA'EIBEP 
''AHI/vA'A 

^?AP^YPl■n. 

5 'TA/^TI 



Soto <f>t\a> . . . 

. . . Qeyxpaffi ? Bip 

\jl <i)l>ii ? . . . 

dpyvpm . . . 

TavTi . . . 



lO 



LAKONIA. 



CLIII. 

On a slab of red Lakonian marble, broken on all sides except the left, the edge of which is perfect from line 9 to line 17. 
Height, Sg'in. ; breadth 10 in. From the Akropolis, Kythera. Inwood Collection. 

n 
Arrpocj)As.i 

VAINOMENOSTAl'* 
GniAIAAAMtEnSOl 
5 AnOAISEYXAPItTOSOV 

ATOYSAZIOYSTAISKAGHK 
OXQAITAinOAEIAMnNEnAIN 
lAAABEITYAHEniTAIEYNOIAIA 
lOAINAMfiNKAIEICTOYSENTYi 
10 THNPOAITANEINAIAEAYTONKAi 

nOAEOSAMnNKAIEYEPTETANA 
rONOYSEINAIAEAYTnirASKAIOI 
SINKAIATEAEIANKAIASYAIANK 
KAIEIPANASKAITAAOinATIMIAOS 
15 AOISnPOZENOISKAIEYEP -AI<T 

MnNYnAPX"-" 
tAN ' 



10 



15 



«o [xpet'ay 

Trapf)(^6iMei'0f\ dnpotfiaallcrrwi it/ rravri KaipZ 
d^LOs] (paivofj.ei'Oi ray i^irap)(^ovo-as kv 
ZaKvv\6(o{^\ SiaXd/jLylrfOiS, oTTTCoy ovv (fiaivrjrai 
a noXii (vydpKTTO^ oi5[cra Koi TifiS)- 
cr}a Tovs d^LOVi rati KaOrji^ovaaii ri/iati^ Sf- 
S16)(^6ai TO, noXei afiwv kirait^icrai tov Sdua tov 
B'ydSa BeirvXrj ewl to. dvota My (ywv SiareXei fis ray 
TToXiv dfiaiv Kat eli tovs euTi^y\dvovTas 
tS>v noXirdu, efvai 8e aiiTov Kal [npo^evov ray 
TToXeoy dii&v Kal evepyeraf, cdiyrbv Kal €k- 
yovovs, ilvai Se avrZ yay Kal o^Kia^ eyKrrj- 
(TLv Kal driXeiau Kal davXtav i^al noXf/iov 
Kal iipdvas Kal rd Xomd TLjiia oa^a Kal Toti dX- 
Xoii npo^ivois Kal ei/e/jfyelTaty T[ay TroXeoy d- 

jMatv {nrdp^ei [ dvaypa- 

■<^dv\T<ti ToSf TO ^Irdtpicr/xa eis ardXav k.t.X. 



For a fragment of a similar decree from Kythera, 
also on red marble, see 'ABrivaiov, iv, p. 464, No. 22. 

This is a fragment of a decree conferring the 
proxenia on some one, son of Biadas, for services 
to a city, which, it is to be presumed, was Ky- 
thera. 



Line 8. The name Biadas as strategos occurs in 
an inscription of later date, No. cxliii, ante, from 
Gytheion. 

BeiTvXfj. OiTvXoi, or, as Ptolemy writes it, BirvXa, 
was a city of the Eleuthero-Lakones. In C. I. 1323, 
we have 17 noXn fj BaiTvXimv. 



CLIV. 

On a small fragment of a thin slab of white marble. Height, 2J in.; breadth, 2 J in. Kythera. Bequeathed by Sir Walter 

Trevelyan, Bart., in 1879. 

PH 
ACI-M 
K£ 



dufOrj'^Ke 



ARKADIA. 



II 



CLV. 

Engraved on the base of a very small term, which is surmounted by a female head, ornamented over the forehead with a sphen- 
donb. The hair, gathered into a knot behind, falls in long tresses on each side of the neck. Height, 12^ in.; breadth, 
3 1 in. This term was found by Colonel Leake at Pikerni, a small village near Mount Alesion in Arkadia (see his Travels in 
the Morea, i, p. iii), and was presented by him to the Museum in 1839. Published, C. I. 1518, from a defective copy, 
and by Foucart-Lebas. No. 352 c. 

XEIHNIS 
\AMA 
TPI 

Xficovii 

AdfiaTpi 



Foucart reads Xpuouh after Leake, but on the stone 
the E is clear. Xioyis occurs as a man's name, C. I. 
199, and there was an early artist of that name, 
Pausan. x, § 13, 4. We know from Pausanias (viii, 
§ 10, 2) that on Mount Alesion was a grove sacred to 
Demeter. It is therefore extremely probable, as 
Leake suggests, that this votive term was brought 



from the site of this grove to the neighbouring 
village of Pikerni. In the temenos of Demeter at 
Knidos I found a similar term surmounted by a 
rude head representing Persephone, and with a 
dedication to that goddess on the base. (See my 
Hist. Disc, i, pi. Iviii, fig. i and ii, pt. 2, p. 384.) 



CLVI. 

On a slab of white marble broken on all sides. The right side is nearly complete. Height, 2 ft. 7 in. ; width at bottom, i ft. 
10 in. This inscription was formerly in the wall of the church at Paleo Episcopi, the site of Tegea, where it was copied 
by some traveller as early as 1747. (See Corsini, Nott. Gr. Diss, iv, p. 68.) It was afterwards removed to Zante, where 
it was copied more correctly by Brondsted; see Ussing, Graeske og Latinske Indskriften i Kjobenhavn, Copenhagen, 1854, 
p. 26; C. I. 15 13, 1514; Leake, Travels in Morea, i, p. 89; iii, pi. No. i ; Foucart-Lebas, Pt. ii, No. 338^. 



10 



'5 



a. 



b. 





lEPH SnKPE TH 


- 


innoooiTAinoAiTAi 


z 


PEPIAAOZSIMn 


lAAY 


AEZIASMNAZIZTPATn 




AAMOZTPATOZAPIZTOAA 



(DIAHNOZ 

oz 

-OTEAEOZ 
\HONIKEOZ 
TAIPOAITAI 
VAAZPYOArrEAA 
ENOtDANTOZAPIZTinNOZ 
NIKIAZNIKOAAMn 
'ZOAAMOZOEIZIAY 
KAAAIAZAPIZTHNOZ 

ETOIKOI 
AAMATPIOZAPOAAfiNIAAY 



EPA0ANAIANPOAITAI 

APIZTOPAMnNANTHJ)AEOY 
ATAOOKAHZEPITEAEOZ 

KPAPinTAIPOAITAI 
AlZr^NMIKIONOZ 
ATAZEAZAPIZTOtJANEOZ 

roprippozropnoz 

lEPHNIPPONOZ 

TEAEZTAZPAXn 

GAAIOZEPrONIKn 



10 



15 



PIZTOKAHZeDIAAlAY 

ZnZIKAHZMOZXn 

ONAZIMOZKAAAIAY 



METOIKOI 

GEOAnPOZPPAZIAAMn 
AAMIXOZYPEPANOFOZ 



«5 



AY 



VEOZXAPM'nNIENfiNOZ 
ATEMAXOZAriAY 

APOAAfiNIATAIPOAITAI 
ZIMIAAZOEZinNOZ 
IMPEAOKAHZOEOTIMri 
IPPIXOZAAEZIAAAY 



APOAAHNIATAir 

GPAZEAZ*IAnNOZ 20 

PATPOKAEIAAZZENOtDANEOZ 
ZENOTIMOZEYMHAIAAY 
TIMOKAHZTIMOKPEOZ 

MiKinNTOPrn 

PAN^IAAAZ<t>IAOKAE0Z 25 



AAMAINET-^i. EYPYTIMO A AMOKAHZAPOAAnNI A AY 

METOIKOI 

METOIKOI 



12 



ARKADIA. 



30 



35 



40 



45 



50 



55 



a. 



I 



b. 



APIZTOBIOZEYPPAKTAY 



IPPOOO.TAIPOAI. Al 
AXn OEOKAEIAAZGEO . . EOZ 

MErAAIASMETAAlAY 
EYPYKPETHZPOAEAY 
. AZYMHAEOZ 

lEPHZAAMOZTPATOZ 
KPAPinTAIPOA|-AI 
HMIAY AAKIZQtNHZAYZIZTPATn 

AAMO<t>ANTn EPAINETO.^TOPriPPIAAY 



C. 
AAMOKAHZ 

IEPHZ<t)IAOAAMOZ 

EPAOANAIANPOAIT/ 

AAMEAZ(l)YTin 

<l)IAnNAPIZTOTEAE0 

KAAAIZTPATOZIPA 

METOIKOI 

OAYNPIOAnPOZOA^ 

AEZIKPATHZAEZ 

APIZTEIAAZAiriNC 



30 



35 



EINIAY 


AAMAINETOSATAOIAY 




ZTATn 




KPAPIHTAIPOAIT 


KAEIOZ 


METOIKOI 


KAEAZOPAZEA 


EOZ 


APIZTfiNAPIZTilNOZ 


AYOKAHZEPAAKP 


OKA . OZ 


ZEYOAZZ - 


NIKAZIAZAAKPI- 


MNAZTAY 




AAMAINETOZAEI 


IPPOOOITAIPOAITAI 
rnNEZ APOAAnNIATAiPOAITAI 
ETIi AEZIAZZf^kTEAEOZ 


NEOKAHZOEOXAP 
NIKIAZAAKIZOENI 


<OAAY 




KAAAIPATAZIEPO 


P PIA 
AnNIAAY 




KAPANIOZAIZXPn 


AIAY 
AAAINBPOT 




METOIKOI 




IPPOOOIT. IPOAITAI 


0IAIZTIAAZEY<I>P/ 


PPOZOENEOZ 


APIZTAIOZTIMOZTPATn 




ZOZAAKIAY 


EYAOZOZKAEAINETO 


ZOZIKPATHZKAAAI 


AITAI 




lEPHZTIMOKPETH 


NY 


NIKAZIPPOZAZ<J)A/ 


KPAPIO OAITA 




EPAOANAIANP Al 


-OE lAY 




-APXO. AlO<t>ANTn 


AY 




T TATAY 





40 



45 



50 



( Ev ay[«](rt rol^ 'OXvfiTriaKois rZ ^iyia-rw Kal Kepawo^oXo) Ait dvaTeBei/xfi^ots 

eKOfiiaavTO Toil's] aTf(f>dvovi ) 

(7. b. C. 



10 



'5 



20 



['/^P'/y ] 

[e7r' ' AQavaiav TroXrrat] 

. . . . (T 
. ^ . . . i^ai/ 

'PiXwi'Oi 

oy 

ZyoriXioi 

KjXTJOVlKiOi 

Kpapi5>\Tai noXiTai 
.... XXas HvOayyfXX^^Lav 
E^fyocpavTOi ApicrTionvos 
NiKiai NiKoSdfio} 
/aoSafios Qipalav ? 
KaXXias ApL(TT<ovos 

MYtoikol 
AafidrpLOi AnoXXmviSav 
flia-TOKXfjs <PiXXiav 
ZwaiKXfji M6cT)((o 
'Ovdaifios KaXXiav 

Xfos Xap/iicoy — ivcoyos 

^Ayf/ia^os Ay lav 

AiToXXa>vtdTai woXTrai 
Zi^idai GecrfTloii/oy 



' /€/)7;[yJ Za>KpeTr][s 
' iTTTToOoiTai noXirai 
HepiXXo? ZipoJ^yoi 
Ae^tai MvacTi<TTpdT(o 
Aa/ioa-Tparoi ' A pi(TTo8d[/j.(o 

(ir AOavaiav noXTrai 
' A piiTTovd/icop AvTL(f>Xkov 
' AyadoKXijs ' EniTeXeos 

KpapiwTai noXiTai 
A iacav /M iKtcouoi 
Ayaatai A piaTO<f)dvios 
rSpyimros Fopyioi 

lipWV ' iTTTTCOyOS 

TfXfarai Hd^o) 
QdXioi ' EpyoviKW 

M iTOlKOl 

OioSapos npa^iSd/ico 
Adfiiyos YmpdvOios 

' AnoXXmvidrai n^oXlTai 
Qpaaias 4>iXcoyos 
riaTpoKXeiSas Efvo<pdyfoi 
EivoTifioi EvjxriXiSav 
TiftoKX^i Ti/xoKpeoi 



10 



16 



20 



ARKADIA. 



13 



av 'IfiTTfSoKXfj^ OfOTifim 

25 5(?)(Aca) 'liTiriKos 'AXf^idSav 

AafiaiviTos EvpvTi/i(o 

MfTOlKOl 

ApiffTo^tos EvnpaKTav 

' InnoOolTai ■rro\'ST\ai 

30 ayoo d€0<XeiSas ©eo[AcX]€Of 

MeyaXias MeyaXiav 

EvpVKpiTTji floXiaV 



Qp^aavji-qSios 



35 



'leprjs Aa/xooTparos 

Kpaptcorai iroXTrai 

AXKi<r6ivrfs Av<n(TTpa.r(o 
ErratvfTOS ropynrniSav 
AafiaiytTOS 'AyaOtav 



' My^aiav ? 

Aap.o(f)dvTa> 

'Afi^iiviav ? 

.... (TTarm 
40 .... AfXejor ? MfTotKoi 

€oy Api(TT<ov Apta-Toavoi 

o/cX[6]oy ZivBa^ I^ivBoa 

Sto^vdvTav 

ImroOoirai rroXTrai 
45 ycoyfs 'AnoXXwvidrat iroXirai 

fTco Ae^ias ZairiXiOf 

KoXav 

pia 

A iToX^atvihav 
50 Xiav 

IC^XXiv^por 

lmtoBoli{oL\i. noXirai 

lyrrroaOepeo? 'Apiaraios TifioaTpdrco 

.... croy 'AXKiav EvSo^os KXtaiuiro 
55 TrojArraj 

NiKaaimros ' A<T^a>\t<o 

'En' ' ABavaiav TTfoXtrJat 
''/7nr]a/)xo[y] ALo<pdi'Ta> 
. . . . T . . Tarav 

The dialect in this inscription exhibits that 
mixture which, according to Strabo, prevailed in 
Arkadia (see Bergk, De Titulo Arcadico, i860; 
G. Curtius, in Getting. Gelehrte Anzeigen, 1862, 
p. 489; Gelbke, De Dialecto Arcadica, in G. Curtius, 
Studien, ii, pp. 1-43). Thus all through this in- 
scription the genitive of masculine nouns of the first 
declension terminates in av instead of aco. This ter- 
mination of the genitive occurs also in the Cyprian 
dialect, see Deecke and Siegismund, in G. Curtius, 
Studien, vii, p. 246, and p. 263. We trace the same 
change in the Boeotian forms lavKpdrfios, laijfifiXos, 
C. I. 1588, 1575, for ZcoKpareos, Zdi/iriXos. 

Line 50, col. c, Ti/xoKpfTrif, line 32, col. d, Ei- 
pvKpiTTjs, for TifiOKparrfS^ EvpvKpdrrjs ; Ahrens, De 
Dialect, ^^ol. p. 233 ; Gelbke, De Dialecto Arcad. 
in G. Curtius, Studien, ii. p. 12. But this change 
was not constant, as we find here Ai^iKpdTrjs^ line 36, 
col. c, ZcoaiKpdrris, line 49, col. c. 

Line 7, col. c, 'Apia-Tond/icov ; nd/xcoi' means possessor. 
Compare fa-Tiondfiwf, Pollux, x, 20 ; floXvirdficnv, II. iv, 
433 ; 'Eondfiooy, C. I. 2I2I ; fx^ndficoy, in the Lokrian 
inscription, Cauer, No. 91, 1. 16; e/Jinaais and wendaBat 
are from the same root. See Cobet, in Mnemosyne, 
1875, p. 216. 



MiKt<of rSpyo) 
flafTidSai 0iAo/cX«of 
AafioKX^i ' AnoXXmfiSav 

MiTOlKOl 

AafjiOKXfji 
'l(pr}i <PiX68a/ioi 

Err' 'A6avaiav iroXiTol^i 
Aafieat 'PvTto) 
4>iXmv '/4pt(7ToTeX6o[r 
KaXXicTTpaTOi ' Jnaicra) 
M iroiKoi 

OXvfnioScopos 'OXlyuTrioSdpco 
Ae^iKpdTT]^ Ae^^iKpdnos 
'AptcTTeiSas 4tWo[y 
KpapiaiTai TroXiTfai 
KXias QpaaecJiy 
AvokXtjs ' EndXK€[os 
NtKaaias AaKpiifo} 
Aafjiaiueros A(c . . . 

NfOKXijS OiO^dfJ^iO^ 

NiKias 'AXKiaOfv^oi 

KaXXindras 'lepo 

Kapdyios Aia)(^p(i3[vos 
MeroiKot 

4>iXi(TTiSai Ev<ppa 
ZcoaLKpdTT]^ /CaXX('[oi» 
ItpTjs TifioKperrj^i 
Kpapia^Tai tt^oXitc^i 
2(9e'[ ]tav 



*5 



30 



35 



40 



45 



50 



. av 



Foucart has republished this inscription from 
Brondsted's transcript without being aware that the 
original is in the British Museum. The stone when 
copied by Brondsted had the heading now wanting, 
and which is therefore printed in brackets. This 
heading shews that the inscription contained a list 
of victors who had gained crowns in certain Olympic 
contests dedicated to Zeus Megistos and Kerauno- 
bolos. These were doubtless games celebrated at 
Tegea, and called Olympia after the fashion pre- 
valent in the Roman period. (See the list of such 
local Olympia in Krause, Olympia, pp. 203 fol.) It 
may be assumed that the crowns were dedicated to 
the local Zeus. The list of names comprises several 
years, which are severally distinguished by the name 
of the eponymous magistrate, ifprji, prefixed to the 
list. The victors are arranged under their respective 
tribes, and further classed as citizens or metoiks. 
We learn from this inscription that the tribes at 
Tegea were four in number, viz. Krariotae, Apollo- 
niatae, Hippothoita;, and fv' 'AOava'iav. The names 
of the same tribes as given by Pausanias, viii, 53, ^ 3, 
are KXapi&rn, probably a more modern form of 
Kpapiwrat, ' InnoBotris, ' AnoXXaividTis, and 'AdavfdTis, 
which Foucart corrects ' AOafaidnt. Bursian, Geo- 



14 



ARKADIA. 



graphic v. Griechenland, ii. p. 218, supposes that 
each of the four tribes derived its name from the 
principal temple in the quarter which it occupied. 
Thus the tribe Athanaiatis would be near the great 
temple of Athene Alea (Pausan. viii, 45, § 4), the 
Krariotae would be on the height dedicated to Zeus 
Klarios or Krarios, the Apolloniatae would be near 
the temple of Apollo Agyieus (Pausan. ibid. 53, ^ 3). 
The Hippothoitae probably took their name from 
the ancient Arkadian king, Hippothoos. 

In the three columns of the inscription the tribes 
recur, but not in the same order. In line 35 of col. d, 
the Krariotae come first. In col. c, line 2, the first 
place is given to the Hippothoitae. Foucart sup- 
poses that each tribe in turn occupies the first place, 
passing next year to the fourth place. We should 
thus obtain the following rotation : — 

1. ' Eir" AQavatav, Kpaptmrai,' AnoWcoviaTai,' ImrodoiTaL. 

2. KpapL&Taij AnoWmvLoiTai, ' lirnoOoTrai, iir ' AOavaiav. 

3. ' AnoXXaiyiarai, ' ImroOoiTai, k-rr 'AQavaiav, Kpapimrai. 

4. ImroQoiTai, kir 'AOavaiav, KpapiMrai, ' AiroWcovLaTaL. 

This rule holds good when applied to columns b 



and c, if we suppose the tribe kn 'AOavaiav to have 
headed the list in b. The second year in this 
column when Damostratos was priest begins with 
the Krariotae and ends with the krr' 'AOavaiav. Be- 
tween this year and that of Sokrates, which heads 
col. c, Foucart supposes a whole year to be wanting 
in which the Apolloniatae were the first tribe. In 
the year of Philodamos, col. c, line 30, kn 'AOavaiav 
returns to the first place, but only two tribes are 
entered ; it is therefore to be presumed that no 
citizen or metoik of the other two tribes gained a 
prize in the contest. At the date of this inscrip- 
tion the metoiks seem to have been distributed 
among the four tribes and allowed to contend 
in the Olympic games of Tegea. At Athens 
the metoiks were excluded from the tribes and 
demes, as was probably the case in most Greek 
cities. 

A fragment of a similar list found at Paleo- 
Episkopi is published by Milchhofer in the Mit- 
theilungen d. deutsch. Inst, in Athen, iii, p. 142. 
Compare the fragment, Foucart -Lebas, Inscriptions 
Grecques, &c. Pt. II, § 6, No. 338 c. 



CLVII. 

On an oblong bronze plate found at Olympia, whence it was brought by Sir William Gell in 1813. Length, 7y in. ; width, 4 in. 
Bequeathed by Mr. R. P. Knight. C.I. 11; Rose, Inscript. Graecae, p. 29, and p. 354; Franz, Elem. Epigraph. Graecae, 
p. 63, No. 24, and p. 378; Ahrens, De Dialect, ^ol. p. 225, fol. Cauer, p. 135, No. 115. 

For the uncials, see Plate /, fig. 3. 

'A Fparpa Toip FaXeioLS Kai tois 'Hp^Faoiois' (Tvvfj.a\ia k ea kKarbv Fkrea- | apx*" ^^ '^'^ ■''°'" "' ^* ''"' ^^oi, aire 
Finos aire Fldpyov, avviav k dXdXots rd t dX Kai na\p TroXe/xco' ai Se fia cruveav, rdXavrov k \dpyvpco dworivoiav 
t£ Al 'OXvvirio) Tot KalSaXrjfjLevoL XaTpelm/ievov ai Se Tip to, y\pd(p€a rat KaSaXioiTO^ aire Ftrai atre T^iXecrrd 
aire Sdfios, ^A'T kmdpcp k kve)(^oiTO rZ 'vravr' kypafikvca. 



This inscription is similar in form to three re- 
cently found at Olympia (Archaol. Zeitung, 1877, 
p. 197, pi. xvi ; 1880, p. 66, No. 362 ; and ibid. p. 117, 
No. 363). All these documents are called Fpdrpai. 
In all three occur the rhotakismos, the digamma, and 
certain other peculiarities of dialect ; they are en- 
graved on oblong bronze plates, the perforations in 
which shew that such plates were attached by nails 
to the walls of a temple, probably that of Zeus. The 
inscriptions (Archaol. Zeitung, 1877, pp. 48, 49, pi. iv, 
fig. 2; ibid. 1879, pp. 47, 48, Nos. 223, 224, p. 160, 
No. 308), all of which are on bronze plates, are pro- 
bably fragments of rhetrae. In line i we find both 
roip and Toh, and line 7, np for rty. So in the Olym- 
pian rhetra already referred to, Archaol. Zeitung, 
1877, p. 197, we have, line i, rolp, but line 6, rty. This 
rhotakismos prevailed much more generally in Elis 
at a later period. (See the Olympian decree of 
proxenia published by Kirchhoff, Archaol. Zeit., 1876, 
pp. 183 sqq.) We find instances of it in the Doric 



of Lakonia in late times. (See Cauer, p. 6 ; Ahrens, 
de Dial. Dor., pp. 71 sqq.) Bockh and Franz hold 
that in accordance with the general usage in the 
.^olic dialect none of the words beginning with a 
vowel in this inscription have the aspirate. This 
rule, though disputed by Ahrens (De Dialect. ^Eol. 
p. 226 and p. 280), is adopted by Kirchhoff. 

The purport of our inscription is a treaty of 
alliance, avvna-^ia, for a hundred years between the 
Eleans and the people of Heraea in Arkadia. 

Line i. « Fpdrpa. Compare Fpfj^is in Alcaeus. 
(Ahrens, De Dial, ^ol., p. 30 and p. 35.) 

pTJrpa, according to Hesychios s.v., originally meant 
'treaty' or 'convention,' but was afterwards used 
in the sense of a law, i.e. something agreed on by 
a community. Hence the laws of Lykurgos were 
called pfjTpai. See the passages quoted by Bockh. 
Here and in the Olympian rhetrae already referred 
to the article d prefixed to Fpdrpa is to be taken as 
the equivalent of the later "ASe a. 



ELIS. 



'5 



FaXfioii. Ahrens read this FaXrjtois. 

'HpFaoiois. Bockh considers this an ^oHc form 
for ' HpaetoLs. Hermann preferred 'HpFawois, in which 
he is followed by Ahrens, who compares TeXSot from 
HtXa. 

Line 2. aw/iaxta k ea. Here the optative «« for 
(IT] preceded by the enclitic Ka has the force of an 
imperative. 

Line 3. a/>x<" ^^ 'f* ''<''• Bockh considers rot here 
as the equivalent of toSi; so infra, line 8, to. ypd^ia 
rat for raSi; so we find rovrot for tovto. The sentence 
written in a fuller form would be apx^' ^^ '^"^ (™ XP^"'^ 
ray avfifiaxias to Ftros) rot. Compare the Orchomenian 
convention. No. clviii, posf, line 40, apx' '''^ XP^*'® ° 
iviavTos 6 fiiTo. Qvvapxov, and Thucyd. iv, 118, dp^fiv 
T'qvSe Ttjy ^nepay, TtrpaSa (vl SeKa, and ibid, v, 19. 

al Se Ti Sioi, aire Finos aire Fdpyov, (rvviav k dXdXois, 
rd T dX Koi irdp noXi/j.a>. ' If there be any need of 
word or deed, let them combine together in all other 
matters and about war.' Here by an unusual apo- 
kope we have dX for dXXa. 

irdp for nipi, as in the Olympian inscriptions, 
Archaol. Zeitung, 1879, p. 48, No. 224, and p. 158, 
No. 306, and elsewhere in .^olic inscriptions ; com- 
pare rav ' AOdvav rdv nep 'HSaXicav in a Cyprian in- 
scription, Schrader in G. Curtius, Studien, x, p. 269. 

avviav for cruviLiv, so below, diroTivoiav for dtro- 

TlVOLiV. 

The formula ai Si n Sioi may be compared with 
the clause in the treaty, Thucyd. v. 79, at Se noi 
a-Tpands Seji Kotvas. 

Line 5. at Sk fid avviav, rdXavTov k dpyvpa drroTivoiai' 
TM Al 'OXvvTTim Tol KaSaXTJ/ifvot Xarpel'di/ieyoi/, 'and if they 
fail (so) to combine, those who violate the treaty 
must pay (in atonement) a talent of silver to be 
dedicated to the Olympian Zeus.' Here Bockh 
reads t£ KaSaXr^jxiixo, ' to the injured Zeus,' in which 
he is followed by Franz. But, as KaSaXiono occurs 
immediately afterwards (line 8) in a deponent sense, 
it seems very improbable that it should be used as 
a passive here, the more so as 57jAeo//at, according to 
the Lexicons, is always employed as a deponent ex- 
cept in the perfect. The last line of the Olympian 
inscription (Archaol. Zeit. 1879, p. 160, No. 308) may 
be part of a similar clause. 

KaSaXrinevos here stands for KaTaSaXrj/ievos (compare 
Karrd for Kard rd and other examples of this syncope, 
Ahrens, De Dialect, .^^ol. p. 150), and is the present 
participle. For other instances of riyavos as the 
termination of this participle, see Merzdorf, Sprach- 
wortl. Abhandl. pp. 32, sq. ; Schrader, Quaestiones 
Dialectologicae in G. Curtius, Studien, x, p. 269. 

The form Ai for Au occurs in other Olympian 
inscriptions, see Archaol. Zeit. 1876, p. 227, and 
ibid. 1877, p. 49. We find it also both in Doric 
and Ionic, see Bullet, d. Corresp. Helldnique, iii, 
p. 132. 

It seems probable, as Bockh supposes, that the 
talent of silver here named was of uncoined metal. 
In the fragment of an Olympian rhetra (Archaol. 
Zeit. 1877, p. 49, No. 56), the fine is in drachms. 
In the rhetra (Archaol. Zeit. 1880, p. 66, No. 362), 
the fine is ten minae. 



XaTp€icoiJ.evoy. This can only mean 'consecrated to 
the service of the God,' and such an interpretation 
is borne out by the general sense of worship con- 
tained in the words Xarpfva, Xdrpev/ia. Bockh and 
Franz write XaTpnojuvov, regarding it as an .^^olic 
form of XaTpivofxevov. Ahrens, p. 229, prefers to write 
XaTpriidtfiivov here, and on the same principle FaXrjtois 
(line i) rather than FaXdois. On a bronze plate 
recently found at Olympia we have the remains of 

a similar form ending toJ] Zl 'OXvvnim Xarp See 

Archaol. Zeit. 1879, p. 160, No. 308, and ibid. 1880, 
p. 69. 

Lines 7, 8. ai Si np rd ypdtftea Tat KaSaXioiTO, atre 
FiTas, aiTe TiXecrrd, aire Sd/xos, KA'T kindpco k ivixoiTo 
Tf 'vTavr' iypa/j-iva. 'But, if any, whether private 
citizen, magistrate or deme, injure these letters, let 
him be bound in the penalty here enjoined.' Bockh 
reads here kvTi=k<TTi, connecting it with the pre- 
ceding clause, because he objects to such a crasis 
as iv T inidpo) for iv tZ inidpco. Ahrens reads iv 
TTJ 'indp<o for iv TO. iwidpai and t£ 'vTavr for t5 ivTavQa, 
not noticing the change of gender in the second crasis. 
Another alternative is to consider r' as the enclitic re, 
though such a conjunction seems superfluous here. 
imapov may, as Bockh conjectures, be an yEolic form 
of i<pifpos, but this word rests only on the authority 
of a passage in Pollux, vi, 76, where it occurs in a list 
of names of different sorts of bread. In the MSS. 
of Pollux this word is written i(pifpis. 

For the use of ivixoLTo here compare the formula 
ai ^[e] Tis Tov aiTiaOivra {iKaicov ipdcTKOi, iv Tai (iKafivaiai 
K ei'«xo['7']o, ai Fei^cbs ifidaKoi in a recently discovered 
Olympian rhetra (Archaol. Zeit. 1880, p. 67, No. 362). 
See in the fragment of another rhetra (ibid. 1879, 
p. 49, No. 224, lines 19. 20) the remains of a similar 
formula, ai Si Tii] to ypdcpos tc^i KaSSaXioiro"^ . . . ivixoLTo 
To^i. Compare also the phrase iv rfj 'ndprj ix^a-Oai. 
K.T.X. in the Teian Diroe. C. I. 3044. 

Ta ypd(f>€a Tat. The word ypd(f)0i occurs in two 
fragments of inscriptions recently found at Olympia 
(Archaol. Zeit. 1879, pp. 47, 48, Nos. 223, 224). 
Tat, as has already been noticed, is a local form 
for TaSi. 

eTTji. The ancient word for a fellow-townsman. 
See He.sych. s. v. hat. Here, and ./Eschyl. Suppl., 
line 250, and also in the treaty between the Argives 
and Lakedaemonians (Thucyd. v, 79), it means ' a 
private citizen.' 

TeXecTTd, for reXeo-rij?, ' a magistrate.' Compare 
tmroTa, vecpeXrjyepiTa, in Homer, vavra, in a Doric 
inscription, C. I. ig^o F, p. 988, may be another 
instance, but this is doubtful. See Schrader, Quaes- 
tiones Dialectologicae in G. Curtius, Studien, x, 
p. 268; Brugman, ibid, ix, p. 259; and Hinrichs, 
De Homer. Eloc. Vestig. .(Col. p. 94. In the Olym- 
pian rhetra (Archaol. Zeit. 1880, p. 66, No. 362) we 
find ip fiiyicTTov TsXoj txoi. In Thucyd. v, 47, the 
magistrates of Elis are designated as oi Ta riXt} 
eXovTes. 

Sdfjios. This doubtless refers to the townships into 
which both Olympia and Heraea were anciently 
divided. 

In the Olympian rhetra already referred to 



i6 



ELIS. 



(Archaol. Zeit. 1877, p. 197) the last words, ai 
fii^S\dnoi SoKfoi, are interpreted by Kirchhoff «' fifra 
Sd/xoi SoKfoi, ' if it shall be decreed in an assembly of 
the community.' 

eypafifvM for yeypa/j./iii/ai. Bockh compares eyvwKws, 
eyXvfj./ji€vos, eKTtja-Oai. See also r^ypanfiivav in the 
Hierapytna inscription, Cauer, p. 53, No. 45, 
line 4. 

The Herseans appear to have remained a com- 
munity of nine villages up to the time of the battle 
of Leuktra, when the city of Hersea was founded by 
Kleombrotos, king of Sparta. As early as Olymp. 
65, they could boast of the honour of an Olympic 
victory gained by Damaratos ; Pausan. v, 8, § 3 ; vi, 
10, $ 2. 

The date of our inscription is placed by Kirchhoff 
(Studien, 3rd ed. p. 152) about the 70th Olympiad 
(b. c. 499-496), a date accepted by Frankel in 
Archaol. Zeit. 1877, p. 49, for this and another in- 
scribed bronze tablet recently found at Olympia. 
Bockh and Franz assigned our inscription to the 
period between Olymp. 40 and 60, B.C. 620-540, 



when the power of Elis having increased, the 
Herajans may have thought it politic to court their 
alliance. See also Clemm, Kritische Beitrage, in G. 
Curtius, Studien, ix, p. 441, and Bergk, Griech. Liter. 
Geschichte, i, p. 60, note 28. 

New light has been thrown on the question of 
the date of this and the other Olympian rhetrse 
by one recently discovered, which is published 
by Kirchhoff, Archaol. Zeit. 1880, No. 362. He 
argues, ibid. p. 68, that in this rhetra the Helleno- 
dikes is referred to as if he were alone in his office, 
not one of a board. If this inference is correct, it 
would follow that the rhetra in question could not 
be later than Olymp. 50, B.C. 580, after which date, 
according, to Pausanias, the number of Hellenodikae 
was increased first to two and then to nine. 

Sonie of the letters in our rhetra seem less archaic 
in form than the corresponding letters in the rhetra 
which mentions the Hellenodikes, and it may there- 
fore be a little later in date, but hardly as late as the 
70th Olympiad, to which Kirchhoff assigns it, if we 
are to accept his date for the other rhetra. 



CHAPTER II. 

INSCRIPTIONS FROM BCEOTIA, THESSALY, CORCYRA, 

MACEDONIA. 

CLVIII. 

On a stelfe of white marble, broken at the foot. Height, 3 ft. ; breadth, i ft. i J in. From the Elgin Collection. C. I. 1 569 ; 
Franz, Elem. Epigr. Gr. p. 192, No. 74; Cauer, Delectus, p. 129, No. 107. Orchomenos. 

JYNAPXnAPXONTOSMEINOZO 

AOYOIOArXIAPOZEYMEIAnTAMI 

AZEYBnAYAPXEAAMn<t>nKEIIXPE 

OZAPEAnKAAPOTAZZOYrrPA*!)" 
S PEAATnNnOAEMAPXnNKHTHN 

KATOPTAnNANEAOMENOZTAZ 

ZOYrrPA<l>nZTAZKIMENAZnAPEY 

<t)PONAKHcDIAIANKHPAIIKAEIN 

KHTIMOMEIAON<l>nKEIAZKHAAMO 
10 TEAEINAYZIAAMnKHAinNYZION 

KActXZOAHPnXHPriNEIAKATTOtA 

<J>IZMATflAAMn MftrET?">lll 

GYNAPXnAPXONTOZMEINOZAAA. 

KOMENIfiFAPNnNPOAYKAEIOZ 
15 TAMIAZAPEAHKEEYBaAYAPXE 

AAMfKDnKEIIAPOTAZZOYrrPA 

<l)nTOKATAAYPONKATTOtA<J)IZMA 

TfiAAMnANEAOMENOZTAZZOYr 

rPA0nZTAZKIMENAZPAPZn<l>l 
30 AONKHEY<t)PONA0nKEIAZKHPAP 

AinNYZIONKA<J>IZOAnPnXHPnNE( 

AKHAYZIAAMONAAMOTEAIOZPE 

AATHNPOAEMAPXnNKHTriNKATO 

PTAONf rf€ HE (-E TE >>IIIOH 
as \PXONTOZENEPXOMENYOYNAPXflME' 

NOZAAAAKOMENinENAEFEAATIHME 

NOITAOAPXEAAnMEINOZPPATnOMO 

AOTAEYBfiAYFEAATIHYKHTHPOAlEP 

XOMENinNEPIAEIKEKOMIZTHEYBH 
30 AOZPAPTAZPOAIOZTOAANEIONAPAN 

KATTAZOMOAOriAZTAZTEOEIZAZOY 

NAPXnAPXONTOZMEINOZOEIAOYOin 

KHOYTO<DEIAETHAYTYETIOYGENPAPTAh 

POAINAAAAPEXIPANTAPEPIPANTOZ 
35 KHAPOAEAOANOITHPOAITYEXONTEZ 

TAZOMOAOriAZEIMENPOTIAEAOME 

NONXPONONEYBriAYEPINOMIAZFETIA 

PETTAPABOYEZZIZ'^YNIPPYZAIAKA 
F 



i8 



BOEOTIA — ORCHOMENOS. 



TIHZFIKATIPP0BA1 YZZOYNHTYSXEI 
40 AlHZAPXITfiXPONnOENIAYTOSOMETA 

OYNAPXONAPXONTAEPXOMENIYZAP. 
^PA<J)EZOHAEEYBnAONKATENIAVTO^ 
EKAZTONPAPTONTAMIANKHTONNOMf 
NANTATEKAYMATATnNPPOBATnNKh 
45 TANHrnNKHTANBOYnNKHTANIPPHNK. 

KATINAASAMAiriNOIKHTOPAEIOOZME. 
AP0rPA<t)EZOnAEPAI0NATnNrErPAM 
•fNnNENTHZOYrXnPEIZIHAEKATIS 

"HTOENNOMIONEYBriAONOOEIAE 

50 UZTnNEPXOMENiriNAPrOYPin 

, ■'ETTAPAKONTAEYBIiAYKAOEK/ 
.NIAYTONK. TOKON<t)EPETnAPAIIi 
.TAZMNAZEKAZTAZKATAMEINA 
,rONKHEMPPAKTOZiZTn~^P. . . 
65 TOMFpv Mrisi . . . '^ 



10 



I. 

Qwdpyci dpyovTos, fiuvos ©[et- 
XovOtm^ Ay)(iapo^ EvfieiXm ra/ii- 
as Eii^diXv ' A p)(^eSdfj.(o (PcoKeTi xpe- 
os dirkSccKO. dno rds aovyypdcpco 
wfSd. tS>v TToKep-dpycov Krj rSiv 
KaroTTTdatv, dueXofievos ray 
aovyypd<f)cos rds Kifievas trap ES- 
<f>pova KT] 'PtSiai/ KTj riacnKXilv 
KTj TifiofifiXop 'PcoKetas Kfj Aajio- 
TiXuv AvaiSdpco Krj Aiiavvcnov 
Ka<f)i(ToSd>p(o Xrjpcoveia Karrb ^Ird- 
<j)i(Tna tS) Sdpm Mf t PE 1T> 1 1 1 



II. 

6vi>dpxa> dpxovTos, fieivos 'AXoJ^X- 
KOfiivioD, Fapvcbv rioXvKXiios 

15 ra/jLias dniScDKe Ev^diXv 'Ap^e- 

Sdfjuo <t>a)Keu (ZTTo rds crovyypd- 
(p(0 TO KaraXviTov Karro yfrdcpKr/jia 
tS) SdfX(Oj di'iXo/j.ei'os ray aovy- 
ypd(f)(os ray Kifieyas nap ZScpi- 

30 Xoy KTj Ev<ppopa 'PcoKeias k^j irdp 

Ai(ovv(Tiov KacpiaoSwpto Xrjpcovfi- 
a KT] AvcriSafiov Aa/iorfXios wf- 
Sa T&v TroX^jjidpycav ktj twv Karo- 
nrdwi' ,pri-EhEHErE>>IIIOH 



III. 

35 "ApxovTOS kv ' Epyop-ivv Qwdp^co, pei- 

voi ' AXaXKop-ivico, kv Sk FeXariT] Me- 
vocrao ' Ap^^Xdca, peivos Trpdro), 6/j.o- 
Xoyli^a Ev^diXv FeXaTirjU ktj r^ iroXi Ep- 
yofMivicov kniSel KeKo/xiaTt] Eii^co- 

30 Aoy nap ray noXioi to 8dv€L0v dnav 

KaTThs dfioXoyias ray TeOetaas Ov- 
vdpxoi) dpyovTOS, fieiubs QnXovOiw, 
KTi ovt' ocfxtXiTT} avTV fTi ov6\v ndp Tav 
noXiv, aXX' dnixi ndvTa ntpl navTos 

36 K^i dnoSfSoauOi rfj noXi tv e\ovTes 

Tcfcy 6/JioXoyias, fTjxev noTtSeSop-k- 
vov xpo^o" Ev^doXv knivopia^ Fkria 
nfTTapa ^owcrai (tovv innvs SiaKa- 
TiJ]S FiKaTi npo^drvs aoiiy rjyvs j(*'" 



BOEOTIA — ORCHOMENOS. 



19 



40 XiTjs' a.p\i. tS) y^p6v(a 6 kviavrhs 6 fiiTo. 

Qvvap-)(ov dpyovra ' Ep^ofifvivs' aTifo- 
ypd(f>«r6r] Si Ev^wXov Kar' kviavTov 
(KacTTOP nap TOf TajjLiav kt) roy vofim. 
vav TO. T€ Kavfiara t&p Trpo^drmv /c^ 

45 rav ^ymv Kfj rdv ^ovwv Kfj rav imrmv kT^ 

Aca TLva daafia ia>v6i k^ to ir\(i6os, //€[< 
anoypa<p€(Tda> Se irXiova tSiv yiypajx- 
jiivcov kv rrj aovyympdai. t) Si Kd Tis 
TT/oarJrj; rb kwofiiov Ev^a>\ov, 6(p(iX(- 

50 TO) d TToJXtf rav 'Ep^op-fvicov dpyovpico 

ftydf^ TTfTTapdKOVTa Eii^wXv KaO' fxa- 

(TTOV f^VlaVTOV, *c[^] TOKOV <j>(piT<ti Spd I I I 

/caret] ray /^cay fKdaras Kara fiitva 
(Kad^ov Kfj (jXTrpaKTOi fo-rw Ev0\a>Xv 
55 & TToAty] Tcoj/ ' E pylo'l/xfi^iaif 



This inscription records two payments by the Ta/xtat 
of the city of Orchomenos to Euboulos of Elateia on 
account of a loan made by him to the city. By the 
second of these payments the entire debt due to 
Euboulos was discharged. After record of these 
payments the inscription proceeds as follows : that, 
whereas the entire loan is repaid according to the 
6/ioXoyiai given in the archonship of Thunarchos, the 
city makes a covenant with Euboulos to this effect ; 
a right of pasturage for 220 oxen and horses, and 
for 1000 sheep and goats, is granted to him for four 
additional years, to be reckoned from the year fol- 
lowing the archonship of Thunarchos ; Euboulos is 
to furnish every year to the ra/iCas and the vofiSyrjs 
a register of the brands of the sheep, the goats, the 
oxen and the horses, also a list of any that are with- 
out brands, together with the total number, and he 
is not to enter a larger number than is allowed in 
the agreement. If any one exacts a pasture due 
from Euboulos, the city shall owe him yearly forty 
minae of silver, and shall pay monthly interest thereon 
at the rate of three drachmae per mina, and the city 
shall be bound to Euboulos (for this amount). 

Bockh thinks that in the original contract for the 
loan the right of pasturage was conceded to Euboulos 
in lieu of a portion of the interest on the capital lent, 
which explains why the two payments recorded are 
on account of capital only, and there is no mention 
of any payment of interest. Afterwards, the loan 
was paid off earlier than the date fixed in the original 
bond, and a fresh agreement was entered into with 
Euboulos by which the right of pasturage, which he 
had hitherto enjoyed in lieu of interest, was granted 
to him for an additional term of four years, doubtless 
in consideration of some concession on his part in 
respect of the money owing to him by the city. 
Probably he remitted some arrear of interest. All 
this must have been arranged in the agreement 
which took place in the month Theilouthios, Kurras 
o/xoXoyiai rdy TeOeiaas Qvvdpyat dpyovTO^. k.t.X. If 
Euboulos remitted a portion of the money due to 
him, this would account for the stringent clause by 
which the Orchomenians are bound to indemnify 
him for any claims of pasture dues in the future. 

According to Bockh the date of this inscription 
must be before b.c. 200, when the Koivri came into 



general use in Boeotian documents. Again, the 
convention must have been made when Orchomenos 
and Elateia were free cities. Now Orchomenos was 
destroyed by the Thebans not later than b. c. 364; was 
occupied for a short time by the Phocians B.C. 353 ; 
and rebuilt by Philip of Macedon after the batde of 
Cha^roneia B.C. 338. The destruction of Thebes by 
Alexander, b.c. 335, secured the independence of 
Orchomenos (see K. O. Muller, Orchomenos, p. 415). 
Elateia lost its freedom b.c. 346, and did not recover 
it till a little before the battle of Chaeroneia, perhaps 
about B.C. 341. Bockh inclines to the belief that 
our inscription may be as early a:s the Pelopon- 
nesian War, in which opinion he is confirmed by 
L. Ross, Hellenika, i, i, p. xviii, note 28, and by Keil, 
Sylloge, p. 33. Ahrens (De Dialect. JEoV, p. 164) 
and Kirchhoff (Studien, 3rd ed. p. 1 33) think that it 
must be subsequent to Olymp. 1 1 1 (b.c. 336-33), and 
Foucart (Bullet, de Corn Hellen. iv, p. 12) thinks 
that it is probably of the same date as another 
Orchomenian inscription similar in subject which he 
places between b.c 220 and 192 ; see also Beermann 
in Curtius, Studien, ix, p. 7. 

In the dialect the following points may be 
noted : — 

Vowels, e before a vowel becomes <, as Fkna, 
line 37 ; ia>v6L for ecao-t, line 46 ; Aa/xoreXios, line 22. 

€t for T) a fieiyos for /irifSs, line i ; Ev/xeiXco, line 2 ; 
Paa-iKXfii/, line 8; Tt/iofifiXov^ AafiOTiXfiy, lines 9, 10; 
kntSfi, line 29; /xei (or lirj, line 46 ; aovyxcapua-i, line 48. 

In <t>(oK€u, line 3 ; Xrjpwvua, lines 11, 21 ; floXvKXtio?, 
line 14; <f>coKeia9, line 20; the «« represents the rj of the 
more ancient Boeotian dialect. See Bockh, i, p. 721 ; 
Ahrens, De Dial. JEol. p. 202. 

( for 0, as' Epxofifvos for' Opxo/J.ey6s, lines 25,41,50, 55. 

ov for V in <Tovyypd<p(o, lines 4, 16: <row, line 39; 
dpyovptw, line 50; but Amvva-iov, AvaiSd/xca, line lO, 
are exceptions. 

r) for ai in ktj for Kai passim ; Xrjpwveia, lines 11, 21 ; 
ijycoy for aly&y, line 45 ; ij for at, lines 45, 48 ; rd be- 
comes Ttj ; so FiXaTirj for 'EXarfia, line 26 ; SiaKariTj^, 
XdXirji, lines 38, 39, for SiaKoatai^, x'^'a'r ; KfKOfiia-Tr), 
line 29 ; ocfyfiXfTTj^ line 33 ; diroypd^i<r6rj^ line 42 ; FiXa- 
Tirjii for ' EXaTdaicp, line 28. 

t for et in Kifieyas, line 7; <f>iSias, line 8;"7r\jWa, line 
47 ; *PX'. line 40 ; aw«X', line 34 ; kmSd, line 29 ; 



20 



BOEOTIA — ORCHOMENOS. 



'AXaXKo/Mefidi, line 26; but Sdveiov^ line 30; TiOiiaw, 
line 31 ; 6<l>(i\fT-q^ line 33. 

V for o£ in Qvvdp-)(a> for 6owdp)(ov, line l ; KaraXvirov, 
line 17 ; Ti/ for rot' line 35 ; ?7r7ri;y, line 38 ; rrpo^drvs, 
^yvs, line 39 ; 'Ep^o/Kyivs, line 41 ; v for o) in Ev^d>\v, 
line 51 ; avrO for avTm, line 33. 

Contractions, ra*/ for rdcoy, line 45 ; kIj for *at a/, 
line 45. 

Consonants, tt for r in Trerrapa, line 38 ; mTTapd- 
KovTa, line 51. 

^ for T where in Doric it follows v, thus, «B«'^t, line 
46, for Doric ewi'rt ; dnoSeSoarOi, line 35, for Doric 
dvoSfSoavTi ; so ex<ov6i, C. I. 1 568, line 6. See Beer- 
mann, in G. Curtius, Studien, ix, p. 62. 

<r changes into t in FiKari, SiaKarirjs, line 39. 

TTfSd for fifrd, in the sense of cum, is used through- 
out, governing a genitive, except line 40, where /Jierd 
occurs in the sense oi post, governing an accusative ; 
troTi instead of Trpoy is used throughout ; kfi for e/y in 
ejiTTpaKTos for ita-trpaKTo^, line 54. See Beermann, De 
Dialect. Boeot, in Curtius, Studien, ix, p. 75. 

Apocope occurs in acotto, lines 11, 17 ; /carray, line 
31 ; and in nap for irapd, lines 19, 20, 33. 

The accusative singular in the third declension 
terminates in v, as HaaiKXeLv, line 8; AafioriXeiv, line 10. 

The digamma occurs in Fapi>6v, line 14; FiXarirj, 
FeXaTirjv, lines 26, 28 ; Fina, line 37 ; Fikuti, line 39. 

Line i. Qwapyos. In the Koiv-q this name is written 
Qoivapyoi. 

QeiXovdico. This was the fifth month in the Boeotian 
year, corresponding with the Attic Thargelion. 
Ahrens (De Grsec. Ling. Dial, i, p. 173, n. 6), deriving 
this name from QeeXovdios, ' the coming of a God,' 
thinks it records some divine advent. ' AXaXKonivios, 
the month named in the record of the second payment 
was, according to Bockh, the eleventh month in the 
year. Hence he argues that payments were made 
every six months, and we may assume that these 
terms were appointed in the agreement. In the 
eleventh month another treasurer, Farnon, is named. 
We may suppose therefore either that the board of 
treasurers took their duties in turn, month and 
month, or six months at a time, or that the work 
was divided among them, to which latter supposition 
Bockh inclines. It should be noted, however, that 
K. F. Hermann, Monatskunde, p. 107, and p. 126, 
prefers to make/^XaXfo/imoy the 12th month. 

Line 2. 'Ayyiapos, The second letter of this name 
is read by Bockh and others as P, but on the marble 
it is certainly r. 

Line 5. The TroXefiapxoi are here associated with 
the Kar&iTTai on account of their authority in Boeotian 
states. See C. I. i, p. 730, and Bullet, de Corresp. 
Hellenique, iii, p. 464, lines 53, 67. The KaroiTTai who 
are mentioned in another Boeotian inscription (C. I. 
1570 fl) seem to have had functions of control and 
audit analogous to those of the Athenian Logistse 
and Euthyni ; compare the enia-KOTroi in a Rhodian 
inscription, Ross, Inscript. Ined. iii, No. 275, and 
No. 276; and the e^fzaa-Tai in two inscriptions from 
Erythrse in Ionia ; Curtius, Anecdot. Delph. Nos. 
68, 69, p. 85. The KaTorrrtKoi vS/xoi is referred to in 
an inscription from Lebadea (Adrjvaiov, iv, p. 369). 



Line 6. dveXoiiEvoi ras crovyypdffxos. These must 
have been copies of the original bond, described 
ante, line 4, as ray aovyypdcpco, which for greater 
security were deposited with certain trustworthy 
persons, probably bankers. See Bockh, Staatshaush. 
2nd ed. i, p. 177. dvaipua-dai Tr)v a-vyypa<f>iju means to 
take up or cancel the bond on discharge of the debt. 
Bockh thinks that after each instalment of payment 
new bonds were issued. Hence the holders of these 
bonds in II are not all the same as in I. 

Line 12. Bockh reads M>n V HE pi > ill, in which 
Franz (Elem. Ep. p. 348) follows him, but on the 
marble the sigla are Mf yrEF>lll. In line 24 
Bockh reads >n I>E hE HE HE > > 1 1 1 H, the true read- 
ing being -F" n-E l-E HE FE > > 1 1 1 O H. 

Line 15. dni8(oK€ Ev^rnXv. The v e^eXx. is here 
omitted. 

Line 27. Meuoirao, not Mervrao, because a Pho- 
cian not a Boeotian is here named. The Phocian 
month is npSros, because the Phocians spoke of 
their months as ist, 2nd, &c., without assigning 
them names ; see C. I. i, p. 734, where reasons are 
given why the first Phocian month did not usually 
correspond, as might be inferred from this passage, 
with Alalkomenios, Bockh's i ith Boeotian, but rather 
with the loth Boeotian, if we allow that the two 
states did not adopt the same system of intercal- 
ation. The rule which Bockh lays down is that in 
a year when one Greek state has already inter- 
calated a month and the other has not yet done 
so, the month of the non-intercalating state cor- 
responds not with the month of the other state, 
with which it usually agrees, but with the preceding 
month. Thus, in the case before us, the Phocians 
having already intercalated, their first month cor- 
responded with the nth Boeotian, Alalkomenios, 
whereas in ordinary years it would have corre- 
sponded with the loth Boeotian. On the other hand, 
Hermann, Monatskunde, p. 126, assuming 'AXuXko- 
jjLivLos to be the 12th Boeotian month, supposes that 
the first Phocian month was reckoned from the 
winter solstice, and that the Boeotians having already 
intercalated, the first Phocian month would corre- 
spond, not with the ist Boeotian month, as in other 
years, but with the 1 2th which immediately preceded 
it. (See Foucart in Bullet, de Corn Hellen. iv, p. 16.) 

Line 28. 6/i.oXoya on the marble ; the penultimate 
letter has been omitted through carelessness of the 
lapidary. 

Line 44 orders the registering of the brands, Kav- 
fiara, and the numbers of the different classes of 
cattle ; compare the inscription, Ross, Inscr. Ined. 
ii. No. 94, p. 7, as restored by Keil, Sylloge, p. 33 : 
K'\aTa6tiv\a.i to kvvofiLOv Totis re/zoJi/Tay 6[7r]6[(r]co»' vifiii 
[rj/caofroy iTpoi\ Si rovs ieponoi^ovs] dirc^ypd^eadai rojvy 
vip-ovras lepa, A:ai5cra[i/ray ra Opep/iara Ka]l vffieiv o[7r]o(ra 
[e/tao-Toy 6poX\o\yd'] vepeiv ocrris S' dv /xfj dpc^Xoyrja-rj'j rjfii- 
pS>v y' Kr\p\KKi TO) TOiiA UpoTTOimv, ocpetXeTco eKarov 5pa[x/iiay 
tg5] Srjpoa-m' <f)aiviiv [Sk t^h [/3oi;Xo/i]€[j']oj' 7r[p]oy Tovi 
<epo7roto[i;y iTrl tw] fipia-ft. On the coins of Thurium 
and other Greek cities bulls and other quadrupeds 
are sometimes marked with a letter or monogram 
on their bodies. These may indicate the brands, 



BOEOTIA— ORCHOMENOS. 



21 



Kaijiara, which disthiguished the herds of different 
owners. 

Line 53. Spa III. Bockh reads here Bpa\^nai 
Sovm'\, not knowing that there are on the marble 
three vertical strokes, which, though faint and rather 
irregular, can only be numerals. The rate of interest 
is unusually high, but in this case would be reckoned 
as the indemnity for breach of contract. 



Correcting Bockh's reading of the sigla, line 12, 
and assuming that HE stands for ■n-etn-qKovTa and "K 
for TpioLKovTa, we have, as the whole amount of the 
first loan, 16,093 instead of 16,163 drachmae, and in 
the second loan, line 24, the amount will be 5773 
drachmae, i^ obols, instead of 5823 drachmae, i^ 
obols. 



CLVIII^. 

On the left hand side of the stone are the following remains of an inscription : — 



A * I Z I n N 

A K P O B A I 

<t> A O S 

\ P I Z T ANAPOZ 
API ZTE AO 

AZfiNAOYZI 
K P AT lOZ 

n ANoinnoz 
. 020TA . 

nOAA 

KPAIIOZOIOAOP 
OZ E N O Z 

ri N o z 



This seems to be the remnant of a list of names 
of those who were enrolled for military service, as 
aKpo^oXia-rai or To^orai. Compare the lists in Keil, 
zur Sylloge, pp. 541-559 ; C. I. 1574, 1575. Foucart 



K'^a<f>i<rt(iDv 
aKpo^oXL^arai 

Api<rTauSpot 
5 AptaTtao 

a^mv Aov<Ti 
Kparioi 

ridvdiiTiroi 

10 TTOW 

Kpa^ios OioScofiov 
coyos 

in Bullet, de Corr. Helldn. iv, p. 87. 

Line 6, we have Aova-i for Ava-i 

This inscription is evidently of a more recent 
period than that on the face of the marble. 



CLIX. 

On a slab of grey marble, with a moulding along the top and bottom ; at the left corner on the top a hole for a dowel. From 
the Elgin Collection. C. I. 1580; Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, ii, p. 152, and p. 630; Keil, Sylloge, p. 56. Height, 
J I in.; breadth, 2 ft. 9^ in. Orchomenos. 

AAEYAZNIKnNOZKA0IZOAriPOZArAAOcl>AiAAOANAPEZZI 
XOPAnONTEZNIKAZANTEZAinNYZOIANEOETANAO 
ANIAOAPXONTOZAYAIONTOZKAEINIAOAIAONTOZKPA 
TONOZ 

AXevai Nikcovo^, Ka<f)ia6Sa>pos Ay\ao(patSao, dySpiorcri 
yopayiovTi^, viKdaavrt^ Aicovvcroi dvederau, Ad- 
aviao dp-)(ovroi, avXtovros KXetviao, aSouTOi Kpd- 

TOlVOS. 



A dedication to Dionysos to commemorate the 
Choragic victory of Aleuas and Kephisodoros. 
This dedication is very similar in form to the 
Orchomenian one published, C. \. 1579, and the 
name of the flute-player, Kleinias, is the same in 
both. Bockh therefore rightly concluded that our 
inscription also came from Orchomenos, and that 
it refers to the Dionysia celebrated there. The 
worship of Dionysos at Orchomenos is noted by Pau- 
sanias, ix, 38, § i. Both dedications were probably 
inscribed on the bases of tripods. Kraton, the singer 
here, is probably the same as the Kraton, son of 
Kleon, a Theban, who obtained the prize as rhapsode 
in the Charitesia at Orchomenos (C. L 1583, 1. 12). 



Line i. Aleuas occurs as archon on another 
Orchomenian inscription, C. \. 1564. 

Line 2. dueOirav. A dual form. See Ahrens, De 
Dialect, .^ol. i, pp. 202, 203 ; Keil, Sylloge, p. 56. 
Compare (rrorja-drav, C. L 25 ; and other dual forms, 
Corpus Inscr. Att. Nos. 374, 375, 376, 396, 401. 
Bockh remarks that the dialect of this dedication 
and of C. 1. 1579 proves them to be earlier than 
Olymp. 145, B.C. 196, about which date we find an 
Orchomenian Agonistic inscription, C. 1. 1584, writ- 
ten in the Koiyri. Leake assigns the Orchomenian 
inscriptions to the third or the latter end of the 
fourth century B.C. 



22 BOEOTIA — OROPOS. 



CLX. 

On a stelfe of white marble, surmounted by a pediment, and engraved on both sides. It has been broken across in two pieces. 
Height, 2 ft. 65 in.; breadth, i ft. 3 in. This marble, found at Calamo near Oropos in Bceotia, was once in the collection of 
Choiseul-GouflBer, whence it passed to that of Lord Elgin. C. I. 1570; Osann, Syll. i, 74; Keil, Syll. Inscript. Boeot. p. 34; 
Lebas, Pt. iii, § i, No. 467. 

a. 

APXONTOZENKOINniBOIfiTnNSTPATriNOEIEPEnZAETOYANKblAPA 

OYEPIKPATOY PIPrHZAPXinPl AOYEinENYPEPIEPnNPPO 

BEBOYAEYMENONAYTniEINAIPPOZTHNBOYAHNKAITONAH 

MONEPEIAHZYMBAINEITINATnNEPITHZTPAPEIHZTOYAM 
6 <t>IAPAOYAPrYPnMATnNAXPEIArErONENAITINAAEEPIZKEY 

HZXPEIANEXEINEINAIAEKAITriNPPOZTOiZTOiXOIZANAKEI 

MENnNPEPTOKOTATINANOMIZMATEEPIZHMONXPYZOYN 

KAIAPrYPOYNKAIETEPAAZHMAAEMPAPAAOZIMOiZEXOY 

ZIN0IIEPAPXAIPEP0NHKENAiAEKAITHN4>IAAHNTHNXPYZHN 
10 THNEPITHZTPAPEIHZHIZPONAOPOEITAIOIEPEYZKAIEINAIAXPEI 

ANAEAOXOAITHIBOYAHIKAITniAHMriinZANKYPriOHITO 

tHcDIZMAEAEZOAITPEIZANAPAZEKPANTnNTnNPOAITnN 

TOiZAEAIPEOEIZINOilEPAPXAIPAPAAOTHZANTOTENOMIZ 

MATOEKPEPTnKOZAPIOMfilKAITriNAPrYPriMATriNOZA 
15 EZTINAXPEIAPYPnZANTEZKAIAPOZYZANTEZTONKATTI 

TEPONriZAYTnZAEKAITAXPYZIATAAZHMAAPAPEIAH<J»A 

ZINKAITHN^^IAAHNTHNXPYZHNTAYTAAEPAPAAOTnZAN 

DIIEPAPXAITHIAPXHIAPEtHZANTEZKAIPOIHZANTEZ 

TniKAAAEIPPOZTOEPIZHMONKAIOYTHZAPOZTHZATO 
ao ZANPAPAAOTnZANAEPANTATAYTAZTAOMniMETA 

POAEMAPXnNKAIKATOPTnNKAIAPOAOnZAZOnZAN 

TAPAPAAOOENTAPPOZKATOPTAZOIAEPAPAAABONTEZ 
OZAMENANAOKHIEPIZKEYHZPPOZAEIZOAIEPIZKEY 
AZATnZANETAETfiNAOIPnNPOIHZATnZANAPrYPn 
as MATATniOEniBOYAEYOMENOIPEPITHZKATAZKEYHZME 

. APOAEMAPXJilNKAIIEPAPXnNKAIZYNHrOPnNTHZPO 

VEnZTAZErAOZEIZPOIOYMENOITHZTEEPrAZIAZKAl 

. HZEPIZKEYHZPAPAKATOPTAZETAOTnAEHAPXH 

. AIEZOYANPAPAAABHIXPYZIOYAZHMOYKAIEPIZH 
30 M0YKATAZKEYAZAITniOEni<t)IAAHNXPYZHN 

KATAAIPOMLNHAOKIMEIONnZAANZYNTEAEZOHlPA 

PAAOTnZANTOIZIEPAPXAIZKAIAPOZTHZATnZANME 

. APOAEMAPXnNKAIKATOPTriNOAEZYAAOrEYZANO' 

. . . -ONOHZAYPONnZNOMIIETAIEZEAETriTOriNO 
36 ANAAflMAKAIAIAOTnTAZAOZEIZTniEPrnNH 

T . . . ZPPO . PHZEIZEANAEMHHIENTniOH 

ZAYPniTOI NAAnMATOZPPOZOETnOTA 

MIAZOPPOAPXnNTuE ONKAIAPOAOnZAZOOnp . . 

KATOPTAZINAAET INYPOMN' 

40 ANAOEMATriNOZAM . . . c'KATAZI 

lEPAPXAZZTHZANTAZEKAZTONTOANAOt 

yAlEIZZTHAHNAIOINHNTOTEONOMATOYANA . tNTOZ 

KAITHNPOAINEZHZANHIKAITHNOAKHNTOYANAOE 

MATOZKAITOYNOMIZMATOZTOPAHOOZANArPAtATn 
46 ZANAEKAITOtHcDIZMATOKYPnOENPEPITOYTfiN 

ElZTHNZTHAHNKAIANAOETnZANOYANAOKHIEN 

KAAAIZTniEINAIKAITOrENOMENONANAAnMAAPO 

AOnZAZOnZANEANAETIMHPOIHZHIHAPXHHAIPE 

OEIZATnNrErPAMMENnNENTOItH<l>IZMATIH0IIE 
50 PAPXAIHOZYAAOrEYZHOTAMIAZENOXOIEZTnZAN 

TfilKATATONTHZOIKONOMIAZNOMninZKATEBAA^O 

TEZTAZPPOZOAOYZTOYOEOY 



BOEOTIA — OROPOS. 23 



b. 

TAAEZYNEKOPHTnNANAOHMATnN 

KATAT0yH<|)l2MA0ErPAyEmPrHZ 

AYZANAPAZKANOYNOAKHHPAAAt-hh 

KnonNIONKPATHZIONOAKHAAAAPHI- 
5 *IAAHNIKAPIZTHZOAKHAAAAl-hf-l- 

KAITnOIAAIONOAKHAHI-H-APOAAnNIOZ 
<l>IAAHNOAKHPI-hhl-APXnKAPYZTIA0IAAHN 
OAKHAAAI-h IPPOZENOZ<l>IAAHNOAKHPAAAAhH 
AEnNAITriAOZOIAAHNOAKHHPAAPH 
10 KA<l>IZOAnPOZ<J)IAAHNOAKHPAAPAPXIAZAKAPNA' 

ZKAOIONOAKHAAAAH ANTI0IAOZZKA«t)IONOAKHAAAAPt-l-H 

VPXEMAXOZ ZKA0IONOAKHAAAAHI-MNAZIKAHZ 
. OPINOIOZTPIPOAIZKONOAKHPHHHAhl-l- 
AYZIKPATHZKAIPPAEATOPAZ TPIPOAIZKON 
15 OAKHHAAAAPI-hl- 

MEAANOZPPOZnPIONOAKHAAPH-l-l-BOIZKOY 

PPOZnPONOAKHPf-l-|-l-<I)IAIAZTITGOZOAKHFI-Hhh 

\PZINOYAIAOI0NOAKHPhKAAAIMAXHZ0<J>IA. . NOAKHT 

.PPnNOZ AIAOIONOAKHI-I-HHEY0POZYNHZT... OZOAKHPl 
ao 4'ATTIOYXEIPOAKHhHI-HArAGOKAHZHAYPOTIAION 

'^AKHAAAAPIZTOKPATEIAAIBANnTIAAOAKHPAAHH 

. AlZOZ Z KA<l>IONOAKHAAAKAlAPrrPIOY 

. OYEKPEPTnKOTOZEKTnNANAOHMATnN 

KAEONOHZHHHMEAANOZHhl-ANTIMAXOYH-H 
»5 HPAKAEIAOYTETPAXMAAPKTHZOYZTETPAXMAII 

AAOTETPAXMONAHMHTPIAZTETPAXMON 

POAnNOZTETPAXMAIIZIMAAHZTETPAXMAP 

EPITEAOYhhhMIOPIAATOYI-l-HAYZIMAXOY 

-ETPAXMAIIPAANIONOZHI-h. ATIOYII I AHMOYZIM 
3<* MIKYOOYhhHEIPHNHZI-hl-PTfilnNOZTETPAXMAPII 

. OAAYPAZTETPAXMAIIIPPOZOAOYI-I-I-APXIOYI-Hh 

. lAOMHAOYHI-l-MEAITHZTETPAXMAII 

)EOMNAZTATETPAXMAIII . ENOKAEOZ 

TETPAXMAPIIIIPAM0IAOYTETPAXMAIIII 
35 BAKXIOZTETPAXMAIIIBinNTETPA . MAIIAAA 

TETPAXMAIII0IAIZTIAOYTETPAXMAIIII 

KAEOIENOYTETPAXMAIIANTANAPIAOYTETPAXMAP 

APIZTOKAEOYZI-I-I-KTHZAPETHZ 

FETPAXMAPAPIZTOKAEOYZI-H-AYZIOY I 

40 PTOAEMAKAPIAHMAPXOYPTO*'- ,k«i 

<1)IA0KAEI . . -"TOAEMAi" ... NOZ Hl- 

\rA'^'^N hf-. API! . . .vPATEIAZTATHPAZAP 

N,^Hi^•l-0IAOKAEIAZI- HAIZTHZI- 

nNAZPAPIZTOYZHhhhKPATHZION 

4« \AEZANAPEIAZHhhhAAAAAEZANAPEIAZP 

AnPIZAAEZANAPEIAZPNIKnNOZXPYZOYZ 

PPOZOAOYXPYZOYZNIKOKAEOYZXPYZOYZ 

ZnTHPIAOYXPYZOYZAPIZTOYZXPYZOIAYO 

KAIANEPirPA4)0IXPYZ0IPMHAIA0Z0B0A0IAA 
50 AA<t)IAAHZXYMAOAKHHAAAAh»-l-h 

a. 

' ApyjiVTO^ kv KoivZ BoicoTcoy ZTpaTcovos, Upecos Sk Tov 'A/jL(piapd\ov ' EiriKparov, HipyT]! 'Ap)(nrniSov untv' 
imip Upa)v npol^ePovXtv/iefov avrw eiuai irphs t^v fiovX^v Kal tov Sfj\/xoi', (TTdSfi avfi^aivfi riva tcov (trt rfjs 

^ Tpani^Tji TOV ' A/i'^(piapdov dpyvpco/xaTcoi' d^pfta yfyovevai, Ttfa Sk €iriaKev\fjs )(p(iav «X*'*'> *?''«' ^^ <«' t^" irphs 
TOis Toiyois dvaKti\fiiv(ov iTiTrTcoKOTa Tivii, pSfita-fjtd re kiridrjuov \pv(rovv 1 Kal dpyvpovp Kal trtpa £<rr]fia, & ift 

lo TrapaSocrtfioii f-^ovlfftv ol Updpxai, nfTTOvqKivai Sf Kal Tfjv <f)id\r)v t^v )(^pv<7rjf I t^jv (tti Trjs Tpairf^rji^ § crnoi/So- 



24 



BOEOTIA — OROPOS. 



TToeTrai 6 Upds Kal ilvai. a.)(^pd\av, BiSoy^Oai rfj fiovXfj Kal t<S Stj/mco^ dis Slv KvpcoOfi to I ■^rj(pLa-fia, iXia-Oai rpus 

dfSpas e/c irdvTcov rS>v Tro\ir5>v, | Tofy 'Se aip(6iT<nv ol updpyai irapaSoTma-av t6 re vofiia-lfia to eKTrtirTcoKos dpidfim, 
15 Kal tS>v dpyvpaiidTwv ocra | kaTLv d^ptla, nvpooa-avTi? Kal diro^vcrai'Tes TOf KaTTiWipov' cDcravTccs Se Kal to, xpvaia 

TO. da-rjfxa & irapuXricf)a\<nv, Kal rfjy <pid\r]v Trjf ^pva-fjy Tavra Se wapaSoTcoa-av I ol Updp^ai Tjj dp-)(j], dTnyirrj- 
20 <ravT€S Kal Troirja-avTes | riS KdWei TTpbs Th knia-qiiov^ Kal ovtcos dirocTT-qcrdTOila-av. irapaSorcocrav Se irdvTa TavTa 

aTadfiZ jiiTa | iro\(^idp-)(a>i> Kal KUTOirTmy, Kal diroXoyia-dcrOaxray | Ta 7rapaSo6ivTa Trpbs KaToiTTas' ol Se vapaXa- 
25 ^ofTes I Sera fjikv dv Soktj ewta-KevTJs npocrSfTcrOat ema-KevlacrdTaaav, ey Sk tS)v XotnSiv TToirjcrdTwaau dpyvpcolfiaTO. 

tS dfS), ^ovXevofLefoi irepl Trji KaTaaKevrjs //€|[r]a TroXejidpxcav Kal l€pap)(a>v Kal crwrjyopcov ttjs TrolXecey, tol^ eySocnif 

TroiovjjLevoL Ttjs T€ epyacTias Kal I [rlfjs iwiaKfvijs irapd KaTOiTTai. eySoTCo Se rj dp^r] I [AclaJ, 6^ off ay vapaXd^rj 
30 y^pvatov darjuov Kal eiriarj^iiov, KaTaaKevdaai rw 6em (ftLdXrjv yj)v<Tfiv, | KaTaXnrop.evri SoKip.elov toy S' dv (rwTeXe<r6fj , 

va^paSoTooaaf toTs lepdpy(ais, Kal dirocrTrjo-dTCoa-ai' /ifjMa troXendpyjav Kal KaTOTTTmv. 6 Se avXXoyevs dvoill^afi 
35 TOf 6r]<Tavpov^ coy vojii^eTai^ e^eXeTco to yiv6\ljj.evoiA dpdX(Ofj.a, Kal SiS6t<o ray Soaeii tw epyoovT] I [Trao-ay ^alifa ra]y 

npo'^p\pri<Teis, edv Se ftfj f) ef tS Brj^xravpco to iUtov tovtov aJraXcu/iaToy, irpocrOeTai 6 t a [lias 6 Trpodp^cof to 
40 ef AAewrloj' Kal dnoXoyLcrdaOod Tr\pos\ i KaTowTas. iva Se ifois dvadeicrlii' VTro/iv\i]naTa ■p toiv] I dyaOefidTcof, ocra 

p^eXX^ei KaTaa-K^evaa-dfji'ai, tovs] I lepdpyas crTrjcravTas eKavTOV to avdO^fia dvaypa^^y^ai eh (tttJXtji' Xidifrji' to re 

6vofia Tov dv<^6\evTos I Kal t^v ttoXlv e^ ijy dv »;, Kal t^c okK^iv tov dvade^/iaTOS Kal tov vopLiajiaTos to irXfjOos' 
45 dvaypaylfaTcoi^aay Sk Kal to yl/rjcpia-ixa to KvpmOkv irepl tovtchv | eh Tr)v a-TtjXrjy^ Kal dvaBeTwaav ov dv Soktj ey 1 

KaXXi<TT(t> elvai Kal to yevofxeyov dydXcofia dwo^XoyLcrda-Ocoaay. edy Se Ti /Mfj voirjcrr] -fj dp-^Tj 17 alpe^Oeicra TOiv 
50 yeypaynieywy ky tS ^jfrjcpiafiaTi fj ol le\pdp-)(ai t] 6 avXXoyeiis ^ 6 Tafias, eyo)(^oi ea-Twaay I T<f KaTot, tov Ttjs oIko- 

vofiiai yS/jup (jsic) coy /caTe/3Xa06|rey ray npoaoSovs tov 6eov. 



TdSe avveKOTrrj tSiv dyaOrj/idTcoy KaTO. to ■^rj(picriJ.a t eypayfre PipyrfS' 

AvcrdySpas Kayovy, oXkt] HPAAAhl-h 

Kcoddoyioy KpaTi^aioy^ dXKrj AAAAPhH 
5 tpidXr] NiKapia-rr]?^ oXkti AAAAI-HHI- 

KXiTQi (pidXtoy, oXkti Ahl-hh 

'AnoXXdiyios ^idX-qy^ oXk^ Phhl-h 

'Ap^oi KapvcTTia ^idXrjy^ oXktj AAAHh 

' lirno^evos <f>idXr]y^ oXkti PAAAAl-h 

Aemy AIt(oXos ^idX-qy^ oXk^j HPAAPh 
10 KacjtiaoSwpos (f)idXr}v^ oXk-t] piAAf 

Ap-)(las AKapvdy (TKdcpioy^ oXktj AAAAh 

'AyTiipiXos <TKd<pLoy, oXkt] AAAAPHI-h 

'Apxefia^os (TKd<pioy, oXkt] AAAAHh 

MvacTLKXris [^Ky>piy6i09 TpmoSiaKoy, oXktj PHHHAHHI- 
15 AvatKpdTT]9 Kal Hpa^ayopas TpiTToStcTKoy^ oXki] HAAAAPHKH 

MeXayos npocrdmioy, oXkti AAPf-HH- 

BotcTKOv ■7Tpo<rd>Tr(^i^oy oXkt] Phl-hH 

0iAiay tltOos, oXkt] fhl-f-h 

Apcriyov alSotoy, oXktj P|- 

KaXXt/j.d)(^r]S ocpi^ioly^ oXKr] P 

"lynrojyos aiSoioy, oXktj HI-hH 

Ev(ppo(Tvyr]i t{it&J69, oXkt) PI 
20 ^aTTiov xeip, oXkt] |-|-|-|- 

AyaOoKXfjs fjSvwoTiSioy, oXk^i AAA 

Apia-TOKpdTeia Xi^ayooriSa, oXktj PAAI-H 

£]Xt^oy (TKd<pioy, oXKfj AAA 
Kal dpyvpiov [rjoi) eKTrewTcoKOTOs eK Twy dyaOrj/xaTcoy 

KXeoyorji hhH 

MeXayos Hl-h 

AyTLjxdyov \-\-h 
25 HpaKXetSov reTpdxfia AP 

Kttjctovs TeTpdxfia 1 1 

AXo TeTpd^fioy 

Ar]pi]Tpiai TeTpdxp-ov 
PoScoyos TeTpdy^lia II 

Zi/idXrji TfTpaxp-a P 

^EniTtXov hhf- 

MiQpiSdTov K-f- 

Avaifidyov TeTpd^na 1 1 

flXavioyos hhh 

. artov 1 1 1 

Arjuovi III 



30 Mlkv$ov hj-j- 

Eiprjvris l-f-H 

riTeotcoyoi TeTpax/xa P 1 1 

Ky>XXvpas TeTpd^jia 1 1 1 

ripocroSov HH- 

'Apxiov f-HH 

4>']iXofj.-qXov l-l-H 

MeXiTrji TeTpd^fxa II 

QeofiydoTa TtTpd^fxa 1 1 1 

E^eyoKXeos TeTpd^p-a P 1 11 1 

flafxcpCXov TeTpd^pa 1 1 1 1 
35 BdKxioi TeTpdxfxa 1 1 1 

Bi<oy TeTpd^x]t^a 1 1 
'ASa Terpdxpa III 

^iXicTTiSov TeTpdxpa 1 1 II 

KXeo^eyov TeTpdxpa 1 1 

AyTaySptSov TeTpdxp-a P 

ApiaTOKXeovs \-\-\- 

KTTja-apeTrjs TeTpdxP-a P 

ApicTTOKXeovi hhk 

Avcrtov riToXe/xaiKd P I 
40 Arjpdpxov riToXe^^pai'lKd I 

0tAo/cXet'[ay] flToXe/jiaiK^d 
yos t-h 

AyaOoy^iKTji] bb 

A pia^To^Kpdreia (TTaTfjpas A P 

.... yiKrji l-h 

^iXoKXeias h 

HSia-TTji h 

. . . d>yas P 

ApiaTovs l-hh-K 
45 KpaTTjo-ioy 'AXe^aySpeias hl-l-h 

"ASa 'AXe^aySpeias P 

Acopli 'AXe^aySpeias P 

NiKcoyo^ Xpvaovs 

npoaoSov x/"^o"ot'y 

NiKOKXeovs XP'^'^'^^^ 

ZcoTTjpiSov xp^'^ovs 

'ApiaTovi xpi/cror Svo 

Kal dyeniypacpoi xpv'oi P 

Mi^XtSos o^oXol A A • 

50 'AX<()idSri9 xi5/^a, oXkti HAAAAhhl-l- 



BOEOTIA— OROPOS. 



25 



This is a decree enacting that a survey be made 
of such of the offerings in the Amphiarai'on as are 
useless or in need of repair ; such offerings as shall be 
condemned are to be melted down and made into new 
vessels for the use of the God. See Demosth. adv. 
Androt. p. 615 ; adv. Timok. p. 755. This was to be 
done by three commissioners chosen from the citizens, 
to whom the kpdpyai are to hand over the objects to 
which the decree relates. This napaSoa-ii is to be 
made under the inspection of the Polemarchs and of 
the KaTonrai, and each article handed over is to be 
weighed. The three commissioners are to have such 
articles repaired as are worth repairing, and are to 
melt down the remainder, converting the metal into 
vessels of silver, argyromata, for the service of the 
God. They are also to furnish out of the gold and 
silver bullion and coin in their hands enough to make 
a gold phiale for the God. Before the anathemata 
are repaired or melted down, a register of them is 
to be made by the Hierarchs, in which the name of 
each donor and the weight of the offering is to be 
entered, and this register is to be engraved on the 
same stele as the decree itself 

The temple of Amphiaraos, to which this decree 
relates, was situated in a ravine on the borders of 
Attika and Boeotia, now called Mavrodhilissi, where 
a number of inscribed blocks and wall stones were 
lying when I visited this spot in 1852. Our decree 
was brought from the neighbouring village of Ka- 
lamo (see Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, ii, 
p. 440; Rangab6, Ant, Hell6n. ii, pp. 252-262, Nos. 
678-687; my Memoir, Trans. Royal Soc. Lit. N. S. 
v, pp. 107-152; and Girard, in Bulletin de Corre- 
spondance Hellenique, iii, pp. 437-440). Amphi- 
araos, who is distinguished in the mythic history 
of Boeotia both as a hero and a soothsayer, was 
worshipped after his death both in Attika and in 
Boeotia. We learn from Strabo and Pausanias that 
the most celebrated of his shrines was that near 
Oropos, where there was an oracle consulted by sick 
persons, who, sleeping in the temple, received in 
dreams a revelation indicating the proper medical 
treatment their case required. When a cure was 
effected the patient threw into a spring near the 
temple gold and silver coins, the fee of the healing 
God. This mode of consultation, called by the 
ancients (yKoifirja-is, or incubatio, was practised in 
many temples of gods and heroes to whom the gift 
of healing was attributed, and through the influence 
of the imagination many cures may have been 
effected by a simple treatment. (See Gauthier, 
Recherches sur I'Exercice de la Medecine dans les 
Temples: Paris, 1844.) The long list of offerings 
appended to our decree shews that the temple 
was largely frequented by sufferers. Livy (xlv, 27) I 
notices the Oropian Amphiarai'on as a pleasant 
spot, abounding in brooks and fountains, and this 
description agrees very well with the character of 
the picturesque site of Mavrodhilissi. 

In the heading of our decree we find the name of 
the eponymous Archon of the Boeotian League, to 
KOLvov tS)v BomTmv, with whom is associated the Hiereus 
of Amphiaraos. It is to be inferred from this that 



at the date of the decree the temple was under the 
control of the League, and this it would seem was 
the case in the middle of the third century, when, 
according to Hermippos, as cited by Diogenes 
Laertios (ii, 142), the philosopher Menedemos, a 
contemporary of Demetrios Poliorketes, was ordered 
to return to Oropos, Soy/ian koivZ tZv BokotZv^ because 
after his stay at the Amphiaraion certain gold cups 
were missing. Bockh maintains that our decree is 
such a Soyiia, and that the /SovXi} and Sfifios, lines 2, 
3, II, refer to the two assemblies of the League, 
and in this opinion he is followed by Keil, Sylloge, 
p. 34. But on a comparison of the decrees from the 
Amphiaraion, published by Rangabe, loc. cit., it seems 
clear that the ^oi;X?7 and Srjfioi in our inscription are 
those of the Tr^Xty, line 26, of which the noXirai are 
mentioned, line 12, and that this noXn must be the 
neighbouring city Oropos, not the city of the League, 
which presided in turn when the decree was passed, 
as Bockh supposes. 

If we assume Oropos to be the noXis meant, we 
may explain the unusual expression, lines 2, 3, npo- 
Pe^ovXevfjteyoi' aiirm uvai irpbi Tfjif ^ovXfjv Kal rhv Sij/iov. 
This npo^ovXevna or Bill, after having been prepared 
by the Boule and Demos of Oropos, may have been 
submitted for approval to the /cojj/w of Boeotia, and 
when ratified by the League became a law, line 11, 

&S Siv Kvp(o6fj ri ■^rjipia-fj.a. 

Having by this yjfri(f>icrfj.a obtained authority to 
deal with the treasure, the Oropian Boule and De- 
mos appointed the commission, whose functions and 
mode of procedure are defined in our decree. The 
ratification, Kvpcoa-ts, of the decree in this instance 
may be compared with the procedure in the Mylasa 
decrees (C. I. 2691 ; Waddington-Lebas, Pt. v, § 2, 
p. no), in which a Soypta of the Ekklesia is confirmed 
by ' the three tribes,' iSo^e MvXaa-fvat . . . Kal ineKvpwaau 
ai Tpeti (f)vXat. 

The priest of Amphiaraos is here associated with 
the archon of the Boeotian League, because the de- 
cree relates to the sacred treasure of the temple of 
which he had charge. See for similar instances 
Franz, Elem. Epigr. Gr. p. 324. 

Line 2. 'EniKparov, a form of the genitive not un- 
common in later inscriptions. 

Line 4. The rpdve^a in a Greek temple usually 
stood in front of the statue of the god, and was 
covered with rich offerings (see K. F. Hermann, 
Lehrbuch d. Griech. Antiquitaten, ii, § 17, 15; and 
Botticher, Tektonik, ii, p. 369). 

Line y. mnraiKoTa Ttfd, vS/jnafid rt enicrrj/xoi' y^pvirovv 
Kai dpyvpovv Koi erepa darffia. So line 1 4, to fo/xia/xa Tb 
(KTrfTTTCOKSi, and line 22 oi S, dpyvpiov tov (KnewTcoKOTOS 
fK Tcov dvaOiiidTCDv. These coins and ornaments in 
silver and gold must have been attached to the ana- 
themata on the walls of the temple, or to a statue. 
Lucian (Philopseud. ed. Lehmann, c. 20) describes 
a statue which had silver coins stuck on the thigh 
with wax, and silver leaves, niraXa, ivyai tivos ^ /xiaObs 
(vl Tfj ida-d, and to this day the Greeks offer coins in 
their churches, sticking them with wax on the pictures 
of their saints. (See my Travels, i, p. 187 ; Lenor- 
mant. La Monnaie dans I'Antiquite, i, pp. 28, 31.) 

H 



26 



BOEOTIA — OROPOS. 



Line 12. 4/c ndvT(ov tcou iTo\iTa>v. Bockh interprets 
this 'all the members of the Boeotian koiv6v^ but 
these noXiTai clearly refer to the ttoXh mentioned 
elsewhere in the inscription, and which, as I have 
already pointed out, can be no other city but 
Oropos. 

Line 15. dno^va-avTe^ tov KaTTirepov, 'scraping off 
the tin.' This was probably the base metal used as 
a solder. 

Line 1 8. diri-^rjaavTes for d<^i'^ri<TavTt^. According 
to Bockh d<piy\ra> is not here used in its ordinary sense 
to ' refine' or ' purify,' but refers to the restoration of 
lustre to tarnished gold by the application of some 
tincture. 

Line 18. koI TroiTJaayres rZ KaWeL wpoi to eiTiarifioi>. 
Bockh understands by this not very clear clause that 
the vessels are to be made equal in lustre to the 
coins, but the words would also bear the interpre- 
tation, ' refining the gold to the same standard as the 
coins.' 

Line 21. For the functions of the KaroTrrac here 
mentioned, see an^e No. clviii, and Decharme, in 
Archives des Missions, Paris, iv, p. 495. 

Line 28. vapa KaToirras for wapa, KaroTTTais. See 
C. I. i, p. 726, § 18, and p. 890, No. 70. 

Line 31. SoKijidov, a sample of the metal to be 
used. 

Line 36. /fa]T[a r^as ■irpo\_p]prj(TiLs, ' according to the 
requisitions.' Bockh reads 7r/3o[o-x]p'7o-€ty with Osann, 
but there is not space on the stone for more than 
one letter before the P. 

(ay 8e fifi fj kv rm Or^aavpo) TO 1 aJj/aXco- 

fiaTos. Bockh reads TO[a']o[i'Toi/, tov d^paXw/iaTos, but 
the letter after TO is certainly not S, as there is a 
vertical stroke. Between this letter and oyaXwfiaTos 
is not room for more than eight or nine letters. 
There are traces of several letters, but too mutilated 
to be made out with certainty. I read to i[a-ov tovtov 
dy^aXcofiaTos k.t.X. to ttXtjOos has also been suggested, 
but the letter after the I seems to me to have been t. 
If there shall not be enough in the treasury of the 
God, it is to be made good by the Tafiias out of the 
treasury of the state. It may be inferred from this 
passage that the o-i/XXoyeuy was charged with the 
custody of the treasure of the God, while the ra/ttay 
had charge of the treasure of the noXis. 

Line 39. cua Se t[^ ]i'. This is all that is 

now visible on the stone. Bockh reads ToFy dva^deiaijv 
from a transcript made when the inscription was in 
better preservation. 

Line 51. tZ KaTo. tw r^y oiKovop-ias uofico. The 
words Kara tov rfjs oiKovofiias must be the beginning 
of the title of a law. Compare, in the inscription 
from Eresos, Sauppe, De Inscript. Lesb. p. 9, (voxos 
(oro) tS) vofim [to)] tolv crraXXav dveXovTi. 

0. Then follows the inventory of the votive 
objects to be melted down, consisting of vessels, 
coins, and models of parts of the body dedicated in 



gratitude for cures. Such models were sometimes 
executed in marble. See ante, pt. i, Nos. Ix-Ixx. 

In the recent excavations under the southern side 
of the Athenian Akropolis, three decrees very similar 
in purport have been discovered. One of these gives 
the report of three commissioners on the state of the 
treasure in the Asklepieion at some time between 
B.C. 307 and B.C. 266. After the report follows a 
long inventory of the models, rimoi, and other ob- 
jects dedicated. See Kumanudes, ' AQr\vaiov, v, p. 103 
and p. 189; Martha, in Bulletin de Corr. Hell^n. ii, 
pp. 419-445. The other two inscriptions relate to 
the treasure in the temple of the"^pcoy /arpoy, which 
is to be dealt with in the same manner as the treasure 
in the Amphiaraion. See Corpus Inscript. Attic, ii, 
pt. i, Nos. 403, 404. 

Line i. dvaOrifidTcov. Elsewhere in this inscription 
we find the later form dvaOe/xaTcoy. 

Line 4. kcoOwvlov KpaT^a-iov. Here the object dedi- 
cated precedes the name of the dedicator, Kratesion, 
who must be a woman. KpaTija-ios occurs C. I. 2031. 

Line 6. Bockh reads MD, but KXlt<o is visible on 
the marble. 

Line 16. npoa-STriov, a small model of a face, not 
a mask, Trpoa-coneTov. 

Line 17. Bockh reads Trpoa-conou for npoa-dnriov. 

Line 19. " lynrcovos, Bockh reads /C^jTrcoi'oy, but the 
first n is visible. 

Line 20. tjSvttotiSiov, the diminutive of riSworis. 
In the inventory of the treasure of the Asklepieion 
we have riSviroTia, lines 34, 35. 

Line 21. Xl^uvcctis. The Lexicons give Xi^avcoTph, 
but Xi^avrnTLs occurs both here and in an inscription 
from Branchid£e, and also in line 33 of the inventory 
from the Asklepieion. 

Line 25. TtTpdxiia for TtTpaSpax/^a. See Etym. 

Mag. p. 754- 40. 

Line 29. flXaviovo^. Bockh reads Ha . vtovos, but 
the third letter is visible. 

. aTiov. Bockh would read 'Atlov, but there has been 
a letter before A. Perhaps the name was BYtiov. 

Line 40. riToXefiaiKd, not drachmae, but coins on 
the Ptolemaic standard. Bockh distinguishes these 
Ptolemaic nummi from the ' AXt^avSpeta^, line 45, 
which are drachmae on the Alexandrian standard. 
In the inventory of treasure in the Athenian Askle- 
pieion we find mentioned TiTpdx/^ov ' AuTij-yoveTov, line 
45, and TiTpd^fxa' AvTiyovila TiTTapa. See line 86 ibid. 

Line 45. AAA. I follow Bockh in reading "/l^a 
here. The lapidary having by mistake written A 
three times must have then converted each of these 
letters into A. 

Line 50. x^A'". ^ lump of metal probably dedicated 
by Alphiades to be used in making good any de- 
ficiency consequent on the melting down. Keil, 
(Sylloge, p. 37) refers for this word to Lobeck 
(Paralipp. p. 420), and considers its meaning equi- 
valent to that of 05oty or (f)OoTSas, which occurs in 
Athenian treasure lists. 



BOEOTIA — OROPOS. 



27 



CLXI. 

On a slab of white marble, broken at the top. Height, lof in. ; breadth, 'lo^ in. Presented to the British Museum by J. P. 
Gandy Deering, Esq., in 1820. C. I. 1566; Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, ii, p. 440; Keil, Sylloge, p. 30; L. Preller, 
Berichte d. phil. hist. Classe d. K. sachs. Gesellsch. d. Wissensch. 185a, pp. 140-188. 



10 



lAi PENAEAOXOAI 

rniA . viniOINO<J)IAON<t>IMENOZ 
''PHTAPPOZENONE' . A . KAIEYE 

. "ETHNTHznoAEnznpnninNKAi 

. YTONKAIEK^ONOYZKAIEINAIA^ 

. '^irH2KAIOIKIASErKTHZINKAIAZ0/ 

. . lANKAIAZYAIANKAIPOAEMOYK . . 

EIPHNHZKAIKATATHNKAIKATA 

OAAATTANKAITAAAAPANTA 

OZAPEPKAITOIZAAAOIZPPO 

ZENOIZKAIEYEPTETAIZ 

ANAPPAtAIAETOAETOtH 

0IZMAENZTHAHIAIOINHIKAIZTh 

ZAIENT^IIEPni~OYAM<t>IAPAOY 



frJTrej/ S(S6-)(6ai 

tS> (STtj]/*® Oiv6<pL\oV 'Pl/J.fUOS 

K]pfJTa TTpo^ivov f'Tt'laT'] 'fat fVi- 
p\YErrjv TTJi TToAecBy 'Dpamicoi' Kal 
aJuTOJ' Kal (Kyovovi Kal ilvai av- 
tIo) yfji Kal OLKias (yKTrjaif Kal dcr(j)d- 
Xeliay Kal davXiav Kal noXifiov i^al 
elprji/Tji Kal Karii yrjv Kal KaT&. 
OdXaTTav Kal rdXXa irdvra 
ocranep Kal toTs dXXoii npo- 
^tvoi^ Kal (ixpyfTaii' 
dvaypdy^at. Se t6S( to yjrrj- 
(f)i<Tiia kv OT'fiXri XiOivrj Kal arfj- 
crai kv Tw Upco tov 'A/icptapdov. 



This is a decree of the city of Oropos granting 
the proxenia to Oinophilos, son of Phimen, a Kretan, 
and ordering that the stele on which it is engraved 
be set up in the Hieron of Amphiaraos. This in- 
scription was obtained from Kalamo (see Leake, 
Travels in Northern Greece, ii, p. 440), and was 
doubtless transported to that village from the ruins 
of the Amphiaraion on the neighbouring site of 
Mavrodhilissi. When I visited this spot in 1852 
there were a number of similar decrees of proxenia 
lying in sitic, which are to be found in Rangab^, 
Antiquites Helldniques, ii, p. 252, foil., and Preller, 
in the Memoir cited in the heading. They were also 
published by me in Transactions of Royal Soc. Lit. 
N. S. V, pp. 107-152. 

In most of these decrees the preamble runs thus : 
" ApyovTo^ iv KOLVM BoKoTwf TOV 8(iyo9, inl St TroAewy tov 
SfTvos, Upioot Se TOV ' A ix(j)iapdov tov Sttvos ; a proof that 
they were enacted at a time when Oropos was a 
member of the Boeotian confederacy and not subject 
to the Athenians, on whose border it was situated. 



Rangab6, chiefly on palaeographical grounds, places 
most of these decrees between i?. c. 340 and B.C. 156, 
during which period Oropos probably changed 
masters several times. See Preller, p. 180 of the 
treatise already referred to, and Kohler in Mittheil. 
d. deutsch. Inst, iv, pp. 259-261. This city seems 
to have sided with Bceotia from time to time when- 
ever Athens was not strong enough to punish her 
defection. 

The upper edge of the stel^ on which our decree 
is engraved having been broken away, there is no 
evidence to shew whether in the preamble the name 
of the eponymous magistrate of the city followed 
that of the magistrate of the league, or stood alone. 
In any case the remains of the heading do not prove, 
as Bockh supposes, that Oropos was independent 
when the decree was made. See Meier in Ersch and 
Griiber, Enkyklop. iii, 5, p. 509 6. 

Line 2. <Pifi(vos. Bockh reads ^tAio-coj/oy, but the 
reading is clear on the stone. I cannot find Phimen 
as a name in Pape or elsewhere. 



28 



BOEOTIA — THESPIAE. 



CLXII, 

On a slab of grey marble, broken at the top and bottom. Height, 2 ft. 8 J in.; breadth, i ft. 95 in. Found at Parapongia, a 
place in Boeotia between Thespise and Platsea. C. I. 1590; Osann, i, 68, p. 199. 



©EOTIMOZMEAANTIXOYTANArpAlOS 

ZTAAI O N 
KAAAIKAHSOMOAniXOYGEZniEYS 
AIAYAON 
6 KPITnNZIMIOYGEZniEYZ 

n A A H N 
MNHSIOEOSMIPnNOZGHBAIOZ 

n Y r M H N 
IfllAOZAAEZANAPOYEAEITHZ 
10 nATKRATION 

ZAMIXOZEnAINETOYAAPYMNEYZ 

nAIAHNTflNnPEZB . TEPriNAO/ • /xON 
EPMOTENHZAnOAA^NIOYIMYPNAIOZ 
Z T A A ION 
15 EPATnNEYXAPIAOYOnOYNT. ^'^ 

AIAYAON 
EPATnNEYXAPIAOYOnOYNTIC 

nENTAOAON 
OYAIAAHZAPTEMIZIOYXPYZAOPEYZ 
20 n A A H N 

AAMOKPATHZTIMOKAEOYZKniOZ 

n Y r M H N 
AIOKAHZAIOKAEOYZAOHNAIOZ 
n ATKPAT I ON 
25 AnOAAOAOPOZAnOAAOAnPOYKYXIKHNOZ 

AT ENEIOYZZTAAION 
AIONYZIOZNIKAPETOYHAATAIEYZ 

nEN TA0AO N 
nANTAAEriNAHM04)nNT0ZMYNAI0Z 
30 n A A H N 

AAKIMOZMHNO4)IAOYNIKAIEYZAnOBI0YNIAZ 

n Y r M H N 
^'^^TPATOZAflPOGEOYAHMHTPIEYZ 



10 



15 



QfoTifiOi M €\afTi)^ov Tavaypaios 

KaX\iK\r]9 ' 0/ioXcBtj(oi/ &e<T7n€VS 

AiavXov 
KpiTdtv Zi/xtov Qecrwifvs 

ndXr/i/ 
MvqaiOios Mipeovos Qrj^aTos 

flvyfir^v 
ZmtXos 'AXe^dvSpov ' EXeiTtjs 

PayKpaTiov 
^djMiyo^ ^ Eiraivirov Aapvfivevs 

PaiSciov tSiv npecr^yVrepoiv 86}^i\^ov 
' Epfioyey-qs ' AiroXXwvtov Z/xvpyaTo? 

ZrdSLOt/ 
Epdrcof EvyapiSov ' OTrovpi\i\os 

AiavXov 
'Epdrcop EvyapiSov 'Ottovvtk^ 

HiVTaOXov 



OvXidSrji 'ApTifJiicriov Xpvcraopivs 

ridX-qv 
AafioKpaTTjs TifioKXiovs KZos 

Hvyiirjv 
AioKXrji AiOKXeovs 'AOrjt/aToi 

FlayKpaTLov 
'AiroXXoSmpos 'AiroXXoScopov Kv^iKt]i>6s ' 

'Ayeveiovs crrdSiov 
Aiovvaios NiKapirov HXaTaievs 

nkvTaOXov 
HavTaXecoy Ar]/io<j>myTOS MvuSios 

fldXrjy 
"AXki/mos Mr)vo(l>iXov NiKauvs dnb BiOvvias 

Hvyix-qv 
Zdarparoi AcopoOeov ArjfirjTptfvs 

^flayKpdrioy^ 



20 



25 



30 



PLATE Jl 



R^l, 





E AO^F TAIAAIAITTBI?^ 
none: IMENH^^E^IANkNAT 

TAAoYAM^PAKl-f^TAN 

TA21TT0A10ZT-^Nl«opKYpAI 
iXNAYTON|<AlET"roNoY X 

^nMt>iA£AYToiz: |<An>| 

AAA AlhlMl A OZAH AJ — * 
/XAA52IZ:npbcs£MOIZ j 

ANlTpog O YAOYEKA'TTpO 
AiKor Z rpA-VANTAlElZ 

><A^)crJ.Iv\AAN AOErAE N 
7oN AF TAMI ANAOMEN 
JTor ^ISOM ^ NoN A^' A A ii 

^AA 



-^•AYSANIAN^7J^^?.T. 



THESSALY — CORCYRA. 



29 



This inscription contains a list of victors in athletic 
Games, and, as it was found near Thespiae, we may 
assume with Bdckh that the Games to which it re- 
lates were the Erotidia, in which festival Musical and 
Gymnastic contests were combined (Pausan. ix, 31, 
§ 3; and C. I. 1429, 1430). Bockh points out that 
the age of this inscription is fixed by the mention of 
Eraton the Opuntian, in lines 15, 16. He identifies 
this Eraton with Eraton the ^Etolian, who, according 
to Africanus, was Olympic victor, B.C. 240 (Olymp. 
135). At that time the Lokri Opuntii were certainly 
i^tolians. This date is confirmed by the mention, 
line 32, of a citizen of Demetrias in Thessaly, and 
of a citizen of Niksea, line 31. These cities were 



founded respectively by Demetrios Poliorketes and 
Lysimachos, of whom the first was expelled from 
Macedon u.c. 287 (Olymp. 123, 2), the other died 
B.C. 283 (Olymp. 124, 2). Again, from the absence 
of Roman names from the list of victors it may be 
inferred that this inscription is earlier than the 
subjugation of Greece by the Romans. On the 
Agonistic Victories of Boeotians, see Krause, Ago- 
nistik, p. 781. Keil, Sylloge, p. 65, remarks on line 
25 that the Apollodoros mentioned here seems to 
be the same as in the Mykonos inscription published 
by Ross, Inscr. Ined. ii, p. 39, No. 145, line 22, 
'>47roXX65ci)/oos' Kv^n^rjuos iScoKlev els aO\a. 



CLXIII. 

On a tablet of white marble, the face of which is sculptured in the form of an .^dicula, composed of an architrave supported by 
two pilasters. In the recess thus formed are sculptured two long plaits of hair; on the architrave is a dedication to Poseidon. 
Length, i ft. 2 in.; breadth, i ft. i in. C. I. 1769; Millingen, Anc. Uned. Mon. pt. 2, pi. xvi, fig. 2. Found in the ruins 
of Phthiotic Thebes by Col. W. M. Leake (see his Travels in Northern Greece, iv, p. 361) and presented by him to the 
British Museum, 1839. 

OlAOMBPOTOZAOGONHTOZAEINOMAXOYFOSEIAnNI 
<PiX6nPpoTOS, 'A(f>d6i/r]Tos Aeivojj.d)(^ov, rioa-eiSSn/i. 



CLXIV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, surmounted by a pediment, in the centre of which is a rosette. About two inches of 
the left side of the stelfe are broken away. Height, 7 J in.; breadth, 6J in. C. I. 1768; Pfordten, De Dialect. Thessal. 
1879, p. 22, No. xii; Lebas, Inscriptions, pt. iii, § 6, No. 1165. Found in the Phthiotis. 

STOKPATEi 
TTAPAKEIA 
zMIAIAOXE 
PAIEYZA/V 



'Api\aTOKpdT€t- 

d] . . . TTapaKiia 
'Aprjefj-iSi Ao\f- 
ia. .] a iv^a/xltt/rj 



The word in the second line must be the end of 
a patronymic adjective as Bockh supposed. For 
other instances see Pfordten, De Dial. Thess. p. 25 ; 
Dittenberger, in Hermes, xiii, p. 396. In line 4 we 



should expect lAI, but the first letter is E, and there 
must have been space for three letters to the left in 
the part broken away. 



CLXV. 

On an oblong bronze plate. Length, S^V'"-! breadth, i| in. From the Collection of the late Mr. James Woodhouse. Kirch- 
hoff, Studien, 1877, p. 92; Vischer, Archaol. u. Epigraph. Beitrage aus Griechenland, Basel. 1855, pi. ii, i, and his Kleine 
Schriften, i, p. 13, pi. ii, fig. i ; Mustoxidi, Delle Cose Corciresi, i, p. 233, No. Ixix. 



[For Uncials see Plate II, Fig, i.] 
A6(f>i6i jx dvi6rfK( 



CORCYRA. 



This inscription is a specimen of the archaic 
Corcyraean alphabet, of which there are several 
other examples. The characters employed are 
identical with those in the earliest Korinthian 
alphabet. The zig-zag line of the Iota in /lo^ioy is 
a sign of great antiquity. Kirchhoff (Studien, 3rd 
edit. p. 97) assigns this and other archaic Corcyrsean 



inscriptions to the first half of the sixth century B.C. 
The plate on which this dedication is engraved was 
attached by nails either to the wall of a temple or 
as a label on the object dedicated. On the left side 
the hole for the nail remains, as in the case of the 
Olympian rhetra, ante clviii. The letters are very 
clearly and deeply cut. 



CLXVI. 

On a bronze plate surmounted by a small pediment, within which is an owl in relief between two olive branches incised. Height, 
I ft. I in.; breadth, 6 in. Found at Palaeopolis, the site of the ancient city of Corcyra, in 1839. From the Collection of 
the late Mr. James Woodhouse of Corfu. Mustoxidi, Delia Cose Corciresi, i, p. 189; Vischer, Epigraph, u. Archaol. Beitrage 
aus Griechenland, p. 7, No. 22, pi. 1. 

SJFor Uncials see Plate III.'\ 

flpVTaVLS ^TpdT(t>V, 

jMih YvSpevs, afiepa Tf- 

rdpra evl SeKa, npocndTai 

rvdGios ZcoKpdrevi- 
5 irpo^evov noil a dXta 

Aiovvariov 'Ppwi^ov 

' AOrjvaioVj aiiTov Koi 

eKyovovs, SiSari Se Kai 

yds Kal oiKtas e/xTracrif 
10 TO.)/ 8e npo^eviav ypdyjray- 

ray (h xaXKOf dvOifJuv^ 

it Ka Trpo^ovXois Kal npo- 

SiKots SoKjj KaXais fX*"'- 
Acofvartoi/ 
15 4>pvvi\ov 

A6r}vaiov. 



This inscription contains a grant of proxenia by 
the city of Corcyra to Dionysios, son of Phrynichos, 
an Athenian. The decree is very peculiar in the 
form of its preamble, which notes the name of the 
Prytanis, the day of the month and the name of the 
Prostates instead of the usual heading iBo^e to, aXia. 
On this account, and on palaeographical and philo- 
logical grounds, Vischer assigns this decree to the 
fourth century B.C. It would thus be considerably 
earlier than the other Corcyrsean decrees of proxenia 
which Bockh places about Olymp. 140. Vischer, p. 8, 
conjectures that the Phrynichos, father of Dionysios 
here mentioned, may perhaps be the Archon, Olymp. 
no, 4 (b.c. 337), and points out that the Prytanis, 
Straton, who is the eponymous magistrate in this 
decree, is probably identical with the Straton whose 
name is inscribed on a roof-tile from a temple at 
Corcyra (Vischer, No. 18). 

Line 2. iieh YvSptw. fieis is the .(^olic or Ionic 
form of fj-rj", but according to Ahrens, De Dialect. 
Dor. p. 242, is used also in the milder Doric instead 
of fii]s ; see Brugman in G. Curtius, Studien, iv, 
p. 87 ; Meister, ibid. p. 383. 

YvSpfvs. This name does not occur in Hermann's 
Monatskunde. Vischer conjectures that it was 
originally an epithet of Hermes in the sense of 
SoXios, and compares it with yjrvSpos, 'lying.' In that 
case this month may have corresponded with the 
'EpfiaTos, 'Epiiaicoi/ of Argos and other states. Only 
three other Corcyraean months are known to us, 



Maxavevi, which seems to have been called after 
Zeiis Maxaufvs, E&Xetoy, and 'Apre/jiiTLos. See Bergk, 
Beitrage zur Monatskunde, p. 18. 

Line 4. npoaTdras FydOios. Thucydides iii, 75, 
iv, 46, and ^neas Poliorc. ii, mention the ■n-poo-TdTai 
Tov Srjfiov as Corcyrsean magistrates, and (C. I. No. 
1845, § 4> ^'l^^ 1^7) "^^ have a Trpoa-Tdrai irpo^ovXcou. 
The position of the word -n-poaTdras in the preamble 
of this decree makes it probable that the magistrate 
here named is the president for the time being of 
a board. Compare the position of the arparayos in 
the Corcyraean decree, C. I. 1846, line 6. 

Line 9. eftiraa-Ls for eyKTua-ts. We find this form 
both in Doric and yEolic. See Ahrens, De Dialect. 
Dor. ^ 15, p. 108, and De Dialect. Aiol. § 47. 

Line 11. dvOe/xev. To reconcile this change of 
construction with the antecedent sentence we must 
suppose e<5o|6 to be understood. 

XaXKoy. x«^'^'*'y"« is used in the same sense in 
CLXvii and other later Corcyraean decrees of proxenia. 

On the npoSiKoi here mentioned see C. I. 1845, 
line 114, and C. A. Muller, De Corcyr. Rep. p. 48. 
In Corcyraean decrees they are usually associated 
with the vpo^ovXoi. 

The owl between two olive branches within the 
pediment of this tablet is there placed as the dis- 
tinctive symbol, napdar]/j.ov or eTTicnjpou, of Athens, of 
which state the person honoured in the decree was 
a citizen. In like manner on the Olympian bronze 
tablet which grants the proxenia to Demokrates, a 




M E IS i'XM^y^'^^^^ PATE 
TA p tA E r^ I A E K An po STAtAX 
PNA ©I ox X ^K pATEYr 
T-TpOH ENoMT-roElAAAlA 
^ I o MYS: I OH 4. p Y W I xoy 
A® H WAloN Ay Tol^f< A/ 
ET M r-oW oYZ A I A^-r I AEKAl 
rAX}<A\ol\< I AXEMT-rAXlH 

r AN^ E rrpoH e: wiAmt pAfAM 

T A r E I :? XAA|<o>iA'N©EMErK 
£ IKArffoj^oYAolsTKA/TTpo 

A IKoIX AoKHIKAA^ZEXEIH 

A I o M r 2/oN 




H A / o N 



CORCYRA. 31 



citizen of Tenedos, a bunch of grapes between two ' ypa^ontvcav to napda-rjuoy rrjs TroXeor {KaOd-mp ka-rlv fdi/xov 

double axes, the vapdcrrj/j.oi' of that city, occupies the i Trda-i irpwrtrapariQivai) vnoypd(f)OVTai Svo KopaKes tip' &/ia^iov 

same position in the pediment. See Ausgrabung. i, x"^'^""'' The correction npo^ivLcav for irpo^ivcov in this 

pi. 31 ; Archaol. Zeit. 1876, p. 177, and p. 184. In passage is due to Locella, see Xenophon, Ephesiaca, 

illustration of this fashion of placing the insignia [ ed. Peerlkamp, p. 324. 

of a city on decrees of proxenia Mustoxidi cites the j In this inscription the letters are filled in with 

following passage from Antigonos Karystios, De silver. The holes pierced in the pediment shew 

Mirabil. c. xv : 'Ev Si Kpdwcoui Tiji QiTTaXias Svo ^aalv I that the tablet has been fastened on the wall of some 

(lovov iTvai KopaKar Sib Kal inl jitiv TTpo^f.v{i)5>v rail' dva- public edifice. 



CLXVII. 

On a bronze tablet. Height, pin.; breadth, 4I in. Formerly in the Prossalendi Museum at Corfu. C.I. 1843; Musto.xidi, 
Cose Corciresi, i, p. 192; Dodwell, Travels, ii, p. 505; Rohl, Sched. Epigraph, p. 6. 

\I'or Uncials see Plate II, Fig. 2.] 

* ESo^i ra. aXia, irpo^e^vov fl/i€v Flavaaviav 'At^toXov ' An^paKidiTav I ray TroXioy rmv KopKvpai<ov, airrhv Kal 
eyyofovi | fifief Se avroii Kal to. I aXXa rtfjiia oaa koTl Toii\ I dWois npo^iyois [fa'] | fvepyeraLi yfypa^nrai' 
Tctf Sf Trpo^ii>i\av npo^ovXovs Kal TrpolSiKOVi ypd'^avras eh I ^dXKCo/xa dvaOifiev, I tov Sk ra/iiaf Sojiev I 
rh yfyo/ievop dvdXw jxa. 

Havaaviav 'ArrdXov 'Afi^paKidtrai'. 

Bockh gives an incorrect copy made up chiefly from Mustoxidi. 



CLXVIII. 

On a small fragment of a bronze plate. Length, 3I in., by i/^ in. Corfu. From the Collection of the late Mr. James Woodhouse. 

. . . EIAIE 
THNXPHMATn 
PPAEIZEZTHMH 
AOTMATITETOMH 

ai 

rS)v y^p'qudToiv 
iWhrpa^ii ecrrm fir) 
Soyfiari t€ to 

This is probably a fragment of a decree relating to finance. 



CLXIX. 

On a slab of white marble formed by the union of three fragments; inscribed on both sides. Height, 8 in.; breadth, 9 in. 

Corfu. Blacas Collection; C.I. 1891. 

a. b. 

\0n reverse of stoucl\ 

eAAliN 
eTfcON 

NXAIPe 

•'£XX[i7]i/ 
vrStv 
V yatpe 



ee PAnwN 


G T to N- 


H 


xAipe 




©fpaTTOM/ 




iTtOV r\ 




Xaipf 





32 



MACEDONIA. 



CLXX. 

On a fragment from a thin slab of white marble. Height, afin. ; breadth, 2^ in. Corfu. Bequeathed by Sir Walter C. 

Trevelyan, Bart., 1879. 

revc 
eAPio 

AHN 
KPA 



CLXXI. 

On a block of white marble. Length, 6 ft. g\ in.; breadth, 2 ft. 8| in.; thickness, i ft. i in. C. I. 1967; Addenda, ibid, ii, 
p. 990; Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, iii, p. 236; Vaux in Transact. Roy. Soc. Lit. viii, pp. 525-548. Presented by 
J. E. Blunt, Esq., H.M. Consul-General, Salonica, 1877. 

noAEITAPXOYNTnNrnriTTATPOYTOYK/ 

lATPAKKAbAoYKlOYrfONTIOYrEKOYNAO 
/I0Y^AYA0YjA0YI0Y2:ABEIN0Y;AHMHTPI0YT 
iAYrTOY^AHMHTPlOYTOYNEIKoTTOAEQrzn 
5 TOYTTAPMENinNOKTOYKAIMENirKOYrAlOYAriAAHIO 
noTEIToYTAMIoYTHr^noAEoSTAYPoY^ToYMMMIAi: 
ToYKAIPHrAoYrYMNAKIAPXoYNTorTAYPoYToYTAYPC 

TOYKAIPHTAOY 

noXeiTap-^ovi'Tan' ZaxrinaTpov tov KXleo'TTJarpas koX Aovkiov FIovtiov ZeKowSdy] I vlov, AvXov 'Aovtov Za- 
^iivov, Ar]/ir]Tpiov i^ovj | 'Pavarov, ArjfirjTpiov tov NiiKOTToXecos, Za^tXovj | tov riapftei'iaii'Oi tov kuI MevicrKov, ratov 
'AyiXXrjtdvl I floTeiTOV, Ta/iiov Trjs noXitos Tavpov tov 'Ajijiias I tov kol ' PrjyXov, yviiva<napyovvTO^ Tavpov tov 
Tavpohi] I tov Kai ' PrjyXov. 



The block on which this in.scription is engraved 
was formerly to be seen on the inner face of one of 
the piers of the Roman arch at Salonica, known in 
modern times as the gate of Vardar, and formed part 
of the original structure of this arch (see Heuzey, 
Macddoine, p. 272, pi. xxii bis). In 1876, shortly 
after this gate had been taken down, the inscription 
was rescued from destruction by being transported 
to the British Consulate. The ends of lines 3, 4 
were completed on the next stone in the arch, which 
was not saved at the time of taking down the arch, 
but which is drawn in the facsimile of the inscription 
given in the Transactions of the Royal Soc. Lit. 
viii, plate, p. 528. It appears from a letter of the 
Rev. David Morton (Northampton Herald, April 24, 
1878) that this second slab was probably used for 
building a new quay. 

The number of Politarchs named in the inscrip- 
tion appears to be six, viz. Sosipatros son of Kleo- 
patra and of Lucius Pontius Secundus, Aulus Avius 
Sabinus, Demetrios son of Faustus, Demetrios son 
of Neikopolis, Zoilos son of Parmenion, Gains 
Agilleius Poteitus. 

In another inscription from Salonica, published 
by Heuzey, Macddoine, p. 274, No. 1 12, the date of 
which is A.D. 143, the number of Politarchs is in like 



manner six, as had been previously inferred by 
Tafel, Thessalonica, p. xxx, and p. 103. On the 
other hand, in an unedited inscription copied by 
Mr. Barker at Salonica, which records a dedication 
by the city of Thessalonika to the Emperor Claudius, 
A.D. 44, the number of Politarchs is only two, and it 
is to be inferred from the photograph of this in- 
scription that no more names were inscribed on the 
stone. 

Politarchs are also mentioned in an inscription 
from Derriopos in Macedonia, Heuzey, Mission 
de la Macedoine, p. 315; also in the Acts of the 
Apostles, xvii, 6, 8 ; and in an inscription found at 
Kertch, Zhil, Antiqu. du Bosphore, ii, Inscript. xviii. 

In our inscription the name of the mother in two 
cases follows where we should expect the father's. 
Sosipatros is styled son of Kleopatra and Lucius 
Pontius Secundus ; in line 6 we have Tavpov tov 'Afi- 
fiias TOV KoX' PriyXov, Tauros, surnamed Reglos, son of 
Ammia. This is very unusual ; Leake thought that 
the precedence given to the name of the mother in 
these two cases indicates that descent was claimed 
from the royal family of Macedonia, but this is hardly 
likely. At the beginning of line 8 the letters PITAn 
are rudely scratched ; these are no part of the original 
inscription, but seem to be an ancient graffito. 



MACEDONIA. 33 



CLXXII. 

On a sepulchral stelfe of white marble, the face of which is sculptured in the form of a small temple in antis, to represent an 
herSon. Within the antae is a group in relief consisting of a veiled female figure seated, looking to the right. Facing her 
stands a youth whose right hand grasps hers. Behind him stands a draped female figure whose left arm rests on the youth's 
left arm ; her left hand rests on his left hand. Behind the seated figure is a veiled female figure standing, and in the back- 
ground in lower relief are two male figures confronted, one of whom is bearded. At the foot of the seat are a standing 
female figure and a seated female figure, whose smaller stature indicates their inferior rank. All eight figures are draped. 
On the top of the monument tiles are sculptured in relief to represent the roof. The inscription is above the figures. 
Height, 3 ft. 8^in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 5 J in. Purchased by me at Salonica in 1854, from a dealer, who stated that he had 
obtained this stel^ from Pella. 

€-n.P ATP A :ANTIMAXoS:<t)IAOPATPA:nAYSANIAC 
PAYSANloY:nAYCANIOY: Ml . YAOY:ANAPISKOY 

Zcondrpa : AvTifiayoi : ^PiXoTrdrpa ; Hava-avlai 
flavaaviov ; flavaaviov : Ali[p]i!Xoi/ : ' AvSpiaKov. 

Pausanias, son of Andriskos, married Philopatra, daughter of Mirylos ; they had issue Sopatra and 

Antimachos. 



CLXXIII. 

Engraved on a terminal bust of Aeschines in white marble. Height, 2 ft. 25 in. Obtained by Colonel Leake at Pelagonia in 
Macedonia, and presented by him in 1839. C. I. 2000; Millingen, Ancient Uned. Monum. ii, pll. 9, 10. 

AIZXINHZ 

Alayjvqi 



CHAPTER III. 

INSCRIPTIONS FROM THRACE AND THE KIMMERIAN 

BOSPOROS. 



CLXXIV. 

On a block of white marble. Height, 3 ft. 10 in.; breadth, 3 ft. ij in. Kumanudes, in the navdi>pa, June, i868; Perrot, Mdmoires 

d' Archdologie, p. 199. Presented by William Price, Esq., 1864. 

ATAeHI TYXHI 
KATATAAOSANATHKPATirTHBOYA- 
KAITQAAMnPoTATQAHMn THr 
. \MrPoTATHi:MH"PoTToAEn2:ToME^i: 
5 vYPHAlONnPEirKlONiriAQPON 

ToNnoNTAPXWKAIAP^ANTATHN 
TTPQBNAPXHNArNnrKAIAMSMTTTxi. . 
KAIAPXIEPArANENONBNAlOTTAQN 
KAIKYWrEnnN0IAoAO3E>ai:cI>IAoTE:iMlA[ 
EcDESHITHMEPQNE^MHAlAAinoNTA 
KAIHNAPXIEPEIANrYNBlONAYToY 

OYAHIAN MATPQNAN 

TTArHKTSIMHrKAIAPETHrXAPIN 
TONKAIBOYAEYHNKAITnJN^PQTSYofTAN 
THKAAMnPoTAHKOAAoYIArNEAi: 
TToAEQrKAIANTinATPlAOZ: 



10 



15 



'Aya6fj Tvyr) 
Karb. TO. So^aura rfj KpaTia-rj] ^ovXfj 
Kal tS Xa/iTTporaro) SrjfKp Trjs 
Xla./j.npordTTjs MrjTponoXecoi Toneoos 
5 AiiprjXiov ripucrKiov laiScopov 

Tov HovTdp'^rjv Kal dp^ayra Tf)v 
npcoTTji' dpyj]v dyvw Kal dfiefiTTTO^s 
Kal dp\upa<Tdnivov ttjv Si ottXcov 

A decree of the Boule and Demos of Tomis in 
honour of Aurelius Priscius Isidoros, who filled the 
office of Pontarches and presided in the first cipxv, 
and as Archiereus celebrated the liturgy relating to 
military exercises and hunting. Hewas also a member 
of the Boul^ and one of the chief citizens of Flavia 
Neapolis and of Antipatris. His wife, Ulpia Matrona, 
who was chief priestess (Archiereia), is also honoured. 

Bockh gives no inscriptions from Tomis, but the 
name of this city is mentioned in an honorary decree 
from Mesembria. C. I. 2053 d, ii, p. 995; compare 
ibid. p. 997, No. 20566 and 2056 c, p. 79. 

The site of Tomis was first fixed at Anadol-Koi, 
near Kustenji, by the discovery there of an inscrip- 



15 



Kal KVfTfyecTicoi' (piXoSo^coi (piXoTfi/J-iay 
e(f)€^rjs ri/ifpSiv (^ fir] SiaXtnovTa 
Kal Tfiv dpy^upuav avv^iov avTov 

OvXniav fAdrprnvav 
ndcrris TUjxrjs Kal dpfrrji X'^P"' 
TOf Kal ^OvXiVTfjy Kal TCOV TrpcoTfvovTcoy 
rrjs XafiTrpoTdrrjs 'PXaovtas A/lay 
nSXecoi Kal AvTcnaTpiSos. 



tion recording a dedication of a statue of Marcus 
Aurelius by a company of vavKX-qpoi. See Gerhard 
in Archaol. Zeit. 1850, p. 141 ; Frohner, Inscriptions 
Grecques du Louvre, No. 77, p. 162. Subsequently, 
in the course of making the railway, twenty-five 
inscriptions were found, thirteen of which were 
published by Kumanudes in the Greek newspaper 
riavSwpa of June 1, 1868. Tomis was a member 
of a confederacy of Ionian cities which originally 
consisted of five cities, but which in the time of 
Hadrian had become a Hexapolis, as is shewn by 
the evidence of an inscription from Kustenji pub- 
lished in the 0tXoXoyi*coy IvXXoyo? of Constantinople, 
iv, p. 107, No. 4, in which the same official per- 



THRACE — TOMIS. 



35 



sonage is described as riovTdpxn^ and dfp^ay t^? 
'E^anoXtan. The numismatic evidence as to this 
league has been collected by Mr. Gardner, Nu- 
mismatic Chronicle, N. S. xvi, pp. 307-314. The 
original cities were Tomis, Mesembria, Odessos, 
Apollonia and Istros, to which Kallatis or Diony- 
sopolis may have been subsequently added (Perrot, 
M6moires, p. 448). 

Line 6. PovTdpxv^. This title was in use not 
only on the European side of the Euxine but also 
in the Asiatic Pontos ; see the Bithynian inscription, 
Waddington-Lebas, Pt. v, § 7, No. 1178, p. 288, 
where the same person is styled Bfidvvidpxrjs and 
novrdpxn^. The FlovTdpxvi also occurs in inscriptions 



from Sinope and Pompeiopolis. See C. I. 4157; 
Perrot, M6moires, pp. 170-174. The dignity of 
Pontarches was analogous to that of the Asiarches, 
Bithyniarches, Galatarches, Lykiarches and others 
which occur in inscriptions in Asia Minor. See 
Marquardt, in Ephemeris Epigraphica, i, p. 208, who 
maintains, in opposition to Waddington, loc. cit, that 
these dignitaries were always as a matter of course 
the dpxifpfis of their respective provinces. In our 
inscription and the following one, No. clxxv, the two 
dignities are certainly united in one person. 

Line 15. <t>Xaovtas A/lay floXfcos. Certainly the city 
in Samaria so named rather than Novae, with which 
Perrot (M6m. d' Archeologie, p. 200) would identify it. 



CLXXV. 

On a block of white marble. Height, 3 ft. 4 in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 9 in. Presented by William Price, Esq., 1864. J. Millingen, 
in the *tXoXoyucor 2v\\oyos of Constantinople, iv, p. 105; Kumanudes, in UavSapa, June, 1868, No. 437. 

ATAGH T¥XH 
KATATAAOIANTATHKPATICTI 
BOVAHKAl'WAAMnPOTAlN-AHMMTCAAM 
nPOTATHC . MHTPOnOAenC . KAI 
6 ATO¥E¥WN¥MO¥nONTO¥-TONEW:TON 

nONTAPXHN-A¥P-nPeiCKION 

ANNIANON 
APIArTATO¥KOINO¥T^EAAHWIKAlTCM^» 
nOAEW:TN-A-APXHNArNW:KAIAPXIEPAE 
10 t^N0NTHNAlOnAWMKAlK¥N-rECIkMENAOIwC 

{})IAC>TEIMIANNHAIAAinoisrAAAAKA|B<>¥AE¥ 
TNKAlTW\jrPWTE¥0Nl^Nc|)AABIACNEAC15t 
Aew:KAlTNAPXIEPEIANC¥MBlONA¥TO¥ 
lO¥AIANAnOAA¥CTHN 
OACHC TEIMHC XAPIN 



15 



10 



15 



'AyaBfj Tvxv 
Kara to. So^avra rfj KpaTlcrTrj 
^ovX-jj Kai rw Xa/XTrpoTaTcp Srjfia) rrjs Xa/x- 
TT/joTarJjy M rjTpowoX f(os Ka] 
d Tov Evwyvfiov Hovtov TofitMi tw 
PovTdpxv*' Avp. ripiicTKLov 

Avviavov 
dp^avra tov kolvov twv ' EXXrjyaiy Kal rfji A1?;r/o[o- 
noXfcos rfjv • d • dpx^v dyvS)^, kol dpxifpao'd- 
fitvov TTjv Si' oTrXcof Kal Kvvrjyta-Lwv ivSo^cos 
(piXoTeiixiav nfj SiaXiirovTa, dXXa Kal ^ovXfv- 
Trjv Kal tS>v TTpcoTivovTwv <PXa^iai A/eay flo- 
Xerns Kal rfjv apxifpftccu avfi^iov ainov, 
'lovXiav ' AtroXavvTrjv, 
nda-qs Tfififjs X'^P"'- 



A decree of the Boule and Demos of Tomis 
in honour of the Pontarches, Aurelius Priscius 
Annianus, who presided over the confederacy of 
Hellenes, kolvov T&v'EXX-qvmv, in the first apx'7- He, 
like the Pontarches of the preceding inscription, 
was a member of the Boule, and one of the 
leading citizens of Flavia Neapolis. His wife, 
Julia Apolauste, who was apxifpeia, is also honoured 
in this decree. 

Line 5. tov Evcovvfiov HSvtov. Compare Strabo, 
xii, p. 541, ra 'Apiareph tov Hovtov — the coast of the 



Pontus Euxeinos on the left of those who entered it 
from the south. 

Line 8. The koivov twv 'EXX^vmv here may be 
compared with the koivov twv iv Bidwia EXX^vwv in a 
Bithynian inscription. Perrot, Galatie, i, p. 35. 

Lines 9, 10. dpxi(pao'dfi€vov Tfjv Si StrXmu Kai Kvvrj- 
yeaiwv ivSo^mi (piXoTeifiiav fifj SiaXinovra, ' having Cele- 
brated continuously as Archiereus the liturgy relating 
to military exercises and the chase.' <l>iXoTtifiia must 
be taken here and in the preceding inscription in the 
sense of Xenovpyia. See pos^, No. clxxvii. 



THRACE — TOMIS. 



CLXXVI. 



Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 4 ft. loiin.; breadth, 2 
awa)- in front, but not at the sides. J. Millingen, in 
niwdipa, June, 1868, No. 437. 

ATAOHTYXH 
lOVAIAN ' <! 

CEBACTHNAVTOKPA 
TOPOCKAICAPOi: • M • A¥ftA 
5 AIOVCEVHPOV/ Y 

E¥CEB ■ E¥T¥X • CEB • MHTE 
PAKAITWNrENNAIOlAT^ 
AVTOVCTPATOnEAWN 
BOVAHAHMOCTHCAAM 
10 rPOTAKMHTPOnOAEWC 

KAI • A • TO¥E¥WN¥Mo¥RN'0¥ 
TOMEWC 



ft. 4^ in. The mouldings at the top and bottom have been chipped 
the *(AoXoy. 2v\\oyns of Constantinople, iv, p. 105; Kumanudes, in 

'AyaOfj TvxV 
'lovKiav (^Mafi/iatajy | IEePacrrf]v 
5 AvTOKpalropos Kaia-apos M. AiiprjX^Xiov 

Zevripov 'A{\f^dv8po)v | Evae^. Evtv^. 2'€/3. MTiT(\pa. 
Kal rS)v yivvaiOTaTOiv | avToD ZTpaToneScoy I 
^ovXf]^ Sfjuos rrjs 
10 Xa/jL^irpoTaTTis Mr/TpoTroXecos | Kal d. 

Tov Evcovvfiov nSvTov I Tofiecos. 



The names MAMMAIAN, line 2, and AAEEAN- 
APOY, line 5, have been purposely erased on the 
stone. This erasure must have been made after 



the murder of Alexander Severus by order of his 
successor, Maximinus. 



CLXXVII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 5 ft. 5I in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 8 in. Above the inscription is a lunette, within which a bearded 
figure reclines at a banquet. At the foot of the couch sits a female figure draped and veiled; at the head of the couch 
stands a diminutive male figure with legs crossed. Above the centre of the lunette rises a fir cone, at each side of which is 
a lion's head in full face. In the exergue below are the remains of a relief; a mounted warrior at full speed aims his lance 
downwards. The upper part only of this figure is preserved ; probably, in the lower part of the relief was a prostrate foe. 
At each side of the inscription is a border of vine tendril ; on each return face of the stelh is a serpent, its head to the top. 
J. Millingen, in the *iXoXoy. 2u\Xoyos of Constantinople, iv, p. 105; Kumanudes, in llavSapa, June, 1868, No. 437; Perrot, 
Exploration de la Galatie, i, p. 68. 



10 



15 



TEIMOKPA 
THSAAE3:AN 
APOYfENINIK 
OMHAEYZOKET 
5 01 MIT HZ4)YAHS 

PXlMEfiNZHZAZEni 
TElMfiCENTHTOMIZ 
nNKE(|)PONnNEAY 
THKETHrYNEKIEAY 
10 TOYOAniAKAZTAKE 

THYEinEAYTOYOYA 
ninMAPTINn<t)YAH 
ZPnMEfiN<t)IAOTEI 
MONEBTOMONnOAE 
15 c^ZTHNSTHAEIAAK . 

TEZKEBAZAZYNT 

nionninnEPic^piz 
mencsoeztMoikoinon 

MOinPOZKAAEINI 
20 K0NZTP04>HXE 

PEOAPOAI TA 



Line 5. 01. After has been incised M, after- 
wards erased. 

Line 1 3. <t>iX6T(ifj.oi here must be an honorary title, 
as in the following inscription, No. CLXXViii, and in 
another inscription from Tomis, No. 7 of the series 
published by Kumanudes in the HavSwpa, June, 1868, 



TeifioKpaiTr]^ ' AX€^dv\8pov, yefi N iK^o/xtjSeijs, 

6 Ke Tlo/xtTJ/y, (fivXfjs | 'Pcofieeop, ^■qcras €7rt|ret/ia)s 

ey TT) TofiL, ^\S>v Ke (ppovmv, kav\TSi k\ rtj 

yweKi iav\Tov OXTria KdaTO. k€ I tZ vei^ 

iavTov OvX\7ria> MapTii^co, (pvXr)\s ' Pwfji.eaii', 

0jXoTet|/ioj' e^TOfiop 7r6A€|coy, T^r crTTjXuSa AcTa-l 

T€(TKi^aaa crvv t\S) TOTtco tw iripi(opLa-\fi(vm 

6 ecTTi fioi KOLvov | jxoi TTpos KaXtivilKOf Zrpocjifj- 

X^lpe TrapoSeira. 



where we have 'PiXokX^s Xprja-rov, (PiXoTei/xoi tov oikov 
T&v vavKXrjpcov. Compare the Kyzikene inscriptions, 
C. I. 3662, 3663 A, lines 22, 23, and b, line 10, 3664, 
3666, 3773, and Bockh, on C.I. 3662, also Kumanudes, 
loc. cit., who conjectures that this honorary title was 
bestowed on those who distinguished themselves by 



THRACE. 



2>7 



their liberality as Xeirovpyoi. It may be inferred 
from the use of <f>i\oTei/jtia, lines lo, ii, clxxv anie, 
that 'PiXoTiLfioi and <Pi\oTetfiia were used in these in- 
scriptions as the equivalents of Xetrovpyoy, Xeirovpyia. 
In this case the (^rofiov which follows 'PiXoTeifiov may 
mean seventh in rotation. We might have expected 



here ^iXSreinos efiTo/xoi, but the change of case may 
be due to inadvertence. See posl ccxxxii, ccxxxiii. 
In CLXxviii the <t>iX6TUfjios seems to be connected with 
the (f)vX^ which follows it. 

Line 15. After the final K there is no trace 
of A. 



OLXXVIII. 

Stelb of calcareous stone. Height, 8 ft. 5 in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 5^ in. Above the inscription a high pediment, plain. J. Millingen, 
in the *iXoX. 2vK\oyos of Constantinople, iv, p. 105. Kumanudes, in navSapa, June, 1868, No. 437. Presented by William 
Price, Esq., 1864. 

XPHCTonoAoKA 
AoYOIAoTElMon 
(DYAHnAIKOPEWN 
KAAWnBIWCAC 
5 ETH2:r>i«XAIPE 
FAPOAEITA 

Xprjaros 0(t)XoAca|Xov <f>iX6Teifios | <f>vXrjs AiKopfcov | KaX&s ^icoaas | frr/ ^y x*'P* I ^apoSura 



Perrot, M^moires d' Arch^ologie, p. 449, con- 
jectures that AiKopecov here is an abbreviated form 
of AlyiKopicov, the name of one of the four original 
Ionian tribes. Another of these, 'ApyaSeh, occurs 



on another inscription from Tomis. These names, 
as Perrot remarks, Memoires, p. 192, are evidence 
of the Milesian origin of Tomis. 



CLXXIX. 

Marble stelb. Height, 2 ft. sj in. ; breadth, i ft. 7 in. Along the top a pattern of ivy. Found near Trajan's Wall in the 
Dobrudscha, at the distance of about three miles from Kustenji. Presented by Dr. W. H. CuUen, 1868. 

lovAiANovnAirm 

KAIPHTEIfWrArAGAI APoi: 
ETTTAKAIAEKETIZOQi: 
AITTONAEAIOV 
5 rMVPISHAENeNHrKQ 

KAAHi:nE¥AnNAbEAEi:(= .. 
nVelAKAinATHETM 
MAHAAHrKoMirAI 
AKriAEMo¥i:TOAN>a^ 

^E^ETAIKAn^^ATIrEXo¥I:I^ 

orTAMoVNAAlGQ 
TQAENIKEVeoNENA 

XAIPETTAPOAEITA 

'lovXiavov naii ^1/ I Kal ' Prjyeivrji ' AydOavSpos [ 

lirraKaiSeKeT^i <pa>i | Xinov atXiov | 
Z/jLvpyfl 8' tv 6yrj<TKCo I KaXfj, cnnvSaiv dviXicrQlai 

HvQia Kal ndrpi] a-Te/ji\fia ndXrjs KOfiiaar | 
dvTi St jiov a-T((j)dv<ov | yivtrai Kal irarph f)(ov<ni' | 

6<TTfa fiovva Xi6cp | twS' efi K(v66/jifva. | 
X<^^P^ irapoSiTra. 

This is the epitaph of one Agathandros who died 
at Smyrna in his i8th year when on his way to 



the Pythian Games, where he hoped to win a prize 
as a wrestler. 



38 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 



CLXXX. 



On a slab of white marble. Height, 7| in. ; breadth, 6| in. 



lo 



BACIAEYONTOCBAClAEWv . . . 
PO>U AT0Y4) I A O K A I C A PO C K A I 4) I A C 
PCOAAAIOYEYCEBOYCGTOYCMHNOC 
AAEICIOYOEtOTHCMACKAinAPOE 
NOYXPHCTOYCKOCCOY>UENANAPOY 
KAI^YNHXH^'A~-EPIAANE0HKAN 
GAAAOYCANOIEnTHNHAAWNNAIOYPI 
CANEninAPA>UON.ii>UETAAETHN . 6) 
. NHX>tCONHyUtONEINAIAYTHNEAEY0E 
. \NYnOAIArHNHAIONANEnAct)H ... I 
. NEnHPEACTHNAnOTEAAOYKAinANTOC 
KAHPOf'OAAOYTP'-rTECeAl . . . . HN 

EHOIOWCI Al./I 



10 



BaaikivovTos fiaa-tXicos [2'av- 
pofidrov 'PiXoKaiaapos Kal <PiXo- 
p(o/iaiov Eva-t^ovs, erovs iirfvo^ 
AafKriov . fcorrjcrfjiai ? Kal Flapde- 
yov)(pr]<TTOvs Kocr<Tov MfvdvSpov 
Kal yvvTj X-qparakpia ? dyidrjKau 
QdXXovaav QpurT^v rjpa>i' vaiofj'^vpi- 
ffav knl napafiovrj^ fier^ Sh rfiu [^]<b- 
tf\v fi/xwu f)p(ov (Ivai avrfju iXevOe- 
pa^p iinh Ata, rijv, " HXiof, dveTrdtprj^v /cajt 
dlveTTTjpeda-Trjv dno r kjiov Kal wavTOS 
KXrjpovS/iov rpiireaOai \p' airYiv 



For similar deeds of enfranchisement found in the 
Crimea, see C. I. 21 14 (5, 211^ dd, 2131 <5; Stephani, 
Parerga in Melanges Greco-Romaines, St. P^ters- 
bourg, 1866, ii, p. 201, fol. ; Gille, Antiquites du 
Bospore, Inscript. xxii, xxiii ; Graefe, Inscript. Grsec. 
in M^moires de 1' Ac. Imp. St. Pdtersbourg, 6""^ serie, 
vi, p. 12. 

The late character of the palaeography makes it 
probable that the Sauromates in the heading is 
the fifth king of the Bosporos of that name. He 
reigned a.d. 231-33. 

Line 3. After irovs the numerals are omitted 
which in other inscriptions of the same class mark 
the date reckoned from the era of Bosporos. After 
Aaeia-iov, line 4, are illegible letters which may either 
be numerals marking the day of the month or more 
probably be part of the name which follows. The 
month Aa(i<rio5 occurs in another Crimean inscription 
(Stephani, Compte rendu, 1863, p. 207). This seems 
to be identical with the Macedonian month Aaicrios, 
C.I. 2943, K. F. Hermann, Monatskunde, pp. 52, loi. 



In lines 4-6 the names which are hardly legible 
may be Theotesmas and Parthenouchrestous, sons 
of Kossos Menandros and Chemataeria. flapOfuov- 
Xprjo-Tovs would thus be a barbarous corruption of 
the Greek name napQevo-^pria-ro^. See Bockh, C. I. ii, 
p. 1 14 and p. 1 1 7, on the prevalence of the diphthong 
ov in the Maeotic dialect. 

Line 7. vaiovpia-ay. Can this be a barbarous cor- 
ruption of vaiovaav in the sense of ' domiciled ' ? 

Line 9. The second -f^pZv must be governed by 
kXivBkpav, 

Line 10. vno Aia, rfjv, " HXiov. The same form 
of adjuration occurs in the deed of enfranchisement 
from Anapa, in Melanges Grdco-Romaines, ii, p. 201, 
where Stephani incorrectly reads vnoSidyr]. 

Line 12. After KXrjpovofiov there are traces of. 
letters which may be restored rpkinaOai [S' avT'\fjv, 
compare C. I. 211^ 6d, rpknea^ffjai [5'] avTov orrov dv 
[/SloiJrXTjIrai dv€TnK<oXvT<>)$. 

I can make nothing of line 13. 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 



39 



The following inscriptions, Nos. clxxxi to ccvi, were obtained by Colonel Westmacott at Kertch, 
during the occupation of that town by the allied English and French troops in 1856. Nos. CLXXXii, 
CLXxxiv, CLXxxix, cxc, cxci, cxcii, cxciv, CCVI, have been published by Ashik in his work in Russian, 
on the Antiquities of the Bosporos, Odessa, 1848, which I have cited under each of these Nos. 
These inscriptions appear to have been all found in the neighbourhood of Kertch except No. ccvi, 
which was found at Phanagoria. 



CLXXXI. 

On a marble stelfe, rounded at the top. Height, 2 ft. 5 in.; breadth, i ft. 5 in. Stephani, Bullet. Acad. S. P^tersb. 1856, p. 163, 
and in Melanges Grdco-Romaines, ii, p. 26. Kaibel, Epigr. Graec. p. 96, No. 250. 

.PAMhNiZ: 

XAIPE 

.... 'liroYrroAIHTINAPIIAAoNKAEOl 

. lOYNANAPETAiriNEKAFANEAOTTA . 
6 AYrrrENeHE' AIA^ ^^EMNONAETC 

oz:yttoi:taaaikpyf" . . . iaien/ . 
aankeygeikopoan"^ . .ozaaaama 

/ V ■'^ riKEINArEirOAoEAGANAT . . 



KXeoTrdr^pa Mr]i>i(r[Kov ? 
Xarpe 

Tfjv 'A'^UKTOv TToXirJTiv dpi(a\ov K\io\Tra.Tpav 

B'^iQvvav dperds 'iv(Ka nav^\6na\v 
apna<Ti\ SvanevOffs 'AtSas, a-f/ivop Sf to [^Kovpas 

aKaj/jos iinb o-raXa KpinTT(iTd\i aUvdlm' 
TT)v diT<i\\b,v KfvOei nop<pdv rfa^loy, aXX' dp.d[pai>Tov 

nvfvi/^a fifvei Keivas ey <pdos dddvaTfou. 



Six lines of Elegiac verse ; above the name of 
the deceased in majuscule letters. I have followed 
Kaibel's restorations, lines 5 and 7, in preference 
to those of Stephani. 

Line i. The P is quite clear on the marble 
before the A. Therefore Stephani's restoration 
K\€(^viKav, line 3, must be wrong. 

Line 4. ByOwdu. Stephani supposes that the 



subject of this epitaph was born at Amisos, and 
which is afterwards married in Bithynia. The com- 
parison to Penelope is not unusual in epitaphs. See 
Welcker, Sylloge Epigr. No. 157. 

Line 6. The three missing letters in /f/)un-r(era)t 
appear in Stephani's transcript, M6\. Greco-Rom. ii, 
p. 26. 



CLXXXII. 

Stelb of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 6,j in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 6| in. In relief above the inscription is a banquet scene, of which 
the upper part is broken away : on the couch has been a draped figure reclining, holding a cup in the left hand ; the head, 
shoulders, and right side of this figure are wanting. Below the head of the couch stands a diminutive male figure having 
on his left arm an oblong shield. In front of the couch is a three-legged table on which are three vases and a ladle 
(simpulum); in front of the foot of the couch is a male statue on a rectangular base, holding in the left hand a bunch of 
grapes (?), and wearing a short chiton and chlamys. Next on the left is a draped terminal figure treated architectonically and 
standing on a pedestal. Further to the left are two statuettes of draped female figures, much injured : in the background 
behind them is a table supporting an arcade of three arches. Ashik, ii, p. 69, No. 33. 

AEYIEANAPONE 
OY XAIPE 



8e vtk 'A fSpovf- 
ov X"'/'* 



40 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 



CLXXXIII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 3 in.; breadth, 2 ft. i^ in. The inscription is placed on a horizontal band between two 
reliefs, the upper of which is broken away, leaving only the lower part of the legs of a horse, the legs of a male figure standing 
at his head, and a dog between the legs of the horse. In the lower relief is a Scythian warrior riding to the right. By 
the side of his horse and nearer the spectator runs a foal, the feet of which, and the head of the warrior, are wanting. The 
warrior holds a spear in his right hand ; at his left side hangs the gorytos containing his bow and arrows ; on his right 
thigh is a sword. His face is broken away. 

APTCMIAnPEIAIorA 

eniTHzniNAKeiAoz 

XAIPE 

' A preftiScopfi Aioyd 
(wi Ttjs TTivaKuSos 
Xaipi 



This is a sepulchral monument to the memory of 
Artemidoros, son of Diogas. I am quite unable to 
explain <Tt t^s vivaKtiSos unless it has reference to 



one of the two reliefs on this monument. Compare 
C, I. 2007 y, AlXiavos NeiKmv .... dviaTr]<Tiv tov /Sta/iw' 
TW 8\ nivaKa dt/iaTrjae yafi^pbs avTov. 



CLXXXIV. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. i if in. ; breadth, i ft. 8f in. Above the inscription is a relief representing a distyle 
hereon in which is a male figure, draped and bearded, standing on the right and joining his right hand with that of a 
youth wearing a chiton and chlamys, who stands on the left. Ashik, ii, p. 64, No. 17. 

BAKXIEBATEOZ 
KAIYIEBAKXIE 
XAIPETE 

BdKy(ii Bdyeos 
Kal vif BdK)(^if 
yaiptTi 



CLXXXV. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 6 in.; breadth, i ft. 5 in. Above the inscription is a relief, much defaced, representing 

a distyle hereon within which a male figure stands on the right, wearing a short chiton and chlamys and joining his right 

hand with that of a female figure on the left, draped and veiled. Both face the front. On the left of the female figure 
is a diminutive female figure draped and carrying a cista. 

KC^AIATYNH 
A -^KOYPIA'^^ 

Kovaia yvvfj 
Aliola-KovpiSov 



CLXXXVI. 

Stelb of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 6J in. ; breadth, i ft. 6| in. Above the inscription is a relief representing a distyle 

hereon, within which a male figure wearing a chiton and chlamys stands to the front, joining his right hand with that of 

a female figure, draped and veiled, who stands on the left turned towards him. On the right of the male figure stands 
a diminutive male figure. All the faces are destroyed. 

TAIOi: TAIOY 
KAIMHTHPBAKIAI . . INA 
XAIPETE 



rdi'os ratov Kal lirjTrjp BacriXilvSlwa )(aipiT( 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 41 



OLXXXVII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 6 in. ; breadth, i ft. 9 J in. Upper part broken away. Above the inscription is a 
relief representing a distyle heroon, within which is a Scythian warrior riding to the right ; the case for his bow and arrows, 
gorytos, hangs behind him ; under his horse runs a dog. Behind the horse stands a diminutive male figure in a short chiton. 
The heads of both figures and of the horse are broken off. 

AAirKEAPIAPA 
MNOYXAIPE 

AataKf ' Apiapdfivov xoupt 



CLXXXVIII. 

Stel& of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, 2 ft. ; breadth, i ft. 8 in. Above the inscription is a relief representing 
a draped female figure standing to the front, the head and shoulders to near the waist wanting. On her left stands a dimi- 
nutive draped female figure, holding in both hands a cylindrical casket. 

AArXAIKINQAIor 
TYNHAEIXElOi: 

XAIPE 

Adaya ' iKivdikios 
yvvr) Sk l)(fTos 
Xatpf 



CLXXXIX. 

Stele of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 3 in. ; breadth, i ft. 25 in. Above the inscription is represented a distyle heroon, within 
which are two figures in relief standing to the front. On the right is a female figure draped and veiled. The figure on 
the left is male and wears a chiton and mantle. Both faces wanting. Ashik, ii, p. 70, No. 38. 

AlO lYCieAAMAXOY 
XAIPE 

AiOfvcrie Aafidyov 
Xalpt 



cxc. 

Stelb of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, 2 ft. 6iin.; breadth, i ft. 8i in. Above the inscription is a relief 
representing a female figure, standing to the front, draped and veiled. On the right is a diminutive female figure draped 
and carrying with both hands an oblong casket. The heads of both figures are destroyed. Ashik, ii, p. 68, No. 31. 

0EONIKH eYTATHP 
NIKIOY XAIPE 

OeoviKT) dvydrrjp 
NlKlOV X"*/"* 



M 



42 KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 

OXCI. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, 2 ft. 7 in.; breadth, 2 ft. 3I in. Above the inscription is a banquet scene. 
On tlie couch reclines a draped figure holding a kantharos in the right hand. At the foot of the couch is a female figure, 
draped and seated in a chair with her feet on a footstool. The heads of both these figures are wanting; the seated figure 
is turned towards the reclining figure. In front of the couch is a three-legged table on which are two vases and a ladle, 
simpulum : to the right of this table is a diminutive male figure carrying a vase in his right hand, in his left a branch. On 
the left of the seated female figure stands a diminutive female figure draped and carrying a cista. Ashik, ii, p. 70, No. 40. 

ICirONHrYNHHPAKAIAOY 

XAIPE 

HPAKAEIAH § 

XAIPE 

JaiyovT] yvvrj HpaKXiSov 

Xaipe 

' HpaKXiiSt] § 

XaTpe 

§, line 3, is probably for yvff) ^, ' second wife.' 



CXOII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, i ft. gf in.; breadth, i ft. 7f in. Above the inscription is a relief 
representing a male figure on the right and a female figure on the left, both standing to the front and draped : they have 
apparently joined right hands. The head of the male figure and the female figure down to the waist are wanting. On the 
left of the female figure stands a diminutive female figure draped. Ashik, ii, p. 67, No. 24. 

KYPIAINA KAIYIE 
APIZZTArOPA XAIPETE 

Kvpiaiva Koi vie 
'Api<T(TTay6pa xaipere 



CXCIII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 2 ft. 4^ in. ; breadth, i ft. 7f in. Above the inscription is represented a distyle herSon, within 
which stands on the right a draped male figure turned to the front: on the left a smaller male figure wearing a short chiton 
and chlamys stands to the front, resting the left elbow and right hand on the top of a pillar. On the extreme left stands 
a diminutive male figure in a short chiton. The heads of all these figures are wanting. 

HPAKAElAHPArTEloK 
XAIPE 

' HpaK\((8r) riatTTiioi 

Xatpe 



CXCIV. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, i ft. 9 in. ; breadth, i ft. 4^ in. Above the inscription is a relief representing 
a female figure draped and resting the left elbow on a pillar. On the left stands a diminutive female figure draped and carrying 
an oblong casket with open lid. The heads of both figures are broken off. Ashik, ii, p. 70, No. 39. 

I 

<t>IAWTGPA4)IAWTC 
YOYrATHPrYNHACHZO 
YPAP .A Al . € 

<t>i\a>Tfpa <Pi\Stov Qvydrrfp, yvvfj 8e 'H^ov' nap^^ajS^ura x]a<"[p]€ 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 43 



cxcv. 

Stele of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, 2 ft. 1 1 J in. ; breadth, 2 ft. Above the inscription is a relief representing 
a female figure draped, standing to the front, and resting the left elbow and right hand on the top of a pillar. On the left 
stands a diminutive draped female figure. The heads of both figures broken away. 

I'YXAPinNOi: n T 
ATAGOrAEIAi: 

/ I A. TAKAIEYKAEIHr 
5 ^^OV UIMEAAXONTTATPHIZENAE 

Yvxapicouos 
'AyaOoKXecai 
X^aipje 

Kal evKXfiT]^ // (Xa^of 

5 ndrprji^ ey Sk 

Lines 4 and 5 are probably part of an epitaph in elegiac verse. 



CXCVI. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, upper part wanting. Height, 2 ft. if in.; breadth, i ft. | in. Above the inscription is a relief 
representing the lower part of a draped female figure seated to the front on a chair with footstool. On the left is a 
diminutive female figure draped and carrying a cista. 

YYXHrVNHBPAAA 
KOY XAIPE 

Vf^^ yvi/fj BpaSuKov x**/"* 



CXCVII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, the right side broken away. Height, 5 ft. | in. ; breadth, i ft. 1 1 ^ in. Above the inscription is repre- 
sented a distyle heroon, within which in relief is a draped female figure seated to the right on a chair with a footstool. With 
her left hand she draws aside the veil from her neck, her right hand rests on her lap. Before her on the right stands a 
diminutive draped female figure. Behind her on the left stands a still more diminutive draped female figure holding a cista. 
The side rail of the chair rests on the figure of a Sphinx. 

EAAArrVNH 

MMNOAHPOY 

XAIPE 

" EXXas yvvfi 
MrjvoSmpov 
XaTpe 



CXCVIII. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, top wanting. Height, 2 ft. 2^ in. ; breadth, i ft. 9I in. Above the inscription is a relief representing 
two female figures draped and veiled, standing to the front and joining right hands : both faces destroyed. 

AIOAOTHrYNHnAM4'IAOY 

©YrATHPAEnPEnnTor 

KAIMHTHPKAAI2TH 
XAIPETE 

AloSorrj yvvfj na/j.<piXov 
Ovydrr/p Sf flpfneoTOi 
Kal fJ-TiTrjp KaXicTTTj 
■)(a(piTi 



44 KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 

CXCIX. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, top broken away. Height, 2 ft. 3^ in. ; breadth, i ft. 7 in. Above the inscription is a relief representing 
a female figure draped and veiled, standing to the front and resting her left elbow on her right hand. On the left is a 
diminutive female figure draped and carrying a casket. On the right is a diminutive male figure. The heads of these three 
figures are destroyed. 

ONH rVNH 
XA OZ XAIPE 

oytj yvvT] 



CO. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, broken at foot. Height, 2 ft. S^in. ; breadth, i ft. 11^ in. Above the inscription is represented the 
front of an hereon, within which are two figures in relief: on the left is a draped female figure seated on a chair turned to 
the right, her left hand raised towards her head; her right hand extended from the elbow holds a mirror: on the right 
stands a female figure draped and veiled, her left hand raised to her head, her right hand holding an end of drapery across 
her waist; on either side of her is a diminutive draped female figure; the one carries a casket, the other an object not now 
distinguishable. 

r^^nrKl^H ©YTA 

Q€0<piXri Ovya^TTjp 



CGI. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone, the foot broken away. Height, 2 ft. 4f in. ; breadth, i ft. 6^ in. Above the inscription is a female 
figure draped and seated on a chair with a footstool. She is turned to the right : her left hand is raised to her head, her 
right hand rests on her lap; before her on the right stands a diminutive draped female figure. Both faces destroyed. 

OTH rVNH 

" .... OTT] yVVT\ 



con. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, 4 ft. \ in. ; breadth, 2 ft. sf in. The front of an hereon, within which is seated in high relief 
to the front a female figure, draped and veiled. Her left hand resting on her left knee holds a fruit ; her right hand holds 
the edge of her mantle, which is brought over the head like a veil. On the left stands a diminutive draped female figure 
carrying a basket in her right hand and a purse (?) in her left. The inscription runs under the pediment of the hereon. 

APTinOYCAAKlMCOLH 
' ApTitrovs AXKifxa) Lfl 



com. 

Bust in calcareous stone. Height, i ft. ifin. ; breadth, iij in. Male figure draped on shoulders: much disfigured. 

The inscription is on a tablet forming a base to the bust. 



KAI nOCBACCAPOV 


€ TUUN 


Kdpnoi BacTcrdpov 


iTCOf 



COIV. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, i ft. iijin. ; breadth, i ft. 6 J in. Above the inscription is a distyle hereon, within which is 
a horseman riding slowly to the right; a chlamys hangs from his left shoulder, and the gorytos is attached to his left side. 

A T JGF 



KIMMERIAN BOSPOROS. 



45 



GOV. 

Stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, £ ft. lo in. ; breadth, i ft. 6J in. Above the inscription is a relief representing a draped 
female figure standing on the right: her head, left shoulder, and breast wanting. On the left stands a diminutive female 
figure, draped and carrying a casket. 



CCVI. 

Marble stelfe, top and right side wanting. Height, i ft. 2| in.; breadth, i ft. 3 in. Above the inscription remain the lower part 
of the legs of a horse, standing to the right, and the legs of a male figure, standing at the head of the horse. Found at 
Phanagoria, thence moved to Yenikale near Kertch. C.I. 2129. Ashik, ii, p. 80, No. 5. 

HZoYZAnoAAt . . 
AoYTolZnAPAr . . 
ZIN XAIPEI*^ 

'H^oCs ' AnoX^Soii'i- 
Sov Toii Trapdy\ov- 
crif yaipeiv 



The form roh trapdyovcnv \aipiiv instead of X**P* irapoSTra is unusual. 



Ashik reads ' AnoWcoi^CjSov and 



M 



CHAPTER IV. 

ISLANDS OF THE ^GEAN: 

THASOS, LESBOS, SAMOS, KALYMNA, KOS, TELOS, RHODES, 

KASSOS, KARPATHOS. 



CCVII. 

On an oblong block of white marble, with a joint on the right side and on the top. The back of the block has been sawn off. 
Length, 3 ft. 9 J in.; breadth, i ft. 5 in. Brought from Thasos in 1728 by Captain J. Hales. Archseologia of Soc. Ant. 
Lond. i, p. 333, where a facsimile is given; C. I. 2164. 

Z.EAAPIOI MOPMIAAONE 

tKATAIAZAAirinAN^EKATAIAZ^TYNAAPEfir^EKATAIAi. 
A^AnEAYeH^NI^e^ZTE^AI^ENIKA^TI^AnEAYGH^EKATA 



'E<r](TeSdpioi 
6 SfTua] 'EKaraias Aiyinav 'EKaraias 

eviKoja ? dneXvOr] vi . 6 . are . ai 

This inscription is the fragment of a Hst of gladi- 
ators ranged under the two classes called Essedarii 
and Mormillones. After the name of each gladiator 
follows that of Hekataia, the lady who owned the 
band. (See Friedlander, Sittengeschichte Roms, ii, 



Mop/iiWofels 
TvvSdpecos EKaraias [o SeTva 
hUa Ti. direXvOt] 'EKara^ias kviKa 

p. 341.) In line 3 vi. stands for vikwv, (tt(. for ore- 
(f)afco6eis, as in C. I. 2889. See Bockh, adloc, amXiiOr] 
probably has the same force as the Latin missio in 
reference to a gladiatorial contest. Compare dtn- 

XxjOriaay, C. I. 6855/ 



covin. 

On the left hand upper corner of a block of grey marble: the top edge and left side as far as the four uppermost lines are 

perfect. Height, i ft.; breadth, 11 in. Mytilenb; C.T.N. 



10 



APIZTOTt. 
EPAINni Oc 
EIKONIXAAKE 
ENTOISArnZ 

ENin 
\NArOPEYZ 
'TAIZPAN/ 
TAZENE 
NAIA 



Fragment of an honorary decree conferring a 
bronze statue and other distinctions, such as npofSpia 
in the public games and proclamation of honours, on 



' Apia-Toy 

knatvco 

i'lKovi. y^dXK^a Kal npofSpia 

kv ToTs dywafi 

kv T& lOedrpa) ? 
ajj/ayopevofej 

Tais Trai^ayvpea-i 

dpehas eVe[/ca &,y 

exft)]*/ Sta^TeXeT} 



10 



some public benefactor, probably the person men- 
tioned in the first line. 



LESBOS. 



47 



COIX. 

On a fragment of a block of grey marble, complete only on the left side. 

I 

^APOZOEnYino 

NEIPEOZKAIAI^ 

nin KAinpoT 
nr 

6 ArAQATYXA 5 

MENKATTAN/ 
KESTINEYP 
AOrHTAIAflC 
BAAEZOAITAN 
10 nPOZOENIKA lo 

OYAYNAMEN/ 
TIZTAPKAIAY 
nAPAMIAAAi 

TnroNEriN 

15 APXATPT A 15 

TnN 



Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 



The second line is restored by the evidence of 
C. I. 2194: Kal lepei/s Sia yei'fos tS> crayrfipos ' AarKKaTTLw 
K.T.X. Compare the dedication by a priest of Askle- 
pios to the God in an inscription from Mytilene, 
Bullet, de Corr. Helldn. 1880, p. 426, No. 5. In 



Height, 11^ in.; breadth, 5 in. 

[- Kal- 

(rapos BeS) vim &€& ? 

flpios Kal Sia [yeifeos tm acor^poi A(TKXa- 

TTJcS Kal irpoT^epov ? 

Line erased. 

'AyaOa Tv^a 

ixff Karrav [ ov- 

K k<TTlV €Vp 

XoyrjTai dno 

^aXecrOai rav 

iTp6<rQiv 

oil Swafiev 

Tis yhp Kal Sr^arhi ? 

napafMiXXda^QaL ? 

TO) yovicov 

apxayiTa 

Toav 

avT 



Style our inscription resembles the decree in honour 
of some personage of the Augustan age (C. I. 2167 af; 
Conze, Lesbos, pi. vii, i), but it probably belongs to 
a later date, and may be part of a congratulatory 
address to an Emperor on his birthday. 



OCX. 

On a fragment of a slab of grey marble, broken on all sides; on the left, and separated by an incised vertical line, are remains 
of another inscription, which has been chiselled away, as has been also partially the fourth line in this inscription. Height, 
in. ; breadth, 5 in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 



4| 



TNAL 

noMnh 

nMET/ 
AOZniH 



The relations between Pompey and the city of 
Mytilene were of a very friendly nature, see Plehn, 



nofiirT]\^t- 
a> Meyd- 
X<o Zcorfjlpi 

Lesbiaca, p. 81 ; and the inscriptions in his honour, 
Conze, Lesbos, pi. viii, i, and p. 13 ; and ccxi, post. 



CCXI. 

On a pedestal of grey marble ; the left side and the mouldings along the top and bottom have been broken away ; the inscription 
is arranged in three columns separated by shallow sunken bands. Height, 8 in. ; breadth, i ft. 5 J in. Mytilen^ ; C. T. N. 
The uncials are published, Archaol. Zeitung, Berlin, 1854, p. 515. 



rNAI^tiunul 
I^rNAi^Tia 
METAA^ATTO 
KRATOPITi^ET 
EPTETAKAira 
THPIKAIKTIKTA 

Fyaico flovnri- 

t<o ruaioo vim 

I 4, 

fifydXm AvTo- 
Kpdropi rm (V- 
epyera Kal am- 
rrjpi Kal ktio-to. 



/ 



Zi.A 



*< . . 



Ria*IAonATRIAI 

eEO*ANHTc^i:^ 

THRIKAIETERTE 

TAKAIKTirTAAET 

TER^TArnATRIAOi: 



pi(fi <(>iXo7rdTpiSi 
6fO(f)dvT) rm am- 
TTJpi Kal fvfpye- 
ra Kal KTiara Sev- 
r€p<p ray waTpiSo^ 



iTOTAMHN' 

AEITBaNAKTO. 

TaETERTETA 

KAir^THPOi: 

KAIKTirTATA^ 

noAioi: 

rioTdfimvi 
Afor^myaKTC^S 
rm (VfpytTa 
Kal (rmrijpoi 
Kal KTiara ras 
noXios 



48 



LESBOS. 



In this inscription the names of Pompey, of Theo- 
phanes, of Lesbonax, and of his son Potamon, are 
associated in a triple dedication. Theophanes of 
Mytilcn^. an intimate friend and follower of Pompey, 
and the historian of his campaigns, was, according to 
Strabo, the most distinguished Greek of his time. 
The Mytilenasans, to whom through his influence 
autonomy was restored by Pompey, granted him 
divine honours after his death, and struck in his 
honour bronze coins, still extant (see Plehn, Les- 
biaca, pp. 8i, 211, 212; and for the fortunes of his 



descendants, Kaibel in Ephemeris Epigraphica, ii, 
p. 19, xxiii). Lesbonax, father of Potamon, was 
a distinguished Mytilenaean sophist who lived in the 
reign of Augustus, and whose name with the epithet 
^pcos veos appears on the bronze coins of Mytilene. 
He is also here styled benefactor, saviour, and 
founder of his native city. For Potamon his son, 
see ccxii post. 

Line i. Too little remains of the first line of the 
dedication to Theophanes to enable me to offer a 
conjectural restoration. 



CCXII. 

On a stelfe of grey marble, the left side broken away ; along the top has been a moulding. 

Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 

nOTAMHNI 
\ECBnNAKT 
OCTnCHTHPI 
KAIEYEPTETAKA 
5 IKTICTATACn 
OAIOC 



floTafjiaiyi 1 Ae(rPa>i'aKT\os tw aaTrjpi \ Kal eiifpyeTO, Kali KTcara tocs nloXios. 



Height, I ft. f in. ; breadth, 85 in. 



Potamon, the son of Lesbonax, was distinguished 
for his varied erudition, and had much influence 
with Tiberius; see Plehn, Lesbiaca, p. 218. He was 
held in high honour, as appears not only from this 
and the preceding inscription, but also from C. L 
2182, which last shews that he had the right of 
wpoeSpCa in the theatre at Mytilene. 

In the castle at Mytilene is a dedication by Pota- 
mon to an Emperor, probably Tiberius. Bullet, de 
Corresp. Hell^n. 1880, p. 426. 



In an inscription copied by Cyriac of Ancona in 
Mytilene (Kaibel, in Ephemeris Epigraphica, ii, 
p. II, No. vii), Aurelia Artemisia, a priestess, is 
described as the descendant of Potamon rw uo/ioOira 
Kal Aea-^MuaKTos fS> (piXoaocpa). Kaibel, in publishing 
this, remarks that Potamon is unknown as a legis- 
lator, but that he may have mediated, (ssymnet(Z 
instar, in civil dissensions and litigations at My- 
tilene. 



CCXIII. 

On a base of grey marble ; the inscription separated into two columns by a raised vertical band. 

Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 



Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 10 in. 



TAItOKAl 
CAPIAriMO 
NITACNEO 
TATOE 



AEYKiCOKAl 
CAPIAriMO 
NITACNE 
OTATOC 



Fauo Kal crapi ' Ayifi6\vi rds i/eoiTaroy 
AiVKL(o Kai\arapL 'Ayinolui t5.s veloTaros 



In line 4 of the first column the fifth letter, E, is 
evidently a blunder of the lapidary for C. On the 
honorary title Princeps Juventutis, of which 'Ayinwv 
rds vioraros is here a translation, see Mommsen, in 
Handbuch d. romisch. AlterthUmer, ii, pt. 2, 2nd edit, 
p. 800, and in Res Gestae Divi Augusti, p. 34. The 
Monumentum Ancyranum, ibid. p. 32, states that 
Caius and Lucius Caesar were made Principes Juven- 
tutis by the Roman Equites, and presented with silver 
parmze and hastse. Caius died a.d. 4 (a.u.C 757), 
Lucius A.D. 2 (a.u.C. 755). Our inscription must 



therefore be older than the earliest of these dates. 
Again, Caius was Consul a. d. i and could not have 
been styled Princeps Juventutis after being invested 
with that higher dignity (see Mommsen, loc. cit.). On 
the other hand our inscription cannot be earlier than 
B.C. 3 (a.u.C. 751), when Lucius Caesar was made 
Princeps Juventutis, Caius having been previously 
so honoured, b.c. 6 (a. u. c. 748), See Mommsen, 
Res Gestae Divi Augusti, p. 142. It is probable, 
therefore, that this dedication was made b.c i 
(a.u.C. 753), when Caius was sent to the East. 



LESBOS. 



49 



CCXIV. 

On a base of grey marble, with moulding at top and bottom. Height, i ft. i in.; breadth, 9 J in. Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 



AYTOKPATO 
PINEPOYATPA 
lANQAPirT.Q 
KAirAPIEEBA 
rTQTEPMANI 
KQAAKIK.QTTAP 
elKQXAPirTH 
PION 



AvTOKparo- 
pi Nepova Tpa- 
iay£ ' Api(TT(o 
Kaiaapi Zefia- 
<TT^, r^pnavi- 
K^, AaKiKw, Hap- 
6ik£ \aptarTrj- 
piov 



For dedications to Trajan at Mytilene, see C. I. 2178 and 2179, and Bullet, de Corresp. Hellen. 1880, 

p. 428, Nos. 7-10, and p. 442, No. 24. 



ccxv. 

On a base of white marble, with mouldings at top and bottom. Height, 7i in.; breadth, 5J in. From near village of 

Keramia; C. T. N. 

rEKOYN 
aAEYXH. 
KAIETPI/ 
ANE0HKEN 

ZfKovfSa eiJx'^M Ka'ivTpia ? a.vfdr)Kiv 



CCXVI. 

On a slelfe of dark grey marble, the top in the form of a pediment. Height, i ft. 7 in. ; breadth, i ft. i\ in. 

C. I. 2195, and Addenda ii, p. 1028. 

niCTICHPAK 
AEIAOYTIBEPI 
OCKAAYAIOCEYO 
AICONKYPIOITHN 
5 KATATEICOTA 

*WNTCONEIEAY 
. OYCKATHNTH 
wAnCPNi 

PicTTis 'HpaK\\fi8ov, Tifiipiloi KXavSioi Evo\Sio)v, icvptoi twu I 
Karayi'm {sic) Ta\(^v twv et(y) ay|[T]oi)y KaTr}i/Tri\[K6Ta)\y anh 



Mytilenb; C. T. N.; 



Bockh follows Kiepert in reading Anaaiv last line, 
but the letters as given above are quite clear on the 
stone. He supposes that an imprecation on those 
who may violate these tombs followed. In KaTayeim 
line 5, the lapidary has evidendy left out the final 



letter v. In EIEA Y, line 6, the second E is probably 
a blimder for E. tHov KarrivT'q^Korai^v (Is avTovs may 
mean 'which have devolved on them;' dnS may re- 
fer to the source from which they have derived 
their right of ownership. 



so LESBOS. 



CCXVII. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of grey marble, which has been surmounted by a pediment, now for the most part broken away. 

Height, 6|in.; breadth, lo in. Mytilenfe; C.T.N. 

AAlZTAAAEHANAPn 
XAIPE 

ASiara 'AXe^dfSpco youpi 



CCXVIII. 

On the upper part of a stele of grey marble ; the top terminates in a pediment. Height, ^^ in. ; breadth, 5| in. 

Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 

ANTIOXOCCtOCOY 'AvtIoxos 2w<rov 

X A I P G X"'/'^ 



OCXIX. 

On a stelfe of grey marble, the lower part broken away ; the top terminates in a pediment ; traces of red colour on the pediment 

and in the letters. Height, 9 in.; breadth, 6f in. Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 

AIHZAEINOKAH Air}s AeivoKXfj 

XAIPE X*'/'* 



coxx. 

On a fragment of grey marble; the right side of the inscription broken away. Height, 3!^ in.; breadth, 6i in. 

Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 

AIONYCIAC Aiot^va-tas 

TACMOYCAI Tas Movaai- 

WENTEAEOC a, hreXeos 

I cannot explain evtfXfos. 



CCXXI. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of grey marble ; the top terminates in a pediment, in the centre of which is a shield. 

Height, 4I in. ; breadth, 7^ in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 



^ A I P E X"'/'^ 



CCXXII. 

On a stel^ of grey marble, rounded at the top. Height, 9^ in. ; breadth, 8^ in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 

rY0ACNYM(t)l 
OCXAIP£INTON 
HAPOAON 

imOas N6/x<pi\o9 xaipfiv rbf I trap' 6S6v 



LESBOS. 



51 



CCXXIII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble; above the inscription remain the feet of a figure which has been sculptured in relief; 
the right side of the inscription is broken away. Height, 7| in.; breadth, 8f in. Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 

AoY.loY.TPo(|)lM 
Aov. 'lov. Tpo(l>tfJ[ov 



CCXXIV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of grey marble ; complete on the left side ; along the top is a moulding ; below the inscription is a 

laurel wreath in relief. Height, 9 in. ; breadth, g\ in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 

TIMAPXOSIGAKj-lXAII 



ccxxv. 

On a fragment of white marble, broken on all sides. Height, 45 in.; breadth, 7^ in. Mytilenfe; C. T. N. 



lo 

TnOIK 
YnoOEZ© 
nAPATAYnE 
KYPIOYKAIS 
. HEYGYNO" 



T(0 OIK 

vTToOicrB 



rrapa to. imelp tov 
Kvpiov Kaia\(ipoi 
vjirevOvvos 



CCXXVI. 

On a fragment of grey marble ; complete on the top. Height, 5I in. ; breadth, 5 J in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 

^ey]t(rTa ? flvOia y^vfiv- 
a<riyip\r]i' ? Sco/x 
va fXfvdfpa 



ISTAPYOIAr 

APXHNAnM 

NAEAEYOEP/ 

ONKAIMHAE 

NSYNKATAi 

INZPYO 



ov Kai prj 
cvvKara 
a)v<nrv6 



Se 



CCXXVII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 4^ in.; breadth, 4J in. Mytilenb ; C. T. N. 

AKEAP. 

.ANEXni 
JkNEPMAI 
5 HNKOINO 

reripyiKe Ap 
Sta rdi fvvoiaij Stv tx^" •' SiartXti ? 
TTphs rh Koivhy rlaf ' E pfiailarav ? 
tov KOIVO 



This may be a fragment of an honorary decree 
for services rendered to the religious association 
of Hermaista;. 

Mention of the koivov of Hermaistee occurs in 



an inscription from Tralles, published by Gelzer, 
Rheinisches Museum, 1872, p. 467, and also in 
the Mov(7iiov Evayy. ZxoXfji of Smyrna, pt. i, p. 66, 
No. 9. 



52 



LESBOS — SAMOS. 



OCXXVIII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 3^ in.; breadth, 3^ in. Mytilenb; C. T. N. 



xni 
aozipoi 

ZONANG 
TOIAN K 



X<B[pa ? 
/4/3re//t]5oy Ipw 

(TOV OLvQ' \SiV ? 



CCXXIX. 

On a fragment of grey marble, complete only on the top. Height, 35^ in. ; breadth, 3^ in. Mytilenfe ; C. T. N. 



AAIA 

aSia 
yp]a<pT] ? 



ccxxx. 

On a bronze votive hare, obtained at Samos by the late Mr. C. R. Cockerell, from whom it passed into the collection of the late 
Mr. Thomas Burgon. Length, 2^^ in.; height, i^^ in. Engraved, Brondsted, i, p. 109; Rose, Inscriptions, p. 326, pi. xli, 2; 
C. I. 2247. 



& 



T^ AnoWcovi tS> ripirjKfjt jx dve6rjKei> ' H(f>aicrTia>v 



In publishing this inscription Bockh follows 
Brondsted in attributing it to a period as late as 
Olymp. 1 1 2-1 1 5, B.C. 332-317. But had he ex- 
amined the original, he would have recognised the 
unmistakeably archaic character of the palaeography. 
Kirchhoff, Studien, 3rd edition, p. 30, assigns this 
dedication to the first half of the fifth century b. c. 
The forms of the <^, H, and ^ would not justify an 
earlier date. 

The / in PPIHAHI is quite certain. It is possible 
that in the Ionic dialect of Samos npir]\ri'i may have 
been used for flpiTfvfjt at the date of this inscription, 
but it is much more probable that the engraver 
omitted the left strode of the N in this word. 
The name of the dedicator has always been read 
' Hfaia-rimy, but the Tl are very difficult to make out, 
because the engraver has evidently made some 
blunder here, setting the T upside down, and mixing 



it up with some other letter which he has not been 
able to erase. An oblique stroke may be taken for 
the /. The facsimile in Brondsted, and still more 
that in Bockh, are incorrect in several letters. 

This inscription is written throughout from right 
to left. On the left shoulder of the hare is a round 
hole, which probably once held the arrow or javelin 
with which it was slain. The body is represented 
bounding forward, the head thrown back in agony. 
The motion is rendered with great spirit. The 
bronze is solid. 

We know from Pausanias ii, 31, § g, that the 
Apollo Pythios was worshipped at Priene from very 
early times (see Panofka, Res Samiorum, p. 63). 
The epithet t£ npirjXfji or llpirjvfi'i in this inscription 
may have been added to distinguish the Apollo to 
whom the dedication is made from the Pythian 
God. 



KALYMNA. 53 



The following inscriptions, Nos. ccxxxi to cccxxxni, were all obtained by me in the island of 
Kalymna, and the greater part of them were found in the course of excavations made by me on 
the site of the Temple of Apollo Delios in the year 1854. See my Travels and Discoveries, i, 
pp. 304-315. The present church of Christos stands on this site, and has been built out of the ruins 
of the temple (see L. Ross, Reisen, ii, p. 96). 

Most of the inscriptions obtained in these excavations were found a few yards to the west of the 
west front of the temple. Nearly all of them, together with other marbles from Kalymna, were 
presented to the British Museum in 1856 by Viscount Stratford de Redcliffe, then Her Majesty's 
Ambassador at the Porte. 

CCXXXI. 

On a slab of while marble, with moulding round the edges; on the right side the moulding has been broken away. Both on the 
right and the left edges of the stone are oblong holes sunk to receive metal cramps. I found this inscription built into a 
modern Greek tomb, the proprietor of which was so obliging as to give it to me in exchange for an ordinary stone. Height, 
I ft. 5J in. ; breadth, 3 ft. n in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

APIETO<J)IAOEAPIETOAaPOYEinEEnEIAHAPATOKPITOSAPIITiAAIAAEZAMENOSTANPAPAT . . 

rONEnNEYNOIANANEXONTEZAIETEAESANnOTITOYSnOAITAZENTETOIZAOIPOIZKAIPOIZ ... 

AOYGnZTAIKEINnNAIPESEIPANTAPP^ZZnNTAXPHZIMAAIATETEAEKETAIPATPIAIMETAP . 

T»'=-EYNOIAZKAIPOAAAKIZEIZTATOYAAMOYZYM0EPONTAXPHMATAEKTnNIAIjnNK . . AY 
5 ... OEIZEYPOPHKEEZriNZYMBAINEIPOAAATniAAMniTnNXPHZIMriNrErENHZG T. . . 

v//xlTANPOAAOIZXPEIAZPAPEIZXHTAIKAIPAPAITIOZrErENHTAITOIZMENAIXMAA . . U'iP . . . 

GEIZINEIZTANPATPIAAEPANEAOEINTOIZAETAIAIAEPANOPOnZAZOAIAIATANAYTOYPO . . 

... TAZEYXAPlZTIANNYNTETANAYTANAIPEZINEXnNKAIPPOAIPEYMENOZTOIEPONTC . 

. . . AAONOZTOYAAAIOYEPIKOZMEINKAITANPATPIAAEIZEPIOANEIANArEINOPnZTOIMF . . 
10 ... vAIXOPIKOIArnNEZZYNTEAnNTAITOIZTEGCOIZKAITOIZEYEPrETAIZKAOAKAIOAAMOi . . . 

AlPEITAIAITEITAITOPONPOTITniGEATPniOZEZTIENTnilEPniTOYAPOAAnNOZnZTEZKAN 

PPOZKANIONKATAZKEYAZAITniGEniPAZANENTEAHTANOIKOAOMIANKAITANZYM(t)PAZINY<t)l 

NOZEZnNZYMBAINEIAAPANANAZIOAOrONAYTONEKTnNIAinNANAAIZKEINEIZTANTAZ.<i . . 

NAZKAIPPOZKANIOYKATAZKEYANAEAOXGAITAIBOYAAIKAITniAAMniEPAINEZAIAPATOKPI . . . 
15 APIZTIAAPETAZENEKEKAIEYNOIAZANEXEIPOTIPANTAZTOYZPOAITAZKAIAOMENAYTHIT 

PONTONPOTITniGEATPmONAITEITAIAEAOZGAIAEAYTniKAIANArPA<t)ANTOYAETOYtA<t)IZMATO . . 

TAZZKANAZANANATIGHTIKAIAAAANANArPAOANTAZANAGEZEnZEPITOYPPOZKANIOYTAN^ . 

APATOKPITOZAPIZTIATANZKANANKAITOPPOZKANIONZTE0ANA<t)OPHZAZAPOAAnNIA/ 

' A piaT6<f)i\oi ' ApiaroSdopov etTre (neiSfj AparoKpiTOt Apicrrta SiaSf^dfieuo^ rav irapa rToJi/ 
yoviwv cCvoiav &,v e\ovTi^ SifrfXtaav ttotI tov^ noXiras €f re Toii Xoinoii Kaipoli [a/co- 
\ov6o)9 TO, Kiivcov aipiCTii ndi'Ta rrpdacrcop ra y^pria-ifia SiarereXfKf ra narpiSi /ifra. Tffa- 
tray fiivoiai Kai ttoXXuki? (is ri rov Sd/iov crvn(pfpoyTa -^pruxaTa (k twv ISimv i^iv^Sv- 
5 vtvXGus fVTTopTjKi, (^ cof ovp^aivfi TToXXa T(p 8dpa> twv ^(^pricri/j.ciii' yfyeufja-^ai kul] tTcoc ir- 
oXirdf TToXXoii ^pfiai TTapii<T)(r]Tai koI napairioi ytyiv-qrai toIs p-if ai)(^paX[d>T'\ois '/[«»'»?- 
6ii<nv tli TCLv warpiSa knaviXOilv, Toii Sk rii tSia firaifopOcoa-aa-dai Sia rap avTov ttoFtj 
irdv\ras iv\api<Triav, vvv re rav avrdv alpeaiv i-)(a>v koL npoaiptvfiivos to Upov T(iv 
' Ano^Xoivos Tov AaXiov (TriKoafiuv kuI rav TrarptSa (h kni(f)dv(iav dyuv onoas rol pf[Xi- 

10 Koi KJai xop'foi dywuei avvreXwyTai T019 re Ofoh Kai tois (txpytTais KaOi. Kat 6 Sdpos \irpo- 
aiptiTat^ aiTfiTai toitov ttoti t£ BidTpco 09 (cm (v raJ i(pS> tov AttoXXcovos, &<tt( (rKai^df Kai 
TrpocTKdviov KaTa<TK(vd^ai toU Q(<o irdcrav (VT(Xri, tolv oiKoSo/iiay Kat Tay crviKJypa^iv v(f)i\iTTdfi(- 
vos, (^ Siv avfi^aivd Sandvav d^ioXoyov airrov (K r&y iSicoy avdXiaKdv di Tay Tdi of^co- 
ydi Kat irpoaKayiov KaTa<TK(vdvj S(86-)(6aL to. fiovXa Kai tqJ Sd/im (naivicrai AparoKpSrov 

15 ApioTia dp(Tdi (V(Kf Kat (vvoias Sj* «x*' 'i^otI vdyTai toi)s noXiras Kai S6/i(y avTZ rfof t6- 

irov Toy itotI t(o 6(dTp<o hv aiT(iTai, S(S6cr6at S( ainZ Kai dvaypa<f>dy tovS( tov i^acfjicrpaTcl^'S (nl 
Tai (TKaydi dy dyaTtOrjTi Kat dXXay dyaypa^dy ray dva6(CT(U)s (irl tov npoa-Kaytov rdy^c 
ApaTOKptTos AptOTia Tay (TKaydy Kai to wpoaKdytoy ffr«payo(()opTJ(ra9 AnoXXcoyt AalXim. 



54 



KALYMNA. 



This is a decree reciting the many services 
rendered by Aratokritos, son of Aristias, to the 
city of Kalymna, and to certain of its citizens, by 
ransoming prisoners and by other liberal acts. The 
decree further states that Aratokritos now wishes 
to ornament the Hieron of the Delian Apollo by 
adding to the Theatre within its precincts a Sken^ 
and Proskenion, in order that Melic and Choric 
contests may be celebrated in honour of the Gods 
and benefactors, and in accordance with the wish of 
the Demos ; the site for these buildings which he 
asks for is granted, and it is further decreed that 
Aratokritos is to be honoured with an iiraivos, that 
a copy of this decree is to be engraved on the 
Skene, and that on the Proskenion be engraved the 
following dedication : ' Aratokritos, son of Aristias, 
being Stephanephoros, (dedicates) the Skene and 
Proskenion to the Delian Apollo.' 

Within the precincts of this temple I found a base 
dedicated to /CaXXio-jTpaT?;, the daughter of Aratokritos. 
This may be the person commemorated in this de- 



cree (see also ccLiipost). Aratokritos was evidently 
of a rich family, as the decree mentions, lines i, 2, 
that his parents had also been public benefactors. 

On a piece of Doric architrave now built into the 
inner face of the western wall of the church of 
Christos, over the doorway, Ross copied the letters 
NA . . PHIAIAPOAA (see his Reisen, ii, p. 98), and 
remarks that they are probably the remains of the 
dedicatory inscription on some votive monument 
near the Temple of Apollo. There can hardly be 
a doubt that this inscribed fragment of architrave, 
which Ross describes as of small dimensions, was 
once part of the proskenion. We may thus restore the 
inscription on it ITE<PA]NA[<PO]PHIAIAnOAA[nNI. 
The Stephanephoros is mentioned in another Ka- 
lymnian decree, posi. No. ccxcviii. 

The theatre at Epidauros stood within the Hieron. 
Pausan. ii, 27, § 5. 

Lines 4, 5. K[iu]Sv[yev]6€is. Compare Demosth. 
adv. Phorm. ed. Reiske, 915, 13, ra xp-q/iaTu rjSr] 
KLi/SwevfTai Tot SaveiaavTi. 



CCXXXII. 

On a stele of white marble, surmounted by a pediment. This stele has been broken into four pieces. Height, 3 ft. 2 in. ; 

breadth, i ft. i\ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



EAOZETAIBOYAAIKAIT/MAAM/vl 
rN/^MAPPOXTATANEPEIAHEPMO 
AYK0XKAAAiXGENEYXEnEAO.n,N 
EPITANBOYAANKAITONAAMON 
5 EM4>ANIXEIANAP0NIK0NMENE 

. AEYXKNIAIONEYNOYNHMENT^I 
. . 1/^.IT/MKAAYMNi.n.NKAITOIXEN 

NOYXITj^-NPOAITANXPEIAX 

OXAPP04-A3:i3:T.rLXKATA 

10 ^TOYOYOENEAAEIPON . . 

II.. ©YMIAXui -•->.XOYN'=|^AINHTAIOA. 
MOXTIM . NTOYXEYEPPETEIN 
PPOAIPOYMENOYXAYTONK/ . TOIAIPO^ 
MENOITAXXPEIAX . APEXEXOAIT .... 

15 Mj-lIT/vIKAAYMNI/xNEIAj-i-NTIOTIYI . . 

ZEIAYTOIXPANTATATIMIAPAPATOi 
PAHOOYXTOYKAAYMNIrvNKATAAYNA 
MINTANAYT.n.NArAOAITYXAIAEAO 
. 0AIT.A.iAAM.n.lPOAITANHMENANAPO 

20 . ,^ONMENEKAEYXKNIAIONKAIAYTON 

KAIEKTONOYXMETEXONTAXPANTj^N 
■n-NPEPKAITOIAAAOIKAAYMNIOIEPIKAA 
P^TLXAIAEAYTONKAIEPI-'fYAANKAIAA 
MONTOYXAEPPOXTATAXANArPAtAITO 

25 ^A4'IXMAEIXXTAAANAI0INANKAI0E 

MENEIXTOIEPONTOYAPOAAj^NOXTA^ 
AEANAOEXEj^XKAITAXANArPA4'AXE 
PIMEAHGHMENEPMOAYKONKAAAIXGE 
NEYXEPEKAAP/vOHEPI^^YAANKAIAA 

30 . 0NEAAXE4>YAAXKYAPHAEI/^NAAM0Y 

AM4'IPETPAN 



KALYMNA. 55 



"ESo^i TO. ^ovXd Kai t<o Sdjift) | yvcofia TrpoaraTav, (TreiSfj 'Ep/i6-\ 

\vKos KaWicrOfviVi kinXOmv | itri rav fSovX&i' Kal tw Safiov I 
5 f/i(f>ayi^(i ' Av8p6viKOv Mivf^K^evs KyiSiov ivvovv ^fifv t^ \ 

Sd/iyp TW KaXv/jificoi' Kal Tots ev\[Tvy)(d]vov(Ti Ta>v noXirav ^peiai | 
10 ■!Tapf)(^6fifvJos aiTpo<pa<ri<rr<os Kara I [Swaniv rav aJi/roO ovOiv kWiinov^a I 

Trpo^dvpiiai, 07r[a)]y ovv <f)aivr)Tai 6 iTajl/xoy Tt//[a)lf royy fVfpyiTfiu | 

npoaipovfifyovi airroy fa['] Tol aipovlfjieyoi ras xpfias [Trjape)(^f<T6ai t[£ Sd-\ 
15 fi(p tZ KaXvftytooy (iSociyTi on vir\[ap]^€i avTOis iravTa to, Tinia naph, tov | 

TrXrjBovi TOV KaXvfiyia>y kuto, Svyalfiiy ray aiiTwy, ' Aya&S, Tvya ie^o-j 
20 x]^*" '^'f Sdum noXiTay rffiiy ' AvSpo^^v'UKoy MiviKXws KviSioy Kal avrby I 

■Kai (Kyoyovs niTiyovrai irdyTooy | wyirep Kal toI dXXoi KaXv/iyioi, ewiKXa-^ 

pS>aai SI avrby Kal iirl <f)vXay Kal Sd\fjLoy, roj)y Sk npocrrdTas dyaypd^jrai ri I 
35 y^d(f)iap.a f/y (TTdXav Xidiyay Kal $e\fi€y eli rb Upbv tov ' An6XX<ovo^, rai I 

Se dya6ecr(cos Kal ray dvaypa<pa9 (\Tnfj.fXr]$iJixfy 'Ep/xoXvKoy KaXXiaOe-l 
30 v(vs' (TTeKXapSdrj inl ^vXay Kal Sa\fMoy, iXa)(^e <f>vXas KvSptjXeiwy, Sd/iov I 

'Afi^iTTfTpdy. 



A grant of politeia to Andronikos, son of Mene- 
kles, a Knidian. The decree is ordered to be set 
up in the Hieron of Apollo. 

Line 9. n-opexo/tej/joy. This change of construc- 



tion from the accusative to the nominative occurs 
also in the following decree, and posi, ccxxxvii. 

Line 12. After (vepyfTety a word has been 
erased. 



COXXXIII. 

On a stele of white marble, surmounted by a pediment. Height, 2 ft. 6| in.; breadth, io| in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

EAOEETAIBOYAAIKAIT-n-IAA 

Mj^-irN/vMAPPOXTATANEPEIAH 

nPAIIct>ANHXKPATIAAEPEAGJT.N 

EPITETANBOYAANKAITONAA 
6 M0NEM(J)ANIXEIOE0rNHT0NAN 

HBIOYAAMtAKHNONEYNOYNH 

MENT/MAAM.n.lT.n.lKAAYMNIriN 

KAITOIXENTYNXANOYXITj^N 

POAITANXPEIAXPAPEXOMENOX 
10 PAXINAPP04)AXIXTj-i.XKATAAY 

NAMINTANAYTOYOY0ENEN 

AEIPONTAPPOOYMIAXOP^XOYN 

4)AINHTAI0AAM0XTIMjt^NT0YX 

EYEPTETEINPPOAIPOYMENOYX 
15 AYTONKAITOIAIPOYMENOITAX 

XPEIAXPAPEXEXOAirniAAMj^l 

T.A.IKAAYMNlJ-LNEIA-n.NTIOTIYPAF 

ZEIAYTOIXPANTATATIMIAPAPA 

TOYPAHGOYXTOYKAAYMNIv^NKA 
20 TAAYNAMINTANAYTJT-NArAOAl 

TYXAIAEA0XOAIT/>.IAAM.n.|P0AI 

TANHMENKAAYMNlJ-tNOEOrNH 

TONANTIBIOYAAMtAKHNONKA' 

AYTONKAIErrONOYXMETEXON 
as TAXPANT.a.Nj-1-NPEPKAITOIAAAO . 

KAAYMNIOIEPIKAAP.rvXAIAEAY 
TONKAIEPI({)YAANKAIAAMON 
TOYXAEPPOXTATAXANATPAtAI 
TOAETOtAct>lXMAEIXXTAAANAI 
30 GINANKAIOEMENEIXTOIEPONTOY 

APOAA.n.NOXTAXAEANAGEXE.riX 
KAITAXANArPAct)AXEPIMEAHGI 

IENPPAZI<J)ANHKPATIAAEPE 
KAAP/\GHEPl4)YAANKAIAAM0N 
35 EAAXEc})YAAXKYAPHAEIy^N 

AAMOYAM<|)IPETPAN 



56 KALYMNA. 



"ESo^f ra ^ovXa Kai rZ Sd\/Jia>, yvmjia wpocTarav, iireiSr] I 

n pa^L<f>dvrjS KpaTiSa eTreX^oji' I enC re rav ^ovXav koI rov 8a-\ 
5 fiov kfi<j>avi(ii QeoyvrjTov ' AvWi^iov Aafj.-<^aKr)vov ivvovv ^-1 

fiiv T& 8dfi(6 tS> KaXvfiviwv I Koi TOis kvTvyyavovaL t&v I 
10 iroXiToiv \puas irape^ofiefos I Traaiv dTrpocpaaiarcos Kara Sv-\ 

vafiiv rhv avTOV oiiOev kv\\einovTa irpoOv/iias, oncos ovv I 

(baiyrjrai 6 Sdfios Ti^a)v tovs I evepyereTi^ irpoaipovjJLtvovs | 
15 avrov Koi rol aipovfifvoi Tas | XP*"*? wape^fa-Oai t& Sd/xo) | 

Tc3 KaXv/xvicuu eiSmvTi on imdp\^u avroTs Trdvra to, rifiLa irapa I 
20 Tov TrXrjdovs Tov KaXvjivi(ov Ka|ra Svvafiiv rdv aiirStv, ' AyaQS, I 

Tvy(a, SiSoyOai tZ Sdfico 7roXi'|raz/ rjnei/ KaXviivimv Qeoyvq-^ 

TOV ' AvTL^iov Aajxy^aK-qvov Kal | avTW Kal eyySvovs /jLfTe)(oi'-\ 
25 ras rrdfTOiv rnvwep Kal rol aXXc^ij ] KaXvfivioi, kiriKXapSxrai Se av-\ 

TOV Kal (tri (^vXav Kal Sa.fj.ov, | Tois Se npoaTdras dvaypdyfrai I 
30 ToSe TO yfrdcfyicrfia e/y CTdXav Xi\divav Kal difiev eh to lepov rov I 

' AnoXXoivos, Tas Se dvaOeaecos | Kal rdi dvaypa(pds kirineX-q6fj-\ 

(lev npa^i(f>avrj KpaTiSa. eire\KXapd)dr] eirl (pvXav Kal Sa/xov \ 
35 eXa)(^e <f>vXas KvSprjXeicov I Sdjiov ' A fKpiTreTpav. 

A grant of politeia to Theognetos, son of Antibios, a citizen of Lampsakos. The decree is ordered 

to be placed in the Hieron of Apollo. 



CCXXXIV. 

On a stelfe of calcareous stone, the surface of which has many holes, to avoid which the lapidary has spaced the letters irregularly. 
Height, I ft. I if in.; breadth, i ft. \ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

APOAAnNIAAZZYPNn 

NOZEIPENEPEIAHAPIZTnN 

APIZTArOPAAMAOOYZI 

OZXPEIAZPAPEXETAIK/ 
5 AYMNIfiNTOIZENTYrXA 

NOYZINAP"0<t)AZIZ-nZME 

TAPAZAZEYNOIAZEAOZE 

miAAMniTfllKAAYMNinN 

AEAOZO AIAPIZTHNIE N 
10 KAAYMNAIPOAITEIANKAI 

AYTniKAIErrONOIZME 

TEXOYZIPANTONnM PEP 

KAITOIAAAOIKAAYMNIOIME 

TEXONTIEPIKAAPnZAIAEAY 
15 TONKAIEPKDYAANHAHKAIAA 

MONEAAXE<DYAAZKYAPHAEI 
nNAAMOYPEPAIHTAOPnZElZ 

PANTATONXPONON0ANEPONY 

POMNAMATAZAOZIOZYPAPXHIA 
20 NArPAtAIAETOAETOtA<t>IZMAEIZ 

ZTAAANKAIGEMENEIZTOIEPON 

TOYAPOA AHNOZTAZAEE PI 

rPA<l>AZEP IMIAHOHMENA POA 

AnNIAANZ YPNnNOZ 

'^7ro\Xci)«'/'5aj' Zvpvcolvos ehrev eneiSr) ' Apia-Toiv I 

'ApicTTayopa 'Afia6ovat\os xpeias irapeyeTai Ka-\ 
5 Xvfivi(ov Tois evTvy)(d\vov<Tiv dvpocpaa-iaTcoi fJie-\ 

Ta ndaai evvoias, eSo^e I t5 SdfiO) tSi KaXvfj.via>v I 
10 SeSoadai Ap[cTT<ovi ev | KaXvfiva noXiTeiav Kal I 

avTw Kal eyyovoii fie\Te)(^ovcn rrdvTwv ai/iirep I 

Kal Tol aXXot KaXvp.vioi fi€\Te)(^ovTi, ernKXapSxrai Sk av-\ 
15 TOV Kal eirl <f)vXav TJSrj Kal Sd\/j.ov, eXa^f (j>vXas KvSpr]Xei-\ 

cov, Sdfiov HepaicoTa' ottcos eh I ndvra tov \p6vov (ftavepov v-\ 
20 rrofivajia Tas Soaios {jirdp\ri, d\vaypd-<\rai Se ToSe to ■\jfd<f>ia-/j.a eh I 

ardXav Kal Oefiev eh to lepov | tov ' AnoXXcavos, Tas Se «7rt-[ 

ypa(f)ds entiJLfXrjdfJiJLev ' ArroX^XcoviSav Zvpvcovos. 



KALYMNA. 



57 



A decree conferring the politeia on Ariston, son 
of Aristagoras, an Amathusian, for services rendered 
to Kalymnian citizens, and stating that he has been 
elected by lot into the tribe Kydreleioi, and the 



deme Peraiotes. The expression, line 17, Snios etV 
ndvTa Tov xpovov k.t.X. does not occur in the other 
grants of politeia from Kalymna. 



ccxxxv. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of calcareous stone. Height, ii| in.; breadth, lof in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

EAOZETAIBOYAAIKAIT . . AAMP . 

rNr^MAPPOXTATANEPEIAHAI 

KAI0XArH3:ANAP0YEnEAOnNE 

PITETANBOYAANKAITONAA 
5 M0NEN4)ANIIE . AYXIPPONAriA 

AXAIONEYNO^NHMEN iniAA 

MniTniKAAYMNIllNXPEIAXPA 

PEXOMENONEMPANTIKAIPni 

KAIKOINAITAIPOAEIKAIIAIAI lOIX 
10 ENTYNXANOYXITriNPOAITAN 

OPnXOYNKAIOAAMOXcj)AINHTAI 

TOIXEIXAYTONPPOOYMIAXMH 

GENENAEIPOYXIKATAZIAXXAPI 

TAXAPOAIAOYXTHNEYEPrETH 
15 MATHNAEAOXOAITAIBOYAAI 

KAITrilAAMrilPOA . TANHMENAY 

XIPPONATIAA .. "^...lAYTON 

KAIErrON TAXPAI 

TO 

'ESoie TO. ^ovXa Kal t[5] Sd/xo) | yvm/ia irpocrTaToiv, tnuS^ A(-\ 
Kai09 ' AyrjffdvSpov (Tre\6a>v e^ni re ra^' ^ovXav Kal tov 8d-\ 
6 fioi/ €i'0a^£Ye[t] Ava-imroi' ' Ayia | ' Ayaibv divovv r][iiv t5 5a-| 

/iO) t5 KaKvyLvmv, y^ptias Tra\piyoiiivov kji iravrl KaipS I 
Kai Koifd TO, TToXet koi iSia rots I ivrvvydvovcn tS>v noXirdv I 
Sncoi ovv Kal 6 Sd/109 cpaivTjTai I tois (Is avrov irpoBvfiias //?;-| 
6\v kvXitnovaL Kara^ias xa/5t]ray dwoSiSovs twv ivepyiTr)-\ 
ixdroiv, SeSoxOai to. /SouXa [ Kal rm SdfKO iroX^Cyav ^ft(v Aij-\ 
(Tiirirov 'Ayia ' A\^a\i^y Ka?^i airrw | Kal kyyoi^ovs iiiTi-)(ov\Tas ■rrd\y-\ 
ra^v an/nep Kal rot dXXoi KaXvfivioi fifrexovTi k.t.X. 

A grant of politeia to Lysippos, son of Agias, an Achaean. 



10 



»5 



CCXXXVI. 

Fragment of a stele of white marble, the right side and lower part broken away. Height, i ft. 3 in.; breadth, 9^ in. Temple 

of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

. . OIETAIBOYAAIKAITfllAA . . IfNO 
EHEI AHNIK AZI AIKOZKA Ti 
AANKAITONAAMONEM . ANIXE. 
K YPANAIONEYNOYNHME NTni 
6 nAPEXOMENONENHANTIKAIPOIK 

ENTYTXANOI Zl N THNnOAITAS 
TOIZEIZAYT. NHPOGYMIAZMHOE 
XAPITAZA . . AlAOYZTflNEYE 
AAMninOAI. ANEIMENKAAYMI 
10 KYPANAI . . 'AlAYTONKAItKro 

KAITOIAAAOI ..AYM.IOIMETE) 
:ni<j)i A * N . . . . \MONTOYZni 
A . . . AAMO. . K AAin . AN AN A 
AIOINANK/ . v'^EMFNEZTOIEPON 
15 4>AZEr iMEAHGHTnZANTOin 



58 KALYMNA. 



'ES]o^f TO. ^ovXa Kai r^ 5<£[/ia)], yvdl^/ia npoa-Tarav, 

tneiSfi NiKacriSiKos K\ . . ti . . ^kiTe\6<ou kwl rav /3o- 

uTXat' Koi Tov Sdfiov ifj^cf^avi^^i rbv Sfiua rov SeTvoi 

KvpavaTov ivvovv rifiev tS> \8dn<p rm KaXvfivtcov, xpf''«? 
5 TTapfypfiivov kv travTi Kaipm /cfat KOivS, to, ttoXh Kal iSia toi^ 

ivTvy^dvovaiv rail' noXLTav, [oTTCoy ovv Kal 6 Sdfios (palvrjTai 

Tor? 6('y avTTo])/ Trpo6vfj.ia9 fi-qde^y kvXuirovcn Kara^ta? 

)(^dpiTas d^TrolSiSovs tS>v evelpyfTrj/Mdrcoi/, SeS6)(^6ai rS> 

Sd/i^ iroXi[j\ai' itfiev KaXvfj^ficof tov Setva tov Suvoi 
10 Kvpafaifov] Kal avTOv Kal kKy6\vov^ /ifre^opTas ndvTWv cofirep 

Kal Tol dXXoi [KalXv/Avlioi ixeT€)^oi'Tt, kniKXapaxrai Se avTov Kal 

knl <pvXdv [^a2 Sjdjxov tovs wp^oa-TdTas' eXa^e (f)vXds .... 

.... (Sa/iofii] . KaXLC^Syiv dva[ypd\}rai. Se Tama eli crTdXau 

XiOivav ^ai] Okfiiv sy to kpov \tov ' AitoXXcovos, Tas Si dvaypa- 
15 0ay kTn/j.eXT]$TJTQ>(rai' toI TjfpoaTaTai 

A decree of the Boul^ and Demos granting the poHteia to some one whose name is broken away, a Kyrenaean. 

The Deme, line 1 3, may be I^KaXicoSdv. 



CCXXXVII. 

On a stelh of calcareous stone. The letters are irregularly spaced on account of the holes in the stone. Height, 2 ft. 2^ in. ; 

breadth, ii| in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

EAOZETAIBOYAAIKAITniAAMni 

OEYPOMPOZOHBAAAEinENEPEI 

AHMHTPOAnPOZATTAAOYKAPAl 

ANOZANHPKAAOSKAI AOOZKAI 
5 EYNO YZnNAI ATEAEIT lilAA 

MniTfilKAAYM NinNXPEIAZPA 

PEXOMENOZE NPANTIKAI PHI 

KAIKOINAIKAIIAIAITOIIENTYN 

XANOYZirnNPOAITANAE AO 
10 XGAITniAAMniHMENPOAITAN 

MHTPOAnPONENKAAYMNAIKAl 

ENKTHZINKAIAYTniKAIErrO 

NOIZMETEXOYZIPANinNnN 

PEPKAITOIAAAOIKAAYMNIOIME 
15 TEXONT lEPIKAAPnZAIAEAY 

T0NKAIEPl4^YAANKAiAAM0NE 

AAXE4-YAAZOEYrENIAANAA 
lOYPOOAinNTAYTAAEANATPA 

tAIEIZZTAAANAIGINANKAlOE 
20 MENEIZTOIEPONTOYAPOAAnNOZ 

TAZAEANArPA4'AZEPIME AHOF- 

TnGEYPOMPOZGHBAAA 

EAOZETAIBOYAAIKAITniAAMr . 

PAOZflNZnZArrEAOYEIPEN . 
25 GHNAIONAPOAAflNlOY BAPr . . . 

HTHNEYN OYNHMENTniA .... 

TniKAAYMNinNXPEIAZPAP . . . 

vlENOZENPANTIKAIPniKAl . . . 

MIKAIIAIAITOIZENTYNXA 

30 TfiNPOAITANAEAOXGAITni . . 

MniHMENPOAITANAGHNAIOS 

ENKAAYMNAIKAIAYTONKAIErrO 

NOYZMETEXONTAZPANTfiN ClN 

-FPKAITOIAAAOIKAAYMNIOIMETE 
35 . )NTIEPIKAAPnZAIAEAYTONKAI 

EPl4^YAANKAIAAM0NE AAXE 

4^YAAZKYAPH AEinNAAMOY 

. . EZOYTAYTAAEANATPAtAI 

LIZZTAAANAIGINANKAIGEMEN 
40 ElZTOIEPONTOYAPOAAriNOZTAZ 

AEANATPA'^'AZEPIMEAHGHMEN 

. . OZflNAZnZArrEAOY 



KALYMNA. 59 



'ESo^e TO. /SofXci Koi rm Safjup, | Ofvirofinos Orj^dSa thrfu, iirei-\ 

Stj MrjTpoSoipo^ ' AttolXov, KapSi\apbs dvfip KaXbi KayaOo^ Kal I 
5 (vvovi wv SiareXei t£ Sd\ficp rai Kdkvfiviaiv •^ptta^ ira-\ 

pfyofiivo^ kv navrl Kaip<o | kol koivS. koi iSia rois evrvvA 
10 ydvov<Ti rStv irokirdv, SiS6\y6ai t<o Sd/jia> rjftef iroXirav I 

MrfTpoSatpov iv KaXvfiva Kal | evKTrjatv Kal avrS Kal «yyo-| 

voii fKTf^ovcn irdvTotv mvyrrtp Kal rol dXXoi KaXvpvioi fi(-\ 
'5 Ti\ovri, tiriKXapSxraL S( avlrbi' Kal knl (jwXav Kal Saftov t-\ 

Xay^i cpvXai QtvyevLBdv, 8d\fiov Hodaictiv ravra Si dvaypd-l 
20 y^rai eiy (TTdXav XiOivau Kal 6e\fjifv (h to Upov rov ' AnoXXeoi/o^, I 

ras Si dyaypa<f>di fTrtiJi(Xr]6'^\T(o Ofvnofinoi Qrj^dSa. 

"ESo^i ra fiovXa Kal t^ Scl^f^^ | BXocrcov ZcoaayyeXov ilnfv \'A-\ 
25 Orjvaiov ' AnoXXaviov Bapy^Xi\\riTr]v ivvovv rj/ief t5 ^dp.^ I 

TOO KaXvpvicov x.pecas naf^e)^o^\p€fos iv navrl KaipS> Kal \koi-\ 
30 va Kal ISia rois ei'TVi')(d^vova-ij | to^v woXtTav, SeS6)^6ai tS> \pd-\ 

fi<o TjiKv iroXnav ' AQ-qvaiov | kv KaXv/iua Kal ai/Tw Kal kyy6-\ 

vovi, fifTi\ovTas irdmoav S>v\mp Kal rol dXXoi KaXvpvLOi p.iTi-\ 
35 x]'"''''*' kniKXapSxrai Sk avTov Kal | knl <ptvXiLv Kal Sd/iof eXa)(6 I 

(pvXdi KvSptjXetcoi', Sdpov I . . iaov ravra Si dvaypd'^ai I 
40 ih ardXav XiBlvav Kal Bkpiv | «/y ro Upw rov 'AnoXXcofos, ray I 

Si dvaypacfxis knipiX-qOfniiv | [SAjoo-ojj'a ZwaayyeXov. 



Two decrees of the Boule and Demos of 
Kalymna, the first of which grants the poUteia 
to Metrodoros, a citizen of Kardia. The 
second is a grant of pohteia to Athenaios, a 
Bargylian. 

Line 23. BXoctcjdv. This rare name occurs in 
an inscription from Telos ; Ross, Hellenika, i, p. 60. 



See also Lebas, Inscriptions de 1' Asie Mineure, 
pt. V, No. 290; C. I. 6056. 

Line 28. Tra/jexo/tez'oy (sic) for napexopffou. The 
same grammatical fault occurs in the decrees Nos. 
ccxxxii, ccxxxiii, an/e. 

Line 38. . . e<rov. The traces of the letter pre- 
ceding E suggest that it was 0. 



CCXXXVIII. 

On the upper part of a stelb of calcareous stone. Height, lo^ in.; breadth, loj in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

EAOZElAIBOYAAlKAITAiA . . . . 

rNAMAPPOSITATANEnEIAHA 

rOPANA^ArOPAKAEYSIEnEAOn 

NEPITETANBOYAANKAITONAA 
5 MONA^iniTONYIONAYTOYTON 

PPOrONONAroPAKAHf^OIH^AS: 

OAIPOAITANAEAOXOAITAIBOYAA . 

. AITniAAMniArOPAI<AHTONYI 

. NTONPPOrONONTONArOPANA 
lo . TO^POAITANHMENKAAYMNI 

nNI<AIAYTONI<AIErrONOYJ:4'Y 

AANAEAYTAIYPAPXEINKA! 

CVrrENEIANANKAITAIPATPI 

METESTIArOPANAKTITOAEyA 
15 4>l5:MATOAEANArPAyAIEI2:2:TA 

. AN . . ^ . . . . ■''^ . QEMENEI5- i 

' ESo^i ra ^ovXf 'kuI ra S^dprn,"^ | yvmpa npovrardv, kirftSf) 'A-\ 

yopdva^ ' AyopaKXiv^ knfXBoAv kirt n rav ^ovXav Kal rw Sd-\ 
■5 pov a^Kj) rov viov avrov rhy | irpoyovov AyopaKXrj iToii^(Ta<T-\ 

6ai troXirav, SiSoyQai ra fiovXa I [<]«' tS Sdp<o ' AyopaKXfj rhv vt-\ 
10 o\v rov npoyovov ' Ayopdva\\K'\TO? noXirav fjpfv KaXvpvi-\ 

cov Kal aiirov Kal iyyovov^, (pv^Xdv Si avrw irrrdp^f^v Kal I 

avyytvfiav iv Kal r£ narpl I pkreari ' AyopdvaKrf rh Si ^d-\ 
15 (pia-pa roSe dvaypdi^ai ei'y o'raj[X]ai' [Xt]5[«'a«'] fot['] Okpiv «/y \rh Upbv rov ' A7t6XX<i)V0s] 



6o 



KALYMNA. 



Line 5. a|'5, Doric for d^ioT. Ahrens, De Dial. Do- 
rica, p. 310, § 38, points out that the same form occurs 
in two inscriptions from Astypaltea. C. I. 2483, 2484. 

Line 13. miyyivuav 5,v Koi rm warpi fiirea-Ti. avy- 
yiveia evidently here means admission to a yivos. By 
the word fiiTdrn here we must understand the right 
of participation in certain sacra gentilicia. See Rayet, 
Inscriptions Inddites des Sporades, i, pp. 48-54. The 
application made by Agoranax to the Boul^ and 



Demos in this inscription shews that the politeia, 
which we may assume to have been granted to him- 
self, could not be transmitted to his eldest son as 
an hereditary right without the formality of a decree, 
and such a formality may have been always required 
in such cases, though the clause Kal avTov kol kyyovovs, 
usual in grants of politeia, would lead us to suppose 
that the rights bestowed on the father devolved on 
the descendants as a matter of course. 



CCXXXIX. 

On a fragment of a stel^ of white marble, the left edge preserved. Height, 3 J in.; breadth, 6| in. Perhaps from the upper part 

of the preceding stelfe. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

tS)V TToXt-] 

Toiv OTro)? \ovv Kal 6 Sd/xos (f>a(vr]Tai TOis 
eh avTov TT^Qvyiia'S \ir)^\v kvXiiwovcri 
K^xTa^ia^ ydp&ras dnoSiSoiis tSiv evepye- 
TTjfj.d.TCoi' Kal TToX^Xol trpoaipwvTai Kal \i- 
5 yeiv Kal irpdcrcreiv i^a Siovra vwep rod 
7rXrj6eos tov KaXvjxviwv eiSores k.t.X.I 

The last two lines are restored from the Kalymnian decree, published C. I. 2671, under lasos ; see 

lines 47-50. 



TANonni 

EIZAYTONPP 
ATAZIAZXAPI 
THMATnNKAinOA 
-EINKAIPPASZEINT 



CCXL. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble, the right edge preserved. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 7^: in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 



lAAM^IHM 
-'OAITANl<AlEr 
EXONTA^riN 
1 ETEXONTl 
-n|4)Y 



SeSo^^Oai TO, /SovXa kol t£] Sdfico rifiev 

TToXtrav Kal eyfy- 
ovovs avTov TrdvTcou /lieTlexot'Taj &v- 
nep Kal toI dXXoi KaXvpfioi] nerfyovTi 
Kal kiriKXapaxraL avTov Ka1\ ktrl (fn^av 
Kal Sdfiov €Xax« (pvXdi k.t.X.I 



Fragment of a decree conferring the politeia on some person, doubtless a public benefactor, and his 

descendants. 



CCXLI. 

On a fragment of a slel^ of white marble, the right edge partly preserved. 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

O 

OENE 
\ZIA2XAP 
6 ^ANGANKAt 
AOKOAITA 
AAMAIO 
EIAAAOH 
ANHMENk 
TONI<AIErC 
ONTA2:rA 
\AOIKAAYMN 
EPIKAAPns:/ 
I^YAANKA 
-JATAS: 



Height, 7|in. ; breadth, 4I in. Temple of Apollo, 



10 



>5 



oTTcoy ow 6 Sd/xoi <f)aivr)Tai tois] eh 

aiiTov 7rpodvfj.ia9 firf^Oev ([yXeinovari 
Karyi^iai ^dp'^iras 
5 ■ aTToSiSovh dv6' S)v Ka 

Se'^SoKdai ra f/SouAa 
Kal t£] Sd/io) [tw Seiva 
eiSa A Orj^valov 
noXtr'\av ^jiev AcTat 
10 av\rov Kal ey(y)6rj'0i'f 

peTe-)(^ovTas nd^i'Ta>i> 
(jovnep Kal toI c^lAXot KaXvpi^ioi 

emKXapaxTC^i Se avrbf 
Kal €7r]2 ^vXdv koTI Sapou 
16 ToJ^y Trpoja-rdTas- {eXa^e ^vXas k.t.X. 



Line 10. «y(y)^[«'ovy. The second T is omitted here through carelessness of the lapidary ; so SeSoKOai 

for S(S6x6ai, line 6 ; eiriKaXpa>crai for kiriKXapSxrai, line 1 3. 



KALYMNA. 



6i 



On a stelfe of white marble, the upper part broken away. 

lA 

AITAIAAMA 
TONAPETAXENu 
ANEXANAIATEA 
5 AAMONTONKAAYMNlAi .... 

AEAYTONnOAITANI<AAY/ .... 
Nl<AIATTONl<AIErrONOYXM . 
TEXONTAxnANTnNnNl<AI 
TOIAAAOIKAAYMNIOIMETE 
lo . ONTIEPIKAAPAXAIAEAYTON 

i<AIEni-=fYAANI<AIAAMONTOYX 
nP0XTATAXEAAXE4>YAAX0EY 
"ENIAANAAMOYPOOAIANAN 
^ -pAtAIAETOtA^lXMAEIXXTA 
15 . ANAIOINANK mOEMENEIXTOIE 

. . NTuYAPOAAANOXEIXTOPONTON 
. PI^ANEXTATONTAXAEANArPA 
' tfAXKAlANAOEXEAXEPIMEAHOEN 
TATOIPPOXTATAI 



CCXLII. 

Height, I ft. 4 in. ; breadth, i ft. | in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; 
C. T. N. 

TO, fiovXa K]ai tZ 8d/xa> [(Traivfo-cu 
ail^bu dpiras eVef^ca 
hv iyoiv SiaTfySil npos Toy 
5 Sdfioy Toj' KaXvfivi(Ji/j Vt^^f 

Sk aitrov voXirav KaXxAfiytco- 
V Koi avTov KoX kyyovovi //«- 

TiyOVTaS TTaVTCOV S>v Kal 

Tol dWoi KaXvfiyioi fieri- 
XJovTf kniKXapSxrai Sk avTov 
Kal kirl (pvXicv Kat Sd/xou tovs 
npoa-rdras' fXa\e cpvXds Bev- 
yiVLBdv, SdfMov rioOamv di\a- 
ypdyjrai Se to •^d^ia/ia e/y (ttu- 
Xjatf Xidifav Kal de/i(u els to U- 
poyf Tov 'AnoXXwyos eh Tonov tov 
fyri<(>ayea-TaToy rds Se dvaypa- 
<f>ds Kal dvaOicreooi kniiifX-qdiv- 
Tco Tol npoaTdrai. 



10 



15 



COXLIII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of calcareous stone ; the right edge preserved from line 5 to 8. The surface is full of holes ; this 
explains the irregular spacing of the letters. Height, 8J in. ; breadth, 8| in, Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



10 



-MAT At 
An SEPPO^IPOYN 

E o/> TniAAMnion 

DS4>AII MTAITIMnNTO^ 
YNT/ . AYTONKAIKOI 
^EAOXOAITAIEKKAH«I 
AISI^ JNTAaYKIAACI Y 
HMEI . OAITANKA/ ' 
VYTONKAIEKrONOYSME 
'TONnMHEPKAIT . . 
KAAPn 
ANK 



TrpoaipouT/iej/ 
. . , . t£ 8dp(o oTTfcoy 
ovv 6 5a/i]oy (jyatuTjTai Tifiaiv Toi^s 
6vepy€To]t3i'Ta[y] avTov Kal koi- 
va Kal ISia^ 8e86-)(6ai ra fKKXrjai- 

a ] Aicrinov FXavKia 'Acttv- 

iraXaLtf^ fj/jKu [TrJoAtrai^ KaXv- 

livtmv Kal a^'Tov Kal eKyovovs fie- 

TeyovTas ndv^Toiv at/nrfp Kal ifol 

dXXoi noXiTai jieTtyovTr 67ri]/fAapco[(ra£ 

8i avTw Kal enl (pvX'jdv /f[a( Sdpoy (Xa\e 

(pvXdi K. T.X.I 



CCXLIV. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete only on the right edge. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 4i in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna • 

C. T. N. 



HEINE 
AYMNI 
OYZKAIH 
INAIPOAI 
TEAEIANP 
WEKPA 



pavf 

KalXvfjiyi 
Kal airhv Kal exyofjoi/y Kal rj- 
fitv avTois iv KaXv^iva noXi- 
Ttiav d'yiXiiav n- 

dmrnv Ko^i eKiT>^ovv 

davX'yi /fa[t d<nrovSu k.t.X. 



This fragment is probably from a grant of politeia to some public benefactor. 



62 



KALYMNA. 



OCXLV. 

On a stel^ of white marble. Height, 3 ft. 4^ in. ; breadth, i ft. 3I 

EAOiETAIEKKAHSIAITAIKAAT 

MNlJ-iNMHNOSAPTAMITIOrEPA 

PISTOAAIAAPAPMENISKONTON/ 

AEIIAIKOTHMENEYEPrETANKA. 

PPOIENONKAATMNlJ-i-NKAIAYTC . 6 

KAirENOSAEIKAIHMENATTOISEr 

KTHSINErKAAYMNAIKAIATEAEIAI 

T-n-NEIArOMEN-n-NKAIESArOMEN/vN 

KAIEMPOAEM-n-IKAIENIPANAI 



in. 



Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

"ESo^e TO, iKKXrjaia ra KaXv- 
fJLVLCdv, fxrjvos 'ApraniTtov, en 'A. 
pia-ToXatSa, napfiiviaKov Tov ' A- 
Xe^iSiKov rjfifv evepyiTav Ka[l 
npo^evov KaXvfivicov Kal avTofy 
Kai yivos del Kal rjfiev airroTs ey- 
KTrjaiv ky KaXvy.va Kal dTeXeia\y 
tSiv e^ayojjLeycoy Kal eaayojievrnv 
Kal kfi TroXe/ia> Kal ev Ipdva. 



10 O E O C 

EAOIETAIEKKAHCIAITAIKAAYMNI 
J-^NMHNOSKAPNEIOYEPIAEYKAPOY 
AIO«KOYPIAANTONAEA0ONKAIAAE 
3EIAIK0 lEYEPPETASKAIPPOIENOYS 
15 HMENKAAYMNI/xNKAIAYTOYSKAIEKrO 

NOY«KAIHMENAYTOI«ErKAAYMNAI 
ATEAEIANT-n.NE<rt-OMEN-n.NKAIEIA 
-OMEN.n.NKAIE€PAONKAIEKPAONKAI 
EMPOAEM-n.lKAIENIPANAI 

20 EAOIEKAAYMNIOISNIKOMAa 

ONAAKAIOYSIKYjt-NIONPPO 

IENONKAAYMNlJ-i.NHMENK/>. 

AYTONKAIErrONOYSKAIHMfc 

NAYTOISATEAEIANKAIESPA 
25 OYNKAIEKPAOYNK/>'=MPOA 

EM-n-IKAIENElPA . Al 

In this and in No. ccxliii ante the decrees are 
not passed by the /Soi/Xtj and 5^/ioy as is usual in de- 
crees of Kalymna, but by the eKKXrjo-ia, or assembly 
of the people, and the date is fixed by the month 



10 



e 



e OS 



16 



30 



25 



"ESo^e ra eKKXtjaia to. KaXvfivt- 
(of, fxrjvos Kapveiov, enl AevKapov, 
Aioa-KovpiSau rbv AeX<j)bv Kal 'AXe- 
^tSiKOf evepyeras Kal npo^evovs 
rjfiev KaXv/ivicoi' Kal avrovs Kal t/cyo- 
vovs Kal Tj/iev avrois ey KaXv/jiva 
dreXeiav tS>v ecrayofjievcoi' Kal e^a- 
yojjLevmv Kal ecrwXov Kal eKirXov Kal 
kji noXefim Kal ev ipdva. 

"ESo^e KaXv/Muiois NiK6fia-)(- 
ov ' AXKatov ZiKvd>yiov npo- 
^evov KaXvfivmv ^fjtev /caft 
avTOf Kal eyyofovs Kal ^ytte- 
V avToTs dreXecap Kal eanX- 
ovv Kal eKwXow Kal efi ttoX- 
e/im Kal ev e/pa[i']a. 



I and the eponymous magistrate. The word eKKXrjata 
occurs in the fragments of headings of decrees, 
Nos. ccLxxxiii, ccLxxxiv, ccLxxxv ; see also cclxxx, 

CCLXXXI, post. 



CCXLVI. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the left side partially preserved. 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



Height, 9 in. ; breadth, 4| in. Temple of Apollo, 



10 



».5 



KAI . . IN 
XAHOYS:i 
AAMOC^AIN 
OYMIASIMHO 
SIXAPITAS: 
HMATAN 
'^iSENOY 
MEPAIO 
Y2:i<AIEI< 
lEKPAEIHA 
NArPAyAIA 
"iSiTAAANA 

enei2:toiep 

"TONEPI^^ 
EANArP 



10 



15 



Kal ^Ko'^iv\a TO. woXei Kal ISia rots evrvv- 
ydvovai [rtt)*/ noXiTav, oncos oSv Kal 6 
Sdfios ^ajVTTjrat rocs eis avTov npo- 
6v/jLiai firjB^ev evXeinova-i dvra^i- 
al? ydpiTas \diTo8L8ovi t5)v evepye- 
T^ijfiaTcoy, ^SeS6)(^6aL ra ^ovXa Kal rm Sd/xo) 
wpo]^efoi'[y ^fiep toi)j SeTi/as toiv Seivaiv 
. . ' /]//6pa£b[i/y (?) ev KaXvftva Kal aii- 

Toluy Kal txfyoi/oi/y 

Ka'\l eKvXeiv, d\crvXel Kal dcrnovSel 
d'^vaypd'^ai 5[e ToSe to ■^d<l>ia-fLa 
€/(?) ardXav X^i6ivav Kal defi- 
ev els TO Up[ov tov ' AttoXXcovos 
€t]y TOV eni(ffaveaTaTov tottov, 
rds 3J] dvayfLiKpds k.t.X. 



The latter part of a decree granting the proxenia to certain benefactors of the Kalymnians. 



KALYMNA. 63 



COXLVII. 

Fragment of a stelfe of white marble, nearly complete on the left edge as far as line 21. Height, i ft.; breadth, 9^ in. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

ElAHOEYKPATHXOi 

. OYXANKAIcflAOXTniAAMr 
rAxYPAPXOYXAXAYTniPO 
5 TOXPPOTEPONTEAIETEAEIXPE 
MENOXTAinOAEIAIA*YAAX 
AIPEXINKAIPPOAIPEYMENOXM 
TANXYM^EPONTANh^niOlXKAT 
PPOOYMONAYTONEXTATOYAAA/ 
10 . AIENTOIXKAOEXTAKOXIKAIPOIXEX 
. AIXPHMATAEXTETONtA*!: 
. vXlAEIANTirONAIKAIEXTAN 
^TPATIATAN OPAXKAIOAA 
TAEIANAPOAIAOYXAYTAIT/ 
15 HAITIMAOEIXEPIPAEONTANTF 
ANAIA*YAAXXHII<AIEXTOA 
OAPEP1<AITAIIAIAIPATPIAI*IAO 
ArAOAITYXAIAEAOXOAITAI 
OEYKPATHONAXITENEYXTAX 
20 ErrONOXMETEX. . TAXPANTA 
TOIAEPPOXTA l<AAPAXA 

KAITPly^ THI<OXT\ 

"AAANEX 
NMAIAN/ 
25 NArPA4>Al 

ITOYAPO 
*ll<OMENC 



'ETrleiSfi BtvKpaTTjs ' Olyaa-iytvevs KaXvfiviot (v- 

j/Joi/y wv Kal <pi\os t<S Sd/iai ^Kal irpdacratv Kol Alycoi/ dAi(os 

ras vnapxovcras avr<p 7ro[Ti tov Safiov (piXorr/- 
6 Tos, irpoTipov re SiereXeL )(^p^ias €»/ wavTi Kaipm wapevo- 

fitvos TO, TToXet, 8ia<pvkda\(7a>v re vvv riiv ISiav 

atpicTiv Kal npoaipfv/JLevos 

t5)v crvfjicfxpovTWf Kmois ^carTA 

irpoBvuov aiTOf ts to, tov 8dfj.^ov 

10 Klai (V TOts Ka6e<rTaK6(n KaipoTs ea^fvwSprjKe r^ Sd- 

/ilft) y^prinara fs re rhv yfracpi^a-dei/Ta aTe<f>ayov tS 

0]a(nXft ' Avriyov(o Kal is raf \^fiia-Oo(pop^v (}) rwu 

CTpaTioDrdv oircof Kal 6 Sd^^fio? <f>a(t/T]Tai \dpiv dv- 

Ta^iav dnoSiSovs airra ro^f fVfpyeTTjfidrcoy 
15 Kal TijiaQih (ttI nXiov rdv re ^aipi(riv iSt- 

av Sia(pvXd<ra-r] Kal h rb Xj^onrhf to, nSXfi ifiav Ka- 

ddnep Kal to. iSia narpiSi ^/XoTTTjra ? 

'AyaOa Tv\a, StS6)^0ai rS ^Sd/ji<u rrpS^tvov or noXh-qv ^fi(i> 

OfVKpdrrj ' Ovaaiytvtvs rds [TToXemy dfiwv airhv Kal 
20 iyyovot ix(T()^ovyas ndvrcJ^i' cofinep Kal rol dXXoi Kmoi fifTtxpvTi, 

Tol Si wpoard^at. ? . . . kiri^KXapoDa^vTOi inl cfivXiv 

Kal rpto^KdSa Kal neflirTiKoaTi^i' ? 
(rrldXap is 
Sd^/xm difa 
25 ray S( d'\i/aypa(pd![y 

TOV ' AttS^XXcovos 

dytlKOfii 



liVO 



64 



KALYMNA. 



From lines 7 to 9 there is a slight sinking in the 
marble, caused probably by an erasure. 

This is a decree in honour of Theukrates, son 
of Onasigenes, whom from the evidence of line 8, 
T&v <TVfi(f>ip6vT<ov Ka>ois, I suppose to have been 
a citizen of Kalymna who had rendered important 
services to the Koians on several occasions, and 
who appears to have lent them money, lines 
10, II. It is not certain whether the reward 
for these services was the politeia or the prox- 
enia. This inscription would thus be a copy of 



the original decree made at Kos in favour of 
Theukrates. 

The king mentioned line ir may be Antigonos 
the First who caused the Teians to adopt the laws 
of Kos (Waddington-Lebas, pt. v, No. 86), or Anti- 
gonos Doson, who held Karia for a time. See 
Usener, Epigram von Knidos in Rheinisch. Museum, 
xxix, p. 40, Droysen, Hellen. 2nd ed. iii, pt. 2. p. 71. 

Line 21. I have ventured to restore rpic^KciSa 
KOI irfv\TiKoaTt\y, but there is no other evidence that 
such tribal divisions were in use at Kos. 



CCXLVIII. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, surmounted by a pediment, the left side broken away. Height, 10 in. ; breadth, 

6^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



BOYAAIKAITAI 
IKAEO^n-NEIPEh 
AYSZArOPOYPPO 
ONPPOZENO^ 



"ESo^e to] ^ovXd Kai to. 
kKKXr](Tia\ K\iO(pS>v elmv 
Tov S€iv<i\ Avcrayopov Hpo- 
Kovvriai^ov ? irpo^ivov Vrffi- 
ev Twv Ka\v\fivL<ov koSI 
avTov Koi eyyorofy k. t. X.l 



CCXLIX. 

On the upper part of a stelb of white marble, with right edge nearly complete ; the moulding along the top has been broken away. 

Height, p^in.; breadth, 95 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 



. NOZETAIBOYAAIKAITA 

lirNAMAPPOZTATAN 

HAAMOTEAHZAAMArOP/ 

/\4>ANIlEIMENEZOHAnOAAr 
5 .OYMYNAIONEYNOYNHMEN I 

niAAMAITniKAAYMNIAN . 

AIAIATEAEINPOAYAPOYNTA 

TANTEKATAPOAAMIANSYNAN 

TANTANnOAITANKAITANPAPA 

10 "INOMENANEISTANrOAINTA 
V\YNAIANXPEIA2P/*^DFxoMr 

M0NEI<AST01"^K/ 
TAN/ 

" ElSo^i TO. /Soi/Xa Kal tw | [5a/i]a), yvwixa wpoaTardv, [e7r€i5- 
^ AafiOTeXrjs Aa/xayopa ^ejl/jupafi^ei Mefea-Orj '^7roXX<ar»'-| 
5 i\)v MwSiov (vvovv ^fJ.(y tJ5 8dfj.a> jS> KaXvfj.vi<ov \k- I 

al SiaTfXtiv iroXvwpovvTa I rwv re kut dnoSafitav avvavA 
10 TOiVTWv noXirav Kal tS)v 7rapa\yivofiiv<t>v eh rav noXiv r^i'l 
Mvv8[a)v )(pfias wape)(^6fjif\i/ov fKaa-TOis K^ara Svvafiiv 
Tav el^ov 



Beginning of a decree honouring Menesthes a 
Myndian for services rendered to Kalymnians in 
Myndos and elsewhere out of their country. The 



person who certifies to these services is Damoteles, 
son of Damagoras. 



KALYMNA. 



65 



CCXLIX a. 

On a fragment of a stel^ of white marble, the right edge complete. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 5^ in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



NANKAIANAOE 
TOYAPOAAA 
ArPA*AZEnl.w, 

AMOTEAHAA 
\APnQHEPl4>Y 

NEAAXE^TAA 

lAAMONZK/^ 



This is evidently the end of the decree of 
which the preceding fragment is the beginning, 
as Damoteles, the mover of the decree, is the 
person charged with superintending the dvaypa<f>ri. 



dvaypdyfrai Sk t6S( r]b yfrdtpicr/ia 
fis ardXau \i.6r\yai/ Kal dvaOt- 
fifv (Is rh Upov^ rod ' AnoXXcJ^vos 
raii Sk diAaypa^as (irtlneX- 
flOfJufu AlaixoTfXi^ A(J[fiay- 
yopa Kal iweKlKapaiOr] inl (f>v- 
Xav Kal Sd/io\u' eXa\e <pvX6^s 

Sa/iou ZKa- 

[XiatSdv ? 

This decree probably granted the proxenia or politeia. 
Line 8. From the position of 8d/jL0f here we 
might have expected Sdfiov. ZKc^XimSdv ? Compare 
. KaXimSdy, ante ccxxxvi, line 1 3. 



AHTIM-^ . 

. . lAOAN . . . 

bKKAHCIA 

OAAPOHE.... 

EYNOYHHM ... 

^YMHIAHXl . , 

'^HTIKAIH 



COL. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, consisting of three pieces joined together; both sides of the stone are partially 
complete; part of the moulding on the top remains. Height, 9^ in.; breadth, lof in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; 
C. T. N. 

TAIBC^AAIKAITAi 
irS . VAAPPOSITATAN 

rlAACTIMOAII<OY 

TAMBOYAANl<AITAN 

^NlIElA2:l<AH^l 

EMOYBAPfYAIHTH . 
1IAAMA1TAIK/ 
, CAEPAPEXOMbNON 
. r<AII<OINAi I AIAA 
10 -"^NTYI XANOYCIN 

JYNKAIOAAMOJ" 
AYTONPPOOYMI 
OYSIlNKATAilAS: 
IFYEprPT 

"f&^f] Ta ^ovXa Kal rZ 

^a/zo)], yj/[tolyua npoaTardv, 

(nfijSfj Ttuc^KX^eiSai Ti/xoStKov 

(njeXBcbi' [tnij TOLji ^ovXav Kal rdv 
5 (KKXr](Tia!^v iii<p^avi((i 'AcrKXrjni- 

oSwpov E^vnoXYfiov BapyvXirJT-dv 

(WOW ^pl^ev t]o) Sd/i(p t2 Ka- 

Xvfivicov, xp[«/'a]y Si napeyf^o/jievou 

if Tr^avTl /caip[£] Kal Koiva rS> Sd- 
10 jxco Kal iSia roi'h ivTvyydvovaiv 

tS)v noXirdv on<oi\ ow Kal 6 Sd/ios 

(paivTjTai Toh «/y] avrbf npoOvfii- 

ar fiTjOet/ tt/XtiTrlavcni' Kara^ia? 

ydpiTas dnoSiSotis twiA (V(py(i{7]fi- 
15 «£t«)I', SfS6)(^6ai K.T.X.^ 



This is the upper part of a decree in honour 
of Asklepiodoros, son of Eupolemos, a citizen of 
Bargylia in Karia. and probably granted him the 



proxenia or the politeia in return for his services to 
the Kalymnians. 



66 



KALYMNA. 



CCLI. 

On a stelfe of white marble, the foot and part of the left side broken away. Height, ii^ in. ; breadth, 7I in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



10 



a. 

EAOZETAIEK 
KAH^r .A l/i 
El OK 

O 
EE 
AAYM 
TON 

AiErr... Yx: 

AIHI ENAYT 
5:ATlAEIAi 
"^■nAOYN 



b. 



OY 

ENPO 
PANA 
"^oNA 



The fragment b, of which the left side is com- 
plete, and which measures 4-I in. in height by '>)\ in. 
in breadth, probably belongs to the same inscription 
as a, as the quality of the marble and the forms 
of the letters correspond. In that case it would 



have followed immediately after line 11 oi a, and 
the fracture of both stones would favour such an 
arrangement, though the broken surfaces cannot 
be adjusted. The two fragments so united may be 
restored thus : — 



'ESo^f TO. (K- 



10 



IS 



• • • ■^po^f- 
vov iv K'\dKvn- 
va Kal av\rov 

K^al rj/xfv avT- 
oi'k OLTiXiiav [/fa- 
il icnrXovv IkoI 

Kai\ 

kv 7ro[Xl//co Kal (u ei- 
pdva \d<Tv\u Kal dcr- 
TrovSffi 



The letters in 6 are somewhat smaller in type than those in a. 



KALYMNA. 67 



CCLII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, complete only on the left edge. Height, 6Jin. ; breadth, loj in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

ANKAIEIS:! 
kAIENEIPAN 
~PAtAIEI£CTA 
NTOYAnOAAn,\'0 
5 '^iTAAAEP 

-OkPITOV 

KoX dreXfiav /cat acri/X/-l 
af Kal iia\n\ow Kat (KTrXovy Kai iv n6Kin<p 
Kat iv iipdi^a' Tavra Se dva- 

ypdyfrai di o-roTXai' Kidivav Kat Of/ieu fh to iep- 
o\y Tov <4 TToXAwj/oTy 
* 5 a a-rdXa en 

Apah-oKpiTov 

The name Aratokritos occurs in the inscription I No. ccxxxi, anU, and on a block of marble copied 
relating to the Theatre in the Hieron of Apollo, | by me at Kalymna. 



CCLIII. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of calcareous stone, the top broken away, both sides preserved. Height, 9 J in.; breadth, i ft. | in. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

AHMEOY El A 

ErrONOYSMETEXONT . SHA . . ON 
AITO . AAAOIKAAYMNIOIMETEXONT 
KAA...AIAE YTOYCEII TE4)YAA 
5 Al AA -10 . TOYS . °0€TATAS (() . A A . E 

. AXOM lAT "' ANA. A. f AN 

NATPA.AIAE T.AETOIAIIiMAEIST 
AAANKAIAN A GE M E N EISTQIE PON 
TOYAHOA/ONf^ITACAEAN A TPA 
10 AHOHME NAYSI.. PATH 

KPI . EIKE f^S -"*/ 

IkuI avToy Kal 

tyyovovs ixfTiyovT^d]^ nd^vT\)v \Siv 

Ac]a£ T(^i\ dXKoi KaXvjivioL n(rf)(pvT\i 

«7r(]*(X a[pa)a-]at 8i [a]^TOi)y «[T]t' re (ftvXhSy 
5 *c]aJ 5a//o[i'] Totis [w]/30crr(fTay ^i/]Xa[y] c- 

Xla^oi' ? av 

a]faypa['\//-]at SI t^o^St to yffd<pLa-fia «(V {"')'''- 

dXav Kal dvaOififv t/y to Upov 

TOV AiroXXaivoi, rdi Sk dvaypa- 
10 ^ay fTrt/iejXtyfljj/ifi' AvaiKpdTt^ 

(lK«Oi ? . . . 



The latter part of a decree which grants the 
proxenia or the politeia to certain persons whose 
names are lost. The Lysikrates, line 10, who is 
charged with superintending the engraving, is no 



doubt the mover of the ■'^dcfua-fia. This stone is 
very difficult to read, having been partially calcined 
in the oven where I found it in use for retaining 
the heat. 



68 KALYMNA. 



CCLIV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of grey calcareous stone, complete on the right side. Height, 6f in. ; breadth, 7f in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C.T.N. 

/xYMNIulMEi t 
AIAEAYTONKAIEPI 
AAXE4-YAA2:innACI 
EITANTAYTAAEAN/^ 
5 KAIOEMENEI^TOi 

A-^NArp 

PIAF 

SiVTTip Kat Tol dWoL Kapi.il/ii/ioi fiere- 
XovTi, iiTLKXapaxT^ai Sk avrbu Kol ivl 
(pvXdiy Kol Sdfiov ejXa^e (f>v\as 'Innacn- 
.... Sd/iov . . . .^etrdf ravra Se dva- 
5 ypd-i^ai et'y crraAaj'] Koi OejKv els to i[fp- 
bv Tov AiroWoovoi, ray] Se dvayp\a(f>ds 
eTTifKXrjdijp.ei' k. t. X.] 



COLV. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 4^ in.; breadth, 6 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

PAO^ [Kal eia-irXow 

E 1 1< A I Kal IacJttXoi^i' 

>l A E I ' acri/Xlej Kal 

A dano'li'Sei ? 

Apparently from the latter part of a decree of proxenia. 



CCLVI. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete on the left side. Height, 3I in.; breadth, 5{ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

A I h K P A f]a' fK7r\[ovu d(TvXel 

K A I A J 5 P O Kal d(TaTrd[vSfl Kal k- 

NPOAEM'' V noXffio) [/cat ev ei- 

P A N A I T A ~ pdfa ra 

5 AENl'*'AY 5 V^^" 'f«* ai^Tois ? 

This fragment is from the latter part of a decree, probably of proxenia. 



CCLVII. 

On a fragment of a stel^ of grey marble, complete only on the right edge. Height, 6f in. ; breadth, 6J in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 

Iblbf 

roNoY£l<AI Kal avTov Kal ky^yovovs Kal 

MNAIEri<TH2IIN rfjiiv avrois kv KaXv^/xua tyKTrjcnv 

PoEAPIANKAl yay re Kal oUias Kal irjpoeSpiav Kal 

5 IPoAEMj^I 5 €ia~rrXow Kal eKTrXovv kuj voXkiico 

oNAEI Kal kv ilpdva d(rrr]pv8il 

K.T.X. 

The latter part of an honorary decree granting probably proxenia. 



KALYMNA. 



69 



OCLVII a. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of grey marble, the right edge preserved, but flaked ofi' for about eight letters. 

breadth, 9 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



-£OA 
t'NoMEN 
■>-2:EITotA 
AYMNIoYS: 
"oNENT-r 
■^HCEIT/ 
-^KAI 
AA 



(crOa 
rh Si y'levo/jifi^ov dvd\<oiia ? 
S^xm TO y^dS^^iana ? 

ov if T& 
crh-rjaa rfij' (Uova } 

XX 



Height, II in. ; 



This seems to be part of an honorary decree. The form of the letters and the marble are very 

similar to those of the preceding fragment, cclvii. 



CCLVIII. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, the left side nearly perfect ; the right side remains, but is broken at the edge. 

Height, loin. ; breadth, io|^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 



EAOZETAIBOYAAIKAIT . . 
AAMni2:TPATONII<02A . 
OTIMOYEIPEEPEIAHX/ 
TAAA2:*lAO£ENOYB:: . . 
5 NIKEY5: . . . lATPOSin . . . 

AAOI^TANPOAITA 

. 2:nAPE2:XHTA'E 

. EXNAII<AIEI2:OI< 
ONPAPA" 

Part of the heading of a decree in honour of a 
physician for public services, whose name, line 4, 
appears to be Chatalas, son of Philoxenos. For de- 
crees in honour of physicians, see anie, No. cxliii. 

Line 2. ZrpaToviKos A[^ijoTifiov. In the subscription 
list, No. ccxcviii, we find the name of Diotimos, son 



"E^So^e ra fiovXd Kal t\S 
Sdfia> ZrpaToyiKOS 4[t- 
ot(/iov (Tire, enfiS^ Xa- 
rdXat <t>iKo^(vov Be[p6- 
viKiis [apx]taT/)OS' <M[f iro- 
AXoty t5)v iroXiTo^v xpei- 
ah irapi(Tyr)Tai t\v t€ to, 
T^iyva Kal flaoK^a ? 
01/ napa 



of Stratonikos, evidently one of the same family as 
the mover of this decree. 

Line 5. The stone has been much rubbed in the 
space where I supply APX, and there seem to be 
traces of the X. 

Line 6. POAITA, sic. 



CCLIX. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, the right edge nearly complete. Present height, i ft. 2f in. ; breadth, i ft. yf in. 
Within a shallow oblong sinking near the top is sculptured a wreath. a is engraved on the face of the stone ; d on the 
right return. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



10 



MNIKIA AIKASTO 
YAAEZIKPATHZ AY 
. JAIKQYXAIPEAAMOZA 
IPEIAHTniZYMnANTIAA 
. ZYFOIEPAFYTNinNAAl 
. . . TEN AQNK Al AEFTON 
PIPOTONHMENOZAP 



a. 



Place of the 
crown. 



(|)nNTYPnNOZArHTQPA. 

ZANAPOYTAXIPFOZZE 

rNOAAMOY EIPAN 

MninOAEMOYEZENEXGEN 

KnZKAIPAHPnGEIZANMA 

nAOinNAYZANAPOZCjJOINI 

XONYPHPETIKOYKAIZTPA 



OZENAYTQinOTArrEAIAZrENOMENAZOTIMEAAONTiTQino 
■■INEniTANnOAINKAITANXnPANKAITAZNAZOZTAZKA 
DIKAinAEIQNIKAITOYNAYAPXOYKPINANTOZAPANTA 
-ANHPArAGOZErENETOENTETAIZYMFAOKAITA 
OAEMIQZK ATATONA AKHTHPAZYMPAPAMEINA 

'AYNEYZAZANArArf:Aix/v\AA niozj;: 

ni -pAMiA 'tAIA'ATMAZI 
DNE 7 K I 

T 



70 KALYMNA. 



NAPXAIPESIAIS 
KAIFAPAK AAE 
SEiNTIFOTIAEIA 
AENOZAYTASFOI 
HZASOAITANANA 
■QPEYZINAIONTZ I 
.NTJJIFPATniArn 
IMETATAZZFON 
. . ZAAEANATOPET 
. . . AAEEZinOAA 
. . . OK AATMNION 
NOIA 



a. 



NiKf^as NiKia, AiKaaTOcfrnv Tvpaivos, 'AyrJTCop 'A- 
, . . . V, AXf^iKpdTrjs AvadvSpov, Td^innos — «- 
pXaSiKov, XaipeSa/jLos ' AyvoSdfiov eiTTav 
eneiSfj rS a-vfinavTi Sd/xm, TroXkjiov k^(.vey6kv- 

5 Toly imo ' UpanvTvimv dSiKcos Kai irXijpcodeLcrdv fia- 

KpS)v\ Ti va&v Kal XiiTTwv ttXoioov AvaavSpos 0oivi- 
Kos Ke)(^eipoTOi'r]iievos dpymv vwrjperiKOV Kal arpa- 
Tcvcra/iej^Joy iv avrw irorayyeXiai yevofxe-vas on fiiXXouTi toi tto- 
Xifiioi eirnrXlfiv enl rdv iroXiv Kal rav ympav Kal tols vdcroi ras Ka- 

ro XvSvas (tt6X\> Kal nXiiovi Kal tov vavdpyov KpivavTos diravTa- 

V Toh iroAe/itbifl dufjp dyaOos eyevero tv t€ to, avfinXoKa to, 
T£ Sim^d Kal Tovs TrhXf/iioi Kara, tov AaKrjTrjpa avfnrapafieiva- 
vras Kiv^Swevaas dvdyaye alxfJ'aXSTOs 

SilaliTdyfiaai 

b. 

V dpy^aiptaiai^ 
Kal irapaKaXe- 

(TtVVTl VOTlSt^a- 

fxeyos avrdi noi- 
5 TJcracrOai rav dva- 

y^opfvcriv Alovvctl- 
(ov T<£ irpdrco dym- 
v\i fiird Tccs anof- 
Sah, a Se dvayopw- 
lo (Tih &8( etrro), 6 8a- 

/loyl 6 KaXvfiviatv 
<TTi(f)<th^0L A\y(Tav8pov 

0O»'tKOS /C.T.X.] 



This decree confers a crown on Lysandros, son 
of Phoinix, for his services in defending Kalymna 
in a naval action fought against the Hierapytnians 
of Krete. The lower part of the decree is unluckily 
broken away in the middle of the recital of the 
exploit by which Lysandros repelled the enemy. It 
may be inferred from line lo, if rightly restored, 
that the Hierapytnians had a larger fleet than the 
Kalymnians. 

By the expression &px<ov imtjperiKov, line 7, we must 
understand that Lysandros commanded a single 
armed vessel. 

Line 12. I have restored (rvfinapafxtivcJ^PTas. The 



promontory Laketer is the extreme southern point 
of Kos; the Hierapytnians, repulsed in their first 
attack on Kalymna, may have rallied at this head- 
land, and have been there assailed by Lysandros, 
who may have succeeded at considerable risk in 
carrying away those of the enemy who had been 
taken prisoners, KwSweva-ai dvdyaye alxfiaXdyros. 

The first four lines of 6 cannot be explained be- 
cause the lower part of a has been obliterated. 

By the vda-oi KaXv8vai, lines 9, 10, must be meant 
the group of small islands immediately about Ka- 
lymna, mentioned by Homer in the Catalogue of 
the Ships, II. ii, line 675, who doubtless included in 



KALYMNA. 



71 



the group Kalymna itself. See Strabo, x, p. 489 ; 
L. Ross, Reisen, ii, p. 108. 

In the list of movers of this decree are the names 
Dikastophon, son of Tyron, and Alexikrates, son of 
Lysandros. Both these persons are entered in the 



list of subscribers to some public fund, No. ccxcviii, 
lines 15 and ^i,post. 

The attack on Kalymna by the Hierapytnians may 
have been made when Nabis joined the Kretans in 
piratical enterprises, about b. c. 205 ; see Polyb. xiii, 8. 



CCLX. 

On the lower part of a stelfe of white marble, the left edge perfect from line 3 to the end, the right edge from lines 9-12. 
Height, iijin.; breadth, i ft. sin. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 

ftNTIPATPONAIO^n 

VYTOISANArOPEYZINTOY- 

UiiKAITOIZMErAAOIZASKAAPIEIOi 

HAinOTANAOEZINZTAAAZENTnilEPflli 

5 . OXOAIAPOKPINAZOAIAYTOIZOTIOAAMOZE 

-OZEPITniTIMHNTOZArAOOZTnNIATPriN 

PEYZINT0YZTE<t>AN0YP0IHZEITAIKAO0TIAZI0Y 

AEZANTnAEKAITOIPPOZTATAIMETATOYIEPEnZTOIA 

TEZKAOONKAIXPONONAANAOEZIZTAZZTAAAZriNHTAITOI . . 
lo OZKAAOKHAYTOIZEPITAAEIOZHMENEPIMEAHOENTriAEKAl 

TAZANArOPEYZIOZTOYZTEOANOYMETATOYArniNOGETA 

' AvTiiraTpov AioSa^pov 
airroTs dvayopivaiv tov a\T«ftdvov tois Aiopv<ri- 
ois Kai Tois MeydXoLS ' Aa-K\ain(io^ Koi dvSpa drroSe- 
^at iTOT di'ddfcTiu (rrdXas iv tS> iepm \tov ' AaKXaniov ? ^e- 
S 8'\6y6ai diroKpivaaOai avrois on 6 Sdfios ^vfieTdTreicr- 

ros enl rm rifitjv Thi dyadoi toov larpciv ^tolv dvayo- 
pev<Tiv TOV arecpdyov woirja-eiTai KaO' o ri d^toi^criy diro- 
S(^dvT(o Sf Kai Tol npocTTdTai fierd tov Upfcos Tot oJ^lpedii'- 
rey Ka6' Sf Kai \p6vov d dvdOeati Tas (TTaXas yiurjTai toi^ov 
10 Si Ka SoKJj aiiToh kiriTdSnos fj/jnv eTn/ie\r)6fUT(o St Kai 

ray dvayop(v<Tios tov crTfcpdvov fitTa tov dy<oyo6fTa. 



The mention of the MkyaXa 'AaKXanuLa, line 3, 
makes it probable that this decree is the copy of 
one enacted by the people of Kos in answer to 
an application from the Kalymnians, who had be- 
stowed a crown on a Koian physician and wished 
it proclaimed at Kos. Compare the decrees of 
Halikarnassos and Kos, Bullet, de Corn Hell. 1881, 



pp. 212, 213; and for the' A a-KXairuia, ibid. pp. 215, 

2 34- 
Line 6. Tififjv for TL/jLav. See Ahrens, Dial. Dor. 

P- 313. 

Line 9. Tor[o»'] Si Ka Sokt}. This evidently refers 
to the person to be appointed to see to the setting 
up of the stele, lines 3, 4. 



CCLXI. 

Fragment from the heading of a stelfe in white marble, which has been surmounted by a pediment, the right edge complete. 

Height, 8 in. ; breadth, 4I in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

HAYXnNKAl 
THXAPO 
XPTOAEMA 

r]Xva(oy Kai 

. . StKacrlrfii ? dno- 
araXth napd tov /3a<r<X€<B]y ? flToXt/ia- 
[j'oi; 



The following two fragments, cclxi a and 6, probably belong to this stele. 



72 



KALYMNA. 



COLXI a. 

Made up of two fragments of a stelfe of white marble. The left edge is complete in the first four lines. 

breadth, \o% in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



Height, io| in. ; 



lO 



aIAKPINmKAIAIAAYXA 
MENOYXTnislnOAITAN 
OPri^nXKAIXYM<t)EP0^ 
TOIKAAYMNinNPOIH'*" 
EIXKATATANTO^ 

ErAIAcJ)OPAyoi ivNu 
PANTAXJ^YNArArEA/ 
AAMniEPAirJEXAITE 
AIXPYXniXTE 
AEIMENAE 

'"AiErr 



lO 



This fragment evidently refers to the services of 
some one or more persons from another city who had 
been invited by the Kalymnians to judge a number 
of pending law suits. The services of these foreign 
judges or judge are rewarded with a gold crown, 



SiaKplvai Koi Sidkva-cSi. rovs Sia<pepo- 
fiivovs rS>v TToXnav \a,il <f>i\ay- 
Opdoirooi Kal avficfxpoflTO)? t£ Sdfiat 
T& KaXv/ivimi/ TToiTjafd/jKyos ras Kpi- 
<TJ(iS Karh, rhv To[t5 ? 
ey Sia^opas ofiovo 
irdvTas avvdyayi S 
(So^e rm S^dfia kwaivf-crai re [r^j' Siiva rov StTvos 
Kal cr7e^a»'(£cr]at •)(fiv<T& aT^<pdv<o 

elfiey Se ^noXiTaf kv Ka\v/j.va, 
Kal airrbv] Kal eyy{6vovs 

and other honours ; avvdyayt, line 7, would lead us to 
infer that only one person is so rewarded. On the 
other hand, if the fragment immediately following 
(ccLXi d) is part of the same decree, it included more 
than one person ; see line 8, avroin Kal (pvXds k.t.X. 



CCLXI d. 

On a fragment of stelb of white marble, the left edge preserved. Height, i ft. \ in.; breadth, 7 J in. 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 

^lAlOI^JA^ 
APOAAfiMOXTAX 
-TAAAXEPIMEA 
OYXTOMMHNATO 
6 -IXAETANXTAA 

KAITANOYXIANKAI 
ANAAnMA0TAMIA2 
T0YXKAl4>YAAXEM 

^dvaypdylrai Sk ToSe to ■^dtpia/xa (is 

oraXali/ XiQivav [/cat dvaOifiev els to Upw tov 
AnoXXwvos, rds [Se dvaypa(f)di Kal ray dvaOiaios ras ■ 
aTaXai fnifieXl[r]drjfj.ei' Toi>s alprjO-qaofikv- 
ovi rhfi lifjva tc^vtov irpoardTas 
5 «/r iSe Tav CTTd^av Kal tolv dvaypa<f)dv 

Kal Tav Bvcrtav Kal \tov aTetftavov to yivoufvov 
dvdXcofia 6 Ta/iias [S6t(o' piTtyiirOai Se av- 
Toiis Kal (fivXds ev ^KaXv/iva Kal Sdfiov 

K.T.X. 



Temple of Apollo, 



If this and the preceding fragment, a, belong to 
the decree of the heading of which cclxi is part, 
it may have reference to the same transactions as 
the decree of the Kalymnians, of which a copy is 
preserved in a decree of the lasians ; C. I. 2671. 
We learn from that inscription that, at the request 
of the Kalymnians, five dikasts were sent to them 
from lasos to judge various pending law suits 
between Kalymnian citizens. These suits, which 
amounted to two hundred and fifty or more, were 
settled by the dikasts to the satisfaction of the 
people of Kalymna, who in consequence rewarded 



them with a gold crown and other honours. 

The mention of a Sidypa/xfia tov ^aaiXims in this 
lasian decree makes it probable, as Bockh points 
out, that this settlement of litigation was necessary 
in consequence of the return of the exiles which 
took place generally throughout the Greek cities by 
order of Alexander the Great. See C. I. 2166; 
Diodor. xvii, 109 ; xviii, 8. 

Line 6. rdu 6vcriav. Compare the decree from 
Minoa (L. Ross, Aufsatz. ii, p. 641), which grants 
the proxenia and a gold crown to certain dikasts, 
also fifty drachmae ety Ovaiav Kal ^tvia. 



KALYMNA. n 



CCLXII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 5^ in. ; breadth, 3^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

.AA 

lAZE-n. 
inAZ/ 
AAY\ 
5 TI/xNH 

SHE 
^N N 
10 



'ESo^e TO, /SouJXa [*ca( tZ Sdfico, yvwjid TrpoaTarav ? 
tneiSfi 6 8dfjL09 6] 'lacreal^i/ ? 

TTafffaf (TiTOvSav 
T(^ Sdfiai Tw K'\aXvfAuia)f ? 



The mention of the lasians in this small fragment 
suggests that it may be part of a decree similar 
in import to the Kalymnian decree, C. I. 2671, 



to which I have already referred, anU' No. CCLXI. 
On this supposition I have conjecturally restored 
lines 1-4. 



CCLXIII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the left side preserved at lines 5-7 ; line i is in smaller characters and is inscribed on 
the lower part of a moulding on the top of the stelb. Height, 7^ in.; breadth, 7 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 

/mSAITAIA 
AHOAAMOi. 
rPESBEY2:AN 
A2:OITINECnAP 

5 epoihsiantotaj: 

MAITAIKAAYMNir 
OYSiAMO^ANEnA! 
TATAAII^AIAnOI 

"K^o^f Ta ^ov\]a Koi Toi d[(f/ia>, yi^wfia irpoaraTav 

i-!T(C\8r) 6 Sd/xoi \6 laaiwv ? 

npi(T^iv<ra)^oi tov Suvo^ dniaTuXiv dfSpas SiKaar- 
as ? oiTiuei Traf^ayivojxivoi (is Tr)v KaXv/xvau ? 
5 fnoirjaavTO rds [Kpicreis avp^ipovTOiS tw ? Sd- 

pcp Tw KaXvpviu^v Kard Toiis v6p.ovi Kal rois opKovs ? 
ovs wpoaav iTTai\v€(Tai Toi)s Sfipas 
KoWd, rd StKaia noifrjarapivovv 



The decree of which this is a fragment may have 
referred to the dikasts sent by the lasians to Ka- 



lymna at the request of the latter city to settle their 
disputes. See C. I.267i,anda«/'^Nos.ccLXi,ccLXi«,^. 



CCLXIV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the left edge of the stone preserved, but from four to five letters are wanting on this 
side. Height, 4f in. ; breadth, 4^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 

AHA Kal KoivS. K\ai i^ia ? 

ENP/ iv 7ra[i/Tt Kaipm 

TnST aTrpo^acriVlTtBy ? t 

ATOTZI Tovs 

5 n N S Y ^ 5 tIcoi/ a-vjAdxpovTatv ? 

AOEZTA (V Toh K^aOtcrTol^Kocn Kaipois 

Zni^ Xpv\j£ a{Tt(pdi'a) 

El 

This seems to be a fragment of a decree conferring a crown for services. 



74 



KALYMNA. 



CCLXV. 

On a fragment from the upper part of a stelfe of white marble. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 4 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; 

C. T. N. 



OSETAl 
MAIT/ 
"TE* 



"ES^o^e TO, [jSofXa koI tS> 

crTC^Taj'a) or crT€(f^av5)(rai 
eiri 



CCLXVI. 

On part of a stelfe of white marble consisting of two fragments joined together, both sides preserved. Height, 7 in. ; breadth, 

11^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



AEEN 

ibNTn 1ITAII</- . . iNl 

.IT/vNTEI<A . . .TPATEIANPA 
. . . IAAMEYNT-f> . nOAITANI<AI 
5 lANPAPAriNON . NANESiTANnO 

AINPOAYAPOYNT . AIATEAEINXPEI 
ANPAPEXOMENC . ^E . . £TOI2l<ATAA^ 

SIAMINTANAYTC ^OY^ENEAAF 

TAPPOOYMIAS:or . 'OYNOA . ^ . . 
10 ct)AINHTAlTIMAN 

PPOAIPOYMENOYS: 
PEYMENOITA2:XPt 
TAIPAHOEITAIKA 
lOTIYPAPHE 

This is evidently part of an honorary decree 
rewarding some foreigner with the proxenia, the 
politeia, or a crown, for services rendered to Ka- 



10 



15 



Se ev 
ev t£ ^Sd/jL^ Tm KaD^vfjiyilcou 
tSiv re KoSrra a'ypaTiiav na- 
p€TrySafxevi'r<i^i''\ woXirdv koI 
rS)v irapayivojjliflvmv es rav tro- 
\lv •it6\vwpovvt\ol\ SiareXeii/ XP*'" 
av ■7rape)(^6/jifi'c^i''^ €^K(x^(ttois Kara Sv- 
vajiiv rav avrov ovOey eXX^iiroy- 
ra npo6v/j.ias' OTrTajy] ovv 6 ^a]u.[os 
<paifr]Tai Tinmv [roCy evepyfreip avrov 
irpoaipovfievovi [/ca2 toI Trpoai- 
pevfiivoL Tas \p^ias Trap()(^e<T6ai 
Tm nXrjOti rm Ka^Xv/xviaf uScovr- 
i Sti {m-dp^^i avToii TrdvTa to. Tifiia 
napa rov Sdfiov tov KaXvfivicov /c.r.X.] 



lymnians, who had sojourned in his city either while 
on military service or as travellers. 



CCLXVII. 

On part of a stelb of white marble, the left edge and the moulding along the top complete ; about eighteen letters or three-fifths 
of the stone wanting on the right side. Height, 9I in. ; breadth, 6 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



li-i 



EAOZETAIBOYAAl 

tatanepeiaha 
neysikaaymnic 
aamaii<aippa2j: 
aytaipotitanf 

MONAYTONAIATi 

TOYAAMOYXPH 

TANPAHOOSAZ 

POAEIPOAAANI</ 

TEINONTANAITIO 

KAIENTOISIKAOES:" 

TOANAAAMAT 

KATEPEirONT 

TANAPI'-> 

PEYMEN 

AOYXPh 

-•ACO 
OA 



15 



"ESo^e TO, ^ovXa [/ca2 rS Sdfxm^ yvdofia irpoa- 
Tardu^ infiSrj A 

vivs KaXv/ii/Lc^s eiluovs a>v koL (f)iXos tm ? 
Sd/jUo Kal npda-afcov Kai Xkya>v d^ia>s ray v7rap)(ovcras 
avrm noTi Tav \n6Xiv (piXorriTOS 
fiov avTov 8iaT\iXei 
rov Sdfiov ^(^ptjl/iaTa ? 
Tcoi' TrX^^oy affioXoyov 
noXei TToXXmy Acfai fieydXatv aw- ? 
TilVOVTWV aiTK^i 

Kal iv TOis KadeaT^aKoai Kaipois 
TO dvdXco/ia r 
KaTerreiyoi'Tfcoi' 
T(ov anio 

pevfiey [rov Sd- 

fiov )(fi'^\fiara 

o]»ro)y c^Sy 6 Sd/ios (paiyrjrai 
6 ^d/j,oi 



If line 3 is rightly restored, this is a fragment of a decree of some city, honouring a Kalymnian for 

services. Compare anie ccxlvii. 



KALYMNA. 



75 



CCLXVIII. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble, the left edge complete. Height, 4I in.; breadth, 3^ in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 



vior<i> 

EPTETEINI 
TONKAITO 

'1EN0I~AZ 
niAHMIA 
A TAT 

ATAAYN/ 
0/*IT 



[^TTooy ovv 6 Sa- 

fios tjJ^aiyTjTai Tifi&v Tovs tv- 

epyfreiv ^irpoaipov/jiifovs av- 

TOP Kal rdTi npoaipov- 

ftevoi [rjay ^)(pfias naptyiaOai 

irdfTo] TO, Tft/tia 
fclara SvvoSjiiv 
6ai T 



COLXIX. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble, complete only on the left edge. Height, 4^ in.; breadth, 5 in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 



PEIA^ 
3YMIA2:Z. 
OEYAAPON 
TONKAIEI 



)(]peias [Trapexo/xei'oy, ov6\v kWiiir(ov trpo- 
Ovfilas, ^iSoyJdai irokiTav ^fiev kv KaXufiva 
SevScopov [tov SiTvos Kal av- 
Toy Kal ([yyoyovs litTiyovTai k.t.X. 



Line 3. Q^vSwpov. In the list of the dikasts sent by lasos to Kalymna (see C. I. 2671) the name 

of Theodores, son of Noumenios, occurs. 



CCLXX. 

On two fragments of white marble joined together. Height, 6f in.; breadth, 3^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



•-;aan 

01 NAN 
YAPOI 
5 AAAN 

AMP 
YAKIN 
-^ENTOI 
AIPOA 

rSSi TO y^d<f)i<T\u.a, d.i\aypa^aL Se 

(19 ardXav \i\6ivav {koi di^tv els rb Uphv tov ' Air6\K<ii>voi 
v8po 
OT^Xav ? 
Xain 
Hrjvbs .^] ' YaKii^Oiov ? 

/i(V TOl 

t\£ nSXJ^ei 
Fragment from end of honorary decree. 



76 KALYMNA. 



CCLXXI. 

On a fragment of grey marble, complete on the right side. Height, 4I in. ; breadth, 5^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

li>iA 

AI0EMENEII K]al Qiixev eh 

YAA5EAAXE TO kpw Tov ' Air6\Xa>vor (f^Xdi eXax« 

"'"'El AMNIO (TTfiSfi Nio 

Lines 2, 3, the end of an honorary decree. Line 4, the beginning of another decree. 



CCLXXII. 

On the lower part of a stelb of white marble, both sides partly preserved ; along the base is a moulding. Height, 8 in. ; 

breadth, 10^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

/M>IAOEMENL dvaBifiev [ih 

iCPONTOYAPOAAnNOZ to\ Upov tov ' AttoXKohvos 

The end of a decree. 



COLXXIII. 

On the lower part of a stelb of white marble, complete on the right side; the left broken away above line 5. The stelfe extends 
9 in. below the inscription. Height, i ft. ^ in. ; breadth, i ft. 2 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

AAilMAEIX 

- lANXTAAANKAIEIX 

>IAI PAtDANAOTnOTAMIAXOENEX 
5 lAKHXAPIXTIAITrilANAAHXANTI 

TO St yevofiivov av'Y'Xaifia els 
Tavra Koi e/y] Tav a-TdXaf Kal th 
TOLv d,v\ay pa<l)dv Sotco 6 Tajxias 6 kvea- 
TUKobs ' ApicTTia tS) dvaXaxrai'Ti. 

End of a decree. We find the name Aristias in the heading of a stele, posi cccv and anie ccxxxi. 



CCLXXIV. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble ; large characters ; the right edge partly preserved. Height, 5 in ; breadth, 5 in. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

AEAOX^ SeS6x6[ai 

\YMNinN Ka]Xvfjivi(ov 

NO\PA poina 

" Z'A 

Fragment, probably from the latter part of an honorary decree. 



CCLXXV. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 3^ in.; breadth, 2 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

/• 

MPC Kal ehjL irdXe/icp ? 

\ A Y KarA] St^va/iiy ? 

Y 



KALYMNA. 77 



CCLXXVI. 

On a fragment of grey marble, the left edge complete. Height, 2| in.; breadth, 3 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

I EI7 

-niK/» 



«rrtKX[ap£(Tat ? 



CCLXXVII. 

On two fragments of grey marble, joined together, complete on the left side. Height, 6 in.; breadth, 4 J in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

rPAtAIEI 

TOIEPQN" 
OE YTEN 

K A A A I « I 
5 AYcfjPj^NNI 

-n-NAIATE 
AOXG' 
T* 

Sjaxna Sk dva- 
ypd^^ai ej[y (rroKav XiOivav roiii irpocrTaTai kuI dvaBifiiv ds 
TO iepof [rov AttoWoovos' ktr(K\apa)6ri knl (f)v\av Kal SajMov, eXa^* ^vXay 
Qivyn^iSdv, Sdpov 

KaXXicTT^paTOi ? eine, eneiSrj Flo- ? 

5 Xv(ppa)y Ni [eHvovs 

wv Siar^Xil Tw Sdpcp Ta>v KaXvpficoy Se- 

Lines 1-3. The end of a decree conferring a j Lines 4-8. Part of the heading of an honorary- 
grant of politeia and proxenia. I decree. 



OCLXXVIII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken, on all sides. Height, 4I in.; breadth, 3:^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

iOHMEl iiTipfX\r]6f)p(v 

riAAN eXaxe (pvXds . . . Sdpov . . . .] yiSav 
MKAI 'ESo^f ra ^ovX'^ km [rS Sdpm 

Eir^E 6 Suva] dm 



CCLXXIX. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the right edge preserved. Height, 7I in.; breadth, 8| in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 

^AITnlAA^\ 'ESoie ra /Soi/Xa] Kal rm Sap- 

I ATA NEC El AH ^, yvmpa irpoa'yardv, knaS^ 

Oi.ZElNol<PIToYErEA 6 Suva] IdvoKphov (ueX. 

'ITANBoYAANI<AIToNAA 6cby in]! raf ^ovXdi^ kuI tw 8a- 

5 A^ANIlEIKAAAlSTPATo 5 pov e^icpaytXei KaXXiaTpaTc{v 

AoYMYNAIoNEYNOYNHMEN ov MvySioy dvovv ^p^v 

IXPEIA2IPAPEXOMEN0N T& Sdpca T&y KaXvpvtmvj x/'*"'? irapeyopfvov 

To^FMFAMTIhcA" Tor 6> nayrl Kai- 

From the heading of a decree setting forth the public services of KalHstratos, a Myndian. This 

probably contained a grant of politeia. 



;8 KALYMNA. 



COLXXX. 

On a fragment from the left side of a stele of white marble, on the top of which has been a moulding, now broken away; 
the left edge of the inscription partly preserved. Height, 7I in.; breadth, 4^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

. AOZETAI "E'^So^t TO, [/3ot/Xa kol to, (KKXrjcria, yva>- 

/V\AnP02!^TA fia irpoa-rc^Tciv kwuSr] 6 Seiva tov 

KOPAklNOYE KopaKivov k\yri\6a)v kirl ray ^ov- 

A '^ NKAITAN Aaj/ kuI rav ^tKKX-qcriav e/xtpafi^fi 
5 ^ TA rOP 5 '/1[/D«r]Tay6p[aj/ tov Sflvoi 

VAN rrivSi^atoy ? ivvovv rjfiiv rm Sd- 

MA' ""^ fio) t5) \Ka\viivLa)V 



COLXXXI. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, surmounted by a pediment; more than half of the stelfe on the right hand side is 
broken away. The inscription begins near the lower edge of the fragment. Height, 10 in. ; breadth, 5^ in. Temple of 
Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

EAOZET/ 

- FA 

" ESo^i i\S, ^ovXd or i{a kKK\r)aia 
The initial words of a decree. 



CCLXXXII. 

On a fragment from the upper part of a stele of white marble, the right edge and part of the moulding along the top preserved. 

Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 7 1 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

'BOYAAIKAITAI "ESo^e to] ^ovXS. Kal ra 

AAMOfENH^ kKK\r)a-ia], AaiioykvT]^ 

Fragment from the heading of an honorary decree. 



CCLXXXIII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the right side preserved. The inscription begins near the lower edge of the fragment. 

Height, 4| in. ; breadth, 6 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

E K K A H 5 I 'ESo^e TO, fiovXa Kal ra] kKKXrjai^a 
NIKOJP'HF yiKos (In^u 

Fragment from the heading of a decree. 



CCLXXXIV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the right side preserved ; the inscription begins near the lower edge of the fragment. 

Height, 8 in.; breadth, 5 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

<AITAIEKKAH "ESo^e ra ^ovXa] Kai ra kKKXr]- 

INIKOYAT aia, 6 Suva KaXXjifiKov 'Ay 

lAAEIPAN iSa tlvay 

EYZAPK kneiSf) 6 Suva . . . ."jfvs 'ApK 

Fragment from heading of a decree. 



KALYMNA. 79 



CCLXXXV. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the right side preserved. Height, 4^ in. ; breadth, 5 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; 

C. T. N. 

AITAIEKKAHSIIAI 'ESoie rd /SovXa K]al rd (KKXrja-ta 

f<AEOY5:EinEN KXeovi uw^v 

n ''OAOTOY 'EnfiSi] 6 Suva ' A]n[oX]\oS6Tov 

Y 

Fragment from heading of decree. 



CCLXXXVI. 

On a fragment from the upper part of a stel^ of white marble ; the left side and the moulding at the top have been broken away ; 
the right side is complete ; the inscription begins about half way down the fragment. Height, 6| in, ; breadth, 6 in. Temple 
of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

PEN (Tlnfy 

NIoZ 
•sZAAE 

Probably broken off from the heading of a decree. 



OCLXXXVII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, apparently from the upper part of a stelh, complete on the top ; the inscription begins near the 
lower edge of the fragment. Height, 3 in. ; breadth, 1 1 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

AC 
■»!' 

'f JiSoT^e rd ^ovXd k. t. \. ? 
Probably a fragment from the first two lines of a decree. 



CCLXXXVIII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 3f in.; breadth, 2^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

PEN fiyrff ? 

Probably part of the heading of a decree. 



COLXXXIX. 

On a fragment of grey marble. The inscription broken on all sides, but the left edge of the stone partly preserved. 
Height, 3| in.; breadth, 4f in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

KAEYi. . . . KXevs 

DEOYSiA . . . dfov Ic{fiioi ? 

1IAA^^A t]^) Sd/io, 

'^ ^A E N C vpoaipe^fievo ? 

A fragment, probably, from the heading of an honorary decree. 



8o KALYMNA. 



ocxc. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 4 in.; breadth, 5^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

X-MEPL 

PATENOML o'lTivfs ? Tray)ayiv6fi^voi ? ■* 

lYXMENAPilN T]ovi> fikv Spcov 

*XIKAEY5:'^ fl ?]a(nKXevs 
5 A^'i 

Probably a fragment of a decree. If we restore the sending of envoys or commissioners. See the 

Tra]pay€v6iJL^voi, the inscription may have related to j Kalymnian decree, C. I. 2671, lines 33, 36. 



CCXCI. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, the right side preserved. Height, 7| in. ; breadth, sf in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

A^r apy 

I is: Y PI 02: NycTvpios? 

"^JINEI^KAAY pcov iti Ka\x{nv 

H£"T N 

5 MNIA 5 Ka\v]iivia{y 

This seems to be part of a decree. 



COXCII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 2\ in.; breadth, 2 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

I EYE ivif^trav ? 

Perhaps part of an honorary decree. 



OOXCIII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, the right side complete. Height, 3J in. ; breadth, 3! in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

oY-e.IE ovy ^e 

»XMANAPI y MavSpi 

"OcjJflNTO KO(f)covT(^s 

lOXIAZ toy ^d 

5 "^ 

Probably a fragment from the subscription list. No. ccxcviii post. 



CCXCIV. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete on the top. Height, 4 in. ; breadth, 2 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

A P O awo 

XYM of/i 

AAA SaX 

ANA avB 

6 <TAN 5 XTdv 

EN ei/ 
O 



KALYMNA. 



8i 



ccxcv. 

On a fragment of a stelii of grey marble, the left edge preserved. Height, 7 J in. ; breadth, 5 J in. 

C. T. N. 



Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; 



10 



oYSIAEMH 
EOSTHNnY 
ONnZAZEBO 
POAIEPirNO 
TAMIAIANArP 
THMATAKAITO 

'*NEZT0IEP0 
AHMAr 

'TBI 



This seems to be a fragment of some law relating 
to the management of public property. 

Line 5. noai. This word leads me to conjecture 
that the property in question was pasture, perhaps 
sacred land. 

The characters in this inscription are late, and in 
TOKD, line 10, the iota subscriptum is wanting. 



[0/ S( 



10 



. ovai Sk jirj 

£0)9 TWV TTV 

oveos &.S ifioi^KoXrjaavTO ? 

noai 

Tafiiai dvay(^a<f)6vT(ov to, k- 

TTijiaTa Kol To[i)y tSkov^ 

is ri Upcfv rov 'AirSWcoyos, rb Se yivSjKvov 

aj'tflAai/ia 

TOACG) a)[s .? 



On the left edge of this stone is NIKOI; the 
letters are larger and of an earlier date than those 
of the inscription on the face, to which they are set 
at a right angle. The original stone has evidently 
been reworked when the later inscription was en- 
graved on it. 



CCXCVI. 

On a fragment of grey marble, the left edge complete. Height, 4^ in.; breadth, 2| in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



10 



nANurl 

TEIXIZAITOI 

AOZANANHK 

ENAS4)AAEI 

AAAAIXD 

TONAYT 

MANAATi 

nANTA 

MOT 

TIM 



10 



ndvo^fiov } 
Ttiy(t^ai Tot 
So^av avrjK 
kv ocr^aXetfa 
dfXXat •)^^p(U ? 
Tooi' axn^v 
fiav Sar 
vaura 

jlOT 
Tin 



This may be a fragment of a decree relating to ' tioned, post, No. ccxcviii, line 42. 
some fortress in Kalymna. I have restored ndvof^nov, late and crowded, 
line I, because the deme of the Panormians is men- i 



The letters are 



CCXCVII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 2 in.; breadth, 2^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

loNON 
<POZHKO 
NnHZA7 
3ZANAA 

This fragment is of the same grey marble as the form and crowded arrangernent. It may therefore 
preceding one, and the letters have the same late have been part of the same inscription. 



82 KALYMNA. 



OCXCVIII. 

On a stelfe of white marble, the upper part broken off. Height, 3 ft. 2 in. ; breadth, 2 ft. 2 J in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; 

C. T. N. 

\j 

YinN NAMYNTA/ 
AIZTPATOY A ETAZlMC . o 
<AEYZKAIYPEPTnNYinN N ZNu 

5 <0Y K NIKOKPATHZNEOIKOY K OAAMOSOPOOAinN 

<AEY4)ANHZnEIZISTPAT0Y KE T YA IPnOZKAEYct)ANOYS 
..BAAASIK AAMOZOENHZTYPnNOIKEYOYAAZAAMArOPA 
. . NinPIAAZ4)IA0KAE0YZ IE ZTAZAN APOZK AAAI TENOYZH 
. . NYinNNBOIHOOZKAEYCJJANOYZYnEPAYTOYKAITOYYIOY A 

10 . 3ZKAAAIZ TPATOYIE EYOYAAZEYGYAAMOY K HPATOPAZAAMC .. 

<0YYnEPAYTOYKAITOYYIOY A PPAIIMHZTnPKAEIZOAOXOY IE A . . 
ZirrOZAPiZTinNOZ IE nPAIinOAIZXAIPEAAMOYKAIYnEPTOYP . 
TPOZ AIEN04)ANHZKAEYZTPAT0YK MIKIHN APOAAOAOTOY IE lENO 
^ENHZANAIinNOZKAIYPEPTIiNYIIiN I AAMAPATOZ AAMATOPA IE 

15 AIKAZT0ct>ONTYPnN0ZKAIYPEPT OY A TIMOAEHNZIMI A IE IE 

NOAIKOZCJJOINIKOZKAIYPEPTnNYinN . . PAIHNPIZTIAA IE AHMH 
TPIOZMYIZKOYMETOIKOZ A XAPIKAEI AAZPPAIIct)ANOYZ IE ANAIIAI 
KOZAPIZTOYXOY IE APIZTOYXOZcjjEPETIMOY IE CJiANOAAZEYKAEOYZ IE 
AIOKAHZ NIKANOPOZKAIYPEPTOYYIOY A APIZTOMAXOZAPIZTOMAXOYYPEP 

20 AYT0YKAITriNAAEA4)nN N AYZIKPATHZNIKANOPOZKAIYPEPTOYYIOYIWJ OEY • 

KPATHZAIOTIMOYKAIYPEPTnNYinNAIOTIMOYNIKOKAEOYZ I APNIZ 
\PIZTIA K IZOKPITOZAPIZTIA K AAEIIMAXOZIEPAKPITOY K APIZTIA"?' 
. . EYZTPATOY A PEIOANHPAN APO(t)l AOYK Al YPEPTnNYinN P KPATI 
. ^ZPPAIIct)ANOYZKAIYPEPTnNYinN ME APIZTAPOPAZK AEIZI AO 

25 xOY IE OPAZYBOYAOZ E YFEITONOZ IE PIN AAPOZCJ)! AOc})nNTOZ K XAPI 

KAEIAAZXAIPEA IE OEMINOZTPATOZOPAZYAAMOY IE APHZIZTPA 
T0ZZn4)P0NIZK0YKAIYPEPT0YYI0Y A cf)0INII3EEN APOPA IE MIKIflN 
ArHMONOZKAIYPEPTOYAAEA<j)OY A AKEZIZTPATOZAYZIMAXOY IE Al 
NHZIAHMOZZIMOY IE AAMOXAPIZEYOYAA IE ATHZI AZAPXIBIOY IE 

30 IENArOPAZCJ)OINIKOZ IE lENArOPAZIENAPOPAZ IE QHBAAAZAPXE 

AOXOY IE PIZTnNPPAinNOZ IE PPAinNPIZTHNOZ IE PIZTHN 
PIZTHNOZ IE MEAHZIAZZnZINIKOY IE PEPZI AZAAOKHTOYK AIYPEP 
TriNYinN I TAXIPPOZTAXIPPOY IE lENOAIKOZIENAPOPA K 
VIOTIMOZZTPATONIKOY A AAMOPEIOHZPIZTONOZ IE ANAUHNTA 

35 . 'PPOY IE PEIZIKPATHZOINIAAA IE PEI0OAAZOINI AAA IE APA 

. . <j)ANTOZAEYKIPPOY IE P0AY4>ANT0ZTIMHZinN0ZK Al YPEPTHN 

. . ON N EPIKPATHZAPY A K Al YPEPTnNYinN ME EPIKPATHZNAZIH 

. . YPEPAYTOYKAITOYYIOY A MAN APOPENHZMANAPIOZ K KAEYZTPATOZ 

. . NAPOPENOYZ K AIZXYAOZMAN APOTENOYZ K lENOXAPIZZAEHZZTPA 

40 ..Y IE NIKOMHAHZAIZXYAOY A IPPAZOZIPPAZOY IE AAEIIKPATHZ 

. . ZANAPOYKAIYPEPTOYYIOY A K AEAZK AlEAPIPENHZTOIKriMAP 
. DY A AAMOZPANOPMinN P EYKPANI AAZPPAII(j)ANTOYK AIYPEPTOY 
. lOY A AYZIKPATHZAYZEA A AAK I M I AAZOPAZ I PPOY IE APXHNI 
AAZKAAAIKPATIAAKAIYPEPTOYYIOY A TIMOKPITOZK AEITOMA 

45 XOY IE CJ)IAINNEAZOEYAOTOY N ANAIAPETACJ)! AINNEA N KAAAI 

ZTPATHNIKOMENOYZ A NIKOKPITOZOEYAAMOY IE NIKOKPITOZNIKO 
(})IAOY K APKE4)nNEAPINA K ONAZIMAXOZMOZXOY IE APIZTOK AHZANAIAP 
XOY IE KAEYOEMIZANAIAPXOY IE XAPMIZGAPZIKPATOYZ K KAEYZOE 
NHZAE04)nNT0Z IE EYOYAAMOZIEN APOPA IE KAEITO(})ANHZAN API 

50 AA IEEPMAZIAAZEY4)IAHT0Y IE 4)1 AHNI AAZK AAAI AAMOY K MENEKAHZ 

lENAPXIAA IE POTATOPOZPEIZIZTPATOY IIEENEYAIKOZ AAMOKPA 
TOYZ IE OPAZYAAMOZOPAZYBOYAOY IE PIN AAPOZcf)! A0<})ONT0Z K APIZ 
TOAAZAIOTIMOYA I PP I AZ AT I PPOY IE AIMN AIOZOEYIENI AOYK AIY 
PEPTOYYIOY M MENEZTPATOZEPITEAOYZYPEPTOYYIOY IE EPIKPA 



KALYMNA. 83 



55 THSAirEnZ IE 4)IAITT0SEPATnNIAA IE AKESTOPI AASON AZIPPOY IE 

OPAZYMHAHZOPAZYBOYAOY K PEPZI AZ AIOTIMOYK AIYPEPTOYYIOY N EA 
PITENHZNIKEAKAIYPEPTOYYIOY M ONYMAN APOZPPAIITEAOYZ IE KEP 
KEPKIZNIKIOZ IE APIZTOAAZAAMATOPAK AIYPEPTOYYIOY N ANAPIAAZ 
AN API A A 10 APIZTIAZKAAAirENOYZ IE EXE<j)EI AHZAAMAPXI AAK AIY 

60 PEPTOYYIOY A ATNI AZK AAAITENOYZ IE APOAAnNIOZAPOAAHNlOY IE 

HPOZTPATOZAPOAAnNlOY IE OEYIENI AAZOAPZATOPA IE PAATONAE 
riZTPATOYKAIYPEPTOYYIOY N TAYPIZKOZAEHZTPATOYPANIXOMAXOZPAI 
MENIZKOY AEYKTU MnNEYKTHMONOZ A 

AIKAIAPXOZEPIZTPATOYZTE<j)ANA(J)OPHZAZ N 

___..-___._._ Kat inrkp tcSi'] 

vimv V ' A /xvvTcJ[s 

Xtarpdrov \ ZTaai/xd's 
kX(vs Kat vnep tS>v vlSiv v 
5 Kov K NiKOKpaTrjs NeotKov k 6 SS/^los 6 PoOaicoy 

KXev<f)dvTii ne.icna-Tpa.Tov ice rvXiniroi KXevcpduovs Ice 
Or]j^dSa Zi K AafiocrOevr)^ Tvpcofoi ic EvdvXa^ AafiaySpa 
' AyoiyimriSa^ 'PiXoKXeovs le iTdcravSpos KaXXiyevov^ rj ^kuI vnip 
T»]i' vlmu V BoiTjOos KXev(f>dvovs iinep avTov Kal tov vlov X 
10 . oy KaXXicTTpdTOv le EvdvXas EvSvSdfiov ic ' Hpayopas Aa/j-oli/t- 

Kov xmep avTOv Kal tov vlov X flpa^i/XTJcrTcop KXeicroX6)(^ov il ' A\yrj- 
(riTTTros ApicTTLcovos ie flpa^inoXis XaipeSd/xov Kal vnep tov TrTa- 
Tpos X —evo<pdi'T]s KXevcTTpaTOv ic Mikicou ' AttoXXoSotov ie £evo- 
fievT}^ 'Ava^icovos Kal xmep rSiv viSiv ^ AafidpaTos Aa/MaySpa ie 
15 AiKaaT0(fiS>v Tvpctivos Kal imep i\ov vi\ov X TijioXecov ZifMia ie Ee- 

voSiKos 'PoiviKo^ Kal vnep t&u vlSiv [. fT^d^cou flicrTiSa ie Arj/irj- 
rpios Mvta-Kov jxeToiKos X XapiKXeiSas Flpa^icpdvovs ie 'Afa^iSi- 
Kos 'ApiaTOvyov ie ' ApLarTov\oi ^PepeTijiov ie 4>av6Xas EvKXeovs ie 
AiokXtjs NiKdvopos Kal vnep tov vlov X ' A piaTOfiaxoi ' A pia-TO/id^ov imep 
ao aiiTov Kal twv dSeX<f)S>v v Ava-iKpaTtjs NiKavopos Kal vnep tov vlov v Qev- 

Kpdrrjs AtoTiftov Kal vnep twv vla>v Aioti/jlov N iKOKXeovs A "Ayvii 
ApioTia K 'la-oKptTos 'Apia-ria /c ' AXe^ifia^oi 'lepaKpiTov ic 'Apiarias 
KxyvcTTpaTOv X rieiOdvcop ' AvSpocpiXov Kal vnep tS>v vl&v p Kpart- 
d]ay Hpa^Kpdfovs Kal vnep tS>v vlwv pie ' A picrTayopai KXeicriXo- 
'S x]*"^ '* Qpaa-v^ovXos EvyeiToyos ie HipSapos <PiXo(pa)i'Tos Ic Xapi- 

KXeiSas Xaipia ie QefiivoaTpaTOS Qpa(Tv8dp.ov ie ' Ay-qcricrTpa- 
Tos Zax^poviaKov Kal imep tov vlov X 4>oTvi^ Eevayopa ie MiKmu 
Ay-qpovos Kal vnep tov dSeX^ov X 'AKeaicrTpaTOi Avcniidyov ie Ai- 
vijiTiSrip.os Iifiov ie Aapo^apis EvdvXa ie ' Ayrjaias 'Ap-^i^iov ie 
30 -evayopas 'Poipikos ie Eevay opas Eevayopas Ce Qrj^dSas 'Ap)(^e- 

X6)(ov ie nta-TOiv flpd^coyos ie flpd^coy fliaTcovos ie ntcrTatv 
flia-Tcovos ie MeXrjaias ZaxyiviKOv ie Pepa-ias 'ASoktJtov Kal iinep 
t5>v vlwv ^ Td)^innos Ta)(Jnnov ie EevoSiKOS Eevayopa ic 
AtoTifioi ZTpaTQVLKov X Aaponei6T]s niaTcovos ie ' Ava^icav Ta- 
35 x\t.nnov ie neiaiKpdTtjs OlvtdSa ie fleidoXas OlvidSa ie ' Apa- 

TojcfiavTos AevKinnov ie floXvcjiavTos Tijirjcricovos Kal inrkp tS>v 
vl'^wv P ' EniKpaTqs Apva Kal vnep tcov vlS>v pe 'EniKpdTtjs Nacrtw- 
Ta'j vnep airrov Kal tov vlov X MavSpoyevrjs MdvSpios ic KXevcTTpaTos 
Ma'jvSpoyevovs K Ai(r)(yXos MavSpoyevovs ic Eevoxapis AecoaTpd- 
40 Toji/ t€ NiKonrjSrjs AiaxvXov X " Imraaros 'Inndcrov ie ' AXe^iKpaTrj? 

Av'ja-dvSpov Kal vnep tov vlov X KXeas Kal ' EXntyevTjs Tol Kcopdp- 
X]ov X Sdpos riavoppicov p EiiKpaviSa? Hpa^KpavTov Kal iinep tov 
fJ/oO X AvaiKpdTT]9 Ava-ea A 'AXKipiSas Qpaainnov ie 'Apxa>vi- 
Sas KaXXiKpaTiSa Kal vnep tov vlov X TipoKpiTos KXenopd- 
45 X"'' '^ (PiXivveas BevSoTov v 'Ava^apera <PiXivvea v KaXXi- 

(TTpdTT) NlKOpeVOVS X NlKOKpiTOi OevSdpOV ie NlKOKpiTOi NlKO- 

<f>iXov AC ApKe(f)S)v EXniva ic ' Ovaa-Lfiaxps Moff-^ov ie 'ApKTTOKXfjs 'Ava^dp- 
Xov ie KXevOefiis 'Ava^dp^ov ie Xdppn BapaiKfidTOvs Ic KXevcrde- 
vr)s Aeoi^wvTos ie Ev6vSapos Eevayopa ie KXeiTocJMVi)'! 'AvSpi- 
50 Sa ie ' EppaatXas Ev(piXi]Tov ie <t>iXa)viSai KaXXiSdpov ic MeveKX^i 

— fvapxiSa ie floTdyopos fleia-LO-TpdTOv ie EdSiKoi AapoKpd- 
Tovi ie &pa<TvSapos Qpaav^ovXov ie FlivSapos 't>iXo<pwvTos k 'Apia-- 



84 



KALYMNA. 



60 



rSXai Aiorifiov X ' ImrLas ' Aylnrrov il Atjjii'aios Qev^fviSov kuI {j- 
■wlp Tov vlov p. MfveaTpaTos ' EwireXovs vTrep tov viov Ci ' EiriKpd- 
TT]9 Aiy(<i>s a <Pi\iTTOs 'EpaTcouiSa ii ' A Kea-roptSai ' Ovaaimrov Ci 
OpaavfiTjSrjs Bpacrv^ovXov Ic Flepa-iai Aiortfiov Kal inrkp tov viov v ' E\- 
Tnyivi]9 NiKia Kal iirtp tov viov p. 'Oi/v/iavSpoi flpa^tTeXovs Ci Kip- 
KtpKis NiKios ii 'ApioToXas Aajiayopa Kal vnep tov viov v ' AvSpiSa^ 
'AvSpiSa 16 'ApicTTias KaWiyevovs li 'E^ecfyeiSrji Aap-ap^iSa Kal v- 
nip TOV viov X ' Ayvias KaWiyipovi te 'AnoXXwuiov ' AiroXXwviov il 
'HpoaTpaTos ' AiroXXwviov il Bev^eviSas Bapaayopa il HXaTCdv Ae- 
cocTTpaTov Kal imkp tov viov v TavpicTKOS Aeo>aTpa.Tov ira NiK6p.a-)(os flap- 
flivtcTKOV X EvKTrjiuov EvKTi]flOVOS X 
AiKaiap^os ' Enia-TpaTov ZTe<pavafop^cras v. 



The lapidary has made various errors in this in- 
scription. Line 30, Eivayopas, following the same 
name in the nominative, ought to have been 5era- 
yopa. Line 51, for floTciyopoiwe might have expected 
PoTayopas. KEP at the end of line 57 must be the 
first syllable of KEPKII, the name which follows in 
line 58. It is probable that the lapidary through 
inadvertence repeated this first syllable, as we can 
hardly suppose such a name as KepKepKis. 

In Eivoyapii and AioxTTpaTov, lines 39, 40, the 2" is 
repeated, as is the / in the numerals ti which follow 
flua-ia-TpaTov, line 5 1 ; after these numerals EN has 
been erased. We find Z for 2 in the final letter of 
EiiKXeovs, line 1 8, floTayopos, line 51, AajioKpaTovs, line 52. 
<t>iXiTTos, line 55, is probably a blunder for <f>iXimros. 

This inscription contains a list of subscribers to 
a public loan. It was customary, as we learn from 
Diogenes Laertius, vii, 12, to engrave on a tablet 
the names of such public spirited persons. For 
examples of such hsts see C. I. 3140-3 144, 3148- 



fihoiKos, line 17. The Stephanephoros of the year, 
line 64, is also a contributor. This magistrate recurs 
as eponymous on several Kalymnian inscriptions, 
posi, Nos. cccvi-cccxiv. We find also in the list of 
contributors two demes, that of the Pothaioi, line 5, 
and the Panormloi, line 42. The first of these demes 
is mentioned, an^e, Nos. ccxxxvii, line 18, ccxlii, line 
1 3 ; €K HoOatas occurs posi, cccxviii. This name may 
perhaps be traced in Pothia, the modern name of 
a place in Kalymna. The deme of Panormioi was 
probably connected with the Panormos of the frag- 
ment of decree, anie, No. ccxcvi. It has been 
already pointed out, an^e, p. 71, that two names in 
the decree. No. cclix, Dikastophon, son of Tyron, 
and Alexikrates, son of Lysandros, are entered as 
subscribers in the inscription now under consideration; 
see lines 15 and 41. In the Rhodian inscription, 
posi, No. cccxLiii, are five other names also entered 
in the Kalymnian list. 

After 6r]^dSa, line 7, 2i may be the initial letters 



Among the contributors in our inscription is one ' of an ethnic. 



COXCIX. 

On a stelb of white marble, inscribed on both sides ; the heading and part of the sides broken away. 

breadth, i ft. 6^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

a. 

. . YAETOEPIKAAbir , 
. cEAAZSONTOYTOYEZOPKu 
ZAIKAZTAZTOYSAIKAIONTAli 
ENAITONAIAKAITONAPOAAnTONAYK 
5 "INTOIANTIAIKOIANTHMOZANKATAn 

NKAIOYAIKAZZEfiKATAMAPTYPAEIKAMh 
'PEINOYAEAnPAEAABONTAZAIKAZTAYTAIE 
. YTEAYTOSErfiOYTEAAOZOYTEAAAAEMIi 
EMIAIEYOPKEYNTIMEMMOIEYEIMENEPIOPKEYNl 

10 TAAEtAOIZMATAKAITAZPPOKAHZIZKAIEITIKAAAAOAi 

MOZIOYOEPHTAITIOEZOnNEPITOAIKAZTHPIONTOlAi 
ATEPOIEZ0PAriZMENATAIAAMOZIAIZct)PAriAinOAIOZEKAi 
KAOAKAEKATEPAAPOAIZtAOIZHTAIKAl PAPA AON TnTOIZZTPAT 
AroiZTOIAEZTPATArOIAYZANTEZErAIAONTnEZTOAIKAZTHPIO 

15 NP.ANTATArPAMMATAAM<t>0TEP0IZT0IZANllAIK0IZTIOEZOnNAEKA 

TAZMAPTYPIAZEKATEPOIPPINOYAErEZOAITANAIKANAErEZOriAE 
TAZAIKAZOMENPPATOZAOrOZEKATEPOIZnOtlXOAZAEKAOKTnOAE 
AEYTEPOZnOTIXOAZAEKAZYNArOPOYZAEEZEZTnEKATEPOIZ 
lAPEXEZGAITETOPAZEZEZTnAEKAIMAPTYPENTOIZZYNArOPOIZ 

20 TAAEtA<t)IZMATAKAITAZnPOKAHZIZKAITANrPA<t>ANTAZAIKAZKAIEITlK 

AAAAOETAAMOZIOYcDEPHTAIANAriNnZKETnorPAMMATEYZONKAE 
KATEPOIPAPEXnNTAIKAITAZMAPTYPIAZANEYYAATOZOAEMAPT 



Height, 3 ft. 5 in. ; 



KALYMNA. 85 



YPOMENAYNATOZEnNnAPEIMENMAPTYPEITnnAPEnNEPITOYAIKA 
ZTHPIOYTOIAEAAYS . TOimMMAPTYPHNPAPArENEZQAIEPITOAlK 

25 AZTHPIONErMAPTYPHZANTjnEriTnNPPOZTATANENEKATEP/ . 

TAinOAITETAPTMEZIKAAOZMHNOZBATPOMIOYONKAAYMNIOIArONT. 
KniOIAEKAOISIONnAPEYNTHNTfiNANTIAIKriNEIKAXPEIlnNTIPAPH 
MENTOIAEMAPTYPEZn . TOMNYNTnTONNOMIMONOPKONEPITANN 
APTYPIANAAAOEAMAPTYPEINKAIMHAYNATOIHMENPAPArENEZGAIEPI . , 

30 AIKAZTHPIONTOI AEPPOZTATAITAZMAP-^ . . . ZTAZETMAPTYPHOEIZA 

ZEPAYTHNEPIZAMAINEZonTAIAAMOZI \ri AIPAPAZAMAINEZOHAE 

<AITnNANTIAIKnNOXPEIinNANTirPA*A . ~AI AONTnTOIPPOZTATAIT 
\YTANTANMAPTYPIANPAPAXPHMATOIZANTIAIKOIZAPOZTEIAANTnAE 
TOIPPOZTATAITAh . ZNENKniMAPTYPHOEIZANMAr'TYPI ANPAZANAN 

35 . . rPA<t)ATAMENE>: . . XTIZMEN ATAI AAMOZI AIZOPATI AITAAEAZOPATIZ 

.."PITOYZPPOZ. xTAZTOYZENKAAYMNAIENAMEPAIZIKATIAOOYKAErMAP 
... ^OHIAP0ZTEIAANTnA^<AITOIPP0ZTATAIT0IENKAAYMNAITAN^ .. 
. . ' lANTANETMAPTYPHOE . ZANE*AYTOIZANTirPA<t)APAZAMAMENEZ0P 
VriZMENATAIAAMOZIAIZ<DPAriAITAAEAZ<t>AriZTAPOTITuYZPPOZTA . 

40 AZTOYZEI lKniENAMEPAIZIKATIA0OYKAErMAPTYPHOHIKAITAAAAA 

POIOYNTIiTOIPPOZTATAIPEPITANErMAPTYPIANKAGAPEPKAITOYZE 
'KniPPOZTATAZrErPAPTAIPOIEINTOIZAEPAPArENOMFNOIVKAAYM 
SinNEIZKnNEPITANEPAKOYZINTANMAPTYPIANAT 
ilENKril<l)|AIN0ZAIA0NTnAEKAIANAKPIZINTO'- 

45 TYP^NEKATEPOIZK . GENAMETATOYZPPATOYZ 

XNAKPINANTHAEKAITO . ZMAPTYPAZEK ATEPOIO 
KNEITAIAAAOAEMHAENKAITOEPHTAOENYPO" 
. KAIONTHTOYZANTIAIKOYZTOIZTPATAr 
PnTOMENONEPEPriTHI AEYPEPAYTOYT 

50 AOrOIMHZYNTEAEnN"AIPAPAN<J>OTEP 

. ErONTfiEZOKATOYAnPE . 'YAIZYNTEAE 
nNAIAONTriTOIZTPATA ... TAZtA<t>OY 



iPIZTOAAMONAT 
AlAIAPOTITOYZTEr . 
rOPAPATOYZKNIAinNZTP . . 
5 ifcPIAAMIOPrOYAAKIMAXOYAPrYPI 

_AMINA(I)AIPEOENT0ZAP0T0YXPEnZT0YPAYl 
PPOKPATEYZTAZTEA<DEZIOZTOYTAAANTOYOtl>AN 
. . A<J>fclZGAIKAAYMNIOIYPOPAYZIMAXOYKAIKAEYMHAEYZKAIT 
AN<t>IAAANKAITnNAAZEnNKAITANPEMPTANA<l)AIPEOEIZA 
10 NTANAPOAOZinNAZcDANTIAPOAEAnKENKAAYMNIOIPAYZIM 

AXniKAIKAEYMHAEIKAO0M0A0riANAM<t)ANTIP0IHZAZOAI 
KAAYMNIOIPOTIPAYZIMAXONKAIKAEYMHAHPEPinNPANTriN 
AM<J>IZBATEYNTIAYTOIZTOIKAEYMHAEYZKAAPONOMOITOY 
TnNPANTHNAOAIPEOENTOZTOYMEPEYZOEYPIZKOMEZE 
15 "'IPIPTONEPITOXPEOZTOIPPOKPATEIO<t>EIAOMENON/; <J>AI 

PEOENTOZAEKAITOYTOYPAEONOZAPrYPIOYOOANTIKAAYM 
NIOIAPOAEAriKENKAEYMHAHIKAITANAAAANAPOAOZIXlNA* 
AIPEOEIZANPAZANAZENTAIAPOKPIZEIANEAHKEOAAM 
OZOKniriNTrilKAAYMNinNAAMniANEAABONArrEAOIPAP 
ao ATENOMENOIEZKriNEZAKEZTOZXAPIKAEIAAZAPATO 

<t)ANT0ZAPATIAAZEYZI<}>ANT0ZrPA1'ANTEZANHNIK/ 
MEZEXONTAZTOZIPPOKPATEYZKAAPONOMOYZEZT 
OXPEOZOn<t)EIAONKAAYMNIOIIPPOKPATEiniAPXEIKA<DIZ 
lOZEPIEPMnNAKTOZAPAITEYNTHNAEAMnNTA^ 
as "'OAOIPATnNXPHMATnNTOYTriNAriNETAIZYNT . 

KniTAMEPHTAAMAOYKAPOAIAONTIKAAYMNIOI<J)A 
viENOIAPOAEAnKENAYTAKAITOYZTOKOYZTOYZ 
riNOMENOYZKAEYMHAEITnilPPOKPATEYZKAIKAE 
^♦ANTniTniKAEYMHAEYZTIMAMATHNXPHMA 
30 rnNriNAIKAIOMEOATAAANTATPIAKONTA 



86 KALYMNA. 



lO 



ArEAIKAZGHPAPONTriNTANyA^fiNTAIKATAAIKA 
lOYZAIEBAOMHKONTAOKTnTAIAEAPOAIKAIOY 
rAIEKATONIKATIEZEAA<t>PIOYEBAOMAIEniAEKAr 
niAAMIOPrOYAAKIMAXOYZYNArOPHZETOIZn . . 
35 AlOIZTOIZAIAPOPAcDIAINOZAIOKAEYZKniOZTAI 

AEKAAYMNinN OAIEK ATfiNYMOZHPYTANI 
JZMIAHZI0ZEZAKEZT0ZAAKIN0YKAAYMNI02 
\PATO<t)ANTOZAPIZTOAAKAAYMNIOZ 



a. 

oVjbi ? TO kTnKaK^yif.vov ? 
« i\a<T(Tov TOVTOv, i^opKo^vTco Se Tol (TTparayol tov- 
y SiKacrras tovs SiKa^opTas, r--------6Se opKos ecrrco oS- 

(■ vai Tov Aia Kal tw ' AiroXKai tov Avk\i.ov kol rav rdv SiKacTaem irepi 

cov Tol avTiSLKoi dpTco/iocrav Kara y^vcofiav rhv SiKaiOTara- 

V Kal ov SiKaaaim Karit fidprvpa ei Ka //.fj [SoKrj dXaOia fiapr- 

vpeif ovSe S&pa. eXa^ov tSs SiKas ravras e^vcKev 

olvre avTos eyco ovre aX(X)oy ovre dWa ep-^y ov payava ovS- 

epia- ivopKivvTL pip poi ev ffpef, eiriopKevi'T^i 8e ra kvavTia- 

TCI, 5e yjracpicrpaTa Kal rds TrpoKXrjcris Kal et Tt Ka dXXo ^eou ey 8a- 

poiTLov (peprjTai, rideaOcop inl to SiKacrTrjpiov toI d^vTiSiKoi Ik- 

drepoL ea-cppayiapiva to, hapoaia acppaylSt iroXios iKa^Tfpas 

Ka6 a Ka iKaTepa ttoXis ■^a(j)i^r]Tai, Kal napaSovTO) toTs (TTpaT- 

ayoTs, Tol Se crTpaTayoi XvaavTfS kySiSovTco €j to SiKavTrjpio- 

15 V irdvTa to. ypdppara dptfiOTipois TOts dyTiSiKOis^ TiOkcyOaiv Se koH 

ray paprvpias eKdTepoi trplv ov Xkyea-Oai tolv SiKav, XiykcrOm Se 
Tas SiKas 6 pev npaTOS Xoyoy eKaTepois ttotI yoa^ SeKa-oKTa>, 6 Sk 
SevTepos ttotI )(6as SeKa, avvayopovs Se k^e(TT(o eKaTepois 
irapeyeirOaL TeTopa?, k^ecrTco Se Kal papTvpev Toli avvayopois' 

20 r^ Se ■\lra(f)i(rpaTa Kal ray TrpoKXtja-LS Kal tolv ypac^av Tas SUas Kal ei ti k- 

a dXXo ky Sapoaiov (peprjTai di/ayivcocTKeTco 6 ypappaTevs ov Ka e- 
KdTepoL jrapeyoovTai Kal ray papTvpias dvev vSaTor 6 Se pdpT- 
vp, 6 pev SvvaTos emv irapeipev, papTvpetTO) irapeatv eirl tov SiKa- 
CTTrjpiov, Tol Se dSw^ayoi T&p papTvpcov TrapayeveaQaL knl to Slk- 

25 acrrrjpiov kypapTvprjcrdvTd) knl twv irpoaTaTav kv eKaTepa 

ra TToXi T€TdpTa k^ UdSos prjvos BaTpopiov hy KaXvpvioi dyovi^i, 
KZoL Se Ka(piaiov, TrapevvTcov Ta>v dvTiSiKiov^ ei Ka ypei^wyTi Traprj- 
pev, Tol Se pdpTvpes ttToJto/ij'vj'tco tov vopipov opKov knl Tav p- 
apTVpiav dXaOea papTvpeiv Kal pfj SvvaTol rjpeu napayeveaOai knl [jh 

30 SiKaa-Trjpiov, toI Se npoa-rdTai Tas papT^^pla^^s Tas kypaprvprjOeicra- 

y kn avTmv knia-apaivecrOai to, Sapo<Ti\a cr<j)p\ay7Si^ napaa-apaivecrOco Se 
Kai tS>v avTiSiKcov 6 y^pei^cav' dvTiypacpa \Se\ SlSovtco toc npocTTaTai t- 
avTau Tav paprvpidv napaxprjpa TOis dvTiSiKOiS, dnocTTeiXdvTm Sk 
Tol npoa-TdTai Tap \p'\ev kv Km papTvprjOeia-dv papTvpidv nacrdv dv- 

36 Tf'jypa^a to, pev ea\(()p\ayicTpeva to. Sapoaia (T<ppay?Si, to, Se d<T(ppdyi<T- 

Taj knl Toiis Trpocrfrlaray tovs kv KaXvpva kv dpepais lkuti d<p' ov Ka kypap- 
Tvp'^rjdfj^ dnoa-TeiXdvTco Se Kal toI npoaTdTai Tol kv KaXvpva rdv p![ap- 
Tvpydv Tdv eypapTvpT]6(^ijadv k(f>' avToTs dvTtypa<f>a nacrdv, to. pev ka(f>p- 
ayicrpeva to. Sapocria acppayiSi, to. Se dcr<p(^p)dyta-Ta noTl tovs npoa-TO^T- 

40 ay Toiis kv K^ kv dpepais iKaTi d(j> o5 Ka eypapTvprjOfj Kal rd dXXa [ndvTa 

noiovvTCD Tol npoaTdTai nepl Tdv kypapTvpidv Kaddnep Kal Toi/s k- 

V Kw npoaTdras yeypanTai noieiv' Tois Se napayevopevocs KaXvp- 
vicov els K(ov knl tolv knaKovcriv Tav paprvpidv da^<pdXeiav 86t- 

a> kv K(p 'PiXivos, SlSovtm Se Kal dvdKpicriv toI [aTpaTayol raiv pap- 
45 Tvpcov eKaTepois /cTaJ^' eva peTa Toi/s npaTovs [Aoyouy ray SiKas, 

dvaKpivdvTm Se Kal To[ii]y pdpTvpas iKdTepoi olcra ray SiKas l- 

KVfiTai dXXo Sk prjSev Kal to kpcoTaOev vnb [- 5- 

i^Ka^VTCo Toiis dvTiSiKovs Tol o-Tparayfof Tb e- 

pcoTwpevov, knepcoTjj Se vnep avTov t{- ----- ti Se Ka 01 

60 X6yoi pfj avvTeXecdvTai nap dv(f>OTep[cciv noTl xoas, Kaddnep yeypanTai, 

X\ey6vT(o kaoKa Tb vScop k[yy>va, ovvTeXe\cr6evTcov Se tcov Xoyat- 

V SiS6vT<o Tol OTpaTq![yo2] ray \/ra0ov[y avTiKa pdXa. 



KALYMNA. 



87 



b. 

--------- ------ ' A pia-ToSafiov ' Ay- 

Xaoa-rpdrov tA Aiayopa ? Trlaiita itotI tov? yey 

--.-.-.--.--- Trapa Toiis KviSimv (rTp[aT- 

5 ayouy ? ] tnl Sa/jiiopyov ' AXKip-dyov apyvpl^ov 

------ aiiiv dtfiaipeOii'TOi diro tov y^pkaii tov flavcr- 

ifidypv Koi ' lyrwoKpdTevs rds re d(pf<nos tov raXdyrov 6 (j)av- 
Tt] dtpetaOai KaXvp-vioi virb flavcnixdxov Kal KXfVfiijSfVS Kai T~ 
ay (f)iaXdy Kal ray dXcricoy Kai ray TrefinTav dcpaipfdncrd- 

10 y ray dnoSoaiaiy ds (^auTi dnoS(Sd>Key KaXvfiyLOL Havcrifi- 

d\(o Kal KXfVfirjSd, Ka6' 6/j.oXoyiay dp. (payri TTOiTJa-aa-dai 
KaXvpyioi norl HavatpLa^oy Kal KXivpriSr], nepl ay ndyrcoy 
dp<f)i(T^arfvvTi avToTs rol KXevfiijSevi KXapoyopoi, tov- < 

T(oy ndyrcoy d(j)aip(deyTOS tov pepevs 8 (iipLO-KopiS e- 

15 Triirinroy knl to XP^°^ ''"° ' limoKpdTei ocfxiXoptyoy, dcj^ai- 

pediyTos 8e Kal tovtov nXeoyos dpyvpiov o (payri KaXvp- 
yioi aTToSiScoKfy KXevprjSri Kal ray dXXdy diroBocriaiv d<f>- 
aipfdtiady iraady &s ey to. dnoKpto'ei dy eScoKe 6 Sdp- 
os 6 Kdiccy TO) KaXvpyiaiy Sdpco, dy tXa^ov dyyeXoi irap- 

30 ayiyopeyoi ey Kd>y, 'E^dKea-Tos, XapiKXeiSai, ApaTO- 

(payTOS, 'ApariSas, Ev^L(f)ayTOS, ypdyjrayTes dyqyUa- 
fifS e)(oyTas tos ' ImroKpdTev^ KXapoyopovi is t- 
b xpios 8 &<pitXoy KaXvpyioi ' InTroKpdrei & dp^ei Kacpia-- 
los enl ' EppdiyaKTOS, dTrairevyTmy Sf dp&y rd ii- 

25 iroXoina tS>v ^^prjpdraiy rovTcoy & yivtTai atiy rj^o- 

K(o, Ta pepi] ra dpd ovk dnoSiSovTL KaXvpyioL 0a- 
pevoi diroSeSd)K€y aiird Kal tovs tokovs tovs 
yiyopeyovs KXevprjSei tS ' ImvoKpanvs Kal KXe- 
v(f>dyT(o tq5 KXevp-qSivs' Tipapa Ta>y y^prjpd- 

30 Tcov my SiKa^opeOa TdXayTa TpidKoyTa' 

'ATTfSiKdaOr] 7rap6yT(oy Tay \|ra0<Bj/ Tal KaTaSiKd- 
(ova-ai. e^SoprJKoyTa 6kt<o, Tal Sk diroSiKd^ov- 
aai iKaToy iKaTi e^. ' EXa<ppiov e^Sopa inl SeKa e- 
nl Sapiopyov ' AXKipdyov, avyayoprjae toTs 7r[a£- 

35 Siois ToTs Aiayopa 4>iXTyos AioKXivs Kmos, to. 

Sk KaXvp,yiwy TToXei ' EKardyvpoi HpvTdyi- 
os MiX-qa-ios, 'E^dKea-Tos 'AXkwov KaXvpyios, 
' ApaTo^ayTos ' ApiaToXa KaXvpyios. 



a. Line 4. 'An6XX<o for 'AnSXXmya. Ahrens, De Dial. 
Dor. p. 239, § 30, gives two other instances of this 
apokope, which is usual in adjurations in Attic writers. 

Line 6. StKaa-a-ico. According to the rule (Ahrens, 
J 1 1 , i) relating to verbs ending in ^<» we might have 
expected SiKd^co. In the Lesbian inscription (Sauppe, 
Comment, de Duabus Inscript. Lesb. Gotting. 1870, 
p. 12, line 2) we have in the oath taken by the 
dikasts, ^ p]dy SiKda-aco. In an inscription in Argive 
Doric, Waddington-Lebas, Inscript. Grecques, Pt. v, 
No. I, we find SiKaa-aauy and (SiKaa-<ray ; see ibid. p. 6. 

In reference to the penultimate vowel in SiKaa-cria) 
compare in the Delphic inscription, C.I. 1688, ipKi^iw, 
line 13, and (Kirpa^io), line 5. See G. Curtius, Das 
Verbum, 2nd ed. p. 317. 

Line 8. dXot. The omission of the second A 
must be due to an oversight of the lapidary. 

So line 39 we have da-tpdytaTa for dcrcppdyicTTa ; and 
d 16, HAEONOl and KAAYM for HAEONOI and 
KAAYM. 

Line 51. «[y]/)i^a. We should have expected here 
eypvjj, but the >4/ is quite clear. 



d. Lines 10, 17, 27. dnoSeScoKey for the regular 
form dvoSiSwKfyai. Compare SeScoKfy, in a Nisyros in- 
scription, Ross, Insc. Ined. ii, p. 54, No. 166 ; see also 
Ahrens, De Dial. Dor. addenda, p. 573, and p. 330, 
§ 41, 3, and G. Curtius, Das Verbum, 2nd ed. ii, 
p. 201, and p. 249 (Engl. Transl. p. 424); for the 
change of (y for fiy in the infinitive ; see Ahrens, ibid, 
p. 176, ^21, and G. Curtius, Das Verbum, 2nd ed. 
ii, p. 119 (Engl. Transl. 1880, p. 342). 

Line 35. AIAPOPA. The P in this word is evi- 
dently a blunder of the lapidary for T. 

This inscription relates to a claim for thirty talents 
made by the children of Diagoras against the people 
of Kalymna. In a the mode of procedure in the 
trial is prescribed ; d records the case as stated by 
tlie plaintiffs and the judgment given by the dikasts. 
The claimants allege that the sum claimed is the 
balance due to them on a debt owing from the Ka- 
lymnians to Hippokrates and Pausimachos, tov xp«Q>y 
TOV flava^pdyov Kal ' H^noKpdTivs, b, lines 6, 22, 23. 
They admit that there must be set off against the 
original debt the following items. A talent of the 



88 



KALYMNA. 



debt, as the Kalymnians allege, b, line 8, was re- 
mitted to them by Pausimachos and Kleomedes, and 
there must further be deducted from the same debt 
the payments made on account of the phialae, the 
groves and the fifths, according to the bond, which 
the Kalymnians, as they allege, entered into with 
Pausimachos and Kleomedes. All these statements 
are disputed by the heirs of Kleomedes, but the 
claimants allow that in reference to the debt due to 
Hippokrates a proportionate reduction maybe made 
on account of these alleged advances. 

Line 1 6. They further allow as a set off that further 
sum, TovTov irXeovoi dpyvptov, which the Kalymnians 
assert to have been repaid to Kleomedes, and also all 
those payments which in the letter transmitted by the 
demos of Kos to the Kalymnian demos had been 
entered as received by the heirs of Hippokrates. 

On the claimants demanding the balance with 
interest of the debt, the Kalymnians pleaded that 
this balance and all the interest due had already 
been paid to Kleomedes, son of Hippokrates, and 
to Kleophantos, son of Kleomedes. 

The action is of the class called Sikt] tiimtjttj ; the 
sum claimed, Tifirnxa, is estimated at thirty talents, 
6, line 30. (See Meier u. Schbmann, d. Attische 
Process, p. 1 7 1 sq.) 

The upper part of this stele, now broken away, 
doubtless contained the preamble of the decree order- 
ing the mode of procedure to be observed in the trial, 
and the record of the pleadings and verdict which we 
have on the two sides, a and 6 respectively. 

On a we have first the form of the oath to be 
taken by the dikasts in the trial, and to be admini- 
stered by the strategi, lines 2-9. 

All the decrees and other documents needed in 
the trial are to be laid before the court by the two 
parties to the suit under the seal of the two cities, 
Kalymna and Kos, as either city may decree, and 
are to be handed over to the strategi, who, having 
broken the seals, are to place all the documents in 
the hands of the suitors ; the evidence on either 
side is also to be laid before the court, before the 
pleadings commence, lines io-t6. 

The pleadings are to be measured by the KlepT 
sydra, lines 17-19. For the first pleading, d nparos 
Xoyos rds SiKas, the time allowed on either side, as 
measured by the Klepsydra, is not to exceed 
eighteen of the liquid measures called choes ; for 
the second pleading ten choes are allowed ; each 
party is allowed four advocates, avvdyopoi, who may 
be admitted as witnesses. 

Lines 20-21. The decrees, the other documents, 
and the depositions are to be read by the person 
whom either party may appoint, and the time oc- 
cupied in this reading is not to be measured by the 

Klepsydra, dvayivw<TKira> &viv vSaros, lines 22, 23. 

Lines 22-30. Such witnesses as are able to attend 
the court are to give their evidence in person ; those 
who are not able so to attend are to give their 
evidence before the prostatae in either city, and take 
the usual oath that they are not able to appear before 
the court ; any of the parties to the suit who wishes 
may be present at this deposition. 



Lines 30-42. The prostatae are to afifix the seal of 
the city to such depositions, iK/iapTvpiai as are taken 
before them, and any of the parties to the suit who 
wishes may add his seal. The prostatae are to furnish 
copies of the depositions at once to both parties ; 
the prostatae in Kos are to send copies of all the 
depositions taken in Kos, whether sealed or not, to 
the prostatae in Kalymna within twenty days after 
the depositions have been taken, and the prostatae 
in Kalymna are to deal in like manner with the de- 
positions taken in that island. 

Lines 50-52. If the Xoyoi are not finished on both 
sides within the prescribed limits of time, the pleading 
may be continued till all the water in the Klepsydra 
has run out. After the pleadings are finished the 
strategi are to order the dikasts to give their votes. 

We learn from d, lines 31-33, that 126 dikasts 
voted in favour of the defendants in this action, and 
78 in favour of the plaintiffs. 

This inscription in its present fragmentary con- 
dition leaves several questions unsolved. There 
can hardly be a doubt that the plaintiffs in the suit 
are the children of Diagoras, who must have been 
minors at the time, and the matter in dispute is 
what balance, if any, was due from the Kalymnian 
people on account of the loan they contracted with 
Pausimachos and Hippokrates, who were probably 
two bankers, citizens of Kos (d, line 8). This loan 
must have been made some time before, for we find 
(line 28) that Kleomedes, son of Hippokrates, and 
Kleophantos, son of Kleomedes, who was, therefore, 
we may presume, grandson of Hippokrates, are 
admitted by the plaintiffs to be entitled to various 
payments on account of their share of the original 
loan. This is what is meant by tov fiipevs o ivpia-Koiies 
kirnriirrov kvl to XP^os to ' ImroKpaTei 6<p€tX6/j.€vov. This 
part of the loan, due to Kleomedes and Kleophantos, 
the descendants of Hippokrates, is distinguished in 
the pleading from the portion which, as the plaintiffs 
allege, belongs to them, to. fiipt} to. ajid. If these 
plaintiffs were the children of Diagoras, it is to be 
inferred that they claimed this balance as the next 
of kin to Pausimachos, who, jointly with Hippokrates, 
originally furnished the loan to the Kalymnians. 
The Kalymnians declared in answer to this claim 
that they had paid over the entire balance due 
on the loan to Kleomedes and Kleophantos, de- 
scendants of Hippokrates. Supposing this statement 
to be correct, there arises the further question, had 
Kleomedes and Kleophantos the right to receive 
the share due to the sons of Diagoras ? We cannot 
answer this question, because we do not know what 
kind of partnership existed between Pausimachos 
and Hippokrates when they originally made the 
loan. It is probable that they were bankers with 
an account between them, and Kleomedes and 
Kleophantos may have retained the money paid 
into their hands on account of the children of 
Diagoras in satisfaction of some claim due from 
the estate of Pausimachos to the heirs of his asso- 
ciate Hippokrates. 

Ludwig Ross, in his Inscript. Ined. ii, p. 65, No. 182, 
gives the following fragment which he copied at Ka- 



KALYMNA. 



89 



lymna, and which he describes as nearly obliterated. 
It was then built into the wall of a house. 

TO)!/ AfwridSa .... 

.... covos rifiOapaTOv .... 
.... 'AKporeXevs, 'EpacnK\[rJ9 
.... ras SiKas &? iSiKa^e 
5 .... (liTcc kiriTponcav 'PiKl^vov ? 

. , . Teto-t'ofy] 'ApiaTecos ra Tr^Xet 
avvYOivTO TO. Aiayopa irc^iSia, 
'Api<r\roSapo^ ' Ay\ao<rj^pdTOv 

Ka\v^v!^<av ? 

10 ' A pai\o^avTOi ? . . . . 



Tovs re 



*5 



20 



35 



ft)]? jiiv ^<f\avTi Xa/Swi^ef 
ALoVyopa, iraiSiois Kal tS>v 
iVKaySelv ?] TO, Aiayopa v^aiSia 

nevTe . . SeKa 
KCc^Tii TO. yiypapfiiva i(p 
mSe Kal avriypacpa rot 

TrpoSiKos 
ra Aiayopa iraiSia 
yeypafifievwp at Kal 
fitKa](7ri;/3(t)ov ? nplf rav 

OS ecr 



It is quite clear that this fragment relates to the 
same subject as our inscription, with the aid of which 
I have restored <t>i\t[vov\ line 5 ; see d, line 35 ; Aia]- 
yopa, line 17, and 'Apai^ofavTos, line 10; see 6, lines 
20, 38. The mention o{ firiTpoircoy, followed by 0///, 
line 5, leads me to suspect that Philinos and others 
were the guardians of the children of Diagoras. It 
should be noted that according to Ross's copy the 
sameblunder of 4 MrOP-4 for AIATOPA occurs line 18 
and Hne 23, as has been already noted, 6, line 35. 

So far as I know this is the only extant inscription 
which records the mode of procedure in a civil action 
and a statement of the case for the plaintiff. 

a. Lines 3-9. With the form of oath here given 
we may compare the oath administered to the dikasts 
in the inscription from Eresos (Sauppe, De duabus 
inscript. Lesbiacis, iii, line 10, ^ fi]av SiKaa-a-o) ndi^ra'^ 
ocraa fikv kv Tola[i. vop^oiai tvi. Karroos vofio^s, ra 8\ &XKa 
iij^iKp^ivais coy dpi(TTa /c[at S\iKaiTaTa Kal rj/i<£[o-]<B, ai k€ 
KaTdyvco, opO^s /cja/crtcoy ovtco norjcrco val fid Ata Kal 
"AXiov) ; and the oath of the Heliasts, Demosth. adv. 
Timokr. p. 746, ed. Reiske. This oath has been 
thought spurious (see Westermann, Comment, de 
jurisjurandi judicum Atheniens. formula. Lips. 1859; 
Schomann, Griech. Alterth. ii, p. 259 ; and K. V. 
Hermann, Staatsalterthiimer, ed. 1875, J 106, 9), 
but Frankel, in Hermes, xiii, pp. 452-466, shows 
that portions of it have been derived from genuine 
sources, and it contains one clause closely resembling 
that (lines 7, 8, 9) of our inscription, ovSk Swpa Se^ofiai 
TTJs -^XtdafODi iviKa, oGt ovToy eyw, ovt dWos ffiol, oirr 
dXXr], fiSoTOi fpov, oil Tiyvrj, oire iXTj-^afij oiiSfpia. Com- 
pare the oath of the Archons, Pollux, viii, 86, a>nvvov 



. . . pt^ ScopoSoK'qcrfiv, and the oath in the Amphiktyonic 
decree, C. I. A. ii. No. 545, line 11, priSe Swpa ^e^e- 
\i(T\6ai. For other forms of oaths preserved in in- 
scriptions, see C. I. 1688, 2554, 2555, 3137, ii ; C. I. A. 
ii, No. 549 ; Mittheil. d. Arch. Inst, iii, p. 20, line 18. 

Line 4. [Kal rav r&f SiKaa-aeo) irtpl. I have added 
rity Fdv because in Attic oaths Demeter was usually 
invoked with Zeus and Apollo, but there would 
not be room in the line for Adparpa. The Deities 
invoked in oaths varied in number (see Lasaulx, 
Studien, p. 1 80), but were usually a triad. 

Line 5. Kara y^i/dpav tolv SiKaioraTOL^v. See Frankel 
loc. cit. for instances of the phrase yvd>pa ra SiKaioTdra 
in Demosthenes. 

Lines 8, 9. o^i avroi kya> oUre <?X(A)oy ovre dWa 
4/ii[«' ov payava ovS^pM. After EM are two vertical 
strokes, II, close together. I have ventured to restore 
this, EMI\N after the analogy of the Heliastic oath. 

Lines 10, 11. ey 8a\poa-iov. See line 20, it rl Ka 
dWo ky Sapoaiov. 

Line 16. nplv ov. For ■n-plv ij. So in Demosth. 
adv. Steph. ii, p. 11 35, line 19, and De Feed, cum 
Alexand. p. 217, line 1 7, ed. Reiske. TrptV is followed 
by a genitive, Pindar, Pyth. iv, 76, and Arrian, Anab. 
iii, 18, 10; see EUendt ad loc. 

Line 17. rrorl yjias. In the Milesian judgment 
found at Olympia, Archaol. Zeitung, 1876, p. 137, 
is a similar provision : [i5t€/x€r]/3?j5j? avroh rb vScop npos 
rfjy [j'jprjcnPj knl ptv rov\ npd>rov \6yov eKarepois perprjlrwv 
MiXrjcricoi/ SeKo] irkfre, knl Sk rod Sevripov Xoyov, K.r.X. 
On the Slkti nph vS(op see Meier u. Schomann, d. 
Attische Process, p. 714. 

Line 1 9. k^ea-rm Se Kal paprvpev roTs avvayopois. This 
agrees with the passages, Isseus, Fragm. pro Euphilet. 
ed. Reiske, pp. 353-355 ; .^schin. De Falsa Legat. 
pp. 333, 334. On the (Tvvriyopoi^ see Meier u. Scho- 
mann, d. Attische Process, pp. 707-711. 

Lines 26,27. pTjvbi Barpoplov ov KaXvpvioi dyovT\i\, KS>oi 
Se Ka<j)i<nov. The month Badromios, which was in use 
at Rhodes and also at Katana, is identified by Her- 
mann, Monatskunde, p. 47, with the Attic Boedromios. 
The month Ka(pi(nos, its equivalent at Kos, as we learn 
from this inscription, is unknown to Hermann. 

Line 43. paprvpidv da^tpdXeiav Soryo. ' Let Philinos 
give a safe conduct in Kos.' This Philinos is, it may 
be assumed, identical with the Philinos, d, line 35, who 
was the synegoros of the children of Diagoras. 

Line 44. SiSovrco 8k Kal dvdKpuriv rol [arparayol ? rS>v 
papy-vpcov iKarepois. ' The strategi are to allow either 
party to examine the witnesses after the first ad- 
dresses of the (Tvvdyopoi, — pird roiis trpdrovs [Xoyouy.' 

Line 46. o[a-a rds SiKas I'^Kveirai, ' such things as 
are relevant to the suit.' For this use of iKveirai see 
my Essays on Art and Archaeology, p. 443, where this 
word occurs in the same sense in a Halikarnassian 
inscription. Compare Dio Cassius, Fragm. Peiresc. 
xxix, ed. Reimar, pp. 14, line 51 ; ed. Sturz. i, p. 34. 

Lines 47-49. I am unable to offer any conjectural 
restoration here. 

d. Lines 4, 5. napd roiis KfiSimv arf^arayois ?]. After 
this in the latter part of line 5 we have knl SapiopyoO 
'AXKipd\ov, and as the Sapiopyos was the eponymous 

A a 



90 



KALYMNA. 



magistrate at Knidos (see my Hist. Disc, ii, p. 756, 
No. 40), the question here presents itself, was Al- 
kimachos a Knidian magistrate ? The same name 
as Damiorgos occurs again, b, line 34, where it can 
only indicate the eponymous magistrate of the city 
where the trial took place. Was that city Knidos ? 
There is nothing in the text of the inscription which 
militates against such a supposition, while on the 
other hand, it was a recognised practice among the 
Greeks to refer difficult and complicated lawsuits 
to the tribunal of another city, by the decision of 
which both litigants agreed to abide. Such causes 
were called 5"fai eKKX-qroi, and the city chosen by the 
parties to the suit, noXis (kkXtjto?. 

We have a notable instance of such a reference to 
a foreign tribunal in the trial which took place at 
Miletos to decide the question whether the La- 
kedaemonians or the Messenians were in rightful 
possession of a certain territory at a particular date 
(see Archaol. Zeitung, 1876, p. 128). The court in 
this inscription was chosen out of the entire body of 
Milesian citizens, Kpir-qpiov 6k navros tov Stjuov, c, line 8. 
The cause was heard on a certain day with consent 
of both parties, /ca06n[/1aKe5aj/iwt]ot koX MeacrrivLoi avvca- 
fjioXoyrja-ai'To, c, line 7. The amount of time allowed 
for the irp&TOi and Sevrepos Xoyos was measured by 
the Klepsydra, as in our inscription, c, lines 16-19. 
The number of citizens who voted in favour of the 
Messenian claim was 584, and against it 16. For 
other examples, see Betant, An fuerint apud Graecos 
judices litibus inter civitates componendis, Berlin, 
1862, p. 20, p. 34; Meier, Die Privatschiedsrichter, 
Halle, 1846. In the suit of which our inscription is 
the subject, and in which the Kalymnians are the 
defendants, it would have been hardly in accordance 
with Greek notions of equity that they should be 
judges in their own cause. If we assume that the 
trial took place either at Knidos or in any other 
Doric city, then the original record would have been 
kept in that city, and a copy would have been sup- 
plied to the Kalymnians as one of the parties to 
the suit, just as in the Olympian inscription already 
referred to, the Milesians on the request of the 
Messenians supplied them with a copy of the judg- 
ment made at Miletos in their behalf, 3, lines 1-6. 
If we assume our inscription to be a copy so sup- 
plied, the strange clerical errors which have been 
already noted {a, lines 8, 39, and 3, lines 16 and 35) 
would be more easily accounted for. 

On the supposition that a third city acted as judge 
in the Kalymnian suit, we may assume that the 



heading, now unfortunately wanting to our inscrip- 
tion, contained a decree, on the authority of which 
the whole proceedings were based. If the mention 
of Knidians, d, line 4, and of the Damiorgos, d, lines 
5, 34, suggests the probability that the decision in 
this trial was referred to Knidos, a glance at the map 
gives some colour to such a supposition. No Doric 
city would be more convenient and easier of access 
to witnesses coming either from Kos or Kalymna, 
the distance of both which places from Knidos with 
a fair wind is not many hours for a modern sailing 
vessel. On the other hand, it is quite possible that 
lasos, or some other neighbouring Doric city on the 
same coast, may have been selected by the parties 
to this suit. 

Line 9. * rav nefMirrau. This was probably some tax, 
which may have been made over in part payment 
for the loan, or it may refer to some instalment of 
interest. 

Linen. Ka6' dfioXoyiav. This would be an agreement 
subsequent to the loan, by which certain securities 
were accepted by the creditors in part payment. 

Line 23. ® «PX^' Ka^ia-ios enl'Ep/iaii'aKTos, 'which 
dates from the month Kaphisios, when Hermonax 
was eponymous magistrate.' Compare the instances 
of the use of oipyei-v in marking dates collected by 
Bockh, C. I. i, p. 29, col. 2, from the analogy of 
which we might have expected here o5 a/)x«'. As 
we know from a, line 27, that Ka(f>i(nos was a Koian 
month, Hermonax must have been the Damiourgos 
or other eponymous magistrate of Kos. 

Lines 31, 32. If all the dikasts on this occasion 
voted, the court was composed of two hundred and 
four citizens. In the Milesian decree already re- 
ferred to the number of dikasts was six hundred. 
In the state trial of certain criminals at Eresos in 
Lesbos (Sauppe, De duab. inscript. Lesbiacis, p. 10, i, 
line 30) the number of dikasts who voted was eight 
hundred and eighty-three. At Athens the number 
of Heliastae varied according to the nature and im- 
portance of the cause. The largest number recorded 
is 6000, the smallest 200. (See Meier u. Schomann, 
d. Attische Process, p. 138.) 

Line 33. 'EXa^piov. In reference to this month 
see ante, No. cxliii, p. 7, and Wescher and Foucart, 
Inscript. a Delphes, p. 63, No. 63 ; p. 155, No. 212 ; 
p. 177, No. 243; and for the Thessalian month 
"Acjypios, Ussing, Inscr. Ined. Nos. 8Sd, 9. 

Lines 37, 38. 'E^dKia-ros and 'ApaTocpavTos were two 
of the dyyiXoi sent by the demos of Kalymna to Kos, 
d, line 20. 



ccc. 

On a fragment of blue marble, complete on the right side. Height, 2^ in.; breadth, 3f in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C.T.N. 



KAITHTH 
HTPinPO 
AXMA^IKO 



Kai TT) yi) 
Arj/ilrjTpl TTp^^aTOv 

This seems to be a fragment of a law relating to the ritual of Demeter. 



KALYMNA. 



91 



OCOI. 

On a base of calcareous stone, much defaced ; the left edge preserved, the right edge only at line 3 ; broken at the back ; on 
the top is a shallow sinking, probably intended to receive a small statue. Height, i ft. 25 in. ; breadth, i ft. 4I in. Temple 
of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



OAAMoroKAAYMN. 
nNi:YNKA0lEP>Qi:E 
ATTOAA . NI . vAini 
KAAYM . AKMEAEONTI 
6 TAIONKAirAPA . E... 
NIKONEYSFP 

Line 2. avvKaOupaxre. Compare ovvKaTei^payaef, 
C. I. 3827 ^, where several persons are associated 
in a dedication. We must suppose that to have 
been the case in this inscription. Another city, 



'0 Sdfios 6 KaXvfii^i- 
coy avvKaOiipaxre 
'/47r6XX[a)]i't [4a]Ajft) 
/CaXv/i[j']os' /JteSiouTi 
5 rd'Cov Kataapa [/^6[p/[<a- 

viKhv Evaf^rj .... 

perhaps Kos, was probably associated with Ka- 
lymna in thus honouring Germanicus Caesar, the son 
of Nero Claudius Drusus, who appears to be the 
Caesar here named. 



CCCII. 

On a fragment of black stone, apparently the corner of a base; the left edge and"]top preserved. Height, 3I in; breadth, 2 J in. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



snoAA-n-N 
kaAymna. 

TirNj-i.PlM 
KOYIOYX 

For the form of dedication compare the inscription 
found at Kos, Bullet de Corn Hellen. v, p. 228, 



AnoXXoDi^i AaXttp ? 
KaXvjiva^ \fiiSiovri ? 
Tl. rvwpijJ^os 

KOV loV. X . . . 

where it is conjectured that this latter stone may 
have been transported thither from Kalymna. 



OCCIII. 

On a fragment from the rim of a laver of blue marble ; in large characters. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 7 in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

•)AA-n.NI 

' Any>XXcoi'i 



The laver, on the fragment of which this in- 
scription is engraved, was doubtless one of the 
vessels used in sacrificial rites in the temple, with- 



in the precincts of which this fragment was found, 
and dedicated to Apollo according to the usual 
custom. 



CCCIV. 

On a fragment of white marble, with a joint at the foot, but broken on the other sides; the inscription is close to the lower edge 

of the stone. Height, 5^ in. ; breadth, 5 in. Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

APOAAr 

' AnoXXcJiuoi or '^TroXXcori/t 

Probably from a base. 



ccov. 

On a fragment from the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, the top, left side, and a small part of the right side preserved. 

Height, 6^ in.; breadth, 6 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



APICTIA 
FITHAF 
- I 



'Apia 



Large letters, as if from the heading of a dedication. The name of Aristias, as father of Aratokritos, 

occurs anle, No. ccxxxi. 



92 KALYMNA. 



The following inscriptions, Nos. cccvi-cccxiv, relate to the enfranchisement, apeleutherosis, of slaves. 
The forms and conditions of such enfranchisement varied in different places (see M. Foucart's article, 
ApeleiitJieroi, in Daremberg, Dictionnaire des Antiquites, and No. clxxi, ante). In the inscriptions which 
follow the slave, OpirrrSs, Opefifia, is made free on condition that he or she remain in the master's service till 
his death, and in some cases it is further stipulated that the enfranchised slave rear one or more slaves, 
Bpififiara, for the service of their master's family. A fine is to be enforced for non-fulfilment of these con- 
ditions, which are said to be Kara rois direXevOepcoTiKovs vojiovs. In one instance a boy is declared released, 
Totv eXevOfpcoTiKcoy SiKaioDp ; he was probably a 6pip.ixa bred after the enfranchisement of his mother. These 
Kalymnian deeds of enfranchisement must be regarded, like those of Mantineia, as forms of manumission 
without any religious character (see Foucart-Lebas, Inscript. Grecques, &c., pt. ii, p. 218). The marbles 
on which these documents were engraved were placed in the Hieron of Apollo in order to ensure the 
permanence of the record. The eponymous magistrate in Nos. cccvi d, cccx, cccxiv, is the Stephanephoros. 

o 

Nos. cccvi a, b, c, ^,yare headed kwl M. This is probably an abbreviation of km Movdpxov, a magistrate who 

o 

occurs on inscriptions at Kos (see Ross, Inscript. Ined. iii, p. 42). After kirl M follows the name of a month. 
The months which occur in the Kalynmian inscriptions now published are as follows : — 

'Aypidvioi, No. cccxv, posL ndva/ios, No. cccxv, post. 

nerayuTvLos, No. CCCVI c, post ; No. cccix d, post. 'EXd^pios, No. ccxcix<5, line 33, ante. 

BaSpopios, No. ccxcixa, line 26, ante; No. cccxvni a, post. 'AXaecos, No. cccwi, post. 

'AprafMiTtos, No. CCXLV, ante. Kata-ap le^aa-TOi, No. CCCVI f, post. 

'YaKiyOios, No. cccvin, post. Ti^ipios, No. cccvi e, post. 

KapveToi, No. CCXLV, ante ; No. cccxxii, post. 

In an inscription relating to the enfranchisement of slaves which I copied at Kalymna, and published in 
the Journal of Hellenic Studies, ii, p. 362, mention is made of the month Theudaisios. Thus we obtain 
a complete calendar of Kalymnian months, eight of which, viz. Agrianlos, Petageitnios, Badromlos, 
Artamitios, Theudaisios, Hyaklnthios, Karneios, Panamos, are identical with months in the calendars of 
Rhodes and her colonies in Sicily. Instead of the four other months of these calendars, viz. Thesmophorlos, 
DIosthyos, Dallos, and Sminthios, we have Elaphrios, Alselos, Kaisar Sebastos, and TIberios. The 
month 'AXa-em occurs in an inscription from Kos, published in Bullet, de Corr. Hellen. v, p. 223, line 17. 



CCOVI. 

On a base of white marble on which a colossal statue had stood, as is shewn by the sinkings for the feet on the upper surface. 
On the bottom of this base is a circular sinking shewing that it must have rested on a column, a is inscribed on the 
upper member of the cornice in front ; 6 below a; c on the upper member of the cornice on the left hand side ; d below c ; 
e on the upper member of the cornice on the right hand side; /below e. Height, io| in.; breadth, 3 ft. 4f in.; thickness, 
2 ft. I in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

a. 

EniM<J)AAOYlOYKAnAIANOY/ KZHnVPOlI 

riAAinNOCHAEYGEPnCENTONIAIONePEnTONEYOAONKATA 

TOYCAnEAEYeEPflTIKOYCNOMOYC 

'Enl Mo. <PXaovtov KXoaSiavov [/xtji'os' ]k Zanrvpoi 

riXXifOfos r)X€v6epa>(rei/ rhu tSiov OpiWTov EvoSov Kara, 
roil? dmXivOepwTiKoi/i vojiovs. 



EniMTOYACKAHniOYTOrMYAKINGIOYIAAnOAAnNIAHCEICIAOYHAEYGEPnCEN 

TONIAION0PEnTONMINNinNAE4)nTEnAPAMENEITONTACZnACXPONONAYTnTEKAITH 

0PEYACHAYTOYnAP0ENIAIMENnNAnEAEY0EPOCTnNEK<t)YCEriCAYTnNTEKNnNMO 
NHN 

'Eirl Mo. Tov ' AffKXrjTriov to y prj. 'YaKivOiov id ' AiroXXcoviSrjS EicriSoTOV rjXivOipoacnv 
rhv tSiov Bparrhy MLi/ptwva k(f> (o re wapapfuei rof ras ^(ods \p6vov avrSt re Kai rfj 
Opfyffdo-T) ainov napOtviSi pivcov dTrtXfvOepos tZv tK <pija«os avroov TiKvoov fiovrnv. 



KALYMNA. 93 



Eni.?v«J<AnAIANOYMnETArEITNIOYTAIOc|>ANTOC'§ 
TOYAHAEYeEPnCENnAIAIONArAGOnOAAAnOAEAYMENON 
THNAHEA . ('GEPnTIKHNAlK AlHNn APAMENEI AETH(t)YCEIMH_ 
TPIAKTHTONTACZnACAYTHCXPONONHAnOAnCEIAYTHAHNT 

'Evl Mo. KXcoSiavov, fi HiTaynTviov 7, Ai6(f>avTos "§ ^rov Sfivos 
Tov S TjXivOepcoo'ei' naiSiou ' AyaB&woSa aTroXfXvfiivov A 

rmy dirfXlelvOfpcoTiKav SiKaimv napa/ievii Se rfj ^vcrei firj- 
Tpl "Akttj TOf ray ^caay aiirfji y^povov fj dnoScoa-eL avrfj Br)v t. 



d. 

EniZTE(|)ANAct)OPOYAPIZTAIOYTOIAE 

ANEKAPYXGHZANEnEAEYGEPIA 

AnOAAnNIAYnOKPATIAAKAIinniXHZnAPA 

MINAZAAN(J)0TEO'^'ZMEXPIZnAZ 

A^AenNY^OEY^.nNOZKAIEYNlnNOZ 

Ev\ ZTf(f>aua^6pov Apiaraiov ToiSe 
dveKapvyOrjcrav kn kXevOtpia, 
' AiToXXaivia inrb KpariSa Kat Imriyrii irapa- 
Hivaaa dvcportpots p^XP^ C'^^^y 
5 'AydOmv vno Evv\C\<)>voi Kat £wtWoy, 



e. 

EniMKAHAIANOYMMNOCTIBEPlOY Z XAPMEACICIAO 
TOYHAEYGEPnCENTAIAIAGPEMMATIAEYnAEANKAl 
EYOAIANKATATOYCAnEAEYGEPHTIKOYCNOMOYC 

'Enl Mo. KXaSiavoC /irjvbs Ti^epiov ^ Xappias ' laiSo- 
Tov riX(v6ep<0(Tei' to, iSia dpeppdrta EimXiav Koi 
EioSiav Kara. tov9 dneXfvOepwTiKovs vopovs. 

Line 2. BpepfiaTia. The usual word is Opepfiara. The diminutive may indicate that the slaves enfranchised 

are of tender age. 



/ 



EniMKAnAIANOYMHNOCKAICAPOCCEB 
MHN0A0T0[:AC4)AAE0YCHAEYGEPnCENTHN 
IAIANAMMANZnCIMHNE<J)nTEECTA' 
AEYGEPAAYTOYTOYMONOY 

'Enl Mo. KXcuSiavoS, /jLiji/hs Kaiaapoi Z(fi. 
MrjfoSoTos Ao-<paXeovi TjXfvOfpcocrfy r^t* 
iSiav dppav Zmcriprjv, t(f)' oJ re ea-Tai [dwe- 
XivOipa aiiTov tov jiovov. 



Line 3. The sense of dppds here is probably 
foster mother. Hesych. s. v. 'Appdr f) rpo^bs 'Apri- 
(iiSos, Kal ^ MTrjp. Kal 1) 'Pea. Kal 1) ArjprjTTjp. Cf. 
MuUer, Dor. ist ed. i, p. 389 ; Lobeck, Aglaoph. ii, 



p. 822. 'A ft/id occurs on a Christian lamp, C. I. 8979. 
See Ducange, Gloss. Grsec. i, p. 61. 

Line 4. avrov tov fiovov. The second tov is pro- 
bably due to careless repetition by the lapidary. 



Bb 



94 



KALYMNA. 



OOCVII. 

On a block of calcareous stone, which has been a wall stone; all four sides perfect. Above line i is the letter A in majuscule 
characters. Height, i ft. 6 in. ; breadth, i ft. if in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



10 



EniMKAnAIANOY 

mhnocaaceioyFge 
oaothantioxoyh 

AEYGEPnCENTHNIAI 

ANGPEnTHNAHMn 

E(t)nTEnAPAMENEI 

TOICePEyACINTONTAC 

ZflACXPONONMETA 

AETONeANATONAY 

THCOYAENOCECTAI 

AHEAEYGEPA 



It should be noted that in this as in the Delphic 
inscriptions the woman executes a deed of enfran- 
chisement without any mention of a Kvpios. See 



Etri Mo. KXaSiavov, 
fir]vos 'AXcreiov y, Qe- ' 

oSoTT) 'AvTLoyov T)- 
XevOepaxref rfji/ I8i- 
5 av dpenTfji/ Arjfia), 

k<f) S> re Trapafjievei 
roTs 6pe'\lra(7ii' tou rat 
^coas \p6vov, fKrii. 
Se rhv Odvarov av- 

lO TJjf OllBiVO^ (<TTai 

(XTreXevOfpa. 

Caillemer, Le contrat de vente a Athenes, in 
Revue de Legislation ancienne et moderne, 1873, 

PP- 7- 9- 



COCVIII. 

On a block of calcareous stone which appears to have been a wall stone ; the left edge preserved. Height, i ft. 6 in, ; width, 

I ft. 7 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

EniMTOYACKAHn . . . TOTMYAKIN 
AHCKAIMHNOAOTOCHAEYGEPnCANTH 
nTHNM0NAPXIANE4>nTEnAPAMENEI 
TONTACZnACAYTOYXPONONEANAEMH 
5 APOAnCEIEKACTHCHMEPACACCAPlA 

KAITOICMHNOAOTOYPAlAIOICGP 
TECAPPENHAHhT N METAAETONAL 
GANATONOYAENOCECTAIAPEAEYGE 

EniTOYAYTOYMTHAYTHHMEPAMi 
10 AC<t>AAEOYCHAEYQEPnCENTONIAIONG 

EnA<|)POAEITONKATATOYEAnEAEYQEPnT 
MOYC GPEyEIAEKAITOICYIOICAYTOYA■<^ 
NOYMHNinEKAETnGPEMMAAPPEN 
HEKAETflAYTHNANAAHN N 

Enl M Tov AaKXrjTj^iovj to y, /irj. ' YaKii^Oiov ' Aa^a- 
^ Xfjs ? Kol MrjvoSoTO^ TjX€v6ipa>a-av tUi/ ISiav 6pe- 

TTTrjv Movapxtay e(f)' m re irapa/j.ei'fi [roh 6pe\lracnv 
Tof rdi ^a>as avrov \p6vov, iav Se fifj, 
5 dnoBoaaii iKcia-Trfs rifiepas dcrcrdpi. 8 

KOI TOii MrjvoSoTov TratSiois Of^fylrav- 
rey dppev tj 5*;?. v, fierd Se tov 'Aa^jpaXeovs 
BdvaTov ovSevoi ea-rai d7reXevde[pa.. 

Enl TOV avTOv Mo. ttj avrfj rjfiepa MItjuoSotos ? 
lo AacfiaXeovs r)XevOepa)aey tov iSiov 6\penTov 

EnatppoSeiTOV kuto. tovs dTreXevOepaT^iKovs vd- 
p-ovi, 6pe\lrei Se Kai Toti vlois avTOV 'Aa-cf^aXiei Kai 
NovfiJ]via> eKdaTCp 6pepfia dppev 
tj iKaarm airr&v dvii Stjv. v. 



Lines 7, 8. dp 



T(S. 



The construction here 
requires (?/)[<V*', as in line 12, but this restoration 
would leave the rtt unexplained. 



Line 9. Al[j?j'65oroy] 'Aa-(j)aXeous. This is, doubtless, 
the same Menodotos, son of Asphales, whose name 
occurs No. cccvi,y^ anie. 



KALYMNA. 



95 



CCCIX. 

On a fragment of white marble, inscribed on two sides, a is complete on the left edge; b on the right. 

breadth, 4^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



Height, I ft. ; 



a. 



10 



15 



^ AL 

AHOAAflNliL 

H2EEAEY 

nTONATA 

NAPANTH 

KAPniMH 

AYTnro 

NONXOPI 
NAEKAF 

Fkaia 

KEPAA 
KHZ E 
TUN 
ZHyft 
KOZ 



10 



IS 



jjo-e ? i\€^\6(pov Tw iSiov Bpe- 

Trrhu 'Ay a 

vapav TT) 

Kapniixt] [(<})' m re irapa/ifyei 

avrZ To\y rSi ^mas avToD xpo- 

vov XopL \aiTo8ci)<xei a- 

va eVafffrTjj' r/nipay 

y KoX a 

KepaS 

TOOV 

arja 

K OS 



EPA 



d. 



On left flank of the stone. 



epa 



AriTNlOY 
3EPnCEN 
FEHAPA 
NEYAPEC 
-AA 
KHN 

H 

DYM 
OIE 



'EttI ZTf<f>ava<f>6pov tov hdvoi, ixr/voi HeTJayLTviov 

ri\{v]94p<aa-fv 
(<p' u] re TTapa- 
(levfi ]/; (vapeiT 

T]a 8 

K(DV 

ov fir], 
^8]o^e ? 



Line i (5 is in larger characters, and is probably part of a heading. 



coox. 

On a fragment from a block of blue marble, the right edge and part of the top preserved. Height, lo^ in.; breadth, ttjin. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



OPOYATToAAnNlOY 
EPorNIKIArVFO 
.rKAIAAMAlNE 
\KAIT0Y 

>IH4>0P0YArirrTT0Y 

ctEeHEAEYGEPA 

OAPKEKIAAMOY 
I A ,t^ 



Enl ZTf(f>a>'a(f>j6pov ' AttoXXoii'iov 

S Kal Aafiaivf- 
HplaKXtTov 

Errl Zre(f>a\va(p6pov 'AyCmrov 
o^iQ-q iX(v6(pa 

VTTJb ^ApKf(TlSdpOV 



96 KALYMNA. 



CCOXI. 

On a slab of blue marble, the left side of which has been cut away. Height 2 ft. ig in.; breadth, 10 in. Temple of Apollo, 

Kalymna; C. T.N. 

OYGEMINO ov eeiuv({(TrpaT 

EPOOHNTOZ: ' iypo<}>s>vTo<i 

HEAEY0E «^€'^> kXiiOilpo^ 

O^PMTOT. imb ' Up]o(f,mvTos 

5 EMIN0I:TPA 5 6]eiiipo(xrpdi[ov? 

QNTOZ^TTA C0VT09 Tra 

O on NT I ' Up-\o,ps,vTL 

PO 

<[>OYNIKOMH iirl Zrecpapojcpopov NiKOfi^[Sovi> 

OEeHEAEY 10 d]<pi6r, k\i{[d€pos 

YrrOAPIK inb'Apia 

D PEMMA 6]pifCfia 

ETQN "§ ^Tcov 1 

EAEYeEPQKAN iXev6ip<i,aa,{Tei 



10 



CCOXII. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete at the foot. Height, 6 in. ; breadth, 4 in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

NO 
AY 
AE 

5 E I Z J 

aHN Nz 

Part of deed of enfranchisement. 



CCCXIII. 

On a fragment of blue marble, the right side complete. Height, slin.; breadth, 3 J in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 

JOY lov 

YME v/ie 

jBPfl ^\ev]6ip<o 

AN A PON avSpou 

Fragment probably from a deed of enfranchisement. 



KALYMNA. 



97 



CCCXIV. 

On a block of calcareous stone, the left side preserved. Height, i ft. 6 in. ; breadth, i ft. if in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



lO 



<t)ANH(t)0 
IZ 

AHCOCTO 
AnOAAHNOC 
Y AIATOAY 
PnCACTON 
AYAITOAIKAI 
HNACTOY 
OAlPGITAlCNe 

eYKinnoY 

NAYTOYKATA 
^ AHNtuTur 
HAPONlTOC 



'Enl !ET€yj)ai'r]<f>6[pov 

SrjS OCTTO 

TO av 
(Xivdelpaxras rhv ^Siov OptnToy ? 
yp]<£\jrat TO SiKai\a)fta ? 



10 



^} 



aipHTai iv e 

liVKLTTITOV 



napovTOi 



I have restored this inscription on the supposition that it is a fragment of a deed of enfranchisement, 

but of this there is no sure proof 



oooxv. 

On two fragments of white marble, joined together; no edge complete. Height, 9f in. ; breadth, 9I in. Kalymna; C. T. N. 



t» E ZO . 

AOZOAPZK}) 

OY (a) EKVOQfl 
APlETOMAXr>v 

5 iirnoYrbroNi 

jenoyAezopkatoy 

xSrErONnZEPIPAPMEl 

yAezopkatoymatpoz 

rONnZEPIAPIZTONOYP/ 
10 MATPOZAPIZTIOYTAZAI 

NAPOYATPIANIOY AP 
-AEKPATEIAZ TErO 

"aeoyzXezopk 

^7EPlf 

This and the following inscriptions, Nos. cccxvi- 
cccxx, seem to be fragments of registers of births. 
The constantly recurring words «^ opKUTov paTpos or 
f^opKdcTov parpos may have reference to a declaration 
on oath made by the mother as to the legitimacy of 
the child. See Egger (Revue Archdol. N. S. iv, 
p. 1 75) on the usage at Athens, which corresponded 
to the French 6tat civil, and which is illustrated by 
a passage in the Oration of Isaeus on the succession 
of Kiron, ed. Reiske, p. 208. The orator there 
states that the father had to swear before the phra- 
tores that his son or daughter was legitimate ; and 
after this legitimacy had been duly confirmed by vote 
of the phratria, the birth was entered in a register, 
ypappaTiiov. At Kalymna it may have been the 
mother who was so sworn, because the right to par- 
ticipate in the rites of the phratria may have been 
inherited through the female line. See Rayet, In- 



Av. e^c^pKciTov parpos yeyoi/coy or ycyoyvla 
Xos Qapaicf) 
ov Hap. €K HoOc^ias 
ApivTopdyov 
5 —ev^^invov yeyoi'aJs 

Oivov Av. e^opKUTov 
$• yeyoj/cby itrl Happ^via-Kov ? 
V Av. k^opKOLTov paTpbi 
yejyoi'ajy tirl ' Apia-Tovov noSydpav ? 
10 paTpbs ApicTiov Tcii 'A 

fT'i .... "^vSpov ' Aypiaviov ' Ap 
poLTpof^ 8\ KpaTeiai yeyo[j/c6y or yeyovvTa 
oJ/cXeofs Av. e^opKUTov 
yeyo»/]a)y enl <f>[tXivov ? 

scriptions In^dites de Cos, p. 29, No. 10; Dubois, 
Bull, de Corr. Hell^n. vi, p. 263. 

The date of the several entries of births in these 
fragments is marked by an eponymous magistrate : 
fnl nappe[yi(rKov'j, line 7 ; enl 'Apiarofov, line 9 ; enl 
Mevoi . . ., cccxvi, line 3 ; enl 0tXi'i/o[v], cccxvii, line 6. 
The date is further marked by a month, as na[vdpov'], 
line 9 ; 'Aypiaviov, line 1 1 ; BaTpofj^tov'], cccxviiia, line 9 ; 
'AXareiov, ibid, d, line 8 ; see ante, No. cccvii. The 
sigla which follow the father's name, lines i, 3, 8, 13 
of this inscription, lines i and 7 of No. cccxvir, lines 
5, 6 of cccxviii a, denote the three tribes of which 
Dorian colonies were originally composed. Thus 
]L = Avpdvri^, ^ =z riapcpvXr]?, X =' YXXevs. See Bull, 
de Corr. Hell, vi, p. 261 ; v, pp. 217, 218. Dubois, 
in the Bulletin de Corr. Hell, vi, p. 266, gives an 
extract from another Kalymnian register in which 
the fuller form ' YXXaiov occurs. 



c c 



98 



KALYMNA. 



OCOXVI. 

On a fragment of blue marble, the right edge partly complete ; h is inscribed on the right flank of the stone. Height, gi in. ; 

breadth, 3f in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

a. 



1 h 










OYTAZAPi^ 








ov Tas ' Api<T 


EHOPKATOY 








f^OpKCCTOV 


EniMENOI 








enl Mivoi 


nOY ME 




5 




nov /xe 


A 1 r E nz 








aiyemi 


'MATPOZ 






k^opKdTov\ /iarpbs 


ZTAZMr 








s ras 


'HOPK/ 


On 

5 


b. 

right flank, 

flN 

TOY 

-E" 

T 

r 




e^opKalrov jiarpoi 




COCXVII. 







On a fragment of a stelfe of blue calcareous stone, the left edge preserved; the spacing of the letters is irregular on account of 
the holes in the stone. Height, 8 in.; breadth, 6^ in. Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



-.c=.OPKATO^ 
TOY MATP 
REHOPKAT^ 
AP I ZTO M 

TPOZAEAPIZTA 
NYIAEni4)IAIN0 
NEYZ 2 EH O 



Av. e^opKUTOv [//arpoy . . . . 

Tov f/.aTf^bs 

fla/i. e^opKccT^ov fiarphs 

ApKTTOfl 

jj-oi^pos Se ' ApicfTa , . . [yeyo- 
vevs Av. k^iipKaTov ? 



k^opKd- 



CCCXVIII. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of white marble, all the edges broken; inscribed on two sides. Height, 7 J in.; breadth, 4I in. Temple 

of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



a. 



10 



Ci 
APIXO 
AOSTAS 
lAEIKOYA 

iXezopkai 

(xtEKPOOAIA 
ONAZIPOAIS 

PIOSTAZPIZI 

AABATPOMi 

ATPOZAI 

inzE 



10 



« 



'OXviJL^iyo 

Soi ras 
'ApliSeiKov A 

' YX. e^opKci^Tov 
riafi. iK rio&ato^s 
' OvaaiTToXis 
pios rds flia- 
iwl . . .18a Barpo/j^iov ? 
/ijarpoy 8^e 
tftjy e 



KALYMNA. 



99 



Line 6. flodaCai. This name occurs cccxv anfe 
and in a Kalymnian inscription cited by Dubois, 
Bullet, de Corr. Helldn. vi, p. 266 ; see also the 



Sfjfios Podaioiv, ante, Nos. ccxxxvii, line 18, ccxLii, 
line 13, ccxcviii, line 5. On the reverse of the 
same fragment : — 



r.vA 
posAen 

"ErONYIAfc 
'KATOYMATi 
fOPKATOVrEI 
xSIKAEAEYOY/ 
ASZncjJPONl' 

aaseioy 

PY5- 



eXX? 
jiaT^pos Sk N 

yiyowTa 
t^o^pKOLTov nai^poi 

([^opKarov y6y[oj'a)y ? 
' Ay^aaiKkia EvQv 
as Zco(f)povi 
'AXcreiov 



Line 8. 'AXcreiov, for this month see ante, p. 92, and Bullet, de Corr. Hell, v, p. 224 and p. 339, 

vi, p. 254, line 24. 



CCCXIX. 

On a fragment from the lower part of a stelfe of white marble ; part of the moulding at the foot remains ; broken on three sides. 

Height, 4 in. ; breadth, lo in. Kalymna; C.T.N. 



OV / 
\L I IOYTASAiO<J)ANOY 
\AIZIOYKA0YO0ESIANAE 
APOZGENI ZAPIZTOAIKOY 



OV rds Aio(f>di'oi^'s 
Ka&' voQiaiav Se 
'Af'^Spoa-Oei^rf^i ' Apta-ToSiKOv 



cccxx. 

Fragment of blue marble, the lower edge of the stone and right side of the inscription complete. Height, 3J in. ; breadth, 4^ in. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna; C. T. N. 



OKAEOYZ 
-MATPOZAE 



okX(ovs 
fiarpos Si 



OCCXXI. 

On the upper part of a stelb of white marble, the right edge and part of the top preserved. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

.airNHMATOY 
Nl A ATOYXAPEI HOY 
I ANTHN^EnNnPONOI 
- JniETAIKAl AIOIKEITAI 
6 ^APPHNTE AEZ4)0PI A2K ATA 

TnN{?)AAMOYAlATOYTOKAAAMA 
NTO.AlAYMEn.AnOAAni^"" 
ANTO^TONHANTHNHNAP 
nriNT... 'HNEKI^JnTHPAAl 
10 PAYNIONKA|TOY2AOinOY5eE 

0YT0NXPH2 MONENTET PA 
- IIN K(?)A 2 n T H P I A N 

OYNAnAPABAl 
NOEON A I A 



Height, 9^ in. ; breadth, 6 in. 



lOO 



KALYMNA. 



10 



"ESo^e T^ /SovAy Kai tZ Sdji^, yvmjia tov 

viSa TOV Xapei(Tiov 
iwfiSfi] lav T&y 6(S>v irpovol- 

a] a-a>(eTai kuI SioiKeiTai 

Kapwwv reXfaipopias Karb. 

TWV ? SdfJLOV Sia TOVTO Ka 

TO kpoy ? TOV 4t5i'/z€a)[y] '^7r6XAft)»'o[y 
TOP ndvTcov 
Kaplerr&v Irov SjitjvfKfj (rcorrjpa At^a 
Kilpavviov Kal Toi/s Xoinovs Be- 
oi/s^ TOP y^prja/jibv tv Te ypdfi ?- 

fia(Tt ?1 aatTrjpiav 

jrapa^aL 
To^f Oebf Sia 



This inscription is much defaced, and the letters 
are crowded and of a very late type. It probably 
relates to some failure of crops which led the 



Kalymnians to consult the neighbouring oracle of 
Apollo at Branchidae. 



CCCXXII. 

On a fragment broken off from the upper edge of a block of blue marble, the top complete. 

Temple of Apollo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



Height, 25 in.; breadth, 10 in. 



MHNoiKAPNElOY 
ENHNZYNEXriNZEIZMnNE 
fiNAMriNKINAYNEYON 
F^QEYTANOE 



Mr]vbs Kapveiov 
■yeyevrniyvcof ffwe^Mf (reLaiiStv k^ 
TO, vda<^ 5i'l SiV ap-wv klvSwojov- 
- - - TTplecr^evTav 6e 



TCCV 



Line 4. I have restored TT/oJeo-ySevrai'. It is possible 
that this may refer to an envoy sent to consult an 



oracle or to propitiate some deity on account of the 
earthquake mentioned, line 2. 



CCCXXIII. 

On a fragment from a stelfe of white marble, all the edges broken. Height, 45 in. ; breadth, 3I in, 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

Ab 

PSTY 
5 4>Xt 

Se . . OiKKpv^oTT pcTTVipyy^ 



Temple of Apollo, 



This is evidently a fragment of a tablet on which 
the Greek alphabet was inscribed, and which was 
probably votive, perhaps an offering by a teacher. 
A Greek alphabet was found in a tomb at Cervetri, 
another in a tomb near Siena, and another in a tomb 
near Veii ; all these were in Archaic characters ; see 
Dennis, Etruria, 2nd ed. i, p. 271, ii, p. 133; Bullet. 



deir Inst. Arch. Rom. 1882, p. 95. Wilkinson (Modern 
Egypt- '>> P- 53) riotes a Greek alphabet on the wall 
of a tomb at Beni Hassan. For instances of Etruscan 
alphabets found in tombs see Dennis, ibid, i, p. 271, 
ii, pp. 224, 306, and Bullet, dell' Inst. Arch. Rom. 
1882, pp. 91-96. 



CCCXXIV. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete on the top. Height, 3^ in. ; breadth, i ft. Temple of Apcrflo, Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



onATPJAOS 
. "EPOA/TC 
t-lC 



naTTpjp TraTpiSos 
npoh-epou ? to 
vo 



Perhaps part of the title of an emperor in a dedication. 



KALYMNA. loi 



cccxxv. 

On a small pillar of white marble, broken on the top and on the left of the letter A. Height, 6^ in. ; diameter, 4§ in. 

Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



A P Up 

O Pn 

Y Y 

Perhaps a boundary stone, Spov. 



OOCXXVI. 

On a fragment of white marble, broken on all sides. Height, 4i in. ; breadth, 4 in. Kalymna; C. T. N. 



£APA . . . . KaC\<Tapa} 

_(J)ANC .... <TTf\(f>avo . . 

AAYMl .... K^Xvjxv 

EO eo . . . 



CCCXXVII. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble, all the edges broken. Height, i ft. ; breadth, 1 1 in. Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

lOYEILI lov Elm 

MAOYKIOY K\a\ ? Aovkiov 

Y ZCjUDYP V Zamvp[os ? . . . . 

I YPOY K/ ... Zcohrvpov Ka . . , . 

5 '"AIOCY 5 Koi eev 



CCOXXVIII. 

On a fragment from a block of blue marble, the upper edge finished as if for a base ; large characters. Height, 4I in. ; 

breadth, loj in. Kalymna; C.T.N. 

10? BYTE/ 

los EvTfX 

This is part of the first line, perhaps of a dedication. 



CCCXXIX. 

On a fragment of white marble, with a moulding above the letters. Height, 3 in. ; breadth, 6 in. Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

HPAKAb 

' HpaK\e 



cccxxx. 

On a fragment of white marble, the left edge and the top preserved. Height, 2^ in.; breadth, 4 J in. Kalymna; C. T. N. 

ETE 

~~ Dd 



I02 



KALYMNA— KOS. 



CCCXXXI. 

On a fragment of white marble, the lower edge preserved. Height, 3 in. ; breadth, 3 in. Kalymna ; C. T. N. 



00> 



CCCXXXII. 

On a fragment of blue marble with moulding on the lower edge, the other edges broken away. Height, 2 J in. ; breadth, 4 in. 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 

EAb 

6Xe 



OCOXXXIII. 

On a fragment of white marble with moulding on lower edge, the other edges broken. Height, 4 in.; breadth, 4 J in. 

Kalymna; C. T. N. 

\ 



CCCXXXIV. 

On a fragment of blue marble, broken on all sides. Height, 5I in. ; breadth, 6 in. Kalymna ; C. T. N. 

A.ANTv'V ...aavra} 

^MAPN ....piiapv 

EBEI . . . e.J(r]e)8et ? 



CCOXXXV. 

On the convex face of a circular shield of white marble. Diameter, 12^ in. Kos; C. T. N. 

vrHZIKPATHSAr 
HSIKPATOYSTPA 
TATHZAZOEOIS 

'AyrjaiKpaTrji ' AyT}<TiKpdTov a-TpaTay/jaas' Geoty. 



This inscription is very similar in form to the one 
from Kamiros, published by Frohner, Inscriptions 



Grecques du Louvre, No. 27. By (rrparay^aai may have been one of the regular magistracies 



be meant nothing more than that Agesikrates filled 
the ofifice of strategos, which here as at Rhodes may 



KOS. 



103 



CCOXXXVI. 

On a fragment of white marble, right edge nearly perfect. Height, 8\ in. ; breadth, 1 1 in. Kos ; C. T. N. 



\rE A<t>IKOMbNoYTE 
■•OAIXN ATOENAAAXAPNAI 
ETAlflNANAPnNTnN 
5 TAXTAMENYPEPTOYAAMOY 

IXXEINTANKAOAIPEXIN 
'EXBEIANPOTIBAXIAH 
EM AAEZEIXOAITfllBAXIAEI 
"lONTAENAOANAlX 
,10 on . XTOPOAIXMAMH 

rwAr^j^/^EIOiK-fiNTI 

This fragment makes mention of an embassy to 
some king (line 7), and also of a fort in Halasarne 
(line 3). Perhaps it is part of an honorary decree, 
rewarding envoys for their services in the embassy. 
6 Sdfioi] 6 ' AXaa-apviTdv occurs in a Koan inscription 
published by Ross, Inscript. Ined. ii, p. 62, No. 176, 
and Babington, Trans. R. S. Lit. N. S. x, p. 122. 

For other inscriptions from Halasarne, see Rayet, 
Inscriptions des Sporades, p. 25, No. 9, and p. 30, 
No. 10. See also Bullet, d. Corn Hell^n. v, pp. 196- 
199, and vi, p. 254, line 4. In Hesychios, s. v. ed. 
Schmidt, 1858, p. 1 13, 'AXacrdpvri Maxav Sfj/ios should be 
' AXafxdpvrj Kwcou, not Tpaxoi/ as Schmidt suggests. In 
Strabo, xiv, p. 657, the name is written 'AXia-apva, 
which, on the evidence of the inscriptions already 
referred to, may be corrected to 'AXaadpvrj, as in 
Hesychios as amended. Strabo places Halasarne 



curiX (IS 

aye d<piKOfiivov re 

TToXicrfia rb kv ' AXaa-dpua 

/ilera t&v dvSpatv toiv 

5 alpiOivTOtv . . . .] rai rii (liv inrep rov Sd/iov 

inrepYiTXfii' riiy KaQaipicnv 

TT^iaPitav irorl PaaCXfj 

tIc SiaXf^eicrdai t£ fiacriXfi 

lovra kv 'AOdvais 

10 57r[<»]y TO iroXicrfxa fifj 

kv d(T<f)aXu otKecovTi 

irpii tS AaKT/T^pi, a statement which cannot be re- 
conciled with the position which Ross and Rayet 
assign to Halasarne east of Cape Antimachia (see 
Ross, Reisen, iii, p. 136; Rayet, M^moire sur I'lle 
de Kos, pp. 80, 81 ; Pantelidis in Bullet, de Corr. 
Helldn. V, p. 197), unless we suppose Cape Anti- 
machia and not Cape Crikalo to be Strabo's Laketer. 
The BacrtXfvs, lines 7, 8, may be Ptolemy Soter, or 
his son Philadelphos, who was born in Kos, and 
who is probably the king of that dynasty referred 
to in a Koan inscription, 'E(pr]ii. 'Apx. Hep. /3. No. 240. 
But, as from the character of the palaeography our 
inscription can hardly be much later than the time 
of Alexander, he may be the Baa-iXevs referred to. 
Kos was one of the islands which shook off the 
Persian yoke and sided with Alexander in B.C. 332. 
See Droysen, Hellenismus, i, p. 314. 



OOCXXXVII. 

On a fragment of a stelb of white marble, lines 7-10 and 18, 20, nearly complete on the right edge. Height, lofin.; breadth, 
8^ in. Transact. Roy. Soc. Lit. N. S. x, p. 124, No. 21. Kos; presented by Admiral Thomas Spratt, C.B. 

aAAM 
AIA4)YAAE 
YNIKIOVEYHME 
vMIAIErAoNTy^.*.! 
5 AET0yA4)ISMAKAIT/ 

-xANKAIANAOENT-n-ENl 
On-n-INAAEKAIOZYNnAZ 
tTIMIANIKIANIKloY YnoTO 
AAAPXOZANAPASEAEZO/A.T^"' 
10 rEZANAA0NT^T0AET0YA4)IZ 

EAOoNTEZEniTANBoYAANKAlE 
oZnoAITAZnOIHZAZOAITANAN 
VOHKOYZIKAIPOI . • NAPEZAPEGEN 
VoArtPoZNIKO • • • OYNIKOMAX . . 
15 TOZ"BKAITOIT/» . . AITOYAAMO . 

STArOPAZ(|)IAIZTOYMIK-n.NrEN 
"NAO/vNOZI/^nYPOZAPIZT/^NOZ 
ANK^MAPXOZ"BTEIMArOPAZEK 
IZTOc})ANOYnY . OKAHZBXAPIAA 
20 \ZAPIZTOKAEIAA 



I04 



KOS. 



San 
Sia(f>vXacr 

NlKlOV 

rot racial ky86vr<o 
5 Tol^e TO yfrd(pia-fia Kal ra . , . , 

map Kal dya6evTa> kv tJ^S 
firi<f>av((rrdT(o ray dyopds tJotto), iva Se Kal 6 avvna^ 
Sd/ios tinyv5> Tifiadiyra Sid rocrla Ti/xia NiKiav (^NyKiov vtto tc^O 
Sdftov Twv K<oa>u, 6 noKf^ap)(09 dvSpa^ eXecrOa) tco[j' 
lo TToXiTay^ 01 Sk alptOeylerfs dvaS6vT<o roSe to ■\\rd<l>Lcr- 

fia Tois . . . Kal iTTleXOovTes kwl Tap ^ovXdy Kal ([vi 
Toy Sdfioy d^iOVVTO) rloy iroXiTai TTOiTJcracrOai Tay di^a- 
yopivaiy tov arT€<pdyov ? ey /cja^jj/coi/o-i Kaipoi^i' £jy8pei a(t^pe6iv- 
T(s 6 Seiya tov Suyos, 'AnoXl^X6Sa>pos Nlko . . . ov, A^i/co/xa[xoy 

ig Tos "B Kal Tol Tal/xi'lai tov Sd/ic^v 

6 Sfiya TOV Sfiyoi . ' AlvTayopa^ 'PlXio-tov^ MiKcoy Fey . . . 

6 Suya rivdOcoyos^ Zconvpos ' A piaTODyos 

6 Siiya TOV Seiyos ]««', Kd>(jiap\os "B, Tei/xayopas ' Ek 
6 Siiya ' A p\i<TTO<f)dyov /7i»[fl]o/cX^y "B XapCSa 
20 ay ' A picTTOKXeiSa. 



The character of the writing is late and careless. I n 
line 8 the N is omitted in NikIov. Line 13, APEQEN for 
AIPEQEN. Line 7, the iota subscript is omitted. 

Line 8. The restoration on which I have ventured 
here is based on the assumption that the Nikias 
honoured in this decree was a citizen not of Kos, 
but of some other city to whom the envoys appointed 
(line 9) are to be sent to announce the honours con- 
ferred on Nikias. The construction n/MaOeyTa Sid is 
harsh and unusual, but I can suggest no better way 
of explaining the double accusative. 

Line 10. oi 81 alpeOey'hes dyaSoyro) ToSe to y^rdipia^/ia 
Toii .... Here we must supply the name of the city 
to which the decree was to be communicated by the 
envoys. Such embassies were usual when the citizen 
of a foreign state had received rewards for signal 
services. Compare C. L 3640, line 31, SeT^ai Se Kal 
Trpia^fia ky to, kKKXrjcria^ ocrris napayfyo/xeyos npbs Aafi^^a- 
Kdyois [to rle ■^d^urfta dwoSman Kal d^idau TTOLrjcraaOai. 



ra[j' ai'JayyeXt'ai' tcoj/ a-Tfcfjdycoy k.t.X. ; ibid. 3655, the 
city of Paros sending envoys to Kyzikos, d^iot tw 
Srjfioy . . . ray Tijids ray SeSofieya? avT(p vwh rov Srmov tov 
flaptcoy ty re Tjj ^ovXij Kal tw S-qfjim dyayyaiyai k.t.X. 

Line 15, . . . roy "B. Line 18, Kwfiapxos "B. The 
siglum "B after a proper name indicates that the 
person who bore it had the same name as his father. 
See Franz, Elem. Epigr. p. 374. 

Strabo, xiv, p. 658, mentions a Nikias, as tyrant 
of Kos in his time, and his name has been recognised 
on the copper coins of the island. See Leake, Nu- 
mismata Hellenica, Insular Greece, p. 13. 

The late character of the writing in our inscription 
would accord very well with the date of the tyrant 
mentioned by Strabo ; but, assuming the decree to 
have reference to him, we must further suppose that, 
though a foreigner, he succeeded in establishing him- 
self as ruler in Kos, if my interpretation of this 
inscription be correct. 



CCOXXXVIII. 



Fragment of a stelb of blue marble, the right side nearly 
Roy. Soc. Lit. N. S. x, p. 123, No. 20, where it is 
Presented by Admiral Thomas Spratt, C.B. 



perfect. Height, i ft. i\ in. ; breadth, 7!^ in. Published in the Transact, 
stated that it was brought from Kephalos, the site of Isthmos in Kos. 



KAAPin 
lEPAIVriE 
MONOIAIOIN 
5 ATAIEMPOAEI 

CniPOKONTEAE 
^KAAPiniENIZQ'Mn 
NAMOYNEYMHNIAIA 
KAIIZTIAiTAMIAIPAy» 
10 -nNHMIEKTONKA 

TAIEPITAZIZTIA^ 
TAIPANAAMniEPI 
"AYTANOYEIIEPE 
AEKA~AIPOTEI 
15 M-ZENATAIAY 

l(t)ONAPZENA 
AlAEKATAir 
ZZONOZ 
ATAT . tfA 



15 



'/4(7]/cXa7r(a) 
iepa ? ' Yyie- 

ta ' 0\ioyoia otv 

kji noXii 
dpyoi^ kniTTOKoy TiXe- 
lov .... ' A^TKXaTTiSi ky 'laQjico 

Halydfiov yevfirjyia 'A- 

(TKXairiSi] Kal 'IcrTia Ta/xta PA/ 

KpiOkyoy ? fifj.i€KToy Ka 

TO. knl Tag ' laTias ? 

.... 'A<ppoSiy-a ? flaySd/Kp ipi- 

(fioy ] Taxnay 6vei Upe- 

^y ? ] SeKara floret- 

Sdyi ] dpaeya ra ai^ra 

djikpa f.p~\i<f>oy dpaeya 

T'\a SfKUTa 

kXaliTCToyos 

(olara t . Ka 



KOS. 



105 



This fragment is evidently part of a ritualistic 
law prescribing the times and nature of the offerings 
to be made to Asklepios and Hygieia, who were 
worshipped at Isthmos, where this inscription was 
found. See Rayet, Inscript. Ined. des Sporades, i, 

P- 59. 

Line 4. I venture to restore this 'OJ^oj/oia, as the 
letters MONOIAI are quite clear. 

Line 6. dpvd] (irtnoKov, ' with the fleece on.' This 
word occurs in the Septuagint (Kings iv, 3, 4) ; see 



Steph. Lexicon s. v. and Dindorf 's note. According 
to Athenian law lambs were usually shorn before 
they were sacrificed (Schomann, Griech. Alterth. ii, 
p. 227). Mr. Babington remarks that this frag- 
ment probably belongs to the same inscription as 
another, of which he gives an inaccurate transcript, 
ibid. No. 19. S&epost, No. cccxxxix. 

Line 9. 'hTia Ta/ita. Ta/iia would seem here 
to be an epithet of 'la-rta as the housekeeper of 
Olympos. See Preller, Griech. Mythologie, i, p. 328. 



CCCXXXIX. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of blue marble, partially complete on the right side. Height, 6| in.; breadth, 8 J in. 
Soc. Lit. N. S. X, p. 123, No. 19, where it is stated to have been found on the same site as No. cccxxxvui. 
by Admiral Thomas Spratt, C.B., 1874. 



10 



JT. 

OY 

ZOHAEiANTAY 

^ONAPXOZTj-lA . . . . -n.1 
'iNON-n.SAAf PPOTATON 
'APXOYIKAAIOE rvNMA 
TF AEATAYTANG 
~'^4)EPET-n.AE0 
MONETAYC 



m 

ov 



10 



6i]\fiav Twi^av 

Movap-f^o^ t5 a .... m 
Siihrvov 0)9 Xafinporarov 
Alojcapx*"^ tKciSt 060)1/ Ma- 
Tpf] reXea, ra'uTav 6- 

rjXeiav ?] ea-cpeperco Se 6 
SeiTr'lyoi' ? iy Svo 
e]€cS»/ ? 



Transact. Roy. 
Kos; presented 



This fragment is very similar in import to No. 

CCCXXXVUI. 

Line 4. Movapxos. The eponymous magistrate at 
Kos was so called. See anU, p. 92 ; Rayet, In- 
scriptions Inedites des Sporades, i, p. 7; Ross, Inscr, 
Ined. ii, No. 175 ; Bullet, de Corr. Hellen. v, p. 239. 
The biographer of Hippokrates states that he was 
born in the month Agrianios, iiovapypvvTos 'AffpidSa 
(Soranus Eph. ap. Physic, et Medic. Minores, ed. 
Ideler, i, p. 253). The functions were probably 
analogous to those of the paa-iXevs dpy(cov at Athens 
and the ^aa-iXtvs at Megara and elsewhere. On all 
these magistrates some of the dignity of the ancient 
fiaa-iXevs probably devolved. 

In a Kalymnian inscription published by me 



(Journal of Hellenic Studies, ii, p. 362) we have M. 
QevSata-iov at Movapxtoii. It would seem therefore 
that the Monarchia was a festival at Kalymna. 

The following fragment, which I copied in a church 
at Kephalos, may be part of the same inscription : — 

ea-ev 

tS avrld dfiipa 
Senrvef 
KrfjpvKmy ye 
<TTa(pvX 

S^k Taf a-T 
a? fifj <j)pa 
kXiv\6fpa } i<ra. 



CCCXXXIX a. 

On the reverse of the preceding inscription, the left edge nearly complete. 

ME 
CP 

F. « n 

ENAO . . . rir 
6 nAE TAI 

HEAA..1 

VITE I A a 
N. PZ. . AHA 
APi AOH 
10 AE/ Ff 

OISA 
AIENAT/* 
P 
Line 4. dpa^tva} Lines 4, 5. eo-c^epsTJo) ? Line 6. f\ iXaa\(Tov } Line 8. «?]p<r[e»']a ? Line 12. t\S. hdra} 

E e 



io6 



KOS. 



CCCXL. 

On a fragment of a stelfe of blue marble, the left side nearly perfect. 

L or 

TOA€YT€PONOlAE 
oroNKATEYEPTEC 
AKAEITOYYIOC2:ENO<^ 
5 CTOCCDIAOKAAYAIOCOI 
rACTACnATPIAOCTIBr 
O^IAEINOCTIBEKAAYAI 
NIKAroPAYIoCAAJKIAAMC 
AKIAAMCOrABETAiry 
lo XAPMYAOYYIOCOIAOOPIOJ 
OI ^eEIEIGHAeoNEICArU) 
CAEYYIOCHPAKAEITOC 

cnrAAEPiocn 



Height, I ft. if in.; breadth, 7| in. Kos; C. T. N. 



15 



OCATTOAA 
YC 



10 



IS 



. . . TO Sivrepou, o'iSe 

oyou Kar evepyea^iav ' Hp- 

UKXeiTOv vlos Eivocj) [0tXo(7e/3a- 

OToy ^tXoKXavSios <f>c [eve/syl- 

ras ? ray irarpiSos Ti^e. 
^iXeivos Ti^i. KXavSi 
NiKayopa vibs 'AXKiSaflos ' A- 
XKiSdfKo Ha. BfToi. Pa. 
XapfivXov vlbs 4>iXo<ppia> 
oi'Se €1 €ia-fjX6ov fis dycSya 
. . y /ev. vlos ' HpdKXeiTo[s 

. . y Ho. FaXipios flo. 
OS 'AwoXXco 
vs 



This appears to be a fragment of an Agonistic list. Line 11, the El before EIC is an error of the lapidary. 



OCOXL^. 

On the left return of the preceding No., in characters of a later date; the right edge complete. 



15 



L 

CM 

A.PKOY 

ANTEPn 

CANTEPf* 

TOC 

POY<J)OY 
EYTYXIAA 
POYCJ)OY 
POYci)0(' 
HCCJ^IAOTOPOY 
ArAGOKA 
(t)IAHAe 

4)iAOCToro 

nOPAIOCENA 
EPIOCMAP 
IOC 



15 



MlapKOv 
A vTfpm 
y A vTepm 

TOS 

Povcpov 
EvTvyJSa 
' Povcpov 
' Poi<pov 
T]s ^PiXoTopov 
' AyaOoKX 
<f>iXri 'A6 
*PiXocTToyo 
HottXios 'Eva 



ipios ? Map 
toy ... . 



OOCXLI. 

On a round stelfe of white marble which tapers upwards from a fluted base. 

TAIOY 
HETIKIOY 
KATQNIAOY 

Patov fliTLKiov ZarcoyCXov. 



Height, I ft. 8i in. Kos; C. T. N. 



TELOS — RHODES. 



107 



CCCXLII. 

On a stelb of white marble, broken at the top and bottom. Height, i ft. ; breadth, io§ in. Transact. Royal Soc. Lit. N. S. x, p. 120. 

Telos; presented by Admiral Thomas Spratt, C.B., 1874. 



10 



15 



-AOZtTniAAMni 

rNHMAPPYTANinN 

APIONAAPIXTONIKOr 

PTOAEMAIHnPOZENON 

HMENKAIEYEPTETAN 

TAXPOAIOXTAXTHAinN 

KAIAYTONKAIEKrONOX 

HMENAEAYTOIXEIX 

rAOYNKAIEKPAOYN 

EIXTHAONAXYAIKAI 

AXPONAIKAIEMPOAE 

MniKAIENIPANAIANA 

"PAtAIAETOtAOIXMA 

. OAEEXTAAANAIOINAN 

virSFI . . -JIAPON 



"ESo^f r<S Sdfio)^ [ yyco/xa npvTavioiv, | ' Apiova ' A pidToviKov | riToXf/jLaifj npo^ivov | ?iii(v Koi evepyerav j ray noXios 
Tas Tt]Xiq)v I Kal avrbif /cat e/cyovoy, | ^fxev Sk avToTs ei(r\rrXovv Kal eKTrXovv I eiy TfjXof davXt /cat I dcmovSi /cat «/* 
TToAej/to) Kal iv Ipdva- a»'a|ypai|rat Se to ylrdtpia-jj.a I [TJoie iorrdXav XiQivav j [/cat 6€\fifv etTy t\o iapov 



A decree of the people of Telos granting the 
proxenia to Arion, son of Aristonikos, citizen of 
Ptolemais. The Hieron, line 15, is probably that 
of Athene Polias and Zeus Polieus, of which Ross 
found the ruins on the Akropolis of Telos ; see his 



Hellenika, p. 64. Bockh gives no inscriptions from 
Telos in the Corpus, but several are published by 
Ross in his Hellenika, p. 59 fol., and Inscr. Ined. 
ii, No. 169. See also Transact. Royal Soc. Lit. N. S. 
X, p. 115. 



CCCXLIII. 

On the four sides of a square stelfe of white marble, surmounted by a moulded cornice. Height, 5 ft. 6 in., by i ft. 4 J in., by 
r ft. 4^ in. Rhodes; formerly in the Church of St. John. Presented by H. R. H. the Prince of Wales, 1873. Ross, 
Inscript. Ined. iii, p. 20, No. 274, for part of the inscription. 



a. 



10 



15 



. . \PXOYNIKOMHAOYZ 
. . YN0YMHNIAIAI0KAH2 
xAMANTOSEIHEOnnS 
. STOYKAIPOY<l>AINnN 
OinOAITAIZYNANTI 
NBA' OMENOITAZKOINAS 
SiDAAEIASAEAOXOAlE 
ArrEAAEZOAITOZAHAO 
tENOZTHNTEnoAITANKAl 
'OAlTIAnNKAINOOnNKAinA 
. OIKaNKAIEENnNTHNAEEnAr 
rEIAAMENHNTAONOMATA 
ANArOPEYZANTnnAPA 
XPHMAENTAIEKKAHZIAIOA . 
AAMOZAIAXEIPOTONEirn 
TANAZIANTAZAHPEAZ 
. AIEIK AAOKHIAAMBAN . 



fTTt vav^dpyov NiKOfiTJSovs 

V vovfirivta ^to/cX^y 

Ai<oS^dnavTOS eTwe Sncos 
k<f) e'/caJoToi; Kaipov ^atvmv- 
rai T^oi noXtrai avvavri- 
Xay^o^vY>iiivot ray Koivai 
oJo-^aXet'ay, StSoyQai <- 
TT^ayyiXXiaOai Tos SrjXo- 
fitvos T(ov T€ TToXnav /cat 
ttoXitlScov Kal v66wv /cat 7ra- 
p'^oiKcov Kal ^efoof, toiv Sk (iray- 
yuXafiivaiv ri ovofiara 
dvayopivcrdvTa) napa- 
yfi^jia iv rq, fKKX7]aia, 6 8[k 

Sd/lOi SLayilp0T0V(LT(O 

rdv d^iav rds Smpedi 
/c]at (t Ka SoKfj Xafi^at^i- 



10 



>5 



io8 



RHODES. 



. a onnzAEvnoMN/ . . 

. . APXH, . ONF-^T^NZr . . 
20 . . ANTANTAZHATPIAOZ . . . 

THNZYMMAXnNZYNEni/ . . 
TONEAYTOYZTOinilAHlAi 
ErAONTOZTAAAZFprA-AZ 
GAITPEIZKAIANAOE .... I 

25 AMMENENTmOEATPf E 

AAAANENTniA''" . . . .t| 
EiniTANAETPIT \NfcNTAIAro 
PAI^APATONBn^ ONTONTOY 
AlONIZOYTriNAEXEIPOTC 
30 NHQENTHNTAONOMATAAN , 

rPAyANTD- . . TAZZTAAA- 
KATAXrriM/ . . ZANT^AEKA . 
El' . .INnNAHOXEIPOTONH 
v...,>EnArrEAIAAIAEKATI 
35 NEZYZTEPriNTITAZEHArrEA 

. AZEIHMENAYTOIZKAIENTAIEXOMENAIEK 
KAHZIAIEHArrEAAEZOAl AIOKAHZ 

AEiiAAMANTOZKAIYnEPTOYYIOYIENOTIMOYTJfrXX 
. "YAOTO . APXIAAMOYYnEPAYTOYKAITjQNTEKNnN 

40 Zrv . A: . . ZXXXAAPAANOZHPAKAEITOYXX) 

GEOZ AinnOYHBKATOAriPOZNIKOMh 
HKAAAiK . . . H-KAEYMHAEYZHOIAinnOZ 

nnOYTOY . A . . . <t>nNTOZHHBKATAIOZ 

. 1IA0YKAIYn~PT. . TAIAiriNKAITAZrYNAIKOZy 
45 HAXPAZH . . AIAIO . . . IZTinnOYKAIYHEPTC . 

HAnnOYAA . . AAMOY . . AAMOKPITOZK Al AlOFENh , 
TOITEIZEAKAIAAMOKP . . OZKAITI Zl AZTOI AIOTEN . . 
XXXAnOAAriNIOZAnC . . '^NIOYKAIYPEPTOYr . 
TPOZTT ? . AIOKAHZZ .... \EYZEYEPrE- . . 
50 TIMOK/ EIA/ZAPIZTOI -(-EEcDANTI AAZE 

TOYHTnAI/» . .. niKPAT TnOKPATHZO 

AOYTTM DZAA AIYHEPTAZF 

KOZHAK TEYZAP 

TFMINNmNK N Z 3 YHEPTf NX 

55 MOYZAIOZEPM. ANOY TSTHYG . aOTOZ 

.rrnOKPATI "- _ Nh "tAPM' NIZKOZ 

1NIA Z -OYYIO"' AAMOKP THZ<l)IA 

-PATOY EYZO HHAA . AANOZOPO 

KAIYHE YIHNXnVIZ. . xiriHY . lilNOZflNE 

60 ...... nOAA . O . TIMriNAKTIXXXNIKOOriNTIMOZTPA 

'AIYHEPTOYYIOYHANAPC I AXOZAPTEMI A^PC 
NETOZA. . NIAAKAIYI EPT^NYni TniAlO 

YT I TOZE<l>ANTIAAHMHT>0<t>ANHZ 

// ANAPOZAAMATPIOYK/IYHEP 

65 TH . MNAZEAKAIYnEPTCYYIO"*- 

YKAIYrrEPTOYYIOYn<DOI 
Tl OZHAAMOZTPATC IKA 

- HGEYAIPOZNIKAPXO lY 

lA/ (AIYHEPTHNY 
70 nNTOXANAPOZO 

TAZ EPTHN 

KAIYHI . . . NHAI 
EFT I 

XN o 



20 



26 



30 



35 



tJo), 6'7rct>y Sk vn6/jiva[fia 
vnyipxr] [tJSi' ey rav cr<B[T?;- 
pCytv T&v rds TrarpiSoi [kuI 
Toi>v avfi/j.dxcoi' a-vye7ri[86i/- 
Tcoy iavTovs, Tol TrooXrjrai 
kyBovTOi oraXas kpyd^acr- 
6ai TpeTs Kal dyadf^vrm fi\[- 
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6fos Kal NLKOfiayvs rol NiKO/xrjSfvs Kal VTr\fp 
rwf vaiSicov HHH. ' Ayias AopKvXov H. Xaip\i.n- 65 
TToy NiKopd\ov TTT. Birrapos Birrdpov [/cat 
vnkp Tov ddeX(f)ov KaXXicrdii'fvs HH. 'Aph- 
a-TOTToXis BoTjOov X. iraiSiov 'Ap^eXa XXX. 
QevKpdTT]i 4joT[r]/i[o]i' Kal inrip t&v vlcov H. ? 
BiTwv Kal <t>iX7vos \toI KjpartSa HH. Borpi- 70 

Xoy Aloi/vctiov H[H. /llaMTr/ay Qap<rwo[u- 
Tos Kal virep ray yvluaiJKos X. 'HpdKXeli- 
Tos NiKocrrpdrov HHH. Ai/xvaios &€v- 
^iviSa Kal inrep tov naiSiov Kal rds 
yvvaiKos TP. 'PiXivos Evr-qpiSa H. nXf^i- 75 

(TTapyos ' PoSokX(vs Kal iinkp tov [iraLSwv . 
Ava^i^LOS NiKOfirjSevs Kal vnep [ray 6vya- 
Tpbs HH. 'ETfOKXfjs '/s/jcoj'oy /ca[t iiirep tov 
vlov TTT. ' HpaKXfiSas ' AiroXX(ovt(ov 
yopas Ti/jioyivevs HHH. 'Apiar 80 

KaXXidvfa^KTOs W. "Aparoi MaKa 
Zcoaia-TpaTos flvBoviKOV H. Qi\jJiiv6crTpa- 
T09 KaXXiaOivevs H. ZayaOivTjs 4>aivov H. 
KXiVjiayos KaXXidvaKTOs X. AS6- 
KTjTOi ' Ayka P. <t>iXiinTos ' A-)(aLOv HH. ro\p- 85 

ytiay Kal ' lirnoKpaTrji toI Ttplcajfoi Kal i- 
irip T&Vy viSlv H. ' Api<rT6Xas Aafiayopa . 
KlaXXi . . . . oy KaXXiadivevs Kal vire[p 
T(ov rT\aL8iai\v H. EvTeXicrTpdrT] Ap^f- 
Xa XXX. 01X117710? ' ApL<TToX6-)(pv Kal {rtr\\p 90 

T&v viS>v HHH. nd(i(f>iXos Aicoyos HH. Evk 
OKpiTov Kal Ip^irlp TOV vlov 
ovos XXX. 



112 



RHODES. 



d. 



OZNIKC<in 
TPOZHnKAAAIG 
PIZTATOPAZZ.. 
6 AINinNOZKAIYnEPTnuYin 

-OAnPOZXAIPEZTPATOYKAl 
TAZrVNAIKOZHHnElZlKAHZZ 

KOYHAlZXYAINOZnAPMENIZKO 

HEPT'^YYIOYFTEniKPATHZZl 
lo . AI"^rfEPTnNnAIAinNHNIKANA 

«PIZTOBOAOYTrAIOZKOYPIAAZKA 
ZANOIAAHEY<t>IAHT0ZrAAYKinn( . 
KAIYHEPTriNnAIAinNHONAZIKAl , 
ONYMAAPOYFTIMENAPriNAIOM . 
15 AONTOZKAIY^EPTnN^AIAln^ 

HPAKAEITOZAPET "ONOZK 

TOYYIOYHHEKA" 
MOYH ZYMMAV 
KATOPAZNIKO 
ao IniAOYHMO 

Y^EPTAZ^Y^ 
AnNOZnrn 

TEYZKAIYHE 
<DIAnNIAAZnY 

as CAIYHEPTriN 

AAZEHIZTPAT 
HNTTNIKOMAXOZ Ao 

""TriNYIIiNH AKAi. 

nEPTnNYiriNHHHA M?QNEniri 

30 PIOZTTAPIZTOZOEYrENEYZHAY 

ZANIAZXAPMENOYKAIYHEPTriNn 
AinNHZTPATONlKOZKAAAIZOE 
PYZFT OEYMNAZTOZAPI'TOAI 
KA. 'HEPTflNnAIAinNHEniXAPM.. 

35 APX . nOAIOZHOEZZAAOZKAIA . . 

AEIKH^'TOIOEZZAAOYHnAIAION 
ANAZA . *PIAATTTXAPMinnOZXAP 
. YAOYK/ . . . ETriNYinNKAITAZrY 
. AlKOZTfT. . KOMAXOZHAPMENIZK . . 

40 YnEPTOYHA -POZTHEniXAPMOZE 

rHPIOZKAIYHEl TnNYIHNHHKPATHZ 
-lANOPOZKAIYHE. TOYYIO^HEKATAI 
ZOEYAOTOYHK . . "lAh . EKATOl. . 
. OYHHHEYAriPIAAlE . . . "lAAH 

45 OEYAnPOZTEAEYTIAH Ain 

()iAIZKOYHHAIZXPOZnY. PIXOi . . . 
KOMAXOZ<l>AINinNO-HHNi''AZinNA 
KIAAMOYHHAYKHN . . \innOYHHA. 
ZTOBOYAOZAPIZTO . TOYNOZZn . . . 

60 KAIYHEPTHNYI >NFT. . AAYA'>^-A .. 

AOYKAIYnEPTnNYinNHTTIMO 

ZYKAEITOYHH ANAPO-EAHZI 

ZKOYKAIYHEPTriNYin. HHHTI 
AlAYMAPXOYKAIYnEPT >YYIO 

66 TYNAIKOZXcDIAinNAAMniA 

THNnAIAIONKAITAZrYNAlK 
KOMAXOZnYAHNOZHAPli . . . E 



oy A/tKo[^]a)[i'7oy koX im\p ras 6vya- 

rpos HP. KaWio 

' A'^picTTayopas 21 

Aiuicoi'os Kat inrep rmv vlStVy 5 

oScopos Xaipea-Tpdrov Kal [virep 

Tas ywaiKos HH. rieicriKXrjs 2 

Xov H. Ai(r)(yXTvos flapnevicrKdv Kal 

iijnep tov vlov P. ' ETTiKparr]! Zi 

KJal vjrep tSiv waiSiay H. A/tKa»'5[/90S 10 

'A'\piaTop6\ov W. AiocTKOvpiSas /CXfft- 

crav6i8a H. Ev<f)i\r]TOS r\avKiTr7ro[y 

Kal im\p tS>v iraiSiwv H. OvaaiKX^s 

'OvvfidSpov P. ZjiivSpav Aion\i- 

SovTos Kal {rrrkp twv naiSicov 15 

'HpaKXeiTos 'AptT mvos K\al inrkp 

TOV vlov HH. 'EKa 

vov H. Zyfifiay^oi Ni~ 

Kayopai NiKO 

ZcotXov H. /Mo 20 

vnep Tas yvv[a,iKbs 

Scovos WV. 

Tevs Kal virklp 

'PiXmviSas flv 

Kal inrep t&v 25 

8as 'Enia-TpaT 

<oi> TT. NiKonayos ao 

imX^p tS>v vl5>v H. a Kal \p- 

Trlp Tmv viS>v HHH. A mv ' EiTLy\rf- 

pios W. " Apiaros Oevyevevs H. Av- 30 

aavias Xapfiivov Kal vnep tZv 7r[at- 

8l(ov H. ZrpaTOPiKOS KaXXicrBe^v- 

evs P. Qevjivacrros ' Api<TTo8i\Kov 

/fa[t] imep twv iTai8i(ov H. ' Entyapn^os 

'Ap)(\e\iT6XLos H. QecraaXos Kal ' A^pi- 35 

SeiKTjs Tol Qe(TaaXoD H. TraiSiou 

' Ava^a^vlSpiSa TIT. Xapntmros Xap- 

filvXov Kail t'7r]€(p) tS>u viwv Kal Tois yv- 

v\aiKos TTT. \N i^Kop.ayo's flapnevicrK^ov 

inrep tov Tralrlpos W. ' EiTlyapp.os '£[7r<- 40 

yijpioi Kal inrep tS>v vlmv HH. KpaTfjs [Hoi- 

/idvopos Kal iwe[p] tov vlov H. 'EKarai- 

o]y OevSoTov H. /C^[paT]r5j;[y] ' EKaToSld)- 

p]ov HHH. EvScopiSas E[vS(o]pLSa H. 

QevSaipos TeXevTia H. [. . . "^/IXiTrrTroy 45 

'PiXtaKov HH. Aicr)(pos nv\p\pi)(^ov , [Ni- 

Kajjia-^os ^aLvt<ovoW\ HH. NiKacrioii/ 'A\X- 

KiSap-ov HH. AvKdnv [0j]\i7r7roi' HH. ' A\p(.- 

orTo^ovXos ' ApiaToVxA tov A/oo-crajfroy ? 

Kal inrep tZv vlmy P. [Xla^uXoy ZalSv- 50 

Xov Kal inrep tSiv vlSiv fTT. Tipo 

EvKXeiTOv HH. ' AvSpoTeXrjs [^flapfievi- 

(TKov Kal vnep tmv via^ul HHH. Ti 

AiSv/idp)(^ov Kal inrep tov v/ofS Kal Tas 

yvvaiKos X. 'PiXicov Aaftnia [/cat inrep 55 

Ta>y naiSicov Kal Tas yvvaLK^os Ni- 

KOfia^^os rivXcovos H. ' ApKr^TOfi^e^rfs ? 



RHODES. 



113 



KYAOYHANOArOPISANOAF . PATTA 
. ^^HSIA2:AYKAIG0YKAIY^E''-0YYi 

60 . . AYKAIOOYHHHAAMATPIO . \AMA . 

. .OYKAIYnEPTHNYinNKAITAS. YNAI 
. OZHHnAIAIAnPAZIAHHA . IST'^M 
. . H2EYTIPIAA prZIiZITPA- )2API 
STArOPAKAIYHEPTOYYIO . ROIE 

65 nHrrEAMEN0ITAZMI2O0<t)0PA . . TA 

ZArOPINOZTIMOZENOYTOY) . THPEZI 
OYENIAYTONHRhTElZAPX . ITEPA 
ZTIOZTOYZITHPEZIOYENI, . TONHPr . 
APIZTHNAPIZTOKAEIAATO" ..."•* 

70 ZIOYENIAYTONHTSTI-AAGAIME 

ZOENEYZKAIYnEPTflNYinNZI 
EinNAYOHHHhhXPYZANTA 
ZITHPEZIONEZAMHNOYFTA 
OOZTPATOZMEMNONOZZI" 

75 ZAMHNOYFfAAAAf-HI-l-hHHHUlll 

MIKIAZITHPEZIONEZAMHNO^ 
COZNIKANAPOYZITHPEZIO 
OY HHFfAhhl-l-l-IIIKAEINOZKPA" 
'ATOAnPOZEKAZTOZZIT 

80 HNOYXRAhUMENAP 

ITHPEZIONENIAYTO 

-iNK ^^EPTAZ^'>'^ 

"NOTZI" 

When Ross copied this inscription in 1843 it was 
built into a step in the pavement inside the church 
of St. John of Jerusalem, which had been converted 
into a mosque after the taking of Rhodes by the 
Turks. Sides a, b, and d of the inscription were 
then entirely hidden under the masonry, and would 
probably have remained so to this day but for a 
singular accident. 

In 1856 a powder magazine in the vaults under 
the mosque exploded, destroying the edifice. The 
fragments of our inscription were rescued from the 
ruins, and were presented by the Pasha of Rhodes 
to the Prince of Wales on the occasion of his visit 
to the island. His Royal Highness presented this 
marble to the British Museum in 1873. 

The subject of the inscription is a decree of the 
people of Rhodes in reference to the subscription to a 
loan on the occasion of some great emergency, when 
the equipment of a naval expedition was necessary. 

That the city was threatened with some great peril 
may be inferred by such expressions as ray kowSl's 
d.(r<j)aXeias {a, line 6), acoT-qpiav rdi narpiSos (lines 19, 
20), and by the fact that not only Rhodian citizens, 
but their female relations, noXiriSfi, and those who did 
not possess full citizenship, such as bastards, v66oi, 
aliens, wdpoiKoi, and strangers, ^erot, all joined in the 
general contribution (a, lines 9-1 1). This contribution 
was mostly in money, but also in kind, as appears 
from the mention of wine, 6, line 42, <ri>f rS, rifia roD 
oivov : b, line 59, c, lines 28, 32, di/Ti rov oivov. 

A certain number of the subscribers contributed 
atTTjpfffiov, provision money, for the soldiers or sailors 
to be employed. The names of these are entered 
under a separate heading as oi firriyyfX/iivoi ray fiia-Oo- 



KvXov H. 'AvOdyopis ' Av6ay\6\pa W. A- 
l^vrjCTias AvKuiOov koI vtt\\j> t\ov vl- 
ovj AvKaiOov HHH. AafidTpLo[i'\ Aa/ia^r- 60 

pt'joy Kai {nrtp t5>v vlS>v Koi rds [yli/j/at- 
/f]os HH. naiSia flpa^la HH. 'A[p]i(TToii- 
ei/]7yy ? EvTipiSa P. 2'a)a-t((T)Tpa[7-]oy 'Api- 
arayopa Kal inrep rov vio[y] P. oi i- 
nrjyyeX/iei'oi ray /ito-flo^o/sa [y Z]ra- 65 

aayopwos Tifio^evov rov a-WlTrjpecri- 
ov hiavTov HPh. T€ia-apx[oij Hepd- 
OTios Tov a-iTTjpeaiov ei'tFavlTw HP[I-. 
Ap((TT(ov Apia-TOKXeiSa to[0 aiTtjpf- 
aiov fviavTov HP1-. ' AXOac/iijjfTjs 70 

aOiviv^ Kal iiwep tS>v viSiv aiWrjpiaLOV 
hmv Svo HHHhl-. Xpv(rdvTa\j tov SeTvos 
a-iTTjpea-iov i^ajirjvov PA {Hv- 

OocTTpaTos Mi/iyofoi (riT\tjp€<Tiov 

i]ia/i^uov PAAAAhhhhht-f-hl-llll. [6 Stiva 75 

NiKia (TiTqpkaLov i^afi^vov 
Kov NtKdfSpov aiTripia-ioli/ iKKaiSeKa- 
/^Vy]ov HHPAHt-hhl-lll. KXfivoi Kpar 
£/f]ar65co/3oy eKaaros (rtT[j?plcr . tKKaiSfK- 
a/jiJTjvov XPAhh. Z fiivSp^aii' 80 

a-'^iTTjpia-toi' et/iairro[p inrep tS>v vl~ 
S>v f[(X£] vnep rds yvfUnKos 
ovoi aiT^rjpicriov 

<f)opds, d, lines 64, 65. Some promise aiTTipea-iov for six 
months, others for a year, and one, d, lines 70-72, 
for two years. 

The names of those who promise contributions 
are to be submitted to the ekklesia, and the demos 
is to take a vote as to whether the offering is worthy 
of acceptance, a, lines 15-18, 6 S[e] 8dp.os 8ia-)^eipoTovuT(o 
rdv d^iav ray Scopeds, [/c]a2 «f Ka Soktj, Xan^avlflTco. It 
may be inferred from this clause that, though the con- 
tributions were to be voluntary, the demos claimed 
the right of rejecting a contribution in cases where 
it was manifestly much less than the subscriber 
could afford to give. The names of those whose 
contributions are accepted by the demos are to be 
engraved on three marble stelee to be placed, re- 
spectively, in the Theatre, the Asklepieion, and the 
Agora, near the altar of Dionysos. Should the 
demos reject any offers, such cases are to be con- 
sidered, a, line 32, /carax/";/*a[7-t](rai'Ta) Sk ««[<] «? 
[>f«£ TJiffoy K.T.X. If any should delay to send in their 
names in time to be proclaimed in this ekklesia, it 
will be competent for them to enter themselves as 
subscribers at the next assembly of the demos. 

What the special emergency was which called for 
this great patriotic effort at Rhodes can only be 
! matter of conjecture. After the siege by Demetrios 
Poliorketes, B.C. 305, Rhodes seems to have enjoyed 
a time of great prosperity till b.c. 227, when much 
of the city and arsenals was destroyed by the same 
earthquake which overthrew the celebrated Colossus. 
(Polyb. V. 88, 89.) A few years later, B.C. 203, 
through treachery contrived by Philip V, king of 
Macedonia, the naval power of Rhodes was much 
shaken by the burning of thirteen of their arsenals, 

Gg 



114 



RHODES. 



together with the triremes in them. Notwithstanding 
this great disaster the Rhodians, allying themselves 
with Attalos king of Pergamon, declared war against 
Philip, and, after a naval action off Lade, B.C. 202, 
in which they seem to have been defeated, gained a 
decided victory at sea near Chios ; in which engage- 
ment they were assisted by the fleet of Attalos. 

In B.C. 190 the Rhodians sent a fleet of thirty-six 
ships, under the command of Pausistratos,to attack the 
Syrian fleet of Antiochos. Deceived by a stratagem 
of his adversary Polyxenidas, Pausistfatos allowed 
his ships to be entrapped into the port of Samos, 
where they were nearly all captured or destroyed. 

This disaster caused the greatest consternation 
at Rhodes, not only on account of the loss of ships 
and crews, but also because of the number of young 
men of aristocratic families who had joined Pausis- 
tratos in this expedition. Nevertheless the Rhodians 
at once despatched ten ships against the enemy, and 
in a few days ten more (Livy, xxxvii. 11, 12). On 
reviewing the history of Rhodes after B.C. 300 I am 
disposed to think that the public emergency to which 
our inscription relates is the preparation of a naval 
expedition either after the burning of their arsenals 
B.C. 203, or after the loss of their fleet under Pausis- 
tratos B.C. 190. The character of the writing on 
this stele would suit very well for either date. 

It is to be inferred, from the mention of ie^oi, a, 
line 1 1, among the contributors, that citizens of other 
states subscribed to this voluntary loan ; we find, 
however, only one entry in which the fact is noted 
that the contributor was a foreigner {d, lines 55, 56, 
Ava-a .... Kpiwvos BoidoTios). On the other hand, five 
names occur in the list which, as has already been 
noted, anie p. 84, are to be found in the Kalymnian 
subscription list, anie No. ccxcviii. 

These names are Aristolas son of Damagoras, 
c, line 87. 

Nikomachos son of Parmeniskos, d, line 39. 
Theukrates son of Diotimos, c, line 69. 
ApoUonios son of Apollonios, a, line 48. 
Limnaios son of Theuxenidas, c, line y^. 
Are we to suppose that these are the names of 
Rhodian citizens subscribing to a loan in Kalymna, 
or of Kalymnians residing at Rhodes as ndpoiKoi and 
contributing to the common fund raised in defence 
of Rhodes and her allies ? The latter seems to me 
the more probable supposition, as, about the period 
to which I would assign our inscription, all the 
islands of the Archipelago, with the exception of 
Andros, Paros, and Kythnos, formed a league with 
Rhodes. According to Livy (xxxi. 15) this alliance 
was made about B.C. 200 (see Paulsen, Commentatio 
exhibens Rhodi Descriptionem, p. 24). Perhaps the 
names of other ievoi may have been entered in the 
part of the inscription now wanting. 

6, line 69, I have here restored Trp6[^e]uos, but 
cannot cite another example of such a title following 



a name. 



In the fragment of another Rhodian subscription 
list, Ross, Inscript. Ined. iii, p. 20, No. 273, the names 
of foreigners are distinguished from those of Rho- 
dians by the addition of their ethnic. 



a. Line i. eTrl uavyipxov. The vavapyo^ is here 
the eponymous magistrate because the decree re- 
lates to a naval expedition. For other instances of 
the yavapxos as eponymous magistrate see the decrees 
of Abydos and Tenos, C. I. 2160 and 2339 (5. 

On the office of vavap\os at Rhodes see Paulsen, 
op. cit. pp. 56-58. 

Line 2. The mover of the decree, Diokles son of 
Leodamas, heads the list of subscribers with a con- 
tribution of 7000 drachmae {a, line 38), the largest 
amount recorded on the marble, so far as it can be 
now read. The other subscriptions vary in amount 
from five thousand (a, line 53) to fifty drachmee. 
The amount, in the present mutilated state of the 
inscription, exceeds a hundred thousand drachmae, 
and, if we allow for the missing portion, 150,000 
drachmae will not be an extravagant estimate for the 
entire subscription. 

Line 8. tos SrjXoftepos rZv re TroXiTay ; SrjXojiai is a 
Doric verb, the equivalent of ^ovXa/iai, Ahrens, De 
Dial. ii. p. 150; G. Curtius, Studien, iv, p. 383; 
Veitch, Greek Verbs, s.v. 

Line 22. rol ir(oXr]Ta\Jj kySovTm. In the treaty 
between Rhodes and Hierapytna, published in the 
Mnemosyne, 1852, p. 82, the irwXrjTai have similar 
instructions, line 96, 6 Safios dvaOeTco a-TuXay — Tol Sk 
nmXrjTal dwoSoa-Occv KaOd Ka 6 dp^ireKTOii/ avyypd'^r]^ ottcos 

kpyaa-Ofj k.t.X. The ten TTcoXrjTai at Athens were a 
board of the same kind. 

Line 23. epyd^aa-Oai for kpyda-aaOai ; see Ahrens, 
De Dial, ii, p. 89, and for other instances in Doric 
inscriptions, Meister in G. Curtius, Studien, iv, p. 427. 

b, line 21. /it(rflo[i/] dv kviavTov. The marble is 
unfortunately broken away at the place where the 
amount of this jiktBos would have been given. On 
this point see d, lines 65-83. 

d, line 29. irpoardTaL tol aiiv X^oi^pivm. These, it 
may be presumed, were a board of Trpoa-Tdrai whose 
function was to take care of strangers and of those 
who had no civic rights. The Kalymnian decrees of 
proxenia are always, as we have seen, yvd>fia irpo- 
(TTardv. 

In the epigram on the base of a statue of Hermes, 
found by me at Knidos, the names of fifteen rrpo- 
a-Tarai are given (see my History of Discoveries, ii. 
p. 749, No. 31). These must also have been a board. 
Compare another Knidian inscription, No. 36 ibid., in 
which, as in the Kalymnian decrees, yvoi>/j.a Trpoa-raTdv 
stands in the heading; C. I. 4157, we have crw-irpo- 
c^dTai, if this restoration be correct. 

c. This face of the stone from line i to line 84 
was copied by Ross when the inscription was still in 
the mosque. The portions of the text which his 
transcript supplies, and which are now wanting, are 
distinguished by curved brackets. 

d, line 63, The stone reads inilTPATOI, but 
the third 2" may have been omitted through in- 
advertence. 

d, line 65. ol ejrrjyyeXfj.ifOi ray fiicrdocpopds. In 3, 
line 2 1 anle, has already been noticed the pna-Oos dv' 
kviavTov, the amount of which is unluckily broken 
away. In the entries which follow we have certain 
amounts of anr^pka-iov, or allowance for provisions. 



RHODES. 



115 



during periods ranging from two years to six 
months. 

The entries relating to this allowance are as fol- 
lows : — 

d, lines 66-68. <Tm]pi(jiov\ . . 

r F 151 drachmae, 

for one year ) 

Line 72. For two years 302 drachmae. 

Line 75. For six months 99 drachmae, 4 obols. 

Lines 11, 78. o-tTtjpiaiov for \ 

an unknown number > 265 drachmae, 3 obols. 
of months * 

Lines 78—80. KXeTvos, Kpar . . . [' E/c]aT65<opof caco- 
<rToi crn^-qpea-ioi' fi]i]vov XPAI-I-. 

Here the contribution amounts to 1062 drachmae. 

It is evident, from the word fKuaros line 79, that 
this large amount was made up of the contributions 
of several persons. If we add to the names Kleinos, 
Hekatodoros, and Krat . . . one more name, for 
which we may calculate that there would have been 
room on the part of the stone now wanting, and sup- 
pose that the four contributed 265 drachmae, 3 obols 
each, the amount of the preceding entry, their joint 
subscription makes up the sum required, viz. 1062 
drachmae. 

If we assume that in each of the above entries the 
a-iTrjpicnoy represents the daily ration-money for one 
soldier, or, as is more probable, for one sailor, for a 
definite period, the enquiry then presents itself, how 
much may this allowance be calculated at per diem ? 
If for six months such daily allowance amounted to 
99 drachmae, 4 obols, one month's allowance may be 
reckoned at 16 dr., 3I- ob., which would give about 
3-ro ob. per diem. Comparing this with the amount 
of daily pay given by the Athenians and others in 
the latter part of the fifth century B.C., we find that 
at the beginning of the Peloponnesian War and in the 
Sicilian expedition the Athenians paid their sailors 
a drachma a day, but more usually only three obols. 
Tissaphernes, after promising the Spartan sailors an 
Attic drachma a day, reduced their pay after the first 
month to three obols, to which he afterwards added 
a trifle amounting, according to Bockh's calculation 
(Staatshaushaltung, 2nd ed. i. p. 383), to •§- of an obol. 
Cyrus the Younger gave his Spartan sailors four obols 
a day, which was one obol more than the Athenians 
gave at that time (see Xenoph. Hellen. i, 5, §§ 3,4). 

If we had only to deal with the entry, line 75, 
which tells us that the airrjpea-iov for six months cost 
99 drachmae, 4 obols, the calculation of the daily 
allowance would present no difficulty; but this entry 
seems at first sight irreconcileable with the entries 
lines 66-68, which state that the a-iTTjpea-iou for one 
year amounted to 1 5 1 drachmae, while again that for 
two years, line 72, amounted to 302 drachmae. If 
we suppose that the tviavTos is the equivalent of 
twelve months, the yearly amount of aiTrjpfanov ought 
to be not 151 but 199 drachmae, 2 obols. As all 
these numerals are perfectly distinct on the marble, 
the only way of explaining this difficulty is to assume 
that the three winter months were not reckoned as 



available for carrying on naval warfare ; see Bockh, 
o/>. cit. p. 397. 

If the a-irrjpicrioi' for six months cost 99 drachmae, 
4 obols, that for three months would have cost 
49 dr., 5 ob. The sum of these two amounts would 
thus be 149 dr., 3 ob., which approximates very 
nearly to the 151 drachmae entered in our inscription 
as the cost of the a-iTrjpio-iov for the hiavros. 

Assuming this hypothesis as the basis of further 
calculations we have now to deal with the entry of 
265 dr., 3 ob., line 78. If we calculate the amount 
of (TiTrjpia-iou for one month as 16 dr., 34- ob., and 
divide 265 dr., 3 ob. by this sum, we obtain 16 as the 
quotient representing the number of months for 
which the sum so divided is entered. It follows 
that in lines yy, 78 we must read a-iTrjpea-idiu (KKaiStKu- 
/x^v\ov, but in lines 79, 80, an^Tipia: iKKaiSeKafiyjuov, as 
without this abbreviation there would not have been 
room on the marble for the entry. 

There remain two questions ; in what money the 
drachma is to be calculated in these entries, and 
whether the aiTTjpia-ioy included the jj.ia-66s, or daily 
pay. 

That the drachma in these entries was calculated 
on the Rhodian standard might have been assumed 
a priori, even if we had not the evidence of the 
treaty between Rhodes and Hierapytna already 
referred to, which is published in the Mnemosyne, 
1852, p. 79. In this defensive alliance the Rhodians 
undertake to pay nine Rhodian obols (a drachma 
and a half) to such Hierapytnian hoplites as may 
serve in Rhodes from the day that they land in that 
island. 

The date of that treaty is probably not earlier than 
B.C. 200, when the Rhodian drachma had fallen much 
below the Attic standard, and when its value in re- 
lation to that standard may be calculated as 3 to 4. 

If, as seems probable, the drachma in our inscrip- 
tion was of the same low standard, the amount of 
a-iTijpea-iov per diem, ^-^ obols, seems small, if we 
suppose that it included the nia-dos, which Bockh, /oc. 
cit. assumes to have been generally the case, and a 
rate of pay more in proportion to the 9 obols to be 
paid to the Hierapytnian hoplites might have been 
expected. But these 9 obols may have included the 
allowance for an attendant on each soldier, as in the 
instances given by Bockh, op. cit. p. 378. 

It might be inferred from the mention of /iia-Oof 
{ante 6, line 2 1 ) that it was provided for separately 
in this public subscription, and not included in the 
(nTTjpfcnoy. 

On the other hand, the entries which we are now 
considering are preceded by the words ol inr]yy(\fi(yot. 
riy fita-6o(popdi, which must be taken as the general 
heading of all these entries. 

If the numerals giving the amount of the fiiaObs 
av hiavrhv, b, line 21, had not unfortunately been 
broken away, we might have solved the question 
whether the aiTtjpfaiov did or did not include the pay. 
The digamma occurs a, lines 41, 43 ; S, line 75. 



ii6 RHODES. 



CCOXLIV. 

On a slab of blue marble, the inscribed face of which has been cut away on each side to the depth of more than an inch. In 
the sinking on the right thus formed are three square crampholes, and in the left sinking two similar ones. Two crosses 
are incised on the back, of which the original surface has been sawn off. On the edge of the stone on either side is a 
moulding which appears to be Christian. The stone has evidently been reworked so as to be fitted into some later building. 
It was probably extracted from the ruins of the Church of St. John at Rhodes at the time of the explosion in 1856 (see 
ante No. cccxliu). It was presented to the Museum in 1879 by H. R. H. the Prince of Wales, who obtained it at Rhodes 
during his visit to that island in 1861. Height, on right side, 2 ft. 8 in., on left side, i ft. 9 in.; breadth, i ft. ii|in. 

a, b. c. d. 

N o 

PETAT 
ONYXIOY 
-OMBPOTOXMEAAN 
5 tpAINIAAXMOinNI 

cY + IKAHXAYXIXTPATS 
AAoiBPriNYtlKAEYXXIB 
AAMOXAPIXrOPriA 
04)AAArHTOXKAIXIMBPOTOY 
10 KHATAnXAPTOXTIMAXAPXOY 

OYKZldAIONYXlOXAPTEMIAnPOY 
XIA5KK(J)AAOPAXYMHAHXAYXIXTPAt5 
KEEPMOKPATHXnPAZinNOXKl^ 
NIKONTOX KAKAAmnAXATOPAXKAAAIXTP 
IS XIOY KrKAA4)APNAKHXKAAAIXTPAT5 

aHXayxixtpat f kaAkaeykpathxteimoaikoy 

I ilOKPATIAEXTIOAriP AA AAMAFOPAXAIONYXIOY P° 

VPXOXEAANIKOY B IOYAIOX(})AINIAAXMOinNI AEY 

tlKAHXBKASnOXIAnNl5 T (t)AAArAnXAPTOXNEIK AXI MAX5 

ao lOX 4)AINIAAXM0inNIAEY A <})AAIEPOKAEYXYI0YMEIKYAAi6a 

KAAYtlKAHXFKA^POXIAnN'^ E rOPTOXAIONYXlOY KAPJAl 

r^ (JjaAmoipatenhxtimoaikoy k lAxnPYOAroPA b5 

f ATEAOXOXAPIXTEnX ^ Z (})AAYI AAPTEl lEI XI A 

Aa IOYAIOX<t)AINIAAXMOinNiAEY H 4)AAIEP0KAEYXMEl KYAA|5kAA 

25 B <})IAIXKOXAAEZANAPOY O c})AAXATYPAIEPOKAEYXKaS<J)AN 

EYXr PYOHNBAMN' I (j>AAAPTEMIXIA 

A PYOnNArHTOYAMNlI lA 4)AAYI AAPTEMEIXI A 

E (JJAAAPIXTOTENHXPAPOY IB AAMOXAPIX TOPriA - 

Y K XnMENHXNOMHNOX IT KaAanTIPATPOXAPA . ONTpi 

30 X Z c}>AAArAnXAPTOXcj)IAOKPATOY lA CJJAAYI AAPTEMEIXI A 

LNl5 H YilKAHXAinNOXKAS IE 4>AAYI0XI EPOKAHX BAA 

O KAAlPPOAYTOXPYOriNOX IK ct)AAAPlXTEIAA . APIXTIPP5 

AOY I IOYAIOX(t)AINIAAXMOiriNIAEYX IZ (jjAAYIAAPTE . . . . lA 

lA PYOnNATHTOY AMN' IH APHXAPXCX EYKAEYX c|)ATa 

35 TOY IB (|)AAYIOXEY<})PANflP lO TEI MliN AZTIMOPOAEIiX (})ATa KE AHi 

iX ir KAAYAIOXCJJANOXTPATOX K |54>AINI AAXMOiriNI AEYX KA API 

EYXIA TAIOX XABIAIOX A^ K A l5<j)AINI AAXMOIfiN I AEYX KF Af 

IE cJ^aAmOIPAPENHXTIMOAIKOY kg MENANAPOXAnXIOEOYTAn f APT 

IK lOYAIOXANTIPATPOXAPTEMIAO KH APHXI AAMOXAIOAOTOY /* ©AK 

40 IZ lOYAIOXMOlPAFENHXZHNnNo KZ CJ)AAMOIPArENHXTIMOAIKOY B KAA. 

at6 IH 'i^ *Amhnoaotoxapato(J)AneY kk (j^aAmeaanoioxeyanapS PArOP 

ATOY 10 <p.xAAPOAAjnNIOXEPMOKPAT KE CJ)AAaIONYXIOXBOIMI API XTOMEN AEYKP 

NOX K AAMOXAPIXrOPPIA KA Al BOYXKI AlOX AHMHTPlOXEPM EPOP 

KA (t>AAAPlXTIAAXAPIXTIPPOY KP K aAmNAXAP0PAXKAAAIXTPAT5 KKAA 

46 ""ATOY Ko (})AAyiaptemixiakaaaikpat'" ffr kaAmnaxapopax . AAAI xtpat5 ZAPA 

EYX KH IOYAIOXct)AINIAAXMOinNIAEY^ f 4>aAM0IPAPENHXTIM0AIK0Y HIOY 

DAPH? KZ IEP04)ONAnXI0E0Y TAnOX Ia1 A ({)l Al XKOXAAEZAN APOY 0({) 

KK KAAYtlKAHXEKA^POXIAHNlOY B KPATI AAXN AYXI KOY A IPI 



RHODES. 



ir 



KEIOYAIOXCJJAINIAAXMOinNIAEY 
SO YA KAOYHPANIANIKAXXAKAEYKPA 

KrKAAMNAXArOPAXKAAAIXTPA? 
KAA f lAXnNPYOArOPA 
lOY IaKAAYAIAAAMO . . . KPATIAEY^ 
YX B EYKPATHXANTIAEONTOXAX 

65 r cJ)aAmeaanoioxeyanap5 

~0Y A KAAYtlKAHXFKA^POX 

E KAA(j)IAOKPATHXArAO PATOY 
K OYHPANIANIKAXXAKAEYKPAT 
Z (|)AAYIOYAPAKONTOXAnOA lOY 
60 OlOn H AHMHTPlOYKAXXinTAKAAP° 

fiNiS G kaAantipatpoxapakontox 

APO I APIXTIPPOX F § 

OY I . AlONYXIOXlKASOEnNOX 



r kaAantipatpoxapakontox 

A NOMriNMENEKPATEY X 
E AAMATOPAXAIONYXIOY P 
K idMOIPArENHXZHNnNOX K^ 
Z (J)AAYtlKAHXAYXIXTPATOY 
H l6cj)AINIAAXM0inNIAEYX 
G AAMATOPAXAIONYXIOY P° 
I (J)AAArHTOX . aiximbpotS 
lA <t)AAAAEZANAPOXNOMnNOX 
IB AAMATOPAXAIONYXIOY P° v 
ir AlONYXiOBKAG fiNOX K 
lA XliMENHXNOMflNOXBPAXI 
IC M0XXinNOi:nN0XKA§AXX5 
IK KAAKAEYKPATHXTIMQA'KOY 

iz ... r 



lA KAE 
IB ({}IAI 
ir c|)AA 
lA APIX 
IC IOY 
IK KAA> 
IZ (t)AA 
IH KaA^ 
IG KAAY^ 
K AION^ 
KA TITOX 
KG AION 
KH KAAY 
KZ XfiX 
KK KPAT 
KE APY 



a. 



b. 



ov 



atSov 



NO 



IKOUTOS 



aiov 



f 




B 


. . evs 


^ r 




A 




E 


. . . V 


K 


i 


Z 


. vtoi 


' H 




G 


Xov 1 




lA 


TOV 


IB 


vs 


ir 


(Vi 


lA 




IE 




IK 




IZ 


drov 


IH 


drov 


IG 


yos 


K 



<t>\av. ' Y-ylnKlXris AvcrtcrTpdTo(v) 
OKparia EcrTioSccpov 
a\pxos ' EXaviKov 
KXai. ' Y\^iK\fis "§ Ka6' V. riocTiSmvtov 
'/ovXjioy 'PaivCKas Moicoi/iSevs 
KXav. ' Yy^iKXf)s B Ka6' v. flocriSmviov 
'PXav. Moipayivrjs TifjioSiKOV 
AyiXoyos ApiaTicos 
'lovXios 'PaiviXas MoiatviSevs 
<t>iXi(rKos ' AXi^dvSpov 
flvOwv "§ 'Afiv . 
PvOcov 'AyrJTov 'Afiv . . 
4>Xav. ' A pia-Toyivrjs fldnov 
Zmfiiyqv NofKoyos 
0Xav. ' AyXd>-)(^apTos 'PiXoKpdrov 
' YylriKXrjs A iwvos Ka9' i>, 
KXav. ' ImroXvTOS nvdcovos 
'tovXios 'PaiuiXai MoKOpiSfVS 
flvBcov AyrJTOV 'Afii/ . 
^Xavios Ev<j)pdi'a>p 
KXavSios 4>av6(TTpaTOi 
rd'ios Za^tSios Aa. 
'PXav. Moipayewrii TifioSiKov 
lovXios AvTiTTarpos AprffiiSa. 
lovXioi MoipayifTji ZrjvQiyos 
0[X]av. MT]y6SoToi ' ApaTo<pdviv{i) 
4>Xav, ' AnoXXwuios ' EpfxoKpaT. 
AafjL6^apis Hopyia 



c, d. 

------ Ai^ovvaiov 

- - - - ojiPpoTOi MeXav\6iov 

- - - 'tovXios 'Paii/iXas Moi<ofi[S(vs 5 

<t>Xav. ' Yf^iKXrjs Avcrca-rpdrov 
«]Xai5. ei^pcov 'YylfLKX(vs Ii^ 
Aajioyapis fopyia 
K]g 0Xav. "AyrjTOS KXiaifi^porov 
KH 'AyXd>-)(^a.pTos Tifia(Tdp)^ov lO 

K Z lov. Aiovvcrios AprfiiiSwpov 
KK *PXav. OpaavfJLrjSrjf Avcncrrpdrov 
KE ' EpfiOKpdTTjs ripa^iaivos Kpv. 
KA KXav. Myaaayopas KaXXia-Tp^drov 
Kf KXav. <t>apvdKrj^ KaXXiarpdrov 15 

T KXav. KXivKpar-qs TeifioSiKov 
A A Aapayopas Aiovvaiov 'Po. 
B 'lovXios 'PaifiXai Moi(oviSfv[s 
r 0Xav. AyXwyapros NeiKa(rifjid\ov 
A 4>Xav. 'lepoKXfvs vlov MeiKvXaiov (K)X. ao 

E rSpyos Aiovva-iov Kapira. 
K ' ld<T<o[y) flvdayopa Bov. 
Z *PXavia ApTf/iei(Tia 
H 'PXav. 'lepoKXevs MetKvXatov KXa. 
Q <PXav. Zarvpa 'lepoKXivs Kad' i. 'Pav. 35 

I 0X011. 'AprefiKTia 
I A 'PXavia ' A pre/jLeia-ia 
IB Aanoyapis Fopyia ^ 

ir KXav, 'Ai'TinaTpoi ApdlKJoi'Tols) pq 
I A *t>Xavia 'ApTf/jKiaia 30 

IE 0Xawoy 'IfpoKXfjs BXa. 
IK 0Xau. ' A pia-reiSa^s] ' A piartirrrov 
IZ 0Xai'£'a ' A pTi^iiiicr\(a 

IH Ayri(7apyoi EvKXed 0aya d. 

I G Tiip.5>va^ TifioTroXfws <t>ayd K E 35 

K lov. 'PatviXas MoimviSevs KA 'Aye 

KA lov. 'PatviXas MoiwviSevi Kf 'Ay 

KG MivavSpos AaxriBiov TX<e. T 'Apr 

KH Ay-qaiSafjiOi AioSorov 'Ap-^} QA K 

KZ 0Xai5. Moipayfvrji TipoSiKov B KXa 40 

KK 0Xav. MfXdydiof EvdvSpov T ' Ayop 

KE 0Xav. Aiovvaio^ B Ol/ii.? 'ApiaTO/jLtv, A EvKp 
KA Ai. Bova-KiSioi Aijfirjrpios ' Epp.. E /"o/j 

Hh 



ii8 



RHODES. 



KA <P\av. 'Apia-riSas ' A piarTiirnov 
pdrov KG 'f>Xav. 'ApTf/ita-la KaXXiKpdrefvi) 
evs KH 'lovXtos 'Paiytkas MoKoviSevs 
'AyqTo(v) KZ 'lepo<f>a>v AaxriOeov TXmos 

KK KXav. ' Y\lnKXfjs 1 Kad' v. noa-iSmviov 
KE 'lovXios 'PaivCXas MouoviSevs 
va KA Ovr^pavta NiKcicrcra KXevKpa. 

Kf KXav. Muacrayopas KaXXia-rpa.To{y) 
KXapo. T 'Ida-cov flvOayopa 

(ov A A KXavSta Aapo , , . KpariSevs? 
fV9 B EvKpdrrjs ' AvTiXeovTos A<t. 
r 'PXav. MiXdfOios EvduSpov 
ov A KXav. ' Y'^ikXtjs ^ KaO' v. noa-^iSaJviov 
E KXav. 'PiXoKpaTrjs 'AyaO . . pdrov 
K Oirjpavca NiKdcrcra KXevKpar. 
Z 'PXaviov ApdKovTos 'AnoX . iov 
QioTTOV H AiJurjTpiov Ka<Ta-id)Ta KXapo, 
Xmviov O KXav. 'AvriirdTpos ApaKovros 
KX^apo. I ' A pia-mriroi B 1§ 

ov I [a] Aiovvcrios ^ Kad' i. Bicovos 



Kr KXav. Mvaarayopas KaXXicrrpdrov K KXa 

rrf* KXav. Mvaaayopas \^K^aXXiaT pdrov Z Ay\ 45 

■f 0Xav. Moipayevrjs TipoSiKov H 'Iov 

RA fPiXia-Kos 'AXe^dySpov _ Q <P 

B KpaTiSas Nava-iKov A^ \ Pi? 

r KXav. 'AvTiiraTpos ApaKovTOS I A KXe 

A Noacov MeyeKpdrevs IB 0t\ 50 

o 
E Aapayopas Aiovvaiov P IT 0Xa 

K 'Iov. MoipayivTjS Zrjvaivos KXa. I A 'A pi 

Z *PXav. 'YyjfLKX^s Ava-iarpaTov IE 'Iov 

H '/oi!. <PaiviXa5 MoicoviSevs IK KaX . . 

Aafiayopas Aiovvcriov P° IZ 'PXav . , 55 
I 0Xai;. ".^yTjTOS [/C]X£<r£/x/3/3oroi; IH /CAai/ 

I A 0Xai;. 'AXi^avSpos Nopmyos lO KXavS 

1 B 4 apayopas A lovvcriov P ° K 4 f oi'i; 
ir /itow(rio(y) "§ Ka6' ii. [9e]cB»/oy /fpu. KA Titos 

I A Zwpeprjs Nopcoyos Bpacri. KO ^toj/ 60 

IE /Moff^^woj/ 0[€]cBj'os' KaQ' V. "Acraov KH KXav 

IK KXav. KXfVKpdrrjS TipoSiKov KZ ^'coo- 

IZ ----- - KK /C/oar 

KE Anv 



This inscription contains part of a calendar, fjpepo- 
X&yiov, in which each day of a succession of months 
is entered, according to the usual arrangement, in 
decades. In the first two decades the numerals 
proceed in regular order from A to I and from I A to 
K ; in the last decade, after KA the order of the 
numerals is reversed, KT being the 28th day of the 
month and KG the 22nd. Of the months still pre- 
served on the stone, either wholly or in part, two 
consist of 30 and three of 29 days. 

The last day of each month is indicated by the 
monogram f , = rpiaKds. The months of 30 days 
are distinguished by the monogram m, = vpoTpiaKds, 
(see Ideler, Handbuch d. Chronologie, i, p. 415, 
C. I. 1562) intervening between KT the 28th and f 
the 30th day. In the Athenian calendar the months 
of 30 days, called irXTjpets, ' full months,' alternated 
with the months of 29 days, koTXoi, ' hollow months,' 
except in the case of the 3rd and 4th months, Boe- 
dromion and Pyanepsion, both of which were full 
months. Whether in our inscription the same order 
of succession of full and hollow months prevailed 
cannot be ascertained, because we do not know what 
number of months are missing. 

On the left of the numeral A, which indicates the 
first day of the month, is a monogram which we may 
assume to contain the name of the month. The 
names of the twelve Rhodian months being known 
to us, we may decipher these monograms thus : 
A line 53, col. d, stands for 'A prapinos. 
A line 17, col. c, stands for ' YaKivOios. 
Kl line 47, col. c, stands for fldvapos. 
© or [51 line 39, col. d, may be Pdvapos Sevrepos, 
but the monogram is very indistinct. 

There remains one more monogram, line 24, col. 6, 
which I have failed to decipher satisfactorily, but it 
may possibly be A, representing 'Aypidvios. The 
order of the Rhodian months, which is not known to 
us at present, would probably have been ascertained 
approximately, if we had not unfortunately lost the 
remainder of this inscription. 



The next point to be considered is, with what 
object was the Rhodian calendar engraved on the 
marble ? Opposite to each day in each month is 
entered a name. These names are all masculine, 
except in four or five cases, where female names 
occur (see lines 45, 50, 53, 58, col. d ; lines 23, 26, 2y, 
30, 33, col. c). The persons so entered are, it is to 
be presumed, for the most part Rhodian citizens ; 
though it is only in a few cases that the deme seems 
to be indicated. Only two can be certainly recog- 
nised as foreigners by the addition of the ethnic or 
gentile adjective written in full after their names. 
After the names Hierophon and Menander, sons of 
Dositheos (lines 47, col. 6, 38, col. c) we find the word 
TXmos, a Tloan. In line 60, col. d, Arjprjrpiov Kaa-a-icora 
must indicate the neighbouring island of Kassos as 
the place of which Demetrios was a native. In other 
cases the name or patronymic is followed by a mono- 
gram which probably represents a Rhodian deme or 
dependency in the Persea or adjacent islands. 

The number of persons, male and female, entered 
in the portion of the calendar which is preserved, 
amounts to 63, of whom nearly half have a Roman 
praenomen. 

From the predominance of Flavins among these 
praenomina it may be inferred that the inscription is 
not earlier than the reign of Vespasian. 

Throughout these entries the name is entered in 
the nominative, followed as usual by the patronymic 
in the genitive, except in the following instances : — 
'PXaviov ApdKoyTOSj col. 6, line 59, ArjprjTpiov Kaaaiwra, 
col. b, line 60, 'PXav. 'lepoKXevs vlov MeiKvXaiov, lines 
20, 24, col. c. In the case of seventeen persons the 
same name recurs in more than one entry. The name 
of Julius Phainilas son of Moionides is entered ten 
times (see lines 20, 24, 33, 46, 49, col. d : lines 5, 
18, 36, 37, 54, col. c). Flavia Artemisia occurs six 
times: see line 45, col. 6: lines 23, 26, 27, 30, 33, 
col. c. Damagoras son of Dionysios (col. c, lines 17, 
51, 55, 58), Claudius Mnasagoras son of Kallistratos 
(col. 6, line 51 : col. c, lines 14, 44, 45), and Flavins 



RHODES. 



119 



Moiragenes son of Timodikos (col. b, lines 22, 38 : 
col. c, lines 40, 46), appear each four times. 

Ka&' v., line 20 6 and elsewhere, stands for KaO' 
iioOeaiav. See C. I. 2655. 

For what purpose are all these names associated 
with a calendar, and what are we to infer from the 
repeated entry of the same name ? It is not likely 
that such a calendar would have been recorded on 
marble for any other than a religious purpose ; and if 
we assume this, the persons whose names are in- 
scribed must have been members of some religious 
association, epayos or diaa-os, who had special daily 
duties to perform in rotation : this hypothesis would 
explain the recurrence of the same name in some 
cases, the introduction of female names, and those of 
persons from foreign cities, for, as we know, such 
religious associations were not restricted to those 
who were citizens in the state where the Oiaa-os or 
(papos was established : (see Foucart, Associations 
religieuses chez les Grecs, p. 6). In Rhodes and 
on the neighbouring coasts there were no less than 
nineteen of such religious societies (see Wescher in 
Rev. Archeol. N. S. x, p. 473 ; Journal of Hellenic 
Studies, ii, p. 357). 

One of the most important of these Rhodian 
societies, the epavos of Haliadai and Haliastai, had a 
public assembly, awoSos, which met periodically, and 
which must have been composed of all the members, 
TO irXrjOos, of the epavos (see C. I. 2525, B d). If we 
suppose that, when our inscription was complete, the 
list of names represented the irXfjOos of such an epavos, 
there remains the question. What were the religious 
rites or other functions the daily performance of 
which was thus recorded on the marble ? This 
question could only be solved by the discovery of 
other inscribed calendars of the same character. So 
far as I know, the only inscriptions which can be 
cited, as in any way illustrating the one now under 
consideration, are the lists of Kyzikene prytanes, C. I. 
3661, 3662, 3663, 3664. These lists record the names 
of certain persons who officiated as prytanes or as sa- 
crificers, knpvTdvivcrav Kal kKaXXiavav, during a succes- 
sion of months. The names, however, in these lists 
are simply entered in succession under each month, 
not severally arranged, as in our inscription, opposite 
the successive days of the month ; but there seems 
to be no doubt that those who were prytanes at 
Kyzikos in one month officiated as sacrificers, UaX- 
Xiaaav, in the next month, and the number of such 
functionaries allotted to each month appears to have 
been 50 (see C. I. ii, pp. 920, 921). 

It may be that the word iiri/i^vios was applied to 
all such functionaries, whether they officiated daily 
during a month or only on certain appointed days in 
the month (see C. I. 2448, ii, line 35; iv, lines 15, 
31-35; V, lines 12, 27, 35; vi, lines 15, 20, 29, 31 ; 
vii, lines 10, 24; C. I. 3137, line 30; 3595, line i; 
3641 d, line 5, and Bockh ad loc. ii, p. 1133; Ross, 
Inscript. Ined. ii, No. 175, lines 9, 17 ; iii, No. 311 d, 



line 28 ; Bullet, de Corr. Hell^n. vi, p. 266, for 
examples of this word, which Hesychios s. v. inter- 
prets as the equivalent of UpoTroios). If we had the 
entire stone of which our inscription is a part, we 
should know whether it contained similar lists for 
the entire year, or only for certain months. There 
are on the stone the remains of four columns of 
inscription, a, b, c, d. If we assume that these 
columns were of equal length, they must have con- 
tained at least eight months, as b and c each com- 
prise one entire month and part of two others, and 
in d are parts of two months. It is quite possible 
that the stone may have originally contained twelve 
months, and some of them may have been engraved 
on the back, of which, as has been noted in the head- 
ing, the surface has been sawn, probably, when the 
stone was adapted to a Christian building, so that its 
original thickness is unknown. 

I have already suggested that the monograms 
and abbreviated words which follow the names may 
indicate demes in Rhodes or elsewhere. The bad 
state of the stone makes the deciphering of these 
very difficult. Thus XI B, c, line 7, if the last letter, 
which is rather indistinct, is not E, may be Ii^vOiof, 
the name of a deme or gens which occurs in a 
Rhodian list of priests of Apollo Erethimios (Ross, 
Inscr. Ined. iii. No. 277, line 24). kI^, c, lines 13, 59, 
may be Kpvacrarevs. Kryassos was a town in the 
Karian Peraea (C. I. 2552). 

P°, c, lines 17, 51, 55, 58, may be 'Po8loitoXitt)s. 
Rhodiopolis was a Rhodian dependency in Lykia 
(Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii. No. 278). 

KAPP^, c, line 21, may be KapwaOioiroXiTtji (see C I. 
2538, 2539. Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii. No. 265). 

KAA, c, line 24, and KA, ibid, lines 20, 52, may 
represent KXda-ios, which we find in the list of S-qnorai 
given in an inscription from Lindos./t*^^ No. ccclvii ; 
Rev. Arch6ol. N. S. xv, p. 210. In like manner b5 
c, line 22, may stand for BovXiSa^, BPAXI, c, line 60, 
for Bpda-ios, and AA, b, 37, for AaSapfiios, all of which 
we find in the same Lindian inscription. 

There remain unidentified BAA, c, line 31, AMN or 
AMNI, b, hnes 26, 27, 34, AX, c, 48, ^, b, line 62, ^ c, 
line 29, (})ATa, c, lines 34, 35, KAAPo, b, 60, EPM, 
c, line 43, and the monogram, c, line 39, which may 
stand for 'y^px- 

The monogram "5 = rb ^. which constantly occurs 
after the name, indicates, as usual, that the son bore 
the same name as his father (see C. I. ii, p. 926; 
Franz, Elem. Epigr. Gr. p. 374 ; and anie cccxxxvii). 

It has been already noted that in four instances 
only the names entered in our inscription are in the 
genitive case. I am quite unable to explain this 
change of case, unless it is meant to indicate that the 
persons to whom it applies exercised some presi- 
dency or other office which distinguished them from 
the rest. In that case we must understand itparev- 
oyroi, -rrpvravfvovTos, or some Other verb, but this ex- 
planation does not seem a satisfactory one. 



I20 



RHODES. 



CCCXLV. 

On the front of a block of blue marble which has been hollowed so as to form a cistern. Height, iij in.; breadth, i ft. 6 J in.; 
thickness, i ft. lo in. Published by Foucart in Rev. Arch^ol. N. S. xiii, p. 153, who states that it was found at Rhodes in 
a garden above the ruins of the Stadion. 

EYAAKIAAZAPIZTunOXOY 
KATAYO0EZIANAEAINEA 
EnAINEeEIZKAIZTE((>ANn0EIZ 
YPOTO. . AMOYTOYAINAOnOAITAN 
S XPY.. 1IZTE<t)ANninPAT0Z 

KAIYP . -AZnATPAZTAZAPYITAN 

XPY> :niZTEct)ANni geoiz 
e iiepehzantiaoxoy 

EvaXKiSas ' A pia-To\6\ov 

Kara voOecriay Se Aivia 
eTTaivfOels Kal are^ai'coOeli 
ino To[y Sldfiov tov AlvSottoKitcLv 

Kal iiTT^o] ras vaTpas ras Apvirav 
yj)V(Xi<o <TT€.(pdv<p, ©foFy. 

km Uptms ' AvTik6-)(ov. 



This inscription commemorates Eualkidas son of 
Aristolochos, son by adoption of Aineas, who re- 
ceived the honour of an itraivos and a gold crown 
from the deme of Lindopolitse, and also a gold 
crown from the irdTpa of Druitae. The stone which 
bears the inscription was, it may be presumed, the 
pedestal of a statue of Eualkidas (see Ross, Archaol. 
Aufsatze, ii, p. 593). 

An inscription from Lindos, published by Ross, 
Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 594, records the dedication 
of a statue to Aristolochos, son of Aristodoros, priest 
of Athene Lindia and Zeus Polieus. It is possible, 
as Foucart suggests, that the Aristolochos of our 
inscription is the same person. 

The word AivSoiroKiTai, line 4, is translated by 
Foucart 'les habitans de Lindos.' He regards it 
as a term applied to those persons who, being 
citizens of Lindos, resided there, while the word 
AivSioi was applied to the same citizens whether 
resident at Lindos or elsewhere. He explains in 
the same way KapnaBioiroXiTai. See Rev. Archeol. 
N. S. xiii, p. 153, xiv, p. 329; Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii, 
p. 16. I should be rather inclined to consider Aiv- 
SoTToXTrai. as a deme perhaps originally composed of 
Lindian citizens. In a list of the priests of Apollo 
Erethimios in another Rhodian inscription (Ross, 
Inscr. Ined. iii, p. 30) we find, among other ethnics, 
NeonoXiras and floXtras, which both probably represent 
Rhodian demes. See Ross, Hellenika, p. 117. 



Line 6. i>no ras Trdrpas ray Apvirdv. Foucart 
translates this 'sa patrie la ville des ApvTrai.' But 
wdrpa here clearly bears the same sense as in the 
Kamiros inscription, No. ccclii, pos^, which contains 
a list of ndrpai entered apparently as the subdivisions 
of phratriae. These ndrpai will be noticed more fully 
under No. ccclii, post. I cannot therefore follow 
Ross, Hellenika, p. 117, and Foucart here and 
in Rev. Archaol. N. S. xv, p. 212, in classing the 
Apvtrat among the Rhodian demes. Apvtras and 
Apviris occur as Rhodian ethnics, Ross, Hellenika, 
p. 102, Nos. 24, 25. These names are probably 
formed from Apvs, which we find in a Prienian in- 
scription, C. I. 2905 A, as the name of a place in 
Ionia. Compare ibid. ApvoDa-a-a. 

Line 5. irpdros. Foucart infers from this word 
that our inscription is of an earlier date than any 
of those which confer honours on Lindian citizens, 
because he considers AwSoTroXirai to mean Lindians 
resident in their native city. But if AivSowoXittis is 
the ethnic of a deme, that deme need not necessarily 
have been in Lindian territory at all ; irpdros would 
thus only mean that such honours had never been 
before conferred by the deme of Lindopolitae. For 
the use of npdTos in this sense see the Lindian in- 
scription C. I. 2527, Ross, Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 614, 
and an lasian inscription C. I. 2682. The name of 
Antilochos, the eponymous priest of Helios here, is 
not otherwise known according to Foucart. 



RHODES. 



121 



CCCXLVI. 

On a block of blue marble which, when found, was built into the wall of a field to the south-west of St. Stephen's Hill, near 
Rhodes. Height, i ft. i^ in, ; breadth, i ft. i in. ; thickness, i ft. 6 J in. There has been a joint on the top of the stone. 
The left side is broken away after line 3; the right side is perfect. Published, Ross, Hellenika, Pt. 11, p. 113, No. 46; Keil 
in Philologus, Suppl. ii, 1863, p. 612; Liiders, Dionys. KUnstler, p. 168, No. 61. 



AZTANTHNTAZPO 
A .OZAOYAflNEYAl 
ENOZrPAMMATEYZ 
MOZIOZIEPAT.. Z 
ilOZATABYPlOY 
■^nNKYPinNPO 
lEOHKEAIIA 
TQYBOYZ 
'ON ia 



rai n6- 

X[i]os SovXo)^, EvXi- 
/ilei^oy, ypa/ifiarebs 
SajfiScnos, UpaT[fv]<r- 
ay] 4 toy ' Ara^vpiov^ 
inrip ?] t&v Kvpiwv ' Po- 
Sicou aji/edr]K€ Ait ' A- 
Ta^vpt^ ?] 



ov. 



Ross restores the first line, dv'\aa-TdvT<ov, supposing 
that there is here reference to a revolt of the SovXoi 
mentioned in line 2. As the left side of the stone 
is preserved for the first three lines, the remainder 
of the word, of which the termination is contained 
in AITANTON, must have been on an upper stone, 
for the joint of which the bed has been prepared. 
This upper stone must have contained at least one 
line, and probably more. The A in EvXi/jteuos, line 2, 
has been misread as A both by Ross and Keil. 

Lines 4, 5. I read i€paT[<ev]a-[as, and the word can 
hardly be anything else ; hpanvaas frequently occurs 
in Rhodian dedications. Foucart, Rev. Archdol. 
N. S. xiii, p. 352, shows that while /e/oeiJy is applied 
to a priest actually in office, lepaTeva-as must be un- 
derstood to designate those who have been Upus. 
A like distinction may be noted in Rhodian inscrip- 
tions, in the case of rafiias and rafiieva-as, arrpaTayos, 
o-rpaTayrja-as. Eulimenos, having been Upivs of Zeus 
Atabyrios, is at the time of the dedication ypanfiantis 
Sa/xoa-Los. The epithet SanSa-tos is applied to a ypa/i- 
fiarevi in the Rhodian inscription, cccliii, line 18, 
post On a Lindian pedestal (Ross, Archaol. Auf- 
satze, li, p. 604, No. 15), the same person is ypa/i- 
/xarfvi fidarpav and Upanvarai 'Addvas AivStai. What 
it was that was dedicated by Eulimenos may have 
been stated in lines 8, 9, but I can make nothing 

oiTOYBOYI ON. Keil, in Philologus, Suppl. 

ii, p. 612, reads ' Yirlp Aioa-aTafivpijaa-Tdv twi' tus noXios 
SovXav Eva(<f>ivoi ypa/ifiaTeiis [SalfjLSa'ios UpaTivlaas] Atbs 
Ara^vptov ^Siaj t(ov Kvpiwv' Pc^Siwi' dvji6j]Ke Au'A^Ta^vpt(^ 

Th npb'j Tov Pov a-\Ta6iv Ki\6v[L\ov, but this restoration, 



which has been adopted by Liiders, Dionys. Klinstler, 
p. 168, No. 61, is entirely conjectural, nor would 
there be room for so many letters in line 8. The 
Awa-aTa^vpiaaTat are mentioned in other Rhodian 
inscriptions (see />os^ No. ccclviii ; Ross, Inscr. 
Ined. iii. No. 282), but are never elsewhere de- 
signated as 01 ray rroXios SovXoi, and this additional 
title does not seem a probable one. A I TAN may 
however be the termination of some other name 
denoting a Thiasos or Eranos, of which there were 
many in Rhodes. 

Line 7. Tcoy Kvpuov ' Po^Siwy. I have followed Ross 
and Keil in this restoration, but not without mis- 
giving. It is to be presumed, if we read 'Po[8ta>i', 
that the Kvpioi are the Rhodian masters of the SovXoi 
mentioned in line 2, but such a phrase as 01 Kvpioi 
'P6S101 seems to me a strange one to find in an in- 
scription of this period. If we could venture to 
read rZy Kvp[a>y 'P6\Sov, the reference would be to 
members of the Imperial family who are not un- 
frequently styled oi Kvpioi ^/xmv in inscriptions (see 
C. I. 2971, 4044). 

From the mention of Zeus Atabyrios in this in- 
scription, and the natural features of the site where 
it was found, a platform overlooking the sea, Ross 
was led to suppose that this hill is the X6<pos ewi^aThs 
rj 'Ara^vpiov Aibs Upov ^v Kai KoXo^bv Teiyiov in' airov 
mentioned by Appian, Mithridat. c. 26, as the hill 
from which a fire signal was to be given in war. 
See Ross, Reisen, iii, p. 106 ; Gu^rin, Voyage dans 
rile de Rhodes, p. 169 ; and my Travels, i, p. 171. 



1 1 



122 



RHODES. 



OCCXLVII. 

On a fragment of tablet of blue marble, with a moulding on the left side and along the foot, the top and right side broken away. 

Height, 5^ in. ; width, 93: in, A. B. 



PET NATO 

MENL^^iPATOZEHAKT 
ArHEIPOAIZArHZiro 
KA0YO0EZIANAE 
ATEMAXOY 
ATHZIANAHKAi Nl 
KAEITANnPZnKPAT 
APIZTOKPITOZ lEPnr 



/?€ 

MevecTTparos ' E^aK^kcTTOv ? 
' AyrjcriiToXis ' Ayqcrino^io^ 
Ka6' i/oOecriav Sk 
' Ayifidyov 
' Ayrjcndya^ K\i .... 
KXfiTdt/cop ZooKparlevs 
' A piaroKpiTos '/l/jtavFoy 



Part of a list of names. 



CCCXLVIII. 

Fragment of a pedestal of blue marble with remains of moulding on the top ; the left side of the stone is cut for a joint with 
two sinkings for cramps. Height, 6in. ; breadth, loj in. Published by Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii, No. 285, who states that it 
was found in a wall in the Christian suburb near another fragment, ibid. No. 273. C. T. N. 



AIOZZHN 
cHNEPMlAP 
TOAYTOKAI \ 
AAEIHNAAI 
A o -lA 



Xios ZtjvIo 

. . . €(ov ' Epjiia 
TO aiiTO Kal 
'AXficou 'AXi . 



Ross conjectures that this is part of a Hst of 
money subscriptions collected at the festival of 
"AXfia, line 4. The Doric form of this word in two 
Rhodian inscriptions (see Rev. Archeol. N. S. xiii. 



p. 159) is 'AXieia, but in another Rhodian inscription 
of the time of Vespasian (Ross, Hellen. i, p. 99, 
No. 20, line 19), we have yeiKrja-avTo, "AXeia, which is 
therefore the later form of this word. 



OOCXLIX. 

On a stelfe of blue marble. Height, 3 ft. | in. ; breadth, i ft. 3I in. lalysos, Rhodes ; S. and B. Published in Transactions of 

Royal Soc. Lit., N. S., xi, pp. 435-442 ; Hermes, xiv, pp. 457-460. 



15 



EAOIETOIXMAXTPOIXKAIIAAYXIOI 

XTPATHXAAKIMEAONTOXEIPE 

OnnXTOIEPONKAITOTEMENOX 

TAXAAEKTRnNAXEYATHTAIKA 

TATAPATPIAEPIMEAHOHMEIN 

TOYXIEPOTAMIAXOnnXXTAAAl 

EPrAXOEnNTITPEIXAIGOYAAPT . 

OYKAIANArPA<t)HIEZTAXXTAAA 

XTOTEtAOiXMATOAEKAIAOYXO 

XIONENTIEKTr>NNOMnNEX<DE 

PEINOYAEEXOAOinOPEINEXTOTE 

MENOXKAITAEPITIMIATXl . PPAX 

XONTIPAPATONNOMON . EMEINAE 

TAXXTAAAXMIAMMENEPITAXEXO 

AOYTAXEKPOAIOXPOTIPOPEYOME 

NOIXMIANAEYPEPTOIXTIATOPION 

AAAANAEEPITAXKATABAXIOXTA . 

EIAXAIAXP . AIO- 



NOMOXAOYXOXIONEXIMEINOYAE 

20 EX<J>EPEINEXTOiEPONKAITOTE 

MENOXTAXAAEKTPriNAXMHEXI 
TniPPOXONOXHMIONOXriNOX 
MHAEAAAOAOOOYPONMHOENMH 
AEEXAFETilEXTOTEMENOXMH 

25 OEIXTOYTriNMHOENMHAEYPOAH 

MATAEX<t>EPETnMHAEYEIONMH 
OENOTIAEKATIXPAPATONNOMON 
POIHXHITOTEIEPONKAITOTEMENOX 
KAOAIPETIiKAIEPIPEIETnHENO 

30 XOXEXTHTAIAXEBEIAIEIAEKA 

PPOBATAEXBAAHIAPOTEIXATilY 
PEPEKAXTOYPPOBATOYOBOAON 
OEXBAAnNPOTArrEAAETXlAE 
TONTOYT^NTIPOIEYNTAOXPHI 

35 inNEXTOYXMAXTPOYX 



RHODES. 



123 



'ESo^f ToTs jidaTpois kol laXvcrioi^i^ | ZTpdrrj^ ' AXKijiiSovTo^ elwe | OTTCoy to Upof Kal to Tefifvos I ray 

5 ' A\eKTp6vas eiiayfJTai koltu to. rraTpia, imfifXrjdj^fidv | toiis UpoTafiias oncos aTuXai | epyacrOiwvTi Tpeii \i6ov 

10 /1a/9r[r]jOV Kal dvaypa(f>ij ey ray o-raXa'y t6 t€ yjfd(l)i(riia ToSe Kal & ov^ o^aioy IvTi kK tS>v vojxmv k(T<f)i\pfi.v 

oiiSi kcroSonTopilv is to Ti\pivos Kal to, eTriTi/iia to) npda.aovTi napa tw vopiov \&\inuv 8e I ray oraXay, fiiafi 
15 fiiv inl Tas iao'^Sov ray iK 7r6X/oy TroTinopevofielyois^ fxiav St imep to IdTiaTopiov, I &Wav Si kirl tSs KUTa- 

^da-tos Ta[y] | e| 'A)(atai 7r[6lAioy. 
20 Nofios St ov)(^ ocTLov ka-ijiuv ovSk | ka^epuv ey to iepov Kal to rll/ieroy ray ' AXiKTpmva^- p.}] ecri\T(o imros, 

25 o»/oy, i)pioi'OS, yifos \ prjSe dXXo Xocpovpou prjOkv pr]\Se eaayeTco ey to Tepefos prjdels TOVTOif prjdtu pr/Sk 

{moSrjlpaTa i<T(pfpeTQ} p'rjSe vnov p-q\6iv o ti 8i Kd Tii napa tov vopov [ noiTJa-t) to re Upbv Kal Tb Tepefos I 
30 KaOaipiTco Kal ejnpe^tTco 77 ei/oj^oy earcB Ta dat^ua- el Si Ka I npo^aTa icr^dXr]^ diroTuaaTai v\iT\p eKacrrov irpo- 
35 /Sarov o^oXhv ] o icr^aXdiv iroTayyiXXiTco Sk I tw tovt<ov ti noievvTa 6 XPVX^'' **■ tovs pd<TTpovs. 



This is a decree of the Mastroi and lalysians, 
ordering the consecration, according to the ancient 
prescription, KaTo. to. naTpia, of the hieron and te- 
menos of the Goddess Alektrona. The Hierotamiae 
are ordered to engrave the decree on three marble 
stelae, and to place one of them at the entrance from 
the city (to the temenos), another above the Hestia- 
torion, and a third on the road leading downwards 
from the city Achaia. 

Then follows the law itself, which declares what 
animals and objects it is not permitted to introduce 
into the hieron and temenos of Alektrona. The 
animals are the horse, the ass, the mule, the yrroy, 
which was the foal of a mare by a mule, and all 
other beasts of burthen. No person is to enter the 
temenos with sandals or with any article made of 
hog's leather ; any one transgressing this prohibition 
will have to purify the hieron and temenos, and to 
offer sacrifices, or to be liable to a prosecution for 
impiety, da-i^eia. Any one introducing sheep into 
the sacred precinct must pay an obolos for each 
sheep. Any one who thinks proper may denounce 
such transgressors to the mastroi. In an inscription 
at Amorgos recording a lease of land belonging to 
the Zeus Temenites, is a similar prohibition with 
reference to sheep feeding in a temenos. According 
to Weil's restoration of lines 33, 34 of this Amorgos 
inscription in Mittheil. d. deutsch. Inst, i, p. 344, 
sheep so straying are to be forfeited to the deity 
of the temenos. 

The goddess Alektrona, whose sacred precinct is 
thus jealously guarded by this law, is evidently 
identical with Elektryone, who, according to Dio- 
doros, V, 56, was the daughter of the god Helios 
and the nymph Rhodos, and who, dying a virgin, 
was worshipped with heroic honours by the Rho- 
dians. According to Diodoros, Elektryon^ had 
seven brothers called the Heliada;, two of whom, 
Kerkaphos and Ochimos, settled in the territory of 
lalysos, and there founded the strong city of Achaia, 
reigning there in succession. Kerkaphos, who suc- 
ceeded his brother in the kingdom, had three sons, 
Lindos, lalysos, Kamiros, each of whom gave his 
name to the city which he founded. The name 
Alektrona or Elektryon^, as Diodoros gives it, is 
evidently derived from the same root as nXiKToap, 
the name of the sun in Homer, 'HXiKTpimv, fiXtKTpov^ 
'HXiKTpa. See G. Curtius, Grundziige, 4th edition, p. 
1 36, No. 24 ; and on the form 'HXtKTpvcoi'T], Wilamowitz- 
Mollendorff, in Hermes, xiv, pp. 458-460. On small 
gold and copper coins of Rhodes of the third century 



B.C., is a radiated female head, ornamented with a 
stephane and earrings. This has been thought to be 
a personification of 'P68o?^ but it has been pointed 
out by Mr. Percy Gardner that the solar character 
of the type would be more appropriate to Alektrona, 
See Numism. Chronicle, N. S. xviii, p. 272. 

Line 3. to kpov Kal to Tipevos. Here these two 
sacred precincts are clearly distinguished. The hie- 
ron is usually considered to be the sacred ground 
round the temple, vaos, corresponding with the Close 
of a cathedral. The temenos was probably an outer 
precinct. 

Line 7. XiOov AapT[^i]ov. The word AdpTia is un- 
known to the Lexicographers, but occurs in two 
other Rhodian inscriptions ; one from Rhodes pub- 
lished by Rohl, in the Mittheihuigen d. deutsch. 
Inst, in Athen, 1877, p. 228, 1. 7, iirl ^danos XiOov 
AapTiov not 5' dpTiov, as Rohl reads ; the other from 
Hierapytna in Krete, published in Cauer, Delectus, 
p. 56, 1. 99, oTTcos ipyaa-Ofj niTpas AapTias. The epithet 
AdpTLos must denote either the kind of stone to be 
employed, or, more probably, the locality whence it 
was to be obtained. The stone on which the lalysos 
decree is engraved is the blue marble, commonly 
called 'foetid limestone,' from the smell which it 
emits when fractured, and which was often used for 
inscriptions. 

Line 10. ifTi for ia-n. On this rare Doric form 
see G. Curtius in Leipziger Studien, iv, p. 216. 

Line 16. iariaTopiov. A banqueting hall for festi- 
vals. la-TiTjTopiov occurs Herod, iv, 35. 

Line 18. ii 'Ayatas. This is the name of the 
strong fortress in the lalysian territory, mentioned 
by Diodoros, v, 57, and in a fragment of the Rhodian 
writer, Ergeias, preserved in Athena;us, viii, p. 360. 
See also the Scholiast to Pindar, Olymp. vii, 34, 
AiSvpos Si <pr]cri Kal TiTdpTtjv eivai woXiv t^i> vvv 'Ay^aiSiv 
KaXovpivr]v, where we must read 'Axatav (see Hermes, 
xiv, p. 456, note 3). Its site has not yet been 
identified. 

Line 25. The prohibition of the wearing of sandals 
within the temenos reminds us of the injunction to 
Moses, Ex. iii, 5, ' Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, 
for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground.' 

In the Andania decree regulating the Mysteries 
of the Great Gods (Foucart-Lebas, Pt. 11, p. 161, 
No. 326 a), it is ordered {§ 3) that those who cele- 
brate the Mysteries shall be bare-footed, and in the 
procession no one is to wear shoes, unless they are 
made either of felt or of the skins of the victims 
offered in the festival. 



124 



RHODES. 



The ixdcrrpoi, mentioned in the first and last lines, 
are Rhodian magistrates whom we shall find men- 
tioned in the decrees from Kamiros and Lindos (see 
Nos. cccLi and ccclvii, />os^, and the note on these 
inscriptions). 

According to the fragment of Ergeias in Athe- 
neeiis, to which I have already referred, there was a 
Phoenician settlement at Achaia in Rhodes, governed 
by Phalanthos, which was taken after a long siege by 
the Greek settler, Iphiklos. According to another 
tradition, preserved by Diodoros, v, 58, Kadmos, 
having dedicated a temenos to Poseidon in Rhodes, 
left some Phoenicians there to have care of it, and 
these united with the lalysians in one community. 
He adds that the priests in lalysos are said to have 



traced the descent of their hereditary priesthood back 
to these Phoenician settlers. 

This stele was found by Mr. Consul Biliotti in the 
course of excavations a little to the east of the hill 
now called Phileremo, and on which must have stood 
the Akropolis of lalysos. 

Mr. Biliotti states that the stele when found was 
standing upright in its original socket, about six feet 
below the surface of the ground, but that no trace of 
foundations could be found near it. It may be that 
the spot where the stele was standing was its original 
site on the road leading from the Akropolis to the 
temenos in the plain below, ras ea-oSov ras « Tr6\ios 
noTiiropevojxkvois, 



COCL. 

On a fragment of a block of blue marble. Length, i ft. 9I in.; breadth, i ft. 4 in. The surface below line 10 has been chiselled 
away. Theologos near Rhodes; C. T..N. ; Ross, Hellenika, ii, p. iii, No. 43. 



10 



10 



I AoZAY^ 
riZANAPOZAAH 
. VEIZ . . AZFOAYKAb 
. EYFOMnOZmZIT . M 
. . niKHNTIMAnOAIOZ 
AFOAnNOZEPEOIMlOY . . . 
-lAZTO . B EPINAEO 

OS 4>i\oKpdTevs 
'AXe^iS'ja/iOi ' AXe^in^poriS^a) 

paos AvaUvaiTov ? 

'Ay^ija-avSpos AajxloKptvevs 
n\\iiar\T\{i)as noXvK\^{ps 

6] eVTTO/XITOS 2(O(JLT{i^ll(0V 

' iTihnKwv Ti/ianoXios 

'AnoXavo? 'EpeOifiiov (fat) ' A p(T\ie/jiiSos 

'Ofoj/jiaaToi^s) B 'Epiyaeols 



AP 



When this inscription was copied by Ross it was 
much more complete. Part of the first three lines, 
now altogether wanting, and line 10, were then still 
preserved, and rather more of several other lines 
was legible. In the cursive I have added what may 
be supplied from Ross's copy. The letters no longer 
extant which he transcribed are separated from the 
rest by curved brackets. 

On the site of Theologos, whence this inscription 
was obtained, several other inscriptions were found. 
See Ross, Inscript. Ined. iii, p. 27, Nos. 276, 277, and 
his Hellenika, ii, p. 112, No. 44, also his Reisen, iii, 
p. 100. One of these inscriptions. No. 277, contains 
part of a list of priests of Apollo Erethimios. The 
name of the same Deity occurs also in our fragment 
and in Hellenika, No. 44. Hence Ross has identified 



the place where these inscriptions were found as the 
site of the temple of Apollo Erethimios, which is 
mentioned by Strabo, xiii, p. 613 : 'PSSioi SI 'EpvOi^iov 
AiroXXcovos i\ov(nv kv Trj xSpa Upov, rfjv kpvcri^riv KaXovvTes 
kpvOi^rjv. Compare Eustath. ad Horn. II. i, p. 34, 
ed. Rom. 1542-50; and Hesychios, s. v. 'EpeOvjiior 
6 'AnoXXav irapa Avkwis' koX ioprfi 'Epedv/iia, where the 
orthography of 'EpeOv/nos nearly corresponds with 
that of the inscriptions from Theologos. We may 
assume with Ross that the three forms, 'Epv6i^iot, 
'EpeOvfiios, and 'EpeOi/iios are simply dialectic varieties 
of one and the same word. See note on />osi cccli, 
line 10, Ahrens, De Dialect. Dorica, p. 85, and 
Roscher in G. Curtius, Studien, iii, pp. 129-143, for 
the interchange of /i and )8 ; and for the convertibility 
of €, I, and V, Ahrens, ibid. pp. 120-123. 



RHODES. 



125 



Our fragment is probably part of a list of Upus, 
like the one in Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii, No. 276. 

Line 10. The last word in this line is read by 
Ross, 'Epwafvs, the ethnic of 'fptreoy, which he sup- 
poses to have been a deme in the district of Lindos, 
as the genitive 'Epuvaicos occurs on a Lindian inscrip- 



tion (see his Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 615, No. 26), but 
on the stone I see or /? after the E. 'Epivfj^ occurs 
in the Karian tribute lists (see Kohler, Urkunden, 
p. 185). 'Epivfos or 'Epiytios with the ethnic 'Epivivs and 
' E pivedTTji is mentioned by Stephanus Byzantinus, s. v., 
as a place in Doris, also in Achaia and in Italy. 



CCOLI. 

On a stelb of white marble. Height, i ft, 24111.; breadth, i ft. if in. Kamiros; S. and B. Transactions of Royal Soc. Lit. 

xi, p. 436; Bullet, de Corr. Hell, iv, p. 144. 

EAOIEKAMIPEYZITASKTOINAZTASKAMIPEnNTAZ 

ENTAINAZniKAITAZENTAIAPEIPniANArPAtAIPAZAS: 

KAIEXOEMEINEZTOIEPONTAZAGANAIAZESTAAAI 

AlOINAIXnPIZXAAKHZEIHMEINAEKAIXAAKHTAIZ 
5 ANArPA<t)HMEINAIKAXPHIIjQNTIEAEZGAIAEANAPAZ 

TPEIZATTIKAMAAAOITINEZEPIMEAHOHZETNTITAT 

TAZTAZPPAIIOZnZTAXIZTAKAIAnOAnZEYNTAI 

TniXPHIIONTIEAAXIZTOrnAPAZXEINTANZTAAAN 

KAITAZKTOINAZANArPAtAIKAIErKOAAtAIENTAIZTA 
10 AAlKAIZTAZAIENTnilEPrilTAZAOANAZKAIPEPIBOAIBn 

ZAinZEXHinZIZXYPOTATAKAIKAAAIZTATAAETE 

AEYMENAEZTATTAPANTATONTAMIANPAPEXEIN 

ErAETATTANTANKTOINANAPOAEIKNYEINTOYZ 

KTOINATAZMAZTPONENTnilEPfilTrilAriOTATni 
15 ENTAIKTOINAIKATATONNOMONTONTriNPOAinN 

TOYTOIAEZYNAErEZOnNENKAMIPniEIZTO 

lEPONTAZAGANAIAZOKKATOIIEPOPOIOIPAPAr" 
'XlNTIKAIAOPEONTnTAIEPATAKAMIPEnN .... 

. . TPAHPANTAAITi 



"ESo^f Ka.fiipeCai, ras KTOiuas Tas Ka/iipicop rits | ei^ to, vdcrco kuI ras kv to, aireipm dvaypd'^ai irdaas 1 
5 Kol ky^OijXdv €S rh Uphv rds 'AOavaias (ardXa | Xi&lva x<»P'S XdXKrjs^ k^rmnv Si Kal XaXKTjrais I dvaypa- 

<f)riiiuv aXKOL XPllCoo^Ti, kXicyOai Se dvBpas | Tpus avTiKa fidXa otrivfg fTnptXrjOrjaevyTt rav^ras rds npd^LOS ms 

Tdxt(TTa, Kal dnoSmcrfvyrai | t£ XP.'?^°*'''' kXa-)(i<TTOv iTapa<T-)(iiv rhv ardXav | Kal ray KTOivag dvaypd-^at Kal 
10 kyKoXdy^ai kv to. orajXa Kal a-rda-ai kv rS iepw rds AOauds Kal Trepi^oXi^mlcrai d>s e^?? '"^ icryvporaTa Kal KdX- 

Xiara, rd Sk Tf\Xevneva ks ravra ndvra rhv rap.iav Trapi\uv, | ky Se ravrdy rdv Kroivdv dnoSfiKvveiv Toi>s I 
15 KTOivdrai ftdarpov kv tS Upm tS> dyicoTdra ] kf rd KTOiva Kard rhy vofiov rhv rmv ' PoSlodv, I tovtoi Se <rvvXeye<r6a>v 

kv Kapipm els to | lepov rds ABavaias oKKa toI ieponoiol irapaye\^v'\a>vTi Kal dOpeovTco rd iepd rd Kafitpecov [rd 

Sa\fJ.o^TeX-^ ? ndvTa at Tt , . . 



This decree orders that the KToTvai of the Kami- 
reans both in the Island and on the Continent are 
to be inscribed on a marble stele, and set up in the 
Hieron of Athena. The KToivai of Chalke are not 
included in this order, but the people of that island 
may, if they demand it, also have their KToivai entered 
in the register. Three commissioners are to be at 
once elected, who are to superintend the carrying 
out of the decree, and are to contract for providing 
a stele, for which the lowest tender is to be accepted. 
The contractor is to inscribe the KToivai on the stele, 
to erect it in the Hieron of Athena, and to fix it 
firmly all round with lead. The treasurer is to de- 
fray the cost of all these operations. The KToivdrai 
or members of the KToTvai are to select in each ktoivu 
a /ida-rpos, who is to be appointed in the most holy 
Hieron in the ktoIvu, according to the law of the 
Hhodians. 

The first question which presents itself in this 



decree is, who and what are the KToivdrai and KToTvai. 
The word Krotva is not found in ordinary Greek 
Lexicons. It is however clear from this and another 
Rhodian inscription published by Martha in Bullet 
de Corr. Hell, iv, p. 1 39, that it is used in the sense 
of a district or other local division of land. Again, 
the mention of the fidarrpos, line 14, and the ieponotoi, 
line 17, seems to point to some religious rites in 
connection with the KToTvai. I had already come to 
this conclusion, when I stumbled on the following 
entry in Hesychios, placed out of its true alpha- 
betical order : — 

KTVvai, Tj KTOivai, ymprjatii wpoyoviKmv iepetmv ^ Sfj/xos 

fiffiepi(rfievos. The gloss is somewhat obscure. If 
the words had been xoop^aen npoyoviKcov lep&v, we 
might have interpreted them ' the marking out or 
defining sacred precincts inherited from ancestors,' 
or ' the places set apart for the celebration of rites 
inherited from ancestors.' It is possible that iepua, 

Kk 



126 



RHODES. 



which in the Septuagint bears the sense of festival 
or sacrifice, may be used here in the genitive plural, 
in the sense of ' rites.' M. Martha, loc. cit. p. 144, 
hesitates between this alternative and altering the 
reading to Upmy. The second part of the gloss, Sijfios 
lifUfpKrfjLifos, suggests that the ktoIvm were certain 
districts or allotments set apart for religious uses 
within the limits of demes. M. Martha considers 
the KToiva the equivalent of the Attic deme, but does 
not seem certain. He states, p. 143, that the word 
KToiva occurs also on an inscription from Karpathos, 
which he promises to publish shortly, and which, 
it is to be hoped, will throw further light on the 
meaning of this nearly forgotten term. The /idcrTpos 
who is to be appointed by the KToivdrai is one of a 
board of magistrates, which we find mentioned in 
other Rhodian decrees. In four instances the nda-rpoi 
precede the name of the people who enact the decree, 
occupying the place usually assigned to the /SouXjj 
in Greek decrees : thus we have «5o|€ fida-Tpois kui 
'laXvcrioi?, ante No. CCCXLIX, f^o^e /ida-rpois Kal AivSiois, 
post cccLVii. Compare two other Lindian decrees, 
Ross, Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 615, No. 26, and his 
Hellenika, p. 113, No. 47. In a Kamiros decree, /tfi-^? 
No. cccLiii, line 8, and in two Lindian inscriptions, 
Ross, Hellenika, p. 1 16, No. 47 c, line 7, and Archaol. 
Aufsatze, ii, p. 604, No. 15, there is mention of 
a ypannanvs fida-Tpcov, and fida-Tpoi bestow a crown on 
a public functionary in the fragment of a Lindian 
decree, Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii, p. 17, No. 271. In a 
decree recently discovered at Delphi, Bullet, de Corn 
Hell. V, p. 162, lines 20-23, the officers charged with 
the duty of punishing those who misappropriate 
certain moneys dedicated to Apollo are the /ida-rpoi, 
and the persons so accused are said to be Kardnaa-- 
rpoL UpS>v xpvf^dTcoy (fxopd?, ' guilty of embezzlement of 
sacred money.' In these cases the /ida-rpoi are to 
inscribe the names of the offenders on the registers 
of the city as having incurred a debt eight times 
the amount of the money which had been mis- 
appropriated. 

Aristotle, Fragm. Polit. 191, ed. Didot, as quoted 
by Harpokration, s. v., fMaarijpef, states that there 
were fiddTpoi at Pellene, and defines their office as 

dpyfj Tis dnoSeSetyfiii/r] eirl to ^r]TUV to, KOiva rov Srniov, 

and states that their functions were analogous to 
those of the Athenian ^tittjtuC and the fiaa-Trjpes else- 
where. Hesychios, s. v., says fidcrTpoi- wapa 'PoSCois 
^ovXfVTrjpn^ where the restoration proposed by Bern- 
hardy, ad Suid. ii, l, p. 723, ^ovXevrac 01 Kal /jLaa-Tfjpes 
seems probable. (See Schmidt, Hesychios, iii, p. 75, 
note.) It appears from another gloss in Hesychios, 
ibid, line 370, that the accounts of magistrates, al twv 
dpxoyrmv iHOvvai, were called p-aa-rpiai. This is con- 
firmed by the Andania inscription, Foucart-Lebas, 
Pt II, p. 172, line 51, where viro/jtaa-Tpoi is applied to 
those who have to render an account in the sense of 
vTTtvOvvoi. From a comparison of all these stray 
notices of fidaTpoi it may be inferred that they were 
a board of magistrates in Rhodian and probably in 
many Doric cities who controlled the administration 
of property belonging to the temples, and were 
apparently an audit board for other public accounts. 



In this capacity they took cognizance of all embezzle- 
ment of sacred funds as at Delphi, and at Lindos 
and lalysos their names preceded that of the city 
in the heading of certain decrees which related to 
religious matters. 

After ordering the election of a /j-da-rpos by the 
KToivdrai, our decree goes on to say, line 16, tovtoi Se 
crvvXeytaOoiv kv Ka/xipo) els to lepov Tcis 'AOayaias oKKa toI 
iepOTroiol irapaye[y\<ovTi Kal dBpiovTW to, Upa tA Kafiipewi' 
[tol Sa/io'^TeXi] TrdvTa. When I originally published 
this inscription (Transactions of Royal Soc. Lit. xi, 
p. 436), I assumed, but not without hesitation, that 
TovToi referred to the KToivdTai mentioned in the 
clause of the decree immediately preceding, and 
according to strict grammatical rule, such would be 
the proper antecedent. I cannot help suspecting, 
however, that there is a latent meaning in the pre- 
ceding clause which the decree fails to convey to us, 
but which may have been sufficiently obvious to 
those for whom the decree was drawn up. 

If we assume that the words tv to, ktolvo. are the 
equivalent of ev kKdaTo. ktolvo., and that each ktoTvu 
elected one fida-Tpos as their delegate, then the toVtol 
would refer not to the KToivdrai but the //.da-Tpoi whom 
they elected, and the object of their assembling in 
the Hieron of Athena would be such an inspection 
and supervision as seems to be implied in the word 
dOpiovTco, and such as we might a priori expect to 
have been the special duty of the nda-Tpoi. It is un- 
certain whether the word iepd here is to be taken in 
its more usual sense, ' the sacred precinct round 
temples,' or as ' sacred rites.' As the inspection is 
to take place at the coming of the Uponoioi, I am 
inclined to think that hpd refers rather to rites than 
to sacred places. Compare the Lindian inscription, 
post No. CCCLVII, line 41, A*]^ /ierexaw'Tt tS>v kv AivS(o 
kpS)V ot fifj Kal irpoTepov iieTeT\ov. 

In the last line I restore [rd (SayuoJreX^ ndvra, after 
which followed at tl \ndcr-)((o(nv, or some such verb. 

The kpoirotoi, mentioned line 17, are sacred mini- 
sters who at Athens, and probably in other Greek 
states, were charged with the duty of conducting the 
sacrifices. See Bockh, Staatshaush. 2nd ed. i, pp. 
303, 304; Ussing, Inscript. Gr. Ined. p. 48; Corpus 
Inscript. Attic, ii, Pt. i, No. 163; ibid. No. 581; 
Etym. Magnum, s.v. Upovoioi; Schol. ad Demosthen. 
adv. Mid. ed. Meier, § 115 and §171. In a Ka- 
miros inscription (Bullet, de Corr. Hell, v, p. 336) 
twelve kpoTToioi join in a dedication with hpds and 
other personages. We find them also in a list of 
sacred ministers inscribed on one of the marbles of 
the temple of Apollo Erethimios in Rhodes (Ross, 
Inscript. Ined. iii, No. 276). In a Lindian inscription, 
post No. CCCLVII, kpoTToioi, together with the Upeis and 
the UpoOvTai, are elected under the supervision of 
certain commissioners chosen ad hoc by the Lindian 
people. As they are mentioned in this decree after 
the hpm and the kpoOvTai, it may be inferred that at 
Lindos they were inferior in rank to the other two 
classes of ministers. The same precedence is given 
to the kpds in an inscription from Kos (Rayet, In- 
script. ined. de Cos, Pt. i, p. 26), in which the names 
of seven kponoioi follow that of a hiereus of Apollo. 



RHODES. 



127 



For other references relating to Uponoiot, see C. I. 
76, 2056, 2157, 2221 <5, 2266, 2953 <}, 3657; K. F. 
Hermann, Lehrbuch d. gottesdienstl. Alterthiimer, 
2nd ed. J 11, 10, and § 62, 18 ; Pollux, viii, 107. At 
Delos they had charge of the treasures. See Ho- 
molle, in Bullet, de Corn Hell, vi, pp. 1-166. 

We find from this inscription that some of the 
KTotvai were in the small island of Chalke, which lies 
on the west of Rhodes, and was probably subject to 
it at all times (see Pliny, Hist. Nat. xvii, 4, ^ 31). 
In the matter of registering their KToivdrai at Ka- 
miros, the people of Chalke appear to have been 
left free, as would be natural if the KToivai were local 
divisions, having reference to common rites. 

The KToivai in the dnfipot, line 2, must have been 
on that part of the coast of Asia Minor lying opposite 
to Rhodes, and called the Peraia. This belonged to 
the Rhodians from a very early period, till they were 
deprived of their independence by the Romans. 

This inscription is written in a strong Doric, in 
which may be noted, line 4, «!'?/*«*»', line 3, exOffieiy. 
The infinitive termination ftuv for fiey, is considered 



by Ahrens (De dial. Dorica p. 315) peculiar to 
Rhodes and its colonies in Sicily. See C. I. 5491, 
5475, 2525^, 2905, and Meister, in G. Curtius, Stu- 
dien, iv, p. 421. 

Line 6, (■irifie\ri6T]a(vi>Ti, line 7, diroSwa-evyTai, com- 
pare T(XfVfi(va, line 12, and KpivfvvTi, SiaXva-ivvn, imap- 
ievvTL in an inscription from Kalymna, C. I. 2671. 

Line 8, X/'I?'^'"'" ^or XP.vYo''"- 

Line 10, ntpi^oXi^axrai for neptpoXi^coa-ai ; poXi^os, 
poXiP6a> are given in the Lexicons as poetic forms of 
poXv^Sos, poXvpSoo). For the interchange of p and /3, 
see Roscher, in G. Curtius, Studien, iii, pp. 129-143, 
and an^e No. cccL. 

Line 1 6, toDtoi for ovroi. See G. Curtius, Leipziger 
Studien, iv, p. 319. 

Line 17, napayiycovTi for irapayivatvTai. See G. 
Curtius, ibid. 

Lines 3 and 17, we have 'ABavaias, line 10, 'ABavd^ ; 
the first would, probably, be the older form. Line 3, 
kardXa for tv (ndXa. Compare €<tt^Xd, C. L A. ii, Pt. I, 
No. 581, line 29, and atiie cccxui. 



CCCLII. 

On a fragment of a slab of blue marble, broken both at top and bottom and down the middle of the slab. The sides are 

perfect. Height, io|in. ; breadth, i ft. Sin. Kamiros; S. and B. 



10 



15 



20 



25 



30 



a. 



b. 



HtlOl 
xtlNPATPAl 
..PZAT °EIOI 
Al 



lOr 



BnAAIl 
APIZTC 

AAOAIME 



MIAAI 



_iOI 

AEnNPATPAl AMcDINEO 

AOIKIKYAIAAI EYTEAlii 

AAPVYAinNEIOI 

KOSMOAEIOI 

MOPMAAEIOI 

MEIAIEIOI 

APISTAPXEIOI 

AAOAIMENIAOS 

AM<J>INEnNnATPAI 

IPPOTAAAI 



Ai 



rPAIAAAl 
OniAAAl 
OniAAAl 
OniAAAl 
OniAAAl 
OAPZIAEIOI 
XYTPIEinNPATPAl 
KPHTINAAAI 
BOYKOAIA 

BOYKO 



AM<MNEI^ 

NAINIEIOI 

KPINIEIOI 

KAEYPENEIO 

EYANOPEIOI 
XYTPIEinNPATP/i 

l<t>IKAiAAI 

XAPIAAMIAAI 

KAAAIAAMEIOI 

OAPZIAAAI 

KPHTINAAAI 

MHTYAEIOI 

KPHTINAAAI 
AHXEiriNP 

K* 



C. 
u 

AkIOl 

lOI 

. NAPHNEIOI 
AEXinNIAAl 

EYPYGEMIEIOI 

AAMHTIAAI 

AYKHNEIOI 

TIMOKPITEIOI 

POIMANOPEIOI 
PYAAnNEinNPATPAl 

MAinNIAAl 

MEAANAPEIOI 

EYHNAKTIAEIOI 

TIMO0IAEIOI 

APAOOBOYAIAAI 

NIKHNEIOI 
BOYKOAEinNPATPAl 

KPHTINAAAI 

AfiPIAAAl 

ATHZIAIKEIOI 

MEIAArOPEIOI 

ZA . lAAAl 



128 



RHODES. 



a. 



8h 



lO 01 

lOl 

Xemv Pdrpai 
\oi KiKvSiSai 

XapfivXiaveioi 
15 Ko(T/x6\eiot 

MopfidSftoi 

MeiSieioi 

' Apia-Tap^uoL 
' AXdaifiiyiSos 
20 ' Ap.<f)LV(<ov ndrpai 

' linroTdSai 

FpaidSai 

OcodSai 

6(od8ai 
25 QcodSai 

QrndSai 

QapcrCXeioi 
XvTpieicov ndrpai 

K prjTiudSai 
30 BovKoXiS^ai 

BovKo\Xi8ai 

Bov^KoXiSai 



This inscription contains a list of ndrpai ranged 
under larger classes, e.g. 'A/Kpivewy irdrpai, a, line 20 ; 
Xvrpituov irdrpai^ a, line 28. 

The word irdrpa occurs occasionally in inscriptions 
in the sense in which it is used here. Thus a Thasian 
decree, C. I. 2 161, confers citizenship on a certain 
Polyaretos and his kinsfolk, ikvai 8\ avrovs kuI [iirl] 
rrdrp-qv V ^^ ■miOaicn. In C.I. 1535, a dedication of 
a statue is made by a irdrpa rS>v npoaviJ.vaicDi>. In the 
Rhodian inscription anie No. CCCXLV, we have seen 
that one Eualkidas receives a gold crown from the 
demos of Lindopolitae and another dno rds vdrpas ras 
Apv'irdv. The decree from Olymos (Waddington- 
Lebas, Pt. v. No. 334) speaks of ray <pvXas Kal <niy- 
yevfias Kal ndrpas. 

The meaning of ndrpa is thus defined in a frag- 
ment of Dikaiarchos preserved in Steph. Byzant. s. v. : 
Hdrpa, tv rcov rpiSiv rS>v irap "EXXrjan KOivatvia^ dSSiv, mj 
AiKaiapyps, h St) KaXovpav irdrpav, (f>paTpiay, (ftvXiju. (KX-qOt] 
ik Trdrpa fikv ety rijv Sevrepav perd^acnv kXQovrcav 77 Kara 
/i6va9 iKdarw irporepov ovcra crvyyivaa, diro rov npecr^v- 
rdrov re Kal fidXiara l<r)(y<Tavros ev rw yivti rfjv kir<ovufJiiav 
(Xovcra. This passage is thus paraphrased by Corne- 
wall Lewis (preface to Miiller's Dorians, i, p. ix) : 
' Patra was the name of the second stage of relation- 
ship among different persons, the first having been 
merely the affinity between man and wife. Its title 
was derived from the most ancient and powerful of 



pHOl 

e(ov ndrpai 

0a]p<ray[6]/3€ioi ? 

BcdXai . . . ai 

' ApKTTO . . . p.tSai 
' AXOai/j.^ei'iSojs 
' A n<pivi(o[v ndrp]ai 

EvreXiSlai 

'AfitpLfett 

Naiviiioi 

KpivUioi 

KXiVyiVilO^l 

Evavopiioi 
Xvrpieiatu ndrpai 

ItpiKXiSai 

XapiSafiiSai 

KaXXiSd[xeioi 

OapcridSai 

K prjriydSai 

Mr]TvXeioi 

KprjrivdSai 
Ar])(^eLa>i' PuiTpai 

KX 



' AlfSpcoffioi 
A e^LooviSai 
Evpvde/iieioi 
Aa/ir}Ti8ai 
AvK(i)veioi 
Tt/jLOKpireioi 
noifiavopeioi 
nvXXmveicou ndrpai 
MaiwviSai 
MeXdvSpeioi 
Eva>vaKri8eioi 
Tip.o<piXeioi 
' Ayado^ovXiSat 

NlKOlVtlOL 

BovKoXeiav ndrpat 
KprjrivdSai 
Awpid8ai 
AyrjcTiSiKeioi 
MeiSayopeioi 
. . . idSai 

'AplOT 



the race, as, for instance, the /Eacidse or Pelopidae.' 
In this sense irdrpa is used both by Homer and by 
Pindar (see the passages quoted by Buttmann, in 
Abhandl. d. berlin. Akad. d. Wissen. phil. hist, 
cl. 1818, 1819, p. 12; Wachsmuth, Hellen. Alter- 
thumsk. i, p. 801), and may be considered the equi- 
valent of yivos. Dikaiarchos goes on to say that 
a (j>parpia, the next stage of relationship, was a com- 
bination arising out of intermarriage of persons be- 
longing to different irdrpai. 

When, for instance, a daughter married out of her 
own irdrpa, she lost the right of taking part in the 
religious rites, irarpicoriKo, Upd, of her irdrpa, being ad- 
mitted in exchange into the rites of the irdrpa into 
which she married. 

This intermarriage between members of different 
irdrpai led to a fresh bond of union called <pparpia ; the 
members of which, though not all descended from 
the same parents, were in virtue of their collateral 
kinsmanship participators in certain religious rites 
common to the phratria ; all these phratriae were 
distributed in the several tribes, <f>vXai, which the city, 
woXts, contained (see Wachsmuth, loc. cit. p. 802). 

The combined evidence of inscriptions and of 
the passage in Dikaiarchos justifies us in assuming 
that the names under which the several patrae are 
arranged represent either ^parpiai, such as Di- 
kaiarchos mentions, or analogous groups of ndrpai 



RHODES. 



129 



called by some other name. Thus the Amphineoi, 
a, line 20, and b, line 12 ; the Chytrieioi, a, line 28 ; 
the Lecheioi, <5, line 27; the Pylloneioi, c, line 10; 
the Boukoleioi, c, line 18, would all be (^paTpiai, or 
analogous bodies in which the ndrpai ranged under 
them were associated by community of religious 
rites and by ties of relationship. The name 'A\6ai- 
fitviSos, which in d, line 11, and a, line 19, precedes 
the entry 'Aii(j>tvi<ov ndrpai, would thus indicate the 
name of the cpvXr} to which all these groups of 
irdrpai belong. It should be noted that under the 
heading 'AficpiveTs we find four ndrpai called QwdSai, 
lines 23-26 «, while the KprjnvdSai occur twice 
under the Chytrieioi, d, lines 24 and 26, and again 
under the Boukoleioi, c, line 18. The mutilated 
entries, a, lines 30, 31, 32, all probably contained 
the same name, BovKoXiSai. This recurrence of the 
same ndrpa in the same and in different (pparpiai may 
be accounted for if we suppose that the lineal de- 
scendants of the same father and mother married 
members sometimes of their own, sometimes of 
other phratriae. As the heading and ending of this 
inscription are wanting, we can only conjecture what 
was the object of this list of ndrpai. Most probably 
it concerned religious rites, access to which was re- 
stricted to the members of certain families, and the 
list may have been embodied in a decree declaring 
that these and no other families were so privileged. 
See the Koian inscription, Rayet, Inscr. Ined. de Kos, 
p. 31, No. 10, the Olymos decree already cited, and 
the Lindian decree, posi No. ccclvii, line 42. 

Two difficulties remain: 6, line 12, we have 'A/x- 
<f>ti'i(o[v ndrp\ai as a heading, and two lines below 
'A/j,(j)ii/eTs among the ndrpai under this heading. Are 



we to suppose that in this instance the phratria took 
its name from a particular ndrpa, or is the coincidence 
accidental ? Again, why does the entry 'A/Kpiveav 
ndrpai occur twice {a, line 20, and d, line 12), and 
why is there like repetition of Xvrpuiwv ndrpai (a, 
line 28, and d, line 19) ? This recurrence suggests 
that some particular function was discharged by 
phratriae in rotation. 

Another question here arises. What was the rela- 
tion of the Kroivai mentioned in the preceding decree. 
No. cccLi, to these groups of ndrpai ? We must wait 
for the publication of the inscription from Karpathos 
promised by M. Martha (Bullet, de Corr. Hell^n. iv, 
p. 143) for the elucidation of this question. 

Line 13 a, AOI seems the termination of a name 
preceding KiKvSiSai. No double name occurs in any 
other entry. 

Line 23 f. This name has been erased. 

The name of the tribe 'AXdat/jiei'is, entered twice in 
this list, is evidently derived from Althaimenes, of 
whom Diodoros (v, 59) relates that he fled from Krete 
to Rhodes, and establishing himself at Kamiros built 
a temple of Zeus Atabyrios on Mount Atabyron. 
Having by misadventure killed his own father 
Katreus, king of Krete, on his landing at Rhodes, 
Althaimenes became an outcast and died of grief, or, 
according to Apollodoros, iii, 2, ^ i, was swallowed up 
by the earth. The Rhodians afterwards worshipped 
him with divine honours. This legend makes it 
probable that a Kretan colony settled at Kamiros 
in very early times. The connection with Krete is 
further indicated by the statement in Steph. Byzan- 
tinus, s. V. 'lepdnvrya, that Hierapytna was anciently 
called Kamiros. See Hock, Kreta, ii, pp. 364-366. 



OCOLIII, 

On a circular convex shield of white marble, encipcled by a rim, the left side broken away. Diameter, i ft. 5I in. 

Kamiros, Rhodes; S. and B. 



lAINETOYZIAYPlOY 
rArHZANTOIEKP ANTON 
XnPAZTAZENTANASZniKA 
6 SAMENOYENTOIZA<t)PAKTOISK/' 

ANTOZENKAMEIPniKAIIEPOPOIH 
AIEZIEPIZTEYZANTOZKAITENOMENOY 
AZTPriNKAIZTE4)ANr2OENT0ZXPYZE 
POTETHNMAZT . . N a'ZKAI YPOAZK AA 
10 YOIAZ . TANKAIEPMAIZTANKAIYPOZEPAPI 

NENKAMEIPriKAIYPOPYPTAI .AANKOINO 

THNENAE . . IKAIYPONAKOPEION 
•'AIAP0ZTAAENT07IEP0P0I0YEIZ 
IIZAHMNONKAIAIAYMEIONKAI 
15 "OZEIZAAEZANAPEIAN 

)ENTOZYPOTAZBOYAAZ 
OIZTE<t)ANni 
1ATEYZAAM0ZI0Z 
DYAPXONTA 
20 AIITE*"' 



l1 



I30 



RHODES. 



15 



20 



' A piar^oKpar fvs ? Ho. 
'ApicTTJaiveTov ? ZiXvpiov 
CTTpalTayrjaayTOS eK iravTOiV 
knl ray] ^(wpas ras iv to. vdcra-cp >fa[t 
a-Tparev^craiJiivov kv rots d<ppdKTOis Ka^l 
Upo6vTi](r'\ayTOS ? tv Kafieipo) Kai UpoiroiTj- 

a-avTos KJal e^ifpia-Tfva-avros Kal yevopiivov 

ypapparecos rmv ji^daTpcov Kal aTecpavmOevTos •)(^pv<Ti- 
a> (m<f>dva -uVirS re t&v pd(TT\pa)^v 8h Kal vno A(TK\a- 
■jriaa-Toiv Kal koivo'ID ©tao-Mraj/ Kal ' Eppaicnav Kal inrb Zepairi- 

aarav r£]f kv Kapeipm Kal inrb nvpya^ui^Sdv koivo^S 

Kal ] Tcov iv Ai\p<f\ Kal virb NaKopeicoi' 

K^al diroaraXevTOi Uponoiov e/y 

Kal e]ty Afjpvov Kal AiSvptTov Kal 

irpea-^eija-av^Tos eis ' AXe^avSpetav 
Kal TiifJ.a'jOivTos inb rds /Sot/Xay 
Kal Tov Sdpov xpva-ejm <rT€<pdv<a 

ypap^fiaTitis Sa/iocnos 
. . . ov dp)(ovTa 
Alt Te\e[[a> 



In the Louvre is a smaller marble shield from 
Kamiros inscribed with a dedication to the gods 
by Aleximachos, son of Aristainetos. See Long- 
p6rier, in Bullet. Archdol. de I'Ath^nseum Fran^ais, 
1855, p. 76 ; Frohner, Inscript. Grecques du Louvre, 
No. 27; and cccxxxiv anie, which, gives a similar 
dedication on a marble shield from Kos. See also 
the dedication C. L 2654, which Bockh attributes to 
Knidos. 

The inscription before us is a fragment of a decree 
of the demos of Kamiros in honour of some person 
whose name is broken away, and contains the recital 
of his services. He was one of the strategi in Rhodes 
(fv TO vdcTCTca^ line 4), and served in a naval expedition ; 
he filled the high office of ifponoios, and was rewarded 
with a gold crown by the Mastri, and also by the 
Asklepiastse and other societies ; he was sent as 
hieropoios to Lemnos and to the Didymeion, and 
also served in a mission to Alexandria, probably as 
npecT^evs. A gold crown was conferred on him by 
the Boule. 

Line 2. 'Api<rT']aii'€Tov. This restoration is sug- 
gested by the fact that on the shield from Kamiros 
in the Louvre, already referred to, the person 
honoured is Aleximachos, son of Aristainetos. 

Line 3. aTpa^Tay^a-avTOS «K ndyTCoy. We have the 
same expression in the Louvre dedication already 
referred to. Longp^rier (Bull. Arch, de I'Ath^n. 
Fran. 1855, p. 76) cites as illustration iraiSas U 
ndvTwv, C. L 232, and tZ Kara irdvTwv^ ibid. No. 425, 
expressions applied to athletes who had been suc- 
cessful against all antagonists. Frohner (Inscr. Gr. 
du Louvre, p. 37), supposes the phrase « ndvrcDv on 
the Louvre shield to be the equivalent of xf'/ooi"*""?^*'? 
arparaybi imb irdvTcav. Neither explanation seems 
satisfactory. 

Line 4. inl ray] xd>pai. The restored words are 
supplied by the Rhodian dedication, C. L 2524. 

iv ra ydaam. Compare (" to. vdam Kal kv ra dneipa^ 
in line 2 of cccli aftte. 

Line 5. (rrpariv\<Tap(vov iv roi^ d<ppdKTois. Compare 
the Rhodian honorary decrees, C. L 2525, arparfvad- 



pevov ev re rf a]ry dcf^pa^KTOis [((at] rafy KaraffypdKTOii vaval 
Kard TTokipov, and Rev. Archdol. N. S. xi, p. 219, 
(TTpanvadptvov Kara voX^epov^ eu re rais KaTa<ppdKTOts 
vavcrl Kal kv TpirjpioXiais. On this latter passage Fou- 
cart (Rev. Archeol. N. S. xi, p. 220) observes that 
Kara noXepov is not a mere pleonasm, but that it 
marks the distinction between service in war and 
expeditions carried on in time of peace as part of 
the military training of the ephebi, to which latter 
also the expression a-Tpareva-dpevot was applied. It 
should be noted here that there would have been 
no room for the words Kara woXepov on the missing 
portion of our shield. 

Line 6. UpoTroirj^a-avTos. For the functions of 
the Uponotoi, see anie, cccli. The missing word at 
the beginning of this line may be either iepo- 
6vTr]crjavTos or SapiovpyTJa^avTos. See the Kamiros 
dedication published by Foucart, Rev. Archeol. 
N. S. xiv, p. 337. 

Line 7. k^iepiarevcrai'Tos. In another Kamiros in- 
scription, Bullet, de Corn Hellen. v, p. 337, line 15, 
we have apxiapia-ras, where the reading seems 
certain. The evidence of these two inscriptions 
justifies Kuster in reading iepia-ras in the following 
passage in Hesychios, s.v. dyvirrj^. 6 dyviaOels pv(Tovs, 
^ 6 KaOdpas Tivd' tovs Se avTovi Kal uptaras rives eXeyov 
Kal rb KaOaipeiv Upi(eiv. Schmidt (Hesych. i, p. 27) is 
therefore wrong in substituting tepeiras for Kuster's 
conjecture. The verb Upia-reva) is not found in the 
Lexicons. 

Line 9. For the Mastri, see anie, No. cccli. The 
ypapparevs pdarpcov occurs in a Lindian dedication 
(Ross, Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 604). 

Lines 10-12. The Asklepiastse, the koivov of 
Thiasitae, Hermaistae, Serapiastae, Pyrganidae, Na- 
koreioi, here mentioned, do not appear elsewhere 
in Rhodian inscriptions. A temenos dedicated to 
Asklepios is mentioned in an inscription found at 
Embonas, three hours distant from Kamiros. For 
similar religious associations in Rhodes or the 
neighbouring coasts, see Wescher, Rev. Archeol. 
N. S. X, p. 473. Foucart (Rev. Archeol. N. S. 



RHODES. 



131 



xi, p. 222, note 4) states that the Hermaistse 
occur in a Tralles inscription, unedited in 1865, 
when he wrote this. They are also found in a 
dedication at Delos (Homolle, in Bull, de Corr. 
Hell^n. iv, p. 190). 

Line 18. ypa/jijuaTfiis Saixoaios. This functionary 



is mentioned in the Rhodian inscription anie 

CCCXLVI. 

Line 19. I can make nothing of this line. 

Line 20. Ait T€\ei[a>\. A dedication to 'Ea-ria 
and Zevi TeXeios found at Kamiros is published by 
Foucart, Rev. Archeol. N. S. xiv, p. 337. 



CCCLIV. 

On a fragment of stelfe of blue marble, the left side only complete. Height, 8 J in. ; breadth, i ft. i in. Kamiros, Rhodes ; S. and B. 



10 



uYAOZa/v 
vMOAAZNIKHN 
(>ANTIAZArHZlOZ 
TIMnNEYPYAlKOYAAMOKP/ 
PIZTANAITIMAKP . . ZYZ 
<A0YO0EZIANAEAPIZTAinNOZ 
HMEPIOZATPIOY 
AKEZTOPIAAZOEYI ENEY" 
FY<i)P . ^IOPA Al 
AAMOZ0 
AA 



AajfioXas NiKa)v\oi 
4>ai'Tias 'Ayrja-ioi 
Tifuov EvpvSiKOV Aa/ioKpd[Tr)9 
' A^picTTdva^ TijiaKp^aT^evi 
Ka6' voQicriav Se ' A piaraicovos 
'Hfiipios Ayptov 
'AKiaTopidas Qtvyii/evs 
Evcpplalvcop ? A . . 

Aanoadleyrjs 



Part of a list of names ; lines 5-10 are in smaller letters than lines 1-4. 



CCCLV. 

On a fragment from a block of white marble, the top and right edge complete. Height, 2|in.; breadth, i ft. 3 in. Kamiros, 

Rhodes; S. and B. 

\OEEENOnO? 
A i A E s A D I < - 

'PijXo^ei'o floa 
. . ir^aiSes 'Apicrr 

The letters in this fragment are earlier in character than those of the other inscriptions from Kamiros. 

The right side of the stone is finished for a joint 



CCCLVI. 

On a fragment from the front of a square cista, broken off at the second line of the inscription. Height, 3J in. ; breadth, i ft. i\ in. 

Kamiros, Rhodes; C. T. N. 

EPMAIOY 



' Epiiaio\ 



,32 RHODES. 



CCOLVII. 

On a stelfe of blue marble. Height, 3 ft. ij in.; breadth, i ft. 5f in. Found at Massari, near Lindos, and obtained by me from 
Dr. Barmann of Rhodes. Published by Foucart, Rev. Arch^ol. N. S. xv, p. 204. 

EAOIEMAXTPOIXKAIAINAIOIXEPIXTATAN 
EPEIAHEPIXTATAIAIPEOENTEXYPOAINAinN 
ANAiANAPOXPArnNOXKAMYNAlOX 
AYXIAXAYXIKPATEYXAAAAP . . OX 
6 EYBOYAOXEYOYMAXOYPAnOX 

KAITOIAIPEOENTEXANAPEX 
XYNArnNIIAXOAITAIXAIKAlX 
PAYXANIAXPOAYIAAOYBPAXIOX 
AXTYMEAnNANAPOXGENEYXAINAOPOAIlA-«. 
10 ATHXANAPOXPOAYAPATOYAPrElOX 

EPIKPATHXATHXIAAMOYKAAXIOX 
TEAEXnNAAMO's . "NEYXKAAXIOX 
0IAiriNANAPOX . . . EYXAINAOPOAITAX 
EPlKPATHXPArr . JXKAMYNAIOX 
15 AIAYMAKAHX*!/ . . OYAIN AOPOAITAX 

ATHXIAOXOXAr . . . N APOYKATTABIOX 
APXINOMOX<l)IAO«Pl'ONOXKAAXIOX 
APXOKPATHXXTPATOKAEYXBOYAIAAX 
KAAAIXTPATOXNIKOXTPATOYNETTIAAX 
20 AAEilMAXOXKAEANAPIAAAAAAPMlOX 

AAEIIMAXOXMIKYAOYAAAAPMIOX 
EYKAHXAtDAIXTinNOXAPTElOX 
AEI N I AX ANOArOP A AIN AOPOAITAX 
I PPAXOXMIKinNOXAIN AOPOAITAX 
36 KAAATNnTOXAAMOXGENEYXKAAXlOX 

APIXTOMAXOXAAEIAPXOYPEAIEYX 
0AINIPPOXEPIKPATEYXKAAXIOX 
NIKArOPAXAPiXTOTENEYXNETTIAAX 
OIAOKPATHXAAMOKPATEYX AIN AOPOAITAX 
30 KAEArOPAXKOMATAKAAXlOX 

ATHXIXTPATOXEYAIKOYBOYAIAAX 
PIXTOKPATHXOEYrENEYXKAAXlOX 
lENOOnNKAEITHNOXBPAXlOX 
<t)AEOriN<t)IA0KPATEYXAAAAPMI0X 
36 AAKIMEAriN<DIAinNOXAINAOPOAITAX 

ONOMAKAHXMEAANIiPOYAIN AOPOAITAX 
QEAIAHTOXPOAYXAPMOYNETTIAAX 
ANAPEXArAO0IErEN0NT0XYNalA<l)YAAIANTEXAINAI0IX0PnX 
TAIAIPEXIEXriNflNTAIENAINAniTriNIEPEnNKAIIEPOOYTANKA . 
\o lEPOPOinNKAITHNAAAnNTHNEPITAKOINATAXXOMEf' . NEI 

AYTriNAINAiriNKAOAKAIENTOlXNOMOIXrEPPAPTAlK/ . mMETE 
XnNTITXlNENAINAnilEPnNOIMHKAIPPOTEPONMETEIXONAEAO 
XOAITOIXMAXTPOIXKAIAINAIOIXEPAINEXAIAYTOYXOTIANAPEX 
ArAOOIETENONTOPEPITAIEPATAAINAinNKAIANArPAyAITOAETC 
46 tA<I)IXMAEXXTAAANAIOINANKAIGEMEINEXT0IEP0NTAXAGANA . 

OPnXPAXINTOIXEPiriNOMENOIX0ANEPOI'HIOTIAINAIOITnNA 
TAGnNANAPHNMNAMANPOIEYNTAIEXTONAPANTAXPONOMTO 
AEANAAnMATOEXTANXTAAANKAITANANATPAOANOIEPEYX . . . 
AGANAXTEAEXATnOPnXAEAXTAAATEGHIEXTOIEPONTAX 
50 . GANAXTOIEPIXTAT/ lEPIMEAHGENTHTOIEN APX AIEONTEX. 



RHODES. 



U3 



10 



»5 



20 



25 



30 



35 



40 



45 



50 



"ESo^e fida-Tpois Kal AivSiois ktnaTaTdv 
fTTfiSfj eTnardTai aipedeyrfs viro AlvSmv 

'Avd^avSpoi Hdycoyoi KafivfSioi 

Avffiai AvaiKpartvi Aaddplfuloi 

Ev^ovXoi EiOvjidyov fldyios 
Kai Toi alpeOevTfi duSpfs 
avyayccvi^aadai rati SiKais 

flava-ayias floXv^dXov Bpdcrios 

' AcTTvixiSdov ' Av8pocrB(v(Vi AiySowoXtras 

' AyfjcravSpo^ HoXvapdrov 'ApytTos 

' EniKpdTrii 'AyrjcnSdfiov KXdcrios 

TeXeacov Aa/ioa^dflpfvs KXdaioi 

0iAiW 'Ai/SpocrlOff^evs AivSonoXiras 

' EiriKpdTTjs fldyco^f^os KafivvSios 

AiSvfiaKXrjs 0t[X/i']oi/ AivSonoXiTas 

' AyrjaiXoyos 'Ay'^rjcra^vSpov KaTrd^iof 

'Ap^ivo/xos 'PiXStppovos KXdcrios 

ApyoKpdrrjs ZrpaTOKXevs BovXiSas 

KaXXicTTpaTos NiKoarpdrov NerrcSa? 

AXi^ijiayp^ KXeaySpiSa AaSdpfiios 

AXf^ijiayp'i MiKvXov AaSdp/iios 

EvKXfji ' A (j)ai(rTt(opos 'Apyiios 

Aiipias ^AvOayopa. AifSonoXiras 

" Imracros MiKicoyos AivSonoXirai 

KaXXiyvmros Aa/xoadevevs KXdaios 

'ApiaT6fjia)(^os 'AXe^dp)(ov fliSieiis 

'PacviTTTTOS ' EircKparevs KXda-io^ 

NiKayopa^ A piaroyiufv^ NerriSas 

4>iXoKpdTT]9 Aa/iOKpdrevs AivSonoXiTa^ 

KXfayopas Kofidra KXdcrio^ 

' AyrjaicrTpaTos EvSiKov BovXiSas 

riicrTOKpdTrjs Oevyevevs KXdaios 

- ivo(f)S)v KXeiTcoi/o? Spdcrtoi 

'PaeOcoi' <PiXoKpdT(V9 AaSdpfiioi 

' AXKLfiiSaiv ^PiXicovoi AivSoTToXiras 

' OvofiuKXfjs MeXavdnrov AivSorroXiTas 

QeaiSrjTOS HoXv^dpfiov NtTTiSai 
dvSpfs dyaOol eyevouro (rwSia(f>vXd^ayT(s AtuSton oira>s 
ral aipi<7tis yivcovrai ku AlvSco toov kpicav Kal UpoQvTav Ka\l 
UpoTTOMv Kal tS)v dXX(ov t5>v kwl ra Koiva Tacr(Toiiiv\(c\v k^ 
ainZv AivSicov Ka6a Kal kv roti vofiois yky pairrai Ka\l /i]^ fiirk- 
ycovri rS)v kv AlvSw hpSiv 01 /xfj Kal nportpov fj.fT(t)(^of SeSo- 
xOai Tois fidcrrpoi? Kal AivSioii kwaivia-ai avroiis otl dfSpei 
dyaOol kykvovTo tripl ri Uph ra AivSioiv Kal dvaypdi^ai roSe to 
^d<f>icrfia ks ardXav XiOivav Kal Ok/xdu ks to Upov Tas 'A9dva[9 
Sffffiy irdcriv tois kniyivoiikvois ^avtpov rj on AivSioi rcav d- 
ya65>v dvSpSiv fivd/xav TroifvpTai ks rof dnavTa \p6vov to 
8i dvdXtofia TO ks Tau cndXav Kal Tav dvaypa(jidv 6 Updis Was 
'Adduas TeXfadrm- orrms 8e a. a-TdXa riOr) ks to Upov ray 
' A^Bdvas Tol kntcTTdTai kmfieXrjOkvTO) toI ku dpy^a kovTiS. 



This is a decree of the ndvTpoi and Lindians in 
honour of a Commission composed of kmardTai and 
other persons associated with them who had been 
chosen to superintend the elections of the Upeis and 
other ministers of religion, and to take care that 
these persons are chosen according to law, and only 
from among the citizens of Lindos, k^ avTwv AivSimv 
(lines 40, 41). The commissioners were also charged 
to prevent any persons from taking part in the 
Lindian Sacred Rites, Upd, who had not formerly 
enjoyed this privilege. The decree is ordered to 



be engraved on a marble stel^ and set up in the 
Hieron of Athen^ Lindia. 

M. Foucart has edited this inscription from a copy 
given him by Dr. Barmann, which on collation with 
the stone exhibits many inaccuracies, of which the 
following may be noted : — 

Line 3. 'E[/3]a[Ta)]»'oy for Hdyaivos. 

Line 5. Hoa- ... for fldyios. This line is wrongly 
transposed to below line 7. 

Line 14. Haw . . s for fldyco^y^os. 

Line 15. /M .... on for 0t[Xa']ot;. 

M m 



134 



RHODES. 



Line 26. This line omitted. 

Line 40. This line is incorrect after dWwv. 

Line 47. [fiyftjaf for nvdfiav. 

In several lines single letters are omitted which 
are perfectly legible on the stone. 

Line i. 'ESo^e fida-rpocs Kal AwStois. In editing this 
inscription (Rev. Archeol. N.S. xv, p. 209) M. Foucart 
considers the fidarpoi in the heading as the senate of 
Lindos. It is however clear from the evidence of 
inscriptions, anfe Nos. cccxlix, cccli, that the f^da-rpoi 
were not peculiar to Lindos, but that they exercised 
authority in religious matters both at lalysos and 
Kamiros, in which latter city they were elected by 
the KToivdrai. Their authority is marked by their 
position in the heading both of Lindian and lalysian 
decrees in which they precede the demos. See ante 
No. CCCLI, where I have collected the evidence as to 
fidoTpoi in Rhodes or elsewhere, so far as I could 
gather it from inscriptions or notices in ancient 
authors. After kma-TaTdv at the end of this line 
yvd>p.a must be understood, as Foucart remarks. It 
may have been omitted by an oversight of the 
lapidary. 

In a Lindian decree, Ross, Hellenika, p. 113, 
No.^47, we have the , complete form, e^o^e nda-rpois 
Kal AivSioir knicTTaTdp yvafia. These iTnaTdrai, ' in- 
spectors' or ' superintendents,' are mentioned in con- 
nection with religious ministration in other Rhodian 
inscriptions. On a marble found on the site of the 
temple of Apollo Erethimios they are associated 
with kiricTKoiToi, Upoiroioi, and other ministers of the 
temple in a list in which they take precedence of all 
the rest. See Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii. No. 276. That 
the office was elective we know from our inscription, 
line 2, and its permanency is proved by the ex- 
pression Tol kv dpxd kovTes, line 50. Here and in the 
inscription, Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii. No. 276, the number 
of epistatae is three. 

The kwiardTai mentioned in another Lindian in- 
scription, Ross, Archaol. Aufs. ii, p. 599, No. 9, are 
described as tol -irfp.^OkvTfs vno toD Sdfiov. These 
were probably commissioners who were appointed 
for some special purpose, as they were not Lindian 
citizens. See Ross, ioc. cit. p. 600. In the island of 
Megiste (Castel Rosso), on the Lykian coast, Ross 
copied a dedication to Apollo Megisteus by two epi- 
statae. See his Hellenika, p. 67. ' EiyKTrdrai occur 
elsewhere in inscriptions in connection with ifpoiroioi 
and with temples. See C. I. 76, 160, 2266. 

Line 3. Kap.vySios. This name occurs in another 
Rhodian inscription (Ross, Arch. Aufs. ii, p. 612, 
No. 22), and on one from Karpathos (Bull, de Corn 
Hell^n. iv, p. 271). 

Lines 6, 7. Kal rol alp(6ivT(s dvSpis crvvayoDvi^acrOai 
Tai9 SiKaii. The SiKai which these commissioners are 
appointed to conduct are, it may be presumed, suits 
against those who claimed rights in respect to the 
Ifpd, to which they were not entitled ; see lines 41, 42. 
The expression ovvaywyi^aa-daL shows, as Foucart re- 
marks, that they were the assessors of the k-mo-rdTai 
in these causes. On the right to participate in 
sacrifices alluded to here, see Waddington-Lebas, v, 
§ 2, p. 105, No. 339; Rayet, Inscr. Ined. de Kos, 



pp. 52-56 ; Foucart, Rev. Archdol. N. S. xv, p. 216 ; 
Foucart-Lebas, ii, f i, p. 2. 

Line 9. AivSonoXiras. This name, which recurs 
lines 15, 23, 24, 29, and in a Rhodian inscription, 
Bullet, de Corn Hellen. v, p. 334, may be compared 
with NeoTToXiras which we find in the inscription from 
the temple of Apollo Erethimios (Ross, Inscr. Ined. 
iii. No. 277), and which Ross ad Ioc. considers to be 
the name of a Rhodian Deme. He supposes that 
rioXiTa^, which occurs in the same inscription, de- 
signates a citizen of Rhodes itself, the dominant TroXty 
in the island. KapTraOionoXiTas occurs in Rhodian in- 
scriptions, C. I. 2538, 2539, and Ross, Inscr. Ined. 
iii, p. 15, No. 265 ; also in a Karpathian inscription. 
Bullet, de Corn Hellen. iv, p. 271. 

Line 19. NtTTiSas, which recurs lines 28, 37. An 
inscription published by me in the Journal of Hel- 
lenic Studies, ii, p. 354, records a decree bestowing 
a crown on a certain Sosikrates, son of Kleonymos 
of Netteia, and ordering that the record of this de- 
cree be engraved on a stele and set up at Netteia 
in the Hieron of Zeus Patroos. I copied this in- 
scription at Apolakkia in Rhodes in 1853 ; it was 
then lying among the stones collected for build- 
ing a church at Apolakkia, and it had been found 
with other marbles at a short distance from that 
village. The site of Netteia was therefore probably 
very near Apolakkia (see my Travels and Dis- 
coveries, i, p. 198). This village is near the south- 
west coast of the island and may very well have 
been included in the territory of Lindos (see the 
map in my Travels, frontispiece to vol. i). 

Lines 20, 21, 34. AaSdp/iios. This deme occurs 
in an inscription (C. I. 2513) which was copied by 
Fourmont, and in his notes is entered as having 
been in a Consul's house at Chios. Bockh places it 
under Kos, but it is more probably Rhodian (see 
C. I. 2545). In a mountainous district of Rhodes, 
about half-way between the two coasts, is a village 
called Laerma, the name of which may be a cor- 
ruption of Ladarmia. It is a little to the north-west 
of Lindos. 

Line 22. 'Apyeios. This occurs in another Rhodian 
inscription (Foucart, in Rev. Archeol. N. S. xiii, p. 360, 
No. 30). Argos must have been a Rhodian deme. 
There is a district in Kalymnos still called" A pyos. 

Line 26. rieSievv. Foucart identifies the inhabi- 
tants of this deme with the fleSLeTs kv Aiv8a> in the lists 
of Karian tributaries (see Kohler, Urkunden, p. 192). 
HeSievs occurs in Rhodian inscriptions, Ross, Hellen. 
p. 104, No. 31, and Bullet, de Corn Hellen. v, p. 334. 
In another Rhodian inscription. Rev. Archeol. N.S. 
xiii, p. 369, No. 32, we have the feminine, /7e5t[a5oy. 

Line 39. UpoGvrdv. hpoOvrai are mentioned in the 
following Rhodian inscriptions : the treaty between 
Hierapytna and Rhodes, Naber in Mnemosyne, 1852, 
i, p. 79; Ross, Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, pp. 589-618, 
Nos. 9, 16, 17; Foucart, Rev. Archdol. N.S. xi, p. 219, 
No. I ; ibid, xv, p. 218, No. 6r. They appear to 
have been a college of at least fifteen presided over 
by an apxttpoOvrrii (see Ross, Arch. Aufs. ibid. Nos. 9, 
16). Among the honours accorded to public bene- 
factors was a-irrja-is kv UpoOvTiif (Ross, Arch. Aufs. idid. 



RHODES. 



135 



Nos. I, 21, 22), which must have been a favour an- 
alogous to the a-iTrja-is iy npvTavetQ) of Other Greek 
states. Pausanias (iv, § $2, i) speaks of a hpoOvaiov 
where were statues of all the Hellenic Gods. See 
Vischer, Kleine Schriften, ii, p. 29 ; Foucart, in Rev. 
Arch^ol. N. S. xv, p. 215. It may be inferred from 
our inscription and from those already cited from the 
Mnemosyne and from Ross (Arch. Aufs. ii, p. 605, 
No. 16), that the Upodvrai ranked after the kpds 
and before the Uponowi. See also C. I. 1297. ^r^ 
Agrigentum, Segesta, and Melita the UpoOijTas was 
the eponymous magistrate. See C. I. 5491, 5546, 
5752. According to Pausanias (viii, § 42, 5) three 
UpoOvrat, chosen from the da-Toi, were associated with 
the Upeia in a sacrifice to Demeter at Phigalia. On 



the functions of the UpoQvrai see Vischer, Kleine 
Schriften, ii, p. 30. He thinks that they were not 
priests but rather ministers representing the state in 
matters relating to worship (Cult-beamte). In that 
capacity they invited guests to the koiv^i ta-Tia. In 
the treaty between Rhodes and Hierapytna already 
referred to, the Upus and UpoOvrai are ordered to pray 
to the Rhodian Gods. 

Line 40. (ttI rk Koivd. By Kowd are evidently 
meant Koivh Upd. 

e^ avTcov AlvSicuv. This must be connected with rat 
alpea-ifs, line 39. All these functionaries were to be 
chosen from Lindian citizens, just as in the already 
cited passage of Pausanias, viii, § 42, 5, the UpoOvrai 
are chosen from the dcrrol. 



CCCLVIII. 

On a circular altar or pedestal of white marble, which has been hollowed out, probably to form a mortar with a hole at the bottom. 
Externally the upper part of the inscription has been cut away so as to form a conical foot to the mortar. Diameter, 1 ft. 
91 in. Found at Mallona, near Lindos, in 1862; S. and B. Wescher, Rev. Arch^ol. N. S. x, p. 462; Foucart, Les Asso- 
ciations Relig. p. 229; Luders, Die Dionysisch. KUnstler, p. 167, No. 55. 

O Hi 2 / 
J <\_ T « - ^LNTAYnO 

TOYKOiNOYiOYAIONYZI AZTANA0ANAIZZTAN AIOZ 
ATABYPIAZTANEY(j>PANOPinNTnNSYN AOHNAinKNI Al O 
5 XPYZEnZTEct)ANnK Al AN AroPEYZEZINIZZTONAEIXPONON 

EnHPE AZGENTOZAETOYKOINOYnEPITHNTOnnNKAl 
ANAAnGEIZANIZZTAnPATM ATAZ.(j)NK AITAYTEZHHAN 
TEI AETOTnKOINnK Al4>IAOTEIMH©ENTOZEIZEYAPEZTH 
ZINTriNEPANIZZTANnAEONAKIZKAIEnANrEIAAMENOYEIZE 
10 niZKEYANTOYTOnOYZ PC K A I A A A E ZEn AN Tl A AMENOYI ZTA 

OIKHTHPIA^PKAIAAAAZEnANriAAMENOYEIZENOHMATAOPAO 
ZIOZTOYTOnOYZ.PKAITAZrYNAIKOZAYTOYAPETHZMENTEIMA0EI 

ZAZYnOTOYKOINOY-r ZIAZTANA«AN .. ZTAN AIOZATABYPI AZTA N 

EY4)PANOPiriNTnN A0EIZ A Z Tfi KOINO 

15 AOANA NAAXiMATON £ 



15 



Kal TeifiojBfVTa vnb 
Tov Koivov Tov AioyvcTiacTTdi' 'AOavaiaardv Aiocr- 
ara^vpiacTTdy Ev^payopicoy Tooy at/y Adr)yaia> KyiSio) 
^vcj-ecp cm<pdy(p Kal dvayopivtreaiy tVy rby dd -^pSyov 
fnupfaadtyTOi 8f tov KOiyov mpl Ta>y T(nr<ov Kal 
dyaXmOiiadv las to, wpdyfiara Ct^y Kal ravTfs fjnav- 
yfiXfTO tS) KOLvip Kal (f)L\oTfip.r]deyTOi els eiiapecrTr]- 
aiv t5>v ' Epayi<T<TTdy nXfoydKis Kal enayyeiXapevov els e- 
TTtaKfvdy TOV Tonov Lchh Kal dXXes kwayyiXafityov Is to, 
olKTjTTJpia Lp Kal dXXas inayyiXafifvov tls iyOijpaTa dnX6- 
aios ? TOV T&jTov Lp Kal Tas yvvaiKos avrov 'ApiTffs pey TetpaOet- 
aas iino tov Koiyov t\ov Aioyv'lcnacrTdy ' Aday[ai^crTdy Atoa-aTaffupiaaTav 
Ev<ppayopi(oy Twy [avy 'A6r]yaia) Kyi8ta> Kal . . . ."ladetaas Tm koivZ 
' AOavaVtaTdv oyyaXmpdTwv 



This inscription exhibits great carelessness in the 
orthography, and must be of a late period. Thus 
we have a double a in ' AdayaiaaTdv, line 2 ; las for ds, 
lines 4, 6 ; 'EpaviaaTav, line 8 ; TdvTis for TavTas, line 6 ; 
dXXis for dXXas, line 9 ; rinayyeiXfTo, line 7, is a bar- 
barous form for eirrjyyeiXaTo, and this verb is left 
without a nominative case. 

The inscription is part of a decree bestowing 



honours on some benefactor of several religious 
associations at Rhodes. 

Lines 1-5. We are told that this benefactor, whose 
name must have been in the missing upper part of the 
decree, was honoured with a golden crown and per- 
ennial proclamations by the Koiyoy of the Dionysiastai, 
the Athanaistai, and Diosatabyriastai Euphranorioi, 
who were associated with the Knidian Athenaios. 



136 



RHODES. 



In line 6 foil., it is stated that the community from 
whom the decree emanates had been molested about 
certain localities which doubtless had been used by 
the Koiv6y for the celebration of their religious rites. 
This had led to litigation, Trpdy/jLara (line 7), the cost 
of which was 550 drachmee. This sum had been 
furnished by the person honoured in the decree, who 
had also given 560 drachmae for setting the ground 
in order, (h kiTKTKtvhv tov tottov (line 10), for the lodg- 
ings, oiKTjTTJpta (line 11), 100 drachmae, and an equal 
sum for a purpose which, from the illegible condition 
of the last word in line 1 1 , cannot be explained. 

I have already noticed the Religious Associations 
of Rhodes. See anie cccxLiv, and the Netteian 
decree (Journal of Hellenic Studies, ii, pp. 357-360). 
The epithet Eixppavopioi attached to the Aioa-ara- 
pvpiaarai here may have been derived from the Eu- 
phranor who is mentioned in the Netteian decree. 

Line 6. irfpl tS>v r6-tra>v. Compare C I. 2525 b, line 
I 20 : xal rais eTri)(y(Tt(n enl t5>v tottohv els rhv del \p6vov. 

Line 7. L^. The siglum L which here repre- 
sents the drachma is explained in Pseudo-Galen. Trepl 
fieTpwf, c. ii ; ap. Hultsch, Metrol. Script. Reliqu. i, 
p. 220: Ac Se Svo ypa/j.fial avvdiTTOVffaL Kara Qdrepov 
irepas Sa-re ymvtav woieiv Spay^p-^v aripaivovvi L. 

With this siglum may be compared the V which oc- 



curs in a Knidian inscription, to denote the drachma. 
(See my Hist. Disc, ii, p. 756, No. 41.) 

Line 11. eh to. olK-qT-fipia. These were probably 
houses where certain officers and members of the 
Koivov were lodged either during the celebration of 
certain festivals or permanently. Such lodges would 
be in the vicinity of the temple or other place of 
worship of the kowov. 

els kvOrjpaTa OHAOcnos tov tottov. I can only read 
the first four letters thus, OflAOcrios. Wescher reads 
evOripaTa (olKi])(rtos, but the letters which I print in 
uncials are certainly not OIKH. Foucart suggests 
KO(7/i77](7£oy, but that is equally at variance with the 
stone. The word may be a blundered form of SirXia-is, 
' equipment.' The barbarous ignorance of the lapi- 
dary has been already noticed. evdrJuaTa is probably 
used here in the same sense in which we find evOepa 
in an inscription, C. \. 3599, lines 13, 15 : to^s Se rpa- 
ne^iTus, iirel Siayeypap.pe\ya fj rh Sid^ipopa^ *X*"' s^'^f/'* 
r51t56i'TaS' t6[ac]oj' avTcof SfKarov . . . tovs Se [rpaTTf^iVay] 
ex^iv evOefta tAj /ivpias .... 'AXe^afSpeias. In this passage 
the word clearly means money deposited with a banker. 

The litigation mentioned, line 6 of our inscription, 
may have made it necessary to deposit a sum in 
court, pendente lite, or as a security or indemnity in 
contingencies which might arise. 



CCCLIX. 

On the end of a blue marble cist found near Rhodes. Height, ^\ in.; width, i ft. ij in. C. T. N. 

HAYEANlAi: navaayias 

PAYKANIA PavaauLa 

PYNXlAAr 'Pvpx^Sas. 

'Pvvx^Sas. This is the ethnic of a deme other- iv, p. 138, we find, line 4, riy yds ray ip 'PoyK[yja). 



wise unknown. In the inscription from Embonas in 
Rhodes, published by Martha, Bull, de Corr. Archdol. 



This may be the same deme. 



COCLX. 

Round a marble cup. Height, sj in.; diameter, inclusive of handles, 9^ in. Rhodes; C. T. N. 

AP0TA4>nNTA<J)nN 
AiroTdcjxou Ta^v, 



These words are inscribed round the body of 
the cup, which is encircled with an ivy wreath in 
relief It is solid, has two handles, and resembles 
in form the skyphos of fictile art. On the top 
are two leaves of the vine or plane in slight re- 
lief; in the centre of each leaf a small hole has 
been drilled, probably for the attachment of some 
object in metal. The bottom of the foot of the 
cup presents a fractured surface shewing that it 
has been broken off from a support of some kind. 
This support would probably be a small column. 
The word dnoTatpoi is thus explained by Hesychios 
s. V. 0/ awTipKTTfVKoTes ToTs e\ev6epois SovXot, Kal pf) 



(TvvTa<pevTes avrois. Suidas, s. v., gives a different 
explanation. The dnoTa^os according to him is o 
direcTTeprjpevos tS>v irpoyovi.Kmv Td^my ovtco Aetvap^os. 
It would seem from a comparison of these two 
passages that the word drroTacpos was in the time of 
Deinarchos applied to those who were deprived of 
the right of burial in the tombs of their forefathers, 
and that slaves who had earned their liberty were 
also called diroTaipoi because they had the privilege 
of a separate place of burial. In our dedication 
Ta(pd>y must be understood as the Doric contracted 
form of Ta<ped>v, ' a burying ground,' which occurs in 
two Palmyrene inscriptions, C. I. 4507 ; Waddington- 



RHODES. 



137 



Lebas, Pt. vi, § 8, Nos. 2619, 2621; in another 
Palmyrene inscription, No. 2625, ibid., we have ra- 
<j>aiu)v. The Rhodian inscription, Bullet, de Corr. 
Hellt^n. iv, p. 139, contains the grant of a burial 
ground to certain eranists, which is marked off by 



boundaries, is Spot Kuvrai. I think it more than 
probable that the vase on which our inscription is 
engraved is broken off from a small pillar which 
marked the boundary of such a burial ground, or 
surmounted a large tomb; see C. I. 534, 535. 



CCCLXI. 

On a tablet of white marble. Length, i ft. \ in. ; height, 6\ in. Rhodes ; A. B. 

AirVnTOYMEAEOYSIBAGYKAHPOIOSAIZTHZ 
ZEINEnAPAnPOnYAniTOYZAEOETOIAKOPOZ 
BnMOYZAOANATOIZINEnEirEPAZAYTOIANAKTEZ 
KEANOIZEYPnnAZnAIZINENEIMANIZON 
5 MOYNaiENAIIEIOIZITOAEKAEOZAOOONONnNHP 

ErMAKAPnNANYZAI<J>ATiAIKAiOZYNAI 

AlyviTTOv fieSiovcTL ^advKXrjpoLO ^atarr]^, 
Eiwe, napot, nponv\(o rovcrSe Oiro (aKopos 

Bconoiis dOavaToicriv, kwa, yepas aiiTol dvuKTes 
KeSvois Evpanras iraKrlv euei/xay taov 
5 MovfO) iv al^eioiaf ToSe /cXeoy d<f)6ovov d>vf)p 

ky fiaKoipcov avvaai (pari SiKaiocrvya. 



This is a dedication of altars to two or more of 
the Ptolemies, kings of Egypt, who are here styled 
AlyvTTTov neSiovTfs and dOdvaroi, from which latter 
epithet we may infer that they were deceased at the 
time of the dedication. The person who erects the 
altars is one Saistes, who is styled a (aKopos, id. qu. 
vewKopos, a sacred minister in some temple, probably 
the one near the trpcmvXov of which the altars were 
placed. The inscription goes on to state the motive 
for the dedication. Saistes had alone of his compeers 
received from the kings an honour equal to that be- 
stowed on the trusty sons of Europe. 

The concluding words of the dedication are not 
clear, but if we connect ey /laKapmv with >cXloy, the 
sense seems to be this : ' he declares that he achieved 
through justice this ample renown bestowed by the 
Blessed ones.' We may assume that Saistes was 
an Egyptian. The name occurs neither in the 
Index to Bockh's Corpus nor in Pape's Lexicon 
of names. What the honour was which was con- 



ferred on him alone among his countrymen is not 
stated. If we translate the expression ev ai^doia-i, 
'among warriors,' the distinction may have been 
his enrolment into some corps such as SidSoxoi npbs 
Tfjv avXriv, who were originally composed exclusively 
of Macedonians (see Polyb. xv, 29. i, 2, and Lum- 
broso. Economic Politique de 1' Egypte sous les 
Lagides, p. 224). The word SiKatoa-vva rrtay mean 
' through the justice of his Royal benefactors,' or 
' on account of his own justice.' 

The inscription, so far as I can judge from the 
form of the letters, would not be later than the time 
of Ptolemy Euergetes I. 

It should be noted that, though this inscription 
was obtained by Mr. Consul Biliotti at Rhodes, I 
am not aware of any evidence that it was found 
there. The mention of a irpcmvXov, line 2, would 
rather lead me to suppose that this marble was 
brought from Alexandria in some Greek ship, and 
sold at Rhodes. 



CCCLXII. 

On a fragment of white marble, broken on all sides. Height, 9^ in.; width, 3 in. Rhodes; A, B. 

Moz: 
vr 

I0N 
5 VN 

^TO 
NKAl 
VTF 
/ 



N n 



138 



KASSOS — KARPATHOS. 



CCOLXIII. 

On a circular piece of blue marble, the back of which is convex, and is roughly tooled. Diameter, 8 in. Kassos ; Ross, Inscr. 

Ined. iii, No. 262, and his Reisen, iii, p. 36; C. T. N. 

AYS 
lAA 
MOS 

Ava-iSa/ios. 



Ross, in his Reisen, iii, pp. 35, 36, states that he 
saw at Kassos several inscribed stones similar in 
form and dimensions. See his Arch. Aufsatze, i, 
p. 65, and Beaudouin, in Bullet, de Corn Hell6n. iv, 
p. 1 23. The place where they were found, about half 
an hour's distance from the port, was strewn with 
the ruins of an ancient city, and is still called to 
nSXiv. These inscribed stones were found in ancient 



tombs. From their form it seems probable that they 
were used to close the mouth of a pithos or other 
receptacle for the ashes of the dead. Ross suggests 
that the omission of the name of the father in this 
and the other inscription published by him may have 
been caused by want of space, but this does not seem 
a sufficient reason, because smaller letters might have 
been used. The writing is of a good period. 



CCCLXIV. 

On a slab of blue marble, broken across at line 16. Height, 2 ft.; breadth, i ft. 4 in. Karpathos; S. and B. 
Wescher in Revue Arch^ol. N. S. viii, p. 469; Vercoutre, ibid. N. S. xxxix, pp. 317-320. 



ulOYBPYKOY . ■ luZEIPE EPEIAHi ri.. 
. . ITOIMHTPOAnPOYZAMIOZAEAAMOZlEY 
. . ZETHYPEPTAEIKOZIEKTENnZTEKAKDIAO 
S . . MnZOEPAPEYriNAIATETEAEKEIPANTAZ 

. ATATETANEMPEIPIANKAITANAAAANANA 
ZTPO<l>ANANErKAHTONAYTONPAPEZXHTAI 
\0IMIKAZTEAIAOEZIOZrENOMENAZKAiP0AAnN 
clZTOYZEZX, TOY-i'lNAYNOYZEMPEZONTnN 
10 OYMONONTnNAAMETANAAAAKAITONPAPO.KEYN 

TUNTANPAZANEKTENEIANKAIKAKOPAOIAN 
■'APEXOMENOZPAPAITIOZrErONEITAZZnTHP . 

AZPPOTOYTEMIZOnOHMEINAIATPIBHNEN 

. . POAAOYZTHNAAMbTANENEPIKINAYNC . . 
15 . lAOEZEZirENOMENOYZEZnZEN . TOONO . 

. . -A . ~NO-rvN/-kii^o^T'"i^ A;ii,^Alii<L 

. . ^ I ONTflNKATOIKEY'JTflNENTniPEPIPOA . 
PIEIZPOPEYOMENOZAIATETEAEKEIOPflZOYN 
^AIOAAMOZOBPYKOYNTlnNct)AINHTAIEYXAPI 
20 . TOZKAITOYZArAOOYZTHNIATPriNTIMnN 

K irPXiOENTOZTOYAETOYtAOIZMATOZAEAOXOA . 
. IIAAMni EPAINEZAIMHNOKPITONMHTPOAnPOY 
ZAMION KAIZTE*ANnZAI XPYZEmZTEOANm 
I AlANArOPEYZAIENTniArriNITriNAZKAAPIEI 
25 ON OTIOAAMOZOBPYKOYNTinNEPAINEIKAl 

ZTE0ANOIXPYZEXllZTE<l>ANniMHNOKPiTON 
MHTPOAriPOYZAMIONEMPEIPIAZENEKAKAIKAAOKA 
. AOIAZ EZEZTaAEMHNOKPITrilKAIEIZTAZPANA 
. YPEIZPAPAriNEZOAIAZZYNTEAOYNTIBPYKOYNTI 
30 01 TOAErENOMENONTEAEZMAEIZTONZTE0AN . N 

'EAEZATnOTAMIAZMETAAETANKYPriZINTOYAZ 
. OYyA<l>IZMATOZEAEZOnOAAMOZPAPAXPHMA 
. 'APAOAEAIPE0EIZA..H. AZOfiENTniZYMPANT. 
. \MniTANA0ZINT0YZTEcDAN0YKAiriZTEANAOE 
35 MEINEIZTOIEPONTOYPOTEIAANOZTOYPOPOMIOY 

ZTAAANAIOINAN K Al ANATPAtAIEIZAYTANTO 
tAcDIZMAKAOOTETIMAKEIOAAMuZOBPYKOYNTiriN 
'1HN0KPIT0NMHTP0 .nPOYTAMIONTOAf N C 



KARPATHOS. 



139 



610V BpvKOvlvT^ios (lire, iTreiSfj [M'\rj[j/6- 
KpjiTos MrjTpoSdipov Zd/xtos, SfSa/xocrifv- 
KOi^S iTT) vnep TO, eiKoai eKT€va>s re Kal <j)i\o- 
5 TQfi(09 dtpairtvcof SiarerfXiKei Travrat 

KJard re rav e/jnreipiau Kal rav dWav ava- 
(rrpo<f)a,v aviyKXr^TOv avrov Trapea^rjTai^ 
XotfiiKas re SiaQicnos yivofievas Kal noXX&i/ 
eh Toiis e<7)(dTovs KivSwovi eimecrSvTcav 

10 ov fiovov tS)v Safierdv dXXd Kal tS>v ■jrapo\C\Kevv- 

Tcof, ray Trdcrav eKTevetav Kal KaKoiraOiav 
Traptypjievoi napairios yeyovei rds trcoTTjpfi- 
ay, 7r/)S tov re /xta-OcodrJueiu Siarpl^cov kv [ra troX- 
ei\ noXXovs twv Sajxerdv ev eniKLvSvvoSii 

15 S^iaQecrecn yevo/iifovi ecrcocre, fj.hlcrObi' o[v 

Se^dfilevos, evfOiKoas re Kal SiKaicoi [irpbs e- 
K(x\<TTOv rmv KaroLKevvTCDV ev rS TrepnroXli- 
a> elanopevofievos SiarereXeKer ottcds ovu 
Kal 6 SdfjLos 6 BpvKovvTL(cv ^aifrjrai evydpi- 

20 crjroy Kal Toiis dyaQovs t5>v iarpZv rifimy, 

KvpaiOevTos TovSe tov i^acftiafiaTO^ 8e86-)(6a\i. 
t]q) SdfKo knaiveaai MrjvoKpirov MrjTpoSoopov 
Zdfiiov Kal arecpai'dxTai )(pvaea> a-Te<pdva>, 
Kal dvayopevaai kv tZ dycoyi t5>v AaKXaniei- 

25 COP oTi 6 Sdfioi 6 B pvKovvTioav eiraivel Kal 

CTe^avot -^pvcreco (TTe(fidva> Mrji/oKpiTOv 
MT)TpoSd>pov Zdfiiof e/nretpias eveKa Kal KoXoKa- 
yja^iay k^ea-Tca Se M-qvoKpiro) Kal eh rif wava^ 
yYvpeiS TTapayivecrOai ds (rvvTeXovvri BpvKovvri- 

30 or TO Se yevofievov reXecrfia eh top aTl^avfoli/ 

TeXeadTO) 6 Ta/icas, /ieTa Se Tau Kvpcocriy TovSe 
t]ou yjra^iarnaTOS eXecrQoa 6 Sd/ios Trapa^pfjfia 
a^vSpa, 6 Se aipedels a[iT'\r]\a-'\dcr6a) ev tS> av/iiravT^i 
S'^djj.O) ? Tdv SooTLv TOV aTe^dvov Kal &<TTe dvaOe- 

35 fieiv eh TO lepov rod floTeiSdvos tov riopOfiLov 

ardXav XtOivav Kal dvaypdy^ai eh avrdv to 
i^d(fnana Ka6' 8 TeTi/idKet 6 Sd/ios 6 BpvKovvTiMv 
MrfvoKpLTov MrjTpoSSpov Zdjiiov, to Se \ye]v[6fj,'\eli'0i/ 
reXecr/ia] --------------- 



On collation of Wescher's text with the stone I 
found that it was incorrect in several places. Among 
the Dorisms which this inscription presents may be 
remarked iiKrOmOrnieiv, line 13, for fii(r6<odfjvai, avvre- 
XowTi, line 29, for (rvvreXovai, and PoTetSdvos, line 35, 
for noaeiSmvos. 

This is an honorary decree by which the demos 
of Brykountii grants a golden crown to Menokritos, 
son of Metrodoros, a Samian, for his services as a 
physician during more than twenty years. At an 
earlier period, before he received a salary, he gave 
his services gratuitously while residing in Karpathos, 
and cured many persons of dangerous illnesses. 

The name BpvKovvnoi occurs three times in the 
Athenian tribute lists, see Corpus Inscr. Att. i, No. 37, 
p. 22, and Nos. 231, 233, pp. 114, 116. BpvKownoi as 
an ethnic occurs in a Rhodian inscription (Foucart, 
Rev. Archdol. N. S. xiv, p. 328), and in a number 
of inscriptions found on a site in the north of Kar- 
pathos, which is called to this day 15 Bovpyovvra. See 
Ross, Reisen, iii, p. 62 ; Wescher, Rev. Arch. N. S. 
viii, p. 473 ; and for the description of the ruins 
on this site, Beaudouin, in Bullet, de Corr. Hell, iv, 



pp. 274-283, who quotes a description of Karpathos 
written in modern Greek by Emmanuel Manolakak^, 
and published at Athens, 1878. According to Strabo, 
X, p. 489, Karpathos had four cities, the names of two 
of which, Nisyros and Poseidion, have been handed 
down to us by ancient geographers. The other two 
must have been Brykountii and Arkesia, which latter 
is known to us by the Athenian tribute lists, and also 
by an inscription found in Karpathos. 

Line 3. Se8afioa-iev[K6']s. Physicians hired by the 
state were called Srjfioa-ioi. See anic cxliii, line 15, 
note, and Vercoutre, in Rev. Archdol. xxxix, p. IQ7. 

Line 5. SiaTereXeKet ; so line 12, yeyovfi; line 37, 
Teri/idKei; cf anie ccxcix ^, lines 10, 17, 27. On this 
form of the perfect with present inflexion see G. 
Curtius, Greek Verb, Eng, Transl. p. 393, §§ 179, 180. 

Line 1 3. Siarpi^cov ev [ra nSXei]. This restoration 
is suggested by the words ev tS iTepnroX[^r\<u, line 17. 
The noXis can hardly be any other than that of the 
BpvKovvTioi, but in that case it is singular that, line 10, 
Safierdv is used where we should expect noXirdv. 

Line 33. 6 Sk aipeOeh a[/T]jj[cr]ao-^o) ev tS avfiwavTlt 
S'jdfim. We find a similar formula in the decree of 



140 



KARPATHOS. 



the Rhodian Euthalidai published by me in the 
Journal of Hellenic Studies, ii, p. 354, lines 18-20, 
Ev6aXiSai iXiaOcca-ai' d^^vSpaj, 6 Sh alpiGus alrr]crda-6co rav 
fiovXav Kai [roju Bafiov 8(S6a6ai Evd^ajXiSais k.t.X. 

The expression fy r£ avfinavTL Sdjim occurs in an- 
other Karpathian inscription in which certain persons 
are chosen as Upaymyol inrb tov avvrravTos Sdjiov. See 
Beaudouin, loc.cit. p. 262, who argues from the evi- 
dence of this inscription that o (xviiiras Sfj/ios refers 
not to a single city, but to the four Karpathian 
cities as represented in one common assembly. So 
too in the case of the Lindian inscriptions (Ross, 
Archaol. Aufsatze, ii, p. 611, Nos. 20, 24), in which 
o avfiiras Sdfios is distinguished from rb trXrjQos tS>v 
AivSioiv, Ross supposes that this collective demos was 
an assembly of all the Rhodians, as distinguished 
from the popular assembly, nXrjOos, of a single city. 
Foucart (Rev. Archeol. N. S. xvi, p. 27) rejects this 
interpretation, and maintains that by 7TXfj$os we must 
understand the Lindian plebs, and by 6 av/nras Sd/ios 
the assembly of all the citizens of Lindos and of the 
surrounding villages. Our decree, however, taken 
in connection with the other Karpathian inscription 
already referred to, inclines me to think that Ross 
was right in his view. 

It is ordered in our inscription, lines 31-35, that 
after the confirmation, Kvpaa-is, of the decree con- 
ferring the crown and the eTraivos, the demos is to 
elect a person who in the common assembly, 6 (rv/x- 
vas Sdfios, is to apply for permission to bestow the 
crown and to dedicate a stele inscribed with the de- 
cree in the temple of Poseidon Porthmios. Adopting 



M. Beaudouin's view, we may infer that the decrees of 
a single Karpathian city required in certain cases the 
sanction of the common assembly of the Karpathian 
Tetrapolis. For similar instances of decrees requiring 
the sanction of a higher authority, see the note on CLX, 
anfe, p. 25, and the decree of the Rhodian Euthalidse, 
already referred to (Journal of Hellenic Studies,- ii, 

P- 359). 

The festivals to which the Brykountii contribute, 
travayvpus &9 avvTtXovvTL BpvKowTioi, line 29, would 
probably be religious festivals celebrated by the 
four cities conjointly. The temple of Poseidon 
Porthmios, in which our decree is to be set up, 
line 35, was, probably, the gathering place of these 
festivals, and the dedication to that deity (Bullet, 
de Corn Hell^n. iv, p. 262), by kpaymyoi, may be 
connected with the same Trai/rjyvpeis. 

The father of the Menokritos honoured in this 
decree is Metrodoros, a name which, as Wescher 
points out, occurs several times in the extant notices 
of Greek physicians. There was a Pythagorean of 
this name (lamblichos, Pythag. 34), also a Metro- 
doros, pupil of Sabinus, the commentator on Hippo- 
krates. A third physician of this name was one of 
the freedmen of Cicero (Cic. ad Attic, xv, ep. i ; ad 
Fam. xvi, ep. 20). 

On honours paid to physicians, see afiU CXLIII 
and ccLviii, also the Delian inscription. Bullet, de 
Corr. Hell6n. iv, p. 349, and one from Kos, ibid, v, 
p. 204. See also Vercoutre, La Medecine publique 
dans I'antiquit^ Grecque in Rev. Archaol. N.S. xxxix, 
pp. 99, 231, 309, 348. 



CHAPTER V. 



MELOS, DELOS, lOS, SIPHNOS, TENOS. 



CCCLXV. 

On a votive tablet of white marble, on which is sculptured in relief a female left leg, turned to the left, and cut off above the knee. 
Height, I ft. :J:in. ; breadth, 7f in. Melos; Blacas Collection. C.I. 2429; Annali dell' Inst. Arch. Rom. i, p. 341. 



ACKAH 

nin 

KAI 

VrEiA 

5 TYXH 

EYXAPIC 
THPION 

A a-KXrjTTim Kai " Yyeia Tv^ij ev^apKTTrjpiov. 



This votive tablet was found with two others 
also dedicated to Asklepios, and with the celebrated 
Blacas head, which is commonly called Asklepios, 
but which Overbeck, Griech. Kunst-mythologie, 
ii, p. 89, maintains to be a Zeus. All these objects. 



together with seven or eight fragments of female 
statuettes, appear to have been found together in 
a grotto. See Annali, /oc. cit. pp. 341, 342. In the 
first letter of " Vyeta the aspirate is indicated by two 
dots as in ante Part i, cxxv, line 2. 



CCCLXVI. 

On the upper moulding of an altar or base of dark volcanic stone rudely carved. Height, 4 ft. ; breadth, i ft. 7 in. Melos ; 
presented by W. R. Hamilton, Esq. C. I. 2434; Rohl, Inscript. Gr. Antiquissimse, p. 117, No. 420; Ross, Inscr. Ined. iii, 
p. 2. 

AA^NCKREO^ AaiioKpicov 

ANEGHKE dv^erjKi. 



This inscription belongs to the class which Kirchhoff 
(Studien, 3rd ed. p. 62) places in the latter half of the 



sixth century B.C. The © appears to have a bar across, 
but this may be the result of fracture of the stone. 



CCCLXVII. 

On a sepulchral stelb of white marble, with relief representing a male figure standing to the front and holding out with his 
right hand a bunch of grapes above the head of a cock which stands on the ground. The figure wears the himation. The 
top of the stelfe is wanting, and the sculpture and inscription much worn away. Height, i ft. 5 in. ; breadth, i ft. i\ in. 
Melos; presented by Dr. Jarvis, 1833. 

AOC PlA 

"APOAITAYPE n-]apo8ha} 

X A I P E x«'P^. 



o o 



142 



DELOS. 



CCCLXVIII. 

On a fragment of grey marble, broken on all sides. Height, 6^ in. ; breadth, 6f in. Delos; presented by Sir Walter Trevelyan, 1874. 

Stuart, Ant. Ath. 2nd ed. iii, p. 128; C.I. 2288. 

ON 

AEnii 

TENO*^ 
HNKA 

5 1NAA* 



This is a fragment of a dedication made by the 
strangers resident in Delos in honour of some one 
who had filled the office of eTri/zeXj^r^y in that island. 
The more complete text, as given C. I. 2288, is as 

follows : ... ^fcoj/joi/ Ztji/ccyofs ' A6[i\ovi a, kiTip .i\r}Tri\v 
Arf^Xov yevofiei'oi' ['AffJTjpaiaiv Kal ' PlMlfiaicolu Kal rlwi' 
dXX mp ^£j/(»[i' oi Ka'\ TOiK ovi'T€s Kal [Tra]pe7riSr]iJ.ov\i''\T€s ku 
ArjXm dpfTTJs efiKev Kal SiKaiocrvu^rjsj dve6t)Kav. The 
fragment in the Museum here given is said to have 
been brought away from Delos by an English naval 



officer many years ago. The marble therefore must 
have been broken up since it was copied by Stuart. 
The letters underlined in the above transcript from 
Bockh are those preserved in the Museum fragment. 
The eTrtjueXjjr^y 477X01; was an officer appointed by 
the Athenians to regulate the government of that 
island, after b. c. i 66, when the Delians were expelled 
and their territory occupied by Athenian citizens. See 
C. I. 1338, 2286, 2288, and i, p. 6ii<5, and Lebegue, 
Recherches sur Ddlos, pp. 147-149, and 310-312. 



OCOLXIX. 

On a tablet of white marble. Height, 6J in. ; breadth, 4^ in. Delos; formerly in the Collection of the Earl of Belmore. 

C. I. 2290. 

znrAozTYPioz 

VPOAAflNI 
. APIZTHPION 

cpiKon 

Z]a>yXos Tvpios ' AnoXXwvL [x] ap'CTijptof 'Ettikoco. 



The first word in this dedication may be read 
ZmyXo?. This name, which is not given by Pape, 
is probably Semitic. Bockh reads T5>yXos, but 



the two horizontal strokes are quite clear on the 
stone. 

Line 4. 'Ettikoo) for 'EnrjKom. 



CCCLXX. 

On a tablet of white marble. Height, 8 in. ; breadth, 8 in. Delos ; presented by A. E. Impey, Esq. 

ANGMOIC 
AnCOCIKAKOIC 

'Ave/jioii dnaxTiKaKOis. 

The word air«o-/ico/(oy corresponding to the Latin averruncus occurs in an inscription, Osann, p. 485, 

C. L 5991, drraxTiKaKois deoTs. 



lOS — SIPHNOS — TENOS. 



H3 



CCCLXXI. 

On a small stelfe of white marble surmounted by a pediment, in the centre of which is incised a Maltese cross ; below the 
inscription is incised an ivy tendril. Height, iijin. ; breadth, lo in. los; C.I. 6953. 

AycAnAPoc 

ZENtONOC 

tPAmmAtikoi: 
AiAAckAAe 
5 xAiPeAtiAoc 

Av<ravSpoi | —iv(ovoi | rpa(ifiaTiKos I 8iSdcrKa\e I xcupe "AyiSof. 

According to Pash van Krienen, Descriz. dell' Archipelago, pp. 41, 159, this was formerly at los. 
The letters throughout have been retouched by a modern hand. 



CCCLXXII. 

On a circular cist of white marble, which has been hollowed out to form a mortar. Height, r ft. fin.; diameter, i ft. if in. 

Siphnos ; C. I. 7004. 

4)AINAPISTHr 
THZ<})IA0<1)AN0YZ 

*Paivapi<7Tr]s | r^y 'PiXo^dvovi. 

Bockh reads <t>aivapeTris, but the letters are distinct. According to Pash van Krienen, Descriz. dell* 

Archipelago, pp. 165 and 116, this was formerly at Siphnos. 



10 



CCCLXXIII. 

On the upper part of a stelfe of white marble, both edges nearly complete. 

C. I. 2329. 

TillA. . . . 

PPYTANtii .... "HEPEIAHA . 

MnNIOZAMMilNIO^ANHPArAe . . 

EZTINKAIEYNOYSTrilAHMni 
5 TniTHNinNKAIAIATEAEIXPEI . . 5 

PAPEXOMENOZKAIKOINEITEinOA . . 

KAIKAGIAIANTOIZENTYrXANOYZ . . 

AYTrilANAAEAEKTAIAEKAl" . . 

GEAPOAOKIANTriNAHAinNAr-C 
10 GEITYXEIAEAOXGAITEIBOYAEIK . . 

-niAHMniEPAINEZAITEAYTf . 

. AIZTE<l)ANnZAlGAAAOYZTE<t)AI . . 

. . . lllEPniT . . TOYPOZEIAHNOZKAITHZ 

JkM<l>ITPITHZAPETHZENEKENKAI 
15 EYNOIAZTHZEIZTONAHMONTON 

THNinNEINAIAEAYTONKAITOYZEi 

rONOYZAYTOYPPOZENOYZKAlE . 

EPTETAZTHZPOAEnZAEAOZGA . 

AEKAIPPOEAPIANENTOIZArnZIN 
20 OIZZYNTEAEIHPOAIZKAIPPOZ'^ 

AONPPOZTHNBOYAHNKAITONAH 
■lONEANTOYAEHTAIANATPAtAI 

. . TOAETOtH^IZMAEIZZTHAHN . . 

.... NKAIZTHZAIEIZTOIEPONTC . 
25 aNOZKAITHZAM(J)ITPITHZ . . . 

.... lAQHNAmiEIAr^'N 



15 



20 



25 



Height, I ft.; breadth, 10 in. Tenos; E. 

irpvTdi'fa)[i' yvdifilr]' iireiSfj 'A^fi- 
fjiwuios 'AfjL/imviov dvfip dyad[6s 
kariv Kai evvovs t^ Srnam 
r£ Trjvimv Kal SiareXei )(^pei[as 
7rape)(6fMevos Kal Koivtt tcT 7r6X\ei 
Kal KaO' ISiav roTs ei'Tvy)(^dvovo-liv 
avTW, duaSeSfKTai Se Kal rf^i' 
deapoSoKiaf rStv AijXicov^ ' Aya- 
6fT Tv-)^ii^ SiSo-^dai Til ^ovX(t K[al 
T<3 Si]/ia) inawecrai re avrb^f 
/clat (rTeipavaxrai 6aXXov (TTe(pdf[a> 
if t]o5 kpf t[£] tov HoaiiSmvos Kai Trjs 
A fi(piTptTr)9 dperrjs effKev Kal 
fiivoias Ttji «'$■ TOf SrjfjLop toi> 
Trjvlatv, eTyai Se avrw Kal ToifS ([k- 
yoyovs avrov wpo^ivov^ Kal i\v- 
fpyirai rfji noXtoys' SeS6a-da{t. 
Sk Kal wpofSpiay ei> rots dycaa-iv 
oh avuTeXfT 17 TrdAiy Kal npocro- 
Sop npbs TTji/ ^ovXfji' Kal rbv Sfj- 
fiov kdv TOV Sei]Taf dvaypdi^ai 
Si\ ToSf TO ■^^(f)C<r/ia els aTTJXrjt/ [Xi- 
Oifrfli/ Kal a-TTJaai els ri lepov rofO 
no(TeiS\5>vos Kal ttjs A/x<f)tTptTr)s' [iva 
Se Aca]t 'AO-qvaloi elSmaiv [ra e\frr}(f>i<rp.ei'a 
'Afifimfto), Toiis dpyovTas diroaTeTXai els 
AQrjvas ToSe to ilrrjcfyia/ia, acfipayicrafievovs 
Tg Sr^fiocria a'<f)payiSi.'\ 



144 



TENOS. 



This inscription has been much rubbed on both 
margins, and some of the letters given in Bockh's 
transcript have consequently been effaced. 

Line 7. Ka6' iSCav. On the Heraklean tablets we 
find FiSios with the digamma, as Bockh remarks here. 
See Ahrens, de Dial. Dor. p. 42. 

In this decree the Senate and Demos of Tenos 
grant the proxenia to Ammonios, son of Ammonios, 
an Athenian, and further honour him with a crown. 
This decree is ordered to be set up in the temple 
of Poseidon and Amphitrite in Tenos. It appears 
from line 8 that Ammonios, among other special 
services rendered to the people of Tenos, enter- 



tained the Theoria sent by them to Delos on the 
occasion of the great Delian festival. See C. I. 158, 
§ I, and i, p. 822. He must therefore have been 
one of the Athenian citizens who colonized Delos, 
and thus Bockh is right in restoring the concluding 
clause of this decree, by the analogy of ccclxxv, posf, 
in which a copy of the decree sealed with the seal 
of the Demos is ordered to be sent to the city to 
which the person honoured belongs. The temple of 
Poseidon and Amphitrite here mentioned was cele- 
brated in antiquity (see Strabo, x, p. 487, and Tacit. 
Annal. iii, 63). 



CCOLXXIV. 

On the lower part of a stelfe of white marble, the left edge complete from line 2. 

Tenos; E. ; C. I. 2331. 



Height, I ft. 3J in. ; breadth, i ft. i in. 



lONXIh 

PONAPXHNEN r ui 
THXAMcJjITPITHXOTA 
NHrYPINXYNTEAEIHnOAIXk 

noxiAEiriNKAiAioNYXinNTniArnNi 

rniAnNEINAIAEAYTONKAITOYXEKrONOYA. 
TOYnPOZENOYXKAIEYEPrETAXTHXnOAEn . 
ANArPAtAIAEKAITOtH<j)IXMATOAEEIXXTHAH 
AlOINHNKAIXTHXAIEIXTOIEPONTOYnoXEIAri 
NOXKAITHXAMCJJITPITHX 

[^at dvayopevcrai 
rou aTi\<pavov tov dpy^ovra Tr\v <TTe^aur]<p6- 
pov dpyjjv kv (t£) [t€/3iS rod noa-eiScoyos /cat 
TTJs 'Afi^iTpLTTjS 0Ta[i' avTois T^v ira- 
vrjyvpiv (TVVTeKeL rj noXis /f[at 0/ vqaiwrai ? Kal 
riocnSdwv Kal Aiovvcrioiv t5> dymvi ^5>v rpa- 
yaSSiv ilvai Sk avrov Kal tovs eKyouovs [av- 
Tov TTpo^evovs Kal evepyeras rfj^ rr6X6<i)[y 
dvaypdt^ai S\ Kal to ■^TJtpiar/j.a ToSe eh aT-^Xrj^v 
XiOiviji' Kal (TTrjaai, eh to lepov tov floaeiSM- 
i/oy Kal TTJs An(f)iTpiTr]s. 



This fragment contains the latter part of a decree 
of the Senate and Demos of Tenos granting the 
proxenia and a crown to some benefactor. Bockh 
restores the three first lines as referring to the 
dyayopevais of the crown in the temple of Poseidon 
and Amphitrite. 

Line 2. ev (to)) [tepw. The traces of letters after 
EN lead me to the conclusion that the lapidary has 
here omitted 77?/ before lEPQI. 

Lines 3) 4- ora^v avToh ttjv ira^vriyvpiv avuTeXei 17 
TToXjy K[al ol vrjcrmrai. The vi]<j-iS>Tai in this restora- 
tion are that confederation of the Cyclades mentioned 
C. I. 2273, 2283 tr, 2334, and in six other inscriptions 
found at Delos, published by M. Homolle, ' La Con- 
federation des Cyclades,' in Bullet, de Corn Hellen. 
'V, pp. 320-334. This Koiuov or confederation pro- 
bably dates from the beginning of the third century 



B. c. ; we have evidence of its existence down to the 
end of that century, and perhaps a little beyond it. 
See Homolle, loc.cit. pp. 332, t,12i- 

The panegyris mentioned line 4 is evidently that 
great festival which Strabo, x, p. 487, calls the Posi- 
donia, and at which a great concourse of worshippers 
from the adjacent islands was gathered together in 
the Hieron of the temple of Poseidon and Amphi- 
trite. It must have been at this panegyris that the 
contests took place which are mentioned mite No. 
CCCLXXIII, as dymaiy oTs avvTeXei f] iroXis k.t.X. The 
Posideia and Dionysia mentioned line 5 and posi 
CCCLXXV, cccLXXVi, also C. I. 2330, were probably, 
as Bockh remarks, festivals of inferior importance, 
and in which the Tenians alone may have had the 
right to participate. 



TENOS. 



145 



CCCLXXV. 



On the lower part of a stelfe of white marble, right edge nearly complete. 

Tenos; E. ; C. I. 2333. 



Height, I ft. 3 in. ; breadth, i ft. 2 in. 



10 



15 



NH<J)OPoi 
. nNOZKAITH^AIIi 

THNPANHrVPINZYNT 
TA. K . IPOZIAEinNK NE 

irnNTPArniAnNC aeaytonppozen 

ONKAIEYEPTETHNTOY. . ETEPOYAHMOYAE A . 
ZO. I . EA. TniKAinPOEAPIANCNTOIZArnZINOIS 

H ZZYNTEAEIKAinPOZOAONPPOZTHNBOYA 

Al MONEANTOYAEHTAIPPriTniME 

TPAtAIAEKAITOtHcDIZMATOAEEIS 
2 NHNKAIZTHZAIEIZTOIEPONTOYPO 

KAITHZANOITPITHZINAAEKAIIEPA 
= IAnZINTAEtH<J>IIMENAAM<J)EPnNI 
...T.YZAPXONTAZAPOZTEIAAIEIZIEPAPYTNAN 
TOAETOtH(l)IZMAZ0PAriZAMENOYZTHIAH 
MOZIAIZOPATIAI 



10 



15 



[/cat dvayo- 
Ipivaai, Tov arecpavop tw ap'^ovra rfji/ (rT«f>- 
a]f};06por»' a.p-)(j]v kv tSi lfpS> tov rioad- 
Sj&yoi Kal TTJs 'A^y<j)tTptTr]9, orav airro- 
Ty] T^iv navriyvpiv avvT^fXu ij noXis Kal 01 vrjaiZ- 
Ta[i^ /([a]t noa-iSeiaiu Ac[at Aioyva-iQijy e\y tS dy&y- 
i Toov TpaycpSSiv eftVat] Se avTW npo^iv- 
ov Kal evepyeTrjf tov [ij/xjerepov Srjjiov 8e8\o- 
cr5[a]£ [r]€ a[i)]T5 Kal irpoeSptaf eV rah dycocriv, oTs 
■fj [TToXt]? avfTeXfi, Kal irpoa-oSov npbs ttji/ /JofX- 
^j' KJat [rw Sfj'j/j.ov, edf tov SiijTai, npdorm /le- 
rct TO. Upd- dva^ypd-^ai Se Kal to \{ri]<f>t<rfia ToSe fls 
(rfTJjXjjj/ Xt6i]i'T]i' Kal (TTfja-ai els to lepbu tov flo- 
auSoi>vof\ Kal TTJs ' Av^iTpiTris' iva Se Kal 'Itpa- 
vvTvtoi] ilSSxnv TO, ky^'qcpiajieva 'A/Kpfpcoyi- 
^ti] ■'■[oj^y dp\ovTai dno(TTfT\ai (is ' Upanurvav 
rSSe rb yfrrj(pia/j.a o-cppayKra/xivovs Tjj Stj- 
fioaia a<f>pay'i8i. 



In this decree the proxenia, a crown, and other 
honours, are granted to Ampheronides, who, it is 
to be presumed, was a citizen of Hierapytna, as a 
copy of the decree sealed with the seal of the demos 
is to be sent to that city, lines 13-16. 

The stone is in very bad condition, but I have 



succeeded in decyphering a few more letters than 
appear in Bockh's transcript. 

Lines 3, 4. Bockh's restoration here, vria-iwTai, 
is confirmed by the fact that TA is legible on 
line 4, t/iii. On the Koivoy of the yr]aia>Tai, see an/e 

CCCLXXIV. 



pp 



146 



TENOS. 



CCCLXXVI. 



On a fragment of a slab of white marble, the left edge complete from line 5. Height, 11 in.; breadth, yf in. 

Tenos; E. ; C. I. 2333. 



10 



15 



HNIf 
KAIKO . . H 
OYSINAYl 
EZAIHTHZIKAH 
vinZAI . niEKTOYNOMO 
KErKAI<t)IAOTIMIAZTH 
rOPEYZAIAYTrilTONAI 
PONAPXHNCNTniOEAl 

zinNTfiiArnNiTnN- 

TOrKAIEKrONOYTPPO 

THZPOAEr^ZTHZTHNI 

KAIP0AITEIArKA!rH7 

KAinPOZ<))YAHrKAI<t)P^ 

OPOIANAMBOYAnNTAlK 

ArnZINOIZHP 3AIZZYN- 

THMBOYAHTK/ Il^ 



10 



15 



Kal Ko^ti/'^fj [t^ TToXei Kal Kad' ISiav rots 
ei/Tvy^du'lovcnt/ avT\m' AyaOfj Tv^r), SiSoyOai 
knaiiAiaai ' HyrjaiKXrj ^tov Setvoi, Kal crT€<f)a- 
vaxrai W\(o iK rod voftohj an^dvcp dpeTTJi fve- 
Kty Kal (j)t\oTifiia9 t^[s els rfj/i iroKiu Kal dva- 
yopevaai avTm tou dpfyopra Tfjv aTi(f)avr)<f)6- 
pov dpyr\v kv tS> 6idT\p(o HoaLSetcou Kal Aiovv- 
(Ticov tZ dycovi tSiv T\pay(p8S>v' ilvai 8e av- 
Toy Kal iKyovovs Trpo\^ivovi Kal fixpyeTas 
rfjs TToXfO)? T^y Trjfi^cov, SeSocrdai S' avToi? 
Kal noXiTiiay Kal yfjs [^Kal o'lKias iyKT-qaiv 
Kal TTpbi (pvXfjy Kal (ppaWpiav Trpocrypacprji'ai 
onotav dp ^ovXmvTai^ kIolI TrpoeSpiav kv toTs 
dyaxTLv oTs tj ttoXh crffrfeXer Kal npocroSov irpos 
Trip ^ovXriy /c[a£ tw Sjr]p^oi> k.t.X, 



This is the latter part of an honorary decree con- 
ferring a crown, the proxenia, and other privileges 
on Hegesikles, whose nationality would doubtless be 
given in the preamble of the decree now missing. 
Bockh's restorations, which are based on anie 
cccLxxiii and ccclxxv, have been followed here 



with one exception. Line 7 he reads in the un- 
cials . . TDI, but restores av]T[6y, but on the stone 
AYTDI is quite clear. In line i, and several other 
lines, I have added letters not to be found in Bockh's 
text, but still legible on the stone. 



n 



CCCLt 

On a slab of white marble. Height, 6 ft. 6 ir 



I^NK Ain 


'01 ( AOXE IX 


'-T A P XC 


-oxeEX 


AHM oXAPT 


MlXlJT- 


EYKA 


AOXOYEK 


\Ejt.X 




JlPAXM 


rvpio 


1 N L 


^XKAAA 


FAPETI- 



I N ONTOX-n-PlJ^N " 
-XONAAPI-<~ 
TON XIMOXKAIA/Y 

OIKiAOlXFEITONEXEYX 
5 XI r XIAX ENEIKAINEAIMI N 

JYE OYKYPiOXANAPOrENHXM 'I rvTH X E HP I ATOTI 

TEI AATO nEGETOTEIXIMAXOXnAPA EYTE A E I A X A P T YP 

EIMYPT-tlXIOXEXX ATI-tlTEIK AAAI XTAPETIl THIAYToY EY' 

YHlJ^NOXHPAK AEI AOYEHPI A ~ 'o Ao M H M E N A H 

lo PTYPlol ATON nPAIlAX/ -A -A. XANAPoXAPI2 

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h 7 [7aK(i']5e[i>]y, Evdv[yijvr]s, ' A pia-Tapxlos] ovs 'HpaKXdSai Kal /ilao) ndvTe^s 

fi r AptaTios 'EaxaTicoTc^v a>y Kvpijoi Ztpos 'ApiaTid's ' EcrxaTimTyji knpiaro ray oiKias Kal tov Kipap.[oy Kal tA x"^ 55 
^c 'j>v TovToov oh yeiTovis ' AXk^ivos KaXXioUA aTTjs 'laoSijlpov 8paxp]oi)V dpyvpiov r€r/3a/ci(7[x'X£'a)i' 

ioIktcov Zvppdxcv KX^ypevevjs Ka^rd OKTaKoaias nevTriKovT^a, ' lkp<ov 'leponoXioi ' E[Xei6vaiii>s 
rr iiKoa-iv, 6pao-vy6pa[s] KUTa n€VTaK0iTi[a9 6 Sdva Mo- 

;i)| ]ay, Ar)poKpdT[i]i\ aiov 6f[a-TidST]'\s KaTo. iKaTov, K 

11] ^epoTTov QfCTTiaS&y oTs Kvpio^s 6 SiTval Zipmvos Opv-qaioi knpiaTO t\5>v x'op"*"' "''^^ ^^ 



If 



cccLxxvi: 

(y 'EXaiovvn Kai rfji iaxarias Kai rfji oUiai Kal tov nvpyov S>v knptaTO 'Afj.<pvXis [7r]a[/)a] KXeodea? 
v/ico*' dpyvptov imaKocTioiv TrefTrJKOVTa, avviTraivovcTTjs [/C]A«[o^]eas' [Tlijy /CX€ro]6e[oi' yuerja tov Kvpiov 
'la-dvSpov Qpvi]a-i\o\v (wpiaro rrjs oiKias rfji tv dcmi t^v rjp.^ijcreia[y] /ca[t tocs dvp^as ras kwovaas Ka, 
SiaKoaitov iTfVTrJKoyra navra Sera kivpiaTO fleKnKpaTrjs napa 0/Da[cr]cBj'ory] 0/3a(rru/3]oi;A[oi;] 7r/)aT^[/>] 

65 Kai nicrm ndvTts Kal )(a>ph fKacTTos TTavrbs tov dpyvpiov '/4pT€[/ii]a-tcoj'[o]s K aX\\iK'\pdTr]^ Zifiwv 

' HpaKX(iSa)V Kal ^vXfjs ' H paK[XJ(iS^a)ji' inptaTO ttjv a\Jpa^<Tia.v ttjv kv NevKXei^o) Trji/j KaXovfiiyrjv Aifie 
vfS ZijJiias Kt^twu 8pa)(^n5)v dpyvpiov TeTpaKocricoy 'ApTep[ija-ia>y^o^s [d Seiva tov SeTyos 'Ecrl^aTicoTrji 
kv ' HpaKXdSwi/ kv ^ rb ijp^Sv ka-Tiv Tb kirdva tS)v \mpicav TS)\y m dpi(ei d] x«'[a'«]p/'oi'[j 

XKp&fTOS oh yiiTOffS KTTJTCoy Iipias 5[p]ax/i<£i' [a]/o[yt»]p/'ou Tf\Tp'ja\_Koa-iooi' ireuTiJKJoi'Ta irpaTrjp 2'[co]t 
70 irov ' EayoLTidiTrji ptrii. Kvpiov 'EtrdvSpov KXedvop^o'^s [e/c irojXecos Trap^a tov Seiyos] dS^ov e>c] noXems kv 

napa TifioOkas Bpa\pS)v oKTaKoaiwv TTf^yJTrJKOVTa- [Z](ji)cr[t']ay ? 4>avrtvTa 'Ea[)(]aTtci)TJ;y Kal Kvpios 'Apii 
TidiTov Kat Kvpiov <PtXap)(iSov 'laKi[v^6eMs e[7r]pt'a[r]o [t^]j/ [ot]K[t'aj'] t[^]i' kf [«]<'"[•'■]" ^' ko-TW kv to, 

'ApioToOeov AovaKfvs' E[y6vJTr]S 'HpaKXetov ' EXeiOv^ai'jivs 'Ap\i<T [e< 7rd]A€(M[y ^]r Kvpios 

^ TJi> TTpoTipov Ev^ovXov TJf kvpiaTO ripa^ias napa Ev^^ov^Xov /ca[r]a Sdveiov kn \a\p-xovTOi "Ap^ov Toi 

75 Spay/iO)!/ dpyvpiov tKaTov avvecpiovTos KaTO. to [5]a[i'€ioi' /cat] avvoiJioVXoy^ovvTOS nv6oKp\f\TOv 'AvSpoykvoi 

KXvjKvli iiiTO. Kvpiov KXioprjSov\y nv'\6o<TTpaTLSov "/y/3[a]/cAe[i]5[cSi' 7rap]a \tov Sdvof^ ' Ecrxartw^rov Kal 

(opov Kal VTTOTVTTOv Spa\pcoy dpyvpiov iKaTby oTs yeiTcoy 4* LXapyJ.8r}s KXeo^kvov 'laKLvOevs avyenaivova-rji '/ 

paKov Kal QeanUwi- ' H paiw^y^os SevTepa laTajxivov Zcoa-[£y]€j'jjy ZioaiK^p^aTOv^ BpvTJcrios napk 9c 

Kiav Kal TO. ^(opia to. kp, BaXavdm ^dv^Ta Kal to, {jSara oaa kcTTlv tS>v y\(i>pi(o\v tovtcov oh ye\f\Ta>v , 
80 xwpicoy Twy KaXXiKpaTovs 8 dydyei d'^yoij ks ttjv oSby Kal dirb Trjs oSov cby irepidyei 7r[;Oo]y Tr]y KpT^yrjy 

TOV MeXiaacoyos m nepidyei to T€i)(^coy kvkXo) Kal coy 6 yiipdppovs a[i']c£ye[i] dya> rrpos r^ kpyd<7ifia x«b 
ka-Tiy 8pos T^S kaxaTids Trjs rj/iia-ias npbs Tby ^(^Lpdppovv hs KaTaya kirl OaXdTTav Kal opi^ei to, •)((opia 
Spaxfiwy dpyvpiov TreyTaKoaiaiy, TrpaTfjpes Kovmy ^PepeKXeovs Qea-TidSrjs KaToc. fKarby eiKoa-i irkyTi Spa^pas 
Spaxpds, NiOTTToXepos Aiayopas 'Acttiov Qe(7TidSa KaTa iKaToy uKoa-i TriyT€ 8pa)(jias, Borj6b9 AcopoOiov ( 
85 Bor]6bs Kal [Ac]aTa [T]ay TpiaKoaias k^SopiJKo[yTa Trjiyre 5[pax/^ay]' ZTpdrios [^flJayTaXeoyTos Qpv^aios 

Xa Xa^va-a-\_iovJ QeaTiaS^&y^ kwpiaTO TTjy oiKia^yj Trjy ky darei jj yet'[T]oj'ey 'AvTiKXr}s N io\TrTo\X\epos\ i 

6f(T\Ti]dSar ' A piar[To'jy6T] Ni^Koa-'^rpaTOv 0[i']A[^]y 2'7;[(7]rai5^[)/] peTa Kvpiov fl a[yT'ja[^pi'\Sov fla 

oiKiay Kal to. [^co/jfja [j^a. ky Kacrpeyeio) kuI tus ka)(aTtas, ocrai iia-l T<ay ^wplmy Tovrcoy o?s yeiToyes fl, 
veyT^Tj^KoyT^a t^s tov^ Xonroi) Tipfjs ^i irpoa-axfieiXe Xaj/)e[A]ay ' A pi(TTOv\o\r) dnb Trjs Tipfjs t&v ^copicov 
90 ''/4yA[ai']y Aiy kK Tr6X\_((o]s [^]s [/c]v/)ioy [VJcrd^Ty/ioy 'laoSijpov \_Aoy'\aK€[ys'\ rrapd vos a to 

kp MrfXia oh y€fro[i'ey] /7 t] Baa-x[i']coi' Kal tus ea-[xaT<]ay oaai eialy Twy )(^cop[^La)\y [rovJTCoy Spa^^ 

via- 'Hyias ' A p(p\^ioyo']s ['£]A€t^i;a[tei>y Trjapa Xa[t/3eA]a Xa^vaaiov 6[6]<r[Tt]a&y Kal irapd 0€iSa> 

Xa^vcraiov OeaTiaScoy kwpiaTo rrjy oiKiav Kal to. ^(mpia to, ky ripa irdyTa \o\<ja rjy Xa^vcrcTiov tov iraTf 
Kal x<oph Trap' kKaaTov oXoy Tb x<»/3[«']o[»'] xal tus ktrxaTids irdaas ocrai e\[\(rl tS>v xcu/>[t']<ui/ /cat tol vh 
95 /cat TO. aA[Aa] tr/cevij Spaxpaiy dpyvpiov k^aKKTXiXimv, irpaTrjpes iTpdTios flavTaXkovTos Opvqcrios KaTo. x< 

^iXripovos \kK 7rd]Ae<B[y], PayTapiSris riavTaXkovTOS Opvijcnos, TipoKpdTrjs Xa^vaaiov Qe(TTidSr]s, Aiyrja-ias 

Tos nayTbs tov dpyvpiov Alvrjaias 'ApiaroXoxov OeaTidSris wapa naai(j)S>yTos flupiov AovaKeats knf. 

Spayjiwy dpyvpiov k^aKoaimy ireyTrJKoyTa ^ TeTiprjrai 'PiXijpoyt, npaTtjpes 'PiXrjpcoy Flaa-KpiXov, HaaicfyiXos ' 
irapa ^eiSms Xa^va-aiov QearidS^os^ peTo. Kvpiav TipoKpdrov Kal XaipkXa Xa^vaariov QeaTiaSmv kirpiaro 
100 vSaTos irdvTmy to. [^/fto-]j/ Sera ^y XaipiXa [rov] iraTpbs tov 0ei[5]djy ois yeiroyes '/(piKpirrj Kal to. iraiSi 

pes rt/zo/C/oa[r]»;y /cat XaipkXas X[a/3i'o-]a-i'[oy] 6ecrTid8[aLJ- '/(pLKpiTrj XaipeXa ' EXaOvah peTo, Kvpii 

yos Aoya^K^k(os kirpiaro T^rf^y oiKiay Kal to. x<'>pi°^ t". ky ['EAeJtfluato) irdyTa d'tra kirpiaTo 'Ap^ayopas ira 

iriVTaKicrxiXimy • ' AyaOu Tv^^i, kir dp^ovTos '/4[/t]etj/[d]Aa [ytijtyi'oy Bov^oymyos TrkpiTTii IcrTapkyov, 

kK noXems trap f(f)iKpiTr]S XaipiXa ' EXeiOvaiSos peTa Kvp^i'^ccy TipoKpdTo^v^ XaipkXa Xa^vcraiov Qe<TTiaSS>v 
105 Ttay Kal tA vSaTa to. irpoaoyTa tois \(opioLS Kal to, a-Kevrj oaa ka-Tly Trjs yeapyias oh yeiToyes XapiinriSr 

arco Kal x<B/'[']y TipoKpdTrjs XaipkXas Xa^vcraiov OecTTidSar " EnaySpos ^ H\yi\Xkoi> KXvpfyevs irapd 

knpiaT^o^ Tcoy xcopiwy Kal Trjs oUias Tooy ky 'EXeiOvaim irdyTcoy to. rjpiarj Kal Twy ka-xaTiayy irdyTcoy &y k: 

Sr/s Spaxpioy dpyvpiov T€TpaKi(rxiXia>y, npaTrjpes Kal ^e^aicoral Ta>y xo>pi<i>y Kal Trjs oiKias 'PiXrj^pcojy flao 

'En dpxovTos 'ApuyoXa prjybs Bov(f>o[yi'\S>yos 'AXKinnrj KXeo(pdyov '£[A]€[t5u]aiy ptTa Kvpiov ' HyeXico 'En 

no rioa-dSwyiov Qea-TidSov knpiaTO Trjy oUiay Trjy ky darn r] ka-riy ky Toyco [T/oltVoD, rj yeiToyes floXvaiyos 'A; 

Spaxpa>y dpyvpiov kyaKoaimy, npaTrjp KXeayopas Mfyinnov ' EXtiOvauvs' ' A piaTOKvSrjS TeX\_ia-'jay6pov 

ky No6iaS(oy, Si knpiaTO AevKinnos nap' 'ApiaTvXov ndvTa [ofy ye\iT0t>y <PiXoKXfjs Kat Trjy oiKiay /c[at] to. 
piov Siax^^^^oy nfyraKoaicoy, npaTrjpes FloXvpy^a-Trjs 'Ay^rijxdpo^y 0e<r]r[t]a5?/y A . rcoy . . . OKXkovs Opvrjcn 
Sa>y napd Oea-niecos Qtcrnikcos kK nnoXicos (su) Kal 'Apia-TcoyaKTOs 'ApiaToXoxov QeaTidSov Kal /co[t]i'oO 0< 
115 knpiaTO Trjy oUiay Kal rd X'^P^"^ ^« ky 'laKiyOa Ta KaXovpeya Zaia-[r]p'jieia, & knpiaTO Oeaniiiis Kal Evfi 

flXdaTapxos Spaxpmy dpyvpiov TpiuKoaiwy avyenaiyovyTOS Ev(f>pdyopos' Qianuvs Qecmiecos kK noXecc 

Q'\(o^(yiaaTcoy nap' 'ApTvpdxov 'ApicrTdpxov ' HpaKXeiSo^v"] UN knpiaTo Td x^p'a ^d ky 'laKiy6(p Ta koXov 
i<os Kal ApiaT<i>v\a.K'\ros Kal koivov Ofo^tyiaaray oh yeiTOves 'ApTvpaxos flXeiaTapxos Spaxp^y dpyvpiov 
ArjpoKpiyov kK noXems peTa Kvpiov 'Aprvpdxov 'Apiardpxov ' HpaKXeiSov, npaTrjpfs ArjpoKpiyrjs ArjpoviKov < 
120 0aj/coy <Pa>Kicovos Opvijatos nap 'AOrjydSov 'Ap<f)i6kov GeffTidSov ov Kvpios 'Aya^ideos 'AdrjydSov dea-TidSrjs 

dpyvpiov x'^'W" TiTpaKo[ai]a)y & d[nt]S(OK[€] 0a)/coy ' A&rjydSu Sayn^opeyos nap 'AOrjydSov x'^taJ Kal Tfr 

pmvos S<oSfKdT(i 'Apcf)iKXfjs <f>ayoKXkovs 'EaxaTUOTrjS napd Seo/cAetay flaa-KpiXov kK noXecos pfTd kvj 

ky TSytp kfiSopo) Tb ptTewpoy oiKrjpa Tb kn[l Tfj] el<r68a) /ca[t K]kpapoy rby knovTa Kal Bvpas ray knovaas 



{Continued}) 

KXiodiov Kol Kvpiov ^KXjeo^^^dfovs] ir^ajvTcoy ri Vf^io'V oh ye/Txtt);' S Suva Spa- 

eocpdvovs- EivoSrjfios \_Moijpr]yevovs ' EXeiOvaievs n\_apa fliKTiKpaTOVS 

yv oLKowiSov TO Tj/J-Lcrv oh yuTdiv 'AKeai/x^poTos Spa^Afiwu dpyvpiov 
ii/Spoi Qi]^aio9 TliLaiKparov Opvija-Loi "laavSpo^ <l>avoK\(.o\yi 

Tx<iTia>Tr]9 irapa Qapaayopov 'AydOcovos Kal Zi/i\iov toO Seiyos 6$ 

IV fjv [e7r]/j('a[j']T0 napa Qpa(TVfj.TJSovi 'HpaK^Xdov rj yetro- 

1 a KaWicpavTOi KTrJTcovos 'HpaKXeiSwv €7rpia[T0 rb ^copiov rb 
Kajrappicov (h rfjv oSbv Kar^a ra •^((opLa ra KaX- 

? A . . . . TTOV Hpa^KX'jeiSoiv TapyrjXicovos [d SeTva rod Selves 

TO Ti]v oiKia[v /c]a[t] r[a. xJ^^P'" ^a «»' ZanTJdo) ■nd\yTa oaa kirpiaro 6 Suva 70 

l;6J'[o]y [0]€o^[a]j/o[i']y 'laKivOevs irapa flpa^^tov tov Seivos 'Ea^a- 
e[/crci)J § yiiTwv 'EnavSpos Spa-^^fimv dpyvpiov €^7jK0J'[ra, irparijpes 6 Suva 
ofiaxos Tiiiofj.dxo[y ' H'\paKXuS[r]s] diTeS[a>K€ rfjv oUiav} 
vTTopLcovos fi yfiToves KaXXiS[d'jfias navTaXieo[y 

\k [TTojAecoy "Evu Kal via ' EXuOvaimvos [^ Suva tov Suvos ^s 

1o(;'[oi) ' A]y(c7[i]XuSwv iirpiaro Tfjs oUias Trji kv d[<TT'\fL rj ^v irp6T[€pov tov SeTvos to /ieri- 
rTO/xd^r]? r^y Zaxrifiivovs fifT^ Kvpiccv Tcop. TTaLS\a)v Flvp- 

n'fjo)? Aoipodeov 6fa-Tid8os Kal Kvpiov Aopodiov KpLToSrjiiov Q€arTidS\ov knpiaTO Trjv ol- 
^X^i'JKpdTTjs TO. /i[exp]t TOV TTOTa/iov o)y opi^u rb TU^iov o kariv T€[pna tSiv 

6pi(u TO TU^iov t[o\ MiXicTo-mvos kaTiv kv toTs xmpiois Toh KaXXtKp[dTOVS 80 

rh KaXXiKpdTovs Kal ctiy nepidyu to tux^ov KVKXm d\x\pL npos 
kpyda-ifia to. Mvrjacos Kal nidovs kuTo. Kal 8X/xov Kal Ovpcov ^€vyi[a 
ir]fika[s NiJKOftd^xov QuJTijdSrjS KaTa iKaTov eiKoa-i nkvTe 
■idSr]^ KaTO. 6[/c]ar[w efj/cotrt niVTe Spaxp-as, npaTopevu} 

■a 'l(piKpiTT]S Xatpe[Xa ' EX]([ievat]Sos fieTO. Kvpicov TipoKpdTovs Kal Xa[ipi' g^ 

{fmv dpyvpiov X'^['W, 7rpa]r7;yoe[y TiixOKpdT]r}s Kal XaipkXas Xa^v(r(T[iov 
Xi[ov]Tos [6p]vlr]']ai[ov irapii Xaip'\kX[a Xa^va-a-Lov'] QearidSov knpiaTO ttjv 
IKOS XdpTaSos Spa[x]fJ-[^'''\ «Hyi'/'">[i^] TiTpaKitrxiXMv kvaKoa-icov 

fv AlatXu Kal k[y K a<T\pive[i'^(a S>v kirptaro irapa 'Api(TT0v6r]S' — 
< TToAecoy kirp[i]aTO ttjv olKlQav Kal to. x<^p'^a [ra kp\ nav6[pfia) to. K]aXov/jLiva go 

i kTTTaKoa-iwv, npaTrjp ' H\yk'\Xim T[i\Xea-TpdTov Qpv[fiaios\ wv Novfir)- 

a^vaa-tov Qea-TidSos Kal irapd 'l^iKpiTr)s XaipiXa 'EXu6vatSo9 fiiTo. Kvptmv [ 7tyuo/(r/)aTo]uy Kal XaipkX[a 
TOV XaipkXa Kal <t>uSm oh yuToves 'ApiaTavSpoi MavTLVivs Kal iikcr[a> irapa] ndvTcov 
6(ra ka-Ti rfji yecopyias Kal Tbv Ktpafiov tov ovra Kal 6v[pas Ta]s kirova-[ai 
HoXvKpdTTjs 'EiTiKpdTovs AovaKfvs KaTO, x'^['a]y, na<Ti<pt.X[os 
laTmva^ ' A pia-ToXoxov QtaTidSai Kal fikcra) irdvTes Kal x^^ph eVafcr- 
) T^v oiKiav TTjv kv da-TU ^ yeiroves 'Apia-TuSrjs Neoirp 

i|/io[i'o]y kK [77d]XecBy 'ApiaToiva^ ' A pia-ToXoxov Ofo-TidlSTji 

oiKias Kal Twv x^B/a^a" twv kv 'Hpicr6a> Kal toov k<rxaTLa>v Kal t\ov 
% AuKpdTov\i\ Spaxjia>v dpyvpiov Sia-xiX(a>v iriVTaKoatmv irpaTU)- 
'STiiioKpdTOv [^ai] XaipeXa Xa^va-aiov decrridSov nap ' Apxayopov Mopvxi<o- 
'<l>iKpiTr]? o[h] yuToves KXtayopas 'ApiaTocpdvTjs SpaxfJ-oov dpyvpiov 
viKw flaa-KpiXov kK iroXuoi fieTo, Kvpiov Haa-KpiXov 4>iXrinovos 
!^piaT0 TTjv o'lKiav Kal to. x<^pta t^ kv 'EXuBvaim Ka[l rajy ka^xa- 
/\6ay6[/)a]y Spaxfioov dpyvpiov oKTaKiax'-^'^^^, '"'paTTJpes Kal fik- 
LKm flaa-KpiXov kK noXem fieTo. Kvpiov flaa-KptXov 'PiXrjp.ovos kK ir6Xuo[s 
TO <PaviKa) irapd 'l^iKpiTrji oh yuToviS KXeayopas Xapiir[iri- 
ov kK TToXecoy, FlacricpiXos <t>iXTJpovos Kal /xea-m Kal x<oph 



100 



wv KXvfifviw irapa KaXXim AioStjfiov QiaTiaSSiv Kal Kvptov AiaiT[ov 

ivTos irdaav oa-tjv knpiaTo KaXXiw Kal 6 Kvpm AiaiTos irapd eeoSiirnov 

3aK:Afta[<S]j/ napd IcoKXiovs AfVKinnov Opvrjaiov kirpiaTO Ta xo>pta to. 

T) Sera ka-Tl twv x<^pia>v Kal vSaTOS dycoyds ray ovcrai twv x(opi(ov SpaxfiZv dpyv- 

Bovcpovimvo? irkfinTU ia-rapevov 'ApT{,paxos 'Apio-Tdpxov 'HpaKXi[i- 

(^ laa-Twv (TvvfiraivovvTOS Kal awnrnXovvTos EiiOvyevovs 

Kal Koivov Oio^iviadTrnv nap EvOvykvovs, oh yuTOves 'ApTVfiaxoi 
il 'ApiffTMvai 'ApKTToXoxov QeaTidSrjs Kal koivov 
: Iwa-Tipiua irdvTa Saa kirpiaTo 'ApTvpaxos irapd deam- 
K0<Ti(ov <Tvvxa>povo-i]s Kal avveiraivo^ja-qi MavT&s 

oXem, Arj/ioviKos Qe6(f)p<ov AtjpoviKov kK TroXecBy 

'aTO TTJV oiKi'av Kal rb x<opwv to kv ' EXu6vai(p Spaxp&v 
>(Tia9 Spaxpds o[I]s yuTcov <Pdpa^ NeoirToXtpos- ' AnaTov- 

dfaivirov flaa-K^CXov kK noXfws kirpiaTo kv tS> da-TU 

SioSov eh TTjv oiKiav fj ye'iTOves 0dpa^ AecoSdpai 



120 



TENDS. 



147 



The surface of this inscription is so much rubbed 
that the letters are entirely effaced in some places 
and most difficult to decypher in others. I have, 
however, by long study succeeded in making out 
many words which are not to be found in Bockh's 
transcript, and have corrected many errors in his 
text. 

In the orthography are the following anomalies : 

Line 43. 'AXKfuwvo^. See C. I. 33, 

4>eiSa>s, lines 92 and 99, is the genitive of <PfiSa>. 
Compare Mayrcos, line 118, KaXXido, KaWim, lines 109, 
no, as in Doric and .^olic. 

The text contains a register, dvaypa<()-q, of sales of 
land and houses, together with, in some cases, farm 
stock and furniture. Each entry states the deme or 
other place in which the property sold is situated, 
the names of the owner and of the neighbours ad- 
joining his land, together with the name of the 
buyer and of the persons who served as sureties in 
the transaction and are styled npaTfjpfs ; also the 
price paid. The sellers, buyers, and sureties are 
usually distinguished by the addition of their father's 
name and their tribe. 

In cases where the purchaser is a woman or a 
minor, the name of his or her legal representative, 
Kvpios, is added in accordance with the usual practice 
in Greek and Roman law. In some cases the con- 
sent of other parties who had an interest in the pro- 
perty sold is expressed by the phrase (rvvenaivovvTos, 
<Tvp.n(o\ovvTos or <Tvvt(f)iovTos Tov Seiyos. It seems pro- 
bable, as Bockh thinks, that many of these sales took 
place when an estate had to be divided among co- 
heirs ; hence we find entries in which portions only 
of the property were sold, the half, as in line 63, 
and probably in line 100, or the fourth part, as in 
line 52. 

The public registration of sales of real property, 
though not, perhaps, universal in Hellenic states, 
certainly prevailed in many cities, as is shown by 
the fragments of the Treatise on Laws by Theo- 
phrastos, xxii, § 1 and § 3, as edited by Dareste, in 
Revue de Legislation anc. et moderne, 1870-71, 
pp. 279-282; K. F. Hermann, Privatalterthii- 
mer, § 49, note 10, § 66, note 6; Buchsenschiitz, 
Besitz u. Erwerb im Griech. Alterthume, p. 526, 
note 3. By such public registering of sales the 
purchaser could ascertain whether the land or other 
real property was free or subject to mortgages or 
other encumbrances. See Theophrastos, /oc. cit. xxii, 
6 I, tto.p ol's yap dvaypacfifi tSiv KTr]fj.dT(oy, e^ iKiiyaii' 
ecTTi fiaOeii' et iXtvOepa Kal dvfTra(f>a Kal ra aiiTOv ttcoXu 
SiKaiais, ev6v9 yap Kal piTfyypdcpn fj dp^f] tov kwurjuivov. 
At Athens public notice of a sale was given sixty 
days before it took place, and the purchaser had to 
pay a fee of one per cent, for registering the sale. 
In Rangab6, Ant. Hellen. ii, Nos. 877, 878, are two 
fragments of Athenian registers in which the amount 
of this fee as well as of the purchase money is stated. 
The phrase d>vr)Tfis iyy ty pan fitvos, as applied in the 
Argument to Demosth. c. Pantsn., is thus explained. 
So far as I am aware the only other records of the 
sale of real property contained in inscriptions are the 
following: The inscription from Amphipolis (Philistor, 



1862, iii, p. 346), which records the sale of a house, 
§ yfiTCdv Mevveas and others, for 300 gold pieces ; the 
register of the sale of confiscated lands and houses 
at Halikarnassos (Bullet, de Corr. Hellen. iv, p. 295 
fol., and in the Appendix to my Essays on Art and 
Archaeology) ; the register of real property sold 
and confiscated at lasos (Bullet, de Corr. Hellt^n. v, 
p. 491 fol.); and the fragments of Attic registers, 
also relating to confiscated property (C. I. A. Pt. i, 
Berol. 1873, Nos. 274-281). In none of these, ex- 
cept in the inscription from Amphipolis, is the 
position of the land or houses sold defined by the 
mention of the yeiTovfs. The largest price re- 
corded in our inscription is 8000 drachmae, line 105, 
but the purchase in this entry includes, besides a 
house and land, waters for irrigation and implements 
of husbandry. On the value of houses and land in 
ancient Greece, see Buchsenschiitz, Besitz u. Erwerb, 
pp. 84, 85. 

It has been already stated that in most of the 
entries the names of certain persons styled wpaTfjpfi 
are added after the names of the seller and buyer. 
These are commonly held to be the same as the 
avpnpaTfjpts, whom the anonymous author of the 
treatise AlkS>v 'Ovo/xara defines as sureties given by 
the vendor, (Tvp-nparrip^ 6 to, ■n-aiXoviK.va iicp' irepov |3e- 
^aicoi/. See Bekker, Anecd. i, p. 193. Such sureties 
are more usually called /Je/Saicorat' or ^e^aLcoTfjpis, and 
occur passim in the Delphic deeds of enfranchise- 
ment of slaves and in other inscriptions. See 
Foucart, M^moire sur rafifranchisement des esclaves, 
pp. 15, 16; Philistor, 1862, iii, p. 346, and the 
register of the sale of confiscated lands at Hali- 
karnassos, already referred to (Bull, de Corr. Hellen. 
iv, pp. 295-320). In this last inscription the Gods 
themselves, to whom the lands sold are forfeit, give 
the required /3e)3atWty, and the vecoTroiai of their tem- 
ples are avnlSe^auarai. In like manner in the lasian 
register of the sale of confiscated lands (Bullet, de 
Corr. Hellen. v, p. 505) the guarantee is given by 
the fivnfioyes or Recorders, and their liability as 
sureties is expressed in each entry by the words 
ppT]/xov€9 (Tvi'e-ircoXTja-ai'. Such (rv/j.ira>Xr)Tai, it is to be 
presumed, were identical with the a-v/nrpaT^pes of the 
AiKcov 'Ovo/xara and the TrpaTTjpis of our inscription. 
Caillemer (Revue de Legislation, 1873, p. 23) ap- 
pears to follow Bockh in assuming that there is no 
distinction between vpaTfjpfs or o-v/xTrpaTfjpfs and /Se- 
^aicorai, but in the very passages which he quotes, 
ibid. p. 22, from Demosthenes we have the words 
nparrip Kal ^i^aLooTrjs, Argument to c. Pantaen. p. 963, 
Reiske, and ibid. p. 964, and p. 969 ult., irparfjpes kuI 
^i^aicDTai; and in line 108 in our inscription we have 
the very same phrase npaTrjpts Kal ^efiaicoTat, whereas 
in all the previous entries in the text the npaTfjpfs 
stand alone. We have, I think, a right to assume 
that these two terms, vparrip and ^f^aicoTrjs, were not 
so exactly equivalent as might have been inferred 
from the definition in the AtKwv 'Ofojiara. Probably 
^f^aicoTTJs was the larger term covering every kind of 
surety, while avfiirpaTijp or npaTijp relates to a parti- 
cular sort of guarantee. Thus in the Halikarnassian 
inscription already referred to, the fielSaiaxns of the 



148 



TENOS. 



Gods and their ministers gives the purchaser an 
indefeasible title for ever, and protects him from 
all possible claims and litigation on account of the 
property he has bought ; so in the enfranchisement 
of the Delphic slaves the validity of the act was 
secured by the jSe/Saior^/jes, who, in case the seller 
did not fulfil his engagement, had to share in his 
liability to an action. 

In the case of the npar^pfs in our inscription, the 
extent of their liability as sureties varies. Some- 
times each nparrjp is guarantee only for a part of the 
purchase money. Thus in lines 57, 58, the irparfjpis 
are severally liable for a definite sum, which ranges 
from 120 to 1830 drachmse. Compare lines 83, 95. 
Caillemer, loc. cit. p. 23, remarks on these cases, 
Dans d'autres cas, les <rvimpwrr\p^<i^ au lieu de garan- 
tir a I'acheteur la propridt^ de la chose vendue, 
s'obligent seulement, pour le cas ou il serait evince, 
a lui payer une somme d'argent. II est probable 
que ces ^t^amrai sont des cr^anciers hypoth^caires 
ou chirographaires du vendeur, que I'acheteur rem- 
bourse sur son prix de vente, et qui promettent de 
lui rapporter, si plus tard il est depossddd, la somme 
qu'il vient de verser entre leurs mains. Besides 
such creditors who had lent money on mortgage 
to him, the seller may have had to satisfy the 
claims of parties who had a reversionary interest 
in the estate sold, and to whom a portion of the 
purchase money would, it may be presumed, have 
been paid, as the price of their consent to the 
sale. In other cases the irpaTfjpes are jointly and 
severally liable for all the amount paid Kat pearo) 
irdvTiS Koi yjoph tKaaro? iravTos rod dpyvpwv, lines 
48, 65. 

Lines 93-94, we have a somewhat different phrase ; 
here the purchaser buys from certain persons various 
lands, houses, and their appurtenances, kuI /ie<r[o) wapa] 
iravTcav Kol )(aipis Trap' eKaa-TOV oXou to ■^(op^i^o^v'j Kal ras 
kcrycLTLas nda-as ocrai «[t]o't T^f \cof^r^cop Kal to. vSara ocra 
iOTi T^s yecopyias koi tov K(pap.ov tov ovra Kal Ov^pas rajs 
tTTOucT^ay] Kal ra <?A[Xa] (tk€vt] Spaxpcov k.t.X., then follow 
the npaTJJpes. I n this transaction the words napa nduTosy 
and trap iKdarov are inserted because a whole district, 
together with the waters for irrigation, is purchased ; 
and litigation might ensue if the purchase did not 
include all the rights common to the various owners 
who sell. 

It should be noted that in line 33 the form 
irpdrmp is used instead of irpaTrjp, Bockh considers 
these two terms as identical, and compares the 

forms KXrJTTip, KXrJTCop. 

nparopivu, line 84, is evidently a verb derived 
from irpdrap, which has escaped the notice of the 
Lexicographers. 

The name of an Archon occurs four times in this 
inscription, from which Bockh infers that the trans- 
actions which it records took place in four different 
years, but the Ameinolas named as Archon, lines 
103, 109, is probably the same as the Archon, 
line I. 

The Archon, Archos son of Euporion, line 74, is 
mentioned only to fix the date of a purchase made 
in a previous year. 



The following months occur in the text ; — 
Artemision, lines 2, 48, 65, 67. 
Apellaion, line 15. 
Heraion, lines 22, 28, 78. 
Bouphonion, lines 35, 103, 109, 113. 
Apatourion, lines 38, 40, 121. 
Posideon, lines 43 and 45, 
Anthesterion, line 48. 
Targelion, line 69. 
Eleithyaion, line 75. 
In line 5 the name of a month which followed 
ENEIKAINEAI . . . is effaced from the marble. The 
letters MIN may be part of MHNOI. 

The month Eleithyaion, line 75, which is not 
given by Hermann, is probably the same as the 
Kretan month Eleusynios ; see Bullet, de Corn 
Hellen. iii, p. 292 and p. 308, where M. Homolle 
observes that the name Eleusynios was probably 
derived from the Goddess Eileithyia, who was much 
worshipped in Krete, and whose name in Kretan 
inscriptions is written ' EXivBvia or 'EXevawa. The 
island of Thera had also a month Eleusinios. M. 
Homolle, /oc. cit., p. 307, supposes that the place 
of the Kretan Eleusynios in our kalendar was from 
February 21 onward into March. 

M. Homolle, by the evidence of recently dis- 
covered Delian inscriptions, has constructed a 
kalendar of Delian months (see Bullet, de Corn 
Hellen. v, pp. 25-30). Of the twelve months in his 
list the following recur in our Tenian inscription : 
Artemision, Targelion, Bouphonion, Apatourion, 
Posideon. There does not seem at present any 
evidence by which we can determine the order of 
the nine Tenian months here named. 

After the proper names in our inscription follow 
the names of the tribes to which they severally be- 
long. The list as given by Bockh comprises nine 
tribes, €k noXioos, ' H paKXeTSai, QeartdSat, AofaKeTs, 'Ea-^a- 
Ticorai, ' EXeidvaifls (not 'EXeiovXets, as Bockh reads), 
KXvfLSpets, 'laKivOils, Qpvrjaioi. (not ' YaKtfdw, 'OpvTJcrioi, 
as Bockh gives them) ; to these may be added 
FvpaieTs (see lines 25, 30, and Ross, Inscn Ined. ii, 
p. 15, Nos. 102, 103), <PvKauis, line 20, and Ir}[ayaiSai, 
line 87, line 42. 

The following are the names of demes or places 
in Tenos : — 

h 'AiaiXei, lines 56, 89. 
h'Aa-rei, lines 21, 25, 36, 72, 86, 97, no. 
if BaXaveif, line 79. 
€1/ Fvpa, line 93. 
kv AovaKia, line 3. 
€v ' EXawvvTi, lines 18, 42, 61. 
kv'EXuQvam, lines I02, 104, 107, 1 20. 
ec] ' Eppivia ? line 34. 
kv 'HpaKXdSwv, line 68. 

iv'HpiarOco, lines 99 and 41 ? Compare 'Hpiarm 
in the Tenian inscription, C. I. 2336, line 8. 
kv 'laKLvda, lines 49, 115, 117. 
h Kaa-p(v€t(o, lines 88, 89. 
Aipfi/fia, line 66. 
e/x MtjXia, line 91. 
ev N(VKXeia>, line 66. 
if No6iaSa>f, lines 29, 112. 



TENOS. 



149 



e/i riavopfKo, lines 14, 90. 

kv Ianrjda>, lines 32, 70. 

fy ^iXv^L, lines 13, 16. 

ZaiaTjpteta, in lakinthos, lines 115, 117. 
The ka-xariai ' Boundary estates' which are so 
frequently mentioned in our inscription are thought 
by Weil (Mittheil. d. deutsch. Inst, ii, p. 62) to have 
been situated in the southern part of the island, and 
chiefly in the broad valley of Peraia. The iripyoi 
must have been built for defence against pirates. 

It is evident from the position of the word ye/roj/ey 
at the end of line 123 that our inscription did not 
end there, but must have been continued on another 
stone, to which may have belonged the two frag- 
ments, (Ross, Inscr. Ined. ii, 102, 103 ; Lebas, Pt. iv, 
§ 2, Nos. 1866, 1866 bis ; Bockh, C. I. ii, p. 1055, 
No. 2338 <5 ; and that published by Weil, Mittheil. d. 
deutsch. Inst, ii, p. 60). The first of these fragments 
is a register of marriage portions, rrpoiKts, settled by 
certain Tenian citizens on their daughters or other 
female relations, and of lands pledged as security 
for these settlements. The second may either 
relate to the same subject or may be a continuation 
of the register of sales in our inscription. It seems 
very probable that many of the sales recorded may 
have been caused by the necessity of providing 
marriage portions, and in that case the register of 
TTpoiKfs would naturally be inscribed after the register 
of sales of real property. On this supposition I 
have restored line i of our inscription : Kara rdSe 
irpdaeis iyiYvovTO ycapimv [/cat o'i^klSiv kuI Tryoot/cfajj'] Socreis. 
On the registering of dowers, dyaypa<pf] npoiKwu, see 
Barrilleau on the Mykonos inscription (Bulletin de 
Corn Helldn. vi, pp. 590-607). 

Several corporate bodies take a part in the trans- 
actions recorded here. Thus we have the koivov 
diaaiTcov^ line 60; the koivov ['>4]ye<r[i]Xei5c3»', line 76; 
the KOLvw Qio^iviaaTmv, lines 114, 117, 118. At the 

end of line 24 we have koivov Q ; the remainder 

of this name seems to be partially preserved in the 
letters AAMYIAADN at the beginning of line 28, and 
lAADN, line 25. The whole may have read koivov 
Sfiao-tTciJi'] AafiviaSaiv, or Aa/xvpaSc^v, as the / may be 
the vertical stroke of P. 

Line 37. /cjai dvpmv ^evyia [e^vvea Kai ray 6vpas ras 
kiTi Ta>v 6vpi8oi\y. The (evyia here and posl, line 82, 
must be the lintels of doorways ; compare the in- 
scription relating to the Erechtheum, Greek Inscript. 
in Brit. Mus. Pt. I, p. 97, § 12 a, h to. ^vyh Se eSei Toi)i 
Xidovs Toiis fiiKavas evdeivat. The Ovpai are the wooden 
shutters of the windows, BvpiSes. 

Line 42. kv ia-dicn. This must mean that they were 
indemnified for their claims by equal shares. 

Line 48. 'AvOtcrTrjpiSivos 6yS6(i ia-rafiivov ^ 'X/9[r]€- 
/xia-iZvoi. I cannot explain why a second month is 
given here, or what is the meaning of the intervening 
X. This letter seems to be part of a monogram, but 
the traces are exceedingly faint. 

Line 53. ov[ov'] dxirriv Kal oA//[oj'. ' An upper mill- 
stone and a stone mortar for pounding grain.' 

Line 73. E^vOv^rrii ' HpaKXewv .... [rfj Seivi ... ^]y 
KvpLOi TLiiojiayoi . . . dnkS\a)Ke ttjv ot'/ctaf] fj rjv wporepov 
Ev^ovXov ^v knpiaTO flpa^ias napd Ev^[ov]Xov KaWja 



Sdviiov kir' ^£jp\ovT09 "Apyov . . . fj yeirovfi /CaXXi5[a]//ay 
riavTaXfcoiy] Spay/jLcov dpyvpiov Ikutov, (rvvfcplovTOS Kara, to 
[S]d[v(iov /cat] avvoporXoy'lovvTOi nvOoKp^C^Tov 'AvSpoykvovs 
(K [irojXem. The house referred to in this entry 
formerly belonged to Euboulos, from whom Praxias 
bought it Kara Sdvuov in the Archonship of Archos. 
If we suppose that Praxias furnished the loan to 
Euboulos, then the words knpiaTo Kara Sdvtiov may 
mean that the house was pledged to Praxias as the 
security for the money lent, and that the mortgage 
was effected by a peculiar kind of sale, as will be 
more fully explained under the entries, line 116 and 
line 120, />osi. The ownership of the house subse- 
quently passed from Euboulos to Euthytes, son of 
Herakleios. If we restore a7re5[(B/<€, then we must 
assume that the minor represented the interest of 
the original mortgagee, Praxias, and that the mort- 
gage on the house was renewed in her name and 
that of her Kvpios, Timomachos ; in that case she and 
Pythokritos must have been the coheirs of Praxias. 
But A HE A might also be restored diTf:8\oTo ; then the 
entry would record that Euthytes sold the house for 
100 drachmae to the female minor whose guardian 
was Timomachos, having obtained the consent of 
Pythokritos, who represented the interest of the ori- 
ginal mortgagee, Praxias, a-vvf(j>iovTos Kara to [8']d[v(iov 
KaT\ a-vvono[Xoy}ovvTos k.t.X. 

Lines 76, 77. Trjs oUias Tfjs kv a[crr]€t rj rjv np6T[epov 
ToO Seivos TO neTe]a)pov kol vttotvttov. In line 1 23 we 
have TO niTkcopov otKrijia. In the Ephesian law, pub- 
lished by M. Dareste (Nouvelle Revue historique de 
droit 1877, pp. 161-179), persons who have become 
sureties for /ierecopa, ol to, fjnTimpa kyyvdipivoi, are dis- 
tinguished from those who are kyyvwfievoi npbs avTo, 
TO, KTrinaTa. M. Dareste understands by the latter, 
sureties who give collateral security to a mortgage 
on real property, while the other class of sureties 
give security for bond debts, ' cautions de dettes 
chirographaires, que la loi appelle dettes en I'air, ra 
fieTicopa.' But in the two cases in our inscription 
where the word fj.eTecopov occurs, it is applied not to 
bond debts but to houses, and in the first of these 
cases, line 77, it is associated with inrorvn-ov. Tvwos, 
according to Pollux, viii, 29, was a legal term which 
in later Greek was used as the equivalent of Siktjs 
Xfj^is ; see Meier and Schomann, d. Attische Process, 
p. 595, and Bockh, C. I. ii, p. 207. ' YnoTvnov here, or 
im-b TV7T0V as Bockh reads it, would thus mean, ' subject 
to some legal claim,' and nfTecopov as applied to a house 
may indicate that the ownership is in abeyance on 
account of some still pending litigation. 

Lines 91, 92. cop Novfirjvia. If NovixTjvia here in- 
dicates the new moon, as seems probable, we must 
supply before it some month. HPAI]nNNOYMHNIA[l 
would fit the space if we suppose that the lapidary 
cut off the final syllable of 'Hpaiwvos. 

Line 98. ^ TiTinrjTai 0iX^fiovi. This must refer to 
some transaction in which the house in question was 
reckoned as equivalent security for a certain sum. 
Such securities, aTron/iTj/iara, were required from a 
husband in reference to his wife's dower, from a 
guardian in reference to a ward's estate, and from 
the tenant to whom a guardian granted a lease of 

Qq 



ISO 



TENOS. 



a minor's property. See Daremberg, Dictionnaire, 
s. V. diroTijxi]/jLa. The house in question here may 
have been assigned as a security to Philemon in his 
capacity of guardian granting a lease in behalf of 
a ward. Compare the inscription on a boundary 
stone cited in Meier u. Schomann, Att. Process, p. 
506, 'Em Ofo^pdarov dpxouTos opos ympiov rt/iijs evo^ei- 
Xo/xeyqs 'PavocrTpdro),. . . Sia-)(^i\ici)y Bpa\iJ.S>v. 

Lines 113— 116. 'ApTv/iaxos . . . napa Qia-iTiecos . . . Kai 
' A piaTcovaKTOS . . . Kal Ko^tjyov Qto^iVLaaTcov, a-vveiraivovvTOS 
Kal awircuXovvTOi Evdvyivovs, enpiaTO ttju oiKiav Kal ra 
)(a>pia rd ev ' laKivOea rd KaXov/ieua Zaxr^rjp'^ieta, d kirpiaTO 
Qi(nrL(i)S Kal Evfiios Kal kolvov Qio^ivLacrraav nap' EvQvyk- 
fovs, oTs ytiTopis A pTv/ia^os nXeiaTap)(^os, Spa)(fj.6op dpyvpiov 
TpiaKoaiwv crvviiraLvovvTOS Evcppdpopos. 

Lines 1 16-1 19. Qfaniei/s . . . Kal 'Apiarcova^ . . . Kal 
KOLVOV [©Jeo^ei'iao-Tcoj/ nap ' A pTv iid-)(ov . . . (d^venpiaro rd 
yatpia rd kv 'laKiv6a> rd KaXovjxeva Zcocrripieia ndvra oaa 
enpiaro ' ApTvp.a-)(0i napd Qecrniecos Kal ' ApiarMv^jiK^Tos Kal 
Koivov Qeo^eviaarmv oh y droves ' Aprvjiayos HXiiarapyos 
Spa)(^p,6iv dpyvpiov rpiaKocriajv, (rvv)(a>povaris Kal avv€naivova-r]s 
MavTws ArjjioKpivov iK noXecos fierd Kvptov 'Aprvfid^ov . . , 
nparfjpes A-qfioKpivqs . . . , Atjiiovikos, Qeo^pcov . . . 

Artymachos purchases of Thespieus and Aristonax 
and the kolvov of Theoxeniastse for 300 drachmae the 
house and fields in lakinthos called Soserieia, which 
Thespieus, Eubios, and the Theoxeniastce purchased 
from Euthygenes. This purchase is agreed to by 
Euphranor. 

Thespieus, Aristonax, and the same kolvov re- 
purchase from Artymachos the same land in lakin- 
thos for the same price. 

Before knpiaro, line 1 1 7, are the letters UN. If we 
assume that the /? is a mistake of the lapidary for A, 
and read dvinpiaro, the sense is clear. 

The transaction recorded is a sale of real property, 
followed immediately by repurchase of the same pro- 
perty. The amount paid is the same in both cases. 
In the second part of the entry the o'lKia mentioned 
in the first part is omitted, but it may be presumed 
that it is included in the words rd x^opia ndvra. It 
should be noted that in the first of these transactions 



no npar^pes are recorded; it seems probable there- 
fore that this first sale was only a nominal one, 
perhaps, what would now be called the friendly 
rescission of a sale. Such a transaction would even 
now require a double registration. 

Lines I 20-1 21. ^wkos <t>a>Ki(ovos . . . nap' 'AdrjvdSov 
'A/KpiOiov Oea-ridSov ov Kvpios 'Ava^iOeos 'A6r]vd8ov Qe- 
(TTidSrjs knpiaro rfjv oiKiav Kal rb yaipiov ro kv ' EXeidvaLCo 
Spa)(^p.S)v dpyvpiov •)(j.XLa>v rirpaKo\(TC\(ov d d\ni}8mK\i\ 
4>S)Kos 'AdrjvdSeL Savei^o/ievos nap' 'AOrjvdSov xtAi'ay Kal 
TfrpaKoa-Las Spa^p-ds o[l'\s ytircov <Pdpa^ NeonroXepos. 

Phokos, son of Phokion, purchases for 1400 
drachmae from Athenades, son of Amphitheos, a 
minor, and his guardian Anaxitheos, son of Athe- 
nades, the house and field which Phokos had pledged 
to Athenades as security for a loan of 1400 drachmae. 
The Athenades from whom this money was borrowed 
must have been the father of Anaxitheos and Amphi- 
theos, and grandfather of Athenades, who as a minor 
was under the guardianship of his uncle Anaxitheos. 
In this case and also in the entry lines 73-75 anie, if 
we restore there dnkS^coKf, the real property was mort- 
gaged and the form by which it was conveyed to the 
mortgagee was by an actual purchase with power of 
redemption on repayment of the loan. This pro- 
cess is what is termed by Caillemer a contrat pigno- 
ratif (see his Etudes sur les Antiquit^s juridiques 
d'Athenes, viii, 5, § 5, where the mode of procedure 
in such cases at Athens is explained ; see also Meier 
u. Schomann, d. Attische Process, p. 507 ; Dareste, 
in Nouvelle Revue Historique, 1877, pp. 171, 172. 
Martha, in Bullet, de Correspondence Hellen. i, p. 237). 
Bockh, in his Staatshaushaltung d. Athener, Engl. 
Translation, 2nd edition, p. 671, says, in reference to 
the mines of Laurium, ' in case of money lent on 
mines, the mines were not given simply in mortgage 
as other landed property, but the creditor was in- 
stated a legal possessor by a fictitious sale for the 
amount of the sum lent, and the debtor was con- 
sidered as the tenant of the mine, upon paying the 
interest of the principal.' See Demosth. c. Pantaen. 
Reiske, pp. 967, 970, 971, 975. 



CHAPTER VI. 



KRETE, CYPRUS. 



CCCLXXVIII. 

On a stelfe of white marble. Height, 2 ft. i in. ; breadth, 10 in. This inscription is on a disk, above which is a relief repre- 
senting a bearded male figure standing to the front with his right arm bent and wrapped in his himation. His left arm falls 
by his side, and holds a small roll. On the right is a diminutive figure draped in a chiton reaching to the knees and standing 
on a pedestal, with legs crossed and hands folded. Krete; Inwood Collection. 

HBOYAH 

KAIOAHMOC 

CTCCJJANOIXPY 

cujCTe4)ANu; 

5 AYP-AAeZAN 

APONKOCMiUJC 
B I UJ C AN T A 



On 



CCCLXXIX. 

a stele of white marble. Height, 2 ft. 2 in.; breadth, i ft. i^ in. Within a distyle hereon is a female figure standing to 
the front and wearing a talaric chiton, over which is a mantle falling from her left shoulder and thrown round her right 
thigh. Her left hand is raised and holds a small globular object with a ring attached, through which her thumb passes. 
Her right hand falls by her side, and holds an object in the form of a spatula. On the left stands a diminutive female 
figure, draped, and resting the left elbow on the right hand. In the centre of the pediment is the head of Medusa in relief. 
Krete; Inwood Collection. 

j^KAAAITYXA>'BoYKoAoY 
KaWiTvya BovKoKov. 



CCCLXXX. 

On a stelfe of white marble. Height, 2 ft. 3 in. ; breadth, i ft. 7 in. Within a distyle hereon is a female figure standing to the 
front and wearing a talaric chiton, over which is a mande falling like a veil from the back of her head, and wrapped round 
her body and arms. On the right stands a diminutive female figure, draped, and holding a cista. On the left is a kalathos 
on the ground, and higher in the field of the relief are a spindle and a distaff. Krete ; Inwood Collection. 

riAPMUJNONAZiAOZGYrATHPKOniAZTHNrY 

NAIKAMNIAZ XA»'N XAIPE 

ndpfioov 'OvdaiSoi Ovyarfjp Konids ti]v yvvalKa /xvias )(dpiv y^aipi. 

It might be presumed that Parmon, son of Onasis, ^ plain this interpolation, unless on the supposition 
dedicated the stele to the memory of his wife were that Kowids was the daughter of Parmon, and joined 
it not for the words Bvyar^p Konids. I cannot ex- 1 her father in the dedication. 



COCLXXXI. 

On the right side of the neck of a marble bull from Gortyna. 

n H M I A 



This bullawas obtained from Gortyna in 1862, and 
is published, Murray, History of Greek Sculpture, 



p. 210 ; Jahn, Denkschrift d. Wiener Akademie, 1870, 
PI. 4 a. The inscription is probably a mere graffito. 



152 



CYPRUS. 



COCLXXXII. 

Round the base of a terracotta stand, modelled in the form of a dwarf Doric column. Found in Mr. Richter's excavations at 

Salamis, 1882. Height, 3J in. ; diameter, 3J in, 



^e T E ^ 
NIKOAHMOSO/O POOSIEPON 

Tov Kpereveos 

NiKoSrjuos O POOI Up6v. 

The letters intervening between NlkoStjuos and iepof must represent the name of the god to whom 

the stand was dedicated. 



CCCLXXXIII. 

On a block of white marble, the right side broken away. Height, 8 in. ; breadth, i ft. Found in excavations at Salamis by 

Mr. Richter in 1882. 



SAPAPlAi 
BASIAEIPTOA 
'AISSHIBEI 
GEOICEYEPI E 1 
5 4)IAIN0Scl)IA0TI 

AOHNAIO 

This is a dedication by Philinos, son of Philotimos, 
an Athenian, to Sarapis, to Ptolemy III (Euergetes I), 
and to his Queen Berenike. A Philinos, father of 



ZapdinSi 

BaaiXei flToXlfnaio) 
Ba(r]iXtaar] Beplei'iKr] 
Oeols Ev€pyiT[a.ii 
5 'PiXTvos 'PiXoTiffj.ov 

'A6r]vaio\s 

Pyrrha, the Athlophoros of Berenike, is mentioned in 
the Rosetta stone, line 5. 



CCCLXXXIV. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete only on the top. Height, 4|in. ; breadth, 3gin. ; thickness, 2 in. Found in 

Mr. Richter's excavations at Salamis, Cyprus, 1881. 



inTOA 
XXHIK 
YEPTF 



Ba<nXe\i nroX^e/xaiai Kai 
BaaiXnaarj K\Xi07rdTpa 
Geots E'^vepyf^rats 



This appears to be the fragment of a dedication to Ptolemy Euergetes II and his Queen Kleopatra. 



CCCLXXXV. 

On a slab of blue marble, broken at the lower right-hand corner. Height, 7 fin.; breadth, 2 ft. Cyprus; C.I. 2620. 

Ac|)PoAITHI nA(J)IAI 
HnoAIZHnA<t)|nNKAAAinnoNKAAAIProYAIZrPAMMA 
TEYEANTATHZBoYAHZKAIToYAHMoYKAlHPXEYKoTATHZ 
PoAEnZKAirnNnEPIToNAIoNYZoNKAloEoYZEYEPrE 
5 TAZTEXNimNToNrPAMMATEATHZPoAP T^^ 
ZIAPXHZANTA KAAnZTolBL 

' A (fjpoSLTT] flacpia. 
H TToXiy 7] Ita^Lajv KdXXnrnot/ KaXXinnov Sh ypafinalTeva-avTa rrjs ^ovXfji Kal tov Stj/j-ov koi rjpyevKora rfjs I 
noXffoi Kai rS>v irtpl rov Al6w(tov koi ©eoi/y Ev(pyi\Tai re^viTcov tov ypafijiaTia Tr\i TroXefcoly yv\uva\\(napyrj(TavTa 
KaXw TO (/3 L 



CYPRUS. 



153 



Line 3. Bockh restores apxilepevjovra, but there 
is no doubt of the reading rjpxevKora. 

In this inscription the city of Paphos dedicates to 
the Paphian Aphrodite a statue or other monument 
in commemoration of Kalhppos, son of KalHppos, 
twice ypanfiaT€vs of the ^ovXrj and Sfjfios, who had 
been archon (?) of the city, if such is the meaning of 
rip^evKora, and who had been ypanfiarevs of the rexftTai 
of Dionysos and the deal EvepytTai, and had honour- 
ably filled the office of gymnasiarch. 

The 0(01 EvepyiTaL in this inscription are probably 
Ptolemy Euergetes II (Physkon) and his Queen, 
rather than Euergetes I (Ptolemy III), though 
Bockh's argument that the first Euergetes would 



not have been styled Qf6s in his lifetime is disproved 
by the evidence of the Kanopic decree. 

The fragment published in L. Cesnola's Cypriis, 
p. 413, No. 2, is probably part of a similar in- 
scription, as there is mention of Geot Evepyirai in 
connection with the Dionysiac technitae ; another 
Cyprian inscription (C. I. 2619) mentions their 
ypafifiarevs. 

Line 6. to t/3 L. This must mark the year of the 
sovereign's reign in which the dedication was made, 
but we must not assume that Euergetes 1 1 was the 
king in question, for the forms of the letters seem 
later than his time. 



CCCLXXXVI. 

On part of a slab of blue marble, the right side of which has been broken away. Height, g^ in.; breadth, i ft. 4^ in. 
From near Kition in Cyprus; Pococke, Inscript. Ant. iii, § i, p. 32, No. 3; C. I. 2621. 

MEAArKoMAN(})IAoAAA 
EniTHSnoAE^ZHT 
EHANAP^NKAIIEPEA 
AI-n-NoZKRHZZAToN 
5 MEAArKoMoYToYEn 

HAIAIA 

MiKayKOfiav ^iXoSdjilov AItcoXoi', tw yivofievov) | knl rrjs TroAeaiy, T)y[<En6va Kal iTrnapx^'') | «7r' avSpZv Kal 
iepea (Qfcov Evipyiriov, 'ApiaTO)) I Aicoyos Kpfjcraa, rbv (narepa tov dfSpos avTTJs^ | MeXayKO/iov, tov en(l rfji 
iToXems Kal ra tovtcop^ | naiSia. 



The portions of this inscription enclosed in brackets 
are given by Pococke from some other traveller's 
copy, but the part of the marble which contained 
them is now lost. 

The Oeol Evfpyirai in this inscription are probably 
Euergetes II and his Queen, as in ccclxxxiv an^e. 

Lines I, 2. rbv yevofifvof iwl rrji woXecos. Cf. C. I. 
2617, where the b kirl rfj^ noXecos is explained by 



Bockh as the equivalent of the em/ieXiyrijj tijs noXtms 
such as was Demetrius Phalereus. 

The ■qyfjicbi' €7r' a.v8pSn> and the iirndpx'n^ «"" avSpSiv 
were military offices which occur in Egyptian papyri 
cited by Bockh, C. I. 2621. S&& post No. ccclxxxix, 
and Lumbroso, Economie politique de I'Egypte sous 
les Lagides, p. 240. 



CCCLXXXVII. 

On a column of calcareous stone. Height, 5 in. ; diameter, 3 in. Found on a site about half-way between Salamis and Larnaka, 
Cyprus. Presented by Thomas Sandwith, Esq., H.B.M. Consul, Krete, 1870. Ceccaldi, Monumens de Chypre, p. 202, No. i ; 
L. Cesnola, Cyprus, p. 423, No. 24. 

EMIA^APOAAWNIEYXHN 

E/Miai ' AnoXXoovt ei)^'?''. 

The letters are carelessly cut and of a late character. The site where this inscription was found is 

identified by L. Cesnola with that of Leukolla. 



CCCLXXXVIII. 

On a fragment of red marble, broken on all sides. Height, 7 in. ; breadth, 7 in. Larnaca, Cyprus. Presented by H. Christy, Esq., 1852. 



INKAi IllN 
KAICYNOI 

NOEANEH 
NKAITAA 
TOAEMAIO 



COf Kai TCOI/ 

dpfTTJi eufKevj Kal ewoi^ai ? 

V Kal TO. 
/7]ToXe/ioto 



Probably part of a decree in honour of some one who had performed a public service. 



R r 



154 



CYPRUS. 



CCCLXXXIX. 

On a comex slab of Parian marble, with a joint on all four sides. Height, s\ in. ; breadth, i ft. Cyprus ; C. I. 2613 ; Kaibel, No. 255. 

KPHTAMENPATPIZMOYOAOIPOPETIKTEAEMATHP 
NIKnSnZIANAZAl- NEMOZTENETAS 

PPAZArOPAZAONOMEZXONEPIKAEEZONPPINEPANAPnN 
©HKATOAATEIAAZKOIPANOZArEMONA 

Kprjra fiiv nuTpis fiov, oSoinope, tikt€ Sk iidrrjp 

NiKQ), Zwaidva^ S' ^[f]'' f/^oy yeveras- 
ripa^ayopas S" ovo/x i<T)(pv iniKXees- tu irplv kir dfSpwv 

QrjKaTO AayeiSas Koipavos dye/xova. 



The date of this inscription must be some time 
in the reign of Ptolemy Soter, as is shown by the 
mention of AayeiSas, last line. For the dyf/xwp fir 



duSpmp see an^e No. ccclxxxvi. This inscription was 
probably found on the site of Kition, as it was at 
Larnaca when first copied. 



cccxo. 

On an oblong tablet of sandstone. Height, 9I in.; breadth, i ft. | in. Nea-paphos, Cyprus; Waddington-Lebas, Pt. vii, No. 2790; 

Kaibel, No. 257. 

cniONeiKoceTHXPYcew oc 

^» OreNHTOKetONBAK I PONeNAM<t>OTePC0N 

WAeCeCYN0PAYCACAAIMCONBAPYCOIAe4>ePONTAI 
ACKeinCONirONHITHPACePei AOMGNOI 
5 rePTIAHAOTAAACAlONYCIOCOYCATeKMAPTOC 
AeirMATYXHeNHTOICeHKeNANWMAAlWI 
HPA0€OICOYKeCTIBPOTtONAOrOCAAAATeeHPeC 
AYTOMAT6)IZ6)HIKYPOMG0H0ANATWI 

KpH (TiTiov eiKoaert] )(pvaea> ? - - - 

A1 [oi/j/] oy€j/^ TOKecoy ^dKTpov tv dfi^OTepcou 
"DXecre crwdpavcras Satfimv ^apiis, oi 8e ^epovrai 
' A<TK€LiT(ovi yovfj yfjpas ipeiSo/xeuoi, 
5 TepTta TjS' 6 rdXas Aiovvaios ov^ dreKfiapros 
Siiyjia Tvyr] Oyrjrots OrJKiv dv<tiiia\La)\v 
^H ^a 6eoTs ovk fan ^pormv Xoyoy, aXX' an Ofjpes, 
aiirofidTa {wfj Kvpofifd' fj Bavdrai. 



In line 2 Kaibel reads Kvjnpoyfi'rj, but I can see 
the letter preceding OPEN is not P but probably N. 
We might expect /lovfoyfvrj, but, though the initial 
letter in the line seems to be M, the letters which 
follow it cannot be made out. 



Line 4. ' Aa-Keinavi. yovfj is what I read on the 
stone, but the meaning is not clear unless it refers 
to some other child too young to be a prop to the 
old. darKiireov (imbecillus) is usually applied to an 
old man, not yet infirm enough to need a stick. 



CCCXCI. 

On a thin tablet of white marble. Found by Mr. Richter in Cyprus, 1882. Height, 6 in.; breadth, 3 in. 



TIMQNATOZ 
MNF r 



TificovaTOS 

fivrj[iiTi]s 

Xldptv. 



CYPRUS. 155 



CCCXOII. 

Fragment of blue marble. Found by Mr. Richter in excavations in Cyprus. Height, 8 in. ; breadth, 7 in. 

O^A€Kv 

HjneioicKe 

5 "^B 

Probably sepulchral, as in line 4 we may restore ni']r]neiois; and in line 5 KB probably notes the age 

of the person commemorated. 



OOOXCIII. 

Fragment of a slab of white marble. Found by Mr. Richter at Salamis, in Cyprus, 1882. Height, 2^ in.; breadth, 4 in. 

lYLloCKAl C Aiof'\va-ios Kal 

'6)Nr£N0Cn <oy yivos ir 

"^TH 0T7, 



CCOXOIV. 

On a fragment of white marble. Found by Mr. Richter in excavations at Salamis in Cyprus. Height, 4 J in.; breadth, 4 in. 

TflN rwv 

ZKOAAY KoW 

5 niKIO 5 Iov\\iriKLo> 



ocoxov. 

On a fragment of white marble, broken on all sides. Found by Mr. Richter in excavations in Cyprus. Height, 2\ in.; breadth, 3 in. 



'KAPio 
OYAOM 
THCKATC- 
CK€Y 



OCCXCVI. 

On a fragment of white marble, broken on all sides. Found by Mr. Richter in Cyprus. Height, 4 in. ; breadth, 3 in. 

HP 

TAMEi 
OkZEKT 
PAPX 



CCOXCVII. 

On a fragment of white marble, complete only on the right side. Found by Mr. Richter in Cyprus. Height, 4^ in.; breadth, 2§ in. 



N 
EEAGHN 



156 CYPRUS. 



CCCXOVIII. 

On a fragment of white marble, perfect only on the right side. Richter, Cyprus. Height, 4 J in.; breadth, 3 J in. 



CCCXCVIII a. 

Fragment of white marble, broken all round. Richter, Cyprus. Height, 3! in. ; breadth, 2^ in. 

OA 
IN 



CCCXCVIII <5. 

On a thin slab of white marble, the right side complete. Richter; Larnaca, Cyprus. Height, 6J in. ; breadth, 9^ in. 

vOYMAPKoi-< ov MdpKos 

iPXOKOYIOi: pxos 6 vl6s? 

PONOMOi: daT]pov6ixo<:? 



CCCXCVIII c. 

On a thin slab of blue marble, complete only in lines 4 and 5. Richter; Larnaca, Cyprus. Height, pin.; breadth, 12^ ir 

I lA 

leVTYXIANHN ,iTvx(ay v" 

.A CADOAACONI X[io]s 'AnoXXwuC- 

AHC^eKAl A0HKHC- B^s kK SiaO^Kr^^ 

A Y T H C o- aiTT)^. 



CCCXCVIII d. 

Cn a thin slab of blue marble, complete only on the top. Richter; Larnaca, Cyprus. Height, 8|in.; breadth, 13^ in. 

P'^'^NNEPATi M\dpKov Nepdri[ov 

S I N O N ' Avra>v'\uvov 



For the name Neratios see C, I. No. 4240 <$, and iii, p. 1121. 



157 



Inscriptions of unascertained provenance, probably from the Archipelago. 



COCXCVIII e. 

On a circular altar of blue marble, sculptured with a festoon hanging from the head of a deer and two heads of oxen. Height, 
I ft. 5i in.; diameter, i ft. 2\ in. Of unknown provenance, possibly from Delos. Presented by A. E. Impey, Esq., 1825. 



ZnZIKAEYZ 
TAHEnZ 
KAI 
ArAGAMEPlAOZ 
TAZMATPOZ 
AYTOY 



lEaxTLKkevs 

Kal 
'AyadafiepiSos 
rds fxarpos 
avTov. 



CCCXOVIII/ 



On a fragment of blue marble, broken on either side and at the bottom. It has been surmounted by a moulding. 

Height, 5 in. ; breadth, 6^ in. C. T. N. 



AYTOKPAT'^ 
Ki^'ZAo 

I have no note of the provenance of this frag- 
ment, but I probably obtained it either at Rhodes 
or Mytilene. I have restored avTOKpdTo[pa on the 
assumption that we have here the initial lines of a 
dedication to an Emperor. As we do not know how 



AvTOKpdro^pa 

Kaicrap[a\ or Kai<Tap^os. 

much of the stone is wanting on the right, it is not 
certain whether KAIIAP refers to the Emperor to 
whom the dedication is made or to his father or 
grandfather. 



s s 



ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA. 

PAGE NO. 

3. CXXXVII. Engraved, Kemble, Horae Ferales, PI. xii, 3, p. 169. 

3. CXXXVIII. Rohl, Inscr. Gr. Ant. addetida, 43, a, and in Jahresbericht d. class. Alterth. Berlin, 1883, 
p. 124; Meister in Neue Jahrbiicher fiir Phil., Bd. 125, p. 522; Frankel in Archaol. 
Zeitung 1882, p. 385. Compare the votive bronze wheel, Carapanos, Dodone, PI. xxvi, i. 

3. CXXXix. Facsimiles published by the Palaeographical Societj'-, PI. 230. 

14. CLVII. Facsimiles published by the Palaeographical Society, PI. 78. 

29. CLXV. Facsimiles published by the Palaeographical Society, PI. 77 A. 

70. CCLIX a, 1. 10. For a similar use of the word diravTav see the Imbrian decree published by Foucart 

in the Bull, de Corr. Hell, vii, p. 163. 

84. CCXCVIII, 11. 5, 42. Compare the fragment from Kalymna quoted in Bull, de Corr. Hell, vi, p. 266, 

where the demes flauopixioi and (k floOaias both occur. 

87. CCXCIX, 1. 51. For kypva and (ypvfj read kypva and kypvrj. Compare ky for €k in fypva-<o, Kaibel, 

Epigr. Gr. 793, 1. 7, and Mnemosyne, 1882, p. 394. 

118, CCCXLIV. In the Rhodian inscription published in the Arch. Epigr. Mittheil. aus Oesterr. 1883, p. 113, 

No. 8, six of these names recur^ but without praenomen. 

125. CCCL, 1. 10. See Foucart in Rev. Arch. N. S. xiii, p. 362, No. 35, 'Ha-ayoprj <t>i\(oviSa 'Epiuatf. 

136. CCCLIX. Compare 'PoyKiSa in the Rhodian inscription. Arch. Epigr. Mittheil. aus Oesterr. 1883, p. 116. 

144. CCCLXXIII, 1. 7. See Bockh, C. I. 2347 ^r, 1. 8, toIs kuO' ISiav dtpiKvovjiivois. 



CN British Museum. Dept, of 

355 Greek and Roman Antiquities 

B7N4. The collection of ancient 

pt.2 Greek inscriptions in the 

British Museum 



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