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24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



B. Ellis Eaton, of the same class, has accepted a 
position In horticulture in Bridgeport, Conn. 

There have been several other calls for competent 
men in this department, which cannot be filled for lack 
of suitable applicants. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Physiology of Plants, by D. F. Macdougal. Ph. D., 
director of the laboratories of the New York Botanical 
Garden. The arrangement of the subject in this vol- 
ume is an effort to place before the student a method 
by which a working knowledge of the physiological 
complex of the plant may be acquired. The disposi- 
tion of the subject matter consists in the study of the 
particular functions and properties of the organism, in 
connection with the forces and agencies which influ- 
ence or initiate them, and a consideration of the gen- 
eral processes of plant life. The first portion of the 
book is devoted chiefly to the special forms of irrita- 
bility exhibited by typical organisms, and the second 
part is taken up with a more critical consideration of 
the broader phases of the activity of the plant. A dis- 
cussion of the principles of the subject is interwoven 
with the directions for practical demonstration in order 
to afford means of interpretation of the experimental 
results secured. Dr. Stone of this college revised a 
chapter dealing with the relations of electricity to 
plants, ami outlined some of the experimental work 
upon the same topic. This chapter describes the 
nature of influence of electricity upon plants, measure- 
ment of differences in electric potential, differences in 
potential due to metabolism, differences in potential 
between illuminated and non-illuminated portions of a 
stem, effect of electric current upon streaming move- 
ment of protoplasm, influence of induced current upon 
Mimosa, influence of currents of electricity upon 
growth, direct current ; effects of continuous stimula- 
tion, effects of alternating secondary currents, influ- 
ence of static eleclricity, electrotropism, electrotaxis. 
It is an excellent text-book for the student of botany. 

Methods in Plant Histology, by Charles J. Chamber- 
lain, Ph. D., Instructor in botany in the University of 
Chicago. This volume was published over a year ago 
as a series of articles in the Journal of Applied Micro- 
scopy. The first part of the book deals with the prin- 
ciples of fixing and staining, and the various other 



processes of microtechnique, while in the later char- 
ters these principles are applied to specific cases. 

Animal Behaviour, by C. Lloyd Morgan. F. R. D. 

Blossom Hosts and Insect Guests, by Wiiliam H 
Gibson. An exposition of the method by which flow- 
ers are fertilized. The history of the discovery of the 
method of flower fertilization is first carefully traced 
then the method is worked out and explained in tht 
case of an abstract flower, and the modifications c ; 
the various flower organs due to their adaption to the;- 
insect visitors, by means of natural selection pointe: 
out. The remainder of the book consists of twenty 
five concrete examples of different methods of cross 
fertilization. These examples stand as types of the 
ordinary processes adopted by nature. 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS 

DRAWING AND BLUE PBOCB88 PAP1BS, 

SCALES, ANCLES, CURVES ead T BQUARE& 
ABCHITRCT8' AND DBAFTMIH 'S COLORS. 

SCHOOL BOXES WATKR COLORS, 

WHDHOBTH. HOWLRND 4 CO., 

INldltroUATKIl, 

81 ami «4 Washington St., 1 RQAfOH 
lit ami 218 Clarendon St., J 

KiietnH.-, MAI.DKN, MASS. 



GEO. N- LUCIA, 



DKAI.KK IN 



PICTURES, PICTURE FRAMES, 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, STATIONERY itn.l FANCY QOOt* 
«4- Makes u Specialty of Picture KraitiinR..** 
»» Mais Stkkkt, • 0t*< Memorial Hall. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




Kit you from hea<l to foot wlilleyou 

■wait. 

Special prices on team order*. 

HINTING CLOTHING. 

(inns, Rllli-M, Pistols, ami Ammunition. 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VO 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 6. 1901 



NO. 3 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Budents and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbob Signal, Amhbrst, Mass. Thb Signal will be 
to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
I the Business Manager. 




BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAP1N CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN. 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902, Interco'legUte. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1903. Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 



Termss $1.00 per year In adeance. Single Copies, 10c. Pontage outside ol United States and Canada, 2«c. extra. 




. C. A. 

Ball Association, 

e Boarding Club. 

g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST, Pres. Athletic Association. 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base-Bal! Association. 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L. Barms, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered at the Pott Office as second-class mall matter. 



-.. 



Edi-tb rials. 



frm our game with Amherst on next Saturday 
afternoon, our football season for 1901 will come to 
an end. In the past few weeks the management has 
had much with which to contend. The schedule, 
carefully prepared though it was. has through no fault 
of our | been almost ruined by repeated cancelling of 
dates by opposing teams. As a result the team has 
been obliged to struggle along with what little practice 
could be obtained from a varying and far inferior 
scrub Deprived of our coach after the first week, we 
were unable to secure a successor till it was too late 
to qlcure much improvement. To complete our mis- 
fortunes, accidents have multiplied of late, till we now 
arepbliged to face our most important game with a 
team composed largely of substitutes and sorely in 
need of adequate practice. Judging from the records 



;4I MAIN STKI' I I 



GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

*,.,., i„i toatgaa Bii.i nil colors for Laui« of the two teams and their relative opportunities for 

____ m * Boy«. devel pment, conditions are not as favorable as could 

befcped for. Yet it has been characteristic of our 
'' teams to make 

SPRINGFIELD, MAS.' 



hopeless conditions ; and we still have confidence that 
our team may be depended upon to do all that can 
reasonably be expected. 



The many changes In educational methods of late 
years are forcibly illustrated by the rise and develop- 
ment of the Correspondence Schools. These have 
started from small beginnings in the simpler branches 
of instruction and have expanded in scope till they now 
include almost every phase of learning. One of the 
more enterprising, the Home Correspondence School 
of Springfield, has recently added complete courses 
along the lines of agricultural education to Its curricu- 
lum. Their text-book on agriculture from the pen of 
Prof. W. P. Brooks of this college has just been issued 
in three practical and comprehensive volumes. It Is 
hoped that in a short time the manager will be able to 
so extend their courses as to enable a young man of 
limited means to take from one to two years of a col- 
lege course at home, thus reducing the expense to 
such an extent that many otherwise debarred from a 
leir best showing under well-nigh college training will gain many of its benefits. 



36 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»7 



When the matter of adopting a new name for this 
paper came up for discussion the editors were in some- 
thing of a quandary. We desired to make our title 
both expressive and significant. Upon experiment 
however we found that we could not include the name 
of the institution, owing to its great length and clumsi- 
ness Nor could we retain the word •• Life " as we 
had hoped to do, the only satisfactory combination 
••College Life "being already in use by a western 
college At this stage we called for designs and sev- 
eral were submitt by students as well as by profesed- 
sional designers. Of these the idea of Mr. W. A. 
Smith of the Sophomore class met with special favor. 
The College Signal ind.cated the rank of the insti- 
tution, and accompanied as it was by the banner with 
the college " M " it also called attention to what we 
hold most dear in our college. At a meeting of the 
board the College Signal was formally adopted. 
Competition for a cover-design however still continued 
and many modifications of Mr. Smith's idea were 
received. At the end of the contest, it was the unan- 
imous opinion of the board that the most desirable of 
all was that of Mr. C. A. Tinker, the artist for the 
1904 Index, and it is his design that now adorns our 
cover. In justice to both Mr. Smith and Mr. Tinker 
however we hope it will be remembered that to both 
credit is due. The honor of naming the college paper 
and suggesting the general plan for the design belongs 
to Mr. Smith ; that of working out the original plan in 
thoroughly artistic fashion belongs to Mr. Tinker. 
The Signal board takes this occasion for publicly 
thanking both for their assistance. 

By a vote of about 1 15 to 4 the student body in a 
recent mass-meeting voted to exclude the term 
•• Aggie " from all publications. In accordance with 
this overwhelming tide of student sentiment, the 
Aggie Life board had no option but to change their 
title to something in accord with this vote. The Col- 
lece Signal is the result. We need not say that In 
no other way has any change been made. Nor is 
any to our knowledge contemplated. The board, the 
subscription and exchange lists, the advertising con- 
tracts and the general policy of the paper remain as 
before. The students have said simply that the inof- 
ficial nickname •• Aggie " shall not be used in place 
of the official name in the public print. The reports 



variously circulated in certain papers charging us with 
abolishing or even attempting to abolisn any portion of 
tha official name of this college are entirely without 
foundation. We would advise the New England 
Homestead, the New England Farmer and certain 
others to obtain their Information from official sources 
hereafter before Indulging in too violent hysterics in 
the future. To our alumni, in view of the agitation 
last spring our action will undoubtedly come as a sur- 
prise. Like themselves we had considered the mat- 
ter as closed. The action of the students was not 
done at the request of the board, but as the result of 
a tide of popular opinion whith we could not have 
withheld. We reversed our action of last spring In 
deference to the wishes of the student body. Our 
policy has been approved by nearly every member of 
the Faculty, and by the advertising committee of the 
alumni. The Rubicon has now been crossed, and 
Time alone can judge of the outcome. We have 
acted sincerely and fairly for what we believed to be 
in the end for the best interests of the college. 
Abiding in that belief, we stand ready to bear the full 
responsibility for failure or success. 



Most gratifying has been the response of our alumni 
to the appeal sent out by the athletic board. Within 
a week of the date of mailing the circulars enough 
money had been subscribed to enable us to secure a 
competent coach for the remainder of the season. 
Whatever success may attend the team in its closing 
games will be In great measure due to this most gen- 
erous response. At the same time the question 
comes up with even greater emphasis of how we can 
guarantee permanent support in the future. If we are 
to accomplish what we desire along athletic lines we 
must of necessity have the advantage of skilled coach- 
ing for an entire season. The problem is a very real 
one. and one that we must solve at once. As a prac- 
tical means of raising a considerable portion of the 
necessary sum. the College Signal board desires to 
make the following proposition at this time. In pas! 
years the financial condition of the paper has been 
precarious at best. A manager who has avoided 
actual failure has been considered as entirely satisfac- 
tory, and as there has been no definite way of dispos- 
ing of any surplus there has been no incentive toward 
enterprise. As a result, matters have simply drifted 



long in a hand-to-mouth sort of way. At the present 
le conditions are better than ever before. The 
fesent manager has thrown vigor and enthusiasm 
Ito his work and his efforts have been rewarded, 
-day there are more advertisements than ever 
jfore, the subscription list has been increased over 
^enty-five per cent, and the paper stands on a firmer 
lancial footing than at any other period in its history 
is the manager's theory that a considerable profit 
in be realized each year, and that any surplus should 
applied to athletics. Already he has mada a lib- 
il donation to the football management. // he 
reives as good support from the alumni as has been 
\nished in the past he is confident that next spring he 
hand to the incoming manager more than the cus- 
lary sum and in addition give to the athletic fund 
/ards of one hundred dollars. In case more of the 
jmnl subscribe the total will be even greater ; if for 
^^f reason the alumni slacken in their support, the 
unt will of necessity be less. We hope the 
^mni will carefully consider the matter and will do 
Ihing to injure the bright prospects in sight for two of 
most important college organizations. 



'he unfortunate outcome of the Bates game would 
jm to call for a statement on our part as to the 
ire of the occurrence. The Bates team was sched- 
to play here on Oct. 24. They arrived in town 
days ahead of time, coming directly from New 
Haven, where they played Oct. 22. Unusual interest 
manifested in the game here and a large crowd 
expected. The game was advertised at some 
expense and It was planned to sell tickets on the 
campus. On the day of the game a dispute arose as 
to the officials. Nothing had been said previously 
upon this point and, for our part it had been supposed 
that according to the usual custom in such games 
each team would furnish one official. Our manage- 
ment had selected Mr. J. E. Halligan as being com- 
petent for the position, having officiated satisfactorily 
at a great many games both for us and for other col- 
leges. The Bates management admitted that they 
*<j»aw of nothing whatever against Mr. Halligan but 
still refused to accept him ; offering, however, it 
should be stated, to take any other man who might be 
put forward. The captain of our team had no other 
object in Insisting upon Mr. Halligan's serving than 



that he was the most competent man available, had 
been asked to serve, and no reason had been shown 
why he should not. Since no previous agreement had 
been made as to officials it was held that Bates had 
no right to cast a reflection upon this man's efficiency 
or honesty by insisting on his not serving. Assurance 
was given, however, that should any reasonable cause 
for complaint arise during the game a new official 
would be substituted at once. This certainly seemed 
a fair compromise. It is doubtless true that In the 
games between the Maine colleges, which are of a 
championship nature, officials are selected by mutual 
agreement, which difference from the custom In 
ordinary games in this section may have lead to some 
misunderstanding, but surely such a selection would 
be spoken of In advance and not left till the day of the 
game. 

No Idea existed that this dispute would have other 
than an amicable ending. A large crowd assembled 
on the campus, many tickets were sold, and both 
teams appeared upon the field ready for play. The 
matter of officials, however, was still unsettled. Capt. 
Paul adhering to his position that Mr. Halligan should 
officiate. At this point an entirely new feature in the 
case appeared. Word was passed about the crowd 
that in case of a disagreement a game was to be 
played between Amherst College and Bates. A few 
moments later the spectators were surprised to see 
the Bates team proceed to their barge and leave the 
grounds, going by way of the village, and with a short 
stop at tbe hotel, to Pratt Field. Those who had 
bought tickets recovered their money from the ticket- 
sellers and many of them hurried to the new scene of 
affairs. 

It Is difficult to conceive how any team would, for 
so trivial a reason, break up a game and forfeit a large 
guarantee, for while in the heat of the discussion each 
side had adhered firmly to its position, there Is no 
doubt that the matter could have been arranged had 
the Bates team not been so ready to leave the field. 
An explanation of the whole affair is not wanting in 
numerous rumors which have been about, which, how- 
ever, we cannot and would not wish to substantiate. 
We will simply state that early in the afternoon of the 
day of the game it was told about town that Bates was 
to play Amherst that afternoon. Whether or not the 
affair was actually pre-arranged the fact Is admitted 




28 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



29 






1 



that the Bates manager had approached the Amherst 
management early in the day for a game ■' in case the 
State College game was given up," and that negotia- 
tions for such a game were under way. It was 
expected in town that there was to be a game on 
Pratt Field, the Amherst manager and coach were on 
hand to accompany the Bates team when they left our 
campus, the crowd went directly from one field to the 
other and the game was reported in the papers next 
morning in the usual manner. If no bad faith toward 
us was intended on the side of either party in this 
impromptu affair, certainly the poor taste displayed 
speaks badly for the judgment of both. Amherst had 
no need of a game on that date and would have done 
much better to have avoided any connection with the 

matter. 

After the Bates team had left our campus for 
another game, causing our receipts and preparations 
to be a total loss, our management refused to consider 
any further propositions of any nature from this team 
and they left town next morning with ill-feeling on 
both sides. Without regard to the merits of the orig- 
inal contention we feel that we were badly used in the 
matter, in that the Bates manager attempted to pre- 
arrange another game, as if expecting to fall out with 
us. and preferred to break up our game rather than 
concede our reasonable demand. The whole affair is 
much to be regretted and we sincerely trust that no 
permanent bad feeling will result. 



TO ALUMNI. 

The appended statement has recently been sent out 
in the form of a circular to a large number of alumni. 
A prompt and generous response has thus far been 
met with, so that we have been able to engage a 
coach for the football team. It is the idea to keep all 
money obtained in this way strictly for extra expenses ; 
for coaching and similar advantages which our teams 
would not receive without it. The good results are 
already apparent in the increased enthusiasm for foot- 
ball and the improvement in the team. Whatever 
may be the result of the remaining games of the sea- 
aon it is certainly true that our team is at present the 
best trained aggregation which ever represented this 
college. We wish to call this matter to the attention 
of those who have not received the circular and to 
urge all who have not already done so to contribute 



toward this object. All money not used this season 
will be devoted to other branches of athletics or saved 
for next year's football team, when it is planned to 
have a coach throughout the season. 

To every loyal son and friend of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College : 

The remarkable record made by our football team 1 
so far this season is one of the most striking advertise- 
ments which this college has ever received. Com- 
mencing with an overwhelming victory over our old , 
opponents of Holy Cross, never but once beaten by us 
Md that nearly ten years ago. we now glory in the 
decisive defeat of Wesleyan University, for the pas: 
two years champions of the Triangular League. With 
our large Freshman class and large number of 0!: 
players the football prospects of the college were never 
so bright before. The baseball situation will be equal,, 
satisfactory when the season arrives. We have the 
men, we have the enthusiasm, and thus we have the 
opportunity, but now, as ever, we have not the monej 
necessary to keep a first-class team in the field throug: 1 

the season. 

The college does not exist which has made such I 
record as ours of the past few years under circurr, 
stances as unfavorable. Where else are there or; 
hundred and twenty-five students who have put ou 
football and baseball teams to beat Amherst, Bowdoir 
Middlebury, University of Maine, University of Ve: 
mont. Trinity. Wesleyan. Norwich University, Wor 
cester Tech., and the state colleges of Connects 
and New Hampshire, and all upon no other finance 
basis than subscriptions from the faculty and Iocs 
alumni, and taxes upon a student body, poor in mone 
but rich in loyalty and pride in their college? 

This is the situation. It will not require a lar f 
sum to carry on athletics for the year in a satlsfacto- 
manner. Plenty of victories are assured and the cc 
lege will be brought before the public as never belcr- 
but without outside assistance this cannot be dor, 
Our last year's football team failed to materialize 
possibilities from lack of proper coaching. The bas: 
ball team disbanded in the midst of a successful se; 
son for lack of funds. Will you not, now. before H 
matter is forgotten, do what you can to help ? H 
your duty and privilege. 

Mass. Acr'l Coll. Athletic Board. 

R. E. Smith. '94. Sec. and Treas 



COMMUNICATION. 

Amherst, Oct. 12, 1901. 
Howard Lawtun Knight, Editor-in-chief of 
Aggie Life : 

ear Sir: In your last issue, in an article on the 
:ond page beginning, " The adoption " the writer 
ims to be seeking a more appropriate name for 
ir College than that now often applied to it : viz. 
iggie." May I ask. has not the college now a 
le given it by act of the Legislature, and does the 
writer or '• the student body." propose to change that, 
If so, how? It seems to me the article is very obscure 
unless you read between the lines. I will look for an 
answer in your next issue. 

Respectfully yours, 

Levi Stockbrit>ge. 



Hv'e fear that Professor Stockbridge as well as some 
others have been misled as to the tenor of the editorial 
In question. The article referred to the adoption of a 

» ! college yell in which the word " Aggie " was 
iced by the word " Massachusetts. 1 ' It in no 
e touched upon the official name of the college as 
this is a matter with which the student body have 
nothi ; to do. This is what it has been and seems 
likely to be for some time, the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. Wherever a complete title is to be 
his must be the one. and mere college loyalty 
demand that whether satisfactory to us or not 
eld to necessity as gracefully as possible. No 
xpects. however, that any such long and cum- 
me title will be used unofficially in every day 
rsation. Some one word must be adopted. We 
itain that as the students are the ones who most 
use It. it is perfectly within their privileges to 
detatmine what the " popular " name shall be. There 
are Iwo parts to the official title, each supposedly of 
equal weight. Student opinion in the past has said thai 
the erphatic word shall be "Agricultural," and in 
response to this sentiment student opinion originated 
the |yo rd "Aggie." This word has been given a 
thonjugh trial and we respectfully submit that It has 
^^koved satisfactory. It has been taken to mean 
pradcally everything under the sun which we did not 
intend it to mean, with the result that to the aver- 
age leader of the daily press It has meant nothing 




whatsoever. Coupled of late to the word •• Amherst " 
it has become especially obnoxious, since in the popu- 
lar mind its effect has been to bestow whatever credit 
we might otherwise obtain from our athletic career 
upon another institution which we have little desire 
to advertise. Nor would the substitution of the entire 
word " Agricultural " entirely remedy the difficulty, 
for experience has shown that to this too the prefix 
" Amherst " will be applied. We must conclude 
then that we have simply made a mistake in our 
choice of a cognomen. To rectify it. let us emphasize 
instead the word " Massachusetts." which is just as 
much a part of our title as the other. This, and 
no more, is what has been done. The " M " rather 
than the " A " has been awarded in athletics, and the 
yell and songs have been correspondingly changed. 
And finally, recognizing that it is folly for us to criti- 
cise others for calling us what we have hitherto been 
calling ourselves, we have formally substituted " Mass- 
achusetts " for "Aggie" In the public press. We 
have taken these successive steps with the best inter- 
ests of the college at heart. If there is anything 
which we have done which can in any way Injure its 

reputation, we should be pleased to hear of it. 

^ 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

We are requested to insert the following notice : 
The Public Winter meeting of the State Board of 
Agriculture will be held at City Hall, Northampton, 
December 3, 4 and 5. 

Programme. 
Tuesday, December 3. 

10-30 a. m. — Meeting opened with prayer. Address 
of Welcome, by his Honor Mayor Arthur Watson. 
Response for the Board of Agriculture, by his Honor 
Lieutenant-Governor John L. Bates. 

1 1 A , M . — Lecture : " Modern Potato Culture." by 
Dr. Chas. D. Woods. Director Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

2 p. m. — Lecture: "The Shade Tree Insect 
Problem." by A. H. Kirkland. M. S. 

7 p. M , — Lecture: "Dairying in Europe," illustrated 
by stereopticon. by Major Henry E. Alvord. Chief of 
Dairy Division. United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Washington. 

8-30-10-00. — Reception to the Board of Agriculture 
and others attending the meeting. 










3© 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3* 



When time was called the sophomores had two feet 
W TT«. TheTatest Results of eleven inches to the good. It was the old story of 
10-30 a. m.— Lecture: "The Latest r«bim . mn „ pimpri ence and grit. The rope furnished 

Experiments I. th. Culture, Cure and F«™^H»™" e ^« 7* i ■»"• *» lhe *"" 
„, Tobacco." by Dr. E. H. Jenkins. Director Connect,. «. aUn ^""^ J^ men pulled . Soph , 



cut Agricultural Experiment Station 

2 P . m.— Lecture : " Dairv Economics,' by Ex-Gov. 
W D Hoard. Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

7 . 45 P m.— Lecture : •' Nature Study and the Need 
of Agriculture in a System of Public Education," by 
Dr. C. F. Hodge, Clark University, Worcester. 
Thursday. December 5. 
9-30. a. M.-Lecture : •• The Relation of Fruit Cul- 



men 
mores. Fulton. Henshaw. A'hearn. Lewis. Pierce 
and Tinker ; freshmen. Gardner, Hunt. Craighead. 
Porter, Munson, and Patch. 



NOTICE TO EXCHANGES. 
This paper hitherto published under the 
name "Aggie Life" will hereafter be known as 
-The College Signal." Exchange edl 



ture'to the Value of New England Farms," by Prof I IJJJLjJZJ^i J| others Who have occasion 
George T. Powell. Director School of Practical Agi »»»^; |j>at| w||h us w |„ sre atly Oblige U 

culture and Horticulture. Briarcliff Manor, N. Y 

n _00 A m.— Lecture: " The Colored Race and its 
Relation to the Productive Industries of the Country," 



by Dr. Booker T. Washington, Principal Tuskegee 
Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee, Ala. 



lo communicate with us will greatly oblige u 
by carefully noting this change of name. Our 

* 88,nthefU THJc«GE8ieNAL, 
Mass. Agricultural College. ^ ^ 



ROPE PULL. 

On Friday. Oct. 25, the annual rope pull between 
the two lower classes was held. On the morning after 
chapel there was the usual delivery of class yells and 
the Juniors appeared with plug hats, bright ribbons and 
canes Shortly after drill the crowd began to gather 
on the campus where it was necessary to wait some 
time for the rope to materilize. The waiting however 
was enlivened by the appearance of -General, the 
college •• mascot." Around his collar were tied maroon 
and black ribbons, the colors of the senior class. Next 
came a sophomore class sweater and on his nether 
extremities he wore a pair of varsity stockings. He 
seemed to enjoy the fun and trotted over the campus 
barking and wagging his tail. About five o'clock the 
Freshmen appeared with the rope and again there was 
continual yelling. Captain Fulton of the sophomores 
won the toss and chose the north side. A 5-10 the 
word to " drop" was given and Immediately there fol- 
lowed one of the prettiest rope pulls ever held on our 
campus. The sophomores upon dropping began to pull 
at once with the quick heave and In about one minute 
had between six and seven feet of rope to their credit 
but from this time on the superior weight of the Fresh- 
men began to tell. The Sophomores perceiving that 
they were losing ground lay on the rope and saved the 
day. 



A THOUSAND YEARS AGO. 

In the days when this doddering earth was young. 

The chalice of joy brimmed high ; 
We knew the earth of the galley oars 
And the lilt of the surf on stranger shores,- 

We lived then, you and I. 
O. the long, long days between cruise and cruise 

In our little hamlet home 
•Neath the gray crag crowned by the tiny shr.ne. 
The yellow sands and the reefs dark line. 

And the rocks with their wreaths of foam. 

We have lost forever that far-off bay. 

And the rattle of hostile steel. 
The hiss of blood as the sword struck home. 
The white-hot sting of the riven bone. 

The shock of the cracking keel. 

They have cooped us up in a sordid age. 

But our spirits wander free 
To the gale-rocked crag and the lapping bay. 
And the rocks white-wreathed by the waves at play. 

And the open surging sea. ^^^ ^ 



the Botanic museum or Insectary and those on the 

»st, and between the Chemical laboratory and the 

^terinary building ; and five minutes be allowed stu- 

fents for passage between other recitations or lecture 

jms. If a student shall not be present in his proper 

ice before the expiration of this time limit, he shall 

marked tardy. 

It was voted that it is the sense of this meeting of 
faculty that the unwritten rule shall be that if the 
Btructor is not in his place before the expiration of 
6se time limits, the class shall be entitled to a bolt. 
Jit was voted that the above agreement shall apply 
to all regularly scheduled examinations as well as to 
^citations and lectures and laboratory exercises. 

C. S. Walker, Sec. 




RESOLUTIONS. 

'hereas : It has pleased the All-wise Father to remove from 
midst our beloved classmate and friend Clarence Linden 
rvens : and 

'hertas : We recognize in him a loyal classmate and true 
d : therefore be it 
\esolved : That we the members of the class of '95 M. A. G. 
mourn his loss and do extend our heartfelt sympathy to 
his I .'.riken wife and his relatives in their bereavement : and be 
ft hirther 

Resolved : That these resolutions be published in the college 
paper, and sent to the family of the deceased and that they 
alto be placed upon the records of the class 

Henry A. Ballou, ) Committee 
Geo. A. Billings. [ for 
Wright A. Root. ) The Class. 




/Uhlctic No^s- 



AS TO BOLTING. 

Extract from minutes of a Faculty Meeting he 

N °,t' washed that ten minutes be allowed for r for. being downed 
students to pass between recitation or lecture 



Williams. 17; Massachusetts. 0. 

ideal weather conditions and before a large 
and enthusiastic crowd Williams defeated Massachu- 
setts by a score of 17-0. on Wednesday. Oct. 16. 

Massachusetts was more or less crippled after its 
hard game with Wesleyan the Saturday before, 
nevertheless it made a creditable showing against 
the strong Berkshire team. Fumbling was a promi- 
nent feature on part of Massachusetts and w^s at 
times very costly. 

O'Heam acting captain for the Massachusetts team 
von the toss. At 3-00 p. m.. Hatch, of Williams. 
kicked off to Bodfish who gained about five yards be- 



With ball on 15-yard line Bodfish circled left end 
for twenty-five yards. O'Hearn then took ball out- 
side left tackle and had a clear field but was caught 
from behind by Watson after running thirty yards and 
a touchdown was saved. On the next ilay the Mas- 
sachusetts fumbled which proved fatal for Watson 
secured the ball and carried it over the line for a 
touchdown after running eighty yards. Moore kicked 

goal. 

Halligan kicked off to Welbin who brought it back 
ten yards. Here Williams fumbled and Snell fell on 
the ball, Massachusetts was then held for downs. 
Williams was then forceu to punt. Whitaker fumbled 
the ball and it was Williams' ball on the 25-yard line. 
By line plunges through tackle the ball was placed on 
the one-yard line, where on third down Peabody car- 
ried it over for touchdown. Moore kicked goal. 
After the kick off there was an exchange of punts be- 
tween O'Hearn and Watson. The first half ended 
with ball on Williams' 40-yard line. Score. 12-0. 

On second half after Hailigan kicked off. Williams 
lost ball on fumble. Massachusetts then played fine 
football and worked the ball steadily down the field 
to 10-yard line. The chances for a touchdown were 
good but a fumble came and Moore fell on the ball. 
Peabody immediately punted over Brook's head and 
the ball rolled eight yards. After O'Hearn had punted 
and Williams had lost the ball on downs.Welbin secured 
the ball on a fumble and by steady gains Williams 
carried the ball to one-yard line. Here Campion car- 
ried it over for the last touch down. Moore failed to 
kick goal, the ball being blocked by O'Hearn. There 
were but a few minutes left to play. The line up : 



WILLIAMS. 



r. e. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Proulx, McCobb 



roor 



O'Neill. Vose. 1. e. 
Jones. Spencer. 1. t. 
Cole. 1. g. 

Mossman. Leighton. c. 
Lawrence, r. g. 
Hatch, r. t. 
Welbtn. r. e. 
Moore, q. b. 
Jackaret. 1. h. b. 
Watson. Graves, r. h. b. 
Peabody. f. b. 

Score— Williams. 17; Massachusetts. 0. Touchdown- 
Watson. Peabody. Champion goals from touchdowns- 
Moore 2. Referee— Rice of Pittsfisld. Umpire— DeCamp of 
Williams. Linesmen— O'Hearn of Massachusetts. Vose and 
Merrcll of Williams. Time— 20 and 15 minutes halves. 



r. t.. Snell 

r. g,. Franklin 

c. Patch 

I. g,. Craighead 

1. t.. Halligan 

I. e.. O'Hearn 

q. b., Brooks 

r. h. b.. Bodfish 

1. h. b.. Whitaker 

f. b.. Munson 




3© 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3' 



When time was called the sophomores had two feet 
eleven inches to the good. It was the old story^ o ; 

Experiments in the Culture. Cure and ^^ ^Z^^Z^ ^^ ^ ^^ 
of Tobacco." by Dr. E. H.Jenkins. Director Connect!- *™ ^J ^ ^ foUcwing men pulled : Sopho- 



Wednesday. December 4. 
10-30 a M.-Lecture: "The Latest Results of 
Experiments in the Culture. Cure and Fermentation 



sweet cider. The following men pulled . Sopho 
mores. Fulton. Henshaw. A'hearn. Lewis. Pierce. 
1 Tinker ; freshmen. Gardner. Hunt. Cra.ghead 



^ "' ^S -cs.. by Ex-Cov. 

w 7 D 45 r;^ 

of Agriculture in a System of Public Education/" by 
Dr. C. F. Hodge, Clark University. Worcester. 
Thursday. December 5. 
9 30 a M.-Lecture : " The Relation of Fruit Cul- 
ture to the Value of New England Farms." by Pro • 
George T. P-well. Director School of Practical Agri- 
culture and Horticulture. Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

n _00 a. M.-Lecture: « The Colored Race and Its 
Relation to the Productive Industries of the Country 
by D r Booker T. Washington. Principal Tuskegee 
Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee. Ala. 



NOTICE TO EXCHANGES. 
This paper hitherto published under the 
name -AKKle Lire" will hereafter be known a> 
S roUeKe Signal." Exchange edltlors, 

"The l Oliege »■» "" . h ve occas | n r eo t .it Ions and lectures and laboratory exercises. 

subscribers and all others , wh ^ have 0C c ^ g< ^^ S( 



the Botanic museum or Insectary and those on the 
st, and between the Chemical laboratory and the 
Iterinary building ; and five minutes be allowed stu- 
mts for passage between other recitations or lecture 
>ms. If a student shall not be present in his proper 
ce before the expiration of this time limit, he shall 
marked tardy. 

It was voted that it is the sense of this meeting of 
, faculty that the unwritten rule shall be that if the 
itructor is not in his place before the expiration of 
se time limits, the class shall be entitled to a bolt. 
It was voted that the above agreement shall apply 
to all regularly scheduled examinations as well as to 



by carefully noting this mange of name. Oui 
aQ(1 re 88 I. the "™™*&M SieNAl. 
Mass. Agricultural College- ^^ ^ 




ROPE PULL. 

On Friday. Oct. 25. the annual rope pull between 
the two lower classes** held. On the morning af er 
chapel there was the usual delivery of class yells and 
the Juniors appeared with plug hats, bright ribbons and 
canes ShorUy after drill the crowd began to gather 
on the campus where it was necessary to wait some 
le for the rope to materillze. The waiting howev 
was enlivened by the appearance of -General, the 
college - mascot." Aroundhis collar weretled maroon 
and black ribbons, the colors of the sen or clas, N ex 
came a sophomore class sweater and on his nether 
extremities he wore a pair of varsity stockings. He 
e mTd to enjoy the fun and trotted over the campus 
barking and wagging his tail. About five o clock the 
Freemen appeared with the rope and «* +»- 
continual yelling. Captain Fulton of the sophomo e 
won the toss and chose the north side. A 5-10 he 
word to •• drop - was given and Immediately there fol- 
lowed one of the prettiest rope pulls ever held on our 
campus. The sophomores upon dropping began to pu 
at once with the quick heave and in about one minute 
L between six and seven feet of rope _ * .the * •* » 
but from this time on the superior ^ght of the Fresh- 
men began to tell. The Sophomores P^jL** 
They were losing ground lay on the rope and saved the 

day. 



A THOUSAND YEARS AGO. 

,n the days when this doddering earth was young, 

The chalice of joy brimmed high ; 
We knew the earth of the galley oars 
And the lilt of the surf on stranger shores,- 

We lived then, you and 1. 
0. the long, long days between cruise and cruise 

In our little hamlet home 
•Neath the gray crag crowned by the tiny shnn-. 
The yellow sands and the reef I dark line. 
And the rocks with their wreaths of foam. 

We have lost forever that far-off bay. 

And the rattle of hostile steel. 
The hiss of blood as the sword struck home. 
The white-hot sting of the riven bone. 

The shock of the cracking keel. 

They have cooped us up in a sordid age. 

But our spirits wander free 
To the gale-rocked crag and the lapping bay. 
And me rocks white-wreathed by the waves at play, 

And the open surging sea. _ Smrthm0 „ p* 



RESOLUTIONS. 

'hereas : It has pleased the All-wise Father to remove from 
midst our beloved classmate and friend Clarence Linden 
ens : and 

'hereas : We recognize in him a loyal classmate and true 

^Bid : therefore be it 

^ksolued: That we the members of the class of '95 M. A. C. 

imourn his loss and do extend our heartfelt sympathy to 

Ltriken wife and his relatives in their bereavement : and be 

■rther 

•solved: That these resolutions be published in the college 
paper, and sent to the family of the deceased and that they 
also re placed upon the records of the class 

Henry A. Ballou, ) Committee 
Geo. A. Billings. > for 
Wright A. Root. ) The Class. 





/Uhletic Not?S- 



AS TO BOLTIHG. 

Extract .mm MM * a Acuity Meeting b 

N °U was'voted tha, ten minutes be allowed lor Mf>elng downed, 
students to pass between recitation or lecture X 



Williams, 17; Massachusetts. 0. 
ider ideal weather conditions and before a large 
and enthusiastic crowd Williams defeated Massachu- 
setts by a score of 17-0, on Wednesday. Oct. 16. 

Massachusetts was more or less crippled after its 
hard game with Wesleyan the Saturday before, 
irtheless it made a creditable showing against 
strong Berkshire team. Fumbling was a promi- 
feature on part of Massachusetts and was at 
times very costly. 

O'Hearu acting captain for the Massachusetts team 
won the toss. At 3-00 p. m.. Hatch, of Williams, 
kicked off to Bodflsh who gained about five yards be- 



Wlth ball on 15-yard line Bodfish circled left end 
for twenty-five yards. O'Hearn then took ball out- 
side left tackle and had a eh ar field but was caught 
from behind by Watson after running thirty yards and 
a touchdown was saved. On the next play the Mas- 
sachusetts fumbled which proved fatal for Watson 
secured the ball and carried it over the line for a 
touchdown after running eighty yards. Moore kicked 

goal. 

Halligan kicked off to Welbin who brought it back 
ten yards. Here Williams fumbled and Snell fell on 
the ball, Massachusetts was then held for downs. 
Williams was then forced to punt. Whitaker fumbled 
the ball and it was Williams' ball on the 25-yard line- 
By line plunges through tackle the ball was placed on 
the one-yard line, where on third down Peabody car- 
ried it over for touchdown. Moore kicked goal. 
After the kick off there was an exchange of punts be- 
tween 0*Hearn and Watson. The first half ended 
with ball on Williams' 40-yard line. Score. 12-0. 

On second half after Halligan kicked off. Williams 
lost ball on fumble. Massachusetts then played fine 
football and worked the ball steadily down the field 
to 10-yard line. The chances for a touchdown were 
good but a fumble came and Moore fell on the ball. 
Peabody immediately punted over Brook's head and 
the ball rolled eight yards. After O'Hearn had punted 
and Williams had lost the ball on downs.Welbin secured 
the ball on a fumble and by steady gains Williams 
carried the ball to one-yard line. Here Campion car- 
ried it over for the last touch down. Moore failed to 
kick goal, the ball being blocked by O'Hearn. There 
were but a few minutes left to play. The line up : 

WILLIAMS. 



the 



c. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e.. Proulx, McCobb 

r. t.. Snell 

r. g,, Franklin 

c. Patch 

1. g.. Craighead 

I. t., Halligan 

I. e.. O'Hearn 

q. b., Brooks 

r. h. b.. Bodfish 

I. h. b.. Whitaker 

f. b.. Munson 

Score— Williams. 17; Massachusetts. 0. Touchdown- 
Watson. Peabody. Champion goals from touchdowns — 
Moore 2. Referee— Rice of Pittsfisld. Umpire— DeCamp of 
Williams. Linesmen— O'Hearn of Massachusetts. Vose and 
Merrell of Williams. Time— 20 and 15 minutes halves. 



O'Neill. Vose, 1. e. 
Jones. Spencer, 1. t. 
Cole. 1. g. 

Mossman. Leighton. 
Lawrence, r. g. 
Hatch, r. t. 
Welbin. r. e. 
Moore, q. b. 
Jackaret. 1. h. b. 
Watson, Graves, r. h. b. 
Peabody. f. b. 






COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 








Massachusetts, 18; Worcester Tech, 12 
On Saturday, Oct. 19. Mass. State College de- 
feated Worcester Tech in a somewhat loosely played 
game by a score of 18-12. 

The offensive work of both teams was very good 
but neither team was strong on defense. After our 
game with Williams the Wednesday before our team 
Ls in a much crippled condition and this necessitated 
the playing of a substitute team which accounted more 

or less for the poor work. rvH^arn 

On the first half Worcester kicked off to Hearn 
who ran it back ten yards. By end runs and line 
bucking the ball was placed on the 5-yard line where 
Munson carried it over for a touchdown O Hearn 
kicked goal Walsh kicked off to Snell who returned 
fWe yard. The ball was worked to center of field 
where it was lost on a fumble. Worcester turned 
Tab is Massachusetts and carried the ball down the 
ffeld for a touchdown. Chickering carried It over and 

Walsh kicked goal. 

Halligan kicked off. Worcester got the ball on 15- 
yard l«ne and was held for downs. From here the ba 
was carried to one-yard line where Munson earned it 
Ter. O'Hearn kicked goal. The first halt end* 
soon after Worcester kicked off. 

The second half was but a mere repetition of the 
first half. Massachusetts making another touchdown and 
Worcester Tech likewise. The line-up : 

W WORCESTER TECH. 

Massachusetts. f e Clancy 

O'Hearn. 1. e. f< t Emerson 

Halligan. 1. t. f g Wheaton 
Craighead, 1. g. 



Lawis, c. 
Franklin, r. g. 
Snell. r. t. 
Proulx, r. e. 
Brooks, q. b. 
Whitaker, 1. h. b. 
Bane. r. h. b. 
Munson. f. b- 

Score—Massachusetts, 18 



c, Thayer 
1. g., Rankin 
1. t., Clark 
1. e., Chickering 
q. b.. Butke 
r. h. b., Steimer, Young 
1. h. b., Walsh 
f. b., Ry lands 
Worcester Tech. 12. Touch. 



F R Wheeler. Time-15 and 12 minute halves. 
Massachusetts. 10; Spr.ngfieldTra.mngSchool.O. 
Massachusetts played and won Its first home 
game of the season. Saturday. Nov. 2. defeat- 
ing Springfield Training School 10 to ,0 on the 
College Campus. The offensive work of the 



home team was somewhat off color but on 
the defence the team showed improvement over he 
Worcester Tech game. Twice, however. In the first 
half owing to slowness of our backs, a Springfield man 
got away with the ball the first time being caught by 
Craighead from behind. The second time our goa 
was seriously threatened Capt. Cornell going around 
our right end for twenty yards and getting by every- 
body but Brooks. The first half ended with no score 
but in the second half the team showed more life 
doing much better work. ,.,.., 

Capt O'Hearn won the toss and Springfield kicked 
off Lewis carried the ball forward 10 yards and 
then by line plays directed mostly at the right side 
Massachusetts carried the bail well into Spnngf.el ds 
territory where it was lost on a fumble. The ball 
remained in Springfield's territory during most of the 
half and twice O'Hearn tried for goals from the field 
one from placement and the other a drop kick but 
both were unsuccessful. The half closed with tnj 
ball in Massachusetts' possession on Spnngfield s J. 

^nthl'second half Snell kicked off for Massachu 
sefts but recovered the ball as it bounded back from : 
Springfield's center. Showing a good deal more Hfc 
than in the first half. Massachusetts then earned the 
ball steadily down the field for a touchdown Sneb 
going over the line on the extreme left of the field 
The punt out was no try for goal. 

Bugbee kicked off to O'Hearn who advanced Z 
yeards Massachusetts kept plugging at the right 
of Springfield's line for steady gams but when 10 yari 
from the goal Halligan went through the left side for 
a touchdown. O'Hearn missed a difficult goal. 

Again receiving the kick off Massachusetts quick, 
carried the ball along until with thirty seconds left i 
play O'Hearn again tried a drop kick but misse: 
Time was called before there was chance for anothe' 

line up. rvu»ir 

For Massachusetts Bodfish. Munson and O Hear 

put up the best game while Cornwell. Woolworth an: 

Berry excelled for Springfield. The line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

O'Hearn. (Capt.). 1. e. 
Franklin. Halligan. 1. t. 
Craighead. 1. g- 
Patch, c. 



SPRINGFIELD TRAINING SCHOOi. 

1. e.. Berr 

1. t.. Thompsc- 

1. g.. Clark. Ashle. 

c . McLart 



Gardner. Franklin, r. g. 
Inell. r. t. 

lodfish. McCobb, r. e. 
Irooks. q. b. 

fhitaker. 1. h. b. 

•wis, Proulx, r. h. b. 
lunson. Bodfish. f. b. 



r. g., Bugbee 

r. t., Hamblen 

r. e., Woolworth 

q. b.. Gray 

1. h. b., Abbott 

r. h. b.. Elliott 

f. b.. Cornell (Capt.) 



Score— Massachusetts, 10; Springfield Training School, 0. 
fouchdowns— Snell. Halligan. Linesmen — Belden of Mass- 

luse'ts and Sullivan of Springfield. Referee— Prof. Smith 
Massachusetts. Umpire— Dr. McCurdy of Springfield, 
lime— 20 minute halves. 



College No**S- 




Porter. '05, has left college. 

Kirby, '04, has returned to college. 

Prof. C. H. Fernald has had an attack of the grip. 

The football team is putting in excellent practice 
Hese days. 

M — J. V. Monahan, '05. has been called home. He 
■y not return. 

The band and artillery detachment have had 
ir pictures taken. 

E. F. McCobb who has been sick for the past 
fc weeks is around again. 

-The Glee Club has at last been reorganized : Mr. 
D. Nelson West is leader. 

R— A. Russell Paul, "05, spent a few days last week 

at his home In Framingham. 

•-Three new shower baths have been placed in the 

training room of the " Gym." 

^1-On Sunday, Oct. 20, the services were conducted 

In the chapel by Rev. John Day. 

^1-Secretary Olney has been the guest of Captain 
Anderson for the past few weeks. 

^■-W. E. Tottingham has been appointed cadet cor- 
poral. He will remain with the band. 

^■-The Examiniing Committee of the Board of 
Overseers visited the college last week. 
^•-President H. H. Goodell delivered a lecture in 
Boiton, Monday evening, Oct. 21, 1901. 

^B-C. P. Halligan. '03, is suffering with a badly 
swoll n forearm. Blood poisoning is feared. 

^•The college sen?.te held a meeting at the home 
of Pr.s. H. H. Goodell last Monday evening. 



— The College Signal board was recently photo- 
graphed by Lovell. 

— Both the Freshmen and Sophomore football 
teams are practicing for the inter-class game. 

— The design used on the cover of the College 
Signal was presented to the paper by C. A. Tinker, '04. 

— Pres. and Mrs. C. W. Palrey of Knoxville. Tenn. 
spent the day of Oct. 26 as guests of Pres. H. H. 
Goodell. 

— " Soils and How to Treat Them " is the title of 
a book, by Prof. W. P. Brooks, which has just 
appeared. 

— The rules oi ihe college have been re-codified 
and printed in a neat pamphlet which is now ready for 
distribution. 

— Dr. A. C. True of Washington, director of exper- 
iment stations, recently paid a visit to the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station. 

— It is said that the Freshmen have adopted a class 
motto. It is " United we hide, divided we swim." 
Quite appropriate. 

— Captain H. A. Paul is suffering with a very badly 
sprained ankle, which may keep him out of the game 
for the rest of the season. 

— The class of 1903 has chosen the following 
" Prom," committee ; E. B. Snell, C. S. Tinkham, N. 
F. Monahan, E. G. Proulx. 

— At a meeting of the Sophomore class R. A. 
Quigley was elected class captain and C. W. Lewis 
was elected football captain. 

— President Goodell and Dr. C. S. Walker repre- 
sented the college at the Yale Bi-centennial. Dr. 
Walker is an alumnus of that institution. 

— Mr. Wallace has been making a few surveys pre- 
paratory to drawing the specifications for the plan of 
the new central heating station which may soon be 
built. 

— F.E.Jennings has been secured to coach the team 
the remainder of the season. Mr. Jennings played 
half-back on the Dartmouth team which he captained 
In 1900. 

— The Freshman class had their pictures taken In 
front of the chapel on Thursday, Oct. 24. The affair 
was well planned so the Sophomores had no chance 
to interfere with them. 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



35 





evolve a good college song as well. 

We have heard many complaints because » was 
^a^mnl would no, s„ppo :r a,hle,lca r . ; 

..ion Recently an appeal was sent out 
J mnl. which has heen responded to most .reel, 

_ Friends of the college will *f~ȣZ 

, .,„ ,h-t the Faculty have appointed a committee lo 

e" e r •- 'he annua, tepott and that a genu ne 

catalogue will be read, for distribution about Dec. I. 

,f will be remembered that the Sophomores sue 

I;:cte\re r r t hrp e rprac,,cedw,,,heSopho- 

mores rope which they had » borrowed. 

A n w feature of college discipline Is being .red 

ri*SiltSlt^ -hey are Inter- 
"T A s"m„ar plan to thls Is employed In many 
other colleges with gratifying success. 

nnOct 17 Governor W.Murray Crane vailed 
r The Governor was accompanied b, D.F. 
""fTi Maxweh H. D. Yerxa. J. J. McNamara. 
t't'Howe L clfF,e,d and J. H. Tippleton a 
5. n. nowc. »-« Qmith secretary 

™r 'Ve'rnr aTs F^amllton.Txe'cutlve 5 ecre- 
to the governor and t. r thg 

a salute of seventeen guns was iww» j 
tary. A saluie Ul u . u-„ rP i|encv was shown 

college battery, after which His Excellency w 

about the college. 

The Seniors and Sophomores treated the college 
Seniors a h ^ & ^^ 

to an interest.ng exhibition 

w» Saturday afternoon. 1 ne game w« 

b r h tdtr; g oan tr, rrfL 8 ::.. ^h *. 

side crossed the goai . most f the time. 

bal , »as in the Sophomore — ™ ^ ^ 

In the second half Q ul *'«» . yards for a 

D6llea , P f b e u d t I 1 1££^ mterference 
^t^tS^d^^rew^nc,. allowed. The 



eral long runs around the ends. Q»»**^ "* 
Pierce excelled for the Sophomores. 

1902. 
Hall. 1. «• 
Dwyer, L t. 
Church. 1. g- 

Cook. Cooley, c. ( 

Dacy, Cook, r. g. 
Saunders, r. t. 



Claflin. r. e. 
Dellea, q b- 
Belden. r. h. b. 
Morse. 1. h. b. 
Gates, f. b. 

Score— '02, ; 
Umpire. Willis, 
keeper. Newhall 



1904. 
r. e.. Peck 
r . t., Gilbert 
r. g.. Tinker 
c, Staples 
Smith. Henshaw 
1. t.. Couden 
1. e.. Griffin 
q. b.. Quigley 
1. h. b.. Gregg 
r. h. b., Fulton 
f. b.. Pierce 
•04 0. Referee, A. R. Dorman. Columbia. 
•05. Linesmen. McCobb. Barnes. T.me- 
15-minute halves. 



•M, Chas W. Felt, who has been for sometime 
tccated^G^lveston. Texas, vlslled friends in town 

la, S'- 87 -Joseph F. Daniels Is at present librarian 

auhe'saj; guttural college, For, Collins. Coo. 

^.-Frederick L. Taylor. H. D.. 336 Washtnglon 

S, V 9 r°°Homer C. West. Superlnlend.nl o, ,he Wai- 

,ham ^"gCo ■ contracted typhoid fever while return 

T„m a vacation trip In Colorado and Is now slowly 

Z 'Zl Z ,he aLxa, ,he home o, his parenls 

M and Mrs. H. C. Wes, a, Belcher.own. 

at St. Pauls church L.'Averin. 

.94 -Prof S. F. Howard has been elected a Fei- 
,ow of the American Association of Science. 

. 94 _Elias Dewey White and Miss Be* *l£ 
Doy le were united in marriage, at East Poln t Ga. 
i a 1901 Mr. White holds an important pos, 
r^rX -11 service of the Georgia. 

Southern R. R. Address. East Point. Ga. 
•04 __H P. Smead. Hanover. 
•94 -Dr. Chas. H. H.ggins. WW ™™f„ 
tot 9 h 4 e D om,n,on Government <» J-J^ 
Montreal after a sojourn of a month a, Swill u 



lm 



ssimbioa, North West Territories. Canada, where he 
as beeen engaged with the Territorial inspector in 
ontrolling an outbreak of Anthrax among sheep. The 
resent inoculation has been administered to about 
hirteen thousand sheep in that section. 

■95, — Clarence Linden Stevens, age 27, died at his 

ome in Sheffield. Oct. 17. 1901. after a brief illness. 

weak heart and internal hemorrhages were the 

mediate causes of his death. He was married in 

arch, 1900 and is survived by his young wife as well 

s by his widowed mother, and two brothers and three 

isters younger than himself. 

'95.— S. P. Tooie. Bedford. 

'95.— It is with pleasure that we make the following 
nnouncement. Harry Edward Clark was united in 
arriage to Miss Christina Titian. Oct. 24, at Middle- 
ry. Conn. Address. Biscoe Farm. 
'95. — Fred C. Tobey. a teacher at Sing Sing, who 
s engaged during the summer vacation in capturing 
ladybugs" and sending them to South Africa has 
signed his position as teacher and bought an interest 
the West Stockbridge Lime Co. and will act as 
neral manager of the concern. 
'97, — Chas. A. Peters is situated as professor of 
emistry and chemist of the experiment station in 
Univensity of Idaho at Moscow. 
I '97. — M. J. Sullivan was in town recently. 
I '99. — d. A. Beaman is proprietor of the box factory 
■ Leverett. 

# *00.— Ysidro H. Canto, while trying to board a trolly 
car in New Y k city, Oct. 1 1 , was thrown to the 
pavements and received some injuries Including the 
fracture of a rib. He was carried to a nearby drug- 
Store and after regaining consciousness was taken to 
1 hospital where he is now recovering his injuries. 
B'Ol. — N. J. Hunting was a recent visitor at the 
college. As elsewhere announced, he has been 
appointed inspector of the Babcock apparatus in use 
in the creameries of the state and will begin his duties 
tary shortly. 

B*01, — C. E. Gordon spent Sunday in town. 
GEx-'OI. — A. R. Dorman who has been attending 
Columbia for the last year was In town for the Massa- 
chusetts-Springfield Training School game. He 
expects to remain in Springfield for the winter and go 
t as an assayer of mines in the spring. 



WHY WE ADVERTISE. 

Not for fun or t'> Meemmodstt *'>e Busi- 
ness Manager of this putter, but business. 

We Want Your Trade 

In Hooks, Stationery, Art. 

A Postal Card Costs One Cent. 

We fill orders or Miswer inquiries cheer- 
fully Hint promptly, 

HENRY R. JOHNSON, 



313 315 Main St. 



Springfield, Muss. 



STEPHEN LANK FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club anil College IMns and Kings. 
Cold and Silver Medal-. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



Reserved for 



Home School of Corres- 



pondence. 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



COLLEGE SIGNAL 



35 



• . -"ZIT^r^^^— - — — t- .. - n j,- Ouiclev. Fulton and 

themselves of late as cornpu 

us hope they will extend their scope a bit further ^ ^ ^ 

evolve a good college song as well. Dwycr , 1. 1. 

We have heard many complaints because ft was church ,. g 

9 tton Recently an appeal was sent uu 
Jul, w H chh/s been responded tomos, free.. 



r. e.. Peck 
r . t., Gilbert 
r. g.. Tinker 



c. Staples 
1. g.. Smith, Henshaw 
1. t., Couden 
1. e.. Griffin 
q. b.. Quigley 
1. h. b.. Gregg 
r. h. b.. Fulton 
f. b., Pierce 
L R. Dorman. Columbia. 
Time- 



Cook. Cooley, c 
Dacy. Cook, r. g 
Saunders, r. t. 

»^"i I Claflin, r. e. 

'. _. . »h* rolleee will doubtless be glad to DcUea >q . b. 
-Friends of the «*J committee to Beld en. r. h. b 

7^:'' "n^; Vein's prance rope L^a, 
ceeded In pinching ^ taMes and | , 

mores rope which they had " borrowed. 

ST iSl p'- • ,hls ' s emp,0,ed '" many 

Mher colleges with gratifying success. 

OnOC 17. Governor W.M.rra, Crane visl.ed 
l IZ The Governor was accompanied by D.F. 
the college. The uov McN amara. 

Slade. A. A. Maxwell. H D. Yer *a. Jl ^ 

s . H . Howe. Lucius Field and J .H. ^ 

memb ers o. J^^i^t!-- ~~ 

r^rsl o seveLn guns was lired by the 

about the college. 

The Seniors and Sophomores treated the college 

game ,f 1 the start both teams excelling in fum- 
contested from the start, d ther 

bling. high taking ***^!X ^ the 

rr To ed u .he b -d ran .orty yards for a 
Dellea picked up tne ,i,i m ed Interference 



-—r^^^T has been for sometime 
JZSZZm. Texas, vlshed friends In .own 

'''E^Sy.-Joseph F. Daniels Is a. present library 

a, fhesL.e Agricultural college. For, Collins. Colo. 

9 ;.!! F rederlcK L. Taylor. M. D.. 336 Washington 

^fCrner C. West Superintendent o. the Wal- 

^:r g rre'laauhe home o, his parent, 
Mr and Mrs. H. C. Wes, a, Belcher,own. I 

•,4-Chas. H. Hlgglns o, Mon.rea, ,«. marn,- 
,. Miss jane Ru,h Hall, daughter of Mr. and Ha 
it ^.rtrk Hall of L. Avetln. Que. Oct. 22. IWl. 
T reoeremony was performed by Dr. James Hepbu. 
at St. Pauls church L.'Averin. 

•94 _Prof S. F. Howard has been elected a F« 
low of the American Association of Science. 

94 _E„as Dewey White and Miss Bessie , Ij. . 

rvwl. were united In marriage, at East Point. Oi. 
D„,le were unl ^^ ^ ^^ 

,„ the railway mail service of .be Georgia I 
SZSZ XZ " <or„ yards for .**£» - / ddres , Ea s, Point. Ga. 



lm 



Assimbioa. North West Territories. Canada, where he 

has beeen engaged with the Territorial inspector in 

Controlling an outbreak of Anthrax among sheep. The 

jresent inoculation has been administered to about 

hirteen thousand sheep in that section. 

'95. — Clarence Linden Stevens, age 27, died at his 
iome in Sheffield. Oct. 17. 1901. after a brief illness, 
weak heart and internal hemorrhages were the 
.mediate causes of his death. He was married in 
narch, 1900 and is survived by his young wife as well 
s by his widowed mother, and two brothers and three 
isters younger than himself. 
'95.— S. P. Tooie, Bedford. 

'95.— It is with pleasure that we make the following 
.nnouncement. Harry Edward Clark was united in 
arriage to Miss Christina Titian, Oct. 24, at Middle- 
|ury, Conn. Address. Biscoe Farm. 

"95. — Fred C. Tobey. a teacher at Sing Sing, who 
ps engaged during the summer vacation in capturing 
lladybugs" and sending them to South Africa has 
isigned his position as teacher and bought an interest 
\ the West Stockbridge Lime Co. and will act as 
eneral manager of the concern. 

'97. — Chas. A. Peters is situated as professor of 
iiemistry and chemist of the experiment station in 
be Univensity of Idaho at Moscow. 
'97. — M. J. Sullivan was in town recently. 
'99. — D. A. Beaman is proprietor of the box factory 
Leverett. 

;*00. — Ysidro H. Canto, while trying to board a trolly 
|r in New York city, Oct. 1 1 , was thrown to the 
cements and received some injuries including the 
.cture of a rib. He was carried to a nearby drug- 
>re and after regaining consciousness was taken to 
hospital where he is now recovering his injuries. 
1*01 . — N. J. Hunting was a recent visitor at the 
college. As elsewhere announced, he has been 
appointed inspector of the Babcock apparatus in use 
In the creameries of the state and will begin his duties 
very shortly. 

B'01. — C. E. Gordon spent Sunday in town. 
jEx-'OI. — A. R. Dorman who has been attending 
Columbia for the last year was in town for the Massa- 
chusetts-Springfield Training School game. He 
^ects to remain in Springfield for the winter and go 
St as an assayer of mines in the spring. 



WHY WE ADVERTISE. 

Not for fun or to nci-onimodate the Busi- 
ness Manager of this paper, but business. 

We Want Your Trade 

In Books, Stationery, Art. 

A Postal Card Costs One Cent. 

Wc fill order* or answer inquiries cheer- 
fully ami promptly. 

HENRY R. JOHNSON, 

313315 Main 8t. Springfield, Mass. 






STEPHEN LANE POLGER, 

200 Broadway, New Yokk. 



Club and College l'insand Rings. 
Gold ami Silver Medals. 
Dlatuends, Watches, Jewelry. 



Reserved for 



Home School of Corres- 



pondence. 





















COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Dep&rtmtivir J4ot*s 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS, 






HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 
Professor Maynard has made the suggestion that 
the biography of some of the most important of our 
alumni with their pictures be put each year m the 
Index This would not only increase the interest of 
our alumni but would show the undergraduates of the 
college what some of our graduates have done 

The examining committee of the Board of Agr.cul- 
ture inspected the Horticultural department last week 
and were much pleased with its progress. The com- 
mittee consisted of John Bursley of West Barnstable. 
W . C Jewett of Worcester. Alvin Barrus of Goshen, 
C K Brewster of Worthington. 

" Professor Maynard hopes that something can be 
done to stop the shooting of gray squirrels in the grove 
on the hill. On recent Saturdays considerable firing 
has been heard in that vicinity and it has been noticed 
that the squirrels, although very tame during the first 
part of the fall, have become very timid. 

CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT OF HATCH 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 
A bulletin of about thirty pages will soon be iss.ed 
which will contain the chemical analysis of o.ficially 
collected samples of commercial fertilizers as well as 
a great variety of general fertilizing material forwarded 
bv farmers in the state of Massachusetts. 

Dr. C. A. Goessmann is absent from town for a 

week. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Diseases of Cattle by William Hird. 
was given to the library by Dr. Page 
in London in 1753. 

Emerson's Works (12 vols). 

Who's Who in America by John W. Leonard 
book consists of a collection of the biographies o I the 
most important men in America, and wntten byjti* „ 

themselves. 

Genuineness of the Gospels by Andrew Norton. 

Geometric Exercises in Paper Folding edited and 
revised by W W. Beaman and D. E. Smith. The 
book illustrates and proves many of the Important 
problems in geometry by folding paper to represen the 
It simplifies many of the most difficult 



DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS. 
SCARFS ANGLES, CUBVB8 and T SQUARES, 
ARCHITECTS' AND DKAFTMKNS COLORS. 
SCHOOL BOXES WATER DOLOBS. 

WBD8WBRTB, HOWLP & CO., 

INCORPORATED, 
82 and 84 Washington St., "I B OSTON. 
216 and 218 Clarendon St., J 

Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



NORTHAMPTON SHOE STORK, 
Northampton, Mass. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




t you from heart to foot while you 

W8 



rait. 



Special prices on team orders. 

HINTING CLOTHING, 

Guns. Rlflea, Pistols, and Ammunition. 

GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

Special designs and all colors for Ladl. 



Gents and Boys. 



It was printed 



The 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



OL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 20. 1901 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
students and Alumni are requested io contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amherst. Mass 
Bt to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid 
lify the Business Manager. 



The Signal will be 
Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1 902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903. Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902, Intercollegiate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1 903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903. Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1934. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1 904. 



Terms: 91.00 per uear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 26c. extra. 



C. A. 
-Ball Association, 
je Boarding Club, 
lir,g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. WEST. Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan. Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L, Barrus. Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered Nov. 9, 1901. as second-class matte". Poit Office at Amherst. Mass., Act of Congress of March 3. 



1879. 



ECdi-to rials. 




SPRINGFIELD, MAS! 



HENKING. 



-44 MAIS STREET, 

"hotel 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

— ■* a;.K«!,;sr; l,b ~ 

1 " Telephone, 4M-3. . 

N>ar Union Static: 

.SPRINOKIELD, M A»« 



e are pleased to notice the revival of the Natural 
ry society, and hope that it may receive proper 
rt from the student body during the coming sea- 
son! In the past, it has proved itself an organization 
of ipistinctly public nature. Its series of scientific 
lectures has been an admirable supplement to the 
regular work of the college, and from them much 
profit and instruction has been received. We under- 
stand 'hat the usual excellent program is well under 
way, rind trust that the attendance at the public meet- 
play be all that is desired. 



figures, 
problems. 



COOLBYS HOTEL, 

HKNBY R. MARSH. Proprietor. 

AM the modern co^e^sTlnrBt class accoft 
All the '" oae moaation9 for aoOjuests. 

1 RESTAURANT ON THE KUROPEAK PLAN. 




spite of the excelle it record made against Am- 

we believe that the need exists of sounding a 

of warning. The season is not yet over. Man- 

ates has succeeded in arranging a game with 

college for next Friday afternoon to be played 

fts ov'al. It is an important game in that It is 

st we have ever played In the eastern part of 

te. The showing that we make will in great 



I 



measure determine our standing in a section from 
which the largest number of our students are drawn 
We must, therefore, do our very best. Our previous 
victories have been won not so much by superior 
coaching as by the spirit which has characterized 
both the team and the college. Yet we must sadly 
ask ourselves what has become of this spirit of late ? 
The lapse into complete apathy since the Amherst 
game is truly lamentable, and if not soon corrected 
will surely bring bitter fruits. That our coach has 
■ag&if'.»!ef'f*:c is no excuse whatever, but an additional 
reason for more and harder work. We have made 
a splendid record this season ; let us not sully It at 
this late day by continuing the present shameful Indif- 
ference. 



We publish in another column portions of the con- 
stitution of the College Signal which relate to the 
election of new members for this board, and we would 
say to those Intending to try for the Board that work 
might well begin at once. In previous years, the 
tendency has been to leave everything till the last few 







38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



39 







weeks and then to rush in a vast amount of material 
of very doubtful literary value. In nothing does he 
timeworn adage that - the early bird catches the 
worm - apply with much more force than in jour- 
nalism and the early contributor of necessity enjoys a 
considerable advantage. Of the value of the training 
received by work of the sort the Signal offers it ought 
not to be necessary to speak. We have often felt, 
however, that the tendency has been in scientific in- 
stitutions much as this, to underestimate the advan- 
tages of literary work. Yet to be able to write forci- 
bly and plainly, is a gift of no small value ; and there 
is no way by which it may be acquired save by con- 
stant practice. This practice the continual work of a 
college paper can give; and aided as it is by the 
exposing of all work to the impartial if somewhat over 
critical gaze of a body of students, the benefits to be 
gained will, it is believed, well repay the expenditure 
of time required. 






We are sorry to learn that any unpleasantness was gen- 
erated by the sophomore-freshman football game.espec- 
ially as we believe the criticisms of the college senate 
so freely expressed in certain quarters are somewhat 
unwarranted. It must be remembered that the senate 
is merely an advisory body; it may recommend 
whatever may seem best, but its power stops there. 
In* the case in question it had made certain recom- 
mendations as to the eligibility of 'varsity men. and had 
both classes agreed to abide by its decision it would 
doubtless have tried to enforce it. But when the two 
classes involved agreed upon another method, the mat- 
ter went beyond the control of the senate. If the 
freshman captain allowed himself to be taken advan- 
ce of it was doubtless unfortunate from a freshman 
point of view ; but as he presumably knew his rights 
we cannot see that he is entitled to much sympathy 
if he consented to waive a portion of them, even if he 
later on found the results more serious than he ex- 
pected If the Freshmen, or their sponsors, had 
cared sufficently for their rights to insist on the com- 
plete adoption of the Senate's recommendation. 
the Senate would of necessity have been odi^d to 
stand by them; but after having of their own 
accord agreed to disregard the Senate's decision, it 
seems a bit far-fetched for them to shift the responsi- 
bility to any shoulders save their own. 



W.th the football season nearly over, the thoughts 
of the college will naturally turn to basket-ball for a 
diversion during the winter months. In the last few 
years considerable interest has been taken here at 
Massachusetts, in a more or less systematic sort of 
way. Class teams have been organized a schedue 
arranged and much interest has resulted. Of late 
however no steps have been taken toward establishing 
a 'varsity team. This we believe to be a mistake 
Basket-ball is a sport which has risen from small 
beginnings to a game of considerable collegiate. mport- 
ance This fall has witnessed the formation of numer- 
ous intercollegiate leagues, one of which, the New 
England is composed mainly of colleges with whom 
we are accustomed to compete in other sports. Our 
class games have served to develop many good players 
and we believe that we have plenty of material ,n col- 
lege for a creditable team. Certainly It will be much 
easier for us to gain admission while college baske , 
ball is still new to all than it will be when the league 
has become established, and has grown conservative 
as to admitting new and untried teams. So too. .t 
will be easier for us to start a successful 'varsity now 
than to wait till our rivals have the advantage of vete- 
ran players and long experience. If Massachusetts 
has an athletic weakness, it Is a willingness to folio* 
rather than to lead. We can see no possible objec- 
tions at present which will not apply with greater for* 
In the future. Why. then, do we wait ? We o, 
the matter will be seriously considered by our athlete: 
at once. 



While the result of ourlgame with Amherst somewto 

upset the rather pessimistic predictions of our te 

iue, it will be readily admitted that the editor was 

m ost cheerful of losers. It Is admitted on both sid- 

that the game was well played, well contested, a., 

that the better team won. Under these c.rc,r 

stances it is a victory well worth the winning and « 

of which we may justly be proud. To the har 

persistent work of Coach Jennings, perhaps the ho - 

■^reoi the praise is due. Mr. Jennings came h- 

to find a discouraging state of affairs. The tea. 

was demoralized by lack of practice and coaching. ■■ 

th*re seeded to be little hope that it would ever r. 

co~ver from the effects of its well-nigh fatal victor. 



er Wesleyan and Holy Cross. Yet in less than two 
eks. Mr. Jennings wrought a complete change, 
om the day of his coming, the spirit of the tea m 
anged. On the day of the game, it showed its 
ility to play as scientific a game as was ever seen 
Pratt Field, and moreover played with a dash and 
gged determination which swept our opponents 
mpletely off their feet. The work of Mr. Jennings 
something which deserves to be remembered, and 
e gratitude of every friend of old Massachusetts 
ould be his. In addition, we must not forget that to 
alumni great credit is due. But for their most 
erous response to our appeal for financial aid. no 
ch could have been secured, and the result might 
e been less gratifying. We were also glad to note 
ir interest as manifested by the unusually large 
ber who saw the game. Such cordial co-opera- 
is what Is needed to b r ing about the truest union. 



im 



COMMUNICATIONS. 

November 13th, 1901. 
'o the Editors of The College Signal: — The 
teenth annual reunion and banquet of the Massa- 
isetts Agricultural College club of New York was 
lebrated December 7th. 1900 at the St. Denis 
lei ; the writer presided. A goodly number were 
attendance, but unfortunately President Goodell 
detained in Washington and his representative 
ler got lost on the way or failed to start in time, 
if. A. Courtenay Washburne now of the actuarial 
irtment of the Metropolitan Insurance Company 
the only representative of previous faculties. 
If. Bainbridge Colby. Williams, '90, (now mem- 
elect of the New York legislature) made a most 
ising address felicitating the College on Its splen- 
work. 

rofessor William N. Bishop, M. A. C, '82. now 
ig the chair of Biology and Agriculture at Dela- 
te college, in an exceedingly instructive address on 
conditions of the so-called Agricultural colleges of 
country, made a most forcible argument that the 
^■te of the College was misleading and a deterrent 
to Its proper growth. Other addresses were made by 
ibb. 73. Barrett. 75. Root. 76. and Myrick '82. 
'he notice of the sixteenth annual dinner is printed 
mother column, 
bur body is to be congratulated on the new name 



and design for our College paper— also for the tone 
of the editorials relating to the changes that are on. 
Some of us have been earnestly opposed to the nick- 
name " Aggie " yet we had not wit enough to see that 
Massachusetts was greater than its Agricultural In- 
terests. 

Why not Massachusetts College? Could there be 
a better name for an institution of the old Bay State ? 
Do not call it Mass. State College as such would be 
tautology. 

A few words as to a new name— Some years ago 
I got together a symposium for one of the Indexes 
and it showed an even division. I then as now be- 
lieve that the desire of those who wish a change Is, 
that the College should be prospered and If we have 
to go through life giving a long explanation of what 
Massachusetts Agricultural College means. — that it is 
not a reformatory for unruly youths or an ordinary 
farm school, but an Institution that fits Its students 
for life work as thoroughly as any in the country, and 
such a name and such explanations do the College 
good and the State good, why all right. But we have 
seen the State pour out its money munificently, and 
because of the deterrent of Its name, many have not 
gone there. The name kills it at first sight with many, 
but Massachusetts College— Where is it? What 
does it do ? What is its tuition? How much can a 
student be educated there for ? And. on further In- 
vestigation, the prospective student of medicine (one 
of a large class) finds that he can get a cheaper, 
healthier and more scientific preparation for the study 
of his chosen profession in a medical school, than In 
any other institution. This I speak advisedly. My 
father, a graduate in Arts of Yale and in medicine of 
Harvard and University of Pennsylvania and my 
grandfather In Arts and Medicine of Harvard, my 
predilections were for Harvard ; but my father learned 
of the farmer's college and sent me there, and this 
applies to other colleges. Now it is said, change the 
name, and the farmer will stop voting grants to the 
institution. In other words, to call the institution 
Agricultural, it must be held down to a limited num- 
ber of students and agriculture Itself injured by men 
not attending it and not becoming by its nature studies 
and courses more Intimately bound to the science o£ 
the soil. 

The present class is a "much larger one than usual. 






4© 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



We have set feast spurts before. My class tetered 
$2~ t - e- -e-.t ahead into '81 and were r i: - 
atedwithit Thirty-one I n 1&52. 

and the onry class that has pufmstz : r.as =eer. :.-.«: 
of 1894. But the subsidence always cc-e^ mas*- 
tng in small classes. 

A CoUege is not what some s-e: "* ' ~* r - 

ZlH^ra: -^ The President of the il n.inrhit. 

;r* - " - -V . Z :';::: ■:-:- "« == ege c..r al Met Ya* «»»**« pta 

. ; ... -. a S ...teenth annual banquet. ' 

"- . -„- a IOA1 half -3 



-^ - -- . •- Hi-.i". i-: Ya.e as p jcxi / i3 Per-- 
*"-/-=--. -- rv -:• ":'a e a~- "' "--" : 

Yours for our Alma M um 

; - - :.—£«. m. D.. '=: 

- - -_= m mm 1 1 FAST MB PRESEKT.C* THE FACC- 



coftorrr but not a 
;s a-.: :-- m a; '.'■■ 



special name, they var.: 

farm college, and re fatbei 

ity have not the sense tnat - V'-l'' 

-a: 5-- -e-t .nothing? H H «* 

. ., . , t -- - m -• outside of some sc-e: » : ' >l 
,-a. ag Hi Ml whose business I I t-.at make: 
. A the name to matt .- ■ I I 
My beloved tea;- K Let c 



:.z • - - 



V ~ s»2 7 2 
- A.-e.. N. Y 



■_-r M 



Man.OE? c 



ncge 



eloquent argj 



-reat 



; ear .• that be- 

- - -- t-.e 



for the old name. He showed most 

fore the war. literary Mi •"" 

land-grant Act of 1862 rest -tz - :: =?=: :nat -ere 

a protest against the existing zrzf z 

towing the war 

that ali ec-oat : _ i -' - 

by and as prcfess: = :t-sr ;: t a.e ^»- 

H ;n in Nwe Ycr< t-: >ears ag: t-e -ft "as 

• _ — 1; •; mature studies ; t~.t ~ e- i 

and sea were annuaUy greater. 

So long M BMa eat and ftrIM ifrteatasm ww-f 
suffer. The ******** ■* *■ Onmf 

Mid put: «•** '•'• -■ '--- *"*2 

shows that the tanner b deir. 



_"tr * 
a-: -t: 

t-.e :: 






_ 



you. Some city men vou.d like 
a Cottege has done its wor- 
cation and has done it wett under - 

The experiment stations are we L esta: sr.*: 

-of the Union. Now K :.- Alma I 
out to far £ SStfa ess under the MM Mas- 

sa a -•"- : 

Au. Ha- flSl VsSWMWi Massachusetts -::" 

BAlxTEAJt' 

One hundred and fdty students— tt.e cone 
and tostng only one game to its season, decisively 
whipping its opponents of much larger institution--- 
Dust be much latent force to our small College 



d I have been enjoying it as \ always :: 
----- .-. ■" k i.e rtsce-t an 3 
onored Aooe Lite. I must confei: 
._ .-_. _ s ; t: -i -t :: efl SM i<en a step 
".--•--•- ■ .- :.. ir -i ' : " 

- - £ 1::: t-.ngs zzrr.t s :- 

,..-, .-; ;-t a --- i".i --.: assc:-ate a great it; 
, a qfa sn . is true, caiied upon *- 
ce considerable ■ " I change of the na- 1 
College paper, but I am sure that I for one 

. .... .i.. „_..- T ..« t t qoU dear, fc- 

viJIIng tc par, *-Tn me — mh b» * "«~ »»— . 

.---•>* general cofleg* we«are. 
t the co^ge, and you as one of theSwsA.] 
.: -; o v emeat to attractiver* 
ef • f • -resentative paper of my Alma Mater 

Very truly, 

Claytoh F. Palme* 

Mansfield, Pa.. Nov. 6, 1901. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



;' t-.e ;: e?e i~.z . s~ ••tr 
efSfd ": the ma"rr . ;; 
i .-a: we i ;-- -r 

: about by a dHMgl 

■j -» , * — • ■ •; _ 

- g ever 
inge has Uken pla:e 

;-; i state rr.er.t :' " -- i:"i 



r; ;e-.e- Ir. er days of BSS POlCfB those whos- 

»y pleasure and helped to establish the " Aggie " were unquestion- 
a a: anxious t: >: inert ..ate 

an be best I a sort - - a- -.e as to get at some 

Mktlf, 



a:::: 






use of and 
oi sftston 



as 
of 



Elwtn W. Ca= 






5 ' 






5 - : . 



;. ' s 



: - 'ati.at : : r.proved appear- 



-s- 



: u 



and a tong step in the way of progress 
also with the contents. 

Very respe: ••'. 

F W. McssMAN 



jalwa e. and I know 

othe-: a-appych- I he part of the 

•Aon We feel that the ne» ri a - 1 howeve -«-.:: • 

{ may be. can never fuDy take the piace of the old one 

I and we hope that your Board will come to see that you 

- your jdgmeaf 

; ;;g-.re the right of your Board to 

choose the nam I fcx our own publication, aid M 
> instance your actton appears to have the endorsement 
1 of a majority of the faculty and student body. As a- 

■ _- - .: i-.isubscrft>er. h: - I : I pleasisg 

aps to others, if in some early issue 
you would kindly show wherein the new name is 

■ t7 and significant". It seems to me that 
t-.e 1 1 e ~-t 3: tn 3 g-a VOaM :e as a;;-:;- a:e 
i • «;,:..:;•';-.:! my cottege in tne country 
~i i - FftSM H as for the M. A. C. Tc -. ~ - i it 

.e of nothing, except -a I I ■ -ates 
•: - •- . : • 

a - .;.' Board is careful to give 
-zression that no move for a change of name of the 
Cofiege is to contemplation and that your actton, and 
the actton of the student body, in eiimtoattog the term 
** Aggt --- - taiBMi as an assaa. 



-,~.. ~4 



- 

• : — e when I took ofi 

: - ;- ; • : re the Aocsti - 

e-e: : - t"t s 

:a:- -c :* mem:* 

ftod that the students now h 

10 zz as icrgago as 96 I 




(Of "-= :;iiEC6S«SNAL ".— ege. I Ml 

Four Board has discarded the u- .--- -r.^ht develop a 
appropriate title the first board of editors net J ■! 

Just one word 
.nrsse and uaneccssary and that tiie paper ' bridge's commea 
he loser rather than the gainer by til laOaaM _-- you say " Let us empaas 



t-.e 



i : .. - : - : 



title as the other 



M it "t • r.at t" e> - 
haven't a doubt but 



tntnate tne word - Aggie." 
:* -:t.-..-g :z m.a-.r of tne undergradjates Mi it 
- - - 

CoMfi It is granted, however, that the word ^ge ". vhich Is aa>: 
-ea- .irJe or nothing were it entirely divorced J there anything in the »:> 
~ . -• and association. 



.- a; ~ .:- i zi". : :-' 



... ... 

Coi- 
> Is 
:- -s 



pccuiiar^iheCoaefe? U not that word them simply 



44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



the team, taking advantage of his team's own strong 
points and the opponent's weak ones. 

Snell. who did punting for Massachusetts, out- 
classed Pierce and the tackling of the Massachusetts 
team was harder and surer. 

The ball was in Amherst's territory most of the 
time and there are no doubts as to the game having 
been won on its merit. 

During the first half Amherst gained their distance 
only twice. 

At 3-15 the teams came on the field and after a 
little preliminary practice O'Hearn having won the 
toss choose the west goal. 

Crook, of Amherst kicked off to Bodfish who ad- 
vanced ten yards. Massachusetts. then by steady gains 
outside of tackle advanced the ball nearly to cer.:er 
of field where Munson fumbled. Amherst tried the 
line for a loss and was compelled to punt. O'Hearn re- 
ceived the punt and was downed in his tracks. Sr.eil 
punted to Amherst's 35 yard line. Amherst again 
tried the line, but failing to gain punted. Massachu- 
setts after making a few gains was held for downs and 
Sneh punted from Massachusetts 40 yard line, the 
ball rolling over Amherst's goal line where Swift fell 
on it for a tcuchback. Amherst then :ut from 

behind their 25 yard line to O'Hearn who made a 
i : catch. O'Hearn missed a try for goal by a nar- 
row margin, resulting in another touchback for Am- 
herst. Whitaker received the punt out on 45 . 
line making another fair catch. Sneli tr .e; ;- goal, 
bail going out of bound on Amherst's 5 yard line. 

Amherst was held for downs and : - t; 

punt Massac was then held for d: 

Snell again punted over the goal line. On punt out 
Franklin tried for a fair catch but was BHnHnd 
and Amherst was penalize:: .. ; c c • 

Massachusetts on Amherst's 2C yard ..r.e. 

--.--- -;-e the bail was a:.r:;; :ers: s 7 

yard line where they held for downs. Amherst being 
unable to gain Pierce punts out at z.i i: A-e-s: 
30 yard line. After advancing : 
yard line O'Hearn sec* i-:ful goal from place 



:si 5 ici 



J-::< • :<?o : 

r-i - A--.i-s: s 
la secc.-d ha.* 



returned the kick. Anearn falling on it on Massachu- 
setts 45 yard line. Massachusetts here played ex- 
cellent ball taking Amherst completely off their feet, 
and by successive rushes by Bodfish Haliigan and 
O'Hearn the ball was carried to Amherst's 10 yard 
line, where the ball being knocked from O'Hearn's 
arms bounded over the goal line and Cook fell on it 
for a touchback. 

Amherst punted out to Ahearn wrn advanced ten 
yards. Amherst held for downs and Sneli punted 
Here Amherst made the longest run of the game. 
Bianchard going around right end for thirty-five yards. 

During the remainder of th ehalf the ball see-saweo 
up and down the field and the game ended with the 
ball in Amherst's possession on Massacnuseit's 
yard line. 

For Massachusetts Haliigan. Sneil. O'Hearn a 
Aheam played the best game, while Washburn. S- 
and Bianchard excelled for Amherst. 

Line up : 

Massachusetts. Amherst. 

-im. L e. 
Haliigan. 1. t. 
Sra ghead. t. g. 

• c. 



45 



ion on her own 45 yard Una. 



- 


ream 


. r. g. 




£ 


nell. r. 


t. 




= 


: 11 5- 


- * 




A 


_„„_ 


r. l h. 






- take 


b. 






f. b. 






Soare- 


— Massacr 




rlMH 


L 



r. 


e.. Crook 


r. 


«.- ._-. 


r. g. 


Vamum 


c 


- : -»-: 


>-g 


Palmer 


i 


. *., Cook 


- 1 


i" :* i - 



1 --r, .5 i. r*g» Ketcrae 
Massacr..: - 

:-;rs— Mjrse. Massac.v.se".s '*.'.. s 



- <: R 

~i- - .: 



j * -• 



CLASS FOOTBALL. 
The se iss defeated the sop-: — : re : ass - i 

loose game of football on Nov. 9. Morse and De.iea 

;.g.ey Ml 

. 't - .e-_: 

1904. 

• :- 

LuCoode- 
g.TbOm 
I Sraplw 

r. f CAT 

- Sr..:- 



played t.l» game for the seniors 

OrMa, L e 
Joma.Lt. 
Coo*. Lf. 

• 
Chrch. r. g. 



Hall, r. e. 
Dellea, q. b. 
Belden. r. h. b. 
Morse. 1. h. b. 
Dwyer, f. b. 



r. e., Peck 

q. b.. Quigley 

r. h. b., Gregg 

1. h. b., Haffenraffer 

f. b., Pierce 



Score-02, 12; '04.0. Referee, Snell. Umpire.' Ha,,, 
gan. Linesmen. Brooks and Saunders. Timekeeper, New- 
hall. Time— 15 minute halves. 

The freshmen defeated the juniors In a very exciting 
game on Nov. 8. The juniors with the exception of 
Jones and Bowen played a very loose game. Peebles 
and West made some very brilliant plays— almost 
Allen. Graves and E. T. Ladd excelled for the fresh- 
Imen. The line-up; 

1903 - .905. 

ly CS, ' 1 - e - '--Allen 

■i ?"' K '• »•• Page 

■Robertson, I. g. , „ ,, . °, 

|„ ' 1. g-. Holcomb 

|Barrus, c. ' .. , .. 

. c.. Newhall 

food, T. P. i, ... 

r ... . r - g- Smith 

lottmgham. r. t. , . , 

-, , , r. t.. Lyman 

D eebles. r. e. „ 

■» , , r. e., Pray 

, " q - b " q- b., Hunt-Ranshausen 

3owen, r. h. b. r h K n 

- , , r. n. b.. Graves 

7 Cr ' '' h ' b ' - 1. h. b„ Ladd 

U ' en ' f ' b - f. b„ Ladd, E. .T 

Score- '05. 12; '03.0. Referee, Prof. Smith. Umpire 
-ates. Linesmen, McCobb and Lewis. Timekeeper, Morse. 
lime— 15 minute halves. 



the ball in the freshmen's possession in the middle of 
the field. The line-up: 

1904. 
Griffin, r. e. 
Tinker, r. t. 
Conden, r. g. 
Staples, c. 
Cilbert. I. g. 
Fulton, 1. t. 
Peck, I. e. 
Quigley, q. b. 
Cregg. 1. h. b. 

Ahearn, Haffenreffer. r. h. b.. 
Pierce, f. b. 



1905. 

1. e.. Allen 

I. t.. Gardner 

1. E-. E. T. Ladd 

c. Newhall 

r g., Lyman 

r. t.. Smith 

r. e.. Willis. Hunt 

q. b., Ranschausen 

r. h. b., Graves 

I. h. b., Ladd 

f. b., Walsh 



„ ,__„ i. u.. waisn 

Score-1904. 6; 1905.6. Touchdowns. Ahearn. Graves 
Goals from touchdowns. Quigley. Graves. Referee V 
A. Gates '02. Umpire, Prof. R. S. Lull. Timekeepers,' 
Morse. 02, Munson, '05. Time-two 15 minute halves 



Collet JMot?$. 



The annual sophomore-freshmen game played on 

ie campus last Friday afternoon resulted in a tie. 6— 
The sophomores had challenged the freshmen to 
[lay without 'varsity men. but before the game the 
Jeshmen agreed to let Haffenreffer. ex-'04 play the 
|rst half and Ahearn of the 'varsity squad the second 
Mf. There was a large crowd of spectators and the 

»me was characterized by the usual rough playing. 

' the first half neither side made any notable plays. 

ie half ended with the ball on the freshmen's 25 
yd line, and in their possession. In the second half 
luigley kicked off to the 10 yard line. Walsh 
Jvanced the ball 20 yards. 
Jphomores on downs and 
V*m on a delayed pass, 
[alsh kicked off to Pierce 



The ball went to the 
Ahearn scored a touch- 

Quigley kicked the goal. 

who advanced 10 yards. 



h sophomores rushed to the 30 yard line and were 
Ned to punt. 1905 rushed to the 35 yard line, and 
I a trick play sent Graves around the end for a touch- 
Graves kicked the goal. The half ended with 



— Kirby. '04. has left college. 

— '• Massachusetts " 5, Amherst. 0. 

—And only one day recess at Thanksgiving. 

—The Freshmen bolted Prof. Babb twice last week. 

—Belden of Hatfield has entered the Freshman 
class. 

—The Chemical Club re-organized last Monday 
night. ' 

—The Seniors have chosen a Photograph 
committee. 

— G. E. O'Hearn spent Saturday and Sunday at 
his home in Pitsfield. 

— R. R. Raymouth and George Drew took parts in 
the play last Friday night. 

—The Storrs game has been cancelled by Storrs. 
Their team has disbanded. 

— R. H. Robertson. 1903. has resigned from his 
position on the college Senate. 

—The Junior class is making preparations for a sup- 
per the night before Thanksgiving. 

—Manager Gates has scheduled a game with Tufts 
college to be played at Tufts Oval next Saturday Nov 
23. 

—Messrs. Claflln. Hall. Kinney and Lewis of the 
Senior class have been chosen to serve on the • • Prom. " 
committee. 



46 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







—Our old friend F. Burkes, alias Zeke, visited the 
college recently. He received a hearty welcome from 
the Junior class. 

—President Goodell and Dr. Fernald represented 
•• Massachusetts " at the annual convention of the 
National Association of Agricultural colleges at Wash- 
ington. D. C, last week. 

— H. L. Barnes '04 is suffering with a multiple 
fracture of the leg bone just below the knee. His 
injuries were received while out practicing for the 
annual Sophomore-Freshmen foot ball game. Just 
how it happened is not known but it seems a i 



— The Amherst game has been played, won. and 
celebrated. After the game the students formed a 
procession behind the barge in which the team rode 
and marched through the streets, yelling and cheering. 
Later in the evening a mass meeting was held and 
addresses were delivered by Drs. Stone and Paige. 
Profs. Mills. Cooley. Smith. Howard. Babson and 
Capt. Anderson. After the speaking the students and 
alumni formed in line, the band first, then the football 
team in a barge, the alumni and the senior, junior, 
sophomore and freshmen classes, and marched down 
town and around the square. They stopped in front of 



tackled him and in failing Barnes got his leg under [the Amherst house and made the town ring with their 



himself in such a way that the bones broke. He is 
now doing well and the doctor hopes to bring him 
around so that his leg will be as good as ever. 

— The Natural History Club has been re-organized 
with the following officers: President. C. E. Dwyer; 
vice-president. M. H West : secretary and treasurer. 
C. A. Tinker; first director. A. C. Monahan; second 
director, W. E. Hinds; third director. E. A. Back. 
There will be a meeting of the club next Wednesday 
evening. Dr. H. T. Fernald will address the meeting 
on the convention of the Agricultural Colleges and 
Experiment Stations which he attended last week. 
All are invited. 

— Captain J. A. Anderson is working hard trying to 
get the necessary perm issi. ftvMk'4 

encampment for the Ba: - If the cadets take 

hold of this movement in I t seems 

very probable that such an e :- "- - 



yells. The band gave a short concert while the men 
danced around the square. Returning to the campus 
the celebration was wound up by burning a huge bon- 
fire which had been prepared by the freshmen. 



Alu 



mm. 



M. A. C. MEN, ATTENTION! 

Tne Sixteenth annual motor a :uet of the 

Massachusetts Agricultural College club of New York 
will take place at trie Hold 5: Te~ s 5::a-.way an: 
Eleventh street. Friday evening. Dec. 6th, at hair- 
past six o'clock under the presidency of Frederic W. 
Morris. 72 President GoodeH and others of fa: 
past and present will be in atte-:a-;e Banquv 
tickets. $3-00. Under the established rule, pleas; 
remit on or before Dec. 3. 1901 ; attendance at HH 
any graduate or former student as a 



Alvan L. Fowler. '80. Treasurer, 
21 West 24th StfMl New Y 



. banquet e 
It is the captains plan to have the Battalion go to member , 

South Framingham at the same time as the Pint 
Brigade of the Massachusetts Votaftwr Militia; in 
which case it would enjoy the same privileges and be 
under the same regulations as the mi, I 

-Among the alumni noted at the game were imm s:a{i , Washington. 

Judge Lyrr, , V v . e. 96 . C. L. R :e ^ immfmm H. H. Goodell. E. W 

•01 :T. Graves. 01 ; A. W\ Morrill. '00 : E. A.Jones.; ,. w £ $ 1 & PhwA "62 

•84. R. I. Smith. 01: J. E Ha gan. 00;H.C. ; " * ' .. ' 1 



At the convention of A- ural colleges 



Burrington. '96 ; S. W. W Kellofg. 



F. B. Car. 
87. . H. Washburr H H.J. Whee 



ngion. *°- » " " " " — ■•' «ndS W Wilev 98 

an. -00 ; J. M. B. Ovalle. "01 : G. I*** 5 ' W Wl ^ 



A. Drew. 97: B. H. Smtth, M ] 2 Barry. 01 

H. A. Ballou. '95. G A B : : - 5 

ney. '96. E A AtfdBj : R - -ds. '99. W 

A. Keli:cc * ] * Deue -Z 



CR-Kenflekl ; C. W. Poole 9 



•5? , : :;e 



74 — Daniel Y H IdK :ck during the recent I 

as Democratic Social candidate for thej 

—We are glad to note that the a- 
ei' RopreM "' -ar 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



47 



was ineffectual. Although the attack on Mr. Preston's 
record was made at the last minute when his friends 
had no opportunity to state the facts he won the cam- 
paign by a good majority. 

'82.— Dr. W. E. Stone. President of Purdue Uni- 
versity, contributed an interesting article to a recent 
symposium by prominent educatiors in Harper's Weekly 
on "The Benefts of a College Education." 

'90.— Fred L. Taylor. M. D., is practicing at 336 
Washington St., Brookllue. 

'95.— Clarence Bronson Lane was married to Miss 
Nellie La Rue, Aug. 21 at New Brunswick. N. J. 

'99.— Wm. E. Chapin has returned from Cumber- 
land Gap, Virginia where he has been employed as 
teacher and is spending a short vacation at the home 
of his parents in Chicopee. 

'01.— C. L. Rice is employed in the City Engineer's 
Office, Plttsfield. Mr. Rice was in town for the 
Massachusetts- Amherst game. 

'01- — E. L. Macomberwas married in Providence, 
R. I.. Oct. 5. 1900 by the Rev. Mr. King to Miss 
Grace Pierce Snow. He is situated with the Inter- 
national Correspondence schools at^Scranton, Pa. 
Present address 167 Cohannet St., Taunton. 




HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION. DEPART- 
MENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 

This department has just completed a collection of 
concentrated feed stuffs, and the same are now being 
analyzed. A bulletin will be issued as soon as possible 
giving full Information on this subject. 

The last General Court passed an act for the pro- 
tection of dairying. This act required : first, that all 
glassware used in connection with the so-called Bab- 
cock machine should be tested for accuracy; second, 
that all parties operating Babcock machines should be 
examined to see If they were properly qualified for 
such work ; third, that all Babcock machines in use 
by creameries, dairies, etc.. in Massachusetts should 
be duly Inspected in order to ascertain if they were in 
proper condition. 

It has been made the business of this department 
to carry out the above provisions. During the past 
summer and autumn a very large amount of glassware I 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS, 

DRAWING AND BLTJ1 l'ROCKSS PAPERS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVE8 and T SQUARES, 

ARCHITECTS' AND DUAFTMKN'S colors, 

SCHOOL BOXM WATER COLORS, 

WHDSWORTH, HOWLIIND & CO., 

INcnitrnUATKD, 
K2 and 84 Wuhingtoa St., ) „ rtci _, 
•2Ui Md 218 Clarendon St., j BOS1( JN. 
Kictorien, MALDKN, MASS. 



NORTHAMPTON SHOE STORE, 
Northampton, Mass. 



IShe HEIR 

to the FARM 




Will make the old flBUtray 
If he fuiiiisUWuranPnia 
modem <W^ 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Gaughl by Matt. 

A dim,, I,,.), n „,| practical course, 
under the direct charge of Wm. P. 
Brooks, l*h. 1)., (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College). Otir course is 

I on Brooks' Agriculture;" it 
tn uts of sniU. plants, tillage, drain- 

I I >g'iti"ii,iMHiiurcs.fertilii?ati<>ii. 
location and everything pm- 

taining to money-snaking on die 
i. it in. Ten books O voiiiim •<. mk) 
pages, 300 illustrations) free to stu- 
dents. S n,| fur .Vi page book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
S'chools, 

Springfield, Majj. 

other r.mnw: ilunlficm, Shorthand, 
I <-limn,mhtp. Tvix-writitiK Kmmal 
i-outm- llti, for ten, hci 'h wrtKlrate. 







4 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



has been inspected by this department. Some forty- 
five candidates have also presented themselves for 
examination. Mr. Nathan J. Hunting. '01. will shortly 
make an examination of all Babcock machines in 
Massachusetts in accordance with the provisions of 
the above law. 

Experiments are at present in progress to deter- 
mine the effect of certain feed constituents upon the 
body of butter. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Foundations of Zoology by W. K. Brooks. 

The Protozoa by G. N. Calkins. 

Agriculture, (3 vols.), by W. P. Brooks. The first 
volume treats of the composition and food of plants 
and tells from what sources the necessary elements 
are derived. It discusses principally the different 
kinds of soils and the methods of making them the 
most profitable. The second volume takes up the 
different kinds of manures, their composition and their 
application. Fertilizers are then taken up in the same 
manner and discussed. The subject of Farm Crops 
is then taken up very thoroughly. Each class is 
discussed as to the best soil, manure, cultivating, 
harvesting and storing of the crop together with the 
principal diseases affecting each. The third volume 
is on the subject of Animal Husbandry. The charac- 
teristics of the different classes of horses, cattie. sheep, 
and swine together with their importance on the farm. 
Stcck Breeding in all its details is taken up. The 
composition of foods and their digestibility are explained. 
Dairying and finally poultry farming are carefully 
explained. The three volumes contain points invalu- 
able to any farmer who wishes to make his farm pay. 

The Control of Trusts by Clarke. 



Reserved for 

Keiaer-Btirathea, 

Cravattinjrft. 



WHY WE ADVERTISE. 

Nut for fun or to a<r mimxliite the Bust- 
in--* Manager of this {taper, but business. 

We Want Your Trade 

In Books, Stationery, Art. 

A Postal Card Costs One Cent. 

We fill orders or answer inquiries cheer- 
fully ami promptly. 

HENRY R. JOHNSON, 

313 315 Main St. SpringfleM, Mass. 



STEPHEN LAKE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 

Club ami College Pin* ami Rings. 
(iolil ami Silver Medals. 
IihuiiMii'l.-, Wntclies, .Jawelry. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




Kit you from head to foot while you 
wait. 

Special prices on team orders. 

HI NTIXG CLOTHING, 

Guns, (titles, Plctols, and Ammunition. 

GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

Special designs and all colors for Ladle?, 
Gents and Hoys. 



:U MAIN STREET, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS 



HOTEL. HEZISIKIING. 

El'RoPEAS PLAN. 

First Class l.uni-h. Rooms #1 00 and upwards; with Bath. 
IMitOtMt. Double, M.SO; with Bath, 13 00 

H. Ca HBZflCUfQ A: OO. 

18 C§*JMM St., oppanUx Vninn Depot, Springfield , Mm»». 
Telephone, 4.W-3. 



OOOLBY'SHOTBL.^tVo?,'^? 1 ^: 

HKMtV K. MAKSU. Proprietor. 



All the modern conveniences. First class accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 





VOL. 


XII. 


AMHERST. 


MASS.. 


DECEMBER 


11, 


1901 






NO. 


5 
























Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amherst. Mass. The 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly 
notify the Business Manager. 


Signal will 
are requested 


10 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAP1N CLAFLIN. 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902. lnterco'leglate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903. College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1 903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904. 



Terms i $1.00 per year in adoance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates. Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index, 

J. C. Hall. Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith. Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus. Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered Nov. 9. 1901, as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. Mass., Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



Edi-tbrials. 



It Is with the greatest of pleasure that we yield the 
bulk of our space this issue to the football team. We 
have previously been somewhat sparing of our praises, 
in the fear that a good record might be spoiled by a 
fit of overconfidence, but we now acknowledge that 
our fears were groundless. The football team of 
1901 has certainly made a wonderful showing; to it 
and to all who have helped It achieve its success we 
can have only words of approval. 



Since the name of the college paper was changed, 
we have been receiving many letters in regard to 
changing the name of the college. From this we 
gather that many of our readers have in some way 
obtained the impression that the abolition of - Aggie " 
had some connection with a possible abolition of 
" Agricultural." If this is so then the editor has 
failed to make his explanations clear. The two ques- 
tions are entirely distinct. The changing of the 



official name is a subject with which the students 
have nothing to do with save in an Indirect way. It 
is not a '• live " issue so far as this paper is concerned 
nor do we intend it shall be unless we are forced to 
discuss it. It Is an old subject which we can see not 
the slightest use in reviving at this time. It has been 
fully debated in the past ; what good can come from 
threshing the same old arguments over again ? It has 
made hard feelings enough already. Moreover, even 
if it was to be discussed, we maintain that the columns 
of this paper are not the proper place. In the first 
place we have not the space without shutting out 
much more interesting and up to date matter. Then 
a still stronger reason for excluding it is that the Sig- 
nal goes not alone to alumni and students, but to rival 
colleges and more especially to the preparatory schools. 
Are we likely to gain in popular estimation by a con- 
tinual " washing of dirty linen " in public ? If there 
ever comes a time when there is a reason to believe 
that a change in name is seriously contemplated then 
let us have It discussed. But In the meantime, we 
believe we are justified in refusing to print arguments 



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on one side or the other. The question of doing 
away with the word " Aggie," is another matter. This 
was a student affair, perfectly within our powers. We 
discovered that its use was injuring rather than help- 
ing the college, and changed it to something free from 
its objections. We expected a certain amount of dis- 
cussion of this change ; but has not even this gone 
far enough ? The change has been made.and nothing 
further contemplated so far as we know. It has 
ceased to be a live issue. Let us spend our energies 
on something of value. 



We were very glad to hear of the large number of 
alumni who attended our football games with Tufts and 
Boston College. Certainly our alumni are standing by 
us this fall as never before. Let us hope that it is 
but the beginning of a better understanding between 
the students and alumni. We have however one 
request to make of them — and it may seem like a 
pretty large one. The old " Aggie " yell was abolished 
by the students for what seemed to us good and suffic- 
ient reasons. We found that to the word •' Aggie " 
which was wholly unobjectionable to everyone, there 
was being tacked on the word •• Amherst " and that 
the combination " Amherst Aggies " was being used 
extensively in the public press. As a result nine out 
of every ten men who read of us under that name 
confounded us with Amherst College and the tenth man 
was completely at a loss to know who was meant. As 
we had ro desire to advertise a weaker but better- 
known rival, we did the only possible thing under the 
circumstances, that is, stopped using •• Aggie " and 
used something to which no one could possibly tsck 
an " Amherst." Since that time we have endeavcred 
to keep the expression •■ Amherst Aggie " out of print, 
with fair success till we 'leard that our alumni were in 
a fair way to ruin all our efforts by resuscitating the 
old yell at out of town games. The effect is best 
illustrated by an extract from a letter from the editor- 
in-chief of the Tufts Weekly, recently received in reply 
to our request to see that " Mass. Agricultural." - M. 
A. C." or •• Massachusetts " was used in his paper: 
" Yours of Nov. 21 received. I appreciate your posi- 
tion, and one of the titles you mention will be used in 
our account of the game this week. If 1 may be 
allowed the privilege however, I would suggest that 
your ' rooters ' drop the objectionable phase from their 



cheering if you hope to kill it entirely." For this 
reason, will our alumni kindly heed this suggestion. If 
they prefer an old familiar yell or object to the " Mas- 
sachusetts " yell for any reason why can they not use 
the old " Hokey. pokey " yell which refers to the col- 
lege as " M. A. C." To this there could be no pos- 
sible objection. 



THE PURPOSE OF AGRICULTURAL COL 

LEGES. 

We print the following communications not for the 
purpose of keeping alive an old controversy, but as ar, 
example of the consistency of one of the leading agri 
cultural journals of New England -Editor's Note. 

The following article appeared in the New England 
Farmer of Nov. 9, 1901 : 

THE FARMERS' COLLEGE. 

The tendency to divert the state agricultural college from 
agricultural aims and purposes cannot but be admitted. Also 
it cannot but be regretted. The first purpose of such a col- 
lege is to educate farmers in farming. Belles lettres and 
military science must be subordinate, if considered at all. 
Agriculture and cognate and allied sciences are the things to 
be taught, whether anything else gets attention or not. In 
Massachusetts we have so far kept the college true to the 
purposes for which it was established, though the tendency 
above referred to has shown occasional symptoms. In Con- 
necticut there has been a tussle between the scatter-gun 
policy and the stick-to-agriculture. In Kansas a similar 
fight is on, even now. In New Hampshire there have been 
covert endeavors to make the agricultural college something 
else, but they have failed. In Maine there was quite a dis- 
turbance over the issue. None of our institutions of learning 
is more important to the state or to the people than the agri- 
tal college. It should be protected from every assault 
on Its (,e! jineness. — Lowell Journal. 

The reply to this by the undersigned appeared in 
the Lowell Weekly Journal , Nov. 29, 1901. Lack of 
space forbids our printing it entire. 

To the Editor of the Lowell Journal : The New England Far- 
mer for Nov. 9, 1901. contains a clipping headed "The Far- 
mers' College." credited to the Lowell Journal. As this is s: 
expressive of the general misunderstanding concerning the 
original and present purpose, and the scope of study of the 
state colleges, and Massachusetts Agricultural college ir 
particular, 1 cannot refrain from writing a few words of cor 
rection. 

As is well known, it was due to the efforts of Senator 
Justin S. Morrill of Vermont that the state colleges were 
established in 1862. by an act of Congress, providing for 
their support by means of what is known as the land-grant. 
The purpose of the land-grant as expressed in the origlrl 



act of Congress is as follows : "The endowment, support and 
maintenance of at least one college where the leading object 
shall be without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts in such manner as the legislatures of the 
states may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the 
liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." 

Since the passage of the bill there has been considerable 
discussion concerning the exact meaning of the above quoted 
sentence. Let us see how Senator Morrill interpreted his 
own bill ; surely no one is better able to do this than was he. 
In an address delivered at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
college June 21. 1887, on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
passage of the Morrill Land-Grant Act. he said in part : "The 
Land-Grant colleges were founded on the idea that a higher 
and broader education should be placed in every state. The 
design was to open the door to a liberal education for this 
large class at a cheaper cost from being close at hand, and 
to tempt them by offering not only sound literary instruction, 
but something more applicable to the productive employ- 
ments of life. It would be a mistake to suppose that it was 
intended that every student should become either a farmer or 
a mechanic, when the design comprehended not only instruc- 
tion for those who may hold the plow or follow a trade, but 
such instruction as any person might need with ' the world all 
before him where to ehoose.' and without the exclusion of 
those who might prefer to adhere to the classics." Else- 
where, as quoted by President Dabney of the University of 
Tennessee, formerly assistant secretary United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. Senator Morrill said : " It is need- 
less to say that these colleges were not established or en- 
dowed for the sole purpose of teaching agriculture. It was 
never intended to force the boys of farmers going into these 
institutions so to study that they should all come out farmers. 
It was merely intended to give them an opportunity to do so 
with advantage if they saw fit." 

/.j regards the classics and military science being subor- 
dinate, " if considered at all " — the idea expressed in the 
Journal— the act of Congress above quoted expressly forbids 
the exclusion of other scientific and classical studies. To 
quote again from the words of the founder of the state col- 
leges ; " Scientific and classical studies, as already stated, 
were not to be excluded, were therefore to be preserved." 
And again he says : " In all the land-grant institutions there 
is likely to be more or less latitude in elective studies, and 
that without impairment of thorough scholarship in whatever 
branches may be pursued. * * • All who wish to be 
equipped for agriculture or for some mechanic art will 
naturally devote more time to the related fundamental 
sciences. Those proposing to follcw a professional life will 
be more industrious and thorough in the direction of ancient 
as well as of modern classical lore." 

Although designed primarily to provide education for the 
Industrial classes, these colleges are not class institutions. 



The following quotation is from the monograph entitled 
" Agricultural Education " by Dabney : "Though designed 
to guarantee them these opportunities they are not limited to 
the industrial classes. They are intended to supplement 
exisiting institutions and provide free tuition for all classes ; 
the sons of professional men as well as mechanics As Sen- 
ator Morrill has said in another place, ' I hope that no farmer 
or mechanic would be so illiberal as to wish to have the 
monopoly of education in any of these land-grant colleges.' 
They are. in brief, the colleges of all the people, of every 
class and profession, and they are intended to give all alike 
opportunities for the broadest education." 

Having shown conclusively by means of these quotations 
the true purpose of the land-grant colleges it would be well to 
consider briefly the existing conditions and the results ac- 
complished by one of these institutions. The Massachusetts 
Agricultural college offers a young man a broad and liberal 
education." The study of agriculture and the related 
branches does not by any means occupy an inferior position 
in the college curriculum, although it is not expected that 
any large proportion of the students will become farmers. 

Of the students who enter the college, I think I am placing 
the average high when I say that about one-fourth are looking 
forward to occupation in agricultural lines. Statistics, how- 
ever, show that among the graduates nearly one-half are 
engaged in occupations connected with agriculture. In Jan- 
uary, 1900, the number of living graduates was about 500. 
Of these 82 were farmers, while 130 others were in such 
occupations connected with agriculture as professors in state 
colleges and universities, farm superintendents, chemists in 
experiment stations, landscape gardeners, horticulturists, 
agricultural journalists, experiment station directors, botan- 
ists and entomologists in experiment stations, etc ; 266 were 
engaged in occupations not connected with agriculture such 
as teachers in schools and colleges (other than state col- 
leges), physicians, civil engineers, chemists, manufacturers, 
lawyers, judges, electrical engineers, journalises, clergymen, 
architects, college presidents, etc. In short, the graduates of 
this institution are to be found in nearly all the walks of life 
and as a rule they have been eminently successful in their 
chosen professions. 

Austin W. Morrill. 
Amherst, Mass. 

Considering that the New England Farmer had 
already seen fit to copy a misleading article, a request 
to publish a correction of it does not seem very unrea- 
sonable. However, the only notice that it received 
was the following polite editorial : 

Austin W. Morrill of Amherst writes a letter to the Lowell 
Journal about agricultural colleges, arguing that they were not 
intended to be narrowly technical schools but were Intended 
" to promote the liberal and practical education of the indus- 
trial classes." The article concludes with a request for the 
New England Farmer to copy it. Bless you, your point is an 
awfully musty chestnut. We have been preaching that gospel 
off and on for twenty years. 



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53 









v 



If we may be permitted to judge, it seems a bit 
strange that one so zealous for a liberal interpretation 
of the term " agricultural colleges " should have 
printed an article of exactly the opposite tenor only a 
week before, and without uttering a word of dissent. 
Wouldn't that have been a very good time to have 
tried " preaching that gospel ?" Or is that " off and 
on " method mostly an " off " one ? 

CHANGE IN PH. T. REQUIREMENTS. 

At a meeting of the faculty Nov. 1, 1901 . the rule 
relating to candiates of the degree of Ph. D. was re- 
vised so as to read, •' All graduates of this college 
who may become candidates for the degree of Ph. D. 
and who during the senior year have not taken the 
subject which they elect as a major, will be required 
to make up the same as an undergraduate (senior) 
subject. Those who elect as a minor a subject not 
taken in the senior year will not be required to make 
up the same as an undergraduate subject." 



REVIEW OF THE SEASON. 

Certainly at the opening of the college year the 
most sanguine adherent of Massachusetts' athletics 
would not have predicted a record breaking team for 
this season. The graduating class had taken with it 
an unusually large proportion of last year's team, many 
of them our strongest players. Others returned late, 
so that but four of last year's team reported on the 
opening day. The Freshman class was indeed large 
but its material uncertain and in any case undeveloped. 
The team began later than hitherto, cutting short the 
period of preliminary practice by about two weeks, and 
to cap the climax the schedule was harder than ever 

before. 

Despite this discouraging outlook, practice began 
with a vim that promised well. Coach Hunt of Brown 
who had been secured for the opening weeks worked 
hard, and his efforts were ably seconded by our gradu- 
ate coach. J. E. Halligan '00. Improvement was soon 
apparent, but it is safe to say that no one really 
expected victory on the 28th of September when we 
met an old rival in Holy Cross. Those of our 
" rooters" who followed the team to Worcester how- 
ever were treated to a pleasant surprise. The game 
was the opening one for both colleges and consequently 
loose, but it was Massachusetts' day from the start. 
Four minutes of straight line bucking was enough for 



the first touchdown. Eight minutes more added 
another, and the second half brought us a third. Mas- 
sachusetts was at no time held for downs and Holy 
Cross was unable to gain at any time during the game. 
Score 17-0. 

The results of this game were seen at once. 
Middlebury and Trinity promptly cancelled their games 
without giving adequate reasons, thus depriving us of 
our next two games. Nevertheless, the victory 
encouraged the team, and gave them an enthusiasm 
which not even the loss of the coach could damper. 
Manager Gates succeeded in filling one of the open 
dates with the Pittsfield Athletic Club. Against this 
veteran team which later in the season was to hold 
Williams to a tie, the maroon and white scored a 
single touchdown. Her goal was never in danger, and 
constant fumbling alone prevented a bigger score. 
Score 6-0. 

A week later we encountered Wesleyan, for the two 
previous seasons champions of the Triangular League, 
and supposedly one of the strongest teams in New 
England. Again we won in clean-cut. decisive fashion. 
Although Wesleyan was the heavier she was unable to 
make consecutive gains or to stop the rushes of our 
backs, the ball being in her territory continually. Our 
students met the team in the centre of the town on 
their return from Middletown and celebrated tha victory 
with great enthusiasm. Score 6-0. 

Four days later the team lined up against Williams 
at Williamstown. Our men had not completely 
recovered from the Wesleyan game and were not in 
the best of condition, nevertheless at times they played 



. and the game was no walkover for Wil- 
But for continual and costly fumbling on our 
part the score might have been much less. As it was, 
Williams deserved to win, though it was generally 
admitted on both sides that the teams were more 
evenly matched than the score Indicates. Score 

0-17. 

The team was left in a crippled condition after the 
Williams game and was probably in poorer shape In 
the game the following Saturday with Worcester 
Polytechnic than at any other time during the season. 
Largely a substitute team was played which accounts 
in large measure for the looseness of the game. Both 
teams did well on the offensive, but the defensive work 
was generally lacking. Score 18-12. 



The most unfortunate incident in the whole season 
was the withdrawing of the Bates team from our 
campus at the last moment. They had refused to ac- 
cept our official notwithstanding that they could give no 
reasons from debarring him and seemed anxious for a 
chance to fall out with us. In view of Bates, crippled 
condition at the time, it would be interesting to know 
to that arf extent fear of defeat inspired their action. 
Again in view of subsequent developments it is barely 
possible that the Amherst College management might 
furnish an explanation of the mystery if so inclined. 
At all events.the affair is deeply to be regretted and we 
hope that the present strained relations between Mass- 
achusetts and Bates will not continue. 

Soon after the Bates fiasco, F. E. Jennings of Dart- 
mouth was secured as coach, thanks to the liberal sub- 
scriptions of the alumni. His coming put new life into 
the team and improvement was evident at the very 
start, though the Springfield Training School game 
revealed some weak points, especially on the offensive. 
The Training School team showed up in unexpected 
strength and as usual in the best of physical condition. 
No score was made in the first half though the ball 
was in Springfield's territory most of the time. In the 
second half our men woke up and twice crossed the 
goal -line. Score 10-0. 

The following week the work of the coach began to 
tell. On Nov. 9th the annual game with Amherst 
took place on Pratt Field. It was an ideal day for 
foot ball save for a strong wind. From comparative 
scores. Amherst was picked as the winner, but failed 
to materialize. Massachusetts outplayed her opponents 
from the start keeping the ball in Amherst's territory 
most of the time. The only score was on a goal from 
placement by O'Hearn kicked from the 20-yard line. 
A fumble in the second half on the 10-yard line alone 
prevented another score. The victory made our record 
with Amherst for the last four years, two victories, one 
tie 0-0, and one defeat. From these figures it is a 
bit difficult to see any grounds for Amherst's claiming 
any great superiority over us in the line of foot ball. 
Score 5-0. 

Connecticut Agricultural, after playing in hard luck 
all the season, vary senr.ibly concluded to disband and 
accordingly cancelled their game. This closed the 
original season, but the team had achieved such a 
record that games were easily arranged with Tufts and 



Boston College neither of whom we had ever met 
before. Both games are described in detail elsewhere. 
The effect of these victories was to add tremendously 
to the prestige of the college in the portion of the state 
from which the bulk of our students are drawn. 

Taking the season as a whole it has easily been the 
most successful in our history. The team played very 
strongly at the start and finish, and the usual slump 
in mid-season was due to misfortune rather than to 
indifferent work. The team played together in good 
style and showed better knowledge of the game than 
usual. It was surprisingly free from over-confidence. 
The worst fault was constant fumbling which cost us 
many points this season. There was often also a 
weakness in catching punts, and it is a wonder that so 
few mishaps resulted from it. Oftentimes too the 
backs were prevented from making long runs only by 
lack of speed. On the other hand, the team played a 
remarkably clean game almost never being penalized 
for holding or offside play. 

It Is becoming easier to arrange a good schedule 
each year, and it is safe to say that next year's will be 
harder than ever before. The remarkably advance of 
the college in football will be seen if it is remembered 
that in 1696. only six years ago, not a single college 
team was played, the entire schedule consisting of 
games with Mt. Herman, Williston and two Y. M.C. A. 
teams. None of these would be considered for a 
a moment to-day. We are justified this year in 
claiming sixth place in New England. Harvard, Yale, 
Dartmouth, Williams and possibly Brown being the 
only colleges that can show a better record for the 
season. Of these Harvard and Dartmouth alone 
have as good a record in per cent of games won. Is 
not this a record for a college of 130 students to be 
proud of ? 

Many factors must be considered as influencing 
this creditable showing. First comes the work of the 
players themselves. If we had not had good material 
to begin with, we could have done little. Our men 
have toiled hard and faithfully ; the best we can give 
them will be none too good for them now. For the 
work of Coach Jennings too we have nothing but 
praise ; the whole college should long remember his 
efforts. Nor should the able coaching of J. E. Halli- 
gan, '00. be forgotten. Without claiming to be the 
equal of a professional coach, he generously gave up 



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55 






much of his time, and it is due In large measure to 
him that the team was kept continually at work during 
the long breaks in the schedule in mid-season. To 
the manager and chef of the boarding club credit is 
due for their hearty co-operation in maintaining a 
training-table. Captain Anderson's readiness to assist 
the team in its practice also showed him to be a true 
friend of athletics. The attitude of the students was 
also encouraging and at all times they have supported 
the team well. And finally the thanks of every 
friend of the college is due the alumni, for their finan- 
cial and moral assistance. If the present " era of 
good feeling" can be kept up, the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College will speedily be made what it 
ought to be made, the best college in the country. 

RECORD FOR THE SEASON. 

Sept. 28. Massachusetts vs. Holy Cross. 17— 

Oct. 5. " " Pittsfield Athletic Club, 6—0 

Oct 12. " " Wesley an, 6— 

Oct. 16, " " Williams. 0—17 

O c t. 19. •• " Worcester Polytechnic, 18—12 

Nov. 2. " " Springfield Training School, 10— 

Nov 9 " " Amherst, 5 — 

Nov! 23. " " Tufts. 6- 

Nov 28 " " Boston College, 11 — U 

•• All others, 79—29 



REVIEW OF THE TEAM. 

The football team of 1901 will easily rank as the 
best in our history. Drawn originally from less than 
twenty candidates, with but six members remaining 
from last year's eleven. It has had much to contend 
against. For more than half of the time it has had 
to struggle along with no coaching whatever. The 
schedule was a hard one, with several long breaks be- 
tween games. There was no organized scrub, and 
the opportunities for practice were correspondingly 
limited. Till the last of the season there was no 
training-table. Certainly a team that can with all 
these handicaps win steadily against colleges with 
triple the number of students, dozens of candidates 
and permanent coaching deserves to be remembered. 
It Is with the greatest of pleasure that we devote this 
space to a brief account of the men who make 

up our team. 

Captain Herbert A. Paul. "02. of Lynn entered 
Massachusetts with the class of 1901 but at the close 
of the year left College to enlist In the Spanish Amer- 
ican War. He returned in the fall of 1899, entering 



the class of 1902. He played on his class team in 
his freshman year and captained the scrub a portion 
of the fall of '99. He was soon transferred to the 
varsity and played at center for the next two years. 
At the close of last year's season he was chosen cap 
tain. This fall he has bent all his energies to devel- 
oping a creditable team. As a captain his tact and 
leadership were responsible in no small measure for 
the harmony and absence of friction among the team 
this season. As a player, he was beset with misfor- 
tunes. Almost at the very start he received an In- 
jury to his shoulder which kept him out of the game 
for weeks and he had hardly recovered enough to play 
when he sprained his ankle and was debarred for the 
rest of the season. He played as a half-back in two 
games, sustaining his reputation of being a reliable, 
all-round man. 

Henry L. Bodfish. '02. of Tisbury entered College 
from Tabor academy where he played two years. He 
made his class team in his freshman year and the fol- 
lowing season played end on the varsity where he has 
remained ever since with occasional games at full and 
halfback. He has played a steady consistent game 
throughout, his defensive work in particular being ex- 
cellent. 

Edmund F. McCobb, '02. of Mllford high school 
played on his class teams the first two years in Col- 
lege, and has substituted at end for the varsity the 
past two seasons. He has been handicapped by lack 
of weight and is somewhat erratic, but has put up a 
hard, plucky and sometimes even brilliant game. 

Edward B. Snell. '03, of Methuen received his 
early football training in the Methuen high school, 
captaining the team in his senior year. He made the 
varsity In his freshman year, playing at end and later 
at guard. The next season he remained at guard 
This fall he was transferred to tackle where he played 
a remarkably strong game throughout the season 
This year he has done much of the punting for the 
team and his work in this line was no small factor In 
winning the Amherst game. He easily ranks as one 
of tne best tackles in New England this season. 

Charles P. Halllgan. '03, of Roslindale comes from 
a noted H football " family. His eldest brother grad- 
uated from Annapolis In 1900, where he ranked as 
one of the stars of the navy eleven. James E. Hal- 



ligan, Mass., 1900, will long be remembered as one 
of the famous captain of our athletic teams. C. P. 
Halligan seems to have followed their example. He 
played on the English high school eleven in his pre- 
paratory school days, and entered Massachusetts in 
the fall of 1900 as a member of the sophomore class. 
He immediately made the varsity as a tackle and has 
played in that position ever sin:e. He was one of 
the surest ground gainers on the team this season. 
His election to the captaincy of next year's eleven 
was well deserved. 

Harry J. Franklin, '03. of Bernardston prepared at 
Powers Institute. He played on his class team in his 
freshman year and served as a substitute for the var- 
sity the following season. This year he played at 
right guard till prevented by injuries at the close of 
the season. He is a light man for the position, but 
he has played a steady, consistent game and held his 
opponent well. 

Philip W. Brooks, '03, of Cambridge prepared for 
college at Carleton school. He played quarter on his 
class team for two years and this season served as 
quarter till the closing games. Though handicapped 
by lack of weight and limited football experience, he 
did surprisingly well. He ran the team in good shape 
and set a good example by the pluck and dash which 
his playing showed. Brooks also served as assistant 
manager this fall and is manager elect for next season. 
Edward G. Proulx. '03, of Hatfield played for two 
years on Smith academy, captaining the team in his 
senior year. In College he made his class team each 
year and this fall played several games with the var- 
sity as substitute half back and end. He played a 
hard and gritty game, and was one of the quickest 
men on the team, but was too light for a regular posi- 
tion. 

George E. O'Hearn. '04. of Pittsfield played four 
years on the Pittsfield high school eleven, and was Its 
captain in his senior year. He also played two sea- 
sons with the Pittstield Athletic club. He has played 
at end since entering Massachusetts. In the absence 
of Capt. Paul he has acted as field captain, and proved 
himself well adapted for the position. He has also 
made most of the tries for goal this fall, kicking 7 
goals from touchdowns out of 9 attempts. He made 
the only score of the Amherst game by a pretty place- 
kick from the 20 yard line. While Inclined to be er- 



ratic he has made a brilliant record for the season. 

Michael F. Ahearn. '04, of Framlngham entered 
College in the class of 1901. He made his class 
teams each year, and in 1899 played right end on the 
varsity. He left College the following winter but re- 
entered last spring as a member of 1904. While in 
the midst of the baseball season he sprained his knee 
and as a result was kept off the gridiron till late in 
the fall. He played his first game at quarter against 
Amherst, surprising everyone by his good judgment in 
running the plays and continued in that position the 
rest of the season. 

Clarence W. Lewis. '04. played guard for three 
years on the Melrose high school team and on the 
town eleven as well. He won his " M " last year, 
playing fullback the entire season. He returned late 
this fall, but finished the season, playing half-back 
most of the time. He was a hard and faithful worker, 
playing a good game throughout. He was especially 
valuable on the offensive, in advancing the ball through 
the line. 

Willard A. Munson. '05. of Aurora. 111., played four 
years on the Aurora high school team, two at tackle 
and two at full-back, captaining the team in his sen- 
ior year. He has played at full-back for Massachu- 
setts the entire season. While somewhat erratic, he 
has proved himself an excellent player, and one of the 
best ground-gainers on the team. 

George W. Patch. '05, of Lexington, played two 
years at centre for Somerville high. He immediately 
made the varsity this fall for the same position and 
has played a good steady game the entire season. He 
has the makings of as good a centre as we have ever 
had. 

William L. Craighead, '05. of Boston prepared for 
college at Howard university of Washington. D. C. 
where he played at centre for three years. He has 
been at guard with us in every game this fall. He 
has Improved wonderfully during the season and In the 
Amherst game showed himself to be one of the 
strongest men on the team, repeatedly breaking 
through on defense and nailing the runner for a loss. 
With three years more of football before him his 
chances for making a reputation are excellent. 

Chester L. Whitaker. '05, of Somerville. played 
two years at tackle on Somerville high. He started 
in here as a tackle but was shifted to half-back, where 



' 



, 



56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i 



1 



he did good work. He has made few long gains, but 
has played a steady, consistent game. 

John J. Gardner, '05, of Milford prepared at Hope- 
dale high. This is his first year of football. As a 
substitute guard he made a good showing in our clos- 
ing games. With more experience he should make a 
valuable player. 

Thomas F. Walsh. '05, played at full-back for 
Ayer high before entering College. He has served 
as a substitute half-back and will doubtless give a 
good account of himself In another season. 

Victor A. Gates, '02. of Memphis, Tenn., has done 
well as manager. His schedule was the best we ever 
had. games being secured with many colleges which 
we never before met. Good coaches have been hired, 
and he has looked out for the team well both at home 
and on Its trips. In one respect he was criticized 
more or less by the students. Frequently when the 
team played away from home, he was not always care- 
ful to send the results promptly, thereby keeping the 
whole College needlessly in suspense. It was not a 
serious fault and we do not mention it as such, but as 
a point which future managers can easily improve 
upon. In general he has shown good 
throughout. 

The statistics of the team follow : 

Name Position 

Paul (Captain) half-back 

Bodfish right end 

McCobb sub end 

Snell right tackle 

Halligan left tackle 

Franklin right guard 

Proulx sub half-back 

Brooks sub quarter 

O'Hearn left end 

Lewis right half-back 

Ahearn quarter 

Munson full-back 

Whitaker left half-back 

Craighead left guard 

Patch centre 

Gardner sub guard 

Walsh sub half-back 

Total weight, 2774 lbs.; average age, 2 
163 1-2 lbs. 

The following men in College are entitled to the 
football '• M : " Paul '02. Gates '02 (Manager), Bod- 
fish '02, McCobb '92, Dellea '02, Snell '03, Halligan 
'03, Franklin '03, Proulx '03. Brooks '03. O'Hearn 
'04, Ahearn '04. Lewis '04. Munson '05, Whitaker 
•05. Craighead '05. Patch '05. Gardner '05. Of 
these. Gates, Franklin, Proulx, Brooks, Munson.Whlt- 



aker, Craighead. Patch and Gardner win It for the 
first time this season. 

Of the work of the team as a whole, we can say 
that it showed a better knowledge of the game, kept 
in better training, did the best team work and showed 
the best spirit of any team in our history. Two or 
three years ago our athletic team went out to make a 
good showing ; by this they usually meant a defeat of 
about 20 toO and thought themselves lucky at that. 
This year our team went out to win, and they did it. 
Our substitutes too have for the first time been reliable 
in case of need. With but three members of the 
squad to graduate, only one of whom .has played in a 
majority of games, and the favorable outlook for a 
permanent coach, the chances for another season are 
most decidedly bright. 



/ithle*ic N<>**S- 



business 


ability 


Age 


Weigh 


22 


155 


24 


165 


22 


140 


22 


183 


20 


183 


18 


164 


20 


140 


18 


127 


21 


170 


19 


173 


23 


140 


20 


172 


19 


165 


25 


183 


20 


183 


19 


176 


17 


155 


; average 


• weight, 



Massachusetts, 6 ; Tufts, 0. 
The game with Tufts college on Friday, Nov. 22, 
was the first opportunity the Massachusetts team has 
had of appearing in the eastern part of the state and 
the reputation which preceded them was well sus- 
tained as may be seen by the results of the game. 

The team was in the best of condition and played a 
fast, snappy game. Their defense and offense was 
excellent but for an unlucky fumble we would have 
scored again. 

Tufts seemed to be a little the heavier but Massa- 
chusetts made up for this by superior team work and 
fast playing. 

Tufts won the toss and chose the wind. Halligan 
kicked off to Knight who ran it back ten yards. On 
next play O'Hearn tackled Clement for a loss of five 
yards. On next down Tufts could not gain so Knight 
punted to Ahearn who was downed without gain. 
Massachusetts then by short gains made by Snell and 
Halligan. Lewis and Whitaker carried the ball to the goal 
line. It was Massachusetts ball and first down with 
ball on goal line, the referee declaring that it was 
not a touchdown because the ball was not entirely 
over the line. On the next rush the ball was fumbled 
and Tufts secured it. Knight punted about sixty 
yards to Ahearn who ran it back about ten yards. 
Massachusetts was unable to gain so Snell fell back 
for a punt but fumbled and It was Tufts ball on Massa- 




— < 



- X 








/ 


_* 


*• 


- V 


X 


v. - 


til 


■i ■ 



y 5 

**! — 
'■Z X 



/ 

X 



"• If. 2 



X 

X 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



57 






chusetts 35-yard line. After making a few short 
gains Tufts was held for downs on 30-yard line. 
Massachusetts then made a few gains around the 
ends and through tackle carrying theball to the center 
of field when time was called. 

In the second half Knight kicked off to Whitaker 
who ran back about 12 yards. Lewis was sent 
through for five yards and was followed by Snell with 
five more.' Halligan was tackled for a loss. Massa- 
chusetts then received ten yards on offside play. 
Munson made one yard through tackle and Halligan 
was again tackled for a loss and on the next play Massa- 
chusetts being unable to gain the ball went to Tufts. 
Knight hurdled the center several times for good gains. 
Clement tried end but lost on next rush. Chapman 
was unable to gain and Knight was compelled to punt, 
Massachusetts being unable to make any gains tried 
quarter-back kick which worked for 30 yards. 
O'Hearn then tried for a place kick but failed. 
Knight caught the kick and ran it back 20 yards. 
Chapman went through right tackle for three yards 
and Clement circled the end for five more. Knight 
then tried to hurdle but lost the ball, Massachusetts 
securing it. From here by continually running by 
Snell and Halligan the ball was carried to the three- 
yard line where it was carried over for a touchdown. 
O'Hearn kicked goal. Score. 6-0. 

For Tufts, Knight. Pierce and Flagg did the best 
playing while Snell, Halligan and Ahearn excelled for 
Massachusetts. The line up : 



Notwithstanding the cold there was a large and en- 
thusiastic crowd present, both sides being well repre- 
sented. The teams were well matched according to 
weight, the advantage being slightly in favor of Boston 
College 



I 






MASSACHUSETTS. TUFTS. 

O'Hearn, I.e. , ' e " *** 

Halligan. I. 1. . r - *•■ McMahon 

Craighead, 1 g. '• •^'gj 

Patch, c. , _ c " oale , 

ror j_ ._ r „ . g.. Galamean 

££7:{' g ' ■• *■■ £*■ s nf r5 

Bodfish. r. e. l •" 1> Ph gSS 

Ahearn. q. b. , . A- *" F,a « 

Lewis, r.h.b. , -\ b K C rf pm * n , 

Whitaker. 1. h. b. '• h ', b ; c ^ e 

Munson, f. b. f - b " Kni K ht 

Score-Massachusetts 6, Tufts 0. Touchdowns-Snell. 
Goal from touchdown-O'Hearn. Referee— Saunders ol 
Somerville. Umpire-Crowell of Dartmouth. Timers- 
Perkins and Belden. Linesmen— Harrington and Halligai.. 
Time— 20 minute halves. 

Massachusetts, 1 1 ; Boston College. 0. 
The last game of the season was played on Thanks- 
giving Day with Boston College and resulted in a vic- 
tory for Massachusetts by a score of 1 1 to 0. 



The offensive work of both teams was very good. 
Massachusetts excelling. On defensive the Massa- 
chusetts team was not quite up to her usual standard 
and did not hold until compelled to do so as in thelirst 
half when Boston College had ball on Massachusetts 
three-yard line they were held for downs. Fumbling 
was quite frequent due to the cold weather. 

Boston College won the toss and Halligan kicked 
off to Boston College's 10-yard line. Murphy ran the 
ball back about ten yards but after a few rushes they lost 
the ball on a fumble. Massachusetts then carried the 
ball to Boston College's 5-yard line where Halligan 
carried it over. O'Hearn missed the try for goal. 

Boston College kicks off to Munson who runs ball 
back about 15 yards. By use of tackles back forma- 
tion. Snell and Halligan, alternately carrying the ball, 
Boston College 55-yard line was soon reached ; here 
Massachusetts fumbled and it was Boston College's 
ball. On a delayed pass McDermott took the ball 
around right end for a 30-yard run. By continual 
line plunges Boston College carried the ball to Massa- 
chusetts three- yard line but were held for downs just 
as time was called. 

In the second half Murphy kicked off to Massachu- 
setts, with a few tricks and line plunges the ball was 
carried to Boston College 45-yard line where Ahearn 
tried a quarterback kick but kicked out of bounds. It 
was Boston College ball but they were immediately 
held for downs and with ball once more in their pos- 
session Massachusetts soon carried It over the line for 
the second and last touchdown of the game, Snell 
carrying the ball over. O'Hearn kicked goal. Score 
II to 0. After the kickoff time was soon called. 

For Boston College Murphy and Kenney did the 
best playing while Snell, Halligan and Bodfish excelled 
for Massachusetts. The line-up : 

BOSTON COLLEGE. 

r. e., Sullivan 

r. t., Cohan 

r. g.. Crane 

c, Kenney 

1. g.. Lafferty 

1. t.. Kendricken 

1. e.. McCarty 

q. b.. Riley 

r. h. b.. McKuster 

1. h. b.. McDermott 

f. b.. Murphy 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Bodfish. 1. e. 
Snell. 1. t. 
Craighead. 1. g. 
Patch, c. 
Franklin, r. g. 
Halligan. r. t. 
O'Hearn. r. e. 
Ahearn. q. b. 
Whitaker. 1. h. b. 
Lewis, r. h. b. 
Munson, f. b. 

Score-Massachusetts It, Boston College 0. Touchdowns 
-Halligan. Snell. Coals-O'Hearn. Ump.re-Crowell. 
RefS-Holton. Tirrers-Wayland of Dartmouth. Gates 
of Massachusetts. Time— 20-minute halves. 



I 









58 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Collet No*^ 



—Basket ball next. 

Eight won out of nine ! 

—Belden, 1905 has left college. 
-The college got its first bolt for years on chapel 
Saturday morning. 

-Captain Anderson is planing to put in some new 
apparatus in the Drill hall. 

—Rev. E. E. Keedy of Hadley conductep services 
In the chapel last Sunday morning. 

_Capt. Anderson is planning to have a sham battle 
next spring between the companies. 

-The regular hour for Sunday service in the chapel 
has been changed from 9-15 to 9-25. 

-The new seats in the Reading Room are a great 
improvement and are highly appreciated. 

_ H A. Paul is now able to get around without the | 
U c e of crutches. He is attending recitations. 

-The ladies of the Faculty will not hold a social 

this Fall as planned but will have two next winter instead. 

— Dr Paige and Prof. Hasbrook have been choosen 

as representatives of the Faculty on the " Prom." 

committee. 

—Barnes '04 has been removed to his home in 
Stockbridge. Although still contined to his bed his 
leg is mending rapidly. 

-The backstop looked very well last week when the 
students returned. Only why not paint the record on 
so that it will last all winter? 

-Quite a number from here went to Northampton! 
Thursday to hear the address of Booker T. Washing- 
ton. All seem well pleased with the lecture. 

— C P Halligan 1903. has been elected foot ball 
captain for the season of 1902; P. W. Brooks was 
chosen manager and C. H. Griffin assistant manager. 
—I M Dellea *02 had two ribs broken while playing 
foot ball about two weeks ago. Dr. Branch attended 
him and Mr. Dellea is now able to attend his 

recitationc. 

—George E. O'Hearn has been confined to his 
home in Pltsf leld with a very bad cold caught at the 
Boston college game. He is now back and able to 
attend recitations. 



-President Goodell was re-elected chairman of the 
executive committee of the American association of 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, at the 
regular annual meeting held in Washington. D. C.two 

weeks ago, 

_ Dr H T Fernald attended the meeting of the 
Association of Nursery Stock Inspectors recently held 
in Washington, D. C. Dr. Fernald is the Massachu- 
setts State inspector and represented this state at the 
meeting. 

-The skating on the pond is only passable but if the 
men would turn out and get a couple of lengths of hose 
they could easily flood the ice and in a very short time 
we would have the best of skating. 

_ T M Carpenter 1902 has left college temporarily 
to accept a lucrative position in the Chemical Division 
of the Pennsylvania Experiment Station. He will 
continue his studies as far as posible and expects to be 
able to return in four months and complete his course. 
—Mr Adoph Heimburger has resigned his position 
as instructor in Chemistry and has returned to Florida. 
His successor is Mr. D. L. Cleaves. Mr. Cleaves 
graduated from the University of Maine in 1898 and 
has taken graduate work in Chemistry at the Worces- 
ter Polytechnic Institute and the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

-At a meeting of the -Prom." committee held 
last Friday night it was decided to hold the " Prom, 
on Friday evening. February 14. 1902. Warner's 
orchestra of Northampton will furnish the music. The 
following committees were appointed : Music. Tinkham 
land Kinrey ; decoration, Kinney, Lewis. Monahan. 
Snell; hack. Proulx; printing. Claflin. Tinkham ; re- 
freshments, Claflin. Hall. 

—Too much cannot be said in praise of the work of 
William Reardon the new chef at the Boarding Club. 
He worked hard to keep an excellent training table and 
to him is due much of the credit for this past successful 
season His Thanksgiving dinner certainly was the 
best meal ever served in this boarding-house, while 
his regular food is so good that everybody wears a 
happy smile of contentment. 



The resources of Columbia University amount to 
$18,000,000. and consists of seven schools with a 
united attendance of 4,600 students. 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS, 

DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPEBS, 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES and T SQUARES, 

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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







I 




Alumni. 



'95.— A. D. Potter, landscape and sanitary engi 
neer, Fair Haven. 

•95._H. W. Lewis is with C. H. Harrington & Co.. 
civil engineers. 60 State St., Boston. 

•96.— F. B. Shaw. Manager Postal Telegraph Cable 
Co.. 1 140 Columbus Ave.. Boston. 

• 97 ._Harry F. Allen is now holding the position 
of teacher in Billings. Oklahoma. 

• 97 ._john W. Allen, florist. 164 E. 85th St.. New 

York city. 

•98 — S. W. Wiley spent a few days in Washing- 
ton. D. C. week before last, on official business con- 
nected with the Hatch Experiment Station. 

•00— Mr and Mrs. Arthur Frost of Boston spent 
Thanksgiving at the home of Mrs. Frost's parents Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. E. Wakefield in Amherst. 

•00 —An interesting article lately appeared in the 
Lowell Journal written by Austin Morrill in answer to 
an article in the N. E. Farmer which came out 
some time since. The tenor of Mr. Morrill's inser- 
tions is appreciated among the students of this 
institution. 

-Oi __p. C. Brooks is now situated at 11902 
Muskegon Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

•01.— John H. Todd recently spent a few days 
visiting his college friends. 

The annual meeting of the New York alumni of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College club of New York 
was held at the Hotel St. Denis in New York, on Fri- 
day evening Dec. 6. President H. H. Goodell and 
Prof. Geo. F. Mills represented the faculty and H. A. 
Paul. '02, the athletic accociation. A detailed 
account will appear in our next issue. ^^ 



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Special prices on team orders. 

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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 22. I902 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Cou-egb Signal. Amhekst. Mass. The S.ohal will be 
Z ItSi^t™ until it. discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do no. receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager , — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. I902. Editor-ln-Chlef. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN. 1 902. Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1 903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH CATES. 1 902. Athletic. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. .902. Intercalate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1 903. Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1 902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1 903, College Note, MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1 903. A.umn. Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. ARTHUR LEE PE^K, 1934. 

Terms-. $1.00 per year in adcance. Sinflle Copies. 10c. Posta fl e outside of United States and Canada, to e, extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 
Readlng-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West, Pres. Athletic Association. 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base Ball Association, 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index. 

J. C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager- 
G. L. Barms, Manager. 

H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered Nov. 9. 1901. as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. Mass., Act of Congress of March 3. 1879. 



EcTrt&ri&.s. 



Friday evening Jan. 24th, the long looked for ban- 
quet for the celebration of our successful football sea- 
son will be held in the drill hall. Through the efforts 
of Mr. Reardon and the committee in charge this 
affair bids fair to be highly successful. A num- 
ber of the alumni are expected to be present and the 
toasts will be interspersed with music by the glee club 
and the band. Although coming rather late after the 
end of the season a generous amount of enthusiasm 
is expected. It is this enthusiasm which is needed to 
help win future games and there is no better time to 
show a genuine college spirit than at this time. Let 
everyone be present ! 

There seems to be no further reason to doubt the 
feasibility of trying to run a basket-ball team at this 
college. Certainly there could be no better proof of 
the abilities of our team to give a good account of 
itself than was manifested in the game against North- 
ampton. Although there Is manifestly much room 



for improvement yet the team work was all that could 
be expected, considering the circumstances In which 
our men are placed. Although basket-ball is a newly 
installed game here, there is no reason why. with the 
proper management and financial support, we cannot 
put out a team which will do credit to the Institution. 
But if such an end Is to be attained the co-operation 
of every man interested in the game should be given. 
Let the requests of the captain for men to appear at 
practice be heeded and let every man do what he can 
towards winning fresh laurels in our athletics. 



The regular annual banquet of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Alumni club was held at the 
Quincy House. Boston, Jan. 16th. About eighty 
were present including alumni all over the state. 
President Gates spoke highly of the way in which the 
graduates had made names for themselves, stating 
that of the 1300 persons at the college since it started 
he could account for 1 100 of them and all were hold- 
ing honorable positions. He set fourth the need of 
more instructors at the college and stated that pro- 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



63 



6a 

visions ha^T been made by the bill now before the 
Legislature to furnish Instruction in mining, forestry 
agricultural engineering and Irrigation and roads and 
road-making also providing for the teaching of physics 
and higher mathematics. A bill asking for an appro- 
priation of $90,000 is also before the Legislature 
$50 000 of which will be used in erecting a first class 
modern dining hall. 535.000 to Install a central heat- 
ing plant and $500 to maintain the dining hall. The 
officers elected were : President. C.H.Preston. 83; 
treasurer R. B. Mackintosh. '86; directors. M. 
Bunker. 75. F. H. Fowler. '87. A. H. Kirkland. <M: 
clerk. W. F. Davis. '89. 

There is nothing more pleasing to the undergradu- 
ate body of any college than Is the knowledge that the 
alumni are energet Ically striving to better the condi- 
tions and further the Interests of their alma mater. 
And especially Is this true at this institution. How- 
ever hard the student body may strive to bolster up 
and keep In pace with other colleges the conditions 
of the various departments of social and athletic life 
it is uphill work to say the least when there is no ad 
trom the alumni In sight. We. however, have little 
at which to complain about our own alumni. Dunng 
the last football season they responded nobly to a call 
to aid our finances and It is to them that we owe 
much of our success. They are not however to lay 
back on the oars now that the season is finished but 
are constantly pushing the matter of the long cher- 
ished but slowly materializing athletic field. A few 
years since, a movement was set on foot to organize 
an athletic association for the purpose of realizing this 
project. Through a misunderstanding however this 
organization was dissolved. Within a few weeks the 
association has been re-organized with a capitalizat.on 
of $15 000 Funds will be raised by the issuing of 
stock certificates at $10 each. The plan was placed 
before members of the alumni at the recent banquet 
at Boston and met with hearty approval. The plan 
seems feasible and with the proper amount of energy 
on the part of its authors there seems no reason why 
the long looked for athletic field may not become a 
reality. 



-Freshmen Belden. Graves. Sprague. E. Straw 
and Brigham, have left college. 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REUNION AND BAN- 
QUET OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRI- 
CULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB OF 
NEW YORK. 

The place: St. Denis. 
The date: December 6th. 1902. 
Guests: President H. H. Goodell. LLD.. Pr**- 
sor William R.Ware. LL. D.. (Harvard 852.) of 
Columbia university. Professor Geo. F. Mills. M. A.. 
Lieut. C. A. L. Totten. M. A.. Thomas Rosenmuller 
of West Hartford, Conn. 

President: Frederick W. Morris, 72. 
Toastmaster: Dr. John A. Cutter. "82. 
In opening the post-prandial exercises, the toast- 
master announced that he had been drafted to serve 
in the place of the president, the latter suffering from 
an affection of the eyes which prevented his seeing 
the members present distinctly. After a few remarks. 
President Goodell was called upon 

The President responded in an unusually entertain- 
ing and instructive address ; missing the reunion of 
the previous, year, because of attendance in Wash- 
ington, he went into detail as to the actual condition 
of things at M. A. C. to our edification and comfort. 
The opportunities in the Immediate future were out- 
lined to us and we felt at the close of his address that 
we had been listening to the same Goodell of twenty 
thirty, yes thirty-three years ago. Long may the Pres- 
ident live to benefit our Alma Mater ! ! 

The Toastmaster said that for four years the off - 
cers of the club had been systematically sending to all 
former and present members of the Faculty whose 
addresses were obtainable, invitations in the name of 
the President of the Club ; such had brought many 
courteous replies ; this year among them was a re- 
sponse accepting by Professor Ware of Columbia. 
On Professor Ware's appearance and introduct.on In 
the parlor of the hotel he stated that he never had 
ever seen the College and had been in Amherst but 
once. The toastmaster was yet very glad that Prc- 
I fessor Ware was with us to-night. 

Professor Ware said : - 1 have been receiving invi- 
tations for four years to these alumni reunions The 
first time I thought it altogether wrong; second, I be- 
came doubtful and thought that there might be some 
rightful intent ; third time my doubt Increased and 



this year I made up my mind to accept. Now I have 
no right here ; I never lectured at your institution ; 
years ago President Clark did invite me to lecture 
and 1 responded favorably. Now usually when cne is 
invited to lecture it means money and not to be put 
aside— yet 1 never did lecture, hence again I have no 
right to be here ; but here I am and 1 am going to 
stay as long as the rest of you do. As to Agriculture 
and Architecture— there is little or no connection, 
apparently ; both words commence and end with the 
same letters, but Agriculture is of the soil ; Architec- 
ture spurns the earth and soars up to heaven. Yet 
there is an intermediary and it Is well that 1 am at 
this dinner to call your attention to it. Landscape 
gardening essentially combines Agriculture and Arch- 
itecture, and to-day there is no school of landscape 
gardening in any college or university of the country. 
Surely here is a field for your institution." The Pro- 
fessor told of some of the progress that was being 
made in the teaching of Architecture and gave a most 
cordial invitation to those present to call upon him at 
Columbia. 

Lieutenant Totten was then announced as the profes- 
sor of military science and tactics that built the fort 
on the campus and did other stunts that the students 
some times did not like. The Lieutenant responded 
in a reminiscent vein and then branching on to the 
subject of football said that some years ago he had 
with Walter Camp written an article on the relation 
of the orders of battle to the game of foot-ball and 
would be pleased to send copies to the foot-ball team. 
In introducing Captain Herbert A. Paul, *02. of the 
Massachusetts foot ball team, the toastmaster briefly 
reviewed the history of the game at M. A. C which 
was started by the late Francis Codman, '80. 

Captain Paul said : "I have been caught red-handed 
in the vineyard and have had to go up against Prexy.but 
this is the hardest game that 1 was ever up against 
and unfortunately 1 cannot call a substitute from the 
side lines. Last June when the College year ended. 
I was condoled with by members of the foot-ball squad 
from '01 ; was told to expect- nothing; you will be 
beaten by Amherst. Holy Cross and Wesleyan but do 
not let Storrs beat you tf*ey said. We returned to 
College in the fall and took up the work in the best 
way we could and with the results-you know well of. 
Here followed a succinct account of the games with 



a history of the coaching relations. The Captain 
closed with a reasonable hope that we would win many 
games next fall. 

The Toastmaster said that we had been highly edi- 
fied by the speech of Captain Paul which reflected in 
Its substance and delivery credit upon him as well as 
the department of English. In regard to the raising 
of funds of which the Captain had not spoken, it was 
necessary to state that a by-law of the New York 
Alumni club does not allow any solicitation of funds at 
any banquet, but that when the fall came and money 
was needed for first class coaching throughout the 
season there would be no difficulty In obtaining from 
individuals of the New York end its quota. 

Professor Mills was then introduced as a first-class 
teacher and loyal friend of the M. A. C. and justified 
this introduction by a most earnest speech on the 
progress of the institution. 

Father Barrett, '75, followed in a timely and en- 
livening speech. Pity we had not a stenographer to 
take it dcvn but those who have heard his addresses 
and sat under his presiding at our •• Kommers" at 
Amherst know well of the treat. 

Dr. Winfield T. Ayres, '86, talked entertainingly of 
football in the days of his class; they did good work 
then. 

Charles Edward Beach. '82, was introduced as a 
genuine farmer; said that he had come to the dinner 
with some down heartedness as he felt that the agita- 
tion for the change of name was unwise but was re- 
freshed by the meeting and the reports of progress. 
(It is well to state that the subject of name was not 
discussed pro or con. other subjects taking up the full 

time.) 

The Nominating Committee reported the following 
list of officers: Pres't. William D. Russell, 71 ; 
vice-pres't. CO. Lovell. 78; 2nd vice-pres't. Jas. 
S. Williams, '82; 3rd vice-pres't. Geo. H. Wright, 
'88; sec'y-treas. . Alvan L. Fowler, '80; choragus, 
Sar.ford D. Foot. '88; historian. Dr. John A. Cutter, 

'82. 

President Morris on motion and vote declared said 
nominees duly elected to their respective offices. 

On motion the meeting adjourned sine die. thus 
ending a reunion which was characterized perhaps by 
the most enthusiastic expressions of loyalty to the 
College and its interests to a high degree. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



65 




I 






ALUMNI CHEERING. 

We publish the following letter instead of answer- 
ing it privately as we have others of similar tenor, 
because we fear that Mr. Hemenway's criticism of our 
request in regard to alumni cheering may have been 
shared by others. This is a new phase of the con- 
troversy, and as nothing could be farther from the 
minds of either the editor or the students than a 
desire to " dictate " to the alumni or anyone else, we 
embrace this opportunity to make further explanations. 

Editor of College Signal: 

In your issue of Dec. 11. I notice in an editorial 
you say that the use of the term '« Aggie" was injur- 
ing the college. As to the truth of that I think there 
is some question. Things are not always what they 
seem and your point of view is an exceedingly narrow 

one. 

The abolition of the term has given the general 
public the idea expressed in the note printed in the 
New England Farmer and reproduced in your issue. 
The dropping of the term gives the impression that the 
college is made up of dudes and a man looking for an 
agriculturist would look elsewhere. It gives the gen- 
eral impression that agriculture and kindred subjects 
are to be secondary. An attempt to place them so 
in this state nearly ruined the college and it will take 
many years of wise counsel to regain its place. I 
believe there is a greater opening in the different lines 
of agriculture than in any other thing. Some states 
require their teachers to pass examinations in it. I 
have heard from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion of nearly every state and territory in the United 
States as well as many foreign countries. The ten- 
dency is much the same. The movement of a broader 
training in public schools is developing faster than the 
teachers. Puerto Rico has just— within a few months 
—established twenty schools where agriculture is 
taught in a practical way. And here where men are 
being trained to fill those positions or should be. they 
take action, which gives an impression which will 
keep them out of them. I would like to ask two ques- 
tions, which gives the most support to the paper the 
undergraduates or alumni ? Is your wisdom so great 
that you should go against the majority and dictate to 
alumni what they can yell when they are helping sup- 
port your team ? 

Yours truly, 

H. D. Hemenway. 



Just why any sane man should get - the general 
impression that agriculture and kindred subjects are 
to be secondary." In our college curriculum, because 
the students are trying to suppress the term •• Amherst 
Aggies " in the public press is something we confess 
we cannot understand. If there Is one point that we 
have tried to bring out more clearly than another. It 
is that •• Aggie " was not dropped because it meant 
•• Agricultural " but because it meant absolutely noth- 
ing to the general public. So long as the official name 
remains what it is, we fail to see why a change In 
••nick-names" could have the slightest effect on 
agriculture. But even supposing for a moment that 
your position is correct, do you really think that the 
number who would believe the M. A. C. students to 
be " dudes " would be any greater than those who used 
to think that - Aggie" stood for a mere « milklng- 
school " or something of that sort ? You must admit 
that we have had trouble enough on that score, and 
one is no farther from the truth than the other. If 
anything the chance of ambiguity is less than before. 
You question our statement that the words " Amherst 
Aggie " did seriously harm the college. We will say 
at once that we do not think » Aggie " as used here 
on the campus or as remembered by an alumnus did 
do any material harm, for those who used it knew just 
what it stood for and could explain It to those who did 
not. But when its use went further than that and took 
the place of the official name in the public press, then 
we maintain that it did do harm. Take the case of 
this fall. Our football team won notable victories, 
such as should have made an athletic-loving public 
interested in us and our work. But how is a stranger 
reading of the " Amherst Aggies " going to know that 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College Is meant? 
Yet up to the time the students took action, I did not 
see the college referred to in any other way in the 
daily papers, and the posters for out of town games 

bore invariably the same sign •' vs. Amherst 

Aggies." How much advertising for the college was 
that ? Why even the athletic editors of the daily 
papers themselves thought we were a sort of " scrub " 
eleven for Amherst. You don't believe it ? Let us 
quote from a note in the Boston Herald; "The 
Amherst Aggies are following close on the track of 
the regular Amherst eleven." And from the Worces- 
ter Telegram at the end of a season so brilliant as to 



give us fifth place in New England : " Amherst Aggie, 
traditionally despised by Amherst Varsity for its 
weakness has sent a lot of good teams down to defeat." 
Do you think that did the college as much good as if 
we had been spoken of by our rightful name " Mass. 
Agricultural ?" If you say that athletics are but a 
single line of work, we reply " True, but are not the 
Alumni supporting the athletic teams because you 
believe that athletics advertise the college by making 
it better known to the public ? Then why not do it in 
a way that will get us the most benefits possible? Now 
as to your questions. First as to the relative support 
of this paper by students and alumni. If you mean 
by support the number of subscribers from each then 
of course six hundred alumni contribute mo-e money 
than one hundred and thirty students. But what has 
that to do with the case? This Is no struggle between 
alumni and student subscribers. -The word " Aggie " 
was not dropped at the desire of students alone, neither 
was its retention advocated by every alumnus. Prac- 
tically every member of the Faculty, the alumni mem- 
bers as well as the rest, knew and approved of our 
intention before the step was ever taken. The origi- 
nal suggestion came not from the students but from 
the advertising committee of the alumni themselves. 
Many of our most prominent alumni have since 
expressed themselves as pleased at the change. And 
while the majority of the alumni may not be with us 
now, we feel sure that those who are thoroughly in 
touch with college opinion to-day support us almost to 
a man. As the more timorous see that no general 
turning of things topsy-turvy is intended, they will 
follow. Time will convince the rest. 

Your second question is already answered in part. 
How the alumni shall cheer is not a question of 
" dictation " but of coliege loyalty. At a public ath- 
letic contest the friends of our college should be as 
one man. It is no time or place to parade our petty 
misunderstandings. Moreover, the supposed object of 
cheering Is to encourage the team. If that is so then 
to revive an obsolete yell so distasteful to our athletes 
that they unanimously favored its abolition is absurd. 
We fancy the yells of Tufts and Boston college were 
sweeter music to our boys. Why must we keep up 
constant playing at cross-purposes? Our interests are 
the same. Let us work together. 



CONNECTICUT M. A. C. ALUMNI. 

A call having previously been issued a meeting of 
Connecticut M. A. C. alumni was held at the Henblein 
Hotel. Hartford. Jan. 8, 1902. for the purpose of dis 
cussing the advisability of forming a perminent M A. 
C. alumni club in Connecticut. 

Those present were E. B. Smead. 71, George A. 
Parker. 76. Dr. Joseph E. Root. 76, James S. Wil- 
liams, "82. Prof. Charles S. Phelps. '85. Dr. Richard 
P. Lyman, '92. Dr. Charles A. Goodrich. '93. H. D. 
Hemenway. '95. A. B. Cook, '96. R. L. Hayward. 
ex-'96. W.A.Dawson, 1901. Several others intended 
to have been present but were unfortunately detained. 

The meeting was called to order by Hemenway. '95. 
and E. B. Smead. 71. was elected temporary chair- 
man and H. D. Hemenway temporary secretary. 

Upon motion of George A. Parker. 76. it was 
voted that we form a permanent Connecticut M. A.C 
alumni organization. The secretary was instructed to 
inform the alumni through the medium of the college 
paper of the sentiment of the meeting in regard to the 
organization which was to the effect that a Connecti- 
cut organization should not and would not injure the 
existing M. A. C. alumni clubs in New York and Bos- 
ton by drawing from their attendence, but on the other 
hand would tend to enthuse local members to attend 
those meetings, and would furnish a place of meeting 
for many alumni not only those in Connecticut but in 
Western Massachusetts and Rhode Island, who do 
not now attend any alumni club. It would develop 
enthusiasm which would be of mutual benefit. It 
would increase our interest in cur Alma Mater, enlarge 
our acquaintance with the alumni, and would aid in the 
general advancement of the Massachusetts Agricul 

tural college. 

It was the opinion of those present that our annual 
meetings should be held in February, a dull season 
of the year for many and held at that time would not 
conflict with any other M. A. C. alumni organization. 
It was also voted that as Hartford is so central and 
easily reached from Western Massachusetts that we 
especially Invite Western Massacusetts and Rhode 
Island M. A. C. Alumni to join us. and that we extend 
a general invitation, through the medium of the college 
paper to all alumni and former students of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 



66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



67 




A committee consisting of George A. Parker. 76, 
Charles S. Phelps, '85 and H. D. Hemenway. "95 
was appointed to draw up a constitution and by-laws 
to be presented at the next meeting for action. 

H. D. Hemenway. Temporary Sec. 



OUR CLUBS. 

There are three clubs which are exerting a power- 
ful influence in our college, in their respective 
spheres. As we have said little about them, 
heretofore, it seems well to give them some space in 
this issue. We believe that, if all the students knew 
just what these clubs are doing, they would give them 
heartier support. The clubs are: The Chemical club, 
representing the chemical department, the Journal 
club, representing the entomological department, and 
the Natural History society, representing all the sci- 
entific departments of our college in general. 

The Chemical club has been reorganized this win- 
ter. A constitution has been drawn up and provision 
made for a meeting in the chemical lecture-room 
every two weeks. Already three meetings have been 
held, all of which were very interesting and Instruc- 
tive. At the first meeting held Nov. 18. 1901. Prof. 
S. F. Howard gave a lecture on the determination of 
the weighs of precipitates in graviometric analysis 
without filtration and weighing ; at the second, held 
Dec. 9, '01, White, '04. and Hamblin. '05, read pa- 
pers on •• Explosives " and Huntington, '05, read one 
on " Argon ; " and, at the third, held Jan. 13. Mr. G. 
A. Billings. '95. gave an interesting lecture on the 
Walker-Gordon methods of preparing milk for infant 
consumption. During the winter, it is proposed that 
each member of the club shall read a paper or de- 
liver a lecture before the club, on some appropriate 
subject. To add to the enjoyment of the meetings, 
and to let them have a social as well as an intellec- 
tual side, refreshments are served at the close of each 
meeting. As Dr. Wellington has quite a number of 
undergraduates at work in the chemical laboratory, 
and as there are several graduate chemists connected 
with the experiment station, there is generally a good 
attendance at the Chemical club. 

On the morning of the first Saturday of each month 
during the College year, the Journal club meets in 
the entomological laboratory. The object of the club 
is the discussion of interesting articles found in the 



entomological magazines received at the laboratory. 
Each member of the club is given some special order 
or suborder of insects to look out for. for the entire 
year and to give the principle points of the magazine 
articles concerning them. This greatly promotes in- 
dividual research. 

The Natural History society, being the most gen- 
eral club of all. has the greatest opportunities. Last 
year, in connection with the fraternity conference, it 
provided for several lectures in the chapel. These 
lecture* were all by scientific men. A number out- 
side of the College, gave their assistance. This year 
the society was reorganized and committees were 
elected to arrange a series of lectures. As yet these 
have failed to materialize. There can be no doubt 
of the benefit of such a series of lectures to the stu- 
dent of science, especially when the college curricu- 
lum does not provide anything of the kind. Un- 
doubtedly, however, these lectures will soon be forth- 
coming. 

The length of time that these three clubs have 
been in existence is'a standing proof of their value- 
The Chemical club was organized during the autumn 
of 1896, a little over five years ago. The Journal 
club was organized during the winter of 1900. but. it 
existed, under the name of the ■• Fernald Entomolog- 
ical Society," two or three years before that. The 
Natural History society first came Into existence over 
ten years ago. and. although it has been dormant some 
time, it is now a living society. 



THE CATALOGUE. 

On Thursnay. Jan. 9th, the college catalogue made 
its appearance. It is different from any heretofore 
issued as in previous years it has been incorporated 
with the experiment station report. This made a large 
bulky catalogue the greater part of which was of little 
interest to the prospective student. The students of 
the college feel grateful to the committee in charge for 
the change and also for issuing the report earlier than 
formally. 

It is a neat pamplet of 64 pages with dark gray 
covers upon which is stamped the state seal. The 
type is large and clear and is well spaced. The fol- 
lowing is a brief summary of the contents ; calendar, 
origin, object and location of the college, the corpora- 
tion, board of overseers, faculty, committees of the 



faculty, requirements for admission, time, place and 
order of examinations, admission on certificate, admis- 
sion to advanced standing, courses of instruction. 
These are much the same as last year. The course 
in Geology has been broadened but there has been one 
change made which we are very sorry to see, in the 
mathematical department the course in lands capeen- 
gineering has been dropped. If the trustees knew how 
popular this course really was they would have acted 
differently for the last fall no less than seven seniors 
desired to take this course. But nevertheless it will 
lighten the heavy load on the shoulders of the senior 
mathematical professor. Next follows a synopsis of the 
courses of instruction, courses for the degress of 
master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, winter 
courses, special courses for women, equipment of the 
several departments, general information in regard to 
dormitories, expenses, the labor fund, self help, religious 
services, scholarships. There follows a list of the prizes 
offered and the award of prizes last year, the degrees 
conferred in 1901, the enrollment of students which 
amounts to one hundred and seventy-eight, the index. 
On the whole it is very satisfactory and much credit 
is due to the committee of the faculty. Professor 
Walker. Babson, Ostrander and Lull, which had the 
matter in charge. 



THE FORENSIC CLUB. 

One great need of our college has been, at least 
partially, met. The need of more social life, two 
years ago. was causing a great deal of discussion. 
The ladles of the Faculty, in co-operation with the 
fraternity conference, have taken this in hand and have 
done much to remedy this matter. 

There is another need in our college life which is 
growing more and more apparent. Last year a Foren- 
sic club was started. Officers were elected, a con- 
stitution was drawn up. and several debates were held, 
but. for some reason. It finally fell through. This 
year. It has not yet revived again. Most of the old 
officers are gone, and the whole thing seems entirely 
forgotten. 

We now send out baseball and football teams which 
compete successfully with all the larger colleges in 
New England, except Harvard and Yale. We have 
organized a basketball team in the hope that, in a few 



years at least, that branch of our athletics will also 
prove a success. 

But is it in athletics alone that we are going to try 
and prove our strength ? Certainly there is material 
in our college from which we could develop a good 
debating team. We should show people that we have 
a mental as well as a physical side. 

It is probable that we would not be successful in a 
debate with a strong team now, but we can develop 
ourselves along these lines by keeping alive the Foren- 
sic club. 

The objection cannot be raised to this that it will 
take a lot of money and that a new tax will have to 
be levied on the students. In this respect, it is 
entirely different from going into some new branch of 
athletics. It need cost but very little. It is simply a 
case of a little interest and a little work. 

It is not alone that we should keep up with other 
colleges in this matter We. as college men, should 
be thoroughly trained to think and speak while stand- 
ing. And there are many other benefits to be derived 
which need not be mentioned here. Our fraternities, 
it is greatly to be feared, are not doing what they 
might. Without the Forensic club, we find ourselves 
practically without any forensic training whatever. 
Let us revive this club. and. not oniy revive it. but 
make more of it than heretofore. 



Colleg? JSIot?s- 



— Basket Ball. 

— Banquet Friday night. 

— Brattalion encampment ? 

— It is rumored that President Goodell will be unable 
to attend the Banquet Friday night. 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey mourns the lost of his father, 
who died in Marblehead Friday. Jan. 3. 

— Myron West '03 has been elected a member of 
the Senate in the place of R. H. Robertson, resigned. 

— Electrician Wallace will soon put another arc 
light In the Drill Hall for the benefit of the basket ball 
team. 

— A bill providing for an appropriation of $90,000 
for the use of this college has been introduced In the 
legislator. 



68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



69 




— The ladies of the Faculty will hold the first of a 
series of three socials in the chapel on Friday evening 
Feb 28. All students are invited. 

The gun shed is being thoroughly overhalled. 

Already a new floor has been laid and the plumbers 
are working on the heating apparatus. 

The Freshmen class have at last received their 

class sweaters. They are made with a blue body and 
white neck and wristbands. They are very handsome. 
— R. !. Smith "01 of the Horticultural department 
has been appointed assistant entomologist at the Mary- 
land Experiment Station. Mr. Smith started on his 
new career Jan. 2. 

An order has been issued by Captain Anderson 

stating that hereafter the drill hall is to be closed at 10 
o'clock every night unless special arrangments are 
made to keep it open after that hour. 

The annual banquet of the M. A. C. Alumni 

Association of Massachusetts was held in Boston last 
Thursday evening. Pres. H. H. Goodell, Prof. R. E. 
Smith. Prof. W. P. Brook and Dr. C. Wellington 
were present. 

In some unaccountable manner the score of the 

Massachusetts viz Northampton Y. M. C. A. basket 
ball game was reported In many of the local papers as 
being 14-10. This is a mistake the correct score was 
Massachusetts 26. Northampton 13. 

—At a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture 
the following appointments to the board were made : 
Dr. C. A. Goessmann, chemist; Prof. C. H. Fernald, 
entomologist; Prof. S. T. Maynard. Botanist and 
pomologist; Dr. J. B. Paige, veterenarian. 

Pres. H. H. Goodell has been in Washington the 

past two weeks attending hearings given by the house 
committees on mines on the bill to establish schools 
of mining in connection with the land grant colleges. 
It seems very probable that the bill will pass. 

The date of the Junior Prom, has been changed 

from Feb. 14 to Thursday. Feb, 7. The cadets will 
not appear in uniform. E. G. Proulx '03 has charge of 
the hacks and anyone desiring a carriage that evening 
or the next day should notify Mr. Proulx at once. 

The first annual catalogue of the college to be pub- 
lished under a seperate cover is now being distributed. 
The book is very tastely arranged and reflects great 



credit on the committee of the faculty. The commit- 
tee was Prof. C. S. Walker, Herman Babson, J. E. 
Ostrander and R. S. Lull. 

The football committee have decided to celebrate 

the season by giving the team a banquet. The banquet 
will be held in the Drill Hall Friday evening. Jan. 24. 
at 8 o'clock. Dr. C. Wellington is to be toastmaster 
and toast are to be offered by men from Hartford, 
New York and Boston, E. W. Reardon will do the 
catering. Invitations have been sent to the faculty and 
alumni and it is expected that over one hundred and 
fifty persons will be present. 

— L. S. Tupper. E. T. Ladd, H. B.Tinkham.F. K. 
Williams. J. H. Ladd, C. S. Holcomb, J. F. Lyman. 
J. H. Hamblin. C. S. Sykes, H. F. Thompson. P. F. 

Williams. H. Filer and F. H. Plumb have joined the 

D. G. K. Fraternity; L. S. Walker. T. F. Hunt, H. 

H. Goodenough, W. B. Hatch, A. D. Taylor, J.J. 

Gardner. U. D. Ingham and E. E. Rhodes the College 

Shakespearean Club ; C.M.Carter, H.H.Crosby. G.E. 

Merrill and G. R. Paige the Q. T. V.; G. W. Patch. 

C. L. Whitaker, W. A. Munson. T. C. Pray. F. L. 

Yeaw, A. U. Swain, W. M. Sears, G. U. Willis. J. C. 

Richardson. F. A. Bartlett, W. A. Smith, R. E. Smith. 

L. A. Ransehausen. A. W. Hall. Jr.. and R. L. Allen 

the *. 2. K. 



/Uhletic N°**S- 



BASKET-BALL. 

Massachusets played her first basket-ball game of 
the season with Northampton Y. M. C. A. on June 
1 1 . The game was played in the drill hall and a 
goodly number saw Massachusetts win. Score 26- 
13. The game was a good one. but would have been 
more interesting If the officials had been a little less 
keen sighted. Ahearn made five of the total of 
eleven baskets thrown during the evening. The score : 
Ahearn. r. f. »■ t- &*** 

Dellea. (c( L f. r - B- Cartwright 

Hall. c. c • Sackeu 

Fulton, r. g. '• '•• Re * an 

McCobb. 1. g. '■ *■• Harris < c > 

Score: Massachuseits 26. Northampton 13. Goals from 
field— Ahearn 5, Carver 2. Dellea. Fulton, McCobb: Cart- 
wright. Goals from fouls— Dellea 2. Harris 2. Carver. Re- 
gan, Sackett. Referee and umpire— Belden and Huntress, 
alternate. Time-keeper— Bodfish. Time— two twenty min- 
ute halves. 



Two interesting games of basket-ball were played 
at the Drill Hall on the night of Jan. 4th. The game 
between the Seniors and Sophomores resulted in a 
score of 15-9 in favor of '04 while '05 won from '03 
by a score of 8-3. The line-up was as follows: 

'02 vs. *04, 



Bodfish. 1. f. 
Dellea. r. f. 
Hall. c. 
Gates. 1. g. 
Belden. 1. g. 



r. g., Quigley 

1. g.. Fulton. Griffin 

c. White 

1. f., Gilbert. Gregg 

1. f.. Ahearn 



Goals from field— Ahearn 4, Gilbert, Dallea, Belden. Bod- 
fish. Score— '04, 15, — '02. 9. 

02 vs. '05. 

Monahan. r. g. |, f.. Hunt 

Tower, 1. g. r. f., Whitaker 

Allen. Franklin, c. , c.. Ladd 

Halligan. 1. f. r. g.. Taylor 

Cook, r. f. I, g.. Ingham 
Goals from field— Ingham, Ladd. Halligan. Goals from 
foul-- Hunt 2. Score, '05. 8— '03. 3. 



"MASSACHUSETTS " 1902 BASKET-BALL 
SCHEDULE. 

Jan. II— Northampton Y. M. C. A.. Drill Hall. Amherst. 

18— Amherst college. Drill Hall 

22-Hartford Y. M. C. A., Drill Hall 
Feb. 1— Open date. 

13 — Amherst. Pratt Gym. 

15— Hartford Y. M. C. A., Hartford. 

20— Trinity. Drill Hall. 

27— Wesleyan. Drill Hall. 
Mar 4 — Brown, Providence. 

5— Fall River Y. M. C. A.. Fall River. 

14— Fitchburg Y. M. C. A., Fitchburg. 

15 — Open date. 



MODIFIED MILK. 

Everyone is familiar with the ordinary method of 
preparing cow's milk for the feeding of infants, but the 
modifying of milk In a laboratory on a scientific bases 
by a physician's prescription is of comparatively recent 
origin. 

A laboratory was established in Boston about 1890 
by G. H. Walker and G. E. Gordon known as the 
Walker Gordon Laboratory Company by the advise and 
assistance of Dr. T. M. Rotch, who found it extremely 
difficult to obtain pure milk and a modification in the 
home because of the following reasons: ordinary milk, 
improperly handled soon developes a growth of bacteria 
hurtful to the infant ; improper modification of cow's 



milk contains too many albuminoids and too little sugar 
while ordinary home modifications become so variable 
that slight changes in formulae could not be depended 
upon; and thirdly overfeeding does not produce the 
best results. 

The Walker Gordon Laboratory Company controls 
everything from the management of the cattle on the 
farm to the leaving of rhe day's supply at the customer's 
door. Their success is chiefly due to cleanliness. 
They do not pasteurize to kill injurious bacteria, but 
believe that by keeping a large proportion of the germs 
out by careful handling of the milk they are In a large 
measure, getting rid of a serious obstacle. 

Each laboratory has its own farm. Only the most 
healthy stock is kept, and those feeds used which will 
produce the purest and most nutritious milk. 

At the laboratory the modifying is done according to 
the formula of the physician prescribing it, and may 
read like this: " Fat, 35% ; Sugar, 65% ; Albuminoids 
1.25%; Alkalinity, 5%. Eight feedings of five ounces 
each." In converting this prescription at the laboratory 
the following solutions would be used ; a definite per- 
centage of cream accurately tested, skim milk with 
but a trace of fat, a twenty percent solution of sugar 
of milk, a satuated lime water solution, and distilled 
water. Different amounts are used to satisfy the pre- 
scription. The whole Is then thoroughly mixed, put 
into nursing bottles — a separate feeding in each — and 
stoppered with nonabsorbent cotton. The milk is then 
delivered. 

The purity and keepingquaiity of the Walter Gordon 
milk is such that it is possible to send it in refrigerator 
boxes across the continent and to Europe ; it still 
remaining perfectly sweet. 

The Walker Gordon Laboratories are now established 
in ail the principal cities and are of great convenience 
to the travelling public. 



Alu 



mm. 



A cordial invitation is extended to every Massachu- 
setts alumnus to be present at a banquet given as a eel- 
ebration of the football season, in the Drill Hall Friday 
evening, Jan. 24, 1902. 

73.— D. P. Penhallow of McGill University has 
been elected one of the vice-presidents of the American 
Society of Naturalists. 



70 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



7* 






78.— Charles Francis Coburn died Thursday Dec. | '99.— Samuel E. Smith is taking a dairy course at 
26, at Lowell, after an illness of over a year. Mr. this college. 

Coburn was city treasurer of Lowell for four years and 'oo. — Mr. and Mrs. Abel Gilbert of this town 
previously had been attached to the Daily Citizen and ! announce the marriage engagement of their daughter, 
also was for fourteen years clerk of the Five Cent! Miss M. Ethel Gilbert to James W. Kellogg. 
Savings Bank of that city. He leaves a wife and three 
sons. 



'91. — Henry J. Field of Greenfield, has recently 
been appointed by Governor Crane as associate justice. 
After graduating from this institution Mr. Field took a 
course in history and sciences in Cornell University 
and a two years course at the Cornell Law School. 
He was graduated in 1896 and was admitted to prac- 
tice the same ye^r. Sines entering the bar Mr. 
Field has practiced at Greenfield where he has since 
held the position of register for Franklin county under 
the United States bankruptcy law. He has also fo 
the past four years been secretary of the Franklin 
County Agricultural Society and is secretary of the 
Greenfield Republican town committee. 

Ex-"92.— F. G. Baldus recently spent a short time 
at the college while on his way to Chicago in the 
interests of the Singer Sewing Machine Co. 

'94. — Arthur H. Cutler. M. D.. is at present prac- 
ticing at Lawrence, Mass. 

'95. — E. C. Howard is principal of a Grammar 
school in Northampton. 

•95. — George A. Billings is acting as instructor in 
the dairy school connected with the " short course " 

of this college. 

'95. — D. C. Potter. Middletown. Conn. 

'95.— F. C. Tobey. Stockbridge. 

'95.— H. S. Fairbanks. "The Gladstone." Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

'96. — F. B. Shaw, son of Charles L. Shaw of 
South Amherst, was married to Miss Josie Belle 
Harris, by the Rev. B. W. Hamilton at Boston Dec. 

11. 1901. 

•98. W. S. Fisher has been appointed principal of 

the Grammar school in Southwick. 

'98. J. S. Eaton Is studying law at the University 

of New York. 

•99. Melvin H. Pingree was married to Miss 

Annie J. Lentell, at 6 p. m.. Dec. 31. 190). at the 
home of the bride's parents. Rev. and Mrs. J. V. 
Lentell on South Pleasant St.. Amherst. 



'00. — A. M. West has been appointed assistant in 
the ornithological department in Washington, D. C. 

'00. — J. B. Landers is at present in charge of his 
father's farm in Bondsville. 

'01. — R. 1. Smith has accepted the position of 
assistant n the entomological department at the Mary- 
land state college. 

01. — J. C. Barry is in the employ of the General 
Electrical Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

"01. — L. A. Root has purchased and is operating a 
.milk route at Northampton. 
^^*01. — E. S. Gamwell and E. L. Macomber have 
entered the employ of the Stanley Electric Co. at 
Pittsfield. 

'01. — W. A. Dawson spent a few days at college 
before the holidays. 

'01. — Charles Lesley is studying medicine at the 
P. & S. Columbia University. 

'01. — C. L. Rice recently visited his college friends. 
He will enter the employ of the Western Electric Co. 
of New York city. 

'01. — George R. Bridgeforth is at the head of the 
department of Agriculture at the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, Normal, Ala. 

'01. — Thaddeus Graves visited college a few days 
since. 



Dep&rtmtrvf JMot?s. 



HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Maynard has had three calls for horticul- 
tural ists. 

R. I. Smith has left for Maryland to become as- 
sistant entomologist at the Maryland Experiment 

Station. 

Thirteen men in the short course are taking horti- 
culture. 

HAT3H EXPERIMENT STATION. 
Dr. Goessman is able to resume his lectures to the 
senior class in Chemistry at the Hatch Experiment 
Station. 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS, 

DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAl'KUS. 

SCALES, ANGLES, CURVES ami T SQUARES, 

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to the FARM 



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modern way. 

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under the direct charge of Wm. P. 
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We sell for caah anil on installment-. We rent, exchange anil repair writing machine*. Suppll.H of all kind* 

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178 Devonshire St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 






7* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



LIBRARY. 

A new set of Shakespeare's plays have just been 
put in the Library. The set consists of thirteen vol- 
umes, each volume contains on an average of five 
hundred pages. The meaning of all the difficult 
words is given together with its history and formation. 
At the end of each play the date of composition is 
given according to the various historians, the source 
of the plot is also given together with criticisms on 
the play and on the principal characters. In •' The 
Tempest " will be found Dryden's version of the play. 

A large number of J ohn Fiske's works have lateiy 
been put in the Library, among which are : The Amer- 
ican Revolution. (2 vols ), The Dutch and Quaker Colo- 
nies in America. (2 vols.). Old Virginia and her Neigh- 
bors, (2 vols.), The Mississippi Valley in the Civil War, 
A Century of Science and other essays. The Unseen 
World and other essays. Danvinism and other essays. 
The Idea of God as Affected by Modern Knowledge. 
Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy (2 vols.), Excursions of 
an Evolutionist. Myths anJ Myth-makers. These books 
are all bound alike and all have gilt tops. 

History of Ma rshfield by L y sa n d e r S 1 1 n j n Rich 
ards. Sometime ago President Goodeil asked Mr. 
Richards to procure for him the " History of Marsh- 
field" for this college ; on enquiry Mr. Richards found 
there was no published " History of Marshfield." 
The thought immediately came to him. that in view 
of the prominence of Marshfield in the history of our 
country, in the days of the Pilgrims and of the Revo- 
lution, there should be at once such a history written 
to preserve in a general and concise form the events 
and occurrences in the development of this Colonial 
town for the use and enlightenment of future genera- 
tions. Mr. Richards immediately set to work to write 
one and has produced a very interesting book. 
The Human Boy by Eden Phillpotts. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



< lnii hikI College I'lns mnl Kill « - 
(iold Hint Silver Medals. 
Diamond*, Wntchea, Jewelry. 



IT IS PROPER TO STEAL 

A few moments to spend in Johnson's when- 
ever in Springfield. The Jiifj Book Store is 
alwayB attractive. 




HENRY R. JOHNSON, 

BOOKS, ART, STATIONERY 



J818 815 Mslfl St.. - Springfield, Ma»s. 



1*. S. Send your nfdSM for sard niKraviiiK hen-. 



KEISER 

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Aofe labtl. 



Keiser- 

Barathea 

Cravattings 



are not satin nor twill, but a 
peculiar weave of silk better 
than either. 

Ask Your Haberdasher. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 

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HUNTING! CLOTHING. 

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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 5. 1902 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbob Signal, Amhbrst, Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902. Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN. 1902. Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN. 1 903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902, Interco'leglate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, I 903, Alumni Notes 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1 9)4. 



Term*: fl.00 per year in advance. Single Copies), 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 2Bc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club. 
Reading-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West, Pres. Athletic Association. 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index. 

J. C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec 
V. A. Gates, Manager- 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 

H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered Nov. 9, 1901, as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst, Mass., Act of Congress of March 3. 1879. 



Edi-tb rials. 



We take great pleasure in announcing the gift to 
the college of the beautiful flag used in the deco- 
tions at our football celebration the other night. It is 
a gift which we have long needed and which we know 
will be heartily appreciated by every friend of the col- 
lege. We desire to thank tor his thoughtful generos- 
ity the donor, Mr. T. W. Harrington of Amherst. 



burdened with their o*m work. The only wonder Is 
that they did it as well as they did. For this reason 
alone. It should also be stated, the college paper was 
unrepresented at the Boston Alumni Banquet for the 
first time in years. 



Considerable criticism has been provoked among 
our subscribers by the poor appearance of the last 
issue of the Signal. We are forced to admit that in 
great measure they were justified, and we hope that 
succeeding numbers will be more creditable. In view 
of the unusual circumstances however under which 
the board labored perhaps there was some justification. 
Just as the material was about to be collected, the 
editor-in-chief was summoned home by the death of 
his mother, necessitating his absence from college the 
entire week of publication. His duties were thus sud- 
denly thrust upon inexperienced men already over- 



It seems almost superfluous to call attention again 
to our urgent need of a good stirring college song. 
To anyone who has attended the banquet to the football 
team, the basketball games or Indeed any college 
gathering it Is certainly unnecessary to speak. Some 
time ago the College Senate appointed a committee 
to take the matter In charge. They have done what 
they could and met with fair success. It has been 
thought best however to provide some special stimulus. 
The College Signal therefore offers a cash prize of 
five dollars for the best college song, either words or 
music or both. The judges will consist mainly of 
members of the faculty. The time limit set is March 
I, and all material must be in the hands of the chair- 
man of the committee, Mr. R. W. Morse, '02, by that 
time. Students, alumni, members of the faculty and 



74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



75 




outside parties are alike elegible to compete. The 
only restriction is that all songs will remain the prop- 
erty of the committee. Let us have a lively compe- 
tition and some good up-to-date songs. 



The predictions made at the opening of the basket- 
ball season seem to be verified by the progress of 
the team. It was pointed out at that time that we 
could not excect to produce a championship team in 
a single season. Mere lack of experience, when 
coupled with the late start and a schedule arranged 
under difficulties was something which could not be 
easily overcome. None the less, we think the team 
has so far done fairly well. Its three victories were 
well-harned. the score in the Amherst game was the 
smallest that any team has mad* against her this 
season, and even in the Chicopee game our men at 
least held their own in the second half. In only one 
respect would we venture to criticize. There need be 
no reason for complaint at the poor physical condition 
of the team which more than once has been evident. 
The time has gone by. if indeed it ever existed when 
games could be won on luck and haphazard individual 
playing alone. Training and team-work are what will 
count, and unless our men recognize this fact we fear 
they will be handicapped very seriously. The attend- 
ance at the games has been reasonably good, and the 
interest manifested by the college in its team is all that 
could be desired. 



been somewhat disappointed at the showing thus far. 
and unless our alumni take a vigorous brace we fear 
Prof Smith will be equally disappointed next spring. 
To facilitate matters we will make this definite offer : 
of all money received for subscriptions before 
March 10. one-half will be given to the athletic asso- 
ciation. Help us that we may help our teams. 



Some time ago we published a statement in these 
columns offering to donate as much as we were able 
of the profits of the College Signal to the athletic 
fund. We did this because we thought that with such 
a policy Inaugurated managers would have something 
to work for each year and consequently take greater 
interest. Then too. we concluded that there was no 
reason why the paper If run on its present basis should 
not pay a reasonable profit annually which would be 
quite a help to athletics. We desire to remind our 
subscribers however that this is purely an experiment 
and that the measure of our success will depend 
entirely on the promptness with which they settle their 
subscriptions. It certainly seems as though everyone 
with a chance to not only pay an honest debt but to 
help the football team as well should make a special 
effort in our behalf. Yet we confess that we have 



In the heat of the controversy which has been rag- 
ing concerning the abolition of the term " Aggie " we 
have refrained from criticising the increasing use 
around college of the expression -Massachusetts 
State College." We have been silent however not 
because of a silent approval, but because we felt that 
one question should be settled as far as possible before 
another was brought up. The abolition of -Aggie 
! however is already as far as the public press is con- 
cerned practically an assured fact. And we now pro- 
pose to declare ourselves in regard to a practice nearly 
If not quite as injurious. We have been sorry to 
note how prevalent the custom has grown. From the 
occasional use of former years it has spread like wild- 
fire till at the present time what do we find? That 
the'great majority of the college pins bear the words 
- Mass. State College ;" that It is almost Impossible 
to secure college stationery bearing any other title ; 
that the official paper of every college organization 
except the College Signal bears that heading ; tha t 
the Basketball Manager recently attempted to register 
the college team with the Amateur Athletic Union 
under that name ; that the class of 1901 at gradua- 
tion printed its programs under that name and even 
placed by its class tree a stone bearing the letters 
-MS C"; and perhaps more significant of all that 
notices posted on the public bulletin board bearing the 
official name of this college are mutilated and altered 
so that the word - Agricultural" is replaced by the 
word " State." To this practice we declare ourselves 
firmly and irrevocably opposed. 

We object to the use of the expression - Massachu- 
setts State College " or its equivalent " M. S. C." on 
precisely the same grounds that we have objected to 
the word - Aggie " viz because it is not the name of 
the college. Whatever we may think of the wisdom 
of the official title, no matter how much or how 
soon we would like to see it changed, the fact 
remains that the name of this college Is the Massa 



chusetts Agricultural College, and must be used as 
such until changed by act of the Legislature of the 
State. Under these circumstances, the term ■■ Mas- 
sachusetts State College " is merely a nickname, and 
a decidedly misleading one at that. We challenge 
any fair-minded person to find a single argument in its 
favor without thereby convicting himself of disloyalty 
to the college. Its use spreads Invariably from that 
false gentility which cannot call a spade a spade, but 
but must speak of it as a •• useful Implement employed 
for agricultural purposes."' We believe it is the use 
of this term and not the discontinuance of a word so 
full of faults as " Aggie " that has created the right- 
eous Indignation of our alumni. 

In view of its manifest intention to deceive we can- 
not understand why its use In places demanding the 
official title is tolerated for an instant by the Faculty. 
Nor how the Alumni Athletic Committee can sanction 
the schedule of a team sailing under the name, or the 
advisory board approve without an objection the records 
of the " Mass. State College Boarding Club." We 
congratulate Prof. Smith most heartily for his attitude 
on the registration of the Basketball team. Likewise 
the Junior Prom, committee for their sensible decis- 
ion as to invitations and programs. 

But It may be asked, must we always use the long, 
cumbersome official name ? By no means. Only 
let us be sure to use it In the right place and often 
enough so that there shall be no possible chance of 
ambiguity. It has been one of the misfortunes of this 
college to be better supplied with nicknames than 
with students. We have been -Aggie." -Amherst 
Aggie." - Massachusetts Aggie." " Amherst Agricul- 
tural," " M. A. C." - M. S. C" - Mass. State." 
•• Massachusetts " and even - Amherst State College." 
Is It any wonder the college is not more widely 
known? We still have left to us - Mass. Agricul- 
tural." "Massachusetts" and " M. A. C." What 
possible argument can there be for any more ? 



A NEW PARLOR GAME FOR THE CHILDREN. 

I was sluing in my room the other night, studying 
the easiest way of attending my next day's recitations 
without reciting, when I heard a terrible racket com- 
ing from somewhere below me. At first I tnought 
that perhaps one of the Freshmen was rehearsing an 



oration ; but the sounds becoming louder. 1 could dis- 
tinguish a number of voices raised in demoniac laugh- 
ter that made my hair feel like the quills of angry 
porcupine. Mingled with these wild outbursts, there 
came every few seconds, a crash which I could only 
account for by remembering that the bass-d-ummer 
of the Massachusetts Band roomed in the direction 
from which the sound seemed to come. The din. 
getting louder and more unexplainable. I concluded 
after due thought to investigate. It may take some 
time to arouse me. but if 1 am once started, it re- 
quires at least one Sophomore to arrest my headlong 
career. Having therefore, come to this conclusion I 
became somewhat excited, and putting on an over- 
coat over my bathrobe — hind side before— 1 made a 
rush for the stairway. In my hurry. I tripped over the 
bath-robe and took a - Brodie " down three flights, 
landing on the tar walk out doors, in a slightly dazed 
condition. Making a grab at my scattered senses, I 
regained enough of them to enable me to investigate 
the extent of my injuries, and found that both my 
limbs, as well as a number of ribs were fractured. I 
did not stop to count how many of the latter were 
broken, for as I was in somewhat of a hurry, I Imme- 
diately - worked the ' Christian Science ' act, and 
again listened for the sounds which had roused me a 
few moments before. 

It did not take long to find the room from which 
the noise proceeded ; and. tearing upstairs, I found 
myself, together with two or three hundred others, 
gazing at a curious sight. On a corner-seat near the 
fireplace, was piled a heterogeneous mass of squirm- 
ing arms and legs, disputing by means of sundry kicks 
and punches, for the possession of this desirable rest 
for overwearied brains. In the interests of law and 
order, of course I Immediately proceeded to separate 
combatants. That is I proceeded to try and separate 
the combatants ; for. by a peculiar combination of cir- 
cumstances which I have now forgotten. I only suc- 
ceeded in separating for a time my mental and my 
bodily accomplishments. I don't remember whether 
I struck the ceiling and then bounded to the floor, or 
hit the floor first and bounded to the ceiling. I do not 
know ; however, from the fact that a few hours later I 
combed about equal amounts of wall-paper, plastering, 
and carpet from my hair, that I gave some attention 
to both. 



7« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



77 






One of the audience dragged me to my feet and. 
telling me that the arms and legs were only playing a 
quiet game of " Pig Pile." he succeeded in dissuad- 
ing me from taking any further part In the combat. 
By standing on a table, which with the rest of the fur 
niture, had been pushed to one corner of the room, 1 
was enabled to get a good view of the manner of play- 
ing this interesting and instructive game which 1 will 
describe for the benefit of any of my readers who are 
desirous of seeing the interior arrangements of Pratt 
Hospital. 

By the time I had climbed to the top of the table, 
about one half the players were gathered in one cor- 
ner of the room, while those who remained on the 
seat seemed to be preparing for another rush. This 
soon came ; for a pair of arms and legs, upon which I 
was surprised to see the head and body of a Junior 
who has been getting excused from drill a great deal 
of late, suddenly made a rush, and hurled himself 
on the pile in the corner. They were immediately 
thrown violently upward and backward by another pair 
of legs and after describing several geometrical figures 
in the air. they landed on the floor with one of those 
crashes which I had thought to be the musical sounds 
of the bass-drum. The owner would have gotten off 
without further mishap but for an impudent Freshman 
who, making a rush in his turn, entangled his feet in 
the carpet and placed the top of his head exactly in 
the middle of the unlucky Junior's supper. The rest 
of the attacking party, tearing to the rescue, tumbled 
over this obstruction ; and the attack was discontinued 
until the Junior, the Freshman, and the carpet 
could be disentangled. The game, varied by changes 
In the occupants of the corner-seat, went on for 
some time, and wagers were freely exchanged, as 
to whether the ceiling, floor or seat would hold out 
the longest. 

Luckily for all three perhaps, the •• Pigs " at last 
became tired of the monotony of the game, and one 
of them suggested a new one in which each man was 
to jump off the tower of South College, the winner to 
be he who broke the fewest bones in the descent. 
My studying being still unfinished I left them arguing 
the question ; and retired feeling well repaid for the 
loss of my overcoat which had been cut into a whole 
suit of clothes during the process of my investiga- 
tions. 



FOOTBALL BANQUET. 

On Friday evening Jan. 24, the first annual foot- 
ball banquet was held In the Drill hall. The hall was 
decorated with streamers of red. white and blue bunt- 
ing. The table for the football team occupied the 
center of the hall. Over this was a long piece of maroon 
bunting with " 1 90 1 " and "Team". In each side in white. 
Suspended from this was a college banner and below 
the banner a football decorated In maroon and white. 
From the top banner maroon and white streamers 
came down to each plate. At the further end of the 
hall was a stage erected for the band. This was deco- 
rated with bunting and potted plants while in the back- 
ground was a large American flag. The menus were 
bound in illuminated covers making a handsome 
souvenir. The names of the football teams and 
officers was printed also the last season's schedule of 
games with the scores. At about half past eight 
prayer was offered by Dr. Walker and the banquet 
convened. Plates were set for one hundred and fifty. 
The undergraduates sat by classes. The band kept 
together while the alumni and faculty also had separate 
tables. Between the course there was singing of the 
popular and college songs by the student body and Dr. 
Wellington read some letters from absent alumni. 
Dr. Wellington filled the position of toast master 
admirably, entertaining those present with his good 
humor and interesting stories. At about eleven 
o'clock the following toasts were given : Capt. Paul, 
" Third Down and Five to gain." He gave a review 
of the season, spoke words of praise for acting Capt. 
O'Hearn and the team, and also of the prospects for a 
good team next year. He ended by calling for the 
college yell for the team. V. A. Gates was the next 
speaker. •• The Man at the Helm." He likened Capt, 
Paul to the captain of a ship. The next speaker was 
Dr. Paige. "The Doctor." He touched on the 
increasing popularity of athletics in the college and 
also emphasized the fact that it was the duty of every 
man in college to come out and support the team. 
P. W. Brooks. •• What's Coming." He spoke on the 
prospects for another season and gave the schedule of 
games for next season. He recommended several 
improvements: namely the purchasing of a tackling 
dummy and the addition of lockers to the training quar- 
ters. He also made an appeal in behalf of those 
| athletic men who were obliged to work their way 



through college and thought there might be some way 
provided whereby they could procure work. Prof. H. 
Babson had for his subject •'System." He said he 
thought we owed our success largely to the systematic 
work of the team and wished them succsss in years 
to come. Prof . W. P. Brooks in " Athletics the Sport not 
the Results." had his usual store of interesting 
stories. L. C. Clafin. " Massachusetts versus Penn- 
sylvania." remarked that he felt proud to attend 
a college that could turn out such a good team. S. 
F. Howard's part was " What Might be Done." He 
spoke on what could be done to Increase college spirit. 
He thought the fraternities might do more in the line 
of music and thereby increase college spirit and 
enthusiasm. C.P.Halllgan.had" What must be Done." 
Captain Halligan spoke of the prospects for another 
season and urged upon the students, the fact that they 
should all strive to induce athletes to enter the college 
so that the team would not be se badly crippled after 
a hard game. The last toast was by Prof. R.E.Smith. 
■ All's well that ends well." He said the end had not 
come yet and concluded by reading a letter from 
Coach Jennings in which he stated that he would 
coach the team next season. Upon receiving the 
news the student body went wild with excitement and 
gave the yell for Coach Jennings. 

During the evening the Glee club and band ren- 
dered several selections. A call was made for Chef 
Reardon and he responded with a speech and thanked 
the fellows for their co-operation concluding by promis- 
ing that he would do all that he could for the team In 
the future. Great praise is due Mr. Reardon for the 
way in which he catered. At about two o'clock the 
company disbanded. y 

M. A. C. ALUMNI ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

On January 9th. the subscribers to an agreement 
of association met at the office of H. M. McCloud in 
Amherst and organized. By-laws were read and 
adopted and the following officers were unanimously 
elected : 

President. Prof. William P. Brooks. 
Vice-President, Dr. James B. Paige. 
Treasurer. Mr. Charles L. Flint. 
Clerk. Mr. S. Francis Howard. 
Directors, R. E. Smith. '94. Dr. G. E. Stone. '86. J. 
E. Deuel. '92. 



The following portions of the by-laws will doubtless 
be of interest to the readers of the College Signal. 

" This corporation shall be known as the ' M. A. C. 
Alumni Athletic Association.' " " The purpose for 
which this corporation is constituted shall be the 
advancement of athletics, the physical training and 
education of students at the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, and to promote a closer fellowship 
among students and alumni." 

" This corporation shall consist of all persons owning 
one or more shares of its capital stock " (which " is 
$15,000 and the par value of its shares Is ten dollars.") 

•• The shares in the capital stock of this corporation 
may be sold only to graduates of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College and to former students whose 
classes have been graduated." 

•• The ownership of shares in this corporation shall 
not be transferable either by sale, inheritance, or gift 
save to such persons as are designated " (above). 

•• This corporation shall hold its annual meeting on 
the fourth Thursday in September of each year in the 
town of Amherst." 

" The presence of at least seven members of the 
corporation representing not less than one hundred 
shares of its capital stock is required to constitute a 
quorum." 

•• All matters arising in any meeting." (except with 
reference to change of or addition to the by-laws 
which require a two-thirds vote) •• shall be determined 
by a majority vote of the shares represented in said 
meeting. 

CHEMICAL CLUB. 

The last meeting of the Chemical Club was held 
Monday evening Jan. 27. in the chemical lecture 
room. The attendance was not quite up to the aver- 
age, and certainly not as large as the excellence of 
the program deserved. It was voted to hold meetings 
In the future on alternate Monday evenings, and to 
change the time from 7.30 p. m. to 7.00 p. m In the 
absence of the president and secretary. Prof. S. F. 
Howard presided and H. L. Knight acted as secretary 

pro tern. 

The speaker of the evening was Mr. D. L. Cleaves, 
who spoke very entertainingly of the " Electrolysis of 
Brine." by the Carmichael cell. The process consists 
of passing an electric current through a saturated solu- 



7» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



79 



lion of sodium chloride, thereby decomposing it into 
metalic sodium and chlorine gas. The chlorine 
is drawn off and applied either directly for bleaching 
or mixed with lime to form bleaching powder and 
used in that form. The sodium immediately attacks 
the water in the solution, decomposing it into sodium 
hydroxide and hydrogen gas. These products would 
attack the chlorine and so neutralize the action of the 
current but for a porous diaphragm which separates 
the positive and negative electrodes, thereby prevent- 
ing a mixture of the products. The caustic soda is 
obtained in dilute solution and is applied in paper man- 
ufacture. The hydrogen may be used for heating and 
lighting the laboratory connected with the works. The 
main product is the chlorine, the caustic soda and 
hydrogen being produced more cheaply in other 
ways, and therefore regarded as byproducts. The 
manufacture of chloride by this means is said to be 

profitable. 

The Carmlchael process originated in England, and 
has not been very extensively used in this country. 
The chief works in America arc located as adjuncts of 
paper mills In Lawrence. Mass.. and at the Cumber- 
land Mills in Maine- The plant is very expensive to 
equip.usually costing about $100,000. and Is profitable 
only where there is abundance of water-power to pro- 
duce the electricity cheaply. 

The thanks of the meeting were voted Mr. Cleaves 
for his Interesting talk. A social hour followed. The 
next meeting will take place Monday evening. Feb. 
7th. at 7 o'clock, when some instructive papers will be 
presented. 



rarely seen or 

The report of 

the amount of 

officers which 



THE BOSTON ALUMNI MEETING. 

Eighty alumni and former students were present at 
the annual banquet last Thursday evening in the 
Quincy House in Boston. 

The officers of the M. A. C. A. C. M. had made 
an unusual effort not only to provide a tempting feast 
but they had put themselves to considerable pains and 
expense in urging the men of our college to attend. 
From six o'clock until twelve the program was entered 
into with as much enthusiasm as ever marked the 
progress of a college gathering. 

After cordial greetings and a short business session 
the attractive menu containing several unusual delica- 
cies was enjoyed. Through the generosity of Presi- 



dent Bunker the rare treat of listening to the fine 
singing of Boston's Mendelsohn Quartette Club both 
during and after the feast was accorded the banquet- 
ers, and because of his untiring efforts, also, the faces 
and voices of many of the old boys 
heard on such occasions were there. 
Mr. Davis. '89. the clerk, revealed 
labor and expense on the part of the 
the securing of such a success means, and credit is 
also due to Mr. Mackintosh. '86, Treasurer, and the 
Directors. Messrs. May. '82. Flint. '87. and Cutler. 
'94. An ovation was given to President Goodell as 
he rose to greet the boys. 

President Goodell began by saying that of the 
1300 persons at the college since it started, he could 
tell where 1 100 of them are to-day. and all of them 
are holding good and honorable positions. In speak- 
ing of the finances and needs of the college, he said 
that the institution needed professors of geology, of 
instruction in forestry and of landscape-gardening. In 
the bill they have again introduced into the Legisla- 
ture this year, provisions are made that not only shall 
mines and mining be taught, but there shall also be 
taught forestry, agricultural engineering and irrigation, 
and roads and road-making. It also provides for the 
teaching of physics, mathematics and the higher 
mathematics. President Goodell said that a bill was 
also before the Legislature asking for a sum of 
$50,000 to build and equip a first-class boarding- 
house. The sum of $1000 is also asked for its main- 
tenance. The present accommodations in this 
respect, he said, were not worthy of the state. This 
bill also asked for $35,000 to establish and maintain a 
heating plant for those buildings west of the college. 

Secretary Frank A. Hill performs a distinct and 
highly appreciated service to the State as well as to 
the M. A. C. by his frequent talks at these Boston 
alumni dinners. The fact often alluded to by Mr. 
Hill, that he represents a domain of educational work 
somewhat remote from the courses of applied science 
of M. A. C. students, in so far as it is a fact, enhances 
rather than diminishes the pleasure and importance of 
hearing him on these occasions. Last Thersday 
evening Mr. Hill spoke on some reforms in peda- 
gogical practice brought about by recent psycho- 
logical Investigations. 

Senator Morse In his usual happy manner, and 



Judge Holmes, 72. with his rich and genial humor 
expounded the glories of agriculture from the farmer's 
and the layman's points of view. Mr. George H. Ellis, 
from the trustees' point of view, clearly and satisfac- 
torily indicated to the alumni their function and their 
duty in the conduct of the college. Mr. Gideon H. 
Allen. 71. of the victorious Ingleside crew, whose 
shell now ornaments the Drill Hall at the college, was 
a welcome speaker after many years of absence. 
Professor Brocks spoke on the Athletic Field and 
Professor Maynard on the Horticultural Department. 

Trustees Secretary J. W. Stockwell, Mr. N. I. Bow- 
ditch, and Mr. W. H. Bowker were present and letters 
of regret were read from Governor Crane, Dr. Goess- 
mann, Dr. Lindsay. '83, Trustee William Wheeler. 
71. Dr. J. E. Root. 75. 

The following officers were elected for the coming 

year: 

President. C. H. Preston, '83. 

Treasurer, R. B. Mackintosh, '86. 

Clerk. F. W. Davis. '89. 

Directors. F. H. Fowler, '87. A. H. Kirkland. '94. 

The alumni are much indebted to the president of 
the club. Dr. Madison Bunker. 75. of Newton, for his 
energy, skill and generosity which made this occasion 
a positive contribution to the growing power of the M. 
A. C. in the educational world. 



HUNTING HORSES. 

Under the interesting subject of " Hunting Horses." 
Prof. Loomis of Amherst College gave a very pleas- 
ing and instructive lecture before the Natural History 
club in the Chapel last Friday night. Prof. Loomis 
was fortunate in being a member of a party of three 
sent out last summer by the Metropolitan Museum of 
New York in search of fossil remains of pre-historlc 
reptiles. The lecture was illustrated by a series of 
lantern slides of the country through which they 
passed, the camps, working grounds, and several show- 
ing the fossils Imbedded In the rock and the develop- 
ment of the horse. 

The party took the Black Hills as their starting 
point with Mr. Thompson as their guide. Their 
camping outfit was as meagre as possible ; consisting 
of three horses and a wagon in which to carry their 
spoils, a cook stove, bedding, and two tents to be used 
only when camping in a place for several days. 



For a short time they explored the Black Hills 
country but, being unsuccessful in finding reptile re- 
mains, they received orders to go southward In search 
of fossil remains of horses. Accordingly they packed 
and travelled thirty mileb a day for several days across 
the plains to the White River Section. Here they 
were joined by Dr. Matthew who had gone on before 
them to look the country over. 

This place was extremely favorable for their work 
on account of the vast rock surface exposed by 
erosion, nevertheless they were doomed to disappoint- 
ment in finding but a few small scattered bones. 
They moved farther south. After traveling two or 
three days and becoming lost, they climbed a ridge 
beyond which they saw lying a country which would 
gladden the heart of any osteologist. With relieved 
minds they descended to this place. Here they were 
not disappointed. The couutry was badly eroded 
and thus large ledges of sandstone were exposed, 
while here and there a mesa rose. This exposure 
was the richest Prof. Loomis had ever had the for- 
tune to strike. The bones were close together and 
often lying bare upon the rock surface. Remains of 
camels, no larger than a sheep and huge turtles were 
found; also an almost perfect skeleton of a horse 
was discovered in one ledge. This specimen had 
but four vertebrae and a few ribs missing. 

As these fossils are always very brittle and will not 
sustain their own weight, they have to be cut out with 
much surrounding stone. To make transportation 
possible, they are then covered with a solution of gum 
arable which afterwards hardens. The gum is then 
covered with tissue paper and the whole covered again 
with a jacket of plaster paris. When ail becomes 
thoroughly hardened the specimen is placed in a box 
and is ready for the wagon or railroad as the case 
may be. The small remains, however, are wrapped 
with bandages of cloth saturated with flour paste. 

Water holes are very good places to find fossil re 
mains in as sick animals, coming thither In quest of 
water, often die. At one such place as this the party 
found enough bones of a rhinoceros to make a skele- 
ton, also bones of primitive tapirs and long-necked 
camels, besides the remains of a turtle measuring 
six feet from front to back. In this spot they re- 
mained for three weeks. 

Here the professor had a map of the world thrown 



8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



8t 






upon the screen, showing the continents as they must 
have been in pre-historic times. They were connected 
more or less, thus allowing the animals to rove from 
one place to another as conditions changed. This 
accounts for the fact that animals which were once 
native to this country are now found only in another. 
Slides were now shown illustrating the development 
of the horse. While there were no native horses in 
this country at the time of its discovery, there is no 
doubt whatever but that North America is the 
ancestral home of the modern horse. Dr. Loomis 
showed how, from a small five-toed animal, no larger 
than a dog or cat, and feeding on succulent food, the 
horse had, as grass developed and the plains became 
hard, developed his teeth for eating grass and his legs 
for running. As the plains were large and hard, and 
the horse had no effective means of defense against 
such animals as the puma, it was only natural for him 
to seek his safety in flight. In order to run easily 
upon the hard plains he had to run on his toes, putting 
more weight upon the middle than upon the other 
four. Thus this middle toe-nail became much harder 
and better developed as time went on, while the 
others tended to dwindle in size through misuse. To- 
day the horse has developed this nail into his hoof and 
but two processes appear as the remains of the two 
toes nearest the middle one. while the callous spots 
higher up on the leg are the remnants of the other 
two outside toes. 

As the modern representatives of the horse family, 
Prof. Loomis showed slides of the wild ass and zebra 
of Africa, the wild horse of the Russian plains and 
the Arabian horse. This last is the very finest 
specimen of horse flesh now living and is noted the 
world over for its beauty and endurance. 

E. A. B. 



Mills, Mrs. Chas. Wellington. Mrs. John Anderson. 

Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck. and Mrs. S. T. Maynard. 

The committee in charge consists of J. C. Hall. 

chairman, and Dr. J. B. Paige. Prof. P. B. Has- 

brouch. C. M. Kinney, L. C. Claflin. C. I. Lewis. 

E. B. Snell. C. S. Tinkham. N. F. Monahan. and 

E. G. Proulx. The programme is as follows : 

1. Waltz, Prom. Waltz, Ellis 

2 Two-Step, Peace Forever, Lucelle 

3. Waltz. The Smugglers of Badayez. Mineonski 

4. Two-Step. White Rats. Pryor 

5. Waltz. The Rounders, Englander 

6. Five-Step. Loving Hearts. Warner 

7. Two-Step. Florodora. Stewart 

8. Waltz. Plasier d' Amour. Caryll 

9. Twc-Step. Fan Tan. Anthony 

10. Waltz. Prayer and Passion, Grimm 

11. Two-Step. Cuban Independence. Heminger 

12. Waltz, Florodora, Stewart 

13. Two-Step. Hottest Ever. Brown 

14. Waltz, Peggy. McCline 

15. Two-Step, Varsity Cirl, Ashton 

16. Waltz. Jolly Friars. Henry 

17. Two-Step. Comedy King. Hirst 

18. Five-Step. Dancing With My Baby. Anthony 

19. Two-Step. Blaze Away. Holzman 

20. Waltz, Helmet of Navarre, Hirst 

21. Two-Step. Barbara Freitchie. Bachmann 

22. Waltz, An Autumn Bird. Lesser 

23. Two-Step. Looney Coons. Hall 

24. Waltz. Medley. Warner 
A full report of the Prom, will appear In the next 

issue of the Signal. 






THE JUNIOR PROM. 

Judging from the elaborate preparations which are 
being made, the 1903 Prom, to be held to-morrow 
bids fair to rank among the most successful in the 
history of the college. The committee has been hard 
at work and the decorations are said to be unusually 
elaborate. The preliminary concert will be given by 
Warner's Orchestral club of Northampton. The 
patronesses will be Mrs. H. H. Goodell. Mrs .G. F. 



Collet N°*«- 



— Junior Prom, to-morrow night. 

—The mid-year exams, close to-day. 

— See the account of the foot-ball banquet In this 
edition. 

— There is a movement on foot to re-establish the 
Forensic club. 

— A return game of basketball will be played with 
Amherst in Pratt gymnasium. Feb. 13th. 

— Quite a number from here attended the dance 
given by Co. I. of Northampton last Friday evening. 

— Capt. Anderson intends to take the Senior class 
on a trip to the Arsenal at Springfield early in Feb- 
uary. 



— All were much disappointed when Pres't Goodell | 
did not attend the reception tendered the foot-ball 
team. 

— The Freshman class are going to give the Jun- 
iors a complimentary banquet some time the last of 
February. 

— Pres't and Mrs. Harris of Amherst College at- 
tended the basket-ball game between Amherst and 
Massachusetts. 

— Jennings, who coached the football team the lat- 
ter part of last season will coach the team the entire 
season next year. 

— G. S. Ladd of Sturbridge, master of the State 
Grange and about twenty of his deputies visited the 
the College last week. 

— R. H. Robertson has resigned from the band 
and has been assigned to Co. A. He feels that he 
needs the physical exercise. 

— The business manager of the College Signal 
has offered a prize of five dollars to the person who 
will compose the best acceptable college song. 

— We are all very sorry to learn of the death of 
Mrs. W. E. Knight, on Jan. 22, mother of H. L. 
Knight, '02. editor-in-chief of the College Signal. 

— The committee on agri:ulture of the Legislature 
recently visited the College to examine the needs of 
the College for a new boarding-house and central 
heating plant. 

— Manager Brooks of the football team has nearly 
completed his schedule for the season of 1902. The 
schedule is a hard one. It will be published in a sub- 
sequent issue of the Signal. 

— The Chemical club held a very interesting ses- 
sion last week. Some very interesting papers were 
presented. The next meeting will be held Monday 
evening, Feb. 10th at 7-00 p. m. 

The Junior class have elected officers for next 
semester as follows: Pres't. E. B. Snell; vice-pres't. 
S. C. Bacon; sec'yandtreas.. G. D. Jones; historian. 
N. F. Monahan; class captain. G. L. Barrus ; serg't- 
at-Arms. W. W. Peebles; physician. Dr. H. C. 
Bowen ; undertaker. H.J. Franklin. 

—The College Senate have passed the following 
rules: No person will be allowed to wear his military 
uniform or any part of his uniform outside of the Col- 



lege grounds, except when going to and from drill or 
when he is authorized to do so by the commandant ; 
no person who has not received a certificate from the 
Athletic Association permitting him to wear an " M " 
shall do so under any condition. 



Athletic No+?$. 



BASKETBALL. 

Amherst, 18; Massachusetts. 12. 

On Jan. 18 the Amherst college basketball team 
defeated Massachusetts In the Drill Hall by a score 
of 18 to 12. A fair attendance was present from 
both colleges and enthusiasm ran high as the result 
of the game was in doubt until the latter part of sec- 
ond half when Wilson threw two goals in quick succes- 
sion making the game sure. 

The game was called at 7-30 and in a short time 
Hall scored an easy goal for Massachusetts but was 
soon followed by Wilson with a goal for Amherst. 
During the rest of the half the goals alternated and at 
the end the score was 10-9 in favor of Massachusetts. 

In the second half Massachusetts seemed to 
weaken and the better physical condition of Amherst 
soon gave her the lead which she maintained through- 
out the game. For Amherst Wilson and Cleeland 
played the best game and Hall and Dellea excelled 
for Massachusetts. Summary : 

AMHERST. MASSACHUSETTS 

Wilson. 1. f. r. g.. Pierce 

Anderson, r. f. r. f.. Dellea 

Cleeland. c. c-. Hall 

Carnell. 1. g. '• '•■ McCobb 

Crawford, r. g.. I- g- Fulton 

Score— Amherst 18. Massachusetts 12. Goals from field- 
Wilson 4, Cleeland. Anderson, Hall 2. Dellea. Coals from 
fouls— Dellea 3. Referee and Umpire— Belden. Massachu- 
setts, and Fields. Amherst, alternated. Scorers— Maynard. 
Amherst, and Paul. Massachusetts. Time— 20 minute halves. 

Massachusetts, 42 ; Ludlow, 15. 
Massachusetts won her second game on Jan. 22. 
by defeating the Ludlow athletics in the Drill Hall by 
a score of 42-15. The team showed much improve- 
ment both in term work and In throwing goals. In 
the first half however the team played as if they were 
in a trance but during the Intermission they woke up 
and started in the second half with new life and suc- 
ceeded in throwing eleven goals. 







82 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



For Ludlow Hyland and Elder played the best game 
and for Massachusetts Quigley and Dellea. Summary: 



MASSACHUSETSS. 

Dellea, r. 1. 
Quigley. 1. f. 
Hall. c. 
McCobb, r. p, 
Fulton, 1. g. 

Score— Massachusetts 42. Ludlow 15 



LUDLOW. 

1. g., Ral Stuart 

r. g.. Ervine 

c. Elder 

1. f.. F. Flynn 

r. {., Hyland 

Coals from field — 



Dellea 2. Quigley 6, Hall 2. McCobb 2. Fulton. Ervine. 
Elder, Flynn. Hyland 2. Referee— Belden of Massachu- 
setts. Umpire— J. Flynn. Scorer— Paul of Massachusetts. 

Chicopee Parish House, 40; Massachusetts, 20. 
On Saturday evening Feb. 1 . Massachusetts was 
defeated by the strong Parish House team by a score 
of 40 to 20. The team work of the Parish House 
was very good while that of our team was exceedingly 
poor. Owing to poor physical condition our men were 
simply outclassed by the Parish House team, though 
showing up fairly well in the second half. Hall played 
the best game for Massachusetts and Minie for 
Chicopee. Summary : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Ahearn, 1. f. 
Dellea. r. (. 
Hall. c. 
Fulton, 1. g. 
McCobb, r. g. 



Parish house. 

r. g.. Wetsel 

1. g., Perry 

c. Bixby 

r. f.. Beasley 

1. f., Minie 



M. C. A.. 17 
Y. M. C. A. 



in 



Massachusetts. 26; Hartford Y 
Massachusetts defeated Hartford 
the Drill Hall Jan. 30, by a score of 26 to 17. The 
general team work of Massachusetts was good and 
our men seemed in better condition than in previous 

games. 

The game was to begin at 8 o'clock but owing to 
the tardiness of the Hartford players the game did not 
begin until nearly 9 o'clock but in the meantime the 
spectators were entertained by a variety of songs from 
the undergraduates. 



Alu 



mm. 



To all Alumni and former students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College : 

The first annual meeting at Hartford of Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College alumni will be held at the 
Allen House, 152 Asylum St.. Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary 2 1st, 1902. at 7-15 p. m. You are invited to be 



present. President Goodell is expected. Please not- 
ify the secretary of your intention to be present as 
early as possible. Dinner $3.00 per plate. Come. 

H. D. Hemenway. 
Temporary Secretary. 
Hartford. Conn.. Jan. 18. 1902. Box 965. 

Ex-72. — It is with exceeding pleasure that we note 
that among our alumni, one man in particular stands 
out as a versatile, prolific and highly successful writer. 
Frederick A. Ober is the author of a large number of 
works treating on various phases of life. He has be- 
come well-known as a naturalist, ethnologist, traveler 
and lecturer and this fact coupled with his pleasing 
style makes him a most interesting and entertaining 
author. 

•88.— William Martin Shepardson was married to 
Olive Gertrude Hamlin. June 20th. 1901 at Plants- 
ville. Conn., and is now living in MidJlebury' Conn. 

•92_ Chas. S. Graham is situated as a poultry and 
milk farmer at Holden. Mass. 

•94. — w. E. Sanderson is engaged in the seed de- 
partment oi J. A. Everett, seedsmen. 227 West Wash- 
ington St.. Indianapolis. 

*0l. C. L. Rice is in the Students' course of the 

Western Electric Co.. 343 West 15th St.. N. Y. 

•01.— p. C. Brooks is in charge of the Nitric and 
Muriatic acid departments of the General Chemical 
Co., Chicago. 111. 

Ex-'Ol. — F. E. Hemenway, who graduated from 
the College of Liberal Arts of Boston university last 
June is teaching at Catamgan. Masbate Island in the 
Philippines. We take the following extract from a 
letter written by him to the Boston University Beacon: 

" The natives as a whole are peaceful, but there are 
several Podcoats on the island (Masbate) who bother 
the inhabitants and incidentally ••bolo" any one who 
gets in their way. But there is a constabulary police 
consisting of natives, headed by an American, who 
goes on a •• bike " after them, and once in a while 
accidentally kills one. • • • However the peo- 
ple are very cordial, and we hope to make the place 
the Boston of the Orient. 

•96. Lucius J. Shepard. late instructor in the 

University of Maine, has been chosen Professor of 
Agriculture In Pennsylvania College. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



83 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







"95. — Fred C. Toby has left his position as teacher 
of science at Mt. Pleasant academy, N. Y. and has 
entered the employ of the West Stockbridge Lime 
Co., as superintendent. Address, West Stockbridge, 
Mass. 

'96. — Mr. G. A. Billings recently delivered a very 
interesting address before the M. A. C. Chemical Club 
on " Modified Milk." 

•96. — W. L. Pentecost is at present dairyman at 
the Katonale's Wood Farm, Katonah, N. Y. 

'96. — Frank L. Clapp announces his marriage en- 
gagement to Miss Ruth Elizabeth Browne of Dor- 
chester, Mass. Mr. Clapp is employed in the city 
engineer's office of Waterbury, Conn. Address 106 
Johnson St.. Waterbury. Conn. 

'97, — Herbert J. Armstrong Is in the office of the 
chief engineer of the Atkinson, Topeka and Santa Fe, 
R. R. Address 1602 Great Northern Building, 77 
Jackson St.. Chicago. 111. 

Ex-'OO. — J. Alden Davis is employed on an ex- 
tensive plantation at Ciega De Avilo, Cuba. 
^ 

LIBRARY NOTES. 

Physics of Agriculture by F. H. King. Madison, 
Wis. (Over six hundred pages and 275 figures, pub- 
lished by the author, price $1.75). The introduction 
deals briefly with certain general physical principles, 
laws and factors, a knowledge of which Is necessary 
to an understanding of their subsequent practical 
application. Other divisions are : Physics of the 
Soil ; Ground Water ; Wells, and Farm Drainage ; 
Principles of Rural Architecture containing a chapter 
on warmth, light and ventilation ; Farm Mechanics, 
including principles of draft, construction and main- 
tenance of country roads, farm motors, farm 
machinery ; and Principles of Weather Forecasting. 

All college men will gladly welcome Hind & 
Noble's latest song book. Songs of the Eastern Col- 
leges. 



STEPHEN LAKE FOLUElt, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Club anil CoIU-k<- lMns and Rings. 
Gold and Sllvir Medals. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jawelry. 




HENRY R. JOHNSON, 

T*l*e Bookman 

invites your call 
and correspondence 



313-315 Main St.. 



Springfield. Mass. 



k 



KEISER 

BARATHE 



XoUIoImL 



Have You 
Worn 



Reiser-Barathea Cravats yet? 

Ought to— 

The best dresser* do. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




Kit you from Ik ad to foot while yon 

wait. 

Special pricos on team orders. 

HUNTING CLOTHING. 

Guns, Rifles, Pistols, and Ammunition. 

GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

Special designs and all colors for Ladles, 
Uents and Boys. 



244 MAIN STRKET, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS 



HOTEL HEIISJKirSIG. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

First Class Lunch. Rooms $1.00 and upwards; with Rath. 
•1.50 to ft'2.00. Double, $2.. V); with Bath, $3.00. 

II. C iiic.vkixm; .v OO. 

Iff l.l/man St., opposite Wninn Depot, Sprinnfl^ld, Ma»f 

Telephone, 4.W-3. 



COOLET'S HOTBL,^";^^ 

IIKNKY I . MAKSH, Proprietor. 






All the modern conveniences. First class accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE KUROPEAH PLAS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 26, 1902 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Colleqb Signal, Amhbrst, Mass. The Sional will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance Is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN. 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, 1 903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902. Interco'leglate. 

RICHARD HENDR1E ROBERTSON, 1903, Department Note?. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS. 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. ARTHUR LSE 



Terms: tl.OO per year in adcanca. Single Copies, 10c. Posta^ outside of United States and Canada, 20c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club. 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West, Pres. Athletic Association. 

V. A. Cites, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Thien Index 

J.C. ilall, Sec. ir..ternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E, Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered Nov. 9. 1901. as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst, Mass., Act of Congress of March J 1879. 



Editorials. 



By one of those strange accidents of mistaken 
identity or something of the sort, an erroneous state- 
ment appeared in the editorial column of the last issue 
of the Signal as to the donor to the college of the 
large flag. To Mr. R. W. Stratton of Amherst, rather 
than to Mr. T. W. Harrington as was printed, the 
thanks of the college tor the gift and the apologies of 
the Signal for the error are alike due. 



Under the rules governing competition to the Col- 
lege Signal board no student will be considered elig- 
ible who has not handed in some article prior to 
March 1. This date is now close at hand and we 
desire to remind would-be-contestants that something 
must be done at once. Thus far the competition has 
been decidedly disappointing, especially that from 
members of the Sophomore class, where to date but 
one candidate has appeared for the two vacancies. 
The charge Is frequently made that the best men in 
college are not always on the Signal board and in 



some Instances this is doubtless true. Yet whose is 
the blame? The electing committee must select 
men from those who have competed. Let the best 
men compete, and there will be no question but that 
full justice will be done. 



A great deal of complaint has arisen among the 
residents of South Dormitory because of the recent 
change from the burning of hard to soft coal in the 
boiler of the building. As is well-known bituminous 
coal gives off in combustion an immense amount of 
soot, and unless special pains are taken to see that 
this soot is completely burned or deposited in some 
way. the "smoke evil" becomes a very real one. 
The perfect cloud of dust and cinders which fills the 
air around the entire building has been compared to 
the famous destruction of Pompeii and Hercula- 
neum by Vesuvius, and while this may be putting it 
rather strongly, there can be no doubt that the matter 
needs the attention of the college authorities at once. 
It may be a good standing illustration of the advantage 
of a central heating station ; but from the standpoint 




86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



87 



of either sanitation or comfort it is little less than a 
public nuisance. 






For the committee which took charge of the recent 
Junior Prom and carried it through In the face of 
serious and unexpected difficulties, the Signal has 
only words of praise. Men with less courage or with 
less of true college loyalty would have abandoned the 
project many times to its fate, and we should have 
had to endure the disgrace of being unable to support 
a single formal affair in an entire season. Socially, 
the Junior Prom was a decided success. That it was 
not a success In other ways was in no way the fault of 
the committee, or of those who attended. The finan- 
cial deficit was so far as we are concerned of little 
consequence ; what we do object in the Prom, how- 
ever, was that It did not represent the college, the 
Junior class, or In fact anything but itself. With less 
than twenty per cent of the entire student body in 
attendance, no gathering can be called a truly college 
affair ; and unless these Proms are bona fide college 
affairs, they must inevitably fail of the highest success. 
For a number of years, every Prom has failed in this 
very point. This has been realized, but how to 
remedy it has been the problem. The small attend- 
ance seems to be due three causes: first, an indiffer- 
ence on the part of the students to social affairs of 
any kind ; second, many students who would like to 
attend feel that they cannot afford to spend so much 
for a single evening's pleasure ; and third, many object 
to the extreme formality of the occasion. The first of 
these causes is not creditable. It ought to be removed 
root and branch, for the social side of college training 
cannot safely be neglected. Thanks to the work of 
the ladies of the Faculty, this spirit is not so prevalent 
as formerly, though much remains to be desired. 
The plan to hold a series of informal dances at the 
college in the near future is a most excellent move- 
ment to this end. The question of expense is more 
serious, and a legitimate source of trouble. Yet it 
stands to reason that it is not likely to be any less with 
a constantly decreasing attendance. The only feasible 
method of reducing it would seem to be to increase 
the number of participants. The third objection is 
chiefly one of sentiment, and still not altogether with- 
out reason. We are Inclined to think that it would be 
found advantageous In the end to establish a Military 



Prom rather than the usual affair. In the present 
state of many of the uniforms this probably would not 
be desirable ; but by the addition of a dress coat to 
the uniform there could be no objection on the ground 
of appearance. A Military Prom would better har- 
monize with the present style of decorations, and we 
have every facility for making it a success. It would 
be a distinctive affair, something which could not 
easily be imitated by our rivals, and still something In 
exactly as good taste. And it might be a means of 
persuading many to attend who otherwise would not 
go. The cost of the military dress coat Is of course a 
feature to be taken into consideration ; but would not 
the extra expense be justified by the improved appear- 
ance of the battalion on other occasions ? In view of 
the increasing lack of interest in the present system of 
conducting the Prom we wish it were possible to give 
a Military ball a fair trial. 



It Is no easy matter to express oneself clearly and 
fully in a single article. Realizing this fact, we made 
no attempt in our editorial on the use of the term 
•• Mass. State College," In the last issue to exhaust 
the subject, but simply intended to bring It up for dis- 
cussion. Several points in connection with it need 
further elaboration and of these we propose to speak. 
In the first place, it will be of value to ascertain the 
motives of those of the students who are using the 
term at the present time. Roughly speaking they may 
be divided Into two classes. The first class is made 
up of those who would not only like to drop the word 
•• Agricultural " from the official title but who would 
like to tear out. root and branch, every agricultural 
feature of the curriculum. In their frantic fear that 
someone will possibly look on them as •• hayseeds " 
they cannot bear to use the word " agricultural " in 
any connection, and scarcely to have it mentioned In 
their presence. Of this class it is unnecessary to 
speak at length. Men so completely out of sympathy 
with the college are most certainly out of place. They 
have no more reason to criticize the policy of the 
institution than would a student to enter, let us say. 
the Hartford Theological seminary, and then bitterly 
complain because it was not immediately converted 
into a Dental school. Fortunately they are In the 
minority and may be disregarded. The second class 
of students Is comosed of men fully In sympathy with 



agriculture or some allied branch, but who agree with 
Senator Morrill in hoping that neither •• farmers nor 
mechanics would be so illiberal as to wish to have a 
monopoly of education in any of the land-grant col- 
leges." They think that the scope of the institution 
might well be extended and desire that the name of the 
college be changed for this purpose. As a means of 
bringing about the change, they advocate the use by 
the students of the words " Mass. State College " in 
the hope that public sentiment will gradually become 
strong enough to force an adoption of this name. It 
was undoubtedly this motive which prompted the class 
of 1 90 1 to carry on their commencement exercises 
as they did and which is probably responsible for most 
of the use of the term at present. 

However laudable the intentions of this class, we 
must beg to differ with them as to the wisdom of the 
means they have chosen. We object on two grounds, 
those of expediency and those of principle. They 
may indeed fancy that they are acting in loyalty to the 
best interests of the college ; practically they are 
working, destructively against it. Thus, anarchists 
may consider that they are doing society a service in 
seeking to overthrow all government ; but it is ques- 
tionable whether they are any real help in correcting 
abuses at present. They are not permitted to carry 
their views into effect but must respect the existing 
government. Similarly, the students of a college 
should respect the name of their Alma Mater. 
ex officio as it were. If the trustees see fit to make 
alterations, well and good ; but until they do we must 
make the best of it. But even if we were to forego the 
question of right, that of expediency would still remain. 
['•Does the use of this term actually bring a change 
any nearer ? We fail to see that it does. We can 
call the Skunk's Cabbage a Rhododendron, but its 
odor will not be changed very materially and we would 
find it hard to sell It for other than what it is. In the 
same way. the great mass of people will not call the 
Agricultural College the •• Mass. State College " to 
any great extent. We have had a practical Illustra- 
tion of that. Our athletic managers have been print- 
ing their paper under that name for the last three 
years or so and never referring to the college as any- 
thing else. But when the schedules of other teams 
were published we were always down as the " Amherst 
Aggies." It might be very convenient if we could 



dispose of the" Agricultural " by simply ignoring it, but 
it is too big a proposition to be got rid of so easily. 
We can undoubtedly create a sensation, cause consid- 
erable bitterness, and l?.y ourselves open to the charge 
of being ashamed of the college by just this means ; 
but how all this Is to effect a revolution in either the 
board of trustees or the legislature is not quite so 
clear. If the students consider they have a grievance 
let them state it, frankly and fully in the proper way, 
to the proper parties, at the proper time. 

What we would criticise above all however is the 
use of the term in such places as the athletic mana- 
ger's stationery, the posters for games, college pro- 
grams and similar public affairs. The wearing of 
" M. S. C." pins and the use of •* M. S. C." banners 
and so on by individual students may indeed be 
deplored ; but these are personal matters in which 
there can be no authority save that of the individual 
concerned The various managers on the other hand 
represent not themselves but the college, and we 
regret exceedingly any movement which can perpetu- 
ate a misleading nickname in a place where the 
official title ought to be used. As we said before, we 
cannot understand why its use is permitted for a 
single instant by either the Faculty or the Athletic 
committee. Their passive attitude may however be 
due to one of three causes. It may be that they 
believe that their opinions in favor of the official title 
are so well known as to render action unnecessary ; 
but If that is so. they should be undeceived at once. 
Rightly or wrongly, their silence is construed to-day 
by the student body as the silence of secret approval. / 
and until they make their position clear the present 
state of affairs will continue. Or second. It may be 
that they regard the matter as unimportant. This It 
may be. but such Is not the opinion of many of our 
strongest alumni, nor indeed we judge of some of the 
leading men of the board of trustees. And third, it 
may be that the Faculty regard the movement as one 
which has already reached its height and will soon 
decline of Itself. This too, is possible ; yet we have 
still to hear of anything which would indicate It. The 
use of the " M. A. C." on the Junior Prom, programs 
is no sign, for it was due to the beliefs of the individ- 
uals who had the printing in charge in the face of 
adverse college sentiment. Neither is the recent 
decision of the Senior class to include the official 



88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



89 






name on every program any indication, for the vote 
was a very close one. and the class of 1902 one that 
has ever been noted for conservatism. Six months 
ago the point would not even have been raised for dis- 
cussion in its meetings. In any other class in college 
such a measure probably would not receive twenty 
percent of the vote. If our professors are in any 
doubt as to the use of the term let them call in the 
notebooks of their classes and find how many bear the 
initials " M. A. C." and they will be enlightened very 
speedily. 

With this, the Signal proposes to leave the question 
for the present. it is a subject which the Faculty 
and the Faculty alone can deal with effectively. 
We have brought up the topic for discussion, 
and with that our power and our duty ends. So 
far we have received nothing but criticism as a 
reward, and as we are under no obligations 
to beat our heads against the stones of public 
opinion continually, unless some new aspect of the case 
presents Itself we shall probably not refer to the mat- 
ter again. 



THE JUNIOR PROM. 

The most important social event of our winter sea- 
son occurred February sixth in the Drill Hall under 
most favorable circumstances. The usual blizzard 
was quite omitted and without exception things passed 
off smoothly and enjoyably. The Junior Prom, is 
rapidly becoming a well established annual event in 
place of the military function, which in the time of 
dress uniforms was so well patronized. However suc- 
cessful this Prom, was socially, we can. but say how 
much, in need the committee always is of more general 
support in the way of attendance and thereby financial 
assistance. This year the number diminished from 
sixty to forty couples. With the money from this num- 
ber of tickets, suitable music cannot be procured. 

The scheme of decorations was much the same as 
usual in that the colors and designs were chiefly 
military. As at last year's Prom, the cannon and 
sabers were used to good effect. Streamers of bunting 
were run from the center of the hall to the corners and 
sides, two muskets being used at the middle for sup- 
port. Along each of the cross-beams was hung the 
tri-color bunting which greatly aided in covering the 
bare woodwork near the roof. Over eighteen hundred 



yards of bunting was used in all. Sabres were fastened 
to the walls in one place as an outspread fan and again 
as a circle. The lighting although somewhat glaring 
was much better than before at such occasions. Four 
arc-lights were placed at good points in the middle line 
of the hall, one being directly in the centre. Also a 
very pretty transparency of 1903 was placed on the 
west wail. The plant-house supplied many leads of 
beautiful potted palms and flowering plants which were 
grouped about the stage, in the cozy nooks and the 
patronesses, seats. The hall was well furnished with 
easy chairs and carpeted about the edges with many 
rugs. Much green from the woods was used in bank- 
ing backgrounds. Various college banners and trophies 
were hung in effective positions and added materially 
to the variety of decoration. The comfort of everyone 
was secured against our usual winter occurrences by 
the change from hot water as a means of heat, to 
steam. The pipes were also covered with aluminum 
paint and were thus allowed to give off their full heat 
and become much more sightly than they were formerly. 
The large net used for base-ball practice was very 
prettily draped over the front of the stage with bows of 
red bunting. On the net. was worked in large charac- 
ters of laurel the number - 1903," either side of which 
was the letter " M " in the same. This was the new- 
est and one of the most attractive features of the 
decorations. 

The patronesses. Mrs. H. H. Goodell, Mrs. S. T. 
Maynard, Mrs. John Anderson. Mrs. Charles Welling- 
ton and Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck received under the 
gallery at the south end of the hall. Warner's 
Orchestral club of Northampton gave a preliminary 
concert and furnished music for the dancing. The 
dance orders, furnished by Elliott of Philadelphia were 
simple but neat in design. The covers were of white 
material bearing the words "'03 " above in gilt on a 
band of maroon, and in the lower corner in gilt letter^ 
•■ M. A. C." Reardon of Amherst catered. 

At 9 o'clock Chairman John C. Hall of the Prom 
committee opened the ball with his partner. Miss Viva 
C. Rose of Washington, D. C. and dancing continued, 
the program of twenty-four numbers being followed as 
printed in the last issue of the Signal. 

The committee in charge consisted of John C 
Hall, chairman and Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck, Dr. J. B. 
Paige, Charles M. Kinney. Claude I. Lewis, Leander 



C. Claflin, Edward B. Snell. Charles S. Tinkham, Neil 
F. Mor.2han, and Edward G. Proulx. Much credit is 
due them for their success under unusual difficulties 
In spite of their precautions a slight deficit is reported 
due to the small attendance which ought to very easily 
be met. The thanks of the college is also due those 
students and friends who contributed to the decorations. 

Among these present were the following : President 
and Mrs. H. H. Goodell. Mrs. S. T. Maynard, Dr. and 
Mrs. Charles Wellington, Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Paige. 
Prof, and Mrs. J. E. Ostrander, Captain and Mrs. 

ii Anderson. Prof, and Mrs. Herman Babson. Prof. 
mi Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck, Prof. S. F. Howard and 
Miss Trott. all of Amherst ; Dr. Eugene H. Lehnert. 
'93, Professor of Veterinary Science in the Conn. 
Agricultural college and Miss Bartiett of Clinton; 
James W. Kellogg. 'CO and Ml£S Ethel Gilbert, 
Amherst; Edward K. Atkins, '00 and Miss Myra 
Hobart, North Amherst ; George C. Hubbard. '99 
and Miss Puffer. North Amherst ; Philip H. Smith, 
'97. and Miss Edith Stevens. Amherst ; James E. 
Kalligan, '00. ar.d Miss Barber of Boston ; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. M. Ovalle of Amherst ; E. W. Fisher and 
Miss Ruder of Northampton; E. L. Kellogg of 
Amherst and Miss Hawkins of Northampton ; Mr. 
and Mrs. Nash of Amherst ; Leander C Claflin and 
Miss Harriet Butler of Northampton ; Lyman A. 
Cock and Miss Bertha Starkweather, Danielsonviile, 
Conn.; Victor A. Gates and Miss Beatrice Marlz, 
San Antonio, Tex.; John C. Hall and Miss Viva 
Rcse. Washington. D. C; Charles M. Kinney and 
Miss Nan Butler, Northampton; Claude I. Lewis and 
Miss Edna Goodnow. Amherst ; Ransom W. Morse 
and Miss Grace Woolsey. New Peitz, N. Y.; William 
E. Allen and Miss Morse, Boston; George L. Barrus 
and Miss Louisa Tinkham. Roxbury ; Philip W. 
Brooks and Miss Edith Brooks, Cambridge; Neil F. 
Monahan and Miss Monahan. Boston; Edward G. 
Proulx and Miss Lillian Proulx. Smith College; 
Edward B. Snell and Miss Cora Clark. Chelsea; 
Charles S. Tinkham and Miss Kate Hutchins. Rox- 
bury ; George E. O'Hearn and Miss May McDermott. 
Providence, R. I.; Raymond E. Huntington and Miss 
Clark. Smith College ; Allen W. Swain and Miss 
Dodge, Smith College; Dr. and Mrs. Dickinson of 
Amherst; Mrs. and Miss Goessmann of Amherst; 
Dr. and Mrs. Stowell of North Amherst ; Mr. and Mrs. 



Kinney of Northampton ; Mr. and Mrs. Barry of 
Amherst; Miss Stratton of Amherst; Miss Hubbard 
of Sunderland. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF PROM. COM. 

EXPENSES. 



Orchestra. 
Catering. 
Printing, 
Incidentals. 



RECEIPTS, 

Tickets sold including balcony. 
Programs sold. 



$80.00 

35.00 

38.50 

3.00 



-$156.50 



$1 18.00 
18.00 



$136.00 

Deficiency, $20.50 

It was voted at a meeting of committee to make 
up deficiency by contributions 

CONTRIBUTIONS TO DATE. 

President Goodell. $5.00 

College Sicnal. 5.00 

J. C. Hall. 2.00 



Deficiency to date. 



$12.00 
$8.50 



NOTICE. 

The sum of fifteen dollars ($15) has been given 
to the music committee (of the Senate), to be used 
by them with the following provisos : 

(a) The sum of ten dollars ($10) shall be given 
as a prize to the author of the best college song 
(words). 

(b) Th« sum of five dollars ($5) shall be given as 
a prize to the author of the second best college song 
(words). 

(c) The above songs shall ieach a given standard 
as required by the judges. 

(d) The judges shall have the power to reject any 
and ail written contribution?; if not of a satisfactory 
quality. 

(e) Contributions handed in after March 15, 1902 

shall not be considered In awarding the prize. 

R. W. Morse, ) 

D W. West. -Committee. 

F. D. COUDEN, ) 

N. B. Anyone whether a member of the college 
or not may compete for the prize. 



go 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



9* 






SENIOR SPRINGFIELD TRIP. 

On Friday. Feb. 21. the Senior class, accompanied 
Capt. Anderson to Springfield where a visit was made 
to the arsenal. 

The grounds are very extensive and have a com- 
manding position on a hill well above the city. They 
contain the commandant's house, the barracks, arsenal 
and work shops. The first place visited was the mu- 
seum. Here we could see at a glance the whole his- 
tory and development of the Springfield rifle, as speci- 
mens cf each pattern have been preserved. There 
were countless numbers of old muzzle-loaders, but 
much to our surprise, we learned that the first rifles 
were breech-loaders, but that was before the days of 
the metallic cartridge so that the rifles proved at that 
time useless. Coats of mail and suits of armor such 
as were worn in the first part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, were on exhibition. One of the most interesting 
sections contained relics brought from China during 
the late war there. These contained a variety of rifles 
and cannon and were very unwieldy weapons. Some 
had barrels ten or fifteen feet long and weighed from 
twenty-five to seventy-five pounds. There was also a 
large collection of Japanese instruments of war and a 
collection of European lances such as are used to-day. 
On one side was an interesting section consisting of 
relics picked up on the battle-fields of the Civil War. 
These were bent in various ways or were burst open 
by bullets. The Major explained to us the mechan- 
ism and operation of the Gatling and Colt's rapid firing 
guns and also of the Mauser and Krag J orgensen ri- 
fles. Several specimens of the former were shown, 
which were captured in the Spanish War. 

We next visited the work shops. The first roorrj 
was the carpenter shop, here the stalks were sawed the 
required lengths, turned in lathes and polished. 
From here we went to the filing room where we found 
a small army of men, each one working on some one 
part of the rifle. We then passed on to the polishing 
room, where by means of emery wheels the metal 
was highly polished. Below we entered the hardening 
room, where we were nearly stifled at first by the 
fumes of burning oil. Here the steel is placed in ovens 
and heated to a very high temperature for several 
hours. Great skill is required to do this work properly. 
By plunging in oil the steel is hardened, and also 
receives its characteristic color, as seen In the. 



finished product. Afterward we visited the printing, 
inspecting, and engine rooms. On the whole the trip 
proved both interesting and instructive. 



GROWTH OF COLLEGES. 

The following table of statistics published in the 
Wesleyan Argus throws an interesting light on the 
growth of eastern colleges during the last debate, 
from which period it was compiled. 

SMALL COLLEGES. 





Increase. 


p. c. increase 


Dartmouth. 


430 


168 


Brown, 


496 


152 


Tufts. 


182 


151 


Syracuse. 


389 


115 


Dickinson. 


146 


106 


Bates, 


142 


94 


Boston Univ.. 


199 


61 


Wesleyan Univ.. 


80 


34 


Williams. 


95 


30 


Mass. Agricultural. 


37 


26 


Amherst. 


58 


17 


Trinity. 


— 13 


—9 


LARGE 


COLLEGES. 






Increase. 


p. c. Increas* 


Columbia, 


733 


201 


Yale. 


968 


116 


Univ. of Penn., 


543 


115 


Harvard, 


1160 


86 


Princeton, 


500 


59 



These figures show an average Increase in the 12 
small colleges of 83 per cent, and in the five large 
colleges of 127 per cent ; and in all Institutions which 
have fallen below the average, especially those which 
have fallen decidedly below, inquiry may very justly be 
be made as to the reason. 

It can be further noted as an interesting fact that 
three of the colleges.— Trinity. Amherst and Wesleyan. 
which are among those showing the least Increase in 
attendance, are colleges which have the greatest per 
capita endowment. — Tufts Weekly. 



FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

An important meeting of the Fraternity Conference 
was held Tuesday evening. February 1 1 , Those pres 
ent were : Dr Wellington. E. B. Saunders '02 and C 
A. Tinker '04 from the D. G. K.; R. W. Morse '02 



and H. J. Franklin "03 from the Q. T. V.; V. A. Gates 
'02 and E. G. Proulx '03 of the Phi Sigma Kappa ; 
and H. L. Knight '02 and N. F. Monahan '03 of the 
College Shakespearean Club. The Conference voted 
to give its full support to the ladies of the Faculty in 
their social enterprises. A committee consisting of C. 
A. Tinker. P. W. Brooks. W. E. Allen and S. L. 
Smith was subsequently appointed to cooperate with 
the ladies in their social gathering of Feb. 28. 

The matter of selecting a uniform night for the 
meetings of the several fraternities was brought up and 
discussed in detail. The chief argument in its favor 
was that by establishing a single Fraternity night con- 
flicts with other college gatherings would be avoided 
and better attendance secured. The Conference vote d 
to recommend that Monday night be adopted by the 
fraternities. 

The Conference expressed itself as decidedly in favor 
of the plan to carry on a series of informal dances in 
the Drill Hall during the winter and spring. C. I. 
Lewis was chosen as chairman of a committee to 
arrange these dances, with full power to appoint his 
committee and take complete charge. 

The problem of how to increase the amount of col- 
lege singing was discussed at great length. R. W. 
Morse. C. A. Tinker, N. F. Monahan and V. A. Gates 
were appointed a committee to ascertain the cost and 
general desirability of printing anew song sheet, similar 
in style to that gotten out some years ago but thoroughly 
revised and brought up to date. H. L. Knight. H. J. 
Franklin and E. G. Proulx were chosen as a commit- 
tee to petition the Faculty for a few minutes after 
chapel each week to practice college songs. The 
question of appointing leaders was discussed but not 
definitely decided. The Conference then adjourned. 



Observation; $ Conclusions 

I have always observed that on introducing himself 
to those, be they few or many, who are expected to 
to read his effusions, the new writer is accustomed to 
say a few words about himself as a sort of preface. 
Washington Irving only followed the example of his 
predecessors in the literary field when he put " The 
Author's Account of Himself" at the beginning of 
his " Sketch Book." and a work of almost any sort at 
the present day, Is thought by many to be incomplete 



without some reference to the life of the author. It 
is a curious fact too, that the more mediocre the 
writer, the more space he devotes to his own history, 
and that of his ancestors, 1 see no reason therefore 
why. in introducing a new column into a periodical, 
even a college paper of this sort, the writer should not 
be allowed — nay, even expected — to devote the first 
few of his papers to his own life, habits, family.and— as 
he is but a beginner, and no one knows how mediocre 
his work is going to become— why he should not include 
also some accounts of his friends. 

On consultation with the editor-in-chief, however. 
1 find that for some reason or other, probably jealousy, 
he refuses to give the observer the space necessary 
to carry on such a project. Some of his reasons for 
this refusal are so puny, that I can not refrain from 
noting at least two of them. 

The first amounts to nothing more than the fear 
that the readers of a college publication would not 
feel interested in such a subject. As the purpose of 
these writings is simply to fill up space and to keep 
the business manager from " hogging " everything 
with his advertisements. I can see no good cause for 
withholding it on that account. The second objec- 
tion is even more easily refuted. It Is in substance 
that no author or literary man with any knowledge of 
the proprieties ever writes his preface until the work 
is completed ; but it is obvious that my history must 
consist in most part of that of my ancestors, the ma- 
jority of whom have completed their lives long ago. 
and so I do not see that I can write the story any bet- 
ter a few years hence than at present. 

However, thus the matter stands and if a sufficient 
number of my readers are so disappointed as to feel 
like withdrawing their respective subscriptions on ac- 
count of missing what I confess. I did all but promise 
at the beginning of this writing. I can only make 
amends by agreeing to fulfill the •« ail but promise" in 
a separate pamphlet. This I will gladly do on receipt 
of an amount sufficient to defray the cost of printing 
and binding the said pamphlet. No subscriptions 
refunded. 

# # • • • 

The matter discussed in this column is not intended 
to relate to anything In particular, nor a great deal In 
general, but it should be well understood that the ed- 
itor would gladly receive observations from any source. 



ga 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



93 






from which he could draw or fail to draw his conclu- 
sions. He would however, give the warning, that it is 
his habit to take the opposite side on any question that 
may be presented to his notice, and as he may be 
compelled, for the sake of making clear his own sen- 
timents, to publish parts or all of any letters received 
by him, correspondents should be careful to write 
nc'hing which they do not care to see in print. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

In response to many requests we venture to try the 
experiment of printing in each issue a calendar of the 
scheduled College events of the next two weeks. As 
the period between issues is so long, it is evident that 
many shifts of date are liable to take place. If sec- 
retaries and managers will take pains, however, to 
notify us promptly we will do what we can to make 
the list complete and as free from errors as possible. 
The calendar for the next two weeks Is as follows : 
Wednesday, Feb. 26, 4-30 p. m. Basketball, Mas- 
sachusetts vs. Amherst at Pratt Gymna- 
sium. 
Thursday. Feb. 27. Dairy convention in the Stone 

Chapel. 
Friday, Feb. 28 at 8-00 p. m. Reception and social 
in the Stone Chapel by the ladies of the 
faculty. 
Feb. 29th, at any old time, the 1903 Index will be 

placed on sale. 
Saturday, March 1st, at 6-00 p. m. the preliminary 
competition closes for the College Signal. 
Tuesday. March 4th. Basketball. Massachusetts vs. 

Brown at Providence. 
Wednesday, March 5th. Basketball. Massachusetts 
vs. Fall River Y. M. C. A. at Fall River. 



Co11e£* fiot?s- 



The Junior Prom, was held Feb. 6. 

—Pierce and Ellsworth 1904 have left college. 

—The Freshmen have begun base-ball practice. 

— Holcomb '05 spent Sunday at his home In 

Connecticut. 

— C. E. Brett 1905 has joined the Phi Sigma 

Kappa fraternity. 

—The College Shakespearean Club has had a pool 

table placed in its rooms. 



—Privates W. J. O'Neil and P. F. Staples have 
been transferred to the band. 

—Belden '02 and Coodenough '05 attended the Glee 
Club concert at Mount Holyoke Saturday. 

—President Goodell attended the Banquet of the 
Connecticut Alumni at Hartford, Friday evening. 

—The Sophomore class are now using Prof. Brook's 
new publication on " Soils and Soil Managment." 

— Claflin '02 spent several days last week in Boston 
and attended the Glee Club concert at Wellesley on 

Saturday 

The - Sagamore Seven " have given up their house 
on Pleasant Street and have taken rooms in the college 

dormitories. 

—Another beginner's dancing class will soon be 
formed. Those wishing to join should give their names 

to C. 1. Lewis '05. 

—The ladies of the Faculty will hold a social in the 
chapel Friday evening Feb. 28. All members of the 
college are invited. 

—Individuals of the senior class In pathology under 
Dr. Paige are delivering a series of lectures on the 
subject of digestion. 

—Every student should make a special effort to 
attend the basket-ball game with Amherst at 4-30 
o'clock this afternoon. 

— C. 1. Lewis has appointed his committee on 
informal dances as follows : G. L. Barrus.C. E. Dwyer. 
W. E. Allen and M. H. West. 

—An elaborate music program is being arranged 
tor the reception to be given by the ladies of the faculty 
in the Chapel on Friday night. 

—The ladies of the faculty have placed an excellent 
piano in the Chapel for the reception on the 28th. It 
will remain for the rest of the year. 

—President H. H. Goodell delivered an address 
Saturday afternoon before the Woman's Club of Sun- 
derland on ' The Writers of Amherst." 

—Chef Reardon is hard at work on a new songbook 
-Songs of the Massachusetts Agricultural College." 
We understand he has nearly enough material on hand 

already. 

—A dairy convention will be held in the Chapel 
Thursday. Among the speakers will be George M. 
Whitaker, editor of the New England Farmer, and 
I Prof. F. S. Cooley. 



—A series of informal dances will be held in the 
Drill Hall during the remainder of the season under 
the direction of the Fraternity conference. C. I. 
Lewis is chairman of the committee which has the 
matter in charge. 

—At a meeting held Feb. 4. the M. A. C. Boarding 
club elected officers as follows : First director and 
manager, E. B. Snell ; secretary and treasurer. C. P. 
Halligan; director:;. H. A. Paul. V. A. Gates. L. A. 
Cook. P. F. Staples. A. W. Gilbert and J J. Gardner. 

The Alumni Athletic Association is endeavoring to 
obtain the field just north of the Experiment Station 
fcr an athletic Held. This is the btst field attainable 
and is in an ideal location being near the ecliege 
and on the line of the Amherst & Sunderland S' 
Railroad. 

— The complimentary banquet of 1905 to 1903 was 
held Friday evening at the United States Hotel in 
Boston. Every member of 'the class was present. 
R. H. Robertson presided. P. W. Brcoks acted as 
toastmaster and the following responded : E. B. E 
S. C. Bacon, N. F. Monahan. C. P. Halligan, W. E. 
Allen, G. L. Barrus, M. H. West, G. D. Jones, H. J. 
Franklin and W. W. Peebles. The complete report 
was received too late for publication, but will appear in 
the next issue. 

— At a meeting of the Senior Class last Wednesday 
evening these officers were elected: President, R. W. 
Morse: vice-president. J. M. Dellea ; secretary and 
treasurer, L. A. Cook ; sergeant at-arms, E. F. McCobb. 
J. L. Lovell of Amherst was chosen photographer on 
recommendation of the committee, C. M. Kinney, C. 
E. Dwyer and R. W. Morse. The following commit- 
tees were appointed by the chair : Insignia, R. W. 
Morse. H. L. Knight and J. H. Belden ; class bed, A. 
L. Dacy, J. M. Dellea. C. E. Dwyer, H. E. Hodgkiss, 
C. I. Lewis, H. A. Paul and D. N. West ; senior 
Prom.. J. C. Hall, chairman. J. H. Belden. V. A. 
Gates. C. I. Lewis. H. E. Hodgkiss. L. C. Clafin, H. 
L. Knight. A general committee consisting of A. L. 
Dacy chairman. J. C. Hall. H. L. Knight. H. A. Paul 
and 0. F. Cooley was chosen to nominate and take 
charge of other committees. It was voted to use the 
letter " M " where initials were to be used in the Com- 
mencement exercises but to use the official title 
" Massachusetts Agricultural College" at least once on 
each program and wherever the whole name was used. 



/Uhletic (Slo+^s. 



BASKET-BALL. 

Massachusetts, 16: Trinity, 14. 
Massachusetts won from Trinity in the Drill Hall, 
February 20. in a rather loosely played game. The 
passing of Massachusetts was good in the first half and 
the ball was in the hands of the home team most of 
the time. The half ended with the score 9 1 in Mas- 
sachusetts' favor. The second half was very poorly 
played and the two regular players who replaced the 
substitutes who were in thr the first half did not 

seem to put the new life in the team that they were 
expected to do. Massa husetts took ihe cue from 
Trinity's game in the first half and both teams 
" roughed it " toward the end of the gnme. A rither 
uninteresting game was made exciting when with the 
score 14 13 in favor of the visitors, and with but 
twenty seconds of play. Hall drew the last gcal and 
saved the game for the home team. The attendance 
was rather small. The band gave a short concert dur- 
ing the game. The team plays Amherst at Pratt 
Gymnasium this afternoon at 4-30 o'clock. The score : 
Masschusetts. Trinity. 

Ahcarn. I., f. r. g.. Henderson 

Dellea. r.. f. 1. g,, Van Weelden 

Cook-Hall. c. c.. Crane 

McCobb. r.. g I, f., Howe 

Whittaker-Quigley, I., g, r. i.. Duffee 

Score — Massachusetts. 16, Trinity. 14. Coals from field 
— McCobb 2. Duffee 2. Dellea. Hall. Quigley. Crane. Van 
Weelden. Goals from fouls — Henderson 2. Dellea. Referee 
and Umpire— Belden and Larcher alternated. Time-keeper 
— Bodfish, Time two 20 minute halves. 



CLASS BASKET-BALL. 

Sophomores. 28; Freshmen, 8. 

The annual Sophomore Freshman basket-ball game 
took place Friday evening, Feb. 7th in the Drill Hall. 
The whole college was well represented and enthusiasm 
ran high. 

As an exhibition of basket-ball the game was not a 
success. Neither side was up to its usual standard, 
and the Freshmen were a particular disappointment. 
Owing to a misunderstanding as to the date of the 
game, two of the Sophomore's regular men were out 
of town, and for a team of substitutes '04 did fairly well. 
'05 however which under the circumstances had been 
picked as an easy winner shewed over confidence and 
lack of team work. Though the ball was in their pos- 






94 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



session most of the time, the forwards could not locate 
the baskets and failed time and again on easy chances, 
The game was as usual very rough and the number of 
fouls called gives no idea of the number committed, 
the teams being about equal in this respect. 

The game began at 8-30 and in less than a minute 
Whitaker threw an easy goal. Things looked dubious 
for the Sophomores but five minutes later Fulton tied 
the* score. Quigley made it 6 to 3 for the Sophomores 
and there was no further score during the first half. 

Both teams started off the second half with a rush, 
but the superior staying power of the Sophomores soon 
placed them in the lead. The Freshmen made but 5 
points to 22 for the Sophomores. In the last few min- 
utes of play the Freshmen were hopelessly outclassed. 
For '04. the all-round work of Captain Fulton told 
from start to finish. Quigley played brilliantly at times. 

throwing five goals but was very erratic. Peck. Gregg 

and Griffin played a good defensive game. For '05. 

the hard, fast playing of Captain Hunt was the feature. 

The score : 

1904. 

Peck. 1. ' 

Gregg, r.. g. 

Fulton, c. (Capt.) 

Griffin, r.. f. 

Quigley. 1.. f. r - B 

Score— Sophomores. 28; Freshmen. 8; Goals from field— 

Whitaker. Taylor. Fulton 3. Criffin. Quigley 5. Goals from 

fouls— Whitaker 2. Fulton. Referee— Dellea '02. Umpire— 

J. G. Cook '03. Timer— H. L. Bodfish '02. Time— 20 

minute halves. 



1905. 

f., Whitaker. 

1. f.. Taylor. 

c. Ladd 

1. g., Merrill. 

Hunt (Capt.) 



Alumni. 



A full report of the Connecticut Alumni Banquet, 
will appear in the next issue. 

'83. Dr. Homer J. Wheeler, chemist in the Rhode 

Island Experiment station was in town recently. 

NINETY-THREE. 

Joseph Baker. Farmer. Riverside farm. New Bos- 
ton, Conn. 

Fred G. Bartlett, sup't of cemetery. Cor. Cabot 
and Sycamore Sts.. Holyoke. Mass. 

Henry D. Clark, veterinary surgeon, 15 Central St. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

George F. Curley. physician and surgeon. 10 Con- 
gress St.. Milford. Mass. 



Herbert C. Davis, railway postal clerk. 10 Highland 
Ave., Atlanta. Ga. 

Chas. A. Goodrich, physician and surgeon. 5 Haynes 
St., Hartford. Conn. 

Francis T. Harlow, farmer. Marshfield, Mass. 

Harry J. Harlow, farmer. Shrewsbury. Mass. 

Ernest A. Hawkes. evangelist. 4th and Broad Sts.. 
Richmond. Va. 

Frank H. Henderson, civil engineer, 43 Ashland 
St.. Maiden, Mass. 

Edwin C. Howard, principal centre grammar school. 
55 Kensington Ave., Northampton, Mass. 

Franklin S Hoyt. assistant superintendent of gram- 
mar schools. No. 17. The Delaware, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Eugene H. Lennert. professor Veterinary science 
and physloiogy. Conn. Agricultural College. Storrs, 
Conn. 

A. Edward Melendy. clerk and wire tester, 1 17 W. 
Boylston St., Worcester, Mass. 

John R. Perry, painter and interior decorator 8 
Bosworth St.. Boston. Mass. 

Cotton A. Smith. Care of N. B. Blackstone Co., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fred A. Smith, florist and nurseryman. 265 Euclid 
Ave.. Lynn, Mass. 

Luther W. Smith, manager of Highland farm. Sec. 
of the Southwestern Rice Co.. Manteno. 111. 

Henry F. Staples, physician and surgeon. Solon. 
Ohio. 

Luiz A. F. Tinoco. sugar planter and manufacturer. 
Campos, Brazil. 

Edward J. Walker, farmer. Box 315. Clinton. Mass. 
The next class reunion of the class of '93. will be 
held in Amherst in June. 1903. 

•94. —Arthur C. Curtis is teaching in the St. Aus- 
tin's school. Salisbury. Conn 

•95. Thomas P. Foley is teacher of mathematics 

at Trinity hall. Washington. Penn. 

•96.— The directors of the National Farm School 
Association have chosen Professor Lucius J. Shep- 
ard. of Orono. Me., to fill the position of Assistant 
Agriculturist and farm superintendent of the National 
Farm School at Doyleston, Pa. Professor Shepard 
has been Assistant Agriculturist and farm superln- 



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9 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tendent at the University of Maine for the past six 
years. Prior to that time he was superintendent of 
the Agricultural Department at the Boys' school at 
Oakdale, Mass. 

•97._-.J0hn M. Barry is in the real estate business, 
No. 3 Fremont St., Boston. 

'98.— S. W. Wiley has left his position in the 
Hatch Experiment station in order to accept an im- 
portant position with the 3owker Fertilizer and Chem- 
ical Company at their works at Elizabeth, N.J. 

'98.— Willis Sykes Fisher is principal of ths Dick- 
inson grammar school, Scuthwick. Mass. 



•99.__Win. E. Chapln 



greenhouse 



engaged in 

work for H. H. Battler, it, te; ding florist of Philadel- 
phia, at his country place near that city. Address. 
Newton Square. Pa. 

'00 Frank H. Brown recently spent a short time 

at the College. 

•00.— James W. Kellogg, since graduation em- 
ployed as assistant chemist In I irtment of foods 
and feeding at the Hatch Experiment station, has ac- 
cepted a -similar but more lu '. ?::;*i?n in the 
Rhode Island Experiment station and will leave very 
shortly. 

Dep&Hlmtrvf f*Ioi?s. 

LIBRARY. 
The following new books have been added to the 
library : 

Cranberry Culture, by Joseph J. White, a practical 

grower. 

The Practical Rabbit Keeper, by Cuniculus. 

The Fox Terrier, and All About It, by Hugh Dalyiel. 

Hew to Handle ard Educate Vicious Horses, by Os- 
car R. Gleason. 



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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 12, 1902 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amherst, Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT. 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES, 1902. Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY. 1902. Intercollegiate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1 903. Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1 903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903. Alumni Notes 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1934. 



Terms: $1.00 per year In adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club. 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West. Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan. Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Thiee Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L. Barms. Manager. 

H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



ECdi-tb rials. 



We desire to call the attention of the students once 
more to the series of informal dances, the first of which 
is to be held on next Friday evening. These affairs 
are something for which there has long been a demand, 
and we hope they will receive the support which they 
deserve. There has been thus far in our college life 
a costly indifference to social affairs, which has 
reacted very unfavorably upon our men after gradua- 
tion. Any movement which tends to remedy this 
feature of our college life deserves the vigorous com- 
mendation and effective co-operation of all. 



The action of the Trinity Tablet in attempting to 
claim a victory over this college in the recent basket- 
ball game Is a painful reminder of the extremes to 
which students of professedly reputable institutions are 
willing to go rather than acknowledge a defeat. We 
confess we are surprised at their course in view of the 
facts of the case. A controversy arose at the close of 
the game as to whether the last, and as it happened. 



the winning goal thrown by Massachusetts (not 
•• Amherst Aggies," by the way, If you please,) should 
be counted. There was but one official timekeeper, 
selected as the rules provide, by the home team. 
Near the close of the game, Hall threw the decid- 
ing goal making the score 16-14 in our favor. No 
protest was entered or apparently considered and play 
continued for at least fifteen seconds later when time was 
called. Then, and not before, the Trinity manager, 
keeping time on his own individual responsibility 
claimed that the game should have ended earlier. 
The referee, also a Trinity man, and the athletic 
editor of the Tablet by the way, attempted to substi- 
tute an unofficial for an official decision. Naturally, 
a controversy resulted. The referee would have had 
as much authority to claim that the score was 50-0 
or any other figure as to do what he attempted. The 
matter was argued at great length. The Trinity man- 
ager finally acknowledged the weakness of his case, 
agreed that the victory was rightfully ours, and more- 
over pledged himself to see that it was so entered on 
Trinity's records. His failure to do so under the 



9 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



99 



circumstances certainly is a dark blot on Trinity's 
athletic honor, but cannot alter the rights of the mat- 
ter. In addition to claiming the game, charges were 
made in regard to the attitude of our students toward 
the visiting team. Says the Tablet " Not only was 
the spirit of the whoie college against whatever the 
visiting team did, but the partiality was evident even 
in the decisions of the officials." These would be 
serious charges if true. We deny however absolutely 
that the student body was guilty of any discourtesy. 
Trinity came to our grounds for the first time and 
was received at the start in a friendly way. From 
the moment the game began, however, the visitors 
chose to violate every rule of gentlemanly conduct as 
well as the prescribed rules of the game. From start 
to finish Trinity played the dirtiest game ever seen in 
our gymnasium, and this without any apparent provo- 
cation whatever. Several of their men were warned 
repeatedly, and would undoubtedly have been disqual- 
ified had the team possessed adequate substitutes. 
They moreover showed a desire to make trouble in 
every possible way, disputing every decision. Just 
before the close of the game they attempted contrary 
to rules to substitute a fresh man for a worn out 
player, when the official's attention was on something 
else. And finally, finding it impossible to win either 
by basketball, football tactics or prize-fighting, they 
trumped up at the close a baseless charge against the 
officials. Under such circumstances it was not to be 
expected that they would long retain the good-will or 
respect of the spectators. Even the Trinity sympa- 
thizers in the audience were thoroughly disgusted at 
their attitude. But while feeling could not have been 
friendly there was no open disapproval whatever, and 
whenever Trinity was willing to play straight basket- 
ball, she received liberal applause. During the last 
few years, we have received most of the colleges of 
New England, and been received by them in turn. 
This is the first charge so far as we know of ungentle- 
manly conduct in all that time. Trinity, on the other 
hand, has long been notorious for just such work. In 
conclusion, we would say that the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College stands ready to stake its reputation 
against Trinity's for fair play, and leave it to the col- 
leges of New England with whom we both compete 
to choose between us in the case at issue. 



On March 1st, nearly two months and a half be- 
hindhand, the 1903 Index made its appearance and 
was placed on sale. In accordance with lhe usual 
custom it becomes the duty of the College Signal 
to attempt some sort of a review at this time. 

In appearance the Index presents little to be criti- 
cised. The cover design is simple, consisting of an 
Indian's head, surrounded with the letters " The 1903 
Index " all in gilt on a maroon cover. The binding is 
evidently a cheaper one than that used by either 1901 
or 1902 but the grade of paper is fully as good as in 
either. The arrangement of material is good, but 
the typographical error? are too numerous to be ex- 
cusable in so elaborate a production. There was am- 
ple time for any number of readings of the proof, and 
a bit more care would have paid many times over. 
The number of pages of reading matter is given as 
194 to 175 for 1902. but closer examination shows 
that the gain is made by a a less compact arrange- 
ment of the statistics and by including the full page 
illustrations in the count. As this was not done last 
year, the actual amount of reading matter has not in- 
creased. The number of advertisements is exactly 
the same. 

We were more disappointed in the statistics than 
in any other feature. To the great body of purchas- 
ers, the value of an Index lies In the accuracy of its 
statistics, and in accuracy the last volume Is woefully 
lacking. Mis-spelled names, incomplete class lists, 
and general looseness of details are to be noticed on 
almost every page. A few examples will indicate It. 
Thus, the one list that ought to be correct if possible, 
is the list of those entitled to wear the " M," yet from 
that list no less than three men were omitted, Gregg. 
Craighead and Gardner. In the list of the faculty, 
the librarian. Miss E. Frances Hall is printed as •' T. 
Francis Hall." In the sophomore class picture only 
four men are numbered correctly. In the fraternity 
statistics, the date of the founding of the College 
Shakespearean club is given as •• 1897 " instead of 
"1879." In the baseball records, the score of the 
Trinity game is printed as 3-2 in our favor Instead of 
2-3 In favor of Trinity, and again, the Middlebury 
score is given in one place as 4-3 and another as 5-4. 
The Chemical club Is entered as the ■ K. K. K." a 
title it discarded more than two years ago. And so on to 
the bitter end. 



In the alumni lists, the same trouble appears. The 
weakest point of the 1902 Index was its neglect of the 
alumni statistics and the board this year had an ex- 
cellent chance for improvement. But what do we 
find ? The officers of two alumni associations given, 
not for 1901 -'02, but for !898-'99. That means that 
three years have gone by since any Index board has 
taken the trouble to revise its lists in good thorough 
fashion. Is it any wonder that the sales of the Index 
to alumni grow smaller and smaller each year ? But 
these are little errors, it is said. True, they are In 
themselves but trifles ; but as Michael Angelo said 
" Trifles make perfection, and perfection is no trifle." 
Or, as the old saying runs. " Whatever is worth doing 
at all is worth doing well." Statistics that are not 
correct are infinitely worse than none at all. We 
respectfully recommend to the 1904 Index board that 
they either revise the alumni list thoroughly or else 
give up publishing it altogether. 

The literary features of the book are, all in all, fully 
as good as we expected. The class has been severely 
handicapped in this respect but we feel sure that those 
who took this part of the book In hand did their best, 
and consequently we have not one word of adverse 
criticism to offer. There is less prose than usual, but 
rather more verse ; and some of it is of considerable 
merit. The book Is remarkably free from severe, bit- 
ter personalities, which too often occur. There is al- 
most nothing at which the most sensitive could take 
offence. The individual records of the class of 1903 
are very well done, indeed ; a great improvement over 
1902, and to our mind the best written feature of the 
whole book. The class histories all are below the 
standard, being decidedly lacking in originality. The 
Sophomore is probably the best. Of course it is un- 
derstood that for none of these Is the Index board 
responsible. 

The artistic work would have been an attractive 
feature but for the poor work of the printer, who cer- 
tainly did his best to spoil many of the best engrav- 
ings. We could wish too that the artistic work like 
the literary had all been a class production. The 
few illustrations that were made outside are in such 
questionable taste for a work of that kind that there 
could have been little loss if they had been omitted 
altogether. 

One of the most pleasing features of the book was 



its dedication to Prof. Ralph E. Smith, an honor cer- 
tainly richly deserved, and which receives universal 
commendation. 

Our criticism of the 1903 Index will undoubtedly 
be criticised in turn as unduly severe, and in compar- 
ison with the usual reviews we are free to admit tha* 
it is. The present volume is not, it is true, any worse 
than many others. It is an attractive book, into 
which much hard work has been put. It de- 
serves, and we hope it will receive a large sale. 
But we do protest vigorously against the slipshod sort 
of way in which the statistics are compiled, and we 
hope that succeeding boards will improve upon it. The 
weak points are the long delay in getting the book be- 
fore the public and the inaccuracy of the statistics and 
alumni list. The strong points are the many illus- 
trations, the high grade of the editorials and the al- 
most complete lack of features which might cause 
ofience. 



A PERSONAL EXPERIENCE ON A NIGHT 
FREIGHT. 

One evening in July a few years ago, I started with 
my horse for my summer home in Maine. We were 
to go by freight, and I expected, if all went well, to 
reach my destination early the next morning. It was 
dusk when we pulled out of the Somerville yards. The 
moon was full, and objects could be discerned almost 
as plainly as if it were daylight. With both doors of 
the car open, a flood of light streamed across the floor 
and made a lantern unnecessary. 

Seated on a box in one of the doorways, I could see, 
at intervals, the shadows of trainmen as they walked 
along the top of the car. Shortly after leaving Ports- 
mouth and crossing the river. I noticed the shadow of 
a man who was walking overhead. On arriving just 
above the doorway in which I was sitting, he sat down 
with his legs dangling in front of the open doorway, 
within easy reach of my hands. At first, I believed him 
one of the trainmen snatching a few moments rest after 
his hard labors at the last stopping place ; but I soon 
changed my mind when I saw that he was turning over 
preparatory to dropping down into the car. I concluded 
at once that he was a tramp. Not wishing to accost 
my strange visitor, unarmed as I was, I retreated Into 
the darkest corner I could find and awaited develop- 
mens. They were not long incoming. He performed 



100 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



101 






the difficult feat of dropping into the car very skillfully 
as only one used to the trick could have done. Look- 
ing around, and seeing only a horse, he made his way, 
lucky for me, to the other end of the car and stretched 
out on some hay which I had taken along for my 
own bed. The rumbling of the train prevented me 
from hearing any noise which might indicate whether 
or not he was asleep; but. after waiting some fifteen 
minutes, my curiosity impelled me to make a closer 
examination of my fellow-traveller. Just as I started 
towards him, we rounded a curve and a streak of light 
shooting across the floor, disclosed his face for a 
moment. It was an unshaven and dissipated counten- 
ance which presented itself. The fact that his eyes 
were closed, and that he was apparently asleep, afforded 
me considerable relief, especially as I noticed a glitter- 
ing object by his side which I knew at once was a 
weapon, and, from its position, I judged it had dropped 
from his pocket. I crept stealthily towards him. cling- 
ing to the dark side of the car, fearing lest he wake 
and see me before I lay my hand on that shining 
metal. Finally I got within reach and quickly stooped 
and picked it up with with a feeling of relief which 
may easily be imagined. It was a revolver. On ex- 
amination, in the light of the doorway. It proved to be 
a six-shooter and loaded ready for duty. I sat down 
in a position where I could keep my eye on the stranger 
in the corner and began to imagine his surprise and 
disappointment when he awoke and found himself dis- 
armed. It did not occur to me that my fellow-trav- 
eller was anything more than a common ■• hobo." I 
thought he was only doing what so many others of his 
profession are continually doing, namely, travelling at 
the company's expense. 

About an hour and a half after he had thrust his 
presence upon me, the train began to slow down. I 
put my head out of the door and saw that we were 
approaching a small station and that there was a man 
standing on the track ahead, waving a lantern. Of 
course the rattle and jar of the cars incident to slow- 
ing down a heavy freight, aroused the man. He lifted 
his head and looked around. Seeing me standing in 
the doorway, he drew back and reached out his hand 
as If in search of his weapon. I shouted to him and 
said there was no need of worrying, as 1 would see that 
he didn't fall overboard. That did not seem to reas- 
sure him.and be began begging me to let him go. I told 



him I shonld not let him go as I was going to hand 
him over to the authorities. In reality, the opposite 
of this was my intention, and I intended to tell him 
to jump as soon as the train should start up again. 
But first, having the upper hand. I intended to have a 
little amusement at his expense. By this time, the 
train-hands were running about with their lanterns. 
As one of them was running by my car, a sudden Im- 
pulse prompted me to call to him. He came out and 
looked in. Seeing the tramp whom I had allowed to 
come forward into the light, he asked hurriedly about 
him. I told him in a few words all I knew about the 
matter. Then, for the first time, I thought seriously of 
the possible character of the man with whom I had 
been riding. When I had told him all I knew, he be- 
came greatly excited and began shouting to the other 
men. When they came up, my prisoner was ordered 
to get out of the car which he did, with a carelessness 
which spoke well of his boldness ; quite a reversal of 
his former pleading attitude when talking to me. On 
touching the ground, he was seized by two burly brake- 
men. I soon learned the cause of these strange pro- 
ceedings. The last town where we had stopped tele- 
graphed ahead to the one where we now were to flag 
the freight and search it for a suspicious character. 
A daring robbery had been committed, and the robber 
had been traced to the tracks ; so it was supposed 
that he had boarded the freight. Here he had been 
riding in my car. You may well Imagine my feelings 
when it occurred to me what I had done ; It being 
nothing more nor less than the capture, single-handed, 
of a blood-thirsty desperado. 

The town constable. having been notified before our 
arrival, soon came tearing down the road In an old 
carriage. Handcuffs and shackles soon adorned the 
prisoner, and he was driven away to spend the rest of 
the night in the country jail. 

As the signal for the train to start was about to be 
given, the operator stepped out of his office with a broad 
grin on his face and handed the conductor a despatch. 
As I happened to be standing beside the conductor, I 
read it by the light of his lantern, while my heart 
quickly took a trip from the seventh story to the base- 
ment and an irrepressible feeling of thirty cents gained 
possession of me. It read as follows : " Robber 

boarded down freight and caught at D , 303 pro- 

Iceed at once ; receive further orders at H 1" 

A. N. S. 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY ALUMNI. 

The alumni of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege living in Hartford and vicinity, had a banquet at 
Allyn House, Hartford, Conn., Friday evening, Feb. 
21, some twenty-five members being present. A pre- 
liminary meeting had been held earlier In the season, 
at which Edwin P. Smead, principal of the Watkinson 
Farm School, was chosen temporary chairman and 
H. D. Hemenway of the Horticultural School of 
Hartford was elected temporary secretary. After the 
banquet the committee appointed at the preliminary 
meeting submitted a draft of a constitution and by-laws 
which were adopted. 

Those present were President H. H. Goodell of the 
college and of the alumni Judge R. W. Lyman. North- 
ampton. 71; Edwin P. Smead. principal Watkinson 
Farm School. 71 ; Lilley B. Caswell, civil engineer, 
Barber-, civil engineer, Windsor, 
H. Webb, lawyer. New Haven. 
B. Minor, manufacturer, New 
George A. Parker, superintendent 
E. Root, physician, Hartford, 



After the business meeting Professor Phelps, as 
toastmaster, called upon the newly elected president, 
Mr. Webb, who spoke in behalf of the organization. 



Athol, 71 ; S. H. 
Conn., 72 ; James 
Conn., 73 ; John 
Britain, Conn , 73 ; 
Keney Park, 76 ; J 



Conn., 76 ; James S. Williams, manufacturer, Glas- 
tonbury, Conn., '82; Charles M. Beach, farmer, West 
Hartford, Conn., 82; Professor Charles S. Phelps. 
Connecticut Agricultural College. Storrs, Conn., '85 ; 
William M. Shepardson. landscape gardener, Middle- 
bury. Conn., '88 ; C. M. Hubbard, farmer, Sunder- 
land, '92; R. P. Lyman, veterinary surgeon, Hartford, 
Conn., "92 ; W. I. Boynton. dentist. Springfield. '92 ; 
E. H. Lehnert. professor veterinary, Storrs, Conn., 
'93; Charles A. Goodrich, physician, Hartford, Conn.. 
'93 ; J. H. Putnam, superintendent estate. Litchfield. 
'94; H. D. Hemenway, director Horticultural School, 
Hartford. Conn.. '95 ; Allan B. Cook, superintendent 
estate, Farmington. Conn.. '96; R. L. Hayward. 
insurance. Hartford. Conn., '96 ; R. D. Gilbert, stu- 
dent at Yale. '00; W. A. Dawson. Pierson green- 
houses, Cromwell. Conn., "01. 

It was decided to call the organization the Connect- 
icut Valley Alumni Association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, and officers were chosen as 
follows: President, James H. Webb of New Haven, 
Conn.; vice-presidents. Dr. Joseph E. Root of Hart- 
ford, Conn., Professor Charles S. Phelps of Storrs. 
Conn.; secretary, H. D. Hemenway of Hartford. Conn.; 
treasurer, John B. Minor of New Britain. 



George A. Parker, superintendent of Keney Park, 
spoke on landscape gardening and urged the necessity 
of a school for its study, and President H. H. Goodell 
of the college made an address, saying something 
about the present condition of the college and its 
increased field for usefulness. 

President Goodell spoke on the needs of the college, 
most of which are appreciated and are being met. 
The trustees now have $90,000 for a new boarding 
house and a heating plant. He was elected an honorary 
member of the association. 

Another speaker of the evening was Judge R. W. 
Lyman, 71, of Northampton, who spoke for the col- 
lege and sister associations of alumni. A letter was 
read for Dr. Wellington, telling of the work of the 
alumni committee on advertising the college. 

The present membership is as follows : 

GUEST. 

H. H. Goodell, President. 

MEMBERS. 

71. — Judge R. W. Lyman. Northampton. 

71.— Lilly B. Caswell. Civil Engineer, Athol. 

71. — F. P. Smead, Principal, Watk'nson Farm 
School, Hartford, Conn. 

72. — S. H. Barber, Civil Engineer. Windsor, Conn. 

73.-— James H. Webb, Lawyer, New Haven, Conn. 

73. — John B. Minor. Manufacturer, New Britain, 
Conn. 

76. — Ceorge A. Parker, Superintendent Keney 
Park, Hartford, Conn. 

76.— J. E. Root. Physician. Hartford, Conn. 

'85.— C. S. Phelps. Prof. Agri. Conn. Agri. College, 
Storrs, Conn. 

'92.— W. I. Boynton, Dentist. Springfield. 

'93. — E. H. Lehnert. Prof. Veterinary Storrs. Conn. 

'93. — Charles A. Goodrich. Physician, Hartford, 
Conn. 

'94. — J. H. Putnam, Superintendent Estate, Litch- 
field, Conn. 

'95. — H. D. Hemenway, Director Horticultural 
School, Hartford, Conn. 

'96, — Allan B. Cook, Superintendent Estate, Far- 
mington, Conn. 

'00.— R. D. Gilbert,Student,Yale,New Haven.Conn. 



102 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



103 




FRATERNITY CONFERENCE 



A meeting of the Fraternity Conference was held 
Tuesday evening. Feb. 25. Those present were Dr. 
Charles Wellington, 73. C. A. Tinker, '04 and E. B. 
Saunders, '02. of the D. G. K. Fraternity ; R. W. 
Morse, '02, and H. J. Franklin. '03, of the Q. T. V.; 
Prof. S. F. Howard, '94. V. A. Gates, "02. and E. G. 
Proulx '03. of the Phi Sigma Kappa ; and H. L. 
Knight', '02. and C. I. Lewis. '02, of the College 
Shakespearean Club. The main business was the 
hearing of the reports of committees. Three frater- 
nities reported favorably on the adoption of Monday 
night as the Fraternity Night, the D. G. K. alone 
opposing It. The committee appointed to investigate 
the matter of a new song pamphlet reported favorably 
and the committee was further instructed to pre- 
pare a song-book, at once. The committee 
instructed to petition the Faculty for ten min- 
utes each week after chapel for college singing, re- 
ported that the petition was granted for a period of ten 
weeks. It was thought best however to delay hold- 
ing these exercises until the appearance of the song- 
books. The Conference then adjourned. 

THE LADIES' RECEPTION. 

The first of the series of social gatherings given 

each year by the ladies of the faculty in co-operation 

with the Fraternity Conference was held Saturday 

evening. March 1. The attendance was fairly large. 

though unquestionably lessened by the sudden change 

in date made necessary by the violent storm on the 

evening before, when the reception was to have been 

held. The affair was entirely informal. A very 

pleasant social evening was enjoyed, and an excellent 

musical program presented as follows : 

Piano solo. Mi M M S« 

Mr. Staples. 



Bass solo. 
Banjo solo, 
Reading, 
Baritone solo, 
Cornet solo. 



Music by quartette. 



Mr. Walker. 

Mr. Couden. 

Mr. Allen. 

Mr. Holcomb. 

'Mr. West. 
Mr. Lewis. 
Mr. Holcomb. 
Mr. Staples. 



The largest single gift ever given an educational 
institution is that of thirty millions which Mrs. Stan- 
ford has recently awarded to the university bearing 
her name. 



THE JUNIOR BANQUET. 

The junior banquet tendered the class of 1903 by 
the class of 1905 was held in the United States Hotel. 
Boston, on Friday, Feb. 21. 

The class left college in a body Friday afternoon, 
after a lively time arrived in Boston, and at 8-30 sat 
down to supper. After their appetites had been satis- 
fied Toastmaster P. W. Brooks took charge and kept 
the class in roars by his funny stories and comical 
poetry introducing each speaker by some fitting little 

original verse. 

Class-president E. B. Snell responded to the first 
toast. •' The Freshmen." He spoke of the responsi- 
bility which Juniors should feel for the Freshmen and 
mentioned the many good characteristics of the class 

of 1905. 

S. C. Bacon, President of the Junior Prohibition 
Club, next spoke on Prohibition and explained the 
object of the Club and the good work which it hopes 
to do. N F. Monahan handled the "Hottest Class" 
in good shape, giving a brief history of the class from 
the time it entered college up to date. 

C. P. Halligan then explained why he liked to 
■• Breakfast at 7-59 " and run to chapel and f-om 
this led on to a most amusing account on something, 
which he knows absolutely nothing about— women. 
•• The Cut System " by W. E. Allen could not have 
been handled in better shape. He mingled his explana- 
tions of the system with many stories and anecdotes. 
G. L. Barrus next gave his version of the manner 
in which certain professors handled their departments 
while others were treated by M. H. West in a very 
pleasing way. G. D. Jones next told about the 
" doings " in our " Stock Exchange." mingled with 
an unusually large number of jokes and stories which 

he showered around the class. 

The " Nobility of Agronomy " responded toby H. 

J Franklin, certainly was a success from an amusing 
point of view. W. W. Peebles in his subject " Re- 
ligion in our class" pointed out the grand moral 
effect religion has had on the individual members, 
illustrating his remarks with many quotations. 

At the close of the banquet a toast was drunk to 

the " Freshmen" and hearty three times three were 

given for the class which had given them such a 

good time. The committee in charge were R. H. 

Robertson, P. W. Brooks and W. V Tower. 



Observations $ C onc ' us,ons 

That was a good joke sprung on us the other day 
when somebody posted on the bulletin board a notice 
to the effect that in case of fire in either of the dormi- 
tories, " students rooming on the upper floors shall im- 
mediately lower the fire escapes." Whether the ad- 
jutant, the fire marshal, or the commandant is re- 
sponsible for the joke we are uninformed but it is 
worthy of Artemus Ward himself. To those rooming 
in the dormitories no explanation is needed ; and oth- 
ers will understand the humor of the situation when 
they know that it is a good ten days undertaking for 
four men, three pair of mules and a machine for the 
computation of heights, weights and densities to lower 
the four contrivances on the south side of South Col- 
lege which the above mentioned humorist has termed 
fire escapes. Our advice to the 'roomers in the up- 
per stories is to try the stairways or; if cut off by the 
fire in that direction, to tie together their sheets and 
blankets, and lower themselves from the rear windows 
where, in case of accident, there is no tar walk to 
break the force of the fall. 

• *#*** 

Speaking of good jokes, puts us in mind of a very 
bad one which the 1903 Index following the exam- 
ple of Its predecessors for many years back, has again 
seen fit to inflict upon us. Why so many Index boards 
should deem it funny to publish year after year a pho- 
tograph of a lot of fellows in dress suits and label it, 
the •• Glee club " is a question worthy the attention of 
future boards of editors. If those gentlemen who 
figure In the photograph want to see their names in 
print, let them form themselves into some other 
kind of a club. This would, at least, relieve the mon- 
otony. Call it the •• New Woman's Club." or better 
"The Old Woman's Club." for a change. Anyway 
the joke. If continued, ought to be labeled as such, or 
it might be taken seriously by some of the alumni, 
and lead them to believe that we really have a Glee 
club In College. In fact it would be a good thing for 
the College if we had. 

****** 
It is curious that those visiting basketball teams 
which play the roughest games themselves are so 
ready to complain of the treatment that they receive 



at our hands. If visitors, even theological students, 
will play " dirty ball " they must not expect to be ap- 
plauded for it by any but students of their own col- 
lege. Apropos of the above, the last issue of the 
Trinity Tablet is very amusing. 



OFFICIAL NOTICE. 

In accordance with the constitution of the College 
Signal we publish the following notice : 

The men named below may become eligible for 
election to the College Signal board : 1903, H.J. 
Franklin, W. W. Peebles, C. S. Tinkham ; 1904. E. 
A. Bach. A. W. Gilbert. R. R Raymoth, H. M. 
White; 1905, G. H. Allen, H. H. Goodenough. C. A. 
Merrill. F. C. Pray, A. W. Swain. 

To become eligible, these men must make at least 
one additional contribution to the College Sicnal on 
or before March 21. 1902. Articles must be in my 
hands or left inside the Signal mailbox on or before 
that date in order to be considered. The election of 
new men will take place as soon as possible after the 
closing of the competition, the basis of choice to be 
the quantity and quality of the work submitted during 

the entire period. 

Editor-in-chief. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

Thursday. March 13. Basketball, Massachusetts 
vs. Cushing Academy at Ashburnham. 
Address before the Y. M. C. A. at 700 
o'clock by Mr. Huntress of Westfield. 

Friday. March 14.— Basketball, Massachusetts vs. 
Fitchburg Y. M. C. A. at Fitchburg. In- 
formal dance in the Drill Hall. 

Saturday. March 15.— Competition closes for the 
college song contest. 

Thursday, March 20.— Condition examinations. 

Friday, March 21.— Competition closes for the Col- 
lege Signal. 

Saturday. March 22.— Election of new editors for 
the College Signal. 

Tuesday. March 25.— Regular meeting of the Chem- 
ical Club. 



John D. Rockefeller has offered to double any gifts 
up to $200,000 made to the endowment fund of Vas- 
sar College before June 1904. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i°5 




Co11e£* JMot*s- 



1903 Index at last! 

E. F. McCobb is suffering from an attack of la 

grippe. 

_Dr. Wellington was unable to attend his classes 

last week. 

—I. H. Hamblin. '05, has left College for a month 
to recuperate. 

—Prof. W. P. Brooks was called to Norwell last 
week by the death of his sister. Mrs. Waldo Jones. 

—The sympathies of the College are with J. C. 
Hall. '02. who was recently called home by the death 
of his sister. 

—The class of 1904 held their sophomore dinner 
in the Bloody-Brook house. South Deerfield last Fri- 
day evening. 

—The officers of the Pan-American Exposition 
have awarded the College a diploma and a handsome 
gold medal for its exhibits. 

' —The first of the series of informal dances will be 
held in the drill hall next Friday evening. March 14. 
All College men are invited. 

—Prof Babson has been appointed to a position in 
the literary department of the Baltimore Sun, con- 
ducted by Prof. Guy Carlton Lee. 

—Attention is called to the fact that anyone wish- 
ing to compete for the College song prize must hand 
in their song on or before Saturday. March 15. 

— H A. Paul delivered a lecture Friday afternoon 
on the -Campaign at Santiago" in the Students- 
Lecture Course of the Military Science department. 
—Prof. Herman Babson lectured before the Col- 
lege Shakespearean club. Monday evening. March 3. 
on " Some phases of German life." 

—The reception held by the ladies of the faculty 
on Saturday. Feb. 27, in the chapel was well attended 
and proved very enjoyable. See account elsewhere 
In this issue. 

—A serious error In the 1903 Index was the omis- 
sion of three names from the list of those entitled to 
the " M." J. W. Gregg has earned the baseball " M " 
and W. H. Craighead and J. J. Gardner the football 
•• M." 



-Mr Canavan intends to clear the snow from the 
board walk between the boarding-house and North 
College some time the latter part of this week, unless 
a thaw comes on to prevent. 

— H. L. Barnes. '04. who had his leg broken while 
playing football last fall has been taken to the House 
of Mercy. Pittsfield. where it was found that he not 
only had his leg broken in three places but had also 
sprained his ankle. 

—Mr. D. L. Cleaves, instructor in Chemistry for 
the past few months has resigned his position. He 
has been chosen assistant chemist In the fertilizer di- 
vision of the Chemical department of the experiment 
station, to succeed S. W. Wiley. '98. He will begin 
his new duties about April 15th. 

—On February 25th Prof. Babson gave a lecture 
before the Amherst ladies' Tuesday club, comparing 
Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards. 

Captain Paul has his squad of baseball men hard 
at work. He is hardening their muscles by rigid 
work in the » setting up " exercises and Butte's ■• Man- 
ual " for the rifle, besides giving them throwing and 
batting practice. The Freshmen who are trying for 
the team— Walker. Ingham, Hunt. Pray and Merrill 
— are showing up well. 

—At the annual election of officers in the Young 
Men's Christian Association, held Thursday, March 
16th the following men were elected : Pres't, W. E. 
Tottingham ; vice pres't, E. A. Bach ; corresponding 
sec'y, P. F. Staples; recording sec'y. E. E. Rhodes; 
treas.. H. J. Franklin. They will assume the respon- 
sibilities of their offices the first of April. 

—Mr. Thomas Lavelle has been secured by Mr. 
E. A. Jones of the farm department as overseer of 
the dairy. This makes a completed list of overseers 
as'follows; E. A. Jones, general sup't : Mr. Bidurtha. 
ass't sup't ; Mr. Halloway. sup't cattle barn ; Mr. 
Meekin. sup't horse barn ; Mr. Brown, sup't carpenter 
department : Mr. Lavelle. sup't dairy. 

—Mr. Huntress, who has been connected with the 
Y M. C. A. in Westfield for ten years and who is to 
take charge of the work in Pittsfield next May, will 
address the Y. M. C. A. to-morrow evening at seven 
o'clock. It is proposed to combine with his address a 
praise service. Plans are on foot for some special 
musical features and It is hoped that all of the Faculty 



and the student body who can, will be present to hear 
Mr. Huntress and to help in the singing. 

— The Political Economists of the senior class 
easily defeated the Botanists, last Saturday evening 
by a score of 60 to 14. The game was one-sided but 
interesting throughout. The " Polycons " excelled in 
team work but marred their showing by persistent 
fouling, which cost them many points. Bodfish ex- 
celled for the " Polycons," throwing eleven goals and 
two fouls, while Dacy and Dellea played a plucky 
game for the Botanists. The summary : 

POLYCONS 

Bodfish, r. f. 
Belden, 1. f. 
Cooley, c. 
Smith, r. g. 
Morse. 1. g. 

Score : Polycons 60, Botanists 14 
fish 11, Belden 4, Cooley 2. Morse, Smith. Dacy, Dellea. 
Fouls called. OB Morse 8. Smith 2, Cooley 2, Bodfish. Plumb 
2, Lewis, Hodgkiss. Coals from fouls.'Dellea 8. Bodfish 2, 
Belden. Referee, Haffenreffer. Umpire, Gilbert. Time- 
keeper, Couden, Scorer, Knight. Time, one 60 minute half. 

NOTICE. 
It is the duty of every alumnus and student of 
this College to send at least one football player 
to M. A. C. this fall. We need more men and 
must have them. 

C. P. Halligan, Cap't. 
F. E. Jennings, Coach. 



/Uhletic No-t^s- 



BOTANISTS 

I. g., Plumb 

r. g,. Dacy 

c, Lewis 

1. f.. Hodgkiss 

r. f.. Dellea 

Coals from field. Bod- 



BASEBALL. 

Indoor baseball practice has begun in the Drill Hall 
and is being continued regularly under the direction of 
Captain Paul. The list of candidates is as follows: 
1902, H. L. Bodfish, L. A. Cook, H. A. Paul ; 1903, 
P. W. Brooks, J.G.Cook, C. P. Halligan. E.G. 
Proulx; 1904. M. F. Ahearn. J.W.Gregg, G. E. 
O'Hearn; 1905. T.F.Hunt. N.D.Ingham. F. C. 
Pray. L. S. Walker. C. A. Merril. 

A good schedule Is being arranged which will be 
announced in due season, and a tax will soon be 
levied on the student body. With proper support, 
there is not the slightest reason why we should not 
have the best team in our history this spring. 



BASKETBALL. 

Amherst, 36 ; Massachusetts, 22. 

The basketball team played their second game with 
Amherst at Pratt gymnasium Wednesday afternoon 
Feb. 26, and were defeated by the score of 36-22. 

The game was close and always interesting but was 
apt to be rough at times. Massachusetts played a 
very good defensive game and especially in the first 
half blocked Amherst's passing skillfully. 

The game began at 4-30 and after a few seconds 
play, Dellea scored a goal for Massachusetts, Massa- 
chusetts kept the lead through the first half until a 
few seconds before time was called when WlL^n put 
the ball in the basket making the score at end of first 
half Amherst, 18; Mass., 16. 

In the second half both teams started in with a 
rush. Owing to Massachusetts' poorer physical con- 
dition they could not keep the pace and at the end of 
the half the score was 36-22 in Amherst's favor. 
The only thing to mar the playing of this half was the 
large number of fouls. 

For Amherst Wilson and Carnell did the best play- 
ing while Hall and Dellea excelled for Massachusetts 
the latter making some very pretty goals. The 
summary: 

AMHEPST. 

Anderson, r. f., 
Wilson, 1. f.. 
Cleeland, c, 
Crawford, r. g., 
Carnell. I. g. 



The honor system which is practiced at Princeton 
has been adopted by the students of Cornell, 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. g., Fulton 
r. g., Whitaker 
c. Hall 
1. f., Quigley 
r. f., Dellea 
Score, Amherst. 36; Massachusetts, 22. Goals from field, 
Wilson 4. Anderson 3. Cleeland 2,Crawford, Carnell, Quigley 
3. Dellea 3. Goals from fouls Crawford 3. Dellea. Umpire 
and referee. Belden of Mass. and Field of Amherst. Timers 
Gates of Mass. and Whitelaw of Amherst. Time. 20 minute 
halves. 

Massachusetts, 27 ; Wesleyan, 24. 
On Saturday, March 8. the basketball team played 
its last home game of the season with Wesleyan at 
the Drill Hall and won by the score of 27-24. 

Although the score was close the game was slow 
and unexciting for it was only during the last few min- 
utes of play that Wesleyan became a dangerous oppo- 
nent. In the last five minutes of play Wesleyan 
scored four easy goals. The team work of the men 



io6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



107 



was rather poor and the passing was not up to the 

standard. 

For Wesleyan Woodruff and Calder did the best 
playing while Fulton and Dellea excelled for Massa- 
chusetts. Summary : 

MASSACHUSEETTS. 

Ahearn. LI 
Dellea. r. f. 
Cook, c. 
Fulton, 1. g.. c. 
Quigley, r. g. 
Whitaker. 1. g. 

Score, Massachusetts. 27; Wesleyan. 24 
field, Fulton 4. Woodruff 3. Calder 2, Ahearn. DeUea Quip- 
ley. Whitaker, MacNaughton. Clerk. Mathison. Goals from 
fouls. Dellea 3. Referee and umpire. Belden o^ Massachu- 
setts and Garrison of Wesleyan alternated T.mekeeper- 
Bodfish. Scorer. Paul. Time. 20 minute halves. 



>i 



WESLEYAN 

r. g., Calder 

MacNaughton 

c. Clerk 

r. f.. Mathison 

1. f., Woodruff 

Goals from 



Alumni. 

H. Easterbrook. died April, 



the Grand Central Station N. Y. city and the remodel- 
ling of the tunnel, in which occurred the recent wreck. 
•99, _M. H. Pingree is instructing a class of about 
fifty men in dairy chemistry at the Penn. State college. 
•99 —Charles M. Walker has lately been promoted 
to first assistant to E. P. Felt, state entomologist of 
New York. The entomological exhibit which Mr. 
Walker arranged for the Pan-American exposition at 
Buffalo has been awarded a gold medal and four 
silver medals, 

• 99 ._F. H. Turner who is in the hardware business 
in Great Barrington spent Sunday. Feb. 23, in 
Amherst. 

•99 —Samuel E. Smith who entered this year's 
dairy class has entered the poultry and dairy business 
at East Longmeadow. 

• 9 9,_W. E. Hinds who was temporary assistant of 
the division of entomology at Washington, P. C, dur- 



72. — Isaac 
Dudley. 

•82 —Henry 5. Brodt has been chosen secretary 
and assistant treasurer of the corporation of J. W 
Hugus & Co.. Rawlins, Wyoming. Mr. Brodt located 
in Rawlins two years after graduating from this Insti- 
tution and secured this position of civil engineer for 
the Wyoming Central association. In November. 
1885. he entered the employ of J. W. Hugus & Co. 
and four years later was given management of the 
grocery department of their extensive store. He 
became a stockholder of the company in 1891 Mr. 
Brodt is also a stockholder in the Carton County Sheep 
and Cattle company. 

•86 -George S. Fellows. B. A., who entered the 
postgraduate course here in '86, died suddenly at 
Exeter. N. H.. Aug. 26. 1901. 

•91— Word has been received that A. G. Eames. 
war correspondent for the Boston Journal in the Phil- 
ippines has mysteriously disappeared. All efforts to 
locate his whereabouts have failed. 

•95 -Walter L. Morse has recently resigned his 
position as assistant engineer, with the N. Y N. H. & 
H R R Co, to accept a similar one with the N. Y. 
Central & Hudson River R. R. Co. He is at pres- 
ent located with the Terminal Engineer, and is to be 
connected with the building of the tunnel loop beneath 



60 YEARS' 

EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights 4c. 

* Patents taken tnrou B h Munn * Co. receWe 
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DWIGHT W. THTJRBER, Prop'r. 



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Other Course: BuslneM, Hhnrthand, 
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course tits for teacher's certificate. 






STEPHEN LANE POLGER, 

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Club and College PinBand Rings. 
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Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



OFFICE OF 



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REAL "ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Muss 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75, 




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We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, exchange tad repair writing machines. Supplies of all kinds. 

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io8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




ing the last summer, prepared, while in that work a 
bulletin on » Carbon Bisulphide as an Insecticide. 
Mr. Hinds in order to conduct some practical experi- 
ments with the use of carbon bisulphide against the 
cigarette beetle, thoroughly familiarized himself with 
the subject and as a result the bulletin is very complete. 
It is of value to persons interested in the destruction 
of insects injurious to stored products, undergound 
Insects, museum pests, tree borers and sucking insects 
and contains in the appendix, chemical experiments 
with carbon bisulphide by E. E. Ewell of the Bureau 
of Chemistry. 

Ex-'05 — F. W. Brigham has entered a Boston 
business ' school, address. 463 Blue Hill Ave.. 
Dorchester. 



Depar-tm^rvf f4ot*s. 



LIBRARY. 
The Life of Robert Stevenson by Graham Balfour 
(2 vols) The author admits that Stevenson had his 
faults but passes en to speak of his virtues. There 
were failures in his life, says Mr. Balfour, but let us 
rather dwell upon his triumphs. Never, perhaps, has 
t h *rp h*en a more vigorous outcry than that precipi- 
tated by Mr. Balfour's biography of his kinsman. It 
is a modest book, and gentle enough, in all conscience. 
It proffers no challenge. It accepts its hero as gen- 
uine and worships him with reverence. The book is 
intended to supplement the volumes of Stevenson s 
letters already published. Originally it was to have 
been written by Mr. Colvin and to have appeared sim- 
ultaneously with the two volumes of correspondence, 
so admirably edited by him ; but when health and 
opportunity unfortunately failed him. Mrs. Stevenson 
requested Mr. Balfour to undertake the task. Mr. 
Balfour was a cousin to Mr. Stevenson and during 
the last two and a half years of Mr. Stevenson's life 
Mr Balfour had on his invitation made Vailima his 
home and the point of departure for his journeys, and 
apart from the members of Mr. Stevenson's own fam- 
ily had been throughout that period the only one of 
his intimate friends in contact with every side of his 
life. Consequently he was selected to write Mr. 
Stevenson's biography. 




44 The College Student 
and His Problems^ 

by President Canflekl of Ohio State University is a 
book which ought to Interest you. By mail, 81-08. 

Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ART, 

Sprinjifleld, Mass. 



S18-818 Main St., 



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HKNKY E. MARSH, Proprietor. 



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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 




the: college signal 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 26. 1902. 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amhbrst, Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

HOWARD LAWTON KNIGHT, 1902, Editor-in-Chief. 

LEANDER CHAPIN CLAFLIN, 1902, Business Manager. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN, I 903, Assistant Business Manager. 
VICTOR ADOLPH GATES. 1902, Athletics. CHARLES MILTON KINNEY, 1902, Intercollegiate. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. 1903, Department Notes. CLAUDE ISAAC LEWIS, 1902. 

NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN, 1903, College Notes. MYRON HOWARD WEST, 1903, Alumni Notes. 

FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN, 1904. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904. 



Terms: ♦1.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside o* United States and Canada, 88c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Boarding Club, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

D. N. West, Pres. Athletic Association, 

V. A. Gates, Manager, Base-Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Three Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L. Barrus. Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Eld i-to rials. 



We had intended to enclose a cut of our basket- 
ball team with this issue, and to devote considerable 
space to an account of the team and its work. 
Delays In securing the photograph however prevented 
us from so doing and accordingly we have postponed 
the entire matter until the following issue. 



At a meeting of the senior members of the Col- 
lege Signal board, these men were elected to the 
editorial staff: H.J. Franklin. 1903. R. R. Ray- 
moth, 1904, H. M. White, 1904. G. H. Allen. 1905, 
H. H. Goodenough. 1905. Subsequently the new 
board organized as follows: Editor-in-chief. Myron 
H. West ; business manager, William E. Allen ; as- 
sistant business manager, Howard M. White. They 
will probably assume their new duties very shortly. It 
is unnecessary to say that the retiring board extends 
to these men its best wishes and desires that they will 
meet with all possible success. They have an excel- 
lent opportunity before them. We leave the Col- 



lege Signal on a firmer financial standing than it has 
previously known, and we hope this has been accom- 
plished without undergoing a depreciation in its 
standards. The position Is one of serious responsi- 
bility and we hope the new board will realize this fact 
In its fullest significance. In conclusion, we would 
thank our friends for their many kindnesses during the 
past year, with the hope that they will be extended In 
the same full measure to our successors. 



Among other editorials in the 1903 Index was one 
strongly opposing co-education in this college. This 
is of course a question In which a difference of opin- 
ion is likely to exist and it is possible that its writer 
correctly represented college opinion. Some of his 
arguments however did not impress us as particularly 
strong. For instance, in conclusion, he says. " We 
cannot see how with so many good colleges for women 
In the close vicinity It would benefit a woman to 
attend our college." This is a dangerous argument. 
It is precisely the one which is used by opponents of 
the college with regard to students of any sort. We 
answer it by saying that it would be true provided the 



no 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



in 








opportunities offered in adjacent institutions were the 
same, but not otherwise. The Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College was established with the express pur- 
pose of " promoting the liberal and practical education 
of the industrial classes " by offering courses in agri- 
culture and its allied branches. No other institution 
in the state has that object or offers those distinctive 
courses. Those who desire them must come to this 
college, and the fact that other colleges of entirely dif- 
ferent aims are to be found within a radius of ten 
miles has no significance whatever. It would be quite 
as logical to exclude a man from West Point on the 
ground that there was a theological seminary in the 
next town. As to whether our courses are such as 
women desire we cannot say ; but if any think that 
they want them we cannot see any argument for 
denying them the privilege. The second argument 
advanced is that co-education is not necessary to us 
from a social standpoint since '• situated as we are. in 
the immediate neighborhood of two colleges for 
women, the men can enjoy as much of the society of 
young ladies as they see fit." This is one of those 
arguments that are excellent in theory but quite worth- 
less in practice. His statement is perfectly true, but 
as far as the great bulk of our students are concerned 
the colleges in question might just as well be located 
on the horns of the moon. The problem of how to 
obtain more social life has been one most serious from 
the very beginning. To our mind the most logical 
solution is co-education. The Index incidentally refers 
to one argument however which is really more import- 
ant than any previously advanced. It has so 
far been the policy of the College to excuse these stu- 
dents from certain exercises without requiring an equiv- 
alent amount of work. As yet no particular harm has 
resulted from this system, but is it not setting up a 
dangerous precedent ? If we are to have electives. 
well and good, only let us all have the privilege. Or if 
these students are taking special courses, and foregoing 
their degrees, well and good ; only let it be so under- 
stood. But we do not believe the College can afford 
to lessen the value of its degree by any system which 
exempts some students from a considerable share of 
our compulsory work without requiring any compensat- 
ing equivalent. And this too without any regard to 
the bitterness and unpleasantness which any such 
policy is almost certain to create. 



J-tories- 



HEROISM : AN EXAMPLE FROM MY MEM- 
ORABILIA. 

It was in the city of Pittsburg one noon In S eptem- 
ber 189-. Crowds of people were hastening to their 
mid-day meals with all the bustle and briskness char- 
acteristic of this occasion in a large manufacturing 
city. In the central portion of the city where the 
streets were flanked by high office buildings, the busy 
hum and clatter of the crowded streets was suddenly 
drowned out by the sharp clear blast of a fire alarm. 
Unmindful of such a common occurrence as a fire, 
the crowd continued on its way. Soon the expected 
sounds could be faintly heard far up the street. Louder 
and louder became the clatter and clang of gongs of 
the approaching fire engines and accompanying appa- 
ratus until the drivers pulled up in front of a ten-story 
brick building. 

Soon after the arrival of the first apparatus, it was 
decided by the chief in command that he had more 
than an ordinary fire with which to cope. Conse- 
quently a second and a third alarm was rung in. As 
can be well imagined the hurrying of great quantities 
of fire-engines and all their attendant pieces towards 
one part of the city soon attracted the attention of 
vast numbers of people who were soon hastening in 
the direction of the fire. The crowd became so great 
that cordons of police were detailed to keep them back ; 
and all the streets in the immediate vicinity were 

roped off. 

The fire was raging in the third and fourth stories 

so fiercely that no access could be had to the upper 

parts of the building. Fortunately, owing to the fact 

that it was the hour between twelve and one, hardly a 

person remained in the doomed structure. Great 

clouds of smoke were continually pouring out, shutting 

off the view of those on the street from the upper 

floors, except at intervals when the smoke would rise 

revealing the upper portions of the building towards 

which the flames were rapidly spreading. At one of 

these intervals some one who happened to be looking 

up saw a woman leaning out of an eight-story window. 

She was clinging there and looking down as if utterly 

bereft of her senses. The attention of the firemen 

was at once attracted. At first, they could see no 

possible way of rescuing her, up there above a seeth- 



ing furnace as she was ; but suddenly, a hose-man, 
grabbing a coil of rope and a scaling-ladder, darted 
through the crowd and into the building opposite. A 
cheer went up from the crowd because, although not 
knowing what would be his course of action, they felt 
sure that a rescue was to be attempted. 

Presently he appeared far up in air on the roof. 
High upas he was, he was below her for whom he 
was going to risk his life. When the truth flashed 
upon him that he was not upon a level with her. he 
seemed to hesitate as if engaged in trying to devise 
some way of getting at her. Suddenly an idea seemed 
to come to him. He made a noose and coiled his 
rope up as if preparatory to throwing it to the woman ; 
then the idea that she would never be able to slide 
down a rope like that occurred to him. and he stopped. 
But his eye happened to fall on a large hook, such as 
is used to fasten shutters, on the sill of the window op- 
posite him. He threw his rope at it, but it fell short. 
When the crowd far below saw the snd dangling down 
through the air, a suppressed groan went up from 
them. Again he tried, this time successfully. Now 
a shout of encouragement issued from their throats. 
Just at this point another fireman appeared by his side, 
and together they tied the end which he had retained 
to a projection on the roof. Now came the time to 
test that hook on which so much so much depended. 
Every eye In that vast gathering far below was fixed 
on this solitary figure as he worked himself slowly over 
hand across the street. Finally he reached a place 
where he could climb upon the sill. Then the man 
who had stayed behind took another rope and threw 
one end of it to his comrade. To one end of it was 
attached the scaling-ladder which he had pulled over 
There was yet before him the most crucial test, as he 
had two stories to scale. Presently he fixed his lad- 
der on the sill of the window above and slowly, care- 
fully worked his way up. In like manner, he went up 
another story and stood beside the woman. 

After a short rest, with the now unconscious woman 
on one arm, he began what seems like a miraculous 
descent. Even more slow than his ascent was his 
descent. Meanwhile the multitude of anxious watch- 
ers were momentarily expecting to see him and his 
burden come hurling through the air to be crushed on 
the pavements many feet below. Indeed it is doubt- 
ful If he would have ever been able to place the woman 



on the sill where the rope was tied. As it was, other 
firemen, having come up on the opposite roof, had 
sent over one of their number who assisted the now 
thoroughly exhausted man. After a moment's pause 
the two men rigged a sling by means of which, using 
the rope as a cable, they sent the woman across, and, 
finally, were themselves pulled over, thus consummat- 
ing one of the most daring rescues from fire on rec- 
ord. When the last man had been safely pulled over 
to his comrades, and they were assured that all were 
sate and sound, such a shout as will never be forgot- 
ten by those who heard it, went up to heaven from 
the throats of that vast audience. 

A. N.S. 



DARK ATTALA. 

All day long on the plains of Media two parties are 
travelling in the same direction, the one in flight and 
the other in pursuit, the first in fear and the second in 
derision and anticipation, for now the rich goods of 
the fleeing caravan are about to change hands. The 
caravan has every reason to fear, for it is Dark Attala 
who follows them with his men, picked for their cru- 
elty, greed, and recklessness. They are the terror of 
all the plainsmen, for their leader from his stronghold 
among the Caspian Range rules with tyranny and 
evades his would-be-captors in the numberless passes 
of the mountains. He rolls in the wealth fallen to his 
hands, and all the restless spirits flock to join them- 
selves under his standard of blood and death. But 
one thing he lacks — his daughter! For her this terror 
of man destroys and plunders in a vain search. Years 
before she was stolen from him as a present to some 
noble : Attala becomes a brigand to drown his grief, 
and seems to hate all mankind. For years he keeps 
up his cruel practices and gains in wealth but Mimima 
seems disappeared from earth, for no trace can he 
find of her. He keeps up his terrible trade, and plun- 
ders all. 

Thus it is we find him, bent on tho same mission of 
butchery and slaughter. All his men are armed to 
the teeth ; their swords are loose in the scabbards, 
and guns loaded and in readiness for the work to which 
they are accustomed. The robbers are on the cara- 
van now and ruthless massacre takes place. The 
victims plead for mercy, but none is given. The air 
is filled with the screams of tortured and dying men 



113 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



**3 




and horses. It is a horrible sight and it turns one 
sick to think of it. 

And now all is over. The brigands give their atten- 
tion to the goods. Here are rare spices from India, 
precious pearls from Ceylon, soft and richly-woven 
rugs from Persia, dates and fruits from Arabia and an 
endless variety of rich and rare articles from the East. 

These things however are not destined to be 
enjoyed by the robbers, for, suddenly, and without any 
intimation of their presence, a battalion of Turkish 
horse are seen charging towards them. Escape | 
seems a hopeless proposition for the surprised band for 
its horses are tired and the men weary from the work 

of killing. 

However Dark Attala is a man of considerable 
resource. He bids his men lash him to a horse and 
then to flee after he has seemingly broken away from 
them. As the troops come dashing up they see a 
man suddenly break from the band of brigands and 
gallop fiercely towards them tied to a horse. The 
brigands make no attempt to follow but flee in all 
directions. Meanwhile the troops pay their attention 
to the bound man— and to the spoils left by the rob- 
bers—who cursing and swearing tells a dreadful tale 
of how the terrible Dark Attala with his following had 
robbed and massacred all his comrades and kept only 
him alive to reserve for some fate, he knew not what. 
He tells also of how he had escaped the robbers dur- 
ing their confusion at seeing the troops. He is invited 
to join the troops and go before the Sultan to tell his 
story. He accepts with seeming pleasure for he 
knows that the invitation is a command. 

Barvivian for that is Dark Attala's name now, dines 
the next noon with a nobleman by whose villa the troops 
are camping, He is received very graciously and 
ushered into the reclining room where are some gentle- 
men friends of the host. Some ladies enter and the 
men all rise and pay their respects. There is moment- 
ary silence. Attala's daughter is before him. She 
sees her father. She makes no sign of recognition, 
no. she is too brave. 

The next day the troops move on but there is no 
Barvivian with them. He is on his way to the moun- 
tains and with him goes the nobleman's wife, his 
daughter MImima. 

The natives say he lives among the mountains still, 
and that there is a beautiful lady with him who calls 



him "father." But none can find him. or his wealth, 
though many are the searchers. H. H. G. 



« ANOTHER LOST SECRET. " 

It is a mild autum night, the rain Is falling in sheets 
and the wind whistles mournful as If bewailing the 
approaching rigor of winter. Inside the chemical 
labratory of the college of S— stands a young man 
working at a bench by the aid of an electric tamp, so 
absorbed in his work as to be wholly unmindful of the 
disturbing elements outside. Since entrance to college 
Arthur Luther had shown special aptitude in chemistry 
and now as a result has been given during his sopho- 
more year special advantages and opportunities for 
working in that subject, among which was the use of 
his bench In the labratory during the evening. He 
seldom took advantage ot this privilege but on this 
particular evening we find him deeply engrossed in his 
subject although the evening was now well spent 
and the janitor whose duty it was to lock up the build- 
ing had for some time been grumbling at his enforced 

waiting. 

On account of his fine work In the subject he had 
won his way to the heart of instructor who had given 
him a chemical problem to work on during spare 
minutes. It was a problem often given to more 
advanced students to work on and its solution would 
give to the one who would solve It. honor and recognition 
in the chemical world If not material recompense. It 
still remained unsolved however and had been given to 
young Luther mainly for the practice the exact work 
required would give. He had worked often during 
spare hours as it. sometimes talking with those who 
had attempted its solution and faiied. On the after- 
noon of the day in question he had by the accidental 
dropping of a comparatively rare salt in a solution he 
had made, brought about a reaction which gave him a 
valuable hint. He had been interrupted at this point 
and had not been able to again take up his work till 
early evening. At the point at which this narrative 
opens he stands defore the light with a solution an 
evaporating dish which he Is carefully acidulating, while 
the eager expression on his face shows with what keen 
interest he is conductinghis experiment. He gradually 
raises the bottle of acid with his right hand while with 
his left he holds the solution nearer the light In order 
to stop the process at exactly the right moment. How 



carefully he proceeds, he slowly allows a small drop of 
the acid to fall, then a second, and a third, then he 
stops, the litmus paper is slowly turning red. with the 
greatest care he again raises the bottle when suddenly 
all is dark and the dish crashes in the sink beneath as 
his over worked nerves give way. Quickly he scratches 
a match in order to make sure of the slip of paper on 
which he has jotted down important notes but at the 
same instance the janitor alarmed at the crash made 
by the breaking of the dish opened the door and the 
small bit of paper Is picked up and hurled away from 
his grasp by the sudden burst of wind wnich came 
through the open door. 

The Daily News the next morning contained the fol- 
lowing item ; " Owing to an accident at the power 
house the college buildings were left in total darkness 
for about a half an hour last evening and although a 
good deal of inconvenience resulted to the students we 
have as yet heard of no accident taking place." 

Although young Luther hunted long for the valuable 
slip of paper he never found it, and although he some- 
what lost interest in that special problem still he retained 
an interest in chemistry and should his real name be 
given a leader in the science would at once be 
recognized. H. M. W. 



A GIRL, A FAN, AND A SPRAY OF MOUN- 
TAIN LAUREL. 

•• Whom shall I take to the Prom ?" 

This was the question which Stanwood had asked 
himself over and over again. He had emptied his 
meerschaum three times and still the question was 
unanswered. Rising from the corner-seat he walked 
from one to another of the many photographs which 
adorned his college room. It availed him nothing. 
The problem still faced him. 

At this moment he heard someone upon the stairs, 
singing in a clear strong voice one of those songs, 
which having once been popular, are with difficulty 
worn out and forgotten. The door opened, a merry 
face looked in, and a letter scaled across the room, 
dropped at his feet. 

" Hello Stan ! Here is an epistle from Her 
Majesty. Glad to see she hasn't forgotten you. old 
man." The door closed and the singing continued 
up the stairs. 

Stanwood picked up the letter and opened it. An 



expression of pleasure crept over his face and broad- 
ened now and then into a smile. Finally he laid the 
letter upon his desk. 

" By all that is lucky," he cried, •' So Laurel Is in 
Hamp. ' Should be pleased to have you call.' Well 
I! Mum-m-m-m-m! And why not take her to the 
Prom? What luck!" 

Here Stanwood became quiet. He was thinking 
of the past summer. Thinking of the many hours 
spent in the company of Laurel Addison, and he lis- 
tened again to her silvery laugh and charming voice 
as when she sat beside him on his yacht. 

He remembered one song in particular. It was 
the very one that Parker was singing when he brought 
this letter from Laurel. It had been a favorite of his, 
and to please him, she had sung it time and time 
again. Now an overwhelming desire to hear her 
sing it once more came over him. He sprang to his 
feet. " Yes," he exclaimed, '-who but Laurel shall I 
take to the Prom ! Of course ! 'Tis a go." 
* # • # 

The Drill Hall was resplendent with decoration. 
Flags and bunting everywhere met the eye. Rifles 
were stacked about the floor. Bayonets and sabres 
gleamed from the walls, while high up among the 
rafters the old six-oared shell still told of a famous 
rowing victory. On the floor, every convenience was 
to be found in the ^hape of furniture. Chairs, 
lounges, and rugs were set off by a wealth of plants 
and evergreen, and beside all this the brilliant array of 
gorgeous gowns and pleasant faces added to the scene. 

In two corners of the hall, tucked away in back of 
the cannon, were two respective nooks, charmingly 
concealed by palm and fur boughs, and fitted with 
easy chairs. 

From one of these Jack Stanwood appeared, the 
happiest man in college. For was not Laurel Addi- 
son by his side ? Had he not already danced four 
times with her. and now was he not to have another ? 

The orchestra broke into a slow, dreamy waltz. He 
glanced at Laurel, but she was already speaking. 
" Why, Jack, do you remember this piece ?" 

•• I will never forget it." he replied. 

•• How long ago." she mused as they started around 
the hall. " How long ago, and yet it is only a few 
months. You used to like this song." and with that 
she began to hum It. 



H4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 












A great peace came over Jack. He finhhed the 
waltz in a sort of charm. Far, far away, forever and 
ever, with this little girl at his side. 

'• And why not," he asked himself, as they silently 
returned to the little den among the plants and boughs. 
By rare good luck it was empty. 

■• Laurel," he said. •• I have a great favor to ask of 

you." 

•• Granted beforehand," she smiled. " Anything I 

can give you is yours." 

» Then may I have this," he asked eagerly reach- 

for her hand. 

"What, the fan?" 

•• Yes. if it brings the hand which holds it." 

" Oh, Jack!" and her pretty face grew prettier. 

••But you can't refuse me now. You see you 
granted it in advance." 

"Yes, that was a rash statement, and — but — well — 
no 1 don't see how I can back out now." She looked 
up from a confusion of blushes. He was quickly at 

her side. 

At this moment a spray of mountain laurel, flitting 
down from some decorations overhead, fell in her lap. 

•• Laurel." she laughed, slipping it into her hair. 
•• This must be for me." 

- Or for me," said Stanwood. 
"You? You have the fan." 
•• Yes, but have 1 not won my Laurel ?" 
•• Are you sure you will always want it," she whis- 
pered, as he took the spray. " It will grow old and 

fade." 

- Always, dear," he replied. " To me it will never 
grow old. 1 shall love and care forever." 

' She smiled and nestled closer. In an instant Jack's 
strong arm was about her. his face bent close to hers. 

G. H. Allen. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Editor College Signal :— Your editorial on the 
1903 Index ought to be engrossed, framed and pre- 
sented to the Index editors for 1904. to hang in their 
sacred sanctum. Its tone is :ommendable, and it 
seems to me, perfectly fair, even to the 1903 editors. 
Accuracy is a characteristic of high value either in 
college publications or in men. But 1 have been an 



Index editor myself, and can readily realize how diffi- 
cult " indexing " sometimes is. No doubt we can all 
excuse ourselves as did a young man who had been 
very awkward at the altar, to his bride after leaving 
the church, "Never mind, dear, I can do it better 
next time." But it was not the -next time" that 
interested the bride. 

It is one of the easiest things in the world to read 
proof carelessly. I have even seen evidence of it oc- 
casionally in the columns of the Signal itself. And 
a mistake thus occurring is often as bad in effect as if 
the misrepresentation was intentional. As your edi- 
torial well says, the College statistics and the alumni 
notes and statistics are the chief value of a college 
publication to the majority outside of the College it- 
self. Now I do not wish to criticize especially the 
present Index. Mistakes of inaccuracy in statistics 
have been found in other issues of other years. From 
my own experience I have come to distrust the Index 
alumni list. It is'either, I speak of no particular num- 
ber, inaccurate in its make up, or else woefully behind 
time in its information. 

We cannot help the past. But in behalf of the M. 
A. C. Alumni club of Massachusetts, and the four 
hundred alumni who will expect to receive notices and 
communications from me, or my successor, as its 
clerk, let me plead with the next Index board, and 
with all future and embryonic Index editors— riease 
do be accurate. Alumni statistics maybe hard to get. 
they are therefore the more valuable. Make them 
accurate so far as they go. Revise and re-revise. 
•• Keeping everlastingly at it is the price of success," 
or a good Index. If the information has to be a year 
old when printed, say so . or imitate some of the daily 
papers which excuse an occasional stale item by say- 
ing in a sort of typographical stage whisper. •• From 
our latest edition of yesterday." Then at least the 
reader knows the value of the information. The need 
of an accurate alumni list was never greater, and will 
increase with the growth of the college and with the 
growing prominence of the graduates. 

And yet. having as already mentioned, " been there 
myself " let me congratulate the 1903 Index board on 
having gotten out an Index. 

Yours for M. A. C. 
F. W. Davis, Clerk, M. A. C. A. C. M. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

A movement has recently been made which it is 
believed will put the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association upon a firmer basis, and make it more 
effective. In the past, the experience gained in the 
work of the Association by the officers in the Senior 
class has gone with them upon their graduation, and 
the succeeding officers have had to depend upon their 
own thought and effort. Because of this fact, the 
Association has not grown stronger with each succeed- 
ing year as it should have done. In order to bridge 
over this critical point and to conserve the experience 
of the retiring officers, the Association has elected an 
advisory committee. This committee consists of three 
men, one to serve for one year, one for two years and 
one for three years, one member to be elected every 
year to serve for three years. The member the long- 
est in office will be chairman of the committee. 

The President of the Association is to make a 
monthly report to this committee embodying in it the 
work of the month as reported to him by the various 
chairmen of committees at the business meeting. 
These reports will keep the committee in touch with 
the work of the Association and will be kept on file for 
future reference. 

It is expected that the committee will confer with 
the Cabinet at different times, and by suggestions aid 
In planning the work of the departments. They will 
look over the books of the secretary and the treasurer 
at stated intervals and see that they are properly kept. 
It is also expected that they will help in securing out- 
side speakers and by their interest in the Association 
greatly strengthen its work. 

The Association has been fortunate in securing as 
members of this committee the following men: For 
one year, Mr. M. B. Kingman '82. who has always 
been interested in the work of the Association ; for two 
years, Mr. C. W. Marshall, prnicipai of the Amherst 
High School. Mr. Marshall was connected with the 
Y. M. C. A. of New Britain, Ct. as a director for 
several years and is a young man who is interested In 
young men. For three years. Dr. J. B. Lindsay '83 
whose ability and interest in the best welfare of the 
students of his Alma Mater is well-known. It was 
under their direction that the recent enjoyable service 
led by Mr. Huntress of Westfield was given and many 
other interesting meetings have been planned. 



Under these new and favorable auspices and a new 
board of officers the Y. M. C. A. enters upon a new 
year of work with a most encouraging outlook before 
it. 



DAIRYING IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES. 

Maj. Henry E. Alvord, chief of the Dairy Division 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry, delivered an inter- 
esting lecture in the chapel last Wednesday evening 
upon the advancement of dairying in some of the 
European countries. Maj. Alvord was listened to with 
added interest as in former years he was first com- 
mandant and latter professor of Agriculture at this 
college. 

The nature of the lecture was such that only those 
present could reap the full benefit of the information 
given. Maj. Alvord supplemented his address by a 
large number of exceedingly fine lanternslides. While 
these were primarily given to illustrate the dairying 
facilities of France. Germany, Switzerland. Denmark, 
and Sweden, yet there was a large number showing 
the buildings, fields, and other views interesting from 
an agricultural standpoint. 

In all of the agricultural schools and colleges that were 
mentioned, there seemed to be no lack of implements 
for the farm and dairy, but the laboratories were ap t 
to be very meagre in their furnishings. One could not 
but marvel at the machinery present in many cf the 
buildings. The dairy stock, at the time of Mr. Alvord's 
trip, was of a poor quality, owing to the recent discovery 
of tuberculosis in many of the herds. The barns ranged 
all the way from the spotless stables of Denmark to 
the foul and illventilated stalls of Switzerland. 

The education at these schools is open to both men 
and women, the latter often out numbering the 
former. The course of study, the theoretical part of 
which balances the practical, is usually of two years 
duration in France. The object of the schools is to 
instruct the people in the best methods of farming and 
dairying, to become teachers of agricultural subjects, 
and to be able to fill government positions in the lines 
upon which they have specialized. E. A. B. 

FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

The last meeting of the Fraternity Conference was 
held Tuesday evening, March 18. Those present 
were C. A. Tinker, '04, of the D. G. K. fraternity; 



u6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



117 







R W. Morse, '02. and H. J. Franklin, '03, of the Q. 
T V • V. A. Gates, '02, and E. G Proulx. '03. of 
the Phi Sigma Kappa and H. L. Knight, '02, of the 
College Shakespearean club. The Conference ex- 
pressed itself as decidedly in favor of the propos.t.on 
made by the ladies of the Faculty. This plan con- 
sists of holding an exhibition drill by a picked squad 
some evening next month, the drill to be followed by 
a military dance. There seemed to be no reason, 
whatever, why such a program might not make a 
most pleasant evening for all. The Conference also 
recommended that the fraternities encourage the 
committee in charge of the informal dances by ad- 
vancing the sum needed for the procuring of music 
till commencement. The committee on a College 
song book reported good progress and hoped to issue 
the book very shortly. ==■ 

Observations $ C onc,us,ons 



Some little time ago, the observer who sometimes 
keeps his ears open, as well as his eyes, heard a good 
deal of complaint among the student body as to a lack 
of social advantages in which the whole college could 
have an equal share. It has been with a good deal 
of satisfaction then, that the editor has watched the 
enthusiasm with which the fraternity conference has 
taken up the matter and begun a series of informal 
dances in the drill hall, and the more than enthusiastic 
manner in which the student body has worked to make 
them a success. Why there must have been at least 
thirty-five or forty couples present at the first dance, 
and as that was held in the evening thus preventing 
the attendance of young ladies from out of town, there 
were more than half as many who danced from five to 
nine last Friday evening and the surprising part of it 
is that a good many of the men were really members 

of the college. 

Of course the committee in charge has lost money, 
but that is of little consequence. They went over and 
danced. They cannot of course expect that with only 
two small colleges for women within a reasonable dis- 
tance, more than half a dozen fellows or so can find 

partners. 

Seriously this thing makes the observer very weary. 
He has heard nothing but kicks at the committee in 
charge since the thing began and he begins to fear 



that if the same knocking element remains in college, 
somebody will complain before long as to the amount 
of the sophomore and junior lab. taxes. Wake up 
some of you, cut out something else, hunt up your 
•• maiden fair" and show her to us. 

* * * 

It might save a good deal of discussion among the 
Freshmen if the observer at last divulges a state 
secret. It isn't surprising that most of the youngsters 
should be surprised to see a chosen few leave the 
ranks nearly every drill day, back out into the gun 
shed, and come back a few minutes later well satisfied 
with having done an hour's J/ork in five or ten min- 
utes " The truth is ' children.' that we are supposed 
to have indoor as well as outdoor target practice. 
And these are not the men who need practice as you 
would very reasonably suppose. These are the best 
shots in the battalion and the object is to cure them 
of the bad habit of shooting straight by letting them 
use under charged or over charged cartridges. Or 
perhaps, the observer Is not quite sure, the intention 
is to give them practice so that they may in time do 
even better than they do now. ' Not fair to the 
others ' Dear, dear, have you forgotten the home 
training so soon? Haven't you even a dim recollec- 
tion of the quotation. ' For unto every one that hath 
shall be given, and he shall have, abundance ; but from 
him that hath not shall be taken away even that which 
he hath.' " 



Collet N°**S- 



L. Lovell as 



Is having 



—The class of 1902 have selected J. 
class photographer. 

—Manager Gates of the baseball team 
the diamond graded. 

— E. E. Rhodes. C. S. Sykes and J. H. Ladd. 
1905, have left College. 

_A new piano has been placed In the drill hall to 
be used at the social dances. 

— Maj Alvord's description of the French students' 
dress makes us think of some of the outlandish rigs 
we were favored with seeing last spring. 

—J W. Kellogg. 1900, was given a surprise party 
on March 12. by a number of friends before he left 
for his new position at the R. I. State college. 



— The following Sophomores have made the Burn- 
ham ten : M. F. Ahearn, J. J. Fahey, C. H. Griffin, 
S. B. Haskell, G. E. O'Heam, S. R. Parker, A. L. 
Peck, R. A. Quigley and R. R. Raymouth. 

— At a meeting of the basket-ball team held last 
week M. F. Ahearn, 1904, of South Framingham was 
choosen captain, E. B. Snell. '03, of Methuen, man- 
ager and R. A. Quigley, '04, of Brockton, assistant 
manager for the season of 1 903. 

— Professor Babson has posted the list of Fresh- 
men eligible to try for the Burnham four as follows : 
G. H. Allen, F. A. Bartlett, W. H. Craighead. H. H. 
Goodenough, F. F. Hutchings, A. N. Swain, R. E. 
Smith, A. D. Taylor, Bertram Tupper, T. F. Walsh. 

— At a meeting of the Fraternity conference held 
on March 19 it was voted to give the support of the 
fraternities to the ladies of the Faculty in holding an 
exhibition drill and dance some time early In April, 
and that they should recommend Captain Anderson 
to pick out three squads of eight men each and give 
them special drill, one squad in the manual, one in 
the rifle enterprise and the other in the bayonet ex- 
ercise. 

— Maj. H. E. Alvord. chief of the dairy beaureau 
at Washington, delivered a lecture in the chapel last 
Wednesday evening on " Dairying in Germany, France 
and Switzerland." He spoke very entertainingly of 
the Agricultural schools and colleges of these coun- 
tries and had many good slides to show both of the 
colleges and views throughout these countries. He 
described the fantastic clothing which many of the 
French students wear and told something of the life 
and customs of the French college men. 

— The annual dairy institute held at the close of 
the winter course took place last Thursday. Prof. 
W. P. Brooks presided and lectures were given by 
Professor Cooley of the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege, Professor Lane of New Jersey, Professor Cooley of 
our own College and Maj. H. E. Alvord of the beau- 
reau of dairying at Washington. At the close of the 
meeting winners of the dairy prizes for the winter 
course men were announced as follows : For best but- 
ter— 1st. F. W. Hall ; 2nd. George Weigold; 3rd, C. 
H.Richardson; for scholarship— 1st George Wei- 
gold ; 2nd, James E. Stultz ; for best understanding 
of use of fertilizers— 1st, George Weigold, 2nd, Wal- 



ter R. Brighan. In the evening the winter class 
and professors held a banquet in the Amherst house, 
— The first of the series of informal dances was 
held in the drill hall Friday evening, March 14. About 
thirty couples were present and all pronounced It to 
be a very enjoyable time. The patronesses were 
Mrs. Hasbrouck and Mrs. Babson. The committee 
in charge was C. I. Lewis, chairman, C.E. Dwyer, W. 
E. Allen, G. L. Barrus and M. H. West. Music was 
furnished by the College orchestra, J. W. Gregg as 
director. The second social dance was held in the drill 
hall last Friday evening. Owing to the fact that the 
condition examinations came on Friday and Saturday 
there were not so many present as at the first one, 
but the twenty-five couples that were there did not fai' 
to enjoy themselves. Refreshments were served. 
The patronesses were Mrs. C. Wellington and Mrs. J. 
B. Paige. The College orchestra furnished the music. 



/Uhletic No-t^S- 



BASE BALL PROSPECTS. 

Base ball practice began last week and upon a call 
for candidates by Captain Paul quite a number of new 
men came out. With nearly all the old team of last 
year and the new material the prospects for the 
season are very bright. 

Captain Paul is again at his old place at short. 
O'Heam is in the same position of last year at sec- 
ond. Ahearn. who was kept out of the game last 
year on account of a sprained knee, will most likely 
play third. Gregg, who played third last year, has 
been moved over to fill first which was left open by 
Cummings. 

Cook and Pray are holding home. Cook being the 
more promising, having had three years' experience 
on the team. Pray is a new man but has a good 
record which he made last year at Natick High 
School. 

For pitchers. Bodfish. Hunt, J. G. Cook and 
Griffin. Of these Bodfish is the most promising one, 
having pitched on the varsity team for three years and 
has a record that compares favorably with any of the 
smaller college pitchers. Hunt has not been out to 
practice owing to an Injury received some time ago in 
the drill hall. 





i8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ng 



In the outfield Halligan is the only one of last year's 
fielders left. There are quite a number of candidates 
for the field, the most likely being Ingham, Quigley, 
Walker and Merrill. 

With these prospects there is no reason why the 
results of the base ball season should not be similar to 
that of the foot ball season. 



Alumni. 



'82.— Charles L. Beach who was to speak at the 
farmers' institute which was held in the chapel Thurs- 
day, March 20, was unable to do so on account of 
severe illness. 

•95.__H. D. Hemenway's address was incorrectly 
given in she 1903 Index. In a letter to the editor he 
says: » I am director of the School of Horticulture. 
Hartford. Conn. This is as much under a different 
corporation from the Watkinson Farm School a la 
nd*X,U M. A. C. and Amherst College, and about half 
their distance apart." 

'95.^— C. B. Lane spoke very interestingly on " The 
Production of Milk for Retail Market." at the institute. 
Mr. Lane is at present connected with the New Jersey 
experiment station. 

'95.— Stephen P. Toole will move from Boston to 
Amherst and engage in the nursery business. 

•OO.—James W. Kellogg was pleasantly surprised at 
his home Wednesday evening, by a visit of about 
twenty-five of his friends. Mr. Kellogg left town 
Thursday for his new duties at the Rhode Island exper- 
iment station. 

Ex .- 3. F. W.Webster lately made a short visit 

to his college friends. 

Ex .'03.— P. H. Bowler is spending a few days at 
the college. He has signed with the Springfield base- 
ball team for the coming season. 



DepaHlmfrvf N°**^ 



LIBRARY. 
The Hook of the Greenhouse by J. C. Tallack. This 
book, like the other books in the present series is the 
work' of a practical gardener. Mr. Tallack having been 
engaged in the horticultural work during most of his 
adult life. The book first describes the structure of a 



typical greenhouse with its internal arrangements. 
The different classes of plants are next taken up and 
described as to management ; so that one who wishes 
to understand practical gardening will find this book 
very interesting and instructive. 

The Bridle Bits, a treatise on practical horseman- 
ship, by Col. J. C. Battersby. 

A Gentleman's Stable Guide, by Robert McClure, 

M. D.. V. S. 

Hints to Housekeepers, by Henry W. Herbert. 

Home Park Making, by A. W. Fulton. 

Practical Log Training, by S. T. Hammond. 

The Practical Pigeon Keeper, by Lewis Wright. 

The New Egg Farm, or the Management of Poultry 
on a Large Scale for Commercial Purposes, by H. H 

Stoddard. 

Training the Trotting Horse, by CharlesMarvin. 
Hints on Dog Breaking, by William Floyd. 
Profits in Poultry, Useful and Ornamental Breeds. 
The Sheep, by Dr. William A. Rushworth. A his- 
torical and statistical description of sheep and their 
products. 

Principles of Dog Training, by W. C. Percy. 
Animal Breeding, by Thomas Shaw. 
The St. Bernard, Its History. Points, Breeding and 
Rearing, by Hugh Dalyiel. 

American Horses and Horse Breeding, by John 
Dunon. A complete history of the horse from the 
remotest period in its history to date, etc. 

Asparagus, Its Culture for Home Use and for Market, 
by F. M. Hexamer. 

The Zoological Record, volume the thirty-seventh, 
being records of Zoological literature relating chiefly 
to the year 1900, edited by David Shary, M. A., F. R. 

S., F. Y. S.. etc. 

Profitable Poultry Keeping, with original illustrations 

by Stephen Beole. 

The American Farmer's Horse Book, by Robert 

Stewart, M. D., V. S. 

Field Notes on Apple Culture, by S. H. Bailey, Jr. 

The Pruning Book, by S. H. Bailey. 

The Illustrated Strawberry Culturist, by Andrew S. 

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Fruit Harvesting, Storing and Marketing, by F. A. 

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The Grape Culturist, a treatise on the native culti- 
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120 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



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Annual Report of the Comtroller of the Currency of 

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Mosquito Brigades, and how to organize them, by 

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Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission. 

The Isthmus of Darien, journal of the expedition of 
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The Dog, Its Management and Diseases, by Wood- 

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Injurious Insects of the Farm and Garden, with a 
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Dogs, Their Management and Treatment in Disease. 
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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 9. 1902. 



NO. II 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amherst, Mass, The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-in-Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINOTON ALLEN, 1933, Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. I 904. Assistant Business Manager. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1 903. Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1903. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1 904. Athletics. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK, 1904, Interco'legiate. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. HERBERT HAROLD COODENOUGH. 1905. 



Terms i $1.00 per year in adconce. Single Copies, l()c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 2Sc. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, Pres. Athletic Association. • . 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base-Ball Association, 

C. P. Halllgan, Sec Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
G. L, Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight. Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



ECdrtbri&ls. 



With the event of this issue, the new board of 
editors of the College Signal take up the respon- 
sibilities which go with the editing of a college paper. 
We fully realize the significance of our position and 
the trials which may be In store for us. It Is at this 
time that we would make an earnest plea for the co- 
operation of the student body In this task. The Signal 
as the organ of the institution should receive the 
unstinted support of each individual connected with 
the college. Its pages should not contain merely the 
contributions of the board of editors ; such a plan 
fails to properly set forth the sentiment of the students 
and the paper therefore fails in its primary object. 
The competition at the end of the year for places on 
the board should not be the only incentive for contrib- 
uting to our columns, neither is the student's duty ful- 
filled when he has paid his yearly subscription. It 
will be our policy to keep In close touch with the needs 
and sentiments of the student body and to use our 
efforts In the promotion of the best interests of the 
institution. 



As a matter of justice we take the liberty at this 
time to congratulate the members of the outgoing 
Signal board for their efficient work during the past 
year. This has been perhaps one of the most trying 
years ever experienced by the editors of the paper at 
this college. From the first, the agitation which 
resulted In the change of name from the Aggie Life 
to the College Signal has kept the board in hot 
water. Mr. Knight has, however, answered the many 
challenges, through the editorial columns in a most 
thorough and forceable manner leaving little ground for 
argument. In his last few issues he has nevertheless 
taken a stand which we cannot commend. Although 
the 1903 Index may have shown defects yet other pub- 
libations of the sort have had the same fault, further- 
more we do not recommend the policy by which one 
publication denounces another of the same institution. 
At a time too when the Index was on sale a severe 
criticism of this sort was unfortunate. For the work 
of Mr. Claflin as business manager we can have but 
words of praise. The paper was never In better finan- 
cial circumstances than at present, notwithstanding 



122 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i*3 



the fact that the Signal has given generously to the 
athletic association, and to the Junior Prom, commit- 
tee, besides offering a liberal prize for the much needed 
college song. The departments which have been 
represented by other members of the class of 1902 
have been well written up. Altogether the paper has 
been highly successtul and reflects much credit upon 
these men. 



For sometime we have been waiting the verdict of 
the judges, chosen to act on the recent college song 
contest. It is with some surprise and no little disap- 
pointment that we learn that out of the number of 
songs presented none have been deemed worthy of 
acceptance. It has been decided to continue the 
contest, the time limitations of which will later be 
made known by the committee in charge. It is ear- 
nestly hoped that the action of the judges will not dis- 
courage those who have tried but will on the other 
hand stimulate them to renewed efforts. It is also 
hoped that many who have not already tried will do so 
as the matter should appeal to every loyal student and 
alumnus as well as all interested in the welfare of 
the college. The need of a good stirring, col- 
lege song is obvious to everyone. It seems beyond 
belief that an institution of this kind, possessing the 
musical talent which it does should go so long without 
a single song which It can strictly call its own. This 
can be said of but few colleges, and even smaller insti- 
tutions of learning, yet one should not harbor the 
thought that such a production is the easiest thing in 
the world to accomplish. Many of the songs pre- 
sented have been too much along special lines as 
athletics, etc., others have contained weak passages, 
faults in meter, have laid undue stress on minor points 
of college life and in short have failed to materialize 
the thoughts which would make the production at the 
same time popular and long lived. It should be 
understood that the contest is open to everone whether 
a student or not and that all contributions will be 
gratefully received and carefully considered. 



BASKETBALL. 

The basketball season Is a thing of the past and be- 
fore turning our attention altogether to baseball we 
take pleasure in devoting a portion of this issue to the 
team, which considering the circumstances under 



which it was placed has given such a good account of 
Itself. Basketball in this College has been up to this 
time so much of an experiment that when the matter 
was broached ftt a mass meeting early in the winter 
It was voted down and for some time it looked as If 
the students would take no further action concerning 
It. Later, however, when the season was far ad- 
vanced and when it would seem that such an action 
was hardly practicable, it was voted at another meet- 
ing to organize a team which was to be supported by a 
tax levied upon the student body. Owing to the fact 
that the College was not represented in basketball 
during the season of 1900-1901 and the consequent 
lack of old players it was no easy matter to select a 
team. To augment the difficulties, Mr. Belden. as 
manager found he was unable, on account of the late- 
ness of the season, to close dates with the more de- 
sirable college teams. 

The outcome has, nevertheless, been all that could 
be hoped for and it Is reasonable to believe that the 
game will henceforth be installed as one of the regu- 
lar athletics of the College. Until, however, one cir- 
cumstance Is removed, it will never receive the sup- 
port which it deserves. At present it Is unrecognized 
by the athletic board and therefore besides receiving 
no financial support from that organization the players 
do not become entitled to the " M." 

Basketball has developed Into more than a girl's 
game ; the time has come when, as In the case of 
every other branch of athletics, every effort must be 
taken on the part of a college if a winning team Is to 
be placed on the floor. It can be seen at a glance 
that the recognition by the athletic board would add a 
great stimulus to the undertaking here. 

As a means to this end it would seem advisable to 
represent the College in the New England basketball 
league. Such an action on the part of the manage- 
ment could prove but beneficial principally for the 
reason that It would bring about a more desirable 
schedule. 

Nothing can be more discouraging to the manage- 
ment than to be obliged to fill dates with inferior 
teams and the moral effect upon the men In such a 
case is bad to say the least. 

In taking a resume of the season we see that not- 
withstanding the adverse conditions the usual Massa- 
chusetts luck, if it may so be called, has prevailed and 



that our showing has been equal to any of the smaller 
New England colleges. 

Of the eight games played, five have resulted in 
decided victories for us. while the other three were 
characterized by excellent individual and team wurk. 
The games have been cleanly played, save in but 
one instance, and the last trial with Amherst was 
especially so. 

Following are the individual recordsofthe members: 
J. M. Dellea. captain of the Massachusetts basket- 
ball team for the season of 1901-1902 served on his 
class team during his Freshman and Sophomore years 
at College and also played in the positions of forward 
and guard on the varsity In the season of '99-'00. 

This season he has the distinction of throwing the 
largest number of goals and his brilliant work as 
player and captain have won for him well-earned 
praise. Captain Dellea Is 21 years of age. weighs 
140 pounds and plays right forward. 

E. F. McCobb played on the Milford Y. M. C. A. 
team before entering College. He held the position 
of captain of the Varsity during the season of '99-'00. 
By his graduation in June the College will lose not 
only a good basketball player but a jealous worker for 
the athletics Interests of this College. McCobb is 22 
pears old and weighs 1 40 younds. 

J. C. Hall played in the position of back during his 
freshman year and center during his Sophomore year 
at College. During the past season he has filled the 
position of center in a very satisfactory manner. Age 
21 years, weight 158 pounds. 

J. G. Cook is 21 years of age and weighs 150 
pounds. He served as captain of the class team of 
1903 for two years, and has acted as substitute center 
on the Varsity. 

E. B. Snell had no experience in the game previ- 
ous to entering College and in his brief appearance In 
the Wesleyan game he barely had time to forget his 
more strenuous football tactics Age 22, weight 190 
pounds. 

M. F. Ahearn was Inexperienced in the game pre- 
vious to this year but has shown himself of the right 
material. His coolness, good judgment and agility 
making him a very efficient man. Mr. Ahearn is 22 
years old and weighs 1 45 pounds. 

E. S. Fulton is 23 years of age, weighs 150 pounds 



and plays in the position of guard. He played guard 
and acted as captain of his class team, and previous 
to entering College was a member of the Lynn Y. M. 
C. A. B. B. team. 

R. A. Quigley played one season in the Intermediate 
Y. M. C. A. team of Brockton and during the season 
of '01 -'02 as left forward on Massachusetts. Age 19 
years, weight 165 pounds. 

C. L. Whitaker has had no experience in the game 
before this year. He has filled the position of right • 
guard in a very satisfactory manner and will doubtless 
give a good account of himself in another season. 
Age 19 years, weight 165 pounds. 

J. H. Belden deserves much praise for the success- 
ful manner In which he has acquitted himself as man- 
ager. He has shown great ability in piloting the 
team through a difficult season. He has also made 
himself conspicuous as an Impartial and reliable 
referee. 

Following are the statistics of the team : 



name 




no. of games 
played 


goals 


goals from 
fouls 


position 


Dellea (Capt.) 


8 


13 


13 


Forward 


Ahearn 




4 


7 




• • 


Pierce 




1 






H 


Quigley 




5 


11 




" 


Cook 




2 






Center 


Hall 




7 


10 




• • 


Whitaker 




3 


1 




Back 


Fulton 




7 


10 


1 


■ * 


McCobb 




6 


7 




• . 


Scores 












M. A. C 


26. 


Nrothampton Y 


. M. C 


. A. 13. 




•« 


12. 


Amherst 




18. 




«< 


42. 


Ludlow 




15. 




ft 


26. 


Hartford Y. M. 


C. A. 


17. 




M 


20. 


Parish House 




40. 




H 


16. 


Trinity 




14. 




N 


22. 


Amherst 




36. 




1 1 


27. 


Wesleyan 

Total 

.»- 




24. 






191 


J 77 





CONSERVAL1SM IN OUR COLLEGE. 

We see the extremes of liberalism and conservatism 
entering into all the affairs of human thought and life. 
They are two opposing elements which were meant to 
check and counteract one another. When they do 
counteract one another, affairs progress naturally and 



"4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"5 












wothly. When liberalism obtains full sway, confusion 
and disorder are apt to result. When conservatism is 
carried to an extreme, growth is checked and progress 

impeded. 

Anyone who is thoroughly acquainted with the affairs 
and curriculum of our college will admit that too much 
conservatism is shown by our trustees and faculty. 

Our curriculum has been raised to a higher standard 
during the past few years, but how slow and how small 
has been the advance compared with what might have 
been done with a little more liberalism. 

Other colleges have electives in three years of the 
four years' course ; we have only one. A large per- 
centage of our undergraduates have to work their way 
through college by hard manual labor. Is it right that 
they should be obliged to practically waste so large a 
part of their time on subjects which they will never 
use ? Our men. by the end of the Sophomore year, 
are thoroughly capable of choosing what they will take 

up- 

The faculty realize this. They are neanng com- 
plaints almost daily. Everyone realizes it who has any 
knowledge of the matter. Why is class after class 
made to take up so much superfluous wcrk. and com- 
pelled to leave behind so much of what they really 
want ? Is it because those who have the power to 
change this have no interest in the welfare of the col- 
lege ? Let us hope not. However, there Is wrong 
somewhere. Our college cannot make the progress 
we would like to see it make until we have Junior 

electives. 

Those who have the power to change our curriculum 
are committing a crime against the state, against the 
college, against each individual undergraduate, and 
against the trust reposed in them by letting this matter 
slide along. Is there not some man or body of men 
who will look into this matter thoroughly ? Is there 
not some way in which we can bring about this much 
needed change ? 

There is another change we would like to see. 
Zoology should be made a Senior elective. In the 
Junior year it is not only a popular study, but also an 
interesting and helpful one. The only difficulty is 
that one who is Interested in it cannot get enough in 
the Junior year to make it worth his while. 

We do not wish to criticise either the faculty or 
the trustees, but we do wish that a more progressive 
spirit might be in evidence. 



WILL-O'-THE-WISP. 

As 1 pondered of the morrow. 

Of the life of toil, and sorrow. 

Of ambitions seared and blasted. 

Of high hopes, now long dismasted. 

Suddenly 1 saw before me, 

Tantalizing, mocking at me. 
Will-o'-the-Wisp, that men bewitches, 
And leaps into swamps and ditches. 

A light 1 saw,— a ball of fire, 
That raced and pranced, with mad desire 
Glancing, dancing, running, turning, 
Doing everything but burning. 
Gazing spell-bound, wonder growing 
At this sphere of something glowing 
As it went on, skipping, skipping. 
Aurora scarcely but eclipsing. 

Thus this light held me hypnotic. 
With its brilliancy despotic, 
With its variating presence. 
Phenomenon of phosphoresence ! 
Thus t'was seen, infernal vision I 
Who can tell what here its mission ? 
Whence it cometh. whither goeth, 
That no mortal ever knoweth. 

But then the Goddess of the Day, 
Vexe*d by this bold display, 
By this impudence so glaring 
To outdo her legions daring. 
Brought forth all her rays of brightness. 
Swept from view with radiant lightness. 
This prancing, dancing, bragging light. 
That held me still, and fix'd my sight. 

And to-day, new courage taking. 
I'll the most of life be making 
In the work-day world of toil 
With its strenuous turmoil. 
I'll not ponder on the morrow 
As a day of care or sorrow, 
But a chance for new endeavor. 
Something then to do.— or never. 



H. H. G. 



Amherst will send no team this year to the Inter- 
collegegiate gymnastic contest to be held in Philadel- 
phia March 21. The colleges and universities of the 
association are : Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Univer- 
sity of Penn.. Cclumbia. Amherst, Rutgers. Haver- 
ford and New York University. The events will in- 
clude contests on the horizontal and parallel bars, side 
horse, flying rings, tumbling and club swinging. 



A VISIT TO NIAGARA FALLS. 

One of the attractions of the recent Pan-American 
Exposition was the nearness of Buffalo to Niagara 
Falls and the ease with which visitors to the exposi- 
tion could visit the Falls. A friend and I while visit- 
ing the exposition, the past summer, set apart one 
day for seeing this famous sight. 

We took a boat on the river at Buffalo and enjoyed 
a ride of several miles down the wide Niagara river, 
with the picturesque scenery that lined both banks. 
We landed on the Canadian side of the river, 
about three miles above the falls, where electrics 
were waiting for the boat. The person who has never 
been outside of his own country, experiences peculiar 
sensations at first setting foot on foreign soil, he is 
overcome with a certain pride for his country, and has 
the desire, to let it be known that he is an American and 
is proud of the fact. The car carried us through 
a pretty country, with its broad fields and old farm 
houses. I remember one old house in particular. It 
was an old brick house, set back some distance from 
the road and of the coloni.il type of architecture, 
while around it were several old trees. I connected it 
with stirring events in the early history of the country. 
The river was at times out of sight from the car line, 
but each time it came in sight there were eager 
glances In the direction of the falls. At last we dis- 
cerned the rapids in the river, just above the falls, and 
from that moment all interest in the rural scenery 
was lost. We left the car at the falls. Although 
pictures of this grand sight are common, still the vis- 
itor who has seen a picture of Niagara Falls is not 
prepared for the glorious falls themselves. Surely 
it i? one of the greatest treats that nature has pre- 
pared for the admiration of man, in this great land of 
ours. The great mass of water as it is hurled over 
the precipice in one great avalanche, then rising again 
in clouds of fine white spray, while the air is filled with 
a sullen roar as of distant thunder, makes an impres- 
sion on the visitor that he will remember a lifetime. 
And as one stands enraptured by the wonderful sight, 
he experiences a feeling of respect and awe for nature 
perhaps never felt before. As we stood looking at 
the falls, the sun which had been hidden, broke 
through the clouds, and we were favored with a sight 
of the rainbow, the crowning beauty of Niagara. 



After feasting our eyes on the grand sight we again 
took the electric cars and rode down the river, some- 
times running along near the brink with the river 
flowing a hundred feet below us. We passed the 
famous whirlpool whose comparatively smooth surface 
little looked as though it covered those treacherous 
currents which caused the death of the English cap- 
tain, who tried to swim the whirlpool some years ago. 
Some miles below the falls we crossed to Lewistown 
and began our trip up the American side. On this 
side the cars pass in some places near the water. 
The color of the water below the falls is a light green, 
a shade so uncommon as to attract the attention of 
a visitor. As we wassed the rapids on our upward trip, 
we were greatly impressed by the wild scene below us. 
The angry mass of water is hurled from one rock to 
another, while the cloud of spray almost wets the trav- 
eler in the car. which at this point runs near the 
water. The effect is heightened by the fact that the 
car is going up stream, and the mass of water seems 
to be rushing down onto the spectatot. 

We recrossed the river to the Canadian side at the 
falls and stopped to take one more look at the impres- 
sive sight. We watched with a good deal of interest 
the little steamer the " Maid of the Mist," which 
carries passengers almost to the very foot of the falls, 
so near in fact that they are obliged to wear rubber 
clothes to protect them from the mist. It seemed 
as she approached the falls, rocking in the turbulent 
water, as though she would be swamped, but she 
kept bravely on till forced to turn back. Some of the 
more adventurous ones procure suits of rubber, and 
pass under a certain part of the falls, but we were 
content with watching them at a distance. After 
leaving the falls we took the cars to the boat and 
thence back to Buffalo. 



A DREAM. 

I had been collecting for several hours, and. becom- 
ing tired, had sat down upon the bank of the pond to 
rest. The sultry atmosphere soon began to work 
upon me. Things of this world grew dimmer and 
dimrrv r until, at length, I reached and entered the 
misty portals of Dreamland. 

As I dreamed I seemed no longer a man, but a fly 
— a beautiful creature, tinted with pretty colors which 
glistened as I sat upon a stalk of grass by the water's 



126 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



127 



edge. Upon my back I bore two wings of gauze. 
The metallic reflections of my body, as I sat in the 
sun, touched my aesthetic taste, but when I found 
that with but a little exertion I could flit from grass to 
weed, or even across the pond and back, my delight 
knew no bounds. 1 darted hither and thither. In 
disdain I passed over the smaller insects. Their very 
ugliness lent to my beauty and I gloried in the fact. 
Here and there I would pause and glance with con- 
ceited eye upon my beautiful form. As once 1 was 
pausing thus, a peculiar noise reached my ears. 
Indistinct at first, it grew louder and louder. I was at 
loss as to Its origin until, from the uniform whirring 
sound, there suddenly came the noise of crumpling 
paper. Then did my heart grow faint and my head 
dizzy. Well did I know that none but my most deadly 
enemy, the dragon fly. could make a noise like that. 
Scarcely had I hidden myself beneath a blade of grass 
when he whizzed into sight and. as if to frighten me 
more, paused in his flight directly above me. 

Even in my fright I could not but admire him. So 
rapidly did his four papery wings vibrate. I could with 
difficulty distinguish them ; his huge eyes seemed to 
pierce my very retreat ; his lower lip lowered and rose 
like a large sac. while his immense jaws, lined with 
long sharp teeth, opened and shut as if hungering for 
something which they might devour. 

Suddenly, with downward sweep, he flew to a 
nearby weed as if intending to light, but. even as his 
feet were about to touch it. a sense of danger seemed 
to have seized upon him. With a quick movement 
he drew back, scrutinized the plants and the surround- 
ings ; and then, ss if assured of his safety, slowly 
drew near again and finally lighted. His long taper- 
ing body was the most beautiful that I had ever seen. 
Alorig his back ran a stripe of shining black while his 
sides were of a pure azure blue which shed the rays 
of sunlight In a most striking manner. 

So quietly and so long did he cling to that weed 
one might easily have imagined him a flower or some 
abnormal growth of the plant upon which he rested. 
In fact I began to still my fears and thought that he 
was taking his afternoon nap. It seemed hard that I 
should spend the pleasant hours of sunlight in hiding 
while I might be flitting lazily about among the flow- 
ers. My desire overcame my prudence. Slowly I 



clear place and then, quick as a flash, I flew as 
swiftly as I could for the opposite bank. 

But alas! Hardly had I covered half the distance 
when again I heard the whirring of those powerful 
wings. I strained every nerve. I sought a speedy 
retreat, but where could I hide ? With water below 
and sky above there was no hope. I could now feel 
the vibrating air set in motion by his wings, i could 
see those monstrous eyes, those yawning jaws. Once 
more I put forth all my remaining strength but nothing 
could save me now. I felt that lower lip enclose 
about me ; the jaws came together with a snap, and 
tore a cruel wound in my body. 

Thinking only of his coming feast, he swiftly flew 
toward the bank. I was faint and dizzy with pain and 
the rapidity with which we were moving and was 
almost unconscious when there loomed up upon the 
bank a huge monster— a monster such as I had never 
seen before. He had four legs upon two of which he 
was walking while in one of the others he carried a 
long stick of timber at the end of which was attached 
what seemed to me a huge bag of gauze. With a 
sudden sweep of this extraordinary contrivance, the 
monster whipped it over us and we found ourselves 
tightly confined. 

In his fright my captor released his hold upon my 
body and began to fight for his escape, while I— I 
awoke. 



ObstrO&tions f Conclusions 

It has just come to the observer's notice that two 
unfortunate members of the Sophomore class have 
•• flunked " the condition exam in •' Zootechny ". This 
is all the more ridiculous because the class in that 
subject, during the greater part of last term, used for 
a text book " Miles Stock Breeding." It is even cur- 
rent among the student body that one member of the 
class has been dropped into 1905 on account of said 
•• flunk." The observer hastens to say that while not 
pretending to any great amount of worldly wisdom, he 
Is not quite so •■ easy " as to believe that the faculty as 
a body would go so far as even to threaten to drop a 
man with so little an excuse. Of course the faculty 
must have Its little joke, but the observer thinks that 

as anyone, when the 



its members can realize as we 
crawled along the edge of my retreat until I reached a fun Is in danger of becoming serious 



About this course in Stock Breeding we have had 
it In mind for some time to say a word. The observer 
thinks that four or five months is too long a time to 
waste on such a comic supplement as Is •• Miles Stock 
Breeding." He is glad to know that " a man who 
stubs his toe during middle life can usually find on 
investigation that his forefathers in the female line 
have probably done the same thing before he was born " 
and that •• the bearing of triplets, sextets, duodecalets, 
etc., is a disease which may descend from father to 
son " but he does not need two or three weeks of 
recitations to make him know it. It Is interesting to 
know that the offspring of Shropd )wn running horses 
takes its sex from that of its parents" but to take three 
or four chapters to prove the fact seems a bit absurd. 
And again the observer can believe the assertion that 
a" hinny is a cross between a mule and a jack-rabbit " 
without its being necessary for* Prof. Miles to use a 
gallon or so of printer's ink In order to prove it to him. 

The whole trouble with the book is that it takes up 
some four or five hundred pages in making assertions, 
proving them, denying their truth, and finally proving 
the denials. Here is the usual way it puts the subject ! 
— " It was formerly supposed that — etc—etc. — a 
chapter of proofs — But this is a wrong supposition — etc 
— • a chapter proving it wrong ' — for it Is now known 
that — ect. — • another chapter of proofs' — Another 
hypothesis is that — etc." and so on.and soon. There 
is some valuable information in Prof. Miles' book, but 
it could all be printed on the reverse side of the 
semester card, and the observer respectfully recom- 
mends that course to the faculty In lieu of wasting so 
much time every year over the whole book. 

• *##»♦ 

Some one has told the observer that •• Prexy " can 
feel for a man who "flunks" in mathematics, but 
sympathizes not at all with him who fails to pass an 
examination in "agriculture." Of course. •• Prexy " 
never flunked in the latter for he never studied It. For 
his Information and for that of others unacquainted 
with Prof. Miles' book the observer will state that he 
personally would rather stand three examinations in 
" mathematics " than one in ■■ stock breeding" trusting 
merely to knowledge, and not at all to luck or the 



generosity of the professor in charge. The only reason 
why there are so many more " flunks " in the former 
is that nothing but an answer to the question asked, 
counts in making up the mark in a mathematics exami- 
nation. This will come to you after a while. Think 
it over. 

The unlucky candidate for examination in Prof. 
Miles' crazy quilt of denials, proofs, and examples 
becomes so completely muddled over former sup- 
positions, present hypotheses, and future beliefs that 
the only cause for wonder to the observer Is the fact 
that the professor in charge can glean questions enough 
from the book capable of being answered by any mem- 
ber of the class. The observer is in fact surprised 
that anybody has ever succeeded in passing an exami- 
nation on the subject. That some have done so is due 
undoubtedly to Prof. C— rather than to Dr. Miles. 
This last will come to you too when you are In on the 
other one. 



BASEBALL. 

Amherst, 5 ; Massachusetts, 3. 
Massachusetts met Amherst in a practice game at 
Pratt Field Saturday and lost by the above score. 
The game was close and interesting and was not de- 
cided until the last half of the seventh when an error, 
two hits and good base running netted Amherst three 
runs and gave her the game. Although the game 
was over when the winning run was made, by agree- 
ment the game was continued until the third put out 
had been made. Before this was done another Am- 
herst man had crossed the plate. The score by 
innings : 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R 
Amherst, 00200035 

Massachusetts. 10 2 3 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE. 

April 1 1— Amherst at Amherst. (Practice.) 
14_ 

19— Open. 

22— Amherst at Amherst. 
24 — Bates at Amherst. 
26— Springfield at Springfield. 
May 3— Millers Falls at Millers Falls. 
10--Trinity at Hartford. 
14 — Williams at Williamstown. 
16 — Bowdoin at Amherst. 
19 — Univ. of Maine at Amherst. 
24 — Open. (Pending with Greenfield.) 



H 
4 
5 



I 
I 
3 



128 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



129 



26— Dean at Franklin. 
27— Bates at Lewiston. 
28— Univ. of Maine at Orono. 
29— Open. 
30— Open. 
June 7— Boston College at Amherst. 
14_Wesleyan at Middletown. 



Collet N°**S- 



— Baseball. 

—Dr. C. Wellington has been sick for the past 

week. 

—Arthur Frost, '00, of Boston, spent a few days In 

town last week. 

— H. L. Barnes, '04. has returned to college after 
an absence of over five months. 

_ D L Cleaves, formerly instructor in chemistry, 
has assumed his duties at the Hatch Experiment 
Station. 

—Fully one-half the men in college are taking 
advantage of the cut system to prolong their Easter 

vacation. 

—The senior class in Horticulture are doing a little 
practical landscape gardening at Mr. Dickinson's north 
of the college. 

—The new rule that all books to be renewed must 
be brought to the library at the time of renewal is 
being rapidly enforced. 

—Three squads of eight men each are to be picked 
out of the companies sometime this week for an exhi- 
bition drill to be held the latter part of this month. 

—We are glad to announce that R. P. Gay. pro- 
prietor of the college store, has decided to keep his 
store open at regular hours: 12.30-1.15 and 6.30 to 

8 P. m. 

—The pamphlet of college songs compiled by the 
Fraternity conference will soon be issued and then let 
us hope we will hear singing around college from 
morning until night-yes and a good share of the night 

too. 

—The junior class have been allowed a choice 
between taking Chemistry or Geology for the remain- 
der of the semester. Eighteen out of twenty- two 
men chose Geology, showing the popularity of that 
department. 



— Dr C S Walker lectured before the Hampton 
Pomona Grange at West Springfield last Wednesday. 
— H A. Ballou, '95, is carrying on a series of 
experiments under the direction of Dr. Stone to deter- 
mine the exact effect which illuminating gas has upon 
trees The idea in view is to devise some way in 
which the destruction of shade trees by leaks in the 
gas mains may be stopped. 

' -The next informal dance will be held in the drill 
hall next Friday evening from four-thirty to nine 
o'clock. As the dance is to be preceded by a base- 
ball game with Amherst College a large attendance is 
assured. All students, alumni, and members of the 
faculty are urged to come. 

—Surveyors have been busy about the college the 
past two weeks laying out the plans for the location of 
the new Boarding House and heating plant. The 
Ravine also is to receive its share of attention and we 
have heard it said that when the work is completed 
the Ravine will be one of the prettiest bits of scenery 
in all Massachusetts. 

—Why is It that certain departments connected 
with the college can hire outside men and not have 
work for students or why can they turn students out of 
their work to make places for outside men ? These 
departments were instituted in order to aid the student 
in earning his way through college and it would seem 
as though the student labor ought to have precedence. 



Alumni. 



71._ William H. Bowker. President of the Bowker 
Fertilizer Co.. has five graduates of this college in his 
employ. We speak of this to show how one of our 
loyal alumni is standing by the college and is helping 

its graduates. 

72.— John W. Clark of North Hadley. Mass.. has 
been In Maine, on institute work, recently. 

73.— One of the Yale Bicentennial Publications 
recently added to the college library is entitled '« Two 
Centuries' Growth of American Law." The book is 
by several members of the faculty of the Yale Law 
School. Chapter XIII on Criminal Law and Proced- 
ure is by James H. Webb of the class of 73. 

•62.— Herbert Myrlck is joint author with J. B. 
Klllebrew, Ph. D.. of an exhaustive treatise on 



tobacco leaf. It is an attractive, profusely illustrated 
book of about 500 pages published by the Orange 
Judd Company. 

'85. — C. S. Phelps has resigned his position as 
Professor of Agriculture and Agriculturist at the Con- 
necticut Agricultural College and experiment station. 

'90. — C. H. Jones, chemist at the Vermont Experi- 
ment Station, recently appeared taking a prominent 
part in a minstrel show given by the " Ethan Allen " 
club at Burlington. Vt. 

'92.— C. M. Hubbard, an extensive tobacco grower 
of Sunderland, is testing the value of soil sterilization 
in tobacco seed-beds, under the direction of the Hatch 
Experiment Station. 

'94.— A. H. Kirkland. of Maiden, visited friends in 
Amherst recently. 

'95. — H. A. Ballou requests that any change of 
occupation or address or ?.ny other item regarding any 
member of his class be sent to him in order that they 
may be published and preserved. 

'95. — Maurice J. Sullivan, superintendent of the 
" Rocks Farm." Littleton, N. H.. has been in town 
recently looking for an assistant. 

'95. — Stephen P. Toole has the position of gardener 
for the country club for the coming summer. 

'95. — E. A. White, assistant horticulturist at the 
Texas Agricultural College and experiment station, is 
a candidate for the position of horticulturist at that 
institution. 

'97.— George A. Drew, who has so well filled the 
position of superintendent of the horticultural depart- 
ment at the college, has been recommended for and 
is considering a responsible and lucrative position on a 
large coffee plantation near Vera Cruz, Mexico. The 
plantation comprises 75,000 acres of land. 

'99. — Daniel A. Beaman. who has been in the box 
manufacturing business in Leverett, Mass.. is return- 
ing to teach in Barre, Mass. 

'00.— H. S. Crane of Ellis, Mass.. visited friends in 
Amherst recently. 

'01. — Wallace R. Plerson was a prominent figure 
at the carnation meeting recently held in Indianapolis 
and read a paper on •• Sterilized Soil for Stem Rot." 
The American Florist for Feb. 22. 1902. contains a 
half-tone photograph of Mr. Pierson with a short 
sketch of his career together with an abstract of the 
above mentioned paper. 

'01. — A. C. Wilson, assistant to S. O. Miller, con- 
sulting engineer, Columbia Ave., and 35 Nassau St. 
Address 507 Manhattan Ave.. New York City. N. Y. 



Dcp&rtmfrvf ftlot?s. 



At the beginning of the present semester a progress- 
ive step was taken in the establishment of a special 
laboratory for post graduate work in Zoology. There 
Is now offered a splendid opportunity for advanced 
work in this subject. And from this experiment we 
have every reason to expect satisfactory results. 

The lecture room in South College has been chosen 
for the location of the Laboratory, and one finds him- 
self almost a stranger now, who was accustomed to 
the room three months ago. Two large tables are 
used, each capable of seating two men. and supplied 
with Bausch and Lomb compound microscopes, dis- 
secting mi :roscopes, complete sets of dissecting instru- 
ments, a large variety of glassware, reagent bottles, 
tender dishes, watch crystals, etc. There is one large 
paraffine bath for general use, two microtomes, and 
highest power objectives for microscopes, and also a 
Zeiss Camera Lucida. A large collection of sea 
forms is preserved in formalin, which together with 
the Museum but a few steps away, makes the Labora- 
tory almost an ideal place for the accomplishment of 
good work. A bookcase filled with the best refer- 
ence works, with the -'Journal of Applied Microscopy," 
supplies the graduate student with the necessary read- 
ing close at hand. In a word, it is a well equipped 
Laboratory, with opportunities for good and careful 
work at convenient disposal. 

The work thus far has Included the zoophyta in 
Sponges and Polypes, the Jelly-fish and Sea- anemones. 
Every Saturday afternoon a Seminar is held, conducted 
by one of the students or Prof. Lull. The first talk 
was given by Prof. Lull on the " Sponge Industry ;" 
the following week Mr. Morrill spoke of " Corals and 
Coral Islands ;" these were followed, in their turn by 
" Deep Sea Fishihg." Mr. Billings ; and •• Lumines- 
cence in the Animal Kingdom," Prof. Babb. Prof. 
Loomis of Amherst College Is to conduct one of the 
meetings sometime in the near future. Two lectures 
a week are given by Prof. Lull on " Embryology" of 
the forms studied, with an occasional lecture on the 
•• History of Zoology." Altogether It makes a prac- 
tical, interesting, and very Instructive study, and is 
worthy the attention of any who desire further scien- 
tific research. 



13° 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



LIBRARY. 
How to Plan the Home Grounds, by Samuel Parsons 
Jr ex-superintendent of parks. New York city 

. .. . ^ i ....ML T 



House Plants, and How to Succeed with Them, by 

Lizzie Page Hillhouse. 

Memoirs of the Philadelphia Society for Promoting 

Agriculture, volumes two and four. 

Ginseng, Its Cultivation, Harvesting, etc., by Maurice 

G. Kains. 

How to Grow Crysanthemums, compiled from the 

volumes of American Gardening, by the Staff. 

The Laboratory Companion to Fats and Oils Indus- 
tries by Dr. J. Lewhowitsch. Ma.. F. I. C. 

irrigation Farming, a handbook for the practical ap- 
plication of water in the production of crops by Lute 

Wilcox. 

Canning and Preserving, by Mrs. L. T. Roser. 

Tobacco Leaf, Its Culture and Cure, Marketing and 
Manufacture, by J. B. Killegrew. A. M.. Ph. D. 

United States-Japan Expedition, by Com. M. L. 

Perry, three volumes. 

Complete Works of John Fiske, an excellent edition. 
Notes on the Bacon -Shakespeare Qvestion. by Charles 

Allen. . 

A Study in the Warwickshire Dialect with a Glossary, 

by Appleton Morgan. A. M.. L. L. B. 

The Cider Makers' Handbook, a complete guide for 
making and keeping pure cider, by J. M. Trowbridge. 
Shakespeare, a new variorium edition, edited by 
Horace Howard Furness. Ph. D.. LL. D. The first 
volume contains the text, with a collection of the texts 
of the Quartos and Folios, and of some thirty modern 
editions together with notes and comments from the 
editors whose texts are collected ar.d added to these, 
such verbal and grammatical criticisms from other 
quarters In the second volume is given a reprint of 
the Quartos of 1603. a history of Hamlet.a translation 
of a curious old German tragedy called " Fratricide 
punished, or Prince Henry of Hamlet . then comes 
fhe English critics, and a discussion of the one great 
insoluble mystery of Hamlet's sanity, etc. There are 
twelve large volumes in all. 

Annates de la SocieU Entomologique Beige. Forty- 
four volumes. 

The World's Orators, comprising orations of the 
world's history, with Introductory essays, biographical 
sketches and critical notes. Guy Carleton Lee. Ph.D., 
editor-in-chief. Illustrated. Ten volumes. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Yale and Harvard debate on May 12 at Cambridge. 
Amherst intends to join with Princeton In a dual 
track meet soon. 

Nebraska will pay a salary of $2,000 this year to 
her football coach. 

Harvard has the largest faculty in America. It 
consists of 337 men. 

Mt. Holyoke has a faculty of 66 members and a 
student body of 61 1 members. 

A loss of $200,000 was sustained by the burning of 
Hutchinson dormitory at Yale recently. 

Yale is to meet University of California in track 
athletics sometime in May, The meeting is to be at 
New Haven. 

On the All-Amerlcan football teams for the last ten 
years. Harvard has had 29 representatives, Yale 28. 
Princeton 23 and Pennsylvania 19. 

President Eliot has shown in his annual report that 
the successes and failures in athletics of a year, do 
not change the size of the next year's entering class. 
Oberlin College has raised $204,000 toward an 
endowment fund of $500,000; $200,000 of which 
will be given by John D. Rockefeller if the remaining 
$300,000 is raised. 

Professor North, who has been professor of Greek 
at Hamilton College for 57 years has resigned. It is 
said that Professor North was personally acquainted 
with every living alumnus. 

Spring football practice at Columbia has begun 
with the object in view of developing the individuals 
rather than the team. Columbia's outlook on the 
gridiron for the coming season Is excellent. 

On May 24 there Is to be held an Interscholastic 
track meet In New Haven. The meet is to be held 
under the auspices of Yale and among the schools in- 
vited to participate are: Mount Hermon. Willlston 
and Vermont Academy. 

The fact that Professor Russell of the State 
Normal School has declined to accept the presidency 
of the collegiate department of Clark University 
because as he says it is a " moneyless college " cer- 
tainly places the institution In an unfortunate light. 



POOL AND BILLIARD HALL. 



1'XltKK NKW MANAGEMENT. 



\o. 3 I'hoenijc Row, 



t"l> one flight. 



Thoroughly Ren ova ted 
and Remodeled. 

BOTTLED SODAS, TOBACCOS AND CIGARS. 

Come in and roll the balls. 



'She HEIR 

to the FARM 



DWIGHT W. THTJRBER, Prop'r. 



!*F£ 



V A| 



(I 



UP TO THE MINUTE" 



!/ 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES, 
The Northampton Shoe Co, 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, Mass, 



Will inn ke the old farm pay 
If he farma the (arm in the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

Baujht by Mail. 

A thorouxh and practical course, 
under the direct charge of Wm P 
Brooks. Ph. D.. (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College). Our course is 
based on Brooks' Agriculture;" it 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age, irrigation, manures. fertillrat inn. 
crop rotation and everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm. Text books (3 volume*, 800 
I'OgeB. 300 illustrations) free to siu- 
denta. Send for 36 page book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

SpringfMd, Mas*. 

Other Course: Kiinlnom, Shorthand 
I i-nmanKhlii, Tyr*wrHltiR- Normai 
course Ota for teiKher'i. certificate. 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

200 Broadway, New York. 



Clnb and College Pins and ttlngs. 
Gold and silver Medals. 
Dlamends, Watches, Jewelry. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

KEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
om.-e. Cook's Hlook, Amher»t, Mass. 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75. 




A Visible Writer. Strong, Durable, Speedy. Widely used in Amherst. 

We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, exchange and repair writing machines. Supplies of all kinds. 

Write for catalogue. 

CUTTER TOWER CO.. 



173 Devonshire St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




The new dispensary building for the medical school 
of Yale will soon be ready for occupancy. In chemi- 
cal work the old dispensary has done service for more 
than 17,000 consultations. 

Rockefeller has given Harvard $1,000,000 for the 
erection of medical buildings. The gift is with the 
condition that half that sum be raised by the college. 
This amount together with the million given by J. P. 
Morgan last June, will make $2,500,000 to be spent 
for this department of the university. 



50 YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
» . , Copyrights Ac. 

mUU rwtic*, without chHTKe. tu the 

Scientific American. 

mfSassmw 



C. H. BOYDEM, 




ii 



The College Student 
and His Problems" 




by FftsMtst Canddd of Oslo State University Is a 
book which ought to Interest you. By mail. 81.08. 



Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, ART, 

313-315 M.1n St., - - Springfield, Mass. 



KEISER 

[barathea! 



Sole la'/el. 



In Dress The 

Best Is None 

Too Good. 



In Cravats that's Kelser-Bara- 
thea. 

Ask Your Haberdaeher. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




Fit you from Head to foot while you 

wnlt. 

Special prices on team orders. 

HUNTING CLOTHING, 

Guns. Rifles, I'lstols, ami Ammunition. 

GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

Special .lesions ami all colors for Ladle*. 
Gents and Boys. 



Ml MAIS STRKET, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



ICE CREAM, FRUIT, 
TIONERY. 

177 MAIM ST., NORTHAMPTON. 



CONFEC- 



TELEPHONE 33-2. 



HOTEL HE1NKING. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

First Class Luncl,. Rooms *}*"£ "!? W , ar,,9; WUh B " t,,, 
ILMtOfW l>oum>. •*.!»; with ""^.♦^oo- 

15 I.yman St., oppo>U< Vnlon »*p»t, Spri^ftrld, M*.». 
Tulcplione, IBM. 

Near Union Station. 

SFRINUHKL1>, MARS 
1IKNKV E. MARSH, Proprietor. 

AH the modern conveniences. First class accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



COOIaBY'S HOTEL, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 23. 1902 



NO. 12 



Published Fonnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal, Amherst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, Editor-in-Chief. 

WILLIAM ETHERINCTON ALLEN. 1 903. Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904, Assistant Business Manager. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN. 1903, Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDR1E ROBERTSON. 1903. FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. Athletics. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904, Interco'leglate. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. 1905. 



Terms s 91.00 per year in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 80c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

J. C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
A. L. Peck, Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 




Once more the tennis courts around college have 
been put in condition for use and once more we see 
the fascinating game entered into with the same inter- 
est as of old. It would seem that at this time it would 
be well to Instigate a series of interclass orinterfrater- 
nity games to be played off during the latter part of the 
semester. We have ample material in college to make 
a tennis tournament possible and there seems to be no 
reason why an interesting series of games could not be 
arranged. 



ceedure as is now being carried out has been manifest 
for sometime and we hope it will meet with the success 
it deserves. 



The action of the Faculty in allowing the students 
a short period after prayers once each week in which 
to rehearse college songs is to be commended. 
Although there is plenty of singing about college there 
Is a marked Inability on the part of the students to sing 
even the more common college songs en masse. So 
It is, that although there is plenty of enthusiasm shown 
at our games there Is a lack of singing which generally 
characterizes such events. The need of such a pro- 



We learn with pleasure that there is a scheme on 
foot to further beautify the college grounds. We can 
conceive of no place where natural conditions would 
so aid the landscape gardener to make a beautiful 
estate as here. We are especially glad to know that 
the ravine is to receive its share of attention. Cer- 
tainly it deserves it for where, for miles around, could 
there be found such an ideal spot if It were but given 
proper improvement ? The Signal, however, would 
respectfully suggest that steps be taken to stop the 
pollution of the brook which flows through the ravine. 
It is not only a nuisance but a menace to health and 
it is time that a decided action should be taken 
concerning the matter. 



By a recent act of the Legislature the sum of 
$70000 has been appropriated with which two much 
needed buildings will be erected on the college grounds. 



134 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*35 



Already plans and specifications are being made and 
it is safe to state that by next September they will be 
well towards completion. The central heating and 
lighting station will be the first to receive attention. It 
will be a 1 10x46 ft. brick structure and will be situated 
in the ravine at a point about one hundred feet west of 
the chemical laboratory. Its situation will facilitate 
the handling of large quantities of coal and will place 
It conveniently near the other college buildings without 
Its being too much In prominence. Three 3 phase 
alternating current dynamos will supply the electricity 
for the college and the uniformity of current will be of 
Immense value to various departments which have 
before been unable to use the current supplied by the 
Amherst company. Two 6x1 7ft. boilers of 125 horse 
power each.will be installed and the exhaust steam will 
be used for heating the buildings nearer the plant. 
Although it is planned to at first only heat the buildings 
west of the county road, the plant will have capacity 
for heating all the structures upon the grounds. R. 
D. Kimball of Boston who has a wide reputation in this 
department of work has been selected as architect. 
At the present writing no contracts have been awarded. 



Concerning the recent appropriation of the Legisla- 
ture, it is gratifying to note with what little opposition 
the bill passed both houses. Although one of the larg- 
est amounts of money asked for by the trustees of this 
college in many years, it has been freely given. It has 
been a noticable fact in years past that like requests 
have met with seemingly undue hostility on the part of 
our legislators. Why this has been true is perhaps 
due more than anything else to the fact that they have 
been unaquainted with the college and its work. The 
visits of the members of various committees and of the 
general court to the college has brought about a decided 
change in their general attitude toward the place ; not 
only have they seen the institution as a whole but they 
have had an opportunity to view its internal structure 
and to become acquainted with its importance, its true 
character and its possibilities. As a public institution 
it Is dependent upon these men for its support and 
development; without their aid it must lie dormant 
or struggle along under adverse circumstances. It Is 
then pleasing to know they are alive to our needs and 
are in sympathy with the work being carried out at the 
college. 



In the Boston University Beacon for February 28 
appears a very interesting letter from F. E. Hemenway 
Ex-'Ol on the Philippines. Lack of space forbids our 
quoting it entire but the following paragraphs will give 
a fairly clear idea of the conditions. 

" A four month's residence in the islands is by no 
means sufficient to give one an exact conception of 
their conditions. In fact, the ordinary individual who 
has been here but a short time does not know as much 
about their conditions and needs as some of those 
extraordinary people who have never visited them. It 
seems to me that many of the reports that reach the 
States are due to premature judgments often based 
upon a slight knowledge of some one part of the 
archipelago. Of course there are many conditions 
common to the Philippines in general, but some of 
these find exception in certain places. 

The climate, for instance, has a world-wide reputa- 
tion for its heat, but the plateaus of Northern Luzon 
are temperate, while some of the mountain peaks wear 
caps of snow to keep warm. The heat, however, has 
not the terrible character that its reputation suggests. 
In some of the other islands it may be more oppressive, 
but the island of Masbate, and especially this town of 
Cataingan, is quite comfortable. At no time since 
my arrival have I suffered with the heat as I used to 
during the May-June examinations in college and after. 
Whether this was due to conditions or circumstances, 
I cannot say. 

The nights are quite cool. This is due to the fact 
that they are longer than the summer nights in the 
States, and so in spite of the humidity of the atmos- 
phere there is time for the heat to take a rest. The 
mosquitoes, however, need no such vacation, so they 
follow the tactics of the insurgent and attack their 
victims while asleep. 

But the continued heat, the heat that knows no dif- 
ference between Christmas and the Fourth of July, 
produces its effects upon the individual. Those who 
have experiencsd it can sympathize more readily with 
the lazy Filipino who requires twelve hours for sleep 
and ten hours for dozing. 

The rainy season cannot be forgotten. Its duration 
is claimed to be different In different parts of the 
island and no two people can agree on Its date. But 
experi ence thus far proves that it begins January first 
and ends some time during December thirty-first. Of 



course it does not rain all the time, but its effects are 
constantly visible and generally felt. Most of the time 
Is spent In keeping things wet, and the rest of the time is 
spent in trying to get them dry. But I will say no more 
about the matter, for the hot season of April, May and 
June is yet to comeand the heat theorymay then be 
melted and the rain theory may then be evaporated. 

The political conditions are somewhat like the 
weather, rather unsettled. Civil government for the 
most part is nominally in vogue, but in some places 
the military Is abnormally predominant. The civil 
authorities, however, are taking matters in hand with 
commendable zeal, and Improvements are going on 
under the impluse of American push. On this island 
and on many others the natives are pleased with the 
present government. They recognize the fact that 
they are Incapable of governing themselves and that 
America is sincere in her motives. 



OUR HONEY TRIP. 

Some folks calls It a honeymoon, but we didn't 
travel by night except but once, an' the* wuz no moon 
around then. It wuz while we wuz at breakfast that 
I thot of it. We hadn't bin married only about four 
months. So we wuz just in good shape fur it. 

" Maria," sez I, ■ let's take a honey trip. Fur's I 
kin remember we didn't take one ; soon's th' parson 
tied th' knot we sot right down to bizness. But I'm 
feelin* good fur a little holiday ; and's Uncle Eb's 
goin' to Bosting fur a couple of days, he sez I kin use 
old Sam an' th' cart. Spose you try'n git ready." 

Th' day wuz a glorious one fur sech doin's; sun 
shinin' bright not a cloud in heavin's clear, unspotted 
blue ; an' I wuz feelin' th' inspiration of th' weather 
an' natur.' There wuz some longin's In my heart 
thet wanted air, 'n I couldn't free them In th' house 
with everythin' goin* on ; but out under th' wide, free 
heaven, with th' sweetest gal In th' world near you an' 
th' springs of love sendin' up their freshness from th' 
depths of your heart an' bubblin' all over your bein'. — 
then, th* whole earth wusn't too big but you 
could put your arms around it 'n ease all its sufferln' 
humanity, an' give your last cent to help some poor 
critter, (I guess It's lucky fur me these inspiratory 
spells don't come more'n often, or I'd be a poor man.) 
Well, ez I wuz sayin', It wuz a fine day, 'n Maria 
thot so too, so she splcked up th' house some, 'n done 



it in quick order, while I went out to git Sam *n me 
ready. 

My spirits wuz ez light ez th' beams of th' shinin* 
sun, an' I wuz a whistiin' all th' time I wuz a har- 
nessin" up of Sam. Well, we wuz ail ready fur 
startln' about nine o'clock. (We didn't have any 
youngsters to fuss around with then, or we wouldn't 
have got off till noon. I'm not sayin' that children 
ain't a pleasure fur they are, th' little rascals, but 
they're mighty onconvenient at times.) Well, we 
started, the sun an' our heads an' hearts high above 
earthly cares 'n troubles. 

Maria thot it'd be a nice trip to her aunt Jem's up 
in Worthington. I hadn't been there fur a long time 
myself an' cal'lated It would be about ez good a drive 
ez we could take. I alwuz did love th' hills, 'n val- 
leys, an* fields, an' there's plenty of all of 'em up 
there. And when I looked up at th' hills, I thot of 
the words of that grand poet of th' hills, an' woods.— 

"The hills 
Rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun, — the vales 
Stretching in pensive quietness between ; 
The venerable woods -rivers that move 
In majesty, and the complaining brooks 
That make the meadows green." 

There seemed to be a power of wisdom locked up 
in those silent spinxes. with their heads reachin' way 
up in th' clouds, an' covered by them with a halo like 
some mighty saint. 

I aint much pious myself 'n can't set an hour er 
two listenln' to some feller usin' big words on what he 
calls a " dissertation on th' problem of th' elect of 
God." I don't know whether I'm one of th' elect er 
not. probably not accordin' to his way of thlnkin'. but 
when I git out in th* fields 'n woods, an' breathe th' 
fresh, sweet incense that comes down from heaven, 
not what we send up, 'n look out on th' great hills 
covered with their livin' forests, an' patches of green 
grass spotted all over with flowers ; — then. I tell you 
ever, th' leaves on th' trees seem to speak an' tell 
me to look up. an' somethin' sez that God is good, 
an' I feel that I want to thank Him fur letting me live 
an' see all these things. Maria sez I ought to go to 
church more regular; perhaps I ought, fur it wuz 
there that I got th' best thing in this world — th' love 
of th' sweetest little girl this side of heaven, 'n that's 
enough fur me. But somehow er other th' Beln' 
I've learned to love out under th' big. blue sky, ain't 



136 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









th' same as th' one they talk of in the church. Per- 
haps I'm wrong, but I'll serve Him ez I love Him an" 
run th' chances when th' bugle sounds. 

But I've bin wanderin' ; as I sed, we decided to go 
to Worthington. An' if you folks ever bin there you 
know somethin' 'bout th' tipsy hills you've got to 
travel over. They're mighty beholdin' from th' dis- 
tance an' inspires th' heart to noble utterances, but 
when you git nearer an' have to climb some, you're 
apt to say other things too. It wuz all pretty fair 
sailin' till we got to Greenhill an' then it started to 
rain. We stopped there over night intendin' to leave 
in th' mornln'. But th' day opened dark an' gloomy 
with more rain. I squinted at th' clouds right after 
breakfast an' thot I see a clearin' up about ten or 
'leven, so we left, but the rain didn't an' when we 
dropped In on Uncle John at Berkfield, we looked like 
a pair of half drowned kittens ; an' th' harness — Uncle 
Eb wuz alwuz so keerful of th' harness, kept it so 
shinin' bright, but I couldn't help it, it got wet same 
ez we did. 

"Well, Maria.sez I, whenjwe went to bed that night 
I guess our honey-trip's not goin' to turn out ez sweet 
ez we hoped fur. Llke's not th' th' honey's all thinned 
out by th' water mixed with it." But howsomever we 
both slept pretty peaceful like ; thus fur none of our 
tempers wuz ruffled, or frilled in th' least. I never 
did see th' use in gettin' riled when th' weather didn't 
go to suit. It wouldn't help matters to grumble about 
It, an' if you did you wuz usually cross an' onbearable 
all th' rest of th' day. Maria wuz of th' same opinion 
ez I wuz ; an' ez I sed, we both slept peaceful, an' 
wuz up with th' sun. helpin' th' birds to sing their 
mornin' psalm. How those little critters did open 
their throats an' let out their messages of good will, 
it seemed ez if we wuz all on a new earth, everything 
wuz so clean an' fresh, th' grass seemed to spring up 
to meet th' sun, an' th' trees wuz all a shakin' their 
leaves so gentle like ez if they wuz throwin' off every- 
thing that would hinder them from standin' out free. 
Even th' sun seemed to shine with a brighter, sweeter 
light. 

Maria an' I walked out under th' trees, arm in arm, 
not sayin' a word we wuz both too happy an' didn't 
want to break th' spell. An' ez I looked down into 
her deep, brown eyes, I seemed to see all thet wuz 
good in th' world. Yes, there wuz still some of th' 



sweetness left after all. I wuz satisfied an' didn't ask 
fur more. After breakfast we hoisted sail again an' 
went down with th' wind in fine shape. Perhaps th' 
finish would be all right. We wuz joggin' along 
pleasant like fur about 'n hour, chattin' away like two 
robins on a branch ; 1 wuzn't holdin' th' lines particu- 
lar, givin' Sam (as well as me) plenty of freedom fur 
movement, when " snap," went somethin' about the 
riggin' an' old Sam began to back, an' we stopped 
short agin a big maple. Maria didn't say nothin' ex- 
cept to cling to me helpless like. When we wuz 
brought up short. I bounced out an' see thet th' trace 
wuz broke ; it didn't amount to much, so we wuz 
soon on th' road again ; but we hadn't got much 
further up th' hill when th' nose band broke. I didn't 
say anything yet, but kept myself calm an' quiet. 

We reached the top of th' hill at last without any 
more trouble an' started on th' down road. One 
thing has alwuz bin a puzzle to me about th' folks 
livin' round here ; why in th' name of th' hills, don't 
they have breaks on their wagons an' carriages. It's 
a risky bizness to travel up an' down these roads with 
only th' harness to hold you, an' wuz just speakin' of 
it to Maria, when dog-gone it, if th* breechin' didn't 
bust. If I'd a hed a techy ol* horse, I guess our 
honey-trip 'd a turned out different ; as it wuz ol' Sam 
stood still, an' I jumped out an' tried to fix th' cussed 
thing. I dunno but I perspired some over thet har 
ness, maybe it wuz on account of th' underbreath, 
I've heerd tell of th' undercurrent, bein' powerful 
strong at th' shore, takin' folk's off their feet an' flus- 
terin' them all out ; I guess it must be th' underbreath 
'et flusters so many on land, I dunno tho ; but I didn't 
cal'late 'twuz so warm ; an' then th' leather wuz ez 
tough ez — yes, ez tough ez leather, 'n I jabbed my 
finger a couple times with the knife ; but I didn't say 
nothin', an' when I looked up a'wipln my face, Maria 
wuz lookin off over th' valley enjoyin th' beauties — 
maybe (she's a smart woman she is ; thet's why 1 
married her.) Well, I got the thing fixed, at last, an' 
we enjoyed th' scenery an' th' weather for a long 
time. It didn't seem ez tho we could have any 
troubles that day, everything wuz so bright an' cheer- 
ful. But just ez we wuz eatin' our lunch somethin' 
happened, an' we dropped right in th' middle of th' 
road. Old Sam stood th* shock like a veteran, — 
'n Maria laughed some. We wuz shuk up a bit, none 



*37 



of us hurt ; an' th* carriage wuzn't damaged much ; 
but I ain't sayin' I smiled an' didn't say nothin' ; It 
made me perspire some more ; an' I spent a good 
hourwipin' th' sweat from my face an' repeatin' 
poetry (?) about the beauties of nature, et cetra, 
while huntin' for that dummed nut. It wuz a good 
thing Uncle Eb left a wrench in th' carriage, or I'd a 
got some warmer tryin' to put th' wheel on. Well, 
we couldn't complain of not havin" an interestin' time 
anyhow. I won't stop to tell you all about th' beauties 
of th' scenery, etc. of th' fields, an' hills. I was im- 
pressed by them well enough ; but I wuz a mite nar- 
vous as to what would happen next. 

Well, we got to West Cummington an" found we'd 
have to stop there over night. Th' roads wuz too bad 
fur travellin', so th' hotel folks told us. So we settled 
down again; but I wuz a gettin' sort of anxious to be 
at Aunt Jem's an' even wished I wuz to hum again, 
didn't know where to-morrow might land us : but I 
wuzn't goin' to bring in to-morrow's troubles, sufficient 
for me to-day wuz the breakdowns thereof (the har- 
ness didn't break only fourteen times.) I wuz a won- 
derin' if everybody had ez pleasant a time ez we had, 
when they took their honey-trip. While we wuz a 
settin' in th' parlor, some folks came in, they looked 
as if they hed bin travellin'. Maria thot she knew 
one of them, an old schoolmate, so she spoke to her. 
Well, that made th' evenin' more pleasant, but they 
were goin' on further that night, an' when they found 
we wanted to go in their direction, they offered to 
lead us ez fur ez Temple about ten miles this side of 
Worthington, and ez Maria hed another aunt there, 
we thought we might make a visit there, while we 
could. So I borrowed a harness of th' landlord, 
wuzn't goin' to trust the patched up riggin' I had such 
a night as this. The* wuz one double team an' two 
single ones, so the' wuz plenty of company. Well, 
we hadn't gone fur when we lost sight of them some- 
how, an' rather than go any further, an' run the risk 
of spillin' out in some hole we turned about an' headed 
for th' hotel, but we hadn't more than got there when 
they came tearin' back after us. I wuz almost de- 
termined to stay here, but sence they'd gone to all th' 
trouble of comin' after us, we thought we'd go on 
again. Well, we got to Temple all right, an' gave th' 
folks a cheerful goodbye, an' started for Maria's aunt's 
house ; an* dum it, there wuzn't a soul to hum. My 



feathers wuz abeginnin to get a mite ruffled, but with 
a mighty effort I kept myself. We spent the night 
at a kind-hearted neighbors, who took pity on us, an' 
next day arrived at Aunt Jem's. They wuz right 
glad to see us, an' we enjoyed our visit, but I wuz 
never so glad ez when I wuz settin" at the table in my 
own house again. 

'' Maria," sez I, when we wuz all settled down to 
quietness again, -th' next time we take a honey-trip 
I'll buy a brand new harness an' buggy, before I trust 
myself to those hills again," an' I meant it. But we 
enjoyed it. powerful. 

Yours, 

E. P. Zu Dicks. 
Lone Pine Hill Farm, 
Squedunks, Mass. 



A CONTRIBUTION TO SCIENCE. 

The subject is but a medium sized cur of uncer- 
tain pedegree. To a casual observer there is nothing 
remarkable about him but his sneaking appearance 
and his stump of a tail which stands straight up like 
the stem of a weather-beaten pumpkin. His color is 
yellow; his habitat, just out of gunshot from my 
study window ; his favorite diversion, a series of in- 
describable prolonged howls without a shadow of re- 
spect for his environment. 

After profound research and consideration I have 
arrived at a few conclusions which may be worth re- 
cording from a biological and psychological stand- 
point. First and foremost, no member of the dog 
family would naturally produce such weird and un- 
earthly sounds. This conclusion I have arrived at 
only after a careful study of the phonetics of the 
canine family. If any one doubts the grounds of my 
conclusions I shall be happy to refer him to a list of 
fifty-seven volumes by eminent scientists treating on 
the above subject. The lack of space alone causes 
me to desist from going deeper Into a detailed discus- 
sion on this point. 

From whence, however, does this deplorable ver- 
tebrate derive his power of articulation ? I am con- 
vinced that here at least we have an Instance of the 
transmigration of souls. No other explanation seems 
applicable. It is with great regret that I am forced 
to accuse one of our ancestors of prehistoric times of 
acquiring the habit of howling In such spasmotlc, 



»38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



139 



melancholic strains. That the spirit of such a person 
still exists and at present occupies a tenement in my 
neighbor's dog seems to beyond dispute from evidence 
at hand. It is hoped that future study of Ethnology 
will throw some light on the time and conditions under 
which the savage in question existed. In the mean- 
while let us hope that when this miserable howling 
cur shuffles off his mortal coil the evil spirit will 
straightway migrate to some less civilized portion of 
this great green earth. 



WESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The Western Alumni Association of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College held Its annual business 
meeting and banquet at Leland Hotel. Chicago. 111.. 
on Thursday evening, Mar. 27. Invitations had been 
sent to some 50 alumni and non-graduates in the 
territory west of Buffalo, extending to the Missouri 
river and north of the Ohio river. While a goodly 
number responded to the invitation sending greetings, 
only thirteen members were present. After the ban- 
quet the committee appointed to draft a constitution 
and by-laws submitted its report, which was accepted 
after making a few changes. It was decided to hold 
the annual meeting in March on such a date as shall 
be chosen by the President and Secretary. 

The following officers were chosen for the ensuing 
year : President, E. B. Bragg, 75, of Chicago. III.; 
vice-president. Asa F. Shiverick, '82, of Chicago, III.; 
secretary and treasurer. A. B. Smith, '95, of Chicago, 
III.; trustees. C. S. Plumb, '82, of Lafayette, Ind.; J. 
E. Wilder. '82. Chicago, 111.; L. W. Smith, '93, Man- 
teno, 111.; E. M. Wright, '99, Manteno, 111.; J. L. 
Field, '92, Chicago, 111. 

Those present were : Lewis A. Nichols, 71, Civil 
Engineer. Chicago, III.; Everett B. Bragg. 75, West- 
ern Manager General Chemical Co., Ghlcago, 111.; 
Winthrop E. Stone. '82, President Purdue Univ.. 
Lafayette. Ind.; Chas. S. Plumb. '82, Professor of 
Agriculture, Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind.; Asa F. 
Shiverick. '82, Firm of Tobey Furniture Co.. Chicago, 
III.; John E. Wilder. '82. Firm of Wilder & Co.. 
Chicago. III.; Royal P. Davidson, '92, Commandant 
of cadets, Northwestern Military Academy. Highland 
Park, III.; Cuther W. Smith. '93. Farmer. Manteno, 
111.; Arthur B. Smith, '95. Credit Dep't Wilson Bros.. 



Chicago, 111.; Herbert J. Armstrong, '97. Civil Engi- 
neer. Chicago, III.; Mark H. Munson, '99, with Swift 
&. Co., Chicago, 111.; Edwin M. Wright, '99. Farmer, 
Manteno, III.; Perclval C. Brooks, 1901. Care General 
Chemical Co., Chicago, III. 

After the routine business of the meeting had been 
gotten out of the way. the Alumni Athletic field came 
up for general discussion. It was finally decided to 
assist the Association by personal subscriptions of 
those present and also to canvas the West supple- 
menting the work already done by the Alumni Athletic 
Field committee at Amherst. The sum of $100 was 
raised and it is hoped that generous subscriptions will 
be received from other Western Alumni. 

While the Western Alumni Association has been 
in existence for a number of years it has not been as 
active as some of the associations, but it is hoped 
that more interest will be taken from now on and 
larger attendance secured for its meetings. Chicago 
is the natural center for the Central States and all 
alumni in or near Chicago should make it a point to 
be identified with the Western Alumni Association. 
Arthur B. Smith, Secretary. 



FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

There was a special meeting of the Fraternity con- 
ference Tuesday evening. April 8. R. W. Morse. H. 
J. Franklin, E. B. Saunders, C. A. Tinker, V. A. 
Gates, E. G. Proulx, H. L. Knight and N. F. Mona- 
han, represented their respective fraternities. The 
conference voted to assist the ladies of the faculty in 
holding a reception. W. E. Allen, G. D. Jones, '03. 
|S. L. Smith. '02, C. A. Tinker '03. and H. L. Knight. 
'02, ex-officio, were appointed as a committee to 
confer with the ladies of the faculty. A meeting of 
the above committee and the ladies was held April 10 
at the home of Miss Helena T. Goessmann ; Mrs. 
Babson. Mrs. Wellington. Mrs. Stone and Miss 
Goessmann being present. It was decided to hold a 
reception Friday evening. May 9. the principle features 
of which will be a public reception, followed by a drill 
by a picked squad, band concert, dance and a light 
collation. A special car will leave for Northampton 
after the dance. The hearty co-operation of all stu- 
dents is requested and expected. It was recom- 
mended that only those students who are to take part 
in the drill wear uniforms at the reception. 



The following leaders of college singing were 
appointed at the conference meeting. John Hall. '02. 
leader ; C. I. Lewis. '02, W. E. Allen, '03, F. D. 
Couden. '04, H. H Goodenough. C. A. Holcomb. '05. 
class leaders. 

Fraternities are requested to practice singing the 
college songs used after the chapel exercises. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

It has been the purpose of the Y. M. C. A. during 
the past year to keep before the young men of the 
college the principles of Christian manhood which 
govern the workings of the great movement of which 
the Association is a part. 

During last spring term the hand-book was pub- 
lished bearing some marked changes in the general 
plan. The shape of the book was longer and narrower 
than previous issues and enclosed several blank pages 
together with a page of useful tables thus rendering 
the book very handy as a pocket note-book. 

The Northfield Student-Conference saw us repre- 
sented in the delegates, Messrs. Tottingham, Smith. 
Carpenter. Shaffrath and Back, who returned with 
words of greatest help to the Association. In accord- 
ance with the custom the Association tendered the 
incoming class a reception in the latter part of Sep- 
tember last. 

Through a lack of teachers there have been only 
two classes in Bible study instead of four as during 
the preceding year. Members of the Freshman class 
under the guidance of Mr. Hinds have formed one 
division and members from the three upper classes the 
other division. Devotional meetings were held regular- 
ly once a week being addressed occasionally by outside 
speakers. 

A notable advance has been made in the working 
of the Association by which it is confidently believed 
the same will be inestimably benefitted. Heretofore 
nearly all of the experience gained by the Senior 
members has been lost to the Association at their 
graduation. To conserve this experience from year 
to year, an advisory committee has been formed com- 
posed of three resident townsmen, Mr. M. B. King- 
man, Mr. C. W. Marshall and Dr. J. B. Lindsey. A 
detailed account of the formation of this committee 
was published in the issue of the Signal for March 26. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

A very pleasant informal dance was held in the 
Drill Hall Friday evening, April II. Although the 
company was smaller than was expected, those who 
attended succeeded in having a very enjoyable time 

It was planned to have dancing begin at 4-30 
o'clock but owing to the baseball game being In 
progress at the time the floor was not patronized until 
after six. The program consisted of eighteen num- 
bers, the music being furnished by the college orches- 
tra. At about eight o'clock an intermission was 
called and refreshments were served from buffet 
tables. 

Some of those present were:— Miss Swain of Dor- 
chester. Miss Proulx of Smith college, Miss Hinckley 
of Amherst. Miss Griswold of Mt. Holyoke, Miss 
Morgan of Mt. Holyoke, Miss Quirk of Mt. Holyoke, 
Miss Merrick of Amherst, Miss Sanderson of Am- 
herst, Miss Foxcroft of Mt. Holyoke, the Misses 
Goodenough of Amherst. Miss Hall of North Amherst, 
Miss Gaylord of North Amherst, Miss Moore of Smith 
college and Miss Purtil of Smith college. Mrs. Lull 
and Mrs. Ostrander acted as patronesses. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

April 22— Baseball game with Amherst at Pratt 

Field. 
April 24— Baseball game with Bates on the Campus. 

Weekly meeting of Y. M. C. A. topic, 

" Suggestions for Meeting Temptations." 
April 25— Band concert in band stand at 7-30 p. m. 
April 26— Baseball with Springfield at Springfeld. 
May 1— Weekly meeting of Y. M. C. A. topic. "The 

Use of the Tongue." 
May 3— Baseball game with Millers Falls at Millers 

Falls. 



BASEBALL. 

The team has had good weather for practice the 
past two weeks, but the absence of coaching is result- 
ing in a rather slow development of fast baseball. 
First bag is still an open position with Gregg, Halligan 
and Pray on the anxious seat. Ahearn is giving Cook 
a rub at home plate and this leaves a chance at third. 
Hunt, Walker, Paul and Gregg have all been tried at 
third bag and at short and no one Is sure of the place. 



140 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



141 



Ohearn ts sure of second and the out fielders will hold 
their positions by good stick work. 

The practice game with Amherst on the eleventh 
was a poor exhibition of baseball from our point of 
view and it was played on the home grounds too. 
Bodfish followed instructions and to give the infield 
practice, allowed Amherst to hit the ball out with 
disastrous results. In the first two innings Massachu- 
setts bunched her errors and seven Amherst men 
crossed the plate. The errors did not end here, but 
luck and good playing at critical points kept the total 
score for the seven innings down to eight. At the bat 
Massachusetts was no better than in the field. The 
Amherst pitcher was only fair but it was an off day, 
and poor base running and the fine support the Amherst 
men gave their twirler kept us from making more than 
a single score. There is much better material for a 
team In college now than last year, but the men will 
have to wake up, if they expect to come anywhere 
near the record of last year's team. 

The schedule game with Amherst will have been 
played when this issue of the Signal is publsshed, but 
too late for an account of it to appear this time. 



Depfcrtrnfrvf ^lot^s. 



The greater the institution, the greater its responsi- 
bilities, the greater its advantages, the greater work 
It accomplishes. This sounds very plausible, but is 
not true to fact. In the March Forum Prof. George 
T. Ladd, discussed the question, " Are American Uni- 
versities Worth what they Cost?" and said, that, 
according to theory the graduates of the University 
should be the leaders in the worlds interests, but found 
that facts proved otherwise. Why this should be so, 
is not satisfactorily accounted for. as every advantage 
seems to be at the disposal of the student to make 
him the most completely fitted man to assume a posi- 
tion at the head of the procession as it passes the 
reviewing stand of Public Opinion. Tho facts point 
otherwise it should not cause a disparagement of the 
good work accomplished by the Universities, but 
should set the thinking men. who are at the head of 
these greater colleges, to work to discover the cause 
of failure and rectify the mistake. 

Though the University should be looked up to with 



respect and admiration for the work it has accom- 
plished and the advantages it does possess, yet it is to 
the smaller colleges scattered broadcast, that the 
world must turn for the majority of her leaders 
and workers. Not every man is in a position to 
receive the benefits of the University, but possessing 
within himself the qualities that make for leadership 
and genius, and receiving a training from the minor 
college, that is not likely to be possessed by the Uni- 
versity, he is enabled to grasp and utilize those oppor- 
tunities that come to him. for the accomplishment of 
his ends, and it is to this fact that America owes 
much of her greatness. 

If the money-burdened men, who, each year, are 
bestowing their millions upon the already magnificently 
equipped Universities were to remember some of the 
smaller colleges who are struggling to maintain their 
dignity, as it were, handicapped by a lack of means to 
provide suitable advantages for the performance of 
their work, their spirit might rest more at peace, and 
see more real work accomplished for the good of 

humanity. 

In the establishment of the State Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment Stations, the United States 
took a step that forced her toward the front rank in 
the scientific world, and through the work done in the 
various departments she leads the world to-day, in her 
advances in the natural sciences. This is particularly 
true in respect to Entomology. '-Owing to the crying 
needs of a rapidly growing population of practical 
people and to the consequent encouragement given by 
Legislatures in making appropriations, as well as by 
the energy, ability, and adaptlbility of the individual 
workers, many of them men of high standing in the 
field of pure science, the United States has jumped 
to the front, 1 ' says Dr. L. O. Howard. " English 
colonists, themselves, confronting many of the same 
problems which we have had to meet, were among 
the earliest to recognize this fact, and agricultural 
papers of the Australian colonies, of New Zeland. of 
Cape Colony, and of British India have for years been 
extensively quoting from American writings. Other 
countries have followed their lead. Cape Colony has 
employed an American economic entomologist. 
Argentina sent for an American entomologist to advise 
that government in the work against migratory locusts. 
The British West Indies are at the present time 



(1899) in search of the proper man to go from the 
States to help them along these lines. In 1896 the 
French authority Dr. Paul Marchal. writing on the 
subject of applied entomology in Europe, began his 
paper with these words (freely translated) : 

'There exists nowhere an organization dealing 
with applied entomology capable of rivalling that of 
the United States The extraordinary development 
which this service has taken in America is well 
known. * * * The progress realized in these 
later years under the influence of this organization has 
been of the highest kind. In particular that which 
concerns the application of insecticides on a large 
scale and biological observations of a high interest 
from the point of view of pure science have been 
accumulated in their publications. European nations 
have commenced to follow the example which has 
been given to them on the other side of the Atlantic' 
Recently Miss Eleanor A. Orrherod, the well known 
English writer and investigator referring to the work of 
American economic entomologists, wrote : • It really 
is impossible for me to say how highly I fully believe 
that their serviceable scientific and applied informa- 
tion is benfitting the world as well as their own 
country.' " All this is the more remarkable when we 
learn that " as late probably as 1878. this country was 
behind certain European countries in its accomplish- 
ments in the field of economic entomology." 

It is a recognized fact that •• Massachusetts " is 
the only true agricultural college in the United States, 
and that its library is the best of its kind in the 
country. Prof. N. G. Johnson, of New York, who in 
December made an inspection of the orchard in 
reference to San Jose scale, writes: " It has been 
my pleasure to visit the colleges and stations of 
twenty-three different states. Your buildings and 
equipments compare favorably with the best in the 
country and are far above the average. This is par- 
ticularly true in your various departments In which 
practical work is given. Your facilities for Instruction 
in botany, vegetable pathology, entomology, horticul- 
ture, general agriculture and allied brands are excep- 
tionally good. Your library is one which commanded 
my attention on account of the careful selection of 
the works necessary for agricultural training." But 
it is not so well known that the course in entomology 
is the most thorough and extensive of any college or 
university in the world. The Senior work here is 
equivalent to that given by Kolbe, which is "far in 
advance of any other college," as Prof. Smith of 
Rutgers wrote to Prof. Fernald, when inquiring as to 
the preparation needed for advanced work, and the 



post graduate work as revealed by replies to a circular 
letter sent to teachers and professors throughout the 
country, describing the course of study, and plan of 
reading, whereby the student is made to depend upon 
his own efforts for further research, enabling him to 
rightly handle and utilize literature upon the subject, 
is shown to be far in advance of anything attempted 
elsewhere. Parts of the letter were printed in the 
Entomological News and Entomologist's Monthly, and 
copied by journals of Germany, Russia, France. Italy, 
and other European countries. The rather mournful 
query of one Italian journal expresses the value set 
upon the course, in few words : •• When will Italy 
ever be able to do anything like this ?" 

The Junior work deals with the economic considera- 
tion of entomology, in the study of such Insects that 
are most commonly met with, endangering the plant 
life with which all subjects are more or less most 
intimately connected. The work at present consists 
of recitation room work in preparation for the field 
work which is to follow about the first of May, when 
the student through his Individual collection learns to 
classify and describe. In the Senior year, the struct- 
ure is studied and the student is trained in the using 
of literature upon the subject, that he may depend 
upon his own efforts, so that on leaving college he will 
not be at a loss what to do next, as might be the case 
were too much aid is given in the class room. In the 
course this practical plan Is followed — specialized work 
is done along such lines that will be of the greatest 
benefit to the student in his future work. If he Intends 
to enter the business of fruit growing, such Insects as 
are most commonly met within that industry are more 
especially and more extensively studied ; if in market 
gardening of vegetables under glass, particular stress 
is laid on the study of those insects known to be more 
active in that line ; If medicine is to be his chosen 
profession, careful research and most thorough work 
is done along that direction with insects which he will 
be compelled to become acquainted with In his pro- 
fession ; while a general knowledge of all forms and 
families is obtained through a course of lectures. The 
graduation thesis is usually upon such a subject as 
relates to his future work, and if of sufficient merit Is 
printed. If post graduate work is contemplated, 
other methods are followed that will lead the student 
to more thorough work by which he shall become an 
acknowledged authority in his subject, becoming 
engaged principally In the work of entomology as a 
profession ; and in consequence if a Ph. D. from 
•• Massachusetts " is obtained, it is the greatest recom- 
mendation that can be secured, and Is an evidence of 
most thorough and complete work having been 
accomplished, and that the one who has received the 
honor is In a position to lead In his chosen field of 
labor. 



142 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



M3 



College N <>**$■ 



— Capt. J. Anderson has been very sick with the 
Grippe. 

— The fraternities are having their tennis courts put 
in order. 

— J. R. Kelton. "05, has joined the D. G. K. 
fraternity. 

— Bertram Tupper has been elected secretary for 
the freshman class. 

— Chef Reardon has left the Boarding club for a 
position in Trenton, N. J. 

— Mr. Parker, 72, has been appointed landscape 
gardner for the coming year. 

— L. S. Walker has been elected captain of the 
freshman baseball team and C. E. Merrill, manager. 

— J. G. Cook, '03, has been elected assistant man- 
ager of the baseball team to fill the place formerly 
occupied by W. E. Allen. 

— O. F. Cooley, '02, made a new record at the 
shooting range April 15, his score being 17, 21, 21, 
21, at two hundred yards. 

— Manager Brooks has completed his schedule of 
the football season of 1902 and the schedule will 
appear in another part of this issue. 

— For the present Captain Anderson intends hold- 
ing two battalion drills and one company drill with 
practice for the rifle team each week. 

— If the weather is favorable, the college band will 
give the first of a series of concerts in the band-stand 
from 7-30 to 8-30 o'clock Friday night, April 25. 

— Work has already begun preparatory to building 
the new heating station. For the past week men 
have been busy cutting out trees on the new location. 

— Privates Walker, Staples, and Quigley have 
been transferred to the band and the following trans- 
fers and promotions have been made : Serg't, C. A. 
Tinker, bearer of national colors ; Corporal C. W. 
Kinney appointed sergeant and transferred to Co. 
" A" ; Private O. F. Cooley appointed corporal. 

— The third informal dance was held in the drill 
hall Friday evening. April 1 1 . directly after the prac- 
tice game with Amherst. Contrary to all expecta- 
tions there was but very few couples present. The 
twenty couples who did attend enjoyed themselves to 



the fullest capacity. Music was furnished by the col- 
lege orchestra. 

— Captain Anderson has ordered a new $75 state 
flag for the battalion. This flag will be of the latest 
design as regulated by a recent act of the Legislature 
and consists of a white field on which is an Indian 
with raised tomahawk, while on the back is an emblem 
of a pine tree indicating the first flag waved by the 
Massachusetts Bay colony, and bearing the words 
•• Clark Cadets. M. A. C, Amherst." 

— At a mass-meeting held in chapel last Friday 
morning the new board of Reading Room Directors 
was elected as follows: 1903 — E. B. Snell. R. H. 
Robertson, W. W. Peebles; 1904— F. H. Couden, 
R. R. Raymoth, A. W. Gilbert; 1905— H. F. 
Tompson, G. W. Patch. E. B. Snell was elected 
president, and R. H. Robertson, secretary and treas- 
urer, at a meeting of the board, April 21. 

— Captain Anderson has entered a team in the 
Intercollegiate Rifle Contest held between many of 
the military colleges in the United States. The 
shooting is to be done on the home ground of each 
team the score to be sent directly to Capt. Geo. E. 
Sage. U. S. A. Ret., University of California, who 
has charge. The teams consist of ten men each, and 
each man will fire ten shots from the Springfield rifles 
with the regulation six pound trigger-pull at a distance 
of two hundred yards. The team is ; Lieutenants 
Morse, McCobb. Saunders; Sergeants Bodfish, 
Plumb, Cop, Cooley; Privates Quigley, O'Hearn, 
Smith, White, Proulx. Hood ; Private Taylor, 
substitute. 

— In accordance with the request of the Ladles of 
the Faculty, Captain Anderson has detailed the fol- 
lowing men for the exhibition drill to be held Friday 
evening, May 9 : A Co., corporals, Couden, Tower, 
Monahan, Peebles; privates, Gardner, Quigley, Ray- 
moth, Ahearn, Franklin, Hunt, Munson, Cook ; ser- 
geants, Hodgkiss. Cook, Barrus ; B Co., corporals. 
Allen, Pool, Snell ; privates, Newton, White, Bacon. 
Parsons, Allen, Griffin. Proulx. Esip ; sergeants, 
Belden, Dwyer, Lewis, Bodfish, The detail will drill 
the manual, rifle exercise and bayonette exercise ten 
minutes each, with a short rest between, under com- 
mand of Captains Paul and Dacy. After the drill 
there will be a band concert and dance. All alumni 
and students are invited. 



POOL AND BILLIARD HALL. 

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IN 



MENS FINE SHOES. 



The Northampton Shoe Go. 



88 Main St., 



Northampton, M; 



STEPHEN LANE FOLGElt, 

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Club and College Pins and Rings. 
Gold and Silver Medala. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jawelry. 




Will make the old farm par 
If he farms the farm in the 
model 11 way. 

Modern 
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Caught by Mail. 

A thorough and practical course, 
under the direct chargo of Win. P. 
Hrooks, Ph. I).. (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural Collegii). Our course is 
based on "Hrooks' Agriculture;" it 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age, irrigation, manures, fertilization, 
crop rotation and everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm. Text books (3 volumes, 800 
pages, 301) illustrations) free to stu- 
dents. Send for 36 page book de- 
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Home 

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Schools, 

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other Course: Buslneiw, Shorthand, 
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OKFICE OF 



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HEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75. 




A Visible Writer. Strong, Durable, Speedy. Widely used in Amherst. 

We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, exchange and repair writing machines. Supplies of all kinda. 

Write for catalogue. 

cuttefTtower CO., 



173 Devonshire St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



144 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



— The long-looked for college song book has been 
published. The book contains twenty-one songs done 
up in a very plain drab-colored cover 3x4 inches. 
The songs are: "Victory" (F. D. Couden. '04). 
" There's Music in the Air," " Song of the Wedding 
March," "My Honey Babe," " Over the Banister," 
•• Drinking Song," " It was my Last Cigar," •' Star of 
the Summer Night," " Evening on the Campus," 
" Dunderbeck." " Drink to Me only with Thine Eyes." 
•• Nut Brown Maiden," " Lovely Night," " Hail, Mas- 
sachusetts ! " " A Stein Song," '• The Edystone Light," 
"Juanlta," M Levee Song," •' Knocked 'Em in the old 
Kent Road," " I Doubt It," " I was a Rhizopod." 
Now that the books have come the college has 
already begun singing in the chapel, as voted by the 
faculty some weeks ago. The plan is to sing ten 
minutes one morning a week, the mornings being 
varied. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




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Anyone Bending a sketch and description m«y 
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Invention Is probably patentable. Communica- 
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sent free. Oldest airency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn * Co. receive 
rpecial notice, without c harg e, In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 7, 1902 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amherst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Editor-in-Chief". 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903. Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. 1904. Assistant Business Manager. 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1 903. College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903. Alumni Notes. 

RICHARD HENDR1E ROBERTSON. 1903, FAYETTE DICKINSON COUDEN. 1904. Athletics. 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904, Interco'leglate. 

CEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH. 1905. 



Terms: $l.o<> per year in adeance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club. 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association. 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



We wish to call the attention of the students to the 
exhibition drill which is to be held in the Drill hall 
Friday evening. The ladies of the faculty are doing 
all In their power to make the event a success and 
the presence of every student is desired. The exhi- 
bition drill by picked squads will be followed by a band 
concert and dance, the music for the latter being fur 
nlshed by the College orchestra. Refreshments will 
be served by the committee in charge and a special 
car will be run for those wishing to return to North- 
ampton. 



The baseball season is well under way and our dif- 
ficulties seem to increase in direct proportion to 
the number of games played. It is. however, no 
time to lose heart. We have yet some of the best 
College teams in New England to try conclusions with 
and the hearty support of every man should be given 
the team from now on. The support of our athletic 
teams is apt to be fickle in the extreme ; it is apt to 



cause unstinted praise and enthusiasm after victories 
and to totally forsake the men when defeat is met. 
The opening games of this season have been disas- 
trous to our team but we have met defeat at the 
hands of worthy rivals. Amherst is playing an unus- 
ually good game this year. Her showing against Har- 
vard. Yale and Princeton has placed her well in the 
front rank of New England colleges. Bates Is play- 
ing good ball and in Springfield we played a profes- 
sional team which has met successfully representa- 
tives of the Eastern and National League. These 
defeats are then to a great extent excusable, and cer- 
tainly there Is no need of censuring the team. Give 
It a good scrub and plenty of encouragement and we 
may feel confident that a good season's work will 
follow. 



Architects Ellsworth, 71. and Kllkpatrick of Hol- 
yoke have completed plans for the erection of the 
new dinlng-hall and dormitory which will be situated 
midway between the old boarding club house and the 
Experiment station. The plans call for a three story 



. 



i 4 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»47 




brick structure 60 by 104 ft. in size, trimmed with 
marble and in design bordering on the colonial. The 
dining-room will occupy the first floor, about 30 by 
80 feet, having a serving-room in the rear connected 
with the kitchen which will be in the basement. It 
will seat 350 persons The basement will also con- 
tain cold storage rooms, laundry, provision and vegeta- 
ble rooms and will have a cement bottom. The sec- 
ond floor will contain a large reception hall, rooms for 
the steward and three suites of rooms of three each for 
the use of students. At each end of the building will 
be entrances to the second floor with balconies over 
each, Occupying as it will a prominent position on 
the College grounds it will add greatly to the general 
effect. Its value to the College, both as a dining-hall 
and dormitory will be great and will supply a long felt 
want. The building will be heated by steam from the 
central heating station and will thus have more avail- 
able room than it otherwise would have. Its estimated 
cost is $30,000. 



Inasmuch as we have of late, received several com- 
munications from members of the alumni bringing 
forth arguments for and against the change of name 
of this College we feel obliged at this time to state 
our attitude towards the question. In the first place 
although we are by no means uninterested in this topic 
we believe that the columns of the Signal are no 
place for a prolonged discussion of any subject. The 
purpose of the paper, we believe, Is to establish har- 
mony and not to create discord. Again The Signal 
acting as it does as an advertising medium of the Col- 
lege would fail in this purpose, and on the other hand 
would bring about a counter influence upon prospec- 
tive students by placing the institution before them in 
a wrong light. The discussion which has been car- 
ried on during the past year may have brought about 
some good results but it certainly has eventuated in 
bad results as well and which on the whole have per- 
haps outweighed the good. We believe that revolu- 
tions never move backward and that the movement 
which has started will ultimately end In a state of af- 
fairs which will be for the best good of the College, 
but for a time at least we are adverse to publishing 
in our columns, articles which argue for or against a 
change of name. At some future time it may be ad- 
visable to publish a supplement to the regular issue. 



containing a fair and liberal discussion of both sides 
of the question and which may be supplied to those 
who are more closely connected with the College and 
in consequence are more interested in the matter. 



A PIPE DREAM. 

" Young men shall dream dreams and old men shall see 
visions." 

The visions of the old men I shall leave to those, 
my seniors, who are more adequate to see and rever- 
ence the old man's visions. It is of a dream of a 
freshman in college that I take as my theme. 

But the first requisite to be able to dream in the 
true lazy, half-sleepy fashion is a good briar or mer- 
cham, filled with equally good tobacco. The second 
is that the one to dream must be alone in the quiet 
of his room with his feet — as one of the laws of man 
require for comfort — higher than his head, he being 
tilted back in his cushioned chair thus equipped to 
dream the dreams as instigated by " My Lady 
Nicotine." 

At last the pipe is burning slow and even : and the 
student falls into a deep reverie. The smoke still 
comes, cool, and with a fragrance known and enjoyed 
only by the true smoker. He blows a ring of smoke, 
another follows the first, still another escapes from the 
eliptical shape of his mouth only to follow the others 
to the ceiling. He blows yet another more perfect in 
its white flimsyness which produces a faint and con- 
tented smile on his sleepy face ; he half closes his 
eyes and silently watches it drift away from him. 
Many flickering expressions pass over his face as he 
watches the ring go on to its sure destruction. He 
dreams ; and without becoming aware of the fact he 
imagines he is in his seat in the mathematics room. 
Perhaps he was trying to find the sine, cosine, or 
cotangent of the circle of smoke. It seems only 
probable for he mutters to himself as dreamers are 
apt to do. " tan x = opposite side over adjacent side," 
and then, " log tan x = log." but he dreams no more 
for he comes back to earth and mortals as If the pro- 
fessor had shouted at him, "Sir! Sir!" from over 
his glasses. 

Again the pipe is put to his lips and the fire takes on 
new life as the smoke Is emitted from his lips like 
the opening of a small volcano. The rings of smoke 
are again formed and sent one after the other only to 



lose all shape as one overtakes the other. They 
come slower and slower until one large thick-set ring 
floats outs, turning in and out. as it gracefully sails 
away from him. After it follows another equally as 
graceful In its flight from its tomb. But the boy is 
again dreaming. He looks through one ring of the 
white nothingness and sees on to the ball field where 
he played in his school days. The next ring he sees 
through and on to the river and camp where he 
would spend his summers. As the rings came and 
went the dreaming boy saw and reviewed as In a 
panorama his whole boyhood from the days he first 
became one of the boys and entered their sports, on, 
and up, to the day when three long months ago he 
bid goodbye to his dear mother, father, brothers and 
sisters. He lingered long at the remembrance of 
his mother, she who is sad when he is sad, and who 
rejoices when he rejoices. The smoke came slower 
and slower as he thought of her and home until it 
seemed the pipe would go out If not quickly used. 
As if by Instinct he momentarily awoke from his 
legarthy and by a few vigorous puffs soon had it 
rekindled. 

With the renewal of the fire in the pipe he returned 
to the blowing of rings. One after the other they 
are formed. One breaks, another, and yet another 
but still no motion from the dreaming smoker. At 
last he mutters to himself as he watches the flight of 
a large curling ring of pure white smoke. " Oh ! my 
dar— — ." He does not finish but from his whole 



his own when sophomores are around. With this 
sudden termination of these blissful dreams he was 
spared that incurable malady — homesickness. 

F. C. P. 



bearing and atmosphere of the dreaming freshman 
we know, whether by Instinct or Intuition, that it is 
something or someone close to his inner feelings. 
He dreams he sees through the perfect formed ring 
of gracefully curving and curling smoke a picture frame. 
He sees his little girl at home or at the boarding 
school In the circle of white floating smoke above 
him. He still sees her pretty picture in its 
natural yet appropriate frame and dreams about and 
of her. 

He even dreams that she is his, all his. and he 

commenced to lay out plans as to the Smash ! 

Smash ! " Lights out freshmen," He dreams no 
more. He is fully awake that after all it was one 
long pipe dream and that he was only a poor freshmen 
in college who must have no thoughts and plans of 



POOR DANDY. 

•' Confound those cats ! " ejaculated Tom suddenly, 
sliding off the table where he had been sitting and 
starting toward the window. 

" Oh, don't get excited ! " drawled another fellow, 
whom nothing ever disturbed. 

The first remark was brought about by a horrible 
howling underneath the window which could not have 
come from anything but a cat fight. We four boys, 
my brother and I and two other fellows had roomed 
together at this house during our two years at college. 
We had been undisturbed during this time but the 
beginning of our junior year our sleep had been strangely 
disturbed by nightly concerts furnished free of charge 
by the cats of our neighborhood. I suppose their 
reason for selecting this particular window was that 
they had found Tom to be more or less musical and 
appreciative of their efforts. 

"Well, who wouldn't get excited?" said Tom, 
indignantly. " after being kept awake every night in the 
week by that racket? " 

" Why don't you throw something at them ? " sug- 
gested the same drawling voice. 

" Throw something at him ! I've thrown everything 
I could spare and many things I couldn't spare, for that 
matter," answered Tom. 

" Why not try some cold lead ? " I hinted. 
The suggestion was accepted and Tom loaded his 
pistol and awaited the return of the muslcans. They 
didn't return that night, or the next, nor next. But we 
did not let his forget them, for each morning one of us 
reminded Tom, by asking how many cat skins he had. 
Four nights passed concertless but the fifth more 
than made up for It. We had gathered In Tom's room 
when, at about 9-30 the first duet began. Tom was 
ready for action In a minute. The noise he made In 
opening the window disturbed the musical program 
below. With a final howl the cats rushed across the 
snow towards some bushes. They were quickly fol- 
lowed by another. Tom aimed and fired and an 
unearthly howl rent the air. We stood at the window 



148 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a moment and then returned to our seats, as Tom 
closed the window with a look of satisfaction, he said, 
" something evidently got hurt." 

Sure enough something did get hurt but we did not 
know what, until about »wo hours later, when Mrs. 
Brown and her daughter, with whom we boarded, 
returned to the house. They had been in the house 
but a few minutes when Dandy, Mrs. Brown's pet dog 
was heard whining and scratching at the doors. 

She opened the door to let him in, when her shrill 
voice resounded through the house. " Jessie do come 
her. Just see what has happened to Dandy. He 
must have hurt his foot. " We went to the top of the 
stairs and she continued. " Poor little doggie, dear 
little Dandy, let me see what has happened to you. " 

" Ugh ! " grunted my brother in disgust, " I sup- 
pose that is dog language." We had all guessed by 
this time what had happened to Dandy and with glances 
at each other we went down stairs to the room below. 
Tom, who was studying medicine, especially anatomy 
soberly asked permission to examine the wounded limb, 
and found the cause of the trouble in a very short time. 
He looked up and said, " Looks as if he had been shot. " 
"Shot!" exclaimed both women in horror, 
"shot," repeated Mrs. Brown. '• I'd like to get hold 
of the person who did it. I'd fix him " and she went 
on to tell of the way she would treat such a person, if 
she should find him, so well, that none of us hoped 
that she would discover the real perpetrator of so 
horrible a crime. Tom arose in a moment with the 
whining dog under his arm telling Mrs. Brown that he 
thought the bullet was still in the limb and that he would 
remove it If she would allow him. 

She consented and we took the dog upstairs. Tom 
had a bottle of chloroform and brought it out and gave 
Dandy a generous dose. 

It did not take long to extract the bullet, and we soon 
had Dandy's leg done up in a neat bandage. But 
horrors! We thought the dog would never come to. 
He layed there as stiff as aboard, until we though Tom 
had finished him this time for good. Every step we 
heard down stairs we thought Mrs. Brown would appear 
at the door the next minute. 

Finally, the dog recovered and we restored him to 
his mistress. The operation pleased her but she did 
not stop denouncing the guilty one. Tom, whom she 
liked very much, was raised very high in her opinion, 



but as for him, poor fellow, he did not dare to again 
use his pistol. So after a short vacation the cats 
resumed their singing with only an occasional inter- 
ruption of a cake of soap. 

C. P. M. 



149 



Observations § Conclusions 

The observer has been to great trouble and expense 
for the past few weeks In looking up the new summer 
styles ; and he has become possessed of many valuable 
hints. It should be understood that the observer began 
these investigations merely for his own personal satis- 
faction, but so many fads are going to become popular 
the coming season, that he feels compelled to give his 
friends the benefit of his researches. A good deal of 
the authority for the following connot be revealed, but 
such people as Would-burry, the face doctor, ought to 
know, and most of them have been glad to give any 
information in their power. Here are a few of 
the points that seem to the observer best worth 
remembering : — 

Foot ball will not be popular through June and July. 

Ice-water still remains a popular summer drink. 

False teeth should not be removed at table while 
using a toothpick. 

Bath-robes, notwithstanding the efforts of a few 
leaders in the styles have not yet become popular as 
part cf a bicycle costume. 

Ping-pong bats and balls are not in good form on 
the tennis court. 

Straw hats of more than five or six decks will not 
be popular as part of a gentleman's bathing costume. 
No more than eight decks should be worn on any 
occasion. 

The shirt waist will be worn again this summer. It 
should however be supplemented by at least one pair 
of trousers. Worn alone, it is not recognized as the 
correct thing by the best people. 

******* 

This is the time of year when the college student 
begins to receive letters offering him summer work. 
Most of these communications invite the recipient to 
become an agent of some sort of other, and all sorts 
of inducements are offered in the way of prizes, extra 
commission etc., though no one seems to care to give 



a small salary. The peculiar part of it is that every 
firm in the country gives at least five per cent, more 
commission than any other firm in the country. 

There are others too, who are either trying to get 
agents, and are wise enough to say nothing about it 
until a certain amount of interest is aroused, or who 
have some other sort of a game to play on the unsus- 
pecting college man. Their letters are -ather indefinite 
In tone, and are usually brief. 

******* 

The observer received a letter of the latter sort the 
other day. It read about as follows : — 

Dear Sir : — Are you in a position to consider a 
proposition for work during the summer months. If so 
please answer by mail, giving age and salary expected. 

Yours truly. 

The writer seems to favor brevity and so an answer 
like the following might please him. 

Dear Sir: — I am. Twenty — . All I can get. 

Yours : 

But the probability is that such a reply would 
immediately find its way into the waste basket accom- 
panied by words to the effect that "some people are 
too smart to work " ; and indeed there are some awfully 
smart people in the world. Why there are those who 
can tell a man's character, his capabilities, and just 
what position he is best suited for merely from hearing 
his age and the salary expected. 

******* 

For the last few days the Observer has noticed a 
plow busily at work on one of the grass plots in front 
of the finest laboratory around college. Supposing as 
a matter of course that the field was to be regraded 
and used as a lawn he made inquiries of the laborers 
and found to his surprise that, — a crop of corn, was to 
be planted. Now the observer has spent much mid- 
night oil in perusing the subject of agriculture and as he 
thinks the matter over his poetic instincts blend with 
his broad knowledge of the subject and he feels him- 
self thoroughly in sympathy in the plan of transform- 
ing the college la*/ns into cornfields. 

What can be more beautiful than a great expanse 
of silver tassels and dark green leaves spreading out 
before the eye. with now and then a horse hoe plying 
back and forth in the distance, and to add a degree of 
dignity to the spectacle, a college hall or a dormitory 



or a chapel, placed in bold relief against the waving 
sea of green. 

But as stated previously, the observer considers 
himself a thorough agriculturalist and for fear that 
the work may stop short of completeness he would 
urge that a crop of potatoes, preferably Baldwins, for 
the new hash house be planted on the campus and 
would suggest the oval around the fountain as an ideal 
place in which to propagate a crop of cabbages. 



MAROON AND WHITE. 

Tune —Stars of the Summer Night. 
Stars of the silent night, 

Send low thy silver light. 

And greet our campus bright. 
Where floats Maroon and White. 
Our pride, our own. Maroon and White. 

Wind of the murmuring night, 

Wave gently, wave above, 

The symbol of our love, 
The pure Maroon and White. 
Our pride, our own. Maroon and White. 

Moon of the smiling night, 

Turn to us while we kneel 

And give us truer zeal 
For our Maroon and White. 
Our pride, our own. Maroon and White. 

Dreams of the quiet night. 

Steal, steal across the deep, 

And tell the world in sleep, 
We love Maroon and White. 
Our pride, our own. Maroon and White. 

R. R. R. 



NOTICE. 
Subscribers are requested to pay their arrears 
without delay. All back debts should be settled 
at once as we must have the money. 

Business Manager. 



FLINT SIX. 

Professor Babson has selected the following men 
from the Junior class to compete for the Flint orator- 
ical prizes at Commencement : H. J. Franklin, Albert 
Parsons, W. W. Peebles. E. M. Poole. W. E. Tot- 
tingham and M. H. West. The selection of these 
men was based upon their work in the department of 
oratory during the past year. The prizes will be 
thirty dollars for first and twenty dollars for second. 



»5<> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



15' 






May 8. 



CALENDAR. 

-Meeting of Y. M. C. A. Topic. "Costly 

Errors." 
May 9. — Reception by ladies of faculty in Drill Hall. 
May 10. — Ball game with Trinity at Hartford. 
May 14. — Ball game with Williams at WHliamstown. 
May 15. — Meeting of Y. M. C. A. Topic, " Do not 

worry." 
May 16. — Ball game with Bowdoin at Amherst. 
May 19. — Ball game with University of Maine at 

Amherst. 



SENIOR COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS. 

The following men have been chosen by the 
Faculty to represent the senior class on the Com- 
mencement stage : — H. L. Knight, A. L. Dacy, D. 
N. West, C. I. Lewis. F. R. Church, and S. L. 
Smith. Three of these men have been selected for 
their scholarship and three on account of their record 
as speakers. 



BAND CONCERT. 

The college band gave the first of a series of out of 

door concerts in the bandstand Friday evening, April 

25. Owing to the coolness of the evening but few 

outside the college attended. The program consisted 

of eight selections as follows : 

Washington Post March, Sousa 

Serenade — Summer Night, Sutton 

A Warm Baby— Two Step. Mctz 

Moonlight Fancies Waltzes. Rollinson 

Charming Ellaline Schottische, Hall 

Our Leader March, Winstien 

The Ring Master Galop. Warren 

Stars and Stripes Forever. Sousa 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE. 

Sept. 27. — Holy Cross at Worcester. 
Oct. 4. — Boston College at Amherst. 
8. — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
18. — Wesleyan at Middletown. 
25.— Tufts at Medford. 
Nov. 1.— W. P. I. at Amherst. 

7.— Springfield T. S. at Amherst. 
15.— Amherst at Pratt field. 



FOOTBALL REPORT. 




Season of 1901. 




Receipts. 






Subscription from college, 


$407 


00 


Guarantees : 






Holy Cross, 


60 


00 


Pittsfield. 


65 


00 


Williams, 


75 


00 


Wesleyan 


70 


00 


W. P. 1, 


60 


00 


Amherst College, 


50 


00 


Tufts, 


75 


00 


Boston College, 


350 


00 


Total receipts. 




$1,212 00 


Expenses. 






Old accounts : 






Co-op. store, 


46 


38 


Supplies : 






W. M. Claflin 


44 


00 


J. W. Brine. 


256 


50 


Co-op. store, 


40 


75 


H. Adams & Co., 


4 


90 


C. R. Elder, 


3 


98 


Carpenter & Morehouse, 


7 


65 


Repairs : 






Davis. 


21 


00 


Coaches : 






I. 0. Hunt, 


50 00 


Jennings. 


6 


25 


Rubbers : 






Tower, 


7 


10 


Cooley, 


4 


65 


Bowen, 


1 


20 


Incidentals: 






Telegrams, 


3 


22 


Telephone, 


4 


25 


M. F. Ahearn 


6 


00 


F. B. Pictures. 


3 


75 


Cartridges, 


1 


95 


Express, 


4 


25 


Drugs, 


6 


80 


H. A. Paul. 


14 


00 


O'Hearn, 


17 


15 


Stationary, stamps, etc., 


7 


32 


Walters, 


4 


48 



Trips : 






Holy Cross, 




68 25 


Pittsfield, 




71 67 


Wesleyan, 




64 25 


Williams. 




69 20 


W. P. 1. 




60 10 


Amherst. 




26 00 


Tufts. 




103 95 


Boston College 


* 


153 36 


Guarantees : 






Springfield Trai 


ning School, 


21 00 


Incidentals to home 


games : 




Springfield Trai 


ring School, 


1 45 


Bates. 


expenses. 


4 50 


Total 


$ 



26 



Net gain, 
Respectfully submitted, 

Victor A. Gates, Manager. 



74 



BASEBALL. 

Amherst, 13; Massachusetts. 8. 

Amherst defeated Massachusetts in a ragged exhi- 
bition of ball-playing on Pratt Field. Apr. 22. It was 
the first scheduled game of the season, and with the 
exception of the Improvement shown in stick work, 
was not up to the standard even of the two practice 
games already played against the same team. 
Neither team in fact played up to their usual form, 
and In consequence the game was slow and uninter- 
esting. Massachusetts had a fighting chance to win, 
when in the fifth they batted out three runs and came 
within a single run of tielng the score. The sixth 
however was a shut out, and when Amherst ran five 
men across the plate in their half, the game was lost. 

The score : 



Chase, 3b. 
Biram. r. f. 
Kelllher, 2b. 
Favour, lb. 
Raftery, I. f. 
Sturgis, s 
Roe. c. 
Field m. 
Rouns'e, e. p. 

Touts. 



M. S. C. 













A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A, 


B. 


4 


1 


4 


1 


1 


5 


3 


1 


4 





4 


1 


3 


1 


n 


5 


3 


9 


3 





5 


3 


2 





3 


4 


1 


2 





1 


5 


1 


2 





1 


1 


























1 

















2 





2 








1 















14 

3 4 

2 
2 



24 
5 6 7 
5 

3 
Field. Rounseville 2. Cook 
Total bases -Amherst 14 



8 
9 

-13 
-8 



AMHBRST. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


m. 


4 


1 


4 


2 





4 


3 


1 


2 





6 


1 


2 








4 


2 


5 





2 


5 





1 








4 


1 


2 


3 





4 





9 


1 





4 


2 


3 





1 


4 


2 





1 






39 



12 



27 



Cook. lb. 
Bodfish. p. 
O.Hearn. 2b. 
Ahearn, c. 
Hunt. s. s.. 3b. 
Halllgan, m. 
Ingham, I. f. 
Gregg, r. f. 
Pray, r. (. 
Walker, r. f. 
Brooks. 3b. 
Paul' s. s. 

Totals. 

Innings, | 2 

Amherst. i 4 

M.S. C, 1 

Runs -Chase. Biram, Favour, Sturgis. Roe 2, 

O'Hearn, Bodfish 3. Ahearn, Hunt, THalligan. 

M. A. C. I 7. Stolen bases- Biram 2, Roe. Chase. Sturgis. Raftery, Field, 
Cook. Walker Two-base hits Favour. Chase, Hunt. Three-base hit 
Ahearn. First base on balls-off Rounseville 5. off Bodfish 7. Left on 
bases-Amherst 9. M. A C, 4. Struck out-by Rounseville 9. by Bodfish 
Sv.J P a , ,t e rsh j'- Biram, Sturgis. Double play-Bodfish. Ahearn and Cook. 
Wildpltch-Rounseville. Time-2 hr., 1 5 m. Umpires-Cooley of Mas- 
sachusetts and Blanchard of Amherst. 

Bates, 9 ; Massachusetts, 8. 
Massachusetts played her second game of the sea- 
son with Bates college, on the campus on April 24, 
and was defeated by a single score after an exciting 
game. The high wind blowing during the early part 
of the game was responsible for a good many errors 
on both sides, but otherwise it was a good exhibition 
of ball. Bates began the run getting in the first half 
of the first inning when three errors by the home team 
let in two runs. Bates scored again in the third when 
Allen reached first on an error and Stone brought him 
home on the first hit secured off Hunt's delivery. Up 
to the sixth Hunt pitched great ball, but in that inning 
he weakened, and after four Bates men had crossed 
the plate, he was replaced by Bodfish. The seventh 
and eighth were shut-outs for the visitors, but In the ' 
ninth a two-base hit. a single and a base on balls 
brought in the tieing and the winning run. Massa- 
chusetts scored one each in the first and second, er- 
rors being responsible for both runs. In the seventh, 
two hits an error and a base on balls netted three 
more, and again in the eighth, timely batting made 
the score eight to seven in Massachusett's favor. In 
the ninth, after two men were out. Hunt made a hit 
and when Paul reached first on a dead ball, chances 
for winning looked bright. The next batter, however, 
hit an easy one to short field and the game was over. 
The score : 



Clason. s. s. 
Parsons, 3b. 
Allen, p. 
Stone, c. 
Purlngton, 2b. 
Dean. lb. 
Moody, c. f. 
Lang. r. f. 
Maerz, l.|f. 

Totals, 35 9 10 27 1 I 



A.B. 


K. 


Is. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 


2 


1 





,1 


1 


5 


l 


I 





I 





4 


2 


2 


4 


3 





4 


1 


2 


6 


1 





4 


1 





2 


1 


3 


5 


1 


2 


10 





2 


3 


1 





I 








2 





2 











3 








2 









15* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Cook. ! b. 
O'hearn, 2b. 
Bodfish. p., r. f. 
Ahearn, c. 
Hunt. r. f., p. 
Paul. s. s. 
Halligan. c. f- 
Ingham, I. f. 
Gregg, 3b. 

Totals. 

Innings 
Massachusetts, 
Bates, 
Stolen bases- 



A.B. 

5 
5 
4 
5 

4 
2 
3 
4 
4 



R. 
1 





2 
2 

3 



IB. 

3 


1 


1 

1 

1 



I 



P.O. 

15 
2 

3 

4 
I 
1 
1 



A. 


7 
3 

4 
3 
1 
1 






Bodfish. 



—Allen, Stone, Moody, La 



31 8 8 27 9 6 

1 23456789 

1 10 3 3 0-8 

2 10 4 2—9 

__, Cook, Clason. Allen. Dean. Sacrifice hits 
Three base hit 



S?& 



Bodfish. Hunt. Two-base hits— Al- 
Dean. Double play— Bodfish to 



len.Cook (2), Halligan 
' life 
dfisl 
Moody • by Al'eii, Paul. Strike-outs— by Al'en. O'hearn. Hunt,_ Halligan 



MILLERS FALLS. 
















A.B. 


R. 




IB. 




P.O. 




A. 


p. 


5 


1 




2 




2 




b 





5 


1 




2 




12 







1 


4 


1 




3 




2 




3 





5 


1 




3 




4 




1 


2 


4 


1 




1 









1 


1 


4 























4 


1 




1 




4 










4 

















3 





4 












3 




/ 


2 


39 


6 




12 




27 




16 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 










1 





2 


1 


2 


0-6 




1 


1 











4 





0-6 



»53 



Bases on balfe— by Allen, Paul and Halligan ; by Hunt. Clason. Pur 

' pitched ball-by ' ' 
t, Hs 



Paul. 

ington. Lang : by Bodfish, Lang and Maerz. 



IMgan : 
Hit by : 



by Hunt. 

Iligan, 
Passed ball 



Ingham (2) : by Hunt. Moody; by Bod'ish, Moody and Clase. 
Ahearn. Umpire— Merrltt. Time of game— 2 hrs. 30 m. 

Massachusetts, 6; Millers Falls, 6. 
The game with Millers Falls last Saturday re- 
sulted in a tie. But nine innings could be played as 
the Massachusetts team were forced to leave in order 
to catch a train. The field was a slow one and the 
day disagreeable for ball playing, but on the whole the 
team made a better showing than they have done be- 
fore, this season. The team had been all shaken up 
since the last game, every man but two of the out- 
fielders filling a new position. Hunt was in the box 
for Massachusetts and succeeded in keeping the hits 
well scattered except in the seventh, when a double, 
three singles, and a home run resulting in a lost ball 
gave Millers Falls, four of her six runs. The home 
team also scored one run in the first, and one In the 
second. Massachusetts did not score until the third 
when two hits and a sacrifice brought Cook across the 
plate. In the fifth. Brooks opened the inning with a 
clean hit. Cook followed with another. Hunt knocked 
Brooks home and Cook scored on the error that put 
Ahearn on first. In the seventh came another run ; 
and Massachusetts tied the score in the eighth when 
Ingham and Brooks reached bases on errors and 
O'Hearn scored them both on what should have been 
a home run, but for a rather questionable decision of 
the umpire who called him out at the plate. The 
second : 

MASSACHUSETTS. 



Cook.c. 
O'hearn, s. s. 
Hunt, p. 
Ahearn. 3b. 
Paul lb. 
Ha'llgan, c. f. 
Gregg. 2b. 
Ingham, I. f. 
Brooks, r. f. 

Totals, 



Driscoll, 2b. 
Austin, lb. 
Connors, s. s. 
Maynard, c. f. 
McCue. 1. f. 
Taggart. r. f. 
Dauphne, c. 
Elmer, p. 
Gilman, 3b. 

Totais, 

Innings. 
Massachusetts, 
Millers Falls, 

Stolen bases— Millers Falls 3. Two-base hit— DriscoM. Three-base hit — 
O'hearn. Home run-McCue. Sacrifice hlts-O'hearn. Double plays- 
Discoll. Connors and Austin (2 >, Ahearn. O'hearn and Paul. Bases on balls 
—off Hunt. Conners. Hit by pitched ball— Brooks. Strike outs-by Elmer. 
Ingham (3) ; by Hunt. Discoll. Austin. Maynard. McCue, Taggart, Dauphne, 
GiTman. Umpire— Murphy. Time of game— 1 hr. 30 m. 



Depart mcn-iT fSlot^s. 



A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A, 


E. 


5 


2 


4 


11 


1 





4 





I 


2 


3 





5 





2 


1 





2 


4 








2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


6 








4 








1 








3 








1 





2 


4 


1 








2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 









36 



10 



27 



The magic thrill of a musical voice, the magnetic 
flash of a sparkling eye, and the eloquence and majes- 
tic bearing of an orator, have swayed the destinies of 
men and nations from the birth of intelligence. The 
mind is awakened to new energy ; the sensibilities are 
given clearer perceptions ; and the whole being springs 
into a new life of enthusiasm and action by the inspir- 
ing words of an ennobling presence. 

'• Centuries," exclaims Napoleon, as he looks upon 
his disheartened troops, " Centuries, are looking down 
upon you." Not simply a silent tomb, magnificent in 
the wonder It creates by its stupendous proportions, 
but a living thing, throbbing with the life of its toiling 
millions as they look down upon the Present, from the 
dim Past. It was the imaginative soul and magnetic 
words of this " conqueror of worlds," that Inspired the 
army with new courage and enthusiasm. 

From the time when Demosthenes, impelled by 
the irresistible force of personal responsibility in the 
affairs of state — which is the motive force of 
eloquence, — nerved the Greeks against the enemies 
of their country; and Cicero aroused the Romans to 
their duty, or spurred them on to new achievements ; 
from the time of Chrysostom whose stirring eloquence 
gave new life to his hearers ; of Luther and Calvin 
who awakened Europe from her lethargy, down to the 
time when our own country was passing through its 
crisis, and its ardent supporters called for •• Liberty 
or death ;" the power of earnest words and a personal 
presence has been an agency of untold Importance in 
shaping the history of the world. 

There is not a man who does not enjoy listening to 



an earnest speaker whose words seem to fall with ease 
and grace, whose very bearing is a delight to the eye. 
There is something in the personal contact of speaker 
and hearer that cannot be defined, but which exists 
nevertheless. We may read an inspiring address, or 
thrilling story, but they both seem comparatively 
dead and lifeless, only as they come from the living 
personalty do they seem to have the power they bear. 
However, though it may be a worthy and commend- 
able aspiration to possess the power to control men 
and nations by the mere wave of the hand and inflec- 
tion of the voice, yet it is not given to everyone to 
have this power ; nevertheless it is the privilege and 
should be the pride, of every one to be able to con- 
duct himself worthily in an emergency. Nothing fits 
one for this occasion better than the practice of speak- 
ing in public. It develops within one a rare presence 
of mind, and enables him to. gain the mastery over 
himself, in the presence of others. He becomes con- 
scious of his own powers, and as a consequence is 
able to " work out his own salvation," to better 
results. 

In the college probably more than anywhere else, 
our statesmen and leaders have been trained. In 
debates, inter-class and inter-collegiate, and oratorical 
contests, the latent power of the student is given an 
impulse that is at once vivifying to the whole man 
and spurs him on to higher attainments. In our own 
college this opportunity is offered in a limited degree. 
In debating, the Senior class alone gains the exper- 
ience ; though a few years at a time a debating 
society is maintained, but rarely with great interest. 
Why this should be neglected is puzzling, since the 
advantage it offers more than overbalances the work 
necessary to its continuance. 

In the oratorical department likewise, little interest 
is manifested by the students, to that which might be 
shown, were they fully alive to Its possibilities. At 
this time of the year especially, as Commencement 
draws near, there should be a lively rivalry existing 
between the contesting honor men, that a truly cred- 
itable showing might be made, which would redound 
to the honor of the college. Besides, what an Incen- 
tive is offered to the winner of the contest. Not a 
badge, which though valuable is of no commercial 
value these practical days, but a prize of gold that 
could not so easily be obtained otherwise for so little 



expenditure of labor. Perhaps now I've wandered 
from the eloquent to the sordid. But the almighty 
dollar does seems to possess the eloquence at times of 
closing the mouth of the veriest silver-tongued orator. 
However that may be let us all in the performance of 
our duty as men secure the blessings of life as best 
we may, and be eloquent in pleading the rights of 
humanity, and verily we shall have obtained the 
richest inheritance of life. 



Alu 



mm. 



71.— F. A. Nichols of the Western Alumni Asso- 
ciation takes an active interest in the athletic field 
movement and is co-operating with the officers of the 
M. A. C. A. A. in their work. 

75. — Everett B. Bragg. Western Manager. Gen- 
eral Chemical Co., address, 135 Adams St.. Chicago, 
III. 

78.— Dr. J. N. Hall of Denver, Colo., the cele- 
brated specialist in diseases of the heart, sailed on 
April 19, with his wife and two children, for Europe 
where he will spend some time in travel and study. 
He Intends to remain in Vienna most of the time. 

Ex. • , 82.— Daniel Willard, 21 Cortlandt St., New 
York, N. Y. 

'91.— F. L. Arnold. St. Bernard. Ohio. Care Bow- 
ker Fertilizer Co. 

'94.— Dr. Chas. H. Higgins has been transferred 
from Montreal to Ottawa where he is to be given a 
laboratory for conducting the experimental work In 
connection with the Public Health and Cattle Quar- 
antine Systems of the Dominion of Canada. The 
Outremont Experiment station of which he has had 
charge for the past three years is to be closed, cen- 
tralizing the whole of the work at Ottawa. His ad- 
dress is, Department of Agriculture. Ottawa, Ont. 

'95.— A. B. Smith. Secretary Western Alumni As- 
sociation. 544 Winnemac Ave., Chicago, III. 

'95. — Jasper Marsh. Consolidated Electric Light 
Co., Danvers, Mass. 

'95. — C. M. Dickinson, manager E. H. Hunt Flor- 
ists' Supply Co.. 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago., III. 

'96. — Horace C. Burrington, milk and cream, 
"Hickory Dell "farm of F. S. Cooley, Amherst, Mass. 






152 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Cook. 1 b. 
O'hearn. 2b. 
Bodfish, p., r. f. 
Ahearn, c. 
Hunt, r. f., p, 
Paul. s. s. 
Halligan. c. f. 
Ingham, I. f. 
Gregg, 3b. 

Totals. 
Innings 
Massachusetts, 
Bates, 
Stolen bases- 



A.B. 

5 
5 

4 
5 
4 
2 
3 
4 
4 



R. 
1 




o 


2 
2 

3 



Is. 
3 


I 


I 
1 
I 


1 



P.O. 

15 
2 

3 

4 

I 

I 

I 



A. 


7 
3 
4 
3 
I 
I 






-Bodfish. 



31 8 8 27 9 6 

123456789 

1 10 3 3 0—8 

2 10 4 2—9 

j. Cook. Clason. Allen, Dean. 



Gregg, Cook. Clason. Allen, Dean. Sacrifice hits 

ang, Maerz, Bodfish. Hunt. Two-base hits— Al- 

Three base hit— Dean. Double play— Bodfish to 

Paul. Bases on balls— by Allen, Paul and Halligan ; by Hunt. Clason, Pur- 

ington. Lang: by Bodfish. Lang and Maerz. Hit by pitched ball— by Hunt, 

Moody : by Alien, Paul. Strike-outs-by Al'en, O'hearn. Hunt, Halligan, 

I ' <Xk ■ ■* • k a 1... i ri mart . 1 UuX. -. — J /■"* ) - —^ D. nr ,„J Un 



—Alien, Stone. Moody, Lang. Maerz, Bodfish. Hunt. Two-base hits 
Hallij 
nball 
by B< 
en, P 
>y Hi 
Umpire— Merritt. Time of fame 



len.Cook (2), Halligan 
i balls— 

sh. Lang and Maerz. 
Strike-outs— by Al 
Moody ; by Bod'ish, I 
Ahearn. rterritt. Time of pame— 2 hrs. 30 m. 



MILLERS FALLS. 


















A.B. 


R. 




IB. 




P.O. 




A. 




F. 


5 


1 




2 




2 




6 







5 


1 




2 




12 









1 


4 


1 




3 




2 




3 







S 


1 




3 




4 




1 




2 


4 


1 




1 









1 




1 


4 

























4 


1 




1 




4 












4 

















3 







4 












3 




2 




2 


39 


6 




12 




27 




16 




t 




1 


2 


3 


<t 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 












1 





2 


1 


2 


'<- 


- | 




1 


I 











•1 





0- 


-6 



by pitched ball— by Hunt, 
l, r*aui. atriKe-ouis t)y wen, O'hearn, Hunt, Halligan, 
lngha'm (2) ; by Hunt, Moody_: by Bod'ish, Moody and Clase. 



Driscoll, 2b. 
Austin, lb. 
Connors, s. s. 
Mavnard, c. f. 
Mc'Cue, 1. f. 
Taggart. r. f. 
Dauphne, c. 
Elmer, p. 
Gllman, 3b. 

Totais, 

Innings. 
Massachusetts, 
Millers Falls, 

Stolen bases— Millers Falls 3. Two-base hit— Drisco'l. Three-base hit - 
O'hearn. Home run— McCue. Sacrifice hits— O'hearn. Double plays— 
Discoll. Connors and Austin (2>. Ahearn. O'hearn and Paul. Bases on balls 
—off Hunt, Conners. Hit by pitched ball— Brooks. Strike outs-by Elmer. 
Ingham (3) : by Hunt, Discoll. Austin. Maynard.McCue, Taggart, Dauphne, 
GiTman. Umpire— Murphy. Time of game— 1 hr. 30 m. 



Massachusetts, 6; Millers Falls. 6. 
The game with Millers Falls last Saturday re- 
sulted in a tie. But nine innings could be played as 
the Massachusetts team were forced to leave in order 
to catch a train. The field was a slow one and the 
day disagreeable for ball playing, but on the whole the 
team made a better showing than they have done be- 
fore, this season. The team had been all shaken up 
since the last game, every man but two of the out- 
fielders filling a new position. Hunt was in the box 
for Massachusetts and succeeded in keeping the hits 
well scattered except In the seventh, when a double, 
three singles, and a home run resulting in a lost ball 
gave Millers Falls, four of her six runs. The home 
team also scored one run in the first, and one in the 
second. Massachusetts did not score until the third 
when two hits and a sacrifice brought Cook across the 
plate. In the fifth. Brooks opened the inning with a 
clean hit. Cook followed with another. Hunt knocked 
Brooks home and Cook scored on the error that put 
Ahearn on first. In the seventh came another run ; 
and Massachusetts tied the score in the eighth when 
Ingham and Brooks reached bases on errors and 
O'Hearn scored them both on what should have been 
a home run, but for a rather questionable decision of 
the umpire who called him out at the plate. The 
second : 



Cook.c. 
O'hearn, s. s. 
Hunt. p. 
Ahearn. 3b. 
Paul lb. 
Ha'ligan, c. f. 
Gregg. 2b. 
Ingham,), f. 
Brooks, r. f. 

Totals, 



Dep&r"tmtrvlr f4ot?s. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 










A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 


2 


4 


11 


1 





4 





I 


2 


3 





5 





2 


1 





2 


4 








2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


6 








4 








1 








3 








1 





2 


4 


1 








2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 









3b 



10 



27 



The magic thrill of a musical voice, the magnetic 
flash of a sparkling eye. and the eloquence and majes- 
tic bearing of an orator, have swayed the destinies of 
men and nations from the birth of intelligence. The 
mind is awakened to new energy ; the sensibilities are 
given clearer perceptions ; and the whole being springs 
into a new life of enthusiasm and action by the inspir- 
ing words of an ennobling presence. 

'• Centuries." exclaims Napoleon, as he looks upon 
his disheartened troops, " Centuries, are looking down 
upon you." Not simply a silent tomb, magnificent in 
the wonder it creates by its stupendous proportions, 
but a living thing, throbbing with the life of its toiling 
millions as they look down upon the Present, from the 
dim Past. It was the imaginative soul and magnetic 
words of this " conqueror of worlds," that Inspired the 
army with new courage and enthusiasm. 

From the time when Demosthenes, impelled by 
the irresistible force of personal responsibility in the 
affairs of state — which is the motive force of 
eloquence. — nerved the Greeks against the enemies 
of their country; and Cicero aroused the Romans to 
their duty, or spurred them on to new achievements ; 
from the time of Chrysostom whose stirring eloquence 
gave new life to his hearers ; of Luther and Calvin 
who awakened Europe from her lethargy, down to the 
time when our own country was passing through its 
crisis, and its ardent supporters called for ■ Liberty 
or death ;" the power of earnest words and a personal 
presence has been an agency of untold importance in 
shaping the history of the world. 

There Is not a man who does not enjoy listening to 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»53 



an earnest speaker whose words seem to fall with ease 
and grace, whose very bearing is a delight to the eye. 
There is something in the personal contact of speaker 
and hearer that cannot be defined, but which exists 
nevertheless. We may read an inspiring address, or 
thrilling story, but they both seem comparatively 
dead and lueless, only as they come from the living 
personalty do they seem to have the power they bear. 
However, though it may be a worthy and commend- 
able aspiration to possess the power to control men 
and nations by the mere wave of the hand and inflec- 
tion of the voice, yet it is not given to everyone to 
have this power ; nevertheless it is the privilege and 
should be the pride, of every one to be able to con- 
duct himself worthily in an emergency. Nothing fits 
one for this occasion better than the practice of speak- 
ing in public. It develops within one a rare presence 
of mind, and enables him to. gain the mastery over 
himself, in the presence of others. He becomes con- 
scious of his own powers, and as a consequence is 
able to " work out his own salvation," to better 
results. 

In the college probably more than anywhere else, 
our statesmen and leaders have been trained. In 
debates, inter-class and inter-collegiate, and oratorical 
contests, the latent power of the student is given an 
impulse that is at once vivifying to the whole man 
and spurs him on to higher attainments. In our own 
college this opportunity is offered in a limited degree. 
In debating, the Senior class alone gains the exper- 
ience ; though a few years at a time a debating 
society is maintained, but rarely with great interest. 
Why this should be neglected is puzzling, since the 
advantage it offers more than overbalances the work 
necessary to its continuance. 

In the oratorical department likewise, little interest 
is manifested by the students, to that which might be 
shown, were they fully alive to its possibilities. At 
this time of the year especially, as Commencement 
draws near, there should be a lively rivalry existing 
between the contesting honor men, that a truly cred- 
itable showing might be made, which would redound 
to the honor of the college. Besides, what an Incen- 
tive is offered to the winner of the contest. Not a 
badge, which though valuable is of no commercial 
value these practical days, but a prize of gold that 
could not so easily be obtained otherwise for so little 



expenditure of labor. Perhaps now I've wandered 
from the eloquent to the sordid. But the almighty 
dollar does seems to possess the eloquence at times of 
closing the mouth of the veriest silver-tongued orator. 
However that may be let us all in the performance of 
our duty as men secure the blessings of life as best 
we may, and be eloquent in pleading the rights of 
humanity, and verily we shall have obtained the 
richest inheritance of life. 



Alu 



mm. 



71. — F. A. Nichols of the Western Alumni Asso- 
ciation takes an active interest in the athletic field 
movement and is co-operating with the officers of the 
M. A. C. A. A. in their work. 

75.— Everett B. Bragg, Western Manager. Gen- 
eral Chemical Co., address, 135 Adams St., Chicago, 
III. 

78.— Dr. J. N. Hall of Denver, Colo., the cele- 
brated specialist in diseases of the heart, sailed on 
April 19. with his wife and two children, for Europe 
where he will spend some time in travel and study. 
He Intends to remain in Vienna most of the time. 

Ex. -'82.— Daniel Willard, 21 Cortlandt St., New 
York. N. Y. 

*91.— F. L. Arnold. St. Bernard. Ohio. Care Bow- 
ker Fertilizer Co. 

'94.— Dr. Chas. H. Higglns has been transferred 
from Montreal to Ottawa where he is to be given a 
laboratory for conducting the experimental work in 
connection with the Public Health and Cattle Quar- 
antine Systems of the Dominion of Canada. The 
Outremont Experiment station of which he has had 
charge for the past three years Is to be closed, cen- 
tralizing the whole of the work at Ottawa. His ad- 
dress is, Department of Agriculture. Ottawa. Ont. 

'95.— A. B. Smith. Secretary Western Alumni As- 
sociation. 544 Wlnnemac Ave.. Chicago. III. 

'95. — Jasper Marsh. Consolidated Electric Light 
Co.. Danvers, Mass. 

'95. — C. M. Dickinson, manager E. H. Hunt Flor- 
ists' Supply Co., 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago., III. 

'96. — Horace C. Burrlngton. milk and cream, 
•' Hickory Dell " farm of F. S. Cooley, Amherst. Mass. 



*54 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'96. — Frederick H. Read, teacher, English high 
school, Providence, R. I. 

'96. — Harry H. Roper, East Hubbardston, Mass. 

'96. — B. K. Jones is studying law in Springfield 
and has been teaching evening school at Indian 
Orchard during the past winter. Address. 341 St. 
James Ave., Springfield. Mass. 

'99. — B. H. Smith has been teaching at the Baron 
de Hirsch Agr'l School, Woodbine, N. J., since Sep- 
tember. During the summer term he teaches Ento- 
mology among other subjects. This position was 
formerly held by G. A. Billings, '95. 

"99. — The engagement of Warren Elmer Hinds to 
Miss Edith Goddard Gray of Templeton, Mass., has 
been announced. 

'00. — J. E. Halligan and D. L. Cleaves are at 
present employed in collecting samples of commer- 
cial fertilizers, in different parts of the state, for official 
Inspection. 

Ex-'03, — P. H. Bowler, who has signed for the 
season with the Springfield baseball team, pitched 
three innings against the Boston Nationals last week. 
Three pitchers were tried during the game, but Mr. 
Bowler made the best showing of them all. Only 
nine men came to bat during the three innings he 
pitched and all they could get from his delivery 
was a couple of singles. 



Colleg? JMot?s. 



— R. A. Qulgley Is now playing the bass-drum In 
the band. 

— The C. S. C. are holding a tennis tournament 
this week. 

— Private H. C. Bowen has been transferred from 
B Co. to A Co. 

— Don't forget the exhibition drill and dance Fri- 
day night. Drill 8— 9. Dancing 9— 11 30. 

— " General," the college Mascot, drawing a little 
girl In a dog-cart was one of the features of the May 
festival. 

— Dr. Paige is holding clinics every Wednesday 
afternoon from 2-30 to 5 o'clock at which all animals 
brought In are doctored free of charge. 



— The Senior members of the outgoing Signal 
Board held a banquet in the Massasoit House in 
Springeld Saturday, April 26. Those present were 
Claflin, Kinney, Lewis, Knight and Gates. 

— The Sophomore Ten will speak before the Fac- 
ulty, Wednesday, May 7. at 2 o'clock and the Fresh- 
man Ten Friday May 9 at the same hour. Every 
man in college Is entitled to hear this speaking and It 
is hoped that a goodly number will be present. 

— The baseball team received quite a shaking up 
last week when Captain Paul changed the positions 
of nearly every man on the in-field. Cook was put 
back behind the bat, O'Hearn short. Paul went to 
first. Ahearn now plays in his old position at third, and 
Brooks was put at second. 

— The Seniors planted their class tree a 

oak In the square directly South of the Chapel Satur- 
day night April 26. The planting was accompanied 
by the usual celebration. The committee in charge 
was: J. N. Dellea. chairman, H. E. Hodgkiss, C. T. 
Lewis, H. A. Paul, and A. L. Dacy. 

— The Sophomore class, under Prof. W. P. 
Brooks, made a tour of inspection April 21 Taking 
a barge at the Chapel at 8 o'clock they proceeded to 
North Amherst City, then to Sunderland and South 
Deerfield where they had dinner, thence down the 
western side of the Connecticut and finally reached 
home late in the afternoon. 



Irvttrcollfgiak-te. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

Columbia University is leading In the inter-colle- 
giate strength contest this year. 

After nine years of disagreement. Yale and Penn. 
meet this year on the diamond. 

Harvard's debating team has recently been de- 
feated by both Bates and Princeton teams. 

There has bsen a triangular tennis league formed 
between Amherst. Williams and Wesleyan. 

Harvard men expect W. W. Coe, Jr., the famous 
Oxford college shot-putter, to enter the University 
next fall. 

W. P. Galder, '03, has been elected basket-ball 
captain for the next year at Wesleyan. He Is also 
foot-ball captain. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE IDEAL 

Iianeh, Billiard, Hair Dressing 

MANICURING ROOMS. 



3 Cook'* Hlock, 



She HEIR 

to the FARM 



op one Might. 



Postal Cards and Stamps at coat. 

Cigars and Tobacco to burn. 

Gentlemen you are always welcome . 



DWIGHT W. THURBEE, Prop'r. 



"UP TO THE MINUTE" 



IN 



!/ 



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STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, 

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Club and College Pins and Ring*. 
Gold and Sliver Medal*. 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry. 



OFFICE OF 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR 8ALE AND TO LET. 

Office, cook 'a Block, Amherst, Maes 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75. 




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We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, exchange and repair writing machines. Supplies of all kinds. 

Write for catalogue. 

cuttefTtower CO., 

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1 5 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






The final events of the spring meet at M. I. T. 
were run off last week, leaving '03 winner of the day 
and '04 champions of the institutions, having made 
the highest total score this year. 

Tufts celebrated its fiftieth anniversary April 22, 
1902. The venerable Ex.-Gov. Boutelle who signed 
the charter of the Institution, helped in the ceremo- 
nies. A degree of LL. D. was conferred upon him 
as a slight recompense for all that he has done to help 
along the " college on the hill." 

Swarthmore college is taking a great interest in the 
Canadian game of Lacrosse. They have been play- 
ing since 1891 and last year carried off the cham- 
pionship of the United States, defeating Lehigh. Col- 
umbia Penn. and Johns Hopkins. Great things are 
promised for this new college sport, for as yet, there 
are no professional players spoiling the game for the 
colleges. 



SO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 

■ — hett 



ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention Is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patent* 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patenU. 

Patents taken through Munn A Co. recetre 
tprcial notice, without charge, In the 



prruil T*m K-c, wi« nuub *. ,..»» w sj. •— • •..» 

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dilation of any scientific Journal. 
year; fourmonths.il. Bold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B -^ New York 

Branch Office. S2& V Ht.. Washington. D. C. 



C. H. BOYDEN, 



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TIONERY. 

177 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON. - TELEPHONE 33-2. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



when you want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth httving. 




Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 
313-315 Main St., - - Springfield, Mass. 



^ 



KEISER 
BARATHE 






Have You 
Worn 



Reiser-Barathea Cravats yet? 

Ought to— 

The best dressers do. 



FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 

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Guna, Rifles, Pistols, ami Ammunition. 

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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 28. 1902. 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Colleob S.onal Amherst Ma-* Tu. ■«-*. m u 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903. Editor-in-Chief, 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903, Business Manager 

HOW ARD MORGAN WHITE, 1904. Assistant Business Manager 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903, College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANki im mm *u i ... 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON, 1 903. FAYETTE DICKINSON f Sr ™ ', onTi SS 

R. RAYMOND RAYMOTH, 1 904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PeS IW4 2 T,\ ' 

r.nnam unu/ADr> n i trKi mnr nunc Let rtUI\, 1904, Interco'len ate. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN. 1905. HERBERT HAROLD GOODENOUGH 1905. 



Terma, SLOP par aear la adoance. Slngla Copies, io c . Poetage oatalde of United StateTalid Canada, 28c. ertra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot- Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Readir.g-Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottingham, Pres. Athletic Association, 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

C. P. Halligan. Sec. Nineleen Hundred and Font Mam 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
H. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Editorials. 



Owing to unforeseen circumstances it has been nec- 
essary to eliminate one number of The Signal. The 
next issue will appear on June 17 and will be a spec- 
ial commencement number. 



College sentiment, can if it will, put a stop to the pres- 
sent state of affairs and we trust that its Influence may 
be brought to bear In this direction. 



We can but express our thorough disapprobation 
for a policy which seems to have taken a firm hold on 
some restless spirits around College, — namely, a pol- 
icy which encourages the destruction of property. 
Why It is that "College pranks " cannot be kept 
within the broad bounds of common sense, we are at 
loss to know. A ruthless destruction or endangering 
of property Is ever to be deplored, but here. In a public 
institution, supported as It is indirectly from our own 
pockets, it would seem that such a spirit of vandalism 
should of all things be lacking. The motive that has 
prompted recent depredations has not been conceived 
in the minds of the majority of students but In those 
of a few, and it lies with those holding the balance of 
power to use every energy In discouraging like actions. 



The Signal regrets that owing to a lack of funds 
the baseball management has been obliged to cancel 
three important games. Although handicapped ear- 
lier in the season by the failure to obtain a coach 
the team has of late given evidence of improvement. 
The game with Bowdoin, although unsatisfactory In 
many respects showed a strengthening in some posi- 
tions and the Maine trip bid fare to result satisfactorily. 
It is not altogether bad luck which has lost our games 
but rather a failure of the students to support the team. 
A failure to play out the schedule always reflects un- 
favorably upon a team and such a circumstance 
should be guarded against. 



EXHIBITION DRILL. 

On Friday evening. May 9th. the final of a very en- 
joyable series of entertainments, given by the ladles 
of the Faculty, was held at the Drill hall. Early in 



i 5 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



the. evening the guests began to arrive and before 
eight o'clock an unusually large company had assem- 
bled in the gallery and on the main floor. The Col- 
lege band, occupying a decorated stage at the north 
end of the hall opened the program with a medley 
overture by Beyer. Picked squads of men in the 
regulation summer uniform under the commands of 
Capt. Dacy and Lieut. Morse, then gave a thoroughly 
good exhibition of Butt's Manuel and the Manual of 
Arms. Following this refreshments were served, af- 
ter which the band struck up a lively two-step and the 
floor was soon crowded with dancers. After the open- 
ing dance Warner's orchestra of Northampton con- 
tinued the program and dancing was enjoyed until a 
late hour. Much credit is due the ladies of the fac- 
ulty for their efforts and it is hoped that another year 
the students will aid in making a like series of events 
equally successful. 



OLD FOLKS' CONCERT. 

CHRISTENING OF HALL AND PARK. 

Our attention was called to the above interesting 
title, a short time ago while looking through a scrap book 
of the late President Clark. It is included in the 
column of Amherst matters, in Hampshire and Frank- 
lin Express, of Friday, Nov. 2, 1860. It is a detailed 
account of the festivities which preceded and followed 
the christening of Park and grounds, But we were 
most pleasantly amused by the speech of an old deacon 
who opposed the work, and that others may enjoy a laugh 
as well as we. and also repeat a bit of the history of 
Amherst, we quote verbatim from the Express. 
" Immediately the feasting on bean porridge hot and 
bean porridge cold," hominy, mush, etc.. was over, 
and a little more cider had passed around, Prof. Clark 
President of Agricultural society, expressed his delight 
at seeing the hall so well filled, and suggested the pro- 
priety of christening the hall and fair grounds, when he 
was unexpectedly and almost rudely interrupted by an 
old foggy deacon of Wendell, who opposed this sug- 
gestion in his ' best nasal ' somewhat thus : 

We give the deacon's speech as nearly verbatum as 
we can from memory prefacing it with the remark 
that it was his manner fully as much as his matter 
that produced the sensation, and to be appreciated, it 
needs to have been heard, rather than read: — 

** Mr. Moderator : — If you've got through I've got 



jest a few words I'd like to say on this subject. I come 
from Wendill this mornin' to help 'em sing a little — 
they wanted me to come down and bring my bass viol 
and violate some of the old tunes for 'em, so I come 
down, (sensation) — hadn't more 'n got here afore some- 
body told me they was going to edicate the new hall 
and park. What hall and park, say I ? Why the 
agricultural hall and park, says they! Now Mr. 
Moderator that was the first I heard about the affair, 
and sence then I've been lookin' round to see what 
you've been doin' here, and I find you've got some 
agricultural grounds and a buildin' on it. Now, Mr. 
Moderator, I'm agin this hull consarn, unqualifiedly and 
teetotally ; (laughter) here you've been. Mr. Moderator, 
and appinted a committee, unbeknown to me or any 
of our Wendill folks ; who has built these 'ere grounds 
and laid out this 'ere hall entirely unbeknown to us and 
without our knowledge — (laughter and voice — you 
ought to take the papers then.) Who says I ought to 
take the papers ? What paper ? I aint a goin' to 
take a Black Republican paper, if I don't never know 
nothin'. (applause.) I've got just three reasons, Mr. 
Moderator, why I'm agin the hull consarn, hall, grounds 
and everything, firstly, in the first place, I hold that 
these 'ere hoss trots is the most dreadful immoral 
thing that there is in these days, and these folks that 
drives hosses so, is the most disreptable kind of folks 
(sensation.) They abuse hosses dreadfully, and you 
know, Mr. Moderator, what the Scripter says about it, 
if you don't you'd oughter. Well the Scripture says a 
marciful man is marciful to his beast, and it can't be 
a very marciful man as drives his hoss two-forty a 
minute, (loud cheering and laughter.) It aint no 
laughin' matter, Mr. Moderator, these 'ere hoss trots 
is dreadful dangerous. as the Scripter sez again, a hoss 
is a vain thing for safety. (Great applause.) Then 
this here fence is a dreadful dangerous thing, the boys 
will be a cllmbin' it and break their necks, they're al- 
lers up to some mischief. Our country is fast goin' 
to ruin, Mr. Moderator, to ruin ! to ruin ! (Sensa- 
tion.) One of our neighbors up in Wendill had a 
paper sent him to'ther day, and our folks borrowed It 
(cheers) and we found it full of nothin' but murders, 
lotteries, and hoss trots, they ail go together, Mr. Mod-, 
erator. (Applause.) 

Secondly, in the next place, I am altogether agin 
the consarn because its a dreadful expensive thing. I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*59 



presume you've been and gone and laid out more'n 
seven hundred dollars, jest on this park. Oh ! Mr- 
Moderator this is what Scripter calls spendin' your 
money for that which is not bread, and your labor for 
that which satisfieth not. (Here as well as elsewhere 
the moderator was unable to moderate his rislbles. 
fairly bursting with laughter.) Why wasn't the com- 
mon up to the middle town good enough for the cattle 
show without coming way down here out of the way of 
everybody, and that hall was a beautiful one. jest the 
thing — right under the meetin' house too. (Loud 
applause.) Speaking of the common, reminds me of 
another foolish thing that shown jest the same spirit as 
built these grounds and laid out this 'ere hall. That 
fence up there, painted white, must have beenamazin' 
expensive. Vociferous applause and cheers from 
small boys in the doorway. 

He was called to order by E. F. Cook, Esq., one of 
the executive committee, who said that the gentleman 
from Wendell was wasting the night with his trash and 
wished the moderator to stop him. Dr. Rice defended 
the deacon and held that he was right in his remarks, 
and wished that he would speak of the fountain, which 
plays so beautifully on its annual day of •• sprinkling" 
far excelling in its "spurt" the famed fountain In 
Central Park or Boston common. He hoped the 
deacon would be allowed to proceed. 

He was allowed to go on. Allow me to say, Mr. 
Moderator, that it don't appear very respectful to the 
aged to call 'em to order in a place like this. To be 
sure, Mr. Moderator, these things is nothing to me. 
but they all show jest the same spirit. The money had 
a great deal better been spent to send clothes and 
vittles to the poor heathen. (Applause.) 

Then what does Amherst want of a new school house ? 
I should calculate there was enough afore, one on every 
corner and ten or a dozen up on the hill, and 
speaking of that, I was up there lookin' around. I see 
one thing that attracted my 'tention. Perhaps I should 
not mention it, bein' as its nothin' to me, but that 'ere 
statur (Sabrina) looked rather foolish 'cordin' to my 
idee. I couldn't think of nothin' but a Black Republi- 
can. It seems most too bad to expose such things to 
the weather. (Cheers.) Then that 'ere place, I for- 
got what they call it ; that 'ere stone building (gym- 
nasium) where the boys go and cut up their capers, 
'pears to me a tremendous expensive and silly thing. 



The boys go there and waste half the forenoon In 
dancin' shindigs and turnln' head over heels, when they 
ought to be in the school house gettln' their lessons. 
I heerd 'em tell that the professor or whatever you call 
him made the boys get out on the roof and hang on by 
their teeth to the copper gutter and stick their legs out 
straight, and then he walked along on 'em to see if 
their toes was in line. (Immense applause.) Now I 
call that foolish and its only a good example of what 
you're doin' here in Amherst. 

Wal. Mr. Moderator, I've run, till I've got to my 
third head. Thirdly, in the last place, finally, I'm agin 
the hull consarn, Mr. Moderator, 'cause you didn't let 
me nor none of our Wendill folks know nothin' about 
it. (Applause.) We hold ourselves to be rational 
and accountable bein's like other folks and deserve a 
hearin' as well as anybody, and hence, whereas (here 
the speaker commenced an emphatic series of gestures 
which lasted through the speech,) you didn't let me 
nor none of our folks up to Wendill know nothin' about 
it, we are bound to go agin the hull thing, and It aint 
no use to continer the consarn, nor think of stlckln' a 
name onto't cause there's more'n forty of our folks up to 
Wendill, who knows their rights and aint goin' to be 
trod on, if they be a few. who are comln' down here to 
the next annual meetin' and are going to vote down the 
hull consarn, in spite of you, Mr. Moderator, or any of 
the rest of the committee. (Prolonged applause.) 

After the deacon had fairly knocked down all hopes 
of the success of the christening, Ethan Allen. Esq. of 
Northampton, •« all hoss." flew up, and with magnificent 
gesticulation, sadly endangering the heads of oldfoggies 
within his terrible swoop, besides snapping off the 
swallow tail of his blue coat, fairly chewed up the old 
deacon of Wendell. 

Mr. President:— If old dried up has got through. 
I'd like to say a few words on this subject. (Inter- 
rupted by Deacon Holt, but Immediately silenced by 
the speaker.) I couldn't hardly keep my seat while 
he was abusing the horse as he has. If I had my say 
about it I wouldn't have one of these old fogy's In the 
society. I'd punch them all out of town with a long 
stick. It's perfectly disgusting to us liberal-minded 
men, to hear one of these old fools attempt to talk. 
Just as soon as any new thing is started, they com- 
mence a great cry about the expense. We shall all 
come up on the town and the like. 



i6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Old dried up wants to know why we can't drive our 
horses around the common, and exhibit our fruit in the 
hall under the church. I should as soon think of 
exhibiting the fruit in a barn, and racing horses round 
the cow-yard. 

Why can't men keep up with the spirit of the age, 
Mr. President ? 1 say let old fogy ism give way to 
Young America. Let us take the reins and we'll 
bring the country out all right, and inside of time, too. 
(Applause.) 1 go In for the horse. Mr. President. 
I'm all horse. I'd like to know if horsepitality isn't 
inculcated as one of the moral virtues. (Shouts of 
laughter.) Didn't King Richard say, bring me a horse 
— my kingdom for a horse. He knew what a horse 
was worth, just think of that, Mr. President, the whole 
kingdom of England with all Its national debt and 
fortifications. Queen Victoria and the Prince of 
Wales all going for a horse. 

I tell you a horse is worth more than Solomon's 
Idea of a virtuous woman if she isn't balky, (I mean 
the horse.) (Laughter and loud cheering.) This old 
fogy is down on tracks too. I'd like to know what 
there is immoral about tracks. Down in New York 
we used to have mile tracks and half-mile tracks, and 
there was one great society called the American 
Track Society. Up here at the big school, they have 
got what they call bird-tracks, but my theory is that 
they were formed by racing hens over stones In former 
times. 

I was out through Wendill where this dead head 
says he lives ; and I went to his barn to look at his 
stock. He has to blanket his horses every time he 
takes them out to keep the wind from blowing the hay 
out of them. He feeds them with sawdust and shav- 
ings, and puts green goggles on them to make them 
think Its green grass. 

He was just killing a fat (?) cow when I was there, 
but he could not get the hide off to save his life, it 
stuck to the bones so hard. 

The speaker went on, taking up other things which 
the deacon said, and made them appear in a decidedly 
ludicrous light, and took his seat amid loud cheering. 

After this one-forty "whole hoss" speech, Dr. 
Bliss of South Hadley levelled the radical views of 
both, and the business proceeded ; and President Clark 
christened the hall and park with water brought from 
the Connecticut, (by Mr. Stockbridge.of North Hadley 



expressly for the purpose,) devoting the hall and grounds 
to the interests of farm labor, mechanic industry, and 
sound morality. 



JUNIOR CHEMICAL TRIP. 

While tne Junior class is proceeding with the study 
of Organic Chemistry it Is the custom of Dr. Wel- 
lington to conduct an excursion to some of the 
neighboring cities, \n order to give the students an 
opportunity to study the practical application of Chem- 
istry, thus demonstrating that Chemistry is one of 
the great factors in the business world of to-day and 
amounts to something besides theory and the juggling 
of equations. On Wednesday, May 21, the present 
Junior class, accompanied Dr. Wellington on a trip 
to Springfield, Holyoke and Mt. Tom. Leaving Am- 
herst In the morning on the 7-59 train, they arrived 
in Springfield about 9 o'clock. The first place vis- 
ited was the plant of the Springfield Brewing Co.. 
where a guide directed them over the buildings, and 
explained the various processes in the manufacture of 
beer. The grain is first soaked with water, and then 
spread out In thin layers in a dark room or malt loft, 
and the temperature is maintained at 55° to 62° F. In 
the course of twenty-four hours the seeds begin to ger- 
minate. A peculiar substance, diastase, containing 
carbon, hydrogen and oxygen Is formed, apparently 
by the oxidation of one of the more alterable constit- 
uents. The diastase is characterized by its remarka- 
ble property of Inducing the conversion of starch into 
dextrin and grape sugar. This process is kept up for 
two weeks, then the grain is killed by drying it at a 
temperature of 90 ° F. # on perforated iron plates. 
The grain, or malt as it Is now termed, is mashed 
with water a about 180° F. for some hours, when 
the diastase changes the starch Into dextrin and 
sugar. The liquor is now drained off for conversion 
into beer. Before subjecting it to fermentation it is 
boiled with a quantity of hops which prevents the 
beer from souring in consequence of the conversion 
of the alcohol into acetic acid. The hopped liquor is 
run off into a vat, where it is allowed to deposit the 
undissolved portion of the hops, and the clear liquor is 
drawn off into shallow coolers, where Its temperature 
is lowered as rapidly as possible to about 60° F. The 
liquor is now transferred to the fermenting tanks where 
It is made to ferment by the addition of yeast, which 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



161 



causes the glucose to undergo decomposition, known 
as alcoholic fermentation. When the desired point 
has been reached the beer is stored for consumption. 
Leaving the brewery, the class proceeded to the 
Springfield Gas Works, and under the direction of 
one of the managers studied the various processes in 
the manufacture of gas. This business is of special 
interest to the student of Chemistry, as much of the 
extraordinary progress made by chemists during the 
last half century must be attributed to the introduc- 
tion and great extension of the manufacture of coal 
gas, No other branch of manufacture has brought 
into notice so many compounds not previously ob- 
tained from any other source. Of the compounds of 
carbon and hydrogen very little was known previously 
to the introduction ot coal-gas. The most important 
of these hydro-carbons, benzoic or benzene, was orig- 
inally procured from benzoic acid ; but it would have 
been impossible for it to have fulfilled its present use- 
ful purposes unless it had been obtained in abundance 
as a secondary product in the manufacture of coal- 
gas ; for leaving out of consideration the various uses 
to which benzene itself is devoted, it yields the nitro- 
benzene so much used in perfumery, and from which 
analine is obtained, from which many of the most 
beautiful dyes are now prepared. 

The retorts in which the distillation of coal is ef- 
fected are made of fire-clay, and arranged in sets of 
three or five, heated by a coal fire or a gas furnace. 
The coal is thrown on the red hot floor of the retort, 
as soon as the coke from the previous distillation has 
been raked out ; the mouth of the retort is then closed 
with an iron plate. An iron pipe rises from the up- 
per side of the front of the retort projecting from the 
furnace, and is curved around at the upper extremity, 
which passes into the side of a much wider tube, the 
hydraulic main, running above the furnaces, and re- 
ceiving the tubes from all of them. This tube is al- 
ways kept half full of tar and water, condensed from 
the gas, and below the surface of this liquid the delivery 
tubes are allowed to dip, so that, although the gas can 
bubble freely through the liquid as it issues from the 
retort, none can return through the tube, while the re- 
tort is open for the introduction of a fresh charge. 
From the hydraulic main the gas passes into a con- 
denser, in which is deposited, in addition to water any 
of the volatile hydro-carbons and ammonium salts. 



The gas is passed next through large iron boxes con- 
taining iron oxide, which absorbs the sulphuretted hy- 
drogen, leaving it free from all dangerous impurities 
and ready for consumption. 

As it was now nearly noon, the members of the 
party wended their way toward the Cooley house, 
where they were entertained by Dr. Wellington. Af- 
ter dinner they boarded a trolley car for Holyoke, 
where they were conducted over one of the large pa- 
per mills of that city. The processes of making pulp 
from rags, and the conversion of the pulp into sheets 
of paper for commercial use were examined. 

After leaving the paper mill the class was conveyed 
by train to the Mt. Tom Sulphide Pulp Works, where 
pulp for the manufacture of paper is made from the 
waste wood of a neighboring lumber-mill. After com- 
pleting the inspection of the works, a trolley car was 
boarded, the party arriving home by way of North- 
ampton about six o'clock, tired, but all well pleased 
with the trip. 

At a special meeting of the class. May 22. the fol- 
lowing was unanimously voted ; 
To Dr. Wellington, department of Chemistry. We. the 
members of the class of 1903, of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, wish to extend to you a vote of 
thanks for one of the most enjoyable excursions par- 
ticipated In by this class; and also to assure you of 
our sincere appreciation of your labor and untiring ef- 
forts to make the trip a success. — Class of 1903. 

R. H. R, 



May 


29. 


June 


3.- 


June 4.- 


June 


5.- 


June 


7, 


June 


12 


June 


14. 


June 


15 


June 


19- 



CALENDAR. 

-Weekly meeting of Y. M. C. A. at 7-30 p. 

m. Topic. '• Do not worry." 
Inspection of Military Department by Maj. 

George L. Anderson, U. S. Art., Battalion 

review at 8-15 a. m. 

Band concert on campus at 7-30 p. m. 
Weekly meeting of Y. M. C. A. at 7-30 p. 

m. Topic. ■• Development of Character. ' 
-Baseball game with Boston College on 

campus. 

-Weekly meeting of Y M. C. A. at 7-30 p. 
m. Topic. " Vacation Christianity." 
— Baseball game with Wesleyan at Middle- 
town. Grinnell prize examination. 

- 1 8. — Commencement. 

20. — Admission examinations. 



i6a 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Observation; $ Conclusions 

You have all heard that the new boarding-house 
and the central heating plant are now assured us. 
Indeed active preparations for the building of the lat- 
ter have been going on for sometime. And the legis- 
lature, at least that part of It which lately visited us, 
is in a generous mood as the fact that one individual 
has promised to secure for our reading-room the 
free delivery of the Boston papers and free telephone 
service shows. There is in fact an extremely 
cordial feeling between the college authorities and 
those to whom we must look for our very existence as 
an institution. All this has encouraged our President 
to make known to the student body his plans for future 
requests for appropriations. The President thinks 
that a new chemical laboratory and an agricultural 
building are needed among other things, and is unde- 
cided only as to the shortest time within which it will 
be wise and safe to ask for them. The " Great and 
General Court" should not feel that we are not duly 
thankful for past favors because we are thinking of 
asking for more. Our President may not believe to 
the letter the promise, " Ask and ye shall receive," 
but he does most certainly go upon the idea that ye 
shall not receive that ye do not ask, and he is a most 
excellent asker. 

***#*## 

The observer agrees perfectly that all these new 
buildings are needed, but he has some ideas of his 
own as to a good use for a small appropriation. There 
is a brook that flows through just enough of our col- 
lege grounds to be made very beautiful at compara- 
tively little cost. Why could not the mud hole be- 
tween the chapel and the road be made into a beauti- 
ful little pond, not for swimming and boating purposes ; 
but simply as a beautifier ? That breeding ground 
for mosquitoes, toads and leeches looks very beautiful 
at certain seasons of the year even without improve- 
ment, but just about this time when everything else is 
dressed in most engaging robes, the poor pond looks 
like an overgrown wash-tub from which has just been 
removed an exceptionally large weeks' washing of 
exceptionally dirty clothes. Here and there on the 
water's placid surface the tender curves of a splotch 
of greace from the sink of some resident farther up 



the stream, stills the waves that rise to kiss the mos- 
quito laden wind ; and the roundelay of the merry 
toad from his seat on a half rotten plank, made soft by 
the pale green slime which caresses it, hails the noon- 
day sun as it draws to itself the odoriferous haze that 
shields the beautiful dust colored wet from its burning 
glare. And why could not the long talked of improve- 
ments to the ravine be drawn from the realm of 
dreamland into the light of that same mid-day sun ? 
Why, oh why ? You will notice that the observer 
says, "why?" He does not say that these things 
will be done. 

******* 

There is another gift from the legislature of which 
the observer has not yet spoken. It is one that we 
should prize most highly, " The white flag of the 
Commonwealth." And while on this point the 
observer grows a little serious which perhaps in his 
character of ironiclast he has not the right to do. 
He has noticed with pleasure that only a few, and 
most of those, freshmen, have failed to salute the 
flag in the proper manner where it has been placed in 
front of the chapel to mark the center of the battalion. 
In the case of the freshmen, ignorance is probably the 
cause of the omission, the others can plead nothing 
but carelessness. Either excuse is a poor one ; for 
every American should know, be he civilian or soldier, 
that Uncle Sam is entitled to at least the salute 
usually given to a lady. There are some cases of 
carelessness that are inexcusable. The observer 
noticed with pride, too, that his mates rose the other 
evening when the band played the National Air, while 
very few if any of the listeners outside the college did 
so. It has always been to him an incentive to 
patriotism to see the band rise and begin playing the 
" Star Spangled Banner," and then to see the audi- 
ence come to their feet and with lifted hats listen in 
silence till the last strains have died away. These 
marks of respect should not be paid carelessly nor 
yet with any mock show. Salute Uncle Sam as you 
would the best of women, and — well, the observer 
won't preach any more but " stay In his own back- 
yard." 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



163 



BAND CONCERT. 

The College band gave an open air concert on the 
campus Friday evening, May 23. the program being 
as follows : 

Clark Cadet March, Babson 

Overture, Jolly Students, Ferrazzi 

Selection, Big Casino, Rogers 

Cornet Solo, In the Sacramento Valley. Beyer 

M. H. West. 

Concert Schottische. My Girl, Beyer 

Serenade, Summer Night, Sutton 

The Merry American March, Wheeler 

Star Spangled Banner. 



BASEBALL. 

Trinity, 5 ; Massachusetts. 3. 
Massachusetts went to Hartford. May 8. and were 
defeated by the above score. -The game was the 
best from a fielding standpoint that Massachusetts had 
played so far this year notwithstanding the fact that 
O'Hearn.who has been playing fine ball at second all 
the season was not able to do any better at short field 
than the other men who have been tried at that position. 
The few misplays, however, were costly, and were di- 
rectly responsible for three of Trinity's runs, while of 
Trinity's errors— and the two teams tied In that col- 
umn, only one nad any effect on the final score. The 
team lost because the ten hits made off Goodrich did 
not come at the right point of the game. In other 
words Massachusetts' luck was taking a vacation ! 
The score: 



A few colleges in the west are trying to do away 
with football. 





TKINITV 














A.B. 


R. 


is. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Barton, c. f. 


4 


1 





3 








Mann. s. a. 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


Goodrich, p. 


4 





1 





5 





Henderson, c. 


4 





1 


2 


3 





Brldgham, lb. 


4 





1 


14 


1 





Allen, 2b. 


4 








3 


4 





Clement. 1. f. 


4 





1 


1 








Syphax, 3 b. 


4 





1 


1 





.■ 


Eaton, r. f. 


3 





1 











Total, 


35 


5 


9 


27 


15 


4 




MASSACHUSBTTS. 












A.B. 


R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


■ 


Cook, c. 


5 





1 


6 


2 





O'riearn. a, s. 


5 








2 


2 


3 


Ahearn, 3 b. 


4 





2 


3 


3 





Hunt, p. 


4 





2 


1 


2 





Paul, 1 b. 


4 


1 




9 








Halllpan, c.f. 


3 


1 













Gregg, 2 b. 


4 


1 




1 


1 


1 


Brooks, 1. f. 


3 










1 





Ingham, r. f. 


4 







2 


1 





Total, 


36 


3 


10 


24 


12 


•1 


Innings, 




1 2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 8 


9 


Trinity. 




t 


1 


2 


1 


0-5 


Massachusetts. 










1 





2-3 



Sacrifice hits-Barton, Brooks. Two base hits-Mann 2. Goodrich. 
Base-on-balls-Hailigan. Struck out— Barton 2. Eaton. Henderson. Cook 
GreRg, Double pUys-lngham to Cook to OH earn. Umpire-Beecher. 

Williams. 13; MASSACHUSETTS, 12. 
Williams made seven errors and Massachusetts 
six when those two teams played base -ball at Williams- 
town May 14. but the hits were not so evenly divided 
and Williams deserved to win. Massachusetts nearly 
tied the score in the ninth when a base on balls, three 
errors, Halligan'ssingle and Hunt's home run. netted 
half her total score. The score : 



Brastow, s. s. 
Jeffrey, lb. 
Durfee, r. f. 
Doughty, I, f. 
Qutnn, c. 
Morgan, c. f. 
Nesbitt, J h, 
Watson. 2 b. 
Wardsworth, p. 

Totals. 



Cook, c. 
Hunt. r. f. 
Bodfish. p. 
O'Hearn, 2 b. 
Paul. I b. 
Halligan, c. f. 
Gregg, I, f. 
Brooks. 3 b. 
Walker, s. s. 

Totals, 

Innings. 
Williams, 
Massachusetts, 

Bases stolen— Paul. Home runs— Doughty. Hunt. Sacrifice hits— Wat- 
son. Bases-on-bil's— Brastow 2, Dur*ee, Jeflrey, G>ok, Hunl Walker 
Struck-ont by Bodfish, Jeffrey 2, Morgan 2. Qulnn 2. Wadsworih 2 
Brastow, Doughty and Durfee : by Wadsworih. Brooks 2, Halligan. Hunl 
Walker. Double play— Brastow to Jeffrey. Umpire Gamsell. 

Massachusetts. 10; Bowdoin. 9. 

Massachusetts played Bowdoin on the campus May 
16. and it took ten innings for the home team to win. 
The game was not a brilliant one on either side and 
it was only because the teams were about equally 
poor that the game was at all interesting. Both 
teams made three runs in the first inning and after 
that it was a see saw. Bowdoin really won the game 
in the eighth inning and it was only the hardest kind 
of luck that kept the final score from being eleven to 
nine in their favor. The first two men up were easy 
outs, but Hunt gave Greene a pass to first and he 
trotted home on Havey's four bagger. Munro made 
a hit and when Kelly duplicated Havey's home run. it 
looked like a merry-go-round. Munro. however, was 
careless, and was called out for failure to touch sec- 



WJI.I.IAMS. 












A.B. 




p. 


1* 


. 


P.O. 


A. 


H 


3 




i 


1 




■ 


3 


? 


4 




i 







9 








4 




i 







1 





1 


5 




2 


1 




2 








5 




3 


2 




9 


1 


n 


S 












1 





i 


5 




2 


5 







2 


? 


5 




3 


3 







1 


i 


5 




1 


2 













41 




1.1 


12 




27 


7 


7 


MA:.;.. 














AH. 




R. 


Id. 




p o. 


A. 


K. 


4 







n 




1 1 


2 





4 




3 


o 




o 








5 




1 


\ 




1 


1 


1 


5 




a 


2 




2 


1 





4 




2 







4 





1 


B 




1 


1 




1 


1 









1 







1 








4 







1 




1 








3 




1 







1 


1 


4 













— 


_ 





39 




12 


7 




24 


6 


6 




1 


2 


3 4 


5 


f. 7 


8 9 






e 





7 





1 2 


3 


-13 




i 





1 








3 6- 


12 



i6 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ond ; so that neither of the last two runs counted. 
Gregg's difficult running catch and Shaugnesy' one 
hand catch of a hot liner were features of the game. 
The score : 





MASSACHUSETTS. 












A.B. 


IB. 


R. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Cook.c. 


6 








9 


1 


o 


Hunt, p. 


6 





1 





4 



2 


Bodfish. 1 b. 


4 


2 


2 


1 1 





O'Hearn, 2 b. 


6 


4 


1 


5 


1 


2 


Paul, s. S. 


5 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


Halligan, c. f. 


6 


1 


1 








o 


Gregg, 1. f. 


5 


1 


1 


1 


o 



2 


Brooks. 3 b. 


3 


2 


1 


1 


3 


Ingham, r. f. 


5 


1 















Totals 



White. 3 b. 
Stanwood, c. f. 
Greene, c. 
Havey, 1 b. 
Monro. I. f. 
Kel'y. r. f. 
Bly, s. s. 
Shaugnesy, 2 b. 
Lewis, p. 

Totals, 

Innings, 
Massachusetts, 
Bowdoin. 



46 

BOWDOIK 
A.B. 
5 
6 

3 
5 
6 
5 
6 
5 
4 



13 



IB. 

I 





2 

2 

4 



1 





K. 

2 



2 

2 

I 



I 

I 





'29 



P.O. 

I 
I 

2 
12 

I 
1 

5 




I 1 



? 

I 






a 

o 

5 



45 10 9 (28 II 9 
123456789 10 
3 10 4 10 1—10 
320010021 0—9 



Sacrifice hits-Paul. Bodfish. Stolen bases- Bodfish, Paul, Shaugnesy 
Two-base hit-Munro. Home run-Havey. First rase on balls-White 
Gr .T n , I' o ew J s ; Brooks 2. Havey, Bodfish. Left on bases -Massachu- 
setts 13. Bowdoin 12. Struck out- Lewis 2. Stanwood 3, Ingham, Shaug- 
??y-u Xy u- u a " p,n -, Batter hit-Green. Double plays-O'Hearn to Boa- 
fish Bodfish (unassisted,) Time of game-2 hrs., 45 m. Umpire-Mer- 

•Munro out for failure to touch second. 
lOneout when winning run was made. 

Massachusetts, 6 ; Greenfield, 4. 

Massachusetts played a semi-professional team last 
Saturday and won by superior pitching. Both teams 
fielded well, but Bodfish kept the nine hits made off 
his delivery well scattered and in no inning was Green- 
field able to make more than a single run. Drink- 
water was in the air in the fifth and five singles, a sac- 
rifice, and an error brought a quartette of Massachu- 
setts men around the four bases before the dust got 
out of that pitcher's eyes. Greenfield made a run in 
the eighth that tied the score ; but a pair of two bag- 
gers by Gregg and Inham, and Cook's sacrifice ena- 
bled the visitors to see them and go one better in 
their half of that inning. This ended the scoring. 
A peculiar incident of the game was the fact that 
Bodfish threw but three balls in the seventh inning. 
Three Greenfield men came to the bat in a rapid suc- 
cession and each succeeded in hitting the first ball 
thrown him. All three, however, were high flies and 
were promptly squeezed by the outfielders. 

The score : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
A.B. R. 



Cook, c. 
Hunt, lb. 
Bodfish, p. 
O'hearn, 2 b. 
Ahearn, s. s. 
Haliigan, c. f. 
Gregg. 1. f. 
Brooks, 3 b. 
Ingham, r. f. 

Totals, 



Cinley, 3 b. 
Thompson, s. s. 
McMahon, c. f. 
Kelly. 2 b. 
Shores, c. 
Casey, r. f. 
Fahey, I. f. 
Drinkwater, p. 
Austin. I b. 

Totals, 



3 
4 

5 
3 

4 
3 

4 
3 

4 



I 
I 
1 


1 



1 



I 



IB, 

1 

2 
2 


2 
2 
2 
I 



P.O. 
b 
10 
1 


3 
2 
3 
2 




A. 



1 

2 
3 
3 



1 




E. 






1 






1 



33 6 


12 


27 


10 


2 


GREENFIELD. 










A.B. R. 


IB. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 1 


t 


1 


2 





5 


1 


5 


I 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 


n 


3 3 





4 


1 





4 


2 


5 


1 


n 


4 


2 


1 


1 


n 


4 





3 





n 


4 





1 


3 


n 


4 


2 


3 









37 4 9 24 10 I 

Stolen bases— Hunt 2, McMahon 2, Cook, Ginley. Shores. Sacrifice 
hits— Cook. Hunt. O'hearn. Two-base hits— Cinley, Gregg. Ingham To- 
tal bases-Massachusetts 14, Greenfield 10. Left on bases-Massachu- 
setts 9, Greenfield 7. Struck out- Bodfish 2, Gregg, Brooks Giniev 
Fahey, Drinkwater. Umpire— Hawkes. J ' 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM. 

Sunday, June 15. 

Baccalaureate Address by L. L. Doggett , Ph. D. of 
Springfield. 

Monday, June 16. 

The Flint Prize Oratorical Contest. Junior class. 
3-30 p. M. 
Speakers: Mr. Franklin, Mr. Poole. 

Mr. Parsons. Mr. Tottingham. 

Mr. Peebles, Mr. West. 

Open Air Concert by the Cadet Band. 7-00 p. m. 
The Burnham Prize Speaking, Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes. 8 p. m. 
Speakers: Sophomores. 
Mr. O'Hearn, 
Mr. Parker, 
Mr. Peck, 
Mr. Raymoth. 

Tuesday, June 17. 

Alumni Meeting in the Mathematical Room, 9 a. m. 

Annual Meeting of the Trustees, at the office of the 
Hatch Experiment Station, 9-30 a. m. 

Meeting of the Committee on Experiment Depart- 
ment, at the office of the Hatch Experiment 
Station. 11-30 a. m. 

Class Day Exercises 1-30 p. m. 

Speakers: Mr. Carpenter. Mr. Dwyer, 
Mr. Claflin. Mr. Hall, 

Mr. Dellea, Mr. Paul. 



Freshmen. 
Mr. Allen, 
Mr. Goodenough. 
Mr. Hutchings, 
Mr. Walsh. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



165 



Battalion Parade. Battalion Drill. 4 p. M . 
Suppers of the various classes. 6 p. m. 
Reception by President and Trustees. 8 to 10 p. m 
Senior Prom., 10 p. m. 

June, 18. 
Graduation Exercises. Announcement of Prizes, and 
Conferring of Degrees. 10 a. m. 
Commencement Speakers: 

Mr. Church, Mr. Lewis, 

Mr. Dacy. Mr Smith, 

Mr. Knicht. Mr. West. 

Alumni Dinner, immediately following the Graduation 
Exercises. 

Thursday and Friday. June 19 and 20. 
Examination of Candidates for Admission at the 
Botanic Museum, 9 a. m. Twodaysare required 
for examination. 

Alumni and former students are requested to enter 
their names on the Register in the Reading 
Room of the Chapel- Library building, as soon as 
possible after reaching Amherst. 



Colleg? N°**S- 



The Maine trip has been canceled. 

At last the Seniors have planted their class bed. 

The new state Flag has arrived and is being used 
on all Battalion drills. 

A L. Dacy. '02. has been spending the past week 
at his home in Boston. 

Quite a number of the townspeople attended the 
concert last Friday evening. 

O. F. Cooley, '02. has secured a situation in the 
Engineers Office at Springfield. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard lectured before the members 
of the Springfield Grange, on May 13. 

" Dan " McMahan of the Greenfield team has 
been coaching the baseball team the past week. 

F. R. Church, "02, spent last week in Lowell, 
where he has been testing the herds of C. I. Hood. 

M. F. Ahearn who was called home by the sudden 
illness of his father last week is now back with us. 
His father is convalescent. 

J. G. Cook and G. L. Barrus, 1903, spent last Sat- 
urday fishing at the home of the latter in Goshen. 
They report a catch of fifty-seven handsome brook 
trout. 



"Some Insect pests of our Fruit Trees" was the 
subject of an address given by Dr. H. T. Fernald 
before the Ware grange on May 10. 

Messrs. Barnes, Newton and Raymoth visited the 
Normal School at Westfield Saturday, and afterwards 
went through the plant of the Springfield Brewing Co. 

W. E. Hinds, '99 has received an appointment from 
the division of entomology of the Agricultural depart- 
ment. He will start work on the Texas cotton 
weave! at once. 

Prof. R. S. Lull lectured before a large audience in 
Goshen Saturday May 17, subject, •• Some of the 
Ancient Inhabitants yf the Connecticut valley and their 
Western Allies." 

The last social event of the season given by the 
ladies of the Faculty was held in the drill hall. Friday 
evening May 9, the entertainment consisting of a 
band concert, and exhibition drill. This was followed 
by refreshments and a short dance. The event was 
well attended there being upward of fifty couples on 
the floor. 

A short time ago some unfortunate student, evi- 
dently trying some practical joke rang in the college 
fire alarm. The Amherst Fire department quickly 
responded and were, to say the least, somewhat vexed 
to find that they had been fooled. The matter is a 
very serious one and has been taken in hand by the 
College Senate and will be thoroughly investigated. 

The house committees on " Ways and Means." 
•' Education," •Agriculture." and "Military Affairs" 
together with many of their friends visited the college 
on Friday, May 17. Immediately on entering the 
college grounds they were given a salute of fourteen 
guns from the field pieces. They then attended 
chapel after which the Battalion had review and dress 
parade. The remainder of the day was spent by the 
guests in inspecting the college. With the exception 
of drill the day was given over to sports by the students. 
Following the custom set by the two previous classes 
the Seniors indulged in a game of base ball on the day 
that the Legislature visitled college. 

The Veterinary Department played the Botany 
Division. The game was a very interesting one from 
many points view. Belden made many phenominal 
slides to bases for the "Vets.' r Freddie Church's 
base running was one of the features of the game, 



1 66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



while '• Home Run " Hall managed to get in his usual 
good work. The line up : 



•• Vets." 
McCobb. c, 
Hall. p. 
Claflin. 1 b. 
Saunder. 2 b. 
Gates, 3 b. 
Belden, s. r,. 
Knight, r. f. 
Church, Dr. Paige, c 
Kinney, 1. f. 

Score : " Vets " 17, 
Knight I, Kinney 1. 
kept track of. 



" Botanists " 

c, Morse 

p., Dellea 

1 b., Dacy 

2 b., Dwyer, Plum 

3 b.. Dwyer 

s. s , West 

r. f.. Plum 

, f. c. f., Carpenter 

I. f., Hodgkiss 

'• Botanists " 10. Home runs — Hall 5. 
Errors, assists, and battery record not 



Alu 



mm. 



•85. — Ptes. Goodell has received a letter from 
Tuciano J. D. Almeida expressing best regards for the 
college and telling of the difficulties which the Brazi- 
lians meet in their work on the coffee plantations. 
Mr. Almeida is director of one of the agricultural 
schools in Brazil. Address, •« Luis de Quevros' Agri- 
cultural College," Piracicaba— Estado de Soo Paulo, 
E. W. de Brazil, S. A. 



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For further Information, time tables, etc., call on ticket agents or address, A. 8. HANSON, G. P. A., Ronton, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



167 



THE IDEAS. 

Iianeh, Billiard, Hair Dressing 

MANICURING ROOMS. 



&he HEIR 

to the FARM 



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(jt'iitlcnuMi you arc iliraji welcome. 

DWIGHT W. THTXRBER, Prop'r. 



IP TO THE 



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Gold ami Silver Medals. 
Diamonds, Watche*, Jewelry. 




Will make the old farm pay 
If ho farms the farm in the 
modern way. 

Modern 
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under the direct charge of Wni P 
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HEW. ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 

Offlee, Cook'H Itlock, AiiiliciHt, Mum. 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75. 




A Visible Writer. Strong, Durable, Speedy. U'idcly used in Amherst. 
We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, exchange ami repair writing inacliines. Supplies of all kinds. 

Write for catalogue. 

CUTTER TOWER CO.. 



173 Devonshire St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



i68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'94. — The growing demand for qualified teachers 
of nature study in the public schools has led to the 
foundation of a new summer school under the direc- 
tion of members of the faculty of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. The Sharon Summer School 
as it is called, has among the members of its faculty 
Mr. A. H. Kirkland. 

•95._WaHer L. Morse, 23 East 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

'95. Born. April 10, 1902, a son, Walter Snow, 

to Wright A. and Anna W. Root. Mr. Root is en- 
gaged in market gardening and fruit growing at East- 
hampton, Mass. 

•97. p. H. Smith was married, May 13th. to Miss 

Edith Stevens of Amherst. The ceremony was per- 
formed at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert S. Stevens. The bride is a graduate of 
the Amherst High School. 

'98. S. W. Wiley spent a few day3 in town re- 
cently. 

'98. -W. S. Fisher b, at present, principal of a 
grammar school in Southwick, Mass. 

•99. W. E. Hinds has received an appointment in 

the division of entomology of the United States de- 
partment of agriculture. He has been instructed to 
proceed to Texas on work connected with the depart- 
ment. 

"00. Ysidro H. Canto will abandon his studies as 

medical student and return to his home in Mexico to 
engage in business. 

•0|._E. S. Gamwell, Chemist for the Viscol Co., 
East Cambridge. Mass. 

•01. W. C. Dickerman is in the insurance busi 

ness at Brockton, Mass. 



C. H. BOYDEH, 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



when you want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth having. 




Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 
313-315 Main St., - - Springtleld, Mass. 



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Special tlcxiKiis ami all colors for I.a«lles, 
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First Class Lunch. Rooms f 1.00 ami upwards; with Until, 
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RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 17, 1902. 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Cou.rok Siomai.. Amhbrst Mass Ths S.gnal will be 

SmVl?mS£S! ,,s discon,inuance is ordered and ™ pid - subscribers wh ° * ^ receive ** £ iu? rsys - 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

MYRON HOWARD WEST. 1903, EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

WILLIAM ETHERINGTON ALLEN. 1903, Business Manager. 

HOWARD MORGAN WHITE. I 904, Assistant Business Manager 
NEIL FRANCIS MONAHAN. 1903. College Notes. HENRY JAMES FRANKLIN, 1903 Alumni Notes 

RICHARD HENDRIE ROBERTSON. .903. FAYET TE DICKINSON COUDEN 9 ? A.hS c. 

R RAYMOND RAYMOTH. .904. Department Notes. ARTHUR LEE PECK. 1904. Intercede 

GEORGE HOWARD ALLEN, 1905. HERBERT HAROLD COODENoJgh I . Jo's 



Term*. $IOO per year In adcance. Sin gle Coplee, IQ c. Portage o af ide o* United Stat«» «nd Canada, 28c. extra. 



Y. M. C. A. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
College Boarding Club, 
Reading- Room Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

W. E. Tottlngham, Pres. Athletic Association. 

P. W. Brooks, Manager. Base Ball Association, 

C. P. Halligan, Sec. Nineteen Hundred and Four Index. 

J.C. Hall, Sec. Fraternity Conference, 



Prof. R. E. Smith, Sec. 
V. A. Gates, Manager. 
A. L. Peck. Manager. 
II. L. Knight, Pres. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 

tvi«\«'.%t v «m».n WMHtW. 



Edrtbri&ls. 



To all members of Massachusetts" alumni who now 
take the opportunity to visit their Alma Mater. The 
Signal extends a hearty welcome. 



We wish to congratulate the editors of the Y. M. 
C, A. hand-book for their success In getting out such 
a first-class publication. The cover is strikingly hand- 
some and Is of full white leather, the front cover being 
set off by a gold " M " of old English style. The 
frontispiece is a fine half-tone of South College. In 
its contents the book follows the general plan of pre- 
vious publications of Its kind. General information 
concerning the college and town, topics of the socie- 
ty's meetings for the ensuing year, railroad connec- 
tions, bits of advice and lastly a few blank pages make 
the book a convenient and attractive pocket memo- 
randum. 



Once more commencement is with us and as a 



natural sequence our minds go back in retrospect 
over the past year. It has been a year characterized 
by many changes and advancements in and about the 
College and on the whole has perhaps been as suc- 
cessful as any year in the history of the Institution. 
In September an exceptionally large freshman class 
entered, showing the beneficial results of a liberal ad- 
vertising in which the College authorities indulged 
during the previous season. The semester plan went 
Into effect at this time. It separated the College 
year into two equal periods, eliminating the short 
spring recess and extending the summer vacation two 
weeks, thus benefitting men who work during the 
summer. 

A pleasing feature of the opening days of the 
College year was the absence of class rushes. Al- 
though there was plenty of class spirit in evidence be- 
tween the two lower classes, the more brutal tactics 
were dispensed with. The appearance of two ladies 
among the freshmen gave a new aspect to College 
life. Although ladles had previously entered with a 
manifest intention of completing the course they evi- 



I 



170 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



171 



dently became convinced that they were out of place 
and speedily left to parts unknown. The " co-ed " 
question is a broad one and we are not prepared to 
take a radical stand on either side ; but the fact that 
the curriculum of the College has been so adapted 
that ladies can pursue thoroughly practical courses in 
several branches of science, and the fact that tuition 
is free and expenses are low will undoubtably prove 
an incentive to co-education here. — We will endeavor 
to reconcile ourselves to the Inevitable. 

Early in the fall the never to be forgotten question 
concerning the change of the name of the College 
was resurrected from its then dormant state and dis- 
cussed until students, faculty, alumni and the public 
in general were heartily sick of it and it was laid aside 
by mutual consent. During the melee, however, the 
Aggie Life became the College Signal and we are 
led to believe that the change has met with universal 
favor. The year's athletics began in a blaze of glory. 
For several years the success of our teams on the grid- 
iron has attracted wide-spread attention but during 
the season of 1901 our victories over Holy Cross.Wes- 
leyan, Amherst Tufts, Boston college, M. 1. T. and 
minor teams, placed us fifth in rank among New Eng- 
land colleges. Basketball, although a newly installed 
game gave us a large percentage of victories. On 
the diamond some of our victories have been defeats 
but the men have put fourth a plucky fight and they 
deserve much credit. The new catalogue, which ap- 
peared early In the spring filled a long felt want and 
was a decided improvement over the annual College 
report which had hitherto served as the principal ad- 
vertising medium of the institution. 

For some time the crying need of more buildings and 
more adequate facilities has been evident. The needs 
in this direction at last made themselves felt to the 
Legislature with the result that at this time there 
are. in the process of construction, two buildings 
which will add greatly to the efficiency and beauty of 
the place. And now last but not least, we are to be 
blessed with a change which though seemingly easy 
to bring about, has for years resisted the most stren- 
uous efforts of the student body, — namely Junior 
electives. While a broad and general education is to 
be desired, the centralization of one's forces along one 
line of research is necessary to success in nearly 
every branch of life. It is the time when a person 



should turn his attention from the broad field of all 
knowledge to the narrow way of particular research, 
which brings up a difficult problem for modern educa- 
tors. The fact that it is better for the majority of 
students to begin to specialize along one line of work 
during the Junior year than during the Senior year is 
as yet problematical, but from our observations In 
other Institutions we are forced to believe that the 
right action has been pursued by those in charge of 
our curriculum. 



FOR TENNIS' SAKE. 

He knew she was watching, but he had no time to 
look her way ; his whole attention was centered on 
the ball as it flew from the racket of Burton, Arlington's 
tennis champion. He was fighting hard and well, not 
only for his own sake, but for the honor of his old 
Alma Mater. 

Arlington and M — had never met on the tennis 
court before, and the result of the day was eagerly 
awaited. The tournament had been arranged as one 
of the commencement features, and M — had put for- 
ward her seven best players to meet Arlington's 
champions. M — had won one of the doubles and 
one single and now waited breathlessly for the finish 
of the last single. Bayard was their hope; he had 
never failed them before ; they felt they could trust 
him now. But he had a man against him whose 
equal he had never met and he knew it, and who can 
blame him if a nervous tremor occasionally did seize 
his arm.and who would wonder if they knew the strug- 
gle he was bravely fighting. 

***** 

" The moonlight is always dangerous." 
" True, but so enticing, as to be always welcome." 
" What a philosopher you are growing to be, Ned 
Bayard ! " 

" Probably the inspiration is due to my nearness to 
divinity." 

" Now, Ned Bayard, I didn't come out here, to be 
made fun of. If you're going to say such horrid things 
you can turn right round and row me home again." 
" Well, hang it all. Doris, you know I'm not making 
fun of you, because I've told you many times before 
that you are the idol I worship and bow down to, and 
I'm not the only fellow who does it ; and not one is 
ashamed of the fact being known either. You know I 



each 



each 



love you, Doris, only why you won't listen to me I 
don't understand. If 1 was always up to some mis- 
chief, getting into all sorts of scrapes, there would be 
some reason for your apparent indifference; but I'm 
not ; and in fact the thought of you has kept me out of 
these things." 

" Ned, we've known each other since we were 
•' knee high to a grasshopper, haven't we ? " 

'• Yes, and all the better too since we know 
other more fully." 

" That's just the trouble, Ned, we've known 
other too well, and we've been together so much, that 
there is danger of our tiring of each other, if we were 
so related that we could not have a change. You 
think you love me now, but you will meet some one 
whom you will like better, and if you were tied to me 
you would be discontented and ours would be an un- 
happy life." 

" Doris, have I not had a "chance to compare you 
with the best of girls since I've been at college, and in 
four years one meets many people ; and have I found 
one that could compare with you within a shadow of 
likelihood. You know, for I've told you that I have 
never met a girl who could in anywise equal you. Do 
I love you because you are beautiful ? Yes. and for 
far more too. I love you for yourself, dear, whether 
others could compare with you or not. Only tell me. 
Doris, that you love me, and nerve my arm for the 
struggle to-morrow, and you shall be proud of me." 
" Ned, you will never, can never understand. 
Please do not refer to this painful subject again. 
Now I must request you to row me to shore and take 
me home, I will not remain here. You have spoiled 
a pleasant evening for me. I want to enjoy your 
friendship, but you will not let me. Oh. why can you 
men not understand ? Now take me home, and re- 
member not a word of this again." 

• * # * * 

A girl laid her head upon the pillow that night with 



dry lashes, but when she awoke In the morning there wearers of red and grey. 



she repent it ? Well, she didn't love Ned as she would 
the man whom she should marry, and she wouldn't 
marry any one. If she didn't love him. Ah, but the 
heart is very fickle indeed and even its possessor can- 
not trust it. 

* * * * * 

The day was as fair as the most churlish could de- 
sire. Just a breath of wind to temper the heat of the 
sunshine. The campus was a scene of beauty and a 
joy forever to be remembered. The dark caps and 
gowns interspersed among the white gowns made an 
exceedingly attractive picture against the green back- 
ground. As the morning wore on the scene of Inter- 
est shifted to the rear of Harbough Hall. Here was 
to be fought and won if possible a battle that held 
more interest to the students of M — than a hundred 
charges like San Juan and Spion Kop. 

The final event came at last and Bayard knew it 
depended on him whether the occasion should be a 
happy or displeasing one for M— . And with a grim 
resolve he determined to give his Alma Mater the 
very best of his blood. 

The score stood — one all in sets; and four — two In 
games.with Burton serving. •• Was Ned weakening? " 
The querry made several fellows knit their brows. 
No. no. look at that pretty return. 
" Forty— thirty." 

Now, Ned. forget last night, this is for old M.— 
•• Deuce ! " 

" Bayard I Bayard ! Bayard ! " 
He responded with a fast volley to the side line ; 
and a faulty cut of Burton's gave him the advantage, 
while a cross-stroke to the back corner gave him the 
game. 

The game stood three to four. He was always 
safe on his own serve, but to-day he could not count 
on it. Why ? He could not tell himself, except that 
a heavy load seemed to weigh upon his chest. He 
lost and gloom seemed to settle over the faces of the 



were tears under them. Was she sorry ? Yes and 
no. Why couldn't Ned be satisfied with her friend- 
ship. She liked him as a friend, but as a — no, not a 
bit more. And then he was such a good-hearted fel- 
low, and a man through and through, like his noble 
ancester. Why couldn't he understand ? Then the 



Five to three. Burton's serve and Bayard weak. 
But a pretty volley of a high lob brought cheers from 
his supporters and gave him new strength. Again he 
won. 

Five to four and the sun grew brighter, 
his serve and the sun fairly blazed. For 



thought came to her, did she do wrong, and would | the air was deafening with the cheers 



He won 
moment 






»7» 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



He was fully alive now. He must forget, he must 



win. 



•• Thirty all." A smash full at Burton won the 
point. 

•• Thirty-forty." 

That was a long reach but he hit it fair. Burton 
tried a high lob, and nearly caught him, but with 
a bound he was back at service and caught the ball 
on the rising and with as pretty a stroke as ever given 
dropped It over the net, but too easy a ball for his op- 
ponent, who sent it towards the side line. It seemed 
well lost, but by what seemed supernatural strength 
and agility Bayard caught it with a back hand lob 
and placed it on the service line. 

Now the struggle came. He dare not lose his 
serve. He must keep steady now if ever. 
•• Thirty-fifteen." 

Ah, M — 's banners were moving gaily. 
•• Thirty all." 

Why that Intense stillness ? 
•• Thirty-forty." 

Come men brace up and cheer your doughty cham- 
pion. 

•• Deuce ! " 

He tried a high ball, Burton returned It with a fast 
volley ; a cut passed the ball by Burton and the ad- 
vantage was his. What was wrong? He couldn't 
see plainly, a film seemed to spread over his eyes. 
Oh, how could he miss that easy ball. His hand 
trembled, but he bit his lips end held on. 
•• Vantage out." 

Now Bayard, for dear old M— Hark ! Answer that 
cheer with victory? What was Burton trying? Ah, he 
saw and with a bound he was crouched at the net ; 
as the slog came, he met it squarely and it killed it- 
self effectively. 
•• Bayard ! " 

It was a girlish voice, but it led a hundred voices. 
He knew the voice, ah, only too well. He turned 
and received a smile from a blushing face. It gave 
new life to his whole being. He must win. He 
would win. Ah, what a cut and Burton could not 
answer It. " 'Vantage In." 

He sent a drop that was fiercely returned. He 
tried a pass but was answered by a cross-stroke .which he 
lobbed to the service line and the game was won. 
Then— but there Is no need of description, here the 



imagination cannot reveal too much. As for Bayard 
the first chance he had, he sought among the crowd 
for a missing one. and when he found her by the 
brook, alone there were tears In her eyes. 

" I'm sorry," was all she said, but there was no 
need of more. Silence is sometimes the best of 
sympathizers. As they returned she broke the 
silence. 

" I really could not help calling out. It was mag- 
nificent, and then when I realized where 1 was and 
what I did, I felt so ashamed, not because of you, 
dear, but — well you know." 

•• Mever mind, my Doris. We'll brave the world 
together." 

And there was peace over a41 the earth — at least 

for two. 

Raymoth. 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWO CLASS 

SONG. 

Tune, "My Old New Hampshire Home." 
Four long years we've worked and cheered for Massachu- 
setts. 

Four long years we've stood together side by side ; 
Now as classmates we await the last sad parting. 

And the future with whatever maybe tide. 
No more our colors wave on tower and campus. 

No more in triumph rings our vlcfry cheer , 
We've met to say goodby to Alma Mater 

And the happy days we've spent together here. 

CHORUS. 

Loyal sons we'll ever stand 

To our Alma Mater grand, 
Though no more we roam beneath her sheltering walls ; 

Still in memory we'll revere 

Fonaest recollections dear, 
Of the days in old Massachusetts' halls. 

In the days gont be we've lived for Massachusetts, 

And we've seen her grow in power and in fame j 
Now. we leave familiar scenes we love so dearly 

As to other hands we trust her honored name. 
But though no more our lives can be united 

And singly we must go our separate ways, 
We'll still be true to the class and Alma Mater 

In remembrance of our happy college days. 

Now have passed our student days at Massachusetts 
And the future lies untried but bright before ; 

While through life we go we'll not forget our college 
And we'll loyal be to ties we loved of yore. 

We'll wait in hope and Joy the glad reunion 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»73 



When once again we meet as classmates dear ; 
To sing of Naughty-Two and Aima Mater 

And the happy days wee've spent together here 

Howard L. Knight. 
John M. Dellea. 



IVY POEM. 

L. C. Claflin. 
The World's wide portals lie open 

And Summer smiles on all. 
While round us the voice of Nature 

Invitingly doth call. 

So at the threshold let us pause 

And feast our gaze in turn 
On each fond tie which through years will not 

In memory cease to burn. 

These college walls, this campus dear, 

Each tree, each path, is ours ; 
And oft through years our thoughts will stray 

Back midst their leafy bewers. 

Back with those dear old mountain friends. 

Four years our guardians they ; 
Their wooded slopes and rugged heights 

Sun kissed at close of day. 

Ah may these memories long remain 

Deep in our hearts and cling 
Fast to the thread that binds our class 

Like the Ivy which here we bring. 

For ages old the Ivy bold 

Has clung to famous wall, 
To castle high 'neath foreign sky 

And ruined tower tall. 

Yet to our hearts more dear by far 

Than ruined castle old. 
The chapel cf our college days 

In reverence we hold. 

So stone by stone let upward spring 

Our sturdy Ivy vine, 
And spreading o'er these chapel walls 

Forever verdant twine. 

So step by step may we too climb. 

E'en as the Ivy green, 
And at the end look from the top 

Back at young manhood's dream. 



Smith College girls are obliged to take four hours 
exercise a week in the Gym during the winter and at 
tennis, boating, golf, or long walks In good weather. 
The president believes that a strong mind can usually 
be found in a strong body. 



OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS. 

The observer has been in battle, he has been under 
fire. He has heard the bullets whistle under him, 
over him. around and about him. He has met the 
enemy and they were not his. The observer has 
even been accused of conducting an ignoble retreat. 
The last he resents as a slander. His action may 
have been misunderstood, but he Is Inclined to the 
opinion that jealousy is behind the stories that are 
being told about him. 

****»♦# 
The batallion had extended order drill a few days 
ago. and the sham battle that was conducted by Com- 
pany A. developed Into a very carnival of real bullets 
and bloodshed without the blood. The observer will 
be generous and allow that the squad selected to de- 
fend Clark Hill against the rest of the company were 
mistaken In thinking the cartridges loaded for the in- 
door range were blanks, but the fact remains that 
several bullets flew within a few hundred feet of the 
observer's devoted head. 

It was an exciting few minutes when the company 
advanced up the hill In sections, shouting like fiends, 
and firing wads into the air. Indeed they advanced 
so enthusiastically, and shouted so lustily, that the 
order to rest for a minute at the foot of the last hill 
before attempting the final charge, was welcomed 
eagerly, notwithstanding the fact that the command to 
lie down was given while the company was wading 
through rather a marshy marsh. No sooner how- 
ever had the men taken a prone position, when the 
enemy on the hill above fired a volley ; and when the 
slugs which should have been wads, began to sing a 
medley of popular airs, the attacking party rose as 
one man and charged forward to seek shelter behind 
the line of trees to Its rear. The observer selected 
the largest tree in sight. It was all of three inches In 
diameter, and by keeping his profile to the enemy, 
and by dodging from side to side, he might have es- 
caped serious Injury. On reaching the cover how- 
ever the observer found four or five privates already 
taking possession of all the shelter that It afforded. 
In menacing tone, he ordered them to charge ; but 
discipline was at an end. no attention was paid to his 
orders, no other tree was without Its full quota of 
defenders, and the observer was at a loss as to the 
best mode of action. And now, having done his best 



»74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



to put some courage into the drooping hearts of his 
men, the observer began to think how the safety of 
all could best be secured ; and just here he executed 
that masterly flank movement to the rear, which 
under different circumstances, might have saved the 
whole company from annihilation. 

******* 



While advancing up the hill a few minutes before, 
the observer had called his captain's attention to a 
body of the enemy who were coming up from be- 
hind in such a manner as to put us between two fires. 
The taking of the hill was going to be such an easy 
matter however, that it was thought best to pay no 
attention to this second party until all resistance from 
the front had been effeclually silenced ; for with the 
hill top in our possession, we could defy an army of as 
many as forty or fifty men. Now however when the 
company refused to go forward, an attack from the 
rear would be disastrous. Calling to his men, and 
waving his bayonet wildly, the observer ran at top 
speed to a point below the brow of the hill just passed. 
Arriving here he took a recumbent attitude and looked 
around for his squad. To his astonishment and 
chagrin, no one was In sight. On him alone de- 
pended the safety of an army, and to make the mat- 
ter worse, he had forgotten to bring his gun with him. 
Well, he could at least "die game." Better to give 
up his life fighting a host, himself unarmed, than to 
be shot in the back with his face to a tree. And now 
having looked in vain for those who should have been 
with him in his extremity, the observer glanced 
toward the point from which the rear attack might be 
expected. And there he saw a sight that caused him 
to give vent to a cheer that might have been heard 
above the roar of a thousand guns, a cheer that woke 
the echoes of Tom and Tobey till they shook to the 
very tips. The observer would have jumped up and 
cracked his heels together but the bullets were still 
flying and he considered discretion the better part of 
valor. The squad in the rear had indeed advanced 
to the attack, but they too had come within range of 
the bullets of their friends above, and — well, the 
observer witnessed just then a rather disorderly re- 
treat. 

All danger from this direction being at an end, the 
observer began again to consider the question of at- 



tacking the hill single handed if need be. It would 
only be necessary to wait a half hour or so until the 
ammunition of the enemy was exhausted. The 
observer became so interested in planning the manner 
of attack that he did not for a few minutes realize that 
the firing had died down and then ceased altogether. 
Suddenly, however, he heard a cheer from the front 
and stood up just in time to see his friends take 
formal possession of the hill they had so nobly won. 
Advancing straight toward them, and paying no atten- 
tion to the jeers of those who had misunderstood the 
brave part he had borne in the victory, he did not 
stop until he saluted the commanding officer and de- 
livered those historic words that ended the " Battle of 
Clark's Hill," '« Sir, 1 have to report that the enemy 
to the rear is in full retreat. Pursuit is hopeless." 
And then to the company, " Say. have any of you 
fellows seen my rifle ? " 



BATTALION APPOINTMENTS. 

Headquarters Clark Cadets, 

Capt. John Anderson, 

U. S. Army Commandant. 

Orders With the approval of the President of the 

No. 16. College the following appointments of cadet 

officers and non-commissioned officers are hereby 

announced to take effect at the beginning of the next 

college year. 

viz : Neil F. Monahan to be Adjutant with the rank 

of 1st Lieutenant. 
Richard H. Robertson to be Quartermaster with 

rank of 1st Lieutenant. 

BAND. 

Myron H. West to be Chief Musician with rank of 

1st Lieutenant. 
William E. Tottlngham to be Principal Musician and 

1st Sergeant. 
Arthur L. Peck to be Sergeant. 
Edward A. Back to be Corporal. 

COMPANY A. 

George L. Barrus to be Captain. 
Winthrop V. Tower to be 1st Lieutenant. 
Elmer M. Poole to be 2d Lieutenant. 
To be Sergeants : 

1. Clifford A. Tinker. 

2. Harry J. Franklin 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*75 



3. Stephen C. Bacon. 

4. Charles S. Tinkham. 

5. Charles P. Halligan. 

To be Corporals : 

1. William L. Hood. 

2. Reuben R. Raymoth. 

3. Clarence H. Griffin. 

4. Clifford F. Elwood. 

COMPANY B. 

William E. Allen to be Captain. 
Albert Parsons to be 1st Lieutenant. 
Edward B. Snell to be 2d Lieutenant. 
To be Sergeants : 

1. Fayette D. Couden. 

2. William W. Peebles. 

3. Joseph G. Cook. 

4. Howard C. Bowen. 

5. Edward G. Proulx. 

To be Corporals : 

1. Phillip W. Brooks. 

2. Gerald D. Jones. 

3. Howard D. Newton. 

4. Howard M. White. 

John Anderson, 
Captain U. S. Army Commandant. 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIVE CLASS 
BANQUET. 

The class of 1905 held a very enjoyable banquet 
at the Cooley House. Springfield, on the evening of 
June 6, 1902. 

All were in the best of spirits owing to the fact that 
they had defeated the Sophomores in baseball in the 
afternoon. They sat down a little after nine to a din- 
ner such as a set of hungry college fellows soon cause 
to disappear. 

Soon after the beginning of the banquet, Mr. Craig- 
head, who had been detained, arrived. He made up 
the full number of those who had intended to come, 
so all fear of interference by the Sophomores was at 
an end. In the course of the toasts a small distur- 
bance was made by the appearance of a few Sopho- 
mores. These soon made a hasty exit, and every- 
thing continued successfully. 

Mr. Gardner was a great success as toastmaster, 
preluding each one's remarks by words quite appro- 
priate. 



"Old '05." byW. A. Munson, president of the 
class, consisted of the history of the class from the 
first class-meeting in the Hatch barn, when all were 
strangers to one another, down through the various 
events in which it had figured to the baseball game in 
the afternoon. 

" Our Sisters— the Co-eds," by F. C. Pray, was 
an exhortation to all, whatever their sentiments with 
regard to co-education, to treat the ladies of the class 
as gentlemen should. 

Thomas Hunt, in his remarks on •• 1903." spoke in 
glowing terms of the manner in which the Juniors 
had treated the class at every turn where it was In 
doubt or needed help. 

If one wanted to learn something about a very im- 
portant subject he should have been present and heard 
F. L. Yeaw's -paper" on •« The Art of Cribbing." 

For a surprise, the few but touching words of L. A. 
Ransehausen should have been heard. His subject. 
"Girls. Girls, Girls." he divided into three parts ; i. e. 
he divided girls into three divisions, the good, bad and 
indifferent. Like many others, he did not believe in 
extremes, so he advocated indifferent girls as making 
good acquaintances. 

L. W. Hill gave a flowing and highly ludicrous 
discourse on the science of Zootechny, which won for 
him prolonged applause. 

"Old Dan Hart " formed quite an important portion 
of what was said by L. S. Walker. In the course of 
his remarks he mentioned some of the things done by 
" Dan " which showed in what esteem he was held by 
those around college. His whole talk on " College 
Characters " was very enjoyable. 

" Athletics." by C.L.Whitaker. as might have been 
expected, was the expounding to each and all the 
duties holden upon them toward the athletic side of 
their career here. 

When some poor Freshman suddenly awakened 
from a sound sleep in the small wee hours of the 
morning by the sudden call of " O— all out ! " he 
tremblingly draws on his clothes and runs out with 
visions of the pond floating through his brain. The 
above was ably depicted by G. H. Allen In " A Mid- 
night Tramp." 

The toasts closed with " Where Are We Bound? " 
by A. N. Swain, In which he spoke of the likelihood 
'05 had of retaining the greater part of Its present 






176 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









large number next year, and with such a class, what a 
chance it had of having some men who would be well 
known in later years. He also urged his classmates 
to be looking forward and not to be thinking merely of 
the • fun " which can be had at the present time. 



BASKETBALL REPORT. 


Season of 1902. 




RECEIPTS. 




Subscription from college, $118 00 


Collected at door : 




Northampton Y. M. C. A,. 


7 15 


Amherst, 


20 50 


Ludlow A. C, 


45 


Hartford Y. M. C. A., 


5 00 


Chicopee Parish House, 


2 25 


Trinity, 


3 00 


Wesley an, 


2 75 


EXPENSES. 




Pants and jerseys. $15 80 


Shoes, 


9 11 


Stamps and stationery, 


5 50 


Ball : repairs on ball and baskets. 


7 50 


Registration in A. A. U., 


2 50 


Sanction of A. A. U., 


2 00 


Tickets and printing, 


4 75 


Posters, 


1 75 


Tape and liniment, 


1 00 


Car fares, 


1 75 


Washing suits (twice) 


3 12 


Screens. 


13 40 


Paint and outlining floor, 


80 


Chalk dust, 


1 40 


Car fare to Springfield and Chicopee 


, 1 50 


Williston (Brown's Mgr.) 


60 


Telegrams and telephones. 


2 05 


Cheese cloth for baskets, 


40 


Guarantees : 




Northampton Y. M, C. A., 


3 20 


Amherst, 


1 00 


Ludlow A. C, 


8 80 


Hartford Y. M. C. A., 


16 00 


Chicopee P. H., 


6 00 


Trinity, 


20 00 



$159 10 



$74 93 



Wesleyan, 

Total expenses, 
" receipts, 



30 00 



$85 00 

$159 93 
159 10 



Net loss, 83 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. H. Belden. Mgr. 



CONTRIBUTION. 

FROM W. R. MOODY, MANAGER OF NORTHFIELD CON- 
FERENCE. 

Northfield plans to entertain young men more ex- 
tensively this year than ever before. A new depart- 
ure has been made by establishing a summer Bible 
school. At the request of friends, the whole month 
of July Is reserved for that purpose. The lecturers 
are Rev. G. Campbell Morgan, Dr. W. W. White, 
and Rev, John Kelman of Edinburgh University. It 
is a rare chance for college men and Y. M. C. A. 
workers. The lectures come In the morning and 
none of them are compulsory. Afternoons for recre- 
ation. " Camp Northfield " will be open, golf links 
near, boating, tennis, fishing and swimming ; every- 
thing in the line of out-door sports. The Students' 
Conference, with John R. Mott as leader, will be In 
progress from June 27 to Jnly 6, and any visitors to 
Northfield during that time may share both the Bible 
School and the platform meetings of the conference. 
No tuition fees are charged, and the delegates to the 
conference are privileged to remain after the 6th and 
attend the school. 



Collet Notts. 



Freshmen, 8 ; Sophomores, 7. 

The class of '99 holds a reunion at college to-day. 

Chef N. T. Reardon leaves the 18th. and will not 
return. 

The game with Boston College was cancelled by 
Manager Gates. 

The Freshmen held their class supper in the Cooley 
House. Springfield, Friday, June 6. 

North College dormitory is to be given over to the 
use of the contractors' men during the summer 
months. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



177 



The farewell banquet of the Senior class will 
held at the Bloody Brook House, South Deerfield. 

A. L. Dacy and C. E. Dwyer have returned, hav- 
ing spent a week at the Arnold Arberetun. where they 
have been studying Botany. 

G. L. Barrus and P. W. Brooks went trout fishing 
in Goshen last Saturday. They had but fair luck, 
catching but twenty-seven in all. 

Work is being pushed forward rapidly on both the 
heating plant and the new boarding house. The for- 
mer will be completed in September, the latter about 
December 1st. 

The following men have been detailed to act as 
ushers during Commencement: M. H. West. G. L. 
Barrus. W. E. Allen. N. F. Monahan. A. Parsons. 
W. W. Peebles, W. V. Tower, E. B. Snell, H. C. 
Bowen, E. M. Poole, C, S. Tinkham. 

At a joint class meeting of 1903 and 1904 the 
members of the College Senate for next year were 
elected, as follows: 1903. E. B. Snell. M. H. West, 
C. P. Halligan, H. J. Franklin. 1904, G. E. 
O'Hearn, F. D. Couden. J. W. Gregg. R. R. Ray- 
moth. 

The college were treated to a surprise the other 
morning when they discovered a large white flag on 
the flag-staff bearing the numbers '05. The flag had 
been placed there the night before by some daring 
Freshman, who climbed to the top of the 100-foot 
flag-pole and nailed on the emblem. It remained 
there all the day of the Sophomore- Freshman base- 
ball game, and was taken down that night. 

During the past few weeks F. R. Church, E. S. 
Fulton and W. A. Conant. the latter one of last win- 
ter's short course men. have been employed under 
the direction of the Division of Foods and Feeding in 
making confirmed butter tests at the celebrated Hood 
farm, situated at Lowell. Mass. N. J. Hunting was 
also employed making tests of dairy animals at the 
farms of N. I. Bowditch. Framingham. and the Hon. 
F. L. Ames, North Easton. ascertaining their quali- 
fications for entrance in the advanced register of the 
American Guernsey Cattle Club. 



Alu 



mm. 



appointed 



During the past twenty years the University of Wis- 
consin has Increased her student list from 481 to 
3000. 



'72.— C. Burleigh Bell Is at present situated as 
clerk in McDonald's Pharmacy, 110 Grand Ave.. 
San Francisco. Cal. 

72.— Frank C. Cowles has recently visited the 
College. He Is at present engaged as civil engineer 
and draughtsman with the Norcross Bros. Co.. No. 10 
East Worcester St , Worcester. Mass. 

72.— Lemuel B. Holmes has been 
judge of the Massachusetts superior court. 

73.— D. P. Penhallow. who Is connected with the 
marine biological laboratory of Wood's Holl. has a 
book In the library containing a lecture on •■ The 
Nature of the Evidence Exhibited by Fossil Plants, 
and Its Bearing upon our Knowledge of the History of 
Plant Life." 

76.— There is a new book in the College Library 
containing the genealogy of Joseph E. Root, B. S.. 
M. D.. of Hartford, Conn. It is a reprint from the 
'• Commemorative Biographical Record of Hartford 
County." It Is a short record of the ancestry and 
life of one of our most worthy and honored alumni. 
His family has contained many noted men among 
whom we may mention. John Putnam, an ancestor of 
Gen. Israel Putnam, of Revolutionary fame. Dr. 
Root received his early school training In the public 
schools of Barre, Mass. In 1876. he received the 
degree of B. S. from this college. He studied medi- 
cine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
New York, graduating therefrom in 1883. While at 
•• Massachusetts" he was one of the Farnsworth prize 
speakers in his freshman and sophomore years, and a 
commencement speaker at graduation. Dr. Root Is 
not only prominent In his profession, but also socially, 
in various clubs and organizations. He has many 
literary works which have given him a wide ar.d well 
deserved prominence. Among them are, •• Early 
Discovery of America by the Norsemen," " Hunting 
Trips In the Rocky Mountains," and no less than 
seven medical treatises. 

'82. — C. S. Plumb has recently been elected pro- 
fessor of Annual Husbandry In the Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

'85.— Benoni 0. Teklrlan was married on the 5th 



«7 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



of May at New York city, to Miss Madge T. Tilley. 
Address, 519 1-2 Palisade Ave., Jersey City. N. Y. 

The Class of 1802 will hold a reunion and class 
banquet at the Mt. Toby house, Sunderland. Tuesday 
afternoon at six o'clock. 

'92.— F. G. Stockbridge is at present situated at 
Wyebrook, Pa. 

•92. _F. H. Plumb, assistant editor of the New 
England Homestead will take a few months vacation to 
recuperate. 

•92. Dr. R. R. Lyman has disposed of his prac- 
tice in Hartford, Conn., and has opened a firm in 
Boston under the name of Lyman & Lyman. 

95 _Albert F. Burgess, chief inspector of nurse- 
ries and orchards of the state of Ohio. Located at 
Columbus, Ohio. 

"95.— E. A. White, professor of botany, forestry and 
landscape gardening, Storrs, Conn. 

*01.— George R. Bridgeforth has accepted a posi- 
tion at Tuskegee, Alabama. 

•01.— Thomas Cast-y. student of law with John F. 



Spring Clothes. 



Just Hie Hurls Hint young men will appreclste. 
There** a collection here that absolutely cannot 
be found elsewhere in West.-rn New England. 
Will you come mid see it? 

HATS FUKNISIUNUK. SHOES. 



Haynes & Co., 

Always Reliable. 



SritlNCPlKMt, 



Mass. 




PULLMAN 
VESTIBULE 
LIMITED 
TRAINS 



OVER 



DAILY SERVICE. 



New York 

Central 

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THROUGH COACHES 



BUFFET 

PARLOR CARS 



EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 

TO MO FROM BOSTOM VIA PALMER, 



SLEEPINO CARS 



DIN1NO CARS 



REAP now*. 

9.06 A.M. 6«W PM- 
fl.M) " 8.4.t " 
10.00 " fi68 " 
10.60 " 8.01 " 
M M " !»03 M 



AS FOLLOWS 

!▼. Amherst 
■t. rainier 
It. Palmer 
ar. Worcester 
hv. Boston 



RKAD (TF. 

»r. fl.Ofi a.m. s:t*ir-M. 

lV.8.20 " "M " 

ar.7.3« " 1M " 

lv.fi.36 " filO " 

lv.5.00 " 5.t0 " 



To ALBANY, 
To BUFFALO, 
To CHICAGO, 
To CINCINNATI, 
To DETROIT, 
To ST. LOUIS, 



Through the 
Famous . . . 



9 Trains 
8 Trains 
7 Trains 
3 Trains 
5 Trains 
3 Trains 



Berkshire 
mils . . . 

AWI> THK 

Hlbanp Gatcwap, 

Which is always Open. 



r orr„r thCTln .orn,.t,™.. lm eU H «..e l c..c., 1 o»* k e l «e„Uo r . ( .dre„,A.S. ..ANSON. O.P.*..Bo. W n.M. M . 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE IDEAL 

Iiuneh, Billiard, Hair Dressing 



A Sl> 



MANICURING ROOMS. 



3 CouIi'h I'.Iim I,, 



■l|i ime lli„l,|. 



<5/>e HEIR 
to the FARM 



Postal Cauls tad stamps at t-ust. 
Cigars fintl Tobaoeo to burn. 

t.eiitleint'ii you Hie iilwayn welcome 



r* " 



DWIGHT W. THUEBEE, Prop'r. 



ti 



OP 10 THE MINUTE" 



i/ 



IN 



MEN'S FINE SHOES. 



The Northampton Shoe Co. 



88 Main St., 



Northampton. Mass. 



Will males the old firm pay 
It he farms the (arm la the 
modern way. 

Modern 
Agricul- 
ture 

G aught by Mail. 

A thorough and practical course, 
under the direct charge of Wm P 
Brooks, Ph. 1)., (Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College). Our course Is 
based on Brooks' Agriculture:" it 
treats of soils, plants, tillage, drain- 
age.iri ixh i ... ii. manures fertilization, 
crop rotation and everything per- 
taining to money-making on the 
farm. Text booka (3 volumes. WW 
pages. 300 illustrations) free to stu- 
dents. Send for 3t. page book de- 
scribing course in full. 

Home 

Correspondence 
Schools, 

Spring fittd. Ma a j. 

Other Course: Hunt new. Shorthand, 
I '■ntM.n.hli.. Typewriting-. Normal 
"■nurse nt« fortAUhnr'amrtinoate. 






STEPHEN LANE FOLGEB, 

200 Broadway, New Yokk. 



Club and College Pins ami Rings. 
Gold and Silver Medals. 
Dlatnands, Watches, Jewelry. 



OKFICE or 



B. H. WILLIAMS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

HEAL K8TATE FOR SALK AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mm. 



The Franklin Typewriter, Price $75. 




A Visible Writer. Strong, Durable, Speedy. Widely used in Am //erst. 

We sell for cash and on Installments. We rent, nTBrWgl «■*! Uptlt writing machines. .Supplies of all kinds. 

Write for catalogue. 



CUTTER TOWER CO 



173 Devonshire St., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



i8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Mcgrath. Address, 15 Railroad St., Fitchburg.Mass. 

•0i._ Max Schaffrath, bookkeeper for Chas. P. 
Alden, wholesale and retail druggists. Address. 68 
Plainfleld St.. Springfield. Mass. 

'01.— J. H. Todd is with the Home Correspond- 
ence School of Springfield. 

Ex.— '01.— William B. Rogers, a member of Co. 
D.. 15th Infantry, is at the General Hospital. Pre- 
sidio, San Francisco. Cal. 



ltvt*rcolW£i&-te. 



Dartmouth has won the first of a series of athletic 
meets in their triangular league. The scores are as 
follows: Dartmouth. 64 1-2; Tech. 48; Brown. 22 1-2. 
Princeton defeated Wesleyan last Wednesday in a 
poorly played game. At the finish. Wesleyan had 
fourteen errors to her credit. 

In the tri-angular league tennis tournament, Amherst 
won first place in the singles and Williams is first in 
the doubles. 

Many students often wonder how the Sophs treat 
the Freshmen in the girls' colleges. Here is the 
drill they are put through at Wellesley. They are 
each met at the station by an upper-clar.s girl and 
helped through all their troubles during the first few 
days. Then come receptions, one after another in 
quick succession all through the fall and winter. 
Even the Sophomores give them a reception and the 
girls are actually sorry to enter the upper-classes. 
How can they live without having, at least, a little 
fun with the Freshmen. 



C. H. BOYDEN 




ICE CREAM, FKUIT, CONFEC- 
TIONERY. 



Write a Note 

to Johnson 



when you want a book, a picture, some stationery 
or anything else worth having. 




Henry R. Johnson, 

BOOKSELLER AND ART DEALER, 
313-315 Main St., - - Springfield, Mass. 




FOOT BALL OUTFITS. 




Fit you from head to foot while you 

wait. 

Special prices on team orders. 

HUNTING CLOTHING, 

Guns, Rifles, IMatola, and Ammunition. 

GYMNASIUM SUITS. 

Special designs ami all colors for Ladles, 
Gent* ami Boys. 



244 MAIN STRKET, 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



HOTEL. HENKING. 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 
First Class Lunch. Rooms fl.OO an.l upwards; with Bath, 
• 1.50to»2.00. Double, *2.M>; with Bath, *3.00. 

M. Oa HBNKINO *» OO. 

18 Lyman St., oppoHU Union Depot, Sprtngflstd, Man. 

Telephone, 4.W-3. 



177 MAIN ST„ NORTHAMPTON, 



TELEPHONE 33-?, 



_._ — IM— ■ Near Union Station, 

COOLEST S HOTBI*,si iunohklo. hu«. 

HKNKY K. MARSH, Proprietor. 

All the modern conveniences. First cUbb accom- 
modations for 300 guests. 

RESTAURANT ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN.