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Full text of "College Catalog (2009-2010)"

COLLEGE 



COLLEGE CATALOG 2009 - 2010 





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EDISON STATE COLLEGE 
2009-2010 CATALOG 



Charlotte Campus 

26300 Airport Road 

Punta Gorda, Flonda 33950-5759 

(941)637-5629 

TTY (94 1)637-3508 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Collier Campus 

7007 Lely Cultural Parkway 

Naples. Florida 341 13-8977 

(239) 732-3737 

TTY (239) 732-3788 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Lee Campus 

8099 College Parkway 

P.O. Box 60210 

Fort Myers, Florida 33906-6210 

(239)489-9300 

TTY (239) 489-9093 
(For Hearing or Speech Impaired Only) 

Hendry/Glades Services 

4050 Cowboy Way 

LaBelle, Florida 33935 

(863)674-0408 

1 (800) 749-2322 
Internet Address; http://www.edison.edu 



Edison State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to 
award baccalaureate degrees, associate degrees and certificates. 

This Catalog is for information only and does not constitute a contract between the applicant or student and the College. The 
programs, policies, requirements and regulations published in this Catalog are continually subject to review to serve the needs 
of the College's various constituencies and are subject to change as circumstances may require. Changes are accessible 
through Edison State's Web site: www.edison.edu. 




Edison State 

COLLEGE 



District Offices 

8099 College Parkway 

P.O. Box 602 10 

Fort Myers. Florida 33906-6210 

District Administration 

Kenneth P. Walker, Ph.D. 

President 

Noreen Thomas, Ed.D. 

Executive Vice President 

Steve Atkins, Ph.D. 

Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs 

Edith Pendleton, Ph.D. 

Vice President 
Strategic Initiatives 



CAMPUS PRESIDENTS 



Patricia Land, Ed.D. 

President 

Charlotte County Campus 

Hendry/Glades Services 



Jeffery Allbritten, Ph.D. 

President 
Collier County Campus 



Noreen Thomas, Ed.D 

President 
Lee County Campus 



^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



District Board of Trustees 4 

Welcome from the President 5 

Mission Statement 6 

About Edison State College 7 

Campus Maps 8-10 

College Calendar 1 1 

Helpful Information 12 

Admissions, Registration, Financial Aid, Student Records, and Transfer of Credits 

Admissions 14-18 

Registration 19-21 

Financial Aid 22-28 

Student Records 29-31 

Transfer of Credits 32-37 

Edison University Center 38 

Student Services 

Student Support Services 40-45 

Student Information and Policies 46-60 

Student Life 61 

Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students 62-67 

Academic Support Programs 

Academic Support Programs 69-71 

Degree Acceleration Programs 72-75 

Honors Scholar Program 76 

Libraries, Bookstores, Computer Labs and Technology Help Desk 77-78 

Graduation Requirements 

General Information 80 

Associate Degrees and Certificate Programs 80 

Baccalaureate Degrees 80-81 

Programs of Study 

Baccalaureate Degree Programs 86-88 

Associate of Arts Degree 89-90 

Associate of Science Degree Programs 93-124 

Certificate Programs 126-137 

Edison Online 138-140 

Course Information and Course Descriptions 

Course Information 142 

Course Descriptions 143-199 

Administration and Faculty 201 

Glossary of Terms 207-209 

Index 210-212 



EDISON STATE COLLEGE 
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




Washington D. Baquero, M.D. 

Chairman 
Lee County 




Randall T. Parrish, Jr., O.D. 

Vice Chairman 
Hendry County 




Mary Lee Mann, B.S. 

Lee County 






Ann E. Berlam, M.Ed. 

Collier County 



David M. Klein, M.D. 

Charlotte County 



JoAnn P. Helphenstine 

Charlotte County 





Julia G. Perry, B.A.E. 

Glades County 



Christopher T. Vernon, J.D, 

Collier County 




Welcome to Edison State College, where learning begins with intellectual curiosity and knowledge opens doors to the 21st 
Century, preparing students to think and work in a global economy. At Edison, learning is a creative enterprises designed to 
encourage each student's independence, intellectual gifts and thirst for knowledge. Our professors teach from the heart, in a caring 
environment that fosters a sense of adventure, collaboration and respect for others. We hope your journey with us will change your 
life for the better. In a world of rapid advancement, we encourage students to greet ambiguity with optimism and opportunity with 
hope. The mind never stops Icaming, and those willing to remain flexible and adaptive can expect a successfijl and productive life. 

As one of Florida's State Colleges, we have seized this historic opportunity to transform Edison into a broad Education 
System that delivers learning from a collegiate charter high school through bachelor's degrees in a wide array of venues and 
disciplines. Each of our four campuses is uniquely positioned to address the needs of its community and the voice and spirit of its 
individual counties. Together we strive each day to be considerate of our students, efficient in our processes, and flexible in our 
services. 

Our tuition is affordable and classes are small. As a flagship institution, Edison State provides innovation in the arts, 
sciences and health professions. Through an ongoing cycle of growth and renewal, we infiise the curriculum with vigor, stretch 
toward areas of diversity and change, and thus build a new and exhilarating platform for learning. 

The faculty shares my vision to be an inspiring presence in the lives of our students and to thoughtftilly guide the College's 
development. As we grow, we are studying campus housing, additional baccalaureate programs, and expanded online learning 
opportunities. Most importantly, we remain committed to our open-door mission and outreach to underserved populations, including 
those needing preparatory work to assure success in college-level courses. 

1 encourage you to explore our campuses and see for yourself how Edison State College can bring out the genius in you. 



Sincerely, 



y[l^^rt24^Jt^^(^^ 



Kenneth P. Walker, Ph. D. 
President 



EDISON STATE COLLEGE 

VISION 

Edison State College will excel as a globally-focused, innovative and open-door regional college providing quality, affordable 
undergraduate education in a caring environment. 



VALUES 

integrity: Exemplified by institutional ethics and individual responsibility 

Respect; Characterized by support for individual goals in an environment that fosters open communication and mutual 

respect 

Belief in Individual Human Potential: Resulting in collegiality, recognition and personal success 



MISSION 

Edison State College is a multi-campus, baccalaureate-degree granting public institution dedicated to educational excellence. Edison's 
programs are responsive to its many communities and accessible through a variety of delivery methods. Within a supportive learning 
environment, faculty and staff are committed to preparing students to be productive citizens by helping them develop academic and 
professional proficiencies; to think logically, critically, and analytically; to communicate effectively; to seek and evaluate information; 
and to act with sound judgment in the interest of our global community. 

In support of this mission, Edison State College is committed to fostering a climate of continuous improvement and institutional 
effectiveness as it provides: 

Liberal arts and pre-professional education through the Associate in Arts degree 

Professional and technical education through the Associate in Science degree and college certificates 

Baccalaureate degrees in selected majors as authorized by the State Board of Education 

Access to additional baccalaureate degrees through upper-division transfer, articulation, and the Edison Universit}- Center 

Qualified faculty- and staff committed to the educational goals of the learner 

Personal and professional development opportunities 

Senices and opportunities promoting academic, personal, and social growth among students 

Accessihilit}- to programs through learning assistance, academic advising, flexible scheduling, and distance education 

Educational partnerships with business, industry: government, and other institutions 

Cultural resources, events and facilities for the community 



STRATEGIC PRIORITIES 

Priority 1: Provide quality programs and services 

Edison State College will cultivate an academic climate that is challenging, engaging, and personal in order to position its 
graduates for transfer success, rewarding careers and as global citizens 

Priority 2: Build capacity for learning and renewal 

To support its educational mission and commitment to community, Edison State College will ensure a strong student 
body, outstanding faculty and staff, and stimulating environment for living and learning 

Priority 3: Create and sustain partnerships 

To attract additional students, donors, and supporters, Edison State College will engage in partnerships, communications 
and outreach initiatives creating greater awareness of its quality education and cultural opportunities 

Priority 4: Ensure continuous improvement 

To assure outstanding, effective and efficient services, Edison State College will foster a climate of continuous 
improvement 



ABOUT EDISON STATE COLLEGE 

Edison State College was established in 1962 in Fort Myers, Florida, winter home to such luminaries as Henry Ford, Charles 
Lindbergh, Harvey Firestone, and the College's namesake, Thomas Edison. The tlrst classes were held in a former elementary school 
and drew 500 students. 

Today, the College is a dynamic, multi-campus institution with an enrollment approaching 17,000 credit-seeking students. Nationally 
recognized as a leader in innovative education. 

With campuses in Charlotte, Collier and Lee counties, and services in Hendry and Glades counties, students can find the courses they 
need at locations and times that meet their busy schedules. Edison also offers a full array of online courses and support services. 

The name of the institution was officially changed fi-om Edison Community College to Edison State College during recent years to 
refiect the College's evolving role as an innovative leader in providing higher education opportunities for career-minded adults. 
Today, Edison's comprehensive curriculum includes bachelor's degrees, associate in arts and associate in science degrees, and 
certificate programs. 

Deeply rooted in its communities. Edison State College takes pride in creating a learning environment that is student-centered and 
challenging. A classical general education curriculum serves as Edison's academic fiilcrum, offering core courses in communications, 
humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and mathematics. Dedicated faculty and staff are committed to educational excellence, 
and small class size ensures one-on-one attention. The College's state-of-the-art facilities, technology and equipment complement the 
friendly, canng environment that permeates the College. 




Edison Slate College is an Equal Access, Equal Opportunity institution. Programs, activities, and facilities of the College are 
available to all on a non-discriminatoiy basis, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, disabilit}; marital status and national 
origin. Questions pertaining to educational equit\; equal opportunity or equal access should be addressed to the Vice President of 
Human Resources. 8099 College Parkway, P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers, Florida 33906-62 lO.Tclephone (239) 489-9294. 

This notice is intended for students, employees, and applicants. Edison State College collects your .social security number for use in 
peiformance of the College's duties and responsibilities far the following possible purposes: classification of accounts; identification 
and verification; credit worthiness; billing and payments; data collection; reconciliation; tracking; benefit processing; tax and 
scholarship reporting; financial aid processing; accreditation of programs; and reporting to authorized agencies of the state and 
federal government. Social securit}- numbers are also used as a unique numeric identifier in certain cases and may he used for 
research purposes. Federal law requires that we protect .social security numbers from disclosure to unauthorized parties. Students and 
employees are assigned ESC identification numbers to assist in protecting their identities. 



Charlotte Campus 



The Charlotte Campus is located on a 200-acre site at 26300 Airport Road near 1-75. In a beautifiil and naturahstic environment, the 
campus offers a fijil range of higher education services with 1 1 buildings arranged in a traditional academic setting. Courses leading to 
bachelor and associate degrees and certificates, as well as non-credit continuing education classes are offered at the Charlotte Campus. 
A child care facility and fitness center are available to serve students and the community. 



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Edison State 

COLLEGE 

CHARLOTTE CAMPUS 



26300 AiKHOKi RoAU • Pun ia Gorua, Florida 33950 

(941) 637-5629 

WWW.ED1S0N.EDU/CHARL0TTE 






Child Care (CC) 

Classrooms (CL) 

Classrooms 
Art Studio 
Computer Labs 

Fitness Center (FC) 

YMCA Fitness 
Program 

Faculty Offices (FO) 

Faculty Offices 



JJ Jones Health Science (HS) 

Computer Lab 

Nursing Labs 

Emergency Medical Services Lab 

Faculty Offices 
Peeples Learning Resources (LS) 

Library 

Open Student Computer 
Lab 

Distance Learning 

Edison University Center 
Moore Observatory (OB) 

Astronomical 
Observatory 



Physical Plant (PP) 

Mailroom 

Physical Plant Offices 
Custodial/Grounds 
Student Activities (SA) 
Cafeteria 
Theatre 

Career Services 
Student Activities 
Tutoring Center 
Clubs/Organizations 
Bookstore 



Richard D. Yarger Hall (SC) 

Science Labs 
Faculty Offices 

Wallie Spatz Student 
Services (SS) 

Admissions/Registration 
Advising 
Auxiliary Aids 
Financial Aid 
Cashier 
Continuing Ed 
Information Desk 
Testing Center 
Public Safety 
Administration 



Collier Campus 



The Collier Campus is located on an 80-acre site at 7007 Lely Cultural Parkway, just south of Rattlesnake Hammock Road and west of 
Collier Boulevard (State Road 95 1 ) in Naples. The campus serves approximately 3,000 students and includes classrooms, learning 
resources (library), a bookstore, cafeteria, auditorium, and student lounge; biology, chemistry, and physics laboratories; and 
specialized laboratories for computer science, EMS, and nursing. Courses leading to bachelor and associate degrees and certificates, as 
well as non-credit continuing education classes are offered at the Collier Campus. 




Edison State 

COLLEGE 

COLLIER CAMPUS 

7007 Lely Cultural Parkway • Naples. Florida 34113 
(239) 732-3737 

WWW.EDIS0N.EDU/C0LL1ER 

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A Building: 

Academic Advising 
Administration 
Admissions & 

Registration 
Cashier 
Career Center 
Financial Aid 
Information Center 
Security 
Student Activities 

B Building: 

Auditorium 
Classrooms 



C Building 

Bookstore 

Cafeteria 
D Building 

Student Lounge 
E Building: 

Classrooms 

Emergency Medical 
Services Lab 

Science Labs 



F Building: 

Classrooms 
Faculty Offices 
G Building: 

Computer 
Classrooms 

Computer Lab 

Distance Learning 
Classroom 

Lab 

Learning Resources 
(Library) 

Tutoring Lab 



H & I Building: 

Plant Operations 
J Conference Center: 

Continuing Education 

Nursing Lab 

Nursing Offices 

Learning Assistance 
Lab 
NCEF Early Childhood Development Building 
NCEF and UF Pediatric Dental School 



Lee Campus 



The Lcc C ampus is located on approximately 140 acres between College Parkway and Cypress Lake Drive in south Fort Myers. 
Courses leading to bachelor and associate degrees and certificates, as well as non-credit continuing education classes are offered at the 
Lee Campus. Offering exceptional programs and ser\ices in Southwest Florida since 1965. the campus serves approximately 10.000 
students annually with state-of-the-art facilities, technology, classrooms and laboratories. The Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall 
and the Bob Rauschenberg Ciallery are located on the Lee Campus. 



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Edison State 

— COLLEGE 

LEE CAMPUS 

fl090CoiLEGE Parkway • Fort Myers. Florida 3?9I9 

(239) 489-9300 

www.edison.[:du/lee 



Walker Health Sciences Mall (A) 

Hcallli and Sciences Division 
Hcalih I L'chnologies 

Anatomy and Physiology Lab 
Cardiovascular I cchnology 
Denial .'Xssisling 
Dental Hygiene 
Microbiology Lab 
Nursing 
Optieianry 

I'hysieal Therapi.sl Assisting 
Radiologic leehnology 
Respiratory Care I cchnology 

Leonhardt Hall (H) 

College Preparatory Learning Center 

Malhenialics 

Natural Sciences 
Robinson Hall (I) 

Administrative Offices 

[idueation 

Lariy Childhood I ducalion 
Alice Lockmiller Child Development 
Center (\ ) 



Richard H. Rush Library (J) 

Library 
Auditorium 

Collections (iallery 

Humanities Hall(L/LL) 

The Bob Rauschenberg 

Gallery 
Communications 
Art 

Humanities 
Music 
Division of Arts and Sciences 

Gresham Hall (B/C) 

Crime Scene Technology 
Criminal Justice! cchnology 
l-^mergency Medical Services 
Fire Science 
Paralegal Studies 

Public Saletv .'\dniinistration 
(H.'\S) 

Barbara B. Mann Performing .Arts 

Hall(M) 



Information I echn(ilo<;> Hall (G) 

I he Peer 1 utoring Center 

Hendry Hall (K) 

Accounting 

Business 

Computer I abs 

Division of Professional and 

lechnical Studies 
Drafting dv: Design 
Social Sciences 

,\reca Hall (P) 

Assessment Center 
Lecture Halls 

Hov>ard Hall (Q) 

Lecture Halls 
SO..\R Program 
I niversily Center 
.Sabal Hall (O) 

Husiness Olfice 
Lecture Halls 



Royal Palm Hall(\) 

Human Resources 

Purchasing and Auxiliary 
Services 

Lecture Halls 
Madeleine R. iaeni Hall (8) 

Admissions 

Advising 

Bookstore 

Cafeteria 

Counseling 

Dean of Academic 
Success 

Dean of Student Services 

Financial .Xid 

Onice of the Registrar 

Records 

Registration 

Student Support Services 

Student (iov eminent and 
Club Offices 
E-Learning Center (T) 

I-.dison Online 



10 



OFFICIAL COLLEGE CALENDAR 2009-10 





Fall Semester 2009 


Spring Semester 2010 


Summer Semester 2010 | 




1 nil 


\ 


B 


1 III! 


\ 


|{ 


Full 


\ 


|{ 


ADMISSION 1 


Last da\ lor new dcgrcc->cek.mj; 

xiii.li-iiu 1.1 innK lor ,\>lini-,M(in 


.•\ug 14 


Aug 14 


Oct 21 


Jan 5 


Jan .s 


Mar 5 


May 7 


May? 


Jun 25 


CLASSHS: | 


f ii>l ija\ ill tla.vscs 


.\ug :4 


.\ug 24 


Oct U» 


Jail ^ 


Jan 7 


Mar 15 


May 12 


Mav 12 


Jun 2S 


1 a-.! ^^\ ot\-la-.Ni> 


Dec 4 


( )ci 1 :< 


\\X S 


Apr 2S 


Mar 2 


Apr 30 


Aug 4 


Jun 22 


Aug 6 


USALLXAMINATIONS: 


Sci- cvaiii >».hcJulc on llic «cl> 


l)e>. ~-\: 


Oct 14-1(1 


Dec ')-12 


Apr 24- 
May 5 


Mai 3- 
Mar 5 


Mas 3 
May 5 


Aug 5- 1 1 


Jun 23-25 


Aug 4-1 1 


GRADLS 


: lo rcinoxij ■'liiconiplcic" 
rrom ihe pre\ unis scmosicr 


Sep : 1 


N .\ 


\ \ 


feb 3 


N A 


N A 


Jun 4 


N \ 


N \ 


Final grado due IKmii the raculls 
b> 4 .^(Ipm 


Dec 15 


Oct h) 


Dec 15 


May ^ 


Mar 15 


May 7 


Aug 1 3 


Jun 24 


Aug 1 3 


Inilial attendance venl'ieation due 


Sep .^ 


Sep 1 


Oct 27 


Jan 14 


Jan 14 


Mar 22 


Ma\ 21 


May 2 1 


Jul 7 


Final atienilanee \enlkaiion due 


\0\ 


Mar 24 


Jul 15 


GRADUATION: ' | 


L '. ,..,:.! 


Dec 10 


Ma\ " 




IBA 




Last da> to appl> lor 
eommeneenieni eerenion\ 


Sep 1 1 


Sep 1 1 


Oct 1 ^ 


Jan 22 


Jan 22 


.\pr 5 


1H\ 


IHA 


1H\ 


1 HOLIDA'tS: 


■. ...... ...-.'J 


Sep- 


Sep 7 


No\ 26-24 


Jan IS 


Jan IS 


\larS-14 


Ma> 31 


May 31 


Jul 5 




No\ 26-2^) 


Mar S- 
14 




Apr 2 


Jul 5 




Dec l^>- 
.ian < 


Apr 2 




REGISTRATION: 1 


Reuisiration begins lor all 
students 


Jun 1 


Oct 26 


Mar 22 


Payment Due Dates (fees due 
by inidnight. or classes will be 
dropped ) 


Aug 


5. Aug 1 7. 


Daily 


Jan 4. Daily 


May 11. 


Daily 


May 14. 
Daily 


Lite Rcgivtraiion begins (S''5 


\ug 22 


Aug 22 


Oct 14 


Jan 5 


Jan 5 


Mar 1 5 


May 12 


May 12 


Jun 12 


LAST DAY TO: 


!'.._ -i.r lor elasseN 


Aug 2S 


Aug 2(> 


Oct 21 


Jan 1.^ 


Jan 1 1 


Mar P 


May IK 


Ma\ 14 


Jun 3(1 


Add a class, change sections ol'a 
course without financial penalty, 
change from credit audit to 
audit credit 


Aug 28 


Aug 26 


Oct 21 


Jan 13 


Jan 11 


Mar 17 


May 18 


May 14 


Jun 30 


Drop a class with a refund 


Aug 2K 


Aug 26 


Oct 21 


Jan 1 .^ 


Jan 1 1 


Mar 17 


May 1 S 


May 14 


Jun 30 


\S ithdraw from individual courses 


( Ki 2*> 


Sep 2K 


Nov 1') 


Mar 23 


Feb 1 2 


Apr 16 


Jul S 


Jun 111 


Jul 27 

1 


1 RESIDENCY: | 1 


Last day lo apply lor chanj:e 
of residency for tuition 
purposes 


Aug 28 


Aug 26 


Oct 2 1 


Jan 13 


Jan 1 1 


Mar 17 


May 18 


May 14 


Jun 30 



M 



HELPFUL INFORMATION 



Questions 

Academic Petitions 

Academic Standing. Probation, 
Suspension, Reinstatement 
Academic Advisement 
Add/Drop or Change Course 
Admissions 
Baccalaureate and University 

Programs 
Books and Classroom Supplies 
Career Information and Resources 
CLAST Testing Information 
CLEP Testing 

Early College (Dual Enrollment) 
FCELPT Testing Information 
Medical ' Accidents ' Emergencies 
Non-Emergencies 

Evaluation of Transcripts 
Financial Aid 
Graduation 
Information General/ 

New Students 

International Students 

Hendry/Glades County Info 

Library Hours 

Learning Assistance Labs 

Loans 

Lost and Found 

New Students/Orientation 

Pay College Fees. 

Adjustment in College Bills 
Personal Counseling 
Registration 
Scholarships 
Student Activities 
Student Employment 
Student Organizations 
TTY Machine for Hearing or 

Speech Impaired 
Technology Help Desk 

Traffic Violations 

Transcripts and Academic Records 

Transfer into Edison 

Transfer credits out of Edison 

Veteran Benefits 

Withdrawal trom Classes/College 

Work Study 



Department 


Lee 


Collier 


Charlotte 




County 


County 


County 


Office of the Registrar 


489-9320 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Academic Advisement 


489-9317 


732-3703 


637-5678 


Academic Advisement 


489-9365 


732-3703 


637-5629 


Registration 


489-9121 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Admissions 


489-9121 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Baccalaureate and University 


489-9295 






Programs 








Bookstore 


489-3345 


732-3738 


637-5671 


Career Center 




732-3792 


637-5605 


Assessment Center 


489-9237 


732-3703 


637-5678 


Assessment Center 


489-9237 


N/A 


N/A 


Admissions 


489-9121 


732-3701/3702 


637-5678 


Assessment Center 


489-9237 


732-3703 


637-5632 




911 


911 


911 


Public Safety 


489-9203 


732-3712 


637-5608 


TTY 489-9010 




TTY 637-5608 




Records 


489-9104 


489-9104 


489-9104 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Records 


489-9056 


732-3107 


637-5678 


Office of College 


489-9054 


732-3737 


637-5629 


Information & Recruitment 








Office of College 


489-9362 


732-3701/3702 


637-5678 


Information & Recruitment 








Dean's Office at LaBelle 


863-674-0408 






Learning Resources Center 


489-9303 


732-3774 


637-5620 


Learning Assistance 


489-9310 


732-3773 


637-5693 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Public Safety 


489-9203 


732-3712 


637-5608 


SOAR 


489-9705 


732-3703 


637-5629 


Cashiers Office 


489-9386 


732-3714 


637-5676 


Counseling 


489-9230 


732-3703 


637-5629 


Registration 


489-9121 


732-3701 '3702 


637-5654 


Financial Aid 


489-9336 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Office of Student Life 


489-9284 


732-3736 


637-5622 


Human Resources 


489-9293 


732-3792 


637-5651 


Office of Student Life 


489-9284 


732-3736 


637-5622 


Students w Disabilities 


489-9093 


732-3788 


637-3503 


Public Safety 


489-9010 




637-5608 




Technology Sen ices 


Ext 1202 


Ext 1202 


Ext 1202 




From off-campus 


(239)489-9202 




Public Safety 


489-9203 


732-3712 


637-5608 


Records 


489-9317 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Admissions 


489-9104 


732-37013702 


637-5654 


Records 


489-9317 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Financial Aid 


489-9345 


732-3705 


637-5651 


Registration 


489-9121 


732-3701/3702 


637-5654 


Financial Aid 


433-8047 


732-3705 


637-5651 



12 



ADMISSIONS, REGISTRATION, 

FINANCIAL AID, STUDENT RECORDS, 

AND TRANSFER OF CREDITS 



Admissions 

Edison State College Admissions Policy 

Admissions Requirements 

International Students 

Requirements for Readmission 

Student Classifications 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 

College Rights 

Registration 

How to Register 

Student Categories 

Academic Course Load 

Registration Fees, Refimds 

Adding, Dropping. Auditing or Withdrawing from a Course 

Class Cancellations 
Student Online Services Access 

Financial Aid 

Tuition and Fees 

How to Apply for Financial Aid 

Fee Payment Information 

Types of Financial Aid 

Policies Governing Financial Aid 

Veterans Education Benefits 

Student Records 

Custodian of Student Records 

Policies Governing Student Records 

Transcripts 

Transfer of Credits 

High School and Technical Centers 

Service Member's Opportunity College 

Credit Based on ACE Recommendations 

Transfer Information and Policies 

State University System Articulation Agreement 

Transfer Services 
Edison University Center 



13 



ADMISSIONS 

Edison State College Admissions Policy 

Edison State College affirms its policy of open admissions. All applicants for admissions are considered solely on the basis 
of their academic qualifications, without regard to their race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, marital status and national origin. 
Edison State College reserves the right to deny admission to any applicant whose behavior is not in keeping with the best interests of 
Edison. 

Edison State assesses a non-refundable admissions application fee for all new students. The admissions application is not 
processed until the admissions application fee is received. The Office of the Registrar is responsible for administering Edison State's 
admissions policies and for providing information regarding the admissions process, including admissions requirements, residency 
requirements, student privacy rights and classification of students. 

Students may submit application for admission via our online system at www.edison.edu/admissions or may print and mail 
an application with the application fee. 

After the admissions application has been processed, the Office of the Registrar notifies each applicant of his/her acceptance 
to Edison State and provides the applicant with assessment, advisement and registration information. Accepted applicants may begin 
their studies any term. For important dates, please see the College Calendar. 

NOTE: Florida law (F.S. 1003.43) provides that students graduating from a Florida public high school after August 1, 1987 
and applying for admission to an Associate in Arts degree program must meet specific general requirements for high school 
graduation. Graduates from private high schools and out-of-state public schools must have completed a curriculum that includes four 
years of English and three years each of mathematics, science, and social studies. However, in lieu of the English requirement, foreign 
students may use four years of instruction in their native language or language of instruction in the secondary school attended. 

Admissions Requirements 

Please note that admission lo Edison State College does not guarantee admission into a limited aceess or bacealaiireate program. For 
program admissions information, please consult the appropriate program page in the College Catalog. 

Associate in Arts (AA) Admissions Requirements 

The AA degree provides students with the foundation needed to be successful at any one of Florida's eleven state universities. To be 
admitted as an AA degree seeking student, an applicant must meet the following requirements; 

1 . Have earned a standard diploma from a high school accredited by the Florida Department of Education, or a standard 
diploma from a regionally accredited high school. Applicants who did not graduate from high school in the United States 
must have the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma and must meet language standards established through College 
policy and/or procedure; or 

2. Have earned a high school equivalency diploma based on performance on the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) test 
administered in English through any state department of education; or 

3. Have completed a home education program meeting the requirements of F.S. 1002.41; or 

4. Have earned a standard certificate of completion from a Florida public high school due to FCAT performance (must have 
completed high school after May 2003); or 

5. Have been approved by Edison State for entry into the Accelerated Programs for High School Students. 

Associate in Science (AS) Admissions Requirements 

The Associate in Science Degree programs arc primarily designed to prepare students for employment in select fields. To be admitted 
as an AS degree seeking student, an applicant must meet the following requirements: 

1. Have earned a standard diploma from a high school accredited by the Florida Department of Education, or a standard 
diploma from a regionally accredited high school. Applicants who did not graduate from high school in the United States 
must have the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma and must meet language standards established through College 
policy and/or procedure; or 

2. Have earned a high school equivalency diploma based on performance on the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) test 
administered in English through any state department of education; or 

3. Have completed a home education program meeting the requirements of F.S. 1002.41; or 

4. Have earned a standard certificate of completion from a Florida public high school due to FCAT performance (must have 
completed high school after May 2003); or 

5. Have been approved by Edison State for entry into the Accelerated Programs for High School Students. 



A- 

A 






Additional Health Professions Admissions Requirements 

The AS degree and Certificate programs in Cardiovascular Technology, Dental Assisting, Dental Hygiene, EMT-Basic, EMT- * 

Paramedic, Emergency Medical Services, Health Information Management, Nursing, Radiologic Technology, and Respiratory Care 

are selective admissions programs. Admission to Edison State College does not automatically qualify an applicant for acceptance to 

these Health Professions programs. Students must complete a separate application for admission to each limited-access program of 

study. Records submitted for application become the property of Edison State College, and will not be available for use to meet the 

requirements of third parties. *— i" 

14 '— 






Criminal History Background Check 

Applicants to Health Professions programs with associated clinical activities will be required to complete a College-approved criminal 
histor\' background check at the individual's expense. Results of the background check must be satisfactory in order for the applicant 
to be eligible for final acceptance/enrollment in a limited-access program. A student who does not maintain continuous clinical 
enrollment in the limited-access program will be required to submit a new criminal history background check. 

Health Record/Ability to Meet Technical Standards 

A completed medical health form and self assessment of program technical standards must be submitted to and approved by the 
individual Health Professions Program Coordinator prior to admission to clinical rotations. The health record will include results from 
a physical examination and laboratory tests, including immunization records, which must be verified by a licensed physician or his/her 
designee. Applicants who do not meet the standards of physical and mental health, as required by clinical facilities for safe patient 
care, may reapply and be considered for application to a Health Professions program after resolution of the health problem. A student 
who does not maintam progressive clinical enrollment in the limited-access program may be required to submit a new student health 
record. 

College Certificate Admissions Requirements 

College certificate programs are usually one year or less in length and prepare students for employment in specialized areas. To be 
admitted as a certificate seeking student, an applicant must meet the following requirements: 

1 . Have earned a standard diploma from a high school accredited by the Florida Department of Education, or a standard 
diploma from a regionally accredited high school. Applicants who did not graduate from high school in the United States 
must have the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma and must meet language standards established through College 
policy and/or procedure; or 

2. Have earned a high school equivalency diploma based on perfomiancc on the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) test 
administered in English through any state department of education; or 

3. Have completed a home education program meeting the requirements of F.S. 1002.41 ; or 

4. Have earned a standard certificate of completion from a Florida public high school due to FCAT performance (must have 
completed high school after May 2003); or 

5. Have been approved by Edison State for entry into the Accelerated Programs for High School Students. 

Post Secondary Adult Vocational (PSAV) Admissions Requirements 

PSAV programs are usually one year or less in length and prepare students for employment in specialized areas. To be admitted as a 
PSAV certificate seeking student, an applicant must meet the following requirements: 

1 . Have earned a standard diploma from a high school accredited by the Florida Department of Education, or a standard 
diploma from a regionally-accredited high school. Applicants who did not graduate from high school in the United States 
must have the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma and must meet language standards established through College 
policy and/or procedure; or 

2. Have earned a high school equivalency diploma based on performance on the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) test 
administered in English through any state department of education; or 

3. Have completed a home education program meeting the requirements of F.S. 1002.41; or 

4. Have earned a standard certificate of completion from a Florida public high school due to FCAT performance (must have 
completed high school after May 2003); or 

5. Have been approved by Edison State for entry into the Accelerated Programs for High School Students; or 

6. Be 16 or older and left high school before earning a standard high school diploma or the equivalency of a standard high 
school diploma. 

The PSAV program in Dental Assisting is a selective admissions program. Admission to Edison State does not automatically admit an 
applicant to this program of study. Students must complete a separate application for admission to the Dental Assisting program. 

International Student (Fl Visa) Admissions Requirements 

Applicants with or seeking an international student visa (F-1 ) must meet the following additional admissions requirements. Edison 
State issues an 1-20 form after all admissions requirements are met. Applicants may be issued the F-1 visa when they present the 1-20 
form to the appropriate personnel in a U.S. Embassy. 

1 . The applicant must apply for admission and submit all required admission credentials (as outlined below) to the Office of the 
Registrar no later than sixty (60) days prior to the published first class day of the term for which he/she is seeking admission. 

2. Since instruction is in English, applicants must demonstrate proficiency in the English language. To demonstrate this 
proficiency, if English is not the applicant's native language, the applicant must either submit results of the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if applying from outside the United States, or if currently applying from within the United 
States, must submit results of the TOEFL or complete a personal interview. The minimum acceptable score is 550 or higher 
on the paper version of the TOEFL or 79 or higher on the Intemet-based test (TOEFL IBT). ACT-E or SAT-R scores may be 
submitted and considered in lieu of TOEFL scores. Applicants scoring below established cut-off scores are referred to the 
college preparatory programs for additional testing and placement into the English Training Program. 

15 



3. The applicant or sponsor must provide a notarized financial statement verifying the availabihty (in U.S. dollars) of the funds 
necessary for the applicant to attend Edison State. The applicant or sponsor must complete the Sponsorship Affidavit form. w 
Edison State does not provide sponsors, financial assistance, dormitories or transportation services. , — 

4. The applicant must provide an official high school transcript as well as official transcripts from any colleges or universities ^ 
that the applicant attended. Applicants interested in receiving transfer credit for coursework completed in a non-U. S. r~" 
institution must have their transcript(s) evaluated by a credential evaluation service approved by Edison State. Transcripts in 
languages other than English must be translated by a credential translation service approved by Edison State. A list of C^ 
approved agencies is available upon request. The translation must include authentic verifying statements and signadjres. The 
applicant must have at least the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma to be eligible for admission. An admission decision w 
is made after all documents are received. r~- 

5. International students transferring from another college or university in the U.S. that is approved by the Bureau of ^ 
Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS) must provide the following items before a final admission decision is reached: ^ 

a. All of the information included in requirements Numbers 1- 4 above; 

b. An official transcript from all U.S. colleges or universities attended; ^ 

c. Copies of all previously issued 1-20 forms; ^. 

d. A visa clearance form from the International Student Advisor at the current U.S. college or university, verifying ^» 
the student's current status; and ^- 

e. A valid passport and an 1-94 form. ^*" 

6. The applicant and sponsor must have an orientation with the International Student Advisor or designee no later than thirty ^ 
(30) days prior to the first class day of the term for which the applicant is seeking admission. 

7. All international students must meet the Standards of Academic Progress for International Students (flill-time status/ 12 -» 
credits per semester and a cumulative 2.00 grade point average). ^ 

8. All applicants must provide proof of health and accident insurance to include a body repatriation and body evacuation rider ^^ 
prior to registering for classes. ^' 

Requirements for Readmission ^ 

Students who have not attended Edison State within the past year must submit an admissions application (the admissions application v. 

fee is not required for former students) and such other information as may be required by the Office of the Registrar including proof of ^ 

residency documents for in-state tuition classification. Degree seeking students readmitting after two years of non-attendance, who did ^^^ 

not complete English and mathematics requirements, must retake the FCELPT. (Please see Assessment Services, in the Student *" 
Services section, for more information.) Students attempting to return after suspension or dismissal must petition for readmission. A 

favorable decision is dependent upon clear written evidence that indicates promise of successfiil performance. (See Petitions, in ^ 

the Student Records section, for more information.) ^ 

Student Classifications Z 

Degree Seeking Classification ^ 

Applicants who indicate on the admissions application their intent to pursue a bachelor's degree, an AA, an AS, or a college certificate ^ , 

program are subject to specific Edison State policies and procedures, which are in place to help students achieve their educational « 

goals. Degree seeking students are required to complete the Florida College Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) or submit a full set ^ 

of ACT-E, SAT-R scores or be test exempt. (Please see Assessment Services, in the Student Services section, for more information.) ^ 

Degree seeking students must satisfy any reading, English and mathematics college preparatory requirements, starting the first "" 
semester of registration and continuing each semester until all requirements are satisfied. (Please see Academic Support Programs, in 

the Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students section, for more information.) Degree seeking students who previously ^ 

attended another college or university must request that an official transcript be sent from that college or university directly to Edison ,_ 

State. » 

Non-Degree Seeking Classiflcation ^ 

Applicants who indicate on the admissions application that they do not intend to pursue a bachelor's degree, an AA, an AS, or a % 

college certificate program, but who wish to enroll in college credit courses for transfer credit purposes, or for personal interest and '— 

enjoyment, must apply for admission and submit the appropriate residency documentation. Non-degree seeking sUidents wishing to * 

enroll in college credit courses must meet all course prerequisites. Non-degree seeking students wishing to enroll in a college-level 

mathematics or an English course are required to complete the Florida College Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) or submit a fiill 

set of ACT-E, SAT-R scores or be test exempt. (Please see Assessment Services, in the Student Services section, for more ^ 

information.) - 

Non-degree seeking students wishing to change to degree seeking status must do so prior to the last day of the add/drop period. 

Changes to a student's stahis will not be made after the last day of the add/drop period. The last day of the add/drop period can be 

found in the College Calendar. 

NOTE: Non-degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid, veteran's benefits and certain academic programs/services that 

require degree seeking status. 



Non-degree enrollment policy for baccalaureate level courses 

Baccalaureate level courses (numbered 3000 and 4000) are intended for enrollment by degree seeking students in an Edison State 
College baccalaureate program. Students may be permitted, on a case-by-case basis, to enroll in baccalaureate level courses on a non- 
degree student basis. Requests must be made in writing and submitted to the affiliated program director/dean for approval. Students 



>v 






16 



who intend to matriculate into the baccalaureate program will be limited to 9 credit hours of upper division coursework. For continued 

enrollment, students must adhere to the stated admission requirements for the intended baccalaureate program. 

Students with a previous bachelor's degree, with proper documentation, may enroll in additional coursework beyond 9 credit hours 

with pemiission from the Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. 

Students interested in taking courses for teacher certification or recertification must provide the following documentation: 

1. Florida Department of Education or School District documentation of certification needs ( Slulcmcni ofSkitiis of Eligihilit}' 
or approved school district fomi). or 

2. a copy of a valid teaching certificate issued by the State of Florida Department of Education and unofficial transcripts from a 
regionally accredited institution showing proof of an earned Bachelor's Degree. 

Guest Students may enroll, following the stated policy at their home institution, in accordance with Edison State College's guest 
enrollment policy. Prior approval from the home institution is required for enrollment in upper division Edison State College courses. 

Guest Student 

Applicants seeking a degree from another college or university v\ho wish to enroll at Edison State to transfer coursework back to their 
"home" college or university are admitted as Guest Students. Guest Students arc advised by their "home" college or university 
regarding courses to take at Edison State. Guest Students must have written permission (Guest Student Form) from the "home" college 
or university. A Guest Student Form is required for each semester of enrollment. The Guest Student Form is available for all Florida 
public colleges and universities on vvvv\\.F.\CTS.ore . 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 

All documents supporting the establishment of legal residency must be dated, issued, or filed 12 months prior to the last day to apply 
for change of residency for tuition purposes for the term for which a Florida resident classification is sought and submitted to the 
Office of the Registrar by the deadline published in the official College Calendar. A copy of your most recent tax return and/or your 
parent's or legal guardian's tax return may be required to establish dependence/ independence. Please note that a stepparent cannot be 
the claimant unless he or she has legally adopted or has legal guardianship of the student (copy of court papers required). 
To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, you must be a U.S. citizen, legal Permanent Resident, or hold a visa status approved by 
the Florida Legislature. Living on or attending school in Florida does not, in itself establish legal residence. Students who depend on 
out-of-state parents for support arc presumed to be legal residents of the same state as their parents. 

A Florida resident for tuition purposes is a person who, or a dependent person whose parent or legal guardian, has established and 
maintained legal residence in Florida for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding their first enrollment at Edison State 
College. If the student was initially classified as a non-Florida resident for tuition purposes (for example; the student was previously 
enrolled in a Florida institution of higher education as a non-Florida resident and paid non-Florida resident tuition and fees; or, upon 
admission to Edison State College the student signed the residency affidavit stating they were not a Florida resident) the student, or a 
dependent student's parent or legal guardian, must have established and maintained legal residence in Florida for at least 12 
consecutive months immediately preceding the proof of Florida residency deadline of the term for which reclassification to Florida 
resident for tuition purposes is sought. Students who have not been enrolled for the past year will need to readmit and will be required 
to submit new documentation to prove Florida residency. 

Definitions: 

A. DEPENDENT STUDENT; If you are under age 24 and 50% or more of your support is provided by another as defined by 
the Internal Revenue Service, you will be classified as a dependent student. 

B. INDEPENDENT STUDENT; If you meet any one of the following criteria, you will be classified as an independent student. 

• You are 24 years of age or older prior to the Proof of Florida Residency Deadline. 

• You are married (copy of marriage certificate required). 

• You have a child or other dependant who lives with you and receives their support from you (copy of most recent 
federal tax return listing the child as your dependent required). 

• You are a veteran of the United States Armed Forces (copies of DD214 or military orders required). 

• Your parents are deceased and you are, or were until age 1 8, a ward of the court (copies of court documents 
required). 

• You can provide documentation that you are not claimed by your parent/legal guardian as a dependent under the 
federal tax code and can document that you provide at least 51% of your own support for the cost of attendance as 
defined by the Edison State College Financial Aid Office (copy of your most recent federal income tax return 
and/or W2 form(s) required). 

The claimant must provide two forms of evidence from the following lists; at least one document MUST be from Tier One; ONE 
document from Tier Two may be used in conjunction with one document from Tier one. ALL documents supporting the establishment 
of legal residence (whether from Tier One and/or Tier Two) must be dated, issued, or filed 12 consecutive months before the last day 
to apply for change of residency for tuition purposes for the term for which Florida Resident classification is sought. 

TIER ONE (at least ONE document MUST be from the following list); 

1 . Florida Driver's License or Florida Identification Card 

2. Florida Voter Registration 

3. Florida Vehicle Registration 

17 



4. Declaration of Domicile (must be certified by a Ciertc of the Court at least 12 consecutive months prior to last day to apply 

for change of residency for tuition purposes). ^ 

5. Proof of purchase of a permanent home that is occupied as a primary residence of the claimant (Homestead Exemption; ^ 
contracts/agreements must be dated 12 consecutive months prior to the last day to apply for change of residency for tuition >f 
purposes). — 

6. Transcript from a Florida high school for multiple years or a Florida GED and score report (only if high school diploma or * 
GED was earned within the last 12 consecutive months); if transcript or Floirda GED is the student's the claimant must be " 
listed as the student's parent or legal guardian. 

7. Proof of permanent full-time employment (letters from current and past employers must be on company letterhead stating « 
the date of hire and that claimant has been employed as a permanent full-time employee for the last 12 consecutive months). f~- 

8. Benefit histories from Florida agencies or public assistance programs. ^^ 

TIER TWO (ONE document from the following list may be used if claimant has only one document from Tier One): ^^ 

1 . A Florida professional or occupational license (must be current and show at least 12 consecutive months). ^ 

2. Utility bill and proof of 12 consecutive months of payments (electric, gas water, cable/satellite TV; service must be current 
and only one utility may be used). Cell/mobile phones cannot be used. 

3. Documents evidencing family ties (Example: adoption or legal guardianship papers or other official court documents). ^ 

4. Lease agreement and proof of 12 consecutive months of payments (lease must be current; copies of prior leases may be used — 
to establish 12 consecutive months). ^ 

5. Proof of membership in Florida-based charitable or professional organizations (NOTE: membership in a church does not 
constitute membership in a Florida-based charitable organization). 



^- 



Reclassification To Florida Resident 

An individual who is initially classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes (you were previously enrolled in a Florida institution of 

higher education as a non-Florida Resident and paid non-Florida Resident tuition and fees; or upon admission to Edison State you 

signed the residency affidavit stating you were a non-Florida resident) may become eligible for reclassification to a Florida Resident 

for Tuition Purposes only if that individual, or his or her parent or legal guardian if that individual is a dependent, supports permanent ^ 

residency in Florida by presenting documentation of establishment of bona fide domicile in this state for at least 12 consecutive — 

months. The burden of proof is on the student and/or the claimant to show both of the following: ^ 

1. Proof of residency in Florida for the required 12 month period; and 

2. That residency in the state of Florida is/was not merely temporary or incident to enrolling in a college or university located _ 
in Florida (the claimant's signature on the Statement of Florida Residency certifies that the claimant satisfies this ^ 
requirement in one of the eight ways listed below; additional evidence or documentation may be required. — 

Required Documentation: 

To satisfy item number I above, the student, or his or her parent if that student is a dependent, must provide two (2) of the following ^_ 

three(3) documents dated at least 12 consecutive months prior to the Proof of Florida Residency deadline. 

• Florida Driver's License or Florida Identification Card (required) 

• Florida Vehicle Registration (must show proof of 12 consecutive months. 2 years of vehicle registrations may be required) ^ 

• Florida Voter Registration 
If the claimant does not have two of the three above documents, consideration may be given on a case-by-case basis for utilizing other 
documents that prove Florida residency; however, in all cases the claimant must have a Florida Driver's License or Identification 
Card. 

To satisfy item number 2 above, the student, or his or her parent if that student is a dependent child, certifies with their signature on ^ 

the Residency Affidavit form that they meet at least one of the following criteria (additional evidence or documentation may be 

required for meeting the requirement of reclassification): W 

1. The claimant was not enrolled full time in a Florida higher education institution during the previous 12 months (Full-time 
during the fall, spring and summer terms as defined as 12 credits per term). 

2. The claimant has maintained a fiill-time permanent job in Florida during the previous 12 months. Full-time employment is ^ 
considered one or more permanent jobs for a minimum of 30 hours a week. 

3. The claimant was transferred to a full-time permanent job in Florida prior to initial enrollment as confirmed on corporate or ^ 
organizational letterhead. ^ 

4. The claimant has an immediate relative (i.e. parent or child) who is currently living in Florida and who has resided in this W 
state for the previous 12 months. 

5. The claimant has purchased a home in Florida as primary residence (evidenced by a homestead exemption) prior to initial 
enrollment. 

6. The claimant has received a military discharge and established residency in Florida prior to initial enrollment. 

7. The claimant received social service benefits (i.e. disability) from the State of Florida during the previous 12 months. ^ 

8. The claimant lost their house or other domicile in another state due to a severe natural disaster or crisis resulting in a state of — 
emergency (i.e. hurricane or earthquake) that occurred prior to initial enrollment. *• 

College Rights *- 

Edison State College reserves the right to deny admission to any applicant, to suspend or dismiss any student whose behavior is not in ^ 

keeping with the best interests of Edison State . and to add, delete or change any of the regulations, rules, policies, procedures, fees, ^ 

courses, or teaching assignments without notice. ^ 

18 ^ 



C: 



c 



c 



^ 

w. 



REGISTRATION 

How to Register 

Registering for classes at Edison State is easy and convenient using Edison State's student online services ( www.edison.edu). 
Students can also register for classes by \isiting one of Edison State's three campuses or the Hendry/Glades Services. Special services 
for disabled students arc available upon request (see Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students). Please refer to the 
College Calendar for registration dates. Other important registration dates, such as late registration, add/drop period, and refimd and 
withdrawal deadlines, are also set in the College Calendar. The College Calendar is published in this Catalog. Placement testing is 
required of all degree and certificate seeking students prior to registration. Testing is used to determine placement in English, 
mathematics, and reading courses. (Please see Assessment Services, in the Student Services section, for more information.) 
All students, by registering for classes, assume the responsibility for familiarizing themselves with and abiding by the regulations, 
rules, policies and procedures of Edison State College. 

Student Categories 

A. Full Time: A student enrolled in twelve credits or more during the Fall. Spring or Summer semesters, or six credits or more 
during a mini-semester is considered to be a fiill-time student. 

B. Part Time: A student enrolled in fewer than twelve credits during the Fall, Spring or Summer semesters, or fewer than six 
credits during a mini-semester is considered to be a part-time student. 

C. Freshman: A student who has earned less than thirty college credits is considered to be a freshman. 

D. Sophomore: A student who has earned thirty but less than sixty college credits is considered to be a sophomore. 

E. Junior: A student who has earned sixty but less than ninety college credits is considered to be a junior. 

F. Senior: A student who has earned ninety or more credits, prior to completing baccalaureate requirements. 

G. Credit: Students who enroll for college credit in a current session will be considered Credit Students. 

H. Non-Credit: Students enrolled in Continuing Education courses, which are not offered for college credit, are considered 

Non-Credit Students. 
I. Audit: Students who enroll for no credit, that is. students who audit a course normally offered for credit, will be considered 

Audit Students. 

Academic Course Load 

A student may not take more than eighteen credit hours during the Fall. Spring or Summer semesters or nine credits during a mini- 
semester without the written permission of an academic advising specialist. Edison State reserves the right to limit the number of 
credits a student can enroll in if the student has been placed on academic warning or suspension. 

Registration Fees, Refunds 

Payment of Registration Fees 

Registration fees are assessed at the time of registration and must be paid by the payment due date. Registration is not finalized until 
all registration fees are paid. The student's registration may be canceled if payment is not made by the due date. Registration fees for 
courses added by the student after payment of initial registration fees must be paid for by the new payment due date, or the student 
must drop the course(s) by the last day to drop with a refund. Students who fail to drop an unpaid course are billed by the Business 
Office for all applicable fees and are responsible for payment of those fees. 

Late Registration Fee 

Students who register for classes during the late registration period, as published in the Official College Calendar, are automatically 
assessed a nonrefundable S75 late registration fee. This fee is not assessed to students who registered and paid prior to the late 
registration period and who are making schedule adjustments. 

Refund Policy 

Refunds of matriculation, tuition and special fees are made only if the student drops the class by the last day to drop with a refund, as 
published in the Official College Calendar. Exceptions to the Refund Policy may be authorized for certain events occurring prior to the 
mid-point of the semester. Student requests for rcfiinds must be submitted through Schedule Adjustment Forms prior to the end of the 
next semester. The Schedule Adjustment Forms are available in the Office of the Registrar or the academic departments. Completed 
forms and third party supporting documentation must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A student who is withdrawn from a 
class or classes because of administrative action, except for disciplinary reasons, is entitled to a full refund of matriculation, tuition and 
special fees. A student who is withdrawn from a class or classes for disciplinary reasons is not entitled to a refiind of matriculation, 
tuition and special fees. Financial aid recipients receiving a refiind may be subject to applicable federal and state regulations and laws. 
Edison State reserves the right to apply any refund due to the student's account if the student has outstanding financial obligations. 



19 



Adding, Dropping, Auditing or Withdrawing from a Course 

Adding or Dropping Courses 

Students can add or drop courses, or change sections through the last day to drop with a refund, as published in the Official College 
Calendar. Students are financially liable for all courses that they are registered in after the last day to drop with a refund. 

Auditing a Course 

Students who intend to register for a college credit course for which they do not want college credit may register as audit students. 
Students are not allowed to change from audit status to credit status, or from credit status to audit status once the last day to change 
audit/credit status has passed. Audit registration fees are the same as for credit. Audit students may participate in class activities, but 
are not required to take examinations and will not receive a grade or credit. 

Withdrawal 

A student can withdraw from any course by submitting the necessary form to the Office of the Registrar, or withdrawing on the Web, 
before the last day to withdraw, as published in the Official College Calendar. Withdrawals after that date may be granted only 
through established Edison State procedures. (Please see Petitions, in the Student Records section, for more information.) Please note: 
Students cannot withdraw from their entire semester schedule on the Web, as withdrawal from college requires seeing an advisor. 
Students who officially withdraw from a course or courses before the withdrawal deadline receive a grade of a "W." Students are 
limited to two withdrawals per course. Upon the third attempt, the student is not permitted to withdraw from the course and must 
receive a grade for the course. 

Withdrawing from a course or courses may affect a student's financial aid status, may result in the student having to pay the third 
attempt course surcharge to retake the course, and may affect the student's anticipated graduation date. 

Students should speak with their professor before withdrawing from a course and should meet with an Academic Advising Specialist 
to discuss the impact of a withdrawal on the student's education plan. Students also should speak with a financial aid specialist to 
discuss the impact of a withdrawal on the student's financial aid. 

Class Cancellations 

Edison State attempts to honor its commitment to provide the classes scheduled for a given semester. However, at times, it is 
necessary to cancel a class due to low enrollment or the availability of a qualified instmctor. In such cases, every effort is made to find 
an appropriate alternate class for the students. 

Student Online Services Access 

Edison State students can register and pay for classes, view grades, financial aid and transcript infomiation, and obtain additional 
services by accessing student online services. Students must use their Banner ID number, which is a nine-digit code beginning with @ 
and followed by eight numbers, and their Personal Identification Number (PIN), which is initially the student's date of birth in a six- 
digit format (mmddyy), to access the student online services. Students are required to change their initial PIN to a unique PIN the first 
time they access the student online services. It is important to remember the unique PIN as the student will be required to enter it to 
access the student online services. 



20 



FINANANCIAL AID 

Tuition and Fees 

Since the Catalog must be published well in advance of the beginning of each school year, it is not always possible to anticipate fee 
changes. If the tuition and fees printed here have to be re\ ised, every effort will be made to publicize the changes as far in advance as 
possible. The most current tuition and fees are available at any Cashier Office or on the College Web site: w^vw.edison.edu. 
The College accepts cash, check, money order. Visa. MasterCard. American Express. Discover or debit cards. Payment may be made 
in person at any campus Cashier Office or online through the College's Web registration system. The College also offers a Tuition 
Installment Plan (TIP). TIP is available online at my.EdisonState.edu and may only be accessed after a student has registered for 
courses. The College reserves the right to drop a class, or classes, from a student's registration if fees are not paid in full by the 
payment due date. All fees are payable by the date shown on the student's fee receipt unless enrolled in TIP. Students who withdraw 
fi-om classes and recei\ed financial aid may have to repay all or part of their financial aid award. Students who receive financial aid 
should check with the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing from any classes. Student financial responsibilities include library 
fines, book replacement costs, parking and traffic fines, returned checks, short-term loans, veteran deferments, employer or other third- 
party delinquent payments and return of borrowed equipment. Official transcripts of the student's record will not be made unless all 
college-related financial responsibilities have been satisfied. 

How to Apply for Financial Aid 

The Office of Student Financial Aid provides financial assistance to qualified students to attend Edison State using the programs 
administered by the College. Students who apply for financial aid, and demonstrate need, will be issued a financial aid package, also 
known as an award letter, made up of one or more of the four basic sources of financial aid: loans, grants, student employment and 
scholarships. Application for student financial assistance is made by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each 
year at wav"w. fafsa.ed.gov. Informational brochures and materials are available at all Financial Aid Offices at Edison State College, or 
at www. edison.edu. Students may log in to the myEdison State Portal at www.edison.edu and click on the Student Services tab for 
information on their financial aid status. 

Fee Payment Information 

1. Checks should be made payable to Edison State College for the amount of fees. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American 
Express credit cards are also accepted at Cashier Office or through the Web registration system at www.edison.edu. 

2. Veterans who are eligible to receive monthly educational benefits should be prepared to meet ALL expenses since the first 
checks are often delayed until after a semester is in session. 

3. The College reserves the right to withhold students from classes, final examinations, and graduation unless fees are paid in 
full. No grades, degrees, statements of honorable dismissal, or transcript of credits will be issued until satisfactory settlement 
of college fees and other financial obligations have been met. This includes loans to students. 

4. The cost of books and supplies varies with the program of each student. 

5. The College reserves the right to change its fees at any time without notice. 

Application Fee - There is a non-refundable fee to apply to Edison State College: 

U.S. Citizen Non-degree seeking 

U.S. Citizen 

Non-U. S. Citizen 

Non-U. S. Citizen Non-degree seeking 

Application Fees for Limited-access Programs 
Cardio\ ascular Technology 
EPI Program 
Dental Hygiene 
EMS/Paramedic 
Nursing 

Radiologic Technology 
Respiratory Care 
Fire Science 

Tuition (Including Audit) Florida Resident 

Per Credit Hour 

AA and AS Programs S80.24 

Baccalaureate Degree $88.75 

Multiple Attempt Charge $187.90 

Postsecondar>' Adult 

Vocational Programs $63.34 

Continuing Workforce 

Education Programs $108.00 



$20.00 


$30.00 


$60.00 


$50.00 


$15.00 


$20.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$125.00 


Non-Resident 


Per C reilii Hour 


$296.32 


$473.04 


$187.90 


$247.33 


$108.00 


21 



Recreation and Leisure, Seminars, Conferences and Otiier Self-supporting Programs 

Fees will be determined for each activity and will be listed in the individual activity announcement. 

Student Access/ID Card $15.00 

Students are charged a College access/ID fee each term. 

Nursing Comprehensive Testing Package: 

Nursing Testing Fees: 
Nursing Comprehensive Testing Package 
Basic Students Per Semester 

Advanced Placement Students: 

First Semester 

Last Two Semesters 

A &P Challenge Tests 
Nursing Mobility Challenge Test 

Nursing HESl Test 

Insurance Fees 

Below is a list of annual insurance fees that are charged to students enrolled in health technology programs that require 
clinic liability insurance. 

Cardiovascular Technology 

Dental Hygiene 

EMT-Basic Certificate Program 

Nursing 

Paramedic Certificate Program 

Radiologic Technology 

Respiratory Care 

Health Testing Fee 

Other Fees and Charges 

Dental Clinic Fee (Pediatric) 

Dental Clinic Fee (Adult) 

Late Registration/Payment Fee 

Lost Library Materials 

Parking Fee (per credit hour) 

Parking Fine 

Parking Fine: Handicapped 

Short-term Loan Application Fee (non-refundable) 

Distance Learning Fee (per credit hour) 

EPl Challenge Fee 

HighcrOne Replacement Card 

Graduation Processing Fee 

Transcript Request (each) 

Test Administration Fees 



$350.00 


« 


$80.00 




$160.00 


^ 


$80.00 


*■ 


$30.00 




$55.00 


_ 


$50.00 


*■ 




^ 




^ 




^ 


$32.50 


*• 


$26.50 


— 


$32.50 


^ 


$26.50 




$32.50 


^ 


$26.50 


^ 


$26.50 


- 


$35.00 


^ 




*• 


$15.00 


M 


$25.00 


^ 


$75.00 


"— 


$42.00 


^ 


$2.00 




$15.00 


*• 


$50.00 


^' 


$15.00 


>- 


$17.00 


^ 


$35.00 


'^ 


$20.00 


*■ 


$20.00 




$5.00 


« 



CLAST (Retakes) 

CLAST (Other Institutions) 

CLEP 

FCELPT (Other Institutions) 

FCELPT (Placement Evaluation Fee) 

Test Proctoring (Other Florida Colleges and Universities) 

SSI (Strong Interest Inventory Test) 



$20.00 
$25.00 
$12.00 
$15.00 
$10.00 
$25.00 
$12.00 



22 



Types of Financial Aid 

A variety of financial resources are available for those who need assistance to attend college. Assistance is awarded to degree seeking 
students enrolled for six (6) or more credit hours in Fall and Spring semesters on the basis of financial need, scholastic achievement, 
and character. Limited funds are available to qualified students for the Summer semester. FAFSA applications for assistance received 
after May 1. 2009. will be considered only if funds are available, in order to remain eligible for scholarships, work-study, loans and 
grants, a student must successfully meet the requirements of the Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP) for financial aid recipients 
(see Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students). 

Loans 

Edison State College Short-Term Loan Fund; The College makes short-term loans available to students who need temporary assistance 
paying their tuition when their financial aid eligibility is pending. Applications are available at the Financial Aid Offices. A small 
service fee will be charged and the loan balance is due on a set date, prior to the end of the term. 

Federal Family Education Loans: Long-term loans are available through the federal government's Stafford Loan program. Students 
must complete an annual FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form and a loan counseling entrance interview at the 
College. Eligibility and certification for loans are determined by the Financial Aid Office. 

Grants 

All students must complete an annual FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) at www.fafsa.ed.gov to establish 

qualification for federal and state grants. Final eligibility for all grants is determined by the Financial Aid Office. 

Federal Pell Grant: The federal government provides Pell grants to students with demonstrated financial need. Students may be 

eligible for a Pell Grant if they are enrolled less than half-time. Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): FSEOG 

fiinds are provided by the federal government to assist students with high financial need. Students need to be enrolled at least half-time 

to be considered for this grant. 

Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG): This grant program is federally fiinded for Pell Grant recipients that meet academic criteria. 

First year students are awarded S750 and second year students are awarded SI 300. 

Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG): These grants are awarded to Florida residents who are fulltime students with financial need. 

Funds for part-time students may be available on a limited basis. 

Work Study Programs 

Students enrolled for six (6) or more hours toward a degree program and who meet federal requirements of financial need and are 
capable of maintaining adequate grade point averages may be employed in part-time jobs to help meet expenses. Jobs are available on 
campus. Off-campus employment opportunities for community service are also available. The College is an equal opportunity 
employer. 

Scholarships 

Edison State College Foundation, Inc. 

The mission of the Edison State College foundation. Inc. is to enhance Edison State College's programs and services through positive 
community relations and the development of private ftinds and partnerships that will advance the education and welfare of the 
institution, its students, its faculty and staff and the community it serves. 

The Edison State College Foundation. Inc. is a direct support organization Edison State College authorized through the Florida Statute 
1004.70 Community college direct-support organizations. The not-for-profit, IRS approved 501 (c)(3) corporation was chartered in 
1966 to receive, hold, invest and administer property and to make expenditures to, or for the benefit of Edison State College. 

Institutional Scholarships 

Edison State College offers a variety of institutional scholarships to students based on academic status and/or financial need. Students 
may apply through the appropriate program or directly to a Financial Aid Office on each campus. 

Florida Bright Futures 

Florida Bright Futures Scholarship awards are determined by the Florida Department of Education and may be used for tuition 
expenses at Edison State. Florida Academic and Florida Medallion awardees may have their tuition paid by the program at 100 percent 
of allowable charges. Florida Academic recipients receive S6()0 each year or the amount designated by the Florida Department of 
Education for other expenses. Vocational Gold Seal recipients will be reimbursed for 75 percent of tuition charges each term of the 
award. Funds will be disbursed to students as soon as they are available from the Florida Department of Education. 

Scholarship Search Information 

Some of the best sources of scholarship information are available through free search services on the Internet at www.fastweb.com. 
The Lee Campus Financial Aid Office has a Resource Center that students may use to access the Internet for scholarship searches or 
financial aid information. Internet access is also available at all Learning Resource Centers. 



23 



Edison State College Scholarship Programs 



Program Activity 
Scholarships 



Activity Scholarships 
Vaiying Amounts 



Honors Scholarships 
Full-time Students $2000 
Part-time Students $1000 



Eligibility Information 



Students who participate or show potential in the 

areas of art, music, or student government. The 

award is renewable with satisfactory academic 

progress. 

Participants in the Honors Scholar Program. The 

award is renewable with continued participation in 

the Honors Scholar Program. 



Application Information 



File the FAFSA. Art students must also submit a 
portfolio to the department chairperson. Music 

and drama students must audition for the 

appropriate department chairperson. Students in 

student government must be recommended by 

the appropriate Edison State advisor. 



Apply for admission to the Honors Scholar 

Program. Contact the Honors Scholar Program 

Coordinator at (239) 489-9102. 



Plummer Memorial 

Scholarships 

Amount determined each year 



Outstanding second-year students from each 

academic division at the Lee, Charlotte and Collier 

campuses. 



;Recipients will be recommended by the academic 
department at the end of the academic year. 






Project HOPE Scholarships 

Full Tuition and Books 
(max. 30 credits per year) 



Recent high school graduates who are at risk and 

I might not be able to attend college otherwise. 

Priority is given to students who were awarded 

Project HOPE in Middle School. Applications are 

available in February from the College or area high 

school counselors. Recipients must participate in 

the HOPE Scholars Club. 



Complete the FAFSA and Project HOPE 

Scholarship Application. Awards are made in 

May for the next academic year. 



Child Care Scholarships 
$500-$I500 



Student Support Services 

Scholarships 

Vaiying Amounts 



Students who have dependents and need financial 

assistance for child care to attend the College. 

Scholarship amounts are determined by the need of 

the student and availability of funds. 



File the FAFSA. Submit the Scholarship 

application fonn with child care scholarship 

addendum. 



Students who participate in the Student Support 

Services program and have financial need may be 

eligible for scholarship assistance through that 

program. Contact that Office at (239) 489-91 12. 



■File the FAFSA and apply for participation in the 
Student Support Services programs. 



24 



Endowed Scholarships 

Students who have been awarded scholarships from a private organization may have those funds administered by the College 
Financial Aid Office. The applications forms for all endowed scholarships are located in each financial aid office, the Hendry/Glades 
office, and on the Edison State College Web site: www.EdisonStatc.edu. Criteria for the scholarship programs will vary, but 
leadership, school and community involvement, special recognition, skills, talent, financial need, or field of study can be considered. 
Certain scholarships may require the student to submit letters of recommendation or additional statements. All students must complete 
and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be eligible to receive institutional scholarship funds. 
Endowed scholarships are provided by the Edison State College Foundation, Inc. Tuition and book scholarships are awarded to several 
hundred students each year from endowments established by community residents. The following endowed scholarships are currently 
offered: 



Business : 

Madeleine R. Taeni Ethics in Business Scholarship 

Charlotte County Students: 

Charlotte County Foundation Scholarship 

Charlotte County General Scholarship 

Charlotte Pops (a Sunset Scholarship 

Charlotte Regional Medical Center Scholarship 

Charlotte Sun Hurricane Charley Relief Fund 

Darryl and Carol Casanueva Scholarship 

David and E.P. Fryar Memorial Scholarship 

Deep Creek Lions Club Scholarship 

Fannie Koontz Henry Scholarship 

Fawcett Memorial Medical Staff Scholarship 

Gertrude & E.P. Fryar Scholarship 

Jennifer Griffin Scholarship 

Leo Wotitzky Scholarship 

Helphenstine Family Scholarship 

McQueen Family Scholarship 

James Moore Scholarship 

Omni Waste Scholarship 

Peace River Medical Center Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship 

Dr. Alex and Linda Pizarro Nursing Scholarship 

Punta Gorda Rotary Scholarship 

Viola Odenheimer Scholarship 

Vernon Peeples Scholarship 

St. Joseph Hospital Medical Staff Scholarship 

Collier County Students : 

Collier County General Scholarship 

Dr. Stephen and Becky Kwedar Nursing Scholarship 

Florida Veterans 40/80 Voiture 795 Nursing Scholarship 

Gordon A. Lozier Scholarship 

Helping Collier Students First 

Holland and Mary Jeanne Salley Scholarship 

Saldukas Family Foundation Scholarship 

Computer Science : 

Susan Price Shrader Scholarship 

Criminal Justice: 

Nancy A. Jerz Scholarship in Public Service 

Joyce and Emory Rogaski Scholarship 

Descendants of Capt. F.A. Hendry: 

Capt. Francis Asbury Hendry Scholarship 

Disabled Students: 

Sanibel-Captiva Lions Club Scholarship 

Disadvantaged Students : 

Peter D. and Eleanore A. Kleist Scholarship 

Drafting and Design: 

Johnson Engineering Scholarship 



Drama : 

Robert and Juliette Brand Scholarship 

Electronics : 

Joseph S. Borek Scholarship 

EMT/EMS : 

Andrew Ryan Bess Memorial Scholarship 
EMT General Scholarship 
Kiwanis Club of Lehigh Acres Scholarship 
Nancy A. Jerz Scholarship in Public Service 
Sally Poppen Marasco Scholarship 

Fawcett Memorial Hospital Staff : 

Fawcett Memorial Medical Staff Scholarship 

Fire Science : 

Kiwanis Club of Lehigh Acres Scholarship 
Nancy A. Jerz Scholarship in Public Service 

Fort Myers High School Graduates : 

Tiffany Bachman Scholarship 

Graphic Arts : 

L. Sherrill Yeomans Scholarship 

Healthcare : 

Ruth Henry Scholarship 
Dora Christianson Scholarship 

Honors : 

Bank of America Scholarship 

George and Mary Jo Sanders Scholarship 

Gordon and Virginia Harbuck Scholarship 

James and Eleanor Newton Scholarship 

Evelyn Rose Silverman Hispanic Honors Scholarship 

Phyllis Spain Scholarship 

Horticulture Students : 

William Barney 'Bill' Corbin Scholarship 

LaBelle High Graduates : 

Isabella Curtis Scholarship 

Martha Jeanne Puletti Swamp Cabbage Festival Scholarship 

Steven Carl Perry Scholarship 

Law Enforcement : 

Florida Police Foundation Scholarship 
Kiwanis Club of Lehigh Acres Scholarship 
Lee County 100 Club Scholarship 
Saldukas Family Foundation Scholarship 



25 



Lee County Students : 

Edith Brooks Scholarship 
Jeff and Cyndie Kotticamp Scholarship 
Lee County General Scholarship 
Lillian Clukies Scholarship 
Lockmiller Common Sense Scholarship 
Mary Gray Cain Scholarship 
William R. Frizzell Scholarship 

Math : 

Joyce and Emory Rogaski Scholarship 
Margaret R. Cran Scholarship 
Ray L. Williams Scholarship 
Susan Price Shradcr Scholarship 

Music : 

Corclla P. Stahl Piano & Organ Scholarship 

Dennis Hill Scholarship 

Eleanor Morgan Music Scholarship 

Music Foundation of SW Florida 

Ralph Tilden Scholarship 

J. Howard Wood Scholarship 

Nursing : 

Alice Saunders Scholarship 

Beryl Berry Scholarship 

Carol Ann Schneeman Scholarship 

Charles A. & Roberta Church Scholarship 

Al and Dorothy Schultz Scholarship 

Charlotte Regional Medical Center Scholarship 

Dr. Fred and Bemiece H. Cain Scholarship 

Dr. Leland and Eileen Glenn Scholarship 

Ellsworth W. & Helen Beckes Scholarship 

Fred S. and Geraldine Willard Scholarship 

General Nursing Scholarship 

Jack C. Wamock, MD Scholarship 

Jennifer Griffm Scholarship 

Joann Evans Scholarship 

Susan Crane Kyle Nursing Scholarship 

Joseph Leto Scholarship 

Sally Poppen Marasco Scholarship 

Joseph Moskal Scholarship 

Joyce and Emory Rogaski Scholarship 

Community Health Association Scholarship 

Lillian A. Medhurst Scholarship 

Marie Morrison Nursing Scholarship 

Marion D. Burgess Scholarship 

Osco Simpson, Jr. Nursing Scholarship 

Paula G. Walker Scholarship 

Punta Gorda Rotary Scholarship 

Richard Orrin Hilliker. Ill Memorial Scholarship 

Rossie Evans Alderman Scholarship 

Roy & Carolyn Neumann Nursing Scholarship 

Sharon MacDonald Nursing Scholarship 

Occupational/Technical Programs : 

Marie L. Bruel Scholarship 

Outstanding Sophomores : 

Maurice and Jean Plummer Scholarship 

Paralegal Studies : 

Paralegal Studies Scholarship 



Project HOPE : 

Project HOPE Scholarship 
Betty Gardiner Scholarship 
Mr. & Mrs. Cleveland Campbell 
Mr. & Mrs. David Copham 
Dorothy Harris Scholarship 

Protective Services, Collier County : 

Saldukas Family Foundation Scholarship 

Public Safety 

Dr. Kenneth P. Walker - B.A.S. Scholarship 

Radiologic Technology : 

The Bireley Family Foundation Scholarship 

Dr. Michael Kyle Radiology Technology Scholarship 

Ward A. Shaver Scholarship 

Respiratory Care : 

Anna Kontinos Scholarship 
Laurel Dawn McNew Scholarship 

Returning Students : 

Estate Planning Council of SW Florida 

Second Chance Scholarship 

Kiwanis Club Fort Myers South Scholarship 

Science : 

Dr. Charles O'Neill Scholarship 

Ray L. Williams Scholarship 

Joyce and Emory Rogaski Scholarship 

Science/Engineering Studies: 

Gertrud Bunzel-Lamberger Scholarship 

Special Populations: 

Chaplain Eli Richard Scholarship 

Col. June E. Henry Scholarship 

Fred Henry Scholarship 

Unrestricted : 

AAUW Scholarship 

Andrew F. Taylor Scholarship 

Andrew W. Thompson Scholarship 

Anna Failing Scholarship 

Benjamin Counselman Scholarship 

Jeff and Cyndie Kottkamp Scholarship 

Beryl Lenoch Scholarship 

Carl and Johanna Muller Scholarship 

Carlisle Qiienzer Scholarship 

Catherine H. Maeder Scholarship 

Cecil Newton Scholarship 

Clarence and Billie Zimmerman Scholarship 

Claude E. Taylor Scholarship 

D. Geraci Scholarship 

Dudley P. Swartz Scholarship 

Edith Duffey Scholarship 

Evelyn Egan Scholarship 

Fort Myers Rod & Gun Club Scholarship 

Fort Myers Women's Network Scholarship 

Fort Myers Rotary. South - Scholarship 

John Evans Memorial Scholarship 

William R. Frizzell Scholarship 

Fuzzy Zoeller Scholarship 



* f 



26 



Unrestricted : 

George F. Riley Scholarship 

Greg Allen Scholarship 

Guy R. Miller Scholarship 

Harold and Leah Jane Freshwater Scholarship 

Helen Nestor Scholarship 

Isadora Claville Scholarship 

John and Alicsc Price Foundation Scholarship 

John C. and Kossie G. Ferguson Scholarship 

Joseph H. and Julia M. Goodwin Scholarship 

Joseph Leto Scholarship 

Josephine and Curtis Queen Scholarship 

Kazen Ques Scholarship 

Laura E. Hedgecock Scholarship 

Leon and Viola Gardner Scholarship 

Lora and Preston Root Scholarship 

Mary Gerrish Scholarship 

Mayson Robbins Scholarship 

Michael Griffith, Valerie Griffith-Holmes, 

Jack Holmes Scholarship 
Mildred Sherrod Scholarship 
Mina Edison Scholarship 
Minnesota Twins Scholarship 
Music on Pine Island Scholarship 
Pat Hammond Memorial Scholarship 
Pop and Marj Kelly Scholarship 
Rene Sichere Scholarship 
Robert Sneckenberger Scholarship 
Rose Kosches Scholarship 
Sarah Barden Scholarship 
Scientists Society of SW Florida Scholarship 
Scott J. Labuzienski Memorial Scholarship 
Seth Cohen Scholarship 
Sidney R. Davis Scholarship 
Sweetbay Supermarket Scholarship 
Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union Suncoast for Kids 
Foundation Scholarship 
Travis A. Gresham, Jr. Scholarship 
United States Sugar Corporation 
United Christian Giving Scholarship #1 



27 



Policies Governing Financial Aid 



t 
^ 



Standards of Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients ^ 

Federal and state regulations require students to meet minimum standards in order to be eligible to receive financial aid funds. The ^ 

minimum standards at Edison State College are applied uniformly to all financial aid programs administered by the College, except ^_ 

those programs whose eligibility requirements are restricted to institutional funds or outside donor restrictions. Some scholarship ^^ 

programs carry their own academic standards for renewal of eligibility. f— 

\ . Students must meet the academic requirement of at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA. ^ 

2. Students must make progress toward their degree or certificate. Minimum progress toward a degree requires initial year ^ 
financial aid applicants who have previously attended the College to have earned 67 percent of registration attempted at the 

College. ^ 

3. Minimum progress toward a degree or certificate requires continuing financial aid recipients to earn 67 percent of credit ^m- 
hours attempted during the current academic year for renewal eligibility. ^» 

4. Students must complete their educational objective within a given time frame: ^- 

a. All AA and AS degree seeking students have a maximum of 90 attempted credit hours. Students in bachelor's "^ 

degree programs have a maximum of 1 80 attempted credits. ^ 

h. All certificate degree seeking students are limited to no more than 1 50 percent of the published length of the 

program. '^ 

All transfer credits will be included as attempted credit hours as well as all Edison State College attempted coursework regardless of ^ 

whether the courses are applicable toward the student's degree program. "^ 

Withdrawals from any course{s) will be counted in the total hours attempted and may result in failure to meet the standards of ^' 
progress. Students must follow the official withdrawal procedures established by the College. Students may owe a refund to the federal 

program as a result of a withdrawal from a course. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for information prior to ,^ 

withdrawing from a course. ^ 

Funding for remedial coursework is limited to 30 credits of assistance by federal financial aid programs. ^ 

Reinstatement J 

If a student is denied/suspended from financial aid assistance, the student must attend a semester without financial aid and earn a w 

minimum of six (6) credits with a semester GPA of 2.0 or above. Students will be required to file an appeal after the term without aid ^ 

is completed for reinstatement of eligibility. ^ 

Review of Continued Eligibility ^ 

Satisfactory progress is reviewed at the end of the student's academic year. Notification will be sent to students at the end of the ^ 

Spring or Summer semester of termination of aid eligibility. " 

Appeal « 

Students may request an appeal by the Financial Aid Office if financial aid funding has been terminated. The student must file a — 

petition form with the Office of Financial Aid. On that form the student must state the circumstances that prevented satisfactory '• 

progress to occur and provide documentation of the circumstances. Once the review has been made the student will be notified of the ^ 

result of the review. ^ 

Class Attendance 

Financial aid recipients must attend all classes they are registered for to receive a financial aid award. Failure to demonstrate ^ 

attendance in classes will result in a reduction or cancellation of financial aid fijnds. ^ 

Transfer Student Evaluation ^ 

Transfer students applying for financial aid must have at least a 2.0 grade point average after transfer credits are evaluated to be ^ 

eligible to receive financial aid funding. To qualify for aid in subsequent terms students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. . 

All transfer credits will be included as attempted credit hours for standards of academic progress regardless of whether the courses are Hr 

applicable toward the student's degree. ■ — 

Prior Baccalaureate Degree v 

Students who have completed a baccalaureate or professional degree from an institution, regardless of whether the institution is an - — 

unaccredited or foreign school, are not eligible for Pell. FSAG or FSEOG funds. Whether the degree is accepted or recognized by *- 

Edison State College does not change the student's eligibility status. ^ 

Student Fees * 

Student fees are payable by the date shown on the schedule receipt. Financial aid recipients may have their fees covered by approved - 

financial aid ftmds. The student's financial aid award process must be finalized to have mition covered by this process. Financial aid * 

recipients that receive fijnds that exceed the charges to their student account will receive a refiind. The Finance Office will notify ^, 

students of the refund options through debit or check. , 

* -J 

28 ^— 



Repayment of Title IV Funds 

Recipients of federal financial aid funds that withdraw from classes prior to completion of 60 percent of the tcmi will be required to 
repay a portion of funds received as defined by the federal regulations. The Financial Aid Office distributes specific information with 
financial aid awards. 

Procedure for Cancellation or Withdrawal of Classes for Financial Aid Recipients 

Students who withdraw or have a class cancelled after the regular registration period (see College Calendar for the last date to drop a 
class with a refund) should consult the Financial Aid Office as they may incur a financial liability. Students who receive an 
administrative refund for classes will have their financial aid adjusted or cancelled and will be required to pay all funds received that 
are determined to be owed back to the federal, state, or private donor that provided the funds. All students who withdraw or drop 
classes are required to do so as directed by the Office of the Registrar. Students are not automatically withdrawn from classes. 
Students wishing to change their course registration by adding or dropping a course must follow registration procedures. Financial aid 
recipients are responsible for completing the change in registration for payment to be made by a financial aid program. 

V^eterans Education Benefits 

The Financial Aid Office. Lee County Campus, serves as the Veterans Affairs Office for Edison State College. Veterans or dependents 
of a veteran who are eligible for educational benefits should: 

1. Contact the Veterans Specialist well in advance of enrollment to process eligibility forms. 

2. Apply for admission as a degree seeking student. 

3. Submit the Certification of Eligibility or a copy of a DD-214 (separation paper) to the Veterans Specialist for certification of 
enrollment. Submit additional forms if requested for certification to the Veterans Specialist. 

4. Contact the Veterans Specialist when registering for classes each semester, changing a course schedule or degree program or 
making a change of address. 

5. Contact the Veterans Affairs Office with a schedule receipt as soon as possible before the beginning of each term to avoid a 
delay in receiving benefits. 

National Guard Fee Exemption 

Recommended National Guard enlistees may be eligible to receive a fee exemption for a percentage of their tuition costs. Contact the 
National Guard Education Officer. Eligibility for the exemption must be processed by the Veterans Specialist, Financial Aid Office, 
Lee County Campus. 

Veterans Dependents 

Wives, widows, or dependents of deceased or 100 percent disabled veterans should contact the Veterans Affairs Office for the 
appropriate forms. 

Veteran Transfer Students 

A transfer student must have a transcript(s) from the previous college(s) forwarded to Edison State College before transferring. The 
Veterans Administration (VA) must be notified of any credits accepted by the College. The student's certification for benefits will not 
be processed by the VA office until the transcript(s) is received and evaluated by Edison State. Failure to have the certification 
finalized will delay the veteran's benefit check. 

Approved VA Programs 

The student must be working toward an approved degree in order to receive VA benefits. Students should contact the College 
Counseling or Advising Centers to ensure that the classes they plan to take are required for the degree selected. This will avoid the 
possibility of overpayment for classes not required for the degree. A student will not be paid for a course repeated to earn a higher 
grade, unless the student received an "F" in the course, or a "D" when a "C" is required. 

Deferment of Tuition 

Veterans and other eligible students may receive one deferment each academic year if there is a break (failure to return in a subsequent 
semester) in the VA benefits. Veteran deferments are processed by the Veterans Specialist on the Lee County Campus. 

Change of Status and Attendance 

Veterans who withdraw, drop or add a class should notify the Veterans Affairs Office immediately. Such a change could result in an 
incorrect payment from the VA. Withdrawals and grades of "W" are retroactive to the beginning of the term, and the VA does not pay 
for courses in which the student receives a grade of "W." 

Standards of Progress for Veteran Educational Benefit Recipients 

Veterans must maintain a "C" (2.0) grade point average to remain in good standing. If the veteran does not have a 2.0 after attempting 
12 credit hours, the student will be placed on academic warning. After attempting 24 credit hours, if the veteran still has less than a 2.0 
GPA, the veteran's benefits will be terminated by the VA. 



29 



STUDENT RECORDS 



Edison State College respects each student's right to privacy and releases, provides access to, and maintains a student's record in 
accordance with all applicable state and federal regulations. 

Custodians of Student Records 

Edison State College has designated the Registrar as the official custodian of general student records. The Director of Financial Aid 
has been designated as the official custodian of student financial aid records. The information contained in a student's record becomes 
the property of Edison State and is not released without the written permission of the student. 

Policies Governing Student Records 

Directory Information 

Under the terms of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Edison State has established the following as directory 
information: 

1. Student's name. 

2. Student's local address and telephone number. 

3. Student's permanent address and telephone number. 

4. Current term hours enrolled. 

5. Major. 

6. Date(s) of enrollment. 

7. Degree(s) and honors earned and dates. 

8. Participation in officially recognized activities or sports. 

9. Date of birth. 

10. Previous colleges attended. 

11. Student e-mail address. 

Although the above directory information may be available for release to the general public, Edison State does not routinely release 
such information to third parties. Under FERPA. students have the right to inform Edison State that any or all of the student's 
directory information is not to be released. Edison State honors the student's request to restrict the release of "Directory Information" 
as stated previously. To withhold information, a student must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing prior to the end of the 
add/drop period each semester. Status of disclosure at the last registration period is binding and all records are noted: "Restricted 
Information, FERPA. No information is to be released without the written consent of the student." 

Edison State College has designated the National Student Clearinghouse and Higher One Inc. as agents of the college, authorized to 
release student information in the performance of their contracted duties. 

Notification of Access and Review of Student Records (Public Law 93-380 Buckley 
Amendment) 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These 
rights are: 

1. The right to inspect and review their education record within 45 days of Edison State receiving a request for access. The 
student should submit to the District Registrar or other appropriate Edison State official a written request that identifies the 
record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The Edison State official arranges for access and notifies the student of the time and 
place where the student may inspect the records. In the case where a request is presented to an Edison State official who 
does not maintain the requested records, the Edison State official advises the student of the correct official to whom the 
request should be addressed. 

2. The right to request the amendment of their education records if the student believes the record is inaccurate or misleading. 
The student should submit to the Registrar or other appropriate Edison State official a written request clearly identifying the 
part of the record the student wants changed, and specifying why it is inaccurate or misleading. The Edison State official 
notifies the student if it is decided not to amend the record as requested by the student. The Edison State official advises the 
student of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment and provides additional information regarding the 
hearing procedures to the snjdent. 

3. The right to request the non-disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in their education record, except to 
the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Students should contact the Office of the Registrar for more 
information. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is the disclosure to school officials with legitimate 
educational interests. A school official is a person employed by Edison State in an administrative, supervisory, academic, 
research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel), a person or company with whom Edison State 
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent), a person serving on the District Board of Trustees, or a 
student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official 
in performing their duties. A school official has legitimate educational interests if the official needs to review an education 
record to fiilfill their professional responsibility. Upon request, Edison State discloses education records without consent to 
officials of school(s) to which the student seeks or intends to enroll. 

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Edison State to comply 
with the requirements of FERPA. 

30 



Notification of Social Security Number Collection and Usage 

In compliance with Florida Statute 1 19.071(5), Edison State College collects and uses student social security numbers (SSNs) only for 
the following purposes in performance of the College's duties and responsibilities. To protect student identity, Edison State College 
will protect all social security numbers from unauthorized access, never release social security numbers to unauthorized parties, and 
assign each student/employee a unique identification number (Banner ID#). This unique ID number is used for all associated 
employment and educational purposes at Edison State. 

1 . Office of the Refjistrar 

Federal legislation relating to the Hope Tax Credit requires all postsecondary institutions to report student SSNs to the Internal 
Revenue Service. This IRS requirement makes it necessary for colleges to collect the SSN of every student. A student may 
rcflise to disclose his or her SSN to the College, but the IRS is then authorized to fine the student in the amount of S50.00. 
In addition to the federal reporting requirements, the public school system in Florida uses SSNs as a student identifier (Florida 
Statutes 1008.386). In a seamless K-20 system, it is beneficial for postsecondary institutions to have access to the same 
information for purposes of tracking and assisting students in the smooth transition from one education level to the next. All 
SSNs are protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and are never released to unauthorized 
parties. 

2. Financial Aid Office 

The Office of Financial Aid requires students to submit their social security numbers on various forms in order to correctly 
identify applicants, match each applicant's financial aid record with the student record, and help coordinate state aid programs 
with federal and institutional aid programs. 

3. Human Resources Office/Payroll Office 

The SSN is used for legitimate employment business purposes in compliance with: 

a. The Application and Employment Packet: completing and processing the Federal 1-9 (Department of Homeland 
Security) 

b. Completing and processing payroll documents: Federal W4. W2 and W9 for 1099 reporting (Internal Revenue 
Service); Federal social security taxes (FICA); processing and distributing Federal W2 (Internal Revenue Service); 
direct deposit files 

c. Completing and processing quarterly unemployment reports (FL Dept of Revenue) 

d. Completing and processing Florida Retirement Contribution reports (FL Dept of Revenue) 

e. Workers Comp Claims (FCCRMC and Department of Labor) 

f Completing and processing federal and state employee and educational reports 

g. Completing and processing 401a, 403b and 457b contribution reports 

h. Completing and processing group health, life and dental coverage enrollment 

i. Completing and processing various supplemental insurance deduction reports 

j. Providing your Social Security number is a condition of employment at Edison State College. 

4. Library 

Student, faculty, and staff social security numbers may be used in the libraries' patron database for online login authentication, 
patron verification and the elimination of duplicate records. 

5. Upward Bound Program 

The Upward Bound Program is a youth outreach (intervention) project funded by a discretionary grant from the U.S. 
Departments of Education. As such, each project is required to exclusively serve eligible participants that are citizens or 
nationals of the United States; or, are permanent residents of the United States. In order to verify a participant's project 
eligibility, social security numbers are required and also later used when submitting information for the annual performance 
reports due to the U.S. Departments of Education. 

Enrollment Verifications 

Students needing official verification of their enrollment should submit a completed Enrollment Verification Request to the Office of 
the Registrar at least one week before the verification is needed. Enrollment Verification Requests should include the specific 
information needed, including actual dates of attendance, fiill-time/part-time status, residency status, etc. Enrollment Verification 
requests are only processed for the current or previous semesters. Future semester enrollment verifications are only processed after the 
last day to drop with a refund for that semester. Enrollment Verification requests are not processed for any student or alumnus with an 
obligation to Edison State such as unpaid fees, overdue loans, library books, audiovisual equipment, or whose admission records are 
not complete. Students are encouraged to contact National Clearinghouse at (703) 742-4200 for official enrollment verifications. 

Final Grade Reports 

Final grades are available to students after the end of each semester through Edison State's student online services 
(http;//www.edison.edu). or through the FACTS Web site ( www.FACTS.org). Edison State does not mail final grade reports. 

Grade Corrections 

A request for a grade correction must be made during the semester immediately following the semester in which the incorrect grade 
was assigned. The instructor who taught the class and the appropriate academic dean must approve the grade correction. No grade will 
be changed after a degree is awarded. 



31 



Academic Second Chance 

The Academic Second Chance policy allows students to request that transfer or Edison State coursework that is five calendar years or 
older be excluded from GPA calculations and determining graduation eligibility. To be eligible, students must complete all admissions 
requirements and be admitted to a degree or certificate program. Academic Second Chance is a one-time non-reversible opportunity. 
The student must submit a completed Academic Second Chance petition to the Office of the Registrar on the Lee Campus, or to the 
Campus Dean at Charlotte, Collier and Hendry/Glades. The student must complete a minimum of twelve semester hours while 
maintaining a GPA of 2.00 or higher for the petition to be considered. ESL/ENS/EAP and college preparatory courses are not included 
when calculating the twelve semester hour minimum and the 2.0 GPA. 

The following statement is added to the student's transcript when the petition is approved: "Academic Second Chance policy has been 
applied." All grades and courses remain on the transcript. 

The Academic Second Chance policy is applied only once and it cannot be reversed. Students planning to transfer to another college 
or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned when computing a GPA for admissions eligibility or 
for other purposes. Academic Second Chance has no effect on the student's financial aid award history. Academic Second Chance has 
no effect on the calculation of course attempts related to the multiple course attempts surcharge. 

Petitions 

The Petitions process is designed to review, based on a student's written request, Edison State College policies or procedures related 
to: 

1 . Admissions eligibility to the College; 

2. Admissions eligibility to an Edison State College Baccalaureate Program; Substitution/waiver of a course required for a 
degree or certificate program; 

3. Readmission from academic suspension or dismissal; 

4. Exception to the Maximum Attempts Policy; 

5. Exception to the Third Attempt Surcharge; or 

6. Exception to registration polices or deadlines. 

Students begin the process by completing an official petition form available in the Office of the Registrar, Office of Counseling and 
Advising, or the Campus Dean's Office. Completed petitions must be submitted to the same office by the end of the semester 
immediately following the semester in which the event occurred. Petitions that are more than one academic year old are not 
considered. 

Many petitions, especially those regarding admissions processes are handled directly in the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the 
Registrar makes a determination based on the information collected by his/her office or provided by the student, and may request a 
meeting with the student for further information or clarification. If necessary, additional college administrators responsible for the area 
of the petition may be involved in the decision. The Office of the Registrar will inform the student of the decision by e-mail. Petitions 
without third party supporting documentation will not be considered. 

Appeal of an Academic Petition 

A student has a right to appeal a decision made on an academic petition. A student wishing to appeal a decision must complete an 
appeal form, and return it to the Office of the Registrar or the campus dean or President's Office. The appeal is forwarded to the 
appropriate campus or academic dean or the Campus President's Office, if the appropriate campus or academic dean or the Campus 
President had not previously reviewed the petition. The appeal is forwarded to the Office of the Vice President of Academic and 
Student Affairs if the appropriate campus or academic dean or the Campus President made the original decision. A copy of the original 
petition is automatically part of the subsequent appeal. An appeal is not simply a review of the original petition decision but a request 
to reverse the original decision. The student must supply new, relevant, previously undisclosed information, or present an argument as 
to why the original petition decision should be reversed. For an appeal to be successful, new information must be critical to the case, 
and new consideration or arguments should prove the student's case conclusively. The reviewing office may request a meeting or 
additional information for clarification. The Vice President of Academic and Smdent Affairs has responsibility for making the final 
academic decision for Edison State College. Appeal forms are available in the Office of the Registrar or campus dean's office. 

Release of Student Information 

Edison State College may, without the written consent of the student, release information from the student's education record to a 
court of competent jurisdiction in compliance with a court order of that court or to the attorney of record pursuant to a lawfiilly issued 
subpoena, provided that in advance of compliance with the court order or subpoena Edison State notified the student. A student who 
objects to the release of their records must file a motion to invalidate the court order or subpoena, and provide Edison State with 
copies of the relevant legal documents. All releases of student information are made in compliance with state and federal regulations. 

Student Holds 

Holds are placed on a student's account, records, transcript, grades, diploma, or registration if the student does not fulfill all financial 
or other obligations to the College. Satisfaction of the obligation is required prior to the release of the hold by the appropriate College 
office. 



32 



Transcripts 

Students needing an official Edison State College transcript should submit a completed Transcript Request Fonn to the Office of the 
Registrar at least one week before the official transcript is needed. Official transcripts may also be requested via Edison State's student 
online services ( vvww.edison.edu). Transcript requests are not processed for any student or alumnus with an obligation to Edison State 
College such as unpaid fees, overdue loans, library books, audiovisual equipment, or whose admission records are not complete. The 
completed transcript request should contain the student's name (at the time they attended Edison State), student identification number, 
date of birth, the name and address of where the transcript is to be sent, and the student's signature. There is a S5 charge for an official 
transcript. Unofficial transcripts may be obtained via Edison State's student online services ( www.edison.edu). 



33 



TRANSFER OF CREDITS 



Edison State College has a number of articulation agreements that ensure the transfer of credit from other schools, colleges, and 
universities into Edison State degree programs, and from Edison State degree programs into programs at other colleges and 
universities. The Florida Department of Education also has agreements that ensure transfer of credit across state colleges and 
universities. These agreements are summarized below. 



High School and Technical Centers 



In accordance with the Florida Department of Education, Edison State College provides articulation opportunities to high school and 

technical center graduates from Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Hendry and Glades District Schools. Edison State College and these districts 

are partners in the Tech Prep program, which offers students the opportunity to focus on technical high school electives that will help 

train them for highskill, high-wage occupations. While high school or technical center students are preparing for careers and 

postsecondary education, they can earn college credit that may be applied toward an Associate in Science degree at Edison State 

College. 

Articulated credit may be awarded to the eligible student who meets the following criteria: 

1. The student must have completed an approved technical program of study (at least 3 high school courses or an earned 
technical center certificate); 

2. The student must be currently enrolled and seeking an associate degree in a correlating discipline at Edison State College. 
The student must successfully meet all requirements that apply to associate degree seeking students as stated in the Edison 
State College Catalog; 

3. The student must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credit hours at Edison State College. 

In addition, the State of Florida has approved statewide articulation agreements for transfer to an Associate of Science degree for 
students who complete an approved technical program of study and earn a technical center certificate. Please note: the State of Florida 
is continuing to develop agreements. The following table outlines approved transfers: 
Please see Degree Acceleration Programs for high school articulation. 



c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c: 
c: 
(^ 



w 

w 

c 

r- 



Florida Technical Center/PSAV to Associate of Science Degree 





Approved Statewide Articulation Agreements 


Florida Technical Associate of Science College Credits ..^„.„^ »? i-j *j */i u • ,^ »-,— . 
^ . mc^ixm n -rrj m^mm^ Validation Mechanisni(s) J^M 
Center/PSAV Program Degree Transferred .HHB JMH 


D ■ r- . Computer 
;Busmess Computer n j 
' Programmmg and 
Programming ^^^^^^^ 


15 


Banked pending completion of 9 credits in program 
core/electives 


1- ■" — 1 

Law Enforcement Officer Criminal Justice 


1 5 State Exam 


Correctional Officer jCriminal Justice 12 State Exam 


:CDAE (Early Childhood) 


Early Childhood , 12 :CDAE 


(■■ 

1 Practical Nursing 


Registered Nursing 10 


LPN Licensure 


Fire Fighter Fire Science 3 


State Exam 



Architectural Drafting 


1 

i Drafting and Design 


12 


: Enroll within 3 years. Complete 3 credits with a "C" 
i or better. 


'Mechanical Drawing 


Drafl:ing and Design 


12 


J Enroll within 3 years. Complete 3 credits with a "C" 
: or better. 



Structural Drafting 


Drafting and Design 


Enroll within 3 years. Complete 3 credits with a "C" 
12 i or better. 


Web Programming 

i 


Computer 
Programming and 

Analysis 


1 
Banked pending completion of 9 credits in program 

. ^ core/electives 


;„, , _ Internet Services 
iWeb Programming „ , , 

• " '^ Technology 


j Banked pending completion of 9 credits in program 
9 ! core/electives 


r- 

Web Design 


Internet Services 
Technology 


Banked pending completion of 9 credits in program 
9 core/electives 


Administrative Assistant, 
Medical Administrative 
i Specialist, Legal 
Administrative Specialist 


Office Administration 


18-21 


Industry Certification/Portfolio 


Network Systems 
Administration 


Network Services 

Technology 


9 


Certificate in Network Systems Administration. 

Complete one NSA course with "C" or better 



34 



ivi ^ 1 c _ c iNctwork Services 
1 Network Support Services _, , . ^ 

i 


Certificate in Network Support Services. Complete 
9 one networking course with "C" or better 


i i 12 for CISCO Certificate in Network Support Services. Complete 
1 . 'Network Services Networking one networking course with "C" or better. Provides 
Network Support Services Technology ' Academy (4 courses evidence of the coursework and the College includes 
i j 1 in CCNA track) | this coursework in their program 


„,. , ^ , Network Services 
Wireless Telecommunications „ , , 

Technology 

J 


Certificate in Wireless Telecommunications 
Technology Complete one networking course with 
9 "C" or better 


„^ ^ ^ . Network Services 
PC Support Services ~ , , 

'^' Technology 


j Certificate in PC Support Ser\'ices. Complete one ^ 
6 jnctworking course 



Service Member's Opportunity College 

The American Association of Community Colleges has designated Edison State College as a Service member's Opportunity College 

(SOC). Aside from stated and traditional means of obtaining credit toward degree or certificate programs, the following special 

policies, procedures, and services are available to active-duty service members, the National Guard, reserves, new recruits and 

veterans. 

Credit may be earned through the College Level Examination Program (Please see CLEP in the Degree Acceleration Programs section 

for more information). 

Credit may be earned through relevant, validated military service training, including military service schools and United States Armed 

Forces Institute (USAFI) courses. The recommendations found in the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to the Evaluation 

of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services serve as the basis for accepting such training and awarding college credit. 

Recommendations in the ACE Guide are advisory in nature and credit awarded is at the discretion of Edison State College. 

After enrolling at Edison State, a student may initiate the request for such credit by providing appropriate documentation as 

determined by Edison State College. (Please see Credit from Military Service Schools below for more information) 

Credit From Military Service Schools 

Edison State may award college credit for military service school training in accordance with the following conditions and 
stipulations; 

1 . The person making the request must be applying or currently enrolled as a degree seeking student. 

2. The person making the request must submit the following documents to the Office of the Registrar at the time the request is 
made: 

a. Armed Forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge. 

b. Course Completion Certificate for each service school/course for which credit is being requested. 

c. DD214 Form or DD295 (if applicant is currently enlisted). 

3. In addition to the documents required in (2) above, the student requesting acceptance of credit from U.S. Army Military 
Occupational Specialty (MOS) schools/courses must provide the following documents; 

a. Course Completion Certificates from each MOS producing school/course completed. 

b. USAEEC Form 10 (for enlisted personnel from October 1975 though December 1976). 

c. The Officer Qualifications Record (DA Form 66) for Warrant Officers. 

4. In addition to the documents required in (2) above, the student requesting acceptance of credit from U.S. Navy general rates 
and ratings schools/courses, must provide the following document; 

a. Navy Occupational/Training and Awards History (NAVPERS 1070/604). 

5. Credit may be granted under this rule in those areas appropriate to the lower-division baccalaureate level. The credits may be 
included in the student's degree program as long as the credits fulfill published degree requirements. 

Credit Based on ACE Recommendations 

The American Council on Education (ACE) Corporate Programs recommends academic credit for college-level examinations and 
training courses offered by business and industry, labor unions, associations, and government agencies. Edison State College 
recognizes the recommendations of ACE as shown on the following pages. In order to receive credit, the Edison State College Office 
of the Registrar must receive official documentation of successfiil completion of the training, or examination scores, either from an 
ACE transcript or score report, or from the sponsoring organization. Documentation must be sent from ACE or the sponsoring 
organization directly to Edison State College Office of the Registrar. P.O. Box 60210. Fort Myers. FL 33906. Credit will not be 
awarded if it duplicates credit already posted to a student's transcript. 

ACE program evaluations are published in the National Guide to Education Credit for Training Programs and the Guide to 
Educational Credit by Examination, which are distributed annually to college registrars and admissions officers throughout the United 
States. Academic divisions within the College may make a determination, on a case-by-case basis, of credit awards for training 
programs or examinations not listed below, but contained in one of the ACE publications. If a determination is made to grant a credit 
award, the Academic Dean will notify the Office of the Registrar accordingly. 



35 















^ 














^ 




Recognized Examinations 








w 




(must achieve passing score) 




















^ 


Title of Examination 


Sponsoring 
Organization 


Effective 
Dates 


Passing 
Score 


Edison State 
College Course 
Equivalent 


Number of 

Credits 

Awarded 


^ 
G 


Certified Professional Secretary Part I: Finance 


International 


November 


Pass 


BUL2241 


3 


^ 


and Business Law 


Association of 


1994 to 




Business Law I 






Administrative 


Present 




ECO 2013 


3 






Professionals 






Economics I 












ACG 1001 


3 










Financial 




^ 










Accounting I 




c 


Certified Professional Secretary Part II: Office 


International 


November 


Pass 


CGS 1000 


3 


r 


Systems and Administration 


Association of 


1994 to 




Computer Literacy 




r 




Administrative 


Present 




CGS 1100 


3 




Professionals 






Microcomputer 
Skills 

SLS 1331 Personal 
Business Skills 


3 


1^ 


Certified Professional Secretary Part III: 


International 


November 


Pass 


MAN 2021 


3 




Management 


Association of 


1994 to 




Management 




^ 




Administrative 


Present 




Principles 




1^ 




Professionals 






MAN 2241 


3 










Organizational 




^ 










Behavior 




r 










MNA 2300 


3 










Personnel 




^ 










Administration 




r- 


Associate Technology Specialist Certification: 


The Chauncey Group 


November 


Pass 


CIS 2321 Data 


3 




Database Development and Database 


International 


2000 to 




Systems and 






Administration Cluster 




Present 




Management 




Associate Technology Specialist Certification: 


The Chauncey Group 


November 


Pass 


CD A 2500 


3 




Network Design and Network Administration 


International 


2000 to 




Networking II 






Cluster 




Present 








z, 


Associate Technology Specialist Certification: 


The Chauncey Group 


November 


Pass 


COP 1000 


3 


>» 


Programming/Software Engineering 


International 


2000 to 




Introduction to 




■^ 


Development and Implementation Cluster 




Present 




Computer 
Programming with 
Visual Basic 




>» 


Associate Technology Specialist Certificafion: 


The Chauncey Group 


November 


Pass 


CGS 2260 - 


3 


^ 


Technical Support Administration/Maintenance 


International 


2000 to 




Computer 




■ — 


and Installations/Upgrades Cluster 




Present 




Hardware and 
Software 




^ 
« 

^ 










Maintenance 




Associate Technology Specialist Certification: 


The Chauncey Group 


November 


Pass 


COP 1822- 


3 


« 


Web Development and Administration Cluster 


International 


2000 to 
Present 




Intemet 
Programming 




« 



36 



Associate Computing Professional and 
Certified Computing Professional, Core 
Examination 



Institute for 
Certification of 
Computer 
Professionals 



May-90 to 
December 
2001 



70% CGS 1000 

Computer Literacy 

GEB 1011 
Introduction to 
Business 

CIS 2321 Data 
Systems and 
Management 

MAN 2021 

Management 

Principles 



Associate Computing Professional and 
Certified Computing Professional, Micro 
computing and Networks Exam 



Institute for 
Certification of 
Computer 
Professionals 



January 1994 
to December 
2001 



TO'J'o 



CGS 2541 
Advanced 
Database 
Computing 

CGS 1100 

Microcomputer 

Applications 

CNT 1000 

Networking 

Essentials 



Associate Computing Professional and Institute for May 1990 to 

Certified Computing Professional, Procedural Certification of December 

Programming Exam Computer 2001 

Professionals 



70% COP 1000 

Introduction to 
Computer 
Programming with 
Visual Basic 



Associate Computing Professional and Institute for January 1994 

Certified Computing Professional, Languages Certification of to December 

Exam - C-H- Computer 2001 

Professionals 



70% COP 1224 

Programming with 

C++ 



Transfer Information and Policies 

Transfer Classification 

Applicants who plan to earn a degree or certificate at Edison State College must provide official transcripts from all previously 
attended colleges or universities. Official transcripts must be sent directly to Edison State College, Office of the Registrar. Lee 
Campus, within the first semester of enrolling. These documents must be sent directly from the educational institution to Edison State. 
Hand-delivered or faxed transcripts are not considered official. 

Acceptance of Transfer Credits from Regionally Accredited Institutions 

All credits earned at other colleges or universities accredited by one of the six regional accrediting bodies will be recorded as transfer 
credit and placed on the student's permanent record (transcript). For students pursuing a baccalaureate degree, all earned credits will 
be recorded at the appropriate level, i.e. freshman, sophomore, junior or senior level. 

Acceptance of Transfer Credits from Non-Regionally Accredited Institutions 

Acceptance of credits from non-regionally accredited institutions of higher education will be based upon evaluation and 
recommendation from the Edison State College instructional department responsible for the course subject arca(s). Credits awarded at 
institutions not regionally accredited may be accepted by Edison State College and placed on the transcript if the credits represent 
collegiate level coursevvork relevant to the program of study and course credit and level of instruction resulting in student 
competencies that are at least equivalent to those of students enrolled in comparable instruction at Edison State. The following factors 
will be considered in determining whether courses are transferable and if so, how they will be recorded. 

1. Breadth, depth and rigor of course content as evidenced by course syllabi, prerequisites, placement test scores, exit 
requirements, student portfolios, textbooks, writing or oral communication requirements, grading standards, catalog 
descriptions, etc.; 

2. Qualifications of the faculty member(s) providing the instruction; 

3. Age of credits; 



37 



4. Recommendations through other established credit assessment bodies (e.g. ACE); 

5. Institutional accreditation via other professional assessment/accrediting bodies (e.g. AMA, NLN, state agency); 

6. Secondary documentation of course competencies (e.g. professional certification, standardized exam scores, etc.). 

Recording Transfer Credits on the Student's Permanent Record (Transcript) 

While evaluating credits, Edison State College reserves the right to delay the recording of transfer credits on the student's permanent 
record. Final award or posting of credits to the student's permanent record may be contingent upon successfijl completion of one or 
more of the following requirements: 

1 . Edison State College residency requirement; 

2. Successful completion of higher-level courses in the student's program of study; 

3. Successful completion of subsequent courses in the subject/course sequence; 

4. Demonstration of specific lab/clinical skills or other applied competencies; 

5. Additional supplemental independent/directed study in the subject area; 

6. Presentation of a portfolio of coursework substantiating the competencies; 

7. Verification of faculty credentials at the transferring institution. 

Once accepted, transfer credits will be recorded on the student's permanent record as externally awarded and will indicate the original 
institution awarding the credit. Where appropriate, an equivalent Edison State College course number may also be indicated. When 
Edison State College does not offer an equivalent course or if the course differs substantively from the suggested Edison State College 
course, the transfer credits may be listed on the transcript as an elective course. 

Application of Transfer Credits to the Baccalaureate Degree Programs 

In order to maintain both flexibility and subject area integrity, as well as to recognize the structure of the Baccalaureate programs, the 
following guidelines apply to the use of upper division elective credit for program completion requirements. 

a. Upper division courses previously taken from related academic areas, which are not identified as equivalent courses through 
transfer evaluation, may be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs in 
collaboration with program faculty. Students may present courses for review by following the process outlined below: 

b. Submit to the District Registrar, in writing, a request for course review (attach the Edison State Course Outline for the 
course in question. A separate form must be submitted for each course), 

c. Attach all relevant documentation (transfer course syllabi, assignments, exams, course outlines). If needed, a student may be 
asked to participate in a meeting with the evaluator. Once a decision has been made, a letter will be sent to the student from 
the District Registrar's office acknowledging the action taken. 

Please note that equivalencies may be determined by combining multiple documentation sources. As a result, the Associate Dean may 
determine that credit will be awarded after completion of specific Edison State College upper division coursework or through a 
combination of transfer courses where grades are consistent with the Baccalaureate program graduation requirement. 

1 . Failure to report previous college level work attempted constitutes a falsification of the admissions application and subjects 
students to loss of all credits earned and dismissal. 

2. Applicants eligible to return to the previously attended institutions of origin are admitted to Edison State. Final acceptance is 
made after receipt and evaluation of official transcripts. 

3. Applicants who were suspended or dismissed from the previously attended institution(s) may be provisionally admitted to 
Edison State. These applicants must submit a petition requesting admission. (Please see Petitions, in the Financial Aid 
section, for more information.) 

4. Applicants admitted to Edison State, who were not in good academic standing at the previously attended institutions, are 
classified in the same or similar manner under Edison State's Standards of Academic Progress. 

5. Credits and grades earned at the previously attended institution(s) transfer in but may not be accepted for a specific program. 
All grades earned at previously attended institutions transfer in to Edison State as part of the student's academic record. 
Grades of "S" and "P" will be accepted and credit will be awarded but will not be calculated in the student's transfer GPA. 

6. Applicants may be exempt from placement testing based on an unofficial review of the student's college transcripts. 
Completion of specific coursework will be assessed for an exemption from all three parts of the placement test. (Please see 
Assessment Services, in the Student Services section, for more information.) 

7. Applicants who have completed an AA or a baccalaureate degree at another regionally accredited college or university 
cannot enroll in an AA degree program at Edison State. 

a. In-State AA students with a previously earned Associate in Arts degree from a Florida community college or State 
University are considered to have met the general education requirements of an Edison State College degree. 

b. Out of State AA students with a previously earned Associate in Arts degree from a college or university outside 
the State of Florida will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis to match the 36 hours general education core 
requirements. Students must have earned equivalent credit hours in each general education category (i.e. 6 hours of 
humanities, 9 hours of social behavioral science). Students with a minimum of 36 hours of general education core 
are considered to have met the general education requirements of Edison State College. 

8. Previously earned Baccalaureate degrees: 

a. Students who have earned a previous baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution are considered 
to have met the general education requirements of an Edison State College degree. 

b. Students who have earned a previous baccalaureate degree from an International institution, and have had the 
necessary course-by-course evaluation completed by an approved International Evaluator, will be reviewed on 
case-by-case basis for specific program admission and graduation requirements. For some programs, in the event 

38 



the student does not receive transferable credit for English Composition 1 and II, the student will need to complete 
the TOEFL for waiver from ENC 1101 and ENC 1 102. Students must score a minimum of 80 on the Internet- 
based test or a 550 on the paper-based version of the TOEFL for a waiver from the composition requirements. 

9. Students who have completed previous upper division coursework in an education program may present those courses for 
evaluation by the Discipline Chair for Education. In some cases, students may be required to submit portfolio icons or 
assignments to demonstrate competency in the required Florida Educator Accomplished practices, reading or ESOL 
standards. The student is urged to provide the Discipline Chair for Education with corresponding syllabi, samples of student 
work and textbook assignment information related to each upper division course. 

Edison State College reserves the right to deny common course number credit for courses in which practicum or internship 
components reside. 

1 0. Transfer Evaluation 

a. Upon review of evaluated transfer credit, the District Dean/Campus Dean/Associate Dean/Program Coordinator or 
Director may submit a Cluin<:e (^J Transfer CrcJil Form to the Registrar's Office. The use of this form is to change 
the transfer designation when an equivalency has been determined. 

1 1 . Transfer students MUST complete a minimum of 25"o (30 credit hours) of course work at Edison State to graduate from 
Edison State with the bachelor's degree. English for Non-Native Speakers (ESL/ENS, EAP), below the 1600 level and 
college preparatory courses do not apply. Thirty (30) upper division program hours (courses at the 3000 level or above) must 
be completed through Edison State College. 

State University System Articulation Agreement 

Florida law provides that Associate in Arts degree graduates of a Florida community college must be granted admission to an upper- 
division program offered by a state university institution, unless that program has been designated limited access (see Transfer 
Guarantees below) If limited access minimum standards are not met, universities may deny both acceptance into the desired program 
and acceptance into the university. The law gives priority to community college Associate in Arts graduates over out-of-state students 
for admission to a state university. Florida community colleges have similar articulation agreements with the Independent Colleges 
and Universities of Florida (ICUF). 

Effective Fall 2000, all graduates of an Associate in Science degree program listed in the Statewide Articulation Manual shall be 
granted admission into a corresponding baccalaureate program at the state universities, except for limited-access programs and those 
requiring specific grades in particular courses for admission. The Florida Department of Education stipulates that the integrity of the 
general education program will be recognized by all public institutions of higher education in Florida. Any questions about the general 
education program should be addressed to an Academic Advising Specialist or the Coordinator of Counseling Services. 

Transfer Guarantees 

Florida community college Associate in Arts graduates are guaranteed the following rights when transferring to a state university 
under the Statewide Articulation Agreement (State Board of Education Rule 6A- 10.024): 

1. Admission to one of the state universities, except to limited-access programs which have additional admission requirements. 

2. Acceptance of at least 60 credit hours by the state universities toward the baccalaureate degree. 

3. Adherence to university requirements and policies based on the catalog in effect at the time the student first entered a 
community college, provided the student maintains continuous enrollment. 

4. Transfer of equivalent courses under the Statewide Course Numbering System. 

5. Acceptance by the state universities of credit earned in accelerated programs (e.g., CLEP, Advanced Placement. Accelerated 
Programs. International Baccalaureate). 

6. No additional general education core requirements. 

7. Advance knowledge of selection criteria for limitedaccess programs. 

8. Equal opportunity with native university students to enter limited-access programs. 

The universities determine the courses and prerequisites that must be taken to receive a baccalaureate degree. Although all credits 
earned toward an Associate in Arts degree will transfer to a university, not all credits earned will meet program prerequisites or course 
requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Therefore, students must assume responsibility for knowing the course requirements of the 
intended program and taking the appropriate course(s) while pursuing the Associate in Arts degree. 

Transfer Services 

Students who plan to transfer to an upper level college or university program are encouraged to consult with the Coordinator of 
Counseling Services or Advising Specialist concerning transfer requirements. Students should also obtain a catalog and list of the 
requirements from the institution that they expect to attend. The Florida Academic Counseling and Tracking for Students program 
(available via www.FACTS.ore ) offers a variety of student services and resources provided by the State of Florida and participating 
institutions. Students anticipating transfer should begin a preliminary application to the college of their choice in the fall session of 
their sophomore year. Students who plan to transfer to Edison State College Bachelor programs should meet with the Program 
Advisor. 



39 



Edison State University Center 



By partnering with accredited colleges and universities, the Edison State University Center offers unique opportunities for Edison 
State graduates to earn bachelor's degrees at an Edison State campus or online. Students may transfer up to 90 hours of credits taken at 
Edison State and be eligible for tuition discounts from partner institutions. Students receive assistance from the Edison State 
University Center staff, and participating colleges and universities may also have support staff on site. 

The baccalaureate program options offered are individually tailored by Edison State College and participating institutions. Program 
requirements are specific and applicable to baccalaureate degree completion at the participating institutions only, as provided in each 
agreement and do not apply to baccalaureate degree transfer to other institutions. 

Current Program Offerings 



.1 



Accounting: 

Franklin University 
Applied Management: 

Franklin University 
Applied Science and Technology: 

Thomas Edison State College 
Bachelor of Applied Science in Banking: 

St. Petersburg College 
Bachelor of Arts: 

Charter Oak State College; 

Thomas Edison State College 
Bachelor of Health Studies: 

Nova Southeastern University 
Bachelor of Science: 

Charter Oak State College 
Banking: 

St. Petersburg College 
Business Administration: 

Franklin University; 

Thomas Edison State College; 

University of Florida 
Computer Science: 

Florida State University; 

Franklin University 
Criminal Justice: 

Florida Gulf Coast University 
Digital Communication: 

Franklin University 
Elementary Education: 

Barry University 
Health Administration: 

Hodges University 
Health Care Management: 

Franklin University 
Human Resources Management: 

Franklin University 



Human Services: 

Thomas Edison State College 
Information Systems Management: 

Hodges University 
Information Technology: 

Franklin University 
Interdisciplinary Social Science: 

Florida State University 
Interdisciplinary Studies: 

Hodges University 
Legal Studies: 

Florida Gulf Coast University; 

Hodges University 
Liberal Studies: 

Barry University 
Management: 

Franklin University; 

Hodges University 
Management Information Sciences: 

Franklin University 
Marketing: 

Franklin University 
Nursing: 

Edison State College 

Florida State University 
Professional Studies: 

Barry University 
Public Safety Administration: 

Edison State College 
Secondary Education Biology: 

Edison State College 
Secondary Education Mathematics: 

Edison State College 
Supervision and Management: 

Edison State College 



4 
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For more information or to find out if new programs have been added, call the Baccalaureate and University Programs Division at 
(239) 489-9295 or (800) 749-2322, option #5, or e-mail bachelorsdegree@edison.edu. 



A- 



40 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Student Services 

Assessment Ser\ices 

FCELPT Placement Testing 

Orientation 

Academic Advising Services 

Counseling Services 

Retention/Student Success 

College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) 

Student Information and Policies 

Student Code of Conduct 

Written Concerns or Complaints 

Security Policies and Statistics 

State Statutes and College Policies Affecting Students 

Americans with Disabilities Act Policy 

Student Life 

Student Activities 

Student Participation in Decision Making 

Student Organizations 

Student Identification 



41 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Services and programs to help students perform academically to the best of their ability are available at the Charlotte, Collier and Lee 
Campuses and the Hendry/Glades Center. Services include academic advising, placement testing, orientation and retention guidance. 

Assessment Services 

Assessment testing is considered an essential part of the College program. Placement testing or exemption is required for all degree 
seeking students, specific certificate seeking students, high school students in accelerated programs and veterans. Non-degree seeking 
students planning to enroll in English, mathematics or entry-level foreign language courses must also be tested or exempted. 

FCELPT - Placement Testing 

The Florida College Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) is used to determine placement in English, mathematics and reading 
courses. Students can access a study guide with helpful resources and practice tests at 
www.edison.edu/assessment/FCELPT_Study_Guide.pdf 

• Students must complete and turn in an application for admissions to the Office of the Registrar prior to testing. Processing 
time for applications is 24 hours. 

• Students are required to take the FCELPT or submit a full set of ACT-E or SAT-R scores or college transcripts. 

• Edison State accepts scores for the SAT-R and ACT-E tests taken within the previous two years. 

• Students that previously attended another college or university may also bring in an official or unofficial transcript for 
evaluation. 

• The FCELPT is administered at all campuses and sites. Contact local campus or www.EdisonState.edu for additional 
infonnation. 

Students who do not achieve the minimum scores on FCELPT will be placed in. and required to satisfactorily complete, appropriate 
college preparatory instruction. Florida State Board of Education Administrative Rule 6A-10.03 15(20) mandates that students 
complete their remedial coursework by the time they have accumulated twelve (12) hours of college credit classes or they must 
maintain continuous enrollment in college preparatory coursework each semester until the requirements are completed while 
performing satisfactorily in the degree earning classes. A hold may be placed on student records requiring on-campus registration until 
college preparatory coursework is completed. 

Florida Statute 1007.263 mandates that every student at Edison State College who scores below college level in any area on the 
common placement test be informed of alternative remedial options. A student who selects a private provider for remedial instruction 
is entitled to enroll in college-level courses in skill areas other than those for which the student is being remediated. Once the student 
has successfijlly completed a private provider remediation program, he or she must be retested and achieve a score above the cut-off 
score in the appropriate section(s) of the common placement test. 

Entrance Test Cut-Off Scores for College Level Placement 



COURSE 


FCELPT 


ACT-E 


SAT-R 


ENC 1101 


83 - English and 


1 7 ENGLISH and 






83 - Reading 


18 -READING 


440 - Critical Reading 


MAT 1033 


72 - Math 


1 9 - MATH 


440 - MATH 


MGF 1106/MGF 1107 


90 - Math 


23 - MATH 


540 - MATH 


MAC 1 105/ STA 2023 


90 Math 


23 - MATH 


540 - MATH 


MAC 1106 


109 -Math 


25 - MATH 


560 - MATH 



Degree-seeking students who desire to enroll in a course higher than MAC 1 105 will be advised to take the College Level Math 

(CLM) portion of the Placement Test. %_. • 

College Level Math - Placement Test *- ' 

MAC 1140(70-99) MAC 2233 (80-99) MAC 231 I (100+) * 

MAC 1114(80-99) , , 

MAC 1147(80-99) _ 

%./ 
Students are referred to the Office of Counseling and Advising or SOAR (Student Opportunities for Achievement and Rewards) after 
completing testing or evaluation of ACTE/SAT-R scores and college transcripts. Students who are placed in multiple areas of college 
preparatory courses are referred to the SOAR program (see Student Information and Policies). SOAR offers workshops and individual 
support to develop student skills, time management, goal setting and test taking strategies. Testing is available by appointment. For 

more information please contact: %.jr 

Charlotte Campus at (941 ) 637-5632 Hendry/Glades Services at (863) 674-0408 ^ 

Collier Campus at (239) 732-3789 Lee Campus at (239) 489-9237 *-r 

»-# 

42 ^ 






Other testing ser\ ices provided by the Assessment Center, Lee Campus, include: 

1 . College Level Examination Program (CLEP). a nationally developed program for acquiring college credit by examination. 

2. eLeaming (distance learning) testing services are available on all campuses and at the Hendry/Glades Center. Testing 
locations, hours and procedures are posted at w\vw.edison.edu/elcaminK^testinu/php . 

Students may get more information about testing requirements by contacting the Assessment Center on each campus or at the 
Hendry/Glades Services. 

Orientation 

All degree seeking students who are attending college for the first time are required to attend an on-campus orientation. During the 
orientation, students will meet with college staff from various departments. This orientation is designed to provide useful information 
to students as they begin their journey toward successftil completion of their academic goals. Times and dates for orientation can be 
found on the Edison State College Web site at www. edison.edu/orientation . 

Academic Advising Services 

Degree seeking student will be assisted in the following: 

1 . Interpreting placement test scores 

2. Understanding degree options at Edison State: Bachelor's, Associate of Science (AS). Associate of Arts (AA), and 
certificate programs 

3. Understanding educational programs and transfer requirements for universities and colleges 

4. Developing an educational plan to accomplish the objective desired by the student 

5. Monitoring the student's progress towards educational goals. This includes 45-credit-hour graduation course check and 90- 
credit-hour course check. 

6. Completing the graduation check verification during the last semester of the degree 

7. Assisting the student in registration for graduation 

Academic advising is available by appointment or on a walk-in basis. Students are encouraged to pursue advising during non-peak 

registration times. 

Please see the Academic Policies and Procedures Relating to Students page for Standards of Academic Progress. 

Counseling Services 

The Counseling staff at the Lee County Campus are professional personnel who provide short term counseling for students who find 

their academic or vocational progress hindered by concerns of a personal, social or emotional nature. Individual and group assistance 

is available directly or by referral to responsible on-campus or off-campus resources. 

The Counseling staff is available to assist students with a variety of concerns including academic advisement, choice of major, career 

options, transfer to four-year institutions, general education requirements, catalog interpretation, withdrawal from College, and test 

interpretation. 

Retention/Student Success 

To ensure students" success at Edison State, students on academic probation and/or returning students from suspension and/or 

dismissal are closely monitored. SLS 1 107 Achieving Academic Success is required for students returning after academic suspension 

or dismissal. First time students undecided about their career goals, returning students and students in multiple college preparatory 

courses are referred to SLS 1101 College Success Skills to enhance their college survival skills. 

REA 1605 Study Skills for College Students is recommended for students needing to improve their reading speed, comprehension and 

vocabulary. 

College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) 

The state of Florida Legislature has repealed the requirement to pass the "College level communication and mathematics skills 

examination" (CLAST) in order to be awarded an Associate in Arts degree effective July 1, 2009. 

In order to demonstrate continuing concern for institutional accountability and effectiveness, as well as performance standards for 

student learning outcomes, the Legislature maintained the current CLAST exemptions as degree requirements. 

For students who graduate after July 1, 2009, the following alternatives will ftilfill the competency requirements in addition to other 

current requirements for the Associate in Arts degree: 

1 . Exemption via American college Testing Program (ACT) 

a. Math: Achieve 21 or above on the enhanced ACT in Math or on the original ACT 

b. Reading: Achieve 22 or above on the enhanced ACT in Reading or a score of 20 or above on the Composite of the 
original ACT 

c. English Language Skills and Essay: Achieve 2 1 or above on the enhanced ACT in English or a score of 20 or 
above on the original ACT. 

2. Exemption via Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT-1) 

a. Math: Achieve 500 or above on the recentered score scale, or its equivalent on the original score scale, meets 
Computation requirements 

b. Verbal: Achieve 500 or above on the recentered score scale, or its equivalent on the original score scale, meets 
Reading, English Language Skills and Essay requirements 

43 



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3. Exemption via Grade Point Average 

a. English Language Stcills: Achieve a 2.5 GPA in 2 courses for a minimum of 6 hours of credit from ENC 1101 and 
ENC 1 102 or equivalent college-level English courses 

b. Math skills: Achieve a 2.5 GPA in 2 courses for a minimum of 6 hours of credit from any of the following math 
courses 

i. MAC 1 105 and any other MAC course with the last three digits higher than 105 
ii. MGFl 106 and any other MGF course with the last three digits higher than 106 
iii. STA or equivalent statistics course 

4. Exemption via College Level Exam Program (CLEP): Achieve minimum acceptable scores as required on English or Math 
exams to be transferred in for degree credit. 

5. Exemption via waiver by committee for students with documented specific learning disabilities and other extenuating 
circumstances. 

CLAST Waiver Requests 

In keeping with State Board of Education Rule 6A- 10.031 1, the following circumstances have been identified that allow a student to 

request a waiver of the CLAST. In order to initiate the CLAST waiver process a petition must be filed with the ITA requesting such a 

waiver. After reviewing the petition, the ITA provides the paperwork to the CLAST Waiver Committee chairperson who then 

convenes a committee appointed by the District Dean of Student Services, Lee Campus, to review the student's case. This committee 

is responsible to the District Dean of Student Services and has four members: a member of the mathematics department, a member of 

the English department, the ITA. and a fourth faculty member from a department other than English or mathematics. Other nonvoting 

faculty or staff may be invited to attend and offer the benefit of their expertise as it relates to the student's inability to pass the 

subtest(s). The CLAST Waiver Committee meetings are scheduled for the last Friday in March and October. The committee will 

consider the student's proficiency in the subject area(s) and the student's educational records as well as other evidence as to whether 

the student should be able to pass the subtest(s). A waiver of the subtest(s) in question may be recommended upon a majority vote of 

the committee. When a waiver from a subtest(s) is approved the student's transcript will be noted accordingly. A state-approved code 

will be used to indicate that the student did meet the requirements of the above-mentioned state statute and that a waiver was granted. 

Once waivers are approved, notification is mailed to the student from the District Dean of Student Services' office and the ITA ^ 

submits a written report to the Department of Education. The report outlines the following: name and social security number of the "^ 

student, gender and ethnic background, type of waiver granted, and the subtest(s) for which the waiver was granted. ^ 

There are two criteria for approving waivers from the CLAST: 

1 . Any student who has a documented, specific learning disability such that he/she cannot successfully complete one or more Cr 
subtests of the CLAST may request a waiver through the ITA. 

2. Any student who has taken a subtest of the CLAST at least four times and has not been able to achieve a passing score, but 
has otherwise demonstrated proficiency in coursework in the same subject area, may request a waiver from that particular ^ 
subtest. Waivers may be considered only after the student has been provided with test adaptations or other administrative 
adjustments to permit the accurate measurement of the student's proficiency in the subject area. ^ 

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44 ^ 



STUDENT INFORMATION AND POLICIES 

Edison State College students are both citizens and members of the academic community. Upon registration, all students are entitled to 
the following freedoms and/or rights provided that their exercise does not disrupt the orderly operation of the College: 

Right to freedom of expression 

Right to peacefiil assembly 

Right to a fair and impartial hearing 

Right to appeal any administrative decision that adversely affects them 

Right to participate in Student Government 
It is expected that the exercise of any of the aforementioned rights must be in compliance with Florida law as well as the policies and 
procedures established by the College and its Board of Trustees. 

It is the responsibility of each student to become familiar with and to abide by the College policies and regulations published in its 
policy statements, current Catalog and Student Handbook, official manuals and other publications. Failure to comply with these rules 
may result in the initiation of disciplinary action. Edison State reserves the right to discipline a student for activities that take place off 
campus when those activities adversely affect the college community. Disciplinary action by the College may proceed while criminal 
proceedings are pending and will not be subjected to challenge on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have 
been dismissed or reduced. 

Student Code of Conduct 

Edison State College is committed to maintaining a civil environment that fosters learning and personal development. The 
administration, faculty, and staff of Edison State College assume that our students are adults and, as such, are responsible for their own 
behavior. All members of the College community understand that our participation in this community is voluntary. 
Generally. Edison State College's jurisdiction over student conduct issues is limited to conduct that occurs on college premises or that 
adversely affects the College community. However, when off-campus activities have negative impact on the College community or 
hinder the College in its pursuit of learning objectives. Edison State College will exercise its right to discipline involved students. The 
Student Service Officers and the District Dean of Student Services will consider off-campus conduct issues on a case by case basis. 
The following code of conduct contains regulations designed to maintain a vital learning environment, to keep our community safe, 
and to foster the development of citizenship skills. All members of the Edison State College community are expected to be familiar 
with the rules and regulations of the College pertaining to academic affairs, social conduct, and student activities. Each student is 
responsible for conforming to the conduct regulations contained in this catalog. 

Article I: Definition of Terms 

The College means Edison State College. 

The Student Code of Conduct may be referred to hereinafter as the Code. 

Student Conduct Administrator(s) are designated by the District Vice President for Academic and Student Services; this college 

official is authorized to impose sanction upon any student found to have violated the Code. Student Conduct Administrators may serve 

as a member of the Student Conduct Board. 

The Student Conduct Board includes all Student Conduct Administrators or their designees; the board is authorized to determine 

whether students have violated the Code and to recommend sanctions based on these determinations. 

At Edison State College, the Appellate Committee is Mediating Body of the Academic Standards Committee. 

The term student includes all persons taking courses at Edison State College (both credit and non-credit), both fiilltime and part-time. 

Students who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with Edison State are still 

considered "students." 

A. faculty member is any person hired by Edison State to conduct classroom activities. 

The term Edison State oj/icial includes any person employed by Edison State, performing assigned administrative or professional 

responsibilities. 

The Edison State community includes any person who is a student, faculty member. Edison State official, or any other person 

employed by Edison State. A person's status in a particular situation shall be determined by the District Dean of Student Services. 

The term Edison Slate premises include all land, buildings, facilities, and other property that is in the possession of or owned, used, or 

controlled by Edison State. 

The term organization means any number of persons who have completed the process required for recognition/designation as an 

official student group by the College. 

The term shall is used in the imperative sense. 

The term may is used in the permissive sense. 

Policy is defined as the written regulation of Edison State College as found in. but not limited to, the Student Code of Conduct, 

Student Handbook, and Catalog. 

Article II: Student Conduct Code Authority 

1 . The Academic Standards Committee is responsible for overseeing unsettled disciplinary concerns, hearing student appeals 
regarding code of conduct violations, and initiating changes to the code of conduct. 



45 



Student conduct administrators are appointed for each campus of Edison State College; on the Charlotte and Hendry Glades 

Campuses, the student conduct administrator is the Campus Director for Student Services; on the Collier Campus, the ^- 

student conduct administrator is the Associate Dean for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs. 

The District Dean for Student Services acts as a student conduct administrator for ail campuses and provides a central W" 

location for the maintenance of disciplinary records. 

When issues of academic integrity are in question, student conduct administrators are the Academic Deans for each campus. 



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Article III: Proscribed Conduct 

Proscribed conduct can be seen in two general categories: conduct that represents a violation of academic integrity and conduct that 

represents violations to the general student code of conduct. Any violation of the Code represents a disciplinary issue that implies a r~ 

disciplinary record that is maintained with the District Dean of Student Services. However, given that Edison State College is 

committed to educational excellence, academic misconduct warrants particular attention; therefore, this article contains a general ^ 

listing of proscribed conduct and a special section addressing violations of academic integrity. 

Any student found to have committed the following misconduct is subject to the disciplinary sanctions: W 

1 . Insubordination or Disrespect for Constituted Authority: Constituted authority is defined to mean any person designated by 
the institution to implement institutional policies. Failing to obey a College official who is performing his/her duties and 
failing to respond to an official summons from an administrative officer of the College within the time indicated constitutes ^ 
insubordination. 

2. Gambling for Money or Material Values: Games of chance for money or material value are prohibited on campus. ^ 

3. False Information: Furnishing false or misleading information (oral or written) to College offices, faculty or staff Falsifying 
the application for admission is included. 

4. Destruction of Property: This term is defined to mean destruction, damage, or misuse of College property, private property ^ 
on the campus, vandalism and/or misuse of library material, fire equipment or other life safety equipment. 

5. Illegal Use or Possession of Narcotic or Psychedelic Drugs is Strictly Prohibited: The Federal Drug Abuse Act prohibits ^ 
distribution and possession of certain drugs, including amphetamines, barbituates, hallucinogens and other prescription-type 
medications that have not been prescribed by a licensed physician. Possession and/or distribution of such drugs, when not W 
prescribed, constitutes a violation. (Chapter 893 of the Florida Statutes and the Controlled Substances Act 21 USC.81 16. 
Possession or Use of Alcoholic Beverages: Use of alcoholic beverages or having alcoholic beverages in one's possession, 
either on campus or at a College-approved fiinction, is prohibited. ^ 

6. Possession and/or Use of Firearms or Other Weapons on Campus: Use or possession of ammunition or other weapons and/or 

setting off any explosive device, fireworks, or flammable liquid or objects, is prohibited. ^ 

7. Forgery: Forging, alteration or misuse of College documents, forms or records. 

8. Stealing: The unlawful taking, destroying, defacing, damaging, or misuse of College property or the property belonging to 
others. 

9. Academic Dishonesty: Students are expected to conduct their academic affairs in a forthright and honest manner. In the 
event that students are guilty of classroom cheating, plagiarism or otherwise misrepresenting their work, they will be subject ^ 
to disciplinary sanctions. The District Dean of Student Services will maintain records conceming academic dishonesty and 

resulting sanctions. For a more detailed description of conduct that represents academic dishonesty, please see Article IV ^ 

entitled Academic Integrity 

10. Violation of Law Committed On or Off the Campus: Violation of municipal, county, state or federal law or subsequent 
conviction of same constitutes violation of College policy. The nature of the violation will determine the extent of sanction ^ 
that may be invoked by the College. 

1 1 . Hazing: Hazing is defined as: the physical or emotional abuse of another person in the College community; subjecting ^ 
another person therein to humiliating or painfi.il ordeals; or harassing someone with threats made in person, by telephone, or 
in writing. Any such hazing as further defined in 1 006.63 F.S. is also unlawfijl in the State of Florida. Such action on or off 
campus on the part of any student or group of students or student organizations shall be construed as a violation of College r~- 
rule. Any individual student or group of students found guilty of such violation will receive disciplinary probation, 

suspension, dismissal, expulsion or any combination of such penalties, depending upon the circumstances and the severity of ^ 

the individual case. A copy of Florida Statute 1006.63 will be provided to each student organization recognized by the 
College. Each student organization will incorporate the wording of this College rule on hazing into its by-laws. Hazing is not W 

allowed even with student consent. 

12. Unlawfijl Entry: The unlawfijl entry to College-owned or controlled buildings. 

13. Smoking: Smoking is permitted in designated areas only. (^^ 

14. Games: Student games such as Frisbee and touch football must be played in designated areas only and not around the 

buildings or inside the buildings. ^ 

15. Commercial Solicitation and Fund-Raising on Campus: 

a. Solicitors and tradesmen, including students, faculty and other College personnel, are prohibited from entering the W 
grounds or buildings of Edison State College for the purpose of transacting business with students, faculty, or r- 
other College personnel, unless they have been issued a permit for this purpose or the information has been signed 

by the appropriate College official. All groups who want to reserve space, sell or solicit must submit an Activity (^ 

Request Form to the appropriate Student Services staff member on the Lee Campus, or the Campus President's 
offices on the Collier and Charlotte Campuses. 

b. The posting or distribution of advertising material shall be limited to a designated bulletin board on each campus 
of the College under the same permit system and must be approved by a member of the Student Services staff or a 
designated representative. I'l^ 

16. Outside Organizations on Campus: In compliance with State Board of Education Rule 6A-I4.057, Student Activities, the 

College may permit organizations and clubs, which are funded by a combination of contributions of its members, ^ 

46 ^ 



c 



c 
c 



c 



c: 



L 






ftindraising projects and sources outside the College to exist on campus, provided the organization has a faculty advisor and 
agrees to be governed by rules of the District Board of Trustees. The College may require approved organizations and clubs 
to deposit monies accruing to such organizations and clubs with the Business Office of the College, to be accounted for as 
agency fiinds. In this case, all monies accruing to the organization shall be deposited with the College and withdrawals made 
upon requisition by the organization and advisor; provided that the expenditure is in accordance with the organization's 
approved budget. Outside organizations must follow procedures in 16, above, and receive approval prior to being on 
campus. 

17. Disruption/Disorderly Conduct: Obstructing or disrupting any College activity including teaching, research, administrative 
functions, disciplinary procedures, social activities, and public ser\ice fimctions. Engaging in any obscene, profane, reckless, 
destructive, or unlawful course of conduct. Beepers, cellular phones, and pagers should be turned off when entering a 
classroom. In an emergency, with prior authorization from the professor, a beeper, cellular phone, or pager may be turned to 
silent ring mode. In such a case, any exit from a classroom to respond to a call should be made with a minimum of 
disturbance. Only currently enrolled students are authorized to be in classrooms, except for situations involving a disability. 
Children, spouses, or other relatives are not permitted, except with pennission of a District Dean, Campus President, or the 
District Dean of Student Services. Complaints regarding classroom disruption should be reported to these offices. 

18. Harassment: Unwelcome verbal or physical abuse which causes the recipient discomfort or humiliation or which interferes 
with the recipient's academic performance or employment. Harassment related to an individual's race, color, sex. religion, 
national origin, age, marital status, or physical or mental handicap is a violation of this policy. 

19. Assault: Intentional threat by word or act to do violence to a person or persons. 

20. Batter}': Touching or striking a person against his/her will. 

21. Violation of Published Policy of the College: Any violation of policy published in the College Catalog, Student Handbook or 
approved guidelines. 

22. Lakes, Waterways: No swimming or recreational activities are allowed on campus lakes without the approval of the campus 
administrator. 

23. Pets Animals: No pets or animals are allowed on campus unless that animal is assisting a person who has a disability. 

Article IV: Academic Integrity 

Edison State College recognizes that adherence to high principles of academic integrity is vital to the academic function of the 
College. Therefore, the entire academic community shares the responsibility for establishing and maintaining standards of academic 
integrity. Those in charge of academic tasks have an obligation to make known the standards and expectations of acceptable academic 
conduct. Each smdent has an obligation to know and understand those standards and expectations. While the academic community 
recognizes that the responsibility for learning and personal conduct is an individual matter, all students and faculty members are 
expected to help maintain academic integrity at the College by refusing to participate in, or tolerate, any dishonesty. 
The general aspects of academic integrity expected of our entire academic community can be summarized in positive statements 
regarding student behavior. Edison State College expects all students to be honest in their academic endeavors. All academic work 
should be performed in a manner which will provide an honest reflection of the knowledge and abilities of each student. All members 
of the community understand the rationale for, and the critical nature of academic integrity. Therefore, any policy associated with 
academic integrity must be linked to efforts to educate students, faculty and staff regarding definitions, concepts and issues associated 
with academic integrity. 

Violations of student academic integrity include any actions which attempt to promote or enhance the academic standing of any 
student by dishonest means. The following is a listing of some, but not necessarily all. actions that are violations of academic integrity: 

1. Cheating on an academic exercise. Cheating includes giving or receiving unauthorized aid or information by copying, by 
using materials not authorized, by attempting to receive credit for work performed by another, or by otherwise failing to 
abide by academic rules. The person who aids an individual in cheating will be held equally responsible. 

2. Plagiarizing the words, ideas, or data of others by not properly acknowledging the source. Plagiarism includes failing to 
identify verbatim statements as quotations and failing to give appropriate credit and citations of sources used. The principles 
of academic integrity require that all work submitted or presented without citation of sources will be the student's own work, 
not only on tests, but in themes, papers, homework, and class presentations, unless it has been clearly specified that the work 
is a team effort. 

3. Fabricating information with intent to deceive. Fabrication includes, but is not limited to, falsifying experimental data or 
results, inventing research or laboratory data or results for work not done, knowingly presenting falsified or invented results, 
citing information not taken from the source indicated, falsely claiming sources not used, known to be false, misleading, or 
not supported by evidence. 

4. Submitting any academic accomplishment in whole or in part for credit more than once whether in the same course or in 
different courses without the prior consent of the instructor. 

5. Obtaining or attempting to obtain an examination, or any part of it, before, during, or after the examination has been given. 

6. Failing to follow approved test taking procedures by performing such acts as changing answers after exam is scored and 
communicating verbally, non-verbally or electronically with another person during an exam, or leaving while an exam is still 
in progress. 

7. Copying, editing, deleting, or intentionally damaging Edison State College computer files without permission. 

8. Altering, changing, or forging College academic records or forging the signature of any academic officer. 



47 



Article V: Student Conduct Violations and Proceedings 

A. Charges and hearings 

1. In all instances except violations of academic integrity, any member of the Edison State College community can 
submit a written charge against a student for a violation of the code of conduct. These charges will be directed to 
the Student Conduct Administrator for the campus on which the alleged violation occurred. 

2. If faculty members choose to engage the hearing process, then those faculty members must make formal charges 
against a student for violations of academic integrity; in many cases, these types of charges will be resolved within 
the confines of the course. Charges of violations of academic integrity will involve the following steps 

a. The faculty member will inform the student in private of the specific charge and the aspect of academic 
integrity that is alleged to have been violated. 

b. The student may explain the circumstances and attempt to justify the action if the student chooses. 

c. The charge may be dropped if an explanation by the student is accepted as being adequate. 

d. If the faculty member chooses to continue the complaint, with or without an explanation by the student, 
the faculty member will submit a written charge to the appropriate Student Conduct Administrator; in 
cases of academic integrity, this will be the Academic Dean for the campus on which the violation 
allegedly occurred. 

e. If the faculty member confirms, based on consultation with appropriate Academic Dean, that a course- 
related violation of academic integrity is a first offense, the faculty member may choose to deal with the 
offense without further consulting the Student Conduct Administrator. In this case, regardless of whether 
or not the student has responded to the charges, the faculty member will impose a penalty which may 
result in a grade of F in the course. 

f If the student wishes to contest the charge or the sanction imposed by the faculty member, the student 
must submit a formal written grievance to an official appointed by the District Vice President for 
Academic and Student Affairs. For more information regarding grievances, please sec the section of the 
Catalog entitled Formal Grievances. 

g. If the faculty member finds that there is evidence of multiple or repeated violations of academic integrity 
by the student, the complaint will be referred to the Student Conduct Administrator for appropriate 
distribution. 

3. The Student Conduct Administrator may conduct an investigation to determine if the charges have merit and/or if 
they can be resolved administratively by mutual consent of the parties involved and on a basis acceptable to the 
Student Conduct Administrator. Such disposition shall be final and there shall be no subsequent proceedings. 

4. Given one of the three following conditions, a charge of violating the Student Code of Conduct can be referred to 
the Student Conduct Board: 

a. Within five business days of the initial charge, the accused student indicates, in a written statement to the 
Student Conduct Administrator associated with the campus on which the violation is alleged to have 
occurred, that he or she wishes to have the charge considered by a board as opposed to the administrator. 

b. The charges are not admitted to by the accused student, or the charge cannot be disposed of by mutual 
consent. 

c. The accused student admits to the charge but objects to the sanction; in this case, the board is limited to 
considering appropriate sanctions. 

5. Student Conduct Board Hearings shall be conducted by a Student Conduct Board according to the following 
guidelines 

a. Normally, attendance at Student Conduct Board Hearings will be limited to the accused student(s), 
witnesses, approved advisors, and Student Conduct Administrators. 

b. The Complainant, Accused Student and their advisors, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire 
portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing at which information is received (excluding 
deliberations). Admission of any other person to the Student Conduct Board Hearing shall be at the 
discretion of the Student Conduct Board and/or its Student Conduct Administrator. 

c. In Student Conduct Board Hearings involving more than one Accused Student, the Student Conduct 
Administrator, in his or her discretion, may permit the Student Conduct Board Hearings concerning each 
student to be conducted either separately or jointly. 

d. The Complainant and the Accused Student have the right to be assisted by an advisor they choose. The 
advisor must be a member of the community and must be available for Board proceedings; the advisor 
may not be an attorney. The Complainant and/or the Accused Student is responsible for presenting his or 
her own mformation. and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any 
Student Conduct Board Hearings before a student conduct board. 

e. The Complainant, the Accused Student and the Student Conduct Board may arrange for witnesses to 
present pertinent information to the Student Conduct Board. The College will try to arrange the 
attendance of possible witnesses who are members of the College community, if reasonably possible, 
and who are identified by the Complainant and/or Accused Student at least two business days prior to 
the Student Conduct Board Hearing. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from 
the Student Conduct Board. Questions may be suggested by the Accused Student and/or Complainant to 
be answered by each other or by other witnesses. This will be conducted by the Student Conduct Board 
with such questions directed to the chairperson, rather than to the witness directly. This method is used 
to preserve the educational tone of the hearing and to avoid creation of an adversarial environment. 

48 






•^ f 



Questions of whether potential information will be received shall be resolved in the discretion of the 

chairperson of the Suident Conduct Board, 
f Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements (including Student Impact Statements) may be 

accepted as information for consideration by a Student Conduct Board at the discretion of the 

chairperson, 
g. All procedural questions are subject to the fmal decision of the chairperson of the Student Conduct 

Board, 
h. After the portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing concludes in which all pertinent information has 

been received, the Student Conduct Board shall determine (by majority vote if the Student Conduct 

Board consists of more than one person) whether the Accused Student has violated each section of the 

Student Code which the student is charged with violating, 
i. The Student Conduct Board's determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than 

not that the Accused Student violated the SUident Code, 
j. Fornial mles of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal or 

civil court, are not used in Student Code proceedings, 
k. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all Student Conduct Board Hearings 

before a Student Conduct Board. Deliberations shall not be recorded. The record shall be the property of 

Edison State College. 
1. If an Accused Student, with notice, does not appear before a Student Conduct Board Hearing, the 

information in support of the charges shall be presented and considered even if the Accused Student is 

not present, 
m. The Student Conduct Board may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well being, and/or fears 

of confrontation of the Complainant, Accused Student, and/or other witness during the hearing by 

providing separate facilities, by using a visual screen, and/or by permitting participation by telephone, 

videophone, closed circuit television, video conferencing, videotape, audio tape, written statement, or 

other means, where and as determined in the sole judgment of Chair of the Sujdent Conduct Board to be 

appropriate. 

B. Sand ions 

The following sanctions may be imposed upon students found to have violated the Code 

1. Warning — A notice in writing to the student that the student is violating or has violated institutional regulations; 

2. Probation — A wTitten reprimand for violation of specified regulations. Probation is for a designated period of time 
and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any 
institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period; 

3. Loss of Privileges -Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time; 

4. Restitution — Compensation for loss, damage or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or 
monetary or material replacement; 

5. Academic Penalty — For academic dishonesty violations, the student may be given a zero/"F" for the 
assignment/course as indicated by the case; 

6. Suspension - Separation of the student from Edison State for a definite period of time, after which the student is 
eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified; 

7. Dismissal — Separation from the College for an indefinite period of time. Readmission may be possible, based on 
meeting all readmission criteria and obtaining clearance from the District Dean of Student Services or designee; 

8. Expulsion — Permanent separation of the student from Edison State. All recommendations of expulsion are must be 
reviewed and approved by the District President. 

More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation. Within five business days of the 
conclusion of three Student Conduct Board hearing, the Student Conduct Administrator will provide the student with written 
notification of the sanctions agreed to by the Student Conduct Board. 

C. Appeals 

Decisions reached by a Student Conduct Board or a sanctions imposed by Student Conduct Administrators can be appealed 
by the accused student to the Academic Standards Committee. Written notice of the appeal will be submitted to the Student 
Conduct Administrator within three business days of the student notification that a sanction has been imposed. The Student 
Conduct Administrator will submit the appeal to the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee within five business days. 
The appeal will be considered by the Mediating Body of the Academic Standards Committee. 

1. The Mediating Body will consist of four members of the Academic Standards Committee plus one student 
representative from Edison State College's Student Government Association. 

2. All mediation procedures will be transcribed and all written documentation will be stored securely. 

3. In cases where the written appeal highlights information that was not available to the Student Conduct Board; an 
appeal hearing will be conducted in accordance with the following procedures: 

a. Written documentation of complaints and charges will be distributed to the chair of the Academics 
Standards Committee at least one week prior to the mediation. 

b. Disputing individuals will be allowed witnesses. 

c. As each person speaks, he/she must first state his/her name for the record. 

d. The proceedings will begin with the Mediating Body Committee Chair reading the charges and/or 
complaints out loud. 

e. The Chair will then ask for a response from each side. 

f Each of the committee members will then be allowed to ask questions. 

49 



g. Following the response and questioning, the chair will allow time for counter responses. 

h. The Chair reserves the right to remove any party from the hearing in order to protect any of the 

participants, 
i. Once questioning is over, the Chair will request that all persons except for the Mediating Body leave the 

room, 
j. The Mediating Body will then weigh the evidence and decide upon appropriate recourse, 
k. Within a week of the Mediating Body's decision, a written recommendation of the decision, signed by 

ail committee members, will be sent to the disputing individuals and to an official Appointed by the 

District Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs. A copy will be retained for committee 

records. 
In all cases where new facts are not described in the written appeal, the Mediating Body will limit its review to the 
verbatim record of the initial hearing and supporting documents for one or more of the following purposes: 

a. To determine whether the original hearing was conducted fairly in light of the charges and evidence 
presented, and in conformity with prescribed procedures giving the complaining party a reasonable 
opportunity to prepare and present evidence that the Code was violated, and giving the accused student a 
reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present a rebuttal of those allegations. 

b. To determine whether the decision reached regarding the accused student was based on substantial 
evidence; that is, whether the evidence in the case was sufficient to establish that a violation of the Code 
occurred. 

c. To determine whether the sanction imposed was too severe for the infraction. 



^ 



Article VI: Rights of the Accused Student 

1 . Accused students have the right to receive a written notice of the Student Code of Conduct charge and the allegations upon 
which the charge is based. 

2. Accused students are to be given a fair and impartial hearing, during which students will be permitted to address the charges 
and provide information, including witnesses. 

3. Accused students will be informed that verbatim recording will be made of the entire hearing process. ^ 

4. Accused students can appeal the decision of the hearing body. "" 

Article VII: Revision of the Student Code of Conduct ^ 

Students can submit questions concerning interpretation of the Student Code of Conduct to the Student Code Administrator. The — 

Academic Standards Committee reviews the entire Code of Conduct on an annual basis. Based on input from the College Community, A 

the Academic Standards Committee is responsible for making changes to the code of conduct. "" 

Academic Grievance Procedures ^ 

Article I: Purpose ^ 

As with most procedures included in this catalog, the academic grievance policy is based on the assumption that academic _^ 

disagreements should be resolved by student and faculty interaction. These formal grievance procedures are intended to provide all ^ 
Edison State College students with opportunities for objective review of facts and events that are related to the cause of a grievance 

when the involved faculty members and students are not able to resolve a dispute on their own. These reviews will be accomplished in ^ 

a coUegial, non-judicial atmosphere. All parties are expected to behave in a civil manner. *^ 

Article II: Definition of Terms ^ 

1 . A formal academic grievance is a claim that a specific academic decision or action that affects that student's academic 

record or status has violated published policies and procedures, or has been applied to the grievant in a manner different ^ 

from that used for other students. Grievances may relate to such decisions as the assignment of a grade seen by the student as ^ 

incorrect or the dismissal or failure of a student for his or her action(s). Academic grievances will not deal with general « 

student complaints. -— 

2. The instructor is any classroom instructor, thesis/dissertation/directed study supervisor, committee member or chair, or ^ 
counselor/advisor who interacts with the student in an academic environment. ^ 

3. An incorrect grade refers to a grade that is not representative of a student's ability or performance as defined by the grading 

rubric associated with a specific course. ^ 

4. A Discipline chairperson is the academic head of a discipline; this can be a dean discipline designee. ,— 

5. Dean means Campus-specific Academic Dean, the District Academic Deans, and/or the District Vice President for ^ 
Academic and Student Affairs. ^ 

6. Written Communication will include hard copy documents sent to the recipient's address of record. 

7. For purposes of this policy, the burden of proof is. with the student; this implies that the student has the responsibility for ^ 
supplying evidence that proves that an instructor's decision, action, or grade assignment was incorrect. An incorrect grading _ 
decision is one in which the grade is based on something other than the student's ability as described by the grading rubric ^ 
published in the course syllabus. All decisions will be base don the preponderance of evidence. ^ 



50 



Article III: Resolution at the Discipline Level 

1 . The student shall first make a reasonable effort to resolve his or her gricvanee with the instmetor concerned, with the date of 
the incident triggering the start of the process (i.e.. the issuance of a grade; the receipt of an assignment), and the instructor 
shall accommodate a reasonable request to discuss and attempt to resolve this issue. 

2. If the situation cannot be resolved or the instructor is not available, the student shall file a notification letter within fifteen 
business days of the triggering incident to the discipline chairperson. This shall be a concise written statement of particulars 
and must include information pertaining to how, in the student's opinion. College policies or procedures were violated. The 
discipline chairperson shall provide a copy of this statement to the instmetor. 

3. The discipline chairperson shall discuss the statement jointly or individually with the student and the instructor to see if the 
grievance can be resolved. If the discipline maintains its own grievance procedure, it should be applied at this point. If the 
grievance can be resolved, the chairperson shall pro\ ide a statement to that effect to the student and the instructor \\ ith a 
copy to the College Dean. 

4. If the grievance cannot be resolved, the Discipline Chairperson shall notify both the student and the instructor, informing the 
student of his/her right to file a written request within three weeks to advance the grievance to the Campus level. The 
in.structor may file a written response to the grievance petition. Upon receipt of the student's request to move the process to 
the Campus Level and the instmctor's response to the grievance (if provided), the Discipline Chairperson shall immediately 
notify the Campus Dean or Vice President of Instruction that a formal grievance has been submitted, providing copies of the 
student's initiating grievance statement, any instructor's written response to the grievance, and the written request from the 
student to have the process advanced to the Campus Level (which may include additional responsive or final .statements by 
the student). Should the student not file a written request to move the grievance to the Campus Level within the prescribed 
time, the grievance will end. 

If the grievance concerns the Discipline Chairperson or other officials of the department, the student has a right to bypass the 
departmental process and proceed directly to the Campus Level. 

NOTE: Disciplines may develop their own formal procedures for considering grievances. Such procedures must be 
considered and approved by the District Vice President for Academic and Student Services, and published on the 
Discipline's website. When such procedures exist, the Discipline's examination of the grievance will unfold as specified in 
the procedures. 

Article IV: Resolution at the Campus Level 

1 . Upon receipt of the grievance, the Campus Dean or Vice President for Instruction will either determine that the matter is not 
an academic grievance and dismiss it, or, with 15 business days, the Campus Dean or vice President for Instruction will 
establish an ad hoc Grievance Committee to consider the issue. 

a. The Grievance Committee will include three faculty members and one student 

b. When feasible, this Committee will include faculty and students from Disciplines outside of the Discipline in 
which the parties are directly involved 

c. The Committee Chairperson will be appointed by the Campus Dean or Vice President for Instruction 

2. Grievance Committee Operations 

a. The Committee Chairperson shall be responsible for scheduling meetings, overseeing the deliberations of the 
committee and ensuring that full and fair consideration is provided to all parties. The Committee Chairperson shall 
vote on committee decisions only when required to break a tie. 

b. All deliberations shall be in private and held confidential by all members of the Committee and those involved in 
the proceedings. The recommendation of the Committee shall be based on the factual evidence presented to it. 

c. Within 15 business of the Committee appointment, the Committee Chairperson shall deliver in writing to the 
student, instmetor, discipline chairperson or Program Director, and College Dean a report of the findings and a 
recommended resolution. 

d. Within three weeks of receipt of the Committee recommendation, the College Dean shall provide a decision in 
writing to all parties. 

3. The smdent or the instmetor may appeal the decision of the Campus to the District Level only if the decision of the Campus 
Dean is contrary to the recommendation of the Committee or if there is a procedural violation of these Student Academic 
Grievance Procedures. Such an appeal must be made in writing to the District Vice President for Academic and Student 
Affairs within three weeks of receipt of the decision from the Campus Dean. Otherwise, the decision is final and not subject 
to further appeal within Edison State College. 

Article V: Resolution at the District Level 

1 . Once appealed to the district level, the appeal notification is submitted to the Vice President for Academic and Student 
Affairs. 

2. At the District Level, the Academic Standards Committee considers grievances; the district level appeal begins when the 
Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs foruards the original grievance and appeal documentation to the Chair of 
the Academic Standards Committee. 

3. Procedures for Academic Standards Committee when considering academic grievances 

a. The Committee Chairperson shall be responsible for scheduling meetings, overseeing the deliberations of the 

committee and ensuring that full and fair consideration is provided to all parties. The Committee Chairperson shall 
vote on committee decisions only when required to break a tie. 

51 



Hearing, sight or speech impaired individuals who use specialized telephone equipment should call the Florida Relay Service by 
dialing 711. 

1 . Other crimes required to be reported by the Clery Act include: murder, non-negligent manslaughter, non-forcible sex offenses, 
aggravated assault, arson, and hate crimes. None of the Edison State campuses had a report of these crimes in 2004, 2005 or 2006. 
None of the Edison State College campuses have reports of arrests or disciplinary action for: illegal weapons offenses, drug law 
violations or liquor law violations for the years 2004 thru 2006. 

2. Edison State College has no student residential housing. 

See the Edison State College website to view Campus Crime Statistics and other Public Safety information: 
http://www.edison.edu/facilities/publicsafety.php 

Telephones for Students 

A number of pay telephones are located on each campus for student use. College office telephones are for official business or to report 
emergencies. 

Traffic Regulations 

As Edison State College is a member of the public education system of Florida, out-of-state students are required to have a valid 
Florida driver's license when operating a motor vehicle on the streets and highways of Florida if they are employed in Florida. Out-of- 
state students should acquire Florida license plates for their vehicles if the vehicles are titled in the parents" name, and if they or their 
parents are employed in Florida, and/or if they claim in-state tuition rates. 

1 . The campus map and parking lot signs indicate where students may park. Students are prohibited from parking in designated 
staff lots. 

52 






^ 
^ 



b. All deliberations shall be in private and held confidential by all members of the Committee and those involved in 
the proceedings. The recommendation of the Committee shall be based on the factual evidence presented to it. 

c. Within 15 business days of the Committee appointment, the Committee Chairperson shall deliver in writing to the 
student, instructor, discipline chairperson or Program Director, and College Dean a report of the findings and a 
recommended resolution. 

d. Within three weeks of receipt of the Academic Standards Committee decision. Committee chair will provide a 
written decision to the following: ^ 

i. Student involved in grievance; 

ii. Faculty member involved in the grievance; W 

iii. Discipline Chairperson; 

iv. District Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs. 
Decisions made at the District Level are final. 



C 



Written Concerns or Complaints ^ 

A concern or complaint is to be distinguished from a petition. A signed concern or complaint with contact information allows the ^ 

College to respond most effectively to the concern or complaint expressed. A written concern or complaint is to be delivered to the ^- 

supervisor of the area, except for areas noted below. Since a concern or complaint is normally related to a specific incident, it is to be ^ 

addressed by the appropriate College official. A concern or complaint about a grade will be referred to the professor, since it is the ^ 

professor's professional obligation to assess student performance. 

A concern or complaint related to sexual harassment must be submitted to the District Dean of Student Services, Edison State College, ^ 

8099 College Parkway, P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers, Florida 33906-6210, telephone 239-489-9027 (see "State Statutes and College 

Policies Affecting Students"). >«» 

Violations of College policy must be submitted to the Chief Learning Officer. "Incident Report" forms may be obtained from the 

Security Office on each campus. 



c 



Security Policies and Statistics ^ 

The Office of Public Safety and Security is committed to providing a safe, secure and orderly environment of the College. The security 

of our campuses is a cooperative effort, and students, faculty, staff and visitors must assume responsibility for personal safety and the w- 

protection of personal and college property. ^- 

Prompt reporting of criminal activities, suspicious persons or behavior, potentially hazardous situations and emergencies to Public ^^ 

Safety is encouraged to allow the department to respond as quickly as possible. However, in the event of a crisis, immediate danger, ^ 

injury or criminal activity, the victim/witness is advised to call 911, then campus public safety. The phone numbers for the Public 

Safety offices and local emergency numbers are as follows: ^ 





Off campus phone # 


On campus 


phone # 


TTY# 


U 


Charlotte Campus Public Safety 


(941)637-5655 


5655 




(941)637-5655 


c 


Local Emergency 




9-911 






r^ 


Collier Campus Public Safety 


(239)732-3712 


3712 




(239) 732-3788 


"-■ 


Local Emergency 




9-911 






1^ 


Lee Campus Public Safety 


(239) 489-9203 


1203 




(239)489-9010 


^ 


Local Emergency 




9-911 






^k 



2. Designated disabled parking spaces are reserved for persons who arc permanently disabled. To use these spaces, students 
must have a special handicap permit issued by the local county license tag office and Public Safety. 

3. Parking is prohibited after 1 1 :00 PM, unless Public Safety Department has received prior notification. 

4. Any theft or accident on campus involving a car must be reported immediately to Public Safety. 

5. Designated parking spaces for motorcycles and mopeds are provided. Please park in these spaces and not on the grass, 
sidewalks or near campus buildings. 

6. Unauthorized parking in "Reserved" or "Restricted" spaces is prohibited. 

7. The absence of "No Parking" signs does not mean that parking is allowed. Parking on the grass, along roadways, drives, 
curbs, sidewalks or ramps is prohibited. Parking is permitted only in paved lots or in designated parking areas. 

8. Vehicles must be parked within marked spaces. Parking diagonally or taking up two parking spaces is not allowed. 

9. The speed limit on campus is 30 m.p.h. unless otherwise posted. Speed limit in all parking lots or service drives is 5 m.p.h. 

10. Campus traffic and parking regulations and directive signs governing the use of motor vehicles are in effect 24 hours a day, 
all year long, unless specifically limited. Inclement weather does not bar their enforcement. 

1 1 . Moving violations, i.e.. speeding, reckless driving, etc. may be referred to an appropriate law enforcement agency. 

12. The Public Safety Officer is on duty to assist students whenever possible, but he/she is also required to enforce all traffic and 
parking regulations and issue citations for violations in accordance with these regulations. 

13. Students who receive traffic or parking citations must pay the appropriate fine to the Edison State Cashier Office within 14 
working days. Students wishing to contest the fine must submit a written appeal within 14 working days to the Student 
Court. 

14. Any student who does not pay a traffic or parking fine will not receive transcripts and will not be permitted to register for 
classes until the fine is paid. 

15. The following traffic or parking fines are in effect: 

a. Each non-moving violation other than parking in disabled spaces: $15.00. This category includes parking 
violations, parking on the grass, parking in a reserved space or lot, parking improperly, parking in a No Parking 
area, blocking an entrance or ramp. 

b. Parking in a disabled space: $50.00. 

c. Speeding; $15.00. 

d. Abuse of a Public Safety Officer may result in a fine of $15.00. 
Fines collected will be used to augment Edison State's student loan funds. 

Traffic Ticket Appeals 

If a student chooses to appeal a ticket for violating the campus traffic regulations, he or she should contact the Public Safety office on 
campus. If the student wants to appeal the decision of the Public Safety office, he or she may choose to have a hearing in front of the 
Student Government Association Chief Justices for a final decision. The Student Traffic Court may uphold the ticket violation, modify 
the charge or overturn the charge. 

State Statutes and College Policies Affecting Students 

(See also Student Information and Policies) The following Florida statutes and District Board of Trustee policies affect students at 
Edison State College. For the benefit of all students, adherence to these laws is expected. Any questions concerning these statutes and 
policies should be directed to the District Dean of Student Services. 

Florida Statutes 

Florida Statute Section 1006.61 

PARTICIPATION BY STUDENTS IN DISRUPTIVE ACTIVITIES AT PUBLIC POSTSECONDARY EDUCATIONAL 

INSTITUTIONS; PENALTIES. 

1 . Any person who accepts the privilege extended by the laws of this state of attendance at any public postsecondary 
educational institution shall, by attending such institution, be deemed to have given his or her consent to the policies of that 
institution, the State Board of Education, and the Board of Governors regarding the State University System, and the laws of 
this state. Such policies shall include prohibition against disruptive activities at public postsecondary educational 
institutions. 

2. After it has been determined that a student of a state institution of higher learning has participated in disruptive activities, 
such student may be immediately expelled from the institution for a minimum of 2 years. 

Florida Stamte Section 1006.62 

EXPULSION AND DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES. 

1 . Each student in a community college or state university is subject to federal and state law, respective county and municipal 
ordinances, and all mles and regulations of the State Board of Education or board of trustees of the institution. 

2. Violation of these published laws, ordinances, or rules and regulations may subject the violator to appropriate action by the 
institution's authorities. 

3. Each president of a community college or state university may, after notice to the student of the charges and after a hearing 
thereon, expel, suspend, or otherwise discipline any student who is found to have violated any law. ordinance, or rule or 
regulation of the State Board of Education or of the board of trustees of the institution. A student may be entitled to waiver 
of expulsion: 

a. If the student provides substantial assistance in the identification, arrest, or conviction of any of his or her 

accomplices, accessories, coconspirators, or principals or of any other person engaged in violations of chapter 893 
within a state university or community college; 

53 



b. If the student voluntarily diseloses his or her violations of chapter 893 prior to his or her arrest; or 

c. If the student commits himself or herself, or is referred by the court in lieu of sentence, to a statelicensed drug 
abuse program and successfully completes the program. 

Florida Statute Section 1006.63 
HAZING PROHIBITED. 

1 . As used in this section, "hazing" means any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or 
physical health or safety of a student for the purpose including, but not limited to, initiation or admission into or affiliation 
with any organization operating under the sanction of a postsecondary institution. "Hazing" includes, but is not limited to, 
pressuring or coercing the student into violating state or federal law, any brutality of a physical nature, such as whipping, 
beating, branding, exposure to the elements, forced consumption of any food, liquor, drug, or other substance, or other 
forced physical activity that could adversely affect the physical health or safety of the student, and also includes any activity 
that would subject the student to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation, forced exclusion from social contact, 
forced conduct that could result in extreme embarrassment, or other forced activity that could adversely affect the mental 
health or dignity of the student. Hazing does not include customary athletic events or other similar contests or competitions 
or any activity or conduct that fi.irthers a legal and legitimate objective. 

2. A person commits hazing, a third degree felony, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083, when he or she 
intentionally or recklessly commits any act of hazing as defined in subsection ( 1 ) upon another person who is a member of 
or an applicant to any type of student organization and the hazing results in serious bodily injury or death of such other 
person. 

3. A person commits hazing, a first degree misdemeanor, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083 , when he or she 
intentionally or recklessly commits any act of hazing as defined in subsection ( 1 ) upon another person who is a member of 
or an applicant to any type of student organization and the hazing creates a substantial risk of physical injury or death to 
such other person. 

4. As a condition of any sentence imposed pursuant to subsection (2) or subsection (3), the court shall order the defendant to A 
attend and complete a 4-hour hazing education course and may also impose a condition of drug or alcohol probation. 

5. It is not a defense to a charge of hazing that: 

a. The consent of the victim had been obtained; 

b. The conduct or activity that resulted in the death or injury of a person was not part of an official organizational 
event or was not otherwise sanctioned or approved by the organization; or ^ 

c. The conduct or activity that resulted in death or injury of the person was not done as a condition of membership to 
an organization. 

6. This section shall not be construed to preclude prosecution for a more general offense resulting from the same criminal 
transaction or episode. 

7. Public and nonpublic postsecondary educational institutions whose students receive state student financial assistance must 
adopt a written antihazing policy and under such policy must adopt rules prohibiting students or other persons associated 
with any student organization from engaging in hazing. 4- 

8. Public and nonpublic postsecondary educational institutions must provide a program for the enforcement of such rules and ^ 
must adopt appropriate penalties for violations of such rules, to be administered by the person at the institution responsible ^ 
for the sanctioning of such organizations. 

a. Such penalties at community colleges and state universities may include the imposition of fines; the withholding _ 
of diplomas or transcripts pending compliance with the rules or pending payment of fines; and the imposition of ^ 
probation, su.spension, or dismissal. '— 

b. In the case of an organization at a community college or state university that authorizes hazing in blatant disregard ^ 
of such rules, penalties may also include rescission of permission for that organization to operate on campus ^ 
property or to otherwise operate under the sanction of the institution. .^ 

c. All penalties imposed under the authority of this subsection shall be in addition to any penalty imposed for ^ 
violation of any of the criminal laws of this state or for violation of any other rule of the institution to which the ■» 
violator may be subject. ^- 

9. Rules adopted pursuant hereto shall apply to acts conducted on or off campus whenever such acts are deemed to constitute ^ 
hazing. ^ 

1 0. Upon approval of the antihazing policy of a community college or state university and of the rules and penalties adopted ^ 
pursuant thereto, the institution shall provide a copy of such policy, rules, and penalties to each student enrolled in that ^ 
institution and shall require the inclusion of such policy, rules, and penalties in the by-laws of every organization operating — 
under the sanction of the institution. ^ 

Florida Statute Section 1006.69 t 

VACCINATION AGAINST MENINGOCOCCAL MENINGITIS AND HEPATITIS B *• 

1. A postsecondary educational institution shall provide detailed information concerning the risks associated with '- 
meningococcal meningitis and hepatitis B and the availability, effectiveness, and known contraindications of any required or 
recommended vaccine to every student, or to the sUident's parent if the student is a minor, who has been accepted for ^ 
admission. ^ 

2. An individual enrolled in a postsecondary educational institution who will be residing in on-campus housing shall provide «. 
documentation of vaccinations against meningococcal meningitis and hepatitis B unless the individual, if the individual is 18 ,*. 
years of age or older, or the individual's parents, if the individual is a minor, declines the vaccinations by signing a separate ^ 
waiver for each of those vaccines, provided by the institution, acknowledging receipt and review of the information ■*■ 
provided. 

54 -_ 






3. This section does not require any postsecondary educational institution to provide or pay for vaccinations against 
meningococcal meningitis and hepatitis B. 
Meningitis is a serious disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Because bacterial meningitis is a grave illness and can rapidly 
progress to death, it requires early diagnosis and treatment. This is often difficult because the symptoms closely resemble those of the 
tlu and the highest incidence occurs during late winter and early spring (flu season). When not fatal, bacterial meningitis can lead to 
permanent disabilities such as hearing loss, brain damage or loss of limbs. 

Hepatitis B is a serious infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause life-long 
infection that leads to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, or liver failure. There is no cure for hepatitis B, but the infection 
can be prevented by vaccination. Each year, about 200.000 people are infected with the virus and 5,000 people die. 
Although there have been no reported cases of meningitis or hepatitis B at our College in recent years, we are taking the proactive step 
towards informing and protecting our students. For more infomiation, please contact the Office of the District Dean of Student 
Services. 

Florida Statute Section 810.08 

TRESPASS IN STRUCTURE OR CONVEYANCE: 

I . Whoever, without being authorized, licensed, or invited, willftilly enters or remains in any structure or conveyance, or, 
having been authorized, licensed, or invited, is warned by the owner or lessee of the premises, or by a person authorized by 
the owner or lessee, to depart and reftises to do so, commits the offense of trespass in a structure or conveyance. 
2. 

a. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, trespass in a structure or conveyance is a misdemeanor of the 
second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. 

b. If there is a human being in the structure or conveyance at the time the offender trespassed, attempted to trespass, 
or was in the structure or conveyance, the trespass in a structure or conveyance is a misdemeanor of the first 
degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. 

c. If the offender is armed with a firearm or other dangerous weapon, or arms himself or herself with such while in 
the structure or conveyance, the trespass in a structure or conveyance is a felony of the third degree, punishable as 
provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. Any owner or person authorized by the owner may. for 
prosecution purposes, take into custody and detain, in a reasonable manner, for a reasonable length of time, any 
person when he or she reasonably believes that a violation of this paragraph has been or is being committed, and 
he or she reasonably believes that the person to be taken into custody and detained has committed or is committing 
such violation. In the event a person is taken into custody, a law enforcement officer shall be called as soon as is 
practicable after the person has been taken into custody. The taking into custody and detention by such person, if 
done in compliance with the requirements of this paragraph, shall not render such person criminally or civilly 
liable for false arrest, false imprisonment, or unlawful detention. 

3. As used in this section, the term "person authorized" means any owner or lessee, or his or her agent, or any law enforcement 
officer whose department has received written authorization from the owner or lessee, or his or her agent, to communicate an 
order to depart the property in the case of a threat to public safety or welfare. 

Florida Statute Section 810.09 

TRESPASS ON PROPERTY OTHER THAN STRUCTURE OR CONVEYANCE: 

1. Any person who: 

a. A person who, without being authorized, licensed, or invited, willfiilly enters upon or remains in any property 
other than a structure or conveyance: 

1. As to which notice against entering or remaining is given, either by actual communication to the 
offender or by posting, fencing, or cultivation as described in s. 8 1 0.0 1 1 ; or 

2. If the property is the unenclosed curtilage of a dwelling and the offender enters or remains with the 
intent to commit an offense thereon, other than the offense of trespass, commits the offense of trespass 
on property other than a structure or conveyance. 

b. As used in this section, the term "unenclosed curtilage" means the unenclosed land or grounds, and any 
outbuildings, that are directly and intimately adjacent to and connected with the dwelling and necessary, 
convenient, and habitually used in connection with that dwelling. 



2. 



Except as provided in this subsection, trespass on property other than a structure or conveyance is a misdemeanor 
of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. 

If the offender defies an order to leave, personally communicated to the offender by the owner of the premises or 
by an authorized person, or if the offender willfully opens any door, fence, or gate or does any act that exposes 
animals, crops, or other property to waste, destmction, or freedom; unlawfully dumps litter on property; or 
trespasses on property other than a structure or conveyance, the offender commits a misdemeanor of the first 
degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. 

If the offender is armed with a firearm or other dangerous weapon during the commission of the offense of 
trespass on property other than a structure or conveyance, he or she is guilty of a felony of the third degree, 
punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. Any owner or person authonzed by the owner 
may, for prosecution purposes, take into custody and detain, in a reasonable manner, for a reasonable length of 
time, any person when he or she reasonably believes that a violation of this paragraph has been or is being 
committed, and that the person to be taken into custody and detained has committed or is committing the violation. 
If a person is taken into custody, a law enforcement officer shall be called as soon as is practicable after the person 

55 



has been taken into custody. The taking into custody and detention in compliance with the requirements of this 
paragraph does not result in criminal or civil liability for false arrest, false imprisonment, or unlawful detention. 

Florida Statute Section 810.095 

TRESPASS ON SCHOOL PROPERTY WITH FIREARM OR OTHER WEAPON PROHIBITED: 

1. It is a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083. or s. 775.084, for a person who is 
trespassing upon school property to bring onto, or to possess on, such school property, any weapon as defined in s. 
790.001(13) or any firearm. 

2. As used in this section, "school property" means the grounds or facility of any kindergarten, elementary school, middle 
school, junior high school, secondary school, career center, or postsecondary school, whether public or nonpublic. 

Florida Statute Section 877.13 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OR SCHOOL BOARDS; PENALTY FOR DISRUPTION: 

1 . It is unlawfi.ll for any person: 

a. Knowingly to disnipt or interfere with the lawfijl administration or ftmctions of any educational institution, school 
board, or activity on school board property in this state. 

b. Knowingly to advise, counsel, or instruct any school pupil or school employee to disrupt any school or school 
board ftinction, activity on school board property, or classroom. 

c. Knowingly to interfere with the attendance of any other school pupil or school employee in a school or classroom. 

d. To conspire to riot or to engage in any school campus or school function disruption or disturbance which interferes 
with the educational processes or with the orderly conduct of a school campus, school, or school board function or 
activity on school board property. 

2. This section shall apply to all educational institutions, school boards, and functions or activities on school board property; 
however, nothing herein shall deny public employees the opportunity to exercise their rights pursuant to part II of chapter 
447. 

3. Any person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as 
provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. 






Board of Trustees Policies 

POLICY REGARDING STUDENTS WITH HUMAN IMMUNODEFIENCY VIRUS (HIV) (Edison State College District Board of 

Trustees Policy 6Hx6:6.02) 

The following guidelines are established regarding students with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): 

1. DEFINITION: For the purposes of this policy, a student with HIV falls into one of the following categories: 

a. An individual who tests positive for HIV antibody but who has no symptom manifestations; or 

b. An individual who is diagnosed as having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)-displaying one or ^ 
more opportunistic infections. 

2. STUDENT RIGHTS: The College recognizes that the rights of students with HIV to obtain education and employment must 
be balanced against the rights of persons without HIV who wish to be reasonably protected from contracting the virus. 

a. Both the Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Florida Education Equity Act prohibit 
discrimination against disabled persons, and students with HIV are classified as disabled. 

b. Precautions will be provided to students in Allied Health Programs and science laboratory classes. — 

c. Any student who reveals that he/she has HIV will be afforded confidentiality in accordance with appropriate ^ 
statutes and state law. "" 

3. ADMISSIONS: No student will be denied admission to the College solely on the basis that he/she has HIV. ^ 

a. The College will not require a student to reveal whether or not he/she has HIV when applying for admission to the ^. 
College. ■— 

b. Furthermore, the College will not require serological testing to determine if a student seeking admission has HIV. ^ 

4. ATTENDANCE, WITHDRAWAL, AND/OR SUSPENSIONS: Under most circumstances, no student will be required to *■ 
cease class attendance solely on the basis of having HIV. ■*" 

a. If a student with HIV requests special accommodations due to illness (i.e., disability), the College will acquire 

sufficient information about such disability to make a determination regarding the requested accommodation(s). ^ 

1 . Any student wishing to request special accommodations should contact the District Dean of Student ^ 
Services. *- 

2. On the Charlotte and Collier campuses, the student should contact the Campus President's Office. '~ 

b. The College will not impose any rule(s) or restriction(s) upon a student with HIV that will have the effect of 

limiting that individual's participation in the College's educational programs and/or services solely on the basis of ^ 

that person's disability. ^ 

c. Current research has indicated the possibility that the central nervous system may become affected by HIV, which *- 
may lead to progressive neurological and cognitive dysfiinction and subsequent inability of the student to maintain >- 
scholastic performance. Decisions as to such a student continuing to attend class or being suspended or withdrawn *" 
from class(es) will be made on a case-by-case basis after reasonable accommodations have been examined or tried, ■*" 
and after an examination of the facts demonstrates to the College that the student can no longer ftinction as 

necessary to meet the requirements of the student's course or program, or that the student presents a health or ^ 

safety risk to self or to the college community. ^ 

56 Z 



DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT COMPLAINT PROCEDURE (Edison State College District Board of Trustees Policy 

6Hx6:2.03) 

Edison State College is committed to providing an educational and working environment free from discrimination or harassment based 

on such factors as race, sex, age, religion, national origin, disability, marital, or veteran status. Edison State College, as a matter of 

policy and in compliance with Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 for employees and 

Title IX of the Education Act of 1972 and the Florida Education Equity Act, absolutely opposes any act of discrimination or 

harassment and strictly prohibits and will not tolerate such action, whether those involved stand in a subordinate-supervisory 

relationship, student-faculty relationship, student-student relationship or others doing business with Edison State College. 

For purposes of this Policy "discrimination" includes, but is not limited to, action with partiality or prejudice for or against a person of 

a group on the basis of one of the protected categories above. 

For purposes of this Policy "harassment" includes, but is not limited to, verbal, physical, and visual conduct that creates intimidating, 

offensive, or hostile working or educational environment or that interferes with work performance or educational opportunities. 

There are two types of educational/workplace sexual harassment. The first is "quid pro quo" which generally means that type of 

harassment where a person is promised better employment conditions such as a promotion or a desired transfer or, in the alternative, is 

threatened with lesser conditions such as a demotion or termination if the person refuses sexual overtures from a supervisor or some 

other person in the management structure of the employer. The second type of sexual harassment is a "hostile environment." A hostile 

environment is created by a pervasive sexually oriented work/educational atmosphere. For example, disparagement related to one's 

sex, unwelcome sexual flirtations, sexually offensive jokes or comments, and sexually offensive material displayed in the workplace 

can create a sexually hostile en\ironment. A sexually hostile environment will exist if the type of conduct described above has the 

purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work perfonnance or academic or professional perfonnance or 

creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or educational environment. 

Edison State College is also equally opposed to willful and intentional bad faith claims of discrimination or harassment. Bad faith 

claims are those that are known or should be known by the alleging employee/student to be false. The College takes this strong stand 

because such claims often affect the future employment and important family relationships of, not only the claimant, but also the 

person against whom the claim is made. 

If an employee or student becomes aware of any behavior that may constitute discrimination or harassment, it is the responsibility of 

that person to report such conduct. 

1 . Employees should notify their immediate supervisor, the Associate Vice President of Human Resources or the Executive 
Vice President. 

2. Students should notify either the Dean for Student Services or the Associate Vice President of Human Resources. 

■'Vny report of alleged discrimination or harassment will be promptly and fully investigated by the individual contacted above or his or 

her designee. Appropriate disciplinary action will be taken against any employee, student or applicant who is determined to have 

violated this policy against discrimination or harassment or against anyone who knowingly files false claims of discrimination or 

harassment. Based on the seriousness of the offense, disciplinary action may include a verbal or written reprimand, suspension, or 

termination. Certain disciplinary actions, as detennined by the President, may require action by the District Board of Trustees, 

depending upon the nature of the offense and the resulting severity of the action to be taken. In such cases, the District President will 

recommend appropriate action to the District Board of Trustees following the completion of the investigation and the communication 

of the District President's position to the individuals involved. Claims of discrimination or harassment made against a student may be 

referred to the student disciplinary committee. Results of the hearing may lead to suspension or expulsion. 

Retaliatory action against anyone filing a valid complaint of any type of discrimination or harassment will not be tolerated. The 

individual investigating such reports or claims on behalf of the College, with the District President's full support, will make all efforts 

necessary to safeguard against any retaliation against any individual involved in the discrimination or harassment claim and any 

witnesses interviewed during the investigatory process. 

This policy is intended to reflect applicable laws regarding discrimination and harassment, as such laws may from time to time be 

stated or clarified, and to provide no greater or lesser protection than the laws provide. This policy is to be interpreted and applied with 

that understanding. 

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY (Edison State College District Board of Trustees Policy 6Hx6:2.04) 

It is the policy of Edison State College to promote and maintain a drug-free workplace. The unlawfiji manufacture, distribution, 

dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substances is prohibited on and off College premises. The possession or use of alcohol 

under the circumstances described herein is also prohibited. All students and employees are required to abide by the terms of this 

policy as a condition of initial and continued enrollment and/or employment. 

This policy is based on the Florida Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. 41 U.S.C. 70-1 et.seq .. as amended and is 

supplemented by College administrative policies and procedures. 

1. The illegal use, possession, manufacture, dispensation and distribution of any controlled substance, at any time, whether on 
or off duty or on or off College premises is strictly prohibited as a matter of College policy. 

2. Except as hereinafter provided, use or possession by an employee or student of alcohol in the workplace, or use of alcohol 
on College property is prohibited. The possession or consumption of alcohol by employees or students of legal age at a 
College sponsored or approved function where alcoholic beverages are served by the College or sponsor is not a violation of 
this Section. 

3. Any employee or student who reports to work or class or perfonns his/her duties while under the influence of drugs or 
alcohol will be in violation of this policy. 

4. Violation of this policy can result in referral to appropriate law enforcement authorities, disciplinary action up to and 
including immediate suspension, expulsion or termination, and/or a requirement of satisfactory participation in a College 
approved drug or alcohol rehabilitation program. A criminal conviction is not required for sanctions to be imposed upon a 
student or employee for violation of this policy. 



57 



DRUG-FREE CAMPUS AND WORKPLACE (Human Resources Employment and Operating Procedure 7.4) 

Policy: ^ 

It is the policy of Edison State College to promote and maintain a drug-free workplace. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, ^ 

dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substances is prohibited on and off College premises. The possession or use of alcohol W* 

under the circumstances described herein is also prohibited. All students and employees are required to abide by the terms of this ' — 

policy as a condition of initial and continued enrollment and/or employment. ^^ 

This policy is based on the Drug Free Workplace Act. 41 U.S.C. 70-1 et.seq., as amended and is supplemented by College i^ 

administrative policies and procedures. The illegal use, possession, manufacture, dispensation and distribution of any controlled 

substance, at any time, whether on or off duty or on or off College premises is strictly prohibited as a matter of College policy. W 

Except as hereinafter provided, use or possession by an employee or student of alcohol in the workplace, or use of alcohol on College 

property is prohibited. The possession or consumption of alcohol by employees or students of legal age at a College sponsored or 

approved ftmction where alcoholic beverages are served by the College or sponsor is not a violation of this Section. r" 

Any employee or student who reports to work or class or performs his/her duties while under the influence of drugs or alcohol will be 

in violation of this policy. Violation of this policy can result in referral to appropriate law enforcement authorities, disciplinary action ^ 

up to and including immediate suspension, expulsion or termination, and/or a requirement of satisfactory participation in a College- 

approved drug or alcohol rehabilitation program. A criminal conviction is not required for sanctions to be imposed upon a student or w 

employee for violation of this policy. 

Policy Guidelines: 

Disciplinary Sanctions - The College will impose sanctions (consistent with local, state, and Federal law) upon all employees and r" 

students who violate these standards of conduct. Such sanctions may include, but are not limited to: 1 ) referral for prosecution; 2) 

probation, suspension, or expulsion of students; or 3) suspension or termination of employees. ^ 



Description of Health Risks 

Alcohol. Alcohol consumption causes a number of changes in behavior and physiology. Even low doses significantly impair 

judgment, coordination, and abstract mental fiinctioning. Statistics show that alcohol use is involved in a majority of violent behaviors 

on college campuses, including acquaintance rape, vandalism, fights, and incidents of drinking and driving. Continued abuse may lead 

to dependency, which often causes permanent damage to vital organs and deterioration of a healthy lifestyle. 

Cannibis (Marijuana, Hashish). The use of marijuana may impair or reduce short-term memory and comprehension, alter sense of 

time, and reduce coordination and energy level. Users often have a lowered immune system and an increased risk of lung cancer. The 

active ingredient in marijuana, THC, is stored in the fatty tissues of the brain and reproductive system for a minimum of 28 to 30 days. 

Hallucinogens. Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin cause illusions and hallucinations. The user may experience panic, 

confusion, suspicion, anxiety, and loss of control. Delayed effects, or flashbacks, can occur even when use has ceased. Phencyclidine 

(PCP) affects the section of the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in check. Because the daig blocks pain receptors, 

violent PCP episodes may result in self-inflicted injuries. 

Cocaine/Crack. Cocaine users often have a stuffy, runny nose and may have a perforated nasal septum. The immediate effects of 

cocaine use include dilated pupils and elevated blood pressure heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature, followed by 

depression. Crack, or freebase rock cocaine, is extremely addictive and can cause delirium, hallucinations, blurred vision, severe chest 

pain, muscle spasms, convulsions, and even death. 

Amphetamines. Amphetamines can cause a rapid or irregular heartbeat, tremors, loss of coordination, collapse, and death. Heavy 

users are prone to irrational acts. 

Heroin. Heroin is an opiate drug that causes the body to have diminished pain reactions. The use of heroin can result in coma or death 

due to a reduction in the heart rate. 

Legal Sanctions You should be aware that State of Florida statutes provide that it is "unlawfijl for any person to sell, purchase, 

manufacture, or deliver, or to possess with the intent to sell, purchase, manufacture, or deliver, a controlled substance in, on, or within 

200 feet of the real property comprising a public college or other postsecondary educational institution." Legal action will be taken for 

violation of these statutes and policies, as appropriate. Any person who violates this paragraph with respect to a controlled substance 

named or described in s.893.03( 1 )(a), ( 1 )(b), ( 1 )(d), (2)(a), or (2)(b) commits a felony of the first degree punishable as provided in 

s.775.082, s.775.083., or s. 775.084 and shall not be eligible for parole or release under the Control Release Authority or staUitory gain 

time. 

State law prohibits the possession of alcoholic beverages by persons under age 2 1 , punishable for the first offense by a definite term of 

imprisonment not exceeding 60 days and/or a S500 fine, and for a subsequent offense by a definite term of imprisonment not 

exceeding one year and a fine of SI, 000. It is similarly prohibited and punishable to distribute alcohol to minors. 

State law makes it a crime for any person to possess or distribute illicit drugs (controlled substances as described in Section 893.03, 

Florida Statutes) under Section 893.13, Florida Statutes. Law provides certain limited exceptions. The crimes range from second 

degree misdemeanors (up to 60 days imprisonment and up to a $500 fine) to first degree felonies (up to 30 years imprisonment and up 

to $10,000 fine). 

Trafficking (distributing specified large quantities of various controlled substances under Section 893.03, Florida Status) under Section 

893. 1 35, Florida Statute is punishable, depending on the particular illicit drug and quantity involved, by a minimum term of 

imprisonment of 3 to 25 calendar years and a fine of $25,000 to $500,000. 

Federal trafficking penalties for first offenses, depending upon the illicit drug involved, range from not more than one year 

imprisonment and a fine of not more than $100,000 for an individual to 40 years to life imprisonment and a fine of not more than 

$200,000 for an individual to not less than life imprisonment and a fine of not more than 8 million dollars for an individual. 

The College requires that any employee who is convicted of any offense relating to the sale, purchase, delivery, use, manufacturing or 

distribution of illegal drugs or controlled substances on campus, or while attending a College-sponsored event or conducting College 

business to report such conviction to the Human Resources Office, (239) 489-9294, no later than five days after the conviction. 

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Drug Education and Treatment Programs 

Edison State College recognizes illegal dnig use and/or dependency to be a health, safety and security problem. Those who need 
assistance with problems related to drug abuse are encouraged to use any available resources including: 



RIVERSIDE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER 
CHARLOTTE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 

733 East Olympia Avenue 

Punta Gorda FL 33950 

(941 ) 637-2474 or 1-800-722-5563 

RUTH COOPER CENTER FOR 
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE 

2789 Ortiz Avenue. SE 

Fort Myers FL 33905 

(239) 275-3222. Extension 202 

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ADDICTION SERVICES 

2101 McGregor Blvd 
Fort Myers FL 33901 
(239) 332-6937 

THE VVILLOUGH AT NAPLES 

9001 Tamiami Trail East 
Naples FL 341 13 
1-800-722-0100 



For ftirther information regarding education, rehabilitation and other 
aspects of the College policy, contact: 

LEE CAMPUS, Fort Myers 

Office of Human Resources 

(239) 489-9293 

Office of Counseling and Advising 

Taeni Hall, second floor 

(239)489-9230 

CHARLOTTE CAMPUS, Punta Gorda 

Campus Director. Student Services 
(941)637-5678 

COLLIER CAMPUS, Naples 

Associate Dean. Student Ser\ ices 
(239)732-3710 

HENDRY/GLADES SERVICES, LaBelle 

Center Coordinator. Student Services 
(863)674-0408 



CAMPUS VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY (Edison State College District Board of Trustees Policy 6Hx6:2.07) 
Edison State College is committed to preserving the safety and security of students, staff, faculty, and visitors to the College. Breach 
of the peace and other violations, including threats, intimidation, violence, assault, batteries, sexual batteries, or other disruptive 
behavior will not be tolerated. Such behavior can include oral or written statements, gestures, or expressions that may communicate a 
direct or indirect threat of physical harm. Edison State College will not tolerate threats, direct or implied: physical conduct that results 
in harm to people or property; possession of deadly weapons on College property; or intimidating conduct or harassment that disrupts 
the teaching/learning and/or work environment or results in fear for personal safety. Threats, threatening behavior, or other acts of 
violence carried out off College-owned or leased property but directed at College employees, students, or visitors while conducting 
official College business are a violation of this policy. Off-site threats include but are not limited to threats made via telephone, fax, 
electronic or conventional mail, or any other communication medium. 

Any student found in violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Any employee found 
in violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including temiination. Individuals who commit such acts may 
be immediately removed from the premises. The College, through its Public Safety office, will refer violations to local and state law 
enforcement agencies for criminal prosecution and fijrther action as determined by those agencies. 

To promote an atmosphere that encourages learning and productive employment, quick responsive action will be taken if violence or 
the threat of violence arises. 

1. ASSISTANCE 

Generally, the office of Public Safety should be the first department contacted after an incident occurs at a campus or 
College site. Upon preliminary investigation, the appropriate local law enforcement agency may be notified and the incident 
may be referred to the agency. The Public Safety office will notify the appropriate campus administrator, or designee. 

2. CONFIDENTIALITY 

Pursuant to Section 794.03. Florida Statutes, it is unlawful to print, publish or broadcast in any instrument of mass 
communication, the name, address or other identifying fact or information of the victim of any sexual offense. 

3. INFORMATION AND RESOURCES 

The College will develop, make available and distribute information regarding safety, security, and/or sexual assault through 
the use of handouts, programs and seminars designed to promote awareness and prevention among the College's students, 
employees and the public. 

4. REPORTING 

Any violent, threatening, harassing, intimidating, or other disruptive behavior or other violations or potentially hazardous 
situations witnessed or received should be reported immediately to Public Safety and/or to a supervisor or manager. NOTE: 
Threats or assaults that require immediate attention by police should be reported first to the police at 91 1. 

SUBSTITUTION POLICY FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (Edison State College District Board of Tmstees Policy 
6Hx6:6.03) 

1. Eligibility: Students who are hearing impaired, visually impaired, or who have a specific learning disability are eligible for 
reasonable substitution for any requirement(s) where it can be documented that the student's failure to meet the 
requiremcnt(s) is related to the disability. Substitutions shall be provided in the areas of admission to the college, admission 
to a program of study, or graduation where the substitution does not constitute a fundamental alteration in the nature of the 
program. 

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2. Documentation: Documentation that is no more than three years old, substantiating the nature of the disability, shall be 

provided by the student concurrent with his or her request for a reasonable substitution for admission to a program of study, ^ 

or graduation. Such documentation shall be provided by a medical doctor, psychologist, or other specialist recognized to 
treat the specific disability. 

3. Review Policy: Students with disabilities requesting course substitutions must submit an academic petition to the Office of 
the Registrar. The petition at minimum shall identify the substitution desired and the justification for the substitution, and 
shall contain the documentation described in paragraph 2 above. The District Registrar, in consultation with the appropriate ^ 
academic dean and the Coordinator for Students with Disabilities, will consider reasonable substitutions appropriate for each 
individual student. ^ 

4. Substitution Decision: The decision will be communicated in writing by the District Registrar to the student and the ^— 
Coordinator for Students with Disabilities. ^ 

5. Articulation: Edison State College will recognize any substitution previously granted to a transfer student by a Florida State r" 
postsecondary institution. In accordance with FAC 6A- 10.04 1(3). substitutions granted by Edison State will be honored at 

any Florida State postsecondary institution. The College will assist the student in contacting the out-of-state or private ^ 

institution receiving the course substitution(s) to determine how the substitution(s) will be treated in the program of study —^ 

he/she is pursuing. The student will be advised accordingly. w 

6. Student Appeal: A student may appeal a denial of the substitution request(s) or determination of ineligibility in writing to the 
District Dean of Student Services, who shall make the final decision. The appeal must be filed within 21 days of receipt of 
the written denial by the District Registrar. Any decision of the District Dean of Student Services is subject to the right of 
any person whose substantial interests are determined to request a hearing pursuant to Title X, Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. 

7. Records: The District Registrar and the Coordinator for Students with Disabilities shall maintain records on the number of 
students granted substitutions by type of disability, the substitution provided, the substitutions identified as available for 
each documented disability and the number of requests that were denied. 

American Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy 

It is the policy of Edison State College that discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities is prohibited. Pursuant to 
Titles I and II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the College 
provides equal employment and educational opportunities and reasonable accommodation for qualified individuals with disabilities. 
Policy Guidelines 

The College reaffirms the principle of Equal Access/Equal Opportunity regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, religion, sex, 
age, marital status, and disability. The equal opportunity principle applies to otherwise qualified persons with disabilities with regard 
to employment, the delivery of educational programs and services and all other appropriate areas in which the College is involved. 
The College assumes the Department of Labor's definition of an individual with a disability is "one who (1) has a physical or mental 
impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person's major life activities; (2) has a record of such impairment; or (3) is 
regarded as having such an impairment." Edison State College understands that it must provide reasonable accommodation to the 
known physical or mental limitations of a qualified applicant, employee, and/or student with a disability, unless such accommodation 
would impose an undue hardship on the College. 

The College has designated the Associate Vice President of Human Resources as the ADA Coordinator for applicants, employees and 
students. The Coordinator will oversee and coordinate the College's efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities pertaining 
to the Act and serve as the contact person for all ADA information, resource policies, procedures and concerns. 
Procedure 

A. Request for Accommodation 
It is the obligation of the individual with a disability to request a reasonable accommodation. Enrolled students must submit 
any request for accommodations to the Program Office for Students with Disabilities on the appropriate campus for 
consideration. Applicants and/or employees must submit any request for accommodations to the Office of Human Resources 
or the Campus President. Individuals with a disability must provide recent documentation from a qualified professional that 
speaks to the specific disability and the requested accommodation. Requests for accommodations must be specific to the 
documented needs. The appropriate party will provide a written response. 

B. Complaint Resolution 

1. Informal Resolution 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged first to attempt to independently resolve concerns by initiating a ^ 

meeting with the faculty member, supervisor, or staff member with whom there is a concern or disagreement. 

However, when the matter cannot be resolved independently, individuals with a disability are encouraged to ^ 

address such instances through the following grievance procedure. 

2. Grievance Procedure 
Edison State College has adopted an internal grievance procedure for prompt and equitable resolution of 
complaints alleging any actions prohibited by the U.S. Department of Justice regulations implementing Title II 
(public, state and local government) of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Title II states, in part, that "no W 
otherwise qualified disabled individual shall, solely by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in, 
be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination" in programs or activities sponsored by a public entity. 

All applicant/employee ADA complaints, excluding those filed against the ADA Coordinator, should be addressed to Pamela Fairfax, 

ADA Coordinator/ Associate Vice President of Human Resources, 8099 College Parkway, S.W., P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers, Florida 

33906 or by calling (239) 489-9293 or call through the Florida Relay Service at 1 -800-955-877 1 (TTY). Q" 

All student ADA complaints should be addressed to the District Dean of Student Services, 8099 College Parkway, S.W., P.O. Box 

60210, Fort Myers, Florida 33906 or by calling (239) 489-9027 or call through the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY). 



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All ADA complaints filed against the ADA Coordinator should be addressed to the Exeeuti\ e Vice President, 8099 College Parkway, 
S.W., P.O. Box 60210, Fort Myers. Florida 33906 or by calling (239) 489-9120 or call through the Florida Relay Service at 1-800- 
955-8771 (TTY). 

1. All complaints should be filed in writing, contain the name, address of the person filing it. and briefly describe the alleged 
violation of the regulations. In addition, a copy of the original request for accommodation must be included with the 
complaint. 

2. A complaint should be filed within 1 80 calendar days after the complainant becomes aware of the alleged violation. 

3. An insestigation. as may be appropriate, shall follow the filing of the complaint. The in\estigation shall be conducted by the 
ADA Coordinator. Executive Vice President or District Dean of Student Services, depending upon the nature of the 
grievance. A thorough investigation will be held, affording the individual or specific class of indi\iduals and their 
representatives, if any, an opportunity to submit evidence relevant to a complaint. 

4. A written determination as to the validity of the complaint and a description of the resolution, if any. shall be issued by 
either the .^DA Coordinator, the District Dean for Student Services or the Executive Vice President, and a copy will be 
forwarded to the complainant no later than fifteen ( 1 5) working days after its filing. 

5. Either party may appeal the findings of the investigation to the Campus President or designee by filing a written request for a 
review of a complaint alleging discrimination on the basis of disability or failure to pro\ ide reasonable accommodation 
within ten (10) calendar days of receipt of the findings. 

6. The ADA Coordinator shall maintain the files and record complaints filed. 

7. Filing a complaint with the College's grievances system in no way precludes an individual's right to file a grievance with the 
Department of Education or the Department of Justice. 



61 



STUDENT LIFE 



Student life is considered an important facet of the Edison State College experience. In keeping with this philosophy, student activities 
staff work to provide a variety of cultural and recreational opporUinities that interest the general student population. All programs are 
funded by student-generated fees. 

Student Activities 

The Office of Student Life sponsors various activities and events on a weekly and monthly basis at Edison State College. These 
activities contribute to the academic, social and cultural development of our students, providing a more enjoyable and multifaceted 
campus experience. To find more information on student activities and programs, see Edison State's online calendar, the Portal 
calendar page, or come by S- 101 or 102 to pick up a monthly Student Life calendar. 

Student Participation in Decision Making 

Edison State College promotes student participation in the decision-making process of the College through a number of mechanisms. 
These include but are not limited to representation on the Curriculum Committee, student surveys, search committees, AS Program 
Committees, student focus groups. Student Government Association (SGA) and various clubs and organizations. 

Student Organizations 

Club activities at Edison State College provide a variety of opportunities for students to participate in the college community outside 
the classroom. For more information, contact the Student Life Office on the respective campus. 

How to Organize a Club at Edison State 

Students are encouraged to join clubs and to organize associations at Edison State for educational, political, social, religious or cultural 
purposes, as long as they are in keeping with the philosophy and objectives of the College. The College procedure for organizing a 
campus club is as follows; 

1. Secure a petition for organization from the Student Life Specialist. 

2. Submit, to the Student Life Specialist, the completed petition, which should include a list of prospective members, a 
constitution and by-laws, a sponsor and any other information that may be relevant according to the College Catalog. 

3. Following approval by the SGA and Student Life, the Student Life Specialist will inform the new club of its status and offer 
support as the club develops. 

Student Government Association and Student Representation 

The Student Government Association (SGA) is the student's voice at Edison State College. There is a Student Government 
Association on each of the three campuses. The SGA serves: 

1 . To provide a means whereby members of the student body may express themselves. 

2. To provide leadership in coordination of activities of the student body for the benefit of the entire College. 

3. To act as a service organization for Edison State College. 

The SGA is made up of club-appointed Representatives and elected Senators, who coordinate events, service projects and follow 
through on student issues. Representatives confer with their advisor on matters of student interest and concern and promote the general 
welfare of the student body. All qualified students, including upper-level students, are invited to participate in SGA by attending 
meetings and running for office. Students are free, individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of College policy and 
on matters of general interest to the student body. The Student Government Association provides a means for participation in the 
formulation and application of College policy affecting academic and student affairs with the assistance of the SGA Advisor and the 
Director of Student Life. Proposals for changes in policy, regulations and procedures that affect the student body as a whole are to be 
directed through the SGA and its advisor or the Director of Student Life. 

The right of assembly for students is recognized, providing that student gatherings do not disrupt or interfere with the orderly 
educational operation of the institution. Such assembly must be in compliance with Florida staUites and College policies and 
procedures. 

Student Identification 

Student ID cards are available to all students. Students should carry their ID card with them at all times. The photo ID card is required 
in the Learning Resource Center and in the various academic computer laboratories. Photo identification cards are also required for 
student verification at the admissions and registration counters, at the Assessment and Testing Center prior to testing, and when selling 
textbooks back to the bookstore. In addition, the student ID card may qualify students to discounts in area theaters and businesses. 



62 



ACADEMIC POLICIES & PROCEDURES 
RELATING TO STUDENTS 



Effective Catalog Policy 

Class Attendance/Absence/Cancellations 

Common Course Syllabus 

Final Examinations 

Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP) 

Grading Policies and Multiple Course Attempts 

Other Academic Policies 



63 



ACADEMIC POLICIES & PROCEDURES 
RELATING TO STUDENTS 



The following excerpts from the Edison State College District Academic Policies and Procedures Manual represent policies and 
procedures relating directly to students. The complete official manual, including forms, may be accessed through the College's home 
page, www.edison.edu. Click on the District Administration link on the left side of the home page, which will expand to reveal 
additional links. Click on the Academic Affairs link next. This will open a page with more links. The second link from the top is 
Academic Policies and Procedures. 



Effective Catalog Policy 



A 
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The College Catalog is the official document that describes the policies, academic programs and requirements for students attending 

Edison State. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to the policies and requirements that affect them. A student's 

effective catalog is the Edison State catalog in effect at the time of the student's initial enrollment at Edison State. A continuously 

enrolled student may choose to meet the graduation requirements specified in either the catalog in effect at the time of initial 

enrollment or at the time of graduation. Graduation requirements refer to the specific combination of general education courses, 

required core courses, elective courses, and any other completion requirements such as passing scores on exams or completion of 

capstone projects. If the prerequisite requirements for any course change since the student's time on initial enrollment, the student 

must meet the prerequisites in effect during the term that the student registers for the course. 

A student whose enrollment was interrupted for more than one year must meet the graduation requirements of the catalog in effect at 

the time of readmission or at the time of graduation. Students entering limited-access programs, such as Nursing, must meet the 

graduation requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of entry into the limited-access program. Exceptions to the effective catalog 

policy may be necessary if degree requirements change as a result of changes in statute, accreditation requirements, or requirements of 

other regulatory agencies to which Edison State College is subject. 

Although Edison State faculty, staff and administrators assist students in meeting the requirements for a degree or certificate, it is 

ultimately the student's responsibility to meet those requirements. Edison State does not award a degree or certificate until all ^ | 

requirements and obligations have been met. Questions regarding application of this rule can be directed to the Office of the Registrar. _ ■ 

Class Attendance, Absence Z ■ 

Students are expected to attend all class periods of the courses for which they are registered. Absence from several meetings of a | 

course may result in a lower grade, depending on the professor's grading policy. The determination of what constitutes excessive 

absence in any course rests with the professor conducting that course. Attendance requirements for a given course are to be found in 

the course syllabus. ^ ■ 

Class Cancellations ^ I 

Edison State attempts to honor its commitment to provide the classes scheduled for a given term. However, at times, usually due to ^ 

low enrollment, it may be necessary to cancel a class. In such cases every effort will be made to find an appropriate alternate class for — 

the student. '"^ 

Religious Observance 

Per Section 1006.53. Florida Statutes, the Edison State College policy on observance of religious holy days provides that students ^ 

shall, upon notifying their instructor, be excused from class to observe religious holy days of their faith. The student will be held 

responsible for any material covered during the excused absence, but will be permitted a reasonable amount of time to complete any 

work missed. Students who feel this policy has been improperly applied may have their grievance addressed through the general ^ 

academic appeals process. . — 

Common Course Syllabus ^ 

The common course syllabus provides students with information such as the description of the course, prerequisites, the major topics «» 

to be covered in the course, and the skills to be mastered as a result of taking the course. This information is the same for all sections , — 

of the course. ^ 

The common course syllabus also provides a detailed description of the particular section of the course that a student is enrolled in ' 
during a particular semester, and includes such information as schedule of class meetings and assignments, attendance policies, course 

materials, and scheduled test dates. Students can access generic course syllabi from the Edison State College web site. Looking at ^^ 

common course syllabi before enrolling in courses each semester can be helpful because they provide more detailed information than a ^ 

course description about what a course requires. Common course syllabi can be found at www.edison.edu. Click on the District <im. 

Administration link on the left, then click on the Academic Affairs link, then click on the Course Descriptions and Outlines folder link. , — 

Common course syllabi are arranged alphabetically by subject area. '"^ 

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Final Examinations 

The final examination schedule is published online at www.edison.edu. It is the student's responsibility to know when and where the 
final examination is scheduled. 

Standards of Academic Progress 

The purpose of maintaining Standards of Academic Progress is to assist Edison State in identifying and providing help to students who 
are having academic difficulties. The intent of SOAP is to inform students that they are not making appropriate academic progress. 
Students are required to meet with an Academic Advising Specialist or Coordinator of Retention Services to discuss ways of 
improving their academic status. 

To complete degree and certificate program requirements, students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better. The District Director of Counseling, Advising and Assessment sends written 
notification to each smdent placed on Academic Suspension, Probation after Academic Suspension or Academic Dismissal. 

1. Good Academic Standing; Students are considered in good academic standing if they maintain a 2.0 or higher cumulative 
GPA and earn credit in greater than 50 percent of the total credits attempted. 

2. Academic Warning: Students are considered on academic warning if they have attempted 12 credit hours or less with a 
cumulative GPA less than 2.0, or have earned credit in only 50 percent of the total credits attempted. These students should 
see an Academic Advising Specialist or Coordinator of Retention Services prior to future registration. Academic warning 
limits a student's enrollment to twelve (12) credits in Fall, Spring and Summer, and six (6) credits in Summer A and B. 

3. Academic Probation; Students whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 are placed on academic probation. These students are 
required to see an Academic Advising Specialist or Coordinator of Retention Services to determine the best strategies to 
improve their academic progress. Academic Probation limits a student to nine (9) credits in the Fall, Spring and fiill Summer 
semesters and limits a student to three(3) credits in Summer A and B semesters. Students on academic probation are placed 
on suspension if they fail to achieve a 2.0 term GPA in the following semester. Students could jeopardize their financial aid 
eligibility, scholarship or veteran's benefits. 

4. Academic Suspension; Students who failed to achieve a 2.0 term GPA while on academic probation are suspended for one 
semester (e.g.. Fall, Spring, Summer). Students may petition their suspension to continue their enrollment by completing an 
academic petition form obtained via the Office of Counseling and Advising or the Edison State College Web site. (Please 
see Petitions in the Student Records section for more infomiation.) Students approved for continuation of enrollment through 
petition will be placed on Probation After Academic Suspension status and required to enroll in the course, SLS 1 107 
Achieving Academic Success. Students whose petitions are denied are suspended for one ( I ) semester. 

5. Probation After Academic Suspension: Students who reenter Edison State following academic suspension are required to 
work closely with an Academic Advising Specialist or the Coordinator of Retention Services who helps the student develop 
an appropriate schedule of classes. Probation After Academic Suspension limits a student to nine credits in the Fall. Spring 
and full Summer semesters and limits a student to three credits in Summer A and B semesters. Students who fail to maintain 
or improve their current cumulative GPA and fail to achieve a 2.0 GPA in their most recent semester are dismissed for one 

( I ) full academic year. 

6. Academic Dismissal: Students who have been on probation after academic suspension and have failed to achieve a 2.0 term 
GPA are dismissed for one ftill academic year. Students may petition their dismissal to continue their enrollment by 
completing an academic petition form obtained via the Office of Counseling and Advising or Edison State web site. (Please 
see Petitions in the Student Records section for more information.) Students approved for continuation of enrollment through 
petition will be placed on Probation After Dismissal status and required to enroll in the course, SLS 1 107 Achieving 
Academic Success. Students whose petitions arc denied are dismissed for one (1) fiall academic year. At the end of the 
dismissal period, the student must petition for readmission. 

Grading Policies and Multiple Course Attempts 

Grade Point System 

The following grade symbols and grade point weights are used at Edison State College. 



A 


Excellent 




4 points 


B 


Good 




3 points 


C 


Average 




2 points 


D 


Poor 




1 point 


F 


Failure 




points 


I 


Incomplete* 




points 


NR 


Not reported 




points 


P 


Pass 




points 


S 


Satisfactory 




points 


w 


Withdraw** 




points 


X 


Audit (No credit) 


points 


* See Incomplete Grade. 


here. 




**See C 


ourse Withdrawal Policy, here. 





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Maximum Course Attempts 

In accordance with State Board of Education Rule 6A-14.0301, students may attempt the same course a maximum of three times at 
Edison State. Enrollment in a course beyond the last day to drop with a refund counts as an attempt for the purposes of this rule. Upon 
the third attempt, the student is not permitted to withdraw from the course and will receive a grade for the course. Course withdrawals 
and earned grades count toward the maximum attempts. 

Multiple Attempt Course Surcharge 

Florida Statute requires that any student enrolled more than tu'o times in the same state-fijnded undergraduate course, including 
college preparatory courses, be assessed an additional fee per credit hour. Students are assessed the additional fee on the third and 
subsequent attempt. Any coursework taken prior to the Fall 1997 semester does not count as an attempt when determining course 
attempts. Only coursework repeated at Edison State count in attempts. Transfer coursework does not count in the repeat calculation. 
Florida Statute also provides a one-time exception to the surcharge based on extenuating circumstances or financial hardship. (Please 
see Petitions in the Student Records section for more information.) 

Course Withdrawal Policy 

A student can withdraw without academic penalty from any course in a term by the mid-point of that term. Withdrawals after that date 

may be granted only through established institutional procedures. The College Calendar provides information on important dates for 

each semester, such as the last day to withdraw from courses without a penalty. 

In order to withdraw from a course or courses, the student must complete a request to withdraw from a course. This request can be 

secured in the Counseling Center or Registrar's Office and be turned in at the Registrar's Office. 

Students who officially withdraw from a class or classes any time prior to the date listed in the College Calendar will receive a grade 

of "W." A student will be limited to two withdrawals per course. Upon the third attempt, the student will not be permitted to withdraw, 

and will receive a grade for that course. 

Incomplete Grade 

A grade of "I" is given only when the student has successftilly completed most of the course in question and, in the judgment of the 

professor, is able to make up any deficit within the assigned time frame. A student who receives an "I" must make up the deficiency 

and have the change of grade recorded in the Office of the Registrar no later than last day to remove incomplete grades as published in 

the College Catalog. After that, the grade defaults to an "F." The responsibility for making the necessary arrangements with a 

professor for the removal of an "I" rests with the student. A student may not register for a class in which they have an "I" grade. 

If a professor awarding an "I" is not going to be available the following term, it is the responsibility of the professor awarding an "1" to 

make arrangements for the student to deliver the necessary completed coursework to a fellow faculty member or the professor's 

supervisor for a change of grade. 

In such a case, it is the professor's responsibility to inform the faculty member or supervisor and the student, in writing, what needs to 

be completed in order for the "I" to be changed. The professor should provide a copy of the student's grades to date, and describe the 

student's remaining work and final grading procedure. 

In extreme cases where circumstances prevent a professor from assigning a grade, final responsibility for the grade change rests with 

the supervisor. 

Grade Corrections 

The responsibility for the evaluation of student coursework and the assignment of final grades rests with the professor who has been 

assigned to teach that course. A student who believes that an error was made in the assignment of their final grade must contact his or 

her professor by the 28th calendar day after the start of classes in the following semester. For example, the student must request the 

review of a grade that was assigned in the Fall Semester by the 28th calendar day after the start of Spring classes. 

The professor who assigned the final grade must initiate a Change of Grade. The Change of Grade form must be approved by the 

appropriate academic dean and forwarded to the Office of the Registrar. 

As a matter of practice, a grade is corrected only in the instance where an error was made in the recording of a grade. Under no 

circumstances will an academic dean change a student's grade. In rare cases under compelling extenuating circumstances, an academic 

dean may ask a professor to consider changing a grade if it is deemed appropriate to do so. 

During the semester professors will communicate directly with those students who are doing unsatisfactory work. Students with 

unsatisfactory performance are encouraged to meet with their professors with a view toward improving their work. 

Grade Forgiveness Policy 

The Grade Forgiveness Policy permits students to repeat a course in an attempt to improve a grade of "D" or "F". A student will be 

limited to two repeats per course, or a total of three attempts. Upon the third attempt, the student is not permitted to withdraw from the 

course and the grade assigned is the final grade for the course. Course withdrawals and earned grades count toward the maximum 

attempts. 

Grade forgiveness is automatic, beginning Summer B, 1995. for all students who have repeated courses at Edison State College. 

Students must complete a Grade Forgiveness Form only if BOTH the original and the forgiven grades were awarded in terms or 

semesters previous to Summer B 1995, or if both courses were transferred to Edison State from other institutions. 

Students should be aware that some colleges or universities may not accept the grade of a repeated course, or may compute grade point 

averages incorporating the grade originally assigned. 

66 



Students receiving financial aid of any type are cautioned to cheek with the Financial Aid Office to ensure that the repeated courses 

will count toward their financial aid award. 

Only the last grade earned in a repeated course will be computed mto the grade point average at Edison State, provided that the last 

assigned grade is not a "W" or an "X" (Audit). However, all grades will appear on the transcript. 

Students may not repeat a course to improve a grade point average after the awarding of the Associate degree. 

This policy applies to courses that are repeated for grade forgiveness purposes, it does not apply to courses designated as repeatable. 

Student requests for a change of grade to a "W" must be submitted through a petition for Exception to Registration Policies and 

Procedures. 



Other Academic Policies 



Dean's List 

At the conclusion of the Fall and Spring semesters only, the Office of the Registrar will generate a list of students completing 12 or 
more credits whose grade point average is 3.5 or above, and who did not receive any grade below a "C". The list is published after the 
period allowed for students to make up "Incompletes." The Dean's List will be posted on each campus, and each student on this list 
will receive a letter noting the accomplishment, signed by the appropriate academic officer for each campus. A notation of this 
accomplishment will be made on the transcript of each student .so honored. Please note: College Preparatory Courses and course 
beginning with the prefixes EAP. PEL, PEM, PEN. and SLS are not considered in calculating Dean's List eligibility. 

Latin Honors Graduation Distinction for Baccalaureate Students 

Baccalaureate students with a record of academic achievement may be considered for Latin honors upon graduation. To graduate with 
a Latin honors distinction, baccalaureate degree candidates must have completed a minimum of 39 credit hours of upper division 
graded coursework at Edison State College and must have earned an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.50 or higher. Latin honors 
designations are conferred according to following scale and are noted on a student's official academic transcripts and diploma: 

Cum Laiulc (with honors): an overall GPA of 3.50, but below 3.70 

Magna Cum Laude (with lihgh honors): an overall GPA of 3.70, but below 3.90 

Summa Cum Laudc (with highest honors): an overall GPA of 3.90 or higher 
When determining Latin honors for graduation, the GPA is not rounded up (e.g., 3.49 is not rounded up to 3.50 for graduation with an 
honors designation). 

Recognition of Latin Honors at Commencement: 

Candidates who have accumulated the minimum Latin honors GPA requirements, prior to the term of graduation, will be recognized at 
the commencement ceremony and will be provided with gold honors cords. Candidates who will become eligible for honors after the 
current term's grades are recorded will not be recognized at the commencement ceremony, but will have the honors designation posted 
on their official academic transcripts and diploma. 

Baccalaureate Regalia: 

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree will dress in the traditional black gown. Gold embossed diploma covers will be presented to 
baccalaureate graduates. Tassels for placement on the traditional graduation cap will represent the color associated with the 
baccalaureate discipline. The colors associated with the different disciplines are as follows: 

Business Drab 

Education Light Blue 

Nursing Apricot 

Public Administration Peacock Blue 

Faculty Office Hours 

Full-time professors are required to schedule a minimum of 10 hours per week of office hours, during which time they will be 
physically present on campus and available to assist students. The scheduling of these office hours is subject to the approval of the 
professor's supervisor but should ideally be distributed over the five working days each week. Office hours will be posted on or near 
faculty office doors. Additional office hours beyond the required 10 hours may be scheduled, and smdents may also be seen by 
appointment. Faculty teaching online courses have the same requirements for holding office hours, but may hold a portion of their 
office hours online. 

Part-time professors arc required each semester to make themselves available for student consultation before or after class. They may 
also make themselves available by appointment, phone, voice mail, or e-mail. Availability to students should be appropriately noted in 
the class syllabus. 

Individualized Study 

Individualized Suidy leads to the completion of a college course and the receipt of academic credit. The content of the learning 
experience is completed under the direction of a professor assigned to work with the student independently of the normal class 
schedule. While Edison State College recognizes the legitimate need for such learning experiences, its policy is to keep this practice to 
a minimum. Individualized Study may be used to complete required courses when extenuating circumstances exist as defined by the 
academic dean. Approval must be obtained before the student is allowed to take the course. 
Individualized Study courses are permitted for the following circumstances: 

67 



1. A regularly scheduled course is cancelled due to insufficient enrollment and no alternate course can be taken to meet the 
student's educational goals for that semester. 

2. A student is unable to complete a needed regularly offered class due to a documented medical or learning disability, or 
unique work schedule. Appropriate documentation must be provided by the student. 

3. A student is in his/her last semester and a course required for graduation is not being offered and an appropriate substitute is 
unavailable. 

The request form for Individualized Study is obtained at the academic dean's office, or at Edison State's Web page www.edison.edu. 
Click on the District Administration link on the left, then click on the Academic Affairs link, then click the Forms link, and click on 
the Word Format link. The Individualized Study form will be on the list of forms available for download. The Individualized Study 
form must be completed and submitted to the academic dean prior to the end of the drop/add period for the given semester. Once the 
form is approved, the student may register for the class. It is the professor's responsibility to prepare the syllabus for each 
Individualized Study. 

The standard college grading system applies to all Individualized Study. Grades earned through Individualized Study have the same 
status as those earned through regular class attendance. 

Word-Processing or Typing Policy 

Students are expected to type or word-process papers presented in courses taken for credit. Edison State's basic composition course, 
ENC 1101, requires students to demonstrate competence in the basic use of computers, including word processing. The word 
processing of papers is regarded as the norm and is considered good practice for students transferring to upper-division colleges and 
universities. Students who cannot type are urged to enroll in a keyboarding class, or to seek assistance through various options 
available in Academic Support Programs. 

Student Review of Instruction and Course Evaluations 

In order to improve the teaching/learning process, further course and program development, and encourage faculty professional 
development, it is necessary to gather information regarding instructional practices and procedures. Among relevant kinds of 
information is the student's opinion regarding classes he/she is taking. Student Review of Instruction and Course Evaluation forms are 
distributed after mid-term examinations. The professor arranges for a student in the class to administer the survey and is not to be 
present while the survey is completed. Written comments regarding any aspect of instaiction in the survey are encouraged. Students 
are encouraged to be as candid and as accurate as possible. Written comments should focus on elements that the student thinks can be 
improved, or on elements that were particularly effective or satisfying so that these may be retained. 

The person administering the survey should remain in the room for questions, collect the survey and materials, seal responses in the 
envelope provided, and return the envelope to the designated office. The survey and the envelope should be checked to verify the 
semester, year, course number, section and professor's name. For those enrolled in distance learning, the survey is given to the student 
by the test proctor when the student takes the last proctored exam of the semester. Copies of these directions may be obtained from 
any instructional administrator's office. Class averages, other survey results, and comments are reviewed by the appropriate 
instructional supervisor. 

Surveys will be forwarded to the professor after the term is completed so the professor may benefit from students' opinions regarding 
instruction. 

Student Surveys 

Edison State College will periodically distribute surveys to students in order to obtain information usefiji in evaluating education 
programs, student services and many other aspects of the College and its mission. These surveys may be sent by mail, administered 
over the phone, administered by a link to a Web site sent by e-mail, or administered in the classroom. They may be administered to a 
cross-section of students, to graduates of particular programs or to students enrolled for a short time. Results of student surveys are 
shared with administrators, faculty, the Board of Trustees and with students. Findings are reported as summaries of all responses, 
without identifying any particular student. The information is used to identify ways to improve programs and services, and to plan 
fijture activities. Student participation in surveys ensures that the information gathered provides an accurate basis for decision-making. 

Textbook Selection Process 

It is the practice of Edison State College to encourage selection of the same textbooks for all sections of a particular course. This 
ensures some consistency in the content covered in each course section. The College anticipates that, except in unusual circumstances, 
course materials will be adopted for at least one year. Committees will meet each year to review materials currently in use and to make 
decisions regarding the continued use of course textbooks and materials or the adoption of new materials. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

State Board of Education Rule 6A-I0.024I2 stipulates that all undergraduate sUidents who admit to a Florida public university must 
have earned two credits of sequential foreign language at a secondary level (high school) or the equivalent of such instruction at the 
postsecondary level (2 semesters). The equivalent number of college credits in American Sign Language may substitute for the foreign 
language admission requirement. In certain cases students may be admitted without the completion of this requirement but must satisfy 
the foreign language requirement prior to graduation from the university. This requirement does not apply to students who have 
already earned a baccalaureate degree or those sUidents who entered a state university in Florida prior to Fall 1987. (NOTE: some 
majors may have a foreign language graduation requirement in addition to admission requirement.) Please consult with the 
Coordinator of Counseling Services or an Academic Advising Specialist about the foreign language requirements. 



68 



Edison State College does not require completion of foreign language for admission into its baccalaureate degree programs. Students 
must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of a bachelor's degree. Students may meet this 
competency in two ways: 

a. successful completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school transcripts must be 
submitted to the College Registrar), or 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in a college (or through 
corresponding Collciic Lewi Examination Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards for review 
of non-traditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in languages other than French. 
German and Spanish). 

Lifelong Learning Surcharge 

Florida Statute requires that students who enroll in courses that were taken previously and passed with a grade of "C" or higher, be 
charged a Lifelong Learning continuous enrollment surcharge. Edison State College bills the new course at the out-of-state tuition rate. 
This rule applies even if the original course was transferred to Edison State College from an out-of-state school. 



69 



ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS S 

Academic Support Programs ^ 

College Preparatory Coursework ^ 

Center for Academic Excellence ^- 

Student Academic Support and Career Services (Charlotte and Collier Campuses) '^ 

Programs for Students with Disabilities ^^ 
Student Support Services Program 

Upward Bound ^j^ 

Cultural Diversity ^ 

Degree Acceleration Programs CI 

Advanced Placement ^- 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) "■"' 

International Baccalaureate (IB) Program P'' 

Honors Scholar Program 

Libraries, Bookstores, and Technology Help Desk ^ 

Libraries 

Bookstores ^. 

Technology Help Desk ^~ 



70 



ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS 

College Preparatory Coursework 

The Florida Legislature ereated, by statute. College Preparatory Programs in all of Florida's community colleges effective July I, 
1985. All degree and certificate-seeking students are tested prior to registration. Edison State recognizes the ACT-E, SAT-R, and 
FCELPT tests for purposes of evaluation. The FCELPT is routinely given to entering students. Students must present scores on the 
above tests that have been earned within the two (2) years prior to admission to Edison State. Further testing on the FCELPT may be 
necessary if the scores are more than two (2) years old. Students must enroll in college preparatory communication and computation 
instruction if test scores are below the specific levels. (Please see Assessment Services in the Student Services section for more 
information.) Students scoring above the specific scores on the placement test may enroll in college credit instruction. Students scoring 
below the specific scores on the placement test are required to enter college preparatory instruction. College preparatory instruction 
does NOT count toward meeting degree requirements. Students who test into college preparatory instruction and subsequently 
enroll in college preparatory instruction must successfully complete the required college preparatory studies by the time they 
have successfully accumulated 12 hours of college-level coursework, or they must maintain continuous enrollment in college 
preparatory coursework each semester until the requirements are completed while performing satisfactorily in the degree 
earning coursework. Students cannot enroll for more than three (3) attempts in each course to complete college preparatory 
instruction. Students enrolled in a college preparatory course who drop the course after the drop/add period are considered to have 
utilized one of the three attempts allowed to complete that course.Students who must enroll in the same college preparatory course a 
third time shall pay fees at 100 percent of the fiill cost of instruction. Students who withdraw or fail a class due to extenuating 
circumstances, or who have a financial hardship, may be granted an exception to the 100 percent full cost of instmction. (Please see 
Petitions in the Student Records section for more information) Students must provide written documentation of financial hardship, 
disability or extenuating circumstances that resulted in the withdrawal or failure. Such documentation shall be submitted to the College 
Registrar for consideration. Students are permitted to enroll in college preparatory instruction concurrently with credit instruction in 
courses for which they are qualified. College preparatory students may not enroll in the following categories of college credit courses 
while completing their college preparatory coursework: 

1. College preparatoi7 students who are deficient in mathematics may not enroll in any college-level mathematics course or 
courses that require mathematics skills beyond the skill level of the student. 

2. College preparatory students who are deficient in English and/or reading skills may not enroll in English or humanities 
courses that meet the Gordon Rule requirements, or any courses that require communication skills beyond the skill level of 
the student. 

3. College preparatory students who are deficient in all three areas may enroll in college-level courses such as orientation 
courses, college success courses or courses that are not dependent on college-level computation and communication skills. 

College preparatory instruction is provided in reading, writing and mathematics. There are three levels of reading, three levels of 
English and two levels of mathematics. College preparatory reading instruction includes the recognition of main ideas, supporting 
details, meanings of words in context, author's purpose, tone, valid arguments, explicit and implicit relationships within and between 
sentences, and the ability to detect bias, to distinguish fact from opinion and to draw logical inferences and conclusion. 
College preparatory writing instruction includes grammatical concepts and usage, punctuation, word choice, and paragraph and essay 
development. College preparatory mathematics instruction includes arithmetic and introductory algebra including real numbers and 
their properties and basic operations, linear expressions, factoring of algebraic expressions, solutions of linear equations and 
inequalities, graphing, and quadratic equations. All college preparatory classes are 4 credit hours. There is also a required lab 
component for every class to be completed in the College Prep Learning Center. The hours of the Learning Center are posted every 
semester. The student's lab component can be completed any time the Learning Center is open. Also offered through Academic 
Success Programs is an opportunity to refresh basic skills in English, math, and reading. Students who are reviewing for a second 
attempt at the Florida College Entry Level Placement Test (FCELPT) are invited to come to the open lab and to meet with a 
paraprofessional who will provide a practice test. Using the practice test to make a diagnosis of the student's weaknesses, a 
paraprofessional will assign some refresher activities for the individual student. The smdent can work at his or her own pace. If 
Internet activities are assigned, students can access them anywhere Internet service is available. After reviewing, a second practice test 
will be available to the student. 

Center for Academic Excellence 

Edison State College is committed to its students and their success and to help them become better learners. To this end. each campus 
of Edison State College has established a Center for Academic Excellence whose mission is to provide a variety of programs and tools 
to enable Edison State students to achieve academic success. Each Center is unique to its campus location but all provide a highly 
supportive environment for student academic engagement. The College Prep Center, The Math Center. The Writing Center and the 
Peer Tutoring Center are all located within the Center for Academic Excellence. These individual centers facilitate learning and 
academic achievement by using individual and small group tutoring sessions. All services in the Centers are free to registered Edison 
State students. 

In the Center for Academic Excellence students will find the SOAR (Students Opportunities for Achievement and Rewards) Program. 
SOAR welcomes all students in a supportive environment that provides them with essential resources and services that range from 
daily study skills workshops to individualized attention with an academic coach. Free workshops cover a variety of life management 
skills that pertain to academic success. A sampling of workshops include: Be Scholarship Savvy, Fear of Math, Follow Your Dreams, 
Learn to Remember, Tackle Test Anxiety, and Time Management. Workshops are scheduled during day and evening hours to meet the 
needs of all students. 

71 



Students can take advantage of the Learning Styles Assessment tool to help them identify their best learning preferences. They can 

also watch the excellent selection of academic skills DVDs or gather resources from the many themed bulletin boards scattered around CZ^ 

the campus. When students need individualized attention that relates to their academic experience at Edison State, they can take 

advantage of the Coaching Program. Students meet one-on-onc with a SOAR Coach to discuss challenges, work on educational and W 

career goals and celebrate successes. Faculty refers students to SOAR through the Early Alert system when the students are having ^ 

academic problems and are exhibiting poor study habits. The SOAR staff receives the referrals, contact the students and invite them to '^ 

come in for individual consultations to discuss possible interventions to help them successfully complete their course work. ^ 

Eligible students can take advantage of the Single Parent Program. This is a grant-fimded program that provides benefits such as ^ 

scholarships and book vouchers. Students must be financial aid and be single. They must have custody of their children and be —. 

majoring in an Associate of Science or Certificate Program and maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0. ^"^ 

Career Exploration resources are available for students who arc uncertain about their majors. Free assessments help students select a '^ 

major based upon their interests and personality. Assistance is also provided for resume and cover letter writing and interviewing ^^ 
techniques. Students may also learn about job descriptions and educational requirements for thousands of occupations. Students may 

register for the Edison State JobNet, where they can view hundreds of area jobs and career listings, and post resumes for participating «»- 

employers. ^- 

Student Academic Support and Career Services (Charlotte and Collier ^ 

Campuses) - 

The Student Academic Support and Career Services Center at the Charlotte and Collier Campuses offer academic and career-related ^ 
support to help students achieve their goals and succeed in college. The Center includes the SOAR Program and Career Services. 

Programs for Students with Disabilities 1 

Edison State College offers students with documented disabilities programs to equalize access to the educational process. The *- 

Coordinator for Students with Disabilities provides support services in the provision of educational accommodations to self- "^ 

identifying students. Documented students needing accommodations and modifications are provided appropriate direct services such ^ 
as note taking, test proctoring, and scribing. 

Student Support Services Program z 

The Student Support Services Program is fimded by the U.S. Department of Education. This program is designed for students whose ^ 

parents did not graduate from a four-year college/university and whose family income may hinder them from remaining in college — 

without financial assistance. A potential Student Support Services student must be enrolled at Edison State , AA degree seeking, ^ 

planning to transfer, and must have a demonstrated academic need. The student must be a citizen or a permanent resident of the U.S., '"' 

or a permanent resident of a territory of the U.S. ^ 
Student Support Services assists selected, qualified participants with: 

• Course and transfer advisement — 

• Scholarships for limited income participants *' 

• Tuition fee exemptions for peer mentors ^ 

• Cultural and educational activities ^■ 

• Workshops on relevant topics ^' 

• Computer skills lab ^, 

• Peer mentoring program '^ 

• Math and English tutoring services ^_ 

• Career exploration — . 

• Enrichment program ^" 

Upward Bound - 

The Upward Bound Program, established at Edison State College in 1999, is a grant program fijnded by the U.S. Department of _ 

Education. Upward Bound is designed to provide a comprehensive academic guidance and skills development program to selected « 

eligible students from five target high schools in Lee County (Lehigh Senior High, Fort Myers High. East Lee County High, Riverdale ^ 

High and Dunbar High School). It is an intensive program that requires participants to attend monthly meetings at the Lee County "* 

Campus during the academic year, weekly tutoring as needed, and a six-week summer school program. To participate in the program, ^ 

students must meet eligibility requirements to include: being a U.S. citizen or permanent resident; being from a low-income household ^ 

as established by the federal government; and/or being a potential first generation college student. Students are selected as ninth or ^ 

tenth graders and must make a commitment to stay with the program until they enter into a postsecondary educational program. ^ 

Cultural Diversity I 

Edison State College supports the rich cultural diversity represented by its student body. The Edison State College Multicultural Task » 

Force is committed to fostering an inclusive and diverse campus community which promotes awareness, understanding, and '~ 

72 Z 



acceptance. It also values and celebrates diversity among administrators, faculty, staff and students at lidison State College. Edison 
State College celebrates cultural diversity with diversity workshops, student events and displays during Latin American History Week, 
Black History Month, Women's History Month, and an annual Multicultural celebration. A variety of multicultural student clubs are 
available to students including: the African-American Student Association (Lee Campus), Latin American Student Association (Lee 
Campus), Multicultural Club (Collier Campus), International Club (Charlotte Campus), the Haitian Student Association (Lee 
Campus), and the West Indian Student Association (Lee Campus). Students are encouraged to consult their Student Handbooks for 
more information on multicultural events and activities. Smdcnt activity and student organization information is also available in the 
Student Development Offices at the Charlotte, Collier, and Lee Campuses. 

Accelerated Programs for High School Students 

Edison State College encourages students to accelerate their education by providing the following acceleration programs. These 
programs allow students to shorten the time required to complete a degree or certificate by eammg college credit based on the 
student's acquisition of knowledge prior to or during their attendance at Edison State. 
1. Accelerated Programs for High School Suidents: 

A. Early College (formerly Dual Enrollment) 

Early college provides an opportunity for qualified high school juniors and seniors to enroll in Edison State 
courses while still enrolled in high school. Early college students receive both high school and college credit. 
College preparatory and health and wellness courses are not included in the early college program. 

To qualify for early college, all seniors must have a minimum unweighted high school GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; 
juniors must have a minimum unweighted high school GPA of 3.5. Sophomores in Charlotte. Glades, Hendry or 
Lee Counties must have an unweighted GPA of 3.5. All candidates must demonstrate readiness for college-level 
work. Readiness for college-level work is determined through achievement of the State minimum cutoff scores on 
the appropriate sections of the FCELPT, or appropriate ACT-E or SAT-R scores. (Please see Assessment Services 
in the Student Services section for more information.) 

Early college students must submit a completed Accelerated Programs form listing the courses that they are 
approved to register for each term. Accelerated Programs forms must be signed by the high school principal or 
designee, the parent if the applicant is under 18, and the applicant. Early college courses are taught on the high 
school campus or on the college campus. 

Early college students are exempt from application, matriculation and special fees. Textbooks and instaictional 
materials for public school students are provided by the school district through the high school. Students enrolled 
in non-public secondary schools or in home school programs must pay for their textbooks and instructional 
materials. 

B. Early Admissions: 

Early admissions provides an opportunity for qualified high school seniors to enroll fiill-time in Edison State 
courses on the College campus while still enrolled in high school. Early admissions students receive both high 
school and college credit. College preparatory courses are not included in the early admissions program. 

To qualify for early admissions, seniors must have a minimum unweighted high school GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, 
and must demonstrate readiness for college-level work. Readiness for college-level work is determined through 
achievement of the State minimum cutoff scores on the appropriate sections of the FCELPT, or appropriate ACT- 
E or SAT-R scores. (Please see Assessment Services in the Student Services section for more information.) 

Early admissions students must submit a completed Accelerated Programs form listing the courses that they are 
approved to register for each term. Accelerated Programs fonns must be signed by the high school principal or 
designee, the parent if the applicant is under 18, and the applicant. 

Early admissions courses are taught on the Edison State campus. Early admissions students are exempt from 
application, matriculation and special fees. Textbooks and instructional materials for public school students are 
provided by the school district through the high school. Students enrolled in non-public secondary schools or in 
home school programs must pay for their textbooks and instructional materials. 



73 



DEGREE ACCELERATION PROGRAMS 

Advanced Placement 

Edison State College participates in the Advanced Placement Program (AP) offered by the College Board to provide greater flexibility 
and opportunity for high school students to proceed with their education. Students must submit to the Office of the Registrar an 
official transcript from the College Board for scores to be considered. Edison State College awards college credit for qualifying AP 
examination scores based on standards recommended by the Florida Department of Education and the Articulation Coordinating 
Committee. Acceptance of AP tests and scores is subject to change without notice. AP credit is not granted if the student has already 
earned credit for the course. 



AP Examination 


Score of 3 


Score of 4 


Score of 5 




Course 


Course 


Course 


Art History 


ARH 1000 


ARH 1050, 1051 


ARH 1050, 1051 


Biology 


BSC I005/1005L 


BSC 1010/IOlOL 


BSC 1010/lOlOLand 101 1/101 IL 


Calculus AB 


MAC 23 11 


MAC 23 1 1 


MAC 23 1 1 


Calculus BC 


MAC 23 1 1 


MAC 231 1,2312 


MAC 231 1,2312 


Chemistry 


CHM 2020/2020L 


CHM 2045/2045L 


CHM 2045/2045L and 
2046/2046L 


Chinese Language 


CHI 1930 






Computer Science A 


CGS 1075 


CGS 1075 


CGS 1075 


Computer Science AB 


CGS 1076 


CGS 1076 


CGS 1076 


Economics: Micro 


ECO 2023 


ECO 2023 


ECO 2023 


Economics: Macro 


ECO 20 13 


ECO 2013 


ECO 20 13 


English Language and 


ENC 1101 


ENC 1101. 1102 


ENC 1101. 1102 


Composition 








English Literature and 


ENC 1101 


ENC 1101, 1102 or LIT 1005 


ENC 1101, 1102 or LIT 1005 


Composition 








Environmental Science 


ISC 1051/1051L 


ISC 1051/1051L 


ISC 1051/1051L 


European History 


EUH 1000 


EUH 1000, 1001 


EUH 1000, 1001 


French 


FRE 2200 


FRE 2200,2201 


FRE 2200, 2201 


German 


GER 2200 


GER 2200, 2201 


GER 2200. 2201 


Government and Politics: 


CPO 2002 


CPO 2002 


CPO 2002 


Comparative 








Government and Politics: 


POS2041 


POS 2041 


POS 2041 


United States 








Human Geography 


GEO 2400 


GEO 2400 


GEO 2400 


Music Theory 


MUT 1001 


MUT 1001 


MUT 1001 



A- 



Physics B 

Physics C: 
Electricity/Magnetism 

Physics C: Mechanics 

Psychology 

Spanish 

Statistics 

Studio Art: Drawing 
Portfolio 

Studio Art: 2-D Design 
Portfolio 

Studio Art: 3-D Design 
Portfolio 

United States History 

World History 



If composite score is 3 or higher If composite score is 3 or higher If composite score is 3 or higher 

MUT 1 1 1 1 , 1 24 1 If both aural and MUT 1 1 1 1 , 1 24 1 If both aural and MUT 1 1 1 1 , 1 24 1 If both aural and 

nonaural sub scores are 3 or higher nonaural sub scores are 3 or higher nonaural sub scores are 3 or higher 

PHY 1053/1053L PHY 1053/1053L and 1054/1054L PHY 1053/1053L and 1054/1054L 

PHY 1054/1 054L PHY 2049/2049L PHY 2049/2049L 



PHY 1 053/1 053L 
PS Y 2012 
SPN 2200 
STA 2023 
ART 1300C 

ART 1201C 

ART 1203C 

AMH2010 
WOH 1023 



PHY 2048/2048L 
PSY2012 
SPN 2200, 2201 
STA 2023 
ART 1300C 

ART 1201C 

ART 1203C 

AMH 2010,2020 
WOH 1023 



PHY 2048/2048L 
PS Y 2012 
SPN 2200,2201 
STA 2023 
ART 1300C 

ART 1201C 

ART 1203C 

AMH 2010, 2020 
WOH 1023 



74 



College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

Edison State College participates in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) offered by the Educational Testing Service 
(ETS) to provide greater flexibility and opportunity for students to proceed with their education. Students must submit to the Office of 
the Registrar an oflTicia! transcript from the Educational Testing Service for scores to be considered. Edison State College awards 
college credit for qualifying CLEP examination scores based on standards recommended by the Florida Department of Education and 
the Articulation Coordinating Committee. Acceptance of CLEP tests and scores is subject to change without notice. CLEP credit is not 
granted if the student has already earned credit for the course. The Nursing Program at Edison State College does not accept CLEP 
credit for DEP 2004 Human Growth and Development. For additional infomiation. contact the Assessment Services area on your local 
campus. 



CLEP Examination 

BUSINESS 

Information Systems and Computer Applications 
Introduction to Business Law 
Financial Accounting 
Principles of Management 
Principles of Marketing 



Score 


Course 


50 


CGS 1077 


50 


BUL2241 


50 


ACG 1001 


50 


MAN 2021 


50 


MAR 2011 



COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 
American Literature 
English Composition with essay 
English Literature 



50 AML 2000 
50 ENC 1101 
50 ENL 2000 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
French Language 
French Language 
German Language 
German Language 
Spanish Language 
Spanish Language 



50 
59 
50 
60 
50 
63 



FRE 1120 
FRE 1120, 1121 
GER 1120 
GER 1120, 1121 
SPN 1120 
SPN 1120, 1121 



HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
American National Government 
History of the United States I 
History of the United States II 
Human Growth and Development 
Humanities 

Introduction to Educational Psychology 
Introduction to Psychology 
Introduction to Sociology 
Principles of Macroeconomics 
Principles of Microeconomics 
Western Civilization I 
Western Civilization II 



50 


POS2041 


50 


AMH2010 


50 


AMH 2020 


50 


DEP 2004 


50 


HUM 2235 or 2250 


50 


EDP 2002 


50 


PS Y 2012 


50 


SYG 1000 


50 


ECO 2013 


50 


ECO 2023 


50 


EUH 1000 


50 


EUH 1001 



SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

Biology 

Calculus 

Chemistry 

College Algebra 

Mathematics 

Precalculus 



50 


BSC 1005 


50 


MAC 2233 


50 


CHM 2025 


50 


MAC 1105 


50 


MGF 1107 


50 


MAC 1 147 or 1140 or 1114 



75 



International Baccalaureate (IB) Program 



Edison State College accepts the International Baccalaureate (IB) offered by the International Baccalaureate Organization to provide 
greater flexibility and opportunity for high school students to proceed with their education. Students must submit to the Office of the 
Registrar an official transcript from the International Baccalaureate Organization for scores to be considered. Edison State College 
awards college credit for IB examination scores based on standards recommended by the Florida Department of Education and the 
Articulation Coordinating Committee. Acceptance of IB tests and scores is subject to change without notice. IB credit is not granted if 
the student has already earned credit for the course. 

Students who receive the IB Diploma are granted college credit for scores of four (4) or higher on both higher level and standard level 
examinations as listed below. Students who do not receive the IB diploma are granted college credits for scores of five (5) or above on 
IB higher level examinations only. 



IB Examination 



Score of 4 Course 



Score of 5 - 7 Course 



Biology 

Business and Management 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Design Technology 

Economics 

English A I 

Environmental Studies 

French 

Further Mathematics 

Geography 

German 

History 

Math Methods 

Math Studies 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Social Anthropology 

Spanish 

Theatre Arts 

Visual Arts 



BSC 1005/1005L 
GEBlOll 
CHM 2025/2025L 
CGS 1078 
ETI 1410 
ECO 2000 
ENC 1101 
ISC 1050/1050L 
FRE 1121 
MHF 1202 
GEA 2000 
GER 1121 
WOH 1030 
MAC 1105 
MAT 1033 
MAC 1147 
MUL 1010 
PHI 2010 
PHY I020/1020L 
PS Y 2012 
ANT 1410 
SPN 1121 
THE 1020 
ART Elective 



BSC 1005/1005L, 1010/lOlOL 

GEB 1011, MAN Elective 

CHM 2025/2025L, 2045/2045L 

CGS 1078, CGS Elective 

ETI 1410, ETI Elective 

ECO 2013, 2023 

ENC 1101, 1102 

ISC 1050/1050L 

FRE 1121,2200 

MHF 1202, 1209 

GEO 2200, 2400 

GER 1121,2200 

WOH 1030. History Elect. 

MAC 1105, 1140 

MAT 1033, MGF 1106 

MAC 1147,2233 

MUL 1010, MUT 1001 

PHI 2010, PHI Elective 

PHY I020/1020L, I009/1009L 

PSY 2012, PSY Elective 

ANT 1410, 1511 

SPN 1121,2200 

THE 1020, THE Elective 

ART Elective (2) 



76 



HONORS SCHOLAR PROGRAMS 

Edison State College offers qualified students with high ability and motivation an enriched, challenging program of study through the 
Honors Scholar Program (HSP). Participation in this superior educational experience provides for intellectual and social development, 
builds character, and promotes enthusiasm for lifelong learning. Honors courses are not intended to be appreciably more work than 
traditional classes, but instead offer innovative approaches to learning that focus on the individual student. Honors classes may, 
depending on the course, involve problem solving, student projects, or a student seminar approach to learning. Synergy results when 
the best and brightest are assembled together to inspire each other to think in unique, novel ways. Faculty are selected for their 
expertise and interest in helping students. 

Benefits of the Program 

• Acti\e discussions 

• Small class sizes 

• Independent and critical thinking 

• Field trips 

• Honors Resource room with Internet-accessible computer 

• Independent research or creative project option 

• HSP student executive board 

• Annual spring luncheon 

Edison State Honors Scholars are desirable recruits to other institutions of higher learning and often receive special attention for 
scholarships and awards. 

Completion of the Honors Scholar Program is recorded on the students' transcripts. Students who graduate with Honors or High 
Honors are also recognized at the graduation ceremony. The cumulative grade point average is used to identify graduation with 
Honors or High Honors as follows: 

Honors 3.50 to 3.99 Cumulative GPA 

High Honors 4.0 Cumulative GPA 

Requirements for Admission 

Students must be AA or AS degree seeking and are required to write an essay and complete an application. The applicant must meet at 
least two (2) of the following criteria, one from Column A and one from Column B, to qualify for the program. 

Column A Column B 

1. Minimum ACT of 25 or, minimum SAT of 1100 or 1. Two written teacher recommendations from high 
minimum FCELPT of 100 on each subtest. school or college. 

2. Minimum of 12 semester hours of college credit with GPA 2. Completion of two college honors courses with an 
of 3.2 or higher. "A" or a "B" in both classes. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of 18 credit hours of Honors classes (earning at least a grade of "B" in each course) will complete the academic 
requirements to graduate from the Honors Scholar Program. These classes must be chosen from at least two of three academic areas: 
basic sciences/math, social sciences, or humanities/communications. One of these classes can be the Honors Research Study (3 
credits). Additional requirements not summarized here also apply. 

Honors Scholarships 

Edison State College is eager to assist the highly motivated and achieving students who participate in the Honors Scholar Program. 
Based on availability, up to $1,000 performance-based scholarships are awarded in the Fall to full-time students who will graduate 
from the program. These scholarships arc renewable each semester if certain criteria are met. 

How to Apply 

The program coordinator should receive completed applications prior to the term in which the student wishes to begin participation in 
the program. For further information or an application form, call the HSP Coordinator at (239) 489-9 1 02. 

Honors Research Classes 

Honors Program Research courses are designed to allow a student to pursue topics within a specific discipline or program under the 
guidance of a qualified professor. It provides an opportunity for the student to explore in depth an area of particular interest. Honors 
Program Research may not duplicate any existing course in the Catalog. The course is designed by a professor to fit the needs of an 
individual smdent. 

77 



The course syllabus must be designed by the professor, with input as to areas of interest from the student. It must represent college- 
level work and be sufficiently complex and demanding to warrant the credits awarded. 

To begin the Honors Program Thesis/Research registration process, students must complete the Honors Thesis/Research Project form. 
This form is available on the Lee Campus in the Division of Arts and Sciences, L-102, and in the Honors Scholar Program office, L- 
137, and on the Charlotte and Collier Campuses in the Academic Advisors' offices. Once this form is properly documented, submitted, 
and approved by the Campus Dean, the student may register for the course. 

The regular college grading system applies to Honors Program Research students. Honors Program Research classes may not be taken 
to satisfy general education requirements. 

LIBRARIES, BOOKSTORES & TECH. HELP DESK 



Libraries 

Libraries are located on each campus with services to Hendry and Glades counties. Edison State College students have access to 
approximately 81,000 volumes on the Charlotte, Collier, and Lee Campuses. An expanding collection of about 45,000 electronic 
books (E-books) is available through Internet access to LINCC (Library Information Network for Community Colleges). 
Approximately 4,000 videos and 6,000 DVDs for classroom and personal use are available through LINCC. 
Electronic resources, including over 80 full text research subject databases, play an important role in the learning environment of 
Edison State College. Students have access to the joint holdings of the 28 Florida community colleges through LINCC as well as 
resource sharing through interlibrary loan and courier delivery. In addition, the holdings of the State University System with reciprocal 
borrowing privileges expand student and faculty research beyond the institutional level. 

Internet with wireless access is provided on each campus. At the Lee campus, the Research Instruction Lab is available to classes. 
Charlotte and Collier campuses also have similar electronic facilities. Policies and handouts detailing specific services are available at 
the individual libraries or online from the Edison State homepage under Edison State Libraries, 
v\-w^v.edison.cduleaminizrest)uices. index. shtml . 

Library Cards 

Students eligible for borrowing privileges must obtain an Edison State student ID card and present the card for all library transactions. 
The ID card is encoded with a library user code for checkout and database access. Community users will be issued a standard library 
card with barcode ID. 
The following charges may apply to all library patrons: 

1. Overdue materials 

Assessments for material checked out and not returned will be the current average trade price of the material not returned. 
Patrons who have overdue materials or who have failed to return material that has been recalled will be notified by mail. A 
hold on records will be placed on students who have overdue materials. 

2. Lost or Mutilated Materials: 

An item reported lost, or return in a damaged/mutilated condition, will be billed the trade price as described above. 

Fees for Edison State materials or interlibrary materials lost but subsequently found are refunded at the discretion of the 

Edison State Library or the lending library. 

Exceptions and special considerations may be made (at the discretion of the Director of Learning Resources) for out-of-print 

materials of continuing value. 

3. Interlibrary loan services: 

Patrons who request interlibrary loan services for which a fee is charged will be billed. The Library will add no additional 
service charges. 

4. Definition of "Hold on Records" Status: 

a. No transcripts are released. 

b. Degrees/Certificates are not released. 

c. Class registration is blocked. 

d. Learning Resources borrowing privileges are suspended. 

e. Patrons are released from "hold" status once fees are paid through the Edison State Business Office. 
Appeals by patrons for these charges and/or "Holds on Records" may be made to the District Director of Learning Resources. 
Library Hours are as follows* 



CHARLOTTE CAMPUS 

Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



(941)637-5620 

7:30am-9:00pm 
7:30 am-5:30 pm 
8:00am-2:00pm 



COLLIER CAMPUS 

Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



(239) 732-3774 
7:30am-9:00pm 
8:00am-4:00pm 
10:00 am-3 :00 pm 



78 



LEE CAMPUS (239)489-9303 

Monday-Thursday 7:30 am-9:00 pm 

Friday 7:30 am-4:00 pm 

Saturday 10;00 am-6:00 pm 

Sunday 10:00 am-6:00 pm 

*Library hours may change during the summer and on holiday weekends. Please call campus library for current hours. 



Bookstores 

Edison State College makes it easy for you to get the books you need when you need them. We have three bookstores open at hours 
suited to your schedule. ESC"s bookstore Web site offers even more convenience. Order your books online and get a first crack at 
money-saving used books. If you order online using a major credit card - you can have your books shipped directly to you or you 
can stop by the store and pick them up. A year-round book buyback is provided where ESC's bookstores will buy back most texts; 
current demand will determine the buyback price (some restrictions apply). 
Textbooks may be returned and exchanged for full credit with the following: 

1. If the book is accompanied by sales receipt. 

2. If the book is unmarked and in original package if purchased new. 

3. If the book is returned within specified time. It is the responsibility of the student to observe the refijnd date posted in the 
store. 

4. Picture l.D. is required. 
Bookstore Hours* 

CHARLOTTE CAMPUS (941)637-5671 



Monday and Tuesday 
Wednesday and Thursday 
Friday 



30 am-7 :00 pm 
30 am-4:00 pm 
00 am- 12 :00 pm 



COLLIER CAMPUS (239)732-3738 

Monday and Tuesday 9:00 am-6:00 pm 

Wednesday and Thursday 9:00 am-4:00 pm 

Friday 9:00 am- 1:00 pm 

LEE CAMPUS (239) 489-3345 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 am-6:00 pm 

Friday 8:00 am-6:00 pm 

*Special hours are ohsenx'd at the beginning of each session and are posted in the stores. 

Order books through the FNTERNET: 

Charlotte Campus: www.EdisonStatechar.bkstr.com 

Collier Campus: www.EdisonStateleiy.bkstr.com 

Lee Campus: www.EdisonState.bkstr.com 

**Texthooks for online classes (EOL) can he orderedlhroiigh the Lee Campus online store. 

Technology Help Desk 

Students, faculty and staff may receive free computer help from the Technology Help Desk. On-campus, call extension 1202: from off 

campus, please call toll-free: 1 (866)818-4243. 

Students may be asked to verify their identity for security. For assistance in changing a portal password, the Help Desk staff will 

request the student's name, date of birth, and student ID number. If the student does not know his/her student ID number, he/she may 

be asked to provide full legal name, date of birth and the last 4 digits of the social security number to verify identity. 

The Technology Help Desk offers: 

• A competent and well trained Help Desk staff 

• Fewer calls going to voice mail 

• Shorter "time to answer" 

• A service that can handle 80% - 90% of the calls over the phone and will forward the remaining calls to specialized 
Technology Services staff promptly. 

Resolution of the calls that typically involve password resets, login difficulties, network or Internet connectivity, basic e-mail, 
WebCT, basic desktop application (i.e.; Microsoft Office) questions and similar issues. 

79 



Walk in service is available at the Lee campus Technology Support Center in K121 Monday through Friday. You can receive help 
with passwords, online registration, iTunes, Microsoft Office programs, online courses and much more. We also offer assistance with 
wireless connectivity and personal computer assistance (limited). 

Career Pathways and Articulation 

Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Hendry and Glades District Schools and Edison State College are partners in the Career Pathways philosophy 
which offers students the opportunity to focus on technical high school electives that will help train them for high-skill, high-wage 
occupations. While in high school students are preparing for careers and postsecondary education, they can begin to earn Edison State 
College credits. 

Edison State provides the opportunity for technical program students to earn college credit that may be applied towards an Associate 
degree. 

High school articulation 

Edison State Sate provides the opportunity for high school graduates to earn college credit that may be applied towards an Associate 
degree. 

High school students who have graduated from any public school in Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Hendry or Glades counties would be 
eligible for college credit at Edison State College. 

Articulated credit my be awarded to the eligible postsecondary graduate who meets the following criteria: 

• The student must be currently enrolled and seeking as Associate Degree in correlating programs at Edison State College. 
Thus, the student will successfijlly meet all requirements that apply to Associate Degree seeking students as stated in the 
Edison State College Catalog. 

• Students will be awarded articulated Associate credit upon successful completion of 12 college credit hours towards the 
Associate Degree. 

• Students who complete one of the approved technical programs of study (at least 3 high school courses). 



Local High School Articulation Agreements 



Program 

Education 

Law 



Criminal 
Justice 



Nursing 



Hospitality 
Drafting 



High School Program Completed 

Teaching Assistant I, 2 and 3 

Legal Systems 

Law Studies 

Criminal Justice Operations 1, 2. and 3 

Courtroom Procedures 

(any 2 courses with 3.5 GPA) 

Health Science II and 

Practical Nursing Program Certification 



TBA 

Drafting 1 . 2 and 3 with B average 



College Credit Articulated 


Credits 


EME 2040 Educational Technology 


3 credits 


PLA 2931 Special Topics in PL 


3 credits 


CCJ 1020 Intro to CJ 


3 credits 


CCJ 2930 Selected Topics m CJ 


3 credits 


10 college credits towards RN: 




NUR 1010 


2 credits 


NUR 1022/1022L 


5 credits 


NUR 1023L 


1 credit 


NUR 1142 


1 credit 


Difference between NUR 121 1/121 IL and 


Basic 


NUR I204/1204L(AP) 


TBA 


TBA 


ETD 1 100 Engineering Graphics 


4 credits 


ETD 1 530 Drafting and Design 


4 credits 



80 



Accounting 



Business 
Supervision 
and 
Management 

Health non- 
nursing 

Information 
Tcciinology 

Public Service 
Fire Science 



If one of the 3 draftmg courses is Auto-CAD with B 
or better average 

Through a portfolio, student can demonstrate and 
manipulate a 3-D modeling software to produce a 
virtual product/model 

Accounting Operations 1 , 2 and 3 

Grade B or higher in each HS course 

Academy of Finance 
Financial Operations 
Personal Financial Planning 

Business Operations 1 , 2 and 3 



Administrative Assistant 

Phlebotomy 

Health Science 1 and 2 

Academy of Technology graduates who graduate and 
credits. 

BFST Firefighter I Certificate 

Principles of Public Service 



ETD 1320 Intro to Auto CAD 

ETD 2350 Advanced AutoCAD 

ACG 1001 Accounting Principles 
ACG 201 1 Accounting Principles II 
ACG 2071 Managerial Accounting 
FIN 2000 Principles of Finance 
SLS 1331 Personal Business Skills 
CGS 1100 Computer Skills 
GEB 1011 Introduction to Business 
SLS 1331 Personal Business Skills 
CGS 1100 Computer Skills 
CGS 1100 Computer Skills 
MNA 1804 Business Elective 
Radiologic Technology Competencies 
BSC 1080 Human Biology 
pass industry certifications may be eligible 

MNA 1804 Fire Science Elective 
MNA 1804 Fire Science Elective 



3 credits 



3 credits 



3 credits 


3 credits 


3 credits 


3 credits 


3 credits 


4 credits 


3 credits 


3 credits 


4 credits 


4 credits 


6 credits 


2 credits 


for up to 16 college 


3 credits 


1 credit 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

General Information 
Associate Degrees and Certificate Programs 

Baccalaureate Degrees 



82 ^ •- 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 



General Information 



Students may participate in the eommeneement ceremony during the calendar year in which they will complete their degree 

requirements. However, diplomas will be awarded only after all of the degree requirements are fulfilled. Degree notations on 

transcripts will include academic terms in which all of the requirements were completed. 

Continuously enrolled students may choose to meet graduations requirements as defined in the College Catalog in effect during their 

initial terni of enrollment or the College Catalog in effect during the term in which they apply for graduation. Degree and certificate 

requirements printed in the Catalog are subject to change. Final responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests with the 

student. 

Associate Degrees and Certificate Programs 

To receive the Associate in Arts degree. Associate in Science degree, or a Certificate, students must satisfy the requirements for that 
degree or certificate. Students are encouraged to see an academic advising specialist prior to each registration. Students must satisfy 
the following College requirements: 

1 . Students must submit completed applications for graduation to the Registrar by the published deadline. 

a. Students interested in graduating at the end of a fall term or spring temi must submit their applications for 
graduation no later than the Friday of the third week of classes 

b. Students interested in graduating at the end of a summer term must submit their applications for graduation not 
later than the Friday of the second week of classes 

c. The Registrar will accept applications after the deadline. However, students who submit late applications will be 
evaluated for academic honors as time permits; this evaluation may occur after the commencement ceremony. 

2. Earn the minimum required semester hours for the degree or certificate with a cumulative 2.00 GPA. 

3. Satisfy Gordon Rule requirements, if applicable. 

4. Complete all non-course requirements, if applicable. 

5. Successfijlly complete a minimum of 25 percent of the required degree or certificate coursework at Edison State College. 

6. Fulfill all obligations to Edison State College. 

7. Satisfactorily meet CLAST requirements. CLAST exemptions must be requested through the Assessment Office before the 
end of semester in which the student is graduating. (See CLAST Policy in the Student Services section. The policy applies to 
Associate in Arts and Associate of Science degrees if the student is planning to transfer to a Florida State university.) 

8. Meet all deadlines pertaining to graduation. 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

The following general requirements for graduation from Edison State College must be met by all candidates for the Bachelor of 
Applied Science and Bachelor of Science Degrees. Additional requirements may exist for individual programs. 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward ftilfilling the total number of credits required for 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 
level or above. Our new BSN program only requires 36 hours of 3000 level or above coursework. 

C. Students must fiilfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all coursework. Individual programs may 
require a higher grade point average for graduation. 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students 
who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community college, or 
bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, are considered to have met the general education component of 
the degree. 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: 

a. successfijl completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through 
corresponding College Level Examination Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 
for review of nontraditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in languages 
other than French, German and Spanish). 

H. In accordance with State Rule 6A-I0.03I2, a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College-Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of 

83 



Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS 

student. ^ 

I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. ,_ 

J. Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the *" 

semester in which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of "- 
final clearance for graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs 

may identify graduation application deadlines. '^ 

B.S. in Education-Additional Program Graduation Requirements >^ 

A. Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale. *" 

B. Students must pass ail sections of the Florida Teachers Certification Examination (FTCE) for certification within the State of ^ 
Florida. ^w 

C. While Edison State College governs a student's program requirements, changes to a program emanating from the Florida '^ 
State Board of Education will take precedence over the College catalog and may alter a student's program of study. 

D. The Florida State Board of Education requires all education students to demonstrate competency in all of the Florida "-■ 
Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) as a condition of graduation, including completion of a professional portfolio. ^ 
Elementary Education students must demonstrate achievement of all State required ESOL competencies as a condition of —^ 
graduation. ^— ' 

E. Students must apply for graduation/internship the semester prior to enrollment in the final internship. Fall graduates must ^ 
apply no later than February 1 of the preceding spring semester. Spring graduates must apply no later than October 1 of the ^ 
preceding fall semester. ^— 

F. Students must successfully complete all school based hours and the final internship experience as a condition of graduation. ^ 



A- 



84 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



Top Ten Majors to Pursue 
Baccalaureate Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Safety Management 
Bachelor of Applied Science in Supervision and Management 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education, Biology 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education, Mathematics 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Associate in Arts Degree 

General Education Program Guide 
Transfer to a State University 

Associate in Science Degree Programs 

General Education Requirements 

Division of Professional and Technical Studies Course Clusters 

Course Listings 

Certificate Programs 
Course Listings 



85 



Not sure what major to pursue? 
Here are the TOP TEN 



According to The Princeton Review the following 10 majors have the highest undergrad enrollment this year ( 
www.princetonreview.com) and better yet what career you can aspire to with this major. Best of all Edison State College can get you 
started in these and dozens more majors. 



Major 

Business Administration and 
Management 

Degrees Earned: 

AA/AS -^BS/BAS ^MBA 



Associated Careers and Degree Path 

Business majors often find success by working their way up the ladder to become managers, 
executives, and vice presidents. This major provides hands on training in accounting, finance, 
marketing, economics, human resources, and decision making. 



Major Courses Required: 

Intro to Business 

Statistics 

Managerial Accounting 



Economics I and II 
Accounting Principles I and II 
Management 



Psychology 

Degrees Earned: 

AA -^ BS/BAS -^ MS. 

Ph.D. 



Psychology is the study of human behavior. You will need a PH. D to open your own practice but you 
have a rich career in education, business or mental health with a bachelor's degree. 



Major Courses Required: 

Psychology 1 and 11 
Child Psychology 



Personal and Social Adjustment 

Human Relations in Business and Industry 



Elementary Education 



Degrees Earned: 
AA -►BS/BAS 



If you want to be a kindergarten and primary grades classroom teacher this is the major for you! You 
will need to pass a state license exam at the end of your bachelor's degree. Education majors may 
also become guidance counselors or school administrators. This is a critically needed career. 



Major Courses Required: 

Intro to Education 
Educational Technology 



Teaching Diversities 
Educational Psychology 



Biology 



Degrees Earned: 
AA. —BS/BAS 



Biology is the study of the living world from single-cell bacteria to elephants. This major focuses on 
calculus, microbiology, cell biology, genetics, evolution, physics, and organic chemistry. Career 
options pre-med, genetics, biotechnology, or medical research, veterinarians, optometrists, ecologists, 
biochemists, and environmentalists. 



Major Courses Required: 

Biology lecture and lab 
Anatomy and Physiology 
Environmental biology 



Microbiology 
Marine biology 
College Algebra 



Nursing 



Nurses are compassionate individuals who often includes are comforters, educators, mediators, 
listeners, problem-solver and therapists. Nurses may work in clinics, hospitals, schools, corporations, 
the military, and in private practice. This is a critically needed career!! Nursing majors learn science 
and liberal arts courses as a first-year student and begin clinical rotations at hospitals and other health 
care facilities after many hours of hands on training. All nurses are required by law to take and pass 
the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) after graduating 
from an accredited nursing program before they can be considered "registered." 



Degrees Earned: 
AS ( become RN) 

-^MSN 



►BSN 



Major Courses Required: 

All NUR courses 
Anatomy and Physiology I 



Human Biology 
College Algebra 



Education (secondary 
education and special 



If you want to be a sixth grade through twelfth grade classroom teacher this is the major for you! You 
will need to pass a state license exam at the end of your bachelor's degree. Education majors may 



86 



education) 

Degrees Earned: 
AA — BS/BAS 



English 



Degrees Earned: 
AA -*BS/BAS —MS 



also become guidance counselors or school administrators. This is a critically needed career. 

Major Courses Required: 

Intro to Education Teaching Diversities 

Educational Technology Educational Psychology 

English majors may be in countless types of careers such as author, reporter, journalist, editor, radio 
broadcaster, advertising and public relations executives. However, English majors also become 
teachers, lawyers (after law school, of course), film directors, politicians, actors, etc. English majors 
are well-rounded, well-read individuals. They read, read, read and read. . . think, write, and discuss. 



Major Courses Required: 

Composition 1 and II 
American Literature 
Creative Writing 



British Literature 
World Literature 



Communication 



Degrees Earned: 
AA —BS/BAS 



Communications majors learn how certain messages influence individual and group behavior, as wel 
as how our reactions reflect the underlying values of society. Career options may include business, 
public relations, advertising, human resources, government, education, media, or social services. 



Major Courses Required: 

Composition I and II 
Public Speaking 



Speech 
Creative Writing 



Computer Science 



Degrees Earned: 
AA/AS — BS/BAS 



This major learns how to develop business applications and perform system analysis and the process 
of developing software (from designing to programming to testing). Programs may also include 
instruction in robotics, natural language recognition programs, artificial intelligence, programming 
languages, and numerical analysis. Career options may include programmer, network administrator, 
webmaster, database administrator or systems engineer. 



Major Courses Required: 

Intro to Programming 
College Algebra 
C++ Programming 



Advanced Programming 

Logic 

Data Systems 



Political Science 



Political Science majors focus on political parties, voting behavior, public 
policy and revolutions all across the world. This major involves a majority of 
reading, writing, and statistical analysis. Career options may include politics 
(running as a candidate or running a candidate's campaign), journalist, 
diplomat, lobbyist, and law school. 



Degrees Earned: 

AA — BS/BAS — JD (]a\^rer) 



Major Courses Required: 

Composition 1 and II 
World Civilizations 
Economics 1 and II 



American History 

Speech 



87 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY ^ 

Bachelor of Applied Science c: 



Public Safety Administration, BAS 

The Bachelor of AppHed Science in Public Safety Administration (BAS PSA) is designed to prepare individuals as leaders, 
supervisors and administrators in public safety related professions. Students enrolling in the program bring a variety of safety and 
security backgrounds to enrich the educational experience, including legal studies and law enforcement, corrections, fire science, and 
emergency medical services. The program provides a career and educational pathway for students who have earned an associate in 
science degree in a public safety discipline, or an associate in arts with electives chosen from the public safety field. 

Program Highlights: The BAS PSA program includes courses in public administration, strategic planning, finance and budgeting, 
human resource management and homeland security. Courses are offered in an online or blend of online and traditional formats, in an 
accelerated eight week fashion, to accommodate students' various schedules and learning preferences. 

Career Opportunities: The BAS PSA program prepares graduates for career promotions and advancement in the public safety 
industry to include law enforcement, fire services, corrections, emergency medical services, emergency administration management 
and industrial security enterprises in both government and private sector agencies. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . Applicants must apply for admission and be accepted to Edison State College. Official transcripts from all previously 
attended colleges or universities must be sent directly to the Office of the Registrar. 

2. Applicants must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in relevant transfer courses that apply 
toward the BAS degree. 

3. Applicants must have earned: 

a. An Edison State College Associate in Science degree in Criminal Justice Technology, Fire Science Technology, 
Paralegal Studies or Crime Scene Technology awarded within the past 10 years which includes 60 hours of 
transfer credit. Additional general education requirements must be completed prior to graduation. 

OR 

b. An Associate in Arts degree or 60 hours of transfer credit which includes the completion of the Florida State 
general education requirements. Such applicants must have 12 credit hours earned in the past 10 years in one of 
the following content areas: 

Criminal Justice 

Crime Scene Technology 

Paralegal Studies 

Fire Science 

Emergency Medical Services 

Combinations of the above content areas upon recommendation by the BAS Admissions Committee or 

approval by the Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. 

OR 

c. An Associate in Arts or higher degree or 60 hours of transfer credit which includes the completion of the Florida 
State general education requirements. Such applicants must have one of the following: 

1 . Florida Fire Officer 1 certification 

2. Florida Paramedic licensure 

3. Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission 
certification in law enforcement or cortections 

4. Demonstrated competencies in the field of public safety upon recommendation by the BAS Admissions 
Committee or approval by the Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. 

Transfer students with an AS degree in Criminal Justice, Fire Science, Paralegal Studies or Crime Scene Technology from a 

regionally accredited college or university awarded within the past 10 years may be admitted following a review of 

transcripts and course descriptions. Any outstanding general education must be completed prior to being eligible for 

graduation. The College reserves the right to review all applicant transcripts and to require supplemental coursework to 

correct deficiencies, should they exist. 

Applicants not meeting stated admissions criteria may petition for program admittance if they feel that there are mitigating 

circumstances. Applicants must submit an official petition form available in the Office of the Registrar. 

While the BAS program is designed to articulate associate degrees, Edison State College freshman and sophomore students 

may declare their intent to enroll in the BAS program through the Edison State College Admissions Application. 

88 



7. Prior to enrollment in any upper division courses, applicants must successfully complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102 and three 
credit hours of college level mathematics. 
The Edison State College Registrar's Office will ensure that previous coursework meets all relevant academic standards before 
acceptance for transfer. The Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs and the BAS Admissions Committee will ensure adherence to 
the above admissions criteria. 

General Education Requirements: 

• * ENC 1101 - Composition I-AA 

• * ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 
or 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

• Humanities Electives 6 Credits to include 3 credits writing intensive 

• Social Science Electives 9 Credits to include one WOH or EUH course 

• College Level Mathematics Electives 6 Credit 

• Natural Science Electives w/Lab 6 Credits 

Subtotal: 36 

**Approved Transfer Electives: 45 

Degree Core Requirements: 

PAD 3003 - Introduction to Public Administration 

PAD 3115- Executive Leadership-BAS 

PAD 3204 - Financial Management in the Public Sector-BAS 

PAD 3393 - Principles of Crisis and Emergency Management BAS 

PAD 3712 - Information Resources Management in the Public Sector-BAS 

PAD 3820 - Public Safety System Integration-BAS 

PAD 3874 - Community Relations Theory and Practice - BAS 

PAD 4332 - Strategic and Operational Planning BAS 

PAD 4878 - Management Capstone Project-BAS 

Subtotal: 33 

*Prior to enrollment in any upper division course (3000 or 4000 level), students must complete ENC 1101. ENC 1 1 02 and three credit 
hours of college level mathematics with grades of "C" or higher. 

**Consult with BAS PSA Program Advising regarding approved transfer electives. A minimum of 12 credit hours of lower division 
(1000 and 2000 level) electives in a public safety discipline is required. Students must complete either two years of a single foreign 
language in high school or two college semesters of a single foreign language to complete graduation requirements for the BAS PSA 
degree. 

Additional Information 

Program information is available online at: http://www.edison.edu/academics/psm/ 

Consult the Baccalaureate Admissions and Graduation sections of the Catalog for additional program requirements. 
Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in 
which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for 
graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs may identify graduation 
application deadlines. 

For additional information, please contact the Public Safety Administration program offices by calling (239) 433-8106. 
Program information is available online at: http://bas.edison.edu . 

Specified Upper Division Electives 
Graduation Requirements: 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit 
awarded for college-preparatory instmction may not be counted toward fulfilling the total number of credits required for 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 
level or above. At least 30 of the 39 hours must be earned at Edison State College. 

C. Students must fulfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. 

89 



D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. 

Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all courscwork. Individual programs may ^ 

require a higher grade point average for graduation. ^ 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. >■ 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of -^ 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students * 
who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community college, or ^ 
bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, are considered to have met the general education component of 

the degree. ^ 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. ^ 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways; •■ 

a. successfijl completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school ^ 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or '^ 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through ^ 
corresponding College Level Examinafion Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 

for review of nontraditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in languages _ 

other than French, German and Spanish). ^ 

H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.0312, a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College-Level — 

Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of ^ 

Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS " 

student. _ 

I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. . 

Choose six credit hours from any of the following upper division course prefixes (3000 or higher): ACG. FIN. ISM. MAN, or PAD — 

Specified Upper Division Electives: 6 * 



Total Credit Hours: 120 



^ 
^ 



90 



Bachelor of Applied Science 
Supervision and Management, BAS 

The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Supervision and Management program is designed to prepare individuals as managerial 
and supervisory personnel in a variety of professions. The program provides a career and educational pathway for students who have 
earned an associate in science degree in a professional and technical discipline. This degree also provides an excellent opportimity for 
individuals with an associate in arts degree and interest or experience in acquiring leadership, business management and supervisory 
skills. 

Program Highlights; The BAS in Supervision and Management program includes courses in leadership, strategic planning, accounting, 
finance and budgeting, human resource management, business ethics and international business. Elective choices will include 
additional courses in marketing, management, information technology and accounting. Courses are offered in an online or blend of 
online and traditional fomiats, including courses in an accelerated eight-week fashion, to accommodate students" various schedules 
and learning preferences. 

Admission Requirements: 

1. Applicants must apply for admission and be accepted to Edison State College. Official transcripts from all previously 
attended colleges or universities must be sent directly to the Office of the Registrar. 

2. Applicants must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in relevant transfer courses that apply 
toward the BAS degree. 

3. Applicants must have earned: 

• An Associate in Science degree from a regionally accredited institution with a minimum of 60 credit hours. 

OR 

• An Associate in Arts degree or 60 hours of transfer credit, which includes the completion of the Florida State general 
education requirements. Such applicants must complete a Principles of Management course (MAN 2021 at Edison State 
College) prior to enrollment in any upper division MAN courses. 

• Students must complete Composition 1, Composition II and three credit hours of college level mathematics prior to 
enrollment in any upper division courses. 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 
or 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

• Humanities Electives 6 Credits to include 3 credits writing intensive 

• Social Science Electives 9 Credits to include one WHO 

• College Level Mathematics Electives 6 Credits 

• Natural Science Electives w/Lab 6 Credits 

Total: 36 

*Prior to enrollment in any upper division course (3000 or 4000 level), students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1102 and 
three credit hours of college level mathematics with grades ofC" or higher. 

Lower division course requirements: 

• ** ECO 2013- Economics l-AA 

• ** ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA 

• % MAN 2021 - Management Principles-AA 

Approved electives ***: 45 

**courses may be used to satisfy Social Science electives within the General Education Requirements. 

(fl required prior to enrollment in upper division MAN courses if no previous MAN coursework completed. 

***Consult with a BAS Program Advisor. 

Degree Core Requirements: 

• MAN 3303 - Leadership and Management Practices- BAS 

91 



MAN 3 1 20 - Organizational Beiiavior and Leadership-BAS ^_ 

ACG 3024 - Accounting for Non-Financial Managers- HAS >»" 

GEB 4375 - Foundations of International Business *" 

FIN 3400 - Financial Management I ^ 

MAN 3301 - Human Resources Management-BAS ^^ 

MAN 4701 - Business Ethics and Society-BAS '^ 

MAN 4720 - Strategic Management and Organizational Policy - BAS ^ 

MAN 49 1 5 - Management Capstone Project »• 

Total: 30 J 

Supervision and Management Elective ^ 

Planned Program Electives (subject to change) ^ 

• ACG 3074 - Managerial Accounting 1 "" 

• FIN 3414 - Financial Management II .„ 

• MAR 3802 - Marketing for Managers-BAS *- 

• MNA 3037 - Project Management and Planning-BAS '^ 

Total: 9 Z 

Total Credit Hours: 120 1 

Graduation Requirements: ~ 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for -» 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit *- 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward fulfilling the total number of credits required for "" 
residency purposes or graduation. ^ 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 

level or above. At least 30 of the 39 hours must be earned at Edison State College. ^ 

C. Students must fulfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. ^ 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. — ■ 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all coursework. Individual programs may *- 
require a higher grade point average for graduation. "* 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. ^ 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of 

general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students » 

who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community college, or *- 

bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, are considered to have met the general education component of » 

the degree. *' 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. 

Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: ^ 

a. successfijl completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school ^ 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or ■» 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through — 
corresponding College Level Examination Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards * 
for review of non-traditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in ■*" 
languages other than French, German and Spanish). ^ 

H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.0312, a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College-Level ^ 

Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of ^ 

Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS • 

student. " 

I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. 

Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in ^ 

which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for >» 

graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs may identify graduafion — 

application deadlines. * 



92 



Bachelor of Science 
Elementary Education, BS 



The Bachelor of Science (BS) in Elementary Education is designed to prepare individuals to teach all subject areas grades K-6. The 
program provides an educational pathway for students who have earned an Associate in Arts degree to include EDF 2005, EDF 2085 
and EME 2040. It is also a good option for students with a child development focus. Upon graduation, students will meet the mandated 
state teaching requirements, including teacher certification exams. 

Program Highlights; The BS in Elementary Education program includes courses in teaching students with English as a second 
language, students with exceptionalities, reading competency, classroom management, assessment and integrated approaches to 
teaching methodologies at the elementary school level. Students will learn to facilitate lessons that integrate math and science, health, 
music and movement as well as literature, fine arts, language arts and social sciences. Field experience requirements are progressive in 
nature, building upon previous semester experiences. Students will observe teachers in the field, teach lessons through the practicum 
courses, and complete a full-time teaching internship in their final semester. Courses are offered for full and part time students, with 
blended technology components where applicable. Students will complete one upper division (3 credit hours) of literacy coursework 
taught by Florida Gulf Coast University faculty. 

Admission Requirements: 

In addition to fulfilling the entrance requirements for Edison State College, Applicants for the BS in Elementary Education, Secondary 
Education Biology and Secondary Education Mathematics degree programs must meet the following requirements consistent with 
Florida Statute 1004.04: 

1. Completion of the Associate in Arts (AA) degree, including all general education and required program prerequisites. 
Students with a minimum of 60 transferable hours, with all general education requirements and prerequisites met, may apply 
for admission. 

2. Completion of the lower-division education prerequisite courses: EDF 2005 Intro to Education, EDF 2805 Teaching Diverse 
Populations and EME 2040 Educational Technology with grades of "C" or higher. 

3. Have a grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale for the general education component of undergraduate studies or 
have completed the requirements for a baccalaureate degree with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale from 
any college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association as defined by State Board of Education mie or any 
college or university otherwise approved pursuant to State Board of Education rule. 

4. Demonstrated mastery of general knowledge, including the ability to read, write, and compute, by passing the General 
Knowledge Test of the Florida Teacher Certification Examination, the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST). a 
corresponding component of the National Teachers Examination series, or a similar test pursuant to rules of the State Board 
of Education. 

5. Students must disclose background information that may preclude them from becoming certified at the time of admission. 
For continued enrollment in the program, students must be fingerprinted and screened by the Florida Department of Law 
Enforcement and the FBI prior to entering any school. 

6. Applicants not meeting stated admissions criteria may petition for program admittance if they feel that there are mitigating 
circumstances. Applicants must submit an official petition form available in the Office of the Registrar. 

The Edison State College Registrar's Office will ensure that previous coursework meets all relevant academic standards before 
acceptance for transfer. The Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs and the BS Admissions Committee will ensure adherence to 
the above admissions criteria. 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 
or 

SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 
Humanities Electives 6 Credits to include 3 credits writing intensive 
*Social Science Electives 9 credits to include one WOH or EUH course 
College Level Mathematics Electives 6 Credits 
Natural Science Electives w/Lab 6 Credits 

Total: 36 

Required Program Prerequisites (grades of C or better) and electives for the Associate in Arts 
Degree (minimum of 24 credit hours): 

• * EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

• * EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

• * EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

• *PSY2012- General Psychology I-AA 

93 



or 
• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA ^ 

*courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in social sciences (in addition to speciHc WOH or EUH ^ 

requirement) " 

Degree Requirements (60 credit hours) Z 

EDE 4930 - Special Topics in Education I-BS '- 
EDF 3214 - Human Development and Leaming-BS 

EDG 34 1 - Classroom Management-BS v 

TSL 4142 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment " 

TSL 4520 - Second Language Acquisitons and Culture- BS ^ 

RED 4012 - Foundations of Reading and Literacy Development-BS '^ 

RED 4350 - Literacy Content and Processes-BS ' 

RED 4519 - Diagnosis and Intervention in Reading-BS ^ 

ESE 4323 - Educational Assessment-BS '^ 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS "*■ 

EDG 3620 - Classroom Management-BS ^ 
LAJE 44 1 6 - Children's Literature (FGCU) 

EDF 4790 - Ethics and Law * 

EDE 4222 - Music, Art and Movement -BS ^ 

EDE 4304C - Integrated Math and Science with Practicum BS — 

EDE 4226C - Integrated Language Arts. Social Science and Literature Practicum -BS *" 

EDE 4940 - Internship in Elementary Education -BS ^ 

Total Credit Hours: 120 ^ 

School Based Hour Requirements (720 total hours) 

EDG 34 1 - Classroom Management-BS ^ 

TSL 4142 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment ^ 

TSL 4520 - Second Language Acquisitons and Culture- BS ■" 

RED 40 1 2 - Foundations of Reading and Literacy Development-BS _ 

RED 45 1 9 - Diagnosis and Intervention in Reading-BS ^ 

EDE 4304C - Integrated Math and Science with Practicum - BS "" 

EDE 4226C - Integrated Language Arts. Social Science and Literature Practicum -BS _ 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS *- 

EDE 4940 - Internship in Elementary Education -BS ^ 

Graduation Requirements: ^ 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for ■*■ 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit "" 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward fulfilling the total number of credits required for ^ 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 
level or above. At least 30 of the 39 hours must be earned at Edison State College. 

C. Students must ftilfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all coursework. Individual programs may 
require a higher grade point average for graduation. 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students 
who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community college, or 
bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, are considered to have met the general education component of 
the degree. 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: 

a. successful completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through 
corresponding College Level Examiiuilion Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 

94 



for review of non-traditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in 
languages other than French, German and Spanish). 
H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.03 12. a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College-Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of 
Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS 
student. 
I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. 

Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in 
which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for 
graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. lndi\ idual programs may identify graduation 
application deadlines. 

B.S. in Education- Additional Program Graduation Requirements 

J. Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale. 

K. Students must pass all sections of the Florida Teachers Certification Examination (FTCE) for certification within the State of 

Florida. 
L. While Edison State College governs a student's program requirements, changes to a program emanating from the Florida 

State Board of Education will take precedence over the College catalog and may alter a student's program of study. 
M. The Florida State Board of Education requires all education students to demonstrate competency in all of the Florida 

Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) as a condition of graduation, including completion 

of a professional portfolio. Elementary Education students must demonstrate achievement of all State required ESOL 

competencies as a condition of graduation. 
N. Students must apply for graduation/internship the semester prior to enrollment in the final intemship. Fall graduates must 

apply no later than February I of the preceding spring semester. Spring graduates must apply no later than October I of the 

preceding fall semester. 
O. Students must successfijlly complete all school based hours and the final intemship experience as a condition of graduation. 



95 



Bachelor of Science ;: 

Secondary Education Biology, BS ^ 

The Bachelor of Science (BS) in Secondary Education Biology program is designed to prepare individuals to teach biology grades 6- •<^ 

12 (middle and high school). The program provides an educational pathway for students who have earned an Associate in Arts degree "' 

to include specific science and education prerequisites. Upon graduation, students will meet the mandated state teaching requirements, ^^ 

including teacher certification exams. ^ 

Program Highlights: The BS in Secondary Education program includes courses in teaching students with English as a second v. 

language, students with exceptionalities, reading competency, classroom management, assessment and integrated approaches to <— 

teaching methodologies at the middle and high school levels. Field experience requirements are progressive in nature, building upon "^ 

previous semester experiences. Students will observe teachers in the field, teach lessons through the practicum courses, and complete a '" 

full-time teaching internship in their final semester. Courses are offered for full and part time students, with blended technology '^ 

components where applicable. Students will complete three upper division (9 credit hours) of science coursework through Florida Gulf ^ 

Coast University. ^_ 

Admission Requirements: ^ 

In addition to fulfilling the entrance requirements for Edison State College, Applicants for the BS in Elementary Education, Secondary 

Education Biology and Secondary Education Mathematics degree programs must meet the following requirements consistent with .. 

Florida Statute 1004.04: ^ 

1. Completion of the Associate in Arts (AA) degree, including all general education and required program prerequisites. ■• 
Students with a minimum of 60 transferable hours, with all general education requirements and prerequisites met, may apply ^ 
for admission. "" 

2. Completion of the lower-division education prerequisite courses: EDF 2005 Intro to Education. EDF 2085Teaching Diverse ^ 
Populations and EME 2040 Educational Technology with grades of "C" or higher. 

3. Have a grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale for the general education component of undergraduate studies or — 
have completed the requirements for a baccalaureate degree with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale from ^ 
any college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association as defined by State Board of Education rule or any — 
college or university otherwise approved pursuant to State Board of Education rule. ^ 

4. Demonstrated mastery of general knowledge, including the ability to read, write, and compute, by passing the General 

Knowledge Test of the Florida Teacher Certification Examination, the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST), a _ 

corresponding component of the National Teachers Examination series, or a similar test pursuant to rules of the State Board ^ 
of Education. 

5. Students must disclose background information that may preclude them from becoming certified at the time of admission. ^ 
For continued enrollment in the program, students must be fingerpnnted and screened by the Florida Department of Law ^~ 
Enforcement and the FBI prior to entering any school. ^ 

6. Applicants not meeting stated admissions criteria may petition for program admittance if they feel that there are mitigating 
circumstances. Applicants must submit an official petition form available in the Office of the Registrar. <_ 



The Edison State College Registrar's Office will ensure that previous coursework meets all relevant academic standards before ""• 

acceptance for transfer. The Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs and the BS Admissions Committee will ensure adherence to ^ 

the above admissions criteria. 

c 

General Education Requirements ^ 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition Il-AA C^ 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA ^ 
or 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking- A A C 

• Humanities Electives 6 Credits to include 3 credits writing intensive ^ 

• *Social Science Electives 9 credits to include one WOH or EUH course 

• College Level Mathematics Electives 6 Credits W 

• **Natural Science Electives w/Lab 

Total: 36 

Required Program Prerequisites (grades of C or better) and electives for the Associate in Arts 
Degree(minimum of 23 credit hours): 

• * EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

• * EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

• * EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

96 



c: 



• 



• * PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology 1- A A 
or 

• DEP 2004 - Human Groulh and Development-AA 

• ** BSC 1010 - Biological Science 1-AA and 

• BSC lOlOL - Biological Science I Laboratory- A A 

• ** BSC 101 1 - Biological Science II-AA and 
BSC 1011 L - Biological Science II Laboratory-AA 

• ** BSC 1 093C - Anatomy and Physiology 1-AA 

The following courses (or H hours of physics with lab): 

• ** CHM 2045 - General Chemistry 1-AA and 

• CHM 2045L - General Chemistry I Laboratory-AA 

• ** CHM 2046 - General Chemistry II-AA and 

• CHM 2046L - General Chemistry II Laboratory-AA 

*courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in social sciences (in addition to speciTic WOH or EUH 
requirement) 

'''^courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in science 

Degree Requirements (61 credit hours): 

MCB 20 IOC - Microbiology-AA 

PCB 3023C - Cell Biology-BS 

PCB 3063C - Genetics with Lab (FGCU course) 

PCB 3043C - General Ecology with Lab (FGCU course) 

ISC 3 120 - Scientific Process (FGCU course) 

EDF 3214 - Human Development and Leaming-BS 

EDG 3410 - Classroom Management-BS 

TSL 4142 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment 

RED 4335 - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas-BS 

RED 4350 - Literacy Content and Processes-BS 

SCE 4330C - Special Methods in Teaching High School Science with Practicum -BS 

SCE 3320C - Special Methods in Teaching Middle School Science with Practicum -BS 

Science with practicum 4 Credits 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS 

ESE 4323 - Educational Assessment-BS 

EDE 4930 - Special Topics in Education 1-BS 

EDF 4790 - Ethics and Law 

SCE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Biology Emphasis-BS 

Biology Emphasis 12 Credits 

Total Credit Hours: 120 

School Based Hour Requirements (675 total hours) 

EDG 3410 - Classroom Management-BS 

TSL 4142 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment 

SCE 4330C - Special Methods in Teaching High School Science with Practicum -BS 

SCE 3320C - Special Methods in Teaching Middle School Science with Practicum -BS 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS 

SCE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Biology Emphasis-BS 

Graduation Requirements: 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 1 20 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward fijlfilling the total number of credits required for 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 
level or above. At least 30 of the 39 hours must be earned at Edison State College. 

C. Students must fulfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all courscwork. Individual programs may 
require a higher grade point average for graduation. 

97 



E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students 
who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community college, or 
bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, are considered to have met the general education component of 
the degree. 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: 

a. successful completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or 

b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through 
corresponding College Level Examination Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 
for review of nontraditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in languages 
other than French. German and Spanish). 

H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.03 12. a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College- Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of 
Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS 
student. 
I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. 
Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in 
which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for 
graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs may identify graduation 
application deadlines. 

B.S. in Education-Additional Program Graduation Requirements 

A. Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale. 

B. Students must pass all sections of the Florida Teachers Certification Examination (FTCE) for certification within the State of 
Florida. 

C. While Edison State College governs a student's program requirements, changes to a program emanating from the Florida 
State Board of Education will take precedence over the College catalog and may alter a student's program of study. 

D. The Florida State Board of Education requires all education students to demonstrate competency in all of the Florida 
Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) as a condition of graduation, including completion of a professional portfolio. 
Elementary Education students must demonstrate achievement of all State required ESOL competencies as a condition of 
graduation. 

E. Students must apply for graduation/internship the semester prior to enrollment in the final internship. Fall graduates must 
apply no later than February I of the preceding spring semester. Spring graduates must apply no later than October I of the 
preceding fall semester. 

F. Students must successfiilly complete all school based hours and the final internship experience as a condition of graduation. 



W 
'» 



98 



Bachelor of Science 
Secondary Education Mathematics, BS 

The Bachelor of Science (BS) in Sccondan,' Education Mathematics program is designed to prepare individuals to teach mathematics 
grades 6-12 (middle and high school). The program provides an educational pathway for students who have earned an Associate in 
Arts degree to include specific math and education prerequisites. Upon graduation, students will meet the mandated state teaching 
requirements, including teacher certification exams. 

Program Highlights: The BS in Secondary Education program includes courses in teaching students with English as a second 
language, students with exceptionalities, reading competency, classroom management, assessment and integrated approaches to 
teaching methodologies at the middle and high school levels. Field experience requirements are progressive in nature, building upon 
previous semester experiences. Students will observe teachers in the field, teach lessons through the practicum courses, and complete a 
fiili-time teaching internship in their final semester. Courses are offered for full and part time students, with blended technology 
components where applicable. Smdents will complete three upper division (9 credit hours) of mathematics coursework through Florida 
Gulf Coast University. 

Admission Requirements: 

In addition to fulfilling the entrance requirements for Edison State College. Applicants for the BS in Elementary Education, Secondary 
Education Biology and Secondary Education Mathematics degree programs must meet the following requirements consistent with 
Florida Statute 1004.04: 

1. Completion of the Associate in Arts (AA) degree, including all general education and required program prerequisites. 
Students with a minimum of 60 transferable hours, with all general education requirements and prerequisites met, may apply 
for admission. 

2. Completion of the lower-division education prerequisite courses: EDF 2005 Intro to Education, EDF 2085Teaching Diverse 
Populations and EME 2040 Educational Technology with grades of "C" or higher. 

3. Have a grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale for the general education component of undergraduate studies or 
have completed the requirements for a baccalaureate degree with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale from 
any college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association as defined by State Board of Education rule or any 
college or university otherwise approved pursuant to State Board of Education rule. 

4. Demonstrated mastery of general knowledge, including the ability to read, write, and compute, by passing the General 
Knowledge Test of the Florida Teacher Certification Examination, the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST). a 
corresponding component of the National Teachers Examination series, or a similar test pursuant to rules of the State Board 
of Education. 

5. Students must disclose background information that may preclude them from becoming certified at the time of admission. 
For continued enrollment in the program, students must be fingerprinted and screened by the Florida Department of Law 
Enforcement and the FBI prior to entering any school. 

6. Applicants not meeting stated admissions criteria may petition for program admittance if they feel that there are mitigating 
circumstances. Applicants must submit an official petition form available in the Office of the Registrar. 

The Edison State College Registrar's Office will ensure that previous coursework meets all relevant academic standards before 
acceptance for transfer. The Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs and the BS Admissions Committee will ensure adherence to 
the above admissions criteria. 

General Education Requirements: 

ENC 1 101 -Composition I-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 

or 

SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

Humanities Electives 6 Credits to include 3 credits writing intensive 

*Social Science Electives 9 credits to include one WOH or EUH course 

**CoIlege Level Mathematics Electives 6 Credits 

Natural Science Electives w/Lab 6 Credits 

Total: 36 

Required Program Prerequisites (grades of C or better) and electives for the Associate in Arts 
Degree (minimum of 24 credit hours): 

• * EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

• * EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

• * EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

• * PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 
or 

• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

99 



• ** STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA ^ 

• ** MAC 23 1 1 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry I-AA * 

• ** MAC 23 12 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry Il-AA 
**College level math electives 6 credit hours 

*courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in social sciences (in addition to specific WOH or EUH ^ 

requirement) xr 

**courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in mathematics * 

Degree Requirements (61 credit hours): ^ 

MAC 23 1 3 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry III-AA >- 

MHF 2191 - Mathematical Foundations (FGCU course) "^ 

MAS 3105 - Linear Algebra(FGCU course) ^ 

MAS 4301 - Intro Abstract Algebra (FGCU course) ^ 

MTG 32 1 2 - College Geometry-BS "^ 

EDF 32 14 - Human Development and Leaming-BS ^ 

EDG 3410 - Classroom Management-BS ^ 

TSL 4 1 42 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment ^ 

RED 4335 - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas-BS ^ 

RED 4350 - Literacy Content and Processes-BS ^ 

MAE 4330C - Teaching Methods in Secondary School Mathematics with Practicum-BS "^ 

MAE 3320C - Teaching Methods in Middle School Mathematics with Practicum-BS -^ 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS ^ 

ESE 4323 - Educational Assessment-BS ~ 

EDE 4930 - Special Topics in Education I-BS _ 

EDF 4790 - Ethics and Law A 

MAE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Mathematics Emphasis-BS ~ 

Mathematics Emphasis 12 Credits _ 

Total Credit Hours: 12 — 

School Based Hour Requirements (675 total hours) a 

EDG 3410 - Classroom Management-BS 

TSL 4 1 42 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment ^ 

MAE 4330C - Teaching Methods in Secondary School Mathematics with Practicum-BS ^^ 

MAE 3320C - Teaching Methods in Middle School Mathematics with Practicum-BS '^ 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalities-BS <— 

MAE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Mathematics Emphasis-BS ^ 

Graduation Requirements: Z. 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for ^- 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit '^ 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward fulfilling the total number of credits required for ^ 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 39 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 «. 
level or above. At least 30 of the 39 hours must be earned at Edison State College. 

C. Students must flilfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. ^ 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. ~~ 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all coursework. Individual programs may 

require a higher grade point average for graduation. ^ 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. . 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of ^ 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be 

reviewed for equivalency. Students who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a ^ 

Florida community college, or bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, ^ 
are considered to have met the general education component of the degree. 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. v. 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: ,— 

a. successfiil completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school •■ 

transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or '"^ 

100 Z 



b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through 

corresponding Collci^i' Lewi Examimilion Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 
for review of nontraditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in languages 
other than French. German and Spanish). 
H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.03 12. a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College- Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of 
Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS 
student. 
I. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. 
Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in 
which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for 
graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs may identify graduation 
application deadlines. 

B.S. in Education- Additional Program Graduation Requirements 

A. Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale. K. Snidents must pass all sections of the Florida 
Teachers Certification Examination (FTCE) for certification within the State of Florida. 

B. Students must pass all sections of the Florida Teachers Certification Examination (FTCE) for certification within the State of 
Florida. 

C. While Edison State College governs a student's program requirements, changes to a program emanating from the Florida 
State Board of Education will take precedence over the College catalog and may alter a student's program of study. 

D. The Florida State Board of Education requires all education students to demonstrate competency in all of the Florida 
Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) as a condition of graduation, including completion 

of a professional portfolio. Elementary Education students must demonstrate achievement of all State required ESOL 
competencies as a condition of graduation. 

E. Students must apply for graduation/internship the semester prior to enrollment in the final internship. Fall graduates must 
apply no later than February 1 of the preceding spring semester. Spring graduates must apply no later than October 1 of the 
preceding fall semester. 

F. Students must successfully complete all school based hours and the final internship experience as a condition of graduation. 



101 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Nursing, BSN 

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program is a RN-BSN program designed for registered nurses who want to advance their 
education. The program will provide registered nurses with a well-rounded general education in the arts and sciences as well as an 
advanced degree in nursing. The program offers a diverse population of students with innovative educational experiences and 
opportunities to meet the healthcare needs of the community they serve. Through the educational process, the student will be able to 
internalize the values, traditions, and obligations of the professional nurse and gain a greater professional perspective and increased 
critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The program provides a career and educational pathway for registered nurses who have 
earned a diploma or associate of science degree in nursing. 

Program Highlights: The BS in Nursing program includes courses in professional issues, informatics, research, legal ethical aspects of 
healthcare, advanced health assessment, pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical decision making, leadership, and community health. 
Courses are offered in an online or blend of online and traditional formats, in an accelerated five and eight week fashion to 
accommodate students' various schedules and learning preferences. Courses are offered for full and part-time students. During 
practicum experiences in community health and leadership students will work with a nurse preceptor in the community to assist them 
in applying theoretical knowledge in the workplace. 

Career Opportunities: The RN-BSN program prepares graduates for career promotions and advancement in nursing to include 
positions in community health, management, and leadership. It also provides a basis for continued education at the graduate level. 

Admission Requirements: 

In addition to fulfilling the entrance requirements for Edison State College, applicants to the BSN program must meet the following 
requirements: 

1. Provide official transcripts showing an Associate Degree in Nursing from a regionally accredited institution. Registered 
nurses who have graduated from a diploma school of nursing will be evaluated on an individual basis. 

2. Possess and submit a valid, unrestricted, unencumbered RN license from the state in which the applicant is practicing, to be 
kept current throughout the duration of the required course of study. 

3. Complete all college preparatory coursework and a minimum of fifteen (15) semester hours of transferable general education 
coursework. 

4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in all postsecondary coursework. 

5. Prior to enrollment in any upper division courses, students must complete Composition I (ENC 1 101) & II (ENC 1 102), 
Statistics (STA 2023). and all science courses. 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 
or 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

• Humanities Electives 6 credits to include 3 credits writing intensive 

• Social Sciences 9 credits to include one WOH or EUH course 

• PSY 2012 - General Psychology I-AA and 

• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 
College Level Mathematics to include 

• STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA 

• **Natural Sciences w/Lab 6 Credits 

Total: 36 

Required Program Prerequisites (grades of C or better) and electives for the Associate in Arts 
Degree (minimum of 24 credit hours): 

** BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 
** BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 
** CHM 2032 - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences -AA and 
CHM 2032L - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab -AA * 
** MCB 20 IOC - Microbiology-AA 
HUN 1201 - Nutrition-AA 
SYG 1000 - Introduction to Sociology-AA 
"'courses can be used to satisfy general education requirements in natural sciences 

102 



A- 
A- 



*Humanities elcctives may be chosen from any course listed in tiie General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
*CHM 2045 and lab or higher level can be used to satisfy this requirement. 

Students must possess a valid, unrestricted RN license for admission. 

Prior to enrollment in any 3000 or 4000 level courses, students must complete ENC 1101. ENC 1 102, statistics and all science 

prerequisites 

Degree Requirements: 

Lower Division (AS Degree) Nursing: 

NUR 3805 - Professional Roles and Dimensions - BS 

NUR 3 125 - Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice - BS 

NUR 3873 - Informatics for the Health Professional - BS 

NUR 3826 - Legal Ethical Aspects in Nursing - BS 

NUR 3066C - Advanced Health Assessment - BS 

NUR 3145 - Pharmacology and Alternative Therapeutics - BS 

NUR 4165 - Nursing Research - BS 

NUR 4636 - Community Health Nursing Theory - BS 

*** NUR 4636L - Community Health Nursing Practicum - BS 

NUR 4835 - Leadership in Nursing - BS 

*** NUR 4835L - Leadership in Nursing Practicum - BS 

NUR 4847 - Clinical Decision Making - BS 

Total: 30 

Electives: 3 Credit Hours, Choose One 

• NUR 3655 - Multicultural Nursing - BS 

• NUR 4295 - Critical Care Nursing - BS 

• NUR 4169 - Evidenced Based Nursing Practice - BS 

• NUR 3895 - Teaching and Learning for the Healthcare Professional - BS 

Upper Division Nursing: 

Total: 33 

Total Credit Hours: 120 

***The practicum enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of immunization and health report. The process also requires 
satisfactory completion of a College-approved criminal history background check completed at the student's expense. 

Graduation Requirements: 

A. Students must satisfactorily complete 120 credit hours. For residency purposes, a minimum of 30 credit hours required for 
graduation must be completed at Edison State College. All other specific degree requirements must also be met. Credit 
awarded for college-preparatory instruction may not be counted toward fijlfilling the total number of credits required for 
residency purposes or graduation. 

B. For purposes of conferring the bachelor's degree, students must complete at least 36 credit hours of courses numbered 3000 
level or above. At least 30 of the 36 hours must be earned at Edison State College. 

C. Students must fulfill all requirements for their program major. Students should refer to program graduation requirements. 

D. Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all work at Edison State College. 
Students pursuing a degree in education must achieve a 2.5 average or higher in all coursework. Individual programs may 
require a higher grade point average for graduation. 

E. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all upper division program requirements. 

F. Students must complete the general education requirements of the .Associate in Arts Degree including any assessment of 
general education outcomes that are required by the College. Transfer courses will be reviewed for equivalency. Students 
who transfer to Edison State College with a previous associate in arts degree from a Florida community- college, or 
bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, arc considered to have met the general education component of 
the degree. 

G. Students must have completed Florida's foreign language requirement prior to the completion of the bachelor's degree. 
Students may meet this competency in one of two ways: 

a. successful completion of two years of a single foreign language while in high school (official high school 
transcripts must be submitted to the College Registrar), or 

103 



b. successful completion of two semesters (8-10 credit hours) of a single foreign language in college (or through 

corresponding College Level Examination Program CLEP exams). Edison State College may determine standards 
for review of non-traditional foreign language competence for languages not available through CLEP (in 
languages other than French. German and Spanish). 
H. In accordance with State Rule 6A- 10.0312, a student must demonstrate proficiency on the State of Florida College- Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) or meet eligibility standards for CLAST alternatives. Students in pursuit of the Bachelor of 
Applied Science Degree must complete the CLAST requirement by the time they have earned 36 semester hours as a BAS 
student. 
1. Students must meet program criteria prior to enrollment in the capstone or internship experience. 
Students must complete an Application for Graduation through the Office of the Registrar and enroll for the GRD 4000 the semester in 
which they intend to graduate. Students must apply for graduation by the published deadline to be assured of final clearance for 
graduation, timely receipt of diploma, and participation in the graduation ceremony. Individual programs may identify graduation 
application deadlines. 



For additional information, please contact the Baccalaureate and University program office by calling (239) 489-9295. For admission 
and graduation requirements, refer to the appropriate section of the College Catalog. 

Information is available online at; http://www.edison.edu/academics/ 



I. 

104 ' — ■" 



Associate in Arts 



The Associate in Arts degree in Florida consists of 60 credit hours in two main parts: the general education core, and bachelor's 
degree program prerequisites. The 36-credit hour general education core is outlined by the Florida Department of Education, and 
consists of the following five areas of concentration: communications, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences. 
The remaining 24 credit hours constitute program prerequisites, which should be chosen by the student based on the entrance 
requirements of the Edison State bachelor's degree program, or other college or university bachelor's degree program, to which the 
student will transfer. 

Associate in Arts Degree General Education Program Guide 

General Education Philosophy 

General Education is a program of study that establishes a foundation for lifelong learning and prepares students to be thoughtful, 
informed, global citizens. This program fosters academic excellence, interdisciplinary dialog, respect for self and others and social 
responsibility. 

General Education Core Courses 

General education core courses differ from traditional survey courses by integrating a breadth of knowledge and skills essential to a 
complete education and are the foundation of knowledge upon which all degrees are built. 

General Education Competencies 

General education courses must meet all of the following outcomes at a primary or secondary level. At the conclusion of the general 
education program of smdy. students should be able to demonstrate the following competencies: 

• Communication (COM): To communicate (read, write, speak, listen) effectively using standard English and apply effective 
techniques to create working relationships with others to achieve common goals. 

• Critical Thinking (CT): To demonstrate the skills necessary for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. 

• Technology/Information Management (TIM): To demonstrate the skills and use the technology necessary to collect, 
\erify'. document, and organize information from a variety of sources. 

• Global Socio-cultural Responsibility (GSR): To identify, describe, and apply responsibilities, core civic beliefs, and 
values present in a diverse society. 

• Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR): To identify and apply mathematical and scientific principles and methods. 

Associate in Arts students must follow the general education guide below in planning required courses. This guide complies w ith 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools' (SACS) Core Requirement 2.7.3 which requires course distribution in humanities/fine 
arts, social/behavioral sciences, natural sciences/mathematics; Florida Statute 1007.25(3) which requires the core curriculum to 
include subject areas of communications, mathematics, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences; Rules of the Florida State 
Board of Education, which requires six credits of mathematics and twelve credits (four courses) in which writing is heavily 
emphasized. Additionally, the mathematics and writing courses must be passed with a "C" or better. 

Communications: 9 Credit Hours 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1 1 7 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA or 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

Humanities: 6 Credit Hours 

(Select rvvo courses - One from Part A and one from Part B, or two from Part A) 

Part A* 

• HUM 221 1 - Studies in Humanities: The Ancient World Through the Medieval Period-AA 

• HUM 2235 - Studies in Humanities: The Renaissance Through the Age of Reason-AA 

• HUM 2250 - Studies in Humanities: The Romantic Era Through the Present-AA 

• HUM 2930 - Studies in Humanities: Great 

• HUM 1950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA (**) 

• HUM 2950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA (**) 

• HUM 25 1 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing any of these courses with a "C" or 
better. 



105 



Humanities Part B 

AML 2010 - Literature of the United States I, to 1860-AA 

AML 2020 - Literature of tiie United States H, 1860 to Present-AA 

ARH 1000 - Art Appreciation-AA 

ARH 1050 - History of Art 1-AA 

ARH 1051 -History of Art II-AA 

ARH 1950 - Introduction to European Art and Architecture-AA 

(first time tour/must take in combination with HUM 1950) 

ARH 2010 - Art of the Western World- AA 

ENL 2012 - British Literature and CulUirc 1 to 1780-AA 

ENL 2022 - British Literature and Culture 11. 1780 to Present-AA 

ENG 2100 - American Cinema- AA 

HUM 2410 - Intro to Asian Humanities 

LIT 2090 - Contemporary Literature-AA 

LIT 21 10 - World Literature I-AA 

LIT 2120 - World Literature II-AA 

MUH 2018 - Jazz History and Appreciation-AA 

MUL 1 1 10 - Music History and Appreciation-AA 

PHI 2010 - Introduction to Philosophy-AA 

PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking-AA 

PHI 2600 - Ethics- AA 

REL 2300 - World Religions-AA 

THE 2100 - Theatre History and Literature-AA 

Writing Intensive Courses: 

The following courses satisfy the writing requirement of 4.000 words each. Each student must successfiilly take four courses: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 1 02 - Composition II-AA 

• CRW 2001 - Creative Writing-AA (**) 

• CRW 2102 - Creative Writing II-AA (**) 

• HUM 221 1 - Studies in Humanities: The Ancient World Through the Medieval Period-AA 

• HUM 2235 - Studies in Humanities: The Renaissance Through the Age of Reason-AA 

• HUM 2250 - Studies in Humanities: The Romantic Era Through the Present-AA 

• HUM 25 1 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA 

• HUM 2930 - Studies in Humanities: Great 

• HUM 1 950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA ( **) 

• HUM 2950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA (**) 

• WOH 1012- History ofWorld Civilization to 1500-AA 

• WOH 1023 - History of World Civilization 1500 to 1815-AA 

• WOH 1030 - History of World Civilization 1815 to Present-AA 

For an AA degree, writing intensive courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher. World Civilization courses which are 
designated as writing intensive (designated as "W" in the Schedule of Classes) satisfy the writing requirement. 

Social Sciences: 9 Credit Hours 

Anthropology 

• ANT 1410 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology-AA 

• ANT 1 5 1 1 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology-AA 

Economics 

• ECO 20 1 3 - Economics I-AA 

• ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA 

Education 

• EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

• t EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

106 



• t EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

• EDP 2202 - Introduction to Educational Psychology 

t May not fulfill social science requirements at some state universities. 



Geography 

• GEA 2010 - Geography of the Eastern Hemisphere-AA (**) 

• GEA 2040 - Geography of the Western Hemisphere-AA (**) 

History 

• AMH 20 1 - History of the United States to 1 865- A A 

• AMH 2020 - History of the United States 1865 to Present- AA 

• AMH 2070- Florida History-AA(**) 

• AMH 2091 - African-American History- AA 

• AMH 2095 - American Indian History 

• AMH 293 1 - Women in U.S. History 

• EUH 1 000 - The Western Tradition I-AA 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing this course with a "C" or 
better. 

• EUH 1001 - The Western Tradition II-AA 

*.'\A degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing this course with a "C" or 
better. 

• WOH 1012 -History of World Civilization to 1500-AA 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing this course with a "C" or 
better. 

• WOH 1 023 - History of World Civilization 1 500 to 1 8 1 5-AA 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing this course with a "C" or 
better. 

• WOH 1030 - History of World Civilization 1815 to Present-.\A 

*AA degree-seeking students must demonstrate competence in written communication by passing this course with a "C" or 
better. 

Human Services 

• HUS 1001 - Introduction to Human Services-AA 

Political Science 

• POS2041 - American National Government- A A 

• POS 21 12 - American State and Local Politics-AA 

• INR 2002 - International Relations-AA 

Psychology 

• CLP 1001 - Personal and Social Adjustment- A A 

• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

• DEP 2 1 02 - Child Psychology- AA 

• DEP 2302 - Adolescent Psychology-AA 

• INP 2390 - Human Relations in Business and Industry-AA 

• PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 

• PSY 2014 - General Psychology II-AA 

Sociology 

• SYG 1000 - Introduction to Sociology- AA 

• SYG 1010 - Contemporary Social Problems- AA 

• SYG 2430 - Marriage and the Family-AA 

Mathematics: 6 Credit Hours 

Mathematics courses used to satisfy the AA mathematics requirement must be passed with a grade of "C" or higher. Pursuant to Rule 
6A- 10.030 (Gordon Rule), the student must successfully complete six (6) semester hours of mathematics coursework. 

General Education Math Requirements 

107 



• MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

• MGF 1 1 07 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts II- A A 

• STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA 

• MAC 11 05 - College Algebra-AA 

• MAC 1 106 - Combined College Algebra Precalculus-AA 

• MAC 1 1 14 - Trigonometry- A A 

• MAC 1 140 - Pre-Calculus Algebra - AA 

These advanced mathematics courses may also be used to meet the AA mathematics requirements: 

• MAC 11 47 - Precalculus Algebra Trigonometry-AA 

• MAC 2233 - Calculus for Business, Social and Life Sciences-AA 

• MAC 23 1 1 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry 1-AA 

• MAC 23 12 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry II-AA 

• MAC 23 1 3 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry Ill-AA 

• MAP 2302 - Differential Equations-AA 

Natural Sciences: 6 Credit Hours 

A student must complete six hours of science, including associated laboratory, in order to fulfill the Natural Science requirement. A 



"C" ( 

Note 



signation after the course number indicates that the lab is "combined" with the class. 
A better foundation in science is provided by taking related science courses in sequential semesters. 

AST 2003 - Astronomy 1-AA 

and 

AST 2003L - Astronomy 1 Laboratory-AA 

AST 2004 - Astronomy Il-AA 

and 

AST 2004L - Astronomy II Laboratory-AA 

BSC 1005 - Introduction to Biological Sciences-AA 

BSC 1010 - Biological Science I-AA 

and 

BSC lOlOL - Biological Science I Laboratory-AA 

BSC 101 1 - Biological Science 11-AA 

and 

BSC 101 IL - Biological Science 11 Laboratory-AA 

BSC 1050C - Environmental Biology: Our Global Environment-AA 

BSC 105 IC - Environmental Biology: Southwest Florida Ecosystems-AA 

BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology 1-AA 

BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology 11-AA 

CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 

and 

CHM 2025L - Introduction to College Chemistry Laboratory-AA 

CHM 2032 - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences -AA 

CHM 2032L - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab -AA 

CHM 2045 - General Chemistry I-AA 

and 

CHM 2045L - General Chemistry 1 Laboratory-AA 

CHM 2046 - General Chemistry II-AA 

and 

CHM 2046L - General Chemistry II Laboratory-AA 

CHM 2210 - Organic Chemistry I-AA 

and 

CHM 2210L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory-AA 

CHM 221 1 - Organic Chemistry II - AA 

and 

CHM 221 IL - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory - AA 

GLY 1 1 - Physical Geology- AA 

and 

GLY lOlOL - Physical Geology Laboratory-AA 

GLY 1 100 - Historical Geology-AA 

and 

108 



GLY 

ISC 1 

ISC 1 

MCB 

OCE 

OCE 

OCB 

and 

OCB 

PHY 

and 

PHY 

PHY 

and 

PHY 

PHY 

and 

PHY 

PHY 

and 

PHY 



1 lOOL - Historical Geology Laboratory-AA 

001 C - Foundation of Interdisciplinary' Science 1-AA 

002C - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science II- A A 

2010C-Mierobiology-AA 

i 00 1 C - Introduction to Oceanography -AA 

1002C - Oceanography II: A Multidisciplinary Science 

2010 - Marine Biology-AA 

2010L - Marine Biology Laboratory-AA 

2053 - College Physics I-AA 

2053L - College Physics I Laboratory-AA 

2054 - College Physics II-AA 

2054L - College Physics II Laboratory-AA 
2048 - General Physics 1-AA 

2048 L - Genera! Physics I Laboratory-AA 
204<^ - Genera! Physics II-AA 

2049L - General Physics II Laboratory-AA 



These courses are sequential, or require another science or math course as a co-requisite or prerequisite: 

Electives 

Be sure electives selected have an AA designation as listed in the course description section of this Catalog. Electives should be 

chosen with a desired baccalaureate program in mind. Students are advised to see an advisor to determine university program 

prerequisites. 

Note: AS courses do not qualify for elective credit. 

Total Elective Hours: 24 

CLAST 

All degree-seeking students need to satisfy the requirement of the CLAST. 

Foreign Language 

Students seeking admission to the Florida State University System should have completed two years of foreign language at the high 
school level or two courses (eight credit hours) at the college level. Foreign language is a State University System baccalaureate 
graduation requirement. 

International Diversity Courses 

Florida State Universities may require students to take courses that have an international or diversity focus. These are designated with 
an "I" after the course descriptions. 

Total AA Credit Hours: 60 

Additional Options for Pursuing a Bachelor's Degree 

The following tips for transfer students are found on the FACTS website: 

1 . Students should meet with their academic advisor to discuss degree requirements and transfer options. 

2. When applying for admission to a state university, transfer students who have not yet completed the AA degree will be 
evaluated on their high school transcripts as well as their college coursework. Transfer students without an AA degree and 
less than 60 hours must compete with all entering freshman applicants to the college or university. 

3. It is strongly recommended that a student complete the AA degree prior to transferring. If this is not possible, students are 
encouraged to at least complete the 36 hour general education block at their initial institution. 

4. Students who have entered a community college with a "CPT-eligible" certificate of completion must complete the A A 
degree before transferring to a 4-year institution. 



109 



5. Students should check with the transfer services office at the college or university to which they are transferring to obtain ^ 
infonnation relating to transfer policies, financial aid opportunities and other available assistance. ^ 

6. Students wishing to receive accommodations for a disability have a responsibility to inform the disability services center at >— 
the 4-year institution. A student with a disability may be eligible for a special admission review under § 1007.265, Florida * 
Statutes. A special admission review may apply if documentation can be provided that failure to meet an admission "^ 
requirement is related to the disability and failure does not constitute a ftindamental alteration in the nature of the program. 

Contact the admissions director for more information. ^ 

Please note: several AS degrees transfer to discipline related BS degrees within the State University system. Please see a program xr 

advisor for more information. ^- 

TRANSFER TO A STATE UNIVERSITY - 

Contact information for each of the state universities in Florida is provided below: 

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University ^^ 

www.famu.edu "^ 

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Tallahassee, FL 32307 ^^ 

(850) 599-37% ^ 

Florida Atlantic University '^ 

www.fau.edu ,^ 

777 Glades Road PO Box 309 1 , Boca Raton, FL 3343 1 A 

(561)297-7300 ~ 

Florida Gulf Coast University »_ 

www.fgcu.edu 4- 

10501 FGCU Blvd. S., Ft. Myers, FL 33965 ~ 

(800) 590-3428 t» 

Florida International University ^ 

www.fiu.edu "^ 

Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 ,^ 

(305) 348-2000 ^ 

Florida State University """ 

www.fsu.edu _ 

Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 A 

(850) 644-2525 '^ 

New College of Florida _ 

www.ncfedu ^ 

5800 Bay Shore Road, Sarasota, FL 34243 ^ 

(941)487-5000 CL 

University of Central Florida a- 

wwrw.ucf.edu 

4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 C 

(407) 823-2000 ^ 

University of Florida 

www.ufl.edu ^ 

University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 3261 1 ^- 

(352)392-3261 ^ 

University of North Florida * 

www.unf edu 

1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224 

(904)620-1000 

University of South Florida 

ww^w.usfedu 

4202 E. Fowler Avenue. Tampa, FL 33620 

(813)974-2011 

University of West Florida 

www.uwfedu 

1 1000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 

(850)474-3000 

110 



Associate in Science 



Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree 

1. Earn the required semester hours for the degree v\ith a eumulative 2.00 GPA. 

2. Complete all non-course requirements, if applicable. 

3. Successfully complete 25% of the required degree course work at Edison State College. 

4. Fulfill all obligations to Edison State. 

5. Meet all deadlines pertaining to graduation. 

6. Earn a grade of "C" or higher in English composition and mathematics courses required for the degree. 

General Education Requirement in all Associate in Science Degree Programs: 

The Florida Department of Education requires completion of a minimum of fifteen ( 15) semester hours in the general education 
core curriculum in the subject areas of communication, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences, which 
also meets the criteria of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. English and math 
courses must meet the requirements adopted by the State Board of Education in Rule 6 A. FAC and the Board of Governors. 
No physical education credit will be included in the general education block of credit. Additionally. Administrative Rule 6A 
indicates students must cam a grade of C or better in English and mathematics. 

Limited Admissions AS Degree Programs 

The Associate of Science Degree programs in Dental Hygiene, Nursing, Respiratory Care. Radiologic Technology, 
Cardiovascular Technology, Opticianry, Physical Therapy Assistant, and Emergency Medical Services Technology are 
selective admissions programs. Admission to the College does not automatically admit a student to these programs of study. 
Application should be made to the College as well as application for admission to the program of study. Such applications 
for admission to the program of study are available by calling (239) 489-9255. Application information for the Emergency 
Medical Ser\ ices Technology program is available by calling (239) 489-9392. 

Division of Professional and Technical Studies Course Clusters 

What are the course clusters? 

A record of completion (certificate) will be issued for various course clusters, and signifies that the student has satisfactorily 
completed a series of courses that develop specified skills. The certificate provides employers with documentation for 
employment or for professional development. Information on course requirements is available in the Division Office and in the 
Advising Office. These clusters are specifically designed to upgrade job skills and provide college coursework for those not 
ready to commit to a full degree program. 

Courses in most clusters are the same courses required for the particular associate degree or Technical Certificate of Credit and 
apply toward the degree or technical certificate unless otherwise indicated. 

Note: Only students who declare a major as specified in the Edison State catalog are eligible to receive federal financial aid. 
Students who are pursuing a course cluster and are not degree-seeking students are typically not eligible for this assistance. 



Ill 



Accounting Technology, AS 

The Associate in Science Degree Program in Accounting is designed to prepare students to enter public or private accounting in 
various capacities. Students who successfully complete this program will have the knowledge and skills necessary to sit for two 
certification examinations. 

Accreditation Council for Accountancy and Taxation (ACAT) 

The ACAT examination is sponsored by the National Society of Public Accountants located in Alexandria, Virginia. The examination 
is offered twice a year, in May and December. The six-hour examination is given at over 200 test sites nationwide. Accreditation in 
Accountancy by the ACAT demonstrates to your clients and/or employer they have a professional working for them. , 

There is an articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a university bachelor's degree program. Please contact the 
Baccalaureate and University Programs Division at (239) 489-9295 for fijrther information. 

Enrolled Agents Examination 

The Enrolled Agents Examination is a comprehensive four-part exam administered once a year by the Internal Revenue Service. The «. 

primary benefits of being an enrolled agent are ( 1) recognition of attaining a high level of knowledge of federal taxation and (2) ^ 

eligibility to practice before the IRS. *■ 

Accounting Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S33,380 ($ 1 6.05 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $65,240 (3 1 .36 
per hour).* * 

There are approximately 144 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** *" 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. ^ 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities: *-■ 

Accountant 

Accounts Payable Clerk — 

Accounts Receivable Clerk * 

Accounting Clerk 

Bookkeeper — 

Paraprofessional Accountant *" 

Payroll Assistant 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? *- 

The Edison State College has academic partnerships with many university partners. For example, the Accounting Degree transfers to a 
BS in Accounting at Hodges University. Edison State graduates receive reduced tuition with many of our university partners. For more 
information, call (239)489-9067. ' ^ 

Course Prerequisites: ^ 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. ^^ 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

(Technical Writing Emphasis) 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

or 

SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

**Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA 

STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA 

*Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

(PHI 2600 recommended) 3 Credits 

Total: 22 



112 



Degree Core Requirements: 

ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

GEB 101 1 - Introduction to Business-AA 

ACG 201 1 - Financial Accounting II-AA 

RMI 2001 - Principles of Risk Managcment-AA 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

ACG 2071 - Managerial Accounting-AA 

ECO 2013 - Economics 1-AA 

TAX 2000 - Federal Tax Accounting 1-AA 

CGS 251 1 - Advanced Spreadsheet Computing-AS 

ACG 2500 - Governmental and Not-Forprotlt Accounting-AA 

TAX 2010 - Federal Tax Accounting II-AA 

SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 

Electives 5 Credits 

Total: 42 

Total Credit Hours: 64 



Electives: 

Electives may be selected from any Accounting, Business, Management, Finance, or Computer courses. 

*Humanities Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



* f 



Business Administration and Management, AS 

The Business Administration and Management Associate in Science Degree Program is designed to provide a broad foundation of 

icnowiedge and stcills necessary for students seeicing entry-level employment in various fields, and for those currently employed in ^ 

business and desiring advancement. , 

The degree consists of 18 hours of general education requirements, 31 hours of degree core requirements, and 15 hours of business or * 

related subject electives. >■ 

V 

Business Graduates May Earn: t 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S28,880 (SI 3.50 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $43,900 ($21.1 1 >. 

per hour).* * 

There are approximately 152 annual openings in Edison State's service district.** ^ 
* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 
** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 



Career/Industry Opportunities 

Front Office Supervisor 

International Business Specialist • ^ 

Manager Trainee 

Marketing Trainee 

Office Manager ^ 

Sales Representative 

Tour Director 



A 



Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going on to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College or looking into our academic 

partnerships with many universities and colleges. There is a state articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a state 

university bachelor's degree program. Students who wish to do this should choose their electives from the following list: STA 2023, 

MAC 2233. ACG 20 1 1 , ACG 207 1 and ECO 2023. For more information please contact a program advisor at (239) 489-9067. ^ 



Course Prerequisites: t. 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. ^ 

Program Prerequisites: t. 

None 



*• 



General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 
**Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

• ECO 20 1 3 - Economics I-A A 
*Humanities Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 18 

Degree Core Requirements: 

ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

ACG 1002 - Microcomputer Accounting Applications-AS 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

MTB 1 103 - Business Mathematics-AA 

MAN 2021 - Management Principles-AA 

FIN 2100 - Personal Finance-AA 

GEB 101 1 - Introduction to Business-AA 

BUL 2241 - Business Law I-AA 

MAR 2011 - Marketing-AS 

SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 



114 



Total: 31 

Business and/or Related Subject Electiives: 

• ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA 

• STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA 

• BUL 2242 - Business Law Il-AA 

or any course in Accounting, Business, Hospitality, Management, Customer Service, Computer Technology, Banking, 
Finance or Real Estate. 

Total: 15 

Total Credit Hours: 64 

Accelerated Format for the Business Administration and Management degree: 

The Accelerated Coursework in Business Administration and Management is designed specifically for individuals with professional 

experience who wish to learn contemporary supervisory skills while maintaining full-time employment. This degree path consists of 

accelerated credit courses that combine in-class instruction with outside projects and assignments. Because students will be assigned to 

faculty-directed study groups, a maximum cohort of 24 students will be accepted per year. 

Upon completion of the Accelerated Coursework in Business Administration and Management, participants will have the option to 

develop an individualized program of study toward the Associate in Science degree in Business Administration and Management 

utilizing the previously earned college credits from the accelerated format. 

Participants will register for three classes in the fall and spring semesters and two classes for each summer session. 

Year 1 

Fall 

• GEB 1 1 1 - Introduction to Business-A A 

• ECO 20 1 3 - Economics I-AA 

• CGS 1 1 00 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

Spring 

• ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

• MAN 202 1 - Management Principles-AA 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

Summer A 

• MAC 1 1 05 - College Algebra-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 

Summer B 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 



• 



ACG 1002 - Microcomputer Accounting AppIications-AS 



Year 2 

Fall 

• ACG 201 1 - Financial Accounting II-AA 

• ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA 

• Humanities 

Spring 

ACG 2071 - Managerial Accounting-AA 

MAC 2233 - Calculus for Business. Social and Life Sciences- AA 

MAR 2011 - Marketing- AS 



• 



• 



115 



Summer A 

• STA 2023 

• BUL2241 



Statistical Methods I-AA 
Business Law I-AA 



Summer B 

• GEB 1949 - Internship Work Experience I-AA 

• GEB 2949 - Internship Work Experience II-AA 

• BUL 2242 - Business Law II-AA 

Applicants will be required to: 

• Provide references demonstrating a minimum of two years of full-time employment. 

• Present at least two letters of recommendation regarding the applicant's potential for success in an accelerated program. 

• Meet with college personnel regarding the program requirements. 

• Recognize that all admissions procedures and deadlines as outlined in the Edison State College Catalog will apply. 

*Humanities Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



116 






Cardiovascular Technology, AS 



The Cardiovascular Technology Program is a two year program leading to an Associate in Science Degree in Cardiovascular 
Technology. The first year of the program is comprised of both general education and core cardiovascular courses. In the second year 
students are concentrating on core didactic, lab and clinical cardiovascular courses. Clinical instruction occurs at affiliated hospitals 
throughout Southwest Florida. 

Cardiovascular Technology is an exciting, rewarding and relatively new field. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in 
the United States. Advances in technology and the training of Cardiovascular Technologists have improved the lives of millions of 
patients. This has resulted in a high demand for our graduates. After graduation you will be in demand as a Cardiovascular 
Technologist to work in hospitals and cardiology practices. The demand is high in Florida and throughout the United States. 
The Invasive Cardiovascular Technologist is employed in cardiac catheterization laboratories (cath labs). Our specialty of invasive 
cardiology will prepare the graduate to function in multiple facets in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Working with a 
Cardiologist they perform sophisticated tests in order to diagnose and quantify cardiac disorders. These include coronary artery 
disease, cardiac valve disease or disorders of the heart's electrical conduction system. Cardiovascular Technologists perform 
diagnostic cardiac catheterization studies on patients including coronar>' arteriography, hemodynamic monitoring and analysis, and 
electrophysiology studies. They also assist the cardiologist in interventional procedures including coronary angioplasty, direct infarct 
angioplasty, rotablator procedures, intra-coronary stenting. pacemaker/defibrillator insertion and radiofrequency ablation. We also 
offer an elective in echocardiography for students who would like a basic foundation in this high demand field. 
The Edison State College Cardiovascular Technology Program is accredited in invasive cardiology by The Commission on 
Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) based on the recommendation of the Joint Review Committee 
on Education in Cardiovascular Technology. 

The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) is located at 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 
33756, phone 727-210-2350 ( wwAv.CAAHEP.ort; ). 

Graduates may apply for the invasive cardiology registry examination offered by Cardiovascular Credentialing International (CCI) for 
national certification. Upon successful completion of the national exam, graduates earn the RCIS (Registered Cardiovascular Invasive 
Specialist) credential. 

A freshman class begins each Fall. Currently 20 freshmen are accepted each year. Class size is limited by the number of cardiology 
laboratories in the clinical affiliates needed for the training of students. Students will have the opportunity to practice cardiac 
catheterization procedures in our "on campus" cath lab prior to entering the clinical component of the curriculum. The Cardiovascular 
Technology Program is a "limited" admission program. The criteria for admission are available through the program office or through 
the Health Professions office at (239)489- 9255. Information packets with application to the program may be downloaded by visiting 
www.edison.edu (go to Academic Programs, click on Academic Program Web pages, click on your program of interest to download.) 

Cardiovascular Technology Career Opportunities 

• Registered Cardiovascular Invasive Specialist 

• Invasive Cardiovascular Technologist 

• Cardiac Catheterization Lab Technologist 

• Electrophysiology Technologist 

• Cardiovascular Clinical Applications Specialist 

• Cardiovascular Management 

• Cardiovascular Research 

• Cardiovascular Education 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going on to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College or looking into our academic 

partnerships with many universities and colleges. 

For more information please contact the Baccalaureate and University Programs Division at (239)489-9295. 

First Round Application Deadline! 

June 1 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The program prerequisite encompasses successful completion of program acceptance process including program-level admissions 
points, competition with all other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation and affective skills demonstration. The clinical 

117 



enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. The admissions process requires 
satisfactory completion of a College criminal history background check completed at the applicant's expense. 



General Education 

ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

PSY 2012 - General Psychology I-AA 

BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals-AS 

BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA with Lab 

BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA with Lab 

** MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA + 

CHM 2032 - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences -AA ++ 

CHM 2032L - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab -AA +++ 

PHY 1007 - Physics for the Health Sciences-AS ++++ 

MCB 20 IOC - Microbiology- AA 

Elective *Humanities 3 Credits 

Total: 34 

Degree Core Requirements: 

RET 1024 - Introduction to Cardiopulmonary Technology - AS 

RET 1616C - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology - AS 

RET 1821L - Clinical Prc-Practicum I-AS 

CVT 1200 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology- AS 

CVT 2420C - Invasive Cardiology I-AS 

CVT 2620C - Non-Invasive Cardiology Technology I-AS 

CVT 2840L - Cardiovascular Practicum II-AS 

CVT 242 IC - Invasive Cardiology II-AS 

CVT 2841 L - Cardiovascular Practicum III-AS 

RET 2244 - Critical Care Applications-AS 

CVT 2920 - Cardiovascular Technologist as a Professional-AS 

CVT 2842L - Cardiovascular Practicum IV-AS 

Total: 43 

Total Credit Hours: 77 

Career Core Electives: 

• CVT 262 1 C - Non-Invasive Cardiology Technology II-AS 

Total: 4 

General Education Requirements are included in the required sequences listed above. Some students prefer to take most or all of their 

general education courses before entering the core cardiovascular sequence. This is recommended, especially for those students who 

must work or those who have heavy family obligations. 

* Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

** MGF 1 106 carries a prerequisite of testing or MAT 1033 

+ or higher level math course 

++ or higher level chemistry course 

-H-l- or higher level chemistry lab course 

++++ or higher level physics course 



118 



Computer Programming and Analysis, AS 

The Computer Programming and Analysis Degree Program is designed to give students a basic foundation in computer programming 
and will prepare them for employment as entry level programmers in commercial, industrial, and governmental institutions. The 
training is practical in nature and emphasizes performance of job tasks similar to those performed in today's advanced computer 
technology environment. 

The degree consists of 18 hours of general education requirements, and 45 hours of degree core requirements. 

Computer Programming Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S43,000 (S20.36 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to cam S65.748 (S3 1 .61 

per hour).* 

There are approximately 599 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrie\ ed January 2009 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List Retrieved Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

Junior Programmer 

PC Sales Representative 

PC Technical Support Representative 

Programmer's Aide 

Network Specialist 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going on to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College or you may want to look into our 
academic partnerships with many universities and colleges. There is an articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a 
university bachelor's degree program. Please contact the program advisor at (239) 489-9067 for further information. 

Course Prerequisites 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this catalog. 

Program Prerequisites 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition II- AA 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 

or SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking- AA 

**Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking-AA 

*SociaI Science Elective 3 Credits 

Total: 18 

Degree Core Requirements: 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

SLS 1331 -Personal Business Skills-AS 

ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

MAN 202 1 - Management Principles- AA 

or 

SBM 2000 - Small Business Management-AS 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

CNT 1 000 - Networking Essentials-AS 

COP 1224 - Programming with C-H--AA 

COP 2222 - Advanced Programming with C+-I--AA 

or 

COP 2172 - Advanced Visual Basic Programming-AA 

CIS 2321 - Data Systems and Management-AA 

119 



• CGS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance-AS 

• COP 2701 - Database Programming-AA 

Computer Science Electives at 2000 level (2 courses) 6 Credits 
Electives 5 Credits 

Total: 45 

Total Credit Hours: 63 

Electives: 

General electives may be chosen from any Business, Computer Technology, or Drafting and Design course. 

*Social Science Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program under Social Science. 
** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



120 



Crime Scene Technology, AS 



The Crime Scene Technology program is designed to prepare students for employment in fields related to crime scene investigation. 
Students who complete the program will be able to locate, preserve, develop, collect, analyze and present physical evidence relating to 
the scene of the crime. Students Icam the necessary skills to accurately map out, collect and log evidence, develop and preserve 
fingerprints, write reports and present courtroom testimony. Typical industry job titles include Crime Scene Technician, Crime Scene 
Technologist and Crime Scene Investigator. 

The program consists of a 28 credit hour college certificate (major code PSVC CRST), and a two year, 60 credit hour Associate in 
Science Degree (major code AS CRST). The certificate program is designed to provide technical training and will transfer directly into 
the Crime Scene Technology Associates in Science Degree. Many law enforcement agencies require college degrees prior to 
employment and students who do not have law enforcement related experience are strongly encouraged to complete the AS degree. 
Although most crime scene technicians in Southwest Florida are law enforcement certified, more agencies are beginning to use 
civilians in these positions. Employment opportunities are greatly enhanced by prior experience in a law related field. Salary and job 
opportimities vary with willingness to relocate. 

The core crime scene course schedule is designed for the evening student. Full time students can complete all coursework in two years. 
In addition to class and laboratory training, upon approval, internship opportunities are available that will allow the student to 
experience first-hand the job skills required in the field of crime scene investigation. 

The Associate in Science degree in Crime Scene Technology transfers directly into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied 
Science degree in Public Safety Administration, as well as any public Florida college or university's Bachelor of Science degree in 
Criminal Justice. For additional information on Transfer Services, contact the department at 239-489-9132. 

Crime Scene Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S23,000 while an experienced worker can expect to earn $52,000.* 

There are approximately 50 annual openings in Edison State's service district.** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation Labor Market Statistics Center February 2009. 

** 2008-09 Regional Targeted Occupational List Retrieved from Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. 

Program Highlights 

• The nature of crime scene investigation can require physical activity. Students enrolled in the Crime Scene Technology 
program must be physically able to go into, under, on top of and through many different environmental scenes as part of 
their training. 

• The employment process may include an extensive background investigation. A prior criminal history may strongly inhibit 
employment opportunities in this field. Potential employers may require some or all of the following criteria as part of the 
employment process: 

Physical Agility Investigation 

Drug Screening 

Physical Examination 

Credit Check 

Polygraph and/or Voice Stress Analysis 

Background 

Oral Board Review 

Psychological 

U.S. Citizenship 

Minimum Age Requirement 

Successful Personal Attributes: 

Safety Conscious 

Methodical 

Confident 

Team Player 

Tolerant 

Open-minded 

Creative/Innovative Oriented/ Analytical 

Strong Ethical Standard 

Observant 

Thorough 

Decisive 

Patient 

121 



• Inquisitive/Persistent 

• Logical V 

• Detail " 

Contact Information: ^ 

Law and Public Safety Programs Office (239) 489-9 1 32 ^ 

http://www.edison.edii/academics/crimescene.php ^ 

Program Prerequisites: ^ 

None ^^ 

General Education Requirements ^ 

ENC 1101 - Composition I-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition Il-AA ^ 

Mathematics 3 Credits (recommended:) ^ 

MAC 1 105 - College Algebra-AA 

MAC 1 1 06 - Combined College Algebra Precalculus-AA ^ 

PHI 2600 - Ethics-AA ^ 

PSY 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA - 

*Natiiral Science 3 Credits _ 

Total: 18 - 

Degree Core Requirements: ^ 

CCJ 1020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice-AA ~ 

CGS 1 1 00 - Microcomputer Skills-AA t- 

CJE 2649 - Forensic Death Investigation-AS A 

CJT 1 1 10 - Introduction to Crime Scene " 

CLE 2600 - Criminal Investigation Techniques-AA _ 

CLE 2643C - Advanced Crime Scene Tcchnology-AS a 

CJL 26 1 - Courtroom Presentation of Scientific Evidence-AS "~ 

CJE 2640 - Introduction to Forensics ^ 

CLE 2770C - Crime Scene Photography-AS a 

CJE 2671 - Latent Fingerprint Development-AS ~ 

Total: 32 ^ 

Electives: 10 C 
Total Credit Hours: 60 
Natural Science must be chosen from one of the following courses: 

• ISC lOOlC - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science I-AA 

• BSC 1005 - Introduction to Biological Sciences- AA 
BSC 1010 - Biological Science I-AA 
PHY 2053 - College Physics I-AA 
or 

with permission of advisor 

CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 
CHM 2025L - Introduction to College Chemistry Laboratory-AA 



• 



122 



Criminal Justice Technology, AS 



The Associate in Science degree in Criminal Justice is designed to prepare the student for a full range of career opportunities in the 
field of criminal justice. The degree provides a strong background for employment with any of Southwest Florida's many criminal 
justice or public ser\ ice agencies, including police departments, shcritfs offices, prisons, areas of juvenile justice, or private industry. 
The Associate in Science degree in Crimmal Justice Technology transfers directly into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied 
Science degree in Public Safety Administration, as well as any public Florida college or university's Bachelor of Science degree in 
Criminal Justice. For additional information on Transfer Services, contact the department at 239-489-9132. 

Successful Personal Attributes: 

• Strong ethical standards 

• Open minded 

• Persistent 

• Decisive 

• Tolerant 

• Logical 

• Confident 

• Analytical 

• Patient 

• Able to work under stress 

Related Knowledge and Skills: 

• Communication skills 

• Community knowledge 

• Stress Management 

• Human relations skills 

• Leadership skills 

• People skills 

• Problem solving skills 

• Negotiation/Mediation skills 

Career/Industry Opportunities: 

• Police Officer 

• Security Officer 

• Correctional Officer 

• Deputy Sheriff 

Criminal Justice Graduates May Earn: 

An entr\- level worker can expect to earn S37,000 per year while an experienced worker can expect to earn S52,000 per year.* 
There are approximately 172 annual openings in Edison State's service district** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Labor Market Statistics Center, February 2009. 
** 2008-09 Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. 

For additional information, including course schedules go to http://www.Edison.edu/academics/criminaljustice.php Or contact the 
program office at 239-489-91 32. 

The Criminal Justice Academy Bridge Program 

The Edison State College Criminal Justice Academy Bridge Program is designed for student successfully completing Florida 
Department of Law Enforcement's Criminal Justice Standards & Training Commission Basic Recruit Academies for Law 
Enforcement Officer and/or Correctional Officers. Upon completion of program prerequisites, qualified students are eligible for 12-16 
credit hours of elective credit in the AS degree in Criminal Justice Technology. In addition, selected degree core requirements can be 
met through an accelerated study format. Course requirements for the accelerated study format will include research projects and 
essays. All coursework earned through the Academy Bridge Program will demonstrate advanced, independent, and critical thinking 
skills expected within college level coursework. For additional information, contact the program office at 239-489-91 32 or go to 
Imp: w\\v\. edison.edu academics LTiminaljuslicephp . 



123 



General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1101- Composition I-AA * 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II- AA ^ 

• MGF 1 1 06 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

or V 

• MAC 1105 -College Algebra-AA 
or higher 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA v 

• Humanities 3 Credits " 

• *Social Science Elcctives 3 Credits 

General Education Credit Hours: 18 
Degree Core Requirements: 

CCJ 1 1 - Introduction to Criminology- A A 

** CCJ 1020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice-AA » 

** CJC 1000 - Introduction to Corrections-AA *• 

CJE 1300 - Police Organization and Administration-AA . " 

** ** CJE 1640 - Introduction to Crime Scene Technology- AA <. 

CJJ 2002 - Juvenile Delinquency-AA *■ 

** CJE 2600 - Criminal Investigation Techniques-AA 

**CJL 2100- Criminal Law-AA 1 

** CJL 2130 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence-AA *■ 

Degree Core Credit Hours: 27 t 

Specified Electives: t. 

Choose from any course listed under the following prefixes: Choose from any course listed under the following prefixes: CJD. CJT, ^ 

DEP, BUL, EMS, FFP, HUS. INP. PLA. POS. PSY, SYG, any foreign language course, or any qualifying criminal justice academy — 

articulated credit. ^ 

Specified Elective Credit Hours: 10 J 

Open Electives ~ 

Choose any college level course listed in the Catalog. ^ 

Total Degree Credit Hours: 64 ^ 

* Courses specified as Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics, or Natural Sciences must be selected from courses listed under » 

General Education in the College Catalog, under the respective categories. ^ 

** Students successfully completing the Florida Department of Law Enforcement CJSTC Law Enforcement or Corrections ^ 

examination may be eligible for enrollment in the Academy Bridge Program for the courses indicated: Florida Law Enforcement ^_ 

Officer Exam - CCJ 1 020, CJL 2 1 00, CJL 2 1 30, CJT 1 1 1 0, CJT 2 1 00 and/or Florida Correctional Officer Exam - CJC 1 000, CJL Z 

2100. CJT 2100 ^ 



124 



Dental Hygiene, AS 



The Dental Hygiene Program is designed to prepare the student to practice as a licensed dental hygienist. A graduate of the program is 

eligible to take the Dental Hygiene National Board, and. upon successful completion of that board, is eligible to take a state board to 

obtain a state license. 

The program annually recniits a freshman class to begin in the Fall term. The program is comprised of general education courses. 

dental hygiene courses and clinical practice. The general education course work is acceptable from any accredited college. The dental 

hygiene core courses are offered only on the Lee Campus. 

The Dental Hygiene program has limited enrollment due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each applicant must meet 

specific criteria which are listed in the admission policies. The Criteria for Admission Policies are available through the program 

office or through the Health Professions office at (23^) 489-9255. The applicant must have completed three of the following sciences 

classes: BSC 1093C. ECS I094C. MCB 20 IOC. CHM 2025, and/or CHM 2032L completed by the records check appointment. 

Information packets with application to the program may be downloaded by visiting www.Edison.edu (go to Academic Programs, 

click on Academic Program Web pages, click on your program of interest to download.) 

The program is fijlly accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation. 

The student must purchase uniforms, an instrument kit. liability insurance, and books. There are fees for tuition, graduation. 

laboratory, clinic, licensure exams, and association dues. 

Dental Hygiene Graduates Typically Earn: 

The starting salar>' for a dental hygienist is approximately S35,000-S40,000 annually. * 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor there are 5.000 national openings per year. Consistently. 100% of Edison State's graduates 

from the Dental Hygiene program are locally placed.* 

*Source: http://\\^ww.bls.Rov 

Dental Hygiene Career Opportunities 

• Private Dental Office 

• Public Health 

• Dental Hygiene Education 

• Sales 

• Consulting 

• Marketing 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College or looking into our academic partnerships 
with many universities and colleges. For information about bachelor's degree opportunities at Edison State College, please contact the 
program advisor at (239) 489-9067. 

First Round Application Deadline: December 15 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The Program prerequisite encompasses successfiil completion of a program acceptance process including program level admissions 
points, competition with all other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation and affective skills demonstration. The 
admissions process requires satisfactory completion of a College-approved criminal history background check completed at the 
applicant's expense. The clinical enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• PSY 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 

• BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals- AS 

• BSC 1 093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

• BSC 1 094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 

• MGF 11 06 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 
or 

• MGF 1 107 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts II-AA 
or 

• MAC 1 1 05 - College Algebra- AA 
or higher math 

• CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 
Or higher CHM 

• CHM 2032L - Chemistry Lab Health Sciences 

125 



• CHM 2025L - Introduction to College Chemistry Laboratory-AA 
or higher CHM 

• MCB 20 1 OC - Microbiology-AA 

• SYG 1000 - Introduction to Sociology-AA 

• *Humanities elective 3 Credits 

Total: 34 
Degree Core Requirements: 

DBS 1020C - Dental Anatomy- AS 

DEH 1002 - Dental Hygiene I-AS 

DEH 1002L - Dental Hygiene Preclinical Lab-AS 

DES 1200C - Dental Radiology-AS 

DEH 1802 - Dental Hygiene II-AS 

DEH 1802L - Dental Hygiene II Clinical-AS 

DEH 1602 - Periodontics-AS 

DES I lOOC - Dental Materials-AS 

DES 2830C - Expanded Functions Laboratory-AS 

DEH II 30 - Oral Histology and Embryology- AS 

DEH 2300 - Dental Pharmacology-AS 

DEH 2400 - General and Oral Pathology-AS 

DEH 2804 - Dental Hygiene III-AS 

DEH 2804L - Dental Hygiene III Clinical-AS 

DEH 2806 - Dental Hygiene IV-AS 

DEH 2806L - Dental Hygiene IV Clinical-AS 

DEH 2702 - Community Dental Health-AS 

DEH 2702L - Community Dental Health Laboratory-AS 

DEH 2930 - Dental Hygiene Seminar-AS 

DEH 2808 - Dental Hygiene V-AS 

DEH 2808L - Dental Hygiene V Clinical-AS 

Total: 54 

Total Credit Hours: 88 

*Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 



126 



Drafting and Design Technology, AS 

The Drafting and Design Technology Associate in Science Degree Program is designed to give students the necessary training and 
background for careers of a technical nature. The courses are designed to qualify students, through specialized and intensive 
instruction, for many technical positions. 

The degree consists of 18 hours of general education requirements. 27 hours of degree core requirements, and 17 hours from the area 
of specialization. The student may choose electives from one of the following Drafting and Design specialization areas to complete the 
AS degree: Building Construction. Civil Engineering/Land Surveying, or Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). 

Drafting and Design Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S28.184 ($13.55 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $40,934 ($19.68 

per hour).* 

There are approximately 263 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

*Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

• Drafting and Design Technician 

• CAD Operator 

• Mechanical Draffer 

• Tooling Drafter 

• Quality Control Assistant 

Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

There is an articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a university bachelor's degree program. Please contact the 
program advisor at (239) 489-9067 for fijrther information. 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements 

ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

Any college level mathematics**** 3 Credits 

Social Science Elective* 3 Credits 

Humanities Elective** 3 Credits 

Natural Science Elective*** 3 Credits 

Total: 18 
Degree Core Requirements: 

ETD 1 100 - Engineering Graphics I (Manual)-AA 

ETD 1320 - Computer Aided Drafting-AA 

ETD 2350 - Advanced Computer Aided Drafting-AA 

EGS 1001 - Introduction to Engineering- A A 

BCN 2710 - Construction Procedures- AS 

ENC 1 102 - Composition Il-AA 

GIS 1040 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-AA 

GIS 1045 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Customization-AA 

OR 

BCN 1 272 - Blueprint Reading-AS 

ETD 1538 - Autocad for Residential Architecture-AA 

OR 

• ETD 1 I03C - Engineering Graphics I (Autocad Track)-AA 

Total: 27 

127 



Specializations: 

Building Construction Specialization 

• BCN 1230C - Materials and Methods of Construction- AS 

• BCT 1 760 - Building Codes-AS 

• BCT 2730 - Construction Management-AS 

• BCT 1770 - Construction Estimating-AS 

• BCT 2708 - Advanced Construction Project Management-AS 

• BCT 1720 - Construction Scheduling-AS 

Total: 17 

Civil Engineering/Land Surveying 

• SUR 1 lOOC - Surveying- AS 

• SUR 2 1 40C - Advanced Surveying- AS 

• MAC 1 1 40 - Pre-Calculus Algebra AA 

• MAC 11 1 4 - Trigonometry- AA 

• Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 17 
CAD Specialization 

• ETD 1 538 - Autocad for Residential Architecture-AA 
OR 

• ETD 1 103C - Engineering Graphics I (Autocad Track)-AA 

• ETD 1530 - Drafting and Design (Manual)-AS 

• GIS 1045 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Customization-AA 

• GIS 1040 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-AA /1 045 Customization 

• Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 17 

Total Degree Credits: 62 

Electives: 

Program electives may be chosen from: 

SUR llOOC-Surveying-AS 

SUR 2 HOC - Advanced Surveying- AS 

MAC 1 140 - Pre-Calculus Algebra AA 

or 

MAC 1 1 14 - Trigonometry- AA 

GIS 1040 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-AA 

and 

GIS 1045 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Customization-AA 

GEB 1949 - Internship Work Experience I-AA 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

* Social Science electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Social Science. 

** Humanities electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Part A or Part B 

Humanities. 

*** Natural Science electives may be chosen from any college level science course. 

**** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



128 

C 



Early Childhood Education, AS 



This degree program is designed for students who want to work with young children in a variety of public or private programs as well 
as those who are already employed in early childhood settings. Smdents in this program are provided with comprehensive courses that 
are focused on children from birth through age eight. The study of research and theory is blended with many opportunities for hands- 
on experience. 

Students who wish to earn a National CDA credential may complete the necessary coursework as part of this degree. 
A pre-admission consultation with the program coordinator is strongly recommended. 

Early Childhood Graduates Typically Earn: 

The starting salary for a preschool teacher is approximately $20.000-S30,000 annually.* 

There are approximately 36 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

*Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational Supplemental List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Early Childhood Education Career Opportunities: 

Childcarc worker in public or private facilities 
Pre-school teacher 
Childcare Facility Manager 
Childcare Development Specialist 
Teacher Assistant 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going on to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College or looking into our academic 
partnerships with many universities and colleges. For more information please contact a program advisor at (239) 489-9067. 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

****Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 

OR SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

*Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

**Social Science Elective 3 Credits 

***Natural Science Elective 3 Credits 

Total: 18 

* Humanities courses may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
** Social Science Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program under Social Science. 
*** Natural Science Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program under Natural Science. 
**** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 

Degree Core Requirements: 

CHD II 34 - Management of Early Childhood Leaming-AA 
CHD 1 135 - Understanding Young Children-AA 
CHD 1220 - Introduction to Child Development-AA 
CHD 1332 - Creative Experiences for the Young Child-AA 
CHD 2324 - Early Childhood Language Arts and Rcading-AA 
EEC 1000 - Foundations in Early Childhood Education-AA 
EEC 1202 - Principles of Early Childhood Curriculum-AA 
EEC 1603 - Positive Guidance and Behavior Management- AA 
EEC 1946 - Early Childhood Practicum 1-AA 
EEC 1947 - Early Childhood Practicum 11-AA 

129 



• EEX 1013 - Special Needs In Early Childhood Education- AA 

• HSC 1421 - Health, Safety and Nutrition for the Young Child-AA 

Total: 36 

Core Electives (Choose Three): 

CHD 1 120 -Infant/Toddler Development-AA 

DEP 2102 - Child Psychology- AA 

EEC 1003 - Introduction to School Age Child Care-AA 

EEC 2521 - Administration of A Child Care Center- AA 

EME 2040 -Introduction to Technology for Educators 

EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

Total: 9 
Total Credit Hours: 63 



130 



^ Emergency Medical Services Technology, AS 

"^ The Emergency Medical Services Technology Programs arc designed to prepare the student to become a competent entry-level 

"^ Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and/or Paramedic. The EMS Technology Program is accredited by the Commission on 

Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in conjunction with the Committee on Accreditation of Educational 
^ Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). 



w To be eligible to sit for the Florida EMT exam, students must successfully complete the EMT Program. To be eligible to sit for the 

Florida Paramedic exam, the student must be currently certified as a Florida EMT and successfully complete the Paramedic Certificate 
Prouram. 



o 



Students may obtain an Associate in Science Degree in Emergency Medical Services Technology. General Education requirements 
^ may be completed concurrently with career core requirements, or following successfiil Florida Paramedic Certification. Admission 

requirements for the Paramedic Program encompass evidence of current Florida EMT certification {or eligible for certification-must 

be Florida certified within 90 days of beginning EMS 2671), current CPR certification, grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher, 
•^ and completion of FCELPT testing with no DLA hold(s). Priority will be given to applicants that hold current Florida EMT-B 

certification. 

This program articulates into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Safety Administration. Students 
■J intending to transfer to a bachelor's degree program are strongly encouraged to consult with the transferring institution regarding the 

-^ choice of elective credit. For additional information on bachelor degree partnerships with Edison State College, contact (239)489- 

For course schedules, including special course offerings and additional program information, go to 
^ http://www.edison.edu/academics/emsprogram.php or contact the program office at 239-489-9392. 

EMS Graduates Typically Earn: 

3 An entry level worker can expect to earn $27,850 - $54,030 annual salary * 

There are approximately 284 annual openings in Edison State's service district** 













*Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved February 2009. Range may vary significantly depending upon experience and 

rank. 

** 2008-2009 targeted occupational list retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

EMS Career Opportunities 

• Certified Paramedic 

• Firefighter 

• Educator 

• Medical Equipment sales 

• Air Ambulance 

• EMS Supervisor 

Core Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The EMT and the Paramedic program have limited enrollment due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each student must 
meet specific criteria which are listed in the admission requirements. The criteria for admission are available through the program 
office by calling (239) 489-9392. Or view the web site http://www.edison.edu/academics/emsprogram.php 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 
Mathematics 3 Credits (recommended:) 

• MAC 1 105 - College Algebra- AA or 

• MGF 1 1 06 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA or Fire Company Officer Leadership 

• PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology 1-A A 

• **Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

• **Natural Science 4 Credits 

Subtotal: 22 

131 



Degree Core Requirements: 



EMS 2119 Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Services 

EMS 21 19L Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Services Lab 

EMS 2421 EMS Field Internship 

EMS 241 1 Emergency Department Clinicals 

EMS 2671 Paramedic 1 

EMS 267 IL Paramedic I Lab 

EMS 2672 Paramedic II 

EMS 2672L Paramedic II Lab (^ 

EMS 2673 Paramedic III 

EMS 2673L Paramedic III Lab 

EMS 2674 Paramedic IV Ci 

EMS 2674L Paramedic IV Lab 

EMS 2654 Paramedic Field Internship I 

EMS 2655 - Paramedic Field Internship II-AS \m 

EMS 2656 - Paramedic Field Internship III-AS ^ 

EMS 2649 - Paramedic Hospital Clinicals-AS 

c 

Total: 49 C 



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r^ 



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Total Credit Hours: 73 

*Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 

**The affiliated course requirements are under revision at the time oj publication. See Program Coordinator for additional 
information regarding current degree requirements. 



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132 

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Fire Science Technology, AS 



■^ The Associate in Science Degree in Fire Science Technology is designed to provide advanced educational opportunities for fire 

— service personnel. Students gain both knowledge and experience uscfiil to career advancement in the challenging field of fire service. 
The program is designed both for students who have completed Florida firefighting minimum standards training, and those interested 

~^ in expanding career opportunities in the field of fire science. Fire Science Technology courses are designed to fit into the work 

schedule of employed fire service personnel. 
-^ This program articulates into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied Science in Public Safety Administration. Students 

intending to transfer to a bachelor's degree program are strongly encouraged to consult with the transferring institution regarding the 
'^ choice of elective credit. For additional information on bachelor degree partnerships with Edison State College, contact (239) 489- 

— 9132. 

For course schedules, including special course offerings and additional program information, go to 

^ http://www.edison.edu/academics/firescience.php or contact the program office at 239-489-9392. 

■^ Fire Science Graduates Typically Earn: 

"^ An entr\' le\el worker can expect to cam S35.000 while experienced worker can expect to earn up to S56,000 annual salary.* 

_ There are approximately 76 annual openings in Edison State's service district.** 

— « *Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved February 2009. Range may vary significantly depending upon experience and 

^ rank. 

■— **2008-09 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. 

•* Fire Science Career Opportunities 

""■ Edison State offers courses that meet the following Florida fire certification requirements. For additional information refer to the 

certificate section of the Edison State catalog*, or go to www.fldfs.com sfmbfst'Standard/firestan. htm for more information. 

^ Firefighter 1 and II* 

-^ Fire Officer I and II 

^^ Fire safety Inspector I and II 

"^ Fire Instructor I and II 

^ Fire Investigator I and II 

-^ General Education Requirements: 

^ • ENC 1101 -Composition l-AA 

"^ • ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

— ' • Mathematics 3 Credits (recommended:) 

^ • MAC 1105 -College Algebra-AA 

^^ • MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

— ' • *Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

^ • *Social Science Electives 3 Credits 

-^ General Education Credit Hours: 15 

Degree Core Requirements: 

— ^ • FFP 1505 -Fire Prevention Practices-AS 

^ • FFP 1 5 1 - Fire Codes and Standards-AS 

FFP 1540 - Private Fire Protection Systems-AS 

FFP 2720 - Fire Company Officer Leadership-AS 

FFP 2740 - Fire Service Course Delivery-AS 

FFP 2120 - Building Construction For the Fire Service-AS 

FFP 2810 - Firefighting Tactic and Strategy I- AS 

FFP 281 1 - Firefighting Tactic and Strategy Il-AS 

FFP 2521 - Construction Documents and Plan Review-AS 

Plan Review 3 Credits 



^ 
Q 
Q 
^ 
^ 
Q 
^ 



Degree Core Credit Hours: 27 



133 



Career Core Electives: 

Choose from any course under the following prefixes: FFP, EMS.CGS: 12 Credits 



General Core Electives: 

Electives may be chosen from any category: 6 Credits 

Total Credit Hours: 60 

* Courses specified as Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics or Natural Sciences must be selected from courses listed under 
General Education in the College Catalog, under their respective categories. 



134 



Health Information Management, AS 



The Health Information Management program will prepare students to be medieal reeords professionals and specialists in the 
management of electronic medical reeords. 

The program provides instruction in all aspects of health information management. Emphasis will be the role, purpose, and forms of 
medical records and related legal and ethical issues, basic employability skills and interviewing techniques for career development. 
_ Programs for inpatient as well as outpatient venues will be studied. The HIT program is pending accreditation review by the 

* Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). 

_ Admission Process: 

^ The HIM Program has selecti\e admissions. Because enrollment is limited, a point system for admission will be utilized. 

— In addition to the admission requirements for the College, the following are a requirements for admission to the HIM Program: 

* I. Graduation from high school or receipt of a General Educational Development certificate (GED). 
~ 2. Completion of admission requirements to Edison State College. 

3. Completion of Leaming Assistance courses, if required, by the start of the program. 

^ 4. Completion of prerequisites: MAC 1 105. BSC I093C. CGS 1101 Basic Computers. 

_ 5. Attainment of a minimum grade of "C" or above in all general education courses, including prerequisites, required in the 

^ HIM program. 

— 6. Cumulative grade point average of 2.5. 

7. Submission of Official transcripts from post-secondary institutions showing completion of any of the prerequisite or 
~ corequisite courses. 

8. Completion of the HIM Application along with the SI 5.00 application fee receipt 
^ 9. Application deadline: July 1. 2009 



•^ 



_^ Program Prerequisites 

^ • MAC 1 105 -College Algebra-AA 

~ • BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals- AS 

_^ • BSC 1 093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

■* • CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills 

"* General Education: 

'Z • ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

-"■ • SPC I0I7 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

^ • BSC 1 094C - Anatomy and Physiology Il-AA 

-^ • Humanities Electives 3 Credits 

-> • PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 

• HSC 1531 - Medical Terminology- AA 

-> Program Courses: 

^ First Semester: 

• HIM 1 000 - Intro to Health Info Mgmt 
^ • HIM 1430 -Principles of Disease 

.^ • HAS 1 1 00 -Orientation to Healthcare 

-^ Second Semester: 

^ • HIM 221 4C - Healthcare Statistics and Research 

^ • HIM 2012 - Healthcare Law 

^ • HIM 1 1 10 - Classification Systems, Indices 

^ • HIM 2222 - Basic ICD Coding 

"^ Third Semester: 

— • HIM 121 1 - Health Information Technologies 

'^ • HIM 28 1 - Professional Intership I 

^ • HIM 2500 - Organization and Supervision Management 

• HIM 281 1 - Professional Intemship II 






Fourth Semester: 

• HIM - Basic CPT Coding 



135 



Fifth Term: 

• HIM 2283 - Advanced Coding and Reimbursement 

HIM 2283 - Advanced Coding and Reimbursement 2 Credits 

• HIM 25 1 - Quality Performance Improvement 

• HIM 2820 - Professional Internship III 
HIM Review I Credit 

Total: 68 



136 



Internet Services Technology, AS 



The Associate in Science Degree in Internet Services Technology is designed to train students for employment as developers of Web 
enabled software. Upon completing the program, the students will be able to design, implement, and maintain Web based software 
solutions. The program combines a solid foundation in traditional programming skills with those skills required for Internet based 
client/ser\'er applications development. 
The degree consists of 1 8 hours of general education requirements, and 45 hours of degree core requirements. 

Internet Services Technology Graduates May Earn: 

An entry-level worker can expect to cam S42,34S (S20.36 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $65,748 (S36.61 

per hour). * 

There arc approximately 599 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

♦Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 



Career/Industry Opportunities: 

Internet/Intranet Technician 

Internet/Intranet Administrator 

Website Developer 

Webmaster 

Internet Support Specialist 

Web Database Administrator 



Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

There is an articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a university bachelor's degree program. Please contact a BAS 
program advisor for further information. (239)489-9067. 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in the Catalog. 

Program Requirements: 

None. 



General Education Requirements: 

ENC 1101 - Composition 1-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

or SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking-AA 

*Social Science Electives 3 Credits 



Total: 18 






Degree Core Requirements: 

COP 1 822 - Internet Programming HTML-AA 

COP 2800 - Java Programming- AA 

COP 2830 - Internet Programming - Scripting II-AA 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

COP 1 224 - Programming with C-H--AA 

CIS 2321 - Data Systems and Management- AA 

COP 2172 - Advanced Visual Basic Programming- AA 

or 

COP 2222 - Advanced Programming with C-H--AA 

CNT 1000 - Networking Essentials-AS 

CDA 2524 - Linux Internet Servers-AS 

CDA 2500 - Microsoft Windows Server-AS 

CGS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance-AS 



137 



• SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 
Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 45 

Total Credit Hours: 63 

Electives: 

General electives may be selected from any Business, Accounting, Computer Technology, or Drafting and Design course. 

* Social Science Elective may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Social Science. 
** Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



138 



Networking Administrator, AS 



The Associate in Science Degree in Networking Administrator is designed to prepare students for employment as a Network 
Administrator and other networking positions. Upon completing the program, the students will be able to design, implement, and 
manage local area and wide area networks based on several network operating systems. The students will be trained utilizing industry 
standards, business platforms and operating systems. To enable the student to work effectively in modem business environments, the 
program stresses the development of student skills in written and oral communication, human relations, management, and business 
operations. The degree consists of 18 hours of general education requirements, and 44 hours of degree core requirements. 



Network Administrator Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S35.464 (S17.05 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $61,880 ($29.75 

per hour).* 

There are approximately 714 annual openings in Edison State's service district.** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

Cabling Specialist 
IT Specialist 

Network Control Operator 
Data Communication Analyst 
Network Manager/Systems 
Analyst/Technician 
Computer Security Specialist 
Help Desk Specialist 



Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

There is an articulation agreement that allows this degree to transfer to a university bachelor's degree program. For more information 
please contact the program advisor at (239) 489-9067. 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific courses listed in this Catalog. 



Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

ENC 1 102 - Composition il-AA 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA or 

SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

*Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

Any social science 3 Credits 

PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking-AA 

Total: 18 



Degree Core Requirements: 

CNT 1000 - Networking Essentials-AS 

CDA 2500 - Microsoft Windows Server-AS 

CDA 2524 - Linux Internet Servers- AS 

CDA 2525 - Internetworking with Cisco Routers-AS 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

CGS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance-AS 

CIS 2321 - Data Systems and Management- AA 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic- AA 

ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting 1-AA 

MAN 2021 - Management Principles-AA 



139 



or 

• SBM 2000 - Small Business Management-AS 

• SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 
Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 44 

Total Credit Hours: 62 

Electives 

General electives may be selected from any Business, Accounting, Computer Technology, or Drafting and Design course. 
* Math courses may be chosen from any courses listed in the General Education Program Guide under mathematics. 



140 



Nursing RN Advanced Placement, AS 

Application Deadline: Contact Nursing Office on respective campuses. 
Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specifie course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

• BSC 1 09?.C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

• BSC 1 094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 

• ENC 1101 - Composition I-AA 

• MAC 1 1 05 - College Algebra-AA ** 

Successftil completion of NLN Nursing Mobility Exam 

* Prerequisites must be completed BEFORE admission to the Career Core 

Program prerequisites are part of the General Education Requirements. Paramedics. RTs and CVTs applying for admission to the 
Advanced Placement Program must also have a CNA certificate. 

** May substitute STA 2023 or Math higher than College Algebra 

The clinical enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. The admissions process 
requires satisfactory completion of a College-approved criminal history background check completed at the applicant's expense. 



General Education Requirements: 

• PSY 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 

• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

• HUM *Any Humanities course 3 Credits 

• MCB2010C-Microbiology-AA 

Total: 14 



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Degree Core Requirements** 

NUR 1062 - Health Assessment and Skills-AS 

NUR 1062L - Health Assessment and Skills Practicum-AS 

NUR 1204 - Transitional Nursing Concepts-AS 

NUR 1204L - Transitional Nursing Concepts Clinical-AS 

NUR 151 1 - Introduction to Mental Health Concepts in Nursing-AS 

NUR 1932 - Nursing Seminar- Advanced Placement- AS 

Advanced Placement Credit Awarded after successful completion of NUR 1062/L. NUR 1204/I204L. NUR 1932 10 Credits 

NUR 2140 - Advanced Pharmacological Concepts-AS 

NUR 2260 - Advanced Adult Nursing Il-AS and 

NUR 2260L - Advanced Adult Nursing II Clinical-AS 

NUR 23 10 - Pediatric Nursing Concepts-AS 

NUR 23 lOL - Pediatric Nursing Clinical-AS 

NUR 2424 - Maternal Nursing Concepts-AS and 

NUR 2424L - Maternal Nursing Clinical-AS 

NUR 2523 - Mental Health Concepts Across the Lifespan- AS 

NUR 2530 - Nursing for Clients with Major Mental Health Disorders-AS 

NUR 2810 - Professional Issues and Role Development-AS 

NUR 2941 L - Clinical Preceptorship-AS 

Total: 42 

Total Credit Hours: 72 



141 



** Nursing Requirements are currently under revision and subject to change. 

Length of Program approximately one and one half years after admission to the Nursing Program. Total Cost approximately 
$5,418.90 

General Education Requirements: 

General Education Requirements are included in the required above course sequences. Some students prefer to take most or all of their 
general education courses before entering the nursing sequence. This is recommended by the Nursing Program, especially for students 
who must work or those who have heavy family obligations. 



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142 



Nursing, AS Basic Program RN 



Program Description 

The Associate in Science Degree in Nursing program is designed to prepare the student to care for the clients he'she serves. 
Comprised of general education courses, as well as clinical nursing courses, the ADN curriculum incorporates classroom instruction, 
laboratory' simulation, and clinical practice in the care of infants, children, and adults. Local health facilities are utilized for clinical 
practice, including community agencies, acute care institutions, and long-term care facilities. Graduates of the program possess the 
knowledge, values, and skills essential to practice in a dynamic and rapidly changing health care environment. 

There are two distinct pathways to program completion: the Basic Program and the Advanced Placement Program. The Basic 
Programs are offered in day and evening weekend formats on the Lee campus. Charlotte and Collier campuses offer the Basic 
Program during the day. The Advanced Placement Programs are available to students who already hold licensure as an LPN. or 
certification as a paramedic, registered respiratory technician (RRT). or cardiovascular technician (CVT). Both programs are designed 
for students who seek immediate employment as general staff nurses, as well as for those who decide to continue their nursing 
education by pursuing a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN). 

Accreditation 

The Edison State College Nursing Program is approved by the Florida Board of Nursing, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin C02. 
Tallahassee 32399-3252. phone (850) 488- 0595. The Nursing Program is also fully accredited by the National League for Nursing 
Accreditmg Commission (NLNAC). dl Broadway. 33rd Floor. New York. New York 10006. phone (800) 669-1656. 

Admission 

The Basic Nursing Program and the Advanced Placement Nursing Program are seiectiv e admission, limited enrollment programs. 
Admission to Edison State College does not imply acceptance into either Nursing Program. Following admission to the College, the 
student must meet all admission criteria for the Edison State nursing program he/she wants to attend before applying to that program. 
Each program has its own admission packet. Since there often are more qualified applicants than available spaces, meeting all 
admission criteria does not guarantee acceptance into any of the Nursing Programs. 

Final selection of accepted students is made using a point system that credits cumulative grade point average (minimum 2.75) in the 
general education prerequisite courses, number of required general education courses completed, and standardized preadmission test 
score. .Applicants v\ith the highest point totals, who meet all criteria, are offered admission on a space-a\ailable basis. For details 
regarding the admission criteria and point system, refer to the Edison State Nursing application packet and/or access the nursing 
program web pages at wwvv.edison.edu . 

Students are admitted to the Basic Nursing Program on the Lee or Collier campuses twice a year. Applicants are admitted to the 
Charlotte Basic Nursing Program once per year. Admission to the Advanced Placement Program occurs on each campus annually 
except Lee which admits twice annually. Contact the Nursing Office on the appropriate campus for applications, deadline dates, and 
enrollment limits. 

Under normal circumstances, transfers between campuses are prohibited. Should extenuating circumstances arise which are beyond 
the student's control, transfer requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis by a committee comprised of either the Basic or 
Advanced Placement Program Coordinators and the District Director of Nursing. All requests for transfer must include supporting 
documentation. 

Transfer Applicants 

Applicants vvho have attended another RN program in the past year may apply for admission to the Edison State College nursing 
programs, provided that they supply a letter of good standing from the director(s) of previous nursing program(s). The transfer 
applicant must meet the same admission criteria as any other nursing applicant. Students who have been academically dismissed from 
another nursing program are not eligible to apply to Edison States Nursing Programs. 

All nursing coursework taken elsewhere and at Edison State College must be completed within 3.5 years (from the first nursing course 
taken to graduation from Edison State College). Nursing courses older than one year will not be accepted for transfer. Transcripts must 
be evaluated by both the Nursing Director and the Records Technician at Edison State's Registration Department prior to acceptance 
as an Edison State transfer nursmg student. In order for transcripts to be evaluated, complete syllabi from all previously taken nursing 
courses must accompany the application. Any transfer nursing student must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours at Edison State in 
order to graduate from Edison State's ADN program. 

Academic Standards 

1 . General Education Courses 

A student must earn a minimum grade of "C" or above in all general education courses required in the Nursing Program. 
^ General education courses may be taken prior to entering the nursing program and must be completed prior to beginning the 

_ last semester of nursing course work. Any course with a grade of "D" or below must be repeated. 



V 



143 



2. Registration for Nursing Courses 
In order to enroll in a course with an NUR prefix, a student must be officially accepted into the Nursing Program. Any 
exceptions to this policy require written approval of the District Director of Nursing. 

3. Computer Usage 
Basic computer knowledge is required to complete some assignments in nursing courses. Many nursing courses utilize web- 
based instniction. Instructors in those courses will provide classroom demonstrations of web-based materials. 

4. Academic Progression >rf 
A grade of "C" or higher (minimum passing score of 77 percent) must be achieved in each classroom-based nursing course /- 
in order to progress to the next course in the curriculum. A grade of "S" (satisfactory) must be achieved in each clinical 
nursing course. Since many of the courses in the curriculum have both theory and clinical components and since each is a f 
co-requisite of the other, both must be passed successfully in the same semester in order for the student to progress to the 

next course in the curriculum. ^ 



5. Graduation Requirement 



c 

Satisfactory completion of the 72 semester hours of approved credit with a grade of "C" or higher is required to graduate. f 

6. Licensure Requirement ^ 

Graduates of this program are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN examination to become registered nurses. Fees and a physical 
exam are required by the Florida Board of Nursing for the Licensure Examination. v^ 

If an applicant has been convicted, had any adjudication withheld, or has any criminal charges pending other than a minor traffic ^ 

violation, the applicant is advised to seek counseling from the Florida Board of Nursing regarding possible limitations toward ^ 

licensure prior to applying for entrance to an Edison State Nursing Program. Students with an arrest record must meet with the District ^ 

Director of Nursing upon admission to discuss this issue. f^ 

Nurses May Earn: ^ 

Entry level Registered nurses (RN"s) generally earn $20.00 or more per hour or over $40,000 per year according to hospital systems in f^ 
the local market.* 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor there are 58,700 national openings per year. Consistently, 90% of Edison State graduates C 

from this program are locally placed.* ^ 

* http://www.bls.gov '^^ 

Career Opportunities for a Registered Nurse: 

A Registered Nurse is in high demand throughout the United States. The Registered Nurse will find opportunities in: 

• Hospitals 

• Outpatient Centers 

• Doctor's Offices 

• Clinics 

• Research Facilities 

• Nursing Homes 

• Home Health Care (and many more areas) 

Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

You may want to consider going on to earn your bachelor's degree with Edison State College. For more information please call the 
Edison State Baccalaureate and University Programs Division at (239)489-9295. 

Basic Program 

Application Deadline: May 15 and August 31 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

• BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals-AS 

• BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

• MAC 1 1 05 - College Algebra-AA ** 

*Prerequisites must be completed BEFORE entering the Nursing Program prerequisites arc part of the General Education 
Requirements. 



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b 



** May substitute STA 2023 or Math higher than College Algebra 

The elinieal enrollment proeess requires satisfaetory eompletion of an immunization and health report. The admissions process also 
requires satisfactory completion of a College approved criminal history background check completed at the applicant's expense. 

General Education Requirements: 

ENC I 101 -Composition l-AA 

HUM *Any Humanities course 3 Credits 

PSY 2012 - General Psychology l-AA 

DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 

MCB 20 IOC - Microbiology-AA 

Total: 21 

Degree Core Requirements: 

NUR 1010 - Introduction to Nursing-AS 

NUR 1022 - Fundamentals of Nursing-AS 

NUR I022L - Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical-AS 

NUR 1023L - Fundamentals of Nursing Practicum-AS 

NUR 1 06 1 - health assessment-AS 

NUR 1061 L - Health Assessment-AS 

NUR 1 142 - Introduction to Phamiacology and Math Calculations- AS 

NUR 121 1 - Aduh Nursing l-AS 

NUR 1 2 1 1 L - Adult Nursing I Clinical-AS 

NUR 151 1 - Introduction to Mental Health Concepts in Nursing-AS 

NUR 2140 - Advanced Pharmacological Concepts-AS 

NUR 2260 - Advanced Adult Nursing II-AS 

NUR 2260L - Advanced Adult Nursing II Clinical-AS 

NUR 23 10 - Pediatric Nursing Conccpts-AS 

NUR 23IOL - Pediatric Nursing Clinical-AS 

NUR 2424 - Maternal Nursing Concepts-AS 

NUR 2424L - Maternal Nursing Clinical-AS 

NUR 2523 - Mental Health Concepts Across the Lifespan-AS 

NUR 2530 - Nursing for Clients with Major Mental Health Disorders- AS 

NUR 2810 - Professional Issues and Role Development-AS 

NUR 2941 L - Clinical Preceptorship-AS 

Total: 42 
Total Credit Hours: 72 

*Any Humanities course, writing intensive course or non-writing intensive course. 

**Nursing Requirements are currently under revision and subject to change. 

Length of program approximately two (2) years after admission to the Nursing Program. Please consult the Nursing Office for 
further details 



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145 



Opticianry Program, AS 



The Opticianry Program is made possible via an inter-institutionai agreement between Edison State College and Hillsborough 
Community College (HCC) in Tampa. Florida. Edison State College offers the general education portion of the degree and assists in 
the teaching of the vision care courses. The degree is granted by Hillsborough Community College. The program is delivered via 
distance learning technology combined with campus based instaiction. The laboratory courses are held in the new Vision Care 
Laboratory in the Kenneth P. Walker Health Sciences Building. An essential part of the eyecare delivery system, opticians measure, fit 
and adapt eyeglasses and contact lenses to people with vision problems. Coursework covers basic ocular science including; optics, 
anatomy, contact lenses, and refractometry. It also allows the student to gain specific skills in professional management, eyewear 
fabrication, and dispensing. Clinical experience is gained at affiliate sites. Graduates of the program are eligible to take state and 
national certification and/or licensure exams for opticians. The Opticianry Program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry 
Accreditation. 

Career Industry/Opportunities 

• Licensed Opticians 

• Eyecare Technician 

• Lab Technician 

• Opticianry Management Positions 

Opticianry Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn $23,710 while an experienced worker can expect to earn $45,375.* 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, there are 600 national openings per year. Consistently, 90% of Edison State's graduates 

from this program are locally placed. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2009. 
** http://www.floridajobs.org/ 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

For information about bachelor's degree opportunities at Edison State College, please contact the Baccalaureate and University 
Programs Division at (239)4S9-9295. 

Course Prerequisites: 

None 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

Group I 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• PHI 2600 - Ethics-AA 

Group II 

• MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

Group III 

• PS Y 2012 -General Psychology I-A A 

• SYG 1000 - Introduction to Sociology-AA 

Total: 15 

Degree Requirements: 

First Year - First Semester 

OPT 1000 - Ophthalmic Orientation-AS 

OPT 2204 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye-AS 

OPT 1460 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I-AS 

OPT 1460L - Ophthalmic Dispensing 1 Laboratory-AS 

OPT 1 155 - Ophthalmic Lens I-AS 

Total: 13 

146 



First Year - Second Semester 

• OPT 1 1 56 - Ophthalmic Lens Il-AS 

• OPT 1400L - Ophthah-nic Laboratorv' I- AS 

• OPT 2500 - Contact Lens Theory 1-AS 

• OPT 2500L - Contact Lens Theory I Laboratory-AS 

• OPT 2800L - Vision Care Clinical 1-AS 

Total: 14 

First Year - Third Semester 

• OPT 246 1 - Ophthalmic Dispensing Il-AS 

• OPT 2801 L - Vision Care Clinical Il-AS 

Total: 14 

Second Year - First Semester 

• OPT 246 IL - Ophthalmic Dispensing II Laboratory-AS 

• OPT 1430L - Ophthalmic Laboratory INAS 

• OPT 2501 - Contact Lens Theory Il-AS 

• OPT 2802L - Vision Care Clinical III-AS 

• OPT 2375 - Refractometr\-AS 

Total: 12 

Second Year - Second Semester 

• OPT 29 1 - Directed Research- AS 

• OPT 250 1 L - Contact Lens Theory II Laboratory-AS 

• OPT 2803L - Vision Care Clinical IV-AS 

• OPT 2375L - Refractometry Laboratory-AS 

• OPT 2463L - Ophthalmic Skills Laboratoryll-AS 

Total: 11 

Second Year - Third Semester 

• OPT 2030 - Ophthalmic Board Review-AS 

• OPT 2502L - Contact Lens Laboratory III-AS 

• OPT 2376L - Refractometry Laboratory Il-AS 

Total: 3 

Total Credit Hours: 72 

This is a limited access program with the degree awarded by Hillsborough Community College. Admission information is available by 
calling the Edison State College Health Technologies Office at (239)489-9255. 



147 



Paralegal Studies, AS 



The Associate in Science degree in Paralegal Studies is designed for students seeicing a professional career in a law-related field. The 
program trains students in many diverse areas of law. Subjects include legal research and writing, real estate law, criminal law. family 
law. wills and trusts, torts, and litigation. 

As current industry standards arc under development, program graduates will be specialists who can manage law office operations, 
assume certain routine duties of attorneys and directly assist attorneys in handling legal problems. Other roles may include performing 
legal research, developing new procedures, and drafting of documents. The program is designed for both fijll time and part time 
students. Classes are offered in day and evening formats, including an online format. 

Successful completion of this program qualifies students to sit for the National Association of Legal Assistants (NALA) Certified 
Legal Assistant/Certified Paralegal e.xam (CLA/CP). The program does not qualify students to practice law, sit for a state bar exam, 
nor act as or represent themselves as lawyers. Paralegals and legal assistants arc advised to acknowledge the American Bar 
Association definition of a paralegal or legal assistant as "a person, qualified by education, training or work experience who is 
employed or retained by a lawyer, a law office, corporation, governmental agency or other entity and who performs specifically 
delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible." 

The Associate in Science degree in Paralegal Studies transfers directly into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied Science 
degree in Public Safety Administration, as well as any public Florida college or university's Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal 
Justice. For additional information on Transfer Services, contact the department at 239-489-9132. 

The Florida Registered Paralegal Program 

In the state of Florida, a paralegal is generally defined as a person with education, training or work experience who works under the 
supervision of a member of the Florida Bar and who performs specifically delegated legal work for which a member of the Florida Bar 
is responsible. The Florida Registered Paralegal (FRP) is now recognized and approved by the Supreme Court of Florida. Refer to the 
Florida Bar Association website: www.floridabar.org for more information on becoming a Florida Registered Paralegal. 

Salary Range: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn $37,000 while an experienced worker can expect to earn S52,000. * 

Salary range varies by level of experience and type and/or size of legal employer. Willingness to relocate may increase salary 

opportunities. 

There are approximately 50 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved February 2009. 

** 2008-09 Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Labor Market and Statistics. 

Industry Positions 

Legal Assistant 

Paralegal 

Contract Administrator 

Victim's Advocate 

Private Investigator 

Talent/Sport's Agent 

Title Researcher/ Abstracter 

Legislative Analyst 

Real Estate Closing Agent 

Judicial 

Related knowledge and skills: 

Strong Communication Skills 
Fact Management 
Research Skills 
Computer Skills 
Stress Management 
Negotiation/Mediation Skills 
Time Management 
Financial Skills 
Organizational Skills 
Interviewing Skills 
Document Management 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

148 



Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

• ENC 1 1 1 - Composition 1-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition Il-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 
Communication 3 Credits 

Mathematics 3 Credits (recommended:) 

• MAC 1 105 - College Algebra-AA 

• MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 
*Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

*Social Science Electives 3 Credits 

Total: 18 

Degree Core Requirements: 

BUL 2241 - Business Law I-AA 

CJL 2 1 00 - Criminal Law-AA 

COS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

PLA 1003 - Introduction to Paralegal Smdies-AA 

PLA 1 103 - Legal Research and Writing I-AA 

PLA 2 1 14 - Legal Research and Writing II- AA 

PLA 2200 - Litigation-AA 

PLA 2202 - Torts-AA 

PLA 2600 - Wills, Trust and Probate Administration-AA 

PLA 2610 - Real Estate Law and Property-AA 

PLA 2800 - Family Law-AA 

PLA 2942 - Paralegal Intemship-AA 

Total: 37 
Electives: 9 

Courses specified as Humanities, Social Science, and Mathematics must be selected from courses listed in the College Catalog for AA 
degree requirements, under the respective categories in the General Education Program 



149 



Physical Therapist Assistant Program, AS 



u 



The Physical Therapist Assistant Program is dehvered to the students at Broward and Edison State College via distance learning 

technology. Lectures are broadcast in real time so that all sites participate in lecture classes together. The individual sites manage lab 

sessions. The clinical education component of the program is managed by the Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education at the 

Broward site. The program provides the student with the opportunity to develop technical skills relative to physical therapy through ^ 

planned clinical, classroom and laboratory experiences. The graduate will be prepared to provide a variety of services under the 

direction and guidance of a supervising physical therapist. ^ 

The program is a fiili-time day program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). A 

licensing examination is required upon completion of the two year program and the Physical Therapist Assistant shall be eligible for 

an appropriate membership category in the American Physical Therapy Association. The program is offered at the Edison State Lee (^ 

County Campus. 

This is a limited access program with the degree awarded by Broward College. Admission information is available by calling the (^ 

Edison State College Health Technologies Office at (239) 489-9255. 

Physical Therapist Assistants Typically Earn: ^ 

Median annual earnings of physical therapist assistants were $41,360 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $33,840 

and $49,010.* U 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor there are approximately 2 1 6 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ^ 

Consistently, 90% of Edison State graduates from this program are locally placed.* ^ 

c 

* Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupa-tional Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition, Physical Therapist 

Assistants and Aides, on the intemet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ ocosl67.htm (visited Jan. 4, 2008) ^ 

Career/Industry Opportunities ^ 

Hospitals M 

Private Clinics 

Athletic Organizations 

Rehabilitation Centers 

Nursing Homes 

Home Health Agencies 

School Systems 

Criteria for Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant Associate in Science Program: 

• Applicants must have a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 

• Applicants to the program will be ranked by the number of general education courses completed and the earned G.P.A. 

• Applicants must successfully complete a continuing education course: Online Test Drive prior to the start of PHT courses in 
Term L August. Completion of this course is not required for application to the program. Registration information will be 
provided to students following application to the program. 

• Applicants must complete a Medical History and Physical Examination prior to the start of PHT courses in Term I, August. 
Completion of the physical is not required for application to this program. Physical examination information will be 
provided to students following application to the program. 

Requirements for the Physical Therapist Assistant Associate in Science Degree: 

• Complete a minimum of 74 semester hours of credit and a degree grade point average of 2.0 or higher. 

• Complete the following courses with a grade of "C" or higher: 
All students are encouraged to participate in the Basic Skills Review prior to FCELPT placement. 

Degree Core Requirements: 

First Year Term III - First Semester 

• HSC 1531 - Medical Terminology-AA 

• * BSC 1 093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• MAT 9024 - Introduction to Algebra (*) 

Note: MAT 9012 & MAT 9020 Sequence Accepted 
Total Term Semester Hours: 10 

150 



First Year Term I - Second Semester 

* BSC KW4C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 

* PHT 1200 - introduction to Physical Therapy - AS 

* PHT 1200L - Introduction to Physical Therapy Lab - AS 

* PHT 1 103 - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assistant - AS 

* PHT 1 103L - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assisting Lab - AS 

* PHT 1 300 - Survey of Pathological Deficits - AS 

* PHT 1310 - Survey of Musculoskeletal Deficits - AS 

Total Term Semester Hours: 18 

First Year Term II - Third Semester 

* PHT 1010 - Physical Principles for the Physical Therapist Assistant - AS 

* PHT 121 1 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I - AS 

* PHT 1 2 1 1 L - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I Lab - AS 

* PHT 2224 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II - AS 

* PHT 2224L - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II Lab - AS 

* PHT 1020 - Therapeutic Communication for the PT Assistant - AS 

* PHT 1 801 L - Clinical Practicum I - AS 



Total Term Semester Hours: 15 

Second Year Term I - Fourth Semester 

* PHT 1350 - Basic Pharmacology for Physical Therapist Assistants - AS 

* PHT 2810L - Clinical Practicum II - AS 

* PHT 2162 - Survey of Neurological Deficits - AS 

* PHT 2120 - Applied Kinesiology - AS 

* PHT 2120L - Applied Kinesiology Lab - AS 
PSY 2012 - General Psychology I-AA 

Total Term Semester Hours: 17 

Second Year Term II - Fifth Semester 

* PHT 2704 - Rehabilitative Procedures - AS 

* PHT 2704L - Rehabilitative Procedures Lab - AS 

* PHT 2820L - Clinical Practicum III - AS 

* PHT 2931 - Transition Seminar AS 
Electives Humanities: 3 Credits 

Total Term Semester Hours: 14 
Total Credit Hours: 74 

* Requires a pre- or co-requisite. See course description in Broward or Edison State catalog. 

Successfijl completion of the Physical Therapist Assistant Program will satisfy the SACS Oral Communication Standard and basic 
computer skills requirement. 

** Students must fijlfill the computer literacy general education requirements within the first 15 hours of BC credit by successfully 
completing the basic student technology test or pass the CGS1060C at BC to earn the desgree OR an equivalen computer course at 
Edison State College. 

L'pon successful completion of PHT 1200 and PHT I200L, student will have met the Health Careers Core objectives. 



151 



Radiologic Technology, AS 



The Radiologic Technologist is an allied health professional who combines patient care skills with an in-depth knowledge of human 

anatomy and proficient utilization of medical imaging equipment. The technologist's goal is to produce diagnostic images of the 

human body with minimum radiation exposure at a level of proficiency that will cause the least discomfort to the patient. 

The Radiologic Technology Program is twenty two months of fijil-timc study. It includes classroom courses and extensive clinical 

laboratory experience in departments of radiology at participating clinical affiliates. 

The program is nationally accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 Wacker Drive, Suite 

2850, Chicago, IL, 60606-3182. Graduates may apply for the examination of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists 

(ARRT) for national certification and subsequent licensure by each individual state. 

The program has limited enrollment. A freshman class begins each Fall Semester at the Lee County campus. Clinical assignments are 

made at hospital affiliates in Lee, Collier and Charlotte Counties. Applicants must have successfully completed (with a grade of C or 

better) the following courses, or their equivalents, prior to admission to the program; MAC I 105 (College Algebra) and BSC 1093C 

(Anatomy and Physiology 1). Applicants will be selected through the admission process outlined on the Edison State College website: 

( http;//www.Edison.edu/academics/radiologictechnology/Rad Tech Info_Pack_7-2009.doc). Admitted students will need to submit 

a criminal background check and health report before the start of the program. 

Students are required to maintain a 2.0 grade point average in each radiologic technology (RTE) course to progress in the program 

curriculum. Each core course must be taken in sequence. A minimum of 77 credit hours with a 2.0 cumulative grade point average is 

required for graduation. 

First Round, Application Deadline: April 30 
Radiologic Technology Career Opportunities 

• Diagnostic Technology 

• Computed Tomography (CAT Scan) Tech 

• MR! Technology 

• Mammography 

• Bone Densitometry 

• Healthcare Administration 

• Education 

• Research 

Radiologic Technology Graduates Typically Earn: 

According to the latest survey from the American Society of Radiologic Technologists nationwide, the average annual salary for a new 
graduate is $41,612. * 

According to the Department of Labor there are 3,000 national openings per year. Consistently, 90% of Edison State graduates from 
this program are locally placed. ** 

* https://www.asrt.org/content/rts/surveyresults/wageandsalary retrieved January 2008. 
** https://vvTvw.bls.gov 

Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

For information about bachelor's degree opportunities at Edison State College, please contact the Edison State Baccalaureate and 
University Programs Division at (239)489-9295. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The program prerequisites encompass the successful completion of the program acceptance process including program-level 
admission points, competition with all other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation and affective skills demonstration. The 
admissions process requires satisfactory completion of a College-approved criminal history background check completed at the 
applicant's expense. The clinical enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. 
Students who have completed a hospital-based program accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic 
Technology and are professionally certified as Registered Technologists by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists may 
satisfy the career core requirements (52 credit hrs.) through successfial completion of RTE 195 1 -Radiologic Technology Equivalency 
Assessment. Call the program office at (239) 489-91 10 for further details. 

Program Prerequisites: 

• * MAC 1 1 05 - College Algebra-AA 

• BSC 1 093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

Total: 9 



152 



General Education Requirements: 

(To be taken before or during the program) 

• BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Seience Professionals-AS 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition 1-AA 

• PS Y 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-A A 

• BSC 1 094C - Anatomy and Physiology II-AA 

• *Humanities elective 3 Credits 

Total: 13 



Degree Core Requirements: 



(To be taken following program acceptance) 

RTE 1000 - Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care-AS 

RTE 1503 - Radiographic Positioning 1-AS 

RTE 1503L - Radiographic Positioning 1 Lab-AS 

RTE 1613 - Radiographic Physics-AS 

RTE 1418 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure I- AS 

RTE 1513 - Radiographic Positioning II-AS 

RTE 1804 - Radiology Practicum I-AS 

RTE 1457 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure II-AS 

RTE 1523 - Radiographic Positioning III-AS 

RTE 1814 - Radiology Practicum 11-AS 

RTE 1573 - Radiologic Science Principles-AS 

RTE 2563 - Special Radiographic Procedures and Cross-Sectional Anatomy-AS 

RTE 1824 - Radiology Practicum III-AS 

RTE 1001 - Radiographic Terminology-AS 

RTE 2385 - Radiation Biology/Protection-AS 

RTE 2782 - Radiographic Pathology - AS 

RTE 2834 - Radiology Practicum IV-AS 

RTE 2473 - Quality Assurance- AS 

RTE 2061 - Radiologic Technology Seminar - AS 

RTE 2844 - Radiology Practicum V-AS 

Total: 52 
Electives: 

CGS Computer Science Elective 3 Credits 

Total Credit Hours: 77 

Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
* Or higher mathematics. 



153 



Respiratory Care, AS 



u 



The Respiratory Care Program is designed to offer students the opportunity to obtain an Associate in Science Degree in Respiratory ^ 



u 



Care. Upon completion of the program, students will be registry-eligible respiratory therapists and will take the National Board for 

Respiratory Care Examinations. A graduate Respiratory Therapist is usually employed and licensed in the practice of Respiratory Care 

and has acquired the knowledge and skills necessary to administer respiratory therapy to patients of all ages with varied diseases, and C^ 

to patients in need of acute and critical care. Respiratory Therapists have the opportunity to learn and work in the acute care hospital 

setting, skilled nursing centers, rehabilitation, neo-natal intensive care, and home care environments. Because of the local need for ^ 

graduates, scholarships are available through the College as well as through local hospitals. A freshman class begins each Fall 

semester. Currently, freshmen are accepted each year in May & June. Class size is limited by the number of critical care units in the 

S.W. Florida clinical affiliates which are essential to the clinical education of students. 



u 
L 



The Program in Respiratory Care is a limited access program. The criteria for admission policies are available through the program ^ 
office, the Edison State website or through the Health Professions office by calling (239) 489-9255. Information packets with 

application to the program may be downloaded by visiting www.edison.edu/academics/respiratorycare.php The Program in \m 

Respiratory Care is nationally accredited by The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). •^ 

Respiratory Care Graduates Typically Earn: 

The projected average of annual earnings of RT"s working in the U.S. is $56,222. In this study*, therapists just beginning their careers 
reported average annual earnings of $41,538. According to the U.S. Department of Labor there are 2,300 national openings per year. 
Consistently, 90% of Edison State graduates from this program are locally placed.* 

* American Association for Respiratory Care http://www.aarc.org/career/be_an_rt/ 

Note: Respiratory Care as a Career: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos084.htm 

Continuing Toward A Bachelor's Degree? 

Edison State College has academic partnerships with many universities and colleges. For example, the Respiratory Care A.S. degree 
transfers to a B.S. in Cardiopulmonary Sciences at the University of Central Florida. Edison State graduates receive reduced tuition 
with many of our university and college partners. For more information, please contact the Edison State Baccalaureate and University 
Programs Division at (239)489-9295. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The program prerequisites include: 

• Successful completion of program acceptance process including program-level admissions points 

• Competition with all other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation and affective skills demonstration 
The clinical enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. The admissions process 
requires satisfactory completion of a College criminal history background check completed at the applicant's expense. 

Respiratory Care Application Deadline: June 30 
General Education Requirements: 

(To be taken before or during the program) 
ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 
PSY 2012 - General Psychology 1-AA *** 

BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals-AS 
BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 
BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology Il-AA 
MGF 1 1 06 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 
CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 
CHM 2032L - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab -AA 
MCB 20 IOC - Microbiology- A A 
**Humanities Elective 3 Credits 

Total: 31 

Degree Core Requirements: 

(To be taken following program acceptance) 

• RET 1024 - Introduction to Cardiopulmonary Technology - AS 

• RET 1616C - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology - AS 

• RET 1007 - Respiratory Care Pharmacology- AS 

154 



t 


• RET 1275C 


t 


• RET1832L 


■9 


• RET 2234C 

• RET2874L 


f 


• RET 2254C 


■^ 


• RET 2264C 




• RET 2295 - 


t 


• RET 2244 - 


♦ 


• RET 2714- 




• RET 2875L 


•* 


• RET 2930- 


* 


• RET 2876L 


■r 


Total: 45 



- Clinical Care Techniques-AS 

- Clinical Practicum 1-AS 

- Respiratory Therapeutics-AS 

- Clinical Practicum Il-AS 

- Respiratory Care Assessment-AS 

- Advanced Mechanical Ventilation-AS 
Pulmonary Studies-AS 

Critical Care Applications-AS 
Neonatal-Pediatric Respiratory Care-AS 

- Clinical Practicum Ill-AS 

Respiratory Care Practitioner as a Professional - AS 

- Clinical Practicum IV-AS 



Total Credit Hours: 76 



*MGF 1 106 is appropriate to meet the Mathematics requirement however; it carries a prerequisite of testing or MAT 1033. 
**Humanities Electives may be chosen from any course listed in the General Education Program Guide under Humanities. 
***Sociology may be substituted for Psychology 



V 
V 
V 
^ 
¥ 



155 



Certificate 



Specific requirements for each certificate program of study must be followed. In addition, students must accomplish the following 
requirements; 

Requirements for completion of a certificate program; 

1 . Earn the minimum required semester hours for the certificate with a cumulative 2.00 GPA. 

2. Complete all non-course requirements, if applicable. 

3. Successfully complete a minimum of 25% of the required certificate course work at Edison State College. 

4. Fulfill all obligations to Edison State. 

5. Meet all deadlines pertaining to graduation. 

Accounting Applications Certificate 

The Accounting Applications Certificate is designed to prepare students as accounting clerks or income tax preparers. Course work in 
this certificate program articulates into the Associate in Science degree in Accounting Technology. 

Accounting Certificate Earners May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn $21,840 ($10.50 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $30,659 ($14.74 

per hour).* 

There are approximately 282 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

*Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2008. 

**2007-2008 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

• Account Payable Clerk 

• Accounts Receivable Clerk 

• Income Tax Preparer 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog.. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

Certificate Core Requirements 

GEB 101 1 - Introduction to Business- AA 
COS 1 1 00 - Microcomputer Skills- A A 
ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 
ACG 201 1 - Financial Accounting II-AA 
ACG 207 1 - Managerial Accounting-AA 

Total: 16 

Specializations: 11 
Total Credit Hours: 27 
Specialization Electives 

Specialization electives may be chosen from one of the following areas; General Accounting or Tax Accounting. 

General Accounting Specialization 

• ACG 2500 - Governmental and Not-Forprofit Accounting-AA 

• CGS 25 1 1 - Advanced Spreadsheet Computing-AS 

• Electives 5 Credits 

Total: 11 

156 



Tax Accounting Specialization 

• T/\X 2000 - Federal Tax Accounting l-AA 

• TAX 2010 - Federal Tax Accounting I l-AA 

• TAX 2401 - Trusts, Estates, and Gifts: Accounting and Taxation-AA 

• Accounting and Taxation EJcctivcs 2 Credits 

Total: 11 

Electives: May be selected from any Accounting, Business, Computer or Drafting and Design courses. 



^ 
■* 
* 
* 
•* 






157 



Computer Programming Certificate 



This certificate is designed to prepare students to enter the computer industry in entry level programming positions. The core courses 

provide training in programming languages, basic networking design, systems analysis and design, and professional development 

skills. Students currently employed in the field can supplement and upgrade their skills through the variety of offerings. All credits 

earned in this program are applicable to the AS degree in Computer Programming and Analysis. ^ 

Students may be required to take prerequisites or acquire consent from an instructor to pursue courses for this certificate. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

• Computer Support Specialist 

• IT Support Specialist 

• PC Support Technician 

Those Who Complete the Computer Certificate May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S24,086 (SI 1.58 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $35,067 ($17.34 

per hour). * 

There are approximately 43 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2008. 

** 2007-2008 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

Certificate Core Requirements 

• CGS 1 1 00 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

• SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 

• CNT 1 000 - Networking Essentials-AS 

• COP 1000 - introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

• COP 1 224 - Programming with C++-AA 

• CIS 232! - Data Systems and Management- AA 

• CGS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance-AS 

• COP 2222 - Advanced Programming with C-I-+-AA 
or 

• COP 2 1 72 - Advanced Visual Basic Programming- AA 

• COP 2701 - Database Programming-AA 
or 

• COP 2800 - Java Programming-AA 

• Computer Science Electives at 2000 Level 
(Any CDA. CIS, COP, CGS at 2000 Level) 5 Credits 

Total Credit Hours: 33 



158 



E 



Crime Scene Technology Certificate 

The Crime Scene Technology Certificate programs are designed to prepare students for employment in fields related to crime scene 
investigation. Those who complete the program will be able to locate, preserve, develop, collect, analyze and present physical 
evidence relating to the scene of the crime. Students learn the necessary skills to accurately map out, collect and log evidence, develop 
and preserve fingerprints, write reports, and present courtroom testimony. Typical industry job titles include Crime Scene Technician 
or Crime Scene Technologist. 

The program consists of a 28 credit hour college certificate (major code PSVC CRST) and a two year (60 credit hour) Associate in 
Science degree (major code AS CRST). The certificate program is designed to provide technical training and will transfer directly into 
our Crime Scene Technology Associate in Science degree. As many law enforcement agencies require college degrees prior to 
employment, students that do not have law enforcement related experience are strongly encouraged to complete the AS degree, 
y Although most crime scene technicians in Southwest Florida are law enforcement certified, more agencies are beginning to use 

civilians in this position. Employment opportunities are greatly enhanced by prior experience in a law related field. Salary and job 
opportunities var\' with willingness to relocate. 



y 



The core crime scene course schedule is designed for the evening student. Full time students can complete all coursework in two years. 
In addition to class and laboratory' training, upon approval, internship opportunities are available that will allow the student to 
experience first- hand the job skills required in the field of crime scene investigation, 
y Flonda certified law enforcement and/or corrections officers may qualify for the award of specified courses and elective credit, based 

on the successful completion of the state exam. Please see the Program Advisor or the Criminal Justice Academy Bridge Program for 
details. 



Contact: Law and Public Safety Programs Office at (239)-489-9132 or http://w\\'w.edison.edu/academics/crimescene_cert.php 

Crime Scene Technology Graduates May Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S23.000 while an experienced worker can expect to earn $52,000.* There are approximately 
50 annual openings in Edison State's service district** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation Labor Market Statistics Center February 2009. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. 

Continuing Toward a Bachelor's Degree? 

Students intending to continue toward a Bachelor's degree are encouraged to consult with their transfer school prior to choosing their 
Associate's Degree and/or elective coursework. Contact the Edison State College Law and Public Safety Program Office at (239)-489- 
9132, or go to www.Edison.edu for current information on Bachelor's degree partnershipswith Edison State College. The Associate in 
Science degree in Crime Scene Technology transfers directly into the Edison State College Bachelor of Applied Science degree in 
Public Safety Administration. 

Successful Personal Attributes 

Safety Conscious 

Creative-Innovative 

Detail Oriented/ Analytical 

Observant 

Logical 

Confident 

Thorough 

Tolerant 

Strong Ethical Standard 

Inquisitive-Persistent 

Open Minded 

Team Player 

Methodical 

Patient 

Decisive 

-. Program Guidelines 

"^ The nature of crime scene investigation can require physical activity. Students enrolled in the Crime Scene Technology program must 

"^ be physically able to go into, under, on top of and through many different environmental scenes as part of their training. 

The employment process may include an extensive background investigation. A prior criminal history may strongly inhibit 

W employment opportunities in this field. Potential employers may require some or all of the following criteria as part of the employment 

— V process: 

-V 159 



Physical Agility 

Psychological Examination >^ 

Drug Screening f 

U.S. Citizenship 

Minimum Age Requirement ^ 

Oral Board Review f 

Background Investigation 

Physical Examination ^ 

Credit Check ^ 

Polygraph and/or Voice Stress Analysis 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

Certificate Core Requirements 

CCJ 1020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice-AA 

CJE 2649 - Forensic Death Investigation-AS 

CJE 2770C - Crime Scene Photography-AS 

CJL 2610 - Courtroom Presentation of Scientific Evidence-AS 

CJT 1 110 - Introduction to Crime Scene 

CJL 2100 - Criminal Law-AA 

CJT 21 1 IC - Advanced Crime Scene Technology 

CJT 2141 - Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJT 2241 - Introduction to Forensic Science 

Total: 28 



,60 ^ 



Dental Assisting Certificate 



The Dental Assisting Program at Edison State College leads to a Certificate of Completion and eligibility to take the Dental Assisting 
National Boards. Those assistants who pass the Boards and maintain continuing education credits may use the title "Certified Dental 
Assistant." Upon completion of the program, students will also receive an "Expanded Functions Certificate" which enables them to 
perform designated tasks permitted by the State Board of Dentistry. 

A freshman class begins each Fall semester. The program is comprised of general education courses, which are taken concurrently 
with the dental assisting core courses. The dental assisting core courses are didactic, laboratory, and clinical externships. The general 
education course work is acceptable from any accredited college. The dental assisting core courses are offered only on the Lee 
Campus; the clinical practice site(s) are in the five county service district. 

The Dental Assisting Program has limited enrollment due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each applicant must meet 
specific criteria which are listed in the admission policies. The Criteria for Admission Policies arc available through the program 
office or through the Division of Health and Science at (239) 489-9235. Infomiation packets with application to the program may be 
downloaded by visiting www.Edison.edu (go to Academic Programs, click on Academic Program Web pages, click on your program 
of interest to download.) 

The students must purchase uniforms, an instrument kit, liability insurance, and books. There are fees for tuition, laboratory, and the 
national board examination. 

The program is accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation. 

Application Deadline: June 1 
Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

The Program prerequisite encompasses succcssftil completion of a program acceptance process including program level admission 
points, competition with all other applicants based on academic transcript evaluation and prior degree points. The admissions process 
requires satisfactory completion of a College approved criminal history background check completed at the applicant's expense. The 
clinical enrollment process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report. 

General Education Requirements 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• SPC 1 1 7 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

Total: 6 

Certificate Core Requirements 

DES 002 IC - Dental Anatomy and Physiology-PS AV 

DES 1840 - Preventive Dentistry- AS 

DES 0200L - Dental Assisting Radiology Lab-PSAV 

DES 0200 - Dental Assisting Radiology-PSAV 

DES 0I03C - Dental Materials for Dental Assistants-PSAV 

DES 2830C - Expanded Functions Laboratory-AS 

DEA 0020 - Dental Assisting I-PSAV 

DEA 0020L - Dental Assisting 1 Laboratory-PSAV 

DEA 0029 - Dental Assisting II Dental-PSAV Specialties 

DEA 0029L - Dental Assisting II Dental Specialties Laboratory-PSAV 

DES 0502 - Dental Office Management-PSAV 

DEA 0850L - Extemship I-PSAV 

Total: 39 

Total Credit Hours: 45 



161 



Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) Certificate 

The Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMTB) Program is designed to prepare the student to become a competent entry-level 
EMT-B. This program is one ( 1 ) flill semester in length. The EMS Technology Program is accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in conjunction with the Committee on Accreditation of Educational 
Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (Co-AEMSP). 

Purchase of professional liability insurance is required and included in the program cost. Uniforms are required in all EMS classes and 
at the clinical sites. Students are responsible for transportation to and from the clinical sites. 

Upon successful completion of this program, the student will receive a Certificate of Completion from the EMS department and the 
necessary instruction required to submit to the Florida State EMS Office for the National Registry Examination (NREMT). 

Contact Information: Emergency Medical Services Program Office: (239)-489-9392. 
http://www.Edison.edu/academics/emsproaram.php 

EMT-Basic and Paramedic Graduates Typically Earn: 

An entry level worker can expect to earn S27.850-$54,030 annual salary * 

There are approximately 284 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved February 2009. Range may vary significantly depending upon experience and 

rank. 

** 2008-2009 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. Labor Market Statistics. 

EMT Career Opportunities 

Certified EMT 

Firefighter 

Educator 

Medical Equipment Sales 

Parks and Recreation 

Program Prerequisites: 

The EMT-Basic program has limited enrollment due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each student must meet specific 
criteria which are listed in the admission requirements. The criteria for admission are available through the program office by calling 
(239) 489-9392 or the web site http: vv\v\\.rdison. edit academics cnisproarani.php . 

Admission requirements for the EMT-Basic Program encompass successful completion of a program application documenting the 
following criteria: a current CPR certification (either American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Health care Providers or 
American Red Cross Professional Rescuer) The admissions process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health 
report., and satisfactory completion of a College-approved criminal advisory background check completed at the applicant's expense. 

Course Prerequisites: 

NONE 

The courses listed below must be taken in the same semester and on the same campus. 

Core Requirements: 

• EMS 21 19 - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Care- AS 

• EMS 2 1 1 9L - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Care Lab-AS 

• EMS 24 1 1 - EMS Field Clinical -AS 

• EMS 242 1 - EMS Field Intemship-AS 

Total: 11 



162 



Eye Care Technician Certificate 



The Eye Care Technician College Credit Certificate is made possible via an inter-institutional agreement between Edison State 
College and Hillsborough Communit\' College (HCC) in Tampa, Florida. Edison State College offers the general education portion of 
the degree and assists in the teaching of the vision care courses. The certificate is granted by Hillsborough Community College. The 
program is deli\ered v ia distance learning technology combined with campus based instaiction. The laboratory courses are held in the 
new Vision Care Laboratorv' in the Kenneth P. Walker Health Sciences Building. 

This program prepares individuals to perform visual assessment, contact lens fitting and spectacle dispensing while working closely 
with ophthalmologists and optometrists. Graduates may apply all credits to the Opticianry Degree. 

Note: This program has not been approved by the Florida Department of Education for transfer to other AS degrees in the State of 
Florida. It will, however, transfer to Hillsborough Community College's AS degrees. Students should speak to an HCC ad\ isor 
concerning the transfer of this certificate to another institution. 

The Hillsborough Community College Opticianry Program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianrv' Accreditation. 

Course Prerequisites: 

None 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 



Certificate 

OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 
OPT 

Total: 48 



Requirements 

1000 - Ophthalmic Orientation-AS 
1400L - Ophthalmic Laboratory I- AS 

1 155 - Ophthalmic Lens l-AS 

1 156 - Ophthalmic Lens II-AS 
1225- Low Vision-AS 

1460 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I-AS 

1460L - Ophthalmic Dispensing I Laboratory- AS 

2204 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye- AS 

2461 - Ophthalmic Dispensing ll-AS 

246 IL - Ophthalmic Dispensing II Laboratory- AS 

2800L - Vision Care Clinical I-AS 

2801 L - Vision Care Clinical II-AS 

2463L - Ophthalmic Skills Laboratoryll-AS 

2500 - Contact Lens Theory I-AS 

2500L - Contact Lens Theory I Laboratory-AS 
2375 - Refractometry-AS 

2501 - Contact Lens Theory II-AS 
2375L - Refractometrv' Laboratory-AS 
2376L - Refractometry Laboratory II-AS 






163 



Firefighter Minimum Standards Certificate 

This program will provide training for Southwest Florida firefighters with a Collier County focus and partnership with the North 
Naples Fire Training Center. This is a three part certificate program designed to prepare students to be eligible to sit for the State of 
Florida Firefighter 11 Certification exam. Students must satisfy the requirements set forth in NFPA 1001 and Florida State Statute 69 A- 
37. This is a 510 hour course that runs for 6 months. Classes are held in the evening in Naples and on Saturdays. The cost for this 
course varies due to equipment needs approximately $3900 will cover course application, gear rental (if needed) uniforms, books, 
testing, fingerprints, etc. 

Prerequisite: 

Admission to the Firefighter Minimum Standards Certificate Program. 

Contact Information: Fire Science Program Office: (239)-489-9392, http://www.Edison.edu/academics/firescience.php 

Certificate Requirements 

• FFP 0141C - First Responder and Firefighter Awareness -PSAV 

• FFP 00 1 OC - Firefighter I Minimum Standards -PSAV 

• FFP 0020C - Firefighter II Minimum Standards-PSAV 

Total: 17 



164 



Network Specialist Certificate 



The Network Speeialist College Certificate is designed to prepare students for entry level employment as a local area network (LAN) 

administrator. Upon completion of this program, students will be able to design, implement and manage local area network clients and 

servers. 

The students will be trained utilizing industry standards, business platforms and operating systems. To enable the student to work 

effectively in modem business environments, the program stresses the development of skills in written and oral communication, 

human relations, management and business operations. Course work m this program articulates into the Associate in Science Degree 

in Networkmg Services Technology. 

Those Who Complete the Network Specialist Certificate Program May Earn: 

An entr>- level worker can expect to earn S24,086 (SI 1.58 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn S2.S,067 (SI 7.34 

per hour). * 

There are approximately 54 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

*Florida Agency for Workforce innovation retrieved January 2008 

** 2007-2008 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

• Entry level LAN Administrator 

• Entry level Network Specialist 

• Network Support Technician 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements 

Any college level mathematics 3 Credits 

Total: 3 

Certificate Core Requirements 

CNT 1000 - Networking Essentials-AS 

CDA 2500 - Microsoft Windows Server-AS 

COS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

COS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance- AS 

CIS 2321 - Data Systems and Management- A A 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

GEE 101 1 - Introduction to Business-AA 

SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 

General Electives 6 Credits 

Total: 27 

Total Credit Hours: 30 

Electives: 

Electives may be selected from any Accounting, Business, Computer or Drafting and Design courses. 



165 






Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician Certificate 



The Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician College Credit Certificate is made possible via an interinstitutional agreement between Edison >< 

State College and Hillsborough Community College (HCC) in Tampa, Florida. Edison State College offers the general education f 

portion of the degree and assists in the teaching of the vision care courses. The certificate is granted by Hillsborough Community 
College. The program is delivered via distance learning technology combined with campus based instruction. The laboratory courses (^ 

are held in the new Vision Care Laboratory in the Kenneth P. Walker Health Sciences Building. 

This program teaches surfacing, finishing and other related tasks necessary to fabricate prescription eyewear. It prepares individuals to y 

work in a wholesale or retail optica! laboratory. Graduates may apply all credits from this certificate to the Opticianry Degree. • 

Note: This program has not been approved by the Florida Department of Education for transfer to other AS degrees in the State of 

Florida. It will, however, transfer to Hillsborough Community College's AS degrees. Students should speak to an HCC advisor 

concerning the transfer of this certificate to another institution. ^ 

The Hillsborough Community College Opticianry Program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation. 

Course Prerequisites: 

None 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

General Education Requirements: 

None 

Certificate Core Requirements 

OPT 1000 - Ophthalmic Orientation-AS 

OPT 1 155 - Ophthalmic Lens 1-AS 

OPT 11 56 - Ophthalmic Lens Il-AS 

OPT 1400L - Ophthalmic Laboratory I- AS 

OPT 1460 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I-AS 

OPT 1460L - Ophthalmic Dispensing 1 Laboratory-AS 

OPT 2204 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye-AS 

OPT 2500 - Contact Lens Theory LAS 

OPT 2800L - Vision Care Clmical I-AS 

Total Credit Hours: 24 



C 
t 

166 ^ 



Paramedic (EMT-P) Certificate 



The Paramedic Certificate Program is designed to prepare the student to become a competent entry-level paramedic in the field of 

emergency medicine. Upon successftil completion of the Paramedic Program, the EMS Department will issue to the sUidcnt the 

necessary information required to submit to the Florida State EMS Office to apply for the Florida State Paramedic Certification 

examination. 

During the Paramedic Program, students will be required to complete clinical rotations in local hospital settings and internships with 

area EMS providers. These clinical rotations are in addition to scheduled lecture and laboratory hours. Students must provide 

transportation to and from the clinical and internship sites as required. Purchase of EMS unifomis is required for clinical and 

internship rotations. 

The EMT-Paramedic Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in 

conjunction with the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions 

(CoAEMSP). 

Contact Information: 

Emergency Medical Services Program Office (239) 489-9392 
http:/''w\\^'. Edison. edu/academics/emsprot^ram.php 

EMT-Basic and Paramedic Graduates Typically Earn: 

An entr\' level worker can expect to earn S27,850-S54,030 annual salary * 

There are approximately 284 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved February 2009. Range may vary significantly depending upon experience and 

rank. 

** 2008-2009 Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Labor Market Statistics. 



Paramedic Career Opportunities 

Certified Paramedic 

Firefighter 

Educator 

Medical Equipment Sales 

Air Ambulance 



Course Prerequisites: 

None 

The EMT-Paramedic program has limited enrollment due to clinical facilities and accreditation standards. Each student must meet 
specific criteria, which are listed in the admission requirements. The criteria for admission is available through the program office by 
calling (239) 489-9392 or the web site http://ww^'. edison.edu/academics/emsprouram.php Admission requirements for the Paramedic 
Program encompass evidence of current Florida EMT-Basic certification (or eligible for certification-must be Florida certified within 
90 days of beginning EMS 2671 ), current CPR certification, grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher, and completion of FCLEPT 
testing with no DLA holds. The admissions process requires satisfactory completion of an immunization and health report, and 
satisfactory' completion of a College approved criminal advisory background check completed at the applicant's expense. Priority will 
be given to applicants that hold current Florida EMT-B certification. 



Certificate Core Requirements: 

**Science Requirement under development 4 Credits 

EMS 2671 - Paramedic I-AS 

EMS 2671L - Paramedic 1 Lab- AS 

EMS 2672 - Paramedic 11-AS 

EMS 2672L - Paramedic 11 Lab-AS 

EMS 2673 - Paramedic Ill-AS 

EMS 2673L - Paramedic 111 Lab 

EMS 2674 - Paramedic IV-AS 

EMS 2674L - Paramedic IV Lab 

EMS 2654 - Paramedic Field Internship I-AS 

EMS 2655 - Paramedic Field Internship II-AS 

EMS 2656 - Paramedic Field Internship III-AS 

EMS 2649 - Paramedic Hospital Clinicals-AS 



Total: 42 



167 



Small Business Management Certificate 






The Small Business Management Certificate is designed to prepare students to become small business owners and managers in 
specialized areas. Course work in this program articulates into the Associate in Science Degree in Business Administration and 
Management. ^ 

Those Who Complete the Small Business Management Certificate Program May Earn: ^ 

An entry level worker can expect to earn $28,288 ($13.60 per hour) while an experienced worker can expect to earn $43,908 ($21.1 1 f 

per hour). * There are approximately 1 52 annual openings in Edison State's service district. ** 

* Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation retrieved January 2008 

** 2007-2008 Regional Targeted Occupational List retrieved from Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board. ^ 

Career/Industry Opportunities 

Small Business Owner 
Small Business Manager 
Marketing Associate 
Entry level Hospitality positions 
Entry level Banking positions 
International Business Associate 

Course Prerequisites: 

Refer to specific course descriptions listed in this Catalog. 

Program Prerequisites: 

None 

Certificate Core Requirements: 

SBM 2000 - Small Business Management-AS 
SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 
GEB 101 1 - Introduction to Business-AA 
CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 
MTB 1 103 - Business Mathematics- AA 

Total: 16 
Specializations: 8 
Total Credit Hours: 24 

Specialization Electives 

Specialization electives may be chosen from one of the following areas; Hospitality, International Business, Banking, Customer 
Service or Marketing. 

Hospitality Specialization 

• HFT 1 000 - Introduction to Hospitality Management- AA 

• HFT 24 1 - Front Office Procedures- AA 
Electives (Business Courses) 2 Credits 

Total: 8 






Customer Service Specialization 

• MKA 1 161 - Introduction to Customer Service-AS 

• Electives (Business Courses) 5 Credits |r- 

Total: 8 IC 

c 

,68 ^ 



-* International Business Specialization 

"^ • INR 2002 - International Rclations-AA 

^^ • BAN 2155 - International Banking and Finance-AS 

"* • Finance Electives (Business Courses) 5 Credits 

Z Total: 8 

~ Marketing Specialization 

— • MAR2011 -Markcting-AS 

■^ • MKA 151 1 - Advertising and Sales Promotion-AS 

^ • Electives 2 Credits 

-* Total: 8 



>* 



Banking Specialization 



• 



BAN 1004 - Principles of Banking- AS 
^ • Banking Elective 3 Credits 

— • Electives (Business Courses) 2 Credits 

"; Total: 8 

"^ Electives: 

_^ Electives may be chosen from any OST, Business, Hospitality, Management, Customer Service, Computer Technology, Banking, 

^ Finance, or Real Estate courses. 




^ 
^ 



169 



Visual Assessment Certificate 

The Visual Assessment Advanced Technical Certificate is made possible via an inter-institutional agreement between Edison State 
College and Hillsborough Community College (HCC) in Tampa, Florida. This advanced program is designed for those students who 
already have an AS Degree in Opticianry. Edison State College offers the general education portion of the degree and assists in the 
teaching of the vision care courses. The certificate is granted by Hillsborough Community College. The program is delivered via 
distance learning technology combined with campus based instruction. The laboratory courses are held in the new Vision Care 
Laboratory in the Kenneth P. Walker Health Sciences Building. 

This 1 1 -credit program provides training in Safety and Sports Vision, Low Vision and Refraction for individuals who have already 
earned an AS Degree in Opticianry. 

Course Prerequisites: 

None 

Program Prerequisites: 

AS Degree in Opticianry 

Certificate Core Requirements: 

• OPT2375 -Refractometry-AS 

• OPT 2375L - Refractometry Laboratory-AS 

• OPT 1 225 - Low Vision-AS 

• OPT 2376L - Refractometry Laboratory II-AS 

• OPT 1666 - Safety and Sports Vision-AS 

Total Credit Hours: 11 



170 



Edison Online 

Online A.A 

Edison State Online students enrolled at Edison State College have the ability to complete their Associate of Arts degree online, 
through Edison State Online. Classes have been developed in every core requirement area of the degree program. Students will be able 
to apply online, regi.ster for classes online, and use an mteractive chat system to speak with student services and financial aid. For 
more information please visit: littp:. online.edison.edu . 

Edison State Online courses at Edison State College are credit courses which are academically equivalent to on-campus courses. 
Edison State Online course allow students the opportunity' to complete most of their coursework outside the classroom, and although 
this allows for greater freedom of scheduling, it can require more self-discipline than on-campus courses. 

Online Courses: These courses are offered through the Internet and require that students have access to a computer and to the World 
Wide Web. Course information and assignments are accessed through the browser. Online courses include a textbook, on-campus 
sessions for orientation, discussion, labs and examinations. Online courses may provide the opportunity for interaction between you. 
the instructor and your classmates through the course Chatroom. Bulletin Board or email. 

Blended Learning Courses: In this type of course, several modes of instructional delivery may be used. For example, a course may 
be delivered to the student through a combination of videotaped, online, interactive video, multimedia or print-based material. On- 
campus sessions will be required for orientation, discussion, labs and/or examinations. These courses may also require access to the 
Internet and include a textbook and other materials purchased from the bookstore. 

Registering for Edison State Online or Blended Courses:_This is how you know whether a course is considered to be blended or 
online: An Edison State Online class will have a campus code of EOL and the section number has a seven as the middle number. A 
student might need to come to campus for a proctored exam or an orientation, but the course will be taught completely online. For 
example, AMH 2010, Section 171 is an American History course that is being taught online. However, if the section number has an 
eight as the middle number, it is being taught as a blended course. For example, AMH 2010, Section 181 is an American History 
course that is being taught as a blended course. That means that the course can be taught up to 50% online, but it also meets sometimes 
in a classroom on campus. Professors each have their own timeframe for in-class meetings. It is always a good idea to contact your 
professor to see when the class is meeting. 

Interactive N'ideo Physical Therapist Assistant Program 

A Physical Therapist Assistant Program is offered in partnership with Broward College. This program utilizes interactive video classes 
to be offered simultaneously between Fort Myers and Fort Lauderdale. This is a limited access program with the degree awarded by 
Broward College. Admission information is available by calling the Edison State College Health Technologies Office at (239)489- 
9255. 

Online Opticianry Program 

A program of study leading to Certificates in Opthalmic Laboratory Technology (24 credits) and Eye Care Technology (48 credits) as 
well as the AS Degree in Opticianry is offered in partnership with Hillsborough Community College. Courses in this program are 
offered both online and in the classroom. This is a limited access program with the degree awarded by Hillsborough Community 
College. Admission information is available by calling the Edison State College Health Technologies Office at (239)489-9255. 

Courses Available Online Towards The Associate in Arts Degree 
Communications: 9 Credits 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications AA 

• SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking- AA 

Humanities: 6 Credits 

(Select two courses One from Part A and one from Part B. OR two from Part A) 

• HUM 221 1 - Studies in Humanities: The Ancient World Through the Medieval Period-AA 

• HUM 2250 - Studies in Humanities: The Romantic Era Through the Present-AA 

• FTUM 2235 - Studies in Humanities: The Renaissance Through the Age of Reason-AA 

• HUM 25 1 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA 
(writing intensive) 



Part A 



HUM 221 1 - Studies in Humanities: The Ancient World Through the Medieval Period-AA 
FIUM 2250 - Studies in Humanities: The Romantic Era Through the Present-AA 
FTUM 2235 - Studies in Humanities: The Renaissance Through the Age of Reason-AA 
HUM 2510 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA (writing intensive) 

171 



Parte 

• PHI 20 1 - Introduction to Philosophy-AA 

• PHI 2600 - Ethics-AA 

• REL 2300 - World Religions-AA 

Writing Intensive Courses: 

The following courses satisfy the writing intensive requirement of 4,000 words each. 

• ENC 1 101 - Composition I-AA 

• ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

• HUM 25 1 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA 

• WOH 1 030 - History of World Civilization 1 8 1 5 to Present-AA 

Social Sciences: 9 Credits 

Course selection must include one World Civilization course 
either 

• EUH 1 00 1 - The Western Tradition II-AA 
EU 10001 

• WOH 1 1 2 - History of World Civilization to 1 500- AA 

• WOH 1023 - History of World Civilization 1500 to 1815-AA 
or 

• WOH 1 030 - History of World Civilization 1 8 1 5 to Present-AA 

Economics 

• ECO 2013 - Economics I-AA (Choices & Change Macro) 

• ECO 2023 - Economics II-AA (Choices & Change Micro) 

Education 

• EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

• EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

(May not fulfill social science requirements at some state universities) 

History 

• AMH 2010- History ofthe United States to 1865-AA 

• AMH 2020 - History ofthe United States 1865 to Present-AA 

• WOH 1 030 - History of World Civilization 1 8 1 5 to Present-AA 

Political Science 

• POS 2041 - American National Govemment-AA 

Psychology 

• DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

• DEP 2302 - Adolescent Psychology-AA 

• DEP 2 1 02 - Child Psychology-AA 

• PSY 20 1 2 - General Psychology I-AA 

Sociology 

• SYG 1000 - Introduction to Sociology- AA 

• SYG 1010 - Contemporary Social Problems- AA 

• SYG 2430 - Marriage and the Family-AA 

Sciences: 6 Credits 

(A student must complete six hours of science, including associated laboratory, in order to fijlfill the Natural Science requirement. A 
"C" designation after the course number indicates that the lab is "combined" with the class.) 

• BSC 1005 - Introduction to Biological Sciences- AA 

• BSC 1 1 - Biological Science I-AA 

• CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 

• CHM 2025L - Introduction to College Chemistry Laboratory-AA 

• ISC 1001 C - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science I-AA 

• ISC 1002C - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science II-AA 

(These courses are sequential or require another science or math course as a co-requisite or prerequisite.) 

• OCE lOOlC - Introduction to Oceanography -AA 

• OCE 1002C - Oceanography II: A Multidisciplinary Science 

• PHY 2048 - General Physics I-AA 

• PHY 2048L - General Physics I Laboratory-AA 

172 



• PHY 2049 - General Physics Il-AA 

• PHY :()49L - General Physics II Laboratory-AA 

Mathematics: 6 Credits 

(These mathematics courses are used to satisfy the AA mathematics requirement and a grade of "C" or better is required to move to 
the next level. Pursuant with Rule 6A- 10.030 (Gordon Rule) the students must successfiilly complete six (6) semester hours of 
mathematics coursework.) 

General Education Math Requirements 



■r 


Technology 


■* 


Part A 




• MAC 1 1 05 


^ 


• MGFII06- 


* 


• STA 2023 - 


- 


Parte 


♦ 


• MAC 1105 


* 


• MGFII06- 


— 


• MGF1I07- 


^ 


• STA 2023 - 


•* 


Prepatory Math 


•< 


• MAT 1033 




• MAT 9024 



- College Algebra-AA 
Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

Statistical Methods I-AA 

- College Algebra-AA 

■ Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

■ Mathematics for Liberal Arts II-AA 
Statistical Methods I-AA 

- Intermediate Algebra-AA 

- Introduction to Algebra (*) 

Marketing and Computer (As Electives) 

• MAR 20 1 1 - Marketing-AS 

• CGS 251 1 - Advanced Spreadsheet Computing-AS 

Associate in Arts Degree Program 

AA Electives: 24 Credits 

(Be sure electives selected have an AA designation as listed in the course description section of this catalog. Electives should be 
chosen with a desired Baccalaureate Program in mind. Students are advised to sec an academic counselor to determine university 
program prerequisites. AS courses do not qualify for elective credit.) 

ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

ACG 201 1 - Financial Accounting II-AA 

ACG 2071 - Managerial Accounting-AA 

ACG 2100 - Intermediate Accounting I-AA 

ACG 2500 - Governmental and Not-Forprofit Accounting-AA 

CCJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminology-AA 

CCJ 1020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice-AA 

CCJ 2500 - Juvenile Deliquency 

CJE 1300 - Police Organization and Administration-AA 

CJL 2130 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence-AA 

CGS 1000 - Computer Literacy- AA 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

COP 1822 - Internet Programming HTML-AA 

GEB 101 1 - Introduction to Business- AA 

HUN 1201 - Nutrition-AA 

LIS 2004 - Internet for College Research-AA 

MAN 2021 - Management Principles-AA 

PGY 1800C - Introduction to Digital Photography-AA 

PGY 1900C - Advanced Digital Photography A A 

RMI 2001 - Principles of Risk Management- AA 

TAX 2000 - Federal Tax Accounting I-AA 

TAX 2010 - Federal Tax Accounting II-AA 

TAX 2041 - Trusts, Estates and Gifts; Accounting and Taxation 

Radiographic Technology 

• RTE 1001 - Radiographic Terminology- AS 



173 



Baccalaureate Courses Offered Online: 

ACG 3024 - Accounting for Non-Financial Managers- BAS 

DSC 3034 - Terrorism Preparedness 

EDF 3214 - Human Development and Leaming-BS 

MAN 3 1 20 - Organizational Behavior and Leadership-BAS 

MAN 3301 - Human Resources Management-BAS 

MAN 3303 - Leadership and Management Practices- BAS 

MAN 3641 - Organizational Research 

MAN 4701 - Business Ethics and Society-BAS 

MAN 4720 - Strategic Management and Organizational Policy - BAS 

MAN 4915 - Management Capstone Project 

PAD 3003 - Introduction to Public Administration 

PAD 3204 - Financial Management in the Public Sector-BAS 

PAD 3820 - Public Safety System Integration-BAS 

PAD 4232 - Grant and Contract Management-BAS 

PAD 4393 - Critical Incident Management - BAS 

PAD 4426 - Public Sector Labor Relations - BAS 

PAD 4878 - Management Capstone Project-BAS 

PAD 4932 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety-BAS 

Computing Skills 

• All degree seeking students must demonstrate their competence in the basic use of computers by completing ENC 1101- 
Composition I-AA with a grade of "C" or better. 

CLAST 

All degree seeking students need to satisfy the requirement of the CLAST 

Foreign Language 

Students seeking admission to the Florida State University System should have completed two years of foreign language at the high 
school level or two courses (eight credit hours) at the college level. Foreign language is a State University System Baccalaureate 
graduation requirement. 

Health and Wellness and Physical Education Credits 

Students may elect to take up to six hours of health and wellness courses as elective credit toward graduation. Students are cautioned 
that such credits will transfer to Florida Universities only to the degree that the individual university will accept them. 

International Diversity Courses 

Florida State Universities may require students to take courses that have an international or diversity focus. These courses are 
designated with an "I" after the course description. 



174 



Course Descriptions 



^ 



ACG 1001 - Financial Accounting I-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Introduction to basic financial accounting principles and their application to current business practices for single proprietorships. 

* Major emphasis is placed on the accounting cycle, current assets and liabilities, merchandising and inventory, non-current assets and 

* payroll. 

Z ACG 1002 - Microcomputer Accounting AppIications-AS 

•, 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Microcomputer Accounting Applications is a stand alone, introductory computerized accounting course. The course is intended to 

-^ provide business students with the basics of accoimting while introducing them to an automated accounting system. This course is not 

^ a prerequisite to Financial Accounting I, nor is it a requisite to the AS degree in Accounting Technology. 

ACG 201 1 - Financial Accounting Il-AA 

* 3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ACG 1001 

Continuation of financial accounting principles for partnerships and corporations. Major emphasis is placed on stockholder's equity, 
~^ long-term liabilities, subsidiaries, statement of cash flow, and analysis of financial statements. 

-* ACG 2071 - Managerial Accounting-AA 

— 3 class hours 3 Credits 

** Prerequisite(s): ACG 201 1 

^ Introduction to basic managerial accounting principles and their application to current business practices for all forms of business 

^ organizations. Emphasis is placed on product costing, responsibility accounting and performance evaluation, budgeting, decision 

■* analysis, and just-in-time philosophy. 

"^ ACG 2100 - Intermediate Accounting I-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): ACG 201 1 

■* This course reviews the accounting model, statement preparation, concepts, standards and principles underlying the measurement and 

-K reporting of financial position. The major instructional emphasis is placed on a systematic and in-depth study of the financial 

"^ statements and underlying records with special attention given to the elements composing working capital, investments and assets. 

^ ACG 2110 - Intermediate Accounting II-AA 

w 3 class hours 3 Credits 

— Prerequisite(s): ACG 2100 

"* As the second course of the series, this course continues an in-depth study of financial statements and underlying records. The 

'^ elements that comprise the equity side of the balance sheet are emphasized with additional attention given to special problems in 

income determination and financial reporting. Major areas of instruction for this course include, long-term investments, tangible fixed 

.^ assets, acquisitions, utilization retirement, depreciation, depiction and reinstatement, intangible assets, deferred charges, insurance, 

.^k special purpose funds, liabilities, accounting for bonds, pensions and leases, corporations, contributed capital at formation and retained 

-» earnings. 

^ ACG 2360 - Cost Accounting-AA 

.^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): ACG 2071 

-^ This course provides a study of the relationship of cost accounting to the control and decision-making functions of management. 

^ Emphasis is placed on the review of accounting for costs followed by a detailed consideration of product costing for both job order 
and process cost systems. Major areas of instruction include the accumulation of cost data with detailed coverage of materials, labor 

^ and factory overhead, job order and process costing, budgeting and standard costs. 

— ' ACG 2500 - Governmental and Not-Forprofit Accounting-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): ACG 201 1 

__^ This course covers definitions and operations of the various fijnds used in Government and non-profit accounting: 1 ) fund accounting 

^^ principles and concepts; 2) record keeping requirements; 3) various tax reporting requirements and forms. 

•^ ACG 3024 - Accounting for Non-Financial Managers- BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
^ Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete 

the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1 102 English Composition II, and 
three semester hours of college level mathematics; or permission of Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. 

■-^ This course addresses the use of accounting information by non-financial managers. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of 



O 



accounting information and the language of financial accounting to effectively participate in activities such as planning, investment, 
control, and managerial decision making. 

ACG 3074 - Managerial Accounting I 

The following courses were not found in the supplied content, but were listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, 
if possible, with the correct information. 

AMH 2010 - History of the United States to 1865-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of U.S. history from settlement through the Civil War. Emphasis will be on the development of American 
social, political, and economic throughout that time period. 

AMH 2020 - History of the United States 1865 to Present-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis will be on the development of American social, 
political and economic institutions through that time period. 

AMH 2070 - Florida History-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents Florida history from the age of discovery to the present. 

AMH 2091 - African-American History-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the Black American experience from its earliest roots in the high civilizations of Africa through present 
times. Special emphasis is given to the unique nature of that experience, the structural problems and potential of the Black community, 
and the study of the contributions and thought of outstanding African American men and women. (I) 

AMH 2095 - American Indian History 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course studies the North American Indians in the course of the development of the United States. It introduces people, issues, and 
events, and covers the general American history periods from cultural and political aspects. 

AMH 2931 - Women in U.S. History 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course studies the roles of American women in the nation's development. It introduces people, issues, and events, and covers the 
general American history periods from cultural and political aspects. The course focuses on women's participation in national 
development, and the reactions to, and the results of women's participation. 

AML 2010 - Literature of the United States I, to 1860-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of the United States from Native American Oral Traditions to the Civil War. It centers on 
authors, texts, and the historical and cultural contexts of each period. 

AML 2020 - Literature of the United States II, 1860 to Present-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course is a survey of the literature of the United States from the Civil War to the present. It centers on authors, texts, and the 
historical and cultural contexts of each period. 

ANT 1410 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the basic concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Comparisons between tribal and statal cultures are 
emphasized to give a total perspective to the explanation of human behavior. (I) 

ANT 1511 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A comparative approach to human culture, personality and social systems with close attention given to non-Western cultures and 
societies. 

ARH 1000 - Art Appreciation- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

An introductory course about the visual arts. Emphasis on the analysis of medium and technique, discussion of the social context for 
art-making, and the recognition of selected art movements. Includes classes in the Edison State Gallery of Fine Art and includes visits 
to galleries. 

176 



ARH 1050 - History of Art l-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A sur\'cy of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture) from prehistoric times to the European Renaissance. (1) 

ARH 1051 - History of Art II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture) from the European Renaissance to the present. (I) 

ARH 1950 - Introduction to European Art and Architccturc-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Permission oflnstructor; reservation for Edison State Humanities Study Tour. 

A combination of classroom in.struction with a guided tour of European art museums and galleries plus architectural sites. Students are 
accompanied by the instructor on this tour, and seminars are conducted in Europe. While the course is not a detailed survey of 
historical styles, it provides the student with an introductory experience to the richness and diversity of European visual arts. A paper 
is required and a written examination is given at the end of the tour. (I) 

ARH 2010 - Art of the Western World-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines the greatest works of the Western visual tradition, highlighting issues of social context, form and iconography. 

ART 1201C - Basic Design-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course provides a basic foundation in two-dimensional design. Fundamental design problems common to the visual arts will also 
be studied. 

ART 1203C - Three-Dimensional Design (Sculpturc)-AA 
4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course provides an introduction to concepts, tools and materials relative to sculptural form and expression. 

ART 1300C - Drawing I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course is a practical inquiry into the processes and potentialities of drawing through the investigation of elements, media, 
materials and concepts. 

ART 1301C - Drawing H-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ART 1300C or permission of the instructor. 

This course is a continuation of the experiences encountered in Drawing I with more complex problems and options. 

ART 2500C - Painting I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ART 1201C, 1300C or permission of the instructor. 

This course is a studio course in visual problem-solving through experience with materials and concepts common to easel painting. 

ART 2501C - Painting II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ART 2500C or permission oflnstructor. 

This course is a continuation of Painting 1 with emphasis on individual experimentation. 

ART 2750C - Ceramics I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

An introductory course that encompasses the basic ceramics processes, instruction in clay mixing, forming (coil, slab and wheel), 
glazing, kiln construction and firing. 

ART 2751C - Ceramics II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ART 2750C or permission of the instructor. 

A continuing study in designing ceramic objects as well as the making of clay, formulating glazes, and loading and unloading kilns. 

AST 2003 - Astronomy I-AA 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 or higher 

■^ This course is part one of a two-semester sequence designed to provide an orientation to the night sky and hands-on use of the 

astronomer's tools in the study of our solar system. AST 2003 and AST 2004 may be taken in any order. Laboratory is required to 



o 






177 



satisfy the natural sciences graduation requirement. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to 
enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

AST 2003L - Astronomy I Laboratory-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 

This is the first of a two-semester course utilizing astronomy tools, incorporating laboratory which utilizes an observatory, planetarium 
and astrophotography or imaging equipment. This course is to be taken only in conjunction with the accompanying lecUire AST 2003. 
Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

AST 2004 - Astronomy II-AA 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 or higher 

This course is part two of the two-semester astronomy sequence but may be taken without having taken AST 2003. AST 2004 goes 
beyond the solar system to explore the workings of stars and galaxies, as well as the origin and expansion of the universe. AST 2003 
and AST 2004 may be taken in any order. Laboratory is required to satisfy the natural sciences graduation requirement. Note: It is 
recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

AST 2004L - Astronomy II Laboratory-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 

This advanced laboratory makes continued use of observatory-collected data through imaging equipment, as well as Internet- 
accessible data, through use of Hubble telescope images. This course is to be taken only in conjunction with the accompanying lecture 
AST 2004. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

BAN 1004 - Principles of Banking-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the ftmdamentals of banking. 

BAN 1231 - Commercial Lending-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the commercial lending function. It is targeted to management trainees and junior management, 
and is divided into commercial lending overview, the lending process, portfolio management, and regulation and business 
development. Some specific topics include the commercial loan customer, types of commercial loans, the loan decision process 
(information gathering, analysis), cost analysis, control and profitability, and the regulatory and legal environment. 

BAN 2155 - International Banking and Finance-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to international banking with an emphasis on lending concepts, international financial instruments, 
the Eurodollar market and foreign exchange conversion methods. 

BAN 2240 - Consumer Lending-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents techniques of installment lending. Emphasis is placed on establishing credit, obtaining and checking information, 
servicing the loan, and collecting the amounts due. Each phase of a bank's installment credit operation is carefully scrutinized. Other 
topics discussed are inventory financing, special loan programs, business development and advertising, and the public relations aspect 
of installment lending. 

BCN 1230C - Materials and Methods of Construction-AS 

2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to materials and methods used in wood frame, masonry, concrete and steel construction. Laboratory 
work will consist of "hands on" experience and field trips to construction sites. 

BCN 1272 - Blueprint Reading-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the reading and interpretation of architectural working drawings. Topics include history of recorded 
drawings, architectural and structural details, materials, structural, mechanical and electrical systems and related building code 
requirements. Emphasis is on residential plans. 

BCN 2710 - Construction Procedures-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course presents practices and problems related to construction, such as building codes and regulations, construction materials, 
construction methods, elementary structural design, surveys and real estate. 

BCT 1720 - Construction Scheduling-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to smdy the orderly flow of steps from start to finish in a construction project. The basic concepts and 

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techniques of PERT and network planning and scheduling will be covered. This course will develop the skills necessary to 
successfully apply the critical path method to the construction industry and answer the critical path problems found on the state 
certification exam. 

BCT 1760 - Building Codcs-AS 

2 class hours 2 C redits 

An introduction to the building codes and local zoning codes which arc laws governing the constmction of buildings. Other documents 
arc discussed including: National Electric Code, Life Safety Code, state building codes, testing agencies, accessibility and 
governmental agencies which impact on the constnjction industry. 

BCT 1770 - Construction Estimating-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction in computations for labor, materials, equipment, overhead, and profit for residential construction 
projects. "Take offs" will be made from working drawings. 



BCT 2708 - Advanced Construction Project Management- AS 
y 3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students will be expected to have a working knowledge of computers, Internet access and a current e-mail address. This course is an 
in-depth look at the challenges of coordinating and managing large-scale construction projects. Major topics include construction 
participants, contracts, pre-construction planning, bidding, negotiating, inspections, codes, safety, project closeout and conflict 
resolution. Emphasis will be on the use of computer technology as a tool in the management process. 



BCT 2730 - Construction Management-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course will introduce basic legal skills and knowledge needed to run a light construction office. Emphasis is on business 
organization, the Florida Mechanic's Lien Law. Worker's Compensation. Liability Insurance. Florida Construction Licensing Laws 
and State and Federal tax reporting requirements. Direct and indirect costs of a small business are identified and explored. The student 
will also study questions similar to those found on the Florida State Certification Exam. 

BSC 1005 - Introduction to Biological Sciences-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This survey course provides a foundation for BSC 1 010. BSCI093C and MCB 20 IOC. Topics included are chemistry for biological 
sciences, biology of the cell and heredity. This course will include lecture/discussion and group activities. This course is not a pre- 
requisite for BSC 1010 but it is recommended for those who have had no prior experience with biological sciences course work. This 
course fulfills three hours of the General Education science requirement but does not have an associated lab. 

BSC 1010 - Biological Science I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum score of {(SAT-R 440 quantitative and 440 verbal) or (ACT-E 19 math, 18 reading and 17 English) 

or (FCELPT 72 math, 83 reading and 83 sentence skills)} and {BSC 1005 or high school biology} with a "C" or better 

Co-requisite(s): BSCIOIOL 

This introduction to cell biology is designed to meet entrance requirements for upper division majors in biology, psychology or other 

pre-professional programs. The course addresses and integrates concepts associated with the basic physical and chemical properties of 

living matter as they relate to the structure and ftinction of the cell, cell reproduction. Mcndelian and molecular genetics (DNA 

replication and gene expression), energy metabolism, metabolic control systems, and cell to cell communication systems. 

BSC lOlOL - Biological Science I Laboratory-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum score of {(SAT-R 440 quantitative and 440 verbal) or (ACT-E 19 math, 18 reading and 17 English) 

or (FCELPT 72 math, 83 reading and 83 sentence skills)} and {BSC1005 or high school biology} with a grade of "C" or better 

Co-requisite(s): BSC 1010 

Recommended: CHM 2032 or higher 

This laboratory, which accompanies BSC 1010, emphasizes the development of scientific reasoning, formulation of problem 

statements, and development of investigational techniques and data collection skills used to evaluate scientific hypotheses. 

Investigations using computer-based simulations and hands-on exercises, instrumental techniques common to studies of cell biology, 

are employed to study topics introduced in BSC 1010. 

BSC 101 1 - Biological Science II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010 with a grade of "C" or better 

Co-requisite(s): BSC 101 IL 

This course builds on the cell biology presented in BSC 10 10 and examines the mechanisms of genetic change in populations, the 
adaptation of living things to their environment, the concept of niche and the processes leading to biodiversity, population growth and 
^ regulation, energy fiow and biogeochcmical cycling in the biosphere, and interactions of creatures with the living and non-living 

components of their ecosystems. 



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BSC 101 IL - Biological Science II Laboratory- AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010 with a grade of "C" or better 
Co-requisite(s): BSC 1011 

Investigations using computer-based simulations and hands-on exercises employing instrumental and field study techniques common 
to organism level biological studies are introduced to study topics in BSC 1011. Laboratory activities include outdoor activities on and 
off campus. 

BSC 1050C - Environmental Biology: Our Global Environment-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class, designed for non-science majors, approaches topics in environmental science by studying the impact of humans. 
Contemporary ecological issues are explored in relation to problems of local, regional, national and global concerns. The format of the 
class involves combined lecture, lab and field trip activities including discussions and debates of local problems, as well as national 
and global issues. 

BSC 1051C - Environmental Biology: Southwest Florida Ecosystems-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class, designed for non-science majors, studies the natural processes, field study methods and the identification of biotic and 
abiotic components of the major ecosystems of Southwest Florida. The format of the class involves combined lecture, lab and field trip 
activities. 

BSC 1080 - Human Biology: An Overview for Health Science Professionals-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): College level placement test scores or successful completion of all developmental reading and writing courses 
and corresponding state exit exams 

This team-taught course has two broad purposes: first, to provide a firm foundation in cellular biological processes that is essential to 
success in the study of human anatomy and physiology; second, to provide information that will enable the healthsciences student to 
differentiate between the requirements and professional roles unique to each of the degrees in the health professions. 

BSC 1093C - Anatomy and Physiology I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of a "C" in {BSC 1080 or BSC 1010} and successful completion of all developmental reading 
and writing courses and corresponding state exit exams. BSC 1010 is strongly recommended. 

This is an advanced combined lecture/lab course designed for students in the biological, medical, and health-related fields. This course 
expands upon general biological concepts including: inorganic and organic chemistry, biochemistry, cell structure and fijnction, 
metabolism and genetic mechanisms. These concepts are applied to the structure and function of the human body. This course also 
covers: introduction to anatomy, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, special senses, and 
the endocrine system. 

BSC 1094C - Anatomy and Physiology 11- AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of a "C" in BSC 1093C and successful completion of all developmental courses and 

corresponding state exit exams. 

This is a combined lecture/lab course format designed to be the sequel to BSC 1093C. This course examines how the body's organ 
systems work together to maintain homeostasis. The following topics are covered: summary of endocrine system, cardiovascular 
system, lymphatic and immune systems, respiratory system, digestive system, nutrition, urinary system, fluids, electrolytes, and acid- 
base balance, reproduction, growth and development. 

BSC 1097L - Selected Topics in A and P I-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum of a "C" in BSC 1010, or minimum scores of: (SAT-R 540 quantitative and 440 verbal) or (FCELPT 

90 math, 83 reading and 83 sentence skills) or (ACT-E 23 math, 18 reading and 17 English) 

Co-requisite(s): BSC 1093C 

This course will present special topics and selected laboratory activities in anatomy and physiology that will enhance the concepts 
presented in BSC 1093C. 

BSC 1098L - Selected Topics in A and P II-AA 

1 laboratory hour 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): BSC 1093C 
Co-requisite(s): BSC 1094C 

This course presents special topics and selected laboratory activities in anatomy and physiology will enhance the concepts presented in 
BSC 1094C. 

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BUL 2241 - Business Law I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to develop the student's understanding of the law as a social force which directs and guides both business and 
the consumer. Major emphasis will be law as it pertains to torts, governmental regulation, consumer protection, contracts, sales, 
warranties, personal property and bailments. 

BUL 2242 - Business Law II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite{s): BUL 2241 or permission of instructor. 

This course provides an analysis in law as it relates to commercial paper, secured transactions, insurance, bankmptcy, partnerships, 
corporations, real property, wills, tnists and other related subjects. 



CCJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course the student will be introduced to the theory of deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories 
of crime causation; statistical analysis of criminal behavior, past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. 
V Upon completion, students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal responses. 



CCJ 1020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice-AA 

y 3 class hours 3 Credits 

_ In this course the components and processes of the criminal justice system will be presented. Topics include history, structure, 

* functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and its relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students will be 

- able to define and describe the major components of the system, and how they interact and relate to each other. Students will be able to 

* evaluate career opportunities in the field of criminal justice. 

^ CCJ 2500 - Juvenile Deliquency 

-* 3 Credits 

- The following courses were not found in the supplied content but, were listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, 
'* if possible, with the correct information. 

^ CCJ 2930 - Selected Topics in Criminal Justice-AA 

-* 1-3 Credits 

«k This course is intended to explore a wide range of varying topics in criminal justice, and to provide students with an increased 

■*' understanding of the legal and ethical implications of the subject at hand. Topics to be offered will provide a broad range of 

^ specialized subject matter, and will be selected in areas of current interest or in highly focused areas within the field of criminal 

justice. Topics may vary from one semester to another. Topics will be offered as one, two or three credits and can be combined with 

^ other topics for up to three hours of elective credit. 

CDA 2500 - Microsoft Windows Scrver-AS 

* 3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CNT 1000, COP 1000 

^ This course is a continuation of CNT 1000. This course emphasizes design, manageability, security, capacity, installation and 

^ interoperability of networks, and training users of networks. The student will learn analysis and design techniques, as well as hands-on 

- experience in installing and troubleshooting different networks. 

* 

CDA 2524 - Linux Internet Servers-AS 

_ 4 class hours 4 Credits 

«K Prerequisite(s): CNT 1000, COP 1000 

■^ This course examines the Internet services and technologies as implemented on the Network Operating System (NOS) of Linux. 

* Students are guided through the basics of the network operating system, installation of system software and applications software, and 
" tools for network and system administration. Internet technologies including Domain Name Service, CGI bins for WWW servers and 

* virtual web hosting are explored. Students install and configure several Internet services including PPP. DNS. Web Servers, virtual 
^ machines, ftp and email. 

* CDA 2525 - Internetworking with Cisco Routers-AS 
" 3 class hours 3 Credits 

* Prerequisite(s): CNT 1000. COP 1000 

^ This course emphasizes design, installation, and management of WANs and LANs using routers and routed protocols. The students 

- install and configure multi-protocol routers and hosts for IP, Novell and Appletalk. Remote access technologies including ISDN and 
^ V.90 are introduced and communications servers installed and configured. The use and configuration of firewalls and proxy servers is 

explained. 



CGS 1000 - Computer Litcracy-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 



■^ This course is an introduction to basic computer concepts and computer technology for students who are not computer science. 



engineering, or MIS majors. It is an up-to-date survey of information processing technology, computer hardware and software 
systems, and computer applications. This class provides the background for students to make knowledgeable decisions about their 
fliture in the information technology world. 

CGS 1 100 - Microcomputer Skills-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course provides beginning level learning in the use of modem microcomputer applications used in the business world. The course 
is progressive through disk operating systems, word processing applications, electronic spread-sheets, database management system, 
and presentation software. In addition, students receive a basic foundation in business software applications. (This course may be 
taken as separate one credit courses: CGS 1560, CGS 1500, CGS 1510, or CGS 1540 or as a single four credit course.) 

CGS 1500 - Word Processing Applications- AA 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is an introduction to word processing applications with an in-depth look at several of the more popular programs currently 
being utilized on microcomputers. Course content includes how to create, edit, format, merge, move, delete, copy, extract, save, and 
print text files. 

CGS 1510 - Electronic Spreadsheet Applications-AA 
1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is an introduction to electronic spreadsheet applications with an in-depth look at several of the more popular programs 
currently being utilized on microcomputers. Course content includes how to create, edit, format, merge, move, copy, delete, extract, 
save, and print spreadsheet files to include writing formulas for custom applications. 

CGS 1540 - Database Applications-AA 
1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is an introduction to database management applications with an in-depth look at several of the more popular programs 
currently being utilized on microcomputers. The course content includes how to create, format, edit, save, and access different 
database tiles to include an introductory explanation of the fourth generation languages (4GL). 

CGS 1560 - Disk Operating System- AA 

1 class hour I Credits 

This course is an introduction to family microcomputers and how to use the operating system to harness the power of both software 
and hardware in a typical business systems environment. 

CGS 1821 - Web Page Dcsign-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CGS 1100 

This is a hands-on course designed to provide students with skills to build a web site by using industry standard web authoring 
software, and image editing tools. Students are introduced to basic concepts of web site structure and navigational models. Students 
will develop a web site from initial concept to publication. 

CGS 2260 - Computer Hardware and Software Maintenance-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CGS 1100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of computer hardware and software and the interrelationship 
between the two. Students have an opportunity to assemble different hardware components, hard drives, modems, and memory chips; 
install software, including applications software and system software, and troubleshoot hardware and software conflicts. 

CGS 2511 - Advanced Spreadsheet Computing-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CGS 1100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course provides the student with a detailed knowledge in the use of the most popular spreadsheet package for microcomputers. 
Students learn advanced programming techniques using macros, integration of interrelated spreadsheets, and advanced graphics 
techniques. Emphasis is placed on the student's completion of class projects in areas such as accounting and finance utilizing the 
various features of spreadsheet programming. 

CGS 2541 - Advanced Database Computing-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CGS 1100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This course gives the student detailed knowledge in the use of the most popular database package for microcomputers. Students 
acquire skills commensurate with professional database usage in the business community. Subjects covered mclude the database 
environment controls, file expansion and merging, and advanced functions. 

CHD 1120 - Infant/Toddler Development-AA 

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3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students in this course will explore the physical, cognitive, language, motor, and social-emotional development of children from birth 
through age two and the importance of nurturing adult-child relationships. 

CHD 1 134 - Management of Early Childhood Learning-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course focuses on optimal coordination of home and child-rearing practices and expectations at a childcare facility. Carrying out 
supplementary responsibilities related to children's programs is also covered. This course is designed primarily for those seeking a 
Child Development Associate (CDA) credential or other child care training. 



CHD 1 135 - Understanding V oung Chlldren-AA 

■* 3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course focuses on building positive self-concept and individual strengths in young children. Designed primarily for those persons 
* seeking Child Development Associate (CDA) credentialing or other child care training. 



CHD 1220 - Introduction to Child Dcvelopmcnt-AA 

♦ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students in this course will examine theoretical perspectives of human growth and development from prenatal through age eight. 

* Specific attention will be given to the influence of the family and the environment on the developing child. 



CHD 1332 - Creative Experiences for the Young Child-AA 

♦ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students in this course will participate in an in-depth study of the creative activities that support the growth of both typically 
developing and atypically developing young children in language arts, math, science, social studies, art, music and movement. 

CHD 2324 - Early Childhood Language Arts and Reading-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students in this course will study language and literacy development and the connections between listening, speaking, writing and 
reading. The role of the adult in creating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for fostering emergent literacy will 
be explored. 

CHI 1930 - Elementary Chinese I - AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course is designed as an extensive study of basic skills for beginners or those with less than one year in Chinese. This highly 
interactive course focuses on the dynamics of pronunciation, listening, comprehension, speaking and some composition. 

CHM 2025 - Introduction to College Chemistry-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all developmental courses and corresponding state exit exams 

Co-requisite(s): CHM 2025L 

This one semester course is designed to prepare students planning to enter the CHM 2045/2046 sequence. Topics to be covered 
include matter, energy, measurements, problem solving techniques, the atom, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, chemical 
formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, liquids, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics. 

CHM 2025L - Introduction to College Chemistry Laboratory-AA 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all developmental courses and corresponding state exit exams 

Co-requisite(s): CHM 2025 

This laboratory course begins by emphasizing the appropriate use of units and mathematical techniques important to chemistry, 
science and health disciplines in general. An introduction to chemistry laboratory sampling and measurement techniques is included in 
the second half of the course. Stoichiometric calculations supplement work done in CHM 2025. Selected aspects of inorganic 
nomenclature are included. 

CHM 2032 - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences -AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" 
Co-requisite(s): CHM 2032L 

This one semester course is designed for those allied health students needing a chemistry prerequisite. Topics to be covered include 
matter, energy, measurements, the atom, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, fomiuias. reactions, and stoichiometry. Gases, liquids, 
solutions, acids and bases will be covered. Nuclear chemistry including radiation types and effects, basics of organic and biochemistry 
will also be covered. 



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CHM 2032L - General Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab -AA 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" 
Co-requisite(s): CHM 2032 

This laboratory/recitation course for health science and nursing majors develops laboratory skills and problem solving skills for 
chemistry and scientific measurements. The laboratory experiments arc meant to reinforce the topics covered in the lecture (CHM 
2032). 

CHM 2045 - General Chemistry I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): {CHM 2025 and CHM 2025L with a grade of "C" or better in each course} or {CHM 2032 and CHM 2032L 
with a grade of "C" or better in each course} or Chemistry Department Test 
Co-requisite(s): CHM 2045L 

This course is the first half of a two-semester general chemistry sequence. It deals, in depth, with the topics of matter, chemical 
measurement, stoichiometry, atomic theory, bonding, molecular geometry, gases, liquids, solids, and properties of solutions. 

CHM 2045L - General Chemistry I Laboratory-AA 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): {CHM 2025 and CHM 2025L with a grade of "C" or better in each course} or {CHM 2032 and CHM 2032L 

with a grade of "C" or better in each course} or Chemistry Department Test 

Co-requisite(s): CHM 2045 

This general chemistry laboratory emphasizes safety, chemical measurement techniques, stoichiometry, molar mass determination, 
molecular structure, and spectrophotometric measurements. 

CHM 2046 - General Chemistry H-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L with a grade of "C" or better in each course 

Co-requisite(s): CHM 2046L 

This course is the second part of the two semester general chemistry sequence. It covers thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, 
oxidationreduction and electrochemistry. 

CHM 2046L - General Chemistry H Laboratory-AA 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L with a grade of "C" or better in each course 
Co-requisite(s): CHM 2046 

This laboratory course emphasizes thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base reactions, and electrochemistry through 
appropriate laboratorybased investigations. Data collection, analysis, and presentation techniques employing graphing calculators, 
computers, and spectrophotometers are important features of this laboratory. 

CHM 2210 - Organic Chemistry I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2045/2045L and CHM 2046/2046L with a grade of "C" or better in each course 
Co-requisite(s): CHM 2210L 

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry designed for students entering paraprofessional fields and 
also physical science areas. It covers concepts on saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and their derivatives, as well as their 
synthesis, nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry, and uses. 

CHM 2210L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory-AA 

4 laboratory hours every other week 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2b45/2045L and CHM 2046/2046L with a grade of "C" or better in each course 

Co-requisite(s): CHM 2210 

This lab course accompanies CHM 2210 and is the first part of a two-semester lab sequence in organic chemistry. It emphasizes 
microscale and macroscale laboratory techniques associated with synthesis, isolation, purification and identification of organic 
compounds. Specific techniques include thin layer chromatography, spectral analysis, solvent extraction, isolation, identification, 
reflux condensation, recrystallization, filtration, and/or synthesis. 

CHM 221 1 - Organic Chemistry H - AA 

4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2210 

This course is the second part of the two semester organic chemistry sequence. 

CHM 221 IL - Organic Chemistry H Laboratory - AA 

2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CHM 2210 with a grade of "C or better. 

The second organic chemistry laboratory course utilizes microscale techniques in organic chemistry. 

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^ CIS 2321 - Data Systems and Managcmcnt-AA 

■» 3 class hours 3 Credits 

• Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 or previous Visual Basic programming skills. 

This course introduces the analysis, design, implementation and control of data systems for management. Students study the system 

* development life cycle in depth. The course includes topics on methods of information storage and retrieval, forms design and control, 
system testing, and security. Topics on cost/benefit analysis and design, and development and implementation of new or replacement 

^ systems are discussed. 

" CJB 2801 - Instructor Tcchniqucs-AS 

"^ 5 class hours 5 Credits 

^ This course is designed to provide the student with fundamental knowledge of the techniques of instruction and the role of the 

♦ instructor in the specialized field of criminal justice. Subjects covered include the types of liability associated with instaiction. ethics, 
~ and the control and documentation of classroom activities. This includes the design of programs of instruction, written objectives, test 

* questions, and preparation of appropriate lesson plans. Instmctional methods and techniques designed to increase learning in adult 
"" students arc utilized in this course. Appropriate professional attire suited to the classroom is required. 

♦ CJC 1000 - Introduction to Corrections- A A 

— 3 class hours 3 Credits 

"* This course is a comprehensive view of historical and philosophical treatment programs, and developments in the field of juvenile and 

"" adult corrections. Emphasis is placed on understanding the offender in the correctional system, with an examination of the correctional 

client, the non-institutional correctional system, agencies, and recidivism. 

CJD 2320 - Middle Management-AA 
■* 3 class hours 3 Credits 

■^ This course is designed to provide a broad background in the management of public agencies. This course will deliver an academic 

base in theory and practice in the administration of public safety agencies. Concentration will be made in the areas of middle 
^ management positions in police, fire and emergency medical units. This course will include elements of crisis management. 

— , scheduling, identification of equipment needs, communication to subordinates, management, personnel evaluation, discipline of 

•* personnel, budgeting, planning, and community relations. This course meets the criteria of the Criminal Justice Standards and Training 

■*■ Commission approved Advanced Training Program for mid-management. Refer to Florida Administrative Code 1 IB- 1 4 for additional 

"* information on the Salary Incentive Program. 

^ CJE 1300 - Police Organization and Administration-AA 

-* 3 class hours 3 Credits 

■^ This course examines the principles of organization and administration in law enforcement fiinction and activities, including planning 

"* and research, public relations, personnel and training, inspection and control, and policy formation. 

^ CJE 1640 - Introduction to Crime Scene Technology-AA 

■^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This course is a study of the basic scientific techniques used in criminal investigation with special emphasis on the role of the evidence 

"* technician in solving crimes. While the more comprehensive facilities of a criminal laboratory are explored, major attention will be 

focused on the more limited portable devices available to the small enforcement unit. Pertinent criminal law and Supreme Court 
interpretations are covered as background materials for the consideration of types of physical evidence. 

A CJE 2304 - Line Supervision-AA 

^ 5 class hours 5 Credits 

^ This course is designed to provide a sound academic base in theory and practice in the administration of public safety agencies. 

^^ Concentration will be made in the supervision of police, fire, and emergency medical units. This course will include elements of crisis 

— management, scheduling, identification of equipment needs, communication to subordinates and management as well as personnel 
^^ evaluation and discipline. Theories on the management of training for the first line elements of public safety personnel and the 

'^ implementation of tactical theory and community relations will be addressed. This course meets the criteria of the Criminal Justice 

^ Standards and Training Commission approved Advanced Training Program for Line Supervision. Refer to Florida Administrative 
Code 1 IB- 14 for additional information on the Salary Incentive Program. 

A CJE 2600 - Criminal Investigation Techniques-AA 

"" 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This course presents criminal investigation procedures including theory of investigation, case preparation, specific techniques for 

selected offenses, questioning of witnesses and suspects, and problems in criminal investigation. 

-k CJE 2643C - Advanced Crime Scene Technology-AS 

'^ 4 combination class and laboratory hours 4 Credits 

^ Frerequisite(s): CJE 1640, CJE 2640, CJE 2770C, CJE 2671 

This course covers advanced principles and theories in Crime Scene Technology. Specialized collection procedures of weapons, traffic 
^ crash evidence, arson, gunshot residue, blood splatter, and recovery of buried bodies and surface skeletons are studied. Methods used 



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in the identification and documentation of physical evidence, including the process of preservation are also covered. Data analysis, 
reporting, and plan of action development will be emphasized. 

CJE 2649 - Forensic Death Invcstigation-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CJE 1640, CJE 2640 

This course examines the legal medical investigation of death. Topics include pathology of trauma, forensic issues relating to the 
in\estigation of death, and e\ identiary factors distinguishing homicide from accidental, natural, or traumatic death. Class discussion 
will examine the cause, type, and manner of death. 

CJE 2670 - Introduction to Forensic Science-AS 

4 class hours 3 Credits 

This course co\ ers ad\ anced principles and theories in Crime Scene Technolog>'. The course studies methods used in the 
identification, documentation, and preservation of physical evidence; the forensic \alue. handling. preser\ation. data analysis, 
reporting and plan of action development; testing and documentation of biological evidence; and potential health and safety hazards 
encountered at a crime scene. Emergency procedures, as well as state and federal regulations are included. 

CJE 2671 - Latent Fingerprint Development-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CJE 1640 

This course emphasizes the techniques involved in detection, enhancement and recovery of latent fingerprints from physical evidence. 

Chemical and mechanical methods and surfaces are analyzed and evaluated for proper application in both theory and practice. 

CJE 2770C - Crime Scene Photography-AS 
3 combination class and laboratory hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CJE 1640 

This course includes basic crime scene photography skills, including camera operation and exposure control, proficiency in relational 
photos and flash control for crime scene and e\ identiarv' documentation. Study includes special light sources, filters, specialized 
equipment, digital cameras, computer software and hand held camcorders. 

CJJ 2002 - Juvenile Delinquency-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course the student will become acquainted with the histon.-. problems, and issues pertaining to the juvenile offender. Suidents 
will analyze methods of prevention and correctional treatment, the degree of success of diversion programs, the role of police, courts, 
and corrections in handling the offender, and their impact on prevention and rehabilitation. 

CJL 2100 - Criminal Law-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course explores the nauire. sources and types of criminal law. including the classification and analysis of crimes and criminal acts 
in general, as well as examination of selected specific criminal offenses. 

CJL 2130 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the principles, duties, and mechanics of criminal procedure as applied to important areas of arrest, force, and 
search and seizure. Study and e\aluation of evidence and proof kinds, degrees, admissibility, competence, and weight is also 
presented. Rules of evidence and procedure at the operational level in law enforcement are covered. 

CJL 2610 - Courtroom Presentation of Scientific Evidence-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CJE 2600. CJE 2640. CJE 2770C, CJE 2671 

This course covers dress, grooming, speaking, listening and stress control during courtroom proceedings. Visual aid preparation and 

presentations of all evidence (commonly referred to as "scientific evidence") collected at the crime scene are also included. Mock trial 

exercises are used. 

CLP 1001 - Personal and Social Adjustment-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course co\ers practical psychology for coping with everyday life. The course deals with psychological principles of adjustment, 
emotional functioning, effective relationships, and personal happiness. 



186 



CNT 1000 - Networking Esscntials-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): CGS 1 100 or equivalent proficiency. 

This is an introductory course in computer networking concepts. Students gain a basic understanding of local area networks, and 
networking hardware and software. Network planning, security and user training is covered. 

COP 1000 - Introduction to Computer Programming with Visual Basic-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a hands-on course covering computer programming fijndamentals for computer science, engineering and information systems 
students. This course is technical in nature, and examines language elements, control structures, input/output processing, file 
processing and data structures using a modem object-oriented programming language. 

COP 1224 - Programming with C++-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to structured programming techniques using C++ programming language. Students learn object- 
oriented C+ syntax including arrays, variables, functions, expressions, and algorithms. The focus of this class is on object-oriented 
analysis and design. Course content is achieved through a combination of lecture and hands-on computer projects. 

COP 1822 - Internet Programming- HTML- AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 or COP 1224 

This course introduces students to the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and client side scripting. Students create Web pages 
using HTML, Dynamic HTML and JavaScript, 

COP 2172 - Advanced Visual Basic Programming-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 

Students will gain knowledge of various database concepts and how to use them within the framework of Visual Basic. Access and 
SQL will be used to create applications with Visual Basic. Students will also have the opportunity to use additional VB events and 
methods not covered in the introductory class. Theory will be translated into problem solving and building applications. 

COP 2222 - Advanced Programming with C++-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): COP 1224 

This course explores the advanced fiinctions of programming using C++ programming language. Students cover advanced topics 
including trees, linked lists, interrupts, windows and object oriented programming. 

COP 2701 - Database Programming-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 

This class covers the concepts of relational databases and the industry standard SQL language. Students will create and maintain 
database objects and be able to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. Students write SQL scripts that can be shared by multiple forms, 
reports and data management applications. Classroom lecture and hands-on lab assignments reinforce the fundamental concepts. 
Students will use an additional programming language to apply the SQL concepts in a computer application. 

COP 2800 - Java Programming-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): COP 1000, or equivalent proficiency. 

This course introduces students to the Java programming language. Students create Java applications using object-oriented techniques 
as well as Java applets for Internet programming. 

COP 2823 - Internet Programming - Server-Side Scripting-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 and a basic understanding of the Internet and HTML or COP 1224 

This course introduces students to concepts and tools used in server-side scripting for Internet based applications. Students create 
scripts designed to run on a Web server using Active Server Pages (ASP), VBScript, Structured Query Language (SQL) and ActiveX 
Data Objects (ADO). 

COP 2830 - Internet Programming - Scripting II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): COP 1000 or COP 1224 

^ This course provides the students with study of server-side scripting and portal design. Sttidents are introduced to the Perl/CGI 

scripting languages. Active Server Pages, XML and PHP. Portal design, implementation and management, database integration and 
securitv are covered. 



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187 



CRW 2001 - Creative Writing-AA (**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course is designed to develop and enhance a student's ability to use conventional techniques of imaginative writing. Emphasis is 
placed on creation of character, setting, style, and narrative structure. Analysis and evaluation of student writing is offered throughout 
the course. This course is termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instmctor-evaluated writing per 
student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, 
this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. 

CRW 2102 - Creative Writing II-AA (**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CRW 2100, ENC 1101 

This course is for students who have successfully completed CRW 2001 and wish advanced study in the writing of fiction, poetry, or 
drama with intensive critical review on a major project, to experience writing for and leading workshops, performing and critiquing 
readings, as well as comparative smdy of literature. This course is termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 
words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. 

CGS 1100 - Microcomputer Skills 

The following courses were not found in the supplied content but, were listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, 
if possible, with the correct information. 

CTS 1500 - Desktop Publishing-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a "hands-on" course designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the concepts and applications of desktop 
publishing. The student leams how to utilize the main features of most desktop publishing software, including typefaces and type 
styles, graphics, fonts and type size. 

CVT 1200 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology-AS 

4 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RET 1024, RET 1616C, RET 1821L 

This course is designed to provide the cardiovascular technology student with a foundation of the pharmacology needed to fiinction in 
clinical experiences. This includes classifications of medications, modes of action, indications, contraindications, and their effect on 
the cardiovascular system and cardiac patients. The course also prepares the student to recognize basic cardiac arrhythmias, understand 
basic radiographic theory, safety, protection and cardiac catheterization laboratory equipment. 

CVT 2420C - Invasive Cardiology I-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CVT 1200 
Co-requisite(s): CVT 2840L, CVT 2620C 

This course introduces the student to the specific procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory and the use of the 
resulting data for patient diagnosis. Additional topics include; aseptic techniques, sterilization, patient assessment, radiography, 
pharmacology, cardiac wave forms, coronary artery anatomy, equipment and tools utilized in cardiac catheterization, hemodynamic 
data and analysis, right and left heart catheterizations, complications and treatments that may occur during cardiac catheterization 
procedures. Students will practice cardiac catheterization procedures in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab on campus. 

CVT 2421C - Invasive Cardiology II-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CVT 242bc, CVT 2840L, CVT 2620C 
Co-requisite(s): CVT 2841 L 

This course is designed to tie together cardiac disease processes with diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization procedures. 
Students will be presented with classifications and the use of equipment and techniques used in invasive cardiology. An in-depth 
presentation of various cardiac diseases including coronary artery disease, angina, myocardial infarction, heart failure, valve diseases, 
cardio-myopathies, pericardial disorders, arrhythmias, congenital anomalies and repair procedures is also presented. Additionally, 
students learn the various calculations performed in the catheterization lab including cardiac outputs, vascular resistance, valve areas 
and shunts. 

CVT 2620C - Non-Invasive Cardiology Technology I-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): CVT 1200 
Co-requisite(s): CVT 2840L, CVT 2420C 

This course presents an introduction to non-invasive cardiology and those tests performed in this area. In addition, normal and 
abnormal heart rhythms, ECG acquisition and analysis, patient safety, stress testing, Holter monitoring and an introduction in 
echocardiography is presented. 






CVT 2621C - Non-Invasive Cardiology Technology II-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): C\ T 262()C. C\ T 242()C, C\ T 2840L 
Co-requisite(s): CVT 2841L, C\ T 2421C 

This course presents an in-depth view of echocardiography. A didactic foundation for echocardiography is presented with provisions 
available for further study of this complex technique including 2-D. M-Mode. continuous, pulse wave, and color Doppler techniques. 

CVT 2840L - Cardiovascular Practicum II-AS 

18 clinical hours 6 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): C\ T 1200 
Co-requisite(s): C\ T 2420C, CV T 2620C 

Clinical experience in procedures perfomied in the cardiovascular laboratories, including use of equipment, performing tests and 
patient care as it relates to the cardiovascular areas with emphasis on cardiac catheterization, ECG, stress testing, Holter monitoring 
and an introduction to echocardiography. 

CVT 2841L - Cardiovascular Practicum III-AS 

26 clinical hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): C\ T 2840L. C\ T 2420C, CVT 2620C 

Co-requisite(s): C\'T 242 IC 

This course is designed for students to gain more in-depth clinical experience in invasive cardiology including pre and post 
catheterization activities, cardiovascular techniques, hemodynamic monitoring, intra aortic balloon pumping, and cardiac output 
measurements. Clinical practice in the cardiac catheterization lab includes circulating, scrubbing, recording and manipulating the 
imaging equipment during both diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures. 

CVT 2842L - Cardiovascular Practicum IV-AS 

36 clinical hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): C\ T 284 IL, CVT 242 IC, RET 2244 

Co-rcquisite(s): CVT 1920 

This course is designed for students to gain additional clinical experience and polish their skills in the cardiac catheterization 
laboratory performing all duties involved in diagnostic and interventional cases. 

CVT 2920 - Cardiovascular Technologist as a Professional-AS 

4 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): All C\T Courses 
Co-requisite(s): CVT 2842L 

The professional relationship of the cardiovascular technologist to other health professionals is presented, along with a basic format for 
research. Resume preparation and inter\ iew skills are also discussed. Students also present case studies and receive instruction and 
testing in Advanced Cardiac Life Suppon (ACLS). 

DEA 0020 - Dental Assisting I-PSAV 

2 lecture hours 1 Credits 

Co-requisite(s): All current semester Dental Assisting courses. 

This course is designed to provide the student with the ethical and legal aspects of dentistry, principles and procedures of operative 
dentistry, local anesthesia, instrument identification and use, oral evacuation and tissue retraction techniques, charting, and patient 
management. 

DEA 0020L - Dental Assisting I Laboratory-PSAV 

8 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Co-requisite(s): All current semester Dental Assisting courses. 

This course focuses on the laboratory application of theory presented in DEA 0020. Emphasis is placed on developing skill 
competency for these procedures. Students develop skills in anticipating the needs of the dentist and assisting in four-handed dental 
procedures. 

DEA 0029 - Dental Assisting II - Dental-PSAV Specialties 

3 lecture hours 1.5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Sequential courses from the Fall term. 
Co-requisite(s): DEA 0029L 

This course utilizes the basic knowledge and skills required in DEA 0020 to increase skill competency levels in operative dentistry 
with major emphasis given to principles and procedures of the dental specialties, including orthodontics, periodontics, endodontics, 
prostodontics, pedodontics. and oral surgery. Patient care, management and diagnosis and treatment planning for each specialty area 
are presented. 



189 



DEA 0029L - Dental Assisting II Dental Specialties Laboratory-PSAV 

4 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Sequential courses from the Fall term. 

Co-requisite(s): All current semester Dental Assisting courses. 

This course focuses on the laboratory application of theory presented in DEA 0029. Emphasis is placed on developing skill 
competency for these procedures. Students develop skills in anticipating the needs of the dentist and assisting in four-handed dental 
procedures. 

DEA 0850L - Externship I-PSAV 

465 laboratory hours 15.5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): All required dental assisting courses. 

Co-requisite(s): All Spring term courses. 

Experience based course in which students go into local area dental offices and dental specialty offices (periodontist, oral surgery, 
orthodontists, etc.) to practice duties routinely performed by dental assistants under the supervision of the dentist. Students acquire 
basic skills in patient communication, patient management, expanded functions, basic dental assisting tasks, and professional 
development. They will generally gain clinical practice experience. Students routinely meet as a group to discuss progress and 
evaluate their experiences. 

DEH 1002 - Dental Hygiene I-AS 

3 lecture hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 1002L 

Topics covered in this course include extra-oral and intra-oral examinations, instrumentation, fundamentals of scaling and polishing, 
instrument sharpening, pain control and record keeping. 

DEH 1002L - Dental Hygiene Preclinical Lab-AS 

9 clinical hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 1002 

This is a competency-based course designed for the practical application of the theory and techniques studied in DEH 1003. Practice is 
provided in the clinical laboratory on dental mannequins and then on peers. Completion of all course materials to a specified minimum 
standard of competency is a prerequisite to Dental Hygiene II. 

DEH 1130 - Oral Histology and Embryology-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): All required Fall term courses. 

This course is a study of the embryonic development of the face and oral cavity and the process of tooth development. 

DEH 1602 - Periodontics-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): DES 1020C, DEH 1002, DEH 1002L 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 1802, DEH 1802L 

This course provides the scientific background for the interpretation of clinical changes and the complex etiologic factors that play a 
role in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease from a dental hygiene perspective. 

DEH 1802 - Dental Hygiene II-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 1002, DEH 1002L 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 1602, DEH 1802L 

This course is a continuation and building of skills in dental hygiene to include treatment planning, cleaning and care of implants, 
desensitizing procedures, and further study in patient management. 

DEH 1802L - Dental Hygiene II Clinical-AS 

9 clinical hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 1002, DEH 1002L 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 1602, DEH 1802 

Clinical application of dental hygiene skills presented in DEH 1802. 

DEH 2300 - Dental Pharmacology-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

This course provides information needed to understand the clinical usage of therapeutic agents used in the practice of dentistry. The 
indication, dosage, method of administration, contraindications and side effects of these agents is studied to provide a foundation in 
the physical manifestations to be expected in dnig administration. 

DEH 2400 - General and Oral Pathology-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DES 1020C 

190 






Co-requisite(s): DEH 2806 

The principles of general pathology are studied as they relate to diseases of the teeth and structures of the oral cavity. A description of 
disturbances of development and groulh of orofacial stmcturcs will be covered including classification of oral lesions. Secondary oral 
disorders that have oral manifestations are discussed as well as physical, thermal and chemical injuries to the oral cavity. 

DEH 2702 - Community Dental Hcalth-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): None 

The student will be introduced to the basic concepts of community dental health. Students will be prepared to use assessment tools that 
determine community dental needs, to analyze data collected, to plan programs utilizing this data, to implement programs, and to 
evaluate programs. This course will instmct students in simple statistical analysis, research methodology and critical review of 
scientific literature. Dental health education will be extended beyond the individual client to the various and diverse groups in the 
community setting. 

DEH 2702L - Community Dental Health Laboratory-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2702 

Application of principles taught in DEH 2702. 

DEH 2804 - Dental Hygiene Hl-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 1802 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2804L 

This course expands on dental hygiene prophylactic procedures presented in the first two semesters. It emphasizes advanced 
techniques such as root planning, ultrasonic and air abrasive techniques, subgingival irrigation, and antimicrobials. Dental Hygiene 
treatment of advanced periodontal patients will be introduced. Methods for case documentation and nutritional counseling will be 
presented. 

DEH 2804L - Dental Hygiene HI Clinical-AS 

15 clinical hours 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 1802L 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2804 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2804. 

DEH 2806 - Dental Hygiene IV-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 2804 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2806L 

This course includes an in-depth study of applied techniques for patients with special needs and unusual health factors. It is a 
continuation of Dental Hygiene III with emphasis on treatment planning for patients with special needs. 

DEH 2806L - Dental Hygiene IV Clinical-AS 

15 clinical hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): DEH 

Co-requisite(s): DEH 2806 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2806. 

DEH 2808 - Dental Hygiene V-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 2806 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2808L 

Introduction of new technology in dentistry and state-of-the-art dental patient care will be presented in a seminar setting through 
expert guest speakers and student presentations of current research and literature. Emphasis will be placed on ethics, jurisprudence, 
employment skills, and career opportunities in dental hygiene. The student will be provided with information concerning state laws 
that regulate dental and dental auxiliary practice, with special attention given to the Florida statutes. This will be followed by 
preparatory information for the Florida State Board. 

DEH 2808L - Dental Hygiene V Clinical-AS 

15 clinical hours 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DEH 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2808 

Clinical application of theory presented in DEH 2808. 



191 



DEH 2930 - Dental Hygiene Scminar-AS 

1 lecture hour 1 Credits 

Prerequi$ite(s): All previous dental hygiene courses. 
Co-requisite(s): DEH 2808, DES 28300 

This course provides students the opportunity to develop and present table clinics, and document and present case studies. Emphasis 
will be placed on topics beyond the traditional scope of clinical dental hygiene. 

DEP 2004 - Human Growth and Development-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course includes life span coverage of theories and findings in human development, emphasizing the physical and psychosocial 
growth of the individual from conception to death. Emphasis is placed on the special problems and challenges the individual faces at 
each stage of the life cycle: prenatal development, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. 

DEP 2102 - Child Psychology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PSY 2012 

This course presents an investigation of the forces which shape and influence the growth and development of children. The course is 
designed to be of value to those who are or expect to be parents, teachers, or who plan to work with children in any capacity. 

DEP 2302 - Adolescent Psychology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PSY 2012 

This course is an investigation of the transitional years between childhood and adulthood. Emphasis is placed on the changing self- 
concept of the young person and the special problems unique to this stage of life. 

DES 0021C - Dental Anatomy and Physiology-PSAV 

4 Lecture Hours, 2 Lab Hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): None 
Co-requisite(s): DEA 0020, DEA 0020L 

This course is a basic dental anatomy and physiology course designed to introduce dental assisting students to the study of the 
interrelationship of the primary and permanent dentition, tooth morphology and supporting structures. Other areas of study include 
dental terminology, occlusal relationships, tooth anatomy and identification, oral histology and embryology and the basic concepts of 
human anatomy and physiology. 

DES 0103C - Dental Materials for Dental Assistants-PSAV 

2 Lecture Hours, 4 Lab Hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Dental Assisting Program 
Co-requisite(s): DES 0021 C 

This course is designed to introduce dental assisting students to the basic principles of dental restorative materials. The student will 
become proficient in the recognition, manipulation, and management of dental materials utilized in all aspects of the practice of 
dentistry and become familiarized with the necessary safety precautions that must be taken to protect the patient, doctor, and assistant 
when using these materials. 

DES 0200 - Dental Assisting Radiology-PSAV 

2 Lecture Hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DES 0021C 

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of radiation physics, theory and techniques, operation of the x-ray equipment and 
concepts of radiation safety in the dental office. 

DES 0200L - Dental Assisting Radiology Lab-PSAV 

4 Laboratory Hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DES 0021C 
Co-requisite(s): DES 0200 

Clinical application of the theory presented in DES 0210. 

DES 0502 - Dental Office Management-PSAV 

4 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): All required dental assisting courses. 

Co-requisite(s): All Spring Semester courses. 

This course provides the student with basic knowledge to perform dental business office procedures. These procedures are practiced in 
rotation through general and specialty offices during the same semester. These include all administrative, computer training, insurance, 
billing, collections, inventory, recall, and OSHA. 



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DES 1020C - Dental Anatomy-AS 

1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours 2 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): DH DEH 1002, DEH 1002L 

This course presents a study of gross anatomy of the hard and soft structures of the oral cavity, and the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, 
nervous lymphatic and glandular systems of the head and neck. Tooth morphology is studied in depth. 

DES llOOC - Dental Matchals-AS 

1 lecture hours, 3 lab hours 2 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): DES 1020C 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with various materials used in the dental profession, including rationale for use. 
contraindications, chemistr) and bio-compatability. The laboratory time allows the student to manipulate the various dental materials. 

DES 1200C - Dental Radiology-AS 

2 lecture hours, 3 lab hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisitc(s): DES 1020C 

.An in-depth study of the physics and production of x-rays, the instruments used for taking radiographs, the techniques for exposing 
radiographs, manual and automatic processing, mountmg and interpretation of x-rays. Dental radiographic health for the patient and 
operator is stressed with sterilization and disinfection. Students practice on mannequins before working with patients. 

DES 1840 - Preventive Dentistry-AS 

2 lecture hours 2 Credits 

Co-requisite(s): DA DEA 0020, DEA 0020L 

This course is an introduction to the primary methods of prevention of dental disease: plaque control, fluorides and sealants. Emphasis 
is placed on student development of personal oral hygiene skills and on patient education techniques. 

DES 2830C - Expanded Functions Laboratory-AS 

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): DES llOOC or DES 0103C 

This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge and clinical practice necessary for the dental auxiliary student to perform 
expanded fimctions permitted by the rules and regulations of the Florida State Board of Dentistry. 

EAP 0200 - English for Academic Purposes, Speech/Listening (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing or permission from the Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This course is aimed at non-native students of English who wish to acquire pronunciation, listening and speaking abilities in American 
English. Level: High Beginning. Successfiil completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0220 - English for Academic Purposes, Reading (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing or permission from the Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This course is designed for non-native students of English who wish to acquire basic reading strategies. Level: High Beginning. 
Successfial completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0240 - English for Academic Purposes, Writing (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisiteis): Testing or permission from the Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This course is intended for non-native students of English who wish to acquire writing abilities in American English at the high 
beginning level. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0260 - English for Academic Purposes, Grammar (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prcrequisite(s): Testing or permission from the Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

The aim of this course is to help non-native students of English reinforce and develop their grammatical competence at the high 
beginning level. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0300 - English for Academic Purposes, Speech/Listening (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0200 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course will help non-native students of English to develop listening and speaking abilities for academic purposes. Level: Low 
Intermediate. Successfiil completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 



193 



EAP 0320 - English for Academic Purposes, Reading (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0220 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is designed for non-native students of English who wish to develop reading strategies for academic purposes. Level; Low 
Intermediate. Successfiii completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0340 - English for Academic Purposes, Writing (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0240 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is intended for non-native students of English who wish to develop their writing ability in Standard American English for 
academic purposes. Level: Low Intermediate. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0360 - English for Academic Purposes, Grammar (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0260 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

The aim of this course is to provide non-native students of American English with the elements necessary to master grammatical 
competence at the low intermediate level. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0400 - English for Academic Purposes, Speech/Listening (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0300 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is designed for non-native students of English to develop listening and speaking abilities for academic purposes. Level: 
High Intermediate. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0420 - English for Academic Purposes, Reading (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0320 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

The aim of this course is to help non-native students of English to develop reading strategies for academic purposes. Level: High 
Intermediate. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 0440 - English for Academic Purposes, Writing (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0340 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is intended for non-native students of English who wish to refine their writing ability in Standard American English. The 
focus is paragraph writing for academic purposes. Level: Intermediate. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or 
better. 

EAP 0460 - English for Academic Purposes, Grammar (*) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0360 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

The aim of this course is to help non-native students of American English to reinforce and develop their grammatical competence at 
the intermediate level. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1500 - English for Academic Purposes, Speech/Listening 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0400 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is for students whose primary language is not American English and whose placement test scores show the need for 
instruction in "High Intermediate" vocabulary, listening comprehension and speaking skills. The emphasis in the course will be on 
vocabulary development, and developing academic lecture/discourse comprehension, note-taking and public speaking. SuccessfijI 
completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1520 - English for Academic Purposes, Reading 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0420 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is for students whose primary language is not American English and whose placement test scores show a need for 

194 



instruction in "High Intermediate" vocabulary and reading comprehension stcilis. The emphasis in the course will be on vocabulary 
development, and developing literacy using authentic sources and preparing students for college. Successful completion of this course 
requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1540 - English for Academic Purposes, Writing 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0440 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This is an introductory course to essay writing. It is intended for non- native students of English who wish to develop their writing 
ability for business or academic purposes. Level: High Intermediate. Successfiil completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or 
better. 

EAP 1560 - English for Academic Purposes, Grammar 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 0460 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

The aim of this course is to provide non-native students of American English with the linguistic elements necessary to develop 
grammatical competence at the high intermediate level. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1600 - English for Academic Purposes, Speech/Listening 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 1500 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is for students whose primary language is not American English and whose placement test scores show the need for 
instruction in "Advanced" vocabulary, listening comprehension and speaking skills. The emphasis in the course will be on vocabulary 
dexeiopment, and developing academic lecture/discourse comprehension, note-taking and public speaking. Successfijl completion of 
this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1620 - English for Academic Purposes, Reading 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 1520 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic Success 

Programs. 

This course is for students whose primary language is not American English and whose placement test scores show a need for 
instruction in "Advanced" vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. The emphasis in the course will be on vocabulary 
development, and developing academic literacy using authentic sources and preparing students for college. Successfijl completion of 
this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

EAP 1640 - English for Academic Purposes, Writing 

6 class hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or completion of EAP 1540 and 1560 with a "C" or better, or permission from the Dean of Academic 

Success Programs. 

This course is intended for non-native students of American English who wish to fijrther develop their essay writing ability at the 
advanced level. The focus will be on the grammar, punctuation, and usage skills necessary to master this level of academic writing. 
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

ECO 2013 - Economics I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to economic theory, accounting, analytical and policy aspects of the national income with 
emphasis on the theory of income determination; analysis of the money and banking system; survey of growth theory and policies. 
Emphasis is placed on macroeconomics. 

ECO 2023 - Economics Il-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course acquaints the student with the structure and operation of the market system. Emphasis is placed on microeconomics, which 
is presented not only as a formalized logical way of thinking but also as a model with which to understand and analyze human 
behavior. Students learn to apply an analytical approach to the study of how individuals, businesses and societies deal with the 
fundamental problem of scarce resources. 

EDE 4222 - Music, Art and Movement -BS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs. 

This course will prepare teacher candidates the skills to integrate art, music and physical education in developing curriculum content 
for grades 1-6. Opportunities to apply these skills will be scheduled through field placements. 

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EDE 4226C - Integrated Language Arts, Social Science and Literature Practicum -BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs. 

This course is designed to help the teacher candidate gain icnowledge and competencies to become an effective teacher and leader in 
areas of elementary school language arts, children's literature and social sciences learning and teaching; illustrate and apply models for 
integrating the teaching of these areas; provide practical experience in curriculum instmction and assessment. 

EDE 4304C - Integrated Math and Science with Practicum - BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs. 

Through this course, the teacher candidate will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching mathematics and science to 
the elementary student. Teacher candidates will become familiar with the national curriculum standards and the Florida Sunshine 
Standards for K-6 Mathematics and Science instruction. Teacher candidates will develop an understanding of instructional strategies, 
activities and materials that will enhance student learning in Math and Science. A practicum of 30 hours is required with this course. 

EDE 4930 - Special Topics in Education I-BS 

1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 
of Baccalaureate programs. 

This course is designed for students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Education programs. This course provides an orientation to 
the teaching profession, disposition requirements, state standards and the teacher candidate portfolio. Teacher candidates will 
demonstrate writing skills and complete the initial assessment of student disposition records to be kept throughout the remainder of 
their course work. This course also presents teacher candidates with qualitative and quantitative research skills as well as current 
library and technology resources available. 

EDE 4940 - Internship in Elementary Education -BS 

12 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all other coursework in the B.S. in Elementary Education program of studies. 

This course requires teacher candidates to lead instruction in an area K-6 classroom under the supervision of a trained clinical 
educator. Guided by the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices, ESOL Performance Standards, ESOL K- 2Competencies and Skill, 
and Reading Endorsement Competencies, teacher candidates will write lesson place, choose materials, conduct lessons, and manage 
student behavior during one semester of full day internship. Over the course of the internship, teacher candidates will conduct 
systematic inquiry about their work with children in K-6 school settings and continually revise their classroom instruction and 
management through a cycle of reflective practice. The teacher candidates will also participate in a series of requires mandatory 
seminars at Edison State College. 

EDF 2005 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Required field experience: 15 hours. 

This is the first in a series of required courses for the education student. It explores the American school system, its historical and 
traditional influences; significance of education; educational opportunities; educational requirements and standards. 

EDF 2085 - Introduction to Diversity for Educators 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Required field experience: 15 hours. 

This course is an introduction to the value of diversity in American society and its role in the educational system. It focuses on 
providing prospective teachers with knowledge about students in our schools who are from different ethnic, racial, cultural, and/or 
linguistic backgrounds or who represent other categories of diversity. 

EDF 3214 - Human Development and Learning-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): PSY 2012 General Psychology or DEP 2004 Human Growth and Development 

This course is designed to cover principles of learning and teacher candidate development and the applications to learning/teaching 
situations. Selfconcept, motivation, view of intelligence and assessment are examined with opportunities to analyze teaching/learning 
episodes and to develop a repertoire of teaching approaches. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between the role of the teacher and 
the needs and learning styles of students at various developmental ages and stages. 

EDF 4790 - Ethics and Law 

2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education program or special permission from the Associate Dean 
of Baccalaureate Programs 
Contact hours: 2 

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This course examines public and private school law and ethical issues as they affect teachers' rights and legal responsibilities to 
students, including an examination of students' legal rights and the ethical parameters of education. State, federal, and case law and 
policy affecting school district management, educators, parents and students are reviewed. 

EDG 3410 - Classroom Managcmcnt-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs. 

This course covers the principles, strategies and methods for creating an effective learning environment that encourages positive social 
interaction and communication among members of the learning community. The course emphasizes attitudes, language patterns, 
values and behaviors for eliciting and maintaining student learning as well as on-task behaviors. The course also includes methods and 
strategics for consulting with other school professionals and parents. 

EDG 3620 - Classroom Managcmcnt-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education Program OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs. 

This course is an introduction to the field of curriculum and instruction. Teacher candidates will examine the curriculum and the role 
and responsibilities of teaching including the role of special teachers, problems of individual learners and materials and strategies 
appropriate for the selected area of concentration. Course content includes curriculum and instructional strategies in elementary (K-6) 
reading language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Teacher candidates will connect theory to practice through the creation, 
implementation and evaluation of meaningful and authentic lessons and experiences. 



* EDP 2002 - Introduction to Education Psychology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PSV 2012 

This course surveys the major theories that influence the instructional practices in the modem classroom. This course will emphasize 
the role of the Educational Assisting employee working with or in place of the regular classroom teacher. 



EEC 1000 - Foundations in Early Childhood Education- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course focuses on setting up and maintaining a safe and healthy learning environment to advance physical and intellectual 
competence in young children. It is designed primarily for those seeking a Child Development Associate (CDA) credential or other 
V child care training. 



2 EEC 1003 - Introduction to School Age Child Carc-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

_ Students in this course will be provided with an orientation to school age child care, including the philosophy, purpose and 

j^ social/cultural context of after-school and other programs for school age youth. Students will examine staff roles, program planning 

— and assessment, and interaction with children, families and community in a variety of program models. 

"^ EEC 1202 - Principles of Early Childhood Curriculum-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Students in this course will be provided with an overview of several early childhood curricula, examine the relationship of curricula 

Mk with theories of child development, and develop a plan to implement a developmentally appropriate curriculum in an early childhood 

^ setting. 

_^ EEC 1603 - Positive Guidance and Behavior Management-AA 

w 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^k Students in this course will explore positive guidance techniques and behavior management strategics in early childhood education. 

-^ Child-centered approaches, self-management techniques and conflict resolution strategies designed to establish an environment of 

*• respect, cooperation and social competence in the early childhood environment will be presented. 

1 EEC 1946 - Early Childhood Practicum I-AA 

^k 3 class hours 3 Credits 

--^ Students in this course will have an opportunity to integrate classroom and field experiences in an early childhood setting. Students 

^ will be responsible for planning and carrying out specific activities with young children individually and in groups under the 
supervision of qualified personnel and the course instructor. 

-> EEC 1947 - Early Childhood Practicum Il-AA 

"^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): EEC 1946 

Students will be responsible for planning a daily schedule and carrying out specific activities with young children individually and in 

\J groups while in a supervised early childhood setting. 



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EEC 2521 - Administration of A Child Care Centcr-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a foundation for budgetary, financial and personnel management of the child care center. Topics include 
leadership, organization skills, budgeting, financial management, marketing, hiring, supervision and professional development of a 
child care center. Regulations and resource of national, state and local organizations will be addressed. 

EEX 1013 - Special Needs In Early Childhood Education-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Students in this course will explore the variety of conditions found in young children with special needs, methods of adapting an early 
childhood environment to include all children, the importance of working with families to help children succeed, and ways to identify 
and access appropriate community resources. 

EEX 3012 - Educational Needs of Students with Exceptionalitics-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science Program in Education OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs 

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of exceptional student education. It is a course that is suitable for teacher 
candidates who are entering a program to prepare them for careers in working with exceptional children or adults. It is also appropriate 
for those who may be majoring in other fields but who are interested in becoming familiar with terminology, concepts and issues that 
are important for an understanding of the needs of people with disabilities and the types of services that are available to them. 

EGS 1001 - Introduction to Engineering-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an overview of engineering ethics, certification/registration and opportunities in the various fields of engineering. 
Students arc required to solve problems m selected fields of engineering. The job market, developing a resume and portfolio is studied. 

EME 2040 - Introduction to Technology for Educators 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides applied instruction in the use of technology in an educational setting. Media includes computers, information 
technology, presentation technology, and educational software. Ethical, legal, and social issues regarding educational technology are 
examined. 

EMS 1810 - EMS Equivalency Assessment-AS 

1 Credits 

This course is designed to assist Florida certified EMT-Basic and/or Paramedics who desire to earn an AS in Emergency Medical 
Services Technology. Enrollment for this course is restricted to students who have taken a minimum of 15 credit hours at Edison State 
College, EMT-Basic or Paramedic programs at agencies other than a community college or university, and are currently Florida 
certified as an EMT-B or Paramedic. 

EMS 2119 - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Care-AS 

96 lecture hours 6 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the EMT-Basic Certificate Program 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 21 19L, EMS 2421, EMS 241 1 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services including medical-legal-ethical aspects; techniques of CPR, extrication, 
management of trauma and administration of appropriate emergency medical care. Upon successfijl completion of the EMT-Basic 
Certificate Program, students receive a certificate of course completion and are eligible to take the Florida State EMT-Basic 
certification examination. 

EMS 21 19L - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Care Lab-AS 

64 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2119, EMS 241 1, EMS 2421 

This course presents practical applications of the didactic instruction received in EMS 21 19 to include medical, legal and ethical 
aspects; techniques of CPR, semi-automatic external defibrillation, extrication, management of trauma and medical emergencies, and 
administration of appropriate emergency medical care. Discussion and application of basic computer skills in the health care setting is 
also covered. 

EMS 2411 - EMS Field Clinical -AS 
class hours (24 contact hours) 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): EMS 2119, EMS 2119L, EMS 2421. 

Must be EMT-B Certificate seeking student to enroll In this course paramedic students rotate through various emergency room 
departments at local hospitals observing and performing basic life support skills under the direct supervision of an assigned preceptor. 



198 



EMS 2421 - EMS Field Intcrnship-AS 
class hours (72 contact hours) 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): EMS 2119, EMS 2119L, EMS 241 1. 

Must be EMT-B Certificate seeking student to enroll This course is designed to provide the EMT-Basic student with exposure to pre- 
hospital emergency medicine, it provides seventy-two hours of basic life support training with an Advanced Life Support agency and 
4 hours of obser\ation in a 91 1 Dispatch Communication center. 

EMS 2647 - Advanced Ainvay Management-AS 

40 contact hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2671, EMS 2671L with a grade of "C" or better. 

Co-requisite(s): Concurrent Enrollment in the Paramedic Certificate Program. 

In this course paramedic students rotate through the operating room in a local hospital. The student is supervised by an 
anesthesiologist and/or CRNA while observing performing intubations. A minimum of 30 successful intubations and/or 
demonstration of skill mastery are required. 

EMS 2649 - Paramedic Hospital Clinicals-AS 

96 contact hours and hospital orientations 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2672, EMS 2672L. EMS 2654 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2673, EMS 2674, EMS 2655 

In this course paramedic students rotate through various departments of the local hospitals, performing paramedic skills under the 

direct supervision of the clinical instructor and/or assigned preceptor. The EMS Clinical Coordinator or designee provides clinical 

schedules. Students are responsible for transportation to and from clinical sites. 

EMS 2654 - Paramedic Field Internship I-AS 

class hours (72 contact hours) 2 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): EMS 2671, EMS 2671 L, 

This course involves ride experiences with an Advanced Life Support Provider. It provides the beginning paramedic student an 
opportunity to master basic life support skills and therapeutic communications. Seventy-two hours of learning experience in a work 
environment are required. Enrollment is restricted to those students with concurrent enrollment in the paramedic program. 



EMS 2655 - Paramedic Field Internship II-AS 

« class hours (144 contact hours) 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2654 
" Co-requisite(s): EMS 2673, EMS 2674, EMS 2649 

— This course involves ride experiences with an Advanced Life Support Provider. It provides the intermediate paramedic student an 

opportunity to perform advanced patient assessments, venous access and medication administration. Seventy-two hours of learning 
^ experience in a work en\ ironment are required. Enrollment is restricted to those students with concurrent enrollment in the paramedic 

_^ program. 

EMS 2656 - Paramedic Field internship III-AS 

class hours and 300 contact hours 4 Credits 
2 Prerequisite(s): EMS 2655 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2675, EMS 2675L, EMS 2647, 

-» This course involves ride experiences w ith an Advanced Life Support Provider. It provides basic and advanced life support training 

m. With an ALS agency. Four hundred hours of learning experience in a work environment are required. Enrollment is restricted to those 

" students with concurrent enrollment in the paramedic program. 

^ EMS 2671 - Paramedic I-AS 

^ 48 lecture hours 3 Credits 

», Prerequisite(s): EMT Certification OR EMS 21 19, 

^ This course introduces the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic. Medical, legal and ethical issues are explored. General 

* principles of pathophysiology, pharmacology and venous access are included. 

EMS 2671L - Paramedic I Lab-AS 

40 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMT Certification OR EMS 2119, 

This course presents practical applications of the didactic instruction received in EMS 2671 to include role of the paramedic in the 
health care delivery system, duties and responsibilities. Shock assessment and management, medication administration, and IV therapy 
^ are also covered. 

EMS 2672 - Paramedic II-AS 

"^ 48 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2671, EMS 2671L with a grade of "C" or better. 
J Co-requisite(s): EMS 2672L, EMS 2654 



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This course presents an introduction to advanced patient assessment, clinical decisions, communications and documentation. 
Discussion of the respiratory system and assessment/treatment of respiratory distress is also covered. 

EMS 2672L - Paramedic II Lab-AS 

40 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2671, EMS 2671L with a grade of "C" or better. 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2672, EMS 2654 

This course presents practical applications of the didactic instmction received in EMS 2672 to include advanced patient assessment, 

clinical decisions, communications and documentation. Assessment and treatment of the respiratory distress patient is also addressed. 

EMS 2673 - Paramedic III-AS 

64 lecture hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2672, EMS 2672L with a grade of "C" or better. 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2655, EMS 2649 

This course will discuss the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system; identification of dysrhythmia 
and 12 Lead EKG interpretation. Assessment and management of the patient with suspected cardiovascular emergencies. 

EMS 2673L - Paramedic III Lab 

The following courses were not found in the supplied content but, were listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, 
if possible, with the correct information. 

EMS 2674 - Paramedic IV-AS 

64 lecture hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2673 with a grade of "C or better. 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2649, EMS 2655 

This course presents a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, integumentary and musculo-skeletal systems. 
Pathophysiology and management of patients presenting with diseases and trauma to these systems, as well as identification and 
management of trauma and medical emergencies are also covered. 

EMS 2675 - Paramedic V-AS 

48 lecture hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2674, EMS 2649, EMS 2655 with a grade of "C" or better. 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2675L, EMS 2656 

This course presents information on the reproductive system, patient assessment and management of obstetrical and gynecological 
emergencies. Handling of patients with special challenges, acute interventions for chronic care patients and management of abuse and 
assault is also covered. Upon successful completion, students receive a certificate of program completion. In addition to be eligible to 
sit for the Florida state paramedic certification examination, students are required to pass a cumulative test with a score of 70% or 
higher. 

EMS 2675L - Paramedic V Lab-AS 

12 laboratory hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): EMS 2674, EMS 2649, EMS 2655 with a grade of "C" or better. 

Co-requisite(s): EMS 2675, EMS 2656, EMS 2647, EMS 2990C 

This course is a practical application of the didactic instruction received in EMS 2675 to include patient assessment and management 
of obstetrical and gynecological emergencies. Assessment based management for the medical and trauma patient of all age groups. 
Medical Incident Command, rescue operations, hazardous material awareness, and crime scene management are also covered. 

EMS 2990C - Paramedic Cardiac Emergencies-AS 

64 class hours (or equivalent) 5 Credits 

This course is a combined lecture/clinical course format designed to be the sequel to Paramedic IV and will be taken with Paramedic 
V. This course will examine how the body's systems work together to maintain homeostasis focusing most on emergency situations. 
Students will obtain certifications in Basic Trauma Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advanced 
Life Support (PALS). Students will also receive instruction in 12 lead EKG interpetation, as well as hospital clinical rotation in the 
cardiac catherterization laboratory. 

ENC 1101 - Composition I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing into ENC 1 101 or ENC 9020 with a "C" or better; and/or ENC 9021 with a "C" or better; and/or REA 

9003 with a "C" or better; and/or EAP 1620 and EAP 1640 with a 'C or better 

A course in essay writing designed to develop skill in paragraph construction and methods of presentation. The course includes 
practice in critical reading and analysis of texts as well as an introduction to researching and properly documenting sources using 
MLA format, composing and editing an essay using a word- processing program, accessing information from the World Wide Web, 
and understanding the differences between electronic databases and the Web. This course is termed a writing intensive course and 
requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over 

200 



the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive 
^ course requirements. 

ENC 1 102 - Composition II-AA 

"* 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 (minimum }»rade of "C") or equivalent. 

^ Advanced instruction in expository and other modes of prose writing, including the preparation and writing of a full-length research 

^ paper. Concentration accordmg to section on rhetoric and the essay, writing about literature, technical writing, or creative writing; 

"* students may choose special interest. This course is termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of 

■^ instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If 

completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. 

-. ENC 9010 - Developing the Paragraph (*) 

^ 4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

""^ Prerequisite(s): Placement Testing or Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This is a lecture laboratory course w ith emphasis on grammar usage, capitalization, sentence structure, and paragraph development. 
^ This course is required for students entering the College Preparatory Program who have a basic background of the language but need 

_ to practice usage, mechanics, and organizational skills. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

- ENC 9020 - College W riting Skills (*) 

_^ 4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): Placement Testing or Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

^m. This is a lecture laboratory course with emphasis on grammatical concepts and usage, punctuation, word choice, and paragraph and 

•* essay development. This course is required of all students who need to develop basic writing and thinking skills before entering ENC 

"" 1101. Successful completion of this course requires a urade of "C" or better. A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

X ENC 9021 - Introduction to Composition (*) 

— K 4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

'^ Prerequisite(s): Placement Testing, Grade Lower Than "C" in ENC 9020, Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

■^ This course is designed to help students practice and improve their writing skills, with special emphasis on planning, writing and 

^ editing in-class, time-limited paragraphs and essays in preparation for success in college level courses. Successful completion of this 

^ course requires a grade of "C" or better. A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

■^ 

^ ENG 2100 - American Cinema-AA 

" 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This tele-course explores how Hollywood films work technically, artistically, and culturally to reinforce and challenge America's 

national self-image. An art form, an industry, and a system of representation and communication, American film is a complicated and 
^ profoundly influential element of American culture. 

-A 

-^ ENL 2012 - British Literature and Culture I to 1780-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

^_^ This course is a survey of the literature of Great Britain and its influence on culture from medieval times through the late eighteenth 

-A century. Readings include selections from Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and others. (I) 

^ ENL 2022 - British Literature and Culture II, 1780 to Present-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
^ Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

A This course is a survey of the literaairc of Great Britain as it influenced culture from the early romantic period to the present day. 

■^ Readings include selections from Wordsworth, Dickens, T.S. Eliot, and others. (I) 

^ ESE 4323 - Educational Assessment-BS 

— . 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^K Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science Program in Education OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate Programs 

^ This course is designed for all teacher candidates in teacher education and focuses on assessment concepts that are critical for good 
teaching. The course examines current issues in measurement and analyzes a variety of assessment instruments, and helps learners 
, interpret standardized assessments commonly used in public schools. 

-^ ETD 1100 - Engineering Graphics I (Manual)-AA 

^ 3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

This course emphasizes instrument use plus freehand lettering and sketching. Geometric construction application, orthographic 
ZJ projection, sectional views, fits and tolerances, symbols and conventions for working drawings, and standard representation for threads 

-«». and fasteners are covered. 



201 



ETD 1103C - Engineering Graphics I (Autocad Track)- AA 
4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ETD 1320 

This course covers the fiindamentals of Engineering Graphics I. AutoCAD is used in the solution to the various graphical problems 
instead of traditional drafting tools. Spatial perception, text, orthographic projections, dimensioning, geometric construction, auxiliary 
and sectional views and assembly drawing are topics that are covered. 

ETD 1320 - Computer Aided Drafting-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to the use of computer-aided drafting. Included is a review of computer hardware and software used in 
an automated drafting environment; concepts of how a drawing is stored and manipulated by the computer; commands necessary to do 
a simple drawing; and the actual drawing of a part. This course provides for the development of beginning skills in the use of a micro- 
omputer, operating peripheral devices for CAD, using CAD software. 

ETD 1530 - Drafting and Design (IVIanual)-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course covers specialization in architectural drafting. Expanded coverage in residential design with emphasis on functional floor 
plan layout, architectural standards and construction methods as it relates to drafting is also included. 

ETD 1538 - Autocad for Residential Architecture-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ETD 1320 

This course is designed to guide the student through the methodology of constructing residential architectural drawings with 
AutoCAD. Through the use of tutorials, the student plans and constructs a set of residential architectural plans. 

ETD 2350 - Advanced Computer Aided Drafting-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ETD 1320 

This course is an introduction of hardware/software configurations required for the automated drafting environment. The operating 
system hierarchy and how drawings are stored, edited, copied, deleted and renamed; file specifications and protection; how to log in 
and log out from the CAD work station (to include remote operations); and the commands necessary for basic drawing utilities are 
covered. Different methods of generating commands are also covered. AutoCAD software is used. 

EUH 1000 - The Western Tradition I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a survey course which covers the history of the Western World from the earliest civilizations of the Middle East through the 
Age of Exploration and the Renaissance. It emphasizes political, social, economic, religious and cultural aspects. This course is termed 
a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4.000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of 
three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete 
part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 

EUH 1001 - The Western Tradition II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This survey course covers the history of the Western World from the Protestant Reformation to the present. It emphasizes political, 
social, economic, religious and cultural aspects. This course is termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 
words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 

EVS 2891C - Hydrogeologic Sampling-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course addresses the theory and practice of collecting and analyzing hydrogeologic data in groundwater, storm-water and surface 
water. The course includes an overview of regulatory agency permitting and hands-on experience in sample collection, data recording, 
data storage and analysis. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY 
Science Course. 

EVS 2893C - Ecologic SampIing-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course addresses the theory and practice of collecting and analyzing ecological data in terrestrial, wetland, freshwater and 
saltwater ecosystems. The course includes an overview of regulatory agency permitting and hands-on experience in sample collection, 
data recording, data storage and analysis. This is a "capstone" course that provides sUidents an opportunity to apply skills developed in 
previous courses to ecological sampling, data analysis and report preparation; the course is recommended for the sophomore year. 
Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 



202 



FFP OOIOC - Firefighter I Minimum Standards -PSAV 

7 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Firefighter Minimum Standards Certificate Program 
Co-requisite(s): FFP 0141C, FFP 0020C This program is held at the North Naples Fire Training Center. 

This course is the second of a three part program designed to prepare students to be eligible to sit for the State of Florida Firefighter II 
Certification exam. This minimum standards certification course for firefighters is a mentally, physically and emotionally challenging 
program that includes both classroom and practical application elements. The 225 hour course runs for 12 weeks; meetings scheduled 
week nights and weekends. Upon successful completion the student will be eligible to continue on to the third part of the program. 

FFP 0020C - Firefighter II Minimum Standards-PSAV 

8 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): .\dmission to the Firefighter Minimum Standards Certificate Program 
Co-requisite(s): FFP 0141C, FFP OOIOC This program is held at the North Naples Fire Training Center. 

This course is the third of a three part program designed to prepare students to be eligible to sit for State of Florida Firefighter II 
certification. This minimum standards certification course for firefighters is a mentally, physically, and emotionally challenging 
program that includes both classroom and practical application elements. The 225 hour course runs for 12 weeks; meeting scheduled 
weeknights and weekends. Upon successful completion, the student will be eligible to sit for State of Florida Firefighter II 
Certification exam. 

FFP 0141C - First Respondcr and Firefighter Awareness -PSAV 

2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Firefighter Minimum Standards Certificate Program 
Co-requisite(s): FFP OOIOC, FFP 0020C This program is held at the North Naples Fire Training Center. 

This course is the first of a three part program designed to prepare students to be eligible to sit for the State of Florida Firefighter II 
Certification exam. This minimum standards certification course for firefighters is a mentally, physically and emotionally challenging 
program that includes both classroom and practical application elements. This 60 hour course runs for 3 weeks; meetings are 
scheduled week nights and weekends. Upon successful completion the student will be eligible to continue to the second part of the 
program. 

FFP 1000 - Introduction to Fire Protection-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to the career opportunities within the fire service. The history of the fire service, service delivery 
systems, and prevention programs will be examined. 

* FFP 1304 - Fire Apparatus Operations- AS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

.^ in this course students will discuss driving laws and driving techniques for fire equipment; fire pump operations; apparatus 

^ maintenance; and emergency vehicle operations. This course meets part of the course requirements for Florida State Pump Operator 

•— Certification. 

■^ FFP 1505 - Fire Prevention Practices-AS 

,^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

-^ This course is a survey of the principles of fire prevention and investigation; a study of fire hazards in various occupancies; a review of 

-«k fire prevention codes; a study of procedures and techniques of fire prevention inspection to include, recognition and elimination of fire 

'* hazards, public relations, methods of determining the area of fire origin, fire cause, fire spread and location, and preservation of 

"^ evidence. Meets part of the course requirements for Fire Inspector I. Fire Officer I. and Special Fire Safety Inspector Certification. 

^ FFP 1510 - Fire Codes and Standards-AS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

"" This course is a study of the codes and standards for building construction, which are used to identify and prevent design deficiencies 

^ responsible for the spread of fire, heat, and smoke in existing and new buildings. This course meets part of the requirements for 

Florida State Fire Inspector I certification and Special Fire Safety Inspector certification. 

A FFP 1540 - Private Fire Protection Systems-AS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This course is a survey of fire protection systems and domestic water supply. The operational feature and functional characteristics of 

fire detection and suppression systems and devices is studied. Meets part of the course requirements for Fire Inspector I, Fire 

_^ Investigator I. and Fire Officer I Certification. 

^^ 

-^ FFP 1541 - Private Fire Protection Systems II-AS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a survey of pre-engineered and portable systems, extinguishing agents, inspection procedures for code compliance and 

!!j enforcement, and alarm systems. This course meets part of the requirements for Florida State Fire Inspector II Certification. 



« 
^ 



O 
O 
^ 



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FFP 1824 - Basic Incident Managemcnt-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

In this course the principles and features of an incident command system will be examined. The students will learn how an incident 
command system is organized, the types of incident facilities and their purposes, and the differences among strike teams, task forces, 
and single resources. This course meets part of the requirements for the Florida State Fire Officer 1 Certification. 

FFP 1825 - Intermediate Incident Management-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course lists and describes the duties of various positions within the incident command system. Students will examine the incident 
management organization for a given incident or event, including appropriate procedures for establishing command, transferring 
command, and terminating an incident. Students will learn about effective incident resource management including logistics, finance, 
administration, and record-keeping, and the incident planning processes will be reviewed. This course meets part of the requirements 
for the Florida State Fire Officer I Certification. 

FFP 1832 - Emergency Response to Terrorism-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course will introduce first responders to the consequences of emergency response to terrorism. The response to terrorism track 
will include basic concepts for first responders, tactical considerations, and incident management. This course meets part of the 
requirements for the Florida State Fire Officer I Certification. 

FFP 2111 - Fire Chemistry-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to address knowledge and skills pertaining to chemistry that will be useful to the Hazardous Materials 
Technician. The course features forms of matter, energy, common substances, chemical formulas/structure and bonding of atoms, 
molecules, isotopes, chemical reactions, and physical effects of chemical exposure to victims. Particular emphasis is placed on how 
this knowledge can be effectively used at a Hazardous Materials incident. This course meets part of the requirements for Fire 
Investigator 1, Fire Officer II, and Fire Inspector II Certification. 

FFP 2120 - Building Construction For the Fire Service-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the various complexities of building construction and the effect on fire detection, inspection, prevention, 
safety and suppression; definitions and terminology used in construction. The course includes a study of the principles of construction 
that affect the behavior of buildings on fire. Meets part of the course requirements for Florida State Fire Investigator 1, Fire Officer I, 
and Fire Inspector I Certification. 

FFP 2301 - Fire Service Hydraulics-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of how good fire streams are developed; a study of properties of water, distribution of pressures in dynamic and 
static systems; friction loss in hoses and pipes, and factors which influence water loss. Meets part of the course requirements for 
Florida State Pump Operator Certification. 

FFP 2401 - Hazardous Materials I-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the chemical characteristics and reaction of materials in emergency situations, especially thermal destruction. 
These materials may be in the storage, handling or transportation stage of industrial process. Materials to be studied include flammable 
liquids, combustible solids, radioactive compounds, and oxidizing and corrosive materials. 

FFP 2402 - Hazardous Materials Il-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): FFP 2401 

This course is a study of the increasing number of hazardous materials incidents occurring each year, the various methods of 
transporting and storing hazardous materials and basic tactics used in a hazardous materials situation. 

FFP 2521 - Construction Documents and Plan Review-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of aspects of the blueprint reading which enable the individual to better perform the duties of fire inspector. 
Students will also examine building plan reviews. This course meets part of the requirements for Florida State Fire Inspector I 
Certification. 

FFP 2610 - Fire Cause and Origin-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an examination of sources of ignition, investigation of structure fires, grass/wild land fires, automobile, motor 
vehicle and ship fires, and electrical causes of fires. The smdent will also examine clothing and fabric fires, documentation of the fire 
scene, and the storage and handling of evidence. The course is designed to enhance the investigation, detection and determination of 

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the cause and origin of fire. This course meets part of the requirements for Florida State Fire Investigator I and Fire Safety Inspector II 
Certification. 

FFP 2630 - Latent Invcstigations-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course examines explosives and explosive combustion, chemical fires and hazardous materials, and resources for investigating 
fires. The students will also suidy firc-rclatcd deaths and injuries, arson as a crime, arson law, report writing, courtroom testimony and 
citations. The course is designed to enhance the investigation, detection, and detemiination of the cause and origin of fire. This course 
meets part of the requirements for the Florida State Fire Investigator II Certification. 

FFP 2706 - Public Information Officer -AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course prepares the student to serve effectively as a organizational spokesperson, according to current practices in the profession 
of public relations and numerous examples from the fire service. Particular emphasis will be placed on case studies in crisis 
communications and the role of the Public Information Officer's role in the Incident Command System. This course is an approved 
elective for Fire Inspector 11 and Fire Officer II. 

FFP 2720 - Fire Company Officer Leadership-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the basic concepts of fire company leadership, including effective communications, leadership tools, problem 
solving, and goal achievement of a fire company officer. Emphasis is placed on the role and responsibilities of the officer in a fire 
company setting. Meets part of the course requirements for Florida State Fire Officer I Certification. 

FFP 2740 - Fire Service Course Delivery-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the instructor's responsibility in the communication of learning and teaching objectives, and use of 
instructional aids. This course meets part of Fire Officer I, Fire Instructor I. Fire Instructor II. and Fire Instructor III course 
requirements for Florida State Fire Company officer Certification. 

FFP 2741 - Fire Service Course Design- AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the principles of effective curriculum design. It stresses the principles of adult learning and student-centered 
learning. Designing courses and units that address learning, performance, and behavioral objectives is the program goal. This course 
meets part of the requirements for Florida State Fire Officer II. Fire Instaictor II and Fire Instructor III Certification. 

FFP 2770 - Ethicai and Legal Issues in the Fire Scrvice-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course deals with the entire spectrum of issues facing today's fire service leaders. Topics include labor relations, human rights 
and diversity, conflicts of interest, and frame- works for ethical decision-making. This course meets part of the requirements for Florida 
State Fire Officer II Certification. 

FFP 2780 - Fire Department Administration-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to managing fire and rescue services, and community fire protection programs. This course will cover 
policy issues and decision making areas, including risk management, health, wellness, and injury prevention, leadership training, and 
leadership strategies for the political process. This course meets part of the requirements for Florida State Fire Officer II Certification. 

FFP 2810 - Firefighting Tactic and Strategy l-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the basic concepts involved in firefighting. The student will study fire behavior, firefighting fijndamentals, 
principles of extinguishing fires, and the importance of pre-planning. Meets part of the course requirements for Fire Officer I 
Certification. 

FFP 2811 - Firefighting Tactic and Strategy II-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a continuation of the basic concepts involved in firefighting. Students will examine fire behavior in various occupancies, 
analyze life-safety issues, and study basic fire procedures through scenarios and case studies. Students will explore the importance of 
safety in all aspects of fire and rescue operations. Meets part of the course requirements for Fire Officer I Certification. 

FIN 2000 - Principles of Finance-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the principles of finance as applied to the operations of a profit-seeking (non- 
bank) firm. Major points of emphasis are measuring needs for acquiring, and using business fijnds. Case studies will be used to 
illustrate the process of financial management. 

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FIN 2100 - Personal Finance-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course designed to acquaint the student with persona! and family financial planning. Topics to be covered include the objectives of 
personal financial planning, setting up and maintaining records, budgeting, developing and managing income, consumer expenditures, 
safeguarding resources, investing for retirement, income tax considerations and estate planning. 

FIN 3400 - Financial Management I 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ACG 3024 Accounting for Non-Financial Managers 

This finance course involves the study of financial analysis and decision-making from a management perspective. Topics include 
financial statement analysis, financial planning and forecasting, time value of money with analysis and computation tools, risk and 
rates of return, asset valuation, capital budgeting, and various financial decision-making tools and methods. 

FIN 3414 - Financial Management II 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): FIN 3400 Financial Management I 

This finance course expands on the financial concepts covered in Financial Management I (FIN 3400) and introduces more advanced 
topics involving financial analysis and decision-making from a management perspective. Topics include the capital budgeting process, 
working capital management, long-term financing, the equity markets, investment banking, and mergers and acquisitions. 

FRE 1120- Elementary French I-AA (**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing with a minimum score of 83 of the FCLEPT Sentence Skills and Reading, or 440 on the SAT (Verbal), 
or ACT scores of 17 on the ACT English and 18 on the ACT Reading. 

Designed for beginners or those with one year of high school French, this highly interactive course focuses on the dynamics of speech, 
literature, and culture. (I) 

FRE 1121 - Elementary French II-AA (**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): FRE 1120 

Designed for beginners or those with one year of high school French, this highly interactive course focuses on the dynamics of speech, 
literature, and culture. (I) 

FRE 2220 - Intermediate French I-AA 
4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): FRE 1121 

This course presents continued training in linguistic skills and an introduction to contemporary French life and culture. 

FRE 2221 - Intermediate French II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): FRE 2220 

This course continues to present training in linguistic skills and an introduction to contemporary French life and culture. Major 

emphasis is placed on fluent communication in the French language. 

GEA 2010 - Geography of the Eastern Hemisphere-AA (**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course in the geography of the countries of the Eastern Hemisphere. Focus is placed on the physical, economic, political, and 
cultural aspects of these areas. (I) 

GEA 2040 - Geography of the Western Hemisphere-AA (**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

A course in the geography of the countries of the Western Hemisphere. Focus is placed on the physical, economic, political, and 
cultural aspects of these areas. 

GEB 1011 - Introduction to Business-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides a general outline of the nature of business, including ownership, management, and organization. Business 
operations, such as finance and decision-making controls are emphasized. The legal and regulatory environment in which business 
operates is examined. 

GEB 1033 - Career Exploration and Development -AA 
1 class hour 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Permission required 

Students will be introduced to the Strong Interest Inventory as an information gathering process to find out and understand how their 
interests can relate to careers. Topics will include exploration of work related interests, basic academic abilities and life goals. The 

206 



course offers a high engagement level with the instructor and qualified career professionals and will focus on outside assignments to 
facilitate the decision-making and critical thinking skills needed for career decisions and long term career planning. 

GEB 1949 - Internship Work Experience I-AA 

3 Credits 

This course offers a work experience in a cooperative program between Edison State College, students and local employers. This 
course requires verified work hours and a final summary report at the end of the work experience. 

GEB 2030 - Effective Career and Education Management-AA 

2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Permission to register from counseling staff, advising staff, or course instructor. 

A self-paced mformation gathering process designed for students at different le\els of decidedness about their educational and career 
aspirations. Topics will include exploration of work related interests, basic academics abilities, and life goals. Students will be 
encouraged to focus on a program to help achieve these goals and all aspects of getting from college to career. The focus will be on 
integrati\c teaching, learning, decision-making and critical thinking skills. 

GEB 2949 - Internship Work Experience ll-AA 

3 Credits 

A continuation of the work experience program designed to fiirther enhance personal and work communication skills. The major focus 
of the course is goal setting as a tool to formulate and clarify problems associated with the workplace. 

GEB 4375 - Foundations of International Business 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete 
the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and 
three semester hours of college le\el mathematics. 

Foundations of International Business 3 Credit Hours This course will provide a basic, integrated understanding of the complexity of 
the international business environment and the challenges it poses for businesses which are engaged in cross border activities. The 
course introduces concepts and processes of global trade and foreign direct investment, international monetary system, regional 
economic integration and foreign exchange markets. In a global economy it is especially important to study differences between 
countries and understand how these differences are linked to the various strategic choices businesses adopt, in order to compete 
internationally. Therefore, this course puts a special emphasis on national differences. 

GER 1120 - Elementary German I-AA (**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing with a minimum score of 83 of the FCLEPT Sentence Skills and Reading, or 440 on the SAT (Verbal), 
or ACT scores of 17 on the ACT English and 18 on the ACT Reading. 

This course is for beginners or those with one year of high school German. Training in communication skills is presented through 
typical conversation, contemporary readings, visual aids and laboratory exercises. (I) 

GER 1121 - Elementary German II-AA (**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): GER 1120 

This course is for beginners or those with one year of high school German. Training in communication skills is presented through 
tvpical conversation, contemporary readings, visual aids and laboratory exercises. (I) 

GER 2200 - Intermediate German I-AA (**) 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): GER 1120-1121 or two years of high school German, or permission of instructor. 

This course presents continued training in linguistic skills and an introduction to contemporary German life and culture. (I) 

GER 2201 - Intermediate German II-AA (**) 
4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): GER 2200 

This course continues to present training in linguistic skills and an introduction to contemporary German life and culture. (I) 

GIS 1040 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ETD 1320 or CGS 1100 

This course is an introduction to the use of GIS and the commands necessary to integrate databases with mapping applications. 
ArcView-GIS software will be used. 

GIS 1045 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Customization- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ETD 1320 or CGS 1 100 

207 



ArcView-GIS Software is used to study commands and procedures used in mapping, and developing charts and tables. Avenue, 
ArcView's object-oriented programming language is used to customize the ArcView graphical user interface. The basics of 
developing customized extensions are also covered. It is not necessary to have taken CGS 1363 first. 

GLY 1010 - Physical Geology- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

For both science and non-science majors. This course includes the study of the earth's structure, three major rock classifications, 
minerals, and the erosion factors of waters and soils. May be taken before or after GLY 1 100. Note; It is recommended that all college 
preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

GLY 101 OL - Physical Geology Laboratory-AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

In this course students develop skills in mineral and rock classifications and erosion factors, develop proficiency with aerial and 
surface map-reading skills, as well as development of the scientific method and paradigms to analyze written, verbal and visual 
communication. Note; It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science 
Course. 

GLY 1100 - Historical Geology- A A 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a study of the earth's history through the study of rock layers, the interpretation of fossils, environmental conditions in which 
fossils existed, the dynamic interactions which brought about changes in earth structure. The interpretation of the historical record and 
the evolutionary changes occurring among certain marine life and land flora and fauna is discussed. May be taken before or after GLY 
1010. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

GLY llOOL - Historical Geology Laboratory-AA 

3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

In this laboratory course the students study topographic and geological maps, fossils, and mineral materials that support the historical 
development of the planet Earth. Note; It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in 
ANY Science Course. 

HAS 1100 - Orientation to Healthcare 

Description of the health care industry, its historical background, fijnctions. inter-relations. 

HFT 1000 - Introduction to Hospitality Management-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course traces the growth and development of the hospitality industry. Emphasis on operational units of a hospitality organization 
such as food and beverage, personnel, accounting, and sales. Various hospitality organizations will be discussed with regard to career 
opportunities, including hotels/motels, restaurants, clubs, travel agencies, cruise ships, institutional services, and recreational parks. 
Current and new management concepts and practices are presented. 

HFT 1050 - Tourism and the Hospitality Industry-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course takes a cross-disciplinary approach to examining tourism. The social science perspective provides students with the kind 
of practical knowledge that can be effectively applied to the hospitality industry. 

HFT 2410 - Front Office Procedures-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course traces the flow of activities and fijnctions performed in today's lodging operations with a comparison of manual, machine 
assisted, and computer based methods for each front office fianction. 

HFT 2501 - Hospitality Sales Promotion-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents a practical understanding of the operating statement and precisely where, how, and why the sales effort fits into 
the total earnings and profit picture of a hospitality operation. Emphasis is on producing business profits. 

HFT 2600 - Hospitality Law-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the law grants to or imposes upon employees of the hospitality 
industry, and illustrates the possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. 

HIM - Basic CPT Coding 

The following courses were not found in the supplied content but, were listed in program requirements. Please review and provide us, 
if possible, with the correct information. 

208 



HIM 1000 - Intro to Health Info Mgmt 

An overview of health information statistics, medical informatics, healthcare registries, database design, healthcare research, analysis 
of health data, design formats for presentation of health data and health information management department operations. 

HIM 1 110 - Classification Systems, Indices 

A laboratory' practical course for health infomiation statistics, medical infomiatics, healthcare registries, database design, healthcare 
research, analysis of health data, design formats for presentation of health data and health information management department 
operations. Students will use computer applications 

HIM 1211 - Health Information Technologies 

This course is an introduction to theory and practical methodology utilized in a health information (medical record) department. 
Computer and information systems in health care are discussed with emphasis on systems encountered by health information 
managers. Includes review of new technologies in relation to the evolving paperless electronic medical record. 

HIM 1430 - Principles of Disease 

Introductory study of the nature, cause and treatment of disease processes. This course focuses on general principles, etiology and 
pathophysiology of human diseases on homeostatic mechanisms. A living body systems approach is utilized which includes basic 
anatomy, physiology, manifestations of disease states 

HIM 2012 - Healthcare Law 

This course addresses rates and percentages for basic healthcare statistics with introduction to vital statistics, data display, and report 
generation. 

HIM 2214C - Healthcare Statistics and Research 

This course addresses rates and percentages for basic healthcare statistics with introduction to vital statistics, data display, and report 
generation. 

HIM 2222 - Basic ICD Coding 

Principles of coding diseases, conditions, and procedures with the International Classification of Disease System. Laboratory practice 
in the assignment of codes using both computerized and manual methods. 

HIM 2253 - Basic CPT Coding 

Principles of coding with the CPT classification system. Laboratory practice in the assignment of codes using both computerized and 
manual methods. 

HIM 2283 - Advanced Coding and Reimbursement 

This is an advanced course in the use of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding systems. The course is designed to 
increase the quality and accuracy of code selection by applying the decision-making process using well defined medical record review 
methodologies and official coding guidelines. The course will also provide methodologies to conduct validation studies of coded data, 
evaluate the content of medical record documentation, and verify the accuracy of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) and/or Ambulatory 
Payment Classification (APC) assignments. 

HIM 2500 - Organization and Supervision Management 

This course is an introduction to supervisor*' management, human resources, personnel and financial management. Included are 
employment skills, budgeting, human relations, and methods for analyzing. 

HIM 2510 - Quality Performance Improvement 

Study of the concepts and procedures utilized in the performance of the quality assurance function in the health care setting. Emphasis 
on the role of the medical record practitioner in the management and control of the utilization review function of the facility. In the 
laboratory, the student will participate in utilization review and medical care evaluation activities 

HIM 2810 - Professional Intership I 

This clinical practice allows the student to experience and practice health information (medical record) department fiinctions in the 
either a simulated or actual health information environment. Topics addressed include typical workflow patterns; 
admission/registration processes; record assembly and analysis activities; management of standard health record documents and 
incomplete records; record filing and numbering systems; and retention and retrieval procedures. The student will become familiar 
with and/or utilize various types of equipment used in health information departments. 

HIM 2811 - Professional Internship H 

This clinical practice allows the student to experience and practice health information (medical record) department fiinctions in the 
either a simulated or actual health information environment. Topics addressed include typical workflow patterns; 
admission/registration processes; record assembly and analysis activities; management of standard health record documents and 
incomplete records; record filing and numbering systems; and retention and retrieval procedures. The student will become familiar 
with and/or utilize various types of equipment used in health information departments. 

209 



HIM 2820 - Professional Internship III 

This clinical practice allows the Health Information student to participate in health information (medical record) management 
ftanctions in either an acute care or other health record setting. Topics addressed include various organization and supervision 
activities. The student will become familiar with and utilize various types of equipment, systems and processes used in health 
information departments. 

HIM 2930 - HIM Review 

This is a required course for certification preparation. Test review and review of program material are included in the course. 

HSC 1421 - Health, Safety and Nutrition for the Young Child-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

In this course smdents will learn the most current recommendations of health professionals for keeping young children healthy, safe 
and well nourished. Methods in which adults can help children develop healthy attitudes and practices will be explored. 

HSC 1531 - Medical Terminology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): none 

This course is designed to provide a basis for understanding, utilizing, and pronouncing the vocabulary used by health care 
professionals. The language of medicine becomes understandable through the study of word roots, combining forms, prefixes and 
suffixes. Major disease processes and pathological conditions of specific body systems will be discussed, along with diagnostic and 
surgical terms. This course has no accompanying laboratory and therefore cannot be used to meet the science requirement at Edison 
State College. Note; It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

HUM 1950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

This course is an Edison State College-sponsored study tour abroad with lectures before departure and en route. Joumal required. This 
course is termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, 
including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this 
course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. The course HUM 1950 may be repeated as HUM 2950 
once if the itinerary of the second tour is significantly different from the first. Students will be escorted by an Edison State professor. 
(I) 

HUM 2211 - Studies in Humanities: The Ancient World Through the Medieval Period-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an interdisciplinary humanities course with a multicultural and global perspective. Drawing from the field of arts and 
letters, the course is a study of European culture from the prehistoric age through the end of the medieval period, as well as the 
cultures of Asia, Africa and the contemporary Americas. This course is termed a writing intensive course. If completed with a grade of 
"C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence in written communications. (I) 

HUM 2235 - Studies in Humanities: The Renaissance Through the Age of Rcason-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an interdisciplinary humanities course with a multicultural and global perspective. Drawing from the field of arts and 
letters, the course is a study of European culture from Renaissance through the Enlightenment, as well as the cultures of Asia, Africa 
and the contemporary Americas. This course is termed a writing intensive course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this 
course serves to demonstrate competence in written communications. (I) 

HUM 2250 - Studies in Humanities: The Romantic Era Through the Present-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an interdisciplinary humanities course with a muUicultural and global perspective. Drawing from the field of arts and 
letters, the course is a study of European culture from Romanticism to the present, as well as the cultures of Asia, Africa and the 
contemporary Americas. This course is termed a writing intensive course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in written communications. 

HUM 2510 - Humanities Through the Arts-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a course which explores human values and our sense of selves as individuals in community through the arts. This course is 
termed a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a 
minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 

HUM 2930 - Studies in Humanities: Great 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Central humanities themes presented through the study of selected works and performances (in philosophy, literature, art. music, 
architecture, drama, or film), representing many periods and cultures and serving as a basis for discussion of issues, social and 

210 



historical as well as aesthetic and philosophical-facing the individual and society. The course utilizes multiple perspectives, guest 

^ lecturers, and media presentations. It is recommended that students complete at least one composition course before enrolling. This 

^ course is termed a writing intensi\e course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student. 

-' including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C"" or better, this 

^ course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 

^ HUM 2931 - Introduction to Asian Humanitics-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

-■ This course examines dominant ideas and arts in south and eastern Asian cultures expressed in philosophy, literature, art. architecture, 

^ and music. Content focuses on India, China, and Japan, and covers the period from earliest civilization to the present. 

Z HUM 2950 - Humanities Study Tour-AA (**) 

— . 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

'"' This course is an Edison State College-sponsored study tour abroad with lectures before departure and en route. Journal required. This 

course is tenued a writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, 

^ including a minimum of three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this 

course serves to complete part of the writing intensive course requirements. The course HUM 1950 may be repeated as HUM 2950 

^ once if the itinerary of the second tour is significantly different from the first. Students will be escorted by an Edison State professor. 

— (I) 

^ HUN 1201 - Nutrition-AA 

«. 3 class hours 3 Credits 

•* This is an introductory course to the scientific principles of nutrition, covering the role of specific nutrients, their digestion, absorption. 

— ' and metabolism, sources of the nutrients and requirements of the various age groups. This course cannot be used to meet the AA 

^ Science requirement since it has no accompanying laboratory. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be 

^ completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

■^ HUS 1001 - Introduction to Human Scrvices-AA 

-* 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This course explores the field of human services, including health, mental health, public administration, education, social welfare, 

"^ recreation, criminal justice, youth services, and rehabilitation. 

-* HUS 1400 - Alcoholism and Other Drug Abuse-AA 

** 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This is an introductory course that takes an analytical approach to identification, intervention, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation 

*^ programming. Appropriate legislation and regulations governing rights of clients arc examined. The community resources available 
for dealing with alcoholics and other drug abusers are identified, along with appropriate methods for the utilization of these resources. 

-K HUS 2 1 1 1 - Basic Counseling Skills-AA 

"^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): HUS 1001 or permission of instructor. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the encouragement of personal growih and the development of fundamental interpersonal helping 

^ skills, as well as the promotion of knowledge of styles of helping fostered in a variety of human service settings. 

** HUS 2404 - Working With Alcoholics and Other Drug Abuscrs-AA 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides both theoretical information and practical application of counseling techniques which have been effective in 

.^ working with alcoholics and other daig abusing clients. Through role playing, readings, structured class exercises, class discussions, 

«^ and lectures students become familiar with a variety of counseling theories, techniques and modalities. 

^ IDS 1350 - Critical Thinking-AA 

^^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^^ This course is designed to develop higher level reasoning and problem-solving skills which can be effectively transferred to other 

^K subject areas. Emphasis includes specialized vocabulary development and verbal and quantitative reasoning skills. Students will apply 

— ' creative and critical reasoning skills to brainstorming, patterns of thinking, questioning and effective problem-solving strategies. 

^ Fundamentals of logic, analogies, perceptions and learning styles are also explored. 

^^ INP 2390 - Human Relations in Business and Industry-AA 

^•^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^^ This course is a study and analysis of personal and personnel relationships in occupations. It covers the techniques and dynamics 

^ underlying harmonious relationships in work organizations, and the importance of the working environment as it affects human 
services and productivity. 



:ii 



INR 2002 - International Rclations-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents the interactions of nation states in terms of political, economic, psychological, and cultural factors; power, 
morality and law among states. Conflict and cooperation in the pursuit of national interests, and international political systems and 
their fijnctions is covered. (I) 

ISC lOOlC - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Foundations of Interdisciplinary Science is designed to provide a broad foundation in science for nonscience majors. The two-course 
sequence emphasizes scientific and laboratory activities in a hands-on learning environment. ISC lOOlC addresses the scientific 
method, geologic processes and the structure of the Earth, the solar system and star formation, electricity and magnetism and wave 
energy. The relationships of science to other fields of knowledge and to society are emphasized. This course is recommended as a 
general education course for non-science majors. 

ISC 1002C - Foundation of Interdisciplinary Science II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Foundations of Interdisciplinary Science is designed to provide a broad foundation in science for nonscience majors. The two-course 
sequence emphasizes scientific and laboratory activities in a hands-on learning environment. ISC 1002 covers the topics of energy, 
nuclear reactions and nuclear energy, chemistry and environmental biology. The relationships of science to other fields of knowledge 
and to society are emphasized. This course is recommended as a general education course for nonscience majors. 

ISC 3120 - Scientific Process (FGCU course) 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): OCE 3008C with a minimum grade of C or BSC 1051C with a minimum grade of C or PCB 3063C with a 

minimum grade of C or PCB 3023C with a minimum grade of C or CHM 2211C with a minimum grade of C or (CHM 2211 

with a minimum grade of C and CHM 221 IL with a minimum grade of C) and (STA 2023 with a minimum grade of C or STA 

2037 with a minimum grade of C) 

Introduction to the philosophy, methodology and ethics of scientific practice via classroom discussion and literature review. Focus on 

philosophical and practical differences between physical & historical science; hypothesis generation and testing; experimental design; 

construction of a research proposal; composition of a scientific paper; oral presentation; and critical review. 

JOU 1100 - Basic Reporting-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to the profession. Emphasis is placed on theory and practice of writing news. 

LIN 1670 - Basic English Grammar 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 9020 with a "C" or better and/or ENC 9021 with a "C" or better and/or REA 9003 with a "C" or better 

and/or EAP 1620 and EAP 1640 with a "C" or better. 

This basic grammar course is designed for those students desiring more intensive work in grammar and syntax. It includes the study of 
grammatical principles and theory and application of those principles in exams and brief writing assignments. This course is 
particularly suitable for students enrolled in writing intensive courses who could benefit from more concentrated grammar review. 

LIS 2004 - Internet for College Rcsearch-AA 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is designed to help students become familiar with the Internet and information resources of value in college research. 
Through the use of finding tools and informational resources on the Internet, students develop increased skills in identifying, using and 
evaluating electronic information resources. Classroom activities and practical experience in using the Internet provide students with 
basic research skills necessary for information literacy in today's world. 

LIT 2090 - Contemporary Literature-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course presents an examination of themes and ideas reflected in the writings of award winning American fiction writers published 
since 1980. 

LIT 2110 - World Literature I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course presents a study of great works of literature, and recurrent themes and ideas, including literature of the Greeks, the Middle 
Ages, and the Renaissance. (I) 



212 



LIT 2120 - World Literature II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course presents a study of great works of literature, and recurrent themes and ideas from the late 1 7th century through the modem 
period. (1) 

MAC 1 105 - College Algebra-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prercquisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C". or Testing 

Topics include linear, quadratic, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Graphing and applications are emphasized. 
A graphmg calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the 
general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1 106 - Combined College Algebra Prccalculus-AA 

5 class hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of a "B" or Testing 

This course covers major topics to include: fimctions and relations including domain and range, operations on functions, and inverse 
fiinctions" polynomial, rational and other equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithm ftinctions. their properties and 
piecewise-defined functions" conic sections; sequences and series; applications such as curve fitting, modeling, optimization, and 
exponential and logarithmic growth and decay; mathematical induction; binomial theorem and application. Graphing and applications 
are emphasized. A graphmg calculator is required. Credit is not given for both MAC 1 106 and either MAC 1 105 or 1 140. If completed 
with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1114 - Trigonometry- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 1105 or MAC 1106 with a minimum grade of "C," or appropriate CLM score 

Topics in this class include the real number system, circular ftinctions. trigonometric ftinctions. inverse relations and ftinctions, 
trigonometric graphs, solutions of triangles, and trigonometric equations, polar coordinates, and complex numbers. This course 
contains all of the features of trigonometry found in MAC 1 147. with additional emphasis on applications. A graphing calculator is 
required. (This course may be taken concurrently with MAC 1 140.) If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1140 - Pre-Calculus Algebra -AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MAC 1 105 with a minimum grade of "C" or appropriate CLM score 

This is an algebra class designed to prepare students to enter either engineering or calculus courses. Topics covered include 
exponential and logarithmic ftinctions. polynomials, rational ftinctions. conic sections, sequences and series, mathematical induction, 
the binomial theorem, and matrices. A graphing calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAC 1147 - Precalculus Algebra Trigonometry-AA 

5 class hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 1105 with a minimum grade of "B" or appropriate CLM score. 

This course is designed for students with strong mathematical backgrounds who need a refresher course before beginning the Calculus 
sequence. Topics covered are a combination of topics from MAC 1 140 and MAC 1114. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, 
this course serves to demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. Credit is not given for both MAC 
1 147 and MAC 1 140 or MAC 1 1 14. 

MAC 2233 - Calculus for Business, Social and Life Sciences-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MAC 1105 or MAC 1106 or MAC1140 with a minimum grade of "C," or appropriate CLM score 

This course is designed for students in business and related studies that need calculus but not trigonometry. Included is a review of 
equations and inequalities and their applications, fiinctions and graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions. Major topics include 
mathematics of finance, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration and applications of these. A graphing calculator is 
required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the general education 
mathematics requirement. 

^' MAC 2311 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry l-AA 

_^ 4 class hours 4 Credits 

^^ Prerequisite(s): MAC 1 140 and MAC 1114 with a minimum grade of "C" in each course or MAC 1147 with a minimum grade 

—^ of "C* or appropriate CLM score. 

^ This course is designed for students majoring in science, mathematics or engineering. Topics covered include limits, differentiation. 

integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions and applications. This course is sequential with MAC 
^ 2312 and MAC 2313. A graphing calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate 

competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 



O 
Q 



:i3 



MAC 2312 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 2311 with minimum grade of "C" 

This course presents differentiation and integration's of trigonometric and hyperbolic fiinctions, special techniques of integration, 
improper integrals, sequences, infinite series, and analytic geometry in three-dimensional space. A graphing calculator is required. If 
completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics 
requirement. 

MAC 2313 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry III-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 2312 with a minimum grade of "C" 

This course includes study of linear systems and matrices, partial derivatives, multiple integration, line integrals, polar coordinates, 
and vectors in the plane. A graphing calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 

MAE 3320C - Teaching Methods in Middle School Mathematics with Practicum-BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science Program in Education OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs 

This course is required in the undergraduate Mathematics Education program and should be taken as a pre-requisite for MAE 4330. Its 
major goal is to provide prospective middle school teacher candidates the opportunity to develop concepts, skills and pedagogical 
procedures for effective teaching of mathematics in grades 6-9. To this end, the course will provide for an integration of mathematics 
content and the middle school philosophy while examining learning and teaching at this level. Such a course is recommended by the 
National Council Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). 

MAE 4330C - Teaching Methods in Secondary School Mathematics with Practicum-BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequi$ite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science Program in Education OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate Programs 

This course is required for teacher candidates who are majoring in mathematics education. It is designed to prepare the teacher 
candidate for a successfiil internship experience, by bridging the perceived gap between theory and practice. This course addresses the 
required instructional methods, techniques, strategies, resources and assessment considerations for effective teaching of secondary 
mathematics including pedagogy of early algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus; through the use of problem solving, 
cooperative learning and appropriate technology. 

MAE 4930 - Special Topics in Secondary Education I-BS 

1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science Program in Education OR special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate Programs 

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach in Secondary Mathematics Programs or a combination of the biological 
and physical subject matter areas. This course allows the teacher candidate opportunities to begin their teacher candidate portfolio, 
demonstrate writing skills and assess student disposition records to be kept throughout the remainder of their coursework. This course 
also presents teacher candidates with qualitative and quantitative research skills as well as current library and technology resources 
available. 

MAE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Mathematics Emphasis-BS 

12 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all Secondary Math Education BS program requirements and passing of all sections 

of General Knowledge and Professional Education Exam. This course is limited to Edison State College Bachelor of Science in 

Mathematics degree-seeking students. 

Contact hours: A minimum of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks 

This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate competency on the twelve Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) 

at the pre-professional level during one semester of full day internship in a public or private school approved by the Dean. The 

internship also includes a series of mandatory professional leadership seminars. 

MAN 2021 - Management Principles-AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents basic management principles and theory, including the history, progress and fianctions of management. The 
relation of management principles to operations and the management process in business are emphasized. 

MAN 2043 - Management Solutions for Improvement-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides managerial students with the theoretical and hands-on training in the process of continuous leadership 
improvement through identitying. analyzing, and solving problems that will positively impact on customer satisfaction. Management 
quality is presented in a manner that emphasizes principles and practices, including excellence, efficiency, and effectiveness. 

214 



MAN 2241 - Organizational Bchavior-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): IVIAN 2021 or equivalent recommended. 

This course provides students with an understanding of the human processes in formal organizations, utilizing individual and group 
exercises which simulate behavioral dynamics of organizations. Content areas include conflict resolution, communication, leadership, 
planning and control, as well as other organizational processes. 

MAN 3120 - Organizational Behavior and Lcadcrship-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This is an applied leadership course with a focus on case studies, projects and group interaction, including theoretical background on 
group dynamics, small group behavior and motivation, power, types of groups, verbal and non-verbal communication skills, and 
teambuilding. 

MAN 3301 - Human Resources Managemcnt-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course analyzes modern methods and theories in human resources management, personal administration. Topics include 
recniitment, promotion, performance evaluation, dismissal, and training. 

MAN 3303 - Leadership and Management Practices- BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete 

the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and 

three semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course consists of a comprehensive study of contrasting philosophies of leadership, current theories of leadership, management 

and supervision, as well as current trends and issues for business managers. In addition, this course focuses on applications and cases 

for development of competencies. 

MAN 4701 - Business Ethics and Society-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course explores roles of personal, organizational, and societal values and ethics in society. Topics include exploration of 
individual ethics, values, and goals; the study of ethical behavior within organizations as it influences people, products, and the work 
environment; and the exploration of the appropriate roles of individuals, organizations, and government in society. 

MAN 4720 - Strategic Management and Organizational Policy - BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course examines strategic planning and work organization as well as the development of organizational policies and procedures. 
Topics include corporate planning, organizational analysis and design, change implementation, design and oversight of policies, 
determining organizational direction, developing organizational direction, developing organizational strategy, and evaluation and 
control and its application within an organization. 

MAN 4915 - Management Capstone Project - BS 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): All requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree must be completed, except those courses being taken 
concurrently with the Capstone Course. 

The student will complete a business simulation in which teams of students make decisions weekly and compete against other teams 
for the best organizational results based on strategies chosen using case analysis and course knowledge from many of the former 
studies of this degree program. Successflil completion of the course requires demonstrating learning outcomes from core courses by 
passing a post test at the course end, preceded by a pre test at the course start and additional individual instmction tailored to student 
needs, in addition readings from current and classic business texts and articles will be used for in class discussion. 

MAP 2302 - Differential Equations-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 2312 with a minimum grade of "C" 

This course presents methods of solutions for first order equations. Selected applications also covered arc Linear equations, Laplace 
transforms, and series solutions. A graphing calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to 
demonstrate competence for the general education mathematics requirement. 

215 



MAR 2011 - Markcting-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study of marketing principles and their relationship to product, price, promotion and distribution. The interrelationship 
between marketing and other business operations of the firm is included. 

MAR 2141 - International Marketing and Business Practiees-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the concepts of marketing which are unique to international business. Students investigate product 
development, channel systems, organizational alternatives, business practices and customs, and legal issues, as they relate to the world 
market. 

MAR 3802 - Marketing for Managers-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAN 2021 Management Principles OR permission of Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. Prior to 
enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete the following courses with 
a grade of C or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and three semester hours of 
college level mathematics. 

This course helps develop marketing knowledge and skills necessary for a successful general manager to interact with and problem 
solve in a functional team environment. Students will add to their understanding of marketing concepts including the development and 
implementation of a marketing plan. The course focuses on business to business marketing, marketing of services and global 
marketing. 

MAT 1033 - Intermediate Algebra-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 9020 with a minimum grade of "C" or MAT 9024 with a minimum grade of "C" or Testing 

This course is intended to prepare students for college level algebra courses needed to meet the State requirements for math 
competencies. This course should adequately prepare the student for MAC 1 105 and provide a strong algebra foundations for higher 
level math. 

MAT 9002 - Basic Mathematics (*) 

4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing or Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs 

This course prepares students for algebra by covering basic mathematical skills. The student learns to add. subtract, multiply, and 
divide, and apply those skills to the real number system. The student also learns to solve problems with percents. Ail of the 
aforementioned topics will incorporate word problems. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

MAT 9012 - Developmental Algebra I (*) 

4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, MAT 9002, Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs 

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for success in MAT 9020, Developmental Algebra 11. This course is designed to 
provide students who have little or no algebra background with knowledge of the basic concepts of algebra and the skills required to 
apply these concepts. Topics covered include signed numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations, exponents, and polynomials. 
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

MAT 9020 - Developmental Algebra II (*) 

4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, MAT 9012, Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs 

This course will prepare the student for success in MAT 1033, Intermediate Algebra. This course is a continuation of MAT 9012, 
Developmental Algebra I. It is designed to complete a sequence in Elementary Algebra. Topics covered include factoring polynomials, 
graphing, quadratic equations, rational and radical expressions. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 
A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

MAT 9024 - Introduction to Algebra (*) 

4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing, or Permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs 

This course prepares the student for success in MAT 1033. Intermediate Algebra. Topics covered include signed numbers, algebraic 
expressions, exponents, polynomials, factoring polynomials, graphing, linear and quadratic equations, and rational and radical 
expressions. Word problems and critical thinking skills are topics and concepts used throughout the course. Successful completion of 
this course requires a grade of "C" or better. A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. 

MCB 2010C - Microbiology-AA 

5 class hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Minimum of a "C" in BSC 1080 for students who wish to enroll in a Health Professions program of studies at 
Edison State College or minimum of a "C" in BSC 1010 for students seeking to leave Edison State College and enroll in Health 
Professions degrees elsewhere 

216 



This combined lecture and laboratory course is an introduction to Microbiology. It expands upon general biological concepts 
including: inorganic and organic chemistr>-, biochemistry, cell strucUire and function, metabolism, and genetic mechanisms. These 
concepts are applied to the morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and genetic mechanisms of microorganisms. The course includes a 
survey of the representative types of microorganisms and the role of pathogenic microorganisms in causing diseases and infections. 
Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

MGF 1 106 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" or Testing 

This course is intended to introduce the beauty and utility of mathematics to the genera! student population. Topics include systematic 
counting, probability, statistics, geometn,-. sets, and logic. This course is designed for tho.se students whose majors do not require the 
technical mathematics sequence. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the 
general education mathematics requirement. The geometry component of this course should meet the requirements of 6a-5. 066(3)1. 
Florida Administrative Rules, for education majors. It will enable the teacher to support the instruction of geometry and measurement 
as listed by the Sunshine State Standards. 

MGF 1107 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" or Testing 

This course is intended to present topics which demonstrate the beauty and utility of mathematics to the general student population. 
Topics include management science, linear and exponential growth, numbers and number systems, history of mathematics, elementary 
number theory, social choice and graph theory. This course is designed for those students whose majors do not require the technical 
mathematics sequence. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to demonstrate competence for the general 
education mathematics requirement. 

MKA 1161 - Introduction to Customer Service-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides the student with the basic concepts and current trends in the customer service industry. Through actual case 
studies students analyze customer service strategies. 

MKA 1511 - Advertising and Sales Promotion-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course reviews all phases of sales promotion including advertising display, direct mail, radio and television. Emphasis is placed 
on creation of the message, selection of media, and the planning, coordinating, controlling, and evaluation of the campaign. 

MKA 2021 - Salesmanship-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a study and analysis of the fundamental concepts of selling and the role of sales in today's economy. Current techniques 
and vital principles of selling are taught. Opinions of sales executives, excerpts from job manuals, and company materials supplement 
the textbook. 

MMC 1000 - Survey of Mass Communications-AA (**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents requirements, opportunities, and responsibilities of various media. 

MNA 1804 - Applied Technology-AS 

9 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of a full-time (900 or more clock hours) program at a careertechnical school. 

Completion and submission of the application along with ofFicial veriHcation of program completion (transcripts and 

certiFicates of completion). 

This course serves as a vehicle to accept any applied technology program (900 or more hours) completed in any of the technical 

centers within the College District. 

MNA 2300 - Personnel Administration-AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to personnel administration. Emphasis is placed on staff personnel activities and responsibilities of line 
management in personnel work. 

MNA 2345 - Supervision-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to aid first-line superv isors in making a smooth transition from expert in a particular task to that of a 
supervisor who must produce results through the efforts of others. 



217 



MNA 3037 - Project Management and Planning-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prior to enrolling in any upper level course (course number beginning with a 3 or 4), students must complete 

the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101 English Composition I, ENC 1102 English Composition II, and 

three semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course is designed to give the students an exposure in general project management concepts. This course is meant to provide 

students with a framework on which to build project management knowledge that relates to their specific subset of knowledge. 

MTB 1103 - Business Mathematics- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This basic course involves the study of percent calculations used in taxes, insurance, wages, depreciation and retail math-ematics. 
Emphasis is also placed on simple interest, present value at compound interest, annuities and amortization. 

MTB 1308 - TI Graphing Calculators-AA 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This is an introductory course in using the Texas Instrument graphing calculators currently approved by the mathematics department. 
No previous knowledge of the calculator is expected or required. This course is especially appropriate for those who wish to take 
advantage of the advanced features of the TI Series calculators. This course may be offered as a workshop or in a distance-learning 
format. 

MTG 32 1 2 - College Geometry-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 2311 Calculus with Analytical Geometry II. This course is intended for students admitted into the 
Bachelor of Science Program in Education. Students may seek special permission from the Associate Dean of Baccalaureate 
Programs to enroll. 

This course presents the axioms, basic concepts, proofs and constructions of Euclidean geometry involving segments, angles, triangles, 
polygons, circles, parallel lines and similarity. Constructions arc made using both compass and straightedge and interactive geometry 
software. The course also presents basic concepts of non-Euciidcan geometries including hyperbolic and spherical. 

MUE 1440 - String Techniques-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone production, literature, reading and transposition applicable to string 
instruments. 

MUE 1450 - Woodwind Techniques-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone production, literature, reading and transposition applicable to woodwind 
instruments. 

MUE 1460 - Brass Techniqucs-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone production, literature, reading and transposition applicable to brass 
instruments. 

MUE 1470 - Percussion Techniques-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

This course presents basic principles and techniques of tone production, literature, reading and transposition applicable to percussion 
instniments. 

MUH 2018 - Jazz History and Appreciation-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces jazz styles from a historical perspective. Lectures highlight the general characteristics of various jazz styles and 
artists, and focus on listening skills which aid in an appreciation of jazz. (I) 

MUL 1 1 10 - Music History and Appreciation-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the materials, literature and practices of music, and consideration of its aesthetic purposes and social fiinction. 
Development of listening skills and criteria of judgment is also presented. (I) 

MUM 2700 - Music Business-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to the structure of the music business and the entertainment industry. Emphasis is placed on 
contemporary business practices. Topics include careers in the recording and performing fields, retail music merchandising, 
publishing, song writing and arranging, arts and artist management, professional organizations, copyright law and career development. 

218 



M UN 1 1 20 - Concert Band- A A 

^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

^ The course emphasizes the study and performance of literature written for the modern concert band. The ensemble is open to all 

*^ students. Band students transferring as music majors arc encouraged to enroll. 

^ MUN 1210 - Edison State College Symphony Orchestra-AA (**) 

^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

^' Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

^ The course emphasizes the study and performance of orchestral literature. The ensemble is open to all students and community 

members. 

MUN 1310 - College Choir-AA 
^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

^ This course covers the study, rehearsal, and performance of choral literature, with training in fimdamentals of singing. Attention is 

^ given to general, cultural and humanistic considerations. 

MUN 1340 - Vocal Ensemble-AA 
1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 
^^ Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

,^ This course covers the study and performance of ensemble literature for various small groupings. 

-^ MUN 1410-1440 - Instrumental Chamber Ensembles-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 
^ Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

._. This course allows students to concentrate on specialized literature for small ensembles. Choices include: String Ensemble MUN 

>^ 1410. 2410; Woodwind Ensemble MUN 1420. 2420; Brass En.semble MUN 1430. 2430; Percussion Ensemble MUN 1440. 2440. 

^ MU1M710- Jazz Ensemble I-AA 

^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

-_ Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

^ Emphasis in this course is placed on the study and performance of literature for the modem big jazz band. Auditions are held for 

"— placement in performing or preparatorv group. 

Zf MUN 2 1 20 - Concert Band-AA 

,^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours I Credits 

•^ The course emphasizes the study and performance of literature written for the modern concert band. The ensemble is open to all 

— students. Band students transferring as music majors are encouraged to enroll. 

Z, MUN 2121 - Advanced Concert Band-AA 

^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

«^ Prerequisite(s): Second semester of MUN 2120 or equivalent; permission of instructor. 

•• This course places emphasis on the study and performance of literature written for the modem concert band. The Ensemble is open to 

■^ all students. Band students transferring as music majors are encouraged to enroll. 

^ MUN 2210 - Edison State College Symphony Orchestra-AA (**) 

-^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours I Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

The course emphasizes the study and performance of orchestral literature. The ensemble is open to all students and community 
^ members. 

^ MUN 221 1 - Advanced Orchestra-AA 

^ 1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

"^ Prerequisite(s): Second semester of MUN 2210 or equivalent; permission of instructor. 

^ This course places emphasis on the study and perfomiance of orchestral literature. The Ensemble is open to all students and 

community members. 

^ MUN 2310 - College Choir-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

^ This course covers the study, rehearsal, and performance of choral literature, with training in fimdamentals of singing. Attention is 

given to general, cultural and humanistic considerations. 



MUN 2340 - Vocal Ensemble-AA 
1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

This course covers the study and performance of ensemble literature for various small groupings. 

MUN 2410 - 2440 - Instrumental Chamber Ensembles-AA 
1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

This course allows students to concentrate on specialized literature for small ensembles. Choices include: String Ensemble MUN 
1410, 2410; Woodwmd Ensemble MUN 1420, 2420; Brass Ensemble MUN 1430, 2430; Percussion Ensemble MUN 1440, 2440. 

MUN 2710 - Jazz Ensemble II-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the study and performance of literature for the modem big jazz band. Auditions are held for 
placement in performing or preparatory group. 

MUN 2711 - Advanced Jazz Ensemble-AA 

1 class hour, 2 studio hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Second semester of MUN 2710 or equivalent; permission of instructor. 

This course places emphasis on the study and performance of literature for the modem big jazz band. Auditions are held for placement 
in performing or preparatory group. 

MUT 1001 - Fundamentals of Music-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Designed for students with little or no previous musical training, this course presents an introduction to the reading and performance of 
music, including principles of notation, scales, triads, rhythms, and interpretive markings. 

MUT 1 1 1 1 - Music Theory I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This class presents a study of music fundamentals, and of diatonic and chromatic harmony, largely through the use of a four-voice 
chorale-style model. It is intended that MUT 1241/1242 be taken concurrently, and it is recommended that MVK 1 1 1 1 be taken 
concurrently with MUT 1111. 

MUT 1112 - Music Theory II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MUT 1111 

This class presents a study of music fundamentals, and of diatonic and chromatic harmony, largely through the use of a four-voice 
chorale-style model. It is intended that MUT 1241/1242 be taken concurrently, and it is recommended that MVK 1 1 1 1 be taken 
concurrently with MUT 1112. 

MUT 1241 - Sight Singing and Ear Training I-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

This course covers the development of aural skills through sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and error detection in 
diatonic musical examples. It is intended that MUT 1111 be taken concurrently. 

MUT 1242 - Sight Singing and Ear Training II-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MUT 1241 

This course covers the development of aural skills through sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and error detection in 
diatonic musical examples. It is intended that MUT 1 1 12 be taken concurrently. 

MUT 21 16 - Music Theory III-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MUT 1111/1112 or permission of professor. 

This course presents modulation using diatonic and chromatic harmony, twentieth-century tonal practices, introduction to atonal 
analysis and twelve-tone techniques, and the study of musical forms. It is intended that MUT 2246 be taken concurrently. 

MUT 2117 - Music Theory IV-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): MUT 2116 

This course presents modulation using diatonic and chromatic harmony, twentieth-century tonal practices, introduction to atonal 
analysis and twelve-tone techniques, and the study of musical forms. It is intended that MUT 2247 be taken concurrently. 

220 



IVIUT 2246 - Sight Singing and Ear Training III-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MUX 1241/1242 or permission of instructor. 

This course covers the development of aural skills in both diatonic and chromatic musical styles. The course includes sight singing. 
melodic and harmonic dictation, and error detection. It is intended that MUT 2116 be taken concurrently. 

MUT 2247 - Sight Singing and Ear Training IV-AA 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

Prcrequisite(s): MUT 2246 or permission of instructor. 

This course covers the development of aural skills in both diatonic and chromatic musical. 

MUT 2641 - Introduction to Jazz Improvisation-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MUT 1121, 1122 or permission of instructor. 

This course provides an ensemble experience with emphasis on scales, chord structures, rhythmic patterns and chord progression- 
ordinarily a fiirther development of the Jazz Ensemble experience. 

MVB 1211 - IVIV"V\ 2325 Applied Music Instruction-AA: 

1-2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): M\'V 1111 and permission of instructor. 

Applied Music is indi\ idiial one-on-one voice or instrumental instruction which may be arranged for Edison State degree-seeking 
students of advanced accomplishments, especially those actively enrolled in the Edison State's music program. Thirty minutes of 
private instruction per week equals one credit hour. It is recommended that music majors take weekly lessons in their principle 
instruments. Seats in applied music classes are limited. Permission of the District Dean of Humanities Communications and Social 
Science is required. These lessons are not intended for beginners. 

1. Full-time music majors have first priority. 

2. Full-time ( 12 hours) degree-seeking students have second priority; students who need a one-credit- hour course to "fill" their 
load do not qualify, nor do those who are just learning to play an instalment. 

3. Dual enrollment students and part-time students who are likely to become fiill-time have third priority. 

4. Community members have fourth option on remaining seats, exclusive of those who have repeated a course more than once. 
All students enrolled in applied music lessons must receive approval and certification of demonstrated advanced accomplishment by 
the professor, the written permission of the District Dean, and must show evidence of having enrolled in an ensemble. The written 
permission shall designate the criteria ( 1 . 2. 3 or 4 as listed above) under which the student is granted approval. Students must be 
accommodated in priority order, i.e. criteria one students have first priority, then criteria two students, etc. A form will be provided for 
this process. 

Baritone Horn Guitar Percussion Trumpet 

Bassoon Harpsichord Piano Tuba 

Cello Horn Saxophone Viola 

Clarinet Oboe String Bass Violin 

Flute Organ Trombone Voice 

Students enrolled in Applied Music are expected to enroll in a performance ensemble (choir, orchestra, jazz ensemble or concert 

band). 

- Applied Music Course Numbers - 

BARITONE HORN CELLO FLUTE 

MVB 1214 MVS 1213 MVW12I1 

MVB 1314 MVS 1313 MVW1311 

MBV2224 MVS 2223 MVW2221 

MVB 2324 MVS 2323 MVW2321 

BASSOON CLARINET HARPSICHORD 

MVW 1214 MVW 1213 MVK 1212 

MVW1314 MVW 1313 MVK 1312 

MBW2224 MVW 2223 MVK 2222 

MVW 2324 MVW 2323 MVK 2322 

OBOE TRUMPET SAXOPHONE 

MVW 1212 MVB 1211 MVS 1215 

MVW13I2 MVB 1311 MVS 1315 

MVW 2222 MVB 2221 MVS 2225 

MVW 2322 MVB 2321 MVS 2325 

ORGAN TUBA STRING BASS 

MVK 1213 MVB 1215 MVS 1214 

MVK 1313 MVB 1315 MVS 1314 

MVK 2223 MVB 2225 MVS 2224 

221 



MVK2323 MVB 2325 MVS 2324 

PERCUSSION VIOLA VIOLIN 

MVP 1211 MVS 1212 MVS 1211 

MVP 1311 MVS 1312 MVS 1311 

MVP 222 1 MVS 2222 MVS 222 1 

MVP 232 1 MVS 2322 MVS 232 1 

PIANO GUITAR VOICE 

MVK1211 MVS 1216 MVV 1211 

MVK1311 MVS 1316 MVV 1311 

MVK 222 1 MVS 2226 MVV 222 1 

TROMBONE HORN 

MVB 1213 MBV 1212 

MVB 1313 MVB 1312 

MBV 2223 MVB 2222 

MVB 2323 MBV 2322 

NUR 1010 - Introduction to Nursing-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1093C, MAC 1105 or higher or STA 2023, acceptance to Nursing Program 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 1142, NUR 1061, NUR 1 061 L (for the evening program) 

This course is one of the first nursing courses in the curriculum. The student is introduced to the client and to the health care 
environment, the nature of professional nursing, and professional standards in nursing practice. Basic concepts related to 
communication, family systems, recognition of cultural diversity, stress and adaptation, caring, ethical and legal issues, client 
education and teaching are introduced. Other topics addressed include: medical tenninology. critical thinking and the nursing process, 
test taking, the NCLEX examination, and other available resources to support nursing education. The Edison State College Nursing 
Program's philosophy, curriculum framework, and program outcomes are presented. This course requires some basic computer skills 
and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in the class. 

NUR 1022 - Fundamentals of Nursing-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022L, NUR 1023L, NUR 1061/1 061L (for the day programs) 

In this course students are introduced to the practice of the Associate Degree nurse and the role as provider of care, manager of care, 
and professional within the discipline of nursing. Using the nursing process, students begin to assess human needs and the actual or 
potential problems that interfere with the client's ability to meet these basic needs. Students learn fundamental, technical, and 
interpersonal skills. This course requires some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 1022L - Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical-AS 

6 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022, NUR 1023L, NUR 1061/1 061L (for the day programs) 

Clinical laboratory experiences are provided in selected area hospitals with an emphasis on the adult and older adult. This course may 
require some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 1023L - Fundamentals of Nursing Practicum-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L, BSC 1094C, NUR 1061/1061L (for the day programs) 

In this course students learn fundamental nursing skills and techniques for clients with uncomplicated medical-surgical alterations in 
health. These skills are demonstrated and practiced in the nursing practicum laboratory. Learning experiences include discussion, 
assigned readings, class demonstrations, and videos. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. 

NUR 1061 - health assessment-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1061 L, NUR 1023L (for the day program) 

This course presents an introduction to the concepts and skills of health assessment with a focus on normal physical assessment 
findings. The course is designed to assist students to integrate observations, inferences, and relationships among patient data when 
performing health assessments. Students will learn to apply various communication techniques to gather information regarding a 
client; they will also utilize inspection, palpation, percussion, and ausculta-tion to examine a client's body from head-to-toe. Through 
lectures, discussions, videos, and laboratory practice, sUidcnts will be prepared to take complete health histories, perform physical 
examinations, and record data from same. 



222 



NUR 1061 L - Health Asscssmcnt-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prcrequisite(s): NIR 1010. NUR 1 142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1061, NUR 1023L (for the day program) 

This course presents an introduction to the concepts and skills of health assessment with a focus on normal physical assessment 
findings. The course is designed to assist students to mtegrate observations, mfcrences, and relationships among patient data when 
performing health assessments. Students will learn to apply various communication techniques to gather information regarding a 
client; and perform head to toe examinations. Students will be prepared to take complete health histories, perform physical 
examinations, and record data from same. Laboratory practicum is provided for the development of these physical skills. 

NUR 1062 - Health Assessment and Skills-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prereiiuisite(s): ENC 1 101, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, MAC 1 105 or higher or STA 2023, Nursing Mobility Exam (as required), 
A Florida certiHcate or license as a Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular Technician (RCVT), or Licensed 
Practical Nurse (LPN) is required. Paramedics, RRTs, and RCVTs must be Florida certified nursing assistants. 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 1062L, NUR 1932, NUR 1204L, PSY 2012, DEP 2004, NUR 1204 

This course is part of the first semester m the Advanced Placement Nursnig Program. Enrolled students are licensed practical nurses 
(LPN). paramedics, respiratory therapists (RT), and cardiovascular technologists (CVT). The course has a dual focus: ( 1 ) to assist 
students to integrate observations, inferences, and relationships in performing health assessment, and (2) to become proficient in 
technical skills at the level required for professional nursing. Students will learn communication techniques necessary to gather 
information regarding a client, physical assessment techniques needed to examine a client from head-to-toe. and procedures required 
for patient care. 

NUR 1062L - Health Assessment and Skills Practicum-AS 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 1 101, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, MAC 1 105 or higher or STA 2023, Nursing Mobility Exam (as required), 
A Florida certificate or license as a Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular Technician (RCVT), or Licensed 
Practical Nurse (LPN) is required. Paramedics, RRTs, and RCVTs must be Florida certified nursing assistants. 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 1062, NUR 1932, NUR 1204L, PSY 2012, DEP 2004, NUR 1204 

This course is part of the first semester in the Advanced Placement Nursing Program. Enrolled students are licensed practical nurses 
(LPN), paramedics, respiratory therapists (RT), and cardiovascular technologists (CVT). The course has a dual focus: ( 1 ) to assist 
students to integrate observations, inferences, and relationships in performing health assessment, and (2) to become proficient in 
technical skills at the level required for professional nursing. Students will learn communication techniques necessary to gather 
information regarding a client, physical assessment techniques needed to examine a client from head-to-toe. and procedures required 
for patient care. A laboratory practicum is provided for the de\elopment of physical skills. 

NUR 1142 - Introduction to Pharmacology and Math Calculations-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1093C, MAC 1105 or higher 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1061, NUR 1061L (for evening program) 

Medication administration requires specialized knowledge, judgment, and nursing skills based on the principles of pharmacology. The 
focus of this course is to introduce the student to the nurse's role in the delivery and maintenance of safe and efficient drug treatment. 
Basic concepts of medication management are introduced. Content includes drug actions, systems of delivery, routes of 
administration, factors affecting drug action, ethical and legal concepts related to drug administration, and calculating medication 
dosages. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 1204 - Transitional Nursing Concepts-AS 

3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 5 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, MAC 1 105 or higher. Nursing Mobility Exam (as required), a Florida 

certificate or license as a Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular Technician (RCVT), or Licensed Practical 

Nurse (LPN) is required. Paramedics, RRTs, and RCVTs must be Florida certified nursing assistants. 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1932. NUR 1204L, PSY 2012, DEP 2004, NUR 1062L 

This transitional course mtroduces the student to the Nursing Program's philosophy, conceptual framework, and outcomes. The course 

includes content on the nursing process, legal and ethical issues, and expanded clinical skills. Using the nursing process, students 

assess human needs, alterations of human needs, and nursing interventions necessary to meet these needs. The student is introduced to 

the role of provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. The course utilizes experiences in the 

classroom, and clinical facilities to address nursing care of clients in acute care settings. Advanced Placement Sequence Only 

NUR 1204L - Transitional Nursing Concepts Clinical-AS 

6 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, MAC 1105 or higher. Nursing Mobility Exam (as required), a Florida 
certificate or license as a Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular Technician (RCN'T), or Licensed Practical 
Nurse (LPN) is required. Paramedics, RRTs, and RCV Ts must be Florida certified nursing assistants. 

-^ Co-requisite(s): NUR 1932, NUR 1204, PSY 2012, DEP 2004, NUR 1062C 

Using the nursing process, students assess human needs, alterations in human needs, and nursing interventions necessary to meet these 

^ needs. The student is introduced to the role of provider of care, manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. The course 

*-^ 223 



TD 



utilizes experiences in the clinical facilities to address nursing care of clients in acute care settings. This course may require some 
basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class, if used. 

NUR 1211 - Adult Nursing I-AS 

4 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 7 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1023L, BSC 1094C, NUR 1061L 

Co-requisite(s): DEP 2004, NUR 121 IL, PSY 2012, NUR 1511, NUR 2140 (day program students only) 

Students continue to develop their roles as manager of care and member of the profession of nursing and as a provider of care to 
clients with uncomplicated medical-surgical alterations in health. Application of theory to practice is emphasized. Knowledge, 
techniques, and skills related to promoting, restoring, and maintaining health are taught. Learning experiences include the following: 
lecture-discussion and a scholarly paper. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT if used. The instructor will 
demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 121 IL - Adult Nursing I Clinical-AS 

9 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1023L NUR 1061L, 

Co-requisite(s): DEP 2004, NUR 121 1, PSY 2012, NUR 2140 (for day program students only) 

Clinical experiences take place in acute care facilities and community settings to assist students to develop their roles as providers of 
care, managers of care, and professionals within the discipline of Nursing. This course may require some basic computer skills and 
WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class if used. 

NUR 1511 - Introduction to Mental Health Concepts in Nursing-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1022/1022L or NUR 1204/1204L 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022L, NUR 1023L (for the evening program students only) 

This course, the first in a series of three devoted to mental health nursing, assists students to refine communication skills introduced in 
earlier nursing courses and to develop a beginning understanding of the dynamics of human behavior, as applied in mental health 
nursing and in the psychosocial sphere of general nursing care. Select mental health experiences and activities will be incorporated 
into NUR 121 IL, Adult Nursing I (Basic Nursing students) or NUR 2424L. Maternal Nursing Concepts (Advanced Placement 
Nursing students). These clinical learning experiences will provide students with the opportunity to further develop their roles as 
provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. NUR 1511 may require students to utilize basic 
computer skills and computer-assisted instruction. 

NUR 1932 - Nursing Seminar-Advanced Placement-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 1105 or higher, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, ENC 1101. Nursing Mobility Exam (as required) A Florida 
certificate or license as a Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Cardiovascular Technician (RCVT), or Licensed Practical 
Nurse (LPN) is required. Paramedics, RRT's, and RCVT's must be Florida certified nursing assistants.) 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 1204/1204L, PSY 2012, DEP 2004, NUR 1062L 

This course introduces the student to concepts relevant to the nursing care provided in acute and long term care facilities. Students 
work individually and in groups on assignments pertaining to: cultural diversity, nursing process, nursing care plans, pharmacology, 
ethical-legal implications, and the teaching-learning process. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT if used. 
The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 2140 - Advanced Pharmacological Concepts-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1 142, NUR 1010, NUR 1022/1022L, NUR 1023L, NUR 1061L,, NUR 1062L, NUR 1204/1204L, NUR 1932 

or professor, program coordinator or director's permission. 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1211, NUR1211L (for basic day and evening programs only) 

Medication administration requires specialized knowledge, judgment, and nursing skills based on the principles of pharmacology. The 
focus of this course is to assist the student in applying knowledge of pharmacology and the nursing process to direct nursing decisions 
relative to safe drug administration and to ensure compliance with standards of practice. This course focuses on identification of drug 
classifications, drug interactions, calculation of dosages and solutions and application of the nursing process to clinical situations. This 
course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor will demonstrate WebCT in class if used. 

NUR 2260 - Advanced Adult Nursing II-AS 

3 class hours, 4 laboratory hours 7 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 2140, NUR 2424/2424L, NUR 2310/2310L, NUR 1511, NUR 2523, ENC 1 101, MAC 1 105 or STA 2023 
OR HIGHER, BSC 1093C, BSC 1094C, DEP 2004, PSY 2012, MCB 2010C, Humanities Elective. 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 2810, NUR 2941L, NUR 2260L, NUR 2530 

This course is an integrated study of complicated alterations in health in the adult client. It includes theoretical concepts relevant to 
adults experiencing complex medical/surgical health alterations, and the goal of restoration or maintenance of health. This course may 
require some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor may demonstrate WebCT in class. 



224 



NUR 2260L - Advanced Adult Nursing II Clinical-AS 

12 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 2140, NUR 2424/2424L, NUR 2310/2310L, NUR 1511, NUR 2523 

Co-rcquisite(s): NUR 2810/2941L, NUR 2260, NUR 2530 

Clinical learning experiences provide students with the oppominity to flirther develop their roles as providers of care, managers of 
care, and professionals within the discipline of nursing. This course may require some basic computer skills and WcbCT. The 
instructor may demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 2310 - Pediatric Nursing Conccpts-AS 

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1 204/1 204L or NUR 1211/1211L, NUR 1932, NUR 2424/2424L, DEP 2004, PSY 2012 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2310L, NUR 2523, NUR 2424L 

A developmental approach is utilized to study the nursing care of the child from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is on wellness, 
growth and development, and the nursing care of the child with alterations in health. This course may require some basic computer 
skills and WebCT. The instructor may demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 2310L - Pediatric Nursing Clinical-AS 

6 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1204/1204L or NUR 121 1/121 IL, NUR 1932, NUR 2424/2424L, DEP 2004, PSY 2012 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2310L, NUR 2523, NUR 2424L 

The clinical setting provides the student with the opportunity to develop his/her role as provider of care, manager of care, and 

professional within the discipline of nursing as it relates to the care of children. 

NUR 2424 - Maternal Nursing Concepts-AS 

2 class hours, 1 laboratory hour 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 121 1/121 IL or NUR 1204/1204L, NUR 1511 (Basic) DEP 2004, PSY 2012 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2310/2310L, NUR 1511 (AP), NUR 2424L, NUR 2523 

This course focuses on the nursing care of childbearing women and their families through all stages of pregnancy and childbirth, as 

well as care of the newborn. Emphasis is on the process of labor, birth, and recovei^. teaching about pregnancy, and parenting skills. 

Women's health issues are also discussed. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. The instructor may 

demonstrate WebCT in class. 

NUR 2424L - Maternal Nursing Clinical-AS 

3 clinical hours Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 121 1/121 IL or NUR 1204/1204L, NUR 1511 (Basic) DEP 2004, PSY 2012 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2310/2310L, NUR 1511 (AP), NUR 2424L, NUR 2523 

The clinical setting provides the student with the opportunity to care for women and to prepare women for childbirth as well as 

develop the roles of the nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the discipline of nursing. Mental Health 

concepts will be integrated through-out the course and these concepts will be applied to patient care. 



^ NUR 2523 - Mental Health Concepts Across the Lifespan-AS 

^ 1 class hour 1 Credits 

_^ Prerequisite(s): NUR 1511 

W Co-requisite(s): NUR 2310/2310L, NUR 2424L 

■^ This second mental health course assists the students in understanding dynamics of human behavior and acquiring knowledge of 

^ mental health concepts related to anxiety and to mental health disorders common at specific periods across the lifespan. This course 

^ builds on mental health concepts taught in the introductory course. Select mental health experiences and activities will be incorporated 

into NUR 2310L, Pediatric Nursing Concepts for Basic and Advanced Placement students. These clinical learning experiences will 

^ provide students with the opportunity to fiirther develop their roles as provider of care, manager of care, and professional within the 

^ discipline of nursing. NUR 2523 may require students to utilize some basic computer skills and computer-assisted instruction. 

NUR 2530 - Nursing for Clients with Major Mental Health Disorders-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 2523 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2260/2260L, NUR 2810, NUR 2941L 

This third mental health course assists students in understanding dynamics of human behavior and acquiring knowledge of mental 
health concepts related to major mental health disorders, including Mood Disorders, Schizophrenia, and Substance Abuse. This course 
builds on mental health concepts taught in the first two courses in the series. Select mental health experiences and activities will be 
incorporated into NUR 2260L, Advanced Adult Nursing II for Basic and Advanced Placement students. These clinical learning 
experiences will provide students with the opportunity to further develop their roles as provider of care, manager of care, and 

225 



professional within the discipHne of nursing. NUR 2530 may require students to utiHze some basic computer skills and computer- 
assisted instruction. 

NUR 2810 - Professional Issues and Role Development-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): All nursing courses except NUR 2260-NUR 2260L and NUR 2530 and all general education requirements for 

the A.S. Degree. 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2530 and NUR 2941 L 

This course is designed to facilitate the transition of the student to entry level practitioner. An overview of trends and issues in nursing 
and health care delivery is presented. The course explores legal-ethical issues, management and leadership concepts, and issues related 
to employment in nursing. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. 

NUR 2941 L - Clinical Preceptorship-AS 

96 clinical hours/over 4 weeks 2 C redits 

Prerequisite(s): All nursing courses and general education requirements for the A.S. Degree. 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 2260L, NUR2530, NUR 2810 

The focus of the clinical experience is on the progression of the student from the educational setting and student role, to functioning 
within the reality of the work place in a professional role. This Level 2 clinical Preceptorship teams a student with a registered nurse 
mentor for an in-depth clinical experience. Students are pro\ ided an opportunity to synthesize and utilize knowledge gained during 
their educational experience while functioning in the role of provider of care. Opportunities are provided for students to participate as 
a manager of client care, and to observe basic management functions. Students are required to complete this level 2, ninety-six hour 
clinical Preceptorship during the final month in the nursing program. This course may require some basic computer skills and WebCT. 

NUR 3066C - Advanced Health Assessment - BS 

2 class hours per week and 3 lab hours per week 3 Credits 

This course focuses on a holistic approach to health assessment of clients across the life span. Emphasis is placed on communication 
skills, health history, a review of body systems, and physical examination techniques. Assessment of risk factors and level of health 
functioning are analyzed and interpreted. Advanced practice health assessment skills are developed and refined through laboratory 
experiences. This course is a\ ailablc to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students 
to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to students who are accepted into 
the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 
1101. ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the 
program page. 

NUR 3125 - Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice - BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 3066C 

This course builds upon the student's knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, nursing science, genetics and growth and 
development. An in-depth integration of normal and altered physiological and pathologic mechanisms of body systems and life span 
development and dysfijnction are examined. A variety of episodic and chronic health challenges from individual, family and 
community perspectives will be explored. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is 
web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to 
students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR 
courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102. STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all 
science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 3145 - Pharmacology and Alternative Therapeutics - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course builds on the student's knowledge of pharmacology and therapeutics. Major categories of pharmacological agents and 
alternative, nutrifional and complimentary therapies are explored. Application of pharmacologic concepts, drug interactions, legal 
responsibilities, and nursing considerations are examined. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face 
format that is web-enhanced, requinng students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course 
is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 
level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1 101. ENC 1 102. STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must 
complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 3655 - Multicultural Nursing - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an elective offering in the RN-BSN program. The course examines the ethnic and cultural influences on beliefs, values, 
and practices in relation to health, illness, and health-seeking behaviors. Application of the nursing process and strategies to provide 
culturally competent care to clients and communities with respect to cultural norms, diversity, and individual differences are 
addressed. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to 
complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. 

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^ NUR 3805 - Professional Roles and Dimensions - BS 

- 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ This introductory course is designed for the returning RN and focuses on the issues and theories related to current professional nursing 
practice. The evolution of nursing as a profession and the role of the professional nurse are examined. An overview of selected nursing 

^ theorists and professional nursing practice in a dynamic health care delivery system are presented. This course is available to students 

"* as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based 

^ assignments and activities. Taken in the first 9 credit hours of the RN-BSN program. This course is restricted to .students who are 

^ accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must 

— complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102. STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as 
^ noted on the program page. 

Z NUR 3826 - Legal Ethical Aspects in Nursing - BS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

-' This course focuses on the areas of professional liability as it relates to negligence, intentional torts, and client consent. The role of the 

"• nurse is explored as it relates to patient advocacy and risk management. The student is introduced to the principles underlying legal 

"* and ethical issues and methods of rational decision making related to healthcare. Critical laws and issues related to current professional 

^ practice are explored: the moral foundations of professional practice; the elements of ethical decision-making; and maintaining ethical 

^ practice climates in healthcare delivery systems. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that 

^ is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted 

— . to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR 

■* courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all 

~ science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

Z NUR 3873 - Informatics for the Health Professional - BS 

^ 3 credit hours 3 Credits 

^ This course focuses on information technologies and systems that support decision making and nursing care in current nursing 

^ practice. Computer techniques, the World Wide Web, and lit servers as they relate to nursing practice and basic research are examined. 

Security and confidentiality as they relate to HIPPA. tele-health, and electronic health records (EHR) will be explored. This course is 
w available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and 

mm. specific web-based assignments and activities. Taken in the first 9 credit hours of the RN-BSN program. This course is restricted to 

■^ students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR 

•^ courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all 

science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

_. NUR 3895 - Teaching and Learning for the Healthcare Professional - BS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

"~ This course is an elective offering in the RN-BSN program. This course provides an introduction to the processes of health education, 
teaching, learning and evaluation. The students will develop objectives and learning outcomes as well as explore various teaching and 

^ learning strategies and methodologies applicable to individuals and groups of learners in a variety of settings across the lifespan. This 

^ course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete 

^ classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. 

"^ NUR 4165 -Nursing Research -BS 

^ 3 class hours 3 Credits 

^ Prerequisite(s): STA 2023, NUR 3870 

W This course provides an introduction to scientific inquiry and the research process in nursing and enables the student to understand and 

use published research. Scholarly inquiry, scientific integrity, scientific investigation, and research as it pertains to evidencedbased 
nursing practice are explored. Issues and problems and the systematic evaluation of reports of empirical research are discussed. This 
course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete 
classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 
1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 4169 - Evidenced Based Nursing Practice - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an elective offering in the RN-BSN program. Exploration and integration of current scientific evidence, use of clinical 
judgment, identification of patient preferences, and assessment of available resources are the conceptual elements used to promote 
clinical practice decision making. This course explores the concepts of critical analysis and outcomes research, emphasizing the 
elements of evidence based nursing practice. Focus is placed on utilization of research in clinical practice and the student will examine 
and plan a resolution of a clinical nursing problem. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format 
that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. 

NUR 4295 - Critical Care Nursing - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 3130, NUR 3066C 

This course is an elective offering in the RN-BSN program. The course examines the needs of the critically ill client, focusing on the 

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'^ 



development of knowledge, techniques and skills needed for the delivery of complex nursing care to clients experiencing health 
problems requiring critical care interventions. Emphasis is on the use of evidenced-based practice and critical thinking while applying 
the nursing process to provide and manage care for the client and family. This course is available to students as an online course and a 
face-to-face format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. 

NUR 4636 - Community Health Nursing Theory - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 4636L 

This course focuses on the promotion of health and the holistic nursing role in the community. The student is introduced to community 
nursing practice, concepts of community assessment, health promotion, health maintenance, disease prevention, and health education. 
The nursing care of clients across the lifespan is explored with attention given to the community as client. This course is available to 
students as an online course and a face-to-facc format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific 
web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with 
grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 4636L - Community Health Nursing Practicum - BS 

3 practicum hours 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 4636 

This course is a co-requisite with NUR 4636, Community Health Nursing Theory, and applies the concepts presented in that course in 
a variety of community health settings. The nursing care of clients across the lifespan is explored with attention given to the 
community as client. The course provides experiences with a preceptor and focuses on community assessment and teaching for the 
promotion of health, health maintenance, and prevention of illness. This course is available to students as an online course and a face- 
toface format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete practicum experiences with a preceptor along with specific web- 
based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101. ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with 
grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 4835 - Leadership in Nursing - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 4835L 

This course focuses on the theory, concepts, and underlying principles of management and leadership in health care delivery systems. 
The methods and interpersonal skills to become an effective nurse manager/leader in various health care delivery systems are explored 
along with the concepts of professional organizations, decision making, power, authority, roles, health care legislation, problem- 
olving, evaluation, work groups, and leader behaviors. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face 
format that is web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course 
is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 
level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must 
complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 4835L - Leadership in Nursing Practicum - BS 

3 practicum hours 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 4835 

This course applies the theories, concepts, and underlying principles of management and leadership in health care delivery systems 
presented in NUR 4835. The methods, management/leadership strategies, and interpersonal skills to become an effective nurse 
manager/leader in various health care delivery systems are explored with clinical experiences in a variety of healthcare settings. This 
course requires students to complete practicum experiences with a preceptor along with specific web- ased assignments and activities. 
This course is restricted to students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 
and 4000 level NUR courses, students must complete ENC 1 1 1 , ENC 1 1 02, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also 
must complete all science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

NUR 4847 - Clinical Decision Making - BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): NUR 3125, NUR 3066C 

This course emphasizes critical thinking and clinical judgment of the professional nurse. The decision making role of the nurse to 
affect desired client outcomes in a variety of settings is examined. Critical thinking skills and the ability to utilize the nursing process 
in clinical decision making is emphasized. This course is available to students as an online course and a face-to-face format that is 
web-enhanced, requiring students to complete classroom and specific web-based assignments and activities. This course is restricted to 
students who are accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. In order to enroll in the 3000 and 4000 level NUR 
courses, students must complete ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, STA 2023 with grades of "C" or better. Students also must complete all 
science prerequisites as noted on the program page. 

OCB lOOlC - The Living Ocean -AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A study of the living ocean presented within the context of marine biology and biological oceanography, two closely related albeit 
distinct fields. This course emphasizes the basic scientific processes that affect marine ecosystems and the organisms in the sea. Using 

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the delicate marine environment of Southwest Florida as a natural laboratory', students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts 
learned in the classroom to the field. 

OCB 2010 - Marine Biology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010 or one year of high school biology 

Co-requisite(s): OCB 201 OL 

This course is an introduction to the biology of the sea with an emphasis on the structural, physiological and behavioral adaptations of 
marine life. Discussions will center on organisms from the smallest microbes to the largest marine vertebrates and the roles they play 
in marine ecosystems. Special attention will be paid to the delicate communities of Southwest Florida, including mangrove forests and 
coral reefs. 

OCB 2010L - Marine Biology Laboratory- AA 

3 laboratory hours 1 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): OCB 2010 

This laboratory course complements the lecture-based course OCB 2010; Marine Biology, which examines the biological adaptations 
and diversity of life of the sea. Marine organisms and delicate Southwest Florida ecosystems will be studied through both hands-on 
laboratory activities and field trips. 

OCE lOOlC - Introduction to Oceanography -AA 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

An interdisciplinary exploration of the world's ocean presented in a combined lecture-lab format. This course emphasizes the basic 
scientific processes that govern the ocean and focuses on the classic disciplines of geological, physical and chemical oceanography. 
Using the delicate marine environment of Southwest Florida as a natural laboratory, students will have the opportunity to apply the 
concepts learned in the classroom to the field. Note: It is recommended that all college preparatory classes be completed prior to 
enrollment in ANY Science Course. 

OPT 1000 - Ophthalmic Orientation-AS 
1 Credits 

This course presents an introduction to the field of vision care, including opticianry, optometry, ophthalmology and optical 
manufacturing. Topics include ophthalmic history, legal and ethical principles, patient history, terminology and abbrev iations. 

OPT 1155 - Ophthalmic Lens I-AS 

3 Credits 

This course provides a brief history of the development of glass and plastic lenses, the various sphere, cylinder and prism powers, the 
use of optical cross, flat and toric transposition, and the aberrations of lenses. 

OPT 1156 - Ophthalmic Lens II-AS 
3 Credits 

This course continues the study of optical theory. Topics include: prism notation; vertical imbalance and methods of correcting for it; 
vertex power; luminance; reflection and absorption; diffraction; third-order lens aberrations, and lens tilt; anisometropia, and spectacle 
magnification. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 1225 - Low Vision- AS 

3 Credits 

This course provides a definition of visual impairment and methods used to measure it's severity. A description of the most common 
causes of visual impairment will be presented. Treatment plans including optical and non-optical aids will be reviewed. Credit for this 
course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 1400L - Ophthalmic Laboratory I-AS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to terms, instruments, lenses, frames, and materials to be used in the surfacing and finishing of 
ophthalmic prescription eyewear. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 1430L - Ophthalmic Laboratory II-AS 

3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to terms, instruments, lenses, frames, and materials to be used in the finishing process and 
handwork of ophthalmic prescription eyewear. This course is a continuation of Ophthalmic Laboratory I. Credit for this course does 
NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 



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OPT 1460 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I-AS 
3 Credits 

This course introduces the student to the skills necessary for becoming a dispensing optician. Included are the history of the 
profession, patient/client measurements, frames and lens materials, frame and lens selection, prescription, prescription analysis, and 
adjustment techniques. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 1460L - Ophthalmic Dispensing 1 Laboratory-AS 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce the students to the practical dispensing of optical products. The students will perform 
competencies related to the neutralization of single vision lenses and multifocal lenses for duplication, measure-ment of frames and 
mountings, and the measurement of PD"s. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 1666 - Safety and Sports Vision- AS 
3 Credits 

Opticians are constantly requested to provide eyewear that will better protect, improve and enhance vision for occupa-tional and 
recreational activities. This course will present the visual requirements for common occupations and sports. It will also discuss 
spectacle, contact lens, and non- optical solutions to safety and sports vision problems. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the 
Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2030 - Ophthalmic Board Review-AS 

1 Credits 

This course provides a comprehensive review and update of opticianry dispensing in preparation for the Florida State Board of 
Opticianry examination. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2204 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye-AS 

3 Credits 

This course investigates the anatomical structure of the eye and the fijnction of its parts as they pertain to the process of vision. Credit 
for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2375 - Refractometry-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is designed to instruct the students in the theory of refractometry and testing for visual acuity. It will include identifying 
ametropias, the etiology and distribution of refractive errors and anomalies of binocular vision. The steps in performing retinoscopy, 
objective and subjective refraction procedures will be covered. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2375L - Refractometry Laboratory-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is a continuation of OPT 2375. It is designed to introduce the students to the procedures of an objective and subjective 
refraction. Students will perform competencies related to retinoscopy, patient history, binocular balance and subjective testing for 
visual acuity. This is a primarily hands-on course. The students will gain practice in testing VA (cc and sc), retinoscopy, subjective 
refraction and binocular balancing in a clinically safe environment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts 
degree. 

OPT 2376L - Refractometry Laboratory II-AS 

1 Credits 

This course is a continuation of OPT 2375L. It is designed to fine tune the procedures of objective and subjective refractions. Students 
will perform competencies related to measuring visual acuity and taking a patient history, retinoscopy (review), confrontations and 
ROM's, pupillary functions, balance and binocular/phoria/tropia testing. This is primarily a hands-on course to help the students gain 
speed and accuracy in performing objective and subjective refractions. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts 
degree. 

OPT 2461 - Ophthalmic Dispensing II-AS 

3 Credits 

This course presents ophthalmic instruments and devices; analysis of absorptive lenses; computing and compensation of vertical 
imbalance; discussion of ethics and legal issues; record keeping and communications; optical salesmanship, and visual impairment. 
Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 



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OPT 2461 L - Ophthalmic Dispensing II Laboratory-AS 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce students to the practical aspects of frame alignments and adjustments, and the insertion and 
removal of lenses from various frames. The course includes fiarther instruction and practice on neutralization of lenses for verification 
and duplication of an Rx order, measure and callipering of lenses and frames, the facial measurements of orders (PD and seg heights), 
frame repair and the identification of various types of lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2463L - Ophthalmic Skills Laboratory II-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is designed to educate students in the technical skills of performing various procedures within the ophthalmic visual 
assessment area of a dispensary. The course will present technical equipment procedures, maintenance and use. as well as the skills 
needed in assisting Optometrists and patients with various procedures such as administering medicines and pharmacology 
identification and uses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2500 - Contact Lens Theory I-AS 

3 Credits 

This course includes a historical review as well as theory; design and optical principle of contact lenses; indications and 
contraindications for contact lens wear; patient evaluation; discussion of lens types and availability; fundamental techniques and fitting 
philosophies including the role of the biomicroscope, keratometer and radiuscope; patient education on care, cleaning, insertion and 
removal of contact lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2500L - Contact Lens Theory I Laboratory-AS 

2 Credits 

Students will perform competencies related to the handling of instruments and charts used in the fitting and designing of contact 
lenses. Students will also learn about the handling and evaluation of contact lenses by the fitter and the patient. Credit for this course 
does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2501 - Contact Lens Theory II-AS 
2 Credits 

Emphasizes contact lens verification, dispensing, and follow up care. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and special needs patients 
will also be covered. Credit for this course docs NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2501 L - Contact Lens Theory II Laboratory-AS 

2 Credits 

Students will perform competencies related to the design, inspection, modification, evaluation and dispensing of spherical contact 
lenses. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and other special lens patients will also be covered. Credit for this course does NOT 
apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2502L - Contact Lens Laboratory III-AS 

1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): OPT-2501L 

This course is an advanced hands-on experience in fitting contact lenses. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in 
Arts degree. 

OPT 2800L - Vision Care Clinical I-AS 

2 Credits 

^ This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on 

the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit 
for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 



^ 






OPT 2801 L - Vision Care Clinical II-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on 
the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit 
for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2802L - Vision Care Clinical III-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on 
the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit 
for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 



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OPT 2803L - Vision Care Clinical IV-AS 

2 Credits 

This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge gained in lectures and laboratories to clinical situations. Depending on 
the placement, the student may utilize skills related to management, fabrication, dispensing, contact lenses or visual assessment. Credit 
for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts degree. 

OPT 2910 - Directed Research- AS 

3 Credits 

This course covers the research, planning and development of an optical dispensary. Topics include the type, size, location and design, 
as well as financing, business structure, taxes, licenses and equipment. Credit for this course does NOT apply to the Associate in Arts 
degree. 

ORH 1008C - Introduction to Horticulture- AS 

2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

This course presents an introductory coverage of the fijnction and use of ornamental plants in the home interior and exterior landscape. 

PAD 3115 - Executive Leadership-BAS 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three semester credit hours of college level mathematics, each with a 
grade of "C" or higher 

The purpose of this course is to prove a common foundation to students for understanding the role of the contemporary political 
executive with an emphasis on leadership, organization, personality and power, ideology, relationships, decision making, and policy 
creation. 

PAD 3204 - Financial Management in the Public Sector-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course is an introduction to budgeting in the public and nonprofit sectors. The course concentrates on developing budget 
knowledge and skills essential for successfiji management performance. Upper Division courses limited to students admitted into a 
baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 3393 - Principles of Crisis and Emergency Management - BAS 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three semester credit hours of college level mathematics, each with a 

grade of "C" or higher 

This course is an introduction to all phases of emergency management from the social and environmental processes that generate 
hazards to vulnerability analysis, hazard mitigation, emergency response, and disaster recovery. 

PAD 3712 - Information Resources Management in the Public Sector-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three semester credit hours of college level mathematics, each with a grade of "C" 

or higher 

This course explores the use of technology in the field of emergency management. Examples of current and emerging technology 
applications will be studied. Critical issues and special problems associated with the use of technology in emergency management will 
be examined. Strategies to overcome these relative issues and problems will be outlined. Upper Division courses limited to students 
admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 3820 - Public Safety System Integration-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course compares and contrasts the various components of the public safety sector. The course examines the working relationship 
between public safety organizations and the effectiveness of the various service delivery models. Upper Division courses limited to 
students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 3874 - Community Relations - Theory and Practice - BAS 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three semester credit hours of college level mathematics, each with a 

grade of "C" or higher 

This course will expose the student to community relations theory and practice within a broad range of public safety organizations. 
Students will understand why positive community perception of public safety is critical to funding and operational effectiveness. The 
students will explore the public safety responsibility in establishing business continuity both in preplanning and following a disaster. 
Each student will gain the insight and skills necessary to be effective in the community relations fijnction of public safety 
administration. 

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PAD 4232 - Grant and Contract Managcmcnt-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course is a study ofpublic agency grant and contract administration. Topics include alternate funding sources, grant preparation, 
and application processes. The course addresses legal and ethical considerations in grant and contract management. Upper Division 
courses limited to students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4332 - Strategic and Operational Planning - BAS 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites ENC 1 101, ENC 1 102, and three semester credit hours of college level mathematics, each with a 

grade of "C" or higher 

This course is an introduction to how emergency managers use objective information to design, direct, and improve emergency 
services as well as plan AND facilitate results-based policy decisions. 

PAD 4393 - Critical Incident Management - BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1 102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course studies the techniques, skills, and information systems needed to implement command and control applications during 
significant emergencies. Upper Division courses limited to students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4426 - Public Sector Labor Relations - BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course analyses bargaining and negotiating in political and academic content and provides a practical guide to those involved in 
contract negotiations. The course examines the skills needed to resolve disputes in the public sector through facilitation, mediation, 
and other alternative methods. Upper Division courses limited to students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4442 - Public Relations-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

The course studies the complex field of educating the public and responding to public concerns. Students will design integrated plans 
and develop professional contacts within the public safety system. Upper Division courses limited to students admitted into a 
baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4604 - Regulatory Policy and Administrative Law in the Public Safety Sector-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course examines the issues of administrative ethics in public service. Topics include integrity, ethics codes, administrative 
discretion, secrecy and sunshine laws, organizational pressures, and policies on whistleblowing. Upper Division courses limited to 
students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4878 - Management Capstone Project-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must be eligible to graduate from the Public Safety Administration BAS program to enroll in the 
capstone course. Public Safety Administration elective courses may be taken concurrently, but all other courses (including 
general education and foreign language) must be successfully completed. 

During the course, the student will complete a professional project applying the knowledge gained from the core courses under the 
direction of a professor. Successful completion of the course requires demonstration of achievement of program learning outcomes. 
Student and professor feedback regarding the program will be obtained during the course and used for program improvement. Upper 
Division courses limited to students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 

PAD 4932 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety-BAS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better: ENC 1101, ENC 1102, and three 

semester hours of college level mathematics. 

This course addresses a contemporary theme relevant to Public Safety Administration. The theme will be determined by consultation 
with students and safety agency leaders. Topics will address global or multidisciplinary issues in the field ofpublic safety. Upper 
Division courses limited to students admitted into a baccalaureate program major. 



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PCB 3023C - Cell Biology-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): BSC 1010 Biological Science I with Lab; BSC 1011 Biological Science 11 with Lab 

This course offers a detailed examination into the molecular and cellular concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The cell theory, 
cell organization, and various cellular processes and metabolic pathways including the cell cycle, meiosis, respiration, photosynthesis, 
DNA replication, and protein synthesis will be explored. Consideration will also be given to vinises, pathogens, advances in DNA 
technology and contemporary laboratory techniques. 

PCB 3043C - General Ecology with Lab (FGCU course) 
3 Credits 

Basic concepts of ecology at population, community, ecosystem, and landscape levels will be studied in integrated lectures, laboratory, 
and field exercises. 

PCB 3063C - Genetics with Lab (FGCU course) 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): (BSC lOlOC with a minimum grade of C or BSC 1010 with a minimum grade of C and BSC lOlOL with a 

minimum grade of C) and (BSC 101 IC with a minimum grade of C or BSC 1011 with a minimum grade of C and BSC 101 IL 

with a minimum grade of C) and (CHM 1045C with a minimum grade of C or CHM 1045 with a minimum grade of C and 

CHM 1045L with a minimum grade of C) 

A study of the principles and theories of heredity including the gene concept, Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance. Basic 

concepts include: the nature, organization, transmission, expression, recombination and function of genetic materials. Principles are 

derived for genetically characterizing populations. The curriculum is onquiry based and fijlly integrated with laboratory experiences 

which emphasize active learning strategies. 

PGY 1800C - Introduction to Digital Photography-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Requirement: Student must have access to a digital camera. 

This course gives the learner a complete exposure to the fundamentals of photography as applied to digital image making, including 
optical principles, camera operation, lighting considerations, composition, digital image manipulation (the virtual darkroom), image 
management, metadata considerations and issues of deployment on the World Wide Web. Course includes weekly assignments of 
hands-on field photography exercises for online submission and critique. Prospective students should have basic knowledge of the use 
of computers. 

PGY 1900C - Advanced Digital Photography -AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): PGV 1800C or permission from instructor. 

Requirement: Students must have access to a tripod and a digital camera with manual focus capability and manual exposure 

controls. 

This course continues the development of skills studied and acquired in the prerequisite PGY 1 800. The learner will study and apply 
sophisticated techniques of photography, digital photo editing and image management to her or his imaging workflow. Emphasis is 
placed on creative processes in planning and executing the photo shoot as well as post-shoot processing. Students will improve their 
skills in each area with intensive field photography projects and peer review of weekly photo assignments. 

PGY 2401C - Photography I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course is an introduction to basic aspects of black and white photography. Camera, lighting, film processing, printing and 
presentation are studied. Technical printing as well as the aesthetics of photography will be emphasized. This course requires a manual 
35mm camera and the purchase of darkroom supplies. 

PGY 2410C - Photography II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): PGY 2401C or permission of instructor. 

This course is a continuation of Photography 1. Exposure, negative development, printing, chemistry, composing and personal 
expression are emphasized. 

PHI 2010 - Introduction to Philosophy-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a basic course in philosophical thinking. Selected readings from Socrates to Sartre are included. 

PHI 2100 - Logic: Reasoning and Critical Thinking-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a basic course in methods and principles in the development of correct reasoning. 



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PHI 2600 - Ethics-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This is a basic ctnirse in philosophical thinking about morality, moral problems, and moral judgments. 

PHT 1010 - Physical Principles for the Physical Therapist Assistant - AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Course introduces the student to the basic physical principles that apply to commonly utilized therapeutic procedures in the field of 
physical therapy. Topics include but are not limited to body mechanics, ergonomics and the use of heat, cold, sound and electricity to 
facilitate healing. 

PHT 1020 - Therapeutic Communication for the PT Assistant - AS 

2 contact hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1211 

An overview of effective communication skills and concepts regarding successftil therapeutic interactions will be presented. Students 
will participate in several interactive sessions to become familiar with team building, verbal and non-verbal communication, effective 
listening concepts and conflict management to determine how to manage clinical situations as they arise. Cultural diversity is 
discussed. Students are responsible for developing an in-service presentation as a means of enhancing effectiveness of communication. 

PHT 1 103 - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assistant - AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): BSC 1094C 

Course introduces basic human anatomy with an emphasis on the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems. Actions, 
origins, insertions and innervations of muscles are discussed. Surface anatomy is presented with an introduction to basic palpation. 

PHT 1103L - Anatomy for Physical Therapist Assisting Lab - AS 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

Laboratory sessions for Anatomy for PTA (PHT 1 103) are designed to provide the students with an opportunity to identify, with 
accuracy, a variety of bones, bony landmarks, muscles, ligaments and other soft tissue structures using graphics and various 
anatomical specimens/models. Basic palpation skills are developed. 

PHT 1200 - Introduction to Physical Therapy - AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Course introduces the student to the historical background, philosophy and goals of physical therapy as a profession. It incorporates 
discussion on legal and ethical issues, educational requirements, supervisory relationships and current developments related to 
physical therapy. Health care delivery systems, the medical record and issues of reimbursement are discussed. This course presents the 
basic theory of body mechanics, preparation of the patient and the treatment area, positioning and transferring techniques, gait 
training, and wheelchair prescription. Professional behaviors are introduced. 

PHT 1200L - Introduction to Physical Therapy Lab - AS 
2 hours 1 Credits 

Laboratory sessions for Introduction to Physical Therapy (PHT 1200) are designed to allow the students an opportunity to familiarize 
themselves with the basic fi.mdamentals of patient care. Emphasis is placed on body mechanics analysis, positioning procedures, 
transfers, gait training, and basic patient care skills. Case Studies of various emphases are placed on data collection relative to the 
course content as well as patient and caregiver education. Skill checks as well as competency evaluations are completed. Professional 
behaviors, at the novice level, are assessed. 

PHT 1211 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I - AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1200, PHT 1103 

Course introduces the student to the theory and practical application of physical therapy modalities. The physiological effects of and 
the indications/contraindications of patient care interventions such as heat, cold, radiant therapy, electrotherapy, traction, intennittent 
compression and massage are presented. Principles of effective documentation and discharge planning are discussed. Problem-solving 
skills are detailed. 

PHT 121 IL - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures I Lab - AS 

4 hours per week 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1200L, PHT 1103L 

Laboratory sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures (PHT 1 2 1 1 ) are designed to develop student skills in the actual 
performance of the patient care interventions presented. Skills in massage are developed. Practical application of each intervention is 
emphasized with patient simulations and case studies enhancing the ability to understand a plan of care for a patient. Emphasis is 
placed on data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education. Case studies of various medical 
conditions with emphasis on modality interventions are completed. Skill checks as well as competency evaluations arc completed. 
Students are expected to demonstrate competency in carrying out an appropriate therapeutic modality plan of care including effective 
documentation. Professional behaviors, at the intermediate level, are assessed. 

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PHT 1300 - Survey of Pathological Deficits - AS 

4 class 4 Credits 

Course introduces the student to general pathological conditions with emphasis on those commonly seen in the field of physical 
therapy. Basic system anatomy is reviewed with an emphasis on the pathophysiology of disease. Student presentations of various 
musculoskeletal conditions are completed. Descriptions of how diseases are classified, diagnosed and treated, as well as the natural 
course/prognosis of these diseases are presented. Implications of disease processes as well as contraindications precautions and 
patient/caregiver education related to physical therapy are discussed through cases studies. When relevant, specific physical therapy 
plans, such as chest PT, arc discussed through case study analysis. The effects of aging upon disease and in general are considered. 

PHT 1310 - Survey of Musculoskeletal Deficits - AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Course introduces the student to general pathological conditions with emphasis on those commonly seen in the field of physical 
therapy as they relate to the musculoskeletal systems. Descriptions of how musculoskeletal diseases are classified, diagnosed and 
treated, as well as the natural/prognosis of these diseases are presented. Implications of disease processes as well as contraindications, 
precautions and patient/caregiver education related to physical therapy are discussed through case study analysis. The effects of aging 
upon disease and in general are considered. 

PHT 1350 - Basic Pharmacology for Physical Therapist Assistants - AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT1300 

Course introduces concepts of basic pharmacology and presents pharmacological agents dispensed for conditions commonly seen in 
physical therapy. Drug responses and interactions as they relate to patient response are discussed. 

PHT 1801L - Clinical Practicum I - AS 

20 hours per week 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1211 

Course involves student assignment to a local clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to discuss clinical performance 
objectives, the self-appraisal process, and overall requirements for this novice level practicum. Discussions also include 
professionalism, attitudes, patient rapport, sexual harassment, etc. A journal report of clinical experiences and an article review are 
required. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the novice level. 
Students attend a personal conference with the academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify areas of 
strengths/weaknesses with appropriate target dates and methods of amelioration if needed. Students receive a satisfactory/fail grade. 

PHT 2120 - Applied Kinesiology - AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1020 

This course is designed as part of a continuum in the application of anatomy to facilitate student analysis of functional movements 
with specific focus on the relationship between joint structure and fi.inction. Join structure and function including tests and measures 
for ROM and muscular strength are reintroduced. Special testing procedures, joint play and palpation are introduced which aid the 
student in understanding pathological movement patterns. Normal gait is detailed as well as discussion of implications of pathological 
gait patterns. Orthotic interventions for the spine and extremities are presented. 

PHT 2120L - Applied Kinesiology Lab - AS 

2 hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 2224L 

Laboratory sessions for Applied Kinesiology (PHT2120) are designed to provide opportunities for the students to practice the skills of 
goniometry and manual muscle testing along with special procedures. The student will also perform observation of normal and 
abnormal gait patterns as well as analysis of UE and LE movement patterns. Interventions are developed to address functional deficits. 
Palpation of surface anatomy and review of anatomical/bony landmarks occurs. Through completion of case studies, the student 
correlates patient problems related to various pathologies with their deficits in fiinctional activities and gait. Competency evaluations 
are completed. 

PHT 2162 - Survey of Neurological Deficits - AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1020 

Course introduces the etiology, pathophysiology and symptoms of common neuromuscular diseases/conditions. Basic neuroanatomy is 
reviewed. Neurodiagnostic procedures are presented. Specific case study assignments of various neurological conditions are 
completed and discussed. 

PHT 2224 - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures H - AS 
4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1103 

Course introduces concepts of therapeutic exercise with regards to its principles and objectives. The theory of and application of 

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specific exercise regimes are presented. Principles of ROM and stretching techniques are presented. A basic introduction to 
goniometry and manual muscle testing procedures is presented as it pertains to the development of therapeutic exercise interventions. 

PHT 2224L - Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II Lab - AS 

4 hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): PHT 1 103L, PHT 1200L 

Laboraton,' sessions for Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II (PHT 2224) are designed to provide the student with observation 
and actual application of therapeutic exercise in the laboratoi-y setting. Case studies of various medical conditions with emphasis on 
therapeutic interven-tions are completed. ROM and stretching techniques arc practiced, Goniometry and manual muscle testing 
procedures are practiced as they relate to the provision of therapeutic exercise. Emphasis is placed on data collection relative to the 
course content as well as patient and caregiver. Skill checks as well as competency evaluations are completed. Students are expected 
to demonstrate competency in developing and carrying out an appropriate therapeutic program including effective documentation. 
Professional behaviors, at the intcmiediate level, are assessed. 

PHT 2704 - Rehabilitative Procedures - AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 2162 

Advanced course designed to develop skill in and understanding of the underlying principles of advanced physical therapy plans of 
care including motor learning principles. Techniques presented include advanced therapeutic exercise programs (stroke, spinal cord 
injured, etc.) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF), Bobath and Brunnstrom. Amputations and principles of prosthetics are 
detailed with fitting and check-out procedures reviewed. 

PHT 2704L - Rehabilitative Procedures Lab - AS 

2 hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 2162 

Laboratory sessions for Rehabilitative Procedures (PHT2704) are designed for the students to practice the utilization of developmental 
postures in patient interventions as well as PNF, facilitation/inhibition techniques and others forms of advanced therapeutic exercise 
approaches. Stump wrapping and therapeutic management prosthetic patients are practiced. Case studies of various medical conditions 
with emphasis on advanced therapeutic exercise approaches as well as application of prosthetic principles are completed. Emphasis is 
placed on data collection relative to the course content as well as patient and caregiver education. Skill checks are completed. Students 
are expected to demonstrate competency in developing and carrying out appropriate interventions for a patient with neurological 
deficits. Professional behaviors, at the entry level, are assessed. 

PHT 2810L - Clinical Practicum H - AS 

24 hours per week 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 1810L 

Course involves student assignment to local clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to review clinical performance 
objectives, the self-appraisal process, and overall requirements for this intermediate level practicum. Class discussions are held to 
share and discuss experiences, patient care problems, learning styles, cooperative group participation, acceptance and implementation 
of constructive criticism, etc. A clinical journal and an in-service are required. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical 
thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the intermediate level. Students attend a personal conference with the 
academic coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify areas of strengths/weaknesses with appropriate target 
dates and methods of amelioration if needed. Students receive a satisfactory/ fail grade. 

PHT 2820L - Clinical Practicum HI - AS 

40 hours per week 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 2810L, PHT 2931 

Course involves full time student assignment to a local clinical facility. Includes scheduled class meetings to discuss clinical 
performance objectives, the self-appraisal process, and overall requirements for this entry level practicum. A clinical joumal, a case 
study report and a research project are required. Class discussions are held to share and discuss experiences, patient care problems, 
readiness for the workplace, leadership responsibilities, professional growth, etc. Weekly online discussion forums facilitate critical 
thinking, peer review, and managing clinical situations at the entry level. Students attend a personal conference with the academic 
coordinator of clinical education to discuss progress and to identify area of strength/weaknesses with appropriate target dates and 
methods of amelioration where necessary. Students receive a satisfactory/fail grade. 

PHT 2931 - Transition Seminar - AS 
2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHT 2120 

This course consists of a discussion and presentation seminar course on legal and ethical issues, interpersonal skill refinement, 
employment techniques, quality assurance, and career development. Discharge planning concepts are reviewed. Empathy for patients 
and enhanced understanding of the challenges of a disability are explored through a community advocacy project. A capstone project 
is completed to assess entry level preparation. The course also provides a comprehensive curriculum review and presents details on 
applying for licensure as students prepare for the transition to the work place. 



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PHY 1007 - Physics for the Health Sciences- AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C," or higher level mathematics 

This is a one-semester course for students in the health sciences who need a background in physics which is broad in scope and 
stresses applications in the health field. This course cannot be used to meet the AA science requirement since it has no accompanying 
laboratory. 

PHY 2048 - General Physics I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 23n/MAC 2312 (MAC 2312 may be taken concurrently) 
Co-requisite(s): PHY 2048L 

This is the first course of a two-semester traditional calculus-based physics sequence. Topics covered include mechanics and the 
properties of matter. 

PHY 2048L - General Physics I Laboratory-AA 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 2311/MAC 2312 (MAC 2312 may be taken concurrently) 

Co-requisite(s): PHY 2048 

This course is a companion to PHY 2048 and includes comprehensive experiments, data collection and interpretation to illustrate 
concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity and properties of matter. 

PHY 2049 - General Physics II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHY 2048 
Co-requisite(s): PHY 2049L 

This is the second course in a two-semester traditional calculus-based physics sequence. Topics covered include oscillations and 
waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. 

PHY 2049L - General Physics II Laboratory-AA 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHY 2048 
Co-requisite(s): PHY 2049 

This course is a companion to PHY 2049 and includes comprehensive experiments, data collection and interpretation to illustrate 
concepts and principles related to oscillations and waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity, and magnetism. Principles of optics are 
demonstrated through the use of mirrors, prisms and lenses. 

PHY 2053 - College Physics I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 1140 and MAC 1114 or MAC 1147 

Co-requisite(s): PHY 2053L 

This is the first course of a two-semester non-calculus introduction to physics sequence primarily for pre-professional and technical 
students. Topics covered include mechanics and the properties of matter. 

PHY 2053L - College Physics I Laboratory-AA 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): MAC 1140 and MAC 1114 or MAC 1147 

Co-requisite(s): PHY 2053 

This course is a companion to PHY 2053 and includes comprehensive experiments, data collection and interpretation to illustrate 
concepts and principles related to force and motion, work and energy, rotation, gravity and properties of matter. 

PHY 2054 - College Physics II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHY 2053 
Co-requisite(s): PHY 2054L 

This is the second course of a two-semester non-caiculus introduction to physics sequence primarily for pre-professional and technical 
students. Topics covered include oscillations and waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. 

PHY 2054L - College Physics II Laboratory-AA 

2 laboratory hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PHY 2053 
Co-requisite(s): PHY 2054 

This course is a companion to PHY 2054 and includes comprehensive experiments, data collection and interpre-tation to illustrate 
concepts and principles related to oscillations and waves, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Principles of optics are 
demonstrated through the use of mirrors, prisms and lenses. 

238 



PLA 1003 - Introduction to Paralegal Studics-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course provides an overview of the training and purpose of paralegals. It examines tiie role of the lawyer and the paralegal in 
modem society, the ethical and professional practice standards applicable to both lawyer and paralegal, and surveys the various fields 
of law to be covered in the Paralegal Studies program. 

PLA 1103 - Legal Research and Writing I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 Composition I 

This course presents an introduction to legal research including citation form, case law, reading and finding statutes, legislative 
history', con.stiuitional law, administrative law, court rules, local rules, loose-leaf services, secondary references, computer research, 
and ethical considerations. 

PLA 21 14 - Legal Research and Writing ll-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PLA 1103 

This course provides research and writing skills that the paralegal needs, with emphasis on legal writing and computer-assisted legal 
research. The course is intended to familiarize student with problems, procedures, and ethics in legal research and writing. 
Computerized legal research techniques using LEXIS are examined in depth to complement the techniques learned in?PLA 1 103. 
Ethical issues in legal research and writing are explored in depth in particular issues relating to computer-assisted legal research and 
internet resources. 

PLA 2200 - Litigation-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the structure of the federal and state judicial systems and their jurisdictions. It 
introduces the student to the basic litigation process and its procedural aspects by focusing on the federal and state rules of civil 
procedure and evidence. It includes comparisons of state and federal court rules, the drafting of pleadings, and ethical considerations 
relating to litigation. 

PLA 2202 - Torts-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course covers principles of tort litigation, lawyer and client relationships, causes of action, remedies and defenses, jurisdiction, 
commencement of lawsuits, rules of procedure, pleadings, gathering evidence, and ethical considerations. 

PLA 2600 - Wills, Trust and Probate Administration-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course provides instruction in estate planning, wills, probate practice and procedures, jurisdiction, functions of lawyers and 
personal representatives, initial steps in probate, inventory and appraisal, creditors claims, distribution and discharge, ancillary 
administration, and ethical considerations. 

PLA 2610 - Real Estate Law and Property- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course provides a study of ownership, title issues, legal descriptions, real estate contracts, real estate transfers and transactions, 
real estate closings, and ethical considerations. 

PLA 2763 - Law Office Management-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course covers principles of organization and management, management styles, communications process, utilizing paralegals, 
management of office employees, office environment, office systems, office functions, financial management, and ethical 
considerations in law office management. 

PLA 2800 - Family Law-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101 

This course presents a study of various aspects of family law including marriage, premarital and other agreements, annulment, 
dissolution of marriage, separation agreements, child custody, child support, alimony, judicial separation, adoptions, and ethical 
considerations relating to the field of family law. 



239 



PLA 2931 - Specialized Topics in Paralegal Studies - AA 
1-3 Credits 

This course is intended to explore a wide range of varying topics in law and to provide students with an increased understanding of the 
legal and ethical implications of the subject at hand. Topics to be offered will provide a broad range of specialized subject matter and 
will be selected in areas of current interest or in highly focused areas within the law. Topics may vary from one semester to another. 
Topics will be offered as one, two or three credits and can be combined with other topics for up to three hours of elective credit. 

PLA 2942 - Paralegal Internship-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Eighteen (18) credit hours of PLA coursework, each with a grade of "C" or higher 

This course is designed to provide students with direct work experience in a legal setting such as a law firm, government agency, 
court, corporate legal department, or title company. Students will complete 135 hours of supervised paralegal work in a legal setting 
during their internship. SKident experiences will be documented and evaluated by the supervising paralegal, lawyer, judge, judicial 
assistant, or title company supervisor. Students will submit a portfolio of legal writing samples and a report analyzing their work 
experiences at the end of the internship. Students are responsible for locating a suitable firm or organization in which to obtain this 
experience. The course is the capstone for the Edison State College AS degree in Paralegal Studies. Successfiil completion of this 
course demonstrates that students have effectively met the objectives and outcomes of the AS in Paralegal Studies. 

POS 2041 - American National Govcrnment-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course covers the national government within the American federal system. Functions, processes, and contemporary problems of 
American political systems, along with political parties, pressure groups, elections. Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court 
are also discussed. 

POS 2112 - American State and Local Politics-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course emphasizes practical politics and fijnctional government. A critical analysis of state and community political systems and 
processes is covered using the community as a laboratory, and including contacts with state/local officials. Internships are encouraged 
and credit for practical experience is allowed when approved by instructor. 

POS 2601 - The Constitution-AA (**) 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to landmark Supreme Court decisions and doctrines in American constitutional law. Major social 
problems, social institutions, and the scope of constitutional power will be explored. 

PSY 2012 - General Psychology I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to give all students an introduction to psychology as a science and an understanding of psychology's 
applications to everyday life. The general models and methods psychology uses are explored as well as the factors that influence 
human behavior, including physiology, genetics, sensation, perception, learning, memory cognition, emotions, motives, personality, 
abnormal behavior and social interaction. 

PSY 2014 - General Psychology II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): PSY 2012 

This is the second course in introductory psychology designed primarily for psychology majors. Emphasis is placed on the basic 
principles and concepts of experimental psychology, including scientific methodology and experimental investigation, conditioning 
and learning, perception, cognition, memory, motivation and neuropsychology. 

REA 1605 - Study Skills for College Students-AA 
1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce specific study strategies, encourage self-determination, and student motivation. Emphasis is 
placed on individual application of different learning techniques for all college students. 

REA 1605 - Study Skills for College Students- A A 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce specific study strategies, encourage self-determination, and student motivation. Emphasis is 
placed on individual application of different learning techniques for all college students. 

REA 9001 - Reading Skills 1 (*) 

4 class hours, 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Placement testing or permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This is a classroom/laboratory course that incorporates mastery learning using a textbook, software, and a learning contract. It is 
designed to develop vocabulary literal reading skills, summarizing and sequencing skills, and a reading study system. Successful 
completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. 

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REA 9002 - Rcadino Skills II (*) 

4 class hours. 1 open laboratory hour 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Placement testing or permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This is a required classroom/laboratorv' course for students whose reading test scores indicate a need for the development of reading 
skills. Emphasis is placed on improving literal and inferential comprehension, vocabulary, rate, listening, writing, and study skills. 
Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or better. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or 
better. 

REA 9003 - Reading Skills III (*) 

4 class hours. 1 open laboratory hour 4 C redits 

Prerequisite(s): REA 9002, or placement testing, or permission of Dean of Academic Success Programs. 

This is a classroom laboratory course which is required for students whose reading test scores indicate a need for the development of 
reading skills. This is an integrated course of literal and inferential comprehension, \ocabulary. rate and flexibility, listening, writing 
and study skills. A state exit test must be passed to exit this course. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of "C" or 
better. 

RED 4012 - Foundations of Reading and Literacy Development-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in program in Education or special permission from the Associate 

Dean of Baccalaureate programs 

This course will prepare teacher candidates to be effective elementary reading teachers for a diverse population of students. Teacher 
candidates will develop a substantive knowledge of the structure and Function of language for each of the five major components of 
the reading process including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Teacher candidates will evaluate 
the major reading philosophies and research-based strategies for teaching reading. Teacher candidates will also apply the research- 
based reading strategies to create literacy experiences for elementary students that engage them in critical thinking and constructivist 
principles. The teacher candidates will also learn how to differentiate reading instructions for English Language Learners (ELLS) and 
students with exceptionalities. This course requires fifteen hours of field experience in a K-5 classroom. 

RED 4335 - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science in program in Education or special permission from the Associate 

Dean of Baccalaureate programs 

This course is designed to promote effective teaching of literacy skills across the curriculum. The major emphasis of this course is 
placed on current theories, methods and materials used in content area literacy instmction. Lecture discussion, simulated teaching and 
fieidwork constitute different course activities. Also, this course emphasizes that reading is a process of student engagements in both 
fluent decoding of words and construction of meaning. This course covers knowledge of language structure and function and cognition 
for each of the five major components of the reading process. 

RED 4350 - Literacy Content and Processes-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science program in Education or special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs 

This course examines literacy from an integrated perspective. Intermediate elementary and middle school children are the focus for the 
study that includes assessment and instructional planning for developmental reading, writing, listening, speaking and the support skills 
for the language arts. Skills for integrating literacy into the math and science classroom will be addressed. 

RED 4519 - Diagnosis and Intervention in Reading-BS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RED 4012 and admission into the Bachelor of Science in Education program or special permission from the 

Associate Dean of Baccalaureate Programs. 

This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to a wide range of reading assessment instmments and scientifically-based 
strategies used for understanding the individual and diverse needs of children. Candidates in this course will focus on effective use of 
assessment data to identify areas of concern and to plan, evaluate, and revise effective reading instruction to prevent difficulties and 
promote development. This class will explore materials and methods for a student-centered approach which builds on the sUidents' 
strengths and will focus on developing intervention plans for struggling readers. After taking this course, teacher candidates will have 
a stronger understanding of the reading process including the five dimensions of reading (e.g. phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, 
vocabulary, comprehension) and factors that promote effective teaching of literacy skills. 

REE 1040 - Real Estate Principles and Law-AA 

5 class hours 5 Credits 

This course presents the basic principles of real estate, property rights in real estate, ownership and leasing, property ownership, 
financing real estate, real estate brokerage and Florida real estate law. 



241 



REE 2041 - Real Estate Brokerage Principles and Practices- AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequlsite(s): REE 1040 or permission of instructor. 

This course is a prerequisite to licensing as a real estate broker in Florida and deals with real estate appraisal, financing, investment 
and office management. Students are expected to have mastered the mechanics of filling out closing statements prior to registration as 
a broker. Florida Real Estate Commission (FREC) rules apply. 

REL 1921 - New Religious Movements in Amcrica-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

An exploration of America's new religious movements from an interdisciplinary perspective that includes themes such as "cults" and 
the anti-cult movement, charismatic leadership, conversion methods, millennialism. modernization and globalization. Groups include 
but are not limited to those deriving from 19th century influences and the Biblical tradition. New Age, and Neo-Pagan, Eastern 
arrivals, African origins. Native American and the science-related groups such as Scientology. 

REL 2300 - World Religions-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course presents a scholarly introduction to the major religious traditions of the world. Course material includes historical 
background, function in society, philosophical tenets and sacred texts drawn from Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, 
Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. 

RET 1007 - Respiratory Care Pharmacology-AS 

2 class hours 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 

The knowledge and skills required for safe, effective administration of therapeutic drugs and indications and contraindications 
associated with drug therapy are an integral part of this course. This course introduces essential and advanced concepts of 
pharmacology as related to Respiratory Care. Anatomy and physiology of body systems as related to drug therapy as well as drugs 
related to both maintenance and emergency care will be emphasized. 

RET 1024 - Introduction to Cardiopulmonary Technology - AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the field including terminology and basic skills related to asepsis. The historical development of and current 
trends in cardiopulmonary technology are discussed. Basics of cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology are introduced. 

RET 1275C - Clinical Care Techniques-AS 

1.5 class hours, and 3 laboratory hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 

This combined lecture-laboratory course provides the foundation for both clinical skills and basic patient assessment skills necessary 
to basic Respiratory Care practice in a patient care setting. The course introduces the professional standards for medical asepsis, 
patient positioning, basic pulmonary assessment, medical ethics and behavioral problems unique to patients with Respiratory illnesses. 

RET 1616C - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology - AS 
2 class hour, 1 laboratory hour 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 

This course covers cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, blood gas analysis, and other hemodynamic calculations required in 
cardiopulmonary physiology. 

RET 1821L - Clinical Pre-Practicum I-AS 

4 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1024 
Co-requisite(s): RET 1616 

Supervised clinical practice in the on campus cardiac catheterization laboratory. Areas of concentration in this pre-clinicai course are 
orientation to clinical activities that are preformed in the programs clinical affiliates cardiology and cardiovascular technology 
departments. The cardiovascular technology students will practice in the holding area and cardiac catheterization laboratory on 
campus. The cardiovascular areas of focus include cardiac catheterization, arrhythmias, 12 leas electrocardiography and radiation 
safety. 

RET 1832L - Clinical Practicum I-AS 

8 Laboratory or clinical hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1616C, RET 1007, RET 1275C 

This clinical course consists of supervised clinical practice in both the on-campus cardiopulmonary laboratory and clinical sites. Areas 
of concentration in this course are bedside respiratory care clinical skills development in a patient care setting. Students will be able to 
practice in realistic clinical environments in at least 2 local hospitals. 



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RET 2234C - Respiratory Thcrapcutics-AS 

3 class hours, 5 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RET 1616C 

Co-requisite(s): RET 2874L, RET 2254C 

Medical gas. humidity and ncbulization concepts are presented, as well as advanced respiratory phannacology. Clinical and laboratory 

experience affords the student the opportunity to observe basic respiratory procedures and equipment maintenance. 

RET 2244 - Critical Care Applications-AS 

2 class hours, 1.5 laboratory hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 2234C 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2875L, RET 2930 

This course is an in-depth sUidy of critical care measures for medical, surgical, and emergency patients. Inter-aortic balloon pumping, 
Svvan-Ganz catheter monitoring and ACLS foundations are also presented. 

RET 2254C - Respiratory Care Assessmcnt-AS 

3 class hours, 5 laboratory hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1616C 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2234C 

In this course the student will leam the assessment of patients, focusing on theory, application and evaluation of Respiratory Care 
treatment modalities, as well as employing communication skills with physicians, patients and other health care providers. 

RET 2264C - Advanced Mechanical Ventilation-AS 

3 class hours, 5 laboratory hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RET 2234C 

Co-requisite(s): RET 2875L, RET 2414C 

In this course the student will leam the advanced theory and application of techniques of artificial mechanical ventilation, as well as 

other forms of patient monitoring. This course content comprises the single greatest emphasis on the National Board Exams. 

RET 2295 - Pulmonary Studies-AS 

2.5 class hours, 1 laboratory hour 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RET 2234C, RET 2254C 

Co-requisite(s): RET 2264C, RET 2875L 

Respiratory Care students investigate the causes of pulmonary diseases and injuries that impact on the pulmonary system structure and 

flinction. This course concentrates upon diagnostic techniques that lead to a better understanding of etiology and pathogenesis of 

pulmonary disease and response to injury. Critical thinking in response to the diagnostic process and treatment choice is emphasized. 

RET 2714 - Neonatal-Pediatric Respiratory Carc-AS 

2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RET 1616C 

Co-requisite(s): RET 2264C, RET 2414C, RET 2875L 

This course covers the development and physiology of the fetal and neonatal lung including perinatal circulation, pulmonary fiinction 

in infants, and developmental physiology of the lung. Neonatal and pediatric pulmonary disorders and their corresponding respiratory 

care are emphasized. 

RET 2874L - Clinical Practicum II-AS 

24 clinical hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 1616C 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2234C, RET 2254C 

Under supervision, the student assists the therapist in respiratory procedures in both in-patient and outpatient situations. Class 
presentation involves instmction in the rationale for procedures. 

RET 2875L - Clinical Practicum III-AS 

24 clinical hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 2874L 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2264C, RET 2244C 

Supervised clinical practice at an affiliated hospital. Areas of concentration in this critical care clinical course are arterial blood gasses, 
mechanical ventilation, ventilation monitoring, ECG monitoring, chest x-ray evaluation, aortic balloon pumping, Swan-Ganz 
catheterization and monitoring, cardiac output determination, chest tube drainage, and airway management. 

RET 2876L - Clinical Practicum IV-AS 

36 clinical hours 5 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RET 2875, RET 2264C 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2930 

Under supervision, the student participates in respiratory care measures in all areas of the acute care facility. Students maintain 

243 



equipment, participate in emergency procedures and pulmonary function testing as well as observation rotations in the home care 
setting and physician practice. 

RET 2930 - Respiratory Care Practitioner as a Professional - AS 
3 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisile(s): RET 2264C 
Co-requisite(s): RET 2876L 

In this course the professional relationship of the respiratory therapist is presented and a basic research format is emphasized with an 
added option of taking an ACLS class and NBRC Self Assessment Exams. 

RMI 2001 - Principles of Risk Management-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This cor sc covers basic principles and concepts relating to risk management as it relates to personal and business environments. The 
major areas of instruction include property/casualty, life, and health. 

RTE 1000 - Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1503L 

This course is an overview of medical imaging and an investigation of patient care techniques applicable to the practicing 
radiographer. It includes concepts on becoming a technologist, practicing the profession, and competently performing patient care in 
the medical environment. 

RTE 1001 - Radiographic TerminoIogy-AS 

2 class hours 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Radiologic Technology Program 

This course is the study of the language of medicine which is commonly used in the field of Radiology. It includes the construction, 
analysis, spelling, application and pronunciation of medical terms and how they relate to the structure and fiinction of the human body. 
It explores the use of medical words and abbreviations used in Radiologic procedures, pathophysiology and case histories. 

RTE 1418 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure I-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Program Admittance 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1503 

The course leads the student through concepts related to radiographic imaging including: beam restriction, grids, radiographic film, 
processing, sensitometry, intensiiying screens, quality factors, and conversion techniques involving manipulation of exposure 
parameters. 

RTE 1457 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure II-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1613 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1814 

This course is designed to build upon the concepts learned in RTE 1613, Radiologic Physics, and RTE 1418, Principles of 
Radiographic Exposure I. The course leads the student through concepts related to radiographic imaging including: film critique, 
exposure control systems including fixed and variable kilovoltage technique chart construction, automatic exposure control, and 
exposure conversion methods. 

RTE 1503 - Radiographic Positioning I-AS 

3 class hours 4 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1418 and RTE 1503L 

This course presents a study of radiographic positioning procedures covering the upper and lower extremities, chest and abdomen. 
Concepts include radiographic anatomy and film analysis. Radiation protection is stressed and demonstrated for each procedure. 

RTE 1503L - Radiographic Positioning I Lab-AS 

16 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite($): Admission into the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable the Edison State College Radiologic Technology student to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate skills learned in the classroom in the clinical 
setting. In this area, each student is assigned to the various department subdivisions. The student works closely with a registered 
radiologic technologist. 

RTE 1513 - Radiographic Positioning II-AS 

3 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1503 and 1503L 

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Co-requisile{s): RTE 1804 

This course is a continuation of positioning theoi7 and application stalled in RTE 1503. Radiographic procedures studied include; the 
entire vertebral column, bony thorax, upper and lower gastrointestinal systems, the biliary system, and the genitourinary system. 

RTE 1523 - Radiographic Positioning lll-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1513 and 1804 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1814 

This course covers the procedures involved with radiographic examinations of the head. X-ray sUidies investigated include: bony 
calvanum. sella turcica, facial bones, optic foramen, mandible, temperomandibular joints, paranasal sinuses, and the temporal bone. 

RTE 1573 - Radiologic Science Principles-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1457 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1824 

This course is designed to teach radiography students advanced imaging concepts related to their field. Topics covered include: mobile 
radiography, fluoroscopy, tomo-graphy. macro-radiography, duplication, subtraction, digital imaging processing, and basic physical 
concepts related to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Students learn advanced radiographic procedures 
including venipuncture and mammography. Special consideration is placed on positioning and exposure techniques that help the 
radiographer consistently obtain optimum images of human anatomy. 

RTE 1613 - Radiographic Physics-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1418 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1804 

This course presents a study of the fundamental units of measurement, the structure of matter, and the concepts of work, force and 
energy. The course covers the followmg basics of electricity: electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism, and the electric generator. 
Concepts include electromagnetic induction, transformers, rectifiers. X-ray tubes, and the interactions that produce X-radiation. 
Radiation measurement and basic radiation protection concepts are also included. 

RTE 1804 - Radiology Practicum I-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequislte(s): Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison State College Radiologic Technology students to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate the skills learned in the classroom and 
laboratory in the real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to various department subdivisions. The student at first 
works closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As proficiency and speed increases, the student performs examinations in an 
indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical experience involves the student in handling and care of patients and various radiographic 
apparatus. The student learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, processing of radiographic 
film, and maintaining radiographic records. 

RTE 1814 - Radiology Practicum II-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison State College Radiologic Technology students to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate the skills learned in the classroom and 
laboratory in the real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to various department subdivisions. The student at first 
works closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As proficiency and speed increases, the student performs examinations in an 
indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical experience involves the student in handling and care of patients and various radiographic 
apparatus. The student learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, processing of radiographic 
film, and maintaining radiographic records. 

RTE 1824 - Radiology Practicum III-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison State College Radiologic Technology sMdents to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate the skills learned in the classroom and 
laboratory in the real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to various department subdivisions. The student at first 
works closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As proficiency and speed increases, the student performs examinations in an 
indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical experience involves the student in handling and care of patients and various radiographic 
apparatus. The student learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical situations under many different conditions. Each student 

245 



gains significant experience in routine and special positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, processing of radiographic 
film, and maintaining radiographic records. 

RTE 1951 - Radiologic Technology Equivalency Assessment-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

Equivalency Assessment is a process designed to assist Registered Radiologic Technologists who desire to earn the Associate in 
Science Degree in Radiologic Technology. These individuals arc graduates of accredited, hospital-based, radiologic technology 
programs who arc certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). 

RTE 2061 - Radiologic Technology Seminar - AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

This is a final, comprehensive course that reviews and inter-relates concepts previously covered in the two-year curriculum. It 
provides the student with a mcaningfiil approach to evaluate previous learning and to investigate areas of needed preparation for 
employment and credentialing. The course also includes employment interview skills and related concepts such as resume preparation. 

RTE 2385 - Radiation Biology/Protection-AS 

2 class hours 2 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1613 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 2834 

This course is an examination of radiation safety issues related to the Radiologic Technology profession. Emphasis is placed on 
concepts that increase one's awareness of the responsibility to protect the public and self from unnecessary radiation dose. 

RTE 2473 - Quality Assurance-AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): RTE 1418 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 2834 

This course is designed to introduce the radiography student to evaluation methodology of radiographic systems to assure consistency 
in the production of quality images at the lowest dose. 

RTE 2563 - Special Radiographic Procedures and Cross-Sectional Anatomy-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Co-requisite(s): RTE 1824 

This course offers an investigation of the anatomy, equipment, and techniques for special radiographic procedures. Included are 
angiographic, neuroradiographic. and interventional procedures. Infrequent, but interesting studies are also covered such as 
lymphography and sialography, included in this course is an introduction to cross-sectional anatomy as demonstrated by digital 
imaging techniques. 

RTE 2782 - Radiographic Pathology - AS 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): RTE 2563 

This course is the study of disease processes of the human and how they are identified radiographically. The pathology of each major 

body system and the imaging methods and procedures used for diagnosis are explored. 

RTE 2834 - Radiology Practicum IV-AS 

24 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison State College Radiologic Technology students to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate the skills Icamed in the classroom and 
laboratory in the real clinical setting. In this area each student is assigned to various department subdivisions. The student at first 
works closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As proficiency and speed increases, the student performs examinations in an 
indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical experience involves the student in handling and care of patients and various radiographic 
apparatus. The student learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, processing of radiographic 
film, and maintaining radiographic records. 

RTE 2844 - Radiology Practicum V-AS 

16 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Technology Program and preceding Practicum course. 

Co-requisite(s): Accompanying RTE courses for each semester of study. 

Affiliation agreements with various hospitals enable Edison State College Radiologic Technology students to gain valuable clinical 
experience in departments of radiology. Each student has the opportunity to demonstrate the skills learned in the classroom and 
laboratory in the real clinical setting, in this area each student is assigned to various department subdivisions. The student at first 
works closely with a registered radiologic technologist. As proficiency and speed increases, the student performs examinations in an 

246 



indirectly supervised capacity. Clinical experience involves the student in handling and care of patients and various radiographic 
apparaUis. The student learns to manipulate exposure factors in all clinical situations under many different conditions. Each student 
gains significant experience in routine and special positioning methods, surgical radiographic procedures, processing of radiographic 
film, and maintaining radiographic records. 

SBM 2000 - Small Business Managcmcnt-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Small business firms constitute an important part of today's business system. This course focuses on the need for small business firms 
to anticipate and adjust promptly to significant shifts, customer demands, competitors" actions and public expectations. Emphasis is on 
improving the quality of small firm management and should contribute to the success of individual firnis. 

SCE 3320C - Special Methods in Teaching Middle School Science with Practicum -BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science program in Education or special permission from the Associate Dean 
of Baccalaureate programs 

This course provides infomiation on techniques and materials of instruction for teaching science in the middle grades. In this course 
teacher candidates learn principles of effective curriculum design and assessment and apply these principles by designing and 
developing interactive science curriculum projects and assessments for middle school students. This course includes a practicum in 
which teacher candidates will present their projects in middle school classroom environments. This course addresses specific Sunshine 
State Standards subject matter competencies and pedagogy pertinent to the discipline and required for certification. 

SCE 4330C - Special Methods in Teaching High School Science with Practicum -BS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Bachelor of Science program in Education or special permission from the Associate Dean 

of Baccalaureate programs 

This course is designed to enlarge and expand the instructional theories, ideas and strategies developed and discussed in the two 
previous courses: Science Matters and Interactive Projects that Promote Learning in Science. This course will help the teacher 
candidate gain knowledge and skills necessary to become an effective teacher and leader in the area of secondary school biology or 
middle school science. The acti\ ities in this course will develop the theoretical basis for science instruction intended for middle school 
and secondary school students and illustrate and apply models for instruction in science courses involving laboratory, field activities 
and technology in the process of enhancing a student's understanding of science. The course will also provide practical experience in 
planning, implementing, assessing and evaluating science instruction. This course addresses specific Sunshine State Standards, subject 
matter competencies and pedagogy pertinent to the discipline and required certification. 

SCE 4931 - Special Topics in Secondary Education II-BS 

1 Credits 

This course is designed to allow Secondary Education teacher candidates an opportunity to explore educational trends within the local 
school districts and to exhibit and review portfolio and other professional development opportunities. 

SCE 4940 - Internship in Secondary Education with Biology Emphasis-BS 

12 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all program requirements and passing of all sections of General Knowledge and 

Professional Education section of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam. This course is limited to Edison State College 

Bachelor of Science in Biology degree-seeking students. 

Contact hours: A minimum of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks 

This course requires a teacher candidate to demonstrate pre-professional competencies during one semester of fiill day internship in a 

public or private school approved by the Dean. The internship includes a series of mandatory professional seminars. 

SLS 1101 - College Success Skills-AA 

3 class hours 5 Credits 

This course is designed to make the adjustment of the first time entering college student, as well as the reentering student, more 
comfortable and successful. It also helps the student develop effective learning strategies and techniques in order to be successfi.il in 
college studies. The course is intended to positively impact the academic performance, social adjustment, and personal growih of the 
student. 

SLS 1107 - Achieving Academic Success-AA 

3 class hours 1 Credits 

This course is designed for students who have not succeeded in their academic studies and are on academic dismissal and suspension. 
It provides the essential skills needed to become a competent and motivated student. The students will learn to prioritize their time, 
develop memory and thinking skills, take meaningful notes during lectures and assigned readings, develop strategies for taking various 
types of tests, and improve both written and oral communication skills. In addition, the course will promote self-esteem and a desire to 
succeed, not only in their academic performance, but in their personal and professional lives. 



247 



SLS 1310 - Nursing Peer Enrichment Program 1-AA/AP 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): NUR 1010, NUR 1142 

Co-requisite(s): NUR 1022, NUR 1022L, NUR 1023, NUR 1061, NUR 1061L 

This course is designed to enhance the adjustment of the nursing student matcing the transition to the nursing major more comfortable 
and successful; and to help the student develop effective learning strategies and techniques in order to be successflil in their college 
studies and the nursing major. Students will discover how they learn best and how to monitor thinking and learning processes. The 
course is intended to positively impact the academic performance, social adjustment and personal and professional growth of the 
student. This is a required course for a select group of nursing students meeting certain criteria. It is also open to any nursing student 
wishing to enroll. 

SLS 1311 - Nursing Peer Enrichment Program II-AA/AP 

2 class hours 2 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): SLS 1310, NUR 1022, NUR 1022L, NUR 1023, NUR 1061 and NUR 1061L. 
Co-requisite(s): NUR 1211, NUR 151 1, and NUR 2140. 

This course is the second course in the Peer Enrichment Program of the Nursing Program. It is designed to provide students with the 
essential skills needed to become a motivated and successful nursing student. The student will continue to learn to prioritize their time, 
develop memory and thinking skills, take meaningful notes during lectures and assigned readings, develop strategies for taking various 
types of tests, and improve both written and oral communication skills. The course will promote study skills, review co-requisite 
course content, and enhance the student's self-esteem and desire to succeed in their personal and professional lives. This is a required 
course for a select group of nursing students meeting certain criteria. It is also open to any nursing student wishing to enroll. 

SLS 1331 - Personal Business Skills-AS 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to prepare students, business managers, and supervisors to meet the challenges in the business world. Students 
develop the skills necessary to understand and cope with life's challenges. Emphasis is placed on business entrepreneurship, job 
seeking skills, leadership skills, decision making skills, goal setting, problem solving, stress and time management, and other 
employability skills. 

SLS 1533 - Improving Mathematics Skills by Reducing Anxiety 

1 class hour 1 Credits 

This course is designed to assist students in confronting, understanding and overcoming their mathematics anxieties by improving 
study skills unique to learning mathematics through the use of relevant mathematical applications and concrete mathematics 
manipulative. 

SLS 2261 - Leadership Development-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course has as its central focus the development of leadership ability. The course provides a basic understanding of leadership, 
assists participants in developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of 
leadership, and an awareness of one's own ability and style of leadership. 

SPC 1017 - Fundamentals of Speech Communications -AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces students to the speech communication discipline. A variety of activities and class assignments are designed to 
acquaint students with the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public speaking levels of speech communication. Students may also enroll 
in the business emphasis section of this course, which emphasizes communicating during an employment interview, communicating in 
self directed work teams and developing multimedia presentations. 

SPC 2023 - Introduction to Public Speaking-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is designed to enhance communication skills on the public speaking level. Objectives focus on public speaking 
competency including message composition and delivery skills as well as literal and comprehensive listening skills using both oral and 
written requirements. 

SPN 1 120 - Beginning Spanish I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Testing with a minimum score of 83 of the FCLEPT Sentence Skills and Reading, or 440 on the SAT (Verbal), 
or ACT scores of 17 on the ACT English and 18 on the ACT Reading. 

This course is for beginners or those with one year of high school Spanish. This course is a study of the language and the culture with 
emphasis on communication in the target language. (I) 

SPN 1121 - Beginning Spanish II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): SPN 1120 

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This course is for beginners or those with one year of high school Spanish. This course is a study of the language and the culuire with 
emphasis on communication in the target language. (1) 

SPN 2210 - Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition-AA (**) 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): SPN 2201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 

This course emphasizes oral and written expression in the target language and provides a brief review of Spanish grammar. (I) 

SPN 2220 - Intermediate Spanish I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): SPN 1121 or two years of high school Spanish, or permission of instructor. 

This course presents funher snidy of language and culuire. and provides an introduction to literan.- readings. Continued emphasis is 
placed on communication m the target language. (I) 

SPN 2221 - Intermediate Spanish II-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): SPN 2220 

This course continues to present further study of language and culuire. and provides an introduction to literary readings. Continued 
emphasis is placed on communication in the target language. (I) 

STA 2023 - Statistical Methods I-AA 

4 class hours 4 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): M.AT 1033 with a minimum grade of "C" or Testing 

This is an introductorv' course covering the fundamental topics of statistics. Topics include: descriptive measures, probability, 
probability distributions, central limit theorem, sampling distributions, confidence inter\als, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression 
analysis and nonparametric test procedures. A graphing calculator is required. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course 
serves to demonstrate competence in the general education mathematics requirement. 

SUR llOOC - Surveying-AS 
4 class hours 4 Credits 

This course includes lecture and field practice covering use. care, and limitations of various sur\eying instruments and related 
equipment. Students are shown how to properly record in field notes the data taken from rod. tape, differential level, etc. Suidents 
conduct field exercises and prepare related reports. Principle subjects included are leveling and measurement of angles. 

SUR 2 HOC - Advanced Surveying-AS 

4 class hours 4 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): SLR llOOC 

This course is a continuation of SUR 1 lOOC to include horizontal control surveys, resection and horizontal curve layout. Electronic 
Distance Meters (EDM) equipment is introduced. 

SVL 1221 - Mortgage Lending- AS 
3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course describes the role of the loan department and how it relates to the total organization of the association; assesses the system 
of credit investigation and analysis; summarizes the standard procedures an association follows to maintain a loan from closing to the 
date it is paid off; evaluates the essential characteristics of loans made for construction; apartment, condominium and commercial 
loans; distinguishes benveen conventional and FHA/VA loans; assesses the role of savings associations in the secondarv' mortgage 
market. 

S\ G 1000 - Introduction to Sociology-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a systematic study of human society with primary emphasis on social interaction, culture, socialization, social groups. 

social institutions, social causation, and social change. 

SYG 1010 - Contemporary Social Problems-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a thought-provoking examination of the social dilemmas and controversial issues facing American society today. 

SYG 2430 - Marriage and the Family-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is an examination of the nuclear famiK'; its origins, history', status at present, and struggle for survival. Attention is given 
to male- female relationships, changing lifestyles, conflict, parenthood, and divorce. (I) 

TAX 2000 - Federal Tax Accounting I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): ACG 1001 or permission of instructor. 

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This course presents federal income tax as it applies to individuals, with limited coverage of corporate tax and partnership information 
returns. Students prepare a comprehensive joint income tax return. Current tax law is also covered. 

TAX 2010 - Federal Tax Accounting II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 
Prerequisite(s): ACG 2011 

This course is a continuation of Federal Tax Accounting I dealing with Federal taxation of partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts 
and other selected topics. It is intended to provide the level of knowledge necessary to pass the Enrolled Agents" Examination 
sponsored by the Internal Revenue Service. 

TAX 2401 - Trusts, Estates, and Gifts: Accounting and Taxation- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): TAX 2000 or permission of instructor. 

This course covers definitions and operations of the various fiduciary forms of wealth transfer including: 1) fiduciary accounting 
principles and concepts; 2) record keeping requirements; 3) various tax reporting requirements, forms, and calculations. 

THE 1020 - Introduction to Theatre- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course introduces the elements of drama and the process of theatrical production, with special emphasis on reading, analyzing and 
experiencing contemporary drama. Theatre students should take this course before or concurrently with TPP 1110. 

THE 1925 - Theatre Performance and Production-AA 

6 studio hours 6 Credits 

Rehearsal and performance in a major college or professional production is presented in this course. Open auditions. This course may 
be repeated once for credit. 

THE 2100 - Theatre History and Literature-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a comprehensive survey of the development of the theatre and its literature from its beginnings to modem times. This 
includes reading and discussion of plays representative of each significant theatrical period and study of their relationship to their 
cultural and social setting. (!) 

THE 2925 - Theatre Performance and Production-AA 

6 studio hours 6 Credits 

Rehearsal and perfomiance in a major college or professional production is presented in this course. Open auditions. This course may 
be repeated once for credit. 

TPA 1200 - Fundamentals of Theatre Practice I-AA 

6 studio hours 1 Credits 

This course presents instruction and practical experience in stagecraft, design, lighting, and costume in connection with college or 
professional productions. This course may be repeated once for credit. 

TPA 2200 - Fundamentals of Theatre Practice II-AA 

6 studio hours 1 Credits 

This course presents instruction and practical experience in stagecraft, design, lighting, and costume in connection with college or 
professional productions. This course may be repeated once for credit. 

TPP 1110 -Acting I-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite or Co-requisite: THE 1020 or permission of instructor. 

This course presents the principles and techniques of acting with production of selected scenes. 

TPP 1111 -Acting II-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite or Co-requisite: THE 1020 or permission of instructor. 

This course presents the principles and techniques of acting with production of selected scenes. 

TPP 2118- Acting III-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a continuation of TPP 1110-1111 to include styles of acting and basic directing problems. 

TSL 4140 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum and Assessment-BS 

3 Credits 

This course will build on the teacher candidates' knowledge of applied linguistics and cross-cultural communication and extend their 
understanding of the naUire and role of language and culture in classrooms. This course will prepare teacher candidates to plan for, 

250 



instruct and assess English Language Learners (ELLS) in K-12 settings. Tiic teacher candidates will examine research-based strategies 
for supporting English language development, as well as promoting comprehension and acquisition of grade level content. Curriculum 
development and assessment activities will be tied to content, language and literacy goals for ELLs. This course requires fifteen (15) 
hours of field experience in a K-12 classroom setting. 

TSL 4142 - ESOL Methods, Curriculum & Assessment 

3 Credits 

This course will build on the teacher candidates' knowledge of applied linguistics and cross-cultural communication and extend their 
understanding of the nature and role of language and culture in classrooms. This course will prepare teacher candidates to plan for, 
instruct, and assess English Language Learners (ELLs) in K.-I2 settings. The teacher candidates will examine research-based strategies 
for supporting English language development, as well as promoting comprehension and acquisition of grade level content. Curriculum 
development and assessment activities will be tied to content, language, and literacy goals for ELLs. This course requires fifteen hours 
of field experience in a K-12 classroom setting. 

TSL 4520 - Second Language Acquisitions and Culture- BS 
3 Credits 

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates with the foundational knowledge of applied linguistics and cross-cultural 
communication so that they can effectively teach English Language Learners (ELLS) and culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) 
students in K-12 settings. The course will provide teacher candidates with an overview of the history of US language policy, 
legislation and The Florida Consent Decree. Teacher candidates will examine culture and cross-cultural communication with regard to 
ELL students and stakeholders. Teacher candidates will also study language principles, the structure of the English language, the 
nature of first (LI ) and second (L2) language acquisition, major LI and L2 acquisition theories and effective strategies for promoting 
language development in K-12 settings. This course requires fifteen (15) hours of field experience in a K-12 classroom setting. 

WOH 1012 - History of World Civilization to 1500-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a compact survey of the evolution of civilization from early times to 1500. All major areas and countries are included. 
Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, India, China, Japan, and North, Central and South America receive appropriate emphasis. The 
major focus will be on the political, economic, and social views of the world. This course is termed a writing intensive course and 
requires a minimum of 4.000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of three graded assignments over 
the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete part of the writing intensive 
course requirements. (I) 

WOH 1023 - History of World Civilization 1500 to 1815-AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

This course is a survey of the history of the world from 1500 to 1815. Emphasis is placed on the political, economic, social, and 
intellectual aspects of world history during this period. Subjects include European exploration and colonization; the emergence of the 
nation-state; great modem revolutions; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. This course is termed a 
writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instructor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of 
three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete 
part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 

WOH 1030 - History of World Civilization 1815 to Present- AA 

3 class hours 3 Credits 

A survey course which includes modem revolutions; the Industrial Revolution; Imperialism; the Indian, Far Eastem, and African 
backgrounds and political developments; the rise of Latin America; two World Wars and their results; modem nationalism and the 
decline of colonialism. The political, economic, social, and intellecmal views of the world are emphasized. This course is termed a 
writing intensive course and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of instmctor-evaluated writing per student, including a minimum of 
three graded assignments over the duration of the course. If completed with a grade of "C" or better, this course serves to complete 
part of the writing intensive course requirements. (I) 



251 



Administration* 



WALKER, Kenneth P. 

B.A., University of Texas, Austin 

M.A., East Texas State University 

Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 
THOMAS, Noreen 

B.S., Daemen College 

M.Ed., Eastern Michigan University 

Ed.D., University of Texas, Austin 
ATKINS, Steve 

B.A., Elon College 

M.A., University of North Carolina, Charlotte 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro 
PENDLETON, Edith 

B.J., M.A., University of Missouri 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 
GALLOWAY, Tracey L. 

B.B.A., Northwood University 

M.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 
JONES. Robert R. 

A.A.S., Navarro College 

B.A., University of Texas, Austin 

M.B.A., University of Texas, Tyler 

Ed.D.. Nova Southeastern University 
BERGERSON, Catherine 

B.S., University of Kansas 

M.S., Northwestern University 
HOLLIDAY, Matthew 

A. A., Edison State College 

B.S.. The Florida State University 



President 



Executive Vice President 



Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs 



Vice President, Strategic Initiatives 



Vice President, Development 



Vice President, Administrative Services 



Director, Communication and Marketing 



Director, Governmental Relations 



Charlotte Campus 



LAND, Patricia 

B.A., M.Ed, University of Florida 

Ed.D, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 

RATH, Thomas 

B.A., SUNY Binghamton 

M.S., College Miscricodia 

Ed.D., University of Central Florida 

HARVEY, Tamara 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 
Ed.S., Argosy University 

JONES, Phenessa 

A.A., B.A., Florida State University 
M.S., Clark Atlanta University 

GILFERT, Christy 

B.A., Rollins College 
M.S., Capclla University 



President, Charlotte Campus 



Dean, Academic Affairs 



Collegiate High School Principal 



Campus Director, Learning Resources 



Campus Director, Student Services 



Collier Campus 



ALLBRITTEN, Jeffery 

B.S., M.S., Murray State University 
Ph.D., Middle Tennessee State University 

LINCK Jr., Henry F. 

B.A., Gettysburg College 
M.A., Morgan State University 
Ed.D., University of Maryland 



President, Collier Campus 
Campus Dean 

252 



DAVIS, Christine 

B.A., M.Cd.. Florida Atlantic University 
VALENTl. Anthony 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

M.A., University of South Florida 
MILLER, Kevin 

B.S., Florida State University 
HCLTSLEY, Warren L. 

A.A., Gateway Technical Institute 

B.A.. Carthage College 

M.P.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 

Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 

Hendry/Glades Center 

LAND. Patricia 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville 
BRUHN. Brooke 

B.S., University of Central Florida 

Lee Campus 

THOMAS, Noreen 

B.S., Daemen College 

M.Ed., Eastern Michigan University 

Ed.D., University of Texas, Austin 
BEESON, Robert 

A. A., Erie Community College 

B.A., Buffalo State College 

M.Div.. D.Min., Wesley Theological Seminary 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 
KOMINOWSKL Edward 

B.A., M.S., Indiana University 

Baccalaureate and University Programs 

ZIMMERMAN, Kristen 

B.S., M.A., Michigan State University 

Student Services 

COUGHLIN, Kevin 

B.A., Ohio University 

M.A., Alaska Pacific University 

Office of the Registrar 

SILVA, Billee 

B.A., Central Michigan University 

M.Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University 
MEDHURST, Ray 

A. A., Edison State College 

B.A., M.Ed., University of South Florida 
MITCHELL, Pat 

B.A., University of South Florida 

Student Financial Aid 

LEWIS, Cindy 

A.A., Edison State College 
B.A., University of South Florida 



Associate Dean, Enrollment Management/Student Affairs, 
Campus Director, Learning Resources 

Development Officer 

Coordinator, Continuing Education 



Charlotte Campus President 
Hendry/Glades Administration 

Center Coordinator, Student Services 



President, Lee Campus 



Lee Campus VP. Academic Affairs/Dean of Instruction 



Development Officer 



Associate Dean 



Dean 



Registrar 

Associate Registrar 

Student Services Supervisor 

Director 



253 



MORGAN, Catherine 

A. A, Edison State College 
B.S., University of South Florida 

Student Life 

TEPROVICH, Amy 

B.A.. M.S.. Canisius College 

Counseling, Advising and Assessment 

MORRIS, Kathleen B. 

B.S. Indiana University 

M.A. University of Redlands 
POTTS, Susan P 

B.A., Russell Sage College 

M.Ed., College of St. Rose 
KENNEDY, Kevin 

B.A., Mt. Marty College 

M.A,, Ed.D., University of South Dakota 
DOWNEY-FRITZ, Jeannette 

B.S., M.S.E., University of Kentucky 
BRENNAN, Barb 

B.S., M.A., Western Michigan University 

Facilities Planning and Management 

NICE, Steve 

B.A., Clarion State University 

M.A., St. Thomas University 
PARFITT, Richard 

A.S., Westmoreland County Community College 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh 

M.A., California University of Pennsylvania 

Finance and Accounting 

DOEBLE, Gina 

B.A., Arizona State University 
M.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 

POLANCO. Guillermo 

B.A., University of South Florida 

Human Resources 

FAIRFAX, Pamela A. 

B.S., M.B.A., George Mason University 

ETHERIDGE, Bonnie 

A. A., University of South Florida 
B.S., Florida International University 

Contracts and Risk Management 

TUDOR, Lisa 

B.B.A., University of Miami 

Learning Resources 

DOWD, Frank 

B.A., Michigan State University 

M.L.S., University of Michigan 
SHULUK. William 



Assistant Director 



Director 



Director 



Coordinator, Counseling Services 

Coordinator. Retention Services 

Advising Services Manager 
Assessment Services Manager 

Director 
Director, Public Safety/Security 



Executive Director. Financial Services 
Assistant Director 

Associate Vice President 
Assistant Director 



Director 



Learning Resources Faculty 

Learning Resources Faculty 
254 



B.S., Mercy College 
M.S., Long Island University 
M.L.S., Queen's College, CUNY 
CHARLES. Jane 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A.. North Carolina State University 

Technology and Research 

TRASK, Mark 

B.A., Bradley University 
M.B.A., University of Wisconsin 

SHRINER, Kevin 

B.S.. Kansas State University 
M.A.. University of Arkansas 

Academic Success 

NEWELL, Patricia 

B.S., SUNY-Fredonia 

M.S., Elmira College 
DAILEY. Paula 

B.A.. GeorgetowTi College 

M.Ed., Morehead State University 
CARTER, Sylvia 

B.A., M.A., University of Nevada 
GRISSOM. Teresa 

B.S., M.S., Eastern Ilinois University 
KAYE, Joseph 

A.A., Edison State College 

B.S., University of Central Florida 

M.P.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 
MACY, Drew 

B.A., Fairfield University 
MORGAN, Fredrick D., II 

B.A., South Carolina State College 

Instruction 
Edison State Online 



Learning Resources Faculty 



Chief Information Officer 



Director, Institutional Research 



Dean 

Director. Student Support Services 

Director, Upward Bound 

Coordinator, Student Success Programs 

Coordinator, Learning Assistance 

Coordinator, Students with Disabilities 
Coordinator, Project HOPE 



MYERS, Mary R. 

B.S., Purdue University 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 

College Prep, English 

GROVE, Jennifer 

B.A.. M.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida 
MOORE, Roberta 

B.A., University of Texas, Austin 

M.A., University of Massachusetts 

M.B.A., University of Colorado 

College Prep, Mathematics 

EGGLESTON, Sabine 

B.A., University of South Florida 
M.A., Florida Gulf Coast University 

LAVRACK, Kevin 

B.A., Spring Arbor College 



Associate Dean 



Professor 
Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



255 



M.A., Michigan State University 
MARSHALL, Dorothy 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College 

M.Ed., University of Virginia 
VACANT 



Professor 



Professor 



College Prep, Reading 

HESTER. Susan 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University 
LEMASTER, Melanie M. 

B.Ed.. M.Ed., Shippenburg University 



Professor 
Professor 



English for Academic Purposes 

ROTONDA, Violeta 

B.A., Universidad del Salvador 
M.A., Florida International University 

TUCKER, William 

B.S.. M.A.. Central Missouri State University 

Bachelor of Applied Science Program 

VACANT 



Professor 



Professor/EAP 



Professor 



Division of Arts and Sciences 



BEESON, Robert 

A. A.. Erie Community College 

B.A.. Buffalo State College 

M.Div., D.Min., Wesley Theological Seminary 

Ph.D., University of South Florida 

DENNISON. Rodney 

B.S., Lincoln Memorial University 
B.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville 
M.Ed., E. Tennessee State University 
M.S., University of Tennessee, Chattanooga 
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 

KOUPELIS, Theodoros 

B.S., Aristotle University 

M.A., Ph.D., Universitv of Rochester 



Lee Campus VP, Academic Affairs/Dean of Instruction 



Associate Dean 



Associate Dean 



Gallery and Special Collections 

BISHOP Jr., Ronald 

B.F.A., University of Nebraska, Omaha 
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 



Director 



Communications 



English 

AMBROSE, Martha 

B.A., University of Missouri 
M.Phil., University of York (England) 

ANGSTROM, Anne 

B.A., University of Kentucky 
M.A.. Western Kentucky University 
Ph.D., Auburn University 

BUNTING. Eleanor E. 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 

CAHILL. Maria 



Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 
256 



B.A.. University of Washington 

M.A.. Georgia Southern University 

Ph.D., University of Wiseonsin. Milwaukee 
DESJARDINS. Margaret M. 

B.S.. M.Ed., Salem State College 

Ed.D.. Nova Southeastern University 
GRIFFITH. Barbara 

B.A.. Midwestern College 

M.A., Oakland University 
JO\CE, Dawn 

B.S.. Wright State University 

M.A., California State 
LUTHER. David 

B.A., University of Detroit 

M.A.. Ph.D.. Wayne State University 
MILLER. Kathia L. 

A.B., Cornell University 

M.A.T.. Brown University 
OROBELLO, Natala 

B.S.. M.A.. M.S.. Long Island University 
PELOT. John 

B.A.. Eckerd College 

M.F.A., University of North Carolina 
POLLITT, Amanda 

B.A., Millersville University 

M.A.. Pennsylvania State University 
WAYNE, Thomas 

B.A., University of Wisconsin. Milwaukee 

M.A.. Northeastern University 

Ph.D.. University of SW Louisiana 
VACANT 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Foreign Languages 



MAYORAL, Fernando 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 



Professor 



Speech 



CONNELL. John R. 

B.A., M.A., University of Central Florida 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
EASTMAN. Ann 

B.A.. University of Missouri 

M.Ed., Mississippi College 

Ed.D., University of Centra! Florida 
PASCHALL, Katie 

B.A., M.A., Murray State University 

Ph.D.. University of Florida 
WALTERS. Myra P. 

B.A.. M.A.. University of Alabama 
VACANT 



Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 
Professor 



Humanities 



CHASE. Wendy 

B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D.. Florida State University 
HAYES. John C. 

B.A.. Eckerd College 

M.L.A., University of South Florida 
HOOVER. Dale 

B.A.. West Chester State University 



Professor 
Professor 

Professor 



257 



M.A., Indiana State University 

Pli.D., Ohio University 
JAEN, Janice Professor 

B.A., M.A., Purdue University 

M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University 
ROOKS, Sharon E. Professor 

B.A., Emory and Henry College 

M.A., University of Tennessee 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

Music 

CORNISH. Glenn S. Professor 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

D.M., Florida State University 
SMITH, Thomas Professor 

B.M.E, M.M.E., Florida State University 

D.M.A., University of Texas, Austin 

Art 

VACANT • Professor 

Education 

BARREL, Erin Professor 

B.S., University of Toledo 

M.S.. Nova Southeastern University 

Ph.D., Barry University 
DELUCA, Eileen Professor 

B.S., University of South Florida 

M.S., College of New Rochelle 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
ROLLINS, Joyce Professor 

B.A., Marymount University 

M.A., George Mason University 

Social Sciences 

Economics 

CLARK, Kathy Professor 

B.A.. Campbellsville College 
M.B.A., Morehead State University 

Ethics/Philosophy 

SWANSON, Russell Professor 

B.A., Flagler College 
M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University 

History 

HERMAN. Mark C. Professor 

B.A., Shelton College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina 

Psychology 

HAGAN, 111. Samuel J. Professor 

A.A., Georgia Military College 

258 



A.B., M.S.. Ph.D., University ofCicorgia. Athens 

HECK. Terri 

A.A.. Macomb Community College 
B.A.. M.S.. Wayne State University 

MAETZKE. Sabine 

B.S.. University of Florida 

M.A.. University of Central Florida 

Ph.D.. University of Tennessee 

Sociology 

CAMPBELL. Lee 

C.A.S.. John Hopkins University 
M.Ed.. Antioch LIniversity 
Ph.D.. Union Institute 



Professor 



Professor 



Professor 



Mathematics 

AXELROD. Rona 

B.A., University of Rochester 
M.S.. Rutgers State University 

BERTHIAUME. Rebecca 

B.A.. M.A.. University of Virginia 

BERTHIAUME. Scott 

B.S.. Worcester State College 
M..'\.. University of Virginia 

CHIACCHIERO. Michael 

B.S., Kent State University 
M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

DANIELS. James 

B.E., Vandcrbilt University 
M.A.. University of South Florida 
J.D., Emory University 

GARRETT. Laurice A 

B.A.. North Park College 

M.Ed., University of South Florida 

HICKS. Lloyd R. 

B.S., M.Ed.. University of Illinois 

LEWIN. JoAnn P. 

B.S., Emory University 
M.A.. Washington University 

MOLLER. Marjorie 

B.S., Florida State University 
M.S.. Nova Southeastern University 

RANSFORD, Donald 

B.S., M.S., Indiana State University 

SALEM. John 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Nova Southeastern University 

SMITH. Christine 

B.Ed.. University of Toledo 
M.Ed.. University of South Florida 
Ed.S.. Nova Southeastern University 

SMITH, Ronald 

B.S., University of Illinois 
M.S., Southern Illinois University 
Ph.D., University of South Florida 

VAN GLABEK, Helen Joan 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
M.S., George Mason University 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

WARD, James 

B.S.. Tuskegee University 



Professor 

Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 

Professor 

Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 
Professor 

Professor 
Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

259 



M.A., University of Michigan 
WARREN, Donald M. Professor 

B.S., Bucknell University 
M.A., Vilianova University 

Anatomy and Physiology 

WOLFSON, Jed Professor 

B.A., Hunter College 
D.D.S., Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine 

Basic Science 

JESTER, Rozalind Professor 

A. A., Oxnard College 
B.S., Ph.D, University of California, Santa Cruz 

Biology 

ALLEN, Constance Professor 

B.A., Anderson University 

M.S., Indiana University 
BLACK, Cheryl Professor 

B.S., Kent State University 

M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University 
KOEPKE, Jay Professor 

B.S., Alma College 

M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 
O'NEAL, Lyman Professor 

B.A., Oakland City College 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
PRABHU, Nirmala V. Professor 

B.S., M.S., University of India, Madras 

M.S., University of Georgia 
ROMEO, Peggy Professor 

B.S., Fairmont State College 

M.S., Ed.D., West Virginia University 
WEINLAND, Linda S. Professor 

B.S., Bucknell University 

M.S., Wright State University 
WILCOX. William H. Professor 

B.S., M.S., Memphis State University 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Chemistry 

BURNS, Robert Professor 

B.A., Rutgers State University 

Ph.D., Iowa State University 
DONALDSON, Kurt D. Professor 

B.S., University of Alabama 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
RICE McGARITY, Lisa Professor 

B.A., M.S., University of Montana 

Ed.D., University of Central Florida 
ROHRBACH, David F. Professor 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
SCOTT, Jamie M. Professor 

B.S., University of Maryland 

Ph.D., University of Florida 

260 



Physical Science 

MANACHERIL, George T. Professor 

B.S.. M.S., University of Kerala. India 

Physics 

COM.'VN. Marius Professor 

B.A., University of Bucharest 

M.S., Florida International University 

Ph.D., Florida International University 
DABBY, William Professor 

B.A., Columbia University 

M.A., California State University at Long Beach 

Division of Professional and Technical Studies 

ROSHON, William Dean of Instruction 

B.S., Ohio University 

M.S.. Barry University 
FOY, Dennette Associate Dean 

A.A.. Edison State College 

B.S.. M.Ed.. University of South Florida 

Early Childhood Education 

VACANT Coordinator 

Accounting 

BIGGETT, Earl S. Professor 

B.B.A., lona College 

M.B.A.. St. John's University 
BUGGER. Leroy Professor 

B.S.. M.B.A.. Southern Illinois University 
MC CARTNEY KING, Stephanie Professor 

B.S., M.B.A., West Virginia University 

Business 

HAYDEN, Michael D. Professor 

B.A., Amherst College 
NAY, Douglas Professor 

B.S., Rutgers University 

M.B.A., New York University 

D.P.S., Pace University 

M.B.A., University of Colorado 
OLIVER, David G. Professor 

B.S., New England College 

M.B.A., American International College 

Computer Programming and Analysis 

JOHNSON, Deborah Professor 

B.S., Mount Saint Mary College 

M.S., Union College 
SMITH, Charles E. Professor 

A. A.. Edison State College 

B.S., Troy State University 

M.A., Webster University 
VANSELOW, Scott Professor 

B.A., Rollins College 

261 



M.S., Florida Gulf Coast University 

Drafting and Design 

DAMBROSE. Albert Professor 

A.A., Edison State College 
B.A., M.A., University of Florida 

Networking Services Technology 

DUBETZ, Martin Professor 

B.S., Kettering University 
M.S.. Wayne State University 
Ph.D., University of Alberta (Canada) 

Health Professions 

LEWIS, Mary Associate Dean 

B.S.N., University of Wisconsin 
M.B.A., International University 
M.S.N., Barry University 
Ed.D., University of Central Florida 

Cardiovascular Technologies 

DAVIS, Robert Jeffrey Coordinator 

A. A., A.S., Edison State College 
B.S., University of South Florida 

Dental Hygiene and Dental Assistant 

MOLUMBY, Karen Coordinator 

A.A.S., Milwaukee Area Technical College 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.B.A., Concordia University, Wisconsin 
OLITSKY, Richard Dental Clinical Supervisor 

D.D.S., Temple University 

Radiologic Technology 

MAYHEW, James Coordinator 

B.S., Columbia Union College 

M.S., Ferris State University 
KUBETSCHEK, Coleen Clinical Coordinator 

A.S., Northeastern University 

B.S., International College 
COSTELLO, Nancy Clinical Coordinator 

A.S., Edison State College 

B.A., Westfield State College 

Respiratory Care 

ELSBERRY, Jeffrey Coordinator 

B.S., University of Central Florida 

M.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida 
KARPEL, Sindee Clinical Coordinator 

B.A., Queens College 

M.P.A., Long Island University, CW Post Center 

Nursing 

ROTHWELL, Sharon Associate Director 

262 



B.S.N.. University of South Florida 

M.S.N., University of Miami 
JOHNSON. Anita 

B.S.N., M.A., Bethel College 
HOLBROOK. Bobby R. 

A.S.. Edison State College 

B.S.N.. Florida Gulf Coast University 
KRUGER. Margaret 

B.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville 

B.S.N.. M.S.N., University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences 
STADELMANN, Nora 

A.A., Green Mountain College 

B.S., Skidmore College 
HARNER. Anne 

A.S., Edison State College 

B.S.. Florida Gulf Coast University 

M.S., University of Central Florida 
PASQUINELLI. Mary 

B.S.. Villa Maria College 

M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh 
BOGAR, Catherine 

A.S., Cuyahoga Community College 

B.S.N.. M.S.N., University of Akron 
DEHANEY-DUFFUS, Cassandra 

B.S.N., Saint Joseph College 

M.S.N.. A.R.N. P., Florida Gulf Coast University 
EBAUGH. Debra 

B.S., Valdosta State College 

M.S.N., University of Miami 
FAIRCHILD, Kyle 

B.S., Southern Illinois University 

M.S., University of Florida 
GELLERMAN, Lynn 

B.S.N., Jewish College Hospital of Nursing 

M.S.N., Florida Gulf Coast University 
GORSKI, Regina 

B.S., Olivet Nazarene University 

M.S.N.. Governors State University 
HOLLAND, Susan 

A.S., Edison State College 

B.S.N., M.S.N., University of Central Florida 
KOPP, Andrea 

A.D.N. , St. Louis Community Center 

M.A., Texas Christian University 

M.S., Rush University 
LEWIS. Rosemary 

B.S., M.S.. University of Akron 
SANFORD. Pamela 

B.A., B.S.N., University of North Dakota 

M.S.N., Florida Atlantic University 
TENRREIRO, Kathleen 

B.S.N., University of Rhode Island 

M.S., University of South Florida 
VICTOR, Chitra 

B.S., M.S.C.. Christian Medical College 
WEEKS, Deborah 

A.A., B.S.N., M.S.N.. University of Florida 
WETZEL, Gayle 

B.S.N., Florida State University 

M.S.N.. University of Arizona 

VACANT 



Coordinator 
Coordinator 

Coordinator 

Lee Clinical Coordinator 
Clinical Supervisor. Nursing Lab 

Clinical Supervisor, Nursing Lab 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 

Professor 

Professor 
Professor 
Professor 



263 



Advanced Placement Program 

TRACEY, Gail L. 

A.S., Edison State College 

B.S.N., M.S.N., University of South Florida 

Ed.D., University of Central Florida 

Public Safety Programs 

GRESHAM, Kim 

A.A., Edison State College 

B.P.A., Barry University 

M.S.. International College 
LANDAU, Douglas 

B.A.. Ramapo College of New Jersey 

M.A., New York University 

Ph.D., Idaho State University 
ABERBACH. Craig 

A.S., Miami Dade College 

B.S., International College 

M.S., Hodges University 
CLEMENS, Christine 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
BARRETT, Kristine 

A. A.. A.S., Edison State College 
ZIOMEK, Jeffrey 

A.A.S., Niagara County Community College 

B.S.. Empire State College 

Criminal Justice Program 

FAHEY, Dennis 

A.A., Ocean County College 

B.S., Monmouth College 

M.A., Rutgers State University 
NISSON, Michael 

B.S., American University 

M.A., George Washington University 

Paralegal Program 

CONWELL, Mary H. 

B.A., J.D., Indiana University 

Honorary Administration 

ROBINSON, David G. 

Honorary Faculty 

HENDERSON, Lee G. 
WATTENBARGER, James L. 



Professor 



Associate Dean 



Professor 



Coordinator, Emergency Service Program 

Coordinator, EMT 

Clinical Coordinator 
Professor 

Professor 

Professor 



Professor 



President Emeritus 



264 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

AA: Associate in Arts Degree: A two-year program of instruction consisting of courses offered to freshmen and sophomores intending 
to enter baccalaureate programs. All AA courses are advanced and professional in naaire. 

Academic Success Programs: A math, reading and writing support center for scheduled classes, referrals, and drop-in students 
needing help w ith academic reading, writing and math projects. 

Accreditation: Certification that a college meets a set of criteria established by one of six private, nonprofit, voluntary regional 
accrediting associations. 

Add/Drop: The procedure used to alter class schedules after initial registration and through the first week of the semester. During this 
time, suidcnts can adjust their schedule by dropping or adding a course without penalty. 

Advanced Placement (AP): A national examination through which credit may be awarded in specified subjects. The minimum 
passing score is required for the awarding of credit applicable toward a degree. Information is available in the Counseling, Advising, 
and Assessment Center. 

AS- Associate in Science Degree: A two-year program of instruction consisting of college level courses to prepare for entry into 
employment. All AS courses are advanced and professional or postsecondary vocational courses. 

ACT-Enhanced (ACT-E): American College Testing Program. One of the assessment tests accepted for entry/placement at Edison 
State. 

Articulation Agreement: State Board of Education rules that establish provisions to facilitate the smooth transition of students 
through the secondary, community college and university educational systems. 

Audit: A college credit course taken for informational instruction only. College credit is not earned and regular fees are assessed. 
Testing and course pre-and co-requisites apply. 

Baccalaureate (Bachelor's): A degree obtained by completing 120+ credit hours. The first 60 hours are usually made up of general 
education classes and the final 60+ hours consist of major specific coursework. 

Baccalaureate and University Programs Division: This division is comprised of Edison State's baccalaureate programs and Edison 
State University Center partnership programs. 

Catalog: A resource of academic policies, procedures, college and degree requirements, faculty and course descriptions, published 
yearly (but subject to change). 

CLAST Alternative: Refers to one of the approved alternatives that will satisfy one or more subtests of the CLAST requirement. 
These alternatives include a combination of test scores (SAT-R or ACTE) and/or specific course grades. 

CLEP (College Level Examination Program): CLEP is a national examination through which credit may be awarded in specified 
subjects. Meeting the minimum passing score is required for awarding of credit applicable toward a degree, hiformation is available in 
the Counseling. Advising and Assessment Center. 

Continuing Education: A variety of non-credit subjects offered to the community through Edison State. 

C.E.U. (Continuing Education Unit): One C.E.U. is awarded for every ten contact hours of instruction in an organized continuing 
education/noncredit course. 

Co-requisite: A course which must be taken at the same time as another course. 

Credit by Examination: The award of credit is based upon the demonstration of knowledge of prior learning as assessed by 
examination. This process may also include an assessment of professional certification. Examples include: Advanced Placement, 
CLEP, FL EMT-B and/or Paramedic Certification. FDLE CJSTC exam. International Baccalaureate and the National Registry Exam 
for Radiologic Technologists. 

Credit Hour (or semester hour): The credit hours reflect approximately the total hours a stiident spends per week in class. For 
example, a student enrolled in ENC 1 101 (3 credits) spends approximately three hours per week for approximately 15 weeks in class. 

Degree-Seeking Status: A student whose admission requirements have been ftjlly met and who is working toward a degree. 

Drop: A student may drop a course during the add/drop period. A dropped course does not appear on the permanent record. The 
appropriate form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the established deadline. Drops after that date may be granted 
only through established college procedures. 

265 



Early Admission: Full-time enrollment at Edison State by eligible high school students. Permission of the high school principal or 
designee is required. 

Early College (Dual Enrollment): A student enrolled at two educational institutions (a high school and a community college) 
concurrently. See your high school counselor for information. 

Edison State Online: The systematic effort to reach potential learners who may be excluded from the traditional classroom by 
constraints of time, place and/or circumstance. Edison State Internet courses are an example of distance learning. 

Edison State University Center: An alliance between Edison State College and specific baccalaureate and graduate degree granting 
colleges and universities that allows Edison State College graduates to pursue various bachelor's and graduate degrees while 
remaining on an Edison State campus. 

Educational Plan: A plan of required and elective courses prepared by an academic advisor to assist students in reaching their 
academic goals. 

Effective Catalog: Contingent upon a student's continuous enrollment, the catalog in effect at the time a student first enrolls governs 
the student's graduation requirements. 

EGL: The Edison State Guiding Light program consists of student assistants who work in the Office of the Registrar. They assist in 
student recruitment and retention. 

Fee: A non-refijndablc financial charge for services rendered, such as laboratory fees or special tests. 

Financial Aid Transcript: Official record of financial aid fi.inds received by a student. This is required of all students who transfer 
from another institution and apply for financial assistance at Edison State. 

FCELPT: (Florida College Entry Level Placement Test) is an academic assessment used for placement into either college level 
classes or college preparatory courses. 

Foreign Language Requirement: A requirement of Florida's state universities and the baccalaureate programs at Edison State 
College. Universities generally require two years of the same foreign language at the high school, or 8-10 credit hours at the 
community college level. 

Full-time Status: Enrollment in 12 or more credit hours in a Fall, Spring or Summer semester. 

General Education Hours: A specific number of semester hours of basic liberal arts courses required as foundation in the Associate 
in Arts degree program. 

Gordon Rule: State Board Rule 6A - 10.030 states the following: (a) Six (6) semester hours of English coursework and six (6) 
semester hours of additional coursework in which the student is required to demonstrate college-level writing skills through multiple 
assignments. Each institution shall designate the courses that fulfill the writing requirements of this section. These course designations 
shall be submitted to the Statewide Course Numbering System. An institution to which a student transfers shall accept courses so 
designated by the sending instimtion as meeting the writing requirements outlined in this section. Within the mathematics area, 
completion of specific courses is required. 

Grade: Alphabetical measures of academic success ranging fi^om excellent (A) to failure (F). 

Grade Forgiveness: A method by which students may repeat a limited number of courses to improve their grade point average. Only 
the grade received on the last repeat is used in the GPA calculation. Grade forgiveness is limited to courses in which the student 
earned a "D" or "F" grade. Students are limited to two repeats per course. Upon a third attempt, the grade issued is the final grade for 
that course. 

Grade Point Average (GPA): The calculation of credits attempted, credits earned and grades earned. 

Grant: Non-repayable financial aid funds awarded for college expenses to qualified students. 

International Diversity Classes: Florida State University may require students to take courses that have an international or diversity 
focus. These are designed with an T' after the course descriptions. 

International Student: A student who has entered the United States on a nonimmigrant visa (Fl ) (most often an individual on a 
student visa). 

Limited Access/Enrollment: A designation given to programs that require additional admission requirements (i.e. higher GPA, 
higher test scores, completion of certain coursework). Admission is granted to a limited number of applicants. 

Major: A group of related courses that constitute a focused program of study in a specific area of knowledge. 

266 



Mini-semester: A short semester of credit instruction. Also referred to as Fail A or B or Spring A or B. 

Non-credit: A course for whicii college credit is not granted. 

Part-time status: Enrollment in 1 1 or fewer credit hours in a Fall, Spring or Summer semester. 

Placement Testing: Initial testing and subsequent evaluation of students to aid in placement and progress in reading comprehension, 
writing. Onglish, arithmetic and algebra. 

Prerequisite: A course v\iiich must be satisfactorily completed before entering a related course. 

PSA\': Post secondary adult vocational certificate programs are based upon clock hours instead of credit hours. Coursework leads 
directly to specific jobs such as Dental Assisting. 

Quality Points: The value, ranging from "4" to "0" for grades "A" to "F" multiplied by the number of credits i.e., 3 credits x 
.'\(4pts.)=l2 quality points for all courses completed. These points are used to determine grade point average (GPA). 

Registration: May be accomplished in person or online at http: •7wwvv.edi.son.edu/ . 

Residency: Further information is available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Scholarships: Financial assistance for college expenses granted by donors to qualified recipients. Further information is available in 
the Financial Aid Office. 

Scholastic .\chievement Test (SAT): An academic assessment used for placement into either college level classes or college 
preparatory courses. 

Semester-(Term): Refers to the way an academic year is divided. The academic year consists of three semesters or terms (Fall. Spring 
and Summer), each lasting approximately 16 weeks. 

Semester Hour: See credit hour. 

Student Classiflcation: Pertains to ftill-time. part-time, audit, credit, or non-credit. 

Student Government Association-(SGA): Official representatives of the student body to the administration in matters concerning 
student life. 



267 



INDEX 



Academic Advising Services 43 

Academic Calendar 1 1 

Academic Petition 32 

Academic Policies & Procedures 64 

Academic Probation 64 

Academic Programs of Study 88 

Academic Second Chance 32 

Academic Success Programs 71 

Accounting Applications Certificate Requirements 156 

Accounting Course Descriptions 1 75 

Accounting Technology AS Degree Requirements 1 12 

Accreditation 1 

Administration, Faculty and Staff 252 

Admissions 14 

Admissions Requirements, Health Professions 14 

Advanced Placement 74 

American Disability Act 60 

Anthropology Course Descriptions 144 

Anatomy Course Descriptions 180 

Appeal of Petition Decision 32 

Application Fees 21 

Art Course Descriptions 176 

Assessment Services 42 

Associate in Arts Program Guide 105 

Associate in Science Programs 1 1 1 

Audit Students 20 

Baccalaureate Programs 88 

Bachelor of Public Safety Administration Degree Program 88 

Bachelor of Science Elementary Education 93 



Bachelor of Science Nursing 102 

Bachelor of Science Secondary Education Biology 96 

Bachelor of Science Secondary Education Mathematics 99 

Bachelor of Science Supervision and Management 91 

Biology Course Descriptions 179 

Board of Trustees 4 

Bookstores 79 

Buckley Amendment 30 

Building Construction Course Descriptions 201 

Business Administration AS Degree Requirements 1 14 

Business/Management/Finance Course Descriptions 206 

Calendar (College) 1 1 

Campus Maps 8,9,10 

Cardiovascular Technology AS Degree Requirements 1 17 

Cardiovascular Technology Course Descriptions 188 

Certificate Programs 156 

Charlotte Campus 8 

Chemistry Course Descriptions 183 

Class Attendance. Absence 64 

Class Cancellations 20 

CLAST (College Level Academic Skills Test) 43 

CLAST Waiver Requests 44 

CLEP 75 

College Policies 63 

College Preparatory Program 71 

College Rights 18 

Collier Campus 9 

Computer Programming and Analysis 

AS Degree Requirements 1 19 



268 



Computer Programming Certificate 

Requirements 158 

Computer Science Course Descriptions 181 

Counseling Services 43 

Course Descriptions 175 

Course Outline and Course Syllabus 64 

Credit Based on ACE Recommendations 35 

Credit from Military Schools 35 

Credit Hour Fee 21 

Crime Scene Technology AS Degree Requirements 121 

Crime Scene Technology Certificate Requirements 1 59 

Criminal Justice Course Descriptions 181 

Criminal Justice Technology AS Degree Requirements 123 

Cultural Diversity 72 

Dean's List 67 

Degree Acceleration Programs 74 

Dental Assisting Certificate Requirements 161 

Dental Hygiene AS Degree Requirements 125 

Dental Assisting and Hygiene Course Descriptions 189 

Drafting and Design Course Descriptions 201 

Drafting and Design Technology 

AS Degree Requirements 127 

Drop/Add Periods 1 1 

Drug Free Campus 58 

Early Admissions 73 

Early Childhood Education AS Degree Requirements 129 

Early Childhood Education Course Descriptions 183 

Early College (Dual Enrollment) 73 

Economics Course Descriptions 195 

Edison State Online 171 

Edison State University Center 40 

Education Course Descriptions 195 



Effective Catalog Policy 64 

Emergency Medical Services Course Descriptions 198 

Emergency Medical Services Technology 

AS Degree Requirements 131 

Emergency Medical Technology: 

EMT Certificate Requirements 162 

English for Academic Purposes Course Descriptions 193 

Enrollment Verification 31 

Environmental Science 202 

Evaluation of Transfer Credit ' 34 

Eye Care Technician Certificate 163 

Faculty Office Hours 67 

Fees 21 

FERPA 30 

Final Exam Schedule 65 

Final Grade Reports 31 

Financial Aid Information 21 

Fire Fighter Minimum Standards Certificate 164 

Fire Science Technology AS Degree Requirements 133 

Fire Science Technology Course Descriptions 203 

Florida College Entry Level Placement Test 42 

Foreign Language Requirement 68 

Foreign Students (See International Students) 15 

Geography Course Descriptions 206 

Geology Course Descriptions 208 

Glossary of Terms 265 

Grade Corrections 66 

Grade Forgiveness Policy 66 

Grade Point System 65 

Grade Reports 30 

Graduation Requirements 83 

Grants 23 

269 



Grievance Policy 59 

Guest Students 17 

Hendry/Glades Information 7 

History Course Descriptions 176 

History of the College 7 

Honors Research 77 

Honors Scholar Program 77 

Horticulture Course Descriptions 232 

Hospitality Course Descriptions 208 

Human Services Course Descriptions 21 1 

Humanities Course Descriptions 210 

I. D. Cards 62 

Incomplete Grades 66 

Individualized Study 67 

Information (Helpful) 12 

Information Services Course Descriptions 212 

Interdisciplinary Science Course Descriptions 212 

International Baccalaureate Program 76 

International Students 15 

Internet Services Technology AS Degree Requirements 137 

Late Registration Fee 22 

Laws Affecting Students 53 

Lee Campus 10 

Library (Learning Resources) 78 

Lifelong Learning Surcharge 67 

Literature Course Descriptions 159 

Loans 23 

Maps of Campus 8.9.10 

Marine Science 193 

Mathematics Course Descriptions 170 

Maximum Course Attempts 64 

Maximum Course Attempts Policy 64 



Maximum Student Class Load 20 

Media Course Descriptions 172 

Mission Statement 6 

Multiple Attempt Course Surcharge 65 

Music Course Descriptions 172 

National Guard Fee Exemption 28 

Network Specialist Certificate Requirements 132 

Networking Administrator 

AS Degree Requirements 1 12 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 1 7 

Nursing AS Degree Requirements 1 13 

Nursing Course Descriptions 175 

Nutrition Course Descriptions 193 

Oceanography Course Descriptions 193 

Opticianry AS Degree Requirements 1 1 7 

Opticianry Course Descriptions 1 79 

Ophthalmic Laboratory Technician Certificate 

Requirements 133 

Orientation 41 

Paralegal Studies Course Descriptions 181 

Paralegal Studies AS Degree Requirements 1 18 

Paramedic Certificate Program 134 

Payment of Registration Fees 20 

Peer Tutorial Program 70 

Petitions 31 

Philosophy Course Descriptions 182 

Physics Course Descriptions 193 

Physical Therapist Assistant Course Descriptions 182 

Physical Therapist Assistant AS Degree Requirements 120 

Placement Testing 40 

Political Science Course Descriptions 1 85 

270 



Privacy Rights 29 

Probation after Suspension 64 

Programs for Students with Disabihties 70 

Program OtTormgs 85 

Psychology Course Descriptions 1 85 

Radiologic Technology AS Degree Requirements 122 

Radiologic Technology Course Descriptions 186 

Rauschenberg Gallery of Fine Arts 10 

Reading Course Descriptions 1 88 

Readmission 17 

Real Estate Course Descriptions 147 

Records 29 

Refund Policy 20 

Registration 19 

Religious Obserxance 64 

Repayment of Title IV Funds 29 

Residency Rules/Guidelines 1 7 

Respiratory Care AS Degree Requirements 153 

Respiratory Care Course Descriptions 242 

Scholarships 23 

Security Policy and Statistics 52 

Sen icemcmber's Opportunity College 35 

Small Business Management Certificate Requirements 168 

SOAR Program 71 

Sociology Course Descriptions 249 

Speech Course Descriptions 248 

Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP) 65 

State Articulation Agreement 39 

State Statutes and College Policy Affecting Students 53 

Student Activities 62 

Student Classifications 16 

Student Code of Conduct 45 



Student Discipline and Hearing Procedures 45 

Student Go\emment Association 62 

Student Lift 62 

Student Life Skills Course Descriptions 247 

Student Online Ser\ices Access 20 

Student Organizations 62 

Student Participation in Decision Making 62 

Student Review of Instruction 68 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 50 

Student Support Services 72 

Student Surveys 68 

Student Transfer Tips 91 

Substitution Policy For Students With Disabilities 59 

Technology Help Desk 79 

Testing Services 40 

Textbook Selection Process 68 

Theater Arts Course Descriptions 250 

Top Ten Majors 86 

Traffic Regulations 51 

Transcripts 33 

Transfer of Credits 32 

Transfer to a State University 92 

Tuition and Fees 21 

Transfer of Credit 34 

Transfer Services 39 

Upward Bound 72 

Veterans Information 29 

Visual Assessment Certificate Requirements 170 

Withdrawing from courses 66 

Withdrawal Policy 20, 66 

Word-Processing or Typing Policy 68 

Work-Study Programs 23 

271 



Edison College Libra 



3 3701 01142464 9 



"WE SHOULD REMEMBER 

THAT GCX>D FORTUNE OFTEN 

HAPPENS WHEN OPPORTUNfTY 

MEETS WITH PREPARATION." 

THOMAS EDISON - UFELONG STUDENT & INVENTOR 




^^ 



inKiti^i 



COLLEGE 

Lee Campus (239)489-9300 
Collier Campus (239)732-3703 
Charlotte Campus (941)637-56: 
Hendry/Glades Center (863) 674- 
www.edison.edu (800) 749-2322 





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