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Full text of "College Catalog (2000-2001)"

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EDISON COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
2000-2001 CATALOG 

Charlotte County Campus 

26300 Airport Road 

Punta Gorda, Florida 33950-5759 

(941) 637-5629 

TTY (941) 637-3508 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Collier County Campus 

7007 Lely Cultural Parkway 
Naples, Florida 341 13-8977 

(941)732-3737 

TTY (941) 732-3788 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Lee County Campus 

8099 College Parkway, SW 

PO. Box 60210 

Fort Myers, Florida 33906-6210 

(941)489-9300 

TTY (941) 489-9093 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Hendry / Glades Services 

4050 Cowboy Way 

LaBelle, Florida 33935 

(863) 674-0408 

1-800-749-2322 

Internet Address: http://www.edison.edu 

Edison Community College is part of the Florida state system of public community colleges. Edison Community 
College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern 
Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award the Associate in Arts and Associate in 
Science degrees and certificates. Edison is also a member of the American Association of Community Colleges and the 
Florida Association of Community Colleges. 

The programs, policies, requirements and regulations published in this Catalog are continually subject to review to 
serve the needs of the College's various constituencies and are subject to change as circumstances may require. Changes 
are accessible through Edison's website: www.edison.edu. 

Students needing special accommodations should contact (941) 489-9427, Ext. 1427 at the Lee County Campus, 
seventy-two hours prior to the anticipated visit. Documentation of the specific need is required. 



EDISON 

COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

A STUDENT-CENTERED LEARNING COLLEGE 




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DISTRICT OFFICES 

8099 College Parkway, S.W. 

P.O. Box 60210 

Fort Myers, Florida 33906-6210 

DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION 

Dr. Kenneth P. Walker 

District President 



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Dr. James A. Slusher 

District Executive Vice President 
Campus President 

Robert R. Jones 

District Vice President 
Administration and Finance 

Dr. Vern Denning 

District Vice President 
Academic Affairs 



Dr. Michelle Releford 

District Vice President 
Student Services 



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Table of Contents 



Board of Trustees 4 

Welcome from the President 5 

Mission Statement 6 

Edison College History 7 

Campus Maps 8 

Academic Calendar, Admissions, Accelerated Programs, Residency, Records, Financial Aid, Tliition 11 

Academic Calendar 12 

Admission 15 

College Preparatory Program 18 

Accelerated Programs 20 

Registration 24 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 27 

Records Policies 29 

Tuition and Fees 33 

Financial Information/Financial Aid 34 

Veterans Information 36 

Scholarships 37 

Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students 42 

Academic Information 47 

Graduation Requirements 47 

Honors Scholar Program 48 

CLAST 49 

Student Services and Florida Laws Regulating Student Standards 54 

Student Services 55 

Student Life 58 

Student Organizations 59 

Student Government Association 60 

General Regulations for Student Development/Activities 61 

Student Code of Conduct & Responsibility 65 

Student Discipline and Hearing Procedures 67 

Traffic Regulations 67 

Laws Affecting Students 69 

Programs of Study 77 

Continuing Education 80 

Career Center/Internships 81 

University Center 82 

Associate in Arts Degree General Education Program Guide 83 

Distance Learning 86 

Associate in Science Degree Programs 88 

Certificate Programs 110 

Course Information 1 20 

Course Descriptions 1 22 

Administration and Faculty 1 75 

Glossary of Terms 1 93 

Helpful Information 1 97 

Bookstore, Learning Resources, Computer Lab 1 98 

Index 200 



Edison Community College 
District Board of Trustees 






Marie F, Snow, Ed.D. 

Chairman 
Collier County 



Cathy S. Reiman, J.D. 

Lee County 



Enid S. Gorvine, B.A. 

Charlotte County 




Washington D. 
Baquero, M.D. 

Lee County 






Fredrick A. Deal, B.S. 

Collier County 



Darol H.M. Carr, J.D. 

Charlotte County 



Dawn D. HofTman 

Lee County 



Vacant - Waiting for 
Governor's appointment 



Vacant - Waiting for 
Governor's appointment 




Dear Students, 

Welcome to Edison Community College. Our faculty and staff are dedicated to the philosophy of providing top quality 
education in a friendly atmosphere with individual attention to the needs of our students. You will find that we have an outstanding 
faculty qualified by professional preparation and experience, and dedicated to the creation of a meaningful, successful, and 
disciplined learning environment. 

At Edison, we believe in designing the system around the student's needs, not in molding the student to the system. We call 
this environment a student-centered learning college. We strive to provide learning opportunities which encourage students to 
become immersed in and responsible for their educational process, with assistance from staff and faculty. We believe in providing 
an environment rich in opportunity, encouragement, and methods that allow students to become successful, responsible learners 
today and competent, accountable leaders of tomorrow. 

We are committed to the pursuit of excellence through effectiveness, innovation and accountability. Please help us achieve 
excellence by coming to Edison with a dedication and commitment for serious learning which will enable you to reap the 
maximum benefits from your experience here. We also invite you to give of your time, effort and abilities in a positive and 
constructive way which will enrich your learning and make the college a better place because you have been here. 



Sincerely, 



yjifnri^^^'Ji//:^iLy^t^ 



Kenneth P. Walker 
District President 



EDISON COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

PURPOSE 



The purpose of Edison Community College is to deliver high-quality, convenient, and affordable 
learning opportunities to diverse populations. 



MISSION 



In order to fulfill its purpose, it is the College's mission to strive for excellence through innovation 
and continuous improvement as it provides: 



• General and pre-professional education through the Associate in Arts degree 

• Workforce development programs through Associate in Science degrees and certificates of training for 
employment in specialized fields 

• Access to baccalaureate degree programs through upper-division transfer, articulation, site-based 
programming, and partnerships with colleges and universities 

• Preparatory instruction for students needing academic development for entry into and success in college- 
level coursework 

• Personal and professional development opportunities through credit and non-credit programs 

• Accessibility to programs through academic advising, flexible scheduling, and distance education 

• Services and opportunities that promote academic, personal, and social growth among students 

• Educational partnerships with business, industry, government, and other institutions 

• Cultural resources for the community 

GOALS 



Using its purpose statement as the foundation for planning and evaluation, Edison Community 
College has developed a master action plan, 2002 Edison, which outlines four major goals. 



• Improve the quality of learning and student success 

• Improve institutional effectiveness and efficiency 

• Improve educational accessibility throughout the district 

• Develop and maintain community partnerships 



History 



Edison Community College celebrates 39 years of service to Southwest Florida this year. Since the first students were 
admitted to Edison in the fall of 1962, the College has enrolled more than 175,000 students in credit courses. Associate in Arts 
and Associate in Science degrees are offered at Edison as well as various certificate programs. 

From its first quarters in the old Gwyne Institute Building in downtown Fort Myers, Edison moved to its permanent 140- 
acre campus in South Lee County in June 1965. Following a master plan designed to provide for growth and future needs, the 
Lee County Campus has twenty-three permanent structures including the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall. 

Edison's Collier County Campus opened in March of 1992. The beautiful campus is located on a 50-acre site near State 
Road 951 and Rattlesnake Hammock Road, in east Naples. The Charlotte County Campus opened in 1997. Located on a 
wooded site on Airport Road in Punta Gorda, the campus is an excellent addition to the Charlotte area. Edison also provides 
outreach services to students in Hendry and Glades counties. 

Edison Community College is governed by its District Board of Trustees composed of nine representatives of Charlotte, 
Collier, Hendry, Glades and Lee Counties. The members are appointed to four-year terms by the Governor of Florida. Currently 
about 350 professional and support staff members provide the full-time instructional and support services for the more than 
13,000 credit and 10 000 non-credit students who participate in Edison courses and programs each year. 




Edison Community College is an Equal Access, Equal Opportunity institution. Programs, activities, and facilities oj the 
College are available to all on a non-discriminatory basis, without regard to race, color religion, sex, age. disabilitx. martial 
status and national origin. Questions pertaining to educational equity, equal opportunity or equal access should he addressed 
to the Director of Human Resources. 



Charlotte County Campus 

The Charlotte County Campus is located on a 200-acre site at 26300 Airport Road near 1-75. From 11 buildings in a 
beautiful and traditional setting, the campus offers a full range of higher education services. 

Courses of study leading to Associate in Arts, Associate in Science or certificate programs, as well as non-credit continuing 
education classes are offered at the Charlotte County Campus. A childcare facility and fitness center are available to serve 
students and the community. 




CC-CHILD CARE LAB 

ECC Junior Lab School 

CL-CLASSROOMS 

Classrooms 
Art Studio 
Computer Lab 

FC-FITNESS CENTER 

YMCA Fitness Program 

FO-FACULTY OFFICES 

Faculty Offices 



HS-HEALTH SCIENCE 

Radiologic Technology 
Nursing 
Emergency Medical 

Services 
Faculty Offices 

LS-LEARNING 
RESOURCES 

Library 

Learning Assistance Lab 

Continuing Education 

Office 
Distance Learning 
Edison University Center 



OB-OBSERVATORY 

Astronomical Observatory 

PP-PHYSICAL PLANT 

Mailroom 

Physical Plant Offices 

Custodial/Grounds 

SA-STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Cafeteria 
Theatre 

Tutoring Center 
Clubs/Organizations 
Bookstore 



SC-SCIENCE 

Science Labs 
Faculty Offices 

SS-STUDENT SERVICES 

Admissions/Registration 
Advising 
Auxiliary Aid 
Financial Aid 
Career Center 
Cashier 

Information Desk 
Testing Center 
Public Safety 
Administration 



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Collier County Campus 



The Collier County Campus of Edison Community College is located on a 50-acre site at 7007 Lely Cultural Parkway, just 
south of Rattlesnake Hammock Road and west of State Road 951 near Naples. The campus in made up of one and two story 
buildings including learning resources, bookstore, cafeteria, classrooms, auditorium, student center, gymnasium and physical 
education facilities; biology, chemistry, and physics laboratories; specialized laboratories for computer science, EMS, and 
nursing; and learning assistance. Courses of .study leading to Associate in Arts, Associate in Science or certificate programs, as 
well as non-credit continuing education classes are offered at the Collier County Campus. 



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EDISON 



COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ COLLIER COUNTY CAMPUS 

7007 Lely Cultural Parkway • Naples. Florida 341 13-8977 

(941) 732-3700 



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Academic Advising 

Administration 

Admissions & Registration 

Cashier 

Continuing Education 

Counseling 

Financial Aid 

Faculty Offices 

Information Center 

Security 

Student Activities & Clubs 

"B" Building: 

Auditorium 
Classrooms 



"C" Building 

Bookstore 
Cafeteria 

"D" Building 

Student Lounge 

"E" Building: 

Classrooms 
Emergency Medical 

Services Lab 
Faculty Offices 
Nursing Lab 
Tutoring Lab 
Science Labs 

"F' Building: 

Classrooms 
Faculty Offices 



"G" Building: 

Career Center 
Distance Learning 

Classroom 
Learning Resources 
Classrooms 
Computer Lab 
Learning Assistance Lab 

"H" & "I" Building: 

Plant Operations 

"HPE" Building: 

Gymnasium 
Health/Physical Education 



Lee County Campus 



The Lee County Campus is located on approximately 140 acres between College Parkway and Cypress Lake Drive in South 
Lcc County. Courses of study leading to Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or certificate programs, as well as non-credit 
Continuing Education classes are offered at the Lee County Campus. The first permanent location of the College, the Lee 
County Campus, was constructed in 1965. The campus is made up of one and two story classroom buildings including: library; 
bookstore; cafeteria; student center; auditorium; and specialized laboratories for science, computer science, nursing, health 
technologies, and college preparatory classes. The Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall, the Gallery of Fine Art, and the 
Kulakowski Observatory are located on the Lee County Campus. 




Walker Health Sciences Hall 

Health Technologies 
Anatomy and Physiology 

Lab 
Cardiovascular 

Technology 
Dental Assisting 
Dental Hygiene 
Microbiology Lab 
Nursing 
Physical Therapist 

Assisting 
Radiologic Technology 
Respiratory Care 

Technology 

Leonhardt Hall 

Learning Assistance 
Mathematics 
Natural Sciences 



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Robinson Hall 

Administrative Offices 
Bookstore 
Cafeteria 
Career Center 

Learning Resources Hall 

Business Office 
Corbin Auditorium 
Distance Learning 
Human Resources 
Learning Resources 

Humanities Hall 

Gallery of Fine Art 
Communications 
Fine Arts 
Humanities 

Information Technology Hall 

Kulakowski Observatory 



Gresham Hall 

Crime Scene Technology 
Emergency Medical 

Services 
Fire Science 
Golf Course Operations 

Hendry Hall 

Business 
Computer Labs 
Criminal Justice 

Technology 
Paralegal Studies 
Social Sciences 
Workforce Division 

Sabal Hall 

Advising 
Assessment 
Cashier 
Counseling 



Royal Palm Hall 

Office of the Registrar 
Admissions 
Records 
Registration 
Financial Aid 

Areca Hall 

Lecture Halls 

Howard Hall 

Vice President of Student 

Services 
Lecture Halls 
Student Support Services 
Student Government and 

Club Offices 
University Center 

Center for Professional 
Development 

Continuing Education 



Academic Calendar 

Admissions 

Accelerated Programs 

Registration 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 

Records 

Tuition and Fees 

Financial Aid 



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14 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Edison's college calendar is developed to comply with 
State Board of Education (SBE) Rule 6A- 14.004, Florida 
Administrative Code (FAC). The academic year consists of 
220 days. The Fall Semester is scheduled to begin within 
the first three (3) weekdays after August 22; the Spring 
Semester within the first three (3) weekdays after January 
4; and the Summer Semester within the first three (3) 
weekdays after May 5. 

In the Fall Semester of each year, the Office of the 
Registrar drafts an academic calendar for the subsequent 
year. The calendar contains designation of dates such as the 
following: 

— Beginning and ending dates of instructional terms 

— Observed holidays 

— Final examination dates 

— Commencement date 

— Dates final grades are due 

Once the draft calendar has been reviewed, it is 
forwarded to Human Resources for calculation of class days 
and faculty "duty days". The final version of the calendar is 
then submitted to the Board of Trustees for approval. 

ADMISSIONS 

The following persons are eligible for admission to 
Edison Community College: 

1 . Graduates with a standard diploma from accredited high 
schools in the United States (U.S.) or persons holding 
high school equivalent (GED) diplomas* - all programs; 

2. Completors of a home education program meeting the 
requirements of S. 232.02(4) - all programs; 

3. Transfer students, in good academic standing, from 
colleges, universities, and certain other post-secondary 
institufions - all programs; 

4. Foreign students with the equivalent of a U.S. high 
school diploma and who meet language standards 
established through College policy and/or procedure* 

— all programs. 

5. High school students who have been approved by the 
College for entry in the accelerated program. 

6. Individuals age 1 6 or older who left high school before 
earning a standard high school diploma or the 
equivalency of a standard high school diploma - Post 
Secondary Adult Vocational (PSAV) programs only. 
After the admissions application has been processed, 

the Office of the Registrar will notify each applicant of their 
acceptance to Edison and provide the applicant with tesfing, 
advisement and registration information. 



Programs designated as limited access have 
supplementary admission requirements which may be 
obtained from that department. 

Accepted applicants may begin their studies any term. 
See the academic calendar in this catalog. 

All degree-seeking and certificate-seeking students are 
required to be tested for achievement of communication and 
compulation competencies. Students scoring below 
e.stablished minimum levels are required to enroll in and 
complete appropriate college preparatory instruction. 

*NOTE: Florida law (s240.321 ) provides that students 
firadiiating from a Florida public high school subsequent 
to August I , / 987 and applying/or admission to an Associate 
in Arts degree program must meet specific general 
requirements for high school graduation. Graduates from 
private high schools and out-of state public schools must 
have completed a curriculum that includes 4 years of English 
and 3 years each of mathematics, science, and social studies. 
However, in lieu of the English requirement, foreign students 
may use four years of instruction in their native language 
or language of instruction in the secondary school attended. 
Students presenting a GED diploma must have taken the 
test in English for admission to any certificate or degree 
program. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Non-degree seeking students are individuals who wish 
to take selected college credit courses without the intent of 
earning an associate degree or certificate. These students 
must meet all course prerequisites for any courses taken. 
These students must complete an application for admission. 
Non-degree seeking students attend the College to upgrade 
employment skills, for transfer credit purposes, or for 
personal interest and enjoyment. Non-degree seeking 
students wishing to enroll in a college level mathematics or 
English course are required to complete the Florida College 
Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) or submit a full set 
of ACT-E or SAT-R scores. Non-degree seeking students 
wishing to become associate degree or certificate candidates 
must meet the College's admission requirements for those 
programs. 

NOTE: Non-degree seeking students may not have access 
to financial aid, veteran 's benefits and certain academic 
program/services that may require degree-seeking status. 



15 



Non-Native English Speakers 

Since English is the language of instruction at Edison 
Community College, students must demonstrate an ability 
to read and understand what is taught. Those students lacking 
the skills necessary to succeed may need special assistance. 

To apply as a non-native speaker, you must first pass 
the Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL) test with 
a minimum score of 213 (computer based) or 550 (paper 
based). ACT-E or SAT-R scores may also be submitted and 
considered in lieu of TOEFL scores. Students scoring below 
the cut-off will be referred to the Department of Learning 
Assistance for help. 

International Students on Student Visas (Fl) 

The following admission requirements apply only to 
International Students seeking student visas (F-1). The 
College will issue an 1-20 form when all admission 
requirements are met. The F- 1 Visa is issued by the American 
Embassy when presented with the 1-20 form. 

1 . The applicant must apply for admission and submit all 
required admission credentials (as outlined below) to 
the Office of the Registrar no later than sixty (60) days 
prior to the published first class day of the term for 
which they are seeking admission. 

2. Non-native English-speaking applicants must supply 
the International Student Office with the official test 
results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) or an examination determined equivalent by 
the College. Applicants currently residing in their home 
country must complete the TOEFL with a minimum 
score of 213 (computer based) or 550 (paper based). 

3. The applicant or sponsor must provide a notarized 
statement from their financial institution (showing funds 
at the current exchange in U.S. dollars} as evidence that 
the required funds are available to the prospective 
student. The applicant or sponsor must complete the 
Sponsorship Affidavit form. The College does not 
provide sponsors, financial assistance, dormitories or 
transportation services. 

4. The applicant must provide official transcripts from all 
secondary schools, colleges, universities, technical, and 
other postsecondary schools attended. Transcripts in 
languages other than English must include an official 
certified English translation. The translation must 
include authentic verifying statements and signatures. 
The applicant must have at least the equivalent of a 
U.S. high school diploma to be eligible for admission. 
An admission decision will be made after all documents 
are received. 



5. International college or university transcripts must be 
evaluated by an outside agency recognized by Edison 
Community College. A list of approved agencies is 
available upon request. 

6. An applicant seeking to transfer from a U.S. college or 
university must provide the following items before a 
final admission decision is reached: 

a. All of the information included in requirements 
Numbers 1-5 above, 

b. An official transcript from the current U.S. college or 
university, 

c. A copy of the current 1-20 form, and 

d. A visa clearance form from the International Student 
Advisor at the current U.S. college or university. 

7. The applicant and sponsor must have an orientation with 
the International Student Advisor no later than thirty 
(30) days prior to the first class day of the term for 
which they are seeking admission. 

8. All international students must meet the Standards of 
Academic Progress for International Students (full-time 
status/12 credits per semester and a cumulative 2.00 
grade point average). 

9. Transfer students from a U.S. high school, college or 
university must present a current 1-20 and F-1 Visa. 

10. All applicants must provide proof of health and accident 
insurance to include a body repatriation and body 
evacuation rider. 

Transfer Students 

1 . Transfer students who plan to earn a degree or certificate 
at Edison Community College must provide official 
transcripts from all previously attended colleges or 
universities. Official transcripts must be sent to Edison 
Community College, Office of the Registrar prior to 
the start of the term of enrollment but no later than thirty 
(30) days after the start of classes. 

2. Edison Community College accepts credits earned at 
colleges and/or universities accredited by one of the 
six regional accrediting associations. Edison 
Community College does not routinely accept transfer 
credit from non-regionally accredited institutions. 
Edison may accept, on an individual basis, credit earned 
at colleges or universities not regionally accredited if 
the credit represents collegiate-level course work 
relevant to the program of study, with course content 
and level of instruction resulting in student 
competencies at least equivalent to those of students 
enrolled in comparable instruction at Edison 
Community College. Awarding of transfer credit is 
based on Edison course equivalencies. Students seeking 
to transfer credit to Edison Community College from 



16 



other institutions may be asked to forward to the Office 
of the Registrar copies of course syllabi. Course syllabi 
will be compared with those at Edison Community and 
will govern the transferability of such courses. (See the 
Petitions section page 31 for more information.) 

3. An official evaluation of course transferability is made 
after the student is admitted to the College and official 
transcripts from all previously attended institutions are 
received. The results of the official evaluation will be 
posted to the student's Edison Community College 
transcript prior to the end of the student's first term of 
enrollment. 

4. Failure to report previous college level work attempted 
constitutes a falsification of the admissions application 
and subjects students to loss of all credits earned and 
may result in dismissal. 

5. Transfer students who are eligible to return to the 
institution of origin will be provisionally admitted to 
Edison Community College. Final acceptance will be 
made upon receipt and evaluation of their transcript(s). 

6. Transfer students who have been suspended or 
dismissed from another college or university may be 
provisionally admitted to Edison Community College. 
These students must submit a petition requesting 
admission. (See the Petitions section page 3 1 for more 
information) 

7. Transfer students admitted to Edison Community 
College, who were not in good standing at their last 
college or university, will be classified in the same or 
similar manner under Edison's Standards of Academic 
Progress. 

8. Previously earned credits and grades may transfer in 
but may not be accepted for a specific program. All 
grades earned at another college or university will 
transfer in to Edison as part of the student's record. 

9. Transfer students may be exempt from placement 
testing. They must have earned a "C" or better in a 
college-level English composition course and/or an 
approved college-level mathematics course. 

10. Transfer students who have completed an AA or a 
baccalaureate degree at another regionally accredited 
college or university cannot enroll in an AA degree 
program at Edison Community College. 

11. Transfer students MUST complete a minimum of 
25% of the required degree or certificate course 
work at Edison Community College to graduate from 
Edison. English for Non-Native Speakers (ESL/ 
ENS), physical education and college preparatory 
courses do not apply. 



Transient Students 

Students attending another college or university who 
wish to enroll at Edison to transfer coursework back to their 
original college or university may be admitted as a transient 
student. 

Transient students should be advised by their own 
college or university regarding which courses to take at 
Edison. Transient students must present an official statement 
from their college or university certifying that they are in 
good academic standing and that the credit earned at Edison 
will be accepted as part of their degree or certificate program. 

Servicemember's Opportunity College 

The American Association of Community Colleges has 
designated Edison Community College as a Service- 
member's Opportunity College (SOC). Aside from stated 
and traditional means of obtaining credit toward most 
associate degrees, the following special policies, procedures, 
and services are available to active-duty service members, 
the National Guard, reserves, new recruits and veterans: 

Credit may be earned through the College Level 
Examination Program (see CLEP, page 20). 

Credit may be earned through relevant, validated 
military service training, including military service schools 
and United States Armed Forces Institute (US AFI) courses. 
The recommendation of the American Council on Education 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the 
Armed Services will serve as the basis for accepting such 
training and awarding college credit. Recommendations in 
the ACE Guide are advisory in nature and credit awarded is 
at the discretion of the College. 

After enrolling in the College, a student may initiate 
the request for such credit by providing appropriate 
documentation as determined by Edison. (See Credit from 
Military Service Schools page 24.) 

Requirements For Re-admission 

Former students who have not attended Edison within 
the past year must submit an admissions application and 
such other information as may be required by the Office of 
the Registrar. Degree-seeking students readmitting after two 
years of non-attendance, who have not completed English 
and mathematics requirements, must retake the FCELPT or 
another approved assessment test. Students attempting to 
return after suspension or dismissal must petition the College 
for possible readmission. A favorable decision will be 
dependent upon clear written evidence of factors that 
indicate promise of successful performance. (See the 
Petitions section page 3 1 for more information) 



17 



Ettective Catalog Policy 

A continuously enrolled student may choose to meet 
graduation requirements specified in either the College 
Catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment or at the 
time of graduation. A student whose enrollment was 
interrupted for more than one ( 1 ) year must meet the 
graduation requirements of the College Catalog in effect at 
the time of readmission or at the time of graduation. Students 
entering limited access programs, such as Nursing, must 
meet the graduation requirements of the College catalog in 
effect during the semester of entry into the limited access 
program. Although faculty, staff and administrators will 
help students meet the requirements for a degree or 
certificate, it is the student's responsibility to meet those 
requirements. Edison Community College will not award a 
degree or certificate until all requirements have been met. 
Questions regarding application of this rule should be 
directed to the Office of the Registrar. 



A student who selects a private provider for remedial 
instruction is entitled to enroll in college level courses in 
skill areas other than those for which the student is being 
remediated. Once the student has successfully completed a 
remediation program, they must be retested and achieve a 
score above the cut off score in the appropriate section(s) of 
the common placement test. 

ENTRY PLACEMENT TEST CUTOFF SCORES 





ACT-E 


FCELPT 


SAT-R 


To enroll in ENC 1101 
or higher 


17 - English 


83 - English 


440 - Verbal 


To enroll in a 
college level class 


18- Reading 


83 - Reading 


440 - Verbal 


To enroll in MAT 1 033 


19 -Math 


72 - Math 


440 - Quantitative 


To enroll in MGF 11 06 


19 -Math 


72 - Math 


440 - Quantitative 


To enroll in MAC 1105 


23 - Math 


90 - Math 


540 - Quantitative 



College Preparatory Program 



College Rights 

Edison Community College reserves the right to deny 
admission to any applicant, to change any of the regulations, 
rules, policies, courses, or teaching assignments without 
notice, and to suspend any student whose behavior is not in 
keeping with the best interests of the College. 

Placement Testing 

Placement testing is required of all degree-seeking and 
certificate-seeking students prior to registration. Testing is 
used to determine placement in English, mathematics, and 
reading courses. Students are required to take the FCELPT 
or submit a full .set of ACT-E or SAT-R scores. PSAV 
students are required to take the Test of Adult Basic 
Education (TABE). Students presenting a college ready 
diploma will be exempt from placement testing 
requirements. The FCELPT is administered at the Lee, 
Collier and Charlotte campuses and the Hendry-Glades site. 
AS degree-seeking students can contact the System for 
Applied Individualized Learning (SAIL) Program to see if 
they qualify for assistance prior to testing. This program 
offers guidance in helping students to acquire basic skills. 

Students who do not achieve the minimum scores on 
these tests will be placed in. and required to satisfactorily 
complete, appropriate college preparatory instruction. 
Florida Statute 240.321 mandates that every student at 
Edison Community College, who scores below college level 
in any area on the common placement test, be informed of 
alternative remedial options. A written list will be made 
available to students that shall include, but not be limited 
to. options provided by Edison, adult education programs, 
and programs provided by private sector providers. 



The Florida Legislature created, by statute. College 
Preparatory Programs in all of Florida's community colleges 
effective July 1, 1985. Degree-seeking and certificate 
students shall be tested prior to registration. Tests which are 
recognized for purposes of evaluation at Edison Community 
College are: The ACT-E, SAT-R, and FCELPT. The Florida 
College Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) will be 
routinely given to entering students. 

Students must present scores on the above tests that 
have been earned within the two years prior to admission to 
Edison. Further testing on the FCELPT may be necessary if 
the scores are more than two (2) years old. 

Students must enroll in college preparatory 
communication and computation instruction if test scores 
are below the specific levels indicated on the chart above. 

Students scoring above the cut off scores on the 
placement test may enroll in college credit instruction. 
Students scoring below the cut/off scores on the placement 
test are required to enter college preparatory instruction. 
College preparatory instruction does NOT count toward 
meeting degree requirements. 

Students who test into college preparatory instruction 
and subsequently enroll in college preparatory instruction 
must successfully complete the required college preparatory 
studies by the time they have successfully accumulated 12 
hours of college-level course work or they must maintain 
continuous enrollment in college preparatory course work 
each semester until the requirements are completed while 
performing satisfactorily in the degree earning course work. 
Students can not enroll for more than three (3) attempts in 
each course to complete college preparatory instruction. . 
Students enrolled in a college preparatory course who drop 
the course after the drop/add period will be considered to 
have utilized one of their three attempts allowed to complete 



18 



that course. Students who must enroll in the same college 
preparatory class within a skill area more than two (2) times 
shall pay fees at 100 percent of the full cost of instruction. 
Students who withdraw or fail a class due to extenuating 
circumstances, or financial hardship, may be granted an 
exception to the 100 percent full cost of instruction. Students 
must provide written documentation of financial hardship, 
disability or extenuating circumstances that resulted in the 
withdrawal or failure. Such exceptions require approval 
under guidelines established and approved by the Board of 
Trustees. Such documentation shall be submitted to the 
District Director of Learning Assistance, who will approve 
or disapprove the request. 

Students are permitted to enroll in college preparatory 
instruction concurrently with credit instruction in courses 
for which they are qualified. College preparatory students 
may not enroll in the following categories of college credit 
courses while completing their college preparatory course 
work: 

1) College preparatory students who are deficient in 
mathematics may not enroll in any college-level 
mathematics courses or courses that require 
mathematics skills beyond the skill level of the student. 

2) College preparatory students who are deficient in 
English and/or reading skills may not enroll in English 
or humanities courses that meet the Gordon Rule (see 
page 195) requirements, or any courses that require 
communication skills beyond the skill level of the 
student. 

3) College preparatory students who are deficient in all 
three areas may enroll in college-level courses such as 
orientation courses, college success courses or courses 
that are not dependent on college-level computation and 
communication skills. 

College preparatory instruction is provided in reading. 



writing and mathematics. There are three levels of reading, 
three levels of English and three levels of mathematics. 

Reading instruction includes the recognition of main 
ideas, supporting details, meanings of words in context, 
author's purpose, tone, valid arguments, explicit and implicit 
relationships within and between sentences; and the ability 
to detect bias, to distinguish fact from opinion and to draw 
logical inferences and conclusion. College preparatory 
writing instruction includes word choice, .sentence and five 
(5) paragraph essay. College preparatory mathematics 
instruction includes arithmetic and introductory algebra 
including real numbers and their properties, basic operations 
and linear expressions, factoring of algebraic expressions 
and solufions of linear equations and inequalities, graphing, 
and quadratic equations. 

All college preparatory courses require ninety (90) 
contact hours per semester. These contact hours are 
comprised of a combination of regular classroom lecture 
hours and open lab hours. The combination is determined 
by the Department of Learning Assistance each semester 
and is published in the official schedule of classes. The open 
lab hours are posted each semester. Open lab hours can be 
completed any time the lab is open. 

Edison Community College's preparatory program is 
part of the Department of Learning Assistance. Another 
program offered at Edison Community College is the SAIL 
program. The SAIL Program is designed for AS degree- 
seeking students to test and diagnose their skill level in 
English, mathematics and reading. Assistance is then 
provided, whether it is a case of refreshing skills or steering 
students to the next course or a more comprehensive course 
of study. SAIL Program staff design a program of study 
that allows students to work at their own pace. Should 
questions arise about this program and its regulations, please 
consult personnel in Learning Assistance or a counselor. 




19 



ACCELERATED PROGRAMS 



The "Accelerated Programs'" cluster represents a variety of different programs in which students may earn college credit 
through non-traditional methods. Most of the accelerated programs offered at Edison serve only eligible high school students. 
However, the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) program is available to all students. 

I. CLEP 

Edison Community College participates in the CLEP offered by the College Entrance Examination Board, and grants credit 
for satisfactory scores in four (4) of the five (5) general examinations and selected subject matter examinations. Acceptance of 
CLEP tests and scores is subject to change without notice. 

Edison awards credit for all the following CLEP exams: 



GENERAL EXAMS 

Humanities 

Mathematics 

Natural Sciences (Elective credit only) 

Biology/Physical Sci 

Social Science & History 

SUBJECT EXAMS 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

American Govemment 

American History I 

American History II 

General Psychology 

Human Growth & Development 

Introduction to Educational Psychology 

Principles of Macroeconomics 

Principles of Microeconomics 

Intro Sociology 

Western Civilization I 

Western Civilization II 

* Not writing intensive 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

College French 



College German , 
College Spanish 



COMPOSITION & LITERATURE 

American Literature 

English Literature 



MINIMUM 
PASSING SCORE 

490 

500 



490, 
490, 



50, 

49, 

49, 

50 

51 , 

49, 

50 

50 

50 

50 

48 



42, 
50, 
43, 
55, 
45, 
55, 

50, 
49, 



CREDITS CREDIT 

AWARDED IN 

3 Humanities Elective* 

3 MGF1106 

6 BSC lOIO/ISC lOOlC 

3 SYG 1010 



3 POS2041 

3 AMH2010 

3 AMH2020 

3 PSY2013 

3 DEP2004 

3 EDP2002 

3 ECO 2013 

3 ECO 2023 

3 SYG 1000 

3 EUH 1000 

3 EUH 1001 



6 FRE 1120-1 121 

12 FRE 2200-2201 

6 GER 1120-1121 

12 GER 2200-2201 

6 SPN 1120-1121 

12 SPN 2200-2201 

6 AML 2010-2020 

6 ENL2012-2022 



SCIENCE & MATH 

Calculus 

College Algebra 

Trigonometry 

General Biology 

General Chemistry . 

BUSINESS 

Intro Accounting .... 
Intro Business Law 
Intro Marketing 



49, 

47, 
54, 
49, 
50, 



50, 
51 , 
50, 



4 MAC 2311 

3 MAC 1105 

3 MAC 1114 

6 BSC 1010-1011 

6 CHM 2045-2046 



6 ACG 1001-2011 

3 BUL224I 

3 MAR 201 1 (AS only) 



The effect of State Board of Education Rule (SBE) 6A- 10.030 on the use of the College Level Examination Program at 
Edison Community College is to disallow the use of CLEP to earn credit in any English Composition courses which count 
toward graduation requirements. Students who have completed higher levels of mathematics courses in high schools may seek 
CLEP credit for not more than three (3) credits of mathematics. 

20 



< 



Credit earned on the CLEP for Humanities may be used as the second course in the general education Humanities requirement, 
but not for HUM 2210, 2230 or 2930; credit earned through CLEP will not count in fulfilling a writing intensive course 
requirement. CLEP credit may not be used for grade forgiveness. CLEP credit is not granted if the course has already been 
taken. CLEP credit for DEP 2004, Human Growth and Development, is not accepted by the Edison Nursing Program. 

11. ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

In order to provide greater flexibility and opportunity for high school students to proceed with their education, Edison 
Community College participates in a statewide program of advanced placement with local high schools. The following policy 
will apply to Edison Community College Advanced Placement Program: 

a. Educational Testing Service scores of five (5), four (4), and three (3) will be accepted for credit, such credit to be assigned 
based on the chart below. 

b. State institutions will accept some placement credit for ETS scores of five (5), four (4), and three (3) included in transcripts 
from Edison Community College. The student should contact the anticipated transfer institution for verification of acceptance 
prior to taking the examinations. 

The following advanced placement exams earn Edison credit as indicated: 



EXAMINATION SCORES COURSES CREDIT 

American History 5-3 AMH 2010-20 6 

Biology 5-3 BSC 1010-11 6 

Chemistry 5-3 CHM 2045-46 6 

Economics I (Macro) 5-3 ECO 2013 3 

Economics II (Micro) 5-3 ECO 2023 3 

English Language & Comp I 5-3 ENC 1 101 3 

English Literature & Comp II 5-3 ENC 1 102 3 

European History 5-3 EUH 1000-01 6 

French Language 5-3 PRE 1 120-21 6 

ERE 2200-01 

German Language 5-3 GER 1 120-21 6 

Government & Politics 5-3 POS 2041 3 

History of Art I & II 5-3 ARH 1050-51 6 

Music History and Appreciation 5-3 MUL 1 110 3 

Music Theory 5-3 MUT 1111/MUT 1242 4 

Physics B 5-3 PHY 1053-54 6 

Physics C 5-3 PHY 2048-49 6 

Spanish Language 5-3 SPN 1120-21 6 

SPN 2200-01 6 

Studio Art Portfolio 5-3 ART 1300C 3 

Calculus AB 5-3 MAC 2311 4 



REMARKS 



Elective credit only 
Elective credit only 



Elective credit only 
Elective credit only 



III. ACCELERATED PROGRAMS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: 



Dual Enrollment (courses which carry credit towards 
high school graduation and college) 

High school juniors and seniors who meet the 
required grade point average, and demonstrate an ability 
and readiness for college-level work may, with the 
approval of the district school superintendent or 
designee, enroll for courses which carry credit toward 
high school graduation as well as college. 

These courses may be held on the high school 
campus or the college campus. Readiness for college- 
level work is determined through scores earned on one 
of the following entrance examinations, which are 
required prior to dual enrollment; ACT-E, SAT-R, or 
FCELPT. 



Each county (and many private schools) has a 
separate Dual Enrollment contract with Edison. See 
your high school counselor for details. 

Dual enrollment students work closely with their 
high school guidance counselors to see that the 
following requirements are met. 

1 . Testing prior to admission: SAT-R or ACT-E are 
preferred: FCELPT is allowed. 

2. 3.0 GPA for all seniors and Collier County juniors; 
3.5 GPA for all other juniors. 

3. High school principal or designee must sign the 
dual enrollment form, listing the courses the student 
should take (from approved list). 

4. Admit, attend orientation and register at one of 
Edison's three campuses. 

21 



5. If the class is offered at the high school, admit and 
register in class. 

B. Early Admissions (Seniors take full-time enrollment 
on-campus). 

The Early Admissions Program consists of full- 
time enrollment at Edison Community College. 

The following must accompany the Edison 
Application for Admission: 

1 . A letter from the high school principal or designee 
containing a recommendation for early admission, 
a list of approved courses; and designation of 
courses or categories of courses which the student 
needs for high school graduation. 

2. 3.0 GPA for seniors. 

3. A completed early admission form listing school 
courses for which the student may register each 
term. These courses must apply toward high school 
graduation. Early admission forms must be signed 
by the high school principal or designee, the parent 
if the student is under 18, and the student. 

The applicant must complete admission, college 
placement testing and orientation prior to registering for 
classes. All early admission students must achieve the State 
minimum cutoff scores on all appropriate subtests of the 
college entry placement test. It is preferred that students 
present ACT-E or SAT-R scores at time of application. The 
entire FCELPT will be administered if the student must be 
tested by Edison. High school students may take the 
FCELPT placement test once at Edison before high school 
graduation, and may retest once after high school graduation. 
No high .school student will be placed in college preparatory 
courses or Health and Wellness courses for dual enrollment 
credit or early admission. 

An Edison academic advisor will assist the student in 
selecting the schedule of classes based on the courses 
recommended by the high school principal or designee. If 



the principal or designee indicates that the student has 
completed all high school credits except for electives, an 
Edison advisor will provide a schedule of classes. Early 
admission students receive an education plan for an 
As.sociate in Arts or Associate in Science degree. 

Tuition is waived for students earning early admission 
and dual enrollment credit. Textbooks are available at no 
cost at Edison or the high school. Check with a counselor/ 
academic advisor for information. 

C. Credit-In-Escrow (Flexible program, students earn 

college credit on-campus while in high school). 

Students with demonstrated ability may be admitted 

part-time or in summer school by arrangements with 

their high school principal and counselor. 

A letter from the high school principal or designee must 

be submitted each .session, specifying the areas in which 

the student has demonstrated ability and the courses 

the student is to take at Edison. 

A minimum 2.5 high school grade point average is 

required (GPA). Testing is required for English 

composition and mathematics courses. 

Credit in Escrow Courses do not count towards high 

school graduation. The student is responsible for 

payment of fees and books. 

D. International Baccalaureate (IB) Program Credit 

Edison Community College has adopted a policy for 
awarding International Baccalaureate Program Credit. 
The policy is as follows: 

Students receiving the IB diploma will receive up 
to 30 semester hours of credit for scores of four 
(4) or higher on both higher level and subsidiary 
level examinations. 

Students who do not receive the IB diploma will 
receive credit for scores of five (5) or higher on 
higher level examinations only. 



International Baccalaureate (IB) Scores and Edison Course Equivalents 



IB Course 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 4 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 5 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 6 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 7 


Advanced Math 


MAC 23 11 


MAC 23 1 1 
MAC 2312 


MAC 23 1 1 
MAC 2312 


MAC 23 11 

MAC 2312 


Art/Design 


ART 13()0C 


ART 1300 
Elective 


ART 13()0C 
Elective ' 


ART 1300C 
Elective 


Biology 


BSC 1010 


BSC 1010/ 
BSC lOlOL 


BSC 1010/ 
BSC lOlOL 


BSC 1010/ 
BSC lOlOL 



22 



IB Course 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 4 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 5 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 6 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 7 


Chemistry 


CHM 2030 


CHM 2030 

CHM 2045 

CHM 2045L 


CHM 2030 

CHM 2045 

CHM 2045L 


CHM 2030 
CHM 2045 
CHM 2045 L 


Classic Latin 


Elective 


Elective 
Elective 


Elective 
Elective 


Elective 
Elective 


Computer Science 


COP 1000 


COP 1000 

Elective 


COP 1000 
Elective 


COP 1000 
Elective 


Economics 


ECO 2023 


ECO 2023 
ECO Elective 


ECO 2023 
ECO Elective 


ECO 2023 
ECO Elective 


English A 1 


ENC 1101 


ENC 1101 
ENC 1102 


ENC 1101 
ENC 1102 


ENC 1101 
ENC 1102 


Environmental 

Systems 


BSC 1030 


BSC 1030 
Elective 


BSC 1030 
Elective 


BSC 1030 
Elective 


French B 


ERE 1120 


ERE 1120 
ERE 1121 


ERE 1120 
ERE 1121 


PRE 1120 
ERE 1121 


Geography 


GEO 2370 


GEO 2370 
GEO Elective 


GEO 2370 
GEO Elective 


GEO 2370 
GEO Elective 


German B 


GER 1120 


GER 1120 
GER 1121 


GER 1120 
GER 1121 


GER 1120 
GER 1121 


History 


WOH 1030 


WOH 1030 
WOH 1023 


WOH 1030 
WOH 1023 


WOH 1030 
WOH 1023 


History of Americas 


AMH2010 


AMH2010 
AMH 2020 


AMH 2010 
AMH 2020 


AMH 2010 
AMH 2020 


History of Europe 


EUH 1000 


EUH 1000 
EUH 1001 


EUH 1000 
EUH 1001 


EUH 1000 
EUH 1001 


Math Methods 


MAC 1140 


MAC 1140 
MAC 2233 


MAC 1140 
MAC 2233 


MAC 1140 
MAC 2233 


Math Studies 


MAC 1105 


MAC 1105 
MAC 1140 


MAC 1105 
MAC 1140 


MAC 1105 
MAC 1140 


Mathematics 


MAC 1140 


MAC 1140 
MAC 2233 


MAC 1140 
MAC 2233 


MAC 1 140 
MAC 2233 


Music 


MUL 1110 


MUL 1110 
MUT 1001 


MUL 1110 
MUT 1001 


MUL 1110 
MUT 1001 


Philosophy 


PHI 2010 


PHI 2010 
PHI Elective 


PHI 2010 
PHI Elective 


PHI 2010 
PHI Elective 



23 



IB Course 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 4 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 5 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 6 


Edison Course 

based on IB 

score of 7 


Physics 


PHY 1039 


PHY 1039 
PHY 1053/ 
PHY 1053L 


PHY 1039 
PHY 1053/ 
PHY 1053L 


PHY 1039 
PHY 1053/ 
PHY 1053L 


Psychology 


PSY 2013 


PSY 2013 
PSY Elective 


PSY 2013 
PSY Elective 


PSY 2013 
PSY Elective 


Russian 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Social 
Anthropology 


ANT 1410 


ANT 1410 
ANT Elective 


ANT 1410 
ANT Elective 


ANT 1410 


Spanish B 


SPN 1120 


SPN 1120 
SPN 1121 


SPN 1120 
SPN 1121 


SPN 1120 
SPN 1121 


Theater 


THE 2100 


THE 2100 
TPP 1110 


THE 2100 
TPP 1110 


THE 2100 
TPP 1110 



Credit From Military Service Schools 

Edison may award college credit for military service 
school training in accordance with the following conditions 
and stipulations: 

1. The person making the request must be applying or 
currently enrolled as a degree-seeking student. 

2. The person making the request must furnish the 
following documents to the Office of the Registrar at 
the time the request is made: 

a. Armed Forces of the United States Report of 
Transfer or Discharge. 

b. Course Completion Certificate for each service 
school/course for which credit is being requested. 

c. DD214 Form or DD295 (currently enlisted). 

3. In addition to the documents required in (2) above, a 
person requesting acceptance of credit from U.S. Army 
Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) schools/courses 
must provide the following documents: 

a. Course Completion Certificates from each MOS 
producing school/course completed. 

b. USAEEC Form 10 (for enlisted personnel from 
October 1975 though December 1976). 

c. The Officer Qualifications Record (DA Form 66) 
for Warrant Officers. 

4. In addition to the documents required in (3) above, a 
person requesting acceptance of credit from U.S. Navy 
general rates and ratings schools/courses, must provide 
the following document: 

a. Navy Occupational/Training and Awards History 
(NAVPERS 1070/604). 



5 . The Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences 
in the Armed Services will serve as the basis for Edison 
accepting such training and awarding college credit. 
Credit may be awarded at the discretion of the College. 

6. Credits will be granted under this rule in those areas 
appropriate to the lower division baccalaureate level. 
They will be included in a student's degree program as 
long as they fulfill published degree requirements. 

REGISTRATION 

Registering for classes at Edison Community College 
is as easy and convenient as using your touch-tone telephone 
or by visiting one of our three campuses or the Hendry/ 
Glades Center. Special services for disabled students are 
available upon request. The Schedule of Classes is published 
each semester and is available in all Student Services Offices 
on Edison's campuses, and on the Internet at http://www. 
edison.edu. 

Please refer to the Academic Calendar for registration 
dates. Separate registration periods are set for continuing 
and returning students, new degree- seeking students and new 
non-degree-seeking students. Several other important 
registration dates, such as drop and add, refund, and 
withdrawal deadlines, are also set in the Academic Calendar. 
The Academic Calendar is published in this Catalog and in 
each Schedule of Classes. 

All students, by registering for classes, assume the 
responsibility for familiarizing themselves with and abiding 
by the regulations, rules and policies of Edison Community 
College. 



24 



Attendance 



Final Examination Schedule 



Punctual and regular class attendance is expected of all 
students. Any class session missed, regardless of cause, 
reduces the opportunity for learning and adversely affects 
academic success. Specific attendance and grading 
requirements for each course are stated in the course 
syllabus. It is the student's responsibility to read each 
syllabus and to arrange to make up work missed because of 
absence. Class attendance is restricted to those students 
registered for the course and to guests invited by the 
instructor. Children and other persons not properly registered 
for a course will not be permitted to attend class. Students 
who stop attending classes must complete a withdrawal form 
by the published deadline or they will be assigned a letter 
grade. 

Audit Students 

Students who intend to register for informational 
instruction only and are not working for college credit may 
register for courses as audit. Regular fees are charged for 
audit. A student wishing to change to audit status or from 
audit status must make the change before the last day to 
drop with a refund. Audit students wishing to enroll in a 
college level mathematics or English course are required to 
complete the Florida College Entry Level Placement Test 
(FCELPT) or submit a full set of ACT-E or SAT-R scores. 

Credit Class Scheduling 

Credit classes at Edison are scheduled to comply with 
SBE Rule bA- 10.033, FAC, which requires one (1) college 
credit be awarded for learning expected from the equivalent 
of 15 fifty-minute periods of classroom instruction. Contact 
hours assigned to laboratory instruction, internships or 
clinical experience are determined by Edison, based on the 
proportion of direct instruction to the laboratory exercise, 
internship hours, or clinical practice hours. Definition of 
such ratios are found in the Collective Negotiations 
Agreement, available at the Human Resources Office. 

Drop/Add Periods 

The beginning of each drop/add period coincides with 
the start of telephone registration for that period. The end 
of drop and add coincides with the last day for a refund. 
These dates are published in the College Catalog and in the 
Schedule of Classes. 



The final examination schedule is published, by term, 
in the Schedule of Classes. 

I.D. Cards 

All credit students are entitled to a photo identification 
card. The photo identification card is required in the 
Learning Resource Center and in the various academic 
computer laboratories. Photo identification cards are also 
required when selling textbooks back to the bookstore. 
Photo identification cards will be made after the refund 
deadline each semester. Information on when and where 
photographs will be taken will be posted on each campus. 

Refund Policy 

Refunds of matriculation, tuition fees and special fees 
are made only if the required form is turned in at the Office 
of the Registrar by the published deadlines (see Academic 
Calendar), or if the drop is done via the automated telephone 
registration system (and the drop is confirmed) by the 
published deadline. The refund policy is as follows: 

Semester (16 week major term) - The first five (5) 
weekdays after classes begin, including the first day of 
classes. 

Summer (combined term) - The first four (4) weekdays 
after classes begin, including the first day of classes. 

Mini-Semester (A and B terms) - The first three (3) 
weekdays after classes begin, including the first day of 
classes. 

Exceptions to the Refund Policy may be authorized for 
certain events occurring prior to the mid-point of the term. 
Student requests for refunds must be submitted through 
formal petition prior to the end of the next major term. 
Petition forms are available in the Office of the Registrar. A 
major term is defined as the Fall or Spring term. Completed 
petitions and supporting documentation can be submitted 
in the Office of the Registrar. 

A student who is withdrawn from the College because 
of administrative action, except for disciplinary reasons, is 
entitled to a full refund of matriculation, tuition fees and 
special fees. 

A student who is withdrawn from a course or courses 
for disciplinary reasons is not entitled to a refund of 
matriculation, tuition and special fees. 

Refund checks are mailed as soon as possible after the 
refund deadline and should be received within 30 days after 
the start of classes. 



25 



Full Cost of Instruction 



Maximum Student Class Load 



Florida Statute places responsibility for the full cost of 
instruction on the student alter the second course attempt. 
The legislation does provide for a one-time exception to the 
increased fees. (See the Petitions section page 31 for more 
information). Any state-funded undergraduate course, 
including college preparatory courses, taken repeatedly at 
the same institution by any student beginning Fall 1997, 
and after, will be charged at the full cost of instruction. This 
excludes repeatable courses for the community colleges. All 
students are included regardless of type of residency. Any 
course work taken before the Fall 1997 term will not be 
considered for the full cost of instruction. Courses taken at 
institutions other than Edison will not be counted in 
determining the full cost of instruction. 

Class Cancellations 

Edison attempts to honor its commitment to provide 
the classes scheduled for a given term. However, at times, 
usually due to low enrollment, it may be necessary to cancel 
a class. In such cases every effort will be made to find an 
appropriate alternate class for the student. 



A student may not take more than 1 8 credit hours during 
a major terni or nine (9) credits during Summer A or Summer 
B session without the written permission of an academic 
advising specialist. There is no minimum class load. 

Student Classifications 

A. Full Time, Part Time: A student must take 1 2 credits or 
more during a major term, or six (6) credits or more 
during Summer A or Summer B, to be considered a 
full-time student. A student who enrolls in less than 
these minimums is considered part time. 

B. Credit, Audit, & Non-Credit: Students enrolled for 
college credit in the current session will be considered 
Credit Students. Students who enroll for no credit, that 
is, students who "audit" a course normally offered for 
credit, will be considered Audit Students. Students 
enrolled in Continuing Education courses, which are 
not offered for college credit, will be considered Non- 
Credit Students. 



26 



RESIDENCY RULES/GUIDELINES 



Edison Community College policy regarding Florida 
residency requirements complies with Florida Statute 
240. 1 20 1 and State Board of Education Rule 6A- 1 0.044. A 
summary is provided below. 

Definitions: 

1 . a) The term "dependent" means any person, whether 

or not living with his/her parent, who is eligible to 
be claimed by his/her parent as a dependent under 
the Federal Income Tax Code. 

b) A "legal resident" is one who has maintained his/ 
her legal residence in this state during the preceding 
year, has purchased a home which is occupied by 
him/her as his/her residence, or has established a 
domicile in this state pursuant to FS 222. 17. (Filed 
with Circuit Court). 

c) The term "parent" means the natural or adoptive 
parent or legal guardian of a dependent. 

d) A "resident" for tuition purposes is one who 
qualifies for the in-state tuition rate; a "non- 
resident" for tuition purposes is one who does not 
qualify for the in-state tuition rate. 

2. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes: 

a) An applicant, or if that applicant is a dependent, 
his/her parent must have established legal residence 
in this state for at least 1 2 months immediately prior 
to the published first day of classes for the semester 
in which they are seeking admission. 

b) Every applicant for admission to Edison 
Community College shall be required to submit a 
statement as to the applicant's length of residence 
in the state and shall establish that his/her presence 
or the presence of his/her parent or parents in the 
state currently is, and during the requisite 12 
months qualifying period was, for the purpose of 
maintaining a bona fide domicile, rather than for 
the purpose of maintaining a temporary residence 
incident to enrollment in an institution of higher 
education. Applicants who fail to make the required 
residency statement will be classified as non- 
residents. 

c) With respect to a dependent applicant living with 
an adult relative other than the applicant's parent, 
such applicant may qualify as a resident if the adult 
relative has maintained legal residence in this state 
for at least 12 months immediately prior to the 
applicant's qualification. The applicant must have 
resided continuously with such relative for the 5 
years immediately prior to the applicant's 
qualification. The adult relative must have 
exercised day-to-day care, supervision, and control 
of the applicant. 



d) The legal residence of a dependent applicant whose 
parents are divorced, separated, or otherwise living 
apart will be deemed to be this state if either parent 
is a legal resident of Florida, regardless of which 
parent claims the minor as a dependent on 
individual federal income tax records. 

3. Proof: 

a) An individual shall not be classified as a resident 
for tuition purposes and thus, shall not be eligible 
to receive the in-state tuition rate until he/she has 
provided such evidence related to, legal residence 
and its duration as maybe required by the College. 
The burden of proof will be on the applicant to 
provide appropriate evidence. 

b) With respect to a dependent applicant, the legal 
residence of such individual's parent or parents is 
prima facie evidence of the individual's legal 
residence. 

c) The domicile of a married person shall be 
determined, as in the case of an unmarried 
applicant, by reference to all relevant evidence of 
domiciliary intent. 

d) An applicant shall not be deemed to have 
established or maintained a legal residence in this 
state as a resident for tuition purposes solely by 
reason of marriage to a person domiciled in this 
state. The fact of the marriage and the place of 
domicile of such applicant's spouse shall be 
deemed relevant evidence to be considered in 
ascertaining domiciliary intent. 

e) Any nonresident, who marries a legal resident of 
this state may. upon becoming a legal resident of 
this state, qualify immediately as a legal resident 
if the spouse has met the 12 months requirement. 

f) A Florida resident shall not lose his/her resident 
status for tuition purposes solely by reason of 
serving or, if such person is a dependent applicant, 
by reason of his/her parent's serving, in the Armed 
Forces outside this state. 

g) A person who has been properly classified as a 
resident for tuition purposes but who loses his/her 
resident tuition status because his/her parent 
established domicile or legal residence elsewhere, 
shall continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for 
one year. If the 1 2 months grace period ends during 
a semester for which such former resident is 
enrolled, such grace period shall be extended to 
the end of that semester. 

4. Any resident who ceases to be enrolled and abandons 
his/her domicile in this state shall be permitted to re- 
enroll at Edison Community College as a resident for 
tuition purpo.ses without the necessity of meeting the 



27 



1 2 months duration requirement of this section if that 
person has re-established his/her domicile in this state 
within 12 months of such abandonment. This benefit 
shall not be accorded more than once to any person. 

5. Parolees, asylees, refuges or other permanent status 
persons (e.g., persons who married a U.S. Citizen, 
"Temporary" or Amnesty Aliens, etc.) who have also 
been approved by Immigration and Naturalization 
Service for indefinite stay and employment will be 
considered eligible to establish Florida residency and 
therefore, eligible for in-state tuition fees. Such students 
must meet all other requirements for residency. The 
eligible Visa categories include: 

* Visa category A Government Officials 

* Visa category E Treaty Trader or Investor 

* Visa category G Representative of an International 
Organization 

* Visa category I Foreign Information Media 
Representative 

* Visa category K Fiancee and/or Children of U.S. 
Citizen 

6. The following persons shall be classified as residents 
for tuition purposes: 

a) Active duty members of the armed services of the 
United States stationed in this state, their spouses, 
and dependent children. 

b) United States citizens living in Panama, who have 
completed 12 consecutive months of college work 
at the Florida State University Panama Canal 
Branch, and their spouses and dependent children. 

c) Full-time instructional and administrative 
personnel employed by State public schools, 
community colleges, and institutions of higher 
education, as defined in FS. 228.041, and their 
spouses and dependent children. 

d) Students from Latin America and the Caribbean 
who receive scholarships from the Federal or State 
government. Any student classified pursuant to this 
paragraph shall attend, in a full-time basis, a Florida 
institution of higher education. 

e) Full-time employees of State agencies or political 
subdivisions of the State when the student fees are 
paid by the State agency or political subdivision 
for the purpose of job-related law enforcement or 
corrections training. 

f) Participants in Florida Linkage Institute Programs 
who are specifically approved in writing by the 
director of that institute. 

5. Edison will recognize residency classification 
previously made for transfer students at another Florida 
public college or university unless the student's status 
has changed or there was an error in the original 
classification. 



Evidence to be Required 

The following hard copy documentation may be 
requested, considered, accepted and/or subsequently 
recorded on a checklist as evidence of establishing a legal 
residence in Florida. At least one of the following documents 
must be dated at least 1 2 months before the published first 
day of classes and presented before classes begin. 

NO SINGLE DOCUMENT SHALL BE CONCLUSIVE 

1 . Florida Driver's License; 

2. Florida Vehicle Registration; 

3. Florida Voter's Registration; 

4. Classification as a Florida resident at another Florida 
public college or university; 

5. Proof of purchase of permanent Florida home; 

6. Full-time, non-temporary employment in Florida; 

7. Proof of acceptance of permanent employment in 
Florida; 

8. Part-time permanent employment in Florida; 

9. Professional/occupational license in Florida; 

10. Declaration of Domicile in Florida, dated one year 
before the start of the term. 

Reclassification 

Established procedures will be followed in reclassifying 
students from non-Florida to Florida residents and for 
Florida residents who have subsequently lost their residency 
status. 

The Office of the Registrar will examine all requests 
for change of residency and supporting hard copy 
documentation. Office of the Registrar staff are authorized 
to make prospective residency determinations as of the term 
for which application for reclassification is made. 

It is important to understand that living in or attending 
school in Florida is not sufficient evidence to establish 
residency for tuition purposes. Students must show that they 
were in Florida to maintain a bona fide domicile. 

The following list of hard copy evidence may be 
accepted and considered and filed or recorded on a residency 
checklist as evidence of establishing legal residence in 
Florida. Reclassification of residency must be requested and 
documented before the published first day of classes for the 
semester in which reclassification is requested. 

1 . Independent students, if appropriate, must present most 
recent tax return, employment records, bank accounts, 
etc., and at least one document of legal residency dated 
at least 12 months before the term for which legal 
residency is sought. (See previous list of acceptable 
evidence.) 

2. Dependent students, if dependent on a Florida resident 
parent/legal guardian, obtain from parent/legal 



28 



guardian: a) proof of dependent status and b) at least 
one document of legal residency pertaining to the 
parent/legal guardian which is dated 12 months before 
the first day of classes. (See previous list of acceptable 
evidence). 
3. Students seeking reclassification under an exceptional 
category are required to submit hard copy 
documentation appropriate to the particular category 
(e.g. marriage certificate, military orders, teaching 
contract, etc.). 

RECORDS 

Notification of Student's Rights Under Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 

(Public Law 93-380 Buckley Amendment) 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their 
education records. They are: 

1 . The right to inspect and review their education record 
within 45 days of the College receiving a request for 
access. The student should submit to the Registrar, 
District Dean, or other appropriate College official, a 
written request that identifies the record(s) they wish 
to inspect. The College official will arrange for access 
and notify the student of the time and place where they 
may inspect the records. In the case where a request is 
presented to a College official who does not maintain 
the requested records, the College official will advise 
the student of the correct official to whom they should 
address the request. 

2. The right to request the amendment of their education 
records if the student believes the records are inaccurate 
or misleading. The student should submit to the College 
official responsible for the record, a written request 
clearly identifying the part of the record they want 
changed, and specifying why it is inaccurate or 
misleading. The College will notify the student if it 
decides not to amend the record as requested by the 
student. The College will advise the student of their 
right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. 
The College will provide additional information 
regarding the hearing procedures to the student when 
notified of the right to a hearing. 

3. The right to request the non-disclosure of personally 
identifiable information contained in vheir education 
record, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes 
disclosure without consent. Contact the Office of the 
Registrar for more information. One exception that 
permits disclosure without consent is the disclosure to 
school officials with legitimate educational interests. 



A school official is a person employed by the College 
in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, 
or support staff position (including law enforcement 
unit personnel), a person or company with whom the 
College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or 
collection agent), a person serving on the Board of 
Trustees, or a student serving on an official committee, 
such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or 
assisting another school official in performing their 
tasks. A school official has legitimate educational 
interests if the official needs to review an education 
record to fulfill their professional responsibility. Upon 
request, the College discloses education records without 
consent to officials of school(s) in which the student 
seeks or intends to enroll. 
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department 
of Education concerning alleged failures by the College 
to comply with the requirements of FERPA. 

Release of Student Information 

Edison Community College may, without the written 
consent of the student, release information from the student's 
record to a court of competent jurisdiction in compliance 
with a court order of that court or to the attorney of record 
pursuant to a lawfully issued subpoena, provided that in 
advance of compliance with the court order or subpoena 
the college must nodfy the student, and, in the case of a 
student who is a dependent, the college must also notify the 
parent of the student. A student who objects to the release 
of their records must file a motion to quash the release, and 
provide Edison Community College with copies of the 
relevant legal documents. 

The College will, without the written con.sent of the 
student, release directory information from the student's 
record to an armed forces recruiter in compliance with the 
Solomon Amendment. 

Directory Information 

Under the terms of FERPA, Edison Community College 
has established the following as directory information: 

1. Student name. 

2. Student local address and telephone number. 

3. Student permanent address and telephone number. 

4. Current term hours enrolled. 

5. Major. 

6. Date(s) of enrollment. 

7. Degree(s) and honors earned and dates. 

8. Participation in officially recognized activity or sport. 

9. Date of birth. 

10. Previous colleges attended. 



29 



Although (he above directory information may be 
available for release to the general public, Edison 
Community College does not routinely release such 
information to third parties. The Act states that each student 
has the right to inform Edison Community College that any 
or all of the information is not to be released. Edison 
Community College will honor the student's request to 
restrict the release of "Directory Information" as stated 
previously. To withhold information, a student must notify 
the Office of the Registrar in writing prior to the end of the 
drop/add period each semester. Status of disclosure at the 
last registration period is binding and all records will be 
noted: "Restricted Information, FERPA." No information 
will be released without the written consent of the student. 

Transcripts 

Students should make written requests to the Office of 
the Registrar at least two weeks before the transcripts are 
needed. No transcript will be furnished for any student or 
alumnus whose financial obligation to the College such as 
unpaid fees, overdue loans, library books, audiovisual, or 
physical education materials or equipment has not been 
satisfied or whose admission records are not complete. The 
written transcript request should contain the student's name. 
Social Security Number, date of birth and the name and 
address of where the transcript is to be sent. Married women 
should give their maiden name as well as their married name. 
There is no charge for transcripts, but the number of copies 
may be restricted. Transcripts may be sent and received 
electronically over the Florida Automated System for 
Transferring Educational Records whenever the institution 
is a participant in the computer network system. 

Enrollment Certifications 

Students who need their enrollment certified by Edison 
should follow the above transcript request procedure. 
Requests for enrollment certifications should include the 
specific information needed such as: actual dates of 
attendance, full-time/part-time status, residency status, etc. 

STANDARDS OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS 
(SOAP) 

The purpose of maintaining Standards of Academic 
Progress is to assist in identifying and providing help to 
students who are having academic difficulties. The intent 
of SOAP is to alert students that they are not making 
appropriate progress on a timely basis, so that they may 
correct academic weaknesses and problems eariy in their 
college career. The overall effect of these standards is 



improved academic performance, increased use of special 
resources available for students encountering academic 
difficulty, and increased retention of students. 

To complete degree and certificate program 
requirements, students are required to meet Standards of 
Academic Progress. A minimum cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) is required. 
Students receive written notificafion on their final grade 
report indicating their academic standing. 

1. GOOD ACADEMIC STANDING: Students are 
considered in good academic standing if they maintain 
a 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA and earn credit in 
greater than 50% of the total credits attempted. 

2. ACADEMIC WARNING: Students are considered on 
academic warning if they have attempted between six 
(6) and 1 6 credit hours with a cumulative GPA less than 
2.0, or have earned credit in less than 50 percent of the 
total credits attempted. These students must see a 
Counselor or Academic Advising Specialist prior to 
future registration. Academic warning limits a student's 
enrollment to 12 credits in Fall, Spring and Summer, 
and six (6) credits in Summer A and B. 

3. ACADEMIC PROBATION: Students are considered 
on academic probation if they have attempted between 
17 and 44 credit hours and have earned a cumulative 
GPA less than 2.0 and/or have earned credits in less 
than 50 percent of the total credits attempted. These 
students will receive a letter from the Retention 
Counselor informing them of their status and making 
them aware of the consequences if they do not take 
appropriate action to achieve significant improvements. 
These students will be required to see a Counselor or 
Academic Advising Specialist to determine the best 
strategies to improve their academic progress. Students 
on academic probation will be placed on suspension if 
they do not maintain or improve their cumulative GPA 
in the following semester, and they could also jeopardize 
their financial aid eligibility, scholarship or veteran's 
benefits. 

4. ACADEMIC SUSPENSION: Students whose 
cumulative GPA declines while on academic probation 
or probation after suspension will be suspended for one 
semester (e.g.. Fall, Spring, Summer). Students may 
petition their suspension to continue their enrollment 
by completing a form through the Office of the 
Registrar. Students approved for continuation of 
enrollment through petition must follow specific 
guidelines that will enhance their chances for academic 
success. Students whose petitions are denied or those 
who choose to withdraw on their own will be suspended 
for one semester. 



30 



5 PROBATION AFTER ACADEMIC SUSPENSION: 

Students who re-enter Edison following academic 
suspension will be required to work closely with a 
Counselor or an Academic Advising Specialist who will 
help the student develop an appropriate schedule of 
classes. Students who fail to maintain or improve current 
cumulative GPA and fail to achieve 2.0 GPA in their 
most recent semester will be dismissed. Petitions are 
not available to students in this category. 
6. ACADEMIC DISMISSAL: Students who have been 
on probation after academic suspension and have failed 
to make satisfactory progress will be dismissed for one 
full academic year. At the end of the dismissal period, 
the student must petition the District Vice President for 
Student Services or designee for re-admission. 



or Provost made the original decision. A copy of the original 
petition is automatically part of the subsequent appeal. An 
appeal is not simply a review of the original petition decision. 
It is a request to reverse the original decision. The student 
must supply new, relevant, previously unconsidered 
information, or present an argument as to why the original 
petition decision should be reversed. For an appeal to be 
successful, new information must be critical to the case, 
and new consideration or arguments should prove the 
student's case conclusively. The reviewing office may 
request additional meetings or additional information for 
clarification. The District Vice President for Academic 
Affairs has responsibility for making the final academic 
decision for the College. Appeal forms are available in the 
Office of the Registrar. 



Petitions 



Academic Second Chance 



The Petitions process is designed to review, based on a 
student's written request, Edison's policies or procedures 
related to, but not limited to: 

- Admissions eligibility 

- Substitution/waiver for a required course 

- Readmission from Academic Suspension/Dismissal 
Students begin the process by completing an official 

petition form available in the Office of the Registrar or 
Provost's Office. Completed petitions must be submitted to 
the same office. It is the responsibility of the Registrar to 
act on the petition, or to route it to the appropriate College 
Administrator for review. 

Many petitions, especially those regarding admissions 
processes or standard substitution for required courses, can 
be handled directly at the Office of the Registrar. Those which 
the Registrar feels need to be referred elsewhere are normally 
sent to a College Administrator responsible for that area. The 
College Administrator then makes a determination based on 
the information collected by his/her office or provided by 
the student, and may request a meeting with the student for 
further information or clarification. The petition decision is 
forwarded to the Office of the Registrar, which informs the 
student of the decision by mail. 

Appeal of Petition Decision 

A student has a right to appeal a decision made on a 
pefition. A student wishing to appeal a decision must fill 
out an appeal form, and return it to the Office of the Registrar 
or Provost's Office. The appeal is logged, and forwarded to 
the Instrucfional Dean's or Provost's Office, if the District 
Dean or Provost had not previously reviewed the petition. 
The appeal is forwarded to the District Vice President for 
Academic Affairs' Office if the Instructional District Dean 



The Academic Second Chance policy allows a student 
who is transferring to or seeking admission to Edison 
Community College to request that coursework that is five 
(5) calendar years or older be excluded from grade point 
average (GPA) calculations and in determining graduation 
eligibility. To be eligible, the student must complete all 
admissions requirements and be admitted to a degree or 
certificate program. This is a one time non-reversible 
opportunity. 

The student must submit a written request to the Office 
of the Registrar. For the request to be considered, transfer 
or readmitted students must complete a minimum of 12 
semester hours within two semesters while maintaining a 
term GPA of 2.00 or better. ESL/ENS and college 
preparatory courses are not applicable. 

When the request is approved, the following statement 
will be added to the student's transcript: "Academic Second 
Chance policy has been applied." The grade(s) and course(s) 
will remain on the transcript. 

The Academic Second Chance policy is applied only 
once and it cannot be reversed. Students planning to transfer 
to another college or university are cautioned that the 
receiving institution may use all grades earned in computing 
grade point averages for admissions or other purposes. 
Academic Second Chance has no effect on the student's 
financial aid award history. Academic Second Chance has 
no effect on the calculation of course attempts related to 
multiple course attempt surcharges. 

Written Concerns or Complaints 

A concern or complaint is to be distinguished from a 
petition. A signed concern or complaint willi contact 
information allows the College to respond most effectively 



31 



to the concern or coniplainl expressed. A written concern 
or complaint is to be delivered to the supervisor of the area, 
except for areas noted below. Since a concern or complaint 
is normally related to a specific incident, it is addressed by 
the appropriate College official. 

A concern or complaint about a grade will be referred 
to the professor, since it is the professor's professional 
obligation to assess student performance. 

A concern or complaint related to sexual harassment 
must be submitted to the District Vice President for Student 
Services (see "Laws Affecting Students"). 

Violations of College policy must be submitted to the 
Vice President for Student Services (see "Student Discipline 
and Hearing Procedures"). "Incident Report" forms may 
be obtained from the same office for this purpose. 

Substitution Policy For Students With 
Disabilities 

1 . Eligibility : Students who are learning impaired, visually 
impaired, dyslexic or have a specific learning disability 
are eligible for reasonable substitution for any 
requirement where documentation can be provided that 
the student's failure to meet the requirement(s) is related 
to the disability. Substitutions shall be provided in the 
areas of admission to the college, admission to a 
program of study, or graduation where the substitution 
does not constitute a fundamental alteration in the nature 
of the program. 

2. Documentation Documentation that is no more than 
three (3) years old, substantiating the nature of the 
disability, shall be provided by the student concurrent 
with his or her request for reasonable substitution for 
admission to a program of study, or graduation. Such 
documentation shall be provided by a medical doctor, 
psychologist, or other specialist recognized to treat the 
specific disability. 

3. Review Policy Students with disabilities requesting 
course substitutions must submit an academic petition 



to the Office of the Registrar. The petition at a minimum 
shall identify the substitution desired and the 
justification for the substitution, and shall contain the 
documentation described in paragraph two (2) above. 
The Registrar, in consultation with the appropriate 
academic District Dean and the Coordinator for 
Students with Disabilities, will consider reasonable 
substitutions appropriate for each individual student. 

4. Substitution Decision The final decision will be 
communicated in writing by the Registrar to the student 
and the Coordinator for Students with Disabilities. 

5. Articulation Any substitution previously granted to a 
student transferring into the College by a Florida State 
postsecondary institution will be recognized by Edison 
Community College. In accordance with FAC 6A- 
10.041(3), substitutions granted by Edison Community 
College will honored at any State postsecondary 
institution. It is the student's responsibility to contact 
the out-of-state or private institution receiving the course 
substitution(s) and to determine how the substitution(s) 
will be treated in the program of study he/she is 
pursuing. 

6. Student Appeal A student may appeal a denial of the 
substitution request(s) or determination of ineligibility 
in writing to the District Vice President for Student 
Services, who shall make the final decision. The appeal 
must be filed within 21 days of receipt of the written 
denial by the Registrar. Any decision of the District 
Vice President for Student Services is subject to the 
right of any person whose substantial interests are 
determined to request a hearing pursuant to Chapter 
120, Florida Statutes. 

7 . Records The Registrar and the Coordinator for Students 
with Disabilities shall maintain records on the number 
of students granted substitutions by type of disability, 
the substitution provided, the substitutions identified 
as available for each document disability and the 
number of requests that were denied. 



32 



TUITION AND FEES 

Notice: Fees are subject to change by the 

Florida Legislature and the District Board of Trustees. 

The most current fees are available at any Cashier Office. 

If there is a tuition or fee increase after you register and pay for your classes, 

you will be billed for the difference. 



All fees are payable by the date shown on the 
student's fee receipt. The college reserves the right to 
drop a class, or classes, from a student's registration if 
fees are not paid in full by the payment due date. 

Application Fee 

There is no fee to apply to Edison Community College; 
However, students are charged a non-refundable 
application fee for those limited access programs listed 
below. 



Application Fees for 
Limited Access Programs 

Nursing 

Respiratory Care 
Cardiovascular Technology 
Radiologic Technology 

Tuition 

(Including Audit) 



Credit Program' 
Postsecondary Adult 
Vocational Programs 
Continuing Workforce 
Education Programs 



Lifelong Learning course fees vary. Students that 
enroll in regular credit classes that qualify as Lifelong 
Learning pay the same fees as students taking the 
course for credit. 





$15.00 




$15.00 




$15.00 




$15.00 


Florida 


Non- 


Resident 


Resident 


Per Credit 


Per Credit 


Hour 


Hour 


$48.31 


$178.59 


$41.03 


$162.16 


$88.83 


$88.83 



Student Access / ID Card $5 .00 

Students are charged a college access/ID Card fee each 
term. 



Examination Fees 

National League of Nursing Tests: 
Mobility Test 
A&P Challenge Test 
Nutrition Challenge Test 



$50.00 
$16.00 
$16.00 



Insurance Fees 

Below is a list of annual insurance fees that are charged 
to students enrolled in health technology programs that 
require clinic liability insurance. 



Nursing 

Respiratory Care 
Dental Hygiene 
Radiologic Technology 
Cardiovascular Technology 
EMT-Basic Certificate Program 
Paramedic Certificate Program 



$26.50 
$26.50 
$26.50 
$26.50 
$32.50 
$32.50 
$32.50 



Special Course Fees 

An additional special course fee is assessed for 
laboratory and other high-cost courses, i.e. those that 
require equipment, supplies or other extraordinary 
costs. Special course fees are listed in the Schedule of 
Classes published for each term. 



Recreation & Leisure, Seminars, Conferences and 
Other Self-supporting Programs. Fees will be 
determined for each activity and will be listed in the 
individual activity announcement. 



Credit Programs include Advanced & Professional, Postsecondary Vocational and College Preparatory courses. 



33 



Student Financial Information/Financial Aid 



The staff of the Office of Student Financial Aid provides 
financial assistance to qualified students to attend Edison. 
They administer the Work Study Program for student 
employment, the Federal education grants (PELL and 
FSEOG) and numerous other scholarships and loans 
provided by individuals, organizations and the Edison 
Community College Foundation. Application for all types 
of student financial assistance should be made at the 
Financial Aid Office on any Edison Campus. Information 
brochures and applications are available at all locations. 

Financial Information 



Work Study Programs 

Students enrolled for six (6) or more hours toward a 
degree program in the Fall and Spring semesters and meet 
Federal requirements of financial need, and who are capable 
of maintaining adequate grade point averages may be 
employed in part-time jobs to help meet expenses. Jobs are 
available on campus. Off campus employment opportunities 
for community service are also available. The College is an 
equal opportunity employer. 

Loans 



— Students or parents wishing to make payment by check 
should make it payable to Edison Community College 
for the amount of fees. Visa, Master Card and Discover 
credit cards are also accepted at the Cashier's Office or 
through the telephone registration system. 

— Veterans who are eligible to receive monthly 
educational benefits should be prepared to meet ALL 
expenses since the first checks are often delayed until 
after a semester is in session. 

— The College reserves the right to withhold students from 
classes, final examinations, and graduation unless fees 
are paid in full. No grades, degrees, statements of 
honorable dismissal, or transcript of credits will be 
issued until satisfactory settlement of college fees and 
other financial obligations have been met. This includes 
loans to students. 

— The cost of books and supplies varies with the program 
of each student. 

• — The College reserves the right to change its fees at any 
time without notice. 

Financial Aid 

Students are encouraged to come to the Financial Aid 
Office for assistance in planning the financing of their 
college education. A variety of resources are available to 
assist those unable to attend college. Assistance is awarded 
to degree-seeking students enrolled for six (6) or more credit 
hours in Fall and Spring semesters as a degree-seeking 
student on the basis of financial need, scholastic 
achievement, and character. Limited funds are available to 
qualified students for the Summer semester. Applications 
for assistance received after May 1, 2000, will be considered 
only if funds are available. In order to remain eligible for 
scholarships, work-study, loans and grants, a student must 
successfully meet the requirements of the Standards of 
Academic Progress for Financial Aid recipients. 



Edison Community College Short-Term Loan Fund: 

The College makes short-term loans available to students 
who need temporary assistance paying their tuition. 
Applications are available at the Cashier's Office. A small 
service fee will be charged and the loan balance is due on a 
set date, prior to the end of the term. 

Federal Family Education Loans: Long-term loans 
are available through the federal government's Stafford Loan 
program. Students must complete an annual FAFSA (Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid) form and a loan 
counseling entrance interview at the College. Loan eligibility 
and certification are determined by the Financial Aid Office. 

Grants 

All students must complete an annual FAFSA (Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid) form to establish 
qualification for federal and state grants. Final eligibility 
for all grants is determined by the Financial Aid Office. 

Federal Pell Grant: Pell grants are provided by the 
federal government to students with demonstrated financial 
need. Students may be eligible for grants even if they are 
not enrolled full-time. 

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity 
Grant (FSEOG): These grants are provided by the federal 
government to assist students with high financial needs. 
Students need to be enrolled at least half-time to be 
considered for this grant. 

Florida Student Assistance Grant: These grants are 
awarded to Florida residents who are full-time students. 

Repayment of Title IV Funds 

Beginning 2000-2001 academic year federal financial 
aid recipients that withdraw from classes prior to completion 
of 60 percent of the term will be required to repay a portion 
of funds received as defined by the federal regulations. The 
Financial Aid Office will distribute specific information with 
financial aid awards. 



34 



Standards of Academic Progress for 
Financial Aid Recipients 

Federal and state regulations require students to meet 
minimum standards in order to be eligible to receive financial 
aid funds. The minimum standards at Edison Community 
College are applied uniformly to all Title IV federal financial 
aid programs administered by the college, except those 
programs whose eligibility requirements are restricted to 
institutional funds or outside donor restrictions. 

1 . Students must meet the academic requirement of at least 
a 2.0 cumulative GPA. 

2. Students must make progress toward their degree or 
certificate. Minimum progress toward a degree requires 
initial year financial aid applicants who have previously 
attended the college to have earned 67 percent of 
registration attempted at the college. 

3. Minimum progress toward a degree or certificate 
requires continuing financial aid recipients to earn 67 
percent of credit hours attempted during the current 
academic year for renewal eligibility. 

4. Students must complete their educational objective 
within a given time frame: 

a. All AA and AS degree-seeking students have a 
maximum of 90 attempted credit hours. 

b. All certificate degree-seeking students are limited 
to no more than 150 percent of the published length 
of the program. 

All transfer credits will be included as attempted credit 
hours as well as all Edison Community College attempted 
course work regardless of whether the courses are applicable 
toward the student's degree program. 

Withdrawals from any course(s) will be counted in the 
total hours attempted and may result in failure to meet the 
standards of progress. Students must follow the official 
withdrawal procedures established by the college. Students 
may owe a refund to the federal program as a result of a 
withdrawal from a course. Students should contact the 
Financial Aid Office for information prior to withdrawing 
from a course. 

Funding for remedial course work is limited to 30 
credits of assistance by federal financial aid programs. 

Reinstatement 

If a student is denied/suspended from financial aid 
assistance, the student must attend a semester without 
financial aid and earn a minimum of six (6) credits with a 
semester GPA of 2.0 or above. Students will be required to 
file an appeal after the term without aid is completed for 
reinstatement of eligibility. 



Review of Continued Eligibility 

Satisfactory progress is reviewed at the end of the 
student's academic year. Notification will be sent to students 
at the end of the Spring or Summer semester of termination 
of aid eligibility. 

Appeal 

Students may request an appeal by the Financial Aid 
Office if financial aid funding has been terminated. The 
student must file a pedtion form with the Office of Financial 
Aid. On that form the student must state the circumstances 
which prevented satisfactory progress to occur and provide 
documentation of the circumstances. Once the review has 
been made the student will be nofified by mail, of the result 
of the review. 

Transfer Student Evaluation 

Transfer students applying for financial aid must have 
at least a 2.0 grade point average after transfer credits are 
evaluated to be eligible to receive financial aid funding. To 
qualify for aid in subsequent terms students must have a 
cumuladve GPA of 2.0 or higher. 

All transfer credits will be included as attempted credit 
hours for academic standards of progress regardless of 
whether the courses are applicable toward the student's 
degree. 

Prior Baccalaureate Degree 

Students who have completed a baccalaureate or 
professional degree from an institution regardless of whether 
the institution is unaccredited or a foreign school are not 
eligible for Pell. FSAG or FSEOG funds. It does not matter 
whether the degree is accepted or recognized by Edison 
Community College. 

Student Fees 

Student fees are payable by the date shown on the 
schedule and fee receipt. Financial aid recipients may request 
that their fees be covered by approved financial aid funds 
by submitting their schedule and fee receipt to the Financial 
Aid Office. The student's financial aid award process must 
be finalized to have tuition covered by this process. 



35 



Procedure for Cancellation or Withdrawal of 
Classes for Financial Aid Recipients 

Students who withdraw or have a class cancelled after 
the regular registration period (100 percent refund date) 
should consult the Financial Aid Office as they may incur a 
financial liability. Students who receive an administrative 
refund for classes will have their financial aid adjusted or 
cancelled and will be required to pay all funds received that 
are determined to be owed back to the federal, state, or 
private donor that provided the funds. 

All students who withdraw or drop classes are required 
to do so through the Office of the Registrar. Students are 
not automatically withdrawn from classes. 

Students wishing to change their course registration by 
adding or dropping a course must do so through the Office 
of the Registrar. Financial aid recipients are responsible for 
completing the change in registration and submitting a 
revised Schedule and Fee Receipt to the Financial Aid Office 
for payment by a financial aid program. 

Veterans Educational Benefits 

The Financial Aid Office, Lee County Campus, serves 
as the Veterans Affairs Office for Edison Community 
College. 

If you are a veteran or a dependent of a veteran and are 
eligible for educational benefits, you should: 

— Contact the Veterans Specialist well in advance of 
enrollment to process eligibility forms. 

— Apply for admission as a degree-seeking student. 

— Submit the Certification of Eligibility or a copy or your 
DD-214 (separation paper) to the Veterans Specialist 
for certification of enrollment. Submit additional forms 
if requested for certification to the Veterans Specialist. 

— Contact the Veterans Specialist each time you change 
course schedule, register for classes each semester, or 
change degree program. 

— All veterans continuing enrollment for a following term 
should contact the Veterans Affairs Office with schedule 
and fee receipt as soon as possible before the beginning 
of the next term. 

National Guard Fee Exemption 

Recommended National Guard enlistees may be eligible 
to receive a fee exemption for a percentage of their tuition 
costs. Contact your National Guard Education Officer. 
Eligibility for the exemption must be processed by the 
Veterans Specialist, Financial Aid Office, Lee County 
Campus. 



Veterans Dependents 

Wives, widows, or dependents of deceased or 100 
percent disabled veterans should contact the Veterans Affairs 
Office for the appropriate forms. 

Veteran Transfer Students 

A transfer student must have a transcript(s) from the 
previous college(s) forwarded to Edison Community College 
before transferring. The Veterans Administration (VA) must 
be notified of any credits accepted by the College. The 
student's certification for benefits will not be processed by 
the VA office until the transcript(s) is received and evaluated 
by Edison. Failure to have the certification finalized will 
delay the veteran's benefit check. 

Approved VA Programs 

The student must be working toward an approved degree 
in order to receive VA benefits. Students should contact the 
College Counseling or Advising Centers to ensure that the 
classes they plan to take are required for the degree selected. 
This will avoid the possibility of overpayment for classes 
not required for the degree. A student will not be paid for a 
course repeated to earn a higher grade, unless the student 
received an "F" in that course, or a "D" when a "C" is 
required. 

Deferment of Tliition 

Veterans and other eligible students may receive one 
deferment each academic year if there is a break (failure to 
return in a subsequent semester) in the VA benefits. Veteran 
deferments are processed by the Veteran's Specialist. on the 
Lee County Campus. 

Change of Status and Attendance 

Veterans who withdraw, drop or add a class should 
notify the Veterans Affairs Office immediately. Such a 
change could result in an incorrect payment from the VA. 
Withdrawals and grades of "W" are retroactive to the 
beginning of the term, and the VA does not pay for courses 
in which the student receives a grade of "W". 

Standards of Progress for Veteran 
Educational Benefit Recipients 

Veterans must maintain a "C" (2.0) grade point average 
to remain in good standing. If the veteran does not have a 
2.0 after attempting 12 credit hours, the student will be 
placed on Academic Warning. After attempting 24 credit 
hours, if the veteran still has less than a 2.0 GPA, the veteran 
benefits will be terminated by the VA. 



36 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



Institutional Sctiolarships 

Edison Community College offers institutional 
scholarships in the areas of art, music, drama, and student 
government. For more information on these scholarships 
contact the Financial Aid Office on any Edison Campus. 

Presidential Scholarships are awarded to top graduates 
of the graduating class of each regionally accredited high 
school in the Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee 
counties. Recipients are recommended by the high school 
principal each year. 

For additional information on institutional scholarships 
please contact the Financial Aid Office on Charlotte, Collier, 
and Lee County campuses for application information. 

Private Scholarships 

Private scholarships are awarded to students who are 
enrolled at least half-time and have demonstrated scholastic 
ability and/or financial need. Donors may specify additional 
stipulations regarding eligibility. For information and 
application forms, consult the Edison Financial Aid Office. 

The following organizations have provided scholarship 
assistance for Edison students: 

Advertising Federation of Southwest Florida 

American Association of University Women, Naples 

A.B.W.A. Bridge of Light 

A.B.W.A. Caloosahatchee 

A.B.W.A. City of Palms Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Edisonia Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Estero Island Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Fort Myers, Charter Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Friendship Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Isle of Palms Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Isle of Pines Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Naples on the Gulf Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Neopolitan Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Punta Gorda 

A.B.W.A. Sanibel-Captiva Chapter 

A.B.W.A. Tropic Enlightenment Chapter 

American Legion Aux., Unit #90, Cape Coral 

American Legion Aux., Unit #135, Naples 

American Legion, Unit #103 

American Lung Association 

Art League of Marco Island 

Association of Operating Room Nurses, Naples 

Baker Academy Alumni 
Brechtal, Almeda Award (Grad.) 



Cape Coral High School Activity Fund 

Cape Coral Lodge #367 F& A.M. 

Captiva Civic Association 

Charlettes of B.PO. Elks Lodge #2153 

Charlotte County Medical Society Auxiliary 

Chick-Fil-A, Inc. 

Christ United Methodist Church, Lehigh 

Church Women United in Greater Fort Myers 

Collier City Athletic League 

Collier County Medical Society Auxiliary 

Curtis, Isabella Memorial 

Cypress Lodge F.& A.M. 

Dehon, Dr. William B, Jr. 

East Naples Civic Association 

Feith, Jay Memorial 

Florida Association of Broadcasters 

Florida Nurses Assoc. 

Fort Myers B.P.O Elks Lodge #1288 

40 & 8 Charlotte County 

40 & 8 Collier County 

40 & 8 Fort Myers 

40 & 8 Fort Myers Beach 

40 & 8 Lehigh 

Glades Electric Cooperative, Inc. 
Golden Gate Chamber of Commerce 

Health Professions, Cape Coral Medical Center 

Auxiliary 
Hendry County Bank 
Henderson, Franklin, Stames & Holt 

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity 
Kiwanis Club of Cape Coral 
Kiwanis Club of Fort Myers Beach 
Kiwanis Club of Charlotte Harbor 
Kiwanis Club of lona-McGregor 
Kiwanis Club of Lehigh 
Kleist Foundation 

Lee County Association of Educational Office 

Personnel 

Lee County Legal Secretaries Association 

Lee County Pageant, Inc. 

Lehigh Acres Corporation Scholarship (President's) 

Lions Club of Cape Coral 



37 



Marco Island Hospital Auxiliary 
Marco Island Women's Club 

Naples Athletic Club 

Naples Art Association 

Naples Community Hospital Auxiliary 

Naples-Fort Myers Greyhound Track 

Optimist Club of Fort Myers 
Optimist Club of San Carlos Park 
Opti-Mrs. Club of Cape Coral 

Philanthropic Foundation-Cape Coral 

Riverdale High School 

Roadway Package Systems 

Rotary Club of Cape Coral 

Rotary Club of Cape Coral, Gold Coast 

Rotary Club of Fort Myers Beach 

Rotary Club of Fort Myers South 

Rotary Club of Golden Gate 

Rotary Club of Marco Island, Sunrise 

Rotary Club of Naples 

Rotary Club of Punta Gorda 

Rotary Club of Sanibel-Captiva 

St. Raphael's Polish American Scholarship 
Seminole Tribe of Florida 
Southwest Florida 10-13 Club 
Southwest Florida Bowling Association 
Southwest Florida Council-Boy Scouts of America 
Southwest Florida Regional Medical Center Aux. 
Spinal Cord Group of Fort Myers 

Vietnam Vets of America 

Wiggins Memorial Trust 

Women's Coalition of Southwest Florida 

Endowed Scholarships 

The Edison Community College Foundation, Inc., 
provides tuition and book scholarships to several hundred 
students each year from endowments established by 
community residents. The following endowed scholarships 
are currently offered: 

Rossie Evans Alderman Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Greg Allen Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Tiffany Bachman Scholarship 

Designation: Fort Myers High School Graduates 

Ellsworth W. & Helen Beckes Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Beryl Berry Scholarship 

Designation: Nursing 

Joseph S. Borek Scholarship 

Designation: Electronics 

Robert and Juliette Brand Scholarship 
Designation: Drama 

Marie L. Bruel Scholarship 

Designation: Occupational/Technical Programs 

Gertrud Bunzel-Lamberger Scholarship 

Designation: Science/Engineering Studies 

Marion D. Burgess Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Darryl and Carol Casuaneva Scholarship 

Designation: Charlotte County Students 

Charlotte County Community Foundation Scholarship 
Designation: Charlotte County Students 

Charlotte Pops @ Sunset Scholarship 

Designation: Charlotte County Students 

Charles A. & Roberta Church Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Isadora Claville Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Seth Cohen Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

William Barney 'Bill" Corbin Scholarship 

Designation: Preference to Horticulture Students 

Benjamin Counselman Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 

Isabella Curtis Scholarship 

Designation: Graduates of LaBelle High School 

Sidney R. Davis Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



38 



Estate Planning Council of SW FL Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



Paralegal Studies Scholarship 

Designation: Paralegal Studies 



Anna Failing Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Lehigh Community Health Association Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 



Laura E. Hedgecock Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Joseph Leto Scholarship Fund 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Margaret Heppe Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Catherine H. Maeder Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



John C. and Kossie G. Ferguson Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



Laurel Dawn McNew Scholarship 

Designation: Respiratory Care 



Florida Police Foundation Scholarship 
Designation: Law Enforcement 



McQueen Scholarship 

Designation: Charlotte County Students 



Fort Myers South, Kiwanis Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



Guy R. Miller Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Harold and Leah Jane Freshwater Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



Minnesota Twins Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Leon and Viola Gardner Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



James Moore Scholarship 

Designation: Charlotte County Science Students 



D. Geraci Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Joseph Moskal Scholarship 
Nursing 



Joseph H. and Julia M. Goodwin Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



NationsBank Scholarship 

Designation: Honors 



Capt. Francis Asbury Hendry Scholarship 

Designation: Descendants of Capt. Hendry 



James and Eleanor Newton Scholarship 
Designation: Honors 



Pop and Marj Kelly Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Dr. Charles O'Neill Scholarship 
Designation: Science 



Peter D. and Eleanore A. Kleist Scholarship 

Designation: Disadvantaged Students 



Vernon Peeples Scholarship 

Designation: Charlotte County Students 



Anna Kontinos Scholarship 

Designation: Respiratory Care 



Steven Perry Scholarship 

Designation: LaBelle High Graduates 



Rose Kosches Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Maurice and Jean Plummer Scholarship 

Designation: Outstanding Sophomores 



LaBelle Swamp Cabbage Festival Scholarship 
Designation: LaBelle High Graduates 



Josephine and Curtis Queen Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 



Lee County 100 Club 

Designation: Dependants of Sworn Law 
Enforcement Officers - Lee County 



Carlisle Quenzer Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



39 



Red Cattle Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Chaplain Eli Richard Scholarship 

Designation: Special Populations 

Mayson Robbins Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Joyce and Emory Rogaski Scholarship 

Designation: Criminal Justice, Math, Sciences 

Lora and Preston Root Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 

Saldukas Family Foundation Scholarship 

Designation: Protective Services, Collier County 

George Sanders Scholarship 
Designation: Honors 

Alice Saunders Scholarship 

Designation: Nursing 

Carol Ann Schneeman Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Second Chance Scholarship 

Designation: Returning Students 

Ward A. Shaver Scholarship 

Designation: Radiologic Technology 

Rene Sichere Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Robert Sneckenberger 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Dudley P. Swartz Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 



Madeleine R. Taeni Ethics in Business Scholarship 
Designation: Business 

Claude E. Taylor Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Andrew W. Thompson Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 

Ralph Tilden Scholarship 

Designation: Music 

Paula G. Walker Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Fred S. and Geraldine Willard Scholarship 
Designation: Nursing 

Ray L. Williams Scholarship 

Designation: Math/Science 

J. Howard Wood Scholarship 

Designation: Music/Piano 

L. Sherrill Yeomans Scholarship 

Designation: Graphic Arts 

Clarence and Billie Zimmerman Scholarship 
Designation: Unrestricted 

Fuzzy Zoeller Scholarship 

Designation: Unrestricted 

Charlotte County General Scholarship Fund 
Collier County General Scholarship Fund 
Glades/Hendry County General Scholarship Fund 
Lee County General Scholarship Fund 
General Nursing Scholarship Fund 
EMT General Scholarship Fund 



40 




41 



ACADEMIC POLICIES & PROCEDURES 
RELATING TO STUDENTS 



The following excerpts from the College's District 
Academic Policies and Procedures Manual represent policies 
and procedures relating directly to students. The complete 
manual, including forms, may be accessed through the 
College's home page, www.edison.edu. 

BASIC USE OF COMPUTERS 

Students fulfill Edison's computer literacy requirement 
by successfully completing ENC 1101 (English Composition 
I), a course required of all Edsion graduates. The course 
includes the following competencies: 

• Researching and properly documenting sources using 
MLA format; 

• Composing and editing an essay using a word- 
processing program; 

• Accessing information from the World Wide Web; 

• Understanding the differences between electronic 
databases and the Web. 

BEEPERS, CELLULAR PHONES, AND 
PAGERS 

Beepers, cellular phones, and pagers should be turned 
off when entering a classroom. In an emergency, with prior 
authorization from the professor, a beeper, cellular phone, 
or pager may be turned to silent ring mode. In such a case, 
any exit from a classroom to respond to a call should be 
made with a minimum of disturbance. 

CHILDREN OR FAMILY MEMBERS IN 
THE CLASSROOM 

Only currently enrolled students are authorized to be 
in classrooms, except for situations involving a disability. 
Children, spouses, or other relatives are not permitted, except 
with permission of a District Dean, Campus Provost, or 
Director of Learning Assistance. Complaints regarding 
classroom disruption should be reported to the.se offices. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE, ABSENCE 

Students are expected to attend all class periods of the 
courses for which they arc registered. Absence from several 
meetings of a course may result in a lower grade, depending 



on the professor's grading policy. The determination of what 
constitutes excessive absence in any course rests with the 
professor conducting that course. Attendance requirements 
for a given course are to be found in the course syllabus. 

CLASS CANCELLATIONS 

Edison attempts to honor its commitment to provide 
the classes scheduled for a given term. However, at times, 
usually due to low enrollment, it may be necessary to cancel 
a class. In such cases every effort will be made to find an 
appropriate alternate class for the student. 



COURSE OUTLINE AND COURSE 
SYLLABUS 

The course outline is distinguished from the course 
syllabus in that the outline provides an overview of the 
content of the course. The syllabus, on the other hand, 
provides a detailed description of the particular section of 
the course that a student is enrolled in during a particular 
semester, and includes such information as schedule of class 
meetings and assignments, attendance policies, textbook 
requirements, and scheduled test dates. 

The course syllabus is the responsibility of each 
professor. It should be developed by the professor, approved 
by the academic administrator, typed (or "word-processed"), 
duplicated, and be ready to distribute and review with 
students at the first class meeting. A copy is provided for 
the supervisor's file prior to the beginning of classes. 

COURSE WITHDRAWAL POLICY 

A student can withdraw without academic penalty from 
any course in a term by the mid-point of that term. 
Withdrawals after that date may be granted only through 
established institutional procedures. 

In order to withdraw from a course or courses, the 
student must complete a request to withdraw from a course. 
This request can be submitted to the Office of the Registrar 
or through Edison's automated telephone registration 
system. 

Students who officially withdraw from a class or classes 
any time prior to the date listed in the college calendar (see 
pages 12-13) will receive a grade of "W. "A student will be 



42 



limited to two witiidrawals per course. Upon the third 
attempt, the student will not be permitted to withdraw, and 
will receive a grade for that course. 

DEAN'S LIST 

At the conclusion of the Fall and Spring semesters only, 
the Office of the Registrar will generate a list of students 
completing 12 or more credits (College Preparatory Classes 
EXCLUDED) whose grade point average is 3.5 or above, 
and who did not receive any grade below a "C". The list is 
published after the period allowed for students to make up 
incomplete grades (see Incomplete Grade page 44). The 
Dean's List will be posted on each campus, and each student 
on this list will receive a letter noting the accomplishment, 
signed by the District Vice President for Academic Affairs. 
A notation of this accomplishment will be made on the 
transcript of each student so honored. 

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS 

Full time faculty are required to schedule a minimum 
of 10 hours per week of office hours, during which time 
they will be physically present on campus and available for 
consultation with students. The configuration of these office 
hours is subject to the approval of the professor's supervisor 
but should ideally be distributed over the five working days 
each week. Office hours will be posted on faculty office 
doors by means of a "Class and Office Hours Schedule." 
Additional office hours beyond the required 10 hours may 
be scheduled, and students may also be seen by appointment. 

Adjunct faculty will make themselves available for 
student consultation before or after class, and/or by 
appointment, phone, phonemail, or electronic messaging. 

GRADE FORGIVENESS POLICY 

The "Grade Forgiveness" Policy permits students to 
repeat a course in an attempt to improve a grade of "D" or 
"F". A student will be limited to two repeats per course. 
Upon a third attempt, the grade issued will be the final grade 
for that course (see Maximum Course Attempts Policy page 
45). 

Grade forgiveness is automatic, beginning Summer B, 
1995, for all students who have repeated courses at Edison. 
Students must complete a Grade Forgiveness Form only if 
BOTH the original and the forgiven grades were awarded 
in terms or semesters previous to Summer B 1995, or if 
both courses were transferred to Edison from other 
institutions. 

Students should be aware that some colleges or 
universities may not accept the grade of a repeated course. 



or may compute grade-point averages incorporating the 
grade originally assigned. 

Students receiving financial aid of any type are 
cautioned to check with the Financial Aid Office to ensure 
that the repeated courses will count toward their financial 
aid award. 

Only the last grade earned in a repeated course will be 
computed into the grade-point average at Edi.son. provided 
that the last assigned grade is not a "W" or an "X" (Audit). 
However, all grades will appear on the transcript. 

Students may not repeat a course to improve grade- 
point average after the awarding of the Associate degree. 

This policy applies to courses that are repeated for grade 
forgiveness purposes. It does not apply to courses designated 
as repeatable. 

GRADE REPORTS 

During the semester, professors will communicate 
directly with those students who are doing unsatisfactory 
work. Students with unsatisfactory performance are 
encouraged to meet with the professor or an Academic 
Advising Specialist with a view toward improving their 
work. 

Final Grade Reports are mailed to students at the end 
of each semester. The final grade is the only grade which 
appears on the student's transcript. 

GRADE-POINT SYSTEM 

The following grade symbols and grade point weights 
have been used at Edison Community College beginning in 
the 1997-98 academic year: 

A Excellent 4 points 

B Good 3 points 

C Average 2 points 

D Poor I point 

F Failure points 

I Incomplete* points 

W Withdraw** points 

X Audit (No credit) points 

*See " Incomplete" Grade 

**See Course Withdrawal Policy 

HONORS RESEARCH 

Honors Research courses are specially designed to allow 
a student to pursue topics within a specific discipline or 
program under the guidance of a qualified professor. It 
provides an opportunity for the student to explore in depth 
an area of particular interest: or, if covered in class, the topic 



43 



interests and motivates the student sufficiently to want to 
pursue it in more detail or to explore the area more fully. 
Honors Research may not duplicate any existing course in 
the Catalog. The course is designed by a professor to fit the 
needs of an individual student. 

The course syllabus must be designed by the professor, 
with input as to areas of interest from the student. It must 
represent college level work and be sufficiently complex 
and demanding to warrant the credits awarded. 

To begin the Honors Research process, the student picks 
up a form from the District Dean's or Provost's office. Once 
this form is properly documented, submitted, and approved 
by the District Dean, the student may register for the class. 

The regular college grading system applies to Honors 
Research students. Honors Research classes may not be 
taken to satisfy general education requirements. 

INCOMPLETE GRADE 

A grade of "I" is given only when the student has 
successfully completed most of the course in question and, 
in the judgment of the professor, is able to make up any 
deficit within the assigned time frame. A student who 
receives an "I" must make up the deficiency and have the 
change of grade recorded in the Office of the Registrar no 
later than the date published in the College Calendar. After 
that, the grade defaults to an "F." The responsibility for 
making the necessary arrangements with a professor for the 
removal of an "I" rests with the student. 

If a professor awarding an "I" is not going to be available 
the following term, it is the responsibility of the professor 
awarding an "I" to make arrangements for the student to 
deliver the necessary completed course work to a fellow 
faculty member or the professor's supervisor for a change 
of grade. 

In such a case, it is the professor's responsibility to 
inform the faculty member or supervisor and the student, in 
writing, what needs to be completed in order for the "I" to 
be changed. The professor should provide a copy of the 
student's grades to date, and describe the student's remaining 
work and final grade. 

In extreme cases where circumstances prevent a 
professor from assigning a grade, final responsibility for 
the grade change rests with the supervisor. 

INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY 

Individualized Study leads to the completion of a 
college course and the receipt of academic credit. The 
content of the learning experience is completed under the 
direction of a professor assigned to work with the student 
independently of the normal class schedule. While Edison 



recognizes the legitimate need for such learning experiences, 
its policy is to keep this practice to a minimum. 
Individualized Study may be used to complete required 
courses when extenuating circumstances exist as defined 
by the District Dean or Provost. Approval must be obtained 
before the student is allowed to take the course. 

Individualized Study courses are permitted for the 
following circumstances: 

(1) A regularly scheduled course is cancelled due to 
insufficient enrollment and no alternate course can be 
taken to meet the student's educational goals for that 
semester. 

(2) A student is unable to complete a needed regularly 
offered class due to a documented medical or learning 
disability. 

(3) A student is in his/her last semester and a course 
required for graduation is not being offered and an 
appropriate substitute is unavailable. 

The request form for Individualized Study is obtained 
in the District Dean's or Provost's office. The Individualized 
Study form must be completed and submitted to the District 
Dean or Provost prior to the end of the drop/add period for 
the given semester. Once the form is approved, the student 
may register for the class. It is the professor's responsibility 
to prepare the syllabus for each Individualized Study. 

The standard college grading system applies to all 
Individualized Study. Grades earned through Individualized 
Study have the same status as those earned through regular 
class attendance. 

LEARNING RESOURCES 

The following assessments may apply to all patrons: 

• Assessments for material checked out and not returned: 

The current average trade price of the material not 

returned. 

Patrons who have overdue materials or who have 

failed to return material that has been recalled will 

be notified by mail. A hold on records will be 

placed on patrons who have overdue materials. 

Patrons will be advised of the "Hold on Records" 

as defined. 

If the material is not returned, patrons will be sent 

an invoice for the charges specified in this rule. 

• Lost or Mutilated Materials: 

An item reported lost, or one returned in a 
damaged/mutilated condifion, will be billed as 
described above. 

If "lost" material owned by Learning Resources is 
subsequently found and returned in usable 
condition within six (6) months, a refund will be . 
issued. 



44 



If "lost" interlibrary material is subsequently found, 

any refund will be at the discretion of the owning 

library. 

Exceptions to the time limits of this section may 

be made (at the discretion of the Director of 

Learning Resources) for out-of-print materials of 

continuing value. 

• Fee-based services provided by outside agencies: 

Patrons who request services for which a fee is 
charged will be billed the amount charged. No 
additional service charges will be added by 
Learning Resources. Examples of such services are 
literature searches done by a reference librarian in 
an external database and charges levied by the 
owning library for interlibrary loans. 

• Learning Resources Cards: 

Patrons eligible for borrowing privileges will be 
provided a Learning Resources card. Edison 
students may use their photo I.D. 

• Definition of "Hold on Records" Status: 

No transcripts will be released. 

No further registration will be permitted. 

Degrees/Certificates will not be released. 

Learning Resources borrowing privileges will be 

suspended. 

Patrons will be given signed and dated receipts for 

each charge and/or service fee paid at the Business 

Office. 
Appeals by patrons penalized under this rule may be 
made to the District Director of Learning Resources. 
Appeals must be submitted within ten working days of the 
assessment. 

MAXIMUM COURSE ATTEMPTS POLICY 

A student will be permitted a maximum of three 
attempts per course. Upon the third attempt, the student 
will not be permitted to withdraw and will receive a grade 
for the course. Course withdrawals and earned grades count 
toward the maximum attempts. (Please see Course 
Withdrawal Policy page 42.) 

STUDENT REVIEW OF INSTRUCTION 
(Form VPAA002) 

In order to improve the teaching/learning process, 
further course and program development, and encourage 
faculty professional development, it is necessary to gather 
information regarding instructional practices and procedures. 
Among relevant kinds of information is the student's opinion 
regarding classes he/she is taking. Student Review of 
Instruction forms are distributed after mid-term 
examinations. The professor arranges for a student in the 



class to administer the survey and is not to be present while 
the survey is completed. Written comments regarding any 
aspect of instruction in the surveyed class are encouraged 
and are made on the back of the computer answer sheet 
since the surveys themselves will be re-used. Students are 
encouraged to be as candid and as accurate as possible. 
Written comments should focus on elements which the 
student thinks can be improved or on elements which were 
particularly effective or satisfying so that these may be 
retained. 

The person administering the survey should remain in 
the room for questions, collect the survey and materials, 
seal responses in the envelope provided and return the 
envelope to the designated office. The envelope should be 
checked to verify the course number, section and professor's 
name. The procedure for administering the Student Review 
of Instrucfion is provided on the envelope containing the 
surveys. For those enrolled in distance learning, the survey 
is given to the student by the test proctor when the student 
takes the last proctored exam of the semester. Copies of 
these directions may be obtained from any instructional 
administrator's office. Class averages, other survey results, 
and comments are reviewed by the appropriate instrucfional 
supervisor. 

Surveys will be forwarded to the professor after the 
term is completed so the professor may benefit from 
students' opinions regarding instruction. 

STUDENT SURVEYS 

Edison Community College will periodically distribute 
surveys to students in order to obtain information useful in 
evaluating education programs, student .services and many 
other aspects of the College and its mission. These surveys 
may be sent by mail, administered over the phone or 
administered in the classroom. They may be administered 
to a cross-section of students, to graduates of particular 
programs or to students enrolled for a short time. Results of 
student surveys are shared with administrators, faculty, the 
Board of Trustees and with students. Findings are reported 
in the aggregate, without identifying any particular student. 
The information is used to identify ways to improve 
programs and services, and to plan future activities. 
Surveying students is one way Edison Community College 
strives to be "student centered." Student participation in 
surveys ensures that the information gathered provides an 
accurate basis for decision-making. 

TEXTBOOK SELECTION PROCESS 

Uniform textbook adoption, in courses which consist 

of multiple sections in multiple locations, is strongly 
recommended. To ensure that students pursue sequential 



45 



courses with the prerequisite knowledge, and to ensure 
uniformity ot" course delivery. Edison has identified a process 
which seeks to provide for faculty input in classroom 
materials adoption. 

In mid-Fall semester each year, the textbook adoption 
process begins for the following acadeinic year. The goal is 
to provide timely adoptions so that bookstore buy-backs 
can proceed efficiently, and that materials to be ordered can 
be specified well in advance of the time that they are needed 
for classes. The deadline for completion of these two 
functions is prior to the Bookstore buy-back period during 
the Spring Semester. 

All faculty are solicited for input. Program or discipline 
committees are convened before the Fall semester has ended 
in order for prospective classroom materials to be assembled 
for examination. After the beginning of the Spring semester, 
the committees meet and decide on classroom materials to 
be used in the following year. 

Regular meetings, and/or telephone conferences 
provide the basis for the decision making. 

Time for exchange of ideas should be provided. Once 
the decisions have been made, the Chairperson of each 
committee provides to his/her supervisor documentation of 
the decision process which includes the names of those who 
have been involved in the deliberation process, required 
materials selected, supplemental materials selected, and the 
date upon which these meetings and decisions occurred. 
The Bookstore order for books shall be completed at this 



time, and forwarded through regular channels to the 
bookstore. 

Edison anticipates that except in unusual circumstances, 
the course materials will be adopted for at least one year. 
Committees will meet each year for review to change or to 
re-adopt instructional materials. Documentation of the 
decision-making process should proceed from the Chairs 
of the adoption groups to their supervisors. 

A copy of the documentation regarding classroom 
material adoption should be retained in the supervisor's 
office. A sample form to be used in the process of reporting 
the decision of the committee may be obtained from any 
instructional administradve office. 

WORD-PROCESSING OR TYPING POLICY 

Students are expected to type or word-process papers 
presented in courses taken for credit. Edison's basic 
composition course, ENC 1101. requires students to 
demonstrate competence in the basic use of computers, 
including word processing. The word processing of papers 
is regarded as the norm and is considered good practice for 
students transferring to upper division colleges and 
universities. Students who cannot type are urged to enroll 
in a keyboarding class, or to seek remediation through 
various options available in the Department of Learning 
Assistance. 



46 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 



To receive the Associate in Arts degree, Associate in 
Science degree, or a Certificate, students must satisfy 
requirements for that degree or certificate. Degree and 
Certificate requirements are hsted elsewhere in this Catalog. 
Students are encouraged to see an academic advising 
specialist prior to each registration. Students must also 
satisfy the following College requirements: 

1. Register in the final session of attendance for any 
courses not previously completed which are necessary 
to satisfy the desired degree or certificate. 

2. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College. 

3. Successfully complete a minimum of 25% of the 
required degree or certificate course work at Edison 
Community College. 

4. Meet all deadlines pertaining to graduation. 

A continuously enrolled student may choose to meet 
graduation requirements specified in either the College 



Catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment or at the 
time of graduation. (See Effective Catalog Policy, page 18) 

Graduation is processed automatically for all eligible 
students. Degree or certificate notations are posted to the 
student's tran.script and diplomas are mailed to the graduate's 
last known address. 

Any student whose degree requirements were met in a 
previous term will be graduated in the term in which the 
evaluation takes place. 

Students may participate in graduation ceremonies if 
completing degree requirements during the current academic 
year. 

Graduation and certificate requirements printed in this 
Catalog may change due to changes in Florida State laws or 
Department of Education rules. Final responsibility for 
meeting the requirements for graduation rests with the 
student. 




47 



Honors Scholar Program 



Edison Community College offers qualified students 
with high ability and motivation an enriched, challenging 
program of study through the Honors Scholar Program 
(HSP). Participation in this superior educational experience 
provides for intellectual and social development, builds 
character, and promotes enthusiasm for lifelong learning. 
Honors courses are not intended to be appreciably more 
work than traditional classes, but instead offer innovative 
approaches to learning which focus on the individual student. 
Honors classes may, depending on the course, involve 
problem solving, student projects, or a student seminar 
approach to learning. Synergy results when the best and 
brightest are assembled together to inspire each other to 
think in unique, novel ways. Faculty are selected for their 
expertise and interest in helping students. 

Benefits of the Program 

- Active discussions 

- Small class sizes 

- Independent and critical thinking 

- Field trips 

- Honors Resource room with internet-accessible computer 

- Independent research or creative project option 

- HSP student executive board 

- Annual spring luncheon 

Edison Honors Scholars are desirable recruits to other 
institutions of higher learning and often receive special 
attention for scholarships and awards. An articulation 
agreement with the University of Central Florida enables 
Edison Honors Scholar graduates to enter the UCF 
University Honors Program. 

Completion of the Honors Scholar Program is recorded 
on the students' transcripts and their diplomas receive a 
special embossed designation. Students who graduate with 
Honors or High Honors are also recognized at the annual 
graduation ceremony. The cumulative grade point average 
is used to identify graduafion with Honors or High Honors 
as follows: 

Honors 3.50 to 3.99 Cumulative GPA 

High Honors 4.0 Cumulative GPA 

Requirements for Admission 

Students must be AA or AS degree-seeking and are 
required to write an essay and complete an application. The 
applicant must meet at least two (2) of the following criteria. 



one from Column A and one from 
the program. 
Column A 

1. Minimum ACT of 25 or, 
minimum SAT of 1 1 00 or, 
minimum FCELPT of 100 on 
each subtest. 

2. Minimum high school GPA 
of 3.2 on an unweighted scale 

3. Minimum of 12 semester hours 
of college credit with 
minimum GPA of 3.2 

Honors Scholarships 



Column B, to qualify for 

Column B 

1 . Two teacher 
recommendations from 
high school or college 
teaching faculty 
members. 

2. A portfolio of art, music, 
or dance 

3. Take two college honors 
and obtain an "A" or a 
"B" in both classes. 



Edison Community College is eager to assist the highly 
motivated and achieving students who participate in the 
Honors Scholar Program. Based on availability, $1800 
performance-based scholarships are awarded annually in the 
Fall to full-time students who will graduate from the 
program. These scholarships are renewable the following 
year if certain criteria are met. Honors Certificate students 
are not eligible for these scholarships. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of 18 credit hours of Honors classes 
(earning at least a grade of "B" in each course) will complete 
the academic requirements to graduate from the Honors 
Scholar Program. These classes must be chosen from at least 
two of three academic areas: basic sciences/math, social 
sciences, or humanities/communications. One of these 
classes can be the Honors Research Study (3 credits) 
mentioned on page 43. Additional requirements not 
summarized here also apply. 

A student may receive an Honors Certificate if a total 
of nine (9) credit hours of Honors courses are completed 
with at least a grade of "B". 

How to Apply 

The program coordinator must receive completed 
applications six (6) weeks prior to the term in which the 
student wishes to begin participation in the program. For 
further information or an application form call the HSP 
Coordinator at (941) 489-9332. 



48 



COLLEGE LEVEL 
ACADEMIC SKILLS TEST (CLAST) 



The State of Florida has developed a test of college- 
level communication and computation skills called the 
College Level Academic Skills Test or (CLAST). CLAST 
is designed to test the communication and computation skills 
that are judged by state university and community college 
faculty to be generally associated with successful 
performance and achievement in lower division work. 

The test is required by Florida statutes and rules of the 
State Board of Education when competencies in English, 
reading, and mathematics cannot be demonstrated by any 
of the following options: 

1 . Achieve a score that meets or exceeds the following: 
a. SAT - R 500 or above in Verbal, or its equivalent 
on the original scale score, shall be exempt from 
the Reading, English Language Skills, and Essay 
sections of the CLAST. 

SAT - R 500 or above in Quantitative, or its 
equivalent on the original scale score, shall be 
exempt from the Computation section of the 
CLAST. 

ACT - E 22 or above in Reading, or its equivalent 
on the original ACT, shall be exempt from the 
Reading section of the CLAST. 



2. 



a. 



b. 



c. 



d. ACT - E 21 or above in English, or its equivalent 
on the original ACT, shall be exempt from the 
English Language Skills and Essay sections of the 
CLAST. 

e. ACT - E 2 1 or above in Math, or its equivalent on 
the original ACT, shall be exempt from the 
Computation section of the CLAST. 

Achieve a: 

2.5 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 grade scale in ENC 
1 101 and ENC 1 102 or other equivalent college- 
level English course for a minimum of six (6) 
semester credit hours to be exempt from the English 
Language Skills, Reading, and Essay sections of 
the CLAST. 

2.5 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 grade scale in MAC, 
MAP, MGF, or STA courses for a minimum of six 
(6) semester credit hours to be exempt from the 
computation section of the CLAST. 
PLEASE NOTE: CLAST RULES ARE SUBJECT 
TO CHANGE DUE TO REVISIONS IN ELORIDA 
LAW. 




49 



Computational Skills 

(Eleiucnis of the College Level Academic Skills Program as taught at Edison) 

CLAST mathematics examination items and score report are provided in these broad categories: 



ARITHMKTIC SKILLS 

*Adds and NublraclN rational numbers 


MAT 
1033 

X 


MAC 
1105 

X 


MGF 
1106 

X 


MAC 
1114 

X 


MAC 

1140 

X 


MAC 

1147 

X 


MAC 

2311 

X 


STA 

2023 

X 


'Multiplies and divides rational numbers 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Adds and subtracts rational nutiibers in decimal form 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Multiplies and divides rational numbers in decimal form 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Calculates percent increase and percent decrease 






X 




X 




X 




•Recognizes the meaning of exponents 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Solves the sentence, a 'i of b is c, where values for two of the variables are given 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


'Recognizes the role of the base number in determining place value in the 
base-ten numeration system 


X 




X 




X 


X 






•Identifies equivalent forms of positive rational numbers involving decimals, percents and fractions 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Determines the order-relation between real numbers 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Identifies a reasonable estimate of a sum, average or product of numbers 






X 


X 






X 


X 


♦Infers relations between numbers in general by examining particular number pairs 


X 




X 






X 


X 




•Solves real-world problems which do not require the use of variables and which do not 
involve percent 


X 




X 


X 






X 




•Solves real-world problems which do not require the use of variables and which do require 
the use of percent 


X 




X 




X 




X 




•Solves problems that inv olve the structure and logic of arithmetic 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT SKILLS 

•Rounds measurements to nearest given unit of the measuring device used 






X 


X 




X 


X 




'Calculates distance 


X 




X 


X 




X 


X 




'Calculates areas 






X 


X 




X 


X 




'Calculates volumes 






X 








X 




'Identifies relationships between angle measures 






X 


X 




X 


X 




'Classifies simple plane figures by recognizing their properties 


X 




X 


X 






X 




•Recognizes similar triangles and their properties 


X 




X 


X 




X 


X 




'Identifies appropriate types of measurement of geometric objects 


X 




X 


X 




X 


X 




Infers formulas for measuring geometric figures 


X 




X 


X 






X 




Selects applicable formulas for computing measures of geometric figures 


X 




X 


X 




X 


^ 




"Solves real world problems involving perimeters, areas and volumes of geometric figures 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 




•Solves real-world problems involving the Pythagorean property 


X 




X 


X 




X 


X 





ALGEBRA SKILLS 

•Adds and subtracts real numbers 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




'Multiplies and divides real numbers 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


'Applies the order-of-operations agreement to computation involving numbers and variables 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


'Uses scientific notations in calculations involving very large numbers or very small measurements 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




'Solves linear equations and inequalities 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


'I'ses given formulas to compute results when geometric measurements are not involved 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




•Finds particular values of a function 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 




•Factors a quadratic expression 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




•Finds the roots of a quadratic equation 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




•Solves a system of two linear equations in two unknowns 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




•Uses properties of operations correctly 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Determines whether a particular number is among the solutions of a given equation or inequality 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




•Recognizes statements and conditions of proportionality and variation 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 




•Identifies regions of the coordinate plane which correspond to specific conditions, and vice versa 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




'Use applicable proper ties to select equivalent equations and inequalities 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Solves real-world problems involving use of variables, aside from commonly used geometric 
formulas 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


•Solves problems that involve the structure and logic of algebra 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



STATISTICS SKILLS, INCLUDING PROBABILITY 

"Identifies information contained in bar, line and circle graphs 






X 






X 




X 


'Determines the mean, median and mode of a set of numbers 






X 






X 




X 


♦Uses the fundamental counting principle 




X 


X 




X 


X 






•Recognizes properties and interrelation.ships among the mean, median and mode in a variety 
of distributions 






X 






X 




X 


'Chooses the most appropriate procedures for selecting an unbiased sample from a target population 






X 






X 






♦Identifies the probability of a specific outcome in an experiment 






X 




X 


X 




X 


'Infers relations and makes accurate predictions from studying statistical data 






X 






X 




X 


•Interprets rcal-worid data involving frequency and cumulative frequency tables 






X 






X 




X 


•Solves rcal-worid problems involving probabilities 






X 




X 


X 




X 



50 





MAT 


MAC 


MGF 


MAC 


MAC 


MAC 


MAC 


STA 


LOGICAL REASONING SKILLS 


1033 


1105 


1106 


1114 


1140 


1147 


2311 


2023 


*Deduces facts of set-inclusion and non-inclusion from a diagram 






X 












*Draws logical conclusions from data 






X 












*Draws logical conclusions when facts warrant them 




X 


X 













Communication Skills 

CLAST skills are required in these broad categories: 



READING 

The student: 

*Recognizes main ideas in a given passage 


ENC 
1101 

X 


ENC 
1102 

X 


SPC 
1600 


♦Identifies supporting details 


X 


X 




♦Determines meanings of words on the basis of context 


X 


X 




♦Recognizes stated relationships between words, sentences, and ideas 


X 


X 




♦Recognizes the author's purpose 


X 


X 




♦Distinguishes between statements of fact and statements of opinion 


X 


X 




♦Detects bias and prejuoice 


X 


X 




♦Recognizes author's tone 


X 


X 




♦Perceives implicit as well as explicit relationships between words, sentences and ideas 


X 


X 




♦Recognizes valid arguments and draws logical inferences and conclusions 


X 


X 





LISTENING 

The student: 



♦Recognizes main ideas 






X 


♦Identifies supporting details 






X 


♦Recognizes explicit relationships among ideas 






X 


♦Recalls basic ideas and facts 






X 


♦Perceives the speaker's purpose and organization of ideas and information 






X 


♦Discriminates between statements of fact and statements of opinion 






X 


♦Distinguishes between emotional and logical arguments 






X 


♦Detects bias and prejudice 






X 


♦Recognizes the speakers attitude 






X 


♦Synthesizes and evaluates by drawing logical inference and conclusions 






X 


♦Recalls the implications and arguments 






X 



WRITING 

The student: 



♦Selects a subject which lends itself to expository writing 


X 


X 




♦Determines the purpose for writing 


X 


X 




♦Limits the subject to a topic which can be developed adequately with the requirements of time, purpose 
and audience 


X 


X 




♦Formulates a thesis statement which reflects the purpose 


X 


X 




♦Develops a thesis statement 


X 


X 




♦Demonstrates effective word choice 


X 


X 




♦Employs conventional sentence structure 


X 


X 




♦Employs effective sentence structure 


X 


X 




♦Observes the convention of standard American English grammar and usage 


X 


X 




♦Uses standard practice for spelling punctuation and capitalization 


X 


X 




♦Revises, edits and proofreads units of written discourse to assure clarity, consistency, and conformity to 
the conventions of standard American English 


X 


X 





SPEAKING 

The student: 



♦Determines the purpose of the oral discourse 






X 


♦Chooses a topic and restricts it according to purpose 






X 


♦Fulfills the purpose of the discourse 






X 


♦Employs vocal variety in rate, pitch and intensity 






X 


♦Articulates clearly 






X 


♦Employs the level of .American English appropriate to the designated audience 






X 


♦Demonstrates nonverbal behavior which suppons (he \erbal message 






X 



51 



Students completing an Associate in Arts degree or an 
Associate in Science degree who are planning to transfer to 
a Florida State University must demonstrate the 
competencies required in the CLAST either through the 
method described above or by earning passing scores in 
both the Communication and Computation sections. All 
education majors should take the CLAST prior to transfer 
to the upper division. 

The CLAST is administered three (3) times per year as 
determined by the State Department of Education. Please 
refer to the college calendar for registration deadlines and 
test dates. Transient students need to contact their college if 
they desire to take the CLAST at Edison Community 
College. 

Students who are required to take the CLAST and do 
not make acceptable scores on the test will not be awarded 
the Associate in Arts degree. Students who successfully 
complete three (3) of the four (4) CLAST sections may be 
admitted to the units of the Florida university system, but 
they must complete the remaining section prior to 
completion of 36 credit hours of university work. 

After successful completion of all CLAST sections the 
student will be fully admitted to upper division status in the 
Florida university system. At this point, the student may 
apply for graduation and be awarded the Associate in Arts 
degree from Edison Community College. CLAST 
requirements also apply to students transferring to state 
universities in Florida from private colleges in Florida and 
from out of state colleges. 

The State Board of Education has established minimum 
CLAST score standards for the awarding of the Associate 
in Arts degree and for admission to upper division status in 
state universities in Florida. Students should check with the 
Counseling, Advising and Assessment Center regarding 
specific score information. 

The Counseling, Advising and Assessment Center staff 
at any of the college's three campuses can tell you how and 
when to apply to take the CLAST, and inform you where 
the communication and computation skills are taught in the 
curriculum. In addition, counseling staff can inform you 
about the CLAST exemptions and when special review 
sessions are available. Final authority for granting an 
exemption lies with the Institutional Test Administrator 
(ITA). The ITA is located only on the Lee County Campus 
in the Counseling Center, O Building. 

Students with a disabling condition, which requires 
special accommodations, must see the ITA prior to the 
registration deadline for the CLAST. The College calendar 
should be consulted for appropriate dates. 

Students with a documented disability who wish to 
petition for a waiver of the CLAST must also contact the 
ITA. 



CLAST Waiver Requests 

In keeping with State Board of Education (SBE) Rule 
6A-10.03I1, the following circumstances have been 
identified which allow a student to request a waiver of the 
CLAST. 

In order to initiate the CLAST waiver process a petition 
must be filed with the ITA requesting such a waiver. After 
reviewing the petition, the ITA provides the paperwork to 
the CLAST Waiver Committee chairperson who then 
convenes a committee appointed by the District Vice 
President for Academic Affairs, Lee County Campus, to 
review the student's case. This committee is responsible to 
the District Vice President for Academic Affairs and has 
four additional members: a member of the mathematics 
department, a member of the English department, the ITA, 
and a fourth faculty member from a department other than 
English or mathematics. Other non-voting faculty or staff 
may be invited to attend and offer the benefit of their 
expertise as it relates to the student's inability to pass the 
subtest(s). 

The committee will consider the student's proficiency 
in the subject area(s) and the student's educational records 
as well as other evidence as to whether the student should 
be able to pass the subtest(s). A waiver of the subtest(s) in 
question may be recommended upon a majority vote of the 
committee. When a waiver from a subtest(s) is approved 
the student's transcript will be noted accordingly. A state- 
approved code will be used to indicate that the student did 
meet the requirements of the above mentioned state statute 
and that a waiver was granted. 

The ITA submits a written report to the Department of 
Education as waivers are approved and notification is mailed 
to the student. The report outlines the following: name and 
social security number of the student, gender and ethnic 
background, type of waiver granted, and the subtest(s) for 
which the waiver was granted. 

Students with Documented Disabilities 

Any student who has a documented, specific learning 
disability such that he/she cannot successfully complete one 
or more subtests of the CLAST may request a waiver through 
the ITA. 

Multiple Attempts 

Any student who has taken a subtest of the CLAST at 
least four times and has not been able to achieve a passing 
score, but has otherwise demonstrated proficiency in course 
work in the same subject area, may request a waiver from 



52 



that particular subtest. Waivers may be considered only after 
the student has been provided with test adaptations or other 
administrative adjustments to permit the accurate 
measurement of the student's proficiency in the subject area. 

University Transfer 

Students who plan to transfer to an upper-division 
institution after graduation from Edison Community College 
are encouraged to consult with an advisor and the transfer 
counselor concerning transfer requirements. Students also 
should obtain a catalog and a list of the requirements from 
the institution that they expect to attend. A file of catalogs 
from various colleges and universities is available in the 
Counseling, Advising and Assessment Center or Learning 
Resource Center at the district campuses. Students 
anticipating transfer should begin a preliminary application 
to the university of their choice in the Fall session of the 
sophomore year. Students transferring to an upper-division 
institution should complete the following procedures: 

1 . Complete and submit application(s) 

2. Send transcripts to institution 

3. Apply for financial aid/scholarships 

4. Apply for housing 

5. Verify immunization shots 

6. Attend orientation 

State Articulation Agreement 

Florida law provides that Associate in Arts degree 
graduates of a Florida community college must be granted 
admission to an upper division program offered by a state 
university institution, unless that program has been 
designated Limited Access. If Limited Access minimum 
standards are not met, universities may deny both acceptance 
into the desired program and acceptance into the university. 
The law gives priority for admission to a state university, to 
community college Associate in Arts graduates over out- 
of-state students. Florida Community Colleges have a similar 
articulation agreement with the Independent Colleges and 
Universities of Florida (ICUF). 



Other Transfer Agreements 

Adhering to the principles of a Student-Centered 
Learning College, Edison has been proactive in extending 
education opportunities for its graduates. Currently 
graduates are able to continue their studies through 
traditional classroom instruction and through distance 
learning programs. Specific transfer agreements have been 
established with Thomas College (Georgia), Thomas Edison 
State College (New Jersey). International College (Florida), 
and National Louis University (Illinois). Under these 
agreements students may complete a program leading to a 
bachelor degree in certain academic majors. 

General Education Agreement 

State Board of Education Regulation 6A- 10.24 
stipulates that the integrity of the general education program 
will be recognized by all public institutions of higher 
education in Florida. Once Edison has certified a student as 
having satisfactorily completed the general education 
program, no other public institution of higher education in 
Florida, to which he or she may be qualified to transfer, will 
require any further lower division general education courses. 
Any questions about the general education program should 
be addressed to an advisor or the transfer counselor. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Effective August 1, 1989, all undergraduate students 
who admit to a Florida public university must have earned 
two credits of sequential foreign language at a secondary 
level (high school) or the equivalent of such instruction at 
the post-secondary level. The same number of college credits 
in American Sign Language may substitute for the foreign 
language admission requirement. In certain cases students 
may be admitted without the completion of this requirement 
but mu.st satisfy the foreign language requirement prior to 
graduation from the university. This requirement does not 
apply to students who have already earned a baccalaureate 
degree or those students who entered a state university in 
Florida prior to Fall 1987. (NOTE: some majors may have 
a foreign language graduation requirement in addition to 
admission requirement) Please consult with the transfer 
coun.selor about the foreign language requirements. 



53 



STUDENT SERVICES 

AND 

FLORIDA LAWS 

REGULATING STUDENT 

STANDARDS 



54 



Student Services 



Counseling Services 

Counseling. Advising and Assessment staff are available 
to assist students with a variety of concerns including 
academic advisement, transfer to four-year institutions, 
general education requirements, catalog and program 
interpretation, and withdrawal from college. Individual short 
term counseling is available directly or by referral to 
responsible on campus or off campus sources through the 
Lee County Campus Counseling, Advising and Assessment 
Center. 

Assessment Services 

Testing is considered an essential part of the College 
program. Placement testing is required of all degree-seeking 
and certificate-seeking students prior to registration. Testing 
is used to determine placement in English, mathematics and 
reading courses. 

Other testing services provided by the Counseling, 
Advising and Assessment Center on the Lee Campus 
include, CLEP, a nationally developed program for acquiring 
college credit by examination and CLAST, a test of college- 
level communication and computation skills. CLAST may 
be taken after completing ENC 1101 and ENC 1 102, one 
college level math class, and 18 credit hours. 

Students may get more information about testing 
requirements by contacting the Counseling, Advising and 
Assessment Center on the Lee County Campus. (See 
information on placement testing on page 18.) 

Orientation 

Orientation is a one-and-one-half hour seminar that 
provides an overview of Edison and the admissions process. 
All prospective students are strongly encouraged to attend 
this introductory session in order to ensure a smooth 
transition into college life at Edison. 

Academic Advising Services 

Following orientation and entry placement testing, it is 
expected that each degree-seeking student meets with an 
academic advising specialist or counselor who will assist in 
the following: 

1. Designing an educational plan to accomplish the 
objective desired by the student; 

2. Understanding the General Education Program of the 
College; 



3. Selecting courses for long-range educational goals; 

4. Resolving difficulties encountered by the student in 
understanding educational programs and transfer 
requirements. 

Student Success 

To encourage positive and productive educational 
experiences it is strongly recommended that all first time in 
college students who are undecided about their education 
or career goals, or returning adult students who want to 
enhance their college survival skills enroll in SLS J 101, 
College Success Skills, a three credit hour elective course. 

All first time in college students who are required to 
take one or more college preparatory courses are encouraged 
to enroll in REA 1620, Special Studies Skills course. 

Students concerned about improving their reading 
speed, comprehension, and vocabulary should enroll in REA 
1 105, College Reading Techniques. 

Health Services 

Edison Community College, while having no obligation 
to do so. attempts to secure medical aid for students. No 
health facility is maintained on any of the campuses. 
However students on the campuses are referred to local 
emergency facilities in the district. Registration implies 
understanding and consent of this procedure. 

Students with chronic health problems are advised to 
make their special needs known to the Coordinator of 
Students with Disabilities on Lee County Campus, or the 
Auxiliary Aid Specialist on either the Charlotte or Collier 
Campuses. 

In addition, Edison Community College provides access 
to an effective program of health services and education to 
all of its students through the programming and services 
described below: 

• Annual Health Fairs 

• Health Related Workshops (i.e. Breast Screening, Blood 
Drives, Aids Education; Mental Health Issues; CPR; 
Domestic Violence etc. . . ) 

• Health and Wellness Credit Course Offerings 

• Continuing Education Non-Credit Course Offerings 

• YMCA Wellness Facilities Located on the Charlotte 
Campus 

• Auxiliary Aid Program for Students with Disabilities 



55 



Student Support Services 

The Student Support Services Program is funded by 
the U.S. Department of Education. This program is designed 
for students whose parents did not graduate from a four- 
year college/university whose family income may hinder 
them from remaining in college without financial assistance. 
Students must have a need for support services. A potential 
Student Support Services student must be degree-seeking 
and enrolled at Edison. The student must be a citizen or a 
permanent resident of the U.S., or a permanent resident of a 
Trust Territory of the U.S. 

Student Support Services assists selected, qualified 
participants with: 

Peer Tutoring Assistance 

Course and Transfer Advisement 

Scholarships For Limited Income Participants 

Tuition Fee Exemptions For Mentors 

Cultural and Educational Activities 

Workshops on relevant topics 

Computer Skills Lab 

Peer Mentoring 

Career Exploration 

Programs for Students with Disabilities 

Edison Community College offers to qualified students 
with disabilities, programs to equalize access to the 
education process. The Coordinator for Students with 
Disabilities provides academic advising, registration 
assistance and other related services to self identifying 
students. Documented students needing accommodations 
and modifications are provided appropriate direct services 
such as note taking, test proctoring, and scribing through 
the Auxiliary Aids Program. For more information call the 
program coordinator on the Lee County Campus. 

Auxiliary Aids Program: 

This program provides direct services to students with 
documented disabilities such as; note taking, test proctoring, 
reading, tutorial assistance plus the provision of specialized 
equipment for .student use. 

Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Program 

The Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Program is a 
grant-funded program with a mission to assist single 
pregnant women, single parents and displaced homemakers 
to gain marketable skills and attain self-sufficiency through 



vocational training. The program is designed for students 
who meet the following eligibility criteria: 

1. Enrolled in Associate in Science Degree or certificate 
program core courses 

2. Completed at least one semester at Edison Community 
College with a GPA of 2.0 or better 

3. Applied for and eligible for a Pell Grant 

4. Have custody of minor child/children or 

5. Are adults responsible for livelihood due to divorce, 
separation, death or disability of spouse. 
Information and outreach services are extended to 

women and men concerning vocational education or 
employment opportunities in careers as skilled workers in 
technical fields and emerging occupations. The Coordinator 
is responsible for evaluating the student's qualifications and 
needs as well as providing direction for program choice, 
class selection and other services. These services may 
include tuition exemptions, textbook lending library, 
childcare scholarships and transportation reimbursement for 
qualified students enrolled in vocational core courses. 

Fresh Start Program 

The Fresh Start Program is designed to assist displaced 
homemakers who are 35 years or older to achieve financial 
and emotional independence. A displaced homemaker has 
been dependent upon the income of another family member 
and has lost this support as a result of divorce, death, 
separation or disability. The focus of the program is to help 
the individual to achieve social, economic and mental growth 
and to eliminate barriers to job fulfillment. The prospective 
Fresh Start participant must have worked in the home 
providing unpaid household services for family members; 
is not gainfully employed or is underemployed; has had or 
potentially will have difficulty securing employment; or is 
dependent on public assistance which will soon be 
terminated. The program provides vocational and career 
testing; individual, group and peer counseling; development 
of employability skills; personal assessment and life skills 
training; information on community resources; and 
information on training opportunities and financial 
assistance. 

Upward Bound 

The Upward Bound Program, established at Edison 
Community College in 1999, is a grant program funded by 
the U.S. Department of Education. Upward Bound is 
designed to provide a comprehensive academic guidance 
and skills development program to selected eligible students 



56 



from four target high schools in Lee County (Lehigh Senior 
High School, Fort Myers High School, North Fort Myers 
High School, and Riverdale High School). It is an intensive 
program that requires participants to attend monthly 
meetings at the Lee County Campus during the academic 
year, weekly tutoring as needed, and a six-week summer 
school program. To participate in the program students must 



meet eligibility requirements to include: being a U.S. citizen 
or permanent resident; being from a low-income household 
as established by the Federal Government; and/or being a 
potential first-generation college student. Students are 
selected as ninth or tenth graders and must make a 
commitment to stay with the program until they enter into a 
post-secondary educational program. 




57 



STUDENT LIFE 



Student life is considered an important facet of the 
Edison Community College experience. In keeping with this 
philosophy, student activities staff work to provide a variety 
of cultural and recreational opportunities that interest the 
general student population. All programs are funded by 
student generated fees. 

Student Activities 

A calendar of activities is maintained on each campus. 
Special programs are posted on bulletin and electronic 
messaging boards, as well as on the College's web page. 

Student Participation in Decision Making 

Edison Community College promotes student 
participation in the decision making process of the College 
through a number of mechanisms, these include but are not 
limited to representation on the Curriculum Committee, 
student surveys, search committees, AS Program 
Committees, student focus groups. Student Government 
Association (SGA) and various clubs and organizations. 

Student Identification 

Student ID cards are available to all students. This 
student identification may be required to participate in 
certain campus services. Students should carry their ID card 
with them at all times. In addition, the ID card may qualify 
students to discounts at area theaters and businesses. 

Telephones for Students 

A number of pay telephones are located on each campus 
for student use. College office telephones are for official 
business or to report emergencies. 

Fine Arts Programs 

Music, theater and the visual arts constitute a significant 
and visible part of the Edison academic program. Courses 
in these disciplines are offered throughout the year. Faculty 
and student recitals provide an opportunity to hear a wide 
range of music performed by accomplished musicians. The 
Edison Wind Ensemble, Orchestra, and the Jazz Ensemble 
present numerous concerts each year. The College Choir 
presents several varying programs during each session. 
Edison students present their work each year in two student 
art shows. 



The Edison Community College theater program 
welcomes students as well as community members to its 
facilities at the William Frizzell Center of the Lee County 
Alliance of the Arts at the comer of McGregor and Colonial 
Boulevards in Fort Myers. Performances, staged twice a 
year, include comedy, musicals, and serious drama. Students 
who participate in the program may be eligible for tuition 
waivers. 

The Gallery of Fine Art presents exhibitions by 
internationally known traditional and contemporary artists 
during the entire year. The Gallery is located in Humanities 
Hall on the Lee County Campus. Films, lectures and 
workshops to complement the exhibitions are free and open 
to the public. Artistic exhibitions are also featured in the 
Learning Resources Center on the Collier County Campus. 

The Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall opened 
in January of 1986. The Hall seats 1,777 and features state- 
of-the-art sound and lighting systems. Hosting Broadway 
touring companies and professional music and dance 
ensembles, as well as community productions and College 
activities, the Hall is an asset to both the College and the 
community. 

Peer Tutorial Program 

The Edison Community College Peer Tutorial Program 
is committed to providing students opportunities for 
academic achievement through personalized tutoring 
services. Its goal is to facilitate learning in a professional, 
yet relaxed environment. The Peer Tutorial Program is 
available in a broad range of academic subject areas. It 
specializes in individual and small group tutoring sessions. 
Special arrangements are made during final exams to assist 
students. For more information call 498-9390 or 433-8048 
on the Lee Campus, 637-5515 on the Charlotte Campus, 
and 732-3120 on the Collier Campus. Those students 
attending classes in Hendry/Glades may request tutoring 
through the Lee County Campus. 

Minority Student Services 

Edison Community College supports the rich cultural 
diversity represented by its student body, and actively seeks 
to recruit and retain minority students. To assist students 
through every aspect of College life, the Coordinator of 
Minority Student Services provides assistance to the entire 
five county district. Annual multicultural events of interest 
to minority students include the Lee County Brain Bowl 
competition. College Knowledge, Financial Aid workshops. 



58 



discussion groups on diversity issues, minority mentor 
programs, the celebration of Black History Month, and 
ethnic festivals. Students may contact the Minority Student 
Service Coordinator at 941-489-9338 on the Lee County 
Campus. 

Student Organizations 

Club activities at Edison Community College provide 
a variety of opportunities for students to participate in the 
college community outside the classroom. For more 
information contact the Director of Student Services on the 
Charlotte and Collier campuses and the Coordinator for 
Minority Student Services on the Lee County Campus. 

Students are invited to join one of the following clubs: 
African-American Student Association - Lee 

The primary objective for this organization is to 
encourage African-American students to reach their full 
academic potential. The Association emphasizes academic 
excellence, cultural appreciation and social interaction. 
Art Club - Lee 

This group of students share their artistic talents with 
the rest of the campus. The Art Club hosts student art 
exhibits, paints faces at special events, takes field trips, etc. 
Astronomy Club - Charlotte 

This club is open to all students interested in astronomy. 
The club meets for observations and discussions on topics 
related to astronomy. 
Criminal Justice Club - Lee 

The Criminal Justice Club is an aspiring group of 
student criminologists who participate in field trips to prisons 
and morgues, and also hosts various speakers from 
corrections, probation, parole, and law enforcement 
agencies. Anyone with an interest in criminology is welcome 
to join. 
Delta Psi Omega - Lee, Charlotte 

Delta Psi Omega is a nationally recognized fraternity 
for students majoring in theater. Club members work on a 
variety of plays throughout the year, as well as attend 
workshops and conferences to master their art. 
Dental Hygiene Club - Lee 

Membership in this club is limited to dental hygiene 
students. Individuals involved in this club are students in 
the Dental Hygienist Program. Club members work together 
on a number of different activities that enhance their 
educational and social development. 
Drama Club - Collier 

The Drama Club is composed of students who have an 
interest in the fine arts from production to performance. 
Membership is open to all students, especially those enrolled 
in theater classes. The club typically has two to four 
performances a year. 



Edison Guiding Lights Program - Lee, Charlotte 

The Edison Guiding Lights (EGLs) are a select group 
of student leaders chosen to serve as student assistants in 
the Office of College Information and Recruitment. The 
EGLs assist in the recruitment and retention of Edison 
Community College students. Selection is based on 
leadership qualities, scholasdc achievement, and the ability 
to positively represent Edison Community College to 
students, parents, visitors, staff, faculty and other College 
constituencies. 
Honors Scholar Program Council - Lee 

The Council was formed to assist in the development 
of the Honors Scholars Program. It is run by the students in 
this program and is an excellent opportunity for participants 
to become involved in various leadership and volunteer 
service positions. 
International Club - Lee, Charlotte 

International students are invited to share their cultures 
through social and educational programs. Meetings typically 
feature a specific country with presentations and discussions. 
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship - Lee, Charlotte, Collier 

Inter-varsity Christian Fellowship promotes Christian 
values on campus and in personal life. Members are involved 
with fund-raising for special club activifies, and they also 
sponsor activities such as blood drives on campus. 
Latin-American Student Association - Lee 

The primary objective of this organization is to 
encourage Latin-American students to reach their full 
potential academically. The Association emphasizes 
academic excellence, cultural appreciation and social 
interaction. 
Multicultural Club - Collier 

Students of different ethnicities have united to uplift 
their culture, share their differences and engage in 
educational and social activities. 
The Paralegal Club - Lee 

The Paralegal Club provides a support opportunity for 
students interested in the field of legal studies. Activities 
include the exploration of both career and educational 
advancement through the coordination of guest lecturers, 
field trips, scholarship review, social activities, and 
community service. 
Phi Beta Lambda - Lee, Charlotte 

Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) is the business fraternity 
organized at the state and national levels. Activities include 
academic competitions, community service projects and 
fund-raising. PBL has won se\eral chapter and individual 
awards at all levels of the organization. 
Phi Lambda Alpha - Lee 

This is a fraternity for students studying to be legal 
assistants. These students actively support campus and 
student activities, in addition to participating in legal 
assisting workshops. 



59 



Phi Theta Kappa - Lee, Charlotte, Collier 

Founded in 1918. Phi Thela Kappa, the 2 year college 
national honor fraternity, recognizes leadership, scholarship 
and service. To be invited for membership a student must 
have a 3.0 cumulative GPA, have earned a 3.5 GPA in a Fall 
or Spring semester, and show interest in serving Edison and 
the community. Inductions are held in Fall and Spring. 
Philosophy Club - Collier 

The Philosophy Club is open to all students with an 
interest in philosophy. Meinbers meet to discuss 
philosophical subjects and develop higher levels of reasoning 
and critical thinking skills. 
Political Science Club - Lee, Collier 

Party identification is not needed to join the Political 
Science Club. Members engage in challenging discussions 
regarding candidates, issues and policies. 
Project HOPE - Lee, Charlotte, Collier 

Hope stands for Help One Person Excel. This program 
provides incentives for HOPE scholars to achieve success 
throughout their college experience. 
Radiology Club - Lee, Charlotte 

The Radiology Club members work together to further 
their knowledge outside of the classroom. Members work 
in hospitals and attend seminars to increase their 
understanding of radiologic technology. 
Respiratory Therapy Club - Lee 

Students seeking an Associates of Science degree in 
Respiratory Therapy are invited to join. Members are 
involved in numerous activities related to furthering their 
education. 

Student Nurses Association - Lee 
Club Nurse - Charlotte 

This chapter of a nationally recognized organization. 
National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) with state and 
regional affiliations. Aspiring nurses participate in this club 
by sponsoring a variety of fund-raisers and guest speakers. 
Members also assist in campus health fairs by offering their 
services to participants. 

How to Organize a Club at Edison 

Students are encouraged to join clubs and to organize 
associations at Edison for educational, political, social, 
religious or cultural purposes, as long as they are in keeping 
with the philosophy and objectives of the College. The 
College procedure for organizing a campus club is as 
follows: 



1. Secure a petition for organization from the Student 
Government Office. 

2. Submit the completed petition, which should include a 
list of prospective members, a constitution and by-laws, 
a sponsor and any other information which may be 
relevant according to the College Catalog. 

3. A representative of the proposed group should then 
submit the completed petition to the Student 
Government Association's Senate, and the District Vice 
President for Student Services for approval or 
disapproval. 

Student Government Association and Student 
Representation 

The Student Government Association (SGA) is the 
student's voice at Edison Community College. There is a 
Student Government Association on each of the three 
campuses. The SGA serves: 

1 . To provide a means whereby members of the student 
body may express themselves. 

2. To provide leadership in coordination of activities of 
the student body for the benefit of the entire College. 

3. To act as a service organization for Edison Community 
College. 

The SGA is made up of club appointed Representatives, 
and elected Senators, who coordinate events, service projects 
and follow through on student issues. Representatives confer 
with their advisor on matters of student interest and concern 
and promote the general welfare of the student body. All 
qualified students are invited to participate in SGA by 
attending meetings and running for office. Students are free, 
individually and collectively, to express their views on issues 
of College policy and on matters of general interest to the 
student body. The Student Government Association provides 
a means for participation in the formulation and application 
of College policy affecting academic and student affairs with 
the assistance of the SGA Advisor and the District Vice 
President for Student Services. Proposals for changes in 
policy, regulations and procedures which affect the student 
body as a whole are to be directed through the SGA and its 
advisor or the District Vice President for Student Services. 

The right of assembly for students is recognized, 
providing that student gatherings do not disrupt or interfere 
with the orderly educational operation of the institution. 
Such assembly must be in compliance with Florida statutes 
and College policies and procedures. 



60 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR STUDENT 
DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES 



Academic Standards for Leadership 

To hold minor offices in Student Government 
Association or in student clubs, students must have a 
minimum 2.0 GPA for the preceding session and a minimum 
cumulative 2.0 GPA and complete a minimum of six (6) 
semester classroom credit hours. Holders of major offices 
or Executive Board positions must maintain a 2.5 GPA for 
the current and cumulative semesters and maintain at least 
nine (9) credit hours in the Fall and Spring semesters during 
their appointment. 

Scheduling Meetings, Activities 

All clubs and student organizations on the Lee County 
Campus must secure meeting times and room assignments 
through the office of the District Vice President for Student 
Services. On the Charlotte and Collier County Campuses, 
clubs obtain meeting rooms through the Office of the 
Provost. 

Student Organization Standards 

Recognized student organizations at Edison 
Community College are responsible for maintaining the 
following standards: 

I. Each organization must have one advisor who is 
approved by the respective District Dean or 
administrator and be a member of the College staff/ 
faculty. No regularly scheduled meetings of the 
organization or of its officers may be held without the 
advisor present. If a special meeting is called, the 
advisor must be notified far enough in advance so that 
he or she can be present or arrange for appropriate 
representation. 

II. Membership in student organizations is limited to 
students of Edison Community College. 

III. Activities of student groups must be conducted in 
accordance with city, county, state, federal and College 
regulations. 

IV. The elected student leaders and staff advisor of the 
group are the administrative coordinators for the group 
and must adhere to College regulations. 

V. Clubs must obtain authorization for off-campus trips 
and/or activities. All paperwork must be completed and 
submitted to the appropriate Student Services staff at 
least two (2) weeks prior to the trip or event. 



A. Representatives shall be limited to the number of 
official voting delegates. The College suggests no 
more than 15 students per advisor. 

B. An advisor or proxy must accompany any off- 
campus trip sponsored by the group. The advisor 
has the full authority of the College in matters 
relating to student conduct and student welfare. 

VI. Failure to meet these prescribed standards, or infraction 
of these regulations may result in: 

A. Denial of use of College facilities. 

B. Denial of recognition of the group as an 
organization. 

C. Forfeiture of the right to representation in other 
College organizations such as SGA. 

D. Forfeiture of the right to representation in the 
College publications. 

E. Denial of privileges of some or all Student 
Development activities for a stated period. 

F. Forfeiture of the right to function as a group, 
including forfeiture of charter. If there is a violation 
of regulations, the student or group may have a 
hearing, according to the Student Code of Conduct 
and Responsibility. 

G. Loss of officer status in organization. 

Regulations, Procedures 

I. Definition: A Student Development function is defined 
as an activity or entertainment, sponsored by a College 
approved student group, designed to promote growth 
and development of students. 

II. Approval of Functions: All functions must be approved 
at least two weeks in advance of the event. The correct 
procedure is as follows: 

A. Clear the date on the student activity calendar at 
the appropriate Student Services staff member and 
with the advisor. 

B. Obtain an Activity Reservation form from the 
appropriate Student Services staff member. 

C. Present the Activity Reser\ation form to the ad\ isor 
and to the appropriate Student Services staff 
member for approval. Date, location, hours, budget, 
theme, agreement and signature of the 
organization's president, advisor and treasurer 
should be indicated on the form. 

D. Completed forms must be submitted two weeks 
prior to the e\ent. Upon approval of your request, 
space, publicity, invitations, and other preparations 
may be made. 



61 



E. All publicity must be approved by the club advisor. 

F. Public Entertainment 

i. Student organizations may hold no 
entertainment open to the public without the 
consent of the advisor and the appropriate 
Student Services staff. 

2. All plans, scripts, librettos, and costumes must 
be approved by the club advisor. 

III. Location of P'unctions: It is acceptable to have an event 
in any approved place in the five-county College district. 
A location may be disapproved because of distance, 
inadequate police protection, inadequate facilities, fire 
hazards or other reasons determined valid by the advisor 
and the appropriate Student Services staff member. 

IV. Budgets: Each application for a function must be 
accompanied by a budget which is approved by the 
advisor, president and treasurer. 

V. Conduct: Organizations assume responsibility for 
members" and guests' conduct as follows: 

A. Only registered students and their guests may 
attend College events sponsored by student 
organizations, unless by special invitation of the 
group. 

B. Attire should be appropriate for a public event. 

C. Each group should refrain from using decorations, 
signs and favors considered in poor taste because 
students represent the College at all times. 

D. Any function sponsored by or held in the name of 
a recognized student organization must abide by 
all regulations stated herein, whether that function 
is held on or off the College campus. 

E. The College expects students to conduct 
themselves as mature adults, to dress and conduct 
social events in good taste, and reserves the right 
at any time to discipline students whose conduct is 
deemed against College regulations. (See Student 
Code of Conduct and Responsibility.) 

F. Use or possession of alcohol and/or drugs by a 
student or advisor during any College sponsored 
activity is prohibited. Violation of this policy can 
result in disciplinary action. 

VI. Duties asAdvisorofa Campus Group: It is important 
for the advisor, officers and members to discuss their 
expectations for each other and the group. This will aid 
in preventing misunderstandings as the year progresses. 
The agreed-upon expectations should be written and 
distributed so that all participants are aware that they 
are accountable for the guidelines. The advisor serves 
as a resource person and an overseer of administrative 
details. 

A. Resource: Advisors have organizational and 
community knowledge. Often they have been 
advisors of one club for quite a while and can share 



2. 



3. 



experiences that have occurred over the years. An 
advisor's professional and business associates, as 
well as friends in the local community are 
additional resources for clubs. With the assistance 
of a club advisor, outside resources can be used as 
speakers and sources of financial and general 
support. 

B. Administrative Details: Advisors are employees 
of the College and therefore have critical 
information regarding College staff, operations, 
regulations, etc. This can be of great benefit to 
clubs, especially when dealing with detail-oriented 
tasks such as purchasing items and traveling to 
conferences. Most advisors will be familiar with 
parliamentary procedures, Robert's Rules of Order, 
minutes, and bookkeeping and can share this 
knowledge with others in the club. 

C. Rights and Responsibilities: Advisors of clubs at 
Edison are afforded certain rights and 
responsibilities. 

An advisor has the right to: 

1. Receive ample notice of meetings and club 
functions that require his/her presence. 
Obtain a corporate account credit card through the 
College for club-related travel expenses. 
Document the behavior of students that are in 
violation of the Code of Conduct and 
Responsibility. Discipline students in conjunction 
with the District Vice President for Student 
Services. 

4. Support club endeavors and voice his/her opinion 
in matters of the College. 

An advisor has the responsibilities of: 

1 . Attending all club sponsored functions (including 
field trips/conferences) or getting a suitable 
replacement. Club functions will not be considered 
official without the advisor present and individual 
members and the club will be held responsible for 
unofficial acts undertaken in the name of the 
College and/or club. 

2. Ensuring that any club publication is approved by 
the club advisor. 

3. Approving and signing-off on all club 
expenditures. 

4. Keeping abreast of the work and progress of the 
club. 

5. Being a mediator when a problem arises that 
hinders the club's progress. 

6. Empowering students with information (College 
and community) that will enable them to effectively 
work together and make progress. 

7. Maintaining a club ledger or working closely with 
the treasurer to maintain records. 



62 



8. Checking to see that all officers meet GPA and 
hours requirements and are not on disciplinary 
probation. 

9. Conferring with newly elected officers to orient 
them to their responsibilities and the club 
constitution. 

10. Assisting the club president in evaluating the 
performance of the club and other members. 
Remember, an advisor is there to do just that, 
advise. They are first employees of Edison and 
must maintain those responsibilities in addition to 
personal and professional development. Students 
are expected to be responsible for the success of 
the organization with input from the advisor. 

Financial Regulations, Procedures 

All financial transactions must be approved by the 
advisor, president and treasurer of the club. The officers and 
advisor of a student organization are responsible for seeing 
that the group observes the financial policies and procedures 
of Edison and has the duty of informing appointees of the 
purchasing regulations. The treasurer is held responsible for 
collecting and depositing all funds in Edison's Cashier Office 
within 24 hours. She/he shares with the president and the 
advisor the responsibility of informing members of financial 
duties and of proper purchasing procedures. All expenditures 
from club funds must be approved by the organization, either 
by budget or by motion, properly seconded and passed by 
majority vote and signed-off by the advisor, president, and 
treasurer. 

Fund Raising 

All student organizations must follow Edison 
Community College's policies and procedures for fund 
raising. 

Purchasing Procedures at Edison for Clubs/ 
Organizations 



Once a student organization is officially recognized by 
Edison, it is entitled to an account (Fund 6) within the 
College. These funds are governed by the College's Business 
Office and are accountable to certain guidelines. Note: 
Student Organization accounts are not interest generating. 
I. Accounts and Statements 

A club president, treasurer, or advisor need only 
contact the appropriate Student Services staff member 
and request that an account be opened for that 
organization. Once the account number is obtained, it 
is critical that your organization list the correct account 



number with 1 1 place holders-21 1 and club's name on 
all budget paperwork (i.e., 55550000000-21 1). This is 
particularly important since some account numbers have 
the same prefix, but different suffix. 

Monthly statements for all Edison accounts are 
produced in the Business Office on the Lee Campus. 
These statements are distributed to the budget 
administrator for the various accounts. Because the 
statements arrive monthly, it is mandatory that club 
treasurers and advisors maintain a ledger with all club 
transactions. The budget administrator maintains 
account ledgers for all clubs and organizations on their 
prospective campuses. Club members and advisors may 
feel free to compare their ledgers with the budget 
administrator any time during the year. 

The budget administrator's signature must be on 
all budget paperwork before it can be approved. In 
addition to this, the club president, treasurer and advisor 
must also validate the financial transaction with their 
signatures. Note: The club advisor should be listed as 
the College contact person for any student 
organization's order placed with a vendor. 
II. Budget Transactions 

There are four budget transactions that clubs may use: 
request for purchase, request for payment, petty cash 
and deposits. 

A. Request for Purchase: The REQUEST FOR 
PURCHASE FORM can only be submitted for 
vendors who accept Edison's purchase order. If a 
vendor will not accept an Edison purchase order, 
contact the Purchasing Office for the name of a 
comparable vendor who accepts purchase orders 
and can provide the services or goods you desire. 
Signatures of the president, treasurer, and advisor 
must be on the form authorizing the transaction. 
Submit the typed form to the budget administrator 
for approval. Note: Clubs cannot place an order 
with a vendor without a purchase order number 
from the Purchasing Office. 

B. Petty Cash: Expenses totaling less than S25 may 
be reimbursed immediately through petty cash. 
Obtain a PETTY CASH FORM from the Cashier's 
Office. Secure advisor's, president's and treasurer's 
and budget administrator's signature, and submit 
with a receipt attached, to the Cashier for 
reimbursement. A copy of the PETTY CASH 
FORM must be returned to the appropriate Student 
Services staff member for bookkeeping purposes. 

C. Deposit Memos: Deposits can be made on any 
campus through the Cashier in a matter of 
moments. The Ca.shier's Office will provide all 
student organizations with DEPOSIT MEMOS. 
These may be submitted to the Cashier with cash 



63 



or checks for deposit into club accounts. Checks 

must be made out to the student organization and 

Edison Community College and possess the 

issuer's social security number (if a student). One 

copy of the DEPOSIT MEMO will be returned to 

the student and the other kept at the Cashier's 

Office. 

D. Request for Payment: The REQUEST FOR 

PAYMENT form may ONLY be used for travel 

expenditures. Complete the REQUEST FOR 

PAYMENT form and submit with supporting 

documents to the appropriate Student Services staff 

member. A check is normally ready within 2 weeks. 

The Business Office will mail the check to the 

organization or release it to a designee at the 

Cashier's Office. 

The time line for the above mentioned budget transactions 

is a strict one. All budget paperwork must be submitted to 

the appropriate Student Services staff member for 

appropriate signatures. Once approved and signed, the 

materials are then forwarded to Accounts Payable or 

Purchasing. Any account that has no financial activity 

for at least one year is determined to be inactive. 

Travel Policies 

There are several steps that a student organization must 
complete before they can travel. Prior planning is the key to 
a successful, safe and enjoyable off-campus excursion. 
I. Travel Procedures and Paperwork 

A. Travel Authorization Form: Students attending 
ANY off-campus club sponsored event must sign 
and submit a College TRAVEL AUTHORIZATION 
FORM for the trip to be considered official. A 
TRAVEL AUTHORIZATION FORM should be 
completed & submitted to the appropriate Student 
Services staff member prior to departure. 

B. Code of the Road: The CODE OF THE ROAD 
sets guidelines for club members on off-campus 
excursions. All Edison student organizations are 
responsible for using the CODE OF THE ROAD. 
It should be read and signed by all trip attendees, 
then submitted to the appropriate Student Services 



staff member prior to departure. This form allows 

the student to receive medical attention, emergency 

contact, and informs the student that they are still 

held accountable for adhering to the Student Code 

of Conduct and Responsibility. 

Regardless of how an organization reaches its trip 

destination, remember, that this is an outside-classroom 

learning experience that you are allowed to attend. While 

learning, networking and socializing are all important, 

certain safety considerations must always be adhered to. 

Transportation 

Members of clubs may use rental vehicles, commercial 
transportation, or their personal vehicles for club trips and 
conferences. However, there are certain stipulations attached 
to all of these means of transportation and paperwork to be 
completed. 

I. College Vehicle: No student may drive a College 
vehicle or rental vehicle on behalf of the College or 
any club unless that student is an employee of the 
College. If the club advisor or supervisor asks a student 
to drive a vehicle on behalf of the College, the following 
must be done: (1) make a copy of the student's 
Employment Authorization form and valid driver's 
license, (2) submit this to the appropriate Student 
Services staff member for approval two weeks prior to 
departure. If the student has permission of the 
appropriate Student Services staff member and the club 
advisor to drive his/her own vehicle (not a rental or 
college vehicle) to a conference, the student's own 
insurance should provide coverage. The student must 
drive in "caravan" style with the advisor. 

II. Public Transportation: Commercial transportation 
includes air, train, bus and boat. Because students and 
groups are often afforded discounts, the appropriate 
Student Services staff member and/or club advisor 
should always be consulted prior to making any 
reservations. All proper paperwork must be submitted 
before arrangements are made. If transportation is 
provided by a vehicle rented on a College purchase 
order, non-students and non-College employees are not 
covered under the College's insurance. 



64 



Student Code of Conduct and Responsibility 



Each student, whether in day or evening classes, 
part-time or full-time, is expected to be familiar with 
the rules and regulations of the College pertaining to 
academic affairs, social conduct, and student activities, 
which are published in this Catalog. Each student is 
responsible for conforming to the rules contained herein 
in addition to avoiding violations of the following specific 
offenses to the academic community. Failure to comply 
with these rules may result in the initiation of disciplinary 
action. 

The following list includes the definitions of acts which 
are included in the STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT AND 
RESPONSIBILITY: 

1. Insubordination or Disrespect to Constituted 
Authority: Constituted authority is construed to mean 
any person designated by the institution to carry out 
institutional policies. Also, failing to obey a College 
official who is performing his/her duties and failing to 
respond to an official summons from an administrative 
officer of the College within the time indicated. 

2. Gambling for Money or Material Values: Games of 
chance are prohibited by Florida law and city 
ordinances. 

3. False Information: Furnishing false or misleading 
information (oral or written) to College offices, faculty 
or staff. 

4. Destruction of Property: This term is construed to 
mean destruction, damage, or misuse of College 
property, private property on the campus, vandalism 
and/or misuse of library material, fire equipment or 
other life-safety equipment. 

5 . Illegal Use or Possession of Narcotic or Psychedelic 
Drugs is Strictly Prohibited: The Federal Drug Abuse 
Act prohibits distribution and possession of certain 
drugs, including amphetamines, barbiturates, 
hallucinogens and other prescription-type medications 
which have not been prescribed by a licensed physician. 
Possession and/or distribution of such drugs, when not 
prescribed, constitutes a violation. (Senate Bill 989, 
1969, as defined in Chapters 398 or 404 of the Florida 
Statutes). (Controlled Substances Act 21 USC.811). 

6. Possession or Use of Alcoholic Beverages: Use of 
alcoholic beverages or having alcoholic beverages in 
one's possession, either on campus or at a College- 
approved function. 

7. Possession and/or Use of Firearms on Campus: Use 
or possession of ammunition or other weapons and/or 
setting off any explosive device, fireworks, or 
flammable liquid or objects. 

8. Forgery: Forging, alteration or misuse of College 
documents, forms or records. 



9. Stealing: The unlawful taking, destroying, defacing, 
damaging, or misuse of College property or the property 
belonging to others. 

10. Academic Dishonesty: Students are expected to 
conduct their academic affairs in a forthright and honest 
manner. In the event that students are suspected of 
classroom cheating, plagiarism or otherwise 
misrepresenting their work, they will be subject to 
disciplinary sanctions. 

1 1 . Violation of Law Committed On or Off the Campus: 
Violation of municipal, county, state and federal law or 
subsequent conviction of same constitutes violation of 
College policy. The nature of the violation will 
determine the extent of sanction that may be invoked 
by the College. 

12. Hazing: Physical or emotional abuse of another person 
in the College community, subjecting another person 
therein to humiliating or painful ordeals, or harassing 
someone with threats made in person, by telephone, or 
in writing. Any such hazing as further defined in 
240.326 F.S. is also unlawful in the State of Florida. 
Such action on or off campus on the part of any student 
or group of students or student organization is to be 
construed as a violation of College rule. Any individual 
student or group of students found guilty of such 
violation will receive disciplinary probation, 
suspension, dismissal, or any combination of such 
penalties, depending upon the circumstances and the 
severity of the individual case. Any student organization 
found guilty of such violation will be placed on 
probation, will receive suspension of recognition as a 
student organization, and will permanently lose 
recognition as a student organization or any 
combination of such penalties, depending upon the 
circumstances and the severity of the case. A copy of 
240.326 F.S. will be provided to each student 
organization recognized by the College. Each student 
organization will incorporate the wording of this 
College rule on hazing into its by laws. Consent is not 
a defense for hazing. 

13. Unlawful Entry: The unlawful entry to College-owned 
or controlled buildings. 

14. Smoking: Smoking is permitted in designated areas 
only. 

15. Games: Student games such as frisbee, touch football, 
etc. must be played in designated areas only and not 
around the buildings or inside the buildings. 

16. Commercial Solicitation and Fund-Raising on 
Campus: 

a. Solicitors and tradesmen, including students, 
faculty and other College personnel, are prohibited 
from entering the grounds or buildings of Edison 



65 




Community College for the purpose of transacting 
business with students, faculty, or other College 
personnel, unless they have been issued a permit 
for this purpose. All groups who want to reserve 
space or sell anything must complete an 
ACTIVITY RESERVATION FORM. Submit this 
to the appropriate Student Services staff member 
on the Lee Campus, or the Provosts' offices on the 
Collier and Charlotte Campuses, 
b. The posting or distribution of advertising material 
shall be limited to a permanent official bulletin 
board on each campus of the College under the 
same permit system and be approved by a member 
of the Student Services staff or a representative. 
1 7 . Outside Organizations on Campus: From State Board 
of Education Rules for Community Colleges 6A-14.57, 
Student Activities, Clubs and Organizations: "(2) 
Student organizations and clubs not funded from student 
activity fees or College funds." The College may permit 
organizations and clubs which are funded by a 
combination of contributions of its members, fund- 
raising projects and sources outside the College to exist 
on campus, provided the organization has a faculty 
advisor and agrees to be governed by rules of the Board 
of Trustees. The College may require approved 
organizations and clubs to deposit monies accruing to 
such organizations and clubs with the Business Office 
of the College, to be accounted for as agency funds. In 
this case, all monies accruing to the organization shall 
be deposited with the College and withdrawals made 
upon requisition by the organization and advisor; 
provided that the expenditure is in accordance with the 
organization's approved budget. Outside organizations 



must follow procedures in #16 above and get approval 
prior to being on campus. 

18. Disruption/Disorderly Conduct: Obstructing or 
disrupting any College activity, including teaching, 
research, administrative functions, disciplinary 
procedures, social activities, and public service 
functions. Engaging in any obscene, profane, reckless, 
destructive, or unlawful course of conduct. Students 
are responsible that personal phones, beepers, or 
children do not disrupt the educational and social 
environment of the College. 

19. Harassment: Unwelcome verbal or physical abuse 
which causes the recipient discomfort or humiliation 
or which interferes with the recipient's academic 
performance. Harassment related to an individual's race, 
color, sex, religion, national origin, age, marital status, 
or physical or mental handicap is a violation of this 
policy. 

Assault: Intentional threat by word or act to do violence 
to the person of another. 

Battery: Touching or striking another person against 
his/her will. 

22. Violation of Published Policy of the College: Any 
violation of policy published in the College Catalog, 
handbook or organization's guidelines. 

23. Lakes, Waterways, Fishing: No swimming, fishing, 
or recreational activities are allowed on campus without 
the written permission of the District Vice President 
for Student Services. • 

24. Pets/Animals: No pets or animals are allowed on 
campus unless that animal is assisting a person who 
has a disability. 



20 



21 



66 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE AND HEARING 

PROCEDURES 



Students at Edison Community College agree, at the 
time of enrollment, to abide by the laws of this state and 
this nation, as well as the rules of this particular institution. 
Any student who violates these laws or rules is subject to 
action by the College. A violation may result in varying 
degrees of disciplinary sanctions ranging from a warning 
or probation to expulsion from the College. Sanctions may 
include: written reprimand, loss of certain campus privileges 
(including participation in intercollegiate activities, student 
organizations, student government); credits may be withheld 
if student is delinquent in payment or if the credits were not 
honestly earned by the student; compulsory class attendance; 
monetary fines; penalty work hours; and notification of 
parents if the student is under 18 years of age. More 
information on student discipline is available by calling the 
Student Services Office. 

Rules and regulations that are necessary for the proper 
control and discipline of students shall be developed by the 
District Vice President for Student Services or designee and 
published in the College Catalog after approval by the Board 
of Trustees. In the administration of discipline that student 
shall be accorded the following rights: 

a. The right to a hearing which will normally be closed 
unless the District Vice President for Student Services 
or designee and the student agree to an open hearing. 

b. The right to specific written charges sufficiently in 
advance to the hearing. 

c. The right to present witnesses and evidence at the 
hearing. 

d. The right to cross-examine witnesses and evidence. 

e. No student shall be required to testify against himself/ 
herself. 

f. No disciplinary action shall be taken unless the 
preponderance of the evidence exists. Formal rules of 
evidence do not apply. 

g. Should a student fail to appear at the hearing, the case 
shall still be heard. 

h. The right to a summary record of the preliminary 

hearing/hearing, 
i. If the student wishes to appeal the decision or sanction, 
a letter of appeal should be delivered to the District 
Vice President for Student Services within three school 
days of notification of the decision. The District Vice 
President for Student Services or designee will conduct 
the appeal hearing. 

A student, faculty or staff member may document in 
an INCIDENT REPORT what they deem to be a violation 
of College policy. This INCIDENT REPORT should be 
submitted to the District Vice President for Student Services 



on the Lee Campus. The District Vice President for Student 
Services will conduct a preliminary investigation to 
determine if there is enough evidence to charge the student 
with violating the Student Code of Conduct and 
Responsibility. If there is sufficient evidence warranting 
charging the student with violating the Student Code of 
Conduct, the District Vice President for Student Services 
shall meet with the student and give him/her written notice 
of the charge(s). Within three school days of the receipt of 
the written charges, the student shall meet with the District 
Vice President for Student Services and plead guilty or not 
guilty. If the student pleads guilty, the District Vice President 
for Student Services will impose an appropriate sanction. 
In the case of a not guilty plea a hearing will be scheduled 
with members of the Disciplinary Committee. If the 
Committee finds the student in violation, a sanction will be 
given. 

Traffic Ticket Appeals 

If a student chooses to appeal a ticket for violating the 
campus traffic regulations, he or she should contact the 
Public Safety office on campus. If the student wants to appeal 
the decision of the Public Safety office, he or she may choose 
to have a hearing in front of the Student Government 
Association Chief Jusfices for a final decision. The Student 
Traffic Court may uphold the ticket violation, modify the 
charge or overturn the charge. 

Drug-Free Campus 

Local, state and federal law prohibit the possession, 
use and distribution of illicit drugs (including cocaine, 
heroin. LSD, marijuana, stimulants and depressants.) The 
use, possession or distribution of any narcotic or illicit drug, 
except as expressly permitted by law, on College property 
or at College-approved functions, is strictly prohibited. 
Violation of the College's or state or federal guidelines 
regarding drugs and alcohol may result in sanctions imposed 
by the College and/or the state. There are health risks and 
side effects associated with drug use. For more information 
contact the Human Resources Office. 

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

As Edison Community College is a member of the 
public education system of Florida, out-of-state students are 
required to have a valid Florida driver's license when 



67 



operating a motor vehicle on the streets and highways of 
Florida ifthey are employed in Florida. Out-of-state students 
should acquire Florida license plates for their vehicles if 
the vehicles are titled in the parents' name, and if they or 
their parents are employed in Florida, and/or if they claim 
in-state tuition rates. 

1. The campus map and parking lot signs indicate where 
students may park. Students are prohibited from parking 
in designated staff lots. 

2. Designated disabled parking spaces are reserved for 
persons who are permanently disabled. To use these 
spaces, students must have a special handicap permit 
issued by the local county license tag office and Public 
Safety. 

3. Parking is prohibited after 11:00 pm, unless Public 
Safety Department has received prior notification. 

4. Any theft or accident on campus involving your car 
must be reported immediately to Public Safety. 

5 . Designated parking spaces for motorcycles and mopeds 
are provided. Please park in these spaces and not on 
the grass, sidewalks or near campus buildings. 

6. Unauthorized parking in RESERVED or 
RESTRICTED spaces is prohibited. 

7. The absence of NO PARKING signs does not mean 
that parking is allowed. Parking on the grass, along 
roadways, drives, curbs, sidewalks or ramps is 
prohibited. Parking is permitted only in paved lots or 
in designated parking areas. 

8. Vehicles must be parked within marked spaces. Parking 
diagonally or taking up two parking spaces is not 
allowed. 

9. The speed limit on campus is 30 m.p.h unless otherwise 
posted. Speed limit in all parking lots or service drives 
is 5 m.p.h. 



10. Campus Traffic and Parking Regulations and directive 
signs governing the use of motor vehicles are in effect 
24 hours a day, all year long, unless specifically limited. 
Inclement weather does not bar their enforcement. 

1 1 . Moving violations, i.e., speeding, reckless driving, etc. 
may be referred to an appropriate law enforcement 
agency. 

12. The Public Safety Officer is on duty to assist students 
whenever possible, but he/she is also required to enforce 
all traffic and parking regulations and issue citations 
for violations in accordance with these regulations. 

13. Students who receive traffic or parking citations must 
pay the appropriate fine to the Edison Cashier within 
14 working days. Students wishing to contest the fine, 
they must submit a written appeal within 14 working 
days to the Student Court. 

14. Any student who does not pay a traffic or parking fine 
will not receive transcripts and will not be permitted to 
register for classes until the fine is paid. 

1 5 . The following traffic or parking fines are in effect: Each 
Non-Moving Violation other than parking in disabled 
spaces: $10.00. This category includes parking 
violations, parking on the grass, parking in a reserved 
space or lot, parking improperly, parking in a No 
Parking area, blocking an entrance or ramp. 

• Parking in a disabled space: $25.00. 

• Speeding: $10.00. 

• Abuse of a Public Safety Officer may result in a 
fine of $10.00. 

Fines collected will be used to augment Edison's student 
loan funds. 



68 



LAWS AFFECTING STUDENTS 

(See also Student Code of Conduct and Responsibility) 



Below is a summary of several state and federal laws 
which affect students in Florida educational institutions. For 
your benefit, and that of the College, your adherence to these 
laws is expected. If you have any questions about how they 
affect you or the College, please check with the District 
Vice President for Student Services. 

UNITED STATES PUBLIC LAW 92-318; Section 

497(a): 

This law provides that students or employees at an 
institution of higher learning, who after notice and a hearing, 
are found guilty of substantial disruption will not be eligible 
for financial assistance provided by the federal government. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 282.01(17)(a): 

ADVOCATES OF OVERTHROW OF GOVERNMENT 

This section provides that no state funds can be used as 
salaries or otherwise, to work to the benefit of any employee 
or student who advocates the overthrow of the government 
of the United States, the State of Florida, or a state university 
administration by force and violence, or who willfully 
practices or advocates with clear intent the disruption or 
interference with the lawful administration or functions of 
any state university or college. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 282.01(17)(b): 

PERSONS CONVICTED OF TRESPASS ON SCHOOL 
PROPERTY. 

This section provides that no state funds may be used 
to provide a loan, guarantee of a loan, or grant to any 
applicant who thereafter has been convicted in any court of 
record of any crime which involves the use of, or the 
assistance to others in the use of force, trespass, or the seizure 
of property officials or students at such institution from 
engaging in their duties or pursuing their studies. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 877.13: 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. UNLAWFUL 
INTERRUPTION OR INTERFERENCE PROHIBITED. 

This section makes it unlawful for any person 
intentionally to act or disrupt or interfere with the lawful 
administration of functions of any educational institution 
in this state. Any person who violates the provisions of this 



section is guilty of a misdemeanor in the second degree, 
punishable by imprisonment in the County jail up to sixty 
(60) days, or fined up to $500, or both. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 239.581: 

PARTICIPATION BY STUDENTS OR EMPLOYEES IN 
DISRUPTIVE ACTIVITIES AT STATE INSTITUTIONS 
OF HIGHER LEARNING. 

This section provides that any person who shall accept 
the privilege extended by the laws of this state of attendance 
or employment at any state college or state university shall, 
by so attending or working at such institutions, be deemed 
to have given their consent to the policies of that institution, 
the Board of Regents of the Division of Universities of the 
Department of Education, and the laws of this state. Such 
policies shall include prohibition against disruptive activities 
at state institutions of higher learning. This section also 
provides that after it has been determined that a student or 
employee of a state institution of higher learning has 
participated in disrupfive activities, the following penalties 
may be imposed against such person: (a) Immediate 
termination of contract of such employee of the state 
institution of higher learning, and thereafter such person 
shall not be employed by any state public school or state 
college, state junior college or state university, (b) Immediate 
expulsion of such student from the institution of higher 
learning for a minimum of two years. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 239.582: 

EXPULSION AND DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS IN THE 
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM AND COMMUNITY 
COLLEGES. 

( 1 ) Each student in the State University System and 
each student in a community college is subject to 
federal and state law, respective county and 
municipal ordinances, and all rules and regulations 
of the Board of Regents or board of trustees of the 
community college. 

(2) Violation of these published laws, ordinances, or 
rules and regulations may subject the violator to 
appropriate action by the university or community 
college authorities. 

(3) Each president in the State University System and 
each president of a community college shall have 
authority, after notice to the student of the charges 



69 



and after a hearing thereon, to expel, suspend, or 
otherwise discipline any student who is found to 
have violated a rule or regulation of the Board of 
Regents or of the board of trustees of the 
community college or to have violated any law or 
ordinance. 

FLORIDA STATUTES, Section 228.21: 

TRESPASS UPON GROUNDS OR FACILITIES OF 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS: PENALTIES. 

In any case in which a person who is not a student, 
officer or employee of a junior college, state university, or 
public school and who is not required by his employment 
by the institution involved to be on the campus or any other 
facility owned, operated, or controlled by the governing 
board of any such junior college, state university or public 
school enters the campus of such junior college or state 
university and is committing any act tending to interfere 
with the normal, orderly, peaceful or efficient conduct of 
the activities of such campus or facility, the chief 
administrative officer or employee designated by him to 
maintain order on such campus or facility may direct such 
person to leave such campus or facility. If such person fails 
to do so, such person shall be guilty of trespass upon state 
lands as prohibited by Sec. 821.19 and shall be punished 
accordingly. 

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act 
Amendments of 1989, Public Law 101-226, requires that, 
as a condition of receiving Federal financial assistance, an 
institution of higher education must certify that it has adopted 
and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful 
possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol 
by students and employees. 

FLORIDA STATUTES Section 240.3191; 240.3192: 

POLICY REGARDING STUDENTS WITH HUMAN 
IMMUNE DEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV). 

The following guidelines are established regarding 
students with Human Immune deficiency Virus (HIV): 
1. DEFINITION: Forthepurposesof this policy, a student 

with HIV falls into one of the following categories: 

a. An individual who tests positive for HIV antibody 
but who has no symptom manifestations; or 

b. An individual who is diagnosed as having AIDS 
Related Complex (ARC) - debilitating symptoms 
but no opportunistic infections; or 

c. An individual who is diagnosed as having Acquired 
Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) - displaying 
one or more opportunistic infections. 



2. STUDENT RIGHTS: The College recognizes that the 
rights of students with HIV to obtain education and 
employment must be balanced against the rights of 
persons without HIV who wish to be reasonably 
protected from contracting the virus. 

a. Both the Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 
1973 and the Florida Educational Equity Act 
prohibit discrimination against persons with 
disabilities, and students with HIV are classified 
as disabled. 

b. Under most circumstances, students with HIV will 
be afforded the same opportunities and benefits 
afforded to non-disabled students, including, but 
not limited to access to educational programs, 
counseling, student employment opportunities, and 
financial assistance. 

c. Precautions will be provided to students in Allied 
Health Programs and science laboratory classes. 

d. Any student who reveals that he/she has HIV will 
be afforded confidentiality in accordance with 
appropriate statutes and state law. 

3. ADMISSIONS: No student will be denied admission 
to the College solely on the basis that he/she has HIV. 

a. The College will not require a student to reveal 
whether or not he/she has HIV when applying for 
admission to the College, although the student may 
choose to reveal such data as part of the voluntary 
health information shared with the College. 

b. Furthermore, the College will not require 
serological testing to determine if a student seeking 
admission has HIV. 

4. ATTENDANCE, WITHDRAWAL, AND/OR 
SUSPENSIONS: Under most circumstances, no student 
will be required to cease class attendance solely on the 
basis of having HIV. 

a. If a student with HIV requests special 
accommodations due to illness (i.e.. disability), the 
College will acquire sufficient information about 
such disability to make a determination regarding 
the requested accommodations. 

b. The College will not impose any rule(s) or 
restriction(s) upon a student with HIV that will have 
the effect of limiting that individual's participation 
in the College's educational programs and/or 
services solely on the basis of that person's 
disability. 

c. Current research has indicated the possibility that 
the central nervous system may become affected 
by HIV, which may lead to progressive 
neurological and cognitive dysfunction and 
subsequent inability of the student to maintain 



70 



scholastic performance. Decisions as to such a 

student continuing to attend class or being 

suspended or withdrawn from class(es) will be 

made on a case-by-case basis after reasonable 

accommodations have been examined or tried, and 

after an examination of the facts demonstrates to 

the College that the student can no longer function 

as necessary to meet the requirements of the 

student's course or program, or that the student 

presents a health or safety risk to self or to the 

college community. 

5. HIV LIAISON: A person may be appointed by the 

Provost on each campus to serve as a consultant to 

members of the College community regarding the 

policy of the College in this area. 

a. The appointed liaison will work directly with the 
District Vice President for Student Services in all 
matters regarding students with HIV, including 
hearings and development of policy. 

b. The appointed liaison will provide information and 
education regarding HIV. This information will 
include: mode of transmission; signs and 
symptoms; precautions; appropriate attitude and 
behavior change; and means used to control the 
spread of HIV. Education programs and Health 
Fairs will be the primary vehicle of information 
disseminations. 

c. Any student wishing to request special 
accommodations should contact the District Vice 
President for Student Services. 

FLORIDA STATUTE, 240.319; 240.325 STATE BOARD 
OF EDUCATION RULE 6A-14.0247: 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT. 

Edison Community College adheres to the policy that 
sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination declared 
illegal under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 
Florida's Human Rights Act of 1977 for employees, under 
Title IX of the Education Act of 1972 and the Florida 
Educational Equity Act. Sexual harassment can be verbal, 
visual, or physical. It can be overt or consist of persistent, 
unwanted attempts to change a professional relationship to 
a personal one. 

Sexual harassment can range from inappropriate 
putdowns of individual persons, unwelcome sexual 



flirtations, or more serious abuses. It is coercive and 
threatening, and it creates an atmosphere that is not 
conducive to teaching, learning, or working. 

1. Harassment, intimidation of staff or students, or 
allowing suggestions to be made that sexual favors may 
have an effect on status will not be tolerated by Edison 
Community College. If an employee or student becomes 
aware of any discriminatory behavior or any activity 
which might be considered harassment, it becomes the 
responsibility of that person to report such conduct. 

a. Staff members should notify their immediate 
supervisor and/or the Provost. 

b. Students should notify the District Vice President 
for Student Services. 

2. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, 
and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature 
constitutes sexual harassment when: 

a. Submission to such conduct is made either 
explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an 
individual's employment or education; 

b. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an 
individual is used as the basis for the employment 
or academic decisions affecting such individual; 
or 

c. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of 
unreasonably interfering with an individual's work 
performance or academic or professional 
performance or creating an intimidating hostile, or 
offensive working or educational environment. 

3. Appropriate disciplinary action will be taken against 
any employee who violates this Policy against sexual 
harassment. Based on the seriousness of the offense, 
disciplinary action may include verbal or written 
reprimand, suspension, or termination 

4. Certain actions determined by the District President may 
require action on the part of the board of trustees, 
depending upon the nature of the offense(s) and/or the 
severity of the action to be taken. In such cases, the 
District President will recommend appropriate action 
to the Board at the next regular Board Meeting 
following his communication to the parties. 

5. Retaliatory action against anyone filing a complaint of 
any type of discrimination, including sexual harassment, 
will not be tolerated. The designee of the District 
President, while attempting to investigate and mediate 
any .sexual harassment claim, may establish safeguards 
against retaliation as deemed necessary. 



71 



FLORIDA STATUTE, Sections 229.053(1); 240.325; 
893.03 STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION RULE 
6A 14.0247; 6A-14.0262: 
DRUG-FREE CAMPUS WORKPLACE 

1 . Standard of Conduct 

It is the policy of Edison Community College to 
promote and maintain a drug-free workplace. The unlawful 
manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use 
of controlled substances is prohibited on and off College 
premises. The possession or use of alcohol under the 
circumstances described herein is also prohibited. All 
students and employees are required to abide by the terms 
of this policy as a condition of initial and continued 
enrollment and/or employment. 

2. The Policy 

This policy is based on the Drug Free Workplace Act, 
41 U.S.C. 70-1 et..seq., as amended and is supplemented by 
College administrative policies and procedures. 

The illegal use, possession, manufacture, dispensation 
and distribution of any controlled substance, at any time, 
whether on or off duty or on or off College premises is strictly 
prohibited as a matter of College policy. 

Except as hereinafter provided, use or possession by 
an employee or student of alcohol in the workplace, or use 
of alcohol on College property is prohibited. The possession 
or consumption of alcohol by employees or students of legal 
age at a College sponsored or approved function where 
alcoholic beverages are served by the College or sponsor is 
not a violation of this Section. 

Any employee or student who reports to work or class 
or performs his/her duties while under the influence of drugs 
or alcohol will be in violation of this policy. 

Violation of this policy can result in referral to 
appropriate law enforcement authorities, disciplinary action 
up to and including immediate suspension, expulsion or 
termination, and/or a requirement of satisfactory 
participation in a College-approved drug or alcohol 
rehabilitation program. A criminal conviction is not required 
for sanctions to be imposed upon a student or employee for 
violation of this policy. 



sanctions may include, but are not limited to: 1 ) referral for 
prosecution; 2) probation, suspension, or expulsion of 
students; or 3) suspension or termination of employees. 

4. Description of Health Risks 

Alcohol. Alcohol consumption causes a number of 
changes in behavior and physiology. Even low doses 
significantly impair judgment, coordination, and abstract 
mental functioning. Statistics show that alcohol use is 
involved in a majority of violent behaviors on college 
campuses, including acquaintance rape, vandalism, fights, 
and incidents of drinking and driving. Continued abu.se may 
lead to dependency, which often causes permanent damage 
to vital organs and deterioration of a healthy lifestyle. 

Cannlbis (Marijuana, Hashish). The use of marijuana 
may impair or reduce short-term memory and 
comprehension, alter sense of time, and reduce coordination 
and energy level. Users often have a lowered immune system 
and an increased risk of lung cancer. The active ingredient 
in marijuana, THC, is stored in the fatty tissues of the brain 
and reproductive system for a minimum of 28 to 30 days. 

Hallucinogens. Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline, and 
psilocybin cause illusions and hallucinations. The user may 
experience panic, confusion, suspicion, anxiety, and loss of 
control. Delayed effects, or flashbacks, can occur even when 
use has ceased. Phencyclidine (PCP) affects the section of 
the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in 
check. Because the drug blocks pain receptors, violent PCP 
episodes may result in self-inflicted injuries. 

Cocaine/Crack. Cocaine users often have a stuffy, 
runny nose and may have a perforated nasal septum. The 
immediate effects of cocaine use include dilated pupils and 
elevated blood pressure heart rate, respiratory rate, and body 
temperature, followed by depression. Crack, or freebase rock 
cocaine, is extremely addictive and can cause delirium, 
hallucinations, blurred vision, severe chest pain, muscle 
spasms, convulsions, and even death. 

Amphetamines. Amphetamines can cause a rapid or 
irregular heartbeat, tremors, loss or coordination, collapse, 
and death. Heavy users are prone to irrational acts. 

Heroin. Heroin is an opiate drug that causes the body 
to have diminished pain reactions. The use of heroin can 
result in coma or death due to a reduction in the heart rate. 



3. Disciplinary Sanctions 



Legal Sanctions 



The College will impose sanctions (consistent with 
local, state, and Federal law) upon all employees and 
students who violate these standards of conduct. Such 



You should be aware that State of Florida statutes 
provide that it is "unlawful for any person to sell, purchase, 
manufacture, or deliver, or to possess with the intent to sell. 



72 



purchase, manufacture, or deliver, a controlled substance 
in, on, or within 200 feet of the real property comprising a 
public college or other postsecondary educational 
institution." Any person who violates this paragraph with 
respect to a controlled substance named or described in 
s.893.03(l)(a), (l)(b), (l)(d), (2)(a), or (2)(b) commits a 
felony of the first degree punishable as provided in 
s.775.082, s.775.083., or s.775.084 and shall not be eligible 
for parole or release under the Control Release Authority or 
statutory gain time. 

State law prohibits the possession of alcoholic beverages 
by persons under age 21, punishable for the first offense by 
a definite term of imprisonment not exceeding 60 days and/ 
or a $500 fine, and for a subsequent offense by a definite 
term of imprisonment not exceeding one year and a fine of 
$1,000. It is similarly prohibited and punishable to distribute 
alcohol to minors. 

State law makes it a crime for any person to possess or 
distribute illicit drugs (controlled substances as described 
in Secfion 893.03, Florida Statutes) under Section 893.13, 
Florida Statutes. Law provides certain limited exceptions. 
The crimes range from second degree misdemeanors (up to 
60 days imprisonment and up to a $500 fme) to first degree 
felonies (up to 30 years imprisonment and up to $10,000 
fine). 

Trafficking (distributing specified large quantities of 
various controlled substances under Section 893.03, Florida 
Status) under Section 893. 1 35, Florida Statute is punishable, 
depending on the particular illicit drug and quantity involved, 
by a minimum term of imprisonment of 3 to 25 calendar 
years and a fine of $25,000 to $500,000. 

Federal trafficking penalties for first offenses, 
depending upon the illicit drug involved, range from not 
more than one year imprisonment and a fine of not more 
than $100,000 for an individual to 40 years to life 
imprisonment and a fine of not more than $200,000 for an 
individual to not less than life imprisonment and a fine of 
not more than 8 million dollars for an individual. 

The College requires that any employee who is 
convicted of any offense relating to the sale, purchase, 
deliver, use, manufacturing or distribution of illegal drugs 
or controlled substances on campus, or while attending a 
College-sponsored event or conducting College business to 
report such conviction to the Human Resources Office, 489- 
9294, no later than five days after the conviction. 

6. Drug Education & Treatment Programs 

Edison Community College recognizes illegal drug use 
and/or dependency to be a health, safety and security 



problem. Those who need assistance with problems related 
to drug abuse are encouraged to use any available resources 
including: 

ADDICTION RECOVERY CENTER 

3949 Evans Avenue, Suite 203 
Fort Myers FL 33901 
941/936-3803 

CHARTER GLADE HOSPITAL 

3550 Colonial Boulevard 
Fort Myers FL 33906 
941/939-0403 or 1/800-274-1230 

RIVERSIDE BEHAVIORAL CENTER 
CHARLOTTE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTR 

733 East Olympia Avenue 
PuntaGordaFL 33950 
941/637-2474 or 1/800-722-5563 

RUTH COOPER CENTER FOR 
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE 

2789 Ortiz Avenue, SE 
Fort Myers FL 33905 
941/275-3222, Extension 202 

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ADDICTION SERVICES 

2101 McGregor Blvd 
Fort Myers FL 33901 
941/332-6937 

THE WILLOUGH AT NAPLES 

9001 Tamiami Trail East 
Naples FL 34113 
1/800-282-3508 

For further information regarding education, 
rehabilitation and other aspects of the College policy, 
contact: 

LEE COUNTY CAMPUS, Fort Myers 

Office of Human Resources 
941/489-9293 

Counseling, Advising and Assessment Center, 

Sabal Hall, first floor 

941/489-9230 



73 



CHARLOTTE COUNTY CAMPUS, Punta Gorda 

Campus Director. Student Services 

941/637-567X 

C0LLIP:R county campus, Naples 

Campus Director. Student Services 
941/732-3710 

HENDRY/GLADES SERVICES, LaBelle 

Director's Office 
863/674-0408 

FLORIDA STATUTE 784.01 1, 784.021, 784.03, 784.048: 

CAMPUS VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY 

Edison Community College is committed to preserving 
the safety and security of students, staff, faculty, and visitors 
to the College. Breach of the peace and other violations, 
including threats, intimidation, violence, assault, batteries, 
sexual batteries, or other disruptive behavior will not be 
tolerated. Such behavior can include oral or written 
statements, gestures, or expressions that may communicate 
a direct or indirect threat of physical harm. Edison 
Community College will not tolerate threats, direct or 
implied: physical conduct that results in harm to people or 
property: possession of deadly weapons on College property: 
or intimidating conduct or harassment that disrupts the 
teaching/learning and/or work environment or results in fear 
for personal safety. Threats, threatening behavior, or other 
acts of violence carried out off College-owned or leased 
property but directed at College employees, students, or 
visitors while conducting official College business are a 
violation of this policy. Off-site threats include but are not 
limited to threats made via telephone, fax, electronic or 
conventional mail, or any other communication medium. 

Any student found in violation of this policy will be 
subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. 
Any employee found in violation of this policy will be 
subject to disciplinary action up to and including 
termination. Individuals who commit such acts may be 
immediately removed from the premises. The College, 
through its Public Safety office, will refer violations to local 
and state law enforcement agencies for criminal prosecution 
and further action as determined by those agencies. 

To promote an atmosphere that encourages learning and 
productive employment, quick responsive action will be 
taken if violence or the threat of violence arises. 



1. ASSISTANCE 

Generally, the office of Public Safety should be the first 
department contacted after an incident occurs at a 
campus or College site. Upon preliminary investigation, 
the appropriate local law enforcement agency may be 
notified and the incident may be referred to the agency. 
The Public Safety office will notify the appropriate 
campus administrator, provost, or designee. 

2. CONFIDENTIALITY 

Pursuant to Section 794.03, Florida Statutes, it is 
unlawful to print, publish or broadcast in any instrument 
of mass communication, the name, address or other 
identifying fact or information of the victim of any 
sexual offense. 

3. INFORMATION AND RESOURCES 

The College will develop, make available and distribute 
information regarding safety. Security, and/or sexual 
assault through the use of handouts, programs and 
seminars designed to promote awareness and prevention 
among the College's students, employees and the public. 

4. REPORTING 

Any violent, threatening, harassing, intimidating, or 
other disruptive behavior or other violations or 
potentially hazardous situations witnessed or received 
should be reported immediately to Public Safety and/ 
or to a supervisor or manager. NOTE: Threats or 
assaults that require immediate attention by police 
should be reported first to the police at 9 11 . 
Victim support and assistance is available through 
various support services, both on campus and off 
campus. Counseling and medical care should be 
pursued as soon as possible 6HX6:2.07. The Director 
of Human Resources and the Vice President of Student 
Services are designated to serve as victim advocates. 

Security Policies and Statistics 

Campus safety and security measures must be 
communicated and understood by all students and 
employees of Edison Community College. Therefore, it is 
the policy of the Public Safety Department to encourage 
that all criminal acts, safety hazards and unusual occurrences 
be reported. 

The proper reporting procedure for all students and 
employees is to contact the Edison/Public Safety 
Department. 

In the event of an emergency, danger, injury or criminal 
occurrence, the victim/witness(es) is advised to also call 
the local police, fire or emergency service within the campus 
jurisdiction. These services can also be requested by dialing 
the following numbers: 



74 



Off campus On campus TTY # 

phone # phone # 
Charlotte Campus 

Public Safety (941)637-5655 5655 941-637-5655 

Local Emergency 9-9 1 1 

Collier Campus 

Public Safety (941)732-3712 3712 941-732-3788 

Local Emergency 9-91 1 

Lee Campus 

Public Safety (941)489-9203 1203 941-489-9010 

Local Emergency 9-91 1 

In all cases of criminal activity, loss of property, assault, 
threat, injury or any other crime, the Public Safety 
Department must be contacted as soon as possible. The 
prompt reporting of these events will facihtate investigation 
which will allow for recording the occurrence for further 
study and preventive action. 
Crime Statistics for Edison Community College - 1999 

Lee Collier Charlotte 
Burglary/Breaking & 

Entering 

Larceny /Theft Offenses 8 2 

Motor Vehicle Theft 

American Disabilities Act (ADA) 

Policy 

It is the policy of Edison Community College that 
discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities 
is prohibited. Pursuant to Titles I and II of the Americans 
with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the College provides equal 
employment and educational opportunities and reasonable 
accommodation for qualified individuals with disabilities. 

Policy Guidelines 

The College reaffirms the principle of Equal Access/ 
Equal Opportunity regardless of race, creed, color, national 
origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, and disability. The 
equal opportunity principle applies to otherwise qualified 
persons with disabilities with regard to employment, the 
delivery of educafional programs and services and all other 
appropriate areas in which the College is involved. 

The College assumes the Department of Labor's 
definition of an individual with a disability is "one who ( 1 ) 
has a physical or mental impairment which substantially 
limits one or more of such person's major life activities; (2) 
has a record of such impairment; or (3) is regarded as having 
such an impairment." 



Edison Community College understands that it must 
provide reasonable accommodation to the known physical 
or mental limitations of a qualified applicant, employee, and/ 
or student with a disability, unless such accommodation 
would impose an undue hardship on the College. 

The College has designated the Director of Human 
Resources as the ADA Coordinator for applicants, 
employees and students. The Coordinator will oversee and 
coordinate the College's efforts to comply with and carry 
out its responsibilities pertaining to the Act and serve as the 
contact person for all ADA information, resource policies, 
procedures and concerns. 

Procedure 

A. Request for Accommodation 

It is the obligation of the individual with a disability to 
request a reasonable accommodation. Enrolled students must 
submit any request for accommodations to the Program 
Office for Students with Disabilities on the appropriate 
campus for consideration. Applicants and/or employees must 
submit any request for accommodations to the Office of 
Human Resources or the Campus Provost. Individuals with 
a disability must provide recent documentation from a 
qualified professional that speaks to the specific disability 
and the requested accommodation. Requests for 
accommodations must be specific to the documented needs. 
The appropriate party will provide a written response. 

B. Complaint Resolution 

1. Informal Resolution 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged first to 
attempt to independently resolve concerns by inifiating a 
meeting with the faculty member, supervisor, or staff 
member with whom there is a concern or disagreement. 
However, when the matter cannot be resolved independently, 
individuals with a disability are encouraged to address such 
instances through the following grievance procedure. 

2, Grievance Procedure 

Edison Community College has adopted an internal 
grievance procedure for prompt and equitable resolution of 
complaints alleging any actions prohibited by the U.S. 
Department of Justice regulations implementing Title 11 
(public, state and local government) of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act. Title II states, in part, that "no otherwise 
qualified disabled individual shall, solely by reason of such 
disability, be excluded from participation in. be denied the 
benefits of. or be subjected to discrimination" in programs 
or activities spon.sored by a public entity. 



75 



All applicant/employee ADA complaints, excluding 
those filed against the ADA Coordinator, should be 
addressed to Jacqueline H. Parrill, ADA Coordinator/ 
Director of Human Resources, 8099 College Parkway, S.W., 
P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers, Florida 33906 or by calling 
(94 1 ) 489-9294 or call through the Florida Relay Service at 
1-800-955-8771 (TTY). 

All student ADA complaints should be addressed to 
Dr. Michelle Releford, District Vice President for Student 
Services. 8099 College Parkway, S.W., P.O. Box 60210, Fort 
Myers, Florida 33906 or by calling (941 ) 489-9027 or call 
through the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY). 

All ADA complaints filed against the ADA Coordinator 
should be addressed to Mr. Robert R. Jones, District Vice 
President, Administration and Finance, 8099 College 
Parkway, S.W., P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers, Florida 33906 
or by calling (941) 489-9216 or call through the Florida 
Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY). 

1 . All complaints should be filed in wrifing, contain 
the name and address of the person(s) filing it and 
briefly describe the alleged violation of the 
regulations. In addition, a copy of the original 
request for accommodation must be included with 
the complaint. 

2. A complaint should be filed within 180 calendar 
days after the complainant becomes aware of the 
alleged violation. 

3. An investigation, as may be appropriate, shall 
follow the filing of the complaint. The investigation 
shall be conducted by the ADA Coordinator, the 



6. 



7. 



District Vice President for Student Services, or the 
District Vice President for Administration and 
Finance, depending upon the nature of the 
grievance. A thorough investigation will be held 
affording the individual or specific class of 
individuals and their representatives, if any, an 
opportunity to submit evidence relevant to a 
complaint. 

A written determination as to the validity of the 
complaint and a description of the resolution, if 
any, shall be issued by either the ADA Coordinator, 
the District Vice President for Student Services or 
the District Vice President for Administration and 
Finance, and a copy will be forwarded to the 
complainant no later than fifteen (15) working days 
after its filing. 

Either party may appeal the findings of the 
investigation to the Lee Campus President (or the 
Lee Campus President's designee) by filing a 
written request for a review of a complaint alleging 
discriminafion on the basis of disability or failure 
to provide reasonable accommodation within ten 
(10) calendar days of receipt of the findings. 
The ADA Coordinator shall maintain the files and 
record complaints filed. 

Filing a complaint with the College's grievances 
system in no way precludes an individual's right 
to file a grievance with the Department of 
Education or the Department of Justice. 



76 



PROGRAMS 

OF 

STUDY 



77 




78 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



The two types of programs offered by Edison Community College are degree programs and certificate programs. The 
degree programs are the Associate in Arts, which is oriented toward continuing in higher education, and the Associate in 
Science degree, which is job-oriented. The degree programs normally take two years to complete. The certificate programs 
are usually one year in length and teach students the skills necessary for employment in specialized areas. The objective of 
the degree programs is to provide students with as much general education as possible, while that of the certificate programs 
is to limit courses to an area of specialization. 



For Transfer to a College or University 

Associate in Arts Degree 

The Associate in Arts degree in Florida consists of 60 credit hours in two main parts: the "general education" core, and Bachelor's 
degree program prerequisites. The 36-hour credit general education core is det'med by Florida Statute 240.325 and consists of the 
following five areas of concentration: communication, mathematics, social science, humanities, and natural sciences. The remaining 
24 credit hours constitute program prerequisites, which should be chosen by the student based on the program of the State University 
to which the student will transfer and the subject in which the student intends to major 

The AA degree is designed to support over 500 baccalaureate majors available within the Florida State University System. 



Career Programs 


Associate in 


Science Degree 


Accounting Technology 


Public Service Specialization 


Business Administration and Management 


University Specialization 


Banking and Finance Specialization 


Dental Hygiene 


Customer Service Technology Specialization 


Drafting and Design Technology 


Hospitality/Tourism Management Specialization 


CAD Specialization 


International Business Specialization 


Civil Engineering/Land Surveying Specialization 


Marketing and Management Specialization 


Emergency Medical Services Technology 


Small Business/Entrepreneurship Specialization 


Fire Science Technology 


Cardiovascular Technology 


Golf Course Operations 


Citrus Production Technology 


Networking Services Technology 


Computer Programming and Applications 


Nursing R.N. 


Applications Specialization 


Nursing Advanced Placement Option 


Programming Specialization 


Paralegal Studies 


Crime Scene Technology 


*Physical Therapist Assistant Program 


Criminal Justice Technology 


Radiologic Technology 


Corrections Academy Bridge Specialization 


Respiratory Care Technology 


Crime Scene Specialization 




Law Enforcement Academy Bridge Specialization 


*Degree awarded by Broward Community College 



Certificate Programs 



Accounting Applications 

Computer Programming and Applications (Business 

Data Processing) 
Crime Scene Technology 
Dental Assisting 
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic (EMT-B) 



Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic (EMT-P) 

* Medical Sonography 

Network Specialist 

Small Business Management 

Turf Equipment Technology 

*Certificate awarded by Broward Communitv College 



79 



Continuing Education 



Continuing Education, through the Center for Professional Development, delivers the following services: 

Competency Based Career Training • Certificate Programs • Open to the Public Seminars 

Onsite Training • Continuing Education for Professions • Customized Programs 

Self-Paced Learning 

Contact us at any of the numbers listed to get more information about how Continuing Education is building people's skills quickly. 



Professional Growth - 

Computer Software Training 
Critical Communication Skills 
Customer Service 
Languages 
Business Writing 
Dealing with Difficult People 
Certified Public Manager 
Code Enforcement Certification 
How to Get Organized 
Manager & Supervisor Series 

Offered through The Institute 
Call 



Professional Development 

Management Styles & Team Building 
The Art of Being the Boss 
Effective Communication & 

Listening 
Change as a Positive Force 
Hire the Right Person the First Time 
Problem Solving 
Establishing Performance 

Expectations 
Coaching, Feedback & Discipline 



Managing a Budget Effectively 
Leadership Essentials 
Mediation & Negotiation Skills 
Developing Policies, Procedures, & 

Manuals 
Setting Up a Mentoring Program 
Dealing with Difficult People 
Employment Law 
Personal Excellence 
Creating a Team-based Organization 



for Business Training and Development and The Florida Institute of Government 
941/489-9208 or 432-5233 for more information 







Health Care Occupations 


Career Programs (entry level) - 






• Pharmacy Technician (certification 


• 


Cardiovascular (Certified) • Critical Care 


available) 




Technicians • EKG 


Medical Billing (3 levels) 


• 


Medical Transcription • Holter Monitor 


• Medical Assistant-Administrative 


• 


Coding Certification • Stress Testing 




• 


Perioperative Nursing 


Approved Provider for Continuing Education 


Renewal & Re-activation of the following Florida Healthcare Licenses - 


• Registered Nurses 


• 


Emergency Medical Technicians • Dental Hygienists 


• Licensed Practical Nurses 


• 


Radiographers • Massage Therapists 


• Respiratory Therapists 


• 


Paramedics 


License renewal classes i 


nclude: CPR, Telemetry, EKG, Advanced Airway, Water Rescue 




Call 941/489-9082 for more information 



Intro to Personal Computers 
Intro to Microsoft Word 
Intro to Excel 
Intro to Access 



Computer Software Training 

• Intro to PowerPoint • Quickbooks 

• Internet Topics • Web Design 

• Intermediate & Advanced Microsoft • MS Project 
Word, Excel and Access 

Microsoft Authorized Academic Training Programs 

Jumpstart your future — Having Microsoft Certified Professional next to your name means you meet Microsoft's highest standards. 

Microsoft Certified tells employers you are an expert in Microsoft products — and you've proven it by taking a series of rigorous exams. 

Now offering courses for the following - 
Preparation for the Microsoft • A-i- Certification • CISCO 

Certified Systems Engineer • Webmaster 

Call 941/489-9201 for more information 

Microsoft Office User Specialist 

Taking this program & passing the MOUS examination proves to the world that you have the 

comprehensive skills to drive a wide range of tasks to completion. 

Offering Proficient & Expert level workshops for the following software programs: 

Word • Access • PowerPoint 

Excel 

Call 941/432-5233 to find out how we can help you advance in your career 



Personal Computer Software and 

Training 
Languages (Spanish, German, Italian, 

French) 



General Interest Programs 

• Arts • Kid's College 

• Music • Lifelong Learning 

• Building and Industry • Business Training 

• Photography • Personal Fitness 

Call 941/489-9235 for more information 



80 



Career Center 



The Career Center provides Edison Community College students and alumni with a full range of career and 
employment services. Professional staff is available to discuss your career concerns. For additional information 
about the services listed below, stop by or call the Career Center on your campus. 



Career Planning and Assessment 

Career Assessment - Is available for those interested 
in choosing majors or focusing career interests. 
Interpretation workshops provide feedback on the 
assessment results and help you to understand the steps 
to making a career decision. 

Career Counseling - Individual appointments may be 

scheduled with our professional staff to discuss any 
career development issue from choosing a major or 
career, to changing careers, to finding full-time or part- 
time employment. 

Career Resource Library - Printed and computerized 
resources on career planning and job search topics are 
available on each campus. Topics include career 
exploration, occupational outlook, salary, employment 
correspondence, and networking. 



Locations 

District Office 
Lee Campus 

126 Robinson Hall 
(941)489-9387 

Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 
Tuesday 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

Collier Campus 
Learning Resources 

(941)732-3792 

Call for current semester schedule 

Charlotte Campus 

Student Services/Administration Building 

(941)637-5605 

Call for current semester schedule 



Internships 

Students may use current employment or seek desired 
employment/volunteer experiences to incorporate their 
academic learning into a real-world work experience. 
Students in most programs of study offered by the 
college are eligible. Students may register for the course 
at any time during the semester and are not limited by 
semester time frames. For permission to register for an 
internship, contact the Career Center as early as possible 
to make proper arrangements. 



Employment Assistance 

Resume Critique - Handouts are available to guide 
students and alumni in drafting resumes and 
employment correspondence. Individual appointments 
can be scheduled with our professional staff to have 
completed drafts critiqued. 

Job Listings - Hundreds of full-time and part-time jobs 
are posted in the Career Centers. Internet access is also 
available to search for positions locally, regionally, and 
nationally. 

On-Campus Recruiting - Employers regularly .set up 
display tables in the quad to recruit part-time and full- 
time positions. Students and alumni are encouraged to 
stop and talk with employers and pick up literature and 
applications. 

Employer Literature/Application File - Company 
recruitment literature, videos, and applications are kept 
on file in the Career Centers. This information is helpful 
for those preparing for job interviews or investigating 
employment opportunities. 



81 



The Edison University Center 

The Edison University Center is an alliance between Edison Community College and regionally accredited 
colleges and universities offering unique opportunities for Edison graduates to earn bachelor's degrees. Some of 
the features of degree programs offered through the Edison University Center are the convenience of distance- 
based learning formats or classes on an Edison campus, transfer of up to 84 hours of credit from Edison and, in 
some cases, tuition benefits. Students are supported in their learning by staff at the Edison University Center. 
Some of the participating colleges and university also have support staff on site. 

Edison University Center (EUC) programs are individually tailored by Edison Community College and 
participating institutions. Program requirements are specific and applicable to baccalaureate degree completion at 
the participating institutions only as provided in each agreement. The EUC programs feature Edison Community 
College associate degrees and additional Edison Community College courses which meet the specific 
requirements for completion of baccalaureate degrees offered through the EUC. Agreements governing these 
programs are limited to the EUC programs, and do not apply to baccalaureate degree transfer programs at other 
institutions. Contact the EUC advisor for more information. 

CURRENT PROGRAM OFFERINGS 



Thomas Edison State College 

Bachelor of Science in Applied Science and Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, 

Technology with specializations: 

• Computer Science Technology • Marketing and Management 

• Human Resources Management 

Bachelor of Arts • General Management 

• Computer Science • Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship 

• Liberal Studies 



Florida State University 

Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science 

• Computer and Information Science • Information Studies 

*Coming Soon - Interdisciplinary Social Sciences Bachelor's Degree expected to begin Fall 2000. 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing expected to begin Spring 2001 . 



International College 

Bachelor of Science in Management with Bachelor of Science in Accounting 
emphasis: 

• Executive Management Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 

• Criminal Justice 

• Health Administration Management Bachelor of Science in Business 

• Management Information Systems Administration 



National - Louis University 

Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts 

• Health Care Leadership • Applied Behavioral Sciences 



For more information or to find out if new programs have been added, call the 
Edison University Center at (941) 489-9295 or 800-749-2322 extension 1295. 



82 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE 
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM GUIDE 

Associate in Arts students must follow the general education guide below in planning required courses. This guide complies 
with Southern Association of Colleges and Schools' (SACS) Criteria 4.2.2 which requires course distribution in humanities/fine 
arts, social/behavioral sciences, natural sciences/mathematics; Florida Statute 240.1 15 which requires the core curriculum to 
include subject areas of communication, mathematics, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences; Rules of the Florida 
State Board of Education, which requires six credits of mathematics and twelve credits (four courses) in which writing is 
heavily emphasized. Additionally, the mathematics and writing courses must be passed with a "C" or better. 



COMMUNICATIONS: 9 Credit hours 

ENC 1101 Composition I 

ENC 1102 Composition II 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 

Communications OR 
SPC 2023 Public Speaking (Telecourse) 

HUMANITIES: 6 Credit hours 

(Select two courses — One from Part A and one from Part 
B, or two from Part A) 
Part A 

HUM 2210 Ancient World-Renaissance and/or 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 

HUM 2230 17th Century-Present and/or 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 

HUM 2930 Great Human Questions and/or 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better 

HUM 1950 Humanities Study Tour 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better 

HUM 2950 (second Humanities Tour) 

HUM 2228 Studies in the Humanities: 

Humanities through The Arts 
(Telecourse) and/or any 
course from the following: 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 
PartB 

Literature of the U.S. I, to 1860 
Literature of the U.S. II, 1860 
to Present 
Art Appreciation 
History of Art I 
History of Art II 
European Art and Architecture 
e in combination with HUM 1950) 
Art of the Western World 
(Telecourse) 

British Literature I, to 1780 
British Literature II, 1780 
to Present 



AMI. 


2010 


AML 


2020 


ARH 


1000 


ARH 


1050 


ARH 


1051 


ARH 


1950 


(first time tour/must ta 


ARH 


2052 


FNT 


2012 


F.NI, 


2022 



ENG 2100 American Cinema (Telecourse) 

LIT 2090 Contemporary Literature 

LIT 2110 World Literature I 

LIT 2120 World Literature II 

MUH 2018 Jazz History and Appreciation 

MUL 1110 Music History and Appreciation 

PHI 2010 Introduction to Philosophy 

PHI 2100 Logic: Reasoning and Critical 

Thinking 

PHI 2600 Ethics 

THE 2100 Theatre History and Literature 



Writing Intensive Courses: 

The following courses satisfy the writing requirement 
of 6,000 words each. Each student must successfully take 
four courses: 

ENC 1 101, ENC 1 102, HUM 2210. HUM 2230, HUM 2228, 
HUM 2930, HUM 1950, HUM 2950, WOH 1012. 
WOH 1023. WOH 1030 

For an AA degree, writing intensive courses must be 
completed with a grade of "C" or higher. World Civilization 
courses which are designated as writing intensive 
(designated as "W" in the Schedule of Classes) satisfy the 
writing requirement. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES: 9 Credits hours 

Course selection must include one World Civilization 

course (either WOH 1012, WOH 1023, or WOH 1030). 

Anthropology 

ANT 1410 Introduction to Cultural 

Anthropology 
ANT 1511 Introduction to Physical 

Anthropology 



Economics 
ECO 

ECO 



2013 

2023 



Economics I 
Economics II 



Education 

EDF 

EDG 

EME 



2005 Introduction to Education 
2701 t Teaching Diverse Populations 
2040 t Introduction to Educational 
Technology 

May not fulfill social science requirements at some 

state universities. 



83 



Geography 

GEA 2010 

GEA 2040 



History 



Geography of the Eastern 

Hemisphere 

Geography of the Western 

Hemisphere 



AMH 2010 



AMH 2020 

AMH 2070 
AMH 2091 
EUH 1001 



History of the United States to 

1865 

History of the United States, 

1 865 to Present 

Florida History 

African-American History 

The Western Tradition I 

(Telecourse) 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 
EUH 1002 The Western Tradition II 

(Telecourse) 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 
WOH 1012 History of World Civilization to 

1500 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 
WOH 1023 History of World Civilization 

1500-1815 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 



WOH 1030 History of World Civilization, 

1 8 1 5 to Present 
*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in 
written communication by passing this course with a "C" or better. 



Human Services 

HUS 1001 

Political Science 

POS 2041 

POS 2112 

INR 2002 

Psychology 

CLP 1000 

DEP 2004 



DEP 2102 
DEP 2302 
INP 2301 



Sociology 



PSY 2013 

PSY 2014 

SYG 1000 

SYG 1010 

SYG 2430 



Introduction to 
Human Services 

American National Government 
American State and Local Politics 
International Relations 

Personal and Social Adjustment 
Human Growth and 
Development 
Child Psychology 
Adolescent Psychology 
Human Relations in Business 
and Industry 
General Psychology I 
General Psychology II 

Introduction to Sociology 
Contemporary Social Problems 
Marriage and the Family 



MATHEMATICS: 6 Credits 

The mathematics courses required for a particular career plan are usually specified by that career or curriculum as baccalaureate 
prerequisites. Those students who wish to satisfy the minimum of six hours specified by general education requirements for the 
A A degree may pick one mathematics course from Column A and one mathematics course from Column B. Mathematics 
courses used to satisfy the AA mathematics requirement must be passed with a grade of "C" or higher. 

Note: Do not select the same course from both columns. 



General Education Math Requirements 
Column A 

MAC 1105 College Algebra 

MGF 1 1 06 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 

STA 2023 Introductory Statistics 



Column B 

MAC 

MAC 

MAC 

MGF 



1105 College Algebra 

1114 Trigonometry 

1140 Pre-Calculus Algebra 

1 1 07 Mathematics for Liberal Arts II 



STA 2023 Introductory Statistics 



These advanced mathematics courses may also be used to meet the AA mathematics requirements: 



MAC 1147* 
MAC 2233 
MAC 2311 



Precalculus Algebra/Trigonometry 
Calculus of Business / Social Science 
Calculus w/ Analytic Geometry I 



MAC 2312 Calculus w/ Analytic Geometry II 
MAC 2313 Calculus w/ Analytic Geometry in 
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 



* Students wishing to take MAC 1 147 must have had prior trigonometry classes (high school or college). 



84 



NATURAL SCIENCES: 6 Credit hours 

NOTE: It is recommended that all college preparatory courses be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science course (two 

lectures and two laboratories). 
A student must complete any two of the following science courses, with their associated laboratories in order to fulfill the AA 
Natural Science requirement. An alternative is to complete two combined science courses with a "C" designation. 
Recommendation: A better foundation in science is provided to the student by taking a science pair in sequential semesters. 



Column A 




AST 


2002 


AST 


2002L 


AST 


2005 


AST 


2006 


Rsr 


1050 


RSC 


1051 


GIY 


1010 


GTY 


1100 


r.TY 


1000 


Tsr 


lOOlC 


ocF lonir 


OCR 


1002C 



Universe: The Infinite Frontier 

(Telecourse) 

Universe: The Infinite Frontier Lab 

Astronomy I & L 

Astronomy II & L 

Man and the Environment & L 

Ecosystems of South Florida & L 

Physical Geology & L 

Historical Geology & L 

Earth Revealed & L (Telecourse) 

Foundations of Interdisciplinary 

Science for Education I 

Oceanography I: A 

Multidisciplinary Science 

Oceanography II: A 

Multidisciplinary Science 



NOTE: Only telecourses that have an accompanying 
laboratory can be used to meet the science requirement. 
Those without labs are offered for elective credit only. 



Column B 

These courses are sequenfial, or require another science or 
math course as a co-requisite or prerequisite: 

EOT 20 IOC Botany 

BSC 1010 Biological Science I & L 

BSC 1011 Biological Science II & L 

BSC 1093C Anatomy / Physiology I & L 

BSC 1094C Anatomy / Physiology II & L 

MCB 2013C Microbiology 

OCB 2010 Marine Biology & L 

ZOO 2010 Zoology &L 

CHM 2030 Intro to Chemistry & L 

CHM 2033L Chemistry Lab for Health Science 

CHM 2045 General Chemistry I & L 

CHM 2046 General Chemistry II & L 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I & L 

CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II & L 

ISC 1002C Foundations of Interdisciplinary 

Science for Education II 

PHY 1053 Fundamentals / Physics I & L 

PHY 1054 Fundamentals / Physics II & L 

PHY 2048 General Physics I & L 

PHY 2049 General Physics II & L 



TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS: 36 



COMPUTING SKILLS 

All degree-seeking students must demonstrate their 
competence in the basic use of computers by completing 
ENC 1101 with a grade of "C" or better. 

ELECTIVES 

Be sure electives selected have an AA designation as 
listed in the course description section of this Catalog. 
Electives should be chosen with a desired baccalaureate 
program in mind. Students are advised to see a counselor 
to determine university program prerequisites. AS courses 
do not qualify for elective credit. 



HEALTH & WELLNESS AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION CREDITS 

Students may elect to take up to six hours of health and 
wellness courses as elective credit toward graduation. 
Students are cautioned that such credits will transfer to 
Florida universities only to the degree that the individual 
university will accept them. Those students who are pre- 
majors in health and wellness or physical education subject 
areas may elect to take as many courses as their educational 
plan will permit. Students should consult with their 
advisor as to which classes will transfer and to which 
college or university. 



Total Elective Hours: 24 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Students seeking admission to the Florida State 
University System should have completed two years of 
foreign language at the high school level or two courses 
(eight credit hours) at the college level. Foreign language 
is a State University System baccalaureate graduation 
requirement. 



INTERNATIONAL/DIVERSITY COURSES 

Florida State Universities may require students to take 
courses that have an international or diversity focus. These 
are designated with an "I" after the course descriptions. 

Total AA Credit Hours: 60 



85 



DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES 



Telecourses 

Telecourses may combine any or all of the following: 
videotapes, related reading assignments, on-campus review 
opportunities, orientation, discussion, labs, and 
examinations. Courses are equivalent to on-campus courses 
in content and credit. No distinction is made between a 
telecourse and a traditional course on an official Edison 
Community College transcript. An Edison professor is 
assigned to each course. 

The majority of ECC telecourses are available through 
video check-out at the Learning Resources circulation desk. 
Hendry-Glades students can obtain this service at the ECC 
Administrative Office in LaBelle. Students may check out 
the complete course on two or three videotapes for the entire 
semester with a library card. (You may also view these videos 
in the Learning Resources audio-visual center). The ECC 
Telecourses CLP 1000 and STA2023 are available by check 
out of each individual episode (3 day check out) at Learning 
Resources. The CHM2030, CHM2030L, CHM2045, and 
CHM2046 are video purchase through the local campus 
bookstore (Lee, Charlotte, & Collier). 

Course offerings vary from term to term and are listed 
in the current class schedule and on a telecourse flyer. See 
your academic advisor for more information. 

Interactive (compressed) Video Courses 

Professors utilize the interactive video network to link 
campuses together to optimize course offerings on all sites. 
Offerings vary from term to term and are listed in the current 
class schedule. Please view the sample video in Learning 
Resources to ensure that this delivery method meets your 
needs. For a tour of the interactive facilities, please contact 
the Distance Learning office at 489-9455. 

Interactive (compressed) Video Physical 
Therapist Assistant Program 

A Physical Therapist Assistant Program is offered in 
partnership with Broward Community College. This 
program utilizes advances in technology to allow for two- 
way interactive video classes to be offered simultaneously 
between Fort Myers and Fort Lauderdale. This is a limited 
access program with the degree awarded by Broward 
Community College. Admission information is available at 
Health Technologies orientations, or by calling the Health 
Technologies Office at 489-9252. 

Online Courses 

Offered through the Internet, online courses allow 
access to course information and assignments from a 



computer. Online courses provide opportunities for 
interaction between classmates and the instructor through 
the course Chatroom, Bulletin Board, and e-mail. 

Telecourses available toward the Associate in Arts Degree 

Communications 9 credit hours (Required) 

ENC 1101 *Composition I 

(A Writer's Exchange) (3) 

(before 16th credit hour) 
ENC 1 102 *Composition II (Read, Write and 

Research/Literary Visions) (3) 

(before 3 1 st credit hour) 
SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech Communications 

(Intro to Human Communication) (3) 

SPC 2023 Intro To Public Speaking (Speaking 

with Confidence) (3) 

Humanities 6 credit hours 

ARH 2052 Art of the Western World 

(Art of the Western World) (3) 

ENG 2100 American Cinema 

(The American Cinema) (3) 

HUM 2228 *Studies in the Humanities (The 

Humanities Through the Arts) 

(writing intensive) (3) 

Social Science 9 credit hours 

AMH 2010 History of the United States to 1 865 

(American Adventure) (3) 

AMH 2020 History ofthe United States 1865 

to the Present 

(American in Perspective) (3) 

ANT 1410 Introduction Cultural Anthropology 

(Faces of Cuhure) (3) 

CLP 1000 Personal and Social Adjustment 

(Psychology of Happiness) (3) 

DEP 2004 Human Growth and Development 

(Development Through the Lifespan 

in Action) (3) 

DEP 2102 Child Psychology (Time to Grow) (3) 

ECO 2013 Economics (Economics USA) (3) 

ECO 2023 Economics II (Economics USA) (3) 

EUH 1000 * Western Tradition I 

(The Western Tradition) (3) 

(writing intensive) 
EUH 1001 * Western Tradition II 

(The Western Tradition) (3) 

(writing intensive) 
POS 2041 American National Government 

(Government by Consent) (3) 



86 



PSY 2013 General Psychology (Psychology: 

Study of Human Behavior) (3) 

SYG 1000 Introduction to Sociology 

(Sociological Imagination) (3) 

SYG 1010 Contemporary Social Problems (3) 

Natural Science 6 credit hours 

AST 2002 Astronomy (Universe: 

The Infinite Frontier) (3) 

AST 2002L Astronomy Lab 

On campus lab required (1) 

GLY 1000 Earth Revealed (3) 

GLY lOOOL Earth Revealed Lab 

On campus lab required (1) 

BSC 1050 Man/Environment 

(Race to Save the Planet) (3) 

BSC I050L Man/Environment Lab 

On campus lab required (2) 

CHM 2030 Intro College Chemistry 

(Intro College Chemistry) (3) 

CHM 2030L Intro College Chemistry Lab 

Telecourse lab (1) 

CHM 2045 General Chemistry 

General Chemistry (3) 

CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 

General Chemistry II (3) 



Mathematics 6 credit hours 

MAT 9024 Algebra (College Algebra-Remedial) .. (6) 
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics 

(Introduction to Statistics) (4) 

Electives 24 credit hours ** 

GEB 1011 Introduction to Business 

(It's Strictly Business) (3) 

PRE 1 1 20 Elementary French I 

(French in Action) (4) 

FRE 1121 Elementary French II 

(French in Action) (4) 

HSC 1130 Living With Health 

(Living With Health) (3) 

HUN 1201 Fundamentals of Health 

(Nutritional Pathway) (3) 

* These classes require the student to write a minimum of 
6,000 words and earn a grade of "C" or higher. To fulfill 
the Gordon Rule, the student must take ENCllOl and 
ENCl 102 and two other writing intensive classes. 

** After the requirements in each area have been met, the 
student has the option of taking other telecourses in that 
area as electives. 



87 



Associate in Science Degree Programs 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree 

1 . Complete an approved program of studies as specified of at least sixty (60) semester hours with a 2.0 ("C") grade point average. 

2. Complete a minimum of fifteen (15) semester hours of general education courses including one course from the broad fields of humanities/ 
fine arts, social/behavioral science, natural sciences/mathematics. 

3. Complete 257c of the degree from Edison Community College. 

4. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College. Note: Students completing Associate in Science Degrees who wish to transfer to a unit of 
Florida State University System are required to complete the College Level Academic Skills Test prior to the award of the Associate in 
Science degree. 

Limited Admissions AS Degree Programs 

The Associate of Science Degree programs in Dental Hygiene, Nursing, Respiratory Care, Radiologic Technology, and Cadiovascular Technology 
are selective admissions programs. Admission to the College does not automatically admit a student to these programs of study. Application 
should be made to the College as well as application for admission to the program of study. Such applications for admission to the program of 
study are made, after attending a general orientation, to the individual program. (A Physical Therapist Assistant program is offered in partnership 
with Broward Community College. Admission information for that program is available at general Health Technologies orientations.) 

Articulation Arrangements 

Articulation arrangements have been developed with the local schools for Workforce programs. Information about articulation agreements is 
available from the respective program coordinator. 

Professional Certification 

Students who have completed external professional certification may demonstrate equivalency through an assessment process. Programs that 
employ equi\alency assessment include: Criminal Justice Technology, Crime Scene Technology, Emergency Medical Services Technology, 
and Radiologic Technology. 



ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY 



The Associate in Science degree program in Accounting 
is designed to prepare students to enter public or piivate 
accounting in various capacities. Students who successfully 
complete this program will have the knowledge and skills 
necessary to sit for two certification examinations. 

Accreditation Council for Accountancy and Taxation 
(ACAT) 

The ACAT examination is sponsored by the National 
Society of Public Accountants located in Alexandria, 
Virginia. The examination is offered twice a year, in May 
and December. The six-hour examination is given at over 
200 test sites nationwide. Accreditation in Accountancy by 
the ACAT tells your clients and/or employer they have a 
professional working for them. 

Enrolled Agents Examination 

The Enrolled Agents Examination is a comprehensive 
four-part exam administered once a year by the Internal 
Revenue Service. The primary benefits of being an enrolled 
agent are (1) recognition of attaining a high level of 
knowledge of federal taxation and (2) eligibility to practice 
before the IRS. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES 
NONE 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 









Credit 








Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


ENC 


1102 


Composition II 

(Technical Writing Emphasis) 


3 


SPC 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 
Communications (Business 








Communications Emphasis) 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 


3 


ECO 


2023 


Economics II 


3 


STA 


2023 


Introductory Statistics 
*Humanities Elective 


4 






(PHI 2600 recommended) 


3 






TOTAL 


22 


DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 




ACG 


1001 


Financial Accounting I 


3 


GEB 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


GST 


2335 


Business Communications 


3 


ACG 


2011 


Financial Accounting II 


3 


RMI 


2001 


Principles of Risk Management 


3 


CGS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


ACG 


2071 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


TAX 


2401 


Trusts, Estates, and Gifts: 








Accounting and Taxation 


3 


TAX 


2000 


Federal Tax Accounting I 


3 


CGS 


2511 


Advanced Spreadsheet 








Computing 


3 


ACG 


2500 


Governmental and 








Not-for-Profit Accounting 


3 


TAX 


2010 


Federal Tax Accounting II 


3 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 



TOTAL 
ELECTIVES: 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



40 
2 
64 



88 



ELECTIVES: Electives may be selected from any 

Accounting, Business, Management, Finance, or Computer 

courses. 

*Humanities Elective may be chosen from any course listed 

in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND MANAGEMENT 



Hospitality/Tourism Management Specialization 



The Business Administration and Management Associate 
in Science degree program is designed to provide a broad 
foundation of knowledge and skills necessary for students 
seeking entry-level employment in various business fields, and 
for those presently employed in business and desiring 
advancement. 

The degree consists of 15 hours of general education 
requirements, 25 hours of degree core requirements, and 24 
hours from the area of specialization. The student may choose 
electives from one of the following business specialization areas 
to complete the AS Degree: Marketing and Management, 
Hospitality/Tourism Management, Customer Service, 
International Business, Small Business Entrepreneurship, or 
Banking and Finance. 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 









Credits 








Hours 


ENC 


1101 


English Composition I 


3 


SPG 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 








Communications 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 


3 


ECO 


2013 


Economics I 


3 






*Humanities Electives 


3 






TOTAL 


15 


DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 




GEB 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


COS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


GST 


2335 


Business Communications 


3 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 


ACG 


1001 


Financial Accounting I 


3 


MTB 


1103 


Business Mathematics 


3 


MAN 


2021 


Principles of Management 


3 


FIN 


2100 


Personal Finance 


3 






TOTAL 


25 


SPECIALIZATIONS: 


24 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


64 



Marketing and Management Specialization 

MKA 2021 Salesmanship 



MKA 


1511 


Advertising and Sales Promotion 


3 


BUL 


2241 


Business Law I 


3 


BUL 


2112 


Business Law II 


3 


MAR 


2011 


Marketing 


3 


ACG 


1002 


Microcomputer Accounting 








Applications 


3 


ACG 


2011 


Financial Accounting II 


3 






Electives 


15 






TOTAL 


24 







Credits 






Hours 


HFT 


2313 


Hotel/Motel Property Management 


3 


HFT 


1050 


Tourism and the Hospitality 








Industry 


3 


HFT 


1210 


Human Relations and Supervisory 








Development 


3 


HFT 


1000 


Introduction to Hospitality 








Management 


3 


HFT 


2600 


Hospitality Law 


3 


HFT 


2410 


Front Office Procedures 


3 


HFT 


2501 


Hospitality Sales Promotion 


3 


HFT 


2750 


Convention Management and 








Services 


3 






TOTAL 


24 


Customer Service Technology Specialization 




BUL 


2241 


Business Law I 


3 


INP 


2301 


Human Relations in 





Business & Industry 3 

MKA 1161 Introduction to Customer Service 3 

Electives 15 

TOTAL IT 

International Business Specialization 

ECO 2023 Economics II 3 

MAR 2141 International Marketing & 

Business Practices 3 

INR 2002 International Relations 3 

BAN 2155 International Banking & Finance 3 
GEA 20 1 Geography of the Eastern 

Hemisphere 
or 
GEA 2040 Geography of the Western 







Hemisphere 


3 


Two semesters of a Foreign Language 


8 






Electives 


1 






TOTAL 


24 


Small Business/Entrepreneurship Specialization 




ACG 


1002 


Microcomputer Accounting 








Applications 


3 


MKA 


1511 


Advertising and Sales Promotion 


3 


MAN 


2800 


Small Business Management 


3 


MAR 


2011 


Marketing 


3 


MKA 


1161 


Introduction to Customer Service 


3 






Electives 


9 






TOTAL 


i4 


Banking and Finance Specialization 




BAN 


1004 


Principles of Banking 


3 


BAN 


1006 


Fundamentals of Banking Skills 


3 


BAN 


1800 


Law and Banking Principles 


3 


MKA 


1161 


Introduction to Customer Ser\ ice 


3 


MAR 


2011 


Marketing 


3 



Banking Electives 
TOTAL 



9 
24 



ELECTIVES: General electives may be chosen from any Accounting. Office Systems Technology (OST). Business, Hospitality. 

Management. Customer Service. Computer Technology. Banking. Finance or Real Estate courses. 

* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



89 



CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY 

The Cardiovascular Technology Program is designed 
to offer students the opportunity to obtain an Associate in 
Science Degree in Cardiovascular Technology. The 
Cardiovascular Technologist is employed in cardiac 
catheterization laboratories, cardiac ultrasound laboratories 
and in cardiac non-invasive laboratories. The Cardiovascular 
Technology Program is fully accredited for invasive 
cardiology by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied 
Health Education Programs. Our specialty of invasive 
cardiology will prepare the graduate to function in all aspects 
in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The Cardiovascular 
Technologist performs diagnostic studies on patients in order 
to quantify cardiac disease including coronary arteriography, 
hemodynamic monitoring and analysis, and 
electrophysiology studies. They also assist the cardiologist 
in interventional therapeutic procedures including coronary 
angioplasty, rotablator procedures, intra-coronary stenting, 
pacemaker insertion, and radio frequency ablation. 

A freshman class begins each Fall semester. Currently 
20 freshmen are accepted each year. Class size is limited by 
the number of cardiology laboratories in the clinical affiliates 
needed for the training of students. Graduates are eligible 
to take the national registry examination as offered by 
Cardiovascular Credentialing International. The successful 
candidate will receive the Registered Cardiovascular 
Invasive Specialist (RCIS) credential. Students also will have 
the opportunity to gain Echocardiography instruction and 
experience as an elective component of this program. 

The Cardiovascular Technology Program is a limited 
admission program. The criteria for admission are available 
through the program office or through the Health Science 
division office. 

Application Deadline: June 1 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



4 
3 
3 
1 
3 
4 
3 
31 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

ENC 1101 Composition I 3 

PSY 2013 General Psychology 3 

BSC 1093C Anatomy and Physiology I 

with Lab 4 

BSC 1 094C Anatomy and Physiology II 

with Lab 
MGF 1 106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 
CHM 2030 Intro, to College Chemistry 
CHM 2033L Chemistry Health Science Lab 
PHY 1007 Physics for Health Sciences 
MCB 2013 Microbiology 

*Humanities Elective 
TOTAL 

DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

RET 1024 Introduction to Cardiopulmonary 

Tech. 
RET 161 6C Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & 

Physiology 
RET I82IL Freshman Clinic 
CPT 1 200 Cardiovascular Pharmacology 
CPT 2420C Invasive Cardiology I 
CPT 2620C Non-Invasive Cardiology I 
CPT 2840L Cardiovascular Practicum II 
CPT 242 IC Invasive Cardiology II 
CPT 284 IL Cardiovascular Practicum III 
RET 2244 Critical Care Applications 
CPT 1920 Cardiovascular Technologist 

as a Professional 
CPT 2842L Cardiovascular Practicum IV 

TOTAL 

CAREER CORE ELECTIVES: 

CPT 262 IC Non-Invasive Cardiology 
II-Echocardiography 
TOTAL 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



2 
2 

2 
4 
4 
7 
4 
7 
2 

2 
7 
46 



4 
4 

77 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

The Program prerequisite encompasses successful 
completion of program acceptance process including 
program-level admissions points, competition with all » 
other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation 
and affective skills demonstration. The enrollment , 
process requires satisfactory completion of an 1 
immunization and health report. 



General Education Requirements are incliaded in the 
required sequences listed above. Some students prefer to 
take most or all of their general education courses before 
entering the Cardiovascular sequence. This is recommended, 
especially for those students who must work or those who 
have heavy family obligations. 

* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



90 



CITRUS PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

The Citrus Production Technology AS degree program 
is a cooperative program between the University of Florida's 
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) 
Center at Immokalee, Florida, and Edison Community 
College. It is designed for mid-level grove technicians and 
mid-level managers in the citrus industry. The technical 
courses are provided by UF/IFAS; Edison provides the AS 
degree general education requirements and electives, and 
grants the degree. For the citrus courses, the student must 
register with the University of Florida. Registration may be 
accomplished on the first night of class. For information 
regarding the scheduling of the citrus classes, plea.se call 
the UF/IFAS Center at Immokalee at (941) 658-3400 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 









Credit 








Hours 


*AGG 


2933 


Current Topics in Agriculture 


3 


*AMO 2730 


Introduction to Water 








Management 


3 


*HOS 


1541 


Citrus Culture I 


3 


*HOS 


2542 


Citrus Culture II 


3 


*PMA 


2202 


Pest & Pesticides 


3 


*SOS 


2104 


Soils and Fertilizers 


3 


ORH 


1008C 


Introduction to Horticulture 


3 


ACG 


1001 


Financial Accounting I 


3 


GEB 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 






TOTAL 


30 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog, 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

NONE 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 









Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


SPC 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 








Communications 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 








or higher level mathematics 


3/4 


PSY 


2013 


General Psychology I 


3 


ISC 


lOOlC 


Foundation of Interdisciplinary 








Science for Education I 


3 


ECO 


2013 


Economics I 




PCS 


2112 


or 

American State and Local Politics 3 






tHumanities Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


21/22 



GENERAL ELECTIVES: 

Students may choose 10/1 1 credit hours from any courses 
other than college preparatory courses. 

TOTAL 10/11 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 62 

*Offered by UF/IFAS in Immokalee 

tHumanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 




91 



COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
AND APPLICATIONS 



Programming Specialization Electives 



The Computer Programming and Applications degree 
program is designed to give students the necessary technical 
training to enter the computer technology industry. The 
training is practical in nature and emphasizes performance 
of job tasks similar to those performed in today's advanced 
computer technology environment. 

The degree consists of 15 hours of general education 
requirements. 16 hours of degree core requirements, and 
32 hours from the area of specialization. The student may 
choose electives from one of the following computer 
specialization areas to complete the AS Degree: 
Programming, or Applications. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



Credit 
Hours 



COP 1000 

*OST 1141 

COP 1224 

COP 2222 

COP 2910 

CIS 2321 



COP 
COS 



2172 
2260 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 









Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


SPC 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 
Communications (Business 








Communications Emphasis) 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 








or higher level mathematics 


3 


INP 


2301 


Human Relations in Business 








and Industry 


3 


PHI 


2100 


Logic: Reasoning and Critical 








Thinking 


3 






TOTAL 


15 



Introduction to Computer 

Programming 3 

Computer Keyboarding 3 

Programming with C++ 3 

Advanced Programming in C++ 3 
Programming Project 

Development 3 
Data Systems Analysis & 

Management 3 

Visual Basic Programming 3 
Computer Software & Hardware 

Maintenance 3 

Electives 8 

TOTAL ~32 

Specialization 

Beginning Keyboarding 3 

Intermediate Keyboarding 3 

Computer Literacy 3 

Word Processing I 3 

Word Processing II 3 
Advanced Spreadsheet Computing 3 

Advanced Database Computing 3 

Desktop Publishing 3 

Electives 8 

TOTAL 32 



ELECTIVES: 

Electives may be selected from any Business, Computer 
Technology, Office Systems Technology, Drafting and 
Design or student internships. 

*Student may substitute any computer course in its place. 



Applic 

*OST 


ations 

1100 


OST 


1110 


COS 


1000 


OST 


2711 


OST 


2712 


COS 


2511 


COS 


2541 


COS 


1580 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

COS 1100 Microcomputer Skills 
OST 2335 
SLS 1331 
ACQ 1002 



MAN 2021 



Business Communications 
Personal Business Skills 
Microcomputer Accounting 
Applications 

Principles of Management 
TOTAL 



4 
3 
3 

3 
3 
16 



SPECIALIZATIONS: 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



32 
63 



92 



CRIME SCENE TECHNOLOGY 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



The Associate in Science Degree in Crime Scene 
Technology is designed to prepare students for employment 
in the various fields related to crime scene investigation. 
The Crime Scene Technician locates, preserves, develops, 
collects, analyzes, and presents physical evidence relating 
to the scene of a crime. The program provides students 
with the necessary skills to accurately map out, collect and 
log evidence, develop and preserve fingerprints, write 
reports, and present courtroom testimony. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

None 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 




Credit 




Hours 


ENC 1101 


Composition I 3 


ENC 1102 


Composition II 3 


MGF 1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 




or higher level mathematics 3 


PHI 2600 


Ethics 3 


PSY 2013 


General Psychology I 3 




*Natural Science Elective 3 




TOTAL 18 



Credit 
Hours 



CCJ 1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

CGS 1100 Microcomputer Skills or higher 3 
CJT 1110 Introduction to Crime Scene 

Technology 3 
CJT 1 1 1 1 C Advanced Crime Scene 

Technology 4 
CJT 2100 Criminal Investigative Techniques 3 
CJT 2113 Courtroom Presentation of 

Scientific Evidence 2 

CJT 2141 Introduction to Forensics 3 

CJT 2220C Crime Scene Photography I 4 

CJT 222 IC Crime Scene Photography II 4 
CJT 2261 Biological Evidence and 

Crime Scene Safety 2 

CJT 2241 Latent Fingerprint Development 3 

TOTAL "34" 

GENERAL ELECTIVES: 8 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 60 

^Natural Science elective must be chosen from one of the 
following courses: ISC lOOIC, BSC 1005. BSC 1010, PHY 
1053 or, with permission of advisor, CHM 2030/2030L. 




93 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY 

The Associate in Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to 
prepare the student for a lull range of career opportunities in the field 
of criminal justice. The degree provides a strong background for 
employment with any of Southwest Florida's many criminal justice 
or public service agencies, including police departments, sheriff's 
offices, prisons, areas of juvenile justice, or private industry. Five 
areas of specialization are offered through the program: Law 
Enforcement Academy Bridge. CoiTcctions Academy Bridge, Crime 
Scene Technology, Public Service Specialization, and the University 
Specialization. 

The Law Enforcement or Corrections Academy Bridge 
Specializations are designed for students successfully completing 
Rorida Department of Law Enforcement's Criminal Justice Standards 
& Training Commission certified programs after July 1, 1993. These 
Bridge programs allow students to qualify for the award of specific 
college credit based on Florida certification in Law Enforcement or 
Corrections ( 1 5 credit hours for Law Enforcement - 1 2 credit hours 
for Corrections). The program does not apply to prior recipients of 
academy (bridge) or portfolio credit. 

The Crime Scene Specialization is designed to articulate with 
Edison's Crime Scene Technology one-year certificate program, 
allowing certificate students to continue their status for the AS degree 
in Crime Scene Technology. 

The Public Service Specialization is intended for the criminal justice 
professional seeking to enhance career diversity. The specialization 
is designed to enhance employment opportunities and related skills 
in the field of Public Services. 

The University Specialization is designed to allow students planning 
to continue with their college education after the completion of the 
AS Degree. The specialization allows for the fulfillment of most 
general education requirements for university transfer. Degree 
completion with the University Specialization allows students to 
transfer the Associate in Science degree to Florida Gulf Coast 
University, toward the Bachelor in Science in Criminal Justice or 
Human Services through current institutional articulation agreements. 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

Selected degree core requirements may be awarded to qualified 
students through the Criminal Justice Academy Bridge 
Programs. To qualify for awarded credit, the student must: 

1. Complete an orientation appointment with the Criminal 
Justice Program Coordinator. 

2. Complete all college entrance requirements. 

3. Declare Criminal Justice Associate in Science degree- 
seeking status. 

4. Produce proof of eligibility for current Florida 
certification as a Law Enforcement or Corrections Officer. 

5. Complete at least 15 credit hours of coursework at Edison 
Community College. 

6. Complete the specified Law Enforcement or Corrections 
Bridge program with a G.P.A. of 2.0 or above. 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 








Credit 






Hours 


ENC 1101 


Composition 1 


3 


ENC 1102 


Composition II 


3 


MGF 1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I or 




MAC 1105 


College Algebra 


3 




♦Humanities Elective 


3 




*Social Science Elective 


3 




TOTAL 


15 









Credit 








Hours 


**CCJ 


1020 


Introduction to Criminal Justice 


3 


**CCJ 


1300 


Introduction to Corrections 


3 


**CCJ 


2210 


Criminal Law 


3 


**CCJ 


2230 


Criminal Procedure and Evidence 


3 


**CJT 


1110 


Introduction to Crime Scene 








Technology 


3 


**CJT 


2100 


Criminal Investigative Techniques 


3 


CCJ 


1010 


Introduction to Criminology 


3 


CCJ 


1400 


Police Organization and 








Administration 


3 


CCJ 


2500 


Juvenile Delinquency 


3 






TOTAL 


27 


SPECIALIZATION TOTAL 


22 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


64 


Law Enforcement Academy Bridge Specialization 




CJD 


1706 


Criminal Jusfice Legal I 


4 


CJD 


1707 


Criminal Jusfice Legal II 


4 


CJD 


1726 


Law Enforcement Legal III 


4 


CJD 


1727 


Law Enforcement Patrol 


3 


CJD 


1729 


Law Enforcement Investigations 


4 






Electives 


3 






TOTAL 


22 


Corrections Academy Bridge Specialization 




CJD 


1706 


Criminal Justice Legal I 


4 


CJD 


1707 


Criminal Justice Legal II 


4 


CJD 


1729 


Law Enforcement Investigations 


4 


CJD 


1748 


Corrections Operations 


4 






Electives 


6 






TOTAL 


22 


Crime 


Scene Specialization 




CJT 


line 


Advanced Crime Scene Technology 


4 


CJT 


2141 


Introduction to Forensics 


3 


CJT 


2220C 


Crime Scene Photography I 


4 


CJT 


2261 


Biological Evidence & Crime 








Scene Safety 


2 


CJT 


2113 


Courtroom Presentation of 








Scientific Evidence 


2 


CJT 


222 IC 


Crime Scene Photography II 


4 


CJT 


2241 


Latent Fingerprint Development 


3 






TOTAL 


22 



Public Service Specialization 

Choose from any: Business, Computer Science, Criminal 
Justice, Emergency Medicine, Fire Science, Foreign 
Language, Management, or Paralegal category 15 

Electives: 7 

TOTAL IT 

University Specialization 

♦Social Science: Course selection must include one 
from WOH 1 1 2 W. WOH 1 023W, WOH 1 030W 6 

♦Humanities: Course selection must include one 
from any course with a HUM prefix, or AML 2010, 
AML 2020, CRW 2 1 00, ENL 20 1 2W, ENL 2022W 3 

♦Natural Science: 6 

♦Mathematics: 3 

General Electives: 

Choose from any course with an A. A. designation. 
Foreign Language is recommended. (Note: To transfer 
to FGCU's Bachelor of Science in Human Services, 
students must have HUS 1001 Introduction to Human 
Services) 4 

TOTAL T2" 



94 



♦♦Upon successful completion of either the Law Enforcement or Corrections Academy Bridge Specializations, students are eligible 
for the following certification award - Law Enforcement Certification: CCJ 1020; CCJ 2210: CCJ 2230; CJT II 10; CJT 2100. 
Con-ections Certification: CCJ 1300; CCJ 2210: CJT 1110; CJT 2100. 

♦Courses specified as Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics and Natural Science must be selected from courses listed in the 
College Catalog for A. A. degree requirements, under the respective categories in the General Education Program Guide. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



The Dental Hygiene program is designed to prepare 
the student to practice as a licensed dental hygienist. A 
graduate of the program is eligible to take the Dental 
Hygiene National Board, and, upon successful completion 
of that board, is eligible to take a state board to obtain a 
state license. 

The program annually recruits a freshman class in the 
Fall term. The program is comprised of general education 
courses, dental hygiene courses and clinical practice. The 
general education course work is acceptable from any 
accredited college. The dental hygiene core courses are 
offered only on the Lee Campus; the clinical practice site(s) 
are in the five county service district. 

The Dental Hygiene program has limited enrollment 
due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each 
applicant must meet specific criteria which are listed in the 
admission policies. The Criteria for Admission Policies are 
available through the program office or through the Division 
of Health and Science. 

The program is fully accredited by the American Dental 
Association Commission on Dental Accreditation. 

The student must purchase uniforms, an instrument kit, 
liability insurance, and books. There are fees for tuition, 
graduation, laboratory, clinic, licenses, and association dues. 

Application Deadline: June 1 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES; 

The Program prerequisite encompasses successful 
completion of program acceptance process including 
program-level admissions points, competition with all 
other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation 
and affective skills demonstration. The enrollment 
process requires satisfactory completion of an 
immunization and health report. 









Credit 








Hours 


CHM 


2033L 


Chemistry Lab - Health Sciences 1 


HUN 


1201 


Nutrition 


3 


MCB 


2013C 


Microbiology 


4 


SYG 


1000 


Sociology 


3 






* Humanities Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


34 


DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 




DEH 


1811 


Introduction to Dental Hygiene 


1 


DES 


1020 


Dental Anatomy 


2 


DES 


1800C 


Clinical Procedures 


2 


DES 


1840 


Preventive Dentistry 


2 


DEH 


1003 


Dental Hygiene I 


2 


DEH 


1003L 


Dental Hygiene I Pre-clinic 


3 


DES 


1200C 


Radiology 


2 


DEH 


1802 


Dental Hygiene II 


2 


DEH 


1802L 


Dental Hygiene II Clinical 


3 


DEH 


1602 


Periodontics 


2 


DES 


llOOC 


Dental Materials 


2 


DES 


2830C 


Expanded Functions Lab 


2 


DES 


1600 


Dental Office Emergencies 


1 


DEH 


1130 


Oral Histology & Embryology 


2 


DEH 


2300 


Pharmacology 


2 


DEH 


2400 


General and Oral Pathology 


2 


DEH 


2804 


Dental Hygiene 111 


2 


DEH 


2804L 


Dental Hygiene III Clinical 


4 


DEH 


2806 


Dental Hygiene IV 


2 


DEH 


2806L 


Dental Hygiene IV Clinical 


4 


DEH 


2702 


Community Dental Health 


2 


DEH 


2702L 


Community Dental Health 








Practicum 


1 


DEH 


2930 


Seminar 


1 


DEH 


2808 


Dental Hygiene V 


2 


DEH 


2808L 


Dental Hygiene V Clinical 


4 






TOTAL 


54 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


88 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 

4 
4 
3 
3 



ENC 

PSY 

BSC 

BSC 

MGF 

CHM 



1101 Composition I 
2013 General Psychology 
1093C Anatomy and Physiology I 
1094C Anatomy and Physiology II 
1 106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts 1 
2030 Intro, to College Chemistry 



95 



DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

The Drafting and Design Technology Associate in 
Science Degree Program is designed to give students the 
necessary training and background for careers of a technical 
nature. The courses are designed to qualify students, through 
specialized and intensive instruction, for many technical 
positions. 

The degree consists of 1 8 hours of general education 
requirements, 27 hours of degree core requirements, and 
17 hours from the area of specialization. The student may 
choose electives from one of the following Drafting and 
Design specialization areas to complete the AS degree: Civil 
Engineering/Land Surveying or Computer Aided Drafting 
(CAD). 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 







Credit 






Hours 


SPECIALIZATIONS: 






TOTAL 


17 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


62 


Civil Engineering/Land Surveying Specialization 


SUR 


1 lOOC Surveying 


4 


SUR 


2140C Advanced Surveying 


4 


MAC 


1 1 40 Pre-Calculus Algebra 


3 


MAC 


1114 Trigonometry 


3 




Electives 


3 




TOTAL 


17 



CAD Specialization 

ETD 1538 AutoCad Residential Architecture 

or 
ETD 1103 Engineering Graphics (CAD) 
ETD 1530 Drafting and Design (Manual) 
COS 1 364 Geographic Information Systems 
Customization 
Electives 

TOTAL 



4 
4 

3 

_6_ 
17 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

ENC 1101 English Composition I 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 

Communications 3 

MAC 1105 College Algebra 3 

tSocial Science Elective 3 

***Humanities Elective 3 

*Natural Science Elective 3 

TOTAL 18 

DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

Engineering Graphics I (Manual) 4 

Computer Aided Drafting 3 
Advanced Computer Aided 

Drafting 3 

Introduction to Engineering 3 

Construction Procedures 4 
**Business Communications 
or 



ETD 


1100 


ETD 


1320 


ETD 


2350 


EGS 


1001 


BCN 


2220 


OST 


2335 



ENC 1102 



CGS 
ETD 

ETD 



1 363 
1538 



English Composition II 
(Technical Writing Emphasis) 3 
Geographic Information Systems 3 
AutoCad for Residential Architecture 



or 



1 103C Engineering Graphics I (CAD) 4 
TOTAL 27 



Electives 

Electives may be chosen from: SURl lOOC, SUR2140C, 
ETD1541, ETD1220, CGSl 100, MACl 140 or MACl 1 14, 
ART2602, OST 1141, CGS 1364 

*Students can choose one of the following: ISC lOOlC, ISC 
1002C,AST2005-AST2005L,orGLY 1010-GLY lOlOL 

**Depending on student's overall career choice. 

*** Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

tSocial Science Elelctives may be chosen from any course listed 
in the General Education Program under Social Science. 



96 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TECHNOLOGY 

The Emergency Medical Services Technology 
Programs are designed to prepare the student to become a 
competent entry-level Emergency Medical Technician-Basic 
(EMT-B) and/or EMT-Paramedic. 

The EMS Technology Program is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education 
Programs (CAAHEP) in conjunction with the Committee 
on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the 
Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). 

To be eligible to sit for the Florida EMT-Basic exam, 
students must successfully complete the EMT-Basic 
Certificate Program. To be eligible to sit for the Florida 
Paramedic exam, the student must be currently certified as 
a Florida EMT-B and successfully complete the Paramedic 
Certificate Program. 

Students may obtain an Associate of Science Degree in 
Emergency Medical Services Technology. General 
Education requirements may be completed concurrently 
with career core requirements, or following successful 
Florida Paramedic Certification. 

Purchase of an Edison EMS uniform shirt and 
professional liability insurance is required. Students must 
also provide transportation to clinical and field experiences. 

During the Paramedic Certificate Program, students will 
be required to complete a two week rotation in an Operating 
Room with a local hospital. This rotation is in addition to 
scheduled class laboratory hours. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer tu specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

Admission requirements for the EMT-Basic Certificate 
Program are as follows: a grade point average (GPA) 
of 2.0 or higher, current CPR certification (either AHA 
BLS for Healthcare Providers or ARC-Basic Rescuer), 
and completion of FCLEPT Testing (utilize the SAIL 
Program prior to testing). A student may register into 
the EMT-Basic Certificate Program with a Department 
of Learning Assistance hold. However, student must 
complete all Learning Assistance coursework prior to 
registration in the Paramedic Certificate Program. 
Admission requirements for the Paramedic Program are 
as follows: Evidence of current Florida EMT - Basic 
certification (or eligible for certification - must be 
Florida certified within 90 days of beginning EMS 
2241), current CPR certification, grade point average 
(GPA) of 2.0 or higher, and completion of all college 
preparatory coursework. BSC 1093C with a minimum 
grade of "C" must be completed prior to registration 
into EMS 2241. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

3 



ENC 1101 Composition I 
MAC 1105 College Algebra 

or 
MGF 1106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 
PSY 2013 General Psychology I 

*Humanities Elective 
BSC 1093C Anatomy and Physiology 1 
BSC 1094C Anatomy and Physiology II 
BSC 1098L Special Topics In A & P II 
MNA 2345 Supervision 

Or 
FFP 1130 Fire Administration: 

Fire Company Leadership 
TOTAL 

DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



EMS 2119 



EMS 


2119L 


EMS 


2421 


EMS 


2411 


EMS 


2241 


EMS 


224 IL 


EMS 


2242 


EMS 


2242L 


EMS 


2243 


EMS 


2244 


EMS 


2245 


EMS 


2245L 


EMS 


2457 


EMS 


2458 


EMS 


2459 


EMS 


2469 


EMS 


2647 



Fundamentals of Emergency 
Medical Care 

Fundamentals of EMC Lab 
EMS Field Internship 
Emergency Department Clinicals 
Paramedic I 
Paramedic I Lab 
Paramedic II 
Paramedic II Lab 
Paramedic III 
Paramedic IV 
Paramedic V 
Paramedic V Lab 
Paramedic Field Internship I 
Paramedic Field Internship II 
Paramedic Field Internship III 
Paramedic Hospital Clinicals 
Advanced Airway Management 
TOTAL 



3 
24 



3 
5 
2 
1 

3 
2 
3 
2 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
4 
4 
3 
49 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



73 



A student who has completed a hospital-based or 
vocational technical center-based program accredited 
by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health 
Programs and is Florida certified as an EMT-B or 
Paramedic may satisfy the career core requirements 
through successful completion of EMS 1780 - EMS 
Equivalency Assessment. 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



97 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



The Associate in Science degree in Fire Science 
Technology is designed to provide advanced educational 
opportunities for fire service personnel. Students gain both 
knowledge and experience useful to career advancement in 
the challenging field of fire service. The program is designed 
both for students who have completed Florida fire fighting 
minimum standards training, and those interested in 
expanding career opportunities in the field of fire science. 
Fire Science Technology courses are designed to fit into the 
work schedule of employed fire service personnel. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

Florida Fire Fighting Minimum Standards training is 
recommended, but not required. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 









Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


ENC 


1102 


Composition II 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 








or higher mathematics 


3 






*Humanities Elective 


3 






**Social Science Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


15 



FFP 


1200 


FFP 


1 300 


FFP 


1601 


FFP 


1620 


FFP 


2130 


FFP 


2150 


FFP 


2210 


FFP 


2243 


FFP 


2320 



FFP 2326 



FFP 


2410 


FFP 


2500 


FFP 


2501 


FFP 


2640 



Fire Prevention Practices 
Fire Codes & Standards 
Fire Apparatus Operations 
Private Fire Protection Systems 
Fire Company Officer Leadership 
Fire Service Instructor 
Fire Cau.se & Origin 
or 

Latent Investigations 
Building Construcfion for the 
Fire Service 

Blueprint Reading & Plans 
Review 

Firefighting Tactic & Strategy I 
Hazardous Materials I 
Hazardous Materials II 
Fire Service Hydraulics 
TOTAL 



Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



GENERAL ELECTIVES: 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



39 

6 
60 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

** Social Science Electives may be chosen from any course listed 
in the General Education Program Guide under Social Science. 



98 




GOLF COURSE OPERATIONS 



The Golf Course Operations Program is designed to prepare 
students to become golf course superintendents. The core 
classes within this program are structured to help the students 
establish and maintain a comprehensive knowledge base 
with respect to all golf course related turfgrass management 
issues. These courses also help the students to gain a high 
degree of proficiency in the language of the turfgrass 
industry. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 



GCO 


2932 


GCO 


2431 


GCO 


2441 


GCO 


2442 


GCO 


2450 


GCO 


2741 


GCO 


2601 



GCO 2632 









Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


SPC 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 








Communications 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 


3 






^Humanities Elective 


3 






**Social Science Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


15 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

GCO 1001 Introduction to Golf Course 

Industry 3 

GCO 1201 Basic Mechanics 3 

GCO 1400 Principles of Turfgrass Science I 3 

GCO 1403 Principles of Turfgrass Science II 3 



SOS 


2102 


GEB 


1949 


SOS 


1401 


SOS 


1005 


GCO 


1743 



GCO 2500 



Credit 
Hours 

Turfgrass Management Seminar 3 
Irrigation and Drainage 3 

Integrated Pest Management 
for Turf I: Insect Pests of Turf 3 
Integrated Pest Management 
for Turf II: Diseases of Turf 3 

Integrated Pest Management for 
Turf III: Weed Science for Turf 3 
Plant ID and Landscape Design 3 
Applied Materials Chemistry and 
Calculations for Turf 3 

Golf Course Organization 
and Administration 
Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 
Golf Course Practicum 
Physics and Chemistry of 
Turf Soils 

Biology of Turf Soils 
Golf Course Design and 
Construction 3 

Environmental Issues in Golf 
Course Construction and 
Management 3 

TOTAL ~54" 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



69 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

** Social Science Electives may be chosen from any course listed 
in the General Education Program Guide under Social Science. 

See Turf Equipment Technology Certificate on Page 1 1 8. 



i 




r^m^mmm 



99 



NETWORKING SERVICES TECHNOLOGY 

The Associate in Science Degree in Networking 
Services Technology is designed to prepare students for 
employment as a Network Administrator and other networking 
positions. Upon completing the program, the students will 
be able to design, implement, and manage local area and 
wide area networks based on several network operating 
systems. The students will be trained utilizing industry 
standards, business platforms and operating systems. To 
enable the student to work effectively in modern business 
environments, the program stresses the development of 
student skills in written and oral communication, human 
relations, management and business operations. 

The degree consists of 18 hours of general education 
requirements, and 44 hours of degree core requirements. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


ENC 


1102 


Composition 11 








(Technical Writing Emphasis) 


3 


SPG 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 
Communications (Business 








Communications Emphasis) 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts 1 








or higher mathematics 


3 


INP 


2301 


Human Relations in Business 








and Industry 


3 


PHI 


2100 


Logic: Reasoning and Critical 








Thinking 


3 






TOTAL 


18 









Credit 








Hours 


CDA 


1005 


Networking 1 


3 


CDA 


2500 


Networking 11 


3 


CDA 


2524 


Networking III 


4 


CDA 


2525 


Networking IV 


3 


CGS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


CGS 


2260 


Computer Hardware & 








Software Maintenance 


3 


CIS 


2321 


Data Systems and Management 


3 


COP 


1000 


Introduction to Computer 








Programming 


3 


GEB 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


MAN 


2021 


Principles of Management 


3 


*OST 


1141 


Computer Keyboarding 


3 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 






Electives 


6 






TOTAL 


44 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



62 



ELECTIVES: 

Electives may be selected from any Business, Technology, 
GST, Drafting and Design or student internships. 

*Student may substitute any computer course in its place. 




100 



NURSING 



The Associate in Science Degree in Nursing is designed 
to prepare the student to '"care" for the clients they serve. 
Graduates possess the knowledge, values, and skills essential 
to practice in a dynamic and rapidly changing health care 
environment. Graduates are prepared to take the National 
Council Licensure Examination Registered Nurse 
(NCLEX-RN) examination administered by the State Board 
of Nursing for Florida, and upon successful completion of 
the examination, are licensed as a Registered Nurse in the 
State of Florida. The Edison Community College nursing 
program is fully approved by the Florida Board of Nursing, 
4080 Woodcock Drive. Jacksonville, FL 32207, (904) 858- 
6940. and the National League for Nursing Accrediting 
Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, New York, 10006, 
(800) 363-5555. 

The philosophy of the Associate Degree program is that: 

1. Nursing is a caring, service-oriented profession 
accountable to the client, the community, and the 
profession. 

2. The Profession of Nursing requires critical thinking and 
is based on a body of knowledge derived from nursing 
theories, nursing research, skills, and the biological, 
social, and behavioral sciences. 

3. The practice of the associate degree graduate is based 
on three interrelated roles: (1) provider of care; (2) 
manager of care; and (3) professional within the 
discipline of nursing. 

The nursing program has limited enrollment. Each 
nursing applicant must meet the application criteria. The 
selection process has been established by the Department 
of Nursing and the Nursing Advisory Committee. 
Applicants with the best qualifications will be invited to 
join the nursing program. 

The Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program is 
comprised of general education courses as well as clinical 



nursing courses. The curriculum incorporates classroom 
instruction, laboratory simulation, and clinical practice. Area 
health facilities are utilized, including various community 
health centers and long-term care facilities. Two possibilities 
for program completion are: the Basic Program (Generic), 
or the Advanced Placement Program. Students are admitted 
to the Basic Program (Generic) on the Lee campus once a 
year in the Fall semester. Students are admitted to the 
Advanced Placement Program on the Collier and Charlotte 
campuses in the Fall semester, and the Lee campus in the 
Spring Semester. 

The Nursing program is a limited access program. The 
criteria for admission are available through the program 
office or through the Health and Science Division. 

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 

If an applicant has been convicted, had any adjudication 
withheld, or has any criminal charges pending other than a 
minor traffic violation, the applicant must make 
arrangements with the Florida Board of Nursing for 
permission to take the licensure examination upon 
completion of the program. 

Fees and a physical exam are required by the Florida 
Board of Nursing for the Licensure Examination. 

ADMISSION/ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

A student must earn a minimum grade of "C" or above 
in all general education courses required in the Nursing 
Program. Any course with a grade of "D" or below must be 
repeated and will not count towards admission. An academic 
average of "C" or higher and a grade of "Pass" in the clinical 
portion must be earned in each nursing course in order to 
continue in the nursing program. Satisfactory completion 
of the 72 semester hours of approved credit with a grade of 
"C" or higher is required to graduate. 




101 



NURSING 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



BASIC PROGRAM 
Application Deadline: March 15 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 



catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES*: 

Credit 
Hours 

BSC 1()93C Anatomy and 

Physiology I 4 I 

MGF 1106** Mathematics for Liberal ' 

Arts I _3_ ' 

TOTAL 7 

*Prerequisites must be completed BEFORE applying ■ 
to the Nursing Program 

Program prerequisites are part of the General Education 
Requirements. « 

**May substitute MAC 1 105 or STA 2023 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 



ENC 

HUM 

HUN 

PSY 

DEP 

BSC 
MCB 







Hours 


1101 


English Composition I 

*Any Writing Intensive 


3 




Humanities 


3 


1001 


Fundamentals of Nutrition 


3 


2013 
2004 


General Psychology 
Human Growth and 


3 


1094C 
2013C 


Development 

Anatomy & Physiology II 

Microbiology and Lab 


3 
4 
4 




TOTAL 


23 









Credit 








Hours 


NUR 


1010 


Introduction to Nursing 


3 


NUR 


1022/ 








1022L 


Fundamentals of Nursing 


5 


NUR 


1024L 


Fundamentals of Nursing 








Practicum 


I 


NUR 


1930 


Nursing Seminar I 


1 


NUR 


1210/ 








1210L 


Adult Nursing I 


7 


NUR 


1240L 


Adult Nursing I Practicum 


I 


NUR 


1931 


Nursing Seminar II 


1 


NUR 


2140 


Advanced Pharmacological 








Concepts 


3 


NUR 


2212/ 








2212L 


Advanced Adult Nursing II 


8 


NUR 


2460/ 








2460L 


The Childbearing Family 


8 


NUR 


2810/ 








2810L 


Professional Issues and Role 
Development/ Nursing 








Preceptorship 


4 






TOTAL 


42 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


72 



Length of Program - approximately two (2) years after 
admission to Nursing program. 

Total Cost - approximately $4,992.66 (see Nursing 
Department for details). 

* Humanities Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the 
General Education Program Guide under Humanities Part A. 



102 




NURSING 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Application Deadline: 

March 15, Charlotte and Collier Campus 

September 15, Lee Campus 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES*: 



Credit 
Hours 

4 

4 

3 

I 3 



BSC 1093C Anatomy and Physiology I 
BSC 1094C Anatomy & Physiology II 
ENC 1101 English Composition I 

MGF 1 106** Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 

TOTAL 14 

Successful completion of NLN Nursing Mobility Exam 
*Prerequisites must be completed BEFORE admission 
to the Career Core 

Program prerequisites are part of the General Education 
Requirements. 
**May substitute MAC 1 105 or STA 2023 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 








Credit 








Hours 


HUN 


1001 


Fundamentals of Nutrition 


3 


PSY 


2013 


General Psychology 


3 


DEP 


2004 


Human Growth and Development 3 


HUM 




*Any Writing Intensive 








Humanities 


3 


MCB 


20I3C 


Microbiology and Lab 


4 






TOTAL 


16 









Credit 
Hours 


NUR 


1201/ 








1201L 


Transitional Nursing Concepts 


6 


NUR 


1932 


Advanced Placement Seminar 
Advanced Placement Credit 
(Awarded after successful 
completion of NUR 1201/ 


1 






1201L, NUR 1932) 


12 


NUR 


2140 


Advanced Pharmacological 








Concepts 


3 


NUR 


2212/ 








2212L 


Advanced Adult Nursing II 


8 


NUR 


2460/ 








246()L 


The Childbearing Family 


8 


NUR 


2810/ 








28I0L 


Professional Issues and Role 
Development/Nursing 








Preceptorship 


4 






TOTAL 


42 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


72 



Length of Program - approximately one and one half (1- 
Wi) years after admission to Nursing program. 
Total Cost - approximately $4,285.55 

General Education Requirements: 

General Education Requirements are included in the 
required above course sequences. Some students prefer to 
take most or all of their general education courses before 
entering the nursing sequence. This is recommended by the 
nursing program especially for students who must work or 
those who have heavy family obligations. 

* Humanities Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the 
General Education Program Guide under Humanities Part A. 




103 



PARALEGAL STUDIES 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



(LEGAL ASSISTING) 

The Paralegal Studies program is designed for students 
seeking a career in a law-related field as a paraprofessional. 
Upon successful completion of the program, graduates will 
be specialists who can manage law office operations, assume 
certain routine duties of attorneys and directly assist 
attorneys in handling legal problems. Other roles may 
include legal research, client interviewing, and drafting legal 
documents. Students who wish to articulate into the junior 
year at Florida Gulf Coast University's Bachelor of Science 
in Criminal Justice or Bachelor of Science in Human 
Services, should take courses required in the University 
Specialization. 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

None 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

None 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 









Hours 


ENC 


1101 


Composition I 


3 


ENC 


1102 


Composition II 


3 


SPC 


1600 


Fundamentals of Speech 








Communication 


3 


MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 








or higher mathematics 


3 






*Humanities Elective 


3 






*Social Science Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


18 



*Courses not specified above in Humanities, Social Science, 
Mathematics and Natural Science must be selected from 
any course listed in the General Education Program Guide 
under the respective categories. 



BUL 


2241 


BUL 


2242 


CCJ 


2210 


CGS 


1100 


PLA 


1003 


PLA 


1103 


PLA 


2114 


PLA 


2200 


PLA 


2202 


PLA 


2800 



Business Law I 

Business Law II 

Criminal Law 

Microcomputer Skills 

Introduction to Paralegal Studies 

Legal Research and Writing I 

Legal Research and Writing II 

Litigation 

Torts 

Family Law 

TOTAL 

SPECIALIZATION: 

TOTAL CRDIT HOURS: 

Paralegal Specialization Electives 

Choose from: Any PLA prefix, CCJ 1020, 
CCJ 2230, BAN 1800, 
BAN 1801, HFT 2600, 
GEB 1949, GEB 2949 
General Electives 
TOTAL 

University Specilization Electives 

*Mathemafics: 

*Natural Science: 

^Humanities: Must choose from one PHI 2600, 

PHI 2010, IDS 1350, 

HUM 2210, HUM 2230, 

HUM 2930 
*Social Must choose from one: 

Science: WOH 1012, WOH 1023, 

WOH 1030 



Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

31 
15 
64 



12 

3 

15 



TOTAL 



15 



104 




PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PROGRAM 

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program is delivered 
to the students through an inter-institutional agreement via 
distance learning technology from Broward Community 
College (BCC) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. That is, there is 
a two-way audio and video interaction with one or more 
remote sites located in classrooms geographically distant 
from the BCC campus. The degree is granted by Broward 
Community College. 

Lectures are broadcast in real time so that all sites 
participate in lecture classes together. Lab sessions and 
clinical rotations are managed by the individual sites with 
coordinators. This innovative method of instruction is an 
exciting and challenging means by which separate classes 
of students can be joined as they embark on an education in 
the field of physical therapy. 

The program provides the student with the opportunity 
to develop competency in technical skills relative to physical 
therapy through planned clinical, classroom and laboratory 
experiences. The graduate will be prepared to provide a 
variety of services under the direction and guidance of a 
supervising physical therapist. 

The program is a full-time day program accredited by 
the American Physical Therapy Association. Licensing 
examinations are required upon completion of the two year 
program and the Physical Therapist Assistant shall be 
eligible for an appropriate membership category in the 
American Physical Therapy Association. 

Criteria for Admission to the Physical Therapist 
Assistant Program: 

1 . Complete sixteen ( 1 6) hours of clinical observation in 
a local facility offering physical therapy. 

2. Students must have satisfactorily completed all College 
Preparatory courses. 

3. A minimum 2.0 overall and degree GPA. 

4. Applicants must complete the program prerequisite 
courses with a grade of "C" or higher prior to submitting 
an application to the Department. 

Application Deadline: 
Applications accepted throughout the year. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PREREQUISITES GENERAL EDUCATION 


REQUIREMENTS: 






Credit 




Hours 


ENC 1101 Composition! 


3 


CHM 2030/ 




CHM 2033L Chemistry for Health Sciences/ 


Lab 


3 


BSC I093C Anatomy and Physiology I 


4 


MAT 9024 Introduction to Algebra 





TOTAL: 


10 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

(To be taken before or during the program) 



BSC 


1094C 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


4 


HSC 


1531 


Medical Terminology 


3 


COS 


1560 


Computer Concepts 


1 


PSY 


2013 


General Psychology 


3 


HSC 


2660 


Communication for 








Interdisciplinary Health Teams 


2 






* Humanities Elective 


3 






TOTAL 


16 



HEALTH CARE CAREERS CORE CURRICULUM: 

(To be taken following acceptance into the program) 
HCP 1 30 Health Care Careers Core 

Curriculum 



DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 
First Year 



1010 Physical Principles for PTA 

1 1 03 Anatomy for the PTA 

I I03L Anatomy for the PTA Lab 

1200 Introduction to Physical Therapy 

1 200L Introduction to PT Lab 

1300 Survey of Pathological Deficits 

1211 Disabilities and Thera 

Procedures I 

121 1 L Disabilities and Thera Proc I Lab 

2224 Disabilities and Thera 

Procedures II 

2224L Disabilities and Thera Proc II Lab 

1 350 Basic Pharmacology 

1 80 1 L Clinical Practicum 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the Genera! Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



PHT 
PHT 
PHT 
PHT 
PHT 
PHT 
PHT 

PHT 
PHT 

PHT 
PHT 
PHT 
Second Year 

PHT 2120 Applied Kinesiology 

PHT 2 120L Applied Kinesiology Lab 

PHT 2162 Survey of Neurological Deficits 

PHT 28 lOL Clinical Practicum II 

PHT 2704 Rehabilitative Procedures 

PHT 27()4L Rehabilitative Procedures Lab 

PHT 2931 Transition Seminar 

PHT 2820L Clinical Practicum III 

TOTAL: 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



2 
1 

4 
6 
2 
1 

2 
5 

48 
74 



105 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 



The Radiologic Technologist is an allied health 
professional who combines patient care procedures with an 
in-depth knowledge of human anatomy and proficient 
utilization of medical imaging equipment. The technologist's 
goal is to produce diagnostic images of the human body 
with minimum radiation exposure at a level of proficiency 
that will cause the least discomfort to the patient. 

The Radiologic Technology Program is twenty-four 
months of full-time study. It includes classroom courses and 
extensive clinical laboratory experience in departments of 
radiology at participating clinical affiliates. 

The program is nationally accredited by the Joint 
Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. 
Graduates may apply for the examination of the American 
Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) for national 
certification and subsequent licensure by each individual 
state. 

The program has limited enrollment. A freshman class 
begins each Fall Semester at both the Lee and Charlotte 
County campuses. Applicants must meet specific application 
criteria. The enrollment process includes the submission of 
a health report that includes immunization requirements. 
Individuals having a criminal record are encouraged to check 
with the ARRT for registry eligibility by calling 612-687- 
0048. 

Students are required to maintain a 2.0 grade point 
average in each radiologic technology (RTE) course to 
progress in the program curriculum. Each core course must 
be taken in sequence. A minimum of 77 credit hours with a 
2.0 cumulative grade point average is required for 
graduation. 

Application Deadline: May 15 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

The program prerequisites encompass the successful 
completion of the program acceptance process 
including program-level admission points, competition 
with all other applicants based on academic transcript 
evaluation and affective skills demonstration. The 
enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of 
an immunization and health report. Applicants must 
have completed all required college preparatory courses 
prior to starting the program core courses in the Fall 
semester. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

(To be taken before or during the program) 

Credit 
Hours 

ENC 1101 Composition I 3 

PSY 2013 General Psychology 3 

BSC 1093C Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BSC 1094C Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

MGF 1 106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 3 

CGS Computer Science Elective 3 

*Humanities Elective 3 
TOTAL ^3~ 

DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

(To be taken following program acceptance) 
RTE 1000 Introduction to Rad & Patient 

Care 3 

RTE 1503 Radiographic Positioning I 3 

RTE 1503L Radiographic Positioning I Lab 2 

RTE 1613 Radiographic Physics 4 
RTE 1418 Principles of Radiographic 

Exposure I 3 

RTE 1513 Radiographic Positioning II 3 

RTE 1804 Radiology Practicum I 3 
RTE 1457 Principles of Radiographic 

Exposure II 2 

RTE 1523 Radiographic Positioning III 3 

RTE 2542 Advanced Positioning 2 

RTE 1814 Radiology Practicum II 3 

RTE 1573 Radiologic Science Principles 2 
RTE 2563 Special Radiographic Proc/ 

Sectional Anat. 3 

RTE 1824 Radiology Practicum III 3 
RTE 1001 Radiographic Pathology/ 

Med Terminology 3. 

RTE 2385 Radiation Biology/Protection 2 

RTE 2834 Radiology Practicum IV 3 

RTE 2473 Quality Assurance 1 

RTE 2061 Radiologic Technology Seminar 2 

RTE 2844 Radiology Practicum V 2 

RTE 2854 Radiology Practicum VI 2 

TOTAL 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



54 

77 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

Students who have completed a hospital-based program 
accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in 
Radiologic Technology and are professionally certified as 
Registered Technologists by the American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologists may satisfy the career core 
requirements (54 credit hrs.) through successful completion 
I of RTE 195 1-Radiologic Technology Equivalency 
Assessment. 



106 



Please note: Graduates of the Radiologic Technology program are eligible to apply to the partnership program 
in Medical Sonography. This course of study leads to a post AS degree certificate from Broward Community 
College enabling employment as a specialist in abdominal or obstetrical ultrasound. 



RESPIRATORY CARE 



The Respiratory Care program is designed to offer 
students the opportunity to obtain an Associate in Science 
Degree in Respiratory Care. Upon completion of the 
program, students will be registry-eligible therapists and will 
take the National Board of Respiratory Care Examination. 
In addition, the Respiratory Therapist is employed in the 
practice of Respiratory Care and has the knowledge and 
skills necessary to administer respiratory therapy to patients 
of all ages with varied diseases, and to patients in need of 
acute and critical care. Respiratory Care Practitioners have 
the opportunity to work in the acute care hospital setting, 
skilled nursing centers, rehabilitation, neo-natal intensive 
care, and home care environments. This program also has 
special benefits to the economically disadvantaged and 
minority student. Because of the local need, scholarships 
have been made available by the local hospitals and the 
American Lung Association. A freshman class begins each 
Fall semester. Currently, freshmen are accepted each year 
in June. Class size is limited by the number of critical care 
beds of clinical affiliates needed for the training of students. 

The Program in Respiratory Care is a limited access 
program. The criteria for admission policies are available 
through the program office or through the Division of Health 
and Sciences. The program in Respiratory Care was initially 
accredited by the Committee of Allied Health Education 
and Accreditation in 1986 and re-accredited for five years 
in 1991 & 1996. 

Application Deadline: June 1 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

The program prerequisite encompasses successful 
completion of program acceptance process including 
program-level admissions points, competition with all 
other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation 
and affective skills demonstration. The enrollment 
process requires satisfactory completion of an 
immunization and health report. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

(To be taken before or during the program) 



ENC 1101 Composition 1 
PSY 2013 General Psychology 
BSC I093C Anatomy and Physiology I 
BSC 1094C Anatomy and Physiology II 
MGF 1106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 
CHM 2030 Intro, to College Chemistry 
CHM 2033L Chemistry Health Science Lab 
MCB 2013C Microbiology 

* Humanities Elective 
TOTAL 

DEGREE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

(To be taken following program acceptance) 



Credit 

Hours 

3 

3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 

4 
3 
28 



RET 


1024 


Introduction to Cardiopulmonary 








Tech. 


3 


RET 


1616C 


Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & 








Physiology 


2 


RET 


I821L 


Freshman Clinic I 


2 


RET 


1402 


Pulmonary Electronic 








Instrumentation 


2 


RET 


2234C 


Respiratory Care 


4 


RET 


2874L 


Clinical Practicum 11 


4 


RET 


2254C 


Respiratory Care Therapeutics 


4 


RET 


2264C 


Respiratory Care II 


4 


RET 


2414C 


Pulmonary Studies 


4 


RET 


2244 


Critical Care Applications 


2 


RET 


2714 


Neonatal-Pediatric Respiratory 








Care 


3 


RET 


2875L 


Clinical Practicum III 


6 


RET 


2930 


Respiratory Care Practitioner as 








a Prof. 


2 


RET 


2876L 


Clinical Practicum IV 


6 






TOTAL 


48 



CAREER CORE ELECTIVES: 

RET 2934 Topics in Respiratory Care- 
Hyperbaric Oxygen Medical/ 
Technical Aspects 
TOTAL 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



3 
3 
76 



* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in 
the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



107 




108 



CERTIFICATE 
PROGRAMS 



109 



Certificate Programs 



Specific requirements for each certificate program of study must be followed. In addition, students must accomplish the 
following: requirements: 
Requirements for completion of a certificate program. 

1 . Complete an approved program of studies as specified with a 2.0 GPA ("C"). 

2. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College. 



ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS 



The Accounting Applications Certificate is designed to 
prepare students as accounting clerks or income tax 
preparers. Course work in this certificate program articulates 
into the Associate in Science degree in Accounting 
Technology. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 



CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



SPECIALIZATIONS: 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



Credit 
Hours 

15 

31 



Specialization electives may be chosen from one of the 
following areas: General Accounting or Tax Accounting. 



General Accounting Specialization 

ACG 2500 Governmental and 

Not-For-Profit Accounting 

CGS 25 1 1 Advanced Spreadsheet 
Computing 
Electives 

TOTAL 



Tax Accounting Specialization 









Credit 








Hours 


OST 


2335 


Business Communications 


3 


CGS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


ACG 


1001 


Financial Accounting I 


3 


ACG 


2011 


Financial Accounting II 


3 


ACG 


2071 


Managerial Accounting 


3 






TOTAL 


16 



TAX 2000 
TAX 2010 
TAX 2401 



Federal Tax Accounting I 
Federal Tax Accounting II 
Trust, Estates, and Gifts: 
Accounting and Taxation 
Electives 

TOTAL 



3 
9 
15 



3 
3 

3 
6 
15 



Electives 

Electives may be selected from any Accounting, Business, 
Management, Finance or Computer courses. 




110 



SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Small Business Management certificate is designed 
to prepare students to become small business owners and 
managers in specialized areas. Course work in this program 
articulates into the Associate in Science Degree in Business 
Administration and Management. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 

CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 









Credit 








Hours 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 


GST 


2335 


Business Communications 


3 


ACG 


1002 


Microcomputer Accounting 








Applications 


3 


MAN 


2800 


Small Business Management 


3 


GEE 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CGS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


MTB 


1103 


Business Mathematics 


3 






TOTAL 


22 


SPECIALIZATIONS: 


9 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


31 



Specialization electives may be chosen from one of the 
following areas: Hospitality, International Business. 
Banking, Customer Service or Marketing. 



Hospitality Specialization 



HFT 1000 



HFT 2410 



Introduction to Hospitality 
Management 
Front Office Procedures 
Electives (HFT or FSS) 
TOTAL 



Credit 
Hours 



Customer Service Specialization 

MKA 1161 Introduction to Customer Service 3 
Electives 6 

TOTAL T 



International Business Specialization 

INR 2002 International Relations 
BAN 2155 International Banking and 

Finance 

Electives 

TOTAL 



Marketing Specialization 

MAR 2011 Marketing 



MKA 1511 Advertising and Sales 

Promotion 
MKA 2021 Salesmanship 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
9 


Banking Specialization 

BAN 1004 Principles of Banking 
BAN 1800 Law and Banking Principles 
Electives 

TOTAL 


3 
3 
3 
9 



Electives 

Electives may be chosen from any GST, Business, 
Hospitality, Management, Customer Service, Computer 
Technology. Banking, Finance, or Real Estate courses. 




Ill 



COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND 
APPLICATIONS SPECIALIST 

(BUSINESS DATA PROCESSING) 

This certificate is designed to give students the 
necessary technical training to enter the computer industry 
in entry level areas of programming or applications. 

Course work in this program articulates into the 
Associate in Science Degree in Computer Programming and 
Applications. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 

CERTIFICATECORE REQUIREMENTS: 







Credit 






Hours 


COS 1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


MGF 1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 






or higher mathematics 


3 


ACQ 1002 


Microcomputer Accounting 






Applications 


3 


SLS 1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 


**OST 1141 


Computer Keyboarding 




**OST 1100 


Beginning Electronic Typing 


3 









Credit 








Hours 


SPECIALIZATIONS: 


15 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


31 


Programming Specialization 




COP 


1000 


Introduction to Computer 








Programming 


3 


COP 


1224 


Programming with C++ 


3 


CIS 


2321 


Data Systems Analysis & 








Management 


3 


COP 


2172 


Visual Basic Programming 


3 


COS 


2260 


Computer Hardware and 








Software Maintenance 


3 






TOTAL 


15 


Applications Specialization 




OST 


1110 


Intermediate Electronic Typing 


3 


OST 


2711 


Word Processing I 


3 


COS 


2511 


Advanced Spreadsheet 








Computing 


3 


OST 


2712 


Word Processing II 




COS 


1580 


or 

Desktop Publishing 


3 


COS 


2541 


Advanced Database Computing 


3 






TOTAL 


15 



**Student may substitute any computer course in its place. 



16 



112 




CRIME SCENE TECHNOLOGY 



CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



The Crime Scene Technology Certificate Program is 
designed to provide technical training in the field of crime 
scene investigation. The program is primarily for students 
currently employed in the field of law enforcement. 

Course work in this program articulates into both Crime 
Scene Technology and Criminal Justice Technology 
Associate in Science Degrees. 

This certificate program is in the process of approval 
by the Florida Department of Education at the time of 
publication. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 









Credit 








Hours 


CJT 


1110 


Introduction to Crime Scene 








Technology 


3 


CJT 


line 


Advanced Crime Scene 








Technology 


4 


CJT 


2100 


Criminal Investigative 








Techniques 


3 


CJT 


2113 


Courtroom Presentation of 








Scientific Evidence 


2 


CJT 


2141 


Introduction to Forensics 


3 


CJT 


2220C Crime Scene Photography I 


4 


CJT 


222 1 C 


Crime Scene Photography II 


4 


CJT 


2241 


Latent Fingerprint Development 


3 


CJT 


2261 


Biological Evidence & Crime 








Scene Safety 


2 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 


28 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 




113 



DENTAL ASSISTING 



The Dental Assisting Program at Edison Community 
College leads to a Certificate of Completion and eligibility 
to take the Dental Assisting National Boards. Those 
assistants who pass the Boards and maintain continuing 
education credits may use the title "Certified Dental 
Assistant". Upon completion of the program, students will 
also receive an "Expanded Functions Certificate" which 
enables them to perform designated tasks permitted by the 
State Board of Dentistry. 

A freshman class begins each Fall semester. The 
program is comprised of general education courses, which 
may be taken prior to, during or after completing the dental 
assisting core courses. The dental assisting core courses are 
didatic, laboratory, and clinical externships. The general 
education course work is acceptable from any accredited 
college and/or any Edison Campus. The dental assisting 
core courses are offered only on the Lee Campus; the clinical 
practice site(s) are in the five county service district. 

The Dental Assisting program has limited enrollment 
due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each 
applicant must meet specific criteria which are listed in the 
admission policies. The Criteria for Admission Policies are 
available through the program office or through the Division 
of Health and Science. 

The students must purchase uniforms, an instrument 
kit, liability insurance, and books. There are fees for tuition, 
laboratory, and Boards. 

The program has Provisional Accreditation by the 
American Dental Association Commission on Dental 
Accreditadon. 

Application Deadline: June 1 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 
Catalog. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

The Program prerequisite encompasses successful 
completion of program acceptance process including 
program-level admissions points, competition with all 
other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation 
and experience points. The enrollment process requires 
satisfactory completion of an immunization and health 
report. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 
4 

3 
13 



ENC 1101 Composition! 
PSY 2013 General Psychology 
BSC 1093C Anatomy and Physiology I 
SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 
Communication 

TOTAL 



CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 

DES 1020 Dental Anatomy 2 

DES 1800C Clinical Procedures 2 

DES 1840 Preventive Dentistry 2 

DES 1 200C Dental Radiology 2 

DES llOOC Dental Materials 2 

DES 2830C Expanded Functions 2 

DES 1 600 Dental Office Emergencies 1 

DEA 0020 Dental Assisting I 1 

DEA 0020L Dental Assisting I Lab 4 

DEA 0029 Dental Specialties 1 

DEA 0029L Dental Specialties Lab 4 

DEA 0130 Applied Dental Theory 2 

DES 0502 Dental Office Management 2 

DEA 0850L Externship I 5 

DEA 085 IL Externship II _5_ 

TOTAL 37 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 50 



114 




EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN- 
BASIC (EMT-B) 

The Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) 
Certificate Program is designed to prepare the student to 
become a competent entry-level EMT-B. This certificate 
program is one (1) full semester in length, offered in the 
Fall and Spring semesters only. The EMS Technology 
Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation 
of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in 
conjunction with the Committee on Accreditation of 
Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services 
Professions (CoAEMSP). 

Purchase of professional liability insurance is required 
and included in the program cost. Uniforms are required at 
the clinical sites. Uniform requirements will be provided 
on the first day of class. Students are responsible for 
transportation to and from the clinical sites. All EMT-B 
students must be free of all facial hair prior to fit tesfing for 
the Racal National Institute for Occupational Safety Hazards 
(NIOSH) -approved Respirator mask. This mask is required 
at all clinical sites. (Moustaches are permissible only if 
trimmed above the corners of the mouth.) 

Upon successful completion of this program, the student 
will receive a certificate from Edison Community College. 
The student will also receive a Certificate of Completion 
from the EMS department and the necessary paperwork 
required to submit to the Florida State EMS Office for the 
Florida EMT-Basic Certification Examinadon. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

Minimum GPA of 2.0 ("C") average. 

FCELPT testing (or equivalent). A student may register 

into the EMT-Basic Certificate Program with a DLA 

hold. However, the student must complete all college 

preparatory course work prior to registration into the 

Paramedic Certificate Program. All students are 

encouraged to utilize the SAIL Program prior to 

FCELPT testing. 

Declare student status: EMT-Basic Certification 

Program 1230906. 

CPR Certification - Either American Heart 

Association's Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare 

Provider or American Red Cross Basic Rescuer. 

The courses below must be taken in the same semester 

and on the same campus 



CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 



Credit 
Hours 



EMS 2119 Fundamentals of Emergency 

Medical Care 3 

EMS 2I19L Fundamentals of Emergency 

Medical Care Lab 5 

EMS 2411 Emergency Department Clinicals 1 

EMS 2421 EMS Field Internship 2 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



II 



COURSE PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 




115 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 
TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The Paramedic Certificate Program is designed to 
prepare the student to becoine a competent entry-level 
paramedic in the field of emergency medicine. Upon 
successful completion of the Paramedic Program, the 
Department of EMS will issue to the student the necessary 
paperwork required to submit to HRS/EMS to apply for the 
Florida State Paramedic Certification examination. 

During the Paramedic Program, students will be 
required to complete a two (2) week rotation in an operating 
room of a local hospital. This rotation is in addition to 
scheduled class laboratory hours. Purchase of an EMS 
uniform shirt and professional liability insurance are 
required. Students must provide transportation to and from 
the clinical sites as required. 

The EMS Technology Program is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education 
Programs (CAAHEP) in conjunction with the Committee 
on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the 
Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 

Admission requirements are as follows: FCELPT 
testing (or equivalent). All college preparatory courses, 
if applicable, must be completed prior to enrollment 
into the Paramedic Certificate Program. All students 
are encouraged to utilize the SAIL Program prior to 
FCELPT testing. Evidence of current Florida EMT- 
Basic certification (or eligible for certification - must 
be Florida certified within 90 days of beginning of EMS 
2241), a grade point average of 2.0 or higher, and 
current CPR Certification. BSC 1093C with a minimum 
grade of "C" must be completed prior to registration 
into EMS 2241. Declare student status: Paramedic 
Certificate Program 1230907. 



CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 


Credit 


BSC 

EMS 


1093C 
2241 


Anatomy & Physiology I 
Paramedic I 


Hours 

4 
3 


EMS 


224 IL 


Paramedic I Lab 


2 


EMS 


2242 


Paramedic II 


3 


EMS 


2242L 


Paramedic II Lab 


2 


EMS 


2243 


Paramedic III 


4 


EMS 


2244 


Paramedic IV 


4 


EMS 


2245 


Paramedic V 


3 


EMS 


2245L 


Paramedic V Lab 


2 


EMS 

EMS 


2457 
2458 


Paramedic Field Internship I 
Paramedic Field Internship II 


2 
2 


EMS 


2459 


Paramedic Field Internship III 


4 


EMS 
EMS 


2469 
2647 


Paramedic Hospital Clinicals 
Advanced Airway Management 


4 
3 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



42 



116 




NETWORK SPECIALIST 



The Network Specialist College Certificate is designed 
to prepare students for entry level employment as a local 
area network (LAN) administrator. Upon completion of this 
program, students will be able to design, implement and 
manage local area network clients and servers. 

The students will be trained utilizing industry standards, 
business platforms and operating systems. To enable the 
student to work effectively in modern business 
environments, the program stresses the development of skills 
in written and oral communication, human relations, 
management and business operations. Course work in this 
program articulates into the Associate in Science Degree in 
Networking Services Technology. 

This certificate is in the process of approval hy the 
Florida Department of Education at the time of this 
publication. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this 

Catalog. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 

Credit 
Hours 



MGF 


1106 


Mathematics for Liberal Arts I 








or higher mathematics 


3 






TOTAL 


3 


CERTIFICATE CORE REQUIREMENTS: 




CDA 


1005 


Networking 1 


3 


CDA 


2500 


Networking 11 


3 


CGS 


1100 


Microcomputer Skills 


4 


CGS 


2260 


Computer Hardware and 








Software Maintenance 


3 


CIS 


2321 


Data Systems and Management 


3 


COP 


1000 


Introduction to Computer 








Programming 


3 


GEB 


1011 


Introduction to Business 


3 


*OST 


1141 


Computer Keyboarding 


3 


SLS 


1331 


Personal Business Skills 


3 






TOTAL 


28 



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 



31 



*Student may substitute any computer course in its place. 



PROGRAM PREREQUISITES: 
NONE 




117 



TURF EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY 

The Turf Equipment Technology one-year certillcalc 
program is desiiincd lo prepare students to become employed 
as turt equipnienl managers. The core classes witiiin this 
program are structured to help the students establish and 
maintain a c»>mprehensi\e knowledge base with respect to 
all goir course related equipment management issues. These 
courses also help the students to gain a high degree of 
proficiency in the language of the turfgrass industry. 

( ()l KM I'RI Ki;(,)l ISl IIS: 

KifiT 111 s|)i'iifii loiirsi' (U'M't'iptions Jisli'd in this (alaloj;. 



PKOCRAM PRKRKQl ISITES: 
NONK 



CERTIFICATK CORK REQUIREMENTS: 



Basic Golf Course Mechanics I 
Basic Golf Course Mechanics II 
Turf Equipment Diagnostics I 
Turf Hquipment Diagnostics II 
Turf Hquipment Sharpening and 
Grinding 

Turf Equipment Paints and Painting 
Turf Equipment Welding 
Principles of Turfgrass Science I 
Principles of Turfgrass Science II 
Golf Course Shop Management I 
Golf Course Shop Management II 
Field Training in Turf Equipment 
Management 

Golf Course Organization and 
Administration 
CREDIT HOURS: 



GCO 


120! 


GCO 


1202 


GCO 


12I1C 


GCO 


I2I2C 


GCO 


1220 


GCO 


1242 


GCO 


I252C 


GCO 


I4(K) 


GCO 


140.1 


GCO 


1611 


GCO 


1612 


GCO 


1942 



GCO 2632 



TOTAL 



Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
38 




118 




119 



Course Information 



Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System 

Courses in this ("aialoi: are uleiuifled by prefixes and numbers that were assigned by Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System. 
This eoininon numbermi; s\ stem is used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida and by seventeen participating non-public institutions. 
The major purpi>se of this sy stem is to tacilitatc the transfer of courses between participating institutions. 

E-ach participating institution controls the title, credit, and content of its own courses and recommends the first digit of the course number 
to indicate the le\el at which students normally take the course. Course prefixes and the last three digits of the course numbers are assigned by 
members ot faculty discipline committees appointed for that purpose by the Florida Department of Education in Tallahassee. Individuals 
nominated to serve on these committees are selected to maintain a representative balance as to type of institution and discipline field or 
specialization. 

The ctiurse prefix and each digit in the course number have a meaning in the Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS). The list of 
course prefixes and numbers, along w ith their generic titles, is referred to as the "SCNS taxonomy." Descriptions of the content of courses are 
referred to as "course equivalency profiles." 

Kxample of Course Identifier 



Prtfix 

sv(; 


l,e\el Code 

(first digit) 

1 


Century Digit 

(second digit) 



Decade Digit 

(third digit) 

1 


Unit Digit 

(fourth digit) 



Lab Code 


StKiology, 
General 


Freshman Level 
at this institution 


Entry-level 

General 

Sociology 


Survey Course 


Social Problems 


No Laboratory 
component in 
this course 



General Rule for Course Equivalencies 

Fqui\alent courses at different institutions are identified by 
the same prefixes and same last three digits of the course number 
and are guaranteed to be transferable between participating 
institutions that ofter the course, w ith a few exceptions. (Exceptions 
are listed below.) 

For example, a survey course in social problems is offered by 
31 different postsecondary institutions. Each institution uses 
"SYG_()1() ■ to identify its social problems course. The level code 
is the first digit and represents the year in which students normally 
take the course at a specific institution. In the SCNS taxonomy, 
"SYG" means "Sociology, General." the century digit "0" 
represents "Entry -level General Sociology." the decade digit "I" 
represent.s "Suney Course." and the unit digit "0" represents "ScKial 
Problems." 

In science and other areas, a "C" or "L " after the course 
number is known as a lab indicator. The "C" represents a combined 
lecture and laboratory course that meets in the same place at the 
same time. The "L" represents a laboratory course or the laboratory 
part of a course, having the same prefix and course number without 
a lab indicator, which meets at a different time or place. 

Transfer of any successfully completed course from one 
institution to another is guaranteed in cases where the course to be 
transferred is equivalent to one offered by the receiving institution. 
Eiquivalencies are established by the same prefix and last three 
digits and comparable faculty credentials at both institutions. For 
example. SYG 1010 is offered at a community college. The same 
course is offered at a state university as SYG 2010. A student who 
has successfully completed SYG 1010 at the community college 
is guaranteed to receive transfer credit for SYG 2010 at the state 
university if the student transfers. The student cannot be required 
to take SYG 2010 again since SYG 1010 is equivalent to SYG 
2010. Transfer credit must be awarded for successfully completed 
equivalent courses and used by the receiving institution to detemiine 
satisfaction of requirements by transfer students on the same basis 
as credit awarded to the native students. It is the prerogative of the 
receiving institution, however, to offer transfer credit for courses 
successfully completed which have not been designated as 
equivalent. 



120 



The Course Prefix 

The course prefix is a three-letter designator for a major 
division of an academic discipline, subject matter area, or sub- 
category of knowledge. The prefix is not intended to identify the 
department in which a course is offered. Rather, the content of a 
course determines the assigned prefix to identify the course. 

Authority for Acceptance of Equivalent Courses 

State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.024( 19). Florida 
Administrative Code, reads: 

When a student transfers among postsecondary institutions 
that are fully accredited by a regional or national accrediting agency 
recognized by the United States Department of Education and that 
participate in the common course designation and numbering 
system, the receiving institution shall award credit for courses 
satisfactorily completed at the previous participating institutions 
when the courses are judged by the appropriate common course 
designation and numbering system faculty task forces to be 
academically equivalent to courses offered at the receiving 
institution, including equivalency of faculty credentials, regardless 
of the public or nonpublic control of the previous institution. The 
award of credit may be limited to courses that are entered in the 
course numbering system. Credits so awarded shall satisfy 
institutional requirements on the same basis as credits awarded to 
native students. 

Exceptions to the General Rule for Equivalency 

The follow ing courses are exceptions to the general rule for course 
equivalencies and may not transfer. Transferability is at the 
discretion of the receiving institution: 

A. Courses in the WW-999 series(e.g.. ART 2905) 

B. Internships, practica. clinical experiences, and study abroad 
courses 

C. Performance or studio courses in Art, Dance, Theater, and 
Music 

D. Skills courses in Criminal Justice 

E. Graduate courses 

College preparatory and \ocational preparatory courses may 
not be used to meet degree requirements and are not transferable. 

Questions about the Statewide Course Numbering System 
should be directed to Kathleen Castagna. Institutional Statewide 
Course Numbering System Contact, in the Office of the District 
Vice President. Academic Affairs. 



COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 



121 



Course Descriptions 



ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY 

A((; I(M»1 FINANCIALACCOUNTlNr, I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

IntrixJuciion to basic Hnancial accounting principles and 
their application to current business practices for single 
proprietorships. Major emphasis is placed on the 
accounting cycle, current assets and liabilities, 
merchandising and inventory, non-current assets and 
payroll. 

ACX; 2011 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACCJ 1001, MAC 1 105 or permi.ssion 
or instructor. 

Continuation of financial accounting principles for 
partnerships and corporations. Major emphasis is placed 
on stockholder's equity, long term liabilities, 
subsidiaries, statement of cash flow, and analysis of 
financial statements. 

ACG 2071 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACG 2011 

Introduction to basic managerial accounting principles 
and their application to current business practices for 
all forms of business organizations. Emphasis is placed 
on product costing, responsibility accounting and 
perfomiance evaluation, budgeting, decision analysis, 
and just-in-time philosophy. 

ACG 2500 GOVERNMENTAL AND NOT-FOR- 
PROFIT ACCOUNTING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: TAX 2000, or permission of instructor. 

This course covers definitions and operations of the 
various funds used in Government and non-profit 
accounting: I fund accounting principles and concepts; 

2 record keeping requirements; 3 various tax reporting 
requirements and forms. 

RMI 2001 PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers basic principles and concepts relating 
to risk management as it relates to personal and business 
environments. The major areas of instruction include 
property/casualty, life, and health. 



TAX 2000 FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTING I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACG 1001, or permission of in.structor. 

This course presents federal income tax as it applies to 
individuals, with limited coverage of corporate tax and 
partnership information returns. Students prepare a 
comprehensive joint income tax return. Current tax law 
is also covered. 

TAX 2010 FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTING II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: TAX 2000 

This course is a continuation of Federal Tax Accounting 
I dealing with Federal taxation of partnerships, 
corporations, estates, trusts and other selected topics. It 
is intended to provide the level of knowledge necessary 
to pass the Enrolled Agents Examination sponsored by 
the Internal Revenue Service. 

TAX 2401 TRUSTS, ESTATES, AND GIFTS: 
ACCOUNTING AND TAXATION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: TAX 2000, or permission of 
instructor. 

This course covers definitions and operations of the 
various fiduciary forms of wealth transfer including: 1 
fiduciary accounting principles and concepts; 2 record 
keeping requirements; 3 various tax reporting 
requirements, forms, and calculations. 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

(See Science) 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 1410 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL 
ANTHROPOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the basic concepts and methods of 
cultural anthropology. Comparisons between tribal and 
statal cultures are emphasized to give a total perspective to 
the explanation of human behavior (I) 

ANT 1511 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL 
ANTHROPOLOGY-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A comparative approach to human culture, personality, and 
social systems with close attention given to non-Western 
cultures and societies. 



122 



(*) Preparatory credit, docs not count toward a degree or certificate 
( ** ) Offered if sufficient demand. 



ART 



ARH 1000 ART APPRECIATION-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

An introductory course about the visual arts. Emphasis is 
placed on the analysis of medium and technique, discussion 
of the social context for art-making, and the recognition of 
selected art movements. Includes classes in the Gallery of 
Fine Art and includes visits to galleries. 

ARH 1050 HISTORY OF ART I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture) 
from prehistoric times to the European Renaissance. (I) 

ARH 1051 HISTORY OF ART II- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture) 
from the European Renaissance to the present. (I) 

ARH 1950 INTRODUCTION TO EUROPEAN ART AND 
ARCHITECTURE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Permission of Instructor; reservation for 
Edison Humanities Study Tour. 

A combination of classroom instruction with a guided tour 
of European art museums and galleries plus architectural 
sites. Students are accompanied by the instructor on this 
tour, and seminars are conducted in Europe. While the 
course is not a detailed survey of historical styles, it provides 
the student with an introductory experience to the richness 
and diversity of European visual arts. A paper is required 
and a written examination is given at the end of the tour. (I) 

ARH 2052 ART OF THE WESTERN WORLD-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines the greatest works of the Western 
visual tradition, highlighting issues of social context, form 
and iconography. 

ART 1201C BASIC DESIGN-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a basic foundation in two-dimensional 
design. Fundamental design problems common to the visual 
arts will also be studied. 

ART 1300C DRAWING I-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

This course is a practical inquiry into the processes and 
potentialities of drawing through the investigation of 
elements, media, materials and concepts. 

ART 1301C DRAWING H-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ART 1300C or permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is a continuation of the experiences encountered 
in Drawing I with more complex problems and options. 



ART 1701C THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 
(SCULPTURE)-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an introduction to concepts, tools and 
materials relative to sculptural form and expression. 

ART 2110C CERAMICS I-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

An introductory course that encompasses the basic ceramics 
processes, instruction in clay mixing, forming (coil, slab 
and wheel), glazing, kiln construction and firing. 

ART 2111C CERAMICS II-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ART 21 IOC or permission of the 
instructor. 

A continuing study in designing ceramic objects as well as 
the making of clay, formulating glazes, and loading and 
unloading kilns. 

ART 2150C JEWELRY DESIGN I-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

A beginning course in designing and constructing jewelry 
forms in metal and other appropriate materials through the 
techniques of soldering, casting and other means of 
fabrication. 

ART 2151C JEWELRY DESIGN II-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ART 2150C or permission of the 
instructor. 

A continuing study in designing and constructing jewelry 
forms in metal and other appropriate materials through the 
techniques of soldering, casting, and other means of 
fabrication. 

ART 2400C PRINTMAKING I-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ART 1201C, 1300C or permission of 
instructor. 

This is a beginning course in the execution of multi-original 
prints, using the techniques, tools and materials of relief, 
intaglio (engraving and etching), serigraphy (silk screen) 
and lithography. 

ART 2401C PRINTMAKING II-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ART 2400C or permission of instructor. 

This is a continuing study in the execution of multi-original 
prints, using the techniques, tools and materials common 
to relief, intaglio and lithography. 

ART 2600C INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ART- 

AA(**) 

2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

A practical introductory course utilizing the personal 
computer for the creation of art and graphics. Projects will 
be produced using the objectives of fundamental visual 
design concepts and their application through machine- 
generated graphics technology. Training is provided in the 
use of computers, peripherals, and software. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



123 



ART 2602( IM KKMKDI VI K ( OMI'l IKK ART-AA(**) 

2 class hours. 3 lah(irat(»r\ hours 3 Credits 

Prfri-quisitc: AR I' 26(M)C". or pfrmission of instructor. 

riiis IS an aihaiicod coiiccriK'd with praclical design 
concepts and the utih/ation of the computer for art and 
graphics as a tiH»l. from conception to tlnal hard copy. 

\RT 25l(t( PMMINt; l-AA 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

PriTiquisjtc: ART I20IC. 1300C or permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is a studio course in visual problem-solving 
through experience with materials and concepts common 
to easel painting. 

ART 252()( PAINTINC; II-AA 

2 class hours. 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ART 25 IOC or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of Painting I with emphasis 
on individual experimentation. 

pc;v 240IC phot(k;raphy i-aa 

2 class hours, 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to basic aspects of black and 
white photography. The camera, light'ng. film processing, 
printing and presentation is studied. Technical printing as 
well as the aesthetics of photography will be emphasized. 
Please note: This course requires a manual 35mm camera 
and the purchase of darkroom supplies. 

PGY 241()C PHOTOGRAPHY H-AA 

2 class hours. 3 studio hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PGY 2401C or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of Photography I. The course 
will further investigate the black and white process. 
Exposure, negative development, printing, chemistry, 
composing and personal expression are emphasized. Please 
note: Photo I and 11 require a manual 35mm camera and 
the purchase of darkroom supplies. 

ASTRONOMY 

(See Science) 



BIOLOGY 



(See Science) 



BANKING AND FINANCE 



(See Business/Management/Finance) 



BUSINESS/MANAGEMENT/FINANCE 

ACG 1002 MICROCOMPUTER ACCOUNTING 
APPLICATIONS-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Microcomputer Accounting Applications is a stand-alone, 
introductory computerized accounting course. The course 
is intended to provide business students with the basics of 
accounting while introducing them to an automated 
accounting system. This course is not a prerequisite to 
Financial Accounting 1, nor is it requisite to the AS degree 
in Accounting Technology. 

BAN 1004 PRINCIPLES OF BANKING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the fundamentals of banking. 

BAN 1231 COMMERCIAL LENDING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the commercial lending 
function. It is targeted to management trainees and junior 
management, and is divided into commercial lending 
overview, the lending process, portfolio management, and 
regulation and business development. Some specific topics 
include the commercial loan customer, types of commercial 
loans, the loan decision process (information gathering, 
analysis), cost analysis, control antl profitability, and the 
regulatory and legal environment. 

BAN 1501 MONEY AND BANKING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course emphasizes the practical aspects of money and 
banking, and the basic monetary theory needed by the 
banking student to apply knowledge to a particular job. 
Historical treatment is kept to a minimum. Emphasis is also 
placed on such problems as economic stabilization, types 
of spending, the role of gold, limitations of central bank 
control, government fiscal policy, balance of payments and 
foreign exchange. 

BAN 1605 COMMUNICATIONS FOR BANKERS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a course on oral and written communications for 
bankers. The first half of the course concentrates on oral 
communications, addresses identification and analysis of 
the message and the respondent, and focuses on personal 
communications trouble spots. Using cross-evaluation and 
peer reaction, emphasis is on both the goal of the 
communication and the reaction of the listener. The second 
half of the course utilizes a "thought pattern development" 
approach in addressing the logical organization and writing 
of letters and reports. Orienting the letter or report to the 
purpose and recipient is emphasized as a means of getting 
results from written communications. The course is 
designed for persons in lower to mid-level management in 
the banking field, but can be applied by all students. 



124 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



BAN 1800 LAW AND BANKING PRINCIPLES-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides information on banking law and legal 
issues with special emphasis on the Uniform Commercial 
Code. A summary of the laws pertaining to contracts, real 
estate and bankruptcy, and the legal implications of 
consumer lending is presented. 

BAN 1801 LAW AND BANKING APPLICATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

An introduction to the laws pertaining to secured 
transactions, letters of credit and bank collection process. 
Includes material on check losses and a broad range of legal 
issues related to the processing of checks, as well as 
collateral, perfection and default. Case histories are used 
extensively. 

BAN 2114 DEPOSIT OPERATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines the deposit operations of banks in 
the context of the U.S. payments system. It explores how 
banks operate relative to their deposit-taking activities and 
management of deposited funds. Emphasis is on system 
rather than product or instrument. Also studied is the impact 
of the external environment on determining why banks 
operate the way they do. Government rules and regulations 
and the future of America's payment mechanisms are also 
covered. 

BAN 2155 INTERNATIONAL BANKING AND 
FINANCE-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to international banking 
with an emphasis on lending concepts, international 
financial instruments, the Eurodollar market and foreign 
exchange conversion methods. 

BAN 2210 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACG 1001 

This course is a practical means of discovering how 
financial data are generated and their limitations; techniques 
for analyzing the flow of business funds; and methods for 
selecting and interpreting financial ratios. It also presents 
analytical tools for predicting and testing assumptions about 
a firm's performance. 

BAN 2240 CONSUMER LENDING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents techniques of installment lending are 
presented. Emphasis is placed on establishing credit, 
obtaining and checking information, servicing the loan, and 
collecting the amounts due. Each phase of a bank's 
installment credit operation is carefully scrutinized. Other 
topics discussed are inventory financing, special loan 
programs, business development and advertising, and the 
public relations aspect of installment lending. 



BAN 2400 THE TRUST BUSINESS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the trust department 
in banks, including how the trust department fits into the 
overall banking business, the services it provides, and in 
general, how these services are delivered. The changing 
role of the trust department is also highlighted. 

BAN 2405 TRUST OPERATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

The purpose of this course is to discuss the concepts and 
ideas that comprise the various trust functions and to 
translate them into workable procedures. The course is 
divided into three segments: 1 The securities business, 
which gives a firm grounding in securities investments; 2 
trust services, which focuses on the role of financial 
institutions in providing trust services; and 3 trust 
accounting concepts and functions, the procedures used in 
a trust department to keep track of the cash and assets that 
move in and out of the accounts each day. 

BAN 2511 MARKETING FOR BANKERS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a thorough understanding of basic 
marketing principles and theory and their practical 
application to the banking industry. 

BUL 2241 BUSINESS LAW I- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to develop the student's 
understanding of the law as a social force which directs 
and guides both business and the consumer. Major emphasis 
will be law as it pertains to torts, governmental regulation, 
consumer protection, contracts, sales, warranties, personal 
property and bailments. 

BUL 2242 BUSINESS LAW II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BUL 2241 or permission of instructor. 

This course provides an analysis in law as it relates to 
commercial paper, secured transactions, insurance, 
bankruptcy, partnerships, corporations, real property, wills, 
trusts and other related subjects. 

FIN 2000 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACG 1001 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
principles of finance as applied to the operations of a profit- 
seeking (non-bank) firm. Major points of emphasis are 
measuring needs for, acquiring, and using business funds. 
Case studies will be used to illustrate the process of financial 
management. 

FIN 2100 PERSONAL FINANCE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course designed to acquaint the student with personal 
and family financial planning. Topics to be covered include 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



125 



the objectives of personal financial planning, setting up and 
maintaining records, budgeting, developing and managing 
income, consumer expenditures, safeguarding resources, 
investing for retirement, income tax considerations and 
estate planning. 

FSS 1 KM) MKM PLANNING AND MERCHANDISING -AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This ci>ursc covers the principles of menu planning for 
various types of food service facilities. Menu layout, 
selection, pricing, copy writing and development are 
discussed. Students create their own menu. 

FSS 1272 UNDERSTANDING WINE AND SPIRITS-AS 
3 cla.ss hours 3 Credits 

This course provides the student with a knowledge of wine 
making with special emphasis on California wines. Students 
will learn to identify wines by aroma and taste. Beer and 
spirits are discussed with special attention given to trends 
and server responsibilities. 

FSS 2120 FOOD PURCHASING MANAGEMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course describes the development and implementation 
of an effective food purchasing program, focusing on the 
role of purchasing specifications, and the use of forms and 
control techniques. 

FSS 2251 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT AND 
SERVICE-AS(**) 
3 Class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a basic understanding of the principles 
of food production and service management, reviewing 
sanitation, menu planning, purchasing, storage, and 
beverage management. 

GEB 101 1 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a general outline of the nature of 
business, including ownership, management, and 
organization. Business operations such as finance and 
decision-making controls are emphasized. The legal and 
regulatory environment in which business operates is 
examined. 

GEB 1949 INTERNSHIP WORK EXPERIENCE I -AA 

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of college 
course work or permission of appropriate District Dean 
and permission to register from the Internship 
Specialist. 

3 Credits 
This course offers an internship work experience in a 
cooperative program between Edison Community College, 
students and local employers. Students may use current 
employment or seek desired employment or volunteer 
experiences to incorporate their academic learning into a 
real-world work experience. Participation and eligibility is 
determined by the Internship Specialist. Students in most 
programs of study are eligible. This course requires verified 
work hours and a final summary repon at the end of the 



internship experience. Each student participates in the 
development of an approved individual learning plan. The 
student's work habits and experiences are evaluated by the 
Internship Specialist at regular intervals and a final grade 
is based on approved criteria. Students may register for the 
course at any time during the semester and are not limited 
by semester time frames. 

GEB 2949 INTERNSHIP WORK EXPERIENCE II -AA 

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of college 
course work or permission of appropriate District Dean 
and permission to register from the Internship 
Specialist. 

3 Credits 
This course is for students wanting to complete a second 
internship. Students may build upon their first internship 
with the same employer or pursue a separate internship with 
a different employer. 

HFT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY 
MANAGEMENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course traces the growth and development of the 
hospitality industry. Emphasis on the operational units of a 
hospitality organization such as food and beverage, 
personnel, accounting, and sales. Various hospitality 
organizations will be discussed with regard to career 
opportunities, including hotels/motels, restaurants, clubs, 
travel agencies, cruise ships, institutional services, and 
recreational parks. Current and new management concepts 
and practices are presented. 

HFT 1050 TOURISM AND THE HOSPITALITY 
INDUSTRY-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course takes a cross-disciplinary approach to 
examining tourism. The social science perspective provides 
students with the kind of practical knowledge that can be 
effectively applied to the hospitality industry. 

HFT 1210 HUMAN RELATIONS AND SUPERVISORY 
DEVELOPMENT-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides information relating to the recruitment 
and selection of new staff, the handling of difficult 
employees, motivating employees and conducting . 
performance evaluations. 

HFT 1602 ETHICS IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with an understanding of the 
ethical issues in hospitality management, and helps them 
develop high ethical business standards. 

HFT 1790 TOURISM LEISURE SERVICE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the history and social 
impact of leisure and recreation, including a survey of 
organizations providing recreational services. 



126 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



HFT 2276 RESORT MANAGEMENT-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course offers a complete approach to the operation of 
resort properties. Beginning with historical development, 
details are presented in planning, financial investment 
management, and marketing that deal with the unique nature 
of the resort business. The course also examines the future 
of the condominium, time-sharing, technological change, 
and the increased cost of energy and transportation. 

HFT 2313 HOTEL/MOTEL PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers all phases of property management, 
including pest control, security, parking, maintenance, 
laundry, fire prevention, pools, tennis courts, care of guest 
rooms and public space, with emphasis on equipment, 
personnel and modem innovations. 

HFT 2410 FRONT OFFICE PROCEDURES-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course traces the flow of activities and functions 
performed in today's lodging operations with a comparison 
of manual, machine assisted, and computer based methods 
for each front office function. 

HFT 2421 HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY ACCOUNTING 

FOR MANAGEMENT-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the accounting concerns and techniques 

necessary for managerial decisions in the hospitality 

industry. 

HFT 2500 TOURISM DESTINATION MARKETING-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HFT 1050 

This course provides an understanding of the factors that 
influence peoples' decisions to select among competing 
destinations for leisure, business and convention travel. 
Topics include research and development of an area-wide 
marketing plan. 

HFT 2501 HOSPITALITY SALES PROMOTION-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents a practical understanding of the 
operating statement and precisely where, how, and why the 
sales effort fits into the total earnings and profit picture of 
a hospitality operation. Emphasis is on producing business 
profits. 

HFT 2600 HOSPITALITY LAW-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an awareness of the rights and 
responsibilifies that the law grants to or imposes upon 
employees of the hospitality industry, and illustrates the 
possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. 



HFT 2750 CONVENTION MANAGEMENT AND 
SERVICES-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course defines the scope and various segments of the 
convention market, explains what is required to meet 
individual needs, and most importantly, explores methods 
and techniques that lead to better service. 

MAN 2021 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents basic management principles and 
theory, including the history, progress and functions of 
management. The relation of management principles to 
operations and the management process in business are 
emphasized. 

MAN 2043 MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS FOR 
IMPROVEMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides managerial students with the 
theoretical and hands-on training in the process of 
continuous leadership improvement through identifying, 
analyzing, and solving problems that will positively impact 
on customer satisfaction. Management quality is presented 
in a manner that emphasizes principles and practices 
including excellence, efficiency, and effectiveness. 

MAN 2241 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAN 2021 or equivalent recommended. 

This course provides students with an understanding of the 
human processes in formal organizations, utilizing 
individual and group exercises which simulate behavioral 
dynamics of organizations. Content areas include conflict 
resolution, communication, leadership, planning and 
control, as well as other organizational processes. 

MAN 2800 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Small business firms consfitute an important part of today's 
business system. This course focuses on the need for small 
business firms to anticipate and adjust promptly to 
significant shifts, customer demands, competitors' actions 
and public expectations. Emphasis is on improving the 
quality of small firm management and should contribute to 
the success of individual firms. 

MAR 2011 MARKETING-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of marketing principles and their 
relauonship to product, price, promotion and distribution. 
The interrelationship between marketing and other business 
operadons of the firm is included. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



127 



NIAK 2141 INTKRNATIONAL MARKETING AND 
BISINKSS PRACTICES- AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This ciiursc iniriKluccs students to the concepts of marketing 
which are unique to international business. Students 
investigate product development, channel systems, 
organizational alternatives, business practices and customs, 
and legal issues, as they relate to the world market. 

MKA 1161 IMRODl'CTION TO CUSTOMER SERVICE-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides the student with the basic concepts 
and current trends in the customer service industry. Through 
actual case studies students analyze customer service 
strategies. 

MKA 151 1 ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course re\ iew s all phases of sales promotion including 
advertising display, direct mail, radio and television. 
Emphasis is placed on creation of the message, selection 
of media, and the planning, coordinating, controlling, and 
evaluation of the campaign. 

MKA 2021 SAEESMANSHIF-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study and analysis of the fundamental 
concepts of selling and the role of sales in today's economy. 
Current techniques and vital principles of selling are taught. 
Opinions of sales executives, excerpts from job manuals, 
and company materials supplement the textbook. 

MKA 2169 SEMINAR IN CUSTOMER SERVICE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKA 1161 

This course prepares the student to recognize quality 
customer service techniques that enable any employee with 
customer service responsibility to handle customer service 
interactions more effectively. 

MNA 1804 APPLIED TECHNOLOGY- AS 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full-time (900 
or more clock hours) program at a vocational-technical 
school \*ith the College District. Completion and 
submission of the application (Form No. BT-007) along 
\tith official verification of program completion 
(transcripts and certificates of completion). 9 Credits 
This course serves as a vehicle to accept any applied 
technology program (9(X) or more hours) completed in any 
of the Vo-Tech schools within the College District as 
specified in the Business Administration and Management 
Articulation Agreement. 

MNA 23(M) PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to personnel administration. 
Emphasis is placed on staff personnel activities and 
responsibilities of line management in personnel work. 



MNA 2345 SUPERViSION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to aid first-line supervisors in 
making a smooth transition from expert in a particular task 
to that of a supervisor who must produce results through 
the efforts of others. 

MTB 1103 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: Placement testing. 

This basic course involves the study of percent calculations 
used in taxes, insurance, wages, depreciation and retail 
mathematics. Emphasis is also placed on simple interest, 
present value at compound interest, annuities and 
amortization. 

REE 1040 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND LAW-AA(**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course presents the basic principles of real estate, 
property rights in real estate, ownership and leasing, 
property ownership, financing real estate, real estate 
brokerage and Florida real estate law. 

REE 2041 REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE PRINCIPLES 
AND PRACTICES-AA(**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: REE 1040 or permission of instructor. 

The course is a prerequisite to licensing as a real estate 
broker in Florida and deals with real estate appraisal, 
financing, investment and office management. Students are 
expected to have mastered the mechanics of filling out 
closing statements prior to registration as a broker. Florida 
Real Estate Commission (FREC) rules apply. 

SLS 1331 PERSONAL BUSINESS SKILLS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to prepare students, business 
managers, and supervisors to meet the challenges in the 
ever-changing business world. Students develop the skills 
necessary to understand and cope with life's challenges. 
Emphasis is placed on business entrepreneurship, job 
seeking skills, leadership skills, decision making skills, goal 
setting, problem solving, stress and time management, and 
other employability skills. It is recommended that students 
take this course near the end of their degree program. 

SVL 1001 INTRODUCTION TO SAVINGS 
ASSOCIATION BUSINESS-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the modem business 
world and to the role of savings associations, including 
historical development, present day organization, 
competition and future direction. 

SVL 1 101 SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OPERATIONS-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines specialized areas of savings 
association lending, including large scale mortgage loans, 
the role of government in home financing, the management 
of real estate owned and whole loan sales and participation. 



128 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



SVL 1111 TELLER OPERATIONS-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course explains the importance of the teller in creating 
and maintaining good customer relations; summarizes the 
requirements for check negotiability and acceptability; 
identifies the different types of savings account ownership 
and the requirements for each; describes routine and special 
transactions handled by tellers; and outlines recommended 
procedures to follow in the event of fire, robbery or cash 
shortage. 

SVL 1113 SAVINGS ACCOUNTS- AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course enables students to understand the nature of 
savings accounts, types of savings account ownership, and 
problems unique to savings accounts. This course is 
considered to be a key factor in that it gives a thorough 
study of one of the two main functions of an association. 

SVL 1211 CONSUMER LENDING FOR SAVINGS 
ASSOCIATIONS-AS(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to consumer credit terms, 
concepts and practices. Types of loans, laws and regulations, 
interest calculation, credit evaluation and collection 
techniques are emphasized. Previous knowledge of savings 
associations or lending operations is strongly 
recommended. 

SVL 1221 MORTGAGE LENDING-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course describes the role of the loan department and 
how it relates to the total organization of the association; 
assesses the system of credit investigation and analysis; 
summarizes the standard procedures an association follows 
to maintain a loan from closing to the date it is paid off; 
evaluates the essential characteristics of loans made for 
construction; apartment, condominium and commercial 
loans; distinguishes between conventional and FHAA'A 
loans; assesses the role of savings associations in the 
secondary mortgage market. 

SVL 1241 MORTGAGE LOANS SERVICING-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course students learn the procedures for loan 
servicing including processing payments, escrow accounts, 
real estate taxes, insurance and contract changes. The 
securing of delinquent loans, foreclosure and real estate 
owned are also examined. Upon successful completion of 
this course, students should be better able to: summarize 
loan servicing procedures for a conventional mortgage; 
discuss methods of handling FHA and VA loans, and 
distinguish between these and conventional home mortgage 
loans; and differentiate whole loans and participation and 
procedures for the selling and servicing of these loans. 



SVL 141 1 TECHNIQUES FOR CONSUMER 
COUNSELING-AS(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course students gain an understanding of effective 
interviewing techniques and formulate their own strategies 
for discovering and meeting customer needs. This course 
also affords students the opportunity, through assertiveness 
training and transactional analysis, to develop insight and 
an expertise in effectively communicating with customers. 

CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY 

CPT 1200 CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOLOGY-AS 

4 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisites: RET 1024, RET 1616C, RET 1821L 

This course is designed to provide the cardiovascular 
technology student with the pharmacology needed to 
function in clinical experiences. This includes 
classifications of medications, modes of action, indications, 
contraindications, and their effect on cardiac output and its 
determinates. The course also prepares the student to 
recognize basic cardiac arrhythmias, understand basic 
radiographic theory, safety, protection and cardial 
catheterization laboratory equipment. 

CPT 1920 CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGIST AS A 
PROFESSIONAL-AS 

4 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: All CPT Courses 
Corequisite: CPT 2842L 

The professional relationship of the cardiovascular 
technologist to other health professionals is presented, along 
with a basic format for research. Resume preparation and 
interview skills are also discussed. Students also present 
case studies and receive instruction and testing in Advanced 
Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). 

CPT 2420C INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY IAS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: CPT 1200 
Corequisites: CPT 2840L, CPT 2620C 

This course introduces the student to the specific procedures 
performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory and the 
use of the resulting data for patient diagnosis. Additional 
topics include aseptic techniques, sterilization, patient 
assessment, radiography, pharmacology, cardiac wave 
forms, coronary artery anatomy, equipment and tools 
utilized in cardiac catheterization, hemodynamic data and 
analysis, right and left heart caths, and complications and 
treatment of cardiac catheterization. 

CPT 2421C INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY HAS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPT 2420C, CPT 2840L, CPT 2620C 
Corequisites: CPT 2841 L 

This course is designed to tie together cardiac diseases as 
well as to continue teaching the student classifications and 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



129 



the use of equipment and techniques used in invasive 
cardiology. An in-depth presentation of various cardiac 
diseases including cort)nary artery disease, angina, 
myocardial infarction, heart failure, valve diseases, 
cardiomyapathies. pericardial disorders, arrythmias, 
congenital anomalies and repair procedures is also 
presented. Additionally, students learn the various 
calculations performed in the cath lab including cardiac 
outputs, vascular resistance, \alve areas and shunts. 

CPT 2620C NON-INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY 
TEC HNOI.OGY IAS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prenquisite: C PI 1200 
Corequisites: CPT 2840L. CPT 2420C 

This course presents an introduction to non-invasive 
cardiology and those tests performed in this area. In 
addition, nomial and abnormal heart rhythms, patient safety, 
stress testing. Holter monitoring and an introduction in 
echocardiography is presented. 

CPT 262 IC NON-INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY 
TECHNOLOGY HAS (elective) 
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPT 2620C, CPT 2420C, CPT 2840L 
Corequisites: CPT 2841L, CPT 2421C 
This course presents an in-depth view of echocardiography. 
A firm didactic foundation for echocardiography is 
presented with provisions available for further study of this 
complex technique including 2-D. M-Mode. continuous, 
pulse wave, and color doppler techniques. 

CPT 2840L CARDIOVASCULAR PRACTICUM II- AS 

18 laboratory hours 7 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPT 1200 
Corequisites: CPT 2420C, CPT 2620C 

Clinical experience in all procedures performed in the 
cardiovascular laboratories, including use of equipment, 
performing tests and patient care as it relates to the 
cardiovascular areas with emphasis on cardiac 
catheterization, ECG, stress testing. Holter monitoring and 
an introduction to echocardiography. 

CPT 2841 L CARDIOVASCULAR PRACTICUM III-AS 

26 laboratory hours 7 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPT 2840L, CPT 2420C, CPT 2620C 
Corequisites: CPT2421C 

This course is designed for students to gain more in-depth 
clinical experience in invasive cardiology including pre and 
post cath activities, cardiovascular techniques. 
hemodynamic monitoring, intra aortic balloon pump, and 
cardiac output measurements. Clinical practice in the 
cardiac catheterization lab includes circulating, scrubbing, 
recording and manipulating the imaging equipment during 
both diagnostic and interventional catheterization 
procedures. 



CPT 2842L CARDIOVASCULAR PRACTICUM IV-AS 

36 laboratory hours 7 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPT 284 IL, CPT 2421C, RET 2244 
Corequisite: CPT 1920 

This course is designed for students to gain additional 
clinical experience and polish their skills in the cardial 
catheterization laboratory performing all duties involved 
in diagnostic and interventional cases. 

CHEMISTRY 

(See Science) 

CITRUS PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

NOTE; The following courses are provided under an agreement 
with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural 
Sciences (UF/IFAS). These courses are offered and taught by the 
University of Florida, and are taught at the IFAS Center at 
Immokalee, Florida. Edison accepts these courses as the technical 
portion of Edison Community College's AS degree program in 
Citrus Production Technology. The student must register for these 
courses with the University of Florida. Registration may be 
accomplished on the first night of class. For information regarding 
the scheduling of these classes, please call the IFAS Center at 
Immokalee at (941)658-3400. 

AGG 2933 CURRENT TOPICS IN AGRICULTURE 

3 hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of contemporary issues 
and regulations facing the citrus industry and agriculture. 

AMO 2730 INTRODUCTION TO WATER MANAGEMENT 
3 hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an introduction to design and 
management of agriculture irrigation and drainage systems 
with emphasis on familiarizing students with applicable 
reference information available from the IFAS Cooperative 
Extension Service. 

HOS 1541 CITRUS CULTURE I 

3 hours 3 Credits 

History, botany, physiology, and environmental 
considerations of citrus. Nursery practices, rootstocks, 
scions, grove configuration and other considerations up to 
the time of grove establishment. 

HOS 2542 CITRUS CULTURE II 

3 hours 3 Credits 

This course provides basic aspects of contemporary Florida 
citriculture. Young tree planting and care; and major 
production practices including fertilization, irrigation, 
pruning, and pest management. Integration of production 
practices into a scheduled program is covered. 



130 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



PMA 2202 PESTS AND PESTICIDES 

3 hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HOS 1541 

This course is an introduction to the principles and practices 
relating to the integrated management of major diseases, 
weeds, insects, and other arthropod pests of citrus. 

SOS 2104 SOILS AND FERTILIZERS 

3 hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a study of the physical, chemical, and 
biological properties of soils as related to citrus production; 
and the uses, types, and reactions of fertilizer materials on 
the soil. 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING/ 
NETWORKING 

CDA 1005 NETWORKING I-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or equivalent proficiency. 

This is an introductory course in computer networking 
concepts. Students gain a basic understanding of local area 
networks, and networking hardware and software. Network 
planning, security and user training is covered. 

CDA 2500 NETWORKING II-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: CDA 1005 

This course is a continuation of CDA 1005. This course 
emphasizes design, manageability, security, capacity, 
installation and interoperability of networks, and training 
users of networks. The student will learn analysis and design 
techniques, as well as hands-on experience in installing and 
troubleshooting different networks. 

CDA 2524 NETWORKING III-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: CDA 1005 

This course examinies the internet services and technologies 
as implemented on the Network Operating System (NOS) 
of Linux. Students are guided through the basics of the 
network operating system, installation of system software 
and applications software, and tools for network and system 
administration. Internet technologies including Domain 
Name Service, CGI bins for WWW servers and virtual web 
hosting are explored. Students install and configure several 
Internet services including PPP, DNS, Web Servers, virtual 
machines, ftp and email. 

CDA 2525 NETWORKING IV-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CDA 1005 

This course emphasizes design, installation, and 
management of WANs and LANs using routers and routed 
protocols. The students install and configure multi-protocol 
routers and hosts for IP, Novell and Appletalk. Remote 
access technologies including ISDN and V.90 are 



introduced and communications servers installed and 
configured. The use and configuration of firewalls and 
proxy servers is explained. 

CGS 1000 COMPUTER LITERACY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to basic computer concepts 
and computer technology for students who are not computer 
science, engineering, or MIS majors. It is an up-to-date 
survey of information processing technology, computer 
hardware and software systems, and computer applications. 
This class provides the background for students to make 
knowledgeable decisions about their future in the 
information technology world. 

CGS 1 100 MICROCOMPUTER SKILLS-A A 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course provides beginning level learning in the use of 
modem microcomputer applications used in the business 
world. The course is progressive through disk operating 
systems, word processing applications, electronic 
spreadsheets, database management system, and 
presentation software. In addition students receive a basic 
foundation in business software applications. (This course 
may be taken as separate one credit courses: CGS 1560, 
CGS 1500. CGS 1510, or CGS 1540 or as a single four 
credit course.) 

CGS 1500 WORD PROCESSING APPLICATIONS-AA(**) 
1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is an introduction to word processing 
applications with an in-depth look at several of the more 
popular programs currently being utilized on 
microcomputers. Course content includes how to create, 
edit, format, merge, move, delete, copy, extract, save, and 
print text files. 

CGS 1510 ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEET 
APPLICATIONS-AA(**) 
1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is an introduction to electronic spreadsheet 
applications with an in-depth look at several of the more 
popular programs currently being utilized on 
microcomputers. Course content includes how to create, 
edit, format, merge, move, copy, delete, extract, save, and 
print spreadsheet files to include writing formulas for 
custom applications. 

CGS 1540 DATABASE APPLICATIONS-AA(**) 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is an introduction to database management 
applications with an in-depth look at several of the more 
popular programs currently being utilized on 
microcomputers. The course content includes how to create, 
format, edit, save, and access different database files to 
include an introductory explanation of the fourth generation 
languages (4GL). 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



131 



CGS 1560 DISK OPKRATING SYSTEM-AA(**) 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is an introduction to family microcomputers 
and how to use the operating system to harness the power 
of btith software and hardware in a typical business systems 
environment. 

CGS I5«0 DKSKTOP PIJBLISHING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a "hands-on" course designed to provide 
students with a working knowledge of the concepts and 
applications of desktop publishing. The student learns how 
to utilize the main features of most desktop publishing 
software, including typefaces and type styles, graphics, 
fonts and type size. 

CGS 2260 COMPUTER HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 
MAINTENANCE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic 
understanding of computer hardware and software and the 
interrelationship between the two. Students have an 
opportunity to assemble different hardware components, 
hard drives, modems, and memory chips; install software, 
including applications software and system software, and 
troubleshoot hardware and software conflicts. 

CGS 251 1 ADVANCED SPREADSHEET COMPUTING-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CGS 1100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course provides the student with a detailed knowledge 
in the use of the most popular spreadsheet package for 
microcomputers. Students learn advanced programming 
techniques using macros, integration of interrelated 
spreadsheets, and advanced graphics techniques. Emphasis 
is placed on the student's completion of class projects in 
areas such as accounting and finance utilizing the various 
features of spreadsheet programming. 

CGS 2541 ADVANCED DATABASE COMPUTING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CGS 1100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course gives the student detailed knowledge in the 
use of the most popular database package for 
microcomputers. Students acquire skills commensurate 
with professional database usage in the business 
community. Subjects covered include the database 
environment controls, file expansion and merging, and 
advanced functions. 

CIS 2321 DATA SV.STEMS AND MANAGEMENT- AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course introduces the analysis, design, implementation 
and control of data systems for management. Students study 
the system development life cycle in depth. The course 



includes topics on methods of information storage and 
retrieval, forms design and control, system testing, and 
security. Topics on cost/benefit analysis and design, and 
development and implementation of new or replacement 
systems are discussed. 

CIS 2910 PROGRAMMING PROJECT 
DEVELOPMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: COP 2222, CIS 2321, COP 2172 
This course provides students with a project design 
experience similar to work that may be expected of them 
as entry-level programmers. Student teams perform ail 
phases of project development, design, documentation, 
coding and testing. The course is a capstone experience 
that draws from knowledge and skills gained throughout 
the student's previous courses. 

COP 1 000 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER 

PROGRAMMING WITH VISUAL BASIC-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MGF 1106, or higher mathematics, and 
CGS 1000 or equivalent proficiency. 

This is a hands-on course covering computer programming 
fundamentals for computer science, engineering and 
information systems students. This course is technical in 
nature, and examines language elements, control structures, 
input/output processing, file processing and data structures 
using a modern object-oriented programming language. 

COP 1224 PROGRAMMING WITH C++-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: COP 1000, PHI 2100, MGF 1106 or 
higher mathematics. 

This course introduces the student to structured 
programming techniques using C++ programming 
language. Students learn object-oriented C++ syntax 
including arrays, variables, functions, expressions, and 
algorithms. The focus of this class is on object-oriented 
analysis and design. Course content is achieved through a 
combination of lecture and hands-on computer projects. 

COP 2172 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: COP 1000 or previous Visual Basic 
programming skills. 

This course provides students with a firm foundation in 
applying visual programming techniques utilizing 
Microsoft Visual Basic. The course focuses on the advanced 
concepts of linking Visual Basic with other software 
applications. Students leam to use Active X controls and 
to integrate Access, Excel and Word into Visual Basic 
Applications. Students become familiar with the more 
sophisticated Custom Controls that are available in Visual 
Basic. In addition theory is translated into problem .solving 
applications. 



132 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



COP 2222 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING WITH C++-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: COP 1224 

This course explores the advanced functions of 
programming using C++ programming language. Students 
cover advanced topics including trees, linked lists, 
interrupts, windows and object oriented programming. 

OST 1 100 BEGINNING ELECTRONIC TYPING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides instruction in the touch system of 
electronic typewriter and computer keyboards and machine 
parts with emphasis on touch typing. Development of 
manipulative skills necessary in tabulation and vertical and 
horizontal centering is presented. Basic production 
problems including simple communications, reports, and 
tabulations is presented. Students develop a basic speed of 
25-35 words per minute (WPM). 

OST 1110 INTERMEDIATE ELECTRONIC TYPING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: OST 1100 or equivalent proficiency 

This course covers the application of manipulative 
electronic keyboarding skills to business typing problems 
and skill building drills. Students increase basic speed to 
35-45 WPM. Mailable production drills including business 
letters, other communication forms, manuscripts, reports, 
business forms, and tabulations is presented. 

OST 1141 COMPUTER KEYBOARDING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course students develop essential microcomputer 
keyboarding skills. Emphasis is on touch typing of 
alphabetic and numeric keys and symbols. Students develop 
basic speed and accuracy skills. This course is designed as 
an introductory keyboarding course for the general student 
population. (Students pursuing an AS degree in Applications 
should take OST 1100) 

OST 2120 ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TYPING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: OST 1110 or equivalent proficiency 

This course covers the application of previously learned 
electronic typing and knowledge to office-style typing 
problems with emphasis on mailable production. Students 
increase speed to 45-55 WPM. 

OST 2335 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credit 

Prerequisites: ENCllOl 

Note: Basic knowledge of a word processing software 
program and keyboarding skills is extremely helpful. 
This course emphasizes the importance of communication 
in business organizations. Students develop the basic 
knowledge and skills needed to solve oral communication 
problems and create successful written communication 
products. Grammar, punctuation usage and style principles 
are applied in preparing written communications that meet 



the standards of business. Students learn to analyze a 
business problem, organize their ideas logically, and express 
ideas correctly and persuasively in written and oral form. 
Students compose and keyboard written business 
communications utilizing a computer word processing 
software program. 

OST 271 1 WORD PROCESSING IAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OST 1110 or equivalent proficiency. 

This is an introductory course that develops basic skills in 
the use of word processing applications software. Students 
will learn text creation, editing, saving, printing, and 
formatting techniques using current word processing 
software. 

OST 2712 WORD PROCESSING HAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: OST 2711 

This is a continuation of Word Processing I. Advanced word 
processing skills are developed using word processing 
applications software. Students learn to work with long 
documents, merging, advanced graphic and text 
enhancement techniques, and software integration. 

OST 2828 PRESENTATION SOFT WARE- AS 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

Note: Knowledge of Windows-based word processing 
software is suggested. 

This course is an introduction to presentation graphics using 
a presentation software application program. Students learn 
the basic skills necessary to design and create professional- 
looking presentations. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 

(See Business/Management/Finance) 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CCJ 1010 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a general orientation to the field of 
Criminology. Topics covered include development of 
delinquent and criminal behavior, initial handling of proper 
referrals and preventive police techniques. Specific police 
problems are studied, including addiction, the mentally ill, 
compulsive and habitual offenders. Special attention is 
given to the police handling of juveniles and youths. 

CCJ 1020 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey course of the agencies and processes involved in 
the administration of justice. Interrelationships and 
functions of the legislature, law enforcement, prosecutor, 
courts, corrections, parole and probation are examined. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



133 



CCJ IMH) INTRODICI ION TO ( ()RRK(TIONS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This ciuirsc is a comprehensive \iew oi historical and 
philosophical treatmeiu programs, and developments in the 
field ot juvenile and adult corrections. Emphasis is placed 
on understanding the otYender in the correctional system, 
with an examination of the correctional client, the non- 
institutional correctional system, agencies, and recidivism. 

CCJ 1330 PROBATION AND PAROLEAA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the history of probation and parole 
highlighting the differences between the two. A study of 
current philosophy and practices are included. Particular 
emphasis is placed on the federal probation system and the 
structure of probation and parole in the State of Florida. 

CCJ 140() POI.ICK ORGANIZATION AND 
ADMIMSTRATION-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines the principles of organization and 
administration in law enforcement function and activities, 
including planning and research, public relations, personnel 
and training, inspection and control, and policy formation. 

CCJ 2210 CRIMINAL LAW-A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course explores the nature, sources and types of 
criminal law. including the classification and analysis of 
crimes and criminal acts in general, as well as examination 
of selected specific criminal offenses. 

CCJ 2230 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the principles, duties, and mechanics 
of criminal procedure as applied to important areas of arrest, 
force, and search and seizure. Study and evaluation of 
evidence and proof, kinds, degrees, admissibility, 
competence, and weight is also presented. Rules of evidence 
and procedure at the operational level in law enforcement 
are covered. 

CCJ 2500 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course will focus on etiology, recidivism, and 
prediction studies that relate to the field of juvenile 
delinquency. Studies will include various methods of 
prevention, correctional treatment programs, diversion 
programs, and juvenile offender rehabilitation. Also 
examined are the roles of the police, the courts, and 
corrections as relating to the juvenile offender. 

CJD 1706 CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL IAS 

4 class hours 4 credits 
Prerequisite: Florida Criminal Justice Standards and 
Training (Commission (CJSTC) Law F.nforcement or 
Corrections Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
law enforcement or corrections certification, and to 



supplement certification training as it relates to CCJ 1020 
Introduction to Criminal Justice and CCJ 1 3(K) Introduction 
to Corrections. Students are required to complete an 
introductory overview of the criminal justice system that 
includes the history of law and law enforcement, functions 
of the prosecutor and courts, history and philosophy of 
corrections, and theories of parole and probation. 

CJD 1707 CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL HAS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Florida CJSTC Law Enforcement or 
Corrections Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
law enforcement or corrections certification, and to 
supplement certification training as it relates to CCJ 2210 
Criminal Law. Students study substantive criminal law and 
Supreme Court decisions as required by the Bill of Rights 
and appropriate constitutional amendments. Issues such as 
legality of arrest and confinement as well as cruel and 
unusual punishment are addressed. 

CJD 1726 LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL III-AS 

4 cla.ss hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Florida CJSTC Law Enforcement 
Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
law enforcement certification, and to supplement 
certification training as it relates to CCJ 2230 Criminal 
Procedure and Evidence. Students study procedural 
criminal law and Supreme Court interpretations as they 
affect patrol operations, investigative functions, correctional 
rules and other legal issues. 

CJD 1727 LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: Florida CJSTC Law Enforcement 
Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
law enforcement certification. Types of patrol and patrol 
techniques are examined. Students study topics ranging 
from traffic patrol, traffic management, reporting 
procedures and methods of response in high risk situations 
such as crisis management, officer survival techniques, and 
crowd control. 

CJD 1729 LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: Florida CJSTC Law Enforcement or 
Corrections Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
law enforcement or corrections certification, and to 
supplement that training as it relates to CJT 1110 
Introduction to Crime Scene Technology and CJT 2100 
Criminal Investigative Techniques. Students study the 
history and evolution of scientific criminal investigation 
and analysis of evidence while experiencing the real world 
of crime through the discovery, identification and collection 
of evidence in a mock crime scene. Techniques of suspect 
interrogation, evidence documentation and courtroom 
testimony are covered. 



134 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



CJD 1748 CORRECTIONS OPERATIONS-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: Florida CJSTC Corrections Certification. 

This course is designed to award college credit for Florida 
corrections certification, and to supplement that training 
as it relates to CCJ 1300 Introduction to Corrections. 
Students study the history and evolution of corrections and 
penology from medieval to modem times. Philosophies and 
theories of correctional science and how they may be used 
in modern treatment and rehabilitation programs are 
examined. 

CJD 2501 INSTRUCTOR TECHNIQUES-AS 

5 class hours 5 Credits 
This is a technical training course designed to provide the 
student with the fundamental knowledge of the techniques 
of instruction and the role of the instructor in the specialized 
field of criminal justice. Completion of this course does 
not warrant academy instructor certification or employment. 

CJT 1 1 10 INTRODUCTION TO CRIME SCENE 
TECHNOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the basic scientific techniques 
used in criminal investigation with special emphasis on the 
role of the evidence technician in solving crimes. While 
the more comprehensive facilities of a criminalistics 
laboratory are explored, major attention will be focused on 
the more limited portable devices available to the small 
enforcement unit. Pertinent criminal law and Supreme 
Court interpretations are covered as background materials 
for the considerafion of types of physical evidence. 

CJT line ADVANCED CRIME SCENE 
TECHNOLOGY - AS 

4 combination class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: CJT 1110 

This course covers advanced principles and theories in 
Crime Scene Technology. Specialized collection procedures 
of weapons, traffic crash evidence, arson, gun shot residue, 
blood splatter, and recovery of buried bodies and surface 
skeletons are studied. Methods used in the identification 
and documentation of physical evidence, including the 
process of preservation are also covered. Data analysis, 
reporting, and plan of action development is emphasized. 

CJT 2100 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES - AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents criminal investigation procedures 
including theory of investigation, case preparation, specific 
techniques for selected offenses, questioning of witnesses 
and suspects, and problems in criminal investigation. 



CJT 2113 COURTROOM PRESENTATION OF 
SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE - AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite: CJT 2100 

This course covers dress, grooming, speaking, listening and 
stress control during courtroom proceedings. Visual aid 
preparation and presentations of all evidence (commonly 
referred to as "scientific evidence") collected at the crime 
scene are also included. Mock trial exercises are used. 

CJT 2141 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSICS - AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course exposes the student to the capabilities and 
functions of a full-service crime laboratory. Also covered 
is evidence selection and submission to the crime lab in 
accordance with established standards and legal 
requirements, including chain of custody. 

CJT 2220C CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY I - AS 

4 combination class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: CJT 1110 

This course includes basic crime scene photography skills, 
including camera operation and exposure control, 
proficiency in relational photos and flash control for crime 
scene and evidentiary documentation. 

CJT 2221C CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY II - AS 

4 combination class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: CJT 2220C 

This course expands upon concepts, knowledge and skills 
presented in Crime Scene Photography I, to include 
specialty light sources, darkroom techniques and 
procedures, filters and specialized equipment, such as black 
and white and color enlargers. 

CJT 2241 LATENT FINGERPRINT DEVELOPMENT - 

AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CJT 1110 

This course emphasizes the techniques involved in 
detection, enhancement and recovery of latent fingerprints 
from physical evidence. Chemical and mechanical methods 
and surfaces are analyzed and evaluated for proper 
application in both theory and practice. 

CJT 2261 BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE & CRIME SCENE 
SAFETY - AS 
2 class hours 2 Credits 

This course exposes students to the forensic value, handling, 
preservation, testing and documentation of biological 
evidence. Potential health and safety hazards encountered 
at a crime scene are covered. Students are introduced to 
proper protective techniques to minimize risk to self and 
others. Emergency procedures, as well as state and federal 
regulafions are included. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



135 



DENTAL ASSISTING AND 
DENTAL HYGIENE 



DEA 0020 DENTAL ASSISTING I 

2 lecture hours 1 Credit 

(orequisite: All current semester Dental Assisting 
Courses 

This course is designed to provide the student with the 
ethical and legal aspects ol" dentistry, principles and 
procedures of operative dentistry, local anesthesia, 
instminoni idonlification and use, oral evacuation and tissue 
retraclion techniques, charting, and patient management. 

DEA (K)2(H. DENTAL ASSISTING I LABORATORY 

8 Laboratory Hours 4 Credits 

Corequisite: .\ll current semester Dental Assisting 
courses 

Laboratory application of theory presented in DEA 0020. 
Emphasis is placed on developing skill competency for 
these procedures. Students develop skills in anticipating 
the needs of the dentist and assisting in four-handed dental 
procedures. 

DEA 0029 DENTAL ASSISTING II - DENTAL 
SPECIALTIES 

2 Lecture Hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Sequential courses from Eall term 
Corequisites: All current semester Dental Assisting 
courses 

This course utilizes the basic knowledge and skills required 
in DEA 0020 to increase skill competency levels in 
operative dentistry with major emphasis given to principles 
and procedures of the dental specialties, including 
orthodontics, periodontics, endodontics, prostodontics, 
pedodontics, and oral surgery. Patient care, management 
and diagnosis and treatment planning for each specialty 
area is presented. 

DEA 0029L DENTAL ASSISTING II DENTAL 
SPECIALTIES LABORATORY 

8 Laboratory Hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Sequential courses from Fall term 
Corequisites: All current semester Dental Assisting 
courses 

Laboratory application of theory presented in DEA 0029. 
Emphasis is placed on developing skill competency for 
these procedures. Students develop skills in anticipating 
the needs of the dentist and assisting in four-handed dental 
procedures. 

DEA 0130 APPLIED DENTAL THEORY 

4 Lecture Hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: All required Fall term courses 
Corequisites: All Spring term courses 

This course is designed to provide the student with basic 
knowledge of biomedical and dental sciences. The 
following topics are covered: microorganisms and their 



relationship to the human body, facial development, tooth 
development (histology) and basic knowledge of oral 
pathology and dental anomalies. Specific therapeutic agents 
are also be covered (pharmacology). 

DEA 0850L EXTERNSHIP I 

10 Laboratory Hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: All required dental assisting courses 
Corequisites: All Spring term courses 

Experience based course in which students go into local - 
area dental offices and dental specialty offices (periodontist, 
oral surgery, orthodontists, etc.) to practice duties routinely 
performed by dental assistants under the supervision of the 
dentist. Students acquire basic skills in patient 
communication, patient management, expanded functions, 
basic dental assisting tasks, and professional development. 
They will generally gain clinical practice experience. 
Students routinely meet as a group to discuss progress and 
evaluate their experiences. 

DEA 0851L EXTERNSHIP II 

10 Laboratory Hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: All required dental assisting courses 
Corequisites: All Summer B term courses 

A clinical practice learning experience designed to increase 
dental assisting skills to job-entry level competency. The 
students are placed in a second (different than Extemship 
I) general dental office. Emphasis is placed on visiting 
dental specialty offices. This experience provides an 
opportunity for advanced skill development such as 
expanded functions skills. 

DEH 1003 DENTAL HYGIENE IAS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Corequisite: DES 1800C, DEH 1003L 

Topics covered in this course include extra oral and intra 
oral examinations, instrumentation, fundamentals of scaling 
and polishing, instrument sharpening, pain control and 
record keeping. 

DEH 1003L DENTAL HYGIENE PRECLINICAL-AS 

9 clinical hours 3 Credits 

Corequisite: DES 1800C, DEH 1003 

This is a competency-based course designed for the 
practical application of the theory and techniques studied 
in DEH 1003. Practice is provided in the clinical laboratory 
on dental mannequins and then on peers. Completion of 
all course materials to a specified minimum standard of 
competency is a prerequisite to Dental Hygiene II. 

DEH 1 130 ORAL HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: All required Fall term courses 
Corequisite: All Spring term courses 

This course is a study of the embryonic development of 
the face and oral cavity and the process of tooth 
development. 



136 



{*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



DEH 1602 PERIODONTICS-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DES 1020, DEH 1003, DEH 1003L 
Corequisite: DES 1840, DEH 1802, DEH 1802L 

This course provides the scientific background for the 
interpretation of clinical changes and the complex etiologic 
factors that play a role in the initiation and progression of 
periodontal disease from a dental hygiene perspective. 

DEH 1802 DENTAL HYGIENE HAS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 1003, DEH 1003L 
Corequisite: DES 1840, DEH 1602, DEH 1802L 

This course is a continuation and building of skills in dental 
hygiene to include treatment planning, cleaning and care 
of implants, oral irrigation and antimicrobials, and further 
study in patient management. 

DEH 1802L DENTAL HYGIENE II CLINICAL-AS 

9 clinical hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 1003, DEH 1003L 
Corequisite: DES 1840, DEH 1602, DEH 1802 

Clinical application of dental hygiene skills presented in 
DEH 1802. 

DEH 1811 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL HYGIENE-AS 

1 lecture hour 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the DH program 

This course provides an orientation to the profession of 
dental hygiene including the compositioii of the dental team, 
role of the hygienist, appearance, behavior, ethics, and 
jurisprudence relating to hygienists, and the history and 
development of the profession. 

DEH 2300 DENTAL PHARMACOLOGY-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Corequisite: DEH 2400, DEH 2806L 

This course provides information needed to understand the 
clinical usage of therapeutic agents used in the practice of 
dentistry. The indications, dosage, methods of 
administration, contraindications and side effects of these 
agents is studied to provide a foundation in the physical 
manifestations to be expected in drug administration. 

DEH 2400 GENERAL AND ORAL PATHOLOGY-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1093C, DES 1020 
Corequisite: DEH 2300 

The principles of general pathology are studied as they 
relate to diseases of the teeth and structures of the oral 
cavity. A description of disturbances of development and 
growth of orofacial structures will be covered including 
classification of oral lesions. Secondary oral disorders that 
have oral manifestations are discussed as well as physical, 
thermal and chemical injuries to the oral cavity. 



DEH 2702 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DES 1840 

The student will be introduced to the basic concepts of 
community dental health. Students will be prepared to use 
assessment tools that determine community dental needs, 
to analyze data collected, to plan programs utilizing this 
data, to implement programs, and to evaluate programs. 
This course will instruct students in simple statistical 
analysis, research methodology and critical review of 
scientific literature. Dental health education will be 
extended beyond the individual client to the various and 
diverse groups in the community setting. 

DEH 2702L COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH 
LABORATORY-AS 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credit 

Corequisite: DEH 2702 

Application of principles taught in DEH 2702. 

DEH 2804 DENTAL HYGIENE III-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 1802 
Corequisite: DEH 2804L 

This course expands on dental hygiene prophylactic 
procedures presented in the first two semesters. It 
emphasizes advanced techniques such as root planning, 
ultrasonic and air abrasive techniques, subgingival 
irrigation, and desensitizing procedures. Dental Hygiene 
treatment of advanced periodontal patients will be 
introduced. Methods for case documentation and nutritional 
counseling will be presented. 

DEH 2804L DENTAL HYGIENE HI CLINICAL-AS 

12 clinical hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 1802L 
Corequisite: DEH 2804 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2804 is 
conducted in off-site dental facilities. 

DEH 2806 DENTAL HYGIENE IV-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 2804 
Corequisite: DEH 2806L 

This course includes an in-depth study of applied techniques 
for patients with special needs and unusual health factors. 
It is a continuation of Dental Hygiene III with emphasis on 
treatment planning, study cases, and case documentation. 

DEH 2806L DENTAL HYGIENE IV CLINICAL-AS 

12 clinical hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 2804L 
Corequisite: DEH 2806 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2806 is 
conducted in off-site dental facilities. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



137 



DKH 2808 DENTAL HYGIENE V-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DKH 2806 
Corequisite: DEH 2808L 

Introduction ot new technology in dentistry and state-of- 
the-art dental patient care will be presented in a seminar 
setting through expert guest speakers and student 
presentations of current research and hterature. Emphasis 
will be placed on ethics, jurisprudence, employment skills, 
and career opportunities in dental hygiene. The student will 
be provided with information concerning state laws that 
regulate dental and dental auxiliary practice, with special 
attention given to the Florida statutes. This will be followed 
by preparatory information for the Florida State Board. 

DEH 2808L DENTAL HYGIENE V CLINICAL-AS 

12 clinical hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: DEH 2806L 
Corequisite: DEH 2808 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2808 is 
conducted in off-site dental facilities. 

DEH 2930 DENTAL HYGIENE SEMINAR-AS 

1 lecture hour 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: All previous dental hygiene courses 
Corequisite: DEH 2808, DES 2830C 

This course will prepare a dental hygiene student for 
national and regional board exams. It will overview dental 
hygiene knowledge necessary to practice in a dental setting 
and to achieve at least minimum standards on the National 
Dental Hygiene Board Exam. Information will be presented 
in seminar format by guest speakers and through the 
students' projects. Additional topics presented will be test 
construction, examination format, scoring system, 
preparation guidelines for a written board and tips for taking 
exams. 

DES 0502 DENTAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

4 Lecture Hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: All required dental assisting courses 
Corequisites: All Summer B term courses 

This course provides the student with basic knowledge to 
perform dental business office procedures. These 
procedures are practiced in rotation through general and 
specialty offices during the same semester. These include 
all administrative, insurance, billing, collections, inventory, 
recall, and OSHA. 

DES 1020 DENTAL ANATOMY-AS 

2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours 2 Credits 
DA corequisite: DEA 0020, DEA 0020L 

DH corequisite: DEH 1003, DEH 1003L 

This course presents a study of gross anatomy of the hard 
and soft structures of the oral cavity, and the skeletal, 
muscular, circulatory, nervous lymphatic and glandular 
systems of the head and neck. Tooth morphology is studied 
in depth. 



DES 1 lOOC DENTAL MATERIALS 

2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours 2 Credits 

Corequisite: DES 1020, DES 1800C 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with various 
materials used in the dental profession, including rationale 
for use, contraindications, chemistry and biocompatability. 
The laboratory time allows the student to manipulate the 
various dental materials. 

DES 1200C DENTAL RADIOLOGY-AS 

2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours 2 Credits 

Corequisite: DES 1020 

An in-depth study of the physics and production of x-rays, 
the instruments used for taking radiographs, the techniques 
for exposing radiographs, manual and automatic processing, 
mounting and interpretation of x-rays. Dental radiographic 
health for the patient and operator is stressed with 
sterilization and disinfection. Students practice on 
mannequins before working with patients. 

DES 1600 DENTAL OFFICE EMERGENCIES-AS 

1 lecture hour 1 Credit 
Corequisite: DES 1800C 

This course presents emergency procedures and protocol 
emphasizing the recognition of emergency conditions. 
Topics include emergency prevention, medico legal 
considerations, dental emergencies and their management. 

DES 1800C CLINICAL PROCEDURES-AS 

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 2 Credits 
DA corequisite: DEA 0020, 0020L 

DH corequisite: DEH 1003, DEH 1003L 

This course is an introduction to basic Dental Hygiene 
Clinical procedures. The concepts taught include infection 
control, dental operatory equipment operation and 
maintenance, asepsis, charting and instrument transfer. 
Laboratory experiences are provided for the topics covered. 

DES 1840 PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY- AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

DA corequisite: DEA 0029, 0029L, DEA 0130 
DH corequisite: All Spring semester courses 

This course is an introduction to the primary methods of 
prevention of dental disease: plaque control, fluorides and 
sealants. Emphasis is placed on student development of 
personal oral hygiene skills and on patient education 
techniques. 

DES 2830C EXPANDED FUNCTIONS LABORATORY-AS 
2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: DES llOOC 

This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge 
and clinical practice necessary for the dental auxiliary 
student to perform expended functions permitted by the 
rules and regulations of the Rorida State Board of Dentistry. 



138 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

BCN 2220 CONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course presents practices and problems related to 
construction, such as building codes and regulations, 
construction materials, construction methods, elementary 
structural design, surveys and real estate. 

CGS 1363 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
(GIS)-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ETD 1320 or CGS 1100 

This course is an introduction to the use of GIS and the 
commands necessary to integrate databases with mapping 
applications. ArcView-GIS software will be used. 

CGS 1364 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
(GIS) CUSTOMIZATION-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ETD 1320 or CGS 1100 

ArcView-GIS Software is used to study commands and 
procedures used in mapping, and developing charts and 
tables. Avenue, Arc View's object-oriented programming 
language is used to customize the Arc View graphical user 
interface. The basics of developing customized extensions 
is also covered. It is not necessary to have taken CGS 1363 
first. 

EGS 1001 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or equivalent mathematical 
proficiency. 

This course presents an overview of engineering ethics, 
certification/registration and opportunities in the various 
fields of engineering. Students are required to solve 
problems in selected fields of engineering. The job market, 
developing a resume and portfolio is studied. 

ETD 1 100 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I (Manual)- AA 

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

This course emphasizes instrument use plus freehand 
lettering and sketching. Geometric construction application, 
orthographic projection, sectional views, fits and tolerances, 
symbols and conventions for working drawings, and 
standard representation for threads and fasteners are 
covered. 

ETD 1 103C ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I (AutoCAD 
Track)-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: ETD 1320 

This course covers the fundamentals of Engineering 
Graphics I. AutoCAD is used in the solution to the various 
graphical problems instead of traditional drafting tools. 
Spatial perception, text, orthographic projections, 
dimensioning, geometric construction, auxiliary and 
sectional views and assembly drawing are topics that are 
covered. 



ETD 1220 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II (Manual)-AA 

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Application of the principles of orthographic projection to 
the solution of three-dimensional problems is covered in 
this class. Topics include space relationship of points, lines 
and planes and examples in engineering practice. 
Descriptive geometry is emphasized. 

ETD 1320 COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the use of computer-aided 
drafting. Included is a review of computer hardware and 
software used in an automated drafting environment; 
concepts of how a drawing is stored and manipulated by 
the computer; commands necessary to do a simple drawing; 
and the actual drawing of a part. This course provides for 
the development of beginning skills in the use of a 
microcomputer, operating peripheral devices for CAD, 
using CAD software. 

ETD 1530 DRAFTING AND DESIGN (Manual)-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course covers specialization in architectural drafting. 
Expanded coverage in residential design with emphasis on 
functional floor plan layout, architectural standards and 
construction methods as it relates to drafting is also 
included. 

ETD 1538 AUTOCAD FOR RESIDENTIAL 
ARCHITECTURE-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: ETD 1320 

This course is designed to guide the student through the 
methodology of constructing residential architectural 
drawings with AutoCAD. Through the use of tutorials, the 
student plans and constructs a set of residential architectural 
plans. 

ETD 1541 TOPOGRAPHICAL DRAWING-AS 

4 class hours (Manual) 4 Credits 

This course describes methods and practices used in 
topographical mapping and drawing, and related surveying 
methods and practices. 

ETD 2350 ADVANCED COMPUTER AIDED 
DRAFTING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ETD 1320 

This course is an introduction of hardware/software 
configurations required for the automated drafting 
environment. The operating system hierarchy and how 
drawings are stored, edited, copied, deleted and renamed; 
file specifications and protection; how to log in and log out 
from the CAD work station (to include remote operations); 
and the commands necessary for basic drawing utilities are 
covered. Different methods of generating commands are 
also covered. AutoCAD software is used. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



139 



SIR 



SLR 



11(M)CSIRVKYIN(;.AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course includes lecture and Held practice covering use, 
care, and limitations of various surveying instruments and 
related equipment. Students are shown how to properly 
record in field notes the data taken from rod, tape, 
dilTerenlial level, etc. Students conduct field exercises and 
prepare related reports. Principal subjects included are 
leveling and measurement of angles. 



4 Credits 



2140C .ADVANCED SURVEYING-AS 

4 class hours 
Prerequisite: SUR llOOC 

This course is a continuation of SUR I lOOC to include 
horizontal control surveys, resection and horizontal curve 
layout. Electronic Distance Meters (EDM) equipment is 
introduced. 

ECOLOGY ~ 

(See Science) 



EDG 2701 TEACHING DIVERSE POPULATIONS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the value of diversity in 
American society and its role in the educational system. It 
focuses on providing prospective teachers with knowledge 
about students in our schools who are from different ethnic, 
racial, cultural, and/or linguistic backgrounds or who 
represent other categories of diversity. (I) 
Required field experience: 15 hours. 

EME 2040 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL 
TECHNOLOGY-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides applied instruction in the use of 
technology in an educational setting. Media includes 
computers, information technology, presentation 
technology, and educational software. Ethical, legal, and 
social issues regarding educational technology are 
examined. 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 



ECONOMICS 



ECO 2013 ECONOMICS I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to economic theory, 
accounting, analytical and policy aspects of the national 
income with emphasis on the theory of income 
determination; analysis of the money and banking system; 
suney of growth theory and policies. Emphasis is placed 
on macroeconomics. 

ECO 2023 ECONOMICS II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

The basic objective of this course is to acquaint the student 
with the structure and operation of the market system. 
Emphasis is placed on microeconomics, which is presented 
not only as a formalized logical way of thinking but also as 
a model with which to understand and analyze human 
behavior. Students learn to apply an analytical approach to 
the study of how individuals, businesses and societies deal 
with the fundamental problem of scarce resources. 



EDUCATION 



EDF 2005 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is the first in a series of required courses for the 
education student. It explores the American school system, 
its historical and traditional influences; significance of 
education: educational opportunities: educational 
requirements and standards. 
Required field experience: 15 hours. 



EMS 1780 EMS EQUIVALENCY ASSESSMENT 1 Credit 

This course is designed to assist Florida certified EMT- 
Basic and/or Paramedics who desire to earn an AS in 
Emergency Medical Services Technology. Enrollment for 
this course is restricted to students who have taken a 
minimum of 15 credit hours at ECC, EMT-Basic or 
Paramedic programs at agencies other than a community 
college or university, and are currently Florida certified as 
an EMT-B or Paramedic. 

EMS 2119 FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY 
MEDICAL CARE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Corequisites: EMS 2119L, EMS 2421, EMS 2411 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services 
including medical-legal-ethical aspects; techniques of CPR, 
extrication, management of trauma and administration of 
appropriate emergency medical care. Upon successful 
completion, students receive a certificate of course 
completion and are eligible to take the Florida State EMT- 
Basic certification examination. 

EMS 21 19L FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY 
MEDICAL CARE LAB-AS 

6 laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Corequisites: EMS 2119, EMS 2411, EMS 2421 

This course presents practical applications of the didactic 
instruction received in EMS 21 19 to include medical, legal 
and ethical aspects; techniques of CPR, semi-automatic 
external defibrillation, extricafion, management of trauma 
and medical emergencies, and administration of appropriate 
emergency medical care. Discussion and application of 
basic computer skills in the health care setting is also 
covered. 



140 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



EMS 2241 PARAMEDIC IAS 

6 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1093C 

Corequisite: EMS 2241L, EMS 2457 

This course introduces the roles and responsibiHties of the 

paramedic. Medical, legal and ethical issues are explored. 

General principles of pathophysiology, pharmacology and 

shock and fluids are presented. 

EMS 2241L PARAMEDIC I LAB-AS 

12 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Corequisites: EMS 2241, EMS 2457 
This course presents practical applications of the didactic 
instruction received in EMS 2241 to include role of the 
paramedic in the health care delivery system, duties and 
responsibilities. Shock assessment and management, 
medication administration, and IV therapy are also covered. 

EMS 2242 PARAMEDIC HAS 

6 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2241, EMS 2241L 
Corequisites: EMS 2242L, EMS 2457 
This course presents an introduction to advanced patient 
assessment, clinical decisions, communications and 
documentation. Discussion of the respiratory system, and 
assessment/treatment of respiratory distress is also covered. 

EMS 2242L PARAMEDIC II LAB-AS 

12 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2241, EMS 2241L 
Corequisites: EMS 2242, EMS 2457 
This course presents practical applications of the didactic 
instruction received in EMS 2242 to include advanced 
patient assessment, clinical decisions, communications and 
documentation. Assessment and treatment of the 
respiratory distress patient is also addressed. 

EMS 2243 PARAMEDIC III-AS 

8 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2242, EMS 2242L 
Corequisites: EMS 2458, EMS 2469 

This course will discuss the anatomy, physiology, and 
pathophysiology of the cadiovascular system; identification 
of dysrhythmia and 12 Lead EKG interpretation. 
Assessment and management of the patient with suspected 
cardiovascular emergencies. 

EMS 2244 PARAMEDIC IV-AS 

8 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EMS 2243 
Corequisite: EMS 2469 

This course presents a discussion of the anatomy and 
physiology of the nervous, integumentary and musculo- 
skeletal systems. Pathophysiology and management of 
patients presenting with diseases and trauma to these 
systems, as well as identification and management of 
trauma and medical emergencies are also covered. 



EMS 2245 PARAMEDIC V-AS 

6 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2244, EMS 2458, EMS 2469 
Corequisite: EMS 2245L, EMS 2459 

This course presents information on the reproductive 
system, patient assessment and management of obstetrical 
and gynecological emergencies. Handling of patients with 
special challenges, acute interventions for chronic care 
patients and management of abuse and assault is also 
covered. Upon successful completion, students receive a 
certificate of course completion and are eligible to take the 
Florida State Paramedic Certification Examination. 

EMS 2245L PARAMEDIC V LAB-AS 

12 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2244, EMS 2458, EMS 2469 
Corequisites: EMS 2245, EMS 2459 

This course is a practical application of the didactic 
instruction received in EMS 2245 to include patient 
assessment and management of obstetrical and 
gynecological emergencies. Assessment based management 
for the medical and trauma patient of all age groups. 
Medical Incident Command, rescue operations, hazardous 
material awareness, and crime scene management are also 
covered. 

EMS 2647 ADVANCED AIRWAY MANAGEMENT-AS 

class hours (80 contact hours) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EMS 2241, EMS 2241L 

Corequisites: Concurrent Enrollment in the Paramedic 

Certificate Program 

In this course paramedic students rotate through the 

operating room in a local hospital. The student is supervised 

by an anesthesiologist and/or CRNA while observing/ 

performing intubations. A minimum of 30 successful 

intubations and/or demonstration of skill mastery is 

required. 

EMS 2411 EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT CLINICALS - AS 
class hours (30 contact hours) 1 Credit 

Corequisites: EMS 2119, EMS 2119L, EMS 2421 

In this course paramedic students rotate through various 
emergency room departments at local hospitals observing 
and performing basic life support skills under the direct 
supervision of an assigned preceptor. 

EMS 2421 EMS FIELD INTERNSHIP-AS 

class hours (76 contact hours) 2 Credits 

Corequisites: EMS 2119, EMS 2119L, EMS 2411 

This course is designed to provide the EMT-Basic student 
with exposure to pre-hospital emergency medicine. It 
provides 72 hours of basic life support training with an 
Advanced Life Support agency and 4 hours of observation 
in a 91 1 Dispatch/Communication center. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



141 



VMS 2457 PARAMKDIC FIP:LI) INTKRNSHIP 1-AS 

class hours (72 contact hours) 2 Credits 

i'n-rcquisitc: Acceptance into the Paramedic Certificate 

Program 

Curequisites: EMS 2241, EMS 2241L 

This course involves ride experiences with an Advanced 
Life Support Pro\ ider. It provides the beginning paramedic 
student an opponunity to master basic life support skills 
and therapeutic communications. Seventy-two hours of 
learning experience in a work environment are required. 
Hnrollment is restricted to those students with concurrent 
enrollment in the paramedic program. 

EMS 2458 PARAMKDIC KIKLI) INTERNSHIP HAS 

U class hours (72 contact hours) 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: EMS 2457 
Corequisite: EMS 2243 

This course invohes ride experiences with an Advanced 
Life Support Provider. It provides the intermediate 
paramedic student an opportunity to perform advanced 
patient assessments, venous access and medication 
administration. Seventy-two hours of learning experience 
in a work en\ironment are required. Enrollment is restricted 
to those students with concurrent enrollment in the 
paramedic program. 

EMS 2459 PARAMEDIC FIELD INTERNSHIP HI -AS 

16 class hours and 400 contact hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EMS 2458 
Corequisites: EMS 2245, EMS 2245L 

This course involves ride experiences with an Advanced 
Life Support Provider. It provides basic and advanced life 
support training with an ALS agency. Four hundred hours 
of learning experience in a work environment are required. 
Enrollment is restricted to those students with concurrent 
enrollment in the paramedic program. 

EMS 2469 PARAMEDIC HOSPITAL CLINICALS-AS 

156 contact hours and hospital orientations 4 Credits 
Prerequisites: EMS 2242, EMS 2242L, EMS 2457 
Corequisites: EMS 2243, EMS 2244 

In this course paramedic students rotate through various 
departments of the local hospitals, performing paramedic 
skills under the direct supervision of the clinical instructor 
and/or assigned preceptor The EMS Clinical Coordinator 
or designee provides clinical schedules. Students are 
responsible for transportation to and from clinical sites. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND 
LITERATURE 

AML 2010 LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES I, 

TO 1860- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of the United States 
from Native American Oral Traditions to the Civil War. It 
centers on authors, texts, and the historical and cultural 
contexts of each period. 



AML 2020 LITERATURE OF THE UNITED STATES H, 
1860 TO PRESENT- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of the United States 
from the Civil War to the present. It centers on authors, 
texts, and the historical and cultural contexts of each period. 

CRW 2100 CREATIVE WRITING-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to develop and enhance a student's 
ability to use conventional techniques of imaginative 
writing. Emphasis is placed on creation of character and 
narrative structure. Intensively critical evaluation of student 
writing. Writing intensive. 

ENC 1101 COMPOSITION I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Placement Testing or ENC 9020 

A course in essay writing designed to develop skill in 
paragraph construction and methods of presentation. The 
course includes practice in critical reading and analysis of 
texts as well as an introduction to researching and properly 
documenting sources using MLA format, composing and 
editing an essay using a word-processing program, 
accessing information from the World Wide Web, and 
understanding the differences between electronic databases 
and the Web. If completed with a grade of "C" or better. 
ENC 1101 serves to demonstrate competence in the basic 
use of computers, and partially fulfills the six-credit 
communications requirement for the AA degree. This 
course requires a minimum of 6,000 words of writing. If 
completed with a grade of C or better, this course serves 
to demonstrate competence in written communication. 

ENC 1102 COMPOSITION II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 (minimum grade of "C") or 
equivalent. 

Advanced instruction in expository and other modes of 
prose writing, including the preparation and writing of a 
full-length research paper Concentration according to 
section on rhetoric and the essay, writing about literature, 
technical writing, or creative writing; students may choose 
special interest. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, 
ENC 1 102 partially fulfills the 6 credit English Composition 
requirement for the AA degree. This course requires a 
minimum of fi.OOO words of writing. If completed with a 
grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence in written communication. 



142 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



ENC 9010 DEVELOPING THE PARAGRAPH (*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: Placement Testing or permission of 
District Director of Learning Assistance. 

This is a lecture/workshop course with emphasis on 
grammar usage, capitalization, sentence structure, and 
paragraph development. This course is required for students 
entering the College Preparatory Program who have a basic 
background of the language but need to practice usage, 
mechanics, and organizational skills. Successful completion 
of this course is a prerequisite for ENC 9020. 



ENS 1281 ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS, 
LEVEL I-AA 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing or permission of District Director 
of Learning Assistance. 

This course is designed for non-native speakers of English 
who have basic listening and reading comprehension and 
basic writing and speaking skills. This course further 
develops knowledge and awareness of English 
communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. 



ENC 9020 COLLEGE WRITING SKILLS (*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: Placement Testing or permission of 
District Director of Learning Assistance. 

This is a lecture/workshop course with emphasis on 
grammatical concepts and usage, punctuation, word choice, 
and paragraph and essay development. Required of all 
students who need to develop basic writing and thinking 
skills before entering ENC 1101. Completion of this course 
with a grade of "C" or better is a prerequisite for ENC 1101. 
A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

ENC 9021 INTRODUCTION TO COMPOSITION (*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Placement Testing, Grade Lower Than 
"C" in ENC 9020, Permission of District Director of 
Learning Assistance. 

This course is designed to help students practice and 
improve their writing skills, with special emphasis on 
planning, writing and editing in-class, time-limited 
paragraphs and essays in preparation for success in college 
level courses. A state exit test must be passed to exit this 
course. 

ENL 2012 BRITISH LITERATURE & CULTURE I TO 
1780-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of Great Britain 
and its influence on culture from Medieval times through 
the late eighteenth century. Readings include selections 
from Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and others. (I) 

ENL 2022 BRITISH LITERATURE & CULTURE II, 1780 
TO PRESENT-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of Great Britain as 
it influenced culture from the early romantic period to the 
present day. Readings include selections from Wordsworth, 
Dickens, T.S. Eliot, and others. (I) 



ENS 1282 ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS 
LEVEL II-AA 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing or permission of District Director 
of Learning Assistance.. 

This course is designed for non-native speakers of English 
who are learning English and who have already acquired a 
Level I language proficiency in English. Emphasis is placed 
on advanced speaking and listening skills, reading and 
writing, with special emphasis on individual problems for 
students in preparation for future college assignment across 
the curriculum. 

ESL 9080 ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS, 
COMBINED SKILLS(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing or permission of District Director 
of Learning Assistance.. 

This course is designed for non-native speakers of English 
who wish to improve listening, reading comprehension, 
writing, and speaking abilities in American English. 

LIT 2090 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an examination of themes and ideas 
reflected in the writings of award winning American fiction 
writers published since 1980. 

LIT 2110 WORLD LITERATURE I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course presents a study of great works of literature, 
and recurrent themes and ideas, including literature of the 
Greeks, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. (I) 

LIT 2120 WORLD LITERATURE II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENC 1101 

This course presents a study of great works of literature, 
and recurrent themes and ideas from the late 17th century 
through the modem period. (I) 



FINANCE 



(See Business/Management/Finance) 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



143 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

FFP 1 200 FI RE PREVENTION PRACTICES- AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the principles of fire prevention 
and investigation; a study of fire hazards in various 
occupancies; a review of fire prevention codes; a study of 
procedures and techniques of fire prevention inspection to 
include, surveying and mapping, recognition and 
elimination of fire hazards, public relations, methods of 
determining the area of fire origin, fire cause, fire spread 
and location, and preservation of evidence. Meets course 
requirements for Florida State Fire Company Officer or 
Fire Inspector Certification. 

FFP I3(M) FIRE CODES & STANDARDS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the codes and standards for building 
construction which are used to identify and prevent design 
deficiencies responsible for the spread of fire, heal, and 
smoke in existing and new buildings. Meets course 
requirements for Florida State Fire Inspector Certification. 

FFP 1601 FIRE APPARATUS OPERATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of driving laws and driving techniques 
for fire equipment; construction and operation of a pumping 
engine ladder iioick; aerial platforms; specialized equipment 
and vehicles; apparatus maintenance; and an aerial 
apparatus operator course. Meets course requirements for 
Florida State Pump Operator Certification. 

FFP 1620 PRIVATE FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of fire protection systems and 
domestic water supply. The operational feature and 
functional characteristics of fire detection and suppression 
systems and devices is studied. Meets course requirements 
for Florida State Fire Company Officer or Fire Inspector 
Certification. 

FFP 2130 FIRE COMPANY OFFICER LEADERSHIP-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the basic concepts of fire company 
leadership; including human skills, leadership tools, 
problem solving, and goal achievement of a fire company 
officer. Emphasis is placed on the role of the officer in the 
setting of the fire company. Meets course requirements 
for Florida State Fire Company Officer Certification. 

FFP 2150 FIRE SERVICE INSTRUCTOR-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the instructor's responsibility in 
the communication of learning and teaching objectives, use 
of instructional aids, and formulation of performance 
objectives. Meets course requirements for Florida Stale 
Fire Company Officer Certification. 



FFP 2210 FIRE CAUSE & ORIGIN-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an examination of sources of ignition, 
investigation of structure fires, grass/wildland fires, 
automobile, motor vehicle and ship fires, electrical causes 
of fires, clothing and fabric fires, documentation of the fire 
scene, alarm and detection systems and the storage, 
handling, and use of hazardous materials. The course is 
designed to enhance the investigation, detection and 
determination of the cause and origin of fire. Meets course 
requirements for Florida State Arson Investigator 
Certification. 

FFP 2243 LATENT INVESTIGATION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines explosives and explosive combustion, 
chemical fires and hazardous materials, resources for 
investigating fires, fire related deaths and injuries, arson as 
a crime, arson law. report writing, courtroom testimony and 
citations. The course is designed to enhance the 
investigation, detection, and determination of the cause and 
origin of fire. Meets course requirements for Florida State 
Arson Investigator Certification. 

FFP 2320 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR THE 
FIRE SERVICE-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the various complexities of building 
construction and the effect on fire detection, inspection, 
prevention, safety and suppression; definitions and 
terminology used in construction. The course includes a 
study of the structural engineering principles which affect 
the behavior of buildings on fire. Meets course requirements 
for Florida State Fire Inspector Certification. 

FFP 2326 BLUEPRINT READING & PLANS REVIEW- 
AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of all aspects of blueprint reading 
which enable the individual to better perform the duties of 
fire inspector. Also included is a study of building plans 
examination. Meets course requirements for Florida State 
Fire Inspector Certification. 

FFP 2410 FIREFIGHTING TACTIC & STRATEGY I-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the basic concepts involved in fire 
fighting, including fire behavior, fire fighting fundamentals, 
principles of extinguishing fires, the proper role for and 
utilization of various fire companies, and preplanning fire 
problems. Meets course requirements for Florida State Fire 
Company Officer Certification. 



144 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



FFP 



FFP 



FFP 



2500 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS I-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the chemical characteristics and 
reaction of materials in emergency situations, especially 
thermal destruction. These materials may be in the storage, 
handling or transportation stage of industrial process. 
Materials to be studied include flammable liquids, 
combustible solids, radioactive compounds, oxidizing and 
corrosive materials. Meets course requirements for Florida 
State Fire Company Officer Certification. 



3 Credits 



2501 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS HAS 
3 class hours 
Prerequisites: FFP 2500 

This course is a study of the increasing number of hazardous 
materials incidents occurring each year, the various methods 
of transporting and storing hazardous materials and basic 
tactics used in a hazardous materials situation. Meets course 
requirements for Florida State Fire Company Officer 
Certification. 

2640 FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of how good fire streams are 
developed; a study of properties of water, distribution of 
pressures in dynamic and static systems; friction loss in 
hoses and pipes, and factors which influence water loss. 
Meets course requirements for Florida State Pump Operator 
Certification. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES ~ 

~ French ~ 



FRE 1120-1121 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I, II-AA(**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Designed for beginners or those with one year of high 
school French, this highly interactive course focuses on the 
dynamics of speech, literature, and culture. 

FRE 2200-2201 INTERMEDL\TE FRENCH I, II-AA(**) 
4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; FRE 1120- 
1121; or two years of high school French. 

Continuing to focus on the dynamics of speech, literature, 
and culture, this course reviews the basics, and engages 
the student in the grand tradition of French literature and 
culture. 

~ German- 

GER 1120-1121 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I, n-AA(**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course is for beginners or those with one year of high 
school German. Training in communication skills is 
presented through typical conversation, contemporary 
readings, visual aids and laboratory exercises. 



GER 2200-2201 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I, II-AA(**) 
4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; GER 1120- 
1121; or two years of high school German. 

This course presents continued training in linguistic skills 
and an introduction to contemporary German life and 
culture. 

- Sign Language ~ 

SPA 1620 BEGINNING SIGN LANGUAGE I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

The objective of this beginning Sign Language course is to 
teach comprehension, communication, and cultural 
understanding. The students acquire skills in manual 
signing and reading. 

SPA 1622 SIGN LANGUAGE II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPA 1620, or permission of instructor. 

This course is structured to help the student learn American 
Sign Language through vocabulary and sentences needed 
to communicate in common life situations. 

~ Spanish ~ 

SPN 1120-1121 BEGINNING SPANISH I, H-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course is for beginners or those with one year of high 
school Spanish. Study of the language and the culture with 
emphasis on communication in the target language. 

SPN 2200-2201 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I, II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPN 1121 or two years of high school 
Spanish, or permission of instructor. 
SPN 2200 prerequisite for SPN 2201 
This course presents further study of language and culture, 
and provides an introduction to literary readings. Continued 
emphasis is placed on communication in the target 
language. 

SPN 2210 ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION AND 
COMPOSITION-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPN 2201 or equivalent, or permission 
of instructor. 

This course emphasizes oral and written expression in the 
target language and provides a brief review of Spanish 
grammar 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEA 2010 GEOGRAPHY OF THE EASTERN 
HEMISPHERE-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course in the geography of the countries of the eastern 
hemisphere. Focus is placed on the physical, economic, 
political, and cultural aspects of these areas. (I) 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



145 



GEA 2040 (JKCKJRAPHV OF THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course in the geography of the countries of the western 
hemisphere. Focus is placed on the physical, economic, 
political, and cultural aspects of these areas. 

GEO 2370 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL 
RESOl]RCES-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of natural and human resources and 
the utilization of these resources. Conservation in the United 
States, with particular emphasis on Florida is also covered. 

GEOLOGY 

(See Science) 



GERMAN 



(See Foreign Language) 



GERONTOLOGY 



GEY 2000 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of aging and its links to historical 
and social currents, including graphics and cross cultural 
patterns; a survey of the theoretical frameworks of 
gerontologists, both physiological and social, including an 
examination of psychological, sensory and intellectual 
characteristics. Included are specific problem areas such 
as health, finances, retirement, politics, legal aspects and 
the special nature of minority group elderly. (I) 

GOLF COURSE OPERATIONS 

GCO 1001 INTRODUCTION TO GOLF COURSE 
INDUSTRY-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of golf and the industry 
that supports golf with an emphasis on employability skills. 

GCO 1201 BASIC MECHANICS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a hands-on study of hand tools and power 
shop equipment as they relate to mechanized golf course 
equipment in welding, maintenance of golf course 
equipment, and planning. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of orderly, safe shop procedures and manual 
skill development. 

GCO 1202 BASIC GOLF COURSE MECHANICS HAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: GCO1201 or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of GCO 1201 Basic 
Mechanics. The emphasis of this course is placed on 



troubleshooting and repairing two-stroke and four-stroke 
small engines with special reference to internal components 
including carburetion and electrical. 

GCO 1211C TURF EQUIPMENT DIAGNOSTICS IAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with an introduction to 
electrical systems as related to turf equipment. The 
emphasis of the class is placed on identifying, 
troubleshooting, and repairing electrical system 
components including ignition, starter systems, and 
alternators. Use of electrical diagnostic equipment to 
facilitate troubleshooting and repair of components is also 
covered. 

GCO 1212C TURF EQUIPMENT DIAGNOSTICS HAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: GC01211 or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation ofGCOl 2 1 1 Turf Equipment 
Diagnostics I, with an emphasis on identifying, 
troubleshooting, and repairing fuel and lubricating systems, 
the power train, and system hydraulics as they relate to turf 
equipment. Use of diagnostic equipment to facilitate 
troubleshooting and repair of components is also covered. 

GCO 1220 TURF EQUIPMENT SHARPENING AND 
GRINDING-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to sharpening and grinding techniques, 
adjustment techniques, and basic safety issues as related to 
reel type mowers and rotary type mowers used in turf 
management industry. The emphasis of this class is placed 
on implementing modem shop equipment to facilitate the 
sharpening/grinding process. 

GCO 1242 TURF EQUIPMENT PAINTS AND 
PAINTING-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to paints and painting as they relate to turf 
maintenance equipment. The emphasis of this course is 
placed on selecting the proper paints and painting 
techniques for the job at hand, and on safety practices 
related to painting. 

GCO 1252C TURF EQUIPMENT WELDING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to welding using both gas and electric arc 
techniques. The course emphasizes the selection of proper 
welding equipment for the job at hand and proper welding 
safety. Brazing and soldering are also covered. 



146 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



GCO 1400 PRINCIPLES OF TURFGRASS SCIENCE I-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the fundamental concepts of modern 
turfgrass science. The emphasis of the course is placed on 
introducing, identifying, and discussing the concepts and 
principles of: 1 basic turfgrass taxonomy; 2 individual 
turfgrass species, including both warm and cool season 
grasses; 3 major components of the turfgrass environment 
including soil, air, light, and water; and 4 theoretical 
interactions between the turfgrasses and the elements of 
the turf environment. 

GCO 1403 PRINCIPLES OF TURFGRASS SCIENCE HAS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: GCO 1400 or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of Principles of Turfgrass 
Science L The emphasis of this course is placed on 
introducing, identifying, and discussing all of the major 
relevant turfgrass cultural practices, such as mowing, 
fertilizing, irrigating, and managing pests. 

GCO 1611 GOLF COURSE SHOP MANAGEMENT IAS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to basic shop management practices. This 
course focuses on identifying and selecting shop tools, using 
and organizing basic shop equipment, maintaining stock 
inventory, and operating turf care equipment properly. 

GCO 1612 GOLF COURSE SHOP MANAGEMENT II-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: GCO 1611 or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of GC01611 Golf Course 
Shop Management I. This course emphasizes the 
development and implementation of preventive 
maintenance practices for turf care equipment. Also 
emphasized is the development of training plans and 
programs for turf equipment employees, and the 
development and design of maintenance facility shop 
components. 

GCO 1743 GOLF COURSE DESIGN AND 
CONSTRUCTION-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the basic elements, concepts, and principles 
of golf course design and construction. The course 
emphasizes the master planning and developmental 
execution of a new golf course project, as well as pertinent 
redesign and reconstruction issues. 

GCO 1942 FIELD TRAINING IN TURF EQUIPMENT 
MANAGEMENT-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all other classes 

Field training is an internship experience which provides 
students with real-world turf equipment technology 
experience. The emphasis of this course is placed on the 



application of theoretical classroom concepts taught in other 
turf equipment classes. 

GCO 2431 IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to turfgrass irrigation practices and the 
fundamental concepts and principles of soil drainage. The 
class emphasizes turfgrass water use requirements and the 
use of computerized irrigation scheduling systems to 
distribute and conserve water. The course also emphasizes 
modern drainage techniques to remove excess water. 

GCO 2441 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR 
TURF I: INSECT PESTS OF TURF-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the modern methods of controlling and 
managing the major categories of insects and nematodes 
that are traditionally classified as pests of turfgrasses. The 
course emphasizes the identification and behavioral 
characteristics of insect pests and nematodes, as well as 
specific integrated pest management strategies. 

GCO 2442 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR 
TURF II: DISEASES OF TURF-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the modern methods of controlling and 
managing the major categories of turfgrass diseases that 
are traditionally classified as pests of turfgrasses. The course 
emphasizes identification of pathogens of turfgrass, the 
etiology of turfgrass diseases, and specific integrated pest 
management strategies. 

GCO 2450 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR 
TURF III: WEED SCIENCE FOR TURF-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the modem methods of controlling and 
managing the major categories of weeds that are 
traditionally classified as pests of turfgrasses. The course 
emphasizes the identification and behavioral characteristics 
of weed pests of turfgrass, as well as specific integrated 
pest management strategies. 

GCO 2500 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN GOLF COURSE 
CONSTRUCTION AND MANAGEMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the current environmental issues and 
considerations that affect the golf course industry. The 
emphasis of the course is placed on defining what the 
environment is and how it may be impacted by each of the 
major elements of basic golf course operations. Important 
concepts to be discussed include mitigation and 
management strategies that are designed to effectively 
minimize and/or eliminate golf course related impacts to 
the environment. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



147 



GCO 2601 APPLIKI) MATERIALS CHEMISTRY AND 
CAI.Cl I.ATIONS FOR TURF-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MGF 1 106 or permission of instructor 

This course provides studcnis with the necessary skills and 
techniques to accurately calculate rates and levels of 
turfgrass industry materials, such as fertilizers and 
pesticides. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of 
applied agricultural chemistry, as well as mathematical 
formulas for determining surface areas, volumes, and 
chemical dilutions. 

GCO 2632 GOLF COURSE ORGANIZATION AND 
ADMINISTRATION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an in-depth study of golf course 
management practices: budgeting; record keeping; 
awareness of local, state, and federal laws; and skills in 
leadership, communication, public relations, and human 
relations. 

GCO 2741 PLANT ID AND LANDSCAPE DESIGN FOR 
GOLF COURSES-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This hands on course deals with the identification of various 
plant materials and their application to golf courses. 
Prepares students to select appropriate plant materials for 
specific situations and to make decisions concerning the 
preservation or removal of native plant materials as they 
occur in the existing or proposed landscape. 

GCO 2932 TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT SEMINAR-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive, real- 
world review and discussion of the important concepts and 
ideas presented in core clas.ses. Students interact directly 
with guest speakers and industry experts regarding the 
review of current core class issues within the golf course 
turfgrass industry. 

SOS 1005 BIOLOGY OF TURF SOILS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the basic biological and biochemical 
principles of turf soils. The class emphasizes the 
characterization of soils as a growing medium for turfgrass 
according to the basic biological and biochemical nature 
of the soil. 

SOS 1401 PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY OF TURF 
SOILS-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to the basic physical and chemical principles 
of turfgrass soils, such as the movement of water and air 
through soil. The class emphasizes the characterization of 
soils as a growing medium for turfgrass according to basic 
physical and chemical nature of the soil. 



SOS 2102 SOIL FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides students with a comprehensive 
introduction to soil fertility and turfgrass nutrition. The class 
emphasizes turfgrass nutrition needs and the identification 
and implementation of fertilizers and other soil amendments 
to provide adequate nutrition for the various kinds of 
turfgrasses. 

HEALTH AND WELLNESS 



HSC 



HSC 



DAA 



DAA 
PEL 
PEL 
PEL 
PEL 
PEL 
PEL 
PEM 
PEM 
PEM 
PEN 

PEL 



PEL 
PEN 



1130 LIVING WITH HEALTH-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This telecourse involves both the viewing of videos and 
reading in the course textbook. Emphasis is placed on 
relating course content to lifestyle fostering a better 
understanding of the major health issues of today. 

2400 FIRST AID-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course covering the principles and procedures of 
emergency first aid treatment. Class time is divided between 
lecture and the practical application of first aid procedures. 
The course encompasses American Red Cross standard first 
aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

1311 THROUGH PEN 1136-AA 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Team, dual, and individual sports which utilize college and 
community facilities. Emphasis is placed on skill 
development, knowledge acquisition, and participation. 

1311 DANCE 

1111 BOWLING 

1121 GOLF 

1321 VOLLEYBALL 

1341 TENNIS 

1441 RACQUETBALL 

1621 BASKETBALL 

1101 PHYSICAL FITNESS & CONDITIONING 

1171 AEROBIC FITNESS 

1405 SELF DEFENSE 

1136 BEGINNING SCUBA 

2342 and PEN 2 137- A A 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: As appropriate or individual proficiency 
determined by instructor. 

2342 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS 
2137 ADVANCED SCUBA 



148 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



HISTORY 



AMH 2010 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865- 
AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of U.S. history from settlement 
through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of American social, political, and economic 
institutions; problems of the new government; Jacksonian 
Democracy; territorial expansion and the coming of the 
Civil War. 

AMH 2020 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 1865 TO 
PRESENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the Civil War, Reconstruction, 
and the emergence of the modem United States. 

AMH 2070 FLORIDA HISTORY-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents Florida history from the age of 
discovery to the present. 

AMH 2091 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the Black American experience 
from its earliest roots in the high civilizations of Africa 
through present times. Special emphasis is given to the 
unique nature of that experience, the structural problems 
and potential of the Black community, and the study of the 
contributions and thought of outstanding African- American 
men and women. (I) 

EUH 1000 THE WESTERN TRADITION I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a survey course which covers the history of the 
Western World from the earliest civilizations of the Middle 
East through the Age of Exploration and the Renaissance. 
It emphasizes political, social, economic, religious and 
cultural aspects. Writing intensive sections available. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in written 
communication. 

EUH 1001 THE WESTERN TRADITION II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This survey course covers the history of the Western World 
from the Protestant Reformation to the present. It 
emphasizes political, social, economic, religious and 
cultural aspects. Writing intensive sections available. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in written 
communication. 



countries are included. Europe, the Middle East, Asia, 
Africa, India, China, Japan, and North, Central and South 
America receive appropriate emphasis. The major focus is 
placed on the political, economic, and social views of the 
world. Writing intensive sections available. If completed 
with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence in written communication. 

WOH 1023 HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATION 1500 
TO 1815-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the history of the world from 
1 500 to 1 8 1 5. Emphasis is placed on the political, economic, 
social, and intellectual aspects of world history during this 
period. Subjects include European exploration and 
colonization; the emergence of the nation-state; great 
modern revolutions; the Enlightenment; the French 
Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. Writing intensive 
sections available. If completed with a grade of "C" or 
better, this course serves to demonstrate competence in 
written communication. 

WOH 1030 HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATION 1815 
TO PRESENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey course which includes modem revolutions; the 
Industrial Revolution; Imperialism; the Indian, Far Eastern, 
and African backgrounds and political developments; the 
rise of Latin America; two World Wars and their results; 
modem nationalism and the decline of colonialism. The 
political, economic, social, and intellectual views of the 
world are emphasized. Writing intensive sections available. 
If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in written 
communication. 

HORTICULTURE 

ORH 1008C INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE 

AS(**) 

2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introductory coverage of the 
function and use of ornamental plants in the home interior 
and exterior landscape. 

ORH 2812 INTRODUCTION TO LANDSCAPE & 
DESIGN-AS(**) 
2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

A basic course in the study of residential landscapes 
including preparation, evaluation and implementation of 
simple landscape plans. Emphasis is placed on the use of 
omamental plants for functional and aesthetic improvement 
of the home environment. 



WOH 1012 HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATION TO 
1500-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a compact survey of the evolution of 
civilization from early times to 1500. All major areas and 



HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 



(See Business/Management/Finance) 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



149 



HUMAN SERVICES 



CHD 1 134 MANAGEMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD 
LEARNING-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This ciuirse focuses on optimal coordination of home and 
child-rearint: practices and expectations at a daycare facility. 
Carrying out supplemeniary responsibilities related to 
children's programs is also covered. This course is designed 
primarily for those seeking a Child Development Associate 
(CDA) credential or other child care training. 

CHI) 1 135 UNDERSTANDING YOUNG CHILDREN- 

AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course focuses on building positive self-concept and 
indi\ idual strengths in young children. Designed primarily 
for those persons seeking a Child Development Associate 
(CDA) credential or other child care training. 

EEC 1000 FOUNDATIONS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUC.ATION-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course focuses on setting up and maintaining a safe 
and healthy learning environment to advance physical and 
intellectual competence in young children. It is designed 
primarily for those seeking a Child Development Associate 
(CDA) credential or other child care training. 

HUS 1001 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course explores the field of human services, including 
health, mental health, public administration, education, 
social welfare, recreation, criminal justice, youth services, 
and rehabilitation. Emphasis is placed on the variety of 
expectations and perceptions of consumers of human 
services. Students develop basic helping and 
communication skills. 

HUS 1507 ALCOHOLISM & OTHER DRUG ABUSE-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

An introductory course that takes an analytical approach 
to identification, intervention, prevention, treatment and 
rehabilitation programming. Appropriate legislation and 
regulations governing rights of clients are examined. The 
community resources available for dealing with alcoholics 
and other drug abusers are identified, along with appropriate 
methods for the utilization of these resources. 

HUS 2110 BASIC COUNSELING SKILLS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HUS 1001 or permission of instructor. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the encouragement of 
personal growth and the development of fundamental 
interpersonal helping skills, as well as the promotion of 
knowledge of styles of helping fostered in a variety of 
human service settings. 



HUS 2309 WORKING WITH ALCOHOLICS AND OTHER 
DRUG ABUSERS-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides both theoretical information and 
practical application of counseling techniques which have 
been effective in working with alcoholics and other drug 
abusing clients. Through role playing, readings, structured 
class exercises, class discussions, and lectures students 
become familiar with a variety of counseling theories, 
techniques and modalities. 

HUMANITIES 

ENG 2100 AMERICAN CINEMA-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This telecourse explores how Hollywood films work 
technically, artistically, and culturally to reinforce and 
challenge America's national self-image. An art form, an 
industry, and a system of representation and 
communication. American film is a complicated and 
profoundly influential element of American culture. 

HUM 1950 HUMANITIES STUDY TOUR-AA(**) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 Credits 

Edison Community College-sponsored study tour abroad 
with lectures before departure and en route. Writing 
Intensive; journal required. If completed with a grade of 
"C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence in written communication. 

HUM 2210 STUDIES IN HUMANITIES: THE ANCIENT 
WORLD THROUGH THE RENAISSANCE- AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an interdisciplinary humanities course with 
a multicultural and global approach. Drawing from the 
fields of arts and letters, the course is a study of European 
culture from the prehistoric age through the end of the 
Renaissance, as well as the ancient cultures of Asia, Africa 
and Pre-Colombian America. This course is termed a 
writing intensive course. If completed with a grade of 
"C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence in written communication. 

HUM 2228 STUDIES IN HUMANITIES: HUMANITIES 
THROUGH THE ARTS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a 30-program telecourse which explores 
human values and our sense of ourselves as individuals in 
community through the arts. Students wishing to qualify 
for the AA degree must complete this course with a grade 
of "C" or higher. This course is termed a writing-intensive 
course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this 
course serves to demonstrate competence in written 
communication. 



150 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



HUM 2230 STUDIES IN HUMANITIES: THE 17th 
CENTURY TO THE PRESENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

An interdisciplinary humanities course with a multicultural 
and global perspective. Drawing from the field of arts and 
letters, the course is a study of European culture from the 
Baroque era to the present, as well as the modem cultures 
of Asia, Africa and the contemporary Americas. This course 
is termed a writing intensive course. If completed with a 
grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence in written communication. 

HUM 2930 STUDIES IN HUMANITIES: GREAT HUMAN 
QUESTIONS-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Central humanities themes presented through the study of 
selected works and performances (in philosophy, literature, 
art, music, architecture, drama, or dance), representing 
many periods and cultures and serving as a basis for 
discussion of issues - social and historical as well as 
aesthetic and philosophical-facing the individual and 
society. The course utilizes multiple perspectives, guest 
lecturers, and media presentations. It is recommended that 
students complete at least one composition course before 
enrolling. This course is termed a writing intensive course 
and requires a minimum of 6,000 words of writing. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in written 
communication. 

HUM 2950 HUMANITIES STUDY TOUR-AA(**) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 Credits 

This course is a second tour which is a continuation of HUM 
1950. Both courses are writing intensive; prior instructor 
permission required. If completed with a grade of "C" 
or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence 
in written communication. 

INFORMATION SERVICES 

LIS 1001 LIBRARY SKILLS - AA(**) 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is an introduction to the use of library materials 
and resources. Students learn to develop search strategies 
to utilize traditional library materials and electronic 
information resources. The course focuses on information 
resources related to the undergraduate research paper. 

LIS 1003 INTERNET FOR COLLEGE RESEARCH-AA 
1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is designed to help students become familiar 
with the Internet and information resources of value in 
college research. Through the use of finding tools and 
informational resources on the Internet, students develop 
increased skills in identifying, using and evaluating 
electronic information resources. Classroom activities and 
practical experience in using the Internet provide students 
with basic research skills necessary for information literacy 
in today's world. 



INTERNSHIPS 



GEB 1949 INTERNSHIP WORK EXPERIENCE I -AA 

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of college 
course work or permission of appropriate District Dean 
and permission to register from the Internship 
Specialist. 

3 Credits 
This course offers an internship work experience in a 
cooperative program between Edison Community College, 
students and local employers. Students may use current 
employment or seek desired employment or volunteer 
experiences to incorporate their academic learning into a 
real-world work experience. Participation and eligibility is 
determined by the Internship Specialist. Students in most 
programs of study are eligible. This course requires verified 
work hours and a final summary report at the end of the 
internship experience. Each student participates in the 
development of an approved individual learning plan. The 
student's work habits and experiences are evaluated by the 
Internship Specialist at regular intervals and a final grade 
is based on approved criteria. Students may register for the 
course at any time during the semester and are not limited 
by semester time frames. 

GEB 2949 INTERNSHIP WORK EXPERIENCE II -AA 
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours of college 
course work or permission of appropriate District Dean 
and permission to register from the Internship 
Specialist. 

3 Credits 
This course is for students wanting to complete a second 
internship. Students may build upon their first internship 
with the same employer or pursue a separate internship with 
a different employer. 



JOURNALISM 



(See Media) 



LEGAL ASSISTING 



(See Paralegal Studies) 



MARINE SCIENCE 



(See Science) 



MATHEMATICS 



MAT 9002 BASIC MATHEMATICS(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing or permission of District Director 

This course prepares students for algebra by covering basic 
mathematical skills. The student learns to add, subtract, 
multiply, and divide, and apply those skills to the real 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



151 



number system. The student also learns to solve problems 
with pcrccnts. All of the aforementioned topics will 
incorporate word problems. 

MAT 9012 DFVKI.OPMKNTAL ALGEBRA !(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prt'rcquisite: IVstinn, .M.\T *HW2, Permission of District 
Director of lA'arnin^; Assistance. 
The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for 
success in MAT 9020. Developmental Algebra II. This 
course is designed lo provide sludenls who have little or no 
algebra background w ith know ledge of the basic concepts 
of algebra and the skills required lo apply these concepts. 
Topics covered include signed numbers, algebraic 
expressions, linearequalions, exponents, and polynomials. 

MAT 9020 DK\ ELOP.MKN TAL ALGEBRA II(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing, MAT 9012, Permission of District 
Director of Learning Assistance. 

This course will prepare the student for success in MAT 
10.^3. Intermediate Algebra. This course is a continuation 
of MAT 9012, Developmental Algebra I. It is designed to 
complete a sequence in Elementary Algebra. Topics covered 
include factoring polynomials, graphing, quadratic 
equations, rational and radical expressions. A state exit test 
must be passed to exit this course. 

MAT 9024 INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing, or permission of District Director 
of Learning A.ssistance. 

This cour.se prepares the student for success in MAT 1033, 
Intermediate Algebra. Topics covered include signed 
numbers, algebraic expressions, exponents, polynomials, 
factoring polynomials, graphing, linear and quadratic 
equations, and rational and radical expressions. Word 
problems and critical thinking skills are topics and concepts 
used throughout the course. A state exit test must be passed 
to exit this course. 

MAT 1033 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing or MAT 9024 

This course is intended to prepare students for college level 
algebra courses which students need to take to meet the 
State requirements for math competencies. This course 
should adequately prepare the student for MAC 1 105 and 
provide a strong algebra foundations for any higher level 
math courses that the student may need. This course does 
not satisfy mathematics AA degree graduation 
requirements - may be used for ELECTIVE CREDIT 
ONLY. 

MAC 1 105 COLLEGE ALGEBRA-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: 90 on FCELPT or 540 on SAT-R; 23 on 
ACT-E, "C" in MAT 1033, or Testing 

A course designed for students whose major requires 
College Algebra. Topics include linear, quadratic, rational, 
radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Graphing 



and applications are emphasized. A TI-85/86 or equivalent 
calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" 
or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence 
for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1 140 PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 1 105 or permission of instructor. 

An algebra course designed to prepare students to enter 
either engineering or calculus courses. Topics covered 
include exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomial, 
rational functions, conic sections, sequences and series, 
mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, and 
matrices. A graphing calculator, TI85/86 or equivalent, is 
required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, 
this course serves to demonstrate competence for the 
general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 11 14 TRIGONOMETRY- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: MAC 1140 strongly recommended. 

Topics in this class include real number systems, circular 
functions, trigonometric functions, inverse relations and 
functions, trigonometric graphs, solutions of triangles, 
trigonometric equations, polar coordinates, complex 
numbers. Contains all of the features of trigonometry found 
in MAC 1 147, with additional emphasis on applications. A 
graphing calculator, TI85/86 or equivalent, is required. 
(May be taken concurrently with MAC 1 140.) If completed 
with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education 
mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1 147 PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/ 
TRIGONOMETRY-AA 

5 class hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: High school trigonometry or MAC 1105 
and permission of instructor. 

This course is designed for students with strong 
mathematical backgrounds who need a refresher course 
before beginning the Calculus sequence. Topics covered 
are a combination of topics from MAC! 140 and MAC 1 1 14. 
If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence for the general 
education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 2233 CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS, SOCIAL AND 
LIFE SCIENCES-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or MAC 1140 

This course is designed for students in business and related 
studies who need calculus but not trigonometry. Included 
is a review of equations and inequalities and their 
applications, functions and graphs, exponential and 
logarithmic functions. Major topics include mathematics 
of finance, limits and continuity, differentiation and 
integration and applications of these. A graphing calculator. 
TI8.5/86 or equi\alent. is required. If completed with a 
grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence for the general education mathematics 
requirement. 



152 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



MAC 2311 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 
I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAC 1140 and MAC 1114 or MAC 2132/ 
1147. 

This course is designed for students majoring in science, 
matJiematics or engineering. Topics covered include: limits, 
differentiation, integration of algebraic, trigonometric, 
logarithmic and exponential functions and applications. 
Sequential with MAC 2312 and MAC 2313. A graphing 
calculator, TI85/86 or equivalent, is required. If completed 
with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education 
mathematics requirement. 

MAC 2312 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY H- 
AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 2311 with minimum grade of "C" 
or permission of instructor. 

This course presents differentiation and integration's of 
trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions, 
special techniques of integration, improper integrals, 
sequences, infinite series, and analytic geometry in three 
dimensional space. A graphing calculator, TI85/86 or 
equivalent, is required. If completed with a grade of "C" 
or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence 
for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 2313 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 
ni-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 2312 with a minimum grade of "C" 
or permission of instructor. 

This course includes study of linear systems and matrices, 
partial derivatives, multiple integration, line integrals, polar 
coordinates, and vectors in the plane. A graphing calculator, 
TI85/86 or equivalent is required. If completed with a 
grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence for the general education mathematics 
requirement. 

MAP 2302 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 2312 or permission of instructor. 

This course presents methods of solutions for first order 
equations. Selected applications also covered are Linear 
equations, Laplace transforms, and series solutions. A 
graphing calculator, TI85/86 or equivalent is required. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence for the general 
education mathematics requirement. 

MGF 1106 MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Testing; 72 on FCELPT; or 19 on ACT- 
E; or 440 SAT-R 

This course covers State of Florida essential computational 
skills including arithmetic, algebra, geometry, probability 



and statistics. It covers most of the computational skills on 
the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST). If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence for the general 
education mathematics requirement. 

MGF 1107 MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS II- A A 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: Testing; 72 on FCELPT; or 19 on ACT- 
E; or 440 SAT-R 

This course is intended to demonstrate the utility of 
mathematics with direct applications in a contemporary 
society. Areas of study include the mathematics of social 
choice, management science, and growth and symmetry. 
This course is designed for those students whose majors 
do not require the technical mathematics sequence. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence for the general 
education mathematics requirement. 

STA 2023 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or 90 on FCELPT; or 23 on 
ACT-E; or 540 SAT-R 

An introductory course in statistics covering topics in 
parametric and non-parametric statistics. Topics include: 
descriptive measures, probability, statistical inference and 
decisions-making, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression 
and correlational analysis, probability distributions, 
sampling distributions, use of electronic calculators, 
interpretations of computer printouts, and non-parametric 
test procedures. A graphing calculator, TI85/86 or 
equivalent is required. If completed with a grade of "C" 
or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence 
for the general education mathematics requirement. 

" MEDIA: JOURNALISM, RADIO, 
TELEVISION 

JOU 1100 BASIC REPORTING-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to the profession. 
Emphasis is placed on theory and practice of writing news. 

MMC 1000 SURVEY OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents requirements, opportunities, and 
responsibilities of various media. 

RTV 2000 INTRODUCTION TO BROADCASTING-AA(**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the basic elements of radio and 
television broadcasting. The process of broadcast 
communications and its social, economic, and physical 
basis is covered, emphasizing careers, programming trends 
and future developments in broadcasting. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



153 



MUSIC 



MUE 1440 STRING TECHNIQUES-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of lone 
production, hterature. reading and transposition applicable 
to string instruments. 

MUE 1450 WOODWIND TECHNIQUES-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone 
production, literature, reading and transposition applicable 
to woodwind instruments. 

MUE 1460 BRASS TECHNIQUES-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone 
production, literature, reading and transposition applicable 
to brass instruments. 

MUE 1470 PERCUSSION TECHNIQUES-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone 
production, literature, reading and transposition applicable 
to percussion instruments. 

MUH 2018 JAZZ HISTORY AND APPRECIATION-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces jazz styles from a historical 
perspective. Lectures highlight the general characteristics 
of various jazz styles and artists, and focus on listening 
skills which aid in an appreciation of jazz. (I) 

MUL 1 1 10 MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the materials, literature, and practices 
of music, and consideration of its aesthetic purposes and 
social function. Development of listening skills and criteria 
of judgment is also presented. (I) 

MUM 2701 MUSIC BUSINESS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to the structure of the 
music business and the entertainment industry. Emphasis 
is placed on contemporary business practices. Topics 
include careers in the recording and performing fields, retail 
music merchandising, publishing, song writing and 
arranging, arts and artist management, professional 
organizations, copyright law and career development. 

MUN 1 120, 2120 CONCERT BAND-AA 

1 cla.ss hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 

The course emphasizes the study and performance of 
literature written for the modern concert band. The 
ensemble is open to all students. (Band students transferring 
as music majors are encouraged to enroll.) 



MUN 1210, 2210 ECC COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA-AA(**) 
1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

The course emphasizes the study and performance of 
orchestral literature. The ensemble is open to all students 
and community members. 

MUN 1310, 2310 COLLEGE CHOIR-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 

This course covers the study, rehearsal, and performance 
of choral literature, with training in fundamentals of singing. 
Attention is given to general, cultural and humanistic 
considerations. 

MUN 1340, 2340 VOCAL ENSEMBLE-AA(**) 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course covers the study and performance of ensemble 
literature for various small groupings. 

MUN 1410-1440, 2410-2440 INSTRUMENTAL CHAMBER 
ENSEMBLES-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course allows students to concentrate on specialized 
literature for small ensembles. Choices include: String 
Ensemble MUN 1410, 2410; Woodwind Ensemble MUN 
1420, 2420-; Brass Ensemble MUN 1430, 2430; Percussion 
Ensemble MUN 1440, 2440. 

MUN 1710, 2710 JAZZ ENSEMBLE LII-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the study and 
performance of literature for the modem big jazz band. 
Auditions are held for placement in performing or 
preparatory group. 

MUT 1001 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Designed for students with little or no previous musical 
training, this course presents an introduction to the reading 
and performance of music, including principles of notation, 
scales, triads, rhythms, and interpretive markings. 

MUT 1111/1112 MUSIC THEORY LII-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class presents a study of music fundamentals, and of 
diatonic and chromatic harmony, largely through the use 
of a four- voice chorale-style model. It is intended that MUT 
1241/1242 be taken concurrently, and it is recommended 
that MVK 1 11 1 be taken concurrently with MUT 1111. 

MUT 1241/1242 SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING 
L II-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course covers the development of aural skills through 
sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and error 
detection in diatonic musical examples. It is intended that 
MUT 1 1 1 1/1 1 12 be taken concurrently. 



154 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



MUX 2116/2117 MUSIC THEORY III, IV-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MUX 1111/1112 or permission of 
professor. 

This course presents modulation using diatonic and 
chromatic harmony, twentieth-century tonal practices, 
introduction to atonal analysis and twelve-tone techniques, 
and the study of musical forms. It is intended that MUT 
2246/2247 be taken concurrently. 

MUT 2246/2247 SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING 
m, IV-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: MUT 1241/1242 or permission of 
instructor. 

This course covers the development of aural skills in both 
diatonic and chromatic musical styles. Includes sight 
singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and error 
detection. It is intended that MUT 2116/2117 be taken 
concurrently. 

MUT 2641 INTRODUCTION TO JAZZ IMPROVISATION- 
AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: MUT 1121, 1122 or permission of 
instructor. 

This course provides an ensemble experience with emphasis 
on scales, chord structures, rhythmic patterns and chord 
progression - ordinarily a further development of the Jazz 
Ensemble experience. 

MVK nil CLASS PIANO I, II- A A 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents elementary instruction in piano, 
emphasis on music reading, piano techniques, and piano 
literature. 

MVK 2121 CLASS PIANO HI, IV-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: MVK 1111 and permission of instructor. 

Continuation of MVK 1111. 



MVB 1211-MVW 2325 APPLIED MUSIC INSTRUCTION- 
AA 1-2 Credits 

Prerequisite: MVV 1111 and permission of instructor. 

Applied Music is individual one-on-one voice or 
instrumental instruction which may be arranged for ECC 
degree-seeking students of advanced accomplishments, 
especially those actively enrolled in the Edison's music 
program. Thirty minutes of private instruction per week 
equals one credit hour It is recommended that music majors 
take weekly lessons in their principle instruments. Seats in 
applied music classes are limited. Permission of the District 
Dean of Humanities Communications and Social Science 
is required. These lessons are not intended for beginners. 

1. Full-time music majors have first priority. Due to the 
high cost of individual instruction, students are not 
permitted to repeat an applied music course. 

2. Full-time (12 hours) degree-seeking students have 
second priority; students who need a one-credit-hour 
course to "fill" their load do not qualify, nor do those 
who are just learning to play an instrument. 

3. Dual enrollment students and part-time students who 
are likely to become full-time have third priority. 

4. Community members have fourth option on remaining 
seats, exclusive of those who have repeated a course 
more than once. Such repeaters should be referred to 
the Office of Continuing Education. 

All students enrolled in applied music lessons must receive 
approval and certification of demonstrated advanced 
accomplishment by the professor, the written permission 
of the District Dean, and must show evidence of having 
enrolled in an ensemble. The written permission shall 
designate the criteria ( 1 ,2,3 or 4 as listed above) under which 
the student is granted approval. Students must be 
accommodated in priority order, i.e. criteria one students 
have first priority, then criteria two students, etc. A form 
will be provided for this process. 



Baritone Horn 


Guitar 


Percussion 


Trumpet 


Bassoon 


Harpsichord 


Piano 


Tuba 


Cello 


Horn 


Saxophone 


Viola 


Clarinet 


Oboe 


String Bass 


Violin 


Flute 


Organ 


Trombone 


Voice 



MVS nil CLASS GUITAR L II-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents elementary instruction in guitar, 
emphasis on music reading, fundamental guitar techniques 
and guitar literature. 



Students enrolled in Applied Music are expected to enroll 
in a performance ensemble (choir, orchestra, jazz ensemble 
or concert band). 

- Applied Music Course Numbers - 



MVV 1111 CLASS VOICE- AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

This course presents fundamentals of singing; emphasis 
on tone production and diction as applied to vocal literature. 
MUT 1121 and/or MVK 1111 recommended concurrently. 



BARITONE HORN 

MVB 1214 
MVB 1314 
MVB 2224 
MVB 2324 



CELLO 

MVS 1213 
MVS 1313 
MVS 2213 
MVS 2313 



FLUTE 

MVW 1211 
MVW 1311 
MVW 2221 
MVW 2321 



MVV 2121 CLASS VOICE (Sophomore)-AA(**) 

2 class hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: MVV 1111 and permission of instructor. 

Continuation of MVV 1111. 



BASSOON 

MVW 1214 
MVW 1314 
MVW 2214 
MVW 23 14 



CLARINET 

MVW 1213 
MVW 1313 
MVW 2223 
MVW 2323 



HARPSICHORD 

MVK 1212 
MVK 1312 
MVK 2222 
MVK 2322 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



155 



NUR 



OBOK 

MVW 1212 
MVW 1312 
MVW 2222 
MVW 2322 

ORGAN 

MVK 1213 
MVK 1313 
MVK 2223 
MVK 2323 

PERCUSSION 

MVP 1211 
MVP 1311 
MVP 2221 
MVP 2321 

PIANO 

MVK 1211 
MVK 1311 
MVK 2221 
MVK 2321 

TROMBONE 

MVB 1213 
MVB 1313 
MVB 2223 
MVB 2323 



TRUMPET 

MVB 1211 
MVB 1311 
MVB 2221 
MVB 2321 

TUBA 

MVB 1215 
MVB 1315 
MVB 2225 
MVB 2325 

VIOLA 

MVS 1212 
MVS 1312 
MVS 2222 
MVS 2322 

GUITAR 

MVS 1216 
MVS 1316 
MVS 2226 
MVS 2326 

HORN 

MVB 1212 
MVB 1312 
MVB 2222 
MVB 2322 



SAXOPHONE 

MVW 1215 
MVW 1315 
MVW 2225 
MVW 2325 

STRING BASS 

MVS 1214 
MVS 1314 
MVS 2224 
MVS 2324 

VIOLIN 

MVS 1211 
MVS 1311 
MVS 2221 
MVS 2321 

VOICE 

MVV 1211 
MVV 1311 
MVV 2221 
MVV 2321 



NURSING 



NUR 1010 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BSC 1093C, MGF 1106 or MAC 1105 
Corequisites: BSC 1094C, NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 
1024L, ENC 1101, NUR 1930 

This course introduces students to the history and trends in 
nursing, the health-weliness continum, and Maslow's 
Hierarchy of needs. Other topics addressed include the 
following: legal and ethical issues, medical tenninology, 
death and dying, and the recognition of cultural diversity 
in both the client and the profession. In addition, the Edison 
Community College Department of Nursing's philosophy, 
conceptual framework, and outcomes are presented. 



NUR 1022 FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING -AS* 



3 class hours 



5 Credits 



1022L FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 

CLINICAL-AS 

6 laboratory hours Credits 

Prerequisites: BSC 1093C, MGF 1106 or MAC 1105 

Corequisites: BSC 1094C, ENC 1101. NUR 1010, 

NUR 1930, NUR 1024L 

In this course students are introduced to the practice of the 

Associate Degree nurse and the role as provider of care, 

manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. 

Using the nursing process, students begin to assess human 



needs and the actual or potential problems that interfere 
with the client's ability to meet these basic needs. Students 
learn fundamental, technical, and interpersonal skills. 
Clinical laboratory experiences are provided in selected area 
hospitals and extended care facilities with an emphasis on 
the elderly. 

NUR 1024L FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 
PRACTICUM-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: BSC 1093C, MGF 1106 or MAC 1105 
Corequisites: ENC 1101, NUR 1010, NUR 1930, NUR 
1022/1022L, BSC 1094C 

In this course students begin the application of fundamental 
nursing skills and techniques related to the practice of 
nursing to clients with uncomplicated medical-surgical 
alterations in health. These skills are demonstrated and 
practiced in the nursing practicum laboratory. Learning 
experiences include discussion, assigned readings, class 
demonstrations, and videos. 

NUR 1930 NURSING SEMINAR IAS 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: BSC 1093C, MGF 1106 or MAC 1105 
Corequisites: NUR 1010, NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 
1024L, ENC 1101, BSC 1094C 

This course introduces the student to written documentation 
of care provided in acute and long-term care facilities. 
Students work individually and in small groups on 
assignments pertaining to: the well older adult, interpersonal 
relationships, client assessment, and the nursing process. 

NUR 1201 TRANSITIONAL NURSING CONCEPTS-AS* 

Advanced Placement Sequence Only 

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 6 Credits 

NUR 1201L TRANSITIONAL NURSING CONCEPTS 
CLINICAL-AS 

6 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisites: ENC 1101, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, 
MGF 1106 or MAC 1105, Nursing Mobility Exam (as 
required) A Florida certificate or license as a Paramedic, 
Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular 
Technician (RCVT), or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) 
is required. Paramedics, RRT's, and RCVT's must be 
Florida certified nursing assistants.) 
Corequisites:NUR 1932, NUR 1201L, PSY 2013, DEP 
2004, HUN 1201, 

This transitional course introduces the student to the Edison 
Community College Department of Nursing's philosophy, 
conceptual framework, and outcomes. The course includes 
content on the nursing process, legal and ethical issues, 
and expanded technical skills. Using the nursing process, 
students assess human needs, alterations of human needs, 
and nursing interventions necessary to meet these needs. 
The student is introduced to the role of provider of care, 
manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. 
The course utilizes experiences in the classroom, practicum 
lab and clinical facilities to address nursing care of clients 
in acute care settings. 



156 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



NUR 1210 ADULT NURSING IAS* 

4 class hours 



7 Credits 



NUR 1210L ADULT NURSING I CLINICAL-AS 

9 laboratory hours Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 1930, NUR 1010, NUR 1022/1022L, 
NUR 1024L, ENC 1101, BSC 1094C 
Corequisites: DEP 2004, NUR 1240L, HUN 1201, PSY 
2013, NUR 1931 

In this course students continue to develop their role as a 
member of the profession of nursing and as a provider of 
care to clients with uncomplicated medical-surgical 
alterations in health. Application of theory to practice is 
emphasized. Knowledge, techniques, and skills related to 
promoting, restoring, and maintaining health are taught. 
Learning experiences include the following: lecture- 
discussion, a written teaching-learning plan, and clinical 
experience in acute care facilities. 

NUR 1240L ADULT NURSING I PRACTICUM-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: NUR 1930, NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 
1024L, NUR 1010, ENC 1101, BSC 1094C 
Corequisites: DEP 2004, NUR 1210/1210L, HUN 1201, 
PSY 2013, NUR 1931 

In this course students build upon fundamental skills and 
techniques related to the practice of nursing of clients with 
uncomplicated medical-surgical alterations. Students 
continue to progress in performing simple medical-surgical 
procedures and techniques by utilizing nursing concepts 
and principles derived from lecture-discussion, assigned 
readings, class demonstration and videos in the nursing 
practicum lab. 

NUR 1931 NURSING SEMINAR HAS 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1024L, NUR 
1010, NUR 1930, ENC 1101, BSC 1094C 
Corequisites: NUR 1210/1210L, NUR 1240L, HUN 
1201, PSY 2013, DEP 2004 

This course expands on the written documentation of care. 
Critical thinking skills relevant to providing and managing 
the care of adult clients are introduced. The nursing process 
with emphasis on the nursing diagnosis is stressed. The 
APA format of writing scholarly papers is introduced and 
individual papers are critiqued. 

NUR 1932 NURSING SEMINAR-ADVANCED 
PLACEMENT-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MGF 1106, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, 
PSY 2013, DEP 2004, HUN 1201, ENC 1101 
Corequisites: NUR 1201/1201L 

This course introduces the student to concepts relevant to 
the nursing care provided in acute and long term care 
facilities. Students work individually and in groups on 
assignments pertaining to: cultural diversity, nursing 
process, nursing care plans, pharmacology, ethical-legal 
implications, and the teaching-learning process. 



NUR 2140 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGICAL 
CONCEPTS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 1931 or NUR 1932, NUR 1210/ 
1210L and NUR 1240L, or NUR 1201/1201L, HUN 
1201, DEP 2004, PSY 2013, BSC 1094C 
Corequisites: NUR 2212/2212L or NUR 2460/2460L 
Medication administration requires specialized knowledge, 
judgement, and nursing skills based on the principles of 
pharmacology. The focus of this course is to assist the 
student in applymg knowledge of pharmacology and the 
nursing process to direct nursing decisions relative to safe 
drug administration and to ensure compliance with 
standards of practice. This course focuses on identification 
of drug classifications, interactions and application of the 
nursing process to clinical situations. 



NUR 2460 NURSING OF THE CHILDBEARING 
FAMILY-AS* 
4 class hours 



8 Credits 



NUR 2460L NURSING OF THE CHILDBEARING 
FAMILY CLINICAL-AS 

12 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 1931 or NUR 1932, NUR 1210/ 
1210L, NUR 1240L or NUR 1201/1201L, HUN 1201, 
DEP 2004, PSY 2013, NUR 1024L 
Corequisites: NUR 2140 or NUR 2810/2810L 
This course presents a developmental approach is utilized 
to study the basic needs of the Childbearing/Childrearing 
family. The reproductive years are explored with emphasis 
on the stages of pregnancy, childbirth, the puerperium, and 
on the child from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is 
placed on growth and development and alterations in health 
during these stages. Specialized skills are demonstrated and 
practiced in the nursing laboratory. The clinical laboratory 
provides the student the opportunity to develop their role 
as provider of care, manager of care, and member within 
the profession of nursing as it relates to the childbearing 
family. 

NUR 2212 ADVANCED ADULT NURSING II-AS* 

4 class hours 8 Credits 

NUR 2212L ADVANCED ADULT NURSING II 
CLINICAL-AS 

12 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 1931 or NUR 1932, NUR 1210/ 
1210L, NUR 1240L or NUR 1201/1201L, HUN 1201, 
DEP 2004, PSY 2013, NUR 1024L 
Corequisites: NUR 2140 or NUR 2810/2810L 
This course is an integrated study of complicated alteration 
in health in the adult client. It includes theoretical concepts 
relevant to adults experiencing complex medical, surgical, 
and mental health alterations, and the goal of restoration 
or maintenance of health. Clinical learning experiences 
provide students with the opportunity to further develop 
their roles as providers of care, managers of care, and 
members within the profession of nursing. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



157 



NUR 2«I0 PROFFSSIONAL ISSUES AND ROLE 
l)KVEI.OPMKNT-AS* 
2 class hours 4 Credits 

NUR 2810L CLINICAL PRECEPTORSHIP-AS 

*^6 Clinical hours/over 4 weeks Credits 

Prerequisites: All nursing courses and all A.S. degree 
general education requirements including MCB 2013C 
Corequisites: NUR 2460/2460L or NUR 2212/2212L 

This course is designed to facilitate the transition of the 
student to entry level practitioner. An overview of trends 
and issues in nursing and health care delivery is presented. 
The course explores legal-ethical issues, management and 
leadership concepts, and issues related to employment in 
nursing. The focus of the clinical experience is on the 
progression of the student from the educational setting and 
student role, to functioning within the reality of the work 
place in a professional role. This Level 2 clinical 
preceptorship teams a student with a registered nurse mentor 
for an in-depth clinical experience. Students are provided 
an opportunity to synthesize and utilize knowledge gained 
during their educational experience while functioning in 
the role of provider of care. Opportunities are provided for 
students to participate as a manager of client care, and to 
observe basic management functions. Students are required 
to complete this level 2. ninety-six hour clinical 
preceptorship, during the final month in the nursing 
program. 

*Nursing courses with clinicals are taught as unified 
courses. A student must get a grade of "C" or above in 
theory and a passing grade in clinical in each nursing course 
attempted. 

NUTRITION 



(See Science) 



PARALEGAL STUDIES 



PLA 1003 INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGAL 
STUDIES -AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the training and 
purpose of paralegals. It examines the role of the lawyer 
and the paralegal in modern society, the ethical and 
professional practice standards applicable to both lawyer 
and assistant, and surveys the various fields of law to be 
covered in the Paralegal Studies program. 

PLA 11 03 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING IAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to legal research 
including citation form, case law, reading and finding 
statutes, legislative history, constitutional law, 
administrative law. court rules, local rules, looseleaf 
services, secondary references, computer research, and 
ethical considerations. 



PLA 2114 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING II-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides research and writing skills that the 
paralegal needs, with emphasis on legal writing. The course 
is intended to familiarize students with problems and 
procedures in legal research and writing. Computerized 
legal research techniques on WESTLAW are incorporated 
to complement the techniques learned in PLA 11 03. PLA 
1 103 Legal Research and Writing I is recommended to be 
taken first, but not required. 

PLA 2200 LITIGATION-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the 
structure of the federal and state judicial systems and their 
jurisdictions. It introduces the student to the basic litigation 
process and its procedural aspects by focusing on the federal 
and state rules of civil procedure and evidence. It includes 
comparisons of state and federal court rules and the drafting 
of pleadings. 

PLA 2202 TORTS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers principles of tort litigation, lawyer and 
client relationships and ethical considerations, causes of 
action, remedies and defenses, jurisdiction, commencement 
of lawsuits, rules of procedure, pleadings, gathering 
evidence, and ethical considerations. 

PLA 2433 BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND 
GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a study of sole proprietorships, 
partnerships, and corporations. Includes ethical 
considerations and governmental regulations. 

PLA 2504 REAL ESTATE LAW AND PROPERTY-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a study of ownership, title issues, legal 
descriptions, real estate contracts, real estate transfers and 
transactions, real estate closings, and ethical considerations. 

PLA 2603 WILLS, TRUST AND PROBATE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents instruction in estate planning, wills, 
probate practice and procedures, jurisdiction, functions of 
lawyers and personal representatives, initial steps in 
probate, inventory and appraisal, creditors claims, 
distribution and discharge, ancillary administration, and 
ethical considerations. 

PLA 2763 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers principles of organization and 
management, management styles, communications process, 
utilizing legal assistants, management of office employees, 
office environment, office systems, office functions, 
financial management, and ethical considerations. 



158 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



PLA 2800 FAMILY LAW-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents a study of various aspects of family 
law including marriage, premarital and other agreements, 
annulment, dissolution of marriage, separation agreements, 
child custody support, alimony, judicial separation, 
adoptions and other areas. Ethical considerations are also 
discussed. 

PHILOSOPHY 

IDS 1350 CRITICAL THINKING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to develop higher level reasoning 
and problem-solving skills which can be effectively 
transferred to other subject areas. Emphasis includes 
specialized vocabulary development and verbal and 
quantitative reasoning skills. Students will apply creative 
and critical reasoning skills to brainstorming, patterns of 
thinking, questioning and effective problem-solving 
strategies. Fundamentals of logic, analogies, perceptions 
and learning styles are also explored. 

PHI 2010 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A basic course in philosophical thinking. Selected readings 
from Socrates to Sartre are included. 

PHI 2100 LOGIC: REASONING AND CRITICAL 
THINKING-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a basic course in methods and principles in the 
development of correct reasoning. 

PHI 2600 ETHICS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a basic course in philosophical thinking about 
morality, moral problems, and moral judgments. 

REL 2300 WORLD RELIGIONS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents a scholarly introduction to the major 
religious traditions of the world. Course material includes 
historical background, function in society, philosophical 
tenets and sacred texts drawn from Hinduism, Buddhism, 
Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity 
and Islam. (I) 

PHOTOGRAPHY 



(See Art) 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 



(See Science) 



PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 
PROGRAM 

NOTE: The following courses are provided under an agreement 
with the Broward Community College Physical Therapist Assistant 
Program. These courses are offered and taught jointly by Edison 
Community College and Broward Community College. Edison 
offers the General Education portion of the degree and assists in 
the teaching of the Physical Therapy courses. The degree is granted 
by Broward Community College. The program is delivered to the 
students via distance learning technology. That is, there is a two- 
way audio/video interaction with one or more remote sites located 
in classrooms geographically distant from the Broward Community 
College campus. For information regarding the scheduling of these 
classes, please call 489-9494. 

PHT 1010 PHYSICAL PRINICPLES FOR THE PHYSICAL 
THERAPIST ASSISTANT 

1 class hour per week 1 Credit 
Prerequisites: none 

Corequisites: PHT 1200, PHT 1103 

This course introduces students to the basic physical 
principles that apply to commonly utilized therapeutic 
procedures in the field of physical therapy. 

PHT 1 103 ANATOMY FOR PHYSICAL THERAPIST 
ASSISTANT 

3 class hours per week 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: none 
Corequisites: none 

This course introduces basic human anatomy with an 
emphasis on the structure and function of the skeletal and 
muscular systems. Actions, origins, insertions and 
innervations of muscles are also discussed. 

PHT 1 103L ANATOMY FOR PHYSICAL THERAPIST 
ASSISTANT LAB 

2 hours per week 1 Credit 
Prerequisites: none 

Corequisites: none 

Laboratory sessions for Anatomy for PTA (PHTl 103) are 
designed to provide the students with an opportunity to 
identify, with accuracy, a variety of bones, bony landmarks, 
muscles, ligaments and other soft tissue structures using 
graphics and various anatomical specimens/models. 

PHT 1200 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY 

3 class hours per week 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: none 

Corequisites: PHTl 103, PHTIOIO 

This course introduces the student to the historical 
background, philosophy and goals of physical therapy as a 
profession. It incorporates discussion on legal and ethical 
issues, educational requirements, supervisory relationships 
and current developments related to physical therapy. 
Presents the basic theory of body mechanics, preparation 
of the patient and the treatment area, positioning and 
transferring techniques, gait training, and wheelchair 
prescription. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



159 



PHT 12(M>I. IN IRODICTION TO PHYSICAL 
THKKAP\ 1 AB 

2 hours per week 1 Credit 
Prerequisites: none 

C orequisites: PHTl 103, PHT 1 010 
l.aboiaUir\ sessions tor Introiluclioii to Physical Therapy 
(PHT1200) are designed to allow the students an 
opportunity to familiarize themselves with the basic 
fundamentals of patient care. Emphasis is placed on body 
mechanics analysis, positioning procedures, transfers, gait 
training, and basic patient care skills. 

PHT 1211 niSABHJTIES AND THERAPEUTIC 
PROCEDURES I 

3 class hours per week 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: PHT1200, PHTl 103 
Corequisites: PHT2224 

This course introduces the student to the theory and 
practical application of physical therapy modalities. The 
physiological effects of and the indications/ 
contraindications of patient care interventions such as heat, 
cold, radiant therapy, electrotherapy, traction, intermittent 
compression and massage are presented. 

PHT 121 IL DISABILITIES AND THERAPEUTIC 
PROCEDURES I LAB 

4 hours per week 2 Credits 
Prerequisites: PHT 1200L, PHT1103L 
Corequisites: none 

Laboratory sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic 
Procedures (PHT1211) are designed to develop student 
skills in the actual performance of the patient care 
interventions presented. Practical application of each 
intervention is emphasized with patient simulations and 
case studies enhancing the ability to understand a plan of 
care for a patient. 

PHT 1300 SURVEY OF PATHOLOGICAL DEFICITS 

4 class hours per week 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None 
Corequisites: PHT 1200 

This course introduces the student to general pathological 
conditions with emphasis on those commonly seen in the 
field of physical therapy. Basic system anatomy is reviewed 
with an emphasis on the pathophysiology of disease. 
Student presentations of various musculoskeletal conditions 
are completed. Descriptions of how diseases are classified, 
diagnosed and treated, as well as the natural course/ 
prognosis of these diseases are presented. Implications of 
disease processes as well as contraindications and 
precautions related to physical therapy are discussed. When 
relevant, specific physical therapy plans, such as chest PT, 
are discussed. The effects of aging upon disease and in 
general are considered. 

PHT 1350 BASIC PHARMACOLOGY FOR PHYSICAL 
THERAPIST ASSISTANTS 

1 class hour per week 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None 



Corequisites: PHTI211 

This course introduces concepts of basic pharmacology and 
presents pharmacological agents dispensed for conditions 
commonly seen in physical therapy. Drug responses and 
interactions as they relate to patient response are discussed. 

PHT 2224 DISABILITIES & THERAPEUTIC 
PROCEDURES II 

3 class hours per week 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHTl 103 
Corequisites: PHT1211 

This course introduces concepts of therapeutic exercise with 
regards to its principles and objectives. The theory of and 
application of specific exercise regimes are presented. 
Principles of ROM and stretching techniques are presented. 

PHT 2224L DISABILITIES & THERAPEUTIC 
PROCEDURES II LAB 

2 hours per week 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: PHT1103L, PHT1200L 
Corequisites: none 

Laboratory sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic 
Procedures II (PHT2224) are designed to provide the 
student with observation and actual application of 
therapeutic exercise in the laboratory setting. Case studies 
of various medical conditions with emphasis on therapeutic 
interventions are completed. ROM and stretching 
techniques are practiced. 

PHT 1801L CLINICAL PRACTICUM I 

20 hours per week 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT1103, PHT1211 
Corequisites: none 

This course involves student assignment to a local clinical 
facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to discuss 
clinical performance objectives, the self-appraisal process, 
and overall requirements for the practicum. Discussions 
also include professionalism, attitudes, patient rapport, 
inter/intradepartmental rapport, etc. A journal report of 
clinical experiences, case studies and an article review are 
required. Students attend a personal conference with the 
academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss 
progress and to identify areas of strength/weakness with 
appropriate target dates and methods of amelioration if 
needed. Students receive pass/fail grade. 

PHT 2120 APPLIED KINESIOLOGY 

2 class hours per week 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT2224, PHT2224L 
Corequisites: PHT2120L 

This course is designed to instruct the student in principles 
of applied anatomy. Reinforcement of palpation and 
observational skills with regards to the analysis of human 
movement is emphasized. The singular and combined 
functions of the muscular and skeletal systems, the 
principles of biomechanics and the various aspects of 
normal and pathological gaits are presented. Goniometry 
and manual muscle testing procedures are presented. 



160 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



PHT 2120L APPLIED KINESIOLOGY LAB 

2 hours per week 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: PHT2224 
Corequisites: PHT2120, PHT2224L 

Laboratory sessions for Applied Kinesiology (PHT2120) 
are designed to allow the students to practice the skills of 
goniometry and manual muscle testing. Observation of 
normal and abnormal gait patterns, as well as analysis of 
UE and LE movement patterns are performed. Palpation 
of surface anatomy and the identification of anatomical/ 
bony landmarks are practiced. 

PHT 2162 SURVEY OF NEUROLOGICAL DEFICITS 

4 class hours per week 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT2224, PHT2224L 
Corequisites: PHT2810L 

This course introduces the etiology, pathophysiology and 
symptoms of common neuromuscular diseases/conditions. 
Basic neuroanatomy is reviewed, and neurodiagnostic 
procedures are presented. Specific case study assignments 
of various neurological conditions are completed and 
discussed. 

PHT 2810L CLINICAL PRACTICUM II 

24 hours per week 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT1810L 
Corequisites: PHT2162 

This course involves student assignment to local clinical 
facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to review clinical 
performance objectives, the self-appraisal process, and 
overall requirements for the practicum. Class discussions 
are held to share and discuss experiences, patient care 
problems, learning styles, cooperative group participation, 
acceptance and implementation of constructive criticism, 
etc. A clinical journal and an in-service are required. 
Students attend a personal conference with the academic 
coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and 
to identify areas of strength/weakness with appropriate 
target dates and methods of amelioration if needed. Students 
receive a pass/fail grade. 

PHT 2704 REHABILITATIVE PROCEDURES 

2 class hours per week 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT2162, PHT2120, PHT2120L 
Corequisites: PHT2820L, PHT2931 

An advanced course designed to develop skill in and 
understanding of the underlying principles of advanced 
physical therapy plans of care. Techniques presented 
include advanced therapeutic exercise programs (stroke, 
spinal cord injured, etc.) proprioceptive neuromuscular 
facilitation (PNF), Bobath and Brunnstrom. Principles of 
prosthetic and orthotic devices are detailed. Fitting of these 
devices and check-out procedures are reviewed. 

PHT 2704L REHABILITATIVE PROCEDURES LAB 

2 hours per week 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: PHT2162, PHT2120 



Corequisites: PHT2820L, PHT2931 

Laboratory sessions for Rehabilitative Procedures 
(PHT2704) are designed for the students to practice the 
utilization of developmental postures in patient 
interventions as well as PNF, facilitation/inhibition 
techniques and other forms of advanced therapeutic exercise 
approaches. Stump wrapping and management of orthotic/ 
prosthetic techniques are practiced. Case studies of various 
medical conditions with emphasis on advanced therapeutic 
exercise approaches as well as application of prosthetic/ 
orthotic principles are completed. 

PHT 2931 TRANSITION SEMINAR 

2 class hours per week 2 Credits 
Prerequisites: PHT2162, PHT2120 
Corequisites: PHT2704, PHT2820L 

A discussion and presentation seminar course on legal and 
ethical issues, interpersonal skill refinement, employment 
techniques, PT-PTA relationships, professionalism, quality 
assurance, etc. Various trends in the field of physical 
therapy and innovative interventions are discussed through 
student in-service presentations. Review of the problem- 
solving process with application to challenging clinical 
situations is completed through student presentations. 
Empathy for patients and enhanced understanding of the 
challenges of a disability are explored through a simulated 
disability project. 

PHT 2820L CLINICAL PRACTICUM HI 

40 hours per week 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHT2810L 
Corequisites: PHT2704, PHT2931 

This course involves full time student assignment to a local 
clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to 
discuss clinical performance objectives, the self- appraisal 
process, and overall requirements for the practicum. A 
clinical journal, case study report and in-service are 
required. Class discussions are held to share and discuss 
experiences, patient care problems, readiness for the 
workplace (mock interviews), leadership responsibilities, 
professional growth, etc. Students attend a personal 
conference with the academic coordinator of clinical 
education to discuss progress and to identify areas of 
strength/weakness with appropriate target dates and 
methods of amelioration where necessary. Students receive 
a pass/fail grade. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

INR 2002 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the interactions of nation states in terms 
of political, economic, psychological, and cultural factors; 
power, morality, and law among states. Conflict and 
cooperation in the pursuit of national interests, and 
International political systems and their functions is also 
covered. (I) 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



161 



POS 2041 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the national government within the 
American federal system. Functions, processes, and 
contemporary problems of American political systems, 
along with Political parlies, pressure groups, elections. 
Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court arc also 
discussed. 

POS 21 12 AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS- 
AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course emphasizes practical politics and functional 
government. A critical analysis of state and community 
political systems and processes is covered using the 
community as a laboratory, and including contacts with 
state/local officials. Internships are encouraged and credit 
for practical experience is allowed when approved by 
instructor. 

POS 2601 THE CONSTITUTION-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to landmark Supreme Court 
decisions and doctrines in American constitutional law. 
Major social problems, social institutions, and the scope 
of constitutional power will be explored. 

~ PSYCHOLOGY ~ 



CLP 



DEP 



DEP 



1000 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers practical psychology for coping with 
everyday life. The course deals with psychological 
principles of adjustment, emotional functioning, effective 
relationships, and personal happiness. 

2004 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course includes a life span coverage of theories and 
findings in human development, emphasizing the physical 
and psycho-social growth of the individual from conception 
to death. Emphasis is placed on the special problems and 
challenges the individual faces at each stage of the life cycle: 
prenatal development, infancy, childhood, adolescence, 
adulthood, and old age. 

2102 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PS Y 2013 

This course presents an investigation of the forces which 
shape and influence the growth and development of 
children. The course is designed to be of value to those 
who are or expect to be parents, teachers, or who plan to 
work with children in any capacity. 



DEP 



2302 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY-AA 
3 cla.ss hours 
Prerequisite: PS Y 2013 



3 Credits 



This course is an invesfigation of the transitional years 
between childhood and adulthood. Emphasis is placed on 
the changing self-concept of the young person and the 
special problems unique to this stage of life. 

INP 2301 HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS AND 
INDUSTRY-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study and analysis of personal and personnel 
relationships in occupations. It covers the techniques and 
dynamics underlying harmonious relationships in work 
organizations, and the importance of the working 
environment as it affects human services and productivity. 

PSY 2013 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This cour.se is designed to give all students an introduction 
to psychology as a science and an understanding of 
psychology's applications to everyday life. The general 
models and methods psychology uses are explored as well 
as the factors that influence human behavior, including 
physiology, genetics, sensation, perception, learning, 
memory cognition, emotions, motives, personality, 
abnormal behavior and social interaction. 

PSY 2014 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY II-AA 

3 class hour 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 2013 

This is the second course in introductory psychology 
designed primarily for psychology majors. Emphasis is 
placed on the basic principles and concepts of experimental 
psychology, including scientific methodology and 
experimental investigation, conditioning and learning, 
perception, cognition, memory, motivation and neuro- 
psychology. 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

RTE 1000 INTRODUCTION TO RADIOGRAPHY AND 
PATIENT CARE-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Corequisite: RTE 1503L 

This course is an overview of medical imaging and an 
investigation of patient care techniques applicable to the 
practicing radiographer. It includes concepts on becoming 
a technologist, practicing the profession, and competently 
performing patient care in the medical environment. 

RTE 1001 RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY/MEDICAL 
TERMINOLOGY-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is specifically designed for the radiography 
student that combines a study of medical terminology with 
common disease processes demonstrated radiographically. 
The course follows a programmed text. Class discussions 
of disease processes that correlate with terminology lessons 
bridge these two areas and allow the student to apply new 
terms to his/her field of study. 



162 



(*) Preparatoi7 credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



RTE 1418 PRINCIPLES OF RADIOGRAPHIC 
EXPOSURE IAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: RTE 1613 
Corequisite: RTE 1804 

This course is designed to build upon the concepts learned 
in RTE 1613, Radiologic Physics. The course leads the 
student through concepts related to radiographic imaging 
including: beam restriction, grids, radiographic film, 
processing, sensitometry, intensifying screens, quality 
factors, and conversion techniques involving manipulation 
of exposure parameters. 

RTE 1457 PRINCIPLES OF RADIOGRAPHIC 
EXPOSURE II-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite: RTE 1418 

Corequisite: RTE 1814 

This course is designed to build upon the concepts learned 
in RTE 1613, Radiologic Physics, and RTE 1418, Principles 
of Radiographic Exposure I. The course leads the student 
through concepts related to radiographic imaging including: 
film critique, exposure control systems including fixed and 
variable kilovoltage technique chart construction, automatic 
exposure control, and exposure conversion methods. 

RTE 1503 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING IAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Corequisites: RTE 1503L and RTE 1613 

This course presents a study of radiographic positioning 
procedures covering the upper and lower extremities, chest 
and abdomen. Concepts include radiographic anatomy and 
film analysis. Radiation protection is stressed and 
demonstrated for each procedure. 

RTE 1503L RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING I LAB-AS 

16 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisites: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable the 
Edison Community College Radiologic Technology student 
to gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
skills learned in the classroom in the clinical setting. In 
this area, each student is assigned to the various department 
subdivisions. The student works closely with a registered 
radiologic technologist. 

RTE 1513 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING HAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: RTE 1503 and 1503L 
Corequisites: RTE 1804 

This course is a continuation of positioning theory and 
application started in RTE 1503. Radiographic procedures 
studied include: the entire vertebral column, bony thorax, 
upper and lower gastrointestinal systems, the biliary system, 
and the genitourinary system. 



RTE 1523 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING III-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: RTE 1513 and 1804 

Corequisite: RTE 1814 

This course covers the procedures involved with 
radiographic examinations of the head. X-ray studies 
investigated include: bony calvarium, sella turcica, facial 
bones, optic foramen, mandible, temperomandibular joints, 
paranasal sinuses, and the temporal bone. 

RTE 1573 RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE PRINCIPLES-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RTE 1457 
Corequisite: RTE 1824 

This course is designed to teach radiography students 
advanced imaging concepts including: mobile radiography, 
fluoroscopy, tomography, macroradiography, duplication, 
subtraction, digital imaging processing, and basic physical 
concepts related to computed tomography and magnetic 
resonance imaging. 

RTE 1613 RADIOGRAPHIC PHYSICS-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Corequisite: RTE 1503L 

This course presents a study of the fundamental units of 
measurement, the structure of matter, and the concepts of 
work, force and energy. The course covers the following 
basics of electricity: electrostatics, electrodynamics, 
magnetism, and the electric generator. Concepts include 
electromagnetic induction, transformers, rectifiers. X-ray 
tubes, and the interactions that produce X-radiation. 
Radiation measurement and basic radiation protection 
concepts are also included. 

RTE 1804 RADIOLOGY PRACTICUM IAS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 
gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



163 



RTF. 1814 RADIOIOGY PRACTICUM II-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prcre(|uisitcs: Admission to thi> Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTK courses for each 
semester of study. 

Art'ilialion agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 
gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 

RTE 1824 RADIOLOGY PRACTICUM III-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 
gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
positioning methods, .surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 

RTE 1951 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 
EQUIVALENCY ASSESSMENT - AS 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 Credit 

Equivalency Assessment is a process designed to assist 
Registered Radiologic Technologists who desire to earn the 
Associate in Science Degree in Radiologic Technology. 
These individuals are graduates of accredited, hospital- 



based, radiologic technology programs who are certified 
by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists 
(ARRT). 

RTE 2061 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

This is a final, comprehensive course that reviews and 
interrelates concepts previously covered in the two-year 
curriculum. It provides the student with a meaningful 
approach to evaluate previous learning and to investigate 
areas of needed preparation for employment and 
credentialing. The course also includes employment 
interview skills and related concepts such as resume 
preparation. 

RTE 2385 RADIATION BIOLOGY/PROTECTION-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RTE 1613 
Corequisite: RTE 2834 

This course is an examination of radiation safety issues 
related to the Radiologic Technology profession. Emphasis 
is placed on concepts that increase one's awareness of the 
responsibility to protect the public and self from 
unnecessary radiation dose. 

RTE 2473 QUALITY ASSURANCE-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: RTE 1418 

Corequisite: RTE 2844 

This course is designed to introduce the radiography student 
to evaluation methodology of radiographic systems to 
assure consistency in the production of quality images at 
the lowest dose. 

RTE 2542 ADVANCED POSITIONING-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite: RTE 1523 

Corequisite: RTE 1814 

Students in this course learn advanced radiographic 
procedures including venipuncture and mammography. 
Special consideration is placed on positioning and exposure 
techniques that help the radiographer consistently obtain 
optimum images of human anatomy. 

RTE 2563 SPECIAL RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES 
AND CROSS-SECTIONAL ANATOMY-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Corequisite: RTE 1824 and RTE 2542 

This course offers an investigation of the anatomy, 
equipment, and techniques for special radiographic 
procedures. Included are angiographic, neuroradiographic, 
and interventional procedures. Infrequent, but interesting 
studies are also covered such as lymphography and 
sialography. Included in this course is an introduction to 
cross-sectional anatomy as demonstrated by digital imaging 
techniques. 



164 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



RTE 2834 RADIOLOGY PRACTICUM IV-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 
gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
posidoning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 

RTE 2844 RADIOLOGY PRACTICUM V-AS 

16 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 
gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 

RTE 2854 RADIOLOGY PRACTICUM VI-AS 

20 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program and preceding Practicum course. 
Corequisite: Accompanying RTE courses for each 
semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison 
Community College Radiologic Technology students to 



gain valuable clinical experience in departments of 
radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate 
the skills learned in the classroom and laboratory in the 
real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to 
various department subdivisions. The student at first works 
closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As 
proficiency and speed increases, the student performs 
examinations in an indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical 
experience involves the student in handling and care of 
patients and various radiographic apparatus. The student 
learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical 
situafions under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special 
positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, 
processing of radiographic film, and maintaining 
radiographic records. 

READING 

REA 9001 READING SKILLS I(*) 

6 class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Placement testing or permission of 
District Director of Learning Assistance. 

This is a classroom/laboratory course that incorporates 
mastery learning using a textbook, software, and a learning 
contract. It is designed to develop vocabulary literal reading 
skills, summarizing and sequencing skills, and a reading 
study system. 

REA 9002 READING SKILLS II(*) 

6 class hours and laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: Placement testing or permission of 
District Director of Learning Assistance. 

This is a required classroom/laboratory course for students 
whose reading test scores indicate a need for the 
development of reading skills. Emphasis is placed on 
improving literal and inferential comprehension, 
vocabulary, rate, listening, writing, and study skills. 

REA 9003 READING SKILLS III(*) 

6 class hours and laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: REA 9002, or placement testing, or 
permission of District Director of Learning Assistance. 

This is a classroom/laboratory course which is required for 
students whose reading test scores indicate a need for the 
development of reading skills. This is an integrated course 
of literal and inferential comprehension, vocabulary, rate 
and flexibility, listening, writing and study skills. A state 
exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

REA 1605 STUDY SKILLS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS- 
AA 

1 class hour 1 Credit 

This course is designed to introduce specific study 
strategies, encourage self-determination, and student 
motivation. Emphasis is placed on individual application 
of different learning techniques for all college students. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



165 



REAL ESTATE 



(See Business/Management/Finance) 



RESPIRATORY CARE 



rkt 1()24 introduction to cardiopulmonary 
tkchn()lo(;y-as 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the field including terminology 
and basic skills related to asepsis. The historical 
development of and current trends in cardiopulmonary 
technology are discussed. Basics of cardiopulmonary 
anatomy and physiology are introduced. 

RKT 1402 PULMONARY KLECTRONIC 
INSTRUMENTATION-AS 

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 1616 

This course is an introduction to basic respiratory treatments 
and technologies. 

RET 1616C CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND 
PHYSIOLOGY-AS 

1 class hour, 3 laboratory hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite: RET 1024 

This course covers cardiopulmonary anatomy and 
physiology, blood gas analysis, and other hemodynamic 
calculations required in cardiopulmonary physiology. 

RET 1821L FRESHMAN CLINICAL IAS 

6 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 1024 

This course consists of supervised clinical practice at an 
affiliated hospital. Areas of concentration in this first clinical 
course are cardiopulmonary departments and orientation 
to clinical affiliates. Included are oxygen and an 
introduction to areas and procedures within respiratory care, 
invasive and non-invasive cardiology. 

RET 2234C RESPIRATORY CARE IAS 

2 class hours, 6 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: RET 1616C 

Corequisite: RET 2874L, RET 2254C 
In this course medical gas. humidity and nebulization 
concepts are presented, as well as fundamentals of 
respiratory equipment and mechanical ventilation and 
pharmacology. Clinical experience affords the student the 
opportunity to observe basic respiratory procedures and 
equipment maintenance. 

RET 2244 CRITICAL CARE APPLICATIONS-AS 

2 class hours, 6 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 2234C 

Corequisite: RET 2876L, RET 2930 

This course presents an in-depth study of critical care 

measures for medical, surgical, emergency and pediatric 

patients. Inter-aortic balloon pumping, Swan-Ganz 

monitoring and chest tube management are also presented. 



RET 2254C RESPIRATORY CARE THERAPEUTICS-AS 

3 class hours, 5 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 1616C 
Corequisite: RET 2234C 

This course teaches the theory, application and evaluation 
of Respiratory Care treatment modalities, as well as 
employing communication skills with physicians, patients 
and other health care providers. 

RET 2264C RESPIRATORY CARE II-AS 

2 class hours, 6 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 2234C 

Corequisite: RET 2875L, RET 2414C 

This course deals with the theory and application of 

techniques of artificial mechanical ventilation on neonate, 

pediatric and adult populations as well as other forms of 

patient monitoring. 

RET 2414C PULMONARY STUDIES-AS 

2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 2234C 
Corequisite: RET 2264C, RET 2875L 
Concentrating on diagnostic techniques and patient 
assessment, this course presents the theory, calibration, 
operation and clinical application of instruments used for 
recording and evaluating pulmonary function. It also 
reviews pulmonary pathophysiology and its treatment. 

RET 2714 NEONATAL-PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY 
CARE 

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RET2234 

Corequisites: RET2264C, RET2414C, RET 2875L 
This course covers the development and physiology of the 
fetal and neonatal lung including perinatal circulation, 
pulmonary function in infants, and developmental 
physiology of the lung. Neonatal and pediatric pulmonary 
disorders and their corresponding respiratory care are 
emphasized. 

RET 2874L CLINICAL PRACTICUM II-AS 

12 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 1616C 
Corequisite: RET 2234C, RET 2254C 

Under supervision, the student assists the therapist in 
respiratory procedures in both in-patient and out-patient, 
situations. Class presentation involves instruction in the 
rationale for procedures. 

RET 2875L CLINICAL PRACTICUM III-AS 

12 laboratory hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisite: RET 2874L 
Corequisite: RET 2264C, RET 2414C 

Under supervision, the student assists the therapist in 
respiratory procedures for patients in acute care facilities. 
In addition, the student has experience preparing equipment 
for use in patient care. 



166 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or ceilificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



RET 2876L CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV-AS 

18 laboratory hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: RET 2875, RET 2264C 
Corequisite: RET 2930, RET 2244 

Under supervision, the student participates in respiratory 
therapy care measures in all areas of the acute care facility. 
Students maintain equipment, participate in emergency 
procedures and pulmonary function testing as well as 
observation rotations in the home care setting and sub-acute 
care. 

RET 2930 RESPIRATORY CARE PRACTITIONER AS A 
PROFESSIONAL-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite: RET 2264C 

Corequisite: RET 2876L, RET 2244 

In this course the professional relationship of the respiratory 
therapist is presented and a basic research format is 
emphasized with an added option of taking an ACLS class. 

RET 2934 TOPICS IN RESPIRATORY CARE- 

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN MEDICAL/TECHNICAL 
ASPECTS-AS 

(elective) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: High School Graduate 

This course is designed to teach the student theory, 
application and evaluation of Special Procedures in 
Respiratory Care. Students learn hyperbaric medicine and 
other special topics. 

SCIENCE 

Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be 
completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

~ General Science ~ 

ISC lOOlC FOUNDATION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY 
SCIENCE FOR EDUCATION I-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None 

This interdisciplinary course is designed to meet one-half 
of the general education requirements for Natural Sciences. 
It emphasizes the development of the scientific reasoning 
and laboratory activities in the biological sciences for 
students who will be involved in the education of youth at 
the K- 1 2 level. This course addresses basic chemistry, cell 
structure and function, genetics, bioethics, ecology and 
evolutionary topics. The content and structure reinforce 
current performance levels for the Florida Curriculum 
Framework and the Sunshine State Standards. 

ISC 1002C FOUNDATION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY 
SCIENCE FOR EDUCATION II-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ISC 1001 C 

This interdisciplinary course is designed to meet one-half 
of the general education requirements for Natural Sciences. 



It emphasizes the development of scientific reasoning and 
laboratory activities in the physical sciences for students 
who will be involved the education of youth at the K-12 
level. This course addresses geology, astronomy, the laws 
of motion, matter and energy, wave behavior, electricity 
and magnetism, and nuclear radiation. The content and 
structure reinforce current performance levels for the 
Florida Curriculum Framework and the Sunshine State 
Standards. 

~ Anatomy ~ 

BSC 1093C ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I-AA 

5 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: BSC 1005 or BSC 1010 

This is a combined lecture/lab course format designed for 
students in the biological, medical, and health-related fields. 
This course emphasizes the structure and function of the 
human body. Topics covered are: introduction to anatomy, 
tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular 
system, nervous system, and special senses. 

BSC 1094C ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II-AA 

5 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1093C 

This is a combined lecture/lab course format designed to 
be the sequel to BSC1093C. This course examines how 
the body's organ systems work together to maintain 
homeostasis. The following topics are covered: the 
endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic and 
immune systems, respiratory system, digestive system, 
urinary system, fluid and electrolyte balance, and 
reproduction. 

BSC 1097L SPECIAL LABORATORY TOPICS IN A&P I- 
AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: BSC 1005 or BSC 1010 
Corequisite: BSC 1093C 

This course presents special topics and selected laboratory 
activities in anatomy and physiology which enhance the 
concepts presented in BSC1093C. 

BSC 1098L SPECIAL LABORATORY TOPICS IN A&P II 
1 laboratory hour 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: BSC 1093C 
Corequisite: BSC 1094C 

This course presents special topics and selected laboratory 
activities in anatomy and physiology will enhance the 
concepts presented in BSC1094C. 

HSC 1531 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. 

This course is designed to provide a basis for understanding, 
utilizing, and pronouncing the vocabulary used by health 
care professionals. The language of medicine becomes 
understandable through the study of word roots, combining 
forms, prefixes, and suffixes. Major disease processes and 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



167 



pathological conditions of specific body systems are 
discussed, along with diagnostic and surgical terms. 
Classroom exercises in forming words, pronunciation, and 
defining root words are also included. This course has no 
acci)mpanying laboratory and therefore cannot be used to 
meet the science requirement at Edison Community 
College. 

- Astronomy ~ 

AST 2002 I'MVKRSE: THE INFINITE FRONTIER-AA 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or higher, or permission of 
instructor. 

Universe: The Infinite Frontier is a three (3) credit, 
independent study course in Astronomy having three (3) 
components: a telecourse study guide, a student textbook, 
and 26-half hour video programs. The course covers topics 
contained in four (4) units: Exploring the Sky, The Star, 
The Universe of Galaxies, and Planets in Perspective. 

AST 2002L UNIVERSE: THE INFINITE FRONTIER 
LABORATORY-AA 
1 laboratory hour 1 Credit 

A concurrent 1 credit lab. this course is offered with the 
AST20()2 Universe: The Infinite Frontier telecourse 
program. The lab provides hands-on experience that 
reinforce the topics contained in the 4 units: Exploring the 
Sky, The Star, The Universe of Galaxies, and Planets in 
Perspective. This course is only to be taken in conjunction 
with the accompanying lecture AST 2002. 

AST 2005 ASTRONOMY I-AA 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or higher, or permission of 
instructor. 

This course is part one of a two-semester sequence designed 
to provide an orientation to the night sky and hands-on use 
of the astronomer's tools in the study of our solar system. 
AST 2005 and AST 2006 can be taken in any order but 
each must be taken concurrently with laboratory. 

AST 2005L ASTRONOMY I LABORATORY-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credit 

This is the first of a two-semester course utilizing astronomy 
tools, incorporating laboratory which utilizes an 
observatory, planetarium and astrophotography or imaging 
equipment. This course is only to be taken in conjunction 
with the accompanying lecture AST 2005. 

AST 2006 ASTRONOMY II-AA 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or higher or permission of 
instructor. 

This course is part two of the two-semester astronomy 
sequence described above. AST 2(K)6 goes beyond the solar 
system to explore the workings of stars and galaxies, as 
well as, the origin and expansion of the universe. AST 2005 



and AST 2006 can be taken in any order but each must be 
taken concurrently with laboratory. 

AST 2006L ASTRONOMY II LABORATORY-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credit 

This advanced laboratory makes continued use of 
observatory-collected data through imaging equipment, as 
well as Internet-accessible data, through use of Hubble 
telescope images. This course is only to be taken in 
conjunction with the accompanying lecture AST 2006. 

- Biological Science - 

BSC 1005 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL 
SCIENCES-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None 

This survey course provides a foundation for BSC 1010-t- 
BSC 1093C and MCB 201 3C. Topics included are 
chemistry for biological sciences, biology of the cell, and 
heredity. The course will include lecture/discussion, group 
activities and computer simulations. 
+This course is not a pre-requisite for BSC 1010, however, 
it is recommended for those who have had no prior 
experience with biological sciences course work. It is 
designed primarily as a prerequisite for Anatomy and 
Microbiology. 

BSC 1010 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None 

The physical, chemical and biological principles involved 
in cellular activity are covered in this course. Emphasis is 
placed on cellular respiration, nutrition, gas exchange, 
cellular transport, metabolic regulation, cellular 
reproduction and heredity. This course is designed for 
biology, psychology or pre-professional majors. 

BSC lOlOL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE I LABORATORY- 
AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory, which accompanies Biological Science I 
emphasizes the development of scientific reasoning and data 
collection skills. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of 
a problem statement and the development of appropriate 
investigational techniques for review of a scientific 
hypothesis. Field laboratory activity is a frequent 
component of this laboratory. 

BSC 101 1 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE H-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1010 

The physical, chemical and biological principles involved 
in mitosis, meiosis, heredity, organismal development, 
evolution and ecology are covered in this course. An 
overview of the taxonomy and diversity of anatomical and 
physiological aspects of virusses, monera, protista, plants 
and animals is presented. 



168 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



BSC 101 IL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE II LABORATORY- 
AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course investigates the taxonomy of life 
through illustration of the diversity of organisms. 
Frequently, laboratory activities will include field activities 
both on and off campus. 

BSC 1050 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY: MAN AND 
ENVIRONMENT-AA 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

This course is a non-science-major approach to topics in 
environmental science with an emphasis on the impact of 
humans. Contemporary ecological issues are discussed and 
related to problems of local, regional, national and global 
concern. A telecourse option for this course is periodically 
offered with the broadcast series, "The Race to Save the 
Planet." 

BSC 1050L ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY: MAN AND 
ENVIRONMENT LABORATORY-AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course involves field trips, exercises and 
discussions and debates that relate to topics covered in the 
lecture part of this course. Some of these lab experiences 
focus on local environmental problems, as well as national 
and global issues. 

BSC 1051 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY: SOUTH 
FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTS-AA 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Designed for students of all majors, this course focuses on 
the study of the natural processes, field study methods and 
identification of biotic and abiotic components of the major 
ecosystems of South Florida. 



~ Botany ~ 

BOT 2010C BOTANY WITH LABORATORY-AA(**) 

4 combined class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1010 

This course combines lecture, laboratory and field 
experience in morphology, development, genetics, and 
systems of plants. Ecological relationships are emphasized. 

~ Chemistry ~ 

CHM 2030 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE CHEMISTRY- 
AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Corequisite: MAT 1033 or MGF 1106, CHM 2030L 

This course is a one semester course designed as a 
preparatory course both for those students planning to enter 
the CHM 2045/2046 sequence or those planning to take 
CHM 203 1 . This introductory course covers matter, energy 
and measurements, problem solving techniques, the atom 
and periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical formulas, 
chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, liquids, solutions 
and acids and bases, equilibrium, kinetics and 
thermodynamics. 

CHM 2030L INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE 
CHEMISTRY LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Corequisite: CHM 2030 

This laboratory course begins by emphasizing the 
appropriate use of units and mathematical techniques 
important to chemistry and to science and health disciplines 
in general. An introduction to chemistry laboratory 
sampling and measurement techniques is included in the 
second half of the course. 



BSC 1051L ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY: SOUTH 
FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTS LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course is built around field investigations 
of soil composition, water quality, species richness and 
diversity, and other appropriate parameters. Field trips 
reflect the variety of ecosystems in South Florida and may 
include facilities, which are located off campus. 



CHM 2033L CHEMISTRY LAB FOR HEALTH 
SCIENCES-AA 

3 laboratory hours+ 1 Credit 

Corequisite: CHM 2030 

This laboratory/recitation course for health science and 
nursing majors develops laboratory skills and problem 
solving skills for chemistry and scientific measurements. 
+This lab will meet for three hours for 1/2 of the semester. 



MCB 2013C MICROBIOLOGY-AA 

5 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Biology majors: BSC 1010 and CHM 

2030 or CHM2045 

Health Science Majors: CHM2030 or BSC 1005 and 

BSC 1093C and 1094C 

The first half of this combined course is an introduction to 

microbiology emphasizing principles of basic morphology, 

physiology, biochemistry and genetic mechanisms. The 

second half includes a survey of representative types of 

microorganisms and the role of pathogenic organisms in 

causing disease and infections. 



CHM 2031 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC AND 
BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY-AA 
3 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHM 2030 or CHM 2045 

This course provides an introduction to organic and 
biochemistry for students pursing degrees in the Allied 
Health area, such as BS in Nursing. This course cannot 
be used to fulfill the AA science requirement since it 
has no accompanying laboratory. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



169 



CHM 2045 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHM 2030 (No student will be allowed 
to beKin CHM 2045 without CHM 2030 completed 
unless written permission is first obtained from the 
instructor.) 

This course is the first halt ot a two semester general 
chemistry sequence. It deals, in depth, with the topics of 
matter, chemical measurement, stoichiometry, atomic 
theory, bonding and molecular geometries. 

CHM 2045L GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY-AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This general chemistry laboratory emphasizes chemical 
measurement techniques and stoichiometry. The use of a 
graphing calculator for the collection of data, as well as, 
analysis and presentation of data is an integral part of this 
laboratory experience. 

CHM 2046 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CHM 2045 

This course is the second part of the two semester general 
chemistry sequence. It covers thermodynamics, 
equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction and 
electrochemistry. 

CHM 2046L GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course emphasizes thermodynamics and 
kinetics through appropriate laboratory-based 
investigations. Data collection techniques with graphing 
calculators, computers, and spectrophotometers are 
important features of this laboratory. 



CHM 2211L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY- 
AA 

4 laboratory hours every other week 2 Credit 

The second organic chemistry laboratory course utilizes 
microscale techniques in organic chemistry. 

- Geology - 

GLY 1000 EARTH REVEALED-AA 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

This is an independent study multimedia course in the earth 
sciences. It includes twenty-six half-hour television 
programs addressing such topics as mineralogy, volcanism, 
environmental geology and plate tectonics. Generally, this 
course serves as a brief introduction to the major principles 
of physical geology. 

GLY lOOOL EARTH REVEALED LABORATORY-AA 

3 seven hour laboratory modules 1 Credit 

This modular approach to the study of modem geology 
incorporates three seven hour modules for the intensive 
review necessary to complement a geology telecourse. 
Module 1 includes planetary and structural geology. Module 

2 emphasizes the study of minerals, igneous sedimentary 
and metamorphic rocks. Module 3 provides skills necessary 
to read aerial and terrain maps as well as reviewing ground 
water and shoreline geologic processes. 

GLY 1010 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

For both science and non-science majors. This course 
includes the study of the earth's structure, three major rock 
classifications, minerals, and the erosion factors of waters 
and soils. May be taken before or after GLY 1 100. 



CHM 2210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student must have completed the CHM 
2045/CHM 2046 sequence prior to enrollment. 

This is the first part of a college-level two semester organic 
chemistry course designed for students entering such fields 
as Medicine, Dentistry, Chiropractic. Pharmacy and other 
4-year-plus programs in the Health area as well as the 
Physical Science areas. 

CHM 2210L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY-AA 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credit 

This general organic chemistry laboratory course includes 
a development of basic macroscale measurement techniques 
in organic chemistry. 

CHM 2211 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite: CHM 2210 

This course is the second part of the two semester organic 
chemistry sequence. 



GLY lOlOL PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

In this course students develop skills in mineral and rock 
classifications and erosion factors, develop proficiency with 
aerial and surface map-reading skills, as well as 
development of the scientific method and paradigms to 
analyze written, verbal and visual communication. 

GLY 1 100 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a study of the earth's history through the study of 
rock layers, the interpretation of fossils, environmental 
conditions in which fossils existed, the dynamic interactions 
which brought about changes in earth structure. The 
interpretation of the historical record and the evolutionary 
changes occurring among certain marine life and land flora 
and fauna is discussed. May be taken before or after GLY 
1010. 

GLY 1 lOOL HISTORICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

In this laboratory course the students study topographic 
and geological maps, fossils, and mineral materials that 
support the historical development of the planet Earth. 



170 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



Marine Science ~ 



Nutrition ~ 



OCB 2010 MARINE BIOLOGY-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1010 or one year of high school 
biology, or permission of instructor. 

This course is an introduction to the biology of the sea and 
elementary oceanography. Emphasis is placed on living 
organisms of the sea and their marine environment. 

OCB 2010L MARINE BIOLOGY LABORATORY-AA(**) 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course emphasizes field collection methods 
and organism identification. Measurements are made with 
respect to the physio-chemical properties of the sea and 
water column profiles, as well as the pattern of waves in 
currents. The taxonomy laboratory includes identification 
of a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. Boat- 
centered field experiences are frequently utilized. 

OCE lOOlC OCEANOGRAPHY I: A 

MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Oceanography is a true science but not a traditional science. 
Oceanography is a multidisciplinary field, which 
encompasses the traditional fields of biology, geology, 
chemistry and physics. The beauty of oceanography is that 
it actually incorporates specific subsets of informafion from 
each of these disciplines in an integrated fashion. This 
course provides an overview of each of these fields is 
provided with the ocean environment as a general model. 
The marine environment of Southwest Florida provides an 
excellent laboratory setting to accomplish the overall 
objective of the course enabling students to see connections 
between the disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, 
meteorology, economics and other disciplines traditionally 
viewed as separate. This course can be taken in any order 
with OCE 1002C. 

OCE 1002C OCEANOGRAPHY II: A 

MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Oceanography is a true science, but not a traditional science. 
Oceanography is a multidisciplinary field which 
encompasses the traditional fields of biology, geology, 
chemistry and physics. The beauty of oceanography is that 
it actually incorporates specific subsets of information from 
each of these disciplines in an integrated fashion. This 
course provides an overview of each of these fields is 
provided with the ocean environment as a general model. 
The marine environment of Southwest Florida provides an 
excellent laboratory setting to accomplish the overall 
objective of the course enabling students to see connecfions 
between the disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, 
meteorology, economics and other disciplines traditionally 
viewed as separate. This course can be taken in any order 
with OCE 1001 C. 



HUN 1201 NUTRITION-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is an introductory course to the scientific principles 
of nutrition, covering the role of specific nutrients, their 
digestion, absorption, and metabolism, sources of the 
nutrients and requirements of the various age groups. This 
course cannot be used to meet the AA Science 
requirement since it has no accompanying laboratory. 

~ Physical Science ~ 

PHY 1007 PHYSICS FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAC 1033, MGF 1106 or higher level 
mathematics. 

This one semester course for students in the health sciences 
who need a background in physics which is broad in scope 
and stresses applications in the health field. This course 
cannot be used to meet the AA science requirement since 
it has no accompanying laboratory. 

PHY 1053 FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAC 1140 and MAC 1114orMAC 1147. 

This course is a non-calculus introduction to physics 
primarily for pre-professional and technical students. The 
topics of mechanics, heat, and sound are covered in the 
first half of this two semester physics sequence. 

PHY 1053L FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I 
LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course develops fundamental skills 
necessary to the understanding of physics, including 
experiments which demonstrate the properties of motion, 
force, work and energy, momentum and collision, circular 
motion and gravitation, and rotational motion. Fluid 
behavior demonstrated by liquids and gases, as well as the 
principles of sound, are explored through analysis of 
vibrafional and wave-like behavior. 

PHY 1054 FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHY 1053 

This course is the second half of the two semester physics 
sequence. The topics of light and electricity are covered. 

PHY 1054L FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS II 
LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course illustrates the concepts of light and 
electricity through experiments and demonstrations of 
thermodynamics, electric charge, force and energy, electric 
currents and resistance, magnetism and electromagnetic 
induction. Optics are demonstrated through the use of 
reflection and refraction of light, utilizing mirrors and 
lenses. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



171 



PHY 2048 GENERAL PHYSICS I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAC 231 1/MAC 2312 (MAC 2312 may 
be taken concurrently). 

This is a traditional calculus-based comprehensive physics 
course. Topics covered in the first half of the two semester 
calculus-based physics sequence include mechanics, heat 
and sound. 

PHY 2048L GENERAL PHYSICS I LABORATORY-AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course utilizes comprehensive experiments 
and data collection that would serve to illustrate Newton's 
laws, work and energy, rotation, gravity, mechanics of solids 
and fluids and vibrational energy from sound and 
mechanical sources. 

PHY 2049 GENERAL PHYSICS H-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PHY 2048 

This is a traditional calculus-based comprehensive physics 
course. Topics covered in the first half of this two semester 
course include electricity and magnetism. 

PHY 2049L GENERAL PHYSICS II LABORATORY-AA 
3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This laboratory course includes investigation to illustrate 
the kinetic theory of gases, the first and second law of 
thermodynamics. Coulomb's law. Gauss' law, capacitance 
and Ohm's law. Demonstrations and manipulations of direct 
and alternating current circuits, magnetic fields and 
Ampere's and Faraday's laws are conducted. Investigations 
of the electromagnetic spectrum utilizing Maxwell's 
equations are also introduced. 

- Zoology - 

ZOO 2010ZOOLOGY-AA(**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSC 1010 

This course includes lectures, laboratory, and field 
experiences in the morphology, physiology, development, 
genetics, and systematics of vertebrate and invertebrate 
animals and their environmental relationships. Ecological 
relationships are emphasized. 

ZOO 2010L ZOOLOGY LABORATORY-AA(**) 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credit 

This laboratory course utilizes field collection activities to 
demonstrate the morphology, physiology and development 
of a variety of vertebrates and invertebrates. Morphological 
and physiological differences are contrasted with behavioral 
and environmental relationships in the field. 



SOCIOLOGY 



SYG 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a systematic study of human society with 
primary emphasis on social interaction, culture, 
socialization, social groups, social institutions, social 
causation, and social change. (I) 

SYG 1010 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a thought-provoking examination of the 
social dilemmas and controversial issues facing American 
society today. 

SYG 2430 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an examination of the nuclear family; its 
origins, history, status at present, and struggle for survival. 
Attention is given to male-female relationships, changing 
lifestyles, conflict, parenthood, and divorce. (I) 

WST 2010 INTRODUCTION TO WOMANS STUDIES 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

The major emphasis of this course is on sex difference and 
the manner in which such differences affect human lives 
and institutions. Historical perspective and options for the 
future are considered as well as contemporary issues. (I) 

SPEECH 

SPC 1600 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 
COMMUNICATIONS-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the speech 
communication discipline. A variety of activities and class 
assignments are designed to acquaint students with the 
intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public speaking levels of 
speech communication. Students may also enroll in the 
business emphasis section of this course, which emphasizes 
communicating during an employment interview, 
communicating in self-directed work teams and developing 
multimedia presentations. If completed with a grade of 
"C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 
competence in oral communication. 

SPC 2023 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to enhance communication skills 
on the public speaking level. Objectives focus on public 
speaking competency, including message composition and 
delivery skills as well as literal and comprehensive listening 
skills using both oral and written requirements. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in oral 
communication. 



172 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



STUDENT LIFE SKILLS 



SLS 1 101 COLLEGE SUCCESS SKILLS- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to maice the adjustment of the first 
time entering college student, as well as the reentering 
student, more comfortable and successful. It also helps the 
student develop effective learning strategies and techniques 
in order to be successful in college studies. The course is 
intended to positively impact the academic performance, 
social adjustment, and personal growth of the student. 

SLS 2261 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT-AA 
3 Credit hours 

This course has as its central focus the development of 
leadership ability. The course provides a basic 
understanding of leadership, assists participants in 
developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an 
awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of 
leadership, and an awareness of one's own ability and style 
of leadership. 



THEATRE ARTS 



THE 1020 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the elements of drama and the 
process of theatrical production, with special emphasis on 
reading, analyzing and experiencing contemporary drama. 
Note: Theatre students should take this course before or 
concurrently with TPP 1110. 

THE 1925, 2925 THEATRE PERFORMANCE AND 
PRODUCTION-AA 
6 studio hours 1 Credit 

Rehearsal and performance in a major college or 
professional production is presented in this course. Open 
auditions. This course may be repeated once for credit. 



THE 2100 THEATRE HISTORY AND LITERATURE-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a comprehensive survey of the development 
of the theatre and its literature from its beginnings to modem 
times. This includes reading and discussion of plays 
representative of each significant theatrical period and study 
of their relationship to their cultural and social setting. 

TPA 1200, 2200 FUNDAMENTALS OF THEATRE 
PRACTICE I-II-AA 
6 studio hours 1 Credit 

This course presents instruction and practical experience 
in stagecraft, design, lighting, and costume in connection 
with college or professional productions. This course may 
be repeated once for credit. 

TPA 2248 THEATRE MAKEUP - AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a practical course designed to familiarize the student 
with the basic principles and techniques behind the 
application of stage makeup, including straight, age, 
characterization and animal makeups. 

TPP 1 1 10, 1 1 1 1 ACTING I-II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite or 

Corequisite: THE 1020 or permission of instructor. 

This course presents the principles and techniques of acfing 
with production of selected scenes. 

TPP 2112 ACTING HI-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a continuation of TPP 1110-1111 to include 
styles of acting and basic directing problems. 



(*) Preparatory credit, does not count toward a degree or certificate 
(**) Offered if sufficient demand. 



173 



ADMINISTRATION 

& 
FACULTY 



174 



ADMINISTRATION 

WALKER, Kenneth P. District President 

B.A., University of Texas, Austin 

M.A., East Texas State University 

Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 

SLUSHER, James A District Exec Vice President/Campus 

President 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
JONES, Robert R District Vice President, Admin & Finance 

A.A.S., Navarro College 

B.A., University of Texas, Austin 

M.B.A., University of Texas, Tyler 
DENNING, Vern District Vice President, Academic Affairs 

B.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. University of Kansas 
RELEFORD, Michelle District Vice President, Student Services 

B.A., Albany State College 

M.S., Jackson State University 

Ed.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville 
LEVY, Audre Provost, Collier County Campus 

B.A., Michigan State University 

M.A., University of Michigan 

M.S., California State, Dominguez Hills 

M.S., California State, Long Beach 

Ed.D., Pepperdine University 
YARGER, Richard D Provost, Charlotte County Campus 

B.S., Central Michigan University 

M.A., Western Michigan University 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Charlotte County Campus 
DUETEMEYER, Rosweta ... Coordinator, Continuing Education 

B.S., M.A., Eastern Michigan University 
L AWES, Annette Campus Director, Student Services 

B.A., University of the West Indies 

M.Ed., Columbia University 

M.B.A., Pace University 

O'LEARY, Jerry Coordinator, Physical Plant Operations 

REYNOLDS, Jamie G Campus Director, Learning Resources 

B.A., Georgia State College 

M.L.S., Florida State University 

M.B.A., University of South Florida 
Collier County Campus 
BAILEY, Russell D Campus Director, Learning Resources 

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College 

M.A., University of South Florida 

M.A., University of Kentucky 

M.Ed., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
FUHRI, Jr., Carl W Coordinator, Physical Plant Operations 

B.A., Newark State College 
HELTSLEY, Warren L Coordinator, Continuing Education 

A.A., Gateway Technical Institute 

B.A., Carthage College 
SEDGWICK, Cynthia A Adjunct Services Coordinator 

B.S., Bradley University 

M.A., Chicago State University 
SHIRLEY, Kathy Natural Science Lab Supervisor 

B.S., University of South Florida 

M.S., North Carolina State University 



SOTO, M. Cristina Campus Director, Student Services 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Hendry/Glades/County Services 
BERG, Eva S Director 

B.S.,Mt. Union College 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Lee County Campus 
Office of the Registrar 
LUGO, Lester Registrar 

A.S., Miami-Dade Community College 

B.H.S.A., Florida International University 

M.S.Ed., University of Miami 
Career/Employment Services 
STAHL, Jaylyn M Director 

B.S., M.A., The Ohio State University 
HOFFMAN, Lana Internship Specialist 

B.S., Centenary College 

M.B.A., William Paterson University 
MARSON, Phyllis P Career Specialist 

B.A., M.Ed., Central State University 

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
BROWN II, John V. Career Specialist 

B.S., West Liberty State University 
College Information & Recruiting 
MORGAN, Fredrick D., II Coordinator 

B.A., South Carolina State College 
SILVA, Billee Coordinator 

B.A.A., Central Michigan University 

M.Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University 
Counseling. Advising & Assessment 
LEONARD, Donald G Director 

B.S., Oregon State University 

M.Ed., Springfield College 

Ph.D., Kansas State University 
DENNISON, Rodney Transfer Counselor 

B.S., Lincoln Memorial University 

M.Ed., E. Tennessee State University-Chattanooga 

M.S., University of Tennessee-Chattanooga 
MORRIS, Kathleen B Retention Counselor 

B.S., Indiana University 

M.A., University of Redlands 
POTTS, Susan P Assessment Counselor 

B.A., Russell Sage College 

M.S.Ed., College of St. Rose 
Edison Community College Foundation. Inc. 
DOUGLAS, Sue Executive Director 

B.S., Murray State University 

M.A., Southeast Missouri State University 

GALLOWAY, Tracey L Major Gifts & Planned Giving, 

Coordinator 

B.B.A., Northwood University 

M.B.A., NOVA Southeastern University 
Facilities Planning and Management 
WHITE, Ronald W Director 

B.A., Northeastern State University 
LEGROS, Gregory L Construction Project Supervisor 

B.Arch., University of S.W. Louisiana 



175 



TAYLOR. Robert V. Construction Project Manager 

B.Arch., University of Florida 
Finance 
FRANCIS. Alan B Director 

B.S..Bentley College 

M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology 
Accounting 
CARR. Jean Manager 

B.A., University of North Carolina 
JOHNSON. Ronda Accountant 

A. A.. Edison Community College 

B.S.. University of South Florida 
Budget and Payroll 
MAZUR III, Joe Coordinator 

A. A., Palm Beach Community College 

B.S., B.S.. Florida State University 
Financial Aid 
LEWIS. Lucinda District Director 

A.A.. Edison Community College 

B.A.. University of South Florida 
Human Resources 
PARRILL. Jacqueline H Director 

B.S.. M.B.A.. Auburn University 

BOOKER. Edna Specialist 

GEBHARDT. Wanda Specialist 

B.S.. University of Missouri 
DUVALL. Tonna Specialist 

B.S., Northeastern State University 
Institutional EfFectiveness & Program Development 
McCLINTOCK. Maureen District Director 

A. A.. Mineral Area Community College 

B.A., M.B.A.. University of South Florida 
Public Information 
DAVIS. Ellen Specialist 

B.A.. University of South Florida 
Research & Reporting Assessment 
GORDIN. Patricia C Director 

B.A.. Rockford College 

M.B.A., University of South Florida 

M.Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University 
YAVORSKY, Jill Coordinator 

B.S., University of Central Florida 

M.S.. University of Central Florida 
Purchasing 
COLLIER, Jessie R., Jr Director 

B.B.A..Pikeville College 
Student Alumni Relations 

GREENE. Nancy Coordinator 

Student Services 

MEDHURST. Ray Project Specialist 

A.A., Edison Community College 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Student Support Services 
DOYLE, Catherine L Director 

B.A., University of Charleston 

M.A., University of South Florida 



University Center 

McDowell. Laurie Director 

B.S., Ball State University 

M.S.. College of St. Francis 
Upward Bound 
DAILEY. Paula Director 

B.A., Georgetown College 

M.Ed., Morehead State University 
LOUDEN, Dennis Project Specialist 

B.S., International College 

INSTRUCTION 

Division of Health and Sciences 

ELSBERRY, Jeffrey District Dean of Instruction 

B.S., University of Central Florida 

M.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida 
ELLIS, Jerald K Adjunct Services Coordinator 

B.S, Louisiana State University 

MS, NOVA University 
Health Technolog ies 

VACANT Director 

Cardiovascular Technologies 

DAVIS, Robert Jeffrey Clinical Supervisor 

A. A., A.S., Edison Community College 

B.S., University of South Florida 
Dental Hygiene & Dental Assistant 
WELLING, Gwendolyn Coordinator 

A.S., B.S., Indiana University 

M.Ed., Purdue University 
JACOBS. Gary Clinical Coordinator 

A.S., Tunxis Community College 

B.S., Central Connecticut State University 

M.P.A.. University of Hartford 
Physical Therapy Assistant 
GOOTKIN, Jodi Clinical Coordinator 

B.S.. Ithaca College 
Radiologic Technology 
CRABB, Richard M Coordinator 

B.S., M.P.A.. Brigham Young University 
SWANSON, Coleen Clinical Coordinator 

A.S., Northeastern University 
Respiratory Care 
PILBEAM, Susan P Coordinator 

B.A., Hiram College 

B.S., The Ohio State University 

M.S. Miami University of Ohio 

VACANT Clinical Coordinator 

Learning Assistance 

NEWELL. Patricia District Director 

B.S.. SUNY-Fredonia 

M.S.. Elmira College 
English 
DESJARDINS, Margaret M Professor 

B.S.. M.Ed.. Salem State College 

Ed.D., NOVA University 



176 



HARVEY, Jean H Professor 

B.A., University of Southern Mississippi 

M.A., Mississippi College 
HAYDEN. Roberta Professor 

B.A., University of Texas- Austin 

M.A., University of Massachusetts 

M.B.A.. University of Colorado 
SETH, Johanna Professor 

B.A., Chatham College 

M.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Mathematics 
DANIELS, James M Professor 

B.S., Vanderbilt University 

M.A., University of South Florida 

J.D., Emory University 
LAVRACK, Kevin Professor 

B.A., Spring Arbor College 

M.A., Michigan State University 
MARSHALL, Dorothy Professor 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College 

M.Ed., University of Virginia 
MARTIN, Edith Professor 

B.A., M.S.Ed., University of Florida 

Ed.D., University of Sarasota 
MIDDLEBROOKS, James A., Jr Professor 

B.S.. M.Ed., South Carolina State College 
Reading 
LEMASTER, Melanie M Professor 

B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Shippenburg University 
Mathematics 
GARRETT, Laurice A Professor 

B.A., North Park College 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
HICKS, Lloyd R Professor 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Illinois 
LEWIN, JoAnn R Professor 

B.S., Emory University 

M.A., Washington University 
SMITH, Ronald Professor 

B.S., University of Illinois 

M.S., Southern Illinois University 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 
VAN GLABEK, Helen Joan Professor 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

M.S., George Mason University 

Ph.D., University of Maryland 
WARREN, Donald M Professor 

B.S., Bucknell University 

M.A., Villanova University 
WHIDDEN, Jeanette Professor 

A. A., North Florida Jr. College 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.S., University of Central Florida 



Nursing 

RUDER, Shirley Director 

B.S.N., University of Miami 

M.Ed., Florida International University 

M.S.N., Loyola University 

Ed.D., Northern Illinois University 
WEEKS, Deborah Clinical Coordinator 

A. A., B.S.N., M.S.N., University of Florida 
HOLBROOK, Bobby R Clinical Supervisor, Nursing Lab 

A.S., Edison Community College 

B.S.N., Florida Gulf Coast University 
Advanced Placement Program 
GEIGER, Sandra K Coordinator Charlotte Campus 

A.A., Allegany Community College 

B.S.N., M.S., Ed.D., University of Maryland 

VACANT Coordinator Collier Campus 

TRACEY, Gail L Coordinator Lee Campus 

A.S., Edison Community College 

B.S.N., M.S.N., University of South Florida 
Nursing 
BERNATH, Susan D Professor 

B.S.N., The Ohio State University 

M.S.N., Florida International University 
BISHOR JoAnn B Professor 

B.S.N., Bellarmine College 

M.Ed., University of Louisville 

M.S.N., Florida International University 
MORRISON, Marie A Professor 

B.A. Ottawa University 

R.N., Geisinger Medical Center of Nursing 

M.A., M.S.N., University of South Florida 
SCHAEFER, Walter G Professor 

B.S.N., Long Island University 

M.S.N., Adelphi University 
TUMEY, Mary Professor 

B.S.N., Sangamon State University 
WARBURTON, Irene Professor 

B.S.N., Molloy College 

M.A., M.S.N., University of South Florida 
Sciences 
Basic Science 
SMITH, Gregory Professor 

B.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida 
Biology 
ALLEN, Constance Professor 

B.A., Anderson University 

M.S., Indiana University 
FELDEN, Richard A Professor 

B.A., Hunter College 

M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University 
HART, Joseph L Professor 

B.A., Merrimack College 

M.S., University of Mass. Amherst 

Ph.D., University of California 
O'NEAL, Lyman Professor 

B.A., Oakland City College 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 



177 



PRABHU, Nirmala V. Professor 

B.S.. M.S., University of India-Madras 

M.S.. University of Georgia 
WEINLAND. Linda S Professor 

B.S.. Bucknell University 

M.S., Wright State University 
WILCOX, William H Professor 

B.S., M.S., Memphis State University 

Ph.D.. University of Tennessee 
Chemistry 
CATHERS. Robert E Professor 

B.S.. M.S.. University of Wichita 

M.Div.. University of the South 

Ph.D,. Texas Tech University 
DONALDSON. Kurt D Professor 

B.S., University of Alabama 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
RICE. Lisa A Professor 

B.A.. M.S., University of Montana 
ROHRBACH, David F Professor 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State University 

Ph.D.. University of Cincinnati 
SCOTT. Jamie M Professor 

B.S.. University of Maryland 

Ph.D.. University of Florida 
Life Science 
GRONLUND. Kathryn J Professor 

A.A.. A.S.. Rainey River Community College 

B.S., M.S., University of Minnesota 
Physical Science 
MANACHERIL. George T Professor 

B.S.. M.S.. University of Kerala-India 
Physics 
DABBY. William Professor 

B.A.. Columbia University 

M.A.. California State University at Long Beach 

Division of Humanities, Communications & 
Social Sciences 

PENDLETON. Edith District Dean of Instruction 

B.J., M.A., University of Missouri 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 

VACANT Adjunct Services Coordinator 

Communications 

English 

AMBROSE. Martha Professor 

B.A.. University of Missouri 

M.Phil. University of York (England) 
BUNTING, Eleanor E Professor 

B.A.. M.A., University of South Florida 
FOREMAN, Elizabeth S Professor 

B.S.. Mansfield University 

M.S.Ed.. Elmira College 
GRIFFIN, Linda Professor 

B.A.. M.A.. University of Michigan 

Ph.D.. University of South Florida 



GRIFFITH. Barbara Professor 

B.A., Midwestern College 

M.A.. Oakland University 
JOHNSON, Thomas P Professor 

B.A., Concordia Senior College 

M.A., University of North Carolina 
MILLER. Kathia L Professor 

A.B., Cornell University 

M.A.T, Brown University 
O'NEIL, James F. Professor 

B.A., M.A., DePaul University 

Adv Cert, in School Admin., Winona State Univ. 
ROOT, Bonnie Professor 

B.S., M.A., University of Florida 
SPIVAK, Talbot I Professor 

B.A., Trinity College 

M.A., Cornell University 

Ph.D.. University of Iowa 
Foreign Languages 
JAEN, Janice Professor 

M.A.. Purdue University 

M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University 
MAYORAL, Fernando Professor 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
Speech 
CONNELL, John R Professor 

B.A., M.A., University of Central Florida 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
HALE, Myra P. Professor 

B.A., M.A.. University of Alabama 
Humanities 
Gallery 
BISHOP, Jr Ronald Curator 

B.F.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha 

M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Humanities 
BUTLER, Deborah E Professor 

B.A., M.A.. Florida State University 
HAYES, John C Professor 

B.A., Eckerd College 

M.L.A., University of South Florida 
ROOKS, Sharon E Professor 

B.A., Emory & Henry College 

M.A., University of Tennessee 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
Music 
CAIN, James A Professor 

B.M.. Jacksonville University 

M.M.. D.M.. Florida State University 
CORNISH. Glenn S Professor 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
HILL. Dennis R Professor 

B.M.. M.M., Youngstown State University 

Ph.D.. North Texas State University 



178 



Theater 

WESTLAKE. Richard D Professor 

B.A., College of William and Mary 

M.A.. Southern Illinois University 
Learning Resources 
IGLESIAS. Estrella. M Director 

B.A.. Barr>' University 

M.L.S., Louisiana State University 
DOSS. Barbara P. Librarian 

B.S., Athens College 

M.S.L.M., Alabama A & M University 
SHLTLUK. William Librarian 

B.S. Mercy College 

M.S., Long Island University 

M.L.S.. Queen's College. CUNY 
Distance Learning 
KREMSKI-BRONDER. Lori Instructional Technology Specialist 

A..-\.S.. John .A. Logan College 

B.S.. M.S.. Southern Illinois University 
Social Sciences 
History 
HERM.AN. Mark C Professor 

B.A.. Shelton College 

M.A.. Ph.D.. University of South Carolina 
Psychologj 
BLY TURNER. Margaret A Professor 

B.S.. University of New York 

M.Pssc. Pennsylvania State University 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 
FORDYCE. Michael W Professor 

.A.B. Emop. University 

M.A.. Ph.D.. United States International University 
HAGAN. III. Samuel J Professor 

A. A., Georgia Military College 

.\.B.. M.S.. Ph.D.. University of Georgia-.Athens 
Sociologj 
FULTON. Robert Professor 

B.S.. SUNY-Albany 

M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 
Sociology /Psychology 
C.AAIPBELL, Lee Professor 

C.A.S.. John Hopkins University 

M.Ed., Antioch University 

Ph.D.. Union Institute 

Division of Workforce Programs 

MONAGAN. Paul R Interim District Dean of Instruction 

A.A.S., SUNY - Syracuse 

B.S., SUNY - Empire State College 

M.Ed.. North Carolina State College 
Business & Technolog y 
FOY. Dennette T Coordinator 

.A. .A., Edison Community College 

B.S., M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Accounting 
BIGGETT. Earl S Professor 

B.B.A., lona College 

M.B.A., St. Johns University 



GRACE. Lynn G Professor 

B.B.A.. Western Michigan University 

M.B.A., Eastern Michigan University 
Business 
H.AYDEN. Michael D Professor 

B..A.. .Amherst College 

M.B..A., University of Colorado 
OLIVER. David G Professor 

B.S., New England College 

M.B.A., .American International College 
WIXOM, Victor S Professor 

B.S. Oklahoma State Universitv 

M.B..A.. Golden Gate University 
Computer Application & Programming 
BUCZYNA. Roberta Professor 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.S.. M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
JOHNSON. Deborah Professor 

B.S.. Mount Saint Mar\' College 

M.S., Union College 
MYERS. Man, R Professor 

B.S., Purdue University 

M.Ed.. University of South PHorida 
SMITH. Charles E Professor 

A.A.. Edison Community College 

B.S., Troy State UniNersity 

M..A.. Webster University 
Drafting & Design 
WHITNEY. Fnmk V. Professor 

B.S. University of Minnesota 

M..A.. L'nis ersity of Northern Colorado 
Networking Ser>ices Technologj 
DUBETZ. .Manin Professor 

B.S.. Kettering University 

M.S.. Wayne State University 

Ph.D.. University of .Alberta (Canada) 
Continuing Education 
ROSHON. William R District Director 

B.S.. The Ohio State University 

M.S.. Barr\ University 
Institute of Health Professionals 
TRUNZO. Judith .A Coordinator 

.A.D..\., Owens Technical College 

B.S.N.. Uni\ersit\ of South Florida 
Institute for Management Development 
JOSEPH. Gerahnn .M Coordinator 

.A. .A.. Florida Community College at Jacksonville 

B..A.. Florida State University 
WAGES Program 
MORG.AN. Roxane M Coordinator 

B.F..A.. M.P.A.. Valdosta State University 
Criminal .lustice & Paralegal 
GRESH.AM. Kim Coordinator 

.A. A.. Edison Community College 

B.P..A.. Barrv Universitv 



179 



Criminal Justice 

HEWITT. Rohcri G Professor 

B.S.. Mercy College 

MPS.. Long Island University 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 
Parale}>al Studies 
CONWELL. Mary H Professor 

B.A., J.D.. Indiana University 
Emergency Medical Services 
DICKERSON, Mary Kim Coordinator 

A.S.. B.S.. Eastern Kentucky University 

A.S.. Edison Community College 
PANEM, Warren Clinical Coordinator 

A.S.. Regents College 

B.S.. Ekerd College 

VACANT Lab Manager 

Fire Science Technology 

MESSINA, Anthony Coordinator 

A.S., Manatee Community College 
Golf Course Management 
BERNDT. William L Coordinator 

B.S., Central Michigan University 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Honorary Administration 

ROBINSON. David G. President Emeritus 

Honorary Faculty 

HENDERSON, Lee G. 
WATTENBARGER, James L. 

ADJUNCT FACULTY 

HEALTH AND SCIENCES CHARLOTTE COUNTY 

Amtz, Jr., William B. 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.S., University of Georgia 
Behrens, Larry 

B.S., Illinois State University 

M.S., New Mexico Highland University 
Bohlander, Terry 

B.S., Illinois State University 

M.Ed., University of Illinois 

M.S., NOVA University 
Crowley, Robin 

A.S., Rock Valley Jr College 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University 
Dubetz, Terry 

A.A.S., Macomb Community College 

B.S., Oakland University 

Ph.D., University of Alberta (Canada) 
Ewart, R. Bradley 

B.A., University of Iowa 

M.A., Ph.D., Washington University 
Feldman, Janet 

A.B., M.S., Rutgers University 
Montgomery, Ralph 

B.S., University of California-Davis 

Ph.D., Florida State University 



Muehl, Timothy B. 

B.S., SUNY-Oneonta 

M.S., SUNY-Potsdam 
Safliolm, Richard 

A.B., M.A., San Francisco State College 
Smith, Christine 

B.A., University of Toledo 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Softer, Charles 

A. A., Miami-Dade Community College 

D.C., Texas Chiropractic College 
Yankowski, Kristin 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.A., NOVA University 
HEALTH AND SCIENCES COLLIER COUNTY 
Bland, Iris C. 

B.A., Jersey City State College 

M.A., University of Nebraska 
David, Ira W. 

B.A. Brandeis University 

M.A., SUNY-Stony Brook 
Di Nunzio, Michael D. 

A.B., M.A., Syracuse University 
Feduccia, Anthony J. 

B.A., Utica College 

M.S., Syracuse University 
Ferguson, Jr Edward 

B.S., M.S., SUNY-Albany 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Ghorayeb, Anthony 

B.A., Rutgers University 

M.B.A., Seton Hall University 
Hilliard, William L. 

B.S., Newberry College 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
Jackson, Jr., David A. 

B.S., M.S. University of Richmond 
Kilgore, Richard 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College 

M.S., Antioch College 
Kwiatkowski, Neil 

B.S., Niagara University 

M.S., Bridgeport University 
Levin, Florence 

B.A., Case Western Reserve University 

M.A., University of Akron 
Marshall, Richard P. 

B.S., University of Maine 

M.S., University of Southern Maine 
Putney, Nathan E. 

B.A., Central Wesleyan College 

M.Ed., Clemson University 
Salley, Scott 

A.S., Edison Community College 

B.S., Louisiana Technical Institute 

M.S., Barry University 
Schmelz. Gary W. 

B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 



180 



Syron, Ann T. 

B.S., University of Detroit 

M.S., Marquette University 
Tomei, Anthony 

B.S., American University 

B.S., Seattle University 

M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 
Warren, Amy 

B.S., University of West Florida 

M.S., University of South Florida 
HEALTH AND SCIENCES-LEE COUNTY 
Austin, Adriana 

B.S.N.. M.A.. Ph.D., New York University 
Baker, Edd C. 

B.S., M.S., Eastern Kentucky University 

Ed.D., University of South Florida 
Barnes, Tomma 

A.S., Fairmont State College 

B.A., West Virginia State College 

B.S., Coastal Carolina University 

M.S., University of West Florida 
Bartlow, Richard H. 

B.S., Ohio University 

M.Ed., Xavier University 
Berte, John B. 

B.S., Spring Hill College 

M.D., Georgetown University School of Medicine 
Bolay, Chester 

B.S., West Chester University 

M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

M.S. Ed., Villanova University 
Boliek, Ellen R. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Bryan, Beverly 

A. A., B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University 
Cassani, Mary Kay 

B.S., Saginaw Valley State University 

M.S., Central Michigan University 
Chance, Steven G. 

A.S., Miami Dade Junior College 

B.S., D.C., Palmer College of Chiropractic 
Collett, Pamela L. 

B.A., Wayne State University 

M.S., University of South Florida 
Deeter, Darina 

B.S., University of Southern California 
DeLucas, Victor 

B.S., St. Joseph's University 

D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Fairfield III, John 

A. A., Edison Community College 

D.Ph., NOVA University 
Flood, Linda 

A.S., Fones School of Dental Hygiene 

A.S., B.S., University of Bridgeport 
Gillespie, Michael D. 

B.A., Hendrix College 

B.S., Columbia University 



M.S., University of California-Berkeley 
Grainger, Timothy 

B.S., University of Western Ontario 

D.V.M., Ontario Veterinary College 
Hair, Thomas 

B.S., University of Florida 

M.S., Naval Postgraduate School 
Harper, Valerie 

B.S., University of Miami 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Huge, Terry L. 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.S., NOVA University 
King, James R. 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Florida 

D.C., Life Chiropractic College 
Kirgan, Yvette 

A.A.S., Kaskaskia College 
Kluesner, Dennis 

B.S., M.N.S., Southeast Missouri State University 
Knox, Lynda D. 

B.S., Western Michigan University 
Kulis, LeRoy 

B.S., D.D.S., Western Reserve University 

M.S., Indiana University 
LaPorta, Patricia 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Laser, Kenneth D. 

B.S., Ferris State University 

M.A., University of Northern Iowa 

Ph.D., Iowa State University 
Lasso de la Vega, Ernesto 

B.S., University of Panama 

M.S., Auburn University 
Loer-Martin, Deborah 

B.S., University of Minnesota 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Mantell, Ann S. 

B.S., University of Miami 

M.S., University of Pittsburgh 
Martine, Joseph 

B.S., Penn State University 

M.S., Lowell Technological Institute 
Maurer, William P. 

B.A., B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Kent State University 

Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 
Myers, Lawrence H. 

B.S., Northwest Missouri State College 

M.A., Northeast Missouri State College 

Ph.D., University of Iowa 
Nadkarni, D. D. 

B.E., University of Poona (India) 

M.E.E., Syracuse University 

Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 
Pennisi, Salvatore A. 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania 

M.D., Georgetown University 



181 



Robertson. Bonny S. 

B.S.,M-S.. Butler University 
Rowzie, Jon W. 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.S.. George Washington University 
Safhoim. Richard D. 

B.A., M.A.. California State-San Francisco 
Schlanger. William 

A.S.. Edison Community College 

B.A.. B.S.. Washington University 
Schnackenberg, F. Richard 

B.A.. Wabash College 

M.A., Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin 
Skiff. Walter T. 

B.S.. Eastern Michigan University 

M.A., University of Michigan 
Smith, Geordie D. 

B.A., Sangamon State University 

M.S.. Ph.D.. Southern Illinois University 
Stancel, Greg W. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

DC. Life College 
Stanley. Robert 

B.S.. D.D.S.. University of Illinois 
Strommen, Linda 

B.S.N.. College of St. Benedict 
Suchora. Kathleen 

B.S.. University of South Florida 

M.S.. University of Central Florida 
Sweeney. Dennis 

A.B.S.. Thornton Junior College 

B.S.. D.D.S.. University of Illinois 
Thiel. Margaret (Peggy) 

B.S.. Bowie State College 

D.C.. Life Chiropractic College 
Thomas. Robert J. 

B.A.. Wayne State University 

M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
Von Arx. Ellen 

B.A.. Georgian Court College 

M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
Walter. Everett 

B.S., M.S.. Purdue University 

Ed.D.. NOVA University 
Werst. Sr.. Lee E. 

B.S.. Greensboro College 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 
Wolfe. Julieanne C. 
Wunderlich. Chance A. 

B.S.. Olivet College 

D.C.. Parker College of Chiropractic 
HENDRY & GLADES COUNTIES 
Breakfield. Gary 

B.S.. The Ohio State University 

M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
Bridwell. Joy 

B.S.. Vanderbilt University 



Bugger, Leroy Z. 

B.S.. M.B.A., Southern Illinois University 
Cooper, R. Scott 

B.S., Stetson University 

M.S., University of South Florida 
Franks, Eleanor O,. 

B.A., M.A., Mississippi College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Huysman, John T 

B.A., Moorehead State University 

M.A., Eastern Kentucky University 
Lillard, Louis P. 

B.A., Purdue University 

M.A., University of Florida 
Luckey. II Larry 

B.A., Flagler College 

M.S.. NOVA University 
Lutkenhaus. Kevin A. 

B.A., Wartburg College 

M.S.. NOVA University 
Macy, Drew 

B.A., Fairfield University 
Marotti, Haili R. 

B.S., Florida Southern College 

M.S., NOVA University 
Minton, Pamela 

B.S., Fordham University 

M.A., Brigham Young University 
Moon, Maria 

B.A., M.L.S., SUNY-Albany 
Moore, Jeffrey 

A. A., Manatee Junior College 

B.A.. University of South Florida 

M.A., University of Florida 

D.M.A., University of Kansas 
Nauss, Deborah 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Ozores. Monica 

M.S.. Florida International University 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
Paul. Melvin Dean 

B.A., M.I.S., University of Pittsburgh 
Raulerson, Jr James 

B.B.A., M.Acct., Stetson University 
Rundle, Claire 

B.A.. Duke University 

M.A.. Sarah Lawrence College 
Schreiber, Scott A. 

B.S., Michigan State University 
Shearer, Richard 

A. A., Hinds Community College 

B.A.. Mississippi College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Sitta, Robert E. 

B.A., Florida Southern College 

M.A., Stetson University 



182 



Thomas, Robert 

B.A., Wayne State University 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Tripp, Linda R. 

B.A., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Way, James 

A. A., Hillsborough Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.S., NOVA University 
HUMANITIES. COMMUNICATIONS & SOCIAL 
SCIENCES - CHARLOTTE COUNTY 
Apple, Warren Jr 

B.M., North Carolina School of the Arts 

M.M., D.M., Eastman School of Music 
Bass, III Truman 

B.A., University of Alabama 

M.A., Jacksonville State University 

M.Ed., Auburn University 
Batchelder, Vemita 

B.A., Shorter College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Castro, Janet 

A.B., M.A., Hunter College 
Cleveland, Paul M. 

B.S., M.S., Emerson College 
Costa, Nicholas 

B.A., American International College 

M.Ed., Boston University 
Fullam, Ken 

B.A., Plymouth State College 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Herum, Jane L. 

A. A., Elgin Community College 

B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Northern Illinois University 
Highsmith, Mark 

B.S., M.A., Ball State University 

Ph.D., University of Kansas 
Janovic, Margaret 

B.A., SUNY-Geneseo 

M.A., SUNY-Brockport 
Kippen, Susan 

A.A., North Shore Community College 

B.S.N., Salem State College 
Lagnese, Patsy 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

M.S., NOVA University 
Leonard, Carol 

B.A., New College 

M.F.A., Warren Wilson College 
Moeller, Alan H. 

B.G.S., University of Nebraska 

M.S., Kearney State College 
Morgan, Edward 

B.A., M.A., SUNY-Albany 
Olshewsky, Thomas 

B.A., Wabash College 

B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary 

Ph.D., Emory University 



Orobello, Natala 

B.A., M.A., M.S., Long Island University 
Pelot, John 

B.A., M.F.A., University of North Carolina 
Reiss, Nevin 

B.A., Adelphi University 

B.F.A., New York Institute of Technology 

M.S., Pratt institute 
Roark, Carol 

B.F.A., Southern Methodist University 

M.A., West Texas State University 

Ph.D., LaSalle University 
Talley, Charles 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College 

B.B.E., Columbia Theological Seminary 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Education 

M.Div., D.Min., Union Theological Seminary 
Taylor, Cora 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.A., University of Kentucky 
Tidwell, Gale 

A. A., Vermont College 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Witherell, Donald B. 

B.A., Western Michigan University 

M.A., Michigan State University 
Zauner, Katherine A. 

B.A., St. John's University 

M.A., New York University 
HUMANITIES. COMMUNICATIONS & SOCIAL 
SCIENCES - COLLIER COUNTY 
Bilitzke, Patricia 

B.A., Saginaw Valley State University 

M.A., Wayne State University 
Bleck, Frederick C. 

B.S., Michigan State University 

M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 
Burnett, Jerry L. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Carell, Richard 

B.A., Paterson University 

M.A. Newark State University 

Ph.D., Heed University 
Clayton, Margaret E. 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.A., George Washington University 

M.A., Barry University 
Corsica, James 

B.S., M.S., John Carroll University 
Delgado, Mario 

B.B.A., M.B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.S., Iowa State University 
DiLorenzo, Frank 

B.S., Boston College 



183 



Dukes, Jr.. James E. 

B.A., University of Florida 

M.A., University of South Carolina 
Evers. Paul 

B.S., Southwest Missouri State University 

M.A.. Southern Illinois University 
Farrell. Robert 

B.A.. University of Connecticut 

LL.B.. New York Law School 
Fekete, David J. 

B.A.. Urbana College 

M.T.S., Harvard University 

Ph.D.. University of Virginia 
Foreman, Carl 

B.S., M.S., Miami University of Ohio 
Geiser, Patricia S. 

B.S., University of Illinois 

M.A., University of Chicago 
Geraghty. Michael 

B.A., Long Island University 

M.A., New School for Social Research 
Gonzalez, Eliut 

B.A., M.A., City College of New York 

Ph.D.. Hofstra University 
Hopler, Jay 

B.A.. New York University 

M.F.A., University of Iowa 

M.A., Johns Hopkins University 
Jaffe, David 

B.S., Boston University 

M.A., Hofstra University 
Johnson, Frederick 

A.B.. University of Oklahoma 

M.Div.. Yale University 

Kozie-Peak, Brenda 

B.A.. M.A., Bowling Green Stale University 
Lee Jones. Nancy 

A.B.. Stanford University 

M.A., Ph.D.. Tufts University 
Lopez, Jose A. 

M.A., University of South Carolina 
Lucius, Daney W. 

A. A., College of Lake County 

B.A., M.A.. Eastern Illinois University 
Luther. David C. 

B.A., University of Detroit 

M.A., Wayne State University 
Mack, James R. 

B.A., William Jewell College 

M.Th.. Colgate Rochester Divinity School 

Ph.D., Emory University 
Mansfield, Robert "Mike" 

A. A., University of Guam 

B.S., Belleville Area College 

M.A., Southern Illinois University 



McCleary, Marguerite D. 

B.A., Carlow College 

M.A., Middlebury College (England) 
O'Brien, John 

B.S., M.S., SUNY-Buffalo 
Paschall, Katie A 

B.A., M.A.. Murray State University 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
Purdy, Charles H. 

A.B., Villanova University 

M.A., University of Delaware 

M.A., Glassboro State College 
Rivera-Scailan, Lisa 

B.A., M.S., Fordham University 
Rundle, Claire 

B.A., Duke University 

M.A., Sarah Lawrence College 
Saba, Joseph K. 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida 
Sullivan, James P. 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary 

M.S.Ed., Hofstra University 

Ph.D., New York University 
Thompson, Timothy 

B.M., Samford University 

M.M.. D.M.. Florida State University 
VanBoven, Harold 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

M.A., SUNY-Binghamton 
Wamick Koester, Julie 

B.S., Westminster College 

M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 
Waxman, Stephen 

B.S.. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

M.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

M.Ed., Temple University 
Weiland, Harry 

B.S., New York University 

M.S. Queens College 
Weiskopf, William J. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Wendel, Charlene A. 

B.A., SUNY-Albany 

M.Ed., Boston University 

J.D., Northeastern University 
HUMANITIES. COMMUNICATIONS & SOCIAL 
SCIENCES - LEE COUNTY 
Anderson, Dana 

A. A.. Edison Community College 

B.A.. University of South Florida 

M.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 
Ayaz, Sandra 

A. A., Santa Fe Community College 

B.A., M.A.. Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
Barringer, Tony 

B.S., M.S., Southeast Missouri State University 



184 



Beeson, Robert J. 

A. A., Erie Community College 

B.A., SUNY-Buffalo 

M.Div., D.Min., Wesley Theological Seminary 
Berry, Marjorie 

B.A., Chevy Chase Jr College 

M.S., NOVA University 
Brown, Nancy L. 

B.A.. B.S., M.A., Jacksonville State University 
Colasanti. Robert 

B.A., M.A., West Virginia University 
Cotton, Trae 

B.A., University of North Texas 

M.A., Eastern New Mexico University 
Dennis, Constance 

B.A., Arizona State University 

M.Ed., University of Nevada 
Diaz, Juan 

M.A., Florida State University 
Dodson, Jeffrey P. 

B.F. A., Art Center College of Design 
Duplaa, Celeste 

B.A., M.A., University of Maryland 
Ellington, Scot 

B.M., Eastman School of Music 
Encke, Sharilee 

B.A., Oglethorpe University 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Farren, Pauline 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State University 

M. A., University of Georgia 

M.F.A., Roosevelt University 
Fekete, David 

B.A., Urbana College 

M.T.S., Harvard University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Ferenz, Leonard 

B.A., University of Denver 

M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Garry, Ann 

B.S., Southern Illinois University 

M.Ed., University of Illinois 
Geraghty, Michael 

B.A.., Long Island University 

M.A. New School for Social Research 

Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technology 
Gonzalez, Eliut 

B.A., M.A., City College of New York 

Ph.D., Hofstra University 
Griffin Seal, Mary W. 

B.M., M.M., Boston University 
Hamilton, Nancy W. 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

M.S., Florida International University 
Harmon, Judith 

B.F.A., Ohio University 



Harrison, Wendy 

B.S., New York University 

M.F.A., Vermont College 

J.D., Boston College 
Hartmann, H. Joseph 

B.A., M.A., University of Illinois 
Hauk, Janita O. 

B.M., Ohio Wesleyan University 

M.M., University of Michigan 
Hefner, Ronald H. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
Hernandez, Danilo 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Hess, Debra 

B.S., Concordia Teachers College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida 
Holbrook, Gean 

B.A., M.F.A., Bob Jones University 

M.R.E., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Horlacher, Jeannie 

A. A., Ventura Community College 

B.A., California State University-Northridge 

M.A., University of Oklahoma 
Hominger, Janet L. 

B.S., M.Ed., West Chester University 
Hunter, Patricia 

A.A., College of DuPage 

B.S., Northern Illinois University 

M.Ed.., National Louis University 
Ingraham, James 

A.B., M.A., New York University 

Ph.D., University of Sarasota 
Jaffe, David 

B.S., Boston University 

M.A., Hofstra University 
Joffe, William 

B.A., Loras College 
Juneau, Diane 

B.A., Indiana University 

M.A., University of Wisconsin 
Keizs, Sonji 

B.B.A., Howard University 

M.A., SUNY-Albany 
Kellams, Dean 

B.S., M.A., Indiana State Teachers College 

Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
Klemt, Barbara A. 

B.A., Ramapo College of New Jersey 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 
Kong, Mingshan 

M.M., University of Massachusetts 
Kostush, Ruth E. 

B.M., Concordia University 

M.M., Northwestern University 



185 



Larsen, William H. 

B.M., Arizona State University 
M.M.. University of Cincinnati 

Leone, Gary A. 

B.M., Heidelberg College 

M.M.. Youngstown State University 

Levasseur, Marc 

B.S., University of Maine 

M.A.. University of Southern Maine 

Ph.D., Kensington University 

Licata, Angelo 

B.A.. Adelphi University 
M.S.. St. John's University 

Lilly, Sherry L. 

A.A., Edison Community College 
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 

Linne, C. Robert 

B.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
M.A., Michigan State University 

Liu, Si-Cheng 

B.A., Nanjing Conservatory 
M.M., University of Missouri 

Lovejoy, Wilma 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University 
M.Ed., University of South Florida 

Makuen, Donald R. 

B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College 
Ed.D., Columbia University 

Mason, James 

B.A., Concordia University 
M.A., Marquette University 

Matthews, Dennis 

B.F.A., Murray State University 
M.F.A., University of Kentucky 

Mauldin, Kevin 

B.M., University of Memphis 
M.M., University of Cincinnati 

Maxwell, Steven 

A. A., Miami-Dade Community College 
B.A., University of Florida 
M.P.A., University of Dayton 

Mayers, Marvin K. 

B.A., Wheaton College 

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Medis, Nancy 

B.S., Carnegie-Mellon University 
M.Ed., American University 

Moore, Natalya 

M.A., Pedagogical University (Russia) 

Music, Michael 

B.S., West Virginia University 
M.A., University of Central Florida 

Nedley, Katrina 

B.S., M.S., East Carolina University 
Ph.D., Florida State University 



Nerad, Christine 

B.A., Bowling Green State University 

M.S., The Ohio State University 
Niedung, Helen 

B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music 
Nolan, Elizabeth 

B.A., New York University 

M.A., University of South Florida 
O'Phelan, Mary L. 

A.A.S., Lakewood Community College 

B.A., Hamline University 

M.A., College of St. Thomas 

M.S., University of Wisconsin 
Perry, Jr., Willie M. 

B.S., M.A., University of Alabama 
Peterson, Barbara 

B.A., National School of Teachers (Mexico) 

M.A., The Superior Normal School (Mexico) 
Peterson, Stephen 

B.A., Clinch Valley College 

M.A., University of Memphis 
Peterson, Todd 

B.A., Furman University 

M.A., University of Central Florida 
Polk, William B. 

M.A., Sangamon State University 
Redmond, David 

B.A. Ricker College 

M.S., Gorham State Teachers College 
Reinhard, Michelle L. 

B.A., North Central College 

M.A., Lewis University 

Ed.D., NOVA University 
Rivera, Paul R. 

B.A., M.L.A.. The Johns Hopkins University 

Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Rose, June 

B. A., Youngstown University 

M.S.W., The Ohio State University 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee 
Ryan, Gloria 

B.A., University of Miami 
Santoro, Steven 

B.S., Gannon University 

M.S., Ed.D., NOVA University 
Scaruffi-Klispie, Cindy M. 

B.M., Illinois State University 

M.M., Northwestern University 
Schneider. Bernard M. 

B.M., University of Miami 

M.M., St. Louis Institute of Music 
Schwartz, Carl E. 

B.F.A., Art Institute of Chicago 
Schwartz. Stephenie 

B.A., Beloit College 

M.A.. George Washington University 



186 



Shilling, Dawn W. 

A. A., St. Louis Community College 

B.A., Southeast Missouri State University 

M.A., Mississippi State University 
Shula, Lori 

A.A.S.. William Rainey Harper College 

B.S., Cal-State University-Northridge 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Simon, Barbara B. 

B.S., SUNY-New Paltz 

M.A., University of Wisconsin 
Sirianni, Margaret A. 

B.A., M.A., Marshall University 
Smith, Patricia 

B.A., Illinois State University 

M.A., Northern Illinois University 
Sonnebom, Kristen 

B.M.. St. Olaf College 

M.M., University of Southern California 
Sterzer-Paull, Susanne 

B.A., University of Laval (Canada) 
Stevens, Mary Kaye 

A.B., M.A., Bethany Nazarene College 
Strahom, Eric 

B.A., Drake University 

M.A... Ph.D., University of Iowa 
Sullivan, Jr., Cornelius P. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., St. Louis University 
Sutter II, Leslie E. 

A.A., San Diego Mesa College 

B.S., SUNY-Regents College 

M.A., California State University-Dominguez Hills 

Ph.D., Columbia Pacific University 
Trapp, Roy J. 

A.A., Edison Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Trogan, Amy L. 

B.A., Florida Southern College 

M.A., Florida State University 
True, Jennifer 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
Uscher, Steve 

B.M., University of Hartford 
Van Otterloo, Jan 

B.Ch.M., Drake University 

M.M., Southern Methodist University 
Westman, Dawn 

B.M., M.M., University of Michigan 
Willis, Robert 

B.S., West Chester University 

M.Ed., Temple University 

M.A., University of Scranton 

Ph.D., West Virginia University 
Zhang, Xu 

B.M., Tianjin Conservatory of Music 

M.M., University of Massachusetts 



LEARNING ASSISTANCE - CHARLOTTE COUNTY 

Beninati, Jean M. 

A.S., Middlesex Community College 

B.S., Salem State College 

M.Ed., Worcester State College 
Christoff, Barbara 

B.S., Youngstown State University 
Costa, Amelia 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Fox, Catherine 

B.S., University of Tampa 

M.S., NOVA University 
Greer, Sandra 

B.A., University of Northern Iowa 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Hanson, David 

B.S., University of Minnesota 

M.A., University of Northern Iowa 
Losey, Shirley 

B.S., Southeastern Louisiana University 

M.A., University of Kentucky 
Lourenco, Odelia 

B.A., Rhode Island College 

M.Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University 
Morgan, Edward 

B.A., M.A.., SUNY-Albany 
Rannenberg, Janet 

B.S., Capital University 

M.Ed., SUNY-Buffalo 
Rapp, Elizabeth M. 

A.B., Indiana University 

B.S., M.S., Ed.S., Butler University 
Robishaw, James 

B.A., Marietta College 

M.Ed., Kent State University 
Roosa, Carolyn 

B.S., Springfield College 

M.Ed., Keene State College 
Yankowski, Kristin 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.A., NOVA University 
LEARNING ASSISTANCE - COLLIER COUNTY 
Gaynor, Timothy 

B.A., SUNY-New Paltz 
Hall, Annette 

AA., Edison Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Hendershot, Dorothy V. 

A.B., Upsala College 
Lissette, Andrea 

B.A., University of Massachusetts 

M.A., Lesley College 
Marshall, Richard 

B.S., University of Maine 

M.S., University of Southern Maine 
Oar, JoAnn 

B.A., SUNY-Cortland 

M.S., Syracuse University 



187 



Patemo, Karen 

B.A.. M.A., University of Kentucky 
Rogers, F. Ellaine 

B.A.. University of Western Ontario 
Tagliasacchi, Fabio 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A.. University of South Florida 
LEARNING ASSISTANCE - LEE COUNTY 
Barclift. Stephanie J. 

B.A.. Rollins College 

M.A., University of North Alabama 
Cooke. Susan 

B.S.. M.S. Stephen F. Austin State University 
Dennis, Constance 

B.A., Arizona State University 

M.Ed., University of Nevada 
Eggleston. Sabine 

A. A., Edison Community College 
Lozen, Douglas 

B.S., Michigan Technological University 

M.S., NOVA University 
Moon. Franklin 

A. A., Lorain County Community College 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.S., University of South Florida 
Rotonda, Violeta 

M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
Sapir, Scott 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh 

M.S. Duquesne University 
Saulters, Rebecca V. 

B.A., University of Arkansas 

M.S., University of Memphis 
Speer, Linda 

B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College 

M.Ed., Kent State University 
True, Jennifer 

A.A., Edison Community College 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
Turner, Monica 

B.S., Alabama A&M University 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Wilson, Robyn 

B.S.. LeTourneau College 
WORKFORCE PROGRAMS - CHARLOTTE CAMPUS 
Adams, John J. 

A.S., Edison Community College 

A.S., Lake City Community College 

B.S.. Regents College 
Ahrens, William M. 

B.S., Ashland University 
Artman, George 

B.A., University of Tampa 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Asfour, Paul 

M.B.A., University of South Florida 

J.D., University of Miami 



Bohlander, Terry 

B.S., Illinois State University 

M.Ed., University of Illinois 

M.S., NOVA University 
Bowman, Elizabeth 

B.S., M.Ed., Westfield State College 
Burke, Robert J. 

A.A., St. Petersburg Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.S., NOVA University 
DeVita, Ellen 

B.S., M.S., Queen's College 

Ed.D., Hofstra University 
Garcia, Arthur 

A. A., Edison Community College 
Gugliuzza, Jo.seph 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Hanna, Sr., Robert L. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Jordan, Randolph 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Kiah, Donald A. 

B.A., Howard University 

M.A., Ed.D., George Washington University 
Kinney, Karen J. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Leever, Kimi 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Libby, Wilfred D. 

B.A., University of Massachusetts 

J.D., New England School of Law 
Manalili, Doni 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.S., M.A., University of South Florida 
Massolio, William 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Florida 
Maurer, Larry 

B.S., St Edward's University 

M.A., Ph.D. University of Texas- Austin 
McCartney, Stephanie A. 

B.S., M.P.A., West Virginia University 
Mikell, Christopher 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Moran, Edward 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Nisbet, Lawrence 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Oaks, David K. 

B.A., Michigan State University 

J.D., Thomas M. Cooley School of Law 
O'Neal. Cynthia 

A.S., Pasco-Hernando Community College 
Paquin, Richard 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Patterson, Lauren 

B. A., University of Central Florida . 

M.A., NOVA University 



188 



Rider, Larry 

B.S., Ball State University 

M.S., Troy State University 
Robertson, David 

A.B., George Washington University 
Taylor, Glen 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Taylor, Marianne F. 

A.S., Edison Community College 

A.S., University of New York 
Wayne, John C. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
WORKFORCE PROGRAMS - COLLIER COUNTY 
Aguilera, Jorge A. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Baumgardner, Paul D. 

B.S.,Milligan College 
Beale, Edgar J. 

A. A., B.S., The George Washington University 

B.C.S., M.C.S., Benjamin Franklin University 
Coulter, Todd R. 

B.A., University of North Texas 
D'Amore, Jr Anthony M 

B.S., St Peter's College 

M.B.A., New York University 
DaSilva, Veronica 

B.S., Jacksonville University 

M.S., Florida Institute of Technology 
Delgado, Mario E. 

B.B.A., M.B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.S., Iowa State University 
Donnelly, Michelle 

B.S., Youngstown State University 

M.S., NOVA University 
Durham, Timothy 

A. A., Raritan Valley Community College 

B.S., Rutgers University 

J.D., Florida State University 
Forsell, Edward G. 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University 

M.A., Michigan State University 
Fort, Christine P. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Gastineau, Bruce 

B.S., Indiana State University 
Hansen, Christopher 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
High, Douglass 

B.A., The Ohio State University 

M.B.A., Duquesne University 
Hopler, Jay 

B.A., New York University 

M.A., Johns Hopkins University 

M.F.A., University of Iowa 
Hunter, Ann 

A. A., Montgomery College 

B.M., Catholic University of America 



Johnson, Jr Carl W. 

B.S., Syracuse University 

M.A.T., Colgate University 
McMahon, Jr John 

A.A., Edison Community College 
Nash, Laura 

B.M.E., M.M., Morehead State University 
Salley, Scott 

A.S., Edison Community College 

B.S., Louisiana Tech University 

M.S., Barry University 
Santos, Jr., Otto 

B.S., John Carroll University 

M.A., Kent State University 

Ph.D., The Ohio State University 
Vila, Matthews 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Watson, Wayne A. 

B.B.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Wendel, Charlene 

B.A., SUNY-Albany 

M.Ed., Boston University 

J.D., Northeastern University 
WORKFORCE PROGRAMS - LEE COUNTY 
Adams, John 

A.S., Edison Community College 

A.S., Lake City Community College 

B.S.N. , Regent's College 
Ali, Ahmad Daoud 

B.S., M.S., University of California-Davis 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University and A&M College 
Amick, Robert 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Bennett, Stewart 

A.S., Lake City Community College 
Bensen, Virginia 

A.A., St. Petersburg Junior College 

B.A., International College 

M.B.A., NOVA University 
Blough, Robert 

B.S., Juniata College 

Ed.M., Temple University 

M.S., Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Boyhan, Christina 

B.A., Catholic University of America 
Bradbury, Frank 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.B.A., Golden Gate University 
Bugger, Leroy 

B.S., M.B.A., Southern Illinois University 
Cardoza, James S. 

A.A.. SUNY-Delhi 
Carlin, John S. 

B.A., J.D., The Ohio State University 
Checklick, Carl T. 

A.S., Edison Community College 



189 



Christensen. Timothy E. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Christy. Jr., Edward 

B.S.. Florida State University 

M.B.A.. University of South Florida 
Dailey, Mary E. 

B.A.. B.S.. M.S.. University of Delaware 
DeArmond. Paul D. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Devine. Sheila 

B.A.. Marquette University 

M.I.M., University of Denver 
Dobson. Kenneth 

A.S.. Edison Community College 
Dowaliby. Christopher J. 

A.S.. A. A., Edison Community College 
Egana. John 

B.A.. St. Johns University 

B.FA.. School of Visual Arts 

M. A.. City College of New York 
Encke. Sharilee 

B.A.. Oglethorpe University 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Esposito. Antonio J. 

A.S.. Edison Community College 
Fans, Jr.. Paral V. 

A.A., SUNY-Albany 

B.S., Southern Illinois University 
Fisher, Donald 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy 

M.S., University of Oklahoma 
Fitzpatrick, James 

A. A.. B.S.. American University 

M.F.S.. George Washington University 
Fowler, Cathy M. 

B.A., St. Leo College 

M.S., NOVA University 
Garcia. Arthur 

A.A., Edison Community College 
Ghelberg. Henry 

B.A., M.B.A., Long Island University 
Gibbs. Arnold A. 

A. A., Miami-Dade Community College 

B.RS., Barry University 

M.S.M., St. Thomas University 
Glocer, Helene M. 

B.A., Montclair State College 

M.L.S.. Pratt Institute 
Grace, Louisa 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.S., Central Michigan Univesrity 
Gugliuzza, Joseph A. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Hagan, Elizabeth R. 

B.A., Marymount College 

M.Ed., M.B.A., University of Illinois 



Hamilton, Jr., Henry D. 

A.B., Stillman College 
Hansen, Christopher 

B.A., M.A.. University of South Florida 
Haugh, Jeffery J. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Hayward, Jr., Archie B. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A., J.D.. University of Florida 
Jordan. Donna J. 

A.S.. Edison Community College 
Keating. Linda 

B.G.S.. M.B.A., Roosevelt University 
Kehl, Jon W. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Kitchens, William K. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.D.. M.A., University of Florida 
Kooi. Thomas 

A.S.. Washtenaw Community College 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University 

M.B.A... Florida Gulf Coast University 
Kreft. Matthew 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Lefort, Phyllis 

A.S., North Country Community College 

B.S., SUNY-Albany 
Martin, Jr., Oliver E. 

A. A., Edison Community College 

B.A.. University of South Florida 
Mather. Norman S. 

A.S., B.S., Salve Regina University 

M.Ed.. Providence College 
McLean. Lenore 

A.A., Edison Community College 

B.S.. M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
McSheehy. Michael K. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Miller, Todd A. 

B.B., Western Illinois University 
Molloy, Douglas L. 

A. A., B.S., J.D., University of Florida 
Moran, Edward 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Moriarty, Mark C. 

B.A., University of Delaware 

J.D., Widener University School of Law 
Nagle, John W. 

A.S.. A. A., Edison Community College 
Nevins, Barry J. 

B.B.A.,Baruch College 

M.B.A., Pace University 
Nevins, Ellen 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

M.B.A., University of South Florida 
Nisbet III, Lawrence W. 

A.S., Edison Community College 



190 



Pastula, Robert G. 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.S., University of Alabama 
Pcolar, Michael P. 

A.S., Edison Community College 

A. A., Lyndon State College 
Peceri, Michael B. 

B.S., Rider College 

M.S., George Washington University 
Phillips, Jr., Lewis L. 

A.S., A.A., Edison Community College 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Reckwerdt, David A. 

A.S., Edison Community College 
Ricketts, Thomas W. 

A.S., Illinois Central College 
Rideout-Blough, Kenneth 

B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 

M.A., Rowan University 
Ross, Robert E. 

B.S., M.B.A., Cal-State San Jose 



Solock, Richard 

B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University 

M.Acct., Florida International University 
Tuttle, Scott 

A. A., Edison Community College 
Valvo, Anthony 

B.B.A., Miami University 

M.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University 
Volz, Jr., Edward J. 

B.S., Villanova University 

J.D., Fordham University 
Waldorf, Douglas 

B.S., M.B.A., J.D., University of Florida 
Walzer, Joseph F. 

B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Miami 
Wilkison, James 

A.S., St. Petersburg Jr. College 

B.S., University of Central Florida 
Wise, Joseph 

A.S., Edison Community College 



191 




192 



GLOSSARY 

OF 

TERMS 



193 



AA-Associate in Arts Degree. A two-year degree designed 
for transfer to another college or university to complete 
a four-year degree. 

Accreditation-Certitlcation that a college meets a .set of 
criteria established by one of six private, nonprofit, 
voluntary regional accrediting associations. 

Ad€l/Drop-The procedure used to alter class schedules after 
initial registration and through the first week of the 
semester. During this time, students can adjust their 
schedule by dropping or adding a course without 
penalty. 

Advanced Placement (AP)-A national examination through 
which credit may be awarded in specified subjects. The 
minimum passing score is required for the awarding of 
credit applicable toward a degree. Information is 
available in the Counseling, Advising, and Assessment 
Center. 

AS-Associate in Science Degree. A technical two-year 
degree for students pursuing career training instead of 
a four-year degree. 

ACT-Enhanced (ACT-E)-American College Testing 
Program. One of the assessment tests accepted for entry/ 
placement at Edison. 

Articulation Agreement-State Board of Educadon rules 
that establish provisions to facilitate the smooth 
transition of students through the secondary, community 
college and university educational systems. 

Audit-A college credit course taken for informational 
instruction only. College credit is not earned and regular 
fees are assessed. Testing and course pre- and co- 
requisites apply. 

Career Center - The Center provides students and alumni 
with a full range of career and employment services 
including career planning and assessment, occupational 
information, internships, job listings, and employment 
assistance. 

Catalog-A resource of academic policies, procedures, 
college and degree requirements, faculty and course 
descriptions, published yearly (but subject to change). 

CLAST Alternative-Refers to one of the approved 
alternatives that satisfies one or more subtests of the 
CLAST requirement. These alternatives include a 
combination of test .scores (SAT-R or ACT-E) and/or 
specific course grades. 



CLEP (College Level Examination Program) - CLEP is a 
national examination through which credit may be 
awarded in specified subjects. Meeting the minimum 
passing score is required for awarding of credit 
applicable toward a degree. Information is available in 
the Counseling, Advising and Assessment Center. 

Compressed Video - A transmission system in which special 
equipment is used to "compress" the video signal before 
sending it. A similar piece of equipment is used at the 
receiving end to "decompress" the video so that it can 
once again be put on a screen. Edison offers many 
distance learning courses with other campuses that use 
this technology. 

Continuing Education-A variety of non-credit subjects 
offered to the community through Edison. 

C.E.U. (Continuing Education Unit)-One C.E.U. is awarded 
for every ten contact hours of instruction in an organized 
continuing education/non-credit course. 

Corequisite-A course which must be taken at the same time 
as another course. 

Credit by Examination-The award of credit is based upon 
the demonstration of knowledge of prior learning as 
assessed by examination. This process may also include 
an assessment of professional certification. Examples 
include: Advanced Placement, CLEP, FL EMT-B and/ 
or Paramedic Certification, FDLE CJSTC exam. 
International Baccalaureate and the National Registry 
Exam for Radiologic Technologists. 

Credit Hour (or semester hour)-The credit hours reflect 
approximately the total hours a student spends per week 
in class. For example, a student enrolled in ENC 1101 
(3 credits) spends approximately three hours per week 
for approximately 1 5 weeks in class. 

Credit in Escrow-Enrollment at Edison Community 
College by eligible high school students. Permission 
of high school principle or designee is required. 

Degree-Seeking Status-A student whose admission 
requirements have been fully met and who is working 
toward a degree. 

Distance Learning-The systematic effort to reach potential 
learners who may be excluded from the traditional 
classroom by constraints of time, place and/or 
circumstance. Edison telecourses are an example of 
distance learning. 



194 



Drop-A student may drop a course during the add/drop 
period. A dropped course does not appear on the 
permanent record. The appropriate form must be 
submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the 
established deadline. Drops after that date may be 
granted only through established college procedures. 

Dual Enrollment-A student enrolled at two educational 
institutions (a high school and a community college) 
concurrently. See your high school counselor for 
information. 

Early Admission-Full-time enrollment at Edison by eligible 
high school students. Permission of the high school 
principle or designee is required. 

Educational Plan-A plan of required and elective courses 
prepared by an academic advisor to assist students in 
reaching their academic goals. 

Edison University Center-An alliance between Edison 
Community College and specific baccalaureate degree 
granting colleges and universities that allows Edison 
Community College graduates to pursue various 
bachelor's degrees while remaining at an Edison 
campus. 

Effective Catalog-Contingent upon a student's continuous 
enrollment, the catalog in effect at the time a student 
first enrolls governs the student's graduation 
requirements. 

EGL-The Edison Guiding Light program consists of student 
assistants who work in the Office of Student 
Development. They assist in student recruitment and 
retention. 

ESL-English as a Second Language. A series of courses 
offered to students for whom English is not their 
primary language. 

Fee-A non-refundable financial charge for services rendered, 
such as laboratory fees or special tests. 

Financial Aid Transcript-Official record of financial aid 
funds received by a student. This is required of all 
students who transfer from another institution and apply 
for financial assistance at Edison. 

FCELPT-(Florida College Entry Level Placement Test) is 
an academic assessment used for placement into either 
college level classes or college preparatory courses. 

Foreign Language Requirement-A requirement of 
Florida's state universities. Universities generally 
require two years of the same foreign language at the 
high school, or 8-10 credit hours at the community 
college level. 



Full-time Status-Enrollment in 12 or more credit hours in 
a Fall, Spring or Summer semester. 

General Education Hours-A specific number of semester 
hours of basic liberal arts courses required as foundation 
in the Associate in Arts degree program. 

Gordon Rule-State Board of Education Rule 6A- 10.030, 
also known as the Gordon Rule, requires students 
graduating with an Associate of Arts Degree to meet 
specific requirements in the areas of writing and 
mathematics. Satisfactory completion of this rule 
requires that a student earn a grade of "C" or better in 
each applicable course. Within the communications 
area, the student is required to write a total of 24,000 
words in specifically designated courses. Within the 
mathematics area, completion of specific courses is 
required. 

Grade-AlphabeUcal measures of academic success ranging 
from excellent (A) to failure (F). 

Grade Forgiveness-A method by which students may repeat 
a limited number of courses to improve their grade point 
average. Only the grade received on the last repeat is 
used in the GPA calculation. Grade forgiveness is 
limited to courses in which the student earned a "D" or 
"F" grade. Students are limited to two repeats per 
course. Upon a third attempt, the grade issued is the 
final grade for that course. 

Grade Point Average (GPA)-The calculation of credits 
attempted, credits earned and grades earned. Remedial 
course and grades are not included in degree GPA's. 

Grant-Non-repayable financial aid funds awarded for 
college expenses to qualified students. 

International Diversity Classes-Florida State University 
may require students to take courses that have an 
international or diversity focus. These are designed with 
an "I" after the course descriptions. 

International Student-A student who has entered the 
United States on a nonimmigrant visa (Fl) (most often 
an individual on a student visa). 

Internship Program-Students may use current employment 
or seek desired employment/volunteer experiences to 
incorporate their academic learning into real-world 
experience. Offered through the Career Center. 

Learning Assistance-(LA)-A math, reading and writing 
support center for scheduled classes, referrals, and drop- 
in students needing help with academic reading, writing 
and math projects. (LA is sometimes referred to as 
DLA-the Department of Learning Assistance.) 



195 



Limited Access/Enrollment-A designation given to 
programs that require additional admission 
requirements (i.e. higher GPA. higher test scores, 
completion of certain coursework). Admission is 
granted to a limited number of applicants. 

Major- A group of related courses that constitute a focused 
program of study in a specific area of knowledge. 

Mini-semester-A short semester of credit instruction. Also 
referred to as Fall A or B or Spring A or B. 

Non-credit-A course for which college credit is not granted. 

Part-time status-Enrollment in 1 1 or fewer credit hours in 
a Fall, Spring or Summer semester. 

Placement Testing-Initial testing and subsequent evaluation 
of students to aid in placement and progress in reading 
comprehension, writing, English, arithmetic and 
algebra. 

Prerequisite-A course which must be satisfactorily 
completed before entering a related course. 

PSAV-Post secondary adult vocational certificates are 
comprised of vocational credits, which are not college 
level credits. PSAV programs are designed to prepare 
students for employment in selected occupational skill 
areas. 

Quality Points-The value, ranging from "4" to "0" for 

grades "A" to "F" multiplied by the number of credits 
i.e., 3 credits x A(4pts.)= 1 2 quality points for all courses 
completed. Used in determining grade point average 
(GPA). 

Registration-May be accomplished in person or through 
Edison's automated telephone registration system. 

Residency-Further information is available in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Scholarships-Financial assistance for college expenses 
granted by donors to qualified recipients. Further 
information is available in the Financial Aid Office. 

Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT)-An academic 
assessment used for placement into either college level 
classes or college preparatory courses. 



Semester-(Term)-Refers to the way an academic year is 
divided. The academic year consists of three semesters 
or terms (Fall, Spring and Summer), each lasting 
approximately 16 weeks. 

Semester Hour-See credit hour. 

Student Classification-Pertains to full-time, part-time, 
audit, credit, or non-credit. 

Student Government Association-(SGA)-Official 

representatives of the student body to the administration 
in matters concerning student life. 

Student Course Load-Number of credit hours carried each 
semester. 

TABE - (Test of Adult basic Education) is an academic 
assessment used for placement into post secondary adult 
vocational courses. 

Transcript-Official record of a student's courses and grades 
that is housed in the Office of the Registrar. 

Transfer Student-Student who has attended another post- 
secondary educational institution. 

Transient Student-A student who is enrolled at Edison with 
the written approval of another college or university 
and who intends to return to that institution. 

Tbition-Financial charge for each credit hour of instruction. 

Tutorial Assistance-Special academic help in specified 
subjects. 

University Parallel Program-Courses of study leading to 
Associate in Arts degree, which equates with the first 
and second level requirements of a bachelors degree. 

Withdrawal-A student can withdraw from any course by 
submitting the appropriate form to the Office of the 
Registrar before the established deadline. Withdrawals 
after that date may be granted only through established 
college procedures. A student is limited to two (2) 
withdrawals per course. Upon the third (3) attempt, the 
student is not permitted to withdraw and will receive a 
grade. 



196 



Helpful Information 



Questions 


Department 


Lee 


Collier 


Charlotte 






County 


County 


County 


Academic Petitions 


Records 


489-9317 


732-3703 


637-5654 


Academic Standing, Probation, 










Suspension. Reinstatement 


Academic Advisement 


489-9363 


732-3703 


637-5626 


Academic Advisement 


Academic Advisement 


489-9365 


732-3703 


637-5603 


Add/Drop or Change Course 


Registration 


489-9363 
489-9319 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Admissions 


Admissions 


489-9361 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Books and Classroom Supplies 


Bookstore 


489-3345 


732-3738 


637-5671 


Career and Personal Counseling 


Counseling Center 


489-9230 


732-3703 


637-5605 


Career Counseling and Assessment 


Career Center 


489-9387 


732-3792 


637-5605 


Career Information and Resources 


Career Center 


489-9387 


732-3792 


637-5605 


CLAST Testing Information 


Counseling Center 


489-9383 


732-3703 


637-5620 


CPT Testing Information 


Assessment Center 


489-9383 


732-3703 


637-5654 


Dual Enrollment 


Admissions 


489-9361 
489-9360 


732-3701/3702 


637-5678 


Medical / Accidents / Emergencies 




911 


911 


911 


Non-Emergencies 


Public Safety 


489-9203 
TTY 489-90 10 


732-3712 


637-5608 


Evaluation of Transcripts 


Admissions 


489-9361/ 
489-9360 






Financial Aid 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Graduation 
Information General/ 


Records 

Office of Student 


489-9320 
489-9318 






732-3703 


637-5629 


New Students 


Development 








International Students 


Registrar 


489-9362 


732-3701/3702 


637-5678 


Internships 


Career Center 


489-9387 


489-9387 


489-9387 


Hendry/Glades County Info 


Coordinator's Office at 
LaBelle 


674-0408/674-0921 






Loans 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Lost and Found 


Public Safety 


489-9203 


732-3712 


637-5608 


New Students/Orientation 


Counseling Center 


489-9230 


732-3703 


637-5653 


Pay College Fees, 


Cashiers Office 


489-9386 


732-3714 


637-5676 


Adjustment in College Bills 










Registration 


Registration 


489-9363 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Scholarships 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Student Activities 


Office of Student 
Development 


489-9063 


732-3768 


637-5653 


Student Employment 


Human Resources 


489-9293 


732-3792 


637-5678 


Student Organizations 


Office of Student 
Development 


489-9063 


372-3768 


637-5653 


TTY Machine for Hearing or 


Student Services 


489-9093 


732-3788 


637-3503 


Speech Impaired 


Public Safety 


489-9010 




637-5608 


Telecourse Office 


Distance Learning 


489-9078 


l-800-749-2ECCExt. 


1078 


Telephone Registration 




489-4437 


732-0235 


629-2112 


Traffic Violations 


Public Safety 


489-9203 


732-3712 


637-5608 


Transcripts and 


Records 


489-9317 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Academic Records 










Transfer into Edison 


Admissions 


489-9361/ 
489-9360 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Transfer credits 


Records 


489-9317 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


out of Edison 










Veteran Benefits 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Withdrawal from College 


Registration 


489-9363/ 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


before Last Day to 




489-9319 






Withdraw with a "W" 










Work Study 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 



197 



BOOKSTORE OFFERS TEXTBOOKS, SUPPLIES & GIFTS 

Bookstores arc located on each campus. They carry the required books for courses at Edison Community College as well as 
supplemental materials. The Bookstores carry supplies for writing, nursing students, art, and engineering. Imprinted clothing, 
class rings, and other memorabilia can be purchased there. General items such as greeting cards, calculators and tape recorders 
are also sold, in addition to educationally discounted computer software. Students with valid identification may cash personal 
checks in the amount of ten dollars maximum. The stores accept American Express, Visa, Discover, and Master Card for 
payment. A year-round book buy-back service is provided at all bookstores. 
Textbooks may be returned for full credit if the book is: 

1. Accompanied by sales receipt. 

2. Unmarked, if purchased new. 

3. Returned within specified time (it is the responsibility of the student to observe the refund date posted in the 
store). 

4. Picture I.D. is required. 



BOOKSTORE HOURS* 
CHARLOTTE COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday and Tuesday 

Wednesday and Thursday 

Friday 

COLLIER COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday and Tuesday 

Wednesday and Thursday 

Friday 

LEE COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday through Thursday 

Friday 



Ph. 637 

8:30am 
8:30am 
8:30am 
Ph. 732 
8:00 am 
8:00 am 
8:00 am 
Ph. 489 
8:00 am 
8:00 am 



•5671 

- 7:00 pm 

- 4:00 pm 

- 1:00 pm 
•3738 

- 7:00 pm 

- 4:00 pm 

- 1:00 pm 
•9244 

- 7:00 pm 

- 4:00 pm 



*Special hours are observed at the beginning of each session and are posted in the stores. 
Order your books through the INTERNET: 



Charlotte County Campus 
Edisonchar@bkstr.com 



Collier County Campus. 
Edisonlely@bkstr.com 



Lee County Campus 
Edison @ bkstr.com 



Or 

www.efollett.com 



198 




Learning Resources 



Learning Resources Centers are located on each campus with distance learning service to Hendry and Glades counties. Edison 
Community College students have access to approximately 97,000 volumes, representing about 87,000 titles including periodicals. 
Campus distribution is as follows: Charlotte approximately 5,000 titles; Collier approximately 7,500 titles; and the remainder at 
Lee. Approximately 3,700 videos for classroom use, over 4,500 videos for television courses and other audiovisual materials are 
available. 

Electronic resources, including some full text, play an important role in Learning Resources. Computers access the catalogs of 
all 28 community colleges through LINCC (Library Information Network for Community Colleges) as well as catalogs of the 
State University System, First search (over sixty-five databases), encyclopedias, and the Internet. 

Internet and CD-ROM access is provided at each campus. At the Lee campus the Electronic Learning Facility is available to 
classes and individual students. Other computers are available in the reference area for students and the public. Charlotte and 
Collier campuses also have similar electronic facilities. 

Policies and handouts detailing specific services are available at the individual libraries. 

The hours for Learning Resources are as follows:* 

CHARLOTTE COUNTY CAMPUS Ph. 637-5620 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

COLLIER COUNTY CAMPUS Ph. 732-3773 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm 

Friday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm 

LEE COUNTY CAMPUS Ph. 489-9303 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 am - 10:00 pm 

Friday 8:00 am - 7:00 pm 

Saturday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm 

Sunday Closed 
*Hoursfor Learning Resources are subject to change. 



Computer Lab Hours 



♦ 



CHARLOTTE COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday-Wednesday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm 

Thursday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm 

Friday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm 
Hours in the Charlotte Lab depend on class schedules. 

COLLIER COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm 

Friday 8:00 pm - 4:00 pm 

LEE COUNTY CAMPUS 

Monday-Thursday 9:00 am - 10:00 pm 

Friday 9:00 am - 4:30 pm 

Saturday 8:30 am - 1:00 pm 

*ALL LAB HOURS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



199 



INDEX 

Academic Adx ising Services 55 

Academic Calendar 12 

Academic Probation 31 

Academic Programs of Study 79 

Academic Second Chance 31 

Academic Suspension 30 

Academic Warning 30 

Accelerated Programs 20 

Accounting Applications Certificate Requirements 1 10 

Accounting Course Descriptions 122 

Accounting Technology AS Degree Requirements 88 

Accreditation 1 

Administration. Faculty and Staff 175 

Admissions 15 

Advanced Placement 21 

American Disability Act 75 

Anthropology Course Descriptions 122 

Appeal of Petition Decision 31 

Art Course Descriptions 123 

Assessment Services 55 

Associate in Arts Program Guide 83 

Associate in Science Programs 88 

Attendance 25 

Audit Students 25 

Banking and Finance Course Descriptions 124 

Basic Use of Computers 42 

Beepers, Cellular Phones, and Pagers 42 

Board of Trustees 4 

Bookstore 198 

Business Administration AS Degree Requirements 89 

Business/Management/Finance Course Descriptions 124 

Calendar (College) 12 

Campus Maps 8 

Campus Violence Prevention Policy 74 

Cardiovascular Technology AS Degree Requirements 90 

Cardiovascular Technology Course Descriptions 129 

Career Center 81 

Certificate Programs 109 

Charlotte County Campus 8 

Children or Family Members in the Classroom 42 

Citrus Technology AS Degree Requirements 91 

Citrus Technology Course Descriptions 130 

Class Attendance. Absence 42 

Class Cancellations 42 

CLAST (College Level Academic Skills Test) 49 

CLAST Waiver Requests 52 

CLEP 20 

Code of Conduct and Responsibility 65 

College Level Academic Skills Competencies (CLASP) 50 

College Preparatory Program 18 

College Rights 18 

Collier County Campus 9 

Computational Skills 50 

Computer Lab Hours 199 

Computer Programing and Applications 

AS Degree Requirements 92 

Computer Progamming and Applications Certificate 

Requirements 1 12 



Computer Science Course Descriptions 131 

Continuing Education 80 

Counseling Services 55 

Course Descriptions 122 

Course Information 120 

Course Outline and Course Syllabus 42 

Credit Class Scheduling 25 

Credit from Military Schools 24 

Credit Hour Fee 33 

Credit in Escrow 22 

Crime Scene Technology AS Degree Requirements 93 

Crime Scene Technology Certificate Requirements 1 13 

Criminal Justice Course Descriptions 133 

Criminal Justice Technology AS Degree Requirements 94 

Dean's List 43 

Dental Assisting Certificate Requirements 1 14 

Dental Hygiene AS Degree Requirements 95 

Dental Assisting and Hygiene Course Descriptions 136 

Disciplinary Probation & Suspension 67 

Distance Learning Courses 86 

Drafting and Design Course Descriptions 139 

Drafting and Design Technology AS Degree Requirements .... 96 

Drop/ Add Periods 25 

Drug Free Campus 72 

Dual Enrollment 21 

Early Admissions 22 

Economics Course Descriptions 140 

Edison University Center 82 

Education Course Descriptions 140 

Effective Catalog Policy 18 

Emergency Medical Services Course Descriptions 140 

Emergency Medical Services Technology 

AS Degree Requirements 97 

Emergency Medical Technology: 

EMT Certificate Requirements 1 15 

English Language Course Descriptions 142 

Enrollment Certifications 30 

Evaluation of Transfer Credit 16 

Faculty Office Hours 43 

Fees 33 

Final Exam Schedule 25 

Financial Aid Information 34 

Fine Arts Programs 58 

Fire Science Technology AS Degree Requirements 98 

Fire Science Technology Course Descriptions 144 

Florida College Entry Level Placement Test 18 

Florida Statewide Course Numbering System 120 

Foreign Language Course Descriptions 145 

Foreign Students (See International Students) 16 

Fresh Start Program 56 

Full Cost of Instruction 26 

General Education Agreement 53 

Geography Course Descriptions 145 

Gerontology Course Description 146 

Glossary of Terms 194 

Golf Course Operations AS Degree Requirements 99 

Golf Course Operations Course Descriptions 146 

Grade Forgiveness Policy 43 



200 



Grade Point System 43 

j^ Grade Reports 43 

Graduation Requirements 47 

Grants 34 

Healtii and Wellness Course Descriptions 148 

Health Services 55 

Hendry/Glades County Information 7 

History Course Descriptions 149 

History of the College 7 

Honor Societies 59 

Honors Research 43 

Honors Scholar Program 48 

Horticulture Course Descriptions 149 

Hospitality Course Descriptions 126 

Human Services Course Descriptions 150 

Humanities Course Descriptions 150 

I.D. Cards 25 

Incomplete Grades 44 

Individualized Study 44 

Information (Helpful) 197 

Information Services Course Description 151 

International Baccalaureate Program 22 

International Students 16 

Internship Course Descriptions 151 

Internships 81 

Laws Affecting Students 69 

Learning Resources Charges 44 

Lee County Campus 10 

Library (Learning Resources) 199 

Literature Course Descriptions 142 

Loans 34 

Maps of Campus 8 

Mathematics Course Descriptions 151 

Maximum Course Attempts Policy 45 

Maximum Student Class Load 26 

Media Course Descriptions 153 

Minority Student Services 58 

Mission Statement 6 

Music Course Descriptions 154 

National Guard Fee Exemption 36 

Network Specialist Certificate Requirements 117 

Networking Services Technology AS Degree 

Requirements 100 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 15 

Nursing AS Degree Requirements 101 

Nursing Course Descriptions 156 

Orientation 55 

Paralegal Studies Course Descriptions 158 

Paralegal Studies AS Degree Requirements 104 

Peer Tutorial Program 58 

Petitions 31 

Philosophy Course Descriptions 159 

Physical Therapist Course Descriptions 159 

Physical Therapist AS Degree Requirements 105 

Placement Testing 18 

Political Science Course Descriptions 161 

Privacy Rights 29 



Probation After Suspension 31 

Program Offerings 77 

Psychology Course Descriptions 162 

Radiologic Technology AS Degree Requirements 106 

Radiologic Technology Course Descriptions 162 

Reading Course Descriptions 165 

Readmission 17 

Real Estate Course Descriptions 128 

Records 29 

Refund Policy 25 

Registration 24 

Regulations for Student Development Activities 61 

Repayment of Title IV Funds 34 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 27 

Respiratory Care AS Degree Requirements 107 

Respiratory Care Course Descriptions 166 

Scholarships 37 

Science Course Descriptions 167 

Security Policy and Statistics 74 

Servicemember's Opportunity College 17 

Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Program 56 

Small Business Management Certificate Requirements 1 1 1 

Sociology Course Descriptions 172 

Speech Course Description 172 

Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP) 30 

State Articulation Agreement 53 

Student Activities 58 

Student Classifications 26 

Student Conduct 65 

Student Discipline and Hearing Procedures 67 

Student Government Association 60 

Student Internships 81 

Student Life 58 

Student Life Skills 173 

Student Organizations 59 

Student Participation in Decision Making 58 

Student Review of Instruction 45 

Student Support Services 56 

Student Surveys 45 

Substitution Policy For Students With Disabilities 32 

Testing Services 18 

Textbook Selection Process 45 

Theater Arts Course Descriptions 173 

Traffic Regulations 67 

Transcripts 30 

Transfer Agreements 53 

Transfer Students 16 

Transient Students 17 

Tuition and Fees 33 

Turf Equipment Technology Certificate Requirements 1 18 

University Transfer 53 

Upward Bound 57 

Veterans Information 36 

Withdrawal Policy 42 

Word-Processing or Typing Policy 46 

Work-Study Programs 35 

Written Concerns or Complaints 31 



201 



1 

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Edison Coilege Librai 



3 3701 01142455 7 



LEE COUNTY 
CAMPUS 



8099 College Parkway SW 

Fort Myers, Florida 33919 

941/489-9054 

COLLIER COUTNTY 
CAMPUS 

7007 Leiy Cultural Parkway 

Naples, Florida 3411 3 

941/732-3737 

CHARLOTTE COUNTY 
CAMPUS 

26300 Airport Road 

Punta Gorda, Florida 33950 

941/637-5629 



HENDRY/GLADES 
SERVICES 

4050 Cowboy Way 

Labelle, Florida 33935 

863/674-0408 

EDISON 

COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

A STUDENT-CENTERED LEARNING COLLEGE 

800/749-2ECC 
http://www.edison.edu