(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Collections on the history of Albany : from its discovery to the present time ; with notices of its public institutions, and biographical sketches of citizens deceased"



': : IM-^'k 




ICtbrarg 

Darlington Memorial Library 



OIlaaH- 
look 









>'4^»a3?jH 



.^ / 



COLLECTIONS 

ON THE 

HISTORY or ALBANY, 

FROM ITS 

DISCOVERY TO THE PRESENT TIME, 

WITH 

Xotices of its ^atitlir ^institutions, 

AND 

BIOailAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CITIZENS DECEASED. 

VOL. in. 




ALBANY, N. Y. : 
J. MUNSELL, 82 STATE STREET. 

1S70. 






a 



PREFACE 



Since the second volume of these Collections was issued, a portion of 
the Dutch records in the county clerk's office has been translated by 
Prof. Pearson of Union College, and published. The edition was quite 
small, and being now out of print, the contents of the volume have been 
incorporated in this work, and are about equally divided between this and 
the succeeding volume. The value and importance of these records as a 
portion of the history of Albany, must have an increased appreciation 
with the lapse of time. They are the oldest public records that have 
come down to us, and make us acquainted with the names, abodes, and acts 
of the people that occupied these streets in the earliest times. The amount 
of labor bestowed upon their translation and annotation can hardly be 
estimated by the reader. When we consider the uninviting nature of the 
subject ; the illegible condition of the records themselves, and their extent ; 
the necessity of acquiring a language that has become obsolete among us ; 
the necessary knowledge of individuals whose names are concealed under 
peculiar pseudonyms, and also of their personal history, requiring many 
years of patient research and familiarity to identify them ; we cannot too 
highly admire the courage and perseverance that led to the accomplish- 
ment of the work ; a work which might never again have found one so 
competent to its performance. It is no small claim upon the gratitude 
of the descendants of those ancient citizens, that it enables them to 
identify their ancestors, to know whence they came, and when and where 
they lived. These particulars will be further elucidated in the next 
volume by diagrams of the streets, with the dimensions of the lots and 
the names of their occupants, more than two centuries ago, and their 
successors down to the present century ; forming a very curious directory, 
which is also the work of Prof. Pearson. 

The remainder of the volume is made up as usual, of a variety of mat- 
ters relating to Albany and its immediate vicinity. The Notes from the 
Newspapers form an interesting chrouulogy of recent events, embruciug 



iv P)-eface. 

the years 1865, 1866, and 1867. An unusual number of notable citi- 
zens finished their respective missions during those years, of whom sketches 
are given, and portraits also, when they could be procured. In a few in- 
stances the paternity of these articles has been lost, although it has been 
the intention of the publisher, as they are wholly obtained from the city 
papers, faithfully to acknowledge the sources from whence they are derived. 
It is proposed to add another volume to this series, in order to com- 
plete the records of the county herein partially given, and to bring down 
the annals of the city to the end of the year 1870. In no case is it de- 
signed to repeat anything in these volumes, unless by more recent in- 
vestigations and discoveries much new material has been found, rendering 
it important to restate the subject. In answer to the question sometimes 
put, whether this series of Eistorical Collections is a reprint of the Annals 
of Albany^ it is now distinctly stated that none of these papers have 
heretofore been printed in either of these works. 



CONTENTS. 



Introduction to Albany County Records, vii 

Albany County Records, 1654-78, 1 

Notes from the Newspapers, 1865-67, 225 

The Cruise of the Katy-Did, 390 

Notes of Travelers, 393 

Origin of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite in Albany, 411 

Albany County in the year 1813 425 

Albany City in the year 1813, 428 

The Stafford Family, 44O 

Anneke Janse, 459 

Colonel Lewis Benedict, 465 

Index, 469 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Peter Stuyvesant, (Frontispiece) 

Broadway M. E. Sunday School, 245 

Congress Hall, 246 

Eliphalet Nott, 282 

Dr. Howard Townsend, 344 

Clark B. Cochrane, 350 

Dclavan House, 354 

Original plan of Union College, , 401 

Spencer Stafford, 445 

Court Street, 1796, 446 

Stafford's Store, 447 

Stafford's Dwelling house, 448 

Diagram of South Pearl Street, 458 

Medallion portrait of Lewis Benedict, 465 

Tomb of Col. Benedict, 467 



INTRODUCTION" TO ALBANY COUNTY RECORDS. 



Among the registers kept in the office of the clerk of the county of Albany, seven vohimes of 
the earhest records, viz : three labelled Deeds, two Notarial Papers, one Mortgages, and one 
WUls, are wholly or in part written in the Dutch language, and contain a variety of papers — 
deeds, bonds, mortgages, contracts, wills, vendue sales, inventories of personal estates, marriage 
contracts, proposals and sales of the slaughter, and of the wine and beer excise, leases, affidavits, 
indentures of apprenticeship, powers of attorney, correspondence with the governor and coun- 
cil, proceedings of Indian councils, in a word, records of all such formal transactions as were 
usually drawn up by and acknowledged before the chief officer of Fort Orange, or the secretary 
of the village of Beverwyk. All these are original papers bearing the autograph signatures of 
the parties concerned, such being the custom of the Dutch, whose statutes were based on the 
civil or Roman law. This custom continued many years after the Dutch West India Company 
ceased to bear rule over the province of New Netherlaud. The earliest registers were simply 
quires stitched together, which at a later date were gathered up by some one ignorant of the 
language, and bound and labelled regardless of dates or subjects. 

The records contained in this and the succeeding volume are a translation of all the papers 
bound in the two volumes labelled Deeds A and B. These documents are of a miscellaneous 
character, ranging in date from 1654 to 1678, and are in the handwriting of the following officers : 

Johannes Dtckman appointed commies,* in 1651, held the office till July, 1655, when he was 
incapacitated by insanity. His earliest records extant begin August 19, 1654, and end July 7, 
1655. They comprise nearly one hundred and fifty pages of volume B, and are a severe trial to 
the patience of any one who tries to decypher them, some portions being quite illegible. 

JoHAN De Deckere was appointed to succeed officer Dyckman, the 21st of June, 16.55 ; his 
first official act is recorded on July 7th, following, and the last on the fith of July, 1656. He was 
evidently an officer of good capacity and spirit. His correspondence with Governor Stuyvesant, 
shows clearly that his office was anything but a sinecure. 

Johannes Db La Montagne received his appointment as vice director and commies the 28th 
of September, 1656 ; his first official act was recorded 12th of October, following, the last on 
the 24th of October, 1664. He was accompanied by Johannes Provoost in the capacity ot clerk, in 
whose beautiful handwriting the register was mostly kept during his administration A portion 
of his record, from 17th of December, 1657, to 16th of July, 1659, are unfortunately missing. 

Johannes Provoost served as secretary of Albany, Colonie of Rensselaerswyk and Schene- 
tady, from the 12th of November, 1664, to the 8th of August, 1665, when he was succeeded by 

Dirk Van Schelldtne, who came to Beverwyk, in 1660, in the capacity of notary public. 
His first official act as secretary is dated September 10, 1665, and his last the 9th of August, 1668. 

LuDovicus CoBES followed him in the same office on the 5th of September, 1668, and continued 
until the 24th of October, 167.3, when 

Johannes Provoost was reinstated and held the office until the 11th of August, 1675. 

Robert Livingston became secretary of Albany, September, 1675, and held the office till 1721, 
when he resigned in favor of his son Philip. 

In addition to the above officers Adrian Van Ilpendam acted as notary public in Albany from 
the 16th of August, 1669, to the 12th of November, 1685, his official acts being recorded in the 
volumes entitled Notanal Papers. 

These papers now first translated contain the oldest public records extant relating to the city 
and county of Albany. Hitherto they have been sealed books. Until the year 1865 they were 
not even included in the indexes of the office ; and only now and then a curious antiquarian 
had patience to bring to light their hidden contents. If they have no other value to the legal 
profession, the informal methods of conveying and pledging real and personal property, afford 
an interesting view of the simplicity of those times. The local historian will find the facts here 
recorded in many cases new. The many curious customs long since disused, and the habits 
and manners of a rude, border community, are clearly portrayed ; and inasmuch as the earliest 
church registers before 16a3 are lost, these records furnish in many cases the only authentic 
facts respecting the first settlers of Albany and the upper Hudson. 

There is scarcely a Dutch family in this region, the names of whose original ancestors from 
Fatherland may not be found here written (if the record be rightly interpreted), often hundreds 
of times and in various and interesting business relations. The right interpretation of these names, 
however, is a matter of considerable difficulty, only to be acquired after great familiarity with the 
writings in which they occur. This difficulty arises mainly from the constant disuse of sur- 
names, a custom brought from Fatherland and practiced here more or less, a hundred years 
after the settlement of the country. Thus the original ancestors of the family of Schuyler were 
Philip and David Pieterse, brothers; of Douvv, Volkert Janse; of Wendell, Evert Janse; of 
Vander Poel. Wynant Gerritse ; of Hun, Harmen Tomase ; of Van Buren, Cornells Maasen ; of 
Visscher, Harmen Bastiaense ; of Van Benthuysen, Paulus Marteuse; of Vosburgh, Pieter 
Jacobse; of Van Schaick, Goosen Gerritse; of Groesbeeck, WilleniClaase, etc. 

* Commies may usually be translated clerk, but lierc it signitics the chief officer of I'oit Orange. 



viii Introduction to Albany County Records. 

In the following pages the surnames have been supplied in brackets [ ] as often as it was 
thought necessary, and to such persons chiefly whose names are still pei-petuated in the ancient 
county of Albany. It should be remembered, however, that many of the persons named in this 
volume never obtained a permanent foothold here. The little hamlet of Beverwyk for fifty years 
or more, was mainly a trading station ; the resort of adventurers from New Amsterdam and 
Fatherland, particularly at the business season (June, July, and August). For convenience and 
to obtain the burger's rights in trade they purchased houses and lots. This trading community 
•was changeable, some departing, and others arriving to take their places. After the conquest 
by the English, in 1664, many of this transient population retired, and immigration from Holland 
soon ceased. , , , 

It will be noticed that the following conveyances are for lots m Beverwyk, or for lands beyond 
the limits of Rensselaerswyk ; in Schenectady, Kinderhook, Claverack, Coxsackie. Catskill, etc. 
The reason for this limitation is found, of course, in the fact that the manor lands were under a 
different jurisdiction, leases and conveyances being made by and before the patroon and his 
court. The identification of the village lots, here described, is rendered nearly impossible by 
the brevity and vagueness of the descriptions, the streets and lanes being without names. A 
few lots have been located, others may be, perhaps, by a long and patient examination and com- 
parison. 

The first settlement at Albany was clustered around Fort Orange, near the foot of Lydius 
street ; for two reasons this was soon changed to higher ground farther north, along the present 
Broadway,* first to avoid high water, and secondly to give space around the fort for free range 
of the guns.t The old church near the fort was used till 1656, when another was erected in the 
street at the junction of State street and Broadway, which made it necessary to lay out these 
streets of unusual width. Broadway, however, as it approached the north gate and main guard 
at Steuben street, was reduced to a mere cart path, and hence called the Fuyck,t a name very 
commonly applied to the village instead of Beverwyk. It will be seen therefore, that Fort 
Orange and Beverwyk, though often confounded, were two distinct localities. 

Some years after the surrender of the province to the English, another fort called Fort Albany, 
was built at the head of State street opposite the present Lodge street, and the old fort was 
abandoned.! The lands in the vicinity of Fort Orange, as the conveyences of a later date show, 
were mainly divided up into gardens, whilst the house lots, for safety, were mostly located 
within the palisades, which then ran from the river up Hudson and Steuben streets, curving 
north and south so as to join the new fort at the head of State street. Lots fronting on any 
street west of Broadway, the highest being Berg, now Chapel street, were said to be " on the 
hill." The contracted space within which the village was crowded led to a very minute division 
of land in the best streets, and lots only fifteen to twenty feet wide, and of corresponding depth 
were quite common. 

At the period of these records most of the dwelhngs were built on four streets, viz : Broadway 
from Hudson to Steuben ; State from Broadway to Chapel ; North Pearl to Steuben, and Chapel 
from State to the palisades which crossed this street about half way between Maiden lane and 
Steuben street ; Beaver, Norton, State between Broadway and the river called Staats's alley, Ex- 
change and Steuben which extended only from Broadway to North Pearl street contained but 
few dwellings ; Hudson fiom Broadway to Green being simply the rondivegh, and James street 
a mere alley had no dwellings. 

A word may be allowed, perhaps, in relation to this translation ; it is not claimed to be ele- 
gant English, indeed, the original could hardly admit of such, unless a mere paraphrase, in- 
stead of a tolerably literal rendering, were made of it. The translator was forced to contend with 
a handwriting in many places almost illegible, with much bad spelling, bad grammar and obso- 
lete phrases and law terms. A proper consideration, therefore, it is hoped, will be made of all 
these difliculties in judging of this performance. 

Whenever additions have been made they will in general be found enclosed in brackets [ ], 
except the notes which have been made brief either for want of information, or because they 
were thought sulHcient for the elucidation of the text. In annotating this volume the transla- 
tor desires specially to acknowledge his indebtedness to the historical writings of Dr. E. B. 
O'Callaghan and to the Annals of Albany compiled and published by Mr. Munsell. 

* A great part of Fort Orange, was washed away in IBfiH, by liigh water, and application was made to Governor 
Stuyvesaut, for assistance in rebuilding \t.—Dr.eds, ii, 12H. 

t All grants for lands within fiOO paces of the fort were annulled in 1652, by the governor and council.— i)M«cA 
Man-nscripts, v, 6, 25. 

i: Albany "was formerly named the Fuyck, on account of two rows of houses standing there opposite to each 
other; which being wide enough apart in the beginning finally ran quite together hke a Fuyck," i. e., hoopnet.— 
Dankers and Sluyter's Journal, p. 31H. It is believed that no street in Beverwyk, would answer to this description 
except Broadway, between State and Steuben streets, afterwards called Handelaer street. 

%ln IBeo, when Dankers and Sluyter revisited the village the old fort was still standing; it had not then been long 
enough abandoned for the palisades to fall away by decay. — Dankers and Sluyter^s Journal, p. 3'20. 



ALBANY COUNTY RECORDS 



Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne,i in the service of the 
Privileged West India Company, Clerk and Vice Director at Fort Orange 
and the village of Beverwyck in the presence of Messrs. Rut Jacobsen"^ 
[Van Schoenderwoert] and Andries Herbertsen-^ [Constapel, Vander 
Blaas], Commissaries' of the same jurisdiction, Thomas Jansen Miugael, 
who declared that he had transferred, as, by these presents, he does trans- 
fer and grant, in true, actual, and permanent possession, to the behoof of 
Jan Roeloifsen [De Groyer], his heirs, or whomsoever may receive title or 
action from him, the full half of a house and lot, lying in the village of 
Beverwyck in New Netherland, with all permanent fixtures,'^ bounded 
south by the street, north by the lot of Marcelus Janssen [Van Bommel], 
east by a cross street and west by the hill, according to the patent given 
by the Honorable Director General and Council of New Netherland, of 
date 24th March, 1654, to the aforesaid Jan Roeloffsen,'^ including the 
half of the aforesaid house, for the sum of one hundred and ten whole 
merchantable beavers' [skins], which number of beavers the before men- 
tioned Jan RoeloflFsen promises to pay in specie, without delay, on the 
four and twentieth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
six hundred and fifty-seven, for the payment of the same, pledging his 
person and estate, personal and real, without any exception ; the said 
Tliomas Janssen Mingael promising to free the said part of the aforesaid 
house and lot from all seizures, demands or claims that he or any other 
person may have upon said house and lot, renouncing all rights, laws, 
or customs, repugnant to his real interest, and henceforth putting the 
aforesaid Jan RoeloflFsen in full possession of said house and lot under a 
pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable, presentaud future. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck in presence of Claas Heuderickse'^ 

1 Johannes Le Montagne sncceecled Johannes De Decker, as vice director and deputy at Fort 
Orange, 28th Sept., 1656. Johannes Provoost was secretary, and Ludovicus Cohbes court mes- 
senger. See p. 9, note. 

2 Riitgor Jacobsen Van Schoenderwoert, alias Rut Van Woert, married Tryntje Jansen Van 
Bristede of New Amsterdam, .3d June, 1646, and had two daughters and one son, viz : Margaret 
who married Jan Jause Bleecker, Engel baptized in New Amsterdam, 10th April, 1650, and 
Eyckert Rutgeraen.(?) 

3 Andries Herbertsen, constapel (gunner), was at Fort Orange as early as 1654 ; 1662 he killed 
Seger Cornelisse in self-defense, and his wife petitions in his favor; in 1662 he was deceased. 

•» Kommlssaris. commissioner or magistrate. 

5 Alles luatter in is aert en nagel vast ; i. e., all that is made fast by earth and nail, as for in- 
stance the fence, and outhouses, and all permanent fixtures belonging to tlie house. 

s Jan Roeloffse De Goyer, perhaps son of Roeloft' Janse and Anneke Janse, was one of the 
early settler^; of Sohonrc'tady where he was killed Feb. 9, 1690. in the destruction of that place 
by the French and Imlians. In 1670 he accidentally killed Gerrit Verbeek in Albany, but on 
trial was aiiiniitcd, a-nl pardoned by Gov. Lovelace. 

7 Abeavor ~kiu at iliis time was worth 8 to 10 guilders, or $.3..50 to $4. See p. 13. 

sRiaas Hciidrikse Van S. was brother of Guert Hendrikse V. S., from whom the families of 
this namj in the vicinity of Albany have descended. Klaas had a patent for a lot in Beverwyck 
in 1657 ; he died about 1661, when his widow Neeltie Frederickse married Willem Janse 
Slyckoten. 

ILSf. Coll. Hi 1 



2 Albany County Records. 

[Van Schooulioveii] and Cornelis Teunisse [Bos] called as witnesses 
thereto. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck this 16th Oct., 1656. 
As witnesses. Thomes Jansen Mingael.i 

Claes Hendrycksen. 
Cornelis Thonisen Bos.~ 
Rutger Javohsen. 
Andries Hcrherts. 
Acknowledoed before me, 



sTouUfrt^^^^^ 



Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne Clerk at Fort Orange 
and village {dorp) Beverwyck, in the service of the Privileged West 
India Company, the Hon. Pieter Hartgers' and Jan Tornassen [Mingael], 
who constituted themselves, as, by these presents, they do constitute them- 
selves, sureties and principals, for the payment of the one hundred and 
ten whole beavers, mentioned in the above written conveyance; the same 
to pay without delay, for the person of Jan Roelofl'se to Thomas Janssen 
Mingael, on the four and twentieth day of September, one thousand six 
hundred and fifty-seven, under a pledge of their persons and estate, 
movable and immovable, renouncing all reservations which might militate 
against their intent. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 16th of Oct., 1656. Present 
Henderick Joehimse and Jan Clute. 

As witnesses. Jan Tomas. 

Hendrick Jocliemse. 
Johannes CluteA La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the Privi- 
ledged West India Company, Vice Director, and Deputy -^ of Fort 
Orange and the appendances of the same, the Honorable Rutger Jacob- 
sen, inhabitant of the village of Beverwyck in New Nefherland, who, in 
the presence of Messrs. Andries Herbertsen and Gosen Gerritsen [Van 
Schaick],' commissaries of the same jurisdiction, hus acknowledged, as by 

1 Tbomas JaBse Minsiael's wife was Maritie Abrahamse, danghter of Abraham Pieterse Vos-' 
bure;. They had one son, Capt. Johannes Thomase M., who lived on north corner of James 
street and Maiden lane, and was buried in the church 15th April, 1731. T. J. M. was not living in 
1662. 

- Cornelis Teunise Bos was much given to gossip and backbiting : on the tth March, 1657, he 
and his wife were accused of slander by Do. Schaets. On the 8th July, 1658, complaints were 
made that he had defamed the court, and on the 28th Oct., 1659, he was fined 1,200 guilders and 
banished for 12 years lor the same otieuse, and the next year he was again arraigned before the 
court for a similar ofl'ense against Wm. Teller.— 7>w<c/i Manuscripts. 

3 Pieter Hartgers Van Vee came over in 164.3 and first settled in Port Orange as commissary 
1654, died in Holland 1670. He married Sytje Koeloffse, daughter of Anueke Jause, by whom he 
had two daughters: Jannetie and Rachel. — V Callaghan' s History of New Netherland., i, 441. 

•> Johannes Clute was from Nuremburg ; he was commonly called captain, and was held in 
esteem by the Mohawks. He was a trader and large land-holder in Loouenburg, Niskayuna 
and Albany. Alter his death, about 1684, his nephew Johannes Clute inherited his property. 
From the latter and from Frederic Clute (his brother?) have descended the families of this name 
in the vicinity ot Albany. 

^ Iwmmies, deputy or clerk. 

« Ciipt. Gozen Gerritse Van S., brewer, is said to have married first, Geertie, daughter of 
Brandt Peelen Van Nieukerke ; and second, Ainiatie Lieveus 2d July, 1657. He had three sons: 
Gerrit, Anthony and Sybrant, and three (laiiiililei's : Geertruy, Gerritie and Margaret. He and 
Philip Pieterse Schuyler had permission to purchase the Half Moon, now Waterford, of the 
Indians, to prevent " those of Connecticut " purchasing it. 



Albany County Records. 3 

these presents, he does acknowledge, that he is honestly indebted to the 
Honorable Johannes Withurt, merchant, dwelling in the city of Amster- 
dam in New Netherland, in the sum of fifteen hundred and twenty eight 
Carolus guilders,' growing out of the delivery to him of certain bills of 
goods {cargo soonen) and merchandise by the said Johannes Withart, to 
his contenf, which sum he promises to pay without any vacillation, in 
good whole winter beavers on the last day of June, in the year 1657, 
under a pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable, present 
and future, especially, both of his houses and lots in the aforesiid village 
ofBeverwyek, and another lying in said city of Amsterdam; submitting 
himself and his estate to all courts and justices, for the payment of the 
above mentioned sum, without taking shift or subterfuge in any laws or 
customs, which might militate against the same. 

In witness of the truth whereof he has signed these presents, with his 
own hand, in Fort Orange, this day 17th of Oct., 1656. 

Andries Herberts. Rutger Jacobsen. 

The mark of -(- Gosen Gerritse. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne, in the service of the 
Privileged West India Company, Vice Director and Deputy of Fort 
Orange and appendances of the same, Femmetie De Baxter, who in the 
presence of the Honorable Andries Herbertsen and Rut Jacobsen, com- 
missaries of the same jurisdiction, has acknowledged, as she, by these 
presents does acknowledge, that she is honestly indebted to the Honorable 
Groose- G-erritse, inhabitant of the village of Beverwyck in New Nether- 
land, in the sum of ninety-six Carolus guilders,-' which she promises to 
pay in the month of April, in the year one thousand six hundred and 
fifty-seven, under a pledge of all her estate movable and immovable, 
present and future, especially her house situated in the aforementioned 
village, submitting herself to all laws and justices for the full payment of 
said sum ; renouncing all laws, statutes, and customs which have been 
made in ftivor of woman. 

In acknowledgment of the truth [whereof] she has with her own hand 
signed these presents. Done in Fort Orange the 17th, Oct., 1656. 

This is the mark of -j- Femmetie Baxter. 
Rutger Jacobsen. 
Andries Herbertsen. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy in Fort Orange. 

Upon this 21st day of October, 1656, appeared before me Johannes 
De La Montagne, in the service of the Privileged West India Company, 



' The guilder was worth about 40 cents. 

2 It is not uncommon, in the provinces of Holland where the language is spoken with the 
greatest purity, that the n is omitted in the pronunciation of words terminating in that letter, 
as will be found all th'ough this work. Hence this name Gozen is frequentl}' written Goose, the 
pronunciation of which is Go-ze or Hose. 

3 Specie was scarce in the province at this time, and as paper money had not come into use, 
beaver skins and wampum or sevvant became the currenc.y of the people. A guilder beaver 
was worth about 40ct8, whereas a guilder sewant was worth but one-third of that sum. " A 
gpod merchantable beaver skin," usually sold for $3.20 to $4. 



4 Albany County Records. 

Deputy in Fort Orange and tlie appeudances of the same, in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses; Dirrick Bensick,' inhabitant and burgess 
of the village of Beverwyck in New Netherland, who has declared, that 
to procure the payment of certain moneys to him belonging, by testament, 
consequent upon the decease of one Jurriaen Baxban, late provost at St. 
Casteel De Mina, in Cluinea, and from one Nicholaes Twie, soldier, deceased 
in the year 1648, on the ship Thoif of Zeeland : Power of attorney was given 
to Roeloflf Gerritse, crane master, at Groeningen, in virtue of the same to 
demand and receive the payment of said moneys from the Honorable the 
Directors of the Privileged West India Company, of the Chamber of 
Groeningen, for the receipt of which, he [Bensick] gave another warrant to 
Tryntie Van Rechteren, his mother-in-law, to demand of the said Roeloff 
Gerritse, an account of the residue of the same, and since the aforesaid 
Tryntie Van Rechteren died without having given intelligence of what she 
had done in the matter, the aforesaid principal Ij'omjKirant] gave another 
warrant to Frans Pieterse Klau, carpenter, to demand of the above named 
Roeloff Gerritse a restitution of the moneys, and an accounting for the 
remainder, in case he had received such moneys, or if not, to demand and 
receive said moneys from the Directors of the Privileged West India 
Company at the chamber of Groeningen ; but since the aforesaid Frans 
Pieterse Klau,'- of this country, has fallen sick, and not knowing the event 
of his sickness : for the greater security in his case, and in the event of 
his disease, the aforementioned (principal), Dirck Bensick, has constituted, 
and, by these presents, does constitute the Honorable Johannes Withart, 
merchant, at present dwelling in Amsterdam in New Netherland, 
attorney, in his name and for his benefit to" demand of the above named 
Roelofi' Gerritse, or from his heirs, and those holding title from him, the 
restitution of the above mentioned moneys, or an accounting for the 
remainder of the same, in case he has received them, or in case he has 
not received them, to demand the same of the Directors of the Privi- 
leged West India Company. Also to demand of Christoffel Cornelise Bui, 
citizen of Amsterdam, husband of Tryntie Van Rechteren, his mother-in- 
law, the will and certain other letters belonging thereto, which will and 
other papers relating to the same, he, the principal, delivered into the 
hands of his said mother-in-law, Tryntie Van Rechteren ; likewise to 
present his claim to said Christoffel Cornelise Bui and his wife as coheirs, 
or in case of refusal, to take proceedings for the division and partition of 
the estate and goods left by Tamson Berck, late husband of Tryntie Van 
Rechteren, father and mother of Catrina Berck, wife of this principal ; 
the respective portions and parts to receive ; of the same quittance to 
give ; or in case of refusal of payment to proceed according to law. Like- 
wise to claim, demand, and receive of William and Hendrick Berck, his 
wife's brothers, the sum of one hundred and forty Carolus guilders, 
according to their obligation, whereof an authentic copy is hereto annexed ; 
moreover to receive certain fifty guilders due [? ] on the demise of one 
Altien Berck, his wife's aunt, who died at Ringborck [? ] ; and generally 
to receive whatever he, the principal, has outstanding in fatherland {Pa- 
tria) — quittance for his receipts to give, full discharge to grant ; in case 

■Dirk B-'iisinj- i Dr Bensen ) was docoased in 1060, when his wife Catalyn Bercx is called 
widdw. /'.-/. u. 

-Fiaii> l'h-ui>.> Klauw settled iu Kiiiderhook. He had two sous, Heudrik and Jurriaan (and 
perhaps ot Ik i- eh ildren), who lived iu the same place, and had families. 



Albany County Records. 5 

of refusal the unwilling to constrain to payment according to law ; all 
terms of courts as well substantial as accidental to keep; to look after all 
suits against all persons with power of substitution in common form ; in 
courts to conclude suits; submitting to composition and agreement; 
sentence and determination to follow up; if beneficial to yield, "or put to 
execution : or in case of loss of suit to appeal ; and do in the aforesaid 
matters all that his judgment shall find good, as he, the principal, if 
present, might or could do, if so be that any precept more especial than 
above written demands ; promising to hold as good and true all that shall 
be done and transacted by the attorney or his substitute ; under a pledge 
of his person and estate, present and future, without exception, submit- 
ting the same to all courts and judges, provided that the attorney shall 
be held to act properly with the receipts, and proper accountings of the 
remainder to exhibit, under a like pledge as above mentioned. 

Done in said Fort Orange in New Netherland, in the presence of Johan- 
nes Provoost,! Lambert Van Valkenburgh, and Jan Clute, as witnesses 
thereto called. The mark of -f Derick Bensick. 

The mark of -\- L. Van Valkenburgh. 
Johannes Clute. 
Johannes Provoost. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the 25th of October, A. D. 1656, appeared before me Johannes La 
Montagne, etc., Claes Henderickse [Van Schoonhoven], who declared that 
he had granted, as, by these presents, he does grant and convey, in real 
and actual possession, for the behoof of Harmen Jacobsen [Bambus?], and 
Dirck Bensick, burgesses and inhabitants of the village of Beverwyck, for 
their heirs and successors, a certain house and lot situate in the village of 
lieverwyck, as it lies in fence, and as it at present is occupied by Jan 
Tomassen, except thirty wood feet - on the north side of the same in front 
and rear, together with the buildings, which stand upon said lot of thirty 
feet; for the number of two hundred and fifty-one whole merchantable 
beavers, which said number, said buyers shall pay, without delay in the 
month of July, A. D. 1657, to wit, the half of said number; and 
the other half in the month of July, A. D. 1658, the following year, 
under a pledge of their persons and estates, fast and movable, present and 
future, subject to all courts and judges, the seller promising to set said 
house and lot free from all demands, seizures or other claims, which may 
be upon said house and lot, renouncing under the above mentioned pledge, 
all exceptions, laws, and customs, which might be prejudicial to the same, 
which freeing of said house and lot [from incumbrances] the seller stands 
obligated to accomplish by May next, A. D. 1657. 

1 Johannes Provoost was town clerk and nolarv puhlic at Albany frmn 1056 to 1675. Sth Sept., 
169.3, he was lately deceased. He had three wives, of whom the second was Sarah Webber, 
widow of L. Vander Spiegle, married '2M\ .Tune, H;s5, :iiiil deceased Dec. 2.3, 1085 ; and the 
third was Anna, widow of Dr. Van Nieuwenhuysen, married lyth July, 1687. The only child 
bai)tized ill Alliaiiy was Isaacson of his first wife, baptized 23d Sept., 1683. 

- 'I'heie w di' two kinds of foot used by the Dutch in this province. The hotit or wood foot, 
eciual to 11.15 inches English, was commonly employed for all short measurements, and where 
simply the wold loot is found in writings this kind is intended. The Rhynland foot, equal to 
12.36 in. English, was used in long measurements such as land. When the rod was used it was 
always the Ehynland rod, consisting of 12 Rhynland feet. 



6 Albany County Records. 

Done at the above date in the village of Beverwyck, in the presence of 
Henderick Jochemsen and Frans Baventsen [I*astoor], witnesses for that 
purpose called. 

Claes Hendrycksen. 
Harmen Jacobse. 

This is the mark -f- of DiRCK Bensinck. 
Hendreck Jochemsen,^ as witness. 
Frans Barentse Pasfoor, as ivitness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

And at the same time and before me, the aforesaid deputy, appeared 
Kem Janssen [Smit], and Henderick Andriese Van Doesborch, citizens 
of the village of Beverwyck, and constituted themselves sureties and 
principals (hurgen en principalen), for the above mentioned number of 
two hundred and fifty-one whole merchantable beavers, for the full pay- 
ment of the same, under a pledge of their persons and estates, fast and 
movable, present and future, subject to all laws and judges. 
Present, Henderick Joehemse and Frans Barentse [Pastoor]. 

Kem Janssen. 
Hendryck Aendryessen.'- 
As ivitness, Hendrick Joehemse. 
Freins Beirentse Pastoor, as witness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
Privileged West India Company, deputy at Fort Orange, and the append- 
ances of the same. Rem Janssen [Sunt], citizen of the village of Bever- 
wyck in New Netherland, and in the presence of Messrs. Ruth Jacobsen 
[Van Schoenderwoert], and Andries Herbertsen [Constapel, Van der 
Blaas], commissaries of the same jurisdiction, declared that he had 
granted and conveyed, as, by these presents, he does grant and convey, in 
real and actual possession, for the behoof of Hendrick Gerritse' [Van Wie, 
or Verwey (?)], his heirs or assigns (^die van hem ree/ht hebhen sullen') ; 
a certain lot for a house, lying in the village of Beverwyck, bounded 
south by Adrian Janssen De Vries, north by Hage Bruyns, west and 
east by the wagon road ; breadth five rods,^ length, seven rods and a half, 
in a square; according to the patent to the grantor, given by the Honor- 
able Director General and Council of New Netherland, on the 25th of 
Oct., 1653, which lot the aforesaid grantor, to the aforesaid Henderick 



1 Hendrik Joehemse was lieutenant of the Burger Company in 1658.— Dutch Manuscripts. 

2 Henclrik Andriese Van Doesburgh was in Beverwyck as early as 1G53, but was deceased in 
1664. His wife was Maritie Damens, widow of Dirk Van Eps ; by her he had one daughter 
Jannetie, who married Martiiius Cregier, son of Capt. Martinus C. of New Amsterdam, and 
settled at Niskayuna, where their descendants may still be found. After Hendrik Audriese's 
death, his widow married in 1664 Cornells Van Nes. 

3 Frans Barentse Pastoor had been a magistrate in Beverwyck at least two .years previous to 
1657. His house lot was ou Broadway next north of Bleecker Hall. He left no descendants 
here. 

" Hendrik Gerrltse Van Wye, or Verwey, was a volunteer in the expedition against Canada 
in 16'Jl, and was desperately wounded at La I'raire ; on his return he was cared for at ihe 
house of widow Jacob TyssiMi Naiid.T H.-ydeii. It is v)resumed that he did not long survive. 
In Kl'.tl lie uiiule liis will ; ;iiinni iIih liiuc PickT Srluiylor petitioned the governor aud council 
for his relief. Ilr left three son-, (.,-nii, .l;iii, and Ueiulrik. 

s The Khyulaud rod consisted of i^ feet Kliynlaud, or 12.;j6 feet English. 



AJhany County Records. 7 

Gerritse, has conveyed, promising said lot to free from all demands and 
claims that may be made against the same ; by these presents, renouncing 
all laws, statutes and customs repugnant to this conveyance ; under a 
pledge of his person and estate, fast and movable, present and future, 
submitting the same to all laws and judges, for the maintenance of this 
present conveyance. 

Done in Fort Orange the l(3th Octob., A. D. 1656. Present Johannes 
Provoost and Daniel Verveelen,i witnesses. Rem Janssen [Smit]. 

Daniel Verveelen^ 

Johannes Provoost, ivitness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Muntagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 



On this 28th of October, A. D. 1656, appeared before me Johannes La 
Montagne, in the service of the Privileged West India Company, 
etc, the Honorable Adriaen Janssen Van Ulpendam, burgess and citi- 
zen of said village, and in the presence of Messrs. Piuth Jacobsen and 
Andries Herbertsen, commissaries, etc., declared that he had granted 
and conveyed, and, by these presents, does grant and convey, in actual 
and real possession, for the behoof of Adriaen Gerritsen- [Papendorp], 
fellow burgess and citizen of the same village, his heirs or assigns, a 
certain house and lot in said village of Beverwyck, bounded on the 
south side by the public road, on the north by Pieter Loockermans, on 
the west by Gerrit Janssen, on the east by Ruth Areutseu [Schoemaecker], 
according to patent to said Adriaen Van Ulpendam, granted by the 
Director General and Council of New Netherland, the 25th of October, 
A. D. 1653 (excepting froai said lot a parcel of about three feet on the 
street, being a corner (Tioecke) on the east side of said house, which 
corner the said Adriaen Van Ulpendam, heretofore, has conveyed to Rem 
Janssen [Smit] ; for the sum of eighteen hundred Carolus guilders, which 
the grantor acknowledges he has received, and is content and satisfied; 
together with a certain garden entitled number five in said patent, for 
which garden said Adriaen Van Ulpendam, acknowledges he has received 
satisfaction, acquitting said Adriaen Gerritse of said sum: which house, 
lot, and garden the grantor promises to set free from all demands and 
claims, renouncing all laws, statutes and customs repugnant to the same, 
under a pledge of his person and estate, fast and movable, present 
and future, submitting the same to all laws and judges for the perfecting 
of his promises. 

Done in Fore Orange, at the above date. 

Rutyer Jacobsen. Adrtaen Van Ilpendam. 

Andries Herbertsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 



1 In 1687 Daniel Verveelen petitioned for the renewal of the grant of the ferry at Spyting 
Devil, formerly held by his father, Johannes Verveelen. — English Mamiscripts, xxxv, 135. 

2 Adrian Gerritse Papendorp served as commissary or magistrate several years; he made his 
will in 16S8 and speaks of his wife Jannatie Croon, bnt not of children. 

3 Adrian Janse Van Ulpendam was notary public in Albany for a time; in Jan., 1674-5, he 
said he was 56 years d\A.— Notarial Papers. In 1686 he committed suicide by hanging.— 
Colonial Manuscripts, xxxiii, 42. Jacobus De Beavois was his uncle and h^iv.— Deeds, iv, 12. 



8 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Johanues La Montague, in the service of the 
Privileged West India Company, etc., Zacharias Sickelsi Van Weenen, 
dwelling at Fort Orange and in the presence of the after named witnesses, 
who has appointed and empowered, as, by these presents, he does appoint 
and empower, Adriaen Sinionse, in the appointer's name and for his benefit 
to demand of the Honorable Directors of the West India Company of the 
Chamber at Amsterdam, the payment of such moneys as are due to him 
for services rendered by him for said company, on the island of Curagoa, 
as appears by a settlement made on said island, and jf date A. D. 1G55, and 
for its receipt quittance to give in proper form; with power in case 
necessity requires it, to substitute one or more persons in his place, for 
the farthering the payment: promising to hold good all that the afore- 
said attorney or his substitutes shall do in this matter (provided that the 
aforesaid attorney or his substitute, shall be holden to render an accounting 
of the money received to the principal or his attorney), under a pledge 
of his person and estate, fast and movable, present and future, submitting 
the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange this 4th day of November, A. D. 1656, in presence 
of Johannes Provoost and Jan Lambertse [Van Bremen]. 

Witness. Sackaryst Seckels. 

This is the mark of -\- Jan Lamhertscn. 
Johannes Provoost. 

La Montagne, L~)eputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne, in the service of the 
Privileged West India Company, etc., Hendrick Gerritse [Van Wie, or 
Verwey], citizen of the village of Beverwyck, and in the presence of Messrs. 
Philip Pieterse [Schuyler],- and Jacob [Janse] Schermerhooren,-* com- 
missaries, etc., who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as he 
does grant and convey, by these presents, in real and actual possession, 
for the behoof of Pieter Janse Loockermans,^ his heirs or assigns, a certain 
house lot' situate in the village of Beverwyck, bounded on the south by 
Adriaen Janse De Vries, north by Huge Bruynsen, east and west on the 
wagon road, which lot is five rods wide; in length seven and a half rods, 
in a square, according to the patent to Rem Janse [Smit], granted by the 
Honorable Director General and Council of New Netherland, on the 23d 
of Octob., 1653, of which lot the grantor according to said patent received 
a deed from said Rem Janse, on the 16th Oct. last, and said grantor promises 
said lot to free from all incumbrances, claims and demands, which may 
come against the same, under a pledge of his person and estate, movable 
and immovable, present and future, submitting the same to all courts 
or judges; acknowledging that he has received satisfaction for said 



1 Zacharias Sikels was corporal in the Company's service in 1658; in 1661-2-3 he was the 
town's herder and contracted to perlorm this duty for IS guilders each beast for the season. In 
1689 he was ratel watch tor the town ; and in 1693 he removed to New York. 

2 Col. Philip Pieterse and David Pieterse (Schuyler), brothers, early settled in Albany. The 
former married Margareta Slichtenhorst, 22d Dec, 1655, at the age of 22 years, and had a family 
often children. He died 'tlh of March, 1683-4. 

3 Jacob Janse Schcniu'rhiinrcii was a native of Waterland, Holland ; he early settled in Bever- 
wyck as a trader, and accjuii'cd a large estate for the times, which he left to his nine children. 
He died in Schenectady in 1688. All the families of this name in the state of New York are 
believed to be descended from him. 

* Pieter Janse Lookermans was a brother of Govert L. of New Amsterdam, and in 1658 was 
boatswain in the West India Company's service,— i>Mte/i Manuscripts, viii, 835. 
^ See page 6. 



Albany County Records. 9 

lot, and acquitting said Pieter Janse Loockermans of the payment of the 
same. 

Done in Fort Orange, 16 Nov., 1656. 

Hendrick Gerritse, 
Jacob Schermerhooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne,^ Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Jan De La 3Iontagne, in the service of the Privi- 
leged West India Company, Vice Director and Deputy at Fort Orange,'^ 
and village of Beverwyek, in the presence of Messrs. Rutger Jacobs'e 
and Philip Pieterse, commissaries, etc., the Honorable Frans Barentse 
Pastoor, burgess and citizen of said village of Beverwyek, who declared 
that he had granted and conveyed, as he does grant and convey, by these 
presents, in real and actual possession, for the behoof of Michael Jansen, 
citizen of the city of Amsterdam in New Netherland, a house situated at 
Fort Orange, the place which was granted by the Honorable Director 
General and Council of New Netherland, to Jacob Janse Hap [or Stoll,] 
of date 3d July, 1649, which house the grantor, by virtue of a conveyance 
to him made by the said Jacob Janse Hap, occupies according to the tenor 
of said conveyance; for which house said Michael Janse "[Van Broec- 
huysen] '^ shall pay the sum of seven hundred guilders in good strong 
seewant (wampum),^ the half next May, A- D. 1657, and the other hal^ 
in May, 1658, under a pledge of his person and estate, without exceptions, 
which house said grantor promises to free from all seizures, claims and 
demands, which may be made upon the same, under pledge of his person 
and estate, movable and immovable, present and future, submittino- the 
same to all laws and judges. ^ 

Done in Fort Orange, 20th of November, A. D. 1656. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 

iJohanne^ La Montague, a magistrate at Albany, N. Y., under the Dutch colonial govern- 
ment, was born in 1592 ; was a Huguenot physician, of varied acquirements, and came to New 
Netherland in 1637 ; in 163 S was appointed one of the council under Kieft ; married 1 Rachd 
Monjour ; 2, Agritta Filhs, 18 Aug., 1647 ; 1641 was appointed by Kieft to command an Expedition 
consisting of hfty men in two yachts to Fort Good Hope, now Hartford, on the Connecticut river 
to maintain the Dutch rights there against the encroachments of the English ; but the enterprise 
was stayed by the pressure of affairs nearer home; 1643 saved the life of Director Kieft, attacked 
by Maryn Adrmensen, and same year was sent to Staten island with three companies to nut 
down the Indians, from which he returned laden with the spoils of several hundred bushels of 
corn ; 1644 headed an expedition against the Indians of Long Island, where one hundred and 
twenty savages were killed ; 1645 accompanied Kieft on his first voyage to 1^ ort Orange, to secure 
the friendship of the Mohawks, on which occasion he conducted an analysis of the war paint of 
the natives, and discovered gold therein, to the great comfort of Kieft ! 1647 was retained in the 
council by Stuyvesant ; 1648 was dispatched to the South river to secure the Dutch acquisitions 
there, which was successfully done ; 1652, it having been determined to establisii a school in the 
city tavern, he was ior the time appointed schoolmaster ; 1653 he was in the enjoyment of an 
income ol nearly four hundred dollars a month from his public offices ; 1656 on the retirement of 
De Decker he was appointed vice director at Fort Orange, now Albany; 1660 headed a detach- 
ment of soldiers to discover and arrest forestallers (bosk-loopers, bush runners), or persons 
among whom were some of the magistrates of the city, who went out to intercept the Indians 
on their way to Fort Orange with furs with a view to make advantageous purchases against the 
regulations of trade ; 1664 surrendered Fort Orange to the English, and swore allegiance to the 
new dynasty. His bouwery in New York was east of Eighth avenue, and extended from 9.3d 
street north to Har em river, containing about two hundred acres, which was called Vredendael 
mftml of^NeuTrork ^S^wtorj- of New Netherland; Documents relating to the Colonial 

•■' Fort Orange was situated on the river side between Denniston and Lydius streets. Gov 
f "JC Wf .fiH ^^ A-?/ *n *" ^"l^ India Company all lands within 600 paces or 250 Rhvnland rods 
of the fort, and in 16o2 al grants which fell within that space were annulled. Dorp Beverwyek 
Bituated t ) the north of the fort, fell within the land claimed by the Van Rensselaers 

3 Michael Janse \au Bioethuyscn came over to Beverwyek in 16.36, as a servant, with his wife 
^°- £°Vd'"'5n- Having amassed a fortune in a few years in the fur trade, he removed in 1646 to 
M&nhaiX&n.— 0'Callaghan;s History of New Netherland, i^AZi^. 

i A guilder sewant was one-third of the guilder beaver, and was worth about 13X cents 

Hist. Coll. III. 2 



10 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the Privi- 
leged West India Company, etc., Adrian Janssen [Appel] Van Leyden,' 
who declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he does appoint 
and empower, Honorable Arent Van Curler, in the principal's name and 
in his behalf to cite Marcelis Janssen [Van Bommel,] late farmer of the 
tapster's excise of beer and wine, and against the same to proceed to a 
decisive sentence, for payment for loss and interest on an anker - of 
brandy wine drawn in a violent manner through the public street, by 
Marcelis Janssen ; from said sentence to appeal, or to acquit of the same; 
and in this matter to represent his person before the court of Fort 
Orange and village of Beverwyck; promising to hold good all that the 
said Curler shall do in this matter, under a pledge of his person and 
estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in Fort Orange, Dec. 1st, A. D. 1656. 

Adrian Jansse Van Leyden. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me JCohannes La Montagne, in the service of the Gene- 
ral Privileged West India Company, etc., Jan Bembo Van Lingen,'^ 
dwelling in the colony Rensselaerswyck, who in the presence of the after 
named witnesses, appointed and empowered, as he, by these presents, 
does appoint and empower the Honorable l^hilip Pieterse [Schuyler] in 
the principal's name, and in his behalf, to demand of the Honorable Directors 
of the General Privileged West India Company, at the Chamber in Amster- 
dam, or of the Honorable Director here, the payment of such moneys as 
are due to him, for service by him performed for the aforesaid Company, 
in New Netherland ; according to an accounting to this principal given, 
signed by Petrus Stuyvesant under the credit side and by Carel Van 
Bruggen' under the debit side and quittance to give for the receipts, with 
power to substitute one or two [persons] in his place to further the pay- 
ment of the aforesaid accounting, promising to hold as good and true all 
that the attorney shall do in this matter, under a pledge of his person 
and estate, present and future, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange, in presence of Johannes Provoost, and Arent 
Vandeu Berch,'^ 5th January, 1657. 

Jan Bembo. 
Tliis is the mark of -]- Arent Vanden Berch, as witness. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms on which Frans Barentse Pastoor intends to sell, 

1 Adrien Jause Appel Vau Leyden was an innkeeper ; in 1654 he received a patent for a lot at 
Beverwyck, on condition that the house to be erected thereon be not an ordinary tippling house 
but an inn lor travelers. He removed to New Amsterdam and petitioned for the freedom of the 
city in 1662. He married Folkie Pieterse, widow of Pieter Meese Vrooman, in 1685.— Dutch 
Manuscripts and Valentine's Manual. 

^An anker was about 10 gallons English. 

3 In 1658 Jan Bembo was a soldier in the West India Company's service. He was at Fort 
Orange in 1656 and 1657. — Dutch Mam/scripts. 

" Carel Vau Bruggen was provincial secretary at New Amsterdam, and died at Flushing, L. I., 
in 1682. — C Callaghan's History of New Netherland. 

s Arent Vanden Berg was a corporal in the West India Company's service at Fort Orange in 
1657. 



Albany County Records. 11 

to the highest bidder, at a public sale, his house, lot, brewery and 
garden, as they are at present occupied and possessed by him, according 
to the patent thereof. First. — The house and brewery shall be delivered 
to the seller, as they stand, to wit, permanent fixtures Qcterdt en nagel 
vast), except furniture and household goods, also the lot and garden, as 
they stand within their fences, according to the patent, with the horse 
stable and a hogsty. With the brewery, shall be delivered an under- 
trough (tmderback), a cooler, (koolhach)^ a brew kettle, a wort kettle 
(brut/pot), a wort tub, a barrel kettle (?) (vaetback), and twenty stout 
half barrels and beer tubs (bie?- vlooten), an iron vise (?) Qwerck greef) 
a little kettle, a wooden funnel, a neest (?) cloth, a brewer's sling, two 
gutters, a long and short gutter, and a scoop. The delivery shall take place 
on the 1st day of May, 1657, until which time the seller keeps posses- 
sion. Payment shall be made in these terms, to wit, on delivery a third 
part, on the 1st of August next coming a second, and the third on the 1st 
of May, 1658. The payment shall be made in good whole merchantable 
beavers, or by exchange on Holland, for which the buyer shall be 
allowed ten per centum advance. The buyer shall be holden to furnish 
two sufficient sureties each as principals, to the satisfaction of the seller. 
The per centage {siidver geldy becomes a charge upon the buyer. With 
the first payment a proper conveyance shall be made for the buyer, and 
with the last the patent shall be delivered. If the buyer cannot produce 
sufficient sureties in the time of four and twenty hours, then at his cost 
and charge it shall be sold again, and whatever it falls short the buyer 
shall be held to make good ; but if it becomes of greater value he shall 
derive no benefit therefrom. On this 11th day of December, A. D. 
1657, at a public sale of the house, brewery and appurtenances of the 
same, according to the specifications in the above conditions, the highest 
bid made was three thousand six hundred and thirty guilders, and 
Hendrick Andriessen [Van Doesburgh] stood the buyer, according to the 
conditions above narrated. 

Done at the above date, in the village of Beverwyck ; present Jacob 
[Janse] Schermerhooren and Lowies Cobus ; and was subscribed by Hen- 
derick [Andriessen] Van Doezborch, Jacob Schermerhooren and Lowius 
Cobus. - 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

At the same time appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, Deputy 
at Fort Orange, etc.. Rem Janssen Smit and Dirck Bensinck, citizens of 
the aforesaid village, and declared that they had constituted themselves, 
as by these presents they do constitute themselves sureties, each as prin- 
cipal, for the person of Henderick Andriessen, for the sum of three thou- 
sand six hundred and thirty guilders, upon the terms of payment, and in 
the currency specified in the above conditions, under a pledge of their 
persons and estate, movable and immovable, present and futm-e, submit- 



The stuivei- geiawa.9 an arrangement made at all public sales, both of real and personal property 
by which It was stipulated that the buyer should pay 21 stuivers to the guilder on the amount 
ot his purchase, the odd stuiver being the auctioneer's fees, and was equivalent to 2X per cent 

2 Ludoviciis Cobes was the tip staflF or court messenger of Beverwyck in 1(556; appointed 
notary public 1673, and secretary of Schenectady in 1677. He left but one child, a dau<rhter who 
married Johannes Kleyn of Schenectady. He died about 16S1. "=."'^'='- wiiu 



12 Alhayiy County Records. 

ting the same to all laws and judges, and renouncing all exceptions which 
may be repugnant to said pledge. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, this 11th of December, A. D. 1656; 
present Rutger Jacobsen and Jacob Schermerhooren, commissaries of the 
jurisdiction of this place : was subscribed by 

Rem Janssen Smith. i 
This is the mark of -|- DiRK Bensick. 
Rutger Jacobsen. 
Jacob Janse Schermerhooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, Vice Director, etc., Henderick 
Andriessen [Van Doesburgh,] who declared that he had surrendered, as 
by these presents he does surrender, to Philip Henderickse [Brouwer]- 
his claim upon the house, brewery, lot and garden, and the appurtenances 
of the same, which he, the assignor, as the highest bidder, publicly 
bought of Frans Barentse Pastoor, on the eleventh of this month, accord- 
ing to the conditions and contract of sale, made the same date; with all 
the rights and claims which the assignor may have upon the aforesaid 
house, brewery, etc., for the sum of four thousand Carolus guilders, in 
good whole merchantable beavers [skins], at eight guilders a piece [skin], 
which sum the said Philip Hendrickse shall pay in three payments, to 
wit, the first on the first day of August of the coming year 1657, the 
second on the first day of August in the year 1658, and the last on the 
first day of August in the year 1659, with interest on the last two pay- 
ments at 10 per cent, from the first day of May in the year 1657, until 
the final payment, under a pledge of his person and estate, movable and 
immovable, present and future, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, this 17th of December, A. D. 1656, 
in presence of Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven], and Hendrick Reur, 
witnesses for that purpose called ; and was signed by Hendrick Andriesse, 
Philip Hendrickse, Hendrick Janssen Reur, and Claas Hendrickse. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms on which Jan Verbeeck ^ proposes to sell, to the 
highest bidder, at public sale, his house situate and standing on the 
river side, where he at present dwells. First. — There shall be delivered 
to the buyer, the house of two planks length, with a kitchen (Jcoockhuys') 
of sixteen feet square attached to said house, with a chimney and an oven 
therein, and the whole lot, in which are contained his two gardens, one 
behind and the other before said house, all according to the patent there- 

> Rem Jansen Smit was in Rensselaerswyck as earlj' as 1656. A person of this name was in 
New Amsterdam 1C43-51 ; and in 1663 was at the Waalebocht, L. I., and being complained of by 
Adriaen Hageman for carrying off a ploughshare, was ordered by the court to replace it in the 
spot where he found it. and it he had any claim to prosecute it at law.— Dutch Manuscrij^ts. 

2 Philip Hendrilsse Brouwer was one of the original settlers of Schenect»dy in 1662. The 
following year, 1663, he accidentally shot Claas Cornelise Swits : the nest year, 1664, he died. 
His wife's name was Elsie Tjerck. It is not linown that he left any children. 

3 Jau Verbeek was one of the magistrates of Beverwyck for several years. His name often 
appears in the public records. If he left any children their names do not appear in the church 
registers. 



Albany County Records. 13 

of, together with a well and hogsty. The buyer shall receive the lot as 
it lies within its fence, with all the permanent fixtures, both in the 
house and on the lot, except furniture and household goods, and the 
tailor's shopboard. Delivery shall be made on the 1st day of May, A. D. 
1657, until which time the seller shall have possession. Payment shall 
be made in three terms, to wit, on receipt of the property a just third 
part, and on the first day of August, the second part, and the third or 
last part on the first day of May, A. D. 1658. The payments shall be 
made, the half in good whole merchantable beavers, and the other half 
in good strung sewant, at ten guilders the beaver,' to be reckoned at the 
payment of the beavers. The buyer shall be held to furnish two sufficient 
sureties as principals jointly and severally to the content of the seller. 
The per centage to become a charge against the buyer. With the first 
payment the buyer shall receive a proper conveyance, and on the last the 
patent (jgrondhriej) shall be delivered. If the buyer can furnish no 
sufl&cient sureties within twenty-four hours, then it shall be sold again at 
his charge and cost, and whatever less it comes to be worth the buyer 
shall be held to replace, and whatever more it comes to be worth he shall 
derive no profit therefrom. After much bidding, Claas Hendrickse [Van 
Schoonhoven] remained the last bidder, for the sum of eighteen hun- 
dred and twelve guilders, who, in presence of Rutger Jacobsen and 
Andries Herbertsen, said conditions accepted, under a pledge of his person 
and estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck this 10th Jan., A. D. 1657, and 
was signed by Claas Hendrickse, Andries Herbertsen and Rutger 
Jacobsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On same date appeared the Honorable Johannes Baptista Van Rens- 
selaer - and the Honorable Philip Pieterse [Schuyler] who offered 
themselves as sureties and principals for the persons of Claas Hendricksen, 
under pledge of their person and estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck at the above date, and was subscribed 
by Jan Baptist Van Rensselaer and Philip Pieterse. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms upon which Jan Verbeeck proposes to sell, at 
public sale, a house lying on the hill,^ south of the house of Lourens 
Lourensen, and on the north side of the public road, with the whole lot 
according to the patent thereof. First. — The house with the whole lot [and 
all that is] fastened by earth and nail, shall be delivered to the buyer. 
The delivery shall be made on the 1st of May, A. D. 1657. The pay- 
ment shall be made in two terms, to wit, on receipt of the property a 

1 The heaver skin was worth therefore about $4 in this transaction, but ofteuer it is quoted 
at 8 guilders, and worth but $3.20 in our currency. 

2 Johannes Baptista Van Rensselaer was son of Kiliaen the first patroon. He was the first of the 
family who visited this country. He died 16th Oct., 1688. 

3 The first settlement at Beverwyck was around the Fort (Orange), near the foot of Lydius 
street, by the river side ; subsequently those grants of lots were annulled, and the chief settle- 
ment was made farther north on higher ground along Broadway and State street, which was 
called the Hill. The land south of the city wall and Hudson street was called the Plain. 



14 Albany County Records. 

just half; and on the first day of August next coming, the last payment. 
The payment shall be made in good whole merchantable beavers. The 
buyer shall be held to furnish two sufficient sureties as principals, jointly 
and severally, in the space of twenty-four hours, and if he cannot furnish 
sufficient sureties in the space of four and twenty hours, then at his cost 
and charge it shall be again sold, and whatever less it comes to be worth, 
the buyer shall be holden to replace, and if it comes to be worth more, he 
shall derive no benefit therefrom. With the first payment, the buyer 
shall receive a proper conveyance ; with the last payment the patent. The 
per centage a charge upon the buyer. After many bids, Hendrick 
Andriessen [Van Doesburgh] remained the last bidder for the sum 
of twelve hundred and ten guilders, who, in the presence of Rutger 
Jacobsen and Andries Herbertsen accepted said conditions, under a 
pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck this 10th of January, A. D. 1657, 
and was subscribed by Henderick Andriessen [Van Doesburgh], Rutger 
Jacobsen and Andries Herbertsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the same date appeared Jurriaen Teunissen [Glasemaeker r*] and 
Pieter Bronck, who, as sureties and principals, offered themselves for 
the person of Hendrick Andriesse, under pledge of their persons and 
estates, movable and immovable. 

Done as above : was subscribed Jurriaan Teunissen and Pieter Bronck. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Upon this 13th day of Jan., A. D. 1657, appeared before me Johannes 
La Montagne, in the service of the Greneral Privileged West India Com- 
pany, Vice Director, etc., the honorable Rutger Jacobsen, burgess and 
citizen of said village of Beverwyck, and acknowledged that he is in- 
debted to Tennis Dircks [Van Vechten]i and Cornells Teunissen - as guar- 
dians of the estate of Cornells Maasen [Van Buren],'^ the sum of six 
hundred and sixty guilders remaining of the sum of 15U0 guilders, which 
the said Rutger tfacobsen owed the said guardians, growing out of the sale 
of a certain parcel of laud lying on the island of JManhattan, belonging to 
the afore mentioned Cornelis Maasen in his life time, which sum of six 
hundred and sixty guilders he promises to pay in good strung sewant within 
a year from date, with interest on the same, in beavers reckoned at nine 
guilders the piece [or skin],' under a pledge of his person and estate, 
movable and immovable, present and future, especially the above mentioned 
piece of land, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

1 Teunia Dirkse Van Vechten came out from Holland with wife and child in the Arms of Norway, 
and had a farm in 1648 at Greeubush, north of that occupied by Teunis Cornelise Van V. He is 
referred to iu ICBSas " an old inhabitant here." — 0' Callaghaii' s History of New Netherlands i, 
438. He was deceased in 1700, leaving 4 children. 

2 Cornelis Teunissen Van Vechten, son of Teunis Dirkse ? 

3 Cornells Maase Van Buren of Gelderland, Holland, came out in 1621 in the ship Rensselaers- 
wyck. HehadafarmatPapsknee. Heand his wife Catalyntje Marteuse died in 1648 and " 6(?j/c?e 
op eenen dagh zyn begraaven.'''' He left 5 children, all of whom were living in 166-^.— O' CallagJuin's 
History of New Netherlands i, 4.34. 

* The beaver skin is worth in this transaction about $3.60. 



Albany Comity Records. 15 

Done in Fort Orange, as above, in presence of Johannes Provoost and 
Jan Roeloffsen [De Goyer]. 

RUTGER JaCOBSEN. 

Johannes Provoost^ witness. 
Jan Roeloffse., as witness. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, Vice Director, etc., William 
Frederickse Bout,' farmer of the wine and beer excise consumable by the 
tapsters, in Fort Orange, village of Beverwyck and appendancies of the 
same, who declared that he had transferred, as by these presents, he does 
transfer, to Jan Andriessen the Irishman from Dublin, dwelling in 
Catskil, the right in the aforesaid excise belonging to him, the assignor, 
in Catskil, for the sum of one hundred and fifty (150) guilders, which 
sum the aforesaid Jan Andriesse promises to pay, in two terms, to wit, 
on the first day of May, the half of said sum ; and on the last day of 
October of the year A. D. 1657, the other half; under a pledge of his 
person and estate, movable and immovable, present and future, submitting 
the same to all courts and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange this 19th of January, A. D. 1657, present 
Johannes Provoost and Daniel Verveelen. 

This is the mark of ^•-\'~ William Frederickse Bout. 

4 

This is the mark of ^^ Jan Andriessen. 2 
Johannes Provoost, ivitness, 
Daniel Verveelen. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms upon which Dirck Bensinck"^ and Harmen 
Jacobsen Bembus, propose to sell at auction, the house where Jan 
Tomassen [Mingael ?] at present dwells, to the highest bidder, together 
with the lot. First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer, as it 
stands fast by earth and nail, with the lot, in breadth on the west side 
seven and fifty wood feet, and on the east side seven and forty wood feet 
and a half, with the fence so far as the breadth extends as well as the 
fence lengthwise on the south side, all according to the patent thereof. 
The delivery shall be made on the first of May, 1657. The payment 
shall be made in two terms, in good whole merchantable beavers [skins], 
the first shall be made in the month of July, A. D. 1657, and the 
second in the following year, A. D. 1658, also in the month of July. 
With the first payment, a conveyance shall be given to the buyer, and 
with the last, the patent [^grondhrief] shall be delivered up. The buyer 
shall be held to furnish two sufficient sureties, each as principals, to the 



1 Willem Frederickse Bout, perhaps in Beverwyck in 1642. In 1657, and afterwards, he kept a 
public house, and was also farmer of the excise on beer, wine, etc. 

2 His Irish name was probablj' John Anderson ; his nick name was Jantie or Johnny. 

3 His descendants write this name Benson, Bensen, or Bensing. 



16 Albany County Records. 

content of the seller, before lie goes out of the house. If the buyer can 
not furnish sufficient sureties, then, at his cost and charges, it shall again 
be sold, and what it falls short, he shall be holden to pay, and that within 
three months. The per centage becomes a charge against the buyer. 
After much bidding, the bid remained with Jan Verbeeck, for the sum 
of two thousand and nineteen guilders, according to the above conditions. 

Done in Beverwyck this 22d January, A. D. 1657. 

Jan Verbeeck. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the same date appeared Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven] and 
Marcelis Janse,i who stood as sureties and principals, for the sum of two 
thousand and nineteen guilders, for the person of Jan Verbeeck, under 
pledge of their persons and estates, movable and immovable. 

Done as above ; present as witnesses, Johannes Provoost and Lowies 

Cobus. 

Claas Hendryckse. 
Marcelys Jansen. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms according to which Jacob Janse Schermerhooren 
proposes to sell to the highest bidder his house standing in Fort 
Orange, where deputy Johannes La Montagne at present resides, with 
a garden behind the fort. First. — The house, whatever is fast by earth and 
nail, shall be delivered to the buyer according to the patent thereof. 
******** 

[The above paper not having been executed, was erased]. 

Conditions and terms according to which, Caspar Jacobse [Halenbeek]- 
proposes to sell his house, lot and garden, standing in the village of 
Beverwyck. First, The house and permanent fixtures shall be delivered 
to the buyer with the lot and garden, altogether sixteen rods'^ long and 
in breadth four rods and four feet, except the cherry trees, all according 
to the patent thereof. Delivery shall be given on the 8th of May, A. D. 
1657. Payments shall be made in two terms ; the first on delivery [of the 
property], to wit, the 8th of May, A. D. 1657, and the second payment 
on the 8th of May, in the year 1658. The payments shall be made in 
whole merchantable beavers [skins]. The per centage becomes a charge 
upon the buyer. The buyer shall furnish two sufficient sureties to the 
content of the seller. If the buyer cannot furnish sufficient sureties, then 
the property shall be sold again at his cost and charge, and whatever less 
it shall come to be worth, shall be a charge against the buyer. After 
much bidding, Harmen Jacobse [Bambus] remained the last bidder, for 

1 Marcelis Janse Van Bommel was a tavern keeper in 1656. He seems to have been a man 
of good capacity and large business. His children went by the name of Marcelis, which name 
has been perpetuated by many families in Albany, Schenectady and elsewhere. 

5 Caspar Jacobse Halenbeek, one of the early settlers of Beverwyck, left two sons, Isaac and 
Jan, from whom have descended the families of this name in Albany and yicxmiy .— Munseir s 
Collections on the History of Albany, ii, 410, et seq. 

8 Khynland rods, 13 feet to the rod, and 12.36 English inches to the foot. 



Albany Comity Records. 17 

the sura of eight hundred and ten guilders, according to the above con- 
ditions. 

Done in Beverwyck the 22d of January, A. D. 1657. 

Harmen Jacobsen.i 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the same date appeared Adrian Janse [Van Ilpendam] and Abra- 
ham Pietersen [Vosburgh], who were offered as sureties and principals, 
for the sum of eight hundred and ten guilders, for the person of Harmea 
Jacobsen, on a pledge of their persons and estate, movable and immovable. 
Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 22d of January, 1657. 
Adrian Van Ilpendam. 
Abraham Pietersen Vosburght.- 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms upon which Marcelus Janssen [Van Bommel] 
proposes to sell, at public sale, to the highest bidder, his house where he 
at present lives. First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer, just as 
it stands, with a piece of the lot running through from top to bottom, the 
lot shall be 30 wood feet^ wide at the top and bottom, and where the said 
house stands, with the permanent fixtures, except the hogsty, which the 
seller keeps to himself Delivery shall be made the first day of May 
next. Payment shall be in two terms, to wit, on the first day of 
July, the first payment, being the first half; and on the first day of 
July, 1658, the last payment, being a year after the first payment. The 
payment shall be in good and whole merchantable beavers. The 
buyer shall be held to furnish two sufiicient sureties, as principals, jointly 
and severally, to the content of the seller. If the buyer cannot furnish 
sufiicient sureties in the time of twenty-four hours, the property shall be 
sold at his cost and charge, and, besides, he shall be holden to replace 
whatever less it shall come to be worth, and if it shall become worth more 
he shall derive no profit therefrom. The per ceutage becomes a charge 
to the buyer. After much bidding, Cornelis Wyncoop remained the 
highest bidder, for the sum of nine hundred and eleven guilders,^ accord- 
ing to the above conditions, on a pledge of his person and estate. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 29th of January, A. D. 1657. 

Cornelis Wynckoop.-^ 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the same date, appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy 

1 Harmen Jacobse Bambas fled from Beverwyck in 1657 to escape imprisonment for debt, and hia 
Bloop and otiier property were attached at tlie suit of Riit£;er Jacobse. Having concealed liim- 
eelf at Esopus he was there shot by an Indian in 1658, and his body was carried to New Amster- 
dam for interment.— Dutch Manuscripts. 

^ Abraham Pieterse Vosburg was one of four brothers, all of whom settled in Beverwyck —sons 
of Pieter Jacobse V. The four brothers were Jacob, Isaac, Pieter and Abraham. The latter was 
deceased in 1674. 

3 Wood feet, at 11.15 inches English each. The wood foot, however, was commonly called 11 
inches English. 

< $364.40. 

» Cornelis Wynkoop is supposed to have been a son of Pieter W. He is said to have removed 
from Albany to Esopus in 1664, where he resided until his death in 1674, leaving six children. 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 8 



18 Albany County Records. 

at Fort Orange, etc., Henderick Andriessen [Van Doesburgh], and 
Kobert Engel, who stood as sureties and principals for the person of Cor- 
nelis Wyncoop, for the sum of nine hundred and eleven guilders, on 
pledge of their persons and estates. 
Done as above. 

Robert Engel. 
Hendrick Andriessen. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Jurrian Teunissen Glasemaeeker' pro- 
poses to sell his house and lot, where he at present dwells, to the highest 
bidder. First. — The house, with all permanent fixtures, shall be delivered 
to the buyer, with the lot, length and breadth ten rods, according to the 
patent thereof, with two hogsties ; also a part of a lot lying to the south 
of the house, in breadth about 23 feet. Delivery shall be given this cur- 
rent year in the month of May. The payment shall be made in good 
whole merchantable beavers, in two terms, to wit, on the first day of July, 
A. D. 1657, the half, and the other half on the first day of July, A. 
D. 1658. With the first payment a transfer (^transport) shall be made 
to the buyer, and with the last payment, the patent ((jt'ondbrief) shall 
be given. The buyer shall be held to furnish two suflBcient sureties, each 
as principals, in the time of four and twenty hours, to the content of the 
seller, and if the buyer cannot furnish sufficient sureties in the time of 
four and twenty hours, then it [property] shall be sold again at the cost 
and charge of the buyer, and all that it shall become less worth, he shall 
be holden to replace, and if it become worth more he shall enjoy no 
benefit therefrom. The auction fees become a charge to the buyer. 
After much bidding, Andries Herbertsen remained the last bidder, for 
the sum of one thousand five hundred and ten guilders, according to the 
above conditions, which he has accepted, on pledge of his person and 
estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 29th of January, A. D. 1657. 

Andries Herberts. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort-Orange. 

On the same date, appeared Philip Pieterse [Schuyler] and Marcelus 
Janssen.[Van Bommel], who constituted themselves sureties and princi- 
pals for the person of Andries Herbertsen, for the sum of one thousand 
five hundred and ten guilders, and that upon pledge of their persons 
and estates. 

Done ut supra. 

Philip Pieterse Schuyler. 
Marcelys Janssen. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Abraham Pieterse Vosburgh proposes to 
sell to the highest bidder, his house and lot, lying in the village of Bever- 

' Glazier. See page 14. 



Albany County Records. * 19 

wyck, where lie at present dwells. First. — The house, with all that is fast 
by earth and nail, shall be delivered to the buyer, with the lot, in breadth 
in front on the street from Tomas Clabbort's lot to the south side 
of his house, and in breadth in the rear four rods, and in length ten rods, 
provided that the door and windows on the south side of the seller's 
house shall remain closed, all according to the patent thereof. 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted]. 

Terms and conditions on which Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoenderwoert 
or Van Woert], proposes to sell to the highest bidder, his garden, lying in 
the village of Beverwyck, according to the patent thereof First. — There 
yhall be delivered to the buyer, the garden ^ with its enclosure, lying by 
Herr Van Rensselaer's on the river side ; and westerly on the road ; in 
length 8 rods and 7 feet; along the river 8 rods and one foot: bounded 
on the north on the lot of Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick] G rods, 
breadth on the south side three and a half rods, according to the patent, 
except the sagetrees {salij hoomen) and the fruit which is thereon. De- 
livery shall be made on the IGtIi April, A. D. 1657. Payment shall be 
made in two terms, to wit, on delivery, the half in good merchantable 
sewant ; the other half on the first day of August of this year 1657, in 
merchantable beavers. The buyer shall be holden to furnish two sufficient 
sureties in four and twenty hours, to the content of the seller. And if 
the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties in said time, then it shall 
be again sold at his cost and charge, and whatever less it comes to be 
worth, he shall be holden to replace, and whatever more it shall become 
worth, he shall not profit thereby. The auction fees become a charge 
upon the buyer. On this date the 29th of January, A. D. 1657, Frans 
Barentse Pastoor remained the last bidder for the sum of two hundred and 
eighty-six guilders, according to the conditions. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck this 29th of January, A. D. 1657. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 

Acknowledged before me, 

IjA Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On the same date, appeared Jan Verbeeck and Gerrit Slechtenhorst, 
as sureties and principals, for the person of Frans Barentse Pastoor, and 
for the sum of two hundred and eighty-six guilders, on a pledge of their 
persons and estates. 
Done ut supra. 

Gerrit Slichtenhorst.- 
Jan Verbeeck. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoender- 
woert] proposes to sell to the highest bidder a lot situated at the west of 
his house where he at present dwells. First. — There shall be delivered to 

1 This garden lay on the east side of Broadway, south of State street. 

2 Gerrit Slichtenhorst came to Beverwyck in 1646, with his father Brant Arentse S., and served 
as schout-fiscaal for a short time. He removed to Kingston about 1672, where he died the 9th 
of January, 1684. 



20 Albany County Records. 

the buyer, the lot situate to the west of the house where he at present 
dwells, in breadth on the road 30 feet, in the rear or south side 27 feet in 
breadth ; length on both sides 62 feet. The delivery shall be made on 
the 16th April, 1657. The payment shall take place on the first day of 
May, 1657, to wit, the half in good merchantable seewant, and the other 
half in good merchantable beavers. The buyer shall be holden to furnish 
two sufficient sureties and that in the time of four and twenty hours, to 
the content of the seller. If the buyer cannot furnish sufficient sureties 
in the aforesaid time, then at his cost and charge it shall again be sold, 
and what less it shall become worth he shall be holden to replace ; and 
although it come to be worth something more, he shall enjoy no profit 
therefrom. The auction fees become a charge to the buyer. After 
much bidding Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven] remained the last 
bidder, for the sum of five hundred and six guilders, according to the 
above conditions. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 29th of January, A. D. 1657. 

Claas Henderycksen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On same date appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy at 
Fort Orange, the Hon. Johannes Baptist Van Rencelaer and Jacob 
[Janse] Schermerhooren, as sureties and principals, for the person of Claas 
Henderickse, for the sum of five hundred and six guilders, on a pledge 
of their persons and goods. 
Done %it supra. 

Jan Baptist Van Rensselaer. 
Jacob Jansen Schermerhooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Gerrit Eeyersen [Lansing ?] proposes 
to sell at public sale his house and lot standing by Jurrian Glasemaecker, 
and now occupied by Jan Broersen. First. — There shall be delivered to 
the buyer, the house by earth and nail fast, with the lot, four rods 
broad and 8 rods long, according to the patent thereof. 

* ^ ^ * * * * 

[This paper was not executed]. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., of the 
General Privileged West India Company, Vice Director, etc., the Honor- 
able Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoenderwoert], who declared that he had 
sold to Harmen Vedder, his house and lot lying in the village of Bever- 
wyck, in breadth front and rear six and thirty feet, with an alley of five 
feet in breadth, in length to the kil, which alley lies between Goosen 
Gerritse [Van Schaick] and the seller, with a portion of the place where 
his brewery stands; which brewery shall be worked [by the seller] until 
next November of the year 1657, and the lot of said brewhouse shall 
then be delivered, for the sum of two thousand three hundred and 
twenty-five guilders, which he promises to pay in three terms, to wit, the 
first payment on the 20th of May, A D. 1657, being a just third part, in 
good commercial seewant, reckoned at ten guilders the beaver; the second 



Albany County Rtcords. 21 

payment shall be made on the first of August of the year 1657, in good 
whole merchantable beavers; and the third payment on the first day of 
August, A. D. 1658, also in good whole merchantable beavers, the seller 
promising to give the buyer a deed (Jransjjorf) on the 20th of 3Iay, on 
the first payment; under pledge of their persons and estates, movable 
and immovable, present and future, submitting the same to all laws and 
judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 31st of January, A. D. 1657, in presence 
of Henderiok Andriessen [Van Doesburgh] and Johannes Provoost. 

RUTGER JaCOBSEN. 

Harman Vedde:r.i 
Hendrick Andriessen. 
Johannes Provoost., witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., and in 
the presence of Rutger Jacobsen and Andries Herbertsen, commissa- 
ries, etc., Frans Barentsen Pastoor, burgess and citizen of the village of 
Beverwyck, and declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these 
presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the 
behoof of Henderick Andriessen [Van Doesburgh], also a citizen of said 
village, a house, brewhouse, lot and garden lying in the village of Bever- 
wyck, according to the patent granted to him by the Director General 
and Council of New Netherland, for the sum of three thousand six 
hundred and thirty guilders, which the aforesaid Henderick Andriessen 
shall pay in three terms, in good whole merchantable beavers, to wit, on 
the first day of May of the current year 1657, a just third part; on the first 
day of August next coming the second third part, and the last third part 
on the first day of May in the year 1658 ; which house, brewhouse, lot 
and garden the grantor shall free from all claims and demands, which 
may be upon the same ; the parties respectively to the observance of this 
contract, pledging their persons and estates, present and future, and 
submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the tenth day of February, A. D. 1657. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 
Rutger Jacohsen. 
Andries Herberts. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange, 

Upon this lOlh of February, 1657, appeared before me Johannes La 
Montagne, Deputy, etc., Andries Harperssen, burgess and citizen of the 
village of Beverwyck, who declared that he had granted to Jan Martense 
[Beekman]- also a citizen of the same village, all the right that he, the 
grantor has in the house and lot of Jurrian Teunisse [Glazemaecker] by 

1 Harman Albertse Vedder was early a trader in Albany. In 1672 he bought a bouiverij ia 
Schenectady, where he settled with his Ave sons and one daughter. He was not living in 1715. 
The families of this name in the vicinity of Albany are descended from him. 

2 Jan Martense Beekman, son of Marten Beekman, blacksmith, married, 1, Machtelt, 
daughter of Jacob Janse Schermerhooren ; and 2, Eva Vinhagen, on the 26th of October. 
1692. He had 15 children baptized, of whom 13 were mentioned as living, in hia will, made 16th 
December, 1728. He was buried September 30, 1732. 



22 Albany County Records. 

him, the grantor, obtained at a public sale held on the 20th of January, 
1657, according to the conditions read at the time, for the sum of three 
and twenty hundred guilders, which sum the said Jan Martense promises 
to pay in good strung seew:;nt, or corn at the market price, in three terms, 
the first, on the first of May of the current year 1657 ; 800 guilders on 
the first day of May of the year 1658; and the third or last on the first 
day of May, A. D. 1659 ; and all on a pledge of their persons and goods, 
movable and immovable, submitting the same to all courts and judges. 

Done tit supra, in presence of Marcelus Janssen and Rutger Jacobsen 
as witness called for that purpose. 

This is the mark of >-j- Jan Martense. 
Rutger Jacobsen. 
Marcelys Jarisen. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Pieter Bronck proposes to sell, to the 
highest bidder, his log house {halchenhuys), at public sale, and the lot 
thereof. First. — There shall be delivered to the buyer the house fast 
by earth and nail, with the lot, which is in length a hundred and fifty- 
four feet and a half ; rear sixteen wood feet; breadth on the road the 
same as the house, with an alley on the south side seven feet in breadth. 

* * * >J: * * * 

[On the 26th of February, A. D. 1657, the above property was bidden 
in by the owner, atthe house of William P'rederickse Bout, and of course 
this paper was not executed]. 

< 

Terms and conditions according to which Pieter Bronck proposes to 

sell, to the highest bidder, at public sale, his house lying on the hill. 

First. — There shall be delivered to the buyer the house and fixtures 

with the lot, 20 rods in length and five rods in breadth, according to the 

patent thereof; which house is leased until the first day of May, A. D. 

1658, for the sum of five and twenty beavers, which five and twenty 

beavers the buyer shall receive. 

* * * * * * * 

[This property was bidden in by the owner, Pieter Bronck, 26th of 
February, A. D. 1657, at the house of William Frederickse Bout, and 
the above paper was not executed]. 

Terms and conditions according to which Pieter Bronck proposes to 

sell his house standing to the north of the log house {halckenliitys), with 

the lot. First. — There shall be delivered to the buyer, the house and 

all the fixtures, with the lot 83 wood feet in length, and 8 eight feet in 

breadth in the rear, with a hogsty ; which house is leased until the first 

day of May, A. D. 1657, for the sum of 12 beavers, which 12 beavers 

the buyer shall receive, etc. 

* * + * * * * 

[The above property was bidden in by the owner Pieter Bronck, on 
the 26th of February, A. D. 1657, at the house of William Frederickse 
Bout, and this paper was not executed]. 

Terms and conditions according to which Claas Hendrickse [Van 
Schoonhoven] proposes to sell his lot, which he holds from Rutger 



Albany County Records. 23 

Jacobsen, lying to the west of the house of Kutger Jacobsen. Firsts 
There shall be delivered to the buyer the lot, thirty feet broad on the 
road, m the rear or south side seven and twenty feet broad, leno-th on 
both side^s sixty-two feet. Delivery shall be made on the J 6th of^April 
A. D. 1657. Payment shall be made in good whole merchantable beavers' 
in two terms ; with the delivery, the half, and on the first day of July' 
A. D. 1657, the other half. The buyer shall be holden to furnish two 
sufficient sureties to stand as principals to the content of the seller. If 
the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties in the aforesaid time, then 
It shall be offered for sale again at his cost and charge, and whjitever 
less It shall come to be worth, he shall be holden to replace, and if it shall 
come to be worth more, he shall receive no benefit therefrom. The 
auction fees become a charge against the buyer. After much biddino- 
Claas Hendrickse remained the last bidder on the 26th of February, A. D.' 
1657, at the house of William Frederickse Bout. 
[This paper was not executed]. 

Conditions and terms according to which Do. Gideon Schaets i proposes 
to sell his garden lying behind Fort Orange, on the south bounded by 
Gilhs Pieterse [Timmerman], and on the north side by Jacob De Brouwer 
on the east side by Pieter Hartgers, and on the west side by the 
road, more or less as described in the patent. The delivery shall be 
made for ready pay (contant'). The payment shall be made in good whole 
merchantable beavers, the last of July, in the year 1657. The auction 
fees become a charge upon the buyer. After much bidding, Jan Van 
Aecken remained the bidder for the sum 107 guilders, according to the 
above conditions. 

Done in Fort Orange this 26th of February, A. D. 1657. 

This is the mark of ^ ^g^ J^ Jan Coster Van Aecken. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne. 

Tennis Teunissen Metselaer proposes to sell a garden, 7 rods lono- 
and four rods broad, lying behind Jan De Wever's house, by Fort Oranoe"^ 
Delivery shall be made on the first of March, A. D. 1657. Payment sh'^li 
be made in the month of October, A. D. 1657, in good whole merchanta- 
ble beavers. The auction fees become a charge on the buyer. After 
much bidding, Jan Clute remained the last bidder, for the sum of 38 
guilders, according to the above conditions. 

Done in the village of Beverwyek, the 26th of February, A. D. 1657. 

Johannes Clute. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne. 



\^1'-®i'^'^?u Schaets became minister of the church in Albany in 16.52. and continued in offipn 
until his death about 1691 at the age of 83 years. On the 13th of Aug., 1686, h s a%^ i " thus snoken 

ouderdom-, etc. His house was on the east side of Broadway between State and Beaver streef? 
near the bridge over the Rutten kil. He had two wives, the second of whom^^g Barentfe 
Hendrkse of New York, whom he married 32d Aug., 1683. His children were Reynier who 

ZSIilSi^^^Taffie^^rke^beTo^fit'^YoT^^ 



24 Albany County Records. 

I, the subscriber, Daniel Rinckhout,' acknowledge that I have hired of 
Reyuier Wisselpenningh,- a house standing and lying in the village of 
Beverwyck, for the sum of one hundred guilders, half beavers and half 
seewant, which lam to pay as the rent becomes due, from the middle of 
next August, of the year 1(357, to the first day of June, of the year 
1658, when the lessee shall be holdeu to deliver up the said house, glass 
and roof tight. Below, the parties respectively pledge their persons and 
estates, movable and immovable, the same submitting to all laws and 
judges without craft or trick. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 23d of February, (?) A. D. 1657, 
in the presence of Jan RoeloflFse [De Goyer] and Pieter Lambertsen. 

Daniel Ringhout. 
Rynier Wisselpenningh. 
Jan Roeloffse. 
Pieter Lambertsen. 
Copy of a certain paper given by Jacob Adriansen'^ \_Raadmaecker^, 
to the trustees of the estate of Kit Davids and Cornelia De Vos, his late 
wife, which Jacob Jansen Tol [Stol] ' wrote with his own hand. I, the 
subscriber, Kit Davids, acknowledge that I have well and truly sold Jacob 
Janssen Hap [or StoU] those my lands lying in the Great Esopus, next 
the farm {bouwery') of the late Joiians De Hulter, with a road passing 
over the same ; provided that he make payment to the seller. Kit Davids, 
from this date, being the 17th day of August, to wit, in three terms, 
the first payment to be after delivery made, provided that he. Kit Davids, 
gets him a clean transfer from the Indians (wilden), and moreover a 
patent (grondbrief), from the Honorable [West India] Company. In 
accordance with my own hand, with witness hereto called and asked 
and that for the sum of 1400 guilders, say, fourteen hundred guilders, 
without any abatement or haggling {ciccordatie). So have I as seller, 
with my accustomed sign manual, subscribed this [paper] was subscribed. 
This is the mark of p Kit Davids,'^ with my own hand as seller. 

Jacob Janssen Stol. 
J..S tvitness, Jacob Adriaense. 
Agrees with the principal so far as we could read it. 
Quod Attestor. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Inventory of the estate of Kit Davids, and of the late Cornelia De Vos 
[his wife]. 

In a great chest. 
A pair of red and yellow sleeves. 
A Haerlemer damask under waistcoat, red and blue. 

1 Daniel Rinkhout was a baker, 36 years of age in 1663, from Pomeren, Holland. He made his 
will in 1662 and gave his property to his brother Jan, save 25 guilders, to his brother Aertman of 
Pomeren, if living.- iVotorzaOJap^?-*, 1,63. ■ >.^-u x. v. 

2 Reynier Wisselpenningh was probably a carpenter. He brought an action against the church 
in 1658 for building a baptistry {doop huysje), and obtained judgment for 270 guilders.— Dutch 

^JacobAdriaensen Van Utrecht came to Beverwyck in 1639.— 0' Uallagfian's Histoid of New 
Netherlands i, 438. , . ^_,„^ _, , , tt i -^ K^■u ^ 

^ Jacob Jause Stoll (or Hap) came to Beverwyck in 1630, and succeeded Hendrik Albertsen 
as ferry master. He removed to Esopus about 1657. He corresponded with Governor Stuyvesant 
in relation to the Indians and other matters.— Dutch Manuscripts. , ^ , „^ 

5 Christotfel Davids was a native of England. In 1656 lie received a patent for 36 morgens of 
land at Esopus from which he was driven by the Indians, and in 1663 asks permission to reenter 



Albany County Records. 25 

A red cloth under waistcoat. 

A red cloth under petticoat. 

A Pooyse apron. 

A black silk damask gown with red lining. 

13 napkins, made up. 

6 ditto cut unmade. 

A pair of curtains with a valance. 

2 old dark green ditto with a valance. 

A little table cloth. 

A child's yellow jacket. 

5 bed sheets (laeckens). 

10 pillows. 

A piece of fine linnen, of 1? ells. 

7 cotton swathing cloths {luyers). 
A package of childs bed linnen. 

7 night neckercheifs. 

5 white bibs (yoor schooteii). 

5 Tuckers (iieer stucken). 

5 wonians handkercheifs. 

A package of child's bed linnen tied in a square linnen cloth. 

Also two corn bags and two deer skins, a bed with its bolster, two pil- 
lows, two towels, with a coverlet and a sheet. 

This inventory was made in the presence of ChristoflFel Davids, Jan 
Verbeeck,! and Evert Wendels, orphan masters, at the request of Andries 
De Vos, guardian, in the absence of Arent Andriesse (Bratt) fellow 
guardian, by me Johannes La Montagne, as officer at Fort Orange and 
village of Beverwyck, who had the above mentioned goods locked and 
sealed in a great chest, on the 2d of March, A. D. 1657. Was subscribed 
by Jan Verbeeck, Evert Wendels,'- and Andries De VoS; as orphan masters. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the West 
India Company, deputy, etc., Andries De Vos and Arent Andriessen 
[Bratt] of the one side, and the Honorable Frans Barentse Pastoor of the 
other side ; who [have come to an agreement] with each other, in respect 
to the sale of the garden, which said Frans Barentsen, at a public sale, 
purchased, on the 29th of January, A. D. 1057, of Rutger Jacobsen ; 
which garden was again purchased afterwards by ChristofFel Davids, at a 
public sale, on tlie 26th of February, of said Frans Barentsen in this man- 
ner, to wit, that the aforesaid Andries De Vos,-^ and Arent Andriesse 



upon the same. His wife was Cornelia De Vos, who was deceased in 1657. Their son David 
settled at Schenectady where with his wife and 4 children he was killed by the French and 
Indians, February 9. 1690. 

1 Jan Verbeek and family arrived at Manhattans 29th Nov., 1641. In 1670 he had a grant of a 
lot on the west corner of James and Steuben streets. In 1697 he was eighty- five years old, and 
died about 1699. 

- Evert Janse Wendel had a house lot on the north corner of James and State streets, which 
was occupied in 1714, by his son Thomas. He was sixty years old in 1675, had two wives. Elsie 
and Anantie ; and sons, Evert and Johannes, and perhaps Thomas, Hieronimus, Philip, and 
Abraham. 

3 Andries De Vos had a lot on the west corner of James and Columbia streets, afterwards 
owned in 1726 by Harmauus Wendel ; also ground north of Steuben and west of Pearl streets. 
He was brother-in-law of Barent Pieterse Coeymaus and father-in-law of Cornells Vos. His 
daughter Catalyntie married, 1, Arent Andriese Bratt; 3, Barent Janse Van Ditmare, who 

Hist. Coll. in. 4 



26 Albany County Records. 

[Bratt], trustees legally appointed, of the estate left by Cornelia De Vos, 
late wife of the above mentioned Cbristoffel Davids, have obligated them- 
selves, by these presents in said capacity [of trustees] as principals, to 
pay the sum of two hundred and eighty-six guilders, to the Honorable 
Rutger Jacobsen, for and in place of said Frans Barentse [Pastoor], in 
the same money as the conditions of said sale, made on the 29th of Janu- 
ary, A. D. 1657, mentioned ; and, moreover, to said Frans Barentse the 
sum of thirty guilders, and to the deputy the sum of fourteen guilders 
six stuivers for per centage; which obligation the aforesaid Frans 
Barentse has accepted ; the parties respectively pledging for the observ- 
ance of these presents, their persons and estates, movable and immovable, 
present and future. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, this 5th of March, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Jan Verbeeck and Evert Wendels, orphan masters, as wit- 
nesses ; was subscribed, Andries De Vos, with the mark of Arent 
Andriesse [Brat] ;^ Frans Barentse Pastoor, Jan Verbeeck, witness, and 
Evert Wendels, as witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne, in the service, etc.. 
Jan Janssen Van Kro'xenborch, who in the presence of the after named 
witnesses, declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he does ap- 
point, Sacharias Sickels corporal at Fort Orange, in his name to demand 
of the commissary of the West India Company in New Netherlands, the 
settlement of his wages earned, and the payment of the same, in a proper 
manner ; promising to hold good all that the attorney [Sickels] shall in 
this matter do, on a pledge of his person and estate. 

Done in Fort Orange the 13th of April, A. D. 1657, present Jan Jans- 
sen Van St Tobyn- and Marcelis Janssen [Van Bommel]. 

This is the mark of + Jan Janssen Van Kromenborch. 

This is the mark of X^ Jan Janssen Van St. Tohi/n. 

Marcelys Janssen. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Hans 
Coenradtsen [Backer] late soldier in the service of said company, who 
declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he does appoint, Jan 
Van Eeckelen,-^ at present citizen of the village of Beverwyck, in the 
constituent's name and in his behalf, to demand and procure a settle- 
ment and payment of the honorable commissary, and the receipt of 
all such moneys from New Netherland as are coming to your consti- 
tuent, for his services rendered to the aforesaid company in this country ; 



•was killed at Schenectady February 9, 1690; and 3, Claas Janse Van Boekhoeven, whom Bhe 
outlived, and died about 1712 in Schenectady. Cornelia, wife of Christofl'el Davidts, was proba- 
bly anottier daughter of Andries De Vos. ^ ,, , , , . 

' Arent Audriese Bratt was brother of Albert Andriese Bratt, or De Noorman, who settled m 
Albany The former married Catalyntje De Vos, who, on the death of her husband, in 1652, 
removed to Schenectady with her six children. From this branch are descended the Bratts of 
Schenectady. 

2 Jan Jansen St. Obyn was a resident of New Amsterdam.— Dutch Manuscripts. 
' ' VanEeckeleu was a school master in Flatbush in \^9\.— English Manuscripts. 



Albany Comity Records. 27 

promising to hold good all that the attorney in the constituent's name shall 
do, on a pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable. 

Done in Fort Orange the 18th of April, A. D. 1657. in presence of 
Johannes Provoost and Thomas Poulr 



lus. 



This is the mark of H Hans Coenradts. 

Johannes Provoost, witness. 
Thomas PowallA 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 
Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, etc., Albert Gerritsen [Lan- 
sing?], who declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he does 
appoint, the Honorable Symon Janssen, dwelling at Amsterdam in New 
Netherland, in the constituent's name and for his behalf, to sell and con- 
vey a certain lot lying in the city of Amsterdam in New Netherland 
next the house of Adrian Vincent; length and breadth as the patent of 
the same, of date the first of June, A. D. 1644, and as the conveyance 
afterwards made, mention ; promising to hold good all that the attorney 
[Janssen] shall do in this matter on pledge of his person and estate 
movable and immovable, present and future. ' 

Done in Fort Orange the 18th of April, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Jan Cloet and Johannes Provoost, witnesses for that purpose called. 

Albert Gerretsen. 
Johannes Clute. 
Johannes Provoost, loitness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes La Montagne, Deputy of Fort Orange. 
Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy, etc., Hans Vos 2 
dwelling at Catskil, who in the presence of Rutger Jacobsen and Philip 
Pieterse [Schuyler], commissaries of the same jurisdiction, acknowledges 
himself to be honestly indebted to Pieter Bronck, Dirck Bensick and 
Phihp Hendrickse Boeckhout, in the sum of three hundred o-uilders 
which sum he promises to pay, within the time of one year fi^om this 
date, on a pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable 

Done in Port Orange the 28th of April, 1657, in presence of Albert 
Janssen-^ and Johannes Provoost. 

This is the mark of \ Hans Vos, signed by himself. 
This is the mark of -\- Albert Janssen. - 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 
^ Terms and conditions on which William Frederickse Bout, and Jan 
Oarstensen^ propose to sell their yacht, at public sale, as it at present lies 

1 Thomas Powall, with others, petitioned in 1664 for permission to buy a parcel of land between 
Kinderhook and Neuteuhoeli.- Dutch Manuscripts. ^ ^ oetween 

2 Hans Vos Van Baden came to Beverwyck in 1642, whence he removed to Catskil In 1658 ha 
and his wife were committed to prison, probably for selling liquor to the Indians. In 1661 he 
was appointed deputy sheriff.— Z>wteAifo«M6-cry;fe. <= ^"uiauB. in looi ne 

= Albert Jansen Ryclanan Van Amsterdam came to Beverwyck in 1642 
tc4pts ^^^^^^^^^ contracted to serve Remmert Jansen as a blacksmith in \^^.-Dutch Manu. 



28 Albany County Records. 

in the roadstead, with all her appurtenances according to the inventory 
thereof. First.— T\\q aforesaid yacht shall be delivered to the buyer 
with all her appurtenances. Delivery shall be given immediately. Pay- 
ment shall be one half in good whole merchantable beavers, and the other 
half in good current sewant, in two payments, the first on the 23d of 
July next coming [and] the second, one year thereafter, on the 23d of 
July, A. D. 1658. The buyer shall be holden to furnish two sufficient 
sureties, and that immediately, to the content of the seller. If the buyer 
can furnish no sufficient sureties in said time, then it shall again be sold at 
his cost and charge, and whatever less it shall become worth he shall be 
holden to replace, and if it come to be worth more, then he shall enjoy no 
profit therefrom. The auction fees become a charge on the buyer. After 
much bidding, Dirck Bensick remained the buyer for the sum of one 
thousand nine hundred and seventy-one guilders, according to the condi- 
tions ; for which sum Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven] stood surety as 
principal, on a pledge of his person and estate. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 23d of May, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. Was subscribed. 
This is the mark of ^-]-+ Dirck Bensick. 
As surety, Claas Hendrickse. 
Loivies Cohiisse7i, as witness. 
Johannes Provoost, as witness. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., in the presence of 
Jacob [Jause] Schermerhooren and Philip Pieterse [Schuyler] commis- 
saries; Jochem Wessels Backer,' burgess and citizen of the village of 
Beverwyck, who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as he by 
these presents does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, for 
the behoof of Wouter Albertsen [Vanden Uythofi'], his heirs or assigns 
(die reght van hem hehhen sullen) ; his house and lot lying in the village 
of Beverwyck, bounded southerly by the kil, northerly by the alley, 
easterly along the river side, westerly by the new house of Jochem Wes- 
sels, for the sum of nineteen hundred and fifty guilders in beavers, and 
that in two terms ; the first payment, the half, to be paid in June, next 
coming, 1657, and the second shall be made in July, A. D. 1658 ; which 
house and lot the aforesaid Jochem Wessels promises to free from all 
actions and claims, on a pledge of his person and estate, movable and 
immovable, present and future, submitting the same to all laws and 
judges. 

Done in Fort Orange this 80th of May, A. D. 1657. 

Jochem [Wesselse] Backer. 
Philip Pietersen [^Schuyler']. 
Jacoh Janse Schermerhooren. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

1 Jochem Wessels Backer in 1670 had a lot " upon ye hill, there next above Capt. Philip Pieterse 
Schuylers," which his widow, Geeriruy Hieronimus, sold to Bay Croesvelt, 26th March, 1683, 
then described as a house and lot " about ye church." Jan Casparse was only son and heir of 
Baid Geertruy. 



Albany County Records. 29 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc, in the presence of 
the Honorable Jacob [Janse] Schermerhooren and Adrian Gerritse 
Li'apendorp] commissaries of the same jurisdiction, Claas Henderickse 
LVan fechoonhoven], burgess and citizen here, who deckred that he had 
granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey in 
real and actual possession, to the behoof of Jan Tomassen rMin<4'en 
commissary and burgess of the village of Beverwyck, his heirs or assTo-ns 
his house and lot lying in Beverwyck on the hill, with a garden thereto 
belonging, according to the patent granted by the honorable director 
general and council of iNew Netherland, to Philip Pieterse Schuyler of 
date 16 June, 1656, signed Petrus Stuyvesant, and lower down by ordi- 
nance of the honorable director general of New Netherland, stood G V 
Buyven, secretary, and in exemplification, of date the 7th October 165G 
signed Petrus Stuyvesant; of which patent the aforesaid Claas Hende- 
iickse received a conveyance, from the aforesaid Philip Pieterse Schuyler 
the 4th of July, 16o6, signed Jan De Decker,i and again ratified on the 
back of the said patent, written the 29th November, A. D. 1656 
signed La Montagne, vice director and deputy; for which house and lot 

1 Jau de Decker for several years a notary public at Schiedam, having connections in the 
Amsterdam chamber, and being a young man of sound judgment and high character, was sent 
out by the company to New Netherland, in November, 1G54 ; he arrived April, 1655, as supercargo 
of the ship Black Eagle, with instructions to receive the first vacant oflice. These recom- 
mendations having been renewed in the spring, he was accordingly commissioned vice director 
ot iiort Orange. In the following May, orders were sent to appoint him receiver-general and 
?®°l?.^^.°' r^ council, but his private affairs calling him home, he returned to Holland, Decem- 
ber itob, where he married the daughter of Jacob van Belcamp. With her he returned to New 
Netherland, May, IfaoT, as receiver-general and member of the council, at a salary of 78 o-l per 
month, and 200 gl. for board. In April, 1662, his father-in-law applied, at his daughter's request, 
lor Mr. De Decker s discharge from the company's service. This caused his employers much 
regret, who expressed a hope that he would be prevailed on to remain in this country He was 
afterwards employed, in 1663, in visiting the Esopus as member of the council, and attending to 
the interests ol that settlement ; after which, he was sent to Virginia to reclaim the company's 
ship, The Arms of Amsterdam, which an English privateer had captured on her voyage from 
(guinea with a cargo of slaves, and carried into the Chesapeake.* He remained there half a year 
but returned to New Netherland without accomplishing the object of his mission, having 
quarrelled, it is said, with the authorities of that place. Some misunderstanding occurred be- 
tween him and Stuyvesant, to whom he wrote, in July, what the latter considered an " ieno- 
™f^?i°^'^ ^°,'? iisiifferably harsh letter, filled with false accusations and calumnies." The approach 
ot the Jin'-rlish left no time to the parties to follow up the quarrel. The country surrendered to 
Nicolls. Mr De Decker, being one of the Dutch commissioners, signed the treaty of capitulation 
7th September, 1664, at the close of which month he was banished, for reasons set forth in the 
following order : " Whereas the Heer John de Decker, late of the councill for the Dutch West 
India Company in New Yorke, did (contrary to the 14th Art. of Surrender) actually travaile from 
hence and tratticke with powder and negroes unto ftbrt Alliauy and other placet" upon Hudson 
river, without requesting or having a certificate from mee, or liberty so to doe ; and beino- fully 
informed that then and there he did endeavor by discourses to alienate the mindes of H. M. 1)utch 
subjects from that happy reconcilement without bloodshed, uppon articles so lately made, and 
that he did committ these misdemeanors before that flbrt Albany was surrendered unto his 
majesty s obedience, the consequences whereof are contrary to the peace of this government • I 
have, therefore, thought fitt to order and appoint, and doe by these presents order and appoint 
that the said John de Decker shall within the space of ten days transport himselfe out of this 
government. Given under my hand and scale the 30th day of September, 1664, at flbrt James, 
&c. R. NiooLLs." On the 8th of October he received permission to sail with eight negroes for 
any of the French plantations of Martinico, Guadaloupe, or St. Christopher's, and from thence to 
Holland. There was due to him at this period 7,350 gl. from the West India Company, and he 
had besides some land on Staten island. He complained to the Duke of York, and obtained a 
reference on his petition to Gov. Lovelace, with which he arrived in New York in January, 1671. 
He succeeded in obtaining a grant for 120 acres of land on Staten island, " though accordino- to 
the strictness of the laws and customs of the country his right thereunto is laijsed." He was 
bound to settle this land within a year. For the arrears of salary which he claimed, he was re- 
ferred to the West India Company. It is presumed that he remained in this country, where 
many of his descendants are still to be found, who have given the name of Deckerville to a 
settlement in northern New Jersey. The whole of his oflicial correspondence whilst vice director 
of J<ort Orange, is still among the Dutch Records in the county clerk's office, Albany. The 
reference of the Duke of York is in the Register of Wills, surrogate's office, New York.— (9'C'a«a- 
(jhan's Hvitm-yofNew Netherland, ii, 304. 

* [An account of this voyage has been published under the title of Voijage of the Dutch Slavers. 
St. .John and Arms of Amsterdam, 1659-63, with Appendix of Additional Papers relatijjg to the 
blave Trade under the Dutch; translated from the original Dutch Manuscripts, with Introduc- 
tion, by E. B. O'Callaghan. J. Munsell, Albany, 1867, 8vo, pp. xsxvi, 233.] 



30 Albany County Records. 

the above mentioned Jan Tomassen grants and conveys to the above men- 
tioned Claas Hendrickse, for him, his heirs or assigns a lot, to the north 
bounding on Andries Herbertsen, on the south the common highway, 
on the east and west a common road, in length ten rods and in breadth 
six and a half rods, and in addition to the same a garden bounding on the 
south side on Henderick Janssen Westercamp,' east, west and north on a 
common path in length six rods ten feet, in breadth six rods and one foot, 
according to the patent, granted to the aforesaid Jan Tomassen, by the 
director general and council of New Netherland of date 23d April, A. D. 
1652 ; the respective parties each for himself promising to free said lots 
from all actions and claims, renouncing all rights and customs contrary 
to their sincere intentions, on a pledge of their persons and estates, mova- 
ble and immovable, present and future, the same submitting to all laws 
and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the last day of May, A. D. 1657. 

Jan Tomas. 
Claas Hendrycksen. 
Jacob Jansen Schermerlworen. 
Adrian Gerritsen \^Papendor][f\. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy in Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., and in presence of 
Jacob Schermerhooren and Adrian Gerritsen [Papendorp] commissaries 
of said jurisdiction, the Honorable Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoender- 
woert], burgess and citizen of the village of Beverwyck, who declared that 
he had granted and transferred, as by these presents, he does grant 
and transfer, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of Claas Hen- 
derickse [Van Schoonhoven], a lot to the west of his house, where he at 
present dwells, in breadth on the road thirty feet, in the rear, or on the 
south, twenty-seven feet in breadth, length on both sides sixty- two feet, 
which lot is a part of what was granted him by patent of the director 
general and council of New Netherland, of date 23d of April, A. D. 1653, 
for which lot the afore mentioned Rutger Jacobsen acknowledges that he 
has received the sum of five hundred and six guilders to his satisfaction ; 
promising to free said lot from all actions, claims or demands, which may 
be against said lot, on pledge of his person and estate, movable and immo- 
vable, present and future, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange, last day of May, A. D. 1657. 

Rutger Jacobsen. 
Jacob janse SchermerTiooren. 
Adrian Gerritsen [^Papendorp]. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., and in the presence of 
Honorable Abraham Staets- and Jan Tomassen [Mingael] commissaries 

'Hendrick Jansen Westercamp was in Beverwyck in 1645, having come there from New 
Amsterdam. 

2 Major Abraham Staets (written Staes hy himself) was a surgeon and settled in Rensselaers- 
wyck in 1643. He had sons Jacob " Chirurgeon," his eldest son, Abraham and probably Samuel. 
He was deceased in ITOl. 



Albany County Records. 31 

of this jurisdiction, Claas Henderickse [Van Schoonhoven] burgess and 
citizen of the aforesaid village, who declared that he had granted and 
conveyed, as he by these presents, does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to the behoof of Jan Vinhagel and Barent Reyndersen 
[Smit], also burgesses and citizens of the afore written village, their 
heirs or assigns, his lot lying to the west of the house of Rutger efacobsen, 
in breadth on the road thirty feet, on the rear or south side seven and' 
twenty feet in breadth, length on both sides sixty-two feet, which lot is 
a part of what was granted to the aforesaid Rutger Jacobsen by patent of 
the director general and council of New Netherland, of date 23d of 4pril 
1653, for which lot the aforesaid Vinhageli and Barent Reyndersen 
promise to pay five hundred and twenty-five guilders, in good whole 
merchantable beavers; to pay half in August, A. D. 1657; promising said 
lot to free from all actions or demands, which may be against said lot 
under a pledge of their persons and estates, movable and immovable' 
present and future, and submitting the same to all laws and judo-es " ' 
Done in Fort Orange the 2d of June, A. D. 1657. ° 

. , ^ Claas Hendrycksen. 

Abram Staes. 
Jan Tomas. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

^ On this the 28th of July, A. D. 1657, Claes Hendricksen declared 
before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy at Fort Orange and villao-e 
of Beverwyck, that he is honestly and truly paid the sum above mentioned. 
Done in Fort Orange %it s^ipra. 

Claas Hendryckse. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Jan Van Hoesen proposes to sell his 
house on the hill, with all that is fast in earth and nailed and ready to 
dwell in, with a lot belonging to the same, according to the patent thereof. 
First.— ThQVQ shall be delivered to the buver, the house a plank and 
a half long, and in breadth nineteen feet, with a hall {iiytleaedinge) of 
five feet broad leading through it, with a cellar, chamber, a garret, and 
a lot ten rods'^ in length, and four rods in breadth. Delivery shall be 
made the 20th of this month of June. The payment shall be made in 
good whole merchantable beavers in two terms, the first on delivery the 
second on the first day of October of the current year 1657 ' 

* * * * * * ■ * 

[This paper was erased and not executed]. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., and in the presence 
of Honorable Abraham Staets and Adrian Gerritsen [Papendorp], com- 
mis.saries of this jurisdiction, Caspar Jacobsen [Halenbeek],3 who declared 

^^^^XY''^^'^^^^^^^y^\: ^''™ i" 1633, was living in Albany in 1708. His son C') Johannes 
BoL^Talc'an^/an^^Sr^^^^^^^^^^ Hehadtwo 



32 Albany County Records. 

that lie had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of Harmen Jacobsen 
[Bambus], his house, earth and nail fast, and lot and garden, whole 
length sixteen rods, and breadth four rods and four feet, according to the 
patent thereof, for the sum of eight hundred and ten guilders to be paid 
in good whole merchantable beavers, in two terms; the first on delivery 
and the second payment on the 8th of May in the next coming year, 
1658 ; for which payment the buyer has furnished two sureties to the con- 
tent of the seller, to wit, Adrian Van Ilpendam and Abraham Vosburgh,' 
on pledge respectively of their persons and estates, movable and immov- 
able, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 
Done in Fort Orange this 5th of June, A. D. 1657. 

This is the mark of |^ Y Caspar Jacobse. 
Ahram Staes. 
Adrian Gerritsen. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Jan Roeloffsen [De Goyer] proposes to 

sell his house lying on the hill, with the lot, according to the patent 

thereof. First. — There shall be delivered to the buyer, the house, fast 

in earth and nailed, with the lot thereof, seven rods and five feet broad ; 

to the west, and along the hill four rods and eleven feet; to the north on 

Marcelis [Janse ?] 17 rods in length, all according to the patent thereof. 
^ ^ * ^ ^ * * 

[This paper was not executed, the sale not taking place]. 

Terms and conditions on which Jan Roeloffse [De Goyer] proposes to 
sell a lot lying to the north of his house, according to the patent. First. — 
There shall be delivered to the buyer, the lot one rod and eleven feet 
broad on the east, to the west two and a half rods, and five rods long. 
****** * 

[This paper was unexecuted and erased]. 

Terms and conditions on which Jan Roeloffse [De Goyer] proposes to 
sell a lot lying to the north of his lot. First. — There shall be delivered 
to the buyer, the lot two rods and a half broad on the east, to the west 
three rods wide, and in length on the road five rods, according to the 

patent. 

* ****** 

[This paper is unexecuted and erased]. 

Terms and -conditions on which Reyer Elbertsen proposes to sell his 
house and lot, except the brick oven, with the bricks [.steenen'], lying in 
the village of Beverwyck. First. — There shall be delivered to the 
buyer the house, and all the fixtures, with the lot four rods wide and 
twenty rods long, according to the patent. 

* * * * * * * 

[This paper is unexecuted and erased]. 

1 Abraham Vosburgh, perhaps son of Pieter Jacobse Vosburgh, deceased in 1674. 



Albany County Records. 33 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Priviledged West India Company, etc., and in the presence of 
Honorable Jacob Schemerhooren and Abraham Staets, commissaries of 
the same jurisdiction, the Honorable Jan Tomassen [Mingal] burgess 
and citizen of the aforesaid village, who declared that he had granted and 
conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, for the behoof of Claas Hendericksea [Van Schoon- 
hoven], also burgess and citizen of the afore mentioned village, his heirs 
or assigns, a house and lot bounded on the north by Andries Her- 
bertsen, on the south by a common highway, on the west and east by a 
common road ; in length four rods, and in breadth six and a half rods, 
with a garden bounding on the south side on Henderick Janssen Wester- 
camp, on the east, west and north on a common path, in length six rods 
and ten feet, and in breadth six rods and one foot, according to the patent 
to him, the grantor, given by the honorable director general and council of 
New Xetherland, of date 23d of April, A. D. 1650, for which lot and 
garden the grantor acknowledges that he has had satisfaction, and pay- 
ment of said Claes Henderickse, acquitting him of the same; and promis- 
ing to free said lot and garden from all actions and claims on pledge of 
his person and estate, movable and immovable, and the same submitting 
to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 2od of June, A. D. 1657. 

Jacob Jamen Schermerhooren. ^^^ TOMASSE. 

Abram Staes. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, etc., and in presence of the 
Honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Abraham Staets, commissaries of 
the same jurisdiction, Claas Hendricksen [Van Schoonhoven], who de- 
clared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does 
grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of Harmen 
Bastianse [Visscher],' his heirs or assigns, a garden bounded on the 
south side by Henderick Janssen Westercamp, east, west and north by a 
common path, in length six rods ten feet, and in breadth six rods and 
one foot; which garden is a part of the patent of Jan Tomassen, to him 
granted by the honorable director general and council of New Nether- 
land, of date 23d of April, 1650; for the number of seventeen whole 
merchantable beavers, to be paid in the month of June, A. D. 1657, the 
grantor promising to free the aforesaid garden from all actions, demands 
and claims, on pledge of his person and estate, movable, present and 
future, and submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 25th of June, A. D. 1657. 

Jacob Jansen Schermerhooren. ^LAES Hendryckse. 



Abraham Staes. 
Acknowledged before me, 



La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 



1 Harmen Bastianse Visschg: (or De V}'8elaer) was in New Amsterdam, as early as 1649. In 
1044 he was aged twenty-five years, and was deceased in 1693. In 1675 his father lived in Hoorn, 

Hist. Coll. in. 5 



34 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., Tjerck Claessen [De 
Witt],' who declared that he had conveyed, as by these presents he does 
convey, to (Jarsten Claessen- and Jan Barensen [Wemp] the sum of 
one hundred and eighty guilders, to be paid in vphole merchantable 
beavers, growing out of the sale of a stallion, at public sale, of which Jan 
Roeloffse remained the last bidder, for the aforementioned sum; which 
stallion was delivered to his content, renouncing all demands that he, 
the grantor, upon the aforementioned sum may claim ; appointing by 
these presents, the said Carsten Claessen and Jan Barentsen-* the payment 
of said sum to demand, and the same in case of refusal by court to prose- 
cute. 

Done in Fort Orange the 25th of June, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Dirck Bensick and Johannes Provoost. 

Tjerck Claessen. 

This is the mark o/-}— 1-+ Dirck Bensick, loitness. 

Johannes Provoost, witness. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms on which Adrian Blomert' proposes to sell his 
house and lot lying in Manhatans, next the City Hall, according to the 
patent thereof. First. — There shall be delivered to the buyer, the 
house and all its fixtures with the lot, in breadth on the street forty-seven 
feet, and in. the rear forty feet. Delivery of the house shall be made on 
the last day of September of this year, 1657 ; but the seller shall retain 
the use of the rear house and little cellar, until the first of May, A. D. 
1658, with the garden. Payment shall be made in three installments ; 
the first on delivery of the house, the second on the first of May, A. D. 
1658, and the third on the first of September, A. D. 1658 ; the first in- 
stallment, in whole good merchantable beavers, the second in good current 
seewant, and the last also in good whole merchantable beavers. The 
buyer shall be holden to furnish two sufl&cient sureties as principals, 
jointly and severally {een voor al en elck'), to the content of the seller, and 
that in the space of four and twenty hours. If the buyer can not furnish 
sufficient sureties in the aforesaid time, then it shall be again sold at his 
cost and charge, and whatever less it shall become worth he shall be 
holden to replace, and he shall receive no benefit from whatever more it 
comes to be worth. The auction fees become a charge upon the buyer. 
After much bidding Rem Janssen Smit^ remained the last biddc, for the 
sum of four thousand and twenty guilders, according to the aforesaid 



Holland. His wife was Hester Tjerkse. They had five sons, viz : Johannes, Bastian, Nanning, 
Frederick and Tjerk. From these have sprung the various families of the name in this vicinity. 
Many changes have been made in the spelling of the name. 

1 Tjerk Claessen De Witt was a resident of Esopus.— English 3Ianusmpts. 

a Carsten Claessen Timmerman {carpenter), in 1658. 

3 Jan Barentsen Wemp (or Wemple) arrived in Beverwj'ck in 1644, where he remained until his 
death ii) 1663. He was one of the proprietors of Schenectady. After his death, his widow, 
Mary tic Mynderse, married, in 1064, Sweer Tennis Van Velsen of Schenectady, and in the 
massacre of February 9, 1690, was slain together with her husband. Her children by Wemp, three 
sons and three daughters, inherited the property (which was considerable) of both father and 
Etepfather. The families of the name, settled on the Mohawk and vicinity, claim Jan Bareutse as 
their common ancestor. 

■lAdriaen Bloemmert came to New Nctherland in 1C44, in the ship Prince Mauritz, and was 
engaged in business at New Amsterdam for many years. — Dutch Mcuuiscripts. 

^ Rem Janssen Smit's name often occurs in the records as a considerable dealer in real estate. 
No descendants of his appear in the church or city records. 



Albany County Records. 35 

conditions ; for whicli sum Abraham Isaacksen Verplancki and Heuderick 
Williamsen Backer stood his sureties, each as principal, on pledge of their 
persons and estate. 

Done in the the village of Beverwyck, the 5th of July, 1657, in presence 
of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Rem Janssen. 
Abraham Verplanck. 

HiNRIK WiLLEMSEN BaCKKER." 

Ludovicus Cobiis, tijjstaf. 
Johannes Provoost, as witness. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., in the presence of 
the Honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], 
commissaries; the Honorable Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoenderwoert], 
who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he 
does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of 
Frans Barentsen Pastoor, a garden lying in the village of Beverwyck, next 
the Heer Renselaer, on the river side, in length westerly on the road 
eight rods and seven feet, length on the river side eight rods and one 
foot ; breadth on the north on the lot of Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick] 
six rods; and breadth on the south side three and a half rods; which 
lot the aforementioned Frans Barentsen at public sale bought on the 29 
January, A. D. 1657 ; and that for the sum of two hundred six and 
eighty guilders, which sum the aforementioned Rutger Jacobsen acknow- 
ledges to be paid, and for the same the said Frans Barentsen gives, etc., 
quittance ; promising said lot to free from all claims and demands, on 
pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable, present and 
future, submitting the same to all courts and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 6th of July, A. D. 1657. 

Rutger Jacobsen. 
Jacob Janse Schennerhooren. 
Philip Ptetersen \_Schui/ler'\. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me, J. La Montagne, etc., the Honorable Frans 
Barentsen Pastoor, who, in presence of Jacob Schermerhooren and 
Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], commissaries of the same jurisdiction, de- 
clared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents, he does 
grant and convey, to ChristoflFel Davids,-^ citizen of the village of Bever- 
wyck, a certain garden lying in the aforesaid village, next the Heer 



1 Abraham Isaacse Verplauck. See Valentine's Manual, 1863 ; and 0' Callaghan's History of New 

2 Hendrik Willeinse Bakker was a baker of New Amsterdam ; in 1658 he made a contract to 
bake for the government.— i>(^/cA J/a/i;«cry)te. ^ . . , . , 

3 Christoffel Davidts was a native of England. In 1650, he lived on a farm at Dommie s hoek, 
now called Van Wie's point ; 25th September, 1656, he received a patent for thirty-sis moreens of 
land at Bsopus about a Dutch mile inland from the North river, and having been driven from it 
by the Indians he asks permission in 1663, to reenter upon it. He married Cornelia De Vos, 
daughter of Audries De Vos. They had at least one son, David, who, with his family, was 
killed by the French and Indians, Feb. 9, 1690, in Schenectady. Cornelia De Vos was deceased 
in 1657.— 0' Callaghan's History of New Netherland ; Deeds, i ; and Dutch Manuscripts. 



36 Albany County Recwds. 

Rencelaer's, on the river side, in length westerly on the road eight rods 
and seven feet, along the river side eight rods and one foot, breadth 
northerly on the lot of Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick] six rods, and 
breadth on the south side three and a half rods ; which lot the afore- 
said Christoflfel Davids, at public sale, bought of the aforementioned 
Frans Barentse on the 26 February, A. D. 1657, for the sum of three 
hundred and thirty guilders, with the expenses, which sum the said 
Frans Barentsen acknowledges to be paid ; promising the same lot to free 
from all claims or demands, on pledge of his person and estate, movable 
and immovable, present and future. 

Done in Fort Orange the 6th of July, 1657. 

Frans Barentsen Pastoor. 
Jacob Janse Schermerhooren. 
Fhilij) Fieterse \_Schuyler']. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., and in the presence of 
the Honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], 
commissaries, the Honorable Andries Herbertsen [Constapel Vander 
Blaes], who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these 
presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the 
behoof of Leendert Philipsen [Conyn],i his heirs or assigns, a house and 
lot lying in the village of Beverwyck, bounded to the south by Jan 
Tomassen [Mingal], to the north by Pieter Bronck, to the east by the 
river side, to the west by the common road, length nine rods, and 
breadth six and thirty wood feet ; which lot is a part of the whole lot 
which was granted to him, the grantor, by patent of the director general 
and council of New Netherland, given of date, 2od of April, A. D. 
1652, for which house and lot the grantor acknowledges to have received 
nine hundred guilders to his satisfaction ; and promises the same lot to 
free from all claims or demands which may be upon the same, on pledge 
of his person and estate, movable and immovable, present and future, and 
submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 10th July, A. D. 1657. 

Andries Herberts. 
Jacob Janse Schermerhooren. 
Philip Pieter sen \_Schuyler'\. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., in the 
presence of the Honorable Abraham Staets and Jan Tomassen [Mingael], 
commissaries, etc., the Honorable Andries Herbertsen, who declared that 
he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of Leendert Philipse 
[Conyn], his heirs or assigns, a house lot and garden, which is a part of 
the whole lot, to the grantor, conveyed by the honorable director general 
and council of New Netherland, of date 23d of April, A. D. 1652, the re- 

1 Leendert Philipse Conj'n had two sons, Philip and Caspar (and perhaps Jacob), who settled 
in Coxsackie and Claverac. He died in 1704. 



Albany County Records. 37 

mainder of the same being as large as it stands within the fence, for the 
sum of eighteen hundred guilders, to be paid in whole merchantable 
beavers, in two installments, to wit, the first in cash down, and the other 
half within one year after the date of these presents, and with the last 
payment the grantor shall deliver to the buyer the patent; all this on 
pledge of their persons and estate, movable and immovable, submitting 
the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 10th of July, A. D. 1657. 

Andries Herberts. 
Leendert Philipse [Conyn]. 
Ahram Staes. 
Jan Tomas. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne. in the service, etc., in the 
presence of Honorable Jan Tomassen [Mingael] and Adrian Gerritse 
[Papendorp], commissaries, etc., the Honorable Jurriaen Teunisse [Grlaze- 
maeckei-], burgess and citizen of said village, who declared that he had 
granted and conveyed, as he, by these presents, does grant and convey 
in real and actual possession, to the behoof of the Honorable Andries 
Herbertsen, also burgess and citizen of the aforesaid village ofBeverwyck ; 
a house and lot lying in the village of Beverwyck ; length and breadth 
ten rods, which is part of the whole lot conveyed to him, the gi-antor, by 
patent frijm the director general and council of New Netherland, of date 
25th of October, A. D. 1653, for the sum of one thousand five hundred 
and ten guilders, to be paid according to these conditions, to wit, in two 
terms; the first installment on the first of July, A. D. 1657, in good 
whole merchantable beavers; the grantor promising to free said lot from 
all claims or demands, on pledge of his person and estate, movable and 
immovable, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 
Done in Fort Orange the 12th July, 1657. 

jureyan tunissen. 1 
Andries Herberts. 
Andriaen Gerrietsen [^Papendorp]. 
Jan Tomas \^Mingaer\. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., in the 
presence of Honorable Abraham Staets and Adriaen Gerritsen [Papen- 
dorp] commissaries, etc., the Honorable Andries Herbertsen, citizen of the 
village ofBeverwyck, who declared that he -had granted and conveyed, 
as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual pos- 
session, to the behoof of William Janssen Schut, also burgess and citizen 
of the aforesaid village, a lot, next to his lot, which he, by deed of 22d of 



1 Juriaen Tennlse Glasemaecker was an innkeeijer. In 1658, Isaac De Forest brought an action 
against tiim for sixty guilders, being half of his wife's passage money from Holland. In 1660, he 
was complained of for beating some of the magistrates at Mrs. D.yckman's house, and for abus- 
ing the -worshipful court : he pleaded intoxication, and was fined thirty guilders. He was again 
arraigned with Marcellus Jause, also a tavern-keeper, for entertaining persons at night after the 
ringing of the bell, and each was fined seventy guildera.— Dutch Manuscripts. 



38 Albany County Records. 

August, A. D. 1654, received from Frans Boon- husband of Lysbet Cor- 
nelise, late widow of Grysbert Cornelissen Van Wesep,'* according to the 
patent to the aforementioned Gysbert Cornelissen Van Wesep, granted 
by the director general and council of New Netherland, of date 25th of 
October, 1653, which portion was to him, the grantor, given by the Heer 
director general and the court on the 6th of October, A. D. 1657, per 
order, which lot is in length on the north along the road ten rods and 
one foot, to the east a road breadth three rods, to the west the hill 
one rod, for which lot the aforesaid William Janssen Schut shall pay in 
cash, the sum of two hundred guilders, amounting to the number of five 
and twenty beavers ; which lot the grantor promises to free from all actions 
and demands, on pledge of his person and estate, movable and immovable, 
submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 17th of July, A. D. 1657. 

Andries Herberts. 
Ahram Staes. 

Adrian Gerritsen [^Papendorp]. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., in the presence of 
Honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Philip Pietersen [Schuyler], com- 
missaries, etc., the Honorable Jan Verbeeck, burgess and citizen of the 
village of Beverwyck, who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as 
bv these presents he does grant and convey, in actual and real possession, 
to the behoof of Honorable Heer Johan Baptista Van Rencelaer, director of 
the colony of Eencelaerswyck ; his lot lying in the village of Beverwyck, 

according to the patent thereof, of date for the sum of eighteen 

hundred and twelve guilders, of which sum the aforesaid Heer Eence- 
laer has already paid to the grantor twelve hundred and eight guilders, 
to the content of the same grantor, and six hundred and four guilders, 
the said Heer promises to pay, the half in merchantable beavers and the 
other half in current seewant, on the first day of May, A. D. 1658, on 
pledge of his person and estate, personal and real; which house and lot 
the grantor promises to free from all actions, claims or demands, on 
pledge of his person and estate, personal and real, submitting the same 
to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 18th of July, 1657. 

Jan Verbeeck. 
Jacoh Jansen Schermerhooren. 
Philij) Pietersen Schuyler. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., in the presence of 
Honorable Jan Tomassen [Mingael] and Adrian Gerritsen [Papendorp], 

1 Francis Boon was a French Indian trader wlio married Lysbet Cornelise Van Voorhoudt, it is 
said against lier parents' wishes. He subsequently removed to New Amsterdam, where he 
acquired wealth, and removed from thence to the West Indies.— Valentine''s Manual, 1855, p. 517. 

2 Gysbert Cornelise Van Wesep, also called Aen de Berg, and op de Berg, because he lived on 
the Hooge Berg at the lower end ot Papsknee, came to Beverwyck in 1645. His widow, Lysbet 
Cornelise Van Voorhoudt married Frans Boon, a French trader, before the year 1657. — C Calla- 
ghan's History of New Netherland, i, 441. 



Albany County Records. 39 

commissaries, etc., the Honorable Abraham Staets, commissary and citi- 
zen of the aforesaid village, who declared that he had granted and 
conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to the behoof of the Honorable Johannes Van Twillert,' 
his heirs or assigns, a house lying in Fort Orange, on the east side of the 
aforesaid fort, in length four and forty- feet, and in breadth twenty feet, 
with a garden behind the aforesaid fort, according to the patent thereof, 
of date 27th of April, 1649, for the sum of two thousand three hundred 
and twenty-five guilders, which sum the grantor acknowledges to have 
received to his content; promising the afoi'esaid house to free from all 
claims and demands, on pledge of his person and estate, movable and 
immovable, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 
Done in Fort Orange the 18th of July, A. D. 1657. 

Abram Staes. 
Jan Tomas. 
Adriaeii Gerritsen. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Jacob Joosten [Van Covelens] proposes 
to sell his house and lot lying in the village of Beverwyck. First. — 
There shall be delivered to the buyer, the house, tight all around, with 
all that is fast in earth and nailed, with a new bedstead, and a cellar ; of a 
plank long on each side, and a trap door in it; also a lot thirty wood feet 
long, and in the rear twenty-eight feet broad in the clear (?;?;y '^^ff). The 
delivery of the house shall be on the 21st of this month of July, A. D. 
1657. The payment shall be within twelve days, and that in good whole 
merchantable beavers, to wit, the first installment on delivery, and the 
second on the first of May, A. D. 1658. The buyer shall be held to furnish 
two suificient sureties and that immediately, to the content of the seller. 
If the buyer can not furnish sufiicient sureties in the aforesaid time, then 
it shall be sold again at his cost and charge, and whatever less it comes to 
be worth, he shall be holden to pay, and whatever more it shall become 
worth, he shall enjoy no benefit therefrom. The auction fees become 
a charge on the buyer. After much bidding, Jan Dareth- remained the 
last bidder, for the sum of five hundred and seventy guilders, according 
to the aforesaid conditions ; for which sum Rutger Jacobsen and Hen- 
derick Jochemsen-^ stood sureties as principals, jointly and severally, on 
pledge of their persons and estates. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 18th of July, 1657, in presence 
of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Jan Dareth. 
RuTGER Jacobsen. 
Hendrick Jochemse. 
Ludovicus Cobes. 
Johannes Provoost^ witness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

' Johannes Van Twiller of Beverwyck, merchant, Hjoi.— Dutch Manuscripts. 
- Another John Dret [Dareth] lived in Albany in 1736, but how related to the above is not 
known. 
" Hendrik Jochemse was lieutenant of the burgher company.— Dutch Manuscripts. 



40 Albany County Records. 

Terms and conditions on which the trustees of the estate of Jacob 
Luyersen propose to sell the house of the late Jacob Luyersen, with the 
lot of the same lying next to Fort Orange, according to the patent 
thereof. First. — There "shall be delivered to the buyer, the house with 
all the fixtures, and the lot, in length eight rods, in breadth in front on 
the road four rods and a half, in breadth on the west side three rods and 
five feet, all according to the patent thereof, except the garden stuff 
(gaderen) which is therein. Delivery of the house shall be on the 20th 
of August of this year, 1657. The payment shall be in two installments 
in good current seewant; the first installment shall be on delivery of the 
house, and the last on the first day of May, A. D. 1658. The buyer shall 
be held to furnish two sufficient sureties and that immediately, to the 
content of the seller. If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties in 
the aforesaid time, then it shall be sold again at his cost and charge, and 
whatever less it comes to be worth he shall be held to make good, and 
whatever more it becomes worth, he shall enjoy no benefit therefrom. 
The auction fees become a charge on the buyer. After much bidding, 
Henderick Janssen Van Wytert remained the last bidder, for the sum of 
eight hundred and thirteen guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions. 

Done in Fort Orange the 18th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

This is the mark H of Henderick Janssen Van Wytert. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On this the 20th day of July, appeared William Frederickse [Bout] 
and Harmen Bastianse [Visscher], who, as sureties and principals, stood 
for the person of Henderick Janssen Van Wytert on pledge of their 
persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in Fort Orange, ut supra. 

* This is the mark of J "" William Frederickse. 

4 

IJarmen Bastiaense. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy, etc., Arent Van 
Den Berch, who declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he 
does appoint and empower, Heer Robert Vasterick, merchant of Amster- 
dam, in the appointer's name and in his behalf, to claim and demand of 
the honorable directors of the General Privileged West India Company 
of the chamber of Amsterdam, the sum of six hundred and sixty-eight 
guilders and nine stuivers,i by the appointer earned for the aforesaid 
company in New Netherland, as his settlement shows, signed under the 
credit side by P. Stuyvesant and under the credit side of the same by 
Carel Van Brugge,"- giving him power, one or more persons to substitute 



1 20 stuivers make a guilder of 40 cents value. 

- Carel Van Bragge was the keeper of the company's accounts in New Netherland, also provin- 
cial secretary. 



Albany County Records. 41 

[for himself] in case of need ; promising to hold good all that the attorney 
[Vasterick] in this matter shall do, on pledge of his person and estate, 
movable, present and future. 

^ Done in Fort Orange, the 19th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Evert Hedeman and Johannes Provoost. 

This is the mark of ^l^ Arent Vanden Berch. 
Eberhardt Hedeman. 
Johannes Provoost^ witness. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

On this date the 20th of July, appeared Andries Vander Sluys,i who 
declared himself to be surety for the person of William Frederickse 
[Bout] in the action respecting the house, which Henderick Janssen Van 
Kytcrt,- bought of the trustees of the estate of Jacob Luyersen deceased 
for so much as the half of the aforesaid house comes to, to wit, the sum' 
of four hundred and six guilders and ten stuivers. 

[This paper is imperfect and erased]. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, etc., in the presence 
of Honorable Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick] and Adrian Gerritse 
[Papendorp], commissaries, &c., Harmen Jacobsen [Bambus], who de- 
clared that he had granted and conveyed, as bv these presents he 
does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of 
the Honorable Claas Hendericksen [Van Schoonhoven],-^ burgess and citi- 
zen of the aforesaid village, his heirs or assigns, a house, lot, and garden 
lying in the aforesaid village of Beverwyck, altogether 16 rods long and 
4 rods and 4 feet in breadth, according to the patent thereof, for the sum 
of nine hundred guilders in whole merchantable benvers, of which sum 
the aforementioned Claas Henderickse has already paid the half, and pro- 
mises to pay the other half in the month of July in the coming year 
1658; which aforesaid house, lot, and garden, the aforementioned 
Harmen Jacobson promises to free from all claims and demands, on 
pledge of his person and estate, personal and real, submitting the same 
to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 21st of July, A. D. 1657. 

Harmen Jacobs. 

Claas Hendrycksen. 
Adriaen Gerritsen, 
This is the mark of |-| Goosen Gerritsen. 

Conditions and terms on which Cornelis Cornelissen and Jan Witmondt 
propose to sell their brew house lying in the Greenbush, in the colony 
llencelaerswyck. First.— T\\q brew house shall be delivered to the 
buyer, with all that is fast in earth and nailed, with a well, and the tools ; 

1 Audries Vander Sluys lived at Esopus. In 1658, he wrote to Gov. Stuyvesant, requesting 
to be appointed TOw/«2er and sclioo]ma8ter.— i>MteAi/««,wcr2»fe ^ 

2 See Van Wytert. 

3 Claas Hendericksen Van Schoonhoven was brother of Guert Hendericksen Van Schoon- 
hoven. He had considerable transactions in real estate as appears by Ms frequent convevances 
It is not known that he left any descendants. 

Hist. Coll. vii. 6 



42 Albany County Records. 

a brew kettle, a work tub, a wort tub, with a cooler, an under trough, a 
handmill with four stones, thirty stout half barrels and six tubs {vlooteii), 
two beer stilliugs, with two round tubs, (ronde knypen~), a neest (?) that 
is upon it, a beer yoke, and a beer tankard, a new stable seventeen feet 
long and fifteen feet broad, which shall be delivered tight with a garden 
attached, except the garden stuff which is therein. Delivery shall be 
made on the first of November, A. D. 1G57. Payment shall be made in 
three terms ; the first on delivery, in good whole merchantable beavers, 
and the second installment on the first of March, A. D. 1658, in good 
current seewant, and the third installment on the first of November., A. D. 
1658, in good whole merchantable beavers. The buyer shall be held to 
furnish two sufficient sureties, and that immediately, to the content of the 
seller. If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties, in the aforesaid 
time, then shall it be sold again at his cost and charge, and whatever less 
it shall become worth, he shall be holden to make good, and whatever 
more it shall become worth he shall enjoy no profit thereby. The auction 
fees become a charge on the buyer. After much bidding, William 
Brouwer remained the last bidder, for the sum of twelve hundred and 
seven guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions ; for which sum Cor- 
nells Wyncoop stood surety, as principal, for the payment of the aforesaid 
sum, on pledge of his person and estate, personal and real. 

Done in village of Beverwyck the 19th of Sept., A. D. 1657, in pre- 
sence of J. Provoost and Lowies Cobus. 

William Brouwer.i 

CORNELIS WYiNCKUOP. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 
Lxidovicus Cobes, loitness. 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Cornells Cornelissen - proposes to sell 
his house lying in the village of Beverwyck. First. — The house as it is, 
with its fixtures, shall be delivered to the buyer, with a lot of nine rods 
in length and four rods in breadth, with a garden behind Fort Orange ; 
in the house there shall be delivered a garret, with a double chimney. 
Delivery shall be on the 8th of August, A. D. 1657. The payment shall 
be in three terms : the first with the delivery, in good whole merchant- 
able beavers, and the second installment on the 8th of February, A. D. 
1658, in good current seewant, and the third installment on the 8th of 
July, A. D. 1658, in good whole merchantable beavers. The buyer 
shall be held to furnish two sufficient sureties, and that immediately, to 
the content of the seller. If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties 
in the aforesaid time, then it shall be sold again at his cost and charge, 
and whatever less it shall become worth, he shall be holden to make 
good, and whatever more it shall become worth, he shall enjoy no profit 
therefrom. The commissions shall be a charge to the buyer. After 

' William Brouwer, the ancestor of tbe Schenectady Brouwers, was, perhaps, a brother of 
Philip HendrikseBronwer. He was buried in Albany, Aug. 3, IfiOS. In relation to hiii death 
the deacon's book under this date has this entrj'-, " tot de begraevenisse van Willem Brouwer, 
40 g. 15." After his death the brewery passed into the possession of Jan Oothout. 

2 Of the many Cornelises it is difficult to say which this is ; probably Cornelis Cornelissen De 

VOB. 



Albany County Records. 43 

much bidding, Daniel Rinckhout remained the last bidder, for the sum of 
seven hundred and twelve guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions, 
and Henderick Andriesse [Van Doesburgh] and Marcelis Janssen, stood 
as sureties and principals, on pledge of their persons and estates, personal 
and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 2od of July, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Henderick Reur and Johannes Provoost. 

Daniel Ringhougt. 
Hendrick Andriesen. 
Marcelys Janssen. 
Mendrich Reur. 
Johannes Provoost^ vitness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms on which Rem Janssen [Smit] proposes to sell 
his little house, where Gysbert Janssen ^ dwells, with the smith's house 
there, except the smith's tools. First. — The house with the smith's 
house and all its fixtures shall be delivered to the buyer, except the 
smith's tools, with the lot behind, as long as the lot of the large house, 
and as broad as the house, with the smith's house, and a bake oven 
therein. * * *>,;** 

[This paper is unexecuted and imperfect]. 

Conditions and terms on which Rem Janssen Smit proposes to sell his 
great house lying in the village of Beverwyck, with all its fixtures. 
First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer, except the smith's 
bench and vise, with the lot as broad front and rear as the house is, and 
as long as the rear is fenced, with a free alley running through between 
both houses ; and there shall be delivered a cow stable and a hogsty, and 
a bleaching field with a bake oven. Delivery shall be made the last of 
September. Payment shall be made in three terms ; the first installment 
with the delivery, in good whole merchantable beavers ; the second install- 
ment on the first of May, A. D. 1658, in good current seewant ; and the 
third or last installment on the first of September, A. D. 1658, in good 
whole merchantable beavers. The buyer shall be holden to furnish two 
sufiicient sureties, and that immediately, to the content of the seller. 
If the buyer can not furnish sufiicient sureties in the aforesaid time, 
then it shall be oflFered for sale again at his cost and charge, and whatever 
less it shall become worth, he shall be held to make good, and whatever 
more it shall become worth, he shall enjoy no profit therefrom. The 
commissions become a charge to the buyer. After much bidding, 
Cornells Teunisse remained the last bidder, for the sum of three thousand 
two hundred and twenty-five guilders, according to the above written 
conditions, and as security for the above mentioned sum, Rutger Jacobsen 
and Gerrit Bancker stood, on a pledge of their persons and estates, real 
and personal. 

1 In 1660 Gysbert Jaiisen was brought before the court by the euperiutendent of the wells, 
and directed to pay his proportion of the cost of construction of a public well.— • i>Mfc/t Manu- 
scripts. 



44 Albany County Records. 

Done in Fort Orange the 23d of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Hendrick Reur and Johannes Provoost. 

CORNELUS ThONISEN. 
RUTGER JaCOBSEN. 
Hendrick Reur. Gerrit Bancker.i 

Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

I, Daniel Rinckhout, the subscriber, acknowledge that I have leased 
to Reinier Wisselpenninck, a house standing and lying in the village of 
Beverwyck, for the sum of one hundred guilders, half beavers and half 
seewant, from the middle (?) of August next in the year 1657, to the 
first of July, in the year 1658, to be paid as the rent becomes due, where- 
upon the lessor shall be holden to deliver the aforesaid house tight in 
roof and glass ; the respective parties below pledging their persons and 
estates, real and personal, submitting the same to all laws and judges, 
without craft or guile. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck the 23d of July, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Jan Roeloffsen and Pieter Lambertsen. 

Was signed by Daniel Rinckhoudt. 

Reynier Wisselpenninck. 
Jan Roeloffsen, and 
Pieter Lambertsen. - 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Teunis 
Teunissen Metselaer'^ and Egbetje Egberts, husband and wife, who 
declared that they had appointed, as by these presents, they do appoint 
and empower, Teunis Swaneken, in their names and in their behalf, to 
procure and receive the payment from Joucker Quarp, of such a sum 
as belongs to the appointers, according to the lease, which the attorney 
[Swaneken] already has in his hands, and for the furtherance of this 
object to proceed according to the method of law to a definite sentence, 
and from this sentence to proceed to execution, or to appeal from the 
same, as necessity demands, with power to substitute one or more persons, 
and to do in the case as if the appointers themselves were present; they 
promising to hold good all that the attorney shall do on pledge of their 
persons and estates, real and personal, submitting the same to all laws and 
judges. 

1 Gerrit Banker probably came from Amsterdam, Holland, where his brother William 
resided in 1698. He married Elizabeth Van Eps, daughter of Dirli Van Eps, and Maritie 
Damens, and had one son Evert, born 24 January, 1665. His house lot in Beverwyck was on the 
south side of Joncker street, now State street, the third (now second), east from South Pearl 
street. He also owned a lot on the north side of Beaver street, next west of the alms house. 
After her husband's death Mrs. Banker removed to New York, where she opened a store and 
resided until her death, on the .3d of July, 1693. The inventory of her property, made 26 August, 
1693, shows that she had houses and lands in Schenectady, Albany, Catskil and New York, 
besides a large amount of personal property. 

- In 1658, complaint was made against Evert Nolden for drawing his knife and hanger on 
Pieter Lambertse.— Z>MteA Manuscripts. 

3 Teunis Teunissen Metselaer made his will in 1685, and then speaks of his wife Egbertie 
Egbertse and of his children, Maritie, wife ofHarmen Lievese, Egbert, Gerritie, wife of Andries 
Hanse, Dirke, wife of Bastian Harmeuse [VisscherJ, Willemtje aged 23 years, Anna aged 21 
years, and Marten aged 19 years. 



Albany County Records. • 45 

Done in Fort Orange the 25th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Adrian Simonsen [Boer or Bat] and Johannes Provoost. 

Teunis Teunissen Metselaer. 
Egbertyen Egbers. 
This is the mark of -\- Adrian Simonsen. 
Johannes Provoost, loitness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Frans 
Jacobsen, who declared that he was honestly indebted to Adrian Simonsen, 
in the sum of thirteen whole beavers ; which number of beavers he 
IH-omises to pay the next year, 1658, in the month of May, with interest 
on the same at twenty per cent,i on pledge of his person and estate, 
real and personal. 

Done in Fort Orange the 25th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of Jan 
Cloet and Johannes Provoost. 

Frans Jacobsen. 

Johannes Cliite, witness. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., in the 
presence of Jacob Schermerhooren and Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], com- 
missaries of the same jurisdiction, Teunis Teunisse [Metselaer], burgess 
and citizen of the village of Beverwyck, who declared that he had granted 
and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to the behoof of Jan Cloet, his heirs or assigns, a garden 
lyino- behind Fort Orange, by Jan De Wevers,^ in length seven rods, and 
in b°eadth four rods, and that for the sum of eight and thirty guilders, 
in good whole merchantable beavers, to be paid in the month of October, 
A. D. 1657; and promises the same to free from all actions, claims or 
demands that may be upon the aforesaid garden, on pledge of his person 
and estate, personal and real. 

Done in Fort Orange the 26th of July, A. D. 1657. 

Teunis Teunissen Metselaer. 

Jacob Janseu Schermerhooren. 

Philip Pietersen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, deputy, etc., Cornells Cornelissen 
De Vos,3 who declared that he had appointed, as by these presents he 
does appoint and empower, the honorable Dirck Janssen Croon-* in his 
name and in his behalf, to procure the payment from the honorable 



1 The usual interest at this time was 10 per cent. T7-,-„^^,hnnV 

2 Jan Marteuse De Weever, who subsequently settled at Kinderhook 

3 Andries De Vos is called scAoon»arfeniather-in-law) of Cornelia Yos.- Deeds, n, it.o(. 
* Dirk Croon was of Amsterdam in lG6i.— English. Manuscnpts. 



46 Alhany County Records. 

director general of New Netherland, of the sum of two hundred and 
fortj-five guilders and eight stuivers fourteen pennies and two-ninths 
parts, earned by the appointer in the service of the Honorable West India 
Company, as appears by his settlement, signed by P. Stuyvesant and A. 
Reyser, also to procure the payment from said Heer [Stuyvesant] of two 
beavers, disbursed by the appointer, at the time of the English war, as the 
billet signed by Rutger Jacobsen shows ; acquittance for receipts to pass 
in case necessity requires it, and to do in this matter all that shall be right 
and just; promising to hold good all that the attorney [Croon] shall do in 
the matter, on pledge of his person and estate, personal and real. 

Done in Fort Orange the 26th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Harmen Jacobsen [Bambus] and Johannes Provoost. 

CORNELIS Vos. 
Harmen Jacohs. 
Johannes Provoost, tcitness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., the 
honorable Francoys Boon, who declared that he had appointed, as by 
these presents he does appoint and empower, the honorable Johannes 
Van t'Willer of Newkerck in Gelderland, in his name and in his behalf, 
to procure [the payment] of a certain bill of exchange passed by Gysbert 
Philipse Van Velthuysen, upon the appointer [Boon] for the sum of six 
hundred Carolus guilders in current money, which bill of exchange was, 
by Cornells Pietersen Huysman, dwelling at Velthuysen, not accepted and 
was protested, because Gysbert Philipsen Van Velthuysen had received 
of the aforementioned Cornells Pietersen Huysman the value of fifty 
guilders in money, for which sum he demands a settlement of him ; the 
aforesaid attorney [Van t'Willer is authorized] to procure the payment 
of said sum of six hundred guilders and to proceed against him [Philipsen] 
according to law, before competent judges, namely, before the honorable 
magistrates of the province of Gelderlant, to definite sentence, the same 
to execute or waive, as he shall find good, for the receipt of the aforesaid 
money acquittance to pass, and in said matter to act as if the appointer 
himself were present; promising to hold good all that the attorney [Van 
t'Willer] in this matter shall do without the exception of any privilege 
or action, on pledge of his person and estate, real and personal, present 
and future, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 28th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Evert Heedeman. 

Francoos Boon. 
Eberhardt Hedeman, as witness. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Jan 
Labit^,! who declared that he had appointed and empowered, as by these 

' Jan LabitS, a native of France, came out previous to 1634 ; he was commissary for the 
patroon, and held the same office in Fort Orange under the company. He married Jillisje Claes, 
widow of Harmen Van De Bogart. Although owning lands and a house lot at Schenectady, it 
is not probable that he long resided there. 



Albany County Records. 47 

presents he does appoint and empower, Keyndert Hoorn, in liis name and 
in his behalf, to ask and to procure of the honorable director general of 
New Netherland, payment of the sum of three hundred and sixty-three 
guilders, seventeen stuivers and thirteen pennies, earned by the appointor 
ibr the honorable West India Company, as appears by his settlement, 
for the receipt of said moneys acquittance to pass, and in the matter to do 
as if the appointor himself was present ; promising to hold good all that 
the attorney [Hoorn]' in this matter shall do, on pledge of his person and 
estate, personal and real, submitting the same to all laws and judo-es. 

Done in Fort Orange the 30th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Teunis Tempelier and Johannes Provoost. 

Jan Labatie. 

Thuenes Pietersen Ti^mper.- 
Johannes Provoost, ivitness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Teunis 
Pietersen Tempelier, who declared that he had appointed, as by these 
presents he does appoint and empower the Honorable Philip Pieterse 
[Schuyler] and Jan Mangelsen,'^ in his name and in his behalf, to ask 
and to procure all the debts which are due to him, according to his 
account book, for the receipts thereof to pass acquittances, and in the 
matter to do as if the appointor himself were present; promising to hold 
for good all that the attorneys [Schuyler and Mangelsen] in this matter 
shall do, on pledge of his person and estate, personal and real, submitting 
the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange the 30th of July, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Thunes Pietersen Temper. 
Ludovicus Cohes. 
Johannes Provoost, ivitness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

In the name of the Lord Amen, be it known by the contents of this 
present instrument, that in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ, sixteen 
hundred seven and fifty, on the thirtieth day of the month of July, before 
me Johannes La Montagne, etc., and in the presence of the after named 
witnesses, appeared the honorable Groosen Gerritsen [Van Schaick], 
widower of Gerritie Brant-, bridegroom, on the one side, and Annetie 
Lieveus, daughter of Lieveus Janssen^, bride, of the other side, who 
declared that, for God's honor, they are resolved upon a future marriage, 
and before the bands of the same, have willingly made the foUowin"- cou- 

1 In 1663 Reyndert Jansen Hoorn had permission to come to New Amsterdam and reside tliere 
four months free from arrest to settle with his creditors.— Dutch Manuscripts. 

2 Teunis Pietersen Temper was prohably in trade at Beverwyck for a short time. In 1660 
certain beaver skins — property of his — were confiscated in New Amsterdam.— ZJi^^cA Manu- 
scripts. 

3 Jan Mangelse, an Indian trader in 1661.— Butch Mam/scripts. 

* Gerritie Brant was daughter of Brandt-Peelen [Van Nicuwkerke] who came to Albany in 
1630.— 0" Callaghan's History of Neio Netherlands i, 433. 

5 Lievens Janssen received a patent for 25 moigens of land in Newtown, L. I., adjoining 
Hellgate in 1654, on which he built a house. The next year he sold this plantation to Andries 
Andriessen and removed to Beverwyck.— Butch Manuscripts. 



48 Albany County Records. 

tract. First. — For the maintenance of this marriage, the aforesaid married 
people shall mutually bring together and bestow all their goods and effects, 
however much, of whatever kind and nature, in whatever place, and with 
whatever persons the same may lie outstanding and remaining; none of 
those eff"ects are to be excepted, which they each at present possess and 
which it is just should be possessed in common by them, according to 
the customs of Holland ; except that on the part of the bridegroom, there 
shall be reserved, six thousand guilders, for his four children left by 
Gerritie Brant, his late wife, to wit, Geertien Goossen, Gerrit Goossen, 
Sybrant Goossen and Antony Goossen, for their contingent possession 
from their late mother : which sum shall remain in common or in the 
hands respectively of the bridegroom and bride, until the time that each 
of said children comes to competent age, or the marriage state, at which 
time, to each one of the same shall be given his contingent possession, 
without rent or interest; there is also excepted all the clothing and jewels 
of Gerritie Brant, his late wife, which she in her life time gave to 
Geertjen Goossen, his oldest daughter, which, or the value of them, shall 
be given to her at her majority, or marriage; provided that the other 
three children, each out of his portion be assessed as the aforesaid clothing 
and jewels shall be estimated by two impartial persons, which portion 
shall be taken from the aforesaid sum of six thousand guilders. Item, 
that the aforesaid children shall be brought up and maintained in victuals 
and clothes, until their majority or marriage, without lessening their 
matrimonial [maternal?] estate, using only the income of the aforesaid 
sum of six thousand guilders ; which marriage and conditions the said 
bridegroom and bride promise to keep without craft or guile, on pledge 
of their persons and estate, personal and real, submitting the same to all 
laws and judges. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck ut sutjra, in presence of Philip 
Pietersen [Schuyler] and Johannes Provoost. 

This is the mark of -f GoosEN Gerritsen. 

FJiilip Pietersen Schvyler. Annetge Lievens. 

Johannes Provoost^ witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes De La Montagne, in the service, etc., 
the honorable Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven], who declared that 
he had appointed, as by these presents he does appoint and empower the 
honorable Jan Verbeeck and Hendrick Andriessen [Van Doesburgh] 
and his wife Cornelia Frederickse, in his absence, to direct all his affaii's, 
debts to receive and for the same discharge to give, debts to pay from his 
eff"ects, transfers to give, and in all his afi"airs to act as if he himself were 
present; promising to hold good all that the said attorneys, with his said 
wife shall do, on pledge of his person and estate, personal and real, 
present and future, and submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange, in presence of Zacarias Sickelssen and Evert 
Edeman, witnesses for "that purpose called, the 3d of August, 1657. 

Claes Hendrycksen. 
Zacliaryas Sechels. 
Eherhardt ILdvmann. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 



Albany County Records. 49 

At this date, the sixth of August, A. D. 1657, Harmen Jacobse 
[Bambus] and Heuderick Bierman, came to an agreement about the 
burgher excise of beer and wine, whereupon Harmen Jacobse, as farmer 
of the same, transferred it wholly to the above mentioned Henderick 
Bierman, and that for the sum of six hundred guilders to be paid in two 
installments; the first, four hundred guilders, to be paid in the time of 
eight days from the date hereof, to Rut Jacobsen [Van Schoenderwoert], 
and the other two hundred guilders, when the excise falls due, for which 
aforesaid sum of six hundred guilders, Marcelus Janssen [Van Bommel] 
and Henderick Driessen [Audriessen Van Doesburgh] stood sureties, 
on pledge of their persons and estates, real and personal. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck iit supra, in presence of Claes Hen- 
derickse and William Frederickse [Bout]. 

Harmen Jacobs. 
This is the mark -\- of Henderick Bierman. 
Marcelys Janssen. 
Hendrick Andriessen. 
As witnesses, Claas Hendrychsen. 
This is the mark of -{■ William Frederickse, witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service, etc., Har- 
men Jacobsen [Bambus], who declared that he had granted and conveyed, 
as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual posses- 
sion, to the behoof of the honorable Rutger Jacobsen, burgess and citizen 
of the village of Beverwyck, his yacht, named the Oak Tree {Eyckenhoom'), 
just as it at present lies in the roadstead, with all its appurtenances, for 
the sum of eighteen hundred guilders, for which sum the aforesaid Har- 
men Jacobse, the same yacht from said Rutger Jacobsen bought, and from 
failure of payment, the same yacht, by these presents, he has been obliged 
to reconvey. yielding, by these presents, all claims that he upon said yacht 
may have, on pledge of his person and estate, personal and real. 

Done in Fort Orange the 10th of August, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
"William Marteuse [Hues] and Johannes Provoost. 

Harmen Jacobse. 
Willem 3Iartense Hues. 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

In the name of the Lord Amen, be it known by the contents of this 
present instrument, that in the year sixteen hundred and fifty-seven, on 
the thirteenth day of the mouth of August, appeared before me Johannes 
La Montagne, in the service of the General Privileged West India Com- 
pany, deputy at Fort Orange and village of Beverwyck, Roelofi" Swart- 
wout,i in the presence of his father, Tomas Swartwout, on the one side, 
and Eva Albertsen (Bratt), widow of the late Antony De Hooges,^' in the 

1 Roeloff Swartwout was appointed the first sheriff of Esopus in 1660.— 0' Callaghan' s History 
of New Nethe7iand, II, 480. . . ^ . ,.u 

"- Authony De Hooges succeeded Arent Van Curler in 1642 as superintendent of tlie colony of 
Rensselaerswyck.— O' Callaghan's History of New Netherland, i, 32:2. 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 7 



50 Albany County Records. 

presence of Albert Andriessen [Bratt] her father of the other side, 
who in the following manner have covenanted this marriage contract, to 
wit, that for the honor of God the said Roeloff Swartwout and Eva 
Albertsen after the manner of the Reformed religion respectively held 
by them shall marry; secondly, that the said married people shall con- 
tribute and bring together all their estates, personal and real, of whatsoever 
nature they may be, to be used by them in common, according to the 
custom of Holland, except that the bride, Eva Albertse, in presence of 
the orphan masters, recently here chosen, to wit. Honorable Jan Verbeeck 
and Evert Wendels, reserves for the children of her and Antony De 
Hooges, for each of them, a hundred guilders, to wit, for Maricken, 
Anneken, Catrina, Johannes, and Eleonora De Hooges, for which sum of 
one hundred guilders for each child respectively [she] mortgages her 
house and lot, lying here in the village of Bcverwyck ; it was also 
covenanted, by these presents, by the mutual consent of the aforewritten 
married people, that Barent Albertse [Bratt] ^ and Teunis Slingerland, 
brother and brother-in-law of the said Eva Albertse, and uncles of said 
children, should be guardians of said children, to which the aforesaid 
orphan masters have consented ; which above written contract the respective 
parties promise to hold good, on pledge of their pei-sons and estates, 
personal and real, present and future, the same submitting to all laws 
and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange ut supra, in presence of Pieter Jacobsen and 
Johannes Provoost, witnesses, for that purpose called. 

Roeloff Swartwout. 
This is the mark of-j- Eva Albertse. 

Thomas Swartwout. 

Albert Andriessen. 

Jan Verbeeck. 

Evert Wendel. 

Teunis Cornelissen.2 
Johannes Provoost, witness. 
This is the maric of -\- Pieter Jacobsen.^ 
Acknowledged before me. 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Terms and conditions on which Jan RoelofFse [De Goyer], purposes to 
sell at public sale his house and the whole lot lying on the hill, according 
to the patent thereof. First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer, 
with all the fixtures, with the whole lot, twenty rods long, and in breadth 
to the east, five rods one foot, or two exclusive ; to the west the hill, in 
breadth seven and a half rods. The delivery of the house and lot shall be 
o-iven on the first of October of this year, 1657. The payment shall be 
made in two terms, the first installment with the delivery of the house, 
and the second installment, on the first of August, 1658, and that in whole 

1 Barent Albertse Bratt lived without tlie north gate of Beverwj'ck in 1700, just west of the 
main guard, near or on the east corner of Steuben street and Broadway. He had frequent warn- 
ings Irom tiie common council not to fence in certain grounds there belonging to the city.— 
Mmseirs Annals of Albany, iv, 109, etc. ; vii, 24. , , ^ . 

2 Teunis Cornelise Slingerland came early to Beverwyck and settled at Onisquathaw or 
Niskata, now New Scotland, where his descendants may be found to this day. He married 
Enweltie Albertse Bratt, and among their children were Arent, Albert; and Cornelis, who settled 
in Schenectady. 

3 Pieter Jacobsen (Borsboom?), brickmaker {steenbakker), who early removed to Schenectady. 



Albany County Records. 51 

merchantable beavers. The buyer shall be held to furnish two sufficient 
sureties, jointly and severally, to the content of the seller and that imme- 
diately. If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties immediately, then 
it shall be offered for sale again at the cost and charge of the buyer, and 
whatever less it comes to be worth he shall be held to make good, and 
whatever more it shall come to be worth, he shall enjoy no benefit from it. 
The auction fees become a charge upon the buyer. After many offers, 
Cornelis Segerse [Van Voorhoudt] ' remained the last bidder, for the sum 
of two thousand and twenty-one guilders, according to the abovesaid con- 
ditions, whereupon the aforesaid Cornelis Segerse bought the said house, 
upon condition that Jan Roeloffse shall take his horse, named Little Star 
(Kolletie), for the sum of four hundred guilders, as a deduction from the 
first payment, which horse the buyer shall deliver to the seller, with the 
delivery of the house, for which sum of two thousand and twenty-one 
guilders, the honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Francoys Boon stood 
his sureties, on pledge of their persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 20th of August, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Cornelis Segersen, with his own hand signed. 

Jacob Jansen Schermerhooren. 

Francoos Boon. 
Ludovicus Cobus, as witness. 
Johannes Provoost, as witness. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Upon the date underwritten Harmen Jacobsen [Bambus], who at public 
sale remained the last bidder, in behalf of a garden lying behind Fort 
Orange, belonging to Jan Roeloffsen [De Goyer], promised to make 
payment for the same in two installments the first on the first of May, 
A. D. 1658 : with the first payment the garden shall be delivered to Har- 
men Jacobsen, and that for the sum of one hundred and thirty-eight 
guilders; whereupon Pieter Jellesen Metselaer, stood surety for the last 
payment, on pledge of his person and estate, real and pei'sonal. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 20th of August, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Harmen Jacobs. 
Pieter Jellesen Metselaer. 
Ludovicus Cohes. 
Acknowledged before me, 

La Montagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the 
General Privileged West India Company, vice director, etc., in the 
presence of the honorable Jacob Schermerhooren and Abraham Staets, 
commissaries of the same jurisdiction, Harmen Bastiaensen [Visscher], 

1 Coruelis Segerse Van Voorhoudt came to Beverwyck in 1642, " and succeeded Vander Donck 
on the farm called Weelysburgh, on Castle island. He married Bregje Jacobse, by whom he had 
six children. Many of the family now pass by the name of Seger, in Albany county."— 
0' Callaghan's History of New Netherlands i, 433. 



52 Albany County Records. 

who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as hy these presents 
he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of 
William Hofmeyr' his heirs or assigns, a garden, bounding upon the 
south side of Henderick Janssen Westercamp, east, west and north a 
common road, length six rods ten feet, breadth six rods and one foot, 
which garden is a part of the patent of Jan Tomassen [Mingael] to him 
granted by the director general and council of New Netherland, of date 
28d of April, 1650, for the sum of two hundred and sixty guilders, in 
good current seewant, to be paid in cash; the grantor promising the 
aforesaid garden to free from all claims or demands, on pledge of his 
person and estate, personal and real, the same submitting to all laws and 
judges. 

Done in Fort Orange, the 28th of August, A. D. 1657. 

Harmen Bastiaens. 

WiLLEM HOFFMEYER. 
Jacoh Jansen Schermerhoor-e7i. 
Abraham Staes. 
Acknowledged, 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, In the service, etc., in the 
presence of Jacob Schermerhooren and Philip Pieterse Schuyler, Chris- 
toffle Davids, burgess and citizen of the village of Beverwyck, who 
declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does 
grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to the behoof of Jan 
Tomassen [Mingael ?], also citizen of the same village, his heirs or assigns 
a house and garden lying in said village of Beverwyck, next to the Heer 
Renselaer, on the river bank, in length on the west side along the road 
eight rods and one foot, on the east along the river eight rods and one 
foot, on the north on the lot of Gossen Gerritse [Van Schaick], in breadth 
six rods, on the south side, in breadth three and a half rods, which garden 
was received from Frans Barentse Pastoor, of date 6 July, 1657, for 
the sum of three hundred and fifty guilders, of which sum said Christofel 
Davids acknowledges he has had satisfaction ; promising the said garden 
to free from all claims and demands, which may be against said garden, on 
pledge of his person and estate, personal and real, present and future, the 
same submitting to all laws and judges. 

Done in Fort Orange, the 7th day of September, 1657. 

This is the mark of -j- Christoffel Davids. 
Jacob Janse Schermerlworen. 
Philip Pietersen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Conditions and terms according to which Cornells Vos [De Vos] 
proposes to sell at public sale his new house and lot lying in the village 
of Beverwyck. First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer, with 
all the fixtures, in breadth in front upon the street, nineteen feet and 

I Willem Hoffmeyer was fined 500 guilders ($900) and banished two years for conveying beer 
up the river and selling it to the Indians. The next year he had a suit with Jochem Wesselse 
Bakker, his stepfather, in reference to a house.— Dutch Manuscripts. 



Albany County Records. 53 

four inches, and breadth in the rear, eighteen feet, length five and twenty 
feet, with a lot behind of five and sixty feet in length, and in breadth 
fourteen feet, stretching frona the kil to the breadth of the hou«e ; also the 
lot is nineteen feet four inches in breadth in front on the street, in the 
rear on the kil side the breadth is fourteen feet. * * * * 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted.] 

Conditions and terms on which Cornells Vos [De Vos] proposes to 
sell at public sale his old house where he at present lives, with the lot. 
First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer as it at present is 
occupied by the seller, with its fixtures, except the signboard ; the aforesaid 
house is twenty-one and a half feet broad and five and twenty feet long; 
with the lot five and twenty and a half feet broad ; the lot is four feet 
wider than the house, to have a free gangway ; the whole lot with the 
house is one hundred and four feet long. 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted.] 

Conditions and terms on whicli Jacob Kip^ proposes to sell publicly, 
to the highest bidder, his house, kitchen, hen or hog yard, and lot 
lying in the city of [New] Amsterdam, over against the house of 
Heer OloflF Stevense [Van Cortland],- as the same is occupied by him. 
The house two and thirty feet long and twenty feet broad, inclosed 
with thick planks and a glazed pantile roof, has a garret and floor, cellar 
walled up three, four or five feet with stone, and has a brick chimney 
in the front room, also a shop, the partition wall of bricks, the inner room 
built up with brick all around (rond(om), bedstead, counting house, and 
larder therein, besides the aforesaid house, there is a kitchen eight or 
nine feet wide and seventeen or eighteen feet long, on the side of the 
house, with a brick chimney, in use by him, together with a hen or hog 
yard in the rear, and the place paved with bricks, and an apple tree 
therein, also a common gangway on the west side of the house six feet 
wide, and a common well, and what more is thereon and fast in earth and 
nailed, except the andirons (Imndizer) and hearth stone. * * * * 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted.] 

Conditions on which the Heer deputy and commissaries of Fort Orange 
and village of Beverwyck, desire to farm out to the highest bidder, the 
burgher wine and beer excise, for the time of one year. The farming, 
as well as the duties shall begin on the first day of November, A. D. 
1657, and end on the last day of October, A. \). 1658, accordingto the 
ordinances of our fatherland. The farmer of the excise shall receive for 
a tun of strong beer {goedt bier) one dollar (daelder), for a tun of small 
beer {klein bier) ten stuivers (20 cts.), for a hogshead of French wine, six 
guilders (S2.40), for an anker^ of brandy, Spanish wine or spirits (waters) 
two guilders (80 cfs.). The farmer of the excise shall be holden to 



1 Jacob Kip was a resirlent of New Amsteriiam : for an account of this family, see O Calla- 
ghan's History of New Netheiiand, n, 213. 

2 Ibid., I, p. 212. 

3 About 10 gallons. 



54 Albany County Records. 

furnish two suflBcient sureties, jointly and severally, as principals, to 
the content of those who farm out the excise {verpachters), to pay the 
aforesaid farmer's excise every quarter, a fourth part of the whole sum. 
In case that the farmer shall fail of the aforesaid sureties, then it shall 
be offered for sale again at his cost and charge, and whatever less it comes 
to be worth, he shall be holden to make good, and whatever more it comes 
to be worth he shall enjoy no benefit therefrom. After many offers, 
Marcelis Jaussen [Van Bommtl]' remained the last bidder for the sum 
of two thousand one hundred and fifteen guilders, according to the above- 
written conditions, and Andries Herbertsen and Jan Van Aken- stood 
sureties as principals, on pledge of their persons and estates, personal 
and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 5th of October, A. D. 1657. 

Marcelys Jansen. 

Andries Herberts. 

This is the mark of ^^■A'^^^S^. Jan Van Aecken. 



^ 



Conditions upon which the honorable deputy and commissaries of Fort 
Orange and village of Beverwyck desire to farm out to the highest bidder, 
the slaughter excise for the space of one year. The farming of the 
aforesaid slaughter excise shall commence on the first day of October, in 
the year 1657, and end on the last day of September, A. D. 1658. The 
farmer shall receive for slaughtered animals, that is to say, oxen, cows, 
bulls, calves, hogs, goats and sheep, a stuiver for every guilder'^ of the 
value of the same, in case of dispute, to be valued by impartial persons ; 
the farmer shall stand holden to furnish two sufficient sureties to the 
content of the Heer commissaries, for the excise money, to be paid, one 
just fourth part of said excise every quarter of a year, and if the farmer 
can furnish no sufficient surety, it shall again be offered for sale at his cost 
and charge, and whatever less it shall come to be worth, he shall be 
holden to make good, and whatever more it shall become worth, he shall 
receive no profit therefrom. After many offers, Marcelus Janssen [Van 
Bommel] remained the last bidder for the sum of seven hundred and 
twelve guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions; and as sureties for 
the aforesaid sum, Andries Herbertsen and Jan Van Aecken [offered 
themselves], on pledge of their persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 5th of October, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Ludovicus Cobussen. 

Marcelys Jansen. 
Andries Herberts. 
This is the mark of X Jan Van Aecken. 
Ziudovicns Cobus, as witness. 
Johannes Provoost, as witness. 

This farming was made in the presence of the vice director, J. La 
Montagne, and Jacob Schermerhooren, Philip Pieterse Schuyler, Jan 



1 Marcelis Janse was one of the innkeepers of Beverwyck. 

' Jan Coster van Aecken is often mentioned in these records. No names of the family appear 
on the ancient church register of baptisms. 
3 This excise amounted to 3 cents for every 40 cents in the value of the animals mentioned. 



Albany County Records. 55 

Tomasse [Mingael], Goossen Gerritse [Van Schaick] and Adrian Gerritse 
[Papendorp], commissaries, the <5th of October, A. D. 1657. 

La Montagne, V. Dr. of Fort Orange. 

Jacob Jansen Schermerhooren. 

Philijy Pieterse Schuyler. 

Jan Tomassen. 

Adrian Gerrietsen. 

Conditions on which the director general and council of iNew Netherland 
propose to farm out the excise of beer, wine and strong waters consumable 
by the tapsters in Fort Orange, village of Beverwyck, and appendances of 
the same. First. — That the farming out, as well as the collecting the 
duties, be done in pursuance of the laudable customs of our fatherland, and 
in accordance with the printed ordinance and placards of the honorable 
their high mightinesses the States General of the United Netherlands, 
to that end made (in respect to the matter of finances and subsidies 
required for the common weal) whereof a printed exemplar shall be put 
into the hands of the Heer deputy and commissaries. The farming of the 
excise shall begin on the first of November, of the year 1657, and end on 
the last of October, A. D. 1658, during which time the farmer, of himself, 
may collect and receive, or by his deputy or collector may collect and 
receive, for all wines, beers, or distilled (?) waters by any tapsters, 
innkeepers or retailers, to be drawn and consumed by the small measure, 
in Fort Orange, village of Beverwyck, colony of Benselaerwyck, Catskil, 
Esopus, and other places, lying between them, or falling within this 
period, as follows : for a tun of domestic brewed beer, 4 guilders ($1.60), 
for a tun of oversea or foreign beer, 6 guilders ($2.40), for a hogshead of 
French wine or Rhenish wine {rincewyn), sixteen guilders ($6.40), for 
an ankeri of brandy or of distilled waters, malmsey (niaelueseyeii), Spanish 
or Canary wines, 16 guilders ($6.40) per anker, and proportionally for 
greater or less casks {fustatie). Inasmuch as at the sale- two or more 
persons may make the same bid, it remains for the Messrs. contractors 
to choose according to their liking and approbation', and to grant the 
excise to one of the bidders at their pleasure, or to ofi"er the same at public 
sale again, if they find it proper to do so. The farmer stands holden to 
furnish two sufficient sureties to the content of the Messrs. contractors 
for the excise money, and to pay every quarter a just fourth part in 
current seewant, to the receiver of the director general and council, or to 
their attorney, and that upon order of the honorable Messrs. director 
general and council. Next, to prevent all caviling, misunderstanding, 
compounding and frauds, the Messrs. contractors stipulate and agree that 
after the expiration of this contract, whenever the ftirming out shall be 
renewed, it shall be permitted to the new farmer, immediately, or on the 
following day, or at the longest within the time of three days, after the 
new farming, in common form and in presence of the late farmer, if he 
wishes to be present, to guage the remainders of the wines, beers and 
distilled waters kept over by the tapsters, innkeepers or retailers, and by 

' lOK s;allons. 

2 There were two metliocls of offering property at public sale : by one. the purchasers commenc- 
ing at a low figure gradually raised the price until the seller was willing to pronounce the article 
sold ; by the other, the seller oflered the article at a higher figure than he expected to get, and 
gradually lowered the price until some one of the purchasers cried out "w»7i." The latter 
method called by the Dutch mining, was more commonly used by them than the former. 



56 Albany County Records. 

them given over for the new farming, foi which wines, beers, or distilled 
waters held and found over two-thirds of the excise received or due, shall 
be returned and restored to his successor. The director general and 
council reserve to themselves the interpretation and amplification of these 
presents, and promise the farmer all proper aid and assistance in his acts 
and arrests. At the public sale of the above farming, William Frede- 
rickse Bout,' became the farmer for the sum of four thousand two 
hundred and fifty guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions, and the 
Messrs. Arnoldus [Arent] Van Corlaer and Cornelis Teunisse [Bos] stood 
sureties for the former, for the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their persons 
and estates, personal and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, 
in presence of Lowies Cobus and Johannes Provoost. 

This is the mark of }'~ Willem Frederickse Bout. 






A. Van Curler."' 
Cornelis Thonisen Bos. 



Lu'^ovicus Cohes. 
Johannes Provoost. clerk. 



Conditions and terms on which Juffrouw Johanna De Ilulter^ proposes 
to sell at public sale her brick kiln (steen bakkenj") as it stands. First. 
The brick kiln shall be delivered to the buyer as it stands fenced, and shall 
be shown to him, in free ownership, except that he shall pay as an 
acknowledgment, two guilders yearly, to the patroon. The delivery 
shall be made on the 8th of November, 1657. The payment shall be 
made in three terms, to wit; the first installment on the first of July, 1658, 
one-half in good whole merchantable beavers, and the other half in good 
current seewant; the second installment on the first of July, A. 1). 1659, 
the half also in good whole merchantable beavers, and the other half in 
good current seewant; and the third instalment, on the first of July A. D. 
1660, also to be paid in the aforesaid currencies. The buyer shall be 
holden to furnish two sufiicient sureties, and that immediately, to the 
content of the seller. If the buyer can not furnish sufiicient sureties iii 

1 Willem Frederickse Bout was one of the innkeepers of Beverwj'ck. 

2 Arenclt "Van Curler came out from Holland in 16-30, as assistant commissary of tlie patroon, 
but was soon after tiis arrival appointed commissary-general, or superintendent of the colony, 
and acted as colonial secretary until 1()42; his jurisdiction extended from Beeren island to the 
mouth of the Mohawk on both sides of the river ; 1642 he rescued father Jogues from the Mohawks ; 
1646 married Antonia Slaghboom, and visited Holland; and on his return moved to the flats 
above Albany, where he had a farm; 16.59 held a conference with the Mohnwks at Caughnawagas, 
and renewed the treaty of sixteen years standing with them ; 1660 assisted Stuyvesant at a nego- 
tiation with all the Indian tribes at Esopus (Kingston) ; was one of the leaders in the settlement 
of Schenectady 1661-2; and on the surrender of New Netherland to the English, was specially 
sent for by Gov. Nicoll to be consulted on Indian aft'airs and the interests of the country generally ; 
was highly respected by the governors of Canada; was invited by the viceroy, Tracy, to visit 
Quebec, 1667, and set out accompanied by M. Fontaine, whom he had rescued from the Indians— 
his influence among them being so unlimited, and his memory so highly esteemed, that all 
succeeding governors of New York were addressed by the name of Corlaer, in honor of him. In 
attempting to cross Lake Champlain in a canoe, he was overtaken by a storm and drowned, it is 
supposed near Split rock, and the country experienced a great loss, and the French of Canada a 
warm and efficient friend.— 0' Callaghan' s History of Neiv Netherland. i, S22. 

3 Johau De Hulter, one of the partners of Eensseiaerswyck, embarked in May, 1653, from Amster- 
dam, in the vest^el cal'ed the Graef, with different families, taking with them a number of free 
men, among wh(mi were several mechanics, as one extraordinary potter (steenbakker, brick- 
maker), who intended to settle either in the colony or any other conveuient i>\i\ce.— Albany 
Becords, iv, 9.3. Mrs. De IJulter was a daughter of Johannes De Laet. In 1657 she obtained a 
patent for 500 acres of land at Esopus.— 2>MfcA Manuscripts, hh, 14.. 



Alhany County Records. 57 

the aforesaid time, it sball again be oflFered for sale at his cost and charge, 
and whatever less it comes to be worth, he shall be holden to make good, 
and whatever more it shall become worth he shall enjoy no profit therefrom. 
The auction fees become a charge upon the buyer. After many ofi"ers, 
Adrian Janseu Van llpendam remained the last bidder, for the brick kiln^ 
of JuflProuw Johanna de Hulter, for the sum of eleven hundred guilders, 
according to the aforesaid conditions, on pledge of his person and estate, 
personal and real. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, 
in presence of Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Adrian Van Ilpendam. 

At the same time, Pieter Loockermans and Cornelis Teunissen Bosch- 
stood as sureties and principals for the person [of Adrian Van Ilpendam], 
and the aforesaid sum of eleven hundred guilders, on pledge of their 
persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done %it supni in presence of the above written persons. 

Cornelis Thonisen Bos. 
Pieter Loockermans.' 

Madam lJuffrouw'] Johanna De Hulter proposes to sell at public sale, 
her tile kiln {pannenhackerij), according to the aforementioned conditions 
for the brick kiln, provided that the tile kiln be bound to be worked one 
year at her own expense, according to the contract made with the late 
Heer De Hulter, and that she shall receive five and twenty guilders a 
thousand and a suit of clothes during the year as a present. After many 
offers, Pieter Meesc [Vrooman], remained the last bidder, for the tile 
kiln, 'for the sum of three thousand seven hundred and seventeen guil- 
ders', according to the foregoing conditions, on bond of his person and 
estate, personal and real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost, for which sum Andries Her- 
bertsen and Cornelis Woutersen [Cornelisse Sterrevelt] stood sureties on 
the aforesaid pledge. 

Pieter Meese Vrooman.^ 
Andries Herbertsen. 
Cornelis Cornelissen Sterrevelt, 
Ludovicus Cohes. 
Johannes Provoost. 

Madame Johanna De Hulter proposes to sell, at public sale, her pasture, 
as it stands in fence, except the garden stuff, which is thereon, and it 

1 The often repeated tradition of dwellings built of bricks brought from Holland ^yould seem 
to be discredited by the fact that bricks and tiles were made in the province at so early a date. 

2 Cornelis Teunisse Bos, bomvknecht to Cornelis Maase Van Buren in 1631, was commissary 
at Fort Oraiige previous to 1662.-^ O'a</to.0'/tfm^^i7i5toryo/iV«('iYs//;ertoicZ, I, 434. 

3 A brother of Govert Loockermans of New Amsterdam, who came from Turnhout, Holland. 
Jacob Loockermans, another brother, was also a citizen of Beverwyck at this time.— JJuWt, 

? There\vere three brothers Vrooman in Albany, Jacob, Pieter and Hendrik. The latter 
settled early in Schenectady, where he was killed by the French and Indians, Feb. 9, 1690 leaving 
a laro-e family of children from whom have descended all the Vroomans of this vicinity. Ihe 
first brother, Jacob, died in Albany in 1691, leading no children. Pieter was a surveyor and died 
in 16S4. A son and daughter sm-vived him ; but the son had no descendants, save one daughter 
Geertruy. 

Hist. Coll. Hi 8 



58 Albany County Records. 

shall be delivered on the 8th of November free and clear, the payment 
as before. After many offers, Jan Janse Van Otterspoor' remained the 
last bidder, for the pasture of Madam Johanna De Hulter, for the sum of 
eight hundred and eighty guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions, 
and Cornelis Teunisse [Antonisse] Van Slyck and Jurian Teunisse 
[Glazemaecker] stood as sureties, for the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their 
persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Pi'ovoost. 

Jan Janssen. 

Cornelis Anthonissen [Van Slyck]. '^ 

JURRYAN TuNISSEN. 

Madam Johanna De Hulter proposes to sell at public sale her 
dwelling house, as it stands in fence, with a barn (schuurhercli) and a 
garden, which lies within the fence; it shall be delivered to the buyer, 
on the first of June, A. D. 1658, free and clear, and the payment shall be 
according to the conditions, before stated. After many ofi"ers, Didrick 
Van Hamel'^ remained the last bidder, for the dwelling house of Madam 
De Hulter, for the sum of two thousand one hundred guilders, according 
to the aforesaid conditions, and the honorable Johan Verbeeck and Adrian 
Janse [Appel] Van Ley den, stood as sureties for the aforesaid sum, on 
pledge of their persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in Fort Orange, the 8th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobus and J. Provoost. 

D. V. Hamel. 

Jan Verbeeck. 

Adrian Janssen Van Leyden.^ 

Appeared before me Johannes La Montagne, deputy, etc., Jan Gillissen 
Kock, who declared that the last of the month of October, being on the 
yacht of Evert Pels-^ he heard Jan Van Breemen" say among the farmers 
at Katskil, concerning there being fodder for the beasts, which were in 
the yacht of the aforesaid Evert Pels, that no fodder was provided for 
the beasts, six in number, because the kil was dry, and he had taken two 
men also, to wit; the boor of his farm, and Glerrit Segersen, to drive the 
beasts overland to Fort Orange; upon which Tryntje Jurriaensen asked 
said Jan Van Breemen, if there was no feed about the country to be had 
with a cart; whereupon he, Jan Van Breemen, answered "The devil may 

1 There was a place at Mauhattans on the east river, called the Otterspoor (the otter run).— 
Diitch MamiscHpts. 

2 Cornells Antonisse Van Slyck arrived in Albany in 1641, and was the first patentee of Catskil 
in 1046, given to him for eminent services rendered in bringing about a general peace, and in 
ransoming prisoners in the hands of the Indians.— 0' Callaghan'' s Histoi'y of New Netherlands 
I, 384. He had an Indian wife, by whom he had at least three children, Jacques, Marten, and 
Hilletie. The former settled in Schenectady and left a large family ; the latter married Pieter 
Van OLinda, and also left descendants. Cornelis Antonisse Van Slyck was sometime caUed 
Broer Cornelis. 

3 Mr. Van Hamel was secretary of Rensselaerswyck.— Z>MfcA j¥a?iM«mpfe. 

4 Adrian Janse Appel, alim Van Lej'den, was an innkeeper in Bcverwycli whence he removed 
to New Amsterdam. He liad at least two sons, Johannes and Willem, who were wounded at the 
sack of Schenectadv, Feb. 9, 161)0. 

6 Evert Pels Van Steltyn, brewer, and wife lived at the Mill creek, Greenbush. They came 
to New Netherland in 164-2, with Do. Megapolensis.— ff Callaghan'it History of New Netherlands 
I, 440. 

6 Jan Jansen Van Bremen came over in 164(j, and lived at Bethlehem ; in 1650 he removed to 
Catsldl.— i&i6?., I, 441. 



Albany County Records. 59 

draw it by land." Also, that lie said to Tryntie Jurriaense, " We should 
let the beasts die of hunger if we should let them be driven overland to 
Fort Orange," whereupon the aforementioned Tryntje Jurriaense said, 
" There is no danger for the beasts from the Indians or others," Jan Van 
Breemen answered, " I will stand the danger of it for a guilder," and 
further, he had them brought out of the yacht, and they ran away, so 
that they were not to be found, which he [Kock] affirms to be true, and 
when necessary will confirm the same with an oath. 

Done in Fort Orange, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence 
of J. Provoost and Nataniel Pietcrsen, by me. 

Jan Jellissen Koock. 

Johannes Provoost, witness. 

Nattanael Piettersen. 

Madam Johanna De Hulter proposes to sell, at public sale, the house 
where Piet Bouti dwells, but nothing more than the premises shall be 
delivered to the buyer, the payment six weeks after date according to 
the aforesaid conditions. After many offers, Aernoldus- Van Curler 
remained the last bidder, for the sum of seven hundred and forty guilders, 
according to the aforesaid conditions, and Johan Dareth and Frederick 
Hendericksen stood sureties for the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their 
persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence 
of Lowies Cobussen and J. Provoost. 

A. Van Curler. 
Jan Dareth. 
Frederick Hendrick. 

Madam De Hulter proposes to sell, at public sale, her cart with a horse, 
named Old Cato, which shall be delivered in the morning being the 8th 
November, but the payment shall be made on the first day of July, A. D. 
1658, half beavers and the other half in merchantable seewant. After 
many off'ers, Pieter Jacobse Borsboom ' remained the last bidder for two 
hundred and eighty guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions, and 
Cornells Cornelisse Sterrevelt and Jan Anderiessen De Graeff"' stood 
sureties for the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their persons and estates, 
personal and real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 7th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobussen and Johannes Provoost. 

Pieter Yacopse Borsboom. 
Jan Anderressen De Graep. 
Cornelis Cornelissen Sterrenvelt. 

Appeared before me J. La Montague, in the service, etc., Evert 
Luycassen [Backer], who acknowledges that he has received and been 

1 Pieter Bent or Bout was a brickmaker. He brought an action tliis year against Piet* Jacobse 
Borsboom for breach of contract in refusing to manufacture bricks for him. — Dutch Manuscripts. 

" This was probably intended for Arent. 

3 Pieter Jacobse Borsboom was among the early settlers of Schenectady. He was a brick- 
maker {steenbaliker). He died about 1689. His will made in 1686 mentions five children, Cor- 
nelis, Anna, Maritie, Fytie and Tryutie. The four daughters married into Schenectady families, 
save the last, who married John Oliver. Nothing is known of the son, who probably died young. 

■* Jaa Andriesse De Graaf, brother of Claas Andriesse De Graaf, one of the first settlers of 
Schenectady, was a brickmaker in Albany, and afterwards in New Amsterdam. 



60 Albany County Records. 

paid, by David Wessels,i the sum of five hundred and sixty guilders in 
diverse payments, to wit, in the year 1654 a hundred and fifty guilders, 
and in the year 1657, in the month of August, the sum of four hundred 
and ten guilders, for which sums the aforesaid Evert Luyeassen discharges 
the said David "Wessels from all claims and every demand. 

Done in Fort Orange, the 10th of November, A. D. 1657, in presence 
of Johannes Provoost and Willhem Montague. 

Evert Luckas. 

Appeared before me J. De La Montague, in the service of the General 
Privileged West India Company, vice director, etc., Jan PtoeloflFse [De 
Goyer], burgess and citizen of the village Beverwyck, who declared in 
the presence of Flip Pieterse Schuyler and Jan Tomasse [Mingael], 
commissaries of this jurisdiction, that he had granted and conveyed 
as he by these presents does grant and convey, in real and actual 
possession to the behoof of 'Cornelis Seegers [Van Yoorhoudt],'- his 
heirs or assigns, a certain house and lot lying in the village of Bever- 
wyck ; in length twenty rods and in breadth on the east five rods, one 
foot, or two exclusive; on the west on the Hill, in breadth seven 
rods and a half, which length and breadth was changed by the road 
(ranch), made by the director general and commissaries of this place, so 
that it does not agree with the patent thereof granted; for which house 
and lot the aforesaid Cornelis Seegers has promised to pay, at a public 
sale, the sum of two thousand and twenty-one guilders, of which sum the 
grantor acknowledges that he has received the sum of one thousand and 
forty-two guilders, and the remainder of said sum of two thousand and 
twenty guilders, the aforementioned Cornelis Seegers promises to pay, on 
the first of August, A. D. 1658, in whole merchantable beavers; the 
respective parties pledging, for the maintenance of this contract, their 
persons and estates, personal and real, present and future, without 
exception, or subterfuge to any custom or laws, submitting the same to all 
courts and judges. 

Done in the village of Beverwyck, the 10th of December, A. D. 1657. 

Jan RoELOFFSE. 
V. Q. m. 6, [C. Zeegers]. 
Philip Pieterscn \_Schiiyler'\. 
Jan Thomas \_Mingaer\. 

Acknowledged before me, 

La Moxtagne, Deputy at Fort Orange. 

Conditions and terms on which Albert Cierritsen" proposes to sell, at 
public sale, his house hing in the village of Beverwyck. First. — The 
house of the said Albert Gerritse shall be delivered to the buyer, being 
bounded on the northside by Gerrit Bancker's house, on the south side by 
his own house, where Jan Van Eeckelen dwells ; breadth front and rear 

' David ^Vessels was probably a citizen of New Amsterdam.— Z)?/^cA Manuscripts. 

2 Cornelis Segerse Tan Voorhoiidt, was among the early settlers of Albany. His wife was 
Bregje Jacobsen. The> had three sons and three""danghters. His son Seetrer was killed in 1662, 
by Andries Herbertsen yco/istapel) in a drunken brawl.— O' Callarjhan s History of XeiB Xether- 
land. I. 440. 

3 Elbert Gerritsen was son of Gerrit Reverse : he married Maria Prnj-n in 169.3, and had three 
daughters and two sons, Gerrit and Hendrik. He was buried in the church 18 Nov., 1750. His 
wife, Marytie, was buried 21st of Aug., 1731.— Annals of Albany, i, 8. 



Albany County Records. 61 

twenty wood feet, with a lot, in length ninety-four feet, and breadth 
twenty wood feet, with a bakery, which house and lot shall be delivered 
with all that is fast in earth and nailed, the 10th 3Iay, A. D. 1658. 
[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted]. 

On this day, the 28th of March, A. D. 1657, Claas Hendrickse [Van 
Schoonhoven], as seller, and Jan Viuhagen' and Barent Reyndersen as 
buyers, covenant and agree in regard to the sale of a certain lot on the 
following conditions: First. — The seller shall deliver the lot in breadth 
and length, and upon the same conditions, as the aforesaid Claes Hen- 
drickse purchased said lot of Rutger Jacopse, at the house of Hendrick 
Jochemse,- lying by the side of the house of the aforesaid Rutger Jacopse 
[Van Woert] ; the aforesaid buyers shall pay for said lot five hundred and 
twenty-five guilders, in good whole beavers; the payment shall be made, 
in August, A. D. 1657, all without craft or guile : So we have subscribed 
to it, with our own hands, and as witnesses thereto, have called Rem 
Jansen [Smit] and Barent Mynderts.-^ 

Done as above in Beverwyck, A. D. 1657. Was subscribed. 

Claas Hendrickse. 
* Jan Vixhagex. 

Rem Janse. Barent Reyndersen. 

Barent 3I^7iders, as loitnesses. 

Conditions and terms on which Cornelis Cornelisse [De Vos ?] proposes 
to sell, at public sale, his house and lot, lying in village Beverwyck. 
First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer as it stands, with all 
that is fast in earth and nailed, with the chimney and garret therein, with 
a lot l^ rods long and 4 rods wide, and a garden. Delivery shall be made 
within the time of eight days from this date. (On the 18th of December, 
A. D. 1657, the aforesaid lot was delivered to Tomas Poulusse). The 
payment shall be made in three terms; the first on the first of May, A. D. 
1658, in good whole merchantable beavers; the second installment on the 
first of August, A. D. 1658, in good whole merchantable beavers; and the 
third or last installment, on the first of February 1659, in good current 
seewant. The buyer shall be h ilden to furnish two sufficient sureties and 
that immediately, or in the time of 24 hours, to the content of the seller. 
If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties in the aforesaid time, then 
it shall be off"ered for sale again at the cost and charge of the buyer, and 
whatever less it shall come to be worth, he shall be holden to make good, 
and whatever more it shall become worth, he shall enjoy no benefit 
therefrom. The auction fees become a charge on the buyer. After many 
offers, Tomas Poulussen remained the la.st bidder for the sum of seven 
hundred and eight guilders, according to the aforesaid conditions, and 
Sander Leendertse [Cllen]- and Pieter Loockermans stood as sureties for 

1 Johannes Vinhagen. born in 1633. was living in 1V08. His son. Johannes. Jr.. married Maria 
Van Tri"ht in 1700, and had a family of seven children. 

2 Hendrik Jochemse was lieutenant of the burgher company.— Butch Jfamismpfs. xvi. 103. 

3 Barent Mynderse was a shoemaker, born iu 163T ; he died about 1GS9. when Pieter Vosburgh 
administered upou his estate. It is not known that he left any descendants : those of the name 
in this vicinity have descended from >Iyndert Frederickse. 

^ Sander Leendertse Glen, a servant of the West India Company, was at Fort Nassau on the 
Delaware in 1633. He returned to New Amsterdam and theuce to Beverwyck, where he settled 
about 1643 as a trader. In 1662 he became one of the proprietors of Schenectady, calling the 
name of his plantation, Scotia. His wife Catharine Dongau died in lOSl. The following year 
he died, leaving three sons, Jacob, Sander and Johannes. 



62 Albany County Records. 

the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their persons and estates, personal and 
real, submitting the same to ail laws and judges. 

Done in village Beverwyck, on the 18th of December, A. D. 1657, in 
presence of Henderick Jochemse and Johannes Provoost. 

Thomas Powel.' 
Sander Lenrsen [Glen]. 
Witness, Hendrick Joghemse. Pieter Loockermans. 

Johannes Provoost, loitness. 

Conditions and terms on which Teunis Teunissen Metselaer proposes 
to sell, at public sale, his house and lot lying in village Beverwyck. 
First. — The aforesaid house shall be delivered to the buyer, with all that is 
fast in earth and nailed, with the lot in length from one street to the other, 
and in breadth in front of the house fifty-three [feet], in breadth in the rear 
sixty [?] feet. Delivery shall be made on the first of May, A. D. 1658. 
The payment shall be made in three installments : the first with the 
delivery, in good current seewant; the second installment on the first of 
July the next coming year, in good whole merchantable beavers; the 
third installment on the first of July, A. D. 1659, in good whole mer- 
chantable beavers. The buyer shall be held to furnish two sufficient 
sureties, and that immediately, or else in the time of 24 hours, to the 
content of the seller. If the buyer can not furnish sufficient sureties in 
the aforesaid time, then it shall be offered for sale again at his cost and 
charge, and whatever less it shall become worth, he shall make good, and 
whatever more it shall become worth, he shall enjoy no benefit therefrom. 
The auction fees shall become a charge to the buyer. After many off"ers, 
Andries Herbertsen [Constapel, van der Blaas], remained the last bidder, 
for the sum of one thousand two hundred and four guilders, according to 
the aforesaid conditions, and the honorable Philip Pieterse [Schuyler] 
and Philip Henderickse [Brouwer], stood as sureties and principals, for 
the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their persons and estates, personal and 
real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 17th of December, A. D. 1657, in presence of 
Lowies Cobus and J. Provoost. 

Andries Herberts. 

Philip Pietersen. 

Flip Hendricksen. 

Conditions and terms on which Marcelus Janssen proposes to sell, at 
public sale, to the highest bidder, the house of Jan Van Hoesen,- lying 
on the hill. First. — The house shall be delivered to the buyer as it stands, 
with all that is fast in earth and nailed, with a lot of ten rods in length 
and four rods in width. 

[This paper is incomplete and unexecuted]. 

Conditions and terms on which Jan Anderessen^ proposes to sell at 
public sale his horse, and to deliver it immediately; to be paid for on the 

1 In 1664 Thomas Powel with others petitioned for permission to purchase a parcel of land 
■between Kinderhook and Neutenhook.— Butch Manuscripts. 

" Jan Franse "Van Hoesen was not living in 1667, perhaps not at the date of the proposed sale 
above. His wife was Volkic Jnriaense ; they had a large family, of whom eight sous and daughters 
were living in 1694, viz : Juriaan, Jacob, Volkert, Anna, Styntie, Maria, Catharina, ' ' 

3 Jautie (Johnny) the Irishman ? 



Albany County Records. 63 

first of August, A. D. 1658, iu good whole merchantable beavers. The 
buyer shall be holden to furnish two sufiicient sureties and that imme- 
diately to the content of the seller, the auction fees to the charge of the 
buyer. After many offers, Jan Koeloffsen remained the last bidder for 
the sum of one hundred and ninety-four guilders, according to the aforesaid 
conditions, and Pieter Loockermans, Junr., and Geurt Henderickse [Van 
Schoonhoven], stood as sureties for the aforesaid sum, on pledge of their 
persons and estates, personal and real. 

Done in Beverwyck, the 17th of December, A. D. 1657. 

Jan RoELorrsE [De Goyer]. 

Pieter Loockermans. 

Geuert Henydrickse. 

[There is a break in the records here of nearly seven years. The 
foregoing papers are chiefly in the handwriting of Johannes Provoost, 
clerk, though acknowledged before Johannes De La 31ontagne as vice 
director of Fort Orange]. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, clerk of the jurisdiction of 
Albany, and in presence of the honorable Jan Verbeeck and Jacob 
Schermerhoorn, commissaries of the same jurisdiction, the honorable 
Adrian Gerritse [Papendorp], who declared that he had granted and 
conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, to and for the 
behoof of Jan Cloet, his heirs or those who shall acquire title from him, a 
house and lot lying in the village of Beverwyck, on the hill, bounded on 
the north by the street, on the south by Jan Hendrickse Van Bael,i on 
the east by Jan Tomase [Mingael], on the west by Wouter Albertsen 
QVan Den Uythoff], of such magnitude as it lies enclosed in the fence; 
which he does by virtue of a conveyance given him by Sander Leen- 
dertsen [Glen], and the grantor acknowledges that he is paid and satisfied 
for tlie purchase and delivery of these premises, with the sum of six 
hundred and thirty guilders in beavers; wherefore he promises to free the 
aforesaid house and lot from all actions, claims, and demands, which 
hereafter may come against the same; pledging his person and estate, 
personal and real, present and future, nothing excepted, and putting 
himself in subjection to all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany, the i| of November, A. D. 1664. 

Adrian Gerretsen [Papendorp]. 
Jan Verheeck. 
Jacob Seller merhoor en. 

Conditions and terms on which the trustees of the estate of Jan 
Andriessen,- the Irishman, deceased, in the presence of the Messrs. 
commissaries, propose to sell, at public sale, to the highest bidder, several 
horses and beasts, for which payment shall be made in beavers, or seewant, 
at 2-4 guilders the beaver, or corn at beaver's price; and that in the time 

1 Jan ncudi-ikse Van Bael or Baelen, had a patent for land on the Normanskil, which was 
sold by his heirs in 1716 to Omy La Grange and Johannes Symonse Veeder for £250. Van Bael 
had one son, Henry, who with his father had long been dead iu 171G, and four dauo-hters viz • 
Hannah, non compos mentis ; Maria, who married Isaac De Peyster of New York ; Margaret' wife 
of Nicolaas Evertsen of New York; and Rachel, wife of Henry Wileman of the same place 

2 Jan Andriessen the Irishman, alias Jantie (Johnny), was at Beverwyck in 1G45 He 
removed to Catskil and bought land of Pieter Bronck. 



64 Albany County Records. 

of six weeks from the date hereof, and it is, by these presents, expressly 
conditioned, that no one shall purchase by a oiFset of moneys which may 
be due from Jantie the Irishman, deceased, but shall deliver the purchase 
money in to the hands of Johannes Provoost, and wait for a pro rata distri- 
bution. The buyer shall be held to furnish sufficient sureties as principals 
for the securing of the purchase money. In paying as aforesaid, the 
auction fees become a charge upon the buyer. 
In Albany, 28th November, A. D. 1664. 

Pieter Adriaense^ [Soogemackelyk or Van Woggelum], one 

mare (merrij paert^, / 65.00 

as security, the person standing below, Lucas Gerryts. 

Lucas Gerritse [ Wii/ngaardl.- 

Pieter Bronck, one mare colt, /115.00 

[Sureties], Cornelis Tonisen Bos. 
Daniel Ringlioiigt. 

David Maries, a mare, / 150.00 

(P^i on this 48 guilders in seewant, also paid 14 schepels of 

wheat.) 
[Sureties], Thomas Powell. 

This is the mark of Jan Brick er, + with his 
own hand set. 

Evert Luycassen [Backer], a stallion, / 62.00 

[Surety], Jochem Backer. 

Cornelis Segersen [Van Voorhoudt] Senior, a cow, / 75.00 

[Surety], Jacob Schermerlworen. 

Also Cornelis Segersen Senior, a heifer, / 90.00 

OiFered for sale again and bought by Jan Kloet. 

Jan Cloet, a heifer, / 84.00 

Surety, Jan Heind [?] 

Heer Jeremias Van Benselaer, a young black bull,... f 40.00 

also a red white faced bull, / 55.00 

[Surety], Anthony Jansen. 

Poulus Martensen [Van Benthuysen],-^ an old cow, for / 32.00 

[Sureties], Jacoh Tyes [^Van Der Heyden'].^ 
Adrian Van Bpendam. 

Hans Caresen, an old gelding, / 36.00 

[Surety], Davidt Schuler.'' 

Carried forward, /804.00 



1 Pieter Adrianse (ijoegemackelyk), was innkeeper in Beverwyck. His fatlier (or stepfatiier) 
Barent Janse Bal, was deceased in 1660, but his mother, Anna Pieterse, was livin.<? then. He 
was one of the early proprietors of Schenectady, hut soon sold outliis share to Helmer Otten 
and probably never resided there. 

2 Lucas Gerritse Wyngaard was a baker. He married Anna Janse Van Hoesen ; made his 
will 30 Oct., 1709, and speaks of wife and five children then living. 

s Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen had three sons, Baltiis, Marten and Barent, who were 
heads of families, and perhaps daughters. His widow was living in 1T17 on the corner of Beaver 
and South Pearl streets. 

■* Jacob Tyse Van Der Heyden was a tailor. He married his wife, Anna Hals, in Amsterdam, 
Holland, the 25 July, 1655. She outlived him, kept a public house and die^ in 1691, leaving, 
probably, but one son. Dirk, who raised a large family. 

^ David Schuyler, a brother of Philip Pieterse Schuyler, came from Amsterdam and married 
Catalyn Verplanck of New Amsterdam, 13 October, 1667. His widow was living in 1693 on the 



Albany County Records. 65 

Brought forward, / 804.00 

Jacob Tyssen [Van Der Heyden], a young heifer, / 25.00 

[Sureties], Adrian Van llpendam. 
Jacob Lokermans. 
Jan Henderickse Cruyn, a heifer of two years that is at 

present at Bethlehem, bought for / 52.00 

As surety, Johannes Clute. 

Jacob Loockermans,! an ox also bought as he at present stands 

there [in Bethlehem ?], in the third year of his age, / 49.00 

As surety, Daniel Ringliougt. 
Eldert Gerbertsen,'^ a bull calf, six months old, at present at 

Pieter Bronck's where he shall receive it, / 10.00 

[Surety], Claas Janse \_Van Bockhoven?'\ 
Gerrit Bancker, a calf of three months, at present at Pieter 

Bronck's, where he must receive it, f 7.00 

[Total], /937.00 

On the 9th January, old style, sold at the house of Pieter Bronck a 
copper Kettle of Jantie, the Irishman, deceased, to Frans Pieterse'^ [KlauwJ 
for/ 12 in seewant. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, clerk of the jurisdiction of 
Albany, and in the presence of Gerrit Slichtenhorst* and Jacob Scher- 
merhoorn, commissaries of the same jurisdiction, Jan Tomassen [Mingael] 
and Gerrit Bancker, citizens of the village of Albany, who declared that 
they had granted and conveyed, as, by these presents they do grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Pieter 
Claerbout, chorister (voorsanger) in the church here, his heirs or those 
who shall derive title from him, a house and lot, lying in said village, 
bounded on the north by the street, on the east by Cornelis Teunissen Bos^ 
and on the west by Jan Van Aecken, in breadth in front on the street 
two rods and one foot and six inches, on the east in length six rods and 
three feet, on the north, in breadth one rod and six feet, on the west in 
length six rods and three feet ; which house and lot the grantor received 
by conveyance from Rem Janssen Smit," of date 3 August, A. D. 1660, 
and acknowledges that he is paid and satisfied for the sale and delivery of 

Soiith corner of Broadway and Steuben street and was succeeded by her sons, Jacobus and 
Abraham. David Schuyler had five sous, Pieter, Jacobus, Abraham, David and Myndert, and 
perhaps daughters. 

1 In 1664 Jacob Loockermans was one of the commissioners to negotiate a treaty of peace 
between the Mohawks and northern Indians. In 1657 the sheriff brought a suit against him for 
having assaulted Meuwes Hoogenboom and split his face open from his forehead to his underlip 
with his knife ; he was find 300 guilders ($120) and further to pay for loss of time, board and 
surgical attendance.— Dutch Manuscripts, xvi, 98, 103. 

2 Eldert Gerbertsen was twice prosecuted for defamation in 1657 and 1658.— Butch Manuscripts. 

3 Frans Pieterse Clauw or Klauw was a carpenter. He settled in Kinderhook, where his two 
sons also resided — Hendrik and Juriaen. 

^ Son of Brant Arentse Slichtenhorst. SeeO'Callaghan's History of New Netherlands ii, 69. 

5 Cornelis Teunisse Bos was complained of in 1658 for defaming "the court, and in 1660 for 
calling Willem Teller a backbiter.— Dutch Manuscripts, a, 155. xvi, 214. In retaliation Cornelis 
brought an action against Wm. Teller for calling Jacob Tyse (Van Der Heyden) and himself a 
rabble.— Dutch Manuscripts, xvi, 159. 

« Rem or Remmert Jansen Smit (blacksmith) was in New Amsterdam as early as 1643. Rem 
Jansen Smith of Waalebocht is complained of in 16(53, by Adriaen Hegeman for carrying off his 
ploughshare : Rem is ordered to replace it in the spot where he found it, and if he have any 
claim to prosecute it at law.— Dutch Manuscripts, x, 327, 329. 

Hist: Coll. Hi. 9 



66 Albany County Records. 

these premises; wherefore he promises to free the same from all actions, 
demands or claims, which hereafter may come against the same, pledging 
his person &nd estate, personal and real, present and future, putting him- 
self in subjection to all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany the 7th of December, A. D. 1664, new style. 

Jan Tomas. 
Gerrit SlicJitenhorst. Gerret Bancker. 

Jacob Schermerliooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, clerk. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, clerk of the village of Albany, 
and in presence of the honorable Grerrit Siichtenhorst and Jacob Scher- 
merhooren, commissaries of the same jurisdiction, Pieter Claerbout, 
citizen of said village, who declared that he had granted and conveyed, 
as he does grant and convey by these presents, in real and actual 
possession, to and for the behoof of Rut Arentsen [Schoemaecker],i his 
heirs, or those who shall have title from him, a house and lot, lying in 
the village of Albany aforesaid, on the public highway, bounded on the 
north by the aforesaid highway, on the east by the grantor, on the west 
by Jan Coster van Aeckeu ; in length three rods, nine feet, ten inches, 
breadth in front on the street eleven feet and seven inches, on the north 
[south?] in breadth seven feet, which lot is a part of the transfer made to 
him, the grantor, by Jan Tomassen and Gerrit Bancker, of date the 7th 
of this month, by virtue of which [transfer] his ownership is apparent: 
and he acknowledges further that he is paid and satisfied for the sale and 
delivery of these premises ; wherefore he promises to free the aforesaid 
house and lot from all actions, demands or claims, which hereafter may 
come against them, pledging his person and estate, personal and real, and 
putting himself in subjection to all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany the 17th of December, A. D. 1664, new style. 

Pieter Claerboudt. 
Gerrit Siichtenhorst. 
Jacoh Schermerhooren. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, clerk. 

Conditions and terms on which "William Frederickse Bout- proposes to 
sell, at public sale, by virtue of the patent, his house and lot lying in the 
village of Albany, before this, named Beverwyck; bounded on the 
south side by Teunis Cornelisse, on the west side by the public highway, 
on the north by the heirs Jaques Tyssen,-^ on the east by the horse mill 
of the Heer Rensselaer. The aforesaid house and lot shall be delivered 
to the buyer, in length to within two feet of the aforesaid horse mill, and 
in breadth twenty-nine wood feet, front and rear, and that, free and 
unencumbered, except the Heer's right in consequence of the aforesaid 
patent, granted to Teunis Cornelise of date the 23d of April, A. D. 1652. 

[This paper is imperfect]. 

l^ Rut Arentsen was in New Amsterdam perhaps in \fAZ-A.— Butch Manuscript.'), n. 1.30. 
* Willem Frederickse Bout was an innkeeper, and was complained of in 1058 for evading tlie 
excise law : his liquor was seizcA.— Dutch Manuscripts, A, 118. 
3 Jacob Tyee Van Der Hoyden. 



Albany County Records. 67 

Conditions and terms according to which William Frederickse Bout 
proposes to sell, at public sale, to the highest bidder, his house and lot, 
lying in the village of Albany, before this, named Beverwyck, bounded 
on the south side by Teunis Cornelise, on the west side by the public 
highway, on the north side by the heirs of Jaques Tyssen [Van Der 
Heyden], and on the east side by the horse mill of the Heer Jeremiah Van 
Renselaer. The house and lot shall be delivered to the buyer in length 
from the front on the street to within two feet of the aforesaid mill, and 
in breadth twenty-nine wood feet, front and rear, and that, free and 
unencumbered except the Heer's right; which is done by virtue of a 
patent of a greater lot granted to Teunis Cornelisse, of date the 23d of 
April, A. D. 1652 ; of which aforesaid house and lot the buyer with the 
last payment shall receive a proper conveyance, and the same shall begin 
with this date. Payment shall be made in three installments : the first 
installment fourteen days after this date, in beavers, or failing of beavers 
to be paid in good strung seewant, at 24 guilders the beaver ; the second 
installment on the first day of August of this year 1665, new style ; and 
the third installment on the first day of May, A. D. 1666, new style, and 
in currency as before. The buyer shall be holden to furnish two sufficient 
sureties as principals, jointly and severally, and that immediately, to the 
content of the seller. If the buyer can not furnish the said sureties in 
said time, then shall the aforesaid house and lot be ofi'ered for sale again 
at his cost and charge, and whatever less it comes to be worth, he shall be 
held to make good, and whatever more it becomes worth, he shall enjoy no 
profit therefrom. The auction fees become a charge on the buyer. After 
oflFering this property at public sale, one person, Jan Cloet, remained the 
bidder and buyer of the house and lot of V/illem Bout, according to the 
above standing conditions, for the sum of three hundred and ninety guil- 
ders ; for the payment of which Jurrian Teunissen' [Glazemaecker] and 
Dirk Wessels [Ten Broeek], stood sureties and as principals, jointly and 
severally, according to the conditions aforesaid. 

Done in Albany, the 2nd of January, A. D. 1665, new style. 

Johannes Clute. 

jureyan tunsen. 

DiERK Wessels. - 

On this date the 9th of January, A. D. 1665, old style, Frans Pieterse 
[Clauw], in presence of the honorable Jan Verbeeck and Gerrit Slich- 
tenhorst, commissaries of Albany, and in the presence of Johannes 
Provoost, secretary, has measured the farm or cleared land of Pieter 
Bronck,-^ which is found to comprise one hundred and seventy-six 



1 Juriaan Teiinise was a tavern keeper ; in 1662 he applied for permission to keep a tavern at 
the mouth of Esopus kil, but was rejected. In 1660 he was fined 30 guilders for beating some of 
the magistrates at Mr. Dyckman's house; and was complained against for entertaining persons 
at night after the ringing of the bell, and fined 70 guilders.— Dutch Manuscripts, xvi, 211, 2.33. 

2 Major Dirk Wesselse Ten Broeek was a trader, born in 1642; he died in 1717. His wife, 
Christina Cornelise Van Bureu, died in Albany in 1729. In 1715 they had eleven adult children 
living. Major Ten Broeck's house vyas on the east corner of James and State streets. In the 
family Bible his death is thus recorded : " 1717 Den 13 Sept. in Roelofl's Jansen's kil is myn 
Vader Dirk Wesselse in den Heere gerust op syn bouwery op Roelofl' Jansen's kil. Dc Heere 
geve liem een zalige opstandinge." 

3 This farm was at Coxsackie. Pieter Bronck came to Bevernyck in 1645 and built a tavern 
there in 1651 : the third in that place then. He afterwards lived at Coxsackie, the creek at which 
place was called by the Dutch, Pieter Bronck's kil. He had two sons, Jan and Pieter.— 
O'Cidlaghaii's LRstory of New Netherlands i, 441. 



68 Albany County Records. 

morgens,! and one hundred and ten rods. In like manner the land of 
Jantien [Andriessen]- the Irishman, deceased [was measured], which was 
sold off from the land of Pieter Bronck and he bought of said Bronck, 
and it amounted to sixty-nine morgens and 345 rods ; lying in a square 
345 rods long and 121 rods wide, front and rear; besides a lot for a 
homestead, lying next to Pieter Bronck, where he proposes to build, 
northeast of him [Bronck], and is 30 rods long and twenty rods wide, 
and which at the north is separated by the kil or a flat (Jaeyhte). Also 
was measured a piece of land taken off from the aforementioned land of 
Pieter Bronck, which belonging to Anderies Hanssen'^ was granted to 
him by Pieter Bronck, and by Johnny (Jantie) the Irishman, deceased, 
a part ; length on the south side 54 rods, and on the north 95 rods ; breadth 
on the west 41 rods, and on the east 58 rods, and was estimated at 6 
morgens and 100 rods. The calf pasture of Pieter Bronck measured 65 
rods, as long as broad, being square, and contains 7 morgens and 25 
rods tit S7ipra. 

Conditions : The guardians over the estate left by Dirckjen Pieterse, 
deceased, wife of Cornelis Vos ; propose at once to sell, at public sale, 
some household stuff, whereof the payment shall be made in good strung- 
merchantable seewant, and that in the time of 8 days, and conditioned 
that no one shall purchase by an offset of any debts, as the aforesaid house- 
hold stuff by order of the honorable court is retired, and destined for the 
payment of the funeral expenses (dootscliuW). The auction fees become a 
charge on the buyer. Payment as aforesaid. 

Done on the 6th of February, A. D. 1665, in Albany. 

Rykert Van Rensselaer, a looking glass, / 25.10 

also a trammel chain with a pothanger, / 24.00 

also two andirons {hrandisers) , f 27.00 

Poulus Martenssen [Van Benthuysen], 2 old kettles, / 10.00 

also 3 white earthen bowls and a ditto salt cellar, / 8.10 

Luycas Pieterse [Coeymans],' a maul (?) (kol/t), / 5 00 

Barent Pieterse [Coeymans], the miller, a shovel and tongs,.. / 12.00 

Barent Pieterse [Coeymans], a hammer, and chopping knife,. / 12.00 

Jan Evertsen [Schoemaker],-^ a horn and knife, / 4.00 

Johannes Provoost, a chain and also other things {en nocli 

anders), / 12.00 

Lowies Cobus, a spice box, a hand candlestick, etc., / 6.00 

Anderies De Vos, a plate (hort)^ almanac, and 2 little pictures 

{schildertien), / 4.00 

Doctor {Meester) Adriaen, 3 tin plates and a liquor measure 

(mutsje), / 10.00 

Carried forward / 159.20 

1 A morgen, old Amsterdam measure, was 2.00T6 acres, or 9 1-1.3 acres. 

2 Jan Andriessen Van Dublin leased a bouwerie in 1649, described as lying " north of Stoney 
Point, being the north half of the Flat."— 0' Callaghan's History of New Netherlands i, 441. 

3 Andries Hanse Barheit, "yeoman of the great Flat ueer Coxhachky."— ZJ«ec?s, iv, 1692. 
His wife was Greetie, daughter of Tenuis Teunisse Metselaer. She was not living in 1699, when 
Egbert Teuuise (her brother?) became guardian to her iowx (MlAven.— Annals of Albany , i, 99, 
&n6. Deeds, iv. 

^ For an account of the Coeymans family, see O'Callaghau's History of New Netherlands i, 435. 
6 In 1661, he was complained against for smuggling shoes.— Z>Mte/i Manuscripts, ix, 716. 



Albany County Records. 69 

Brouglit forward, / 159.20 

Henderick Ilosenboom,i 4 plates and 8 spoons, / 13.10 

Cornelis Van Dyck, a tin platter, / 15.00 

also one ditto, , / 14.10 

Barent Pieterse [Coeymans], one ditto, / 11.00 

Daniel Rinckhout, 2 platters, tin, / 17.10 

Henderick Rosenboom, 2 curtains and a valance, / 14.10 

Poulus Martense [Van Benthuysen], 2 valances, / 8.10 

Ryckert V. Renselaer, a floor cloth (fajpei/t), / 33.00 

Lambert Van Neck,- 2 women's pocket handkerchiefs, / 28.00 

Jan Evertse [Schoemaker], 2 funeral bands (heffeii), / 6.00 

Willem [Frederickse] Bout, 2 bonnets (Jcapers^ similar to 

those worn by Shakers), / 4.00 

Adrian G-erritse [Papendorp], a church [foot] stove 

(kerckstooff), / 5.00 

/ 330.10 
The persons who have paid on the above standing sale. 

Ryckert V. Renselaer, /109.10 

Jan Evertse, / 10.00 

Lambert Van Neck, / 18.00 

Adrin Gerritse, / 5.00 

Adrian Van Ilpendam, / 10.00 

Hendrick Rosenboom, / 28.00 

Cornelis Van Dyck,3 / 29.10 

Paulus Martense, / 27.00 

Lambert Van Neck, also, / 10.00 

D. Rinckhout, / 17.10 

Inventory of the goods and estate left by Tryntie Janssen, deceased, 
wife of Jan Michielsen' [Van Edam], taken the ^ February, A. D. 1665. 
A black hrat (?) cloak and a stomacher with a grogram gown, 

being a black [one], / 80.00 

A black cloth bodice, a fur coat trimmed with black (sivarf 

gebbanf), and a pair of sleeves, and a black curtain stuff 

(brat^, worth, / 50.00 

A colored upper petticoat {machajer, striped goods worn by 

servants), / 36.00 

A blue gown {dosyntiers ?), / 20.00 

Carried forward, /186.00 

1 Hendrik JRoseboom was the voorlezer and sexton of the church. He had two wives ; the 
last marriage is thus recorded in the church register: "Hendrick Roseboom de oude, 
weduwenaar van Gysbertje Lansing, en Tryntje Janse, weduwe van Rut Jacobse [Van Schoen- 
derwoert]," etc. They probably had four sous, Johannes, Gerrit, Hendrik, and Myndert. His 
last wife, Catharine Breestede, was the licensed midwife of the city. 

2 Lambert Van Neck was fined in 1656, tor committing an assault.— Dutch Manuscripts, xvi, 40. 

3 Cornelis Van Dyck, son of Schout Fiscal Hendrik Van Dyck, studied medicine with Jacob 
D'Hinse, chirurgeon of Albany, and practiced his profession there until his death, which occurred 
about 1687. The name of his first wife is not known ; his second wife was Elizabeth Beck, widow 
of captain Sylvester Salisbury. She survived Dr. Van Dyck, and in 1691 was married a third time 
to captain George Bradshaw. She was deceased in 1701. Dr. Van Dyck had two sons and two 
daughters; the former followed their father's profession; Hendrik settling in Albany and Jacobua 
in Schenectady. 

4 Jan Michielsen came over in 16-37; he v/a,s a. tnUor.— 0' CallagMn's Hisionj of JVew jVether- 
land, I, 437. 



70 Alhmiy County Records. 

Brought forward, /186.00 

2 white aprons, 3 smocks, 2- table cloths, and small lot of 

articles (^jer?i?^e?i), total, / 30.00 

2 pair of old stockings, and cap with a little box, and an old 
cap or two ; one old cloak with loose sleeves, one bone lace 

pillow with bobbins, f 12.00 

3 earthern dishes, 6 little pictures, 1 little tin cup, 2 copper 
candlesticks, 1 tin salt cellar, and 3 tin cups, 4 tin platters, 

and 4 tin trenchers, a little tin basin, with five spoons,, ■ / 56.00 

A patched bed pan, 1 church stool, / 28.00 

A. great iron pot, with a little copper pot, 3 little copper 
kettles, a copper pan {pannekoeckx ?), 3 earthen pots, a 
pepper mill, a little earthern mug, an earthern and tin 

plate, a butter tub, a sieve, / 60.00 

A pothanger chain, a shovel and tongs, gridiron, pothooks, a pail, / 32.00 

4 chairs with a little table, / 10.00 

[Total], /414.00 

Unvalued goods which Jan Michielse keeps at his house. 
2 Sheets (^laeckeii), 

5 pillowbiers, 

2 blankets (deeckens)^ 
Ibed, 

1 bolster, 2 pillows, 

A chamberpot (loaterpof), 

2 curtains with a valence, 
and for the chimney, one, 

6 books, among which two old Bibles, 
2 axes and an iron vise, 

2 chests, 

1 tailor's shears. 

These appraised goods, Willem Janssen Schut has taken to himself for 
the maintenance of Jan Michielse [Van Edam], in board during his life, 
and at the decease of the aforesaid Willem Schut, the aforesaid goods shall 
be taken as a payment of the board of Jan Michielse at 200 guilders see- 
want per annum, and if they come short of paying the board money, 
Willem Schut shall not claim more ; on condition thiit all work, mending 
and sewing, that Jan Michielse may do at the house of Willem Schut, shall 
not inure to his benefit, but shall be for the profit of the aforesaid Willem 
Schut; which they with their signatures attest (?) and promise to perform. 
Done in Albany, the 21st of February, A. D. 1665; done in presence 
of Stoflel Janssen [Abeel]i and Jacob Schermerhooren. 

Jan Mychgyelsoon. 
Jacoh Schermerhooren. Willem Jansen Schuidt. 

Stoffel Janse. 
Acknowledged before me, 

J. Provoost, Secretary. 

1 stoflel Janse Abeel was a master carpenter. His wife was Neeltie Janse ; and he was 
brother-in-law of Tennis Cornelise Vander Poel and Adrian Gerritse Papendorp, who were his 
executors. His children were Magdalena, born 1653 ; Maria, born 1656 ; Johannes, born 1659 ; and 
Elizabeth. He was deceased in 1684. 



Albany County Records. 71 

Conditions and terras according to which the administrators of the 
estate of Jan Andriessen [the Irishman], with the Messieurs commissaries, 
propose to sell at public sale, to the highest bidder, the hind of the said 
Irishman, lying near Pieter Bronk's [at Catskil]. First. — The aforesaid 
land shall be delivered to the seller, in area nine and sixty morgens arable 
land, without trees, or only a few about the woodside at the west, together 
with a spot for a homestead, lying next to Pieter Bronk's, where he was 
proposing to build, in length 30 rods and in breadth 20 rods, and is sepa- 
rated at the north [from Pieter Bronck], by a kil or flat (Jaeghte); more- 
over the^ buyer shall have the right, with Pieter Bronck, to use the 
surrounding woodland for pasturing cattle. Delivery shall be given so 
soon as the buyer shall please to take possession. Payment shall be made 
in beavers, or good strung commercial seawant, at 24 guilders a beaver, and 
in two installments; the first on the first day of June, of the year 1665; 
and the second on the first day of June, A. D. 1666, being a year there- 
after, and with the last payment, a proper conveyance shall be given to 
the buyer. The buyer shall be held to furnish two suflicient sureties, 
jointly and severally, as principals, immediately, to the content of the 
seller. If the buyer can not furnish the aforesaid sureties in said time, 
the said land, together with said homestead, shall be ofi"ered for sale again 
at the buyer's cost and charge, and whatever less it comes to, he shall be 
holden to make good, and whatever more it comes to, he shall enjoy no 
profit therefrom. The per ceutage becomes a charge to the buyer in 
paying, as^ aforesaid, on the 9th of March, 1665. On the 9th of March, 
A. D. 1665, the schout and secretary of the colony of Renselaerswyck, 
for a certain consideration, being asked if they, in the name and behalf of 
the patroon, had any claim against the land of Johnny the Irishman, 
deceased, which lies by Pieter Bronck's, and they answered they had no 
claim whatever against the same. 

Done ut supra. Which I witness. 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

We, the undersigned, administrators and guardians of the estate of 
Dirkje Pieterse,i deceased, late wife of Cornells Vos,- acknowledge that, 
in respect to the goods sold of said Dirkje deceased, they are paid and 
satisfied by the vendue master, Johannes Provoost. 
Done on the |4 March, A. D. 1665, in Albany. 

Andryes De vos. 
This is the mark of -f Barent Pieterse [Coeymans].-^ 
with his own hand set. 
Adriaen Gerritse \_Papendoi-j)'], witness. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Albany, and in 
the presence of Jan Verbeeck and Jacob Schermerhooren, magistrates of 
the jurisdiction of Albany aforesaid; Jochim Kettelheym,* citizen of said 
place, who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these pre- 

1 Dirkje Pieterse Coeymans (?) was probably sister of Bareut Pieterse Coeymans, alias Mole- 
naer [Miller]. 

2 Two years later (1667), Cornells Vos or De Vos had married again, and was then called the 
gon-ln-law of Andrles De Vos. — Deeds, ii. 

3 For an account of the Coeyman family, see O'Callaghan's History of Neio Netherlands i, 435. 
^ Joachim Kettelhuyn came to Beverwyck in 1042, the first settler of this name in the county 

By his wife, Anna (?), he had three sons : Willem, David, and Daniel, who had families. The name 
is now degenerated into Kittle. 



72 Albany County Records. 

sents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for 
the behoof of Barent Meyndersen,i shoemaker here, his heirs or those 
who shall obtain title from him, a lot, lying in the village of Albany, 
lying over against the house of Gillis Pieterse- [Timmerman?], (and 
bounded) south and west by the king's highway, north by Aernout Cor- 
nelise [Viel^],^ and to the east the grantor, and is in breadth, front and 
rear, nine and twenty feet, Rynland measure, and in length forty and a half 
feet, which lot is a part of the patent, given to the grantor by the director 
general and council of New Netherland of date 25 Oct., A. D. 1653; 
moreover the grantor promises to free said lot from all actions, claims, 
and demands, which hereafter may come against the same, binding his 
person and estate, real and personal, present and future, and submitting 
himself to all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany, 19th of Feb., old style, 1665. 

This is the mark W of Jochim Kettelheym, 
with his own hand set. 
Jan Verheeck. 
Jacob Schermerliooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

J. Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Albany, and in 
the presence of Jan Verbeeck and Jacob Schermerhooren, magistrates of 
the jurisdiction of Albany aforesaid; Jochim Kettelheym. citizen of said 
place, who declared that he had granted and conveyed, as by these 
presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and 
for the behoof of "jacob Abrahamse,'^ cooper [kuyper Vosburgh ?], his 
heirs, or assigns a lot, lying in Albany, bounded on the west by the street, 
on the east by the grantor's lot,. on the north by the grantor's house, and 
on the south by the house of Arnout Cornelise [Viele] ; in length three 
rods nine feet and seven inches, breadth one rod eight feet and an inch, 
which lot is a part of a patent given to the grantor by the director general 
and council of New Netherland, of date 25 Oct., A. D. 1653 ; wherefore 
he promises to free the same from all actions, claims and demands, which 
hereafter may come against the same, binding his person and estate, 
personal and real, present and future, putting himself in subjection to all 
laws and judges. 

Done in Albany, 19th Feb., 1665, old style. 

This is the mark of W JocHiM Kettelheym, 
with his own hand set. 
Jan Verheeck. 
Jacob Schermerliooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

J. Provoost, Secretary. 



1 Barent Myndertse was born in 1627 (Notarial Papers), and died about 1689, when Pieter 
Vosburgh administered on his estate. It is not known thSt he left any descendants, those of this 
name in this vicinity having descended from Myndert Frederickse. 

2 Gillis Pieterse owned a lot in 1657 behind Fort Orange, next to Do. Schaets's lot. p. 59. 

3 Arnout Cornelise Viele was Indian interpreter for many years at all the great meetings held 
by the natives in Albany, and was held in high esteem by them. His sou, Arnout, was carried 
away captive by the Freuch and Indians in 1690, when Schenectady was sacked, and was absent 
three years before his return. He also became an Indian interpreter. 

* Jacob Abrahamse Vosburgh, probably. 



Albany County Records. 73 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, Secretary of Albany, Jocbim 
Kettelheym of tbe one part, and Grabriel Tomassen of the other part, 
who in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, declare that they have 
come to an agreement in the manner following, namely, Jocbim Kettel- 
heym lets, by these presents, his house to said Gabriel Tomassen, i except 
the cellar belonging to the above house, and that for the time of six 
months, commencing on the first of May next, new style, and ending on 
the last day of October, new style, for which Gabriel Tomassen promises 
to pay Jocbim Kettelheym for the hire during said six months, nine 
pieces of good whole merchantable beaver skins, and that upon the first 
of August, new style, next coming; wherefore the respective parties for 
the performance of these covenants, put themselves in subjection to all 
laws and judges. 

Thus done, without craft or guile, on this if of April, A. D. 1665, in 
presence of Arent Vanden Berg, as witness, hereto called. Done in 
Albany. 

This is the mark W of JocHiM Kettelheym, 

with his own hand set. 
This is the mark -j- of Gabriel Tomassen, 
with his own hand set. 
This is the mark 0/ A B Aroid Van Bergh, loith his own hand set. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Inasmuch as Jan Clute,^ and Jan Hendrickse Bruyn, and Juriaen 
Teunise [Glazemaecker]^ have shown at the session of the court at 
Albany, the consent, at their request, of the governor of New York and 
of the Indians, to purchase a certain parcel of land, lying on the west side 
of the North river, over against the Claverrack, near Fort Albany, so 
there have appeared before him the underwritten, secretary of Albany, 
five Indians (wildeii), namely: Sachamoes, Mawinata, alias Schermer- 
hoorn, Keesie Wey, Papeuna, Masseha, owners of the above mentioned 
land, and also having a commission from the other owners; who declared, 
in the presence of the after named witnesses, that they had sold, granted 
and conveyed, as by these presents they do grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to the behoof of the aforesaid Jan Cloet and Jan Hen- 
drickse Bruyn, the said land, called Caniskek ; in magnitude stretching 
along the river side from the land of Pieter Bronck to the vale, which lies 
on the point of the mainland, behind the Beeren island, named Macha- 
wameck, and so running into the woods, both on the south and the north, 
even to the Katskil path ; and that for a certain sum in goods (cargasoen) 
which the grantors acknowledge that they have received from the buyers 
and therewith are completely paid ; and [said grantors] waive their former 



1 In 1662 Gabriel Thomase Stridles hired out to Thomas Powell, for two years, at bread- 
making for 22 beavers ($70.40) and found. In 1665 he hired a house of Jochim Kettelhuyn, and 
probably commenced business for himself. He had four children baptized in Albany, and two in 
New York, whither he removed about 1690. He died there iu 1718. 

2 Captain John Clute came to Beverwyck, about 1656 ; he was a trader and considerable land- 
holder at Loonenbara;h (now Athens), Niskaynna, Albany, etc., and had great influence with the 
Indian inhabitants. It is not known that he had any family. He came oriLrinally from Neuren- 
burg; and, oifhis death, about 16&3, his property passed to his nephew, Johannes Clute, the 



ffisf. Coll Hi. 10 



74 Albany County Records. 

title [to said land], and declare Jan Clute and Jan Hendrickse [Bruyn]' 
to be the rightful owners thereof; and promise to free said land from all 
actions, cla?ms and demands of other Indians, who might sinisterly lay 
claim to some portion of said land, or the right to set deer traps. 

Done in Albany in the presence of Harmen Bastiaense [Visscher] and 
Hendrick Gerritse as witnesses hereto called, on this 20th of April, A. D. 
1665, old style. 

This is the mark of Keesiewey +, with his own hand set. 

This is the mark of Sachamoes f^:::;^ y^\i\i his own hand set. 

This is the mark of Papeuna "O" with his own hand set. 
This is the mark of Massehas ^<^ with his own hand set. 
This is the mark of Mawinata W-j alias Schermerhorn, 

^^ with his own hand set. 

Harmen Bastiaense, as witness. 

Bendrick Gerritsen {Van Wie'], as ivitness. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of the jurisdiction 
of Albany, in the presence of Capt. John Manning,- one of the Mohican 
Indians, named Wattawit, owner of a certain parcel of land lying behind 
Kinderhook, who declared in the presence of Jan Dareth,^ interpreter, 
that he had sold, granted and conveyed to Evert Luycasse [Backer],' as 
by these presents he does [grant and convey] his aforesaid land lying on 
the east side of the kil, being the half of the middle piece; the other 
half he declared he gave to Volckert Janse [Douw], and had presented 
it to him as a token of his friendship and in satisfaction of an old debt 
for maize ; also the grantor waives his [claim] to said middle piece on the 
east of the kil, declaring Evert Luycasse and Volckert Janse to be the 
rightful owners of the same, and acknowledges that he has had of Evert 
Luycasse perfect satisfaction for his part, and [promising] to free it from 
all claims and demands which hereafter maybe [made against the same]. 
Done in Fort Albany the 6th of May, A. D. 1665, old style. 

This is the mark of Wattawit _- -e- with his own hand set. 

Musqxiaemseeck (^^ '^^'^ mark icith his oion 

hand set, as witness. 
Oramp Q ^^^ mark made with his own hand set, as witness. 

Jan Dareth, 
John Manning. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



1 Jan Henclrickse Brujni, or De Bruyn, had au uncertain residence. In 1678, in answer to the 
sheriff forbidding him to trade with the Indians on the ground that he was a New Yorker, he 
alleged that he had been a burgher of Albany for upwards of twenty years, notwithstanding the 
court adjudged that he should be prohibited from trade because he had not kept "fire and 
lio-ht " in Albany for one whole year ; to which Bruyn protested.— English Manuscripts. 
"5 Capt. John Manning was sheriff of New York at this time. 

s Jan Dareth from Utrecht, married Ryckje Van Dyck in New Amsterdam, in 1654, and in 1657 
bought a house and lot in Beverwyck, where he became a permanent resident. 

4 Evert Luycasse Backer, was in Beverwyck as early as 1657. In 1680, witlf Laurens Van 
Alen he petitioned for an additional tract of land behind Kinderhook.— English Manuscripts. 



Albany County Records. 75 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of the jurisdiction of 
Albany and in the presence of the after named witnesses, Jan Gerntsen 
Van Marcken 1 who declared by these presents that he had granted and con- 
veyed to and for the behoof of Harmen Rutgers"^ and Volckert Janse 
FDouwl - the following sums of money seewant (drawn off from the assignor s 
account book), to be received from the under mentioned persons making 
payment to him. Jan Gerritsen Van Marcken, by a deduction of such a 
sum of money as he owes to the aforesaid Harmen Rutgers and Volckert 
Janse provided said Harmen Rutgers and Volckert Janse hold open the 
suits of those persons from whom they can collect no money by reason ot 
a denial of debt or a failure to pay ; but these shall remain as a charge to 
the assignor ; promising this assignment truly to keep under a pledge ot 
their persons and estates, personal and real. 

The debtors or assigned sums are these : 

Kleynde Goyer [the thrower], / 37.13 

Henderick Hendericksen ^ [Bakker], / j»l^ 

Poulus Cornelissen,5 • / ^-^-^^ 

ditto, also some money detained by him belonging to 

Kleyn Keesie [little Cornelius], / 00-^0 

Jan [Roeloffse] de Goyer, f 91-^« 

Pieter the Frenchman, '^' / °^-y^ 

Hendrickthe Spaniard, / ^^-j^ 

Hans the Norman, / ^'^l 

Jan the little cooper,^ / ^^-^-l 

Tys Barentse,- / ^J,^ 

Poutien the sash-maker, / ^'^-^^ 

Storm Albertse [Bratt],'' / ^-^^ 

Pieter Bronck, / ^"^^ 

JanNak,io / f_^^- 

Elias Van Ravensteyn, • • / ^'•^' 

1 Jan Gerritse Van Marcken and Ws wife, Geertje Hiiybertse, came o^^f^"^ the ship St. Jacob 

ki Tlbanv Col Douw first located on Papskna'e island, and had three houses and a brewery 

"' Henderick Hendcrlckse, tie baker, wa. Hoed and problblted from following Us trade lo 
'".'S&SnS 'w«??„^',£te'rt^;rai!?;,r.cT|'Sa Oo.arell.e Vaad.r Ee,<,en, 

was ao-ent for Maritie Myndertse, widow of Jan Barentse Wemp. 

^fS'rns^^^SriSrwTcSTS^k.,,^ «f j-f ?'i^^^r,^[L^i'icSLSr 

now state street. His wife was Neeltie Clause, widow ol Henderick Gardeniei ot Schenectady. 
Thev had four daughters, but no sons. ^ ■ -.aoa 

« TVS Barentse Schoonmaker Van Edam, came to Beverwyck m 1636. 

9 itnrm AlhpvtH Bratt alias Vanderzee, son of Andriese Bratt De Noorman, v. ab born at sea m 
a storm™ ence'he was called Stornf Vanderzee, and many, if not all of Ms desceodants, assumed 



76 Albany County Records. 

Albert De Normaa,i / 15.10 

Claes Jansen, / 31.19 

Claes Vanden Bergb,- / 3.16 

Claes Van llotterdam, / 26.19 

Luycas Pieterse [Coeymans]," / 31.07 

Sander Leendertse [Grlen], / 13.06 

William Martense Moer [negro ? ], / 21.10 

William Hoffmeyer, / 10.04 

Paulus de Boer [the boor], / 11.00 

Walrave Claerhout, / 3.15 

The said assignor, Jan Gerritsen, also by these presents, appoints and 
empowers the aforesaid Harmeu Rutgers and Volckert Janse the aforesaid 
sums to collect, demand and receive ; acquittance to pass for receipts, and in 
case of neglect payment to exact by law, and the severity of justice to a 
definitive sentence and execution. Thus done [without] craft or guile on 
this ^ June, 1665, in Albany, in presence of Gerrit Swart -^ and Jan 
Bastiaense van Gutsenhoven as witnesses called hereto. 

J. G. V. Marcken. 
G. Swart. 
Jan Bastiaensen Van Gutsenhooven. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Albany, and in 
the presence of Jan Van Aken and Jacob Schermerhoorn, commissaries 
of the same jurisdiction, Tennis Cornelissen,'^ who declared that he had 
granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in 
real and actual possession to and for the behoof of Jan Evertse,^^ his heirs 
or assigns, a house and lot lying in the town of Albany, bounded on the 
north by Symon Volckertse [Veeder, alias De Backer]," and on the south 
by Willem [Frederickse] Bout, on the east by the street ; of such mag- 
nitude as the grantor possesses, and as it lies encompassed by the fence 
between the said Willem Bout and Symon Volckers, with a garden in 
the rear as it also lies in fence, being the whole patent, given to the 
grantor by the director general and council of New Netherland, of date 
April 23d, A. D. 1652, about seven rods in breadth, and in length to the 
fence of the garden, which was separated and sold to the behoof of Jacques 
Tyssen, deceased,^ and Willem Bout ; further the grantor waives all his 
title or claim [to said house and lot], and also acknowledges that he is 
completely paid and satisfied for the aforesaid house, lot and garden, with 
the number of two and twenty beavers, and promises the grantee to free 
the same from all claims and demands, which may hereafter come against 

1 Albert Andriesse Bratt. For an account of him, see O'Callaghan's History of Mto Nether- 
land., I, 435. 

2 Three brothers (?) Van den Berg settled in Beverwyck, viz ; Gysbert, Gerrit and Claas, all of 
whom left sons. Claas had at least one son, Cornells, who married Susanna Ouderkerk, and had 
a family of six children. 

3 For an account of the Coeyman's family, see O'Callaghan's IListwy of New Netherland, i, 435. 
■i Gerrit Swart was appointed sheriff of Rensselaerswyck in 1652, and held the office until 

1670.— 0' CallagharCs History of Neiv Nethet-kmd, ii, 184. 

5 This was so common a name that it is impossible to know what was his surname. 

8 One Jan Evertse [Schoemaker], was complained of for smuggling shoes in 1661. — Dutch 
Manuscripts. 

' Symon Volkertse Veeder, alias De Backer, was among the earliest settlers of Schenectady. 
All those who bear this name in this vicinity are his descendants. 

8 Jacques Tyssen Van der Heyden ? 



Albany County Records. l^J 

the same ; binding his person and estate, personal and I'eal, present and 
future, and submitting himself to all judges and laws. 
Done in Albany, the If July, A. D. 1665. 

This is the mark ^ of Teunis Cornelisse, 

with his own hand set. 
Jan Koster [Faw AkeTi]. 

Inventory of the goods of Jan Reyersen,i deceased, taken on the yacht 
of Gerrit Visbeeck,'^ if July, A. D. 1665. 

Found in a great chest. 
1 tin mug, 1 tin cup, 3 spoons, 1 tin beaker, 
1 tankard- tin, 1 smoothing iron, 1 little copper pan, 
1 chopping knife, 1 tin platter, 2 copper basins, 

1 iron candlestick, 2A ells of red calico {dosyntiens), 

2 prs. new Icelandish stockings, 

2 prs. old ditto, 

1 valance with 2 curtains, 

35 articles, caps, neckkerchiefs, santees'^ and handkerchiefs, 3 shirts of 

coarse cloth, and a parcel of old ragged clothes, 
an iron pot with a cook pan, 
1 salt box and a candle box, 
1 pothook, 2 forks, with a handle (een greep), 

3 sichten with a mathoeck,^ 1 schinckeP of a waggon, 

4 old horseshoes, 2 iron wedges, 

1 bail of a pail, 1 old spade, 1 copper kettle, 

2 iron bands for a cart, 3 axes, 

1 mattock, 1 pail, 2 torch holders, 

1 ploughshare, 1 sack of wheat meal, 

1 butter pot (?) with some butter therein, 

1 little tub of corn meal, 

1 great earthern pot of peas (?), 

1 bed bolster, and 2 pillows and a blanket, 

1 milk tub, 1 empty tub, 1 old wooden bowl, 

1 small basket {mantle) and pot of fresh butter, 

a white coverlet. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Albany, and in 
presence of Jacob Schermerhooren and Jan Van Aken, magistrates of 
the same jurisdiction, Claes Janse Timmermau, citizen here, who declared 
that he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant 
and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Andries 
Jochimsen, dwelling at New York, his heirs or assigns, a house and lot '^ 



1 Jan Reyersen came to Beverwyck iu 1637. He succeeded Rykert Rntgersen in the posses- 
sion of the Bethlehem island in 1652, and gave his name to it.— 0' Callaghan's History of Neio 
Netherlands i, 437. „ ,. 

2 Gerrit Visbeeck, in 1673, sold land in Claverack to Jan Hendi'ik Van Salsbcrgeu.— ^wj^^z^A 
Manuscripts. , ^ , . ., , , 

3 Santee, or gezondheid, is a flannel worn about the abdomen and loins, as a sanitary bandage. 
1 These compose an instrument used in cutting buckwheat. 

5 This belongs to a peculiar kind of wagon, used only in two or three provinces of Holland, 
and is of iron. 

« This lot was on the east side of North Pearl street, second south of Steuben, and ran through 
to James street in the rear. 



78 Albany County Records. 

lying in the village of Albany, bounded on tLe north by Jan Verbeeck's, 
to the south by Stoffel Janse [Abeel],' east and west by the street; breadth 
front and rear thirty wood feet, and length one hundred and fifty-two 
wood feet and a half, which lot is a part of the patent granted by the 
director general and council to Jan Tomasse [Mingael ?] of date 23d of 
April, A. D. 1652 ; and the grantor acknowledged that he was fully satis- 
fied and paid for the sale and conveyance of the same, and therefore he 
promises the aforesaid house and lot to free from all actions, claims and 
demands which hereafter may be made ; binding his person and estate, 
personal and real, present and future, putting himself in subjection to all 
laws and judges. 

Done in Albany the 3d of August, A. D. 1665, old style. 

Claes Janse. 

Jacob Schermerliooren. 

Jan Koster [ Van Aken]. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretai-y of the jurisdiction 
of Albany, and in the presence of Hon. Jacob Schermerhooren and Jan 
Coster Van Aecken, magistrates of the same jurisdiction, Jochim Wesselse 
Backer, citizen of the aforesaid place, who declared that by virtue of a 
conveyance from Francis Boon, 17th July, 1664, he had granted and 
conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession to and for the behoof of David Pieterse Schuyler, his 
heirs, or those who may receive title from him, a house and lot lying in 
the village of Albany, bounded on the east, west and south by the king's 
highway, and on the north the house of Gillis Pieterse,- and of such size 
as it lies inclosed in fence, with all the right and jurisdiction which he, 
the grantor, has therein, which lot was granted by patent to Jacob Hen- 
drickse Sibinck and Stofi"el Janse [Abeel], of date 25th October, A. D. 
1653 5 and the grantor acknowledges that he is paid and fully satisfied 
for the sale and delivery, and therefore promises to free the aforesaid 
house and lot from all actions, claims or demands, which hereafter may be 
made ; pledging his person and estate, personal and real, present and 
future, submitting the same to all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany the 8th of August, 1665, old style. 

JocHEM Backer. 
Jacob Schermerhooren. 
Jan Koster [ Van Aken'\. 

Conditions and terms, according to which the administrators of the 
effects of the late Jan Reyersen propose to sell to the highest bidder at a 
public sale, two horses and two calves, two old heavy (Joggen') hogs, 
together with some other articles of farming utensils and furniture. The 
payment for the beasts, horses and hogs, also the bed, bolster and pillows, 
shall be made in good whole merchantable beavers, and that on the first 
of June, A. D. 1666, or otherwise in good strung seewant, beaver's price, 
at 21 guilders the beaver, which last payment shall be made on the 1st of 

1 stoffel Janse Abeel, master carpenter, was in Beverwyck in 1662, perhaps earlier, and died 
before 1684. He made liis will 4th December, 1670, and then speaks of the following children : 
Magdalena, 17 years old ; Maria, 14 years old ; Johannes, 11 years old, and Elizabeth. His wile's 
name was Neeltje Janse Croon. 

2 Gillis Pieterse Timmerman. 



Albany County Records. 79 

April, next coming ; as it respects the farming utensils or furniture, they 
shall be paid for within three days from date in good strung seewant. 
The auction fees become a charge upon the buyer, in payments as aforesaid. 
Besides it is expressly conditioned that no one shall purchase by offsetting 
moneys, which may be due him from said Jan Reyersen, deceased,' but 
shall deliver the purchase money into the hands of the vendue master, 
and await for a pro rata division. The buyer shall be holden to furnish 
two sufficient sureties, jointly and severally, as principals for the purchase 
money, to the content of the seller. 



Tennis Cornelise [Van Vechten], remained the buyer of an old mare, 
according to the above standing conditions, for the sum of one hundred 
and sixty-seven guilders. 

This is the mark ^ of Teunis Cornelise, 

with his own hand set. 
As sureties stood Jan Verbeeck and Dirk Teunisse. 
Jan Verbeeck. 
DiRCK Teunisse [Van Vechten]. 

Cornells Segersen [Van Voorhoudt] remained the last bidder and buyer 
of a young mare for the sum of one hundred and eighty-four guilders, 
and Jan [Janse] Oothout' and Coraelis Cornelisse [Viele] stood sureties 
for him, according to the foregoing conditions. 

CORNELIS SeECtERS. 

Jan Jansen Oothoet. 
This is the mark -}- of Cornelis Cornelisse [Viel^].'- 
with his own hand set. 

Cornelis Van Nes" remained the buyer of an old cow for the sum of 
seventy guilders, and Abram Staets and Jan Koster [Van Aken], stood 
sureties for him, according to the foregoing conditions. 

Cornelis Van Nes. 

Abram Staas. 

Jan Koster. 

[Note]. The 7 April, 1668, Cornelis Van Nes has paid 9 beavers 
and /J 18.10 in seewant, so that there still remains/ 18 in 
beavers. 30 May, Van Nes has paid off the/ 18 in beavers. 

Teunis Dirricxse [Van Vechten]^ remained the buyer of a young cow, 

1 Jan .Janse Oothout was a brewer in Greenbush, and made his will 13 March, 1687-8, and letters 
of administration were issued to his sons, Hendrik and Jan, 3 Jan., 1695-6. {Wills, i). He left 
six children, three sons and three daughters. 

2 Cornelis Cornelise Viele owned tlie lot on the west corner of State and South Pearl streets, 
which in 1673 he sold to Richard Pretty. A little before this (1668), he bought a bouwery in Sche- 
nectady, and settled there. In 1671 he had license to tap strong drink in Schenectady.— Gen. 
Entr., IV, 83. 

3 Cornelis Hendrikse Van Ness came to Beverwyck in 1642. His first wife was a daughter of 
Jan Janse Oothout, the brewer of Greenbush, by whom he had three sons : Henderick, Jan, and 
Gerrit, and perhaps daughters. His second wife was widow Maritie Damens, whose two former 
husbands were Dirk Van Eps, and Hendrik Andriese Van Doesburgh. 

^ Florin, equivalent to guilder, i. e., 40 cts. 

5 Teunis Dirkse Van Vechten is said to have come to Beverwyck in 1638, with wife, child, and 
two servants, and had a farm at Greenbush. Four of his children were living in 1700, viz. : Dirk 
Teunisse, Cornelis, Gerrit, andPietertje, who married Myndert Frederickse Smith. 



80 Albany County Records. 

for the sum of eighty guilders, and Jan Koster [Van Aken], and Jan 
Oothout stood as sureties, according to the foregoing conditions. 

The mark of Theunis + Dirrixse, with his own hand set. 

Jan Koster. 

Jan Jansen Oothouet. 

Jan Verbeeck remained the buyer of a bull calf for thirteen guilders, 
and Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick], stood as surety, according to the 
above conditions. Jan Verbeeck. 

GoosEN Gerritsen. 

Ryck Claes [Van Vranken],i remained the buyer of a boar (teeryerA;e), 
and that for nine guilders, and Barent Reyndersen- stood as surety, 
according to the above conditions. 

Ryck Claessen. 

Barent Reyndersen. 

Jan Evertse remained the buyer of a bull calf for eleven guilders; 
surety therefor Cornelis Bos. 

The mark of Jan -j- Everts, with his own hand set. 

Cornelis Van Nes was the buyer of a sow, for twenty guilders. 

Symon [Volkertse Veeder De] Backer'^ remained the buyer of a sow 
for four and twenty guilders ; surety therefor Wouter Arentse. 

The mark of Symon -|- Volkertse, by him set. 
The mark of + Wouter Arentse, by him set. 

Gerrit Bancken became the buyer of a boar for eight guilders. 
Cornelis Theunissen Bos became the buyer of a little boar for eleven 
guilders. Gerrit Bancker. 

Harmen Vedper.4 

Jan Janse Ouderkerk became the buyer of a bed with its appurtenances 
for eight and fifty guilders ; sureties therefor. Storm Albertse [Bratt] 
and Eldert Gerbertse. 

Jan Janse Ouderkerk.^ 
Eldert Gerbertse Cruiff.'^ 
Storm Van der Zee.^ 



1 Two brothers, Gerrit and Ryckert Claes Van Vranken, sons of Claas Van Vranken, early- 
bought laud In Niskayv;na. From these have descended the families of the name in this vicinity. 

2 Barent Reynderseu bought a house and lot inBeverwyck in VS^l.— Deeds, i, 77, 161. 

3 Symon Volkertse Veeder De Backer, was one of the early settlers of Schenectady. He had 
four sons: Peter, Gerrit, Johannes, and Volkert, all of whom left families; also three daughters. 
The seven he speaks of in his will, made Jan. 8th, 1696-7. 

4 Harmen Albertse Vedder was also one of the first settlers of Schenectady, where he bought 
a bouwery in 1672. Previously he was a trader in Albany. He had five sons and one daughter, 
all of whom were living in 1715, and heads of families. 

5 Jan Janse Ouderkerk, " de smalle kuyper," lived on the north side of Yonker, now State 

« In 1657. Eldert Gerbertse Cruift" was prosecuted for defaming Ulderick Kle}'n's wife ; the next 
year he was again brought before the court for calling Jochim Kettlehuyn a i\Aei. — Dutch 
Manuscnpts. „ „ . , . „ ^ 

' Storm Albertse Vander Zee, cdias Bratt, was the son of Albert Andriese Bratt De Noorman, 
who settled early in Beverwyck, and gave the name to the Norman's kil. Storm was born in a 
storm at sea, and hence he was called Storm Van der Zee, which name he and his descendants 
have since borne.— 0' CaUaghan's Histoi^y of New Netherland, i, 433 - 4. 



Albany County Records. 81 

Goods of Jan Ryersen, deceased, sold at public sale, to be paid for in 
good strung seewant, in the space of three days : 

Jan Janse Ouderkerk, debit, 

1 chopping knife and some of^her things, / 8.00 

1 coverlet, / 20.00 



28.00 

Symon [Veeder] De Backer, debit, 

1 coverlet, / 26.00 

Jan Evertse Schoonmaker, debit, 

1 coverlet, / 16.00 

Young Keesie [Cornelius], debit, 

a pot hanger and a pan, / 18.00 

a plough share and schinckels for a cart, / 20.00 

Poulus Martense [Van Benthuysen],i 

1 pot (?) with a little butter therein, / 10.10 

some trumpery for, / 6.00 

1 old box, / 7.00 

a parcel of old linnen, „ / 8.00 

31.10 

Meester (Doctor) Cornelius Van Dyck,2 

an old kettle and salt tub, / 12.00 

Cornells Teunisse Bos, debit, 

4 horse shoes, two wedges, and other things for, / 26.00 

also some trumpery, f 27.00 

to linnen goods, / 11.07 



64.07 



Dirck Wesselse [Ten Broeck], debit, 
a can, , / 5.00 

Jacob Flodder lalias Gardenier],-^ 

3 sichten and two torch holders, / 16.10 

also to a bolster, / 20.00 



/ 36.10 

Jan Cornelise, 1 grindstone, ,- / 29.00 

Jacob Engel, 2 axes, and an adze, / 16.00 

Jan Gauw, 1 bag of maize meal, and one tub of wheat meal, / 12.10 

1 Panlus Mai'tense Van Benthuysen was the first of his name in Beverwyck. He had three 
sons : Baltus, Bareut, and Marten, who settled in Schenectady. They all left families. 

2 Doctor Van Dyck was a son of Hendrik Van Dyck, of New Amsterdam, who was Gov. 
Stuyvesant's schout fiscal for a time. Conielius studied medicine with Jacob D'Hiuse, who gave 
him a certificate of four years' study in the business of chirurgie.— Notarial Papers, i, p. 91. In 
1687, he was deceased. He had two wives : the last, Elizabeth Beck, widow of Capt. Sylvester 
Salisbury. He left two sons, Hendrick and Jacobus, both physicians, and two daughters. 

3 Jacob Flodder, alAas Gardenier, came to Beverwyck in 1638, as servant to Claes Janse 
Ruyter.— <9' Callaghan's History of New Netherlands i, 438. He had two wives : the first, Josyua 

; and the second, Barentie Straetsmans, who was his wife in 1674. She had previously been 

the wife of Uoenraedtse Backer. In 1688, she was a widow again with fifteen living children, ten 
by her first husband and five by the last, and her estate was to be divided into fifteen parts, one 
for each. 

Hist. Coll. iii. 11 



82 Albany County Records. 

Eldert Gerbertse [CruiflF], 

a piece of calico (dosyntiens), f 49.00 

[Note.] paid through Marcels Janse [Van Bommel] a tun 
of beer, / 28; further, paid io the citizens (iitr- 

Jan Clute, 

one kettle, and some iron work, / 13.10 

one little pan and basin, / 19.00 

/ 32.10 
Frans Jansen,i debit, 

1 pair of curtains, f 11.00 

2 copper scales and other things, f 6.00 

/ 17.00 

Mary Hoffmeyer,^ 
1 pewter can, 1 platter, / 25.00 

Cornells Wyncoop, 
a coat and some rubbish for, / 15.10 

Adriaen Van Ilpendam, 
1 chest, / 25.00 

[Total], /507.07 

On the -|§ October, delivered to the administrators of the 
estate of Jan Reyersen the sum of, / 398.07 

deduct for Cornells Teunis Bos, deceased, which was not paid 
because of his death, / 67.11 

/ 330.16 
To young Kees [Cornells], for forage for the beasts, / 6.00 

/336.16 

Terms and conditions on which Willem Hoflfmeyer proposes to sell, at 
once at public sale to the highest bidder, some furniture and goods, 
together with two cows, for which the payment shall be made on Monday 
next, without longer delay, the furniture in good strung seewant, and 
the cows in good whole merchantable beaver's skins ; also the great shot 
gun. The buyer shall be held to furnish sufficient sureties for the pur- 
chase money. The auction fees in payment, to be a charge on the buyer. 

Done the i| October, 1665, Albany. 

Hendrick Meese [Vrooman],'^ a gun, for seewant, / 16.00 

Daniel Rinckhout, a straw cutter (suybanck^') f 15.00 



1 Frans Janse Pruyn is the first of the name who settled in Albany. In 1699, he could not take 
the oath of allegiance, etc., because he was a papist. — Annals of Albany, m, 280. In 1703, he 
owned a lot on the east corner of James street and Maiden lane.— Annals of Albany, it, 183. 

2 Perhaps the wife of Willem Hoffmeyer. 

3 Hendrik Meese, one of the brothers Vrooman, early settled in Schenectady. He had two 
Bons, Jan and Adam, from whom have descended all the families of the name in this vicinity. 
Hendrik Meese was killed Feb. 9, 1090, in the sack of Schenectady, by the French and Indians. 



Albany County Records. 83 

Terms and conditions on whicli Sieur Cornelis Steenwyck i proposes to 
sell at public sale to the highest bidder his house and lot lying in village 
of Albany, on the hill, between Harmen Vedder's and Barent Reyn- 
dersen's. 

****** 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted]. 

Terms and conditions according to which Sieur Cornelis Steenwyck 
proposes to sell at public sale to the highest bidder his house and lot 
lying in the village of Albany, on the hill, between Harmen Vedder's 
and Barent Reyndersen's, as it was received by him by conveyance from 
Rutger Jacobsen, deceased, of date 7 Aug., 1662, new style, which, besides 
this paper, shall be read to the bystanders. 

* * * * * * . 

[This paper was not executed]. 

Conditions and terms on which the administrators of the estate of the 
late Rutger Jacobsen [Van Schoenderwoert], propose to sell at once at 
public sale to the highest bidder some furniture, goods and household 
stuff, for which payment shall be made in good strung seewant, within 
the space of a month ; and it is expressly conditioned that no one shall 
pay by deducting moneys due him from tho aforesaid Rutger Jacobsen, 
but that the buyer shall deliver the money into the hands of the vendue 
master, and wait for a pro rata division. The buyer shall be holden to 
furnish two sufficient sureties for the purchase money. The auction fees 
for the payment aforesaid become a charge to the buyer. 

Done the 9th of December, 1665, old style. 

Claes Lock, a stew pan, f 30.00 

Rycker V. Rgnselaer, a copper kettle, / 10.00 

Mr. (Meesfer, i. e. Doctor), Jacob [D'Hinse],-' a copper kettle,... / 14.10 
Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], 1 ditto (copper kettle), 1 pan, 1 

skimmer and candle {kandel'), y 20 00 

J. Gr. van Ball, 4 earthen platters, f 2.00 

Andries Teller,'^ 3 earthen platters, and 1 ditto little drinking 

cup, / 12.00 

Stoffel Janse [Abeel], 1 tin dish, little cup, and saltcellar, / 14.10 

Jan Viuhagen, 1 child's bed basket (luyermant), and 1 little 

calabash (calhasje), / g.lO 

Jan Clute, one pothook, f 13.00 

Barent Pieterse [Coeymans the miller], a slate with a frame, / 10.00 



1 Cornells Van Steenwyck was a merchant doing business in New York. 

2 Jacob D'Hinse was surgeon and physician in Beverwyck as early as 1656. In 1657 he broueht 
an action against Tomas Powelsen [Powell], for fees ; but the defendant answered by saying that 
he had engaged to attend his family for two beavers ($6.40), a year : the plaintiff assented but 
urged that wounds willfully inflicted were not included in this contract. The case went over ' and 
how settled is not known.— Z»MfcA Manuscripts. He was deacon of the Dutch Keformed Church 
in 1670, and his record of the transactions for that year is preserved in the archives and an 
abstract thereof may be found in Munsell's Historical Collections, i, 33. 

3 Andries Teller was a son of William Teller, the first settler, who was long resident in Albany 
as a trader. Soon after 1690, the whole family removed to New York, except Johannes who 
lived m Schenectady. Andries Teller married Sophia Van Cortland, daughter of Olofl" Stevense 
and had three children, two of whom, Andries and Margareta, were mentioned in their father's' 
will, made in 1702. 



84 Albany County Records. 

Daniel Rinckhout, one ditto without a frame, / 4.00 

Jocbim Wesselse [the baker], Si weyslui/p,^ / 13.00 

Claes Lock, 3 pewter plates, / 14.00 

Cornelus Bogardus,"- a chain pothanger, / 15.10 

Volkert Janse,-^ 2 pewter platters, / 25.00 

Jan Byvanck,' 2 pewter ditto, / 10.00 

Johannes Provoost, 3 earthen platters, / 17.10 

Abram Staets, 5 little earthen ditto, / 16.00 

Daniel Rinckhout, 3 ditto, / 12.10 

John Clute, 3 ditto, / 16.10 

Jan Gr. Bruyn, 9 pewter spoons, / 8.00 

The Heer Renselaer,'^ 3 great wine glasses, / 5.05 

Barent [Pieterse Coeymans], the miller, two old firelocks, / 41.00 

Mons. [Arent Van] Curler, a tap auger, / 7.15 

Barent [Pieterse Coeymans], the miller, two books,.,. f 30.10 

Abram Staets, a parcel of old books, / 17.00 

Juriaen Teunisse [Glazemaecker], a great clothes basket, / 18.10 

Jan Gr. Bruyn, 1 scrub brush (hoende)^ 1 brush, and wooden bowl, / 7.10 

Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], a picture, / 35.00 

Johannes Provoost, 2 little pictures, / 17.10 

Gabriel Tomassen [Stridles], a looking glass, / 43.10 

Philip Pietersen [Schuyler] , a picture, / 100.00 

Mons. Arent Van Curler, one ditto, / 85.00 

Robert Sandersen [Sanders]," one ditto, / 36.00 

Arent Van Curler, an earthern pot, / 8.05 

Loweis Cobussen , an ash shovel, / 4.00 

Daniel Rinckhout, a piece of lace, / 10.10 

Fraus Janssen [Pruyn], / 8.05 

Robert Sandersen [Sanders], 2 andirons, / 20.00 

Jan Clute, a table, ,/ 10.05 

Cornells Teunisse Bos, 1 silk wagon cover (foersJdeet,') ; / 97.00 

Barent [Pieterse Coemans], the miller, 1 pair stockings with a 

pair of breeches, / 15.00 

Jan G. V. Bael, 3 chair cushions, / 18.00 

Juriaen Teunisse [Glazemaecker], a chimney hanging, / 9.00 



> This was an instrument similar to a harrow, for passing over the ground in spring to level 
mole hills. 

2 Cornells Bogardus was the second eon of the famous Anneke Janse and her second husband, 
Do. Everhardus Bogardus, of New Amsterdam, and was baptized 9 Sept., 1640. He married 
Helena, daughter of William Teller, of Albany, where he resided until his death in 1660. His 
movable property sold at public sale, on the 14-24 Sept., 1666, amounted to 3015 guilders, a 
large sum for the times. He left one son, Cornelis, who married Rachel De Wit, and died in 1707. 

3 Captain Volkert Janse Douw. 

■> Jan Byvang or Byvauck was born in 1634, in Oldenzeel, Holland ; in Oct., 1666, he married 
Bolitje Evertse Duyching, in New York. Only three of their children are registered in the 
Albany church books, viz: Hendericus, baptized 20 Feb., 16&4; Gerrit, 17 May, 1686; Maria, 
12 Feb., 1688. In 1692 he married his second wife, Sara Frans, of New York. 

5 Jeremias Van Rensselaer, "who succeeded his brother, Jan Baptist, as director of the 
colony, in 1658, and administered its affairs for sixteen years, with great prudence and 
discretion."— 0' Callaghan's History of Neio Netherlands ii, 551. 

" Robert Sanders, son of Thomas Sanders, Jr., of Amsterdam, and Sarah Cornelise Van Gorcnm, 
of New Amsterdam : was baptized in New Amsterdam, 10 Nov., 1641. He was a trader, and had 

two wives : Ist, Elsie Barentse ; 2nd, Alida ; and one son, Barent, besides daughters. In 1691 

lie obtained a patent, in connection with Myndert Vander Bogart, for a mile square of land, in 
Dutchess county, including the site of the present city of Poughkeepsie. He is mentioned in the 
Journal of Jasper Danckers and Peter Sluyter, 1670, at lonsiderable length {,Loncj Island 
Historical Society Collections, i); and his name often occurs in Muusell's Historical Collections, 
vol. I, as late as 1692. 



Albany County Records. 85 

Lowies Cobus, a chair, / 12.10 

Hans de Poolt, for Volkert, a safe for provisions (eetens kasse,')/ 9.00 

Teunis Grerrits Verwey [or Van Wie], a chest, / 28.10 

Mr. IDoctor} Jacob [D'Hinse], a table, / 2.05 

[Total], /983.10 

We, the undersigned, acknowledge, that we have received from the 
hands of the receiver Johannes Provoost the sum of nine hundred and 
eighty-three guilders and ten stuivers, on account of the estate of the late 
Rut Jacobsen, arising from the household stuff sold. 
Done 14" Jan., 166f , Albany. 

R. V. Renselaer. 
Jan Van Bael. 



The administrators, as before, of said estate of Rut Jacobsen, propose 
now to sell some silver ware and gold jewels, the payment for which 
shall be made in good whole merchantable beaver's skins, to be paid in 
the space of two months from date ; and it is conditioned as before, that 
no money shall be deducted by reason of an account contra. The buyer 
shall be holden to furnish sufficient sureties for the purchase money. In 
paying, the auction fees become a charge against the buyer as before. 

9tli December, 1665, old style. 

Abram Staets, a pair of favors (s^r«X'i-en), f 20.17 

J. Provoost, one ditto, / 25.16 

Jan Clute, a gold ring, / 15.10 

Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], a fine ring {roossens ringh), / 18.00 

Jeremias V. Renselaer, one diamond ring, / 17.00 

Immetie De Baxter, 2 half bari'els {inand,) / 7.08 

Jeremias Van Renselaer, 1 double ring (^dubbelde Jioep), / 26.00 

Idem, a gold bodkin (Jiaernaelt), / 29.00 

Idem, a gold chain, / 80.00 

Idem, a silver dish {schael'), / 24.00 

Abram Staets, a silver salt cellar, / 16.16 

Ryckert Van Renselaer, i 4 silver spoons, f 30.00 

Arent Van Curler, a silver beaker, / 68.00 

Abram Staets, a silver beaker, / 52.13 

Andries Teller, 4 silver spoons, / 31.00 

Jeremias Van Renselaer, 6 ditto mannetiens,- / 51.00 



/ 512.14 

We, the undersigned, acknowledge, that we have received from the 
hands of the receiver, Johannes Provoost, the sum of five hundred and 
twelve guilders and fourteen stuivers, beaver money, for the gold and 
silver ware sold. 

fl Jan., 166f, Albany. R. V. Renselaer. 

Jan Van Bael. 



I Ryckert Vau Rensselaer, brother of Jeremias, the patroon. 
- That is, having a human figiire engraved upon them. 



86 Albany County Records. 

Terms and conditions on which Jacob Schermerhooren, attorney for 
Pieter Symonse [Van Oostsanen], proposes to sell at public sale, to tlie 
highest bidder, the yacht [sloop], that Rutger Jacobsen, deceased, com- 
manded, by virtue of a mortgage, with such appurtenances, as are below 
mentioned. Said yacht shall be delivered to the buyer, within the space 
of 24 hours, and with it shall be delivered a mizzen sail and foresail, 
mizzen and foresail falls, both the sheets, a lift, a pulley, an anchor with a 
cable, grapple rope, the Prince's flag, a pair of oars, a boat, which is said 
to have floated away to the other side of the river, and to lay under the 
snow, and is there at the command of the buyer, who has to look for the 
same. Payment shall be made in good whole merchantable beaver skins, 
or failing in that in good strung current seewant, at 25 guilders a beaver, 
in two installments; the first, half in June, A. D. 1666, and the second 
installment also a half in June, A. D. 1667. The buyer shall be holden 
to furnish two sufficient sureties, jointly and severally, as principals, and 
that immediately, to the content of the seller. If the buyer can not fur- 
nish the aforesaid sureties in the aforesaid time, then the aforesaid yacht 
shall be offered for sale again at his cost and charge, and whatever less it 
comes to be worth, he shall be held to make good, and whatever more it 
happens to be valued at, he shall derive no profit therefrom. The auction 
fees for the payment, as above mentioned, are accounted a charge against 
the buyer, in specie. According to the before mentioned conditions, 
Daniel Rinckhout remained the highest bidder and buyer, for the sum of 
two hundred and fifty-nine guilders, for the payment of which Jan Ver- 
beeck and Juriaen Teunisse [Glazemaecker] stood for him as sureties and 
principals, according to the aforesaid conditions. 

Done in Albany, the 18th of December, 1665, old style. 

Daniel Ringhout. 

Jan Verbeeck. 

jurejan tunse. 

Goods of Stoflfel Janse [Abeel],i sold for the behoof of the poor, to be 
paid in good strung seewant, on the first of March, 1666. 

Done the 18th December, 1665. 

Antony Janse, a black coat (toerse, coarse cloth), / 127.00 

Antony Janse, a ditto cloak, / 34.00 



/ 161.00 



Terms and conditions on which the attorney of Peter Hartgers- pro- 
poses to sell at public sale, to the highest bidder, the house of said Peter 
Hartgers, which was overturned by the ice. ***** 

[This paper is imperfect and unexecuted]. 

Terms and conditions on which the attorney of Pieter Hartgers pro- 
poses to sell, at public sale, to the highest bidder, the .house of the said 
Hartgers, which has been overturned by the ice. The aforesaid overturned 

1 Stoffel Janse Abeel was not deceased until after 1670, in which year he made his will. 

2 Pieter Hartgers Van Vee come over in 1643, and first settled in Fort Orange in 1654 as 
commisBary or magistrate. He returned to Holland, where he died in 1670.— 0' Callaghmi's 
History of New Netherkmd, i 441. He married Sytje Roeloflse, daughter of the famous 
Anneke Janse, by whom he had two daughters : Jannetie, and Rachel. 



Albany County Records. 87 

house shall be delivered to the buyer as it lies, upon the lot, with the iron, 
appendages and dependencies of the same, and wheresoever any part of 
the woodwork may have been driven, the buyer shall seek for, and gather 
together the same. The payment shall be made in good current seewant, 
to be paid within ten months from this date. The buyer shall be held 
to furnish two sufficient sureties, jointly and severally, as principals, and 
if the buyer cannot furnish the aforesaid sureties, then the aforesaid 
house shall be offered for sale again at his cost and charge, and whatever 
less it becomes worth, he shall be holden to make good, and whatever 
more it becomes worth, he shall derive no profit therefrom. In paying 
as above, the auction fees become a charge to the buyer. 

Done April 12th, 1666. 

The highest bid was/ 160, by Geurt Henderickse [Van Schoonhoveu]. 

Terms and conditions on which Gerrit Slichtenhorsti proposes to sell 
to the highest bidder, at public sale, his pan tile shed, to wit, the fallen pan 
tile kiln. All the wood and iron work that belongs to the aforesaid shed 
shall be delivered to the buyer as it lies upon the lot, and as it respects 
what has been swept off (by the ice and water), the buyer must search for 
the same at his own risk ; likewise the buyer shall receive the tiles, which 
are in the aforesaid shed; all of which the buyer may at once begin to 
remove from the lot and use at his pleasure. ***>!<* 

[This paper was not executed]. 

Terms and conditions on which the house and lot, and some furniture 
and goods of the late Cornelis Bogardus, shall he sold. The house and 
lot, situate here in Albany, shall be delivered to the buyer, free and unen- 
cumbered, according to the conveyance thereof, of date -^ May, 1666, to 
which reference is made, and which shall be read to the bystanders. 
The buyer, or bidder, shall occupy the aforesaid house and lot on the first 
day of November, first coming, new style. The payment therefor shall be 
made in two installments, half beavers, half seewant; the seewant 
reckoned at 25 guilders the beaver ; the first payment, or the first half, 
on the first of November aforesaid, and the remaining half in the month 
of July, A. D. 1667, at which time the aforesaid house and lot shall be 
conveyed to the buyer. The buyer, or bidder, of the furniture and goods, 
shall pay for the same in seewant, at the price at which they bought 
them, or bid them off, within the space of six weeks. The buyer, or 
bidder, shall not have the power to deduct, or hold back the price, under 
any pretext whatsoever. The buyer, or bidder, shall be holden to 
furnish sufficient sureties, for what he buys or bids off, to the content of 
the administrators, failing of which the same shall again be offered for 
sale, and sold at his cost and risk. The auction fees become a charge 
against the buyer. 

Household stuff of Cornelis Bogardus, sold, according to the conditions, 
^ September, 1666, to be paid in good strung seewant, within six weeks. 

1 Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst was son of Brant Arentse Van Slichtenhorst, and came to Rens- 
selaerswyck with his father, in 1646, from Nieuwkerk, Gelderlaod. For a short time he served 
as schout fiscal, also as magistrate, at Schenectady, in 167-2. Afterwards he removed to Kings- 
ton, where he died in 1684. He married Aeltie Lansing, of Beverwyck.— 6>' Callaghan's 
History of Neiv Netlierland, ii, 69. 



88 Albany County Records. 

Jan G. Bruyu, 2 pewter platters, for, / 21.00 

Idem, a ditto porridge dish, and one ditto platter, / 29.10 

Jan Janse Bleycker, i 3 great pewter platters, / 56.00 

Jan Clute, 6 pewter plates, / 31.00 

Dirk Hesselingh,-^ 6 ditto, new, / 39.00 

Jan Wolsengracht, one pewter salt cellar, and one ditto mustard 

pot, / 12.05 

Tomas the drummer (de tamboer), 1 pewter pot and 6 spoons,... / 10.00 

Jan Vinhagen, 5 little earthen platters, / 9.50 

Mr. [Doctor'] Adriaen, 2 earthen bowls, / 7.00 

Jan Janse Bleeker, 2 ditto, / 8.05 

Barent the shoemaker, 3 great earthen platters, / 26.10 

Wouter, the baker, 1 earthen bowl, and 2 ditto platters, / 30.00 

Jan Clute, 2 little pictures, / 16.00 

Idem, 3 pictures, / 34 00 

Aernout Cornelise [Viele], 2 little pictures, / 17.00 

Jan Bleycker, a framed Ql^st) almanac, [or calendar,] / 10.15 

Abraham Staets, a looking glass, / 31.00 

Joachim Kettel [huyn], 1 earthen pot, and 1 ditto colander, / 7.00 

Philip Schuyler, a little iron pot, / 23.10 

Aernout Cornelise [Viele], an earthen cheesepot, / 3.10 

Abraham Staets, 3 ditto pots, / 12.00 

Harmen Metselaer, a copper kettle, / 10.00 

Geertie Bouts,'' a copper kettle, i / 9.05 

J. Provoost, a pothook, and a copper pan, , / 11.05 

H. Rooseuboom,i 1 little copper pan, and 2 iron candlesticks,.../ 11.05 

Robert Sandarsen, an old innosent,^ f 32.10 

Gabriel Tomassen [Stridles], an old serge {saryie) garment, / 30.00 

Jan Corneel, soldier, a leather and a cloth breeches, / 36.10 

Jan Clute, a copper mortar, and a brush, / 30.00 

Abram Staets, a woolen garment, / 45.00 

Henderick Lansingh,'^ a black grogram garment, / 205.00 

Gabriel Tomassen [Stridles], a pair of black silk stockings, / 24.10 

Do. Staets, 2 blue waistcoats, / 28.05 

Harmen Vander Bos [Bogart?], a little white coat of napped 

cloth, / 30.00 

Dirck Hesselingh, 2 old hats, / 10.00 

Jan Bleecker, a pair of old white silk stockings, / 16.00 



1 Jan Janse Bleecker, came from Meppel, province of Overyssel, in 1658. He was a trader, 
and filled many Important civil offices, the last of which was that of mayor in the city, in 
1700-1. He married Margaret, daughter of Rutger Jacobsen, by whom he had a family of nine 
children. He died in 1732, at the age of ninety-one years, and she the year following, in her 
eighty-seventh year. 

2 Dirk Hesselingh was a resident of Schenectady for a time. In 1673 he sold his bouwery 
to Harmen Vedder. Robert Hesselingh (perhaps a brother), was killed in Schenectady, Feb. 
9 1690. in the sack of the place, by the French and Indians. 

3 Geertie Bouts was, perhaps, a resident in Schenectady, in 1690, when her adopted son 
Stephen was carried away captive by the French and Indians. 

•> Hendrik Roseboom, the first settler, was the voorlezer and sexton of the church. In 1674 
he brought a suit, to recover his fees, against a man, who had employed the grave digger 
of the Lutheran church, who is styled an interloper ; judgment for the plaintifi", 18 guilders. 
He died in 170.3, leaving four sonB. — MunseWs Historical Collections, i, 32-54. 

5 It is with much difficulty that some of these terms are decyphered, and others cannot now be 
defined, the articles as well as their names having become obsolete. 

^ Hendrik Lansingh was one of the three sons of Gerrit Lansing, who came from Hassell 
near Z woll, in Overyssel. Hendrick left one son, Jacob. He died 11 July, 1709.— Church Records. 



Alhany County Records. 89 

Willem [Frederickse] Bout, 2 pair of woolen stockings, / 14.15 

Jan Janse Bleccker, 2 bands with lace, / 22.10 

Dirk Wesselse [Ten Brock], 2 ditto, without lace, / 4.00 

Aernout Corneiise [Viele], 2 ditto, / 2.10 

Do. Schaets,' 2 ditto / 2.15 

Ludovicus Cobus, 2 linnen and one woolen cap, ,/ 6.05 

Gysbert Janse,- two cravats (d.asiens)^ /' 7.00 

A rent Vanden Bergh, V 5 10 

Lowies Cobus, a shirt, f 13.05 

Do. Schaets, a shirt, / 15.10 

Willem Frederickse Bout, one ditto, / 18.15 

Lowies Cobus, one ditto, / 29.10 

Jan Gauw, 2 pillow biers, f 19.00 

Idem, 2 ditto, / 22.00 

Arnout Cornelise [Viele], white drawers, / 15.05 

Jan Janse Bleycker, 6 pocket handkerchiefs, / 16.15 

Jan Vinhagen, a Psalmbook, / 80.05 

Dirk Wesselse [Ten Brock], two silver breeches buttons, / 14.00 

Juffrouw De Witt, 2 silver spoons, / 26.00 

Aernout Cornelisse [Viele], a little silver beaker, / 65.00 

Jochim Wesselse [De Backer], 11 ells Haerlemer stuff, / 36.00 

Abram Staets, a pipe mould, , / 6.00 

Lowies Cobus, a pot chain, and iron tongs, / 17.00 

Abram Staets, a painted casket, / 59.00 

Gerrit Bancker, a little milk pot and a barber's basin (schaerbort) , f 10.00 

Jacob Schermerhooren, a meat tub, /' 10.00 

Pieter Loockermans, Senior, a water pail, / 2.00 

Elias Van Ravensteyn, 3 gun barrels (loopeii), and a lock, / 40.00 

Philip Schuyler, 4 gun barrels, / 25.00 

Jan G. Bruyn, 2 guns and 2 gun barrels, / 58.10 

Eobert Sanderssen, 7 old pistol barrels and 2 locks, / 31.00 

Henderick Rooseboom, 5 gun locks, / 45 00 

Jacob Loockermans, a dirk and one old hanger, / 21.10 

Henderick Cuyler,'^ a little vessel of red paint (inenij), / 26.00 

Jan G. Bruyn, 7 axes and 2 old andirons, '/ 42.00 

Abram Staets, a smith's bench screw, / 54.00 

Jan Clute, a saw with a bit stock (stamioer boor)^ '/" 11.00 

Idem, a parcel of box maker's tools, / 68.00 

Jan Clute, a provision safe with drawer {eetens lasie'), / 27.05 

Myndert Harmense [Vander Bogart], * a cabinet of drawers (laa), f 50.00 

Jan Clute, a wash tub, /' 7.10 



1 For account of the Eev. Gideon Schaets, see Annals of Albany, passim: also History of Neiu 
Netherland; the Labadists, Bankers and Sluyter, allude to him with much censure of his man- 
ners and habits, see Memoirs Long Island Historical Society, i. 

» In Beverwyck as early as imi.— Dutch Manuscripts. 

3 Hendrik Cuyler was- born in 1637, probably in Amsterdam, where, in 1675, his brother, 
Eeynier, cnoopemaecker, resided. Li 1680 his house lot was on the south side of State street, 
west of Pearl, "near ye Fort," which lot passed into the hands of his son-in-law, Pieter Van 
Brugh. He also had a patent for land on the western bounds of Schenectady, above Hofl'nian's 
Ferry. By his wife, Anna, he had two sons, Johannes and Abraham, and a daughter, Maria. 

4 Myndert Harmense Van Der Bogart, son of Harmen Van Der Bogart, a trader, settled in 
Albany, and married Helen:i Schermerhooren, daughter of Jacob Janse Schermerhooren. His 
house lot was on the south side of State street, west of Pearl. In 1691, he, and Robert 
Sanders obtained a patent for a mile square of laud, including the present city of Poughkeepsie. 

Hist. Gol. in. 12 



90 Albany County Records. 

Robert Sandersen, amanger (krehLe), / 4.00 

Carsten [Frederickse],' de Smit, a little table and table cloth, and 

a bench, / 15.10 

Jan Clute, a little rack to set platters on, / 6.10 

/ 2014.15 

The vendue master, Provoost, has paid to us the administrators of the 
estate of the late Cornelis Bogardus, a sum, according to the above 
written sales. 

Albany, ^ November, 1667- 

Philip Pieterse [Schuyler]. 
d. v. schelluyne.- 
1667. 

A grey garment of Jan Clute's sold at auction by Gerrit Slich- 

tenhorst, for, / 64.00 

to be paid in beavers in 6 weeks. 

Conditions on which the administrators of the estate of Rutger Jacobsen 
[Van Schoenderwoert], deceased, propose to sell at public sale, a garden, 
lying behind the Fort Albany; being three gardens, contained in one, 
whereof the delivery shall be immediate, and of such magnitude as it lies 
within fence, with some posts and boards, which are thereon ; breadth 7 
rods, and length 15 rods; but the buyer shall at his own expense solicit 
the patent of the Heer governor. Payment shall be made within the 
space of three weeks, from this date, in good current seewant. The buyer 
shall be holden to furnish sufficient sureties for the purchase money. 
The auction fees become a charge against the buyer. It is conditioned 
that, if the buyer can obtain no patent, the sale shall be null and of no 
value. Jan Clute remained the bidder and buyer of the garden for the 
sum of sixty-two guilders, and Philip Schuyler offered himself as surety, 
according to the above standing conditions. 

The 8th of April, 1667. 

Johannes Clute. 

Philip Pieterse Schuyler. 

Jan Clute is the buyer of an iron fire plate (_viei-plaet), to be 

paid in cash, seewant, / 41.00 

Willem Brouwer,^ a settle hed {slabanck), / 10.00 

Lowies Cobus, a copper pan, /* 4.10 

J V. Renselaer, an iron wedge, / 4.05 

/ 59.15 

1 Carsten Frederickse was brother of Myndert Frederickse Smith, one of the elders of the 
Lutheran church, in 1680. 

2 Dirk Van Schelluyne came over in 1650 as a notary, and for a time resided in New 
Amsterdam. He was appointed town clerk of Albany, in 1660. In 1667 he had a grant of land 
In Niskayuna for services. He had three sons : Cornelis, Tielmau and Johannes. The name 
has disappeared from Albany. 

3 Willem Brouwer was in Beverwyck, as early as 1657. He was buried 3 Aug., 1668, and in 
the church book is the following entry : " tot die begraevenisse van Willem Brouwer, 40 
g(uilders) 15 stuivers." His son, Hendrik, early settled at Schenectady, and his descendants 
may be found there in considerable numbers. It is not known that he had any other children. 



Albany County Records. ' 91 

Jan Clute, a ploughshare with a coulter, belonging to J. G. V. 

Bael, cash, to be paid in seewant, / 49.00 

Terms and conditions on which SheriflP Swart' will sell, under an 
execution, the household goods of Harmen Jansen Bos, together with a 
horse, for which payment shall be made in good whole merchantable 
beaver's skins, or in good strung current seewant, at 25 guilders the 
beaver; conditioned by these presents, that no one shall have the power 
to buy any goods by offsetting any debt, which the buyer might truly 
demand of said Harmen Bos, but the purchase money shall be delivered 
into the hands of the sheriff. The per centage becomes a charge against 
the buyer, in payments as aforesaid. 

Elmer Otten- remained the highest bidder and buyer of the 

horse for, / 81.00 

Jacob Tyssen [Vander Heyden], a musket, / 28.00 

Henderick Van Nes, two guns, / 25.00 

Jacob Tyssen [Vander Heyden], two ditto, / 14.00 

[Henderick] Rosenboom, two gun barrels and 3 locks, / 16.00 

Dirck Van Schelluyne, a sword, / 8.03 

Jacob Tyssen [Vander Heyden], 1 pistol and an ax, / 6.00 

Carsten [Frederickse], the smith, two coverlets, f 16.00 

Jacob Tyssen [Vander Heyden], a parcel of old trumpery, / 11.00 

Dirk Hesselingh, 3 hams, one flitch of bacon (s?^'), and 5 

smoked pieces of pork, / 19.00 

Jacob Tyssen [Vander Heyden], one hat, / 17.00 

Lowies Cobus, one little cloth coat and a pair of serge breeches,/ 54.00 

Idem, a little white napped cloth coat, / 7.10 

Dirck Hesselingh, one ditto, , / 8-00 

Barent, the smith, a parcel of gloves (/iontT/bes), / 5.10 

Black Marten, a parcel of old stockings, / 15.00 

Elmer Otten, a parcel of flints {yiersteeneii), /' 3.00 

Gysbert Vanden Bergh,'^ an innosent and a waistcoat, / 14.00 

Sheriff [Gerrit] Swart, 8 ells of linnen, / 28.00 

[Hendrick] Roosenboom, a bit of cotton cloth, a powder horn, 

and a pair of (?), / 4.05 

Gerrit Hardenburgh,^ three old shirts and one valance, / 8.00 

/ 388.08 

On this day, the 14th of June, A. D. 1673, appeared before me Ludo- 
vicus Cobes, secretary of Albany, colony of Renselaerwyck and Schaen- 

1 Gerrit Swart was appointed schout flscaal, or slieriff, of Kensselaerswyck, in 1653, and lield the 
office until 1670, wlien lie was succeeded by Captain Salisbury. He was bom in 1607.— 0' Calla- 
ghan's History of New Netherlands ii, 184. 

2 Helmer Otten was a baker. His wife was Adriaentje Arentse Bratt, daughter of the first 
settler and proprietor of that name in Schenectady. In 1670 he bought a bouwery of 26 mor- 
gens at Schenectady, of Pieter Adriaense Soegemacckelyck, and soon after died, leaving one 
daughter, Catharina, who married Gerrit Simonse Veeder. His widow married Ryer Scher- 
merhorn, another of the early settlers of Schenectady. 

3 Gysbert Vanden Bergh was living in Albany as late as 1685. He had two sons, Cornelis and 
Willem, who left families ; also a daughter Maritie, who was baptized 5tli July, 1685. 

4 Gerrit Hardenburgh and his wife, Jaessie Schepmoes, made a joint will in 1678 (Notarial 
Papers) \ in 1583 they had a daughter baptized by the name of Bareudine. In 1690 he owned 
the sloop Royal, Albany.— English Manuscripts. 



92 Albany County Records. 

hecbtade, iu the presence of the honorable the magistrates of the same 
jurisdiction, Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst and Adriaen Gerritse [Papen- 
dorp], Jacob Heven and Gerrart Swart and Adriaen Van Ilpendam, as 
administrators of the estate of the late Eeyndert Pieterse, who declared 
that, in true right, free ownership, they had granted, conveyed and 
transferred, by these presents, to and for the behoof of Mr. Henderick 
Roosenbooni, a certain house and lot lying here in Albany, on the hill, 
bounded on the south by Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick], on the north 
by Lourens Lourense, on the west by the hill, and on the east by the 
wagon way ; breadth five rods, and length twenty rods, lying in a square, 
by virtue of the patent thereof of date the 30th of April, 1667, from the 
right honorable Governor General Nicolls, and conveyance of date the 
5th of August, 1662, passed by Secretary Schelluyne, and that, free and 
unencumbered, without any charge standing or issuing against it, save only 
the governor's right, and without the grantors in the aforesaid characters 
[of administrators] having any more the least claim thereupon. Also 
acknowledging that they are quite satisfied and paid therefor, the first 
penny with the last; giving therefore p/e?i«m actionem cessam, and perfect 
power to the aforementioned Mr. Roosenboom, his heirs and successors, 
or those who hereafter may receive his right and title, to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid house and lot, as he with his patrimonial estate 
and effects mijjht do ; promising to keep the same safe against every one 
and to free the same from all troubles, demands and charges, as is right, 
and further, nevermore to do, nor permit anything to be done, against 
this, either according to, or without the laws, in any manner whatever, 
thus agreeing thereto under obligation according to law. 
Actum in Albany of date ut supra. 

The mark of Jacob Heven ::^, with his own hand set. 

G. Swart. 

Adriaen Van Ilpendam. 
In my presence, 

LuDOVicus CoBES, Secretary. 

On this, the 19th day of June, 1673, appeared before me Ludovicus 
Cobus, secretary of Albany, in the presence of the honorable commissaries 
of the same jurisdiction. Messieurs Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp], and 
Andries Teller; Gerrit Janse Stavast, who in the matter iu question 
between him and Mr. [Doctor] Jacob Vervanger,i by special provision, 
mortgages his house and lot standing and lying here in Albany, according 
to the sentence of the duke's (heeren) laws, and further [pledging] 
generally his person and estate, personal and real, present and future, 
without exceptions ; submitting the same to the force of all the duke's 
judges and laws, by which, in case of need, to recover payment without 
cost or damage. 

Albany of date ut supm. Gerrit Jansen Stavast. 

Adriaen Gerritsen. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ludovicus Cobes, Secretary. 

1 Dr. Jacob Hendrikse Varravaiiger was in the West ludia Company's service from 1646 to 
1662, residiug most of tlie time in New Amsterdam. 



Albany County Records. 93 

The contents of [the above paper] are canceled, destroyed (jjemortifi- 
ceert doodt), and annihilated, pursuant to the act notarial in the margin 
of the copy of the mortgage, written by Willem Bogardus,' reading as 
follows : " On this date, the 8th of July, 1673, the contents of the above 
written mortgage, with another obligation, were canceled, destroyed, and 
annihilated. In witness of this, subscribed in N. Yorck, ut supra; was 
subscribed by Jacob Hendrickse [Yarravanger] lower down stood 

" Acknowledged before me, 

W. BOGARDUS, Not. Pub." 

Compared with the principal, Albany, the 16th July, 167eS, 

LuDOVicus CoBES, Secretary. 

On the 17th day of July, 1673, appeared before me Ludovicus Cobus 
secretary of Albany, etc., in the presence of the honorable commissaries 
of the same jurisdiction, Messieurs Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp] and 
Andries Teller, Gerrit Yisbeeck, who declared that in true right, free 
ownership, he had granted, conveyed and transferred by these presents to 
and for the behoof of Jan Hendricx Yan Solsbergen- and Mr. Gerrart 
Yan Slichtenhorst, a certain parcel of land, lying on the east bank [of 
the Hudson river j, stretching along the river and inland towards the 
woods from the second claeuer (clover ?) to the little stone kil {steene 
killetie), alias in the Indian language called Treeuwen Point {hoeclc),^ by 
virtue of the patent thereof from the right honorable governor, Richard 
Nicoles, and that free and uncumbered, without any charge standing or 
issuing against the same, except only the duke's (heer's) right; without 
the grantor's making any more the least claim upon [said laud], acknow- 
ledging that to his content he is satisfied therefor and paid the first 
penny with the last, granting moreover 'plenam actionem cessa^n, and full 
power to the aforesaid Jan Hendricx and Mr. Slichtenhorst, their heirs 
and successors or those who hereafter may acquire their right and title, 
to do with, and dispose of the aforesaid parcel of land, as they with their 
patrimonial estate and goods might or could do; promising to keep the 
same safe against every one, and to free it from all trouble, claims and 
charges (as are lawful) ; and further, never more to do or suff'er to be done 
any thing against the same either with or without the laws, in any manner 
whatsoever, thus agreeing thereto under obligation according to law. 

Albany, of date ut supra. 

Gerrit Yisbeeck. 
Adriaen Gerritse. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ludovicus Cobus, Secretary. 

1 Willem Bogardus was the oldest of the four sons of Do. Everhardus Bogardus and Anneke 
Janse. In 1656 he was appointed clerk in the secretary's office in New Amsterdam, and, in 1687, 
post master of the province. His first wife was Wyntje Sybrantse, of Amsterdam, by whom he 
had four children ; only Anna (the wife of Jacob Brouwer, of Gowanus), arrived at maturity. By 
his second wife, Walburga De SiUe, the widow ol Frans Cregier, he had five children. 

^ Jan Hendrikse Van Salsbergen's first wife was Emmeke Lucasse: the second, Tanneke 
Janse, " weduwe van Ryk Riddersen ; " he married 30th of Jan., 1693. He had four sons : Jan, 
Lucas, Henrik, and Harmen, who settled in Claverack or Kinderhook. and had families, with 
the exception perhaps of the first. 

3 This parcel of land was situated in Claverack. In 1673 Van Salsbergen conveyed to Van 
Slichtenhorst half a tract of woodland on Maj. Abram Staets's kil, the same as tlie stone kil 
mentioned above perhaps.— £'«g'/M Manuscripts, xsv, 5. 



94 Albany County Records. 

On the 30th day of July, 1673, appeared before me, Ludovicus Cobes, 
secretary of Albany, in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, Capt. 
Thomas Willett, who acknowledged that he had received from the hands 
of Juriaen Teuuissen [Glaseniaecker], the quantity of one hundred good 
merchantable beaver's skins, for which the appearer (comparanf) promises, 
with the very first opportunity, this summer, herein Albany, to deliver to 
Juriaen Teunissen, free and unencumbered, eight hogsheads of good 
French [wine?] and an anker of brandy, besides also the refusal of four 
hogsheads of French [wine ?], provided that Juriaen Teunisse shall pay 
therefor, according to agreement; below pledging his person and estate, 
personal and real, present and future, nothing excepted; submitting the 
same to all the duke's laws and judges. 

Thus done in Albany, of date ut siqyra, in presence of Joris Christoffclse 
as witness, called for that purpose. 

Tho : Willett. • 

Nofa bene. — For the sake of formality, and to prevent all trouble and 
disputes, it is agreed between the parties, that each hogshead must con- 
tain and hold 6 ankers, and what more is found in the casks Juriaen 
Teunisse must make compensation for. 
Joris Chrktoffelse Davits.- 

Upon this 1st day of August, 1673, appeared before me Ludovicus 
Cobes, secretary of Albany, etc., in the presence of the honorable com- 
missaries of the same jurisdiction. Messieurs G. \ . Slichtenhorst and 
Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp] ; Capt. Silvester Salisbury,-^ sheriff here, 
who declared that in true rights, free ownership, he had granted, con- 
veyed, and transferred by these presents to and for the behoof of Mister 
{Sinjeur) Andries Teller, trader here, a certain house and lot standing 
and lying here in Albany, next the house of the said Teller, by virtue of 
a conveyance thereof, derived from Cornells Viele ; and that free and 
unencumbered, without any claim standing or issuing against the same, 
except only the duke's (fieersyn:) right ; without the grantor's making 
the least claim any more upon the same ; also acknowledging that he is 
perfectly satisfied and paid therefor, the first penny as well as the last ; 
giving therefore ■plenum actioium cessam. and full power to the aforesaid 
Mr. Andries Teller, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
receive his right and title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house 
and lot as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; promising 
to defend the same against every one, and to free it from every trouble, 
claim, and charge, as is lawful ; and furthermore, neither to do nor suffer 

> Thomas Willett, from New Plymouth, N. E., was in New Amsterdam as early as 1644. He 
engaged in trade with success, and in 1665 was appointed mayor of the city ; 1650 was one of the 
commissioners to agree on a boundary between New Netherland and New England ; 1656 was a 
commissioner to settle the boundary line of the to^vn of Gravesend ; also the same year to settle 
differences between the town of Middleburg (Newtown) L. I., and Thomas Stevenson ; 1663 to 
inquire by what authority certain persons were attempting to reduce Middleburg and the neigh- 
boring towns on Long island, under the English— 0' Callaghan's Neiv Netherland Register, 
115 - 59. He died 4 Aug., 1674.— Yalentine'' s Manual, 1853, p. 379. 

2 Joris Christoffelse Davidts was son of Christoffel Davidts, an Englishman, who early settled 
at Beverwyck. He had another son, David, who, with his family, was killed in Schenectady 
Feb. 9, 1690. 

3 Capt. Sylvester Salisbury was commissioned lieutenant of the governor's company of foot in 
1670, and commander of the fort in Albany. He continued in this command until his death, 
about 1682. His widow, Elizabeth Beek, then the wife of Doctor Cornelis Van Dyck, adminis- 
tered on his aflairs the same year.— Engislh ManuscrijJts. 



Albany County Records. 95 

anything to be done against the same, either with or without the laws; 
in any manner whatsoever, under an obligation provided therefor 
according to the laws. 
Albany, of date iit supra. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorsf. 
Adrian Gerritsen. 

SiLVES? Salisbury. 
In my presence, 

LuDOVicus CoBUS, Secretary. 

On this the first day of August, 167o, appeared before me Ludovicus 
Cobus, secretary of Albany, etc., in the presence of the honorable 
commissaries of Albany, G-. V. Slichteuhorst and Adrian Gerritsen 
[Papendorp], Mine Heer Thomas de Laval,' who declared that, in true 
rights and free ownership, he had granted, conveyed and transferred by 
these presents to and for the behoof of Mr. (Si)ijeur) Daniel Hondecoutre, 
trader here, a certain house and lot standing and lying here in Albany, 
inhabited by Mr. Pretty,- and standing next to the house of Gerrit Janse 
Stavast, in virtue of a patent thereof, and that free and unencumbered, 
without any claim standing or issuing against the same, except only the 
duke's (Jieeresijn) right, without the grantor's making any more the least 
claim upon the same; also acknowledging himself perfectly satisfied and 
paid therefor, the first penny as well as tlie last; and therefore giving 
planam actionem cessam, and complete power to the aforesaid Mr. Honde- 
coutre, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter receive his 
right and title, that he may do with, and dispose of the aforesaid lot as 
he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects; promising the same 
to defend against every one and to free it from all troubles, claims 
and charges, as is right; and further, never more to do or suffer any thing 
to be done against the same, with or without law, in any manner whatso- 
ever, under obligation as provided by the laws. 

Albany, of date ut supra. 

Tno. De Lavall. 
Gerrit Van Sliclitenliorst. 
Adriae7i Gerritsen. 

In my presence, 

Ludovicus Cobus, Secretary. 

On this 21st day of September, 1673, appeared before me Ludovicus 
Cobes, secretary of Willemstadt,-* etc., in the presence of the honorable 
commissaries of the same jurisdiction, Messieurs Gerrit Van Slichteuhorst 
and Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp]; Hendrick Marsehs^ dwelling behind 

1 Captain Thomas De Laval was in New York as early as 1668 engaged in trade. His 
residence was chiefly in New York, although from the fact of his owning a house in Albany, 
it is probable he occasionally resided there for the purposes of trade or otherwise. 

2 Richard Pretty was many years sherifi' and collector of the excise for Albany county. He 
died in 16%. — English Manuscnpts. 

3 During the short time that the province was a second time under Dutch rule, in 1673, Albany 
was called Willemstadt. 

4 Hendrik Marselis was one of Melyn's colonists on Staten island, and probably came over with 
the others in the ship New Netherland's Fortune, in 1650. In 1654. he had a grant of a lot in 
Beverwyck. When Staten island was attacked by the Indians, in 1655, he fled with his wife, 
two children and servant, and removed to Fort Oranue, where he permanently settled.— 
O'C'allaghan'sHwtoi'y of Neiv Netherland. He died about 1697. He had two daughters, and 
probably, no sons. 



96 Alhany County Records, 

Kinderhook, offering himself as surety for his son-in-law, Matthys 
Coenraets, and acknowledging by these presents that Lourens Van Alen 
has disbursed and paid a certain sum of money to them in payment of the 
farm hands (loim vo/ck^, and of other sums (j-estanten, remainders) 
honestly due to him, for which moneys this appearer (comparcmt), 
specially pledges a mare and a heifer, and all the grain that shall not 
now have been taken off, before he, Lourens Van Alen, has his; which 
payment he [Hendr : Marselis] shall deliver here (in Albany), or on the 
river bank, according to Lourens's [Van Alen] ' election ; and further 
generally [the appearer, Marselis, pledges] his person and estate, personal 
and real, present and future, without exception, in order that it may be 
possible to recover payment thereby in due time if need be, without cost 
and loss. 

Willemstadt, of date tU supra. 

The mark of Hendr. Marcelis /ft, with his own hand set. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Adriaen Gerritssen. 
In my presence, 

LuDOVicus CoBES, Secretary. 

On this 17th day of October, 1673, appeared before me Ludovicus 
Cobes, secretary of Willemstadt, in the presence of the honorable com- 
missaries of the same jurisdiction, Mr. (^/Siitjeur) Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst 
and x\driaen Gerritsen [Papendorp] ; Mr. David Pieterse Schuyler, who 
declared that, in true right and free ownership, he granted, conveyed and 
transferred by these presents to and for the behoof of Johannes Wendell, - 
a certain parcel of ground lying on the hill, next to Jacob Janse [Scher- 
merhoorn], in breadth one rod less one inch, and in length according to 
the patent, of date 15th of September, old style, 1670, from the late right 
hdnorable General Francis Lovelace, whereunto reference is made ; and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same, except only the duke's (Jieersy)i) right, without the grantor's 
making the least claim any more upon it; also acknowledging that he is 
quite satisfied and paid for the same, the first penny as well as the last ; 
giving therefore plenam actionem cessa^n, and entire power to the afore- 
said Johannes Wendel, his heirs and successors, or those who may 
receive in after times his right and title, to do with, and dispose of, the 
aforesaid lot as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; pro- 
mising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges (as are lawful), and neither to do nor suffer 
anything to be done hereafter against the same, with or without law, in 
any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided according to law. 

Done in Willemstadt. 

r^ : ir 07- 7. 7 , DaVYDT ScHUYLER. 

Gerrit Van IShclitenliorst. 

Adriaen Gei'ritssea. 
In my presence, j^^j^q^j^us Cobus, Secretary. 

1 Lourens Van Alen wa6 probably son of Pieter Van Alen, of Albany. By his wife, Elbertje 
Evertse, he had five sons, and, perhaps, daughters. 

'^ Capt. Johannes Wendell, merchant, was, perhaps, a son of Evert Janse Wendell. His house 
lot was on the south side of State street, west of Pearl. His will was proved 9th Fchruar}', 169- ; 
and wife, Elizabeth, made executrix. By his two wives, Maritic Jillise and Elizabeth Staats, be 
had twelve children — six sons and six daughters. 



Alhany County Records. 97 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of the court of 
Willemstadt, colony Renselaerwyck and Schanhechtade, in the presence 
of David Pieterse Schuyler and Cornells Van Dyck, magistrates {jicliepeneib) 
of the same, Cornells Cornelisse Viele, who declared that he has gi anted 
and conveyed, and that in right and true ownership, as by these presents 
he does [grant and convey], to and for the behoof of Mr. Kichard Pretty, 
his house and lot, lying in Willemstadt, and lying to the south of the 
Broad street [State]; to the north of the kill [liutten], joining westerly 
on the house of Pieter Hartgers, and easterly by the little street [South 
Pearl] ; in breadth in front on the street one rod [12 ft.] three feet and 
eleven inches, and in the rear on the [Rutten] kil one rod one foot and 
four inches; length on the east side five rods one feet and ten inches, 
and on the west side five rods five feet and two inches, Rynland measure, ^ 
by virtue of the patent thereof from the late Rt. honorable governor 
general [Nicols], of date the 2nd of May, A. D. 1668; to which 
reference is made; and that free and unencumbered, without any 
claim standing or issuing against the same, save the duke's (lieersyii) 
right, without the grantor's making the least claim any more upon it ; 
acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor; and therefore 
giving complete power to the aforesaid Richard Pretty, his heirs and 
successors, or those who hereafter may receive title from him, to do with, 
and to dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he might do with his 
other patrimonial estate and effects; and promising to defend the same 
from all persons, and to free the same from all troubles, claims and 
charges which are lawful, and further, neither to do nor suffer anything 
to be done against the same with or without law. in any manner what- 
soever, under obligation, provided according to law for that purpose. 

Done in Willemstadt, 24th of October, A. D. 1673. 

Cor. Cor. Vielen. 
Davydt Schuyler's. 
Cornells Van Dyck. 

In my presence, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt, etc., 
in the presence of Messieurs Marten Gerritsen [Van Bergen]- and Pieter 
Bogardus,'^ magistrates of the same jurisdiction, Mr. Richard Pretty, 
who declared that in true rights and free ownership he had granted, con- 
veyed and transferred, as by these presents he does [grant, convey, etc.], 
to and for the behoof of Juffrouw Elizabetli Salisbury,^ wife of Captain 

1 This lot was on the west corner of State and South Pearl streets before the latter was 
widened. 

2 Martin Gerritse Van Bergen is said to have arrived in Beverwyclj in 1630. He settled in 
1668 on Castle island, afterwards called Marten Gerritse's island, and subsequently on the 
mainland. — 0' Callaghcui's History of New Netherlands i, 433. For many years he was one of 
the magistrates of the county, and captain of the foot company. By his two wives, Jaunetie 
Marteuse, and Neeltie Mynderse, he had five sons ; two of whom, Gerrit and Myudert, are 
spoken of in letters of administration issued to his wife in 1696. 

3 Pieter Bogardus was the youngest son of Do. Bverhardus Bogardus and the famous Anneke 
Janse, and was born in 1645 in New York. He subsequently settled in Albany, where, in 1673, he 
was one of the magistrates, and in 1690 was commissioned with others to treat with the Five 
Nations, and to look after the defense of the town. By his wife, Wyntje Cornelise Bosch, he had 
eight children. He made his will in Feb., 1701-2, and died in Kingston, in 1703. 

* Captain Salisbury died about 1682, and his widow, Elizabeth Beck, married Doctor Cornelis 
Van Dyck, soon after. About 1690 Doctor Van Dyck died, and the next year she married Captain 
George Bradshaw. She died in 1701. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 13 



98 ■ Albany County Becords. 

Silvester Salisbury, his certain house and lot, lying in Willenistadt, lying 
to the south of the Broad street [State]; to the north of the [Rutten] kil, 
joining on the west upon the late house of Pieter Hartgers, on the east 
upon the little stre'et [South Pearl]; in breadth in front upon the [State] 
street one rod three feet and eleven inches, and on the rear on the 
[Rutten] kil one rod one foot and four inches ; length on the east side 
[on South Pearl street] five rods one foot and ten inches, and on the west 
side five rods five feet and two inches, Rynland measure,i by virtue of the 
patent thereof from the late governor, Richard Nicols, of date 2nd of May, 
A. D. 1668, to which reference is made ; and that free and unencumbered 
without any claim standing or issuing against the same, except the duke's 
(Jieersi/ii) right ; without the grantor's making the least claim any more 
upon the same, acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, 
and giving therefore full power to the aforesaid Elizabeth Salisbury, her 
heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter receive title from her, to 
do with and to dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as she might do with 
her other patrimonial estate and eff'ects; promising to defend the same 
against all persons, and to free it from all troubles, claims, and charges 
which are lawful, and further, neither to do nor suffer anything to be 
done henceforth against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation in accordance with the laws. 
Done in Willenistadt, the 2d of November, A. D. 1673. 

Richard Pretty. 

Marten GerUe. 

Pieter Bogardus. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

On this 18th day of December, A. D. 1673, appeared before me Jo- 
hannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt, in the presence of Cornelis 
Van Dyck, magistrate of this jurisdiction, Henderick Lambertse [Bont],- 
who declared by these presents that he is honestly indebted to Mr. Gerrit 
Slichtenhorst in the sum of two and thirty guilders in beavers [$12.80], 
which he promises to pay within the time of two months from date ; 
specially pledging therefor his cow, at present standing in the stall at 
Schanhechtade, by Adam Vrooman's,-^ to promote the payment of the 
aforewritten sum in case of need, without cost and loss. 

Done ut supra, of date ut supra. 

This is the mark of Henderick Lambertse j-| , with his own hand 

set. 
Cornelis Van Dyck. 

Acknowledged before me, 

JoEiANNES Provoost, Secretary. 

1 On the a4th Oct., this lot was conveyed to Richard Pretty by Cornelis Cornelise Viele. It 
now lies in and forms a part of South Pearl street, which is the ''little street" (de Meyne 
st7^aaf), widened. 

2 Henderik Lambert«e Bont, or Bent, owned land above the city of Schenectady, which he con- 
veyed to Douwe Aukee in 1692, and removed to Claverack. His son Jan, also of Claverack, in 
Iti.S, confirmed the above conveyance, and gave more specific boundaries. 

3 Adam Vrooman was the sou of Hendrik Meese Vrooman, who was killed at the sack of 
Schenectady, in 1690, at which time Adam, by his brave defense of his house, gained the admira- 
tion of the French, who spared his life. All the Vrooman s of this vicinity are descended from 
this Adam and his brother Jan. 



Albany County J records. 99 

The abov'3 standing mortgage (yerhititenisse) of the cow charged against 
Henderick Lambertse, Mr. Gerrit Slichtenhorst acknowledges that he has 
been fully paid therefor. 

Done in Willemstadt, this 20th October, 1674. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in presence of the afternanied witnesses, 
RoelofF Jansen and Jan Coneel, who declare by these presents that they 
have made a contract with each other as follows, viz : KoelofF Jansen has 
sold to Jan Coneel aforesaid, his lot lying on the hill,' between Jacob 
Tyssen Vander Heyden and Jan [De La] Waerd,- and that of such 
magnitude as it was received by him, the seller, from Jacob Tyssen at 
public sale,-* which lot the buyer shall immediately begin to build upon, 
and on payment for the lot the buyer shall receive a pi'oper deed, for 
which lot the said Jan Coneel promises to pay four good, whole merchant- 
able beaver skins, and that punctually on the first day of July next 
coming, thus done without craft or guile, in presence of Maas Cornelise 
[Van Buren], and Jan Gauw, as witnesses. 

Done in Willemstadt, the 27th of February, A. D. 1674. 

RoELOFF Jansen. 
John Conell. 
This is the mark of Jan Gauw-{-, ivith his own hand set. 
Maas Comely sA 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

On this 2nd day of July, A. D. 1674, appeared before me Johannes 
Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt, in the presence of the honorable 
Cornells Van Dyck and Pieter Bogardus, magistrates of the same juris- 
diction, Hendrick Willemsen [Backer], who declared that in true rights 
and free ownership he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he 
"does o^rant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof 
of StoflFel Janse Abeel, by virtue of an accompanying patent, his certain 
house and lot here standing and lying in Willemstadt, bounded to the 
north by Hans Dreper,"' to the south by Pieter Loockermans, Senior, and 
is in breadth in front on the street three rods five feet and one inch, in 
the rear three rods less three inches ; length on the north side seven rods 
and one foot, on the south side in length from the street to the fence of 
Adrian Gerritse [Papendorp], and that free and unencumbered, without 



1 It was ao-reed at the time that the seller should he holden to deliver to the huj^er the aforesaid 
lot forty feet long from front to rear, and twenty feet broad in front on the street. 

2 Jan De La Warde came over from Antwerp in 1662 : in 1684 he bought land at Niskayima and 
subsequently, inl698, he acknowledged satisfaction for anisland in the Mohawk above Sche- 
nectady, between Claas Gravens Hoek and said village, sold to Jons Aertse Vander Baast, 
deceased. He died 28th January, 1702. 

3 In 17015, Margaret, widow of John Coneel, had a lot in Maiden lane, next east of Mr. Min- 
gael's, near James street.— Annals of Albanij, v, 132, 133. 

* Maas Cornelise Van Buren was son of Cornells Maas Van Buren. He married Josina Janse 
Gardenier, and had five sous and one daughter. His wife died in 1701, and he in 11104.- Albany 
Church Records. 

5 In 1656 he had a patent for a lot in New Amsterdam.— ZJiiteA Manuscripts. 



100 Albany County Records. 

any claim standiosj or issuing against it, only excepting the duke's 
(Jieersyn) right, without the grantors laying claim any more upon the 
same, acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving 
therefore full power to the aforesaid StoiFel Janse Abeel, his heirs and 
successors, or those who hereafter may receive right and title from him, 
to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he might do with 
his own patrimonial estate and efi"ects ; promising to defend the same 
against every person and to free it from all trouble, claims and charges 
which are lawful, and further, never more to do or permit anything to 
be done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation thus provided according to law. 
Done in Willemstadt, datum ut supra. 

This is the mark of + Henderick Willemse, 
with his own hand set. 
Cornells Van Dych. 
Pietcr Bo(jardus. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

On this 31st day of July, A. D. 1674, appeared before me Johannes 
Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and colony Renselaerswyck, in the 
presence of the honorable Gerrit Slichtenhorst and David Schuyler, 
magistrates oP the same jurisdiction, Jochem Wesselse Backer, burgess 
and citizen here, who declared that in true rights, and free ownership, 
he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Henderick 
Cuyler, his certain house here and two lots, standing and lying together 
here in Willemstadt upon the hill, lying to the west of Myndert t'ar- 
mense [Van De Bogart],i to the east of the town's fence [stockade], to the 
south of the street [State] and to the north of the fence of the Lutheran 
church; the lot upon which the house stands is in breadth, front and 
rear, twenty wood feet, and in length to the fence of the Lutheran church ; 
the other lot to the west thereof, is in breadth two rods three feet and 
eight inches ; length as before to the aforesaid fence,"' which he does by 
virtue of the patent of Grovernor Lovelace; the one of date 19 October, 
1668; the other of the 15th of August, 167—, and that free and 
unencumbered without any claim standing or issuing against the same, 
only excepting the duke's (lieersyii) right, without the grantor-* having 
any more the least claim against the same, acknowledging that he is fully 
satisfied and paid therefor, giving therefore free power to the aforesaid 
Hendrick Cuyler, his heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may 
receive right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid 



1 Myndert Harmense Van De Bogart was a son of Harmen Myndertse Van DeBogart, a sur- 

?eon in the West India Company's service, who died in Albany, in 1649. He was baptized in New 
ork, 3d of May, 1643, and married Helena, daughter of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn. In 1686, in 
connection with Robert Sanders, he obtained a patent for 12,000 acres of land in Dutchess county, 
including the site of the city of Poughkeepsie. About this time he removed with his family to 
Dutchess county. 

2 The lots above described were on the south side of State street, the fifth and sixth west of 
South Pearl- in 1701, "ye house of Mr. Cuyler was near ye Fort." In 1703 Pieter Van Brugh, 
son-in-law of Henderick Cuyler, owned the whole or a part of these lots ; his house being a corner 
house with the stockadoes in the rear. The lot next west Gerrit Luycasse Wyngaart bought with 
a depth of only 30 ft. by reason of the rondweg and city stockadoes. The Lutheran church lot 
was the Centre market lot. 



Albany County Records. 101 

house aad lot as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; 
promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free the same 
from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and further, neither 
to do nor suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsover, under obligation for that purpose 
provided according to law. 

Done in Willemstadt. datum ut supra. 

JociiEM Wesselse B. 
Gerrit Van SUchtenhorst. 
Davidt Schuyler. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, in the presence of Messieurs Cornelis Van Dyck 
and Pieter Bogardus, magistrates of the same jurisdiction, Wouter 
Albertsen Wyttenhoff, attorney for the late Pieter Claerbout's' effects 
here, who declared that, in true rights, just ownership he had granted 
and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to and for the behoof of Jan Harmense Backer, his heirs 
or those who shall obtain title from him, the house and lot of said Pieter 
Clairbout, lying here in Willemstadt, wlach he does by virtue of a patent 
from Governor Richard Nicols, of date 14 May, A. D. 1667, being of such 
breadth, length and limitation as it lies inclosed in fence, lying between 
the house of said Bogardus and Rut Aertsen, and that free and unen- 
cumbered, without any claim standing or issuing against it, excepting only 
the duke's (Jieersi/n) right, without the grantors laying the least claim 
any more to the same ; also acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and 
paid therefor, and therefore giving full power to the aforesaid Jan Har- 
mense Backer, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter receive 
right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and 
lot as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects; promising to 
defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
and charges, as is right, and further, never more to do or suffer anything 
to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided according to law for that purpose. 

Done in Willemstadt, 24th of August, 1674. 

As Jan Harmensen was not satisfied, that the measure of the lot was 
not expressed in this instrument, since the grantor according to contract 
has sold him the house and lot as it lies in fence, so Jan Harmense has by 
the surveyor caused the same to be measured, and the length is six rods 
three feet and three inches, breadth in the rear nine feet and a half, and 
in front on the street fourteen feet, Rynland measure; which he desires to 
claim from him the [grantor]. 

Wouter Albertsen. 

Cornelis Van Dyck. 
Pieter Bogardus. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



Pieter Claerbout was the voorlezer of the church. 



102 Albany Counttj Records. 

Appeared before lue Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willerastadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, 
Jan Coneel and James Penniman, who in love and friendship declare that 
they have agreed and contracted with each other about the sale of a house 
and lot in the manner followini^ : Firstly. — Jan Coneel acknowledges 
that he has sold and James Penniman that he has bought of him, his, 
Coneel's, house and lot, lying here in Willemstadt, where the seller at 
present dwells; for which he, the buyer, promises to pay to the seller the 
sum of seventy pounds sterling, in Boston money, in two installments, the 
first of which shall be in the month of July, A. D. 1675, a sum of thirty 
pounds sterling, to be received by the seller in Boston, together with 
thirteeii ells of serge for his, the seller's, wife for a dress ; and the second 
installment, a year after, being A. D. 1676, also in the month of July, the 
sum of thirty pounds sterling, to be paid in New Orange/ in rum at 
three shillings sis stuivers the gallon, besides also ten pounds sterling, 
which the buyer shall pay in hats at market price ; about which the parties 
contracting are mutvially well content as being done * * * without craft 
or guile ; the respective parties pledging their persons and estates to the 
performance of this contract. 

Thus done in Willemstadt, in presence of Andries Teller and Willem 
Percker [Parker], as witnesses called for that purpose, on this the lOth 
day of August, 1674. 

John Coneel. 
James Penimane, 
A. Teller., loitness. 
Wm. Parker. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, in the presence of the honorable magistrates, 
Cornells Van Dyck and David Schuyler, commissaries of the same juris- 
diction, and the honorable William Nottingham,"- who acknowledged by 
these presents that he is well, truly and honestly indebted to Mr. Goossen 
Gerritsen [Van Schaick], in the quantity of six and twenty good, choice 
beaver skins, each of which must weigh one and a half pounds ; also 1 
guilder, two stuivers and eight pennies in beavers ; besides three beavers 
of seven quarters [of a pound] weight, good and merchantable, for goods 
and merchandise received therefor to his satisfaction ; which aforesaid 
beavers he promises to pay to the aforesaid Goosen Gerritsen or his 
attorney punctually on thie first of August, A. D. 1675, with interest on 
the same at 12 per cent yearly, to commence on the date of this instru- 
ment, and running until full payment; except in case the mortgagor 
[Nottingham], during the year, gives full satisfaction for and pays said 
beavers, he shall be exempt from paying the interest; to the full per- 
formance of which the said William Nottingham pledges his person and 
estate, personal and real, present and future, especially mortgaging and 
pledging both of his houses and lots lying here in Willemstadt, as 
security, if need be, for the recovery of the payment of the aforesaid 

1 On the recapture of New York by the Dutch in 1673, they changed the name of New York to 
New Orange. 

2 In 1676, William Nottingham and wife, Anne, were residents of Kingston. In 1715 he was 
captain of the military company of Marbletown, and was i,i\\\\\y'mg in Vim.— English Manu- 
scri2)ts. 



Albany Coimty Records. 103 

nine and twenty beavers, one gnilder, two stuivers and eight pennies in 
beavers, without cost or loss. 

Done in Willemstadt, the first of October, A. D. 1674. 

Wm. Nottingham. 
Cornells Van Di/ch. 
Davydt Schuyler. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Frovoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in the presence of the honorable Gerrit 
Slichtenhorst and Pieter Bogardus, magistrates of the same jurisdiction, 
the honorable William Nottingham, who acknowledges by these presents 
that he is well, truly and honestly indebted to Mr. Andries Teller in the 
quantity of sixteen good, whole and merchantable beavers' skins, for 
goods and merchandise received to his content and satisfaction ; which 
aforesaid sixteen beavers he promises to pay between this autumn and 
the middle of the month of November next coming, and failing of pay- 
ment in said time, he promises to pay interest at the rate of ten per cent ; 
thereto pledging his person and estate, personal and real, present and 
future, herewith mortgaging as a special pledge his two houses here in 
Willemstadt, lying on the hill, if need be, for the recovery of the pay- 
ment of the aforesaid sixteen beavers, without cost and loss. 

Done in Willemstadt, the 15th of October, A. D. 1674. 

Wm. Nottingham. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Pieter Bogardus. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in the presence of the honorable Cornelis 
Van Dyck and Pieter Bogardus, magistrates of the same jurisdiction, the 
honorable William Nottingham, at present residing here, who, by these 
presents acknowledged and declared that he is well, truly and honestly 
indebted to the heirs of Captain Thomas Willet, deceased, in the sum of 
three hundred and seven and fifty guilders, payable in good, whole and 
merchantable beaver skins, at eight guilders each, for goods and merchan- 
dise, received to his content and satisfaction, and promises to pay the 
aforesaid sum to the said heirs, said administrators, or their attorney, just 
as soon as they shall make a demand upon him, the mortgagor ; thereto 
pledging his person and estate, real and personal, present and future; 
mortgaging herewith and especially pledging his two houses and lots here 
in Willemstadt, lying on the hill, to secure the payment if need be of 
the aforesaid sum of three hundred and seven and fifty guilders, without 
cost aud loss. 

Done in Willemstadt, the 16th of October, A. D. 1674. 

Wm. Nottingham. 
Cornelis Van Dyck. 
Pieter Bogardus. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



104 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in presence of honorable Marten Gerritse 
[Van Bergen], and Pieter Winne,i magistrates of the same jurisdiction ; 
Geertruy Pieterse, late widow of Abraham Pieterse Vosburgh,- deceased, 
who declared that she had granted and conveyed, as by these presents she 
does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof 
of Wynant Gerritse Van der Poel* her half of the sawmill, lying in colony 
Renselaerswyck, on the east bank [of the Hudson river], opposite the 
bouwery of Mr. Philip Schuyler, standing on the kil,' which lies on the 
south side of the bouwery of Mr. Jeronimus Ebbingh, with all the tools 
there to belonging, which she possesses, and that free and unencumbered, 
only excepting the lord patroon's right, without the grantor's making 
any further claim upon it, acknowledging that she is fully satisfied and 
paid therefor, giving therefore full power to the aforesaid Wynant 
Gerritse, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter receive right 
and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid half said mill 
as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising 
the same to defend against all persons and to free the same from all 
actions, claims or charges, which hereafter may come against the same 
and are lawful, and further neither to do nor to suffer anything to be 
done against the same, with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Willemstadt, the 18th Oct., 1674. 

This is the mark -\- of Geertruy Pieterse, 
with her own hand set. 
Marten Gerritse. 
Pieter Winne. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary of Willemstadt and 
colony Renselaerswyck, and in the presence of the honorable Adriaen 
Gerritse [Papendorp], and Marten Gerritse [Van Bergen], magistrates of 
the same jxirisdiction, Gerrit Bancker, who declared that, in true right, 
free ownership, he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he 
does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the 
behoof of Jacob Staets,"^ his, the grantor's, house and lot, standing and 
lying here in Willemstadt, at present inhabited by Hans Proper, to the 
south bordering upon StoflPel Janse [Abeel], and to the north upon 
Myndert Frederickse, as the same stands in fence; in breadth in front 

1 Pieter Winne was born in the city of Glient, in Flanders. His wife, Tanneke Adams, was 
a native of the "cityof Leeuwaerden, inVrieslandt." He resided in Bethlehem, two miles south 
of Albany, where he made his will, in 1684 ; when he had thirteen children living. His estate 
was valued in 1696, at 860 pieces of eight, at six shillings each. 

2 Abraham Pieterse Vosburgh was the fourth son of Pieter Jacobse Vosburgh. He died in 
1660, leaving one sou, Pieter, probably, who settled in Kinderhook. 

3 Wynant Gerritse Van der Poel, trunkmaker, was in Beverwyck as early as 1657 ; by his 
wife, Tryntje Melgers, he had two sons: Melgert, and Gerrit; and a daughter, who married 

. Willem Van den Bergh. In 1695, when he made his will, he was a resident of New York, 
''late of Albany." His will was proved in 1702. 

* This kil was afterwards, and to this day is, called the Wynant's kil, having received its 
name from Wynant Gerritse "Van der Poel, who owned the mill hereby conveyed. 

5 Jacob Staets was the eldest son of Major Abraham Staets. surgeon. He followed the 

profession of his father. His wife's name was Ryckie ; but it is not known that he left any 

children. 



Albany County Records. 105 

upon the street three rods and four feet, in the rear ten feet and a half, 
Eynland rueasui-e, free and unencumbered, without any chiim standing or 
issuing against the same, only excepting the duke's (Jieersyn) right, 
without the grantor's having any further claim upon the same ; acknow- 
ledging that he has received therefor full satisfaction and payment, 
giving therefore full power to the aforesaid Jacob Staets, his heirs and 
successors, or those who may receive hereafter right and title from him, 
to do with and dispose of the said house and lot as he might do with his 
other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising to defend the same from 
all persons, and to free it from all actions, claims and charges, which may 
hereafter come against it, and are lawful, and further neither to do nor 
to suffer anything to be done hereafter against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Willemstadt, the 6th of November, A. D. 1674. 

Gerrit Bancker. 
Adriaen Gerritsen. 
Marten Gerritsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable Adriaen Gerritse and Jacob Janse Schermerhoorn, 
commissaries, etc., Mr. Willem Teller,' who declared that in true right, 
free ownership he had granted, conveyed and transferred as by these 
presents he does [grant, convey, etc.], to and for the behoof of Johannes 
De Wandelaer;- so does he, J. De Wandelaer, in like form, hereby, and 
at once, transfer and convey again to Mr. Jan Henderickse Van Bael, a 
house and lot, lying here in Albany on the hill ; in breadth in front on 
the street twenty-one feet; length, to the lot of Captain Backer, and 
breadth in the rear twenty feet, Rynland measure, out of which breadth 

of said lot there lies a foot and a half on the ■]',.? side of said house, 



^ west? 

for an alley in common, with Dirck Hesselinge, who also has a foot and a half 
there, so that the said alley is three feet in its whole breadth, for the use 
of both of them ; adjoining, on the east, the grantor (acceptant), on the 
west, Dirck Hesselinge; on the south. Captain Backer's lot ; and to the 
north, the street, and that by vi'-tue of a conveyance of date -^ July, 
A. D. 1668, given by Jan Coster Van Aken, to the behoof of the first 
grantor, Willem Teller; free and unencumbei'ed, without any claim, 
standing or issuing against the same, excepting the duke's right; the 
grantors' acknowledging that they are satisfied and paid by Jan Hende- 
rickse Van Bael, the first penny with the last, in respect to the bargain 



1 Wm. Teller was bom in 1620, and arrived in New Amsterdam in 1639. He served the 
West India Company ; at first as corporal at Fort Orange, bnt was soon advanced to the office of 
quarter-master. He resided in Albany until 1692, when he removed to New York with his family, 
except one son, Johannes, who remained in Schenectady. He became a trader after leaving the 
service of the company. By his two wives, Margaret Donchesen, and Maria Varleth, he had 
eleven children, the most of whom lived to mature years and left families. 

2 Johannes De Wandelaer came over from Leyden, and on the 17 March 16T2, married Sara 
Schepmoes, of New York. Soon after, he removed to Albany, where he remained until about 
1702, when he is found in New York. He was a trader, and had a house on the west corner 
of Maiden lane and Broadway ; of his ten children eight were living in 1705, when his will 
was made. 



Hist. Col. Hi. 14 



106 Alhauy Coiudy Records. 

for the aforesaid house and lot, giving therefore full power to the aforesaid 
Jan Henderickse Van Bael, his heirs, and successors, or those who may 
hereafter receive right and title from him, to dispose thereof as he might 
with his own patrimonial estate and effects, without the grantors' having 
any further claimupon the same; promising to defend it against all 
persons and to free it from all trouble and claims, and never more to do 
or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or without 
law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, this 15th of December, A. D. 1674. 

WiLLEM Teller. 
Adriaen Gerritsen. Johannes de Wandelaer. 

Jacob Schermerhooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable Gerrit A'^an Slichtenhorst, and Adriaen Ger- 
ritse, commissaries of the same jurisdiction, a certain Katskil Indian by 
the Dutch commonly called Schermerhooren, offering himself as surety 
and principal for diverse Esopus and Katskil Indians to the behoof of 
Mr. Jan Clute, burgess of this town, on account of certain goods and 
moneys disbursed, which sum with others, amounts to eighty good whole 
merchantable beaver skins and fifteen good otter skins, which aforesaid sum 
he promises to pay promptly to said Jan Clute or to his order, within 
two and a half (derdehalff) years from this date, but if he [Schermer- 
hoorn], happens to die in the meantime, or the aforesaid time having 
expired, he has not paid said sum, then with free deliberation he entirely 
agrees that the aforesaid Clute or his order, may take to himself in 
complete ownership his, Schermerhooren's, and his, participant's, land, 
being the half of the land belonging to the Indians at Katskil, together 
with the free range (idtdrift) in the woods ; and their lots shall be cast 
who shall have the preference as to the selection; and binds himself in 
such a manner that in case he comes to act otherwise than above mentioned, 
either directly or indirectly, or by any evasion howsoever it may be, it 
shall be null and of no effect whatever; well understanding that the land 
belonging to Jan Bronck' is not included herein. All that is above written 
he promises to hold valid and true, under obligation as provided therefor 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of January, 167^. 

This is the mark -|- of the Indian, named Schermerhooren, 
with his own hand set. 
This is the mark of -\- Lepelmaker \_Si)oonmaker']^ loith his oion hand 

set as witness. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Adriaen Gerritsen. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



1 Jan Pieterse Bronck, son of Pieter Bronck, lived at Catskil. By his wife, Commetle 
Leendertse Couyn, lie had six sons and two daughters, of whom five sons are mentioned in 
his will, made 9 Sept., 1738, and proved 6 Oct., 1742. 



Albany County Records. 107 

I, John Clute, heir of Capt John Clute, late of Canastagieone of county 
of Albany, deceased, do acknowledge, on the 24th of March, 169-f-, to 
have rec', of Neele Van Bergen,' late widow of Capt. Marten Gerritse, 
dec^', on y^ behalf of y*^ above mentioned Ind'i, the full contents of y^ 
afore mentioned mortgade, wittnesse my hand. 

Albany, y^ 27th of Sept., 1708. 

Johannes Clut.'- 

Appeared before mc Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., an Indian, 
commonly called by the Dutch, Schermerhoorn, for himself, and specially 
commissioned for another Indian, named Siachemoes ; who declared, in 
presence of the honorable Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, and Adriaen 
Gerritsen, commissaries, etc., that he had granted, conveyed and trans- 
ferred, as by these presents he does transfer, to and for the behoof of Jan 
Bronck, his heirs, or those who shall receive title from him, a certain 
piece of land, lying in Katskil, lying on the north side of the kil, called 
by the Indians Paskoecq, situate under the hill which stands to the west, 
moreover he grants him free range for his cattle; which he does by virtue 
of being the natural and rightful proprietor of said land, and that, out of 
a liberality shown him and for friendship enjoyed ; refraining from any 
further claim on said piece of land ; giving therefore to said Jan Bronck 
and his heirs full power to dispose thereof, the same as he might do with 
his other patrimonial estate and effects, without the grantor's making the 
least claim any more upon it; promising to defend the same against all 
persons, and to free it from all actions, claims or charges of other Indians, 
or all other persons who may succeed them, and never more to do or suffer 
anything to be done against the same, with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of January, A. D. 1674. 

This is the mark. Outs, of an Indian, named Schermerhoorn. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Adriaen Gerritsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable Adriaen Gerritse, and Andries Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Jan Coneel, burgess and citizen here; who declared, that in true rights, 
free ownership, he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does 
grant and convey, to and for the behoof of Evert Janse Wendell, also a 
burgess here, a house and lot, lying in Albany, on the hill, with all that 
is fast therein by earth and nailed ; the lot is in breadth, front and rear, 
five and twenty feet; in length on the south side four rods six feet and 
three inches; bordering upon the east side Claes Van Rotterdam; on the 
south side Gerrit Lansingh ; ' on the west and north sides the highway, 

1 Captain Marten Gerritse Van Bergen ; Neeltie Myndertse was his second wife. 

2 Jobannes Clute, nephew and heir of Captain Johannes CUite, inherited his large landed 
property in Niskayuna, Loonenburg, and Albany. He resided in the former place. By his 
wife, Bata Slichtenhorst, he had nine children ; from him and Frederick Clute, also of Niskaynna, 
have descended the families of this name in Albany and Schenectady counties. 

2 Gerrit Lansingh was a native of Hasselt near ZwoU, in Overyssel. He was deceased before 
1679, leaving three sons : Gerrit, Hendrik, and Johannes ; and three daughters : Aeltie, 
Gysbertje, and Hilletje, all of whom had families, and lived in Albany or its vicinity. — 
Deeds, m, 51. 



108 Albany County Records. 

according to the measure and survey of the surveyor, of date the fifth of 
May, 1668, and pursuant to a conveyance from Mr. Thomas De Laval, of 
date the 17th of August, A. D. 1670, to him, the grantor, given, to which 
reference is made ; and that free and unencumbered, with no chxim 
standing or issuing against the same, save the duke's right, without the 
grantor's having any further claim upon the same, acknowledging that he 
has received full satisfaction and payment therefor, the first penny with 
the last, giving therefore full power to the aforesaid Evert Janse Wendel, 
his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter derive right and 
title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he 
might do with his patrimonial estate and eflPects; promising to defend the 
same against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims and charges, 
which are lawful, and further never more to do or suflPer any thing to be 
done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner what- 
soever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, the 11th of March, A. D. 167|. 

John Conell. 

Adriaen Gerritsen. 

A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable G-errit Slichtenhorst, and Jacob Schermerhoorn, 
commissaries, etc., Jan Ooneel, citizen here, who declared that he had 
sold, granted, conveyed and transferred, as by these presents he does 
grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of 
Kobert Livingston, i merchant, a certain lot lying here in Albany, being 
named No. 1, received by him the grantor, by deed from Andries De 
Vos, of date 18 June, A. D. 1672, and lying on the hill, adjoining 
westerly Jan (De La) Ward, easterly the highway, northerly Pieter 
Winne; breadth on the south side four rods, and westerly three rods and 
six feet J and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against the same, excepting the duke's right, without the grantor's 
having any more the least claim upon the same, and acknowledging that 
he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore, full power to the aforesaid Robert Livingston, his heirs and 
successors, or those who hereafter may derive right and title from him 
to do with and to dispose of the aforesaid lot, as he might do with his 
patrimonial estate and efi"ects ; promising to* defend the same against all 
persons, and to free it from all trouble, charges and claims, which are 
lawful, and further, never more to do or sufi'er anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided by law therefor. 

Done in Albany, the 11th March, A. D. 167^. 

Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Jacob Schermerhooreti. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

" Robert Livingston was the first settler in this province of this well known family. He was 
for many years secretary of Albany, mayor of the city, Indian commissioner, etc. He married 



Albany County Records. 109 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable Andries Teller, and Jacob Janse Schermerhoorn, com- 
missaries, etc., Andries De Vos, burgess and citizen here, who declared, 
that in true rights, free ownership, he had sold, granted, conveyed, as by 
these presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to 
and for the behoof of the deaconry (diaconi/e) here in Albany, his house 
and lot and garden, here lying on the hill, adjoining and southward of 
the third kil,' northward of the highway, westward of Paulus Martense 
[Van Benthuysen], eastward of a lot of the grantor, of such magnitude 
and limitation as it lies inclosed in its fence, together with a little piece 
of hop land, lying below on said third kil, bounding to the east Reyer 
Elbertse, to the west the kil, to the south and north the hill, and is in 
length on the south side, thirty-one rods; on the north side, thirty rods; 
breadth on the west side, fifteen rods; on the east side, twenty-three 
rods;"-^ and that, free and unencumbered, with no claim, standing or 
issuing against the same, excepting only the duke's right, which he does 
by virtue of patents; the one of date lOtli Sept., and the other the 11th 
ditto, A. D. 1667, to him, the grantor, given by Governor li. Nicols, and 
acknowledging that he. the grantor, has been fully satisfied and paid 
therefor, the first with the last penny ; therefore giving to the aforesaid 
diaconate or those who may hereafter receive title from them, full power 
to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house, lot and garden, with the 
piece of hop land, as they might deal with and dispose of their other estate ; 
promising the same to defend and to free from all trouble and charges or 
claims which hereafter may arise, and never more to do or sufier any- 
thing to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the first of April, A. D, 1675. 

AxXDBYs De Vos. 

A. Teller. 

Jacob Schermerhooren. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., und in the 
presence of the honorable Jacob Schermerhooren, and Adriaen Grerritse, 
commissaries, etc.. Evert Janse Wendel, who declared that he had sold, 
granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in 
real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Nehemiah Pears,' his 
house and lot, lying in Albany, on the hill, with all that is therein fast 
by earth and nailed; bounded on the east side by Claes Van Rotterdam, 
on the south side by G-errit Lansingh, on the north and west sides by the 
highway ; breadth in front on the street twenty-five feet, and in the rear 
on G-errit Lansingh's house; from the upper corner stretching to the 

Alida Schuyler, widow of Rev. Nicholas Van Rensselaer and had seven children. His house lot 
was on the north corner of State and Pearl streets. He died 20 April, 1725, and was buried in the 
church. He was succeeded in the office of secretary by his nephew, Robert, Jr. 

1 The three principal kils in the city were sometimes numbered as follows : First kil, or 
Beaver kil ; Second kil, or Rutten kil ; Third kil, or Vossen kil. 

2 These lots lay northward and west of Steuben and North Pearl streets, in the valley of the 
third or Vossen kil, now Canal street. 

3 Nehemiah Pearse was perhaps the father of Jacob and Johannes Pearse, who settled early at 
Niskayuna. 



110 Alhany County Rtcords. 

bottom in a straight line along said Lansingh's bouse drop free; it is in 
breadtb in tbe rear fourteen feet less two incbes, and in lengtb on tbe 
south side four rods six feet, and three incbes, length on tbe north side 
four rods three feet and three incbes, all as it is at present inclosed in 
fence, which be, the grantor, does by virtue of conveyance, acquired by 
him from Jan Coneel, of date the twenty-first of March, A. D. 167|, to 
which reference is made, free and unencumbered, with no claim standing 
or issuing against tbe same, excepting tbe duke's right, without tbe 
grantor's making tbe least claim upon it any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving therefore full power to 
Nehemiah Pears, bis heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
derive right and title from him, to do with and dispose of tbe aforesaid 
house and lot as be might do with bis other patrimonial estate and effects; 
promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims or charges which may hereafter arise, and never more to 
do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with law or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, tbe 21st of April, A. D. 1675. 

Evert Janse Wendell. 
Jncoh Schermerhooren. 
Adriaen Gerrifsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

On the day and date underwritten, appeared before me Johannes 
Provoost, secretary, etc., and in tbe presence of tbe afternamed witnesses: 
Jacob Salomonse [Goewey],' of tbe one side, and Sara [Roeloffse] Van 
Borsum,- commissioned by her husband, Coruelis Van Borsum, of tbe 
other side, who declare that, in perfect friendship and amity, they have 
contracted with each other and made a bargain in the manner following, 
namely: Jacob Salomonse acknowledges that be has sold Sara Van 
Borsum, and Sara Van Borsum, that she has bought of him, his, the 
seller's, certain house, lot and garden, lying in A.lbany, by tbe Beaver's 
kil with all that is therein and thereon fastened by earth and nailed, the 
magnitude, length and breadtb according to tbe patent thereof, with such 
rights as he, the seller, possesses in tbe same, for which said bouse and 
lot and garden, Sara Van Borsum promises to pay to the said Jacob 
Solomonsen, or to bis order, the number of fifty good whole merchantable 
beaver's skins, in two installments ; the first, on the first day of July, of 
the year 1675, and tbe second installment, on the first day of July, A. D. 
1676, at each time a just half of the promised purchase money. The 
aforesaid house and lot shall be given and delivered to tbe buyer, on tbe 
first of June, next coming ; wherewith tbe contracting parties have full 
satisfaction, and the same truly to keep and for tbe consummation of tbe 
same, tbe aforesaid parties respectively pledge their persons and estates, 

1 Jacob Salomonse Goewey was perhaps a brother of Jan Salomonse Goewey, who was the 
ancestor of the Goeweys of Albany. 

"^ Sara Roeloflfse was a daughter of the celebrated Anneke Janse, by her first husband, Roeloff 
Janse. Sara, first married Hans Klerstede, and after his death, Coruelis Van Borsum, of 
Brooklyn ferry, in 1669. She outlived him and married Elbert Elbertsen, of New York, in 1683.— 
Valentine's Manual. 



Albany County Rccoids. Ill 

real and personal, present and future, submitting themselves to all laws 
and judges. 

Thus done in Albany, in the presence of Cornells Van Dyck and Dirck 
Wesselse [Ten Broeck], as witnesses hereto called, upon this 24th of 
April, A. D. 1675. 

This is the mark J. S. of Jacob Salomon se, 
with his own hand set. 

Sara Van Borsem. 
Cornells Van Dj/ck. 
Derek Wessehe. 
Quod Attestor, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of honorable Adriaen Gerritsen, and Andries Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Jan Tomassen [Mingael], also commissary, who declared that, in true 
right, free ownership he had granted, conveyed and transferred, as by 
these presents he does grant and convey in real and actual possession, to 
and for the behoof of Harmen Rutgers, his, the grantor's, half brewery, 
lot and garden, as he, the grantor, possesses the same in company with 
Volkert Janse [Douw], according to the patent received by said Volkert 
Janse and the aeceptant from the governor Francis Lovelace, of date the 
24th of March, 166f, and is according to the tenor of the same; in 
breadth on the east side or the highway, six rods nine feet ten inches ; 
length on the south side on the alley of Abraham Staets, five rods and 
eleven feet; on the west also on Abraham Staets's paling, six rods five 
feet ; on the north side the street, seven rods one foot ; the garden [is 
bounded] on the west side by the road, length six rods nine feet; on the 
north side by the road, four rods seven feet; on the east by the river, 
seven rods and five feet; and the south side again on Abraham Staets 
[alley], five rods and five feet;' all free and unencumbered, with no 
claim standing or issuing against the same, excepting only the lord's 
right, without the grantor's making the least claim any more thereupon, 
acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving therefore 
full power to the said Harmen Rutgers, his heirs and successors, or those 
who may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid brewery, lot and garden as he might do with his 
other efi"ects and patrimonial estate; promising to defend the same against 
all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims and charges, which 
hereafter may arise, and never more to do or allow anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided therefor, according to law. 

In Albany, 28th March, A. D. 167|, 

Jan Thomas. 
Adriaen Gerritsen. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



1 The flrst lot, above de8cribed, on which the brewery stood, was the easterly half of the 
block, on which the Exchange stands, bounded by Broadway, Exchange, Dean, and State 
streets. Captain Abram Staets then owned the westerly half, fronting upon Broadway. State 



112 



Albany County Records. 



Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of honorable Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, and Jacob Schermerhoorn, com- 
missaries, etc., Volkert Janse Douw, who declared, that in true rights, 
free ownership, he had granted and conveyed, as by these presents he 
does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof 
of Harmen Rutgers ; bis, grantor's, just half of his brewery, lot and gar- 
den, as they have possessed the same in company, according to the patent 
granted to them, the grantee and grantor, by the governor, Francis 
Lovelace, of date 24th of March, 166f, and having the following dimen- 
sions: breadth on the east side or highway, six rods nine feet ten inches; 
length on the south side, on the alley of Abraham Staets, five rods eleven 
feet; on the west, also on Abraham Staets paling, six rods five feet; on 
the north side the street, seven rods one foot; the garden [is bounded on] 
the west side by the road, length six rods nine feet; on the north side the 
road, four rods seven feet; on the east, on the river side, seven rods five 
feet; on the south side, again on Abraham Staets [alley], five rods and 
five feet;i and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against the same, excepting only the lord's right, without the 
grantor's having the least claim any more upon it ; acknowledging that 



street, between Broadway and the river, was merely an alley to the water side. Subsequently, in 
1735, Sybrant Van Schaick received a conveyance of half of the same property from Pieter 
Pieterse Lansing.— ^wwafo of Albany, x, 60. The garden lot lay between the river and Dean 
street, then a space barely sixty feet wide. Dean street was first called Dock street, and was 



EXCHANGE STEEET. 







7 R. 1 ft. : 






Volkert Janse. : 






Jan Tomase : 






to : 


; 1 

: a 

; 1 

: < 


:d 

: K 


Harmen Kutgers.',^ : 

d : 

C5 : 

K : 
Brewery Lot. : 

5 B. 11 ft. : 



4 b. 7 ft. 
Volkert Janse. 



Jan Tomase 
to 



: =S Harmen Eutgers. "S ; ^ 



ABEAM STAETS'S ALLEY, 



subject to inundation in high water as well as the space between it and the river. The late 
Cornelis Truax said that when the Yankees began to come in they ventured to build below 
Dock street, and were told by the Dutchmen if they had seen the river break up they would 
not build there. Before the pier was erected the current of the river swept toward this point 
with great force, especially in times of high water. 
1 The other half of this property was conveyed to Herman Eutgers, by the last deed. 



Albany County Records. 113 

he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving, therefore, full power to the 
said Harmen Rutgers, his heirs and successors, or those who may here- 
after acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the 
aforesaid brewery, lot and garden, as he might do with his other patri- 
monial estate and eifects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, 
and to free it from all trouble, claims and charges which are lawful, and 
never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either 
with^ or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as 
provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, this 28th of April, A. D. 1675. 

Gerrit Van JSlicJitenhonf. Volkert Janse Douw. 

Jacob Schermerlioren. 

Acknowledged before me, t t^ ^ 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Gerrit Van Nes,i of the one side, and Jacob 
Salpmonse [Goewey], of the other side, who declared that in love and 
amity they have contracted and made a bargain in manner following, 
namely : Gerrit Van Nes acknowledges that he has sold, and Jacob 
Salomonse, that he has bought of him, his, grantor's, certain house, 
standing and lying in the colony of Renselaerswyck, at the Greenbush, 
lying between a vacant lot and the house of Jan Oothout; and that, with 
all that is therein fast by earth and nailed at this date, free and unencum- 
bered, with no claim standing against it, save only the patroon's right 
(heersynrecht) ; also the seller makes over to the buyer the use of the lot 
and garden, so far as it lies in fence, in form and manner as lots and 
gardens used by other colonists; and, as the buyer granted to Frederick 
de Visser,- deceased, leave to build a little house on a corner of the lot, 
which he [de Visser] has done, the buyer must not allow said little house 
longer to remain there, by reason of the delay of said Frederick, whereas 
he or his successors are holdeu to cause the same to be removed therefrom ; 
for which aforesaid house Jacob Salomonse promises to pay the number of 
thirty-four and a half good whole merchantable beaver skins, in two install- 
ments ; the first, on the first day of July of this year, a just half; and the 
second installment, on the first of July, A. D. 1676; each time seventeen 
beavers and two guilders in beavers; the house remaining in possession of 
the seller until next Monday, when delivery shall be made; all which afore 
written, the contracting parties declare is to be held valid and true. 

Thus done, without craft or guile, in the presence of Cornelis Van 
Dyck, and Dirck Wesselse, as witnesses, hereto called, on this 11th day 

of iAIay, A. D. 1675, in Albany. ^ Tr xt 

•^ Gerret Van Nes. 

This is the mark X of Jacob Salomonsen, 
Cornelis Van Dyck. with his own hand set. 

Dierck Wesselse. 

Acknowledged before me, t ^^ r. 

' Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

1 Gerrit Van Nes was son of Cornelis Hendrik Van Nes, and born in 1645. He was Jiving in 
Greenbusli, in 1663. In his will, made 1707, tie speaks of Ills second wife, Maria Pieterse 
Loockermans, wliom he married in 1677, and of a son, "Willem, mariner, and Jannetie, wife of 
Loiirens Van Schaick. He had also a son, Gerrit, born about 1681, and living in 1703, but 
probably dead at date of his will. 

2 Now Visscher or Fisher. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 15 



114 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable commissaries Gerrit Yan Slichtenhorst, and 
Jacob Schermerhoorn, etc., Harmen Rutgers, citizen here, who declared 
that in true rights, free ownership, he had granted and conveyed, as by 
these presents he does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to 
and for the behoof of Mr. Goosen Gerritse Van Sehaick, and Pieter 
Lassingh, in company, ^ his, the grantor's, certain brewery, lot and garden, 
according to the patent granted to him and Volkert Janse Douw, in 
company, by the Governor General Francis Lovelace, 'of date 24th of 
March, A. I). 166|, having these dimensions; breadth on the east side or 
highway, six rods nine feet ten inches ; length on the south side, on the 
alley of Abraham Staets, five rods and eleven feet; on the west, also on 
Abraham Staets paling, six rods five feet; on the north side, seven rods 
one foot ; the garden has on the west side the street, length six rods nine 
feet; on the north side, also the road, four rods seven feet; on the east, 
on the river side, seven rods and five feet ; on the south, on Abraham 
Staets [alley], again five rods and five feet;- and that free and unencum- 
bered, with no claim, standing or issuing against the same, only excepting 
the lord's right, without the grantor's making the least claim any more 
upon it; acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving 
therefore full power to the aforesaid Goosen Gerritse Van Sehaick, and 
Pieter Lassingh, their heirs and successors, or those who may acquire 
right and title hereafter from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid 
brewery, lot and garden, as they might do with their other patrimonial 
estate and effects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to 
free them from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and 
never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as 
provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, this last day of May, A. D. 1675. 

Herman Rutgers. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Jacob Schermerhoren. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Albert Ryekman, as attorney for Eldert Gerbertsen Cruyff, of the 
honorable court of Albany, has solicited relief from the trouble and com- 
mission imposed upon him by said CruiflF, and likewise from the books and 
papers, made over [to him] by said Cruifi", touching the creditors, also 
that he, Ryekman, may remain in the further possession of the household 
stufi" and the dwelling house, with the appendances and dependencies of 
the same, on his paying to the owner of the house 700 guilders in beavers, 
which was allowed by the honorable court aforesaid, according to their 
honors' verdict thereon pronounced, of date 21 January, A. D. 1674; also 
two special mortgages are charged against Eldert Gerbertsen '-^ Cruyff afore- 
said, whereof that of Jan Hendrickse Bruyn has the preference according 

1 Pieter Pieterse Lassingh, afterwards sold his half of the brewery and lots to Sybrant 
Gooseuse Van Sehaick, who o^vned it in I"i35.—Amials of Albany, x, 60. 
- See note on page 111. 
3 Herbertsen ? G and H were used quite promiscuously, and Goosen was pronounced Rosen. 



Albany County Records. 115 

to the verdict of the honorable court aforesaid, of date Feb. 4, A. D. 167 f; 
wherefore Albert Ryckman,' and Stephanus Van Cortlandt as director of 
the colony Renselaerswyck, are agreed, that said Ryckman shall assume 
the mortgage of Mr. Jan Hendrickse Bruyn, and that I, Stephanus Van 
Cortlandt, as director, will be satisfied with the superstructure and 
the appurtenances of the saw mill on Bethlehem kil, and the house at 
Bethlehem and the rights, which the aforesaid Cruyff had in Katskil ; 
because we find that the effects of the said CruyfF can reach no further ; 
provided that the aforesaid Byckman shall be holden to satisfy the said 
mortgage of Mr. Bruyn, [and having received] some outstanding debts, 
a cow, some iron work, and certain other trifles, we mutually acknowledge 
that we are satisfied therewith. 

Thus done in Albany, without craft or guile, on this 2nd of June, A. 
D. 1675. 

s. v. cortlant.'- 
x\lbert Janse Ryckman. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 



Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, Secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of Adriaen Gerritsen, and Andries Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Albert Jansen Ryckman, who [declared] by [these presents that], as he 
had made a contract and agreement with Mr. Stephanus Van Cortlant, 
director of colony Renselaerswyck, by consent of Jan Hendrickse Bruyn, 
for the satisfaction of the junior [of two] mortgages, both of which 
the said Bruyn holds against Eldert Gerbertse Cruyfi", so, he, the mort- 
gagor, Albert Janse Ryckman, in consideration of the renouncement 
which said Henderick Bruyn makes of his claim upon the person of 
Eldert Gerbertsen Kruyt [Cruyff], by reason of his right of preference 
for his mortgage against said Kruyff, acknowledges that he is bound and 
obligated for the payment of said mortgage, assuming the same by these 
presents as his own debt, amounting to the sum of three hundred and 
nine and ninety guilders and four stuivers, in good whole merchantable 
beaver skins, which aforesaid sum of 399 guilders four stuivers and 
interest on the same at ten per cent. I, Albert Reeckman, promise to 
pay in two installments ; the first, being the just half, in the coming 
year, A. D. 1676 ; the other half, a year after, in A. D. 1677, for which 
payment he pledges as a valid mortgage and special hypothecation, his 
house, brewhouse, and brewkettle, all -is they were bought and the bill of 
sale thereof mentions, and in preference also to 700 guilders beaver, for 
which the house still stands indebted to the owner, together with a 
distiller's kettle, and two heifers, an iron trammel (heiigel) for a saw mill, 
an iron pinion, and an iron spindle; and further [he pledges] his person 
and estate, real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted, for 
the recovery of payment, in case of need, of the aforesaid three hundred 



1 Captain Albert Janse Ryckman was a brewer. His house was on the south (?) corner of 
Hudson street and Broadway, in 1704. 1T03-3 he was mayor of the city. His mother, Tryntje 
Janse, was married to Eldert Gerbertse Cruyff. By his wife, Neeltje Quaclienbos, he had 
twelve children, of whom nine were living and spoken of in his will, made in ItSG. He was 
buried Jan. 13, 1737, and his wife on 17th of Oct., of the following year. 

2 Stephanus Van Cortlandt was son of Oloff Stev. Van Cortlandt. For an account of this 
family, see OX'allaghan's Ilistory of New Netherlands i, 213. 



116 Mhany County Records. 

and ninety-nine guilders and four stuivers, in beavers, without cost and 
loss. 

In Albany, on this 2nd June, A. D. 1675. 

Albert Janse Ryckman. 
Adriaen Gerritse. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

On this, the 8d day of Aug., 1678, appeared Jan Hendrick Bruyns 
before the secretary, and acknowledged that he is fully paid and satisfied 
for the contents of the above standing mortgage, by Albert Janse Ryckman. 
Done in Albany, datum xit s^ipra. 

Jan Henderck Bruyns. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro : Livingston, Secretary. 

The Messieurs commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck and 
Schanhechtade, declare by these presents, that in true rights, free owner- 
ship, they do grant and allow to and for the behoof of Mr. Cornells Van 
Dyck, chirurgeon, in a certain parcel of land, lying here in Albany, on 
the plain,! by and upon Mr. Philip Schuyler's, and Pieter Bogardus, 
[land, and having] to the east, a breadth of thirteen and a half rods; to 
the south, a length of sixteen and a half rods ; on the west, a breadth of 
eleven rods ; and to the north, a length of sixteen rods ; for a pasture for 
a horse, and that free and unencumbered ; the same is so done by way of 
exchange and barter for a little piece of land on the Rutten kil, of one 
and a half morgeus, formerly to him granted by conveyance, of date the 
10th of April, A. D. 1673; and which extended so as to inconvenience 
the range of the burgesses cattle ; giving therefore full power to the afore- 
said Mr. Cornells Van Dyck, his heirs and successors, or those who may 
hereafter acquire right and title from him to dispose thereof as he might 
do with his own patrimonial estate and effects, and for which he is 
empowered to solicit a patent of the right honorable governor general. 

Done in Albany, this 5th of June, A. D. 1675. 

Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst. 
Jacob Schermerhoren. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

The Messieurs commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck and 
Schanhechtade, declare by these presents that, in true rights, free owner- 
ship, they do grant, convey and transfer, to and for the behoof of Mr. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, in a certain lot, standing and lying in Albany, 
hard by the plain, within the town fence [stockadoes], on the survey (?) 
of Rut Aertse's garden, to the east the street; and is at the west side on 
the street, in breadth, four rods and two feet; at the south, along the 
town's fence, in length nine rods ten feet and four inches; breadth in the 
rear or to the east, six feet; to the north the length [is] from the front on 

' The plain included the area south of the Rutten kil and east of Pearl street. The Rutten kil 
is the covered sewer, crossing Pearl street, about equidistant between Beaver and Howard streets, 
and emptying into the river near the foot of State street. 



Albany County Records. 117 

the street to the rear on the other street; and that free and unencumbei-ed, 
without their honors making the least claim any more thereupon, and 
acknowledging that they are fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving 
therefore full power to the aforesaid Mr. Slichtenhorst, his heirs and 
successors, or those who may hereafter acquire right and title from him, 
to do with and dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his other 
patrimonial estate and effects, granting herewith consent to solicit of the 
governor general a patent for the same. 

Thus done by the court in Albany, on this 27 May, A. D. 1675. 

Jacob Schermerhoren. 
Adriaen GtERRETSEN. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

The Messieurs commissaries of Albany, etc., declare by these presents, 
that in true rights, free ownership, they do grant, convey and transfer, to 
and for the behoof of Adriaen Gerritseu, in a certain lot, standing and 
lying in Albany, hard by the plain, within the town's fence, between the 
lot of Mr. Slichtenhorst, and Rut Aertse, on the east side the street, and 
is at the west side, in front on the street, in breadth, three rods and nine 
feet; to the north on Rut Aertse, in length, nine rods and one foot; in 
the rear against the other street, being to the east, in breadth, six and 
thirty feet; on the south side, in length from the front on the street to 
the rear street; and that free and unencumbered, without the grantor's 
having the least claim any more upon the same, and acknowledging that 
they are fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving therefore full power to 
the aforesaid Adriaen Gerritsen, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter receive right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
the aforesaid lot, as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and 
effects, grafting him, by these presents, consent to solicit a patent of the 
right honorable governor general. 

Thus done by the court in Albany, on this 27th of May, A. D. 1675. 

Jacob Schermerhoren. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc , and in the 
presence of the honorable Messieurs Adriaen Gerritse, and Andries Teller, 
commissaries, etc., Sweer Teunissen [Van Velsen],' who declared, that 
he had in true rights, free ownership, granted and conveyed, as he by 
these presents does grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and 
for the behoof of Jan Cornelise Vyselaer,'- and Lucas Pieterse [Coey- 
mans],-* his, the grantor's, certain saw mill, together with the kil whereon 

1 Sweer Teuniase Van Velsen, or Van Westbrook, was one of the early settlers of Schenectady, 
where he built the first grist mill, in 1069, on the Sand kil, and maintained it until his death, 
when it passed by bequest to the Dutch church. He married Maritie Mynderse, widow of Jan 
Bareutse Wemp, in ltj64. In the sack of the village of Schenectady, in 1690, he was killed, 
probably leaving no children ; for his property was distributed among the children of his 
widow, by Wemp, and to the church. 

2 Alim Gow. 

3 Lucas Pieterse was one of the four brothers Coeymans, who came out in 1636, from Utrecht . 
He was probably the same person as Lucas Pieterse Houtsager {houtzaager, wood or timber 
sawyei'), mentioned in the records. 



118 Albany County Records. 

the mill stands, and two morgens of arable land (houidandt) , lying in the 
colony Renselaerswyck, up the [Hudson] river, on the east bank over 
against Stoney point {stecne hoeck), before this called Poesten mill,' 
together with free egress and a road along the hill, by Pieter Pieterse 
Van Woggelum's,- to the shore, as it has been used before this ; which 
land is a part of the patent granted to him, the grantor, by Governor 
Richard Nicols, of date the I3th day of April, A. D. 1667 ; and that free 
and unencumbered, with no claim, standing or issuing against it, except 
the lord's right, without the grantor's making the least claim any more 
upon it, and acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, 
the first penny with the last; giving therefore full power to the aforesaid 
Jan Cornelise Yyselaer, and Lucas Pieterse, their heirs and successors, 
or those who may hereafter acquire right and title from them, to do with 
and dispose of the same, as they might do with their other patrimonial 
estates and efi"ects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, and 
to free it from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and never 
moi'e to do or sufi"er anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of June, A. D. 1675. 

SWEER ThOONUSSEN. 

Adriaen Gerritsen. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable Adriaen Gerritsen, and Andries Teller, com- 
missaries, etc., Dirck Hesseling, who declared that he had in true rights, 
free ownership, granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant 
and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Jacob 
Heviek, a little parcel or lot of land, lying at Lubberden land, in the 
colony Renselaerswyck, bounded on the east by the highway; to the 
west, the river bank; to the south, Henderick Reur, deceased; and to 
the north, Gerrit Swart; breadth, eighty wood feet; and length, from the 
river bank up to the highway ; and that free and unencumbered, excepting 
the lord's [patroon's ?] right, which he does by virtue of a decree of the 
court, the two certain sentences made against Dirck Schelluyne, the first 
owner, etc. 

[This paper is not executed]. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the afternamed witnesses : Volkert Janse Douw, and Pieter 
Winne, who declare that, in friendship and amity, they have bargained 
with each other for a half of the island, lying over against {de Paerde 

1 Hence, perhaps, Poesten kil, the name given to a stream in Rensselaer county. In Dntch, 
the noun poesten signifies bellows — the verb jMesten, to puff or blow. 

2 Pieter Pieterse Van Woggelum was probably a sou of Pieter Adriaeuse Van W^oggelnm, 
alias Soegemackelyck, who was one of the first proprietors of Schenectady. Pieter Pieterse 
Van Woggelum early became possessed of the land, on which the present city of Troy 
stands, which he sold to Dirk Van Der Heyden. The latter conveyed this farm to his three 
sons : Jacob, David, and Mattys.— Deec^s, v 325 ; Woodvxyrth'' s Troy, 2d ed., passim. 



County Records. 11 Q 

hoeclc)^^ Horse Point, and in the manner following : Firstly. — Volkert 
Janse acknowledged, that he had sold, and Pieter Winne, that he had 
bought of him, the aforesaid half island, lying as aforesaid over against 
Paerde Hoeck, which was aforetime named Constapel's island. (The 
other half of which at present belongs to Teunis Spitsbergen, and is leased 
by Marten Cornelissen [Van Buren]),.with the half the house, barn and 
rick, and all that is thereon fast by earth and nailed ; the same shall be 
delivered free and unencumbered to the buyer, only excepting the lord's 
[patroon's?] right. For which aforesaid half island, with the half of the 
house, barn and rick, Pieter Winne promises to pay the number of nine 
and sixty good whole merchantable beaver skins, six pieces [skins] of 
which he shall pay down to the seller's wife; the remainder in three 
installments, each time twenty-one beavers, of which the first shall be on 
the first of November, next coming 5 the second on the first of November, 
A. D. 1676 ; and the third or last installment, on the first of November, 
A. D. 1677. Further, it is hereby agreed and conditioned, that, as the 
aforesaid half island is still under lease to Marten Cornelise for the term 
of six years, from the first of May last, the lease shall have its full efi'ect; 
and as [it is rented] for fifty-six schepels of wheat yearly for the whole 
island, as the seller says, the buyer shall receive five years' rent thereof, 
and the seller the rent of the current year, each time twenty-eight 
schepels for the half; wherewith the contracting parties acknowledge 
that they are well satisfied ; pledging hereto for the performance of this 
contract their respective persons and estates, real and personal, present and 
future. 

Thus done in Albany, in the presence of Adriaen Gerritsen, and 
Andries Teller, as witnesses, hereto called on this 26th of July, A. D. 1675. 

Pieter Winne. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable Adriaen Gerritsen, and Andries Teller, com- 
missaries, etc., Mr. Jan Hendrickse Bruyns, who declared that he, in 
true rights, free ownership, had granted, conveyed and transferred, as he 
by these presents does [grant, etc.], to and for the behoof of Myndert Frede- 
rickse Smit, here in Albany, his just third part of land, to him belonging, 
in company with Jan Clute and Jurriaen Teunissen, with all the right and 
title, which he, the grantor, therein has, according to patent thereof, from 
the right honorable Governor General Nicols, of date the 25th of May, 
A. D. 1667, whereto reference is made; and that free and unencumbered, 
with no claim, standing or issuing against the same, excepting the lord's 
[duke's] right, without the grantor's making the least claim any more 
against it, and acknowledging, that he is fully satisfied and paid for the 
same, the first with the last penny, by him, Myndert Frederickse, giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessain, and full power to the aforesaid Myn- 
dert Frederickse, his heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may 
acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid 



Paerde Hoeck is spoken of as early as 1643.— 0'' Gallaghmi's HlMoryof New Netherland,i,AM). 



120 Albany County Records. 

third part of land and the appendances of the same, as he mi^ht do with 

his patrimonial estate and effects; promising to defend said third part of 

land and appendances of the same, against all persons, and to free it from 

all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and further, never more 

to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 

without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 

therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, this 7th of August, A. D. 1675. 

A J . ri * Jan Heinderck Bruyns. 

Adriaen brerretsen. 

A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Johannes Provoost, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of honorable Adriaen Gerritsen, and Anderies Teller, com- 
missaries, etc., Mr. Gerrit Swart, and Mr. Adriaen Van Ilpendam, as 
administrators of the estate of Jan Stuart, deceased, who declare by these 
presents, that they have granted and conveyed, and in true rights, free 
ownership, have transferred to and for the behoof of Lourens Van Alen, 
for a certain house and lot of the aforesaid Jan Stuart, standing and 
lying in Albany, on the hill, between the house of Evert Janse Kuyper 
[Cooper], and Wynant Gerritse [Van der Poel], and said lot is according 
to conveyance from Jan Coneel, of date 20 Aug., A. D. 1G70 ; breadth, 
twelve feet seven and a half inches, Rynland measure ; and length to the 
rear, six rods and five feet, or according to the bill of sale, as large as it 
lies inclosed in fence ; which being measured by the surveyor, was found 
to be on Evert Jansen's side, six rods * * * and two inches ; on Melgert 
Wynants' side, length six rods six feet and one inch ; breadth in the rear, 
one rod * * ten inches; in front to the street on the hill [?], breadth 
one rod * * * ten inches, Rynland measure; and that free and unen- 
cumbered, with no claim, standing or issuing against the same, excepting 
the lord's [duke's?] right, without the grantor's in aforesaid character 
[of administrators], making any further claim upon it, also acknowledging, 
that they have been fully satisfied and paid by said Lourens Van Alen, 
the first penny with the last, moreover giving full power to said Lourens 
Van Alen, his heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may acquire 
right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house 
and lot, as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; promising 
to defend said house and lot from all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and never more to do or 
suffer anything to be done against the same, cither with or without law 
in any manner- whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, 11th of Aug., A. D. 1675. 

Qr. SWARTT. 

Adriaen Gerretsen. Adriaen Van Ilpendam. 

A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Johannes Provoost, Secretary. 

1 Melgert Wynaiitse Van der Poel, gunstocker, was a son of Wynant Van der Poel. By 
his two wives : Ariaantje Verplanck, and Elizabeth Teller widow of Abraham Van Tricht, he 
had ten children, seven sons and three daughters. His lot was in State street, fronting the 
Port. He was not living Sept. 19, 1710. 



Albany County Records. 121 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary of Albany, colony 
Renselaerswyck, etc., and in the presence of the honorable commissaries 
of the same jurisdiction. Major Abraham Staets, and Adriaen Gerritz, 
Jurian Teunissen Tappen,' who acknowledges that he is well and truly 
indebted to Mr. Philip Schuyler, in the quantity of one hundred and fifty 
good and merchantable beavers, growing out of a matter of moneys paid 
to Jurian Teunise to his content, which aforesaid hundred and fifty 
beavers the mortgagor promises to pay to Mr. Schuyler or his order, 
within the space of one year, commencing on the first of August, A. D. 
1675, with interest at ten per cent., pledging therefor specially his house 
and lot, lying here in Albany, together with his farm,"- with horses and 
cattle, and generally his person and estate, real and personal, present and 
future, without exception, submitting the same to the force of all the 
duke's (Jieeren') laws and judges, to procure, if need be, the payment 
thereof without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, the 8th of September, 1675. 

JUREJAN TUNSEN. 

Ahram Staes. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Secry. 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary of Albany, etc., and 
in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, INIr. Nehemiah Pearse, and 
Samuel Holman, who declare that they, in friendship and amity, have 
agreed and contracted with each other about the sale of a house, in 
manner following: First. — Nehemiah acknowledges that he has sold, 
and Samuel Holman, that he has bought of him, his, Nehemiah Pearse's, 
house and lot, lying here on the hill, where now Elias Van Ravesteyn 
lives, for which he, the buyer, promises to pay to the seller the sum of 
thirty pound sterling, in Boston money, and that on or before the 21st of 
July, 1676, coming, to wit, twenty pounds here in Albany in dufi"els and 
stroudwaters, free from all freight and customs, the duffels at 40 per cent, 
advance on England, and the stroudwaters at 50 per cent; and the remaining 
ten pounds as the parties can agree, to wit, to be paid out of such goods 
as said Holman shall bring up here, and if Nehemiah Pearse does not 
like such goods as said Holman shall bring here, he must wait until the 
second journey, always understanding that said Pearse shall have a choice 
of said Holman's wares ; as it regards the rent of the aforesaid house, the 
seller shall receive it until the first of June next coming ; but the buyer 
shall from this time forward have possession of said house, and the seller 
shall provide and well point with lime, the pan tiles lying upon the afore- 
said house; with which the contracting parties are mutually well satisfied 
as being arranged without craft or guile, and the respective parties pledge 
their persons and estates for the observance of these presents. 

Thus done in Albany, in presence of Jan Byvanck,^ and Dirk Wesselse 



1 Perhaps the same person as Juriaen Tetmise Glazemaker. 

2 This farm '.ay on the east bank of the Hudson river, and on the north side of the Wynants kil. 

3 Jan Byvanck of Oldenzee, Holland, was born in 1637. In 1666 he married Bolitje Evertse 
Duyching, of New York ; and in 1602 he married Sara Frans, of the same place. Of his 
children, three: Heudricus, Gerrit and Maria, are recorded in the records of the Albany church. 
He probably had other childi-en, who settled in New York. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 16 



122 Albany County Records. 

[Ten Broeck], as witnesses hereto called, this twenty-first clay of 
October, 1675. 

Nehemiah Pears. 
Samuell Holm an. 
Jan Byvanck. 
Dlerck Wesaelse. 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary of Albany, etc., and 
in presence of the afternamed witnesses: Elmer Otte,' and the honorable 
Domine Nicholas Van Renselaer,- who declare that they, in friendship 
and amity, have agreed and contracted with each other, about the sale of 
a house and lot, standing and lying here in Albany, in Joncker [now 
State] street, being a corner house, bounded on the west by the house of 
Johannes Witthardt, and on the east the highway, in manner following: 
First. — Helmer Otten acknowledges that he has sold, and Dom. 
Nicholas Van Renselaer that he has bought the aforesaid house and lot, 
for which he, the buyer, promises to pay to the seller the sum of two hundred 
good merchantable beavers, in three payments, to wit, a third part of the 
two hundred beavers on the first of April, 1676, and the third part on 
the first of January, 1677, and the third third part on the first of April, 
1678 ; the seller promises to make the aforesaid house water tight, roof 
tight, and glass tight, also to leave ten posts for the fence; it being under- 
stood that the seller has nothing to do with the cellar only to make the 
glass tight. The seller also promises to furnish sureties against all 
trouble, claims or charges, and also to give a proper conveyance thereof 
to the buyer, so soon as the last installment is paid. The seller has made 
delivery of the aforesaid house and lot to the buyer to-day ; about which 
the contracting parties are mutually well satisfied as being done without 
craft or guile ; the parties respectively pledging their persons and estates 
for the observance of the same. 

Thus done in Albany, in the presence of Jan Byvanck, and Juriaen 
Janse Groenwout,-^ as witnesses, hereto invited, on this 6 Nov., 1675, and 
in the 27th year of the reign of our sovereign Lord, Charles, by the grace 
of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, defender of the 
faith, etc. 

Helmer Otten. 
NicoLAUs Van Rensselaer. 
Jan Bi/vanch. 
This is the mark -\- of Juriaen Janse Groenwout^ with his own hand set. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston. 

Appeared [before] me Robert Livingston, secretary, etc., in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Christopher Skaysse, and Samuel Massie, 

1 Helmer Otten was a baker. His wife, AdriaaDtje Arentse, was daughter of Arent Andriese 
Bratt, one of the first proprietors of Schenectady. In 1670 he purchased a bouwery of 26 
morgens at Schenectady of Pieter Adriaense Van Wog^elum, alias Soegemaclielyck, and within 
a few years died, leaving one daughter, Catharyna, who subsequently married Gerrit Symonse 
Veeder. His widow married Ryer Schermerhorn, who became possessed of Otten's bouwery, 
portions of which are still held by the family. 

2 See O'Callaghan's History of New Netherlands, i, 123. 

3 Juriaen Janse Groenwout was a licensed butcher in Albany, in 1070. His wife was Maritie 
Tomase Mingael, widow of Cornells Teunise Bosch [Van VV^estbroeck], by whom he had a 
daughter, Wyntie, wife of Pieter Bogardus. She was not living in 1664. 



Albany County Records. 123 

who acknowledge that they are justly and honestly indebted, etc , and in 
arrears to Mr. Nehemiah Pears, for the use of Mr. [Samuel] Wilson, in 
the sum of eight hundred and thirty-eight guilders, seewant, for goods, 
received to theirs atisfaction, to be paid in beavers, seewant, or wheat of 
beavers value, on or before the 25th of March, 1676, pledging therefor 
generally and specially their persons and estates, jointly and severally, 
real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted, submitting the 
same to the force of all the duke's (heeren) laws and judges, to promote 
the payment thereof if need be, without cost or loss. 

Done in Albany, in the presence of Dirk Albertse Bradt, and Johannes 
Wandelaer, as witnesses hereto invited, on this 4th day of December, 1675. 

Christopher Skaysse. 
SaiMI-P Massie. 
jDirck Albertse BratJ 
Johannes de Wandelaer. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secrr., etc., and in the presence of 
these afternamed witnesses, Richard Pretty, who declared that he was 
fully paid by Jan Coneel as it respects the mortgage, which he had upon 
said Jan Coneel's house and lot in Albany, inasmuch as Mr. Andries 
Teller has promised to satisfy said Pretty to his content, according to 
contract, witnessing the same with his own signature on this 31st day of 
December, 1675, in Albany, in presence of Mr. Nehemiah Pears, and 
James Penniman, as witnesses hereto called. 

Richard Pretty. 
Nehemiah Pears. 
James Peniman. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Philip Schuyler, and 
Pieter Winne, Dirk Henderickse Sweedt,'^ who declared that he in true 
rights, free ownership, has granted, conveyed and transferred by these 
presents, to and for the behoof of Pieter Du Moree, for a certain lot of 
land lying behind the Kinderhoeck ; to the west of the kil, to the south 
of Jan Martensen,-* to the east of Jan Martensen, and that free and 
unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against it, excepting 
the lord's right, without the grantor's having the least claim any more 
upon the same, and acknowledging himself fully satisfied and paid there- 
for, the first penny with the last, giving therefore jjfenajn actionem cessam, 
and full power to the aforesaid Pieter Du Moree, his heirs and successors, 
or those who may hereafter acquire title from him, to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his patrimonial estate 
and effects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free 

1 Dirk Albertae Bratt was one of the five sons of Albertse Andriese Bratt. 

2 Or Dirk Hendrickse Bye de Sweedt. 

3 Probably Jan Marteuse VVever, or De Wever, who, in 1057, owned a house near Fort 
Orange. Page 60. 



124 Albany County Records. 

it from all actions, claims and charges, wliicli may hereafter arise an<l 
are lawful, and further, never more to do or allow anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided therefor by law. 
Done in Albany, the 7th of March, 167f . 

This is the mark of Sarah -(- Veriiaele, wife of Dirk Hendrikse, 
with her own hand set. 
Philip Scliui/hr. 
Pietcr Winne. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp], 
and Richard Pretty, Cornells Teunisse, who acknowledged that he is well 
and truly indebted and in arrears to Mr. Andries Teller, merchant, here 
in the sum of nine hundred and seventy guilders in beavers, at eight 
guilders for a merchantable beaver, and a hundred and fifty-four guilders 
in seewant, growing out of merchandise, received to his content, which 
aforesaid nine hundred and seventy-one guilders in beavers, and one 
hundred and fifty-four guilders seewant, the mortgagor promises to pay 
to Mr. Teller or his order in manner following. First. — Four hundred 
guilders in beavers, he, the mortgagor, promises to pay on the first of 
November next coming, and the remaining five hundred and seventy-one 
guilders in beavers, and one hundred and fifty-four guilders seewant in 
January, February or March, 167f , and failing [in the payment] of the 
aforesaid five hundred and seventy-one guilders beavers, and one hundred 
and fifty-four guilders seewant; the mortgagor shall be holden to pay 
interest, at ten per cent yearly ; pledging specially his, the mortgagor's, 
two cows, five heifers in their third year, two gelded horses, two mares, 
one of five and the other of seven years of age, and seventy schepel of 
winter wheat (cooren^ sowed, which at present stands upon the land, and 
all on the bouwery at Paepsknee, which the mortgagor at present possesses, 
and generally his person and estate, real and personal, present and future, 
nothing excepted, submitting the same to the force of all the duke's laws 
and judges for the recovery if need be of the payment thereof, without 
cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, on this 5th day of April, 1676. 

CORNELUS TeUNISZ.I 

Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 
Before me, 

Ro. Livingston. Seer. 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp], 
and Mr. Richard Pretty; Pieter Meese [Vrooman], and his wife, Volkje 
Pieterse, who declare that they, in true rights, free ownership, have 

1 Cornelus Teunisse Van Vechten, alias Keesom, was a son of Teunis Dirkse Van 
Vechten, and lived at Paepsljnee. He had two wives : 1st, Annatie Leendertse ; and 2nd, 
Maria Lucaee, widow of Jacob Claas, wliom he married in 1689. He had a large family of 
children, among whom were at least four sons: Lucas, Salomon, Dirk, Leendert. 



Albany County Records. 125 

granted, conveyed and transferred by these presents, to and for the 
behoof of Mr. Frederic Phillipse, a merchant of New York, in their 
house and lot, standing and lying hard by the church of this town, in 
Joncker [now State] street, next the house of Mr. Jan Withart, on the 
one side, and the house that Mr. [DeJ Laval owned, and that Pieter 
Hartgers caused to be built on the other side, as it at present lies inclosed 
in fence; and that free and unencumbered, except the sum of eighty 
beavers, which Pieter Meese Vrooman has assigned to his son Matthys 
Pieterse Vrooman, upon the aforesaid house, according to instrument of 
date the 18th of February, 167|, with no other claim, standing or issuing 
against the same, excepting the duke's (heerensf/n') right, without the 
grantor's making the least claim any more upon the same, and acknow- 
ledging that he is fully satisfied and paid for the same the first penny as 
well as the last, giving therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power 
to the aforesaid Frederic Phillipse, his heirs and sucsessors, or those who 
hereafter may acquire title from them, to do with and dispose of said 
house and lot, as they might do with their patrimonial estate and eff"ects; 
promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all 
actions, claims and charges, which may hereafter arise and are lawful, 
and further, neither to do nor suffer anything to be done against the 
same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obli- 
gation as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, on this 9th day of May, 1676. 

Pieter Meesen Vrooman. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. Folcketen Pieters. 

Richard Pretty. 

In my presence, 

Ko. Livingston, Seer. 

Volkje Pieterse, widow of the late P. Meese Vrooman, brought the 
following satisfaction under the hand of Frederick Flipsen respecting the 
house mentioned in the aforesaid conveyance : 

I, the subscriber, give permission to Folckie Pieterse, in regard to a 
mortgage, which I have hitherto had upon her house, that said Volkje 
may receive her money in full, and that I have no more right or claim 
upon said house. 

New York, this 30th of May, 1685. 

Frederik Flipsen. 

Thus registered at the request of said Volkje Pieterse. 
RobT Livingston, Seer. 

The messieurs commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck and 
Schaenhechtady, declare by these presents that they, in true rights, free 
ownership, do grant, convey and transfer to and for the behoof of Jacob 
Tysse Van der Heyden,J in a certain lot, standing and lying in Albany, 
hard by the Plain, within the town's fence [stockadoes], on the corner 
of the Plain street; bi-eadth on the road, twenty-seven feet and a half; 
on the road in the rear, against the new grave yard (kerkhof), eleven 
feet; south, the town's fence, three rods; north, Jan Clute's lot, three 

1 Jacob Tysse Van der Heyden was a tailor in New Amsterdam, in 1653. lu 1655, he 
married Anna Hals, in Amsterdam, and soon after settled in Beverwyck. In 1691 lie was not 
living ; his widow was then keeping a public house. He left one son, Dirk. 



126 Alhany County Records. 

rods; and that free and unencumbered, without the grantor's having 
the least claim any more upon it (being granted in recompense or requital 
for his lot and house, which he had on the hill, without the town's gate' 
by Rosseboom's), giving therefore ^j?e«(M>i actionem cessam, and full power 
to the aforesaid Jacob Tyssen Van der Heyden, his heirs and successors, 
or those who hereafter may acquire title from him, to do with and dispose 
of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and 
effects, granting herewith consent to solicit from the right honorable 
governor general a patent (grondbrief). 

Thus done by the honorable court in Albany, on this 20th of May, 1676. 

Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in presence of 
the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse, and Mr. Richard 
Pretty, Jacob Tysse Van der Heyden, who declared that he had sold, 
granted and conveyed as he by these presents does grant and convey in 
real and actual possession to and for the behoof of Willem Loveridge, his 
lot, lying in Albany, hard by the Plain, within the town's fence, on the 
corner of the Plain street; breadth on the road, seven and twenty feet; 
and on the road in the rear, against the new grave yard (kerkhojf), eleven 
feet; south in length, three rods; and north, three rods; which the 
grantor does by virtue of the conveyance, received by him from the 
honorable commissaries, of date the 20th of May, 1676, whereto reference 
is made, besides granting him consent to solicit a patent from the right 
honorable the governor general ; and that free and unencumbered, with 
no claim standing or issuing against it, excepting the duke's right, 
without the grantor's making the least claim any more against the same, 
and acknowledging that he is fully satisfied and paid therefor, giving, 
therefore ^:>^e?tam actionem cesscim, and full power to said Willem 
Loveridge,- his heirs and successors, and those who hereafter may acquire 
title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid lot, as he might do 
with his other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising to defend the 
same against all persons, and free it from all trouble, claims and charges, 
which may hereafter arise, and never more to do or suffer anything to be 
done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, on this 20th day of May, 1676. 

Jacob Tyssen Van der Heyden. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



J This gate was near the junction of North Pearl and Steuben streets. 

2 Willem Loveridge, Senior, owned a farm at Catskil, in 1680, and petitioned for an addition 
to it of 40 acres. Tte Willem Loveridge above, was probably Willem Loveridge, Junior. He 
was accused, in 1676, of charging the Dutch with selling the Northern Indians gunpowder and 
imprisoned until he prove the charge, failing of which he was fined 20 beavers. In 1678, he, 
with others, was condemned and sentenced for setting up a scandalous tree before the door of 
one Thompson, and in extenuation he writes, that it is the custom of the place ; nevertheless 
his sentence was confirmed.— ^'wg'^isA Manuscripts. 



Albany County Records. 127 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Jan Janse Bleecker," and Jacob Sanderse 
Grlen, attorneys for Jan Hendrickse Van Bael of the one side, and Mr. 
Timothy Cooper of the other side, who dechired, in friendship and amity, 
that they had covenanted and agreed with each other, in regard to the 
sale of a house and lot, standing and lying here in Albany on the hill, in 
breadth and length as it lies in fence; to the south bounding upon the 
house of Jan Tomase, and to the north Marte Hoffman,'^ and east and 
west the street, according to the patent of the right honorable governor 
general R. Nicolls, of date the oOth of April, 1667. First.— T^he afore- 
said attorneys acknowledge, that they have sold, and Timothy Cooper, 
that he has bought, the aforesaid house and lot, with all (hat is fast by 
earth and nailed, for which he. Cooper, promises to pay to the sellers or 
their order, the sum of seventy good whole merchantable beavers of one 
and a half pounds a piece, one with another, in two installments, a just 
half each; the first installment in the month of July next coming, and 
the last in the month of July, 1677; the sellers promising to deliver the 
aforesaid house and lot in their present condition ; so soon as the first 
installment is paid, a full conveyance [shall be given], and the patent 
with the last installment, only excepting the lord's right, but as the 
aforesaid house is occupied by Jacob Ten Eyck,-^ who has leased the 
house until, the first of May, 1677, the rent comes to the seller [buyer?], 
from the time the first payment is made, with which the contracting par- 
ties are mutually well satisfied as being done without craft or guile, said 
parties respectively pledging their persons and estates, for the perform- 
ance of these [conditions]. 

Thus done in xilbany, in the presence of Tho. Sharp, and W'". Parker, 
as witnesses hereto invited, on this 26th of May, and in the 27th year of 
the reign of our sovereign lord Charles, by the grace of Grod, king of Grreat 
Britain, France and Ireland, defender of the faith, etc., Annoq. Dom. 1676. 

Jan Jansz Bleeker. 

Testes. Jacob Sanderse Glen.^ 

Thos. Sharp. Timothy Cooper. 

W"}' Parker. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Secretary. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Major Ab'". Staas, and Adriaen Gerritse, commissaries, 

1 Jau Janse Bleecker was born in 1641, in Meppel, province of Overyssel ; he came to 
Albany, in 1R58. He was for several years a magistrate, recorder of the city, member of 
the general assembly, and, in 1700, mayor. By his wife, Margaret Rutse, daughter of Rutger 
Jacobsen, he had nine children. He died 21st of November, 1732, aged ninety-one years and 
was buried in the church. 

2 Marten Hoflfman came from New York, where, in 1675, he owned a house and lot, which 
he sold to Jno. Manning.— English Manuscripts. 

3 Jacob Coenradse Ten Eyck was probably a son of Coenrad I'en Eyck, of New York. He 
was by trade a shoemaker; by his wife, Geertje Coemans, daughter (?) of Barent Coemans, 
he had four sons : Coenrat, Barent, Audries, and Hendrik ; and two daughters : Mayke, and 
Jenneke. His widow made her will in 1716, proved in 1736. She died 1 March, 1736. 

4 Jacob Sanderse Glen was the eldest son of Alexander Leendertse Glen. He settled in 
Albany, whilst the rest of the family removed to Schenectady. By his wife, Catharine Van 
Witbeck, he had three sons and two daughters. Alter his death, in 1083, his widow married 
Jonas Volkertse Douw. In 1680 he owned a lot on the south side of State street, the second 
west of Pearl street, which was afterwards occupied by Harmanus Wendell, who married his 
daughter Anna. 



128 Albany Gounty Records. 

etc., Mr. Neliemiah Pears, who declared, that he had granted and 
conveyed, as he by these presents does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to and for the behoof of Mr. Samuel Holrqan, his house 
and lot, lying in Albany, on the hill, with all that therein is last by earth 
and nailed; bounded on the east side by Claes Van liotterdam, on the 
south side Gerrit Lansing, on the north and west sides by the highway; 
breadth in front on the street, twenty-five feet ; and in the rear on Gerrit 
Lansing's it stretches from the upper corner down in a straight line along 
said Lansing's house drip free, and is in the rear fourteen feet, less two 
inches broad; and the length on the south side is four rods six feet and 
three inches; all as it at present lies enclosed in fence, which he, the 
grantor, does [convey] by virtue of a conveyance, received by him from 
Evert Janse Wendell, of date the 21st of April, 1675, to which reference 
is made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against it, excepting the lord's right, without the grantor's making 
the least claim any more upon the same ; acknowledging that he is fully- 
satisfied and paid therefor, giving therefore full power to the said Samuel 
Holman, his heirs and successor, or those who may hereafter acquire right 
and title from him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and lot 
as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and efi'ects ; promising to 
defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
or charges, which may hereafter arise, and never more to do or suffer any- 
thing to be done against the same, either with or without law in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, this 5th of July, 1676. 

Nehemiah Pearce. 
Ahram Sfaas. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ko. Livingston, Secretary. 

On this sixth day of July, 1676, appeared before me Robert Living- 
ston, secretary, etc., and in presence of the afteruamed witness. Captain 
Philip Schuyler, who acknowledges that he is well and truly indebted and 
in arrears to Mr. Jeronimus Ebbink,i in the quantity of an hundred and 
fifty good and merchantable beaver skins, growing out of the second 
payment on the bouwery, bought by Juriaen Teunisse [Glasemaker, or 
Tappen], of Madam Ebbink, which aforesaid hundred and fifty beavers the 
mortgagor promises to pay to Mr. Ebbink, or to his order, or to send to 
him before or on the first day of August next coming, for which payment 
pledging his person and estate, real and personal, present and future, 
nothing excepted, submitting the same to the force of all the duke's 
{Jieereri] laws and judges, to promote the payment (if need be) thereof, 
without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, of date ut supra. 

Philip Schuyler. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Willem Teller. 
In my presence, 

Eo : Livingston, Secretary. 

1 In 1659, 16(il, aud 1673, he was schepeu in New York. Madam Ebbiugh was the widow of 
the late Johan De Hulter, and daughter of Johannes De Laet. 



Albany County Records. 129 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Juriaen Teunise Tappen, who promised to 
deliver to Captain Philip Schuyler, the quantity of sixty ankers of good 
and merchantable rum (which he shall receive from Mr. [De] La Vail, 
iu the sale of his house), growing out of the second payment on the 
bouwery, which said Schuyler has paid for Juriaen Teunise, and that in 
the space of three months after the date of the contract, for which [pay- 
ment] pledging his person and estate, real and personal, present and 
future, nothing excepted, submitting the same to the force of the duke's 
(lieeren) laws and judges, to promote the payment thereof, if need be, 
without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, in the presence of Major Abr'" Staas, and Richard 
Pretty, as witnesses, hereto invited, on this 7th day of July, 1676. 

Jure Tunissen. 
Abram Staas. 
Richard Pretty. 
I being present, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., in the presence of 
the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse, and Mr. Richard 
Pretty, Mr. Jeronimus Ebbink, husband and guardian of Madam 
Johanna de Laet, who declared that he had, in true rights, free owner- 
ship, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the behoof of Jurian 
Teunisse Tappen, in a certain bouwery, lying in the colony Renselaers- 
wyck, where Jurian aforesaid at present dwells, with dwelling house, 
barn and two ricks, likewise eight draft horses, among which six mares, 
and two geldings, and four cows, moreover all the land, as well arable as 
pasture land, as the same lies in fence between two kils,i all by virtue of 
the contract and conveyance thereof, passed between Mr. Jeremias Van 
Renselaer, deceased, late director of the colony before named, and Madam 
Johanna De Laet for her tenth part, being her just tenth part of the 
colony, the same being of date of the 2lst of June, 1674, whereto refer- 
ence is made, only excepting the lord's right, without the grantor's 
having the least claim any more upon the same, acknowledging that he is 
fully satisfied and paid therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Jurian 
Teunise 1'appen, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
acquire right and title from him, to dispose of the aforesaid bouwery and 
appurtenances, as he might do with his own patrimonial estate and effects; 
promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and further, never more to 
do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or without 



1 In 1674 {Becords, p. 250), Jeronimus Ebbingh owned a bouwery on the north side of the 
Wynants ki). The two kils, above mentioned, were perhaps the Wynants and Poesten kils. 
In 1675, Pieter Pieterse Van Woggelum owned a bouwery, south of the Poesten kil (Ibid., 
p. 271). Ebbingh's and Van Woggelum's bouweries comprised the ground, now covered by 
the city of Troy. This tract was purchased in 1720 by Dirk Vanderheyden, consisting of 490 
acres, subject to an annual rent to the patroon of three bushels and three pecks of wheat and 
four fat fowls. See Woodworth's Reminiscences of Troy, 2d ed., p. 8. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 17 



130 Albany County Records. 

law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor, 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 7th of July, 1676. 

Jeronimus Ebbingh. 
Adriaen Gerretse. 
Richard Pretty. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, and in presence of the 
honorable Adriaen Gerritse, and Richard Pretty, commissaries, etc., 
Stoifel Janse Abell, who declared that he had in true rights, free owner- 
ship, granted, conveyed and transferred, as he by these presents does 
grant and convey, in actual and real possession, to and for the behoof of 
Claas Janse Stavast, his, grantor's, house and lot, standing and lying in 
Albany, bounded to the south by Claas Jansen's, to the north by Leendert 
Philipse [Conyn], to the east by the river, and to the west by the high- 
way, and is in length, nine rods ; and in breadth, thirty-six wood feet ; and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same, only excepting the lord's right, which he does by virtue of the 
patent, of date 30th of April, 1667, to him granted by the governor, 
Richard Nicolls, and acknowledging, that he is fully paid and satisfied 
therefor, the first penny with the last, giving therefore full power to the 
aforesaid Claes Janse Stavast, his heirs and successors, or those who 
hereafter may acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
the aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his patrimonial estate and 
eflfects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it 
from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and further, never 
more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th July, 1676. 

Stoffel Janse Abeel. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in presence of 
the honorable Adriaen Gerritse, and Mr. Richard Pretty, commissaries, 
etc.. Captain Hans Heudrickse, and Johannes Wendell, who declared 
that they do, in true rights, free ownership, grant, convey and transfer to 
and for the behoof of Hendrick Jillise Meyer,^ in their grantor's, two- 
third's part of a house and lot, standing and lying in New York, in the 
Pearl street, their inheritance as lawful heirs of Gillis Pieterse,^ 
decea.sed, whereof the other third part belongs to Hendrick Gillise as his 
inheritance of the third part, all the elFects of Gillis Pieterse, deceased, 
according to the will. The house is bounded to the south, by the fort 
in Pearl street; to the east, by Gillis Pieterse; to the west, by Jan 

1 In 170.3, cordwainer of New York.— English Manuscrijits. 

^ In 1651 and 1665, he owned lots in Beverwyck.— .Recwd^s, p. 59, 184, 195. 



Albany County Records. 131 

Scepmoes; and is in breadth, in front on the street, on the nortli side, 
two rods five feet ; in the rear, on the south side, two rods four feet and 
five inches ; in length, on the west side, next Jan Janse Scepmoes, eight 
rods eight feet and four inches; and on the east side, next Gillis Pieterse, 
eight rods eight feet and six inches, amounting altogether to twenty-one 
rods nine feet three inches, and three barleycorns ; and that free and 
unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, only 
excepting the lord's right, which they do by virtue of the patent, of date 
the tenth of June, 1667, granted to Gillis Pieterse, by the governor, 
Richard Nicolls, which patent is left with them, as being participants in 
the hereditary goods of Gillis Pieterse, and they, the grantors, acknow- 
ledge, that they are fully paid and satisfied, the first penny with the last, 
for their two-thirds, which they claim in the aforesaid house, giving 
therefore pJenam actionem cessani, and full power to the aforenamed 
Henderick Gillise Myer, his heirs and successors, or those who may 
hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and to dispose of 
the aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his patrimonial estate 
and effects; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free 
it from all trouble, claims and charges as is right, and further, never 
more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of July, 1676. 

Hans Heindrickse.i 
Johannes Wendel.2 

Adriaen Gerretsen. 

Richard Pretty. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

The Messieurs commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck and 
Schanhechtady, declare by these presents, that they do, in true rights, 
free ownership, grant, convey and transfer, to and for the behoof of the 
diaconate here in Albany, in a certain lot, standing and lying in Albany, 
hard by the plain within the town's fence, on the corner of the Plain 
street, bounded on the south side by the town's fence [stockadoes] ; on 
the north side, by Mr. Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst ; on the east and west 
the highway; length, south and north [sides], ten rods; breadth in front 
on the street, two rods ; and in the rear, one rod ; and that free and unen- 
cumbered, without their honors having the least claim any more upon the 
same, having granted it to them in recompense or requital for their house 
and lot, which they had upon the hill without the gate'^ by Rooseboom's, 
giving therefore ^^e?iam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid 

1 Captain Hans Hendrikse's house stood on the east side of Broadway, next north of 
Bleecker Hall. By his wife, Eva Jillise Myer, he had four children : Hendrik, Margareta, 
Johannes, and Elsje, who were living, and mentioned in his will, made in 1694. His 
descendants have assumed the surname of Hansen. 

2 Captain Johannes Wendel was a son of Evert Janse Wendel, the first settler. He was a 
merchant; in 1684, a magistrate; in 1685, commissioned captain; and in 1690, commissioner 
to treat with the Five Nations, and superintend the afiairs for the defense of Albany. By his 
first wife, Maritie Jillise Myer, he had two children ; by his second, Elizabeth Staats, ten 
children. His house stood on the south side of State street, west of Pearl. His will was 
proved 9 Feb., 1691-3, his wife Elizabeth executrix. 

3 This gate was near the junction of North Pearl and Steuben streets. 



132 Albany County Records. 

diaconate or to those who may hereafter acquire title from them, to do 
with and dispose of the aforesaid lot, as they deal with and dispose of 
their other estate, granting herewith consent to solicit of the governor 
general a patent for the same. 

Thus done in Albany, on the 5th of August, 1676. 

Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in the pre- 
sence of the honorable commissaries, etc.. Monsieur Adriaen Gerritse, 
and Mr. Richard Pretty; the diaconate of the town of Albany, who 
declared that they had in true rights, free ownership, granted and con- 
veyed, as by these presents they do grant and convey, in real and actual 
possession, to and for the behoof of Mr. Cornells Van Dyck, chirurgeon, 
in a certain piece of hop land, lying down in the Third kil [Fox creek], 
bounded eastwardly by Ryer Elbertse, westwardly by the kil, south and 
north the hill, and is in length, on the south side, thirty-one rods; on the 
north side, thirty rods; breadth on the west side, fifteen rods; on the 
east side, twenty-three rods ; and that free and unencumbered, with no 
claim standing or issuing against the same, only excepting the lord's 
right, which they do by virtue of a conveyance to them, given by Andries 
De Vos, of date the first of April, 1675, according to patent thereof, 
granted to said De Vos by Grovernor Richard Nicols, of date the 10th 
of September,- 1667, and these grantors acknowledge, that they are fully 
paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving therefore 
to the aforesaid C. Van Dyck, his heirs and successor, or those who here- 
after may acquire right and title from him, full power to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid lot, as he might do with his patrimonial estate and 
eifects; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it 
from all trouble, claims and charges as is right, and further, never more 
to do or sufi'er anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany the 10th of August, 1676. 

Davidt Schuyler. 
A. Teller. 
Adriaen GerreUen. 
Richard Pretty. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse and Mr. Rich- 
ard Pretty, the diaconate of this town, who declare that they do in true 
rights, free ownership, grant and convey to and for the behoof of Mr. 
Gabriel Thomase [Stridles] in a certain lot, situate and lying in Albany 
hard by the plain within the town's fence, on the corner of the Plain street, 
bounded on the south side by the town's fence, on the north side by Mr. 
Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, on the west and east sides by the highway ; 
length south and north ten rods, breadth in front on the street two rods, 
and on the rear one rod, which these grantors do by virtue of a convey- 
ance to them given by the honorable commissaries, of date the fifth of 



Albany County Records. 133 

August, to which i-eference is made, granting them likewise consent to 
solicit of the right honorable the governor general a patent, giving there- 
fore to the aforenamed Gabriel Thomase, his heirs and successors, or those 
who may hereafter acquire title from him, full power to do with and dis- 
pose of the aforesaid lot, as he might do with his patrimonial estate and 
effects. 

Thus done in Albany the 10th of August, 1676. 

Davidt Schuyler. 
A. Teller. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 
In my presence, 

Pto. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable commissaries, etc., Mr. Adriaen Gerritse [Papendorp] and 
Mr. Richard Pretty, Harmen Janse [Van Salsbergen], who acknowledged 
that he is well and truly indebted to the widow and children of the late 
Pieter Van Ale in the sum of two hundred and one guilders in beavers, 
at 8 guilders the merchantable beaver, growing out of the purchase of a 
certain bouwery bought of said Van Ale, which aforesaid two hundred 
and one guilders in beavers, this mortgagor promises to pay to the widow 
and children before the 13th of October next coming, pledging specially 
his, the mortgagor's, bouwery lying in the land of Kinderhook before this 
belonging to Pieter Van Ale, deceased, together with his house and lot 
standing and lying in Albany, at present inhabited by him, to the south 
of Paulus Martense [Van Benthuysen] and to the north of Pieter Loock- 
erman's, and generally his person and estate, real and personal, present 
and future, nothing excepted, submitting the same to the force of all 
the duke's (Jieereii) laws and judges, to promote the payment thereof if 
need be, without cost or loss. 

Done in Albany on this 13th day of August, 1676. 

Harmen Janse. 
Adriaen Gerretsen. 
Richard Pretty. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, the widow of Thomas Paulussen [Powell] on 
the one side and Paulus Martense on the other side, who declared that 
they in amity and friendship had agreed and covenanted with each other 
respecting the purchase of a house and lot, standing and lying here in 
Albany next to Dominie Gideon Schaets, bounded on the south and west 
by the streets, on the north by the house of [De] Lavall ; length to the 
north ten rods, in front on the street the breadth is two rods and ten feet, 
on the south the length is ten rods eight feet and a half, on the west 
along the fence of Mr. [De] Lavall's house, the breadth is five rods and 
three feet, which aforesaid lot is a part of a patent which the seller 
promises to deliver free and unencumbered, excepting only the lord's right ; 
the delivery of the aforesaid house and lot stands at the option and choice 
of the seller, to be done between this and May next coming, provided that 



134 Albany County Records. 

the payment of the first installment shall be made in beavers, the half of 
sixty-four merchantable [beavers] whole and good, at 8 guilders a piece 
stretched; the other half being thirty-two beavers, he, the buyer, to be 
holden to pay in the space of one year from this date, when a proper con- 
veyance shall be delivered to him ; for the performance of the above 
mentioned conditions, the contracting parties mutually pledge their re- 
spective persons and estates, real and personal, present and future, sub- 
mitting the same to the force of all the duke's (Jieeren') laws and judges. 
Thus done in Albany the 24th of August 1676, in presence of Ludovi- 
cus Cobes and Corn : Corn : Vielen as witnesses hereto called. 

This is the mark of XD the widow of Thom. Powells. 

POULUS, (?) 

Testes. 

Ludovicus Oohes, not. puh. 

Cor. Cor. Viele. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the Honorable Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, commissaries, 
etc., Stoffel Janse Abeel, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Johannes 
Wendell, in his house and lot standing and lying in Albany on the hill with 
all that is thereon fast by earth and nailed, bounded on the east by Jacob 
Sanderse [Grlen], on the south by the Lutheran graveyard, i the west by 
the aforenamed Johannes Wendell, and on the north by the [State] street; 
breadth in front on the street fifteen feet Rhynland measure, front and 
rear of the same breadth, just as it stands drip free, which he, the grantor 
does, by virtue of a patent granted him by the governor general, Richard 
Nicolls, of date the 12th of August, 1668, to which reference is made, 
with no claim standing or issuing against the same, save the lord's right, 
without the grantors having the least claim any more upon it, acknow- 
ledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, giving therefore full 
power to the aforesaid Johannes Wendell, his heirs and successors, or those 
who may hereafter acquire right and title from him to do with and 
dispose of said house and lot, as he might do with his other patrimonial 
estate and eflfects ; promising the same to defend against all persons, and 
to free it from all trouble, claims and charges which hereafter may arise, 
and never more to do or permit anything to be done against the same, with 
or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of August, 1676. 

Stoffel Janse Abeel. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



1 The Lutheran church lot and graveyard included the present Centre Market lot and lay in the 
rear of the State street lots, extending from South Pearl street nearly or quite to the ptesent 
Lodge street. 



Albany County Records. 135 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller 
etc., Willem [Frederickse] Bout, who declared that he had in true rights' 
free ownership, granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant 
and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of'^Vil- 
liam Nottingham, in his house and lot standing and lying in Albany, on 
the hill, with all that is thereon fast by earth or nailed ; bounded east by 
the street, west by the aforenamed Willem Bout, south also by the street, 
and north by Claes Van Rotterdam, being in breadth in front and rear| 
thirty-two feet nine inches, Rynland measure ; length on the south and 
north sides, thirty-six feet ; which he, the grantor, does by virtue of 
patent to him granted by the governor general, Nicolls, of date the 6th 
of September, ]667, whereto reference is made, with no claims standing 
or^ issuing against the same, excepting the lord's right, without the grant'^ 
or's having the least claim any more against the same, acknowledging 
that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, and giving full power to" the 
aforesaid W>" Nottingham, his heirs and successors, or those who may 
hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the 
aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his other patrimonial estate 
and eflFects; promising the same to defend against all persons, and to free 
it from all trouble, claims and charges, which may hereafter arise, and 
never more to do or suffer anything to be done, either with or without 
law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of August, 1675. 

This is the mark ^~r~ of Willem Bout, 

with his own hand set. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, secretary, etc., and in presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries 
Teller, etc., Claes Jacobse, alias Rotterdam,! who declared that he had 
sold, granted and conveyed, as he by these presents does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of George 
Heathcote,- a lot, lying in Albany, on the hill, bounded north by Harmen 
Bastiaensen [Visscher], south by Claas Jacobse [the grantor], west by 
Harmen Bastiaensen, and east by the street [North Pearl], -^ and is in 
length, seventy-six wood feet; and in breadth, front and rear, twenty-two 



1 Or, simply, Claes Van Kotterdam. 

2 George Heathcote was master of the Good Hope, in 1675. He was complained of the 
following year of haying uttered seditious words against the government and lined £20 and 
costs. Coming to Albany for the purpose of trade, he became involved in litigation, and 
his goods were taken from him. li 1682, he was araiu arraigned before the coSrt in New 
York. In 16f>4, he sold his house and lot in Albany, to Robert Sanders.- EnglMi Manuscripts. 

He was the first of the name that came to New York ; was interested in trade in Jamaica: and 
arrived in New York about 1675 ; carried on trade on a large scale ; removed to Bucks county. 
Pa where he died 1710, leaving the bulk of his property to his kinsman, Caleb Heathcote.— 
Valentine s Manual., 1853, p. 403 

3 Harmen Bastiaeuse Visscher's lot was on the west side of North Pearl next the 



136 Albany County Records. 

wood feet, also an alley of five feet breadth, besides the twenty-two feet 
which shall be used in common ; being a part of the lot No. 6, which the 
grantor [conveys] by virtue of a patent granted him by the governor 
general, Richard Nicolls, of date the 6 September, 1G67, to which refer- 
ence is made; and that free and unencumbered, with no claim, standing 
or issuing against the same, excepting the lord's right, without the grant- 
or's having the least claim any more upon it, acknowledging that he is 
fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid George 
Heathcote, his heirs and successors, or those, who may hereafter acquire 
right and title from him, to do with and dispone of the aforesaid lot, as 
he might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the 
same to defend against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
or charges, which may hereafter arise, and never more to do or sufi"er 
anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany the 26th of August, 1676. 

Claes Jacobse. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Andries Teller, etc., 
Harme Bastiaensen [Visscher] who declared that he had sold, granted 
and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession to and for the behoof of George Heathcote his house and 
lot lying in Albany on the hill, bounded on the north by Teunis Slinger- 
land, on the west by the street [Chapel], on the east by Harmen Bastiaense 
and Claes [Jacobse Van] Rotterdam, and to the south by Samuel Holl- 
man ; breadth in front on the street [Chapel] twenty-three feet three 
inches, Rynland measure, and in the rear of the like breadth, in length 
fifty-two feet and eight inches, also Rynland measure, ^ and that free and 
unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, ex- 
cepting the lord's right, the grantor herewith making over all the right 
and title which he has therein, without making the least claim on the 
same any more, acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, 
the first penny with the last, giving therefove j)lcnam actionem cessam, and 
full power to the aforesaid George Heathcote, his heirs and successors, or 
those who may hereafter acquire right and title from him to do with or 
to dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he might do with his other 
patrimonial estate and efi"ects ; promising the same to defend against all 
persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges, which hereafter 
may arise, and never more to do or sufi"er anything to be done against 



stockadoes, which at this time passed up the hill, on the north side of Steuben street. The 
lot here sold to Heathcote was therefore the second lot south of Steuben street. He held it 
for the purposes of occasional trade probably, till 1684, when he sold it to Robert Sanders. 
He seems to have been a merchant and consignee for English houses, in New York. 

1 This lot purchased of Harmen Bastianse Visscher, added to the lot purchased of Claas Jacobse 
Van Rotterdam as shown by the last conveyance (Records p. 319), gave Heathcote a lot of 22 feet 
breadth, extending through the block from Pearl to Chapel street. 



Albany County Records. 137 

the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under ob- 
ligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of August, 1676. 

Harmen Bastiaens. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Claas Jacobse, alias Rottei'dam, who declared that he had granted 
and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and convey, in real and 
actual possession, to and for the behoof of William Nottingham, his lot, 
lying in Albany, on the hill, bounded westerly by Jan Vinhagen, easterly 
by Claas Jacobse aforesaid, southerly by Jan Vinhagen, and Willem Bout, 
and northerly by Claas Jacobse aforesaid ; in breadth on the east, fifteen 
feet, Rynland measure, westerly of the same breadth, length east and 
west three rods and a half, which the grantor conveys by virtue of a 
patent, granted him by Governor General Richard Nicolls, being lot 
Number 6, of date the 6th of September, 1667, to which reference is 
made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing 
against the same, excepting the lord's right, without the grantor's making 
the least claim any more against the same, acknowledging that he is fully 
paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving therefore 
plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforementioned William 
Nottingham, his heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may 
acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of said lot as he 
might do with his other patrimonial estate and eflfects ; promising to 
defend the same from all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
or charges, which may hereafter arise, and never more to do or sufi"er 
anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according 
to law. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of August, 1676. 

Claes Jacobse. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, etc., 
the honorable William Nottingham, who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does 
grant and convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of 
Robert Story, in his two houses and two lots, with all that is therein fast by 
earth and nailed, standing and lying in Albany, on the hill, bounded as 
follows : First. — His two houses and lots, bounded southerly and east- 
erly by the street, westerly by Willem Bout, and northerly by Claas 
[Jacobse] Van Rotterdam; in breadth, front and rear, thirty-two feet 
nine inches, Rynland measure ; and in length on south and north [sides]. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 18 



138 Albany County Records. 

thirty-six feet ; being part of the lot No. 5 ; which he, the grantor, does 
by virtue of a conveyance, given to him by Willem [Frederickse] Bout, 
of date the 26th of August, 1676, to which reference is hereby made.i 
Likewise a lot, lying also on the hill, bounded westerly by Jan Vinhagen, 
easterly and northerly by Claas Jacobse, alias Rotterdam, and southerly 
by Jan Vinhagen, and Willem Bout; in breadth, east and west, fifteen 
feet, Eynland measure; and in length, three rods and a half,-' which he, 
this grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance, received by him from Claas 
Rotterdam, of date the 26th of August, 1676, whereto reference is herein 
made ; with no claims standing or issuing against the same, excepting the 
lord's right, and without the grantor's having the least claim any more 
against them, acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, 
and giving therefore full power to the aforementioned Robert Story, his 
heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may acquire right and title 
from him, to do with and to dispose of the aforesaid two houses and two 
lots, as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and eff"ects ; promis- 
ing the same to defend against all persons, and to free the same from all 
trouble, claims or charges, which may hereafter arise, and never more to 
do or permit anything to be done, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 
Done in Albany, the 28th of August, 1676. 

William Nottingham. 

Richard Pretty. 

A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Andries Teller, and Mr. Dirk Wesselse [Ten 
Broek], etc., the honorable Ro. Story, who acknowledges that he is well 
and truly indebted and in arrears to the heirs of Captain Thomas Willet, 
deceased, in the sum of three hundred and fifty seven guilders [8142.80], 
to be paid in good whole merchantable beavers, at eight guilders a piece, 
or in good winter wheat, at beavers price, and he promises to pay the 
aforesaid sum to the said heirs, the administrators of the same or to their 
attorney on the first demand which they shall make upon him; this 
mortgagor pledging therefor his person and estate, real and personal, 
present and future, submitting the same to the force of all the duke's 
Xjieereix) laws and judges, to the promoting of the payment thereof if need 
be, without cost or loss. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of August, 1676. 

Robert Story. 
A. Teller. 
Dirch Wesselse. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



' These two lots were on the north corner of North Pearl street and Maiden lane. 

2 This third lot 15 by 42 feet, lay on the northwest corner of the other two lots, and in 
the interior of the block. Ingress was probably had to it by means of a narrow alley not 
mentioned in the description. 



Albany County Records. 139 

Appeared before me Ko. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
afternamed witnesses, Mr. Richard Pretty, attorney of the heirs of 
Captain Thomas Willet, deceased, who declared that he is fully paid and 
satisfied by William Nottingham, for a certain mortgage, which the 
aforesaid heirs hold against William Nottingham's two houses, in the sum 
of 357 guilders, beavers, of date the 16th of October, 1674, herewith 
annulling the force and effect of said mortgage, and witnessing the same 
with hand and seal, in the presence of Abraham De Peyster, and Charles 
Eccles, as witnesses hereto invited. 

In Albany, this 26th of August, 1676. 

Richard Pretty. 

Charles Eccles. 
Ah^ De Fei/sterA 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., and in the presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Dirck Wesselse [Ten 
Broeck], etc., WilHam Nottingham, who acknowledged that he is well 
and truly indebted and in arrears to Mr. Andries Teller, in the quantity 
of eight good and merchantable beavers, which aforesaid eight beavers 
William Nottingham promises to pay to Mr. Teller, or order, on demand, 
pledging therefor his person and estate, real and personal, present and 
future, nothing excepted, and submitting the same to the force of all the 
duke's (Jieeren) laws and judges, to promote the payment thereof if need 
be, without cost or loss. 

Done in Albany, the 28th of August, 1676. 

William Nottingham. 
Richard Pretty. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witness, Mr. Andries Teller, who declared himself to be 
paid and satisfied by Mr. William Nottingham, for a mortgage, which he 
held against William Nottingham's two houses, of date the 15th of 
October, 1674, discharging herewith the aforesaid mortgage, annulling 
the force and eff"ect of the same, and witnessing the same with his own 
hand and seal, in presence of Michael Siston, and Jonathan Walker, as 
witnesses thereto invited. 

In Albany, this 26th of August. 1676. 

A. Teller. 

Testes : 

Mich. Siston. 

Jonathan Walker. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



1 Abraham De Peyster was a merchant of New York. For an account of this familv see 
Valentine's J/a«d<a;, 1852, 1862. Ji ° « 



140 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, etc., 
the honorable Mr. Robert Story, who acknowledged that he is well and 
truly indebted, and in arrears to Annetie Lievens, widow of Goose 
Gerritse Van Schaick, deceased, in the sum of two hundred and ninety- 
six guilders, in beavers, which aforesaid sum he promises to pay in good 
merchantable beaver skins, at eight guilders a piece, or in goods, at 
market price, for the performance of which the said Robert Story pledges 
his person and estate, real and personal, present and future, nothing 
excepted, and submitting the same to the force of all the duke's laws and 
judges, for the promotion of the payment of the same, if need be, without 
cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of August, 1676. 

Robert Story. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Annetie Levens, widow of Goose Gerritse 
[Van Schaick], deceased, who declared that she is fully paid and satisfied 
by William Nottingham, in respect to the mortgage, which she held 
against the aforesaid Nottingham's house, of date the first of October, 
1674, witnessing the same with her own hand and seal on this 26th of 
August, 1676. 



By order of my mother. 

Testes : 

M. Cregier, Junior.'^ 

Rohertt Story. 
Acknowledged before me. 



Sybrant GoosENsi [Van Schaick]. 



Ro. Livingston. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence [of] the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Andries Teller, etc., the 
honorable Robert Story, who acknowledged that he is well and truly 
indebted, and in arrears to Mr. William Nottingham, in the sum of fifty- 
one good merchantable beavers, and four guilders and eleven stuivers, in 
beavers, to be paid in good merchantable duffels. ^ at four ells the beaver, 
or in other marchandise at market prices, and promises to pay the afore- 
said sum to the said W™ Nottingham, his heirs or successors, on the first 



1 Sybraut Goosense Van Schaick was son of Goosen Gerritse Van Schaick. By Ms mfe, 
Elizabeth Vauder Peel, he had three sons and one daughter, who were living in 1686, 
when his widow contracted a second marriage with Bennony Van Curler. 

- Marten Cregier, Jr., was son of Captain Martynus Cregier, the skilful military leader 
of the New York militia. He married in 1671, Jannetie Heudrikse Van Doesburgh, and 
had seven children, of whom two were sons. Marten, and Samuel. The Cregiers settled 
early in Niskayuna, where Captain Cregier owned a tract of land, a portion of which is 
still held by his descendants. 



A kind of coarse woolen cloth, having a thick nap or frieze ; baize • 



Albany County Records. 141 

demand, which he shall make upon him, this mortgagor, pledging therefor 
his person and estate, real and personal, present and future, and submitting 
the same to the force of all the duke's (heereii) laws, to promote the 
payment thereof, if need be, without loss and cost. 
Done in Albany, the 28th of August, 1676. 

RoBERTT Story. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me E,o. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., the honorable Ro. Story, who acknowledged that he is well and truly 
indebted, and in arrears, to Mr. Samuel Holman, in the sum of thirty 
pounds sterling, to be paid in installments to wit, ten pounds to be paid 
in Boston money, or good merchantable beavers, at twelve shillings a 
piece, or nine shillings a pound, and that in New York, on the first 
demand which he shall make upon him, the mortgagor, and the other 
twenty pounds to be paid before the first of May, next coming, in the 
before mentioned currency, that is Boston money, or merchantable 
beavers, at 12 shillings a piece, or 9 shillings a pound, English weight, 
pledging therefor his person and estate, real and personal, present and 
future, and submitting the same to the force of all the duke's (Aeere?t) 
laws and judges for the promotion of the payment thereof, without cost 
and loss. 

Done in Albany, the 29th of August, 1676. 

Robert Story. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, etc., 
Mr. Samuel Holman, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted and conveyed, as by these presents he does grant and 
convey, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Mr. Robert 
Story, his house and lot,i standing and lying in Albany, on the hill, with 
all that therein is fast by earth and nailed, bounded easterly by Claas 
[Jacobse] Van Rotterdam, on the south side by Gerrit Lansing, on the 
north and west sides the public street; in breadth, in front upon the 
street [Chapel], five and twenty feet; and in the rear, on Gerrit Lansing's 
house, stretching from the upper corner to the bottom, iu a straight line 
along said Lansing's house, drip free, and is in breadth in the rear 
fourteen feet, less two inches ; and in length, on the south side, four rods 

1 This lot lay on the east side of Bergh street, afterwards called Barrack and now Chapel 
street, commencing between 60 and 70 feet, northerly from Maiden lane. There is now no 
street on the north side of this lot, and it was then probably only the 5 foot alley between 
Van Rotterdam's and Heathcote's lots, carried through from North Pearl to Chapel streets, 
but now abandoned aa an alley. 



Samuell Holman. 



142 Albany County Records. 

and six feet and three inches ; all as it lies inclosed at present within its 
fence, which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance, given to 
him by Nehemiah Pearse, of date the 5th of July, 1676, to which 
reference is made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim stand- 
ing or issuing against the same, excepting the lord's right, without the 
grantor's making the least claim any more upon it, acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore full power to the aforesaid Ro. Story, his heirs and successors, 
or those who may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with 
and dispose of said house and lot, as he might do with his other patri- 
monial estate and efi'ects ; promising the same to defend from all persons, 
and to free the same from all trouble, claims or charges, which may 
hereafter arise, and never more to do or permit anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, on the 29th of August,'1676. 

Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates of the same jurisdiction, Mr. Richard Pretty 
and Mr. Andries Teller, Geertruyt Barents, wife of Jacob Heveu [or 
Hevick], who declared that she had in true rights, free ownership, 
granted and conveyed, as she by these presents does grant and convey, in 
real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Jacobus Gerritse 
Brower, in her house and lot, standing and lying in Albany, with all that is 
thereon, fast by earth and nailed, bounded southerly by Harmen Schoen- 
maker, northerly by Arnout Cornelise Viele, easterly by the public highway, 
being in length ten rods, in breadth two rods, all as it at present lies in 
fence ; which this grantor does, by virtue of a patent granted her by the 
right honorable the governor general, Richard Nicolls, of date the SOtli 
of April, 1667, to which reference is made, and that free and unencum- 
bered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, excepting the 
lord's right, without the grantor's making the least claim upon the same 
any more, acknowledging that she is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the 
first penny with the last, and giving therefore full power to the aforesaid 
Jacobus G-erritse, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of said house and 
lot as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and eff"ects; promising 
the same to defend against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, 
claims or charges which may hereafter arise, and never more to do nor 
suflFer anything to be done, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, on the 17th of September, 1676. 

This is the mark /\ of Geertruyt Barendts, with her own hand set. 

Richard Rretty. 

A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Albany County Records. 143 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Capt. Jan Clute, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, by these presents, in real 
and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Ludovicus Cobes, in his 
house and lot, standing and lying in Albany, next the corner house of 
Jan Tomase [Mingael], in the Yonker [now State] street, in length, 
breadth, and boundaries, in accordance with the patent granted by the 
right honorable governor general, Richard Nicolls, of date the first of 
April, 1667, to which reference is herein made, and that free, etc. 
******** 

[This paper was not executed]. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Mr. Grerrit Swart, citizen here, who acknowledged that he is well 
and truly indebted to Mr. Frederick Fillipse, merchant, dwelling in New 
York, in a certain sum of money arising and growing out of a claim of 
the estate of one Harm en Janse Bos, by him [Fillipse], as trustee, ad- 
ministered upon and disposed of according to his pleasure ; for the 
payment of the aforesaid sum the mortgagor pledges especially, a certain 
parcel of land in the colony of Rensselaerswyck, bounded easterly by the 
river, southerly by Barent Pieterse [Coeymans],' westerly the common 
mill road, northerly by Jacob Heven ; breadth eighty feet, and length 
from the mill road to the river ; and generally his person and estate, in 
possession and to be acquired, nothing excepted, submitting the same to 
the force of all the duke's \Jieeren'] laws and judges, to promote the pay- 
ment thereof, if need be, without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, the 20th of Sept., 1676. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., the honorable Mr. Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, who declared that he 
had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, by 
these presents, to and for the behoof of Claes Ripse Van Dam,- in a 
certain lot lying in Albany, on the hill ; bounded westerly by the public 
highway, commonly called Bergh street,'^ northerly by Ro. Sanders, south 
and east by the aforenamed Mr. Slichtenhorst ; in breadth in front on 
the street twenty-seven wood feet, and in the rear of the same width, and 
in length on the north side fifty-seven feet and two inches, and on the 
south side fifty- six feet and three inches, which the grantor does by virtue 
of a patent granted him by the right honorable the governor general, 
Richard Nicolls, of the whole lot of which this is a part, dated the 27th 
of April, 1667, to which reference is made, and that free and unencum- 

i Barent Pieterse Coeymans, the miller, came out in 1636. with his four brothers, from 
Utrecht. (?) After leasing the patroon's mill for many years, he bought a tract of laud south 
of Rensselaerswyck, now called Coeymans, on which he settled. — 0" Callaghaii's History of Xeio 
Netherlands i, 4.35. 

2 Eldest son of Rip Van Dam, merchant of New York. 

3 Berg, usually pronounced Barrack, now Chapel street. 



144 Albany County Records. 

bered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, excepting the 
lord's right, and without the grantor's making the least claim any more 
upon said lot, acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, 
by the hands of the said Claes Ripse Van Dam, the first penny with the 
last, giving therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to do with 
and dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his other patrimonial 
estate and effects ; promising never more to do nor suffer anything to be 
done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner what- 
soever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, the 22d Sept., 1676. 

G-ERRiT Van Slichtenhorst. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me. 

Bo, Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., in the presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, etc., 
Lieut. Jan Janse Bleecker and Jacob Sanderse Glen, attorneys for Mr. 
Jan Hendrickse Van Baell, who declared that they had in true rights, 
free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, by these presents, to 
and for the behoof of Gerrit Hardenberg,i in a certain house and lot 
standing and lying in Albany, on the hill, with all that is therein fast by 
earth and nailed ; bounded westerly by Jacob Schermerhorn, south by the 
street, east by Mr. Abraham Van Tricht,- and northerly by Capt. John 
Backers ; in breadth in front on the street two rods two feet and seven 
inches, and in rear two rods two and a half inches, in length on west side 
four rods and nine feet, and on the east side five rods four feet and nine 
inches ; which the grantor conveys by virtue of a patent to Van Bael, 
granted by the right honorable governor general, Francis Lovelace, of 
date the 13th of August, 1669, to which reference is here made, and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against it, 
excepting the lord's right, without the grantor's making the least claim 
any more upon the same, and acknowledging that he is fully paid and 
satisfied therefor by the hands of the aforesaid Hardenbergh, the first 
penny with the last, and giving him therefore plenam actionem cessam, 
and full power to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he 
might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising never 
more to do nor permit anything to be done against the same, with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 22d of September, 1676. 

Jan Janse Bleecker. 
Richard Pretty. Jacob Sanderse Glen. 

A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

1 Gerrit Hardenbergh was in Albany as early as 1667, and in 1690 he owned the sloop Royal, 
Albany. He and his wife, Jaepe Schepmoes, made a joint will in 1678. A daughter, Barendine, 
was baptized in 1683. 

2 Abraham Van Tricht, married Lysbeth Teller, daughter of William Teller ; before 1692 she 
was a widow, and married Melgerts Wynantse Van Der Poel. Van Tricht had two daughters, 
and perhaps other children. 



Albany County Records. 14 5 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, xMr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Lieut. Jan Janse Bleecker, attorney for Johannes Witthardt,' who 
declared that he had granted, conveyed and transferred, by virtue of a 
power of attorney from Symon Symonse Groot, of date the 80th of Sept., 
1662, (?) a certain house and lot, standing and lying without the town of 
Albany, to and for the behoof of Wouter Pieterse Quackeboss ;-^ bounded 
south by Jan Bricker, north by Barent Albertse Bradt,-i east and west by 
the common highway; length seven and a half rods, and breadth four 
rods;! which the grantor conveys by virtue of a patent received by him 
from Symon Symonse G-root, granted to said Groot by the right honorable 
governor general, Richard Nicolls, of the date 2d of May, 1667, to which 
reference is here made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim 
standing or issuing against it, excepting the lord's right, and without the 
grantor's making the least claim any more upon the same, and acknow- 
ledging that he has been fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, giving, therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power 
to him to do_ with and to dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he 
might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects ; promising never 
more to do nor to permit anything to be done against the same^ either 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as pro- 
vided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 22d of September, 1676. 

Jan Janse Bleecker. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

On this 9th day of October, 1676, appeared before me Rob. Livingston 
seer., etc., and in presence of the afternamed witnesses, Capt. John 
Backer and Mr. William Parker, who declared that in amity and friend- 
ship they had covenanted and agreed with each other in manner following : 
in regard to a certain process which the aforesaid Wm. Parker has insti- 
tuted against the aforesaid Backer before the court here, in relation to a 
claim for fourteen pounds sterling, for which Mr. Parker stood surety for 
Capt. Backer to Mr. Ponchones, for the purchase of two oxen, etc. ; the 
parties are agreed as follows, to wit, that Capt. Backer must pay for said 
plaim twelve pounds sterling, to said Parker, with all the expenses 
incurred thereon, and give him in payment two obligations, to wit, one 
against Jan Janse Flodder,5 of date the 5th of this month [October], for 

1 Johannes Withart was a trader in New Amsterdam as early as 1C54 ; four years after he was 
engaged in trade m Beverwyck, and remained there several years. 

i«n,^*'u'^?^i*^'^?:^.H"l\°^^ married first Neeltje Gybertse, and second, Cornelia Bogart, in 
was buried 21 N i-Qf?'"'^'^' ^ ^^^ ^'^^^ ^°'^^' ^^'^*^'-' ^'^^ Johannes. His second wife 

3 In 1700, Bareut Albt-rtse Bradt lived without the north gate, near the junction of Steuben 
street and Broadway, just west of the Main Guard. He had frequent warnings from the 
common council not to fence in certain grounds there belonging to the city. 

* This lot was probably without the north gate, just north of Steuben street, extending' from 
Broadway to James street. ° 

=i Jan Janse Flodder, carpenter, came to Beverwyck in 1042. The name is sometimes chant^ed 
to Gardenier. = 

Hist. Col. Hi. 19 



146 Mhany County Records. 

the sum of 500 boards (jylanckcn), the half billing due the coming 
summer, and the other 250 the summer following ; and an obligation of 
Evert Wendell, for the sum of eighty-eight guilders in beavers, falling 
due next summer, in the business season {liandel tf/dt), together with five 
beavers to be received from Jan Nack,i on the first of May next coming, 
for the rent of a house ; with which securities Wm. Parker is very well 
content; and which aforesaid obligations, I, the aforesaid Jan Backer, 
deliver to Wm. Parker, with all the right and title which I therein have, 
and full power the same to collect {inneii)^ and recover the payment of 
the aforesaid 12 pounds, with the expense ; and whatever proceeds of 
both obligations the aforesaid Parker shall receive, together with the five 
beavers, he shall be holden to account [?] to said Backer for what it shall 
amount to over and above the twelve pounds and costs. But in case he 
does not withal receive the proceeds of the obligation, then Capt. Backer 
binds him, Parker, to pay the aforesaid sum, with costs, out of the first 
moneys he shall receive for the sale of his house standing here in Albany. 
For the performance of which above written conditions, the contracting 
parties mutually bind their respective persons and estates, personal and 
real, present and future, nothing excepted, placing the same in subjection 
to all the duke's \lieeren'\ laws and judges. 

Done in Albany, of date ut supra, in presence of W'" Loveridge, Jr., 
and Anthony Van Schaick, as witnesses. 

John Baker. 
W^. Parker. 
William Loveridge. 
Antony Goosen \_Van Schaic]c\~ 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc, and in presence of the 
afternamcd witnesses, William Parker, who acknowledged that he had 
received from Capt. John Backer, two obligations, and an assignment, for 
the payment and security of the sum of twelve pounds, which he. Backer, 
must pay to said Parker, with costs, and Parker promises to pay the sur- 
plus of the obligations, so soon as he shall receive the proceeds of said 
obligations ; the one being against Jacob Janse Plodder, of the 3d of 
October, 1676, for the sum of five hundred boards, falling due one-half 
next summer, and the other half the summer after; the other obligation 
being against Evert Wendell, of date the second of October, 1676, for the 
sum of eighty-eight guilders in beavers, together with an assignment of 
five beavers, which he, Backer, holds against Jan Nak, all which above 
mentioned obligations and assignment, he acknowledges that he has 
received from the hands of the aforementioned Backer, and will account 
to said Backer for the surplus over and above twelve pounds and costs, 
if he shall receive it. 



1 Jan Nack came from Utrecht, was trader and gun-stocker, and married Catharina Roomers 
in New Amsterdam, 28 Oct., 1663 (Valentine's JfcmwaZ, 1861), andliadone sou, Matthys, who also 
settled in Albany. He died 13 Dec, 1708. 

2 Antony Goosen Van Schaick was son of Goosen Gerritse Van Schaick. He married Maria 
Van der Poel, daua;hter of Anthony Coruelise Van der Poel, and had eight children, of whom 
five were sons. He was bm-ied Feb. 4, 1737. 



Albany County Records. 147 

Done in Albany, in presence of Laurence Van Ale, and Wynant Van- 
der Poele, as witnesses hereto invited, on tliis the 9th day of October, 
1676. 

William Parker. 
Lourens Van Alen. 
Wynant Gerreyts Van der Poell. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Andries Teller, etc., Mr. 
Jan Hendrickse Bruyn, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted and conveyed, as he does grant and convey by these 
presents, in real and actual possession, to and for the behoof of Mr. Cor- 
nelis Van Dyck, to his house and lot, standing and lying in Albany, on 
Yonker [State] street, with all that is therein fast by earth and nailed, 
bounded westerly by Harme Rutgers, easterly by the new house of Mr. 
Jan Hendrickse Bruyn, aforenamed, south by the [Rutten] kil, and north 
by the public street [State], of such dimensions, as the aforesaid lot at 
present lies in its fence, and that in length and breadth with all the 
rights, property and ownership, which devolved upon this grantor, although 
he. Van Dyck, since the purchase from the aforesaid Bruyn, has some 
claim upon the carpenter work, which he, the grantor, to said Van Dyck 
also conveys, all as it now stands and lies inclosed in its fence, which the 
grantor does by virtue of the patent granted him by the right honorable 
governor general, Richard Nicolls, of date 14 June, 1667, to which 
reference is here made, and that free and unencumbered with no claim 
standing or issuing against it, excepting the lord's right, and without the 
grantor's making the least claim any more against the same, acknow- 
ledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with 
the last, and giving therefore j)lenam actiontm cessam, full power to the 
aforesaid Mr. Cornells Van Dyck, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
the aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his other patrimonial 
estate and effects; promising to defend the same against all persons, and 
to free it from all trouble, claims or charges, which may hereafter arise, 
and never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation 
as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, on this the 2nd of November, 1676, in America. 

Jan Heinderck Bruyns. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Annetie Lievens, widow of Goose Gerritse 
Van Schayk, deceased, who acknowledged that she is fully paid and 
satisfied by Robert Story, merchant, and that in respect to an obligation 



148 Albany County Records. 

to said Aunetie Lievens, given for the sum of two hundred and ninety-six 
guilders, in beavers, of date the 26th of August, 1676, and thanking said 
Ro. Story for good payment; she promises him to free from all claims 
from the beginning of the world to this date, pledging therefor her person 
and estate, real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted. 

Thus done in Albany, in the presence of 

Annetge Lievens. 



Appeared before me llob' Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Kichard Pretty, and Andries Teller, 
etc., Marten Hoffiuan, who declared, that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred by these presents, to and 
for the behoof of Cornelis Cornelise Van der Hoeve,^ in his house and lot 
standing and lying here in Albany, hard by William Loveridge, hatter, 
with all that is thereon fast by earth and nailed ; in breadth, in front on 
the street, twenty-four feet; length, backwards, fifty-five feet; and breadth, 
in the rear, eight feet; all as it lies inclosed in its fence, which he, the grantor, 
does by virtue of a conveyance from Jan Conell, given him, of date the 3d of 
June, 1672, having been sold to said Conell, at public sale by Jacob 
Joostens [Van Covelens] ;'- and that free and unencumbered, with no 
claim standing or issuing against it, excepting the lord's right, and with- 
out the grantor's making the least claim upon it any more; acknowledging 
that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, 
giving therefore jj/e«am ae^?'o?«cm cessam, and full power to the aforenamed 
Cornelis Cornelise Van der Hoeve, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
the aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his own patrimonial 
estate and efi'ects ; promising to defend the same from all persons, and to 
free it from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, and further, 
never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as 
provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 30th of December, 1676. 



Marten Hoffman. 



Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Secry. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wessells 
[Ten Broeck], etc., Jacob Jansen Gardenier,'^ alias Plodder, who ac- 

1 Cornells Cornelise Van der Hoeve married Metie, daughter of Marten Beeckman. He had 
three children, baptized in Albany: Marten, Susanna, and Johannes. 

2 See page 100. 

3 Jacob Janse Gardenier came to Beverwycli in 16.38, as servant to Claes Janse Euyter.— 

0' Gallaghan's History of New Netherlaml, i, 438. His first wife was Josyna ; the second, 

Barentje Straetsmans, widow of Hans Coenraetse Backer. In 1688 she was again a widow, and 
made provision for the partition of her estate into 15 parts, one for each of her living children, 
viz : 10 by her first husband and 5 by the second. Jacob Janse Gardenier left 5 sons, besides 
daughters, who mostly settled in Columbia county. 



Albany County Records. 149 

knowledged that he is well and truly indebted, and in arrears, to Mr 
Andries Teller, in the sum of two hundred and forty-eight guilders and 
two stuivers in beavers, and eighteen guilders and four stuivers in seewant 
growing out of a matter of money loaned to the aforesaid Jacob Janse to 
his content ; which aforesaid sum of two hundred and forty-eight guilders 
two stuivers in beavers, and eighteen guilders four stuivers' in seewant 
this niortgagor promises to pay to Mr. Andries Teller, or his order, within 
the time of three mouths next coming, in good merchantable beavers' 
skins, reckoned at 8 guilders apiece, or other payment to the content of 
the aforenamed Mons. Teller ; pledging therefor specially his negro boy 
named Wynamus, about 9 years old, together with another negro named 
Bock, about twenty-one years old, with this understanding, that if so be 
that he, Mr. Teller, be not paid the above sum within the limited time, 
then shall he [Gardenier] deliver to him the aforesaid negro boy Wyna- 
mus, hale and sound, for the sum of twenty-eight merchantable beavers, 
and the remainder of the sum he shall pay as herebefore mentioned; and 
further pledging generally his person and estate, personal and real, 
present and future, nothing excepted, and submitting the same to the 
force of all the laws and judges, for the promoting of the payment thereof 
if need be, without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, on the 22d January, 167-f. 

Jacob Jansen Gterdenier. 
Alyeuas Flodder. 
Richard Pretty. 
Dierck Wesselse. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Eobt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Dirk Hesseling, who declared that he had in true rights, free owner- 
ship, granted, conveyed and transferred, to and for the behoof of Jacob 
Hevick [or Hevin], in two certain lots of land lying in the colony 
Rensselaerswyck, the one before this belonging to Dirk Van Schelluyne, 
which devolved upon him by commission of the honorable court, by 
virtue of an execution of date the 17th of June, 1670, and the other 
before this belonging to Hendrik Reur, deceased, and by the late 
director, Mons. Jeremias Van Rensselaer, sold at public sale, of which the 
grantor remained the highest bidder and buyer, according to the vendue 
book in the custody of the vendue master, Mons. Provoost, of date the 
9th of July, 1670, and that free and unencumbered, excepting the lord's 
right, with^no claim standing or issuing against the same, and without 
the grantor's having the least claim any more upon it, acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforenamed 
Jacob Hevick, his heirs and successors, or those who may liereafter 
acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the said two 
lotsof land as he might do with his patrimonial estate and efi"ects ; pro- 
mising the same to defend against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims or charges which are lawful : and further, never more to 



150 Albany County Records. 

do or suflPer anything to be done against the same, either with or without 
law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by 
law. 

DiRCK Hesselingh. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robert Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Paulus Martense [Van Benthuysen], wheelwright, who declared that 
he had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred 
to and for the behoof of Harme Gansevoort,! in his house and lot, 
standing and lying in Albany, in the Cow street, 2 where the aforesaid 
Harme at present dwells, being a corner house, and that, as it lies in 
fence; bounded south by Mr. Samuel Wilson, east by the house of Hubert 
Janse de Vroome, and north and west by the public street,-^ which this 
grantor does by virtue of two patents, both from the late Governor NicoUs, 
the one granted to him, the grantor, of date the 7th of May, 1667, and 
the other granted to Arent Janse, of date the 11th of June, 1667, which 
he received from said Arent Janse, and that free and unencumbered, 
excepting the lord's right, with no claim standing or issuing against the 
same, and without the grantor's making the least claim against it any more, 
acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, and giving therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full 
power to the aforesaid Harme Gansevoort, his heirs and successors, or 
those, who may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid house and lot, as he might do with his patrimonial 
estate and effects ; promising the same to defend against all persons, and 
to free it from all trouble, claims or charges, which are lawful, and 
further, never more to do or sufi"er anything to be done against the same, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as 
provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 24th of March, 167|. 

PouLus Martens. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Rob. Livingston, Seer. 



The honorable commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck and 
Schinnechtady, declare by these presents, that they have in true rights, 
free ownership, granted and conveyed to and for the behoof of Mr. Cor- 

1 Harmen Gansevoort was a brewer, and occupied the lot on which the Stanwix Hall uow 
stands. His wife was Maritie Leendertse Conyn. They had two sons, Leendert and Henderick, 
and three daughters. 

2 Two streets at different times passed by this name, South Pearl and Broadway, the latter 
is here alluded to. 

3 The lot, here described, was ou the south corner of Broadway and Maiden lane ; the 
former street being sometimes called Cow street. 



Albany County Records. 151 

nelus Van Dyck, chirurgeon, in a certain parcel of ground, lying on the 
third kil [Fossen kil], in length on the south side, thirty rods, including 
the kil ; breadth on the west side, twenty-four rods ; length on the north 
side, twenty rods; and breadth on the [east] end, next the land, formerly 
belonging to Andries De Vos, twenty-four rods ; which [land] the afore- 
said Van Dyck has bought of the diaconate of Albany, i free and unen- 
cumbered, and the same is conveyed by way of barter and exchange for a 
parcel of land on the Kutten kil,~ of a morgen and a half in size, hereto- 
fore conveyed to said Van Dyck, by conveyance, of date 10th of April, 
1673, and which extended to the inconvenience of the citizen's range for 
their cattle ; giving therefore full power to the aforesaid Cornelis Van 
Dyck, his heirs and successors, or those who may receive right and title 
hereafter from him, to dispose of the same as he might do with his 
patrimonial estate and effects, and hereby, he is empowered to solicit a 
patent for the same of the right honorable the governor general. 

Done in Albany, the 29th of March, 1677. 
A. Teller. 
DiERCK Wesselse [Ten Broeck]. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Rort Livingston Seer. 



Appeared before me Rob' Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, etc., Jan 
Conell, who declared and acknowledged, that he is well and truly indebted, 
and in arrears to Capt. Anth" Brockholes,'^ in the sum of fifty- two pounds 
two shillings and nine-pence sterling, growing out of a matter of goods and 
merchandise to his content received, which aforesaid £52 2s. Qp sterling, 
this mortgagor promises to pay to Capt. Anth'^' Brockholes, or to his 
order, in two installments, of which the first shall be in the coming 
business season (Jiandel tycW), in the month of August, six and twenty 
pounds one shilling and four and a half pence, being the just half, and 
that in beavers and in good current strung seewant, to wit, thirty beavers 
at 12 shillings sterling, a piece, is £18. and the remainder, in good 
merchantable seewant, at one shilling, reckoned for two guilders ; the 
second installment, one year thereafter, 1678, in the month of August, 
the sum of twenty-six pounds one shilling four and a half pence sterling, 
to wit, thirty good merchantable beavers and the remainder in good 
strung seewant, as the first payment, pledging therefor specially his house 
and lot, lying here in Albany, on the hill ; bounded south, by Arent Van 
den Bergh ; north, on the new house of Dirk "Wesselse; and generally his 
person and estate, real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted, 

1 Andries De Vos's land lay on the west side of Pearl street, extending from Steuben 
street northerly to or beyond the Vossen kil, now Canal street; and Dr. van Dyck's lot, 
above described, lay in the valley of the Vossen kil, next west of De Vos's land. 

2 The Rutten kil is now a covered sewer. It crosses Beaver street, above Pearl, and runs 
north easterly till it crosses Norton street, when it takes an easterly direction towards the 
river, between Norton and State streets, and empties into the basin, a little south of the 
foot ot the latter street. 

3 Commander Brockols was chief military officer, under the governor, and during his 
absence from New York, occasionally acted as his deputy. Ho resided chiefly in New York. 
He married 2 May, 1681, Susanna Schrik (widow), daughter of Wm. Teller, Sen., by whom he 
had eight children. 



152 Albany County Records. 

and submitting the same to the force of all laws and judges, to promote 
the payment thereof in due time (if need be), without loss and cost. 
Done in Albany, ou the 3d of May, 1677. 

John Conell. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Copia vera : 

lleceived from John Connell, of Albany, six and twenty pounds one 
shil : and four pence half penny, being one half or moeyty of fifty-two 
pound "Is. and nine-pence due to Capt. Autho. Brockholes ; I say received 
by me July the twenty-third day, Anno 1678. 
Witness, ( Robert Hamilton. 

Charles Celes. < This is a true copy, R : Liv : Seer. 

( Record : 8 Aug., 1678. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Dirck Wesselse 
[Ten Broeck], etc., Jan Conell, who declared that he had in true rights, 
free ownership, granted, conveyed, and transferred to James Penuiman, 
in a certain house and lot lying here in Albany, with all that is thereon 
fast by earth and nailed ; and in length and breadth as it lies in fence ; 
bounded north by the dwars house of Jurian Janse Groenwout, and 
south by the house of Harme G-ansevoort, on condition that the cZiwars 
house on the point of the northeast side shall stand a foot from the lot, 
and then follow a straight line, and a free drip between him and Harme 
Gansevoort ; and that by virtue of a conveyance given to him by Jurian 
Janse Groenwout, of date the 8th of February, 1669, to which reference 
is here made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing 
or issuing against the same, except the lord's right, and without the 
grantor's making the least claim any more upon it, acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessani, and full power to the aforesaid James 
Pennimau, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire 
right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the same as he might 
do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the aforesaid house 
and lot to defend from all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
or charges which are lawful ; and further, never more to do nor suffer 
anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 15th of May, 1677. 

John Conell. 
Richard Pretty. 
Dirck Wesselse. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Robt. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., Mr. Andries Teller, 
who acknowledged that he is fully paid and sati^sfied by Jacob Janse Gar- 
denier, alias Plodder, in respect to an obligation of the 22d Jan., 167-7, 



Albany County Records. 153 

given to said Mr. Teller for the sum of 248 guilders and 2 stuivers in 
beavers, and 18 guilders 4 stuivers in seewant, thanking said Jacob Janse 
for prompt payment ; and he promises the same [Gardenier] to free from 
all claims, from the beginning of the world to this date. 

Thus done in Albany, in presence of Pieter Meese Vrooman and 
Gabriel Thomasen, as witnesses hereunto invited, being the 17th of May, 
1677. 

A. Teller. 
Testes : 
Pieter Meese Vrooman. 
Gahriell Tomasen. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Jacob Janse Gardenier, alias Plodder, who acknowledged that he is 
well and truly indebted, and in arrears, to Pieter Meese Vrooman, in the 
quantity of three hundred and fifty good merchantable boards {greene 
planken), growing out of a matter of money paid to the aforesaid Jacob 
Janse to his content, which aforesaid 350 boards this mortgagor promises 
to pay to Pieter Meese or his order on demand, pledging therefor specially 
his negro boy Wynamus, aged about nine years, and generally his person 
and estate, personal and real, present and future, nothing excepted, and 
submitting the same to the force of all laws and judges to promote the 
payment of the same in due time, if need be, without cost and loss. 
Done in Albany, the 17th of May, 1677. 

Jacob Janse Gerdenier, 
al^as Plodder. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Robt. Livingston, Seer. 

I, the undersigned, acknowledge that I am fully paid for this mort- 
gage by the hands of Jacob Janse Gardenier, alias Plodder, freeing him 
from all claims. 

Done in Albany, the 1st of May, 1680. 

Pieter Meese Vrooman. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of Mr. Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commissaries, etc., Hendrick 
Rooseboom, who declared that he had in true rights, free ownership, 
granted, conveyed and transferred, by these presents, to and for the 
behoof of Mr. Philip Schuyler, in a certain lot lying here in Albany, on 
the hill ; bounded on the south by the lot of Mr. Wilson, i and on the 

1 Samuel Wilson, a merchant of gi-eat -wealth, estahlished himself iu New York soon after the 
cession to England, his residence beiu^ on the south side of the present Wall street near Pearl. 
Mr. Wilson was a prominent citizen and active iu public life. He died in the year 1689, leaving- a 
-wido-w and two sons.— Valentine's History of Nezv York, p. 346. In 1683, Pieter Fileroy, o/ios De 
Garmeau, contracts for the purchase of his house and lot in A\]nvty,— English ManmcHpfs. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 20 



154 Alhaity County Records. 

north by the lot of the aforenamed Ilendrick Rooseboom, and on the 
west by the public street ; in breadth on the west and east sides thirty 
wood feet, and in length fifty-one feet on the south and north sides, 
Rynland measure (and whereas he is minded to build a house thereupon, 
so the same is granted drip free), by virtue of a patent thereof, of date 
the 30th of April, 1667, from the right honorable governor general 
Nicolls, and a conveyance given to him by the administrators of the estate 
of the late Reyndert Pieterse,' executed before Secretary Ludovicus 
Oobes, of date the 14th of June, 1673, and that free and unencumbered, 
with no claim standing or issuing against the same, excepting the lord's 
right, and without the grantor's making the least claim any more upon it, 
acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, and giving therefore ^)?e»«?>i actionem cessam, and full 
power to the aforenamed Mr. Philip Pieterse Schuyler, his heirs and suc- 
cessors, or those who may acquire right and title hereafter from him, to 
do with and dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his patrimo- 
nial estate and effects; promising the same to defend against all persons, 
and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges which are lawful ; and 
further, never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation 
as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, on the 14th of June, 1677. 

Hendrick Roesboom. 
Ricliard Prcttij. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wessells 
[Ten Broeck], etc., James Penniman, who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to Mr. Andries 
Teller, in a certain house and lot lying here, with all that is thereon, fast 
by earth and nailed ; in breadth and length as it lies in fence ; bounded 
northerly by the house (dwars huys) of Jurian Janse Groenwout, and 
south by the house of Harme Gansevoort, on condition that the dwars 
house on the point on the northeast side shall stand one foot from the lot, 
and that it run in a straight line, and there be a free drip between him 
and Harme Gansevoort, by virtue of a conveyance made him by Jan 
Conell, of date the 15th of May, 1677, to which reference is made, and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same, excepting the lord's right, and without the grantor's making 
the least claim any more upon it ; acknowledging that he is fully paid 
and satisfied for the same, the first penny with the last, giving therefore 
plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Mr. Andries 
Teller, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire right 
and title from him, to do with and dispose of the same as he might do 
with his patrimonial estate and eff"ects; promising to defend the aforesaid 
house and lot against all persons, and to free the same from all trouble, 
claims or charges which are right; and further, never more to do or 

' Records, page 221. 



Albany County liecords. 155 

suffer anything to be done against tbe same, either with or without law, 
in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided by law. 
Done in Albany, the 8th of June, 1677. 

James Peniman. 

Richard Pretty. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wesselse 
[Ten Broeck], etc., Mr. Andries Teller, who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to Mr. Samuell 
Willson, in a certain house and lot lying here in Albany, with all that is 
thereon fast by earth and nailed, in breadth and length as it lies in fence, 
bounded north by the dwars (cross?) house of Jurrian JanseGioenwout, 
and south by the house of Harmen Gansevoort, on condition that the 
dwars house on the corner of the northeast side shall stand a foot from 
the lot, and that it [lot] follows a straight line, and there be a free drip 
between him and Harme Gansovoort, and that by virtue of a conveyance 
o-iven him by James Penniman of date the 8th of June, 1677, to which 
reference is here made, free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against the same, and without the grantor's making the least 
claim upon it any more, acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied 
therefor, the first penny with the last, and giving therefore plenam 
actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Mr. Samuel Wilson, his 
heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire right and title 
from him. to do with and dispose of the same as he might do with his 
patrimonial estate and effects ; promising to defend the aforesaid house 
and lot from all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges 
which are lawful ; and further, never more to do nor suffer anything to 
be done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the"9th of June, 1677. 

A. Teller. 

Richard Pretty. 
Dirck Wesselse. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. x\ndries Teller, 
etc., Mattheus Abrahamse [Van Deusen],' who declared that he had in 
true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to Paulus 
Marteiise [Van Benthuysen], in a certain house and lot lying here in 
Albany, with all that is therein, fast by earth and nailed ; bounded south 
by Pieter Loockermans, north by the house of Lourence Van Ale and 
Jan Janse Bleecker, and west and east by the public street 5 in breadth 
in front on the street two rods, and in the rear on the west side -one rod 



1 MattlieiTs, or Teuwis. Abrahamse Van Deusen, was at Fort Orange in 1657. He liad two 
■brothers, Melgert and Jacob. His wife's name was Helena in 1700. They had three sons, 
Kobert, Jan and Isaac, and perhaps daughters. 



156 Albany County Records. 

and ten feet and a half ; length on the north side six and a half rods, and 
on the south side six rods five and a half feet; ^ which this grantor does, 
by virtue of a patent granted him by the right honorable governor 
general, Rich'd Nicolls, of date the 7th of May, 1667, to which refer- 
ence is here made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim 
standing or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), and 
without the grantor's having the least claim upon it any more, acknow- 
ledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with 
the last, and giving therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to 
the aforesaid Paulus Martense, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
said house and lot as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and 
effects; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it 
from all trouble, claims and charges, which may hereafter arise, and 
never more to do or suffer anything to be done against the same, either 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as pro- 
vided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of June, 1677. 

This is the mark of M Mattiieus Abr'ahamse, 
with his own hand set. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Secry. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the after named witnesses, Aunetie Lievens, widow of Goose Gerritse 
[Van Schaick], deceased, of the one side, and Jan Jacobse Van Noorts- 
trant - of the other side, who declared that they had in amity and friend- 
ship made a bargain with each other for the sale of a piece of land lying 
to the north of the fourth branch or fork (spruyt^ [of the Mohawk river], 
above the colony Rensselaerswyck, being a part of a parcel of land called 
the foreland of the Half Moon, and by the Indians Mathahenaack, 
together with about two morgens of cleared land lying on the island 
[Cohoes], which lies directly over against the aforesaid parcel of land, 
commonly called Haver [Oats] island, and that in the manner following : 
Firstly. — The widow aforesaid acknowledges that she has sold, and Jan 
Jacobse Van Noortstrant that he has bought of her, the aforesaid parcel 
of land, stretching from the fourth fork [of the Mohawk river] to the 
little creek close by Roeloff Gerritse [Van der Werken's] ^ house, con- 
taining about seven morgens of arable land (houw hint), having to the 
south the aforenamed fourth fork, to the west Roeloff Gerritse, to the 
north the little creek, and to the east the river, together with two morgens 
of arable land lying upon the Haver [Oats] island, which lies directly 

1 This lot was doubtless on the west side of Broadway, north of Maiden lane, extending back 
to James street. 

2 Jan Jacobse Van Noorstrant was in Coxsackie in 1685, and bought land in Niskayuna. In 
1670 his wife, Agniette, took a dismission from the Albany church to that of New York. They 
had one daughter, Margriet, baptized in Albany, for the church at Albany was the only one north 
of Esopus, now Kingston, for many years. 

3 Roeloff Gerritse Van Der Werkeu early settled at the forks of the Mohawk. By his wife, 
Geertruy Jacobse, he had five sons, Johannes, Jacob, Gerrit, Hendrik and Albert, besides four 
daughters. 



Albany County Records. 157 

over against the aforesaid parcel of laud ; the same to be delivered to the 
buyer free and unencumbered at the end of the term [of this conti-act], 
only excepting the lord's [duke's] right; for which two parcels of land 
Jan Jacobse Van Noortstrant promises to deliver the number of six and 
sixty whole beavers, to be paid in wheat, oats, or other grain, cattle, 
work, etc., at market prices, and that in four installments, a just fourth 
part each time, being sixteen beavers and a half, whereof the first shall 
be in March, 1679, the second installment in March, 1680, the third in 
1681, and the fourth in March, 1682 ; and it was hereby covenanted and 
agreed that the aforenamed Jan Jacobse shall put the aforesaid land in a 
sufficient fence the next spring, for the keeping of her and his land free 
[from cattle]. Also, that the widow aforesaid shall have free passage for 
her cattle through his land up to the Half Moon, for pasturage there. 
Likewise the buyer shall be held to keep away all the cattle which may 
come from the Half Moon to do damage to the aforesaid widow's corn. 
Further, it is agreed that at harvest time, when the grain is in, the cattle 
of the aforesaid widow shall have free pasture on his, the buyer's, land, 
and in the stubble, and his cattle in like manner upon her land, to pre- 
vent all quarrels respecting the driving of cattle. And if the buyer does 
not pay for the aforesaid lands at the times [specified], then the. seller 
takes her land again ; wherewith the contracting parties are well satisfied, 
it being done without craft or guile, respectively pledging hereto for the 
performance of these presents, their persons and estates, personal and 
real, present and future. 

Thus done in Albany, the 26th of June, 1677, in presence of Mr. Gerrit 
Banker and Harme Rutgers, as witnesses hereto invited. 

Annetge Lievens. 

This is the mark /; of Jan Jacobse Van Nortstrant, 
yy with his own hand set. 

Gerret Bancken. 
Hermen Rutgers. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

On the 10th Octobr., 1680, Roeloff Gerritse [Van der Werken], 
assumed [?] the above purchase of Jan Jacobse, the widow agreeing 
thereto, he paying 56 beavers, \ in the winter of 168i, and the f each, 
winter thereafter. 

' Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., the honorable Thomas De Laval, as attorney for Mr. John Savine,i 
heir of Capt. Thomas Willet, merchant at Boston, who acknowledged that 
he is fully paid and satisfied by Mr. Robt. Stoi-y, in respect to an obliga- 
tion which said Story gave to the heirs of the aforesaid Willet, for the 
sum of three hundred and fifty-seven guilders beavers, of date the 26tli 
of August, 1676, and thanking said Ro. Story for prompt payment ; pro- 
mising him to free from all trouble or claims ; which aforesaid obligation 

' Merchant of New York.— English Mamiscripts. 



158 Mhany County Records. 

said Story gave for the freeing of the house which he bought of Wni. 
Nottingham, from a mortgage which was tlien upon said house for the 
aforesaid sum ; pledging therefor his person and estate, personal and real, 
present and future, nothing excepted. 

Thus done in Albany, on the 25th July, 1677. 

Tho. De Lav all. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me. 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Mr. Samuel Wilson, of the one side, and Mr. 
Jan Heyndrik Bruyn, of the other side, who declared that they, in amity 
and friendship, had agreed and covenanted with each other in respect to 
the sale of a house and lot standing and lying here in Albany, on the hill, 
between the house of Robt. Sanders and the new house of Capt. Philip 
Schuyler, and that in the manner following : First. — Mr. Bruyn promises 
to pay to Mr. Wilson, for the aforesaid house, the quantity of one hundred 
and fourteen beavers, to be reckoned at 8 guilders apiece, always provided 
that the buyer have the choice or option to pay in heavy beavers, that is, 
five quarter pounds beavers reckoned at 8 guilders a beaver, and that in 
two installments, of which the first shall be paid down at once, a sum of 
fifty-seven beavers, and the second in New York, also fifty-seven beavers, 
within the time three months ; with the first payment, being cash down, 
the house shall be delivered with all that is therein, fast by earth or 
nailed, and as the same is in fence, on condition that the seller on the 
payment of the last installment shall be holden to deliver a good valid 
conveyance, together with the patent thereof. The aforesaid covenants 
the said contracting parties mutually promise to keep and perform, under 
a pledge of their respective persons and estates, nothing excepted, subject 
to all courts, laws and judges. In witness whereof the contracting par- 
ties have signed this in presence of Jan Van Loon and Claas Janse 
Stavast, as witnesses hereto invited. 

Done in Albany, the 26th of July, 1677. 

Samuell Willson. 
J. H. Bruyn. 
Jan Van Loon.^ 
Claes Jansen Stavast. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Robt. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Andries Teller and Mr. Dirck Wesselse 
[Ten Broeck], etc., Pieter Winne, Junior,- who acknowledged that he is 
well and truly indebted, and in arrears, to Mr. Richard Pretty, in the 



1 Jan Van Loon came from Luyck, Holland, and early settled at Coxsackie, at a place called 
Loonenbm-o-h now Athens, He was bv trade a blacksmith. In 1676, he married Maria Albertse, 
in New York,' and had three sons, Albe'rt, Nicolaas and Mattheus, and perhaps other children. 

2 Pieter Winne, Jr., son of Pieter Winne, was born in 1643; he settled at Esopus, where he 
was living in 1696, when letters of administration were issued on the estate of his father. 



Albany County Records. 159 

sum of four hundred and twentj-four guilders seewant, growing out of a 
matter of goods and moneys received to bis content, for which he promised 
to deliver tar for his honor the governor general ; but having failed in 
this, and being willing to give satisfaction to the aforesaid Mr. Pretty for 
the aforementioned 424 guilders seewant, he engages and pledges himself 
to work with Mr. Marten Gerritse [Van Bergen], from the 1st of August, 
1677, until the whole sum shall have been earned (sickness only ex- 
cepted), which payment shall be for the aforenamed Mr. Pretty or his 
order; and for the performance of the same he pledges his person and 
estate, real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted, submitting 
the same to the force of all laws and judges. In witness whereof he has 
signed this with his own hand. 

Done in Albany, on the 8th of August, 1677. 

This is the ma'rk R. p, W. of Pr. Winne, Jr., 
with his own hand set. 
A. Teller. 
Dirck Wessels. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

The honorable commissaries of Albany, colony Rensselaerswyck and 
Schaenhechtady, declare by those presents that they have in true rights, 
free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the belioof 
of Pr. Meese Vrooman, in a certain house and lot standing and lying in 
Albany; bounded south by Ro. Sanders, and north by the house of Capt. 
Schuyler; in breadth and length according to the patent thereof of date 
the 6th of March, 1667, to which reference is here made ; and whereas 
said Pieter Meese, in the court (vergaderinge'), has made it appear that 
the aforesaid house was bought by his predecessor (voorzaat),^ Gerrit 
Janse Stavast, of Richard Frizer [i^ra^/er I'], and by him, Meese, paid 
for, unto such persons as he was directed, and chiefly to Mr. Pretty, in 
whose hands the patents were deposited ; and afterwards said Frizer died 
in England, without appointing any attorney ; therefore their honors of 
the court, this conveyance make, free and unencumbered, with no claim 
standing or issuing against the same (excepting only the lord's right), 
and without their honors, the court, making the least claim thereupon, 
giving therefore full power and plencan actionem cessam, to the afore- 
named Pieter Meese Vrooman, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of 
the said house and lot as he might do with his other patrimonial estate and 
effects ; promising the same to defend against all persons, and to free it 
from all trouble, claims and charges ; and further, never more to do nor 
suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, 
in any manner whatsoever. 

Given under our hands and seals, in Albany, the 14th of August, 1677. 

Philip Schuyler. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



1 The former husband of his wife, widow of Gerrit Janse Stavast. 



160 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Pr. Meuse Vrooman, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to Elizabeth Claese, widow 
of the late Jan Burger, deceased, to a certain house and lot, standing and 
lying in Albany ; bounded south by Ro. Sanders, and north by the new 
house of Capt. Schuyler ; in breadth and length according to the patent 
thereof, of date the 6th of June, 1667, to which reference is here made, 
which he does by virtue of a decree granted him by the honorable com- 
missaries of this town, of date the 14th of August, 1677, and that free 
and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, 
(excepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least 
claim thereupon any more ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and 
satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and giving therefore 
plcnam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Elizabeth Claese, 
her heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire right and title 
from her, to do with and dispose of the same, as she might do with her 
patrimonial estate and eff"ects; promising to defend the same against all 
persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges, which are law- 
ful, and further, never more to do or suff"er anything to be done against 
the same, either with or without law in any manner whatsoever, under 
obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, the 6th of September, 1677. 

PiETER Meesen Vrooman. 

Richard Pretty. 

A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Rob^ Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. A. Teller, etc., 
Elizabeth Claese, widow of the late Jan Burger, deceased, who declared 
that she had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and trans- 
ferred to Mr. Samuell Wilson, merchant at New York, a certain house 
and lot, standing and lying in Albany, bounded south by Ro. Sanders, 
and north by the new house of Capt. Schuyler, in breadth and length 
according to the patent thereof, of date the 6th of June, 1667, whereto 
reference is here made ; which she does by virtue of a conveyance to her, 
given by P''. Meuse Vroomen, of date the 6th of September, 1677, and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's making 
the least pretensions to the same any more, acknowledging that she is 
fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first and last pennies, and giving 
therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Mr. 
Samuell Wilson, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the same, as 
he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects; promising the afore- 
said house and lot to defend against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims or charges, which are lawful, and further, never more to 
do no or suff"er anything to be done against tjie same, either with or with- 



Albany County Records. 161 

out law in auy manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor 
by law. 

Done in Albany, on the 7th of September, 1677. 

Leysebeth Claes. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Rob' Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Samuell Willson, 'merchant at New York, who declared that he had 
in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and 
for the behoof of Mr. Jan Heyndrik Bruyn, in a certain house and lot, 
standing and lying in Albany, on the hill, bounded south by Ro. Sanders, 
and north by the new house of Capt. Philip Schuyler, in breadth and 
length according to the patent thereof, of date the 6th of June, 1667, 
whereto reference is here made, which he does by virtue of a conveyance, 
given by Elizabeth Claese, widow of the late Jan Burger, deceased, of 
date the 7th of September, 1677, and that free and unencumbered, with 
no claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), 
and without the grantor's making the least pretension to the same any 
more; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied, the first penny 
with the last, and giving therefore p?ejmm actionem cessam, and full power 
to the aforesaid Mr. Jan Heyndrickse Bruyn, his heirs and successors, or 
those who may acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose 
of the same as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects; 
promising the aforesaid house and lot to defend against all persons, and 
to free the same from all trouble, claims and charges, as is right, and 
further, never more to do or sufi"er anything to be done against the same, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation 
as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 8th of September, 1677. 

Samuell "Willson. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Rob* Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty, and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc.. Evert Luycase Backer,^ who declared that he had, in true rights, 
free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, to and for the behoof 
of Jacob Janse Gardenier, in a certain farm, being the just half of the 
land, lying behind the Kinderhoek, in which is comprised the rights, 
which were presented to Volkert Janse [Douw], by the right owner 
Watawit, whose right and title the grantor possesses, namely, all the 
aforesaid land to wit, the southerly jusT half with all the rights, title and 
ownership of the same, lying on the east side of the kil, being the middle- 

> In 1065, Evert Luycase Backer bought land behind Kinderhook of an Indian (p. 189) 
He was in Beverwyck in 1657 (p. 171). 

Hist. Col. Hi. 21 



162 Albany County Records. 

most piece of land there, which he, the grantor, does by virtue of the 
patent to him, granted by the right honorable governor, Richard Nicolls, 
of date the 26th of June, 1668, and that free and unencumbered, with no 
claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), 
and without the grantor's making the least pretension any more to it, 
acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, and giving therefore plenam actionem cessam, and full 
power to the aforesaid Jacob Janse Gardenier, his heirs and successors, 
or those who may receive right and title from him, to do with and to 
dispose of the same as he might do with his patrimonial estate and eff"ects ; 
promising the aforesaid parcel of land to defend against all persons, and 
to free the same from all trouble, claims and charges, which are lawful, 
and further, never more to do or suffer anything to be done against it, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation 
as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 8th of September, 1677. 

Evert Luycas. 

Richard Pretty. 

A. Teller. 



In my presence, 



Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



On this, the 9th day of September, 1677, appeared before me Ro. 
Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the afternamed witnesses, Jacob 
Janse Gardenier, alias Flodder, who acknowledged that he sold last 
January, to Adam Dingmans,i the farm at Kinderhoeck, upon which he, 
Dingman, at present resides, in manner following, the same shall be 
delivered to Adam Dingmans, with all his right, title and ownership of the 
same, as it lies in fence, with the house, lot, ricks and barn, as he at 
present occupies it, with a cart and half of a horse, and that for the sum 
of five hundred guilders, Holland money, to be paid in exchange on 
Holland, whenever the seller shall desire the bill of exchange, with this 
reservation that, if so be the bill come back protested or if the money be 
not recovered there, then the sale shall be nul, and the buyer shall be 
held to pay yearly rent as before; to which end the contracting parties 
mutually pledge their respective persons and estates, real and personal, 
present and future, nothing excepted, placing the same in subjection to 
all laws and judges. 

Done in Albany, without guile or craft, in presence of Arnout Cornelise 
Viele, and Hendrik Vande Water, as witnesses hereto called. 

Jacob Janse Flodder. 
Adam Dingemans. 

Testes : 

Arnout Cor. Viele. 
Henderick Vande Water. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



1 Adam Dingman was born in Haarlem, Holland. He married Aeltie, daughter of Jacob 
Janse Gardenier, by whom he had two sons, Gerrit, and Jacob, and two daughters. He was 
in Greenbush in 1663, but subsequently settled in Kinderhook. His will made 31 January, 
1721, was proved the 30th of March. 



Albany County Records. 163 

By the honorable, the commissaries of Albany, colony Renselaerswyck 
and Schaenhechtady, etc., whereas Catelyntje Van Eslant, wife of Jacob 
Abrahamse' Cuyper, proposes to depart from here for Holland, to collecf*' 
and receive there some moneys, coming to her and her brother by way of 
inheritance, and bequest from her late mother's uncle, Harmanus 
Antonides Vander Linde, in his life time minister at Naerden, to which 
end she has solicited of us a certificate testimonial, which we cannot 
refuse : therefore, we declare that she is a daughter of Claes Van 
Eslandt, deceased, having been in his life time undertaker (ae^ispreccker') 
and gravedigger at New York, and her mother's name Willemtie Harpers 
Vander Linde. 

Given under our hands and seals, in Albany, the 25th of September, 
and in the nine and twentieth year of the reign of our sovereign lord 
Charles the Second, by the grace of God, king of Great Britain, France, 
and Ireland, defender of the faith, 1677. 

[This paper is a copy without signatures.] 

Appeared before me Robert Livingstone, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Philip Pieterse Schuyler and Mr. Richard 
Pretty, etc., Claes Van Eslandt, and Jacob Abrahamse Cuyper, citizens 
of Albany, who declared that they had, in accordance with advices from 
Harmanus Vander Linde, dwelling in the Hage, in Holland, appointed 
and empowered Catelyntje Van Eslandt, wife of the aforesaid Jacob 
Abrahamse Cuyper, and sister of the aforesaid Claes Van Eslandt, 
specially to demand, collect and receive in Holland, etc., her and her 
aforesaid brother's portion of the inheritance and bequest, left for them 
by her mother's uncle, named Harmanus Antonides Vander Linde, in his 
life time minister at Naerden, and acquittance to execute for receipts, 
and for claims to caveeren (?), and further, to do, perform and execute 
all things which may be needful and her judgment may suggest; promis- 
ing at all times to hold good all that shall be done and performed in the 
aforesaid matter by their aforesaid sister and wife, as their attorney, without 
any contradiction. 

Done in Albany, in America, on the 25th of September, and in the 
nine and twentieth year of the reign of our sovereign lord, Charles the 
Second, by the grace of God, king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, 
defender of the faith, Annoque Domini 1G77. 

[This paper is a copy without signatures.] 

By the honorable, the commissaries of Albany, colony of Renselaers- 
wyck and Schaenhechtady, etc., a certain citizen of this town of Albany, 
in America, named Aernout Corn. Viele, appearing before us solicits very 
earnestly, that he may receive a certificate testimonial from us, that he 
was married to one Gerritie Gerritse, born at Amsterdam, Holland, which 
we are not able to refuse him ; whereas some years since a certain power 
of attorney was given to Harmen Vedder, also in our jurisdiction dwelling, 
having reference to Arent Janse Timmerman, stepftither of Gerritje 



Perhaps Jacob Abrahamse Vosburgh, cooper. 



164 Albany County Records. 

Gerritse, in respect to some moneys, which were coming to her from the 
Orphans Chamber, but came back fruitless, because not specially addressed 
to the Messrs. orphan masters, therefore we, to all magistrates on whom 
these presents are served, make known the truth to be that he, the 
aforenamed Arnout Corn. Viele is husband and guardian of Gerritje 
Gerritse, both living and in sound health. 

Given under our hands and seals in Albany, in America, on the 25th 
of September, and in the nine and twentieth year of the reign of our 
sovereign lord, Charles the Second, by the grace of God, king of Great 
Britain, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, Annoq. Dom. 1677. 

[This paper is a copy without signatures.] 

Appeared before me Robert Livingstone, secretary, etc., and in the 
presence of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Philip Pieterse Schuyler and 
Mr. Richard Pretty, etc., Arnout Corn. Viele, citizen and inhabitant 
here, who declared that he appointed and empowered, by these presents, 
Messieurs Abraham de Hoshipee and Daniel de Niewville, merchants 
dwelling in the city of Amsterdam, specially to demand, collect and 
receive from the Messieurs Orphan Masters of the same city, the sum of 
two hundred and fifty carolus guilders, with the interest due on the same 
since the 24th of August, 1656, to the date of payment, arising out of 
the proven estate of the subscriber's wife, Gerritje Gerritse; and by 
virtue of an authentic copy herewith given of a certain extract from the 
five and twentieth register of the orphans' chamber of the city of Am- 
sterdam, fol. iii, drawer 289, together with this [power of attorney], these 
attorneys [are empowered] acquittance to give for receipts, and in case of 
refusal, with law and the rigor of justice to constrain them to payment, 
and to that end all terms of courts to observe unto sentence and ex- 
treme execution {van dien indues), and finding the sentence withheld, 
to challenge or appeal therefrom; and said challenge or appeal also to 
prosecute to the extreme; with power, also, one or more persons in their 
places to substitute ; and further, to do all things in the matter aforesaid, 
either with or without law, as may be needful, and as their judgment may 
suggest, and as he, the subscriber, if himself present, might or could do ; 
promising at all times [to hold good] all that shall be done and performed 
by the aforesaid attorneys, or by one of them, or by those substituted in 
the case by virtue of these presents, without any contradiction, under 
obligation as provided therefor according to law, provided that these 
attorneys be holden, when asked and solicited, of their transactions to 
show a proper accounting. 

This done and executed in Albany, in America, the 25th of September, 
and in the nine and twentieth year of the reign of our sovereign lord 
Charles the Second, by the grace of God King of Great Britain, France 
and Ireland, defender of the faith. Annoq. Dom. 1677. 

[Copy without signature.] 

Appeared before me Robert Livingstone, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Philip Schuyler and Mr. Andries Teller, 
etc., Mr. Cornells Van Dyck, chirurgeon, husband and guardian of 
Elizabeth Lakens (both alive and well), who declared that he had ap- 



Albmiy County Records. 165 

pointed and empowered, by these presents, Mr. William Lakens and Mr. 
Daniel Honde Koetre, merchants, dwelling m the city of Amsterdam in 
Holland, specially, in the subscriber's name and for his sake, jointly or 
severally, to ask, demand, collect and receive such household goods and 
moneys as are coming to him by way of inheritance and bequest by will, 
to his wife Elizabeth Lakins aforesaid, from Mr. Dirck Heck, her full 
cousin, which [property] is lying at Emerck and elsewhere, as appears by 
said will ; together with a just share of the estate left by Meutie Dirckie, 
also lying there, etc. ; and further, all that is coming to him and to his 
aforesaid wife elsewhere, however it may be and wherever it may be or 
lie, and therefore acquittance to pass for property received, and in case of 
refusal, with law and rigor of justice to compel them to payment; to 
which end all terms of courts to observe, to sentence and the extreme 
execution of the same ; and finding the sentence or sentences adverse, 
to challenge or appeal therefrom, and said challenge or appeal to 
prosecute to the extreme ; with power one or more persons in their 
places to substitute ; likewise to demand of those there an accounting, 
inventory, the will, and other writings needful thereto, and if, when 
heard, the case require it, to come to a reconciliation and compromise, 
and further to do all things there as their good judgment shall resolve, 
the property as well personal as real, house lots, lands and other things to 
sell, and proper conveyance thereof to deliver, and transfer to make as 
comports with the method of the laws ; yea, wherever the matter de- 
mands a more specific and graver charge than above stated, which the 
attorneys shall understand to be herein contained and included, [the sub- 
scriber] promises to hold good all that shall be done and performed in 
the aforesaid matter by the aforenamed attorneys, or either of them or 
those substituted for them, without any contradiction, under obligation as 
provided therefor according to law, provided that the attorneys be holden 
on demand and solicitation to exhibit a proper statement of their afore- 
said transactions, and the moneys remaining over. 

Thus done and executed in Albany, in America, on the 26th Sep- 
tember, 1677. 

[Copy without signatures.] 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Philip Schuyler and Dirck Wessells [Ten 
Broeck], commissaries, etc., Albert Andriese Bratt,' who acknowledged 
that he is well and truly indebted and in arrears to Mr. Nicolaus Van 
Renselaer, director of colony Renselaerswyck, in the sum of three 
thousand nine hundred and fifty-six guilders, as appears by the books of 
the colony Renselaerswyck, growing out of the part rent for the mill and 
land ; which aforesaid 3,956 guilders the mortgagor, to the aforenamed 
Mr. director o.r to his successors, promises to pay, provided that whatever 
he, the mortgagor, shall make appear to have been paid thereon shall be 
deducted; pledging therefor, specially, the produce of his orchard 
(hoom(jaert geivass), standing behind the house which the mortgagor now 

1 Albert Andriessen Bradt, de Noorman, married Annetje Barents, by whom he had eight 
children, one of whom married Tennis Slingerland, of Onisquethaw; and the tradition is, that 
another was born on shipboard, on the passage out, in the midst of a storm, in consequence of 
which he was called Storm Vanderzee, a name which has been perpetuated among the Vander- 
zees. See O'Callaghan's History of New Netherlands i, 4.33. 



166 Albany County Records. 

possesses, from which, produce of the orchard he promises to pay in reut 
during life twenty guilders in patroon's money in apples, and generally 
pledging his person and estate, personal and real, present and future, 
nothing excepted ; submitting the same to the force of all laws and 
judges to promote the payment thereof in due time, if need be, without 
loss or cost. 

Done in Albany, without craft or guile, on the 30th of October, 1677. 

Aalbert Andriesse Brat. 
Philip Schuyler. 
Dierck Wcssells. 
Acknowledged before me, 

EoBT. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robert Livingston, seer., etc,, and in the presence 
of the honorable Capt. Philip Schuyler and Mr. Dirk Wcssells, commis- 
saries, etc., Harmen Vedder and Barendt Boyndertse,! who declared that 
they had, in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred 
to and for the behoof of Claes Janse Van Boeckhoven -' and Byck Claese 
[Van Vranken,] ^ in a certain piece of land lying over the river in Canas- 
tagioene [Niskayuna], and that according to all the rights which the 
aforesaid grantors have therein ; which they do by virtue of a patent 
to them granted by the right honorable the governor general, Francis 
Lovelace, of date the 19th of May, 1671, to which reference is here 
made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing 
against the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the grantors' 
making the least pretensions to it any more, acknowledging that they are 
fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and giving 
therefore ^?e?iom actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Claes 
Janse Van Boeckhoven and Byk Claese, their heirs and successors, or 
those who may acquire right and title from them, to do with and dispose 
of the aforesaid land as they might do with their patrimonial estates and 
efi'ects ; promising the aforesaid land to defend against all persons, and to 
free it from all trouble, claims or charges, which are lawful; and, fur- 
ther, never more to do nor sufi'er anything to be done against the same, 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as pro- 
vided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 31st of October, 1677. 

Harmen Vedder. 
Barent Reyndertse Smit. 
Philip Schuyler. 
Dierck Wesselse \_Ten Broeclc]. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Robt. Livingston, Seer. 

1 See pp. 77, 161, 198. 

2 Claes Janse Van Boeckhoven bought land over the river in Niskayuna, in company with 
Ryck Claas. in \iTi%— Notarial Papers. His first wife was Volkertie Janse ; his second, Catlyntje 
DeVos, daughter of Andries De Vos and widow of Arent Andriese Brat, whom he married about 
1691. He probably lived until about 1712, leaving no children. His property passed to his wife, 
and, after her death, in 1717, to her children. 

^ Ryck Claas Van Vranken was in Beverwyck as early as 1665 (p. 198). He had three sons, 
Maas, Gerrit and Evert, and perhaps daughters. This family settled at Niskayuna, on both sides 
of the river, where the descendants are still found. 



Albany County Rtcords. 167 

Appeared before me Robert Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of 
the honorable Capt. Philip Schuyler and Mr. Dirk Wessells [Ten 
Broeck], commissaries, etc., Barent Beynderse [Smit], who declared that 
he had, in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred 
to and for the behoof of Claes Janse Van Boekhooven, for all his title to 
the land at Canastagioene. on this side of the river, which he does by 
virtue of a patent to him and Harmen Vedder, granted by the right 
honorable the governor general: Francis Lovelace, of date the 19th of 
May, 1671 ; this aforesaid land being the just half of that which is 
specified in the aforesaid patent, to wit, on this side of the river ; and 
that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same, excepting the lord's [duke's] right, and without the grantor's 
making the least pretension to the same any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and 
therefore giving plenam actionem cessam, and perfect power to the afore- 
said Claes Janse Van Boekhooven, his heirs and successors, or those who 
may acquire right and title from him, to do with and dispose of the afore- 
said land as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; pro- 
mising to defend the aforesaid land from all persons, and to free it from 
all trouble, claims or charges which are lawful ; and further, never more 
to do nor suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 31st of October, 1677. 

Barent Reyndertse Smit. 
Philip Schuyler. 
Dirck Wessells. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Capt. Philip Pieterse Schuyler and Mr. Dirk Wessells, 
commissaries, etc., Claes Janse Van Boekhooven, who declared that he 
had, in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to 
and for the behoof of Capt. Jan Cloete, in a certain piece of land lying 
at Canastagioene, on this side of the river, with all the title which he has 
therein, as it was conveyed to him to-day by Barent Rynderse, being the 
first half which the aforesaid Barent received on this side of the river, by 
patent thereof granted to Harme Vedder and Barent Reyndertse by tlie 
late governor, Francis Lovelace, of date the 19th of May, 1671 ; and that 
free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the 
same, excepting the duke's (Jieeren syn) right, and without the grantor's 
making the least pretensions any more against it; acknowledging that he 
is fully paid and satisfied, the first penny with the last, and therefore 
giving plenam actionem cessam^ and full power to the aforesaid Capt. Jan 
Cloete, his heirs and successors, or those who may acquire right and title 
through him, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid land as he might do 
with his patrimonial estate and effects ; promising to defend the aforesaid 
land from all persons, and free it from all trouble, claims and charges 
which are lawful ; and further, never more to do or suff'cr anything to be 



168 Albany County Records. 

done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner what- 
ever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, the 21st of October, 1677. 

This is the mark X of Claes Janse Van Boekhooven, 
with his own hand set. 
Philip Schuyler. 
Dirclc Wessels. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 



On this, the first day of November, 1677, Cornelis Van Schelluyne i 
declared, in presence of Hend. Cuyler and Claes Van Boekhooven, that 
it was well known to him that Jan Cloet bought the land of his father at 
Canastagione, and paid for it to Tieleman Van Schelluyne, his brother, 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Jurian Teunisse Tappen, of the one side, and 
Capt. Philip Pieterse Schuyler, of the other side, who declared that they 
had in amity and friendship covenanted and agreed with each other re- 
specting the sale of his, Jurian Teunisse's bouwery, lying on the Hudson 
river, obliquely over against the bouwery of the aforesaid Capt. Schuyler,- 
as follows : First. — Jurian Teunise acknowledges that he has sold, and 
Capt. Schuyler that he has bought of him, the aforesaid bouwery, with 
all that appertains to the same, being the just tenth part of the colony 
Reusselaerswyck, according to the conveyance delivered to him by Jero- 
nimus Ebbinck, of date the 7th of July, 1676, together with horses, 
cattle, house and barn, grain sowed, and all that is thereon fast by earth 
and nailed, all of such dimensions as he, Jurian Teunise, at present is in 
possession, only excepting his, Jurian's household goods, which he now 
has, everything else that belongs to a farmer's utensils Capt. Schuyler 
shall possess ; the seller shall deliver to the buyer all the above men- 
tioned property on the 8th of this month, and on payment shall give a 
perfect conveyance ; for which bouwery and title to the same, the above 
named Capt. 'Schuyler promises to pay to the aforesaid Jurian Teunisse 
the number of six hundred merchantable beaver skins in the month of 
July next, 1678, all in one sum, wherewith the parties contracting 
acknowledge that they are well content ; hereto pledging their respective 
persons and estates, personal and real, present and future. 

Thus done in Albany, without craft or guile, in presence of Dirk 



1 Cornelis and Tieleman Van Schelluyne were two sons of Dirk Van Schelluyne. The former 
married Geertie Harmense Visscher, and had four sous and two daughters. He was buried on the 
27th May, 1728, and his wife survived him several years. His brother Tieleman was li\'ing in 
Albany in 1728, but probably left no descendants. 

- This bouwery, called the tenth part of the colony Reusselaerswyck, probably extended from 
Wynant's to the Poesten kil. It was owned by Johanna De Laet, wife of Jerouimus Ebbingh, 
her father, Johannes De Laet, being one of the partners of the patent. Ebbingh sold it to Jurian 
Teunisse. 



Albany County Records. 169 

Wessels [Ten Broeck], and Johannes Wendel, as witnesses hereto called, 
on this 6th of Nov., 1677. 

JURIAN TeUNISSE. 

Philip Schuyler. 
Dirck Wessels. 
Johannes Wendel. 
Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Sscr. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Harme Gansevoort, of the one side, and Claes 
Janse and Albert Jacobse Grardenier,i carpenters, of the other side, who 
declared that they had in amity and friendship covenanted and agreed 
with each other about the building of a barn for Gansevoort at Catskil, 
as follows : First. — Claes Janse and Albert Jacobse aforesaid, acknow- 
ledge that they have agreed to build a barn for Harme Gansevoort at 
Catskil, with an opening \_uytlaeting'] on both sides ; the barn shall be 
sixty feet long and thirty feet broad, with a floor of timber (halke), horse 
crib, cow stall and loft (solder') therein, shortened to fifty feet in length, 
and of the breadth of the barn ; on condition that Harme aforesaid shall 
furnish ihem victuals and drink, and all the timber, and deliver the 
materials that belong thereto on the ground ; likewise it is conditioned 
that Jan Dirkse shall rough hew a month for the aforesaid carpenters at 
the expense of Harme aforesaid ; they shall begin to build in January or 
February next coming, and not stop the work until the barn is finished ac- 
cording to the above specified conditions ; for which he, Harme Gansevoort, 
promises to pay the sum of forty beavers in two installments, to wit, the first 
half, being twenty beavers, in the autumn after the barn shall be finished, 
one-third of the same in maize, one-third in hogs and one-third in cattle, at 
market prices; the second installment a year after, being likewise twenty 
beavers, in the same kind, to wit, J maize, J in hogs and I in cattle ; 
with which the contracting parties acknowledge that they are well satis- 
fied, hereto pledging their respective persons and estates, real and personal, 
present and future. 

Thus done in Albany, without craft or guile, in the presence of Claas 
Janse Stavast and Jan Conel, as witnesses hereunto called, on this 29th 
of November, 1677. 

Hermen Gansevort. 
Claes Janse. 
This is the mark A-f-i of Albert Jacobse. 
Claes Janse Stavast. 
John Concll. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., in the presence of the 
honorable Messieurs Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commissaries, 
etc., Capt. Volkert Janse Douw, who declared that he had in true rights, 



Albert Jacobse Gardenier was son of Jacob Janse Gardenier, of Kinderhook. He had three 
^hters baptized in Albany before 1690, after whi 
•k, where he probably settled after that date. 

Hist. Col. Hi. _ 22 



daughters baptized in Albany before 1690, after which time he had two children baptized in New 
York, where he probably settled after that ' ' 



170 Albany County Records. 

free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to Mr. Pieter Winne, 
to the half of an island lying in the Hudson river opposite to Paerde- 
hoek, and was before this named Constaple's island, with the half of the 
house, barn and rick, and all that is thereon fast by earth and nailed, 
which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a patent granted him by the 
honorable the governor general, Richard Nicolls, of date the 6th of Sept , 
1667, to which reference is here made; and that free and unencumbered, 
with no claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting only the 
lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least pretensions any 
more upon it, and acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied 
therefor, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving plenam 
actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Mr. Pieter Winne, his 
heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire his right and 
title, to do with and dispose of the afoi'esaid half island, and half of that 
which appertains thereto, as he might do with his other patrimonial estate 
and effects ; promising the same to defend against all persons, and to free 
it from all trouble, claims or charges which hereafter may arise, and never 
more to do nor sufi"er anything to be done, either with or without law, in 
any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according 
to law. 

Done in Albany, the 13th of December, 1677. 

VOLCKART JaNSE DoUW. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro't Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commissa- 
ries, etc., Paulus Martense Raemmaker,i who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the 
behoof of Harme Janse Lyndrayer [ropemaker], in a certain house and 
lot standing and lying here in Albany, with all that is therein fast by 
earth and nailed, and is bounded south by Pieter Loockermans, north by 
the house of Laurens Van Ale and Jan Janse Bleecker, west and east by 
the public street ; in breadth, in front on the street [Broadway], two rods, 
and in the rear on the west side [James street], one rod and ten feet and 
a half, length on the north side six and a half rods, and on the south side 
six rods five feet and a half; - which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a 
conveyance given him by Mattheus Abrahamse [Van Deusen], of date the 
26th of June, 1677, to which reference is here made, and that free and 
unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same (ex- 
cepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least 
pretension any more to it ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satis- 
fied, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving plenam actionem 
cessam^ and perfect power to the aforesaid Harme Janse Lyndrayer, his 
heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire his right and 
title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he might do 

1 Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen, at other times radernaJce7\ i. e., wheelwright. 
= This lot fronted on Broadway, and extended in the rear to James street, and lay between 
Maiden lane and Steuben street. 



Albany County Records. 171 

witli his patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the same to defend 
against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges 
which may hereafter arise, and never more to do nor suffer anything to 
be done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 
Done in Albany, the 13th December, 1G77. 

Paulus Martense. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commis- 
saries, etc., the Reverend Dom. Nicolaes Van Rensselaer, director of 
colony Rensselaerswyck, who declared that in the aforesaid character [of 
director], he had granted, conveyed and transferred to Mr. Pieter Winne, 
the saw mill on the Betlehem's kil,i with the superstructure and appur- 
tenances of the same, as Pieter Winne aforesaid at present is in possession 
of the same (he bought the same of Mr. Stephanus Van Cortlandt, when 
director of colony Rensselaerswyck in 1673), which he does by virtue of 
an agreement made between Mr. Stephanus Von Cortlant, in the cha- 
racter of director of colony Rensselaerswyck, and Albert Rykman, in the 
character of attorney for Elbert Gerbertse Cruyff, of date the 2d of June, 
1675, wherein the superstructure and appurtenances of the aforesaid 
mill were assigned to Mr Van Cortland ; and that free and unencumbered, 
with no claim standing nor issuing against the same (excepting the 
lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least pretension to the 
same any more ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied there- 
for, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving plenam actionem 
cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Mr. Pieter Winne, his heirs and 
successors, or those who may hereafter acquire his right and title, to do 
with and dispose of the aforesaid mill and its appurtenances as he might 
do with [his] own patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the same to 
defend against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or 
charges which may hereafter arise, and never to do nor suffer anything 
to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 13th of December, 1677. 

NicoLAus Van Rensselaer, 

Colonise pastor et director. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence. 

Rot. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, 
etc., Hendrick Marcelis, who declared that he had in true rights, free 



Now the Norman's kil. 



172 Albany County Records. 

ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the behoof of 
Robert Sanders, in a certain lot of land lying without the town of Albany, 
without the gate by Hendrick Rooseboom,' lying to the South of Claas 
Gerritse,- to the north of Jacob Tyssen [Van der Heyden], to the west 
the land belonging to Andries De Vos, and to the east of the public 
highway [North Pearl], being in breadth in front five rods, in the rear 
four rods and four feet, and length ten rods,-^ which he, the grantor, does 
by virtue of a patent granted him by the right honorable the governor 
general, Richard Nicolls, of date the 11th of May, 1667, to which refer- 
ence is here made, this being the just half of the lot mentioned in the 
said patent, being the first half, the other having been sold to Volkie Van 
Hoezen,' and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against it (excepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's 
making the least pretensions to the same any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and 
giving therefore p/enam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid 
Robert Sanders, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
acquire his right and title, to do with and to dispose of the aforesaid 
parcel of ground as he might do with his patrimonial estate and efi"ects; 
jjromising to defend the same against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges which may hereafter arise, and never more 
to do nor suffer anything to be done against the same, with or without 
law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 14th of December, 1677. 

This is the mark A of Hendrik Marcelis, 

with his own hand set. 

Richard Pretty. 

A. Teller. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Rot. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Ands. Teller, commissaries, 
etc. , Mr. Ludovicus Cobes, schout of Schenectady , who declared that he had, 
by these presents, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the behoof 
of Mynerd Jance Wemp,'' so much of the two last payments as are 
coming to him from Mr. Gerrit Van Schaick," for the purchase of a house 
and lot lying here in Albany, amounting to the sum of fifty beavers, ac- 
cording to a bill of sale thereof, of date the 15th of December, 1677, to 



1 The burgher blockhouse and gate were at the junction of North Pearl and Steuben streeta. 

2 There was a Claas Gerritse in Beverwyck in 1640.— 0'Ca??aoAa«'s History of New Nether- 
land, I, 439. 

3 This was on the east side of North Pearl, a little way north of Steuben street. 
* YoLkie, the wife of Jan Franse Van Hoesen, the first settler. 

6 Myndert Wemp was son of Jan Bareutse Wemp and Marytje Mynderse. He was among the 
early settlers of Schenectady, where he was killed by the French and Indians. Feb. 9, 1690. He 
left one son, Johannes, who was carried away captive, but returned and became the father of a 
numerous family. 

" Gerrit Van Schaick was eldest son of Goosen Gerrit Van Schaick. He died 11 Nov., 1679. 



Albany Comity Records. 173 

which reference is here made ; and that for a house and lot bought of 
him, Myndert, standing and lying in Schenectady. 

Thus executed in Albany, on the 29th of December, 1677. 

LUDOVICUS COBES. 

RicTi'd Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
In my presence, 

. Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and A. Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Wattawyt and his son Appanewayett, with the sister of Wattawyt, named 
Sassioncha, and her little son named Metschekamek, all Mohegans, 
dwelling at Schotak, who declared that they are well paid and satisfied 
by Mr. Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst for their claim upon a certain parcel of 
land which they, by these presents, release and convey to him, lying in 
the Claverak between the bouwery of Jan Roothaer and Major Abm. 
Staes, beginning at a certain fall upon the kil named Kiesiewey'si kil, to 
the kil of Major Abm. Staes, with the vly. little islands and wood stand- 
ing thereupon, with all the rights and ownership of the same which they, 
the former proprietors, possessed ; renouncing and making full release for 
themselves and their heirs, by these presents, of the claims which they 
had thereupon, to and for the behoof of the aforesaid Mons. Gerrit Van 
Slichtenhorst, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire 
his right and title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid land, the ap- 
pendances and dependencies of the same, as he might do with his own 
patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the same to defend against all 
persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges which may 
hereafter arise, and never more to do nor to suffer anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided therefor according by law. 

Thus done in Albany, and ti'anslated by Arnout Cornelise Viele, on 
this first day of January, 167|-. 

This is the mark -\- of Wattawyt, with his own hand set, for 

himself and for his son. 
This is the mark -j- of Sassioncha, with her own hand set, for 
herself and for her son. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Arnout Cor[_nelise Viele'], Interpreter. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Rot. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Ands. Teller, commis- 
saries, etc., Claes Janse Van Boekhooven, who declared that he had in 
true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for 



This was the name of an Indian residing in this neighborhood. 



174 Albany County Records. 

the behoof of Teunis Willemse i Van Wout Bergh, in a certain piece of 
arable land of ten morgens, lying on the other side of the river at Canas- 
tagioene, to the east of the aforesaid Claas Janse's bouwery, with the 
right to the woods with his neighbors for a range for his cattle and other 
purposes, which piece of land Teunis aforesaid at present occupies and 
tills ; which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance given him 
by Harme Vedder and Barent Rynderse, of date the 31st of October, 1677, 
being a part of his half then conveyed, whereto reference is here made, 
and that free and unencumbered, with no claims standing or issuing against 
the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's making 
the least pretensions to it any more ; acknowledging that he is fully paid 
and satisfied therefor, the first penny as well as the last, and giving there- 
fore plenam actionem cessam, and perfect power to the aforesaid Teunis 
Willemse Van Wout Berg, his heirs and successors, or those who may 
acquire his right and title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid land 
as he might do with his own patrimonial estate andeflfects; promising the 
same to defend against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
or charges which are lawful ; and further, never more to do nor suffer 
anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 8th of Feb, 167|. 

This is the mark of -j- Claes Janse Van Boekhoven. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Andr. Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Ro. Sanders, who declared that he had in true rights, free ownership, 
granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the behoof of Paulus Mar- 
tense [Van Benthuysen], raemmaker,^ a certain parcel of land, lying 
without the town of Albany, without the gate by Hend. Rooseboom,^ 
lying to the south of Claas Gerritse's, to the north [of] Jacob Tyssen 
[Van der Heyden], to the west the land belonging to Andries De Vos,* 
and to the east of the public highway [North Pearl street] ; being in 
breadth in front five rods [60 ft.], and in the rear four rods and four feet, 
and in length ten rods [120 ft.] ; which the grantor does by virtue of a 
conveyance to him given by Hendrik Marcelis, of date the 14th Decem- 
ber, 1677, to which reference is here made, this being a just half of the 
lot mentioned in the patent of said Marcelis, the other half, being the 
rear, has been sold to Volkie Van Hoesen,^ and that free and unencum- 
bered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting the 
lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least pretension to it 



1 Teunis Willemse and wife, Jannetie Hendrikse, had three children baptized in Albany 
1696-1700. 

2 Sash maker. 

3 This gate was at the junction of North Pearl and Steuben streets. 

^ Andries De Vos's land lay on the west side of North Pearl street, and extended north from 
Steuben street to Fox creek. 
^ Volkie Van Hoesen was the wife of Jan Franse Van Hoesen, the first settler. 



Albany County Recm'ds. 175 

any more ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the 
first penny with the last, and therefore gWmg plenam actionem cessam, Viwdi 
full power to the aforesaid Paul Martense Raemmaker, his heirs and suc- 
cessors, or those who may hereafter acquire his right and title, to do with 
and dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his own patrimonial 
estate and efi'ects ; promising the aforesaid lot to defend against all persons, 
and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges which may hereafter 
arise, and never more to do nor allow anything to be done against the 
same, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor 
according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 21st of Feb., 167|. 

RoBBERT Sanders. 
Rich. Pretty. 
A. Teller. 
In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Ands. Teller, commissaries, 
etc., Paulus Martense [Van Benthuysen], Raemmaker, who declared that 
he had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred 
to and for the behoof of Mr. David Schuyler and Lawrence Van Ale, in 
a certain lot lying without the town of Albany, without the gate by 
Hend. Rooseboom, lying to the south of Claes G-erritse, to the north of 
Jacob Tyssen [Van der tieyden], to the west the land belonging to An- 
dries De Vos, and to the east of the public highway [North Pearl street], 
being in breadth in front five rods, and in the rear four rods and four 
feet, and in length ten rods ; which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a 
conveyance to him given by Ro, Sanders, of date the 11th of Feb., 167-|-, 
to which reference is here made, this being the just half of what was 
mentioned in the patent of Hend. Marcelis, of date the 11th of May, 1667, 
the other half, being the rear, was sold to Volkie Van Hoese, and that 
free and unencumbered, with no claim standing nor issuing against it 
(excepting the lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least 
pretension to it any more; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satis- 
fied therefor, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving plenam 
actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid David Schuyler and 
Lawrence Van Ale, their heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
receive his right or title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid lot as 
they might do with their own patrimonial estates and efi'ects ; promising 
the aforesaid lot to defend against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges which may hereafter arise, and never more 
to do nor sufi"er anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 22d Feb., 167|. 

Paulus Martense. 
Rich'd Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



176 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Dirk Wessels and A. Teller, commissaries, etc., 
Jan Janse Bleecker and Jacob Sanderse Glen, attorneys for Jan Heyn- 
drix Van Bael, who declared that they had granted, conveyed and trans- 
ferred to and for the behoof of Paulus Martense [Van Benthuysen], 
Raemmaker, a certain lot lying without the town of Albany, by the gate 
where the court house stands, i bounding on the north the garden of 
Harme Bastiaense [Visscher], to the south the common way to the shore 
[Division street], to the east of the highway [Broadway], in breadth five 
rods and three and a half feet, length to the river path,- which the 
grantors do by virtue of a patent granted to Van Bael by the late governor 
general, Richard Nicolls, of date the 30th of April, 1677, all as it lies in 
fence, free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against 
the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the grantors' making 
the least pretension to it any more ; acknowledging that they are fully paid 
and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving 
plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid Paulus Martense, 
his heirs and successors, or those who hereafter may acquire his right and 
title, to do with and dispose of the same as he might do with his own 
patrimonial estate and effects ; promising the said lot to defend against 
all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims or charges which may 
hereafter arise, and never more to do nor suffer anything to be done 
against the same, either with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, 
under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 25th of Feb., 167|. 

Jan Janse Bleecker. 
Jacob Sanderse Glen. 
A. Teller. 
Dirck 'Wesseh. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Rot. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence o£ 
of the honorable Messieurs Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commis- 
saries, etc., Annetie Lievens, widow of Goose Gerritse [Van Schaick], 
deceased, who declared that she had in true rights, free ownership, given 
and presented to and for the behoof of Gerrit Van Schaick, ^ in a cer- 
tain house and lot standing and lying without the town of Albany, on the 
Third kil [Fox creek]; bounded north and west by the lot of Gerrit 
Reyerse,^ south and east by the public highway, being six rods in length 
aud in breadth four rods ; -^ all which she, by these presents, grants, con- 

1 The court house stood on the east corner of Hudson street and Broadway, just inside the 
Btockadoes. 

2 This lot of Van Bael, probably a garden, was on the east corner of Division street and Broad- 
way. 

3 Gerrit Van Schaick was the eldest son of Goosen Gerritse Van Schaick, the first settler. He 
married Alida Van Slichtenhorst, daughter of Barent Arentee Van Slichteuhorst, and died 11 
Nov., 1679. His widow afterwards married Pieter Davidse Schuyler, whom she outiived. 

■» Gerrit Eeyerse came from Utrecht, and was in Beverwyck as early as 1656 {Deeds i, 49). In 
1665 he married Annatie Janse, of Amsterdam, in New York, and in his will, made 15 Feb., 169M, 
he mentions five children then living. He was a trader, and in 1660 and 1662 made two voyages 
to Patria. His two logs of these voyages are still preserved. His descendants pass by the name 
of Gerritsen. 

^ This lot was on the north corner of Broadway and Columbia street. 



Albany County Records. 177 

veys and transfers to Grerrit Van Schayk aforesaid, by virtue of a patent 
granted her late husband by the late governor general, Rich. Nicolls, of 
date the 25th of April, 1667, to which reference is here made, and that 
free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the 
same (excepting the lord's (Jieer zyii) right), and without the grantor's 
making the least pretension thereto any more ; acknowledging that she 
has given and presented the aforesaid house and lot to Gerrit Shayk 
aforenamed, and therefore giving plenam actionem cessani, and full power 
to Gerrit Van Shayk, his heirs and successors, or those who may here- 
after receive his right and title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid 
house and lot as he might do with his patrimonial estate and effects ; 
promising the same to defend against all persons, and to free it from all 
trouble, claims and charges ; and further, never more to do nor suffer 
anything to be done against the same, either with or without the laws, in 
any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to 
law. 

Done in Albany, the 4th of March, 167f . 

Annetge Lievens, 

Rich'd Pretty, 

A. Teller. 



In my presence. 



Ro, Livingston, Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Ands. Teller, commissaries, 
etc., Cornelis Cornelise Van der Hoeve, who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for the 
behoof of Arent Jacobse, in his house and lot standing and lying here in 
Albany, between the houses of Mr. William Loveridge, hat maker, and 
Jacob Staes, with all that is thereon, fast by earth and nailed ; in breadth 
in front on the street four and twenty wood feet, length five and fifty 
feet, and breadth in the rear 8 feet, all as it lies inclosed in fence, which 
he, the grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance made to him by Marte 
Hoffman, of date the 30th December, 1676, and that free and unencum- 
bered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting the 
lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least pretension to the 
same any more ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, 
the first penny with the last, and therefore ^Wingplenam actionem cessain, 
and full power to the aforenamed Arent Jacobse, his heirs and successors, 
or those who may hereafter acquire his right and title, to do with and 
dispose of the aforesaid house and lot as he might do with his own patri- 
monial estate and effects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, 
and to free it from all troubles, claims and charges which are lawful ; and 
further, never more to do nor suffer anything to be done against the same, 
either with or without law, in any manner whatst)ever, under obligation as 
provided therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, the 4th of March, 167|-. 

Cornells Kornelissen Van der Hoeve. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

RoT. Livingston, Seer. 

Hist. Col. Hi 23 



178 Albany County Records. 

Appeared before rue. Ro'. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of the 
afteruamed witnesses, Anuetie Lievens, widow of the late Goose Gerritse 
[Van Schaick], of the one side, and Zybrant Van Shayk ' of the other 
side, who declared that they have in amity and friendship agreed and 
made a bargain with each other in manner following, namely : Annetie 
Lievens acknowledges that she has sold, and Zybrant Van Shayk that he 
has bought, the grantor's half of a certain brewery, lot and garden, with 
all the rights of the same, kettles, tubs, etc.,- at present possessed by 
Pieter Lassiug, who owns the other half; he, the buyer, taking upon 
himself all the debts and credits which exist at this time, so that the seller 
is at once released therefrom, as well from the income as the receipts ; the 
aforesaid half brewery shall be delivered to the buyer at once ; for which 
Zybrant Goosens aforesaid p'-omises to pay the number of one hundred 
good whole merchantable beaver skins, in two payments, the first on the 
first day of August this year, the quantity of sixty beavers, and the 
second payment on the first of August, 1679, the remaining forty beavers ; 
the seller shall be holden after the second payment to give a perfect con- 
veyance, with all the rights of the same, just as it was conveyed to her 
late husband by Harme Rutgers (excepting the lord's right) ; all that is 
stated above the contracting parties shall surely and truly keep. 

Thus done without craft or guile, in the presence of Mr. Audries Teller 
and Mr. Dirk "Wessels, commissaries of this town of Albany, on this 5th 
of March, 167|. 

Annetge Lievens. 
Sybrant Van Schaick. 
A. Teller. 
Dirck Wessels [TVn Broeck']. 

In my presence, 

Ro'f. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc, and in the presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Richard Pretty and Andries Teller, commissa- 
ries, etc., Areut Jacobse, who declared that he had in true rights, free 
ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, to and for the behoof of 
William Loveridge, Sen^., hatter, in his house and lot standing and lying 
here in Albany, between the houses of said William Loveridge and 
Jacob Staes, with all that is therein fast by earth and nailed ; in breadth 
in front on the street four and twenty wood feet, length to the rear fifty- 
five feet, where the breadth is eight feet, all as it now lies inclosed in 
fence ; which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance received by 
him from Cornelis Cornelise Van der Hoeven, of date the 4th of March 
of the year 167|-, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing 
or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the 
grantor's making the least pretension to it any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and 
therefore giving plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the afore- 



' Sybrant Van Schaick was son of Goosen Gerritse Van Schaick. He married Elizabeth 
Van der Poel, who, after his death, in 1686, contracted marriage with Bennony Van Curler. At 
that time she had four children by her first husband. In 3735 the above brewery was owned by 
Sybrant (Antonissen ? ) Van Schaick. 

2 This brewery stood upon the east half of the present Exchange block, and remained in pos- 
session of the Van Schaick family to 1735 or later. 



Albany County Records. 179 

named William Loveridge, Sen^., his heirs and successors, or those who 
may hereafter acquire his right and title, to do with and dispose of the 
aforesaid house and lot as he might do with his own patrimonial estate 
and effects ; promising to defend the same against all persons, and to free 
it from all trouble, claims and charges which are lawful ; and further, never 
more to do nor suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or 
without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor by law. 

Done in Albany, this 8th of March, 167|-. 

Arendt Jacobsen. 
A. Teller. 

In my presence, 

RoBT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the honorable Messieurs Philip Schuyler and Richard Pretty, commis- 
saries, etc., Dirkie de Weevers, wife of Jan Martense [VVeever or de 
Weever], who acknowledged that she is well and truly indebted, and in 
arrears, to Jacob Lokermans in the sum of eight hundred and twenty-six 
guilders and twelve stuivers in beavers, growing out of the matter of 
moneys paid, and goods to her content received ; which aforesaid eight 
hundred and twenty-six guilders, twelve stuivers in beavers, the mortgagor 
to Jacob Lookermans, or his order, promises to pay in good merchantable 
winter wheat, at five schepels i the beaver ; to pay it in the space of one 
year,, beginning from this date, with yearly interest at 10 per cent; 
pledging therefor specially her bouwery, with house and barn, lying at 
Kinderhoek, with horses and cattle belonging thereto, and generally "her 
person and estate, personal and real, present and future, nothing excepted, 
submitting the same to the force of all magistrates, courts, laws and 
judges, to promote payment in due time, if need be, without cost and loss. 

Done in Albany, the 8th of May, 1678. 

Derckien Hermens. 
Philq) Schiii/le/: 
Riclid Pretty. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Rqt. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Capt. Jan Cloete, on the one side, and Jan 
Conell and Gerrit Teunisse [Van Vechten],' of the other side, who de- 
clared _ that they had in amity and friendship made a bargain with each 
other in regard to his, Jan Cloete's, claim and right which he has in 
Catskil, viz : First. — Jan Cloet acknowledges that he has sold, and Jan 
Conell and Gerrit Teunise that they have bought his, Jan Cloet's. claim 
and right which he has in Catskil, being the half of the laud that the 
Indians own, he having a mortgage thereon, of date the 15th of January, 
1671, to which reference is here made ; for which claim they, the buyers, 
promise to pay the quantity of one hundred beaver skins, to wit, twenty- 



' A schepel was about three pecks English. 

» Gerrit Tennise Van Vechten had two sons, Johannes, by his first wife, Antje Janse, and 
Volkert, by his second wife, Grietje Volkertse Doiiw. He made his will 8 March, 1080 - 



180 Albany County Records. 

five beavers this summer, and the remaining seventy-five beavers in the 
space of six years nest coming, each year a sixth part, well understanding 
that if the Indians who gave him the mortgage pay liim this summer, then 
this sale shall be null and of no eftect ; about which the contracting par- 
ties are well content, pledging therefor their respective persons and 
estates, personal and real, present and future, for the performance of the 
above agreement. 

Done in Albany, without craft or guile, this 2d of April, 1678. 

Johannes Clute. 
John Conell. 
This is the mark >i' of Gerrit Teunise. 

Testes : 
Arnout Cor. Viele. 
WilUani Loveridge^ Jun^. 
In my presence, 

lio. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Eo'. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable Messieurs Rich. Pretty and Ands. Teller, commissaries, 
etc., Hendrick Meese Vrooman,' who acknowledged that he is well and 
truly indebted, and in arrears, to Hobert Sanders, in the sum of seventy- 
seven guilders and fourteen stuivers beavers, and four hundred and forty- 
seven guilders and fourteen stuivers in seawant, and a hundred and nine 
schepels of good winter wheat, growing out of goods received to his con- 
tent, an obligation hereof having passed, of date the 9th of June, 1676, 
which is herewith destroyed ; which aforesaid seventy-seven guilders 14 
stuivers in beavers, four hundred and forty-seven guilders 14 stuivers 
seewant, and one hundred and nine schepels of wheat the mortgagor pro- 
mises to pay before the first of June next coming, in wheat, at five 
schepels, and peas at six schepels the beavers, and failing in payment he 
shall be holden to pay as interest, for the whole sum twenty-one schepels of 
wheat, yearly, commencing on the first of June, 1678 ; pledging therefor 
his house and barn standing and lying in the south end of the village of 
Schenectady,- and generally his person and estate, personal and real, 
present and future, nothing excepted, submitting the same to the force of 
all magistrates, courts, laws and judges. 

Thus done, without craft or guile, in Albany, this 4th of April, 1678. 

Heinderick Meesen Vrooman. 
Rich'd Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Robt. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence 
of the afternamed witnesses, Harme G-ansevoort, of the one side, and Jan 
Conell of the other side, who declared that they had, in amity and 

1 Hendrik Meese Vrooman was one of the three brothers who settled early in Albany. He was 
among the earliest inhabitants of Schenectady, where he was killed Feb. 9, 1690. at the sack of 
the to^^^l. His son Bartholomew was killed in Saratoga the same year, by the Indians. His 
other sons, Adam and Jau, lived in Schenectady, and had large families. 

2 His lot was on the north side of State street, Schenectady, and extended from Centre street 
to the New York Central rail road depot, which covers a portion of his ground. 



Albany County Records. 181 

friendship, covenanted and agreed with each other in relation to the sale 

of his, Harme Gansevoort's bouwery at Catskil, as follows : Firstly. 

Harme Gransevoort acknowledges that he has sold, and Jan Conell that 
he has bought of him, the aforesaid bouwery of Harme G-ansevoort, lying 
at Catskil, with all its appendages, the superstructure, house, fences, etc° 
except a new barn that is now built, and the horses, cattle, etc., he not 
being holden to deliver anything but the land and what belongs thereto. 
The seller shall make the delivery on the 2d of Nov., 1678, and after the 
last payment he is to give a perfect conveyance. For which bouwery and 
the rights of the same, the aforenamed Jan Conell promises to pay to the 
aforesaid Harme Gansevoort the number of two hundred merchantable 
beaver skins, to wit, five and twenty beavers in the space of eight days, 
and the remaining one hundred and seventy-five beavers within the six 
following years, in each a just sixth part; wherewith the contracting 
parties are well content. 

Done in Albany, without craft or guile, the 20th of April, 1678. 

HaRMEN GrANSEVORT. 

John Conell. 
Jem Cornelise Roodt. 

This is the mark -f- of Jacobus de Brotoer. 
In my presence, 

R. Livingston, Seer. 

[Note in the margin of the above paper.] The 22d of Nov., 1679, H. 
Gansevoort acknowledges that he has received of J. Conell, on an ac- 
counting, for the bouwery, four and fifty beavers and one crown. 

Appeared before me R. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the afternamed witnesses, Harme Gansevoort of the one side, and William 

Jochemse of the other side, who declared thatthey had in amity and 

friendship covenanted and agreed with each other in relation to the sale 
of the sowed land at Catskil, on his, Harme's, bouwery, which he has this 
day sold to Jan Conell, as follows : Firstly. — Harme, aforesaid, acknow- 
ledges that he has sold, and William Jochemse that he has bought, 40 
schepels of good sowed winter wheat on his, the aforesaid Harme Ganse- 
voort's, bowery at Catskill, and that for the sum of forty good merchantable 
beaver skins, to be paid, the first half, being 20 beavers, in December 
coming, and the other half next March, 1679, on condition that Harme 
Gansevoort at once relinquishes the aforesaid bouwery, which herewith 
he doe?, making a complete resignation of the sowed land there, and 
delivering the same to the aforesaid Willem Jochemse, to be used for his 
profit ; about which the contracting parties are well content. 

Done in Albany, without craft or guile, on this 20th of April, 1678. 

Harmen Gansevoort. 
Testes : WiLLEM JoCHEMSEN. 

Dirck Alhertse Brat. 
Jacob Theysen. (?) 
In my presence, 

RoT. Livingston, Seer. 

[Note in the margin of the above paper.] On this, the 22d of No- 
vember, 1679, Harme Gansevoort acknowledges that he is at once paid 



182 Albany County Records. 

and satisfied for the sowed land at Catskil, being forty beavers; in 
acknowledgment of wbicb he has signed this with his own hand. 
Dated nt supra. 

Harmen Gansevoort. 

Acknowledged before nie. 

RoT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro'. Livingston, seer., etc., Claes Willemse Van 
Coppernoll,! of the one side, and Jan Conell, of the other side, who de- 
clared that they had in amity and friendship covenanted with each other 
in form and manner following : Firstly. — Claes Willemse acknowledges 
that he has let himself and his wife, and Jan Conell that he has hired them 
for the space of a whole year, commencing with the 18th of June, lG78,and 
ending with the 18th of June, 1679, to be his farm superintendent (io?«p- 
meesier), on his bouwery at Catskil, and his wife to do such other services as 
may be there needful ; and that for the sum of two and forty good merchant- 
able beaver's skins [S134.40], one-half to be paid the next winter in wheat, 
at market price, and the other half at the end of his term of service in bea- 
vers ; his wife shall be furnished with soap to wash for herself and others 
on the bouwery [and said Claes and his wife], promise to serve Jan Conell 
faithfully, in all proper services, according to the bounden duty of a 
servant to a master; with which the contracting parties are well content ; 
thereto pledging their respective and estates, personal and real, present 
and future, nothing excepted, and submitting the same to the force of all 
magistrates, courts and laws. 

Done in Albany, without craft or guile, this 30th of May, 1678. 

Klaes Willemse. 
John Conell. 
Testes : 
Wm. Parker. 
William Loveridgc, Junr. 

In my presence, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro^ Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates Mr. Rich. Pretty and Mr. Jan Thomase [Min- 
gael], commissaries, etc., a certain Mahikander Indian, called by Christians 
Knaep, and by the Indians Paantachtnatt, who (being commissioned by 
his aunt, named Paunichkam), declared that he was full paid and satisfied 
by Mr. Dirck Wessells [Ten Broeck], and Mr. Cornells Van Dyck, citi- 
zens of this town, for their right and title to a certain piece of land lying 
on the east side of the Hudson river, behind Jan Ooms, about five Eng- 
lish miles oif from the shore, being a swale [y?y] named by the Indians 
Taxkichenok, extending to or bounding upon a certain piece of wood 
land named Tamschenakassik, and also another piece of land named 
Kekantik, having been heretofore maize land, and stretching to the river; 
all of which aforesaid land, as well the swale as the other two pieces of 

1 Claes Willemse Van Coppernol, in 16T9, hired a bouwery of William Teller, at Schenectady, 
and soon after obtained a patent in connection with Pieter Van Olinda, for a parcel of land on 
the south bank of the Mohawk river, 15 miles west of Schenectady, at a place called de Willegeu. 
He married a Mohawk woman named Lea, who, after his death, married, about 1703, Jonathan 
Stevens of Schenectady. 



Albany County Records. 



183 



wood land, together witli the kils, creeks, woods, and the rights to the 
same, he, Knaep, and his aunt aforesaid, he for her, transfer, grant and 
convey to Mr. I). Wessells and Mr. Cornelis Van Dyck, with all their 
title and ownership therein, which they, the late proprietors, possessed, 
resigning and giving a perfect release, by these presents, for them and for 
their heirs, of the claims which they had therein, to and for the behoof of 
the aforesaid Mons. Dirk Wessells and Mr. Corn. Van Dyk, their heirs 
and successors, or those who may hereafter receive their right and title, 
to do with and dispose of the aforesaid land, and the appendances and 
dependences of the same, as well the swale as the two other pieces of 
wood land that belong thereto, as well the kils and creeks as other things, 
as they might do with their own patrimonial estates and effects ; promising 
the same to defend against all persons, and to free them from all trouble, 
claims or charges which may hereafter arise, and never more to do nor 
suffer anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, 
in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor accord- 
ing to law, their honors [the commissaries], herewith granting consent to 
solicit a patent of the right honorable, the governor general. 

Thus done in Albany, being interpreted by Arnout Corn. Viele, in 
presence of a certain Mahikander named Thamokenik, on this the 11th 
day of June, 1678. 



This is the mark 
with his own 



5=5 



of Knaep, 
hand set. 



This is the mark 
with his own 



of Thamokenik, 
hand set. 



Witness : 
Richard Pretty. 
Jan Thomase. 

Arnout Cor. Viele, interpreter. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, 



Seer. 



Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Rich. Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wessells, com- 
missaries, etc., Jan Thomase [Mingael], who declared that he had in true 
rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred, in real and 
actual possession, to and for the behoof of Johannes De Wandelaer,i 
burgher of this town, in a certain house and lot standing and lying here 
in Albany, on the hill, on the corner of Bergh [now Chapel] street, 
where Johannes [Wandelaer] aforesaid at present dwells ; in breadth in 
front on the street [now State], to the south two rods three and a half 
inches, and breadth in the rear two rods and three inches, length to the 
west on the Bergh street three rods and a half, and on the east side on 



1 Johannes De Wandelaer was from Leyden ; in 1672 he married Sara Schepmoes in New 
York, and took up his residence in Albany. In his will, made in 1705, he nicntions eio-ht 
children then living. His wife was probably then deceased. In 1702, he is called " merchanfof 
New York" {Deeds, ivj. In 1711 and 1714 a Johannes De W'andelaer, perhaps his son, owned the 
west corner of Maiden lane and Broadway.— 4/6a?i2/ Annals., yi, 254. 



184 Albany Com it y Rcconh. 

[Jacob Janse] Scheruierhooren four rods and one foot,' which he, the 
grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance given him by the honorable the 
commissaries, of date the {fjuHe',}- 16G8, being h)t 5, granted him in con- 
sideration for a certain lot which the court received from him, the 
grantor, by Avay of exchange, giving consent also to solicit a patent from 
the right honorable the governor general ; [said lot] being free and un- 
encumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same (excepting 
the lord's right), and without the grantor's making the least pretension 
to it any more; acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, 
the first penny with the last, and therefore ^wxnf^pUiKtm actionem ccsscwi, 
and full power to the aforesaid Johannes De Wandelaer, his heirs and 
successors, to do with and dispose of the same as he might do with his 
own patrimonial estate and efiFects; promising: never more to do udr suffer 
anything to be done against the same, in any manner whatsoever, either 
with or without law, under obligation as provided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 18th of June, 1G78. 

Jan Thomase. 
RicJid Fretty. 
Dirck Wessels. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Rot. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wessells, com- 
missaries, etc., Sweer Teunise [Van Yelsen], citizen of Schenectady, who 
declared that he had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed 
and transferred to and for the behoof of Wouter Aerse Raemmaker,-' in a 
certain lot lying without the town of Albany, by Gerrit Ryersen's, where 
his, the grantor's, house stood, now lately taken down and carried to 
Schaenhechtady ; in breadth on the east side against the road [Broad- 
way], nine rods [108 feet Ryn.], to the west, in the rear, eight rods and a 
half [102 feet Ryn.],'^ to the north against the cart road [Van Tromp 
street], eight rods, nine feet and a half [lOSo feet Ryn.], Rynland measure ; 
which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a patent granted him by the 
right honorable the governor general, Rich'd Xicolls, deceased, of date 
the 15th of April, 1667, to which reference is here made, and that free 
and unencumbered, with no claim standing or issuing against the same, 
excepting the lord's right, and without the grantor's making the least 
pretension any more to it ; acknowledging that he is fully paid and 
satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and therefore giving 
pletiam actionem cessam, and full power to the afoi'esaid Wouter Aerse 
Raemmaker, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter acquire 
his right and title, to do with and to dispose of the aforesaid lot as he 
might do with his other patrimonial estate and effects; promising to de- 
fend the same against all persons, and to free it from all trouble, claims 
and charges which may hereafter arise, and never more to do nor suffer 



i This lot was on the east corner of State and Chapel streets, the rods mentioned were Ehjni- 
land rods, of twelve feet each ; each foot containing about 12.36 English inches. 

- Sashmaker. 

3 This lot was north of the town's stockadoes, on the west comer of Broadway and Van Tromp 
street. Gerrit Kyerse's lot lying to the south. 



AXbany County Records. 185 

anything to be done against the same, either with or without law, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to 
law. 

T)one in Albany, the 12th of June, 1678. 

SWEER ThOONUSSEN. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Rich'd Pretty and Mr. Dirk Wessells 
[Ten Broeck], commissaries, etc., Jan Thomase [MingaelJ, who declared 
that in true rights, free ownership, he had granted, conveyed and trans- 
ferred, to and for the behoof of Ryer Jacobse Schermerhooren,i husband 
and guardian of Ariaantje Arentse [Brat], late widow of Elmer Otte, de- 
ceased, in a certain lot lying here in Albany, on the hill, upon which at 
present the house of Dom. Nic. Van Rensselaer and the house of Jan 
Witthardt stand, being in breadth in front to the south, on the street, 
three rods eight feet and six inches [4-4^ ft.], and to the north three rods 
three feet six inches [39* ft.], in length to the west on the hill, five rods 
and eleven feet [71 ft.], and to the east on the street, six rods and one 
foot [73 ft.] ; '-2 which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a patent given 
him by the late governor general. Rich. Nicolls, deceased, of date the 
29th of April, 1667, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim 
standing or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right) and 
without the grantor's making the least pretensions any more to it; 
acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, and therefore giving plenum actionem cessam, and full 
power to the aforesaid Ryer Jacobse Schermerhooren, his heirs and suc- 
cessors, or those who may hereafter acquire his title and right, to do with 
and dispose of the aforesaid lot as he might do with his other patrimonial 
estate and efi"ects ; promising the same to defend against all persons, and 
to free it from every trouble, claim or charge which may hereafter arise, 
and never more to do nor sufi"er anything to be done against the same, 
with or without law, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as pro- 
vided therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, this 13th of June, 1678. 

Jan Thomase. 
Richard Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro. Livingston, seer., etc., and in the presence of 
the honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mr. A. Teller, com- 
missaries, etc., the Honorable Jan Thomase [Mingael], who declared that 
he had, in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred 

1 Ryer Jacobse Schermerliooren, eon of Jacob Janse Schermerhooren, and one of the early 
settlers of Schenectady. For many years he was the sole surviving patentee of the town, 
managing all its affairs in Ma own name. He married Ariaantje Arentse Brat, widow of Helmer 
Otten, and occupied his farm at Schenectady, a portion of which is still held by his descendants. 
He left a large family, and a handsome property for the times. 

2 This lot was on the north corner of North Pearl and State streets. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 24 



186 Albany County Records. 

to and for the behoof of Mr. Cornells Steenwyk, merchant of New York, 
in a certain house and lot standing and lying here in Albany, on the 
Yonker [State] street, in which Hamburge at present dwells ; bounded 
south and west by the public streets, north by the house and lot of Mr. 
Timo. Cooper, and east by the house of Hieronimus Wendell, in breadth, 
in front on the street, to the south, two rods six feet, two inches, breadth 
in the rear, two rods and three feet, length to the east, five rods ten feet 
and four inches, and to the west, on the street, five rods and nine feet 
Rynland measure ; ' which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a patent 
which came to him from the right honorable the governor general, 
Kichard Nicolls, of date the 29th of April, 1G67, to which reference is 
here made ; and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the 
grantor's making the least pretension to it any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and 
therefore giving plenam actionem cessam, and full power to the aforesaid 
Mr. Cornells Steenwyk, his heirs and successors, or those who may here- 
after acquire his right and title, to do with and dispose of the aforesaid 
house and lot as he might do with his own patrimonial estate and effects ; 
promising . the same to defend against all persons, and to free it from 
every trouble, claim and charge which which may hereafter arise, and 
never more to do nor suflFer anything to be done against the same, in any 
manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor according to 
law. 

Done in Albany, the 14th of June, 1678. 

Jan Thomase. 
RicJid Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

KoT. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ko. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Philip Schuyler and Mr. Richard Pretty, com- 
missaries, etc., Jacob Abrahamse Cuyper, who declared that he had in 
true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to and for 
the behoof of Jan Cornellse Vyselaer, alias Gow, in a certain house and 
lot standing and lying here in Albany ; bounding to the south and west 
upon Jochem Ketelheyn's, to the north on the house of the aforesaid Jan 
Gow, to the east on the public street, length three rods nine feet seven 
inches, and in breadth one rod eight feet and one inch; which he, the 
grantor, does by virtue of a patent which came to him from the late 
governor general, Rich'd Nicolls, of date the 22d of May, 1667, to which 
reference is here made, and that free and unencumbered, with no claim 
standing or issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), and 
without the grantor's making the least pretensions to the same anymore; 
acknowledging that he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny 
with the last, and therefore giving 2^^<^'>'>^^(^'>^^ actionem cessam, and full 
power to the aforesaid Jan Cornellse Vyselaer, to do with or to dispose of 
the same as he might do with his own patrimonial estate and effects ; pro- 



This lot was on the east corner of North Pearl and State streets. 



Albany Comity Records. 187 

raising the same to defend against every person, and to free the same 
from every trouble, claim or charge which may hereafter arise, and never 
more to do nor suiFer anything to be done against the same, in any manner 
whatsoever, under obligation as provided therefor by law. 
Done in Albany, the 20th of June, 1678. 

Jacob Abrahamsen. 
Philip Schuyler. 
Richard Pretty. 
Acknowledged before me. 

Rot. Livingston, Seer. 

Appeared before me Ro'. Livingston, seer., etc., and in presence of the 
honorable magistrates, Mr. Richard Pretty and Mi-. Ands. Teller, com- 
missaries, etc., Jan Cornelise Vyselaer, alias Gow, who declared that he 
had in true rights, free ownership, granted, conveyed and transferred to 
and for the behoof of Jan Andriese Douw,i in a certain house and lot 
standing and lying here in Albany ; bounding to the south and west 
Jochim Ketelhuyn's, to the north the house of the aforesaid Gow, and to 
the east the public street, in length three rods nine feet seven inches, and 
in breadth one rod eight feet one inch ; with the reservation that the 
alley between this house and the house of Jan Gow, shall remain in 
common, it being fifteen and a half feet wide, and in length to the rear of 
said Gow's house ; which he, the grantor, does by virtue of a conveyance 
received by him to-day from Jacob Abrahamse, to which reference is 
here made ; and that free and unencumbered, with no claim standing or 
issuing against the same (excepting the lord's right), and without the 
grantor's making the least pretension to it any more ; acknowledging that 
he is fully paid and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, and 
therefore gWmgplenam actionem cessani, and full power to the aforesaid 
Jan Andriese Douw, his heirs and successors, or those who may hereafter 
acquire his right and title, to do with and dispose of the same as he might 
do with his own patrimonial estate and eff'ects ; promising the same to de- 
fend against all persons, and to free it from every trouble, claim and charge 
which are lawful, and never more to do nor to suffer anything to be done 
against the same, in any manner whatsoever, under obligation as provided 
therefor according to law. 

Done in Albany, the 20th of June, 1678. 

This is the mark -j- of Jan Corn. Vyselaer, 
with his own hand set. 
Rich'd Pretty. 
A. Teller. 

Acknowledged before me, 

Ro. Livingston, Seer. 



[end of vol. i of deeds.] 



1 Jan Andries Douw may have been related to Volkert Janse Douw ; if so, the relationship 
does not appear. He had two children baptized in Albany in 1084 - 9, and three, 1691 - 6, in 
New York, where, perhaps, he became a permanent resident. 



188 ■ Albany Cminty Records. 



[volume II.] 

On this nineteenth day of August, of the year after the birth of our 
Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, sixteen hundred and fifty-four, in the 
forenoon, appeared before me Johannes Dyekman,' in the service of the 
privileged West India Company, clerk [commys], and vice director of 
Fort Orange, Honorable Jan Labatic, burgher in Beverwyck, and de- 
clared (jjetiede) that he had granted, transferred and conveyed to the 
Honorable Mr. Paulo Schrick,- merchant, his certain lot lying in the 
Manathans, in New Amsterdam, lying between skipper Willem Thomasse 
and Isaak de Foreest, the patent of which is in the custody of Karel Van 
Brugge; that he may sell said lot, or cause it to be sold and conveyed by 
some other person, and release to execute, as if he, Labatie, were himself 
in his own person present, with power to do all such things as appertain 
to the same ; the money to collect, or cause to be collected, demanded and 
received; also, the same to keep together with the former sums ; and these 
receipts, and the whole amount which shall come from the sale of the lot, 
shall be used to lessen all such sums of money as the aforesaid Mr. Paulo 
Schrick is to receive from said Labatie. 

In witness whereof, this was signed with his own hand, in Fort Orange, 
of the date aforesaid. 

Jan Labatie. 

Which I affirm was so executed. 

Joannes Dyckman. 



On this, the twentieth day of August, in the year of our Lord sixteen 
hundred and fifty-four, in the forenoon, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, in the service, etc., the Honoi-able Paulus Schrick, merchant, 
and declared that he had appointed and empowered, as by these presents 
he does appoint and empower, the Reverend Dominus Gideon Schaets and 
the Honorable Jan Verbeeck, commissary of the honorable court here, in 
his, the subscriber's name, and for his sake, to demand, collect and receive 
all such sums of money as upon a settlement shall be coming to the 
honorable Mr. Schrick aforesaid from Jan Labatie and Hendrick Janse 
AVesterkamp, for which they have in general pledged all their estates for 
the satisfying of the aforesaid payment, and specially Jan Labatie's house 
standing in the fort, with the garden thereto belonging, which he, Labatie, 
will permit to be sold at the time promised, the aforesaid, the honorable 
attorneys, taking good and needful care that everything is done which is 
needful to be done for the collecting of the moneys, besides at the proper 
time a settlement thereof to make ; in like manner, also, with the house 
of Hendrick Janse Westerkamp, which was also mortgaged therefor, and 
in favor of which he, the subscriber, has acknowledged a bill of preference 

1 Johannes Dyckman came to New Netherland as book-keeper, in l&Zl.— Annals of Albany, rv, 
72. He had been first clerk to the chamber at Amsterdam, and sailed from Holland in April, 
1631 ; went to Fort Orange as commies in the same yca.r.—N'eiv Netherland Register. In 1655 he 
became deranged, and was superseded by Johannes JDe Decker. — 0' Callaghari's History of New 
Netherland. His wife's name was Maria Bosyns. 

2 Paulus Schrick was a citizen of New Amsterdam. 



Albany Ccmnty Records. 189 

(acte van preferentie) before the court ; as before, also, an estimate to make 
(te laten omslag), and then to sell said house for the satisfying of the 
moneys due the subscriber from him,i ***** [wanting], 
and to acknowledge what their honors' [the attorneys,] substitutes shall 
do therein, provided they make a proper statement of the receipts m/orma, 
all faithful and true. 

These, by the subscriber, with his own hand signed, in Fort Orange, 
of date aforesaid, in presence of Mr. Johan de Hulter and Mr. Franz 
Barentse Pastoor, commissaries of this jurisdiction, and also subscribed by 
them, as witnesses for that purpose invited. 

Paulus Schreek. 
As witnesses : 

Johan de Hulter. 
Prans Barentse Pastoor. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



I, the undersigned Jan Labatie, in accordance with the above written 
power of attorney, promise to give possession of the aforesaid house of 
mine, standing in the fort, altogether and immediately; also in conformity 
with the above power to permit their honors, the substitutes [for the above 
mentioned attorneys], whenever it is proper and serviceable, to sell, collect 
and pay such debts as I owe to Mr. Paulo Schrick, provided that after a 
settlement, what remains over, shall inure to my benefit. 

Done in Fort Orange, this 20th of August, 1654. 

Jan Labatie. 



As Jan Labatie has promised the above written, so will I, the under- 
signed, also promise the same, as I also do, for Westerkamp. Datum ut 
sujjra. 

This is the mark of \- Albertsen, in the name and for the 

sake of Hendrick Janse Westerkamp. 



On this 21st day of August, 1654, appe^ared before me Joannes Dyck- 
man, in the service of, etc., the honorable Wynant Glerritse Vander Poel 
(Jclstemaker^^- cabinetmaker, and declared that he had agreed with Adrian 
Dirrickse De Vries, in regard to an exchange of certain lots, providing 
that Wynant Gerritse, to lessen the high price of his own lot, shall take 
down and set upon his own lot, the barn from the lot of Adrian Dirkse, 
and providing moreover that Adrian Dirkse shall receive and there be paid 
him by Wynant Gerritse, four beavers, with the understanding and for 
the greater security that mutual possession shall be had of the aforesaid 
lots, thus giving both parties power of perfecting the delivery of both lots, 
under a pledge of their respective persons and estates ; real and personal, 
present and future, in accordance with the laws; and as an acknowledg. 



» a email portion of the page is here wanting. 
2 Trunkmaker, joiner, cabinetmaker, etc. 



190 Albany County Records. 

ment of the truth, without craft or guile, the parties subscribe this with 
their own hands in Fort Orange, on the date above written. 

Wynant Gerritse V. D. Poel. 
This is the mark of Adrian ^^ Dirrickse de Vries, with his own 

hand set. 
Which 1 attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



On this the twenty-third day of August, in the year of our Lord 1654, 
appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable Gysbert 
Philipse Velthuysen,! and declared that he had appointed and empowered, 
as he by these presents does, etc., the honorable Paulus Schrick of K.ep- 
kouw (who proposes on the first ship to depart from this country to 
patrla)^ in his, the subscriber's, name, and for his behalf, to demand, 
collect and receive in Holland all such sums of money as are coming to 
this subscriber from Cornells Pieterse his father-in-law (heliout-vader) , 
dwelling at Velthuysen ; with the aforesaid person to settle, liquidate and 
square accounts and the money of this subscriber on settlement of the 
accounts to receive, quittance therefor to give, and, further, to do all 
things therein as if the subscriber in his own person were present, yea, 
also, to do all those things that the matter specially demands. 

Thus done without craft or guile in Fort Orange, in the presence of 
Mr. Jacob de Hinsse, chirurgeon, and Claas Hendrickse [Van Schoon- 
hoven], carpenter, as witnesses hereto called and asked, and who have 
also signed these presents. 

This is my own hand, Gysbert Phillipsen. 

As loitnesses : 
J. De Hinsse. 
Claes Hendryckse. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



RoeloflP Jansen and Lammert Cornelise propose to sell the following 
goods on these conditions, to wit : That the payment for the purchased 
goods shall be made in good whole beavers, which payment shall be made 
within the space of four and twenty hours. ***** 

Paulus Martense [Van Benthuysen], the sashmaker, a strong ax 

and a plane, / 7.10 

Three dishes, to Claes Bendingh, / 2.00 

Cornells Teunise, / 2.00 

Claes Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven], some chisels (bytels),.... / 1.16 

Mens the wheelwright, some chisels, , / 2.09 

Gillis Douwesse Fonda, sundries (^alegaers) , , / 3.04 

Jan Labatie, sundry articles, / 4.00 

Jan Labatie, some planes (scliaveii)^ f 1.00 

Gerrit Swart, an adz and sundries, / 4.00 

' Gysbert Philipse probably resided at Esopus. On 25 November, 1659, an order was granted 
at the request of Cornelis Wjiikoop for the appointment of curators over his estate, left at 
Esopue, he having been murdered by the Indians.— Z>«teA Manuscripts, xvi, 302. 



Albany County Records. 191 

Hendrick Jochemse, an ax and adz, / 2.14 

Claes Hendrickse. some chisels, / 2.12 

Do. some chisels, / 2.11 

Gerrit Swart, some chisels, / 2.10 

Claas Bendigh, knife (rnes), / 4.02 

Claes Hendrickse, a naildrawer (de hamer'), / 3.11 

Claes Bendinck, an auger (boer), f 2.11 

Jacob Janse Flodder (alias G-ardenier), / 5.02 

Claes Janse Van Rotterdam, chisels, / 1.11 

Abraham Craboat, a hammer, f 1.14 

Pieter Bronck, some chisels, / 2.06 

Claes Bendingh, some chisels, , / 2.14 

Claes Hendrickse, some trumpery, / 3.10 

Gillis Douwese Fonda, some augers, / 4.12 

Jan Roeloflfse, chisels, f 5,03 

Jacob Janse Flodder, a chest, f 2.05 

Dirrick Bensinck, a chest, f 3.00 

Abraham Craboat, y 4.15 

Daniel Rinckhout, agun, f 16.10 

Hendrick Jochemse, a gun, f 21.10 

Abraham Craboat, a sword, f 13.00 

Jacob Janse Flodder, a tub of tobacco, / 6.02 

Paid, /140.04 

Lammert Cornelise, his goods, of date the 23d of August: 

Stoffel Janse [Abeel], sundries, / 8.09 

Claes Hendrickse, two slick chisels, / 12.04 

Claes Hendrickse, f 4.I8 

Jacob Janse Flodder [Gardenier], some planes, / 7.00 

Claes Hendrickse, some planes^ / 3.05 

Claes Bendingh, some planes, / 2.14 

Jan Roeloffse, some planes, / 4.09 

Jacob Janse Flodder, some trumpery, / 3.00 

Claes Hendrickse, some chissels, / 3.07 

Do. do., / 3.15 

Jacob Janse Flodder, a square, ./ 5.00 

Jan Roeloffse, some trumpery, „ f 1.13 

Jacob Janse Flodder, some trumpery, / 3.01 

Claes Hendrickse, an ax, / 9.OO 

Cornells Theunisse, a coat, / 38.00 

Caspar Jacobse [Halenbeck], an ax and auger, / 6.07 

Abraham Craboat, some traps, / 2.10 

Tennis Teunisse [Metselaer], / 8.00 

Claes Hendrickse, a coat, / 36.00 

Gisbert Gysen, two cushions, / 10.10 

Jacob Janse Flodder, some clothes, / 3.10 

Celes (?), Houteweel, / 11.05 

Harmen de Metselaer, two straps (riemen), / 8.00 

Andries Herbertsen, a gun, / 14.00 

Jan Gouw, some knives, / 2.10 

Jan Dyckman, f 7.05 



192 Albany County Records. 

Abraham Craboat, acoat, / 9.00 

Jacob Janse Flodder, a coat, / 8.00 

Jan Roeloffse, some trumpery, / 0.12 

/ 237.04 
Jan Gouw offered for sale a gun, which makes 181 (18 ?) 

guilders in money. 

Jan Gouw and Harmen Janse wish to sell a certain casket, inlaid with 
ebony and other woods, on the following conditions, to wit : That the 
payment shall be made in good whole beavers ; which payment shall be 

made within twenty -four hours, without one hour longer delay, * * * 
Jacob Janse Flodder remained the buyer for thirty beavers and nineteen 
guilders. 

Jacob Janse Flodder. 

Also goods [belonging to] Jacob Tyssen [Van der Heyden]. 

Skipper Frederick, clothes, / 24.00 

JanMichielse [Van Edam],i acoat, / 14.06 

Jan Dyckman, some cushions, / 7.10 

Claes Hendrickse, some bells (?), / 4.05 

Andries Herbertsen, / 7.05 

Cornelis Theunisse, some bands (beffen), / 9.00 

Abraham Craboat, / 16.00 

Wynant Gerritse [V. D. Poel], amap, / 7.05 

JanLabatie, / 12.00 

Jacob , / 16.00 

Cornelis Theunise, a chest, / 6.05 

Jan Roeloffse, a gun, / 18.00 

Wynant Gerritse, a coat, / 17.10 

Jacob Janse Flodder, / 5.06 

Willem Janse Schut, a coat, / 39.00 

Jan Roeloffse, a sword, / 12.00 

/ 218.07 

Harmen de Metselaer : 

Jan Michielse, a coat, / 29.00 

and Harmen offered for sale andirons, bevers, / 13.10 

Caspar Jacobse [Halenbeck], / 23.10 

cushions [or pillows] offered for sale, / 21.00 

Jacob Theunisse, / 12.00 

/ 64.10 

A gun, offered for sale, / 22.10 

* * offered for sale, / 6.00 

Michiel, the carpenter, paid/ 21.00 

Jacob Janse Flodder, / 250.00 

Claes Hendrickse, / 275.00 

Jacob Janse Flodder, / 324.00 

also the casket offered for sale, 27 beavers. 

Clothing is offered for sale, / 76.00 

1 See Deeds, i, 181. 



Albany County Records. 193 

Willem Janse Schut, / 25.16 

A gun, Jan RoelofFse. / 12.00 

Paid the 30th of August, / 37.16 



On this the twenty-fourth day of August, 1654, in the forenoon, 
appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, in the service, etc., the honorable 
Mr. Francois Boon, husband and guardian of Elisabet Cornelise, late 
widow of Gysbert Cornelise [Van Wesp], deceased, assisted by the 
honorable Jacob Janse Schermerhoren, chosen and appointed guardian of 
the children, left by Gysbert Cornelise aforesaid, and declared that he was 
well and truly satisfied by the honorable Steven Janse [Coniuck], in 
regard to the money in beavers for the house, bought by him at public 

sale, in the name of Jacob Headrickse Maat, on the of this [month] ; 

upon the first payment or installment there shall be a complete delivery 
of the aforesaid purchased house, and on payment of the last installment, 
he promises to deliver a proper deed thereof in forma. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of which he has signed this with his 
own hand, in presence of Mr. Anthonius de Hooges, and the honorable 
Jan Verbeeck, commissaries of this honorable court, as witnesses for that 
purpose asked and called, who have also subscribed their names hereto. 

Franscoos Boon. 

As witnesses, 

Anthonius de Hooges. 
Jan Verbeeck. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



Farming of the beer and wine excise, to commence from this date 
within this jurisdiction. Their honors the court here propose by these 
presents at public sale to farm out to the highest bidder the common and 
ordered tapsters' wine and beer excise, on the following conditions, to 
wit: First. — This farming shall begin on the date of these presents. 
The payment shall begin with the farming and be made in three terms or 
installments. The first installment, being a third part, shall be paid 
punctually within the time of three months; the second installment, also 
being a third part, three months thereafter; and the third installment, on 
the termination of the farming. Provided that the farmer of the excise 
understand that he shall be holden to furnish sureties to the content of 
this honorable court; and in case he does not furnish sureties, the farming 
shall again be offered at public sale, at his cost and charge. The 
payments shall be made in good current seewant. Provided that the wine 
and beer given in up to this day, be not comprehended in this farming, 
as the excise thereof has already been paid. Their honors of the court 
promise proper support to the farmer. Jacob Van Loosereght remained 
the farmer on the before mentioned conditions for the sum of thirteen 
hundred guilders. 

Jacob Hyndrickse Maat. 

Hist. Col. Hi. 25 



194 Albany County Records. 

On the above written conditions we stand as sureties, and in case the 
principal does not pay, we ourselves will pay in his stead. 

Lambert Cornelisse. 
Claes Jacobse Van Rotterdam. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

I, the undersigned, Steven Janse [Coninck], offer myself as surety and 
principal for the person of Lamniert Cornelise, who, on the 25th of this 
month (August ?), stood surety for the farming, bid off by Jacob Hen- 
drickse Maat, and to whom it was knocked off, and upon the above written 
conditions, I pledge myself, according to law. 

Fort Orange, this 2nd of September, 1G54, 



Claes Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven], desires to sell on the following 
conditions an inlaid oaken cabinet,' lent out [pledged?] by Jacob Janse 
Flodder \_aUas Gardenier], to wit : that the buyer shall be holden to make 
payment to-morrow morning punctually, in good whole beavers. In case 
he fail to pay or furnish surety, it is understood that it shall again be sold 
at his cost and charge. The cabinet was sold on the above written con- 
ditions at public sale to the undersigned, for the sum of twenty-two 
beavers and ten guilders, in beavers. 

Philip Pieterse [Schuyler]. 

I, the subscriber, Jan Thomasse [Mingael], stand as surety, 

Jan Toniase. 

Claes Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven] desires to sell on the above con- 
ditions some timber, bought by him yesterday, at the house of Pieter 
Bronck. Mr. Pieter Hartgerts was the buyer for the sum of three hun- 
dred and one guilders. 

Pieter Hartgers. 

I acknowledge myself as surety for the above person, 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 

Jacob Janse Schermerhoren desires also to sell on the aforesaid condi- 
tions an inlaid ebony and oak cabinet. The afore named cabinet was 
bought by me, the subscriber, for the sum of eighteen and a half beavers. 

CORNELIS ThONISSE. 

As surety, Hendrik Jochemse. 

Instructions for the farmer Jacob Hendrickse Maat, who yesterday bid 
off the farming of the tapsters' wine and beer excise, that he may regulate 
himself therein in all justice. First. — Jacob Hendrickse, or those whom 
he shall commission, shall have power to visit the tapsters' cellars, to 
guage the wine and beer, and note the guaging accordingly, as is fitting a 
public ofl&cer. The guaging being registered, he may from that time 
begin the duties of his office, and if he find that any one has concealed 
wine and beer, the civil officer shall be holden and pledge himself to 



See page 10. 



Albany County Records. 195 

render him all needful assistance, either by day or night. The fines for 
smuggling shall go to him, provided that the officer shall receive a third 
part; in like manner with those who sell brandy to the Indians, in case 
they shall be apprehended and convicted, as is fitting. If any sloop or 
sloops {jaghten) come up here from Manathans, the manifest shall be 
examined, and an account taken of the wine and beer which comes up, 
and he shall address himself to the customhouse officer, who receives the 
permit, and he shall make such examination, and make a faithful and 
proper search of the sloops. 
26th Aug., 1654. 

Mr. Abraham Staets will sell at public sale his house and lot, standing 
and lying in Fort Orange, to the south, bordering upon the passage way 
out from the gate of the fort, and to the north, the angle {^^unt) of said 
fort, together with a garden, bordering to the sout'h of Mr. Adrian 
Ilpendam, to the north. Rem Jansen Smit, to the east, the Heer Eense- 
laer, and to the west, a public highway, just as the aforesaid house and 
garden lie; under the following conditions, to wit : The payment must 
be made in good whole beavers, in three installments; the first, a just 
third part, punctually within the space of one month from this date, 
without any exception, within which time said house and garden also 
shall be accepted by the buyer upon the aforesaid conditions •, the second 
installment, within one year; and the third and last installment the vear 
after or within two years punctually. For the payment of which' the 
buyer shall be holden to furnish a constant and sufficient security to the 
content of the seller. The auction fees shall become a charge to the 
buyer. And in case the buyer, as aforesaid, shall not furnish sufficient 
sureties, then the aforesaid house shall be offered again at public sale at 
his cost and charge, and whatever less it comes to be worth, he shall pay 
the same. 

(Done this 27th October, 1655). 

The buyer on the aforesaid conditions was Joannes Van Twiller, for 
the sum of twenty-three hundred and twenty-five guilders on the date 
aforesaid. 

J. Van Twiller. 

I offer myself as surety for Joannes Van Twiller for the purchase 
money of the aforesaid house. 
J. B. Van Rensselaer. 
Philip Pietersen \_Schuyler']. 

Mr. Willem Beeckman i proposes on this, the 27th of August, 1654, 
to sell a certain bouwery lying at Manathans named the Backer's bou- 
wery, asit at present lies, joining upon the bouwery of General Stuyve- 
sant; with a dwelling house and barn {houiohuys), also a dwelling stand- 
ing thereon before this used as a brewery, according to the following 
conditions. Firstly.— TlhQ seller shall deliver therewith the cattle and 
draft oxen. 

The payment therefor shall be made in three installments, to wit : 
the first, being the just third part, within one month; the second within 



» William Beeckman waa a citizen of New Amsterdam ; for an account of him, see O'Calla- 
ghan'8 History of New Netherlands n, 473. , =^c w K^aua. 



196 Albany County Records. 

six months thereafter, and the third and last within the following six 
months. The payment shall be made in good whole beavers. The auc- 
tion fees the buyer shall pay. 

Moreover the buyer shall be holden to furnish sufficient surety to the 
content of the seller, and in case it be a second time oflfered for sale, it 
shall be at his cost and expense. 

[This sale was not completed.] 

On this the twenty-eighth day of August, 1654, appeared before me 
Joannes Dyckman in the service, etc., the Honorable Jacob Janse 
Flodder [cilias Gardenier] who declared before him that he is fully paid 
the sum of eighty beavers, which Eldert Gerbertse has given him, to be 
repaid again to him, Eldert Gerbertse, by said Jacob Janse Flodder, within 
six weeks, and until it be repaid, the sloop of Jacob Janse Flodder 
shall be specially mortgaged, and neither chartered nor alienated before 
the said eighty beavers to Elbert Gerbertse be again returned ; fur- 
ther, pledging his person, to wit, Jacob Flodder and estate, personal 
and real, present and future, nothing excepted, also acknowledging 
that he has accepted Claas Hendrickse Van Utrecht i carpenter and 
Elbert Gerbertse as partners in the hire of the saw mill of Jacob Janse 
Flodder ; all under a mutual pledge of their persons and estates, accord- 
ing to law. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of the same, they have subscribed 
with their own hands, in Fort Orange on the date aforesaid, in presence 
of Jan Thomase [3Iingael] and Pieter Hartgerts, commissaries of the 
honorable court here, as witnesses hereto called. 

Jacob Janse Flodder. 
Claas Hendryckse. 

As witnesses, 
Jan Thomase. 
Pieter Hartgerts. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

I, the undersigned, Juriaen Teyssen Van Amsterdam, acknowledge and 
confess that I have well and truly received of the honorable Mr. Philip 
Pieterse Schuiler, the sum of twenty-five hundred and sixty-two and a 
half guilders, to be paid by me or on my account in Holland, to wit, in 
good current money, sis weeks after the showing of this to Meyndert 
Andryesse. pork buyer, or Jacob Janse Schermerhooren, now ready to 
depart thither; growing out of the receipt of goods received here; 
promising the aforesaid payment to make punctually, under a pledge of 
my person and estate, personal and real, present and future, submitting 
them to the force of all laws and judges. 

In witness whereof, without craft or guile, two of the same tenor are 
signed; the one being paid, the other of no value ; in Fort Orange, of date 
the twenty-ninth of August, 1654. 

JuRYAN Teyssen. 

In my presence, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



Alias Yau Schoonliooveu, 



Albany County Records. 19 7 

On this the thirtieth day of August, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, etc., and in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, the 
honorable Jacob Janse Schermerhoren, commissary, being about to depart 
to imtria [Holland], and declared that he had appointed and empowered, 
as by these presents he does appoint, etc., the honorable Pieter Hartgerts 
and Volkert Janse [Douw], in his name and on his account, to act during 
his^ absence in Holland, or so long as he may be away, with all the sub° 
scriber's estate, as well houses, gardens and other property, as with the 
invoice of merchandise which he is expecting, accordin<? to advices from 
his honored father in Holland by the last arrivals, and further, generally 
to act, for the subscriber as if he, in his own person, were present, yea, 
even as if herein it were stipulated and required as a special charge ; all 
to he held good and trustworthy, provided these attorneys on the sub- 
scriber's return shall render a proper settlement and report, in forma, of 
their acts. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of which, he has with his own hand 
subscribed this, in Fort Orange in Nieuw Nederland, in the presence of 
Mr. Francis Boon and Claes Hendrickse Van Utrecht, as witnesses hereto 
asked and called, and who to that end have also signed this paper. 

Jacob Janse Schermerhooren. 

-4s witnesses, 

Franscoos Boon. 
Claes Hendry cksen. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

On this the thirtieth day of August, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, etc., the honorable Mr. Francois Boon, being about to depart 
for jmtria [Holland], and declared that he had appointed and empowered 
the honorable Pieter Hartgerts and Volkert Janse [Douw], in his name 
and for his sake (afterwards to be sent to his father in patria), to 
demand, collect and receive all lawful obligations, claims and payments on 
his house sold, also to dispose of his goods, expected by the next arrivals 
from patria; provided that on request and demand of the subscriber, 
these attorneys shall be holden, upon his return, to render a proper account 
and statement thereof, and generally of all his estate here. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of which, he has with his own hand 
signed this, in Fort Orange, on the date aforesaid, in presence of Jan 
Thomase [Mingael] and Claes Hendrickse Van Utrecht, as witnesses 
hereto called, who have also signed this paper with the principal (com- 
yarant). 

Franscoos Boon. 
As witnesses, 
Jan Thomase. 
Claes Hendryckse. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

I, the undersigned, Jurian Thyssen Van Amsterdam, acknowledge and 
confess, that 1 am well and truly indebted to, and that I have received, 
here in New Nederland, from the honorable Jan Thomase and Volckert 
Janse [Douw], the sum of four thousand guilders, to be paid by me, or in 



198 Albany County Records. 

my belialf, iu Holland, in good current money, within six weeks after 
sight, to Jacob Janse Schermerhoren, or to his honored father, living in 
Amsterdam, growing out of an indebtedness for good peltries, received here, 
promising to make said payment punctually ; provided that in case I do 
not, at the appointed time, make said payment as is fit and proper, whereby 
the aforesaid friends would be greatly injured, inasmuch as they have 
ordered invoices of goods to be bought and the ships horn patria gene- 
rally depart hitherwards but once a year, whereby they would be deprived 
of much interest and the goods for a whole year, I will be bound promptly 
to make good all such losses and interest, which may arise from delay of 
payment, and to pay the interest as it is reckoned in this country; all 
under a pledge of my person and estate, personal and real, present and 
future, submitting the same to the force of all laws and judges. 

In witness whereof two only of this tenor are made, the one paid, the 
other of no value. 

Fort Orange, in New Netherland, this thirty-first day of August, 1654. 

JURYAN TeYSSEN. 

In my presence, 

JOANNE.S DyCKMAN. 

On this the thirty-first day of August, in the year of our Lord, 1654, 
appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable Jan Thomase 
[Mingael] and Volkert Janse [Douw], and declared that they had 
appointed and empowered, as by these presents they do appoint, etc., the 
honorable Jacob Janse Schermerhoren about to depart hence for Holland, 
in their names and for their sakes to demand, collect and receive of 
Jurian Thyssen Van Amsterdam, all those five thousand guilders, which 
he has received of them in peltries here, for which he is indebted, and 
according to a bill of exchange is to pay on his arrival in Holland, six 
weeks after sight; also the same moneys to lay out in merchandise, and 
bring or send the same hither, by the first opportunity ; provided they 
make a proper settlement of the receipt and expenditure of the same ; and 
in case the said Jurian Thyssen fail to make payment punctually, they 
may at once sue and by that means compel him to pay, and further to do 
all things as if the subscribers were there present in their own persons, and 
by these presents were expressly demanded : all iu good faith. 

These with their own hands signed in Fort Orange, on the date afore- 
said, in presence of; Mr. Jacob Steendam and Jacob Tysse Van der 
Heyden, as witness thereto called, who, with the principal, have signed 
their names. 

Jan Tiiomase. 
VoLKARTT Janse. 

As witnesses, 

Jacob SteendamA 

Jacob Teyssen Van der Heyden. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Roland Saverye in Fort Orange, lying here in New Netherland, in the 
service of the honorable privileged West India company in the fort afore- 

1 Jacob Steendam was citizen of New Amsterdam. 



Albany County Records. 199 

said, during the space of ten months boarded at my house, running up 
a bill of two hundred guilders, which sum, on his departure from here, 
he promised to pay on his return from Manathans, but "afterwards having 
returned to patria [Holland], without paying me, he remains indebted to 
me as aforesaid; therefore to recover said sum, I, Jan Labatie, burgher 
and inhabitant of New Netherland, to whom the aforesaid moneys are 
due, have thought it needful to appoint and empower the honorable 
Theunis Janse at Themaker (?), to claim, collect, and receive the afore- 
said moneys, from the friends and heirs of said Rooland Saverye now 
deceased, also to draw from the moneys paid into court, and of receipts to 
pass acquittances, and moreover all things to do therein, as if the sub- 
scriber, Jan Labatie, were there present in his own person, or were spe- 
cially ordered and expressly demanded by these presents; to which end, 
we, the subscribers, Rem Jausen Smit and Lammert Van Valkenborgh, 
inhabitants and burghers of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, testify that 
during the aforesaid time, said Roeland Savery boarded at the house of 
Jan Labatie : all in good ftiith and without craft or guile, these with my 
own hand signed in Fort Orange the 31st of August, 1G54. 

Jan Labatie. 
As witnesses, 

Rem Janssen. 
The mark by Lammert -f- Van Valekenborgh 
with his own hand set. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

I, the undersigned, Claes Cornelise, acknowledge and confess that T am 
well and truly indebted to Poulus Cornelise [Van Flensburgh] now 
ready to depart for 2^atna, in the sum and number of six beavers, grow- 
ing out of a debt for goods and wares here received, which said six 
beavers I promise to pay at sight to the aforesaid Poulus Cornelise, the 
next year, after his safe arrival (if he does not come back this debt 
shall be canceled), on pledge of my person and estate, personal and real, 
submitting myself to the force of all laws and judges. 
_ In acknowledgment of the truth whereof, two only of this tenor are 
signed ; the one paid, the other of no value, in Fort Orange this first day 
of September, 1654. 

This is the mark set by Claes X Cornelise's own hand. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Their honors of the court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, by expe- 
rience having found that their honors' well mannered placardsand orders, now 
and then published and posted at the usual places, are not observed and 
executed as was fitting; and also that the burghers as well as the tapsters' 
proper directions may have with respect to the receiver, Peter Reyuer- 
dingh,! who does not yield a proper observance of the aforesaid orders, 
whereby smuggling has became common; and whereas their honors of 
the court resolved to farm out the tapster's wine and beer excise of this 



' Pieter Ryverdingh was clerk and court messenger at Fort Orange and Beverwyck. 



200 Albany County Records. 

jurisdiction ; as also it was farmed on the 25 [of August,] at public sale ; 
and Jacob Hendrickse Maat became the farmer, and to the honorable 
court promised a proper performance of his office during the time of the 
farming ; now, therelbre, their honors of the court hereby expressly interdict 
and forbid the aforementioned Jacob Hendrickse Maat, his collector, or 
those whom he has employed therein, in words, much less in acts, to 
revile, slander and defame, and in this his office to do any unlawful act (?) 
on penalty (^jwete ) that those who shall have done such things shall be 
punished as the matter demands; and for the better preventing of smug- 
gling, all burghers and inhabitants of this jurisdiction, without respect to 
persons, shall receive and land no strong beer, wine or distilled waters and 
unload no incoming sloops before a proper permit {lUjet) from the 
farmer of the excise or his collector shall have been fetched and acknow- 
ledged ; for which purpose they shall have their set times, morning and 
afternoon, to provide the good people with proper permits, and at such times 
and place shall cause such permits to be acknowledged; but the applicants 
shall be obliged to pay no excise, only two stuivers for every permit pre- 
sented ; under the penalty that whosoever shall be found to have done other- 
wise, all such beer and wine landed and put in cellar without such permits 
and acknowledgment of the farmer, shall, without any contradiction, be 
forfeited, and in addition to the forfeit a sum of three guilders ; also all 
brewers dwelling in this jurisdiction are informed that no strong beer is 
to be permitted to the burghers or tapsters, before a permit (Jnljet) from 
the farmer or his collector is shown to them under the penalty thereto 
attached ; and further, all boats (harcquers) coming laden from Manathans 
are not to unload before their passes (passen) have been presented and 
they are properly visited by the officer here, also those moneys which shall 
come from the farming shall be employed in the service of the public 
only ; and every order made by the court (?) is to be regulated precisely 
and strictly according to the contents of this paper. 

Thus done by the honorable court here in Fort Orange, this first of 
September, and resumed again on the second of September, 1654; present 
the honorable collector of customs and officer Johannes Dyckman. 

Jan Verbeeck. 

PlETER HaRTGERTS. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 

On this the second of September, in the year of our Lord 1654, ap- 
peared before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable Goosen Gerritse 
[Van Schaick], burgher and citizen in the village of Beverwyck, and 
acknowledged that he had contracted and agreed with Marcelis Janse 
[Van Bommel], also burgher and citizen as aforesaid, for the sale 
of his certain house, as it is 'at present occupied by Goosen Gerritse, 
and the aforesaid house to set up on his certain lot on the hill, joining upon 
the north Pieter Bronck and upon the south, Jan Roeloffse [De Goyer] ; 
which house Goosen Gerritse shall be holden at his own expense not 
only to take down but also to set up again, as good and bad as it is at 
present, on the lot aforesaid, and in case anything happens to be 
broken in pieces, Goosen Gerritse is holden to renew it ; with glass (?) 
and a chimney within, just as the aforesaid house stands there, except 
the cellar, which the buyer Marcellis Janse must make at his own ex- 
pense ; provided that the buyer also shall be the owner of said lot, hav- 



Albany County Records. 201 

ing obtained a patent' thereof, when the house shall be set upon it, and 
that the house must be erected there, on or before the first day of May 
next coming, finished according to contract, without fail ; for the erect- 
ing of said house upon said lot, the buyer, Marcelis Janse, must pay the 
sum of twelve hundred guilders, in three installments, to wit, on the first 
of May next, on taking possession, the sura of four hundred guilders, 
the following year, on the first of May, four hundred guilders, and 
on the year thereafter, on the first of May, a like sum of four hundred 
guilders, to be paid in good current seewant or other current wares, such 
as the seller can and ought to be satisfied with, and the other to pay; 
provided that the buyer furnish sufl&cient sureties for the aforesaid pay- 
ments to the content of the seller ; all under pledge of their respective 
persons and estates, personal and real, present and future, submitting 
themselves to the force of all laws and judges; and in acknowledg- 
ment of the truth of the same they subscribe this paper with their own 
hands at the house of the buyer in Beverwyck, on the day aforesaid. 
Maercelys Janssen. 
This is the mark J-j of Goosen Gerritse with his own hand set. 



We, the undersigned, Franse Barentse Pastoor and Arent Andryssen 
[Brat] acknowledge and confess by these presents, that we or either of us 
have ofi"ered ourselves as sureties and principals for the purchase money, 
the aforementioned sum of twelve hundred guilders, and in case the 
buyer fails on the set times to make the payments, we or one of us for 
both, will take his place, and on the set and promised time, pay for the 
buyer himself, under a pledge of our persons and estates, personal and 
real, present and future, according to law, without craft or guile. 
Signed on the date and place aforesaid, with our own hands, without 
craft or guile. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 
Arent Andresse. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



The administrators of the estate of the late Rut Arentsc, tailor, propose 
to sell at public sale, to the highest bidder, a certain house and lot standing 
and lying at Manathans, behind the fort at New Amsterdam, joining on 
the east side Henderick de Backer, and on the west side Annetge Bogardus, 
all according to the patent thereof, upon the following conditions, to wit : 
that the buyer shall make the payment in two installments ; the first, being 
the half, shall be paid punctually within one month ; and the second install- 
ment, being the other half, shall be paid six weeks thereafter, also punctually. 
Which payment shall be made in good whole beavers ; provided that the 
auction fees shall be a charge upon the buyer alone. The buyer shall be 
holden, immediately after the sale, to furnish sufiicient security to the 
content of the seller, with the understanding, that in case no sufiicient 
sureties are furnished, the property is to be off"ered for sale again at the 
cost and charge of the buyer. Further, the seller puts ail things on the 
footing of making no rebate or restitution on any occasion whatsoever. 

Hist. Col. Hi 26 



The mark ^'-J — set by WiLLEM Frederickse, 
with his own hand. 



c4 



202 Albany County Records. 

The buyer was William Frederickse [Bout] on the aforewritten condi- 
tions for the sum of six hundred and twelve guilders, this 3d of Septem- 
ber, 1654. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 
We, the undersigned, offer ourselves as sureties and principals for Wil- 
lem Frederickse, according to law. 

The mark -\- set hy Dirrick Bentdinck's own hand. 
The mark o/^ * * * 

Jacob Janse Van Noorstrant desires at public sale to sell his house 
standing in Beverwyck adjoining to the west Henderick Gerritse [Van 
Wie], and to the east the alms house, together with the lot thereto 
belonging, besides a garden lying behind Fort Orange, number 19, adjoin- 
ing to the south Dominie Schaets, and to the east Gysbert Cornelise 
[Van Wesp], or those who may lay claim thereto, to the west and north 
a road, length six rods and a half, breadth four rods and a half, all ac- 
cording to patent thereof, upon the following conditions, to wit, that 
the payment for the house, lot and garden shall be made in two install- 
ments ; the first, being the half, punctually within the time of one month ; 
and the second and last on the first of May next coming, which 
payments shall be made in whole and good beavers. The auction fees 
shall [be] a charge to the buyer alone; provided that the crops now stand- 
ing on the aforesaid garden shall this year belong to the seller alone. 
Further, the seller puts everything on the footing of making no rebate 
or restitution on any occasion whatsoever. In this sale the mill and 
brewer's tools at present in the aforesaid house are not included. Pro- 
vided that the buyer shall be holden to furnish sufficient security to the 
content of the seller, and if he cannot, then the lot shall be sold again at 
his expense. The buyer was Rutger Jacobsen, on the aforesaid condi- 
tions, for the sum of eight hundred and thirty guilders, this 3d of Sep- 
tember,- 1654. 

E.UTGER Jacobsen. 

We constitute ourselves sureties for the above standing person and 
purchase money, all according to law, this 3d of September, 1654. 
Jan Verbeeck. 
The mark [H] set by Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick], 

with his own hand. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

On this the fourth day of September, 1654, in the morning, appeared 
before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable Symon Volckertse 
Backer [Veedei'], dwelling in Beverwyck, and acknowledged that he had 
sold to Albert Gerritse, carpenter, a certain lot, lying at Manathaus, next 
to Adrian Vincent, breadth, on the west side, three rods and one foot; 
length, on the south side, five rods and six and a half feet; and on the 



Albany County Records. 203 

north side, five rods; all according to the patent; he, Synion, also 
acknowledging, that he has received the sum of thirty beavers therefor, 
being the full sum which he was promised for the aforesaid lot ; he, 
Symon Volckertse, herewith giving a perfect conveyance of the aforesaid 
lot, without his having any action, right or claim thereon any more for- 
ever, but putting the aforesaid Albert Gerritse, carpenter, in respect to 
that, in his place, with all such rights as he, the seller and grantor, 
therein has had, being as aforesaid fully paid therefor. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of which he has signed this paper 
with his own hand in Fort Orange, on the date aforesaid, in the presence 
of Thomas Sanders and Jan Van Aecken, smiths, as witnesses hereto 
called, who have also subscribed this with the grantor. 

The mark set by Symon + Volkertse, with his own hand. 
Aelbert Gerritse. 

As icitnesses, 

The mark set % X T Thomas Sanders with his own hand. 
The mark of Jan -j- Van Aecken with his own hand set. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



On this fourth day of September, in the year of our Lord, 1654, in the 
morning, appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable 
Thomas Sandersen, smith, and declared that he had sold to Jan Van 
Aecken, his certain house and lot, standing and lying in the village of 
Beverwyck, adjoining to the north, Carsten and Myndert Frederickse, 
and to the south, east and west, a road together with a garden, lying 
behind Fort Orange, alotment number 22; breadth four rods and a half; 
length seven and a half rods, with the appendances and dependences of 
the same, and he, Thomas Sanderse, acknowledges that he is fully paid 
and satisfied therefor, the first penny with the last, giving therefore a per- 
fect release for the same forever ; he, Thomas Sanderse, having no more 
right, claim or pretension to the aforesaid house, lot and garden, and put- 
ting the aforesaid Jan Van Aecken, in this respect, in his place, just as 
he, Thomas Sanderse, has stood therein. 

In acknowledgment of the truth whereof, he has signed this with his 
own hand in Fort Orange, on the date aforesaid, without craft or guile, in 
the presence of Mr. Joannes Van Twiller, and Albert Gerritse, carpenter, 
as witnesses thereto called, who acknowledged that they had also signed 
this with the grantor. 

The mark set X T by Thomas Sanderse with his own hand. 
The mark of Jan Van Aecken -f- with his own hand signed. 

As witnesses: 

J. V. Twiller. 

Albert Gerritsen. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



204 Albany County Records. 

On this the fourth day of September in the year of our Lord 1654, ia 
the morning, appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable 
Albert Gerritse, carpenter, and declared that he was paid and fully satis- 
fied for a five and forty foot lot (to wit, wood feet) in breadth on the road, 
running back to the * * besides the house standing thereon, joining to 
the south, Carsten and Myndert Frederickse, and to the north the seller, 
for which house and lot, as they lie and stand, he, Albert Gerritse, acknow- 
ledges that he is fully paid and satisfied, the first penny with the last, 
giving a perfect release therefor, forever, without his making any claim, 
demand or pretension to the same, putting the aforesaid Jan Van Aecken, 
in this respect in his place and in such ownership as he the seller and 
grantor has had therein, and promising the buyer, to free and defend the 
same for a year and a day. 

In acknowledgment of the truth, without craft or guile, this is signed 
by the grantor's own hand, in presence of the honorable Jan Verbeeck 
and Mr. Joannes Van Twiller as witnesses for that purpose called, who 
also have signed this with the grantor. 

Albert Gerritsen. 



The mark set by Jan 
with his 



k 



Van Aecken. 
own hand. 



-4s tvitncsses, 
Jan Verheeck. 
J. V. Twiller. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

On this fifth day of September, in the year of our Lord 1654, appeared 
before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable William Janse StoU 
[alias Hap], and declared that to his satisfaction he had received from 
the hands of Arent Van Den Bergh, the sum of five hundred and fifty 
guilders, being half of the payment for the house, lot and garden standing 
in the fort and behind the same, of said Stoll, sold on the 8th of August 
last, at public sale, at the house of Hendrick Jochemse, for the sum of 
eleven hundred guilders, being the house adjoining to the east Hendrick 
Driessen,! and to the south Jacob Janse Stoll, and the garden adjoining 
to the south Mr. Abraham Staats's garden, and to the south Hendrick 
Driessen, all according to the conditions of sale; he, Willem Janse Stoll, 
therefore, giving a complete release to the buyer aforesaid for the afore- 
named house, lot and garden, and promising on the payment of the last 
half, punctually in the month of May next, to deUver to the buyer a con- 
veyance of the aforesaid house, lot and garden as is proper, under pledge 
of his person and estates, personal and real, present and future, submitting 
himself to the force of all laws and judges, witnessing this with his own 
hand; signed in Fort Orange, at the date aforesaid, in presence of Jacob 



1 Hendrik Dries or Driessen came to Beverwyck in 1642, with Ms sister Gertrude Dries Van 
Driesbergen.— 0' Callaghan's History of New NetUrland^ i, 440. 



Albany County Records. 205 

Hendrickse Maat and Lammert Van Valkenbergb, as witnesses for that 
purpose called. 

WiLLEM Janse Stall. 
The mark set by X Arent Van den Bergh. 
As witnesses, 

The marh set hy -\- Lemmert Van den Bergh. 
Jacob Heyndrickse Maat. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



On this fifth day of September, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, etc., Willem Albertse Van Munichendam and declared that he 
had appointed, as by these presents he does appoint, etc., the honorable 
Claes Bendingh departing for Manathans, in his, the subscriber's, 
name, and for his sake, to demand collect and receive, Jirstli/, all 
those thirty guilders and thirteen stuivers coming to the subscriber, 
from [Nicolaas ?] Terhaer to be paid in seewant, for which the 
aforesaid Terhaer had been arrested here, and also those thirty-six 
guilders, which are coming to him, the subscriber, aforesaid, from 
Jan Van Leyden, dwelling in Mespachs kil, for boards, in lieu of which 
goats were to be delivered, which he has slaughtered for himself and 
has received the money, which money Claes Bendingh shall endeavor to 
collect, in case of refusal by law, and to act for the subscriber as if he 
were present in his own person, also acquittance for receipts to give, all 
without craft or guile ; these with his own hand signed in Fort Orange, 
of date aforesaid, in presence of Sebastian DeWinter, and Arent Van 
den Bergh as witness hereto called. 

William Albertse. 

As loifness, 

Basteiaen de Winter.^ 

The mark set hy Arent -f- Van Bergh with his own hands. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



1 Bastiaeu De Winter was a native of Middleburgh, Holland. In 1666, he was an inliabitaut of 
Schenectady, bnt being about to depart for Holland, made Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen his 
attorney. In 1670, he sold his house lot in Schenectady together with his bouwery upon the 
G-roote Vlachte to Jan Labatie, Elias Van Guysliug, and Joris Aertse Van Der Baast. The tra- 
dition in the Van Guysling family was, that he was sick of consumption and sold with the 
intention of returning to Holland, but died before doing so. In 1678, the Dutch church of Al- 
bany claimed and probably obtained his property for the use of the poor ; from which it may be 
inferred that he left no heirs in this country.— English Maimscri2)ts, 169, 189 ; Notarial papers ; 
Deeds, n, 618, 788-9. "^ 



206 Albany County Records. 

5th September, 1654. 
Gerrit Teunisen (?) desires to sell to the highest bidder the under- 
written goods, on the following conditions, to wit : The bidder and 
buyer shall be holden to make payment within twenty-four hours with- 
out delay. The bidder shall be held to furnish sufficient sureties to the 
content of the seller. The payment shall be made in good whole or half 
beavers. 

12 earthen plates, Dolle Griet, / 4.15 

2 platters and 6 plates, Mr. Adrian, / 4.05 

5 pairs of pillows, Mr. Jacob Barbier, / 12.00 

A candlestick and * * , John Thomase, / 6.15 

6 pairs of pillows, Dolle Gryet, / 26.5 

1 scale and weights, Goosen Gerritse, f 9 

A parcel of *, Cornelis Vastterrick, / 

A gun, sword and belt ; Goosen Gerritse, /" 26.00 

7 pictures, Jan Van Aecken, / 9.00 

1 Bible, Cornelis Teunise, / 14.00 

5 bands, Dan. Rinckhout, / 2,15 

1 traveling coat, Barent [Pieterse Coeymans] the miller, / 21.00 

1 book on health, Mr. Jacob Barbier. / 8.00 

2 shirts and carpenter's work bench, / 5.15 

1 gun, Daniel Rinckhout, / 19.10 

4 porringers, Cornelis Theunisse, /' 3.10 

some knives, Volkert Janse [Douw], / 20.10 

1 cloak * in beavers, '. / 58.00 

6 pewter plates, and a porringer, Juraien Teunisse [Tappen]... / 10.00 

10 earthen plates, Barent [Coeymans] DeMolenaer, / 3.10 

4 dishes, * * * planck, / 4.00 

1 gun, Barent DeMolenaer, / 17.00 

6 earthen plates, Mickial De Liemaker, / 2.10 

6 pair of pillows, Barent De Molenaer, / 18.10 

2 scales and weights, William Bout, f 12.15 

6 weights, Jochem [Wesselse] Becker, / 7.00 

1 pair pillows and bible, Andreyes Herpertsen, / 12.00 

a carpenter's work bench, and two * * / 13,00 

1 book, Festus Jomnius (?) Philip Pieterse Schuyler, / 6.00 

1 bat and balls, Pieter Hartgens, * * * / 6.00 

a parcel of tobacco, Volckert Janse [Douw], / 10.00 

a parcel of snuffers, (?) (^zmit/ters), Dolle Griet, f 2.70 

3 books, Philip Pieterse, / 16.00 

2 schahi-otten, Bom'mie Schaets, / 6.00 

1 tongs, shovel and chain, Claes Bordingh,i / 9.00 

1 book, Andryes Herpertsen, / 5.00 

1 saw bench, pail, and other traps, Carsten Frederickse,- / 55.00 

2 books, Cornelis Steenwyck,-^ / 3.00 

1 In 1648, and subsequently, Claes Bording seems to have been a trader, making New Amsterdam 
his headquarters, but trading to South river, and Fort Orange. In 1648 and 1653, he was accused 
of dealing in contraband articles and smuggling.— IhitcJi Manuscnpts, m, 24, 55 ; iv, 393 ; v, 196. 

2 Carsten Frederickse, brother of Myndert Frederickse both smiths ; had a shop and house on 
north comer of Beaver and South Pearl streets. 

3 Cornells Steenwyck, a merchant of New Amsterdam. 



Albany County Records. 207 

1 book, Jurian Theunisse \jjlasemaeker'], ../ 4.80 

1 trunk (roffer); Harmen i)e Metselaer, / 3.50 

a pair of shears and slippers irnuyleii) and a pair of pillows 

(kuissen) and a powder box (cruydtdoos), Barent, the miller,/ 6.15 

1 chair and two cushions, Andryes Herpertse, / 8.40 

/ 386.90 

On the 9th day of August, in the year of our Lord 1654, appeared 
before me Joannes Dyckman, etc., the honorable Symen Symonse Groot 
and declared that he had appointed and empowered, as by these presents 
he does appoint, etc., Mr. Isaack De Foreest, his brother-in-law, livingin the 
Manathans, to sell, transfer and assign, as his judgment approves, a certain 
settlement, amounting to the sum 684 guilders earned in the service of 
the West India company, and put into thehands of saidDe Foreest^ for safe 
keeping, and also to act in the matter to the best of his, the attorney's, judg- 
ment, all true and without craft or guile, signed with his own \_Grooi's] 
hand at the date aforesaid, in the presence of Sebastian De Winter, and 
Mr. Joannes Megapolensis, * * * as witnesses hereto 

called who have also signed this with the principal. 

Symen Symense Groot.'^ 
As witnesses, 

Basteiaen De Winter. 
Mr. Jan Megapolensis.^ 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. • 



De Vryes '* complains of Seeger Cornelis [Van Voorhoudt], and Har- 
men Herpertse (?), for ringing bells at his door and before his house, and 
complains of their blowing horns (^getoeten') at him, in presence of Jilles 
Pieterse and the neighbors about there. 

On this tenth day of September, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, etc., Rutger Jacopse, Cornelis Theunis Van Westbrock, and 
Goosen Gerritse [Van Sehaick] burghers and citizens of the village of 
Beverwyck, and declared that they had together shipped on board the 
sloop of Cornelis Vos, Skipper Reynicks, two boxes of beavers containing 
seven hundred pieces to be again resliipped on the ships which are now 
about to depart for Holland ; and if they be not present, to give by these 
presents, full power and authority to Gerrit Janse Van Swoll, at Mana- 

1 Isaac De Foreest was son of Hendrik De Foreest, who died in New Amsterdam, about 1638. 
He was from Leyden, and married Sarah Dn Trueux, in New Amsterdam, 9 June, 1641. In 
1647 he received a patent for 50 morgens of land on Manhattan island. In 1656 he was weigh- 
master; died about 1695.— ValenH?ie's Manual, 1861, and Didch Manuscripts. 

2 Symen Groot, boatswain of the Prince Maurice, purchased a house of Jacob Roy, in New 
Amsterdam, in 1645 ; subsequently he came to Beverwyck {Deeds i, :343), and from thence to 
Schenectady. At the burning of that village by the French and Indians, in 1690, his five sons, 
Symon, Abraham, Philip, Dirk, and Claes, were carried away captives to Canada ; one son, 
Cornelis, escaped capture. 

3 Jan Megapolensis, son of Domine Megapolensis first minister of Beverwyck, was a chirurgeon ; 
removed to New Amsterdam, 1655 ; and thence to Holland, 1056.— 0' Callaghan''s Neiv Netherland 
Register. 

* Adrian Janse De Vries. 



208 Albany County Records. 

thans, to receive said boxes, and to do with them according to his best 
judgment, or as if the subscribers were present in their own persons. 
Signed with their own hands in acknowledgment of the truth of this, in 
Fort Orange, at the date aforesaid, in the presence of Jochem [Wesselse] 
Becker and Mr. Joannes Megapolensis, chirurgeon, as witnesses hereto 
called. 

RUTGER JaCOBSE. 
CORNELIS ThONISSEN. 

The mark set |-| by Goosen Gerritse, with his own hand. 
As vntnesses, 

Jochem Backer. 
Mr. Joannes Megapolensis. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



Credentials /or custom officer Dyckman and Peter Hcrt<jerts, dated at 
Manathans. 

Worshipful, valiant, and most noble lord and right honorable gentlemen, 

Heer General [Stuyvesant] and right honorable gentlemen [of the 

council]. 

The excellent letter of the right honorable, Heer general, of date the 
29th of June last, was duly received by us, wherein he was pleased to 
write to us, that we, according to our request formerly made in writing, 
and by word of mouth to your honors, on or before the arrival of the 
ships from pai!rm, dispatch two from our bench [of magistrates] to hold 
a closer consultation with your honors. Therefore not being able to 
omit the performance of your honors' gracious directions, we have chosen 
and sent to your honors from this court, the honorable, the custom officer, 
Joannes Dyckman and Peter Hertgerts, to present such matters as we ' 
have committed unto them ; and our desire is that your honors will please 
to receive and recognize them as our deputies, favorably to listen, and 
speedily to come to such resolutions as we trust their honors' wise discre- 
tion and judgment may approve ; we commit and commend your honors 
to God's gracious protection. 

Worshipful, valiant and most noble lord and right honorable gentle- 
men. Your honors humble and faithful servants of the court of Fort 
Orange and Beverwyck. 

Fort Orange, 11 Sept., 1654. 

Instructions for the commission to the Manhatans, in accordance with 
the purport of the right honorable, the Heer general's missive of date the 
29th of June, last, to the custom officer Joannes Dyckman and Pieter Hert- 
gerts, deputed from the honorable court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, 
according to which they are to regulate themselves. First. — That they 
shall with all reverence solicit of the right honorable, the director 
general and council of the province, their honor's resolutions and answer 
to the propositions as well oral as written, heretofore made by the honor- 
able court aforesaid, for their government. That the said committee 
shall also petition for the speedy completion of the new company's (?) 
house at the company's expense, also that on account of the scarcity of 



Albany County Records. 209 

money, the small income from the excise be adjudged to remain for the 
public service; that some soldiers may be sent up as well to keep watch 
in the fort as against the savages, whose insolence the good people suffer 
daily, moreover they are to ask that two stuivers be levied on every beaver 
sent down for the payment of the salaries of the commissaries of this court 
and of the custom officer. * * They are also to petition for a 

quantity of gunpowder for the use of the fort, of which this court and the 
magistrates shall have the care, provided that on request made a proper, 
though not specific, account be rendered of the same, * ^ * * * 
also for places where new lots may be given out, because there are daily 
calls for lots, and there are no more. * * * * 

12 September, 1654. 

That the court messenger, Pieter Ryverdingh, shall be paid a reason- 
able and proper salary. Their honors of the court here, finding that 
notwithstanding the good and well mannered order heretofore posted 
respecting the burghers and tapsters obtaining a proper permit from the 
farmer of the excises before storing their wines and beer, said good order 
is neglected; therefore, the better to prevent all smuggling in the future. 
All burghers dwelling in this jurisdiction are ordered to store no wines, 
beer or distilled waters, or permit them to be kept in places where they 
are commonly drank, under a penalty of fifty guilders, etc. *=*=** 

Thus ordered by the court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, this 12th 
of September, 1654. 

On this the seventeenth day of October, 1654, in the morning, about 
nine o'clock, appeared before me Joannes Dyckman, in the service of, etc., 
the honorable Jan Thomase [Mingael] magistrate (commissar is ordinaris) 
of the honorable court here, and Reyntyen Pieterse Baroquier, and 
together declared, as by these presents they do declare, by request of 
Adrien Claes Vryman, that they in the evening of Wednesday night last, 
were at the house of Abraham Pieterse Vosburgh, and among others, 
there were found in the aforesaid person's house, Jacob Symonsen Clomp 
Baroquier and the aforesaid Adriaen Claesse was sent out by Jacob Clomp 
aforesaid to fetch a canoe, lying on the other side of the river, which he 
Adriaen Claesse did ; returning with the canoe and falling into the water, 
he, Adriaen Claesse came again to the house of Abraham Pieterse Vos- 
burgh and took his knife in his hand to cut loose the lace of one of his 
shoes ; laying down the knife by his side, and having some words with 
Jacob Clomp respecting the wages of said Arian Claase, Jacob Clomp 
springing up with the knife in his hand, cut diverse gashes in said 
Arian Claese's face and arm, without these deponents observing that 
Arian Claese opposed himself to, or fought against said Jacob Clomp ; 
the deponents ending this their declaration and being asked to strengthen 
the same by oath, with their own hands subscribed the same, in Fort 
Orange, on the date aforesaid. 

Jan Thomase. 
The mark set by + Reyntyen Pieters, with his own hand. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

On this one and twentieth day of October, 1654, I, Jochem Becker, 
burgher in Beverwyck, offer myself, by these presents, as surety and 
mst. Col. Hi. 27 



210 Albany County Recmxls. 

principal for the person of Jacob Symonse Clomp Baroquier, for one 
hundred and seven guilders, which Jacob surnamed Clomp, must pay to 
the officer within the time of six weeks, according to the tenor of the 
contract made between the mutual arbitrators in the matter, and in case 
he, Jacob Clomp, fails within said time to pay said sum to said officer, I 
will immediately take his place and pay the same as my own debt, and 
pledge my person and estate, personal and real, present and future, 
nothing excepted, without craft or guile. 

Signed with my own hand in Fort Orange, of the date aforesaid. 

JOCHEM WeSSELSE. 

On this 21st day of October, 1654, appeared before me Joannes Dyck- 
man in the sei-vice of, etc., the honorable Frans Barentse Pastoor, 
magistrate of the honorable court here, and declared that he had appointed 
and empowered by these presents, the honorable Pieter Cornelise, dwell- 
ing on the Long island at Breuckelen, in his name and for his sake, to 
demand, collect and receive all those six and seventy guilders and four- 
teen stuivers, for which Lodewyck Cornelise, dwelling at Manathans, 
according to an obligation, of date 28th of August, 1651, of said Lodewyck 
Cornelisse, to the subscriber is indebted, as well for money lent, as for 
duffels' delivered, and in case of refusal and longer delay, the same to 
sue at law, and proceed according to the forms thereof, also to act as may 
be needful ; and further to do all things therein, as if the subscriber in his 
own person were present, yea, as though special charge were herein given. 

Signed with his own hand in acknowledgment of this, at Fort Orange, 
of date aforesaid, in presence of the honorable Jan Verbeek and Jan 
Thomase, commissaries of the honorable court here, as witnesses hereto 
called, and who have subscribed the same also with the principal. 

Frans Barentse Pastoor. 

As witnesses, 
Jan Verbeeck, 
Jan Thomase, 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

We, the undersigned, Jacob Henderickse Maet and Eldert Gerbertsen, 
acknowledge by these our signatures, that we have offered ourselves as 
sureties and principals for Cors Boutsen (?) * * and are ready to 
deliver up again the person of said Cors Boutsen, or of ourselves to make 
compensation as for our own indebtedness, all under pledge of our persons 
and estates, real and personal, present and future, according to law. 

In acknowledgment of the truth, this is subscribed with our own hands in 
Fort Orange this 21st of October, 1654. 

Jacob Heyndrickse Maet. 
Elbert Gerbertse Cruip. 

In manner following the honorable Govert Loockermans, merchant at 
Manhatans and Eldert Gerbertsen, sawyer, covenant and agree with each 
other, to wit, that Eldert Gerbertsen shall be holden to send all that he 
shall saw, to Govert Loockermans aforesaid (except he sells both mills) to 
be sold by the same at Manhatans, for the profit of Eldert Gerbertse, as 

1 Duffels was a kind of coarse woolen cloth having a thick nap or frieze. 



Albany County Records. 211 

best he can, wliicli contract shall begin on the morning of Monday the 
twenty-fifth of this month, and continue first one year, but in case, after 
that, they can come to an agreement, it shall continue from year to year; and 
for pains Govert Loockermans shall receive for selling and collecting, five 
per cent {vyfften liondert), over and above all expense. 

In acknowledgment of the truth, this is subscribed by our own hands 
in presence of Mons. Joannes Van Twiller and Henderick Janse, as wit- 
nesses hereto called, who have signed this minute with the principals in 
Fort Orange, this 24th of October, 1654. 

Govert Loockermans. 
As witnesses, Elbert Gerbertse Cruip. 

J. V. Twiller. 
Hend. J. Va7id^ Vin. 
Which I attest, 

Jannes Dyckman. 

Worshipful, valiant, and most noble Heer General [Stuyvesant] : 

The custom officer Dyckman has advised us that he has made known 
to your honor, that we, for a short period, to wit, until the first of May 
next, had publicly farmed out the tapsters' beer and wine excise, for the 
sum of thirteen hundred guilders; now, so it is, that the aforesaid officer 
being at Catskil, the Heer Rensselaer directed some wine to be delivered 
to those who hve in the colony, without even directing a warrant from 
the impost master to be fetched, also without directing any impost to be 
paid ; once and again, yea, the third time this was permitted; for though 
we had a general order, yet there is no special command that if wine and 
strong beer are carried from here, out of this jurisdiction into the colony, 
the excise should be paid, as well as by those who dwell within it ; * * 
Our petition, therefore, is that your honor would please, at the first 
opportunity, to grant us a special order, that henceforth, for wine and 
beer carried out of this jurisdiction, the customs officer issue his permit (r*) 
and seek to prevent evasions of payment. We shall await your honor's 
speedy order, lest the Heer Rensselaer, or some one else, may carry some 
wine or strong beer into the colony before a proper permit from the 
customs officer be obtained. 

Mons. Johannes Van Twiller has represented to us, that he had spoken 
to your honor for permission to make a gangway {iiytgawj') and a cellar 
door (Icelder deiir) ; we refer the matter to your honor ; we think, however, 
that it could be better and more properly done within the fort, still we 
await the answer which your honor shall please to send. We petition, if 
it please your honor, to send an answer and written order to the propositions 
written by the customs officer, and according to our direction delivered to 
your honor, that we may know how to regulate ourselves. We shall ever 
remain your honor's true and humble servants, of the court of Fort 
Orange and Beverwyck. 

Fort Orange, this 4th of November, 1654. 

[The next paper is a conveyance, dated 4 November, 1654, of a house 
and lot in Fort Orange, from Jan Labatie to Adrian Janse [Appcl] Van 
Leyden, erased and not executed.] 

The following paper is used in its place. 



212 Albany County Records. 

On this the eleventh day of November, 1654, iu the forenoon, appeared 
before me Joannes Dyekman, in the service of, etc., the honorable Jan 
Labatie, and declared that he had sold, as by these presents he does sell 
to Adriaen Janse [Appel] Van Leyden, his certain house, standing in 
Fort Orange, adjoining to the south angle (j^imt) of said fort, and to the 
north the north gate of the same, with a garden and hogpen therein 
standing, lying to the south of said fort, adjoining to the west Lambert 
Van Valckenborgh, and on the south side Pietev Jacobse [Borsboom?], 
to the north a road, and to the east the honorable company's garden; the 
aforesaid house as it stands, and the said garden and hogpen, to be deli- 
vered free, according to the patent thereof; for which the buyer, Adrian 
Janse Van Leyden, must pay for said house, lot, garden, hogpen and 
appurtenances of the same, the sum of eighteen hundred and twenty-five 
guilders, to the Rev. Dominie Gideon Sehaets and the honorable Jan 
Verbeeck, as attorneys for Mr. Paulus Schrick, in three installments; the 
first payment, being six hundred guilders, shall be paid on the first of 
May, 1G55, in beavers; the second payment, on the first of May, 1656, 
being also six hundred guilders in beavers; and the third and last 
payment shall be paid on the first of May, 1657, being six hundred and 
twenty-five guilders, in good current seewant; provided that the buyer 
shall remain in the occupancy thereof until May and during the time of 
said occupancy and lease, shall pay nothing to tlio seller; for the full 
payment he shall furnish as sureties Mr. Anthony De Hooges and Pieter 
Ryverdingh, who, with their signatures, bind themselves, that in case the 
buyer aforesaid fail of payment on the set time or times, they will at once 
step into his place, and themselves the purchase money assume to pay for 
the buyer, under a pledge of their persons and estates, personal and real, 
and moreover submitting the same to the force of all laws and judges. 

In acknowledgment of the same, said sureties have subscribed these pre- 
sents with their own hands, with the consent of the attorneys of Mr. Paulus 
Schrick aforesaid ; and the seller shall be obligated to warrant and defend 
said house, lot, garden and hogpen for a year and a day only, and in like 
manner is bound and indebted; all in good faith and without craft and 
guile. 

Signed by the buyer, seller, attorneys and sureties in Fort Orange, on 
the date aforesaid. 

Jan Labatie. 

Arian Janse V. Leyden. i 

As attorneys of Paulus Schrick, 

Gideon Schaefs, Pastor in Renselaerswi/ck. 
Jan Verbeeck. 

As sureties, 

Antonius De Hooges. 
Pieter Ryverding. 

Which I witness, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

1 Adriaen Janse Appel, or Van Leyden, was an innkeeper in Beverwyck for some years, bnt 
subsequently removed to New Amsterdam, and petitioned for the freedom of the village, in 
1662.— Dutch Manuscrixits, x, 247. 

In 1654, he received a patent for a lot at Beverwyck, on condition, that the bouse to be 
erected thereon, be not an ordinary tippling house, but an inn for travelers.— Patents HH -, 43. 
28th June, 1685, Adriaen Janse Appel, " wedawnaar van Maria Reyverding, en FolMe Pieterse, 
weduwe van Pieter Meese Vrooman," were married in Albany. 



Albany County Records. 213 

The attorneys hereby annul the aforesaid sale and the sureties of the 
same are discharged ; in witness whereof this is subscribed by the attor- 
nies in Fort Orange, this 23d of April, 1655. 

Gideon Schaet, Pastor in Kensselaerswyck. 
Jan Verbeeck. 

Worshipful, valiant and most noble, Heer General : 

Our honorable fellow member, Pieter Hertgerts, having come up, has 
informed us that the papers and resolutions were delivered to your honor, 
and by word of mouth and by writings has shown the resolutions you 
directed to be sent up. In all kindness we petition that your honor will 
please to send up speedily, the sooner the better, advice for the regulat- 
ing of our affairs. How desolate is our condition from the late high water, 
* * * * will report to your honor by word of mouth ; 
nevertheless we cannot refrain from writing that the four angles of the 
fort, by the late flood, are almost destroyed or carried away, besides the 
honorable company's garden, where scarcely a * remains, especially 
those residing on the third {^Fosseii] kil. * * * * WTg 
petition that your honor will please afford us the means for rebuilding the 
fort, * * * expecting which speedily, we commit your 
honor and family to God's defense and protection, and remain your honors' 
humble and faithful servants of the court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck. 

Nov., 1654. 

On this 16th day of November 1654, appeared before me Johannes 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the honorable Claes Hendrickse Van 
Utrecht [Van Schoonhoven ? ], and declared that he had sold to Hen- 
drick Andriesse Van Doesburgh, his certain house standing in Mana- 
thans and the lot thereto belonging, lying on the broad or public way, as 
he the aforesaid Claes Hendrickse bought the same from Jan Peek^ 
citizen of Manathans, which aforesaid house adjoins on the north on 
Evert Pels, and on the south Jan De Metselaer. * * * 

[The above conveyance is imperfect and unexecuted.] 

On this 20th day of November, 1654, appeared before me Johannes 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the Honorable Abraham Staets, and de- 
clared that he had hired Barent Gerritse, which Barent Gerritse himself 
acknowledges ; to serve for the time of a whole year (rontjaer) commenc- 
ing on the 7th of October last, and continuing until the 7th of Octo- 
ber next, on the conditions that he, Barent Gerritse, on his honor's 
land, or wherever he shall have need of him, shall do all the farm labor, 
during the aforesaid time, upon his houwery, except the sowing of that 
portion which is not sown ; for which service he, Barent Gerritse, shall 
receive within the year aforesaid, three hundred and thirty guilders ; two 
hundred in beavers and the rest in current seewant ; Barent Gerritse has 
also stipulated for free washing, two pairs of stockings, and a pair of 
shoes ; upon which conditions the honorable Abraham Staets aforesaid 
has paid one beaver as earnest money (jjoots penninck) , and for the per- 

1 Jan Peek was an innkeeper in New Amsterdam. He also owned a honse in Be verwj'Ck, which 
he oflfcred for sale in 1655 (p. 94). He is said to have been the discoverer and tirst settler of 
Peekskil. By his wife, Maria Volchers, he had four chUdren. His son Jacobus settled in Schenec- 
tady, and from him have sprung those of this name in that vicinity. 



214 Albany County Records. 

formance of this contract, they pledge their respective persons and estates, 
personal and real, present and future, and in acknowledgment of 
the truth, with their own hands subscribe the same, in presence of Adrian 
Janse [Appel] Van Leyden and Gillis Douwesse Fonda, as witnesses 
hereto called and invited who, with the officer aforesaid, and the princi- 
pals, have also subscribed the same, on the date aforesaid, in Fort Orange. 
Abram Staes. 
This is the mark set X by Barent Gerritse, with his own hand. 
As witnesses, 

Adrian Janse V. Leyden. 
Jelles Vonda.^ 
Which I attest. 

Johannes Dyckman. 

On this 27th day of November, 1654, appeared before me Joanties 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the honorable Andryes Herpertsen, and 
declared that he had contracted and agreed as follows, that Claes Hen- 
drickse Timmerman and Claes Janse Van Rotterdam shall for him, 
Andryes Herpertsen, make, frame and set up, a house in Beverwyck, upon 
a lot to be pointed out as great in length and breadth and as good 
and bad (^goet en qtiaet), as the house by him at present occupied, for 
which, the contractors shall furnish all the materials, in all respects like 
those in his, the subscriber's house in Beverwyck built by Dicke Van 
Houten (?), both without and within, nothing excepted ; provided also 
that said house shall be framed and set up by the first of May next; for 
which, when done the contractors shall receive, and the subscriber 
Andryes Herpertsen, shall pay the sum of 1800 guilders in whole beavers. 

In acknowledgment of the truth of which, the parties have subscribed 
this with their own hands, in presence of Rutger Jacopsen and Hen- 
drick Jochemse, as witnesses hereto called, who also have subscribed this 
agreement with the contractors. 

Andries Herberts. 
Claes Hendrycksen. 

As witnesses, Claes Jacobse. 

Riitger Jacobse. 
Hendrick Jochemse. 

By these presents Evert Brantse, the soldier, and Jan Labatie agree 
with each other that the former shall be holden to labor as a farmer for 
a whole year, commencing from this date, for which service, within the 
year, he shall receive the sum of three hundred guilders, and moreover 
Jan Labatie, inasmuch as the customs officer has need of him, agrees 
that he shall remain three days with said officer. 
Fort Orange the 29th of Nov., 1654. 
Jan Labatie. 
The mark set by Evert Brantse -)- Van Amersfoort. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



1 Jillis Donwesse Fonda had one sou, Douwe. In 1656, a suit was brought against his wife for 
removing Le^vis Cobussen's wife's petticoat itom the fence ; defendant says plaintiff pawned the 
article for beaver : put over.— Butch Manuscnpts, xvi," 14, 15. 



AXbany County Records. 215 

On this the first day of December, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the honorable Roelofi" Jacopse, as hus- 
band and guardian of Gretie Jacopse, whom the subscriber declared to 
have received a letter from Holland, from Glysbert Evertse, guardian, 
which [announces] to the subscriber, that his wife or he for her is * 
* * at Bunschoten under Ryck Aelten dwelling there, promising 
that the money shall be paid * * * to Mr. Lambert Wil- 
lemse Munick and Pieter Munick, citizens and advocates, the subscribers 
people, who are bound for the interest * * [illegible] * 
* in presence of Mons. Robert Vastrick and Pieter Janse as wit- 
nesses hereto called and invited, who, with the principals, have signed this. 
The mark -f- set by Grietgen Jacobse, with her own hand. 

ROELOFF JacOBSEN. 
As loitnesses, 
P. Vastrick. 
Pieter Jansen. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Kit Davits : 

What his honor, the Heer general [Stuyvesant], has written to you, will 
be seen in the following copy : " You are to permit the Heer De Hulter 
and his, to enjoy free possession of land purchased, and other things, and 
not incite the savages against him or his, nor let harm come to his pro- 
perty, nor do him the least injury; if you do so, we shall proceed against 
you according to law. Let this serve as a final warning to you, according 
to which to regulate yourself, that the aforesaid Heer [De Hulter] may 
enjoy free possession ; and in case you act to the contrary, we shall at 
once proceed against you according to law.'^ 

The court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck. 

Fort Orange, 3 December, 1654. 

On this the 21st day of December, 1654, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the honorable Rutger Jacopson, bui-gher 
and citizen of Beverwyck, and declared that he had agreed and contracted 
with Dirrick Bensinck, to frame and make a house one board in length ; 
to set up and build it behind the house of the said Dirrick Bensinck, now 
standing and built in Beverwyck, according to the requirements of the 
work upon * * to be completed by Dirrick Bensinck at his 
own expense : further the contractor shall be holden to construct the 
house with a * * pantry ; also three girders, brackets, a garret, floor, 
door and window tight, all at his own cost; also the contractor shall make 
therein a door case ; for which he shall receive five hundred and twelve 
guilders, to be paid in installments as follows, the first immediately, the 
second in the month of June, and the last * * * all honest and in 
good faith ; in Beverwyck in presence of Cornells Theunisse Van * * 
and Jan * * as witnesses hereto invited. 

Rutger Jacobsen. 
This is the mark set by X Bensinck. 
Hendrick Jochemse (?). 
Cornells Thonissen, as loitness. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 



216 AJhany County Recorch. 

Their honors of the court here having been informed that one Maats,' 
at the public inns, has been gambling for great sums of money, so is it 
that their honors hereby give notice that such * * playing is 
forbidden, * * the officer being requested against such lavish 
squanderings of such notable sums of money to proceed according to law ; 
further, in such cases their honors will no longer execute judgment for 
such winnings and losses * * but the officer shall be requested 
to proceed against, and impose the penalty upon, all such unlawful players 
which are hereby expressly prohibited, that the evil consequences which 
may arise therefrom * * * * 

This done in Fort Orange, this 22d of December, 1G54. Present in 
Registro. 

[The greater part of the following paper is illegible] : 

***** on the 3d of November, before the 
court has acknowledged that, ***** officer 
here * * * brandy sold to the Indians, so is it upon her 
request * * * because the first * * excused, 
provided that a fine to the clerk and officer, shall be paid, at once in 
current seewant, the sum of * * * * under this re- 
servation, that in case hereafter she do so any more, after the full * 
* * * *= this serving as a public warning. 

Fort Orange, this 30 Decemb : 1654. 

Willem Fredericse Bout proposes to sell at public sale, his house and 
lot, at present occupied by himself, adjoining on the south side upon Jan 
Michielsen [Van Edam] on the east side the public road, breadth nine 
rods and ten feet in front, length twelve rods on both sides, breadth in 
the rear nine rods and five feet, all according to the patent thereof; upon 
the following conditions : That the payment shall be made in three 
installments punctually, of which the first, being a third part, shall be 
paid in May next, the second six months thereafter, and the last third 
part, also in the following six months ; which payment shall be made in 
good whole beavers or grain, at the choice of the buyer. The auction 
fees shall be claimed of the buyer alone. The buyer shall be holden to 
furnish sufficient sureties for the payment. Further, the seller makes the 
sale on this condition, that no rebate shall be made, whatever may be the 
occasion. The buyer was Teunis Dirrickse [Van Vechten] - for the sum 
of nineteen hundred and twenty guilders. 

We, the undersigned, present ourselves as sureties for the principal for 
payment for the aforesaid house under obligation according to law, this 
11th of January, 1655. 

The mark -f set by Theunis Dikrickse, with his own hand. 

As sureties, 

A. Van Curler. 
Rutger Jacobse. 



1 Jacob Hendrikse Maats. 

2 Tennis Dirkse Van Vechten came out in 1638, witli wife, child, and two servants, in the Arms 
of Norway, and had a farm in 1648, at Greenbush, north of that occupied by Teunis Cornelise 
Van Vechten. He is referred to in 1663, as an old inhabitant here. — 0' Callaghaii' s History of 
New Netherland, i. 438. Perhaps he was called " Poentie" in 1649.— 2>MteA Manuscripts, m, 37. 



Albany County Records. 217 

Willem Frederickse [Bout] proposes to sell, on the followino; condi- 
tions, a lot and some timber for a house, adjoining to the north Volckert 
Janse [Douw], and to the south Sander Leendertse [Glen], to the west 
a public road, to the east the path to the river side ; upon the following 
conditions ; that the payment for the same shall be made in good whole 
beavers or hard grain (hart koren). * * * * 

[This paper is unexecuted.] 

Jochem [Wesselse] Becker desires to sell, at public sale, a piece of wood- 
land lying behind Fort Orange, with a house of a board long, just as they lie 
and stand ; the breadth of the land is according to the patent thereof, 
which shall be delivered to the buyer when the payment is made, bounded 
south upon the Beaver kiljWestthe woodland, north the hill, east the thicket 
{creupelbosch^, is in breadth on the south side 50 rods, on the north side 
36 rods, length 105 rods, with the fence set round about the same and the 
house also there built; upon the following conditions, to wit, that the 
payment shall be made in three installments of a third part each ; the first 
in the month of May, next, the second, six months after, and the third, 
six months following. The payment must be made in good whole 
beavers, or grain, at the choice of the buyer. The auction fees shall be a 
charge against the buyer ; provided that the buyer shall be holden to 
furnish sufiicient sureties to the content of the seller, for the payment. 
Philip Pieterse [Schuyler], was the buyer, on the aforementioned condi- 
tions, for the sum of four hundred and sixty-eight guilders. 

Philip Pietersen. 

As sureties according to laiv, 
Johan Baptist Van Renselaer. 
A Van Curler. 

11 Jan., 1655. 



Worshipful, valiant, most noble lord and right honorable sirs. Heer 
general and right honorable sirs : 
The Mohawks, or some of them, have been here with us, asking us that 
some Dutchmen may go to the Sinekens,i to compose the difficulties which 
have arisen between them and the Sinekens, but through the unfitness of 
the times no one has been found (?); and moreover as one of the leaders 
of the Sinekens has been killed by the Mohawks, they are indisposed (?). 
So that we have thought it needful to write to your honor and the right 
honorable [council], since we judge the same to be a matter of state, for 
if the Mohawks drive out the Sinekens, or whilst war exists, no trade here 
will yield any returns from that time on. If this war begins we shall 
expect your honor and the right honorable [council], in their wise judg- 
ment, to take this matter into consideration, and our humble petition is 
that your honor, etc., will please send by the bearer of this, their resolu- 
tion upon this weighty point, to wit, the slaying of the chief of the 
Sinekens of Onnedaego, which Indians as aforesaid are threatening to 
make war upon the Mohawks. * * * It is a dangerous thing 

for us to interfere with this exciting quarrel on such an occasion. The 



■ Senecaa. 

Hist. Col. iv. 28 



218 Albany County Records. 

Mohawks came to us with a gift, saying that they thought counsel nearly 
at an end, and therefore sought our intervention with the excited parties, 
and, if possible, to remove the difl&culty. We answered them that the time 
of the year was not propitious for the Dutch to undertake such a journey, 
even if it were needful, and a fit time beforehand were had, so then they 
ordered what might be fitting therein. * * * * \ye 

beseech your honor, to please send up the accounts of the six soldiers, and 
other honorable company's servants, stationed here, and to order the 
traders to contribute so much as amounts to a bale of clothing, else we 
must at once demand their license. We shall now await your honor's 
good orders ; our power alone avails nothing * * * * tji^t 

so both the honorable company, and we, may thereby render better service. 
Wherefore expecting your honor's good orders, Heer general and right 
honorable sirs, we commend your honors to God's protection, and remain, 
right honorable sirs, 

Your humble and trusty servants. 

The court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck. 
Fort Orange, 6 January, 1654. 

Honorable Jan Dirrickse Van Bremen : 

As divers creditors of yours have shared with us in the grain, therefore 
we have ordered that you sell no grain before the after following persons 
shall have been fully paid, Evert Bils (?), for the sum of two hundred 
and twenty, and Pieter Hertgerts, the sum of two hundred and seventy 
guilders. ***** 

The court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck. 

13 January, 1655. 

On this the l3th day of January, 1655, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman, in the service of, etc., Adrian Dirickse De Vries, who declared 
that he had sold to Pieter Adriaansen Soogemacklyck,i a certain lot (to 
be determined and delivered on the first of May), lying in Beverwyck, 
provided that the seller shall * * the house standing thereupon, 
adjoining easterly and westerly on the * *, southerly and north- 
erly, provided that the seller (sic) shall be holden to pay to the buyer 
(sic) the sum of a hundred and twelve guilders, the remaining eight guil- 
ders to pay for the patent, to remain a charge to the buyer. * * 
* * The payment must be made * * * ^\\ j^ 
good faith, and under pledge of their persons and estates, personal and 
real, present and future. 

In acknowledgment of the same, signed with their own hands, as well 
by the buyer as the seller. 

The mark of Adrian Dirrickse De Vries, with + his own hand signed. 

On this the 17th day of January, 1655, appeared before me Joannes 
Dyckman in the service of, etc., the virtuous (eerbaar) Femmetje Albertse 
widow of the late Hendrick Janse Westerkamp, and declared that she 



1 Pieter Adriaansen Soogemackelyck was an innkeeper. In 1660 he was called voorsoon of 
Anna Pieterse Soogemackelyck, widow of the late Barent Janee Bal. In 1664, he received a 
patent for a bouwery in Schenectady, which he sold in 1670 to Helmer Otten, from whom it 
passed to Ryer Schermerhorn, by marriage to Otten's widow. He is perhaps the same person 
as P. A. Van Woggeliim, often spoken of in the ancient records. 



Albany County Records. 219 

had sold to the Honorable Jan Thomase [Mingael], Pieter Hertgerts and 
Volckert Janse [Douw], a certain corner (Jioeck) of her lot lying in 
Beverwyck, in length five rods and six feet and in breadth six rods and 
eight feet just as it lies there^ for which the seller shall receive in cash 
the sum of three hundred guilders, to be paid in beavers or hard grain, 
at the choice of the buyer, whereupon, she, the seller, of the aforesaid lot, 
(as well in its length as in its breadth), promises a full release of the 
same to them and their heirs forever. 

In acknowledgment of the truth this is signed with their own hand, in 
Fort Orange, on the date aforesaid. 

The mark set by Femmetje Albertse X with her own hand. 
As buyers, 

Jan Thomas. 
Pieter Hertgerts. 
As witnesses, 

Pieter Ryverdingh. 
Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Their honors of the court having learned that certain persons, on the 
solemn festivals of yesterday and Shrovetide evenings, in this jurisdiction, 
having clothed themselves in strange habiliments, and put on women's 
clothes, therein publicly marched as mountebanks, through the city and 
streets, in the sight of the inhabitants, and besides did other scandalous 
and unseemly things, * * * ^\^^^ ^^ ^^^ during the whole 
* * draw [a knife] or shoot off a gun, under any pretext whatso- 
ever, for the reason that not only many improprieties thereby take place, 
but the farm and other servants not only cease from their service, and by 
that means lose their time, but fights, blows, blasphemy, oaths and other 
irregularities happen; so is it that their honors of the court, hereby ex- 
pressly forbid such things to be done, on penalty that those who are found 
doing contrary hereto, shall pay to the behoof of the officer here, the sum 
of twenty-five guilders, for the first offense. 

Thus done in Fort Orange this 26th of January, 1654. 



Appeared before me, Joannes Dyckman, in the service of, etc., in the 
presence of the honorable magistrates of the court here, Sander Leen- 
dertse [Grlen] and Pieter Hertgerts, Firstly — Jacob Janse StoU [cilias 
Hap] who declared that he had granted, conveyed, and transferred, for him- 
self and his successors, two certain houses standing in Fort Orange, with 
the gardens thereto belonging at present, adjoining on the east upon Arent 
Van den Bergh, and to the west on the angle {punt) of said fort, for 
which, in exchange, he has agreed with Claas Hendrickse Van Utrecht, 
that in real ownership he (Stoll) shall again receive a certain house 
standing in Manathans, according to conveyance of date the 17th of May, 
1054, delivered in the presence of Messieurs Nicasius de Sille and La 
Montague in Niew Amsterdam, lying and standing on the island of Mana- 
thans in Niew Amsterdam, bounded easterly on the river, in breadth on 
the road or south side three rods and three and a quarter feet, breadth in 
the rear, on the north side, one rod, seven and a half feet, length on the 
east side, ten rods, two and a half feet, length on the west side, twelve 



220 Albany County Records. 

rods ; and the grantors declare, that they confirm both sales, and also for 
themselves and their heirs will warrant and defend the same forever ; 
promising to hold this conveyance secure, and said grantors acknowledge 
what has been done above by way of exchange, annulling the former 
exchange forever, and that what is aforesaid is fast and done in good 
faith, thus holding this agreement, honestly, and in good faith : in pre- 
sence of us, signed by both the grantors with their own hands, and by 
the honorable commissaries this twenty-seventh day of January, 1655. 

Jacob Janse Stoll. 

Claes Hendryckse. 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Saunder Lenrsn. 

PlETER HeRTOERTS. 



1655, 5 February, at the house of Marselis Janse. 
Cornells Wouterse desires to sell, at this public sale, the following 
goods upon these conditions, to wit : The payment shall be made within 
the time of three weeks, or at the outside one month, in good whole 
beavers. The buyer shall be holden to furnish security for the above 
payment, to the content of the seller, and failing so to do, the articles 
shall again be oflFered at his cost and charge. Moreover, the seller puts 
all upon this footing, that no reduction or increase of price shall be 
allowed for any reason whatever after the sale. 

Andries Herpertse, a bed with pillows and bolsters, for / 65.00 

Keesie Wouters, a cloak, / 64.00 

do a petticoat, / 36.00 

Eldert Gerritse, a little cloak, / 17.00 

Cornells, a ditto, with a stomacher, f 25.00 

Pieter Adreansen [Soogemackelyck], an upper petticoat, f 25.00 

Barent [Coeymans], the miller, an upper petticoat, / 21.00 

Cornells Teunise, a pair of sleeves, f 9.00 

Barent the miller, a Turkish (?) coat, / 37.00 

Lambert Albertsen [Van Neck], a cloak, / 49.00 

Andres Herpertse, two loockeas, / 22.00 

Andres Herpertse, two do, / 25.00 

Corn. Bos, two pillows, / 11.00 

Grietje Teunise, two pillows, / 12.00 

Lambert Albertse, three pillows, / 12.00 

Janne Mon, two napkins {servetten), / 8.00 

do five napkins, / 13.00 

Lambert Albertse [Van Neck], two napkins. / 10.00 

Pieter Meesen [Vrooman] two napkins, / 9.00 

Cornells Teunis, two napkins, / 8.00 

Pieter So Mackelyck, two napkins, / 9.00 

Pieter Bronck, two napkins, / 9.00 

do do / 10.10 

do do / 9.00 

Claes Henderickse [Van Schoonoven], two napkins, / 8.06 

P. Ryverdingh, two napkins, / 8.00 

do six pewter plates, for / 12.00 



Albany Comity Records. 221 

Hendrick Jocliemse, six pewter plates, for , / 11.00 

Cornells Teunisse, a chest, / 21.00 

Tgerck, a sum of money (een j>emmi<jJi)^ / 18.00 

591.00 

Marcelis Janse [Van Bommel] sold a cloak exposed for sale a second 

time, for / 40.00 

Evert Pels, a gun, / 6.70 

Pieter Ryverdingh sold the following rolls of tobacco : Gerrit 

Segerse] Van Voorhoudt] 8 rolls, / 31.00 

Jan Andriesse De GraflF,i 4 ditto, / 10.00 

Willem, 3 rolls, for / 8.30 

Cornells Theunise, 6 rolls, / 35.00 

Klaes Hendrickse [Van Schoonhoven or Van Utrecht] stood 

security for Gerrit Segerse for 6 rolls, for / 25.00 

Elbert Gerritse stood security for Gerrit Segerse, for 14 rolls of 

tobacco, / 

Eldert, 6 rolls, /. 24.10 

Gerrit Reyerse,'- 6 rolls, / 25.10 

Mr. Johan De Hulter desires at this sale to sell the following goods, 
underwritten, upon the following conditions, to wit: The payment of 
the goods sold shall be made punctually, within two months from this 
day. The payment shall be made in good whole beavers or wheat. 
Moreover the buyer shall be holden, at or shortly after the sale, to fur- 
nish sufficient sureties to the content of the seller, if not, the articles shall 
again be oflPered at the buyer's expense and charge, and if they sell for 
less, he shall be holden to make good the loss. 

An iron vise to Cornells Vos, / 36.00 

An iron vise to Pieter Hertgerts, / 6.17 

Three saw (j^aye) irons, to Jan Van Aecken,..- / 25.00 

A drill (dril'iser), to Mr. Rensselaer, / 8.02 

A cloak, Pieter Hertgerts, / 20.01 

A silk camlet robe, Pieter Hertgerts, / 30.00 

A child's coat, Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick], / 5.01 

A boimetgen, Jan Thomase [Mingael], / 17.00 

An old woman's gown, Rutger Jacopsen, ./ 28.00 

Two napkins {servetten), Mr. Rensselaer, / . 9.10 

Two napkins, Seger Cornelise [Van Voorhoudt], / 9.10 

Two napkins, Mr. Rensselaer, / 8.17 

Two napkins, Cornells Vos, / 9.13 

Mr. Rensselaer, two napkins, / 9.00 

1 Jan Andriesse De Graff, son of Andries De Graff, was a brickmaker. In 1658, he was fined with 
two others 500gl. for selling liquor to the Indians. With one Roseboom he went to New York, 
and commenced the making of bricks. His brother Claas settled in Schenectady, and is the 
ancestor of the families of this name there. 

2 Gerrit Reyerse of Utrecht, was a trader, and made two voyages to Holland in 1660 and 1662. 
On his first return in July, 1661, a complaint was made against him for smuggling. His two 
logs are still in existence. 

In 1078 he owned a lot on the west side of Broadway on the Vosseukill, 4 rods north of Colum- 
bia street. — Deeds, i, 414. By his wife Aunatie, he had at least five children ; made his will 15 
February, 169?^ ; was not living in 1700. 



222 Albany County Records. 

Griertgen Bouts,i two napkins, / 9.13 

Two napkins, Jonge Gees, / 9.12 

/ 232.11 
18 Feb., 1655. 

Brought from the other side, / 241.11 

Two napkins, yo?i^e Kees, / 9.12 

do. Cornelis Vos, / 9.16 

do. Giergen Bouts, / 9.10 

do. Cornelis Vos, / 9.12 

do. Dicke Gees, / 9.14 

Six napkins, Giergen Bouts, / 31.00 

Six napkins, Kutger Jacobsen, / 24.00 

One rix-dollar, Claes Janse Van Boere (?), / 5.06 

One rix-dollar, Goosen Gerritse [Van Schaick],..., / 4.08 

One rix-dollar. Soger Gornelise, / 4.01 

One piece of money (stuch gelts), Jannemon, f 3.16 

One piece of money, Louys, / 15.00 

One piece of money, Thomas Janse, / 4.08 

One piece of money, Segar Gornelis, / 4.00 

One piece of money, DirrickBensick, / 4.80 

do. Soger Gornelise, / 5.15 

do. Mr. Rensselaer, / 5.15 

do. Thomas Janse, / 4.00 

do. Pieter Meuwse (?) / 4.05 

do. Mr. Rensselaer, / 5.11 

do. William Janse Shut, / 5.10 

do. do. / 4.13 

do. Seger Gornelise, / 5.05 

do. Gornelis Theunise, / 4.14 

do. Seger Gornelise, / 4.05 

do. Jannemon, / 4.05 

do. Mr. Rensselaer, / 4.05 

do. do. f 5.06 

do. DolleGiet(?) / 5.10 

do. do. / 5.12 

do. Pieter Meuwse,- / 4.11 

do. Arent Van Gurlee, / 3.02 

do. Mr. Rensselaer, / 3.05 

do. Keesie Wouterse, ,. / 3.02 

do. Jeremias Rensselaer, f 3.06 

do. Kees3 Wyncoop, / 3.06 

Seger Gornelis, scissors, / 2.10 

[Arent Van] Curler, scissors, / 2.05 

A piece of gold, Seger Gornelise, / 12.50 

do. do. / 14.15 

do. do. / 12.02 

1 Geertje Bouts's adopted son Stephen, was carried away captive to Canada, by the French, 
after the destruction of Schenectady. 
- Pieter Meese Vrooman ? 
3 Kees and Keesie are nicknames for Cornelius. 



Albany County Records. 223 

Curler, a fmc^:, (.?) y 39.0O 

Thomas Janse, two Icoogte, (J) f I7.OO 

Rutger Jacobsen, a tinck, (?) f 31.10 

Cornelis Vos, do. / 61.10 

Curler, two •* * a thick, (?) / 24.00 

Cornells Theunise, a gold, * y 92.00 

Robbert Engelse, a piece of gold, / 20.13 

do. do / 13.30 

Lambert Albertse [Van Neck] do / 11.10 

Barent Pieterse, [Coeymans] the miller, two * * .../ 26.00 

Rut Jacobse, same * y 24.00 

do. a cloak, y 148.00 

Jan Gowen, (?) y § oo 

Cornelis Vos, two napkins, y 9.11 

Filip Pieterse [Schuyler], 6 napkins, f 29.00 

Rem Janse [Smit], 4 napkins, y 20.10 

/ 1349.50 

On this 22d day of February, 1655, appeared before me Joannes Dyck- 
man, in the service of, etc., the honorable Jan Labatie and Lambert Van 
Valkenborgh,! who declared, by these presents, at the request of Steven 
Janse [Coninck], that it is a fact, that these deponents, yesterday evening, 
were at the house of said Janse, and among other things, saw, while said 
deponents were at the house of said Steven Janse, Jacob Hendrickse 
Maat come into the house throwing out many abusive words, whereupon 
said Janse * * * * a loaded gun he would shoot him 
through, afterwards going to close the door, Jacob Hendrickse Maat 
following drew his knife, then Steven Janse exclaimed " Strike with your 
fists;" which these deponents heard, and also declared that Jacob 
Hendrickse Maat further abused him with many ungracious words, whilst 
said Janse was so far as he could be, patient and remained quietly within 
his house. By this deposition enough has been said about what said 
Janse was complaining, especially about what was done to him as well 
within as without his house. This deposition being presented, is of 
necessity and by request, strengthened by oath. 

In acknowledgment of the truth, this is subscribed by their own hands, 
in Fort Orange, of date aforesaid. 

Jan Labatie. 
The mark set by + Lambert Van Valkenborgh with his own hand. 

Which I attest, 

Joannes Dyckman. 

Appeared before me Pieter Ryverdingh, clerk in the service of the 
privileged West India company, the honorable Arent Vandenberch and 
Hendrick Biermans,- who declared, as by these presents they do, at the 



i<-(P n'^f ,^,^" Valkenburgh bought a house and 25 morgens of land in Manhattans, 29 July, 
1044.— Duteh 3Ianusc?tpts, ii, 121. From thence he removed to Beverwyck, in 104.5. By his wife 
Annatie, he had two sous, Jochem and Lambert, wto settled in Kinderhook. In 1697, his widow 
was living, but died before 1704, when his heirs owned his house and lot in " ye Voddemark " on 
the west corner of Green and Beaver stveeta.— Annals of Albany, ii, 21 ; iv, 180. 
- ncndrck Biermans was collector of the excise in 1057.— Dutch Manuscripts. 



224 Albany County Records. 

request of Steven Janse [Coninck], the fact, that these deponents, yester- 
day evening, the 20th of this month, were tarrying at the house of said 
Janse, and among other things, saw and heard Jacob Losorecht,i utter 
many abusive words against the aforesaid Janse, and soil (?) a handker- 
chief of said Janse, exclaiming " Come with me out into the woods, and 
there, with a gun or guns fight ; " whereupon said Losorecht further invited 
him, Steven, out of doors, and Steven answered that he would fight with 
fists, " as I am content without sharp fighting," complaining further of 
violence done in his house. Appearing against the aforesaid Jacob, we 
being required of necessity, strengthen this by an oath. 
This 22d of February, 1655, in Fort Orange. 

The mark of X Arent Vandenberch 

with his own hand set. 
The mark HB of Hendrick Biermans 
with his own hand set. 
Acknowledged before me, 

Pr. Ryverdingh. 

Appeared before me Pieter Ryverdingh, clerk, etc., the honorable 
Ryck Ridders, aged about thirty-seven years, and Klaas Andriese [De 
Graaf] ~ aged about twenty-seven years, who, upon the request of Steven 
Janse, declared that it is a fact, they were yesterday evening the 21st 
of this month, at the house of the complainant [Janse], where was pre- 
sent Harmen N. '^ whose surname is unknown ; which Harmen uttered 
many words against the complainant, without said complainant's provok- 
ing him thereto ; and after many words, said Harmen pulling oif his 
coat wished to strike this complainant in his own house. Stephen 
aforesaid answered, " Strike on : " After this answer, he went after the 
oflBcer, complaining of the force and violence used against himself by 
said Harmen. Appearing against the aforesaid Harmen from necessity 
and being required to make afiirmation with an oath, this is done this 
22d of February, 1655, in Fort Orange. 

The mark of -f Ryck Ridderse. * 
Claes Andries. 
. Acknowledged before me, 

Pieter Ryverdingh, Clerk. 

On this third day of February, 1654, in the forenoon, appeared before 
me Joannes Dyckman, in the service of, etc.,. the honorable Stofi'el Janse 
Abeels, aged about thirty-two years, and Jacob Hendrickse Sibinck,^ aged 
about twenty-six years, and testified and declared, as by these presents 
they do testify and declare, that Jan Verbeeck had said that the fire 
at the house of Aert Jacobse was set by young Paulus, at another time, 
by Pieter, the Fleming, and that the said young Paulus had brought 
some fire by which it was kindled (?). 



1 Jacob Loserecht, alias Maat. 

2 Claas Andriese De Graaf was one of the first settlers of Schenectady. By his wife, Elizabeth 
Willemse Broiiwer, he had a large family of children who settled in and about Schenectady. 

3 By Harmen N. is probably meant Jacob Hendrikse Maat, alias Loserecht, of the two pre- 
vious depositions. 

'Jacob Hendrikse Sibinck received a patent for a lot in Beverwyck, 25 Oct., 1653.— Deeds,i,19^. 



[ 225 ] 



NOTES FROM THE NEWSPAPERS. 



1865. 

January 1. New year's day fell upon a Sunday, to the great dissatis- 
faction of many persons. 

2. Governor Fenton inaugurated at the Capitol Jacob La Grange 

died, aged 74. John McCann died, aged 23. 

3. William Peck died, aged 50. Mary, wife of Patrick Mohan died, 
aged 52. 

4. The river was so strongly bridged with ice that the steam boats 

ceased to run, and the heaviest laden teams crossed in safety Michael 

Joseph Malone died, aged 19. John C. Spencer, of the 13th N. Y. 
Heavy Artillery, died at Fort Hazelton, Va., aged 58. 

5. William T. Cuyler died suddenly at the house of his son, in Cuyler- 
ville. He was born in this city in 1802, but removed to Rochester at an 
early age, where he soon became engaged in active business, and occupied 
a prominent position as an energetic and public spirited citizen. In 1830 
he removed to Cuylerville, where he continued to reside until 1860, 
when he went back to Rochester. He was a man of great energy and 
enterprise ; was one of the earliest advocates and projectors of the 
Genesee Valley canal ; and was actively concerned in several rail road 
enterprises in the western part of the state. He was a man of genial 
nature, and was greatly beloved in the community where he had so long 
resided. — Times. James C. Briggs died, aged 34. Margaret Roche 
died, aged 23. 

6. Bridget Weir died, aged 18. Nancy, widow of Seth Jarvis, died 
in Brooklyn, aged 58. 

8. James T. Lennox died, aged 42. Michael Finn died. Dr. Alex. 
W. McNaughton, formerly of this city, died at sea, aged 38. The 
deceased, for several years after the death of his father, lived with his 
uncle. Dr. James McNaughton, with whom he studied his profession. 
He graduated at the Albany Medical College in 1848. In the spring of 
1849 he connected himself, as surgeon, with the Albany Gold Mining 
Company, and went with the company to California, around Cape Horn. 
The company did not find mining either pleasant or profitable, and soon 
disbanded. Subsequently he was appointed surgeon to one of the United 
States Pacific mail steamers, in which service he continued until his 
death ; preferring that kind of life to the monotony of professional ser- 
vice ashore. His skill as a physician, his attention and kindness to his 
patients, and his gentlemanly manners endeared him to many persons, 
who will mourn his early and unexpected death. 

9. The Albany Dental Association elected its officers : President, Dr. 
Robert Wilson ; vice president, Dr. J. A. Perkins ; recording secretary. 
Dr. W. F. Winne; corresponding secretary. Dr. B. Wood; treasurer, 
Dr. J. C. Austin Mary White Walker, wife of James Arnott, died, 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 29 



226 Notes from the Neivspapers. [1865. 

aged 61. Joliu McCormick died, aged 48. Mrs. Mary Mullaly died, 
aged 26. 

10. Rain all day Anna M. Lagrange, wife of Calver Pulver, died. 

11. The following named gentlemen were elected directors of the First 
National Bank of this isity : Thomas Schuyler, Matthew H. Head, Adam 
Van Allen, Charles H. Adams, Frank Chamberlain, G. A. Van Allen, 

N. H. Johnson, Horace D. Hawkins, Samuel Schuyler Elizabeth 

Wilson died, aged 78. Lyman G. I)art died, aged 37. Owen Kilboy 
died, aged 70. 

12. Warren H. Chase died, aged 19. Mary, widow of Isaac McMurdy, 
died in Brooklyn, aged 64. 

13. John J. Callanan died, aged 53. 

15. Ellen Barrett, wife of Thomas Crawford, died, aged 40. Hannah 
Maria, wife of Daniel Childs, died. 

16. Margaret Coyle died, aged 38. Mary Elizabeth, wife of Warren 
S. Kelly, died. William J. Mackay died, aged 40. James Campbell 
died, aged 49. 

18. Thermometer 2° above zero Catharine Ann Bowne died, 

aged 38. Patrick Kelly died, aged 67. 

19. The installation of the llev. James M. Ludlow, successor of Dr. 
John N. Campbell, as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, took place 
in that edifice in the presence of a large audience. The opening prayer 
was ofi"ered by the Kev. B. H. Pitman. The 181st hymn was read by 
the Rev. Mr. Twombly, of the State street church, and sung with effect 
by the choir. The Rev. Dr. Halley, of the Third Church, preached an 
able and eloquent discourse. Dr. Sprague, of the Second Church, pro- 
nounced the charge to the pastor, in his usual able and impressive manner. 
The Rev. Mr. Barnard, of Kingsboro, pronounced the charge to the 

people, and offered up the closing prayer and benediction Margai'et 

E., widow of Nathaniel Hyde Hall, and daughter of the late Francis 
Bloodgood, died at Plattsburgh. Peter Albert died, aged 62. John 
Krank died, aged 23, of the 44th Regiment. 

20. The Jews having purchased the Methodist church, corner of 
Franklin and South Ferry streets, dedicated it as the synagogue of the 
congregation of Beth-El. This congregation is the oldest of that faith in 
the city, and was organized twenty-eight years ago. Its first place of 
worship was at a private dwelling in Basset street, and after a time, the 
congregation becoming sufficiently large, they purchased the church 
property on Herkimer street, which was until this time occupied by them. 
It is one of three congregations, the other two being the Anshe-Emeth 
congregation, worshiping on Pearl sti'eet, and the Beth-El Jacob con- 
gregation, whose synagogue is on Fulton street. The Methodist society 
having built the Ash-grove church, sold this edifice to the congregation 
of Beth-El for $8,000, who fitted it up for their service. It is a substan- 
tial brick building, about 40 by 120 feet; on entering the front door, the 
first thing observable, of any peculiarity, is a marble tablet, bearing 
besides a Hebrew inscription, the words : " In grateful remembrance of 
his munificence, this testimonial is erected to the memory of Judah Touro." 
It was originally placed in the old synagogue as a testimonial to Judah 
Touro, a wealthy Israelitish resident of New Orleans, who, in 1865, died, 
bequeathing among other charitable and religious bequests to this, the 
oldest congregation in Albany, the sum of three thousand dollars. The 



Jan.] Notes from the NeiDspapers. 227 

tablet was removed from the old and placed in the new church. Upon 
entering the church, one is at once struck with the peculiar, but beauti- 
fully arranged tapestry, at the south end of the building, which is the 
sanctum sanctorum of Jewish churches, and the shrine or tabernacle 
wherein is deposited the Pentateuch or Sapher-Torah, from which read- 
ings are made every sabbath and holiday. This Pentateuch is of an 
interesting character, being a parchment scroll, written with an iron pen, 
in the Hebrew language, and contains only the original five books of 
Moses. It is regarded with reverence by Israelites, as being their reli- 
gious and civil code. It is written without punctuation, so that no 
innovations may be made as to its character or words, and can only be 
read by the skilled. The readings from it are made by the chazan, or 
readers, in a peculiar chaunt. This synagogue possesses three copies, 
which are, of course, valuable. The almenomer, or altar, is beautifully 
decorated with the rich brocatelle tapestry of the shrine, beneath which 
is the blue velvet curtain, trimmed with silver, which conceals the 
Pentateuch from view when not in use. The shrine was beautifully 
decorated with flowers, and from each side were suspended the national 
colors. It is surmounted by a beautiful stone tablet, containing the 
Decalogue, in Hebrew, the tenets of Judaism, shaped to represent the 
tablets of stone, upon which were written the Holy Law of God, and 
which Moses broke before the eyes of the people. The church contains 
all the modern improvements, and is a very neat and beautiful place of 
worship, and reflects credit on the trustees and members of the congre- 
gation, who have spared no time and energy to make the afi"air complete. 
The dedication of a synagogue is made among Israelites a great /e^e, and 
no pains are spared to render the occasion as festive and happy as is in 
their power. The festivities are sometimes kept up for a whole week, 
and the whole population of that faith make it a holiday. The ofiicers 
and members of this congregation, anxious to do their duty and contribute 
towards making this dedication a pleasant and worthy affair, had spared 
neither money nor pains since the church came into their possession. 
The ladies, even (and to them is due the neat and beautiful appearance 
of the church) entered into the work with zeal, and prepared with their 
own hands the tapestry and curtains and coverings of the shrine and 
scrolls. Invitations had been extended to many of our leading citizens 
to be present at the ceremonies, which were fixed at two o'clock, and 
before one o'clock the church was filled, and long before the hour for the 
commencement of the ceremonies there was a dense throng in all parts of 
the house, and the dense crowd, the peculiar but beautifully tapestried 
shrine, the evergreen and floral decorations of the church, together with 
the many lights, the chandeliers and altar lights being lit, presented 
indeed a strange sight. Meanwhile, the older members of the congrega- 
tion, with the readers and ministers assembled at the Herkimer street 
church, where, after appropriate ceremonies, the line of march was taken 
up. Rev. Dr. Gotthold, of the congregation, at the head, escorted by the 
president and vice president, followed by Rev. Dr. Schlessinger, rabbi 
of the Pearl street congregation, and Rev. Mr. Ritterman, of the Fulton 
street congregation, each of which clergymen carried one of the Penta- 
teuch scrolls, which was clad in blue velvet trimmed with silver lace, and 
surmounted by crowns. As the procession approached the new synagogue, 
they were met by the remaining members of the congregation with a band 



228 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

of music, and under their escort the procession entered the church. As 
it entered, the choir, which was that of the Pearl street congregation, 
who had kindly volunteered for the occasion, Mr. George Doelker, the 
popular and able musician, leader, commenced singing, in Hebrew, the 
chant, '■'■Leu sheorim 7'osrhechem," "Lift up your heads, ye gates." 
The procession proceeded up the aisles to the altar where the Pentateuch 
scrolls were deposited in the shrine, the choir singing in Hebrew, "J/aA 
tohu," " How beautiful are thy tabernacles." The scene at this momeqt, 
the rabbi and readers at the shrine in their robes, wearing each the talith, 
the peculiar garment of the Israelite during divine service, depositing 
the elegantly clad scrolls in the beautiful shrine, the whole audience 
rising and the choir chanting, was as striking and picturesque as it was 
interesting. After reading Psalms 84 and 122, the choir sang: 

When the Lord shall build up Zion 

He shall appear in his glory. 
O, pray for the peace of Jerusalem ! 

They shall prosper that love thee. 
Peace be within thy walls, 

Ajid plenteousness within thy palaces. Amen. 

Then followed Rev. Dr. Gotthold, the reader of the congregation, in a 
most solemn and impressive prayer, after which the choir sang : 

Bow down tliine ear, O Lord, Be gracious, Lord, to me, 
O Lord, aud answer me ; Be gracious, Lord, to me, 

For daily I will call, O Lord, For daily I will call, O Lord, 
O Lord, will call on thee. O Lord, will call on thee. 

The solos were sung by Mr. Doelker, in his usual perfect and pleasing 
style, and Miss Hannah Sporborg, who possesses a clear and powerful 
voice which would require but very little cultivation to render it one of 
the best soprano voices in the city. Then followed the dedication sermon 
by Rev. Dr. Schlessinger, rabbi of the Pearl street congregation, which 
was listened to with a great deal of attention by the vast audience, after 
which donations were received. After a few remarks by Mr. Charles 
Smith, one of the trustees, his honor the mayor, who was present, con- 
gratulated the congregation in a short speech, in his usual manner. The 
donations netted very handsomely, and after a short but impressive prayer 
by the minister of the congregation, the usual sabbath evening services 
were commenced (sabbath commencing at sunset of Friday in this church). 
It was to be regretted that Rev. Dr. Isaacs, of New York, who was 
expected to deliver the dedication sermon in English, disappointed the 
congregation. The sermon and services being in German and Hebrew, 
detracting much from their interest to a great number present. Quite a 
number of prominent persons were present, among whom we noticed his 
excellency Governor Fenton, Mayor Perry, Recorder Paddock, and a 
number of others. The services were concluded about half past five 
o'clock, and it is a matter of congratulation to the trustees that all passed 
ofi" so pleasantly, and without anything to mar the order and arrangement 
of the programme. The festivities were continued during the evening, 
by a sociable soiree at Tweddle Hall, under direction of the trustees, 
where a galaxy of youth and beauty assembled, and in social enjoyment 
ended so eventful and memorable a day. — Journal. 



Jan.] Notes from the Neios^papers. 229 

21. Dr. Mason F. Cogswell died, aged 54. He was a native of Hart- 
ford, Conn., where his father was an eminent physician. He graduated 
at Yale College, and began practice in Albany in 1833. He attained to 
great skill and eminence in his profession, and his private character was 
unimpeachable. Besides having had a large and most respectable medical 
practice, he occupied, at different periods, various important public posts 
of professional responsibility. He had been the physician of the city hos- 
pital ever since its organization. On the breaking out of the rebellion he 
was appointed examining surgeon at this post, an office of no small delicacy 
and difficulty, and he actually examined several thousands of volunteers 
in respect to their capabilities for military duty. He was appointed sur- 
geon of the Post hospital in 1862 ; and when in 1864, this became a 
United States general hospital, he had the place of assistant surgeon of 
volunteers, and subsequently he received the appointment of surgeon, 
which was waiting for the ratification of the United States senate a't the 
time of his decease. After the battles of Williamsburg and West Point, 
in the summer of 1862, a call was made for volunteer surgeons to meet 
the exigency of the service. Dr. Cogswell, fired by a spirit of lofty patri- 
otism, was among those who responded to the call. He directed his course 
first to Fortress Monroe, and then up the Pamuuky river to the White 
House in Virginia. General McClellan, having then just advanced with 
his forces from the last mentioned point towards Richmond, had left the 
sick and disabled of his army behind him; and for the relief and accom- 
modation of these afield hospital was provided, and Dr. Cogswell was very 
efficient in its establishment. Here, probably from insufficient diet and 
impure water, in connection with his arduous labors and constant exposure, 
he contracted an insidious disease that was never afterwards fully dislodged 
from his system. For some time after his return he was actually confined 
by illness ; and though he was soon able to attend to his accustomed pro- 
fessional duties, he always felt that the vigor of his constitution had been 
materially impaired in consequence of his visit to Virginia. Since that 
time, however, the office that he held, under the United States government, 
had kept the energies of his mind and body in constant requisition; and 
notwithstanding his imperfect health, he probably performed a greater 
amount of labor than during any previous period of equal length in his 
whole life. And the result of his labors is a monument of both his skill 
and his fidelity. No hospital in the department of the east, which includes 
the whole of New England, the state of New York, and part of New Jer- 
sey, was conducted with so much order, neatness and general efficiency, 
as this of which Dr. Cogswell had the charge. In addition to his other 
more public medical services, he was associated with one of his brethren 
in this city, in February, 1863, under the direction of the Sanitary com- 
mission, to ascertain the general condition of the hospitals in the west. 

22. John J. Schuyler died at Amsterdam, aged 74. Andrew J. Hagan 
died, aged 31. 

23. Mrs. Sarah Sickles died, aged 66. 

24. Bridget McNally died, aged 31. John Vana died, aged 59. 
Mrs. Margaret Anderson died, aged 33. Miss Burbanks, actress at the 
Academy of Music, died. 

25. Dr. James H. Armsby was appointed surgeon to the United States 
hospital in this city in place of Dr. Cogswell, deceased. 



230 Notes from (lie Newspapers. [1865. 

26. The Albany Exchange Bank having organized as a national bank, 
the oflficers elected were William Gould, president, C. P. Williams, cashier. 

27. Thermometer at zero Albertis B. Brower, died, aged 50. 

Henry W. Meade, committed suicide in New York city, where he had 
long resided, by taking laudanum. He left letters for his wife and other 
relatives, in which he gave directions for his burial, and asked God and 
them to forgive him for the act. He was one of the first to engage in the 
daguerrean business in this city, some years ago, occupying rooms in the 
Exchange building. He removed from this city to New York, and with 
his brother, Charles Meade, established an extensive gallery on Broadway, 
opposite the park. He made many improvements in the art, and for a 
time was the leading artist in the city. What prompted him to the com- 
mission of the suicide is not known. Elizabeth, wife of James Cum- 
mings died, aged 26. Aaron J. Becker died, 34. Ellen M., wife of 
Alexander Beaver, died, aged 41. 

28. Thermometer 6° below zero William McHarg, died at 

Albion, Orleans Co., aged 87. He was born in Galway, Saratoga Co., in 
1778. His father, with eleven other heads of families, came to this 
country from Galway, Scotland, in 1774, and settled the town to which 
they gave the name of their old country home. In 1786, the family 
came to Albany, and for many years occupied the house which stood on 
the site of the present store of the Messrs. Cushraan, in Broadway. 
William engaged in mercantile pursuits in very early life, and continued 
thus engaged (part of the time as a partner with Bufus H. King) until 
1830, when he took the place of bookkeeper in the State bank, which 
he held until 1855, since which time he has resided with his daughter, 
where he died. In 1810, Mr. McHarg, with Archibald Mclntyre, Peter 
Boyd, and others of that day, formed the St. Andrew's society, and was 
one of its earliest officers. Although born in this country, he always 
loved the land of his fathers, and was always proud to be recognized as 
one of her sons. In early life, he served in the common council of this 
city, and was active in promoting whatever seemed necessary for the good 
of the city. It was through his active agency that the mail route between 
this city and New Y^ork was established as within one hundred and fifty 
miles, a fact which secured the reduction of the then heavy postage of 
18|cts., to 12Jcts. Mr. McHarg was a man of decided religious senti- 
ments, and he carried his religion with him as a constant and pleasant 
companion. It was made manifest in all that he said and did, and gave 
consistency and dignity to his whole business and social life. He was 
connected with the First and Fourth Presbyterian churches of this city 
for more than fifty years. In manners, he was unassuming, modest and 
retirino-j but he was, with intimate friends, kind, social and entertaining. 
He was kind hearted and gentle, and as pure as he was upright and con- 
scientious. Besides several sisters, he leaves behind him four sons and 
one daughter. Two of the sons are clergymen, and two are engaged in 
mercantTle pursuits. They inherit from their father no rich estate, for 
the deceased never had either the desire or the tact to amass wealth ^ — 
but they inherit what is of more value, the rich legacy of an unsullied 
name. He had a strong constitution, and he maintained his full bodily 
vigor, almost unimpaired, to within a week of his decease. Oue can 
hardly mourn the death of such a man. He was ready for the great 
change, for his life was an unclouded day of preparation, and his death 



Jan.] Notes from the Netvspapers. 231 

was as peaceful as his life had been pure.... Thomas Fitzsimmons died, 

aged 23. Michael Dohany died, aged 21. 

29. Edward H. Boyd, died, aged 35. 

80. Ann, wife of Owen O'Hare, died, aged 34. Peter Murphy died, 
aged 65. Margaret E., wife of Edward A. Going, died, aged 24. 

31. Ann Elizabeth, wife of Felix McCann, died, aged 38. 

February 1. A hundred guns were fired on the reception of the news 
that the house of representatives at Washington had passed the bill for 

the abolition of slavery A span of horses ran away in Broadway, 

throwing out the driver, and killing a Mrs. Gary Mary Lee, wife of 

John Jay Cole, died at LaCrosse, Wisconsin. Richardson Thurman 
died, aged 74. Margaret, wife of Patrick Leary, died, aged 48. Samuel 
T. Thorn, who arrived in this city from England, in 1819, died in Utica, 
where he had long resided, aged 68. He was a forwarder, and established 
the Albany Canal Line. 

2. Edward D. Marvin, died at Cohoes, aged 24. 

3. Thermometer 2° above zero At the annual meeting of St. 

George's Society, William Lacy was elected president Charlotte, wife 

of Peter S. Wyckofi", died. 

4. With the beautiful spring weather are introduced many new faces 
and things upon our public thoroughfares, that have been somewhat 
scarce and secluded during tbe winter months. Among the most promi- 
nent features is the street bootblacks. These ingenious little fellows have 
become one of the institutions of our city. They were few and far 
between a few years since, but at the present time, are as numerous almost 
as flies in a sugar hogshead about midsummer. You see them on the 
sidewalks, in and around hotels, and frequently on the ferry boats. They 
carry a box containing their kit of implements, the brushes, blacking 
boxes, etc. This is suspended by a strap over the shoulders, and when 
a customer nods assent to their generally polite invitation, " Black yer 
boots," or " Shine up, sir," they quickly set down the box for your foot 
to rest on, drop on their knees on the pavement, and work as rapidly as 
possible, so as not to detain their patrons. They first turn up the pants, 
to keep them from being soiled, then with one brush they clean the boots, 
with another apply the blacking, and with two others, one in each hand, 
polish away. They return a " Thank ye " for the half dime, given for 
their labor. These boys are generally so polite and so industrious that 
we rather like them, and sometimes take a shine uj) just to see them 
work and to chat with the smart little fellows. — Times and Courier. 

..The Washington Avenue Baptist Church, on Monday evening 

changed its name to the Calvary Baptist Church, and authorized its 
trustees to purchase of its owners the house now occupied by the State 
Street Baptist Church, which purchase was eifected Tuesday evening. 
Material alterations and improvements will be made in the building, prior 
to the Calvary Church taking possession. It is understood that the State 
Street Church will disband, and that many of its members, with other 
Baptists residing on the hill, now connected with the Pearl Street, and 
First Churches, will unite with the Calvary Church, thus creating a sub- 
stantially new interest. This will furnish a strong and influential Baptist 
Church on the hill, while it will also strengthen the other two churches 
named, now really weakened by their numerical strength. In making 
this purchase the Avenue Church have but fulfilled the wishes of the 



232 Notes frmn the Newspa2)ers. [1865. 

late lamented Samuel Patten, using for that purpose, in part payment, a 
generous legacy of S10,000 which he left them. The owners of the pro- 
perty had the opportunity of disposing of it to great pecuniary advan- 
tage, but preferred to keep it in the hands of their denomination. The 
principal owner was Wm. Newton, Esq., who sold his interest for about 
one-half its original cost. The remaining owners were S. M. Fish, Esq., 
Hon. Eli Perry and Mrs. Wilson. Mayor Perry donated his interest. 

6. William Gillespie died, aged 71. Maria McCrea, wife of David 
Cameron, died, aged 54. Margaret McLoughlin died, aged 60. John 
Murphy died, aged 80. Terrence Hagan died, aged 28. Lieven Kry- 
ger died, aged 42. 

7. The largest snow storm of the season began at night fall ; the trains 

were detained nearly two days Mary Johns, wife of Joseph II. 

McBride, died aged 24. Matthew McNally died, aged 26. Smith 
Waterman, clerk of the county, died at West Troy, aged 42. 

8. Mrs. Elizabeth Komaine died, aged 50. Mrs. Elizabeth Case died, 
aged 56. Elizabeth, widow of Col. Samuel Conner, and daughter of the 
late Isaac Denniston, died, aged 76. Lieut. Col. Frederick L. Tremain 
died at City Point Hospital, of wounds received in battle at Hatcher's 
Run on the 6th, being nearly 22 years of age. 

9. No express trains left this day for the west on account of the block- 
ade by snow Hattie Burleigh, wife of Augustus C Cole died. 

10. Col. John Sharts died, aged 66. He came to Albany from Hudson, 
was a printer in his youth, and was connected with several of the news- 
papers of the city ; and at one time published a city journal. He was 
prominently connected with the militia of the state ; and was assistant 
adjutant general under Gen. Temple. 

11. The ice in the river was 28 inches in thickness in some places, and 
there was 18 inches in the running stream. 

12. Eliza Murtaugh, widow of Patrick Mulcahy, died, aged 66. 

13. Temperature at some places in the city 16° below zero. As there 
had been a steadily cold winter from the first of December, without any 
thaw that could be counted, at least no interruption of sleighing for a day, 
it was hoped that the season had now reached its climax Clement- 
ina, wife of Charles Bailey, died, aged 51. 

14. Maisella Bigelow died, aged 30. 

15. Funeral of Lieut. Col. Frederick L. Tremain, at St. Peter's church, 

which was numerously attended Moses Brown died, aged 75. Mrs. 

Abby C. Booth died, aged 22. Susan, wife of John S. Belcher, died, 
aged 38. 

16. John V. R. Elmendorf died, aged 57. 

17. No man has seen a skating carnival who has not witnessed those 
which take place at the Van Rensselaer Park in Albany ; for of all places 
in this country winter is in its glory in Albany. It is cold and steady, 
and the snow and the ice stay white and pure, and are enduring. All the 
pleasant appendages to comfort are at the park. It is a parlor for those 
who look on, and a great field of ice for those who skate. The Albany 
park, when lighted by the arches of lamps, by decorative signals and 
legends, by its one tall beacon light rising gracefully out of a mound of 
snow ; with its crowd of artists ■ — for these Albanians are masters of all 
the intricacies of this movement — is a picture which it is worth a long 
journey to see. Other cities may emulate the brilliancy of the illumina- 



Feb.] Notes from tlie Neiospapers. 233 

tions, but very few can show such ice. It is the gift of the winter in 
compensation for the difficulty by which the integrity of bone is preserved 
in the descent of the hills. The winter, since the Van Rensselaer 
park was organized, has lost its gloom, and all Albany feels as if it was 
their carnival season indeed. — Anonymous Wm. Wrightson, for- 
merly of this city, was killed by the Indians in Arizona. He was 
an Arizonian pioneer, and at the time of his death was superintendent of 
the Santa Rita silver mines. 

18. Thomas J. Lee, of the 175th regiment, died, aged 28. 

19. The remains of Mr. Geo. W. Stackhouse, of the 91st N. Y. S. V., 
arrived here under the charge of his brother, Lieut. James Stackhouse, of 
the same regiment. Major Stackhouse was born in this city, and for a 
number of years was second lieutenant in the old and honored Albany 
Republican Artillery. At the first call of his country for troops, he and 
his company entered the service in the 25th Albany regiment, under the 
command of Col. Bryan, and remained with the regiment for the term 
they enlisted in the defense of the capital at Washington. On his re- 
turn, Lieut. Stackhouse raised a company for the 91st regiment, N. Y. 
S. v., mostly from the 9th ward, where he resided, and received the 
appointment of captain, and went to the defense of the gulf He was with 
the regiment in the campaign on the Terche, acting as major, participat- 
ing and rendering valuable services in the several engagements in which 
the regiment took part in the memorable march from Donaldsonville to 
the Red river. While on this march, Capt. Stackhouse received, for his 
heroic conduct and experienced qualifications, his promotion as major of 
the regiment. On the 27th of May last, was fought the terrible battle in 
front of Port Hudson, in which he was shot through both legs, while 
gallantly leading on the regiment in the defense of his country. He was 
taken to New Orleans, where he died from the effects of his wounds. He 
leaves a wife and four children to deplore his loss. His remains will be 
buried on Monday, Feb. 22d, the common council, 25th regiment. Col. 
Church, and the Fire Department participating in the funeral obsequies. 
His remains will lie in state at the City Hall, from 10 until 2 o'clock on 
that day, under a guard of honor detailed from the Albany Republican 
Artillery. 

20. Watts Sherman died on the island of Madeira, aged about 50. He 
was for many years cashier of the Albany City Bank, and at the time of 
his death was of the firm of Duncan, Sherman & Co. He was the son 
of Henry Sherman of Utica. He commenced his career as teller of the 
Ontario County Bank at Canandaigua, and was cashier of the Livingston 
County Bank at Geneseo, before coming to Albany, at the organization of 
the Albany City Bank in 1834. In 1851, Mr. Sherman removed to New 
York, where he became the active manager of the well known banking 
house of Duncan, Sherman & Co. His first wife was an adopted daughter 
of Hon. Krastus Corning, of Albany. He married, after the death of his 
first wife, a daughter of the late Henry B. Gibson, and received with her 
a large fortune, more than a quarter of a million of dollars, and she sur- 
vives him, and was with him at Madeira when he died This large 
accession to his alreadjr large fortune was received less than two years ago. 
Mr. Sherman was a man of the most rare qualifications for his position. 
His course was strictly governed by commercial integrity, unswayed by 
any bias but the interests of his firm ; and which he knew could be best 

Uist. Coll. in. 30 



234 Notes from the Newspa]pers. [1865. 

subserved by a strict adhereuce to business principles. His age at his 
death could not have exceeded fifty years, if it were so much, and hence 
the most of his business career happened while he was a young man ; but 
the maturity of his judgment was constantly apparent, and no man ever 
possessed a keener appreciation of the character of those with whom he 
had dealings. In his personal appearance, he was slender, but his face 
was peculiarly striking for its delicacy and masculine beauty. His hospi- 
tality was munificent, and a gentleman who knew him well, and had 
traveled extensively in Europe, told the writer that in the highest society 
of France and England, he had never seen more elegant hospitality than 

he had found at the New York residence of Mr. Sherman Bridget, 

wife of Thomas llhatigan, died, aged 44. Mrs. Mary Murphy died, aged 
56. 

22 The celebration of the 133d anniversary of the birthday of Wash- 
ington was unusually imposing; the military display being large and 

brilliant John H. Chadwick died, aged 49. George Monteath, 

died. Richard Atkinson died, aged 38. 

23. The old subject of removing the capitol from Albany was agitated 
in the legislature, growing out of the movement for a new edifice, which 
the progress of time demanded. The correspondent of The World, Mr. 
Wm. H. Bogart, thus wrote upon the subject : There seems to be an in- 
genious satire in the off'er of the New York city authorities of a capitol 
in New York, as if they were asking that the power that regulated all 
their aflFairs should, at least, be situated in their midst. The state is to 
be so much embarrassed by the magnitude and multitude of the proposals 
made to it about these public buildings that it will do nothing. The 
charge about insufficient social courtesies is partially well founded, but all 
those who recollect the elegant, and indeed, profuse hospitality which the 
Hon. J. V. L Pruyn to a large circle of legislative gentlemen has so 
freely dispensed, will not lightly make this accusation, and although his 
house was oftenest thrown open, it has not been the only one. Mr. 
Weed's home witnessed for a series of years the most agreeable entertain- 
ments. I mention these, because these are public men. I am quite sure 
that nothing would give citizens of this old city — hospitable since the 
days that it welcomed the great union convention of 1754, with Benjamin 
Franklin at its head — greater pleasure than to meet the gentlemen of the 
legislature in every form of social kindness. There was charming hospi- 
tality last evening, by a gentleman whose residence is between Albany 
and Troy, and who brought beneath the chandeliers the pleasant people 
of both cities. It was a superb evening; the light of the gr.eat furnace- 
fires gleamed over the snow, and the solid Hudson reflected these blended 
illuminations of industry and opulence, as the guests passed forge and 
mansion. The gentlemen of the two cities forgot that they had any 
differences, and remembered only that they were the guests of a large 
hearted hospitality. Albany at last stirs up itself about the location of 
the Capitol. As it is said to be a peculiarity of their ancestors to be very 
slow in wakinir, so once aroused they prove themselves invincible. The 
very beautiful situation which is found here at the head of State street, 
is of itself too valuable to be lightly thrown aside. It has all that belongs 
to the traditions of the age, all that is associated with history, and to re- 
move the Capitol would be to put aside the settled judgment of the 
people as expressed in a long series of years. The great block of ground 



March.] Note^ from the Neiospapers. 235 

from State street to Washiagton avenue, and from Eagle to Hawk streets, 
would be a site for an edifice of which the State would soon be proud. 
Albany has great hotels ; it is in the very network of all public convey- 
ance by all forms of water or earth or iron ; it has libraries, and in the 
peculiar accompaniments which belong to ice and snow, is unrivaled. It 
is a city just large enough and not over large. The legislature is neither 
obtruded upon nor forgotten. 

26. John McMurray died, aged 71. Mrs. Mary Livingston Crofts 
died, aged 76. 

27. Thomas R. Smith, of the 2d Veteran Cavalry, N. Y. S. V., died. 
Mary, wife of Henry Rigley died, aged 41. 

28. John Fairburn died, aged 38. 

March 1. Mrs. Margaret Gr. Thompson died, aged 43. She was born 
at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, and was occupied as a practical phre- 
nologist during most of the time of her residence in Albany. 

2. Bridget O'Neill died, aged 36. John Kastendike died, aged 88. 
He was an unusually active man, and did not take his bed, until within 
fifteen minutes of his death. The day before he died he even went into 
the garret of his house, and to-day walked about, apparently as well as he 
had been for a long time. He died very easily, not from any disease, but 
really from old age. He was a soldier under Napoleon for eleven years, 
and remained in his service until he went to Russia. The old gentleman 
felt a peculiar pride in claiming to be the oldest German settler in this city. 

4. The heavy rain of twenty-four hours duration abated. 

5. John R. McCollum, alderman of the sixth ward, died suddenly, aged 
38. Catharine Kenelty died, aged 52. Anna, widow of Francis Blood- 
good, died at Philadelphia. 

7. John Gaff'ney died, aged 28. Daniel Duggan died, aged 74. 

8. At half-past four o'clock in the afternoon a very serious accident oc- 
curred in Clinton Avenue, caused by the great body of water that had 
accumulated in the pond at the head of the street The water had risen 
until it was several feet higher than the large drain through which it 
passes into the main drain in the street, and thence to the river. It ap- 
pears that the great pressure thus produced caused the street drain to 
burst in several places, and the private drains were rapidly overflowed to 
the great destruction of property on the north side of the avenue, and to 
the consternation of the occupants of the dwellings. About twenty houses 
were more or less damaged, as well as the sidewalk and street in front of 
the buildings. It being about tea time, many of the families were at tea 
in their basements, and the first intimation they had of the accident was 
a rumbling noise under the floor, followed, in some instances, by the up- 
heaving of the planks, a rush of water, and in an instant the water was 
ankle-deep, then knee deep, and in several basements it rose to the height 
of two feet and upwards. Of course they only had time to get out them- 
selves, with wet feet, leaving their furniture to float about in the muddy 

water The body of Edward Marks, who had been missing since the 

6th of December, was found floating in the river and supposed to have 
been murdered. Lucy W. widow of Chester Judd, died at Cleveland, 
Ohio. Robert Swain died at St. Louis, aged 73. 

9. At the annual election of the Young Men's Association, Franklin 

Edson was elected president Bridget Murray died, aged 67. Mrs. 

McCarthy died, aged 21. 



236 Notes from the Neicspapers. [1865. 

10. Spencer S. Kittle died, aged 29. David Pick died, aged 25. 
William Vanderzee died, aged 20. 

11. On the 9th the atmosphere was quite wintry in its character. 
Saturday the wind changed to the south blowing very fresh all day, with 
indications of more rain. During the night the wind changed to the west 
blowing great guns, and we had quite a snow storm. Sunday morning 
the atmosphere was very keen, and during the entire day a high west 
wind prevailed. The sudden change in the weather having checked the 
flow of water from the tributary streams of the river, the freshet subsided 
somewhat, but still the water had not receded a very great distance below 

the top of the docks Maria Kirnan, wife of Edward White, died, 

aged 26. John Feeley died at Alexandria, aged 20. 

12. M. Augusta Allen, wife of William McDonald, died, aged 21. 
Catharine Eliza, died, aged 48 wife of John H. Leonard. 

13. James Roach died, aged 36. Elizabeth Buerger died, aged 54. 
Samuel Whalen died, aged 22. 

14. The vote of the city against the constitutional amendment for a 

change in the court of appeals was 890 for, 1522 against Ralph Pratt 

died, aged 89. He was born at Spencertown, Columbia county, on the 
12th day of x\pril, 1776; so that the whole revolutionary war came within 
the period of his Hie. His early years he spent partly at home, working 
upon his ftither's farm, and partly with his uncle, who lived in the same 
neighborhood; and at a later period he went to live with a Mr. Root at 
Kinderhook, as a clerk in his store. Here he continued until about the 
year 1800, when he came to this city and became a clerk in the office of 
the late venerable and excellent Stephen Van Rennselaer. After remain- 
ing in this position until he had earned three hundred dollars, he expressed 
a wish to the patroon to engage in some permanent business for himself; 
and his wish was generously responded to by a loan of a sufficient sum of 
money to enable him to accomplish it. Accordingly he commenced mer- 
cantile business with a Mr. Daniel, who, however, died after about two 
years; and then he became a partner with Mr Durant, and the firm 
thus constituted, was for many years, one of the most respectable and suc- 
cessful mercantile establishments in the city. Mr. Pratt retired from 
active business some twenty-five years ago, and about the same time his 
vision began perceptibly to fail, and but for an operation that was per- 
formed upon his eyes, his last years would probably have been spent in 
total darkness. His vision, however, enabled him, for the most part to 
walk about the streets, when his health otherwise would permit, and to 
read occasionally the daily papers; and this continued till near the close 
of his life. On Monday evening he retired in his usual health ; feeble 
indeed, but very comfortable, and when a member of his family entered 
his room Tuesday morning, he had almost ceased to breathe, and very 
soon died without a struggle. Mr. Pratt was of a more than ordinarily im- 
posing personal appearance, and so marked was his resemblance to Presi- 
dent Nott, that he was not unfrequently mistaken for him. He possessed 
business talents of a high order, and was perfectly upright and honorable 
in all his dealing. His mind was stored with many facts and incidents 
pertaining to the olden time, that were of great interest, and of some of 
which he was perhaps the only depositary. He enjoyed the company of 
his friends to the last, and of none perhaps more than his distinguished 
elative Bishop Upfold, who for many years, it is believed, favored him 



March.] Notes from the NeiDspa;pers. 237 

with an annual visit. He had been a member of the common council of 

the city, and was greatly respected by all classes Charles Smith 

died, aged 25. Julietta A. Snyder died, aged 21. James Vandenburgh 
Jr., died, aged 36. 

15. Mary Lynch died, aged 17. 

16. The ice moved away in front of the city, and as usual the water rose 
above the docks. The pressure from above by the breaking up of the ice 
in the vicinity of Troy forced it to move in front of this city. The ice 
at the time was quite thick and strong, but the abutments of the Hudson 
river bridge stood the test. The ice ran up the breakers to a certain 
height, when it crumbled and fell by its own weight. This solid masonry, 
as fine a work as can be found in the United States, could not be moved. 
The abutments, doubtless, kept the ice from moving as rapidly as it other- 
wise would, but nothing more. There was a rapid current in the river, 
and floating ice continued to run rapidly down for a day or two. At night 
we were visited by a violent gale from the south, accompanied by rain and 
hail, which raged for upwards of two hours with almost unprecedented 
violence. Towards morning the wind subsided and the rain turned into 
snow. During the night the inundation extended, and in the morning a 
goodly portion of the 'city adjacent to the river was covered with water. 
At Maiden lane the water was up to Dean street, and at the Steam boat 
landing it covered Broadway. The water had gained an outlet through 
the Schodack channel. The Hudson River rail road train which left the 
next morning was obliged to return, and the passengers and mails were 
forwarded by the Harlem rail road. Between Castleton and Schodack the 
track of the Hudson River rail road was not only submerged, but buried 
over with ice which came down the river. A bridge sixty feet long, in 
the vicinity of the latter place, was carried away. The stone bridge of the 
Delaware turnpike on the Beaver kil, which had been some time in a 

dilapidated condition, fell into the stream ..Emeline F. Williams 

died. ElonComstock died, aged 50 The time of the openingand clos- 
ing of the river as stated frequently in the newspapers, is found to vary, 
because some of the tables are made up from the time of actual closing or 
opening, others from the time of arrival or departure of steam boats. 
Some allowance is also due for typographical errors. Volume i, of 
Annals of Albany contains a table of closing and opening of the river 
derived from various sources supposed to be authentic. A table of open- 
ings is here given from one of the papers : 

1845 February 24 1855 March 27 

1846 March 18 1856 April 11 

1847 April 7 1857 March 18 

1848 March 22 1858 March 20 

1849 March 18 1859 March 13 

1850 March 10 1860 March 6 

1851 February 25 1861 March 5 

1852 March 28 1862 April 3 

1853 March 23 1863 AprU 7 

1854 March 17 1864 March 11 

17. St. Patrick's day celebrated Patrick Seery died, aged 40, 

Margaret, widow of John Sullivan, died, aged 72 

18. The river seemed to be clear of ice, and had all day continued to 
fall. The little steamer May-Flower, reached here from Coxsackie last 



238 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

evening, Captain Staats reporting that he came up through the regular 
channel, but that there was considerable ice below the latter place. The 
water in the river at 7 o'clock this morning was not by three feet ten 
inches as high as it was in 1857, yet this inundation covered a good 
portion of our city adjacent to the river. The river continued to rise 
during the night, and at sunrise this morning had reached the highest 
point. The water at that time was up to Broadway in Maiden lane, and in 
South Ferry street reached a point one hundred and fifty feet west of 
Green street. All South Broadway was navigable for boats, and the base- 
ments of almost every house south of Lydius street were inundated. Most 
of the occupants anticipated and prepared for it; consequently but little 
property has been destroyed by water. 

Higher Water. — The following, not by Longfellow, is applicable to 
the rampant condition of the Hudson river : 

Be not weary and I'll tell you, 
Tell you if you are not weary, 
Of the mighty High Water ; 
Higher Water swelling proudly. 
Proudly swelling down the valley, 
Of the grand, majestic Hudson ; 
On 0-wa-te-paw the white wave, 
With him came the whirling eddies, 
Came with him Ker-chuck the big stump; 
Came the rolling logs O-wah-ses, 
Came the snags the Jag-ger-nag-gers ; 
Came Sca-wot-che-te the drift wood. 
Came Ka-rick-e-ty the fence rails. 
Came the cornstalks, came the bark wood ; 
Came a pitching mass of plunder. 
Big sticks, little sticks and shavings. 
Swimming, driving, butting, pitching. 
Rolling, piling, thumping, smashing. 
Heaving, tumbling, spinning, crushing. 
Hither, thither, this side, that side — 
What a confusion, what a tumult, 
"WTiat a roaring, what a surging, 
What a mighty rush of waters. 
What an army of destruction, . 
Coming down in wrath and fury. 
Coming do^vn the handsome river. 
Coming down with a Higher- Water, 
Filled with raging and with fury. 
Rushing down to fight the big rats. 
To overwhelm the skulking wharf-rats. 

The high price of milk, 10 cents a quart, was now the subject of com- 
plaint. Butter had fallen from 50 to 33 cents a pound, and although milk 
could be procured within a few miles of the city at about one-third of that 
price, no one entered into the business, but the entire supply came in by 
carts from the immediate vicinity. 

19. Joseph Boyle died, aged 80. Richard James died, aged 26 years, 
at Federal Hill Hospital, Baltimore. 

20. Solomon Buckley died, aged 79. Wm. Hopper, aged 29, was 
drowned by falling into the basin at the foot of Hamilton street. 

21. The propeller Erastus Corning arrived, the first boat from New 
York, although the river had been open two days Charles U. Burt, 



March.] Notes from the Neiospapers. 239 

brewer, aged 45, was killed while lie was superintending some repairs to 
one of his buildings on Centre street, a stone or coping fell from the top 
and striking upon his head, knocked him senseless to the walk. Surgical 
aid was immediately summoned, but all efforts to restore him proved una- 
vailing, and he expired within an hour or two. Mr. Burt had been long 
engaged in the brewing business, first with his father, the late Uri Burt, 
and since the death of that ■estimable citizen, conducting the business 
extensively and successfully on his own account. James J. Gray died, 
aged 31. Matthew McCarty died, aged 68. Michael Loonam died, 
aged 60. 

22. The melting of the great body of snow ttiroughout the country 

raised the water in the river above the docks again. Alice Reynolds 

died, aged 24. 

23. James M. Albright died, aged 52. Elizabeth Lansing died, aged 
79. Margaret McDonald, wife of. James Kelly, died, aged 24. Simon J. 
Jacobsen died, aged 46. 

24. James Stuai't died, aged 77. Joseph Taylor died, aged 34. Mary 
Brower, widow of James Wilkinson died, aged 73. Michael Gordon died, 
aged 45. Susan Gates died, aged 74. Sarah Monaghan, wife of Frank- 
lin J. Alot, died, aged 19. 

25. Mary Martin died, aged 69. Peter Donahue died, aged 49. Ce- 
leste G. Backus, wife of Samuel Rork, died. 

26. Otis Allen died, aged 61. George Maul died, aged 56. 

27. Robert Taylor, died aged 74. 

28. Margaret Young, widow of Isaac Winnie, died aged 72. John E. 
Thomas of Co. H, 5th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, an exchanged prisoner, died. 

29. Albert Coppinger died. John O'Reily died, aged 42. Alexander 
Hamilton died, aged 50. John Devery died, aged 57. J. Howard Rath- 
bone died, aged 27. 

30. Peter J. Mosher died, aged 28, of Co. C, 7th N. Y. Artillery. 
John G. Weaver died, aged 18. Alexander Slawson died, aged 17. 
Thomas Newitt was killed by being run over by the train at West Albany, 
aged 53. 

31. Francis Campbell died, aged 65. 
April 1. Maria Stiles died. 

2 The rector of St. Peter's church announced to the congregation 
that a subscription of $20,000 had been completed to liquidate the entire 
indebtedness of the church.. Patrick Cary died, aged 56. Syl- 
vester D. Willard died after a very brief illness, aged 40. Sunday week 
he attended church, in apparent good health. Early in the week he was 
attacked with typhoid fever under the effects of which he failed quite 
rapidly. Dr. Willard was surgeon general of the state, and was secretary 
of the State Medical Society. He had devoted many years to that 
society, was the editor of its transactions, the biographer of its members, 
the patient chronicler of its progress and history. To his labors it is 
indebted for the revival of its spirit and the extension of its usefulness. 
He was prominent in all similar works, in all that tended to elevate the 
profession and minister to its objects. He volunteered early to go to the 
front, to assist in the hospitals, and was constant in his labors for the sol- 
dier. He had traits of personal character that bound many hearts to him 
in ties of affection and friendship. Pierce Nolan died, aged 38. Ben- 
jamin P. HiltO'i died in New York, aged 56.] 



240 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

3. Ichabod Lewis Judson died, aged 80. He, for more than half a 
century, maintained a high character as a citizen, a man of business and a 
Christian. He was a lieutenant and captain in the war of 1812 j was for 
many years president of the Albany Exchange Bank ; several times 
alderman and supervisor ; president of the trustees of Rev. Dr. Halley's 
church, and in every department of life, one of the best and purest of 
men. Joel Munsell, Sen., died at Auburn, aged 83. Wm. M. Graves 
died at Fort Prebel, Me., aged 38. Col. Levi Chapman died, aged 84. 

4. Patrick Madock died. James Madden died, aged 22. William 
Whalen died, aged 21. Nathaniel Berry, son-in-law of Gen. Stephen Van 
Rensselaer, died at Parjs, where he had resided 30 years, and was brought 
to Albany for interment. 

5. Bridget, wife of A. Hearn, died, aged 38. Sarah E.,wife of Joseph 
Blackwall, died at Saratoga Springs, aged 75. 

6. Jane Tate, wife of Robert McHaffie, died, aged 75 The funeral 

of the late Surgeon General Willard took place and was very imposing. The 
body was escorted from the late residence of deceased in Swan street, to Dr. 
Sprague's church, by Company B, 10th Regiment. The services in the 
church were of a very impressive character. At the conclusion of the 
services the remains were taken out, placed in the hearse, and escorted to 
their last resting place in the Rural Cemetery, by Governor Fenton and 
staff, state officers, members of the medical profession, Tenth and Twenty- 
fifth regiments, and a large concourse of citizens. John Hickey died, 
aged 75. 

7. Rose V. Dooner died, aged 19. Henry Wright died, aged 56. 
Mrs. Cordelia Soney died, aged 63. 

8. The bell recently placed in the tower of the Middle Dutch Church fail- 
ing to give satisfaction, was taken down and replaced by a new one 

An unhappy feud having existed during the past year in the Young 
Men's Association, a compromise was efiected, by the consent of the 
dominant party to the admission of negroes to the privileges of the associa- 
tion. 

9. Robert H. King died in this city, aged 18 years. He was a 
son of the late Samuel W. King, and enlisted in the navy last September, 
and was one of the five sailors under the command of Lieut. Gushing, 
on the torpedo boat that sunk the rebel ram Albemarle, in October last. 
He was taken prisoner on that occasion, and confined four or five months 
in prison at Salisbury, N. C. On the advance of Sherman, he and three 
others escaped from prison and reached Washington, where they were 
each rewarded with a medal for their bravery. Only a few days since he 
reached home, and soon died, a victim to his sufferings while confined in 
prison. Jeremiah H. Gage died, at Sacramento city, Cal 

10. The news of the surrender of Lee's army having reached the city, 
a midnight celebration took place As the town clock pealed forth the 
solemn hour of midnight, Capts. Harris Parr and Archy Young were on 
State street with their guns, and commenced firing a salute — the church 
bells began to ring; the fire department turned out; a grand assemblage 
was concentrated upon State street, where a scene followed that almost 
beggars description. The steamers fired up and blew their whistles, the 
bells and gongs of the smaller apparatus sounded their peals of joy, while 
the people shouted and cheered for Grant, Sheridan and Sherman, and 
the brave soldiers under them. Friends congratulated friends upon the 



April.] Notes from tlie Newspapers. 241 

glorious news, and at the corner of State and Green streets, the crowd 
joined in singing Old Hundred, Rally Round the Flag, etc. Bonfires 
were kindled, public buildings lighted, and joy was unconfined. Between 
one and two o'clock Schreiber's band came up street, followed by i]ngine 
8. On State street the different companies fell into line and joined in a 
procession. Every one was glorious, and shouting and blowing of horns 
were kept up till nearly daylight. For an impromptu affair it was a 
grand one. — Times. 

II. George Guest died at Ogdensburg, aged 78. Mr. Guest was born 
in the city of New York, on the 15th of October, 1787. He first went 
to Ogdensburg from Albany, to reside, in the year 1809, and engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, but during the war of 1812, his goods having been 
destroyed by the British, he returned to Albany — afterwards went to 
Elmira, and returned to Ogdensburg in 1822, where he has since resided. 
While the unsold lands of Canton and Lisbon were owned by the late 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, he was appointed the attorney and agent of that 
gentleman for their sale and disposition — was continued in the same 
trust by the successor to the title, the late Hon. Henry Van Rensselaer, 
and remained in charge of the same estate till his decease. In this capa- 
city, he possessed the confidence and affection of the settlers, many of 
whom will long remember his kindness, and cherish the memory of one 
who was their true friend. Sarah E., wife of 0. E. Green, died, aged 

39 Charter election — total number of votes 8,389, being 4,326 

less than last fall; democratic majority 1,365 ....Frances Ari'etta Or- 

cutt died, aged 39. David Vaughan, who had been for many years em- 
ployed in the various departments at the State House, died. He was 62 
years of age, a worthy and exemplary man, and was famous for his excel- 
lent penmanship. Many very beautiful specimens of his work are in 
our public offices. 

12. Mrs. McDonald died, aged 65. John Disney died, aged 52. So- 
phia, wife of John Dauphin died, aged 33. Mary Jane Sawyer, wife of 
John P. Blood, died at Athens, Penn., aged 28. John Couch died, aged 
59. James McEwen died, aged 24. 

13. Lydia H. Gale, wife of Rev. Charles J. Shrimpton, died, aged 27. 

14. Lewis Wiles died, aged 44 ; for the last eight years receiver of 
taxes. Edna A., wife of Harvey R. Watson, died, aged 35. Thomas 
Nolan died, aged 29. Timothy Ryan died, aged 29. 

15. At an early hour in the morning, news of the assassination of the 
president, reached the city. The streets began to fill up rapidly, and in 
.a short space of time, large crowds were collected about the various news- 
paper offices and bulletin boards Flags throughout the city were soon 
draped in mourning and suspended at half mast. Nor was this all. Signs 
of mourning were exhibited in every conceivable way. The dry goods 
stores were besieged for white and black cloth, and in a few hours there 
was scarcely a street in the city that did not give evidence of sorrow in 
view of the great national calamity. The Capitol, City Hall, State Hall, 
State Library, Agricultural Rooms, and other public buildings were hung 
in black. All the banks, printing establishments, hotels, and the stores 
on Broadway, State street and Pearl street, were draped in mourning in 
a like manner, as were also hundreds of private residences in every part 
of the city Capt. John Maguirc, of the 175th regiment, N. Y. V., 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 31 



242 Notes from tlw Newspapers. [1865. 

was killed by guerrillas near Goklsborough, N. C, while in the perform- 
ance of his duty. Capt. Maguire was born in the town of Belturbet, 
county of Caven, Ireland, in the year 1829. He came to this country in 
1845, and for a long time was employed as clerk for Mr. Kerr, at the 
corner of Pearl and Howard streets. At the breaking out of the rebellion, 
on the 19th of April, 1861, when the summons came from the govern- 
ment for defenders to save the national capital, Capt. Maguire was a 
private in the 25th regiment, N. Y. S. M., commanded by the lamented 
Col. Bryan. He left his business at a sacrifice, and accompanied his regi- 
ment to Washington, and thence to Virginia. He was promoted to a 
sergeant in the Worth Guards, and is remembered by those who were 
with the 25th regiment in its first campaign as a good and prompt soldier, 
worthy of imitation. Upon the return of the regiment to Albany he re- 
sumed his occupation as a clerk, in a clothing store in New York city. 
When his regiment was again called to the field in May, 1862, he joined 
them at New York city, and was at once selected by Colonel Bryan as 
sergeant major of the regiment, which position he filled with credit. 
Upon the return of Col. Bryan's command from Sufl'olk, Va., to Albany, 
in September, 1862, he at once joined the 175th regiment, N. Y. V., 
which was being raised by Col. Bryan for the war, and was promoted to 
a first lieutenancy. He went with the regiment throuj^h many battles, 
and was present at the bloody assault on Port Hudson, in which his 
commander fell. He continued with the regiment, after being promoted 
captain, till his death, on the 15th of April. 1865, when he was shot by 
the enemy with three balls, one through the head and two through the 

breast John Bame, of Schenectady, drove his mare Lady Fisher 

from this city to Schenectady, in fifty-eight minutes ! taking an extra 
Atlas & Argus. He did this on a wager of two hundred dollars that the 
space couldn't be gone over in one hour and fifteen minutes, having, 
therefore, seventeen minutes to spare. The distance is sixteen miles. 
Mr. Bame must have made every mile in a trifle less than four minutes ! 
The story seems incredible, but we are assured that it is true. And we 
have to add to it that he drove the Lady Fisher to this city in the morn- 
ing. The judge and stakeholder arrived in the city on the express train, 
and the purse of four hundred dollars was duly delivered up to Mr. 
Bame. — Argus. 

16. Cornelius W. Groesbeeck died, aged 88. Annie Ross, wife of 
James Seath, died, aged 63. Brown S. Spencer died, aged 57. Ade- 
laide Theresa Lodge, died, aged 70 

17. Maria, wife of John M. Kubler, died. Ellen, wife of John C. 
Peyton, died, aged 25. George W. Gamble died. 

18. Susan Anthony died, aged 63. Cornelius H. Young, late of the 
91st, died, aged 19. Michael Connors died, aged 65. Wm. E. Quigley 
died, aged 15. Mary A., wife of G. J. Holm, died, aged 45. Mary, 
wife of Thomas Robinson, died, aged 28. Eliza Rice, died, aged 35. 
Joseph Gladding, of the 18th N. Y. Cavalry, died, aged 20. T. W. Con- 
verse, Esq., the well known flour and commission merchant of this city, 
committed suicide at his residence in Worcester, Mass. Mr. Converse 
was about 60 years of age, and has for twelve years past been one of our 
most extensive merchants. He was a gentleman who was esteemed for 
his many noble qualifications, and leaves a wife and a son to mourn his 
loss. We could not learn the exact cause of his death, but know that it 



April.] Notes from the Newspapers. 243 

was sudden, as in a correspoodeace he expected to be in the city in a day 
or two. 

19. Although the sun shone bright and beautiful, yet the gloom was 
there, and could not be extinguished. Sorrow was predominant every- 
where, on the street, on the houses, in the churches, and upon the coun- 
tenance of every body. Almost every house bore some evidence of the 
grief that our whole nation felt. Several places of business did not open 
yesterday morning, but at 11 A. M., there was a general suspension of 
business throughout the city. The churches were thrown open, the bells 
tolled solemn peals, and every body was downcast and sorrowful, for the 
chief of our nation was being borne to his last resting place. The solemnity 
and suspension of business continued to a great degree during the afternoon 
and evening, and the day passed out in a quiet and undisturbed manner 
like the end of a funeral procession from the portals of a church The 
mourning habiliments in which our city is at present attired, will no 
doubt be worn until the funeral obsequies are performed at Springfield, 
Illinois, and in many cases longer. 

20. The majority of the places of business continued closed during the 
day, and services were held in the churches under the governor's procla- 
mation, which puzzled many to understand whether it was intended as a 
day of fast or feast, Elizabeth, wife of John Riely, died, aged 42. 

21. Thomas F. King died, aged 25. James Merrigan died, aged 26. 

22. Mrs. Helena Baker died, aged 64. Wm. Scott died, aged 35. 
J. H. Gilkerson died at Washington, aged 20, of a wound received at 
Hatcher's run, Va. 

23. Julia Finn died, aged 21. 

24. Betsey Luddingtou died, aged 62. Michael Brown died, aged 
39. William Bouner died, aged 39. 

25. The remains of President Lincoln were received at 11 o'clock at 
night by an escort, and borne to the Capitol with ceremony. 

26. The remains of the president were visited by an immense concourse 
of people from 6 o'clock in the morning till half-past one, when the coffin 
was closed, and thousands who had come many miles for the purpose, 
failed to get a sight of them. The coffin was borne to the cars at 3 p. M , 
accompanied by the largest procession that had ever been seen in Albany. 

27. Margaret Joraleman died, aged 68. 

28. The legislature passed a law appropriating two millions of dollars 

to the building of a new capitol at Albany Mrs. Mary F. Connor 

died, aged 65. 

29. The legislature adjourned at 1 o'clock in the morning Mi- 
chael MuUally died, aged 61. 

30. Maria Hoffman Davidson died. Altia D., wife of J. Wesley Smith, 
died at Auburn, aged 36 Edward Shirley died, aged 78. Moses Doc- 
tor died The following statement shows the amount of taxes re- 
turned on the assessor's monthly list for April, 1865, and also the amount 
of tax returned on the collector's detailed list for the same month : 

Manufactures and produc- Distilled spirits ... . , 0.00 

tions $65,722.67 Collector's list, ale, etc $ 47,780.78 

Slaughtered animals 284.60 

Gross receipts, carts, etc 441.14 Total April, 1865 |114,356.60 

Auction sales 127.41 Total April, 1864 124,945.09 



Total monthly list $66,575.82 Decrease $10,588.49 



244 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

May 1. Mrs. Margaret Ridder died, aged 34. 

2. Patrick Ginane, died, aged 26. 

3. The clerks of the post office presented to Charles Skinner, a member 
of the force of that institution, a pair of gold spectacles and silver case, 
inscribed Charles Skinner. The present was awarded as a slight token of 
the regard entertained by the other attaches for the old man. After twenty 
years service in the post office department of this city, he retires from 
labor to go to Hartford, Connecticut, where he was born, there to end his 
days. He is now about 80 years old. Charles Skinner was one of the 
institutions of Albany in days gone by. He was the last survivor of the 
printing firm of Websters & Skinners that existed half a century ago. 
He was one of the proprietors of the old Daihj Advertiser, printed under 
the old elm tree. The above firm also printed Webster's Spelling Book and 
Almanac, and several other standard works for household use. The 
Almanac was a book that was known from one end of the state to the 
other, and our ancient Dutch friends swore by it altogether, They 
seemed to believe there were only two books in the world worthy of 
notice. One was the Bible, the other Webster's Almanac. Even to this 
day our Helderberg neighbors hold Webster's Almanac as an indispen- 
sable article. — Knickerbocker. 

4. Margaret Louisa Burdick died, aged 20. 

6. The steam boiler in James Quinn's brewery in North Ferry street, 
exploded, by which two persons lost their lives. Loss of property esti- 
mated atS30,000 Mary F., widow of William Brown died, aged 39. 

Isaac White died, aged 23. 31rs. Glorana, widow of Cicero Loveridge, 
and daughter of C. W. Groesbeck died. James Burns died, aged 53. 
Philip McCafi'rey died, aged 36. John M. Dempsey died at at City Point, 
Va., of wounds received in battle. 

7. John Smith died, aged 65. Mr. P. Malburn died, at Freeport, HI., 
aged 23. 

9. John Henry Townsend died, aged 23. Mrs. Mary Mclntyre died. 
Mary E., wife of Charles Goodrich, died. 

10. The ruins of Quinn's brewery took fire during the gale in the 

evening, and destroyed his dwelling house also A peddler by the 

name of Rice was knocked down in Green street near Westerlo, and 

robbed of $1,000 in money and jewelry, at 9 o'clock in the evening 

Thomas Walsh died, aged 21. 

11. Pamela B., wife of Edward Robinson, died. 

12. Water over the docks and pier, the result of heavy rains of nearly 
a week's duration William H. Bancroft died, aged 31. 

13. The pond at the head of Clinton Avenue, near Lark street, over- 
flowed and caused much damage to property at the upper end of Canal 

street George Wilkinson of the 18th New Vork Cavalry, died 

in St. Louis Hospital, New Orleans, aged 29. Peter G. Van Zandt died, 
aged 68. Anna, wife of Charles Kane, died, aged 36. 

14. Two gangs of boys on Arbor hill, known from their respective 
rendezvous as the Hills and the Greeks, fought about two hours on Mr. 
Kinney's orchard, and many of them were badly injured. They num- 
bered about 200. Edward Graham, a ring-leader was arrested and com- 
mitted Jane, wife of Charles Rodgers, died, aged 28. Thomas 

O'Reardon, aired 38, died of injuries received by the falling of a derrick 
at Ransom's foundery. 



May.] Notes from the Neiospapers. 245 

15. Polly, widow of Abraham Austin, died, aged 65. 

16. Maggie E. Prime, wife of Louis Scliutter, died, aged 24. Jacob 
G-eorge died. Emeline, widow of Germaiue Lamoure, died. 

18. John T. Groeway, first lieutenant 170th Reg., Co. D, died, aged 23. 

22. James Ryan died, aged 24. Catharine, widow of Arlond Carroll, 
died. Mary Doyle died, aged 80. 

23. The steamer C. Vibbard made her first trip up this day. The Vib- 
bard was most beautifully painted, and opened the season with a new 
cylinder 622 inches in diameter. The old one was 55 inches. This in- 
crease of power made her about three miles an hour faster than she was 
last season. The ofl&cers of the Vibbard are : Commander Dave Hitch- 
cock ; Clerk, Alfred Harcourt ; Steward, James Fairchild ; Engineers, 
L. W. Nelson and George Travers ; Pilot, Phil. Elmendorf ; Superintend- 
ent of the .Restaurant, Wm. Wallace Catharine, wife of Christo- 
pher Wallace, died. George Stevens, Co. D, 7th Heavy Artillery, N. 
Y. S. v., died, aged 40. George G. Hart died. Catharine E., wife of 
James Ten Eyck, died, aged 23. 

25. The Sunday School building erected by the Broadway M. E. Church, 
corner of Broadway and Lawrence street, entrance on Lawrence street, was 
dedicated to the service of Almighty God. Preaching at 10'} A. M. by 
R. S. Forster, D. D., of New York. Sunday School gathering at 3 p. M. 
Addresses by Rev. R. R. Meredith, of Cohoes, and Rev. A. J. Jutkins, 
of Schenectady. Singing by the school. Preaching at 7} P- M. by Rev. 
C. W. Gushing, of Auburndale, Mass. This was the handsomest house 
of the kind in the city or vicinity; the walls are of brick, the aisles 
neatly carpeted, the seats of the rail road pattern and was handsomely 
covered. There was a gallery at the end of the building nearest the street, 
for the use of the choir and the infant department, when occupied by the 
latter, it was enclosed on the side toward the interior of the building with 
handsome glass sliding doors. The school was in a highly flourishing con- 
dition, and was doing agreat deal ofgood Willie Wilson died, aged 20. 

26. Thomas Hennes;jey died, aged 66. 

27. Mary L., wife of Robert L. Patrick, died, aged 24. Mary Barbara 
Carmody died, aged 19. Albinus S. Dole died, aged 46. 

28. Catherine Ten Eyck, wife of William M. Burr, died at Cazenovia. 

29. The fiirm of Hiram Secor of the town of Berne was sold under an 
execution of the supreme court, after judgment obtained, nearly three years 
ago, at the suit of Van Rensselaer. It was a manorial farm, and the claim 
against it was for an accumulation of back rents and the costs of a pro- 
tracted litigation. The time to redeem having passed, two brothers. 
Finch, were put in possession by Colonel Church. On Wednesday twenty 
or thirty persons, disguised as Indians, with masks, &c., entered upon the 
premises, turned Messrs. Finch out of doors, and replaced the goods and 
furniture of Secor. On Saturday Colonel Church again undertook to put 
the Finch brothers in possession, but was resisted and forced to come 
back to town. He immediately called on the sheriff, who ordered an 
armed force to aid him in executing process. Colonel Church, with the 
sheriff and his posse, a company of the 25th regiment and a company of 
National Guards from Bethlehem, left this morning to put the Finch 
brothers in possession of the premises Eliza Cantine died. 

30. Julia Kohoe died-, aged 84. James Daily died, aged 60. Mary 
M., widow of George Campbell, late of Albany, died at Cedar Falls, Iowa, 



246 Notes from tlie Newspapers. [1865. 

aged 67. Elizabeth, wife of W. H. Watson, died. She attended the 
funeral services of Miss Carmody at the Cathedral, and left the church 
just before 12 M. enjoying good health, and at 1 p. M. she was dead. 
Disease of the heart is supposed to be the cause. 

31. Thomas E. Lee, late of Albany, died in New York. John J. Gor- 
don of the 8th N. Y. Artillery, stationed at Alexandria, died of accidental 
poisoning. 

June 1. Congress Hall, Albany. — Congress Hall, which to-day closes 
its mortal eyes forever, and the dwellings on the Pirk which it had ab- 
sorbed, has a history that deserves to be commemorated. In the follow- 
ing communication to the World, Wm. H. Bogart has undertaken in part 
this office, and has suggested how it may be more completely fulfilled : 
The people of Albany respond at once to the request of the people of 
the state, and are preparing a beautiful site for the new Capitol. That 
Albany, and only that city, would be chosen for this good fortune, this 
correspondence avowed as its belief, while other cities seemed about to 
grasp the prize — and yet it is settled to be at Albany ; not from any 
popularity of the place, for, in their hearts, the legislature wanted to de- 
cide to go to the metropolis at oncej but the act of giving up all the 
property the state already owned, and to sanction such a thricegilt chap- 
ter in architecture as the casting of such contracts before the city would 
have been, was too far, too much ; and Albany's choice, reluctantly, was 
made a fixed fact. The first step was to do just what was done with the 
old Capitol — to go into partnership with the corporation of Albany. 
Then, as now, the building was to owe something of its existence to both 
state and city; which was wrong in 1796, and is wrong in 1865; for the 
state will pay tremendous interest on all it wins out of any locality. The 
state could best aff"ord to do all its work itself. But in the shape of a 
gift of the land, the municipal authorities have quite rapidly done, and 
are in the act of doing their duty. The famous Congress Hall block, so 
famous in all the collateral history of the capital, is the selected, and 
indeed the indispensable property. This, and the estate in the rear, 
secured, and all that square bounded by Eagle, State, Hawk, and Wash- 
ington streets, is the location of the new Capitol — whose beginning we 
see, but the close of whose construction account it shall not be for many 
a long year to behold. As it is decreed that a new Capitol is to be built, 
it would be folly to construct any other than such an one as will, by its 
convenience and its beauty, be a perpetual favorite of the people — repay- 
ing their eyes the expenditure of their pockets — a fair business transac- 
tion. The old Capitol originally cost ^115,000. It is only facetious to 
mention that sum in view of the certain expenditure on the new edifice. 
The buildings now known as Congress Hall were a few years since, only 
in a section devoted to the purposes of a hotel. The necessities of the 
increasing business, and the energies and enterprise of Mr. Mitchell, 
have from time to time absorbed the dwellings of Messrs. Gregory, Bene- 
dict and Wing. I doubt if the new Capitol, whose marble may occupy 
this place, will in its record furnish any scene more interesting than that 
which was witnessed just here upon an August day in 1843, when John 
Quincy Adams, standing on the steps of the house of the venerable Mat- 
thew Gregory, addressed the citizens of Albany, and told them in such 
felicity of language, such result of wisdom, as belonged only to that 
greatest of our statesmen, his judgment of the grandeur of New York. 



June.] Notes from the Newspapers. 247 

It was a proud hour for Albany. Its people were declaring by their 
welcome that they anticipated the plaudit that history would utter to this 
grand old man. In the political horizon, the clouds, not large, but dark, 
were even then gathering, and when Mr. Adams declared himself the 
unchangeable friend of the right of Americans to ask their government 
whatever of public duty thoy believed that government should perform 
for them, the summer day was vital in that cheering of the crowd. Of 
all the private and public festivity that has made itself heard and felt in 
Congress Hall, the chronicles would be as varied and as voluminous as 
the record of the Nights at Ambrose's, which have made their mark so 
deeply in literature. I have seen a quick and hurried gathering at two 
in the morning — short, lively speech, in voices of a most unfeigned feel- 
ing — with a look as of men whose labor had been of the heart, when 
after the wearying, vexing vicissitudes and cares, and watchfulness and 
conflict of a day — such a day ! — a good and true man — a gentleman, 
had found his victory as United States senator. It was a midnight hour 
when the fervor did not make itself visible in Albany, alone. As men 
made congratulations near the Capitol, so did men exult in New York. 
But some in their good hearted zeal went beyond others. " You take it 
very coolly," said the telegraph messenger, as he watched the efi"ect on 
Hamilton Fish of the news he was conveying to him at this depth of the 
night "When I told it to Mr. Greeley," he continued, " Ae jumped 
over the stove pipe." There is a narrative of wit and brilliant incident 
which distinguished Congress Hall when it was managed by that genial 
and remarkable man, Leverett Cruttenden, and this narrative no one 
could write half so well as could Mr. Weed. My recollections of it are 
of the era of Mr. Landon and Mr. Mitchell, and it has seen in that time, 
so much of kind and pleasant and dignified social life, that its history 
will long outlive its demolition. Grreat public measures and private 
schemes have been taken thence to the Capitol. The evening of the 19th 
February, 1852, saw that superb party given by the eleven ladies. 
There were at Congress Hall that winter a charming society, and one 
which brought to it a pleasant attention from the hospitalities of families 
in Albany. These eleven ladies determined that it was their duty to 
return these courtesies by opening the great hall of the hotel to a brilliant 
festival, and their wish found full accomplishment. The scene was long- 
remembered The hostesses of the evening presided in the metropolis 
and in other places over elegant homes themselves. They brought to 
their duties of the evening an accustomed grace, and in all that could be 
gathered for an evening's cultured festal hours this was distinguished. 
We cannot see Congress Hall depart, if the fates will it to go out of ex- 
istence, without some genial th:)ught of the glad hours that in various 
forms it has moulded. Time to us, too, has its chapter of the serious, of 
the playful, of the wealthy, the witty and the wise, and its memories shall 
be the theme of comment far and wide, when we shall be told that its 
timber and its mortar have been scattered as a ruin. 1. do not know 
when the existence of Congress Hall as a delightful home for the traveler 
shall cease. For many a year it has given the welcome that Shenstone 
thought of all we receive was warmest, but whenever the exit takes place, 
let men believe that a friend has left our accustomed life. Albany has 
grown larger and richer far beyond its older day, but its hotels have 
gradually concentrated in the elegance and extent of the few what was 



248 Notes from the NeiDspapers. [1865. 

once found in the many. Not a great cycle of years lias gone since the 
two mansion houses of Mr. Rockwell and Mr. Skinner made a gateway 
of comfort for North Market street (Broadway), and he had no right to 
say that he had known what the hospitalities of a host could be till he 
had been at the Eagle tavern. These may seem to be only Albany remi- 
niscences, but as homes for winter weeks, as resting places while en route 
for Saratoga, they were as familiar as the sunlight to New York So it 
fairly belongs to our columns to say a kind word of farewell to Congress 
Hall. Sentinel. 

2. Mary, wife of Michael Kennedy, died, aged 59. John Thomas, Jr., 
died, aged 49. 

3. Mary Marshall, wife of William Orr, died, aged 56. 

5. Catharine, widow of George Griffith, died, aged 75. David Thomas, 
died, aged 68. 

6. Bernard M. Tague, died. Dirk Knock, died, aged 61. 

7. Martha J., wife of Richard Ross, died, aged 65. 

8. V/illiara F. Croswell, died at New Haven. He was the son of Sher- 
man Croswell, formerly editor of the Albany Argus, and a grandson of the 
late Rev. Harry Croswell. He has resided here about ten years, graduated 
from the Yale Law School in July, 1862, and was admitted to the bar at 
the following term of the superior court. He met with flattering success 
in practice. His health being quite delicate he went to St. Paul, Minn , 
last December, and returned a few weeks since somewhat improved A 
few days before his death, however, he had a severe hemorrhage, and from 
that time he sank rapidly till death ensued. He was a young man of fine 
abilities, amiable and warm hearted, and had many friends, who deeply 
lament his untimely demise. 

10. Great rain storm mit diinder en hliksem. About 8 o'clock, and when 
the storm was about over, one of Mr. iVndrew Hunter's large hay barns, 
at his West Albany cattle yards, was struck. There was a lightning 
rod on the building, but the lightning did not touch that. It seemed to 
enter the ground near the foundation of the building, and passing under, 
set fire to the hay. In a short time the barn and its contents, about 100 
tons of hay, were consumed. There was no insurance on either, and Mr. 
Hunter loses about $4,000 by the accident. A drove of cattle was stand- 
ing in the yard near by, and one steer that stood at least twenty feet from 

the barn, was struckand instantly killed Theophilus Roessle, farmer 

and landlord. — A traveling correspondent of the Rochester Democrat, 
writing from Albany, has the following account of its notabilities: As 
the traveler approaches Albany from the west, he may notice the change 
in the face of nature as he passes from the rich flats of the Mohawk to 
to the sandy wastes which separates Schenectady from this city. These 
wastes have been either utterly neglected, or else occupied by a wretched 
class of squatters, until at last it has been found that they are capable of 
cultivation. One of the most striking features in this much contemned 
reo-ion is an Italian villa, which within a year past has reared its tower 
and flagstaff", and which stands as a witness of what may be done by 
energy and perseverance. The spot where this villa stands was bought 
by a young German who was in search of a location. He was bred a 
farmer, and had come from Wittenberg. After landing in New York he 
went to Rochester ; but not succeeding there he turned his steps eastward, 



June.] Notes from the News'papers. 249 

and under the pressure of economy, he walked the entire distance to 
Albany. Here he commenced a market garden, purchasing; land at thirty- 
dollars per acre, and clearing it of its wood (stunted pine) and breaking up 
the wilderness. Such was the commencement of Theophilus Roessle, the 
proprietor of the Delavan House, and occupant of the above mentioned 
villa. Mr. Roessle devoted much attention to the celery culture, and 
introduced such improvements as gave him the lead in this specialty. 
Among other of his customers was the newly established Delavan House, 
whose proprietors, however, could not make it pay. Roessle noticed the 
leaks of the concern, and thought that it could be made profitable, and 
^ence became the next lessee. In his hands it has become one of the 
best hotels in the world. In this house Mr. E. C. Delavan invested over 
a half million of dollars, and it brings him an annual rent of $25,000. 
Mr. Delavan's original intention was that it should be a temperance house, 
and Mr. Roessle's clerk states that the former has no complicity in this 
change which has taken place in this feature in its character. Mr. 
Roessle has .continually enlarged his farming operation, and now cultivates 
nearly two hundred acres, whose product is consumed by his hotel. This 
may be explained by the fact that eleven hundred guests are frequently 
entertained beneath its roof at a time. Five hundred head of celery is a 
daily item, and a patch of some eight acres is devoted to its culture. 
Five thousand fruit trees find room in the various orchards, and more 
than half are in bearing condition. Most of these trees are from the 
EUwanger and Barry nurseries. Mr. Roessle has discovered that these 
sandy barrens are the best lands for fruit in the world, and his success 
has largely increased their value. He is now putting up a grapery, and 
this, with his other conservatories, and the long array of flowers which 
grace the avenue, renders the establishment a scene of bearing in the 
midst of a wilderness. Mr. Roessle expended nearly $30,000 on the 
villa alone, and will continue his improvements as fast as may be pro- 
fitable. 

11. John Henry Morris died, aged 19. 

12. John J. McGee died, aged 24. 

13. Isaac Annesley died. Mrs. Adeline Fefler died, aged 20. 

14. At a meeting of the Hudson River Baptist Association it appeared 
that the additions to the Albany churches by baptism were as follows : First 
church 112, Pearl street 76, Tabernacle 82. The report of membership 
was: First church 664, Pearl street" 520, Tabernacle 280, Calvary 215, 
Hamilton street 40, German 70 Addison G. Courtney died, aged 17. 

15. The old Ninety-first regiment reached the city this morning. A 
large crowd of people were on the landing to welcome them, and Captain 
Bowden's gun squad fired a salute in honor of their arrival. The crowd 
was immense, as nearly all of those who arrived belonged here and con- 
sequently drew out their relatives and friends. But there were some 
among that crowd who looked wistfully for their friends, while others 
looked gloomy and sad, deeply attired in mourning. The joy with which 
the living are welcomed home again, safe from pestilence and violent 
death, will find its painful contrast in the feelings inspiredin many hearts 
as the vacant places in the ranks bear testimony to separations from many 
who went out from among us in the strength and hope of manhood. In 
the far fields of the South many of the sons of his country have yielded 
up life in the performance of patriotic services, and the sorrow of friends 

Hist. Coll. in. 32 



250 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

and relatives were freshened as the companions of the fallen return to 
receive the welcome of their fellow citizens. While we give the sur- 
vivors words and tokens of approval, let us not forget the sacrificed aspects 
of the day, or the wounds in mourning hearts, touched into keener sensi- 
tiveness as old scenes come back upon memory with the returning regi- 
ments. It was intended to have the members parade to the City Hall, 
but they no sooner struck the dock than they were carried oflF by their 
friends. As many as could be collected together, were by Aid. Mulhall 
and City Marshal Ten Eyck, escorted to the Stanwix, Merchants and 
Exchange Hotels, also to John Evans's saloon, and furnished with break- 
fast. The number that returned was 666. These were all one year men,* 
yet they participated in the spring campaign and saw some hard service 
before Lee surrendered. Capts. Herworth and Stewart, also Lieut. 
Dederick, were the only officers who returned with the regiment. Lieut. 
Delamater accompanied the regiment on leave of absence. The veterans 
were to remain in service and be consolidated with the One Hundred and 
Forty-seventh New York. The ladies of New York were sadly disap- 
pointed on Wednesday. A number of them learnino: that the Ninety-first 
New York regiment would arrive there during the day, prepared a gene- 
rous reception. Large quantities of strawberries, cherries, lemons, flowers 
&c., were purchased, together with substantial edibles provided by the 
New York State Agency in Howard street, and arranged in tasteful 
order for them ; but when the soldiers came, they were hurried to a boat 
and started for Albany, much to the disappointment of the patriotic ladies. 

16. Sarah D. Lasher died, aged 76. 

18. William Hyatt died, aged 87. Dr. J. H. Case died, aged 58. 
Lucinda, wife of Nelson H. Salisbury, died, aged 27. 

20. Michael McCabe died, aged 73. 

22. Charles Skinner, the last survivor of the house of Websters & 
Skinners, begun in 1782, as printers and booksellers, died in Hartford, 
aged 81. He had been employed in the Albany Post Office since the 
firm was dissolved in 1845, and had recently returned to his native 

city Margaret Elizabeth Betteger, wife of Charles Keeler died, 

aged 29. 

24. James Douglass, formerly of Albany, died at Nashville, Tenn. 
Lydia N. Howard, wife of Charles A. Burns, formerly of Albany, died at 
Newport, Herkimer county. New York. John McGraw died, aged 

47 A game of base ball was played between the Knickerbocker 

club of Albany, and the Williams College club, resulting as follows : 

Knickerbocker, 123 000000 6 

Williams College, 033016313 ...... 18 

25. Jane Lynan died, aged 65. Nehemiah Smith died, aged 73. 

26. The common council after much controversy and a severe struggle, 
appropriated two thousand dollars for the expenses of celebrating the 
Fourth of July. 

27. Jane Byrnes died, aged 45. 

28. James S. Connelly died, aged 31. The 5th New York artil- 
lery encamped on the steam boat landing, and Howard W. Arthur in 
spreading his blanket for the night's repose, fell ofi' the dock and was 
drowned. 

29. Mary, wife of Thomas Hughes, died, aged 46. 



July.] Notes from tlie Neiospapers. 251 

30. An eleo-ant and valuable service of silver was presented by the 
directors of the New York State Bank to Mr. Rufus H. King (when the 
bank was reorganized under the national system), in token of their apprecia- 
tion of his services for more than thirty years as presiding officer of the 

bank The new police force entered upon duty Michael 

Artcher died of apoplexy. He was some years proprietor of the Eagle 
Street Hotel, and subsequently sheriff of the county ; and of late years 
was engaged in the flour business. 

July 1. Three regiments of returning soldiers arrived, numbering 
about sixteen hundred, among them the 43d, which was an Albany regi- 
ment. It was mustered in September 16, 1861, with seven hundred and 
six men, and with the recruits it has received, has numbered within its 
rank two thousand three hundred and twenty-seven. It returns with two 
hundred and ninety-one men and thirteen officers. By general order, it 
is permitted to wear on its banner the names of the following battles, in 
which it has particularly distinguished itself : Yorktown, William.sburg, 
Seven Days' Battle, Fredericksburg, Marye's Heights, Salem Church, 
Gettysburg, Antietam, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Ream's Station, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar 
Run, Siege of Richmond, Sailor's Creek ; also. Surrender of Lee. The 
regiment was received by the Burgesses Corps, and at the armory of the 
corps they were welcomed home on behalf of that company by Col. 
Church, who eloquently and feelingly alluded to their brilliant record 
and to the pride that all our citizens take in it. None of the original 
officers remain with the regiment. The following is a list of the present 
officers : brevet colonel, Charles A. Milliken ; went out as private : 
brevet lieutenant colonel, W. H. Terrell; went out as first lieutenant: 
surgeon, H. H. Carpenter: adjutant, Thomas Lynch j went out as 
private: quartermaster, Miles Goodyear; went out as private. Com- 
pany A : captain E. B. Goodyear ; went out as sergeant : first lieu- 
tenant, Hiram Van Buren; went out as private. Company B : first 
lieutenant, John Ahern ; went out as private. Company C : captain, 
Wm. Russell ; went out as private. Company D : second lieutenant, 
Nicholas A. Swartz; went out as sergeant. Company E: captain, 
Richard L. Annesley ; went out as first lieutenant : first lieutenant, 
James McGraw ; went out as private: second lieutenant, Frank Shubert ; 
went out as private. The following have been the field officers of the regi- 
ment : Colonel F. H. Vinton, promoted to brigadier general ; Colonel B. F. 
Baker, went out as major ; Colonel John Wilson, went out as captain, killed 
May 6th, 1864; Lieutenant Colonel Pierson; Lieutenant Colonel James D. 
Visscher, went out as captain, killed at Fort Stevens; Lieutenant Colonel 
John Fryer, went out as sergeant, killed May 6th, 1864; Major William 
Wallace, went out as captain, killed May 6th, 1864 ; Major John L. New- 
man, went out as captain ; Major Samuel A.Davidson, went out as lieutenant. 
The following line officers have been killed in action : Captain Knick- 
erbacker, Company D ; Captain Lodge, Company A ; Captain Gilfillian, 
Company A ; Captain Burhans, Company H ; Lieutenant Koonz, Company 
D ; Lieutenant Bailey, Company A ; Lieutenant Mead, Company A ; Lieu- 
tenant Carter, Company K; Lieutenant Dempsey, Company B 

Mrs. Bridget Keernan died, aged 56. 

2. Miss Margaret Radcliff died, aged 82. Charles Barnard died, 
aged 18. 



252 Notes from the Neiospapers. [1865. 

4. The celebration of the day was rendered more than usually interest- 
ing by the exercises of the Young Men's Association at the Washington 
Parade Ground, where a building capable of seating five thousand persons 
had been erected, and the state collection of battle flags was presented, in the 

presence of Gen. Grant, who honored the city on the occasion A Queen 

Anne gun, two hundred and thirty five years old, which went through the 
revolution and the war of 1812, was fired by Arch. Young at the Van 
Rensselaer Mansion on the 4th. It was fired two years ago by the same 
gunner, both times at the request of Mr. Van Rensselaer. With these 
exceptions, it has not been fired since the war of 1812. 

5. Charles Dillon died in Philadelphia, aged 27. 

6. The Ash Grove Methodist Episcopal Church dedicated. The south- 
west corner of Broad and Westerlo street has many historic associations 
connected with it, as the site of the Yates Mansion, and the residence of 
several governors, including Governors Clinton and Seward. This ancient 
dwelling has now given way to one of the finest church edifices to be found 
anywhere in the country. The old mansion was situated back from the 
street, in the midst of a fine grove, and its site is included within the 
foundations of the present church. As the edifice is approached the 
beauty of its situation at once charms the beholder. The grounds are 
elevated above the level of the street, and with its nice green sward and 
tall ash trees, it becomes by far the most attractive church location in the 
city. Entering the grounds by the main gateway, on Westerlo street, 
and the church through its front entrance, the visitor steps into a neat 
unpretending hall, covered with cocoanut matting, and from thence 
through one or the other of two entrances, into the main audience room. 
The exquisite simplicity and perfect harmony of this, the principal portion 
of the church, at once imposes the spectator. The style of architec- 
ture is Romanesque, and it is harmoniously carried out. The entire floor 
of the church, both aisles and pews, is carpeted, and the seats and backs 
of the pews are cushioned. There are galleries on either side of the 
house, and an orchestra separate for the choir, in which there is a fine 
organ, manufactured by E. L. Holbrook, East Medbury, Mass. During 
the inspection the choir entertained the visitors with many sacred melo- 
dies, which were exceedingly well executed. The main portion of the 
church is sixty-nine by sixty-one feet, and contains on the floor one hun- 
dred and sixteen pews, and in the galleries sixty-six. It will seat one 
thousand persons. The mode of lighting is novel, and very pleasing, gas 
jets being placed around each column, near the top. There are in all 
one hundred and sixty-six of these jets. Underneath the entire edifice 
there is a spacious cellar, seven feet deep, with cement flooring. In this 
there is one stationary furnace and four portable. I'he foundations are 
very massive, and being imbedded in red clay will last for ages. They 
were laid a little over a year ago. The beauty of the main edifice is fully 
equalled by the transept, which is most admirably adapted to the pecu- 
liarties of Methodism and for Sunday school purposes. Entering this 
from Broad street we have on the left a study for the pastor, furnished 
with a black walnut case twelve feet long and filled with valuable works. It 
is easily ventilated and is adapted to the purposes of a study, and not to 
entertain visitors. While sitting in this room thinking of the church and 
also of the fine parsonage which stands on the same grounds, we could not 
help the thought arising that it must test to the utmost tension the 



July.] Notes from the Neimpapers. 253 

pastor's devotion to itinerancy. Passing along a spacious tall, we have 
on the same side with the study three neat class rooms, and in the 
opposite corner a large and commodious ro im for prayer meetings, capable 
of seating one hundred and fifty persons, and on the side of this a very 
convenient room for the official board of the church. On this floor there 
is also a store room for the sexton. Passing from this floor up a flight 
of stairs, we stand in one of the most attractive school rooms we 
ever witnessed, neatly furnished, extending across the transept, capable 
of seating three hundred and fifty persons and a still larger number of 
Sunday school scholars. On the south end of the transept a raised plat- 
form, or altar, runs the width of the room, and with a small desk, completely 
furnishes the outfit for Sunday school purposes. To the right of this 
platform there is a large infant school room, which will seat two hundred 
children, and is capable of being connected or disconnected from the main 
room by means of glass sliding doors. The school room connects with 
the galleries in the church on either side, thus rendering it easy at any 
time to transfer the school to the church. We have thus endeavored to 
describe this ornament to our city, as best we could, but no description 
can give an adequate conception of it. Those who wish to see a hand- 
some church edifice, without extra adornment, simple but neat, should 
visit it. It is a perfect gem. The church is located in a section of the 
city where it is imperatively needed, and will doubtless accomplish great 
good. Including the grounds, it could not have cost less than S75,000, 
and the energy, enterprise and liberality of Mr. Thomas Schuyler has con- 
tributed largely to the success of the enterprise. Messrs. Woolett & 
Ogden were the architects and superintendents, and the following were 
the contractors : mason, Jas. Ballentine ; carpenter, John Clemshire ; 
stone cutters, Laing & Stormont; slater, J. W. Osborn ; stucco worker, 
A. Boyle; fresco. Rice & Mickel; painting, S. E. Gray; gas fixtures and 
pipes, Robinson Bros.; furniture, B. Wooster ; upholstering, Watson & 
Koonz ; stained glass, Sharp of New York ; furnaces, Michael Delahanty; 
iron fencing, Simeon Conliff"; flagging, grading and sodding, Thomas 
Lynch. The church was crowded to its utmost capacity, and many went 
away unable to obtain admittance. Many of the clergymen of the city were 
present. The exercises were very interesting and impressive. The fol- 
lowing was the order observed : prayer by Rev. H. L. Starks ; reading of 
the address prescribed in the discipline ; reading of scripture lessons, 
by Rev. C. F. Burdick. Bishop Simpson then preached the sermon ; 
presentation of the chnrch by the trustees. The consecration services 
then took place, consisting of a declaration on behalf of the congregation. 
7. Anne, wife of James Sewell, died. John Connor died, aged 28. 
Peter Passenger, formerly of Albany, died at Brady, Mich. 

9. Richard Dwyer died, aged 18. Maria D., wife of Nathaniel Grullup, 
died. 

10. Christian D. Lang died, aged 88. 

11. Agnes Kilmer died, aged 16. 

12. Wm. Regan died, aged 19. Wm. Lynch died, aged 54. Nancy, 
widow of Gerrit Vosburgh, died, aged 80. 

14. Ann Jane, wife of Michael Leonard, died, aged 38. 
16. Mrs. Pamelia Maben died, aged 74. Nelson T. Arms, formerly of 
Albany, died at Nassau, aged 60. 



254 Notes from tJie Newspapers. [1865. 

17. The large pond at the head of Canal street, west of Lark, over- 
flowed in consequence of the heavy rains, and more or less damage re- 
sulted to several houses on the south side of Canal street, near the locality 

known as Gander bay James Jackson, (colored) who had been head 

waiter on the steamer Daniel Drew since she first came on the river, died 
suddenly of heart disease. He was one of the most popular waiters on 
the river boats, and was a great favorite of Capt. Tallman. His remains 

were brought to this city, where his family resides. — Argus John 

Schreiber died, aged 75. 

18. Mary, widow of John McDole, died, aged 74. Jacob Quilhart 
died, aged 37. Susan, wife of Jacob Grifl&n, died, aged 76. 

19. Elida Saulsbury died, aged 101. 

20. The People's Line placed upon the route between Albany and 
New York the new and splendid steam boat Dean Richmond. This float- 
ing palace was a trifle smaller than the St. John, but cost some $200,000 
more than the latter, making her total cost as delivered at the dock ready 
for service, a little over $700,000. In point of workmanship and finish 
she outrivaled all of the Hudson river steamers. The Dean Richmond 
had superior accommodations for nine hundred first-class and six hundred 
second-class passengers, the vessel being so arranged that the most per- 
fect ventilation was secured, and also great pains had been taken to make 
the rooms large and airy. 

21. Betsey Ann Northrup died, aged 52. 

23. Rev. Dr. Darling preached his last sermon in the Fourth Presby- 
terian church previous to its demolition, its dimensions being inadequate 
to the increasing numbers of the congregation since Dr. Darling's advent. 
The edifice was built in 1830. See Annals of Albany, ix, 210. 

24. The work of taking down the Fourth Presbyterian church was 
begun. 

25. Church Movements. — Our city is fast assuming the front rank in 
religious enterprise. New churches, the beautifying of old ones, and the 
erection of mission chapels are progressing on every hand. This, with 
the renewed interest and activity manifested in the Young Men's Christ- 
ian Association, indicate a new era in rehgious afi"airs in x\lbany, which, 
if not short-lived, will result in a more rapid growth of the churches than 
has prevailed of late years. The Fourth Presbyterian congregation has 
commenced the most important movement, in the tearing down of their 
old building, which was begun yesterday by John Bridgford. It will 
take about fifteen months to erect the new edifice. In the meantime the 
congregation will worship with Dr Halley's. When completed, it will 
be one of the most commodious of churches, and one of the finest ornaments 
of our city. It will cost about $60,000. Then we have also, among the 
Presbyterians, a movement to build a large mission chapel in the Bowery, 
near its intersection with Washington avenue, which will be occupied by 
the Spring Street Mission. This chapel is much needed, and will of 
course be attractive and neat. Extensive improvements are contemplated 
by various Methodist congregations. The Washington avenue church 
having purchased a lot on the corner of Lark and Lancaster streets, pro- 
pose to erect, as soon as their arrangements are perfected, a building 
somewhat on the model of the Ash Grove church (just completed), but 
which shall be an improvement on that very fine aifair. The North 
Pearl street congregation are replacing their common windows by stained 



July.] Notes from the Newspapers. 255 

glass, and are otherwise beautifying their house of worship. The Hud- 
son street church are making extensive alterations. The pulpit is to be 
placed on the Plain street side, the seats, of course, to be reversed, and 
the side galleries to be taken out. The Hudson Street Baptist Church 
have given them the use of their house a portion of the time while these 
and other improvements are being made. The brotherly love which this 
indicates as existing between the different denominations, is not the 
least auspicious sign of the day. Besides these movements, the Metho- 
dist Sunday School Union contemplate the erection of a new mission 
chapel for Bath, to supply the growing wants of that section. Among 
the Baptists, we have first, the very extensive repairs on the State street 
edifice, now approaching completion. These consist in the fi-eseoing of 
the ceiling, the blocking of the side walls, altering and cushioning the 
seats, so as to make them comfortable, painting and oak graining the in- 
terior, remodeling the entrance, and repairing the basement. The exte- 
rior is also to be painted. These repairs have made the audience room 
one of the most handsome and commodious in the city. The Calvary 
Church will take possession of the building the first Sunday in August. 
The Baptist JMissionary Union have about perfected arrangements for 
the erection of mission chapels at Paigeville, North Albany and Ken- 
wood ; the growing wants of all these stations rendering them impera- 
tively necessary. At the two latter stations, the meetings of the schools 
and congregations have been held in school houses kindly granted for 
that purpose, but the accommodations are inadequate. At Paigeville the 
present chapel has been entirely outgrown by the Sunday school, and a 
commodious and attractive chapel there, is an indispensable want. In 
addition to these movements, the Pearl Street church is agitating with 
fresh vigor the question of removal to the hill. Improvements are also 

being made by other churches. — Journal At this time Hon. John 

V. L. Pruyn was putting in two stained windows on the east side of St. 
Peter's church, representing the crucifixion and taking down from the 

cross John A. Livingston died in New York, where he had long 

resided. His remains were brought to this city for interment. Mayor 
Talk died, aged 42. 

26. The steam boat Dean Richmond made her first appearance. Her 
length was three hundred and seventy feet, and she had accommodations 
for fifteen hundred passengers. 

27. Ira Jenkins died, aged 80. He was for many years in the dry 
goods business, one of the firm of Jenkins & Hazard, but had for some 
years kept a clock and watch store in Broadway. He was colonel of the 
89th regiment in the war of 1812 (?) and one of the founders of the 
Albany Artillery Company, which attended his funeral. Cara E. Jagger, 
wife of Henry W. Corbett, died at Portland, Oregon, aged 35. Mrs. 
Rebecca Wheelwright Clark, died, aged 81. Mrs. Connelly died, aged 
64. Margaret A., widow of Loring Gilbert (of Troy) died, aged 55. 

28. Charles McCarthy died, aged 36. He was singing a song in his 
own house, and died instantaneously. 

29. John McCulloch was drowned at Schenectady, aged 30. 

30. Kdward D. Wait, lost at sea. The sad and sudden death of this pro • 
mising young officer, by shipwreck on the Pacific ocean, in the steamer 
Brother Jonathan, en route from San Francisco to Oregon, adds another to 
the list of the gallant young men of Albany, whose loss our city mourns. 



256 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

Lieutenant W. was in his twenty-ninth year at the time of his death. 
He was born and reared in this city, and was a graduate of the Albany 
Academy in 1856, twice, during his course there, leaving his name on its 
honorary record ; receiving, in 1855, the Gannon (Philosophical) Gold 
Medal, and in 1856, the Caldwell (Mathematical) Gold Medal. He de- 
signed to become a merchant ; and served in this city with his father 
(George Wait) and afterward with a prominent East India house in New 
York. But when the war began, his attention, in common with many 
others of our best young men, was turned to the service of his country. 
He applied for and received a commission in the regular army as second 
lieutenant of infantry, and was ordered for duty to the Ninth United 
States Infantry in January, 1862, then stationed at Presidis Barracks, 
four miles from San Francisco, California. In March, 1863, he was pro- 
moted to a first lieutenantcy, and in August, 1864, was transferred to the 
staflF of Brigadier- General Wright (also lost on the same steamer), as 
acting assistantadjutant-general. Remaining thus on the Pacific coast, he 
had no opportunity to distinguish himself in the more active service of 
the east, but was at once ordered in charge of a company to Panama, to 
guard the steamers from pirates. By an order of the war department in 
June, 1865, General Wright (one of the oldest and best ofiicers in the 
regular service) was transferred to the Northern Pacific Division, con- 
sisting of Oregon, Washington and Idaho, with headquarters at Fort Van- 
couver. He sailed with part of his staff (including Lieutenant Wait) in 
July last, in the ill fated Brother Jonathan The voyage was nearly 
completed, when, on the 30th of July, the steamer struck a sunken rock, 
about twelve miles from shore, and not far from Crescent City, California, 
and out of about two hundred and fifty souls on board, but twenty were 
saved. The body of Lieutenant Wait was washed on shore, and found 
some time after, by a patroling party, unmutilated, recognized by a 
brother officer, and suitably interred. It has by this time been disinterred 

and prepared for transit home Patience, widow of Nehemiah Smith, 

died, aged 61. Sarah Borden died, aged 44. 

31. TJie Old Eejmblkrai Artillery^ created in 1806, was mustered 
out of the Twenty-Fifth Regiment, and mustered in as an independent 
battery of artillery, to be attached to the ninth brigade. One hundred 
and twenty men were in line for the purpose. So the Old Republican 
xlrtillery is among the things that were. There are many recollections 
connected with the company that will forever remain green in the memory 
of our citizens ; prominent among which is its participation in the war of 
1812, when the gallant Mills, of this company, fell mortally wounded, and 
whose remains now lie in the Capitol Park awaiting the erection of some 
mark to note where the gallant hero lies. The flag which has been carried 
by the old company, bears the stains of Mills's blood. The new battery 
is to have five pieces, and will be a grand feature in all future military de- 
monstrations in this city Delia Olmsted, wife of Capt. William 

Adams, died, aged 76. 

Aug. 1. The census returns showed a city population of 62,825. This 
was a depopidation undoubtedly of more than 10,000, which arose from de- 
fective canvassing Allen Adams died, aged 66. Martha, wife of 

Levi Relyea, died, aged 62. John Randel, Jr., died, aged 79, and was 
interred at Orange, N. J. Alonzo P. Wands died, aged 27. ■ 

2. Bridget Shanahan, died, aged 30. 



Aug.] Notes from the Newsjpapers. 257 

6. William Muddle committed suicide by hanging himself from the 
bannisters ; aged 42. Richard H. Northrup died at Concord, Cabarra 
county, N. C, aged 45. John Hart died, aged 64. 

7. Maria Vosburgh died, aged 58. Mara, wife of Wm. Ellery, died, 
aged 44. Thomas A. Burke died, aged 29. James J. Morlan died, 
aged 17. Paul Keating died, aged 55. Philip Morgan died, aged 47. 
Sarah E. Lloyd died. Mary Chase, wife of Greorge A. Wood, died at 
Jamaica, L. I., aged 35. 

8. Richard Williams died, aged 78. 

9. George W. Hogeboom died at Ballston, aged 30. 

10. The following were the prices received for the articles named, in State 
street. Fruits — peaches of a fair quality sold for ^2.75 per basket, and 
of an inferior quality 12 cents per quart. Plums of an inferior quality 
sold for 12 cents per quart. Pears, supply small but good, S6 per bushel. 
Apples, fair supply, price from $3.50 to $5.50 per barrel. Huckleberries 
15 cents per quart, $4 per bushel. Blackberries 25 cents per quart. 
Water melons 40 to 75 cents each. Vegetables — tomatoes 5 cents per 
quart. Potatoes 12 and 13 shillings per barrel, 20 to 25 cents per peck. 
Corn 20 cents per dozen. Cabbage 62 cents and $1.12 per dozen. 
Meats — best cuts of beef, porter house and sirloin 25 cents per pound. 
Coarse cuts 10 and 12 cents per pound. Lamb 18 and 20 cents per 

pound. Fish — unsettled and fluctuating Mary, widow of Patrick 

Malone, died, aged 68. Eliza Armstrong died, aged 26. 

11. J. H. Sherman, the United States consul for Prince Edward island, 
died at his resi(3ence, in Charlottetown, of congestion of the lungs, in the 
63d year of his age. The deceased was a native of Albany, and previous 
to his appointment as consul, in 1861, was a resident of Vermont. He 
was an accomplished and liberal-minded gentleman, and there are few men 
who were more ardent in their attachment to their country than he was. 
Flags floated at half mast from the City Hall, and other prominent build- 
ings, between the interim of his death on the 11th, and his interment on 
the 14th inst., when the principal stores of the city were partially closed 
and his remains were followed to their last resting place in the Protestant 
cemetery, Malpeque road, by a large and most respectable concourse of 
persons. 

12. Mary, widow of Daniel Doncaster, died, aged 67. Wm. Lutz died, 
aged 24, member of Co. D, 7th N. Y. heavy artillery. 

14. The official order detaching the Republican Artillery from the 
25th regiment and organizing it as an independent battery was issued. 
The battery is termed Independent Battery A, it being the first of the 
kind in the state. It has been recruited up to about the maximum 
number. They will take the first rank in the militia artillery of the 
state Elizabeth Wood, formerly of Albany, died at Bergen, N. J. 

15. Charles Todd died, aged 20. 

L6. William Castle was killed at Jamaica, L. I., by being thrown from 
a wagon. John ^IcNurney died, aged 25. Elizabeth Strain, wife of 
Smith P. Burton, died in Boston, aged 44. Harriet, wife of Stephen 
Myers died, aged 60. 

17. Christian Houck died, aged 70. Mrs. Ellen O'Connor died, aged 
45. Mary, wife of Wm. Akins, died, aged 25. 

Hist. Coil. in. 33 



258 Notes from the Neivspapers. [1865. 

18. The periodical complaint of the impurity of the aqueduct water 
agitated the city, and found vent through the newspapers. The common 
council ordered the opening of the old wells, a retrograde expedient. 

19. Mrs. Abigail Blanchard, died, aged 89. 

20. Maj. Heman A. Fay died at Bennington, Vt., aged 87. He 
was formerly a resident of this city, but removed to B., in 1856. He 
was born at Bennington in 1779. His father, Dr. Jonas Fay, was 
secretary of the council of safety, and author of the declaration of in- 
dependence of Vermont; also a surgeon under Col. Ethan Allen at the 
taking of Ticonderoga. Maj. Fay graduated at West Point in 1810, 
as an officer of artillery, and was connected with the United States army 
for thirty-six years, in different capacities. He was deacon and elder of 
the Fourth Presbyterian church in this city, a true gentleman of the old 
school. His urbanity of manner, intelligence and strict integrity, gained 
for him a large circle of friends, both in military and social life. At a 
silvery old age he entered into the " rest that remains for the people of 
God." His remains were deposited in the Albany Rural Cemetery. 

21. Margaret McGlashan, widow of John Browne, died, aged 72. 
Mary Thompson died. 

25 The following statistics of the Sunday schools of those churches 
styling themselves evangelical, were gathered by Mr. H. S. McCall. 
Owing to the unfortunate propensity of parents, and adults generally, 
to neglect this institution, and the great ambition of children from 15 
to 20 to be considered of age, this class is practically lost to the Sunday 
school, and will be until adults learn that they are never too old to study 
the Bible, in the Bible class at Sunday school. This will account for the 
absence of about seven thousand children from the Sunday school ; but 
there may be of that number one thousand who, despite the bad example 
of their seniors, still remain in the schools. Making a deduction in ac- 
cordance with this estimate, of 6,000, we have 15,000 left. 



Baptist — 

First Church 

Poo7>l S+rppt 


Officers 

and 

Teachers. 

58 

28 


Scholars. 
573 
134 
275 
150 
30 
40 
130 

364 
186 
205 

370 
386 
288 
340 
182 
53 

200 
180 
244 
320 
703 


Presbyterian — 

United* 

Second Street 


Officers 

and 

Teachers. 


Scholars. 
125 
150 


Tabernacle 

Calvary 




Spring Street 

Rensselaer Street *. 
Lutheran — 

First (Ebenezer) . . . 

State Street 

German (Nucella st 
Reformed Dutch — 

North 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Congregational 

Central Mission .... 


26 

24 

28 

,.), . . 18 

50 

44 

40 

16 

.... 42 
8 


250 
250 


Hamilton Street . . 

German 

Paigeville 

Methodist — 

Hudson Street 

North Pearl 


3 

10 

17 

49 

.^3 


130 
200 
160 

400 


Washington Avenue. . . 33 

Ash Grove 47 

Swan Street 45 

Broadway 32 

West Mission 35 

Bowery 20 

West Albany 12 

Presbyterian — 

First 38 

Second 33 


467 
594 ■ 

80 
406 

70 


Episcopal — 

St. Peter's ." — 

St. Paul's* — 

Trinity 21 

Holy Innocents * — 

Grace * — 

Total 

* Estimated. 


150 
353 
125 
150 


Third 

Fourth 

State Street 


42 

50 

53 


150 
9,360 



Aug.] Notes from the News]pa;pers. 259 

Deducting this total from the 15,000, it will be seen that there are 
about six thousand children between 5 and 15 not in the evangelical 
schools, of which number the Catholics, Jews and non-evangelicals will 
doubtless cover a large proportion. The average attendance is not over 

eight thousand Henry Gr. Wheaton was instantly killed near York- 

ville, by being run over by a New Haven train. It is supposed he 
attempted to cross the track as a train was approaching, and was caught 
by it. Mr. Wheaton practiced law in this city, and was one of the most 
prominent and able men of the profession. As a criminal lawyer he then 
ranked among the most distinguished in the country. He at one time 
held the office of district attorney of the county, and also represented the 
city district in the legislature. About 1828, then a young man, just from 
college, with its highest honors, he studied and commenced the practice of 
law in the city of Albany. He was accomplished in mind and manners, 
irreproachable in character and habits, patriotic in principles, elevated in 
aspirations. All who saw him enter upon the battle of life anticipated for 
him a prosperous, brilliant, honorable and useful career. He married an 
attractive young lady, descended from one of the oldest and most wealthy 
Dutch families, and lived in a style becoming his position and prospects, 
devoting himself most industriously to his profession, in which he soon 
achieved a high rank. An able advocate, he was retained in as many 
causes as he could manage. He had a large business, and gave himself 
up to hard work. The management of considerable real estate, which his 
wife inherited, drew him into some unprofitable speculations ; and after 
fifteen or twenty years it became evident that things were not going 
smoothly; why, was not apparent, for there was nothing wrong in himself. 
Then his health failed, his spirit sinking with his impaired health. And 
finally, some ten or more years ago, he removed to New York, where, at first, 
his friends heard that he was mending ; but meeting him, as we did occa- 
sionally, his subdued manner and care worn expression revealed too much. 
For two or three years those who had know him best saw little of him, and 
we now apprehend that these were years of sickness, if not of destitu- 
tion. Mr. Wheaton was buried in Albany, in the Lush vault 

Charles T. Mansfield, formerly principal of one of the public schools, 
died suddenly at Point Pleasant, Va., aged 38. 

26. Catharine, wife of Abram Sawyer, died, aged 58 Bridget, wife 
of John Reilley, died, aged 26, Bridget, wife of Michael Cavanaugh, 
died, aged 49. 

27. Michael McManus died, aged 42. 

29. Air, highest 67°, lowest, 51° The Susquehannah rail road 

being now finished to Oneonta, an excursion was got up by the directors 
of the road, and a train of eight cars filled with invited guests left the 
city at 8 o'clock in the morning, to hold a jubilee at Oneonta. 

30. Air, h.70, 1. 53 Mary, wife of William Lynch, died, aged 35. 

31. Air, h. 73, 1. 67 Maria Stewart, wife of Alexander Garvin, 

died, aged 42. James A. Watts died, and was taken to Carmel for burial. 
Margaret, wife of James Mitchell, died, aged 39. Hugh O'Hare died, 
aged 35. 



260 



Notes from the Neiaspapers. 



[1865. 



Albany County War Loan Bonds — Principal and Interest — Payable 

Yearly from 1866 to 1876. Interest pmjable semi-annually on the first days of September and 
March. $SO,000 of Loan Commission payable second Tuesday in October. 



March 1. 


Principal. 


Interest. 


March 1. 


Principal. 


Interest. 


1866. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 

1867. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 

1868. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 

1869. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 percent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 

1870. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 

1871. 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

6 per cent 

7 per cent 

7 per cent 

Interest 

Total 


$29,000 00 


$3,480 00 
26,071 50 
44,058 00 
2,280 00 
2,100 00 
9,994 25 


1872. 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 

1873. 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 

1874. 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 

1875. 

6 per cent. .. 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 

1876. 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 

Total. 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

6 per cent. . . 

7 per cent. . . 
7 per cent. . . 

Interest 

Total.... 


'$i'24',6o6'6o 




$34,783 00 

■■■■4,566'66 


652,100 00 




19,000 00 




630 00 




$700,100 00 
87,983 75 


$87,983 75 


$124,000 00 
39,973 00 


$39,973 00 






$788,083 75 
$29,000 00 




$163,973 00 




$5,220 00 
52,143 00 
42,469 00 
4,560 00 
2,100 00 
18,658 50 




$124,000 00 


$26,103 00 


143,900 00 




4,560 00 






138,000 00 




630 00 




$310,900 00 
125,150 50 


$125,150 50 


$124,000 00 
31,293 00 


$31,293 00 






$436,050 50 
$29,000 00 




$155,293 00 




$3,480 00 
52,143 00 
32,396 00 
4,560 00 
2.100 00 
8,998 50 


$124,000 00 


$17,423 00 


175,000 00 




4,500 00 




50,400 00 


9,000 00 


630 00 


$254,400 00 
103,677 50 


$103,677 50 


$133,000 00 
22,613 00 


$22,613 00 






$358,077 50 
$29,000 00 




$155,613 00 




$1,740 00 
52,143 00 
20,146 00 
4,560 00 
2,100 00 
5,470 50 




$121,900 00 


$8,743 00 
■"■■4,560'66 


287,800 00 




30,000 00 
31,700 00 










$378,500 00 
86,159 50 


$86,159 50 


$124,900 00 
13,303 00 


$13,303 00 




$464,659 50 




$138,203 00 








$123,000 00 


$52,143 00 






■'$76,oo6'66 






4,560 00 


$4,560 00 




25,900 00 


3,251 50 










$148,900 00 
59,954 50 


$59,954 50 


$76,000 00 
4,560 00 


$4,560 00 






$208,854 50 




$80,560 00 

$116,000 00 
744,900 00 
1,2.58,800 00 
76,000 00 
30,000 00 
285,550 00 






$13,920 00 
365,228 50 
139,069 00 

47,880 00 
8,400 00 

49,701 75 


$125,000 00 


$43,533 00 




4,560 00 




11,550 00 


1,438 50 


$136,550 00 
49,531 50 


$49,531 50 


$2,511,250 00 
624,199 25 


$624,199 25 






$186,081 50 




$3,135,449 25 









Sept.] Notes from the Newspapers. 261 

Sept. 1. [The notices of the temperature of the atmosphere, which are 
given, are from the observations of Mr. Joel W. Andrews.] Air, h 82, 1. 

71 September came in carrying a portable furnace upon her shoulder, 

with which she baked the air on Friday, Saturday and Sunday to a kitchen 
heat. On Friday, when the thermometer stood at 82 deg., the day 
seemed as warm as though the mercury was 100 deg. It was a stifling, 
sticky heat, a great enemy to sound sleep and good temper. — Times and 

Courier Arrival of the New York Veteran Volunteers. — This old 

Albany regiment, which left this city in May, 1861, under command of 
Colonel Fred. Towusend, reached the city this morning, and was received 
and fittingly entertained by the Citizens' committee. The regiment went 
out 200 strong, and recruited during the first term some 200 men. It re- 
organized for the war at Fortress Monroe in 1863, about 200 reenlisting, 
and the Ninth New York (Hawkins's Zouaves) being consolidated with it. 
From this source it received about 400 men, making its total strength at 
the beginning of its service as a veteran regiment about 800. It has 
since received some 700 conscripts and two hundred recruits. It returns 
with 630 men and 20 officers. During its first term of service (two years) 
the regiment did garrison duty at Forts McHenry, Federal Hill and 
Marshal, Baltimore, Md., and at Fortress Monroe, Va., where it was sta- 
tioned at the time of its reorganization. It participated in the following 
battles : Big Bethel, Suffolk, Va., Siege of Longstreet, Hanover Junction, 
Siege of Charleston and Wagner, S. C, Swift Creek, Proctor's Creek, 
Drury's Blufi", Cold Harbor, Petersburg Heights, Bermuda Hundred, 
in front of Petersburg, Petersburg Mine, Fort Gilmore, Chapin's 
Farm, Darbytown Roads, first and second Fort Fisher, and Wilmington, 
N. C. The regiment achieved an enviable fame for bravery, devotion, 
and endurance. At Fort Gilmer, four color bearers were wounded, and 
all the color guard killed or wounded. At Fort Fisher the state color 
which it carried was the first regimental color hoisted on the works. 
It was carried by Color Sergeant F. 0. Wallace. Its officers were : 
lieutenant-colonel, Gr. W. Warren, commanding; first lieutenant and 
acting adjutant, S. C. Pitt; first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster, 
T. C. O'Brien. Company A : captain, G. H. Dixon ; second lieu- 
tenant, A. M. Green. Company B: first lieutenant, Peter Oaks. Com- 
pany C: captain, James Ryall. Company D: captain, G. E. Fordham ; 
first lieutenant, J. T. Williams ; second lieutenant, A. Cobb. Company 
E : first lieutenant, P. McDermott. Company F : captain, G. E. Avent ; 
first lieutenant, W. H. Wright; second lieutenant, Benj. F. Whip- 
ple. Company G : captain E. A. Bohan. (Jompany H : first lieutenant 
M- J. Brown. Company I: captain, J. W. Knowles, first lieutenant, J. 
Hawley; second lieutenant, Chas. A. McKevitt. Company K: captain, E. 
W. Raynsford. The lieutenant colonel went out as a private in the First 
Vermont. All the officers, also, entered the service as privates, and had 
risen to their respective positions by the force of their own energy 

and patriotism John B. Barnard died, aged 47. F^velina C. 

Bogart died. 

2. Air, h. 84, 1. 72 As the train which was due in this city at 

nine o'clock, was in the vicinity of the Centre, about eight miles from 
this city, the axletree of the baggage car broke while the train was in 
rapid motion, upsetting the car and throwing it from the track, instantly 
killino; the baogase-master, Matthew Smith, residing at No. 263 North 



262 Notes from the Newsxjapers. [1865. 

Pearl street, and injuring the person who was in the car with him 

Henry Goffe died, aged 40. 

3. Air, h. 80, 1. 61 Fredus Van Horn died, aged 76. 

4. Air, h. 81, 1. 67 The Eighty-first New York Veteran Vo- 
lunteers arrived this morning. The first that was known of its arrival 
was its appearance marching up Broadway. It was cared for as quickly 
as possible by the Citizens' committee. The regiment was organized in 
this city December 20, 1861, and consisted of one thousand one hundred 
men, mostly from Oswego county, under command of the late lamented 
Edwin Rose as colonel and Jacob J. De Forest of this city as lieutenant 
colonel. It left in February, 1862, landed at Fortress Monroe, and par- 
ticipated in General McClellan's campaign on the peninsula. In the 
battle of Seven Pines it lost heavily, and a large number in the Seven 
Days' Fight. After the retreat to Harrison's Landing, it went to New- 
bern, N. C, and joined Foster's expedition, and from thence to Hilton's 
Head, and took part in the bombardment of Fort Sumter. It then went 
back to Newport News, Va., and from there to North West Landing, a 
place 28 miles from Norfolk. Here it reenlisted — some five hundred 
of them came home on a veteran furlough, and recruited up to a 
thousand strong. As the expiration of their furlough, the veterans went 
to Yorktown, and were organized in the Eighteenth Corps (Baldy Smith's). 
The regiment was at Bermuda Hundreds, Swift Creek and Violent Sta- 
tion. In the three days at Cold Harbor it lost more than half its men, 
eight out of nine captains, and three lieutenants. It was at the success- 
ful storming of Petersburg Heights, where sixteen guns were captured, 
and then lay before Petersburg under fire for twenty-two days. On the 
24th of June the rebels made a terrible charge and were repulsed, leaving 
eighty-one of their dead in front of the Eighty-first alone. From here it 
went over to the north side on a surprise, captured Fort Harrison, and 
was at Fair Oaks. It then aided in keeping the Chapin's Farm line, 
until the night of the 2d April, when the word was received " On to 
Richmond," and on the 3d it entered that renowned capital of the late 
Rebeldom. It aided in putting out the conflagration, marched to Libby 
prison and liberated some three or four hundred of our soldiers, placing 
2,500 rebels in their stead, over which it stood guard for two weeks, when 
it was sent to Williamsburg, where it has remained until sent home. It 

has a most noble and glorious record The common council did a 

wise act, in ordering the erection of a suitable dead house on the Alms 
House farm. Frequently, when a pauper died his remains were placed 
in the dead house, to await the coming of his friends. Sometimes the 
remains were left there a week, and even longer in the winter time, and 
common humanity demanded that such a receptacle should be, at least, of 
decent fashion and substantial material. The little building that had 
been used for this purpose was very much dilapidated, and for some time 
the rats have found easy access to it. It has occurred that during one 

night these vermin have nearly succeeded in gnawing through a cofiin 

Mary Elizabeth Girvan died, aged 23. Minerva Whitney died, aged 20. 
William H. Bowhall died, aged 24. 

5. Air, h. 83, 1. 68 Margaret, wife of George Anderson, died, 

aged 60. Harriet Putnam, wife of William H. Ross, died. 

6. Air, h. 83, 1. 71 Thomas Butler died, aged 53. Joseph Gil- 
son died, aged 59. 



Sept.] Notes from the Newspapers. 263 

7. Air, h. 72, 1. 64 Dr. Wm. Bay died, aged 92. He was born in 

this city on the 14th day of October, 1773. He descended from the noble race 
of Huguenots who fled from France to preserve their religious rights and 
privileges, during the persecution under the French monarch, Louis the 
Fourteenth. Dr. Bay's ancestry went to Holland, and thence to Ireland. 
In 1720 his great grandmother came to America, with her two sons, Andrew 
and William, and settled in Maryland. Xhe Rev. Andrew Bay preached for 
a time in the Presbyterian Church in Beaver street, in this city. His 
brother William remained in Maryland, and had a son John, the father 
of Dr. Bay, who was born in 1743, and died in 1818. He was an edu- 
cated lawyer, and distinguished for his integrity, courteous and generoua 
hospitality. The mother of our departed friend, Ann William Bay, a 
woman of great intelligence, sterling worth, and Christian virtues, at- 
tained to the great age of one hundred years. In a refined and religious 
home, formed by such parents, the youthful faculties of our friend were 
developed, and his character fitted for his career of honorable usefulness, 
and high moral integrity. In 1777 the parents of Dr. Bay removed to 
Claverack, Columbia county, in this state, where he prosecuted his studies 
until he entered Princeton College in New Jersey. On reaching his 
senior year his health failed, and in 1794 he went to New York to study 
medicine under the eminent Dr. William Pitt Smith. Soon after, this 
distinguished physician fell a victim to the laborious and exhausting 
duties of a large practice, and of the responsible office that he held as 
health officer of the port of New York. In the early part of Dr. Bay's 
practice he was at different times prostrated by nearly every disease that 
he was called to prescribe for, among his patients. His strength was 
wasted by several severe fevers. Twice he had the cholera, and once was 
almost in a state of collapse. In the year 1797, just as he commenced 
the practice of medicine at Claverack, he had such decided symptoms of 
consumption, that he was obliged to take a voyage to the East Indies for 
the restoration of his health. Yet he rallied from these various attacks 
and the last thirty years of his life he enjoyed better health than he had 
at any former period. In the year 1810 Dr. Bay removed from Claverack 
to this city, bringing with him a high reputation as a skillful and success- 
ful physician. He became connected with Dr. McClelland, who soon 
after died, leaving him a large field of practice to be occupied at once. 
He continued to discharge the active duties of his profession for a period 

of sixty-eight years The Times and Courier which had been a 

morning paper from its commencement, on this day appeared as an 

evening paper, under the title of Evening Times Blanche Molinard, 

wife of Wm. H. Elliot, died in New York, formerly of Albany. 

8. Air, h. 78, 1. 57 Jacob Loatwall, Jr., died, aged 19. 

9. Air, h. 64, 1. 61 Grant Weed died, aged 78. 

10. Air, h. 63, \. 58 The Boston ferry boat, Thomas W. Olcott, 

was partially destroyed by fire The last marks of respect were paid 

to the remains of the late venerable Dr. Bay, from the North Dutch 
church, llev. Drs. Sprague, Clark, and Wyckoff, took part in the solemn 
and impressive services. Beside a large number of our more aged citi- 
zens, the entire medical faculty of the city were present — thus indicat- 
ing their respect for the memory of the much loved senior of the profes- 
sion in this city. No man ever lived or died amongst us more universally 
respected than Dr. Bay. He had reached the great age of ninety-two 



264 Notes from tJie Newsimpers. [1865. 

without a stain upon his personal or professional character. He was in 
active practice in this city for more than fifty years, and during this 
protracted period, he was the trusted friend and counsellor of, as well as 
the professional attendant upon, most of the leading families of the city. 
Of most genial temperament, and always in full and kindly sympathy 
with his patients, he was ever welcome in the sick chamber and in the 
family circle. The tears of two generations will bedew his honored 
grave. — Journal Marv, wife of William Roarke, died, aged 50. 

11. Air, h. 69, 1. 67. 

12. Corner-stone of the new edifice for the congregation of the Fourth 

Presbyterian was laid The People's Line folks laid the keel of a 

new steam boat. She is to be fifteen feet longer than the St. John, five 
feet wider, and will contain one hundred more state rooms. She is to 
have three tier of the latter, one more than any other steamer ever built, 
"With one hundred additional state rooms and other appointments to match 
the new boat should be able to supply with rooms all the passengers who 
present themselves. This is more than the St. John and Dean Richmond 
has been able to do for the past two months. Although the new boat will 
have three tier of state rooms, she will be only four feet higher than the 
St, John. The dining hall is to be greatly improved, and so supplied 
with ventilation that suppers may be partaken of with a comfort which 
you look for in vain on any boat now on the river. The new boat will be 
furnished in the best possible style, and will cost nearly one million of 
dollars. This is a large sum, and yet as the new boat will able to earn 
^5,000 per day, it will be seen that she will earn money enough to pay for 
her construction in two hundred nights. Steam boating was never more 
profitable than at this very moment. In the way of passengers and 
freight, the People's Line were never more crowded than at the present 

time. The day boats, Vibbard and Drew, are also coining money 

Jeremiah Coakley died, aged 40. Catharine Moran died, aged 39. Catha- 
rine Brady died, aged 86. 

13. Mrs. Catherine Bigelow died. Patrick Dempsey died, aged 60. 

Otis Tingley died atNaugatuck, Conn., aged 60 David H. Carydied, 

aged 60. 

14. William Feely died, aged 53. 

15. Catherine, widow of Peter Johnson, died, aged 84. 

16. Elizabeth Latimer, wife of Weare C. Little, died. 

17. Henry McKenna died. Wotkyns Vanderlip died at Annapolis, 
Md. Mrs. Mary Hallenbeck died, aged 80. 

18. James Murray died, aged 68. Jane, widow of Lewis Lewis, died. 

19. John Allen died, aged 69. Mary Courtney died, aged 70. Mrs. 
Mary Morris died, aged 70. Catharine, wife of Christopher Lewis, died, 
aged 23. 

20. Air, h 58,1. 47 John McGrovern died at Fredericksburg, Va. 

21. Air, h. 66, 1. 59. Henry W. Webster died, aged 49. John D. 
Carroll died, aged 62. 

22. Air, h. 73, 1. 60. 

23. Air, h. 72, 1. 61. 

24. Air, h. 72, 1. 61 Rev. Charles G. Ames, of the Unitarian 

church, preached his farewell sermon. 

25. Air, h. 71, 1. 54 Twenty years ago the basin was of some 

importance, floating nearly all the commerce that was carried over the 



Sept.] Notes from the Newspapers. 265 

Erie canal, amounting to many millions annually. At that time it was 
kept, ordinarily, in a clean condition, as it was the receiving reservoir 
of all the filth from the sewers of the middle and north part of the city. 
it was presumed that it was one of the causes of the cholera that visited 
our city in the year 1832. It is well known that the disease first made 
its appearance in the lower part of Columbia street. Be that as it may, 
of late years nearly all navigating boats sailing the Erie canal enter and 
leave the river at West Troy ; as a consequence, the contractor of this 
section of the canal has failed to keep the basin properly cleansed, as he 
should have done, causing the filth to accumulate so that at the present 
time from Columbia street bridge north, it is nearly all dry land at low 
water, except a small, narrow channel in the centre, emitting anything 
but a healthy, pleasant odor. Rank and sickly vegetation is in several 
places growing, and before long, if not properly cleaned and improved, 
the basin will be among the things that were — a vast swamp and lazaar 
place, from which will ooze forth miasmatic vapors that will spread terri- 
ble pestilence to all in its vicinity ; and inasmuch as the cholera is ex- 
pected to visit us next year, we call upon the board of health to examine 
the matter and insist upon the auditor's drawing the attention of the 
canal board to the omission of the contractor in not keeping the basin in 

proper repair. — Times Andrew Williamson died at Utica on his 

way to Ohio, aged 61. 

26. Air, h. 72, 1. 55 John Gilligan died, aged 46. 

27. Air, h. 58, 1,42. Ralph Smith died, aged 79. Mr. Smith 

was a native of England. He came to this country about the year 1800 
and settled in the city of Albany, where he continued to reside until his 
death. He commenced life for himself at a very early age. Having 
chosen mercantile pursuits as best adapted to his tastes, he entered the 
store of the late James Grourley, then an extensive merchant on Wash- 
ington avenue, and remained with him in the capacity of clerk until 
about the year 1806, when he took a lease of a lot on Washington avenue 
from the late Gov. Taylor, erected the store now still upon it, and con- 
tinued to do business there with but slight interruptions until his death. 
From the commencement and throughout a series of consecutive years he 
did a prosperous business and accumulated a handsome fortune. But the 
close of the war of 1812 left our merchants with large stocks of goods 
upon their hands, at prices which proved ruinous to many, and Mr. 
Smith suifered largely in consequence. But whether as principal or 
security, all the paper containing his name was paid to the utmost. He 
struggled hard through many years to pay, as security, the debts of others, 
and nobly he accomplished his undertaking. Those who have had busi- 
ness relations with him during any part of his protracted mercantile career, 
will accord to him the high but merited praise of being an honest man. 
It can be said of him as truly as of any, that he fought the great battle of 
life as bravely and as much for the good of others, as any one amongst us. 
He lived to become one of our most aged citizens; and when his time 
had come to go hence to return no more, he died calmly and without a 
struggle. None were with him in his last moments but the children of 
his adoption ; but he had the satisfaction to receive, and they to bestow 
those kind and unremitting attentions which throw a hallowed lustre 
around the scenes of death, and soften all its pangs. His loss is sincerely 
mourned, and his memory will be most aifectionately enshrined in the 

Hist. Col. Hi. 34 



266 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

loving hearts of those whose happiness ever seemed to be the highest 
wish of his heart. — Journal Patrick Riely died, aged 79. 

28. Air, h. 59, 1.44 William Leonard, of Wheeling, Va., was found 

drowned. He left Richmond in the year 1862, to prevent being pressed 
in the rebel service, came to this city and worked at his trade, that of 
a tailor, for the firm of Parker & O'Brien, clothing merchants, on Broad- 
way. Some time since he went to Saratoga Springs for the purpose of 
engaging in work, and nothing was heard of him again until he was found 
in the basin at the foot of Spencer street. 

29. Air, h. 65, 1. 47 This being Michaelmas, the board of alder- 
men, under the requirements of the city charter, met to elect a chamber- 
lain and receiver of taxes. The present incumbents, Mr. J. C. Y. Paige 
and James Mclntyre were reelected Martin Melvin died, aged 40. 

30. Air, h. 68, 1. 51 The final and sad end of anti-rentism in 

this county was reached last week by a judgment confirmed in a suit of 
Van Rensselaer against Martinus Lansing, a respectable and wealthy 
farmer of Greenbush. The papers were filed in the county clerk's office 
in this city at four hours twenty minutes P M., Tuesday, and about the 
same time Deputy Sherifi" G-riggs, with a party entered the premises, 
drove out the inmates, and took complete possession. The farm is proba- 
bly worth $20,000. This is probably a final and complete loss of the 
premises to Mr. Lansing, and is a forerunner of what is likely to occur in 
other cases now in litigation. Anti-rent put itself above the law. It 
went into politics, and was ruined. It elected governors, judges, congress- 
men, senators, legislators, sherifl's, and town and county officers, ruined 
the Van Rensselaers, and worried them out of their handsome estate, was 
petted and patronized as long as it had votes to give, and now after long 
years of struggle the law finally puts its broad hand upon anti-rentism, 
and hopelessly squelches it. The lawyers who have grown rich out of 
it, and the politicians who have been boosted into office by its help 
abandon it, and none are so poor as to do it reverence, least of all those 

who have profitted most by it. — Troy News The valuation of real 

estate in Albany county was $33,666,516; of personal estate, $10,939,880; 
real estate in Rensselaer county, $21,373,077; of personal estate, 
$8,107,931. 

October 1. Air, h. 72, 1. 65 Catharine, widow of Jesse Peters, 

died, aged 72. John Hamill died, aged 38. William Bray died, aged 25. 
Margaret, wife of Alexander H. Schultz, died. 

2. Air, h. 64, 1. 53 Alanson Lewis died, aged 38. Eliza Daly, 

wife of James McFadden, died. Emma S. M. Olcott died, aged 17. 

3. Air, h. 59, 1. 43, Gas pipes were laid across the State street 

bridge to light the pier. 

4. Air, h. 64, 1. 40 Lydia, widow of William Truax, died, aged 66. 

5. Air, h. 49, 1. 42 The price of coal was $12 to $14 a ton. 

6. Air, h 50, 1. 42 Phebe A. Chatterson, wife of John G. Hota- 

ling, died. Mrs. Elsie Laraway died, aged 63. 

7. Air, h. 52, 1. 40. Elizabeth, wife of William Pevers, died, 

aged 39. Matthew Flanagan died, aged 50. Rose, wife of Patrick 
Smith, died, aged 41. Charlotte, wife of Robert Powderly. died. 

8. Air, h. 58, 1. 55 Gen. E. B. Bigelow died, aged' 64. George 

C Green of Company G, 31st Mass. Reg., died, aged 24. Rose, wife 
of Thomas McFadden, died, aged 25. Michael Burns, drowned, aged 47. 

9. Air, h. 57, 1. 49 William McCaskie died, aged 7.8. Cynthia 



Oct.] Notes from the Newspapers. 267 

Shaw died. Stephen Haggeny died, aged 24. Maggie Lynch died, 

aged 17. William Cassidy died, aged 26. , wife of Rev. Barnes 

M. Hall, formerly pastor of the Garretson Station M. E. Church, died at 
Newtonville. 

10. Air, h. 61. 1. 53 William Lynch died, aged 40. 

11. Air, h. 66, 1. 42 Honora Houlihan died, aged 57. 

12. Air, h. 53, 1. 46 Letter boxes were placed in the street 

lamp posts, for drop letters The rear wall of the old Grreen 

street theatre fell while some repairs were being made The 

Soldier's Refreshment Committee reported that they had fed from 
the 18th of June to the 12th of October inclusive, fifteen thousand 
and fifteen men, on their return from the war, at an expense of 

$7,642.94; which sum had been obtained by private donations 

George Victor Tycho Emerson, alias Holm, died in the Albany 
Hospital. He was born at Rykawyck, Iceland, September 30, 1839, 
and was the son of a Danish naval captain. Educated in the best 
schools of Denmark, he became a telegraph operator, and came to Ame- 
rica when a lad of seventeen, to join an enterprise for laying a line of 
telegraph around the world, which had been projected by American par- 
ties. The crisis of 1857 threw him upon the world destitute, and he 
became a cigar maker. When the war of 1861 broke out, he joined 
Company I, 1st N. Y. Vols., and served two years as sergeant. Taken 
prisoner at Bull Run, he was paroled and sent to Annapolis where he 
barely escaped alive from an attack of fever. Subsequently he acted as 
captain of Company F, 53d Pennsylvania Militia for three months at 
Gettysburg. After traveling through the western states he returned 
eastward, and by chance stopped at Albany in the fall of 1864, in feeble 
health and dependent upon strangers. Subsequently he recovered some- 
what, and was employed in the census bureau in the spring of 1865, but 
finally yielded to the disease which- for two years had been wasting his 
constitution, and died of consumption on the date above mentioned. He 
had acquired a large fund of knowledge from books and observation, and 
excelled in scientific information, especially in mathematics and the 
physical sciences. He left his effects and papers to Dr. F. B. Hough, 
superintendent of the census bureau. His remains were removed to 
Lowville, Lewis Co., for burial. 

13. Air, h. 47, 1. 34 Charles J. Baker died, aged 21. James 

McCall died, aged 42. Margaret, wife of Henry Patzig, died, aged 23. 

14. Air, h. 46, 1. 32. 

15. Air, h. 51, 1. 45 Consecration of Bishop John J. Conroy at 

the Cathedral, of which full proceedings may be found in the Argus of 

the 16th instant Mary, widow of John Slack, died, aged 77. John 

Talbot died, aged 43. 

16. Air, h. 47, 1. 43 Allen F. Peck died, aged 48. 

17. Air, h. 45, 1. 46 Prudence Wells, wife of George W. Welsh, 

died, aged 88. Annie Robertson, wife of Adam Cowieson, died, aged 
62. Elizabeth Smith died, aged 19. Thomas Callendar died, aged 91. 

18. Air, h. 48, 1.44 Sarah E. Storey died, aged 24. Patrick 

Flynn died, aged 57. 

19. Air, h. 55, 1. 50 Mary, wife of James McClane, died, aged 27. 

20. Air, h. 62, 1. 49 David Ransom died, aged 91. Mary Ann 

Beatty, wife of Thomas Henry, died, aged 29. Thomas Welsh died, 
aced 38. 



268 Notes from tlie Newspapers. [1865. 

21. Air, h. 50, I. 40 Elizabeth Lewis, wife of Abram Pinckney, 

died, aged (33. John McGovern died at the hospital in Petersburg, Va., 
aged 37. 

22. Air, h. 45, 1. 34 The North Albany mission chapel was dedi- 
cated, the sermon by Rev. Mr. Alden. pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist 

church Michael McGrath died, aged 21. Oliver Thompson died, 

aged 4(3. 

23. Air, h. 46, 1. 42 The steam boat Chauncey Vibbard made 

her last trip of the season as a day boat to New York A grotesque 

spectacle appeared on State street yesterday morning. A body of men 
in masks and in all sizes, colors, shapes and fits of garments, with accou- 
trements of divers kinds, and muskets carried in all fashions, paraded 
previous to going on a target shoot. They styled themselves the Water- 
fall Guards — why, no one knows, unless it is by ridicule, to shame their 

female friends out of a fashion regarded by many as ridiculous The 

Albany Evening Post made its first appearance as an evening paper, pub- 
lished by M. & E. Grifiin. at one cent a copy, claiming to be the only 

penny paper in the state ...Mary, wife of John McNamara, died, 

aged 42. Charles M. Brower died at Fort Snelling, aged 19. 

24. Air, h. 48, 1. 30 Mrs. Lucy Harris died, aged 85. Harriet 

Pearse, wife of John Ward, died, aged 39. Isabella Madden, wife of 
Richard Canavan, died, aged 27. Olivia 0. Sheldon, wife of Nelson 
Martell, died, aged 24. 

25. Air, h. 40, 1. 30 Jane, widow of Robert Brew, died, aged 

78. Marietta, wife of O. E. Culver, died, aged 29. 

26. Air, h. 41,1. 34 Augusta Thies, wife of Nicholas Thauer, 

died, aged 27. Lawrence Lamb died, aged 84. 

27. Air, h. 44, 1, 32 A snow storm set in early in the morning 

and continued throughout the day. There was two inches of snow at 
daylight, but the temperature being above freezing point it did not 
accumulate during the day, and wholly disappeared under a warm rain the 
next day John Walsh died, aged 36, 

28. Air, h. 35, 1. 32. 

29. Air, h. 43, 1. 36..... The steam boat St. John, on her down trip 

exploded a boiler, killed 11 passengers, and wounded 15 severely. Of 
the persons killed, a Mrs. Wallaber and her two children belonged to 

Albany., Ellen, wife of Arthur Laughren, died. Charles Whitney 

died, aged 80. 

30. Air. h. 39, 1. 33 Bridget Carlin died, aged 75. Sandford W. 

Northrup died of wounds by the explosion of the St. John boiler, aged 
31 Mrs. Mary Deal died, aged 103. 

31. Air, h. 42, 1. 36 City Finances. — The state of our city 

finances at the close of the last fiscal year was set forth in the reports of 
the Chamberlain and Finance Committee, as follows : 

Receipts and Dishiirsements at the Chamherlain s Office of the City of 
Albany, from November 1, 1864, to November 1, 1865. 

Balance of cash on hand, Nov. 1, 1864, $66,555 70 

Receipts from Nov. 1, 1864, to Nov., 1, 1865, 905,457 60 

Disbursements from Nov. 1, 1864, to Nov. 1, 1865, $883,210 77 

Cash on hand, Nov. 1, 1865, 88,802 53 

$972,013 30 $972,013 30 



Nov.] 



Notes from the Newspapers. 



269 



Receipts. 

City Water Works, $91,218 49 

Alms House 332 57 

Assessments for streets and 

drains, 32,292 29 

City Poor, , 1,534 96 

Contingents, 5,002 11 

Street contingents, 1,717 20 

District Schools, 18,949 76 

Interest, 12,046 10 

Court Special sessions, . . . 924 50 

Police Court, 2,173 94 

Rents and quit rents, 346 51 

Commutations, ... 553 52 

Markets, 1,077 00 

Trustees general debt sink- 
ing fund, 300 00 

Surveyor's office, 37 00 

Justices' court, 1,017 58 

Redemptions, 1,308 99 

Bonds and mortgages, .... 1,000 00 

Real estate, 1,085 01 

Dividends, 431 75 

City taxes, 422,080 60 

County of Albany, 32,779 12 

Costs on assessments, 194 00 

Temporary loans, 185,000 00 

New York Central raU road 

loan, 100,000 00 

Ferry, 1,962 50 

Certificate of city indebted- 
ness, 92 10 



$905,457 60 



Disbursements. 

City water works, $33,628 67 

City water debt, interest ac- 
count, 51,000 00 

Alms House, 30,417 08 

Assessment for streets, .... 44,877 58 

Assessment for drains, .... 6,298 19 

City poor 50,477 52 

Contingents, 30,120 90 

Street contingents, 29,816 02 

Police department, 45,235 34 

Fire department 34,016 02 

District schools, 58,864 19 

Interest, 44,657 63 

City Hall 5,981 14 

Court of special sessions, . . 100 00 

Police court, 4,016 96 

Markets, 2,064 33 

Trustees general debt sink- 
ing fund, 100,600 00 

Ferry, 18,759 76 

Surveyor's ofiice, 2,931 03 

Printing and advertising,. 7,266 27 

Justices' court, 3,412 86 

Salaries, 14,437 53 

County of Albany, 8 25 

Elections, 2,312 00 

City lamps, 41,344 43 

Wells and pumps, 1,599 09 

Industrial schools 527 50 

Costs on assessments, 586 00 

Temporary loans, 90,000 00 

Certificates of city indebted- 
ness, 738 45 

Congress Hall block, 125,555 00 

Redemptions, 1,561 03 



$883,210 77 

The amount of tax returned to collector of this district by United States Asses- 
sor Treadwell, for the month of October, 1865, including also the Collector's 
special list for the same month, was : 

Manufactures and productions, $133,520 70 

Slaughtered animals, 960 47 

Gross receipts, 00 

Auction sales, 30 97 

Total monthly list, $134,512 14 

Collector's list, 51,283 20 

Total October, 1865, $185,795 34 

Total October, 1864 147,069 87 

Increase, $38,725 47 

November 1. Air, h. 43,1. 32 Funeral of Mrs. Harriet E. Isdell, 

wife of Henry P. Vi/'allaber, who, with her two children, was killed on the St. 
John ; her age 26. Eliza, wife of Nicholas Bartlett, died, aged 21. 

2. x\ir, h. 45, 1. 36 Mrs. Anna Eaton died, aged 29. Ann, wife 

of James Vandenburg, died, aged 60. Louisa Hill, wife of Howard Mar- 
vin, died at Port Jervis. John C. McLyman died, aged 84. 



270 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

3. Air, h. 48, 1. 44. 

4. Air, h. 47, 1. 11 L. A. Sheldon died, aged 44, and was buried 

at East Worcester, N. Y. 

5. Air, h 46, 1. 42 Bradford Rowe died, aged 60. Michael 

Cherry was killed by being run over by the Central locomotive near 
Broadway. 

6. Air, h. 39, 1. 27 Nicholas A. Finagan died, aged 28. William 

Fitzpatrick died, aged 45. Henry Quayle died, aged 27. 

7. Air, h. 39, 1. 35 Election day. Ira Shafer was elected to the 

senate, Clarke B. Cochran and Lyman Tremain to the assembly, Giles K. 

Winne county clerk The weather was decidedly winterish. The 

strong north-west wind that blew all day appearing to come directly from 
the north pole. Ice was visible all along the flats in the river. This is 

quite early in the season for its appearance Jacob Henry died, aged 

64. Julia Weaver died, aged 22. 

8. Air, h. 36, 1. 20 Elizabeth Fitch died, aged 80. 

9. Air, h. 36, 1. 28 The St. John steam boat made her appearance 

again, looking as good as new after the great disaster of her exploded boiler. 
Up to this time 15 had lost their lives by the casualty. 

10. Air, h. 42, 1. 32 John W. Conklin died, aged 53. 

11. Air, h. 33, 1. 24 Mary E. Parke, wife of Isaac H. Pangburn 

died, aged 33. John Sager died, aged 74. 

12. Air, h. 30, 1.26 The mission chapel recently erected at Paige- 

ville by the Baptist Missionary Union, was dedicated this afternoon, with 
appropriate exercises. The dedicatory sermon was preached by Rev. Mr. 
Bridgman, and the dedicatory prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Alden. Rev. 
Mr-. Twombly, pastor of the State street Presbyterian Church, also partici- 
pated in the exercises. The edifice is large and commodious, and was 
crowded to its utmost capacity. It is, beyond question, the neatest mission 

chapel in the vicinity of this city Anna Rathbone, widow of David 

M. Jewett, died. 

13. Air, h. 37, 1. 35. 

14. Air, h. 50, 1. 30 Mrs Margaret Douglas died, aged 77. 

Francis Flynn died, aged 61. 

15. Air, h. 54, 1. 35 Everyone is crying out against the expen- 

siveness of living. What with the price of butter at fifty-four cents a 
pound, flour at twelve dollars a barrel, coal fourteen dollars a ton, and wood 
upwards of ten dollars a cord, prices have indeed reached the maximum. 
Life is frightfully expensive at this time ; costly in necessaries, and costly 
in show, but more costly for such appliances as are held to be indispensable 
to one's appearance and position. A respectable suit of clothes is beyond 
the reach of many a man's purse, while the procurement of fine clothing 
is a matter of impossibility. According to the laws of modern society, 
fashion is as absolute in her demands as are the demands of meat and 
bread, so that between the high price of undeniable needs and the extra- 
vagance of social requirement, economy is driven to the wall, and mode- 
rate incomes find themselves at a heartrending disadvantage. No one can 
get behind the scenes of most ordinary middle class families, without being 
made aware of the hard hand-to-hand fight going on between inadequate 
means and the prevalent passion for luxury and display. — Times. 



NOY.] 



Notes from the Newspapers. 



271 



Billofima. 
1 piece of muslin, 34 yards 
6 lbs. of coffee, 13c , 

24 yds. calico, 10c 

1 lb. pepper 

10 lbs. sugar, 8c. 



10c. $3 40 

72 

2 40 

10 

80 



5 yds. Canton flannel, 15c 75 

1 silk handkerchief 1 00 



BilloflSm. 
1 piece of muslin, 34 yards, 70c $23 80 



lbs. of coffee, 50c. 
24 yds. of calico, 35c 

1 lb. of pepper 

10 lbs. sugar 

5 yds. Canton flannel, 75c. 

1 silk hankerchief 



00 
8 40 
75 

2 00 

3 75 
3 50 



Total $9 17 Total $45 20 

Same kind and quality of goods bought in 1860 for 9 17 

The difference now $36 03 

Catharine, wife of Patrick Maloney, died, aged 46. Edward Cahill 
died, aged 39. Elizabeth Kegan died, aged 72. 

16. Air, h. 53, 1. 38 William Stevens died, aged 51. 

17. Air, h. 57, 1. 50 We are now in the enjoyment of truly de- 
lightful weather — the Indian summer — as enchanting and lovely as was 
ever experienced in this climate. A heavy dew fell last night, completely 

drenching the streets, leading many to infer that rain had fallen 

Hugh Clark died, aged 73. Mary Beresford died, aged 70. John J. 
Ross, formerly of Albany, died in New York. 

18. Air, h. 45, 1.41 John Carmody died, aged 96. John Madison 

Moyrton died at Owasco, Mich, aged 38. 

19. Air, h. 48, I. 38 Rose, wife of James McNally, died. 

Jemima, widow of Sartelle Prentice, died in Brooklyn, aged 92; late of 
Albany. 

20. Air, h. 39, 1. 37 Mrs. Mary Jones died, aged 48. 

21. Air, h. 40, 1. 39. 

22. Air, h. 38, 1. 35 Margaret R. Lape, wife of James M. Percy, 

died. Ellen Flanigan died, aged 55. 

23. Air, h. 39, 1. 36 Edward Hand, superintendent of the Bank- 
ing department, died, aged 51. Mr. Hand was a native of Durham, 
Greene county, N. Y. His father, Mr. Alfred Hand, was well known 
as an enterprising, public-spirited, and prominent citizen and merchant, 
and at an early day, the subject of this notice exhibited a capacity which 
gave assurance of future usefulness and distinction. Soon after he be- 
came of age he entered into business at Buifalo, as a merchant, but after 
continuing it for a few years, with a promise of remarkable success, the 
great commercial crisis and revulsion of '37-8 overwhelmed him. He 
then returned to his former residence in Durham, and continued for a 
short time in business with his father. In 1839, he sought for and ob- 
tained a position under Millard Fillmore, comptroller of the state, in the 
Banking department, which was then under the superintendence and 
control of the comptroller. Soon afterwards, the banking department 
was organized as a separate and independent department, when Mr. • 
Hand was appointed deputy superintendent, and continued to hold that 
position until August last, when he was appointed by Governor Fenton 
superintendent in place of Mr. Van Dyck. While engaged in his official 
duties at New York city, he contracted a cold which resulted in pneu- 
monia, and after a painful and severe illness of four or five weeks, 
terminated his life. Mr. Hand was a model of diligence and faithful 
attention to official duties. He enjoyed the entire confidence of the 



272 Notes from tlie Newspapers. [1865. 

bankers of the state, who had the best means of knowing his capacity ^ 
and worth. He possessed fine natural abilities, which had been im- 
proved by thorough education and culture. 

24. Air, h. 40, 1. 39 Michael Lyons died, aged 26. 

25. Air, h. 41, 1. 38 Nicholas Cunningham died, aged 40. 

Theresa, wife of Henry A. Hisgen, died, aged 46. 

26. Air, h. 40, 1. 37 Bridget, wife of John Tallcut, died, aged 

26. Eliza, wife of Thomas McLaughlin, died, aged 29 

27. Air, h. 40, 1. 30 Edward Leslie died, aged 35. 

28. Air, h. 39, 1. 29. 

29. Air, h. 31, 1. 23. 

30. Air, h. 29, 1. 25 Patrick Martin died, aged 23. Owen 

Gallagher died, aged 23. 

December 1. Air, h. 37,1.36 Bertha Elizabeth, wife of John 

Henry Bradt, died, aged 24. Sarah Anderson died, aged 45. Stephen 0. 
Parks died of an overdose of chloroform administered by himself to alle- 
viate the pain of neuralgia. 

2. Air, h. 36, 1. 30 Myndert Van Schaick, one of the oldest, 

wealthiest, and most respected citizens of New York, died at his residence, 
corner of Fourteenth street and Fifth avenue, after a short illness, aged 
84. In 1825 he became a member of the firm of John Hone & Co., 
dry goods auctioneers, in which business he acquired a considerable for- 
tune, which was afterwards increased by judicious investments in real 
estate. In 1832 he was elected to the assembly. The following year he 
was returned to the senate, and was reelected in 1835. He also held the 
offices of alderman of the Fifth Ward, in 1833, and of assistant alderman 
in 1835. In 1855 he was elected president of the board of Croton Aque- 
duct commissioners, which position he retained until 1859. During Mr. 
Van Schaick's term of office, the afi"airs of the Croton department were ad- 
mirably administered. Mr. Van Schaick was descended from an old Dutch 
family, who first settled in Albany. He was a man of sterling integrity 
of character, and was possessed of great administrative ability. A mem- 
ber of the Reformed Dutch Church, he took a lively interest in its 
sabbath schools, and by his wealth and influence, greatly promoted their 

efficiency. Mr. Van Schaick leaves a widow and a large family 

Matthew Brumaghim, on trial for the murder of Charles Phillips at the 

Delavan House in November, 1864, was acquitted Anna Maria, widow 

of Alexander Sheldon, died at Amsterdam. Mrs. Lucinda C. Simons 
wife of John B. Witbeck, died, aged 55. 

3. Air, h. 40,1. 36 The Rev. Dr. Clark preached his third anni- 
versary sermon at the North Dutch Church, reciting the following sta- 
tistics : Membership added during the three years, 116 ; total membership, 
650 ; connected with church and congregation, 295 families, embracing 
1360 persons. The pastor has made over 2,000 calls during the three 

•years. The rite of baptism has been administered to 49 children and 18 
adults, and he has officiated at 53 funerals. Contributions for benevolent 
objects and church purposes, including rentals of pews, amounted, in round 
numbers, to $65,000. The sabbath school is in a high state of prosperity, 
numbering 345 scholars, 50 officers and teachers, and a library of 1,000 
volumes David Terry died, aged 83. 

4. Air, h 44, 1. 40 Patrick Horan died, aged 53. 

5. Air, h. 48, 1. 44 Phebe A. Long died, aged 24. Joseph 

Mittaner died, aged 18. 



Dec] 



Notefi from the Newspapers. 



273 



6. Air, h. 38, 1. 28 The County Budget.— The following is. the 

county budget, as prepared and reported to the board of supervisors by 
Thos. Kearney, county treasurer : 

State school tax $321,550 00 

Support of poor at Alms 
House, under contract 
with the city of Albany, 
as per estimate of the 
chamberlain 

Payment of jurors, justices, 
constables and court 
orders 

Support of patients in Lu- 
natic Asylum 

PajTuent of supervisors 
and officers 

Salary of district attorney 

Salary of assistant district 
attorney 

Salary of supt. of Peniten- 
tiary 

Salary of recorder of Al- 
bany 



20,000 00 



17,000 00 
6,000 00 



12,000 00 
2,800 00 



1,000 00 
2,500 00 



00 



Salary of coimty judge. . . 


2,300 00 


Salary of county treasurer 


1,500 00 


Expenses of clerk hire in 




county treasurer's office 


1,200 00 


Salary of county physician 


200 00 


Salary of jailor 


900 00 


Night-watch at jail 


650 00 


Rent of county treasurer's 




office 


300 00 


Salary of chaplain to jail 


100 00 


Salary of excise marshal 


800 00 


Salary of surrogate 


2,500 00 


Advance on county taxes 




in 1865 to pay bounties 


19,822 00 


Salary of recording clerk 




county court 


375 00 


Correcting enrollment 


555 00 



Total $315,352 00 



Principal and Interest of County Bonds. 
Deficiency of interest on county bonds (six month's interest, Sept. 

1, 1865,) $77,987 75 

Interest on $285,550 couuty bonds, issued in 1865, unprovided for 

in tax levied in 1864 13,105 75 

Principal of county bonds coming due March 1, 1866 700,100 00 

Interest on county bonds for 1866. . .' 147,409 00 

Interest on $30,000 loan of commissioners 2,100 00 

Total $1,256,054 50 

Less balance of cash and state stock on hand 472,190 68 



$783,863 



George Cullen died, aged 70. Maria Elizabeth Van Rensselaer died. 

7. Air, h. 37,1. 31 Thanksgiving day. Snowstorm all day 

Joel Marble, who for the past eight years had been superintendent of 
the Albany Orphan Asylum, resigned, and was succeeded by the Rev. 
Timothy Fuller, of Rochester. In a letter published herewith, the 
managers of the Asylum render a tribute of gratitude, which, generous 
as it is in expression, is fully deserved, to " the wise, faithful, assiduous 
and energetic superintendence " of Mr. Marble; and not less warm and 
respectful acknowledgment to Mrs. Marble. Our citizens share in this 
feeling ; and their obligations extend beyond the time and the acts to 
which the managers so gratefully refer. Mr. Marble, who came here in 
1838, and took charge of School No. 2, on State street, was the first to 
advocate the present educational system, adopted in 1844, by which the 
schools were placed under the charge of a board, and opened free to 
pupils. In 1854 he relinquished the school (in which he bad found 
fifty pupils and left three hundred), and retired on a farm in Massa- 
chusetts ; but after four years resumed his residence here, taking charge 
of the Asylum at the head of Washington avenue, whose blooming 
grounds and smiling children attest his paternal care. This charge he 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 35 



274 Notes from the NetDfi]pai}ers. [1865. 

has now resigned, in order to take up his residence in New York 

Mary Hinds, sister of the late Jacob Henry, died. Mary Maheta died, 
aged 48. John Smith died, aged 80. 

Air, h. 35, 1. 15 Wintry morning ...Under an order from 

the provost marshal general, Capt. S. H. H. Parsons, provost marshal 
of this district, made a full report of the work performed by him and his 
subordinates since the office was instituted. The office was organized on 
the 27th of May, 1863, Captain John 0. Cole being appointed provost 
marshal. Captain Parsons succeeded Captain Cole on the 11th of Jan- 
uary, 1861. There have been four calls for troops and one draft since 
the creation of the office. 

The total number of men drafted in the district was 4,244 

The number of drafted men held was 1,674 

The number of drafted men discharged for various causes 

of exemption was 1,889 

The number of drafted men that paid commutation was. . 1,161 

The number that rendered personal service was 2 

The number that were arrested for failing to report and 

forwarded to the service was 6 

The number of substitutes for drafted men enlisted by 

Captain Cole was 388 

The number enlisted by Captain Parsons 76 

The total amoimt paid to sucli substitutes by principals 

as their boimty was, under Captain Cole $60,100 00 

Ditto imder Captain Parsons 18,000 00 

The number of substitutes enlisted before a draft and to 

the credit of principals liable to a draft, all under Cap- 
tain Parsons, was 232 

The amount of money paid to them by their principals, 

and as exclusively their own, was 150,360 00 

The total number of volunteers enlisted and mustered by 

Captain Cole was 413 

The total number of volunteers enlisted and mustered by 

Captain Parsons 3,555 

Making the total number of substitutes and volunteers 

enlisted by both marshals 4,664 

The total amount of money raised by the district for the 

payment of bounties and the presentation money for 

volunteers and substitutes (not including the amount 

raised by voluntary subscription) and which has become 

a tax upon the property of the district, is 4,205,065 45 

The total amount of the above money (not including the 

presentation fees) wliich has been paid to volunteers 

and substitutes imder the supervision of the provost 

marshal, has been, under Captain Cole 123,900 00 

Ditto under Captain Parsons 2,603,000 00 

Total $2,726,900 00 

The total number who escaped from the head-quarters here under both 
marshals was 33. The total number who escaped en route to the rendez- 
vous was 21. At least one-half of the above number were retaken. The 
largest number of recruits mustered in upon one day was 183. In a 
period of ten days there were mustered in 932. The greatest number 
forwarded in any day to the general rendezvous was 135. For several 
days there were as many as one hundred forwarded each day. The 
greatest number of guards sent in command of any detachment of re- 
cruits, was 12. It was the practice of the marshal to refuse to enlist 



Dec] Notes from the Newspapers. 275 

any man who was believed to be dishonest in his purposes, and whose 
intention was supposed to be to desert after receiving a bounty. A re- 
cord was kept of such cases. The number thus rejected swells up to the 
enormous figure of fifteen hundred. And yet, as the report states, this 
number would have been much larger had not the well-known practice 
of the marshal deterred hundreds from offering themselves at all. In 
thus refusing to enlist men the marshal always gave them an opportunity 
of establishing their integrity by certificates or other proof, and offered 
to furnish the means to do it; but out of the above large number rejected 
not a dozen ever came back with any such proof. As an instance of the 
fearful extent of bounty jumping, it is stated that one of the men con- 
victed of desertion, and now in our penitentiary, has voluntarily and 
boldly stated that he " has jumped the bounty thirti/-tioo times." The 
total number of deserters arrested was, under Captain Cole 235 ; under 
Captain Parsons, 856 ; total, 591. The aggregate amount paid for 
rewards and expenses in arresting deserters was $9,896.22. Since Jan- 
uary last all the flagrant cases of desertion have been tried before the 
court-martial ordered here by General Dix at the request of the provost 
marshal. There have been tried thus far twenty-eight cases, in all but 
one of which a conviction has followed, and in all but three a sentence to 
the state prison. Some cases remain yet to be tried. There have been 
but three escapes of deserters within a year past, all of whom have been 
retaken Bernard McCormick died, aged 51. 

9. Air, h. 25, 1. 21 Anna, wife of Simon Stroebel, died, aged 40. 

10. Air, h. 81, 1. 25 The Rev. Dr. Wyckoff preached his fare- 
well sermon to the church over which he had so long presided. For 
twenty-nine years he had ministered in the pulpit of the Middle Dutch 
church, and his sermon upon leaving the accustomed place was full of 
touching tenderness and pleasant reminiscences. Among other thin.o-s 
the venerable preacher said he had never during all his ministration here 
been absent from the pulpit a single Sunday in consequence of sickness. 

His successor. Rev. Joachim Elmendorf, was installed Albert 

liathbone died in New York, aged 24. George W. Welsh died, aged 90. 

11. Air, h. 88, I. 25 Sabina Miller died, aged 19. 

12. Air, h. 89, 1. 33 The canals were closed by order, but the 

weather being mild, boats that were en route were allowed to proceed to 

their destination Dr. David Boyd died. Catharine, wife of Daniel 

Carroll, died, aged 68. 

Air, h. 46, 1. 82 The assessed valuation of the real and personal 

property of the city and county of Albany was stated as follows : 

WARDS. REAX. PERSONAL. TOTAL. 

First Ward $1,144,799 $ $1,144,799 

Second Ward 1,154,150 92,290 1,246,446 

Third Ward 1,621,638 166,800 1,788,438 

Fourth Ward 3,204,065 1,214,086 4,418,151 

Fifth Ward 3,560,898 4,012,035 7,572,933 

Sixth Ward 2,068,510 593,350 2,661,866 

Seventh Ward 1,258,306 104,000 1,359,306 

Eighth Ward 1,295,625 238,100 1,533,725 

Nintli Ward 1,944,478 572,100 2,516,578 

Tenth Waid 3,367,005 291,700 3,658,705 

Total $20,619,474 $7,281,461 $27,900,935 



276 Notes from the Newspapers. [1865. 

TOWNS. ACRES. REAL. PERSONAL. TOTAL. 

Berne 38,851 I 374,138 $ 79,977 $ 454,115 

Betlilehem.... 88,117 1,937,666 156 250 3,098,916 

Coeymans .... 30,566 1,045,075 181,946 1,227,021 

Giiilderland... 32,501 745,373 94,388 839,760 

Knox 26,191 271,530 71,137 343,667 

New Scotland.. 36,086 1,083,015 108,104 1,191,119 

Eensselaerville. 36,840 587,185 143,040 729,225 

Westerlo 35,441 536,485 114,828 651,313 

Watervliet. . . 34,869 2,237,865 321,300 2,559,165 

" West Troy. 1,240,845 296,988 1,537,283 

" Colioes,.... 1,958,920 118,206 2,077,126 

Total Towns $12,017,596 $1,685,114 $13,702,710 

Total Wards 20,619,474 7,281,461 37,900,985 

Grand Total .$33,637,070 $8,966,575 $41,608,645 

Assetsed Valuation for 1864. 

Wards $30,803,388 $8,514,993 $28,817,275 

Towns 12,115,266 1,524,888 13,640,154 

Grand Total $32,417,549 $10,039,880 $42,457,429 

A comparison of the assessed valuation of the present year with that 
of 1864 shows an increase in real estate in this city of #317,191, and a 
decrease in personal of ^1,233,531. There is a decrease in the valuation 
of the real estate in the towns, compared with last year's valuation, of 
$97,670, and an increase in personal of $160,226. Compared with the 
grand total valuation in the wards and towns for 1864, there is a decrease 
in the valuation for 1865 of $853,784. 

14. Air, h. 38, 1. 30 The inspectors of the penitentiary appeared 

before the board of supervisors with their annual report. It appeared that 
the gross earnings of the penitentiary for the past year were $67,648, and 
the expenses of carrying on the institution $46,268; leaving a profit of 
$21,380. The number of prisoners in confinement was 506, of which nearly 

half were negroes. They were mostly employed in making shoes 

Annie E. Scrafi"ord died, aged 17. Michael Clarke died. He had re- 
presented the Fifth Ward in the board of supervisors. 

15. Air,h. 30, 1. 15 Thursday afternoon (14th) there was a sudden 

change in the weather, and during the night it was intensely cold and con- 
tinued so all this day. At 11 o'clock Thursday night the river was as free 
from ice as in July. After that time ice commenced making, and at daylight 
this morning the river was covered with floating ice which kept increasing 
in quantity and thickness all day. The Dean Richmond arrived at the usual 
hour and left again with a large load of freight, not to come up again unless 

the weather should change Lucy, widow of Timothy B'assett, died, 

aged 84. 

16. Air, h. 21, 1. 12 Navigation on the Hudson was virtually at 

an end. The cold weather of the past forty-eight hours had the effect of 
giving the river a winter overcoat, which looked very likely to wear well 
for a month to come. Consequently a number of boats were icebound 
several miles below the city. 

17. Air, h. 19, 1. 16. 

18. Air, h. 23, 1. 16 Ruth Ann, wife of Wm. H. Buck, died, ased 

49. Bridget O'Hanlon died, aged 68. Sidney Smith, died at Cincinnati 



Dec] Notes from the Newspapers. 277 

of consumption. He was stage manager of the Academy of Music, during 
its opening season. He began his theatrical career in the old Albany 
Museum. His death occurred after a protracted illness. Mr. Smith was 
a talented actor, an accomplished manager and a genial gentleman. — Ex- 
press. 

19. Air, h. 32, 1. 23 The heavy rains of the previous night, and 

the strong southerly winds of this morning broke up the ice in the river, 
rendering navigation difficult, but not impossible. The steamer Norwich 
came up the river and after lauding two laden barges, turned about and 

steamed down the river Thomas Lyons died, aged 21, late of Co. D., 

91st Reg. 

20. Air, h. 38, 1. 32 The following persons were elected directors 

of the Albany and Schenectady Turnpike Company, for the ensuing year, 
viz : Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Stephen Van Rensselaer, Richard Van Rens- 
selaer, John Tayler Cooper, Volkert P Douw, David I. Boyd, Orlando 

Meads, Norman Dings, and Andrew E. Brown Mrs. Elizabeth Plumb 

died, aged 84. Maria Lange died, aged 36. Philip Ford, late of Albany, 
died at Little Falls, aged 77. Robert Stephens died at sea, aged 45. 

21. Air, h. 29, 1. 24 Three or four inches of snow having fallen 

during the night, and the ground being well frozen, winter seemed to have 

fairly set in, and the sleighing was good James Muir died, aged 

78. Ann, widow of William Connersdied, aged 45. Harrison L. Kewin 
died, aged 24, 

22. Air, h. 30, 1. 9 Michael Moran died, aged 48. 

23. Air, h. 20, 1. 12 The river was now completely closed for a 

considerable distance down the river; but the ice was not strong enough 

to cross on, and the ferries were still running Margaret Beattydied, 

aged 27. 

24. Air, h. 21, 1. 15 The Rev. J. S. Kennard was installed pastor 

of the Calvary Baptist Church. 

25. Air, h. 33, 1. 29 The Pine Grove Presbyterian Church, situ- 
ated on the Schenectady Turnpike, was dedicated Sunday morning. A 
large concourse of citizens were present. Rev. Dr. Darling preached the 
sermon Amelia, wife of Seth Griffin, died, aged 58. 

26. Air, h. 38, 1. 28 Catharine, widow of Matthew Naley,died. 

27. Air, h. 47, 1. 33 The property lately owned and occupied by 

the Washington Avenue Baptist Church, was sold to Anthony John- 
son, who proposed to convert it into a piano forte manufactory For 

several days prior to Christmas the weather was all that a reasonable per- 
son could desire. The air was sufficiently frosty to render it invigorating 
and keep the snow in good sleighing condition ; but that capricious gentle 
man, the clerk of the weather, ordered us a spell of slush, mud and 
London fog. The ice on the river was rotten and unsafe, and skating 
received a death blow ; the wind got round to the north, and the weather be- 
came colder, but not sufficient to stiffen the mud in the streets Andrew 

Joy died, aged 65. Elisha McDonald died, aged 21. Mary E., wife of 
Joseph Lyon, died. Mary Lyall died, aged 26. 

28. Air. h. 52, 1. 35. The mild weather and the rain that had fallen, 

caused quite a freshet in the river, and the ice broke up and commenced 
moving down. The water was three to five feet below the level of 
the pier, and a breaking up was not anticipated. The ice, however, had 
been so greatly weakened that the pressure of water caused it to give way. 



278 Notes from tli e Newspapers. [1866. 

Just before the breaking up, a large number of men were at work on 
the western span of the new rail road bridge, the span next west of the 
draw, which is about two hundred and fifty feet in length. A large 
number of piles had been driven in the river on which a working platform 
had been built to enable the men to work. The trestle work across the span 
which was of very heavy timber, was nearly completed, but the piles had 
not been removed. When the ice moved down against the piles the pres- 
sure was so great that they could not resist it and were quickly carried 
away. The tressle work, being in some way attached to the piles, gave 
way with a crash and was precipitated into the river. As it fell the 

timber was badly broken and floated down the river Benedict 

Lewis died in New York. 

29. Air. 36. 1.32 Mary Ryckman, wife of Alex. W. Gregory, 

died, aged 46. Catherine Ann Jacobs died, aged 20. 

30. Air. h. 35, 1. 21. 

31. Air. h. 21, 1. 20 The total receipts of the year, at 

the Chamberlain's ofiice was $905,457.60. The disbursements were 
$883,210.77. The city debt was $1,483,250, the water debt being 
$850,000. 

1866. 

January 1. Air, h. 33, 1. 23 ...The time honored customs of the 

day were observed with great hilarity Harriet H., wife of George 

W. Butts, died. Mary, wife of John Ryan, died, aged 35. James S. 
Gould, son of Job Gould, formerly of this city, died at King's Ferry, 
Cayuga Co., aged 66. 

2. Air, h. 37, 1. 27 Meeting of the legislature; Hon. Lyman 

Tremain elected speaker of the house of assembly Mary Selick died, 

aged 22. 

3. Air, h. 30, 1. 16 Some time since, the proprietor of the De- 

lavan House, Theophilus Roessle, rendered to the city a bill of some 
fourteen hundred dollars for the feeding of troops, then on their way to 
the seat of war. The bill was regarded as excessively exorbitant, and 
payment was refused. Mr. Roessle sued the city for the amount. This 
morning the case was decided against the city, and deputy sherifi" McGinty 
took possession of the common council chamber and all the property 
therein, consisting of the portraits of the governors of the state, desks, 

chairs, etc., to satisfy the amount of the judgment The Baptist Church 

in Washington avenue was bought by the catholics. Price $8,000. If 
the catholics keep on they will own all the churches in the city, forcing our 
protestant friends to do up their services in the park or on the State street 
bridge. By the way, why do our church people build beyond their means, 
and give mortgages which must sooner or later end in a forced sale or a 

foreclosure. — Eveniny Post James McGregor, formerly of this city, 

died at Johnstown, aged 70. 

4. Air, h. 28, 1. 22. 

5. Air, h. 29, 1. 4 below zero ; other thermometers indicated — 5° 

Levi Phillips died, aged 66. Mrs. Ann Gilligan died, aged 21. Hannah 
Rowe died, aged 76. 

6. Air, h. 12, 1. b; thermometer indicated — 6° The river was 

now strongly bridged, and teams could safely cross on the ice for the first 
time this winter Bridget Markey died, aged 50. 



Jan.] 



Notes from the Newspapers. 



279 



'7. Air, b. 10. 1. — 7 Thermometer indicated 10° below zero at 

noon. 

8. Air, h. 2, 1. — 14 This was a bitter cold day and the previous 

night was by far the coldest of the season. Many of the early risers 
felt the keen atmosphere creeping in their houses, and upon examina- 
tion found the water pipes frozen. Colder weather has been experienced 
in this latitude, but yesterday and this morning the atmosphere was by 
far too cold for comfort. At sun-rise this morning the thermometer 
ranged 16° below zero, and in some parts of the city thermometers ranged 
as low as 26° below zero. In glancing over the record of past years, we 
find the following : 



1857, January 21, —18 

1835, December 16, 23 

1840, January 17, 23 

1859, January 10, 18 



1859, December 2J 
1861, January 13, 
1861, February, . . 
1866, January 8,.. 



-16i 
16 



16 



At 10 o'clock this morning, says Mr. Joel W. Andrews, the true height 
of the standard barometer after applying the usual corrections, stood at 
31.130 inches. This shows a greater elevation of the barometer column 
than I have ever known recorded in this locality. On the 17th of Janu- 
ary, 1859, it was recorded at 30.992 inches in this place, and at other sta- 
tions, Boston, Mass., and New York, very nearly the same, but no reports 
over thirty-one inches. The observation, to-day, is one of very rare 
occurrence in any locality on the general level of earth's surface. 

9. Air, h. 5, 1. — 4 Some ten years ago a society connected with the 

Academy resolved to have an annual supper (and sleigh ride if possible) 
every 9th of January, until only one member was left alive. The 
members pledged themselves to lay aside all engagements, save those 
arising from sickness, and to attend the annual supper. Time rolled 
on, the 9th of each January came and was celebrated : some members 
left the city. That lessened the number present at the reunion. By-and- 
by came a death, the first. Then more members departed from the Aca- 
demy to seek their fortunes. Then came more deaths. Still the annual 
meeting was large, and the society assumed the task of erecting a monu- 
ment to Dr. Beck. At the reunion on January 9th, 1865, twelve mem- 
bers were alive and well, and present. On the evening of January 9th, 
1866, two men sat in solitary state at the familiar board. The members 
were all young in years, apparently destined to live a long and happy life, 
yet the two sat drearily looking at ten empty chairs, their memory peo- 
pling them with familiar forms. The usual order was gone through with ; 
correspondence from distant members was read, the Rallying Song was 
sung. And the grim humor of an election, one being chosen president, 
the other secretary and treasurer, took place. And when the two shook 
hands and separated, each one said in his heart : " Shall I be alone at the 
reunion next year ; or will my comrade be alone ; or will there be no 
meeting ?" It was a solemn question. 

First National Bank. — Directors : Thomas Schuyler, Matthew H. Read, 
Adam Van Allen, Charles H. Adams, Frank Chamberlain, G. A. Van 
Allen, Noble H. Johnson, Horace D. Hawkins, Samuel Schuyler. In- 
spectors : Alfred Van Santvoord, Edward Robinson, William H. Taylor. 

Commercial National Bank — Directors : James I). Wasson, Robert 
H. Pruyn, Ezra P. Prentice, Eliphalet Wickes, James N. Ring, Archibald 



280 Notes from the News]japers. [1866. 

McClure, Peter Cagger, Peter Monteath, Robert L. Johnson, Benjamin 

C. Raymond, Thomas P. Crook, Jeremiah J. Austin, Alfred Van Sant- 
voord. 

Merchants' National Bank of Alhany. — Directors : John Tweedle, 
Richard Vdn Rensselaer, Robert A. Forsyth, Joseph H. Bullock, A. C 
Puling, Borden H. Mills, Charles B. Redfield, Geo. A. Wolverton, Nathan 

D. Wendell. Inspectors: Jesse C. Potts, C. W. Armstrong, James 
McMartin. 

Union National Bank.— Directors : Billings P. Learned, Wm. N. Strong, 
Charles W. Durant, Amos P. Palmer, William L Learned, Daniel T. 
Charles, Alfred Wild, Chauncey Vibbard, James W. Eaton, Chas. E. 
Gifford, Edwin Andrews, A. E. Stimson, B: A. Sweet. Inspectors: 
James C. Cook, J. A. Post, J. H. Rice. 

New York State National Bank. — Directors : Rufus H. King, Franklin 
Townsend, William Adams, John H. Van Antwerp, J. Howard King, 
Samuel H. Ransom, David I. Boyd, Harmon Pumpelly, Jeremiah Water- 
man, Franklin Edson, Charles B. Lansing. Inspectors: George Dexter, 
Ernest J. Miller and Jesse C. Potts. 

At a subsequent meeting of the directors, Messrs. Rufus H. King and 
Franklin Townsend were reelected president and vice president. 

National Mechanics and Farmers' Bank — Directors: Thomas W. 
Olcott, Alanson Sumner, George B. Hale, Theo. F. Humphrey, Charles 
Newman, John J. Olcott, Alden March James B. Jermain, Wm. H. 
DeWitt, Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Thos. Olcott. 

National Albany Exchange Bank. — Directors : James McNaughton, 
Wm. McElroy, William Gould, Christopher W. Bender, Amos Pilsbury, 

Lansing Merchant, S B. McCoy, Wm. G. Thomas, Lemon Thomson 

John O'Connell died, aged 33. Catharine, wife of Roger McGrath died, 
aged 36. 

10. Air, h. 9, 1. 6. 

11. Air, h. 26, 1. 15 Annie Adair, wife of W. W. Smith, died, 

aged 25. Honorah, widow of Jeremiah Coockley, died, aged 70. Eliza 
Jane McKown, wife of George S. Hamill, died. William Tingle died, 
aged 21. 

12. Air. h. 37, 1. 27 David Gillan, died, aged, 79. James Mur- 

taugh died, aged 33. John D. Turnbull died aged 58. Honora Gorman 
died, aged 28. 

18. Air, h. 35, 1. 31 Fillmore G. Hulse, died, aged 38. Abram 

J. Johnson died, aged 69. Andrew J. Clicker died, aged 36. 

14. Air, h. 39,1. 20 ..AbbieE. Lee, wife of Lyman E. Cline, 

formerly of Albany, died at Phelps, N. Y. 

15. Air, h. 21, 1. — 5 Ann, wife of Michael Hageny, died, aged 

30. Augusta, wife of Peter J. McGoddrick. wife of 

Oscar Tyler died, aged 62. 

16. Air, h. 13, 1. — 5 A few inches o fsnowfell, covering the bare 

earth Philip Mills died, aged 76. He was one of the few surviv- 
ing veterans of the battle of Waterloo, and was one of the recipients of a 
silver medal from his majesty's government for his bravery on that 
memorable day. He served nine years in the Grenadier Guards, which 
regiment was in attendance at the funeral of Princess Charlotte, only 
child of George the Fourth, in the year 1817. He likewise served five 
years on the metropolitan police of London. Mr. Mills was born in 



Jan.] Notes from the Newspa]jers, 281 

England, town of Hamilton, county of Surrey, and emigrated with the 
intention of going to Canada, but settled in Albany in 1835. He brought 
letters of introduction from the officers of his regiment, from his superin- 
tendent of police to Major G-eneral Colgrave and Lieutenant-Colonel W, 
Rowan, then on duty in Upper Canada. At the urgent request of his 
friends he was introduced to the Prince of Wales while sojourning in 
this city. Two of the prince's suit were attached to the regiment to 
which Mr. Mills formerly belonged. These letters were then opened for 
the first time, and contained very flattering evidences of his conduct as a 
soldier and member of the police force. The prince, the Duke of New- 
castle, and Lord Lyons, then British minister at Washington, felt deeply 
interested in meeting with the old soldier, who shed tears at such an out- 
burst of expressions of sympathy in his behalf, as he was the only veteran 
of Waterloo they hq,d met with in their travels through the states. He 
left a widow, a much respected and esteemed lady, who has enjoyed his 
social companionship for nearly fifty years. Though in humble circum- 
stances, he enjoyed the respect of all classes of our citizens who had the 
pleasure of his acquaintance. Almira Beebe, wife of Denice Cady, died, 
aged 41. Thomas Gr. Spencer died at Richmondville, aged 58, formerly 
of Albany. 

17. Air, h. 25, 1. 17, James Tiernan died, aged 52. Edward 

Kimmey died, aged 23. Hugh J. Rowland died, aged 53. 

18. Air, h. 29, 1. 27 We are sorry to hear that Mr. Chas. T. 

Smyth is about to remove from Albany and take up his residence in one 
of the eastern towns. Mr. Smyth is one of our oldest merchants, having 
been engaged in business on the dock upwards of a quarter of a century, 
and not one has retired with a more honorable record for probity and 
liberality. He has been president of the Board of Trade, and has re- 
ceived from his fellow merchants many other evidences of their confi- 
dence and friendly consideration. — Argus Sarah Ann Patrick, 

wife of John J. Bradt, died, aged 34. Sarah Lawton died, aged 66. 
Patrick Welsh died, aged 95. Patrick Hanlan died, aged 47. 

19. Air, h. 46, 1. 27 Richard O'Connell died, aged 50. Bridget, 

wife of Thomas O'Brien, died, aged 53. Mary Elizabeth Wise died, aged 
15. On Thursday, after returning to her dinner she asked her mother if 
she could not go skating, stating at the same time that she had a headache, 
and that she thought a little exercise would make her feel better. She 
went, and after coming home remarked that she had not benefited much 
by the time spent on the ice, as she still had a severe headache. Her 
mother then advised her to go to bed, and she went, and never rose again. 
Yesterday morning, after nine o'clock, the unfortunate girl expired. 

20. Air, h. 40, 1. 33. 

21. Air, h. 43, 1. 14 Carrie, daughter of the late Philo K. Cole, 

died, aged 24. Sarah Stuart, wife of Robert Daly, died, aged 73. Patrick 
Matthews died, aged 36. 

22. Air, h. 18, 1. 13 Peter Fitzpatrick died, aged 57. Ellen, 

wife of Thomas Welsh, died, aged 63. 

23. Air, h. 24, 1. 19. 

24. Air, h. 26, 1. 16. 

25. Air,h, 25, 1.23 Margaret Murray, formerly of Albany, died 

in New York. 

Hist. Coll. Hi. 36 



282 Notes from the NeiDspapers [1866. 

26. Air, h. 28, 1.26 Sarah, wife of TerrenceReily, died, aged 43. 

27. Air, h. 28, 1. 19 The Cohoes Cataract of the 27th, speaking 

of Albany, says : " There are said to be 40,000 persons in the city who 
are reached by neither the church nor the sabbath school. Measures are 
about to be taken to Christianize this heathen element. If the above be 
true the city really needs a reenforcement of clergymen, Sunday school 
teachers and good and benevolent people generally, or else Cohoes needs 

a more truthful editor. — Argus .Dr. C. B. O'Leary, who went off in 

1861 with the lamented Col. Bryan, and who has been all through the 
war acting as surgeon and physician for government, and since the 
capture of Savannah has been there acting as assistant post physician, 
now returns to his old friends and reopens his office in Herkimer street 

for the practice of his profession. — Arg\is Mrs. Catherine Davidson 

died, aged 86. Andrew Tracy died, aged 52. 

28. Air, h. 22, 1. 4 The Reverend Father Duffy, of St. Mary's 

Church, preached his farewell sermon yesterday. It was brief and stir- 
ring, and there was hardly a dry eye in the church. He leaves for Salina 
this week, and is about to take charge of the next oldest church to 
St. Mary's in the diocese of Albany. May his field of labor be pleasant. — 
Argus Sophia, wife of B. Reitzenberg, died, aged 42. 

29. Air,h. 17, I 12 Rev. Eliphalet Nott, D.D., LL.D., president 

of Union College, and for several years pastor of the First Presbyterian 
church in this city, died at Schenectady, aged 93. He was born of highly 
respectable parentage, in Ashford, Conn., on the 25th of June, 1773. 
His father was a country merchant on a moderate scale, but was able to 
earn a respectable support for his family. His earliest intellectual deve- 
lopments were quite extraordinary. When he was but four years old, he 
had read through the Bible, and had committed considerable portions of 
it to memory. His father, being now a farmer, designed to train the son 
to the same occupation ; and several of his early years were actually spent 
on his father's farm ; but his insatiable desire for knowledge led him to 
devour every book that came within his reach. He lost his mother at 
the age of about twelve, and shortly after returned to Franklin to live with 
his brother, who meanwhile had become possessed of a small farm. Here 
he worked during the summer, and studied in the winter under his 
brother's instruction. At sixteen and seventeen he taught a school for 
two successive winters in the neighboring parish of Portapang, and at 
eighteen took charge of the Plainfield Academy, and at the same time 
prosecuted his classical studies under the Rev. Dr. Benedict, to whose 
daughter he was subsequently married. Here he remained, it is believed, 
for a year or two, until he entered Brown Univ<-rsity. His connection 
with the college continued but about one year ; but, during that time, he 
was at the head of his class both in mathcniatics and the languages. He 
graduated out of due course in 1795. He returned now to his brother's 
at Franklin, and, after studying theology under his direction for about 
six months, was assigned to preach by the Congregational association of 
New London county. He was immediately sent on amission by the asso- 
ciation which had licensed him, into the then destitute part of New York, 
bordering upon Otsego lake. After laboring a c uple of months in dif- 
ferent places in that thinly inhabited region, he accepted an invitation to 
settle at Cherry Valley, in the double capacity of preacher and teacher. 
The flourishing academy which still exists in that town he was instru- 




Ej;? t.yAIlJlurand. 



WMWo miLllWMMMT m(BTT BM. ILILm 



Jan.] Notes from the Newspapers. 283 

mental in establishing. After having remained two or three years at 
Cherry Valley, he had occasion to visit his friends at the east, and on the 
way stopped at Schenectady to pass the night. As it happened to be 
the evening of the weekly lecture, he attended and consented to perform 
the service; and Dr. John Blair Smith, then president of the college, 
happening to be present, and much interested in his discourse, proposed 
to him to become a candidate for the pulpit of the First Presbyterian 
church in Albany, and through his influence an invitation to supply that 
pulpit was soon after sent to him. After preaching two sabbaths, a call 
to become their pastor was presented to him ; and though not entirely 
unanimous, on account of a prejudice which some of the Scotch had 
against Yankee ministers, he accepted it, in the hope of being able to 
conciliate those who were disposed to stand aloof from him. At the time 
of his settlement, he had but two or three written sermons, having been 
accustomed to preach from short notes ; but as the sight of any manu- 
script, no matter how brief, was offensive to Scotch hearers, he abandoned 
his notes altogether, and began to commit his sermons to memory, and 
this practice he continued through his whole subsequent life. From the 
commencement of his labors here, he had a well nigh unprecedented 
popularity, and among his greatest admirers were Alexander Hamilton, 
Brockholst Livingston, and others of the same class. After having served 
this congregation most acceptably for five yeais, he was chosen, in 1804, 
president of Union College. This appointment he accepted, and has 
filled the place with great honor during the long period of sixty-one 
years. To give an account of all the plans of public usefulness, in the 
way of intellectual improvement and moral reform, with which he has 
been connected, would require a volume. It is not too much to say that 
he has been emphatically one of the great spirits of his time. His stu- 
dents, scattered all over the country, have regarded him with an affection 
and veneration bordering upon idolatry. His occasional efforts in the 
pulpit, whether in the country or in the city, have always attracted, and 
sometimes well-nigh entranced, his hearei's. The vigor of both his mind 
and body continued until a very late period, but for the last two or three 
years he has been gradually declining, and for some months past has been 
reduced to nearly the mental imbecility of childhood. His long and 
splendid career has closed amidst the most affectionate and grateful 
attentions and benedictions. He had held the ofllice of president of the 

college sixty two years. — Evening Journal A deep religious interest 

is prevailing in many sections of the country. We are glad to observe strong 
indications that Albany is not to be passed over in the general awakening. 
A few days since we directed attention to the neglected portion of our 
city, and mission movements are already in active operation. A consulta- 
tion of city pastors and active laymen has been had, from which good 
results are already apparent. The Young Men's Christian Association is 
not to be left longer a burden on the hands of a few. The good already 
accomplished will be continued by a strong and earnest band, who will 
receive the hearty cooperation of hundreds of active Christians. The 
North Dutch has voted to employ a city missionary, and its young men 
are aroused to the necessity of energetic action. The State street Presby- 
terian Church, also, proposes to enter into the mission work, and employ 
a city missionary. The First Presbyterian Church has resolved to esta- 
blish and maintain a Mission Sunday school south from the church. la 



284 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

every direction, the churches are moving. The Baptists, who are fre- 
quently alluded to in all consultations on this subject, as the pioneers in 
this mission work, are strengthening their stakes, and the Methodists are 
widening the influence of their numerous and successful mission schools. 
The churches themselves cannot long remain uninfluenced by this awaken- 
ing. Indeed, already, in the Calvary Baptist Church, a strong interest 
prevails, and several inquiring ones have arisen in the prayer meetings. 
There has been no extra efi"ort; the meetings being confined to the two 

usually held on Wednesday and Friday evenings. — Journal 

Michael Ryan died, aged 60. 

30. Air, h. 23, 1. 21 The receipts of flour and grain at this port 

during the years 1864 and 1865, were as follows : 

1864. 1865. 1864. 1865. 

Flour, bbls.,.. 1,190,000 1,014,600 Barley, bu.,.. . 3,169.200 4,551.600 

Wheat, bu.,.. 15,916,700 10,579,200 Rye, bu., 647,200 1,350,900 

Corn, bu.,. . . .10,352,400 18,699,900 Oats, bu., 13,730,100 10,847,500 

Henry C, son of the late Solomon Southwick, died, aged 58. 

31. Air, h. 31, 1. 24 The amount of tax collected as internal 

revenue for the month of January, in this district, was as follows : 

Manufactures and productions, $120,889 53 

Slaughtered animals 947 38 

Gross receipts, rail roads, theatres, etc., 29,623 72 

Sales, auctions and brokers, 84 19 

Licenses, 1,544 50 

Incomes, 3,365 28 

Legacies and successions, 4,644 67 

Articles in schedule A, watches, etc., 13 00 

Unassessed penalties returned by the collector,... . 474 23 



Total, January, 1866, $161,586 44 

Total, January, 1865, 149,288 25 



Increase, $12,298 19 

February 1. Air, h. 32, 1. 20 John Armiston died, aged 24. 

Mary Callanhan died, aged 18. 

2. Air. h. 29, 1. 15 At an election of ofl^icers of the St. George's 

Society, the following persons were chosen for the ensuing year : William 
Lacy, president; Wm. H. Taylor, first vice-president; Eichard Bygate, 
second vice president; John H. Ingmire, treasurer; Thomas P. Way, 
recording secretary ; Henry Rowland, financial secretary; William Tay- 
lor, physician; Rev. William Tatlock, chaplain John Armstrong 

died, aged 23. Philander Coley died in Brooklyn, aged 69 ; formerly 
alderman of the 10th ward. 

3. Air, h. 22, 1. 9 Virginia Ensign died, aged 15. Ann Fitz- 

patrick died, aged 80. 

4. Air, h. 22, 1. 11 Sophia Moss died, aged 80. 

5. Air, h. 19, 1. 2 The weather had changed from a moderate to a 

decidedly cold temperature ; the snow had almost entirely disappeared, 

and sleighing was done on bare stones Mary, widow of Charles 

Enus, died, aged 43. Susan S. Irons died, aged 55. 

6. Air, h. 14, 1. 6 Annual election of the board of trade. Charles 

T. Shepard, president; Wm. H. Taylor, first vice president ; John H. 
Russell, second vice president; William Lacy, secretary; Edmund L. 



Feb.] Notes from the Newspaijers. 285 

Judson, treasurer ; Stephen B. Congdon, Charles H. Requa, Bradley 

Nichols, Harvey A. Dwight, Samuel Rankin, A. Combs, managers 

Margaret Feenan died, aged 68. David V. N. Radcliff died, aged 67. 
He was apparently in his usual health and, we are told, was on the streets. 
While in his house last evening he was taken suddenly ill, and at 11^ o'clock 
died from disease of the heart. Many years since he came to this city 
from Poughkeepsie (where he had been judge of Dutchess county), and 
rapidly gained eminence and a fortune in his profession, that of the 
law. He had been a member of the assembly, and supervisor of the 

Sixth ward for a number of years. — Times Anna Euphemia, wife 

of Rev. E. A. Huntington, D.D., died at Auburn, aged 49. Mrs. Hunt- 
ington was a daughter of Rev. Dr. Van Vechten, of Albany, and grand- 
daughter of the late distinguished Dr. John M. Mason, of New York. 
The first sixteen years of her married life was spent in the city of Albany, 
where her husband was pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church, now 
under the care of Dr. Halley. From there she removed in the year 
1855 to Auburn, Dr. Huntington having been elected to the chair of 
Biblical criticism in the Theological Seminary. She was not of very 
robust constitution ; her health had been delicate for some years, and 
since November last she had been confined to her bed. She met her 
end with the utmost tranquillity, expressing with her latest articulate 
accents her unwavering hope and trust in her Redeemer. 

7. Air, h. 23, 1. zero Catharine E., wife of Jacob M. Slinger- 

land, died, aged 25. 

8. Air, h. 22, 1. 12 Snow began to fall in the previous night, 

and continued all this day, leaving a bed of eight or ten inches, the most 
that had fallen during the winter. 

9. Air, h. 30, 1. 22 David Moore died, aged 68. Annie Arkels, 

wife of George W. Simond, died at Youngstown, Ohio, a^ed 22. 

10. Air, h. 29, 1. 27 James Callahan, died, aged 53. 

11. Air, h. 36, 1. 31 The semi centennial celebration of the Second 

Presbyterian Sunday school v/as held. The fiftieth anniversary of any 
Sunday school in this country is a rare thing j for fifty years ago, such 
schools were a comparative novelty; for not many churches had, so long ago, 
become imbued with the spirit, or impressed with the greatness of the work. 
The Second Presbyterian church of this city was an exception to the general 
rule. The work was entered upon with zeal and hope, and has been con- 
tinued from that day to this, with results which will only be revealed in the 
last day. The Second Presbyterian church was organized iu 181 6, under the 
pastoral supervision of the Rev. Dr. Chester, who was succeeded, in 1829, by 
the Rev. Dr. Sprague, who still survives, the venerable and beloved pastor 
of the flock. From their first organization, the members of this church 
evinced marked zeal iu the cause of religion, and readily engaged in the 
Sunday school work. In October, 1816, the session formally endorsed 
the system, and adopted, as its own, the school for some months previously 
held in a carpenter's shop, on the corner of Chapel and Steuben streets, 
under the supervision of Messrs. Dillingham, James McClure and Hutton. 
The school was transferred to the Lancaster school room ; thence to the 
Uranian Hall, on the site of the present Female Academy; thence to the 
Mechanics' Academy, corner of Chapel and Columbia streets; thence to 
the old Albany Library building, corner of Chapel and Steuben streets ; 
thence to Masonic Hall, corner of State and Lodge streets, and from 



286 Notes from the Newspa;pers. [1866. 

thence to the rooms of the church. When Mr. Dillingham removed from 
the city, Benjamin F. Butler became its superintendent. During the 
attempt to break down the prejudices against Sunday schools, which 
existed in the minds of many respectable lamilies, Mrs. Governor Clinton 
sent her children to the school. But it was a long time before these 
schools were looked upon as anything higher than places of instruction 
for the very poor. This school had no library until 1826, and Archibald 
McClure, still a teacher, was the first librarian. Two others of the 
teachers of that day are still in the school, viz : John Winne and George 
C. Treadwell. The contributions of the school since 1847, have resulted 
in the organization of five hundred schools in the southwest. Mr. Mc- 
CuUoch, of Kentucky (of the American Sunday School Union), is one of 
its most zealous almoners. Tbe school will soon rejoice in the possession 
of its new chapel, a spacious and beautiful edifice, now nearly completed. 
As it has waited for it fifty years, it deserves to enjoy it. — Journal. 
Catharine, wife of John Dunn, died. 

12. Air, h. 42, 1. 34 A thaw followed the snow fall of the 8th, 

which continued till this morning, when the wind changed to the north, 

and rain began to fall, which continued throughout the day Frank 

C. Griswold died, aged 20. 

13. Air, h 35, 1. 28 A new military company has just been 

organized in this city. It is to be attached to the Twenty-fifth regiment 
to take place of the Republican Artillery, which has been converted into 
a battery. The captain of the new organization is John Barnett, for 

merly an ofiicer in the Forty-third New York Volunteers. — Express 

Mary, widow of Richard Winslow, died, aged 83. George W. Burdick 
died, aged 47. He was formerly assistant engineer of the fire department, 
and deputy sherifi" of this county. A large circle of friends will mourn 
his loss. The funeral takes place this afternoon. John O'Brien died, 
aged 63. Peter Sheridan died, aged 28. 

14. Air, h. 30, 1. 29 Upwards of 5,000 valentines passed 

through the post office. 

15. Air, h. 31, 1. 20 The Albany bridge was crossed by a loco- 
motive for the first time. The event marks an era in the history of 
progress and Albany. The locomotive was the Augustus Schell. The 
engineer Michael Burns of Greenbush. Connected with the engine 
were two platform cars loaded with Inmber. The Troy Times in speaking 
of the bridge said it was an accomplished fact, after a thirty years' con- 
troversy, in which Troy had borne the brunt of the fight in opposing 
the work, spending large sums of money, and exerting her most vigorous 
efforts against what the Times says was originally the unanimous purpose 
of the people of Albany, and of a powerful moneyed and railway combi- 
nation. The Trojans took ground against the measure on a question of 
unconstitutionality, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to defeat it, 
fearful that if successful it would prove disastrous to the interests of Troy. 
It said lawyers were still heavily feed with a view to ultimately procuring 

a decision that the bridging of the river is unconstitutional Ellen 

Heslin died, age 21 . 

16. Air, h. 20, 1. zero. 

17. Air, h. 10, 1. 7 The ice boat fleet arrived. It left Pough- 

keepsie at nine o'clock Friday morning, reached Hudson between four 
and five in the afternoon, remained there over night, leaving in the 



Feb.] Notes from the Neiospapers. 287 

morning at nine o'clock and arriving here at half-past eleven. The re- 
spective crews were handsomely entertained by the Beaverwyck Club, and 
then returned. An accident occurred to the fleet upon the return trip. 
While the Haze was dashing along at the rate of more than a mile a 
minute, when opposite Castleton, the gale was so heavy that her spar was 
carried away, completely disabling her, but not injuring any of the excur- 
tionists. The Snow Flake being but half a mile astern, sailed up along- 
side of the wreck, and taking the Haze in tow proceeded to Stuyvesant, 
where the adventurers took the cars of the Hudson River rail road for 
home, leaving the vessels to he brought down the next day. The Min- 
nehaha also met with an accident just below the city, by the breaking of 
her runner plank Isaac Redstone died, aged 52. 

18. Air, h. 23, 1. 18 Edmond Charles Kirnan died, aged 20. 

Sarah Capron died, aged 74. 

19. Air, h. 34, 1. 28 Edward S. Swain died, aged 20. James 

Bassett died, aged 70. Nelson Weeks, formerly of Rouse's Point, 
died, aged 62. 

20. Air, h. 38, 1. 28 The Young Men's Christian Association 

found it necessary to legislate against the monopolies of the young women, 
who, with their accustomed commendable interest in all that relates to 
the welfare of young men, attended the lecture course in such numbers 
as to deprive many young men of even entering some of our largest 
churches. It was, therefore, deemed imperatively necessary to reserve 
seats for those for whom the course was specially designed. The Pearl 
Street Baptist Church was nearly filled with ladies, and a hose company 
that went there in a body, was thus prevented from even entering the 
church, and returned disappointed to their house. It was enacted that 
the central seats in the house be reserved for the exclusive use of young 
men, until fifteen minutes before the commencement of the exercises, 
and any organization of young men desiring to attend, have seats specially 
reserved for them on sending information of their numbers to the presi- 
dent of the association. 

21. Air, h. 36, 1. 19 There was a remarkable display of aurora 

early in the morning, which was thus described by Prof. G-. W. Hough, 
of the Dudley Observatory. During a portion of last night and this morn- 
ing, a peculiar aurora appeared in the northern heavens. At 12p. m., of the 
20th, an auroral cloud was visible near the northern horizon, and occasional 
streamers were given ofi" from the cloud ; being mostly confined to the 
east and west limits. But it was not until 5 A. M. of the 21st that we 
noticed anything unusual in this phenomenon. At that time a black 
auroral cloud lay piled up in the north, extending along the horizon about 
120 degrees. This cloud increased in darkness as we approached the 
horizon, and we have reason to believe it was an auroral cloud ; since the 
sky was perfectly clear, and not a single vapor cloud was in any other 
portion of the heavens. This cloud had an altitude of about 30 degrees 
on the meridian, and the upper margin was fringed with the auroral light, 
forming at times a complete arch. The streamers or flakes of light were 
thrown off from the north-east and north-west ends of the cloud with 
astonishing rapidity. We estimated the motion from the horizon to the 
zenith at less than the one-tenth of a second of time. At 5h. 10m. the 
streamers seemed to jet in one constant stream from the north-west and 
north-east portion of the cloud, while all along the north the auroral arch 



288 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

threw off waves of light every two or three seconds. At this time it was 
truly a grand and magnificent phenomenon. These detached flakes formed 
in such a rapid stream from the cloud as almost to hewilder one in trying 
to follow them. At 5h. 20m. the flakes and streamers continued to appear 
and disappear in remarkably quick succession. And occasionally an im- 
mense wave of light was rolled from the whole northern horizon and 
disappeared in the zenith. At 6h. 30m. the aurora continued, but with 
not such striking characteristics. In the early evening until nearly 8 
o'clock the sky was clear and the moon' shone with unusual brilliancy. 
About this time a snow squall suddenly came up, which continued for 
half an hour or longer. This squall was accompanied with a violent gust 
of wind from the north-west. Immediately preceding this squall the 
registering and printing barometer showed a sudden rise of 0.06 inch, 
in less than three minutes. The barometer continued to rise until noon 
of the 21st, when its height was 30.37 inches. That the aurora is an 
electrical phenomenon is pretty generally admitted, but whether it has 
any connection with the atmospheric pressure, and the fluctuations of the 

barometer, has not yet been fully determined Jane S., wife of Joseph 

Arnold, died. Matthew J. Hallenbeck died at Columbus, Ga., aged 65. 

22. Air, h. 32, 1. 19 The legislature of 1865 having enacted that 

the 22d of February should thereafter be held as a public holiday, it was 
now for the first time observed as such by the closing of the public ofiices. 
The day was observed with unusual display. The weather has been de- 
lightful, and all the city and its country cousins have been in the streets, 
while the American colors have floated gaily from every flagstaff". The 
military display was the finest we have witnessed in this city in a long 
time. The Tenth and Twenty-fifth vied with each other in the display. 
Both of them turned out in large numbers, and looked exceedingly well : 
it would seem impossible for them to excel this demonstration. The de- 
tachment of police which preceded the military appeared to excellent 
advantage. The cavalry and the battery of artillery made a highly 
creditable appearance. — Journal. In the evening John Van Buren spoke 
at Tweddle Hall to a full house. Taking Washington's Farewell Address 
as his text, and commenting upon its warning against geographical parties, 
and the dangers which factions threatened to the Republic, he spoke 
of the reelection of Andrew Johnson as the best means of avoiding these 
dangers, and uniting parties and sections in tranquil and harmonious 
efi'orts to restore the union to its normal condition, and advance the 
people in constitutional liberty and material prosperity. His remarks 

were received with evident favor. — Argus After the meeting of the 

directors of the Hudson River Bridge Company, and shortly after three 
o'clock, a train consisting of four cars, drawn by the locomotive Lyman 
J. Lloyd, belonging to the Central Rail Road Company, started from the 
depot on Maiden lane for a trip across the bridge. The director of the 
Bridge company, several of the directors of the Central rail road, and a 
number of the employes of the company, together with officers of the 
Hudson River, Harlem and Boston rail roads, were passengers on the train. 
A large number of persons assembled on the pier and ice to witness the 
passage of the train, which was successfully accomplished. The train was 
drawn back by the locomotive, James H. Banker, belonging to the 
Hudson River Rail Road Company. Subsequently a freight train, con- 



Feb.] Notes from the Newspapers. 289 

sistino; of eight cars, loaded, belonging to the Red Line thi-ougli cars from 
Chicago to New York, passed over the bridge safely. — Journal. 

The New Rail Road Bridge. — To-day the celebration of the great 
rail road bridge over the Hudson is corning off. This is another completed 
link in the matter of a continuous avenue between Boston and the great 
west. The city is full of visitors, taking advantage of the holiday, and 
the vicinity of the structure is crowded with observers. The first train 
of passenger cars crosses to-day ; the first locomotive, with a couple of 
long cars laden with lumber, went over yesterday, and the chief ofiicers 
and managers of the several rail road lines that operate through this 
city lend the charm of their presence to the occasion. The day will be 
festive, if not gay. This old Dutch town enters upon a new career of 
greatness at this hour; for the advantage of the freight and passenger 
transfers being withdrawn, nothing remains but to inaugurate a system of 
manufacturing industry that shall give employment and support to the 
people. 

The Foundation. — Twenty-one stone piers support this enormous 
structure. Commencing at the Albany side of the river a solid pier of 
masonry is built up from a foundation fifteen feet below the bottom of the 
river, 32 feet long and 6 feet wide, in which were driven 150 piles, and 
in and upon the tops of them was built a solid pediment of concrete 
masonry, or cement and broken rock combined, and then was erected the 
pier of solid limestone, 7? wide on the top, as the coping projected over 
9 inches. In this manner the whole number of piers, except two or three 
are built, and these exceptions differ only in size. One standing on the 
old business pier in the river, is not far from 30 feet by 24, and the one 
at the east side of the river is furnished with two wings additional to the 
main pier, that connect it with the main banks of the river. The central 
pier, on which the draw rests and turns, is about 260 feet long and over 
30ieetwide, and built up not only in the centre under the bridge but 
extends each way up and down the river, far enough to give the required 
length, and on each end is built a shoulder for a point of rest for the ends 
when the draw is swung open. . On the top of this central pier is placed 
the system of wheels and rollers, on which the whole rest and revolves. 
The cost of the piers was immense, the work occupying about two years. 
The stone is well cut, and the ends rounded on the smaller piers, but is left 
rough and square on the two largest. They are too narrow for the ice 
to have serious effect on, as in striking so sharp or narrow a ridge of rocks 
it will be broken or ground into small pieces. They are near 50 or 60 
feet high from their base, and contain probably not far from ten thousand 
cubic yards of masonry, including crippling and concrete. 

The West End. — Commencing at the rail road avenue, near the junc- 
tion of Colonic street, a grand series of trestle work extends to the river, 
and terminates at the first pier. This trestle work rests upon some 150 
bents of timber placed for a large portion of the way at 8 feet distance 
and the rest at 26 feet. Under each bent a trench was dug, from five to 
eight feet, and a timber laid down across said trench, directly under each 
post, and then a stick of timber, some 10 or 12 inches square, was laid 
over and fastened to them, and on this base was erected the bent. Each 
bent consi.sts of five posts, 10 by 12 inches square, and framed into the 
Hist. Coll. Hi. 37 



290 Notes from tlie Newspapers. [1866. 

timber at the bottom, and besides being securely braced at the sides, is 
held in place by heavy cross timber at the top, some 12 inches square, 
and an additional heavy post is placed as a brace at each end of the bent. 
The bottom being held by the framework embedded in the earth, and the 
top secured by the superincumbent weight of its own cross timbers, and 
the four stringers that form the bed proper for the iron rails, and the rails 
themselves, forbids any idea of their ever being moved out of their places. 
At the beginning of the trestle work the posts are cut oflF at the surface 
of the ground, but with a level or slant upwards towards the river of 
10 inches in the hundred feet, or about 41 feet to the mile. Each suc- 
cessive bent carries the ascent higher and higher, till the maximum is 
reached at or near Centre street. From that point across the river the 
surface is as near a level as may be. 

The East End is built in a more temporary style, resting wholly on 
piles. The nature of the bank, and the business of the town here, did 
not require the extensive trestle work of the west end, and this 800 feet 
will by another year be all filled in with gravel and made a solid em- 
bankment up to the first stone pier on that side. As we said above, this 
pier is built with a wing at each end, for the better security of the em- 
bankment. 

The Shape of the Bridge is that of the letter S. Standing at no point 
is the eye able to look through the whole length of it. And while this 
adds much to the length and expense, yet the eye can detect a careful 
attention to the quality of beauty in giving the curves a graceful sweep. 
And now we come to the 

Main Bridge. — The How pattern, which is of almost universal use in 
bridge building, is adopted in this. The great peculiarity in this style is 
that the railing or sides of the bridge is framed into and with the founda- 
tion, so as to make the structure self-supporting for any convenient length 
of span. The longer the span the higher the railing is carried. In this 
bridge it is twenty-four feet in height. The system is somewhat like 
this : A strong timber, or series of parallel timbers of great strength 
and of given length are bolted together^ and this is called the lower 
chord, and designed for the bottom of the sides of the bridge, and which 
must support all the cross ties. Parallel to, and of equal size with 
this, runs the upper chord framed in like manner. Between these two 
run a multitude of slanting or diagonal double braces of great strength, 
the foot of each resting upon a cast iron shoulder block, weighing 
in the main bridge three hundred and sixty pounds, into which it is 
fastened by a wrought iron bolt, an inch and a half in diameter, and 
which pin passes down into the timber below, slanting in one direction 
for four-fifths of the distance, and in the opposite direction for the bal- 
ance, and right up between these double braces runs another single brace 
of smaller dimensions but inclining in an opposite direction, resting .its 
foot upon the same iron block. At the head these braces are bolted 
securely into the upper chord, or just against a head block of iron or oak, 
which latter clasps or holds the upper claords secure and fast. The bind- 
ing force of these braces prevents any sag in the bridge, and insures it 
against breaking down when properly made. 

Iron Rods. — ^^ Besides the diagonal wooden braces above named, two 
upright iron rods, one and three-quarter inches in diameter, and bolted 



Feb.] Notes from the Newspapers. 291 

into the iron shoulder blocks, and running down through the upper chord, 
and fastened at each end with a nut and screw, or a shoulder of iron that 
enables these rods to take their share of the load to be borne, and this 
constitutes another security against settling or falling. When these 
bents or spans are properly framed and bolted together, they are raised 
to the position each is to occupy, each end resting upon an abutment. 
Besides these upright iron rods, hundreds of bolts are put through the 
timbers that compose the chords, giving the main support of the bridge 
the most formidable security against disasters. 

Number of Spans. — There are four spans 172 feet each, and 14 of 72 
feet, and 257 feet in the draw, making in all of the bridge proper 1953. 
Add to this 1500 feet of trestle work on the Albany side, and 800 feet 
for the embankment and pile work on the East Albany side, and we 
obtain for the whole length of the bridge 4253 feet as the whole length 
of the work. The width is about twenty feet. This brings us to 

The Draw, which is the eminent portion of the whole affair. This, as 
we said above, is 257 feet long, suspended at the centre on a pile 37 feet 
wide, and swings out in a span of 110 feet on each side of the pile. The 
general outline of this part of the bridge is similar to the rest, except the 
turret for supporting the ends when suspended over the stream, and 
endangered by their own weight. It is put in motion by a lever or a set of 
levers inserted in a circular iron wheel, which connects with the other 
wheel work, and easily moves the superincumbent mass. This machinery 
for swinging the draw was furnished by the Boston Machine Company, 
and will no doubt redound to their fair fame. 

The Turret is raised over the centre of the draw, and directly over 
the centre of the supporting pier. Two pairs of upright posts, some 
10 inches square, are set up on each side, and strongly fastened by 
extended braces, till they reach a height of six feet. At the top of these 
posts, and on each side of the turrets, a framework of iron is placed, 
strongly bolted to the supporting timbers, and sustaining an arrange- 
ment of iron wheel work, designed for special use. A wheel, some 
five or six feet in diameter, is fastened to a shaft, on which is cut an 
endless screw, which screw works into an eccentric wheel, and the turn- 
ing of this eccentric elevates for one or two feet the cross-bar to which 
is attached the upper ends of eight chains constructed in a novel 
manner. They consist each of a number of links of wrought iron, seven- 
eighths of an inch thick, five inches wide and some twenty feet long, 
fastened together at the ends by a huge bolt passing through, and having 
been attached to the iron framework at the top of the turret, are carried 
down to near the extremity of each lower chord and then attached to the 
other end. Two of these chains run down on each side of the turret, and 
on both sides of the bridge. Chain work descends from the large per- 
pendicular wheel spoken of above, and being attached to the machinery 
on the bridge proper, is turned at will, till by elevating the upper end of 
this heavy chain, sufiicient strain is brought upon it to lift tlae extremi- 
ties of the draw a little from the abutments, and thus reduce the friction 
in starting, as well as support the pendant ends. This plan proving a 
success will materially assist similar enterprises where navigation is to be 
cared for and a swino; draw constructed. 



292 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

Amount of Timber. — Over two and a quarter millions of square feet, 
inch measure, have been consumed in building the work, including three 
minor bridges yet to be spoken of. 

The Cost of the whole, so far, has been about three-quarters of a million 
dollars ', but the extensive purchases of real estate on the Albany side has 
created an investment including the cost of the bridge, of $1,100,000. 

Minor Bridges had to be erected over Water, Centre and Montgomery 
streets. At the last the Saratoga rail road passes under this bridge, and 
the small bridge placed across this street is built on the same plan as the 
large one. Four timbers strongly bolted and supported by truss iron rods 
of If inches diameter, and these series of timber and iron repeated some 
six or eight times, forms the bed work of the bridge 82 feet wide. The 
upper and lower ends are framed as in the large bridge, only the railing 
is but 12 feet high ; over Centre street it is 8 feet and over Water street 
9 feet high. These bridges are so strong and firm that the passing of a 
locomotive, with several heavily loaded lumber cars attached, produced 
only a slight jar, but no perceptible depression. 

How the Rail RoadTrackis laid. — All the science of bridgebuilding lies 
in the knowledge of how to use braces to most advantage. Cross bracing, 
diagonal bracing, upper bracing, under bracing, inter-bracing at sides, 
bottom and top, with wood, wrought and cast iron complete the description 
of this art. So all that we have described so imperfectly is only the simple 
preparation for the support of the stringers that support the rails and 
ties. These stringers are square sawed pine timber, 12 by 14 inches, and 
closely spliced at the meeting ends, and four are laid down, two for each 
track, which is to be double to the edge of the river, and single over the 
river. After these stringers or sills are in position, white oak ties, two 
feet apart, are laid across as on any railroad, and spiked with wrought iron 
spikes to the stringers. On these ties are laid the heavy iron rails, except 
over the street bridges, where a broad white oak timber some four inches 
thick is laid transversely of the bridge and on it are placed and to it, all 
spiked, the rails that cross the bridge. 

The Spikes used are of two kinds ; one the common spike five-eighths 
of an inch square^ that is driven in after an orifice a little smaller than itself 
has been bored ; the other screw nearly an inch in diameter, with a bar- 
head large enough to lap on the edge of the rail, is, after being slushed, 
forced into the timber and turned to hold the rail in its place. This last 
one is to our mind, an excellent improvement. 

Charter. — The legislature of New York gave a charter to this company 
for an iron bridge, to be erected in three years The wooden structure 
now completed, is only of a temporary nature, and as soon as the financial 
matters become settled so that the price of iron will be within the reach 
of the company's purse, they intend to replace one span of the bridge 
with it, and eventually to replace the whole bridge with the same material. 
The trestle-work will probably remain as it is for many years, if not till 
worn out. 

The Owners are the New York Central Rail Road Company, one-half; 
the Western Rail Road Company of Massachusetts, one-quarter; the 
Hudson River Rail Road Company, one-quarter. The original joint stock 
company, on finding it rather difficult to raise the money, transferred all 
right and title to the above named proprietors. 



Feb.] Notes from the Newspapers. 293 

Mechanics. — Charles Newman was overseer of the mechanical construc- 
tion, and a competent man for the place. John Holmes was master of the 
framing, and Edward Sheffer boss of the trestle work. One hundred and 
sixty-three carpenters were employed, and a great number of laborers. 
A. F. Smith was superintendent of the whole business, Mr. Fairchild trea- 
surer of the company. 

General Remarks. — The completion of this work and opening of con- 
tinuous, uninterrupted railway accommodations between the east and 
west, on this route, it is supposed by the Trojans, will sensibly affect the 
railway interests of their city, which, until now, has enjoyed a monopoly 
of said accommodations. Consequently there is said to be considerable 
bitterness of feeling on their part in regard to it. This is natural. Peo- 
ple are usually inclined to oppose all projects that seem to conflict with 
their present pecuniary interest, without stopping to inquire whether the 
new improvement will not open up, or make available some other sources 
of profit much more lucrative and satisfactory; and if no public improve- 
ments were ever undertaken till the unanimous, or even general assent of 
those whose business is to be affected could be obtained, there never 
would be a project undertaken. Many, if not most places, now flourish- 
ing from some paying enterprise, have been forced to give up some fancied 
or real advantages and adopt a new course of business. The advantage 
could not be wholly foreseen, but the new facilities brought it distinctly 
into view. So it will ever be with an inddstrious and intelligent people. 
They will accommodate themselves to new conditions. They will apply 
the new forces within reach. If driven from staging they will go into 
the rail road business; if deprived of trucking in Albany they will turn 
their hands to another department of industry. The wide domain of 
manufacturing effort is open to every town, and the market grows wider 
every day. Troy is at present a large and prosperous centre of manufac- 
tures. She is not dependent on river or railway transit for her wealth, 
and the bridge won't harm her. Albany, too, feels a little restless in the 
expectation that her business will be disturbed by this new arrangement, 
but she is too old to fear such slight changes, and not "too old to learn 
new tricks," at money making. Any city of 65,000 inhabitants with a 
long list of rich men, with large accumulated capital, with a splendid 
river at its feet and railway connections with all creation in her possession, 
ought to die a natural death if she can't turn all these advantages to good 
account, and compete in the markets of the world. So go ahead goodly 
capital of the Empire State. Let us see you put out in all directions, 
and our Yankee neighbors will stop on their way to the west to see how 
you prosper and leave that extra quarter of a dollar behind them also. 

Final. — We congratulate Boston on the completion of an enterprise 
among the last needed to put her in ready connection with the world's 
granary, and all the traveling public that the unpleasant ferriage over 
the Hudson disappears from the highway to the west. The freighter 
will rejoice, and we trust the universal republic of New England will 
share the diffusive joy. 

John Long died, aged 75. Rachel Ruso, wife of Francis Kennedy, died, 
aged 48. Hugh Collins died, aged 25. Max Schuster died. Mrs. Catharine 
King died, aged 62. 



294 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

23. Air, h. 42, 1. 38 President Taylor called the Board of Trade 

to order this morning, and announced the death of one of its members, 
Matthew I. Hallenbeck, which occurred recently in Columbus, Georgia. 
On motion, the chair appointed a committee of five, consisting of Messrs. 
A. E. Gifi"ord, Glazier, PuUen, Rankin and Bender to draft and report 
resolutions of condolence. .....Thomas Maher died, aged 56. 

24. Air, h. 46, 1. 38 Andrew White died, aged 42. 

25. Air, h. 49, 1. 30 The ice in the river in front of the city 

moved early in the morning, and being as usual, firm in the gorges below, 
the water began to rise rapidly. The yearly moving of the ice on the 
river is looked forward to by merchants and boatmen with anxiety, on 
account of the great damage sometimes done by the freshets that follow. 
On Saturday night, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, the last sleigh load 
of passengers from the Hudson river rail road train had but barely crossed 
the river when the efi"ect of the freshet in the Mohawk was felt here in 
the breaking up of the ice above and below the city. It did not move 
far, however, until about ten minutes to nine o'clock this morning, when 
the water commenced to rise very quickly, and the ice below the city was 
noticed slowly moving down the river. The water, at this time, at 
Maiden lane, almost touched Broadway, and the Steam boat landing was 
five feet under water. The ground floors of stores along Quay street were 
submerged, and parts of South Broadway, near the South ferry, were not 
available for foot passengers. The current in the river was carrying the ice 
down at the rate of fully six miles per hour, and the water receded somewhat 
until ten o'clock, when a jam formed at the first island below the city, 
across the river to the Greenbush side. The current then set through 
the Island creek at a rapid rate, but the passage was not sufficiently large 
for the great body of water, and it commenced again to rise. In the jam 
a pile driver and a large river boat were firmly wedged, having been 
carried from their moorings. In the morning the prevailing high wind 
was favorable to the current, and somewhat aided the ice in its career. 
The bridge crossing the Island creek, near the Susquehanna rail road 
track, was completely carried away. Many large timbers, resembling 
pieces of dock and bridge structures, were seen floating down with the 
ice. Notwithstauding the many unfavorable predictions, the new bridge 
piers ofl'ered no barrier to the passage of the ice, which struck them and 
went on its way. The train on the Hudson river rail road which arrived 
in East Albany at 9 A. M., passed over the bridge and proceeded on its way 
to Cincinnati,saving the unpleasant delay usually caused by the breaking up 
of the ice. Comparatively little damage resulted. Our merchants on the 
piers and dock were fully prepared for the freshet, having been abundantly 
warned by the warm rains and strong winds of the past week. The usual 
number of cellars were inundated, but it took nobody by surprise, and 
found none unprepared for the visitation. Indeed, of late years, it has been 
the later spring freshets, caused "by heavy rains in April and May, when 
the ground was thoroughly wet, and the water flowed quickly off" instead 
of penetrating the earth, that have brought most serious loss to our mer- 
chants, and to occupants of dwellings in the southern section of the city. 
This is the earliest break up we have had in fifteen years. In 1851, the 
ice broke up on the 25th of Februarv ; in 1845, it occurred February 
24th ; 1812," February 4th ; 1840, February 25th • 1834, February 29th ; 
1828, February 8th; 1825, February 25 — Argus. The weather this 



March.] 



Notes from the Newspapers 



295 



morning became quite cold, cliecking the freshet, and nearly freezing over 
the newly opened water. As a matter of interest we give the date of the 
opening of the river for the last twenty years : 



1847 April 7 

1848 March 22 

1849 do 18 

1850 do 10 

1851 February 25 

1852 March 28 

1853 do 28 

1854 do 17 

1855 March 27 

1856 April 11 



1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 ... 

1862 

1868... 

1864 

1865 

1866 February 24 



March 


18 


do 


20 


do 


13 


do 


6 


do 


5 


April 


8 


do 


7 


March 


11 


do 


21 



The journal of the Eighty-second Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
church in the diocese of New York, presents the following figures in 
reference to the churches in this city : 



Bap- Confirm- Commimi- Sunday 



Grace, 

Holy Innocents, 

St. Paul's, 

St. Peter's, 



Trinity, 46 



tisms. ations. 
18 22 

88 20 

25 38 

29 20 

24 



cants. 
168 



208 
391 
114 



School. 
100 
100 
353 
199 
125 



Contribu- 
tions. 
$1,667 

22.749 



Ellen Stapleton died, aged 72. Eliza Wilson, wife of Lithan Algie, died, 
aged 63. 

26. Air, h. 30, 1. 8 William Humphrey died at Kasoag, Oswego 

county, aged 80. During his residence in Albany he was connected with 
Erastus Corning and John Spencer in the hardware business, and con- 
ducted it for many years alone. He was a gentleman of great integrity 
and excellence of character. He leaves two sons, George and James 
Humphrey, in business at the place of his late residence. Gilbert C. David- 
son, late of this city, was a son-in-law of the deceased Mrs. Margaret 

Barnard died, aged 47. Bridget, wife of Patrick Caughlan, died, aged 
29. Henrietta Brown, wife of Peter Webster, died, aged 39. 

27. Air, h. 20, 1. 13 The river was again frozen over, although 

the ferry boats continued to cross Annie E. Ableman, wife of 

George W. Bulson, died, aged 21. Salema H., wife of J. J. Roff, died, 
aged 40. 

28. Air, h. 28, 1. 24 Patrick Sweeney died, aged 37. 

March 1. Air, h. 33, 1. 29 Hon. Erastus Corning turned over 

the remainder of his extensive business to his son and to three other 
young gentlemen who had been connected with him for some years past: 
and withdrew from business life. Over a year ago Mr. Corning made 
over the general business of his store to Edward Wilson & Co., young 
men brought up to mercantile life and educated at his counter. This 
was the anniversary of the fiftieth year since Mr. Coming's commencement 
of business life in Albany. On March 1, 1816, he entered into the 
firm of John Spencer & Co., Wm. Humphrey (whose death at the vene- 
rable age of 80 we have just chronicled), being third partner. Mr. 
Humphrey retired in 1818 ; and in 1825 Mr. Spencer withdrew, and 
John T. Norton became the partner, under the firm of Corning & Norton. 
In 1829 John T. Norton retired and James Horner became a partner, 



296 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

under the title of Corning & Horner, and so continued for fifteen years, 
when in 1844 Gilbert C. Davidson was admitted; and in 1848 Mr. Hor- 
ner retired, giving way to Erastus Corning, Jr., the title of the firm being 
E. Corning & Co., which was retained when Mr. Davidson retired in 
1862. We dwell upon these changes and these names because they bring 
up grateful recollections to the minds of our citizens. They suggest the 
memory of business enterprises, financial struggles, the fluctuations of 
speculation, the development of great industries and the social and po- 
litical changes dependent on them. They recall not less impressively the 
pleasant amenities of social life, in which these names have been in vari- 
ous ways connected, of political associations, and also of patriotic labors 
for city, and state, and country. The semi-centennial anniversary of a 
business life like this, deserves a commemoration like a golden wedding. 
In that space of time what has not been accomplished ! The canals built, 
the west developed, the rail road system inaugurated and extended, the 
net-work of telegraphic communication following, and all the wondrous 
steps in progress taken, which have quickened the march of humanity 
towards its glorious future, are embraced in that comparatively brief 
record. Of Mr. Coming's share in all this — the rail road, the express 
and telegraph system particularly — we will not speak, except to say that 
they owed more to his urgency and directing and constant mind than to 
that of any one man. Nor shall we dwell upon other traits of character; 
except to say that he has been the helper and friend of all within the 
circle of his business connection — lifting up young men to place, and 
aff'ording to the enterprising the opportunity that commanded fortune — 
and has been the fast friend of this good old city of Albany, which, in re- 
turn, has honored him with every gift in its power. Mr. Corning will, 
we trust, enjoy for many years the tranquillity that follows an active life 
devoted to energetic work and crowned by the largest measure of success. — 
Argus. Mr. Corning was succeeded by E. Corning, Jr., Townsend Fon- 
dey, William H. Nichols, James E. Walker and Clarence H. Corning, 
under the firm name of Corning & Co. These gentlemen, long connected 
with him, succeed to a business of great magnitude, and which will enable 
them to early enjoy a competency as the result of their devotion to the 
interest of their employer and benefactor. What changes has not Mr. 
Corning witnessed, participated in, and promoted during the last century 
of active business life ! Since March 1st, 1816, what man has been more 
deeply, daily and hourly interested in all the great enterprises of the 
century than has Erastus Corning ? To a great extent has he been the 
chief architect of many of these enterprises. It has been said of Mr. C, 
because he did not invest in real estate in this city, that he did not have 
the interests of Albany at heart. This is not the case, as instance his 
influence in securing the transfer of the repairing and building of locomo- 
tives from various points along the line, to West Albany. But for Eras- 
tus Corning the large interests now at West Albany would have been 
located at Kochester or Buffalo. It required a giant's strength to over- 
come the western influence that prevailed at that juncture. West Albany 
is the creation of Erastus Corning. — Times. 

2. Air, h. 35, 1. 34 Ann, wife of James O'Ncil, died, aged 55. 

Isaac S. Clements, of Half Moon, died, aged 57. 

3. Air, h. 39, 1. 34 All the trains left this city from the New 

York Central depot near the Delavan House. The Hudson river, the 



March.] Notes from the Newspapers . 297 

Harlem and the Boston trains all landed their passengers on this side of 
the river, and all the trains leaving this city for New York or Boston 
started from the same locality. Passengers going east or west had only to 
Btep from one train to another. The trains of the New York Central and 
the other roads named all started from the same depot. Trains were also 
run from New York to Buffalo and Suspension Bridge without any 
change whatever. Passengers from either of the points named retained 
their seats through the whole route. These trains were called the Red 
Line, the cars being painted red to distinguish them from the other trains. 
They were elegantly fitted up and provided with all the comforts and con- 
veniences possible to furnish for such a long journey. This arrangement 
involved important changes in connection with travel through this city. 
The ferry boats would necessarily be almost entirely relieved from business, 
except so far as local traffic is concerned. The crowds of carts, and drays, 
and passengers, at the foot of Maiden lane, be no longer witnessed. The 
ticket and baggage offices of the Boston rail road be transferred to the 
New York Central rail road yard, and from that locality tickets be 
sold, and baggage checked, for all points leading from the city by rail 
road, except the Albany and Susquehanna route. This great revolution 
has been efiected by the construction of the Hudson river bridge. For 
years the crossing of the ferry of Albany has been a great inconvenience 
to the traveling public. Especially has this been the case during the 
fall and winter months. — Argus. 

4. Air, h. 41, 1. 33 Mrs. Anne Townsend, wife of Henry H. 

Martin, died, aged 50. She was a daughter of the late Isaiah Townsend, 
and was a lady who added to the accomplishments of social life, great 
strength of character and a truly Christian spirit. Joseph Corbiere died, 
aged 47. ' ■ 

5. Air, h. 34, 1. 18 Ann, wife of Thomas Kite, died, aged 51. 

6. Air, h. 25, 1. 19 Rev. Father McCurry, formerly assistant 

pastor of St. John's church in Ferry street, died at Cooperstown. 

7. Air, h. 27, 1. 21 The ice on the river was sufficiently strong 

to admit of crossing upon it by pedestrians. The weather for a week was 
severe even for March, the winds being keen and throwing up clouds of 
dust. 

8. Air, h. 27, 1. 17 Isabella Taylor, wife of Timothy A Knower, 

died. George Ovens died at Red Bank, N. J. Patrick Brally died, aged 
55. Mary A., wife of John W. Scott, died, aged 56. 

9. Air, h. 24, 1. 18 Thomas J. Gray died, aged 24. Gray was 

drum-major of the 25th Regiment. He was a member of Schreiber's 
band, and, with the Ellsworth Avengers (44th N. Y. V.), passed through 
a great many of the hardships of the Army of the Potomac. 

10. Air, h. 27, 1. 16 ..Catherine Wickham, wife of James Rourk, 

died. Richard V. R. Ketchum died, aged 48. 

11. Air, h. 27, 1. 16 After a long spell of cold weather, with rain 

and winds from the north, there sprang up a strong gale from the south, 
which filled the atmosphere with dust, then with snow, then with 

rain. John McCarty died, aged 60. Nicholas Conherty, died, aged 

80. Mrs. Elizabeth Bloomer, died, aged 86. Mrs. Abigail Page, died, 
aged 70. 

12. Air, h. 36, 1. 32. 

13. Air, h. 44, 1. 40. 

Hist. Coll Hi. 38 



298 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

14. Air, h. 40, 1. 34 At a large and influential meeting of the 

iron founders from all sections of the United States and Canada, convened 
at the rooms of the Board of Trade, in the city of Albany, pursuant to a 
call in that behalf, made by several of the most prominent iron founders 
of our state, Charles Eddy, Esq., of Troy, was by the unanimous vote of 
the said convention, elected president, and John F. Rathbone, Esq , vice 
president; and after the formal organization of the convention, the follow- 
ing preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Preamble — Whereas the iron moulders in different sections of the 
country are seeking, by concert of action and union among themselves, 
to change the relations which naturally exist between the employer and 
employed, assuming arbitrarily to dictate the prices which shall be paid 
by the employer, and to direct the government of the workshop and the 
management of the business of their employers, as will more fully appear 
by a reference to some of the rules and regulations of the iron moulders' 
international union, which are sought to be enforced in every iron foundery 
in the United States and Canada, through the agency of its local unions, 
and which are substantially as follows: First, That one apprentice only 
shall be permitted to every ten moulders employed. Second, No moulder 
shall be permitted to work in any establishment unless he be a member in 
good standing of an iron moulders' union. Third, Shop committees 
shall be appointed by each local union for each foundery within its dis- 
trict, for the purpose of controlling prices and enforcing the necessary 
rules and regulations therein. Fourth, It is especially the duty of such 
shop committee to give all necessary information to applicants for work 
and whether their services are required, and if so, whether it be proper 
for such applicant t ) apply either to the employer or his foreman for 
employment. Fifth, Should such applicant presume to make direct 
application to the employer or his foreman for work without first consult- 
ing the said committee, he shall be fined the sum of two dollars for such 
offense. Sixth, Should any employer presume to exercise a control of 
his own business, and thereby infringe upon any of the aforesaid rules 
and regulations, as, for example, to employ one or more apprentices exceed- 
ing the number dictated by the union or shop committee, or should he 
persist in furnishing employment to a moulder who is not a member of 
the moulders' union, such action on the part of the employer shall be 
deemed sufficient cause for a strike, and such shop is immediately declared 
a struck shop, and work is discontinued, until the rules and regulations 
aforesaid shall be reestablished and observed. 

The iron founders of this country have ever maintained the principle 
that organizations for the purpose of arraying capital as a force of element 
hostile to labjr, are as obnoxious to the principles of a sound political 
economy as they are to the true spirit of our republican institutions We 
seek not, by the organization which we contemplate, to degrade the 
mechanic or oppress the workingman ; but, on the contrary, we aim to 
dignify labor, and to elevate those who are compelled by the sweat of 
their brow to earn their bread. We aim to emancipate the workingman 
from those arbitrary restrictions upon his manhood, to which he has been 
subjugated by this moulders' union, a device of selfish men, more shrewd 
but less honest than himself, and to allow to him what we claim for our- 
selves, the right to the exercise of his own free will and of that judgment 
with which God has endowed him, to exchange his own labor for such 



March.] Notes from the Neivspapers. 299 

remuneration, and with such persons, and upon such terms, as his own 
judgment shall dictate to be for his advantage, free from the interfei'ence 
of the crafty and the designing among his fellows, and untrammelled by 
the insolent dictation of a power often as arbitrarily exercised as it was 
inconsiderately created. And we especially seek the restoration and the 
maintenance of those personal rights which legitimately belong to us as 
men and American citizens ; the right to control and direct our own 
business, as our own discretion may dictate, and the right to make our 
own contracts for labor, and with whomsoever we may deem proper. And 
whereas, the odious and oppressive regulations of the moulders' union, to 
which we have alluded, and which by no means embrace all that is ob- 
noxious in their organization, aim to divest us of these rights, which 
belong to us at least equally with our employes ; therefore 

Resolved, That it is expedient and necessary to the protection of the 
interests of the iron founders of this country to organize themselves into 
a national association for the protection of their general interests, the 
promotion of a friendly feeling and mutual confidence among the members, 
and especially for the purpose of resisting any and all action of the 
moulders' union, which shall in any manner interfere with our right to 
the control of our workshops and to manage our own business. 

And in accordance with the foregoing resolution, and the unanimous 
sentiment of the said convention, a national organization of the iron 
founders and stove manufacturers of the United States was established. 
After the completion of the said organization, the following resolution 
was unanimously adopted by the said association : 

Resolved, That we will proceed to introduce into our shops all the 
apprentices or helpers we deem advisable, and that we will not allow any 
union committees in our shops, and that we will in every way possible, free 
our shops from all dictation or interference on the part of our employes. 

The following individuals and firms were personally present, and very 
many letters were received from others of the most influential individuals 
and firms from all sections of the country, who were unable to attend in 
person, expressing their hearty approval of the measures contemplated, 
and entire sympathy with the purpose of the proposed organization : S. 
H. Ransom & Co., J. F. Kathbone & Co., Shear Packard k Co., S. B. 
McCoy, Wm. Doyle, Littlefield Stove Co , J. McB. Davidson & Co., John 
A. Gowey, Hilan Seabury, Albany; Jewett & Root, Bufi"alo ; Woolson, 
Hitchcock & Carter, Myers, Rouse & Co., Akron Stove Co., Cleveland, O. ; 
William Resor&Co.,S. H. Burton &Co., Cincinnati; William Buck, Brant, 
ford, C. W. ; James Stuart & Co., D. Moore & Co., Hamilton, C. W.; J. & 0. 
McClay, London, C W. ; Barr, Johnson & Co.. Tibhals, Shirk & Whitehead, 
Erie, Pa. ; Hunt & Miller, Hudson; Munsell & Thompson, S W. Gibbs- 
National Stove Works, J. L. Mott, New York ; Abbott & Noble, Lei- 
brandt & McDowall, Stuart, Peterson & Co , Chase, Sharpe & Thompson, 
Smith, Wells & Co., Isaac A. Shepard & Co., Philadelphia; A. Bradley 
& Co., Grafi"& Hugus, John B. Herron & Co., Mitchell, Stevenson & 
Co., Pittsburg; March, Sisler & Co., Limerick Bridge, Pa.; Frost & 
Southard, R. R. Fiuche's Sons, Peekskill, N. Y. ; E. E. Sill, Rochester, 
N. Y. ; Ingraham, Phillips & Co., Russy & McLeod, Sheldon & Greene, 
Wager & Fayles, Morrison & Colwell, Fuller, Warren & Co., Cox, Church 
& Co., G. W. Eddy, C. Eddy & Co., Ruswell & Durand, Hicks, Wolfe 
& Co., Potter, Paris & Co., M. L. Filley, Sweet, Quimby & Co., Troy; 



300 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

J. S. & M. Peckham, B. Wheeler, Utica, N. Y The ice moved 

down to a point below the city, and the river reached to the top of the 
docks. 

15 Air, h. 46, 1. 41. 

16. Air, h. 50, 1. 40 John F. Gaffney died, aged 23. 

17. Air, h. 44, 1. 28 St. Patrick's day was duly celebrated and 

honored by our Irish citizens by a grand military display and procession. 
In view of the recent trouble in Ireland, every Irishman in the country 
determined to celebrate the anniversary day of his patron saint with 
becoming eclat^ and the arrangements for grand celebrations were made 
long since in all the cities of the Union. Albany, therefore, had her 
procession, and may well be proud of it. Early in the morning the 
different military companies met at their respective armories, and the 
civic societies at their rooms, and proceeded to the Cathedral, where 
high mass was celebrated. The panegyric was delivered by Rev. Father 
O'Hara, of Syracuse. After mass, the procession formed in the order 
previously arranged on, the military under command of Capt. Terrence 
Quinn, the civic societies being effectively marshaled by Capt. Joseph 
Clinton. The procession moved in the regular order, Schreiber's brass 
band heading. The companies of the 25th Regiment, in their neat uni- 
form, looked exceedingly fine, and marched well. The Hibernian Pro- 
vident Society, too, made a good appearance, and turned out in goodly 
numbers. The delegations from the companies of the fire department 
marching in military order with muskets, attracted much attention, and 
their red and black costume formed a good contrast to the dark civilian 
dress of the Hibernian Society, which immediately preceded them. 
Taken altogether, St. Patrick's day has never before been celebrated in 
Albany in better style, and much credit is due the movers in the affair, 

who worked so energetically to secure a good turn out. — Times Jane 

Brooksby, wife of George S. Lansing, died. 

18. Air, h. 30, 1. 11. 

19. Air, h. 24, 1. 20 The river was conquered by the steam boat 

City of Hudson, which broke through the last barrier of ice, and reached 

the dock A train of invited passengers left the Susquehanna rail 

road depot on the first trip to Unadilla by steam ; 100 miles of the road 
being completed Patrick Burns died, aged 30. 

20. Air, h. 30, 1. 20 The steam boat St. John, the first of the pas- 
senger boats, arrived At noon it began to snow, and everything had 

the appearance of midwinter Frank Lathrop died in New York, aged 

52 years. Many will remember him as keeper of the old Mansion House, 
North 31arket street. He volunteered with the three months' men in 
Washington, 1861 ; was with the army that marched into Petersburgb, 
and at the surrender of Lee in Virginia. His last strength was given 
in the service of his country. 

21. Air, h. 30, 1. 26 The moulders employed in Rathbone & 

Co.'s foundery quit work, and all the stove founderies in the city were now 
closed. If a cessation of business must occur, perhaps no time could be 
more opportune than the present. Everything is falling in price. 
Iron, and all the materials used by the founderies, sympathize with the 
general downward tendency. The founders have all a fair stock on hand 
now. Should prices continue downwards, and they keep in operation, 
they might find themselves with a large amount of stock which they would 



March.] Notes from the News^papers. 301 

be compelled to sell at a loss. They can well aiford a suspension of sixty 
days, or even longer, and actually profit by it. When they resume, it 
will be on a system of reduced expenditure, and the country at large will 
profit by the reduction. The throwing out of employment, however, of so 
large a number of men is a matter of deep regret, not only to the com- 
munity but also to their employers; but after all, the men themselves are 
the most vitally interested, and should weigh well the question, before 
entering on a formal strike. Many of them confess that the resolution^"of 
the convention is not unreasonable. Should prudent councils prevail in 
the meeting of the union, which we understand is to be held to-night, there 
can be no reason why labor cannot be speedily resumed, with noninfringe- 
ment on the rights of the moulders. — EvcMing Journal Eweretta 

Moore, daughter of the late Benj. Vernor Clench, died. Sarah Edwards, 
wife of George B. Griffin, died at St. Paul, Minnesota. 

22. Air, h. 36, 1. 25 Charles D., son of the late Thomas Gould, 

died in New York, aged 51. Katie R. Graff, wife of F. 0. Harvey, died 
in Mexico, Mo., aged 22. 

23. Air, h. 34, 1. 25 Rhoda Wells, wife of Sylvester Topping, 

died, aged 74. 

25. The Hudson Street Methodist Episcopal church edifice was origin- 
ally erected in 1844 at an expense of $30,000. It had been for about 
eight months past undergoing very extensive alterations and improvements, 
which were now completed, at an expense of $15,000. The arrangement 
of the entire basement was changed, the lecture and Sunday school 
room enlarged, refrescoed, reseated aud otherwise greatly beautified and 
improved. The most extensive changes, however, appeared in the audience 
room. The galleries and pulpit had been removed, and the room extended 
in length twelve feet. An organ loft was erected at the northern 
extremity, a new pulpit built at the south end, and the seats turne(J 
facing the pulpit. The pulpit and altar rail were of heavy black 
walnut- and the design and workmanship very elaborate. The 
splendid new organ was from the establishment of Johnson, of West- 
field, Mass. The room was lighted by new patent gas lights, suspended 
Irom the ceiling, which produced not only a soft pleasant light without 
glare to the eyes, but accomplished the most perfect system of ventilation. 
The ceiling was frescoed in admirable taste. The main entrance was 
enlarged and ornamented, and handsome iron fences erected on each street. 
The work was conducted under the immediate charge of James W. Eaton. 
The architects were Wollett & Ogden ; mason work by James W. Eaton ; 

. carpenter work in basement, John Kennedy, Jr. ; carpenter work in 
audience room, John N. Parker; painting, Robert Coburn ; frescoing, 
0. S. Rice ; iron work, Pruyn & Lansing; upholstering, Watson & Kelley ; 
carpets, A. & J. C. Koonz ; furniture, John Winne; excavating and 
flagging, Thomas Lynch ; gas fixtures and patent lights. Tucker & Craw- 
ford ; heaters, etc., Crandell & Weller Mrs. Catharine, wife of 

Anthony McMurdy, died, aged 73. Wm. Chambers died, aged 53. 
Philip A. Cogburn died, aged 42. 

26. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kean appeared for the first time at the 
Academy of Music. The plays selected for the evening's entertainment 
were Henry VIII, and the Jealous Wife, both of which were given as 

only great artists can perform them Sarah, widow of Ira Porter, 

died, ased 83. 



302 Notes from the Newspapers. 1866.] 

27. The early days of March gave delusive indications of spring. 
Blue birds appeared, and the Dutch church yard robin, that builds on the 
Middle Dutch trees, made his annual appearance ; but it is said they all 

threw away their flutes and returned south The water in the river was 

lower than had been known in twenty-five years. The Dean Richmond, 
which left the previous evening, touched ground at Douw's point, 
and returned to the city this afternoon. The St. John got aground also, 
but succeeded in reaching her dock, and left this evening, the Dean 
Richmond lying over. A new, dangerous, but not a lasting, obstruction to 
river navigation appeared within two miles of the city. When the ice 
moved in January, an ice barrier was formed in the river nearly opposite 
to Douw's point, by which the current of water was forced into the creek 
and an outlet made west of the dyke and over the main land near Van 
Wie's point. By this barrier of ice, a bar was formed over the cross- 
over, extending nearly three-quarters of the distance from Douw's point 
to the dyke, and where there was last year sixteen feet of water at 
ordinary tides. It is thought that this bar cannot be of long duration, 
and many are of the belief that the ordinary spring freshets will remove 
it. But should this fail, it will be dredged out. River men say that 
where the new dykes are, the depth is fully adequate, but that the ice 
dammed on the old Bucken plaat, and threw up a body of sand, which has 
formed a temporary bar, easily removed by the current. Another is 
formed at Castleton, where it is contemplated to make a new dyke. 
These impediments are temporary, and will be removed in a short space 
of time Christopher Lavender died, aged 54. 

28. Margaret Wickham died, aged 40. Andrew Yorke died, aged 
64. Hiram S. Coe died, aged 31. Bridget, wife of George Lester, died, 
aged 48. Francis Garrett died, aged 80 

30. Total eclipse of the moon Peter Bradt died, aged 85. Alex. 

W. McLean died, aged 20. 

31. Minnie W. Root, daughter of Arthur H. Root, died at Geneva, 
aged 22. 

April 1, Air, h. 42, 1.29 The semi-centennial anniversary of the 

Middle Dutch Sunday school took place. The church was filled to overflow- 
ing, and the exercises were very interesting. On the one side of the pulpit, 
in gas jet, were the figures 1816, and on the other, 1866. Ralph 
Wells, the well known Sunday school speaker, and the pastor of the church, 
Rev. Dr. Elmendorf, delivered addresses From the report of the superin- 
tendent, R. V. De Witt, we derive many interesting reminiscences of the 
history of the school during the past half century. The North and Middle 
Dutch churches were originally one organization, but had for a number of 
years two pastors and two houses of worship. A separation took place in 
1815. In the monthof June, 1816, three Christian ladies, members of the 
church, whose memory will ever be cherished in our city, felt themselves 
called to do something for the souls of the children. Those ladies were Mi'S. 
Charles D. Cooper, Mrs. Christian Miller and Mrs. David Pruyn. The 
father of Mrs. Cooper, Lieut. Gov. John Tayler, fitted up a room for the 
purpose in his storehouse on the site now occupied by Cooper's building. 
Here was commenced a sabbath school, either the second or third of which 
we have any knowledge in the city, and so well did it prosper that 87 
scholars were soon enrolled, with an average atteudence of 50. Of the 
teacheiSjin 1810, the only one surviving is Mrs. Sarah Waterman, then Miss 



April.] Notes from the Neiospapers. 303 

Sarah Van Wie. Mrs Douglas, lately deceased, was also a teacher during 
that year. After having continued about a year, the school was suspended 
on account of a severe winter. In 1818 or '19 it was revived and opened 
in the western lobby of the church, by Messrs. Richard Varick De Witt 
and William C. Miller, who had then just graduated from Union College. 
The school commenced with four girls and three boys, but was rapidly 
reinforced by new scholars and teachers, and was soon removed into the 
galleries of the church, where it was held for about ten years, when, in 
1828, it was transferred to the basement of the parsonage on Beaver 
street, adjoining the church grounds, on the lot where the house lately 
occupied by Thurlow Weed now stands. The library was commenced in 
1825. Among the teachers attached to the school in earlier years, we 
find the names of Geo. Young, now an elder of the church at Grand Rapids, 
Mich. ; G. V. S. Quackenbush, the well known merchant of Troy ; S. H. 
Lloyd, a present elder of the church, Harmanus Wendell, F J. Hosford, 
now of New York, Nicholas Van Schaack, E. E. Spencer, E. Bunker, J. 
F. Linacre, Miss Talmadge, now Mrs. Hoyt, of Ithaca; Miss Groesbeck, 
now Mrs. Robert Thompson ; and Miss E. Brooks. It is recorded that 
in 1822, when the enrollment was 86 and the average attendance 60 
scholars, 26,749 verses were recited, being 334 verses to each scholar 
enrolled. In 1827, a number of the members of the church founded a 
school in Fayette street, which was afterwards removed to a district school 
house on State street, where it was continued for about eleven years, and 
then was merged into other schools that had been started in the neighbor- 
hood. Among the superintendents and teachers were Philip Phelps, 
Frederick J. Hosford, N. Van Schaack, E. E. Bunker, George Fonda and 
J. F. Linacre. About the same period or somewhat latter, we find a brief 
account of a separate school for colored persons, chiefly adults, which was 
held in the school building. How long this school was maintained is not 
known, but it is stated to have been blessed with a number of conversions. 
The school was removed to the building it now occupies, in December, 
1845. Two sessions of the school were held until 1850, when the 
afternoon session was abandoned. The school has had, during the fifty 
years of its existence, fifteen superintendents, viz: Wm. C. Miller, 
Richard Varick De Witt, Harmanus Wendell, Nicholas Van Schaack, 
James F. Linacre, x\braham F. Lansing, Benjamin Nott. Josephus Brock- 
way, Philip Phelps, John A. Johnson, Adam Van Allen, William L. M. 
Phelps, and the present incumbent, Abraham V. De Witt. Mr. Nott 
held the ofiice five years and Mr. Van Allen eight years, these being 
the longest terms of office. The church has had but three pastors, prior 
to the present incumbent, viz : Rev. Drs. John De Witt, Isaac Ferris and 
Isaac N. Wyckoff". Seven of the former pupils of the school have entered 
the gospel ministry, viz. : Rev. Ph. Phelps, president of Hope College, 
Mich. ; Rev. C. N. Waldron, of Cohoes ; Rev. J. L. Pearse of Bethle- 
hem ; Rev. M. Steele, and Rev. M. Burroughs (Baptist) in the south, and 
the lamented deceased Theodore Wyckofi" and A. Miller. The number of 
persons enrolled is 406, classified as follows : principal department. 221 
scholars ; infant department, 139 scholars ; total number of scholars. 360 ; 
officers 6, teachers 40. Teachers admitted during the year, 13; scholars 
in the principal department, 63; infant department, 66; total, 129. 
Scholars who have left the principal department, 90; inf\int department, 
49 ; total, 139. Five scholars have died during the year, and two have 



304 Notes from the Newspa;pers. [1866. 

become teachers. The largest attendance, 45 teachers and 254 scholars; 
smallest, 15 teachers and 38 scholars 5 average, 37 teachers and 190 
scholars. Seven members of the school have united with the church, and 
more than the same number are known to have found Christ as their 
Saviour. Volumes in the library, 865. Total receipts, including amount 
in the treasury at the beginning of the year, $447.01. Total disburse- 
ments : for the expenses of the school, $268.97 ; missionary purposes, 
$150 ; on hand, $29.04 ; amount of sabbath collections, $266.22. monthly 
concert collections, $21.91 '.Andrew J. Lloyd died, aged 43. 

2. Air, h. 43, 1. 35 Mary J., wife of Elmore J. Northrop, died, 

aged 32. Margaret F. Riley died, aged 18. Catherine Ann, wife of 
David Palmer, died, aged 30. 

3. Air, h. 47, 1. 32 Mrs. Anna Spelman died, aged 90. Eliza- 
beth M., wife of Christian Jacobs, died, aged 72. Mary, widow of Peter 
Albert, died, aged 59. Nicholas N. Groot, Jr., died, aged 29. 

4. Air, h. 49, 1. 38 James Toole died, aged 60. 

5. Air, h. 67, 1. 52 Solomon P. Mork died, aged 19. 

6. Air, h. 68, 1. 53 Colonel William A. Thornton, of the ord- 
nance department of the army, died at Governor's island, where he had 
long been on duty, aged 64. He was born at Albany, entered West 
Point with Alexander Bache, Daniel S. Donnelson, Robert Anderson, 
Charles F. Smith and other distinguished men, in 1821, and graduated 
No. 12 in 1825. He was brevetted second lieutenant of the First artillery 
on bis graduation, and rose through the various grades of the regular army 
until he became colonel in September. 1863. He served in the Black 
Hawk and Florida wars, and was with General Scott at Charleston in the 
nullification troubles. He has been in the ordnance corps ever since its 
organization, and almost always on constant duty as inspector of small 
arms. He had charge of several arsenals, at Watertown, Watervliet, and 
the ordnance department at Fort Columbus, New York harbor. He was 
recently brevetted brigadier general for his long and faithful services in 
the army. He never received a furlough. When Jeff. Davis was secretary 
of war, he sent Colonel Thornton to New Mexico, and here he lost his 
health. Returning over the plains he took cold, contracted a bronchial 
aflPection, which brought on asthma, which harassed the remainder of 
his life, and was the indirect cause of his death. 

7. Air, h. 53, 1. 36. 

8. Air, h. 37, 1. 32 Oliver Mead died at Bridgewater, Conn., 

aged 75. 

9. Air, h. 38, 1. 28 William L. Henry died, aged 46. Charlotte 

Kastendike died, aged 59. Susannah, widow of John Vrooman, died, 
aged 62. 

10. Air, h. 42, 1. 29 Annual charter election; George H. 

Thacher elected mayor by 738 majority over Robert H. Pruyn. The 
republicans carried 7 of the 10 wards, and claimed a majority of 4 in the 
common council. The democrats elected 6 supervisors which gave them 

a majority in the board The blacksmith shop of Patrick Powers, 

No. 72 Bowery, was burnt. It was a frame structure, one story in height, 
and was owned by a German named Andrew Muhlick, residing at 280 
Washington avenue. During the progress of the fire it was discovered 
that a man was burning in the rubbish. Upon examination it turned 
out to be Mt. Muhlick, the owner of the premises. He was speedily 



April.] Notes from the Newspapers. 305 

taken from the ruins, but not before life was extinct, his body, arms, 
shoulders and face being horribly burned and almost beyond recogni- 
tion Mrs. Delia Carberry died, aged 51. Ann Banan died, aged 65. 

Mary Kearns died, aged 18. 

11. Air, h. 50, 1. 35 John Roff died, aged 31. 

12. Air, h. 55, 1. 42 Thomas Galvin died, aged 56. 

13. Air, h. 58, 1. 87. 

14. Air, h. 58, 1. 37 In expectation of a visitation of cholera, 

efforts were made to cleanse the foul places about town, and the pond on 
Canal, Lark and Sand streets came under notice. It may interest posterity 
to know what sort of a place existed there at this time. A correspondent. 
Citizen, in the Journal of last evening, in calling attention to the very 
dangerous condition to health of this pond, implies censure of the board 
of health for its remissness in not having taken action in the pi-emises. 
Citizen is respectfully informed that some two weeks ago the board visited 
the locality referred to, and found that the pond was in a condition 
highly dangerous to the public health ; that it needed attention and that 
immediate. The city surveyor, who accompanied the board, was appealed 
to for information as to what should be done in the premises. From 
Knox street up the Bowery to Robin, all the sewerage runs into Sand 
street, which has no drain at all. There it lays in stagnated pools until 
a rain storm overflows the bed of the street, and then it is carried into 
this pond. Though there is, in some parts of it, from twelve to twenty 
feet of water, the drain under the extension of Knox street is higher than 
the surface of the water in the pond. It is, therefore, the receptacle of 
the sewerage and excrement from the Bowery, besides holding in bond 
the carcasses of dogs, cats, &c. This year much alarm has been created 
by the intense and peculiar blackness of the water; but the matter is easy 
of explanation. When the buildings used at the Sanitary fair, held in 
the Academy park, were demolished, the water proof roofing, composed of 
coal tar, &c., was thrown into this pond. Its decomposition has colored 
the water, and the atmosphere of that locality is impregnated with an 
effluvia similar to that surrounding the gas works buildings. To this is su- 
peradded the noxious odor of other decomposing foreign matters in the 
pond. The only question debated by the board of health has been not 
the necessity so much as the expense. Surveyor Bingham estimates the 
laying of a drain in Sand street, and the proper and permanent improv- 
ing of the pond at from $75,000 to 880,000. A law for the improving 
of Sand street was noticed some three months, and it was the duty of the 
board to take action in the premises. Yesterday Mr. Bingham was in- 
structed to prepare a plan for the improvement of the pond, which when 
reported to the board of health — which it is expected he will do to-day — 
will be acted upon promptly and effectually. The proposition to drain the 
pond will not in Mr. Bingham's opinion, remedy the evil ; for the expo- 
sure of the causes which have grown the complaint to the sun will the 
more speedily generite malaria than though covered with ten or twelve 
feet of water. It is, indeed, a vexed question, the solution of what is 
best to be done. — H. L. Godfrey, Secretary Board of Health. 

15. Air, h, 57, 1. 52 The Rev. Ray Palmer, D.D., pastor of the 

First Congregational Society, worshiping in the ancient brick church, 
corner of Beaver and South Pearl streets, preached his farewell sermon 
to his congregation. The Evening Journal thus alludes to the withdrawal 

Hist. Coll. m. 39 



306 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

of Dr. Palmer from the cliurcb : We had occasion two or three weeks 
since to notice the fact, that the Rev. Dr. Palmer, of this city, had been 
invited to a highly responsible and honorable position, as general super- 
intendent of some of the more important interests of the Congregational 
church. We have to announce now, and so far as the interests of our 
city are concerned, we do it with deep regret, that he has thought it his 
duty to accept this appointment. It is now fifteen years since he came to 
live among us, and during this period he has earned a reputation which 
any minister of the gospel might be thankful to possess. While, as a 
preacher, he has never aimed at the sensational or the startling, he has 
always presented the plain truths of the gospel in a correct and graceful 
style, and with great logical accuracy, and yet with such simplicity and 
directness as to come within the range of the humblest intellect. In the 
pastoral relation, we understand that he has been a model of affectionate and 
dignified fidelity; and we are not surprised to hear of the deep and general 
sorrow which the resignation of his charge has occasioned among his 
people. His uncommonly diversified talents, in connection with his fine 
moral constitution, and particularly his genial spirit, have rendered him 
a general favorite in our community. We cannot dissemble our apprehen- 
sions that it will not be an easy matter to fill the place which his removal 
from us will vacate; while we have no doubt that he will be found admira- 
bly adapted to the place he goes to fill. We congratulate him that his 
ministry closes here in a manner every way honorable to himself, while he 
carried with him the warm regards and kind wishes of all the churches in 
our city John McCabe died, aged 40. 

16. Air, h. 50, 1. 44 Susan Evertsen, wife of Harvey Parsons, died, 

aged 68. Mary A. Finnegan, wife of J. B Barnard, died. Peter Martin 
died, aged 66. Gerrit W. Bell died at San Francisco, aged 50. 

17. Air, h. 56, 1. 39 Owen Johnson, died. 

18. Air, h. 57, 1. 39 Adeline Cole died, aged 63. Betsey, widow 

of Henry Briggs, died, aged 82. Wm. Langrish died, aged 64. Peter 
Boyle died, aged 23. Maria Lloyd died, aged 81. Wm. Bristol died, 
aged 69. 

19. Air, h. 62, 1. 55 Azariah E. Stimson died, aged 57. 

20. Air, h. 72, 1. 47. Ellen, wife of James McFarland, died, aged 

34. 

21. 'Air, h. 76, 1. 64 Sarah, wife of John Gannon, died, aged 41, 

Patrick Fox died, aged 48. Sarah A. Burch, wife of Gilbert Weeks, 
died, aged 44. 

22. Air, h. 77, 1. 60 Mary Mackenzie died, aged 50. Dr. Leo- 
nard G. Warren died at Newburgh, aged 63. 

23. Air, h. 70, 1. 50 Mary Margaret, daughter of the late Amos 

Fassett, died, aged 61. Terence Mulligan died, aged 38. 

24. Air, h. 71, 1. 46 James Gallagher died, aged 64. 

25. Air, h.41, 1. 37. 

26. Air, h. 47, 1. 37 Edward Lee died, aged 34. 

27. Air, h. 41, 1. 33 The Rev. John Kelly, Catholic priest, died 

suddenly in Jersey city. He was found dead in his bed. Father Kelly 
was seventy years of age, and was well known in this city, having been 
pastor of St. John's Catholic congregation. After leaving here he was 
for three years a missionary in Africa, and returning settled in Jersey 
city. Elizabeth Morrisson died ,aged 33. 



April.] Notes from the Newspapers. 307 

28. Air, h. 51, 1. 36 Charles L. Austin died in Mexico, aged 50. 

He had left this city about the 20th of March, on a sea voyage, in one of 
the Panama steamers, of which his son, Edward Austin, was one of the 
officers. Landing at Vera Cruz, he went to the capital of the empire, on 
a brief visit, awaiting the return trip of the vessel. His letters from the 
Mexican capital were marked by buoyancy of spirits, and were full of 
assurances of enjoyment and health. The circumstances of his death 
have not reached us. He was a gentleman of rare excellence of cha- 
racter. He was a student, but his bent of mind sought the recondite and 
unaccustomed paths of literature. He was deeply impressed with reli- 
gious sentiments, yet cultivated a gay and cheerful spirit. He was a 
rio-id business man ; yet was generous and even lavish, in the cause of 
religion, or charity, or of country. He was sedulous in his care of city 
interests when recorder, and was, above all, a just judge, tempering mercy 
with justice, but never swerving from right. He was born in Orwell, 
Vt., in 1816, studied at Chambly, and graduated at Burlington college. 
He married in 1835, a daughter of the Hon. Robert Elliott, of this city, 
and then went to Europe, where he pursued a course of studies at one of 
the German universities. While there, the philosopher Schelling was 
his constant associate and friend. On his return, he entered the law 
office of Col. McKown, whom, at an interval of many years, he succeeded 
in the office of recorder. The Mexican correspondent of the New York 
Times^ gives these particulars, in which it will be perceived there are 
some errors of date : Judge Austin had only been here a few days, yet 
he had the entree of the palace, and the heads of the bureau of govern- 
ment officials welcomed him to their head-quarters. He arrived here on 
the 11th ult., intending to remain until it was time to return to Vera 
Cruz, to take passage on the steam ship Manhattan, from Vera Cruz, on 
the 8th instant. A slight affection of the throat, caused by exploring the 
historical canals surrounding this city during the day of the 22d ult., 
made him think of leaving for Vera Cruz sooner than it was necessary, 
in order to embark on the steamer on the 8th instant. He had con- 
cluded to start yesterday morning, but when Monday morning came he 
was lying near the spot, where only one week before, exiled con- 
federates had buried H. W. Allen. Friday evening last he retired, 
suffering severely with palpitation of the heart. Saturday, those who 
visited him, thought all danger was over, and none were so confident as 
the deceased himself. Saturday evening he had another severe attack, 
but at midnight he rallied so much that his physician, Dr. Luis Hassel, 
thought that all immediate danger had passed, yet recommended extreme 
quiet, that he might the sooner be able to get out of Mexico, and away 
from this elevated country. At 6 A. M., Sunday morning, he was seized 
with another attack, too severe even for his strong constitution, and died 
in a few minutes. Sunday evening he was followed by quite all the 
Americans in IMexico, to the American burying ground, situated west of 
the city, and not far from Chapultepec castle. John F. Jenkins died, 
aged 81. Clarissa Cantine died. Patrick Carroll died, aged 64. 

29. Mary Joralemon died, aged 85. 

The following are the remarks made and the resolutions offered by Re- 
corder Paddock, in common council, Monday night, on the death of the 
late Recorder Austin : 



308 Notes from the Newspapers. [1866. 

Mr. Mayor — The sad intelligence of the death of our highly esteemed 
citizen, ex-Recorder Austin, brings sorrow and mourning to a loving family, 
and to a large circle of friends, all of whom had confidently anticipated 
that a relaxation of the cares of business and a change of climate would 
restore his impaired health. But, sir, Providence ordered otherwise. 
Mr. Austin left this city but a few weeks since with high hopes of a speedy 
return in health, but instead of his return comes the startling intelligence 
of his death. He died in the city of Mexico on the 28th day of April 
last, where his remains are buried. The friends that knew him will know 
him no more this side of the grave. To you, gentlemen, and to the citizens 
of Albany it will be unnecessary to allude to the able, impartial, honorable 
and beneficial manner in which he performed the duties of the several 
honorable and responsible offices which he held in this city and county. His 
record is an honor to his memory, and his name will be held in kindly remem- 
brance by the citizens of Albany. I cannot do justice to the memory of 
Mr. Austin, but a brief statement of his history may not be uninteresting 
to us who had learned to regard him as one of Albany's most esteemed 
citizens. Mr. Austin was born at Orwell, in the state of Vermont, in the 
year 1816. He was sent early to Canada to school, and after having 
finished his studies there, graduated at Burlington College. In 1887 he 
went to Europe, where he pursued a course of studies in one of the Ger- 
man universities. After returning from Europe, in 1837, he commenced 
the study of law in the law office of McKown, Van Buren & Robinson, 
and has since been a resident of this city. After completing his studies 
he was admitted to practice as attorney and counsellor at law in the courts 
of this state, and in his practice, by his courtesy, learning and ability, he 
secured and retained the respect and friendship of the members of the 
legal profession, and of his clients by his devotion to their true interests. 
He was for several years senior member of the law firm of Austin & 
McMahon. In 1857 he was elected supervisor of this county from the 
Tenth ward of this city, and was at once chosen the presiding officer of 
that body, an office which he filled with ability, and to the satisfaction of 
the public. In 1860 he was elected recorder of this city by a large 
majority, which office he filled for four years with great ability, and with 
faithfulness to the true interests of the city of Albany. He was an up- 
right magistrate, and an honorable, honest and faithful representative of 
the people in this board, and to his wisdom we are indebted for many 
benefits to our city. Mr. Austin was also appointed by the common 
council as member of the board of education, which office he held many 
years with the confidence and respect of his associates. And he was at 
the time of his death, and had been for many years, a highly esteemed 
member of the executive committee of the State Normal School. That 
he could not have lived longer among us is to be regretted, for we cannot 
alFord to lose men like Mr. Austin. 

30. The following statistics of the Methodist Episcopal church in this 
city and county, are derived from minutes of the Troy conference : Mem- 
bership — Hudson street, 360; Ash Grove, 285; Washington avenue, 
263; Garretson Station, 212; Arbor Hill, 173; Broadway, 121; Green- 
bush, 195; Watervliet, 165 ; Bethlehem, 126 ; Guilderland and Rotter- 
dam, 195. Deaths — Washington avenne, 12; Ash Grove, 8 ; Hudson 
street, 5 ; Garretson station, 5 ; Arbor Hill, 2 ; Broadway, 1 ; Greenbush, 
6; Watervleit, 2; Bethlehem, 2. Probationers — Ash Grove, 90; Hudson 



Mat.] Notes Jrom the Neiospapers. 309 

street, 70; Arbor Hill, 45; Washington avenue, 40; Garretson Station, 
29; Broadway, 20; Greenbush, 13; Watervliet, 5; Bethlehem, 29; 
Guilderland and Rotterdam, 65. Baptisms — Adults : Arbor Hill, 27 ; 
Hudson street, 20 ; Broadway, 20; Washington avenue, 17; Ash Grove, 
10; Garretson Station, 6; Greenbush, 12; Bethlehem,!; Guilderland 
and Rotterdam, 35 ; Watervliet, none. Infants : Ash Grove, 44 ; Wash- 
ington avenue, 19; Broadway, 10 ; Arbor Hill, 9 ; Garretson Station, 4 ; 
Hudson street, 3 ; Greenbush, 2 ; Watervliet, 10 ; Bethlehem, 3; Guilder- 
land and Rotterdam, IB. Sunday Schools — Scholars : Ash Grove (two 
schools), 806 ; Hudson street (two schools), 709 ; Washington avenue 
(two schools), 410 ; Broadway (two schools), 410 ; Arbor Hill (one 
school), 325; Garretson Station (one school), 200; Greenbush (two 
schools), 422 ; Watervliet (two schools), 200 ; Bethlehem (two schools), 
220 ; Guilderland and Rotterdam (5 schools), 385. Conversions : Ash 
Grove, 60 ; Hudson street, 40 ; Broadway, 29 ; Washington avenue, 25 ; 
Garretson Station, 14; Arbor Hill, 13; Greenbush, 4; Bethlehem, 20; 
Guilderland and Rotterdam, 50 ; Watervliet, none. Estimated value of 
Churches — Ash Grove, S93,000 ; Hudson street, $36,000; Broadway, 
S20,000; Garretson Station, $17,000; Washington avenue, $12,000; 
Arbor Hill, $10,000 ; Greenbush, $8,000 ; Watervliet, $2,500 ; Bethle- 
hem, $3,000 ; Guilderland and Rotterdam, $10,400. Estimated value of 
Parsonages — Ash Grove, $7,000; Hudson street, $1,000; Garretson 
Station, $3,000; Washington avenue, Arbor Hill and Broadway, none ; 
Greenbush, $2,000 ; Watervliet, $500 ; Bethlehem, $1,500 ; Guilderland 
and Rotterdam, $1,000. Missionary/ Contributions — Ash Grove, $666- 
.77 ; Hudson street, $468.36 ; Garretson Station, $316 ; Washington 
avenue, $190.75; Arbor Hill, $53.05 ; Broadway, $104.50 ; Greenbush, 
$156; Watervliet, $101; Bethlehem, $35; Guilderland and Rotterdam, 
$117.25. 

May 1. Mrs. Margaret, widow of Wm. N. Sill, died at Cedar Hill, 
aged 78. Eneas Daley died, aged 26. 

2. Matthew Usher died, aged 61. Jane, wife of James Gurney, died, 
aged 42. George VV. Piatt died in Brooklyn, aged 59, sometime a 
printer in Albany. 

3. The new bell of the Fourth Presbyterian church was placed in the 
tower, weighing 4,500 lbs., the largest bell in the city; the munificent 
gift of William B. Conant, who made this splendid present wholly unso- 
licited on the part of the congregation, and whose public spirit deserves com- 
mendation. The bell was from the foundery of Jones & Co., Troy 

Three men were found floating in the water between the Greenbush ferry 
slip and Schuyler street, and Coroner Bullock held the inquest. One 
body was identified as that of Patrick Roach, who six weeks since fell 
overboard from the steamer Redfield. A verdict was rendered that the de- 
ceased was found drowned. The second body, that of John Dunning, was 
identified by his friends, and a verdict of found drowned was also rendered 
in this case. The third body was identified by his friends as that of Patrick 
Shea, a man sixty-five years of age, who gained his living by working on 
farms. He habitually spent a few months in this city, and it was while 
enjoying, one of these intervals that he lost his life. A verdict of found 
drowned was rendered by the jury. These three bodies being all found 
within a few minutes of each other, and near the same spot, caused some 
excitement, and rumor's busy tongue soon increased the number of bodies 



310 Notes from the Neivspapers, . [1866. 

found to nine Patrick Roche died, aged 26. Nicholas Commes- 

ford, died. 

6. Air, h. 55, 1. 46. 

7. Air, h. 63, 1. 40 Edward Butler, died, aged 89. 

8. Air, h. 57, 1. 42. 

9. Air, h. 66, 1. 52 Belinda J. Radliff, died, aged 39. Mary, 

wife of Hugh McNamara, died, aged 38. 

10. Air, h. 61, 1. 46 Elizabeth Hewitt, died, aged 61. Hannah, 

wife of Patrick Grady, died, aged 47. Giles Sandford died, aged 20. 
Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Enos, died, aged 78. Jacob F. Wentworth 
died, aged 28. 

11. Air, h. 65, 1. 50 James D. Wasson died, aged 75. The 

death of Jas. D. Wasson, removes another of the landmarks of Albany. 
His life was wholly passed in this city, prosperous and respected. 
Starting life with the rudiments of education, and with no other means of 
fortune than the determined will to achieve one, he soon acquired position 
and influence. He was, from 1826 to 1839, doorkeeper of the senate; 
in which position he acquired the confidence of leading men in the state, 
and much influence. He was often consulted by the leader? of the demo- 
cratic party, and was considered as a representative man in its ranks. 
Subsequently he became alderman and supervisor, and later, postmaster 
of the city. He was a prominent director in one of our banks, was active 
in religious matters, and associated in some of the most useful organiza- 
tions of charity. His sterling common sense, firmness, integrity and 
uncommon administrative capacity, made his cooperation in all public 
aflfairs, whether of politics, or business, or benevolence, of great value. 
He died possessed of ample fortune, surrounded by friends, and carrying 
to his grave an untarnished reputation. — Argus. Something more than a 
passing record of the death of this highly esteemed and justly valued citi- 
zen is due to his life and virtues. No truer illustration of the nature of 
our institutions and the tendencies of goodness and an ever prompting 
kindness of heart, can be presented, than these afi"ord Devoid of all pre- 
tensions, or display, or guile, he carried into practical eff'ect that divine 
injunction, which is second only to the first and great commandment, 
" Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." James Duane Wasson was 
born in the town of Duanesburgh, in the then county of Albany, on the 24th 
of April, 1792. He was the youngest of eight children of George Wasson 
and Agnes Sullivan, his wife. He was left an orphan at the early age of 
seven years, without patrimony, and was bound out to John Oliver of that 
town, to learn the trade of tanner and currier, and to do chores generally. 
It may be mentioned that he was named after the mayor of the city of 
New York, at that time the owner of the manor of Duanesburgh. His 
means of education were extremely limited, scarcely beyond the attain- 
ment of reading. His master, Mr. Oliver, proving a severe one, and his 
task being very onerous, he concluded to quit that pursuit, and come to 
Albany and seek his fortune, thinking, to adopt his own language, " he 
could get his living easier than to pull hides out of a vat." Self-relying, 
as he ever has been, he put this thought into practical execution, and 
at the age of sixteen arrived in Albany, with his entire eartlily pos- 
sessions in his hand, consisting of a change of shirts and stockings 
in a cotton handkerchief. His first step was to enter into an engage- 
ment with one Thomas Campbell, grocer, on the hill, now Washington 



May.] Notes from the Newspapers. 311 

avenue, for three years, at ninety dollars a year, and live in the store. 
At the end of this term, with about two hundred dollars in his pocket, he 
and a partner engaged in business as grocers, in which pursuit he was 
successful, until the close of the war of 1812, when being overstocked with 
tea and sugar at very high prices, the unexpected termination of the war 
compelled him to stop payment. He compromised with his creditors at 
fifty cents on the dollar; and it maybe mentioned as a proof of his incor- 
ruptible integrity that he devoted over fifteen industrious years to fully 
discharge his compromise debts. After the war he engaged in the livery 
business, having for his partner Mr. V. D. Jewell, a worthy and respect- 
able citizen, who survives him. In this he was successful. His intuitive 
knowledge of the horse was wonderful, and in that trait and as a lover of 
that noble animal, he was without a rival. In the outset of active life 
he attached himself to the democratic party, not as a mere partisan, but 
from a fixed conviction of the truth and stability of its principles, and the 
patriotic impulses which he believed controlled its action. But in his 
politics, as in his course of life, he was tolerant and liberal, awarding to 
others the right of opinion he claimed for himself, and avoiding as far as 
possible any personal prejudices which political or religious difi"erences are 
too apt to engender. His first vote was for Gov. Tompkins, and he gave 
to that eminent patriot, literally a war democrat in that exigency of our 
country's affairs, an earnest and effective support. In 1828 he was elected 
sergeant at arms of the assembly, and the next year to the same office in 
the senate, and subsequently doorkeeper to the same body, which duty he 
discharged until the memorable political campaign of 1840, when he was 
displaced. He enjoyed the confidence and association of the leading men 
of the state. It became, indeed, in the course of his long sei'vice, a bye- 
word with the minority, that the senate was ruled through the tall man in 
blue (his uniform color of dress in those days), alluding to the influence 
he was supposed to exercise in the senate over appointments to office, etc. 
In 1842, he was appointed by President Tyler postmaster at Albany, and 
served in that ofiice through the administration of Mr. Polk, and until 
removed by Gen. Taylor. During the most of that period this position 
was one of peculiar importance and responsibilty, Albany being a large 
distributing and collecting office and his judgment, discretion and fidelity 
were implicitly relied on, not only in the ordinary management of the 
office, but in the performance of instructions not strictly official require- 
ments, involving the collection and custody of considerable sums of money, 
but for which he neither sought nor received commission nor emolument. 
But he was tendered the unusual compliment of an official expression of 
the approval and thanks of the department. During the most of his active 
life, he was leading and promiueot in the municipal affairs of Albany, 
serving as assessor, alderman, excise commissioner, supervisor, &c., &c., 
giving to the public interest the same diligence, considerate attention and 
uniform kindness of manner that were characteristics of his daily life in 
his business and personal relations. In 1850 he associated himself with 
his friend, the indefatigable and successful Mr. John Butterfield, in the 
express organizations, which have since grown into collossal proportions ; 
and was prominent in the recent consolidation of the great companies, to 
which his forecast and judgment gave an impetus. He was one of the 
founders of the Albany Orphan Asylum, and for several years, and at 
his death, its president. An orphan boy himself, his sympathies were in 



312 Notes from tlie Newspa;pers. [1866. 

unison with the objects and proper management of this noble charity, and 
it was much indebted to his active efforts to advance its interest and efl&- 
cieucy. The presence of his wards at his funeral was a touching tribute 
to the memory of their honored head. It was one of the most natural 
impulses of his nature that he should feel a warm interest in those who, 
like himself, had been thrown on the charities of the world. One of his 
modes of doing good was in lending a helping hand to young men at 
the entrance on business life, as also in affording aid and encouragement 
to those of more mature years who had fallen into difficulty. His indorse- 
ments and loans, in comparatively small individual amounts, but .large in 
the number of instances, were, perhaps, unexampled in the history of a 
business man ; and it was rare that his benevolence was abused. His heart 
was large, active, benevolent, not lifted up by the acquisition of wealth, 
but to the last the poor man's friend, both with advice and purse. He 
was married in October, 1814, to Miss Harriet E. Benjamin, by whom he 
had six children. His first wife dying in 1839, he married Miss Clarissa 
Eddy, by whom he had three children, four of his children and widow 
surviving him. Mild, genial, affectionate, he was a model in all the rela- 
tions of domestic life; and never happier than when contributing to the 

happiness and relief of others. — Argus Margaret Courtright died, 

aged 24. Daniel O'Brien died, aged 68. 

12. Air, h. 73, 1. 53 William James Gourlay died, aged 23. 

William J. Gourlay was born and educated in the city of Albany. At an 
early age he won a high reputation at school as an essayist and poet. 
One of his first successes was at the Albany Academy, where he took the 
gold medal of the Beck Literary Society. Shortly after that time, he was 
awarded the gold medal of the Young Men's Association, for an English 
essay, and the year following, received from the same institution, the 
prize for a poem of deserved merit. All his writings, prose and in verse, 
evinced a high and refined order of talent, and a distinguished position in 
the literary world doubtless would have been his, had life been spared. 
Mr. Gourlay, entering an advanced class at Williams' College, Massachu- 
setts, graduated in the summer of of 1863. The following fall he began 
the study of divinity, under Bishop Whipple of Faribault, Minnesota, and 
remained there nearly two years. Being deprived of many advantages at 
the Western Seminary, he, about three months since, came east and entered 
the Episcopal Seminary in New York city, with the intention of there 
finishing the prescribed course of three years, and of taking orders in 
June. James P. Crombie died at New Boston, N. H., aged 21. 

13. Air, h. 75, 1. 57 The Rev. William Tatlock, associate rector 

of St. Peter's church, resigned that position and accepted the rectorship 
of St. John's church, Stamford, Conn. Mr. Tatlock, during the four 
years of his connection with St. Peter's, greatly endeared himself to the 
people of that parish, by his untiring devotion to the duties of his holy 
office, and by the ability and discretion which have been constantly shown 
in the discharge of all its important functions. — Journal. 

14. Air, h. 74, 1. 42 Sarah Bradley, wife of Alfred Edwards, 

died. Angus Cameron died, aged 62. Milton F. Jones died, aged 29. 

15. Air, h. 68, 1. 38 The prices of all commodities in the mar- 
ket were firm. Eggs from 23c. to 25c. per dozen ; fresh butter from 4oc. 
to 55c. per pound," poultry 16c. per pound, and SI. 75 and S2 per pair; 
veal, 8c. and 10c. per pound ; lamb, 12c. to 14c. per pound for the hind 



May.] Notes from the Newspapers. 313 

quarter, and from 8c. to 10c. for the fore quarter; hind quarter of beef, 14c. 
per pound, and the fore quarter at 10c. and lie; potatoes, $3.50 and U 

per barrel; peachblows, $4 per hm^.— Argus William W. Wolford 

formerly keeper of the Bull's Head Hotel, died, aged 63. ' 

15. Margaret C , widow of Israel Smith, died, aged 81. 

16. Air, h. 60, 1. 53 The body of William Cullen was found 

drowned in the river, near the foot of Arch street. He had been missino- 
since the 8th instant, and it is believed that by some mischance he walked 

off the dock on the night of that day William Yates, residing at 

No. 37 Ten Broeck street, came home from his business apparently as 
well as usual. He sat down in a chair, and suddenly fell over and ex- 
pired; death caused by heart disease. Mr. Yates was a clerk in one of 
the Central rail road offices, and was about 64 years of age. 

17. Air, h. 60, 1. 42 Belinda Benny, wife of John V Marshall 

died, aged 32. Anna Maria Lynch died, aged 27. Cornelius Korman 
died, aged 55. Caroline M., widow of James Taylor, late cashier of the 
Commercial bank, died at Utica. 

18. Air, h. 60, 1. 43 There was no branch of