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Full text of "The College year-book and athletic record for the academic year 1896-197"

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''Amorita" 
Smoking Mixture 




MANUFACTURED FROM THE 
FINEST SELECTED 
SUN-CURED 

Virginia Leaf mixed with 
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Are You Aware 



that a series rif text-books has 
been; fre . . he special 
design of facilitating the work of teachers, tutors, and college profess- 
ors, whose duties imply the careful preparation of students to pass, 
not only entrance examinations for college, but also the final and all 
intermediate examinations for degrees ? 

This is the design of the University Tutorial Series, 
comprising over 200 books on the above lines, prepared 
by expert examiners, and covering text-books in Latin, 
Greek, French, the sciences, mathematics, ethics, 
etc., etc. Mackenzie's " Ethics," for example, 
is esteemed an epoch-maker in its field. 

By special arrangement with W. 
B. Clive, London, we have be- 
come sole agents and pub- 
lishers for America of 
the Tutorial Series. 
Catalogue free 



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Does 
It Pay to 

cumber your shelves 

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•^ rZ^. ^^^^ h^yg ysg f Qf p ^jjy not use these 

dead school-books to help pay for 
the live ones that you must keep buying 
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Before luying your fall supplies send for our complete catalogue, 
above described, of 5,200 school-books of all publishers — second-hand 
and new. We can always save money to close buyers. 

Hinds & Noble, 

Succeeding Artbor Hinds & Co. 

4 COOPER INSTITUTE. NEW YORK CITY. 



(/ 



THE 



College Year-Book 



AND 



ATHLETIC RECORD 



FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 



1896—97 



(,(!> 



3 



ff 



Compiled and Edited by 
EDWIN EMERSON, Jr, 




NEW YORK 
STONE & KIMBALL 



MDCCCXCVII 






COPYRIGHT, I 896, BY 
STONE AND KIMBALL 



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10 25 



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PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY 
PRESS AT CAMBRIDGE MASSACHU- 
SETTS FOR STONE AND KIMBALL 



PREFACE. 



IN the selection and rejection of material for this book, the 
Editor has been guided by the standards established by 
the Federal Bureau of Education at Washington. Thus many 
schools conferring degrees or bearing the name of college have 
been omitted because they are not recognized as such by the 
Commissioner of Education. Other institutions of higher learn- 
ing have suffered omission by reason of the limitations of 
their charters or the obvious restriction of their training. All 
theological seminaries, law schools, musical conservatories, 
academies of art, or colleges of medicine, pharmacy, and den- 
tistry ; all trade and business schools ; all normal and teachers' 
institutes ; schools of languages ; summer and night schools, as 
well as most women's colleges, unless forming an integral part 
of some recognized university or institute of general learning, 
have been excluded, notwithstanding their educational merit or 
reputation. By the same rule, all requests to be included in 
this issue of the book, that were made by Canadian and other 
foreign universities, or by colleges conducted under American 
charters abroad, have reluctantly been denied by the Editor. 
The reason for this will be readily understood when it is 
recalled that the schools coming under the above classifica- 
tions number thousands. 

In all other cases strenuous efforts have been made to do 
justice to every school, college, institute, or university author- 
ized to confer collegiate degrees. In pursuance of this aim, the 



VI PREFACE. 

Editor endeavored to enter into correspondence with the presi- 
dents, secretaries, or other responsible ofificers of all American 
schools of higher learning enumerated in the official reports 
of the Bureau of Education, or in the lists of colleges printed in 
the annual summaries of metropolitan journals. Where such 
efforts failed, recourse was had to the various existing State 
Reports of Education, to cyclopedias and other available 
publications. 

It is to be hoped that future issues of the book will afford an 
opportunity to atone for all insufficiencies and for any errors of 
fact or conception. 

The Editor takes pleasure in returning thanks for the cour- 
teous aid rendered him by many college officers and graduates, 
and in acknowledging his indebtedness to the editors and pub- 
lishers of the German year-book " Minerva," — to those of the 
almanacs issued by the New York World and Tribune, — of 
the " Spirit of the Times " ; to the author of " American Col- 
lege Fraternities," and to George H. Emerson, his invaluable 
helpmate. 

EDWIN EMERSON, Jr., 

Livingston, Staten Island. 
Stone House, October, 1896. 



^ 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

An Alphabetical Catalogue and Description of all 
American Universities, Colleges, and Schools of 
Learning Qualified to Confer Collegiate Degrees 3 

Miscellany 443 

Degrees, 443; College Fraternities, 448 ; College Colors, 451 ; Col- 
lege Cheers and Yells, 453 ; College Publications, 458 ; Old Univer- 
sities, 462 ; College Politics, 463 ; University Extension, 464 ; 
Statistics of Education, 466; Statistics of Illiteracy, 471. 

Athletic Record 472 

Track and Field, 472 ; General Records, 476 \ Games between Col- 
leges, 482 ; Intercollegiate Relay Races, 486 ; Open Intercollegiate 
Games, 487; Fall Games, 489 ; International Athletic Contests, 496; 
Rowing, 497 ; Lacrosse, 508 ; Fencing, 508 ; Intercollegiate Chess, 
509 ; Wheeling, 510 ; Cricket, 513, Lawn Tennis, 516 ; Golf, 518 ; 
Baseball, 519: Football, 523. 

Index of all Professors, Instructors, and College Officers 533 

Advertisements 593 



I 



THE 



COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ADD-RAN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY. 

Waco, Tex. Co-Educational. Disciples. 



Income, 
$10,667 



Students, 
2S6 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,044 



The school was founded in 1873, ^"^ was converted into a college 
and assumed its present name in 1890. It has been moved very re- 
cently from Thorp Spring to Waco, on the donation of fifteen acres 
and a building. It is governed by a board of fifteen trustees. The 
degree of B.A. is granted after a four years' course. The year is 
from September 2 to June i. There are three literary societies: the 
Walton, Add-Ran, and Nolls, and there is an oratorical association. 
No secret societies are allowed. The students publish " The Colle- 
gian." In all 153 alumni have been graduated, the oldest of whom 
is E. Milwell, 1876, of Okla, Texas. 



Faculty. 



James W. Lowber, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Chancellor, Philosophy. 
A. Clark, LL.D., President, Mental 

and Moral Philosophy. 
W. B. Parks, A.M., Natural Science. 
T. Louis Comparette, A.B., Ancient 

Languages. 
R. Clark, A.M., History and English. 
J. W. Froley, M.S., Mathematics. 
W. B. Parks, A.M., Modern Lang's. 



J. B. Sweeney, A.M., Sacred History. 
A. C. Easley, A.M., Commercial 

School. 
A. Taylor, A.M., Preparatory School. 
Theodora Cayce, L.B., Assistant. 
A. M. Chinn, Music School. 
Sallie Cayce, Art School. 
Theodora Cayce, L.B., Elocution. 
Ida V. Jarvis, Sup't. Girls' Home. 



ADRIAN COLLEGE. 



Adrian, Mich. Co-Educational. 


Methodist. 


Income, 
$12,200 


Students, 
250 


Instructors, 
15 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
6,000 



Adrian College was organized in 1859. It consists of four schools : 
the college, the theological seminary, the musical conservatory, and 
the preparatory school. It is governed by thirty trustees, six of 



4 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



whom are elected by the alumni, and there is a ladies' committee of 
six Admission is by examination and upon certificates. Degrees 
of B A , B.S., B.L., B.Ph., and in Music are conferred. The expenses 
for the 'year, lasting from September 30 to June 24, are from $170 
to I200. Prizes are given in English literature, oratory, and for the 

best essay. , , , j. . 

The college grounds cover twenty acres, and the value ot the 
property is estimated at $225,000. The literary societies are the 
Star Lambda-Phi, and the Theological. Chapters of the followmg 
fraternities have been established : A T A, 1878 ; A T n, 18S1 ; K K T, 
1882 ; 2 A E, and AAA, 1890. 

Faculty. 



Denison C. Thomas, A.M., Ph.D 

President, Mental Science. 
George B. McElroy, Pli.D. 

Mathematics and Theology. 
Martin L. Jennings, A.M., 

Greek and Hebrew. 
James D. H. Cornelius, A.M 
Walter H. Howard, M.S., 

and Chemistry. 
Amsbury L. Reynolds, A.M., History 

and English Literature. 
OrrenL. Palmer, A. B., Academic Dept. 



, D.D., 

D.D., 

., Latin. 
Physics 



Thomas F. Rinehart, A.M., B.Mus., 
Piano. 

Wise, B.Mus., History of 



Hamilton, Preceptress. 

L. Stearns, B.S., Natural 



Octa E. 

Music 
Belle M. 
Frances 

History. 
Libbie Gibbs, A.M., German and 

Greek. 
Carrie B. Phelps, O.M., Elocution. 
Libbie Gibbs, Registrar. 
Mary J. True, Librarian. 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 

Auburn, Ala. Co-Educationnl. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$70,000 



Students, 
297 



Instructors, 
26 



Buildings, 
12 



Books, 
9,000 



The college was established in 1872 as a school of industnal 
science. At that time Congress gave to the State a tract of 240,000 
acres of land. Owing to a gift of a building from the Methodist 
Church at Auburn the college was located there. In 1883 the State 
appropriated §30,000 to construct an additional building, and to . 
encourage technical education. In June, 1887, the main college |i 
building with all its equipments was burned to the ground, but was 
restored with the help of $30,000 insurance. In the following year 
Congress estabUshed an agricultural experiment station at the col- 
lege, and appropriated $15,000 annually for its support. Further 
appropriations by the general and State legislatures brought the 
general income up to $70,000 a vear. 

The presidents have been the Rev. I. T. Ticknor, 1872-1882; 
William L. Broun, 1882-1883; David F. Boyd, 1883-1884, and 
Wilham L. Broun, the present incumbent. 

There are ten trustees, with two ex-officio members of the board. 
Admission is by examination, and upon certificate. Attendance at 
chapel and mihtary drill are compulsory. There is no tuition fee, 
but an incidental fee of $12 a year is charged. The expenses for 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



5 



the year, lasting from the first week in September to the first week 
in June, are from $140 upwards. 

The literary societies are the Wirt and Websterian, holding con- 
tests on Thanksgiving Day and Washington's birthday. Besides 
two Christian Associations, and an athletic association including 
football and baseball teams, a glee club and chapters of the follow- 
ing fraternities have been organized among the students : 2 A E, 
187S ; * A e, 1S79 ; A T n, 1S79 ; K A, 1SS3 ; 2 N and n K A. 

The college publications are an annual report and the periodical 
bulletins of the agricultural station, a biennial report, a Y. M. C. A. 
handbook, and a fortnightly called the " Orange and Blue." The 
alumni of the college now number 400. 



Faculty. 



William LeRoy Broun, M.A., LL.D., 

President, Physics. 
Otis D. Smith, A.M.. Mathematics. 
P. H. Mali, M.E., Ph.D., Botany and 

Geology. 
James H. Lane, C.E., LL.D., Civil 

Engineering. 
Charles C. Thach, A.M., English. 
George Petrie, M.A., Ph.D., History 

and Latin. 

A. F. McKissick, A.M., M.M.E., 
Electrical Engineering. 

B. B. Ross, M.Sc, Chemistry. 
Charles H. Ross, C.E., Ph.D., Mod- 
ern Languages. 

J. T- Wilmore, M.E., Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

C. A. Cary, B.Sc, D.V.M., Phy- 
siology. 

Magnus O. Mollis, U.S.A., Military 
Science. 



E. R. Miller, Phar.M., M.Sc, Phar- 
macy. 

Lucien M. Underwood, Ph.D., Bi- 
ology. 
J. F. Duggar, M.Sc, Agriculture. 

F. S. Earle, Horticulture. 

B. H. Crenshaw, M.E., Mechanic 
Arts. 

C. L. Hare, M.Sc, Chemical Labora- 
tory. 

R. J. Trammell, C.E., Engineering. 

L, S. Boyd, IM.Sc, Assist. Librarian. 

W. M. Riggs, E. and ^LE., Physical 
Laboratory. 

J. P. Slaton, I\LSc, English. 

H. H. Smith, B.Sc, English. 

J. C. Thomason, B.Sc, Mathematics. 

H. H. Kyser, B.Sc, Mechanic Arts. 

H. H. Peevey, B.Sc, Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

S. L. Coleman, B.Sc, Chemistry. 



ALBION COLLEGE. 

Albion, Michigan. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Total Income, 
$34,000 




Instructors, 
31 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
15,000 



History and Organization : Albion College was endowed as the 
Wesleyan Seminary in 1839, and opened in 1843. 1'"^ ^^49 the grant- 
ing of degrees to women was authorized. In 1861 the present name 
and system were adopted. In all, 796 students have been graduated, 
117 of whom are women. The general government of the institution 
is vested in a board of trustees, consisting of sixteen persons, six 
elected by the Detroit Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, six by the Michigan Conference, and three by the Society 
of Alumni. With the foregoing, the President of the college is asso- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



dated as a member ex-officio. The State appoints annually a Board 
of Visitors and Examiners to inspect the workings of the college, 
which Board makes a Report to the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion. Boards of visitors are also appointed by both the Detroit and 
Michigan Conferences, and also by the Society of Alumni. 

In the interim of meetings of the Board of Trustees a certain 
measure of power is vested in an Executive Committee. 

Ad77iission, Degrees, etc. : Candidates must be sixteen years old, 
but can be admitted without examination oa certificates from high 
schools. There is a department for preparatory study. The nature 
of the degrees is determined by the work of the first two years. The 
different degrees are B.A., B.S., B.Ph., B.L., with degrees for music 
and painting, as well as degrees of M.A., M.S., M.Ph., and LL.D. 
The college opens on September 24, and closes on June 27. 

Equipme7it : There are new buildings for a chemical laboratory 
and gymnasium, and a new library building is under construction. 



Faculty. 



Rev. L. R. Fiske, D.D., LL.D., 
President, Intellectual and Moral 
Philosophy. 

Delos Fall, M.S., Chemistry. 

Carl B. Scheffler, Piano, Harmony, 
and Counterpoint. 

Samuel D. Barr, A.M., Mathematics. 

Robert S. Avann, A.M., Ph.D., Latin. 

Frederick Lutz, A.M., Modern Lan- 
guages. 

E. Josephine Clark, A.M., Latin. 

Charles E. Barr, A.M., Astronomy 
and Biology. 

Dwight B. Waldo, A.M., History. 

Rev. Frederick S. Goodrich, A.M., 
Greek. 

William F. Oldliam, D.D., English 
Bible. 

Henrietta A. Bancroft, A.M., English. 

Jennie A. Worthington, Piano and 
Harmony. 



Franklin C. Courter, Drawing, Per- 
spective, and Painting. 

H. \V. Mosher, Decorative Painting. 

Jennie M. Whitcomb, Voice. 

Charles L. McClellan, Commercial 
Department. 

John ^L Pearson, Piano and Organ. 

Smith Burnham, Ph.B., History. 

Carrie M. Bolster, Piano. 

Wilber D. Engle, A.M., Chemistry. 

R. Clyde Ford, Ph.B., German. 

Kittie Eggleston, Violin. 

W. H. Skillman, Physical Culture. 

Mary Phelps, Art of Expression. 

Ethel J. Calkins, Piano. 

Lottie B. Kendrick, Shorthand and 
Typewriting. 

David R. Lee, Greek. 

Rev. B. S. Taylor, M.D., Librarian. 

Charles E. Barr, A.M., Registrar. 



ALFRED UNIVERSITY. 

Alfred, JV. Y. Co-Ediicatioiial. Non- Sectarian. 



Incomr, 
$29,029 



Students, 
123 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings. 

5 



Books, 
10,000 



From a select school of that name begun in 1836, Alfred Academy 
was incorporated in 1843. The charter of the University was granted 
in 1857. It comprises departments of liberal learning, mechanic, in- 
dustrial, and fine arts, music and theology, and a preparatory school. 
The board of trustees numbers twenty-eight members. It has $250,000 
of invested funds, and property worth $400,000. There are four lyce- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ums, two for men and two for women, a science club, Christian Asso- 
ciation, and athletic association. A very large proportion of the 724 
graduates of Alfred have worked their way through college. The 
college year extends from September 10 to June 25. The sixtieth 
anniversary was celebrated in 1896. 



Faculty. 



Boothe Colwell Davis, A.M., D.B., 
President, Doctrinal Theology and 
Philosophy. 

Edward M. Tomlison, A.M., Greek 
Language. 

Henry C. Coon, A.M., Ph.D., M.D., 
Physics and Chemistry. 

Alpheus B. Kenyon, S.M., Mathe- 
matics. 

Frederick S. Place, A.M., D.B., In- 
dustrial Mechanics and Astronomy. 

Charles M. Post, A.M., Ph.D., M.D., 
Natural History. 

Lester C. Rogers, A.M., D.B., His- 
tory and Political Science. 

Lewis A. Platts, A.M., D.D., Pas- 
toral Theology and Enghsh. 



Francis A. J. Waldron, A.M., Latin. 
Martha B. Saunders, A.M., Romance 

and Germanic Languages. 
William C. Whitford, A.RL, Biblical 

Languages and Literature. 
Earl P.Saunders, A.M., Preparatory 

School. 
Inez R. Maxson, A.M., Fed. B. Pre- 
paratory School. 
George \\^ Hill, Physical Culture and 

Elocution. 
Amelia E. Stillman, A.M., Painting 

and History of Art. 
Eleanor Ellsworth, A.M., Decorative 

Art. 
Mary E. Brynes Main, Music. 



ALLEGHENY COLLEGE. 

Meadville, Pa. Co-Ediicational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$22,000 



Students, 
761 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
14,000 



Allegheny College was founded by Timothy Alden and other citi- 
zens of Meadville, in 1815. A charter was obtained in 1817, and the 
foundations of the first building, Bentley Hull, were laid in 1820. In 
1833 the school passed into the control of the Methodists. Women 
were admitted as students in 1870. 

The presidents have been: the Revs. T. Alden, D.D., 1817-1833; 
Martin Ruter, D'.D., 1833-1837 ; Homer J. Clark, D.D., 1837-1847; 
John Barker, D.D., 1847-1860; George Loomis, D.D., 1860-1874; 
Lucius H. Bugbee. D.D., 187 5-1882; David H. Wheeler, D.D., LL.D., 
1883-1888; W. G.Williams, D.D., 1888-1889; D. H. Wheeler, D.D., 
LL.D., 1889-1S93 ; and Wm. H. Crawford, D.D., 1893. 

The government of the college is vested in forty-seven trustees. 
Admission is by examination and upon the certificates of high schools. 
Three courses of study lead to degrees of B.A., and a fourth to the 
degree of C.E. The master's degree is conferred after one year of 
post-graduate study. During the first three years military drill is 
compulsory for all male students. Attendance at chapel is compul- 
sory for all. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 19 
to June 29, are $160. 

The college grounds cover thirteen acres, and are situated two hun- 
dred feet above the river. The natural history museum contains good 



8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



collections of minerals, shells, and entomological specimens. The 
literary societies are : the Allegheny, the Philo-Franklin, and the 
Ossoli, the last of which is for women. Between them they own 
some 3,600 books. There are two Christian Associations and an ath- 
letic association, with foot-ball, base-ball, and basket-ball teams, and an 
alumni association. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized : * K ^, 1855 ; * r A, i860 ; A T A, 1863 ; * A 0, 1879 ; K A ©, 
1882; 2AE, 1887; KKr, 1888; and A. C. C. B. The students pub- 
lish " The Kaldron," an annual, and " The Campus," a weekly. 

The graduates number 1,044, of whom 844 are living. The most 
prominent among these are William McKinley, Governor Lowndes of 
Maryland, and Senator Allison of Iowa, while the oldest is William 
Reynolds, 1837, of Meadville, Pa. 



Faculty. 



William H. Crawford, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Social Science. 

Jonathan Hamnett, D.D., Librarian. 

James H. Montgomery, Ph.D., Phys- 
ics and Chemistry. 

John W. Thomas, A.M., French and 
German. 

William T. Dutton, C.E., Civil Engi- 
neering and Mathematics. 

William A. Elliott, A.M., Greek and 
Latin. 



Mili- 



Lieut. John K. Cree, U. S. A. 

tary Tactics. 
Calvin L. Walton, A.M., Chemistry. 
Clarence F. Ross, A.B., Greek and 

Latin. 
Charles S. Jewell, A.B., Latin and 

Mathematics. 
Ellen W. Laffer, A.M., Principal. 
M. Blanch Best, Phj-sical Training. 
W. J. Merchant, A.B., Tutor. 
Laura Temple, A.B., Tutor. 



ALLEN UNIVERSITY. 

Columbia, S. C. Co-Ediicaiional. 



Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 
253 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,500 



The university was incorporated in 1881 for colored students. 
Its presidents have been Dr. J. C. Waters, 1881-1885; J. W. Morris, 
A.M., LL.B., 1885-1894; John Q. Johnson, A.B., B.D., 1894-1895. 
Since 1884, when the first class was graduated, 220 students have 
taken degrees in the collegiate and normal departments. The college 
is governed by a board of twenty-one trustees. Degrees of B.A., 
E.S., B.L., and LL.D. are conferred. 



Faculty. 



Joseph W. Morris, M.A., LL.B., 

President, Greek, Philosophy, Latin, 

English. 
Joseph C. Williams, B.S., Rhetoric 

and Pedaco::jy. 
James L. Bumgardner, B.S., LL.B., 

Mathematics and Latin. 



H. Josie Prioleau, Intermediate De- 
partment. 

F. H. Thomas, Musical Department. 

Emma E. Felder, Primary Depart- 
ment. 

Emilia M. Carr, Primary Depart- 
ment. 

Chinca D. Wall, Industrial. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Alma, Mich. 



Pil^^Ps. COLLEGE. 

Co-Educatioiial. 



Presbyterian. 



Total Income, 
$12,000 



Students, 
268 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 



Books, 
14,000 



History and Organization: The Presbyterians of Michigan in 1886 
established this college with $120,000 received from three churches. 
Since that time it has received annual gifts from all the churches 
in the State. Its first president vv^as George F. Hunting, D.D., 
M'ho had charge of the college from 1S87 to 1891. Since then the 
present incumbent of the president's chair has had charge. The 
college is governed by twenty trustees. Classical, philosophical, 
scientific, and literary courses are offered, leading to appropriate 
degrees. There is a library with 14,000 books, a gymnasium, and a 
laboratory building. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The 
college grounds cover twenty-nine acres. There are five literary 
societies. Students for the ministry may receive $80 per year. 
Three prize scholarships are offered. The academic year extends 
from September 11 to June 19. 



Faculty. 



August F. Bruske, D.D., President, 
Biblical Literature and Theism. 

Kendall Brooks, D.D., Mathematics. 

Joseph W. Ewing, A.M., Physics and 
Preparatory. 

Mary C. Gelston, A.M., Lady Prin- 
cipal, Latin. 

Charles A. Davis, A.M., Natural Sci- 
ences. 

John T. Ewing, A.M., Ancient Lan- 
guages. 

Helen Church, Modern Languages. 



Anna B. Gelston, Ph.B., Latin and 
English. 

Rev. W. F. Jones, B.D., English 
Bible. 

Eleanora Bushnell, Music. 

Kate L. Booth, Art. 

Mary D. Plum, Kindergarten Training. 

Amos W. Beckner, Commercial De- 
partment. 

Lizabeth B. Case, Librarian. 

Charles A. Davis, Secretary. 

John T. Ewing, Registrar. 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY. 



Washington, D. C. 



Men. 



Methodist Episcopal. 



This university, which has not as yet been organized, was chartered 
by Congress in 1893. At that time fifty trustees were appointed, and 
funds and real estate aggregating $1,040,000 subscribed. With a part 
of these funds a site of ninety acres, on both sides of Massachusetts 
Avenue, in the northwestern part of Washington, has been purchased, 
and the construction of one building, the History College, has been 
begun. Other buildings, for colleges of literature, philosophy, tech- 
nology, law, art, and the sciences are to follow. In the meanwhile 
the " University Quarterly " is published by the university. 

Officers. 
John F. Hurst, LL.D., Chancellor. 
Samuel L. Beiler, Vice-Chancellor. 
Albert Osborne, Registrar. 



lO THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

AMHERST COLLEGE. 



Amherst, Mass. 


Men. 


N'on-Sectarian. 


Income, 
^108,000 


Students, 
460 


Instructors, 
33 


Buildings. 
15 


Books, 
65,000 



History: Amherst College was opened on Sept. 19, 1821, as a 
result of a private endowment. By its charter of 1825 it was given 
the privilege of electing its own trustees, not to exceed seventeen, 
ten of whom were to be laymen. After the expiration of their terms, 
all vacancies in the board of trustees were to be filled by the legis- 
lature of the State. By an act of the legislature in 1874 the election 
of trustees was transferred to the alumni of the college. The presi- 
dents have been the Rev. Drs. : Zephaniah Swift Moore, 1821-1823; 
Heman Humphrey, 1823-1845 ; Edward Hitchcock, LL.D., 1845-1854 ; 
William Augustus Stearns, LL.D, 1854-1876; Julius Hawley Seelye, 
LL.D., 1876-1890; Edwards Gates, LL.D., L.H.D., since 1890. 

In all, 3,650 students have been graduated, of whom 2,500 are liv- 
ing. The oldest living graduate is Prof. E. Sayre, of Monticello, 
Mo., who took his degree in 1828. 

Organization: The college is governed by a board of seventeen 
trustees, seven of whom are clergymen. The Faculty, consisting of 
the entire force of instructors, has charge of all matters of discipline 
and study. The undergraduates are represented in the Faculty by 
a committee of students, to whom is accorded the privilege of attend- 
ing Faculty conferences. 

The College Course: Candidates for admission must be fifteen 
years old. In the classical course the studies of the first year are 
prescribed; in the sophomore year four out of twelve courses are 
elective ; in the junior and senior years the choice of studies is unre- 
stricted. In the scientific course, tw^o languages besides English are 
required; two courses in natural science are continued throughout; 
all the rest are elective. Examinations for admission are in writing, 
but certificates of fitness from certain preparatory schools are ac- 
cepted in lieu of examination. In addition to the degrees of B.A. 
and B.S., that of M.A. may be acquired after residence and study 
of one year, and that of Ph.D. after two years' study. Attendance 
at gymnastic exercises is compulsory. Negroes are admitted. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: The general term-bill is $110 a 
year ; rent in dormitories is from $35 to $36. The following fellow- 
ships are established : Two for $250, and one on the income from 
$30,000, to an alumnus spending three years at a German University 
or four years of lectures at the college. There are senior prizes, $80 
and $40, for scientific evidences of religion ; $60 for Greek ; thirteen 
of from $10 to $40 for Latin; two of $50 and $30 for biblical litera- 
ture ; ten of from $40 to $100 for English ; two of $40 and $20 for 
German ; two of $20 and $40 for mathematics and physics ; five of 
from $5 to $50 for science ; and four of from $50 to $100 for general 
culture. There are in all forty-four scholarships from the interest of 
$180,000. The entire proceeds of the college amount to $108,000, 
the interest of $1,320,000. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



II 



The academic year embraces thirty-seven weeks, beginning in the 
middle of September and closing on the last Wednesday in June. 
Vacations are at Christmas and Easter. 

College Adjjincts : There is a gymnasium under the care of two 
physicians, two new dormitories, a chapel, attendance at which is com- 
pulsory, a library and art collections with a fund of $3,000, and an 
observatory. The campus covers fifteen acres, while " Pratt Field," 
the athletic ground, covers thirteen acres. 

The students publish the "Amherst Student," the "Amherst 
Literary Monthly," and the "Olivet." Besides a Christian associa- 
tion and athletic association, with football, baseball, and other teams, 
and a glee and banjo club, chapters of the following fraternities have 
been organized : * B K, 1837 ; A A *, 1837 ; Y T, 1841 ; A K E, 1846; 
A T, 1847 ; Z ^, 1858-65 ; X ^, 1864 ; X 4», 1873 ; B n, 1883 ; A X, 
1885. * A 0, 1888, and " Sarcophagus," 1896. 



Facility. 



Merrill Edwards Gates, Ph.D., LL.D., 
L.H.D., President, Philosophy. 

Rev. William Seymour Tyler, D.D., 
LL.D., Greek. 

Edward Payson Crowell, D.D., Latin. 

Edward Hitchcock, M.A., M.D., Hy- 
giene and Physical Education. 

William Cole Esty, LL.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Elijah Paddock Harris, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Chemistry. 

Benjamin Kendall Emerson, Ph.D., 
Mineralogy and Geology. 

Rev. Heman Humphrey Neill, M.A., 
English Literature. 

Anson Daniel Morse, LL.D., History. 

Henry Bullard Richardson, M.A., Ger- 
man. 

John Mason Tyler, Ph.D., Biology. 

Charles Edward Garman, M.A., Men- 
tal and Moral Philosophy. 

David P. Todd, Ph.D., Astronomy, 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

Rev. John Franklin Genung, Ph.D., 
Rhetoric. 

Henry Allyn Frink, Ph.D., Logic, 
Rhetoric, and Public Speaking. 

William Lyman Cowles. M.A., Latin. 

Arthur Lalanne Kimball, Ph. D., 
Physics. 

George Daniel Olds, M.A., Mathe- 
matics. 



J. R. Sitlington Sterrett, Ph.D., Greek. 

Rev. Edwin Augustus Grosvenor, 
M.A., European History. 

Rev. John Ellery Tuttle, D.D., Bib- 
lical History and Interpretation. 

Levi Harry Elwell, M.A., Greek and 
Sanskrit. 

William Stuart Symington, Ph. D., 
Romance Languages. 

Ephraim Lincoln Wood, M.A., Latin, 

Joseph Osgood Thompson, Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Arthur John Hopkins, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry. 

James Walter Crook, B.A., Political 
Economy. 

Hiram Henry Seelye, M.A., M.D., 
Physical Education. 

Richard Francis Nelligan, Floor and 
Field Athletics. 

William Pingry Bigelow, B.A., Ger- 
man and Music. 

Thomas Gushing Esty, B.A., Mathe- 
matics. 

Willard James Fisher, B. A., Biolog- 
ical Laboratory. 

Edward L. Sumner, Vocal Music. 

Ephraim Lincoln Wood, M.A., Reg- 
istrar. 

William Isaac Fletcher, M.A., Libra- 
rian. 

Edward Dickinson, Assist. Librarian. 



12 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



AMITY COLLEGE. 

College Springs, loiva. Co-Educational. 



CJvisfian Church. 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 
246 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
2,500 



The College, founded by Silas Thomas in 1853, was incorporated 
in i8c;c;, and became a college in 1872. Its presidents have been : the 
Rev Marion Lxorrison, D.D., 1871-1872 ; the Rev. A. T. McDiU, A.M., 
1872-1877; the Rev. S. C. Marshall, D.D., 1877-1883; the Rev. T.J. 
Kennedy, D.D., 1883-1892, and W. W. Chandler, Ph.D., 1892-1894. 

It has eleven acres of land. The degrees are : B.A., B.S., B.L., 
M.A., and B.Ph. There are three literary societies : the Athenian, 
Aeolian, and Ionian; an athletic association, and two Christian 
associations. "The Amitonian " is the name of a monthly journal 
published by the college. Since the foundation of the school, 121 
students have been graduated, 117 of whom are living. Of these 
James Anderson, 1879, of Omaha, is the oldest. The academic year 
is from September ist to June 12th. Total expenses are $150 a 

year. 

Faculty. 



J. M. Littlejohn, A.M., LL.B., D.D., 
President, Mental, Moral, and Po- 
litical Science. 

Perry W. Jenkins, A.M., Mathemat- 
ics and Astronomy. 

Howard K. Holcomb, M.S., Natural 
Sciences. 

I. A. Blackwood, A.M., Greek and 
Elocution. 

Mattie E. McFarland, M.S., English. 



Clara B. Brown, A.B,, Latin and Ger- 
man. 

H. L. Sayler, M. Accts., Comm. Dep't. 

Geneva Fleming, Shorthand and Type- 
writing. 

Kate M. Leonard, B.M., Music. 

Damaris Wright, Orchestral and Vocal 
Music. 

Miss Hunter, Art. 

P. W. Jenkins, A.M., Librarian. 



ANTIOCH COLLEGE. 

Yellow Springs, O. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 
214 



Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 



Books, 
7,000 



The college was founded in 1852. It is governed by twenty trus- 
tees. Admission is upon certificates mainly. Three parallel courses 
lead to degrees of B.A., B.Ph., and B.S. The master's degree in art 
and science is conferred after one year of graduate study. A fee 
of $5.00 is charged for diplomas. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 16 to June 22, are $130 to $150. The literary 
societies are the Union and Star, the former of which owns a library 
of six hundred books. The graduates number 200, of whom 1 50 are 
living. The oldest of these is the Rev. J. B. Weston, D.D., '56, 
of Stamfordville, N. Y. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



13 



Faculty. 



Daniel A. Long, A.M., D.D., LL.D.; 

President, Philosopliy. 

Frank H. Tufts, A.M., Mathematics. 

George S. Brown, A.M., Latin and 
Greek. 

Eleanor C. Lewis, A.M., Modern Lan- 
guages and English. 

George A. Hubbell, A.M., Geology 
and English. 

William J. Hancock, M.S., Chemistry, 
Physics, and Biology. 

Frank L. Tufts, A.M., Physics and 
Astronomy. 

J. Peery Miller, History and English. 



J. M. Harris, A.M., M.D., Physiology. 
Stephen G. Palmer, Latin and Greek. 
Nelson H. Clark, Chem. and Physics. 
Jessie E. Brown, Instrumental Music. 
George S. Brown, A.M., Voice Culture. 
Glendora Jones, Art. 
Pearl A. Means, Elocution. 
C. L. Neibel, Commer. Department. 
Herbert B. Judy, Drawing. 
Eleanor C. Lewis, A.M., Librarian. 
Mrs. E. W. Humphreys, Matron. 
J. Peery Miller, Secretary of Faculty. 
George A. Hubbell, A.M., Manager of 
Boarding Hall. 



ARKANSAS COLLEGE. 

Batesville, Ark. Co-Ediicational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 



Studhnts, 
IIO 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 

2 



Books, 
3,600 



Arkansas College was founded by Isaac J. Long, its first presi- 
dent, in 1872. He was succeeded by his son E. R. Long, who was 
in turn succeeded by Mr. Cleland, the present incumbent, in 1895. 
The college is governed by nine trustees. Students are admitted on 
certificates from high-grade preparatory schools, or from the college 
preparatory department. The degrees are B.A. and B.S. At least 
fifteen recitations per week are required of all students, as is atten- 
dance at chapel and gymnastic drill. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September 16 to June 10, are $144, of which $55 is paid 
for tuition. The students publish the " College Magazine," and 
maintain three literary societies, of which the Philomathean and 
Erosophic are for men, and L'Etoile for women. The organization 
of a branch of the Y. M. C. A. has been undertaken by the college, 
and an athletic association is expected to follow the recent equip- 
ment of a gymnasium. There have been 106 graduates. 



Faculty. 



John I. Cleland, M. A., President, Phil- 
osophy and Greek. 

Charles F. Bizzell, M.A., EngUsh, 
History. 

D. Manton Frierson, M.A., Mathe- 
matics, etc. 



Eugene C. Blanford, B.Lit., Latin and 
Modern Languages. 

Rev. J. E. Latham, M.A., Bible Study. 

J. GarnettWood, Preparatory Depart- 
ment. 

Julia Shive, Primary Department. 



14 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ARKANSAS INDUSTRIAL UNIVERSITY. 

Fayetteville, Ark. Co-Educational. N'on-Sectarian. 



Income, 
|6o,ooo 



Students, 
964 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
7,000 



The university was founded in 187 1. It is situated in the heart 
of Ozark Mountains, sixteen hundred feet above the sea. The affili- 
ated Normal College, which was added in 1875, ^-^ ^^ Pine Bluffs. 
The medical school is at Little Rock, Ark. The school is governed 
by six trustees. Tuition in the university is free except in law, 
medicine, and music. Other expenses are estimated at $100. Eighty- 
one scholarships for residents of Arkansas have been established. 
The degrees are B.A., B.S., C.E., M.E., and E.E. The master's 
degree is given after one year of post-graduate study, and the 
doctor's degree after three years. The college year is from Sep- 
tember 16 to June 17. 

Besides a library with 3,000 volumes, there is a museum rich in 
Arkansas specimens. Six laboratories are used. 

The students publish the " Ozark." There are three literary socie- 
ties, an athletic association, and a Christian Association. A chapter 
of A T n was organized in 1882. In all 171 alumni have been grad- 
uated, 163 of whom are living. 

Faailty. 



John Lee Buchanan, M.A., LL.D., 
President, Psychology and Ethics. 

Albert Ernest Menke, D.Sc, F.C.S., 
Ph.D., Chemistry and Physics. 

Jerome Fee McNeill, B.S., M.A., 
Biology and Geology. 

Richard Henry Willis, M.A., Ph.D., 
English and Mod. Lang. 

Charles Volney Kerr, Ph.M., M.E., 
Engineering. 

Julius Franklin Howell, A.M., History 
and Pedagogics. 

Elias Chandler, U. S. A., Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

John Clinton Futrall, M.A., Ancient 
Languages. 

Harrison Randolph, M.A., Mathe- 
matics, etc. 

William Burdelle Bentley, A.M., Chem- 
istry and Physics. 

George Wesley Droke, A.M., Math. 

Seth Eugene Meek, M.S., Ph.D., 
Biology and Geology. 

Julius James Knoch, M.S., C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

William Nathan Gladson, B.M.E., 
Electrical Engineering. 

Ida Pace, A.B., Eng. and Mod. Lang. 



Edgar Finley Shannon, B.A., Ancient 

Languages. 

Boling James Dunn, A.M., Prepara- 
tory Department. 

William Ferdinand Bates, Agriculture. 

Jessie Lee Cravens, B.L., Elocution. 

Mack Martin, B.M.E., Mechanic Arts. 

George Albert Cole, A.M., Math. 

Mary Elizabeth W'ashington, M.E.L., 
Geography and English. 

Naomi Josephine Williams, A.M., 
Latin and History. 

Emma Wilmer Cole, M.L.L., History 
and Mathematics. 

Mary Anne Davis, English. 

Frank Pierce Nicholas, Woodworking. 

Anna H. Edmiston, Instru. Music. 

Anna Dinsmore Davis, Vocal Music. 

Amarinthia Leverett, Art. 

George Vaugn, Latin. 

AGRICULTURAL STATION. 

Robert Love Bennett, B.S., Director. 

Robert R. Dinwiddle, V.S., M.D., 
Pathologist, etc. 

George Lincoln Teller, M.S., Chemist. 

John Turner Stinson, B.S., Horti- 
culturist. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



15 



John Franklin Moore, B.S., Chemist 
George B. Irby, B.A., Agriculturist at 

Newport. 
C. L. Newman, B. S., Agriculturist 

at Camden. 
Charles John Eld, English. 
Julia Angelina Garside, Librarian. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

P. O. Hooper, M.D., Medicine. 

Edwin Bentley, M.D., Surgery. 

James A. Dibrell, Jr., M.D., Anatomy. 

A. L. Breysacher, M.D., Obstetrics. 

John J. McAImont, M.D., Therapeu- 
tics, Botany, etc. 

James H. Southall, M.D., Medicine. 

Roscoe G. Jennings, M.D., Surgery. 

Claibourne Watkins, M.D., Diagnosis 
and Clinics. 

James H. Lenow, M.D., Genito-Uri- 
nary Organs. 

L. P. Gibson, M.D., Anatomy. 

Louis R. Stark, M.D., Gynecology. 

E. R. Dibrell, M.D., Physiology. 

C. S. Gray, M.D., Opthalmology and 
Otology. 



S. H. Kempner, M.D., Histology, Pa- 
thology and Urinology. 

W. H. Miller, M.D., Anatomy and 
Adjunct Professor ot Obstetrics. 

Frank Vinsonhaler, M.D., Clinical 
Opthalmology and Otology. 

T. N. Robinson, Medical Chemistry 
and Toxicology. 

L. Augspath, D.D.S., Oral Surgery. 

E. E. Moss, A.M., LL.B., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

F. H. Clarke, U. S. Weather Bureau, 
Meteorology. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Frank M. Goar, LL.B., Dean. 

G. B. Rose, John Fletcher, J. C. 
Marshall, J. H. Carmichael, Lec- 
turers. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

J. C. Corbin, A.M., Principal. 
James C. Smith, A.B., Mathematics. 
Annie C. Patillo, Languages. 
Thomas S. Childress, L.L, Penman- 
ship. 



ARMOUR INSTITUTE. 



Chicago, III. 


Co-Eihicational. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
^94,000 


Students, 
1,000 


Instructors, 
40 


Buildings, 
8 


Books, 
1 5,COO 



Armour Institute was founded by Mr. Armour, of Chicacjo, in 1893. 
It is intended for those seeking a practical technical education, but 
is not a free school. There are departments of chemistry, engineer- 
ing, architecture, library work, domestic arts, and all forms of mechan- 
ical and domestic work, as well as commercial and musical courses. 
The junior and senior years embrace in sequence : kinematics, 
machine-drawing and design, study of materials, steam-engineering, 
thermo-dynamics, boilers, hydraulics, applied mechanics, statics, 
dynamics, and extensive practice in engineering laboratory, with 
extended inspection visits and reports, leading up to thesis work. 

There are some eight buildings in all, five of which are used for 
dormitories. Gymnasium drill is provided, but is not compulsory. 
No chapel service. The Armour Mission alone is endowed with a 
fund of $2,000,000, maintains a library of 16,000 volumes for 2,200 
pupils, and publishes " The Mission Visitor." The students main- 
tain a Christian Endeavor society, a Saturday Night Club, Young 
Women's club, Chord Club, Technical Association, Engineers' Club, 
Arena, Glee and Mandolin Club, and an Athletic Association, with 



i6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



base-ball and football teams, 
ber 20 to June 19. 



The college year lasts from Septem- 
Faciilty. 



Frank Wakely Gunsaulus, D.D., 
President. 

TECHNICAL COLLEGE. 

Thomas Conant Roney, A.M., Eng- 
lish Literature and Dean. 

Frank C. Hatch, Sc.D., Steam and 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Wibsr M. Stine, M.S., Ph.D., Elec- 
tricity and Electrical Engineering. 

James C. Foye, Ph.D., LL.D., Chem- 
istry and Chemical Engineering. 

Louis J. Millet, Architecture and De- 
sign. 

Katherine L. Sharp, Ph.M., B.L.S., 
Library Economy. 

Victor Clifton Alderson, M.A., Mathe- 
matics. 

Louis C. Monin, Ph.D., Modern Lan- 
guages and Logic. 

Albert B. Porter, B.S., Physics. 

Thomas Grant Allen, M.A., Chemistry. 

May L. Bennett, A.B., Library Econ- 
omy and Librarian. 

Walter F. Shattuck, B.S., Mathe- 
matics and Construction. 

Abram M. Feldman, B.S., M.E., 
Mechanism. 

Truman P. Gaylord, B.S., Electricity. 

Henry Barrett Learned, M.A., History 
and Civics. 

William K. Fellows, Ph.B,, Design- 
ing and Drawing. 

John D. Young, Assaying and Metal- 
lurgy. 

Peter S. Dingey, Wood Working. 

Edward D. Agle, Machine Tool Work. 

Jessie S. Van Vliet, Library Economy. 

Mary G. Hess, Decorative Designing. 

C. D. Wade, Water Color. 

Pauline A. Dohn, Freehand Drawing. 

David Gorrie, Forging. 

David Layton, B.S., Mathematics. 

William Craig, Gymnastics. 

Margaret Mann, Irene^Warren, Library 
Assistants. 

Samuel S. Posey, B.S. in C.E., Draft- 
ing. 

John C. Snow, Electrical Laboratory. 

Alfred Weller, Electrical Mechanician. 

SCIENTIFIC ACADEMV. 

Professor Roney, Director and In- 
structor in English. 



Professor Alderson, Mathematics. 
Professor Foye, Qualitative Analysis. 
Professor Monin, Modern Languages. 
Professor Allen, General Chemistry. 
William H. Runyon, A.M., Physics. 
Rosa C. Lang, German. 
Plenry Barrett Learned, A.M., History 

and Civil Government. 
Margaret VV. Morley, Biology. 
Carrie Wright, A.B., Latin. 
David Layton, B.S., Mathematics. 
William J. Bovven, A.B., Mathematics. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

Otto W. G. Pfefferkorn, Director, 
Pianoforte, Organ, and Composition. 

Nellie Bangs Skelton, Pianoforte. 

Herman Walker, Voice Culture and 
Choral Singing. 

Theodore Spiering, Violin. 

Herman Diestel, Violoncello. 

John Skelton, Cornet. 

Elias A. Rivkin, Flute. 

L Tomaso, Mandolin. 

DEPARTMENT OF KINDERGARTENS. 

Eva B. Whitmore, Director, and In- 
structor in Occupations. 

Anna E. Bryan, Principal Normal 
Class, Theory and Gifts. 

Margaret Morley, Natural Sciences and 
Physical Culture. 

Marie-Ruef Hofer, Music. 

LECTURERS. 
Technical College. 

F. W. Gunsaulus, History of Printing. 

William A. Otis, History of Archi- 
tecture. 

George L. Schreiber, History of Art. 

W. S. MacHarg, Sewerage and Venti- 
lation, 

Irving K. Pond, Theory of Design. 

W. L. B. Jenney, Construction, 

Edith E. Clarke, Dictionary Cata- 
loguing. 

George E. Wire, Binding and Library 
Economy. 

Lutie E. Stearns, Reading for the 
Young. 

Domestic Arts. 

Thomas Grant Allen, Chemistry of 
Foods. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



17 



Department of Kindergarten. 
F. W. Gunsaulus, Education and 

Christianity. 
Thomas C. Roney, English Literature. 
Katharine Sharp, Use of Books. 

DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC ARTS. 

Isabel D. Bullard, Cooking. 
Henrietta Connor, Dressmaking. 
Mrs. Dwight S. Dow, Bookkeeping. 



Florence E. Kennedy, Plain Sewing. 
Hazel Kirk, Technical Dressmaking. 
Emogene L. Kennedy, Millinery. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. 

Isaac S. Dement, Director. 
Belle F. Dement, Principal. 
Pitt SoRelle, Shorthand. 
Frances G. Porter, Typewriting. 
Julia Mexia, Spanish. 



ASHEVILLE FEMALE COLLEGE. 

Asheville, N. C. Women. Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 
160 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
I,OCO 



The college, which is situated amid the mountains of Western 
North Carolina, Avas founded in 1843. Admission is after examina- 
tion only. The college course, which is an exceedingly varied one, 
with a pronounced predominance of religious training, leads to the 
degree of B.A. Attendance at chapel, and at gymnasium is obliga- 
tory. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 10 to the 
third week of May, are $224. Special fees are charged for diplomas, 
and for such optional studies as modern languages, music, art, and 
the use of the library. Since 1S81, the number of graduates has 
been 106. 

Faculty. 



Rev. James Atkins, A.M., D.D., 
President, Psychology and Ethics. 

F. L. Bruce, Natural Sciences and 
English. 

Lula Lamar Strother, Latin and Mod- 
ern Languages. 

Mary Edwards, Physiology and Gym- 
nastics. 



Mary D. Willson, Mathematics. 

Eva Patterson, Preparatory Dep't. 

Alice Hepl'ne, Art. 

W. F. Grabau, Music. 

Mrs. I. Coolidge, Vocal Music. 

Pearl Ogburn, Piano. 

Celine C. Early, French and German. 

Lelia L. Wheeler, Vocal Music. 



ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. 

Atlanta, Georgia. Co-Educational. A^'on-Secfarian. 



Total Income, 
^36,714 



Students, 
227 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
8,200 



Atlanta University was incorporated and opened in 1869. I* is 
governed by a board of seventeen trustees. Since its organization 
the college has graduated 285 students, of whom 259 are now living. 
It stands on a tract of sixty-five acres, one mile from the city. 



L 



i8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Besides a full college course, there are normal, mechanical, and 
preparatory courses. The work is chiefly among negroes, and one 
of the main purposes is to furnish teachers for public schools. 
There is an income for scholarships from a fund of $24,000, and a 
permanent library fund of $5,000. The academic year lasts from 
October 2 to May 28. The university publishes a monthly bulletin, 
while the students publish the " Scroll/' a weekly, under the control 
of the Phi Kappa society. Besides this society, there is a Chris- 
tian Association, a Y. P. S. C. E., the Ware Lyceum, the Wheatley 
Society, the Owl and Bone, an athletic association with base-ball 
team, and a glee club. Since 1873, some 206 alumni have been 
graduated. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Horace Bumstead, D.D., Presi- 
dent, and Latin. 

Thomas N. Chase, A.M., Dean. 

Edgar H. Webster, Science and Nor- 
mal Department. 

Rev. Myron W. Adams, A.M., Greek. 

Winfrid A. Stearns, A.M., Instructor 
in Science. 

Walter D. Smith, Manager. 

Lucy E. Case, Matron. 

Hattie W. Chase, English Branches. 



Idella M. Swift, Mathematics. 

Julia A. Ellis, A.B., Latin and English. 

Emily J. Stenabaugh, Librarian. 

Anna J. Atkinson, Matron. 

Susan A. Hosmer, Matron. 

Anna H. Bumstead, Northern Secre- 
tary. 

Katharine M. Marvin, Local Secretary. 

Mary T. Chase, Reading and EngUsh 
Literature. 

Amanda E. Burdick. 



AUGSBURG SEMINARY. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Men. 



Lutheran. 



Total Income, 
$13,922 



Students, 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,000 



History: Augsburg Seminary was established in 1869, as the first 
Norwegian Divinity school. It consists of a preparatory school, a 
college, and a theological department. The total number of gradu- 
ates since 1870 has been 297. 

Faculty. 



Georg Sverdrup, President, Old Tes- 
tament and Dogmatics. 

Sven Oftedal, Newf Testament Exe- 
gesis and Church History. 

J. H. Blegen, Greek and German. 

A. M. Hove, English Literature. 



J. L. Nydahl, Greek and History. 

W. M. Pettersen, History and Mathe- 
matics. 

Theodore S. Reimestad, Latin and 
Norwegian Literature. 

Melius Christiansen, Music. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



19 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE. 

Rock Island, III. Co- Educational. 



Lutheran. 



Income, 
^49'939 



Students, 



Instructors, 
24 



Buildings, 



Books, 
15,000 



The Scandinavian Lutherans of the Northeast in i860 withdrew 
from their synod, and in 1863 established a separate seminary in 
Chicago, wliich in 1S75 "^^'^^ moved to Rock Island. The college is 
governed by sixteen directors. Students from other institutions are 
admitted without examination, but are held to be on probation for 
four months. The collegiate department has three courses : English 
and Swedish, classical, and scientific. There is also a business and 
normal department, and a conservatory of music. 

The college covers twenty-six acres of ground. There are two 
literary societies, a lyceum, and an alumni association. A students' 
" Journal " is published monthly. The graduates number 703, of 
whom 667 are living. The oldest of these is the Rev, Andrew Jack- 
son, 1S61, of Rush Point, Minn. 



Faculty. 



COLLEGIATE. 



Rev. C. O. Granere, Latin. 

A. O. Bersell, Ph.D., Greek. 

A. W. Williamson, A.M., Mathemat- 
ics and Astronomy. 

C. W. Foss, A.M., Vice-President, 
History and Political Science. 

C. L. E. Esbjorn, A.M., Mod. Lang's. 

Rev. E. F. Bartholomew, D.D., Eng- 
lish and Philosophy. 

J. A. Udden, A.M., Natural History 
and Geology. 

V. O. Peterson, A.M., Physics and 
Chemistry. 

Rev. P. M. Lindberg, A.M., Christi- 
anity. 



Rev. E. A. Zetterstrand, Swedish. 
C. A. Wendell, A.B., English. 
K. A. Linder, Ph. Lie, Swedish. 
Joshua Larson, A.B., Mathematics, 
English, and History. 

THEOLOGICAL. 

Rev. Olof Olsson, D.D., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Catechetics, Homiletics, and 
Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. Nils Forsander, D.D., Church 
History Symbolics, Isagogics. 

Rev. Conrad Emil Lindberg, D.D., 
Dogmatics, Liturgies, Church Polity. 

Rev. Carl Elofson, Ph.D., Hebrew, 
Greek, and Exegesis. 



AUSTIN COLLEGE. 



I 



Sherman, 


Texas. 


Men. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 
$9,000 


Students, 
147 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
5,000 



The college was chartered in 1849. ^^ '^'^^.s opened in 1S50 at 
Huntsville, Texas ; thence it was moved to Austin. In 1876 it 
was removed to Sherman. The college is governed by sixteen 
trustees. Degrees of B.A., B.S., and A.M. are given. Seven prizes 
are offered for excellence in undergraduate study. The academic 



I 



20 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



year is from September 3 to June 4, and the total cost per year for 
students is estimated at $160. 

There are two literary societies, an alumni association, a branch 
of the Y. M. C. A., and chapters of * A 0, 1852, and * K 2, 1865. 

Faculty. 



S. M, Liickett, D.D., President, Phi- 
losophy. 

Allison Thompson, A.M., Ph.D., Latin. 

D. F. Eagleton, A.M., English, Li- 
brarian. 

William S. Morrison, A.M., Physics 
and French. 



Rev. S. E. Chandler, A.M., B.D., 
Bible and History. 

L. J. Mitchell, A.M., C.E., Mathe- 
matics. 

J. L. Bell, A.B., Greek and German. 

Lt. Edwin Cole, U. S. A., Military 
Science. 



Trenton, Mo. 



AVALON COLLEGE. 

Co-Ediuational. Utiited Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$2,000 



Students, 
169 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
8,000 



The college was founded in 1869. Until 1881, the school was an 
academy. It was then made a college, and ten years afterward, in 
1891 was moved to Trenton, Mo. Among the presidents have been 
the Rev. C. J. Kephart, 1881-1885; Rev. G. P. Macklin, 1886-1887 ; 
F. A. Z. Kumler, 1888, and the present incumbent. The college is 
governed by a board of twenty trustees. Admission is upon certifi- 
cates and recommendations solely. The degrees are B.A., B.S., 
B.L., B.Ph., and M.A., the last after three years of post-graduate 
study. The expenses for the year, lasting from September ist to 
June 14th, are $100. The literary societies are the Cliomathean, and 
Philopheonian, and there is also a Christian Association. The 
graduates number 75, of whom 60 are living. 

Faculty. 



F. A. Z. Kumler, A.M., President, 

Philosophy. 
J. W. Crawford, A.M., Greek and 

Criticism. 
Juan R. Kumler, M.S., Latin. 
A. E. Conetet, A.B., Natural Science. 



Mattie B. Kumler, L.B., Instrumen- 
tal Music. 
J. H. Drake, M.Accts., Bus. Dep't. 
Horace G Murphy, M.L., Law School. 
H. E. Beals, Stringed Instruments. 
C. C. French, Art. 
Carrie I. Roberts, Librarian. 



BAKER UNIVERSITY. 

Baldwin, Kan. Co-Ediccational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$16,000 



Students, 
580 



Instructors, 
23 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
5,000 



The institution, founded in 1858, was named in honor of Bishop 
Baker, and is the oldest college of liberal arts in Kansas. Such men 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



21 



as Drs. Davis, Locke, Denison, Swet, Gobin, and Quale have been its 
presidents. The college is governed by thirty-two trustees. Degrees 
of B.A., B.S., and B.L., and certificates are given in special courses, 
and a course of post-graduate study leads to M.A. degree. The ex- 
penses are from $75 to $160 a year. There is a museum containing 
some 32,000 specimens. The college grounds cover sixteen acres. 
The academic year lasts from September 8 to June 4. 

The Biblical society was the first to be organized among the stu- 
dents. It was followed by three literary societies, — the Athenian 
and ^olian, and the Clionian for women. There is also an Epworth 
League and Christian Associations for both sexes. A chapter of 
^rA was organized in 1865, and lasted three years. 



Faculty. 



Lemuel Herbert Murlin, A.B., S.T.B., 

President, Philosophy and Biblical 
Literature. 

Charles Sylvester Parmenter, A.M., 
Ph.D., Biology. 

Emory Melville Wood, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mathematics. 

George William Martin, A.M., Greek. 

Osman Grant Markham, A.M., Latin, 
Academic Department. 

Samuel Alexander Lough, A.M., His- 
tory, English. 

First Lieut. E. V. Smith, U. S. A., 
Military Science, Physics. 

Ermina Fallas Murlin, Ph.D., Precep- 
tress, Modern Languages. 

Frank Nelson Hair, Music Depart- 
ment. 

Lilian Scott, B.S., Principal Normal 
Department. 



William Neely Simpson, Principal 

Commercial Department. 
Georgiana Reed, M.L., Principal Art 

Department. 
Alfred Leach, Elocution and Oratory. 
Mabel Cunningham, B.S., Vocal 

Culture. 
Francis Marion Powell, Penmanship 

and Bookkeeping. 
Louise Frederica Stoelzing, Modern 

Languages. 
Mary Myrtus Pendleton, Stenography 

and Typewriting. 
Paul C. Curnick, M.A., Lecturer in 

Sociology. 
Roberta Simpson, Academic Dep't, 
Francis W. Fenn, Physics. 
Dora C. Markham, Latin. 
Laura K. Myler, Normal Department. 
Harry A. Gordon, Mathematics. 



Berea, Ohio. 



BALDWIN UNIVERSITY. 

Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Total Income, 
|l 2,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
4,000 



Baldwin University celebrated its fiftieth anniversary this year. 
From its date of foundation, in 1846, men and women have been 
admitted. The school was founded by John Baldwin, who gave land 
and a building. Its presidents have been : John Wheeler, D.D., from 
1846-1870; W. D. Godman, 1871-1874; Aaron Schuyler, 1874-1884; 
Joseph E. Stubbs, 1886-1894; fifth and last president, Millard F. 
Warner, 1895 ^^ present time. The institution is governed by a 
board of twenty-one trustees, fifteen of whom represent the three 
Ohio conferences, while six are chosen by the alumni. There are 
six departments for liberal arts, preparation, business, music, art, 



22 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



and elocution, conferring the usual degrees. Of the five college 
buildings three are modern ; they are the recitation hall, library, and 
ladies' hall. Chapel attendance is compulsory, but military drill is 
not. Negroes are not excluded. The campus covers fifteen acres 
in the heart of the village of Berea. One paper, a monthly, called 
"The Bulletin," is issued by students. The Philozetian, Phrenocos- 
mian, Clionian, and Alethean, are the four literary societies ; there 
are also two religious organizations. Fraternities there are none. 
A base-ball and football team are maintained by the students. 

The total of graduates since 1846 is 413, of whom 381 are living. 
The oldest of these are Rosanna Baldwin, of Canton, N. Y., and 
Julia D. Sheldon, of Topeka, Kan., of the class of 1851- College 
opens September 2 and closes June 13. Associated with the univer- 
sity is Wallace College, a German school, and a summer school. 

Faculty. 



Millard F. Warner, A.M., B.D., M.D., 

President, English and Hebrew. 

William C. Peirce, S.T.D., Natural 
Sciences, Natural Theology and Evi- 
dences of Christianity. 

Carl Riemenschneider, Ph.D., Greek. 

Archie M. Mattison, A.M., Latin and 
Anglo-Saxon. 

Victor Wilker, A.M., German and 
French. 

Albert Hallen, A.B., S.T.B., Ph.D., 
Mathematics. 

George F. CoUier, A.B., B.S., English. 

Sarah Walker Eddy, A.B., History. 

James Hervey Smith, A.M., Natural 
Sciences. 

Anna E. Rhodes, A.B., Greek and 
Latin. 

Watson I. Taylor, Ph.B., Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Kate I. Brawn, B.L., History. 

Alfred Arthur, Music. 

W. C. Howell, Voice and Harmony. 

Alberta E. James, Drawing and Paint- 
ing. 

John G. Scorer, Elocution. 

Alfred Franklin Arthur, Harmony and 
Musical History. 



B. Floyd, Guitar. 
Frank L. Clark, A.B., Greek. 
Paul Shroup, Piano and Organ. 
F. B. Sott, Stenography. 

GERMAN WALLACE COLLEGE. 

Wilhelm Nast, D.D., Honorary Pres- 
ident. 

Karl Riemenschneider, Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Hebrew and Theology. 

Viktor Wilker, A.M., Latin and Mod- 
ern Languages. 

Julius O. Berr, German and Music. 

Wilhelm Volkner, A.M., Theology, 
Philosophy, and Greek. 

Johann Diekmann, A.B., Preparatory 
Studies. 

John C. Marting, Treasurer. 

Rev. H. Herzer, Sc.D., Curator of 
Museum. 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 

Frank L. Clark, A.B., Manager, An- 
cient and Modern Languages. 

George F. Collier, A.M., English and 
History. 

Ossian S. Myers, A.B., Mathematics 
and Pedagogy. 

Katie Ward, Ph.B., Normal Studies. 



BARNARD COLLEGE. 

Nezv York City. Wonien. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$50,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
27 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
203,000 



Barnard College, incorporated in 1889 by the regents of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York, is a college for women, in close 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 23 

affiliation with Columbia University. The founders were : Messrs. 
J. H. Schiff, J. Talcott, J. Pierpont Morgan, Mrs. J. J. Goodwin, 
Mrs. Seth Low, Mrs. E. Herrman, Mrs. F. P. Olcott, Miss Mabel 
Slade, with one gift made in the name of Josiah M. Fiske. It is an 
independent corporation, consisting of a dean, twenty-three trustees, 
forty-seven associates, and a registrar. At Barnard College the cur- 
riculum is the same as at Columbia College, and Columbia makes 
itself responsible for its standards by conducting all the examinations. 
These are identical with those of Columbia. The instruction at 
Barnard is given for the most part by Columbia instructors, and, 
when this is impossible, by persons appointed with the approval of 
the President of Columbia University. Degrees are given to the 
graduates of Barnard College by Columbia University. Through 
Barnard College, women properly qualified, can obtain the Columbia 
degrees of A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. In the three lower years of the 
course the instruction is separate. In the senior and graduate years 
certain courses at Columbia are open to the students of Barnard. 

Tuition is $150 for the year, lasting from the first week of October 
mitil the middle of June. In addition to this there is a matricula- 
tion fee of $5, a final fee of $15, and a fee of $50 for special 
students taking botany or chemistry. Diploma fees of $25 and $35 
are also charged. Twenty scholarships, equivalent to tuition, and 
one of $50 for special students are available. Prizes of $50 and $25 
are awarded to seniors and sophomores for excellence in mathe- 
matics and chemistry. 

Faculty. 

Emily James Smith, Dean. I Emily L. Gregory, Ph.D., Botany. 

Mrs. N. W. Liggett, Registrar. I Ernest R. Von Nardroff, M.E., Physics. 

For all other instructors see names marked thus * in the Faculty list of 
Columbia Collese. 



BATES COLLEGE. 



Lewiston, Me. Co-Educational. 


Free Baptist. 


Income, 
$27,000 


Students, 
218 


Instructors, 
15 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
12,000 



Bates College grew out of the Maine Seminary of 1855, and was 
chartered in 1S64. Mr. Bates, the founder, gave $25,000 in 1855, and 
$75,000 afterwards. There is a coi-porate board of fifteen and a 
board of overseers of twenty-five. The degrees are B.A. and M.A. 
There are two literary societies, two Christian Associations, and one 
college paper, the " College Student." 

There is a good gymnasium, and a herbarium containing one of 
the best collections of plants in New England. A divinity school 
is associated with tne college. 

The total number of graduates has been 729, of whom 689 are 
living. Of these the Rev. A. H. Heath, of St. Johnsbury, Vt., and 
Prof. J. H. Rand, of Lewiston, Me., of the class of 1837, are the 
oldest. 



24 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



George C. Chase, D.D., LL.D,, Presi- 
dent, Psychology and Logic. 

Jonathan Y. Stanton, A.M., Litt.D., 
Greek and Latin. 

Rev. Thomas L. Angell, A.M., Mod- 
ern Languages. 

John H. Rand, A.M., Mathematics. 

Lyman G. Jordan, A.M., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

William H. Hartshorn, A.M., Rheto- 
ric and English Literature. 

William C. Strong, A.M., Physics. 

Ernest E. Osgood, A.B., Elocution. 

Carohne A. Woodman, A.M., S.B., 
Librarian. 

Edward H. Hill, M.D., and Aurelia 
Springer, M.D., Medical Advisers, 
Gymnasium. 



W. W. Bolster, Jr., A.B., Director 

Gymnasium, 
Mary Buzzell, Assistant Gymnasium. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL. 

Rev. John Fullonton, D.D., Ecclesias- 
tical History and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. James Albert Howe, D.D., Dean, 
Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

Rev. Alfred Williams Anthony, A.M., 
Secretary, New Testament Exegesis 
and Criticism, 

Rev. Benjamin Francis Hayes, D.D., 
Apologetics and Pastoral Theology. 

Herbert Bonelle Purinton, A.M., He- 
brew and Ecclesiastical History. 

Ernest E. Osgood, A.B., Elocution. 



BATTLE CREEK COLLEGE. 

Battle Creek, Mich. Co- Educational. 



Adventists. 



Total Income, 



Students, 
670 



Instructors, 
24 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was founded in 1879 by the Seventh Day Adventists. 
It is supported in part by the church of that denomination in Battle 
Creek, by the proceeds of the sanitarium conducted under the 
auspices of the same place, and by the money received for tuition. 
Tuition and living expenses are $140 a year. One department of 
the college is devoted to instruction in the gospels and mission- 
ary work. There is besides this a classical literary course, confer- 
ring the usual degree. Since the foundation of the school 182 
students have been graduated, of whom 175 are living. The oldest 
of these is Eli B. Miller, of the entering class, of Walla Walla, 
Wash. The college year extends from September 11 to June 16. 



Faculty. 



George W. Caviness, A.M., President, 
Philosophy. 

Albert W. Kelly, Ph.D., Natural 
Sciences. 

Emmet J. Hibbard, English Bible. 

Emory D. Kirby, A.B., Greek and 
Latin. 

William E. A. Aul, Pe.B., Mathe- 
matics. 



Karl Graf, German. 
Edwin Barnes, A. CM., Music. 
Percy T. Magan, Ph.B., History. 
Walter E. Sanderson, A.B., Mathe- 

niatics. 
Fred A. Howe, LL.B., English. 
H. W. Miller, Preceptor Industrial 

Department. 
S. J. Olney, Preceptress. 
Jeanette Baldwin, Latin. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



25 



BELOIT COLLEGE 



Beloit, Wis. 




Men. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 


Students, 
489 


Instructors, 

25 


Buildings, 
9 


Books, 
20,000 





Beloit College was founded in 1843, ^-^^ was chartered in 1846. 
The first instruction was given in 1847. President Chapin took 
charge in 1S50, and resigned in 1884. In 1874 a philosophical course 
was added, and a course in science in 1892. Women were admitted 
in 1895. 

The college is governed by twenty-nine trustees. The students 
from other colleges are admitted on certificate. Degrees of B.A., 
B.S., and B.Ph., as well as M.A. are given. The expenses vary from 
$158 to {^300 per year. Twelve prizes and one scholarship are 
offered. 

There is a gymnasium, wdth an athletic field covering fifteen acres. 
The students maintain two literary societies, a Christian Association, 
a scientific society, an athletic association, with football and baseball 
teams, glee and banjo club, and the following fraternity chapters : 
Ben, 1861 ; * K% 1881 ; 2X, 1882. A magazine, "The Round Table," 
now in its forty-second year, is published. 

Since the foundation of the school 494 students have been gradu- 
ated, of whom 433 are living. The oldest of these is Rev. Joseph 
CoUis, of the class of 1851, of Delaware. 



D.D., 



Edward D. Eaton, 
President, History. 

Joseph Emerson, D.D., Greek, and 
Librarian. 

William Porter, D.D., Secretary and 
Dean, Latin. 

James J. Blaisdell, D.D., Philosophy, 
Hebrew. 

Rev. Henry M. Whitney, M.A., Eng- 
lish. 

Thomas A. Smith, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Erastus G. Smith, Ph.D., Chemistry 
and Mineralogy. 

Rev. Almon W. Burr, M.A., Academy, 
and Pedagogics. 

Charles A. Bacon, M.A., Director of 
Observatory, Astronomy. 

Calvin W. Pearson, Ph.D., Modern 
Languages. 



Faculty. 
LL.D., I Theodore 



L; Wright, M.A., Greek 

Literature and Art. 
Hiram D. Densmore, M.A., Botany. 
George E. Kale, B.S., Astronomical 

Physics. 
Rev. Louis E. Holden, M.A.. Oratory. 
Robert C. Chapin, M.A., B.D., Polit- 
ical Economy. 
George L. Collie, Ph.D., Geology, and 

Curator. 
Benjamin D. Allen, Music. 
Harry W. Methven, Art. 
Charles M. HoUister, B.A., M.D., 

Physical Culture. 
George P. Bacon, M.A., Mathematics 

and Physics. 
Elliot R. Downing, M.S., Science. 
William K. Hay, Commercial Branches. 
Allan P. Ball, B.A., Latin and History. 
Robert J. Eddy, B.A., German and 

English. 



26 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



BENZONIA COLLEGE. 

Benzonia, Mich. Co-Educational. Congregational. 



Income, 
$3,100 



Students, 
125 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
6,300 



Benzonia College is the successor of Grand Traverse College, a 
secondary school founded by a colony from Oberlin settling in 
Benzie County in 185S. The college grounds were dedicated in 
i860. Instruction began to be given in the Carrier building during 
the summer of 1863, with Dr. J. B. Walker as president. Sessions 
were next held in a log-house erected for the purpose. With the com- 
pletion of the new building in 1869, came more students, until the 
destruction of the college building by fire in 1874, when instruction 
was for a while suspended. A temporary structure was used until 
the building now known as East Hall was secured, in which recita- 
tions were held until the completion of Barber Hall in 1890. In 
1888 a new charter was obtained ; the property of the former institu- 
tion was turned over to the present trustees, coming under the con- 
trol of the Congregational churches of Northern Michigan. The 
first president of the new college was the Rev. M. A. Breed, who 
resigned in 1895. Rev. J. G. Rodger was elected president March 
30, 1896. Between these dates the acting president was Dr. E. L. 
Whitney. The trustees number twenty-one, with the president. 

The requirements for admission to the college are the same as 
to the University of Michigan. Students from the academy are 
admitted to the corresponding course in the college without exami- 
nation. Graduates of schools approved by the University of Mich- 
igan are also admitted to the college without examination. Students 
with certificates from other schools will be given credit for work 
performed. 

Graduates from the classical course receive the degree of A.B. ; 
from the philosophical course, Ph.B. ; from the scientific course, 
S.B. ; from the literary course, Litt.B., and from the normal course, 
Pd.B. The corresponding master's degrees are given for one year 
of resident graduate study. Instruction is also given in music and 
art. Attendance at chapel is obligatory. All college exercises are 
omitted on Mondays. The expenses for the year, lasting from Sep- 
tember 29 to June 26, are $150. 

The total endowment, including buildings, is valued at $50,000. 
Besides the two college buildings there is a college church. Near 
the college is Crystal Lake, nine miles in length. There is no saloon 
within nine miles of the campus. The societies are the K K A, the 
Crescent, and a choral society. 

Faculty. 



A.B. 



A.M. 



Rev. James George Rodger, 
Ph.D., President, Sociology. 

Stephen Benjamin Harvey, 
Latin and German. 

Susie Belle Manning, English and 
History. 



Edson Leone Whitney, Ph.D., LL.B., 
Librarian, Mathematics and Civics. 

Perry Greeley Holden, M.S., Pd.B., 
Sciences. 

Zelos F. McGee, Pedagogy. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



27 



Rev. Forrest Ellsworth Davy, Busi- 
ness Course. 

Lucy Martindale, Art. 

Thomas Bath Glasson, Music. 

Winifred Temperance Waters, Ph.B., 
Latin and English. 

Rev. Wiliiam Henry Hannaford, Bible. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Charles Elmer Case, Instrumental 

Music. 
John Albert Kropp, Bookkeeping. 



Vesta Elizabeth Pettitt, Grammar and 

History. 
Rose Etta Gilbert, Latin. 
Lizzie Tillie, Arithmetic. 
Herbert Alvord Coates, Music. 
Harriet Emma Van Deman, Singing. 
Marion Goodrich Phelps, Singing. 
Herbert Blowers Woodward, Physical 

Culture. 
Carrie Burnett Holden, Science. 
Flora E. Sprout, Matron. 



BEREA COLLEGE. 



Berea, Ky. 


Co- Educational. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Total Incoi^ie, 
^19,000 


Students, 
460 


Lmstructors, 
29 


Buildings, 
II 


Books, 
7,000 



Berea College was founded in 1855 by the anti-slavery men of 
Kentucky. The first preacher in the college was the Rev. John G. 
Feer, in 1853 ; the first teachers, in 1858, were Waters and Lincoln : 
the first principal, from 185S to 1869, was the Rev. J. A. R. Rogers; 
and the first president, from 1S69 to 18S9, was the Rev. E. H. Fair- 
child. Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago, recently gave $50,000, on 
condition that $150,000 more should be raised. . This is being done. 

The college is governed by a board of eighteen trustees. There 
are three courses, the classical, philosophical, and literary; and 
appropriate degrees are given. The library contains some eight 
thousand books and pamphlets. All tuition is free. The students 
last year numbered 460. 

Faculty. 



Rev. William Goodell Frost, Ph.D., 

President, Philosophy, Education. 
Rev. John G. Fee, A.M., Emeritus. 
L. V. Dodge, A.M., Greek and Civics. 
Rev. B. S. Hunting, A.M., Latin. 
A. E. Todd, A.M., Natural Sciences, 

Librarian. 
Rev. Henry M. Penniman, Christian 

Evidences. 
Mary W. Mills, A.M., English. 
Kate Gilbert, A.M., German, French. 
Ernest G. Dodge, A.^L, Greek. 
Clay Herrick, A.M., Hist , Mathemat. 
C. Rexford Raymond, A.B., Greek 

and English. 
Kate E. Putnam, Teaching. 



William P. Thurston, A.B., Music. 

Julia Hunting, Normal Department. 

Lillian M. Fairchild, Normal Dept., 
Penmanship. 

T. S. Correll, Phonography and Type- 
writing. 

Em.ily F. More, Grammar School. 

Alice K. Douglas, Intermediate School. 

Viola F. Badger, Model School. 

Rev. William H= Robe, Woodwork. 

T. J, Osborne, Farming. 

Adelia Fox, Domestic Industry. 

Will D. Candee, Printing. 

DaisyE. Pomeroy.Instrumental Music. 

Sarah G. Street, Painting. 

George A. Forbes, Gymnastics. 



28 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Bethany, W. 


Va. Co-Ediicatio7ial. 


Disciples. 


Income, 


Students, 


Instructors, 
10 


Buildings, 
3 


Books, 
3,000 





The college was founded in 1840, after Alexander Campbell's idea, 
to teach "literature, morality, and unsectarian Christianity." The 
charter was obtained in 1840, and the school was located on a site 
of great natural beauty in the Panhandle of West Virginia. The 
trustees number twenty-nine. Admission is upon certificate. Four 
regular courses of study are offered. The classical and ministerial 
course lead to degrees of B.A., while the literary and scientific 
courses lead to degrees of B.L.L., and B.S. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 21 to June 18, are $175, of which $50 is 
paid for tuition and matriculation. Diploma fees are also charged. 
Students for the ministry can have tuition reduced by one-half, but 
may be required to give instruction in the primary classes. A loan 
fund of $5,000 has also been established for the benefit of ministerial 
students. 

The students publish the " Monthly Collegian," and maintain four 
literary societies, of which the American and Neotrophian are for 
men, the Ossolian for women, and the Adelphian for ministerial stu- 
dents. In all, 318 students have been graduated. 



Faculty. 



A. C. McKeever, Chancellor. 
W. K. Pendleton, LL.D., President 
Emeritus. 

A. C. Pendleton, A.M., French and 
German. 

Oscar Schmiedel, A.M., Mathematics. 
J. N. Dodd, A.M., Mathematics. 

B. T. Blanpied, A.M., Nat. Science. 
R. H. Wynne, A.M., Hebrew and Hist. 



B. C. Hagerman, Biblical Literature. 
B. C. Bondurant, A.B., Latin. 
Eugene Feuchtinger, A.M., Music. 
Clara Shepard, Stringed Instruments. 
Bessie C. Trible, Drawing and Painting. 
Benjamin Brown, Jr., Elocution and 

Oratory. 
Henry S. Green, Greek, 
Carrie D. Anderson, English. 



BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Lindsborg, Kan. Co-Educational. Swedish Lutheran. 



Income, 
$25,000 



Students, 
444 



Instructors, 
24 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



The college was founded in 1881. It is governed by a board of 
nine directors. The degrees of B.A. and B.S. are given. The stu- 
dents maintain two literary societies, an oratorical and an alumni 
association, and publish the "Bethany Messenger." The college 
year is from September 10 to May 28. Since 1884 there have been 
195 graduates, of whom 190 are living. 
Eric Glod, 1891, of Stockholm, Kan. 



The oldest of these is Rev. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



29 



Rev. Carl A, Swensson, A.M., Ph.D., 
President, Christianity and Mental 
Science. 

N. A. Krantz, Music. 

C.F. Peterson, A.M., History. Polit- 
ical Science, and Greek. 

J. Westlund, B.S., Secretary, Mathe- 
matics, Physics, and Chemistry. 

A. A. Abercrombie, M.Accts,, Busi- 
ness Practice. 

Hannah C. Anderson, M.Accts., 
Shorthand and Typewriting. 

P. H. Pearson, A.M., German and 
English. 

J. E. Welin, A.B., Natural History 
and Curator of Museum. 

Frank Nelson, Ph.B., Pedagogics and 
Elocution. 

Franz Zedeler, Violin and Ensemble. 

C. A. Stone, A.B., English, History, 
and Civics. 

George Hapgood, Cornet and Band In- 
struments. 

G. E. Eberhardt, M.Accts., Commer- 
cial Law and Book-keeping. 

Charles D. Wagstaff, Pianoforte and 
Organ. 



Faculty. 



Lecturers. 
John D. Milliken, Law. 
W. B. Dewees, M.D., Hygiene. 

Other Officers. 

Marie Swensson, Principal. 

G. A. Svalander, B.A., Librarian. 

John S. Swensson, Manager and Treas- 
urer. 

Ida Sannquist, Matron. 

Rev. John Ekholm, Ph.Cand., Swed- 
ish and Greek. 

Olof Grafstrom, Drawing and Painting. 

Catherine Pearson, Model School. 

Sigfrid Laurin, Dir. Music, Piano. 

Birger Sandzen, German, French, and 
Swedish. 

Samuel Thorstenberg, Music. 

Rev. Ernst Pihlblad, A.M., Latin and 
Religion. 

Marie Malmberg, Model School. 

Oscar Sellberg, English and Mathe- 
matics. 

J. Emil Verner, English. 

Andrew Nelson, Sergeant, Gymnastics. 

N. P. Lindey, Gymnastics. 



BETHEL COLLEGE. 

McKenzie, Tenn. Co- Educational. 



Presbyterian, 



Income, 
$1,500 



Students, 
200 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,000 



The college was founded in 1847. It is governed by thirteen trus- 
tees. Admission is upon certificate. The departments are the pre- 
paratory, collegiate, professional, musical, and that of fine arts, and 
lead to bachelors' degrees in arts, philosophy, science, music, and 
English literature. The degree of Master of Accounts is conferred 
at the completion of the business course, while that of M.A., ML.L., 
and M.Ph. is given after one year of post-graduate study. Tuition 
for the term of five months is $25 in all departments. Students pre- 
parmg for the ministry are admitted free, but whenever they abandon 
such purpose tuition shall be due. Students are not allowed to pro- 
fane the Sabbath, and must not attend shows, horse-races, balls, 
hops, dances, or places of mere vaui amusement; also the reading of 
novels is forbidden. 

Four literary societies are maintained by the students. Of these 
the Burrow, Ewing, and Kallelogion are for men, and the Corrin- 
nian for women. Of the 150 graduates, 100 are living. The oldest 
of these is M. J. Hort, 1855, of Dyersburg, Tenn. 



30 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



Lillian Curtis, Music. 
Bernice Patton, Art. 
Mrs. J. L. Dickens, M.E.L., Wood- 
Carving. 

LECTURERS. 

Hon. S. J. Everett, B.S. LL.B., Ele- 
mentary Law. 

Rev. C. H. Bell, D.D., Missions. 

Rev.J.W.LaughIin,A.M.,Christian'y- 

Rev. W. J. Darby, D.D., Ministerial 
Education. 



Rev. D. M. Harris, D.D., History. 
J. L. Dickens, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 

President, English, Philosophy, and 

Biblical Study. 
Rev. G. W. Neal, A.M., Languages, 

Mathematics. 
J. B. Reed, B.Ph., Preparatory Depart. 
Janie Buchanan, A.M., Preparatory 

and Com. Depart,, Elocution, etc. 
Mrs. J. B. Reed, Primary Depart. 



Russellville, Ky. 



BETHEL COLLEGE. 

Men. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$14,000 



Students, 
213 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
5,000 



History and Orgatiization : Bethel High School was organized in 
1849, was opened in 1S54, and became a college in 1856. During the 
Civil War instruction was suspended. The presidents have been: 
B. T. Blewitt, 1854-1861 ; Rev. George Hunt, 1S61-1864; J. W. Rust, 
1864-1868; Noah K. Davis, LL.D., 1868-1873; Leslie Waggoner, 
1873-1883; James H. Fuqua, 1883-1887 ; W. S. Ryland, the present 
incumbent. The trustees number fifteen. Candidates for admission 
must be fourteen years old. Entrance examinations are not re- 
quired. The courses of study, divided into eight independent 
schools, are elective. To attain degrees of B.A. and B.S. it is neces- 
sary to have taken studies in seven and five schools, respectively. 
Attendance at chapel and gymnastic exercise are not required. The 
tuition is $55 for the year, lasting from September 2 until June 10. 
Other expenses aggregate $70. Free scholarships are given to Bap- 
tist licentiates, sons of clergymen, and to twenty pupils from the 
public schools of Logan County, and the State. Seven prizes are 
offered. 

Eqinp7ne7it: Of the four college buildings, one is a dormitory and 
boarding-hall. A new building has been given to the college for a 
library, and a new gymnasium, with an adjoining athletic field, has 
recently been equipped. The students publish the " Blue and Gold," 
and maintain the following societies : the Philomathean, and^ Neo- 
trophian, owning libraries ; the ministers club, Texas club, military 
company, and alumni association, with chapters of the following 
fraternities : * T A, 2 N, 2 A E, and K E. Of the 185 graduates, 158 
are living. The oldest of these is the Rev. C. P. Shields, 1857, of 
Russellville. ^^^^^^^_ 



Rev. W. S. Ryland, D.D., President. 

Aaron F. Williams, A.M. Vice-Pres. 

Henry Leland Trimble, A.M., Secre- 
tary and Librarian, History. 

James Henry Fuqua, A.M., Math. 

Charles Patrick Shields, A.M., Latin 
and Greek. 



John Henry Damm, ISIod. Lang, and 

Gymnastics. 
James Ludwell Lake, A.M., Natural 

Sciences. 
John Phelps Fruit, A.M., Ph.D., Eng. 
Rufus E. Holder and James T. Mc- 

Glothlin, Assistant Librarians. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



31 



BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 

Charlotte, N. C. Freedmeti. 



Presbyterian. 



Total Income, 
$6,490 



Students, 
260 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
9,000 



Biddle University was founded in 1867 for the purpose of educat- 
ing colored teachers and preachers. It is governed by fourteen 
trustees. Admission is by certificate mainly. Instruction is given in 
carpentry, printing, brick-laying, plastering, and stereotyping, as well 
as in the liberal arts and theology. The degrees are B.A. and B.S. 
No charge is made for tuition. There is a fund of ^6,000 to aid 
in preparing students for mission work in Africa. The literary soci- 
eties are : the Mattoon, Clarisophic, Johnson, and Douglass. The 
college year is from October 7 to June 9. The graduates number 
350. The oldest of these is Dr. D. W. Gulp, 1876, of Palatka, Fla. 



Faculty. 



Rev. D. J. Sanders, D.D., President, 
Theology. 

Rev. A. F. Bissell, D.D., Ph.D., He- 
brew, Exegesis, and German. 

Rev. Yorke Jones, D.D., Homiletics, 
History, and English, 

Rev. W. M. Hargiave, D.D., Mental 
and Moral Science. 

Rev. A. U. Frierson, D.D., Greek, 
Librarian. 



Geo.E. Davis, A.M., Science andLatin 
S. B. Pride, A.M., Mathematics. 
Rev. W. F. Brooks, D.D., Preparatory 

School . 
J. D. Martin, A.B., Assist. Professor. 
Rev. P,G. Drayton, A.B., Assist. Prof. 
Rev. H. L. McCrory, A.B., Tutor. 
H. A. Hunt, A.B., School of Industries. 
Rev. David Brown, A.M., Supt. of 

Home. 



BLACK HILL'S COLLEGE. 

Hot Springs, S. Dak. Co-Educatio^ial. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$4,000 



Students, 
162 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was opened in 1890. It is governed by twenty-one 
trustees and a board of councillors. Ten students in all have been 
graduated. The endowment is to be increased to $100,000. Ad- 
mission is upon certificate mainly. Degrees of B.A., B.S., B.Ph., BT^., 
and in music are conferred. The degree of M.A. is given after one 
year's resident study. The expenses for the year, lasting froin 
September 17 to June 4, are $135. Summer school courses are 
given. A literary society exists, and an alumni association has been 

organized. 

Faailty. 



Rev. John W. Hancher. A.M., S.T.D., 
President, Natural Sciences. 

Rev. Elmer E. Lymer, M.S., Vice- 
President, Latin and Mathematics. 

Rev. Nathan A. Swickard, A.M., Ph.D., 
Philosophy. 

Loren D. Corning, A.B., Greek. 



Lillian McDonald, Ph.B., Math. 
William A. Turner, A.B., Principal 

of Commercial Department, Latin. 
Edith L. Swift, Instrumental Music. 
Arthur L. Eaton, Stenography and 

Typewriting. 



32 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



BLACKBURN UNIVERSITY. 

Carlinville, III. Co-Educational. P?-esbyterian. 



Income, 
^6,500. 



Students, 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
3,000 



The university was founded in 1864. Since 1870 there have been 
250 graduates. The school is governed by sixteen trustees. Degrees 
of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. are granted. Examinations for admission 
are in prescribed studies, though a fair equivalent may be offered. 
There are nine scholarships, leading up to $60 a year; and up to 
^100 a year is given to students for the ministry. Senator Palmer, 
president of the board of trustees, gave $500, the interest of which 
is devoted to prizes for oratory. The average expense for the year 
is $150. The academic year is from September 10 to June 3. 

The college grounds cover ten acres. There is a gymnasium with 
athletic grounds. The students have organized three literary socie- 
ties, — the Orthopathetic, the Philomathian, and the Oroparthenian, 
the last of which is for both sexes. In addition to this, there is a 
science club and a Christian Association. Among the publications is 
the " Blackburnian," which succeeded the "Gazette" in 1887, and 
afterward the " Courier," and the " Centre Rush," a publication 
devoted to athletics. The alumni now living number 245, of whom 
Dr. D. J. MacMillan, 1870, of New York, is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



James E. Rogers, Ph.D., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Theology,* Greek. 

Walter H. Crowell, M.A., Latin. 

George Francis Weida, Ph.D., Nat. Sci. 

Walter Hensill Bradley, M. A., English 
and Political Science. 



Wesley A. Challacombe, B.S., Mathe- 
matics. 
Margaret Hubbard, Preparatory. 
Ruth Hubbard, Drawing and Painting. 
Mrs. Chiles-Hartley, Music. 







* Resigned. 


E. 

Catholic. 


Boston, Mass 


BOSTON COLLEG 

Men. 


Income, 


Students, 
404 


Instructors, 
21 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
40,000 





The college was incorporated in 1863, and was opened in 1864. It 
is governed by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, but according to 
its charter, students of other denominations must be admitted. Ad- 
mission is upon certificate from acknowledged preparatory schools. 
The degree of B.A. is given. The expense for tuition is $60 for ten 
months. There are forty-nine scholarships on the interest of from 
$1 ,000 to $2,000 each. The library contains 32,000 volumes, and some 
4,000 books besides are owned by the students' associations. The 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



33 



societies are: the Fulton and Junior debating society, the Agassiz 
Association for the Study of Natural History, St. Cecelia Society, 
College Orchestra, Athletic Association, Alumni Association, and 
three religious associations. The students publish the " College 
Stylus." 

Faadty. 



Rev. Timothy Brosnahan, S. J., Pres- 
ident, Christian Doctrine. 

Rev. Daniel A. Doherty, S.J., Schools 
and Discipline. 

Rev. Francis J. 0'Neill,S.J., Chaplain. 

Rev. Thomas A. Reid, S.J., Treasurer. 

Rev. James A. Doonan,S J., Logic, etc. 

John J. Cadigan, A.M., Latin, Alge- 
bra, and French. 

Joseph H. Willis, A.M., Rudiments. 

Peter F. Gartland, A.M., English, etc. 

James A. Dorsey, A.B., Arithmetic, 
etc. 

Samuel R. Kelley, A.M., Elocution. 

Charles E. McLaughlin, Director of 
Orchestra. 

Rev. George A. Fargis, S.J., Physics, 
Chemistry. 



Rev. Thomas I. Gasson, S.J., Rhet- 
oric, etc. 

Rev. Patrick J. Cormican, S.J., Hu- 
manities. 

William J. Duane, S.J., Grammar, 
Mathematics, and French. 

Augustus J. Duarte, S.J., Mathe- 
matics and French. 

John H. Doody, S.J., Grammar and 
Algebra. 

Daniel J. Quinn, S.J., Grammar and 
Mathematics. 

Francis J . Donnelly, S.J ., Algebra, etc. 

Rev. Henry J. ^firllfiiiMii1 T ^""" 
ments and 

George A. 
Disciplij 



Boston, Mass. 



BOSTON UNIVERSI 

Co-Ediicatiojial. 




Income, 
$208,843 



Students, 
1,252 



Instructors, 

"5 



Buildings, 

IS 



Books, 
35,000 



History: Boston University was founded by Isaac Rich, who 
gave $1,000,000, in 1869. In the same year it was chartered by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In 1883 an additional charter 
was obtained from New York. The Colleges of Liberal Arts and of 
Music were opened almost immediately after the university was char- 
tered; while the place of the College of Agriculture has been sup- 
phed smce 1875 by the Massachusetts Agricultural College at 
Amherst. ^ 

Organization: The corporation consists of the president and five 
classes of trustees, elected for terms of five years. The president 
and dean of the several departments constitute the university council. 
1 he members of the council, together with all the regular professors 
inaJlthe schools and colleges, constitute the university senate. In 
addition to these bodies, there is a university convocation, consist- 
ing of all the alumni and a board of visitors, who are annually 
appointed. •' 

■ ,. '^^^ university is divided into schools or colleges, which are thus 
I distnbuted : The College of Liberal Arts, 12 Somerset street, Boston; 



I 



34 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

the College of Music, Franklin Square, Boston; the College of Agri- 
culture, Amherst, Mass. ; the School of Theology, 72 Mt. Vernon 
street, Boston; the School of Law, 10 Ashburton Place, Boston; the 
School of Medicine, East Concord street, Boston; the School of All 
Sciences, 12 Somerset street, Boston. 

Admission, Courses of Study, and Degrees: Admission is by exami- 
nation, which can be undergone either at the end of September or 
in the middle of March. The courses of instruction presented in 
the college proper number more than 180. Bachelors' degrees are 
conferred in arts, letters, laws, medicine, music, philosophy, science, 
surgery, and theology ; masters' degrees, in arts and laws ; doctors' 
degrees, in civil law, medicine, music, philosophy, and theology. The 
doctor's diploma confers the privilege of attending courses at the 
schools of art in Athens and Rome free of charge. During the last 
year the attendance was thus divided among the six colleges : Liberal 
arts, 353; agriculture, 172; theology, 152; law, 339 ; medicine, 170; 
and graduate school 125, making a total of 1,252. In the College of 
Liberal Arts, tuition and incidental expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 17 to June 3, are $110. Students who are able to 
Jive -^""jioi^iej Tt is estimated, can secure the entire college course of 
^^,1^'' four years for $500. ' One hundred and eight free scholarships have 
been established. . There are two fellowships yielding an annual in- 
come of $500, and four other beneficiary funds, ranging from $5,000 
to $30,000, for scholarships, to be equally divided between men and 
women. 

Equipment: The assets of the university are as follows : Real 
estate above incumbrance, $1,283,279.71; stocks, bonds, notes re- 
ceivable, etc., $327,822.93; sundries, including cash, $55,462.38; 
total, $1,666,565.02. The liabilities at the same date were $85,637.25. 
" "EXte^S'of assets over liabilities, $1,580,927.77. 

During the year 1895-96, $35,000 was received in donations and be- 
quests. The bulk of this, $30,000, was a bequest from Miss L. B. 
Paddock, a former school teacher, to be applied in scholarships for 
both sexes. In answer to an appeal for gifts to establish a museum 
of all religions, Somdetch Phra Paramindr Maha Chulalonkorn Phra 
Chula Chom Klao, the King of Siam, gave an original edition of the 
" Tripitaka," or canonical sacred writings of the Southern Buddhists, 
comprised in thirty-nine volumes. 

New buildings costing $200,000, have been erected for the Law 
School, which moved into its new quarters at the beginning of the 
academic year, thus enlarging the quarters of the College of Liberal 
Arts. A new Museum of All Religions has been projected. 

Societies and Organizations: Literary and debating societies, lan- 
guage clubs, seminaries of philology, philosophy, history, etc., are 
maintained by professors and students alike. Some of these are : 
La Conference Fran9aise, the French Dramatic Club, the German 
Seminar, the Deutsche Gesellschaft, philosophical club, and athletic 
association, with football and base-ball teams. The " University Bea- 
con " is published monthly. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized : B n, A X, 1876 ; K K r, 1882 ; A *, 1883 ; 
* A *, 18S5 ; r * B, 1887 ; ATA, and AAA, 1 889. The graduates 
number 3,225. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



35 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Faculty. 

William F.Warren, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 
William E. Huntington, Ph.D., Dean, 

Ethics and History. 
Augustus H. Buck, A.M., Greek. 
Borden P. Bowne, LL.D., Philosophy, 

Dean of Sciences. 
William H. Niles, Ph.B., A.M., Ge- 
ology. 
Charles R. Cross. Sc.B., Physics. 
Alpheus Hyatt, Sc.B., Biology and 

Zoology. 
Thomas B. Lindsay, Ph.D., Latin 

and Sanskrit. 
Marshall Livingston Perrin, Ph.D., 

Germanic Languages. 
Frank R.Butler, A. B.,S.T.B., English 

Literature. 
Thomas E. Pope, A.M., Chemistry. 
Joseph R. Taylor, A.M., Greek and 

Latin. 
William Marshall Warren, Ph.D., 

Philosophy. 
Foy Spencer Baldwin, Ph.D., R.P.D., 

Political and Social Science. 
Balfour H. Van Vleck, Sc.B., Biology. 
George H. Barton, Sc.B., Geology. 
Louis Derr, A.M., Sc.B,, Physics. 
Helen L. Blackwell, Calisthenics. 
Ashley H. Thorndike, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and History. 
Lincoln R. Gibbs, A.M., English 

Literature. 
William T. Harris,LL.B., Pedagogics. 
MalvinaM. Bennett, Ph.B., Elocution. 
Judson B. Coit, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
James Geddes, Jr., Ph.D., Romance 

Languages. 
Charles H. L. N. Bernard, French. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Faculty. 

Henry H. Goodell, LL.D., President. 

Levi Stockbi"idge, Agriculture. 

Charles A. Goessmann, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry. 

Samuel T. Maynard, Sc.B., Botany 
and Horticulture. 

Charles Wellington, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Richard S. Lull, A.B., Zoology. 

Charles H. Fernald, Ph.D., Zoology, 
Veterinary Science. 

Ralph E. Smith, Sc.B., German and 
Botany. 



Faculty. 

Philip B. Hasbrouck, Sc.B., Mathe- 
matics. 

George E. Stone, Ph.D.. Botany. 

Charles S. Walker, Ph.D., Mental 
Science, Political Economy. 

James B. Paige, V.S., Vet. Science. 

Edward R. Flint, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Eugene B.Lehnert,V.S., Vet. Science. 

William P. Brooks, Sc.B., Agriculture. 

George F. Mills, A.M., English. 

Herman Babson, A.B., English. 

Robert \V. Lyman, LL.B.,Farm Law. 

Fred S. Cooley, Sc.B., Farm Supt. 

Walter M. Dickinson, First Lieut., 
Military Tactics. 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY. 

Faculty. 

MarcusD.Buell, A.M., S.T.D., Dean. 

John \V. Lindsay, S.T.D., Emeritus. 

Luther T. Townsend, S.T.D., Emer- 
itus. 

Henry C. Sheldon, A.M., S.T.D., 
Historical Theology. 

Hinckley G. Mitchell, Ph.D.,S.T.D., 
Semitic. 

James Mudge, S.T.D., Missions. 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 
Faculty. 

Edmund H. Bennett, LL.D., Dean. 

Samuel C. Bennett, A.B., LL.B., As- 
sistan Dean. 

Frank Goodwin, A.M., LL.B., Real 
Property. 

Arthur H. Wellman, LL.B., Equity 
Jurisprudence and Pleading. 

James Schouler, LL.D., Bailments, 
Domestic Relations. 

George R. Swasey, LL.B., Sales. 

Henry A. Wyman, LL.B., Criminal 
Law. 

Charles Almy, LL.B., Mortgages and 
Liens. 

Melville M. Bigelow, Ph.D., Bills and 
Notes, Torts. 

Irving Browne, Evidence. 

Josiah H. Benton, Jr., Railroads and 
Corporations. 

George H. Fall, Ph.D., LL.B., Ro- 
man Law. 

Homer Albers, LL.B.. Common Law 
Pleading, Trademarks. 

Ralph W. Bartlett, LL.B., Real Prop- 
erty. 

William B. French, A.M., Insolvency. 



36 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Henry C. Merwin, LL.B., Federal 
Jurisdiction. 

Frank Parsons, LL.B., Insurance. 

Charles S. Rackemann, LL.B., Con- 
veyancing. 

Charles H. Tyler, LL.B., Landlord 
and Tenant. 

Herbert M. Chase, LL.B., Contracts. 

J. Porter Crosby, LL.B., Bills and 
Notes. 

Charles F. Jenney, LL.B., Massachu- 
setts Practice. 

Conrad Reno, LL.B., Law Theses. 

Alonzo R. Weed, LL.B., Equity. 

G. Phillip Wardner, LL.B., Evidence. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 
Faculty. 

I. Tisdale Talbot, M.D., Dean. 

John Ordronaux, LL.D., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

Conrad Wesselhoeft, M.D., Pathology 
and Therapeutics. 

J. Heber Smith, M.D., Materia Medica. 

Henry C, Ahlborn, M.D., Pathology 
and Therapeutics. 

Walter Wesselhoeft, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Herbert C. Clapp, M.D., Diseases of 
Chest. 

Edwin E. Calder, A.B., Chemistry. 

John P. Sutherland, M.D., Anatomy. 

Edward P. Colby, M.D. Nervous Dis- 
eases. 

John L. Coffin, M.D., Dermatology. 

Horace Packard, M.D., Surgery. 

George R. Southwick, M.D., Obstet. 

Alonzo Boothby, M.D., Gynsecology. 

John H. Payne, M.D., Ophthalmology, 

Fred. B. Percy. M.D., Materia Medica. 

Joseph W. Hayward, M.D., Surgery. 

J. Wilkinson Clapp, M.D., Pharma- 
ceutics. 

John A. Rockwell, M.D., Physiology. 

Winfield S. Smith, M.D., Anatomy. 

Nathaniel W. Emerson, M.D., Minor 
Surgery. 

Winthrop T. Talbot, M.D. , Pathology. 

Frederick P. Batchelder, M.D., Phy- 
siology. 

A. Howard Powers, M.D., Medicine. 

George B. Rice, M.D., Diseases of 
Nose and Throat. 

J. Emmons Briggs, M.D., Surgery. 



Charles L. Nichols, M.D., History and 
Methodology. 

Frank C. Richardson, M.D., Nervous 
Diseases. 

Frederick W. Halsey, M.D., Medicine. 

Maurice W. Turner, M.D., Pathology. 

George H. Earl, I\LD., Obstetrics. 

Herbert D. Boyd, M.D., Anatomy. 

Frank E. AUard, M.D., Physiology. 

Everett W. Burdett, Medical Juris- 
prudence. 

Marion Coon, M.D., Comparative 
Anatomy. 

Howard P'. Bellows, M.D., Otology. 

George W. Tower, Jr., A.B., Physics. 

Nathaniel Emons Paine, M.D. , Men- 
tal Diseases. 

William L. Jackson, M.D., Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

F. L. Sargent, A.M., Botany. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

W. D. Lovell, Treasurer's Assistant. 
Susan C. Sparks, Sect'y and Clerk. 
Roscoe C. Learned, LL.B., Librarian 

and Secretary, School of Law. 
H. H. Benton, Librarian, Schoolof Law. 
George M. Churchill, Proctor. 
Marshall B. Evans, Proctor. 
Alma M. Whitman, Proctor. 
Sarah E. Reed, Proctor. 
Bliss P. Boultenhouse, Proctor. 
Ella L. Chase, Proctor. 
Charles B. Allen, A.B., Librarian, 

School of Theology. 
S.J. Barney, Librarian, School of Med- 
icine. 
W. M. Blatt, Librarian, School of Law, 
Mary E, Hanks, Librarian, School of 

Medicine, 
William Hoag, A.B., Librarian, School 

of Law. 
Edwin K. Smith, Librarian, School of 

Theology. 
George H. Smith, Librarian, School 

of Law. 
Frederick D. Stackpole, Librarian, 

School of Medicine. 
John R. Nichols, A.B., Librarian, 

School of Law. 
M. Elma Dame, A.B., Librarian, 

College. 
Lilla B. Smallidge, Librarian, College. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 37 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Brunswick^ Me. 


Men. 


Co7tg regational. 


Total Income, 
I47.153 


Students, 
364 


Instructors, 
30 


Buildings, 
9 


Books, 
55,000 



History : Bowdoin College, the oldest college of Maine, was incor- 
porated in 1794, six years after the first petition for a charter had 
been presented to the Massachusetts Legislature. It was named after 
James Bowdoin, Governor of Massachusetts, and was established 
on its present site with five townships as a foundation. Eight stu- 
dents were admitted in 1802. James Bowdoin, the son of the gov- 
ernor, gave one thousand acres of land and more than ^^ 1,100, and 
at his death, in 181 1, he bequeathed to the college more land, 
together with his entire library, his paintings, and more than one 
thousand specimens and models of crystallography. This collection 
has formed a nucleus for the present valuable museum. In 183 1 
President Allen was removed, but was reinstated by the courts. The 
presidents have been: Joseph McKeen, D.D., 1801-1807 ; Jesse 
Appleton, D.D., 1807-1819; Rev. William Allen, U.D., 1819-1839; 
Leonard Woods, D.D., 1839-1866; Rev. Samuel Harris, S.T.D., 1867- 
1871; Joshua L. Chamberlain, LL.D., 1871-1885, and William De 
Witt Hyde, the present incumbent. 

Orgaiiizatio)i : The government of the college is vested in a board 
of fourteen trustees and forty overseers. There is a visiting com- 
mittee, and an examining committee, each composed of two trustees 
and three overseers, and the finance committee of two trustees and 
two overseers. Connected with the college is the Medical School 
of Maine. 

Admission, Instrnction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination 
only. The regular course of study comprises four years, all studies 
being required, except that for the third term of the third year; 
Italian and Greek are optional, and for the second term of the last 
year Spanish is optional. Besides this regular course leading to 
B.A., there is a scientific course leading to B.S. After a post- 
graduate course of three years, degrees of A.M., Sc.D., and Ph.D. 
are conferred. Attendance at the chapel and military drill is 
compulsory. 

liiition. Scholarships, and Prizes : The expenses for the year, last- 
ing from September 17 to June 27, are $105 for each student, to 
which $40 for necessary expenses must be added. The income of 
$55,000 is devoted to scholarships, of which there are more than a 
score. In addition to this there are a dozen prizes ranging from 
$10 to $300 for excellence in English, oratory, the classics, French, 
and mathematics. 

Equipment: Among the nine college buildings, the most note- 
worthy are Massachusetts hall, the Searles science building with 
several laboratories, the Walker art building, and the astronomical 
observatory. The library in Banister hall contains 50,000 books, 
while the medical library in Adams hall contains 4,000 volumes. 
The college grounds are one mile from the Androscoggin River, 



38 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



where the university boathouse is, and four miles from the ocean. 
There is a gymnasium, but no athletic field. 

Societies: Besides several literary and religious societies, there is 
an athletic association with football and baseball teams and a crew. 
Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized: * B K, 
A A *, 1841 ; ^ T, 1843 ; X >F, 1844-1S69 ; A K E, 1844 ; A X, 1854 ; 
A T, 1857-18&2; Z Y, 1868. 

The graduates number 4,410, of whom 2,550 are living. Among 
them were Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry W. Longfellow. The 
oldest of these is Thomas P. Stone, D.D., 1820, of Bowdoin, Mass. 

Faculty. 



Rev. William DeWitt Hyde, D.D., 
President, Mental and Moral Phi- 
losophy. 

Israel Thorndike Dana, A.]\r., M.D., 
Pathology and Practice of Medicine. 

Alfred Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Obstet- 
rics and Diseases of Women and 
Children. 

Stephen Holmes Weeks, A.M., M.D., 
Surgery. 

Charles Oliver Hunt, A.M., M.D., 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Lucilius Alonzo Emery, A.M., Medi- 
cal Jurisprudence. 

Henry Leland Chapman, D.D., Rhet- 
oric, Oratory, and Enghsh Literature. 

F"redcric Henry Gerrish, A.M., M.D., 
Anatomy. 

Frank Nathaniel Whittier, A.M.,M.D., 
Director of Gymnasium, Hygiene. 

George Tavlor Files, Ph.D., German. 

William MacDonald, Ph.D., History 
and Political Science. 

Wilmot Brookings Mitchell, A.B., 
Rhetoric. 

Henry Crosby Emery, A.M., Political 
Economy and Sociology. 

Charles Selwyn Rich, A.B., Rhetoric. 

Addison Sanford Thayer, A.B., M.D., 
Pathology and Medicine. 



William Lawrence Dana, A.B., M.D., 
Anatomy and Histology. 

Bert Lewis Bryant, A.B., Chemistry. 

Walter Scott Abbott Kimball, A.B., 
Biology. 

Harlan Page Small, A.B., Physics. 

Leslie Alexander Lee, Ph.D., Geology 
and Biology. 

Franklin Clement Robinson, A.M., 
Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Natural 
Science. 

WilUam Addison Houghton, A.M., 
Latin. 

Henry Johnson, Ph.D., Modern Lan- 
guages and Curator Art Collections. 

Frank Edward Woodruff, A.M., Greek, 
and Revealed Religion. 

Albert Roscoe Moulton, M.D., Mental 
Diseases. 

George Thomas Little, Litt.D., Libr. 

Charles Dennison Smith, A.M., M.D., 
Physiology and Public Hygiene. 

William Albion Moody, A.M., Mathe- 
matics. 

John Franklin Thompson, A.M., M.D., 
Diseases of Women. 

Charles Clifford Hutchins, A.M., 
Physics. 

Willis Bryant Moulton, M.D., Dis- 
eases of Eye and Ear. 



BOWDON COLLEGE. 



Botvdon, Ga. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$1,500 



Students, 
143 



Instructors, 
4 



Buildings, 



Books, 
300 



This college was founded in 1887. The expenses are $130. The 
graduates number 75. The oldest is F. H. M. Henderson, D.D, 
1861, Stockbridge, Ga. 

{Further information lacking.) 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

BROWN UNIVERSITY. 

Providence, R. I. Co-Educatio7ial. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
^193.152 



Students, 
850 



Instructors, 
78 



Buildings, 
16 



Books, 
80,000 



Histoiy : The university now bearing the name of Nicholas Brown 
was founded in Warren in 1764, and its original name was Rhode 
Island College. The change in name was made in 1804, in accord- 
ance with a provision of the charter, and a special vote of the fellows 
and trustees in 1803 that the university should take the name of the 
benefactor who first gave it the sum of $5,000. The design of the 
college originated with the Philadelphia Baptist association, who 
wished to found a college "somewhere in North America." Six 
years after its establishment in Rhode Island the school was moved 
to Providence instead of to Newport, where it had been chartered. 
The college opened with one student, William Rogers by name. At 
the first commencement, in 1769, seven students were graduated. 
Of these, three distinguished themselves in the war of the Revolu- 
tion. During this period all instruction at the new college was sus- 
pended, the town having fallen into the hands of the British. The 
solitary college building, University Hall, modelled after Nassau 
Hall of Princeton, was turned into barracks, and afterward into a 
hospital for French troops. After the war the students broke the 
royal seal of the university, causing a new seal to be adopted. Owing 
to the lack of students commencements were not resumed till 1786. 
The first funds of the college, a trifle more than $1,000, were in- 
creased by a subscription of ^^4,500 raised in England by Rev. Mor- 
gan Edwards. The next considerable gift was that of Nicholas 
Brown, a former student of the college, and the son of its treasurer. 
This fund accumulated until in 1826 it had more than doubled. In 
185S eleven scholarships, on the interest of $1,000 each, were endowed 
by the same benefactor. In i860, John Carter Brown, his son, sub- 
scribed $25,000, to which he added $50,000 in 1874. Previous to 
this the college obtained $50,000 from the Federal land grant of 1862, 
as well as immunity from taxation. After long litigation, the Com- 
promise Act of 1894 authorized the State treasurer to pay over to 
the university the sum of $40,000, in consideration of which, the 
proceeds of the land-grant, amounting to $50,000, and the accumu- 
lated Morrill fund, amounting to $S8,ooo, had to be returned to the 
State treasurer to be redistributed among the higher schools of 
Rhode Island. In 1889 George F. Wilson, of Providence, left 
$100,000 for a science building. In 1891 the university was made 
co-educational. 

The presidents have been: James Manning, 1764-1791 ; Rev. Dr. 
Maxcy, 1792-1802; Asa Messer, 1802-1826; Francis Wayland, 1826- 
1855; Barnas Sears, 1855-1867 ; Alexis Caswell, 1868-1872; E. G. 
Robinson, 1872-1889, and Elisha B. Andrews, the present imcumbent. 

Orgafzization : The university is governed by a corporation, con- 
sisting of thirty-six trustees and twelve fellows. Of the trustees 
twenty-two must be Baptists, five Quakers, five Episcopalians, and 



I 



40 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

four Congregationalists. Of the fellows, eight, including the presi- 
dent, must forever be Baptists. Once in three years the corporation 
must choose from the trustees a treasurer, and a chancellor of the 
university, and from among the fellows a secretary. The office of 
chancellor is merely to preside over the trustees, while the president 
presides over the fellows. All instruction and immediate govern- 
ment of the college rests with the president and fellows, to whom, 
with the faculty, belongs the privilege of conferring degrees. 

Admission, Ifisti'iiction, and Degrees : Pupils from schools of known 
excellence are admitted on the certificates of the principals. All 
others must undergo examination, either at commencement, or at 
the opening of the college in September. Instruction is given in 
the liberal arts, the sciences, and military tactics. In the last three 
years most studies are elective. Attendance at chapel and military 
drill is compulsory. The following degrees are given : B.A., B.Ph., 
B.S., C.E., M.E., M.A., and Ph.D. These last two are given only 
after resident post-graduate study. Honorary degrees are conferred 
in arts, letters, laws, music, and divinity. 

Dues, scholarships, and frizes : Tuition for the year, lasting from 
September i6 to June 17, is $150. Expenses are estimated at from 
$265 to $500. There are one hundred scholarships in all, seventy- 
three of which are on the interest of $1,000 each, while nine are on 
the interest of $5,000. Two fellowships, on the interest of $10,000 
each, have been established by the G. A. R. of Rhode Island, and 
the alumni of Philadelphia. Twenty-five prizes and medals, ranging 
in value from $10 to $36, are given for excellence in study and 
debate. In addition to this two free beds, for students or alumni of 
Brown, have been placed in the Rhode Island hospital ; and a small 
loan fund for short term loans has recently been established. 

Equipment : The working funds of the university amount to 
$117,319. The library funds amount to $46,000. The number of 
volumes is 80,000, while the pamphlets number 20,000. The college 
buildings number sixteen : among which are the women's college, in 
process of erection ; the recently completed science building ; a new 
gymnasium ; a chapel ; an observatory ; four laboratories ; a museum, 
with several collections of artistic, archeological, geological, zoolog- 
ical, and botanical specimens. The college dormitories number 
eight, rooms in which are rented at from $50 to $125. The grounds 
comprise a campus and athletic field adjoining the river, with oppor- 
tunities for boating. 

Societies and Pi(blications : The Misokosmian, a literary secret 
society, which afterward changed its name to Philerminian, was 
founded in 1794. The United Brothers, a similar society, originated 
in 1806. In 1824 the Franklin Society was organized, only to dis- 
band again in 1834. Some six thousand books are owned by the 
two former societies. A chapter of * B K was established in 1830, 
to be followed by chapters of other fraternities in the following 
order : A A *, 1836 ; A «f», 1838 ; ^ T, 1840 ; B n, 1847 ; A K E, 1850 ; 
Z ^I', 1852; A X, 1S53; X%iS6o; AT, 1867; X *, 1872; and * A 9, 
18S9 ; besides these societies there is a dramatic club, several dinino; 
associations, two Christian Associations, an alumni association, and 
an athletic association with a track team, football eleven, baseball 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



41 



nine, and boat club. The students publish the " Liber Brunensis," 
an annual, the " Brunonian," a weekly, the " Daily Herald," and the 
" Brown Magazine." 

The graduates number nearly 5,000, of whom 2,200 are living. The 
oldest of these is the Rev. George W. Briggs, 1825, of Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Faculty. 



Elisha Benjamin Andrews, D.D., 
LL.D., President, Philosophy. 

Albert Harkness, Ph.D., LL.D., Emer- 
itus. 

Benjamin Franklin Clarke, A.M., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

John Howard Appleton, A.M., Chem- 
istry. 

Alonzo Williams, A.M., Germanic 
Literatures. 

William Carey Poland, A.M., History 
of Art, Director of Art Museum. 

Alpheus Spring Packard, M.D,,Ph.D., 
Zoology and Geology. 

Nathaniel French Davis, A.M., LL.D., 
Pure Mathematics. 

William Whitman Bailey, A.M., Nat- 
ural History and Botany. 

Winslow Upton, A.M., Astronomy. 

John FrankUn Jameson, Ph.D., History. 

Albert Granger Harkness, A.M., Ro- 
man Literature and History. 

Henry Brayton Gardner, Ph.D., Polit- 
ical Economy. 

Hermon Carey Bumpus, Ph.D., Com. 
Anatomy and Curator of Museums. 

Courtney Langdon, A.B., Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

Lorenzo Sears, L.H.D., American Lit. 

Wilfred Harold Munro, A.M., Hist. 

John Matthews Manly, Ph.D., English 
Language. 

Otis Everett Randall, Ph.D., Me- 
chanical Drawing. 

George Grafton Wilson, Ph.D., Social 
and Political Science. 

Edmund Burke Delabarre, Ph.D., 
Psychology. 

James Irving Manatt, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Greek Literature and History. 

Walter Cochrane Bronson, A.M., Eng- 
lish Literature. 

George Wilton Field, Ph.D., Cellular 
Biology. 

Walter Goodnow Everett, Ph.D., Phil- 
osophy and Natural Theology. 

Asa Clinton Crowell, Ph.D., Ger- 
manic Languages and Literatures. 

Harry Lyman Koopman, A.M., Libr. 



Carl Barus, Ph.D., Physics. 

Francis Greenleaf Allinson, Ph.D., 

Greek and Classical Philology. 
Henry Parker Manning, Ph.D., Pure 

Mathematics. 
Hammond Lamont, A.B., Rhetoric and 

Oratory. 
John Edward Hill, M.S., M.C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
James Quayle Dealey, PhD., Social 

and Political Science. 
Walter Ballou Jacobs, A.M., Pedagogy. 
Charles Foster Kent, Ph.D., Biblical 

Literature and History. 
Cunliffe Hall Murray, Military Tactics. 
Louis Franklin Snow, A.M., Dean of 

Women's College. 
Frank Washington Very, B.S., As- 

tronomv and Director of Observatory. 
Albert Davis Mead, Ph.D., Embryol- 
ogy and Neurology. 
Frederick Taft Guild, A.M., Registrar. 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Edwin Eddy Calder, A.M., Chemistry. 

Walter Mills Saunders, Chemistry. 

John Francis Greene, A.B., Latin. 

Fred Eugene Parker, A.B., Physical 
Culture, Director of Gymnasium. 

Edward Clifton Burnham, A.B., B.S., 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Albert Bushnell Johnson, A.M., Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Robert Elkin Neil Dodge, A.M., Eng- 
lish Literature. 

Albert DeForest Palmer, Jr., Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Frederick Poole Gorham, A.M., Bi- 
ology. 

Walter Edward Smith, A.M., Chem- 
istry. 

Elmer Almy Wilcox, A.B., Law. 

Theodore Francis Green, A.M., Roman 
Law. 

Norman Morrison Isham, A.M., Archi- 
tecture and Drawing. 

Edmund Cody Burnett, A.M., History. 

Ralph Winfred Tower, A.M., Chem- 
ical Physiology. 



42 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Miller Moore Fogg, Jr., A.M., Public 
Speaking. 

Adolph Conrad Ely, A.M., German. 

John Elof Boodin, A.M., Pliilosophy. 

Lucien Edward Taylor, A.B., French. 

George Hopkinson, A.B., Rhetoric. 

Joseph Richard Bullock, Jr., B.P., 
Rhetoric. 

William Edward Price, A.B., Rhetoric. 

George Abner Williams, Ph.D., Greek. 

Joseph Nickerson Ashton, A.M., Mus- 
ical Theory and History. 

Carroll Harry Ash, B.P., Mathematics, 

John Smith Shippee, A.B., Latin. 

Arthur Eugene Watson, A.B., Physics. 

Frederick Slocum, A.B., Mathematics. 

Walter Guyton Cady, B.P., Math. 



Frederick Otis Clapp, A.B., Math. 

Edwin Collins Frost, A.B., Rhetoric. 

Haven Metcalf, A.B., Botany. 

Albert Smith Morse, A.B., French. 

James Franklin Collins, Curator of 
Herbarium. 

Reuben Aldridge Guild, A.M., LL.D., 
Librarian Emeritus. 

John Milton Burnham, A.M., Assis- 
tant Librarian. 

Theron Clark, A.B., Assist. Registrar. 

Mabel Temple, Cataloguer. 

Archibald Grant Delaney, Steward. 

Frank Eugene Lester, Carpenter Shop. 

Frank Edwin Stark, Machine Shop. 

George Milton Gray, Anatomical Lab- 
oratory. 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Wometi. Non-Seciarian. 



Income, 

$1,500,000 

and tuition fees. 



Students, 
298 



Instructors, 
36 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
23,000 



History and Organization : The college was endowed in 1880 by 
Dr. Joseph W. Taylor of New Jersey, for the advanced education of 
women. In 1884 a president, — James E. Rhoads, — and a dean of 
the Faculty, — M. Carey Thomas, — were chosen, and the college 
was opened in 1885. The college is governed by a board of thirteen 
trustees. All matters of conduct and discipline are regulated by a 
self-government association, consisting of all the students acting 
through an annually elected Executive Committee of eight students. 

Admission, Studies, and Degrees: Three classes of students are 
admitted : graduates, undergraduates, and hearers, the last having a 
required age of at least twenty-five years ; and having, before enter- 
ing, pursued the studies required in the matriculation examination. 
There is no division into the traditional four classes, and, although 
the course is usually four years, there is no fixed date for graduation. 
Candidates for degree of Ph.D. must have spent three years in 
graduate work, and at least two of these years at Bryn Mawr. The 
A.M. degree is conferred only on graduates of Bryn Mawr. 

Dices, Scholarships, and Prizes: Tuition is $100 a year, other 
expenses are from $275 to $500. Among other provisions for poor 
students there are three public school $100 scholarships, nine $200 
scholarships, and three of $400 each open to graduates of local insti- 
tutions. Three scholarships of the value of I300 and three of the 
value of $200 are awarded on the results of the entrance exam- 
inations. Eleven resident graduate fellowships of $525 each are 
awarded annually to graduates of any college of good standing, and 
five scholarships of $200 each are awarded to the candidates next 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



43 



in merit. There are also three graduate fellowships of $500 each for 
the purpose of European study. The academic year extends from 
September 29 to June 3. 

Equip77ient : There is a gymnasium with running track and swim- 
ming bath, and also athletic grounds with skating pond. Gymnastic 
exercise is required of all resident undergraduates. There is a 
cottage hospital. The library is equipped for special study, and 
^3,000 is expended annually for additions. There are, besides the 
two halls for lecture purposes and a gymnasium, five dormitory 
buildings. 

Societies and Publications : The students issue an annual magazine 
called " The Lantern," and maintain the following organizations : 
The Self-Government Asociation, graduate club, undergraduate As- 
sociation, athletic association, philosophical club, a branch of the 
Y. W. C. T. U., missionary association, Christian Union, De Rebus 
Club, and chess club. 

Facility. 



M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., President, 

English. 
Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Math. 
Edward H. Keiser, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Hermann Collitz, Ph.D., Comparative 

Philology and German. 
James Harkness, A.M., Mathematics. 
Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph.D., Greek. 
Mary Gwinn, Ph.D., English. 
Charles McLean Andrews, Ph.D., Hist. 
Gonzalez Lodge, Ph.D., Latin. 
George A. Barton, Ph.D., Biblical 

Literature and Semitic. 
Max F. Blau, Ph.D., German Lit. 
Joseph Auguste Fontaine, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages. 
Arthur Stanley Mackenzie, Ph.D., 

Physics. 
James Douglas Bruce, Ph.D., English 

Philology. 
Thomas Hunt Morgan, Ph. D. , Biology. 
Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Physiology. 
Dickinson Sergeant Miller, Ph.D., 

Philosophy. 
Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Edgar Buckingham, Ph.D., Physics 

and Chemistry. 
Lindley Miller Keasbey,Ph.D.,R.P.D., 

Political Science. 



Mortimer Lamson Earle, Ph.D., Greek 

and Latin. 
Paul Elmer More, A.M., Sanskrit and 

Classical Literature. 
Alfred Hodder, EngHsh. 
Ricliard Norton, A.B., History of Art- 
Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Geology . 
Ohver M. Johnston, Ph.D., A.B., 

French Philology. 
Rose Chamberlin, German. 
Abby Kirk, A.B., English. 
Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Biology and 

Botany. 
Florence V. Keys, A.B., English. 
Charles Andrew Barneaud, Ph.D., 

Italian. 
Lucy Martin Donnelly, English. 
Alice Bercha Foster, M.D., Director 

of tlie Gymnasium. 
Elizabeth Bates, Gymnasium. 
Mary Sherwood, M.D., Hygiene. 
Henrietta R. Palmer, A. B., Librarian. 
Jane Bowne Haines, A.M., Associate 

Librarian. 
Bessie Baker. B.S., Assistant Librarian. 
Fredericka M. Kerr, Bursar. 
Madeline Vaughan Abbott, A.B., Sec. 
Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Secretary to 

the President. 
Mary Harris, A.B., Recording Sec. 



44 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



BUCHTEL COLLEGE. 



Akron, Ohio. 


Co 


Educatiottal. 


Uiiiversalist, 


Income, 
$30,825. 


Students, 
491 


Instructors, 

IS 


Buildings, 

5 


Books, 
7,000 



The college was founded in 1870 by the Ohio convention of Uni- 
versalists, and was named after John R. Buchtel, its most liberal 
benefactor. The presidents have been : the Revs, S. H. McColHster, 
D.D., 1872-1S78; E. L. Rexford, D.D., 1878-1880, and Orello Cone, 
D.D., the present incumbent. In June, 1879, a fire partially destroyed 
the main building. In December, 1890, another fire caused great loss 
of property, and resulted in the death of three students. 

The school is governed by eighteen trustees. The degrees are 
B.A., B.S., B.Ph., and M.A. There are six endowed professorships, 
fifty endowed scholarships, and other funds amounting to $66,000. 
Tuition is from $24 to $39 a year. All studies after the Sophomore 
year are elective. Chapel and gymnasium are not compulsory. The 
college campus covers six acres, and there is an athletic field cover- 
ing nearly four acres. The students publish " The Buchtelite," a 
weekly, and "The Buchtel," an annual junior publication. Besides 
two literary societies, the usual Christian Associations, and an 
athletic association, chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: ATA, 1873; * A 0, 1875; K K r, 1877; A T, 1879 and 
The Lone Star, 1882. Faculty. 



Rev. Orello Cone, D.D., President, 
Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Charles M. Knight, A.M., Physics and 
Chemistry. 

Carl F. Kolbe, A.M., Ph.D., Modern 
Languages. 

William D. Shipman, A.M., Greek 
and Philological Science. 

Charles C. Bates, A.M., Latin. 

E. W. Claypole, B.A., D.Sc, Nat. Sci. 

Hermas V. Egbert, A.M., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

L. Alonzo Butterfield, A.M., Ph.D., 
Rhetoric and Oratory. 

Ellen E. Garrigues, A.M., English Lit- 
erature, Logic, and English History. 

Frederick C. Bryan, A.B., LL.B., Law. 



and 



Charles R. Olin, B.S., Librarian. 

Jennie Gifford, A.M., Science 
School Management. 

Mary E. Stockman, L.A., History and 
Latin. 

Martha A. Bortle, English. 

Samuel E. Findley, A.B., Greek and 
Latin. 

Joseph H. James, B.S., Physics and 
Geometry. 

M. Caryle Sylla, Piano and Theory. 

Alfred G. Cogswell, Vocal Music. 

Gustav Sigel, Violin, 'Cello, and Zither. 

Minnie C. Fuller, Painting, Drawing. 

Joseph S.Benner, Gymnasium Director. 

Amy I. Herriff, B.S., Gymnasium In- 
structor for Women. 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY. 

Lewisbiirg, Pa. Co-Educatio7ial. 



Baptist. 



Total Income, 
$30,000 



Students, 
245 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
10 



Books, 
16,000 



Bucknell University was founded in 1846, and holds its fiftieth 
anniversary this year. Of its endowment of $400,000, $25,000 is 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



45 



used for scholarships, of which there are sixty, and for prizes, which 
number fourteen. It has a classical and scientific course, with appro- 
priate degrees, and gives instruction in art, music, and elocution. 
Its museum contains 12,000 specimens, with an art collection of 
500 pieces. 

Faculty. 



John Howard Harris, Ph.D., LL.D., 
President, Psychology and Ethics. 

Freeman Loomis, A.M., Ph.D., Mod- 
ern Languages and Literature. 

George G. Groff, M.D., LL.D., Or- 
ganic Sciences. 

William Cyrus Bartol, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Frank Ernest Rockwood, A.M., Latin. 

William Gundy Owens, A.M., Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Enoch Perrine, A.M.,Litt.D., English. 

Thomas Franklin Hamblin, A.M., 

Lincoln * Hulley, A.M., Ph.D., His- 
tory and Hebrew. 

William Emmett Martin, A.M., Logic 
and Anthropology, Librarian. 

Elysee Aviragnet, A.M., Music and 
the Romance Languages. 

Leo Guido Charles Riemer, A.B., 
Latin and German. 

Heman Lincoln Wayland, D.D., So- 
ciology. 

Thomas A. Edwards, A.M., Principal, 
Latin. 



Albert Burns Stewart, A.M., Math. 

George Edward Fisher, Ph.B., Eng- 
lish and Science. 

Llewellyn Phillips, A.M., Greek and 
Elocution. 

Ezra Allen, A.B., Proctor. 

Annie M. Black, Matron. 

Nelson Fithian Davis, Sc.B., Organic 
Chemistry and Science. 

George Dana Boardman, D.D., LL.D., 
Social Ethics. 

William Ciiristian Gretzinger, Ph.B., 
Registrar. 

Katherine B. Larison, A.M., Principal, 
Instructor in Literature. 

Candace Wood, Drawing and Painting. 

Harriet Clare Armitage, English, Elo- 
cution, and Gymnastics. 

Juliet Aiken, Instrumental Music. 

Elizabeth Collins Eddelman, Sc.B., 
Latin and German. 

Minnie Gould, Vocal Music. 

lona Morgan, Music. 

Eliza Bell, Ph.B., History and English. 

Jessie June Wheeler, A.B., Math. 



BUENA VISTA COLLEGE. 

Storm Lake, Iowa. Co-Edticational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 
114 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
1,500 



The college is the precursor of the Dodge Collegiate Institute. 
It owes its endowment to the Presbyterian Church. 



Faculty. 



Willis Marshall, A.B., President, Phil- 
osophy. 

George H. Fracker, A.M., Classics. 

C. W. von Coelln. Mathematics and 
Normal Department. 

N. F. Douglas, History and Eng. Lit. 

Miss G. J. Armstrong, A.B., Principal 
and Higher English. 



P. B. S. Peters, Commercial and Short 

hand Departments. 
Ida L. Sisson, Piano. 
Eloise Lemon, Violin. 
J. C. Hutchison, A.M., Ph.D., Natural 

Science. 
Rev. C. E. Fisk, Mediaeval History. 
F. F. Faville, LL.B., Commercial Law. 



46 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Spencer, Tenn. 



BURRITT COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Christian. 



Income, 
$25,000 



Students, 
164 



Instructors, 
10 




Books, 
3,000 



Burritt College was founded in 1848, and was one of the first 
co-educational schools in Tennessee. It is governed by thirteen 
trustees. No entrance examinations are required. Courses in 
classics and sciences, in commerce, art, and music are offered, lead- 
ing to bachelors', mistresses', and masters' degrees in arts, science, and 
English literature. The expenses for the year, lasting from the first 
Monday in August until the end of May, are $140. Attendance at 
chapel and gymnastic exercise is not obligatory. Free communica- 
tion between the sexes is not allowed. No student is permitted to 
carry any " dirk, pistol, or other deadly weapon," to " wrestle, scufiie, 
or box," or address a petition or other paper to the board of trustees. 
There are two literary societies, — the Philomathesian and Callio- 
pean, and a gymnastic society. The graduates number more than 
200, of whom 170 are living. 

Factdty. 



W. N. Billingsley, A.M., President, 

English Classics, etc. 
W. V. Freiley, B.S., Mathematics and 

Science. 
G. A. Kuykendall, Prep, Depart, and 

Vocal Music. 



Jennie Billingsley, Primary Branches. 
R. H. Fitzgerald, Commercial Dep't. 
Emma Riddle, Instrumental Music. 
Fannie Kuykendall, Art. 
Maggie Parkins, Embroidery. 
Ersie Henson, Calisthenics. 



Irvington, Ind. 



BUTLER COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. Christian Church. 



Total Income, 
$22,000 



Students, 
215 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 



Books, 
6,123 



History and Organization: Butler College received its charter in 
1850, and was opened in Indianapolis in 1855. It was organized as 
a joint-stock organization, with twenty-one trustees. In 1875 i' was 
removed to Irvington, four miles distant. 

Admission, Courses of Study : Freshmen are admitted from certain 
public and private schools without examination. Prizes are given 
for proficiency in declamation, orations, essays, and Greek. Tuition 
fees are $30 a year, and total expenses are estimated at from $140 to 
$200. There is a museum besides a gymnasium, library, and pre- 
paratory school. Since the foundation of the school 271 students 
have been graduated, and forty honorary degrees have been con- 
ferred. The degrees are B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. There is an athletic 
association and military drill. The annual catalogue is published in 
June. The students publish the " Collegian." The academic year 
extends from September 5 to June 10. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



47 



Faaclty 



Scot Butler, A.M., President, Latin. 

Allen R. Benton, LL.D., Philosophy 
and Biblical Literature. 

William M. Thrasher, A.M., Math. 

Hugh C. Garvin, A.M., Biblical Phi- 
lology. 

Demarchus C. Brown, A.M., Greek. 

Flora Bridges, A.M., Eng. Literature. 

Thomas M. Iden, Ph.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Thomas C. Howe, A.M., Germanic 
Languages. 

Hugh Th. Miller, A.M., History and 
French. 

Henry L. Bruner, A.M., Biology, Geol. 



Archibald M. Hall., A.M., Ph.D., 
Hebrew. 

Frank F.Hutchins, M.D., Anatomy. 

John D. Nichols, A.M., M.D., Mate- 
ria Medica and Therapeutics. 

Thomas M. Defrees, Lieut. U.S.A., 
Military Tactics. 

J. M. Dungan, Music. 

Henry T. Mann, B.S., Phys. Culture. 

Lida E. Gilbert, Elocution and Phy- 
sical Culture for Women. 

Robert Hall, A.M., Latin. 

Charles A. Stevens, A.B., German. 

Charles W. Culbertson, Laboratory 
Assistant. 



CALIFORNIA COLLEGE. 



Oakland^ Cal. 


Co-Educatio7ial. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
5-300 


Students, 
1 06 


Instructors, 
12 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
2,500 



The college was founded in 1S72. Since 1S74, in all, thirteen alumni 
have been graduated. The control of the school is vested in fifteen 
trustees. The grounds, covering twelve hundred acres, overlook 
San Francisco and the Bay. There are two. literary societies, and 
two Christian Associations. " The Student " is published monthly. 



Facility. 



Samuel C. Morse, A.M., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy and Greek. 

Lorenzo D. Inskeep, A.M., Mathe- 
matics, German, and Latin. 

J. T. Wallace, A.M., Natural Sciences 
and History. 

Louise Humphrey Smith, Elocution. 

H. B. Pasmore, Vocal Music. 



Madame Otto Blankart, Piano and 

Theory. 
Mrs. H. B. Pasmore, Vocal Music. 
Lily Sherwood, Guitar and Mandolin. 
Flora Bell, Wood Carving, Repousse, 

and China Painting. 
Miss Montagle, Oil Painting and 

Drawing. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



CANISIUS COLLEGE. 

Men. 



Roman Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
253 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,500 



Canisius College was opened in 1S70, and was incorporated in 
1883. Degrees of B.A., and A.M. are conferred. The school is gov- 
erned by ten trustees. The expenses average ^250 a year. The aca- 



48 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



demic year lasts from the first Wednesday in September to the last 
Wednesday in June. Besides two religious societies, there is a 
debating club, and a class orchestra and band. 



Faculty, 



Rev. John I. Zahm, S.J., President. 

Rev. J, Ulric Heinzle, S.J., Logic 
and Metaphysics. 

Rev. Richard J. Martin, S.J., Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Rev. John B. Theis, S.J., First Com- 
mercial. 

Rev. Peter Hagcf, S. J., Treasurer. 

Rev. Bernard Henke, S.J., Assistant 
Treasurer. 

Rev. John J. Ming, S.J., Ethics, Post- 
Graduate Class. 

Rev. Martin Bischoff, S.J., Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Rev. Anthony Guggenberger, S.J., 
Rhetoric. 

Rev. Peter J. Mueller, S.J., Latin 
and Greek. 

Rev. Hubert A. Hartmann,S. J., Poetry. 

William Weis, S.J., Humanities, 

Rev. Francis Heiermann, S.J., First 
Grammar. 

Charles Barnauer, S.J., Sec. Grammar. 

Rev. Sebastian Huber, S.J., Third 
Grammar. 



Rev. Luke Van Ree, S.J., Latin and 
German. 

Rev. Francis X. Pilliod, S.J., English 
and French. 

William Poloczek, S.J., Latin, Greek, 
and French. 

John B. Heinen, S.J., Rudiments. 

Peter Leonard, S.J., Second Commer- 
cial. 

Francis Hilgers, S.J., Third Commer- 
cial. 

Francis Giesen, S.J., Preparatory. 

Rev. Louis Bonvin, S.J., Singing. 

John M. Sullivan, S.J., Frederick Stre- 
rath, S.J., Joseph Huneck, S.J., 
Charles Gisler, S.J., Bernard Co- 
hausz, S.J., Edmund Schmitt, S.J., 
Assistant Teachers. 

Charles Mischka, Ignatius Czerwinski, 
John Gelbke, Sylvan Herrmann, 
Music. 

Henry Schmitt, Drawing. 

Patrick E. O'Brien, late U. S. A., 
Gymnastics and Military Tactics. 



CARLETON COLLEGE. 

Northfield, Mhifi. Co-Educational. Congregational. 



Income, 
^35'977 



Students, 
277 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1 2,000 



Carleton College was incorporated in 1866, and a preparatory 
school was opened in 1S67. The first college class was graduated 
in 1874. The school received from W. Carleton, of Minnesota, 
$50,000, and $10,000 from his wife. In 1883 Dr. Williams, of Phila- 
delphia, gave $12,000 for a science building, and $15,000 for a tele- 
scope. In all, 229 students have been graduated, 224 of whom are 
living. The oldest of these is J. J. Dow, 1874, of Faribault, Minn. 

The college is governed by a board of twenty-two trustees. Three 
parallel courses lead to degrees of B.A., B.L., B.S., and M.A. 
There are ten scholarships on funds amounting to $37,000, and an 
education society. The highest scholarship provides for $1,000 a 
year. Students for the clergy can receive $100 a year. Besides this 
there are five prize funds. The income from $4,500 is devoted to the 
increase of the library. There is a museum containing 20,000 sped- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



49 



mens, and two gymnasiums for the separate use of men and women 
students. The college grounds cover eighty acres. The academic 
year extends from September 4 to June 13. 

_ There are six literary societies, an oratorical and athletic associa- 
tion, a naturalists' club, a Christian Association, and a missionary 
society. A chapter of * K % 1 883-1 888, was once organized. 



Rev. James W. Strong, D.D., Presi 
dent. 

Horace Goodhue, A.M., Greek, aiM 
Dean of Faculty. 

William W. Payne, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy, and Director 
of Observatory. 

Margaret J.Evans, A.M., Lady Prin- 
cipal, and English and Modern Lan- 
guages. 

Rev, George Huntington, A.M., Logic, 
Rhetoric, and Elocution. 

Rev. Arthur H. Pearson, A.M., Phi- 
losophy and Biblical Literature. 

Lucian W. Chaney, Jr., M.S., Biology 
and Geology. 

Charles H. Cooper, A.M., History and 
Political Science. 

Louisa H. Richardson, Ph.D., Latin. 

Herbert C. Wilson, Ph.D., Astronomy. 



Facility. 



Wilmot V. Metcalf, Ph.D., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Rev. Daniel Ma.gnus, A.M., Swedish 
and Teacher of English. 

Lyman B. Sperry, M.D., Sanitary Sci- 
ence. 

Charlotte R. Willard, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Isabella Watson, B.L., French and 
German. 

Frederick E. Stratton, Ph.D., Prin- 
cipal of Academy, and Greek. 

Lucia E. Danforth, B.L., Preceptress 
of Academy, and Latin. 

Caroline E. Linnell, Elocution. 

George Bagnall, Music and the Piano 
and Harmony. 

Flora M. Fay, Music. 

Gertrude M. Potwin, Violin. 

Helen F. Young, Voice Culture. 



CARSON AND NEWMAN. 

Mossy Creek, Tenn. Co- Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 



Students, 
250 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
3,000 



The school was founded as the Mossy Creek Missionary Baptist 
Seminary, by the Baptist Educational Society of East Tennessee. 
It was chartered in 1851, and was endowed by W. C. Newman, who 
also endowed Newman College, which was added to the older college 
after its change of name in 1889. The presidents have been Wilham 
Rogers, 1 850- 185 1 ; R. R. Bryan, 1851-1653 ; Dr. Samuel Anderson, 
1^53-1857; Rev. Mathew Hillsman, D.D., iScjj-iSsg; Rev. N. B 
Goforth, 1859-1862; R. R. Bryan (second term), 1866-1S68; Rev. 
Jesse Baker, D.D., 1S69-T870; Dr. N. B. Goforth (second term), 
1870-1S82; Rev. B. G. Manard, 1882; S. \V. Tindell, 1882-1888; 
Rev. W. A. Montgomery, D.D., LL.D., 1888-1892 ; and J. T. Hen- 
derson, the present incumbent. During the Civil War, and later, 
1882, during a small-pox epidemic, instruction was suspended. The 
college IS governed by thirty-three trustees. Admission is by exami- 



so 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



nation upon certificate from a limited number of schools. Three 
courses of study, the classical, Latin-scientific, and English, lead to 
de<^rees of B.A., and B.S. The masters' degree is given after one 
year of post-graduate study, and the payment of a diploma fee. 
Attendance at chapel and gymnasium drill is required. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from August 25 to May 28, are $120. 
Tuition is remitted to ministerial students. The college grounds 
cover thirteen acres. The societies are: the Columbian and Philo- 
mathean for men, the Calliopean and Hypatian for women, the 
Berean for ministerial students, two Christian Associations, and an 
athletic association. The graduates number nearly 200, of whom 
140 are living. The oldest of these is Richard S. Scruggs, M.D., 
1855, of Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Faculty. 



J. T. Henderson, A. M., President, 

Metaphysics. 
R. A. Henderson, A.M., Latin. 
J. C. Welsh, B.S., Natural Science. 
Rev. J. M. Burnett, A.B., Th.M., 

Librarian, Greek. 



W. S. Gass, A.B., English. 

Rev. S. E. Jones, A.M., Mathematics. 

Lollie Phillips, Piano. 

Liicile D. Phillips, Art and Voice. 

Tennessee Jenkins, History. 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE. 

Carthage, III. Co- Educational. 



Lutheran. 



Income, 
J^ 1 1,000 



Students, 
156 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
5,coo 



The college was chartered in 1870, by the general synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in the West. The first class was 
graduated in 1875, ^•^d ^44 alumni, in all, have been graduated. The 
presidents have been: Rev. D. L. Tressler, 1873-1880; Rev. J. A. 
Kunkelman, 18S1-1883; Rev. J. S. Detweiler, 1883-1884; Rev. E. F. 
Bartholomew, 1884-1888; Rev. Holmes Dysinger, 188S-1895. 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of the college was celebrated last 
year, when a souvenir volume was published. The school is gov- 
erned by a board of seventeen trustees. Scientific and Classical 
courses lead to degrees of B.A. and B.S. There is a Junior class 
scholarship, and three prizes for excellence in study are offered. 
The grounds cover fifteen acres. A gift of $10,000 for a new dormi- 
tory was made last year. Attendance at chapel is compulsory to 
students who have recitations before and after chapel hours. Colored 
students have not as yet attended, but would be admitted. The stu- 
dents maintain two literary societies, called the Cicero and Gahleo, 
two Christian Associations, a musical association, an athletic associa- 
tion, with a foot-ball team, and a chapter of n B * was organized 
in 1882, lasting six years. The college year is from September 5 to 
May 28. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



51 



Faculty. 



Rev. Holmes Dysinger, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy and History. 

Cleophas C. O'Harra, A.li., Natural 
and Physical Science. 

John M. Criley, A.B., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

William W. Tioup, A.M., Classics. 

Carl Schlenker, A.B., English and 
Modern Languages. 

Elnora Cuddeback, Ped.M., Ph.M., 
Normal Department. 

Penfield E. Mason, A.B., Ancient Lan- 
guages, History, and English. 



Wm. M. Beck, A.B., Shorthand and 
Typewriting. 

Chas. A. Webber, Penmanship and 
Bookkeeping. 

Jessie M . Peters, Normal Department. 

Laura A. Manier, A.M., Music. 

Hon. O. F. Berry, Civil Government 
and Commercial Law. 

W. H. Veatch, M.D., Practical Hy- 
giene. 

Elnora Cuddeback, Matron. 

Carl Schlenker, Secretary of Faculty. 

Cleophas C. O'Harra, Librarian. 



CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE. 

Cleveland, O. Men. N^on-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$5o,ooo 



Students, 
230 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
35.000 



The school was founded by Leonard Case, who gave it an endow- 
ment of about $2,000,000 in 1877. The school was incorporated in 

1880. Instruction was begun in Mr. Case's house after his death in 

1 88 1. In 1885 the school was transferred to its new buildings oppo- 
site, four in number, and a campus of thirty acres. There are 
twenty-one members of the corporation, and seven trustees. The 
various courses of instruction are those specified by the founder, 
and comprise mathematics, physics, engineering, chemistry, geology, 
mining, mineralogy, natural history, drawing, and the modern lan- 
guages. Excursions to mines and manufactories form a part of the 
curriculum. 

Tuition is $100. There are five scholarships, of $300 each, for stu- 
dents from Ohio High School, and four others of the same amount 
open to all students. A prize of $25 is offered in the course of 
physics in the Sophomore year. 

The academic year lasts from the third Wednesday in September 
to the second Thursday in June. Attendance at chapel and gym- 
nasium drill is not compulsory. Since the foundation of the school 
there have been 109 graduates. The students issue " The Integral," a 
m-onthly,and an annual publication. The names of the associations and 
societies are legion. Among them is a chapter of Z ^, founded in 1885. 



Faculty. 



Cady Staley, Ph.D., LL.D, Presi- 
dent, Civil Engineering. 

Charles F. Mabery, S.D., Chemistry. 

Charles H. Benjamin, M.E., Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 



Charles S. Howe, Ph.D., Mathematics 

and Astronomy. 
Frank Mason Comstock, Ph.D., Eng. 
John W. Langley, Ph.D., Electrical 

Engineering. 



I 



52 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Arthur S. Wright, A.M., French and 
German. 

Albert W. Smith, Ph.D., Metalhirgy. 

Frank Howard Neff, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Dayton Clarence Miller, D.Sc, Phys- 
ics. 

Charles W. Trumbull, C.E., Math. 

Robert Hey wood Fernald, B.M.E., 
Mathematics. 

William Osborne Quayle, A.M., Chem- 
istry. 



John William Easton, A.M., E.E., 
Mathematics and Physics. 

Edward Jesse Hudson, Ph.M., M.S., 
Chemistry. 

Herbert Otis White, A.B., French and 
Drawing. 

Wilson Andrus Carter, B.S., Mathe- 
matics and Electricity. 

Wilbur M. Judd, C.E., Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Howard P. Fairfield, Machine Shop. 

Lorin O. Burwell, Apparatus Shop. 



CATAWBA COLLEGE. 



Newton, 


N. C. 


Men. 


ReJ 


ormed. 


Income, 
^4,000 


Students, 
275 


Instructors, 
9 


Buildings, 


Books, 
2,000 





The college was founded in 1851. The expenses for the year are 
)I05. The president is the Rev. G. C. Clapp. 

{Further information lacking.) 



CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA. 

Washington, D. C. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 

$145,000 



Students, 
120 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
18,000 



History and Organization: The university was founded in 1884, 
after a gift by Miss Caldwell of $300,000 to the American Episcopate. 
From 1889 to 1895 its educational activity was confined to the School 
of Divinity. In 1895, after the Pope had expressed a hope that the 
university might be able to adapt its work to modern educational 
needs in a wider sense, schools of philosophy and the social sciences 
were opened, with departments of philosophy, letters, mathematics, 
physics, chemistry, biology, technology, sociology, economics, political 
science, and law. During the last year eleven chairs for the teach- 
ing of the arts and sciences have been endowed by individuals. 

The university is governed by seventeen directors, and a chancellor, 
who is at present Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore. With the direc- 
tors, who are for the most part, prominent members of the Catholic 
clergy, are associated by virtue of their office, all the Catholic arch- 
bishops in this country. 

Admissio7t, Instriiction, and Degrees : Students are admitted to the 
school of social sciences, either by examination or upon the presen- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



53 



tation of other evidences of sufficient preliminary education. For 
admission to the school of philosophy, a diploma for the degree 
of B.A., or its equivalent, is required. Candidates for degrees in 
divinity must have completed a seminary course. The school of 
divinity has four departments ; the school of philosophy, six ; that 
of social sciences, four; and that of technology, four; making in all 
eighteen, each of which is under a full professor, aided by associates 
and assistants. The school of divinity grants baccalaureate, licen- 
tiate, and doctor's degrees ; the school of philosophy confers degrees 
in letters and philosophy; the school of social science degrees of 
B.A. and M.A. ; the law school degrees of LL.B,, LL.M., D.C.L., 
J.E.U., J.U.D., and LL.D ; while in the institute of technology, de- 
grees in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, with correspond- 
ing masters' degrees are conferred. Eleven scholarships, distributed 
among five different dioceses, have been established by individuals, 
and there are three further scholarships in chemistry. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : The annual fee for students in 
the schools of philosophy, social sciences, and law, is $ioo. Resi- 
dent students in the school of divinity pay $250. Candidates for 
degrees of Ph.D. and LL.D. pay $200, besides fees of from $10 to 
$25 for diplomas. Special fees are charged in the departments of 
physics, sociology, and in laboratory courses. 

Equipmejit: The university is in the northern suburb of the city, 
adjoining the Soldiers' Home Park, some three miles from the 
Capitol. Two buildings, — the Caldwell and MacMahon halls of 
divinity and philosophy, — are already in use, while eleven more, 
not including dormitories and dwelling-houses, have been projected. 
The two present buildings, besides lecture rooms and dwelling- 
rooms for teachers and students, contain a, chapel, the university 
and MacMahon libraries, the general museum, post-office, twelve 
laboratories, a seminary, and a gymnasium. 

Puhlicatiois and Societies : The university publishes the "Catholic 
University Bulletin." Besides several literary, religious, and athletic 
societies, a debating club, and moot court are maintained by the 
students of the law school. 

Faculty. 



His Eminence James Cardinal Gib- 
bons, Chancellor. 
Rt. Rev. John J. Keane, D.D., LL.D., 

Rector, Homiletics. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas O'Gorman, D.D., 

Emeritus. 
Very Rev, Thomas Bouquillon, D.D., 

Moral Theology. 
Very Rev. Joseph Schroeder, Ph.D., 

D.D., Dogmatic Theology. 
Rev. Henry Hyvernat. D.D., Semitic. 
Charles Warren Stoddard, L.H.D., 

English Literature. 
Very Rev. Charles P. Grannan, Ph.D., 

D.D., Sacred Scripture. 
Rev. Thomas J. Shahan, D.D., J.U.L., 

Church History and Roman Law, 



Rev. Edward A. Pace, Ph.D., D.D., 

Philosophy. 
Rev. Daniel Quinn, Ph.D., Hellenic 

Literature. 
Rev. George Peries, D.D., J, CD., 

Canon Law. 
Hon, William C. Robinson, LL,D., 

Law. 
Edward L, Greene, LL.D., Botany. 
Maurice F. Ejr.n. A.M., LL.D., Eng- 
lish Philology. 
Rev. John J. Griffin, A.M., Ph.D., 

Chemistry. 
Rev, George M. Searle, A.M,, Ph,D., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
Daniel W. Shea, A,M„ Ph.D., Physics. 
Frank K. Cameron, Ph.D., Chemistry. 



I 



54 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Rev. Edmund T. Shanahan, D.D., 
Ph.D., J.C.L., Philosophy. 

Rene de Saussure, Ph.D., Math. 

Albert F. Zahm, A.M., M.S., M.E., 
Physics. 

Rev. Simon J. Carr, S.T.B., Hebrew. 

George M. Boiling, Ph.D., Compara- 
tive Philology. 

Josiah Pierce, A.M., Surveying and 
Drawing. 



Rev. Frederick Z. Rocker, Ph.D., 
S.T.D., D.D., Ethics. 

Hon. Carroll D. Wright, LL.D., So- 
cial Economics. 

John A. Robinson, M.D.,, LL.B., Law. 

Rev. William J. Kerby, S.T.L., So- 
ciology. 

Charles P. Neill, A.M., Economics. 

William L. Clark, Jr., Law. 

Frederick W. Pelly, B.A., Modern 
Languages and History. 



CATHOLIC SUMMER SCHOOL OF AMERICA. 

A Roman Catholic Chautauqua or Summer School was opened 
at New London, Conn., in the summer of 1892 under the auspices 
of distinguished clergymen and laymen, and the first meetings were 
held from July 30 to August 14. The association has since acquired 
a site at Bluff Point, near Plattsburgh, N. Y., on Lake Champlain, 
upon which the necessary buildings have been erected, and here the 
summer school is held annually in July and August. The object of 
this institution is " to encourage the diffusion of sound literature ; 
to give those who desire to pursue their studies, after leaving school, 
an available opportunity to follow prescribed courses of the most 
approved reading; to enable others, who have made considerable 
progress in education, to review their past studies, and, particularly, 
to encourage individual home reading and study on systematic and 
Catholic lines." Besides the school a reading circle for home work 
all the year round is in successful operation. A full course requires 
four years' study, but members may join for one year or longer. 
The term each year begins October i and ends July i. Special 
or post-graduate courses will be prepared for those who complete 
the regular course. An annual fee of fifty cents shall be paid by 
each member. This fee is required to meet the necessary expenses 
incidental to the work, namely, printing, postage, etc., and shall be 
remitted to the general secretary with the application. 



Officers. 

Rev. Thomas J. Conaty, D.D., Presi- 
dent. 

Rev. P. A. Halpin, S.J., First Vice- 
President. 



John Byrne, Second Vice-President. 
Rev. M. M. Sheedy, Treasurer, Chair- 
man of the Directing Board. 
Warren E. Mosher, A.M., Secretary. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



55 



CENTENARY COLLEGE. 



Jacksofi, La. 


Men. 


Methodist. 


Income, 
$4,OCO 


Students, 
75 


Instructors, 
7 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
3,000 



The college was established in 1825 by the State of Louisiana, 
and was transferred to the Methodist Church in 1845. ^^ ^s gov- 
erned by twenty trustees. Admission is on examination in prescribed 
studies or their equivalent. The degrees are B.A., B.S., and M.A., on 
examination. The college year is from September 2 to June 3. A 
gymnasium, with athletic grounds, has been recently established. 

There are two literary societies, with libraries of 1,600 volumes 
each, a Christian Association, and several athletic clubs. Chapters 
of the following fraternities have been established : * K 2, 1855-1861 ; 
Mystical Seven, 1857-1S61 ; A K E, 1857-1862; X *, 1858-1861 ; and 
K E, 18S5. Of the 308 graduates, 291 are living. The oldest of these 
is A. J. Norwood, 1838, of Clinton, La. 



Faculty. 



Rev. C. W. Carter, D.D., President, 

Mental and Moral Science. 
G. H. Wiley, M.A., Languages. 
Thomas Carter, A.B., English. 



W. H. Carter, B.S., Mathematics. 
J. M. Sullivan, M.A., Natural Science. 
C. C. Miller, B.S., Preparatory Dep't. 
J. M. Sullivan, Sec. of Faculty. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



Fayette, Mo. 


Co-Educatiojial. Methodist. 


Income, 
$12,128 


Students, 
1 60 


Instructors, Buildings, 
9 4 


Books, 

5.500 



The college was organized in 1857. The number of graduates 
since 1859 have been 106. It has a campus of twenty acres and three 
buildings, with a gymnasium and athletic grounds. The endowment 
yields some $10,000. Degrees of B.A., B.Ph., and M.A. are con- 
ferred. The school is governed by fourteen curators. The academic 
year lasts from September 10 to June 10. Of the 107 alumni, 90 are 
living. E. R. Boston, 1861, of Denver, Col., is the oldest. A chapter 
of the * A fraternity was organized in 1S76, and lasted two years. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. D. Hammond, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy and Christianity. 

O. H. P. Corprew, A.M., Greelc. Latin. 

William A. Frantz, A.M., English 
and Modern Languages. 

J. W. Kilpatrick, A.M., Natural His- 
tory, Mineralogy, and Geology. 

A. F. Hendrix, A.M., Greek and Latin. 



Rev. R. T. Bond, A.M., Mathematics 

and Astronomy. 
T. Berry Smith, A.M., Chemistry and 

Physics. 
W. H. Key, Preparatory Department. 
Charles E. Davis, A.M., Mathematics 

and English. 
Frank J, Mapel, Gymnasium. 



56 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE. 

New Berlin, Pa. Co-Educational. Evangelical. 



Income, 
$3,oco 



Students, 
79 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
4,217 



The college was founded through the efforts of Bishop W. W. 
Orwig, of the Evangelical Association, in 1855, and was first incor- 
porated as Union Seminary. Owing to the war it was closed in 1863 
and its charter was forfeited. In 1865 Rev. M. J. Carothers secured 
its reorganization. The principals have been Rev. W. W. Orwig, 
1855-1859; Rev. Francis Hendricks, A.M., 1859-1860; A. S. Sassa- 
man, A.M., 1860-1862 ; Rev. John H. Leas, A.M., 1862-1863 ; Rev. 
Francis Hoffman, A.M., 1865-1869; D. Deninger, 1869-1874; Rev. 
Francis M. Baker, A.M., 1874-1879; Rev. J. W. Bentz, A.M., March 
to December, 1S79 ; and Rev. A. E. Gobbler, who has been president 
since the new articles of incorporation were granted in 1880. The 
college is now the property of the United Evangelical Church. In- 
struction is given in classical, scientific, and commercial courses, as 
well as in theology. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. There is 
no gymnastic nor military drill. 

The students maintain an Agassiz Association, and three literary 
societies, — the Excelsior, Neocosmian, and Enigma, the last of which 
is for women students, — as well as three Christian Associations 
and a baseball club and football team. Of the 129 graduates, 117 
are living; the oldest of these is Miss Kate Swinford, 1859, of 
Philadelphia. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Aaron E. Gobble. A.M., D.D., 

President, Mental and Moral Science, 

and Greek. 
Alvin M. Wonder, A.M., Mathematics 

and Latin. 
William P. Winter, A.M., Natural 

Sciences and German. 



Ida R. Bowen, English Language and 

Literature. 
Lewis E. Walter, B.E., Mathematics. 
M. S. Bentz, Penmanship. 
M. J. Randall, Commercial Branches. 
Maude V. Bowen, Lizzie H. Smith, 

Instrumental Music. 



CENTRAL TENNESSEE COLLEGE. 

Nashville, Tenn. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
19,978 



Students, 
460 



Instructors, 
40 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was chartered in i865. Since 1870 there have been 
470 graduates in all, 270 of whom were graduated in medicine. 
The school is governed by thirteen trustees. The departments are 
English, normal, college, medicine and dentistry, law, theology, as 
well as an industrial and training school. There is a students' endow- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



57 



ment association, an improvement league, library, congress, lyceum, 
and Blackstone Club, as well as two Christian Associations and four 
missionary societies. 

FactUty. 



J. Braden,D.D., President, Philosophy. 

Rev. William Osburn, A.M., Science. 

Matthew W. Dogan, A.M. Mathe- 
matics and Librarian. 

David W. Byrd, A.M., Greek and Latin. 

Emma A. Parker, History and Lit. 

Mrs. H. G. Hipp, Abby Barry, Annie 
E. Beall, ElJa Woodworth, Mrs. H. 
Pattengale, Normal and English. 



H. G. Hipp, A.M., Normal Dep't. 

M. E. Braden, Music. 

Mrs. M. W. Dogan, Miss WiUie Sim- 
mons, Piano and Organ. 

Carrie E. Walker, Annie E. Beall, 
Model School. 

Rev. W. T. Shedd, D.D., Bursar. 

Cynthia C. Mitchell, Matron. 

Van J. Davis, Assistant Librarian. 



CENTRAL UNIVERSITY. 



Pella, loxva. 


Co-Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
^3,600 


Students, 


Instructors, 
II 


Buildings, 


Books, 
5,000 





The university was founded in 1853 by a convention of Baptists. 
Instruction was suspended during the war. In 1870 the debts of the 
institution were paid, and the school was reorganized. The campus 
and buildings are valued at $35,000, and there are productive funds 
of $40,000. The expenses for the year are $.133. The president is 
J. Stuart, B.D., Ph.D. 

{Further information lacking.) 



CENTRAL UNIVERSITY. 

Richmond, Ky. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$28,000 



Students, 
754 



Instructors, 



'' Buildings, 



Books, 
8,000 



The school was founded in 1874. The expenses for the year are 
$175. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized 
among the students: 2 A E, 1882-1890; 2 N, 1883; A T n, 1884- 
1890; * A 0, 1885, 3.nd A K E, 1885. The graduates number more 
than 700, of whom some 600 are living. The oldest of these are 
French Tipton, of Richmond, and Prof. B. L. Hobson, A.M., of 
Chicago, of the class of 1875. The chancellor is L. H. Blanton, D.D. 
(Further information lacking.) 



58 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



CENTRAL WESLEYAN COLLEGE. 

Warrentoii, Mo. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$14,410 



Students, 
265 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 

5,000 



The school was founded in 1864 by the German Methodist Con- 
ferences. It is governed by fifteen trustees. Admission is by exami- 
nation for candidates over the age of fifteen. A classical, scientific, 
and literary course, each of four years, lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., 
and B.L. Master's degrees are also conferred. The expenses for 
the year, lasting from September 15 to June 10, are from ^120 to 
$200. Fees of $5 are charged for college diplomas, and of ^2 and 
$3 for commercial and musical diplomas. 

Associated with the college are a theological seminary, musical 
conservatory, and military department. Special attention is paid to 
the study of German. Attendance at chapel is required. Besides 
the college proper, a chapel and concert hall, a ladies' home, two 
dormitories, and a church are included in the buildings. A library, 
museum, and laboratory have recently been equipped. The grounas 
consist of a grove of maple-trees on the high ridge separating the 
Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, sixty miles west of St. Louis. 

The students publish the " College Star," a monthly. The soci- 
eties are the Beethoven Association, Goethenian Society, Garfield 
Society, Germania Verein, Philomathia (for women). Oratorical 
Association, Union Temperance Society, and a military company. 
Of the 300 graduates, the oldest is Prof. J. H. Frick, 1870, of 
Liberty, Mo. 

Faculty. 



George B. Addicks, A.M., President, 

Theology and Philosophy. 
John H. Frick, A.M., Mathematics 

and Sciences. 
Albert Sauer, A.M., Music. 
Henry Vosholl, A.M., English and 

History. 
John M. Kinkel, A.M., German. 
John H. Asling, Ph.D., Latin and 

Greek. 



Henry W. Steininger, Violin and 

Drawing. 
John L.Nuelsen, A. M.,B.D., Theology. 
Jennie Selleck, Vocal Music. 
Jacob Boss, A.M., Commercial Dep't. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Olivia Heidel, J. P. Koeller, Hy. Buth- 
mann, W. F. Isler. 



CENTRE COLLEGE. 

Danville, Ky. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$23,000 



Students, 
269 




Instructors, 
16 



Books, 
11,138 



The college was chartered in 1819, and the first class was gradu- 
ated in 1824. The presidents have been the Revs. : Joseph Cham- 
berlam, 1823-1826 ; David C. Proctor, temporary president till 1828 ; 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



59 



William Blackburn, 1828-1830; John C. Young, 1830-1857 ; L. W. 
Green, 1857-1863; \V. L. Breckinridge, 1863-1S6S; Prof. O. Beatly, 
1868-18S8, when the Rev. W. C. Young, son of a former president, 
was chosen. In all, 1,100 alumni have been graduated. 

Two courses lead to degrees of B.A. and B.S., and a certificate is 
given to elective students. There is also a law school. There are 
forty-eight scholarships of $1,000 each, and six of $50, and four of 
$100 a year. The interest of $1,500 is given to the best Latin stu- 
dent in the Sophomore class, and the interest of $1,000 to the best 
Senior. Two gold medals are competed for annually by the two 
literary societies, — the Chamberlain, and the Demologian. The col- 
lege grounds cover twenty-two acres. The annual expenses are from 
$125 to $150. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic drill are com- 
pulsory. Negroes are excluded. The academic year lasts from 
September 9 to June 9. 

The students publish "The Cento," a monthly. Besides the 
above-mentioned societies, and a football and baseball team, chap- 
ters of the following fraternities have been organized: B n, 1847; 
* A 0,1855; *r4iS56; $KE, 1 860-1 862; EX, 1S76, and KA, 1883. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William Clark Young, D.D., 

LL.D., President, Moral Philosophy. 
Rev. John Lapsley McKee, D.D., 

Vice-President, Christian Evidences. 
John Cilley Fales, A.M., F.G.S.A., 

Geology and Biology. 
Alfred Brierley Nelson, A.M., M.D., 

Mathematics. 
John W. Redd, A.M., Greek. 
Samuel Robertson Cheek, A.M., Latin. 



J. Proctor Knott, LL.D., Law, Civics. 
Robert P. Jacobs, LL.D., Law. 
John W. Yerkes. A.M., LL.B , Law. 
C. H. A. Wager, A. B., Ph.D., English. 
W. O. Stillwell, M.E., Chem., Physics. 
M. Douglas Flattery, M. G., Physical 

Culture. 
Leslie Carro] Bosky, A.M., Principal 

of Academy. 
John Buford Wood, A.B., Assistant. 



Qicincy, III. 



CHADDOCK COLLEGE. 

Co-Edjicational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 



1^0 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was founded in 1853. It is situated on the east bank 
of the Mississippi, two hundred and fifty feet above the river, on 
ground covering two acres. The trustees number twenty-eight, of 
whom three are alumni. Admission is upon certificate. Three college 
courses, — the classical, Latin-scientific and literary, — are offered, 
besides preparator} courses, and a course in music and law. A sum- 
mer school has recently been established. The degrees are B.A., 
B.S , B.L., and B.LL., as well as M.A., after three years. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 8 to June 10, are $140. 
A gold medal is offered for the best law thesis. Attendance at 



6o 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



chapel is required. The use of tobacco on the campus, and the 
visiting of theatres or opera houses is forbidden. The societies are 
the Cartesian and Adelphic, maintaining halls, two Christian Asso- 
ciations, and an athletic association. The graduates number 200. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Benjamin W. Baker,M.A.,Ph.D., 
President, Ethics and Metaphysics. 

Rev. Abner Clarke, M.A., B.D., Sci- 
ence and Greek. 

Hallie Hall, M.A., English. 

Louisa A. Moore, Ph.B., English. 

Lucy Bates, B.S., Languages. 

W. E. Baker, A.B., Business Dep't. 

Mary Baker, A.B., Music. 

Walter D. Agnew, Mathematics. 



Mrs. L. A. Moore, Art and Drawing. 

Carl Gardner, Instrumental Music. 

L. E Emmons, LL.B., Torts and 
Common Law. 

C. E. Epler, LL.B., Equity, Evi- 
dence, and Practice, 

H, M. Swope, LL.B., Corporation and 
Probate Law. 

T. R. Petri, LL.B., Contracts and 
Criminal Law. 



CHAUTAUQUA. 

The Chautauqua Assembly was organized in 1874 as the result of 
a joint plan of Lewis Miller and John H. Vincent. It holds annual 
sessions during July and August at Chautauqua, N. Y. The plan 
includes courses of instruction in language, literature, science, and 
art, lecture courses, musicales, recitals, and concerts, and various 
forms of entertainment and recreation. 

The Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle, J. L. Hurlbut, New 
York, General Secretary; Kate F. Kimball, Buffalo, Executive 
Secretary, was organized at Chautauqua in 1878, with the aim of 
continuing the influence of the assembly throughout the year in all 
parts of the country. Since that time more than two hundred and 
twenty thousand members have been enrolled. The circle aims to 
promote habits of reading and study in history, literature, science, 
and art, in connection with the routine of daily life. The course 
seeks to give "the college outlook" on the world and life. The 
essentials of the plan are : A definite course covering four years 
each year's course complete in itself; specified volumes approved by 
the counsellors, allotment of time by the week and month, a monthly 
magazine with additional readings and notes, a membership book 
with review outlines, and other aid. Individual readers may have 
all the privileges and local circles may be formed by three or four 
members. The time required is about one hour daily for nine months. 
Certificates are granted to all who complete the course. Seals are 
affixed to the certificates which are granted for collateral and ad- 
vanced reading. Any one may become a member of the C. L. S. C. 
by sending an application together with fifty cents (the annual fee) to 
John H. Vincent, Drawer 194, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Officers. 



Lewis Miller, President. 
W. A. Duncan, Secretary. 
E. A. Skinner, Treasurer. 



John H. Vincent, Chancellor. 
William R. Harper, Principal. 
G. E. Vincent, Vice-Chancellor. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



6i 



CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY. 

Canton^ Mo. Co- Educational. Disciples of Christ. 



Income, 
$1,500 



Students, 
71 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,500 



The university was founded in 1852. It is governed by nineteen 
trustees. There is an ancient and modern classical course, leading to 
the degrees of B.A. and B.S. The college grounds cover nineteen 
acres. The academic year lasts from September 10 to June 11. The 
students maintain one Biblical and three literary societies. Of the 
181 graduates since 1857, no less than 150 are preachers. 



Faculty. 



Clinton Lockhart, A.M., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Hebrew and Sacred Literature. 

B. H. Smith, A.M., LL.D., Evidences 
of Christianity. 

A. J. Youngblood, A.M., Philosophy 
and Latin. 

Alex. C. Hopkins, A.M., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

J. H. Carter, A.M., Greek, German, 
and French. 



Belle H. Updegraff, A.M., English and 
History. 

R. B. Turner, M.D., Anatomy, Phy- 
siology, and Hygiene. 

O. S. Reed, A.M., Elocution, Oratory. 

Mary B. Hopkins, Music. 

Jennie H. Youngblood, Voice Culture. 

Mary A. Lockhart, Painting. 

A. C. Hopkins, Secretary of Faculty. 



CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY. 

Orangeburg, S. C. Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
^25.000 



Students, 
570 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
12 



Books, 
1,800 



This institution for colored students owes its foundation to Lee 
Claflin, of Boston. In 1S70 a charter was obtained, and sixty-seven 
acres of land purchased. In 1872 the college of agriculture and of 
mechanical arts was organized, and a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres was secured. The college is governed by twenty-one trustees, 
with a board of sixteen for the college of agriculture. Nine courses 
of study lead to degrees of B.A. and B.S. The college year is from 
October 3 to May 22. Besides several literary societies, there are 
two Christian Associations, a building for which is in progress. Of 
the 300 graduates, 2S0 are living, the oldest of whom is W. S. 
Buckley, 1882, of Orangeburg, S. C. 



Faculty. 



L. M. Dunton, D.D., President, Agri- 
culture. 

James S. Heyward, A.M., Physical 
Science. 

L. M. Dunton, A.M., Preceptress, 
Literature and German. 



William L. Bulkley, Ph.D., Latin. 
Mortimer Glover, A.M., History and 

Political Science. 
P. F. Stevens, D.D., Mathematics. 
Charles D. Mead, A.M., Latin and 

Pedagogics. 



62 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Joseph C. Hartzell, Jr., B.S., B.Lit., 

Biology and Mineralos;y. 
Charles H. Sears, A.M., Pedagogics 

and English Department. 
William R. A. Palmer, A.M., B.D., 

Greek. 
R. Charles Bates, Drawing and Manual 

Training. 



Mrs. J. C. Hartzell, Jr., Music. 

M. Louise Linebarger, Music. 

Eva Penheld, Director Memorial 

Home. 
Charles H. Sears, A.M., S. Rufus 

Youngblood, A.B., Jessie E. Stoney, 

Eliza R. Bowler, Ada G. Doar, 

Alice J. Blakely, A.B. 



CLARK UNIVERSITY. 



South Atlanta^ Ga. 



Co-Educational. 



Methodist, 




Income, 
$9,163 



Students, 
400 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
4 



Clark University was founded in 1869, and incorporated in 1877 
by the Freedman's Aid and Educational Association. The school is 
governed by twenty-seven trustees. It gives the degrees of B.A., 
B.S., and M.A., as well as mechanical engineering. No money is 
required for tuition. Since the founding of the school, in all 124 stu- 
dents have been graduated. The academic year is from October i to 

•^ ' Faculty. 

Flora Mitchell, Domestic Economy. 
Sara Melissa Soule, Preceptress. 
Sibyl Eliza Abbott, A.M., Fifth and 



Rev. David Clarke John, A.M., D.D., 

President, Mental Science. 
William Henry Crogman, A.M., Latin 

and Greek. 
Charles Henry Turner, M.S., Natural 

Sciences. 
George William Kessler, M.S., Math. 
Arthur Willis Rowell, Prin. Normal 

Department, Methods of Instruction. 
Elizabeth Whitaker John, History, 

English Literature. 



Sixth Grades. 
Josie Emma Holmes, Third and Fourth 

Grades. 
Marie Isabel Hardwick, First and 

Second Grades. 
Ariel S. Bowen, Instrumental Music. 
John Henry Shilling, Vocal Music. 
Marie Louise Hyde, Registrar. 



CLARK UNIVERSITY. 



Worcester, Mass. 


Men. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 


Students, 


Instructors, 
41 


Buildings, 


Books, 
16,000 









Only graduate students are admitted. No entrance examinations 
are required. Instruction is given in mathematics, physics, chemis- 
try, biology, and psychology. Special research is carried on in all 
these courses. The highest appointment is that of docent, preceding 
that of doctor. Candidates for the degree of Ph.D. must have done 
two or three years of graduate work. There are ten fellowships of 
$600 and ten of $400 a year, and ten scholarships of $200 and ten of 
^100 a year. With eight the annual fee of $200 is remitted. The 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



63 



library has 16,000 volumes, and receives 239 periodical publications. 
Besides the "Journal of Psychology and Pedagogy," thirteen publi- 
cations are issued annually by the university. 

Faculty. 



G. Stanley Hall, Ph.D., LL.D., Pres. 
William E. Story, Ph.D., Math. 
Clifton F. Hodge, Ph.D., Physiology 

and Neurology. 
Edmund C. Sanford, Ph.D., Psychol. 
Henry Taber, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Arthur G. Webster, Ph.D., Physics. 
William H. Burnham, Ph.D. , Pedagogy. 



Alexander F. Chamberlain, Ph.D., 
Anthropology. 

Joseph de Perott, Docent in Math. 

Herman T. Lukens, Ph.D., Docent 
in Pedagogy. 

Adolf Meyer, M.D., Docent in Psy- 
chiatry. 

Louis N. Wilson, Librarian. 



CLARKSON MEMORIAL SCHOOL. 

Potsdam, N. Y. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^15,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 



Books, 



The Thomas S. Clarkson Memorial School of Technology was 
founded in 1895, ^""^ opened its doors to students in September, 
1896. It v.'as established in commemoration of the late Thomas S. 
Clarkson, of Potsdam, who before his death in 1894 had expressed 
a wish to found such a school. His three sisters, with the help of 
a committee, the members of which visited .the most prominent 
schools of technology in the East, endeavored to carry out their 
brother's plans by establishing the present school. The plan is to 
train students for the engineering profession, laboratory work, and 
for the various branches of industrial art and the applied sciences, 
together with the usual liberal studies. Candidates for admission 
must be sixteen years old. Both sexes are admitted on an equal 
footing. Tuition is from $20 to $40 for term of twenty weeks, and 
from $6 to $10 for manual training. Students in the State Normal 
School of Potsdam can attend all courses given in the new school 
free of charge. A course in engineering leads to the degree of B.S. 
No other degree is given. The endov/ment fund is $300,000, and 
$200,000 have been spent for the buildings and equipment. 



Faculty. 



Charles W. Eaton, Director, Tech- 
nology. 

Henry ^B. Dates, B.S., Electrical En- 
gineering. 

Edward Robinson, B.S., Mechanical 
Drawing and Designs. 



Henry R. Hedge, Mathematics and 
Languages. 

Clarence A. McDonald, M.E., Ma- 
chines and Smithing. 

Sarah A. Nichols, Domestic Arts. 



64 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



COE COLLEGE. 



Cedar Rapids^ la. Co-Educational. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 
$12,000 


Students, 
170 


Instructors, 
12 


Buildings, 
2 


Books, 
2,500 



Coe College had its origin in a school opened in 1851, which organ- 
ized as a collegiate institute afterwards known as the Parsons Semi- 
nary and Coe Collegiate Institute, finally adopting the name of Coe 
College in 1881. The first president was Rev. Stephen Phelps, who 
was followed by the present incumbent in 1887. From the sale of 
real estate $So,ooo have been realized for the college, and $50,000 is 
still expected. The total endowment is $270,000. The college is 
governed by eighteen trustees. There are four courses, — the clas- 
sical, philosophical, engineering, and scientific. In the last two years 
a large number of studies are elective. Twenty prizes, varying 
from $5 to $25, are given for excellence in various studies. 

There is a gymnasium with athletic grounds, a campus of ten acres, 
and a building for the Y. M. C. A. A preparatory school is also 
maintained. The students have organized four literary societies, 
and publish a monthly paper called " The Cosmos." 



Faculty. 



Rev. James Marshall, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Mental and Moral Science and 
Political Economy. 

Rev. Robert A. Condit, A.M., An- 
cient Languages. 

Alice King, English and History. 

CUnton O. Bates, A.B., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry and Physical Sciences. 

Stephen W. Stockey, Sc.M., Natural 
Sciences and Biology. 



Gordon V. Skelton, C.E., Mathe- 
matics and Engineering. 

M. Leeb, Modern Languages. 

John A. Rockfellow, A.B., Head of 
Preparatory. 

Marian H. Kilbourne, Lady Princi- 
pal, Elocution, Physical Culture. 

Margaret West, Instrumental Music. 

Annie Snyder, Vocal Music. 



COLBY UNIVERSITY. 



V/aterville, Me. Co-Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$37,689 


Students, 
260 


Instructors, 

IS 


Buildings, 
10 


Books, 
31,000 



Colby University was founded in 1820, and was formerly called 
"Waterville College. In all, 1,037 students have been graduated, of 
whom 690 are now living ; the oldest of these is Albert N. Paine, 
1832, of Bangor, Me. The fiftieth and seventy-fifth anniversaries 
of the college were duly observed. There is a gymnasium, with an 
athletic ground covering eleven acres. The college grounds cover 
twenty-five acres. Degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.A. are given. Attend- 
ance at chapel is compulsory, as is attendance in the gymnasium 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



65 



during the winter term. Negroes are not excluded, though but three 
have attended in all. The students publish the " Colby Echo," a 
fortnightly, and the " Colby Oracle," an annual. Among the socie- 
ties organized by students are an athletic association, two Christian 
Associations, a chess club, and chapters of the following fraternities: 
A K E, 1845 ; Z % 1850; A T, 1852 ; 2 K, 1S74; and * A 0, 18S4. 



Faculty. 



Nathaniel Butler, D.D., President, 
Psychology, Ethics, and Sociology. 
W. Elder, Chemistry. 
J. D. Taylor, Latin. 
W. S. Bailey, Mineralogy and Geology. 
C. B. Stetson, Greek. 
J. W. Block, History, Polit, Economy. 



A. J. Roberts, English. 

A. Marquardt, Modern Languages. 

A. H. Evans, Greek. 

E. W. Hall, Librarian. 

L. E. Warren, Mathematics and Art. 

G. D. B. Pepper, Biblical Literature. 

W. A. Rogers, Physics and Astronomy. 



COLGATE UNIVERSITY. 



Hamilton, N. Y. 


Men. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
^89.475 


Students, 
310 


Instructors, 
34 


Buildings, Books, 
II 25,000 



Histo)y and Organization: Colgate University was founded in 1816 
by Daniel Heascall, D.D. One hundred and twenty acres of land 
were given for a college site in 1826, to be increased to two hundred 
acres at a later time. The presidents have been Nathaniel Kendrick, 
D.D., 1836-1848; Stephen W. Tavlor, LL.D., 1851-1856; George W. 
Eaton, D.D., LL.D., 1856-1868 ; Ebenezer Dodge, D.D., LL.D., 186S- 
1890; George WiUiam Smith, LL.D., 1895-. 

The fiftieth anniversary of the university was celebrated on May i, 
1869. An effort to move the university to Rochester failed after a 
controversy of three years. 

The college is governed by a corporation of twenty-five members. 
There is a fund of $500,000, one half the interest of which is added 
to the principal. Three parallel courses lead to degrees of B.A., M. A., 
B.L., B.Ph., B.S., and B.D. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic 
exercise is compulsory. 

Scholarships atid Prizes: Tuition and yearly expenses are $60 and 
from $200 to $400. There are sixty-four scholarships, yielding from 
$30 to $90 a year. The education society aids poor students ; and 
there are thirty prizes of from $12 to $60 for excellence in study. 

College Adjuncts : The library receives an income of $25,000 a year. 
There is a gymnasium accommodating four hundred, and an athletic 
field of fifteen acres. The students publish the " Madisonenses," a 
bi-weekly paper, and the " Salmagundi," the college annual. There 
is an athletic association, with a football eleven, a baseball nine, and 
a track team; a glee club, a banjo, guitar, and mandolin club, a uni- 
versity quintette, a students' private band, a press club, dramatic 
club, students' association, Laurie Club, and Y. M. C. A. Chapters 

5 



66 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



A A*, 1850-1S51 ; 
iSSo; * r A, 4> ^F 



of the following fraternities have been established : 
A K E, 1856; A Y, 1868; A *, 1S74-1876; B n, 
1887 ; * K % 1887 ; N E ; and BAB. 

The alumni now living number 1,260. Of these, Philetus B. Spear, 
of Hamilton, of the class of 1836, is the oldest. 



Facility. 



George William Smith, A.B., LL.B., 
President, 

Philetus Bennett Spear, D.D., He- 
brew and Latin. 

Alexander McWhorter Beebee, D.D., 
Logic and Homiletics. 

Newton LloydAndrews, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Greek. 

James M or ford Taylor, LL.D., Math. 

William Hale Maynard, D.D., Eccle- 
siastical History. 

Sylvester Burnham, D.D., Old Testa- 
ment Interpretation. 

Joseph Frank McGregory, A.M., 
F C.S., Chemistry and Mineralogy. 

William Henry Crawshaw, A.M., 
English Literature. 

Nathaniel Schmidt, A.M., Semitic 
Languages and Literature. 

William Newton Clarke, D.D., Chris- 
tian Theology. 

Robert Webber Moore, Ph.B., French 
and German. 

Albert Perry Brigham, A.M., Geology 
and Natural History. 



New 



David Foster Estes, A.M._ 
Testament Interpretation. 

Arthur Jones, D.D., Homiletics. 

Ernest Fox Nichols, B.S., Physics. 

John Greene, Ph.D., Latin. 

Ralph Wilmer Thomas, A.M., Rhet- 
oric and Public Speaking. 

Albert Cook McGregory,Ph.D., Phys- 
ics. 

Melbourne Stuart Read, Ph.D., Phi- 
losophy. 

Charles Worthen Spencer, A.B., His- 
tory and Economics. 

Eugene Pardon Sisson, A.M., Prin- 
cipal of Colgate Academy. 

Thomas Joseph Brj'an, A.B., French 
and Public Speaking. 

William Frank White, A.B., Greek. 

Wayland Morgan Chester, A.B., Ge- 
ology and Natural History. 

Herbert Edward Nims, A.B., Chem- 
istry. 

James Paddock Taylor, A.B., Peda- 
gogy. 

May Frances Smith, Librarian. 



COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.* 

Cleveland, Ohio. Wofuen. No7t-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
128 



Instructors, 
27 



Buildings, 

2 



Books, 



History and Organization: The college was opened in 1888 as a 
part of Western Reserve University. It is governed by a board of 
twenty-three trustees, and an advisory counsel of twenty-two mem- 
bers. The students are required to pass examination on studies 
previously pursued in other colleges, but are also admitted upon cer- 
tificate. Many elective courses are offered. The degrees are B.A., 
B.L., and B.Ph. The college dues are $75 a year. There are scholar- 
ships for worthy students, and honors in German, Greek, Latin, and 
mathematics, and a publication fund for the results of original 
research. 

College Adjuncts : The gymnasium is modern and effective. There 
is an athletic association, a Christian Association, and several other 

* See Western Reserve University. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



67 



clubs and societies maintained by the students. 

lish the "College Folio." ^ ,^ 

Faculty. 



The students pub- 



Charles Franklin Thwing,D.D.,LL.D., 
President. 

Hiram Collins Haydn, D.D., LL.D., 
Biblical Literature. 

Mary Noyes Colvin, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages. 

Emma Maud Perkins, A.B., Latin. 

Stephen Francis Weston, A.M., Po- 
litical and Social Science. 

Harold North Fowler, Ph.D., Greek. 

Henry Piatt Cushing, M.S., Geology. 

Henry Eldridge Bourne, B.D., History 
and Registrar. 

Robert Waller Deering, Ph.D., Ger- 
manic Languages and Literature. 

Clarence Walter Ayer, A.M., English 
and Librarian. 

Jennette Barbour Perry, A.B., English. 

Herbert Austin Aikins, Ph.D., Phi- 
losophy. 

Annie Thomson Nettleton, A.B., Eng- 
lish. 



William Henry Hulme, Ph. D., German. 

Ella Jane Morse, Gymnastics. 

Lemuel Stoughton Potwin, D.D., Eng- 
hsh. 

Edward Williams Morley,M.D., Ph.D., 
LL.D., Nat. His. and Chemistry. 

Frank Perkins Whitman, A.M., Physics 
and Astronomy. 

Charles Harris, Ph.D., German. 

Frederick Morris Warren, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Francis Hobart Herrick,Ph.D., Biology. 

Samuel Ball Platner, Ph.D., Latin 
and Sanskrit. 

Edward Gaylord Bourne, Ph.D., His- 
tory. 

Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph.D., Greek. 

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A.M., 
Literary Conditions in America. 

Jessie Boggs, A.M., M.D., Hygiene. 

Elizabeth Currier Annin, Housemis- 
tress. 



COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, S. C. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$10,712 



Students, 
50 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
12,000 



The college, which is the oldest in the State, was chartered in 
17S5, after a petition had been sent to the assembly in 1770. Owing 
to the disturbances of the Revolutionary War the college was not 
actually organized until 1791, when a new charter was obtained, and 
gifts of $60,000, made before tlie war, were realized upon. In 1794 
the first class, numbering six students, was graduated. Among the 
presidents have been: the Rev. Robert Smith, 1785-1797 ; Thomas 
Bee; Rev. George Buist ; Rev. Jasper Adams, 1824-1836; Dr. 
"William Brantley, 1836-1845; Dr. Perronneau Findley, 1845-1857 ; 
Dr. N. R. Middleton, 1857-1880; and Dr. Henry E. Shepherd, the 
present incumbent, who was elected in 1882. 

During the first thirty years the work of the college was practically 
that of a grammar school. It deteriorated steadily until Professor 
Adams was called from Brown University to assume the presidency. 
He raised the school to collegiate rank at once, but his attempted 
abolishment of the preparatory department embroiled him with the 
trustees, who compelled his resignation. As a result of the diffi- 
culties that followed, the city authorities assumed control, detached 
the preparatory department, and constituted a new board of twelve 
trustees, three of whom are members of the city council. 



I 



68 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Admission is by examination. The degree of B.A. is given after 
completion of the four years' curriculum, with one elective course, 
and a graduating essay. M.A. is conferred after two years. Atten- 
dance at chapel is compulsory. Smoking is forbidden on the college 
o-rounds, as is the possession of " fireworks, explosives, firearms, 
knives, dirks, or deadly weapons," or the practice of hazing. The 
expenses of the year, as well as tuition, lasting from October 5 to 
June 29, are $214. Ten scholarships yielding ^150 have been estab- 
lished by the late Kerr Boyce. 

The college now enjoys the income from $200,000, of which 
^170,000 was given by Ephraim Baynard, a planter of the State. 
The city annually appropriates $2,000. A museum of natural his- 
tory was founded in 1851 at the suggestion of Louis Agassiz. The 
library, dating back to the last century, contains 12,000 volumes. 
The Chrestomatic Society, a debating club, which has existed, with 
its hall and library, for more that fifty years, is officially recog- 
nized as an educational adjunct of the college. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized : 2 A E, 1881-1882, and 
A T n, 1889. 

The graduates number 476, of whom 226 are living. The oldest 
of these is the Rev. R. S. Trapier, U. S. N., 1828, of Charleston. 



Faculty. 



Henry E. Shepherd, A.M., LL.D., 

President, History and Engish. 
A. Sachtleben, Greek and Latin. 
Gabriel E. Manigault, M.D., Geology. 
Hancke F. Wagener, B.A., French 

and German. 



Beauregard Boaz, M.A., Librarian, 

Mathematics. 
William R. Cathcart, Jr., A.M., Ph.D., 

Chemistry and Physics. 
R. W. E. Bassett, A.M., French and 

German. 



COLLEGE OF EMPORIA. 

Emporia, Kan. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$10,000 



Students, 
132 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
4,000 



In 1882 the city of Emporia gave forty acres of land, with $40,000, 
for a building, the college to be fully endowed by the Presbyterian 
Synod. An additional gift of $18,000 was given later. Degrees 
of B.A. and M.A. are conferred. There are six prizes, and a schol- 
arship for indigent students. There is a gymnasium with exten- 
sive athletic grounds. Four literary societies and two Christian 
Associations are maintained. The students publish the "College 
Life." The academic year is from September 15 to June 16. 



Faculty, 



John Dunbar Hewitt, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Financial Secretary. 

William Reeside Kirkwood, D.D., 
Mental, Moral, and Political Sci- 
ences. 



William Dennis Ward, A.M., Latin. 

Reuben S. Lawrence, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics, Astronomy, and Greek. 

Vernon Louis Parrington, A.M., Eng- 
lish and French. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



69 



Francis William Bushong, A.M., Ger- 
man and Natural Sciences. 

Martha Roach McCabe, History, Li- 
brarian. 



Hon. Charles B. Graves, Constitu- 
tional Law, 
Ethel Page, A.M., Greek and Geom. 
Sadie Belle Mann, Algebra. 



COLLEGE OF MONTANA. 

Deer Lodge, Mont. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$12,880 



Students, 
lOI 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
3,000 



The school is governed by fourteen trustees. The endowment is 
$50,000. The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.Ph., B.C., C.E., GPh., and 
a degree in mining. Tuition is from $36 to $100 a year; other 
expenses are about $6 per week. There is one scholarship from the 
proceeds of $10,000 for the education of one deserving woman. The 
college grounds comprise twenty acres. The total number of gradu- 
ates is 32, of whom the oldest is H. L. Hilbard, 1889, of New York 
city. 

Facility. 



Rev. A. B. Martin, President, Philos- 
ophy and Sacred Literature. 

Frank Newton Notestein, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mathematics and Botany. 

William Newton McKee, A.B., Greek 
and Latin. 

Catharine Eliza Hutchins, A.B., Eng- 
lish and History, Lady Principal. 

Lena Greve, German and French. 

Gustave Michaud, D.Sc. Chemistry. 



Henry Marquette Lane, M.E., Mining 
and Civil Engineering. 

William R. McLeod, Stenography and 
Typewriting. 

Susie Maud Kraft, Piano and Instru- 
mental Music. 

Evelyn Gorham, Voice. 

Howard Lincoln Major, Violin, Gui- 
tar, Mandolin, and Banjo. 

Nathan Davies Birdseye, Librarian, 



COLLEGE OF ST. JOSEPH. 

St. Joseph, Mo. Co-Educational. N'on-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$5,040 



Students, 

«5 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 



Books, 
600 



The college was founded in 1869. The expenses of the year are 
$200. The graduates number 145, of whom Helen Lehmer, 187 1, is 
the oldest. The president is Furman J. Smith. 

{Further information lacking^ 



70 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



COLLEGE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 

Ne2u York, N. Y. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^53.052 



Students, 
1,695 



Instructors, 
50 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
29>342 



History aftd Onramzation : The Free Academy of New York was 
established in 1848. In 1866 it became a college, and the present 
name was adopted. The first class to complete a four years' course 
was that of 1853. In 1882 the school was opened to all young men 
of New York City. The institution is governed by the board of 
regents of the State, and eleven trustees. 

Admission, Degrees, etc.: Admission is free. All who pass the 
entrance examinations are admitted on probation for eight weeks. 
There are four courses of study, two of five years each : the classical, 
leading to the degree of B.A., and the scientific, leading to the de- 
gree of B.S. ; and two of one year each, the commercial and the 
mechanical. The academic year is divided into two terms, and lasts 
from the Thursday following the second Monday of September to 

June 18. . , 1 rr^u 

Scholarships, Prizes, and Equipment: No tuition is cnarged. 1 here 
is a loan fund for poor students. Eight gold medals, six of silver 
and twenty of bronze, are awarded, besides prizes for speaking, 
mechanical proficiency, and excellence in political economy. There 
is a prize of $80 for the best essay on American affairs, and one of 
j5ioo for the best translation. 

The students publish the "Microcosm," an annual, and "The 
Mercury." There are two literary societies : the Clionian, and the 
Phrenocosmian ; glee and mandolin clubs, an athletic association, 
with lacrosse and football teams, and chapters of the following fra- 
ternities have been established: * B K, A A *, 1855; A K E, 1856; 
X Y, 1857-1882 ; * r A, 1865 ; A T, 1874-1879 : A X, 1881 ; * A 0, 
1884. The graduates from 1853 to last year numbered 1,760, of 
whom 1,350 are living. The oldest is George W. Birdsell, 1853, of 
New York City. 

Faculty. 

Alexander Stewart Webb, LL.D. , Pres- 
ident. 

Robert Ogden Doremus, M.D.,LL.D., 
Chemistry and Physics. 

Adolph Werner, Ph.D., German. 

Alfred George Compton, A.M., Ap- 
plied Mathematics. 

Charles George Herbermann, Ph.D., 
LLD., Latin and Librarian. 

Solomon Woolf, A.M., Descriptive 
Geometry and Drawing. 

Fitz Gerald Tisdall, Ph.D., Greek. 

James Weir Mason, A.M., Pure Math- 
ematics. 

Henry Phelps Johnston, A.r.L, Hist. 



William Stratford, M.D., Ph.D., Nat- 
ural History. 

Casimir Fabregou, A.M., French. 

George Edward Hardy, A.M., Eng. 

Robert H. Hatch, Elocution. 

William George McGiickin, A.B., 
LL.B., Histo'ry. 

John Robert Sim, A.B., Pure Mathe- 
matics. 

Leigh Harrison Hunt, M.S., M.D., 
Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 

Ivin Sickles, M.S., M.D., Natural 
History. 

Calvin Rae Smith, Descriptive Geom- 
etry and Drawing. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



71 



Charles Avery Doremus, M.D., Ph.D., 
Chemistry and Physics. 

Gustave Legras, B.S., Pure Mathe- 
matics. 

Lewis Freeman Mott, M.S., English. 

John J. McNulty, Ph.D., Moral and 
Intellectual Philosophy. 



C. Howard Parmly, M.S., E.E., Ap- 
plied Mathematics. 

Stanislas C. Constant, French. 

Ernest Ilgen, A.B., German. 

August Rupp, A.B,, Latin. 

John Alfred Mandel, Chemistry and 
Physics. 



COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS. 

Woj'cester, Mass. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 




Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
21,000 



The college was founded in 1843, ^^'^ incorporated in 1865. The 
course of study, with the academic course, embraces seven years, 
the last year's study being devoted to rational philosophy and the 
natural sciences. The degrees are B.A. and M.A. Scholarships 
paying tuition, with gold and silver crosses of honor and pre- 
miums for speaking, are offered. There are six leagues and soci- 
eties, besides a philharmonic and glee club, with other associations. 
" The Purple " is published monthly. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Edward A. McGurk, S.J., Presi- 
dent. 

Rev. John F. Lehy, S.J., Vice-Pres. 

Rev. John B. Mullaly, S.J., Treasurer. 

Rev. Joseph F. Hanselman, S.J., 
Studies and Discipline. 

Rev. Joseph Loyzance, S.J. .Chaplain. 

Terence J. Shealy, S.J., Librarian. 

Rev, Francis W. Gunn, S.J., Rational 
and Moral Philosophy. 

Fernand A. Rousseau, S.J., Physics, 
Mechanics, and Geology. 



Patrick M. Collins, S.J., Chemistry 
and Geometry. 

Terence J. Shealy, S.J., Rhetoric. 

Rev. John A. Buckley, S.J., Philip 
M. Finegan, S.J., Ppetry. 

Jeremiah Cronin, S.J., James I. Moak- 
ley, S.J., Humanities. 

Rev, John F. Lehy, S.J., Differential 
and Integral Calculus. 

Rev. Joseph A. Gorman, S.J., Trigo- 
nometry and Analytical Geometry. 

Rev. Alphonse Dufour, S.J., French. 



COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Colorado Springs, Col. Co-Educational. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
300 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 



Books, 
20,000 



Colorado College, the oldest school in the State, was founded in 
1873, ^^<i incorporated and opened in 1874, while Colorado was still 
a territory. The presidents have been: Rev. Jonathan Edwards, 
1874-1875; Rev. James G. Dougherty, 1875-1885; and William F. 
Slocum, Jr., 1888, who is still in charge. Before Mr. Slocum's 



72 



THE COIXEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



election, the college was without a president for three years. The 
first permanent building was occupied in 1880. Dormitories for men 
and women, and a gymnasium, were added in 18S9 and 1891, to be 
followed by a library and observatory of great architectural beauty 
in 1894. During the last year $200,000 have been subscribed in con- 
sequence of a gift of $50,000 from Dr. D. K. Pearson, of Chicago. 

In 1896 the property of Tillotson Academy at Trinidad, Col., was 
transferred to the college. The school is governed by eighteen trus- 
tees. Associated with it is a musical conservatory and Cutler 
Academy. Admission is by examination, except for the graduates 
of the academy, or for those bearing certificates of the Colorado 
State Teachers' Association, or of accredited schools. Three courses, 
of four years each, lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. In the 
junior and senior years a choice of fifty elective courses is offered. 
Attendance at chapel is not required. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September 22 to June 16, are from $100 to $200, of 
which $43 is for tuition. Ten scholarships are offered, three of 
which are of $1,000, one of $700, and three of $500. Several others 
are supported by annual subscription. One prize of $10 is offered 
for proficiency in Greek. The societies are the Women's Educa- 
tional Society (the object of which is to make loans to poor stu- 
dents), the Colorado Scientific Society, an alumni association, two 
Christian Associations, three literary societies, who jointly own a 
society hall, and an athletic association, with football and baseball 
teams, tennis association, and golf clubs. 

University extension was inaugurated in 1894. 



Faculty. 



William Frederick Slocum, Jr., B.D., 
LL.D., President, Philosophy. 

Louis A. E. Ahlers, A.B., Modern 
Languages. 

Susan Almira Bacon, French, German. 

Florian Cajori, M.S., Ph.D., Physics. 

Francis Whittemore Cragin, B.S., 
Geology and Mineralogy. 

Oma Fields, Piano. 

George A. H. Fraser, B.A., M.A., 
Latin. 

M. Clement Gile, B.A., M.A., Greek. 

Rubin Goldmark, Director of Music. 

Blanche Hermann, Piano. 

Edith Huse, Sight Reading. 

Hugh H. Langton, B.A., Librarian. 

Rev, E. C. F. Krauss, Ass't Libr. 

Frank Herbert Loud, B.A., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Rev. George Nathaniel Marden, Hist. 

Paul Martin Mead, Physical Culture. 

Atherton Noyes, B.A., English and 
Greek. 



Marion McGregor Noyes, Latin. 
Edward S. Parsons, B.A., M.A., B.D., 

English. 
Sophie Bendelari de Peralta, Fine Arts. 
Grace A. Prest0n, B.A., M.A., M.D., 

Physiology. 
Louise Reinhardt, Spanish. 
Arthur F. Stearns, B.A., Elocution. 
William Strieby, B.A., M.A., E.M., 

Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
George Szag, Violin. 
Hannah L. Taylor, M.D., Physiology 

and Hygiene. 
Fanny Aiken Tucker, Vocal Music. 
Francis Walker, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

Political Science. 

LECTURERS. 

J. T. Eskridge, M.D., Brain Functions. 
Edward Freeman, M.D., Microscopic 

Analysis of Nervous Tissue. 
Rev. James B. Gregg, D.D., Ethical 

Teaching of Old Testament. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



73 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 

New York, N. Y. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Total Income, 
^770,832.79 



Students, 
1.943 



Instructors, 
265 



Buildings, 
4 (6 projected) 



Books, 
2 1 5,000 



History and Location : King's College, as Columbia University- 
was formerly called, was founded in 1754, under royal charter. The 
design of establishing a college in New York was contemplated fifty 
years before. Active measures began to be taken in 1746, when 
provision was made by law for raising money by public lottery. The 
college was established on a grant of land known as the king's 
farm, the property of Trinity Church, between the present Barclay 
and Murray Streets, overlooking the Hudson River. It was then 
declared by travellers to have the finest site of any college in the 
world. In 1857 it was removed to a block between 49th and 50th 
Streets, New York City, overlooking the East River. From the 
beginning this location was regarded as temporary. The present site 
on Morningside Heights, between ii6th and 120th Streets, was the 
field of the Battle of Harlem. It overlooks the Hudson River on 
one side, and North New York on the other, and is once more de- 
clared to be one of the finest college sites in the world. 

The original charter made the college a non-sectarian one. The 
first class was graduated in 1760 with eight students. During the 
Revolutionary War instruction had to be suspended, the president 
of the college, a royalist, having been forced to flee to England. 
The college buildings were converted into a' military hospital. In 
1784, after a lull of eight years, the school was revived under the 
name of Columbia College. The first student under its new name 
was DeWitt Clinton, while the new president was the son of the first 
president of King's College, The names and terms of the presidents 
areas follows: Samuel Johnson, S.T.D., i7;)4-i763, Myles Cooper, 
LL.D., 1763-1775; Benjamin Moore, A.M., 1775-1776; William 
Samuel Johnson, LL.D., 1787-1800; Charles H. Wharton, S.T.D, 
1801 *; Benjamin Moore, S.T.D. , 1801-1811 ; William Harris, S.T.D. , 
1811-1829; William Alexander Duer, LL.D., 1829-1842 ; Nathaniel 
F. Moore, LL.D., 1842-1849; Charles King, LL.D., 1849-1864; 
Frederick A. P. Barnard, S.T.D.. LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L., Ph.D., 
1864-1889, Seth Low, LL.D., 1890. 

A medical faculty was established in King's College in 1767, and 
consisted at first of six professors. The faculty was discontinued 
in 1813 because of the establishment of the college of physicians and 
surgeons. No degrees in medicine were given for fifty years. In 
i860 the college of physicians and surgeons became the medical 
department of Columbia, but the present charter was not surren- 
dered till 1S91. Instruction in law was first given in 1793. The 
school of mines, now the school of applied science, through the 
efforts of Thomas Egleston, was founded in 1863. In 1880 a school 



* Resigned. 



74 THE COLLEGE YEAR-EOOK. 

of political science was opened. Barnard College, where instruc- 
tion is given to women, was founded in 18S9. Tiie school of philoso- 
phy was established in 1890, and that of pure science in 1892. 

Organization : Columbia University consists of a school of arts 
(the original college), of sundry professional schools, to wit : the 
school of law, the college of physicians and surgeons, the school of 
applied science, of political science, of philosophy, of pure science, 
and Barnard College. The various schools are under their own 
faculties, which in turn are governed by the university council, con- 
sisting of the president, the faculty deans, and one member of each 
faculty. The university as a whole is governed by twenty-four 
trustees, who hold office for life, and who appoint their own 
successors. 

Degrees and Instruction : Degrees are given by all the various 
schools, embracing degrees of bachelors of arts, science, laws, medi- 
cine, and engineering as well as master's and doctor's degrees. The 
college has a four years' course in arts and sciences, leading to the 
degree of B.A. Admission is upon written examination, and can- 
didates must be at least eighteen years of age. Negroes are not 
excluded. Graduates of colleges and scientific schools in good stand- 
ing, and all persons who have received the academic diploma of the 
regents of New York, are admitted without examination. The studies 
for the first two years are obligatory; in the junior year two studies 
are required, and forty-two are elective; in the senior year all are 
elective. In the junior and senior years of Barnard College all 
courses given in the school of arts are open to students. The de- 
grees for Barnard College aie those of Columbia University, and are 
given as such. Attendance at chapel or gymnastic drill is not com- 
pulsory. The college year lasts from October 5 to June 10. 

Tuition, Scholarships, and Aid: The tuition fee is from $150 to 
$200, with special fees in the various schools. The price for tuition 
can be reduced, except in the medical school, on the ground of good 
character and ability. The total expenses of the year range from 
5380 to $1,000. There are twenty-four fellowships yielding the in- 
come of $500 each, twenty-nine scholarships of lesser income, and 
nearly one hundred prizes for the students of the college. In the 
medical school there are three fellowships of $500 each, and one 
prize of $700 in medical science. Three similar prizes are given 
for clinical reports, three for proficiency, and three of $200 and $100 
for medical essays. One scholarship of $1,300, and two of $1,000 
provide for foreign study. Two prizes, one of $1,000, and the other 
of $400, have been established for the best works on North America, 
and there are seven prizes of from $500 to $40 for good work in 
political science. 

Equipment : The annual income is $770,833. The library contains 
215,000 volumes, and receives 500 periodicals. The university press 
publishes " The Bulletin," and all meritorious work in special 
research. Besides the Seth Low library building, costing $100,000, 
a hall to cost $300,000, and two new buildings costing $650,000, six 
new buildings are to be erected, the future cost of which is estimated 
at $2,000,000. One of these is a gymnasium to be connected with 
the present athletic grounds in North New York, and with the 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



75 



university boat-house on the Hudson, which has already been 
completed. 

Instnictors, Students^ and Alumni : The number of students during 
the last current year was 1,943. More than 2,000 are to attend the 
session of 1896-1897. The number of American colleges repre- 
sented in the postgraduate department is 136, and of foreign colleges, 
26. The total number of instructors is 265. The total number of 
alumni last December was 14,634; of these 2,719 had died. The 
oldest living graduate is Hamilton Martin, 1824, of New York. 

Societies and Publications : The following is a list of the societies 
and athletic teams maintained by the students : Pnilolexian Literary 
Society, Barnard Literary Association, Shakespeare Society, Columbia 
Musical Society, Banjo Club, Mandolin Club, Glee Club, Gun Club, 
Athletic Association, with track team, 'varsity eleven, 'varsity crew, 
'varsity nine, lawn tennis club, freshmen crew, and freshmen baseball 
club. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized: 
* B K, A A *, 1836; Y T, 1842; A *, 1S42; X Y, 1846-18S5; A ^, 
1S47; «i>KE, 1855-68; * r A. 1866; * K V, 1872-1876; A K E, 1874; 
A 2 X, 1877-1878; Z % 1879; B n, 1881 ; * A *, 1881 ; A T n, 
18S1-1882 ; A T A, 1882-18S8 ; A X, 1883 ; 4> A 0, 1884 ; A T, 1S85, 
and 5 A E. The students issue "The Columbia Spectator," "The 
Morningside," "The Columbia Literary Monthly," and "The 
Columbia Medical News." 

Officers of Instruction. 
Seth Low, LL.D., President. 



PROFESSORS. 

John Howard Van Amringe, A.M., 
Ph.D., L.H.D., Mathematics. 

Ogden N. Rood, A.M., Physics. 

Thomas Egleston, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Mineralogy and Metallurgy. 

Charles F. Chandler, Ph.D., M.D., 
LL.D., Chemistry. 

John W. Burgess, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 
History, Political Science, and Con- 
stitutional Law. 

Henry S. Munroe, E.M., Ph.D., Min- 
ing. 

*RichmondMayo-Smith, A.M., Ph.D., 
Political Economy and Social Science. 

James W. McLane, M.D,, Obstetrics. 

William R, Ware, B.S., Architecture. 

*Thomas R. Price, M. A., LL.D., Eng- 
lish Language and Literature. 

Frederick R. Hutton, A.M., E.M., 
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering. 

John Krom Rees, A.M., E.M., Ph.D., 
Astronomy. 

Francis Delafield, M.D., LL.D., Medi- 
cine. 

Munroe Smith, A.M., J.U.D., Roman 
Law, Comparative Jurisprudence. 



John G. Curtis, M.D., Physiology. 
Pierre dePeysterRickettSjE.M., Ph.D., 

Analytical Chemistry and Assaying. 
George M. Tattle, M.D., Gynecology. 
Frank J. Goodnow, LL.B., A.M., 

Administrative Law. 

* Richard J. H. Gottheil, Ph.D., Rab- 
binical Literature and Semitic. 

George L. Peabody, M.D., Materia 

Medica and Therapeutics. 
Edwin R. A. Seligman, A.M., Ph.D., 

Political Economy and Finance. 

* Harry Thurston Peck, A.M., Ph.D., 

L.H.D., Latin. 

* Nicholas Murray Butler, A.M., 

Ph.D., Philosophy and Education. 
William T. Bull, M.D., Surgery. 

* William Henry Carpenter, Ph.D., 
Germanic Philology. 

M. Allen Starr, M.D., Diseases of the 
Mind and Nervous System. 

Alfred D. F. Hamlin, A.M., Archi- 
tecture. 

Alfred J. Moses, E.M., Ph.D., Min- 
eralogv. 

Charles E. Colby, E.M.,C.E., Organic 
Chemistry. 

Nathaniel L. Britton, Ph.D., Botany. 

William A. Keener, LL.D., Law. 



* Members of Barnard Faculty. 



76 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Georges. Huntington, M.D., Anatomy. 

* Herbert L. Osgood, A.M., Ph.D., 
Historv. 

* James McK. Cattell, A.M., Ph.D., 

Psychology. 

George M. Gumming, A.B., Law. 

Francis M. Burdick, LL.D., Law. 

George W. Kirchwey, A.B., Law. 

John Bassett Moore, A.B., Interna- 
tional Law and Diplomacy. 

Henry F. Osborn, ScD., Zoology. 

* Edward D. Perry, A.M., Ph.D., 
Greek. 

Frank Dempster Sherman, Ph.B., 

Architecture. 
William A. Dunning, Ph.D., History. 

* A. V. Williams Jackson, A. M., Ph.D., 

Indo-Iranian Languages. 

*Adolphe Cohn, LL.B., A.M., Ro- 
mance Languages and Literatures. 

George E. Woodberry, A.B., Lit. 

Edmund B. Wilson, Ph.D., Inverte- 
brate Zoology, 

James F. Kemp, A.B., E.M., Geology. 

Robert Peele, E.M., Mining. 

William Hallock, A.B., Ph.D., Physics. 

Brander Matthews, A.M., Lit. 

Francis B. Crocker, E.M., Ph.D., 
Electrical Engineering. 

Michael I. Pupin, Ph.D., Mechanics. 

Robert F. Weir. M.D., Surgery. 

T. Mitchell Prudden, M.D., Pathol- 
ogy and Bacteriology. 

William H. Burr, C.E., Civil Eng. 

Robert S. Woodward, C.E., Ph.D., 
Mechanics. 

* Henry A. Todd, Ph.D., Romance 

Philology. 

* George R. Carpenter, A.B., English. 

* Franklin H. Giddings, A.M., Sociol. 
Henry B. Starbuck, LL.B., Law. 
George F, Canfield, LL.B., Law. 
Thomas Scott Fiske, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 
Harold Jacoby, A.B., Astronomv. 
*John B. Clark, Ph.D., Polit. Econ. 

* James R. Wheeler, Ph.D., Greek. 

* Frank N. Cole, Ph.D., Mathematics. 

* James Harvey Robinson. Ph.D., His, 
Frederic S. Lee, Ph.D., Physiology. 

* James C. Egbert, Jr., A.M., Ph.D., 

Latin. 

* James H. Hyslop, Ph.D., Logic, 
Ethics. 

Henry W, Harden, A.B., LL.D., Law. 
E. A. McDowell, Music. 

* Calvin Thomas, A.M., Germanic. 



CLINICAL PROFESSORS AND LECT- 
URERS. 

William H. Draper, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

Abraham Jacobi, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

George M. Lefferts, M.D., Laryn- 
goscopy and Diseases of the Throat. 

Charles McBurney, I\LD., Clinical 
Surgery. 

George H. Fox, M.D., Diseases of the 
Skin. 

Albert H. Buck, M.D., Diseases of 
the Ear. 

Herman Knapp, M.D., Ophthal- 
mology. 

Robert W. Taylor, M.D., Venereal 
Diseases. 

Francis P. Kinnicutt, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

Virgil P. Gibney, M.D., Orthopedic 
Surgery. 

J. West Roosevelt, M.D., Medicine. 

Francis H. Markoe, M.D., Surgery. 

Walter B. James, M.D., Medicine. 

Andrew J. McCosh, M.D., Surgery. 

John W. Brannan, M.D., Contagious 
Diseases. 

DEMONSTRATORS, 

Charles E. Pellew, E.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Bern B. Gallaudet, M.D., Anatomy 
and Surgery. 

Frederick J. Brockway,M.D., Anatomy. 

Joseph A. Blake, M.D., Anatomy. 

George E. Brewer, M.D., Anatomy. 

Ellsworth Eliot, Jr., M.D., Anatomy. 

Lucius W. Hotchkiss, M.D., Anatomy. 

Joseph A. Deghuee, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Douglas Ewell, M.D., Anatomy. 

Howard D. Collins, M.D,, Anatomy. 

Richard H. Cunningliam, M.D., Phy- 
siology. 

Chariest. Carmalt, M.D., Anatomy. 

Walton Martin, M.D., Anatomy. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

James S. C. Wells, Ph.D., Qualitative 
Analj'sis. 

Alexis A. Julien, A.M., Ph.D., Micro- 
scopy and Micro-biology. 

Ferdinand G. Wiechmann, Ph.D., 
Chemical Philosophy and Chemical 
Physics. 

George C. Freeborn, M.D., Normal 
Histology. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



77 



Frank Hartley, M.D., Operative Sur- 
gery. 

Ralph E. Mayer, C.E., Drawing. 

Ira H. Woolson, E.M., Drawing. 

Charles A. Harriman, Architectural 
Drawing. 

* Carlo L. Speranza, A.M., Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

* Eugene H. Babbitt, A.B., Germanic 
Languages. 

Bashford Dean, A.M., Ph.D., Biology. 
Grenville T. Snelling, B.S., Archi- 
tectural Engineering. 

* Clarence H. Young, Ph.D., Greek. 
Timothy M. Cheesman, M.D., Bac- 
teriology. 

* Livingston Farrand, A.B., M.D., 
Physiological Psychology. 

George Francis Sever, Electrical En- 
gineering. 

* Benjamin Duryea Woodward, A.M., 
Ph.D., Romance Languages. 

Andrew E. Foye, C.E., Civil Eng. 
Ira T. Van Gieson, M.D., Normal 

Histology. 
Eugene Hodenpyl, M.D., Pathology. 

* Nelson G.McCrea, A.M., Ph.D., 

Latin. 

James Maclay, C.E., Mathematics. 

Edward Leaming, M.D., Micro-Photo- 
graphy. 

George L. Brodhead, M.D., Practical 
Obstetrics. 

TUTORS. 

Louis H. Laudy, Ph.D., General and 

Applied Chemistry. 
Joseph Struthers, Ph.B., Ph.D., 

Metallurgy. 
Reginald Gordon, A.B., Physics. 
Henry C.Bowen, Quantitative Analysis. 
Joseph C. Pfister, A.M., Mechanics. 
Lea McI. Luquer, C.E., Ph.D., Min- 
eralogy. 
*Louis Marie Auguste Loiseaux, B.S., 

Romance Languages and Literatures. 
William H. Freedman, C.E., E.E., 

Mechanics. 
*HermannT.Vulte, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Charles A. Hollick, Ph.B., Geology. 
Herschel C, Parker, Ph.B., Pliysics. 
James Ewing,M D., Normal Histology. 
Edmund H. Miller, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry and Assaying. 
Gary N. Calkins, B.S., Biology. 
♦William T. Brewster, A.M., Rhetoric. 
Gustave R. Tuska, M.S., C.E,, Civil 

Engineering. 



Ei-vin A. Tucker, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Gynecology. 

Charles P. Warren, A.M., Architec- 
tural Construction. 

Carlton C. Curtis,A.M., Ph.D., Botany. 

Oliver S. Strong, Ph.D., Biology. 

* J. Brace Chittenden, Ph.D., Math. 
*John E. Hill, Ph.B., Mathematics. 
Herman S. Davis, Ph.D., Astronomy. 

ASSISTANTS. 

John S. Ely, M.D., Pathology, and 
Curator of the Museum. 

Alexander R. Cushman, Ph.D., Chem. 

Asa S. Iglehart, A.B., Physics. 

Herbert Percy Whitlock, C.E., Min- 
eralogy. 

Charles C. Trowbridge, B.S., Physics. 

Henry S. Curtis, A.B., Physics. 

Herbert T. Wade, A.B., Physics. 

Luther E. Gregory, C.E., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Whiheld Johnson, Ph.D., Toxicology. 

Parker C. Mcllhiney, Ph.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Metallurgy. 

Edwin M. Kitchel, M.D., Normal 
Histology. 

Marston T. Bogert,A.B.,Ph.B.,Chem. 

*Arthur M. Day, A.M., Political Econ- 
omy and .Social Science. 

* Norman Wilde, Ph.D., Philosophv. 
Thomas H. Harrington, C.E., Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

Adolph Black, C.E., Civil Engineering. 

Theodore C. Janeway, Ph.B., Bacteri- 
ology. 

Harrison G. Dyar, B.S., A.M., Bac- 
teriology. 

Frederick R. Bailey, M.D., Normal 
Histology. 

Samuel A. Tucker, Chemistry. 

Van Home Norrie, M.D., Pathology. 

George H. Ling, A.M., Mathematics. 

George B. German n, A.B., Math. 

*GeorgeC. D. Odell, Ph.D., Rhetoric. 

Nathan R. Harrington, A.M., Biology. 

* Ralph C. Ringwalt, A.B., Rhetoric. 
Halbert P. Gillette, E.M., Physics. 
Henry E. Keys, Ph.D., Physics. 
Charles T. Parker, M.D., Operative 

Surgery. 
Clarke G. Voorhees, A.M., Assaying. 

CURATORS. 

Maximilian K. Kress, A.M., Archi- 
tecture. 

Gilbert van Ingen, Geological Collec- 
tions. 



78 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



John K. Small, A.B., Ph.D., Her- 
barium. 

LECTURERS. 

John Ordronaux, LL.D., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

Frederic Bancroft, Ph.D. American 

History- 
William Z. Ripley, Ph.D., Physical 
Geography and Anthropology. 

Herman J. Schmitz, A.M., Germanic 
Languages and Literatures. 

George Louis Beer, A.M., European 
History. 

David Bandler, A.B., LL.B., Law. 

*Rev. Abraham Yohannan, Oriental 
Languages. 

*Henry J. Burchell, Jr., A.M., Greek 
and Latin. 

*Curtis Hidden Page, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

*Harry A. Gushing, A.M., History. 

Edmond Kelly, A.M., PoUtical His- 
tory of New York. 

Herbert Noble, A.M., LL.B., Pro- 
cedure in Equity and under the Code. 

EhrmanSyme Nadal. A.B., A.M., Eng. 

Dr. Franz Boas, Anthropology. 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS AT 
VANDERBILT CLINIC. 

Medicine. 
Frank W. Jackson, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
George R. Lockwood, M.D. 
William K. Draper, M.D. 
Van Home Norrie, M.D. 
Angier B. Hobbs, M.D. 

Surgery. 
Ellsworth Eliot, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Louis Irving Mason, M.D. 
Edward M. Foote, M.D. 
Joseph I. Higgins, M.D. 
Forbes Hawkes, M.D. 

Neurology' 
Frederick Peterson, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
William H. Caswell, M.D. 
Morton R. Peck, M.D. 
Pearce Bailey, M.D. 
Louis F. Bishop, M.D. 
Charles E. Atwood, M.D. 
Lewis A. Connor, M.D. 
A. W. Ferris, M.D. 
William B. Noyes, M.D. 
Archibald Campbell, M.D. 



Gyiucology . 

George W. Jarman, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
W. L. Stone, M.D. 
B. W. Stiefel, M.D. 
E. H. L. McGinnis, M.D. 
Charles L Proben, M.D. 
John W. Kennedy, M.D. 
E. P. Mallett, M.D. 
W. B. Brinsmade, M.D. 

Ophtha hnology. 

Charles H. May, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
John Herbert Claiborne, M.D. 
Ward A. Holden. M.D. 
Edward B. Coburn, ISLD. 
Henry H. Tvson, M.D. 
Jackson M. Mills, M.D. 
Alexander Duane, M.D. 
Curtis B. Carter, M.D. 

L aryngology. 

D. Bryson Delavan, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
Christopher J. Colles, M.D. 
George A. Richards, M.D. 
William K. Simpson, M.D. 
James P. McEvoy, M.D. 
Edward W. Perkins, M.D. 
John Haskell Billings, M.D. 
Richard Frothingham, M.D. 
Alphonso A. Richardson, M.D. 
Charles W. Stewart, M.D. 
Edmund W. Bill, M.D. 

Otology. 

William Cowen, M D., Chief of Clinic. 
Robert Lewis, M.D. 
A. G. Terrell, M.D. 
Marcus Kenyon, M.D. 

Dermatology. 

George T. Jackson, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
John Cabot, M.D. 
Charles C. Ranson, M.D. 
J. H. P. Hodgson, M.D. 
John Aldrich, M.D. 
Charles T. Dade, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 

Francis Huber, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Joseph Huber, M.D. 
Fred. S. MacHale, M.D. 
Louis M. Silver, M.D. 
F. Bierhoff, M.D. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



79 



GentiO' Urinary and Venereal Diseases. 
James R. Hay den, M.D., Chief of 

Clinic. 
Robert H. Greene, M,D. 
William C. Gilley, M.D. 
Edmond Y. Hill, M.D. 
John Van der Poel, M.D. 
John B. Stein, M.D. 
E. L. Williamson, M.D. 
J. C. P. Van Loan, M.D. 
W. B. Brouner, M.D. 
J. E. Shrady, M.D. 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Henry Drisler, LL.D., Greek. 

Rev. Cornelius R. Dufifiie, S.T.D., 

Chaplain. 
Thomas M. Markoe, M.D., Surgery. 
T. Gaillard Thomas, M.D., Obstetrics 

and Gynecology. 



John T. Metcalfe, M.D., Clinical Medi- 
cine. 

Edward Curtis, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics. 

Fessenden N. Otis, M.D., Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

John D. Quackenbos, A.M., M.D., 
Rhetoric. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

George R. Van de Water, D.D., 

Chaplain. 
George William Warren, Music, and 

Organist. 
Charles Alexander Nelson, A.M., Dep- 
uty Librarian. 
Edwin B. Cragin, M.D., Secretary of 

Faculty of Medicine. 
John F. Plummer, Jr., A.B., Assistant 

Secretary of the University. 



COLUMBIAN UNIVERSITY. 

Washington, D. C. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 

$68,821 



Students, 
1069 



Instructors, 
142 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
11,000 



History arid Organization : The original act of incorporation was in 
1821. In 1873 the present name was adopted. There are eleven 
overseers and seventeen trustees. The university consists of the 
Columbian College, with scientific, summer, graduate, law, medical, 
and dental schools, the University Extension, and the Columbian 
Academy. The endowment is $1,000,000. A school of corporate 
jurisprudence is to be added at a cost of $250,000. 

Admission, Degrees, and Study : Examinations for admission are in 
writing. Appropriate degrees are conferred by all the schools, and 
degrees of Ph.B. and LL.D. are given by the Graduate Faculty. 
Honorary degrees are rarely given. The college year is from 
September 20 to June 10. 

Dues, Scholarships, a7td Prizes: The college admission is $10, and 
a yearly tuition from $50 to $100. Other expenses are from $20 to 
$35 per month, $90 in the scientific school, $80 in the law school, $75 
in the medical school, and $100 in the dental school per year. There 
are seven gold medals given yearly, five prizes of from $20 to $100 
in the law school, and six prizes in the medical school. 

College Adjuncts : There is the Enosinian Society for debate and 
composition in the college, a moot court and court of appeals in the 
law school, as well as a debating society. The following fraternities 
have established chapters at the university: 2 A E, i8i;9-i869; 2 X, 
1864-1878; * K Y, 1868; A T n, 1874; * A *, 1884; n B *, 1S89. 



8o 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



By special agreement the resources of some twenty national scien- 
tific societies, besides the libraries and museums of Washington, 
have been made available for students. 



Faculty. 



Benaiah L. Whitman, A.M., D.D., 
President. 

Cleveland Abbe, Ph.D., LL.D., Me- 
teorology. 

Cleveland Abbe, Jr., A.B., Physiog- 
raphy. 

George N. Acker, A.M., M.D., Med- 
icine. 

Louis Amateis, Architecture. 

Frank Lloyd Averill, C.E., Engineer- 
ing Field-work. 

Frank Hagar Bigelow, A.M., Solar 
Physics. 

Henry Carrington Bolton, Ph.D., His- 
tory of Chemistry. 

J. Wesley Bovee, A.M., M.D., Gyn- 
ecology. 

Andrew Coyle Bradley, LL.B., Crim- 
inal Law, Pleading and Practice. 

David J. Brewer, LL.D., Law of Cor- 
porations. 

Glenn Brown, Sanitary Engineering. 

William K. Butler, A.M., M.D., 
Ophthalmology. 

Benjamin Butterworth, LL.B., Law 
of Patents. 

William P. Carr, M.D., Physiology. 

James Carroll, M.D., Demonstrator of 
Pathology. 

George Vose Chandler, B.S., Miner- 
alogy. 

Melville Church, Law of Patents. 

James Robb Church, M.D., Demon- 
strator of Anatomy. 

Thomas Marean Chatard, Ph.D., 
Chemical Engineering. 

William Lathim Clark,'D.D.S., Dem- 
onstrator of Dentistry. 

Frank Wigglesworth Clarke, B.S., 
Mineral Chemistry. 

T. A. Claytor, M.D., Theory and 
Practice of Medicine. 

C. Wythe Cook, M.D., Medicine. 

Walter S. Cox, LL.D., Law of Real 
Property, etc. 

Andrew Fuller Craven, LL.B., Ph.D., 
Economics. 

Edward Y. Davidson, M.D., Demon- 
strator of Anatomy. 

Henry Edgar Davis, LL.M., History 
of Law. 



Robert B. Donaldson, D.D.S., Ope- 
rator in Dentistry. 
Williams Donnally, D.D.S., Operator 

in Dentistry. 
James H. Eckels, Finance. 
George Henry Emmott. LL.M., Civil 

Law. 
Edward Farquhar, Ph.D., History and 

English. 
Elmer S. Farwell, C.E., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Francis Renatus Fava, Jr., C.E., Civil 

Engineering. 
Peter Fireman, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Worthington C. Ford, Statistics. 
Felix Freyhold, C.E., Iron and Steel 

Construction. 
Thomas J. T. Fuller, B.S., Architec- 
ture. 
Edgar Frisby, A.M., Astronomy. 
Alfredo Victor Gana, Ph.B., Drawing. 
Theodore Nicholas Gill, M.D., Ph.D., 

LL.D., Zoology. 
L. W. Glazebrook, M.D., Clinical 

Medicine. 
James Howard Gore, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Geodesy. 
Adolphus Washington Greely, Geog- 
raphy. 
Robert E. L. Hackney, D.D.S., Dem- 
onstrator of Dentistry. 
Jonathan R. Hagan, D.D.S., Oral 

Surgery. 
Walter Scott Harban, D.D.S., Ope- 
rator in Dentistry. 
John Marshall Harlan, LL.D., Con- 
stitutional Jurisprudence of U.S., etc. 
William T. Harris, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Philosophy. 
George Byrd Harrison, M.D., Paedi- 
atrics and Medicine. 
William Perry Hay, A.M., Zoology. 
George B. Heinecke, M.D., Anatomy. 
George Neely Henning, A.B., French, 

German, and History. 
Harry Grant Hodgkins, Ph.D., Math- 
ematics. 
Charles J. Hopkins, M.D., Anatomy, 
J. C. Hornblower, Architecture. 
Louis C. F. Hugo, D.D.S., Dentistry. 
Presley C. Hunt, M.D., Anatomy. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



8l 



Adoniram Judson Huntington, M.,A., 
D.D., Greek. 

Virgil B. Jackson, M.D., Anatomy. 

Philip Jaisohn, M.D., Bacteriology. 

John Scott Johnson, A.M., Applied 
Mathematics. 

Henry L. E. Johnson, M. D., Gyne- 
cology. 

Veraniis Alva Moore, A.B., M.D., 
Normal Histology. 

Francis P. Morgan, M.D., Pharma- 
cology. 

Edward E. Morse, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Edward Adams Muir, Machine Draw- 
ing. 

Charles Edward Munroe, Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

Charles W. Needham, Esq., Law. 

Harry F. Newcomb, LL.M., Statistics. 

Henry B. Noble, Sr., D.D.S., Den- 
tistry. 

Rupert Norton, M.D., Normal His- 
tology. 

William Ordway Partridge, Fine Arts. 

Albert Clark Patterson, Mental Dis- 
eases. 

W. F. R. Phillips, M.D., Hygiene, etc. 

Josiah Pierce, Jr., A.M., Drawing and 
Applied Geometry. 

Minott E. Porter, B.S., Geography. 

John Wesley Powell, A.M., LL.D., 
History of Culture. 

Daniel Webster Prentiss, A.M.,M.D., 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Henry Rogers Pyne, A.M., Greek and 
Latin. 

Marathon Montrose Ramsey, A.M., 
Romance Languages. 

Walter Reed, M.D., Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

Charles Russell Rice, D.D.S. , Den- 
tistry. 

Herbert Louis Rice, M.S., Astronomy. 

Charles Williamson Richardson, M.D., 
Laryngology. 

Powhattan W, Robertson, Accoimting. 

Sterling Ruffin, M.D., Medical Juris- 
prudence, etc. 

Hermann Schoenfeld, Ph.D., German 
and Continental History. 

E. A. de Schweinitz, Ph.D., M.D., 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 

J. Foster Scott, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Walter Alfred Low, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

Thomas E. McArdle, A.M., M.D., 
Minor Surgery. 



Oscar A. M. Mckimmie, M.D., Ex- 
aminer of Applicants for Medical 
School. 

Charles Everett McNabb, LL.M., 
Business Law. 

Robert H. Martin, Esq., Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Charles Frederick Marvin, M.E., Me- 
teorology. 

Otis Tufton Mason, Ph.D., Anthro- 
pology. 

William F. Mattingly, Esq., Prac- 
tical Commercial Law. 

William A. Maury, LL.D., Equity, 
Jurisprudence, etc. 

George P. Merrill, Ph.D., Geology 
and Mineralogy. 

Emil H. Meyer, Drawing. 

Joseph S. Mills, A.M., Qualitative 
Analysis. 

Andrew Philip Montague, Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Lincoln Johnson, M.D., Anatomy. 

William G. Johnson, LL.M., Legal 
Catechetics, etc. 

William W. Johnston, M.D., Clinics. 

Thomas H. Kearney, Botany. 

James Kerr, M.D., Surgery. 

Albert Freeman Africanus King, 
A.M., M.D., Obstetrics, etc. 

Harry King, LL.B., Drawing. 

Alfred Klakring,Topographic Drawing. 

F. Lamson-Scribner, B.Sc, Botany. 

Frank Leech, M.D., Minor Surgery 
and Anatomy. 

James Hall Lewis, D.D.S., Prosthetic 
Dentistrj . 

Nathan Smith Lincoln, A.M., LL.D., 
M.D., Surgery. 

Lee Davis Lodge, Ph.D., Political 
Philosophy. 

Edward G. Seibert, M.D., Chemistry. 

Charles Tilden Sempers, A.M., Eng. 

Henry Simpson, Architecture. 

Alexander R. Shands, M.D., Orthop- 
edic Surgery. 

D. Kerfoot Shute, A.B., M.D., Anat- 
omy. 

Samuel Moore Shute, A.M., D.D., 
English. 

J. Curtis Smithe, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

George J. Smith, LL.M., Ph.D., 
English. 

Antonio Maria Soteldo, A.B., LL.D., 
Spanish. 

Timothy W. Stanton, A.M., Geology. 



82 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Paul A. Steele, Commercial Law. 

James McBride Sterrett, A.M., D.D., 
Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, 

Perly Egbert Stevens, C.E., Applied 
Mathematics. 

James Stuart, M.D., Anatomy. 

Henry Clay Thompson, D.D.S., Op- 
erative Dentistry. 

J. Ford Thompson, M.D., Surgery. 

Ernest Lawton Thurston, C.E., Dravir- 
ing. 

Edmund Lee Tompkins, M.D., Ner- 
vous Diseases, etc. 

William H. Trail, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

John Van Rensselaer, A.B,, M.D., 
Surgical Pathology, etc. 

Lester F. Ward, Ph.D., Sociology. 

William S. Washburn, M.D., Normal 
Histology. 



John R. Wellington, A.M., M.D., 
Minor Surgery, etc, 

Cabell Whitehead, B.M., Assaying, 

William Allen Wilbur, A.M., Latin 
and English. 

Harvey Washington Wiley, Ph,D., 
M,D., Agricultural Chemistry. 

William Lynne Wilson, A B., LL.D., 
American Economic Legislation. 

William Crawford Winlock, A.B., 
Astronomv, 

Frank A. Wolff, Ph.D., Physics. 

W. M. Wooster, M.D., Demonstrator 
of Anatomy. 

Carroll D. Wright, LL.D., Social Sta- 
tistics. 

Henry Ciecy Yarrow, M.D., Derma- 
tology. 

Hans Zopke, Mechanical Engineering. 



CONCORDIA COLLEGE. 



Fort Wayne., 


Ind. 


Men. 


Lutheran. 


Income, 


Students, 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 


Books, 
3,600 







The college was founded in 1839. The expenses for the year are 
$115. The graduates number nearly 700, the oldest of whom is the 
Rev, C H. Loeber, 1846, of Brooklyn, N. Y. The president is Jos. 
Schmitt, A.M. 

{Further information lacking^ 



COOPER-HUDDLESTON COLLEGE. 

Daleville, Miss. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

j555,5oo 



Students, 
130 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,500 



Hunt and Huddleston College was founded in 1865, but in recent 
years was united with the Cooper Normal College and removed to 
Daleville. The expenses for the year are $150. The graduates num- 
ber 160, of whom 150 are living. The oldest of these is the Rev. 
R. G. Pearson, A.M., 1875, of North Carolina. The president is C. 
A. Huddleston, A.M. 

{Further information lacking.) 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



83 



CORNELL COLLEGE. 

Mt. Vernon, la. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 

^23,871 



Students, 
562 



Instructors, 
29 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
30,500 



The college was founded in 1857 by Rev. G. B. Bowman. The 
first presidents were Rev. R. W. Keeler, 1857-1859, and Rev. Samuel 
M. Fellows, 1859-1863. In 1882 the quarter-century of the college 
was celebrated. The institution is governed by thirty trustees. The 
courses are classical, philosophical, scientific, and civil engineering, 
all of which lead to bachelor's degrees. Attendance at chapel and 
drill are compulsory. There are ten scholarships, four of which are 
for women. For needy ministerial students the income of j^io.ooo 
is given. The college grounds cover seventy acres, twenty of which 
are used for an athletic field. 

The students maintain seven literary societies in the college and 
three in the academy, an engineering society, the ministerial club, 
an athletic association, and a glee club. The following fraternities 
had chapters: * K % 1868-1872; 2 N, 1888-1890. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William F. King, President, 
Moral Philosophy. 

James E. Harlan, Vice-President, 
Mathematics. 

Alonzo Collin, Physics and Chemistry. 

Rev. Hugh Boyd, Latin. 

Hamline H. Freer, Teaching and Po- 
litical Economy. 

Sylvester N. Williams, Civil and San- 
itary Engineering. 

William Harmon Norton, Geology. 

George O. Curme, German. 

William B. Van Valkenburg, Conser- 
vatory of Music. 

Charles A. Cumming, Art School. 

Lieut. Charles L. Phillips, Military 
Tactics. 

William Stahl Ebersole, Greek, and 
Secretary. 

James A. James, History and Science 
of Government. 

Harry M. Kelly, Biology. 

Rev. Thomas Nicholson, Logic and 
Bible. 

Florence Louise Mitchell, English. 



Mary Burr Norton, Mathematics. 

Edward R. Ristine, Principal of Com- 
mercial School. 

Laura F. Ristine, Shorthand and 
Typewriting. 

Sarah Andrews Hackett, Director of 
the School of Oratorjf. 

Margaret Richie Wiseman, French. 

Jessie Carlotta Mack, Voice Culture. 

Maud Wilson, Piano. 

Frances C. Hoadley, Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 

Judson W. Mather, Instrumental Mu- 
sic and Harmony. 

Mary Edith Love, Mathematics and 
English. 

Mary E. Marshall, Piano. 

Mary Elizabeth Smith, Mathematics 
and Natural Science. 

Ernestine Cotton, Voice Culture and 
History of Music. 

Gertrude M. Potwin, Violin and His- 
tory of Music. 

Julia E. King, Art. 

May Lavinia Fairbanks, Librarian. 



84 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 

Ithaca^ N. Y. Co-Edticatio7tal. N'on- Sect avian. 



Income, 
$515,412 



Students, 
1,654 



Instructors, 
167 



Buildings, 
20 



Books, 
173793 



History and Efidcnvfnent : Cornell University was incorporated by 
the legislature of the State of New York April 27, 1865, and opened 
October 7, 1868. The existence of the university is due to the com- 
bined bounty of the United States, the State of New York, and Ezra 
Cornell. By an Act of Congress of July, 1862, it was provided that 
there should be granted to the several States public lands, the pro- 
ceeds of which should be used for the endowment and maintenance 
of at least one college. The share of the State of New York was 
990,000 acres. By a union of the money realized for this land and 
the resources of Ezra Cornell, Cornell University was founded. 
Ezra Cornell's wish was to found an institution where any person 
could find instruction in any study; while the State stipulated that 
the college should be strictly non-sectarian, and that it should annu- 
ally receive from each assembly district of the State one student free 
of charge. Ezra Cornell's first gift was $500,000 with two hundred 
acres of land. Later he purchased all that remained of the land 
scrip for $50,000, upon the condition that all the profits that should 
accrue from the sale of lands in the future should be paid to Cornell 
University. His terms were accepted in 1866, and the absolute own- 
ership by the university of the endowment fund was established in 
1890 by a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States. The 
college land scrip fund amounts to $688,576. 

The first college buildings were built by the students. Women 
were admitted, and a large dormitory known as Sage College erected 
for them, in 1872. There are no other dormitory buildings on the 
campus proper, the situation of which, on a plateau between two 
waterfalls, overlooking Cayuga Lake and the settled valley at its 
head, is unique. In 189c, after a long lawsuit, the large property left 
to the university by Mrs. Jenny McGraw Fiske was withheld from it 
by a ruling of the Supreme Court of the United States. To make 
up for this, Henry W. Sage, a previous benefactor of Cornell, gave 
$560,000 for the cost and endowment of the new university library. 
In 1 891 the fees for tuition were raised. In 1896 an expedition was 
sent to Greenland under Professor Tarr to make geological observa- 
tions. The presidents have been Andrew D. White, 1865-1885; 
Charles K. Adams 1885-1890; Jacob G. Schurman, 1890 till present. 

Organization : The university is governed by thirty-five trustees, 
fifteen of whom are elected by the alumni. They are organized in 
an executive committee and in seven standing committees. 

Admissio?i, Instruction, and Degrees : Candidates for admission must 
be at least sixteen years of age, and if women, seventeen. Examina- 
tions in all the subjects required for admission are held twice a year, at 
Ithaca only. No candidate markedly deficient in English is admitted 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 85 

to any course in the university. Candidates with diplomas from the 
regents of New York are accepted without examination. Certifi- 
cates from specified schools are also accepted in lieu of an examina- 
tion, but no school certificate will be accepted in place of the entrance 
examination in English. Students of at least twenty-one years may 
be admitted as special students without examination, except in the 
department of architecture. Degrees of B.A., B.S.A., C.E., and 
M.E. are conferred after at least one hundred and eighty weekly term 
hours of credited attendance at recitations and lectures. All studies 
of the first two years are obligatory, as is military drill ; but in the 
junior and senior years all studies, other than that of military science 
during the first term, are elective. The Faculty has decided after 
1897, when severer conditions of admission go into force, to permit 
freedom of election, except in the matter of drill and physical train- 
ing, to all candidates for the degree of B.A., doing away with the 
general courses in philosophy, letters, and science. The master's 
degree is given in arts [philosophy, letters, science], architecture, 
civil engineering, mechanical engineering, agriculture, and veterinary 
science. The doctor's degree is conferred in philosophy [and science] 
after two years of graduate study. The architectural department has 
been organized as a college. The college year lasts from September 
23 to June 18. There is also a short summer course of study, open 
to undergraduate students and others. 

Tuition, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition is $100 a year in the 
school of law, in the medical preparatory course, and in the course 
in arts [philosophy, letters, and science] for both graduates and 
undergraduates. Special students pay $125. Students in engineer- 
ing pay $5 for extra expenses, and a fee of $5 has to be paid for each 
diploma. The yearly expenses are estimated at from $325 to ^500. 

Under the law of the State the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion is empowered to award annually a number of free scholarships 
equal to the number of assembly districts in this State (128). In 
addition to this eighteen scholarships of $200 each are thrown open 
each year for competing candidates. Eighteen further scholarships 
of $200 each become available every other year. There are twelve 
university fellowships of an annual value of $500 each, and one 
fellowship in modem history yielding $600. In the Susan Linn 
Sage School of Philosophy there are six graduate scholarships of 
$300 each, and ten further graduate scholarships yielding the same 
income have been distributed among ten departments. There is an 
annual prize of a $100 gold medal for oratory, a ^30 prize for decla- 
mation, two $10 and $20 prizes for veterinary, a $100 prize in 
mechanic arts, and a $60 prize for Shakespeare study. Medals of 
gold and silver are offered for good work in civil engineering and 
American history. 

College Publications and Societies : Learned publications. President 
J. G. Schurman is editor of " The Philosophic Review ; " Prof. H. 
Morse Stephens is co-editor of " The American Historical Review ; " 
Professors Wheeler, Bennett, Bristol, Emerson, and Elmer edit 
"Cornell Studies in Classical Philology;" Professors Trevor and 
Bancroft publish and edit "The Journal of Physical Chemistry;" 
Professor Baily edits the " Bulletin of the Agricultural Experiment 



86 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Station;" Professor Fuertes, the crop and other reports of the 
State; Professor Harris edits and publishes a palaeontological 
bulletin. The students publish the "Cornellian," an annual; the 
" Cornell Magazine," a monthly ; the " Era," a weekly ; the " Daily 
Sun," also the " Sibley College Journal of Mechanical Engineering." 
Cornell students form one company of the New York National 
Guard. There are three debating societies, two Christian Associa- 
tions, an ethical club, the Savage Club, a dramatic club, a self- 
government association, a civil service reform club, and an athletic 
association, embracing a football eleven, baseball nine, track team, 
several crews, and a canoe club. Chapters of the following frater- 
nities, most of which own houses of their own, have been established 
at Cornell University: * B K, 2 E, 1886; Z W, 1869; X *, K A, 1868; 
X % * K % A T, 1869; A K E, A X, A A *, A X, 187O; * A 0, 
1872; A 2 X, B n, 1874; ^ T, 1876; K A 0, 1881 ; K K r, 1883 ; 
A r, 1885 ; A T n, 1887 ; * A *, 1888 ; * T Y, 1888-1889 ; * T A, 1888 ; 
* 2 K, A *, A Z, 1889 ; A T A, and 2 X, 1890. 



Faculty. 



Jacob Gould Schurman, A.M., D.Sc, 
LL.D., President, Moral Philos- 
ophy. 

Rev. William Dexter Wilson, D.D., 
LL.D., L.H.D., Moral and Intel- 
lectual Philosophy, Emeritus. 

Goldwin Smith, D.C.L., LL.D., Eng- 
lish History, Emeritus. 

George Chapman Caldwell, B.S., 
Ph.D., General and Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Burt Green Wilder, B.S., M.D., Phys- 
iology, Vertebrate Zoology, and Neu- 
rology. 

James Law, F.R.C.V.S., Veterinary 
Medicine and Surgery. 

Albert Nelson Prentiss, M.S., Bot- 
any, Horticulture, and Arboricul- 
ture. 

John Lewis Morris, A.M., C.E., Me- 
chanics and Machine Construction. 

Thomas Frederick Crane, A.M., Ro- 
mance Languages and Literatures. 

Hiram Corson, A.M., LL.D., English 
Literature. 

Waterman Thomas Hewett, A.B., 
Ph.D., German Language and Lit- 
erature. 

Rev. Charles Babcock, A.M., Archi- 
tecture. 

Estevan Antonio Fuertes.M. A. S.C.E., 
Civil Engineering. 

Isaac Phillips Roberts, M.Agr., Agri- 
culture. 

Horatio Stevens White, A.B., Dean, 
German Language and Literature. 



John Henry Comstock, B.S., Ento- 
mology and General Invertebrate 
Zoology. 

Samuel Gardner Williams, A.B., 
Ph.D., Science and Art of Teach- 
ing. 

Rev. Moses Coit Tyler, A.M., L.H.D., 
American History. 

Robert Henry Thurston, C.E., Ph.B., 
A.M., LL.D., Dr.En'g, Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Benjamin Ide Wheeler, A. B., Ph.D., 
Greek and Comparative Philology. 

Edward Leamington Nichols, B.S., 
Ph.D., Physics. 

Liberty Hyde Bailey, M.S., General 
and Experimental Horticulture. 

Edward Hitchcock, Jr., A.M., M.D., 
Physical Culture and Hygiene, and 
Director of the Gymnasium. 

James Morgan Hart, A.M., J.U.D., 
Rhetoric and English Pliilology. 

Rev. Charles Mellen Tyler, A.M., 
D.D., History and Christian Ethics. 

Jeremiah Whipplejenks, A.M., Ph.D., 
Political Economy. 

Lucien Augustus Wait, A.B., Mathe- 
maiics. 

Irving Porter Church, C.E., Applied 
Mechanics and Hydraulics. 

George Lincoln Burr, A.B,, Ancient 
and Mediaeval History. 

Charles Edwin Bennett, A.B., Latin. 

George Bell, Jr., LL.B., First Lieut. 
3d Infantry, U. S. A., Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



87 



Ernest Wilson Huffcut, B.S., LL.B,, 
Law. 

Judge Francis M. Finch, History and 
Evolution, Dean of School of Law. 

Henry Morse Stephens, M.A., Mod- 
ern European History. 

Cuthbert Winfred Pound, Law. 

Simon Henry Gage, B.S., Anatomy, 
Histology, and Embryology. 

Rolla Clinton Carpenter, M.S., C.E., 
M.M.E., Experimental Engineering. 

Charles Lee Crandail, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

George William Jones, A.M., Math. 

James Edward Creighton, Ph.D., 
Modern Philosophy. 

Harris Joseph Ryan, M.E., Electrical 
Engineering. 

William Frederick Durand, Ph.D., 
Marine Engineering and Naval Arch- 
itecture. 

Edward Bradford Titchener, A.M., 
Ph.D., Psychology. 

William Albert Finch, A.B., Law. 

Edwin Hamlin Woodruff, LL.B., Law. 

Louis Dyer, M.A., Greek. 

Edwin Chase Cleaves, B.S., Freehand 
Drawing and Mechanical Drawing. 

George Prentice Bristol, A.M., Greek. 

Alfred Emerson, Ph.D., Classical 
Archaeology, and Curator of the 
Museum of Casts. 

Charles Francis Osborne, Architecture. 

George Francis Atkinson, Ph.B., Bot- 
any. 

Henry Sylvester Jacoby, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Louis Munroe Dennis, Ph.B., B.S., 
Analytical Chemistry. 

Walter Francis Willcox, LL.B., 
Ph.D., Social Science and Statis- 
tics, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

John Henry Barr, M.S., M.M.E., 
Mechanical Engineering. 

George Sylvanus Moler, A.B.,B.M.E., 
Physics. 

Herbert Charles Elmer, A.B., Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Harvey Daniel Williams, M.E., Me- 
chanical Drawing. 

James McMahon, A.M., Mathematics. 

William Ridgely Orndorff, A.B., 
Ph.D., Organic Chemistry. 

Henry Hiram Wing, M.S., Animal 
Industry and Dairy Husbandry. 

Fred Putnam Spalding, C.E., 
M.A.S.C.E., Civil Engineering. 



William Alexander Hammond, A.M., 
Ph.D., Ancient and Medieval Phi- 
losophy. 

George Robert McDermott, Naval 
Architecture. 

Ernest George Merritt, M.E., Physics. 

Joseph Ellis Trevor, Ph.D., General 
Chemistry and Physical Chemistry. 

Ralph Stockman Tarr, B.S., Dy- 
namic Geology and Physical Geog- 
raphy. 

Willard Winfield Rowlee, B.L., D.Sc, 
Botany. 

Charles Henry Hull, Ph.D., Political 
Economy. 

Duncan Campbell Lee, A.M., Elocu- 
tion and Oratory. 

Frederick Bedell, Ph.D., Physics. 

Gilbert Dennison Harris, Ph.B., Pal- 
zeontology. 

Adam Capen Gill, Ph.D., Mineralogy 
and Petrography. 

John Henry Tanner, B.S., Mathe- 
matics. 

Clarence Augustine Martin, Archi- 
tecture. 

George Wesley Johnston, A. B., 
Ph.D., Latin. 

Ernst Ritter, Ph.D., Mathematics. 

Wilder Dwight Bancroft, A. B., 
Ph.D., Chemistry. 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Hiram Samuel Gutsell, B.P., A.M., 
Drawing and Industrial Art. 

Grant Sherman Hopkins, D.Sc, Phys- 
iology and Vertebrate Zoology. 

George Burton Preston, M.E., Ex- 
perimental Engineering. 

Emile Monnin Chamot, B.S., Analyt- 
ical Chemistry. 

Charles Worthington Comstock, 
Met.E., M.C.E., Civil Engineering. 

Ernest Gustavus Lodeman, M.S., 
Horticulture. 

Homer James Hotchkiss, B S., C.E., 
A.B., Physics. 

William Strunk, Jr., A.B., English. 

John S. Reid, Mechanical Drawing 
and Designing. 

F"rederick John Rogers, M.S., Physics. 

George Harley McKnight, A.B., Eng- 
lish. 

Irwin John Macomber, M.E., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

Paul Louis Saurel, B.S., Mathematics. 

Ernest Albee, A. B., Ph.D., Philosophy, 



88 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Fred Douglass Smith, B.S., Analyt- 
ical Chemistry, 

Henry Hayden Lannigan, Gymnastics. 

Christopher Kenry Bierbaum, M.E., 
Experimental Engineering. 

Alfred Henry Eldredge, M.E., Me- 
chanical Laboratory. 

Homer James Edmiston, A.B., Latin. 

Wilham Elton Mott, S.B., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Constant Pierre Vergauven, B.L., 
D.Sc, French. 

Frederic Lawrence Kortright, D Sc, 
Chemistry. 

Victor Tyson Wilson, Drawing. 

Howard Parker Jones, A.M., Ph.D., 
German. 

David Reid, Drawing and Designing. 

Hans Ludwig Wenceslas Otto, French. 

Ferdinand Canning Scott Schiller, 
M.A., Philosophy. 

Clement D. Child, A.B., Physics. 

Charles Edward Timmerman, B.S., 
M.M.E., Physics. 

John Sanford Shearer, B.S., Physics. 

Daniel Alexander Murray, Ph.D., 
Mathematics. 

Joseph Allen, A.M., Mathematics. 

Henry Neely Ogden, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Lewis Learning Forman, Ph.D., Greek. 

Ellen Brainard Canfield, Physical Cul- 
ture at Sage College. 

Charles Edwin Houghton, A.B., 
M.M.E., Experimental Engineer'g. 

John Irwin Hutchinson, A.B., Math. 

Edward DuBois Shurter, Ph.B., Elo- 
cution and Oratory. 

Charles Jesse Bullock, Ph.D., Polit- 
ical Economy. 

Frank Emil Lodeman, A.M., Ph.D., 
French. 

Virgil Snyder, D.Sc, Mathematics. 

Henry Henderson Denham, B.S., 
Chemistry. 

William Kendrict Hatt, A.B., C.E., 
Civil Engineering. 

John Fillmore Hayford, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Edward Thomas Adams, M.E., Draw- 
ing. 

Olaf M. Brauner. Industrial Art. 

Bert Brenette Stroud, D.Sc, Physi- 
ology, Vertebrate Zoology, and Neu- 
rology. 

Reginald Horton Keays, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 



John Thomas Parson, Civil Engin'g. 

Clayton L. Stanton, Mechanic Arts. 

Fred Clarkson Fowler, Physics. 

James Wiseman, Machine Shop and 
Construction. 

Richard Hiscock, Steam Engineering. 

Robert Shore, Botany and Head Gar- 
dener. 

William Henry Wood, Woodshop. 

James Wheat Granger, Forging. 

James Eugene Vanderhoet, Foundry. 

George W. Tailby, Farm. 

William Orland Stubbs, Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Alexander Dyer MacGillivray, Ento- 
mology. 

George Conger Pollay, Woodshop. 

Robert Vanderhoet', Foundry. 

William Frederick Raymond, Mechan- 
ician. 

William Frederic Head, Forging. 

Blin Sill Cushman, B.S., Chemistry. 

William Tobey Van Buskirk, B.S., 
Chemistry. 

Frank Starkins, Machine Shop. 

Clayton Halsey Sharp, A.B., Ph.D., 
Physics. 

George Piatt Knox, B.S., Chemistry. 

Karl McKay Wiegand, B.S., Botany. 

Clark Sutherland Northup, A.B., Eng- 
lish. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, A.B., Eng- 
lish. 

Walter Bowers Pillsbury, A.B., Phi- 
losophy. 

Darwin Abbot Morton, B.S., Chemis- 
try. 

Elias Judah Durand, A.B., D.Sc, Bot- 
any, 

Jay Allan Bonsteel, Geology. 

David Irons, A.M., Ph.D., Philos- 
ophy. 

Mortimer Alexander Federspiel, Ph.B., 
Ph.D., American History. 

Alonzo Whitlock, Lineman. 

Herbert Crombie Howe, B.L., Eng- 
lish. 

Arthur Lynn Andrews, M.L., English. 

Oliver Shantz, M.E., Experimental 
Engineering. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

Emmons Levi Williams, Treasurer. 

Charles Baker Mandeville, B.S., Treas- 
urer. 

Horace Mack, Treasurer in the Land 
Office. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



89 



Thomas Tree, Assistant Treasurer. 

Mrs. Ellen Kelley Hooker, Principal 
of Sage College. 

Edward Payson Gilbert, Manager of 
Sage College. 

David Fletcher Hoy, M.S., Registrar. 

Fred Stephen Crura, M.L., Assistant 
Registrar. 

Herbert Crombie Howe, B.L., Presi- 
dent's Secretary, 

Jacob Peters, Superintendent of Build- 
ings and Grounds. 

William C. Dean, Superintendent of 
Heating and Water Service. 

LIBRARY STAFF. 

George William Harris, Ph.B., Li- 
brarian . 

Andrew Curtis White, Ph.D., Libra- 
rian in charge of Classification. 

Willard Henry Austin, Librarian in 
charge of Reference Library. 

Mary Fowler, B.S., Cataloguer in the 
Library. 

Emma Avalyn Runner, B.S., Cata- 
loguer Zarncke Library. 

Leon Nelson Nichols, B.L., Reference 
Library. 

Mary Ellen Griswold, B.L., Order De- 
partment. 

Jennie Thornburg, B.L., Accession 
Department. 



George Lincoln Burr, A.B., Librarian 

President White Library. 
Alexander Hugh Ross Fraser, LL.B., 

Librarian Law Library. 
William Mosher Gould, Law Library. 
Horace Shaffer Potter, Law Library. 

AGRICULTURAL CORPS. 

Isaac Phillips Roberts, M.Agr., Di- 
rector and Agriculturist. 

Henry Hiram Wing, M.S., Animal 
Industry and Dairy Husbandry. 

George Chapman Caldwell, B.S., 
Ph.D., Chemist. 

James Law, F.R.C.V.S., Veterinarian. 

Albert Nelson Prentiss, M.S., Bot- 
anist and Arboriculturist. 

John Henry Comstock, B.S., Ento- 
mologist and Invertebrate Zoologist. 

Liberty Hyde Bailey, M.S., Horticul- 
turist. 

Simon Henry Gage, B.S., Anatomist. 

George Francis Atkinson, Ph.B., 
Cryptogamic Botanist. 

Mark Vernon Slingerland, B.S., En- 
tomologist. 

George Walter Cavanaugh, Chemist. 

Ernest Gustavus Lodeman, M.S., 
Horticulturist. 

Elias Judah Durand, A.B., D.Sc, 
Cryptogamic Botanist. 

Hoxie Wilbur Smith, B.S., Clerk. 



COTNER UNIVERSITY. 

Lincoln, Neb. Co-Edticational. 



Christian. 



Income, 



Students, 
343 



Instructors, 
32 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,000 



The university was founded in 1889. It is governed by tv/elve 
trustees. Degrees of B.A. and B.S. are conferred. The regular 
courses are commercial, medical, biblical, musical, and in art, and 
there is a preparatory course and a summer school. The college 
grounds cover twenty acres. Two literary societies are maintained 
by the students. 

Faculty. 

David R. Dungan. A.M., LL.D., Martin Osterholm, A.M., Modern Lan- 

Chancellor, Mental and Moral Phil. guages. 
William P. Aylsworth, A.M., Hebrew Joseph F. Woolery, A.M., Ancient 

and Sacred Literature. | Languages. 



James A. Beattie, A.M., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 



N. A. Stull. A.M., Natural Sciences, 
Medical Chemistry, and Toxicology. 



90 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Nora Madden, A.M., English. 

G. H. Walters, Commercial Depart- 
ment. 

Kathleen G. Hearn, A.B., Latin. 

James M. Howie, B.S., Mathematics. 

E. D. Harris, M.S., Principal Bennet 
Academy. 

George E. Jones, A.B., Bennet Acad. 

W. S. Latta, M.D., Pathology and 
Medicine. 

O. C. Reynolds, M.D., Surgery. 

B. J. Alexander, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 

Milton P. Guy, M.D., Anatomy. 

Herschel B. Cummins, M.D., Physi- 
ology, Histology, and Hygiene. 

R. L. Bentley, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

P. R. Madden, M.D., Ophthalmology. 



J. S. Eaton, M.D,, Diseases of Mind 
and Nervous System. 

J. L. Mack, LL.B., Medical Juris- 
prudence. 

Herman H. Schultz, M.D., Physiology. 

F. L. Wilmeth, M.D., Pathology and 
Medicine. 

Wallace C. Davis, B.S.,D.D.S., Den- 
tal Surgery. 

B. J. Alexander, M.D., Anatomy. 

May Z. Hughes, A.B., Instrumental 
Music. 

Nellie Painter, Elocution. 

H. T. Sutton, A.B., Oratory. 

Lulu Murphy, Art. 

George H. Walters, Vocal Music. 

Grace Barrow, Music. 

S. M. Haughey, Shorthand and Type- 
writing. 



CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY. 

Omaha, Neb. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 

$15,000 



Students, 
220 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
9,000 



Edward Creighton, the founder, for the purpose of establishing a 
free institution of learning, left ^100,000, which was laid in the hands 
of the Catholic bishop by his widow. In 1879 the fund had risen 
to $147,000. With this the university was begun. Since that time 
$100,000 more has been spent on buildings and equipment. Tuition 
is free. Degrees of B.A., B.S., B.Ph., Ph.D., and professional 
degrees are conferred. The grounds cover six acres. The students 
maintain a religious sodality, a debating society, an athletic associa- 
tion, a glee club, and there is also an alumni association. The aca- 
demic year, of one term, lasts from the first Monday in September 

to the last week in June. „ 

raciclty. 



Rev. John Pahls, S.J., President. 
Rev. John B. De Shryver, S.J., Vice- 
President, Elocution. 
J. M. Aikin, M.D., Dis. of Children. 
Rev. Peter I3oyce, S.J,, Chaplain. 

D. C. Bryant, A.M., M.D., Ophthal- 
mology and Otology. 

H. Leslie Burrell, M.D., Rhinology 
and Laryngology. 

E. M. Carpenter, M.D., Surgical Clinic. 
A. H. Carter, M.D., Electro-Thera- 
peutics. 

Rev. Charles Coppens, S.J., English, 
Logic, and Metaphysics. 



F. E. Coulter, M.D., Anatomy. 

Charles S. Crowley, A.M., Ph.C, 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 

B. F. Crummer, M.D., Medicine. 

Alexander Dreane, S.J., French. 

Rev. Augustine M. Efifinger, S.J., 
Rhetoric and Elocution. 

J. S. Foote, A.M., M.D., Histology, 
Physiology, and Pathology, 

W. O. Henry, M.D., Surgical Anatomy. 

Frank Hinchev, M.D., Anatomy. 

A. H. Hippie, D.D.S., Dental Sur- 
gery. 

W. R. Hobbs, M.D., Surgery. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



91 



Rev. George A. Hoeffer, S.J., Poetry 
and Elocution. 

H. B. Jennings, M.D., Surgery. 

H. P. Jensen, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics. 

P. S. Keogh, A.M., M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 

Rev. W. T. Kinsella, S.J., Librarian. 

T. B. Lacy, M.D., Surgery (Frac- 
tures and Dislocations). 

J. P. Lord, M.D., Surgery. 

Martin Luersman, S.J., German. 

W. P. Lyons, S.J., Elocution. 

T. J. Mahoney, LL.B., Medical Law. 

Charles E. Furay, A.M., M.D., Dem- 
onstrator. 

W. J. Galbraith, A.M., M.D., Clin- 
ical Surgery, 

Paul Grossmann, A.M., M.D., Medi- 
cine. 

H. P. Hamilton, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

W. E. Harris, M.D., Anatomy. 



Rev, Francis X, Mara, S,J., Mathe- 
matics and Christian Doctrine. 

W. Ross Martin, M.D., Orthopedic 
Surgery and Bacteriology. 

James L, McGeary, S.J., Humanities, 
Elocution, and Vocal Music. 

J. C. Moore, M.D,, Demonstrator, 

Bernard J. Otten, S,J,, Mathematics, 
Chemistry, and Astronomy. 

J. H. Peabody, A.M., M.D,, Military 
Surgery, 

W. F, Race, M,D., Demonstrator. 

John S, Ragor, S. J., Third Academic B. 

A. W. Riley, A.M., M,D,, Medicine 
and Clinical Medicine, 

Charles Rosewater, M.D., Obstetrics. 

A. B, Somers, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

S. K, Spalding, M.D., Mind and Ner- 
vous System. 

H. Clayton Sumney, M.D,, Professor 
of Dermatology, etc, 

F, S. Thomas, M.D., Mental Diseases, 

S. R, Towne, A.M., M.D., Hygiene 
and State Medicine. 



CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY. 

Lebanon, Tenn. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$15,100 



Students, 
255 



Instructors, 
20 




Books, 
6,200 



The college was established in 1827 at Princeton, Ky., but in 
1842 the presbytery, by reason of its indebtedness, transferred the 
school to Cumberland. During the war the buildings were burned, 
the library destroyed, and the endowments scattered. The school 
was re-opened in 1865. The presidents have been: F. R. Cossitt, 
1842-1844; T. C. Anderson, 1844-1867 ; B. W. McDonald, 1867-1873, 
and Nathan Green, the present incumbent. Four halls are now in 
use, and a fifth building is just completed. The school is governed 
by seven trustees. There is a department for women, where instruc- 
tion is given in literature, art, music, elocution, shorthand, and type- 
writing. The law school is the oldest in the South. The theological 
school is co-educational. Collegiate degrees of A.B., B.S., A.M., 
Ph.B., together with C.E., B.LL., and B.D. are conferred. Atten- 
dance at chapel is not compulsory. The total number of graduates 
has been 2,294; the oldest living is Nathan Green, 1845, ^f Lebanon, 
Ky. The students maintain three literary societies with halls, and 
an athletic association. Chapters of the following fraternities have 
been established: B 11, 1854; Mystical Seven, I867 (united, 1889); 
A K E, 1857-1873 ; A % A A *, 1858-1861 ; * K E, 1859-1861 ; 2 A E, 



92 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



iS6o; * K ^, 1860-1S79; X *, 1860-1861 
1S69-1878; 2 X, 1872-80, and K 2, 18S7 
lished annually. 

Faculty. 



A T n, 1867-1872; * r A, 
*' The Phoenix " is pub- 



Nathan Green, LL.D., Chancellor and 

Professor of Law. 
Andrew H. Buchanan, LL.D., Applied 

Mathematics and Engineering. 
WiUiam D. McLaughUn, A.M., Latin 

and Greek. 
John I. D. Hinds, A.M., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry, Geology, and Mineralogy. 
Robert V. Foster, D.D., Systematic 

Theology and Exegesis. 
Edward E. Weir, A.M., Philosophy. 
Andrew B. Martin, LL.D., Law. 
Claiborne H. Bell, D.D., Missions. 
James M. Hubbert, D.D., Practical 

Theology. 
Isaac W. P. Buchanan, Ph.D., Pure 

Mathematics. 



Rev. Winstead P. Bone, A.M., New 
Testament Literature. 

Laban Lacy Rice, Ph.D., English. 

Benjamin F. Foster, A.M., Latin and 
Greek. 

Lieut. Charles Gerhardt, Military Sci- 
ences and Tactics. 

Rev. John Vant Stephens, A.M., Bib- 
lical History and Literature. 

Rev. Finis King Farr, A.B., Hebrew 
and Exegesis. 

William J. Grannis, A.M., Prepara- 
tory School. 

Herbert W. Grannis, A.M., Prepara- 
tory School. 

Henry N. Grannis, Preparatory School. 

William J. Darby, D.D., Pastor. 



DARTMOUTH COLLEGE. 



Hanover^ N. H. 


Men. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
^75,000 


Students, 
560 


Instructors, 
48 


Buildings, 
15 


Books, 
75,000 



History and Organization : Dartmouth was the outgrowth of a 
charity school opened by Master Moor in 1754 for Indians. Two 
years later, fifteen of the thirty students were English. In 1765 
;^i,ooo was raised in England, and placed in charge of the trustees, 
with the Earl of Dartmouth at the head. The founder. Dr. 
Wheelock, decided to reach " a greater proportion of English 
youth." The present site was chosen, and in 1769 a charter was 
given. The first four students were graduated in 1771. There was a 
suit for the control of the college between the State and the college, 
which was decided in 1819 in favor of the trustees, on argument 
by Daniel Webster. The medical college dates from T798; the 
Chandler School of Science and the Arts from 1851 ; the College of 
Agriculture and Mechanical Arts from 1866; and the Civil Engineeiik 
ing School from 1867. The presidents have been : Eleazar Wheelock, 
1769-1779; John Wheelock, 1779-1815; Francis Brown, 1815-1820; 
Daniel Dana, 1820-1821 ; Bennett Tyler, 1821-1828; Nathan Lord, 
1828-1863; Asa Dodge Smith, 1863-1877; Samuel Colcord Bartlett, 
1877-1892, William Jewett Tucker, 1893. The college is governed 
by a board of twenty-four trustees. 

Courses 0/ Study : Three parallel courses, — the classical, the 
Latin-scientific, and the scientific lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., M.A., 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



93 



and Ph.D. In the first year all studies are prescribed, in the three 
following years elective studies are offered. Attendance at chapel 
is compulsory for all. Gymnastics are compulsory for freshmen. 

Scholarships and Prizes : There are four resident graduate scholar- 
ships of $300 each per year ; four resident graduate scholarships, 
twelve class, and two hundred beneficiary scholarships with twenty- 
three prizes. 

Equipt}ie7it: Among the fifteen college buildings, are seven dor- 
mitories, rooms in which cost from $14 to $100 a year, and a gym- 
nasium. Expenses range from I252 to $391 per year. The college 
grounds cover thirty acres, with a campus of four acres. In 1894 the 
different libraries were consolidated. 

College Adjuncts: The students publish the "Dartmouth," and 
" Literary Monthly," and "^gis," and maintain an athletic associa- 
tion, with a football and baseball team. Other societies are : Ace 
of Spades, Scouts, Creosote, Lebanon Club, Dramatic Club, Medical 
Club, Eating Club, Co-operative Association, Medical Society, Press 
Club, College Council, Orchestra, Choir, Glee Club, Bazoo Concert 
Company, Hare and Hounds, Boat Club, and Christian Associations. 
Chapters exist of : * B K, •*!' T, 1842; K K K, 1842; A A *, 1846; 
Z % 1855; A K E, 1853; * Z M, 1857; * A 0, 1884; B0n, 1889; 
A X ; 2 X and N E. 

The oldest graduate is Mark N. Fletcher, 1825, of Wayne, 111. 



Faculty. 



William Jewett Tucker, D.D., LL.D., 
President. 

Oliver Payson Hubbard, M.D., LL.D., 
Chemistry and Pharmacy, 

Samuel Colcord Bartlett, D.D., LL.D., 
The Bible and its Relations to Sci- 
ence and History. 

Henry Elijah Parker, D.D., Latin. 

Rev. Henry Griswold Jesup, A.M., 
Botany. 

John Ordronaux, M.D., LL.D., Medi- 
cal Jurisprudence. 

Carlton Pennington Frost, M.D., 
LL.D., Science and Practice of 
Medicine. 

Charles Henry Hitchcock, Ph.D., Geol- 
ogy and Mineralogy. 

Granville Priest Conn, A.M., M.D., 
Hygiene. 

Edward Rush Ruggles,Ph.D., German. 

Henry Martyn Field, A.M., M.D., 
Therapeutics. 

Phineas Sanborn Conner,M.D., LL.D., 
Surgery. 

Edward Cowles, M.D., LL.D., Men- 
tal Diseases. 

William Thayer Smith, A.M., M.D., 
Physiology. 



Gabriel Campbell, M.Pd., D.D., Phil- 
osophy. 

Paul Fortunatus Munde, M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 

Robert Fletcher, Ph.D., Civil Engin- 
eering, Director of Thayer School. 

Charles Franklin Emerson, A.M., 
Dean, Natural Philosophy. 

John King Lord, Ph.D., Latin. 

David Webster, M.D., Ophthalmology. 

Arthur Sherburne Hardy, Ph.D., 
Modern Art. 

William Henry Parish, M.D., Obstet. 

Frank Asbury Sherman, M.S., Math. 

Charles Francis Richardson, Pli.D., 
English. 

Marvin Davis Bisbee, B.D., Biblio- 
graphy and Librarian. 

Thomas Wilson Dorr Worthen, A.M., 
Mathematics. 

Edwin Juhus Bartlett, A.M., M.D., 
Chemistry. 

James Fairbanks Colby, A.M., LL.B., 
Law and Political Science. 

George Adams Leland, A.M., M.D., 
Laryngology. 

John Vose Hazen, C.E,, Civil Engin* 
eering and Graphics. 



94 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Rev. Charles Darwin Adams, Ph.D., 
Greek. 

David Collin Wells, A.B,, Social Sci- 
ence. 

Tilghman Minnour Balliet, A.M., 
M.D., Therapeutics. 

William Patten, Ph.D., Zoology. 

George Dana Lord, A.M., Greek. 

Herbert Darling Foster, A.M., Hist. 

Edwin Brant Frost, A.M., Astronomy. 

Gilman DuBois Frost, A.M., M.D., 
Anatomy. 

Frank Gardner Moore, Ph.D., Latin. 

Fred Parker Emery, A.M., Rhetoric. 

Albert Cushing Crehore, Ph.D., Nat- 
ural Philosophy. 



Rev. Charles Frederic Robinson, A.B., 
Hebrew. 

John Hiram Gerould, Ph.D., Zoology. 

Louis Henry Dow, A.B., Greek. 

William George Stoughton, A.B., 
German. 

Arthur Willard French, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

John Chamberlain Roe, Ph.D., French. 

Elmer Howard Carleton, A.B., Phys- 
ical Culture. 

William Alfred Redenbaugh, Bio- 
logical Laboratory. 

Etta Mattocks Newell, Librarian. 

Hon. Henry L. Dawes, United States 
History. 



DAVIDSON COLLEGE. 

Davidson, N. C. Meti. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$17,000 



Students, 
162 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
11,000 



The college dates from 1837. The trustees number fifty-five. 
The degrees are A.B., B.S. and A.M. The college year is from 
September 13 to June 13. There is ample space for athletic exer- 
cise, and a lake for boating. There have been 717 graduates in all. 
The oldest of these is the Rev. R. E. Sherrell, 1841, of Haskell, 
Tex. The students publish " The Davidson Monthly," and main- 
tain ten literary societies. The following fraternities have chapters : 
B n, 1858; Mystical Seven, 1884 (united, 1889); X *, 1859-1867; 
n K A, 1869; K A, 1880, 5 A E, 1883. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. B. Shearer, D.D., LL.D., 
President, Bible and Moral Philoso- 
phy. 

William J. Martin, LL.D., Vice-Presi- 
dent, Chemistry. 

William D. Vinson, M.A., Math. 

William S. Currell, Ph.D., English. 



Henry Louis Smith, Ph.D., Natural 

Philosophy. 
C. R. Harding, Ph.D., Greek, German. 
W. R. Grey, Ph.D., Latin and French. 
J. B. Wharey, A.B., Instructor. 
J. D. McDowell, A.B., Laboratory 

Assistant. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



95 



DEFIANCE COLLEGE. 

Defiance, Ohio. Co-Educational. No7i-Sectarian, 



Income, 



Students, 

"5 



Instructors, 

5 




Books, 



The college is situated at old Fort Defiance, which has been sub- 
stantially rebuilt. The State of Ohio gave 1,280 acres of land. 
There is a lecture hall and dormitory building standing on a campus 
of ten acres. The college is governed by a board of five trustees. 
Instruction is given in a normal, scientific, and commercial course. 
The studeuts number 115. The college year is from September 7 to 
June 5. 

Facility. 



J. C. McCauley, M.A., President, 
English, Latin, Mathematics. 

Jay J. Weber, M.A., Shorthand and 
Typewriting. 



W. S. Powell, M.D., Physiology and 

Hygiene. 
Wilham Carter. Esq., Commer. Ethics. 
John G. Wisda, Preparatory Dep't. 



DELAWARE COLLEGE. 

Newark, Del. Co-Edticational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

^40,755 



Students, 
83 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
6,756 



The college was founded in 1870. It is governed by a board of 
trustees, fourteen of whom compose the original board, while fifteen 
come from the three Delaware counties. The courses leading to the 
degrees are the classical, the Latin scientific, civil engineering, scien- 
tific, and agricultural. The grounds cover ten acres. Tuition is 
free to students residing in the State of Delaware. There are two 
literary societies. In all 174 students have been graduated. The 
college year is from September 3 to June 17. 



Facidty. 



Albert N. Raub, A.M., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Mental, Moral, and Polit. Sci. 

Theodore R. Wolf, M.A., Ph.D., 
Chemistry, Geology, Sanitary Sci. 

George A. Harter, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mathematics and Physics. 

Charles S. Conwell, A.M., Latin, 
Greek, and French. 

Charles L. Penny, A.M., German. 

Frederic H. Robinson, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

William H. Bishop, B.S., Agriculture 
and Biology. 

H. B. Eves, D.V.M., Veter. Science. 

Lieut. J. H. Frier, Military Tactics. 



Howard W. Huffington, Mechanical 
and Electrical Engineering. 

George B. Hynson, Elocution and 
Oratory. 

Charles J . Hibberd, Shopwork. 

AGRICULTURAL. 

Arthur T. Neale, Ph.D., Director. 

Frederick D. Chester, M.S., Botanist. 

M. H. Beckwith, Horticulturist and 
Entomologist. 

Charles L. Penny, A.M., Chemist. 

William H. Bishop, B.S., Agricul- 
turist and Meteorologist. 

H. P. Eves, D.V.M., Veterinarian. 



96 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



DENISON UNIVERSITY. 



Granville, Ohio. Co- Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$30,000 


Students, 


Instructors, 
21 


Buildings, 
7 


Books, 
17,000 



Denison University was organized in 1831 under the auspices of 
the Ohio Baptist Educational Society, bearing the name of the 
Granville Literary and Theological Institution. In 1845 ^^^ name 
was changed to Granville College, and again in 1856 to the present 
name, in honor of William S. l3enison, of Adamsville, Ohio. The 
site was at first a farm, some two miles southwest of Granville, but 
in 1855 the present site, containing twenty acres, was purchased, and 
the college moved to town. The first class was graduated in 1840. 
A severe fire occurred during the first year of the school's existence. 

The list of presidents is as follows : Rev. John Pratt, D.D., 
1831-1837; Rev. Jonathan Going, D.D., 1837-1844; Rev. Silas 
Bailey, D.D., LL.D., 1846-1852; Rev. Jeremiah Hall, D.D., 1853- 
1863; Rev. Samson Talbot, 1863-1S73; Rev. Elisha Benjamin 
Andrews, D.D., LL.D., 1875-1879; Rev. Alfred Owen, D.D., 1S79- 
1886; Rev. Galusha Anderson, S.T.D., LL.D., 1886-1889; Daniel 
Boardman Purinton, Ph.D., LL.D., 1890. 

Degrees of A.B., B.S., B.L., B.Ph., and M.A. are conferred. The 
college is governed by thirty-six trustees. A gymnasium, costing 
$25,000, is to be added to the present buildings, two of which were 
erected only two years ago. Attendance at chapel is required. 
The students publish " The Denisonian," a weekly, " The Denison 
Quarterly," "The Journal of Newsology," and "The Adytum," an 
annual, and maintain two literary societies, having their own halls, 
an athletic association, an oratorical association, and a mandolin 
and guitar club, with the following fraternity chapters : 2 X, 1867 ; 
B n, 1869, and * r A, 1885. 

The total number of graduates has been 450, of whom 75 have 
died. The college year is from September 17 to June 17. 



Faculty. 



Daniel B. Purinton, Ph.D., LL.D., 

President, Philosophy. 
John L. Gilpatrick, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 
Richard S. Cohvell, D.D., Greek. 
George F. McKibben, A.M., French 

and German. 
Alfred D. Cole, A.M., Chemistry and 

Physics. 
J. D. S. Riggs, A.M., Ph.D., Prin- 
cipal of Doane Academy. 
Clarence L. Herrick, M.S., Biology. 
Charles L. Williams, A.M., Rhetoric 

and English Literature. 
William H. Johnson, A.M., Latin. 
Edward P. Childs, A.B., Chemistry 

and Physics. 



William G. Tight, M.S., Geology and 
Natural History. 

Willis A. Chamberlin, A.M., Modern 
Languages. 

Leverette E. Akins, A.M., Mathe- 
matics. 

C. Judson Herrick, M.S., Natural 
Science. 

Frank C. Ewart, A.M., Latin. 

James R. Ewing, A.B., Greek. 

William H. Boughton,' B.S., Mathe- 
matics and Science. 

Charles B. White, A.B., Latin. 

J. Carleton Bell, Greek. 

Ira C. Painter, English. 

Henry S. Sauerbre}', Gymnastics. 

Rev. H. H. Tattle, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



97 



DE PAUW UNIVERSITY. 

Greencastle, Ind. Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$55,000 



Students, 
783 



Instructors, 
48 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
17,000 



History: The Indiana Asbury University was chartered in 1837. 
In 1847 the university was empowered to establisli professional 
schools. The first president, in 1839, was Matthew Simpson, after- 
ward bishop. The old buildings were begun in 1837. After a fund 
of $143,000 had been raised, W. C. De Pauw gave $167,000, and the 
name was changed. The university as such was not organized until 
1884. The semi-centennial celebration was held in 1S87. A con- 
flagration resulting in the destruction of West College occurred in 

1879. 

Organization and Instriictton : The university is governed by a 
board of twenty-one trustees. Degrees are offered in arts, letters, 
science, philosophy, law, and theology. During the last two years 
elective courses can be taken. Attendance at chapel and drill are 
compulsory. 

Equipment : The college grounds cover twenty-four acres in the 
city, and include a university park of 120 acres. There are ten 
buildings, among which are a woman's hall and three dormitories 
for women and an observatory. 

The students publish the " De Pauw Weekly " and the *' Mirage," 
a junior annual. They maintain the following associations : philo- 
logical and athletic associations, Der Deutsche Bund, French Club, 
Christian Associations, oratorical association, glee club, symphony 
orchestra, quartette, Independent Literary Society, De Pauw Skull, 
and Fortnightly Club. 

The following fraternities have chapters at De Pauw: * B K, 

Ben, 1845; * r A, 1856; 2 x, 1859; * k y, 1865; a k e, 1S66; 

* A 0, 186S; K A 0, 1870; n B *, 1870; ATA, 1871 ; K K T, 1875; 
A X XI, 1885; A T, 1887 ; A *, 1887. 

Since the foundation of the school there have been 1,789 gradu- 
ates, 1,376 of whom are now living. The oldest of these is the Rev. 
T. A. Goodwin, 1840, of Indianapolis, Ind. 

The college year is from the third Wednesday in September to 
June 2. 

Faczilty. 



Thomas Bowman, D.D., LL.D., 
Chancellor. 

John P. D. John. A.M. D.D., Pres't. 

Edwin Post, A.M., Ph.D., Latin. 

Philip S. Baker, A.M., M.D., Chem- 
istry. 

James Riley Weaver, A.M., B.D., 
Civics. 

William F. Swahlen, A.M., Ph.D., 
Greek. 

Clarence A. Waldo, A.M., Math. 



Lucien M. Underwood, Ph.D., Botany. 
Joseph P. Naylor, M.S., Physics. 
Henry B. Longden, A.M., German. 
Wilbur V. Brown, Ph.D., Astronomy 

and Observatory. 
Wilbur T. Ayres, A.M., Latin. 
Andrew Stephenson, Ph.D., History. 
F. W. Hanawalt, A.M., Mathematics. 
William E. Smyser, A.M., English. 
Rev. T. G. Duvall, Ph.D., Philosophy 

and Bible. 



98 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Arthur R. Priest, A.M., Rhetoric and 
Oratory. 

Samuel Baer, Ph.D., German. 

Jesse Johnson, Ph.B., Latin. 

G. D. Fairfield, A.M., Romance Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

Sidelia Starr, A.M., English. 

Lieut. Edw. M.Lewis, Mihtary Tactics. 

L. C. Bentley, A. B., Math, and Physics. 

J. F. Brumback, A.B., English. 

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY. 

Bishop Thomas Bowman, Chancellor. 
John P. D. John, President. 
Hillary A. Gobin, A.M., D.D., Prac- 
tical Theology. 
John Poucher, A.M., D.D., Exegesis. 
Trumbull G. Duvall, System. Theo. 
Andrew Stephenson, Eccles. Hist. 
Arthur R. Priest, Oratory, Elocution. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

Belle Aurelia Mansfield, A.M., LL.B., 
Dean, Theory and Plistory of Music. 



Julia Alice Druley, Pianoforte. 
Walter Howe Jones, Piano and Pipe 

Organ, and Advanced Theory. 
Alison Marion Fernie, Voice Culture, 

Opera and Oratorio. 
Caroline Dutton Rowley, Pianoforte, 

Harmony and Theory. 
Anna Allen Smith, Pianoforte. 
Adolph Schellschmidt, Violin and 

Violoncello. 
Frank Newhouse, Pianoforte. 
Irene Hayes, Mandolin and Guitar. 
Adaline Rowley, Sight Singing. 
Mary Janet Wilson, Harmony. 

SCHOOL OF ART. 

Belle A. Mansfield, A.M., LL.B,, 

Dean, Fine Arts. 
Agnes E. Foster, B.P., Drawing and 

Water Color Painting. 
Melissa B. George, Oil Painting and 

Perspective. 
Lizzie H. Goulding, China Painting. 
Bessie Smith, Art Extension. 



DES MOINES COLLEGE. 

Des Moines, Iowa. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$5,000 



Students, 
173 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was founded in 1865. It is affiliated with the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, which sends occasional instructors, grades examina- 
tion papers, issues certificates of attainment, and confers the same 
degrees, to which students would be entitled if at the university, 
besides offering fellowships of $140 to graduates of the college. 

The trustees number forty-six. Candidates for admission must 
be fourteen years old, and must pass examinations in thirty-one of 
fifty-eight subjects. Instruction is given in academical and collegi- 
ate courses and in music. The college confers degrees of A.B., B.S., 
and Ph.D. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Students are not 
allowed to undergo ordination for the ministry during term time, 
and are forbidden to secure rooms, contract debts, or leave the city 
during term, without permission from the president. The expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 30 to June 30, are from $125 
to $250. Of this $36 is for tuition, while fees of $3, $10, and %zo are 
charged for the use of the library, and for instruction in chemistry 
and music. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



99 



The students maintain three literary societies and two Christian 
Associations. The graduates number 75, of whom L. Ella Miller, 
1875, of California, is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



Herbert Lee Stetson, B.D., A.M., 

D.D., President, Hist. and Philos. 
James Pomeroy Stephenson, A.B., 

A.M., Ph.D., English and Logic. 
Alfred Bennett Price, A.B., A.M., 

Latin, 
Thomas Marcus Blakslee, Ph.B., 

A.M., Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Florence Tyler Stevenson, A.B., A.M., 

French and English. 



Flora Etta Harris, A. B., A.M., Greek. 

Frank Elbert Goodell, A.B., Chemis- 
try and Physics. 

Fred Enno Morgan, A.B., Biology. 

Daniel M. Shoemaker, German. 

Delia W. Bonbright, Piano. 

Metta H. MacRae, B.Mus., Singing. 

Lida H. Thompson, Musical History, 
Harmony. 



DETROIT COLLEGE. 

Detroit^ Mich. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
300 



Instructors, 
•3-7 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 

5,000 



Detroit College was founded in 1877 by the Jesuits, and incorpo- 
rated in 1881. It is governed by five trustees. Classical and com- 
mercial courses of instruction are offered. Besides two literary 
societies, there is a dramatic and athletic club, a religious and an 
alumni association. Nineteen gold medals are offered for excellence 
in study, and ninety-eight premiums for class work. The college 
year is from the first Monday in September to June 26. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Henry A. Schapman, S.J., Presi- 
dent. 

Rev. Joseph A. Murphy, S.J., Prefect 
of Studies. 

Rev. William F. Boex, S.J., Treasurer. 

Rev. Benedict Masselis, S. J., Chaplain. 

Rev. William T. Kinsella, S.J., Phil- 
osophy, Evidences of Religion. 

Rev. James J. Curran, S.J., Mathe- 
matics, Chemistry, Physics, and 
Astronomy. 

Rev. Eugene A. Magevney, S.J., 
Rhetoric. 

William J. Harrington, S.J., Poetry. 

William J. Talbot, S.J., Humanities. 



Martin M. Luersman, S.J., William 
F. Connolly, A.B., George J. Leahey, 
S.J., Isaac H. Bosset, A.B., William 
H. Trentman, S.J., George F. 
Monaghan, A.B., Academic. 

James P. Bacon, A.B., Edward D. 
Devine, A.B., Commercial. 

PRECEPTORS IN SPECIAL STUDIES. 

Rev. Philip J. Roos, S.J., William H. 
Trentman, S.J., German. 

Rev. George H. Worpenberg, S.J., 
Book-keeping. 

George F. Monaghan, A.B., Pen- 
manship. 

Gregory Freytag, Music, 



100 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Carlisle, Pa. 



DICKINSON COLLEGE. 

Co-Editcatlonal. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$32,107 



Students, 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 

9 



Books, 
34,000 



Dickinson College was founded in 1783. It is governed by a 
board of forty-eight trustees, four of whom are alumni. Originally 
all trustees were clergymen. Its preparatory department has existed 
since the foundation of the college. The law school was organized 
in 1836. 

Four parallel courses of study are pursued : the classical, Latin- 
scientific, Greek-scientific, and in modern languages. The studies of 
the first two years are almost all compulsory, while those of the last 
two years are elective; the degrees are B.A., Ph.B., M.A., D.D., B.L., 
and LL.D. Tuition is $50 a year; other expenses amount to $200. 
There are three scholarship funds, several scholarships of $1,000 
each, and seventeen college prizes for excellence in study, with four 
prizes for debate. 

Equipvient: With the exception of two old buildings, built in 1804 
and in 1836, all other buildings — seven in number — are modern. 
The campus is a full square. There are three libraries, containing 
34,000 volumes, a museum, and an observatory and a gymnasium 
with a running track and an athletic field. 

Societies and Publications : There are two literary societies, the 
Belles Lettres and Philosophical, coeval with the founding of the 
college, and two general societies which meet at commencement. 
Besides these, there is an alumni association, two Christian Associa- 
tions, with chapters of the following fraternities : 4> B K; Z'V, 1853- 
1855; * K 2, 1854-1878; * K% 1859; 5X, 1859; AX, 1861; X*, 
1869; B n, 1874; * A 0, 1880. 

There have been 1,564 graduates, of whom 836 are now living. 

The oldest is the Rev. William B. Mcllvaine, of the class of 1825, in 

Peoria, Illinois. „ ,^ 

Facility. 

Harry F. Whiting, A.M., Latin and 

Mathematics. 
Montgomery P. Sellers, A.M., German 

and English. 
Martha E. Barbour, Physical Culture. 
William Trickett, LL.D., Law of 

R63.1 Eststc 
Hon. Wilbur F. Sadler, A.M., Crimi- 
nal Law. 
Hon. J. M. Weakley, Law of Pleading. 
H. Silas Stuart, Esq., A.M., Law of 

Partnership. 
George Edward Mills, Esq., A.B., 

LL.B., Law of Torts. 
M. W. Jacobs. Esq., A.M., Equity. 
Albert H. Bolles, Ph.D., Law of 

Contracts. 



Rev. Geo. Edw. Reed, D.D., LL.D., 

President, Moral Science, Oratory. 
Charles F. Himes, Ph.D., Physics. 
Rev. Henry M. Harman, D.D., LL.D., 

Greek and Hebrew, Bible. 
Rev. Henry C Whiting, Ph.D., Latin. 
Ovando B. Super, Ph.D., Modern 

Languages. 
James^'H. Morgan, Ph.D., Greek and 

Political Economy, Librarian. 
William B. Lindsay, Ph.D., Chem. 
Bradford O. McTntire, A.M., English 

Literature and History. 
William K. Dare, A.M., Philosophy 

and Pedagogy. 
William W. Landis, A.M., Math. 
Henry M. Stephens, A.M., Physiology. 



V 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



lOI 



Crete, Neb, 



DOANE COLLEGE. 

Co-Ediccatio7ial. 



Conzres'ational. 



Income, 
^21,000 



Students, 
28-. 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
7,000 



The college began in 1872 with six hundred acres of land, over- 
looking the city of Crete. Ninety acres of this were devoted to the 
college campus. The institution is governed by a board of twenty- 
seven trustees. There are two regular courses in classics and sci- 
ences ; the studies of the first two years are prescribed. Military drill 
and attendance at chapel are compulsory. The students maintain 
three Christian Associations and three literary societies, named the 
Hesperian, Philomathean, Palladian, Phi Kappa Delta, an athletic 
association, with a tennis association and football team, and the 
glee club and mandolin club. " The Oval " is published by the 
students. 

vSince the foundation of the school there have been 89 graduates, 
86 of whom are living. 

Factdty. 



Rev. David B. Perry, A.M., President, 
Philosophy. 

Arthur B. Fairchild, A.B., Math. 

John S. Brown, A.M., Ancient Lan- 
guages. 

Howard F. Doane, A.B., Greek, Latin. 

Margaret E. Thompson, S.B., Princi- 
pal of Ladies' Department. 

William E. Jillson, A.M., German and 
French. 



Henry H. Hosford, A.M., Astronomy, 
Phvsics, and Chemistrv. 

Joseph H. Powers, S.B.,'Ph.D., Biol- 
ogy and Geology. 

Charles B. Hardin, Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Jennie C. Hosford, A.B., Greek and 
Latin. 

H. Bert King, Musical Director. 

Mrs. A. R. Rieth, Music. 



DRAKE UNIVERSITY. 

Des Moines, Iowa. Co- Educational. 



Protestant 



Income, 
j^22,OCO. 



Students, 
678 



Instructors, 
51 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
6,000 



The school was founded in 1881. It comprises nine colleges with 
courses in letters and science, bibUcal research, law, medicine, music, 
oratory, and business. It is governed by fifty trustees, of whom 
eighteen are life members, six alumni, and twenty-six appointed from 
year to year. There are six literary societies, of which four occupy 
halls. The students publish the '" Delphic." Besides the college 
library the students have access to the State library of ioo,oco 
volumes. 



L 



102 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



Barton O. Aylesworth, A.M., LL.D., 
President, English Literature. 

Bruce E. Shepperd, A.M., Moral and 
Mental Philosophy. 

L. Higgins, A.B., C.E., Civil Eng'g. 

Lewis Schooler, M.D., LL.D., Surgery. 

D. S. Fairchild, M.D., Medicine and 
Pathology. 

E. H. Hazen, M.D., Diseases of Eye 
and Ear. 

Gerhard J. Zepter, A.M., Modern 

Languages. 
Sarah Cottrell, Painting, Drawing, and 

Decorating. 
Nathan E. Coffin, A.B., LL.B, Wills 

and Probate Law. 

D. W. Finlayson, M.D., LL.D., An- 
atomy and Clinical Surgery. 

O. B. Benson, A.M., M.D., Ph.G., 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

A. W. Hoff, M.D., Ph.G., Physiology 
and Hygiene. 

Charles O. Denny, A.M., Latin. 

Hon. William A. Spurrier, Indictments 
and Weaknesses of Defences. 

James C. Hume, A.M., LL.B., Ele- 
mentary Law, Equity Jurisprudence, 
and Law of Insurance. 

Spencer S. Cole, A.B., LL.B., Con- 
tracts, Agency, Code Pleading, Prac- 
tice, and Procedure. 

Oscar T. Morgan, A.M., Greek and 
Hebrew. 

Walter E. Scott, M.D., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry and Toxicology. 

WiUiam A. Crusinberry, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

E. S. Lawrence, M.D., Ph.G., Anatomy. 
J. B. Hatton, M.D., Diseases of Throat 

and Nose. 
Frank S. Dunshee, A.B., LL.B., 

Medical Jurisprudence. 
C. E. Stoner, M.D., Bacteriology and 

Microscopy. 



Lewis Schmidt, Ph.G., Dean of Phar- 
macy. 

H. O. Breeden, A.M., LL.D., "A 
Ministerial View of the Legal Pro- 
fession." 

Charles A. Dudley, Esq., Statute of 
Frauds. 

Hon. Josiah Given, The Relation of 
Lawyers to the Courts, their Clients, 
the Public, and Each Other. 

Hon. C. C. Nourse, Legal Rights of 
Married Women. 

P. S. McNutt, B.E., LL.B., Law. 

E. Amhurst Ott, Principal College of 
Oratory. 

Hon. J. G. Berryhill, The Lawyer's 
Business Opportunities. 

W. H. Bailey, Esq., Making and Ex- 
amining Abstracts. 

Senator C. H. Gatch, Practical Law- 
Making. 

Hon. A. B. Cummins, Corporation 
Law. 

Hon. Chester C. Cole, LL.D., Evi- 
dence, Commercial Paper. 

L. G. Kinne, LL.D., Corporation Law. 

Hon. C. P. Holmes, Real Property. 

J. A. Strong, Mus.D., Mus. Director. 

L. S. Ross, M.S., Biology, Chemistry. 

D. W. Smouse, M.D., Clin. Gynecol. 

A. O. Michael, Ph.G., Botany. 

Angus McKinnon, A.B.B.B.Sc, Com- 
mercial School. 

Carrie B. Belknap, Vocal Music. 

J. C. Macomber, M.S., LL.B., Crimi- 
nal Court. 

A. N. Porter, LL.B., Probate Practice. 

J. Madison Williams, A.M., History. 

Mrs. A. Z. Williams, A.B., Normal 
College. 

Robert T. Mathews, A.M., Sacred Lit. 

A. M. Newens, Oratory. 

Harry McCormack, Laboratory Assist. 

George W. Hamilton, Tutor. 



DRURY COLLEGE. 



Springfield, Mo. Co- Educational. 


Congregational. 


Income, 
$20,000 


Students, 
360 


Instructors, 
16 


Buildings, 
8 


Books, 
22,000 



At a Congregational convention in 1873 the college was established 
at Springfield with an endowment of $225,000, and with a campus 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



103 



of thirty-five acres. The presidents have been : Rev. Nathan Jack- 
son Morrison, D.D., LL.D., 1873-1887; Rev. Francis Theodore 
Ingalls, D.D., 1887-1892. The school is governed by twenty trus- 
tees. Students are admitted on certificates. Two parallel courses 
lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.A. The expenses range from 
$125 to $175 a year. There are eighteen scholarships, and three 
prizes of from ^10 to $25. Attendance at chapel, military drill, and 
gymnastics are compulsory. The college year is from September 1 1 
to June II. The natural history collection owned by the college is 
considered to be very good. A gymnasium with athletic grounds 
provides for physical exercise. There are two literary societies : the 
Oratorical Association for men, and the Lauriferae for women ; 
two similar societies in the preparatory department ; three Christian 
Associations and Endeavor Societies, and a Historical Society. 
*' The Mirror " is published fortnightly. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Homer T. Fuller, Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Edward M. Shepard, A.M., Librarian, 
Biology and Geology. 

Frederic A. Hall, A.M., Greek. 

Arthur P. Hall, Ph.D., Latin. 

William A. Chalfant, Piano and Organ. 

Caroline W. Daniels, A.M., Women's 
Department and English. 

Oliver H. Richardson, A.M., History 
and Modern Languages. 

Clark P. Howland, A.M., Academy. 

Helen F. Barnes, A.M., English. 

William J. Whitney, A.M., History 
and Modern Languages. 

Benjamin F. Finkel, A.M., Sect'y, 
Mathematics and Physics. 



INSTRUCTORS. 



Verna M. Thompson, M.S., English 
and Modern Languages. 

Mary Barton, A.B., History and Eng- 
lish Literature. 

Laura A. Schab, Expression and 
Physical Culture. 

Margaret H. Duffey, B.S., Art. 

Bertha B. Allen, A.B., Science and 
Mathematics. 

Darwin O. Clark, Chemistry. 

Charles N. Smiley, Jr., Latin. 

John Howard Nixon, M.D., Histology 
and Physiology. 



EARLHAM COLLEGE. 

Richmond^ Md. Co-Educational. 



Quaker. 



Income, 
$24,000 



Students, 
366 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
6,000 



Earlham College was founded in 1859. It began as a co-educa- 
tional institution, having grown out of the Friends' Boarding School 
of the same town, to which both sexes were likewise admitted. The 
first graduating class consisted of one man and one woman ; since 
that time one-third of the graduates have been women. The college 
is governed by thirteen trustees. 

Admission is by examination, or upon certificates from fourteen 
specified academies, and five high schools of Indiana. There are 
eight courses of study of four years each. The degrees are B.A., 



104 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



B.Ph., B.LL., B.S., and that of M.A., after one year's study. The 
total expenses for the year, lasting from September 14 to June 9, are 
$215. Eight benevolent funds, aggregating $40,000, have been estab- 
lished, from the interest of which scholarships of $65 each are be- 
stowed. In addition to these funds there is a loan fund for young 
women, and one for graduating students. 

The college grounds cover one hundred and twenty acres, and 
overlook the valley of the White River. There is an athletic field 
large enough for all sports, and an auditorium seating one thousand. 
Of the societies the Oratorical Association is open to members of 
all four classes. The Ionian is for men, and the Phoenix Band for 
women. Both own libraries. The "Earlhamite" is published by 
the students. 

In all, 350 students have been graduated, 323 of whom are living. 
The oldest of these is Luzena Thomburg, 1862, of Carthage, Ind. 



Faculty. 



Joseph J. Mills, A.M., LL.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Joseph Moore, A.M., LL.D., Geology 
ana Zoology. 

William B. Morgan, A.M., C.E., 
Mathematics. 

David W. Dennis, Ph.D., Chemistry, 
Biology, and Physics. 

William N. Trueblood, A.M., English. 

Adolph Gerber, Ph.D., German and 
French. 

Cyrus W. Hodgin, A.M., History and 
Political Economy. 

Marianna Brown, A.M., Greek. 

Edwin P. Trueblood, A.M., Elocution 
and Gymnastics. 

Robert L. Sackett, B.S. (C.E.), Ap- 
plied Mathematics and Astronomy. 



Mary L. Coggeshall, B.Ph., Latin. 

Elbert Russell, A.M., Exegesis and 
Church History 

Emma Spencer Townsend, Eng. Bible 

Alice A. Mendenhall, A.B., Hebrew 
and English Bible. 

Mary E. Harris, Librarian. 

J. Elwood Bundy, Painting and Draw- 
ing. 

Alice B. Finley, B.P., Music. 

William O. Beal, Chemical Laboratory. 

Walter E. Day, Assistant Librarian. 

Irving King, German. 

Charles E. Cosand, English. 

Edwin P. Haworth, Gymnasium. 

John U. Harkness, Superintendent and 
Treasurer. 

Charity C. Harkness, Matron. 



ELMHURST COLLEGE. 



Elmhurst, III. 



Men. 



German- Evanzelical. 



Income, 
$21,629 



Students, 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,473 



This college, which was originally intended as a German prepara- 
tory theological seminary, was founded in 1871, and celebrated its 
twenty-fifth anniversary in 1896. It is situated sixteen miles from 
Chicago, on a tract of twenty-eight acres. The trustees number 
eight, with three parishes having one vote each. Admission is on 
certificate. Instruction is given in the classics, modern languages, 
sciences, music, and pedagogy. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 
Students are forbidden to correspond without permission from the 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



105 



president, and must have no intercourse whatever with members of 
the opposite sex. A marriage engagement is followed by instant 
dismissal. The expenses for the year are $200. Poor students can 
obtain scholarships of from $100 to $150, but in return for such 
scholarships must sign articles promising to return such advances, 
and promising also never to leave the Evangelical Church. 
The graduates number one thousand. 



P. H. Wolf, President. 
P. H. Stamer, Secretary, 
P. C. Krafft, Treasurer. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

P. D. Irion, Inspector. 
P.- 1. Liider, Professor. 



Faculty. 

P. E. Otto, Professor. 

H. Brodt. 

G. A, Sorrick, A.M., English. 

F. A. Kern. 

P. K. Bauer. 

Georg Ramge. 

C. G. Kirch er. Superintendent. 



Elmira, N. V. 



ELMIRA COLLEGE. 

JVo?nefi. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$31,000 



Students, 
184 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
5,000 



The school was chartered in 1852 as the Auburn Female Univer- 
sity. It was transferred to Elmira in 1853, and was opened to stu- 
dents two years later as the first women's college giving the degree 
of B.A. in the East. It was also the first to receive aid from the 
State. It is governed by nineteen trustees. , Students holding cer- 
tificates of the Regents of New York, or of preparatory and high 
schools are admitted without examination. Degrees of B.A., B.S., 
and in music are given, as are the degrees of M.A. and M.S. after 
one year's post-graduate study. The expenses for the year are 
$350. The income of $25,000 is used to assist worthy students, and 
the interest of $1,000 is given to the best graduate. 

The campus covers ten acres, and contains athletic grounds. The 
graduates number 404, of whom 340 are living. The oldest of these 
is Martha B. Flint, 1859, New York City. Two literary associations, 
the Kappa Sigma, and the Phi Nu are maintained by the students, 
and the " Sibyl " is issued five times a year by the Seniors. The col- 
lege year lasts from September 16 to June 10. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Augustus W. Cowles, D.D., 

LL.D., Acting President, Psychol. 
Rev. Darius R. Ford, D.D., Physical 

Sciences and Astronomy. 
Anna Leach, Lady Principal, Ethics 

and English. 
Emma K. Clark, A.B., Librarian, 

Latin. 
Cornelia P. Dwight, Mathematics, 

Secretary of Faculty. 
Ellen C. Pierson, German. 
Helen E. Hoag, A.B., Greek and Hist. 



Eleanor Hamilton, French. 

Bertha Conde, A.B., Physical Sciences. 

Mary G. Cummings, Ph.B., Rhetoric 

and Physical Culture. 
George Morgan McKnight, Music. 
Lena Broughton, Piano and Harmony. 
F. Angeline Palmer, Piano. 
M. DeForest Siple, Violin and Guitar. 
George W. Waters, A.N. A., Art. 
Mabel Waters, Jean Waters, Grace 

Allington, Assistants in Art School. 
Amanda Townsend, Matron. 



io6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Eminence, Ky. 



EMINENCE COLLEGE. 

Co- Educational, 



Non-Sectarian. 



The school was opened as a high school in 1857. In 18^9 after 
a transfer of the property, it was organized as a college. ' It is 
governed by seven trustees. Three courses lead to degrees of B A 
BL. and B.S. The expenses for the year, lasting from the first 
Monday m September to the first Thursday in June, are $^2t^ The 
societies are the Philomathean. the Shakespeare Society, and a 
debating club. The " Philomathean Weekly " is published The 
graduates number 272. 

Facility. 



W. S. Giltner, A.M., President, Ethics 

and Greek. 
J. C. Gordon, Higher Mathematics. 
Nannie B. Rees, A.B., English. 
Miss M. F. Gordon, A.B., Latin. 
Prudie Gordon, A.B., Civil History. 



Miss L. D. Giltner, A.M., Musical 
Director. 

Mrs. H. A. Brewer, Art and French. 

L. D. Giltner, Commercial Depart- 
ment. 

Leila Bettis, Matron. 



Oxford, Ga. 



EMORY COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$19,685 



Students, 
288 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
10,000 



The college, which dates from 1837, is forty miles from Atlanta, 
on a high granite ridge. Of the thirty-nine trustees, three must be 
alumni. No student can receive the degree of A.B. who has not 
studied Latin and Greek and one modern language. Degrees of B.S., 
B.L., B.Ph., and M.A. are also given. 

There is a loan fund association which provides $200 or less a year 
for indigent students. There are also two literary societies, which 
date from the foundation of the college, and possess libraries of 
6,000 volumes. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: Mystical Seven, 1S41-1858; K A, 1869; X *, 1869- * A 
'«r' ^^'J'^'i'^^'.' 2 AE, 1882-1S88; ATA, 1882; KE, 1887; 2 N,' 
1684. The alumni number 11 13, of whom 750 are living; the oldest 
of these IS the Rev. J. R. Armstead, 1841, of Mansfield, La. 

Fac7ilty. 
Rev. W. A. Candler, D.D., President, H. H 

Philosophy and Bible. 
Rev, Morgan Callaway, D.D„ English. 
John F. Bonnell, Ph.D., Sciences. 
Rev. L. H. Harris, A.M., Greek. 
Rev. John S. Moore, D.D., Latin. 
Rev. Julius Magath, Modern Lan- 
guages and Hebrew. 
Mansfield T. Peed, A.M., Pure Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 



Stone, A.M., Applied Mathe- 
matics, Librarian. 

W. B. Griffin, Jr., A.B., Classics. 

Edgar H. Johnson, A.B., Mathematics. 

Rev. H. S. Bradley, A.B., Sciences. 

Rev. J. E. Dickey, A.B., Philosophy. 

Capers Dickson and Col. John S. 
Candler, Law Lecturers. 

U. G. Hardeman, Assist. Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



107 



EMORY AND HENRY COLLEGE. 

Emory, Va. Men. Methodist. 



Income, 
$14,000 



Students, 
100 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
8,000 



The college was founded in 1837. It is governed by twenty-seven 
trustees. Its courses of study lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., and 
M.A. There are two scholarships of $100 each, three gold medals, 
and two other prizes for proficiency in study. The college year lasts 
from September 12 to June 12. 

The campus covers twenty-three acres. A new gymnasium has 
recently been erected seating 1,600 persons. Two literary societies, 
which jointly publish a monthly, are maintained by the students, 
and chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : 
*K2, 1855-1861; K, 1872; Rainbow, 1 883-1 886; 2 A E, 1884; A K 0, 
1889; and* AX. 

Faculty. 



Rev. R. G. Waterhouse, M.A., D.D., 
President, Psychology and Ethics. 

Rev. Edmund Longley, M.A., Modern 
Languages. 

Rev. James A, Davis, M.A., Sciences. 

James S. Miller, C.E., D.Sc, Math. 

Joseph L. Jarman, Natural Sciences. 

Jesse T. Littleton, M.A., Modern 
Languages. 



Charles H. Shannon, B.A., Ancient 
Languages. 

Lacon H. Carlock, B.A., Ancient Lan- 
guages and English. 

Henry L. Lyons, Gymnasium. 

J. N. McClure, Superintendent. 

A. E. Buchanan, Languages. 

C. H. S. Humphreys, Mathematics. 

C. W. Crawford, English. 



ERSKINE COLLEGE. 

Due West, S. C. Co-Educational. 



Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$5,400 



Students, 
112 



Instructors, 




Books, 



Erskine College was founded in 1839. In 1892 the old building 
was burned, and a new one was erected in its place. The school is 
governed by twenty-one trustees. Admission is by certificates. 
There are two courses of study, of four years each, leading to de- 
grees of A.B., and B.S. The expenses for the year, lasting from the 
first week in October to the middle of June, are $100. A scholar- 
ship of $175 has been established, and a new chair has been founded 
on a recent gift of $8,000. Among the college buildings is an audi- 
torium seating 1,500, and a new observatory. Buildings are also 
owned by the Philomathean and Euphemian societies, and by a 
branch of the Y. M. C. A. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized : 2 X, 1860-1861 ; Rainbow, 1872-1874 ; K A, 
1883; 2 AE, 1884-1888. 

The graduates number 517, of whom 300 are living. The oldest 
of these is D. G. Phillips, 1846, of Louisville, Ga. 



io8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty 

Rev. W. M. Grier, D.D., President, 

Philosophy. 
E. L. Reid, A.B,, Physical Science. 
P. L. Grier, A.M., Mathematics and 

Astronomy. 
R. G. Peoples, A.B., Greek, German. 



Rev. J. McC. Todd, A.M., D.D., 
Latin and Frencli. 

J. I. McCain, Ph.D., English Litera- 
ture. 

John L. Pressly, A.B., Preparatory 
Department. 



Eureka, III. 



EUREKA COLLEGE. 

Co- Educational. 



Disciples. 



Income, 
$22,000 



Students, 
192 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
4,692 



The college was founded in 1857. It is governed by twenty-four 
trustees. Degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.A. are given. Attendance 
at chapel is compulsory, but drill and gymnastics are not required. 
Negroes are not excluded. The expenses are upward of $125 a year. 
The college year lasts from September 10 to June 10. 

The college grounds cover twenty-five acres, six of which form 
the campus. The Edmund Burke and Periclesian literary societies 
have been in existence for more than forty years, while another, the 
Adelphian, has been founded since that time. Besides two Chris- 
tian Associations there is an Athletic Association, a baseball team, 
a football eleven, and glee club. The " Pegasus " is published 
monthly. Since the foundation of the school 393 alumni have been 
graduated, the oldest of whom is Elija Dickinson, i860, Eureka, 111. 



Faculty. 



Carl Johann, A.M., LL.D., President, 

Modern Languages. 
B. C. Deweese, A.M., Sacred Lit. 
B. J. Radford, A.M., LL.D., Latin 

and History. 
Horace N. Herrick, A.M., Greek and 

Sanskrit. 
John A. Lowry, Mathematics. 
R. E. Conklin, A.M., Nat. Sciences. 
R. E. Hieronymus, A.M., English. 
A. T. Smith, Preparatory Department, 

Vocal Culture. 



G. W. Hootman, Commercial Depart- 
ment. 

Janie Vandervort, Piano. 

Zua I. Briggs, M.A., Violin. 

Mattie Naramore, Drawing, Painting. 

Annie J. Jones, M.A., Elocution. 

J. T. Allison, Typewriting. 

F. W. Burnham, Telegraphy. 

J. E. Wharton, Physical Culture. 

J. A. Evans, Ladies' Boarding Hall. 

John Lewis, Gentlemen's Boarding 
Halls. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



109 



EVELYN COLLEGE. 

Princeton, N'.J. Women. 



No7t-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 

35 



Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 



Evelyn College was founded in 1887 as an annex to Princeton for 
women students. It was incorporated in 1889. There is a classical 
course, equal to that of Princeton, leading to the degree of B.A., 
with other courses in English, music, and art, leading to the degree 
of B.L. Instruction is given by professors and instructors of Prince- 
ton, and the libraries and museums of Princeton are used by the stu- 
dents. Post-graduate courses at Princeton are open to the students 
of Evelyn. The price of board and tuition is $400 a year. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. H. McIlvaine,D.D., President, 
Political Economy, Christian Evi- 
dences, Latin, and Greek. 

Rev. James Ormsby Murray, D.D., 
LL.D., Bliss Perry, A.M., English. 

Alexander Thomas OiTnond, Ph.D., 
Ethics, Psychology, and Logic. 

Charles Augustus Young, Ph.D., 
LL.D., Taylor Reed, A.M., Astron. 

Cyrus Fogg Brackett, M.D., LL.D., 
Phvsics. 

Henry B. Cornwall, E.M., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

Allan Marqiiand, Ph.D., L.H.D., Art. 

Winthrop M. Daniels, A.M., History. 

Walter Meade Rankin, Ph.D., Biology. 

John Grier Hibben, Ph.D., Math. 

Josephine de Valley, French. 

Martha Engell, German. 

Dr. William, Director School of Music. 



Miss A. H. Biggs, Instrumental Music. 
Alice M. Mcllvaine, Vocal Music. 
Edgar M. Ward, M.A., Director School 
of Design. 

PRINCETON COLLEGE LECTURERS. 

Charles W. Shields, D.D., LL.D., 

Harmony of Science and Revealed 
Religion. 

William A. Packard, Ph.D., Latin 
Language and Literature. 

S. Stanhope Orris, Ph.D., Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. % 

Theodore Whitefield Hunt, Ph.D., 
Old and Early English. 

Henry Fairfield Osborn, D.Sc, Bi- 
ology. 

William B. Scott, Ph.D., Geology. 

William Libbey, D.Sc, Physical Geog- 
raphy and Histology. 



EWING COLLEGE. 



Ewing, III. 


Co-Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 


Students, 

IIS 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 
6 


Books, 
2,500 





The school was founded in 1867 as the Ewing High School, and 
in 1S74 became Ewing College. The presidents have been : John 
Washburn, 1867-1875; Rev. J. W. Patton, 1875-1876; John Wash- 
burn (second term), 1876-1877 ; Rev. W^iiliam Shelton, 1877-1880; 
Dr. Washburn (third term), 1880-1890; and Rev. J. A. Leavitt, the 
present incumbent. The school is governed by seventeen trustees. 



no 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Three parallel courses lead to degrees of B.A, and B.S. Attendance 
at chapel is compulsory. Expenses for the year are from $ioo up- 
wards. The academic year lasts from September 3 to June 4. The 
college grounds cover seven acres. Two societies : the Pythagorian 
and the Logossian are maintained by the students. In all, fifty-seven 
alumni have been graduated. 

Factdty. 

Rev. J. A. Leavitt, Pres., Philosophy. 
John Richeson, A.M., Natural Sci- 
ences and History 



C. E. Thompson, A.B., Languages. 
J. D. Martin, Mathematics. 



Mary E. Bryan, Academ. Department. 
Alice Lichty, Singmg, Instrumental 

Music. 

Mrs. M. E. Bryan, Lady Principal. 
Mrs. C. E. Thompson, Matron. 



FAIRFIELD COLLEGE. 

Fairfield, Neb. Co-Educational. Church of Christ. 



Income, 



Students, 
106 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 



Books, 
300 



The college was founded in 1884. The graduates number forty. 
The president is A. J. Murphy, A.M. 

{^Further i7iformation lacking.) 



Findlay, Ohio. 



FINDLAY COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. Church of God. 



Income, 
$7,481 



Students, 
434 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was incorporated in 1882. It is governed by eighteen 
trustees. There are four regular courses leading to B.A., B.S., B.L., 
and M.A., and six special courses. Six scholarships, the interest on 
$1000 each, are available. Two literary societies are maintained by 
the students. The college year is from September 16 to June 20. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William N. Yates, A.M., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Allen C. Redding, M.Sc, Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Charles T. Fox, A.M., Latin, German. 

Ed. M. Mills, Ph.M., A.M., Math. 

Julie Pauline Davies, Ph.D., Lady 
Principal, French, History, English. 

Erastus F. Loucks, A.M., Registrar, 
Greek. 

Jennie C. Oliver, Elocution, Oratory. 

Reno B. Myers, Piano Department. 



Mrs. E. F. Loucks, Singing. 

Mrs. Nellie Bacon, Organ and Piano. 

Leon Wineland, Violin, Cornet, and 

Orchestra. 
Harry J. Minnich, Stenography. 
John H. Livingston, Book-keeping, 

Commercial Law. 
Claribel Jenkins, Drawing, Painting. 
Minnie Maude Thorley, Minnie Myrtle 

Carrothers, Singing. 
William Taylor, Curator of Museum. 
Lizzie Graul, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Ill 



FISK UNIVERSITY. 

Nashville^ Tenn. Co-Educational. Congregational. 



Income, 
$43,000 



Students, 
465 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
5,227 



The university was founded by the American Missionary Associa- 
tion of New York and the Western Freedman's Aid Association in 
1865, to provide instruction for colored students. The first class was 
graduated in 1875. The college is governed by nine trustees. The 
Jubilee Singers were sent out from this school. There are depart- 
ments of industrial education, and domestic work. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. There are five buildings, a gymnasium, and 
an athletic ground. The college year lasts from September 21 to 
June 10. Since the foundation of the school 270 students have been 
graduated, of whom 256 are living. The oldest of these is John D. 
Burrows, 1875, of Nashville, Tenn. 



Faculty. 



Rev, Erastus M. Cravath, D.D., Pres- 
ident, Philosophy and Polit. Econ. 

Rev. Adam K. Spence, M.A., Greek 
and French. 

Rev. Henry S. Bennett, M.A., Theol- 
ogy and German. 

Helen C. Morgan, M.A., Latin, and 
Librarian. 

Rev. Frederick A. Chase, M.A., Nat- 
ural Science. 

Herbert H. Wright, M.A., Mathe- 
matics and Vocal Music. 

Rev. Edwin C Stickel, M.A., Bible. 

Rev. Charles W. Dunn, M.A., B.D., 
Theology and Church History. 

Rev. Eugene Harris, M.A., B.D., 
Hebrew and Old Testament. 

Rev. George W. Moore, M.A., B.D., 
Pastoral Theology. 

Anna T. Ballantine, Lady Principal. 

Dora A. Scribner, B.A., Rhetoric, 
Literature, and Natural Science. 



Emma L. Parsons, M.A., Secretary. 

Mary E. Spence, M.A., Greek, French. 

Mary A. Bye, B.S., Latin, History. 

Alice M. Garsden, English Reviews 
and Mathematics. 

M. Antoinette Kellogg, B.Pd., Physi- 
cal Geography and Normal Methods. 

Caroline Wandell, Common English, 
Writing, and Drawing. 

Alice L. Walker, Ph.B., U. S. History. 

Ella F. Comings, B.S., Arithmetic. 

Miriam E. Carey, Composition. 

Emily R. Bishop, Reading, Geograph}^. 

Lucy R. Greene, Model School. 

Jennie A. Robinson, Instrumental 
Music and Voice Culture. 

Mary E. Chamberlin, Music, Harmony, 

Luretta C. Stickel, B.L., Music. 

Alice May Grass, Organ and Piano. 

Frances L. Yeomans, Nursing and 
Hygiene. 

W. D. McFarland, Cooking, Sewing. 



112 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



FLORIDA CONFERENCE COLLEGE. 

Leesburg, Fla. Co-Ediicational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$2,000 



Students, 

57 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was founded by the Florida Conference of Methodists 
in 1885, and the conference since that time has appropriated $2,000 
a year for its purposes. It is governed by a board of eighteen trus- 
tees. Degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.L. are given. The college year 
lasts from September 11 to May 20. Two societies are organized 
among the students. Since 1890 twenty-eight alumni in all have 
been graduated. 

Faadfy. 



Rev. J. T. Nolen, A.B., B.D., Presi- 
dent, Latin. 

Rev. F. A. Taylor, A.M., Mathematics 
and Greek. 

Rev. T. A. Jordan, A.B., B.D., His- 
tory, English, and Natural Science. 



Mrs. C. C. B. Richards, Natural Sci- 
ence, German, and French. 
Mrs. A. S. Barnett, Music. 
Fannie Collins, Art. 
Victor Knight, Librarian. 
Mary Knight, Assistant Librarian. 



FORT WORTH UNIVERSITY. 

Fort Worthy Texas. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$30,000 



Students, 
344 



Instructors, 
42 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
1,500 



The school was chartered as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, 
but changed its name to the present one in 1889. It is governed by 
a board of thirteen trustees. Admission is by examination and upon 
certificate. Two collegiate courses, and courses in law and medicine, 
lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., LL.B., and M.D. Two preparatory 
courses, a normal and commercial course, besides courses in music 
and military training, are also offered. Attendance at chapel, 
church, and at military drill for men, is required. The expenses for 
the year, lasting from September 15 to May 20, are $165, of which 
$50 is for tuition. Scholarships equivalent to tuition are offered 
in the Normal College, and a gold medal is given for excellence in 
oratory. 

The campus, situated in the midst of Fort Worth, the " Chicago 
of Texas," on the southern bank of the Trinity River, covers ten 
acres. Of the buildings, four, including the dining-hall and armory, 
are on the campus, while the professional schools are in the centre 
of the town. The college owns a good library, observatory, two 
laboratories, and a museum of zoological and mineralogical speci- 
mens, and of archaeological casts. The societies are the Athenian 
and Hesperian for men, the Orophilian for women, an Athletic Asso- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



II 



elation, with football and baseball teams, and two Christian Associa- 
tions. Of the twenty-eight graduates, William R. Edrington, 1887, 
of Fort Worth, is the oldest. 

Faculty. 



Oscar L. Fisher, A.M., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Ethics and Metaphysics. 

William A. Adams, A.M., M.D., 
Medicine. 

James Anderson, M.D., Dermatology. 

Elias J. Beall, M.D., Surgery. 

Augustus J. Booty, Dean, Evidence. 

J. T. Brantley, Book-keeping and 
Commercial Law. 

Blanche G. Brazelton, Fine Arts. 

Amanda Brock, Shorthand. 

Samuel T. Camp, Law. 

Edgar Doak Capps, M.D., Physiology 
and Brain. 

Ira Carleton Chase, A.B., Chemistry 
and Toxicology. 

Alice C. Conkling, Belles Lettres. 

William A. Duringer, M.D., Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

Charlotte E. Fisher, History. 

Irene Fisher, Preparatory. 

Julian T. Feild, M.D., Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 

Robert W. Flournoy, A.B., Law. 

David R. Fly, M.D., Anatomy and 
Clinics. 

Agnes Ferguson, A.M., German and 
French. 



Theodore F. Graham, A.M., Latin 

and Greek. 
Frank Gray, M.D., Eye, Ear, Nose, 

and Throat. 
B. H. Green, Telegraphy. 
Marie B. Hack, Oratory. 
Ella F. Hendricks, Shorthand. 
Grace Hiltz, Vocal Music. 
William R. Howard, M.D., Histology. 
John W. Irion, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 
Kent V. Kibbie, B.S., Chemistry. 
Almeda F. Mann, Violin. 
R. F. Moore, Penmanship. 
F. P. Preuitt, Commercial College. 
Bacon Saunders, M.D., Surgery. 
U. S. Shewmaker, Penmanship. 
Robert L. Short, A.M., Mathematics. 
Laura Grant Short, Music. 
Ernest L. Stephens, M.D., Materia 

Medica. 
F. D. Thompson, M.D., Gynecology. 
Anne Walford, Music. 
Amos Clarke Walker, M.D., Anatomy. 
William Beverly West, M.D., Diseases 

of Children. 
W. M. Short, Commandant. 
Flavilla Grant, Latin, Mathematics. 
George W. Steere, English. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE. 

Franklin, Ind. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$24,000 



Students, 
207 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded in 1S35. It has been suspended twice, 
first in 1864 for lack of students by reason of the war, then m 1872 
for want of funds. The presidents have been : the Revs. George C. 
Chandler, 1843-1849; Silas Bailey, 1852-1862, and William T. Stott, 
D.D., 1869 to the present. The government is vested m twelve 
directors. The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.Ph., and M.A. Attendance 
at chapel is compulsory. Negroes are not excluded. The yearly 
expenses are from $138 to $216. The academic year lasts from Sep- 
tember 17 to June 10. The students maintain three literary societies : 
the Pereclesian, Webster, and Athenian ; two Christian Associations, 
an athletic association, tennis club, with baseball and football teams ; 



114 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



and publish " The Kodak." Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized: * A 0, i860; ATA, 1871-1882; A r, 1878- 
1883 ; K K r, 1879-1884, and n B *, 1888. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William T. Stott, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy, 

Rev. Columbus H. Hall, A.M., B.D., 
Greek. 

Rebecca J. Thompson, A.M., Mathe- 
matics, Librarian. 

David A. Owen, A.M., Biology. 

Francis W. Brown, A.M., Ph.D., Latin. 

Wellington B. Johnson, A.M., Chem- 
istry and Physics. 



Charles E. Goodell, A.M., Secretary, 

History. 
William E. Henry, A.M., English. 
Jeannette Zeppenfeld, M.S., Modern 

Languages. 
Arabella R. Stott, Painting and 

Drawing. 
James M. Dungan, Mus. Doc, Music. 
Minnie Bruner, Music. 
Grace E. Stott, Assistant Librarian. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE. 

New Athens, Ohio. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$3,000 



Students, 
100 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded in 1825, and was flourishing in the days 
of Andrew Jackson, who was among its benefactors. Of the thirty- 
five colleges of Ohio only five have graduated a larger number of 
classical students. It is governed by twenty-one trustees. Admis- 
sion is by examination and upon certificate. The curriculum leads 
to degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph., and diplomas in business, music, 
and art are offered. Degrees of M.A., Ph.M., and M.S. are given 
after three years. Expenses for the year, lasting from September i 
to June 2, are from I130 to $200. 

A new college building has recently been erected at a cost of 
$12,000, and a separate dormitory has been provided for women. 
The students maintain two chartered literary societies, the Philo- 
sophic and Jefferson, and two Christian Associations. A chapter of 
ATA was organized in 1863, but expired in the same year. 

The graduates number 800, a very large majority of whom are 
clergymen. The oldest of these is Rev. Joseph McKee, 1832, of 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Faculty. 



Rev. W. A. Williams, D.D., President. 
Rev. R. G. Campbell, D.D., Classics. 
T. M. Sewell, Ph.D., Mathematics 

and Natural Science. 
C. E. Githens, Latin. 
W. D. Porterfield, M.S., Secretary, 

Normal Department. 



Anna Day, Vocal Music. 
Mrs. S. M. Boice, A.M., Art. 
Grace Hunter, Shorthand. 
E. B. Thomas, Commercial Branches. 
W. M. Amos, Penmanship. 
Margaret McFarland, M.S., B.E., 
Elocution. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



IIS 



FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE. 

Lancaster, Pa. Co-Educational. Reformed Chnrch. 



Income, 
$12,500 



Students, 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
29,000 



It was founded in 1853 as the continuation of Franklin College, 
founded by Benjamin Franklin, dating from 1787, and Marshall 
College, named after Chief Justice Marshall, dating from 1836. The 
presidents have been: Rev. E. V. Gerhart, D.D., 1854-1866; Rev. 
J. W. Nevin, D.D., LL.D., 1866-1876; Rev. Thomas G. Apple, D.D., 
LL.D., 1877-1889; Rev. John S. Stahr, Ph.D., D.D., 1890 to the 
present time. 

The college is governed by thirty trustees. Besides the college, 
with courses leading to the degree of B.A., there is a theological 
seminary under the direction of three eastern synods. The college 
grounds cover thirty-two acres. Three oratorical contests are held 
each year for prizes of $20, ^25, and $50. In the seminary three 
similar prizes are given for excellence in church history, rhetoric, 
and Hebrew. A preparatory academy is connected with the college. 
The students publish " The College Student," a monthly ; the 
" F. and M.," a weekly; the "Nevonian," a senior annual, and the 
"Oriflamme," a junior annual. There are two literary societies, 
the Diagnothian and the Goethian, a Christian Association, a glee 
and mandolin club, an athletic association, with a football eleven, 
baseball nine and tennis club. Chapters of the following frater- 
nities have been organized: * K E, X 2, 1855; * K ■*•, i860, and 
ATA, 1874. 

Faculty. 



Rev. John Summers Stahr, Ph.D., 

D.D., President, Mental and Moral 

Science and Geology. 
Rev. Emanuel Vogel Gerhart, D.D., 

LL.D., Sys. and Prac. Theology. 
Rev. Thomas Gilmore Apple, D.D., 

LL.D., Church Hist, and Exegesis. 
Rev. Frederick Augustus Gast, D.D., 

Hebrew and Old Testament. 
Rev. John Calvin Bowman, D.D., New 

Testament Exegesis. 
Rev. William Rupp, D.D., Practical 

Theology. 
Rev. Joseph Henry Dubbs, D.D., 

History and Archaeology. 
John Brainerd Kieffer, Ph.D., Greek. 
Jefferson Engel Kershner, Ph.D., 

Math, and Director of Observatory. 
Rev. Geo. Fulmer Mull, A.M., Latin. 



Rev. Richard Conrad Schiedt, A.M., 
Mod. Linguages and Nat. Science. 

Rev. Charles Ernest Wagner, A.M., 
English. 

Anselm Vinet Hiester,A.M., German 
and Mathematics. 

Clarence Nevin Heller, A.M., Ancient 
Languages. 

John Michael Grove, A.M., Natural 
Science. 

Lieut. Edgar Wellington Howe, Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

Martin Luther Herr, A.M., M.D., An- 
atomy, Physiology, and Hygiene. 

Minnie L. Morgan, Elocution. 

George Washington Hartman, A.B., 
Director of Gymnasium. 

William Ward Moore, A.M., Rector 
of Academy. 



ii6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



FRENCH-AMERICAN COLLEGE. 

Springfield, Mass. Co-Educational. Protestant. 



Income, 

$12,500 



Students, 
56 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 



The college was chartered in 1885, and notwithstanding its name 
is a distinctly American institution. It is governed by a corporation 
of twenty-nine and by seventeen trustees, and by a business council 
of eight. There is a " conseil," with students from each class, which, 
under the direction of the president, deals with cases of discipline. 
Degrees of A.B., B.S., A.M., and Ph.D. are conferred. Two scholar- 
ships have been established for deserving students. The college 
grounds cover three acres, and there are four buildings. The library 
of Springfield is accessible. The students maintain a literary and 
debating society, a Christian Endeavor, Church Society, and publish 
the " French-American Citizen." 

Faculty^ 



Rev. Samuel H. Lee, A.M., President, 
Psychology, Ethics, and Economics. 

Gustave Michaud, D.S., French, Nat- 
ural Science. 

Z. Willis Kemp, Ph.D., Latin, Greek. 

Rev. Louis F. Giroux, B.A., History 
and Biblical Literature. 

George H. Howard, Mathematics. 



Elliott F. Talmadge, Principal Boys» 

Department. 

Louise B. Sampson, Principal Woman's 
Department. 

Frances H. Eldredge, Bible. 

Blanche Ray Alden, Piano. 

Rev. S. G. Barnes, Ph.D., Lit.D., Lec- 
turer, Relations of Literature to Life. 



FURMAN UNIVERSITY. 



Greenville, S 


. C. Co-Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$12,000 


Students, 
139 


Instructors, 
10 


Buildings, 


Books, 
4,500 





The university was founded by subscriptions of the Baptists of 
South Carolina. It was formerly the Furman Institution, and was 
located at Winnsboro, S. C. When it was made a university in 
1852, it was moved to Greenville. During the Civil War it was sus- 
pended. The presidents have been : Dr. James C. Furman, 1852-1881, 
and Dr. Charles Manley, elected in 1881. In 1893 the university 
was made co-educational. The degrees are B.A., B.L., B.S., M.A., 
and Master of Mathematics and Mechanics. Attendance at chapel 
or gymnastic drill is not compulsory. Negroes are excluded. The 
college year is from September 25 to June 18. There are two 
literary societies : the Adelphianand Philosophian ; an Athletic Asso- 
ciation, with football, baseball, and tennis clubs ; three boarding clubs, 
and chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : X "V, 
1858; K5, 1868-1869; 2AE, 1868-1885; Rainbow, 1871-1875; K A, 
1872. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



117 



The students publish a monthly magazine. The number of 
alumni since 1853 is 238, of whom 218 are living. The oldest of 
these is Rev. John G. Williams, 1855, of Allandale, S. C. 



Faculty. 



Charles Manly, D.D., President, Eng- 
lish. 

Charles Hallette Judson, LL.D., Math- 
ematics and Mechanical Philosophy. 

Harvey Toliver Cook, A.M., Greek. 

William Franklin Watson, A.M., 
Physics and Chemistry. 

Gordon Beverly Moore, D.D., Phi- 
losophy. 



Herri ck Piatt Young, A.M., Latin. 

Edgar von Fingerlin, Ph.B., Ph.L., 
Modern Languages. 

Marshall Delph Earle, A.M., M.M.P., 
Math, and Mechanical Philosophy. 

Stiles Rivers Mellichamp, A.M., Pre- 
paratory Department. 

Charles Love Durham, A.M., M.M.F., 
Assistant. 



Galesville, Wis. 



GALE COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$3,000 



Students, 
65 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded in 1856. It is governed by fifteen trus- 
tees. Admission is without examination to graduates of high schools. 
Besides the college course, leading to the degree of B.A., there is a 
Teachers' Normal School and a Law School. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 13 to June 18, are from $125 to $150, 
of which $30 is for tuition. Of the two buildings, one is used as a 
dormitory, while the other serves for purposes of instruction and 
contains a museum, several laboratories, and a gymnasium In the 
vicinity of the athletic field is a lake. The students maintain a 
literary society and an athletic association. 



Faculty. 



J. George, A.M., D.D., President, 
History and Pedagogics. 

Ella Willey, A.M., Math., EngHsh. 

B. G. Williams, A.B., Classics. 

Rev. J. W. Winder, Ethics and Chris- 
tian Evidences. 

Miss E. H. Kennedy, Music. 

Bessie Barr, Art. 

Ella Bunn, Librarian. 



LECTURERS. 



Hon. A. A. Arnold, Government and 

Contracts. 
Hon. G. Y, Freeman, Law. 
Edson Rhodes, M.D., Hygiene. 
C. P. Bunsen, M.D., Bacteria and 

Fermentation. 
F. A. Bell, M.D., Physiology. 



Ii8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE. 

(For the Deaf.) 
Washington, D. C. Co-Ediicational. N^oti- Sectarian. 



Income 



Students, 
72 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
3,000 



Gallaudet College, under the name of the National Deaf-Mute 
College, was founded by Professor Gallaudet of Yale in 1865. The 
institution is under the direct auspices of the National Administra- 
tion and the United States Congress, and has a board of twelve 
directors consisting of senators and congressmen. 

Applicants for admission must be able to express their thoughts 
in English. Instruction is given in English and other languages, in 
mathematics and sciences, as well as in drawing and gymnastics. 
There is a special department in articulation. Degrees of B.A., B.S., 
A.M., and Ph.D., are given. Expenses are $250 a year, but Con- 
gress has voted funds for the aid of poor students. The college 
year extends from September 18 to June 19. 



Faculty. 



Edward M. Gallaudet, Ph.D., LL.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Edward A. Fay, M.A., Ph.D., Lan- 
guages. 

Samuel Porter, M.A., Logic and Eng- 
lish Philology. • 

Rev. John W. Chickering, M.A., 
Natural Science. 

Joseph C. Gordon, M.A., Ph.D., 
Math., Chem., and Articulation. 



John B. Hotchkiss, M.A., History and 

English. 
Amos G. Draper, M.A., Mathematics 

and Latin. 
Charles R. Ely, M.A., Mathematics. 
Arthur D. Bryant, B.Ph., Drawing. 
Albert F. Adams, B.A., Gymnastics. 
Mary T. G. Gordon, Instructor. 
Kate H. Fish, Instructor. 



GATES COLLEGE. 



N'eligh, Neb. 


Co- Educational. 


Congregational. 


Income, 
.'^3,200 


Students, 

75 


Instructors, 
7 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
5,000 



The college was located and incorporated in 18S1, and opened in 
1882. It is governed by eleven trustees. The degree of B.A. is con- 
ferred. The expenses are from $125 to $170. There are four 
scholarships and three loan funds. The annual session lasts from 
September 9 to June 23. The students maintain the Docendia 
Literary Society, and publish the " Yearly Index." 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



119 



Faculty. 



George Warren Hinman, A.B., Acting 
President, Mathematics. 

May Belle Chellis, A.M., Latin, Greek, 
and Literature, and Librarian. 

Rev. Charles Anderson, A.M., His- 
tory, Latin, and Greek. 

Herdman Fitzgerald Cleland, A.B., 
Science. 

Christian John Schubert, Director of 
Conservatory. 



Frank W. Ellis, Principal of Business 

Department. 
Etta Fitchie, History and Elocution. 
Mrs. Christian J. Schubert, German. 
Edward Moore Furman, Latin and 

English. 
Louie Lenora Robinson, Art. 
Celia Rundquist, Violin. 
Jennie M. Smith, Assistant Librarian. 
Mrs. C. C. Taylor, Matron. 



GENEVA COLLEGE. 

Beaver Falls, Pa. Co-Educational. Reformed Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$14,000 



Students, 
237 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,500 



The college was founded by J. B. Johnston in 1848. The presi- 
dents have been: John Black Johnston, D.D., 1848-1850; William 
Finney George, A.M., 1850-1852; James Renwick Willson Sloane, 
D.D., 1852-1856 ; John Calvin Knox Milligan, D.D., 1856-1858 ; David 
Strang, A.M., 1864-1865; Nathan Robinson Johnston, 1865-1867; 
Samuel John Crowe, A.M., 1S67-1871 ; William Milroy, A.M., 1871- 
1872; Henry George, D.D., 1872-1890; and William P. Johnston, 
1890. 

The college is governed by a board of twenty-three corporators, 
and by eight trustees. The degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.A. are 
conferred. Members of the graduating class compete for fourteen 
prizes of from $10 to $25. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, but 
not so gymnastic drill. The college year lasts from September 
3 to May 28. There are two literary societies, the Adelphic and 
Theorian, two Christian Associations, and a college publication: 
"The Geneva Cabinet." 



Faculty. 



William Pollock Johnston. A.IM., 
D.D., President, Philosophy and 
English. 

George Kennedy, A.M., Librarian, 

William' M. Milroy, A.M., B.D., 

Ph.D., Latin. 
William McCracken, A.B., Science. 
William H. Wilson, A.M., Math. 



Political 



James M. Coleman, A.M., 
History and Philosophy. 

T. D. McCloskey, Academic Depart- 
ment and Gymnastics. 

Grace P. Morehead, German. 

Morris Stephens, Vocal Culture. 

Frances E. Waddle, A.M., Piano. 

Edith L. Winn, Stringed Instruments. 

Frances A. Heath, Oratory. 



120 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



GEORGETOWN COLLEGE. 



Georgetown, . 


Ky. 


Men. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$18,000 


Students, 
340 


Instructors, 
13 


Buildings, 


Books, 
10,000 





The college was founded in 1839. Tuition is from $30 to $50, 

i with other expenses, ranging from }^8o to $150, for the year, ending 

on June 11. Graduates number 300, of whom the oldest is B. F. 

Bradley, 1847, of Georgetown, Ky. The president is A. C. Davidson, 

A.M., D.D. 

{^Further information lacking,) 



GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY. 

Washington., D. C. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
725 



Instructors, 
85 



Buildings, 
9 



Books, 
70,000 



Georgetown University was founded by Archbishop John Carroll in 
1789 on Georgetown Heights, two and a half miles from the Capitol, 
where it still stands. It was the first Catholic college in the coun- 
try, and opened its doors to students in 1791. It was recognized by 
Congress as a university in 181 5, and was empowered to grant 
degrees in philosophy and theology in 1833. An observatory was 
established in 1843. -^ college of medicine was added in 1S51, to 
be followed by a law school in 1870. The present buildings were 
begun in 1878. They have a frontage of eight hundred feet, and are 
surrounded by seventy-eight acres of ground. The presidents have 
been: the Rev, Drs. Plunkett, 1791-1793; Robert Molyneux, 
1793-1796; William L. DuBourg, 1796-1799; Leonard Neale, D.D., 
1799-1806; Robert Molyneux, S.J., 1806-1808; William Matthews, 
1808-1810; Francis Neale, S.J., 1810-1812; John Grassi, S.J., 1812- 
1817 ; Benedict J. Fenwick, S.J., 1817-1818; Anthony Kohlmann, 
S.J., 1818-1820; Enoch Fenwick, S.J., 1820-1822; Benedict J. Fen- 
wick, S.J., 1822-1825; Stephen Larigaudelle Dubuisson, S.J., 1825- 
1826; William Feiner, S.J., 1826-1829; John William Beschter, S.J., 
1829; Thomas F. Mulledy, S.J., 1829-1837 ; William McSherry, S.J., 
1837-1840; Joseph A. Lopez, S.J., 1840; James Ryder, S.J., 1840- 
1845; Samuel A. Mulledy, S.J., 1845; Thomas F. MuUedy, S.J., 
1845-1848; James Ryder, S.J., 1848-1851 ; Charles H. Stonestreet, 
S.J., 1851-1852; Bernard A. Maguire, S.J., 1852-1858 ; John Early, 
S.J., 1858-1865; Bernard A. Maguire, S.J., 1866-1870; John Early, 
S.J., 1870-1873; Patrick F. Healy, S.J., 1873-1882 ; James A. 
Doonan, S.J., 1882-18S8; Joseph Havens Richards, S.J., 1888 to 
the present. 

Adviisston, Degrees, etc. : From certain preparatory schools stu- 
dents are admitted on certificates, in all other cases only after exam- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



121 



ination. The degrees are B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., besides the degrees 
granted by the professional schools. Attendance at chapel is com- 
pulsory, but not so drill. The college year lasts from the second 
Wednesday in September to the fourth Tuesday in June. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: The total expenses for the year 
are t'^'yi- Prizes of ^25 are given to the best students in philosophy, 
English history, and Oriental literature ; and fourteen gold medals 
and thirty silver medals are conferred for excellence in numerous 
specified studies. 

College Societies and Publications : The college grounds cover 
seventy acres. The seniors' campus measures 400x500 feet, while 
that of the juniors measures 270x350. There is no adequate gym- 
nasium or college hospital. The school of medicine is in Washing- 
ton City at 920 H Street, N. W., while the law school is at 506 E 
Street, N. W. Besides four religious societies, an alumni associa- 
tion, and athletic association, there is a debating club and historical 
society, a glee club, students' library, and a junior sodality with a 
library. Tau Theta Kappa, a literary society organized among the 
students, dates back many years. The "College Journal" is pub- 
lished, and the observatory issues regular reports of its observations 

and discoveries. „ ,, 

Faciuty. 



Rev. J. Havens Richards, S.J., Presi- 
dent. 

Rev. Francis P. Powers, S.J., Vice- 
President, Christian Doctrine. 

Rev. Edward H. Welch, S.J., Chaplain. 

Rev. Edward McTammany, S.J., 
French and Calculus. 

Rev. Jerome Daugherty, S.J., Calculus. 

Rev. Edward 1. Devitt, S.J., Logic, 
Metaphysics, and Ethics. 

Rev. Robert Fulton, S.J., English 
Literature. 

Rev. John G. Hagen, S.J., Astronomy 
and Director of Observatory. 

Rev. George A. Fargis, S.J., Rev. 
John T. Hedrick, S.J., Assistant 
Astronomers. 

John J. Thompkins, S.J., Physics, 
Mechanics, Geology, Trigonometry, 
and Analytical Geometry. 

Rev. John W. Fox, S.J., Chemistry. 

Rev. Laurence J. Kavanagh, S.J., 
Rhetoric and Literature. 

Rev. Daniel J. MacGoldrick, S.J., 
History and Geometry. 

Rev, Joseph A. Gorman, S.J., Ana- 
lytical Geometry and Calculus. 

Michael A. Mess, A.M., German. 

Henry Donch, Orchestral Instruments. 

Armand Gumprecht, Organ and Piano. 

James B, Becker, S.J., Poetry. 

Rev. J. F. X. Mulvaney, S.J., First 
Grammar. 



Rev. A. Coppens, S.J., French, and 

Librarian. 
John W, Corbett, S.J., Higher Algeb. 
Rev, W. F. Gannon, S.J., Patrick F. 

O'Gorman, S.J., John T. Conwell, 

S.J., John B. Butler, S.J., Assistant 

Prefects. 
Joseph Schneider, W. F. McLauchlin, 

A.B., Assistant Librarians, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

J. W, H. Lovejoy, A.M., M.D., 
Presid«.nt of Faculty, 

Samuel C. Busey, LL.D., M.D., 
Emeritus. 

G. L. Magruder, A.M., M.D., Dean 
of Faculty. 

Joseph Taber Johnson, A.M., Ph.D., 
M.D., Gynecology. 

C. H. A. Kleinschmidt, Ph.D., M.D., 
Physiology. 

Frank Baker, A.M., Ph.D., M.D., 
Anatomy. 

John J. Stafford, A.M., M.D., Chem- 
istry and Toxicology. 

Henry D. Fry, M.D., Obstetrics. 

William H. Hawkes, A.M., M.D., 
Materia Medica, Therapeutics, and 
Diseases of Children, 

James Kerr, M.D,, M.Ch., Surgery, 

Swan M, Burnett, Ph,D., M D,, Oph- 
thalmology and Otology. 

John W. Bayne, M,D., Clin. Surgery. 



122 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



L W. Blackburn, M.D., General Pa- 

thology and Histology. 
C. V. N. Callan, M.D,, Clin. Medicine. 
Harrison Crook, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 
A. H. Witmer, M.D., Ment. Diseases. 

F. T. Chamberlin, M.D., Laryngology. 
M. F.Cuthbert, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 
J. J. Kinyoun, M.D., Hygiene and 

Bacteriology. 

I. S. Stone, M.D., Gynecology. 

Warden Stiles, A.M., Ph.D., Medical 
Zooloijy. 

W. C. ^Voodward, M.D., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

W. H. Coffron, B.S., M.D., Chem. 

Hugh M. Smith, M.D., General Pa- 
thology and Histology. 

J. F. Moran, M.D., Anatomy. 

W. Sinclair Bowen, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Ralph H. Ross, M.D., E. B. Olmsted, 
M.D., R. B. Brummett, M.D., 
Anatomy. 

S. E. Watkins, M.D., Dermatology 
and Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

George J. Lochboehler, M.D., Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics. 

Austin O'Malley, Ph.D., M.D., Hy- 
giene and Bacteriology. 

G. L. Magruder, A.M., M.D., Dean 
and Treasurer. 



SCHOOL OF LAW. 

Hon. Henry B. Brown, LL.D., Ad- 
miralty Jurisprudence. 

Plon. Martin F. Morris, LL.D., Con- 
stitutional and International Law, 

Hon. Seth Shepard, Law of Corpora- 
tions and Equity Jurisprudence. 

Hon. Jeremiah M. Wilson, LL.D., 
Law ot Real Estate and of Evidence. 

Joseph J. Darlington, LL.D., Law of 
Personal Property, Contracts, and 
Negotiable Paper. 

George E. Hamilton, LL.D., Practice, 
Testamentary Law, and Equity 
Pleading and Practice. 

R. Ross Perry, A.M., LL.D., Com- 
mon Law Pleading, Criminal Law, 
and Domestic Relations. 

Rev. Rene Holaind, S.J., Nat. Law. 

Tallmadge A. Lambert, LL.D., Civil 
Law, 

Charles A. Douglass, Law of Torts. 

Michael J. Colbert, A.M., from Cir- 
cuit Court. 

Tallmadge A. Lambert, Job Barnard, 
and Henry Wise Garnett, from 
Court of Appeals. 

Samuel M. Yeatman, A.M., Secretary 
and Treasurer. 



GIRARD COLLEGE. 

Philadelphia, Peiin. Men. 



//on-Sectarian. 



Income, 
i 1, 03 1, 849 



Students, 
1665 



Instructors, 
62 



Buildings, 
13 



Books, 
13,022 



Girard College was founded in 1848. It is governed by the board 
of directors of city trusts of Philadelphia, thirteen in number. The 
first president was Alexander Dallas Bache, LL.D., elected in 1836, 
but the college was not opened until 1848. Hon. Joel Jones was 
the first acting president in 1S47 ; he was succeeded by William 
Henry Allen, LL.D., in 1849. Iri 1863 President Allen was suc- 
ceeded by Richard Somers Smith, A.M. In 1867 President Smith 
was succeeded by Ex-President Allen, who served until his death. 
The present incumbent, A. H. Fetterolf, LL.D., was elected in 1882. 

The development of manual training and mechanical instruction 
in which Girard College stands so high, is due largelv to the efforts 
of the late Richard Vaux, who was long a member of the board of 
directors. As a consequence of this development fifty per cent of 
the graduates, some 3,000 in number, are engaged in clerical and 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



123 



mercantile pursuits. Under the will of the founder negroes are 
excluded. Attendance at chapel and at gymnastics and military 
drill are compulsory. Theodore A. De Dow, 1855, is the oldest 
living graduate. The college, which has never been moved, stands 
on grounds covering some forty acres. The most noticeable events 
of the college year are New Year's Day, when the annual distribu- 
tion of premiums takes place, and Founder's Day which occurs on 
May 20. 

Facility. 



Adam H. Fetteroll, Ph.D., LL.D., 
President. 

Winthrop D. Sheldon, A.M., Vice- 
President. 

George J. Becker, Drawing. 

N. Wiley Tliomas, Ph.D., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Frederick Prime, Jr., A.M., Ph.D., 
Natural History. 

C. Addison Willis, M.E., Math. 

Mme. S. Anna Simon, French. 

Archibald Cobb, Phonography. 

Warren Holden, A.M., Mathematics. 

James N. Walker, A.M., English and 
Literature. 

John K. Harley, M.E., Penmanship 
and Book-keeping. 

Calixto Guiteras, Spanish. 

Capt. Frank A. Edwards, First Cav., 
U.S.A., Mil. Science and Tactics. 

Marian B. Heritage, Elocution. 

Mary Lynch, Librarian. 

George P. Rupp, Assistant Librarian. 

Charlotte E. Overn, Hessy R. Miller, 
Emily P. Town, Harriet Braddock, 
Inez E. Walsh, Elizabeth McDuffee, 
Mary D. Ware, Virginia B. Tucker, 
Susan B. Price, Martha G. Mc- 
Laughlin, Margaret Wylie, Teachers 
in Third School. 



Louise St. C. Wolf, Mary E. Ro'ob, 
Annie D. Swift, Jane Peoples, Kath- 
arine IL Brophy, Laura E. Baymore, 
Alice W. Cox, Bessie Sharp, Mary 
Peoples, Eva Roberts, Helen Long, 
Bessie Burnett, Teachers in Second 
School. 

Emily E. Payne, Emma B. Develin, 
Clara G. Duffy. Georgie A. Currie, 
C. Jessica J. Donnelly, lona M. 
Nowlen, Carmelita E. Boettger, 
Helen A. Wilson, Charlotte A. 
Ragotzky, Kate L. Morgan, A. Tillie 
Shenk, Nellie Albrecht, Jane Knox 
Jackson, Teachers in First School. 

Thomas A'Becket, Thomas Winn, 
Vocal Music. 

Fanny West, Drawing. 

George Bastert, Brass Band. 

Louis Lewis, Gymnastics. 

MECkANICAL SCHOOL. 

T. R. Coggeshall, Superintendent. 
Robert H. CUnger, Carpentry. 
Davis Eavenson, Wood-turning. 
John W. Breen Blacksmithing. 
George A. Peddle, Iron Work. 
Charles M. Knapp, Elec. Mechanics. 
John Uprichard, Plumbing. 
Chas. S. Williamson, Mech. Drawing. 



GRAND RIVER CHRISTIAN UNION COLLEGE. 

Edinburgh Mo. Co-Educational. Christiatt Unio7i. 



Income, 
$2,000 



Students, 
140 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
500 



The college was organized as Grand River Academy in 1850, but was 
not incorporated until 1859. During this interval the original build- 
ing was destroyed by fire in 1853, ^^'^'^ replaced by a new one in 1858. 
The school was the first co-educational institution in the State. 
It is governed by twelve directors and sLx trustees. Admission is by 



124 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



examination and upon certificate. Besides the college curriculum 
leading to degrees of B.A., B.S., and B L., courses in theology, busi- 
ness, music, and art are offered. Attendance at chapel is required. 
In the college all " gallanting and loafing, the use of tobacco, or the 
carrying of dangerous and deadly weapons " is strictly prohibited. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 15 to May 6, are 
from $100 to $130, of which $26 is for tuition. The college grounds 
cover four acres of fine blue grass. The buildings consist of the old 
college structure, and a dormitory for women. The library contains 
several hundred volumes. The students maintain the Alpha-Philo- 
mathian, and a Christian Endeavor Society. 



Facility. 



Rev. George W. Mitchell, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Theology and Philosophy. 

Rev. J. V. B. Flack, D.D., Church 
History, 

R. T. Boyd, A.B., Latin and Greek. 

N. E. Stephenson, B.L., Mathematics 
and English. 



W. H. Winninghara, M.D., Physiol'y. 

T. V. Williams, M.D., Hygiene, etc. 

Mayme Garrett, Music. 

Beatrice Rice, Elocution. 

Olevia DePriest, Art. 

Artelia Smith, Primary Studies. 

H. S. Mitchell, Librarian. 



GREENSBORO FEMALE COLLEGE. 

Greensboro, N. C. Women. Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 
160 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
25,000 



The college was founded in 1837; the corner-stone was laid in 
1843, and in 1846 the building was completed. The founders were 
the members of North Carolina Conference which met at Petersburg. 
A Faculty was selected in 1847. The college was burned in 1864, 
and rebuilt in 1875. The presidents have been : Rev. Solomon Lea, 
1846-1847; Rev. A. M. Shipp, 1847-1850; Rev. Charles F. Deems, 
1850-1854; Rev. T. M. Jones, 1854-1890; Dr. B. F. Dixon, 1890- 
1893; Rev. F. L. Reid, 1893-1894, and Dred Peacock, the present 
incumbent. The college is governed by seven directors. The degree 
is B.A. It is conferred after completion of the entire English course 
and a course in at least one ancient or modern language. Candi- 
dates are admitted on certificate. The expenses are $160 a year. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Negroes are excluded. The 
college year lasts from September i to May 25. 

The college grounds cover forty acres. There are two literary 
societies, the Irving and the Emerson, a Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union, and the Marvin Missionary Society. " The College 
Message " is published. 

Faadty. 



Dred Peacock, A.B., A.M., President, 

German. 
Mrs. Z. A. Long, Lady Principal. 



Charles L. Raper, A.B., Latin, Sci- 
ence, and Metaphysics. 
Lillian Long, English and History. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



125 



Minnie H. Moore, Mathematics. 
Annie M. Page, French and English. 
Ava L. Fleming, Latin and English. 
Alice Brown, English Lit,, History. 
J. W. Parker, Piano and Voice Culture. 
Anne M. Snead, Piano. 
Catharine F. Heiskell, Drawing and 
Painting. 



Alta B. Cozart, A.B., Elocution. 

Bettie Armfield, Business Department. 

Rev. J. H. Weaver, D.D., Chaplain. 

Maie Carr, Librarian. 

Fannie Armfield. Supervisor of Health. 

Mrs. L. A. Rees, Matron. 

J. A. Odell, Treasurer. 

Leila G. McGirt, Assistant Treasurer. 



GREENVILLE AND TUSCULUM COLLEGE. 

Tusculu?n, Tenn, Co-Educational . Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$3,000 



Students, 
160 



Instructors, 

7 



Buildings, 



Books, 
7,800 



Greenville and Blount colleges were founded in 1794. In 1839 the 
colleges were moved into Greenville. Instruction was suspended 
from 1847-1854. In 1872 Tusculum College was combined with the 
older school. Tuition is from $30 to $40, with other expenses for 
the year, ending May 8, aggregating $100. Instruction is given in 
preparatory, normal, musical, and collegiate branches, leading to the 
degree of A.B. The president is Rev. J. Moore, D.D. 
{Further information lacking.) 



GRISWOLD COLLEGE. 



Davenport, Iowa. Co-Educational. 


Ep 


iscopal. 


Income, 
140,000 


Students, 
180 


Instructors, 
26 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
10,000 



The college was founded in 1859 on property purchased from 
Iowa College. Admission is on certificate. Instruction is given in 
the classics, sciences, and military tactics. The degrees of A.B. 
and B.S., the latter after but three years, are conferred. Tuition for 
the year, ending on June 10, is $110. Connected with the college 
is a theological department. The graduates number 1,150, of whom 
more than 800 are living. The oldest of these is S. R. J. Hoyt, D.D., 
1862, of Davenport. The president is the Rev. C. H. Seymour, D.D. 
{Further information lacking.) 



126 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



GROVE CITY COLLEGE. 

Grove City, Fenn. Co-Edticatiottal. Evangelical. 



Income, 



Students, 
573 



Instructors, 

i6 



Buildings, 



Books, 



Grove City Academy was incorporated in 1879, and became a 
college in 1884. The trustees number thirty-one, and elect their own 
successors. A preparatory department and five graduate courses are 
maintained. Degrees of B.A., B.S., B.Ph., and in didactics are con- 
ferred. The annual session lasts from September ID to June 17. The 
college grounds cover twenty acres. Four literary societies are 
maintained by the students. Since 1876 five thousand students have 
attended. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Isaac C. Ketler, Ph.D., D.D., 

President, Mental Sci., Philosophy. 
Rev. Jas. B. McClelland, A.M., Greek. 
Rev. John A. Courtney, A.M., Math. 
Rev. Samuel Dodds, A.M., Ph.D., 

Physics and Chemistry. 
Morgan Barnes. A.M., Latin. 
Capt. WilHam A. Thompson, Military 

Science and Tactics. 
Mary H. Brown, A.M., French and 

German. 
Jennie A. Dale, A.B., History, Chem. 



Rev. J. J. Thompson, A.M., Latin 
and Mathematics. 

Herr Hermann Pcehlmann, Director of 
Music, Piano, and Harmony. 

Johanna Christina Poehlmann, Voice. 

Stella McKay, Piano. 

Efifie Aleen Thompson, Fine Arts. 

L. W. Barton, Business Department. 

Thomas C. Rankin, A.B., Telegraphy. 

M. Elizabeth Kugler, A.M., Stenog- 
raphy and Typewriting. 

Lizzie L. Hughes, M.L.A., Librarian. 



GUILFORD COLLEGE. 

Guilford, N. C. Co-Educational. 



Quaker. 



Income, 
$13,000 



Students, 
239 



Instructors, 
ID 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
2,500 



The school was founded by the North Carolina Yearly Meeting of 
Friends, and was opened as the new Garden Boarding School in 
1837, with twenty-five girls and twenty-five boys in attendance. 
Owing to the hostility of the legislature no college charter could 
be obtained till 188S. In 1885 a fire destroyed King Hall, the main 
building. It is governed by thirteen trustees. The courses are clas- 
sical, Latin-scientific, scientific, and preparatory. The expenses are 
from $167 to $171. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Bryn 
Mawr offei's a scholarship of $400 to women graduates of Guilford. 
The students issue the " Guilford Collegian," and maintain three 
literaiy societies : the Websterian, the Henry Clay, the Philagorean; 
and a baseball team. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



127 



Faculty. 



Lewis Lyndon Hobbs,A.M., President, 
Latin, Philosophy. 

Mary E. Mendenhall, B.S., English 
and Librarian. 

J. Frankhn Davis, A.M., Greek and 
German. 

George W. White, A.B., Mathematics. 

Walter W. Haviland, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and History. 

A. W. Blair, A.M., Nat. Sci., History. 



Louisa Osborne, A.B., Governess, 

Latin. 
Lydia N. Blair, A.B., Principal of 

Preparatory Department, English. 
Lillian J. Hill, Drawing and Painting. 
Adah Craven, Music. 
L. M. H. Reynolds, A.B., Preparatory 

Department. 
Laura D, Worth, B.S., Phys. Training. 
Priscilla B. Hackney, Matron. 



GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS COLLEGE. 

St. Peter, Minn. Co-Educatiotial. Lutheratt. 



Income, 
$23,000 



Students, 
269 




Buildings, 



Books, 
11,138 



The college was founded in 1879. ^^ is supported and controlled 
by the Minnesota Conference of the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana 
Synod. The government is vested in a board of twelve directors, 
and in the Faculty, the members of which are permanently elected. 
The degrees are B.A., with diplomas for accounts and music. The 
expenses are $140 for thirty-three weeks. The college year lasts 
from September 8 to May 20. Besides a missionary society and a 
literary society, called the Philomithian, there are six musical asso- 
ciations. The alumni hold a reunion every fifth year. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Matthias Wahlstrom, Ph.D., 
President, Greek and Christianity. 

Rev. Jacob P. Uhler, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Natural Sciences. 

Johan S. Carlson, Ph.D., History, 
Philosophy, and Political Science. 

Oscar A. Allen, M.Accts., Commercial 
Department. 

Rev. John Sander, A.M., Latin and 
German. 

Reinhold Lagerstrom, Mus.D., Music. 

Joshua A. Edquist, A.M., Science and 
History. 

Karl A. Kilander, T.F., S.M.K., 
Swedish. 



John A. Youngquist, A.B., Languages 

and Mathematics. 

Alfred C. Carlson, A.B., English. 

Inez Rundstrom, B.S,, F.K., Lady 
Principal, Mathematics. 

Andrew Kempe, A.B., Shorthand and 
Typewriting. 

Isaac M. Anderson, A.B., B.S., Greek. 

Albert Lagerstrom, Vocal Music. 

Anna M. Pehrson, Voice Culture. 

Aaron E. Pearson. Violin. 

Anna B. E. Olson, B.Accts., Pen- 
manship. 

H. A. Tomlinson, M.D., H. D. Valin, 
M.D., Special Lecturers. 



128 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



HAMILTON COLLEGE. 



Clinton, N. V. 


Men. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
$30,000 


Students, 
160 


Instructors, 
17 


Buildings, 
9 


Books, 
35,000 



Hamilton College was chartered in 1812. The presidents since that 
time have been the Revs.: Azel Backus, D.D., 1812-1816; Henry 
Davis, D.D., 1817-1833; Sereno E. Dwight, D.D., 1833-1835 ; Joseph 
Penny, U.D., 1835-1839; Simeon North, IX.D., 1839-1857; Samuel 
W. Fisher, D.D., LL.D., 1858-1866; Samuel G. Brown, D.D., LL.D., 
1866-1881 ; Henry Darling, D.D., LL.D., 1881-1891 ; and M. Woolsey 
Stryker, D.D., LL.D,, 1892 to the present time. 

The college is governed by twenty-eight trustees. Admission is 
given upon certificates from the State regents or from approved 
preparatory schools. Degrees of B.A., B.S., B.L., B.Ph., A.M., and 
M.S. are given after a required number of studies in appropriate 
courses have been successfully passed. Attendance at chapel and at 
gymnastic exercises is compulsory. Negroes are admitted. The 
college year is from September 19 to June 25. The total expenses 
for the year are from $280 to $380. Candidates for the ministry 
may receive from $80 to $100 a year. There are forty scholarships 
yielding incomes of from $60 to $100. Besides this there are four 
prize scholarships, one prize fellowship, and a number of other prizes 
for seniors. 

Besides the Emerson Literary Society, there is an athletic, foot- 
ball, baseball, and tennis association, with their respective teams, 
a glee and banjo club, and a Y. M. C. A., dating back to 1824. 
Chapters of the following fraternities have been established : * B K, 
2 *, 1831 ; A A *, 1832; Y T, 1843; X Y, 1845; ^ T^. 1847; A K E, 
1856; A X, 1867. The students publish the " Hamiltonian," and 
the "Pink," an annual. The alumni number 2,771, of whom 1,843 
are living. The oldest of these is James Voorhees, 1826, of Pitts- 
ford, N. Y. 

Faailfy. 



Melancthon Woolsey Stryker, D.D., 
LL.D., President, Christian Evi- 
dence and Ethics. 

Edward North,LL.D.,L.H.D.. Greek. 

Rev. Oren Root, D.D., L.H.D., Math. 

Rev, Abel Grosvenor Hopkins, Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Herman Carl George Brandt, Ph.D., 
German, French, and Philology. 

Rev. William Rogers Terrett, D.D., 
Amer. Hist., Constitutional Law, 

Albro David Morrill, A,M,, M.S,, 
Biology. 

Charles Henry Smyth, Jr., Ph.D,, 
Geology and Mineralogy. 

Rev. William Harder Squires, A.M., 
Psychology, Logic, and Hebrew. 



Samuel J. Saunders, D.Sc, Physics 
and Astronomy. 

Brainard Gardner Smith, A.M., Rhet- 
oric and Oratory. 

Edward Fitch, A.M., Greek. 

Melvin Gilbert Dodge, A.M., Libra- 
rian, Chemistry. 

Delos De Wolf Smyth, A.M., Munici- 
pal Law and History. 

William Pierce Shepard, A.M., French, 
Italian, and Romance Philology. 

Joseph Darling Ibbotson, A.M., Eng. 
Literature. 

Howard H. Higbee, A.B., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

Thomas F. Nichols, A.B., Ph.D., 
Mathematics. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



129 



HAMLIN UNIVERSITY. 



Haynlin, Minn. Co-Ed7icational. 


Methodist. 


Income, 
$16,304 


Students, 
300 


Instructors, 
II 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
6,000 



The university, which is located midway between St. Paul and 
Indianapolis, was founded in 1854. It is governed by twenty trus- 
tees. A classical and a Latin-scientific course lead to degrees of 
B.A., and B.Ph. The expenses for the college year, lasting from Sep- 
tember 17 to June 4, are within $200. 

There are four literary societies, the Philomathian and the Amphic- 
tyon for men, and the Browning and Athenian for women. There 
are also two Christian Associations, and an oratorical association. 



Faculty. 



Rev. George H. Bridgman, LL.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Rev. George S. Innis, Ph.D., History, 
and Librarian. 

Loren H. Batchelder, A.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Erastus F. Mearkle, LL.B., Mathe- 
matics. 

Milton J. Griffin, A.M., Greek. 



Henry L. Osborn, Ph.D., Biol., Geol. 
William E. Thompson, A.M., Latin. 
Arthur Z. Drew, A.M., Mathematics. 
Ella S. Gold, Acting Preceptress. 
E. E. McDermott, Elocution. 
H. H. Clark, Vocal Music. 
Mrs. H. L. Osborn, Piano. 
Jeanette R. Evans, Elocution. 
R. P. Kaighn, Physical Director. 



HAMPDEN-SIDNEY COLLEGE. 

Farmville, Va. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$12,500 



Students, 
109 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
15,090 



Hampden-Sidney was incorporated as an academy in 1783. The 
presidents have been: Samuel Stanhope Smith, D.D., 1775-1779; 
John Blair Smith, D.D., 1779-1789; Drury Lacy, A.M., 1789-1797; 
Archibald Alexander, D.D., 1797-1806; William S. Reid, D.D., 
president during remainder of the year; Moses Hoge, D.D., 1807- 
1820; Jonathan P. Cushing, A.M., 1821-1835; George A. Baxter, 
D.D., 1835-1836; Daniel Lynn Carroll, D.D., 1835-1838; William 
Maxwell, LL.D., 1838-1844; Patrick J. Sparrow, D.D., 1845-1847; 
S. B. Wilson, D.D., 1847-1848; Lewis W. Green, D.D., 1848-1856; 
Albert L. Holladay, 1856; John M. P. Atkinson, D.D., 1857-1883; 
Richard Mcllwaine, D.D., 1S83 till the present time. 

The college is governed by a board of twenty-one trustees. It 
confers the degree of B.A. only. The fees are $76 a year. There 
are two prize scholarships, and fourteen other scholarships, two of 
which are for ministerial students, while eleven are given by local 
branches of the alumni. Of the two literary societies the Union was 
organized in 1789, and the Philanthropic in 1805. They meet twice 



130 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



annually in debate, and jointly issue a college magazine. The 
College Historical Society makes research in local and State history 
its prime object. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: B n, 1850; * K % 1855; 5 A E, 1860-1861 ; X *, 1867; 
* r A, 1870; 2 X, 1872-1879; K 2, 1S83; * A X, 1884; n K A, 1885. 



Facidty. 



Rev. Richard Mclhvaine, D.D., 

President, Philosophy. 
Walter Blair, A.M., D.L., Latin, Ger. 
James R. Thornton, A.M., Mathemat. 
Henry C. Brock, B.Lit., Greek, French. 
J. H. C. Bagby, M.A., M.E., Ph.D., 

Physical Science. 



Henry R. Mcllwaine, A.B., Ph.D., 
English, History, and Librarian. 

C. W. Sommerville, A.B., B.Sc, 
Latin and German. 

Henry Irving Brock, A.B., Latin, 
Greek, and Mathematics. 

W. J. King, Physical Culture. 



HAMPTON INSTITUTE. 

Hampton, Va. Co-Educational. N'on-Sedarian. 



Income, 
M 49,999 



Students, 
972 



Instructors, 
80 



Buildings, 



Books, 
7,000 



History and Organizatiott : Hampton Institute was founded by 
General S. C. Armstrong in 1868, and was conducted and managed 
by him till his death in 1893. He was succeeded by H. D. Frissell, 
D.D. It is governed by seventeen trustees and six State curators. 
The students of the institute are either negroes or Indians. Origi- 
nally the school was intended only for negroes, but in 1878 Indians 
of Florida, who had been held as prisoners of war, were received. 
Tuition is free, the estimated cost of instructing each pupil being 
from ^50 to ^70. Instruction is given in the liberal arts, as well as 
in industrial and mechanical pursuits. Attendance at chapel, gym- 
nastics, and military drill is compulsory. The academic year lasts 
from the first week in October to the middle of June. 

Equipment : The grounds of the school extend over one hundred 
and fifty acres, and comprise some sixty buildings, among which 
are the Whittier School, the Normal School, the Indian School, and 
a Night School, as well as a gymnasium, library, and observatory. 

Societies and Ptihlications : The Indian students publish "Talks 
and Thoughts;" the negroes publish "The Beacon;" while the insti- 
tute as such publishes the "Southern Workman." The societies 
are the Lyceum League, Lend-a-Hand, several Christian and En- 
deavor Associations, and an Athletic Association, with a football 
and baseball team. The graduates number 840, the oldest of whom 
is Jonas A. Fields, 1871, of Newport News. 

Factdty. 

Rev. H. B. Frissell, D.D., Principal. Albert Howe, Sup't of Industries. 

Rev. H. B. Turner, Pastor. Francis C. Briggs, Business Agent. 

George Foster Peabody, Treasurer. Martha M. Waldron, Res. Physician. 

F. Chichester, Assistant Treasurer. Elizabeth Clark, Lady Principal. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



131 



Elizabeth Hyde, Academic Dep't. 
Josephine E. Richards, Indian Dep't. 
Robert B. Moton, Mil. Commandant. 
Leonora E. Herron, Librarian. 

GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Elizabeth Clark, Josephine E. Rich- 
ards, Mary T. Galpin, Jessie W. 
Williams, Nina Forsythe, Lucy A. 
Seymour, Emily L. Austin, Julia 
A. Williamson, Clara L. Blodgett, 
Harriet M. Howe, Julia E. Pratt, 
Sarah M. Howland, Vincentine T. 
Booth, Clara Woodward, Harriet H. 
Titlow, Clau-e Blieler, Helen Town- 
send, Mary F. Andrus, Susan A. 
Berry, Sarah A. Clements. 

boys' industrial SCHOOL. 

J. J. Wilson, Superintendent. 
John G. Hartelius. Carpentry. 
E. M. Haines, Saw Mill. 
Charles A. Bartlett, Planing Mill. 



John Sugden, Carpentry, 

Geo. W. King, Pierce Machine Shop. 

H. N. G. Corson, Wheelwright and 

Blacksmith Shops. 
William H. Gaddis, Harness Shop. 
J. E. Smith, Shoe Shop. 
J. F. La Crosse, Paint Shop. 
W. F. Baker, Tin Shop. 
C. W. Betts, Printing Department. 
G. Vaiden, Gas, Steam, and Engineer 

Department. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Albert Howe, Superintendent. 
C. L. Goodrich, Agriculture. 
G. J. Davis, Home Farm. 
Henry E. Jordan, Hemenway Farm. 

TRADE SCHOOL. 

C. C. Tucker, Superintendent. 
L S. Lindley, Carpentry. 

D. R. Lewis, Mechanical Drawing. 



HANOVER COLLEGE. 

Hanover, Md. Co-Ediicatiottal. 



Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$12,000 



Students, 
175 



Instructors, 

14 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
13,000 



The college began in 1827 in a log cabin ; was incorporated in 
1828 ; became a synodical school in 1829, and in 1833 received its 
present name. It was opened to women in 1880. The presidents 
have been: James E. Blythe, D.D., 1832-1S36; Duncan McCauley, 
D.D., 1836-1838; Erasmus Darwin MacMaster, D.D., LL.D., 1838- 
1843; Sylvester Scovel, D.D., 1846-1849; Thomas E. Thomas, D.D., 
1849-1854; Jonathan Edwards, D.D., LL.D., 1855-1857 ; James 
Wood, D.D., 1S59-1866; George D. Archibald, D.D., 1S68-1S70; 
George C. Heckman, D.D., LL.D., 1870-1879; Daniel W. Fisher, 
DD., LL.D., 1879 to the present. 

The school is governed by a board of thirty-two trustees. The 
degrees are B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., and LL.D. Tuition is free; 
expenses are from $150 to $200. Attendance at chapel is com- 
pulsory ; gymnastic, and military drill are not required. Negroes are 
excluded. The college year lasts from September 16 to June 16. 

Of the four literary societies, the Union and Philalethian are for 
men, and the Zetalethian and Crestomathian for women. Together 
they own 2,000 books. Besides this there are two Christian Asso- 
ciations, an Alumni Association, and chapters of the following fra- 
ternities : B n, 1853 ; * r A, 1864 ; * A 0, 1860; 2 X, 1871 ; ATA, 
1872; A r, 1881 ; n K A, 1885. 



132 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



D. W. Fisher, D.D., LL.D., President, 

Philosophy. 
Rev. Joshua B. Garritt, A.M., Ph.D., 

Greek, and Secretary of Faculty. 
Frank Lyford Morse, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 
A. Harvey Young, A.M., Ph.D., 

Natural Sciences, and Registrar. 
Rev. A. P. Keil, A.M., Ph.D., Latin 

and Modern Languages. 
Rev. P. H. K. McComb, A.M., Hist. 



Glenn Culbertson, A.M., Physics, 

Astronomy, and Geology. 
John F. Lowes, A.M., Ethics and 

Christian Evidences. 
John J. Francis, D.D., Lecturer on 

English Literature. 
Josephine H. Chamberlin, Piano and 

Organ. 
Gertrude Morse, A.B., Latin. 
Henry S. Thompson, Tutor. 
Leila Garritt, Librarian. 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

Cambridge, Mass. Men. Non-Sectarian, 



Income, 
$1,084,000 



Students, 
3,800 



Instructors, 
366 



Buildings, 
56 



Books, 
466,410 



History : Harvard University, the oldest school in America, was 
founded in 1636, six years after the first settlement of Boston. The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, through its General Court in that 
year, made a grant of ;[^400 " to advance learning and perpetuate it 
to posterity," and in the following year appointed twelve of the prin- 
cipal men in the colony "to take order for a college at Newtown." 
Two years afterward the Rev. John Harvard, a non-conformist clergy- 
man of Charlestown, who the year before had graduated at Em- 
manuel College, Cambridge University, gave by his will the sum of 
£779 i?-^' 2^- in money, and three hundred books, more than half of 
his estate. Nine students entered the first class. All of these 
distinguished themselves in after life ; one of them. Sir George 
Downing, achieving the unenviable distinction of serving both the 
Commonwealth and the king in the English Revolution. Two other 
members of the class upon graduating were publicly rebuked for 
" foul misbehavior, in swearing and ribaldry speech." John Har- 
vard's bequest was followed by other gifts, such as " a font of print- 
ing letters," books, silver spoons, cooking utensils, garden tools, 
and others, varying in value from three shillings to two hundred 
pounds. The first gift of real estate was two and one-half acres of 
land given by the town of Cambridge, thereby changing the site of 
the college from Newtown to Cambridge. The General Court, in lieu 
of the money it had promised, granted to Harvard College the right 
of ferry between Charlestown and Boston. Li 1642, the board of 
overseers, consisting of the governor and deputy-governor of the 
colony, the magistrates then in juiisdiction, the president of the 
college, and the teaching elders was constituted. In 1643 ^^^^ pres- 
ent seal of the university and its motto, " Christo et Ecclesiae," was 
adopted. The college charter was granted in 1650, and the college 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 1 33 

"corporation" created. In 1653, Rev. Henry Dunster, the first 
president, fell under suspicion of favoring the Antipoedobaptists, 
and as a consequence was indicted by the grand jury for "disturb- 
ing the ordinance of infant baptism in the Cambridge Church." He 
was tried, convicted, and besides being compelled to resign, and 
being laid under bonds for good behavior, was sentenced to receive 
an admonition once a year. Previous to this Nathaniel Eaton, the 
first person who had charge of the institution, was dismissed for 
beating his usher. The presidents in succession, with their terms 
of office, have been as follows: Henry Dunster, 1640-1654; Charles 
Chauncy, 1654-1672; Leonard Hoar, 1672-1675; Urian Oakes, 
Acting President, 1675-1679, President, 1679-1681 ; John Rogers, 
16S2-16S4; Increase Mather, Acting President, 168^-1686, Rector, 
1686-1692, President, 1 692-1 70 1 ; Charles Morton, Vice-President, 
1697-1698; Samuel Willard, Vice-President, 1700-1707; John Lever- 
ett, 1707-1724; Benjamin Wadsworth, 1725-1737; Edward Holyoke, 
1737-^769; Samuel Locke, 1770-1773; Samuel Langdon, 1774- 
1780; Joseph Willard, 1781-1804; Samuel Webber, 1806-1S10; John 
Thornton Kirkland, iSio-1828; Josiah Quincy, 1829-1S45; Edward 
Everett, 1846-1849; Jared Sparks, 1849-1853 ; James Walker, 1853- 
1860; Cornelius Conway Felton, 1860-1862; Thomas Hill, 1862- 
1868; Charles William Eliot, 1869 to the present time. 

During the term of the second president a hall, costing ;!^350, was 
erected for the purpose of giving instruction to Indians, but one 
Indian only applied for admittance, and was graduated by the 
college. Before this a single building had served all the purposes 
of the college. All the college halls that were erected after this 
during the seventeenth century were subsequently rased or destroved, 
so that the oldest building now standing oil the Harvard yard is 
Massachusetts Hall, erected in 1720. 

Harvard College from that time on prospered. Thus, during the 
first ten years, no less than ;^2,ooo in money, and nine hundred 
acres of land had been given to the college. The total grants 
made by the legislature of the colony during the first century aggre- 
gated _;^8,ooo. Since that time no year has passed in which some 
gift of money or land has not fallen to Harvard College. The his- 
tory of the college is usually divided into four periods : the first 
from the foundation till 1692, when it was avowedly a theological 
institution ; the second from the accession of President Holyoke to 
the end of its first century, taken up with bitter religious con- 
troversies ; the third from 1738 till accession of President Eliot, 
when it was a college proper, and the last when it became a 
university. 

Oi\s^ajiization: The legal title of the corporation is ''The President 
and Fellows of Harvard College." It consists of the president of 
the university, five fellows, and the treasurer. The board of over- 
seers, all of whom are elective, consists of thirty members. The 
university is divided into the following departments, with separate 
faculties or boards of administration : Harvard College, Lawrence 
Scientific School, Graduate School, Divinity School, Law School, 
Medical School, Dental School, School of Veterinary Medicine, 
Bussey Institution (a School of Agriculture), Arnold Arboretum, 



134 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

University Library, Museum of Comparative Zoology, University 
Museum, Botanic Garden, Herbarium, Astronomical Observatory, 
Peabody Museum of American Archseology and Ethnology. Rad- 
cliffe College, formerly known as the Harvard Annex for Women, 
though intimately connected with the university, is still a separate 
institution. The first three departments are governed by the 
faculty of arts and sciences. In addition to this there is an admin- 
istrative board of sixteen members of the Faculty for Harvard 
College proper. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degrees: Candidates for admission 
are examined in writing in a stated number of subjects. The exami- 
nations for admission embiace two classes of studies, elementary 
and advanced, and are by common consent considered to be the 
most difficult to pass in this country. No students are exempt from 
examination, but partial exemption is granted to those who enter 
from other colleges. Upon proper notification the extrance exami- 
nations may be taken in any other place than Cambridge, and in a 
specified number of places in Europe. Courses at Harvard may be 
taken by students who have not passed the regular examinations, 
upon certain conditions, but such students are classed as special 
students only, and cannot receive degrees. The degree of A.B. is 
conferred after four or three years of study, provided all prescribed 
studies, and the requisite number of elective courses have been 
satisfactorily passed by the candidate. In the freshman year two 
courses are prescribed, and forty can be open to students as elec- 
tive courses. In the sophomore and junior years, two half courses 
are prescribed, while all courses of study, except in the graduate 
department, are open for election. In the senior year no courses 
are prescribed, while all courses of instruction given at the university 
are open for election. The degrees granted by the university are : 
Bachelor of Arts, of Agricultural Science, of Divinity, of Laws, of 
Science, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy, Science, Laws, 
Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Dentistry, atter one year of 
residence. 

Tuition, Scholarships, and Prizes: Tuition is $150 a year. The 
yearly expenditures are estimated at from ^372 to $1,010. The aid 
annually available from scholarships and other beneficiary funds 
amounts to about $90,000. Of the 144 scholarships, twenty-nine with 
an annual value of $8,050 are awarded to members of the graduate 
school ; 1 1 5, aggregating $25,630 a year, go to undergraduates. Three 
of these may be assigned to special students. The annual value of 
the scholarships varies from $40 to $450, the average amount being 
$225. Most of these scholarships are assigned only on the basis 
of a previous year of work in the college. Sums of $100 to $250 a 
year, from the " Price Greenleaf Fund," are awarded to undergradu- 
ates in the first year, or to deserving students who have failed to get 
other scholarships. In addition to these beneficiary funds there is 
a loan fund, the interest of which, amounting to $3,000, is lent to 
meritorious students, in sums ranging from $40 to $75. Prizes in 
the form of books, called " deturs," are annually distributed. Three 
prizes of $60 each, and three of $45 are awarded to seniors and 
juniors at a public competition in elocution. Nine prizes of from 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 1 35 

$^0 to $100 are distributed for the best dissertations on specified 
subjects. A prize of $ioo is given for the best essay on Dante, and 
another of $ioo for the best metrical translation of an ode of 
Horace. A prize of $250 is offered for the best thesis of an honor 
student in modern literature, and another prize of $250 for the best 
essay upon "The Causes of the Russian War of 1812." A prize of 
$150 is offered for the best essay on a subject in political science, 
two prizes of $100, and one of $50 for the best essays on any modern 
social subject, and two prizes of $40 and $45 for the best Spanish 
student, and the best essayist on any American governmental sub- 
ject. Many other prizes, not here enumerated, are given in the 
various professional schools. 

Eqicipfnent : The college grounds are distributed through Cam- 
bridge, Boston, West Roxbury, Hyde Park, Rochester, Brighton, 
and Arequipe, Peru. They cover about 700 acres. There are fifty- 
six college buildings, twenty of which are used for instruction, while 
the others are used as dormitories, for commons and eating-houses, 
or for purposes of entertainment. The university library contains 
nearly a million books and pamphlets, and there are in addition a 
number of separate libraries distributed among the professional 
schools and faculties. Besides the Divinity School, Law School, 
Medical School, Veterinary School, Dental School, and Agricultural 
Institution, with their chemical, physical, and clinical laboratories, 
botanical gardens, herbaria, and arboreta, there are museums of 
zoology, botany, mineralogy, ethnology, American archaeology, and 
Semitic antiquities. There is also a general university museum and 
an art museum. Astronomical observatories are maintained both 
at Cambridge and at Arequipe, Peru. Opportunities for physical 
exercise are afforded by the large gymnasium, the athletic grounds 
on Holmes and Soldiers' field, two football and baseball fields, the 
polo grounds and the university boathouse on the Charles River. 
All students are required to undergo physical measurements at the 
gymnasium, but gymnastic exercise is not compulsory. Attendance 
at chapel is likewise not compulsory. 

Societies, Teams, ajtd Publications : The following clubs and soci- 
eties are maintained by the students: Amphadon Club, Andover 
Club, Alumni Associarion, Banjo Club, Freshman Banjo Club, B. L. 
S. Association of Harvard University, Boylston Chemical Club, 
Brewster Academy Club, Camera Club, Cambridge Latin School 
Association, Canadian Club, Catholic Club, Central New York Club, 
Cercle Fran9aise, Chess Club, Christian Association, Civil Service 
Reform Club, Classical Club, Co-operative Society, Cycling Asso- 
ciation, Deutscher Verein, Disciple Club, Dining Association, Engin- 
eering Society, English Club, E. H. S. Association of Harvard 
University, Harvard Forum, Foxcroft Dining Club, Freshman De- 
bating Club, Glee Club, Freshman Glee Club, Good Government 
Club, Graduate Club, Groton Club, Guitar and Mandolin Club, 
Freshman Guitar and Mandolin Club, Harvard Medical School Asso- 
ciation, Harvard Memorial Society, Harvard Rifles, Hasty Pudding 
Club, Institute, Jowett Club, Law School Association, Maine Club, 
Minnesota Club, Natural History Society, Noble's Club, Odonto- 
logical Society, O. K., Oxford Club, Peripatetic Club, Philosophical 



136 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK, 



Club, Philosophical Society, Pierian Musical Sodality, Press Asso- 
ciation, Prohibition Club, Prospect Union, Religious Union, Repub- 
lican Club, Samoset Club, Shakespeare Club, Signet, Southern Club, 
St. Mark's Club, St. Paul's Society, St. Paul's School Club, Total 
Abstinence League, Harvard Union, Whist Club, Worcester Acad- 
emy Club, University Club. 

The athletic associations and teams are : the Athletic Association, 
the Mott Haven Team, 'Varsity Football Team, Second Eleven, 
Freshman Football Team, Baseball Nine, Class Nines, Freshman 
Nine, Cricket Eleven, 'Varsity Crew, Class Crews, Freshman Crew, 
Tennis Association, Polo Club, Canoe Club, Shooting Club, Har- 
vard Rifles, Cyclers' Association, Fencing Club, Lacrosse Team, 
Pushball Club, Weld Boat Club, and Cross Country Runners. 

Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : * B K, 
1837 ; A A *, 1837 ; B n, 1843 ! ^ *' 1S45 '■> ^ ^y 1851-1872 : Z T, 
1852; A K E, 1851 ; n H, 1850; A X, 1855- 1889; * K 2, 1S65 ; A T, 
1880; X *, 1885-1887; * A *, 1887; * A 0, 1888. 

The students publish : " The Index," an annual ; " The Harvard 
Monthly Magazine ; " " The Harvard Advocate," a weekly ; " The 
Lampoon," an illustrated weekly; "The Crimson," a daily; "Har- 
vard Club Book ; " " The Portfolio," and " The Law Review." These 
publications proceed directly from the departments : " Harvard 
Oriental Series," Indo-Iranian Department; "Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology," yearly ; " Studies and Notes in Philology and 
Literature," yearly; "Harvard Historical Studies;" "Quarterly 
Journal of Economics ; " " Annals of the Observatory of Harvard 
College ; " " Comparative Zoology Bulletin," Memoirs by Professors 
and Assistants; "Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory;" 
"American Archaeology and Ethnology," annual reports; "The 
Harvard Graduates' Magazine," issued quarterly. 

Since the foundation of Harvard College nearly 20,000 students in 
all have been graduated, of whom some 11,000 are alive. The oldest 
living graduate is William Lambert Russell, A.M., M.D. 



Faculty. 



Charles William Eliot, LL.D., Presi- 
dent. 

Wolcott Gibbs, M.D., LL.D., Emeri- 
tus. 

George Martin Lane, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Emeritus. 

Charles Eliot Norton, Litt.D., LL.D., 
History of Art. 

Charles Carroll Everett, D.D., LL.D., 
Theology, Dean of Divinity Faculty. 

Edmund Hersey, Farming, Superin- 
tendent of Bussey Farm. 

Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Litt.D., 
New Testament Criticism. 

Charles Franklin Dunbar, LL.D., 
Political Economy. 

William Watson Goodwin, Ph.D., 
LL.D., D.C.L., Greek. 



Christopher Columbus Langdell, 

LL.B., LL.D., Law. 
Ferdinand Bocher, A.M., Mod. Lan- 
guages. 
David Williams Cheever, M.D.,LL.D., 

Emeritus. 
James Bradley Thayer, LL.B., LL.D., 

Law. 
Adams Sherman Hill, A.B., LL.B., 

Rhetoric and Oratory. 
James Mills Peirce, A.M., Astronomy 

and Mathematics, Dean of Faculty 

of Arts and Sciences. 
James Clarke White, A.B., M.D., 

Dermatology. 
Justin Winsor, LL.D., Librarian. 
Alexander Agassiz, LL.D., Director 

Museum of Comparative Zoology. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



137 



Francis Humphreys Storer, S.B., 

A.M., Agricultural Chemistry. 
James Bradstreet Greenough, A.B,, 

Latin. 
Arthur Searle, A.M., Astronomy. 
Jeremiah Smith, A.M., LL.D., Law. 
Crawford Howell Toy, A.M., LL.D., 

Hebrew and Oriental Languages. 
John Chipman Gray, LL.B., LL.D., 

Law. 
John Knowles Paine, A.M., Mus.D., 

Music. 
George Lincoln Goodale, M.D., LL.D., 

Nat. Hist., Director Botanic Garden. 
Oliver Fairfield Wadsworth, A.M., 

M.D., Ophthalmology. 
Henry Pickering Bowditch, A.M., 

M.D., Physiology. 
Charles Herbert Moore, A.M., Design 

in Fine Arts, Curator Art Museum. 
Frederick Ward Putnam, A.M., S.D., 

American Archaeology, Ethnology. 
Clarence John Blake, M.D., Otology. 
Frank Winthrop Draper, A.M., M.D., 

Legal Medicine. 
Charles Burnham Porter, A.M., M.D., 

Clinical Surgery. 
Charles Sprague Sargent, A.B., Arbori- 
culture, Director Arnold Arboretum. 
Nathaniel SouthgateShaler,S.D.,Geol. 
Frederic DeForest Allen, Ph.D., Clas- 
sical Philology. 
John Orne Green, A.M., M.D., Otol. 
Amos Lawrence Mason, A.B., M.D., 

Clinical Medicine. 
Clement Lawrence Smith, A.M., 

LL.D., Latin. 
John Collins Warren, M.D., LL.D., 

Surgery. 
Reginald Heber Fitz, A.M., M.D., 

Theory and Practice of Physic. 
George Herbert Palmer, A.M., LL.D., 

Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, 

and Civil Polity. 
William Lambert Richardson, A.M., 

M.D., Obstetrics. 
Edward Charles Pickering, A.M., 

LL.D., Practical Astronomy. 
John Trowbridge, S.D., Application of 

Science to Useful Arts. 
George Alonzo Bartlett, A.M., German, 

and Regent. 
Thomas Dwight, M.D., LL.D., Anat. 
William Gilson Farlow, A.M., M.D., 

Cryptogamic Botany. 
Thomas Fillebrown, M.D., D.M.D., 

Operative Dentistry. 



William James, M.D., Ph. et Litt.D,, 
Psychology. 

James Jackson Putnam, A.B., M.D., 
Diseases of Nervous System. 

Charles Loring Jackson, A.M., Chem. 

Edward Stickney Wood, A.M. M.D., 
Chemistry. 

James Barr Ames, A.M., LL.B., Law. 

Frederick Cheeves-^Shattuck, A.M., 
M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

Frederic Cesar de Sumichrast, French. 

John Williams White, Ph.D., Greek. 

Edward Hickling Bradford, A.M., 
M.D., Orthopedics, 

William Morris Davis, M.E., Physical 
Geography. 

Henry Barker Hill, A.M., Chemistry. 

Warren Andrew Locke, A.M., Organ- 
ist and Choir Master. 

Francis Greenwood Peabody, A.M., 
D.D., Christian Morals, Theology. 

Charles Albert Brackett, D.M.D., 
Dental Pathology. 

Francis Henry Davenport, A.B., M.D., 
Gynecology. 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, A.B., M.D., 
Diseases of Children. 

Benjamin Marston W^atson, A.B., 
Horticulture. 

William Elwood Byerly, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics. 

Ephraim Ehierton, Ph.D., EccL His- 
tory. 

William Barker Hills, A.B., M.D., 
Chemistry. 

Charles Rockwell Lanman, Ph.D., 
Sanskrt. 

Edward Laurens Mark, Ph.D., Anat. 

Eugene Hanes Smith, D.M.D., Me- 
chanical Dentistry. 

Wilham Fiske Whitney, A.B., M.D., 
Parasites and Parasitic Diseases. 

William Thomas Councilman, M.D., 
Pathological Anatomy. 

Charles Sedgwick Minot, S.D., His- 
tology and Human Embryology. 

Edward Stevens Sheldon, A.B., Ro- 
mance Philology. 

Silas Marcus McVane, Ph.D., Ancient 
and Modern History. 

Maurice Howe Richardson, A.B., 
M.D., Clinical Surgery. 

Robert Wheeler Willson, Ph.D., 
Astronomy. 

John Henry Wright. A.M., Greek. 

Charles Montraville Green, A.B.,M.D, 
Obstetrics. 



138 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Charles Parker Lyman, F.R.C.V.S., 
Veterinary Medicine. 

Edward Cornelius Briggs, M.D., 
D.M.D., Materia Medicaand Thera- 
peutics. 

Le Baron Russell Briggs, A.M., Eng- 
lish, Dean of Harvard College. 

Kuno Francke, Ph.D., German Lit. 

Edwin Herbert Hall, Ph.D., Physics. 

David Gordon Lyon, Ph.D., Divinity. 

Josiah Royce, Ph.D., Hist, of Philos. 

Dudley Allen Sargent, A.M., M.D., 
S.D., Director Hemenway Gymnas. 

Herbert Leslie Burrell, M.D., Clinical 
Surgery. 

Harold Clarence Ernst, A.M., M.D., 
Bacteriology. 

Philippe Belknap Marcou, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Charles Pomeroy Parker, A.B., Greek 
and Latin. 

Benjamin Osgood Peirce, Ph.D., 
Mathematics, Natural Philosophy. 

Eugene Wambaugh, LL.B., LL.D., 
Law. 

Hans Carl GUnther von Jagemann, 
Ph.D., Germanic Philology. 

Frederick Huntington Osgood, SB., 
M.R.C.V.S., Veterinary Surgery. 

Jere Edmund Stanton, M.D., D.M.D., 
Oral Anatomy and Physiology. 

William Hopkins Tillinghast, A.B., 
Librarian. 

Barrett Wendell, A.B., English. 

Edward Channing, Ph.D., History. 

William Parker Cooke, D.M.D., Crown 
and Bridge Work. 

Charles Gross, Ph.D., History. 

Paul Henry Hanus, S.B., Pedagogy. 

Charles Harrington, A.B., M.D., Ma- 
teria Medica and Hygiene. 

Ira Nelson Hollis, Engineering. 

Hugo Karl Schilling, Ph.D., German. 

Henry Fiske Leonard, M.D., M.D.V., 
Anatomy, and Clinical Lecturer. 

Wm. Henry Pickering, S.B., Astron. 

Frank William Taussig, Ph.D., LL.B., 
Political Economy. 

John Eliot Wolff, Ph.D., Petrography 
and Mineralogy. 

Albert Bushnell Hart, Ph.D., History. 

Alfred Bull Nichols, A.B., D.B., 
German. 

Herbert Langford Warren, Archi- 
tecture. 

William James Ashley, A.M., Eco- 
nomic History. 



Solon Irving Bailey, A.M., Astronomy. 
Morris Hicky Morgan, Ph.D., Greek 

and Latin. 
Joseph Henry Beale, Jr., A.M., LL.B., 

Law. 
Charles Townsend Copeland, A.B., 

English. 
Albert Andrew Howard, Ph.D., Latin. 
George Lyman Kittredge, A.B., Eng. 
Theobald Smith, Ph.B.,M.D., Zool. 
Roland Thaxter, Ph.D., Cryptogamic 

Botany. 
Samuel Williston, A.M., LL.B., Law. 
Edward Cummings, A.M., Sociology. 
Arthur Richmond Marsh, A.B., Com- 
parative Literature. 
Hugo Miinsterberg, Ph.D., M.D., 

Experimental Psychology. 
James Atkins Noyes, A.B., Catalogue 

Editor. 
Henry L. Smith, A.B., C.E., Mining. 
Kenelm Winslow, B.A.S., M.D.V., 

M.D., Veterinary Therapeutics. 
Lewis Edwards Gates, A.B., English. 
Robert Tracy Jackson, S.D., Palaeon- 
tology. 
James Lee Love, A.M., Mathematics. 
Max Poll, Ph.D., German. 
William Townsend Porter, M.D., 

Physiology. 
Abbott Lawrence Rotch, S.B., A.M., 

Meteorology. 
Joseph Torrey, Jr., A.M., Chemistry 
Franklin Dexter, M.D., Anatomy. 
John Hays Gardiner, A.B., English. 
William Fogg Osgood, Ph.D., Math. 
Theodore William Richards, Ph.D., 

Chemistry. 
Wallace Clement Sabine, A.M., 

Physics. 
George Santayana, Ph.D., Philosophy 
George Pierce Baker, A.B., English. 
George Wells Fitz, M.D., Physiology 

and Hygiene. 
Jefferson Butler Fletcher, A.M., Eng. 
Herman Wadsworth Hayley, Ph.D., 

Latin. 
Byron Satterlee Hurlbut, A.B., Eng. 
Lewis Jerome Johnson, A. B., C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
Benjamin Lincoln Robinson, Ph.D., 

Curator of Herbarium. 
Maxime Bocher, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Wirt Robinson, ist Lieut. 4th U.S. 

Artillery, Military Science. 
Frank Beverly Williams, A.M., LL.B., 

Rom.an Law^. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



139 



Chas. B. Davenport, Ph.D., Zoology. 

Alfred Cope Garrett, Ph.D., English. 

James Hardy Ropes, A.B., New Tes- 
tament Criticism and Interpretation. 

Comfort Avery Adams, Jr., S.B., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

NKW APPOINTMENTS.* 

George A. Gordon, D.D., Immortality 
of Man. 

F. C. Huntington, A.M., LL.D., 
Pleading and Practice. 

George Rublee, A.B., LL.B,, Contracts. 
J. G. Jack, Lecturer in Arboretum. 
John Cummings, Ph.D., Polit, Econ. 
M. W. Mather, Ph.D., Latin. 

G. W. Botsford, Ph.D., Greek and 
Roman History. 

Asaph Hall, Celestial Mechanics. 

E. B. Delabarre, Director Psychologi- 
cal Laboratory. 

J. E. Lough, A.M., Experimental 
Psychology. 

C. M. Bakewell, A.M., Philosophy. 

H. R. Meyer, A.M., Polit. Economy. 

C. A. Duniway, A.M., History. 

C. E. Banne, A.M., History. 

Charles Palache, Mineralogy. 

R. J. Forsythe, A.M., Metallurgy and 
Chemistry. 



G. A. Reisner, Ph.D., Semitic Lang. 
Leo Wiener, Russian Language. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

Allen Danforth, A.M., Treasurer. 

Charles Frank Mason, A.B., Bursar. 

Arthur Gorham Davis, Keeper Ac- 
counts and Records. 

John Bertram Williams, A.B., Publica- 
tion Agent. 

Leonard Dwinnell Garfield, Superin- 
tendent of Buildings. 

George Washington Cram, A.B., 
Recorder. 

Montague Chamberlain, Secretary of 
Scientific School. 

Benj. Franklin Mills, Stenographer. 

Alexander Winthrop Pope, Clerk in 
Treasurer's Office. 

John Lev\?is Taylor, Clerk in Bursar's 
Office. 

Adam K. Wilson, University Printer. 

William Hartwell Eveleth, Supt. 

Lyman Beecher Fisk, A.B., Auditor 
Dining Association. 

Charles Milton Reade, A.B., Auditor 
Foxcroft Club. 

Jeremiah Joseph Sullivan, Steward of 
Dininar Hall. 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE. 

Haverford, Pa. Men. 



Quakers. 



Income, 
$60,000 



Students, 
99 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
31,604 



In 1830 the Friends in Philadelphia raised $40,000, and bought 215 
acres, near Bryn Mawr, nine miles away. In 1833 Haverford College 
was opened with twenty-one students. The school was suspended 
from 1845 to 1848. In 1852 an observatory was built, and the college 
reorganized three years afterward. In 1861 the preparatory school 
was abandoned leaving college studies only. The presidents have 
been: Samuel J. Gummere, 1856; Thomas Chase, 1856-1873, and 
Isaac Sharpless, 1887 to the present time. The school is governed 
by twenty-seven managers. Admission is on examination or certi- 
ficate from schools of recognized ability. Expenses are from $400 
to $525. Three courses lead to degrees of B.A., and B.S., and 
degrees of M.A., and M.S. are conferred after three years of study. 



* So far as announced. 



140 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



There are five undergraduate and four graduate scholarships of j^ioo 
and $300, two junior prizes, one alumni prize, a prize for English, 
while honors are conferred in seven departments. Attendance at 
chapel and gymnastic drill are compulsory. Negroes are not 
excluded. The college year is from September 25 to June 11. 

The Lagonian Society dates from 1834. There is another society 
called the Athenian, and two Christian Associations. Fraternities 
are not allowed. The Athletic Association includes a football and 
cricket eleven, with a tennis association. The cricket team is con- 
sidered the best college eleven in the country. The students publish 
the " Haverfordian." 

Since 1836 there have been 580 graduates, of whom 420 are living. 
The oldest of these is Thomas F. Cook, M.D., LL.D., 1836, of 
New York City. 



Faculty. 



Isaac Sharpless, Sc.D., LL.D., Presi- 
dent, Ethics. 

Allen C. Thomas, A.M., Librarian, 
History. 

Lyman Beecher Hall, Ph.D., Chem. 

Seth K. Gifford, A.M., Greek. 

Levi T. Edwards, A.M., Mechanics 
and Physics. 

William Coffin Ladd, A.M., French. 

Francis B. Gummere, Ph.D., English 
and German. 

Frank Morley, A.M., Pure Math. 

William Draper Lewis, Ph.D., Politi- 
CR,1 ^cicncG. 

Henry S. Pratt, Ph.D., Biology. 



James A. Babbitt, A.B., Physical 

Training. 
Rufus M. Jones, A.M., Philosophy 

and History. 
Emory R. Johnson, Ph.D., Economics. 
Clarence Gilbert Hoag, A. B., English. 
Allen Curry Thomas, S.B., Drawing 

Room and Shop. 
James Linton Engle, A.B., Library. 
Thomas Harvey Haines, Secretary. 
Ernest William Brown, A.M., Applied 

Mathematics. 
Wilfred P. Mustard, PhD., Latin. 
William H. Collins, A.M., Director of 

Observatory. 



Mingdon, III. 



HEDDING COLLEGE. 

Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$10,000 



Studknts, 
364 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
2,000 



The college grew out of the Abingdon College, the property of 
which was purchased for $60,000. An endowment fund of $100,000 
was then secured. The school is governed by twelve trustees. 
There are four courses : the normal, literary, scientific, and classical 
leading to degrees of B.A., B.S., B.L., and in pedagogy and oratory. 
The college year is from September 3 to June 11. The expenses are 
$160. There are two literary societies : the Oliniana and the Lin- 
colnian. A chapter of A T A was organized in Abingdon College. 
In all, 250 students have been graduated, of whom 230 are living. 
The oldest of these is Mrs. Josie Degroot, 1867, of Augusta, 111. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



141 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. G. Evans, D.D., LL.D., 

President, Theological and Social 
Science. 

Rev, A. C. Piersel, A.M., Vice-Presi- 
dent, Greek and Latin. 

Rev. A, A. Waters, A.M., B.D., 
Natural Science. 

Rev. S. L. Guthrie, A.B., English and 
Ethics. 

Cliff Guild, M.S., Secretary, Math. 

A. \V. Ryan, Ph.B., German, History. 

Angela H. Randolph, M.L.A., Latin. 

Rev. A. P. Rolen, B.S., Psychology. 



Milo Hempy, M.S., Pedagogy. 

Alma M. Hempy, M.Accts., Book- 
keeping, etc. 

Bertha B. Lash, B.O., Elocution. 

C. Addison Squire, Singing. 

Lulu Converse Squire, Piano. 

C. A. Lindoft, Violin and Mandolin. 

A. E. Werts, Penmanship. 

J. J. Bradbury, Portrait-Painting. 

Belle Bradbury, Landscapes, etc. 

C. F. Bradway, M.D., Physiology and 
Hygiene. 

Rev. J. C. Craine, Librarian. 



HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITY. 

Tiffin, Ohio. Co-Educational. No)i-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$15,000 



Students, 
288 




BUILDTNGS, 

4 



Books, 
10,500 



Heidelberg College vi^as incorporated in 1851, and in 1890 was 
changed into a university. It was originally located at Tarleton, 
and was moved to Tiffin, Ohio, in 1850, upon a site of ten acres. 
College work has never been suspended. The founders were the 
Revs. S. S. Rickley and J. S. Good. The presidents and chancellors 
have been : Rev. E. V. Gerhart, 1850-1855 ; Rev. Moses Kieffer, 
1855-1863; Rev. George W. Aughenbaugh, 1863-1865; Rev. George 
W. Williard, D.D., 1865-1892 ; Rev. John A. Peters, D.D., 1892 ; 
Rev. JohnKost, D.D., 1892-1893; Rev. L. H. Kefauver, D.D., 1893 
to the present time. 

The school is governed by twenty-four regents. Admission is by 
examination. Students from academies and high schools receive 
credit for work done. The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.Ph., and M.A. 
A theological seminary is connected with the university. Tuition 
and contingent fees are $36 for the year, lasting from September 7 
to June 17. Prizes of $20 and $\o are offered for the best orations. 
Attendance at chapel and at gymnastic drill is compulsory. Negroes 
are admitted. 

Of the four literary societies the Excelsior and the Heidelberg 
are for men, the Plesperian for women, and the Irving for prepara- 
tory students. There is an Oratorical Association, a Christian Asso- 
ciation, and a Glee Club. The students publish the " Argus " and 
the " Kilikidik." Of the 425 graduates, 383 are living ; the oldest 
of whom is Rev. George P. Mechling, 1854, of Hamilton, Ohio. 



142 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faadty. 



Rev. Lewis H. Kefauver, D.D., Act- 
ing Chancellor. 

Rev. David Van Home, D.D., Presi- 
dent Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Herman Rust, D.D., Historical 
Theology. 

Rev. Alvin S. Zerbe, Ph.D., D.D., 
Hebrew and Old Testament Theol- 
ogy, and Librarian. 

Rev. John A. Peters, A.M., D.D., 
Philosophy, Christian Evidences. 

Rev. Reuben Good, A.M., Science. 

Christian Hornung, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Rev. Cornelius M. Lowe, A.M., Ph.D., 
Latin and Bible. 

Martin E. Kleckner, A.M., Geology 
and Biology, Curator of Museum. 

Thomas H. Sonnedecker, A.M., Greek 
and History, and Secretary. 

Alfred Charles Zembrod, A.M., Ger- 
man and French. 



Frederick F. Briggs, A.B., English 
and History. 

Edward A. Day, A.M., Principal of 
Academy. 

Viola Meyer, M.S., Assist. Principal 
of Academy. 

Harold B. Adams, Music. 

Inez I. Crampton, Art Department. 

Charl M. Replogle, College of Com- 
merce. 

Rev. Franklin J. Miller, A.M., School 
of Oratory. 

Charles N. Helter, Summer School. 

Alfred D. Sheffield, Mathematics. 

Rev. E. Herbruck, D.D., Homiletics 
and Archaeology. 

Rev. W. R. Miller, A.M., Sunday- 
School Work. 

William Cross, Taxidermy. 

John E. Schmidlin, Gymnasium. 

Francis W. Kennedy, A. C. Shuman, 
A.B., Librarians. 



HENDRIX COLLEGE. 

Comuay, Ark. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 
156 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,coo 



The Arkansas Conference in 1884 purchased the Central Collegi- 
ate Institute at Altus. For five years both sexes were admitted, 
but in 1889 the Galloway Female Institute was opened, and the 
college was restricted to men only, although women have never been 
formally excluded. In 1890 the school was moved from Altus to 
Conway without suffering suspension. The college grounds cover 
twenty-eight acres. Rev. J. L. Burrow, A.M., was the founder and 
the first president. He was succeeded by the present incumbent 
in 1887. 

The school is governed by eighteen curators from three confer- 
ences. Students are admitted upon examination and certificate. 
Expenses are from $150 to $184, the college year lasting from Sep- 
tember 25 to June 17. Free tuition for one year is given to the best 
graduate of the academy. The degrees are B.A., B.L,, and B.Ph. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory, but not so gymnastic drill. 
Negroes are excluded. 

There are two literary societies, the Franklin and Harland, a Chris- 
tian Association, an Athletic Association, Racquet Club, and a 
Dining Association. The students publish the " College Mirror." 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



143 



Faculty. 



Rev. A. C. Millar, A.M., President, 
Mental Science and Pedagogics. 

G. H. Burr, A.M., Natural and 
Physical Sciences. 

Rev. James M. Hawley, B.D., A.M., 
English and Hebrew. 



George C. Millar, A.M., Mathematics, 
French, and German. 

C. T. Gotham, A.B., Latin and Politi- 
cal Science. 

G. T. Rowe, A.B., Greek and Math. 

O. L. Dunaway, Librarian. 



HIGHLAND UNIVERSITY. 

Highland, Kan. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$4,000 



Students, 
83 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



In 1837 the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions established a 
mission among the Iowa and Sac Indians, who lived on a reservation 
west of the Missouri River. In 1854 the Indians were transferred, 
and in 1857 a college was established at Highland in a log cabin. 
A charter was obtained in 1858, but college instruction was not 
given till 1870. The school is governed by twenty-seven trustees. 
The graduates since 1872 number fifty-nine. Degrees of B.A., and 
B.S. are conferred, together with that of M.A. after two years of 
graduate study. Attendance at chapel is compulsory ; gymnastic and 
military drill are not required. Negroes are not excluded. There 
are two literary societies, the Arodelphian for men, and the Athlecto 
for women, both of which have libraries. There are also two Chris- 
tian Associations. The students publish the " Nuncio." The col- 
lege year is from September 8 to June 10. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William Boyle, President, Phi- 
losophy and Modern Languages. 

Charles A. Read, M.S., Mathematics. 

Jennie L. Carpenter, A.M., Classics. 

Leander C. Hills, B.S., Rhetoric and 
History, and Librarian. 

Grace Partch, English Branches. 



Maggie E. Morton, Stella M. Pentz, 

Instrumental IMusic. 
Adelia R. Luse, Elocution. 
W. R. Breeding, M.D., Physiology, 
W. E. Lewis, M.D., Anatomy. 
W. M. Boone, M.D., Histological 

Demonstrator. 



HILLSBORO COLLEGE. 



Hillsboro, Ohio. Co-Educational. 


Methodist. 


Income, 
$2,600 


Students, 
40 


Instructors, 
10 


Buildings, 


Books, 







The college was founded in 1854. Tuition for the year, ending 

June II, is $30, with other expenses aggregating nearly $100. The 

productive funds of the institution are $6,000. The president is C. 

F. Enyart, A.M. . , , 

{Fuj-ther information lacking.) 



144 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



HILLSDALE COLLEGE. 

Hillsdale^ Mich. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
^13.057 



Students, 
500 



Instructors, 
28 



Buildings, 
9 



Books, 
9,000 



The college was established in 1844 ^s Michigan Central College, 
at Spring Arbor, Mich. In 1853 it was moved, and after a change of 
name, opened its doors to students in 1856. The endowment steadily 
increased from $990 to $131,467 in 1881, and $280,107 in 1885. The 
presidents have been: Rev. Edmund B. Fairfield, D.D., LL.D., 
D.C.L., 1855-1869; Rev. James Calder, D.D., 1869-1871 ; Rev. 
Daniel M. Graham, D.D., 1871-1874; Rev. DeWitt C. Durgin, D.D., 
1874-1884; Rev. Ransom Dunn, D.D., 1884-1886; Hon. George F. 
Mosher, LL.D., 1886 until the present. 

It is governed by a board of trustees. The degrees are B.A., B.L., 
B.Ph., and in Pedagogy and Divinity. Special funds of from $10,000 
to $15,000 have endowed nine professorships and the presidency. 
Other funds have been given for prizes in mathematics, literature, 
history, and general proficiency. The college year is from Septem- 
ber 14 to June 18. 

There are five literary societies, three for men, and two for women : 
two Christian Associations, and a Beethoven Society, an Athletic 
Association, with football and baseball teams. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized : A T A, 1867 ; K K r, 18S0; 
* A 0, 1882 ; 2 X, 1883 ; n B *, 18S7, and A T H, 1888. 

In all, 814 alumni have been graduated, of whom 720 are living. 
The oldest of these is Eliza Scott Potter, 1856, of Grinnell, Iowa. 



Faculty. 



Hon. George Frank Mosher, LL.D., 
President, Law, Philosophy, Evi- 
dences, and Civilization. 

Kingsbury Bachelder, A.M., Greek. 

Wiliiam Frank Tibbetts, A.M., Latin. 

Charles Henry Gurney, A.M., Logic, 
Rhetoric, and English. 

Duncan McLaren Martin, Ph.M., 
Mathematics. 

William H. Munson, B.S., Chemistry, 
Biology, and Geology. 

Harriet A. Deering, Ph.B., German. 

Frances Stewart Mosher, A.M., French 
and History. 



Harry S. Myers, A.B., Englisli. 

M. Frances Randolph, A.B., Math. 

Melville Warren Chase, Mus.Doc, 
Piano, Harmony, and Theory. 

John Murray Merrill, Voice Culture. 

Clarence M. Chase, Pianoforte. 

Minnie Whitney Lougher, Violin. 

Violet Lelia Lewis, Accompanist, 

George B. Gardner, A.M., Painting 
and Drawing. 

Lieut. Eli A. Helmick, U. S. Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

Clara Mcintosh Hulce, Elocution and 
Reading. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



145 



HIRAM COLLEGE. 



Hiram, Ohio 


Co-Educational. 


Disciples. 


Income, 

^20,400 


Students, 
400 


Instructors, 
18 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
5,000 



Hiram College was founded in 1850. It is governed by twenty- 
five trustees, and three honorary members of the board. The college 
year is from September 24 to June 25. Courses in literature, sci- 
ence, geology, law, and medicine lead to degrees of B.A., B.Ph., B.S., 
M.A., and professional degrees. Admission is by examination or on 
high school certificates. Expenses are $150 a year. Of the four 
literary societies the Delphic, Hesperian, and Garfield societies are 
for men, and the Olive Branch for women. Besides two Christian 
Associations, there are also ministerial, medical, legal, and oratorical 

associations. ^ 

r'acjilty. 



Ely Vaughn Zollars, LL.D., President, 

Moral Science. 
George Henry Colton, Ph.D., Natural 

Science. 
George Alfred Peckham, A.M., Greek 

and Hebrew. 
Colman Bancroft, M.S., Mathematics 

and Astronomy, 
Arthur Chester Pierson, Ph.M., Eng- 
lish Literature and Psychology. 
Bailey Sutton Dean, A.M., History. 
Edmund Burritt Wakefield, A.M., 

Law and Political Science. 
Edwin Lester Hall, A.M., Latin. 
Cora Mabel Clark, A.M., Mod. Langs. 
Plarlan Myron Page, A.M., M.D., 

Biology and Medical Science. 



Marcia Henry, A. B., Principal, Ladies' 
Department. 

Silas Warren Pearcy, A.M., Ancient 
Languages. 

Emma Johnson Dean, China Decora- 
tion and Pastel. 

Lulu Freeman Pearcy, Music. 

Alice Cornelia Brooks, Painting. 

Homer W. Campbell, Principal, Busi- 
ness Department. 

William E. Adams, Oratory. 

Lora E. Wire, Phys. Cult., Elocution. 

Emerson J. Smith, Mathematics. 

Grace G. Finch, Physical Culture. 

Belle Griffith, Delia P. Hart, Mary 
B. Logue, C. A. Niman, Vernon 
Stauffer, Mary Wilson, Prep. Dep. 



HIWASSEE COLLEGE. 

Hiwasse, Tenn. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$2,500 



Students, 
75 



Instructors, 
4 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
2,200 



The college was founded in 1849, having grown out of a school at 
Eat Camp Ground. The grounds cover ninety-five acres. Instruc- 
tion is given in preparatory, business, and collegiate branches, lead- 
ing to the degree of A.B. Tuition for the year, ending June 4, is 
$35, with other expenses aggregating $100. The graduates num- 
ber 250, of whom D. N. K. and W. L. Eakin, 1849, of Chattanooga, 
Tenn., are the oldest. The president is S. G. Gilbreath, B.S., Ph.B. 
{.Further information lacking^ 



146 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Geneva, N. Y. 



HOBART COLLEGE. 

Men. Episcopal. 



Income, 
^24,166 



Students, 
81 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
8 



Books, 
3i>4i7 



History: The trustees of Fairfield Academy in 1S12 petitioned 
the trustees of Trinity Church, New York City, for the establish- 
ment of a college west of Albany, and a theological seminary was 
started the following year at Fairfield. At the suggestion of Bishop 
Hobart the school was transferred in 1821 to Geneva, with a college 
printing press. In 1822 Geneva Academy was raised to college rank 
by the regents of the University of New York. In 1824 the theo- 
logical school was abolished, and its endowment transferred to the 
college. The first class was graduated in 1S25. In 1874 the trus- 
tees were made elective, and the alumni were given five members. 
The Trinity gift of 1851 was $3,000 a year. The present name was 
adopted in i860. Four bequests of $400,000 have been made, and 
four professorships and the chaplaincy have been endowed. The 
presidents have been: Jasper Adams, D.U., 1826-1828; Richard 
Sharp Mason, S.T.D., 1830-1835; Benjamin Hale, S.T.D., 1836- 
1858; Abner Jackson, S.T.D., LL.D., 1858-1867 ; James Kent Stone, 
S.T.D., 1S68-1869; James Rankine, S.T.D., 1869-187 1 ; Maunsell 
Van Rensselaer, S.T.D., 1S71-1876; Rt. Rev. William Stevens Perry, 
S.T.D., LL.D., 1876; Robert Graham Hinsdale, S.T.D., 1876-1883; 
Eliphalet Nott Potter, S.T.D., LL.D., D.C.L., 1884. Acting Presi- 
dents: Daniel McDonald, S.T.D., 1825-1826; William Dexter 
Wilson, S.T.D., LL.D., L.H.D., 1867-1868; Hamilton Lanphere 
Smith, A.M., LL.D., 1883-1884. 

Organization : The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.L., and M. A. Eclec- 
tics go with upper class- work. There are twenty-two scholarships 
and twelve prizes, besides loans and special gifts. Tuition is $50 
for the year, lasting from September 17 to June 24. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. 

The grounds overlooking Geneva Lake cover fifteen acres, on 
which are eight college buildings, six residences, and three fraternity 
houses. There is a gymnasium and a campus for athletic games. 

Since the foundation of the college 1345 students have been 
graduated, of whom 1043 are living. The oldest of these is S. P. 
McDonald, 1829, of Mansfield, Ohio. The societies are : the St. 
John's Guild, White Cross, Postulants, Critic, Debating Union, 
choir. Glee and Banjo Club, Dramatic Club, with an Athletic 
Association, baseball nine, and football eleven. The following fra- 
ternities have been established: * B K, 1840; A A *, I846-1876; 
2 *, 1840; K A, 1844; A X, 1857 ; X *, 1860-1880; * K >F, 1881. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Eliphalet Nott Potter, S.T.D., 
LL.D., D.C.L., President, Eco- 
nomics and Civics. 

Hamilton Lanphere Smith, A.M., 
LL.D.j Astron., Nat. Philosophy. 



Joseph H. McDaniels, A.M., Greek. 

Charles Delamater Vail, A.M., Libra- 
rian, Elocution. 

Francis Philip Nash, A.M., L.H.D., 
LL.D., Latin. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



147 



Charles John Rose, A.M., German and 
French. 

William Pitt Durfee, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Chemistry. 

Rev. Rob Roy MacGregor Converse, 
S.T.D-, Chaplain, Philosophy. 

Milton Haight Turk, A.M., Ph.D., 
English. 

Albert Fermaud, A.M., French. 

John Archer Silver, Ph.D., History. 

David Francis Lincoln, A.M., M.D., 
Geology, Physiology and Hygiene. 



Capt. Charles Washington Fairfax, 
Gymnastics. 

LECTURERS. 

Rev. William Clark, LL.D., Modem 
History and Religion. 

Theodore Stanton, A.M., History of 
French Republic. 

Frank Landon Humphreys, A.M., 
S.T.D., American History. 

Frank Hunter Potter, A.M., Music. 

Allan Marquand, Ph.D., L.H.D., His- 
tory of Art. 



HOPE COLLEGE. 

Holland, Mich. Co-Edtccational. Reformed Church. 



Income, 
$13,665 



Students, 
273 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 
8 



Books, 
9,000 



The college was chartered in 1865, and is situated near Macatania 
Bay of Lake Michigan, on a campus of sixteen acres. It was 
founded in 1851 as the Pioneer School, changing its name in 1857 to 
the Holland Academy, and finally to Hope College in 1865. The 
presidents have been : P. Phelps, Jr., D.D., 1866-1878 ; G. H. Man- 
deville, D.D., 1878-1880; Charles Scott, D.D., 1 880-1 893 ; and G.J. 
Kollen, A.M., the present incumbent, who was elected in 1893. The 
college is governed by a council of twenty-four members. Admission 
is by examination and on certificate. Th^ degree of B.A. is con- 
ferred, and that of A.M. after three years. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from the third week in September to the last week of 
June, are $128. Four cash prizes are offered for excellence in study. 

The societies are the Meliplean, Cosmopolitan, Fraternal, and 
Ulfilas (the last for the study of Dutch), the G. M. S. for women, 
and a Christian Association, publishing a religious weekly; the stu- 
dents also publish " The Anchor." The graduates number 620, the 
oldest of whom is the Rev. A. Bursma, 1866, of Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Faculty. 



Gerrit J. Kollen, LL.D., President, 

Political Economy. 
Cornelius Doesburg, A.M., Dutch, Art. 
Henry Boers, A.M., History. 
John H. Kleinheksel, A.M., Math. 
James G. Sutphen, A.M., Latin. 
Rev. John H. Gillespie, A.M., Greek. 
John B. Nykerk, A.M., English. 
Douwe B. Yntema, A.M., Chemistry. 



Erastus A. WTiitenack, A.B., French 

and German. 
Rev. John Tallmadge Bergen, A.M., 

Ethics. 
Hon. G. J. Diekema, A.M., LL.B., 

John C. Post, LL.B,, Arend Viss- 

cher, A.M., LL.B., George E. 

Kollen, A.M., LL.B., Lecturers on 

Political Economy. 



I 



148 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



HOWARD COLLEGE. 

East Lake, Ala. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$16,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
6 




The college was chartered in 1841. It has twice been destroyed 
by fire. It was located at Marion, but in 1887 was moved to the 
vicinity of Birmingham. The alumni since 1848 number 337. The 
school is governed by twenty-five trustees. A degree of B.A. is 
given after completion of the classical course. The college year lasts 
from September 24 to June 10. Among other societies chapters of 
the following fraternities have been established: * r A, 1856-1861 ; 
2A E, 1870-1873; B n, 1872-1879; 2 X, 1872-1885; 2 N, 1879- 
1881. The oldest living graduate is Gen. G. D. Johnston, 1849, ^^ 
Mississippi. 

Faculty. 



Arthur Watkins McGaha, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy and Bible. 

Thomas John Dill, LL.D., Greek and 
Latin. 

Albert Durant Smith, A.M., Ap. Math. 

George Washington Macon, A.M., 
Ph.D., Chemistry, Natural History, 
German, and Secretary. 



Benjamin Franklin Giles, A.M., Eng- 
lish. 

Robert Judson Waldrop, A.M., Pure 
Mathematics, and Treasurer. 

Amos Bailey Goodhue, A.M., LL.D., 
Elocution and French. 

Willis Hilliard Payne, A.B., A.M. 
Principal Sub-Collegiate Dep. 



HOWARD PAYNE COLLEGE. 

Brownwood, Texas. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 

;?2 5,500 



Students, 
205 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
12,000 



The college was founded in 1890, on grounds fifteen hundred feet 
above the sea. It is governed by fifteen directors. Admission is by 
examination and upon certificate. Degrees of B.A. and B.S. are 
given. Attendance at military drill and chapel is required. The 
expenses for the year, from September 2 to May 26, are $135. The 
societies are the Excelsior and Irving for women, and the Theodorus 
and Lyceum League for men. 

Faculty. 



J. H. Grove, A.M., President, Mathe- 
matics and Philosophy. 

F.J. Buchanan, A.B., Secretary, Eng- 
lish and History. 

Leo O'Brien, A.M., Librarian, Sci- 
ences and Latin. 

Cora G. Jones, Piano and Harmony. 



Genevieve Muse, Elocution. 
Mrs. J. W. Sheppard, Art. 
Mrs. J. H. Grove, Primary. 
Rev. A. E. Baten, Theology. 
E. S. J. Whitehead, Vocal Music. 
J. T. Corley, Stringed Instruments. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



149 



HOWARD UNIVERSITY. 

Washington, D. C. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$62,641 



StudentSi 
629 



Instructors, 
50 



Buildings, 

7 



Books, 
13,000 



The university was established by the Friends of the Freedman 
immediately after the war. The presidents have been : Charles B. 
Boynton, 1867; Byron Sutherland, 1867-1879; Gen. O. O. Howard, 
1869-1873; E. P. Smith and George Whipple, 1873-1876; W. W. 
Patten, 1877-1889, and J. E. Rankin, D.D., the present incumbent. 

There are twenty-four trustees, and an honorary board of eight 
members. The school is free to all, and no charge is made for tui- 
tion. Room, rent is $15 a year, and iDoard %% a month. The depart- 
ments are : the college proper, the normal and industrial departments, 
the law school, medical school, and theological seminary. The col- 
lege year is from September 23 to June 3. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Jeremiah Eames Rankin, D.D., 
LL.D., President, Moral Science. 

Rev. F. W. Fairfield, D.D., Greek 
and Political Economy. 

Richard Foster, M.S., M.D., Natural 
History. 

Robert B. Warder, A.M., B.S., Physics 
and Chemistry, and Missions. 

Kelly Miller, A.B., Mathematics. 

Charles C. Cook, B.L., English. 

Elizabeth A. Cook, French, German. 

William J. Stephens, Vocal Music. 

Rev. John L. Ewell, D.D., Church 
History, etc. 

Rev. Isaac Clark, A.M., Scriptural 
Theology. 

Rev. Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Bib- 
lical History and Literature. 

Rev. Charles H, Butler, A.M., Hebrew. 

Rev. George O. Little, D.D., Pastoral 
Theology. 

Rev. Teunis S. Hamlin, D.D., Rev. 
E. D. Bailey, Rev. A. W. Pitzer, 
D.D., Rev. S. H. Grene, D.D., 
Rev. S. M. Newman, D.D., Rev. 
Alexander Crummell, D.D., Lec- 
turers on Pastoral Work. 

Thomas B. Hood, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Nervous System. 

Charles B. Purvis, A.M., M.D., Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology. 

Neil F. Graham, M.D., Surgery. 

Daniel S. Lamb, A.M., M.D., Anat. 

William H. Seaman, A.M., M.D., 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 



John E. Brackett, M.D., Medicine. 

Robert Reyburn, A.M., M.D., Physi- 
ology and Hygiene. 

Furman J. Shadd, A.M., M.D., Mate- 
ria Medica. 

J. M. Lamb, M.D., D.D.S., Histology. 

E. A. Balloch, A.M., M.D., Minor 
Surgery. 

E. Oliver Belt, M.D., Ophthalmology 
and Otology. 

Walter W. Alleger, M.D., Phar.D., 
Bacteriology. 

Daniel H. Williams, M.D., Abdominal 
Surgery. 

Samuel R. Watts, M.D., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

George N. Perry, M.D., Paediatrics. 

N. R. Jenner, M.D., Anatomy. 

Collins Marshall, M.D., Histology. 

W. W. Purnell, M.D., Ophalmology. 

Charles I. West, M.D., Anatomy. 

James B. Hodgkins, D.D.S., Chem. 

Hamilton S. Smith, D.D.S., Operative 
Dentistry. 

Andrew J. Brown, D.D.S., Crown 
and Bridge Work. 

William M. Ash, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

Clarence R. Dufour, M.D., Phar.D., 
Pharmacy and Botany. 

B. F. Leighton, LL.D., Laws of Real 
Property. 

Arthur A. Birney, LL.B., Pleading 
and Practice. 

Hon. Francis Wayland, LL.D., Eng- 
lish Constitution. 



ISO 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Hon. John M. Harlan, Constitutional 
Law. 

W. H. Richards, LL.B., Evidence. 

William H. H. Hart, A.M., LL.M., 
Torts. 

George Francis Williams, LL.M., 
Domestic Relations. 

T. W. Birney, C.E., LL.B., Com- 
mercial Law. 



James F. Bundy, A.M., LL.M., Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Charles E. Hall, Printing. 
Jonathan F. Akers, Carpentry. 
Willis A. Madden, Tin Work. 
Mrs. B. M. Howard, Sewing. 



ILLINOIS COLLEGE. 

Jacksonville, III. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$130,000 



Students, 
214 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
14,475 



History and Organization : The college is identified with the first 
settlement of the State in the second decade of this century. The 
" Yale Band of Seven " undertook to establish Christian education 
in what was then the far West, and through their efforts a school 
was opened in 1829. A part of the original building has remained in 
the south wing of Beecher Hall. The first teacher was Julian M. 
Sturtevant, who remained with the college as teacher and president 
for fifty-six years. The first president was the Rev. Edward Beecher, 
who was elected in 1831. The government of the school is vested in 
nineteen trustees. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination, 
but equivalents can be substituted for the subjects required in the 
catalogue. The courses of the first year are required, while in the 
three succeeding years the hours of study can be almost equally 
divided between elective and prescribed studies. Attendance at 
gymnastic drill is required. Three courses of four years each lead 
to degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. The degree of M.A. is given 
after one year's resident work, while that of Ph.D. is given after 
two years. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition for the year, lasting from 
the second Monday in September to the second Thursday in June, 
is $50. Other expenses are estimated at $100. There are eight 
scholarships, equivalent to tuition, and ten prizes of from $5 to $25 
each, three prizes of $45 each, and five for $15 each for excellence 
in study. 

College Adjuncts: The campus covers twenty acres. Among the 
six college buildings is a chapel and gymnasium. The college library 
contains some 1 5,000 books. Libraries are also owned by the Sigma 
Pi, Phi Alpha, and Philalogian literary societies, aggregating some 
4,000 books. Besides these societies there are two Christian Associa- 
tions and an athletic association. A chapter of B n was organized 
in 1856, and existed for ten years. The graduates number 560, of 
whom 450 are living. The oldest of these is J. E. Spillman, D.D., 
1836, of Car mi, 111. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



151 



Faculty. 



John E. Bradley, Ph.D., LL.D., Pres- 
ident, Philosophy. 

Hiram K. Jones, LL.D., Philosophy. 

Harvey W. Milligan, A.M., M.D., 
Librarian, History and Economics. 

James B. Shaw, D.Sc, Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

Milton E. Churchill, A.M., B.D., 
Greek and German. 

Jacob A. Zeller, A.M., Pedagogy. 

John M. Clapp, A.M., English and 
Oratory. 



Truman P. Carter, A.M., Science. 

Frederick W. Sanford, A.B., Latin 
and French. 

Frank Parsons Norbury, M.D., Psy- 
cho-Physics. 

James W. Putnam, B.S., History, etc. 

Willard H. Garrett, B.S., Assistant 
in Preparatory Department. 

Truman P. Carter, A.M., Physical 
Training. 

Wm. Kirby McLaughlin, A.M., M.D., 
Physical Examiner. 



ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

Blooiningto7i, III. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
^30.915 



Students, 
1,625 



Instructors, 
40 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
6,750 



The university was founded in 1853. ^^ is governed by twenty-two 
trustees from the sixth Illinois Conferences. The courses are in 
groups: the classical, leading to B.A., the Latin-scientific to B.S., 
and the English to Ph.B. For the master's degree a thesis is required. 

The entrance examination is reputed to be strict. Tuition is ^140 
for the year, lasting from September 14 to July 13. Four prizes in 
natural history and two in oratory are given. Attendance at chapel 
and gymnastic exercise is compulsory. Negroes are admitted. 

The grounds cover eight acres, and comprise an athletic park and a 
new gymnasium. There is also an observatory. The literary societies 
are the Adelphic and the Amateurian. Chapters of the following 
fraternities have been organized: * r A, 1866; K K r, 1S73; K A 0, 
1875; ATA, 1877-S0; * A 0, 187S; * A 4», 1878-88; and 2 X, 1883. 

The students publish the " Argus," and the " Wesleyan Magazine " 
edited by the graduates. The museum issues annual reports. Since 
the foundation of the college nearly 1,000 students have been gradu- 
ated, the oldest of whom is W. J. Short, D.D., 1857, of Jackson- 
ville, 111. 

Faculty. 



Rev. William H. Wilder, M.A.,D.D., 

President, Ethics and Metaphysics. 
Robert O. Graham, M.A., Ph.D., 

Chemistry and Geology. 
Robert B. Steele, M. A.., Ph.D., Latin. 
Morton J. Elrod, M.A., Biology and 

Physics. 
Wilbert Ferguson, M.A., Greek. 
Melvin P. Lackland, M.A., B.D., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 



M. Luella Denman, A.B., Belles 

Lettres. 
Clarence E. Snyder, Instructor in 

French and German. 
Delmar D. Darrah, B.S., Elocution. 
Calvin W. Green, M.A., Prep. School. 
William A. Heidel, M.A., Ph.D., 

Pedagogics. 
Judge Owen T. Reeves, LL.D., 

Equity Jurisprudence. 



152 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Judge Reuben M. Benjamin, LL.D., 
Elementary Law, etc. 

Jacob P. Lindley, LL.B., Contracts. 

Judge Colostin D. Meyers, LL.B., 
Practice. 

Rolland A. Russell, LL.B., Elemen- 
tary Law. 

Hon. John M. Scott, LL.D., Hon. 
Lawrence Weldon, LL.D., Lectures 
on College Law. 

Sain Welty, M.A., LL.B., Civics. 



Lyde R. Porter, Martha Matheny, 
B.S., Charles C. Adams, B.S., Prep- 
aratory School. 

Mrs. John R. Gray, Oliver R. 
Skinner, Joint Directors of Music 
Department. 

Blanche Mayers, Katherine Young, 
Kate Sherwood, Julia Tool, May 
Skinner, Farie Stevick, Lynn E. 
Hersey, Assistants in Music. 

Oscar L. Wilson, Ph.C, Ph.B., Dean. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY. 

Bloomington, Ind. Co- Educational. Nan- Sectarian. 



Income, 
$80,000 



Students, 
771 



Instructors, 

55 



Buildings, 



Books, 
20,000 



The university was founded in 1820, and is designed to stand at 
the head of the public school system of the vState. Cognate schools 
are Purdue University (the Indiana Institute of Technology), the 
State School of Agriculture and of Mechanic Arts, and the Normal 
School. The original campus of four squares has been increased to 
twenty acres by a grant of national forest land. The university is 
governed by eight trustees, three of whom are alumni. The graduates 
of fifty-nine high schools are admitted without examination. Some 
choice of subjects is offered to other candidates. Tuition is free. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 16, 
are from $160 to ^200. The degrees are B.A., B.S.. B. L., with M.A., 
after one year of special study, and Ph.D. after a three years' course. 

There are two literary societies : the Century for men, and the 
Independent for men and women. In addition to these there is a 
philological society, a lecture association, mathematical, physical, 
zoological, and botanical associations, with two Christian Associa- 
tions. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : 
B T, 1845; * A 0, 1849; 2 X, 1858; * K^, 1869; K A 0, 187O; 
ATA, 1870 ; * r A, 1871 ; K K T, 1873 ; and K 2, 1887-88. 

" The Student " is published weekly. Of the students 540 are men 
and 231 women. 

Faculty. 



Joseph Swain, LL.D., President of 
the University. 

"William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., Vice- 
President, Philosophy. 

Theophilus Adam Wylie, D.D., LL.D., 
Emeritus. 

Daniel Kirkwood, A.M., L.L.D., 
Emeritus. 

Thomas Charlton Van Niiys, M.D., 
Chemistry. 



Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Greek. 

Gustaf Ernst Karsten, Ph.D., Ger- 
manic Philology. 

David Demaree Banta, LL.D., Dean 
of Law School. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., 
American History. 

Robert Judson Aley, A.M., Math. 

George Emory Fellows, Ph.D., Euro- 
pean History. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



153 



Carl H. Eigenmann, Ph.D., Zoology. 

Edouard Baillot, B.S., Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Vernon Freeman Marsters, A.B., Geol. 

John Rogers Commons, A.M., Politi- 
cal Economy. 

William Perry Rogers, LL.B., Law. 

Martin Wright Sampson, A.M., Eng. 

John Anthony Miller, A.M., Math. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Frank Fetter, Ph.D., Polit. Economy. 

Carl Osthaus, A.M., German. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Chem. 

Arthur Lee Foley, A.M., Physics. 

David Myers Mottier, A.M., Botany. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, A.M., 
Mathematics. 

Charles Andrew Rhetts, A.B., LL.B., 
Law. 

Joseph Henry Howard, A.M., Assis- 
tant Professor of Latin. 

John Andrew Bergstrom, Ph.D., Assis- 
tant Psychology and Pedagogy. 

Louis Sherman Davis, A.M., Chem. 

David A. Rothrock, A.M., Math. 

Charles J. Sembower, A.B., English. 

Ernest H. Lindley, A.M., Philosophy. 

George M. Howe, A.B., German. 

William Stewart Pinkerton, A.B., 
French. 

George David Morris, A.B., French. 

Launcelot M. Harris, A.B., English. 

Charles T. Knipp, A.B., Physics. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Ernest William Rettger, A.B., Math. 

Charles Swain Thomas, A.B., English. 

William J. Moenkhaus, A.B., Zoology. 

Peter A. Yoder, A.B., Chemistry. 

John B. Faught, A.B., Mathematics. 

William A. Rawles, A.B., History, 

Guido H. Stempel, A.M., English. 

Mabel Banta, A.M., Latin and Greek. 

John F. Newsom, A.M., Geology. 

Henry T. Stephenson, B.S., English. 

Charles Henry Beeson, A.B., Tutor 
in Latin. 

Roy Henderson Perring, A.B., Tutor 
in German. 

Frank M. Andrews, A.B., Laboratory, 
Assistant in Botany. 

Ira Bordner, John M. Culver, Labora- 
tory Assistants in Experimental 
Psychology. 

Harvey Bordner, Laboratory Assistant 
in Chemistry. 

Edgar Charles Syrett, Men's Gym. 

Juliette Maxwell, A.B., Women's Gym- 
nasium. 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

Louise Maxwell, A.B., Acting Li- 
brarian. 

Sophia Sheeks, A.B., Assistant Li- 
brarian. 

William W. Holmes, Law Library 
Assistant. 

Florence Hughes, Library Assistant. 



INDIANAPOLIS UNIVERSITY. 

Irvington, Lid. Co-Ediicatio7ial. Christian. 



Income, 
$21,974 



Students, 
2^1 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
6,123 



In 1849 it was decided at the general convention of Christian 
churches of Indiana to found a college at Indianapolis under the 
name of the Northwestern Christian University. In 1S55 the school 
was opened. In 1875 it was moved to Irvington, and in 1877 the 
name was changed to Butler College. The following colleges com- 
pose the University of Indianapolis : Butler College (department of 
arts), Medical College of Indiana, Indiana Law School, Indiana 
Dental College. 

The university is governed by twelve trustees, while the college 
proper comes under the immediate administration of twenty-two 
directors. Women are admitted on equal terms with men. The 



154 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



degree of B.A. is conferred after a four years' course, that of M.A. 
after two years, and that of Ph.D. after three years of graduate study. 
In lieu of examination certificates from approved preparatory schools 
and high schools are accepted. 

There are two Christian Associations, an Athletic Association, 
Alumni Association, and an Oratorical Society. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized: * A 0, 1859; 2 X, 1866; 
ATA, 1875 ; B n, 1879-1881 ; K A 0, 1874-1886, and K K T, 1878. 

Since the foundation of the college 393 students, in all, have been 
graduated, of whom 351 are living. The oldest of these is Mrs. A. 
M. Atkinson, 1856, of Wabash, Ind. 



Faculty. 



Scot Butler, A.M., LL.D., President, 

Latin, 
Allen Richardson Benton, A.M., 

LL.D., Philosophy, Biblical Lit. 
William Merrit Thrasher, A.M., Math. 
Hugh Carson Garvin, A.M., Ph.D., 

Biblical Philology. 
Demarchus C. Brown, A.M., Greek. 
Flora Bridges, A.M., English. 
Thomas Medary Iden, Ph.M., Chem. 
Thomas Carr Howe, A.M., Germanic. 
Hugh Thomas Miller, A.M., Secretary, 

History and French. 
Henry L. Bruner, A.M., Biol., Geol. 
Archibald McClelland Hall, A.M., 

Ph.D., Hebrew. 
Elmer Burritt Bryan, A.B., Social and 

Educational Science. 



Benjamin M. Davis, M.S., Biology. 
Will David Howe, A.M., English. 
John Delbert Nichols, A.M., M.D., 

Materia Medica. 
John W. Sluss, A.M., M.D., Anat. 
James William Comfort, Homiletics. 
Lida Endress Gilbert, Elocution and 

Physical Culture for Women. 
James Lilly Zink, Phys. Cult, for Men. 
Robert Hall, A.M., Ph.D., Patristic 

Latin. 
Charles A. Stevens, A.M., German. 
James Challen Smith, A.M., Latin. 
William F. Clarke, A.M., German. 
Charles W. Culbertson, Chemistry. 
Omar Wilson, Evelyn Mitchell Butler, 

A.B., Albert James Brown, A.M., 

Preparatory School. 



Grinnell, lotva. 



IOWA COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Congregational. 



Income, 
$38,000 



Studknts, 
487 



Instructors, 
3 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
21,049 



The " Iowa Band," of twelve young graduates from Andover, in 1S43 
resolved to found a Christian college west of the Mississippi. In 
1846 trustees were elected, and work was begun at Davenport two 
years later. Ten students were graduated in the following ten 
years. In 1859 the college removed to Grinnell. From 1858 to 
1865 no students were graduated. 

The school is governed by twenty-one trustees, three of whom 
are alumni. Students from high schools and academies are admitted 
on certificates ; for unconditional admission a written examination is 
required. The degrees are B.A. and B.Ph. The degree of M.A. 
in curs7i is no longer given, one year of resident work or two of 
non-resident study being required. Tuition is $50 for the year, lasting 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



155 



from September 11 to June 16. Additional fees are charged in 
special subjects. There are four scholarships with an income of 
$17$ each, and nine prizes are given for excellence in study. 

The college grounds cover twenty-two acres. Of the four literary 
societies the Chrestomathian and Grinnell Institute are for men, 
the Calocagathean and Ellis Institute for women. There are three 
societies in the academy, two for men and one for women. The 
Goodnow Scientific Association is for advanced students in physical 
science and biology. There are also two Christian Associations, an 
Athletic Union, a Football and Track Association, a Tennis Club, 
and a Glee Club. 

The total number of graduates is 633, of whom 548 are living. 
The oldest of these is Rev. John H. Windsor, 1854, of Geneva, 111. 



Faculty. 



Rev. George A. Gates, D.D., LL.D., 

President, Philosophy of Religion. 

Rev. Samuel J. Buck, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Jesse Macy, A.M., Constitutional Hist. 

Rev. Leonard F. Parker, D.D., Hist. 

Moses S. Slaughter, Ph.D., Latin. 

Walter S. Hendrixson, Ph.D., Chem. 

J. Fred Smith, A.M., Principal of 
Academy. 

James Simmons, Jr., A.M., Philosophy 
and Pedagogics. 

Harry W. Norris, A.M., Biol., Geol. 

John H. T. Main, Ph.D., Greek. 

John S. Nollen, Ph.D., Mod. Lang. 

Rev. George D. Hereon, D.D., Applied 
Christianity. 

Frank F. Almy, B.Sc, Physics. 

Rev. Charles Noble, A.B., English. 

Rossetter G. Cole, Ph.B., Director 
School of Music. 

Selden L. Whitcomb, A.M., English. 

Garrett P. Wyckoff, A.B., Applied 
Christianity. 

Frank I. Harriott, Ph.D., Constitu- 
tional History. 



Edith Denise, B.L., Modern Lang. 

Carrie Rand, Principal for Women. 

Clara E. Millerd, A.M., Preceptress. 

Estelle Patterson, A.B., Academy. 

Rev. Joshua M. Chamberlain, A.M., 
Librarian. 

Lily Newton, Librarian of Music. 

Delia M. Strong, Matron Mears Cot- 
tage. 

Minora Trueblood, Secretary. 

Fannie L. Gwinner, Grace T. Mason, 
Pianoforte. 

El wood A. Emery, Singing. 

Mrs. H. E. Harrington, Guitar and 
Mandolin. 

Laura A. Rew, Violin. 

Edward M. Nealley, LL.B., Social 
Economics, etc. 

William A. Willard, Ph.B., Biology. 

Marion L. Lawall, Academy. 

Anna B. x^aymond, Physical Culture. 

Wilfred E. Blatherwick, A.B., Chem. 

Wade Gray, Physics. 

Ellen G. Starr, Assistant Tutor. 

Robert A. W^oods, A.B. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

Ames, Iowa. Co- Educational. N'on-Sectarian. 



Tncomk, 
^100,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
44 



Buildings, 
10 



Books, 
10,000 



History: The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts was founded in 1858 by an act of the Iowa legislature. In 1862 
the general assembly of Iowa accepted the Federal land grant pro- 



156 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



vided by Congress. The presidents of the college have been : A. S. 
Welch, 1868-1884; Seaman A. Knapp, 1884-1885 ; Leigh S. J. Hunt, 
188 5-1 886; W. I. Chamberlain, 1 886-189 1 ; W. M. Beardshear, 1891 
to the present. 

Organization: The school is governed by eleven trustees. Ad- 
mission is by examination. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic 
exercise is voluntary, but military drill is compulsory for men during 
the first two years. Negroes are not excluded, and are represented 
even in the Faculty. Besides the usual collegiate courses, instruc- 
tion is given in agriculture, horticulture, stock-breeding, veterinary 
science, engineering, military tactics, and domestic economy. The 
degrees are B.S., B.Agr., M.E., C.E., and E.E., besides the degrees 
conferred by the professional schools. The expenses for the year 
are $150. Several scholarships are available for residents of Iowa. 

Equipmettt: The college grounds cover one hundred and fifty 
acres. Among the fifteen buildings are ten dwelling-houses, four 
college halls, besides seed-houses, shops, barns, and other agricul- 
tural structures, and an experiment station. 

Societies and Publications : The students publish the " I. A. C. 
Student," "Mechanical Engineer," and "Junior Annual," The 
societies are : the Science Club, Engineering, Veterinary, Economic, 
Agricultural, and Horticultural societies ; Bachelor, Cliolian, Welch, 
Philomathean, Philelutheory, and Pythian Literary societies ; Lect- 
ure Association, Oratorical Association, Christian societies. College 
Athletic Association, with baseball and football teams, and Tennis 
Association. Chapters of the follomng fraternities have been 
organized : A T A, 1875; H B *, 1877, and AAA, 1889. 



Faculty. 



W. M. Beardshear, A.M., LL.D., 

President, Psychology and Ethics. 
M. Stalker, M.Sc, V.S., Veterinary 

Science. 
J. L. Budd, M.H., Horticulture. 
E. W. Stanton, M.Sc, Mathematics. 
Gen. James Rush Lincoln, Tactics. 
Alfred A. Bennett, M.Sc, Chemistry. 
Herbert Osborn, M.Sc, Zoology and 

Entomology. 
W. H. Wynn, Ph.D., D.D., English 

Literature and History. 
L. H. Pammel, B.Agr., Botany. 
James Wilson, Agriculture. 
J. B. Weems, Ph.D., Agricultural 

Chemistry. 



Margaret DooHttle, A.B., Eng., Latin. 

W. S. Franklin, M.Sc, Physics. 

G. W. Bissell, M.E., Mech. Engin. 

A. Marston, C.E., Civil Engineering. 

Celia Ford, A.B., French, German. 

Sally S. Smith, B.Sc, Preceptress. 

W. E. Harriman, B.Sc, M.D., Pathol. 

C. F. Curtiss, B.S.A., Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

W. B. Niles, D.V.M., Vet. Science. 

W. H. Meeker, M.E., Mech. Engin. j 

Marie L. Chambers, Elocution. 

S. W. Beyer, B.Sc, Ph.D., Geology 
and Zoology. 

L. B. Spinney, B.M.E., Physics. 

Herman Knapp, B.S.A., Treasurer. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



157 



IOWA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

Mount Pleasant^ Iowa. Co-Educational. Methodist, 



Income, 
$20,000 



Students, 
340 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
4,000 



The school was incorporated as the Mount Pleasant Collegiate 
Institute in 1844, and was chartered as a university in 1855. ^^ ^s 
governed by twenty-four trustees. Associated with it is the Mount 
Pleasant German College. Students from high schools are admitted 
without examination, but must make up deficiencies. Elective 
studies begin with the third year. It is the avowed purpose of the 
authorities to do away with class distinctions in the near future, giv- 
ing nothing but the name of the courses and the credits attained in 
them. Attendance at chapel is obligatory. The degrees are A.B., 
B.Ph., B.L. and B.S., with A.M. after one year of graduate study. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 16, 
are I125. 

An oratorical contest, at which prizes aggregating $50 are dis- 
tributed, is held annually, " The Wesleyan " is published monthly. 
The students maintain five literary societies : the Hypatia and 
Ruthean for women, and the Philomathean, Hamlin, and Harlan 
for men, with lecture courses, and a Christian Association. Chap- 
ters of the following fraternities have been organized: B n, 1868; 
* A 0, 187 1, and a"t a, 1S75-1880. 

The graduates number 475, the oldest of whom is W. S. Wayne, 
1856, of Council Bluffs. 



Faculty. 



C. L. Stafford, A.M., D.D., President, 
Philosophy. 

C. M. Grumbling, A.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

F. W. Adams, A.M., B.D., Greek. 

F. C. Demorest, A.B,, Latin, 

William Koren, A.M., Eng,, French. 

Julia B, McKibben, M.S,, History, 

Edwin Johnson, A.M., Mathematics. 

W. H. Mahaffie, M.S., Ph.D., Princi- 
pal, Commercial Branches. 

Capt. C. L. Hodges, U. S. Military 
Science and Tactics. 



A. Rommel, A. CM,, Music. 
Miss M, M, Deitrichsen, Vocal Music. 
G. O. Riggs, Instrumental Music. 
Fannette O'Kell, Painting. 
Elizabeth Sawyers, Piano. 

GERMAN FACULTY. 

Rev. Frederic Munz, A.M., President, 

Theology. 
Rev, Gustav Becker, Exegesis. 
Rev. Karl Stiefel, German. 
S. R, Roper, Elocution. 
Carrie Manch, Music. 



158 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. 

Baltimore, Md. Men. Noti-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$190,000 



Students, 

593 



Instructors, 
86 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
77,000 



At the request of Johns Hopkins, who died in 1873, the university 
was incorporated under a statute " for the promotion of education 
in Maryland." His will provided for a university and a hospital, 
each with $3,500,000. The trustees in 1874 visited a score of the 
leading American universities, and subsequently obtained the advice 
of Presidents Eliot, White, and Angell, of Harvard, Cornell, and 
Michigan. In 1875 Daniel C. Oilman was elected president, and 
before taking office visited all the leading European universities. 
He was inaugurated in 1876 when the university was opened, and 
Professor Huxley delivered an address. The twentieth anniversary 
of the school was celebrated in 1896. 

Johns Hopkins University is primarily a graduate school, 403 of 
the 593 students being postgraduates. It is governed by a board of 
sixteen trustees. Instruction is given in sixteen departments, the 
most well-attended of which are the English and German depart- 
ments. Admission for undergraduates is upon examination only. 
During the first two years courses in English and literature are 
prescribed. Besides the usual bachelor's and master's degrees, the 
doctor's degree is given in philosophy, medicine, law, philology, and 
letters. Since the foundation of the school 363 doctor's degrees 
have been given. The academic year is from October i to June 15. 
Tuition is from $150 to $200 a year. There are twenty fellowships 
yielding $500 a year, and one yielding $800. In addition to these 
there exist thirty-five Hopkins scholarships, ten for Maryland, 
fifteen for Virginia, fifteen for North Carolina, three for Washington, 
and five for undergraduates. 

Eqtcipment : The site of the university is in the heart of Baltimore, 
near the comer of Howard and Monument streets. Among the 
buildings, eleven in number, are a gymnasium, three laboratories, 
and a library with 77,000 volumes, and 30,000 pamphlets. Over 1,000 
periodicals are regularly received. An Oriental library has been re- 
cently added by G. W. Gail. Among the publications of the univer- 
sity, the most prominent are the journals of philosophy, chemistry, 
and mathematics, and those relating to historical and political sci- 
ence, with biological laboratory and hospital reports. 

Of the societies the Christian Association, owning Levering Hall, 
is the most noteworthy. Chapters of the following fraternities have 
been established : B n, 1878; K % 1879; ^ *. iSSS; A A *, 1889; 
and * B K, 1896. 

In all, 2,078 students have been graduated at the university, more 
than 500 of whom are now holding chairs in seventy American uni- 
versities and colleges. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



159 



Facility. 



Daniel C. Gilman, LL.D., President. 
J. J. Sylvester, F.R.S., LL.D., D.C.L., 

Emeritus. 
Basil L. Gildersleeve, Ph.D., LL.D., 

D.C.L., Greek. 
Ira Remsen, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., 

Chemistry. 
Henry A. Rowland, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Physics. 
Paul Haupt, Ph.D., Semitic Lang. 
William H. Welch, M.D., LL.D., 

Pathology. 
Simon Newcomb, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
Edward H. Griffin, D.D., LL.D., His- 

tory of Philosophy. 
William Osier, M.D., F.R.C.P., 

Medicine. 
Henry M. Hurd, M.D., LL.D., Psy- 
chiatry. 
Howard A. Kelly, M.D., Gynecology. 
Herbert B. Adams, Ph.D., LL.D., 

American and Institutional History. 
William K. Brooks, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Zoology. 
Maurice Bloomfield, Ph.D., Sanskrit 

and Comparative Philology. 
Thomas Craig, Ph.D., Pure Math. 
A. Marshall Elliott, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Romance Languages. 
William S. Halsted, M.D., Surgery. 
Harmon N. Morse, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
Minton Warren, Ph.D., Latin. 
George H. Emmott, A.M., LL.M., 

Roman Law, etc. 
Henry Wood, Ph.D., German. 
Edward Renouf, Ph.D., Chemistry, 
John J. Abel, M.D., Pharmacology. 
William H. Howell, Ph.D., M.D., 

Physiology. 
Franklin P. Mall, M.D., Anatomy. 
James W. Bright, Ph.D., Eng. Philol. 
William Hand Browne, M.D., English 

Literature. 
Herbert E. Greene, Ph.D., English. 
William B. Clark, Ph.D., Organic 

Geology. 
Nicholas Murray, A.B., LL.B., Libra- 
rian. 
Edward H. Spieker, Ph.D., Greek and 

Latin. 
Louis Duncan, Ph.D., Electricity. 
Ethan A. Andrews, Ph.D., Biology. 
Joseph S. Ames, Ph.D., Physics. 
Kirby F. Smith, Ph.D., Latin. 



Adolf Rambeau, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages. 

Alexander S. Chessin, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics, etc. 

Charles L. Poor, Ph.D., Astronomy. 

Sidney Sherwood, Ph.D., Pol. Econ. 

John M. Vincent, Ph.D., History. 

Simon Flexner, M.D., Pathology, 

Boiling W. Barton, M.D., Sys. Botany. 

James E. Humphrey, Sc.D., Botany. 

Philip R. Uhler, Natural History. 

Hermann S. Hering, B.S., M.E., 
Electrical Engineering. 

George P, Dreyer, Ph.D., Biology. 

C, W. Emil Miller, Ph.D., Greek. 

Bert J, Vos, Ph.D., German, 

John M. T. Finney, M,D., Surgery. 

J. Whitridge Williams, M.D., Obstet. 

Wyatt W. Randall, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Christopher Johnston, Jr., Ph.D., 
Semitic Languages. 

Lewellys F. Barker, M.B., Anatomy. 

Lorrain S. Hulburt, Ph.D., Math. 

L. Emil Menger, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages. 

Bernard C. Steiner, Ph.D., History. 

Herbert G. Geer, M.E., Engineering. 

Edward B. Mathews, Ph.D., Min'logy. 

William S. Thayer, M.D., Medicine. 

WiUiam W., Russell, M.D., Gynecol. 

S. Edwin Whiteman, Drawing. 

J, Elliott Gilpin, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

J. Williams Lord, M.D., Anatomy and 
Dermatology. 

Thomas B. Aldrich, Ph.D., Physio- 
logical Chemistry. 

J. Bascom Crenshaw, Ph.D., Physical 
Training. 

Albert B. Faust, Ph.D., German. 

John R. Scott, A.M., Vocal Culture. 

MelvinBrandow, A.B., Ass'tLibrarian. 

Jacob H. Hollander, Ph.D., Econom. 

C. Carroll Marden, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages, 

Fonger de Haan, Ph.D., Rom, Lang. 

Albert C. Crawford, M.D,, Pharmacol. 

Abraham Cohen, Ph.D., Mathematics. 

Thomas S. Baker, Ph.D., German. 

Han-y C. Jones, Ph.D., Phys. Chem, 

George C. Keidel, Ph.D., Rom. Lang. 

Charles P. Sigerfoos, S.B., Zoology 
and Embryology, 

Harry L, Wilson, Ph.D., Greek and 
Latin. 

Joseph C. Bloodgood, M,D., Surgery. 

George Blumer, M,D,, Pathology. 



i6o 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Adolph G. Hoen, M.D., Micrography. 
Thomas S. Cullen, M.B., Gynecology. 
George W. Dobbin, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Thomas B. Futcher, M.B., Medicine. 
Frank R. Smith, M.D., Medicine. 
William J. A. Bhss, Ph.D., Physics. 
Rufus M. Bagg, Ph.D., Geology. 
James C. Ballagh, Ph.D., History. 
John U. Mackenzie, M.I)., Laryngol. 
Samuel Theobold, M.D., Ophthal- 
mology and Otology. 



William D. Booker, M.D., Diseases 

of Children. 

Henry M. Thomas, M.D., Nervous 
Diseases. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.D., Dermatol. 

Robert L. Randolph, M.D., Ophthal- 
mology and Otology. 

Henry J. Berkley, M.D., Psychiatry. 

H. F. Reid, M.D., Physics. 

Thomas R. Ball, Registrar. 



JOHN B. STETSON UNIVERSITY. 

De Land, Fla. Co-Educational. Baptist. 



Income, 

$30'744 



Students, 
260 



Instructors, 
24 



Buildings, 
10 



Books, 
6,000 



The charter of the university was granted in 1887, when the school 
was named after its most generous benefactor. It is governed by 
twenty-four trustees. The location, on grounds of twenty acres, is 
one hundred miles south of Jacksonville, on the seacoast. The work- 
ing endowment is $140,000. The degrees are B.A. and B.S. Ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from October 2 to May 19, aggregate 
$224, with special fees in music and art. There are three scholar- 
ships on the proceeds of $3,000 each. Attendance at chapel and 
military drill are compulsory. The admission of negroes is pro- 
hibited by the laws of Florida. There are no college fraternities. 
The students publish the " Collegiate." Since the foundation 65 
alumni have been graduated, the oldest of whom is Hanlon De 
Loud, 1886, of Frankfort, N. Y. 



Faculty. 



John F. Forbes, A.M., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy and Pedagogy. 

G. Prentice Carson, A.M., Physical 
and Political Science. 

Julia A. Dickerson, Librarian. 

Warren S. Gordis, A.M., Latin, Hist. 

Charles S. Farriss, A.B., Greek. 

Clara J. Brown, Elocution, Phys. Cult. 

Anne L. Barrett, B.S., Lady Princi- 
pal, German. 

Mme. E. H. Senegas, French. 

J. C. Maclnness, A.B., English. 



Franklin R. Strayer, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and Military Tactics. 
J. F. Baerecke, Ph.D., Biol., Physiol. 
Julia M. Ober, A.B., Latin. 
C. B. Rosa, Commercial Branches. 
Leila M. Child, A.B. 
W. A. Sharp, Art. 
Marion M. Baldwin, Music. 
Mrs. C. S. Farriss, Piano. 
Julia S. Carter, Voice. 
Mrs. W. A Sharp, Violin. 
J. B. Crippen, Gymnasium, 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



i6i 



KALAMAZOO COLLEGE. 

Kalamazoo^ Mich. Co-Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$14,820 



Students, 
212 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
6,000 



The original charter of 1853 was obtained for the Michigan and 
Huron Institute. The school was one of the branches of Michigan 
University. In 1855 a college charter with land and a building were 
obtained, but at present the college is affihated with the University 
of Chicago. It is governed by thirty-five trustees. The degrees are 
B.A., B.S., B.Ph., and M.A. The expenses are $150 for the year, 
lasting from September 16 to June 16. Provision is made for poor 
students. The Sherwood Rhetorical Society was founded in 1851, 
the Philolexian Lyceum in 1855, and the Eurodelphian, for women, in 
1856. There are also an Athletic Association and a Christian 
Association. 

Eactilty. 



Arthur Gaylord Slocum, LL.D., Presi- 
dent, Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Samuel Brooks, D.D., Latin. 

Seth Jones Axtell, A.M., Greek. 

Stillman G. Jenks, B.S., Natural Sci- 
ences, and Librarian. 

Samuel Haskell, D.D., Bib. Instruc. 

Clarke B. Williams, A.M., Math. 

Clark Mills Brink, Ph.D., Eng., Hist. 



Maud Wilkinson, A.B., French. 

Lucy Johnson, Ph.B., English, Latin. 

Carolinne Harder Swartout, A.B., 
German. 

George Kuhn Grant, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Science. 

George Herbert Fairclough, Music. 

Frank F. Churchill, Vocal Music. 

Helen E. Keep, Art. 



KANSAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

Salina, Kan. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$5,950 



Students, 

339 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
5,200 



In accordance with a resolution of the Northwest Kansas Con- 
ference of 1883, a charter for this college was obtained in 1885. The 
township of Salina gave fifteen acres, with a building costing |526,ooo. 
Instruction was begun in 1886. The trustees number twenty-four. 

Admission is by examination and on certificate. Two regular 
courses are offered with degrees of A.B. and B.S. A graduate school 
has been established, leading to degrees of A.M., M.S., Sc.D., and 
Ph.D. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 
10, are $109. Besides a number of scholarships established at the 
time of the foundation, new scholarships are given to any donor of 
$1,000. The library includes the collection of Col. W. A. Phillips, 
covering the history of the Indian races of the West. The museum, 
too, is rich in specimens of Western American archaeology. 



l62 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



The societies are the Adelphian and Ionian for men, and the 
Athenaeum for women, besides two Christian Associations. The 
graduates since 18S7 number 163, of whom the oldest is the Rev. 
H. M. Mayo, 1887, of Rocky Ford, Col. 



Faadty. 



George J. Hagerty, A.M., President, 
Latin and Greek. 

Aaron Schuyler, A.M., LL.D., Math, 
and Philosophy. 

W. H. Sweet, D.D., Graduate School. 

Ansel Gridley, A.M., B.Ped., Peda- 
gogics and History. 

Harriette M. Thompson, A.B., Ger- 
man and French. 

Alfred W. Jones, B.Sc, Physics. 

W. G. Medcraft, Algebra. 



R. E. Dunham, Arithmetic. 

H. M. Templin, English. 

V. A. Austin, B.O., Elocution. 

Catherine Eberhardt, Music. 

Mary Belle Daily, Voice Culture. 

Herman Holmes, Instrumental Music. 

T. W. Roach, A.M., Commer. School. 

E. O. Allen, Shorthand. 

W. D. Gilpen, Penmanship. 

Alice Wimer, Book-keeping. 

Susie Teele, Shorthand. 



KEACHIE COLLEGE. 



Keachie, La. Co- Educational. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$10,568. 


Students, 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 
3 


Books, 
1,000 



The college was founded in 1856. It is governed by twenty-eight 
trustees and eight directors. The degrees are B.A., B.S., and M.A., 
the last being granted after a review examination. The expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 3 to June 3, are $150. Since 
1889 there have been thirty-five graduates. 



Faculty. 



Rev. C. W. Tomkies, President. 
G. W. Thigpen, A.M., Eng., Math. 
J. H. Thigpen, A.B., Science. 
C. C. Foster, A.B., Languages. 
J. W. Everett, B.S., Mathematics. 
Miss B. E. Harwell, B.S., English, 
History. 



M. Agnes Clay, Piano. 

Maimie LeSueur, Voice. 

Miss M. E. LeSueur, Mrs. A. F. D. 

Norris, Painting, etc. 
Mrs. G. W. Thigpen, Art Embroidery. 
Mrs. M. V. Moseley, Primary Dep. 
Miss A. O. Norris, Matron. 



KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY. 

Lexington., Ky. Co-Educational. Disciples of Christ. 



Income, 
5^17.437 



Students, 
650 



Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
I4>540 



The university was organized as Bacon College in 1836. In 1865 
it was united with Transylvanian University dating from 1799, as 
the successor of the Transylvanian Seminary, dating from 1783. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



163 



The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky was in 1865 
joined to the university. In 1867 a commercial college, and in 1877 
the College of the Bible were added to the University. The cura- 
tors number thirty-two ; the trustees fourteen. The degrees are B.A., 
B.S., B.L., and M.A. after one year's post-graduate study. Expenses 
for the year, lasting from the second Monday in September to the 
second Thursday in June, are $120. There are five literary societies, 
the Crecopian, Periclean, Ossolian, Philothean, and Phileusebian. 
Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : <t> F A, 
1860-1862; * K % 1865-1866; ATA, 1873-1878, and n K A, 1887. 



Faculty. 



Charles Louis Loos, LL.D., President, 
Greek. 

John W. McGarvey, A.M., Sacred 
History, etc. 

Wilbur R. Smith, Commercial School. 

C. Morris Campbell, College of Music. 

Henry H. White, LL.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Robert Graham, A.M., Mental, Moral, 
and Political Philosophy. 

Alexander R. Milligan, A.M., Latin. 

Isaiah B. Grubbs, A.M., Exegesis, etc. 

Alfred Fairhurst, A.M., Nat. Science. 



Charles J. Kemper, A.M., French, 

German, and Mechanics. 
Clarence C. Freeman, A.M., Enghsh. 
Richard H. Ellett, A.M., Math. 
Walter G. Conley, A.M., Principal of 

Academy, Sacred History, English. 
Benjamin C. Deweese, A.M., Hebrew 

and Homiletics. 
Mrs. A. R. Bourne, English. 
Henry B. Robison,' A.M., Henry H. 

Halley, A.B., Assists, in Academy. 
Elzie B. Thomas, M.D., Gymnasium. 
Robert L. Conley, Librarian. 



KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE. 

Winchester, Ky. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,000 



The college had its foundation in Bristol Academy, which was 
established in 1795 by Bishop Asbury. It was incorporated i" 1803 
the second institution for higher education west of the Alleajhenie 
The present name was assumed more than fifty years ago. The first 
building stood in a campus of 115 acres. The State gave to the 
school more land covering 6,000 acres, some 1,500 feet above the sea. 
The principals and presidents have been : Valentine Cook, Rev. 
Joseph L. Tomlinson, Bishop John P. Durbin, and Henry B. Bascon. 

The government of the school is vested in a board of education, 
consisting of fourteen members, two of whom are alumni. Admis- 
sion is on certificates of State schools or after examination. Attend- 
ance at church and chapel is required. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September i to June i, are $130. Degrees of B.A. and 
B.S. are conferred. The societies are the Eucleian and Philoma- 
thean, and are recognized by the authorities as a part of the college. 



164 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



Rev. E. H. Pearce, A.M., D.D., 

President, Philosophy. 
D. W. Batson, A.M., Nat. Science. 
B. T. Spencer, A.M., Greek, German. 
W. H. Garnett, Ph.D., Mathematics 

and French. 
Marvin West, A.M., Latin, History. 
Rev. T. W. Watts, Elocution. 



James L. Clark, A.B., Preparatory 

Department. 
G. F. Burner, Shorthand, etc. 

LECTURERS. 

Rev. John R. Deering, Bible History 

and Literature. 
Hon. M. J. Durham, A.M., Civics. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 

Gambier^ Ohio. Men. 



Episcopal. 



Income, 
$18,000 



Students, 
180 




Books, 
30,000 



The college was founded in 1824. In 182S it was removed from 
Worthington to Gambler. The present name was adopted in 1891. 
After many changes in its organization, a college, theological semi- 
nary, and a preparatory school have resulted, each independent 
though under the same government. The trustees number twenty- 
six, six of whom are alumni. Admission is by examination, and 
upon high school certificates. Three college courses lead to degrees 
of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. The degree of M.A. is conferred after one 
year's prescribed study. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 12 to June 29, are $232. There are nine scholarships 
equivalent to tuition, a loan fund, and another fund for annual dis- 
tribution in prizes. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: 4» B K, A K E, 1852; © A X, 1854-1889; A A *, 1858; 
YT, i860; X *, 1861-1866: B n, 1879, and ATA, 1881. 

The graduates number 833, of whom 460 are living. The oldest 
of these is James C. Wheat, D.D., 1829, of Lynwood, Va. 



Faculty. 



Theodore Sterling, M.D., LL.D., 
President, Natural Philosophy, etc. 

Rev. Edward C. Benson, A.M., Latin. 

Russell S. Devol, A.M., Mathematics. 

Rev. Hosea W. Jones, D.D., Eccle- 
siastical History, etc. 

Rev. Jacob Streibert, A.M., Old Tes- 
tament. 

Rev. C. Theodore Seibt, S.T.D., Sys- 
tematic Divinity, etc. 

Leslie H. Ingham, A.M., Greek, etc. 

Charles Frederick Brusie, A.B., Eng. 

William Foster Peirce, A.M., Mental 
and Moral Philosophy. 



William N. Guthrie. A.M., Mod. Lang. 

Guy Hamilton Buttolph, A.B., Latin 
and Greek. 

William Hahn Foley, A.B., French 
and German. 

Lawrence Rust, M.A., LL.D., Mili- 
tary Academy. 

Ensign Armstead Rust, Commandant. 

John C. Flood, A.M., Head Master. 

Allan L. Burleson, A.M., J. B. Greene, 
A.M., Miner T. Hines, A.M., Henry 
J. Eberth, A.M., L. C. Williams, 
A.B., Military Academy. 

Emma E. Wright, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



165 



Keuka, N. V. 



KEUKA COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Free Baptist. 



Income, 
^5,000 




Instructors, 
12 




Books, 
2,000 



The college was established but a fe^v years ago, m 1892. The 
expenses for the year, ending June 11, are $150, of which $30 is for 
tuition. The productive funds of the institution aggregate ^75,000. 
The president is Rev. George H. Bali, D.D. 

{Further information lacking.) 



Bristol, Tenn. 



KING COLLEGE. 

Men. 



Presbyterian. 



Income, 
33.500 



Students, 
100 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
5,000 



At the close of the Civil War the Presbyterian Church in East 
Tennessee and Southwest Virginia found itself without schools, and 
too poor to send students elsewhere. In 1866 Holston Presbytery 
was enabled by the Rev. James King's gift of real estate in Bristol 
to organize a school, which, in January, 1S69, was chartered as King 
College. In 1891 the college was closed for two years, owing to 
the removal of the old buildings and substitution of new ones. The 
college is governed by three trustees and eighteen curators. Admis- 
sion is by examination. Degrees of B.A., B.S., and M.A. are given 
after prescribed courses with electives. Attendance at chapel is 
required. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 5 to 
June 10, are $150. Three medals are offered for excellence in study, 
and other prizes and medals are offered by the Philothesmian and 
Athenian literary societies, which date back to the foundation of 
the college. A chapter of K 2 was organized in 1878 and lasted six 
years. The graduates, like the students, number one hundred. The 
oldest is Rev. J. C. Cowan, M.A., 1870, Morristown, Tenn. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. Albert Wallace, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Metaphysics. 

Charles R. Pepper, M.A., Greek and 
French. 



Rev. J. G. McFerrin, M.A., Mathe- 
matics. 

J. H. Delaney, B.A., S. V. Carmack, 
Tutors. 



1 66 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Galesburg, III. 



KNOX COLLEGE. 

Co- Educational. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
688 



Instructors, 
31 




Knox College was founded by Rev. George \V. Gale in 1837, and 
fully organized in 1841. One half the township of Galesburg was 
originally purchased as an endowment for the college. The presi- 
dents have been the Revs. : H. H. Kellogg, 1838-1845 ; J. Blanchard, 
1846-1857; Harvey Curtis, 1858-1S63 ; W. S. Curtis, D.D., 1863- 
1868; J. P. Gulliver, D.D., 186S-1872; Prof. A. Hurd, 1872-1874; 
N. Bateman, LL.D., 1874-1892; and John H. Hinley, A.M., the 
present incumbent. In 1843 ^^e female seminary was burned. In 
1887 the college celebrated its semi-centennial. 

The school is governed by a board of twenty-four trustees. Con- 
nected with the college are the Knox Academy, the Conservatory 
of Music, and the Knox School of Art. In the college proper there 
are three courses of study, the classical, the scientific, and the liter- 
ary, leading to the degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.L. Electives are 
offered in the later years of each course. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September 8 to June 14, are $227. Twenty-three prizes 
of from $10 to $45 each are given. Founder's day is celebrated 
annually on February 15. Military drill is compulsory during the 
first two years, attendance at chapel throughout the year. Negroes 
are admitted. Among the buildings, six in number, standing on 
fourteen acres of ground, are a gymnasium, an observatory, and 
alumni hall. 

The literary societies are the Adelphi and the Gnothantii for men, 
the L. M. I. for women, and the Zetetici, E. O. D., and Oniota for 
students at the academy; the Knox College Contest Association, 
the Mission Circle, and two Christian Associations, with an Athletic 
Association, embracing a football and baseball team, and a Memo- 
rabilia Society. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized-, B © n, 1856; * T A, 1867; * A 0, 1871; K K T, 1871-1874; 
n B *, 1S84, and AAA, 1888. 

The students publish the "Gale," an annual; the "Coup D'Etat," 
a monthly; and the "Knox Student," a weekly. Knox College 
enters upon its sixtieth year with a thousand graduates, of whom 910 
are living. 

Faculty. 



John H. Finley, President. 

Hon. Newton Bateman, A.M., LL.D., 

Philosophy. 
Albert Hurd, A.M., Chemistry and 

Natural Sciences. 
George Churchill, A.M., Principal of 

Academy. 
Milton L. Comstock, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics and Nat. Philosophy. 



Thomas R. Willard, A.M., Greek and 

German. 
Lee S. Pratt, A.M., Latin. 
William E. Simonds, A.M., Ph.D., 

English Literature and German. 
Edgar L. Larkin, Observatory and 

Physical Laboratory. 
Henry W. Read, A.M., Latin, Greek. 
Grace Chamberlain, O.M., Elocution. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



167 



Lieut. George O. Cress, U. S. A., Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

Maria H. Whiting, Head of Seminary. 

Sarah M. McCall, English and Math. 

Jessie R. Holmes, B.S., L.M., History 
and German. 

William F. Bentley, Music. 

J. Winter Thompson, Piano. 

Florence J. Lee, A.M., Singing. 



Frederick W. Mueller, Organ, Piano. 

Allen Bentley Dow, Piano. 

William H. Cheesman, Instrumenta- 
tion and Orchestral Playing. 

Mary G. Crippen, Guitar, Mandolin, 
and Banjo. 

L. A. Loomis, Drawing and Painting. 

Roy B. Guild, Director of Gymnasium. 

Walter M. Irwin, Librarian. 



KNOXVILLE COLLEGE. 

Knoxville, Teiin. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 

^13,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
I, SCO 



The college was begun in 1879 after a normal school had been 
established. A fire in 1894 necessitated the reconstruction of several 
buildings. The object is to train colored teachers and preachers. 
The school is governed by ten directors, and the degrees are B.A. and 
B.S. The University of Tennessee has made provision for its 
colored students in Knoxville College by adding to the equipment 
of the agricultural and mechanical schools, by maintaining a pro- 
fessor in each, and setting aside $600 annually for students. Accord- 
ing to the agreement vv^ith the university all colored students over 
fifteen years have free tuition, for the year lasting from September 
26 to June II. Each senator of the State has the privilege of 
appointing two colored students, male or female, to the State Normal 
College for two years. The applicant must declare his intention to 
make teaching a profession, and in return receives $50 credit on 
board and tuition for nine months. The college consists of a train- 
ing school, musical department, normal school, industrial depart- 
ment, agricultural and mechanical course, medical department, and 
school of theology. 

There are four literary societies, adhesion to at least one of which 
is required, to wit: the Witherspoon, Philomathean, Gamma, and 
the Douglas. 

Faadty. 



Rev. J. S. McCulloch, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Mental and Moral Science. 

Eliza B. Wallace, Lady Principal. 

Rev. J. R. Millin, A.M., Theological 
Department and Latin. 

Rev. R. J. Love, A.M., Ph.D., Nor- 
mal Department and German. 

Agnes H. Wait, B.S., Training and 
Primary Departments. 

Miss E. W. Shontz, A.M., Greek and 
Latin. 

W. A. Dunn, A.M., Agriculture, Chem. 



W. G. Purdy,C.E., Mech. Arts, Math. 

Ida M. French, A.B., English. 

Matilda Wishart, B.S., Physiology. 

Agnes Wishart, Music. 

Alice McMillin, Sewing School. 

E. Belle Kerr, Training School. 

Mabel Simpson, Kindergarten Work. 

Jennie McCahon, Bible Reading. 

Emma Pinkerton, Matron. 

Maggie McDill, Supt. Little Girls' 

Home. 
Anna Rutherford, Supt. Boys' Home, 



i68 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Mary Wallace, H. A. Kerr, Matrons. 
Miss M. J. Fisher, Dressmaking. 
R. M. Ginter, Printing Department. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

R. M. C. Hill, Principles and Practice. 
E. L. Randall, M.D., Obstetrics. 



C. C. Yarbrough, M.D., Chemistry 

and Materia Metlica. 
L. Jones Price, M.D., Surgery. 
J. C. P"ord, Medical Jurisprudence. 
A. G. Edwards, M.D., Anatomy and 

Histology. 
W. H. Moore, M. D., Physiology, etc. 



LAFAYETTE COLLEGE. 



Easton, Pa. 




Men. 


Presb) 


'terian. 


Income, 
^41,000 


Students, 


Instructors, 
28 


Buildings, 
21 


Books, 
25,200 



History: Lafayette College was organized in 1824. The founder 
was J. W. Porter. In 1826 the school was opened. The present site 
was occupied in 1834. In 1866 the School of Science was added by 
Ario Pardee. Pardee Hall was burned in 1876, and rebuilt in 1880. 
The presidents have been : George Junken, 1S32-1841 ; John W. 
Yeomans, 1841-1844 ; George Junken (second term), 1844-1848; 
C. W. Nassau, 1848-1850 ; Dr. V. McLean, 1850-1857; G. W. 
McPhail, 1857-1863; William C. Cattell, 1863-1883; James II. M. 
Knox, 1883-1S90; Traill Green, 1890-1891, and E. D. Warfield, the 
present incumbent. The college is governed by twenty-four trustees, 
six of whom are alumni. 

Orgatiization : Certificates of the New York regents and of 
approved preparatory schools are received in lieu of an examination. 
Degrees of B.A., B.Ph., C.E., in music, and in electrical and mining 
engineering are given. The master's degree is conferred after a 
prescribed course of two years, and that of Ph.D. after three years. 
Attendance at chapel and gymnasium are required. The college 
year is from September 12 to June i8. The expenses for the year 
are from $150 upwards. Seventeen prizes of from ^10 to $50 are 
offered for excellence in study. 

The college has two libraries, and the literary societies own 6.000 
volumes in addition. The alumni have provided an athletic field of 
seven acres with a gymnasium. Eastonian Hall is provided with the 
best periodicals and newspapers. 

The students publish the " Melange," " Mirror," and " Miscellany." 
Besides the Franklin and Washington literary societies, who hold 
an annual contest in oratory, there are two scientific societies, two 
Religious Associations, an Athletic Association, and ten Alumni 
Associations, who meet once a year at the college. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized: * B K. 1853; ^ K 2, 
1853-1S82; A K E, 1855; Z % 1858; A X, 1866; 2 X, 1867-1887; 
* k V, 1869; * A 0, 1873; X*, 1874; ATA, 1875; * r A, 1883, and 
A Y, 1885. 

The total of graduates has been 1,563, of whom 1.333 are living. 
The oldest of these is George W. Kidd, M.A., 1836, of Houston, 
Texas. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



169 



Faculty. 



Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, LL.D., 

President, History, etc. 
Rev. William C. Cattell, D.D., LL.D., 

Moral Philosophy. 
Traill Green, M.D., LL.D., Chem. 
Francis Andrew March, LL.D., 

L.H.D., English and Philology. 
Rev. Thomas C. Porter, D.D., LL.D., 

Botany, etc. 
Rev. Augustus A. Bloombergh, Ph.D., 

Modern Languages, etc. 
Rev. Robert Barber Youngman, Ph.D., 

Greek. 
Rev, Selden Jennings Coffin, Ph.D., 

Astronomy. 
James W. Moore, A.M., M.D., 

Mechanics, etc. 
Justus Mitchell Silliman, M.E., Mining 

Engineering, etc. 
Charles Mclntire, A.M., M.D., Sani- 
tary Science. 
Joseph Johnston Hardy, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
William Baxter Owen, Ph.D., Latm. 
Edward Hart, Ph.D., Analyt. Chem. 



James Madison Porter, C.E., Engin'g. 

Francis A. March, Jr., Ph.D., Eng- 
lish Literature. 

William Shater Hall, C.E., E.M., 
M.S., Technical Mathematics. 

Rev. Edsall Farrier, D.D., Hebrew. 

Allen P. Berlin, A.M., C.E., Mining 
Geology. 

Jacob D. Updegrove, A.M., M.D., 
Director of Physical Training. 

Porter W. Shimer, M.E., Iron, Steel. 

George Herbert Stephens, A.M., 
Ethics and Logic. 

Alvin Davison, M.S., A.M., Biology. 

Albert Hunt Welles, M.S., Chemistry. 

Earl B. Lovell, C.E., Civil Engin'g. 

Chauncey G. Hellick, C.E., Ph.D., 
Electrical Engineering. 

Harry Irwin Woods, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and Latin. 

Francis A. March, LL.D., L.H.D., 
Librarian. 

Augustus A. Bloombergh, Ph.D., 
Curator of Reading- Room. 



LA FAYETTE COLLEGE. 

La Fayette^ Ala. Co-Educational. Non- Sectarian. 



Income, 
$4,200 



Students, 
300 



Instructors, 

28 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded in 1883. The expenses for the year, 
ending May 14, are $150, of which $40 is for tuition. The graduates 
number fifty. The president is J. H. Patterson, A.M., Ph.D. 
{Further information lacking) 



LA GRANGE COLLEGE. 



La Grange, Mo. Co- Educational. 


Baptist. 


V Income, 
$[ 0,000 


Students, 
98 


Instructors, 
10 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
3,000 



In 1856 a seminary for boys and girls was established, and a build- 
ing opened for instruction in 1858. In 1859 the school was chartered 
as a college. At the end of the Civil "War, during which the college 
was closed, Dr. J. F. Brooks became president. The trustees num- 



170 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ber nine, and they are aided by thirty councillors. Admission is by 
examination and on certificate. The degrees are B.B., B.L., B.l'h., 
and B.S. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 15 to 
June 3, are $100. 

There are three literary societies, and chapters of the f(>llo\ving 
fraternities have been organized: Rainbow, 1S49-1S61 ; * K % 1859- 
iSoo, anil 2 X, 1S60-1S61. Since 1S70, in all, 229 students have been 
graduated, of whom 200 are now living. The oldest of these is Rev. 
E. H. Sawyer, 1S70, of Kirkwood, Mo. 

Faculty. 

M. Stella Dorser, J. H. Nolen, In- 
struniental Music. 



Jere T. Muir, A.M., President. 

W. Claude O'Neal, A.B., Mod. I,ang. 

John N. Nolen, B.S.D., History and 

Political Science. 
Charles E. Freeman, B.S., Latin and 

Greek. 
Frances Nagel, Music. 



Daisy L. Baker, A.B., English. 
Byrde Teniplin, Art. 
Mary Davies, Physical Culture, 
John W. Crouch, Registrar. 
Harry Bates, Librarian. 



LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 
Lake Forest and Chicago, III. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



In'COME, 

$75,000 



Students, 
2,200 



Instructors, 
179 



Buildings, 
16 



Books, 
20,000 



History and Organization : Lake Forest University was planned 
and its location selected by Presbyterians of Chicago and Wauke- 
gan in the year 1S55. In 1S56, "The Lake Forest Association" was 
formed, and purchased 2,500 acres of land where Lake Forest now 
stands. Half of this land was permanently set apart as Association 
property, and the plat of the town was recorded July 23, 1S57. Every 
alternate lot was assigned as an endowment for a university, and 
sixty-two acres were set apart as inalienable campus. The institu- 
tion was chartered in 1857, as " Lind University," subject to the con- 
trol of the Synod of Peoria and its ecclesiastical successors. In the 
fall of 1S58 the first building was erected and the academy began. In 
1865 the legislature changed the name to "Lake Forest University." 
In 1869 Ferry Hall was built, and the seminary course began. 
In August, 1875, ^6v- Robert W. Patterson, D.D , was elected presi- 
dent of the university, and in September, 1876, the collegiate depart- 
ment was opened with a freshman class of eight men and four 
women. In March, 1878, President Patterson resigned, and the year 
was finished under the control of Acting President John H. Hewitt. 
In the summer of 1S78 the present college dormitory was built and 
Rev. Daniel S. Gregory, D.D., assumed the presidency, and the next 
college year began with all the classes organized. In March, 1879, 
the original academy building was burned, but was speedily re- 
placed by " Old Academy Hall." Dr. Gregory resigned the presi- 
dency in 1886, having brought the institution $14,000 in scholarship 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. I /I 

funds and $80,000 in buildings, and sent forth fort}'-five graduates. 
Rev. William C. Roberts, D.D., LL.D., succeeded to the presidency 
in September, 1886. In 1887, Rush Medical College and the Chi- 
cago College of iJental Surgery became departments of the Univer- 
sity, and in 1889 the Chicago College of Law was added. The JJurand 
Institute and the Gymnasium were erected in 1891. In April, 1^92, 
President Roberts resigned, having added 3800,000 to the endow- 
ment funds of the institution. For the next fourteen months Rev. 
James G. K. McClure, D.D., was President /ri? tempore^ under whose 
administration the new academy buildings, Reid Hall, Annie Durand 
Cottage, and East Dormitory were erected, at a cost of $80,000. In 
June, 1893, John M. Coulter, PhTJ., was installed as President. In 
1896, Dr. Coulter resigned, and John J. Halsey was elected Acting 
President. 

The university comprLses six distinct institutions : Lake Forest 
Academy, Ferry Hall Seminary, Lake Forest College, Rush Medical 
College, Chicago College of Dental .Surgery, and Chicago College of 
Law. The first three are governed by the board of trustees of the 
university, while each of the three professional schools has its own 
board of trustees, but of all the four boards the president of the 
university is an ex officio member. The trustees number twenty-four. 

Admission^ Instruction, and Degrees: The admission requirements 
are based upon four years of secondary school work with three daily 
recitations. Candidates for admission must undergo examinations 
in English, history, mathematics, laboratory science, Latin, and one 
modern language. Certificates are accepted in lieu of examination 
from four academies of Illinois and Wisconsin, and from twenty-six 
high schools, two of which are in Iowa and Wisconsin, The require- 
ments for graduation are four years of twenty-four semesters, with 
thirteen semesters of required work, and from five to seven of elec- 
tive studies. Among the required subjects are English, mathematics, 
laboratory science, philosophy, and Biblical literature. In the college 
the degree of B.A., only is given. The master's degree is conferred 
after one year of resident graduate work, and the doctor's degree 
after three years of post-graduate work, two of which must have been 
spent at the university. The usual professional degrees are conferred 
by the professional schools. ^ 

Tuition, Scholarships, and Prizes: The charge for tuition is $60 for 
the year, lasting from September 14 to June 14. In addition to 
this, laboratory fees and a diploma fee of $10 are charged. The total 
expenses for the year are estimated at from S215 to $500. There are 
in all twenty-one scholarships, on incomes from sums ranging from 
$78 to 55,000. Of these scholarships, ten are available only for 
students studying for the ministry. In addition to this, tuition is 
remitted to all children of clergymen who need such assistance. A 
loan fund of $50,000, to be distributed in amounts not larger than 
$100, has been established by Dr. D. K. Pearsons. 

Equipment: The college grounds cover seventy acres. Besides the 
residences provided for dwelling purposes and college clubs, there is 
a college dormitory, a recitation hall, an art institute, and a modem 
gymnasium with a swimming bath. The Library contains some 
13,000 volumes. Ferry Hall, the women's building, contains some 



172 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



2,000 volumes in addition. Laboratories exist for all branches of 
scientific work, as well as an astronomical observatory, and a her- 
barium. 

Societies aud Publications : The students publish the " Weekly 
Journal," and " The vStentor." The societies are : the Athenaean, 
the Zeta Epsilon, Tri Kappa, and Gamma Sigma for men, the 
Alephian for women, the Musical Association with glee, banjo and 
mandolin clubs, the Latin Club, Biological Club, Social Science Club, 
Athletic Association with teams for track athletics, baseball, football, 
and other field games, two Christian Associations and an Alumni 
Association. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organ- 
ized : K 2, 1878-1882 ; T *, and * * E. 



Faculties. 



COLLEGE. 



John J. Halsey, M.A., Acting Presi- 
dent, Political and Social Science. 

Arthur C. Dawson, B.L., French. 

Malcohn McNeill, M.A., Ph.D., 
Mathematics and Astronomy. 

M. Bross Thomas, M.A., Bib. Lit. 

Lewis Stuart, M.A., Ph.D., Latin. 

Walter Smith, M.A., Ph.D., Philos. 

Robert A. Harper, M.A., Botany. 

Walter Ray Bridgman, M.A., Greek. 

Frederick W. Stevens, B.S., Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Albert E. Jack, M.A., English. 

George W. Schmidt, M.A., German. 

Edward M. Booth, M.A., Elocution. 

Martin D. Atkins, Physics and Chem. 

Edwin B. Uline, M.A., Botany and 
Herbarium. 

William L. Bray, M.A., Botany. 

Adelbert Grant Fradenburgh, Ph.D., 
Economics. 

Tuley Francis Myron Huntington, 
B.A., English. 

Henry B. Hinckley, M.A., English. 

O. P. Seward, M.A. , German. 

Hiram M. Stanley, M.A., Librarian. 

Mogens C. Jensen, B.A., Herbarium. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY. 

Sabra L, Sargent, Principal, Math. 
Lucy M. Smith, M.A., Hist., English. 
Mary E. Taylor, M.A., Latin. 
Helen M. Searles, M.A., Greek. 
Lucia Goodwin, Science and Math. 
Mary L. Phelps, M.S., English. 
Mary Stevens Ayres, Greek and Gym- 
nastics. 
Fannie Belle Maxwell, M.A., German. 
Susie H. Hull, French. 
Lillian S. Cushman, Painting and Art. 
Martha Fleming, Elocution. 



Annie K. Sizer, Intermediate Branches 

and History. 
Ida Maria Street, M.A., History and 

Literature. 
George Eugene Eager, Instrum. Music. 
Carrie Ripley, B.Mus., Instrum. Music. 
Henrietta L. Meyer, Vocal Music. 
Charlotte Marie Petisch, Mandolin 

and Guitar. 

ACADEMY. 

Charles A. Smith, M.A., Principal, 
Rhetoric. 

William H. !Williams, M.A., Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

W'illiam L. Burnap, B.A., Greek and 
History. 

William F. Palmer, M.A., Ph.D., 
Latin. 

William H. Dudley, Science. 

William W. Truesdale, M.A., Greek 
and History. 

George H. Meyer, M.A., German and 
French. 

Will F. Brewer, B.A., English. 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

Edward L. Holmes, M.D., LL.D., 

President, Eye and Ear. 
Henry M. Lyman, A.M., M.D., Med. 
James H. Etheridge, A.M., M.D., 

Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
DeLaskie Miller, A.M., M.D., Ph.D., 

Emeritus. 
Ephraim Ingals, M.D., Emeritus. 
Daniel T. Nelson, A.M., M.D., 

Emeritus. 
Walter S. Haines, A.M., M.D., Chem- 
istry and Toxicology. 
James Kevins Hyde, A.M., M.D., 

Skin and Venereal Diseases. 
Norman Bridge, A.M., M.D., Clinics 

and Diagnosis. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



173 



Arthur Dean Bevan, M.D., Anatomy. 
Nicholas Senn, M.D., Ph.D, LL.D., 
Surgery. 

E. Fletcher Ingals, A.M., M.D., 
Laryngology and Chest. 

Daniel K. Brower, M.D., Mental Dis- 
eases and Therapeutics. 

John B. Hamilton, M.D., LL.D., 
Surgery. 

John Milton Dobson, A.M., M,D., 
Physiology and Histology. 

Sanger Brown, M.D., Hygiene and 
Medical Law. 

Truman W. Brophy, M.D., D.D.S., 
LL.D., Dentistry. 

W. T. Belfield, M.D., Bacteriology 
and Surgery. 

Alfred C. Cotton, A.M., M.D., Chil- 
dren's Diseases. 

Ludvig Hektoen, M.D., Morbid Anat- 
omy, and Director of Laboratories 

D. W. Graham, A.M., M.D., Surgery. 

H. B. Stehman, A.M., M.D., Obstet. 

Philip Adolphus, M.D., Gynecology 
and Clinics. 

Harold N. Moyer, M.D., Neurological 
Clinics. -• 

Henry P. Merriman, A.M., M.D., 
Gynecology. 

James B. Herrick, A.B,, M.D , Med. 

J. H. Salisbury, A.M., M.D., Med. 

John A. Robison, M.D., Medicine. 

Henry Baird Favill, A.B., M.D , 
Medicine. 

Eugene S. Talbot, M.D., D.D.S., 
Dentistry. 

F. H. Montgomery, M.D., Derma- 
tology and Urinary Diseases. 

A. E. Kauffman, ]\LD., Chemistry. 

John Edwin Rhodes, A.M., M.D., 
Laryngology and Chest. 

Frederic S. Coolidge, A.B., M.D., 
Orthopedic Appliances. 

George H. Weaver, M.D., Bacteriology. 

Albert L Bouffleur, M.D., Emergency 
Operations. 

Frank A. Stahl, M.D., Obstetrics. 

S. L. Weber, M.D., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics. 

William B. Marcusson, A.M., M.D., 
Surgery. 

A, M. Ccrwin, A.M., M.D., Diagnosis. 

Ignatz Lange, M.D., Children's Dis- 
eases. 

Alfred Hinde, M.D., Eye and Ear. 

Cassius D. Wescott. M.D., Eye, Ear. 

William C Cox, M.D., Eye and Ear, 



D. D. Bishop, M.D., Histology, 
Microscopy, and Dermatology. 

E. R. LeCount, M.D., Anat., Pathol. 
J. J. Tuthill, M.D., Laryngol., Chest.^ 

C. J. Whalen, M.D., Laryncol., Chest. 
Frank D. Churchill, A.B., M.D., 

Children's Diseases. 

D. L. Shaw, M.D., Anat., Physiol. 
Charles A. Parker, M.D., Anatomy. 

B. M. Linnell, A.B., M.D., Physiol, 
Harvey A. Tyler, M.D., Gynecology. 
Lawrence H. Prince, M.D., Gynecol- 
ogy and Obstetrics. 

J. A. Patton, B.S., M.D., Materia 
Medica and Chemistry. 

Samuel C. Beach, M.D., Laryngology 
and Chest. 

W. F. Robinson, B.S., M.D., Der- 
matology. 

E. Friend, M.D., Dermatology. 
Emanuel J. Senn, M.D., Surgery. 
Malcolm Gunn, M.D., Pathol., Surg. 
William R. Parks, Ph.M., M.D., 

Pathol., Surgery, and Laryngology. 
J. W. O'Neill, M.D., Bandaging. 

F. W. Jay, M.D., Surgery. 
E. J. Meilish, M.D., Surgery. 
Elijah P. Noel, M.D., Physiology. 

C. A. Wade, M.D., Children's Diseases. 
James C. Gill, M.D., Materia Medica 

and Therapeutics. 

Edward Buel Hutchinson, B.S., M.D., 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

William J. Butler, M.D., Chemistry. 

George W. Hall, A.M., M.D., Laryn- 
gology and Materia Medica. 

George W. Reynolds, M.D., Surgery. 

J, W. Vanderslice, M.D., Children's 
Diseases. 

R, W. Holmes, M,D., Dermatology 
and Children's Diseases. 

Arthur J. Holbrook, B.S., M.D,, 
Laryngology and Chest. 

George B. Joiner, A.M., M.D., Medi- 
cine and Obstetrics. 

S. R. Slaymaker, Physiology. 

Thomas A. Olney, Anatomy. 

Frank Jordan Gould, Clerk. 

COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

Truman W. Brophy, M.D., D.D.S., 
LL.D., Dean, Oral Surgery. 

W. L, Copeland, M. D., CM., 
M.R.C.S., Anatomy. 

W. T. Belfield, M.D., Pathology. 

Charles B. Gibson, B.Sc, M.D., 
Chemistry and Metallurgy. 



174 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Frank H. Gardiner, M.D., D.D.S., 
Operative Dentistry. 

C. N. Johnson, L.D.S., D.D.S., 
Operative Dentistry. 

W. C. Barrett, M.D., D.D.S., Dental 
Anatomy and Pathology. 

L. L. Skelton, A.M., ,M.D., Physi- 
ology. 

A. H. Peck, M.D., D.D.S., Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics. 

Calvin S. Case, M.D., D.D.S., Ortho- 
dontia. 

Norman J. Roberts, D.D.S., Ortho- 
dontia. 

G. N. West, D.D.S., Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics. 

Leonard C. Borland, M.D., L.P., 
Anatomy. 

J. R. Pagin, D.D.S., Prothetic Dentis. 

L. S. Tenney, D.D.S., Operative 
Technics. 

B. F. Eshelman, D.D.S., Prothetic 
Technics. 



N. D. Edmonds, D.D.S., C. N. 
Thompson, D.D.S., H. C. Strong, 
M.D., D.D.S., F. E. Phillips, 
D.D.S., L. C. Borland, M.D., L.P., 
Daniel J. Hayes, M.D., W. F. Wes- 
terschulte, C. B. Gibson, B.Sc, 
M.D., H. J. Goslee, J. Prendergast, 
M.D., Jos. Prendergast, M.D., Ed- 
win Hamill, M.D., Demonstrators. 

Walter M. Fitch, M.D., Anatomy. 

H. C. Strong, M.D., D.D.S., Physiol. 

J. Prendergast, M.D., Chemistry. 

D. M. Gallie, D.D.S., Dental Anat. 

C. O. Bauth, D.D.S., Mat. Medica. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Hon. Thomas A. Moran, Dean. 

Hon. Henry M. Shepard, Hon. Ed- 
mund W. Burke, Hon. John Gib- 
bons, Hon. S. P. Shope, Hon. O. 
N. Carter, C. E. Kremer, Frank 
F. Reade, Adelbert Hamilton. 

Elmer E. Barrett, Secretary. 



LA SALLE COLLEGE. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Men. 



Christian Brothers. 



The college was incorporated in 1853, and authorized to confer 
degrees of A.B., and A.M. In 1892 the Bouvier Mansion was occu- 
pied, and further buildings were erected by Francis A. Drexel. 
Courses in science, the classics, and literature are given, and special 
attention is paid to English. All examinations are in writing, and 
prize medals are awarded for excellence in study. The year lasts 
from the first Monday in September to the last Thursday in June. 
Tuition is ^60 a year. The college is conducted by the Brothers of 
the Christian Schools, and none of the teachers are named in the 
college catalogue. 



LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY. 

Applet on, Wis. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 

^14,000 



Students, 
361 



Instructors, 
29 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
14,236 



In 1846 Amos A. Lawrence, of Boston, gave $10,000, to which 
$10,000 were added, thus founding the Lawrence Institute. In 1849 
it was made a university with the Rev. W. H. Sampson, president. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



175 



In 1853 a fund of $100,000 was raised, to which $50,000 was added in 
1885. The presidents have been, the Revs. : William H. Sampson, 
1849-1852; Edward Cooke, 1853-1861 ; Russell Z. Mason, 1861-1865; 
George M. Steele, 1865-1879; E. D. Huntley, 1879-1883 ; B. P. Ray- 
mond, 1883-1889; C. W. Gallagher, 1889-1893; Samuel Plantz, 1894 
to the present. 

The school is governed by sixteen trustees. Admission is by ex- 
amination, and on certificates from accredited schools. A classical, 
modern classical, and scientific course lead to the degrees of B.A., 
B.S., and B.L. Degrees in music and commerce are given by the 
musical and commercial departments. There is also a university 
extension course. A loan fund provides for indigent students, and 
there are also scholarships remitting the tuition of $132 and ten 
prizes. The college year lasts from September 14 to June 23. 

The university grounds cover sixty-two acres. The students main- 
tain four literary societies : the Philolethean and Phoenix for men, 
and the Athena and Lawrence for women. A Science Club, Natural 
History Association, and Christian Association are also maintained. 
The " Lawrencian " is published. 

Since 1857 some 616 alumni have been graduated, 583 of whom are 
living. The oldest of these is Henry Coleman, A.M., 1857, of Beloit, 
Wis. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Samuel Plantz, Ph.D., D.D., 
President, Ethics, Christianity. 

Hiram A. Jones, A.M., Vice-President, 
Latin. 

Rev. Henry Lummis, D.D., Greek. 

Dexter P. Nicholson, M.S., Natural 
History and Geology. 

George B. Merriman, A.M., Math., 
and Director of Observatory. 

Charles W. Treat, A.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Charles O. Merica, A.M., History and 
Political Science. 

Harriet E. Hammond, M.L., German 
and French. 

Elizabeth Wilson, B.L., English Lit- 
erature and Latin. 

Lieut. James O. Green, Tactics. 

Arthur J. Wilbor, B.S., Biology. 

John Scott Davis, A.M., Sociology. 

Samuel W. Trousdale, Ph.D., Evi- 
dences of Christianity. 

John McCoy, A.B., Old Testament 
Literature. 

Amos P. Wilder, Ph.D., Sociology. 



Rev. George H. Trever, Ph.D., Com- 
parative Religions. 

Sara H. Parkes, Elocution and Physi- 
cal Culture. 

Rev. Emanuel Gerechter, D.D., He- 
brew and German. 

Rev. Henry P. Haylett, A.M., Uni- 
versity Lecturer. 

A. A. Trever, English. 

J. H. Farley, Rhetoric. 

Gunluf Guthormsen, Botany. 

Ella M. Bottensek, Painting, Drawing. 

John Silvester, Musical Director. 

Harry Heard, Vocal Music. 

Frank G. Dana, Brass Instruments. 

Joseph Hassmann, Violin. 

H. W. Harper, Mandolin and Banjo. 

Zelia A. Smith, M.S., Librarian. 

Oliver P. DeLand, Book-keeping. 

Amanda Zimmerman, Book-keeping. 

Alexander B. Whitman, A.M., Com- 
mercial Law. 

Erna Zimmerman, Stenography and 
Typewriting. 

Charles W. Treat, A.M., Secretary. 



1/6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Annville, Pa. Co-Educational. United Brethren. 



Income, 



Students, 
117 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
4,Soo 



The college was founded in 1866, and received its charter in the 
following year. The presidents have been : Rev. Thomas R. Vickroy, 
Ph.D., 1866-1871 ; Prof. L. H. Hammond, A.M., 1871-1876; Rev. D. 
D. DeLong, D.D., 1876-1887 ; Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., 18S7-1S89; 
Rev. C. J. Kephart, D.D., 1889-1890; Prof. E. Benj. Bierman, Ph.D., 
1890 to the present. It is governed by thirty-two trustees. 

The degrees are B.A., B.S., and A.M., after three years. Attend- 
ance at chapel is compulsory. The literary societies are the Clionean, 
the Kalozetian and Philocosmian. The college grounds cover ten 
acres. There are also an Athletic Association, a baseball team, and 
two Christian Associations for men and women. The " College 
Forum," is published. Since the foundation of the school there have 
been 212 graduates, of whom 206 are living. The oldest of these is 
Albert C. Rigler, 1870, of Annville, Pa. 



Faculty. 



E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

H. Clay Deaner, A.M., Latin, Astron. 

John E. Lehman, A.M., Math, and 
Natural Philosophy. 

John A. Shott, Ped. B., Ph.M., Natu- 
ral Science and Pedagogics. 



Rev. J. A, McDermad, A.M., Greek. 
Anna M. Thompson, JPh.M,, Modern 

Languages, etc. 
Carrie M. Flint, Instrumental Music. 
Anna R. Forney, A.B., Harmony. 
Oscar Ellis Good, A.B., Nat. Science. 
Urban H. Hershey, Violin. 



LEHIGH UNIVERSITY. 



South Bethlehem, Pa. 


Men. 


Ep 


iscopal. 


Income, 
|20,000 


Students, 
415 


Instructors, 


Buildings, 
8 


Books, 
100,000 



Asa Packer in 1865 gave $500,000 with 115 acres of land, and by 
his will added $2,000,000. The college is governed by eight perma- 
nent trustees, and by six honorary and four alumni trustees. There 
are three departments : the classical, Latin-scientific, and that of 
science and letters, together with special facilities in seven branches 
of engineering, chemistry, and architecture. The degrees are B.A., 
B.S., B.Ph., and A.M. ; and in the School of Technology, C.E., M.E., 
B.M., B.S., E.M., E.E., A.C., M.S., and Ph.D. Admission is by 
examination only. Students in literary courses are permitted to take 
technical courses for a part of their work during the junior and senior 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



177 



year. The expenses for the college year, from September 7 to June 
16, are from $350 to $500. Three scholarships of from 3200 to $250, 
and seven prizes of from $10 to $50 have been established. 

The university library has shelf room for 160,000 volumes. Besides 
four laboratory buildings, there is an observatory and a gymnasium. 

The students publish the " Brown and White," a weekly, the 
*" Bun," a monthly, and the " Epitome," an annual. The societies 
are the Agora, for literary debates, the Mustard and Cheese, a dra- 
matic club, the Chemical and Natural History Society, the Engi- 
neers' and Mining Club, the Classical Society, the Electrical and 
Architectural Club, the Toothpick, Ace, and Dynamite Eating Clubs, 
a University Glee Club, with Banjo and Mandolin Clubs, a Chris- 
tian Association, and an Athletic Association, with football, baseball, 
track, and lacrosse teams, and a Brush Club. Chapters of the follow- 
ing fraternities have been established : * B K, 1870 ; 4> K 2, 1870- 
1886 ; X *, 1872 ; A T n, 1882 ; A 4>, •*F T, A X, 1S84 ; A T, 1S85 ; 2 N, 
T B n, * r A, 1886 ; * A 0, 2 X, 1887 ; ATA, 1888 : and B n, 1S90. 

Since the foundation of the college 782 alumni have been gradu- 
ated, of whom 752 are living. The oldest of these is Miles Roch, 
C.E., 1869, of Philadelphia. 

Faculty. 



Thomas Messinger Drown, LL.D., 
President. 

W. H. Chandler, Ph.D., F.CS., Chem. 

Benjamin W. Frazier, A.M., Miner- 
alogy and Metallurgy. 

H. Wilson Harding, A.M., Physics 
and Electrical Engineering. 

Mansfield Merriman, C.E., Ph.D., 
Civil Engineering. 

Severin Ringer, U.J.D., Modern Lan- 
guages and History. 

Edward H. Williams, jr., B.A., E.M., 
A.C., F.G.S.A., Mining Engineer- 
ing and Geology. 

Joseph F. Klein, D.E., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

William A. Robinson, A.M., Greek, 
and Secretary. 

Edmund M.Hyde, A.M., Ph.D., Latin. 

Rev. Elwood Worcester, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

William C. Thayer, A.M., English. 

C. L. Thornburg, C.E., Ph.D.,>hilos. 

William L. Estes, M.D., Physiology 
and Hygiene. 

Alexander Macfarlane, M.A., D.Sc, 
LL.D., Electrical Engineering. 

Arthur E. Meaker, C.E., Math. 

Harvey S. Houskeeper, B.A., Physics 
and Electrical Engineering. 

Preston A. Lambert, M.A., Math. 

Joseph W. Richards, M.A., A.C., 
M.S., Ph.D., Metallurgy, etc. 

Lewis B. Sample, A.M.. Ph.D , Eng. 



Ralph M. Wilcox, Ph.B., Civil Engin. 

John P. Brooks, M.S., Civil Engin. 

Prosser Hall Frye, B.A., English. 

Robert Ferguson, A.B., Mod. Lang. 

Frederic C. Biggin, B.S., Drawing and 
Architecture. 

Fred. W. Spanutius, M.S., Qualitative 
Analysis, etc. 

Will B. Shober, Ph.D., Chem. Philos. 

Herman E. Kiefer, A.C., M.S., Geol- 
ogy and Lithology. 

Joseph Barrell, B.S., E.M., Mining 
and Metallurgy. 

Robert C. H. Heck, M.E., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

J. Grant Cramer, A.M., Mod. Lang. 

Samuel Lippincott Griswold Knox, 
M.E., Mechanical Engineering. 

Harry M. Ullmann, A.B., Ph.D., 
Quantitative Analysis. 

J. Henry Klinck, M.E., Elec. Engin. 

Henry Storrs Webb, B.S., Elec. Engin. 

John Hutcheson Ogburn, C.E., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Schuyler Stevens Clark, S.B., Physics. 

Nathaniel Thurlow, AC, Chemistry. 

Wm. H. Hoffman, B.C.E., Civil Eng. 

Rev. Elwood Worcester, A.M.,Ph.D., 
Chaplain, 

J. Fred Wolle, Organist. 

C. W. Smith, Gymnasium. 

William H. Chandler, Ph.D., A. W. 
Sterner, Wilson F. Stauffer, Peter 
F. Stauffer, Library. 



178 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

LELAND STANFORD, JR., UNIVERSITY. 

Palo Alto, Cal. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

^250,000 



Students, 
1,100 



Instructors, 
85 



Buildings, 
18 



Books, 
30,000 



History and Organization: Leland Stanford, and Jane Lathrop 
Stanford, in 1884, determined to found a university for both sexes, 
with all colleges, schools, seminaries, institutes, museums, and collec- 
tions appropriate thereto. In the following year, the legislature of 
California passed an authorizing act, and in 1885 the grant was made. 
The cornerstone was laid in 1S87, at Palo Alto, some three miles from 
the sea, near the Monte Diablo Mountains, thirty-three miles from 
San Francisco. David S. Jordan, the present president, was installed 
in 1891. The suit for ^15,000,000, or the original endowment, between 
the university and the Federal Government was decided in the 
university's favor in 1895. The university is governed by twenty- 
four trustees, chosen for life. 

Admissiojt^ Instruction, and Degrees : Candidates for admission have 
a choice of twenty-two subjects, in which to undergo examination. 
To attain full standing, twelve of these must be successfully passed. 
Certificates are not accepted in lieu of examination. Attendance at 
chapel or military drill is not required. The degrees are B.A., B.S., 
and C.E. No honorary degrees are given. Degrees of M.A., M.E., 
and Ph.D. are conferred only after resident post-graduate work. 
Expenses for the year lasting from September 3 to May 29 are from 
$225 to j^5oo. Tuition is free. 

Equipment: The estate, on which the university is situated covers 
7,500 acres. The buildings are arranged in a series of quadrangles, 
the present central group consisting of two, one of which includes the 
other. The architecture of the buildings follows the motif of the 
Spanish missions. They are all low, with connecting open arcades, 
and are built around an open court covering more than three acres. 

Publications and Societies: Besides twelve scholarly and scientific 
publications issued by the university, the students publish a daily 
and weekly paper, a junior annual, and a senior classical. The socie- 
ties are: The Associated Students, Euphronia, Alpha, Philalexian 
Nestorian, Bench and Bar, Coif Club, Green Bag, Marshall, Curtis, 
and Bractam Law Clubs, Press Club, Zoological, Geological and 
Botanical Club, Engineers' Club, Republican and Democratic Clubs, 
University Orchestra and Band, Glee and Mandolin Clubs, Choral 
Society, Whist Club, and Students Guild. Chapters of the follow- 
ing Greek letter societies have been organized : Z "*", * A 0, * K % 
* r A, 2 N, 2 X, A T n, 2 A E, ATA, B n, X N^, K A, A Y, N E, 
2 2. A K E, >F T, A X, A A *, K A 0, K K T, n B *, I A 2, A T, and 
A *. 

The graduates number 365. The oldest of these is George W. A. 
Luckey, 1894, of Lincoln, Nebraska. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



179 



Faculty. 



David Starr Jordan, M.S., M.D., 
l^h.D.. LL.D., President. 

Andrew Dickson White, A.M., Ph.D., 
LL.D., European History. 

Benjamin Harrison, A.B., LL.D., 
lix-Pres. U. S. A., Constitut. Law. 

George Elliott Howard, A.M., Ph.D., 
History. 

John Casper Branner, B.S., Ph.D., 
Geology. 

Oliver Peebles Jenkins, A.M., M.S., 
Ph.D., Physiology and Histology. 

John H. Comstock, B.S., Entomology. 

Melville B. Anderson, A.M., English. 

John M. Stilhnan, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Fernando Sanford, M.S., Physics. 

Charles David Marx, C.E., Civil Eng. 

Ernest Mondell Pease, A.M., Latin. 

Charles Henry Gilbert, M.S., Ph.D., 
Zoology. 

Douglas Houghton Campbell, Ph.D., 
Botany. 

Earl Barnes, A.B., M.S., Education. 

Thomas Denison Wood, A.M., M.D., 
Hygiene and Organic Training. 

Albert William Smith, M.M.E,, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Ewald Fliigel, Ph.D., Eng. Philology. 

Charles Benjamin Wing, C.E., Struc- 
tural Engineering. 

Frank Angell, B.S., Ph.D., L.H.D., 
Psychology. 

Leander Miller Hoskins, M.S., C.E., 
Applied Mechanics. 

Robert Edgar Allardice, A.M., Math. 

Amos Griswold Warner, B.L., Ph.D., 
Economics and Social Science. 

William Russell Dudley, M.S., Botany. 

Augustus Taber Murray, Ph.D., Greek. 

Albert Pruden Carman, A.M., D.Sc, 
Theoretical Physics. 

Julius Goebel, Ph.D., Germanic Lang. 

Edward Alsworth Ross, A.B., Ph.D., 
Economics and Finance. 

Nathan Abbott, A.B., LL.B., Law. 

Frederic A. C. Perrine, A.M., D.Sc, 
Electrical Engineering. 

John Ernst Matzke, A.B., Ph.D., Ro- 
manic Languages. 

Charles N. Little, A.B., Ph.D., Math. 

Edward Howard Griggs, A.M., Ethics. 

George Mann Richardson, A. C, Ph.D., 
Organic Chemistry. 

James Owen Griffin, German. 

Walter Miller, A.M., Archaeology. 

W^illiam H. Hudson, English Lit. 



Rufus Lot Green, B.S., A.M., Math. 
William Joseph Hussey, B.S., C.E., 

Astronomy. 
Arley B. Show, B.D., A.M., History. 
Orrin Leshe Elliott, Ph.D., Registrar. 
Vernon L. Kellogg, M.S., Entomology. 
Henry Rushton Fairclough, A.M., 

Greek and Latin. 
Bolton Coit Brown, M.P., Painting. 
James Perrin Smith, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mineralogy and Paleontology. 
Alphonso Gerald Newcomer, A.M., 

English. 
Henry B. Lathrop, A.B., English. 
Lionel Remond Lenox, Ph.B., Chem. 
Wilbur WilsonThoburn, A. M., Ph.D., 

Ethics. 
Mary Sheldon Barnes, A.B., History. 
Emory Evans Smith, Horticulture. 
Samuel J. Brun, B.-e's-S., French. 
John Anthony Miller, A.M., Math. 
David Ellsworth Spencer, B.L., A.M., 

History. 
Arthur Bridgman Clark, M.Ar., Draw- 
ing and Draughting. 
Frank Mace McFarland, Ph.B., A.M., 

Histology. 
Margaret M. Wickham, A.B., German. 
William Stuart Symington, Jr., A.B., 

Romanic Languages. 
Mary Roberts Smith, Ph.B., M.S., 

Social Science. 
Merritt E. Taylor, M.S., Physics. 
George Clinton Price, B.S., Zoology. 
John Charles Lounsbury Fish, C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
George Kriehn, A.B., Ph.D., History. 
Stewart W. Young, B.S., Chemistry. 
Robert Judson Aley, A.M., Math. 
Westel Woodbury Willoughby, A.B., 

Ph.D., Political Science. 
Charles Ellwood Cox, A.M., Math. 
Herman DeC. Stearns, A.M., Physics. 
Daniel W. Murphy, A.M., Physics. 
Charles W. Greene, A.M., Physiology. 
Margaret E.Schallenberger, Education. 
Walter Robert Shaw, A.M., Botany. 
Clelia Duel Mosher, A.M., Hygiene 

and Organic Training. 
Harold Heath, A.B., Histology. 
Irene Hardy, A.B., English. 
Henry C. Myers, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Jessica S. Vance, Ph.B., English. 
Karl G. Rendtorff, A.M., German. 
Guido Hugo Marx, M.E., Mechanical 

Engineering. 



I So 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Charles K. Jenness, A.M., Economics. 

George Archibald Clark, B.L., Secr'y. 

Anna Louisa Brown, B.P., Hopkins 
Laboratory. 

Clark VV. Hetherington. Gymnasium. 

Orrison Vert Eaton, Assist. Registrar. 

Maud Marcli, Gymnasium. 

John Copeland Kirtland, Jr., A.M., 
Latin. 

Lucien Howard Gilmore, A.B., 
Physics. 

Gertrude North Brown, Education, in 
charge of Kindergarten. 

Julius Embret Peterson, Foreman of 
Forge. 

Edward Soule, Foreman of Wood- 
working. 



John Kinlay Wight, A.B., Art. Mus. 
Flora Hartley, Zoological Museum. 
Kay Lyman Wilbur, Physiology. 
Clara Stoltenberg, Physiology. 
Frederick John Teggart, A.B., Library. 
Charles James Newman, John Mason 

Ross, Jackson Eli Reynolds, Library 

Assistants. 
Alfred F. W. Schmidt, Louise Mait- 

land, Percy Erwin Davidson, Cata- 
loguers. 
Frederick Louis Otto Roehrig, Ph.D., 

M.D., Lecturer Oriental Philology. 
Ellen Frances Thompson, Mistress of 

Roble Hall. 
Charles Edward Hodges, Resident 

Architect. 



LELAND UNIVERSITY. 

New Orleans, La. Co-Ediicational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 



Students, 
495 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,000 



Holbrook Chamberlain, of Brooklyn, erected the first buildings of 
the university after its foundation in 1S70, and after his death left 
the bulk of his property, about $100,000, as an endowment fund. It 
is governed by twenty-seven trustees. The degree of A.B. is given 
after a four years' course in the classics, mathematics, English, and 
psychology. No charge is made for tuition, but other expenses are 
from $85 to $150. The university has taken under its charge, as 
auxiliary schools, Howe Institute ; Leland Academy, at Donaldson- 
ville, La. ; and Coleman Academy, at Gibbsland. Besides a Chris- 
tian Society and an Endeavor Society, the Philomathean, a literary 
society for both sexes, is maintained. 



Faculty. 



Edward Gushing Mitchell, A.M., D.D., 
President, Theology, etc. 

George Hurlburt Felton, A.M., M.D., 
Normal Principal. 

Marcia Savage Mitchell, Lady Princi- 
pal, Latin, etc. 

Alfred A. Newhall,A.M., Greek, etc. 

Jonas Henderson, A,B., History and 
Mathematics. 

Mary Lena Briggs, Music. 

Sophie Fanny Burns, Latin and Eng- 
lish Literature. 

Elizabeth Bompus Groves, Domestic 
Department. 



William Allen, Armstead Venia Mor- 
rison, Alexander Hamilton Brown, 
Sub-Normal Department. 

Lida Marsh Felton, Librarian. 

Eli Noyes Smith, A.M., Principal 
Howe Institute. 

Mary Brown Washington, Caroline 
Osborne Washington, Assistants. 

Elizabeth Smith, Matron. 

Oliver Lewis Coleman, A.M., Princi- 
pal Coleman Academy. 

Samuel Simpson Gray, Principal Le- 
land Academy. 

Alice Peterson, Assistant. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



i8l 



LENOX COLLEGE. 

Hopkintoji, Io7va. Co-Educational. 



Presbyterian. 



Income, 
#4,000 



Students, 
^73 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
2,500 



The college was founded in 1884. The trustees number twenty- 
one.* Admission is on certificate and by examination. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., and B.L. The expenses for the year, from September 
8 to June \2, are #150, of which ;?30 is for tuition. Prizes are given 
for essays and debate. The productive funds of the institution aggre- 
gate $9,000. The societies are the Athenian and Clionian, and two 
Christian Associations. The graduates number 200, the oldest of 
whom is Ralph H, Kirk, of Sturgis, S. D. A ladies' hall, with gym- 
nasium, has recently been erected by the alumni. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Hugh Robinson, A.M., Pres. 
Andrew G. Wilson, A.M., Natural and 

Physical Science, and Librarian. 
Mary C. Lord, A.M., French, German. 
Lura L Vaughn, A.M., English. 
David C. Mackintosh, A.M., New 

Testament Greek. 



C. E. Merriam. Jr., A.B., Ancient 
Languages. 

W. B. Guthrie, Ph.B., Political Sci- 
ence, and Secretary. 

Lucy L. Gearheart, Book-keeping. 

Luella Gibson, Music. 

Myra Parker, Matron Clarke Hall. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 

Lincoln, III. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$12,500 



Students, 
160 




Books, 
2,000 



The university was founded in 1865. The presidents have been : 
Azel Freeman, D.D., 1866-1870; J. C. Bowden, D.D., 1870-1873; A. 
J. McGlumphy, D.D., 1873-1887 ; Albert McGinnis, Ph.D., (Vice- 
President), 1887-1888; and A. E. Turner, A.M., the present incum- 
bent. It is governed by fourteen trustees. Decrees of B.A., B.S., 
and in music are given. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 3 to June 18, are $132. Attendance at chapel is com- 
pulsory. Negroes are not excluded. The societies maintained by 
the students are : Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., Philomathean Associa- 
tion, Amasagacian Literary Society, Athenian Society, Amicitian 
Society, Athletic Association, Tennis Association, Baseball Club, 
Football Team, and Alumni Society. The " Lincolnian " is published 
monthly. Since the foundation of the school 247 students have been 
graduated, of whom 228 are living. The oldest of these is A. J. 
Wallace, M.D., 1868, of Decatur, 111. 



l82 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



Archelaus Ewing Turner, A.M., Presi- 
dent, Natural Science. 

Estelle Biddle Clark, A.M., English 
and History. 

Alexander Von Wclffersdorff Leslie, 
A.B., Greek and Latin. 

Frederick Herman Zimmermann, 
M.M., School of Music. 



Russell, A.B., Mathe- 
Oglevee, B.S., 



William Polk 

matics. 
Christopher Stoner 

Preparatory School. 
Katharine Miller, M.D., Hygiene. 
Lillian Maude Dougherty, Drawing 

and Painting. 
John Wesley Hart, Laboratory. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Oxford, Pa. 




Men. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 
$35,000 


Students, 
191 


Instructors, 
II 


Buildings, 
7 


Books, 
15,000 



This institution, situated in Chester Count}', was founded in 1854, 
to give classical, scientific, and theological instruction to negroes. 
It is governed by a board of twenty-one trustees. Applicants must 
be at least fifteen years old. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 
The college year lasts from September 26 to June 4, and the total 
expenses for the year are estimated at $122. The literary societies 
are the Garnet Association and the Philosophian. Attendance at 
the meetings of one of these societies is required. Since the foun- 
dation of the school there have been 658 graduates, the oldest of 
whom is the Rev. W. D. Johnson, of the class of i860. 



Faailty. 



Rev. Isaac N. Rendall, D.D., President. 

Rev. Gilbert T. Woodhull, D.D., 
Greek and New Testament. 

Rev. John B. Rendall, A.M., Latin. 

Rev. Robert Laird Stewart, A.M., Pas- 
toral Theology, etc. 

Rev. J. Aspinwall Hodge, D.D., Eng- 
lish Bibleo 



J. Craig Miller, M.D., Natural Science. 

Walter L. Wright, Jr., A.B., Mathe- 
matics and Librarian. 

Rev. William Deas Kerswill, B.D., 
Hebrew and History. 

Rev. William R. Bingham, D.D., 
Systematic Theology. 

Charles E. Tucker, A.B., Greek. 



i^A^^^" 



LOMBARD UNIVERSITY. 



Salisbnry, III. Co-Ediicatio7ial. 


Universalist. 


Income, 
$15,000 


Students, 
161 


Instructors, 
18 


Buildings, 


Books, 
7,000 





^ The Liberal Institute, the precursor of Lombard University, was 
opened in 1852 ; was chartered in the f ollowing,year ; and three years 
later became a university and took the present name. The first 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



183 



class was graduated in 1856. A divinity school was opened in 1881, 
and an elective system organized in 1894. The university is gov- 
erned by twenty-six trustees. It is divided into four departments : 
the college of liberal arts, the preparatory department, the divinity 
school, and the school of music and art. Admission is on examina- 
tion and on certificate. The degrees are B.A., B.S., and M.A. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 3 to June 4, are $150. 
There are six money prizes for oratory, and fifteen scholarships on 
an interest of $1,000 each. The societies are the Erosophian for 
men, the Philomathean for preparatory students, the Zetacalian for 
women, and the Philalethian for divinity students. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized: A 0, 1S69; ATA, 1869- 
1885; n B 4», 1873; * A 0, 1878. 

The " Review " is published. Since the foundation of the school 
there have been 298 graduates, of whom 257 are living. The oldest 
of these is* William R. Cole, 1856, of Mount Pleasant, 111. 



Faculty. 



Rev. John Van Ness Standish, Ph.D., 
LL.D., President, Philosophy. 

John Clarence Lee, A.M., English, 
Rhetoric, and Librarian. 

Isaac Augustus Parker, Ph.D., Greek. 

Nehemia'h White, Ph.D., D.D., Bib- 
lical Languages, etc. 

Frederick William Rich, B.S., Natural 
Science, Curator of Museum. 

Philip Green Wright, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy, 

Carrie E. Bascom. Modern Languages. 

Anna Chappell Gunnell, Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 

John Watson Grubb, M.S., Latin. 



Helen Carlton-Marsh, Singing. 

Mary Frances Smith, Piano. 

Mary Gaston Crippen, Guitar and 

Mandolin. 
Isabelle Blood, Drawing and Painting. 
Emily Augusta Hadley, Principal. 

NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

Augusta J. Chapin, D.D., English 

Literature and Art. 
Marion D. Shutter, D.D., Biblical 

Literature. 
A. J. Canfield, D.D., Preaching. 
M. H. Harris, D.D., Pastoral Theol. 



LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY. 

Baton Rouge, La. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
to756 



Students, 
193 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
25 



Books, 
20,000 



History and Oj'ganization : Grants of land were made from 1806 to 
1827 for the use of a "Seminary of Learning." In 1855 a State 
Seminary and Military Academy was established at Alexandria. It 
was opened in i860 with William Tecumseh Sherman as superinten- 
dent. Instruction was suspended throughout the Civil War. The 
original building was burned to the ground in 1S69, causing the 
removal of the college to Baton Rouge. The agricultural and 
mechanical colleges associated with it were established at New 



1 84 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Orleans in 1S73. The fusion was brought about in 1877. The 
federal government relinquished its old fort, dating back to the 
Spaniards, with grounds of 213 acres to the univeri>ity in 1SS6, thus 
adding a lake and campus of lifty-two acres to the former giounds. 
The supervisors number fourteen. 

Admission, Digrees, etc.: Five courses are offered: the agricul- 
tural, mechanical, engineering, classical, Latin-scientitic, and general 
scientitic. Admission is by examination. Attendance at military 
drill is compulsory. The degrees are A.B. and B.S., with post- 
graduate degrees of A.M., M.S., and C.E. Medals are given by the 
Faculty and Alumni Society. Seventy-tive beneficiary cadets may 
be sent from as many parishes at a cost of 5250 each. Tuition is 
free. The college year lasts from September 16 to June 16. 

Equiptncnt: Of the twenty-five buildings four are used as barracks. 
Besides these there is an armory for each of the cadet companies. 
A new gymnasium and hospital have recently been equipped, and 
laboratory buildings for agriculture, chemistry, and j^hysics have 
been established. On the grounds overlooking the Mississippi are 
a botanical garden, herbarium, and artificial lake, with a government 
experiment station. 

Si'ciWicS and Pul'ii\\2licns : The students maintain the Clay-Gibson 
Debating Society, and publish a student journal. Chapters of the 
following fraternities have been organized: K A, A r, 18S5; K f , 
2 N, 18S7. The graduates since 1S69 number 166. 



Faculty. 



Col. J. D. Bovd, President, Philos. 

W. W. Clendenin. A.M., M.S., Geol- 
ogy and Mineralogy. 

Charles E. Coates, Jr., Ph.D., Chem. 

W. R. Dodson, A.B., S.U., Botany. 

Lieut. C. C. Gallup, Military Science. 

W. H. Goodale, Philosophy. 

H. A. Morgan, B.S..\.. Zoology. 

J. H. Randolph, Jr., C.E., Mechani- 
cal Drawing. 

E. L. Scott, A.M., Languages. 

C. Alphonso Smith, A.M., Ph.D., 
English. 

Wm. C. Stubbs, Ph.D., Agriculture. 



S. B. Staples, B.S., D. V.S., Veterinary 

Science. 
W. D. Taylor, C.E., Physics and 

Engineering. 
T. \V. Atkinson, B.S., C.E., Physics 

and Mathematics. 
D. N. Barrow, B.S., Agriculture. 
F. H. Burnette, Horticulture. 
C. H. Stumberg, A.M., Languages. 
C. E. Ives, A.B., Principal Prepara- 

torv Department. 
C. K.' Thompson, B.S., C.E., R. G. 

Pleasant, A.B., A. Brian, A.B., 

J. B. Roberts, A.B., Instructors. 



LUTHER COLLEGE. 



Decor ah, Imva, 


Men. 


Lutheran, 


Income, 
$1,883 


Students, 
200 


Instructors, 
13 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
7,755 



Luther College was founded in 1S61 by the Norwegian Evangelical 
Synod. It was temporarily located at Half-way Creek, Wis., but in 



THE COLLEGE VEAR-BOOK. 



185 



1862 was removed to Decorah, III., where it occupies thirty-two 
acres. It is governed by a board of nine trustees, and there is also 
a board of ten visitors. Degrees of B.A., and M.A. are given, but 
special attention is paid to preparing students for the ministry. 
Attendance at chapel and gymnastic exercise are compulsory. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September first to June sixteenth, 
are from $So to $110. The societies are the Irving, the Amphic- 
tyonic, the Athenian, and the Normannalaget. "College Chips" 
has been published since 1882 in English and Norwegian. There 
have J^een 279 graduates since 1866. 



Faculty, 

Rev. Laur. Larsen, President, History, 
Hebrew, etc. 

Rev, Chr. A. Naeseth, A.M., English 
Literature, History, Greek Testa- 
ment, and Librarian. 

Gisle Bothne, A.M., Greek and Nor- 
wegian. 

H. W. Sheel, B.S,, Math., Science. 

Rev. H. L G. Krog, Norwegian, 
Latin, etc. 



W. Sihler, A.M., German, Greek, and 

Zoology. 
George Markhus, A.B., English, U. S. 

History, etc. 
J. E. Granrud, Ph.D., Latin. 
Haldor Hanson, A.B., Music. 
J. M. Peterson, Penmanship. 
Th. Normann, Gymnastics. 
Oscar Strom, Algebra. 
I. Anderson, Arithmetic. 



MACALESTER COLLEGE. 
St. Paul, Minn. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$20,000 



Students, 
143 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
6,000 



The college is the outgrowth of the Baldwin School, and was 
opened in 1865. It is situated midway between St. Paul and Min- 
neapolis. It is governed by a board of fifteen executive and three 
honorary trustees. Admission is by examination and on certificate. 
Elective studies are offered throughout the college course. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 16, are 
$125. The societies are the Criterion and Philadelphian, with an 
Oratorical and Athletic Association. The students publish the 
"Echo," a fortnightly. 



Faculty. 



James Wallace, Ph.D., Acting Presi- 
dent, Greek and Anglo-Saxon. 

Edw. Collins Downin<?, A.M., Latin. 

Andrew Work Anderson, A.M., Phi- 
losophy and English. 

Rev. George William Davis, Ph.D., 
Hebrew and English. 



Newton Kingery, A.B., Physics, Chem. 
Lester Dorman Brown, A.B., Greek 

and German. 
Charlotte M. C. Mead, German. 
Harry E. Phill ps, Music. 
Marguerite Morton, Elocution. 
Orlando H. Cheeks, Drawuig. 



1 86 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



MAINE STATE COLLEGE. 
Orono, Me. Co- Educational. N'on-Sectariaji. 



Income, 
,700 



Students, 
279 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
17 



Books, 
7.755 



History and Organization : In 1863 the State accepted the agricul- 
tural grant of 1862, and from its proceeds established this college. 
In 1865 a board of fifteen trustees was appointed, among whom was 
Hannibal Hamlin. The presidents have been: C. Fernald, A.M., 
186S-1871; Charles F. Allen, D.D., 1871-1879; C. Fernald, Ph.D., 
1S79-1893, and A. W. Harris, Sc.D., 1893 to the present time. 

Admission, Degrees, etc. : Admission is by examination or on the 
certificate of any of forty-three approved schools. Two general 
courses are offered : Latin and Latin-scientific ; four scientific 
courses: chemical, agricultural, medical, and preparatory; three 
technical courses : civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering, and 
five short courses. The degrees are B.S., C.E., and M.E. Other 
diplomas arc- also granted. Attendance at chapel and military drill 
is compulsovy. Negroes are not excluded. 

Dues, Scholarships, afid Frizes: Tuition is free, but there are so 
many incidental charges that the expenses for the year are estimated 
at $200. One scholarship, the income of which is not stated in the 
catalogue, is offered together with eight prizes for excellence in 
study. A loan fund has also been provided. 

Eqtupment : The college grounds cover 360 acres. In all $500,000 
have, been spent on buildings and grounds. Connected with the 
Horticultural Building is a Government Experiment Station, dairy, 
an.d botanical garden. The library contains nine thousand books 
?;nd pamphlets. 

Societies and Publications : Besides catalogues, reports, bulletins, 
and circulars published by the college as such, the students publish 
the "Cadet," a monthly, and the "Prism," a junic- annual. The 
societies are : the Engineering and Electrical Society, Photographic 
Club, Y. M. C. A., Publishing Association, Reading Club, Press 
Club, college band and orchestra, and an Athletic Association with 
baseball, football, and other teams. Chapters of the following fra- 
ternities have been organized: Q T V, 1874; A 2 X, B IT, 1878; 
K 2, 1886; A T n, and O E H n. 

The graduates number 441, the oldest of whom is B. F. Gould, 
1872, of Hollister, Cal. 

Faculty [incomplete). 



Abram Winegardner Harris, Sc.D., 
President. 

George Herbert Hamlin, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Alfred Bellamy Aubert, M.S., Chem. 

Allen Ellington Rogers, M.A., Civics 
and Logic. 

Walter Flint, M.E., Mechanical En- 
gineering. 



Whitman Howard Jordan, M.S., Agri- 
culture. 

James Monroe Bartlett, M.S., Lucius 
Herbert Merrill, B.S., Chemists. 

Francis Leroy Harvey. Ph.D., Natural 
History. 

James Norris Hart, C.E., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Howard S. Webb, B.M.E., Shop Work. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



187 



Fremont Lincoln Russell, V.S., Biol- 
ogy, etc. 

Nathan Clifford Grover, B.C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Harriet C. Fernald, M.S., Librarian. 

Welton Marks Munson, M.S., Horti- 
culture. 

Horace Melvyn Estabrooke, MS., 
M.A., English. 



James Stacy Stevens, Ph.D., Physics. 
Gilbert Mottier Gowell, M.S., Animal 

Industry. 
David Wilder Colby, B.S., Chem. 
Harris P. Gould, B.S., Horticulture. 
Albert Joseph Durgin, Wood-work. 
Fred Charles Moulton, M.S., Chemist. 
Elmore David Cummings, C.E., Civil 

Engineerina:. 



MANHATTAN COLLEGE. 



JVew York, N. 


y. 


Men. 


Christian Brothers. 


Income, 
^64,577 


Students, 
644 


Instructors, 
26 


Buildings, 
I 


Books, 
10,000 



The college was organized in 1853, and dedicated ten years later. 
It is governed by a board of trustees, and is divided into two 
departments, the classical and the scientific. Instruction is also 
given in architecture and commercial methods. Admission is by 
examination or on regents' certificates. The degrees are B.A., B.LL., 
B.S., C.E., and M.A. after two years. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from the first Monday in September to the last Friday in 
June, are $350. There are seven scholarships, and numerous medals 
are given for proficiency, as well as a prize of $50 for the best English 
essay. Besides seven literary unions, the students maintam a glee 
club and a college orchestra. 

There are six other institutions which are affiliated with the 
college. In all, 542 students have been graduated, the oldest of 
whom is Rev. J. P. McClancy, 1866, of Middletown, N. Y. 

Officers. 



Rev. Brother Ouintinian, Chairman 

Board of Trustees. 
Rev. Brother Justin, President. 



Rev. Brother Elzear, Director. 
Rev. Brother John. Secretary. 
Rev. Brother Angelus, Treasurer. 



MARIETTA COLLEGE. 

Marietta, Ohio. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
297 



Instructors, 
25 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
52,000 



History and Organization : In 1830 the Marietta Institute of Edu- 
cation was established with four departments, among which were a 
high school and a ladies' seminary. In 1832 a Women's Teachers' 
Seminary was added. In 1S35, after a transfer of the property, the 
present name was adopted, and the present quarters occupied. 
There was then a faculty of five. The first class was graduated in 



1 88 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



1838. The presidents have been: Joel H. Lmsley, D.D., 1835-1846; 
Henry Smith, D.D., LL.D., 1846-1855; Israel W. Andrews, D.D., 
LL.D., 1855-1885; John Eaton, Ph.D., LL.U., 1885-1891; John W. 
Simpson, D.D., LL.D., 1892 to the present. In 1893 Marietta College 
for Women was opened under the original college charter, but with 
a provision that instruction to women was to be given in a separate 
building, 

Admission and Degrees : Admission is upon examination, with 
special reference to the studies taken in the preparatory department. 
The studies in the regular courses are largely elective during the 
last two years, but English is required throughout. The expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 7 to June 18, are $120. There 
are thirty general scholarships and several private ones, besides four- 
teen cash prizes and four gold medals. Degrees of B.A., B.S., 
B Ph., M.A., and Ph.D. are given. Honorary degrees are extensively 
bestowed. 

Equipment: There are five college buildings, among which are a 
library, science building, observatory, and museum. The library 
contains over fifty thousand volumes, several thousand pamphlets, 
while some eleven thousand volumes are owned by the students' 
societies. There are three laboratories and a college chapel. Oppor- 
tunities for exercise are furnished by extensive athletic grounds and 
a college boathouse. 

College Publications ajid Societies : The students publish the " Olio," 
an annual, and the "Monthly Medical Journal." The "Bulletin" 
and a law journal are issued by the Faculty. There are two literary 
societies, two Christian Associations, a Mathematical Society, two 
Alumni Associations, and an Athletic Association, with football, 
baseball, and tennis clubs. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been established : * B K, * r A, 1855 ; A 2 *,i86o ; and A T, 1870. 



Faculty. 



John Wilson Simpson, D.D., LL.D,, 
President, Biblical Literature and 
Ethics. 

Mary Schuyler Phillips, M.A., Dean, 
German. 

Walter Greenwood Beach, M.A., 
Philosophy, History. 

Amy Louise Barbour, B.A., Greek and 
Latin. 

Elizabeth Edgerton Putnam, French. 

Elizabeth Anderson, English. 

Mary Louise Oldliam, Mathematics. 

Kate Stockton Blayney, Drawing, etc. 

Bertha Dickinson Metcalf, Instrumen- 
tal Music. 

Mary Louise Buell, Vocal Music. 

Martha Belle Van Vleck, in charge of 
Home. 

Joseph Manley, B.A., Greek. 

William Alpha Cooper, B.A., Modern 
Languages. 

William Chamberlain Gurley, M.A., 
Director of Observatory. 



Frank Craig Jordan, M.A., Math. 
William Aaron Hadley, M.A., Latin. 
William E. Sykes, Ph.B., Math. 
Rodney Metcalf Stimson, M.A., Libra- 
rian Emeritus. 
Elmore M. Monfort, B.A., Librarian. 

INSTRUCTORS FOR WOMEN. 

Thomas Dwight Biscoe, LL.D., Biol- 
ogy and Botany. 
Joseph Hanson Chamberlin, Litt.D., 

Latin. 
Edward Emerson Phillips, Ph.D., 

Greek and Philosophy. 
James Allen Smith, Ph.D., Economics 

and Sociology. 
Wilson Forsythe Monfort, B.A., 

Chem., Mineralogv, and Geology. 
John Cutler Shedd. B.A., M.S., 

Physics and Mathematics. 
James PVancis Jones, B.S., M.D., 

Physiology. 
John Shape Donaghho, B.A., Sciences. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



189 



MARQUETTE COLLEGE. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 



Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 
$7,500 



Students, 
292 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
9,100 



The college was chartered in 1864, but was not opened until 1881. 
The presidents have been: James Rigg, 1881 ; Rev. T, Baudreaux, 
1882; Rev. Thomas Fitzgerald, 1884; Rev. S. P. Lalimiere, the 
founder, 1887; Rev. P. Meyer, 1890; Rev. V. Putten, 1893; and the 
Rev. Leopold Bushart, 1894. The trustees number five. Admission 
is by examination only. The degree of A.B. is conferred, and that 
of A.M. after one year of post-graduate study. Attendance at chapel 
is compulsory only for Catholic students. Tuition for the year last- 
ing from first week in September to last week in June, is $60. A 
gold medal is given for the best Latin essay ; three smaller gold 
medals and four silver medals for literary excellence, with a money 
prize of $25 for the best essay. More than one hundred premiums 
are distributed annually. 

The societies are the Marquette, the Historical Academy, the 
Library Association and an Alumni Society. Contests in oratory 
are held at the close of the year. The graduates number 120. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Simon A. Blackmore, S.J., Phi- 
losophy, English, and Religion. 

John J. Driscoll, S.J., Physics and 
Mathematics. 

Rev. James J. Corbley, S.J., Rhetoric. 

George R. Kister, S.J., Poetry. 

Rev. Francis J. Finn, S.J., Humanities. 

Rev. Michael Comely, S.J., Penman- 
ship and Shorthand. 



Rev. Simon A. Blackmore, S.J., Rev. 

Henry M. Calmer, S.J., James T. 

Shannon, S.J., Rev. John C. Burke, 

S.J. , John E. Copus, S.J., Elocution. 
Michael J. Rohan, B.S., Book-keeping. 
Rev. Victor Putten, S.J., Latin. 
Arthur E. Muth, A.B., Commercial 

Branches. 
Aloysius Laur, S.J., Librarian. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE. 

Maryville, Tetin. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 

$12,500 



Students, 
446 



Instructors, 
15 




Books, 
12,000 



The college was founded in 1819, with an entering class of five. 
It was closed during the war, but reopened in 1866, when $265,000 
was secured, together with 250 acres, commanding a view of the 
Cumberland and the Smoky mountains, and seven buildings. The 
directors number forty-eight. 

Admission is by examination and upon certificate. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., and B.L., and the master's degree is conferred after 
three years. Students are permitted to elect studies. The expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 3 to May 27, are $80. A gold 



1 90 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



medal, and two scholarships are given for excellence in study, and a 

fund of l7,ooo has been established to help poor students. 

The societies are the Biononian and Theta Epsilon for women, 

with the Athenian and Alpha Sigma for men. The Adelphic, a 

society which holds an annual contest, is composed of all the other 

societies. Athletic, Alumni and Christian associations have likewise 

been organized. ^ 

*= Faculty. 



Rev. Samuel W. Boardman, D.D., 

LL.D., President, Philosophy and 

Theology. 
Rev. Samuel T. Wilson, D.D., English 

and Spanish, Librarian. 
Rev. Elmer B. Waller, A.M., Math. 
Rev. Herman A. Goff, A.M., Modern 

Languages. 
James H. M. Sherrill, A.M., Greek. 



George S. Fisher, Ph.D., Natural 
Sciences. 

Jasper C. Barnes, A.M., Teaching. 

Rev. John G. Newman, A.M., Latin. 

Frank M. Gill, Robert C. Jones, Mar- 
garet E. Henry. Prep. Branches. 

Charles Marston, English. 

Agnes B. Clemens, B.L., Piano, Organ. 

J. H. Newman, S. B. Parker, Singing. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Amherst, Mass. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$60,000 



Students, 
206 



Instructors, 
19 




The college was established by Act of Congress of July 2, 1862, 
supplemented by aid from the State, with grounds covering 360 acres. 
The presidents have been: Hon. Henry Flagg French, M.A., 1864- 
1866; Hon. Paul Ansel Chadbourne, M.D., D.D., LL.D., 1866-1867; 
Col. William Smith Clark, Ph.D.. LL.D., 1867-1879; Charles Louis 
Flint, M.A., LL.B., 1879-1880; Hon. Levi Stockbridge, 1880-1882; 
Hon. Paul Ansel Chadbourne, M.D., D D., LL.D., 1882-1883; James 
Carruthers Greenough, M.A., 1883-1886, and Henry Hill Goodell, 
M.A., LL.D., the present incumbent, elected in 1886. 

On January 5, 1883, the Durfee plant house was destroyed by fire. 
In 1885 the same thing happened to South dormitory, and in June, 
1894, to the college barn. Admission is by examination. Attend- 
ance at military drill is compulsory. Besides annual reports and 
bulletins issued by the experiment department of the college, the 
students publish the "Index," a junior annual, and "Aggie Life," a 
bi-weekly. A " Hand-book " is issued by the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

The societies are the College Shakespearean Club, Washington 
Irving Literary Society, Y. M. C. A., Natural History Society, Read- 
ing Room Association, Athletic Association with baseball and foot- 
ball teams, and a Polo Club, and the Glee and Banjo Clubs. Chap- 
ters of the following fraternities have been organized: D G K, 1868; 
Q T V, 1869, and * 2 K, 1873. The graduates number 500, of whom 
450 are living. The oldest of these is Lewis A. Sparrow, 187 1, of 
Boston, Mass. 

\For all further viatters and for Faculty, see Boston University, of 
which this college is a fart.] 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



191 



MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 

Boston, Mass. Co-Editcational, Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^410,000 



Students, 
1,200 



Instructors, 
143 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
3^'953 



History and Organization: The institute was founded in 1861 
after a memorial to the Legislature by Wm. B. Rogers. It was 
opened in 1865 with 272 students. The course of Electrical Engin- 
eering was established in 1886. The presidents have been : William 
Barton Rogers, 1865-70; John D. Runkle, 1870-78; Brest. Rogers 
(second term), 1878-81; and Francis A. Walker since 1881. The 
corporation consists of forty-one trustees and three ex-officio mem- 
bers : the governor, chief justice, and secretary of education of the 
State. Affiliated with the institute are the Lowell Institute, for gen- 
eral instruction, and the School of Practical Design. 

Adfuissioji, Instruction, Degrees : Admission is by examination, 
which can be undergone in Boston and the principal cities of the 
union. Candidates must be seventeen years old. College graduates 
are admitted without examination. Twelve distinct courses lead to 
degrees of B.S. Of these courses, seven are in engineering, four in 
the sciences, with one of liberal learning. At the end of the first half 
year, in which the same instruction is given to all, the choice of 
courses is free. Specialization is encouraged. No religious services 
are held. Master's degrees are conferred only after resident graduate 
study. 

Equipment: The buildings now occupied are the Rogers Building, 
on Boylston Street, devoted to instruction in mathematics, literature, 
history, political science, geology, mineralogy, and biology; the 
Walker Building, at the corner of Boylston and Clarendon Streets, 
mainly devoted to the departments of chemistry, physics, and elec- 
tricity, and to instruction in language ; the engineering building, on 
Trinity Place, devoted to the engineering laboratories and to instruc- 
tion in mechanics and hydraulics, and in mechanical and civil engin- 
eering ; the architectural building, immediately adjoining the engin- 
eering building ; a series of workshops, on Garrison Street, with a 
room devoted to the Lowell School of Design ; and a g}'mnasium and 
drill-hall on Exeter Street. 

Besides the general library, a special reference library of 5,000 is 
owned by the Department of History and Political Science. Similar 
libraries are owned by the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Elec- 
tricity, and Railroads. Well equipped laboratories are maintained 
by all the departments. The annual expenses of the school aggregate 
nearly $500,000. Tuition for the year, lasting from the last week in 
September to the last week of May, is $200. Incidental expenses are 
estimated at $30. while living expenses are from $100 to. $500. 
Thirty-three scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are available, with 
two funds yielding $400 each, for graduate students. In all, funds 
amounting to ^75,000 are devoted to aiding poor students. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Tech," a 
weekly, and the "Technique," an annual. Social and other organiza- 



192 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



tions of every description are maintained by the students, besides 
athletic teams and chapters of the following fraternities : X *, 1873-78 ; 
2 X, 18S2; A T n, 1885-1886; * r A, A% H, ATA, 1889; and 
A X, 1890. 

Faculty. 



Francis A. Walker, Ph.D., LL.D., 

President. 
John D. Runkle, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Mathematics. 
George A. Osborne, S.B,, Math. 
James M. Crafts, S.B., Organic Cham. 
Robert H. Richards, S.B., Mining 

En£;ineering. 
William H. Niles, Ph.D., A.M., Geol. 
Charles R. Cross, S.B., Physics. 
Gaetano Lanza, C.E., Mechanical Eng. 
George F. Swain, S.B., Civil Eng. 
Francis W. Chandler, Architecture. 
Alphonse N. Van Daell, LL.D., 

Modern Languages. 
William T. Sedgwick, Ph.D., Biology. 
Davis R. Dewey, Ph.D., Economics. 
Silas W. Holman, S.B., Physics. 
Webster Wells, S.B , Associate Prof. 

of Mathematics. 
Peter Schwamb, S.B., Mechanism and 

Workshops. 
Cecil H, Peabody, S.B., Marine Engi- 
neering. 
C. Frank Allen, S.B., Railroad Eng. 
Alfred E. Burton, S.B., Topographi- 
cal Engineering. 
Dwight Porter, Ph.B., Hydraulic Eng. 
Heinrich O. Hofman, E.M., Ph.D., 

Mining and Metallurgy. 
Thomas E. Pope, A.M., General 

Chemistry. 
Linus Faunce, S.B., Drawing. 
Eleazer B. Homer, S.B , Architecture. 
George T. Dippold, Ph.D., Modern 

Languages. 
Henry P. Talbot, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
Arlo Bates, A.M., Litt.D., English. 
Lieut. John Bigelow, Jr., U. S. A., 

Military Science. 
Desire Disprodelle, Architectural 

Design. 
Charles F. A. Currier, A.M., History. 
William O. Crosby, S.B., Economic 

Geology. 
Jerome Sondericker, C.E., Applied 

Mechanics. 
Allyne L. Merrill, S.B., Mechanism. 
Dana P. Bartlett, S.B., Mathematics. 
Edward F. Miller, S.B., Steam Eng. 



Frank Vogel, A.M., Modern Langs. 

William L. Puffer, S.B., Electrical 
Engineering. 

Frederick H. Bailey, A.M., Math. 

Fred L. Bardwell, S. B., General Lhem. 

Augustus H.Gill, Ph.D., Gas Analysis. 

Arthur A. Noyes, Ph.D., Organic 
Chemistry. 

S. Homer Woodbridge, A.M., Heat- 
ing and Ventilation. 

Harry E. Clifford, S.B., Theoretical 
Physics. 

Richard W. Lodge, Mining and 
Metallurgy. 

Frederick S. Woods, Ph.D., Math, 

Theodore Hough, Ph.D., Biology. 

William Z. Ripley, Ph.D., Sociology 
and Economics. 

Henry K. Burrison, S.B., Mechanical 
Drawing. 

Ellen H. Richards, A.M., S.B., San- 
itary Chemistry. 

Charles L. Adams, Freehand Drawing. 

Joseph J. Skinner, Ph.D., Math. 

George H. Barton, S.B,. Geology. 

Peter S, Burns, Ph.D., General Chem. 

John W.Smith, Industrial Chemistry. 

Arthur G. Robbins, S.B., Highway 
Engmeering. 

James H. Stanwood, S.B., Civil Eng. 

Henry N. Dickinson, A.M., English. 

George W, Hombert, S.B., Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

Frank A. Laws, S.B., Electrical Meas- 
urements. 

Nathan R. George, Jr., A.M., Math. 

William H. Lawrence, S.B., Architec. 

William S. Davenport, S.B., Analyti- 
cal Chemistry. 

Harvey M. Goodwin, Ph.D., Physics. 

William Lincoln Smith, S.B., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

Edward Robinson, S.B., Mechanical 
Drawing. 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard, Modern 
Languages. 

Joseph Blachstein, Modern Langs. 

Willis R. Whitney, S.B., Analytical 
Chemistr3\ 

Carleton A. Read, S.B., Mechanical 
Engineering. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



193 



James Swan, S.B,, Naval Architecture. 
G. Russell Lincoln, S.B., Sanitary 

Chemistry. 
Louis Derr, M.A., S.B,, Physics. 
George V. Wendell, S.B., Physics. 
Leon E. Bernard, Modern Languages. 
Robert P. Bigelow, Ph.D., Biology, 

Librarian. 
Benjamin E. Carter, Jr., A.M., Math. 
Henry G. Pearson, A.B., English. 
Frank- H. Thorp, Ph.D., Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Charles E. Fuller, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
William A. Johnston, S.B., Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 
Joseph P. Lyon, S.B,, Civil Eng. 
Charles F. Park, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
John O. Sumner, A.B., History. 
William H. Walker, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
Samuel P. Mulliken, Ph.D., Organic 

Chemistry. 
George W. Rolfe, A.M., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
L. Kimball Russell, S.B., General 

Chemistry. 
Simeon C. Keith, Jr., S.B., Biology. 
Ervin Kenison, S.B., Mech. Drawing. 
Charles L. Norton, S.B., Physics. 
Kilburn S. Sweet, S.B., Civil Eng. 
F. Jewett Moore, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
W. Felton Brown, Freehand Drawing. 
Frederic H. Keyes, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Henry E. Crampton, Jr., A.B., Biol. 



Justin Erhardt, Modem Languages. 
Henry Fay, Ph.D., Analytical Chem. 
Harry W. Gardner, S.B., Architecture. 
George B. Haven, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Frank P. McKibben, Civil Eng. 
Joseph W. Phelan, S.B., Chemistry. 
Franklin H. Robbins, S.B., Mech. 

Drawing. 
Alexander W. Moseley, S.B., Mech. 

Engineering, 
Harold K, Barrows, S.B., Civil Eng. 
Jesse H. Boiune, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineermg. 
Carl H. Clark, S.B., Mechanical Eng. 
WiUiam J. Drisko, S.B., Physics. 
Fred A. Hannah, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Henry A. Holdrege, S.B., Physics. 
Frederick W. Howe, SB., Chem. 
Charles A. Meserve, S.B., Sanitary 

Chemistry. 
James F. Norris, Ph.D., Organic 

Chemistry. 
Samuel C. Prescott, S.B., Biology. 
Charles R. .Walker, S.B., Chemistry. 
Walter S. Williams, S.B., Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Frank B. Nusters, S.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Theodore B. Merrick, Wood and 

Foundry-Work. 
James R. Lambirth, Forging. 
Robert H. Smith, Machine-Tool Work. 
Minot A. Bridgham, Woodwork. 
Everett H. Masters, Forging. 
Ira G. Studley, Machine-Tool Work. 
Herman Boos, Gymnastics. 



There are besides the above, twenty-seven lecturers on special 
topics during the current year. 



McKENDREE COLLEGE. 

Lebanon, III. Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$5,935 



Students, 
276 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
8,000 



The college was organized as Lebanon Seminary in 1828, and is 
therefore the oldest institution of higher education in the West. In 
1830 it took the name of Bishop McKendree who had bequeathed all 
his possessions to it, and came under the control of the bishops of 



194 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



the Methodist Church. The first principal was E. A. Ames, who 
afterwards became a bishop, while the first president was the Rev. 
Peter A. Akers. The school is governed by thirty-six trustees. 
Entrance is by examination and by high school certificate. Degrees 
of B.A., B.C., B.L., and of Law are conferred, and M.A., after one 
year. The law degree gives admission to the bar of the State. 
Tuition for the year, lasting from September lo to June 4, is ^36. 
Special fees are charged for laboratory work. The societies are the 
Philosophian and Platonian for men, and the Clionian for women. 
There have been in all, 8,000 students, of whom 700 have taken de- 
grees. The oldest graduate is H. H. Horner, 1841, of Lebanon, 111. 



Faculty. 



McKendree Hypes Chamberlin, A.M., 
LL.B., President, Mental and Moral 
Science. 

Albert G. Jepson, A.M., Ph.D., Libra- 
rian, Mathematics and Astronomy. 

William C. Walton, A.M., Greek. 

Edwin P. Baker, A.B., Latin, German. 

Edward B. Waggoner, A.M., Natural 
Science and Physics. 

Rev. T. H. Herdman, D.D., Dean of 
Post-Graduate Department. 



George C. Worth, LL.B., Dean of 
Law Department. 

J. Russell Miller, A.B., English. 

Fred. Pesold, Ottilie Pesold, Instru- 
mental Music. 

M. Edwin Johnson, Vocal Music. 

Abbie Lupton, Art. 

W. L. Cunningham, Stenography and 
Typewriting. 

E. B. Waggoner, Curator of Museum. 

N. Theresa Jepson, Assist. Librarian. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 

McMinnville, Ore. Co- Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
l4,8oo 



Students, 
112 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,025 



McMinnville College was founded by the Baptists of Oregon in 
1859 It is governed by a board of eighteen trustees. Admission 
is upon certificate. The degrees are B.A , and B.S. and certificates 
are given. The expenses of the year lasting from September 17 to 
June 12, are $150. The students maintain two religious associations, 
and one literary society, the Philergean, for both sexes. In all there 
have been twenty-one graduates, the oldest of whom is John M. Smith, 
1882, of Astoria, Ore. 



Facility. 



T. G. Brownson, President, English, 

Latin, and Philosophy. 
Emanuel Northup, Math., Greek. 
Mrs. T. G. Brownson, Languages. 



W. F. Fargo, Sciences, Rhetoric, and 

English. 
Mrs. F. E. Wolfenden, Elocution and 
Music. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



195 



MERCER UNIVERSITY. 



Macon, Ga. 


Co- 


Educational. 


I 


Baptist. 


Income, 
$15,000 


Students, 
211 


Instructors, 
14 


Buildings, 


Books, 
6,000 





The university was founded in 1833, Admission is on certificate. 
Degrees are conferred in art, science and pedagogy. The expenses 
for the year ending June 3, are $85, no charge being made for tuition. 
The graduates number 780. The president is the Rev. J. D. Gam- 
brell, D.D. 

{Further information lacking.) 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL COLLEGE OF THE 

SOUTH. 



Birmingham, Ga. 



Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$1,000 



Students, 
109 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
500 



The college was founded in 1894. Admission is on certificate. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The degree is A.B. The ex- 
penses for the year ending May 23, are $100. The president is the 
Rev. L. Gordon, A.M. 

{Further information lacking.) 



MIAMI UNIVERSITY. 



Oxford, 0. 


Co-Ediccational. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
$27,000 


Students, 
125 


Instructors, 
12 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
13,000 



History and Organization: The university was established under 
its present name in 1809, according to acts of Congress of 1792 
and of 1803 vesting a township of land with the legislature of Ohio. 
The law of 181 2 providing that the actual settlers should from 
a given date and forever after pay only a yearly rent of six per 
cent upon the purchase money, for a period of seventy years pre- 
vented the university from securing an increased revenue, and thus 
practically crippled it, so that in 1873 the school had to be closed. 
It was reopened in 1886, but has undergone a complete change of 
faculty since that time. Women were admitted in 1S87. In 1896 



196 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

the State legislature provided a special fund by levying an annual 
tax upon the State, and thus restored Miami University to its original 
rank. 

The school is governed by twenty-six trustees. Admission is by 
examination and upon provisional certificates. In the junior year 
the majority of courses, and in the senior year all studies are elec- 
tive, i^ttendance at chapel is compulsory. The degrees are B.A., 
B.S., and M.A. after one year and a specific examination. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from September 16 to the third vveek in 
June, are from $170 to $300. There is no charge for tuition. Free 
lecture courses are also given. Three prizes of $25 each are given 
for excellence in English and the classics. 

Societies and Piiblicaiions : The students publish "The Miami 
Journal." There are two literary societies with halls and libraries 
called the Erodelphian and Miami Union, and there is also an 
Oratorical Association offering an annual prize, an Athletic Asso- 
ciation with football and baseball teams, and a Christian Association. 
Chapters of the following fraternities, three of which were originally 
founded at Miami, have been organized among the i?tudents : A A *, 
1835; B0n, 1839; * A 0,1848; A K £,1852; 2 X, 1855-1858 ; and 
A T, 1866-1873. 

Since the first class was graduated in 1824, there have been 1,093 
graduates, of whom 513 are living. The oldest of these is John W. 
Caldwell, 1827 of Cmcinnati, Ohio; while the best known is Ex-Presi- 
dent Benjamin Harrison. 

Faculty. 



Rev. William O. Thompson, D.D., 
President, History, Polit. Economy. 

Rev. Andrew D. Hepburn, D.D., 
LL.D , English. 

Henry Snyder, M.Sc, Physics and 
Chemistry. 

Roger Bruce Johnson, A.M., Phi- 
losophy. 

Herman L. Ebeling, Ph.D., Greek. 



Edward P. Andersen, Ph.D., French 
and German. 

Aaron L. Treadwell, M.Sc, Biology 
and Geology. 

Edward P. Thompson, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

William B. Langsdorf, A.M., Latin. 

Wilbur J. Greer, A.M., Prep. Dept. 

Orlando B. Finch, A.M., Librarian. 



MIAMI MILITARY INSTITUTE. 

The school was founded in 1886 to meet the want of preparatory 
training for colleges in Ohio, but a collegiate course is at the same 
time given. Three courses lead to B.A., B.L., and B.S., and there 
are elective courses. The degree of M.A. is conferred after three 
years. Special attention is given to military instruction, and uni- 
forms are worn by all the students. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from the third week in September to the first of June, are 
$350. The school is governed by seven trustees. The names of the 
teachers are not given in the catalogue. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



197 



MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Lansings Mich. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$85,000 



Students, 
402 



Instructors, 
31 



Buildings, 
40 



Books, 
20,000 



The college was organized in 1S55 and opened in 1857. In 1S62 it 
received a congressional land grant. It was under the control of the 
State Board of Education until 1861, when it came under that of the 
department of Agriculture. The presidents have been : Joseph R. 
Williams, 1857-1859 ; Theophilus C. Abbot, 1863-1885 ; Edwin Willits, 
1885-1889; Oscar Clute, 1SS9-1893; Lewis G. Gorton, 1893-1895. 

Admission is upon certiiicate and by examination. Degrees of 
B.S., and M.S. are conferred after four years, the latter being for 
graduate study, or for an honorary degree. Attendance at chapel 
is not compulsory, but military drill is. Negroes are not excluded. 
Of the forty buildings, seven are laboratories, three dormitories, and 
one a dwelling house for the teachers. Six new laboratories have 
been equipped, and there is an herbarium of 60,000 specimens. The 
general museum contains a large collection of zoological exhibits. 
The campus covers eighty acres, the college farm four hundred acres, 
while forty acres are devoted to horticulture. ■ 

The expenses for the year, lasting from September 14 to June 18, 
are $122. Besides the bulletins and reports issued by the experi- 
ment station, the students publish the " Weekly Record," an out- 
growth of the former " Speculum," a monthly. The societies are, 
the Eclectic, Hesperian, Olympic, Columbian, Union, and Feronian, 
a branch of the Y. M. Christian Association, the Alumni Organization, 
and a Students' Organization, controlling athletics and matters of 
discipline ; botanical and natural history societies, a Shakespeare 
Club, and a College Band. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized : ATA, 1872 ; and 4> A 0, 1873. 

The graduates since 1851 number 676, of whom 645 are living. 
The oldest is Albert F. Allen, Vineland, Kan., of the class of 1861. 



Faculty. 



Jonathan L. Snyder, A.M., Ph.D., 
President. 

Robert C. Kedzie. M.A., M.D.,Chem. 

William J. Beal, M.S., Ph.D., Botany 
and Forestry. 

E. A. A. Grange, V.S., Veterinary 
Science. 

Levi R. Taft, M.S., Horticulture. 

Howard Edwards, M.A., LL.D., 
Modern Languages. 

Herman K. Vedder, C.E., Math. 

Lieut. Edson A. Lewis, U.S.A., Mili- 
tary Science. 

I. H. Butterfield, Secretary. 

Clinton D. Smith, M.S., Agriculture. 

Charles L. Weil, S.B., Engineering. 



Walter B., Barrows, S.B., Zoology. 

Edith F. McDermott, Domestic 
Economy. 

Frank S. Kedzie, M.S., Chemistry. 

Wm. S. Holdsworth, M.S., Drawing. 

Philip B. Woodworth, B.S., M.E., 
Physics. 

Alvin B. Noble, B.Ph., English and 
Modern Languages. 

Fred. B. Mumford, M.S., Agriculture. 

Wilbur O. Hedrick, M.S., History and 
Finance. 

Paul M. Chamberlain, M.E,, Engi- 
neering. 

Warren Babcock, Jr., B.S.. Math. 

Gager C. Davis, M.S., Zoology. 



198 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Charles F. Wheeler, B.S., Botany. 
A. L. Westcott, B.M.E., Engineering. 
Dick J. Crosby, B.S., English. 
Burton O. Longyear, Botany. 
Cyrus C. Pashby, B.S., Mathematics. 
Gordon H. True, B.S., Dairying. 
Merritt W. Fulton, B.S., Agriculture. 



Thomas Gunson, Horticulture. 

Ernest Wittstock, Farm. 

Vinton V. Newell, B.S., Machine Shop. 

Thomas Durkin, Horticulture. 

Charles E. Hoyt, Wood Shops. 

Linda E. Landon, Librarian. 

C. J. Foreman, Assistant Librarian. 



MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 

Middlebury, Vt. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
j5 1 8,000 



Students, 

105 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 



Books, 
18,000 



History, and Organization: In 1800 the General Assembly of Ver- 
mont established Middlebury College in one of the most picturesque 
spots of the Champlain Valley. The former presidents of the institu- 
tion have been: Jeremiah Atwater, D.D., 1800-1809; Henry Davis, 
D.D., 1810-1817; Joshua Bates, D.D., 1818-1839; Benjamin Laba- 
ree, D.D., LL.D., 1840-1866; Harvey Denison Kitchel, D.D., 1866- 
1S73; Calvin Butler Hulbert, D.D., 187 5-1880; Cyrus Hamlin, D.D., 
LL.D., 1880-1885; Ezra Brainerd, LL.D., 18S6 to the present time. 
The college corporation consists of a board of nineteen trustees. 

Instruction : Two courses are furnished, the classical and the 
Latin-scientific. All studies for the first two years are prescribed ; 
while for the juniors eleven hours a week, and nine hours a week for 
the seniors are prescribed. A system of honors is established. Dr. 
Merrill, a former proctor at Middlebury, gave ^15,000 for prizes and 
elocution. Two prizes are offered for the best freshmen speakers, 
and two for proficiency in Latin. There are funds for the payment of 
term bills, a scholarship of $100 for a woman student, five scholar- 
ships of ^60 each for deserving students, and $2,400 to be divided 
among thirty students. 

College Adjuncts : The library has 20,000 volumes and 1,150 pam- 
phlets. There is also a museum, rich in geological specimens, and 
a gymnasium with athletic grounds. Commencement is on June 
25. Of the 2,524 students that have been graduated since the begin- 
ning of the college, 1,422 are now living. The oldest of these is 
Jonathan B. Kidder, of the class of 1821, in Huntington, Pa. 



Faculty. 



Ezra Brainerd, LL.D., President, 
Mental and Moral Science. 

Henry Martyn Seely, A.M., M.D., 
Natural History. 

William Wells Eaton, A.M., Greek. 

Walter Eugene Howard, LL.D., His- 
tory and Political Science. 

Charles Baker Wright, A.M., Rhetoric 
and English Literature. 

Myron Reed Sanford, A. INT., Latin. 

Wm. Wesley McGilton, A.M., Chem. 



Theodore Henckels, S.B., Modem 
Languages. 

Ernest Calvin Bryant, S.B., Physics 
and Mathematics. 

Edward Angus Burt, Ph.D., Natural 
History. 

Charles Leslie Leonard, A.B., Elo- 
cution. 

C. B. Wright, Librarian, 

Annie Lawrence Ritchie, A.M., Assist- 
ant Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



199 



MIDLAND COLLEGE. 

Atchikson, Kan, Co- Educational. 



Lutheran. 



Income, 



Students, 
120 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
J 



Books, 
5,000 



The college was founded in 1887 by the Board of Education of the 
General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. The town of 
Atchinson contributed twenty acres and $55,000, and guaranteed to 
furnish two hundred students. The endowment is to be raised to 
$100,000. The trustees number fifteen. 

Students holding high school diplomas are admitted. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., and B.L. No honorary degrees are conferred. Attend- 
ance at chapel and gymnastic drill is compulsory. The expenses for 
the year, lasting from September 9 to June 10, are ^160. Prizes of 
$30 are offered to freshmen and seniors. 

The societies are the Kalophronean, the Wynn, the Excelsior, a 
Christian Association, Mission Band, an Alumni Association, and 
Athletic Association, with football and baseball teams. The stu- 
dents publish the " Midland." The graduates since 1891 number 
thirty-two. The oldest of these is Leroy H. Kelsey, 1891, St. 
Joseph, Mo. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Jacob A. Clutz, A.M., D.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Rev. J. Howard Stough, A.M., Ph.D., 
Greek and Latin. 

E. B. Knerr, A.M., Sc.D., Mathe- 
matics and Sciences. 

Rev. Carl Krueger, German, French. 

Granville H. Meixell, M.A., Librarian, 
English. 



Ella C. Beegle, Maggie C. Delo, B.S., 

Academic Department. 
J. Francke Detweiler, A.B., Classics, 
William C. Wright, A.M., Elocution 

and Music. 
Josephine L. Piatt, Music. 
Margaret A. Root, Art. 
David Lloyd, Director of Gymnasium. 
George W. Livers, Proctor. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. 

Milligan^ Tenn. Co-Educational. 



Disciples. 



Income, 
$4,500 



Students, 
204 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,400 



The college was founded in 1882 in a picturesque situation amid 
scenes of historic interest. The trustees number eight. Admission 
is upon certificate. The degrees are A.B., B.S., B.L., and A.M., 
with M.L. five years after graduation. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September to June, are $160. Most of the literary work 
at the college has been entrusted to the literary societies, of which 
there are several. 



200 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-EOOK. 



Faculty. 



J. Hopwood, A.M., President, Ethics, 

etc. 
J. P. McConnell, A.B., Ancient 

Languages. 
H. R. Garrett, A.B., Mathematics. 
Mrs. S. E. L. Hopwood, English and 

Elocution. 
W. J. bhelburne, A.B,, Mathematics. 



T. B. McCartney, A.B., Literature. 
J. V. Thomas, A.B., Preparatory De- 
partment and Languages. 
Sallie Wade, Music. 
J. G. Johnson, Shorthand, etc. 
E. C. Wilson, A.B., Law, 
Allie Owings, Primary Department. 
L. C. Felts, B.S., Librarian. 



MILLS COLLEGE. 



Seminary Park, Cal. 


Women. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 


Students, 
146 


Instructors, 
27 


Buildings, 
7 


Books, 
4>5oo 





Mills Seminary was established in 187 1, after the pattern of Mount 
Holyoke. It was chartered as a college in 18S5. The site is an 
attractive one, and covers ground of 100 acres. The trustees 
number fourteen. 

Admission is by examination or after a preparatory course in the 
seminary. Attendance at chapel is not obligatory. The degrees are 
A.B., and B.L. The expenses for the year, lasting from August 7 to 
May 28, are $350. Fourteen scholarships yielding from $160 to $400 
are offered. 

The students maintain the Bryant, the Missionary, and a Christian 
Endeavor Society, with an Alumni Association. The graduates 
number 500. 

Faculty. 



Mrs. C. T. Mills, President, Theism 

and Ethics. 
Cynthia K. Goulding, President's 

Assistant. 
Jane C, Tolman, Classics and Art. 
Josiah Keep, A.M., Natural Science. 
Ellen W. Bushnell, Librarian, History. 
Mary Ellis, A.M., Psychology and 

Political Economy. 
Ida J. Everett, B.L., English. 
Emily Ruth Harris, B.L., English. 
Katherine Andrews, Mathematics. 
Mary L. Benton, B.A., Latin, Greek. 
Mary Chamberlain, A.M., French and 

German. 
Julia M. Adams, B.L., Latin, English. 



Charlotte L. Tenney, B.L., Latin and 

Physical Culture. 
Clara K. Wittenmyer, Grammar Dep. 
Flora Howard, B.A., Assistant. 
Louis Lisser, Music. 
Juhus Weber, Anna S. Gilbert, Daisy 

D. Foster, Instrumental Music. 
Julie Rosewald, Vocal Music. 
Lillian E. Morey, Assistant. 
J. H. Rosewald, Musical History and 

Harmony. 
Rocco M. Laraja, Guitar, Mandolin. 
Leila Ellis, Elocution. 
Julia Mann, Painting and Drawing. 
Ella J. Nutting, Penmanship. 
Hannah Williams, Hygiene. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



20I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 

Jackson, Miss. Men. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$15,000 



Students, 
166 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



The college is named in honor of its founder and principal bene- 
factor, R. W. Millsaps. It was organized in 1892 by the Methodist- 
Episcopal Church of Mississippi. The school is governed by a board 
of thirteen trustees. Admission is upon certificate. Degrees of B.A., 
B.S., B.L., M.A., and M.S. are given. No tuition is charged. The 
expenses of the year, lasting from September 23 to June 16, are $120. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Four scholarships have been 
established, and two cottages for students have been built. The 
literary societies are the Galloway and the Lamar, and there is a 
Y. M. C. A. and Athletic Association, though it has been the unvary- 
ing policy of the faculty to discourage all intercollegiate contests. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William Belton Murrah, D.D., 

Mental and Moral Philosophy. 
William Lander Weber, A.M., English. 
George Crawford Swearingen, A.M., 

Ancient Languages. 
Anthony Moultrie Muckenfuss, Ph.D., 

Chemistry, etc. 
Rev. James Adolphus Moore, Ph.D., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
James Park Hanner, Jr., A.B., Ancient 

and Modern Languages. 
Edward Mayes, LL.D., Law. 



Hon. J. A. P. Campbell, LL.D., Hon. 
Frank Johnston, Hon. S. S. Cal- 
hoon, Hon, Thomas A. Mc Willie, 
Law Lecturers. 

Robert Scott Ricketts, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Greek. 

Edward Latta Bailey, B.S., English 
and Latin. 

Francis Marion Austin, A.B., History 
and Geography. 

John Tillery Lewis, Gymnastics. 

G. C. Swearingen, Librarian. 



Milton, Wis. 



MILTON COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Non-Sectariatt . 



Income, 

$4,838, 



Students, 
160 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
4,000 



In 1846 a " select school " was established at Milton, which became 
in 1848 the DuLac Seminary. In 1854 it was transformed into an 
academy and in 1887 was incorporated as Milton College. The 
trustees number twenty-six. Admission is upon certificates mainly. 
Bachelors' and Masters' degrees are given in arts, letters, science and 
music. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 4 to July 
I, are $150. A new gymnasium and Scientific Hall are in process, of 
erection. 



202 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



An Alumni and Christian Association, three literary societies, and 
a Shakespeare Club are maintained by the students. The graduates 
number 250, of whom 211 are living. The oldest of these is Prcf, 
Nathan C. Turning, 1867, of Riverside, Cal. 



Faculty. 



Rev. William C. Whitford, A.M., 
D.D., President, Philosophy, Rhet- 
oric, History, and Finance. 

Albert Whitford, A.M., Mathematics, 
Astronomy, etc. 

Edwin Shaw, A.M., Latin, Chemistry. 

Walter D. Thomas, A.M., Greek. 

Ludwig Kumlien, M.S., JPhysics and 
Physiology. 



Jairus M. Stillman, Mus. Doc, Music. 

Charles H. Crandall, Violin. 

Belle R. Walker, M.S., German and 

English. 
Nelly M. Brown, B.S., German and 

English. 
Charlotte D. Maxson, Painting. 
Jennie A. Dunn, B.S., Elocution. 
Alfred E. Whitford, Librarian. 



MISSISSIPPI COLLEGE. 



Clinton, Mis 




Men. 


Baptist. 


Income, 
5^10,150 


Students, 
240 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
8,000 



In 1830 the college was established at Clinton by the citizens of 
that village. It was controlled at first by a board of elective trustees, 
then came under the control of the Presbyterians ; and later, in 
1850, under that of the Baptists. During the Civil War instruction 
was suspended, and a debt of $10,000 incurred by the preservation 
of the property, with simultaneous loss of a cash endowment of 
$iioo,ooo. In 1865 t^^ ^^^t "^'^^ cancelled, the college restored to 
the Baptist denomination, the buildings repaired, and instruction 
resumed. Among the presidents have been Dr. I. Turner, Rev. 
E. C. Eager, Dr. Walter Hillman, Prof. M. T. Martin, Dr. W. S. 
Webb, Rev. R. A. Venable, and J. W. Provine, Ph.D., the present 
incumbent. 

The school is governed by twenty-six trustees. The college year 
is from September 18 to June 3. Tuition is free. The degrees are 
B.A., B.S., and B.LL. Four gold medals are given every year for 
essays and speeches. There are two literary societies, the Hermenian 
and the Philomathean, and a society of missionary hiquiry. Chap- 
ters of the following fraternities have been established : * K "V, 
1860-1861 ; 2 A E, 1869-1875, and 2 X, 1873-1874. The students 
publish the " Mississippi College Magazine." 



Faculty. 



J. W. Provine, A.M., Ph.D., President, 

German and Science. 
Rev. W. S. Webb, D.D., Psychology 

and Ethics. 
J. G. Deupree, LL.D., English. 
J. M. Sharp, A.M., Mathematics. 



A. J. Aven, A.M., Latin and French. 

J. L. Logan, A.M., Principal Prepar- 
atory Department. 

R. A. Venable, A.M., D.D., History 
and Greek. 

J. T. Walker, A.B., Natural Sciences. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



203 



MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 

COLLEGE. 



Starkuille, Miss. 


Men. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
138,099 


Students, 
336 


Instructors, 
25 


Buildings, 
9 


Books, 
3.794 



History : The college owes its origin to an act of the general 
government passed in 1862, to encourage the establishment of indus- 
trial colleges. By this act public land was sold, realizing some 
$227,150 for the State. The State Legislature in 1878 gave one half 
of this to the Mississippi Agricultural College, and another to a 
similar school for negroes, upon the condition that a first-class insti- 
tution be maintained, at which besides agriculture, horticulture, and 
the mechanic arts, also the classics and sciences should be taught, 
including military tactics. 

Organization : The school is governed by nine trustees. Tuition is 
free for students residing in the State, but a matriculation fee of $5 
is charged. Admission is upon examination or certificate. Appli- 
cants must be fifteen years of age, except in the case of two brothers 
entering simultaneously. In that case one may be under the specified 
age, but not more than two years. Military drill and attendance at 
chapel are compulsory. The degree of B.S. is conferred. 

Societies, etc. : Besides a military company, forming a part of the 
militia of the State, there is an Athletic Association with baseball 
and football teams, tennis, wheeling, and fencing clubs, and a dra- 
matic club and students' orchestra. The literary societies are the 
Dialectic and the Philotechnic. A chapter of 2 A E has been main- 
tained since 1887, and there is also a Christian Association. Of the 
180 graduates 173 are living. The oldest of these is H. H. Harring- 
ton, 1883, of College Station, Tex. 



Faculty. 



Gen. S. D. Lee, President. 

Lieut. C. L. Steele, U.S.A., Com- 
mandant. 

W. C. Welborn, B.Sc, Agriculture. 

A. B. McKay, B.Sc, C. T. Ames, 
B.Sc, Horticulture. 

A. J. Wiechardt, M.M.E., J. S. Wier, 
B.Sc, S. L. Grinstead, Mech. Arts. 

G. C. Creelman, B.S, A., Biology. 

W. L. Hutchinson, M.S., E. L. 
Robins, B.Sc, W. F. Hand, B.Sc, 
Chemistry. 

W. H. Magruder, A.M., J. T. Connell, 
B.Sc, English. 



Tait Butler, V.S., Veterinary Science. 
B. M. Walker, M.Sc, J. C. Herbert, 

M.Sc, Mathematics. 
Lieut. C. L. Steele, Military Tactics 

and Mathematics. 
J. M. White, M.Sc, History, Civics, 

and English. 
Dabney Lipscomb, A.M., Psychology 

and Ethics, Prep. Dept. 
S. M. Tracy, M.S., Experiment Station. 
J. S. Wallace, B.Sc, J. S. Carroll, 

B.Sc, Preparatory Department. 
A. M. Maxwell, Penmanship, and 

Book-keeping. 



204 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



MISSOURI VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Mars/iali, Mo. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$16,600 



Students, 

395 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
2,000 



The college was founded in 186S. It is governed by tAvelve trustees. 
Admission is by certificate. Three courses : the Classical, Philosophi- 
cal, and English, lead to degrees of A.B., B.Ph., and B.L. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 3 to June 4, are $130. 
Three prizes of money, and medals are offered for excellence in study. 
A gymnasium has recently been equipped. 

The students publish the " Delta," and maintain three literary socie- 
ties, two Christian Associations, and two other organizations. The 
graduates number thirty-five, of whom May A. Caldwell, 1890, of 
Kansas City, Mo., is the oldest. 

Facility. 



William Henry Black, D.D., Biblical 

Instruction. 
Andrew Jackson McGlumphy, D.D., 

LL.D., Mathematics. 
Wallace Elmer Grube, A.M., Greek. 
Albert McGinnis, A.M., Latin and 

German. 
John Moore Penick, A.M., Physics 

and Chemistry. 
Joan Campbell Orr, A.M., History 

and Elocution. 



Thomas Walton Galloway, A.M., 
Ph.D., Biology and Sociology. 

Robert John Peters, A.M , English. 

Myrtle Thorp, A. B., French and Latin. 

Edgar Sands Place, Music. 

M. Lam-a Woods Place, A.B., B.M., 
Violin and Guitar. 

Mabel Hightshoe, Piano. 

Erna Berry Watson, Painting. 

George Herbert Mack, W. J. Dysart, 
and O. O. Russell, Librarians. 



MISSOURI WESLEYAN COLLEGE. 

Cameron, Mo. Co-Ediicatio7iaL Methodist 



Income, 



Students, 
200 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,000 



The college was founded in 1883, and opened in 1887. It is gov- 
erned by ten trustees. There are four regular courses, leading to 
degrees of B.A., B.S., B.L., and B.Ph. Affiliated departments are : 
The School of Music and Art, the Preparatory School, the Academy, 
and the Commercial Department. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 10 to June 13, are from $roo upwards. A Loan 
Fund for deserving students has been established. Three literary 
societies and a Christian Association are maintained. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Chas. F. Spray, A.M., President, 
Philosophy and Literature. 

Rev. C. W. Caseley, Vice-president, 
English Bible. 



Kate E. Moss, B.A., Greek and Math. 
Charles McCaskill, Latin and German. 
Marion McKercher, Ped.M., Lit. 
Maud S. Dawson, American Literature. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



205 



Charles Leo Huntley, A.B., Mathe- 
matics and Sciences. 
Maude de Groot, Piano and Harmony. 
Lucy D. Cooper, Piano. 



Carrie Shepherd, Art. 

Tandy W. Partin, Commercial Law. 

Mary Hamlet, French. 

Silas H. Corn, Political Economy. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 

■ 
Monmouth, III. Co-Educational. United Presbyterians. 



Income, 
$17,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
18,000 



Monmouth College was founded in 1S56. The presidents have 
been : Dr. D. A. Wallace, 1856-187S, and J. B. McMichael, the present 
incumbent. The government of the school is vested in the Univer- 
sity Senate, consisting of nine trustees, twenty-eight directors, three 
alumni, and an advisory board of seven ladies. Candidates are 
admitted upon written examination, or upon certificates from certain 
academies and high schools. Degrees of B.A., B.S., B.LL., and in 
music are conferred, as well as that of A.M.,, after three years of post- 
graduate study. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 
4 to June 12, are from $175 to $250. Small prizes of money, and 
medals are given for excellence in speaking. There is no college 
gymnasium, but there is a Y. M. C. A. Gymnasium, and a park for 
the use of the Athletic Association, football and baseball team, and 
of the Tennis Club. Of the four literary societies, the Elocution and 
the Philo are for men, and the Aletheorian and Amateur des Belles 
Lettres for women. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
established; B n, 1S65-1878; ATA, 1865-187 1; * r A, 1866-187 1 ; 
nB*, 1867-1884; *A0, 1871-1884; «I>K^, 1872-1886; 2 X, 1874-1888; 
K K r, 1 870-1 878. An annual contest is held on commencement day. 
The graduates number nearly one thousand, the oldest of whom is 
Mrs. M. M. Thompson, 1858, of Monmouth. 



Faculty. 



J. B. McMichael, D.D., President, 
Logic and Philosophy. 

John H. McMillan, A.M., Vice-Presi- 
dent, Latin and Hebrew. 

Mary A. Sterrett, B.S., English. 

J. H. Wilson. Ph.D., Greek. 

Thos. H. Rogers, A.M., Mathematics. 

Russell Graham, D.D., Social Science. 

Clementine Calvin, A.M., German and 
Elocution. 



Samuel S. Maxwell, M.S., W. Edgar 

Taylor, M.S., Biology. 
J. N. Swan, Ph.D., Chemistry and 

Physics. 
E. C. Zartman, B.M.. Music. 
Alice Winbigler, A.M., Mathematics. 
Thos. S. McClenahan, Surveying and 

Engineering. 
T. B. Glass, A.B., Latin. 
Purcell Graham, Librarian. 



2o6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



MOORES HILL COLLEGE. 

Moores Hill, Ind. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 

$8,412 



Students, 
156 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was established in 1853, with Enoch G. Wood, D.D., 
as president. It is governed by twenty-three trustees. Students are 
admitted by examination, and on certificate. The degrees are A.B., 
B.Ph., and B.S., with that of A.M., after three years of professional 
work. Attendance at chapel is required. Regular courses of college 
lectures are offered. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 8 to June 17, are $100. 

The societies are the Philonikean, Segurnian,. and Photosotian; 
two Christian Associations, and an athletic association, with foot- 
ball eleven, baseball nine, and other college teams, all under the 
control of the faculty. A chapter of K A was organized in 187 1, 
and lasted four years. The oldest living graduate is Jane Kahler, 
1858, of San Francisco, Cal. 



Faculty. 



John H. Martin, A.M., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Charles W. Lewis, M.S., Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mathematics. 

Andrew J. Bigney, A.M., Sciences. 

Monroe Vayhinger, A.M., Pedagogy 
and German. 



Benjamin W. Aldrich, A.M., Greek. 
Quincy G. Spence, A.B., Latin. 
Mrs. M. Vayhinger, B.S., Literature 

and History. 
E. Louise Williams, Music. 
Alta Ritter, Geography and Algebra. 
B. W. Aldrich, Librarian. 



Baltimore., Md. 



MORGAN COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



The college was founded in 1890. It is situated on the highest 
elevation of Baltimore. Connected with it are subsidiary schools at 
Princess Anne and Lynchburg, Va., the students of which are ad- 
mitted without examination. The trustees number eight. The 
degrees are A.B. and B.S. The library contains 1,500 volumes. 
The students maintain three literary societies, the most prominent of 
which is the Ciceronian, and publish the " Educator." The graduates 
number 130, while the students number some two hundred. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Francis J. Wagner, A.M., D.D., 

President. 
Rev. Charles E. Young, Psychology. 
Rev. James A. McCauley, D.D., 

Theology and Hebrew. 
Alice I. Sanford, Greek, Latin, etc. 



Mrs. M. A. H. Cadden, Normal De- 
partment, German. 

Joseph H. Lockerman, Frederick 
Handy, Preparatory Department. 

S. Ella Smith, Model School. 

Flora E. Strout, Secretary. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



207 



MOUNT ANGEL COLLEGE. 

Mount Angel, Ore. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 
$12,000 



Students, 
83 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
7,500 



Organization: Mount Angel Seminary and College, situated some 
forty miles south of Portland, was opened in 18S7. It was incor- 
porated under the laws of Oregon, and is under the control of the 
Benedictine Fathers. The trustees number five, among whom are 
the Archbishop of Oregon City and the prior of the Benedictine 
Monastery. The college is divided into three departments : St. 
Thomas Grand Seminary, for students of philosophy and theology ; 
St. Anselm's Little Seminary, for preparatory ministerial students ; 
and St. Joseph's Seminary, for professional and other students. 

Instruction and Degrees: Degrees of B.A., B.L., B.S., and B.M. 
are given after the completion of at least one year's course, with a 
suitable thesis, or musical composition. Masters' degrees can be 
obtained after one year of post-graduate residence, or upon appli- 
cation after two years. Attendance at chapel and mass, with monthly 
confession and communion, is compulsory. Students are not allowed 
to leave the college premises without permission, to retain money in 
their possession, to smoke or use tobacco, or to form clubs and 
societies, or hold meetings without permission. Books, papers, 
periodicals, etc., may be read only at the approval of the director. 
The expenses are $200 for the year, lasting from the first Tuesday 
of September until the end of June. Extra charges are made for 
the use of the library, for instruction in natural philosophy, chem- 
istry, telegraphy, engineering, drawing, Spanish, and music, as well 
as for each diploma. 

Equipment: The college building is surrounded by ample play- 
grounds. There are two distinct libraries : one containing 1,500 
books for the students, another containing 6,000 volumes for the 
teachers. A museum of botanical and mineral specimens has lately 
been added to the college, and a few years ago a meteorological 
observatory was there established by the United States Signal 
Service. There is an exhibition hall, provided with a stage and 
a drop curtain, as well as eight sets of scenery. The college press 
issues a German weekly, and a monthly college magazine called 
the " Banner." The societies are the Sodality of the Immaculate 
Conception, St. Joseph's Altar Society, Acme Dramatic Club, 
college choir and band, the Gross Literary and Debating Society, 
and Alumni Association. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Placidus Fuerst, O.S.B., Direc- 
tor, Physiology, Church History, 
and Music. 

Rev. Maurus Snyder, O.S.B., Supt. 
Commercial Department, Church 
History, Violin, and Telegraphy. 



Rev. Dr. Urban Fisher, O.S.B., Phi- 
losophy, Sciences, Languages, and 
Commercial Branches. 

Rev. D. Wadenswyler, O.S.B., Theol. 

Rev. Frowin Epper, O.S.B., Director 
Seminary, English, Latin, Botany. 



208 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Fr. Louis Bonaly, O.S.B., French. 

Rev. Berchtold Durrer, O.S.B., Clas- 
sics, German, and Mathematics. 

Rev. Thos. Ag. Meienhofer, O.S.B., 
Religion, Latin, and Rhetoric. 

Fr. Bede Robinson, O.S.B., English. 

Fr. Charles, O.S.B., Greek. 



Fr. Leo Perse, O.S.B., U. S. History 

and Geography. 
Bro. Gall Eugster, O.S.B., Singing. 
Bro. Thos. Dunn, O.S.B., Prefect, 

Ivlatii. and Commercial Branches. 
Francis Murrin, Stage. 
Wm. Markham, Geography, History. 



MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE. 

South Hadley, Mass. Women. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$62,000 



Students, 

-or 

jj5 



Instructors, 
34 



Buildings, 
8 



Books, 
16,000 



Organization: Mount Holyoke Seminary was founded by Mary 
Lyon in 1836, and was opened in 1837. It was chartered as a 
college in 1S88, and assumed its present name in 1S93. -'■" Septem- 
ber, 1S96, shortly after the opening of the academic session, a fire 
destroyed the main building, causing consternation among the stu- 
dents and teachers. No lives were lost, and the building was fully 
insured. It is governed by twenty trustees, of whom three are 
chosen by the alumnae. 

Instrtiction : Admission is on certificate and by examination, which 
may be undergone in New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, 
^Vashington, St. Louis, St. Paul, and Bangor, as well as at the college 
itself. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, as is gymnastic exercise 
during the first three years. Negroes are not excluded. The degrees 
are B.A., B.S., B.L., and M.A. after one year's residence and a thesis. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 17 to June 17, are 
$250. There is a loan fund for poor students, and a fund for twenty- 
one scholarships amounting to S6o,ooo. 

Equipment: Besides the college library, which is connected with 
the main building, there are several working libraries and a read- 
ing-room. Instruction is given in four halls, among which is a 
gymnasium and an observatory. The college grounds cover seventy 
acres, adjoining Lake Nonotuck. There is a botanical garden and 
arboretum of one acre. 

Societies and Pnblicatiotis : The students maintain a debating 
society, Shakespere Club, Contemporary Histoiy Club, Mendelssohn 
Club, Glee Clubj Banjo Club, Boat Club, Athletic Association, 
Basket Ball Team and Christian Association. Twenty-three alumnae 
associations, one of which is in Constantinople, have been established. 
During the last year these associations raised $150,000 to add to Dr. 
Pearson's gift of $50,000. 

Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : 5 X, 
and ■4' <i> A. The "Larmarada," an annual, and ''The Mount Holy- 
oke Literary Magazine," are published. 

The graduates number 2,335, °^ whom the oldest is Mrs. G. C. 
Curtis, 1838, Rochester, N. Y. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



209 



Faculty. 



Elizabeth Storrs Mead, A.M., Presi- 
dent, Theism, Biblical Literature. 

Hannah Noble, Painting. 

Ellen Priscilla Bowers, English Lit. 

Frances Mary Hazen, Latin. 

Elisabeth Miller Bardwell, Astronomy, 
Director of Observatory. 

Elizabeth Barstow Prentiss, Mod. Hist. 

Louise Frances Cowles, A.M., Geolog>' 
and Mineralogy, 

Mary Olivia Nutting, Librarian. 

Adaline Elizabeth Green, Ph.B., Latin. 

Cornelia Maria Clapp, Ph.D., Zoology. 

Clara ^Vhite Wood, Ancient History 
and Rhetoric. 

Henrietta Edgecomb Hooker, Ph.D., 
Botany. 

MargaretheE. Vitzthum von Eckstadt, 
French. 

Mary Cleaveland Bradford, Ph.B., 
Latin. 

Clara Frances Stevens, Ph.M., English 
and Rhetoric. 

Sara A. Worden, Drawing. 

Marcia Anna Keith, B.S., Physics. 

Sarah Effie Smith, B.S., Mathematics. 

Florence Purington, Mathematics. 

Ella Adelaide Knapp, A.M., English 
Literature. 

Mary Chandler Lowell, M.D., Physi- 
cian, Physiology. 

Louise Fitz- Randolph, Historj- of Art. 

Elizabeth Slater, A.M., Greek. 



Katherine Elisabeth Sihler, German. 

Alice Porter Stevens, A.B., Rhetoric. 

Mary Frances Leach, B.S., Chemistry. 

Vida Frank Moore, Ph.B., Philosophy 
and Political Economy. 

Louise Baird Wallace, Zoology. 

Rebecca Corwin, A.M., S.T.B., Bib- 
lical Lit. and Semitic Languages. 

Nellie Amelia Spore, Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 

Helen Currier Flint, A.M., Greek. 

Christina Wento, French and German. 

Caroline Louisa White, A.B., English 
Literature. 

Mary Helen Keith, B.S., Chemistr>'. 

Florence L. Adams, B.L.. English. 

Seraph A. Bliss, B.S., Physics. 

Lucy Royal Osgood, A.B., Zoology. 

Margaret B. MacDonald, Chemistry. 

Annie L. Richardson, Botany. 

Bertha E. Blakely, B.L., Ass't Libr. 

Caroline Boardman Greene, Registrar. 

Emily M. Edson, Agnes T. Bemis, 
Mary K. Lunt, Domestic Departm't. 

NON-RESIDENT INSTRUCTORS. 

Charles A. Young, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Astronomv. 
Charles H. Hitchcock, Ph.D., Geology. 

Alonzo S. Kimball, Ph.D., Physics. 
Alfred M. Fletcher, Music. 
Harriet L. Ellsw^orth, Vocal Music. 
Louis Coenen, Violin. 



MOUNT ST. MARYS COLLEGE. 

EmmitsbiD'g, Md. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 
$59,386 



Students, 
215 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
J 



Books, 
15,000 



The college was founded in 180S and received its charter in 1830. 
The founder was Fr. John Dubois, afterwards Bishop of New York. 
A new college building was completed in 1S25, but in the same year 
it was destroyed by fire. The first president was Rev. John D. 
Purcell, afterwards Archbishop of Cincinnati. He was succeeded by 
the Very Rev. John McCaffrey, D.D.. from 1S3S-1S71. The insti- 
tution is under the control of a board of directors, the president of 
which, by virtue of his office, is the Archbishop of Baltimore. 

Students are admitted on certificates. The degree of B.A. is con- 
ferred, and that of M.A. after two years of post-graduate study. The 

14 



2IO 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



expenses for the year, lasting from September 9 till the first week of 
June, are from I150 to ^300. Twenty medals for excellence in study 
are given each year. 

The literary societies are the Purcell, and the Carroll Lyceums. 
A religious society, a Junior Sodality, college orchestra and band are 
also maintained. The oldest graduate is John A. Boyle, 1826, of 
Westminster, Md. 

Affiliated institutions are the St. Joseph's Academy, for girls, and 
an Ecclesiastical Seminary. 



Faculty. 



Very Rev. Edward P. Allen, D D., 
President and Treasurer. 

Rev. William L. O'Hara, A.M., Vice- 
President, Philosophy and Sacred 
Scripture. 

Rev. Edward F. X. McS weeny, 
S.T.D., Dogmatic Theology. 

Rev. Thomas L. Kelly, A.M., Moral 
Theology, Latin, and Greek. 

Rev. Bernard J. Bradley, A.M., Latin 
and Greek. 

Charles H. Jourdan, Ph.D., Math. 



Rev. Dominic A. Brown, A.M., Latin 
and Plain Chant. 

Ernest Lagarde, A.M., Modem Lan- 
guages and English Literature. 

James A. Mitchell, A.M., Ph.D., 
Natural Sciences. 

Charles A. Leloup, A.M., French and 
Latin. 

Edmund J. Ryan, A.M., English. 

Bernard M. West, Book-keeping, etc. 

Robert Reitz, Music. 

Rev. John J. Tierney, D.D. 



MOUNT UNION COLLEGE. 

Alliance, O. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$13,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



The college was founded in 1846, and has just celebrated its first 
semi-centennial, in honor of which a new building has been founded. 
It is governed by twenty-seven trustees, and by committees of super- 
vision and visitation from five conferences. Admission is by examin- 
ation, but credit is given to certificates from approved preparatory 
schools. Women are admitted on equal terms with men and are 
alike eligible to places in the faculty and in the governing boards. 
Degrees of B.A., B.Ph., B.S., and in music and commercial science 
are conferred. The expenses for the year, lasting from August 24 
to June 23, are from $50 to $100, and can be reduced in various ways. 

The students publish the " Dynamo," and maintain two literary 
societies : the Republican and the Linnasan, — two law clubs : the 
Oxford and Blackstone, a journalistic and Itinerant Club with Chris- 
tian and Athletic Associations. Chapters of the following frater- 
nities have been established: ATA, 1875-1884; A T H, 1882; A Y, 
1882; 2 AE, 1885. 

The graduates number nearly 2,000. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



211 



Factilty. 
Tamerlane Pliny Marsh, D.D., LL.D., i Vina Morse Brown, Vocal Culture. 



President, Philosophy 
George Washington Clarke, A.M., 

Ph.D., Astronomy, Zoology, and 

Botany. 
Edwin Norman Hartshorn, A.M., 

Commercial Law. 
Joseph Lorain Shunk, A.M., Ph.D., 

Greek. 
Amelia McCall Brush, Ph.M., Precep- 
tress, English. 
William Soule, M.S., Ph.D., Librarian, 

Chemistry and Physics. 
Benjamin Franklin Yanney, A.M., 

Normal Department, Mathematics. 
Edward Frankhn Korns, A.B., Latin. 
Christine Plouston, A.M., German and 

French. 
Lyman Field Brown, Musical Director. 



Winifred Marsh, Mus.B., Piano and 

Organ. 
Ruliff V. Stratton, Solfeggio and Sight 

Singing. 
Louis Vitak, Violin. 
Kathryn F. Shannon, Art Department. 
Owen Crist, B.C.S., Penmanship, etc. 
Lewis Benton Mathias B.C.S., Sc.B., 

Prep. Department, Shorthand, etc. 
James Hervey Ward, Elocution and 

Oratory. 
Charles Mortimer Rockefeller, Military 

Science. 
Rev. Earl D. Holtz, A.M., D.D., 

English Bible. 
Meredith D. Morris, Samuel Grant 

Miller, Assistant Librarians. 
Herbert Johns, Gymnasium. 



MUHLENBERG COLLEGE. 

Allentotvn, Pa. Men. 



Ltitheran. 



Income, 



Students, 
172 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
10,000 



The college was formerly known as the Allentown Seminary, which 
afterwards became the Collegiate Institute. It assumed its present 
name in 1867, when it came under the control of the Lutheran denom- 
ination, but the original academic department has been retained. The 
college is governed by thirty trustees. Degrees of B.A., and M.A. 
are conferred, the latter after three years of post-graduate study. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from the first Thursday in Sep- 
tember to the last Thursday of June, are $200. There are twenty-six 
scholarships yielding ^50 or the equivalent of tuition each. 

Since the school became a college, 370 students have been gradu- 
ated, of whom 346 are living. The oldest of these is William F. 
Muhlenberg, M.D., 1868, of Reading, Pa. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Theodore L. Seip, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Moral Science and Greek. 

Davis Garber, Ph.D., Mathematics, 
and Librarian. 

Rev, Matthias H. Richards, D.D., 
English and Mental Science. 

Rev. WilHam Wackernagel, D.D., 
German and History. 

Rev. John A. Bauman, Ph.D., Natural 
and Applied Sciences. 

Rev. Jacob Steinhaeuser, Hebrew. 



George T. Ettinger, Ph.D., Pedagogy, 
Latin, and Greek. 

Rev. Stephen A. Repass, D.D., Chris- 
tian Evidences. 

Henry H. Herbst, A.M., M.D., Physi- 
cal Education, etc. 

Francis G. Lewis, A.M., Math., etc. 

J. Richmond Merkel, B.S., A.B., 
Languages and Sciences. 

Gomer B. Matthews, English Branches. 

Clement A. Marks, Music. 



212 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



MUSKINGUM COLLEGE. 

Nezv Concord, Ohio. Co-Educational. United Presbyterian, 



Income, 
$6,500 



Students, 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,600 



The college was founded in 1837. The first class was graduated 
two years later. The presidents have been: S. Wilson, 1838-1846; 
D. A. Wallace, D.D., LL.D., 1846-1848 ; John Milligan, 1848-1849 ; S. 
G. Irvine, D.D., 1849-1851 ; S. McArthur, 1851-1855 ; B. Waddle, D.D., 
1855-1858; J. P. Lytle, D.D., 1858-1859; H. P. McClurkin, D.D., 
1859-1861 ; L. B. W. Shryock, 1861-1864; D. Paul, D.D., 1865-1879; 
F. M. Spencer, D.D., 1879-1886; J. D. Irons, D.D., 1888-1892; D. 
K. McKnight, 1892-1893; Jesse Johnson, A.M., 1893 to the present. 

Degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Pd. are granted. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 18 to June 25, are from $125 to $150. 

The college grounds cover two acres. The students maintain the 
following societies : the Philomathean and Union for men, the Aretean 
for women, an Athletic Association, two Christian Associations, and 
a Missionary Society. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Jesse Johnson, A.M., President, 
Greek and Hebrew, and Librarian. 

Rev. J. A. Gray, A.M., Ph.D., Math, 
and Logic. 

T. H. Paden, A.M., Latin and Civics. 

John McBiirney, A.M., Ph.D., Natu- 
ral Science and Pedagogy. 

L. J. Graham, A.M., English. 

Mary Miller, A.M., French, German. 



Henry McCreary, M.D., Nat. Sciences. 

C. J. Marshall, Greek. 

Edwin R. Snyder, Director of Music. 

Nellie L. Gray, Music. 

Ora Lane-Folk, Stringed Instruments. 

Nellie Harris, Art. 

Viola Doudna-Romans, Elocution and 

Physical Culture. 
S. W. Lyons, Commercial Branches. 



NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

Lincoln, Neb. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$16,824 



Students, 
402 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 



Books, 
2,000 



The school was established in 1888. It is governed by twenty- 
nine trustees. Connected with the university is a normal depart- 
ment, which has a mechanical institute and a preparatory department. 
Associated with them are two seminaries at Douglas and Orleans. 
Admission is by certificate. Bachelors' degrees are given in arts, 
letters, science, and pedagogy. Attendance at chapel is compul- 
sory. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 10 to 
June 17, are $125. Four literary societies are maintained by the 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



213 



students. They are the Orophilian, Theophanian, Everett, and 
^yoodwal•d. An Epworth League is also mamLained, and two Chris- 
tian Associations. 

Faculty. 



Isaac Crook, A.M., D.D., Chancellor, 

Metaphysics. 
Isaac L. Lowe, D.D., Ph.D., Greek. 
Charles M. Ellinwood, Ph.M., Chem. 
Ella King Lowe, School of Art, 
Minnie C. Jay, A.M., Ph.D., History 

and English. 
Charles D. Rose, Ph.B., Mathematics. 
Lieut. Charles C. Webb, M.S., Tactics. 
Orris S. Schnauffer, Music. 
Hattie M. Blood, Elocution. 
Thomas E. Doubt, B.Sc, Physics. 
SaUie Walkden, B.Sc, English. 



S. Sague Videtto, Wood-work. 
Alfred \V. Woods, Mechan. Drawing. 
Charles Fordyce, A.M., Biol, and Geol. 
Frank A. Alabaster, A.B., Latin. 
Corinth Leduc Crook, A.M., Librarian, 

Modern Languages. 
George W. Rausch, Iron-work. 
August Hagenow, Instrumental Music 
Fred A. Stuff, B.A., Academic Dep. 
John Willard Miller, A.B., Douglas 

Seminary. 
James L. McBrien, B.Pe., Orleans 

Seminary. 



NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY. 

JReno, Nev. Co-Educational. Noit-Secta^'ian. 



Income, 
$51,000 



Students, 

335 



Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,000 



The university, the only college in the State, was first established 
at Elko under an act of 1873, ^^^ was removed to Reno by a legis- 
lative enactment of 18S5, where it was re-opened in 1886. The uni- 
versity is governed by three regents. The grounds cover forty 
acres. 

Admission is by certificate from affiliated high schools. A pre- 
paratory department is maintained. Degrees of A.B. and B.S. are 
given, and that of M.A. after one year; degrees in mining and civil 
engineering as well as in pedagogy are given after two years in the 
normal course, and in the School of Mines. Six laboratories have 
been equipped by the various departments. No charge is made for 
tuition. The expenses for the year, from September i to the first 
week in June, are $125. Four scholarships of $50 each are offered. 
Of these three were taken by women during the last year. There is 
a Record Publishing Association, an Adelphic Society, Christian 
Association, and an Athletic Association with baseball and other 
teams. The students also maintain a Self-Government Association. 



Faculty. 



Joseph Edward Stubbs, M.A., D.D., 
President, Political Science. 

Hannah K. Clapp, M.A., Librarian. 

Walter McNab Miller, B.Sc, M.D., 
Anatomy and Geology. 

Robert Dyas Jackson, Ph.B., Mining. 



John W. Phillips, B.S., D.Sc, Chem. 

Fred Hebard Hillman, M.Sc, Botany 
and Entomology. 

Mary Whitesides Emery, M.A., Peda- 
gogics. 

Robert Lewers, Political Economy, 



214 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Ransom H. McDowell, B.Sc, Agri- 
culture, etc. 

Natnaniel tstes Wilson, B.S., M.Sc, 
Agricultural Chemistry. 

Thomas VV. Covvgill, M.A., English 
and History. 

Richard Brown, Practical Mechanics. 

Henry Thurtell, B.S., Mathematics 
and Mechanics. 

James Edw. Church, Jr., B A., Latin. 

Lieut. Wm. Reeves Hamilton, U.S.A., 
M.Sc, Military Science. 



Chas. Peleg Brown, B.S., Mineralogy. 

Rev. Samuel Unsworth, M.A., S.T.B., 

Greek. 
Laura de Laguna, B.A., Modern 

Languages. 
Kate Bardenwerper, Estella Bernice 

Ede, Training School. 
Robert Darling, V.S., Vet. Science. 
Mrs. B. F. Layton, Vocal Music. 
Stella Linscott, B.A., Latin. 
Alice M. Stanaway, B.A., Latin. 
Theodora W. Stubbs, French. 



NEWBERRY COLLEGE. 



Newberry^ S. 


C. 


Men. 


Lutheran. 


Income, 

$6,000 


Students, 
129 


Instructors, 
8 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
6,500 



Newberry College grew out of a theological and classical institute 
founded at Lexington, S. C, by the Lutheran synod of South 
Carolina, 1832. In 1854 it was converted into a college, and was 
located at Newberry. A charter was obtained in 1856, and the 
school was opened in 1859. After the close of the war the college 
building was occupied by a Federal garrison, as barracks. It was 
ruined by the troops, and a bill has, therefore, long been pending in 
Congress asking for an appropriation on account of this damage 
to property. In 1869 the college was moved to Walhalla, in the 
extreme northwestern part of the State, where it remained until 
1877, when it was re-located at Newberry. 

The presidents have been the Revs. : Theophilus Stork, 1S59-1860; 
J. A. Brown, 1860-1861; J. P. Smeltzer, 1861-1877 ; George W. 
Holland, Ph.D., 1878-1895, and George B. Cromer, A.M., the present 
incumbent. 

The institution consists of a college and theological seminary. It 
is governed by a board of twenty-six trustees. Chapel is compulsory. 
Degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. are conferred. Negroes are ex- 
cluded. The expenses for the year, lasting from October i to June 
19, are $122. Four scholarships, yielding from $50 to $70 each, have 
been established, and four gold medals and prize books are annually 
distributed. 

Three literary societies : the Phreno-Cosmian and Excelsior and a 
Christian Association have been organized. The students publish 
"The Collegian," a fortnightly. The graduates number 130, the 
oldest of whom is Joseph E. Houseal, Cedarstown, Ga. 

Faculty. 



George B. Cromer, A.M., President, 
Mental Science and English. 

Rev. A. G. Voigt, A.M., Modern 
Languages, and Librarian. 

Rev. A. J. Bowers, A.M., Ancient 
Languages. 

O. B. Mayer, M.D., A.M., Physiology. 



Rev. W. K. Sligh, A.M., Mathematics 

and Astronomy. 
S. L. Powell, A.M., Natural Sciences, 

and Curator of Museum. 
W. G. Houseal, M.D., A.M., Hygiene. 
Arthur Kibler, A.M., Preparatory 

Department. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



215 



NEW ^A^INDSOR COLLEGE. 

New Windsor, Md. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$9,300 



Students, 

55 



Instructors, 




Books, 
2.000 



The college was founded in 1877. Admission is on certificate. 
The degree of A.B. is conferred. The expenses for the year ending 
June II, are )^i8o. The graduates number nearly 150. The oldest 
is William Q. Shilling, A.M., 1881, of Lonaconing, Md. The presi- 
dent is W. H. Purnell, LL.D. 

[Further information lacking.) 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY. 

IVeiv York, N. Y. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$190,000 



Students, 
1,275 



Instructors, 
127 



Buildings, 
13 



Books, 
31,000 



History and Organization: The university owes its foundation in 
1831 (after the plan to found such a school had been publicly dis- 
cussed in 1829) to gifts of public-spirited citizens. In 1896, after an 
amendment to the original charter, the name of the university was 
changed from University of New York to the present name, and the 
school was moved from Washington Square to University Heights. 
The present site above i8ist Street is midway between Columbia 
University and St. John's College, at Fordham. 

The university consists of The Council and General Faculty, The 
College, Graduate School, School of Engineering, School of Peda- 
gogy, Law School, Medical College, and the related Theological 
Seminary. 

The council is a self-perpetuating body of thirty-two members, each 
holding office four years, or until his successor is elected. 

There are three faculties of arts and science, dating from 1832; 
one of medicine, since 1841 ; of lavv^, since 1858 ; and of theology, 
since 1890. 

Admission, Degrees, etc.: Candidates must bring certificates of 
previous study, and must undergo examination in all the subjects 
named therein. Degrees of B.A., B.Ph., and B.S., are conferred, 
together with degrees of A.M., Ph.M., and M.S., as well as Ph.D. 
Appropriate professional degrees are conferred by the graduate and 
professional schools. At the beginning of the sophomore year the 
student must enter one of ten groups, named in the catalogue, while 
seniors may chose from a stated number of graduate courses. Atten- 
dance at military drill is compulsory for freshmen and sophomores, 



2l6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



while attendance at chapel is compulsory for all. Women are ad- 
mitted to the graduate school. Negroes are not excluded. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition is ^loo for the year, lasting 
from September 30 to June 10. Thirty-two scholarships, yielding 
incomes of $400, are offered, and eleven of from $100 to $200, with 
three graduate fellowships of ^300, and a few beneficiary scholarships 
besides. A prize of ^100 is given for the best examination paper, 
and nine prizes, ranging from ;^20 to $75, for excellence in study. A 
loan fund has also been established. 

Equipment : Three buildings are in process of erection on the new 
grounds on University Heights. Dormitory halls are to be added. 
The other ten buildings of the university are distributed throughout 
the city. The college grounds cover thirty-two acres. A gymnasium 
and athletic field have recently been equipped. 

Societies and Publications : The publications issued by the college 
are the " Violet," a student annual ; " The Item," a weekly ; the 
" University Quarterly," published by students and professors : and 
the " University Law Review," a monthly. 

The societies are the Eucleian, Scientific Society; glee, mandolin, 
and banjo clubs, and an Athletic Association with football, baseball, 
and lacrosse teams. 

Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : * B K, 
1835-1848 ; 2 *, 1835 ; A A *, 1835-1895 ; ^ Y, 1S37 ; A *, 1841 ; Z % 
1846; A y, 1847-1853, A T, 1865; * A *, 1888; * r A, and A n. 

Academic costume was adopted in 1895, ^^ degrees being indicated 
by the pattern, and the classes by the colors. 

The graduates number 12,300, of whom nearly 10,000 are living. 
The Rev. W. R. Gordon, 1834, of Manchester, N. Y., is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



Henry M. MacCracken, D.D., LL.D., 
Chancellor, Philosophy. 

Henry M. Baird, D.D., LL.D., Greek. 

T. Addison Richards, M.A., Emeritus. 

William H. Thomson, M.D., LL.D., 
Medicine. 

John J. Stevenson, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Geology. 

Charles Inslee Pardee, M.D., Otology. 

William Mecklenburg Polk, M.D., 
LL.D., Obstetrics, etc. 

Lewis A. Stimson, M.D., Surgery. 

Rudolph A. Witthaus, M.D., Chem- 
istry, etc. 

Stephen Smith, M.D., Emeritus, 

A. E. MacDonald, LL.B., M.D., 
Emeritus. 

Charles Stedman Bull, M.D., Oph- 
thalmology. 

Charles B. Brush, C.E., Sc.D., Dean, 
Engineering. 

IsaacF.Russell, M.A.,J.C.D.,LL.D., 
Procedure and Elementary Law. 

Daniel W. Hering, C.E., Ph.D., 
Physics. 



Henry G. Piffard, M.D., Dermatology. 

Joseph E. Winters, M.D., Diseases 
of Cinldren. 

Prince A. Morrow, M.D., Genito- 
urinary Diseases. 

W. Oilman Thompson, M.D., Materia 
Medica. 

Abram S. Isaacs, Ph.D., German Lit. 

Frank F. Ellinwood, D.D., Compara- 
tive Religion. 

Francis H. Stoddard, M.A., English. 

George Woolsey, M.D., Anatomy and 
Surgery. 

Robert W. Hall, M.A., M.E., Analyt- 
ical Chemistry. 

William Kendall Gillett, M.A., French 
and Spanish. 

Henry P. Loomis, M.D., Pathology. 

Edward D. Fisher, M.D., Nervous 
Diseases. 

Charles E. Quimby, M.D., Medicine. 

Frederick VV. Gwyer, M.D., Surgery. 

J. Clifton Edgar, 'M.D., Obstetrics. 

Egbert Le Fevre, M.D., Medicine. 

Edgar D. Shimer, Ph.D., Psychology. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



217 



Edward R. Shaw, Ph.D., Pedagogy. 
Austin Abbott, LL.D., Equity and 

Jurisprudence. 
Christopher G. Tiedeman, M.A., 

LL.D., Real Property. 
Morris Loeb, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Charles H. Snow, C.E., Engineering. 
Ernest G. Sihler Ph.D., Latin. 
John D. Prince, Ph.D., Semitic, and 

Philology. 
William Allen Butler, LL.D., Mara- 

time Law. 
Cephas Brainerd, Esq., International 

Law. 
Charles F. MacLean, J.U.D., Crimi- 
nal Law. 
Amasa A. Redfield, Esq., Descent. 
Myer S. Isaacs, LL.M., Real Estate 

Titles. 
William G. Davies, M.A., Life Insur- 
ance Law. 
Langdon S. Thompson, Pd.D., ^Es- 

thetics. 
Abel Mix Phelps, M.D., Orthopedic 

Surgery. 
Wallace Wood, M.D., Art. 
Addison Ballard, D.D., Logic. 
Frank A. Erwin, M.A., LL.M., Con- 
tracts and Torts. 
Ivan Sickels, M.D., Chemistry and 

Physics. 
Willis E. Ford, M.D., Electro-Thera- 
peutics. 
Justin L. Barnes, M.D., Otology. 
Irving S. Haynes, M.D., Anatomy. 
Clarence D. Ashley, B.A., LL.M., 

Contracts. 
Joseph S. Auerbach, LL.B., Corpora- 
tions. 
Pomeroy Ladue, B.S., Mathematics. 
Marshall S. Brown, M.A., History 

and Political Science. 
Charles L. Bristol, M.S., Biology. 
Frederick Monteser, Pd.D., Ph.D., 

Comparative Education. 
Charles B. Bliss, Ph.D., Experimen- 
tal Psvchology. 
Charles F. Bostwick. Ph.B., LL.M., 

Statutory Procedure. 
Cornelius G. Coakley, M.D., Laryn- 
gology. 
Lawrence A. McLouth, B.A., German. 
Samuel Weir, Ph.D., History of Edu- 
cation. 
Samuel Macauley Jackson, D.D., 

Church History. 
Carlos C. Alden, LL.M., Equity. 



James P. Haney, M.D., Physiological 

Pedagogics. 
Arthur B. Woodford, Ph.D., Sociol- 
ogy and Education. 
Francis Collingwood, C.E., Founda- 
tions. 
Alfred P. Boiler, C.E., Bridge Con- 
struction. 
E. Weymann, Jr., C.E., Waterworks. 
Carrill Ph. Bassett, C.E., Ph.D., Sani- 
tation. 
Walter McColloh, C.E., Tunnels. 

Frank M. Colby, M.A., Economics. 

Frederic Tabor Cooper, M.A., LL.B., 
Ph.D., Sanskrit. 

Georges Cante, B. es L,, B. et Lie. en 
Droit, French Literature. 

George A. Miller, LL.B., Law. 

Thaddeus D. Kenneson, M.A., LL.B., 
Law. 

Arthur C. Rounds, M.A., LL.B,, 
Law. 

Ralph S. Rounds, B.A., LL.B., Law. 

Frank H. Sommer, LL.B., Law. 

William Wirt Howe, Civil Law. 

James L. Stewart, LL.B., Patents. 

George C. Mason, M.S., C.E., Eng. 

John F. Fairchild, C.E., Engineering. 

George W. Osbom, B.A., Semitic. 

Edward H. Warren, B.A., Sociology. 

Arthur B. Frizell, B.A., Mathematics. 

Warren H. Everett, B.A., Biology. 

Frank W. Pine, B.A., English. 

WiUiam H. Good, B.A., LL.B., Law. 

Algernon Sidney Norton, B.A., LL.M., 
Law Latin. 

Henry 3. Stearns, M.D., Pathological 
Laboratory. 

Warren Coleman, M.D., Bacteriology. 

J. S. Ferguson, M.D., Histology. 

Frank Abbott, Jr.,M.D., Bacteriology. 

Charles M. Ford, M.D., Anatomy. 

G. W. Bogart, M.D., Anatomy. 

William F. Stone, M.D., Anatomy. 

Russell Bellamy, Materia Medica. 

William Travis Gibb, M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 

J. B. Gibson, M.D.. Ophthalmology. 

Alexander McL. Jeffrey, M.D., Medi- 
cine. 

David D. Jennings, M.D., Surgery. 

Archibald E. Isaacs, M.D., Surgery. 

William L. Stowell, M.D., Diseases 
of Children. 

P. G. Becker, M.D., Practice of Med. 

Francis A. Scratchley, M.D., Mental 
Diseases. 



2l8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Charles W. Allen, M.D., Urinary 
Diseases. 

Warren O. Plimpton, M.D.. Ortho- 
pedic Surgery. 

George Dempster Hamlen, M.D., 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

R. C. James, M.D., Medicine. 

Percy R. Bolton, M.D., Surgery. 

Charles Clifford Barrows, M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 

R. H. Buxton, B.A., Bacteriology. 

David Robinson, M.D., Nervous Dis- 
eases. 

H. L. Winter, M.D., Nervous Diseases. 

Walter B. Brown, M.D., Dermatology. 

L. C. Adamson, M.D., Insanity. 

John W. Duke, M.D., Medicine, 
Mental Diseases. 

L. H. Riggs, M.D., Chemistry. 

Edmund P. Shelby, M.D., Pathology. 

John Rogers, M.D., Anatomy. 

George H. Mahr, M.D., Physiology. 

H. Seabrook, M.D., Ophthalmology. 



J. Wolfarth, M.D., Laryngology. 

J. Sanders, M.D,, Laryngology. 

W. T. Brady, M.D., Orthopedic Sur- 
gery. 

Richard J. Scofield, M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 

M. D. Lederman, M.D., Otology. 

Isaac H. Kirby, B.S., Analytical Chem- 
istry. 

James H. Shipley, French. 

Leslie J. Tompkins, M.S., LL.B., 
Librarian. 

Belle Corwin, Lagarde Library. 

Albert A. Anderson, General Library. 

George Mayer, General Library. 

Marie Chanroux, General Library. 

M. Otis Cox, Law Library. 

Gertrude Crockett, Law Library. 

Leroy M. Young, Law Library. 

Frances M. Woodward, Pedagogical 
Library. 

Frank H. Cann, Director of Gymna- 
sium. 



NIAGARA UNIVERSITY. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 
^45,000 



Students, 
240 



Instructors, 
48 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
7,000 



History : Niagara University, conducted by priests of the Congre- 
gation of the Mission, was founded at Buffalo in 1856, by Rev. 
John J. Lynch, afterward first archbishop of Toronto. It was incor- 
porated in 1S63 as the Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, after its 
transfer to its present site, two miles above the Suspension Bridge 
on the heights of Mount Eagle Ridge, six years before. In 1883 the 
college was made a university by the regents of New York. In the 
same year a medical department, under the presidency of John 
Cronyn, was established in Buffalo. From 1864 to 1865, owing to a 
fire, instruction was suspended. The presidents have been : Rev. 
John J. Lynch, CM., 1857-1860; Rev. Thomas Smith, CM., 1860- 
1863; Rev. John Asmuth, CM., 1863-1864; Rev. Robert Rice, CM., 
1864-1877; Rev. P. V. Kavanagh, CM., 1877-1893 ; Rt. Rev. S. V, 
Ryan, CM., D.D., 1S93-1896; and Rev, P. MacHale, CM., the 
present incumbent. 

Organization : The school is governed by ten trustees. Besides 
the collegiate and medical departments, there is a theological semi- 
nary and preparatory school. The college grounds cover three hun- 
dred acres, with a campus of seven acres. Admission, except for 
those entering from the preparatory department, is by examination. 



THE COLLEGE VEAR-BOOK. 



219 



and upon regents' certificates. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 
The degrees are B.A., and M.A. besides the medical and theological 
degrees conferred by the school of medicine and the seminary. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 5 to June 25, are $200. 
There is one free scholarship for medical students. 

Societies ajid Publications : "Niagara's Tribute," published in 1870, 
became the " Index Niagarensis " in 1874, and is now published fort- 
nightly as the " Niagara Index." The societies are : The Shake- 
spearean, Basilian, R. E. V. R., B. L. A., S. O. L. A. (three literary 
societies), B. V. M. Sodality, a religious organization, Niagara Bat- 
talion, N. U. Athletic Society, N. U. Baseball Club, Niagara Re- 
serves, N. U. Football Team, Cecilian, Choral Union, Banjo and 
Glee Club, and a college band and orchestra. 



Faculty. 



Very Rev. P. MacHale, CM., Presi- 
dent, Geology and Zoology. 

Rev. J. J. Sullivan, CM., Philosophy 
and Liturgy. 

Rev. F. L. McCauley, CM., Trigo- 
nometry. 

Rev. J. j. Elder, CM., French and 
Gregorian Chant. 

Rev. R.H.Albert, CM. .German, Math. 

Rev. E. L. Carey, CM., Greek and 
Calculus. 

Rev. S. V. Haire, CM., Math. 

Rev. J. V. O'Brien, CM., Latin, 
Greek, and Rhetoric. 

Rev. M. J. Rosa, CM., Latin, He- 
brew, and Chemistry. 

Rev. P. J. Boland, C.M., Latin and 
Greek. 

R. S. Kraegel, Music. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

John Cronyn, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., 

President. 

Thomas Lothrop, M.D., Ph.D., Ob- 
stetrics. 

Alvin Allace Hubbell, M.D., Ph.D., 
Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Henry D. Ingraham, M.D., Gynecol- 
ogy and Paediatrics. 

Floyd S. Crego, M.D., Nervous Dis- 
eases and Insanity. 

William H. Pitt, M.D., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry and Physics. 

Herman Mynter, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 

Herbert Mickle, M.D., Surgery. 

Carlton C Frederick, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Eugene A. Smith, M.D., Anatomy. 



John A. Miller, M.Sc, A.M., Ph.D., 
Medical Chemistry and Toxicology. 

John D. Flagg, M.D., Physiology and 
Microscopy. 

Henry C Buswell, M.D., Medicine. 

William C Krauss, M.D., Pathology. 

L. Bradley Dorr, M.D., Bacteriology 
and Chemistry. 

W. Scott Renner, M.D., Laryngology. 

Walter D. Greene, M.D., Hygiene. 

Rollin L. Banta, M.D., Materia Med- 
ica and Therapeutics. 

Harry A. Wood, M.D., Materia Med- 
ica and Insanity, 

Harlov^r C Curtiss, A.M., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

Sidney A. Dunham, M.D., Physiology. 

Edward M. Dooley, M.D., Anatomy. 

Frederick A. Hayes, M.D., Anatomy. 

Frederick Preiss, M.D., Surgery. 

David L. Redmond, M.D., Dermatol. 

William G. Taylor, M.D., Earl P. 
Lothrop, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Alfred E. Diehl, M.D., Histology. 

George Roberts, M.D., Chemistry. 

Robert A. Poynton, M.D., Anatomy. 

William S. Tremaine, M.D., Emeri- 
tus, Surgery. 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

Rt. Rev. S. V. Ryan, CM., D.D., 

Very Rev. James McGill, V.C.M., 

Visitors. 
Rev. J. O. Hayden, CM., Canon Law 

and Liturgy. 
Rev. L. A. Grace, CM., Dogma, 

Church History, and Exegesis. 



220 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE. 

Mount Fleasant, N. C. Men. Lutheran. 



Income, 
$2,649 



Students, 
81 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was founded in 1859. It is governed by eighteen trus- 
tees. Degrees of B.A., and B.Ph. are conferred. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the year, lasting from Sep- 
tember 3 to June 5, are from $85 upwards. Four medals are dis- 
tributed annually. Two halls and libraries are maintained by the 
Philolethean and Pi-Sigma-Phi Societies. The Athenaeum, for pro- 
fessors and students, also maintains a reading-room. The graduates 
number fifty-one, the oldest of whom is H. T. J. Ludwig, 187 1, of 
Mount Pleasant. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. D. Shirey, A.M., President, 
Mental and Moral Science. 

H. T. J. Ludwig, A.M., Mathematics, 
French, etc. 



Lan- 



E. B. Setzler, A.M., Ancient 

guages and German. 
M. A. Boger, A.B., Preparatory 

Department. 



NORTHERN ILLINOIS COLLEGE. 

Fulton, III. Co-Educational. Non- Sectarian. 



Income, 
$15,000 



Students, 
102 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,000 



The college was founded in 1859, on its present site, at the Missis- 
sippi Narrows, opposite Clinton, Iowa. It is governed by twelve trus- 
tees. The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.Ph., M.A., and Ph.D. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from the middle of September till June 
16, are under a hundred dollars. A fund of ten thousand dollars 
has been established for scholarships for the children of soldiers 
who served in the late war. 



Faculty. 



R. A. Morley, A.M., President, Hist. 
Rev. J. R. Kaye, A.M., Ph.D., Ancient 

Languages. 
Charlotte Hayes, B.L., Mathematics, 

Science, etc. 
O. F. Cady, M.Accts., Commercial 

and Shorthand Departments. 
George VV. Eansau, Law. 



C. H. Ferguson, Prep, and Normal. 
Charlotte Garten, Elocution and Voice 

Culture. 
An ice Stevens, Piano and Vocal Music. 
Lola Reynolds Morley, Painting. 
Rev. H. F. Schmidt, German. 
Carra Cooke, Docent. 

D. W. Ward, M.D., Anat., Hygiene. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



221 



NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE. 

Naperville, III. Co-Educational . Evangelical. 



Income, 
$22,450 



Students, 

335 



Instructors, 

IS 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3,200 



Plainfield College, founded in 1861, was changed to Northwestern 
in 1865, and in 1869 was removed to Naperville. It is governed by 
twenty-two trustees. The degrees are A.B., E.L., B.Ph., A.M., and 
M.S. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to 
June 24, are $125. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Associated 
with the college is a Biblical Institute. 

The students publish the " Chronicle," and maintain the Cliosophic, 
Philologian, Laconian, and Philorhetorian societies, a Students' 
Senate, Scientific Association, and two Christian Associations. Of 
the 350 graduates 324 are living. The oldest of these is B. F. 
Briesbach, 1866, of Circleville, O. 



Facility. 



Rev. H. J. Kiekhoefer, A.M., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 
Rev. F. William Heidner, A.M., B.D., 

German. 
Henry C. Smith, A.M., Latin, Vocal 

Music. 
Mrs. N. C. Knickerbocker, A.M., 

Preceptress, Rhetoric and Englisli 

Literature. 
Rev. Henry F. Kletzing, A.M., 

Mathematics, and Librarian. 
L. M. Umbach, A.M., Secretary, 

Physical and Biological Science. 



George W. Sindlinger, A.M., Greek. 
Bishop Thomas Bowman, Rev, S. L. 

Umbach, Rev. S. J. Gamertsfelder, 

A.M., Theology. 
Mary S. Bucks, L.E.L., Preceptress, 

American History. 
E. Edward Rife, B.S., Elocution. 
A. C. Gegenheimer, Commercial 

Branches, 
Omo M. Yaggy, Music. 
Fannie E. Smith, M.S., Piano, Organ, 
Lucy J. Smith, Violin. 
Anna Stijng, Drawing and Painting. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Evanston and Chicago, III. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 

$254,556 



Students, 
3,016 



Instructors, 
237 



Buildings, 

IS 



Books, 
36,500 



History : A meetins: to consider the establishment of this university 
was held in 1850 in Chicago ; a charter was obtained in 1851, and two 
years later a president was appointed. The College of Liberal Arts 
was opened in 1855, the Medical School in 1869, that of law in 1873, 
of pharmacy in 1877, of dentistry in 1888, and the Women's College 
in 1892. In the early years of the university the Garret Biblical 
Institute was made the Theological School. The presidents have 
been: Clark T. Hinman, D.D., 1853-1854; Randolph S. Foster, D.D., 
LL.D., 1855-1860; Henry Sanborn Noyes, A.M., 1860-1866; David 



222 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

H. Wheeler, LL.D., 1867-1S69; Erastus O. Haven, D.D. LL.D., 
1869-1872; Charles H. Fowler, D.D., LL.D., 1872-1876; Oliver 
Marcy, A.M., LL.D., 1876-1881 ; Henry Wade Rogers, LL.D., 1890 
to the present time. 

Organization : The trustees number forty-four. The Faculty con- 
sists of all professors, associate and assistant professors, as well as 
instructors. The faculties of the Medical College and Law School 
are in Chicago, where these schools are situated. The university 
council consists of the president, deans of faculties, and one member 
of each faculty, and considers only such matters as relate to the 
university as a whole. 

Adtnission and Degrees : Candidates are admitted on examination 
or on the certificates of nearly a hundred accredited schools of 
various States. After October, 1897, no student will be admitted 
without undergoing an examination in English. The elective system 
during the last year was extended within certain limitations to the 
first and second years. The degrees are A.B., B.Ph., B.L., besides 
the degrees granted by the professional schools. Masters' degrees 
are conferred after one year of resident, or two of non-resident post- 
graduate study. The degree of Ph.D. is conferred after at least two 
years of resident study and a thesis. Since 1869 women have been 
admitted on the same terms as men. Negroes are not excluded. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory for all, but not so gymnastic or 
military drill. By a provision of the charter the sale of liquor is 
not allowed within four miles of the university. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 11 to June 12, are $200. Three fellowships of $400 
each are offered in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Fifty-one 
State scholarships and five private funds, yielding incomes equivalent 
to tuition and more, are available, and a loan fund has been estab- 
lished. Five prizes of $100 each are offered for oratory and com- 
position, with three ranging from $20 to JS40 for extemporaneous 
speaking. 

Eqiiipmeiit : The ten buildings at Evanston stand on grounds of 
forty-five acres, fourteen of which form the campus. Athletic 
grounds have been levelled in the immediate vicinity of the old gym- 
nasium. During the last year William Deering gave to the uni- 
versity $215,000, thus raising the total endowment to $3,800,000, of 
which $1,818,000 yields income. The museum contains a good 
ceramic collection with many anthropological and archaeological 
specimens. The botanical museum and herbarium is rich in lig- 
neous specimens. Modern laboratories have been equipped by the 
botanical, chemical, geological, mineralogical, physical, and zoo- 
logical departments. 

Societies and Publications: Besides the "Northwestern Record," 
published by the university as such, the students publish the " North- 
western," a weekly, and the " Syllabus," an annual. The societies 
are: Woman's Club, Coffee, Science, Glee, Banjo, Mandolin, and 
Good Government clubs. Historical Association, Oratorical League, 
Hinman Literary vSociety, Prohibition League, Volunteer Band, Set- 
tlement and Northwestern Association, Woman's Debating Club, 
two Christian Associations, Alumni Association, Deru Society, 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



223 



Thalian Dramatic Club, and Athletic Association, with Tennis Club, 
Golf Club, football and baseball teams. Chapters of the following 
fraternities have been organized : <i> B K, * A 0, 1859; * K % 1864; 

* r A, 1867-1870; 2 X, 1869; * K 2, 1872; B n, 1873; A T, 1880; 
A *, 1881 ; A r, K K r, 1882 ; K A 0, r * B, 1888 ; A T A ; © N E ; 
ns*; AAA; n W ; 2AE; AXH; 2* H; *A*; *P2; N5N; 

* X, and A 2 A. 

The graduates number 5,200. During the coming year all depart- 
ments will join in a common commencement. The wearing of cap 
and gown, introduced in 1895, ^^ "*^w required on such occasions. 



Factdty. 



Henry Wade Rogers, LL.D., Presi- 
dent. 

Daniel Bonbright, LL.D., Latin. 

Oliver Marcy, LL.D., Dean, Geology. 

Herbert Franklin Fisk, A.M., D.D., 
Pedagogics. 

Robert McLean Cumnock, A.M., 
Rhetoric and Elocution. 

Robert Baird, A.M., Greek. 

Charles William Pearson, A.M., Eng- 
lish Literature. 

Robert Dickinson Sheppard, A.M., 
D.D., English and American Hist. 

Abram Van Eps Young, Ph.B., Chem. 

George W. Hough, LL.D., Astronomy. 

James Taft Hatfield, Ph.D., German. 

Charles Beach Atwell, Ph.M., Regis- 
trar, Botany. 

Henry Crew, Ph.D., Physics. 

J. Scott Clark, A.M., English. 

John Henry Gray, Ph.D., Civics. 

Peter Christian Lutkin, Music. 

George Albert Coe, Ph.D., Secretary, 
Philosophy. 

Emily Frances Wheeler, A.M., Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Charles Horswell, Ph.D., Hebrew. 

Alja Robinson Crook, Ph.D., Mineral- 
ogy and Petrology. 

Henry Seely White, Ph.D., Pure 
Mathematics. 

Edwin Grant Conklin, Ph.D., Zoology, 



Thomas Franklin Holgate, Ph.D., 

Applied Mathematics. 
Henry Clay Stanclift, Ph.D., History 

of Continental Europe. 
WiUiam Caldwell, Sc.D., Ethics. "^ 
Charles Joseph Little, D.D., LL.D., 

Church History. 
Charles Frederick Bradley, A.M., 

D.D., New Testament Greek. 
Hiram B. Loomis, Ph.D., Physics. 
Henry Cohn, A.M., German. 
Albert Ericson, A.M., Swedish. 
Nels Edward Simonsen, A.M., D.D., 

Norwegian and Danish. 
Burleigh Smart Annis, A.M., Math. 
Arthur Herbert Wilde, A.B., B.D., 

History. 
Mary L. Freeman, A.M., French. 
Edward Ambrose Bechtel, A.B., Latin. 
Chas. Waldo Foreman, M.S., German. 
Leonidas Raymond Higgins, A.M., 

Greek. 
Winfield Scott Nickerson, Sc.D., Z06I. 
Milton Spenser Terry, D.D., LL.D., 

Bible. 
William Abbott Phillips, Ph.B., MD., 

Comparative Anatomy. 
Olin Hanson Bosquin, A.B., Physics. 
Harrison Eastman Patten, Ph.B., 

Chemistry. 
Charles Hazzard, Ph.B., Zoology. 
Maurice Alpheus Bigelow, B.S., Zool. 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Watertozvn, Wis. Co- Educational. Lutheran. 



Income, 
$26,350 



Students, 
165 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
2,500 



The school was founded in 1S65. It is governed by twelve trus- 
tees. The courses of study are collegiate and preparatory, and lead 



224 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



to degrees of A.B. and B.S. The academic year lasts from August 
29 to June 23. The graduates number 269, of whom 250 are livmg. 
The oldest is Prof. E. Pieper, 1872, of St. Louis, Mo. 



Faculty. 



A. F. Ernst, President, Psychology 

and Ethics. 
F. W. A. Notz, Ph.D., Greek. 
J. H. Ott, Ph.D., Enghsh. 
William F. Weimar, Mathematics. 



John P. Koehler, Latin. 
Charles A. Ernst, Natural Science. 
Julius Gamm, English. 
William Biedenweg, Latin and Ger- 
man. 



Oberlin, O. 



OBERLIN COLLEGE. 

Co-EdtuatiojiaL Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^161,377 




Instructors, 



Buildings, 
14 



Books, 
42,286 



History, and Organization : The school was chartered in 1 833 as 
the Oberlin Collegiate Institute, and assumed its present name in 
1850, when a College and Theological Institute were established. The 
founders were the Rev. John J. Shipherd, and Philo P. vStewart. 
The presidents have been, Rev. Asa Mahan, 1835-1850; Rev. Chas. 
Grandison Finney, 1851-1866; Rev. James Harris Fairchild, 1866- 
1889; Rev. William Gay Ballantine, 1891 to the present time. A 
conservatory of music, a school of art and a physical training school 
have since been added. The government is vested in a board of 
twenty-five trustees, six of whom are elected by the alumni. 

Adjnissiofi, Degrees, etc. : Admission is on examination and upon 
certificates of thirty-eight specified High Schools of the State, and 
eight others. Three parallel courses lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., 
and B.Ph. In all these courses the studies of the first year are re- 
quired; in the three following years three-fourths of the subjects are 
elective. Gymnastic drill is likewise elective, but attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. Degrees of M.A., and M.S. are conferred 
after one year of resident graduate study. 

Dries, Scholarships, and Prizes : The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 24 to June 24, are from $160 upwards. Facilities 
for self-support are numerous, and free tuition is provided for many. 
There are thirteen scholarships for theological students ; twenty- 
seven for self-supporting women ; fifty-seven for negroes ; and seven 
for general use. 

Equipment: The college grounds cover forty-five acres, sixteen of 
which are reser\'ed for the campus. Among the fourteen college 
buildings there are two modern gymnasia and a rich library. 
There are several good collections of archaeological, palaeontologi- 
cal and zoological specimens, and eight distinct herbaria. Labora- 
tory work is carried on in two buildings. 

Societies, and Publications : Three literary societies are maintained 
by men : the Phi Kappa Phi, the Phi Delta, and the Alpha Zeta, and 
two by women : the L. L. S. and the ^Eolian. Between them they 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



225 



own 9,000 volumes. In the theological seminary the societies are 
the Samekh Aleph, and the Finney ; in the academy : the Acme, 
and the Cadmian, and in the conservatory, the Harmonia. Secret 
societies are not permitted. Besides two Christian Associations 
and a Missionary Club, there exist an Agassiz Club, a Botany Club, 
a German and French Club, and an Athletic Association, with 
football and baseball teams. The college publishes five annual re- 
ports, a quinquennial catalogue, periodical laboratory and library 
bulletins, and an annual necrology. The students publish the " Hi- 
O-Hi," an annual, and the " Oberlin Review," a weekly. The grad- 
uates number 3,200, the oldest of whom is Huntington Lyman, 1836, 
of Cortland, N. Y. 

Faculty. 



Rev. William Gay Ballantine, D.D., 

LL.D., President. 
Rev. James Harris Fairchild, D.D,, 

LL.D., Theology. 
James Monroe, LL.D., Political Sci- 
ence and Modern History. 
Rev. Charles Henry Churchill, A.M., 

Physics and Astronomy. 
Adelia A. Field Johnston, A.M., Dean 

Woman's Dep., Mediaeval History. 
Fenelon B. Rice, Mus.D., Music. 
Albert Allen Wright, A.M., Geology 

and Natural History. 
Rev. George Frederick Wright, D.D., 

LL.D., Harmony of Science and 

Revelation. 
Rev. Albert Henry Currier, D.D., 

Sacred Rhetoric, etc. 
Rev. Lyman B. Hall, A.M., Latin. 
Frank Fanning Jewett, A.M., Chem- 
istry and Mineralogy. 
Rev. Henry Churchill King, A.M., 

D.B., Philosophy, 
Azariah Smith Root, A.M,, Librarian. 
Rev. Edw, Increase Bosworth, A.M,, 

D,B., New Testament. 
Charles Beebe Martin, A.M., Greek 

and Archaeology, 
John Fisher Peck, A.M., Principal of 

Academy, Greek. 
Frederick Anderegg, A.M., Math. 
Lucretia Celestia Wattles, A.M,, Piano 

and Harmony. 
Howard Handel Carter, Piano. 
Charles Walthall Morrison, Piano. 
Arthur Smith Kimball, Singing. 
George Whitfield Andrews, Organ and 

Composition. 
Fred Eugene Leonard, A.M., M.D., 

Director of Gymnasium and Regis- 
trar, Physiology, 
Rev, Owen Hamilton Gates, Ph,D,, 

Old Testament. 



Rev. Francis Duncan Kelsey, Sc.D,, 

Botany. 
John Roaf Wightman, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages. 
Rev, Albert Temple Swing, A.M., 

D.B., Church History. 
Rev. Louis Francis Miskovsky, A.M., 

D.B., Slavic and Bohemian, 
Edward Dickinson, A.M., History of 

Music. 
Rev. John Taylor Shaw, A.M., D.B., 

Latin. 
Edward Drake Roe, Jr., A.M., Math. 
Wilfred Wesley Cressy, A.M., English. 
Thomas Nixon Carver, Ph.D., Eco- 
nomics .and Sociology. 
Fred Monroe Tisdel, A.M., Rhetoric 

and Oratory. 
Arietta Maria Abbott, A.M., German. 
Helen Maria Rice, Singing. 
Frederick Giraud Doolittle, Violin. 
Edgar George Sweet, Piano, Singing. 
Camilla Mercy Nettleton, Singing. 
Elizabeth W. Russell Lord, Assistant 

Dean of Woman's Department. 
Charles Parsons Doolittle, Violoncello, 

Musical Form, and History. 
Kate H. Winship Morrison, Singing. 
Delphine Hanna, M.D., Director of 

Woman's Gymnasium. 
Frances Juliette Horsford, A.M., 

Latin. 
John Arthur Demuth, Violin and Wind 

Instruments. 
William Kilgore Breckenridge, Piano. 
Kirke Lionel Cowdrey, A.B., French. 
Lepha Kelsey Hall, Singing. 
Jay Rollin Hall, Piano. 
James Lemuel Drew Mosher. Singing. 
Rev. John Faris Berry, A,M., D.B., 

English Bible. 
Eva May Oakes, Drawing, Painting. 
Charles King Barry, Piano. 



226 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Clarissa Lucretia Pendleton, A.M., 
Mathematics. 

Cleveland King Chase, A.M., Latin. 

Robert A. Millikan, Ph.D., Physics. 

Theodore Moses Focke, S.B., Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Clara Louise Smithe, L.B.. Latin. 

Mary Brewster Safford, Ph.B., His- 
tory and Civil Government. 

Charles Winfred Savage, A.B., Latin. 

Louise Frazyer, Ph.B., Declamation. 

George Morris Jones, A.B., Math. 

Marshall Ware Downing, A.B., Greek. 

Alice E. Mead Swing, A.B., German. 

Anna Eleanor Town, Ph.B., German. 

Grace Wakeman Hubbell, Ph.B., 
English. 

Grace Selina Fraser, A.B., Latin. 

Bert Emery Merriam, A.B., Math. 

Walter Yale Durand, A.B., Latin. 

Lynds Jones, S.M., Geology, Zoology. 



Amelia Hegmann Doolittle, Piano. 
Maud Tucker Doolittle, Piano. 
Alberta Josephine Cory, Woman's 

Gymnasium. 
Arthur Edward Heacox, Harmony and 

Choral Singing. 
Rosa Maritta Thompson, A.B., Latin 

and English. 
Gyda Sohlberg, Singing. 
WiUiam Treat Upton, Piano. 
Charles Henry Adams, Singing and 

Harmony. 
Flora Isabel Wolcott, L.B., Registrar. 
Ellen Frances Brown, Mus. Librarian. 
Nellie Hulbert Jameson, Cataloguer. 
Eoline Spaulding, Assist. Cataloguer. 
Grace Ella Prince, Nettie Esther Close, 

Ph.B., Etta Maria Wright, A.B., 

Assistants in Library. 
Elisha Gray, LL.D., Dynamic Elec- 
tricity. 



OGDEN COLLEGE. 

Bowling Green, Ky. Men. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$7,068 



Students, 
90 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded by Major Robert \V. Ogden in 1877. 
The presidents have been: J. W. Whightman, D.D., 1877-18S3, and 
"William A. Obenchain, M.A., the present incumbent. The school 
is governed by six trustees. Admission is on certificate. The de- 
grees are B.A., B.S., and B.Ph. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from the first Tuesday in September to June 10, are from $100 to 
$200. Forty scholarships, equivalent to $40 a year, are available for 
students from Kentucky. The societies are the Literary Society 
and the Literary Club, as well as an Athletic Association. Of the 
thirty-five graduates, the oldest is L. W. Gains, 1881, of Elkton, Ky. 



Faculty. 



William A. Obenchain, A.M., Presi- 
dent, Mathematics, etc. 

William F. Perry, A.M., English and 
History. 

John B. Preston, M.A., Ancient Lan- 
guages and French. 



S. R. McKee, Ph.D., Nat. Science. 
Henry K. McGoodwin, B.S., History 

and Drawing. 
Arthur C. Crofton, Prep. Department. 
John B. Preston, Secretary of Faculty. 
Gi-an villa H. Schroader. Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



227 



OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 

Columbus^ O. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
5159,693. 



Students, 
900 



Instructors, 
85 



Buildings, 

12 



Books, 
1 5,000 



History and Organization : The university was founded in 1870. In 
addition to the congressional grant of 1862 the university has re- 
ceived a permanent annual grant from the general government, special 
appropriations from the State, and since 1891 a permanent annual 
grant from Ohio, raising the whole endowment to more than half a 
million. The university consists of a school of art and philosophy, 
of science, and agricultural engineering, of a law school, and a 
medical school. The preparatory department was dropped in 1896. 
The university is governed by seven trustees. 

Admission, Degrees, etc. : Admission is upon examination and on 
certificates from the Preparatory and Normal schools of Ohio. A 
four years' course leads to degrees of B.A., B.S., and B.Ph., 
as well as to degrees in agriculture, horticulture, industrial 
art, with civil, mining, and mechanical engineering. The courses in 
pharmacy, medicine and veterinary medicine lead to appropriate 
degrees. The degree of M.A., is conferred after one year of resident 
post-graduate study, that of Ph.D. and SS.D. after three years. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: The necessary expenses for the year, 
lasting from the middle of September to the last week of March, are 
^128. The only charges for tuition are $15 a year for incidentals, 
and $5 for diploma fee. There are eight fellowships, divided among 
the different departments, and three scholarships in agriculture for 
one student from each county of the State. An employment com- 
mittee secures work for poor students. 

Eqtiipment : The college grounds cover 330 acres, part of which is 
reserved for botanical and horticultural purposes, and for the twelve 
college dwelling-houses. Besides the college library, the libraries of 
the city and of the State with 130,000 books are open to students. 
There is a botanical and geological museum, with 20,000 specimens 
and an archaeological collection of Ohio antiquities. Extensive 
athletic grounds give opportunity for physical training. 

Societies : The Halcyon Literary Society and the Horton, both for 
men, have halls in the University. The Browning Society, founded 
in 1883, and the Philomathean for women, have halls of their own. 
Besides these there is Newman Club for Catholics, a Biological Club, 
a Political Science Association, Engineers' Club, Athletic Associa- 
tion, two Christian Associations, and a branch of the King's 
Daughters. 

Faculty. 



James Hulme Canfield, 

dent. 
Edward Orton, Ph.D., 
William Henry Scott, 

Philosophy. 



LL.D., Presi- 

LL.D.. Geol. 
M.A., LL.D., 



Sidney A. Norton, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Chemistry. 
Nathaniel W. Lord, E.M., Mining and 

Metallurgy. 
Samuel C. Derby, M.A., Latin. 



228 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



William R. Lazenby, M.Agr., Horti- 
culture. 

Josiah R. Smith, M.A., Greek, and 
Librarian. 

Henry A. Weber, Ph.D., Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Benjamin F. Thomas, Ph.D., Physics. 

George W. Knight, Ph.D., History 
and Political Science. 

R. Daniel Bohannan, B.Sc, C.E., 
E.M., Mathematics and Astronomy. 

David S. Kellicott, Ph.D., Zoology 
and Entomology. 

C. Newton Brown, C.E., Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Ernst A. Eggers, German. 

William A. Kellerman, Ph.D., Botany. 

Thomas Forsyth Hunt, M.Sc, Agri- 
culture. 

Benjamin Lester Bowen, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages and Literature. 

Joseph Villiers Denney, B.A., Rhet- 
oric and English. 

Arthur Lyman Williston, S.B., Direc- 
tor Industrial Department. 

Allen Campbell Barrows, A.M., D.D., 
English Literature. 

Edward Orton, Jr., E.M., Clay- 
working and Ceramics. 

John T.' Martin, U.S.A., Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Robert Irving Fulton, A.M., Elocution 
and Oratory. 

Jos. Nelson Bradford, M.E., Drawing. 

William McPherson, Jr., D.Sc, Chem- 
istry. 

Henry Curwen Lord, B.Sc, Director 
Observatory. 

Embury A. Hitchcock, M.E., IMechani- 
cal Engineering. 

Olive B. Jones, Librarian. 

Chas. Walter Mesloh, M.A., German. 

Edward A. Kemmler, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Wm. David Gibbs, M.Sc, Agriculture. 

H. J. Noyes, Dairy Husbandry. 

Frederick Converse Clark, Ph.D., His- 
tory and Economics. 

Warren K. Moorehead, Curator Ar- 
chcBological Collections. 

George W. McCoard, M.A., Mathe- 
matics. 



Wilbur Henry Siebert, M.A., History. 

Francis Cary Caldwell, B.A., M.E., 
Physics. 

Frank A. Ray, E.M., Mining. 

Dewitt Goodrich, Dairy Husbandry. 

Charles Lmcoln Arnold, M.Sc, Math- 
ematics. 

Lloyd Morris Bloomfield, B.Agr., 
Agricultural Chemistry. 

Frank J. Combs, Charles W. Weick, 
Wm. A. Knight, Industrial Dept. 

Thomas E. French, M.E., Drawing. 

Newton Henry Brown, M.E., Physics. 

Karl Dale Swartzel, M.Sc, Mathe- 
matics. 

Thomas K. Lewis, B.Sc, Drawing. 

Charles A. Bruce, B.A., French, Latin. 

John A. Bownocker, B.Sc, Geology. 

Edwin Mead Wilcox, Botany. 

Francis Leroy Landacre, B.A., Zool- 
ogy and Entomology. 

Jas. Stewart Hine, B.Sc, Entomology. 

Ambrose Pare Winston, A.M., History 
and Political Science. 

Romeo Orpheus Keiser, B.Sc, Chem- 
istry. 

Frank B. Pearson, A.M., Latin. 

Frank Haas, C.E., Mining and Metal- 
lurgy. 

William Lloyd Evans, B.Sc, Raymond 
M. Hughes, A.B., Chemistry. 

Frederick E. Kester, M.E., George H. 
Calkins, M.E., Physics. 

William L. Graves, B.A., Rhetoric 
and English. 

Joseph Russell Taylor, B.A., Rhetoric. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

William F. Hunter, Dean, Law of 
Sales. 

George K. Nash, B.A., Torts. 

David F. Pugh, Equity. 

I. N. Abernethy, Criminal Law. 

Jas. H. Collins, Law of Corporations. 

Orlando W. Aldrich, LL.D., D.C.L., 
Law of Real Property. 

J. Paul Jones, B.A., Law of Contracts. 

EmiUus Oviatt Randall, B.Ph., LL.M., 
Commercial Law. 

Horace Lafayette Wilgus, M.Sc, Ele- 
mentary Law. 

Edgar B. Kinkead, Elementary Law. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



229 



Athens, Ohio. 



OHIO UNIVERSITY. 

Co-Edticational. No7i-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$30,000 



Students, 
286 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
21,000 



The university, though chartered and organized in 1804, was estab- 
lished in 18S7 by a purchase of land from the United States. It is 
under the control of the legislature and of twenty-one tiustees, who 
are appointed by the State. The grounds cover ten acres. The 
main building, which was built in 181 7, is the oldest college edifice 
in the State, just as the university itself was the first institution of 
higher learning contemplated in Ohio. Instruction was suspended 
between 1S46 and 1849. The presidents have been : the Revs. James 
Irvine, A.M., 1822-1824; Robert G. Wilson, D.D., 1824-1839; 
WilUam H. McGuffey, D.D., LL.D., 1839-1843 ; Alfred Ryors, U.D., 
1843-1852; Solomon Howard, D.D., LL.D., 1852-1872; William H. 
Scott, A.M., 1S72-1883, and Charles W. Super, A.M., Ph.D., since 
1884. 

Admission is by examination and upon certificate. The degrees 
are A.B. and B.Ph., and A.M. and Ph.D. after three years and con- 
spicuous scientific attainments. Half the subjects after the first year 
are elective. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Negroes are not 
excluded. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 3 to 
June 27, are $175. Ten $100 scholarships are offered. 

The societies are the Athenian and Philomathean, with the Adel- 
phia for women. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: B n, B K, 1841 ; ATA, 1862; * A 0, 1868; K A 0, 
1876-1S85; and n B4», 1889. 

The oldest graduate is O. W. Brown, 1829, of Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Faculty. 



Charles W. Super, A.M., President, 
Greek. 

Willis Boughton, A.M., English. 

Henry E. Chapin, Biology, Geology. 

David J. Evans, A.M., Latin. 

John P. Gordy, Ph.D., Philosophy 
and Pedagogy. 

William Hoover, A.M., Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

James E. LeRossignol, Ph.D., Ethics 
and Psychology. 

Walker Bowman, B.S., Chemistry. 

EU Dunkle, A.B., Greek. 



Catherine A. Findley, Elocution. 
Kate Cranz, German and French. 
Albert A. Atkinson, B.S., Physics. 
John E. Snow, B.S., Physics. 
Horace M. Conaway, A.B., Latin and 

History. 
Brewster O. Higley, American History 

and Finance. 
Sarah Stinson, Painting. 
Myrtle Stinson, Music. 
Charles M. Copeland, Commercial 

Branches. 
Mabel K. Brown, B.Ph., Stenography. 



230 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

Delaware, Ohio. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 

M 00,000 



Students, 
1,125 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
10 



Books, 
1 6,886 



History and Organization: The college was founded in 1842. The 
faculty was organized two years later. The presidents have been : 
Bishop Thomson, 1842-1860; Rev. Frederick Merritt, 1860-1873; 
Fales Newhall, 1873-1883; Professor McCabe, 1883-1886; Charles 
H. Payne, D.D., LL.D., 18S6-1889; and James W. Bashford, Ph.D., 
from 1889 until the present. The trustees number thirty, of whom 
five are alumni. 

Ad?nission, Degrees, etc.: Admission is by examination and upon 
certificate for subjects corresponding to those of the curriculum. 
The degrees are A.B., B.L., and B.S."; A.M. after one year; Ph.D. 
after three years of resident study ; and S. T. D. after ten years of 
marked success. Attendance at chapel is required except upon 
petition. Attendance at gymnastics and military drill is voluntary, 
and credits are given for such attendance. Negroes have been ad- 
mitted ever since the close of the Civil War. Connected with the 
college is an academic department. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Frizes: Tuition is $15 a year, but an 
'• incidental fee " of $36 is charged in addition. In 1854 no less than 
3,740 scholarships were sold, which are expected to reach cancella- 
tion within twenty years. A prize of ^25 is offered for modern 
languages. 

Equipment: The college buildings number ten, of which six are 
on the campus. Besides a gymnasium and library, there are three 
buildings equipped for laboratory work. Monnett Hall, the dormi- 
tory for women, is situated a half mile from the campus amid pict- 
uresque surroundings. The college grounds cover forty acres. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the" Transcript " 
and " Weekly Folio." The societies are the Zetagathean, Christo- 
mathean, Athenian, and Amphictyonian. Halls are owned by all. 
Four societies are maintained by the academic department, while 
three more flourish in Monnett Hall : namely the Clionian, Athenean, 
and Castilian. In addition to these organizations there is a Chris- 
tian Association, growing out of the Missionary Lyceum, dating 
from 1846, and an Athletic Association wnth baseball and football 
teams. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : 
Ben, 1853; 2 X, 1855;* A 0, 1S60; * K % 1861; ATA, 1866; 
* r A, 1869 ; K *, 1873 ; K K r, 1879-1881 ; K A 0, 1881 ; A T n, 1887 : 
and 5 A E, 1889. 

The alumni number more than 2,200, of whom 2,000 are living. The 
oldest of these is W. D. Goodman, D.D., 1846, of Winsted, La. 

Facility. 
Rev. Jas. W. Bashford, B.D. Ph.D., Rev. William G. Williams, LL.D., 

D.D., President, Christ. Evidences. Greek and Biblical Literature. 
Rev. Lorenzo D. McCabe, D.D., Rev. William F. Whitlock, D.D., 

LL.D., Philosophy. Latin. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



231 



Rev. Hiram M. Perkins, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Wm. O. Semans, A.M., Chemistry. 

Edward T. Nelson, A.M., M.D., 
Ph.D., Physiology and Geology. 

John H. Grove, A.M., Latin. 

Rev. Richard Parsons, A.M., Greek. 

Rev. Cyrus B. Austin, A.M., Math. 

Rev. William W. Davies, A.M., ii.D., 
Ph.D., German and Hebrew. 

Ellen R. Martin, A.M., Belles-Lettres, 
and Preceptress. 

Robert I. Fulton, A.M., Elocution 
and Oratory. 

Rev. Richard T. Stevenson, A.M., 
B.D., Ph.D., History, English Lit. 

William G. Hormell, A.M., Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Rev. Albert Mann, A.M., Ph.D., 
Biology. 

Clara A. Nelson, A.M., French. 

Rev. Trumbull G. Duvall, A.M., 
Ph.D., Philosophy. 

Lieut. Waldo E. Ayer, U.S.A., Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

Samuel H. Blakeslee, Music. 

Delia L. Williams, Ped.D., English. 

Katherine E Junkerman, Elocution. 

Florence Newcomer, China Painting. 

Elizabeth Flint, Physical Culture. 



Francis M. Swinehart, William W. 
Overmyer, Mathematics. 

Charles H. Brownell, Chemistry. 

Charles H. Shaw, Botany. 

Frank Montgomery, Biology. 

Marion Harter, Violin and Piano. 

Edward L. Powers, Counterpoint. 

Charles M. Jacobus, Piano. 

Augusta H. Hayner, B.L., Harmony. 

Nellie Young, Singmg. 

Joseph B. Rogerb, A.B., History of 
Music. 

Aquila Webb, A.B., Elocution. 

Volera Koeppel-Griffiths, Singing. 

Mertie E. Besse, Piano. 

Dana A. Nelson, Fordyce T. Richards, 
Physics. 

Herbert A. Hard, Geology. 

Oliver A. Wright, Samuel H. Layton, 
English. 

Hollis A. Wilbur, Histology. 

John W. Swartz, OUve Austin, B.L., 
Mathematics. 

Allen Chase, Latin. 

Orme W. Brown, Chemistry. 

Mary White Reagh, B.L., Mathe- 
matics and English. 

Martha H. Bailey, Elocution. 

Hiram M. Perkins, Secretary. 

Edward T. Nelson, Curator Cabinets. 



O/ivef, Mich. 



OLIVET COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$2 5,000 



Students, 
400 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
9 



Books, 
24,000 



The college was founded in 1859, and is designed to meet the 
needs of those who wish to begin work at any time in the year. It 
is governed by twenty-four trustees and a Women's Board of nine 
members. Admission is by examination and on certificate. Attend- 
ance at chapel and gymnastic exercise is compulsory. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., and B.Ph. Three honors are open to seniors. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from .September 12 to June 18, are 
^135. Prizes of $25 and $50 and $100 are offered for excellence in 
the classics. 

The societies are the Soronian, for women, the Phi Alpha Pi and 
Delphi, for men, a Musical Guild and two Christian Associations. 
The " Echo," is published. The graduates since 1S63 number 400, 
the oldest of whom is Sarah B. Cosser, 1863, of Vermontville, Mich. 



232 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Willard G. Sperry, A.M., D.D., Presi 
dent, Philosophy. 

Jos. L. Daniels, A.M., D.D., Greek. 

Stewart Montgomery, A.M., Chemis- 
try and Physiology. 

Walter E. C. Wright, D.D., Chris- 
tianity. 

George A. Knapp, A.M., Astronomy 
and Mathematics. 

James L. Kellogg, Ph.D., Biology and 
Geology. 

Charles E. Dixon, A.M., Latin. 

Charles McKenny, A.M., History and 
Pedagogy. 

Cora Marsland, O.M., English. 

Lizzie E. Bintliif, Music. 



Faculty. 



Marie H. Frohn, French and German. 
Thomas F. Kane, A. B., Ph.D., Latin. 
Hamilton King, A.M., Greek. 
George N. Ellis, A.M., Latin. 
M. Ida Swindt, M.L., Mathematics. 
Loren D. Milliman, A.B., English. 
Wendell P. Parker, A.B., Physics, 
Anna B. Shepard, Singing. 
John B. Martin, Orches. Instruments. 
Annie E. Tennent, Music. 
Clara Lee Huston, Piano. 
Samuel L. Wise, Painting. 
William R. Alvord, Gymnastics. 
William H. Reuther, B.S., Biology. 
Joseph L. Daniels, Librarian. 
Albert L. Lee, Registrar. 



OSKALOOSA COLLEGE. 

Oskaloosa, Iowa. Co- Educational. 



Disciples. 



Income, 
$3,000 



Students, 
160 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was founded in 1862. It is governed by twenty-three 
trustees. Admission is by examination and on certificate. Degrees 
are A.B., B.L., and B.S. The expenses for the year, from September 
15 to June 10, are $120. The societies are the Athenian and Philo- 
mathi Oratorical Association. The "Palladium," is published. A 
chapter of A T A was organized in 1878. The graduates since 1867 
number 118, of whom 115 are living. The oldest of these is Geo. 
W. Seevers, 1867, of Oskaloosa. 



Faculty. 



John M. Atwater, A.M., President, 

Philosophy. 
Amaziah Hull, A.M., History. 
Anna R. Atwater, M.Ph,, Math. 
John M. Stoke, B.S., Physics, Chem. 
Chas. J. Atwater, A.B., Classics. 
Mary Forward, B.L., Modern Lang. 



Mabel Pearl Mead, Elocution. 
Ethel M. Brown, English. 
Chattie B. Hunter, Grammar. 
Arthur L. Sprague, Book-keeping. 
Mrs. W. A. Seevers, Music. 
David W. Roberts, Singing. 



OTTA\VA UNIVERSITY. 

Ottawa, Kan. Co-Edticational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$9,760 



Students, 
402 



Instructors, 

IS 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was incorporated in 1865, on a grant of 340 acres of 
land, of which 300 were sold. It is governed by twenty-four trustees. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



233 



Admission is by examination and on certificate. Negroes are ad- 
mitted. The degrees are A.B., B.L., B.S., with masters' degrees 
after three years and degrees in music. A lecture course is main- 
tained. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic drill is compulsory. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 9 to June 10, are 
$113. Four money prizes are given for declamation and scholarship, 
and a fund has been established to aid poor students. The societies 
are the Olympia and Philolethean, with a Christian Association. The 
graduates since 1879 number 100, the oldest of whom are Alice 
Boomer, of Hiawatha, Kan., and Jennie Sherman, a missionary, of 

the class of 1888. ^ 

Faculty. 



J. L. S. Riggs, Ph.D., President, 
Psychology, etc. 

Milan Lester Ward, D.D., Math. 

James S. Gorsline, Ph.B., Sciences. 

Rowland Cyrus Merrill, A.M., History 
and Economics. 

Erwin Charles Harmon, A.M., Greek, 

Frances Cornelia Norris, A.M., Eng- 
lish and Modern Languages. 

Everett Henry Fitch, A.B., Latin. 



Thomas Wright DeHaven, B.S., Busi- 
ness Department. 

Ada Vassar Harbottle, A.B., Elocution 
and Gymnastics. 

Sam. Francis Cravens, B.M., Singing. 

Etta Dent Cravens, B.M., Piano and 
Harmony. 

Emma Belle Brockway, Instrumental 
Music. 

Emma Dilley Dent, Singing. 



jtcA/^^ OTTERBEIN UNIVERSITY. 

Watertown^ O. Co-Educational. United Brethren. 



Income, 
$3,000 




Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
8,000 



In 1846 preparations were made to establish this school at Bluffton, 
Ind., but in October the Blendon Seminary at Westerville was pur- 
chased and transformed into the school bearing the present name. 
In 1854 it was chartered as a college, and graduated two women in 
1857. It is governed by fifty-four trustees, of whom thirteen are alumni, 
and there is a board of alumnae visitors. Admission is on certificate. 
The degrees are A.B., B.L., and B.Ph., with those of A.M. and M.L., 
after one year of resident work. Attendance at chapel is compul- 
sory. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 2 to June 9, 
are $150. Matriculation and diploma fees with incidental fees are 
charged. Tuition is remitted for the sons of superannuated and 
itinerant ministers of the United Brethren. The societies are the 
Philolethean and Cleiorhetean, for women, the Philophronean and 
Philomathean for men, with a Christian Association and Historical 
Society, Of the 443 graduates, 400 are living. Mary K. "Winter, 
1857 of Los Angeles, Cal., is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



Thomas J. Sanders, Ph.D., President, 

Philosophy. 
John Haywood, LL.D., Emeritus. 



John E. Guitner, A.M., Registrar 

Greek. 
Rev. H. Garst, D.D., Philosophy. 



234 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Louis H. McFadden, A.M., Natural 

Science. 
George Scott, Ph.D., Librarian, Latin. 
Frank E. Miller, Ph.D., Math. 
Tirza L. Barnes, B.S., English and 

History. 
Rev. William J. Zuck, A.M., English. 
Josephine Johnson, M.A., Modern 

Languages. 



Rudolph H. Wagoner, A.B 
Rev. W. O. Fries, A.M., 

Evidences. 
Isabel A. Sevier, Painting. 
Gustav Meyer, Music. 
Zorah E. Wheeler, Singing. 
E. Luella Fonts, Ph.B., 

Culture. 
Frank S. Fox, A.M., Elocution 



, Latin. 
Christian 



Physical 



OUACHITA BAPTIST COLLEGE. 

Arkadelphia., Ark. Co-Educational. Baptist. 



Income, 
$9,000 



Students, 
300 




Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded in 1886, when J. W. Conger was elected 
president. Four years later the old building was destroyed by fire. 
The school is governed by fifteen trustees. Admission is upon certi- 
ficate. Negroes are excluded. The degrees are A.B., B.Ph., and 
B.S., Mistress of English Literature, and M-D. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the "year, lasting from 
September 15 to June 5, are $230. The grounds cover ten acres. 

The societies are the Hermesian, Philomathean, Alpha Kappa, and 
Corinean, Society of Religious Inquiry, and an Athletic Association, 
with baseball, football and tennis clubs. The " Society," is published 
monthly. 

Faculty. 



John W. Conger, A.M., President, 

Psychology and Ethics. 
Frederic Otto Schub, A.M., Greek, 

Mathematics, and Science. 
Reese E. Major, A.B., Latin, Math. 
A. G. McManaway, D.D., History. 



Estelle Blake, A.B., English. 

Mrs. N. G. Biscoe, A.B., Preparatory 

Department. 
Cornelia Hickman, A.M., Modem 

Languages. 
Mary Hamilton, Librarian. 



OXFORD COLLEGE. 



Oxford, 0. 




Wo77ieii. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 
$35,000 


Students, 
210 


Instructors, 
25 


Buildings, 

I 


Books, 
5,000 



The Oxford Female College was founded in 1849, changing its 
name in 1855 to the Female Institute. It is governed by twenty-four 
trustees. Miami University and another women's college are situated 
in the same place. Admission is by certificate or by examination. 
Three courses lead to degrees of A.B., B.L., and B.S. Elective and 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



235 



post-graduate studies are offered. Attendance at chapel and gym- 
nastic exercise is compulsory. Alumni, Missionary and Christian 
Endeavor Societies are maintained. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Faye Walker, D.D., President. 
Lillie M. Walker, Preceptress. 
Mary Carrie Holmes, Dean. 
Mary U. Pratt, Philosophy, History. 
Carl Hoffman, Music. 
N. Plempliill Stewart, Sacred Lit. 
Josephine E. Sondericker, A.M., Latin. 
T. Letitia Thompson, Academic Dept. 
Adele Mollyneaux, Stringed Instru- 
ments. 
Cora B. Allen, Lillie M. Schenk, Piano. 
Henry Snyder, S.M., Physics, Chem. 
Anna H. Potter, B.L., Secretary. 
Hattie Roudebush, Treasurer. 
Marie Hoffman, Voice. 



Caroline Blanchard, Art. 
Martha J. Cushman, Librarian. 
Mary S. Cullom, Portraiture. 
Ellen Strong Bartlett, Literature. 
Emily Faber, Modern Languages. 
Shelly Wiseman, Mathematics. 
Elizabeth F. Darhng, A.B., Natural 

Sciences. 
Frances Darhng, A.B., EngUsh. 
LiUan C. Jones, A.B., Greek. 
Anna G. Taggart, Elocution. 
Bessie Banks, Dressmaking. 
Katherine Hartley, Supervisor of 

Practice. 
Lillian Thayer, B.L., Tutor. 



OZARK COLLEGE. 



Greenfield, Mo. Co- Educational. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 
$7,000 


Students, 
120 


Instructors, 

5 


Buildings, 


Books, 
1,200 





The college was founded in 1882. Admission is on certificate. 
The degree is A.B. Total expenses for the year, ending June 17, are 
$145. The graduates number eighty. The president is J. H. Solden, 
A.M. 

{Further information lacking.") 



PACIFIC COLLEGE. 



Newberg, Ore. Co-Educational. 


Qu< 


iker. 


Income, 
|4,000 


Students, 


Instructors, 

8 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
500 



This college was founded in 1891. Admission is mainly on certi- 
ficate. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The degree of A.B. 
is conferred. The academic year ends June 17. The college 
grounds cover twenty-three acres. The students publish the " Cres- 
cent," and maintain oratorical, literary and scientific societies, two 
Christian Associations, and an Athletic Association with^ football 
and baseball teams. Ten alumni have been graduated. The presi- 
dent is Thomas Newlin, A.M. 

[Further information lacking.) 



236 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



PACIFIC UNIVERSITY. 

Forest Grove, Ore. Co- Educational. Congregational. 



Income, 




Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
7,000 



The university, which dates from 1853, is the successor of the 
Tualatin Academy of 1848. It is governed by thirteen trustees. Ad- 
mission is by examination. Degrees of A.B. and B.S. are conferred, 
with the master's degree after three years. Attendance at chapel 
is compulsory. Negroes are not excluded. Tuition for the year, 
lasting from September 18 to June 17, is ^45. The college grounds 
cover thirty acres. 

The students maintain the Gamma Sigma Society for men, and 
Philomathean for women, two Christian Associations, and an Ath- 
letic Association with football and baseball teams. The graduates 
number 107. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Thomas McClelland, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Joseph Walker Marsh, Ph.D., Greek 
and Latin. 

William Nelson Ferrin, M. A., Math. 

Theodore Whittelsey, Ph.D., Chemis- 
try and Physics. 

Francis Ernest Lloyd, M.A., Biology 
and Geology. 

James Rood Robertson, M.A., History. 



Margaret Best, B.A., English. 

Rev. Henry Liberty Bates, M.A., 

Academy. 
Homer Charles Atwell, Greek, Latin. 
Rachel Green L.loyd, B.L., English. 
Bertha M. Buckham, Academy. 
Mrs. F. R. Cook, Music. 
Mrs. Walter Reed, Vocal Music. 
J. M. Garrison, M.S., Penmanship. 
Miss. O. S. Haskell, Matron. 



PARK COLLEGE. 



Parkville, Mo. Co-Educational. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 


Students, 
390 


Instructors, 
18 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
3.700 





The college was founded by the Rev. John A. McAfee, D.D., and 
was opened in 1875. Since the death of the founder and first presi- 
dent in 1890, the school has been without a president. It is governed 
by seventeen trustees. Admission is upon certificate. Attendance 
at chapel is compulsory. Degrees of A.B., and of Litt.B., for 
women, are conferred after two years and an examination. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from September 3 to June 19, are from 
$60 to $100. Tuition is $10 a term. Nine prizes of from ^10 to $20 
are offered for essays and declamations. The societies are the 
Cheever, Park and Bullow, with oratorical and Christian Associations. 
The president's "family "is also mentioned as one of the societies. 
The students publish the " Stylus." The graduates number 245, of 
whom the Rev. W. T. Scott, 187Q, Cleone, Ore., is the oldest. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



237 



Faculty. 



Lowell M. McAfee, Chairman. 
Margaret Best, A.M., Greek, English. 
Rev. Cleland B. McAfee, A.M., Ph.D., 

Mental Philosophy. 
Charles F. Winchell, A.M., Greek. 
Arthur L. Wolfe, A. B., Ph.D., Latin. 
Rev. Samuel L. McAfee, A.M., Bible, 
Mrs. S. L. McAfee, A.M., Music. 
Merlin C. Findlav, A.B., Nat. Sciences. 
Arthur M. Mattoon, A.M., Math. 
Henry S. Verrill, A.B., Rhetoric. 



Jessie B. Woodside, A.M., M.D., 

Physiology. 
Thos. S. Burt, A.B., History, Greek. 
Clara B. Hastings, A.M., History. 
J. McC. Martin, A.M., Geometry. 
Agnes M. Dilley, A.M., Mathematics. 
Mary Hindman, A.B., Vocal Music. 
Isabella McRae, A.M., Latin. 
Mary B. Barrett, A.M., Elementary 

Branches. 
M. Clara Haynie, A.B., English. 



PARKER COLLEGE. 

Winnebago City, Minn. Co-Educational. 



Free Baptist. 



Income, 
$7,000 



Students, 
144 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,500 



In 1886 a General Baptist Conference authorized the Western Asso- 
ciation to establish a college in the West, which was duly incorporated 
as Parker College in 1887. The town gave $12,000 and seventy acres. 
Instruction began in 1888. In 1891 the sum of $50,000 was raised. 
It is governed by thirty-five trustees. Admission is by examination 
and on certificate. Three courses, — the classical, philosophical and 
scientific lead to degrees of A.B., B.Ph., and B.S. The expenses for 
the year, from September 10 to June 13, ate $100. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Gideon A. Burgess, A.M., D.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Lucy Phillips Durgin, A.M., Latin. 

Rev. Robert D. Frost, A.M., Greek 
and German. 

Lewis Eugene Ashbaugh, Ph.B., Math- 
ematics and Astronomy. 



Sarah A. Benedict, A.B., History. 
Charles Wesley Teubner, Business 

Branches. 
A. Louise Randolph, Instrumental 

Music. 
Alice Hope Dunn, Physical Culture 

and Reading. 



PARSONS COLLEGE. 

Fairfield, Iowa. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$12,000 



Students, 
270 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
4,000 



The college was founded in 1875 by Lewis B. Parsons, Sr., on the 
proceeds of a legacy made in 1855. The college grounds cover 
twenty-three acres. The presidents have been the Revs. : John 



238 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Armstrong, D.D., 1876-1879; E. J. Gillett, D.D., 1879-1880; T. D. 
Ewing, D.D., 1880-1889; and Ambrose C. Smith, D.D., 1889 to the 
present. Admission is upon certificate. Negroes are not excluded. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Degrees of A.B. and B.S. are 
given. The expenses for the year, from September 15 to June 3, 
are ^150. Sixteen special scholarships are offered. The societies 
are the Aldine and Orio for women, with the Alethean and Elzevir 
for men ; two Christian Associations, an Oratorical Society, and an 
Athletic Association. The students publish the " Portfolio," the 
" Quarterly," and an annual handbook. The graduates number 200. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Ambrose C. Smith, D.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Richard A. Harkness, M.A., Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Abram H. Conrad, M.S., Natural 
Sciences. 

William A. Wirtz, M.A., Librarian, 
Modern Languages. 

Rev. Selby Frame Vance, M.A., Greek. 



George Daniel Gable, M.A., Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 
Louis Begeman, M.S., Physics and 

Chemistry. 
John V. Bean, M.D., Anatomy. 
Rev. John F. Magill, D.D., Theology. 
Susie Alice Harkness, B.A., Latin and 

Greek. 
Martin M. Schoenert, Music. 



PENN COLLEGE. 



Oskaloosa, Iowa. Co-Educational. 


Quaker. 


Income, 
^8,000 


Students, 
270 


Instructors, 
II 


Buildings, 
3 


Books, 
4,000 



The college was opened in 1873. O^ ^^ fifteen trustees, five are 
alumni. Admission is by examination or on certificate. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., B.Ph., with A.M. and M.S. after three years. Lect- 
ure courses are offered. Expenses for the year, lasting from Sep- 
tember 22 to June 17, are $125. Graduate fellowships of $300, and 
one Bryn Mawr scholarship for women, as well as three other scholar- 
ships equivalent to tuition, are offered. A new gymnasium has 
recently been equipped. The chapel is decorated with valuable 
paintings. 

The societies are the Alethean for women, and the Alcimian for 
men. A large hall is owned by them and a Debating Club, acting in 
unison. Athletic and Christian Associations have also been organ- 
ized. Of the 150 graduates the oldest is Linda Ninde, 1875, ^^ Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Faculty. 



Absalom Rosenberger, President, Psy- 
chology. 
Rosa E. Lewis, English Literature. 
Stephen M. Hadley, Mathematics. 
Wm. L. Pearson, Biblical Literature. 
Charles L. Michener, Greek and Latin. 
Wm. S. Windle, Biology, Chemistry. 
Elmer H. Gifford, Physics. 



Pauline Wies, Modern Languages. 
Elizabeth S. Johnson, Latin, History. 
Margaret Baker, Elocution. 
M. Gertrude Windle, Drawing and 

Painting. 
Belle C. Ray, Instrumental Music. 
Annette L. Harwood, Vocal Music. 
Rosa E. Lewis, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



239 



PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE. 

Gettysburg, Pa. Co- Educational. 



Lutheran. 



Income, 
$16,266 



Students, 
239 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
23,000 



The college was founded in 1832 by a number of citizens, chief 
among whom was Rev. S. S. Schmucker of the local theological 
seminary. It is governed by thirty-six trustees, of whom six are 
alumni. Admission is by examination or on certificate. Degrees of 
A.B. and B.S. are given, as well as that of Ph.D. after two years. 
Elective studies are offered during the last two years. Attendance 
at chapel and at gymnastic exercise during the first two years is 
obligatory. The expenses for the year, from September 8 to June 
22, are $150, A number of permanent scholarships have been estab- 
lished, and five prizes of varying amounts of money are distributed 
annually. 

The college grounds cover fifty acres, and comprise fourteen build- 
ings costing $225,000 in all. The students publish the " Mercury," 
a monthly, and the "Spectrum," a junior annual. The societies are 
the Philomathean and Phrenokosmian, with a library of 12,000 
volumes, the Philo and Phrena Debating clubs, a Christian Associa- 
tion, and Athletic Association with baseball and football teams. 



Faculty. 



Harvey W. McKnight, D.D., LL.D., 
Philosophy. 

Adam Martin, D.D., German, French. 

John A. Himes, A.M., English. 

Rev. Philip M. Bikle, Ph.D., Latin. 

Edw. S. Breidenbaugh, Sc.D., Chemis- 
try, Mineralogy, Curator of Museum. 

H. Louis Baugher, D.D., Greek. 

George D. Stahley, A.M., M.D., 
Physical Culture. 

Henry B. Nixon, Ph.D., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 



Eli Huber, D.D., English Bible. 
Rev. Oscar G. Klinger, A.M., Classics. 
Franklin Menges, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Hon. William McClean, A.M., Con- 
stitutional Law. 
A. Pohlmann, A.B., Gymnastics. 
U. S. G. Rupp, A.B., Latin, Science. 
Charles H. Huber, A.B., Math. 
Thos. Bruce Birch, A.B., English. 
David P. Drawbaugh, Book-keeping. 
J. A. Himes, Librarian. 
Sallie P. Krauth, Assistant Librarian. 



PENNSYLVANIA MILITARY COLLEGE. 

Chester, Pa. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
116 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
1,800 



The college was incorporated in 1862. It is governed by sixteen 
trustees. The grounds cover twenty acres. Admission is by exam- 
ination. Three courses in classics, science, and engineering lead to 
degrees of A.B., B.S., and C.E., and the master's degree is conferred 
after one year of resident study. The expenses for the year, lasting 



240 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



from September 17 to June 17, are $500. Five medals for excellence 
in study are offered. Attendance at chapel is obligatory. Military 
discipline is maintained by a system of military punishments, and 
courses of military science, and of cavalry and infantry drill, as well 
as marksmanship, are given. The college has a well-equipped gym- 
nasium, armory, and a hospital. The graduates number 315, of 
whom 278 are living. The oldest of these is Thomas H. Larkin, 
1867, of St. Louis, Mo. 

Faculty. 
Charles E. Hyatt, C.E., President 



Silas G. Comfort, M.Ar., C.E., En- 
gineering. 

Lieut. George McK. Williamson, Mili- 
tary Science and Mathematics. 

Lee C. Felthausen, A.M., Modern 
Languages. 

Edw. P. Harris, A.M., Ph.D.,Chem. 

Frank R. Brown, C.E., Railroads and 
Military Science. 



John R. Sweney, Mus. Doc, Emeritus. 
Horace G. McKean, A.M., Rhetoric. 
William E. Stubbs, C.E,, Geometry. 
Henry L. McClellan, A.M., Latin. 
Chas. S. Fahnestock, M.E., Drawing. 
Ernest M. Bliss, A.B., Chemistry. 
Clarence W. de Lannoy, M.D., Anat- 
omy and Physiology. 
William B. Ulrich, M.D., Surgeon. 
William H. Martin, Commissary. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE. 

State College, Pa. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$120,248 



Students, 



Instructors, 
43 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1 1 .000 



The college was organized in 1859 as the Farmers' High School, 
and in 1862 became the Agricultural College, after the legislature 
had appropriated the proceeds of the national land grant of 1862 to 
its use. In 1874 it assumed its present name. In all, the State has 
appropriated more than $6,000,000 to this one college. The presi- 
dents have been : Evan Pugh, Ph.D.,F. C.S. ,1860-1863; W. H. Allen, 
LL.D., 1864-1866; John Eraser, A.M., 1867-1868; T. H. Burrowes, 
LL.D., 1869-1871; Rev. James Calder, D.D., 1871-1880; Joseph 
Shortlidge, A.M., 1880-1881 ; Geo. W. Atherton, LL.D., from 1882 
to the present. The college is governed by ten elective and nine 
ex-officio trustees. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degrees: In lieu of examination, cer 
tificates of all normal and high schools, as well as of all academies of 
the State are accepted. The four years' courses are : classical, gen- 
eral science and Latin-scientific, with courses in agriculture, biology, 
chemistry, civil, electrical, mechanical, and mining engineering, as well 
as in mathematics and physics. Provision is also made for an exten- 
sive range of elective work in ancient and modern languages, psy- 
chology, ethics, pedagogics, history, and political science. Degrees 
of A.B., B.S., and of C.E., M.E., and E.E., as well as masters' 
degrees after special study are given. Attendance at military drill 
and chapel is compulsory. Negroes are not excluded 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



241 



Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: No tuition is charged for residents 
of the State. Others pay $100 for the year, lasting from September 
II to June 17. An incidental fee of $\i is charged, as well as labo- 
ratory fees. Fifty senatorial scholarships have been established, 
exempting the holders from all charges except laboratory fees for 
four years. Five prizes of unspecified value are annually distributed. 

Equipment : The college grounds cover four hundred acres, one 
hundred of which are used for experimental purposes, while fifty are 
reserved for the campus. Besides six public buildings, among which 
are a gymnasium and armory, an Agricultural Experiment Station, 
with well-equipped physical and chemical laboratories and machine- 
shops, there are ten dwelling-houses for professors. No dormi- 
tories have as yet been provided. Separate libraries have been 
established for each college department. 

Societies and Publications : The college publishes an annual bulletin, 
an alumni record, and many agricultural bulletins. The students 
publish the " Free Lance," a monthly ; and '* La Vie," a junior annual ; 
the " Mining Bulletin," and a Y. M. C. A. handbook. The societies 
are : the Alumni Association, Adelphi Club, Scientific Association, 
Friday Club, Camera Club, Press Club, Electrical Engineers, Mining 
Association, Chemical Club, L'Union des Esprits, Cotillion Club, 
Glee Club, Choir, Orchestra; Banjo, Guitar, and Mandolin Clubs; 
Delmonico Club, Clover Club, Future Farmers, Military Company, 
Athletic Association with football and baseball teams, and a Tennis 
Association. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: ATA, 1872-1874; * FA, 1888; Q T V, 1885-1890; B n, 
1887 ; * K 5, 1890; 2 X, 1891 ; K 2, 2 A E, 1892; * A E, 1893, and 
N E, 1894. 



Faculty. 



George W. Atherton, LL.D., Presi- 
dent, Political Science. 

William A. Buckhout, M.S., Botany. 

I. Thornton Osmond, M.S., M.A., 
Physics. 

Harriet A. McElwain, M.A., History. 

Louis E. Reber, M.S., Mechanics. 

Wm. Frear, Ph.D., Agricultural Chem. 

George Gilbert Pond, M.A., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

Henry P. Armsby, Ph.D., Stock 
Feeding. 

Henry T. Fernald, M.S., Ph.D., Zool. 

Benjamin Gill, M.A., Greek and Latin. 

E. W. McCaskey, U.S.A., Military 
Science. 

Magnus C. Ihlseng, E.M., C.E., 
Ph.D., Mining Engineering, etc. 

John Price Jackson, B.S., M.E., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

Fred E. Foss, B.S., M.A., Civ. Engin. 

Joseph M. Willard, B.A., Math. 

Fred Lewis Pattee, M.A., English. 

Geo. C. Watson, B.Agr., Agriculture. 



John M. Gregory, A.M., LL.D., Eco- 
nomics. 
George C. Butz, M.S., Horticulture. 
Harry Harkness Stoek, B.S., E.M., 

Mining Engineering. 
Madison M. Garver, B.S., Physics. 
Franklin Elliot Tuttle, B.A., Ph.D., 

Chemistry. 
William Mason Towle, B.S., Practical 

Mechanics. 
Erwin W. Runkle, M.A., Ph.D., 

Psychology and Ethics. 
Joseph H. Tudor, C.E., M.S., Math. 
E. J. Colcord, M.A., History. 
Thomas C. Hopkins, M.S., M.A., 

Geology. 
Carl D. Fehr, M.A., Mod. Languages. 
Charles L. Heisler, M.A., Machine 

Design. 
T. Raymond Beger, B.S., C.E., Civil 

Engineering. 
Anne E. Redifer, Industrial Art. 
Hervey E. Dunkle, B.S., Mechanical 

Drawing. 



242 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



John A. Hunter, Jr., B.S., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Henry A. Lardner, B.S., E.E., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

Harry Hayward, B.S., Dairy Husb'dry. 

John H. Leete, B.A., Mathematics. 

Irving L. Foster, M.A., Romance 
Languages 

Harry K. Munroe, M.A., English. 

George Tucker Sellew, M.A., Math. 

Joseph M. Wolfe, M.A., Instructor. 

Robert Ehner Hendershot, B.S., Math. 

Francis J. Pond, M.A., Ph.D., 
Assaying. 



Walter J. Keith, M.A., Ph.D., Chem. 

Helen M. Bradley, Librarian. 

Clara Dayton Wyman, Music. 

Paul B. Breneman, B.S., Civ. Engin. 

Charles Albert Browne, Jr., B.A., 
Chemical Laboratories. 

Lloyd A. Reed, B.S., Electrical Lab- 
oratories. 

George Dorsey Green, B.S., Biological 
Laboratory. 

Chas. H. Stone, Practical Mechanics. 

Warren P. Smiley, B.S., James C. 
Attix, B.S., Chemical Laboratories. 

Geo. W. Hoskins, Physical Training. 



PHILANDER SMITH COLLEGE. 

Little Rock, Ark. Co-Educatio7ial. Methodist. 



Income, 
$3,954 



Students, 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, I Books, 

3 I 700 



The college was established for negroes in 1867. It is under the 
supervision of the Freedmen's Aid and Southern Education Society, 
and is governed by fourteen trustees. Admission is by examination. 
Besides the collegiate and English departments, special attention is 
given to the teaching of journalism and printing. The degree is A.B. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. A new chapel is in course of 
erection. Among the buildings the Adeline Smith Home, for the 
training of girls is the most notable. Of the thirty graduates, Rufus 
B. Childress, 18S8, of Little Rock is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Thomas Mason, A.M., D.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Rev. James M. Cox, A.M., B.D., 
Ancient Languages. 

Frank E. Tuck. B.S., Higher Mathe- 
matics and Science. 

Anna Lena Lewis, A.B., History and 
English. 

Helena Richardson, L.A., Higher 
English. 

Hattie Willie Cox, English. 



Sadie Dickinson, English. 

M. C. Bradley, Printing, Journalism. 

Kate E. Phillips, Music. 

Rev. G. E. Cunningham, Pol. Econ. 

Rev. Wm. O. Emory, D.D., Theology. 

Geo. W. Hayman, M.D., Physiology. 

Rev. David H. Snowden, D.D., 

LL.D., Post-Graduate Examiner. 
Rebecca Avery, Superintendent. 
Julia Givens, Girls' Home. 
Jas. M. Cox, A.M., B.D., Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



243 



PHILOMATH COLLEGE. 
Philomath, Ore. Co- Educational. United Brethren. 



Income, 



Students, 
67 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 

2 



Books, 
800 



The college was founded in 1867. It is governed by fifteen trus- 
tees. The college grounds cover eleven acres, and embrace Maple 
Park, one mile from the college. Admission is upon certificate or 
by examination. The degrees are A.B., and B.S. Besides the 
academic, collegiate, and normal courses, instruction in business, 
typewriting, etc., is given. The system of instruction in all the 
departments has recently been thoroughly reorganized. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 17, are 
$100. Of the half-hundred graduates, the oldest is J. B. Springer, 
1875, of Philomath. 

Factdty. 



B. E. Emerick, A.B., President, 

Classics and Psychology. 
Henry Sheak, M.S., Natural Sciences. 
Walter A. Law, Mathematics and Art. 
Helena Schweizer, German. 



Mrs. M. J. Bradford, Ladies' Depart- 
ment. 
Ethel Bradford, Organ and Piano. 
Elva Akin, B.S., Telegraphy. 
E. H. Sheak, Librarian. 



PIERCE CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. 

College City, Cal. Co-Educational. Christian Brothers. 



Income, 



Students, 
123 



Instructors, 

5 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 
2,500 



The college was founded by Andrew Pierce. It is governed by 
eleven trustees, one of whom represents the alumni. Admission 
is by examination and on certificate. Ter departments of study 
are offered, leading to degrees of A.B., B.S., C.E., and in music. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 4 to May 17, 
are $100. 

The college grounds cover nine acres. Literary and religious 
societies are maintained by the students. The graduates, since 
1878, number seventy-three. 



Factdty. 



William Henslee, President, Philoso- 
phy, History, and Bible. 
\V. H. Baker, Math., Commercial Law. 



Laura Henslee, Primary Branches. 
Prudie Gillaspy, Music. 
Allie Alexander, Gymnastics. 



244 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



PIERRE UNIVERSITY. 



Pierre, S. Dak. Co- Educational. 


Presbyterian. 


Income, 


Students, 

75 


Instructors, 
7 


Buildings, 
2 


Books, 







The university was founded by the Synod of South Dakota in 
1883. The presidents have been: Rev. Thomas M. Findley, 1883- 
1885; William M. Blackburn, D.D., LL.D., 1885 to the present. 
Admission is on certificate. Academic, classical, scientific, normal 
and business courses lead to degrees of A.B. and B.S. Instruction 
is also given in music and art. Attendance at chapel and gym- 
nastic exercise is not required. The expenses, from September 7 
to June 4, aggregate nearly $100. The societies are the McCormick 
Literary Union and a Christian Endeavor Society. Athletics are 
not encouraged. 

Faculty. 

William M. Blackburn, D.D., Presi- [ Leon S. Smythe, Greek, Mathematics. 
dent. Philosophy and Economics. Mrs. M. E. Farr, Drawing, Painting. 
Miss L. J. Robinson, B.S., English. Edna May Carter, Music. 
D. W. Robinson, M.D., Chemistry, j Eppie McMillan, Stenography. 



PIKE COLLEGE. 

Bowling Green, Mo. Co-Educational. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
165 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 



Books, 
500 



The college was founded in 1S82. Admission is on certificate. The 
degree of A.B. is given. The academic year ends on May 30. The 
president is R. E. Downing. 

{Further Information Lacking.^ 



POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE OF BROOKLYN. 

Brooklyjt, IV. Y. Men. Non-Sectai'ia^i. 



Income, 
^100,000 



Students, 
781 



Instructors, 

5^ 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
12,000 



The institute is the outgrowth of the Brooklyn Collegiate and 
Polytechnic Institute, incorporated in 1854, and opened in 1855, with 
John H. Raymond, LL.D., as president. Up to 1870 two courses 
were offered leading to degrees of A.B., and B.S. The present name 
was adopted in 1889. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



245 



The school is governed by a corporation of twenty-one trustees. 
Admission is by examination and upon regent's certificates, and 
those of the public schools of Brooklyn. At present only the 
degree of B.S. is given after the regular course, while degrees of 
C.E. and E.E. are conferred after graduate study. The academic 
department is preparatory to all the others. Gymnastic drill is re- 
quired but not so attendance at chapel. Tuition for the year, lasting 
from September 18 to June 16, is $200. 

Among the four buildings is a gymnasium, machine-shop, and 
main hall containingmany well-equipped laboratories. The astronom- 
ical observatory has an equatorial telescope. The museum is rich 
in mineralogical and other specimens. 

Besides several scientific publications and bulletins issued by the 
Faculty, a students' journal is published. Many societies and organi- 
zations are maintained among the undergraduates. The graduates 
since 1858 number 600, of whom R. W. Raymond, Ph.D., 1858, of 
Brooklyn, is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



David H. Cochran, A.M., Ph.D., 
LL.D., President, History and 
Philosophy, 

Edward C. Seymour, A.M.. Ph.D., 
Principal Academic Department. 

George W. Collord, A.M., D.D., 
Ancient Languages. 

Constantine Hertzberg, Drawing. 

George W. Plympton, A.M., C.E., 
M.D., Physics and Engineering. 

Rufus Sheldon, A.M., Pure Math. 

Brainerd Kellogg, A.M., LL.D., 
English. 

Rodney G. Kimball^ A.M., Ph.D., 
Applied Mathematics, Engineering. 

Charles A. Lador, French. 

Gustave A. Carteaux, French. 

Henry E. Northrop, A.M., German. 

Samuel Sheldon, A.M., Ph.D.. Physics 
and Electrical Engineering. 

Geo. S. Collins, A.M., Ph.D., German. 

Peter T. Austen, Ph.D., F.C.S., Chem. 

Najah Taylor, Superintendent. 

Gillett Wynkoop, B.A., B.S., Qualita- 
tive Analysis. 

W. Homer Broadhurst, B.S., Qualita- 
tive Analysis. 

John Van Nostrand Dorr, B.S., Chem. 

John Leggett, A.M., Latin and Greek. 

Orville B. Stacy, Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy. 

Alanson H. Green, Norm. Grad., Math. 

George W. Crane, M.D., Norm. Grad., 
Physics and Physiology. 

Moses G. Young, Arithmetic. 

Mary J. Baggs, Norm. Grad., History. 



Lorenzo D. Brown, Book-keeping. 

Henry M. Worrell, A.M., Latin and 
English. 

Geo. A. Sawyer, Arithmetic, English. 

Edwin G. Warner, Ph.D., Latin and 
Greek. 

C. J. King, Norm. Grad., Arithmetic 
and Geography. 

John S. Spink, A.B., Arithmetic. 

A. H, Flint, Drawing. 

L. L. Wight, A.M., Latin and Math. 

John F. ■ Barringer, Arithmetic and 
English. 

Lois L. Gaskill, Norm. Grad., History. 

Edward Southworth Hawes, Ph.D., 
Latin and Greek. 

Sanford J. Ellsworth, Norm. Grad., 
Mathematics. 

Henry H. Esselstyn, A.B., English 
and Geography. 

Nathaniel McGiffin, A.B., Elocution. 

Edward Stone Hawes, A.B., English. 

George Weeks Sanford, Stenography. 

George C. Raynor, Norm. Grad., Pen- 
manship. 

John L Hover, Norm. Grad., Mathe- 
matics and English. 

Homer N. Seaver, M.A., LL.B., 
Mathematics and Spanish. 

Charles P. Emerson, A.B., Phys. and 
Mathematics. 

George A. Watrous, Elocution. 

Ernest Mason Bliss, A.B., History. 

Seymour L. Smith, Mathematics and 
Engineering. 

James Douglas Andrews, Gymnasium. 



246 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



PORTLAND UNIVERSITY. 

Portland, Ore. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
^6,500 



Students, 
390 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 

2 



Books, 
2,500 



A charter for this university was secured in 1890 through the four 
Pacific Conferences. The situation is on the high ground at the 
junction of the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Of the thirty- 
three trustees, three are alumni. Admission is by examination, or 
upon the certificates of eleven high schools. The degrees are A.B., 
B.L., and B.S., as well as that of A.M. after one year of resident 
study. Attendance at chapel is obligatory. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 15 to June 4, are $150. Special at- 
tention is given to track and field athletics. The societies are the 
Hesperian, for men and women, the Columbian and the Belles Let- 
tres for academical students. The graduates number thirty-five. 



Faciei ty. 



Thomas Van Scoy, A.M., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Classics. 

Nehemiah Doane, D.D., Theology. 

Luella Gumming Wetzell, Singing. 

Alice Aubray Weister, Painting. 

Harvey K. Hines, D.D., Historical 
Theology. 

James J. Rippetoe, A.M., Natural 
Science. 

Burton J. Hoadley, A.M., History and 
Literature. 

Arthur E. Breece, A.B., Mathematics. 



Arthur J. Collier, S.B., A.M., Civics. 

Jessie Van Scoy, Ph.B., Mod. Lang, 

Susie Moreland Gill, Piano. 

Anton Zilm, Instrumental Music. 

F. Binnie DeForest, Ph.B., Elocution 
and Oratory. 

Elmer E. Washburn, Ph.B., Grammar. 

Winnie Skeiton, Singing. 

Dora Devereaux, Shorthand. 

Arthur W. Brown, Luella Knapp, 
and Perry F. Chandler, Grammar De- 
partment. 



PRATT INSTITUTE. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Men. 



Nott-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^125,000 



Students, 
3.195 



Instructors, 
147 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
57,000 



The site of this institute, fronting on Riordan Street in Brooklyn 
was purchased in 1884, and the buildings were erected during the 
three following years. The government of the school is vested in- 
three trustees and an associate council of eight. The conditions of 
admission are left to the heads of the various departments. Instruc- 
tion is given in high school branches, fine arts, decorative art, domes- 
tic pursuits, science and technology, kindergarten work, and in 
cataloguing and museum classification. Diplomas are given in each 
of these departments. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



247 



In the high school the clubs are branches of the Pratt Institute 
Neighborhood Association, — they are the Talkers, Voluntaries, 
Camera, Glee, Sketch, Bicycle, and Archery clubs The instructors 
and assistants, of whom only those of the higher departments are 
enumerated below, number nearly 150. The graduates number 
10,066. 

Faculty. 



Frederic B. Pratt, Chairman. 

Walter S. Perry, Harriet S. Sackett, 
Charles E. Richards, Emma O. 
Conro, William A. McAndrew, 
Alice E. Fitts, J. Frederick Hopkins, 
Mary W. Plummer, Instructors. 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 

C. R. Richards, Director. 

Charles M. Allen, Physics, Chemistry. 

Melville A. Marsh, Math., English. 

Louis Rouillion, Mechanical Drawing. 

Eugene C. Sickles, Mechanics. 

Albert B. Green, Wood-working. 

Wilham C. Stimpson, Molding. 

George A. White, Machine Work. 

Edward M. Healy, Carpentry. 

Frank N. Pierce, Manual Training. 

Percival Chubb, Psychology, Pedagogy. 

Douglas Burnett, Physics. 

Arthur N. Mansfield, Electrical Con- 
struction. 

Francis H. Pough, Physics, Chem. 

Charles H. Van Leuven, Mechanical 
Drawing. 

James S. Tierney, Mechan. Drawing. 

Walter S. Kent, Chemistry. 

John Todd, Plumbing. 

George Heath, Plumbing, 

P. William Nelson, Fresco Painting. 



George S. Pinney, House and Sign 

Painting. 
Millard H. Butts, Machine Work. 
George P. Wardell, Secretary. 

FINE ARTS. 

Walter S. Perry, Director. 

S. Herbert Adams, Clay-modelling. 

Arthur W. Dow, Composition, Design. 

Guy Rose, Portrait Classes. 

Mary Allis Hurlbut, Drawing. 

Ethelyn K. Fenner, Water Color. 

Dora M. Norton, Sketching. 

C. Frank Edminster, Architectural 
Drawing. 

Vincent C. Griffith, History of Archi- 
tecture. 

Robert Hunter, Decorative Design. 

George A. D. Tew, Wall-Paper and 
Carpet Design. 

Henry Prellwitz, Antique and Portrait. 

Ida C. Haskell, Color. 

Katharine E. Shattuck, Drawing. 

Horatia B. Ellingwood, Wood-carving. 

Glentworth R. Butler, M.D., Anatomy. 

Emma R. Brill, Freehand Drawing. 

Isabel M. Kimball, Freehand Drawing. 

Morrell Smith, Architectural Drawing. 

Harriet M. Cox, Clara L. Fairfield, 
Secretaries. 



PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Clinton, S. C. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$3,300 




Instructors, 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was founded in 1880, by Rev. William P. Jacobi, D.D. 
The presidents have been: William's. Lee, A.M., 1880-1885 ; Rev. 
Robert P. Smith, A.M., 1885-1888; Joseph W. Kennedy, A.M., 1888- 
1890; John I. Cleland, A.M., 1890-1894; Rev. E. C. Murray, 1894 to 
the present time. The government of the school is vested in twenty- 
nine directors. 



248 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Admission is by examination. Two courses, the classical and 
scientific, lead to degrees of A.B., and B.S., with the degree of A.M. 
after one session of post-graduate study. Attendance at chapel is 
compulsory, but not so gymnastic drill. Negroes are excluded. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 to June 11, 
are $135. Three gold medals are offered for excellence in speaking 
and writing. The four college buildings, among which are gymna- 
sium and museum, stand on grounds of more than twenty acres. 

The students publish the " Palladium," and maintain the Eukosmian 
and Philomathean societies for men, and the Alethesophian for 
women. A Christian Association, Gospel Temperance Union and 
Athletic Association with a baseball club, and a chapter of n K A 
have also been organized. 



Faculty. 



Rev. E. C. Murray, President, Latin 
and English. 

A. E. Spencer, M.A., Greek, French. 

L. L. Campbell, M.A., Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Sciences. 



Rev. J. Ferdinand Jacobs, M.A., Phi- 
losophy and Religion. 

Rev. W. S. Bean, M.A., D.D., Ger- 
man and Astronomy. 

J. J. Boozer, M.D., Anatomy. 



PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE OF THE SOUTHWEST. 

Del Norte, Col. Co- Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 

$2,128 



Students, 
70 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was organized in 1883, especially for theological train- 
ing and work among the Spanish settlers. It is governed by twelve 
trustees. Admission is upon certificate. Classical, philosophical 
and English courses lead to degrees of bachelor and master of arts, 
philosophy, and letters. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 17 to June 3, are about $100. A literary society, the 
Philergian and a Mission Band have been organized among the 
students. 



Rev. Enos P. Baker, M.A., President, 

Bible and History. 
Rev. John McLean, M.A., D.D., 

Vice-President, Greek. 
Rev. L. B. Wilson, D.D., Christianity. 



Faculty. 

Rev. Francis INT. Gilchrist, Theology. 
Chauncey F. Bell, Latin, Literature. 
Caro Ordviray Baker, B.Ph., German. 
J. J. Vigil, Spanish. 
George C. Lindsay, Mathematics. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 249 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY. 
Princeton, N.J. Men. Presbyterian. 



Income, 



Students, 
1,090 



Instructors, 
79 



Buildings, 



Books, 
180,500 



History: The first charter was granted in 1746, and the second, 
making the trustees a self -perpetuating body, in 1748. The college 
was opened at Elizabethtown, near New York, with Rev. Jonathan 
Dickinson as president, and was removed to Newark, and soon after- 
ward in 1753, to Princeton. During the next two years Nassau Hall 
was erected. Though this hall has twice been damaged by fires, in 1802 
and 1855, it still stands. The presidents have been: Jonathan Dick- 
inson, 1747; Aaron Burr, 1748-1757; Jonathan Edwards, 1757-1758; 
Samuel Davies, 1759-1761 ; Samuel Finley, 1761-1766; John With- 
erspoon, 1768-1794; Samuel Stanhope Smith, 1795-1812; Ashbel 
Green, 1812-1822; James Carnahan, 1823-1854; John Maclean, 1854- 
1868; James McCosh, 1868-1888; Francis Landey Patton, S.T.D., 
LL.D., 1888 to the present. The Green School of Science was added 
in 1873, and a department of Engineering in 1875. The sesquicen- 
tennial of the college was celebrated in 1896, when lectures were 
delivered by Profs. Felix Klein of Gottingen, Edward Dowden of 
Dublin, Joseph J. Thomson of Cambridge, Goldwin Smith and 
Edward B. Boulton of Oxford, Andrew Seth of Edinburgh, Henry 
Moissan of Paris, E. K. Brugmann of Leipsic, Johann Conrad of 
Halle, A. A. W. Hubrecht of Utrecht, W. Dorpfeld of Athens, and 
by Sir J. W. Dawson, William Peterson, and Rev. Dr. Caren of 
Canada. In the same year, after a material increase of the endow- 
ment, the trustees transformed the college into a university, changing 
its name from the College of New Jersey to Princeton University. 

Orga7iization : The university comprises an academic department, 
a scientific and engineering school, a graduate school and affiliated 
theological school. The government is vested in twenty-six trus- 
tees, with the Governor of the State a^ an ex-officio member. The 
seminary is under the control of a separate board of trustees. 

Admission, Instruction and Degrees : Admission is by vote of the 
Faculty after examination. Examinations are held at Princeton, 
New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Cincin- 
nati, Louisville, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver, and at other places 
if necessary. The four years' academic course, leading to the degree 
of A.B., embraces studies in philosophy, languages, mathematics and 
the sciences. Studies can be elected in the junior year, when one- 
third of the work only is prescribed. Masters' degrees are given 
after one year of resident study, while that of Ph.D. is conferred 
after two years. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Students are 
forbidden to leave the village without permission. 

Dues, Scholarships, and P7'izes : The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 18 to June 10, are from $325 to $500. Of this $150 
is for tuition. In the scientific department tuition is ^160, with 
additional fees for laboratory work. Four fellowships of $500 and 
$400 are available, with nine fellowships of from $200 to ^600, besides 



250 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



one hundred scholarships on the income of $1000 each, three on the 
income of ^2,000 and ^3,000, several competitive scholarships, and 
thirty-six prizes, the highest of which is for $500. Four funds, aggre- 
gating $50,000, have been provided for the aid of poor students. 
Special funds, yielding an income of $1,700, exist for ministerial stu- 
dents, and seven biblical prizes of $50 each, are available for theo- 
logical students. 

Equipment : The college grounds cover 225 acres, of which 140 
are reserved for the campus. Of the thirty-two buildings the oldest 
are Nassau Hall and the dean's house. The first halls of the Whig 
and Cliosophic societies were built in 1836. Among the modern 
buildings is the attractive house of the president, a new gymnasium 
and library, an art museum, with museums of biology, geology, 
and archaeology, and an astronomical observatory. Nine well- 
equipped laboratories are maintained by the various departments. 
The theological seminary, which was established in 1812, consists 
of five buildings, the oldest of which, Alexander Hall, was occupied 
in 18 1 7. The Brokaw athletic field, in close vicinity to the campus, 
contains a tennis building and two clubhouses. 

Societies ajid Publications : The Cliosophic and Whig societies date 
back to the early history of the college in the last century. They 
occupy new buildings, and own libraries of ten thousand books each. 
Prizes are given by them for declamations, speeches, and essays. 
The Philadelphian, a religious society, dating back to 1825, also 
occupies a hall of its own; while the St. Paul, a similar organization, 
offers a series of sermons each year. Another of the old clubs is 
the Ivy. In addition to these there are numerous social, dining, 
dramatic, and musical organizations, besides the well-known athletic 
teams. Chapters of the following fraternities were at one time 
organized, despite prohibition by the college authorities : B IT, 
1843-1846; A K E, 1845-1857 ; Z ^, 1850-1884; A ^, 1851-1853; X % 
1851-1857; K A, 1852-1855; * K 2, 1853-1876; 2*, 1853-1858; A*, 
1854-1879; X * (Princeton), 1854-1860; X * (Hobart), 1864-1868; 
A X, 1863-1867 ; A A *, 1864-1865; 2 X, 1869-1882 ; A 2 X, 1875- 
1880 ; besides several others. 

Subordinate to the Alumni Association of Nassau Hall and the 
National Association are twenty-two clubs throughout the country. 
The students publish the " Princetonian," a daily ; the " Tiger," a 
comic fortnightly ; the " Nassau Literary Monthly ; " the " Nassau 
Herald," an annual ; and the " Bric-a-Brac," a society annual. 

Of 7,500 graduates, 4,500 are living. The oldest of these is 
William C. Wallace, 1823, of Newark, N. J. 



Faculty. 



Francis Landey Fatten, D.D., LL.D. 

Prest. Philosophy of Rehgion. 
James Ormsbee Murray, D.D., LL.D., 

Emeritus. 
JohnT. Duffield, D.D., LL.D., Math. 
J. Stillwell Schanck, M.D., LL.D., 

Chemistry. 
Henry Clay Cameron, Ph.D., D.D., 

Greek. 



Charles Woodruff Shields, D.D., 
LL.D., Science and Religion. 

Wm. A. Packard, Ph.D., D.D., Latin. 

Cyrus Fogg Brackett, M.D., LL.D., 
Physics. 

Henry Bedinger Cornwall, E.M., 
Ph.D., Applied Chemistry. 

G. Macloskie, LL.D., D.Sc, Biology. 

Charles McMillan, C.E., Civil Eng. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



251 



Charles Augustus Young, Ph.D., 
LL.D., Astronomy. 

S. Stanhope Orris, Ph.D., L.H.D., 
Greek. 

Charles Greene Rockwood, Jr., Ph.D., 
Mathematics. 

Theodore Whitefield Hunt, Ph.D., 
L.H.D., Rhetoric. 

Wm. Milligan Sloane, Ph.D., L.H.D., 
History. 

George Lansing Raymond, L.H.D., 
^Esthetics. 

Samuel Ross Winans, Ph.D., Greek. 

VVm. Libbey, D.Sc, Phys. Geography. 

Wm. Berryman Scott, Ph.D., Geology. 

Frederick Newton Willson, C.E., De- 
scriptive Geometry. 

Wm. Cowper Prime, LL.D., History 
of Art. 

Allan Marquand, Ph.D., L.H.D., 
Archaeology and Art. 

Andrew Fleming West, Ph.D., Latin. 

Alexander Thomas Ormond, Ph.D., 
Mental Science and Logic. 

Hermann Carl Otto Huss, Ph.D., 
Modern Languages. 

Arthur Lincoln Frothingham, Jr., 
Ph.D., Archaeology. 

Henry Burchard Fine, Ph.D., Math. 

John Howell Westcott, Ph.D., Latin 
and Roman Law. 

Woodrow Wilson, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Jurisprudence. 

Wm. Francis Magie, Ph.D., Physics. 

Ernest Gushing Richardson, Ph.D., 
Librarian. 

Leroy Wiley McCay, D.Sc, Chem. 

James Mark Baldwin, Ph.D., Experi- 
mental Psychology. 

Bliss Perry, A.M., Oratory, etc. 

Henry Dallas Thompson, D.Sc, 
Ph.D., Mathematics. 

George McLean Harper, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Winthrop More Daniels, A.M., Politi- 
cal Economy. 

Herbert Stearns Squier Smith, C.E., 
Civil Engineering. 

Taylor Reed, A.M., Astronomy. 

John Grier Hibben, Ph.D., Logic. 

Walter Butler Harris, C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Edwin Seelye Lewis, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages. 

Willard Humphreys, Ph.D., German. 

George Stevenson Patton, A.M., Bib- 
lical Instruction. 



Walter Mead Rankin, Ph.D., Biology. 

Charles Freeman Williams McClure, 
A.M., Biology. 

Alexander Hamilton Phillips, B.S., 
Mineralogy. 

Charles Sidney Smith, A.M., Latin. 

Fred Neher, A.M., Analytical Chem. 

Rev. Chalmers Martin, A.M., Hebrew. 

Jas. Purviance Atkinson, A.B., Chem. 

George Augustus Hulett, A.B., Chem. 

Frederic Crosby Torrey, Graphics. 

Charles Howard Hinton, M.A., Math. 

Frank Allan Waterman, A.B., Physics. 

Howard Crosby Warren, A.M., Psy- 
chology. 

Legh Wilber Reid, A.B., Math. 

Harry Franklin Covington, A.M., 
Oratory. 

John Ely Moore, M.E., E.E., Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

John Houghton Coney, A.M., History. 

John Milton Brooks, A.M., Math. 

John Bell Hatcher, Ph.B., Geology 
and Vertebrate Paleontology. 

Elmer Howard Loomis, Ph.D., Physics. 

Edmund Yard Robbins, A.M., Greek. 

William Kelly Prentice, A.M., Greek. 

Williamson Updike Vreeland, A.B., 
Romance Languages. 

William Ashenhurst Dunn, A.M., 
English. 

Herbert Fowler Sill, B.S., Applied 
Chemistry. 

Herbert Jefferson Eraser, Civ. Engin. 

Walter A. Wyckoff, A.M., Sociology. 

Howard Crosby Butler, A.M., Archi- 
tecture. 

Caspar Wistar Hodge, Ph.D., Phi- 
losophy. 

Jesse Benedict Carter, A.B., Latin. 

Ulric Dahlgren, A.B., Histology. 

Albert Harris Wilson, M.S., Math. 

Geo. Madison Priest, A.B., German. 

Chas. Roger Watson, A.B., French. 

John Preston Hoskins,Ph.D., German. 

Arnold Edward Ortmann, Ph.D., 
Invertebrate Paleontology. 

George Goldie, Director Gymnasium. 

Edward Hodge Bishop, Organist. 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

William Henry Green, D.D., LL.D., 
Oriental and Old Testament Lit. 

William Miller Paxton, D.D., LL.D., 
Eccles., Homil., and Pas. Theology. 

Benj. Breckinridge Warfield, D.D., 
LL.D., Didact. and Polem. Theology . 



252 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Rev. John D. Davis, Ph.D., Semitic. 

George Tybout Purves, D.D., LL.D., 
New Testament and Exegesis. 

J. DeWitt, D.D., LL.D., Ecc. Hist. 

Geerhaidus Vos, Ph.D., D.D., Bib- 
lical TheoJogy. 



Henry Wilson Smith, A.M., Elocution. 
Rev. Joseph Heatly Dulles, A.M., 

Librarian. 
William Brenton Greene, Jr.. D.D., 

Relations of Philosophy and Science 

to Christian Religion. 



PRITCHETT SCHOOL INSTITUTE. 

Glasgow^ Mo. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$10,000 



Students, 

79 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 
3 



Books, 



The institute dates from 1866. It was chartered in 186S, and in 
1869 was moved from the centre of the town to the outskirts. The 
presidents have been the Revs. : Carr W. Pritchett, A.M., LL.D., 
1866-1873; Oren Root, Jr., A.M., D.D., 1873-1876; R. Thompson 
Bond, A.M., 1876-1881 ; Joseph H. Pritchett, 1S81-1884; and Joseph 
S. Kendall, 1884-1891. The trustees number seven. 

Admission is by examination and upon certificate. Two courses 
lead to degrees of A.B. and B.S., and to A.M. after one year of 
resident post-graduate study. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 3 to June 3, are $150. Gold medals are given for 
excellence in study. Among the college institutions is a reading- 
room and library, a museum, and a well-equipped astronomical obser- 
vatory. The societies are the 11 A K and n M. The graduates 
number 115. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Charles C. Hemenway, Ph.D., 
President, Philosophy and Greek. 

Rev. Carr W. Pritchett, LL.D., 
F.R.A.S., Astronomy. 

W. Newton Holmes, A.M., Science. 

H. Clay Harvey, M.S., Mathematics. 



Rev. James A. Lanius, Latin. 
Adelaide Smith, B.S., Modern Lan- 
guages and Music. 
Maud Mann, Music. 
Cornelia M, Keummel, Painting. 
Mary Chattle, Ph.B., Prep. Branches. 



PUGET SOUND UNIVERSITY. 

Tacoma, Wash. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$10,000 



Students, 

257 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
1,200 



The university was founded in 1890 by the Puget Sound Confer- 
ence of Methodists. A preparatory school was added in 1892, and 
in 1895 a normal and business department. The first class was 
graduated in 1893. The presidents have been: F. B. Cherington, 
1890-1892; and C. R. Thoburn, the present incumbent. A new site 
of several hundred acres has been selected for future occupancy. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



253 



The sale of some of this property is expected to add $500,000 to 
the endowment. The trustees number twenty-one. 

Admission is by certificate. Degrees of A.B., B.L., B.S., and 
B.P'gy. are given, as well as A.M. after one year, and Ph.D. after 
two years of resident graduate study. Attendance at chapel is 
obligatory. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 16 
to June 23, are $150. The students publish " Ye Record," and main- 
tain the following societies : Athenian, Delphian, Clionian (for 
women), Aedean Choral Society, two Christian Associations, a Mis- 
sionary Institute and an Athletic Club. The graduates number nine. 



Faculty. 



Crawford R. Thoburn, Chancellor. 
Joseph P. Marlatt, Ph.D., D.D., Dean. 
Chas. R. Pomeroy, D.D., Philosophy. 
Chas. W. Darrow, A.M., Registrar, 

Natural Science. 
Wm. S. Arnold, A.M., Commer. Law. 
Harlan J. Cozine, Singing. 
Henry C. Tillman, M.S., Mathematics. 
Laura K. Snyder, History, Literature. 
Harriet Gilbert, Biology. 



Mary F. Jennings, Art. 
Myrtle Misner, French. 
Stephanie Vervait, German. 
Olof Bull, Violin. 
Pauline Bengel, Piano. 
Mrs. H. A. Richards, Sight Reading. 
Mrs. Orman C. Palmer, Grammar. 
Browder D. Brown, Latin. 
Charles O. Boyer, Mathematics. 
» E. O. Darling, Shorthand. 



PURDUE UNIVERSITY. 

Lafayette., Ind. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^105,000 



Students, 
630 



Instructors, 
62 



Buildings, 
20 



Books, 
6,000 



The university, which is the agricultural and mechanical college 
of Indiana, was founded by John Purdue in 1873. In this year the 
proceeds of the Federal Land Grant of 1862 became available for 
this school, netting, in all, $340,000. Previous to this, in 1869, John 
Purdue had given $150,000, while one hundred acres and $50,000 
were contributed by citizens of Tippecanoe County. A president 
was elected in 1872, but instruction was not begun until 1874 
after the resignation of the first president. The presidents have 
been: Richard Owen, LL.D., M.D., 1873-1874; Abraham C. Short- 
ridge, 1874-187 5; Emerson E. White, A.M., LL.D., 1875-1883; James 
H. Smart, A.M., LL.D., 1883 to the present time. 

The plan of organization embraced schools of natural science, en- 
gineering, and agriculture. In 1883 the School of Industrial Art was 
added, while in 1884 followed the School of Pharmacy, and in 1887 
those of Civil Engineering, Veterinary Science, with that of Electrical 
Engineering two years' later. A Government Experiment Station, 
with an income of $15,000 a year, has also been established. 

Admission is by examination and on certificate for residents of 
the State. Degrees are given in agriculture, science, veterinary sci- 
ence, pharmacy, and with the following degrees after graduate study : 
M.E., C.E., A.C., and M.S. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, as 



254 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



is attendance at gymnastics and military drill during the first two 
years. Negroes are not excluded. Tuition is free. Other expenses 
for the year, ending June lo, are ^200. A number of scholarships 
are available. 

Equip77ient : The grounds cover 180 acres. Among the twenty 
buildings are University Hall, containing libraries and a museum ; 
Industrial Art Hall ; Women's Dormitory ; Chemical, Mechanical, 
and Electric Laboratories ; Military Hall, and Pierce Conservatory. 
A university farm is also maintained. 

Societies and Publications : The literary societies are the Irving, 
Philat, Philalethean, Emersonian, and Carlyle, besides which the 
students maintain a Thirteen Club, Cosmos, Glee and Mandolin 
clubs, two Christian Associations, Civil Engineering Society, Alumni 
Association, Battalion, and an Athletic Association, with football 
and baseball teams. The publications are the " Exponent," a fort- 
nightly ; and the " Debris," a senior annual. Chapters of the fol- 
lowing fraternities have been organized: 2 X, 1874 K ^, 1885; 2 N; 
* A ; 2 A E ; and T B n. The graduates number 620, of whom 
nearly 600 are living. The oldest is John B. Harper, 1875, of Du- 
rango, Cal. 



Faculty. 



James H. Smart, LL.D., President. 

William F. M. Goss, A.M., Practical 
Mechanics. 

Moses C. Stevens, A.M., Math. 

Oscar J. Craig, A.M., Civics, History. 

James Troop, M.S., Horticulture and 
Entomology. 

Arthur L. Green, Ph.C, Pharmacy. 

Henry A. Huston, A.M., A.C., Agri- 
cultural Chemistry. 

Emma Mont McRae, English. 

Joseph C. Arthur, D.Sc, Vegetable 
Physiology. 

Alfred E. Phillips, C.E., Civ. Engin, 

Stanley Coulter, A.M., Ph.D., Biology. 

William H. P. Creighton, U.S.N., 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Anna Von Holland, Modern Lang. 

Ernest Knaufft, Industrial Art. 

Horace E. Stockbridge, Ph.D., Agri- 
culture. 

Albert P. Carmen, D.Sc, Physics and 
Electricity. 

Winthrop E. Stone, Ph.D., Chem. 

Erastus Test, A.M., M.D., Prepara- 
tory Department. 

Theries D. Hinebauch, M.S., V.S., 
Veterinary Science. 



Emma P. Ewing, Domestic Economy. 
Bertha A. Reynolds, Elocution. 
Michael Golden, Wood Shop, Foundry. 
William P. Turner, Machine Work. 
George Spitzer, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 
Otto G. Zerse, Ph.C, Materia Medica. 
Anna E. Baker, B.S., Wood-carving. 
Pauhne Mariotte Davies, Ph.D., 

French. 
William Kendrick Hatt, A.B., C.E., 

Applied Mechanics. 
Joakim Reinhard, M.A., German. 
Edwin M. Blake, E.M., Ph.D., Math. 
Mary Doan, B.L., M.S., English Lit. 
Samuel N. Taylor, Ph.D., Physics. 
Frank H. Curtiss, Physical Director. 
Dumont Lotz, B.S., Chem. Laboratory. 
Kate Wentz, B.S., Mathematics. 
Henry L. Bolley, M.S., Biology. 
William J. Lutz, M.S., Physics and 

Military Tactics. 
L. J. Stabler, Pharmacy. 
Jacob M. Sholl, B.M.E., William H. 

Wells, B.M.E., Wood Shop. 
Winthrop K. Howe, B.M.E., Shop. 
L. D. Swan, Librarian. 
Wm. C. Latta, M.S., Agriculturist. 
Francis M. Webster, Entomology. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



255 



RACINE COLLEGE. 



Racine^ Wis. 




Men. 


Ep 


iscopal. 


Income, 

$14,000 


Students, 
40 


Instructors, 
6 


Buildings, 


Books, 
10,000 





The college was founded in 1853. Admission is on certificate and 
by examination. The degree of A.B. is given. The expenses for 
the year, ending June 10, are $400. The graduates number nearly 
two hundred. The oldest is Benjamin A. Segur, B.S., 1853, of Pom- 
fret, Conn. The president is the Rev. Arthur Piper, S.T.D. 
{^Further Information Lacking.) 



RADCLIFFE COLLEGE. 

Cambridge., Mass. Women. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$45,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
97 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
9,000 



Radcliffe College, the successor of the Society for the Collegiate 
Instruction of Women, offers instruction to women under the 
teachers of Harvard University. The first class was graduated in 
1883. More than eighty instructors of the university are teachers in 
Radcliffe College. It is governed by a council of eleven members 
and twenty-two associates. 

Fay House contains the recitation rooms and offices, a library and 
gymnasium. A field has been levelled for basket ball. The college 
has four laboratories, of physics, chemistry, botany, and biology. The 
collections of the Agassiz Museum of Comparative Zoology, the Pea- 
body Museum of American Archaeology, the University Museums of 
Geology, Botany, and Mineralogy, and the Semitic Museum, are also 
open to the students; and by vote of the President and Fellows of 
Harvard College, the students have the use of the University Library, 
containing 400,000 volumes. Opportunities for study in the astro- 
nomical observatory, the botanic garden and the herbarium are also 
afforded. The expenses of the year, corresponding to that of Har- 
vard, are $300. Five scholarships of $200 each, equivalent to tuition, 
are available. 

The requirements for admission are identical with those for admis- 
sion to Harvard College. The courses of instruction given in Rad- 
cliffe College correspond to both undergraduate and graduate courses 
offered by Harvard University. Graduate students in Radcliffe 
College have access to a large number of graduate courses in 
Harvard University. The examinations are the same in both in- 
stitutions, and the diplomas conferring the degrees of A.B. and 
A.M. are countersigned by the President of Harvard University as 



256 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



a guarantee that these degrees are equivalent to the corresponding 
degrees given by the university. Many societies are maintained by 
the students. The graduates number over one hundred. 



Mrs. Louis Agassiz, President. 
Arthur Gilman, Regent. 
Agnes Irwin. Dean. 



Facility. 

Henry L. Higginson, Treasurer. 
Mary Coes, Secretary. 
Caroline A. Farley, Librarian. 



\^For instructors see Harvard University^ 



RANDOLPH-MACON COLLEGE. 

Ashland and Lynchburg, Va. Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 

$45,752 
^30,300 



Students, 
125 



Instructors, 
44 
15 



Buildings, 

14 
I 



Books, 

12,500 

500 



This college, which consists of two separate schools situated at 
Ashland and Lynchburg respectively, was chartered in 1830 and 
opened in 1832. The women's college at Lynchburg was estab- 
lished in 1893. "^^^ two schools are governed by two boards of 
trustees of forty-four members each, and have separate faculties, 
but are administered by one president. The conditions of admis- 
sion, the courses of instruction and the degrees of A.B. and B.L. 
are identical in both schools. Both courses are largely elective. 
Attendance at chapel and gymnastic drill are compulsory. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from September 12 to June 11, are from 
$200 to $250. The campus at Ashland covers twelve acres, while 
that at Lynchburg contains twenty acres. 

The students of the older institution publish a magazine and 
maintain the Washington and Franklin Societies, with an Athletic 
Association, with baseball and football teams. The women's literary 
societies bear the same names, and Christian Associations are main- 
tained in both schools. Chapters of the following fraternities have 
been organized: A Y, 1853-1861; K A, 1869; * K % 1870-1882; 
*K5, 1872; sen, 1873; 2 X, 1874; * A 0,1874; K 2, 1885. 

The graduates number one thousand. 



Faculties. 



ASHLAND. 

William W. Smith, A.M., LL.D., 
President. 

John A. Kern, D.D., Vice-President, 
Moral Philosophy. 

William A. Shepard, A.M., Ph.D., 
Chemistry and Geology. 

Robert Emory Blackvvell, A.M., Eng- 
lish and French. 

Royall Bascom Smithey,A.M., Math. 



Richard M. Smith, M.A., Ph.D., 

Greek, Hebrew, and German. 
Edwin Winfield Bowen, A.M., Ph.D., 

Latin. 
Bishop J. C. Granbery, A.M., D.D., 

Homiletics and Pastoral Theology, 
Arthur C. Wightman, M.A., Ph.D., 

Biology and Physics. 
R. W. Buchanan, A.B., English, French. 
H, A. Christian, French. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



257 



C. M. Kilby, Mathematics. 

C. G. Evans, English and Greek. 

A. G. Brown, Jr., Pliysical Culture. 

LYNCHBURG. 

F. W. Martin, M.S., Ph.D., Vice- 
President, Chemistry and Geology. 

R. H. Sharp, Jr., M.A,, Ancient Lang. 

Joseph L. Armstrong, A.M., English 
and German. 

Celestia S. Parrish, Math., Pedagogy. 



Jos. H. Riddick, Jr., Physics, Biology. 
Louise J. Smith, Art and French. 
Mrs. W. M. Strother., A.B., Elocution. 
Charles W. Landon, Music, 
Louis Schehlmann, Vocal Music. 
Wm. S. Adams, Instrumental Music. 
Kate M. Hunt, Physical Culture. 
Clara L. Hardenbergh, Instrum. Music. 
May E. Smith, Music and Harmony. 
Ada E. Mapp, English. 
Alice Hargroves, Mathematics. 



RED RIVER VALLEY UNIVERSITY. 

Wahpeton, N. Dak, Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 



Students, 
123 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
2,000 



The college is situated on a tract of eighty acres. The trustees 
number twenty-one. Admission is by examination or on certificate. 
Three courses lead to degrees of A.B., B.S., and B.L. The expenses 
for the year, from September 18 to June 12, are $144. A literary 
society and two debating clubs are maintained by the students. 



Faculty. 



Rev. M. V. B. Knox, Ph.D., D.D., 

President, History and Science. 
Janette Hill Knox, A.M., German, 

French, and English. 
Sarah E. Mason, Latin and Algebra. 



R. M. Black, A.B., Greek and Math. 
Ottie S. parsons, Music. 
F. W. Hazleton, M.Accts., Commer- 
cial Department. 
Allen W. Pringle, Tutor. 



RENSSELAER INSTITUTE. 

Troy, N. Y Men. Non-Sectarian, 



Income, 



Students, 
206 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 

6 



Books, 
5,000 



History: The school was founded in 1824 by Stephen Van Rens- 
selaer for the teaching of science, and secured a charter in 1826. 
In 1835 ^^® ^''s^ American civil engineer was here graduated. In 
1849 t^6 school was re-organized as a general polytechnic institute, 
and its course of study was enlarged. The presidents have been : 
Samuel Blatchford, D.D., 1824-1828; John Chester, D.D., 1828- 
1829; Eliphalet Nott, D.D., LL.D., 1829-1845 ; Nathan S. S. Beman, 
D.D., 1845-1865; Hon. John F. Winslow, 1 865-1868 ; Thomas 

17 



258 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



C. Brinsmade, M.D., 1868; Hon. James Forsyth, LL.D., 1868-1886; 
John Hudson Peck, LL.D., iSSS to the present time. 

Organization : The school is governed by nineteen trustees. Ad- 
mission is by examination only. The degrees are B.S., and C.E. 
Tuition is $100 for each semi-annual session, while other expenses 
are estimated at $300. One prize, the income of $2,000, is offered 
for the best engineering thesis. 

Equipment : The institute is well equipped with machine-shops 
and laboratories, and avails itself extensively of the local factories 
and machine-plants. Attendance at gymnastic drill is not required. 
No religious services are held. Negroes are freely admitted. The 
college grounds cover five acres, and contain a good gymnasium. 

Societies and Publications : The students publish the " Polytechnic," 
a monthly ; and the " Transit," an annual. The societies are the 
Rensselaer Engineers, the R. P. I. Union, Glee, Mandolin, and Banjo 
clubs, an Athletic Association, with football and baseball teams, a 
Christian Association, and chapters of the following fraternities : 
A X, 1853; H, A *, 1864; Z "¥, 1865; A K E, 1867 ; X *, 1878; 
ATA, 1879; 2 X, 1887 ; N E and BAB. 

Of the 1,200 graduates, more than 925 are living. The oldest is 
William G. Henry, 1828, of Detroit, Mich. 



FacJilty. 



John Hudson Peck, LL.D., President, 
Law of Contracts. 

Palmer Chamberlaine Ricketts, C.E., 
Rational and Technical Mechanics. 

James Hall, A.M., LL.D., Geology. 

Dascom Greene, C.E., Math., Astron. 

Dwinel French Thompson, B.S., De- 
scriptive Geometry. 

William Pitt Mason, C.E., M.D., 
Analytical Chemistry. 

William Gait Raymond, C.E., Geod- 
esy, etc. 

Walter LeConte Stevens, Ph.D., 
Physics. 



H. De B. Parsons, B.S., M.E., Steam 

Engineering. 
Chas. Winthrop Crockett, C.E., A.M., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
Benedict Papot, French. 
John G. Murdoch, A.M., English, etc. 
Hugh Anderson, C.E., Mechanics. 
Jolm M. Clarke, M.A., Geology. 
Edw. R.Cary,C.E., Botany, Geodesy. 
Edward Fenemore Chillman, C.E., 

Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 
James McGiffert, Jr., C.E., Math. 
Pemberton Smith, C.E., Lecturer on 

Railroad Signals. 



RICHMOND COLLEGE. 

Richmond, Va. Men. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$25,427 



Students, 
215 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
9 



Books, 
12,378 



The Modist School which was established by the Rev. Edward 
Baptist in Powhattan County in the early part of this century, was 
moved to Spring Farms and became the Baptist Seminary in 1832. 
Two years afterward it was moved to Richmond, and in 1840 it was 
duly chartered as a college. During the Civil War instruction was 
suspended. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



259 



The college is composed of eight academies and schools. It is 
governed by thirty-nine trustees. Admission is by examination, sup- 
plemented by high school certificates. Degrees of A.B., B.S., and 
B.LL. are conferred, with that of A.M. after post-graduate study. 
Attendance at chapel and at gymnastic drill is not compulsory. 
Negroes are excluded. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 20 to June 20, are ^208. The college grounds cover 
twelve and one-half acres. 

The students publish the " Richmond College Messenger," a 
monthly; and the "Bulletin," a quarterly. The societies are the 
Philogian, the Geographical and Historical, Mu Sigma Rho, Law, 
Christian and Athletic Associations with teams, and an Alumni 
Association. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: B IT, 1870; K A, 1S70; * K 2, 1873; * A 0, 1875; 
A T n, 1878-1882 ; 2 X, 1880-18S1 ; 2 A E, 1884 ; * T A, 1890 and 
* A X. . 

The graduates number some 900, of whom 450 are living. The 
oldest of these are P. S. Hanson, of Chicago and J. Ryland of Rich- 
mond, of the class of 1846. 

Faadty. 



Frederick W. Boatwright, M. A., Presi- 
dent, Modern Languages. 

S. C. Mitchell, M.A., Latin, History. 

A. Mitchell Carroll, M.A., Ph.D., 
Greek. 

R. E. Gaines, M.A., Mathematics. 

Charles H. Winston, M.A,, LL.D., 
Physics. 

Joseph Rufus Hunter, M.A., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 



John Pollard, A.M., D.D., English. 
William D. Thomas, M.A., D.D., 

Philosophy. 
Roger Gregory, B.L., LL.D., Law. 
John B. Minor, B. L., Criminal 

Law, etc. 
Robert E. Loving, B.A., Math. 
E. C. Jones, German. 
Oscar L. Owens, Physical Culture. 
Charles H. Ryland, D.D., Librarian. 



RIDGEVILLE COLLEGE. 

Ridgeville, Ind. Co-Educational. Congregational. 



Income, 



Students, 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
2,200 



The college was founded by the Rev. John Collier with other Free- 
will clergymen in 186S. The school was not properly equipped or 
endowed, its actual assets never reaching $20,000, so that in 1892, 
after undergoing many vicissitudes under Presidents Collier and 
Bates, the school with all its property, valued at $40,000, was trans- 
ferred to the Congregational churches of Indiana, who appointed a 
new board of trustees with a new president and faculty. The 
trustees number twenty-one. Admission is on certificate. Two 
courses lead to degrees of A.B., and B.S. Instruction is also given 
in preparatory and normal and business branches, as well as music. 
The college grounds cover five acres. Expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 28 to June 24, are $75. Children of clergymen can 
obtain aid not exceeding that sum. 



26o 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty 



Rev. George Hindley, B.D., President, 

Philosophy, 
Frederick L. Kendall, A.M., Librarian, 

Greek, Mathematics, and History. 
George C. Webber, A.B., Sciences. 



Wilhelmina C. Westrater, B.L., Latin 

and English. 

William B. Starr, Commercial De- 
partment. 

Stella Pearl Hindley, Music. 



RIPON COLLEGE. 



Ripon, Wis. 


Co-Educational. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
^30.709 


Students, 
237 


Instructors, 
16 


Buildings, 
6 


Books, 
7,000 



The college was founded in 1863 to educate Methodists. The 
trustees number fifteen. Admission is on certificate. The degrees 
are A.B. and A.M., the latter after three years of professional work. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 9 to June 23, are 
$120. A fund of $9,000 has been established to help women students, 
in addition to which there are three scholarships and nine prizes. 
Ingell's Park, of ten acres, is devoted to athletics. Among the 
societies are two literary and two Christian societies, for men and 
for women. Of the 180 graduates, 170 are living. The oldest of 
these is Luthera H. Adams, 1867, of Omro, Wisconsin. 



Rev. Rufus Cushman Flagg, D.D., 
President, Political Science. 

Rev. Edw. Huntington Merrell, D.D., 
LL.D., Philosophy. 

Chas. Henry Chandler, A.M., Regis- 
trar, Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Chas. Dwight Marsh, A.M., Librarian, 
Biology. 

William Stowell Leavenworth, M.Sc, 
Chemistry and Physics. 

Edward William Clark, A.M., Latin. 

Rev, John Soren Festerson, A.M., 
English. 

Frederick May Lillebridge, Music. 



Faculty. 



Gym- 



Ger- 



Frank Morton Erickson, A.M. 

nasium Director, Greek. 
Clarissa Tucker Tracy, A.M., Bible 

and Botany. 
Mary Corinthia Harwood, M.L. 

man and French. 
Flora Edith Hockenhull, Painting, 
Maud Lincoln Merrell, B.S., Latin. 
Harriet Peirce Fuller, A.B., Latin. 
Charlotte Sophia Lillebridge, Voice 

Culture. 
Julius Carl Johnson, Violin. 
Bessie Estelle Robbins, Piano. 
Sarah Etta Young, Physical Culture. 



ROANOKE COLLEGE. 



Salem t Va. 




Men. 


Non-Sectarian. 


Income, 
$13,000 


Students, 

^75 


Instructors, 
12 


Buildings, 
4 


Books, 
20,000 



The college was founded in 1853, and is situated among the Blue 
Ridge Mountains, eleven hundred feet above the sea. The presi- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



261 



dents have been: Rev. David F. Bittle, D.D., 1853-1S76; Rev. 
Thomas W. Dosh, D.D., 1877-1878; Julius D. Dreher, A.M., Ph.D., 
1878 to the present. The trustees number seventeen. Admission is 
by examination. Degrees of A.B. and M.A. are conferred, the latter 
after one year's post-graduate study. Attendance at chapel is com- 
pulsory. Hazing is strictly prohibited. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from the middle of September to the middle of June, are 
^150. The college buildings, which are of brick, stand on grounds 
of twenty acres. 

The students publish the " Roanoke Collegian," and maintain the 
following societies : Demosthenian and Ciceronian Debating clubs, 
Mineraiogical and Numismatic Society, Christian Association, Minis- 
terial Union, Missionary Band, Athletic Association, with football 
and baseball teams, and chapters of * r A, 1866; 4> A 0, A T H, 1869; 
2 X, 1872 ; with the * A X and ^ & W. 

Of the 400 and more graduates, some 370 are living. The oldest 
of these is the Rev. B. F. Boulton, 1855, Glen Garden, N. J. 



Faculty. 



Julius D. Dreher, A.M., Ph.D., Presi- 
dent. 

S. Carson Wells, A.M.. Ph.D., Math, 
and Astron., Curator of Cabinets. 

Rev. Luther A. Fox, A.M., D.D., 
Moral Philosophy. 

Rev. F. V. N. Painter, A.M., D.D., 
Modern Languages. 

William A. Smith, A.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Rev. C. Armand M'ller, A.M., Greek. 



Wythe F. Morehead, A.M., Librarian, 

English. 
Henry T. Hildreth, A.B., Ph.D., 

Ancient Languages. 
Charles B. Cannaday, A.B., Latin. 
Leonidas Mc Reynolds, Commercial. 
Eugene A. Smith, A.M., Chemistry. 
Herbert M. Smith, A.B., Classics. 
A. H. Throckmorton, Victor McCauley, 

George McLaren Brydon, Tutors. 
H. J. Mclntire, Physical Culture. 



ROCK HILL COLLEGE. 

EllicoU City, Md. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 
$36,000 




Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
7,500 



The college was founded in 1857 on a site covering fifty acres. 
Admission is by examination. The degrees are A.B., B.S., C.E., 
and M.E. The degree of A.M. is given after a post-graduate course. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from the first Monday in Sep- 
tember to the last Thursday in June, are $250. Gold medals are 
given for excellence in English and mathematics. Attendance at 
chapel is compulsory. Of the 165 graduates, 140 are living. The 
oldest of these is Thomas A Whelan, 187 1, of Baltimore, Md. 



Brother Maurice, President. 



Brother Luke, Vice-Pres. and Treas. 
Brother Joseph, Prefect of Discipline. 



Faculty. 

Brother Blandin, Secretary. 



Brother Francis, Assistant Secretary. 
Brother Julian, Librarian. 



262 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY. 

Nashville, Te7in. Co-Educational. Colored. 



Income, 
$8,048 



Students, 
227 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,756 



In 1883 the Nashville Normal and Theological Institution was 
incorporated under the above name. The situation is on high 
ground covering thirty acres, and commanding a view of the city. 
The trustees number nine. Admission is upon certificate mainly. 
The degrees are A.B. and B.S., with the master's degree after three 
years. Attendance at chapel is obligatory. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 29 to May 19, are less than $100. 
Sixty-six State normal scholarships are offered by the State, which 
are shared in by this school. The societies are the Literary-Debat- 
ing and the Philomathean, with Teachers', Mission, Temperance, 
and two Christian Associations. The alumni since 1876 number 2S8. 



Fac 

Rev. Owen James, D.D., Bible, etc. 
Rev. A. Owen, D.D., Philosophy and 

Theology. 
D. R. Leland, A.M., Greek, Principal 

Normal Department. 
C. C. Phillips, A.M., Latin. 
J. W. Johnson, A.M., Mathematics. 
John Hope, A.B., Natural Science. 
Adele Parrott, A.B,, French, German. 
Margaret Neel, Elocution. 



ulty. 

Myra Handy, U. S. History. 

J. W. Bell, Mathematics. 

W. A. Thompson, Mathematics. 

Anna Bell Pearl Brown. 

Miss L. N. J. Fox, Geography. 

I. H. Hampton, Penmanship. 

F. C. Campbell, Printing. 

A. Green, Carpentry. 

Mrs. S. A. Ballentine, Instrum. Music. 

William Harrison, Vocal Music. 



ROLLINS COLLEGE. 



Winter Park 


, Fla. Co-Educational. 


Congregational. 


Income, 
$10,495 


Students, 
167 


Instructors, 
18 


Buildings, 

6 


Books, 
3.500 



The college was incorporated in 1885, and is situated among the 
Florida Lakes in the centre of the State. The trustees number 
nineteen. Admission is by examination and on certificate. The 
degrees are A.B., and B.S., and special diplomas are given. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from October i to June 4, are $200. The 
students maintain two societies : the Demosthenes for men, and the 
Friends in Council for women, with a Choral Club, The graduates 
number fifteen. 

Faculty. 



Charles G. Fairchild, A.M., President, 

Philosophy. 
Rev. E. P. Hooker, D.D., Pastor. 



Nathan Barrows, A.M., M.D,. Math. 
Rev. L. A. Austin, A.M., Latin. 
J. PI. Ford, A.M., Greek, 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



263 



Eva J. Root, M.S., French, History. 
Thomas R. Baker, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Lanie E. Curtis, Mrs. C. A. Abbott, 

Sub-Preparatory. 
Amy F. Dahymple, Drawing, Painting. 
Kate Waldo Peck, Music. 
Isabella Dieffenderfer, Elocution. 



Hattie A. Peck, Ph.B., Instrumental 

Music. 
Jessie D. Grassie, Gymnastics. 
Eva S. Lamson, Librarian. 
Laura M. Walker, M. Belle Abbott, 

May Pomroy, Music. 
Rex E. Beach, Gymnasium. 



ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 

Terre Haute, Ind. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$45,000 



Students, 
130 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
8,500 



History: The institute was founded by Chauncey Rose, of Terre 
Haute, in 1874, but was not opened until 1883. The presidents have 
been: Charles Oliver Thompson, Ph.D., 1883-18S5; Thomas C. 
Mendenhall, LL.D., 1886-1890; Henry T. Eddy, Ph.D., 1890-1895; 
and Carl Leo Mees, Ph.D., 1895 ^^ the present. 

Organization : The school is governed by eight managers. Admis- 
sion is only by examination. Four parallel courses: the mechanical, 
electrical, engineering, and chemical, all identical in the freshman 
year, lead to the degree of B.S. The master's degree is conferred 
two years after graduation on one year's study, while the degrees of 
M.E., C.E., and E.E. are conferred after two years of professional 
practice after the master's degree. The expenses for the year, last- 
ing from September 16 to June 17, are $300, of which $75 is for 
tuition. Attendance at chapel and drill are not obligatory, though 
the latter may soon be required. Negroes are not excluded. 

Equipment: Among the five college buildings are an academic 
building, shops (with electrical plant and boiler house), chemical 
laboratory, and a gymnasium. 1'he campus covers ten acres, and 
contains a running and wheel track, athletic field with tennis courts, 
baseball diamond, etc. The shops were partially destroyed by fire 
in 1892, but were rebuilt and in full operation within three months. 
The chemical laboratory was burnt to the ground in 1895, ^^^ ^'^^ 
rebuilt and occupied in four months. 

Societies and Publications : Besides many bulletins and scientific 
publications issued by the Faculty, the students publish the " Rose 
Technic," a monthly; and the " Modulus," an annual. The societies 
are the Rose Scientific Society, Orchestra Club, Christian Associa- 
tion, Athletic Association, with football and baseball teams, as well 
as a Tennis Club, and an Alumni Association. Chapters of the fol- 
lowing fraternities have been organized : * 2 *, A T H, and 2 N. 

The graduates number 162. 



Faculty. 



Carl Leo Mees, Ph.D., President, 

Physics. 
\Vm. L. Ames, B.S., Machine Drawing. 



James A. Wickersham, A.M., Lan- 
guages. 
William A. Noyes, Ph.D., Chemistry. 



264 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-COOK. 



Malverd A. Howe, C.E., Civil Engin. 

Thomas Gray, Pii.D., Engineering. 

Charles S. Brown, M,E., Steam En- 
gineering, and Shops. 

Arthur S. Hathaway, B.S., Math. 

Arthur Kendrick, A.M., Physics. 

Edwin Place, M.M.E., Electrical Con- 
struction. 

Robert L. McCormick, B.S., Math. 

Harold H. Ballard, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

John B. Peddle, M.S., Drawing. 



Joseph D. Harper, B.S., Charles 
Wilbur, Civil Engineering. 

Arnold Tschudy, B.A., Librarian, 
German. 

Mrs. S. P. Burton, Registrar. 

J. F. VV. Harris, Machine Work. 

William P. Smith, Wood Work. 

Edw. Nicholas, Forging, Tempering. 

H. W. Dickinson, Foundry Practice. 

Benj. Grosvenor, Boiler Management. 

Garrett W. Logan, Machinist. 



RUTGERS COLLEGE. 

New Brunswick, N. J. Me 71. 



Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
180 



Instructors, 
28 



Buildings, 
8 



Books, 
32,000 



History: The college was established by royal charter in 1770 as 
Queen's College. It took its present name in 1825, in honor of Col. 
Henry Rutgers. The Protestant Reformed Church had control of 
the school until 1865, when it became an independent literary insti- 
tution. The presidents have been : Dr. J. R. Hardenberg, Dr. J. H. 
Livingston, Dr. P. Milledoler, 1825-1840; Hon. A. B. Hasljrouck, 
1840-1850; Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, 1850-1862; and Dr. W. 
H. Campbell, the present incumbent, who was appointed in 1863. 

Orga7tization : The trustees number thirty-eight, of whom three 
are ex ojicio. Admission is by examination and on certificate De- 
grees of A B., and B.S. are conferred, with that of A.M. after one 
year's post-graduate study, those of Ph.D., and Sc.D. after two, and 
that of C.E. after three years. Degrees in divinity are also con- 
ferred. Elective studies may be largely pursued after the first two 
years. Tuition is $75 for the year, lasting from September 18 to 
June 16. A scholarship of $300, with forty smaller scholarships for 
the State, and one for each assembly district, three prizes for $100, 
and twenty-eight prizes of from $25 to ^100 are available. 

During the last year the students decided to abandon the *' Sopho- 
more Cremation," an old college custom usually attended by various 
irregularities of conduct, and to substitute an annual play therefor. 

Equipnioit : Queen's College, the original building, was erected in 
1808. The Fine Arts Building, with a good collection of objects of 
art and a memorial collection, followed in 1841. Van Nest Hall, 
used for general purposes, was given six years later. An observa- 
tory was established in 1865. The Geological Hall and the Kirk- 
patrick Chapel and Library followed in 1871 and 1872. A museum, 
new gymnasium, and athletic field, covering eight acres, have been 
equipped in recent years. Connected with the agricultural depart- 
ment is a farm of one hundred acres. 

The students publish the " Scarlet Letter." Among the societies 
are the Peithessophian and the Philoclean, a Dramatic Club, Chris- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



265 



tian Association, Athletic Association, with football track and base- 
ball teams. Chapters of the following fraternities have been 
organized: * B K, 1845; ^ "^y 1848-1852; Z % 1848; A T, 1858; 
AKE, 1861; X*, 1867; A 2 X and B n, 1871-1888; X% 1879; 
2 E, 1887. 



Faculty. 



Austin Scott, Ph.D., LL.D., Presi- 
dent, History. 

Jacob Cooper, D.D., D.C.L., LL.D., 
Logic and Philosophy. 

Carl Meyer, D.D., Modern Languages. 

Francis Cuyler Van Dyck, Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Edward Albert Bowser, C.E., LL.D., 
Mathematics. 

Charles Edward Hart, D.D., English. 

Louis Bevier, Jr., Ph.D., Greek. 

Edgar Solomon Shumway, Ph.D., 
Latin. 

Alfred Alexander Titsworth, M.S., 
C.E., Graphics and Mathematics. 

Julius Nelson, Ph.D., Biology. 

John Bernhard Smith, Sc.D., Ento- 
mology. 

Edward Burnett Voorhees, A.M., 
Agriculture. 

William Rankin Duryee, D.D., Ethics 
and Evidences. 



Byron David Halsted, Sc.D., Botany. 
Clarence B. Lane, B.A., Agriculture. 
Albert Huntington Chester, E.M., 

Ph.D., Sc.D., Chem., Mineralogy. 
John Charles Van Dyke, L.H.D., 

History of Art. 
Robert Woodworth Prentiss, M.S., 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 
Eliot Robertson Payson, Ph.D., 

Teaching, 
Edward Luther Stevenson, Ph.D., 

History. 
Ezra F. Scattergood, B.S., Math, 
Erwin Bell Davis, B.S., Mod. Lang. 
Lieut. George Burwell Davis, U.S.A., 

Military Science. 
Irving Strong Upson, A.M., Librarian. 
Clarence Livingston Speyers, Ph.B., 

Chemistry. 
Edw. Livingston Barbour, Elocution. 
William Shields Myers, M.S., F.C.S., 

Chemistry. 



RUTHERFORD COLLEGE. 

Rutherford, N. C. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$4,000 



Students, 




Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
5,000 



John Rutherford, in 1853, gave six hundred acres among the South 
Mountains, fourteen hundred feet above the sea, and in the same 
year a school, consisting of a log-cabin, was built by R. L. Aber- 
nethy. In 1890 the old building was burnt to the ground. 

Admission is on certificate or by examination. The degree of A.B. 
is conferred. The expenses for the year are $100. A college paper 
is published. 



Faculty. 



Will E. Abernethy, A.M., President, 
English. 

L. Berge Abernethy, A.M., Mathe- 
matics. Business. 

Arthur T. Abernethy, A.M., Greek 
and Latin. 



Rev. Barth Soulier, French, Italian. 
Mrs. E. P. Moore, Music. 
Rev. J. W. Kennedy, A.B., Prepara- 
tory Department. 
W. P. Cameron, Assistant. 
Jennie Pearson Stanley, Women's Dept. 



266 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



SAN JOAQUIN COLLEGE. 

Woodbridge, Cal. Co-Educational. United Brethren. 



Income, 



Students, 
8i 



Instructors, 

6 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1,000 



The college was founded in 1877. The president is W. J. Ham, 
A.M., LL.B. 

(Further infor?fiation lacking.) 



SANTA CLARA COLLEGE. 

Santa Clara, Cal. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
236 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
1 2,000 



The college was founded in 1871 by the Franciscans who had 
established a mission at Santa Clara in 1851. A university charter 
was obtained in 1853. The old Mission Church is still preserved. 

Admission is by examination. Students pass through classical, 
scientific, and commercial courses leading to degrees of A.B., and 
B.S. The master's degree is conferred only after examination. Be- 
sides an entrance fee of $15 the expenses for the ten months, from 
August to June, are $350. Six money prizes and one hundred and 
sixty medals are offered for excellence in study. 

Nine libraries are distributed through the various departments. 
The Literary League, which after the pattern of Congress, is divided 
into two houses, has two halls with libraries. The buildings enclose 
a quadrangle of ten acres. Two gymnasiums, with a swimming-pond, 
and play grounds of four acres, have been established. The gradu- 
ates since 1859 number 250. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Jos. W. Riordan, President. 
Rev. Robt. E. Kenna, Vice-President. 
Rev. J. F. Collins, Treasurer. 
Rev. J. Ricard, Moral Philosophy and 

French. 
Rev. M. Shallo, Mental Philosophy. 
Rev. A. Brunen,!?o, Nat. Philosophy. 
Rev. A. Cichi, Chemistry. 
Rev. J. J. Cunningham, Librarian, 

Rhetoric. 
Rev, V. Chiappa, Humanities. 
W. Tliornton, First Grammar. 
J. A. Colligan, S. J., Greek. 
J. De Rop. S.J., Third Grammar and 

Algebra. 



J. P. Morrissey, S.J., Latin, Greek. 

Rev. F. Francis, S.J., Analytical 
Geometry and German. 

D. M. Burnett, S.B., Grammar, Math. 

Rey. M. McKey, S.J., Rhetoric. 

J. J. Donovan. First and Second Gram- 
mar and Arithmetic. 

H. Gugiielmetti, Arithmetic. 

Rev. J. Caiedda, Italian and English, 

and College Band. 
*R. Arzu, Spanish. 

B. Tortore, Drawing and Painting. 

J. R. Lawrie, A. W. Kaufmann, Music. 

F. Schubert. Music, Orchestra. 

Jas. M. O'SulIivan, Assist. Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



267 



SCIO COLLEGE. 



Scio, Ohio. 


Co-EducatioTtal. 


Methodist. 


Income, 
$10,650 


Students, 
500 


Instructors, 
14 


Buildings, 


Books, 
2,000 





Scio College was founded in 1866, and has graduated, in all, some 
500, of whom the oldest is the Rev. J. R. Keyes, D.D., 1866, of 
Barnesville, O. Admission is on certificate. The expenses for the 
year, ending June 22, are $100. The president is W. G. Compher, 
A.M., Ph.D. 

{Further information lacking.) 



SETON HALL COLLEGE. 

South Orange, N. J. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 
$40,000 



Students, 
187 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



The college was founded and chartered in 1856. The trustees 
number thirteen. Admission is by examination. The degrees are 
A.B., B.S., and M.Acc. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from the fifst week in September to 
the third week in June, are $380. Twelve prizes are offered for 
excellence in study with many medals for good conduct. 

The grounds cover twenty acres, and embrace an athletic field 
with a pond for skating and swimming. The graduates number 500. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Winand Michael Wigger, D.D., 
General Supervisor, 

Rev. William F. Marshall, A.M., 
President. 

Rev. John J. O'Connor, A.M., Meta- 
physics and Latin. 

Rev. T. J. Synnott. D.D., Christian 
Evidences and Enijlish, 

Rev. Henry C. Phelan, l^.Yy., English 
and Latin. 

Philip G. Lyons, A.M., Latin. 



Charles H. Jourdan, A.M., Ph.D., 
Mathematics and Sciences. 

O'Connor Sloane, A.M., Ph.D., Physi- 
cal Sciences. 

John C. Johnson, A.M., History and 
English. 

J, Reinhard, A.M., German, Latin, 
and Greek. 

Count A. de la Londe, French. 

W. W. Winner, Penmanship. 

Charles F. Schreiner, Music 



268 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



SHAW UNIVERSITY. 

Raleigh, N. C. Co-EdiccatioiiaL 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$23,000 



Students, 
362 



Instructors, 
38 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
2,000 



This university, which was established immediately after the Civil 
War, with H. M. Tupper, D.D., as president, was designed to give 
advanced instruction to negroes. It has a campus of nine acres, 
and consists of a college, industrial school, with medical, law, and 
theological departments. The trustees number twelve. Admission 
is by examination and on certificate. The degrees are A.B., B.LL., 
B.D., and M.D. The original cost of the school was $200,000. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from the last week of September to 
May 14, are $100. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 



Faculty. 



Charles F. Meserve, A.M., President. 
Rev. Moses VV. D. Norman, A.M., 

Biblical Interpretation. 
Nicholas F. Roberts, D.D., Math. 
MacDuffie Bowen, M.D., Physiology. 
Nath. C. Bruce, A.B., Latin, Greek. 



Lovelace B. Capehart, LL.B., English. 
Julie T. Walling, History. 
Lizzie B. Gibbs, Elocution. 
Mary L. Ives, Natural Sciences. 
Lovina A. Haywood, Music. 
Charles W. Jewett, Secretary, 



SHEPARDSON COLLEGE. 



Grandville, O. 



Women. 



Non-Sectarian. 



The college was originally endowed with $150,000 and is situated 
on a beautiful tract of land. The trustees number thirteen. Admis- 
sion is on certificate and otherwise. The degree of A.B. is conferred. 
A fund of $13,000 has been given, the interest of which is available 
for scholarships. The cottage system of residence prevails. The 
students maintain two literary societies, a missionary organization 
and a branch of King's Daughters. The year is from September 
17 to June 16. 

Faculty. 

Daniel Boardman Purinton, LL.D., 
President. 

Rose Davis Whissen, M.A., Principal, 
History of Art. 

Frances Maria Green, Matron. 

Virginia Bond Thorne, Director Art. 

Carrie Marie Howland, China Painting. 

Harriet Maria Barker, Math., Phj^sics. 

Willis Arden Chamberlin, A.M., Mod- 
ern Languages. 

Martha McMilIen, Latin. 



Sarah Goodridge Bagnall, M.A., Hist. 

Mary Castle, Ph.B., Latin. 

John David Seaton Riggs, Ph.D., 

Elocution. 
Eva Virginia Johnson, Physiology. 
Henry Stanislaus Sauerbrey, Physical 

Culture. 
Otto En^werson, Vocal Culture. 
Susan Maxwell Moore, Piano, Organ. 
Jennie Elizabeth Blinn, Harmony. 
Frank Chapman, Violin and Guitar. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



269 



SHURTLEFF COLLEGE. 

Upper Alton, III. Co-Ediuatiojial. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$8,223 



Students, 
201 



Instructors, 
24 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
8,000 



The college was founded in 1827 at Rock Springs, and received its 
charter in 1835, after its removal to Upper Alton. It is the oldest 
college in the Mississippi Valley, and was named after Byron Shurt- 
leff, of Boston, who gave $10,000. The presidents have been, the 
Rev. Joshua Bradley, A.M.; John Russell, LL.D., 182S-1831 ; Rev. 
H. Loomis, 1832-1835; Washington Leverett, LL.D., D.D., 1836- 
1840; Adiel Sherwood, D.D., 1841-1845; W. Leverett (second 
term), 1846-1S49; Norman M. Wood, D.D., 1850-1855; S. Y. 
McMasters, LL.D., 1855-1856; Rev. Daniel Reed, 1856-1870; J. 
Bulkeley, D.D., 1870-1872; A. A. Kendrick, D.D., 1872-1894; and 
Austin K. DeBlois, Ph. D., the present incumbent. 

The college is governed by thirty trustees. The school consists 
of the College of Liberal Arts, an Academy, and the Schools of 
Music and Art. Students from accredited schools are admitted on 
certificate. The degrees are A.B., B.Ph., B.D., with masters' degrees 
after one year of graduate study, and that of Ph.D., after a specified 
course. The expenses for the year, lasting from the second Thurs- 
day in September to the first Thursday in June, are $135. Besides 
a ministerial fund a number of scholarships have been provided. 

The students publish the " College Review," a monthly, and main- 
tain the Alpha Zeta and Sigma Phi Literary Societies, with two 
Christian Associations and Athletic teams: 



Faculty. 



Austen Kennedy de Blois, Ph.D., 

President, Philosophy. 
Rev. A. A. Kendrick, D.D., Graduate 

Studies. 
Rev, Justus Bulkeley. D.D., History. 
Timothy Cloran, Jr., M.A., Greek and 

Modern Languages. 
Walter Hensill Bradley, M.A., Latin 

and English Literature. 
James Archy Smith, M.S., Math. 
Samuel Ellis Swartz, Ph.D., Natural 

Sciences. 
David George Ray, M.A., Hebrew. 
James H. Brownlee, M.A., Elocution. 
Rev. Harry H. Tilbe, M.A., Principal 

Academy, Latin. 



Annette Griggs, Ph.B., Preceptress, 
English. 

Lucy Leverett Greene, M.A., Science. 

Howard Cyrus Tilton, B.A. 

David George Ray, M.A., Commercial. 

Ida May Wightman, Shorthand. 

Archer Alexander Wageley, Gym- 
nastics. 

Wm. D. Armstrong, Musical Director, 
Piano. 

Alice Stanford McMahan, Piano. 

June Mead Rhoads, Piano. 

T. H. Simms, Orchestral Instruments. 

Edith Louise Pratt, Vocal Music. 

Mary Emily Judd, Art. 

Georgia T. First, Ph.B., Librarian. 



2/0 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Ijidianola, la. 



SIMPSON COLLEGE. 

Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
$14,000 



Students, 
480 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



Simpson College was founded by the Des Moines Conference of 
the Methodist church. The presidents have been: Rev. Alexander 
Burns, D.D., 1S68-1878; Rev. Thomas S. Berry, M.A., 1878-1880; 
Rev. Edward L. Parks, A.M., B.D., 1880-1886; Rev. WilUam E. 
Hamilton, A.M., 1886-1889; Rev. Edmund M. Holmes, A.M. B.D., 
1889-1S92; Rev. Fletcher Brown, A.M., B.D., 1892 to the present. 
The trustees number twenty-seven. 

Admission is by examination or on certificate of accredited schools. 
The degrees are A.B., B.S., and B.Ph., with the master's degree after 
a prescribed course. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Negroes 
are not excluded. The expenses for the year, from September 10 to 
June 16, are $150. Three prizes, one consisting of a gold medal and 
two for $25 each, are offered. 

The students publish the " Simpsonian," " Tangent," and " Zenith," 
and the " Educator " is published by the president of the college. 
The societies are the Zetalethean, for women, Smith-Everett, Alpian, 
Gradatim, Lowell Lyceum, with Ministerial and Christian Associa- 
tions and a Volunteer Band. The Athletic Association embraces 
football, baseball and track teams with a tennis club, and chapters 
of the following fraternities have been organized; ATA, 1873; 
* B *, 1874 ; K A 0, 1880; K K r, 1881 ; * K ^, 1882-1889; A T n, 
1885 ; I 2 n, 1888 ; 2 A E, 1889 ; A A A, 1S89. 

Of the 225 graduates more than 200 are living, Louise A. Burke, 
1870, of Nevvkirke, Oklahoma, is the oldest. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Fletcher Brown, A.M., B.D., 

President. 
Rev. W. E. Hamilton, A.M., D.D., 

Moral and Intellectual Philosophy. 
J. L. Tilton, A.M., Natural Sciences. 
Joanna Baker, A.M., Greek. 
L. A. Youtz, Ph.M., Sciences. 
Martha E. Stahl, Ph.M., Latin. 
P. \V. Jenkins, A.M., Astronomy. 
Lucien Waggener, Jr., A.M., German 

and French. 



Emma Kate Corkhill, A.M., Ph.D., 

English and History. 
H. G. Sedgwick, M.S., M.E., Engin. 
Frank E. Barrows, Music. 
Mamie O'Flyng, Voice and Violin. 
Lucy M. Haywood, Piano, Harmony. 
Bertha Stacy, Art. 

E. L. Miller, B.C.S., Business School. 
Estella Trueblood, Shortliand. 
Lillian A. Newland, Oratory and 

Physical Culture. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



271 



SMITH COLLEGE. 

Northampton, Mass. Women. 



Nan- Sectarian. 



Income, 
) 1 24,603 



Students, 
«75 



Instructors, 
60 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
20,000 



The college was founded in 1875 t»y Miss Sophia Smith, of Hatfield, 
Mass., who selected the site and bequeathed the first funds. The 
college is designed to furnish the same means and facilities for higher 
education as are provided by the best colleges for men. The trustees 
number fourteen. 

Admission is by examination. The degrees are A.B., B.L., and 
B.S., and that of A.M. is given to graduates of two years' standing 
who have pursued post graduate study at the college for one year. 
The degree of Ph.D. is also given after stringent requirements. 
Attendance at chapel is customary. Tuition is $100, while the other 
expenses for the year from September 24 to June 16, aggregate ^300. 
Annual scholarships of $100 and $50 are available, with two scholar- 
ships on the income of $5,000 and two on $1,000. The library has an 
endowment of $300,000 for the purchase of books. Besides the 
general library, various reference libraries are maintained by the dif- 
ferent departments. 

The students maintain numerous social organizations, with a dra- 
matic club and an athletic association. A field has been levelled for 
basket ball. The graduates number more than one thousand. 



Faculty. 



Rev. L. Clarke Seelye, D.D., LL.D., 
President. 

Rev. Henry M. Tyler, A.M., Greek. 

John T. Stoddard, Ph.D., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Benjamin C. Blodgett, Mas. D., 
Director of Music School. 

Marie F. Kapp, German. 

Eleanor P. Gushing, A.M., Mathe- 
matics, 

Ludella L. Peck, Elocution. 

Mary A. Jordan, A.M., Rhetoric and 
Old English. 

Harry Norman Gardiner, A.M., Phil- 
osophy. 

Dwight W. Tryon, M.A., Director 
Art School. 

Mary E. Byrd, A.B., Astronomy. 

Delphine Duval, French. 

J. Everett Brady, Ph.D., Latin. 

M. Elizabeth Czarnomska, English 
Literature. 

Mary R. Williams, Drawing and Paint- 
ing. 

Harris H, Wilder, Ph.D., Zoology. 



Rev. Irving F. Wood, A.M., B.D., 

Bible and Ethics. 
William F. Ganong, Ph.D., Botany. 
Charles D. Hazen, Ph.D., History. 
William G. Smith, A.M., Ph.D., 

Logic and Psychology. 
John F. Crowell, Litt.D., Economics 

and Sociology. 
Elsie B. Howe, M.D., Physiology and 

Anatomy. 
Emily Norcross, A.M., Latin. 
Grace D. Chester, B.A., Cryptogamic 

Botany. 
Grace A. Hubbard, A.M., English 

Literature. 
Lendo Berenson, Gymnastics. 
Julia H. Covern, A.M., Greek. 
Ellen P. Cook, B.S., Chemistry. 
Adeline Pelissier, French. 

ASSISTANTS. 

Mary A. Frost, A.M., German. 
Bertha J. Eartelmom, German. 
Elizabeth A. Wright, Gymnastics. 
Flora E, Harper, A.M., Astronomy. 



272 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Elizabeth D. Hanscom, Ph.D., Old 
English. 

Valentine Journier, French. 

Madeline Nellin, Ph.M., History. 

Etta L. Miller, A.B., English Litera- 
ture. 

Florence Jackson, A.B., Chemistry. 

Lucia E. Wood, A.B., Rhetoric. 

Harriet R. Cobb, A.M., Mathematics. 

Florence R. Sabin, A.B., Zoology. 



Anna S. Jenkins, A.B., Latin. 
Harriet C. beelye, A.B., Registrar and 

Secretary. ] 

Mary C. Woodruff, Assistant Regis- ; 

trar. i 

Benjamin K. Emerson, Ph.D., Ge- j 

ology. ! 

Frederic R. Honey, Ph.B., Perspec- ' 

tive. 
Sara D. Kellogg, Librarian. 



SOUTH CAROLINA COLLEGE. 

Columbia. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
184 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 

^C.COO 



The college was founded in 1801 and opened its doors in 1805. In 
1863 the Confederate Government converted it into a hospital. After 
the close of the war the college charter was amended and the school 
was re-opened as the University of South Carolina, in 1866. In 1878 
it was divided into two branches: Columbia and Orangeburg, but ten 
years later the old name was again assumed and the college re-opened 
in 1891. 

The school is governed by nine elective and eight ex-ofificio trustees. 
Admission is by examination and upon certificate. Four courses, in 
classics, literature, science and law are offered, leading to degrees of 
B.A,, B.L., B.S., and B.LL. Since 1894, when the college was opened 
to women, instruction in normal branches has also been given. 
Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from the last week of September to the last week of June, are 
$163. Six scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are available after the 
junior year. 

The students maintain the Eupholian and Clarisophic societies, 
dating from 1806, two Christian Associations and an Athletic Asso- 
ciation. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : 
A >F, 1850-1861 ; A K E, 1852-1861 ; * K ^, 1857 ; X % 1858 ; B n, 
1858-1861 ; A X, 1859-1861 ; K A, 1880; 2 A E, 1882; * A 0, 1882; 
A T n, 1883 ; 2 N, 1884 ; X *, 1889 ; and K 2. 

The graduates since 1809 number 2,050. The oldest of these is 
Thomas M. Lyles, 1831, of South Carolina. 



Faculty. 



James Woodrow, Ph.D., M.D., 
LL.D., Biology and Geology. 

Benjamin Sloan, Physics and Math. 

W. B. Burney, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Rev. E. L. Patton, LL.D., Ancient 
Languages. 



E. S. Joynes, M.A., LL.D., Modern 

Languages. 
R. M. Davis, A.B., LL.B., History 

and Civics. 
Joseph Daniel Pope, A.M., LL.D., 

Law. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



273 



Rev. J. William Flinn, D.D., Philoso- 
phy and Religion. 

F. C. Woodward, A.M., Litt.D., 
English. 

Patterson Wardlaw, A.B., Pedagogics 
and Classics. 



F. Horton Colcock, C.E., Mathe- 
matics. 
F. Horton Colcock, C.E., Secretary. 
Isaac H. Means, A.B., Librarian. 
Paul H. Youmans, Gymnasium. 



SOUTHERN NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 

Huntingdon, Tenn. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
■xod 



Instructors, 
20 




Books, 
3,000 



The university was established but a few years ago. The trustees 
number seven. Admission is on certificate. The degrees are A.B., 
B.S., B.M., and B.D. Tuition is free for those without means. The 
expenses for the year, from September 3 to July 9, are ^100. 



Faculty. 



J. A. Baber, A.M., President, Meta- 
physics and Mathematics. 

E. C. McDougle, A.M., C.E., Vice 
President, Natural Science. 

Mrs. Emma Dailey Baber, A.M., 
Greek and Literature. 

E. Love Hawkins, A.B., Latin and 
Rhetoric. 

Minnie L. Kerr, A.B., I.E., Stenogra- 
phy. 

W. R.. Richardson. A.B., Penmanship. 

Rev. G. M. Oakley, B.D., Hebrew. 

Rev. J. M. Carter, D.D., Ethics. 

M. G. Wittman, Music and German. 

Mrs. J. M. Carter, A.M., Fine Arts. 



A. J. G. Wells, B.S., Common 
Branches. 

B. A. Tucker, B.S., Principal. 
Eva Townes, M.A., Intermediate. 
Maggie Brown, Primary. 

Hon. H. C. Townes, LL.D., Dean of 

Law. 
Judge L. L., Hawkins, Evidence. 
Hon. J. P. Wilson, Pleading and 

Practice. 
Chancellor A. G. Hawkins, Law and 

Equity. 
Hon. G. T. McCall, Corporations. 
Hon. J. R. Bond, Common Law. 
Lillie Blythe, Librarian. 



SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY. 

Greensboro, Ala. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$5,000 



Students, 
158 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,500 



The university was founded in 1856, by the Alabama Conference of 
Methodists. In tiie same village are two colleges for women. The 
trustees number eighteen. Admission is on certificate. The degrees 
are A.B., B.S., and B.Ph., with that of A.M. after graduate study. 

18 



274 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



The expenses for the year, from September 23 to June 16, are $150. 
Three prizes for elocution are annually awarded. P'ree tuition is 
given to two students from each Presiding Elder's district. The 
students publish the " Monthly " and maintain the Cliosophic Literary 
and two Christian Associations. 



Faculty. 



J. O. Keener, A.M., D.D., Mental and 

Moral Philosophy. 
F. M. Peterson, A.M., B.D., Ancient 

Languages. 
J. L. Brown, B.S., Chemistry. 
D. P. Cristenberry, A.M., History 

and English, Librarian. 



L. P. Giddens, A.B., Mathematics. 

L. V. Massey, A.B., Modern Lan- 
guages. 

O. C. Hand, A.M., Sub-Freshman 
Department. 

H. L. Holman, A.M., Laboratory. 

W. C. Hamilton, Asst. Librarian. 



SOUTH KENTUCKY COLLEGE. 

Hopkinsville, Ky. Co-Educational. Disciples. 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 
184 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 

2 



Books, 
1,000 



The college was opened in 1849. Instruction was suspended in 
1862, when it was occupied by troops. In 1884 the main building was 
destroyed by fire but was shortly afterward rebuilt. It is situated in 
a place which has three other institutions for higher learning. The 
grounds cover twelve acres. The government is vested in ten trustees 
with a board of eleven councillors. 

Admission is on certificate and by examination. The degrees are 
A.B., B.L., B.S., and A.M. after one year of post-graduate study. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 8 to June 9, are $125. 
Five scholarships are available. The societies are the Amphytrion, 
for women, the Philomathean and Euphemian for men, with Christian 
Associations. All students, whether men or women, are required to 
wear uniforms, and to attend religious services. The graduates num- 
ber 130. 

Faculty. 



J. W. Hardy, President. 

A. C. Kuykendall, A.M., Mathematics. 

J. P. B. Allan, A.B., Latin and Greek. 

J. W. Hardy, Sacred History. 

R. T. Steinhagen, French and Ger. 

George W. Pooler, Music. 



Annie Crabb, Piano. 

Mrs. G. W. Pooler, Voice Culture. 

Arthur R. Ward, Violin. 

Ellen Dabney, Art. 

Mrs. Edward Callis, Preparatory. 

J. P. B. Allan, Commandant. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



2/5 



SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST UNIVERSITY. 

Jacksoity Tenn. Co-Edtuational. Baptist. 



Income, 



Students, 
266 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 



Books, 

1,500 



In 1845 t^^ Baptists of Tennessee established the University of 
Murfreesboro with Dr. Joseph H. Eaton, president. During the 
Civil War the University was abandoned, and again in 1873 during 
the cholera. In 1875 ^ '^^^ charter was obtained and Jackson was 
chosen as the place for the new college. In 1890 a fund of $30,000 
was raised, and the land and building of the former Tennessee Col- 
lege secured. In 1891 another fund of $50,000 was riven and dormi- 
tories were established. 

The school is governed by thirty-five trustees. Admission is on 
certificate or by examination. The degrees are A.B., B.S. and A.M., 
the last after one year of postgraduate study. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from the first week in September to the first week in 
June, are $125. The societies are the Apoleonian, Calliopean and 
J. R. Graves, all owning libraries, with an Athletic and two Christian 
Associations. An annual field day is held by the members of the 
various athletic teams. The graduates number 257. 



Faculty. 



Geo. M. Savage, A.M., LL.D., Prest. 
Henry Clay Iiby, A.M., Mathematics. 
Thomas Jefferson Deupree, A.M., 

Natural Science. 
Geo. M. Savage, A.M., LL.D., Philos. 
William Edmund Farrar, B.A., Latin 

and Greek. 
Robert A. Kimbrough, M.A., Latin 

and Greek. 



Charles Bell Burke, A.B., English. 

J. B. White, Academy. 

H. C. Jameson, Commercial Dept. 

William Riley Phillips, Stenography. 

William Edmund Farrar B.A., Physi- 
cal Culture. 

Jere. L. Crook, M.A., M.D., Physi- 
ology. 

J. T. VVarford M.D., Anatomy. 



SOUTHWESTERN PRESBYTERIAN UNIVERSITY- 

Clarksville, Tcnn. Men.. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
1 1 8,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
8,000 



The university was founded before the Civil War by William M. 
Stewart of Pennsylvania and Tennessee. 

The institution was suspended from February 1862 until September 
1869, when the buildings were seized and held for three years as bar- 
racks and hospital by troops of the Federal army. While thus 
occupied all their contents, libraries, apparatus, furniture, floors, 



276 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



windows, doors, etc., ivere utterly destroyed, and the president him- 
self, while humanely visiting the sick soldiers, contracted small-pox 
and died. 

In 1875 Stewart College was turned into the Southwestern Presby- 
terian University. In 1S84 a fully equipped Theological Department 
was added. The presidents have been William M. Stewart, Rev. R. 

B. McMullen, D.D., Rev. J. B. Shearer, D.D. Chancellors, after the 
enlargement into the University, Rev. John N. Waddel, D.D., Rev. 

C. C. Hersman, U.D., 1888-1891 ; Rev. James M. Rawlings, D.D., 
1891-1892; and the Rev. George Summey, D.D., 1892. 

The university is governed by ten directors and five alternates. 
Candidates are admitted without examination, their standing being 
determined by the proficiency shown by them after entrance. 
Degrees are conferred in arts, science and divinity, with the master's 
degree after graduate study. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, 
but not so military or gymnastic drill. Negroes are excluded. The 
expenses for the year, from September 9 to June 10, are $170. Ten 
prize medals are annually distributed and ten perpetual scholarships 
on a fund of $10,000 are available. The four college buildings stand 
on grounds of twenty-five acres on the bluffs of the Cumberland. 

The students issue the " S. W. P. U. Journal," a monthly, and 
maintain the Palmer Homiletic Society, Washington Irving Literary 
Society, Stewart Literary Society, Foreign Missionary Society, Athletic 
Association, Lawn Tennis Association; and chapters of the follow- 
ing fraternities have been organized: Rainbow 1873-1874; n K A, 
1878 ; K 5, A T n, 2 A E, 1882 ; and K A, 1S87. 



Faculty. 



Georp^e Summey, D.D., Chancellor, 

Biblical History. 
Robert Price, D.D., History. 
Edwin Blackwell Massie, A.M., Math. 
George Frederick Nicolassen, A.M., 

Ph.D., Greek and German. 
James Adair Lyon, A.M., Ph.D., 

Natural Sciences. 
Thomas Oakley Deaderick, A.M., 

Latin and French. 



William Addison Alexander, A.M. 
Biblical Languages. 

Robert Alexander Webb, D.D., Sys- 
tematic Theology. 

Thornton Wheling, D.D., Philosophy. 

Eugene Rufus Long, A.M., Ph.D., 
English. 

Austin Heaton Merrill. A.M., Oratory. 

D. N. Kennedy, Secretary. 

Dr. Price, Librarian. 



SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Georgetow7i, Tex. Co-Edtuatioiial. Methodist. 



Income, 
$24,000 



Students, 
482 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1,500 



History: The University is the outgrowth of no less than twelve 
schools, organized prior to 1869, on which a total of $300,000 had 
been expended. Among the most prominent of these were Ruterville 
College, chartered by the Congress of Texas in 1840; McKenzie, 
begun in 1841 ; Wesleyan, chartered in 1844; and Soule, chartered in 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



2T] 



1S56. In i86g the Methodist Conference of the South determined to 
consolidate the schools to form one of the best grade. A site was 
procured in 1873 '^"<^ ^ "^^ charter in 1875, when the name of Texas 
University was changed to "Southwestern." In the first year thirty- 
three students attended. In 1878, two years after the first graduates 
had been sent forth, women were admitted, though in separate 
classes. The regents have been F. A. Mood, D.D , 1873-1884; J. W. 
Heidt, D.D., 1885-89 and John H. Mclean, A.M., D.D., the present 
incumbent. 

Organization, Instruction, Degrees: The University is governed by 
eleven trustees and twenty-nine curators. Admission is by examina- 
tion and upon certificate. The course of instruction is divided into 
schools, leading to degrees of A.B., B.S., B.Ph , and A.M. At- 
tendance at chapel is compulsory. Students are forbidden to carry 
deadly weapons or to leave the town without permission. The ex- 
penses for the year, lasting from September 11 to June 3, are from $150 
to $200, of which $40 is for tuition. The sons of clergymen are admit- 
ted free, and tuition is refunded in cases of protracted illness. Many 
gold medals and prizes are annually distributed, and a loan fund to 
help deserving students has been recently established. 

The students publish the " University Monthly" and " An-X," and 
maintain five literary societies with halls and libraries known as the 
Alamo, San Jacinto, Alethean, Grady, and Clio; two Christian 
Associations, a lecture course, and an Athletic Association. Chapters 
of the following fraternities have been organized: Rainbow, 1S82- 
1886; K A, 18S3; K 2, 18S6; * A 0, 1886; 2A E, 1887-1888 ; and 
* K N, 1890. The graduates number 275, of whom 260 are living. 
The oldest of these is the Rev. James Campbell, 1876, of Waco, 
Texas. 

Faculty. 



Jonathan H. McLean, A.M., D.D., 
Regent. 

C. C. Cody, A.M., Ph.D., Math. 

R. F. Young, A.M., Modern Lan- 
guages. 

R. S. Hyer, A.M., Natural Science, 
Librarian. 

C. C. Cody, Secretary. 



J. R. Allen, A.B., D.D., Philosophv. 
H. A. Shands, A.M., Ph.D., Encjlish. 
W. C. Yaden, A.M., Greek and Latin. 
M. L. Mowrev, Commercial College. 
S. H. Moore, A. B., Fitting School. 
G. C. White, A.B., A. S. Pegues, 
A.B., Assistants in Fitting School. 



SOUTHWEST KANSAS COLLEGE. 

Winfield, Kaji. Co- Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 

$5-000 



Students, 
248 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3,000 



The college was founded by the Southwest Kansas Conference of 
Methodists in 1886. The presidents have been Jolm E. Earp, 
1886-1890; Milton E. Phillips, 1 890-1 894 ; William N. Rice, and 
Granville Lowther, 1894-1895; with C. A. Place, the present in- 



278 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



cumbent, who was elected in 1895. In 1896, the dormitory building 
was burned to the ground. The trustees number thirteen. Admission 
is upon certificate. The degrees are B.A., B.S., and B.Ph., with that 
of A.M. after one year's graduate study. Attendance at chapel, 
though not <:ompulsory, is expected of all. The expenses for the 
year lasting from September 24 to June 16, are $110. The college 
grounds cover twenty acres. The students publish the " South- 
western Collegian," and maintain the Athenian literary society for 
men, and the Cadmus, and Belles Lettres for women. 



Faculty. 



Chester Allen Place, A.M., B.D., 
President, Philosophy. 

Granville Lowther, B.D., Moral Phi- 
losophy. 

George Fox Cook, Ph.D., Mathema- 
tics. 

Robert Baldwin Dunlevy, B.L., Sci- 
ence. 

Norman William Jones, Ph.B., 
English. 

George Ross Kirkpatrick, A.B., 
History and Social Sciences. 

Murrey Kerr Martin, A.B., Latin. 



George Miller Ryder, A.B., B.D. 

Greek. 
Edith May Andrus, Art Department. 
Abbie Freeman. B.L., Vocal Music. 
G. H. Hale, B.Mus., Piano. 
C. E. Lowe, M. Accts., Business 

School. 
Clara Dunning Sargent, Elocution and 

Oratory. 
James A. Whitted, B. Ped., Ph.B., 

Science and Mathematics. 
Eleanor Hayes, A.B., English. 
Howard A. Searcy, Stenography. 



STATE UNIVERSITY. 

Louisville, Ky. Co- Educational. 



Baptist. 



Income, 
$5,000 



Students, 
201 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
1,000 



The School was founded in 1879 to give normal, theological, 
collegiate, business and industrial instruction to negroes. Admission 
is by examination. Degrees of A.B. and B.L. are conferred. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September i to May 28, are 
$75- 

The societies are the European, and Athenaeum, with a Battalion, 
Christian, and Athletic Associations. 



Faculty. 



Chas. L. Puree, D.D.,Prest., Theology. 
R. S. Wilkinson, A. M., Languages 

and Political Science. 
W. H. Hoffman, A.B., Mathematics. 
A. G. Gilbert, A.M., M.D., English. 



L. M. Seeley, History, etc. 
L. V, Jones, English. 
L. A. Carter, English, 
Mrs. M. E. Steward, Music. 
Mrs. F. R. Givens, Art. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



279 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Towa City, Iowa, Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
1.307 



Instructors, 
lOI 



Buildings, 



Books, 
40,000 



History : The State of Iowa in 1840, and again in 1857, accepted the 
congressional land grant of 1852, and the first General Assembly- 
located the university and provided for a board of trustees. In i860 
the university was formally opened. The presidents have been : Dr. 
Amos Dean, 1855-1858; Silas Totten, D.D., L.L.D., 1860-1862; Dr. 
Oliver M. Spencer, 1862-1867; N. R. Leonard, 1867-1868; James 
Black, D.D., 1868-1870; George Thacher, D.D., 1871-1877; Hon. C. 
W. Slagle, 1877-1878; Josiah L. Pickard, 1878-1887; Charles A. 
Schaefer, 1887 to the present. 

Orjs^-ujiization, Instruction, and Dej^rees : The school is governed 
by thirteen regents. The university comprises a collegiate depart- 
ment, with schools in law, medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy. 
Admission is by examination, and on certificate from a hundred 
schools, provided all deficiencies are made up during the first year. 
Four general courses in philosophy, in the classics, and in the sci- 
ences, with courses in Engineering, lead to degrees of A.B., B.Ph., 
B.S., B.Pe., and B.S. in Engineering, together with professional 
degrees granted by the respective schools. The master's degree is 
conferred only after one year of resident graduate study. Attendance 
at military drill is compulsory for all male students. 

Dues and Prizes: Tuition is free. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September 16 to June 10, are $150. Two prizes of $35 
each are given for the best essays, one of $25 for athletics, and one for 
speaking. 

Equipment : The General Assembly in 189C provided for an annual 
tax, which will realize $275,000 for the university. These funds are to 
be devoted to the erection of new buildings. The athletic grounds 
now cover ten acres. The museums are well equipped, as is the astro- 
nomical observatory. 

Societies and Publications : Annual bulletins are issued by the 
Natural History Department. The students publish the " Quill," a 
weekly; the "Vidette Reporter," a tri-weekly; the "Hawk-eye," a 
junior annual, and the "Transit," an annual. The societies are: 
The Tabard, Polygon, Ivy Lane, Baconian, Irving, Zetogathean, 
Philomathean, Hesperian, Erodelphian, Christian Associations and 
Athletic Association with athletic teams, besides numerous societies 
in the Engineering, Law, Chemical, and Medical Schools. Chapters 
of the following fraternities have been organized; B IT, 1866; 
* K Y, 1867-1885; * r A, 1873; ATA, 1880; * A 0, 1882; 2 X, 
1882-1889; K K r, 1882; n B *, 1882; and A T, 1887. 

The graduates number nearly 4,500. The oldest is Dexter E. 
Smith, B.S., 1858, of Santa Ana, Cal. 



28o 



THE COLLEGE VEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty, 



Charles Ash mead Schaeffer, A.M., 
Ph.D., LL.D., President. 

Amos Noyes Currier, A.M., LL.D., 
Latin Language. 

Philo Judson Farnsworth, A.M., 
M.D., Materia Medica. 

John Clinton Shrader, A.M., M.D., 
LL.D., Obstetrics. 

William Drummond Middleton, A.M., 
M.D., Surgery. 

Samuel Calvm, A.M., Ph.D., Geology. 

Wilmot Horton Dickinson, M.D., 
Theory and Practice. 

Emlin McClain, A.M., LL.D., Law. 

Alfred Onias Hunt, D.D.S., Den- 
tistry. 

Thomas Huston Macbride, A.M., Bot- 
any. 

James Grant Gilchrist, A.M., M.D., 
Surgery. 

Emil Louis Boerner, Ph.G., Phar- 
macy. 

Launcelot Andrews, A.M., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

Charles Herbert Cogswell, M.D., Ob- 
stetrics. 

George Thomas White Patrick, A.M., 
Ph.D., Philosophy. 

Charles Bundy Wilson, A.M., Ger. 

Lawrence William Littig, A.M., 
M.D,, M.R.C.S., Theory and 
Practice of Medicine. 

Andrew Anderson Veblen, A.M., 
Physics. 

Laenas Gifford Weld, A.M., Mathe- 
matics. 

Charles Cleveland Nutting, A.M., 
Zoology. 

James Renwick Guthrie, A.M., M.D., 
Physiology. 

Isaac Althaus Loos, A.M., Political 
Science. 

Samuel Hayes. M.S., LL.B., Law. 

Joseph Jasper McConnell, A.M., Ped- 
agogy. 

Elbert William Rockwood, A.M., 
M.D , Chemistry. 

Woods Hutchinson, A.M., M.D., 
Anatomy, 

Charles S. Chase, A.M., M.D., 
Therapeutics. 

George Roval, M.D., Therapeutics. 

James William Dalbey, B.S., M.D., 
Ophthalmology. 

Frank John Newberry, M.D., Otology 
and Paedology. 



, . . ^S 



Walter L. Bierring, M.D., Histology 

and Bacteriology. 
Charles Berard Vogdes, U.S. Infantry, 

Military Science. 
James A. Rohbach, A.M., LL.B., 

Law. 
John J. Ney, LL.B., Law. 
William Craig Wilcox, A.M., History. 
Frank Thomas Breene, M.M., 

D.D.S., Clinical Dentistry. 
William S. Hosford, A.B., D.D.S., 

Dental Prosthesis. 
Frederick C. L. Van Steenderen, 

A.M., French. 
Alfred Vorley Sims, C.E., Civil 

Engineering. 
George Armstrong Manchope, M.A., 

Ph.D., English. 
Edward P. Leeds, LL.B., Law. 
Leona Angeline Call, A.M., Greek. 
Charles Scott Magowan, A.M., C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
Albert Levi Arner, B L., Physics. 
Joseph W. Rich, Librarian. 
Bohumil Shimek, C.E., Botany. 
Gilbert L. Houser, M.S., Physiology. 
Henry F. Wickham, M.S., Zoology. 
J. Allen Gilbert, A.M., Ph.D., 

Psychology. 
Martin Joseph Wade, LL.B., Evid. 
La Vega G. Kinne, LL.D., Taxation, 

etc. 
Gershon Hyde Hill, A.B., M.D., 

Insanity. 
Gifford Simeon Robinson, LL.B., 

Appellate Practice. 
W. H. De Ford, A.M., M.D., 

D.D.S., Pathology. 
Horace Emerson Deemer, LL.B., 

Guaranty and Suretyship. 
A. M. Harlan, A.M.,'M.D., D.D.S., 

Therapeutics. 
Thomas L. James, D.D.S., Dental 

Histology. 

INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Mrs. Pauline K. Partridge, Elocution. 

Albert E. Egge, A.M., Ph.D., Eng. 

Frederic Bernard Sturm, A.B., 
German. 

Percy H. Walker, A.B., Chemistry. 

Arthur G.Smith, B.Ph., Mathematics. 

Charles Beardsley, Jr., A.B., Eco- 
nomics. 

Benjamin F. Shambaugh, A.M., 
Ph.D., Political Science. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



281 



Franklin Hazen Potter, A.M., Latin. 

George Cram Cook, A.M., iinglish. 

George N. Bauer, 13. S., Mathematics. 

William Tell Noss, Ph.D., Math. 

D. \y. Dickinson, M.D., Theory and 
Practice of Medicine. 

John Walter Harriman, M,D., Anat- 
omy. 

W. E. Barlow, A. B., Chemistry. 

Mrs. Bertha G. Ridgway, Librarian. 

Theodore L. Hazard, M.D., Obstet- 
rics and Gynecology. 

William R. Whiteis, B.S., M.D., 
Pathological Histology. 

Harry Grant Plum, B.Ph., History. 

Lee Wallace Dean, B.S., M.D., 
Norm, Histology. 

Royal Winthrop Baldwin, D.D.S., 
Dental Technology. 

Frank Russell, M.S., Natural History 
Museum. 

Charles L. Smith, A.B., Botanical 
Museum. 

Charles Henry Bowman, B.Ph., 
Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, B.Ph., Pedagogy. 



W. J. Teeters, B.S., Chemistry. 

Edward S. Newton, A. B., Chemistry. 

A. E. Rogers, D.D.S., Dental 
Technology. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, Taxidermist. 

Adele Pauline Kimball, M.D., Ma- 
tron in Hospital. 

Lulu B. Jester, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

Georgia Knapp, Ph. G., Pharmacy. 

Jonathan G. Morner, LL.B., Law 
Librarian. 

H. C. Smith, M.D., Anatomy. 

C. H. Wright, M.D., Librarian Med. 
Dept. 

W. L. Heorst, B.Ph., Anatomy. 

J. G. McAlvin, Anatomy. 

Ralph W. Homan,M.D., Ophthalmol. 

Fred J. Becker, M.D., Surgery. 

William O. Sherman, M.D., Surgeon. 

A. E. Rogers, D.D.S., Dental 
Technology. 

W. G. Clark, D.D.S., Dental Tech. 

Frank B. James, Dental Tech. 

Henry Erdman Radasch, B.S., Chem. 
Laboratory. 

Samuel Crozier Irving, A.M., Eng. 



STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. 
Hohokeii, N.J. Men. , Noil- Sectarian. 



Income, 

$34,500 



Students, 
264 



Instructors, 
21 



Buildings, 



Books, 
8,800 



The institute was founded in 187 1, aftci Edward A. Stevens in 
1867 had given a block of land with $150,000 for buildings, and an 
endowment fund of $450,000. Since 1881 more than $50,000 has 
been added. The school is governed by eleven trustees. 

Admission is by examination only. The courses of study are such 
as to fit the students for mechanical engineering. The time devoted 
to shop work by each student must aggregate 481 hours. The degree 
is M.E. Tuition for the year, lasting from September 27 to June 21, 
is $150, in addition to which students from other States must pay $75. 
Nine scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are available and a trust 
fund of $11,000, the income of which is devoted to aid poor students, 
has been established. Inspection tours to various manufacturing 
centres of the East are annually undertaken. 

Among the numerous societies, is an Engineers' Club, Christian 
Association, Alumni Association, and Athletic Association, v/ith 
football, baseball, lacrosse and track teams. Chapters of the follow- 
ing fraternities have been organized: E, 1S74; A T A, A 5 X, and 
Ben, 1S75; A T Ci, iS8r ; 2 X, 1883 ; X 11, 1883; and X *, 1883. 



282 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



The students publish the " Eccentric," " Bolt," and ** Link," and other 
publications. 

The graduates number more than 600, of whom 560 are living. 
The oldest of these is J. A. Henderson, 1873, o^ Lamont, Pa. 



Faculty. 



Henry Morton, Ph.D., President. 

Alfred M. Mayer, Plr.D., Physics. 

De Volson Wood, A.M., C.E., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

J. Burkitt Webb, C.E., Mathematics 
and Mechanics. 

Charles W. MacCord, A.M., Sc.D., 
Mechanical Drawing. 

Albert R. Leeds, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Charles F. Kroeh, A.M., Languages. 

Rev. Edw. Wall, A.M., Belles-Lettres. 

Coleman Sellers, E.D., Engineering 
Practice. 

Jas. E. Denton, M.E., Experimental 
Mechanics. 

William E. Geyer, Ph.D., Apphed 
Electricity. 



Thos. B. Stillman, Ph.D., Analytical 

Chemistry. 
Adam Riesenberger, M.E., Mechanical 

Drawing. 
William H. Bristol, M.E., Math. 
D. S. Jacobus, M.E., Experimental 

Mechanics. 
Samuel D. Graydon, M.E., Mechani- 
cal Drawing. 
Robert M. Anderson, M.E., Apphed 

Mathematics. 
George L. Manning, M.E., Physics 

and Chemistry. 
Harry D. King, M.E., Mechanical 

Drawing. 
Horace S. Verley, Applied Electricity. 
Matthew Lackland, Work Shops. 



ST. BENEDICT'S COLLEGE. 

Atchirf^son^ Kan. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
162 



Instructors, 
26 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
12,300 



The college was founded in 1858, on grounds of thirty acres. It 
is managed by Benedictine Friars, who also constitute the Faculty. 
Besides its collegiate and academical departments it has a depart- 
ment for ecclesiastical training. Admission is on certificate and by 
examination. The degrees are B.A., and A.M., the latter after two 
years of post-graduate study. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from the first Monday of September to the last Wednesday in June, 
are $200. Medals, premiums and honors are distributed for excel- 
lence in study in all the departments. 

A gymnasium and play grounds have been recently equipped. 
There is a museum rich in specimens of natural history and an 
unusually complete herbarium. The students maintain a Philomathic 
and Library Association, Shakespeare Club, Choir, Band and other 
musical associations as well as an Athletic Association ; and publish 
the " Student." 

Faculty. 



Rt. Rev. Innocent Wolf, President. 
Gerard Heinz, Classical. 
Andrew Green, Logic and Music. 
Peter Kassens, Commercial. 



Dennis Murphy, Preparatory. 
Louis Flick, Mathematics, 
Leo Aaron, Secretary, Chemistry. 
Edwin Kassens, Preparatory. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



283 



Marian Beyerl, Hebrew. 

Stanislaus Altmann, Men. Philosophy. 

Aloysius Bradley, Oratory and Lit. 

Philip Williams, Elocution. 

Raphael Weiffenbach, German. 

Odilo Otott, Latin. 

Adalbert Blahnik, Mathematics. 

Benno Feser, German. 

Mathias Stein, Minim Preparatory. 

Francis McDonald, Rhetoric. 



Anthony Baar, German. 
Hilary Rosenfeld, German. 
Celestine Sullivan, History. 
Benedict Kappler, Piano. 
Lawrence Theis, Instrumental Music. 
Robert Nolan, Fourth Classical. 
Fabian Stindel, History. 
Ignatius Stein, Elocution. 
Martin Veth, Second Latin. 
George Keim, German and Piano. 



ST. CHARLES' COLLEGE. 

Ellicott City, Md. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
2^0 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1 5,000 



The college was founded in 1830 by Charles Carroll, who stipulated 
that its principal object would be to train students for the priesthood. 
Besides conveying to it 250 acres of land, he gave $5,000. The 
corner-stone was laid in i83i,but the school did not become a college 
until 1848, when the buildings were completed and the first president, 
Rev. O. L. Jenkins, assumed charge. Since that time the presidents 
have been, S. Ferte, D.D., Rev. P. P. Denis, and the Rev. F. L. M. 
Durant, D.D. In all more than 700 graduates have been ordained. 

The college, which is under the control of five trustees, is con- 
nected with St. Mary's University of Baltimore. Admission is by 
examination. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, but not so gym- 
nastic drill. Though negroes are not formally excluded, they are 
nevertheless not admitted to the college. The degrees are B.A., 
A.M., and B.D. The expenses for the year, lasting from the middle 
of September to June 25, are $200. More than fifty premiums are 
annually distributed. The students maintain several societies, but 
no publications are issued by them. The graduates number more 
than 1,000, of whom more than 800 are living. 



Faculty. 



Rev. C. B. Rex, S.S., D.D., D.C.L., 

President. 
Rev. P. P. Denis, S.S., A.M., 

Emeritus. 
Rev. A. J. B. Vuibert, S.S. 

Prefect of Studies. 
Rev. A. P. Bernard, S.S., A.B. 

feet of Juniors. 
Rev. H. M. Chapuis, S.S. 

Rev. G. E. Viger. S.S., A.M, 

S. Guilbaud, S.S., A.M., Rev. 



Prest. 



A.M., 

Pre- 

A.M., 
,Rev. 
A.S. 



Fonteneau, S.S., A.M., Rev. C. B. 
Schrantz, S.S., A.M., Rev. P. F. 
Roux. S.S., A.M., Pev. C. J. Judge, 
S.S., A.M., Rev. J. M. Haug, S.S., 
S.T.B., Rev. J. V. Tabb, A.M., 
Rev. F. X. McKenny, S.S., A.M., 
Rev. C. D. Hogue, S.S., A.M., Rev. 
A. M. Peltier, S.S., A.B., D.C.L., 
Rev. D. P. Duffy, S.S., A.M., 
S.T.L., M. W. Kellogg, A.M., In- 
structors. 



284 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Men. Catholic. 



Tncomh, 



Students, 
203 



Instructors, 
22 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
2,500 



The school, which was opened in 1859, was chartered as a college 
in 1868. The trustees number twelve. Admission is by examination. 
The degrees are A.B , B.S., A.M., and M.S., with diplomas for com- 
mercial students. The students are forbidden to leave the college 
premises without permission, are forbidden to smoke or to introduce 
irreligious books, and must be ready to submit their correspondence 
and the contents of their trunks and bags to the inspection of the pres- 
ident. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the 
year are $250. Eighteen medals, two of which are gold, are annually 
awarded for elocution and proficiency in study. The societies are 
the Alumni, Jerome Club, Literary Union, Debating Society, Ath- 
letic Club, Glee Club and Choir with numerous religious organiza- 
tions. The graduates number 250. 



Faculty. 



Brother Jerome, O.S.F., President, 
Prefect. 

Brother Paul, O.S.F., Vice-President, 
Physics. 

Brother Stanislaus, O.S.F., Second 
Preparatory. 

Brother Ivo, O.S.F., Ph.D., Logic. 

Brother John, O.S.F., Drawing and 
Painting. 

Brother Joseph, O.S.F., Assist. Prefect. 

Brother Caniillus, O.S.F., Treasurer. 

Daniel D. Donelan, Ph.D., Chem. 

Brotlier Damian, O.S.F., Civil Gov- 
ernment. 

Brother Linus, O.S.F., Third Com- 
mercial. 

Brother Luke, English and Physics. 



Brother Lawrence, O.S.F., Fourth 
Commercial. 

James W. Donelan, Latin and Greek. 

Brother Anthony, O.S.F., First Pri- 
mary. 

Brother Jarlath, O.S.F., Drawing. 

Brother Aquinas, O.S.F., Third Pri- 
mary. 

Brother Matthew, O.S.F., Fourth 
Primary. 

Lorenzo Renz, Vocal Music. 

Thos. J . Flynn, A.M., Instrum. Music. 

Francis Muller, German. 

P. S. M. Munro, Elocution. 

William J. Callan. M.D., A.M., Ora- 
tory and Physiology. 

Sergt. James Carroll, Military Tactics. 



ST. FRANCIS SOLANUS COLLEGE. 

Quincy, III. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
iSi 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



The college embraces three departments : the classical, commer- 
cial, and preparatory. Admission is on certificate. The degrees are 
A.B. and M.Acc. The expenses for ten months are $340. The stu- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



285 



dents maintain four sodalities, and the St. Francis and Literary 
Debating Societies. St. Mary's Institute for Women is conducted 
by the same administration. 

Faculty. 



Rev. P. Nicholas Leonard, O.S.F,, 

Rector. 
Rev. P. Peter Wallischeck, O.S.F., 

Vice-Rector. 
Rev P. Samuel Macke, O.S.F., Rev. 

P. Raphael Fuhr, O.S.F., Rev. P. 

Godfrey Hoelters, O.S.F., Rev. P. 



Stephen Scholz, O.S.F., Rev. 
P. Fortunatus Hausser, O.S.F., 
Rev. P. Alphonse Bergener, O.S.F., 
Rev. P. Theophilus Richardt, 
O.S.F., William ThTipe, A.M., John 
Schuman, Mathias Hecker, Michael 
Kelleher, Professors. 



ST. FRANCIS XAVIER COLLEGE. 

Nex& York City. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 

$28,000 



Students, 
900 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
25,000 



The college began in 1683 as a Jesuit Latin School, near Bowling 
Green. In 1809, its successor, the Literary Institute, was established 
near the present Catholic cathedral on Fifth Avenue. The school 
became a college in 1847, and was chartered as such in 1861. 

The institution is governed by eleven trustees. Admission is by 
examination only. The college course, leading to the degree of A.B., 
comprises philosophy, rhetoric, literature, and the classics, the latter 
being studied as an aid to English. Many post-graduate courses are 
offered. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from the first week in September to the last week of 
June, are from $75 to $100, exclusive of board. Twenty-four scholar- 
ships, on the income of $1,500 each, are available. Besides eight 
gold medals and an alumni prize of $50 for excellence in study, 
numerous prizes and medals are offered. 

The main building, which adjoins the Church of St. Francis Xavier, 
the best example of the Rococo style in New York, is on West 
Eleventh Street, near Sixth Avenue. The school has a well-equipped 
museum, and a herbarium containing some 25,000 specimens, which 
are in the main duplicates of those contained in the Smithsonian 
Institute of Washington. The students maintain a Dramatic Club, 
whose performances of classical plays are famous throughout New 
York, an Ethical Society, Alumni Sodality, Debating Club, Junior 
Debating Society, and Military Organization, together with musical, 
religious, and other clubs. 

Of the 670 graduates, some 550 are living. The oldest of these is 
the Rev. Thomas Killeen, 1855, of Bayonne, N. J. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Thomas E. Murphy, President. 
Edward P. Spillane, Librarian. 
Patrick A. Halpin, Mental Philosophy. 
Micloael H. O'Brien, Men. Philosophy. 



John F. X. O'Connor. Rhetoric. 
William Brosnan, Chemistry. 
David H. Buel, Astronomy. 
John C. Keveny, Special Classics. 



286 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



Edward X. Fink, Preparatory Dept. 
John B. Young, Choir Master. 
B, Emil A, Kisler, Drawing. 
Richard Magee, Penmanship. 
P. J. M. Munro, Elocution, 
Maurice Ronayne, Evid. of Religion. 
Martin J. HoUohan, Belles-Lettres. 
Joseph V. Schmidt, Joseph M. Stadel- 

man. Classics. 
Eugene Ryan, Asst. Prefect Discipline. 



Wm. S. Singleton, First Grammar. 
Lalor R. McLaughlin, First Grammar, 

Librarian. 
Martin E.Scott, David H. Roach, Thos. 

J. F. Barrett, Second Grammar. 
John Lunny, Francis de S. Howie, 

Charles E. Lane, Philip J. Reilly, 

A.M., Third Grammar. 
Capt. John Drum, U.S.A., Military 

Science. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. 

Annapolis, Md. Me7i. Presbytej-ian. 



Income, 
^22,000 



Students, 
270 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 



Books, 
8,000 



The first foundation of this school dates back two centuries. 
King William's School, the predecessor of this college, was founded 
in 1696, and existed as such until 1788. In 1784 it obtained a college 
charter, and began its collegiate existence in 1789. During the Civil 
War this college, like so many other Southern schools, suspended 
instruction. The presidents have been: J. McDowell, LL.D., 1790; 
Bethel Judd, D.D., 1807; H. Lyon Davis, D.D., 1820; W. Raffertv, 
D.D., 1824, H. Humphreys, D.D., 1831 ; C.-K. Nelson. D.D., 1857- 
1861; Henry Barnard, LL.D., 1866; J. C. W^elling, LL.D., 1867; 
J. M. Gamett, LL.D., 1870; J. McDowell Leavitt, D.D., 1880; W. 
H. Hopkins, Ph.D., 1884; Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., since 1886. 

The college is governed by thirty-two governors and visitors. 
Admission is by examination. Four parallel courses: the classical, 
Latin-scientific, and engineering, lead to degrees of A.B., and B.S. 
The degree of A.M. is conferred after one year of graduate study. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 20 to June 27, 
are $260. The State provides scholarships for one student from 
each senatorial district, twenty-six in all, while fifteen Annapolis 
scholarships and others for ministerial students have been provided. 
Attendance at chapel, gymnastic exercise, and military drill is 
compulsory. 

The students maintain the Philokalian and Philomathean literary 
societies, a Christian Association, and an Athletic Association, with 
football, baseball, and track teams. The graduates since 1793 num- 
ber more than 500, of whom William Horwood, A.M., 1827 of 
Annapolis is the oldest. 

Faculty. 



Thomas Fell, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 
President, Philosophy and Classics. 

James W. Cain, A.M., Political and 
Social Science. 

John L. Chew, A.M., Mathematics. 



Ellwood W. Evans, U.S.A., Military 

Science and Constitutional Law. 
John D. Epes, B.A., English. 
A. M. Soho, B.A., Greek. 
W. N, Berkeley, Chemistry. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



287 



Joseph R. Wilmer, B.A., Physics. 
Edwin D. Pusey, A.M., German, Latin. 
Rev. W. S. T. Deavor, Ph.D., Math. 
Francis E. Daniels, A.M., Botany and 
Biology. 



James D. Todd, Oratory, Elocution. 

T. Leverett Brewer, B.S., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Joseph R. Wilmer, U.S.N. A., In- 
structor of Naval Candidates. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. 

Fordham, N. Y. City. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 
^141,000 



Students, 
250 



Instructors, 
25 



Buildings, 



Books, 
37,000 



The college was founded by Archbishop Hughes in 1S41, and in- 
corporated in 1S46, when it was transferred to the Jesuit Fathers. 
The presidents have been, Cardinal McCloskey, Rev. John B. Harley, 
Archbishop Bayley, Father Thebaud, Rev. John Larkin, Rev. Remi- 
gius Tellier, Rev. Edward Doucet, Father Moylan, Rev. Joseph Shea, 
Father Gocklen, Rev. P. F. Dealy, Rev. Thomas Campbel, Father 
Scully, and Rev. Thomas J. Gannon. 

The college occupies a site of seventy-five acres on the old Rose 
Hill estate, adjoining Bronx Park. It is governed by nine trustees. 
Admission is by examination. Of the course of seven years, the 
first three are preparatory, while the remaining four years are de- 
voted to collegiate and university instruction, leading to the degree 
of B.A., and that of A.M. after two further years. Attendance at 
chapel, confession, mass, etc., is compulsory^ The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 4 to June 24, are $270, of which $60 are 
for tuition. Nearly one hundred prizes of from ^10 to ^50, together 
with gold medals and a large number of other medals and premiums, 
are annually distributed. 

Of the societies the Parthenian Sodality, dating back to 1837, is 
the oldest. The Sodality of Holy Angels was organized in 1847, 
followed by the St. John's Debating Society in 1854, afterward 
changing into the House of Commons ; the Historical Association 
in 1862. Previous to this an Alumni Society and Dramatic Club had 
been organized. Among the papers published have been the 
"Fordham Monthly" "Goose Quill," " Sem," "Collegian," and 
" Spy." Of the 700 graduates the oldest is the Rev. Patrick Mc- 
Govern, 1848, of Croton-on-Hudson. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Thos. J. Gannon, S.J., President. 

Rev. John F. Quirk, S.J., Vice- 
President, Prefect of Studies, etc. 

Rev. Ignatius Kenaud, S. J., Treasurer. 

Rev. Michael Flynn, S.J., History. 

Rev. Louis Jouin, S.J., Ethics. 

Rev. Patrick O'Reilly, S. J., Philosophy 
and Evidences of Religion. 



Rev. Michael J. Hughes, S.J., Me- 
chanics and Higher Mathematics. 
J. Barry Smith, S.J., Physics, Chem. 
Rev. Patrick Quill, S.J., Rhetoric. 
Rev. John C. Hart, S.J., Poetry. 
Rev. John Fox, S.J., Chemistry. 
Thomas E. O'Shea, Arithmetic. 
M. J. Mahoney, S.J., First Grammar. 



288 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Lieut. Granger Adams, U.S.A., Mili- 
tary Tactics. 

John J. Neary, S.J., Second Grammar. 

Albert G. Brown, S.J., Elocution. 

J. C. Harmon, S.J., Third Grammar. 

John H. Mulligan, S.J., John P. M. 
Walsh, S.J., Rudiments. 



Romuald M, Echeverria, S.J., Math. 
Eugene de L. McDonnell, S.J., Geome- 
try, Director of Music. 
Maurice E. Prendergast, S.J., Algebra. 
Daniel R. Kieran, A.B., Arithmetic. 
Rev. George Petit, S.J. 



ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. 

Waskmsrton, D. C. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 



Instructors, 
10 



Buildings, 



Books, 
1,500 



The college was founded in 1866 on a site near Thomas Circle. 
It is conducted by the Brothers of Christian Schools, and consists of 
three departments : the collegiate, academic, and primary. Special 
attention is given to English. Attendance at chapel, communion, 
etc., is compulsory only for Catholics. Tuition for the year, lasting 
from September 9 to June 22, is $60. In addition to this special 
fees of $2 and $5 for the use of the lil:»rary and of chemicals, with a 
diploma fee of $10. A large number of gold and other medals are 
annually distnbuted for excellence in study. The students maintain 
several religious sodalities, oratorical associations, and a Dramatic 
Club. The oldest graduate is the Hon. N. Schulties, 1872, of 
"Washington, D. C. Rev. Br. Fabrisian is the president. 

{Further information lacking.) 



ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY. 

Collegeville, Minn. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
256 



Instructors, 
23 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
10,000 



The college was founded in 1857 on a territorial charter. In 
1869 it was empowered to confer degrees, and in 1883 the present 
name was assumed. The presidents since 1857 have been, Very Rev. 
Fathers Demetrius de Marogna, Cornelius Wittmann, Benedict 
Haindl, Othmar Wirz, Wolfgang Northman, Bishop Rupert Seiden- 
busch. Right Rev. Alexius Edelhrock, and the Right Rev. Bernard 
Locnikar, and the present president, the Right Rev. Abbot Peter 
Engel, who was elected in 1894. 

Admission is by examination. Degrees of A B., B.Ph., and M.Acc. 
are given, with that of A.M. after post-graduate study. The expenses 
for the year, from September 4 to June 24, are $200. Nine medals 
and many premiums are given for excellence in study. The societies 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



289 



are the St. Boniface, Elexian, Thespian, Reading Association, Choir, 
and College Band. The graduates number moie tham 700. 

Faculty [all O.S.B.'s). 



Rt. Rev. Peter Engel, Ph.D., President. 
Rev, Alexius Hoffmann, Greek, etc. 
Michael Ott, Ph.D., Philosophy, etc. 
Herman Bergmann, Latin. 
Placidus Wingerter, German Lit., etc. 
Francis Mershraan, D.D., 'theology. 
Stanislaus Preiser, Sacred Liturgy. 
Norbert Hofbauer, Commercial Dept. 
John Katzner, Director of Music. 
Isidore Siegler, German. 
Adrian Schmitt, Anatomy. 
Athanasius Mayer, Mathematics. 
Agatho Gehret, Physics. 
Philip Bahner, Penmanship. 
Justin Welz, Arithmetic. 
Charles Cannon, Rhetoric. 
Otto Weisser, Harmony. 



Fidelis Lucking, German. 
Bernard Kevenhoerster, Rhetoric. 
Alto Walter, German. 
Ulric Scheffold, Law, etc. 
Leonard Kepsner, Latin. 
Anselm Ortmann, French. 
Pius Kraker. German. 
Cyril Zenisek, Arithmetic. 
Method Vones, Polish. 
Louis Traufler, English. 
Felix Nelles, Grammar. 
Adolph Dingmann, Geometry. 
Lambert Thelen, Latin. 
Kilian Heid, Arithmetic. 
Edmund Bosel, Grammar. 
Memord Seifermann, Geography. 



ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY. 

Canton, A^. Y. Co-Educational. Universalist. 



Income, 
^20,773 



Students, 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
11,500 



The college was chartered in 1856, after a State Convention of the 
Universalists of New York. The presidents have been : John Steb- 
bins Lee, D.D., acting, 1S59-1868 ; Richmond Fisk, D.D., 1868-1872; 
Absalom Graves Gaines, D.D., LL.D., 1872-188S; Alpheus Baker 
Hervey, Ph.D., 18S8 to the present; and of the Theological School: 
Ebenezer Fisher, D.D., 1S57-1879; Isaac Morgan Atwood, D.D., 
1879 to the present time. The trustees number nineteen. 

Admission is on certificate of the State Board and on high school 
certificates. Negroes are not excluded. Attendance at chapel is 
compulsory. The degrees are A.B., B S., and B.Ph., with that of 
A.M. after three years of graduate study. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from September 30 to June 28, are $175. Twenty-six 
scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are available. 

The college grounds cover twenty acres. The students publish 
the " Laurentian," a monthly, and the " Gridiron," and maintain the 
following societies : Philomathesian, Philomathean, Press Associa- 
tion, Pauline Brotherhood, eating clubs. Christian Association, and 
Athletic Association v.ith teams and clubs. Chapters of the follow- 
ing fraternities have been organized: A 2 X, B 11,1875; K K r, 
1879; A T n, 1S82; A r, 1884-1S87, and AAA. 

Of the 575 graduates, some 525 are living. The oldest is the Hon. 
Delos McCurdy, 1865, of New York. 



290 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



Rev, Alpheus Baker Hervey, Ph.D., 
President, Natural Science. 

Rev. Isaac Morgan Atwood, D.D., 
Theology and Jithics. 

Rev. John Stebbhis Lee, D.D., Eccle- 
siastical History and Archaeology. 

Rev. Absalom Graves Gaines, D.D., 
LL.D., Philosophy and Economy. 

Charles Kelsey Gaines, Ph.D., Libra- 
rian, Greek and English. 

Rev. Henry Prentiss Forbes, D.D., 
Biblical Literature, Librarian Theo- 
logical School. 



Henri Hermann Liotard, M.A., Ger- 
man and French. 

Henry Priest, M.A., Mathematics. 

Rev. Lewis Beals Fisher, Pastoral 
Theology. 

Rev. John Coleman Adams, D.D., 
Preaching. 

Rev. Edward Cortland Belles, Ph.D., 
D.D., Preaching. 

George Robert Hardie, M.A., Latin. 

Ceylon Samuel Kingston, B.A., Math. 

Campbellina Pendleton Gaines, M.A., 
English. 



ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY. 

St. Louis, Mo. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
304 



Instructors, 
18 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
43,000 



This institution, founded in 1829, was incorporated in 1832. In 
1888 it was moved from Washington Avenue to its present site. The 
government is vested in five trustees. Collegiate and academic 
courses lead to degrees of A.B., with A.M. after one year, and Ph.D. 
after two years of post-graduate study. Attendance at chapel is com- 
pulsory. Tuition for the year, lasting from the first week of Sep- 
tember to the last week of June, is ^75. Nine gold medals are given 
for excellence in English, with numerous other medals for other 
studies. 

The Philalethic Society dates from 1832. The students' Library 
Association has accumulated four thousand volumes. Of the 1,022 
graduates, some 700 are living. The oldest of these is Valsin DuPui, 
1838, of Iberville, Ind. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Francis B. Cassilly, S.J., Phi- 
losophy and Religion. 

Rev. Thomas F. Treacy, S.J., Astron- 
omy and Mathematics. 

Rev. Hubert D. Gartland, S. J., Physics 
and Chemistry. 

John P. Coony, S.J., Special Science. 

Rev. Michael Eicher, S.J., Rhetoric, 
German, and Elocution. 

Rev. John A. Gonser, S.J., Poetry and 
Vocal Music. 

Peter G. O'Donnell, S.J., Humanities 
and Elocution. 



Alex. Dreane, S.J., Special, French. 

Joseph H. Dickhaus, S.J., First Aca- 
demic, German and Elocution. 

Lieut. D. D. Johnson, U.S.A., Mili- 
tary Science. 

Thomas A. Healy, Penmanship. 

Edward S. Bergen, S.J., Second Aca- 
demic, Elocution. 

Richard D. Slevin, S.J., Third Aca- 
demic. Elocution. 

Albert Gilbert. S.J., Second Academic. 

John M. Flynn, A.B., Third Aca- 
demic. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



291 



ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. 

St. Marfs, Kan. Men. 



Catholic. 



Income, 
$30,000 



Students, 
207 



Instructors, 
32 



Buildings, 



Books, 
15,000 



The college was chartered in 1869. It is governed by five trustees. 
The classical and commercial course leads to the degree of A.B., 
and that of A.M., after graduate study. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from the first week in September to the last week of June, 
are $200. Eighteen gold medals and many premiums are annually 
distributed. The students publish the "Dial," and maintain the 
Philolethian, Philharmonic, and junior literary societies, with an 
Athletic Association and a billiard room. The graduates number 
nearly 200, of whom 175 are living. The oldest of these is the Rev. 
Richard Dunne, 1882, of Oak Park, 111. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Edw. A. Higgins, S.J.; President. 

Rev. James McCabe, S.J., Studies and 
Discipline. 

Rev, John B. Kokenge, S.J., Philoso- 
phy and Calculus. 

John J, Driscoll, S,J,, Sciences, Math. 

Rev. Francis J. Finn, S,J., Rhetoric. 

Thomas A. O'Malley, S.J., Poetry. 

Matthew H. Germing, S.J., Humani- 
ties and German. 

Thos. W. Smith, S.J., First Academic, 

Adolph J, Kuhlman, S.J., First Aca- 
demic, German and Elecution. 

Joseph P. Conroy, S.J., Second Aca- 
demic, Elocution, 

Wm. P. Lyons, S.J. , Third Academic. 

Rev. J. J, Donoher, S.J,, Special Latin. 



Thos. F. Wallace, S.J., First Commer- 
cial, Penmanship and Elocution. 

Henry G. Hains, A.M., First and 
Fourth Com,, Commercial Law, 

Alexander J. McKay, Second Commer- 
cial, Commercial Law. 

Henry W, Otting, S,J,, Third Com. 

Thos, A. McNeive, S.J., Third Com- 
mercial, Arithmetic, Penmanship. 

George C. Markle, Fourth Commer- 
cial, Typewriting. 

Simon A. Ryan, S.J., English, Latin, 
and Elocution, 

Rev, Peter A. Nogues, S.J,, French. 

Thos, A, Smalley, S.J., Elocution. 

S. M, Ledochowski, A,M,, Piano. 

John CNeill, Doc.Mus,, Violm, etc. 



ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. 



St. Mary's, Ky. 


Men. 


Catholic. 


Income, 

$17,000 


Students, 

"5 


Instructors, 
12 


Buildings, 

3 


Books, 
4,000 



The school was founded by Rev. William Byrne, the first presi- 
dent, in 1S21, and chartered as a college in 1837. The Jesuit order 
had charge from 1833 to 1846; the secular clergy of Louisville dio- 
cese from 1846 to 1869. The college was suspended from 1869 to 
1 87 1 on account of financial embarrassment after the war. From 
187 1 to 1896 the Congregation of the Resurrection has had charge. 
The main building of the college burned down, once in the first 
decade and again shortly before the war. The trustees number four. 



292 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Admission is by examination and upon certificate. Negroes are 
excluded. Attendance at chapel and at military drill is compulsory. 
Courses in the classics, sciences, and commercial branches lead to 
degrees of A.B., B.S., and that of A.M., after one year's graduate 
study. The expenses for the year, lasting from the first Wednesday 
in September to the last Wednesday in June, are $200. The grounds 
cover five hundred acres. 

The students publish the " Monthly Sentinel," and maintain literary, 
debating, declamatory, and dramatic clubs, an Athletic Association, 
and a battalion. The graduates since 1874 number 150. The old- 
est of these is Samuel Spalding, 1S28, of Lebanon, Ky. 



Faculty. 



Rev. D. Fennessy, President, Modern 

Languages. 
John Fehrenbach, D.D., Theology. 
John L. Steffan, Ph.D., Philosophy. 
Rev. Andrew Spetz, Religion. 
John Kosinski, Classics. 
Rev. Eugene Crane, A.M., Classics, 

History, and Enghsh. 



J. A. Timmons, A.M., Mathematics. 
A. F. Didier, Science and Civics. 
Edgar Bourget, Music. 
Charles Degnan, English. 
John L. Seidl, Book-keeping. 
P. J. Kirwin, Arithmetic. 
Richard A. McGary, Shorthand. 
Lawrence J. Timmons, Brass Band. 



ST. OLAF COLLEGE. 

Northfield, Minn. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 

$8,991 



Students, 
122 



Instructors, 
ID 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
1,200 



St. Olaf School was incorporated in 1874 with the Rev. T. H. N. 
Mahin as principal. In 1876 it was made a college, and in 1886 a 
divinity school was added. The school is governed by thirty-five 
trustees. The object of the school is to give instruction to Scandi- 
navians, and special attention, therefore, is given to English, Nor- 
wegian, and German. Degrees of B.A., and B.S. are conferred. 
The expenses for the year, lasting from September 9 to June 16, 
are $125. Tuition is free, but incidental charges of $10, and for 
laboratory fees and musical instruction are made. Attendance at 
chapel, though not compulsory, is expected of all. Students are 
forbidden to smoke, to play cards, or to visit saloons or billiard 
rooms. They publish the " Manitou Messenger," and maintain the 
Manitou Debating Club, Utile Dulci, Sarnfund, a Norwegian Soci- 
ety, and a chapter of A B X. The graduates number thirty, of whom 
C." J. Rollefson, 1890, of Northfield, Minn., is the oldest. 

Faculty. 
Rev. Thorbjorn N. Mohn, President, Andrew Fossum, Ph.D., Greek and 

R.."]iq,ion. Enfflisii. Hist,. Norwefjian. French. 
Rev. Ole G. Felland, A.M . Librarian, Carl J. Rollefson, A.B., Math.. Chem. 

German, Hebr-'w, and I?otany. Ole O. Fii£;leskjel, A.B., Arithmetic, 

Haror T. \'tterboe, A B., Treasurer English, and History. 

and Registrar. I Marie Krohn, English. 

Rev. Olav Lee, A.B., Latin. ' Mathilda Finseth, Piano. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



293 



ST. PAUL'S COLLEGE. 
4$"/. Paul Park, Minn. Co- Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
^3,426 



Students, 

87 



Instructors, 
7 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
943 



The college was founded in 1889, on a site of thirteen acres, ten 
miles south of St. Paul City. The trustees number twenty-one. 
Admission is upon certificate. Degrees of A.B, and B.S. are con- 
ferred. Tuition for the year, lasting from September 17 to June 11, 
is $34. The students maintain two literary societies. 



Faculty. 



Rev. C. W. Hertzler, A.B., President, 
Theology and Book-keeping. 

Rev. W. F. Finke, A.M., Vice-Pres., 
English and History. 

Rev. Th. Rodemeyer, A.M., Ph.D., 
German, Latin, and Greek. 



H. J. Hoffert, B.S., Mathematics and 

Natural Science. 
Lulu Belden, Piano and Organ. 
Lizzie Noltemeier, Painting. Drawing. 
Eva M. Alcott, Vocal Culture. 
Edward C. Nippolt, Violin. 



Annandale, N. Y. 


Men. 


Ep 


iscopal. 


Income, 


Students, 
67 


Instructors, 
7 


Buildings, 
6 


Books, 
I2,OCO 





The school was established in 1861 on a site covering thirty acres 
of ground. The trustees number twenty-four. Admission is on cer- 
tificate. The courses of instruction, which are designed to fit stu- 
dents for the study of divinity, lead to the degree of A.B. The 
expenses for the year, lasting from September 11 to June 13, are $225. 
Prizes of from $25 to $100 are annually distributed, and thirty-seven 
scholarships, yielding incomes from $125 to $250, are available. The 
Eudoxian, Kappa Gamma Chi, and Sigma Phi are societies organ- 
ized for declamation and debate, and a Missionary Society is also 
maintained. 

Faculty. 



Rev. Robert B. Fairbairn, D.D., 
LL.D., Moral Philosophy, Logic, 
and Metaphysics. 

Rev. George B. Hopson, D.D., Latin. 

Rev. Wm. W. Olssen, D.D., Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy. 

J. C. Robertson, M.A., Ph.D., Greek. 

Bertrand C. Hinman, M.A., Chem. 



Chas. Howard Malcom, M.A., D.D., 

History and English. 
Rev. W. H. Pearson, B.A., B.D., 

Greek and German. 
W. George W. Anthony, M.A., Latin 

and Mathematics. 
S. W. Linsley, C. L. Wheeler, 

Librarians. 



294 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ST. VIATEUR'S COLLEGE. 



Bourbonnais, III. 



Men. 



Catholic. 



The school was founded in 1865, and became a college in 1S74. 
It is situated in Kankakee County, some thirty miles from Chicago, 
in close vicinity to Notre Dame, a Catholic college for women. 
The trustees number four. The expenses for the year, lasting from 
September 5 to the middle of June, are $200. A great number of 
prizes, medals, and honors are annually distributed in all courses. 
The students pubHsh the " Viatorian Journal," and maintain a Debat- 
ing Society, Scientific Association, Acolytical Society, Orchestra and 
Glee Club, and an Athletic Association, with a Tennis Club, and 
baseball team. 

Faculty. 



Rev. M. J. Marsile, C.S.V., President, 

Belles-Lettres. 
J. J. Cregan, C.S.V., Vice-President, 

Director of Studies. 
Rev. J. E. Laberge, D.D., Philosophy. 
Rev. G. M. Legris, A.M., Moral 

Theology. 
Rev. T.J. McCormick, Rhetoric, Latin. 
Rev. J. L. Seguin, C.S.V., A.M., 

Trigonometry. 
C.T. Morel, M.S., M.D., Sciences. 
Rev. L. A. Senecal, Treasurer. 
Rev. A. D. Mainville, Asst. Treasurer. 
Rev. J. F. Ryan, Greek. 
Rev. P. Desjardins, Music. 
Rev. G. A. Williams, History. 
Rev. J. Leclair, Latin. 
Rev. M. Lennartz, Latin. 
Rev. J. Harkin, Book-keeping. 



Rev. J. Leduc, French. 

M. P. Sammon, Book-keeping, etc. 

J. B. Surprenant, Reading. 

P. Meehan, Grammar. 

M. Dermody, Minim Department. 

E. Harley, Algebra and Latin. 

M. Welter, German. 

B. King, Grammar and Latin. 

C. Feltes, Latin. 

C. Koch, Arithmetic. 
J. F. Hayden, History. 

J, Nawn, English Literature. 

D. Walsh, Reading. 
A. Michael, Discipline. 
J. V. Lamarre, History. 
H. Concannon, Grammar. 
James Brennan, Reading. 
G. Martineau, Violin. 

C. O'Reilly, Military Instructor. 



^ Q..<^55^^ ST. VINCENT COLLEGE. 

Westmoreland County, Pa. Afen. 



Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
283 



Instructors, 
30 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
12,000 



Founded in 1846, the college was authorized to confer degrees in 
1870. It is situated on grounds of twenty-five acres. The trustees 
number seven. Three courses, the classical, ecclesiastical, and com- 
mercial, lead to the degree of A.B., and to that of A.M., after two years 
of graduate study. A gymnasium building containing a stage, art 
gallery, and music rooms, has recently been erected. The expenses for 
the year, lasting from the first Thursday in September to June 22d, are 
$200. Besides three gold medals, premiums are annually distributed 
in all courses of study. 

The students maintain two literary societies, a debating and drama- 
tic association, a senior dramatic club, and four musical bands. The 
' Journal " is published monthly. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



295 



Faculty. 



Rev. Leander Schnerr, President. 

Rev. Vincent Huber, Vice-President, 
Dogmatic Theology. 

Thanasius Hintenach, Clerical Book- 
keeping. 

Raymond Daniel, Violin. 

Rev. Anthony Wirtner, Arithmetic. 

Rev. Anselm Soehnler, German Gram- 
mar. 

Rev. Jerome Schmitt, Latin. 

Rev. Julian Kilger, Moral Theology. 

Eustace Sonntag, Piano. 

Rev. Gregory Zeilenhofer, Latin. 

Rev. Edward Andelfinger, English, 
Rhetoric. 

Rev. Edgar Zuercher, Latin. 

Rev. Germain Ball, Secretary, Math. 

Rev. Raphael Wieland, Latin. 



Rev. Balduin Ambros, Hermeneutics, 

German, etc. 
Rev. Lawrence Haas, Law. 
Candidus Eichenlaub, Philosophy. 
Daniel Kaib, Commercial Class. 
Leo Eichenlaub, Elocution. 
Rev. Charles Lindner, Latin. 
Theophilus Plent, Natural Philosophy 

and Chemistry. 
Winfried Kallmannspuger, Element. 
Rev. Alexander Michaelis, Latin. 
Wolfgang Kolbeck, German. 
Maurus Hartmann, Vocal Music. 
Suitbert Rickert, Leonard Schlimm, 

and Gerard Bridge, German. 
Aurelius Stehle, Typewriting. 
Virgil Niesslein, Nat. Philosophy. 
Benedict Leckler, Drawing. 



ST. VINCENT'S COLLEGE. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



Men. 



Catholic. 



The college was founded in 1865, and in 1870 the present main 
building on the new grounds was completed. The government is vested 
in five trustees. Admission is by examination. The degree of A.B. 
is conferred after the curriculum has been passed, while that of A.M. 
is conferred after two years of resident graduate study. The expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 7 to June 23, are ^250. Five 
gold and silver medals are annually distributed. Among the socie- 
ties are the Alumni Association, the Lyceum, owning a library, 
several religious societies and an athletic association. The" Student " 

is published. ^ 

Faculty. 



Rev. A. J. Meyer, President, Elo- 
cution. 

Rev. M. Dyer, Logic, Mathematics. 

Rev. M. V. Richardson, Christian 
Doctrine, Spanish. 

Rev. F. X. Antill, Commercial Depart- 
ment. 



Rev. VV. J. Gorrell, Com. Department. 
Rev. D. J. Hurley, Classics. 
Rev. W. H. Musson, Math., English. 
Rev. J.J. Schlereth, Chemistry, Phys- 
ics. 
D. J. Healev, Rhetoric, History. 
T. W. Wilde, Music. 



STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. 

New Orleafis, La. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
563 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
2,000 



The college was organized nearly thirty years ago as the first school 
giving higher education to negroes. Since 1875 nearly two hundred 



296 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



students have been graduated. The trustees number fifteen. Admis- 
sion is by examination and certificate. Degrees are conferred in arts, 
law, and theology. The expenses for the college year, from October 
I to May 31, are ^100. 

Faculty. 



Oscar Atwood, A.M., President, Phi- 
losophy. 

Rev. George W. Henderson, A. M., 
Theology. 

Arthur C. Cole, A.B., Latin and 
Greek. 

Emily W. Nichols, Science. 

Mary W. Culver, Literature. 

Mrs. Edwin J. Pond, Margaret E. 
Reed, Mrs. L. St, J. Hitchcock, 
Mary D. Coghill, Anna M. Pad- 
dock, Piano and Organ. 

Nettie M. White, Vocal Music. 



George L. Dewey, Treasurer. 

Emerson C. Rose, Industrial. 

James D. Gordon, Printing. 

Mrs. George L. Dewey, Dressmaking. 

Jennie Fyfe, Principal. 

Carrie E. Hodgman, Belle C. Harri- 

man. Matrons. 
Emily W. Nichols, Librarian. 
Mrs. Edwin J. Pond, Asst. Librarian. 
Louise Denton, Deborah B, Johnson, 

Grace E, Hance, Jennie W. Mc- 

Kibban, Harriet M. Markham, 

Preparatory School. 



SWARTHMORE COLLEGE. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Co- Educational. 



Quaker. 



Income, 
^^85,000 



Students, 
176 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
16,500 



History: The college was founded in 1864 after one of the yearly 
meetings of the P>iends of New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. 
The presidents have been: Edward Parrish, 1869-1871 ; Edward H. 
Magill, 187T-1889; William Hyde Appleton, 1889-1891 ; and Charles 
De Garmo, the present incumbent, who was elected in 1891. In 1881 
a destructive fire caused the college to be transferred to Media, Pa., 
for one year. The trustees number thirty-two. Associated with them 
are women managers. 

Admission, Degrees, and Scholarships : Admission is by examination. 
The courses of study are advanced in their nature, and elective 
studies in increasing proportion are offered after the freshman year. 
Attendance at chapel and at gymnastic exercise is compulsory. The 
use of tobacco is strictly prohibited. The question whether negroes 
are to be admitted, has never been decided. The expenses for the 
year, lasting from October 20th till June 6, are $450, of which $200 is 
for tuition. Two fellowships, one of $525, and one of $450 are given 
for advanced study. The first of these is available for women only. 
Three scholarships, equivalent to board and tuition are available, 
beside ten freshman scholarships, yielding either $200 or $100 to 
resident or non-resident students. Beside these scholarships there 
is a trust fund, the income of which is devoted to aid deserving 
students. 

Equipment: The grounds cover sixty acres, of which five are in 
the campus. Among the buildings is the main college, a meeting- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



297 



house, science hall, gymnasium with athletic grounds, and an observa- 
tory. The museum contains collections of minerals, collected by 
Joseph Leidy, of comparative osteology, of stuffed birds, Alaskan 
Indian implements, of shells, and of stalactites. The Eckfeldt herba- 
rium contains more than 2,000 Pennsylvanian plants. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Phoenix," 
a bi-weekly, and the " Halcyon," a junior annual. The societies are: 
the Delphic, Eunomian, and Summerville literary societies, Leidy 
Scientific Association, Young Friends Association, Oratorical Union, 
Mandolin and Glee Clubs, and Athletic Association, with football, 
base ball and track teams, besides chapters of two fraternities : the 
K 2, 1888; and * K ^, 1889. The graduates since 1873, number more 
than 400. 

Faculty. 



Charles De Garmo, Ph.D., Presi- 
dent, Philosophy. 

Elizabeth Powell Bond, Dean. 

Edward H. Magill, A.M., LL.D., 
French. 

Arthur Beardsley, C.E., Ph.D., En- 
gineering. 

William Hyde Appleton, A.M., 
LL.B., Ph.D., Greek and Early 
English. 

Susan J. Cunningham, Sc.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

William Cathcart Day, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry. 

Spencer Trotter, M.D., Biology and 
Geology. 

George A Hoadley, C.E., A.M., 
Physics. 

Ferris W. Price, A.M., Latin. 



Marie A. Kemp Hoadley, A. M., 
German. 

Richard Jones, A.M., Ph.D.. English. 

William I. Hull, Ph.D., History and 
Civics. 

Myrtie E. Furman, M. O., Elocution. 

J. Russell Hayes, A.B., LL.B., Eng. 

Beatrice Magill, Painting. 

J. K. Shell, M.D., Physical Culture. 

Emily G. Hunt, M.D., Physiology 
and Hygiene. 

Joseph Bayley, Jr., Engineering. 

Henry V. Gummere, A.M., Math. 

Mary V. Mitchell Green, M.D., Phys- 
ical Culture. 

Marion Hunter, Physical Culture. 

William H. Adey, C.E., Engineering. 

Esther T. Moore, A.B., Registrar. 

Sarah M. Nowell, Librarian. 



SWEETWATER COLLEGE. 

Sweetwater, Tenn. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
86 



Instructors, 
6 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 



The college was founded in 1874. It is the only college in the 
State which is controlled by its alumni. The trustees number 
thirteen, and the visitors seven. Admission is upon certificate. The 
curriculum embraces courses in English, the Classics, History, Philo- 
sophy, Science and International Law. The degrees are B.A., and 
B.S. No student is allowed to change his place of boarding, leave 
town, or be out of his room after seven in the evening. The students' 
rooms are visited at all hours by members of the faculty, and any 
student found absent, or engaged in playing cards, or other '' disrepu- 



298 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



table conduct " is disciplined. All students are required every Mon- 
day to fill out the following blank : — 

I attended Sunday School at 

Church at 

And in the evening at 

I was at the opening and remained to the close. 

Name 

Attendance at military is likewise compulsory, as is the wearing of 
a uniform. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 2 to 
June 5, are ^iio, of which ^30 is for tuition. Sophomores and Fresh- 
men pay $2 less than Juniors and Seniors. Eleven cash prizes, from 
$5 to ;^io each, are offered for excellence in English and drill. The 
graduates since 1878 number 100. 



Faculty. 



Rev. J. Lynn Bachman, A.M., Pres- 
ident, Philosophy. 

Wm. A. McClain, A.B., English and 
Mathematics. 

Col. Sam. E. Young, Law. 



D. N. Bowder, A.M., M.D., Cham. 

J. H. Hardin, A.B., M. D., Physi- 
ology. 

Annie Lynn Bachman, Preparatory 
Branches. 



SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 

Syracuse^ N. Y. Co-Educatio^tal. 



Methodist. 



Income, 
^117,566 



Students, 
1,012 



Instructors, 
92 



Buildings, 

6 



Books, 
57.462 



The university was founded in 187 1, on a site overlooking the 
Onondaga Lake and Valley. It consists of colleges of Liberal Arts, 
of the Fine Arts, and of Medicine and Law. The trustees number 
forty-nine, of whom four are alumni. 

Admission is by examination and on certificates from seven speci- 
fied schools, as well as on regents' certificates for the subjects covered 
by them. The degrees are A.B., B.L., B.Ph., with degrees in Archi- 
tecture, Painting, Music, Laws, and Medicine. The master's degree 
is conferred after one year, and that of Ph.D. after two years of resi- 
dent graduate study. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. Tuition 
is from $75 to $120 for the year, lasting from September 22 to June 
J I. Forty-three scholarships, equivalent to tuition and more, are 
available. 

The property of the school is valued at $1, 800,000, with productive 
funds of $800,000. The library has recently been enriched by the 
famous historical collection of the late Von Ranke. Special libraries 
are owned by the colleges of Law and Medicine. The collection of 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



299 



Fine Arts is rich in portraits and landscapes. The university is one 
of the colleges supporting the school for classical study in Rome. 

Among the numerous societies are two Christian Associations, an 
Athletic Association, with football, base ball and other teams, and an 
Alumni Association. Among other publications the students publish 
the " Syracusan " and "Onondagan." The graduates number 1,650. 



Faculty. 



James R. Day, S.T.D., Chancellor. 
John R. French, LL.D., Mathematics. 
W. P. Coddington, S.T.D., Philoso- 
phy and Pedagogy. 
Frank Smalley, A.M. Ph.D., Latin. 
Eugene Haanel, Ph.D., F.R.S.C, 

Physics, Theistic Science. 
William H. Mace, A.M., History. 
Charles W. Hargitt, A.M., Ph.D., 

Biology. 
William G.Ward, A.M., English and 

Oratory. 
Henry A. Peck, A.M., Ph.D., Astron. 
Edgar A. Emens, A.M., Greek. 
Franklin J. Holzwarth, A.M., Ph.D., 

German. 
Ernest M. Pattee, M.S., Chemistry. 
Edgar Coit Morris, A.M., Rhetoric 

and English. 
Edmund Chase Quereau, Ph.B., Ph, 

M., Ph.D., Geology. 
John R. Commons, A.M., Sociology. 
Charles W. Cabeen, A.M., French. 
Rev. Adolph Guttman, D.D., Semitic. 
William H. Metzler, Ph.D., Math. 
Henry O. Sibley, Ph.D., Library 

Economics. 
Delmer E. Hawkins, A. B., Political 

Science. 
Evelyn Benedict Ayres, Elocution. 
William H. Jakway, B.S., Physics. 
Edward J. Redington, A.B., Latin. 
Ismar J. Peritz, A.M., Semitic Lan- 
guages. 
Jean Marie Richards, Lit. B., English. 
F. Ziah Lewis, A.B., Botany. 
Earl G. Burgh, B.S., Zoology. 
William B. Hodge, B.S., Physics. 
Charles H. Treadwell. B.S., Physics. 
Erwin H. Schuyler, B.S., Chemistry. 
J. A. R. Scott, Gymnasium. 
Minnie B. Woodworth, B.Ph., Gym- 
nasium. 
James M. Thoburn, D.D.. Mission. 
Leroy M. Vernon, A.M., S.T.D., 

Esthetics. 
George A. Parker, Mus.D., Piano 
and Organ. 



Ella L French, Mus. B., Piano. 

Luella M. Stewart, Painting. 

Ruth Elizabeth Guibault, Mus. B., 
Piano. 

Conrad L. Becker, Violin. 

William H. Berwald, Theory of Music. 

Unni Lund, Vocal Music. 

Adolf Frey, History of Music. 

Albert L. Brockway, Architecture. 

Jeannette Scott, Painting. 

Julie Heinbach Hine, German. 

Edwin H. Gaggin, B.Ar., Perspective. 

Miriam A. Guernsey, B.Ph., Music. 

Mary Sims Parker, Vocal Music. 

Gino Bardella, Painting. 

Torquato Di Felice, Painting. 

Alice J. Oliver, Vocal Music. 

Arthur Eltinge, Mus. B., Organ. 

Thomas Walker Gaggin, B. Ar., 
Architecture. 

Frederick William Revels, B.Ar., 
Perspective Geometry. 

Carl Tracey Hawley, B.P., Painting. 

Irene Sargent, French. 

N, Irving Hyatt, Theory of Music. 

Henry D. Didama, M.D., LL.D., 
Medicine. 

William T. Plant, M.D., Pediatrics. 

Alfred Mercer, M.D. State Medi- 
cine. 

Wm. Manlius Smith, A.M., M.D., 
Chemistry. 

John Vanduyn, A.M., M.D., Surgery. 

Gaylord P. Clark, A.M., M.D., Physi- 
ology. 

John L. Heffron, A.M., M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

Henry B. Allen, M.D., Obstetrics. 

A. Clifford Mercer, M.D., Tr., Clini- 
cal Pediatrics. 

Henry L. Eisner, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

David M. Totman, A.M., M.D., Clini- 
cal Surgery. 

Frank W. Marlow, M.D., M.R., 
Opthalmology. 

Nathan Jacobson, M.D., Clinical Sur- 
gery. 



300 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Aaron B. Miller, M.D., Gynecology. 

Scott, Owen, M.D., Anatomy. 

J. C.Carson, M.D., Mental Diseases. 

Reuben C. Hanchett, M.D., Materia 
Medica. 

Fred W. Sears, M.D., Clinical Obstet. 

Frank B. Brooks, M.D., Physiology. 

George M. Price, M.D., Anatomy. 

Wm. H. May, M.D., Pathology. 

William S. Andrews, A.M., Legal 
Medicine. 

Thomas H. Halstead, M.D., Laryn- 
gology. 

I. Harris Levy, M.D., Histology. 

Charles A. Covell, M.D., Chemistry. 

William A. Curtin, Therapeutics. 

Eugene W. Belknap, M.D., Medicine. 

Joseph T. D. Fischer, M.D., Physi- 
ology. 

J. Henry Drum, M.D., Anatomy. 

E. G. Wynkoop, M.D., Anatomy. 

James B. Brooks, A.M., D.C.L., 
Equity Jurisprudence. 

Giles H. Stillwell, A.M., Personal 
Property. 

Edward H. Burdick, A.M., Contracts. 

Frank R. Walker, A.M., William G. 
Tracy, LL.B., Surrogate's Court. 



William Nottingham, A.M., Ph.D., 

Corporations. 
Charles L. Stone, A.M., LL.B., Prin- 
cipal and Agent. 
George McGowan, A.M., Trusts. 
Edwin Nottingham, B.Ph., Law of 

Evidence. 
Charles H. Duell, A.M., LL.B., Law 

of Patents. 
William S. Andrews, A.M., LL.B., 

Statute Law. 
Charles G. Baldwin, A.M., LL.B., 

Partnership. 
Ceylon H. Lewis, A.M., Practice. 
Benjamin J. Shove, A.M., Criminal 

Law, etc. 
Edward C. Wright, A.M., Sales. 
Hon. Peter B. McLennan, A.M., 

Trial of Actions. 
Hon. Irving G. Vann, A.M., LL.D., 

Law of Insurance. 
Hon. George N. Kennedy, Con. Law. 
Hon. John C. Churchill, International 

Law. 
Frank Smalley, Ph.D., Laws and 

Courts of Rome. 
J. William Wilson, A.M., Medical 

Jurisprudence. 



Tabor, Imva. 



TABOR COLLEGE. 

Co-Educatioiial. 



Congregational. 



Income, 
$l8,OII 



Students, 
203 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 



Books, 
6,000 



History and Organization: Tabor College dates from 1866, and 
was the outgrowth of Tabor Institute.. It is modelled after Oberlin 
College, and is practically non-sectarian. The college is governed 
by twenty-five trustees, but some share of the government is left to 
the students. 

^ Admission, Instruction, Degrees : First-class certificates are accepted 
m heu of examination. Three courses of study are offered: the 
classical, scientific, and literary, leading to degrees of B.A., B.S., 
and B.L., besides that of A.M. after further study. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition is $39 for the year, last- 
ing from September 8 to June 12. Other expenses, with incidental 
fees and other charges, aggregate $150. Eighteen free scholarships 
are available, and several prizes are annually distributed. 

Societies attd Publications : The literary societies are the Phi Delta, 
Veritatis, Quasstores, and Phi Kappa j the Current Literature Club, 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



301 



Athletic Union, and two Christian Associations are also maintained 
by the students. The graduates number 140, of whom Mr. and Mrs. 
A. S. McPherson, 1870, of Redlands, Cal., are the oldest. The college 
grounds cover ten acres. 

Faculty, 



Rev. Wm. M. Brooks, A.M., D.D., 
President, Political Economy. 

Rev. Richard C. Hughes, A.M., Vice- 
President, Mental and Moral Science. 

Helen E. Martin, A.M., History. 

Helen Augusta Brooks, B.L., English 
Literature and Rlietoric. 

James T. Fairchild, A.M., Latin. 

Rev. C. H. Polhemus, A.M., Greek, 
German, and French. 



T. Proctor Hall, Natural Science. 

William A. Deering, A.M., Teaching. 

Margaret Lawrence, B.S., Mathematics 
and German. 

Raymond C. Brooks, A.B., B.D., Psy- 
chology and English. 

Mabel Bradbury Main, Music. 

Grace Louise Cronkhite, Organ. 

Sylvia M. Drake, B.L., Vocal, Solfeggio. 

Grace E. Uhl, Art. 



TARKIO COLLEGE. 



Tarkio, Mo. 


Co-Educational. 


Preshy 


terian. 


Income, 

$8,704 


Students, 
241 


Instructors, 
14 


Buildings, 
3 


Books, 
1,010 



The college was founded in 1884. The trustees number thirteen. 
Admission is upon certificate, and the usual college curriculum leads 
to degrees of A.B., B.S., and that of A.M. after further study. The 
college grounds cover twenty acres, and contain a gymnasium and 
athletic field, which are under the immediate control of the faculty. 
The college year is from September 8 to June 17. The students 
publish the " Phoenix," and maintain two literary societies, two Chris- 
tian Associations, and an Athletic Association with football, baseball, 
and track teams. The graduates number seventy-five, the oldest of 
whom is "William R. Littell, 1887, of Tarkio. 



Faculty. 



Jos. a. Thompson, D.D., President, 
Psychology, Ethics, and Logic. 

John C. Adair, A.B., Sciences, German. 

J. Vallance Brown, A.M., Greek, and 
Director of Gymnasium. 

Peter C. McKillop, A.B., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

Martha M. Keid, A.B., Latin. 

E. Ella Russell, B.S., English. 

James A. McLean, Normal and Pre- 
paratory Department. 

Henry K, Noel, M.Accts., Com. Dept. 

Bertha I. Collins, English. 

Daniel R. Willson, B.M., Mus. Dept. 

Elizabeth A. Tuttle, Art. 



and 



Catherine W. Parker, English 

Physical Culture. 
Horace G. Byers, A.B., Sciences and 

German, and Librarian. 
Margaret B. Mason, B.S., English and 

German. 
Anna Campbell, Piano. 
Harry B. Foster, Shorthand and 

Typewriting. 
Jas. F. Gore, Elizabeth M. Jackson, 

Preparatory Department. 
Charles G, Safford, Wm. E. Richard, 

Commercial Department. 
Mary Webster, Matron. 



302 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



TAYLOR COLLEGE. 



Upland^ Ind 


Co-Educatio7tal. 


Methodist. 


Income, 

^7,400 


Students, 
162 


Instructors, 
II 


Buildings, 
I 


Books, 
1,000 



History : The college was organized as Fort Wayne Female Col- 
lege in 1846. In 1847 the first building was erected. The presidents 
have been: the Hon. J. A. C. Heustis, 1847-1848; G. H. Rounds, 
1848-1849; Rev. Horace Cyrus Nutt, 1849-50; J. A. C. Heustis 
(second term), 1850-1852 ; S. T. Gillette, 1852 ; Rev. S. Brenton, 1852- 
1855; Rev. D, R. D. Robinson, 1855-1872; Rev. W. F. Yocum, 
D.D., 1872-1888; and the Rev. H. N. Herrick, 1889 to the present. 
In 1855 the college was united with the Collegiate Institute of the 
same place, became a co-educational school, and assumed its present 
name in 1890. 

The trustees number twenty-one. Admission is by examination 
and upon certificate. The degrees are B.A., B.S., and M.E.L., in 
the literary and normal courses. The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 25 to June 24, are $120. Nine cash prizes are 
annually distributed for excellence in study. The students maintain 
the Thalonian, organized in 1853, "^^^ ^^ Philalathean, organized 
in 1878. 

Faculty. 



T. C. Reade, A.M., D.D., President, 
Philosophy and Church History. 

C. B. Steinen, M.D., LL.D., Physiol- 
ogy and Hygiene. 

C. L. Clippinger, A.M., Ph.D., An- 
cient Languages. 

H. C. Neal, A.M., Hist., Polit. Econ. 

Grace G. Husted, B.Sc, German and 
English. 

Laura E. Liddle, B.Sc, Math. 

S. W. Collett, M.Sc, Nat. Sciences. 

W. A. Griest, M.E., Elocution and 
Homiletics. 



L. D. Peoples, Commercial Dept. 
Rose Watson, Shorthand. 
May Francis, M.B., Instrum. Music. 
Mrs. R. R. Elbright Collett, M.B., 

Music. 
F. Ella Lingo, A.M., Fine Arts and 

French. 
Rev. Edwin A. Blake, Ph.D., S.T.D., 

Comparative Religions. 
Rev. Wm. H. Lawrence, Ph.D., D.D., 

Sociology and Anthropology. 
Rev. W. P. George, D.D., Sacred 

Rhetoric. 



THIEL COLLEGE. 

Greenville, Peiin. Co-Educational. 



Ltitheran. 



Income, 
$15,000 



Students, 
178 



Instructors, 
II 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
6,000 



The college was founded in 1870. It is governed by fifteen trus- 
tees. Admission is on certificate. Four courses lead to degrees of 
A.B., B.S., B.Ph., and B.L. The expenses for the year, from Sep- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



303 



tember 12 to June 20, are $100. Six prizes are annually distributed. 
The students have organized three literary societies and a chapter of 
* r A, lasting from 1872-1873. The graduates number 250. 



Faculty. 



Rev. Theophilus R. Roth, D.D., 

President, Latin. 
Rev. David McKee, A.M., Math. 
Rev. Herman Gilbert, A.M., German. 
Rev. Josiah R. Titzel, A.M., Greek. 
S. H. Miller, A.M., Natural and 

Physical Sciences. 
Franklin B. Sawvel, A.M., Ph.D., 

English. 
Rev. Gustavus Adolphus Bruegel, 

A.M., German. 



Oscar Leon Watkins, A.B., Math. 

Rev. W. M. Rehrig, Ph.D., Hebrew. 

Wm. Weidman Landis, A.M., Math. 

John Prower Symons, Music and Musi- 
cal Literature. 

William E. Smeltzer, A.M., Principal 
Academic Department 

William Daniel Stoyer, Math. 

Catharine A. Miller, Matron. 

Will J. Irvin, Elocution and Oratory. 

Rose Phillips, Shorthand, Typewriting. 



TRINITY COLLEGE. 

Durham, A^. C. Co-Educational. 



Methodist. 



Income, 

$20,544 



Students, 
180 



Instructors, 
9 



Buildings, 



Books, 
7,500 



The college was founded in 1859, taking its origin from the Union 
Institute and Normal College of Randolph County. The principals 
and presidents have been: the Rev. Dr. Brantley York, 1838-1842; 
Dr. B. Craven, 1842-1863; W. T. Gannaway ; 1863-1866; Dr. B. 
Craven (second term), 1866-1882; W. H. Pegram, 1882-1883; Rev. 
M. L. Wood, 1883-1884; Professor Heitman, 1884-1887 ; John P. 
Crowell, A.B., 1887-1896; and John C. Kilgo, the present incumbent. 
In 1864 the college grounds were occupied by Federal troops, and 
all instruction suspended until the close of the Civil War. The 
present endowment fund was begun in 1883. In 1888 the prepara- 
tory courses were abandoned, and courses in technology, theology, 
and law were instituted during the three following years. In 1892 
the college was moved from Raleigh to Durham, after a gift of sixty- 
two acres and $85,000 from Washington Duke, of Durham. 

The college is governed by thirty-six trustees, twelve of whom are 
alumni. Admission is by examination and on certificates. There 
are four courses of instruction, leading to degrees of B.A., B.Ph., 
B.S., B.LL., and C.E. The expenses for the year, lasting from Sep- 
tember I to June 8, are $150. Sixty scholarships, yielding $50 each, 
have been established, and four prizes of $100 are given for excellence 
in study. 

The students maintain two literary societies : the Columbian and 
Hesperian, and an Economic Club, besides Historical, Theological, 
Christian and Athletic Associations. Chapters of the following 
fraternities have been organized: X *, 1871-1879; A T fl, 1872-1879; 
K 2, 1873-1879; * A ©, 1878-1879. 



304 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Faculty. 



John C. Kilgo, A.M., D.D., Presi- 
dent, Biblical Literature. 

Wm. H. Pegram, A.M., Secretary, 
Chemistry, Geology, Astronomy. 

Robert L. Flowers, U.S.N. A., Math. 

Wm. L Crantord, Ph.D., Philosophy 
and Greek. 

John S. Bassett, Ph.D., History and 
Political Science. 

Jerome Dowd, Political Economy and 
Sociology. 

Edwin Mims, M.A., English. 



M. H. Lockwood, E.E., Physics and 

Biology. 
A. H. Meritt, A.B., Latin, German. 
T. A. Smoot, A.B., Greek, History. 
Geo. B. Pegram, A.B., Mathematics 

and German. 
F. S. Aldridge, Latin. 
W. H. Adams, Book-keeping. 
Rev. A. P. Tyer, A.M., Financial 

Secretary. 
V. Ballard, Treasurer of Trustees. 
J. F. Bivins, S. S. Dent, Librarians. 



TRINITY COLLEGE. 

Hartford, Conn. Men. 



Episcopal. 



Income, 



Students, 
130 



Instructors, 
19 



Buildings, 



Books, 
36,000 



History and Organization : The charter of Washington College, as 
this school was formerly called, dates from 1823. Instruction was 
begun in 1824. In 1845 the name was changed to Trinity, and in 
1883 the election of three alumni to the Board of Trustees was 
provided for. Previous to this, in 1872, the old campus was sold to 
Hartford, and a new site of 80 acres was purchased, on which new 
buildings were erected and occupied in 1878. In 1883 the west side 
of the quadrangle, over 600 feet in length, was completed. An ob- 
servatory, the president's house, gymnasium, and hall of science were 
added during the following four years. In 1883, the election of three 
alumni to the Board of Trustees was provided for. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees: The requirements for admission 
are the same as in most of the New England colleges. Examinations 
are held in Hartford, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Chicago, 
and San Francisco. Provision is made for special students who 
cannot pass entrance examination. During the last two years 
elective studies can be pursued. The degrees are B.A., B.S., B.L.. 
and that of A.M. after one year of graduate study. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition for the year, lasting from 
September 19 to June 25, is $100, with other expenses aggregating 
$200. Scholarships to the number of 100 are available yielding 
incomes equivalent to tuition, in addition to which there are three 
prize scholarships, yielding $600 each, and 15 prizes, ranging from 
^10 to $100. ' o o 

Equipment: During the last year nearly $100,000 has been added 
to the endowment by gifts and bequests. The ample college 
grounds include an athletic field near the gymnasium. The library, 
besides its books, contains some 25,000 pamphlets, and has special 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



305 



The other departments of the Univer- 
laboratories, collections, and other 



income from a fund of $28,000. 
sity are well equipped with 
working material. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Ivy," an 
annual, besides other publications, and maintain numerous social, 
literary and debating societies. Christian associations, and an athletic 
association with athletic teams. Chapters of the following frater- 
nities have been organized .'' 

The graduates number nearly 1,200, 750 of whom are living. The 
oldest of these is Charles Graham, 1830, of New York City. 



Faculty. 



George Williamson Smith, D.D., 
LL.D., President, Metaphysics. 

Thomas R. Pynchon, D.D., LL.D., 
Moral Philosophy. 

Samuel Hart, D.D., Latin. 

Isbon T. Beckwith, Ph.D., Greek. 

Flavel S. Luther, M.A., Mathematics 
and Astronomy. 

Henry Ferguson, M.A., History and 
Political Science. 

Charles Frederick Johnson, M.A., 
EngHsh Literature. 

John J. McCook, M.A., Modern 
Languages. 

Wm, Lispenard Robb, Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Robert Baird Riggs, Ph.D., Chem- 
istry and Natural Science. 

W. R. Martin, LL.B., Ph.D., 
Oriental and Modern Languages. 



LECTURERS. 



Charles C. Beach, M.D., Hygiene. 
WiUiam Hamersley, M.A., Law. 
Charles Dudley Warner, L.H.D., 

D.C.L., English Literature. 
Wm. D. Morgan, M.A., M.D., 

Anatomy and Physiology. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Frederick R. Honey, Ph.B., Instruc- 
tor in Drawing and Descriptive 
Geometry. 

W. H. C. Pynchon, M.A., Natural 
Science. 

J. F. Bingham, D.D., Lecturer on 
Italian Literature. 

Waldo S. Pratt, M.A., Elocution. 

Ralph W. Foster, Instructor in the 
Gymnasium. 



TRINITY UNIVERSITY. 

Tehuacana, Tex. Co-Educational. Presbyterian. 



Income, 
$12,072 



Students, 
310 



Instructors, 
15 



Buildings, 



Books, 
2000 



The college was founded in 1869, by the Synod of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church in Texas. The presidents have been : Rev. W. 
E. Beeson, D.D., 1869-1882 ; Rev. S. T. Anderson, D.D., 1882-1883 
Rev. B. G. McClesky, D.D., 188^-1885; Rev. L. A. Johnson, Ph.D. 
1885-1889; Rev. J. L. Dickens, Ph.D., 1889-1890; Rev. B. D. Cock 
rill, 1890. The Trustees number ten. Admission is on certificate 
The degrees are A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. Negroes are not admitted 
The expenses for the year, from September 2 to June 7, are $100 
Prizes from $25 to $50 are given. The college grounds cover 16 acres, 
and are situated ten miles from Mexia. Of the buildings one is a hall 
for divinity students, while the other is a dormitory for women. The 

20 



\o6 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



societies are : the Ratio-Genie and Phiiosophronian, for men, the 
Maeonian and Sapho-Adelphian for women, with the Timothean for 
divinity students. Besides these, two Christian Associations and an 
Exploration Society, with chapters of B n, 187 1, and * A 0, 1878, are 
maintained. The graduates number 150, of whom the oldest is tlie 
Rev. J. S. Groves, 1872, of Mexia, Texas. 



Faculty. 



B. D. Cockrill, President, Theology. 

D. S. Bodenhamer, Ph.D., Mathemat- 
ics. 

L. A. Johnson, Ph.D., English and 
History. 

Jesse Anderson, Ph.D., Greek. 

S. L. Hornbeak, Ph.D., Physical 
Science. 

B. E. Looney, A.M., Latin. 

M. Kate Spencer, Grammar School. 



S. Nelson, Commercial 



Prof. V. 

School. 

Felix E. Anderson, Stenography. 
Flora Etta Morgan, A.B., Grammar 

School. 
Mrs. E. S. Sauter, Music. 
Miss M. L. Sauter, Music. 
Prof. G. A. Landrum, Elocution. 
Miss M. Dysart, School of Art. 
Ida M. Bodenhamer, Art. 



Boston, Mass. 



TUFTS COLLEGE. 

Co-Edticational. 



Universalist. 



Income, 
$99,368 



Students, 
500 



Instructors, 
75 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
32,600 



In 1847, a fund of $100,000 was raised for the creation of a 
Universalist College. Charles Tufts added to this 100 acres of land, 
while Amos Packard gave his entire fortune, to which P. T. Barnum, 
added $95,000. A charter was obtained in 1852, but instruction was 
not begun until 1855. In 1892 women were admitted. The presidents 
have been: Hosea Ballou, 1852-1862 ; Rev. A. A. Miner, 1862-1874; 
and Rev. Elmer H. Capen, who is still in charge. 

The trustees number twenty-nine. Admission is by examination and 
on certificate. All the Vv^ork done by students counts toward acquirin<y 
a degree. The degrees are A.B., M.E., C.E., E.E., A.M. and Ph D* 
the last two following after graduate study. The expenses for 
the year, from September 19 to June 17, are $261. Forty-eight 
scholarships yielding incomes of $100, and five of $50 are available. 
A women's loan fund has been established together with numerous 
prizes for excellence in study. 

Among the eleven buildings are Ballou Hall, the Library, 
Metcalf Hall for women, Broomfield Parsons Building, Barnum 
Museum, Goddard Chapel and a gymnasium. Besides numerous 
social and literary organizations, chapters of the following fraternities 
have been established : 2^1855; 0AX, 180: A r, 1886: and AT A, 
1889. J ' > 

In all, 750 graduates are living, the oldest of whom is the Rev. J. 
Eastwood, i860, of Brattleboro, Vt. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



307 



Faculty. 



Elmer H. Capen, D.D., President, 
Philosophy and Political Economy. 

John P. Marshall, A.I\I., Geology 
and Mineralogy, Dean of Coll. of 
Letters. 

Charles H. Leonard, D.D., Homiletics 
and Pastoral Theology, and Dean 
of Divinity School. 

Albert Nott, M.D., Physiology and 
Dean of Medical School. 

Jerome Schneider, Ph.D., Greek. 

Heman A, Dearborn, A.M., Latin. 

William R. Shipman, D.D., Rhetoric, 
Logic, and Metaphysics. 

Benjamin G. Brown, A.M., Mathe- 
matics. • 

Moses T. Brown, A.M., Emeritus. 

Thomas J. Sawyer, D.D., Emeritus. 

Charles D. Bray, C.E., A.M., Civil 
and Mechanical Engineering. 

Charles E. Fay, A.M., Modern Lan- 
guages. 

William G. Tousey, A.M., B.D., 
Ethics and Philosophy of Theism. 

Amos E. Dolbear, M.E., Ph.D., Phys- 
ics and Astronomy. 

William L. Hooper, A.M., Electrical 
Engineering. 

George T. Knight, A. M.,D.D., Church 
History. 

George M. Harmon, A.M., B.D., 
Biblical Theology. 

David L. Maulsby, A.M., English 
Literature and Oratory. 

J. Sterling Kingsley, S.D., Biology. 

Frank P. Graves, A.M., Ph.D., Clas- 
sical Philology. 

Charles P. Thayer, M.D., Descriptive 
and Surgical Anatomy. 

Henry W. Dudley, M.D., Patholo2;v, 

William R. Chipman, A.B., M.D., 
Surgery and Operative Surgerv. 

Walter L. Hall, M.D., Medicine and 
CHnical Medicine. 

John W. Johnson, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Frank G. Wheatley, A.M., M.D., 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Gardner C. Anthony, A. M., Techni- 
cal Drawing. 

Arthur Michael, A.M., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry. 

Warren S. Woodbridge, A.M., B.D., 
Applied Christianity. 

Samuel G. Webber, A.B., M.D., 
Neurology. 

E. W. Gushing, A.B., M.D., Gynecol. 



Arthur E. Austin, A.B., M.D.. Medi- 
cal Chemistry and Toxicology. 

Charles A. Pitkin, A.M., Ph.D., Gen- 
eral Chemistry. 

Harold Williams, A.B., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Children. 

John A. Tenny, M.D., Opthalmology. 

John L. Hildreth, A.B., M.D., Chni- 
cal iSIedicine. 

Anson B. Curtis, Ph.D., Hebrew and 
Old Testament. 

Herbert L. Smith, M.D., Clinical 
Surgery. 

Walter Channing, M.D., Insanity. 

Thomas M. Durell, M.D., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

Frederick L. Jack, M.D., Otology. 

Leo R. Lewis, A.M.. History and 
Theory of Music. 

Frank W. Durkee, A.M., Chemistry. 

Frank E. Sanborn, S.B., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Edwin A. Start, A.M.. History. 

Frank T. Daniels, A.M.B., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Horatio W. Myrick, A.M.B., Electri- 
cal Engineering. 

Thomas Whittemore, A.B., English. 

John E. Bucher, A.C., Ph.D., Organic 
Chemistry. 

Frank B. Brown, M.D., Bacteriology 
and Assistant in Pathology. 

William P. Derby, M.D., Gynecology 
and Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Charles G. Cumston, M.D., Gyne- 
cology and Asst. in Obstetrics. 

Charles St. Clair Wade.A.M., French. 

Frank G. Wren, A.B., Mathematics. 

Howard H. Higbee, A.B., Ph.D., 
Quantitative Analysis. 

E. Channing Stowell, M.D., Chil- 
dren's Diseases. 

Charles C. Stroud, A.B., Physical 
Training. 

E. E. Thorpe, M.D., Medical Chem- 
istry. 

Charles L. Cutler, M.D., Gynecology. 

Albert E. Rogers, M.D., Materia 
Medica. 

Harry Gray Chase, B.E.E., Electri- 
cal Engineering. 

Thomas A. Mighill, A.B., Ph.D., 
Organic Chemistry. 

Virgil L. Leighton, A.M., Qualitative 
Analysis and Assaying. 

J. W. Edwards, S.B., General Chem. 



3o8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Charles D. Knowlton, M.D., Demon- 
strator of Anatomy. 

Richard M. Pearce, Jr., M. D., Dem- 
onstrator of Physiology. 

Thomas F. Greene, M.D., Assistant 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

J. C. D. Clark, M.D., Theory and 
Practice of Medicine. 

George H. Furbish, Superintendent 
of Shops. 

Orlando F. Lewis, A.B., Modem Lan- 
guages. 

H. E. Cushman, A.M., Philosophy. 

Howard S. Dearing, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

Herbert W. White, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

Samuel C. Earle, A.M., Enghsh Liter- 
ature. 

Mary E. Wellington, Prosector of 
Anatomy. 

Charles A. Hebbard, M.D., Demon- 
strator of Legal Medicine. 

Hairabed S. Djelahan, Gen. Chem. 

Fred H. Robinson, Medical Chem. 

Henry P. Johnson, Bacteriology. 



LECTURERS. 

Medical School. 

William R. Woodbury, A.B., M.D., 
Hygiene. 

William A. White, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

George A. Webster, M.D., Otology. 

Fred H. Morse, M.D., Electro-Thera- 
peutics. 

Walter J. Otis, M.D., Rectal Dis- 
eases. 

William S. Boardman, M.D., Laryn- 
gology. 

Fred S. Raddin, M.D., Genito-Urinary 
Surgery. 

George A. Bates, D.D.S., Histology. 

Divinity School. 

Henry I. Cushman, D.D., Methods of 
Biblical Study. 

Joseph K. Mason, D.D., Preaching. 

Frederic W. Hamilton, A.M., Chris- 
tian Economics. 

Charles R. Tenney, B.D., Demands 
of Ministry. 



TULANE UNIVERSITY. 

New Orleans, La. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$105,000 



Students, 
808 



Instructors, 
72 



Buildings, 
12 



Books, 
1 5,000 



History and Organization: In 1882 Paul Tulane gave a fund for 
the higher education of the white citizens of Louisiana. The admin- 
istrators of the fund prevailed upon the University of Louisiana, 
which had been in operation since 1878, to unite with the new school. 
This was done in 1883, when W. P. Johnston, the present president, 
was elected. A Medical School, dating from 1834, and a Law School, 
dating from 1847 were added at the same time. The university is 
governed by a board of seventeen administrators. Negroes are 
excluded. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degi'ees : Admission is by examination 
and on the certificates of ten high schools and academies. Classical, 
literary, scientific and technological courses lead to degrees of A.E., 
B.S., C.E., M.E., Archt. Eng., Chem. Eng., and to those of A.M., and 
Ph.D. after graduate study, and further degrees are granted by 
the professional schools. Attendance at gymnastic drill and chapel 
is voluntary. The courses and degrees in the H. Sophie Newcomb 
College for women, are identical with those of the University, and 
graduates are admitted to the University's graduate courses. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



309 



Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition for the year, lasting from 
October I to June 18, is ^105, while other expenses iiggreg:ue g200. 
Some 175 scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are available, and five 
medals are also annually distributed. 

Equipment: The grounds have a frontage of 582 feet on Audu^^on 
Park, and cover eighteen acres- Twelve new buildings have ueen 
erected for the College of Arts and Sciences, for physical and 
chemical laboratories and for technological and mechanical halls. 
All these buildings are fitted with the most modern equipment, and 
are among the best in the South. 

Societies and Publications : The students publish the "Collegian," 
a fortnightly ; and the " College Spirit," a weekly. The societies are 
the Glendig Burke, New Literary, Student's Congress, Engineering 
Society, Sketch Club, Glee, Banjo, and Mandolin Club, Class Asso- 
ciations, Alumni Association, Christian Association, and Athletic 
Association with football, baseball and track teams, besides tennis 
clubs and other athletic organizations. Chapters of the following 
fraternities have been organized: K A, 1886; 2 X, 1886; A T n, 1887; 
2N, 188S; AT A, * A 0, 1889; K2;*K2; HB* and N E. 



Facttlty 



Wm. Preston Johnston, LL.D., Prest. 

J. Hanno Deiler, German. 

Alcee Fortier, D.Lt., Romance Lang. 

Brown Ayres, B.Sc, Ph.D., Physics 
and Electrical Engineering. 

Robert Sharp, M. A., Ph.D., English. 

John M. Ordway, A.M., Applied Chem. 

Wm. Woodward, Arch't'l Drawing. 

Ashley D. Hurt, A.M., LL.D., Greek. 

John R. Ficklen, B.Let., History and 
Political Science. 

John W. Caldwell, A.M., M.D., 
Chemistry and Geology. 

Brandt V. B. Dixon, A.M., Psychol- 
ogy and Philosophy, and President 
H. Sophie Newcomb College. 

Henry B. Orr, Ph.D., Biology. 

James H. Dillard, M.A., D.Lt., Latin. 

Wm. B. Smith, A.M., Ph.D., Math. 

W. H. P. Creighton, U.S.N., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Douglas S. Anderson, A.M., Physics. 

John E. Lombard, M.E., Math. 

Ellsworth Woodward, Art. 

Ulric Bettison, Mathematics. 

Evelyn W. Ordway, B.S., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Jennie C. Nixon, English, Rhetoric. 

Marie J. Augustin, French. 

Mary L. Harkness, A.M., Latin. 

Frederic Wespy, Greek and German, 

G. R. Smith, Drawing and Painting. 

Emma S. Rossner, Prep. Classes. 

Julia C. Logan, English. 

Mattie M. Austin, English. 



Frank H. Simms, Music. 

Kate A. Atkinson, Latin. 

Clara G. Baer, Physical Education. 

Clarisse Cenas, French. 

Mary C. Spencer, Physics and Math. 

Mary G. Sheerer, Art Department. 

Francis Devereux Jones, Drawing. 

A. L. Metz, M.Ph., M.D., Chemistry. 

H. S. Lewis, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 

S. P. Delaup, M.D., A. J. Bloch, M.D., 
Marion Souchon, M.D., Anatomy. 

P. E. Archinard, M.D., Microscopical 
Anatomy. 

O. L. Pothier, M.D., Bacteriology. 

J. B. EHiott, Jr., M.D., Physical 
Diagnosis. 

E. D. Fenner, M.D., Children's Dis- 
eases. 

Luther Sexton, M.D., Minor Surgery. 

Edward W. Jones, M.D., Diseases of 
Eye and Ear. 

Isadore Dyer, M.D., Dermatology. 

T. A. Ouayle. M.Ph., M.D., Pharma- 
ceutical Laboratory. 

Robt. D. Hawkins. M.E., Mechanism. 

Wm. B. Gregory, M.E., Experimental 
Engineering. 

George E. Beyer, Curator Museum. 

Wm. P. Brown, A.M.. English, Latin. 

Benjamin Palmer Caldwell, A.B., 
B.E., Chemistry. 

Chas. Wm. Edwards, B.S., Math. 

Ernest J. Villavaso, A.B., French. 

H. F. Rugan, Workshops. 

Tudor T. Hall, Physical Laboratory, 



310 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ULYSSES S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. Co-Educational. MetJiodist. 



^BT 



Income, 
$6,000 



Students, 
613 



Instructors, 
40 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3,000 



East Tennessee Wesleyan College, the predecessor of the Ulysses 
S. Grant University was established in 1867, on the grounds of the 
Athens Female College, an institution once owned by the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, In 1886 the name of the school, which 
in 1869 had assumed the title of university, was changed to Grant 
Memorial University, in recognition of support received from General 
Grant. Previous to this and again afterward the institution labored 
under financial difficulties. The presidents have been : Percival C. 
Wilson, M.A., 1866-1868 ; Rev. Nelson E. Cobleigh, D.D., 1868-1872; 
Rev. James A. Dean, 1872-1875; Rev. John J. Mankee, 1875; Rev. 
John F, Spence, D.D., 187 5-1890; and Bishop I. W. Joyce, LL.D., 
now in charge. 

{Further Inforinatio7i Lacking.) 



UNION CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. 

Merom, If id. Co- Educational. Christian. 



Income, 
$7,580 



Students, 
245 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3.400 



The college was founded in 1864. It is governed by fifteen trus- 
tees, and they are assisted by a women's board of five. Four courses 
lead to degrees of B.A., B.S., B.Pe., and B.D. The expenses for 
the year, lasting from September 17 to June 17, are $100. Attend- 
ance at chapel is compulsory. The literary societies are the Frank- 
lin and Sinconia, two Christian Associations, and an Endeavor 
Society. The graduates number 150. The oldest of these is J. J. 
Summer, 1866, of Dayton, Ohio. 



Faculty. 



Rev, Leander J. Aldrich, A.M., D.D., 
President, Bible and Literature, 

Benjamin F. McHenry, A.M., Mathe- 
matics and Natural Science. 

S. Elizabeth Hatten, A.M., Greek and 
German. 

Maston S. Wilkinson, A.M., Treas- 
urer, Latin and Civics. 

Arthur M. Ward, A.M., English. 



Sadie Fairfield, A.B., Drawing and 

Painting. 
Olive M. Stanley, A.B., Piano. 
Sina H. Sutton, Matron. 
Charles L. Dry, Penmanship. 
Charles E. Hayden, Violin and Guitar. 
John Sempsrott, Vocal Music. 
Clara P. Aldrich, Elocution. 
L. C. Phillips, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 311 

UNION UNIVERSITY. 

Schettectady, N. V. Men. Non-Sectaria7i. 



Income, 

^75.229 



Students, 
500 



Instructors, 
85 



Buildings, 



Books, 
30.736 



History : Union College was incorporated by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York, in 1795. It was the second 
college incorporated in the State, and the first north of the city of 
New York and west of the Hudson River. It received its name 
from the circumstance that several religious denominations co-oper- 
ated in its organization, and was the first college in the United 
States which was not of a strictly denominational character. The 
presidents have been: Rev. John Blair Smith, 1795-1799; Jonathan 
Edwards, Jr., 1799-1S01 ; Rev. Jonathan Maxey, 1801-1804; Rev. 
Eliphalet Nott, 1804-1866; Rev. Laurens P. Hickok, 1866-1868; 
Rev, Charles A. Aiken, 1869-1871 ; Rev. Eliphalet Nott Potter, 1871- 
1884; Hon. Judson S. Landon, \A-..V>., ad interim ; Harrison E. Web- 
ster, LL.D., 188S-1894; and Rev. A. V. V. Raymond, D.D., LL.U., 
who was inaugurated in June, 1894. 

Union College by its original charter, acquired full university 
powers, but the creation of graduate institutions at Schenectady 
was not found practicable for a while. The schools of Law and 
Medicine, and the astronomical observatory which had long existed 
at Albany, were united with Union College, under the charter and 
Board of Trustees of the latter, in 1873. 1 he Albany College of 
Pharmacy was incorporated as a department of the University in 
1881. The hundredth anniversary was celebrated in 1895. 

Organization : Union University embraces the follovv'ing institu- 
tions: Union College, Albany Medical College, Albany Law School, 
Dudley Observatory, Albany College of Pharmacy. The president 
of Union College and permanent chancellor of Union University 
has the oversight of the university, each of the institutions having 
its resident dean. The dean of Union College acts in the place of 
the president in his absence, and also assists him in matters dele- 
gated to him by the president. The University Board of Governors 
is composed of sixteen permanent trustees of Union College, and of 
representatives of each of the other institutions embraced in Union 
University. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees : Admission is by examination for 
all candidates, including those from other colleges, and excepting 
only those holding certificates from the State University, or full uni- 
versity diplomas. The classical course, leading to the degree of B.A., 
is largely elective after the second year; the philosophical course 
omits only the study of Greek; the scientific course substitutes 
modern for ancient languages, and the engineering courses, while 
including the modern languages, substitute engineering and techno- 
logical courses for all other studies. Besides the degrees of B.A., 
B.S., B.Ph., the degrees of C.E., and M.A. are conferred after one 
year of graduate study. 



12 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: The expenses for the year, lasting 
from September 19 to June 27, are ^^300, of which $75 ijfor tuit on 
Ten free scholarships are available, besides a number of half-scholar- 
ships and thirteen scholarships of $150 each. In addition to tMs, 
the mcome of $50,000 is devoted toward aiding poor students. The 
interest of $r,ooo is given annually for the best essay in English 
while many prizes, from $10 to I50, are annually distributed in the 
various departments. 

Equipment: Among the twenty-two college buildings, which are 
distributed through Schenectady and Albany, are a library contain- 
ing fifty thousand books and pamphlets; a natural history museum 
containing collections of zoology, botany, mineralogy, and geolo^: 
a gymnasium; and an astronomical observatory. ThS college grounds 
cover fifty acres. ° 6*'^""'-t=> 

Societies a7id Organization : The students publish the "Garnet" 
r ffl'^'V-f'^ " Concordiensis." The societies are the Key and 
Cofiin, Philomathean, Adelphic, Shakespeare Club, Musical \sso 
ciation (with mandolin, guitar, and banjo clubs). Republican Club 
Christian Association, and Athletic Association, with baseball, foot- 
ball and track teams. Chapters of the following fraternities have 
been organized: * B K, 1825; 5 *, A *, 1827-% T i^i-x- at 
1838; X >i^. 1841-1S77; A X,' 1847-1S69 Z v! \sT7-187v A K e' 
* 2 K. 1888; K A; * r A; N E; 2X. ■" *, 1004, 

^, J''/ g''^^".^tS;\'''""^ber 5,000, of whom 2,800 are living. The old- 
est of these IS Thomas Hun, M.D., 1826, of Albany, N. Y. 



D.D., 



Andrew v. V. Raymond, 

LL.D., President. 
Thos. Hun, M.D., LL.D., Emeritus, 

Dean Medical Faculty. 
John Foster, LL.D., Emeritus. 
Henry Whitehorne, LL.D., Greek. 
Hon. Wm. L. Learned, LL.D., Trial 

of Causes. 
Wm. Wells, Ph.D., LL.D., Modern 

Languages and Current History 
Maurice Perkins, A.M., M.D., Ana- 
lytical Chemistry. 
Hon. Matthew Hale, LL.D., Profes- 
sional Ethics. 
Albert Vander Veer, M.D., Ph D 

Didactic and Clinical Sur<^ery * *' 
John M. Bigelow, M.D., PlT.D Ma- 
teria Medica, Therapeutics, Throat 
and Nose. 
Hon. Judson S. Landon, LL.D., Con- 
stitutional Law. 
Willis G. Tucker, Ph.D., F.C.S 

Ciiemistry and Toxicology. ' * "' 
Wilham Hailes, M.D., Anatomy, His- 

tology, and Fractures. 
Lewis Balch, M.D., Ph.D., Emeritus. 



Faculty. 



S. B.Ward, M.D., Ph.D., Medicine. 

James P. Boyd, M.D., Gynecolo'^y 
and Children's Diseases. 

Cyrus S. Merrill, M.D., Ophthalmol- 
ogy and Otology. 

Sidney G. Ashmore, A.M., L.H.D. 
Latin. ' 

Fred. C. Curtis, M.D., Dermatology, 

Gustavus Michaelis, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

Lewis Boss, A.M., Observatory. 

Alfred B. Huested, M.D., Ph.G., Bot- 
any and Materia Medica. 

Henry Hun, M.D., Nervous Diseases. 

Samuel R. Morrow, M.D., Anatomy 
and Foot Surgerv. 

Jas. R. Truax, A.M., Ph.D., English. 

Thomas W, Wright, A.M., Ph.D. 
Mathematics and Phvsics. ' 

Franks. Hoffman, A.M., Philosophy. 

James W. Eaton, Evidence, Contracts 

Benjamin H. Ripton, A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean, Historv and Sociology. ' 

Hon. Alton B. Parker, Judicial Systems. 
Chas. A. Collin, A.M., N. Y. Statutes 
01m H. Landreth, A.M., C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



313 



Herman Camp Gordinier, M.D., 
Physiology. 

J. Newton Fiero, Dean of Law School, 
Procedure, Equity, and Torts. 

Eugene Burlingame, Criminal Law. 

James F. Tracey, Corporation Law. 

James L. Patterson, Sc.D., Math. 

Wendell Lamoroux, A.M., Librarian. 

James H. Stoller, A.M., Biology. 

Edward E. Hale, Jr., Ph.D., Rhetoric 
and Logic. 

Charles S. Prosser, M.S., Geology. 

Joseph A. Lawson, Property Laws. 

Hon. Chas. Andrews, Lecturer on Law. 

Hon. D. Cady Herrick, Municipal Cor- 
porations. 

Edwin H. Winans, A.B., Math. 

Frank P. Huested, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

Albert H. Pepper, A.M., Mod. Lang. 

Samuel B. Howe, A.M., Ph.D., Prin- 
cipal Union School. 

Joseph D. Craig, M.D., Anatomy. 

Howard Van Rensselaer, M.D., Mate- 
ria Medica and Chest Diseases. 

Wilhs G. MacDonald, M.D., Surgery. 

Herman Bendell, M.D., Otology. 

Ezra Albert Bartlett, M.D., Electro- 
Therapeutics. 

G. Alder Blumer, M.D., Insanity. 

Theodore C. Van Allen, M.D., Oph- 
thalmology. 

Andrew MacFarlane, M.D., Physical 
Diagnosis, Medical Jurisprudence. 

Clinton Bradford Herrick, M.D., Clini- 
cal Surgery. 

Homer P. Cumings, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Howard T. Mosher, A.B., French. 



Arthur Jay Roy, C.E., Astronomy. 
C. P. Linhart, M.D., Physiology and 

Gymnastics. 
George V. Edwards, A.M., Latin and 

Sanskrit. 
Howard Opdyke, A.B., Mathematics 

and Physics. 
Elton D. Walker, B.S., Engineering. 
John I. Bennett, A.M., Greek. 
Edward J. Wheeler, A.B., Chemistry. 
Frank Richardson, Ph.G., Materia 

Medica. 
Leo. H. Neuman, M.D., Medicine. 
George E. Lochner, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Edw. J. Wheeler, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Arthur G. Root, M.D., Diseases of 

Throat and Nose. 
Theodore Prudden Bailey, M.D., Der- 
matology. 
Edw. V.Colbert, M.D., Therapeutics. 
Charles Henry Moore, M.D., Opthal- 

mology and Otology. 
Charles E. Davis, M.D., Physiology 

and Hygiene. 
George A. Williams, M.D., Materia 

Medica and Chest Diseases. 
Thomas W. Jenkins, M.D., Histology 

and Anatomy. 
Thomas A. Ryan, M.D., Surgery. 
Wm. Grant Lewis, M.D., Neurology. 
Wilfred S. Hale, M.D., Anatomy. 
Jos. B. Swett, Jr., M.D., Obstetrics. 
Wm. B. Varnum, A.B., Astronomy. 
Wm. P. Reeves, A.M., Ph.D., Rhet. 
Kenneth McKenzie, A.M., Ph.D., 

Modern Languages. 
Albert F. Buck, A.M., Philosophy and 

English. 



UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY. 

West Point, N'. Y. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$464,261 



Cadets, 
322 



Instructors, 
64 



Buildings, 



Books, 
3S.203 



History: The United States Military Academy was established by 
an Act of Congress in 1802, and was augmented mider a subsequent 
Act of Congress in 181 2. Its location is permanent, and the academic 
course was never suspended. The Long Barracks, known as the 
Yellow Barracks, were destroyed by fire on Christmas day, 1827. 
The same fate overtook the academy on February 19, 1838; the 






THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Cadet Guard House, (store room), on Marcli 13, 1870, and the roof 
of the Cadet Barracks on February 5, 187 1. 

The superintendents have been: Maj. Jonathan Williams, 1802- 
1803; Lieut.-Col. Jonathan Williams, 1805-1812 ; Col. Joseph G. Swift, 
1812-1817; Bvt. Maj. Sylvanus Thayer, 1817-1833; Maj. Rene E. 
DeRussy, 1833-1838; Maj. Richard Delafield, 1838-1845; Capt. Henry 
Brewerton, 1845-1852; Bvt. Col. Robert E. Lee, 1852-1855 ; Bvt. 
Major John G. Barnard, 1855-1856; Maj. R. Delafield, (second term), 
1856-1861 ; Maj. Alexander H. Bowman, 1861-1864; Brig.-Gen. Z. B. 
Tower, 1864; Brig.-Gen. George W. Cullum, 1864-1868; Bvt. Brig.- 
Gen. Thomas G. Pitcher, 1866-187 1 ; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. 
Ruger, 1871-1876; Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield, 1876-1881 ; Bvt. 
Maj.-Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. A., 1881-1882; Bvt. Maj.-Gen. 
Wesley Merritt, 1882-1887 ; l^vt. Maj.-Gen. John G. Parke, 1887-1889; 
Lieut. Col. John M. Wilson, U. S. A., 1889-1893 ; Lieut. Col. Oswald 
H. Ernst, 1893 to the present. 

Organization: The academy is supported by the United States, 
and comes under the direct supervision of the Secretary of War 
and a board of twelve visitors appointed by the President of the 
United States and by Congress. Officers are detailed from their 
regiments to teach at the academy, and after ten years of such 
service have the assimilated rank of colonel. Cadets are made com- 
missioned and non-commissioned battalion officers on the ground of 
merit, and are divided into four classes, the youngest cadets forming 
the fourth class. The teaching staff is divided into a military staff 
and academic staff, which in turn is divided into ten departments of 
philosophy, drawing, mathematics, sciences, tactics, modern languages, 
civil and military engineering, gunnery and ordinance. 

Admission is by examination after appointment by the President of 
the United States. The curriculum is that of the best colleges in 
addition to military training. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 
Equipment: Among the buildings which pertain directly to the 
Academic features of the place, are the Academy Building, Cadet 
Barracks, Cadet Mess Hall, Cadet Chapel, Officers Mess, Library 
Building, Administration Building, Gymnasium, Riding Academy 
and Cadet Hospital. The area of levelled and improved drill 
grounds is about forty acres. The area of the entire military 
reservation is 2,500 acres. 

Societies and Publications : The only publication of the academy 
is the official '' Register of Officers and Cadets " published annually. 
"The Howitzer" is a humorous pamphlet, published annually by 
the cadets for private distribution. There are no secret societies, 
but the cadets maintain a branch of the Y. M. C. A., an Athletic 
Association, with football and baseball teams, and a Dialectic 
Society. 



Lieut.-Col. O. H. Ernst, Supt. 

Capt. Wilber E. Wilder, Post Adjutant. 

Capt. Wm. F. Spurgin, Treasurer and 
Commissary. 

Capt. John B. Bellinger, Quarter- 
master. 



Staff. 



Lieut. Barrington K. West, Commis- 
sary and Treasurer. 
Lieut. Wm. Weigel, Officer of Police. 
Maj. G. H. Torney, Surqeon, 
Capt. Chas. F. Mason, Assist. Surgeon. 
Capt. Chas. Willcox, Assist. Surgeon. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



315 



Peter S. Michie, Capt. William B. 
Gordon, Lieut. Samuel E. Allen, 
Lieut. Lucien G. Berry, Lieut, 
Samuel D. Freeman, Philosophy. 

Chas. W. Larned, Lieut. Austin H. 
Brown, Lieut. Chas. B. Hagadorn, 
Lieut. Horace M. Reeve, Drawing. 

Edgar W. Bass, Wright P. Edgerton, 
Lieut. Daniel B. Devore, Lieut. 
Chas. P. Echols, Lieut. Wm. AL 
Cruikshank, Lieut. John H. Rice, 
Mathematics. 

Samuel E. Tillman, Lieut. Richmond 
P. Davis, Lieut. Edgar Russel, 
Lieut. Palmer E. Pierce, Lieut. 
Wm. R. Smith, Sciences. 

Lieut. -Col. Samuel M, Mills, Com- 
mandant of Cadets. 

Capt. James Parker, Cavalry. 

Lieut. Alexander B. Dyer, Artillery. 

Lieut. G. Adams, Co. Commandant. 

Lieut. Wilds P. Richardson, Infantry. 



Lieut. Wm. H. Allaire, Lieut. Willard 

A. Holbrook, Lieut. I'vobt. L. Howze, 
Company Commandants. 

Lieut. Matthew C. Butler, Jr., Cavalry. 

Edward E. Wood, Lieut. Peter E. 
Traub, Lieut. Marcus D. Cronin, 
Lieut. Samuel C. Hazzard, Lieut. 
Edward B. Cassatt, Modern Lan- 
guages. 

Lieut. -Col. G. B. Davis, Lieut. Jas. A. 
Cole, Lieut. Walter A. Bethel, Law. 

Gustav J. Fiebeger, Capt. James L. 
Lusk, Lieut. Thos. H. Rees, Lieut. 
Francis R. Shunk, Lieut. E, Eve- 
leth Winslow, Lieut. Jay J. Mor- 
row, Engineering. 

Capt. Lawrence L. Bruff, Lieut. Edwin 

B. Babbitt, Lieut. Henry D. Todd, 
Jr., Ordnance and Gunnery. 

Rev. Herbert Shipman, Chaplain. 
Herman J. Koehler, Master of Sword. 
George Essigke, Music. 



UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY. 

Annapolis, Md. Men. N'on-Sedarian. 



Income, 

$200,000 



Students, 
245 



Instructors, 
70 



Buildings, 
66 



Books, 
35.235 



History : The United States Naval Academy was founded in 1845 
by the Hon. George Bancroft, vSecretary of the Navy, in the Admin- 
istration of President James K. Polk. It was formally opened on 
October loth of that year under the name of the Naval School, with 
Commander Franklin Buchanan as superintendent. It was placed 
at Annapolis, Md., on the land occupied by Fort Severn, which was 
given up by the war department for the purpose. The course was 
fixed at five years, of which only the first year and the last were 
spent at the school, the intervening three years being passed at sea. 
This arrangement was not strictly adhered to, the exigencies of the 
service making it necessary, in many cases, to shorten the period of 
study. In January, 1846, four months after the opening of the 
school, the students consisted of thirty-six midshipmen of the date 
of 1840, who were preparing for the examination for promotion; 
thirteen of the date of 1841, who were to remain until drafted for 
service at sea; and seven acting midshipmen, appointed after Sep- 
tember of the previous year. The midshipmen of the date of 1840 
were the first to be graduated, finishing their limited course in July, 
1846, and they were followed in order by the subsequent dates until 
the reorganization of the school in 1850. 

In 1850 the system of instruction was reorganized, a practice cruise 
supplying the place of three years of sea-service, thus reducing the 
course from r-ix years to four. In May, 1861, on the outbreak of 



3l6 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

war, the academy was moved to Newport, R. I. The three upper 
classes were detached and ordered to sea, and the remaining mid- 
shipmen were quartered in the Atlantic House, and on board the 
frigates "Constitution" and " Santee," while the academy itself was 
occupied by Federal troops. In the summer of 1865 the academy 
was moved back to Annapolis, where it has since remained. When 
the Bureau of Navigation was established in 1862 the academy was 
placed under its supervision. In 1867 it was put under the direct 
care of the Naval Department, — all details of administration still 
coming under the Bureau of Navigation. The term of the academic 
course in 1873, was changed by law from four to six years. 

The superintendents have been : Comm. Franklin Buchanan, 1845- 
1847; Comm. George P. Upshur, 1847-1850; Comm. Cornelius K. 
Stribling, 1850-1853; Comm. Louis M. Goldsborough, 1853-1857- 
Capt. George S. Blake, 1857-1865 ; Rear-Ad. David D. Porter, 1865- 
1869; Com. John L. Worden, 1870-1874; Rear-Ad. C. R. P. Rodgers, 
1874-1878; Com. Foxhall A. Parker, 1878-1879; Rear-Ad. George 
B. Balch, 1879-1881 ; Rear-Ad. C. R. P. Rodgers, 1881 ; Capt. F. M 
Ramsay, 1S81-1886; Comm. W. T. Sampson, 1886-1890; Capt. R. 
L. Phythian, 1890-1894; Capt. P. H. Cooper, 1894 until the present. 
Organization : The academy, as stated, is under the direct control 
of the Secretary of the Navy and the Navigation Bureau. In addi- 
tion to this there is a board of twelve visitors, consisting in part of 
congressmen. The teaching staff is divided into departments of 
discipline, seamanship, ordnance, navigation, steam-engineering, 
mechanics, physics, mathematics, English, languages, drawing, and 
physical training. 

Admission, Discipline, etc. : Candidates for admission are appointed 
from each congressional district and at large, and must be within the 
age limit of fifteen and twenty years. Admission is by examination. 
Negroes are not excluded. Two courses of instruction are now 
given, the one for cadet midshipmen, the other for cadet engineers, 
each of four years. All undergraduates are designated as naval 
cadets. Attendance at chapel is compulsory for all. Cadets are 
promoted to the rank of cadet officers for merit. 

Equipvietit: The grounds of the academy, called the campus, 
cover ninety acres. Among the sixty-six buildings are the comman- 
dant's house, a chapel, gymnasium, and other structures worthy of 
note. The United States practice-ship, used by the cadets for their 
summer cruises, is the " Bancroft," and the " Monongahela " has 
been used for similar purposes. In the last academic year Congress 
appropriated $199,618.45. 

Societies and Publications : The cadets publish " Shakings and 
Etchings," "Fag Ends," "Junk," and the "Lucky Bag." Among 
the societies are a branch of the Y. M. C. A., a boat club, football 

eleven and baseball nine. 

StaJ". 

Capt. P. H. Cooper, Superintendent. 
Lieut. -Comm. A. Ross, Asst. Supt. 
Lieut. W. P. Potter, Secretary. 
Comm. W. H. Brownson, Lieut. C. 

E. Colahan, Lieut. T. Porter, Lieut. 

D. Daniels, Lieut. P. W. Hourigan, 

Discipline. 



Lieut .-Comm. W. T. Swinburne, 
Lt. F. E. Beattv, Lt. R. M. Doyle, 
Lt. DeWitt Coffman, Seamanship. 

Lieut. Alexander McCrackin, Supt., 
Lieut. J. H. Glennon, Lieut. J. M. 
Ellicott, Ensign E. Moale, Jr., 
Ordnance. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



317 



A. J. Corbesier, Sword Master. 

J. B. Retz, G. Heintz, Assistant 

Sword Masters. 
Lieut. Comm. B. F. Tilley, Lieut. J. 

A. Norris, Lieut. C. J. Boush, 
Lieut. John Gibson, Navigation. 

C. W. Rae, F. H. Eldridge, F. W. 
Bartlett, L. D. Miner, H. \V. Jones, 
H. O. Stickney, Steam Engineering. 

Lieut.-Comm. Chas. Belknap, Lieut. 
M. L. Wood, Lieut. W. H. Allen, 
Lieut. J. M. Orchard, Lieut. Harry 
Phelps, W. W. Johnson, A.M., 
Mechanics. 

N. M. Terry, A.M., Ph.D., Lieut. T. 

B. Howard, Lieut. J. E. Craven, 
Lieut. J. A. Hoogewerff, Ensign J. 
W. Oman, Paul J. Dashiell, Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Lieut. G. P. Colvocoresses, Supt., 
Ensign A. B. Hoff, C. F. Blauvelt, 
Drawing. 

Conim. Asa Walker, Lieut. A. W. 
Grant, Lieut. H. G. Dresel, Ensign 

A. H. Robertson, Ensign L. H. 
Chandler, Ensign W. V. Pratt, 
Ensign G. R. Marvell, Mathe- 
matics. 

Lieut.-Comm. Perry Garst, Lieut. E. 

B. Underwood, Lieut. J. P. Parker. 



Lieut. G. R. Clark, Ensign E. W. 
Eberle, Ensign E. H, Durell, En- 
sign F. B. Bassett, W. W. Fay, 
A.M., A. N. Brown, English. 

Lieut. G. L. Dyer, Supt., Lieut. T. 
Snowden, Ensign B. F. Hutchison, 
Jules Leroux, Henri Marion, Samuel 
Gardner, Ph.D., P. J.des Garennes, 
A.M., Languages. 

Henry G. Beyer, M.D.. Ph.D., Mat- 
thew Strohm, Physical Training. 

Lieut.-Comm. U. Sebree, in Charge of 
Ships. 

T. C. Walton, M.D., Med. Director. 

W. R. Du Bose, M.D., Surgeon. 

S. S. W^hite, M.D., A. M. D. McCor- 
mick, M.D., Passed Asst. Surgeons. 

T. T. Caswell, Pay Officer. 

W. Goldsborough, Pay Director and 
General Commissary. 

A. L. Royce, Chaplain. 

M. Oliver, U.S.N., Librarian. 

J. M. Spencer, Assistant Librarian. 

R. M. Chase, Secretary. 

A. A. Phelps, Gunner. 

J. S. Sinclair, Boatswain. 

C. J. Murphy, W. G. Smith, Mates. 

Lieut. -Col. McLane Tilton, Capt. J. 
M. T. Young, Lieut. C. A. Doyen, 
Lieut. C.F. Macklin, Marine Officers. 



UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA. 

University, Tusc. Co., Ala. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$26,000 



Students, 
185 



Instructors, 
25 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
I2,G00 



Organization: The university was founded in 1831. It is governed 
by nine trustees and consists of an academic department embracmg 
eleven schools and a professional department of three law schools. 
In the academic department five courses of study are offered : classi- 
cal, literarv, scientific, civil, and mining engineering, leading to degrees 
of B.A., B'S., B.L., C.E., and Min.Eng. with LL.B. in the Law School. 
Master's degrees are given after one year's resident studv. Admission 
is by examination, except for students from the university's auxiliary 
schools. Male candidates must be at least sixteen years old, while 
women must be at least eighteen, and must be prepared to enter the 
sophomore class. To candidates for Bachelor of Science, the study 
of Latin is optional. Candidates for Min. Eng. and Civil Eng. 
do not take Latin or Greek ; but scientific students may take the civil 
or mining engineering course, at the end or the freshman or sopho- 
more year. Attendance at chapel and military drill is compulsoi7 
for all undergraduates. The only fee charged is an incidental one of 



C^.^ 



3i8 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK 



$15 a year for residents of Alabama. Others pay $40 for the year 
lasting from the first Wednesday in October to the middle of June. 
There are post-graduate scholarships, one in mineralogy, geology, 
and chemistry; one in Latin, Greek, and modern languages; one in 
English, history and philosophy ; one in mathematics and physics ; 
and one in civil and mining engineering which entitle the holder to 
instruction in any school except that of law, free of all cost for board, 
lights, fuel, and attendance for one year. 

Equipment : The college buildings, consisting of Alva Woods, 
Manley, Clark, Garland, Tuomey and Barnard halls, surround the uni- 
versity quadrangle. The auditorium in Clark Hall accommodates 
fifteen hundred persons. A gymnasium and armory, with neighbor- 
ing athletic grounds, provide for physical exercise. The natural his- 
tory museum in Garland Hall contains good collections of the 
geology and birds of Alabama. 

Societies aiid Publications: The students publish the ** Crimson- 
White," a weekly, and besides two literary societies, maintain two 
Christian Associations, an Alumni Society (providing for poor stu- 
dents), and an Athletic Association, with baseball and track teams, 
as well as a Tennis Club. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized: * B K, 1847 ; A K E, 1847 ; A A *, 1851-1856; 
* r A, 1855-1878; 2 A £,1856; K 2, 1867-1869; 2 N, 1874; * A 0, 
1877 ; 2 X, 1876-1878; A T n, 1885; and K A, 1885. 

The graduates since the foundation of the college number nearly 
1,500, of whom J. B. Read, M.D., 1834, of Tuscaloosa, Ala., is the 
oldest. 

Faculty. 



Richard C. Jones, LL.D,, President, 

Constitutional Law. 
William S. Wyman, LL.D., Latin, 
Benjamin F. Meek, LL.D., English, 
Wm. A, Parker, LL.D., Mod. Lang. 
Eugene A. Smith, Ph.D., Geology, 
Thomas C. McCorvey, M.A., LL.B., 

History and Philosophy. 
John C. Calhoun, M.A., Greek, Latin. 
Robert A, Hardaway, M.A., C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
Thomas W. Palmer, M,A., Math. 
George M. Edgar, LL,D., Astronomy. 



James M. Pickel, Ph.D., Chemistry, 
Amelia G. Gorgas, Librarian, 
S, Van De Graaflf, B.A., LL.B., Law. 
Ormond Somerville, B,A., LL.B., Law. 
William G, Somerville, M.A., M.D., 

Hygiene. 
Jas. Baylies, U.S.A., Military Tactics. 
Eli Abbott, B.S,, Gymnastics, 
C. H. Coleman, Civil Engineering. 
P. H, Brothers, A.B,, Post Adjutant. 
W. H, Payne, A.B., Law Librarian, 
G. T, Edgar, A,B., Chem. Laboratory. 
Henry McCalley, M.A., Geology. 



UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA. 

Tucson, Arizona. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
100 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 

5 



Books, 
2,000 



The University of Arizona was created by a territorial act of 1885, 
providing for a board of six regents, of whom the governor and 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



319 



superintendent of instruction of the state are ex cjia'o members. 
Building began in 18S7, and the first instruction was given in 1S91. 

The university is situated on high ground covering some forty acres, 
near the mountains, one mile from Tucson. Admission is by exami- 
nation and on certificate. Candidates must be sixteen years old. 
Five courses in collegiate branches, science, engineering, metallurgy, 
and agriculture lead to the degree of B.S. Degrees of A.M., M.S., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., and Irrg.E. are given to graduates after one year 
of resident study. Attendance at military drill is compulsory for all 
male students during the first year, but not so attendance at chapel. 
Tuition is free, but a matiiculation fee of $$ is charged. Other ex- 
penses aggregate from $1^0 to $200 for the year, lasting from 
September 24 to June 2. 

The library contains 2,000 books, of which 1,200 deal with science. 
An agricultural experiment station has been established with two 
chemical laboratories, and a museum containing biological, botanical, 
entomological, and mineralogical specimens. One of the best-equipped 
departments of the university is the School of Mines. The students 
maintain the Philomathean Literary Society. 



Faailty. 



Howard Billman, A.M., President, 
Civics. 

Wm. P. Blake, Ph.B., A-M., Geology, 
School of Mines. 

James W. Tourney, B.S., Biology. 

Edward M. Boggs, Engineering, Com- 
mandant. 

H.J. Hall, A.B., English, Librarian. 

George L. Hoxie, M.E., Mechanics. 



Robert H. Forbes, B.S., Chemistry. 
Wm. S. Devol, B.Agr., Agriculture. 
John A. Rockfellow, A.M., Math. 
Gertrude B. Hughes, English Branches. 
Annie G. Rockfellow, Preparatory. 
Montford Mendenhall, Stenography. 
Jose E. del Castillo, Music. 
Herbert Brown, Museum. 
Mrs. S. A. Buell, Matron. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Berkeley, Cat. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
55285,237 




Instructors, 
235 



Buildings, 



Books, 
65,000 



History : The university was instituted by a law which received the 
approval of the governor^ March 23, 1868. Instruction was begun in 
Oakland in the autumn of 1869. The commencement exercises of 
1873 were held at Berkeley, July 16, when the university was 
formally transferred to its permanent home. Instruction began at 
Berkeley in the autumn of 1873. The new constitution of 1879 made 
the existing organization of the university perpetual. 

The College of California, which had been organized several years 
before the university, transferred its property and students upon 
terms which were mutually agreed upon, and closed its work of 
instruction in 1869. It had been incorporated in 1855, and through 
its agency a part of the Oakland property of the university and the 



320 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

Berkeley site now owned and occupied by the latter, were secured — 
a domain of about two hundred and fifty acres, situated on the slope 
of the Contra Costa hills, about five miles from Oakland, facing the 
Golden Gate. 

The undergraduate colleges were the only ones actually included in 
the original organization, although the Organic Act contemplated the 
establishment of Colleges of Law and Medicine. The professional 
colleges in San Francisco have been added from time to time. The 
Lick Observatory was formally transferred to the university in June, 
1888 ; the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, in 1893. 

Organization : The university comprises the following departments: 
College of Letters, College of Social Sciences, College of Natural 
Sciences, College of Agriculture, College of Mechanics, College of 
Mining, College of Civil Engineering, College of Chemistry, Lick 
Astronomical Department, Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, Hastings 
College of Law, Medical Department, Post-graduate Medical Depart- 
ment, College of Dentistry and California College of Pharmacy. 

The government and financial management of the university is 
intrusted to the regents, consisting of the governor, the lieutenant- 
governor, the speaker of the Assembly, the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, the president of the State Agricultural Society, 
the president of the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco, and the 
president of the university, as members ex officio, and sixteen other 
regents appointed by the governor and approved by the senate. 

The instruction and government of the students are intrusted to the 
several faculties and to the Academic Senate. The Senate consists of 
the members of the faculties and the instructors of the university. It 
holds regular meetings twice a year, and is created for the purpose of 
conducting the general administration of the university, memorializing 
the board of regents, regulating in the first instance the general and 
special courses of instruction, and receiving and determining all 
appeals from acts of discipline enforced by the faculty of any college. 

The Academic Council is composed of the president and the pro- 
fessors and instructors in the College of Letters and the Colleges of 
the Sciences, the president and professors alone having the right to 
vote in its transactions. The president of the University is ex officio 
chairman, and the recorder, secretary. It regulates provisionally, 
or supervises, such matters as are not reserved by law to the separate 
faculties at Berkeley, but in which they are all concerned. 

The Professional Council is composed of the president of the uni- 
versity and two members of each of the faculties of Law, Medicine, 
Dentistry, and Pharmacy, elected annually by these faculties, respec- 
tively. Of this committee, the president of the university is ex officio 
chairman, the secretary being elected from its own number. It 
regulates provisionally, or supervises those matters in which these 
colleges are all concerned ; it also considers the wants of any or all of 
these colleges, and makes recommendations concerning the same to 
the Academic Senate. 

The editorial committee, consists of the president of the university, 
as chairman ex officio and two professors in the College of Letters, 
elected annually by the Academic Council. This committee has 
editorial charge of the " Register " and such other publications con- 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 321 

cerning courses of instruction and like matters as are from time to 
time authorized by the Academic Council or by the Senate. 

In all matters not expressly delegated to the Senate or to the 
several faculties, the Board of Regents governs, either directly or 
through the president or secretary. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees: Admission is by examination and 
on the certificates of forty-eight accredited schools. The curricula of 
the various departments lead to degrees of B.A., B.L , B.S., A.M., 
C.E., D.D.S., D.V.S., LL.B., A.M., M.L., M.S., ME., M.D., Met.E., 
Min.E., Ph.G., Ph.B., and Ph.D. 

Dties, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition in the colleges and at the 
observatory is free, with only incidental expenses and inevitable 
charges at the special schools. Six fellowships of $600, two of $500, 
two of $200; eleven scholarships of $300, eight of which are for 
women, and several loan funds are annually available. In addition 
to these m^ny gold and silver medals are annually distributed for 
excellence in specified studies. 

EqiiipjueJit : The endowments on which the College of Letters and 
the Colleges of the Sciences have been founded and maintained are 
the following : The Seminary Fund and Public Building Fund, 
granted to the state by Congress ; the property received from the 
College of California, including the site at 13erkeley; the fund 
derived from the Congressional Land Grant of July 2, 1862 ; the Tide 
Land Fund, appropriated by the State ; various appropriations by the 
State Legislature for specified purposes ; the State University Fund, 
which is a perpetual endowment derived from a State tax of one cent 
on each $100 of assessed valuation; the Endowment Fund of the 
Lick Astronomical Department ; the United States Experiment Sta- 
tion Fund of $15,000 a year ; the Morrill College Aid Fund, yielding 
in the current year $20,000 ; and the gifts of individuals. The Colleges 
of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy are supported bv fees from 
students ; the College of the Law and the Mark Hopkins Institute 
of Art have separate endowments. The general library contains 
60,000 volumes, and has the income from $50,000 annually. Be- 
sides collections of ethnology, botany, zoology, paleontology, geology, 
mineralogy, petography, soils, seeds, and models, the university 
has a gallery of fine arts, and a museum of classical archaeology. 
Extensive laboratories including a botanical garden, conservatory, 
students' observatory, the famous Lick Observatory and others have 
been equipped by the various departments. Experiment stations are 
maintained at the Berkeley, Jackson, Paso-Robles, Tulare, between 
Chino and Pomona, Santa Monica, and the San Josea Mission. A 
gymnasium was presented to the university by A. K. P. Harmon. 

Societies and Publications : Besides eighteen publications and bulle- 
tins issued by the university, the " Blue and Gold," with other publi- 
cations is issued by the students. They also maintain among numerous 
other social, literary and religious associations, several athletic asso- 
ciations, with football, baseball, lacrosse, and track teams. Chapters 
of the following fraternities have been organized : Z % 1870; * A 0, 
1873; X*, 1875; A KE, 1876; B n, 1879; K K r, 1880-1884; *rA, 
1882; * A *, 1883 ; 2 X, 1886; and K A 0, 1890. 

The graduates number nearly 3,000, of whom 2,500 are living. 



322 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Facultv. 



Martin Kellogg, A.M., LL.D., Pres. 
John Harmon C. Bonte, A.M., D.D., 

Legal Ethics. 
Joseph LeConte, A.M., M.D., LL.D., 

Geology and Natural History. 
F. Soule, Civ. Engineering and Astron. 
Stephen J. Field, LL.D., Law. 
Willard B. Rising,A.M.,M.E., Ph.D., 

Chemistry. 
George Davidson, Ph.D., Sc.D., Ge- 

odesv and Astronomy. 
R. B. Cole, A.M., M.D., M.R.C.S., 

Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
George C. Edwards, Ph.B., Math. 
Albin Putzker, A.M., German. 
Eugene W. Hilgard, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Agriculture. 
Samuel B. Christy, Ph.D., Mining and 

Metallurgy. 
Frederick Slate, B.S., Physics. 
Frederick G. Hesse, Mechanical En- 
gineering. 
Bernard Moses, Ph.D., History and 

Political Economy. 
Wm. C. Jones, A.M., Jurisprudence. 
William T. Wenzel, M.D., Ph.M., 

Chemistry. 
Robert A. McLean, M.D., Clinical 

and Operative Surgery. 
G. A. Shurtleff, M.D., Emeritus. 
William F. McNutt, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Diseases of Heart and Kidneys. 
Edmund O'Neill, Ph.B., Chemistry. 
Edward J. Wickson, A.M., Agricul- 
ture, etc. 
Hans H. Behr, M.D., Emeritus. 
William M. Searby, Materia Medica. 
William E. Taylor, M.D., Surgery. 
Clark L. Goddard, A.M., D.D.S.., 

Orthodontia. 
Abraham L. Lengfeld, M.D., Chemis- 
try and Metallurgy. 
Irving Stringham, Ph.D., Math. 
Edward Lee Greene, Ph.B., Botany. 
Cornelius B. Bradley, A.M., Rhetoric. 
William B. Lewitt, M.D., Anatomy. 
Benjamin R. Swan, M.D., Diseases 

of Children. 
George H. Howison, A.M., LL.D., 

Intellectual and Moral Philosophy. 
Luis L. Dunbar, D.D.S., Operative 

Dentistry, etc. 
Maurice J. Sullivan, D.D.S., Dental 

Pathology. 
Charles W. Slack, Ph.B., LL.B., Law. 



Herman Kower, C.E., Instrumental 

Drawing. 
Edward S. Holden, A.M. LL.D., 

Lick Observatory and Astronomer. 
George H. Powers, A.M., M.D., 

Opthalmology, etc. 
Joachim H. Senger, Ph.D., German. 
William W. Kerr, A.M., M.B., Clini- 
cal Medicine. 
Felicien V. Paget,French and Spanish. 
Arnold A. D'Ancona, A.B., M.D., 

Physiology and Microscopy. 
Thomas R. Bacon, A.B., B.D., Euro- 
pean History. 
Elisha W. McKinstry, LL.D., Law. 
William D. Armes, Ph.B, EngHsh. 
Douglass W. Montgomery, M.D., His- 
tology and Pathology, etc. 
George M. Richardson, Ph.D., Clas- 
sical Archaeology. 
Charles M. Gaylev, A.B., Enp-Hsh. 
Mellen W. Haskell, Ph.D., Math. 
Armin O.Leuschner,A.B., Astronomy 

and Geodesy. 
Alexis F. Lange, Ph.D., English. 
Andrew C. Lawson, Ph.D. Geology. 
Henry I. Randall, B.S., Civil En- 
gineering. 
Isaac Flagg, Ph.D., Classical Phi- 
lology. 
Washington Dodge, M.D., Thera- 
peutics and Medicine. 
John M. Williamson, M.D., Anatomy. 
J. J. B. Argenti, Ph.G., Botany, etc. 
Robert H. Loughridge, Ph.D., Agri- 
cultural Geology and Chemistry, 
Charles W. Woodworth, M.S., En- 
tomology. 
Walter E. Magee, Physical Culture, 
William J. Raymond, B.S., Physics. 
William E. Ritter, M.A., Biology, 
Samuel D, Huntington, A.B., French. 
Leon J. Richardson, A.B., Latin. 
Marshal A. Howe, Ph.B., Cryptogamic 

Botany, 
Joseph C. Rowell, A,B,, Librarian, 
John W. Robertson, A.B., M.D., 

Insanity and Medical Law. 
John M. Schaeberle, M.S., C.E,, 

Astronomer, 
Edward E. Barnard, A,M,, Sc.D., 

Astronomer, 
Wm, W, Campbell, P,S,, Astronomer. 
Harold Whiting, Ph.D., Physics. 
MyerE. Jaffa, Ph.B., Agr. Laboratory. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



323 



George E. Colby, Ph.B., Viticultural 

Laboratory. 
Frank H. Payne, M.D., Physical 

Culture. 
Elmer Reginald Drew, B.S., Physics. 
William E. Hopkins, M.D., Opthal- 

mology. 
Elmer E. Brown, Ph.D., Teaching. 
Louis Du Pont Syle, A.M., English. 
Franklin T, Green, Ph.G., Director of 

Laboratory. 
Fred Emory Haynes, Ph.D., U.S. Plist. 
Louis Bazet, M.D,, Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
Edward S. Clark, M.D., Otology. 
Frederick W. D'Evelyn, M.B., CM., 

Pediatrics. 
Charles A. von Hoffmann, M.D., 

Gynecology, etc. 
Henry Kreutzmann, M.D., Gynecology 

and Obstetrics. 
Martin Regensburger, M.D., Derma- 
tology, etc. 
Harry M. Sherman, A.M., M.D., 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
George F. Shiels, M.D., CM. (Edin.), 

Surgery and Hygiene. 
Henry Lewis Wagner, Ph.D., M.D., 

Rhinology and Laryngology. 
William A. Martin, M.D., Opthal- 

mology. 
Luke Robinson, M.D., M.R.C.P. 

(Lond.), Gynecology. 
William H. Mays, M.D., Gynecology. 
Leo Newmark, M.D., Neurology. 
John C Spencer, A.B., M.D., Pa- 
thology and Histology. 
Archie B. Pierce, A.M., Math. 
E. H. Samuels, Ph.G., M.D., Chem. 
Ambrose E. O'Neill, Laboratory. 
Josephine E. Barbat, Ph.G., Botany. 
Martin R. Gibson, Microscopy, etc. 
Henry E. Besthorn, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 
Charles A. Seifert, Ph.G., Materia 

Medica. 
William J. Sharwood, Chemistry. 
Clarence L. Cory, M.M.E., Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 
Richard H. Tucker. Jr., C.E., Astron. 
Frederick A. Grazer, Ph.G., M.D., 

Pharmacy. 
Frank L. Winn, First Lieut., Military 

Science and Tactics. 
George M.Stratton, A.M., Philosophy. 
CarlC. Plehn, Ph.D., History, etc, 
Louis Theodore Hengstler, Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 



William J. Raymond, B.S., Physics. 

Thomas F. Sanford. A.B., English. 

Edward B. Clapp, Ph.D., Greek. 

Walter S. Thorne, M.D., Surgery. 

Amedee JouUin, Painting. 

Oscar Kunath, Portraits. 

Arthur F. Mathews, Antique and Life 
Painting. 

John A. Stanton, Antique Class. 

Raymond D. Yelland, Landscape 
Painting. 

Henry T. Ardley, S.A., Decorative 
and Industrial Art. 

Charles H. Howard, French. 

Ernest A. Hersam, B.S., Metallurgy, 
etc. 

Herbert P. Johnson, Ph.D., Biology, 
ad interim. 

Jacob Voorsanger, Semitic Languages. 

William A. Merrill, Ph.D., L.H.D., 
Latin. 

Thos. P. Bailey, Jr., Ph.D., Teaching. 

Gustave Faucheux, A.B., French. 

Bernard R. Maybeck, Drawing. 

Evander B. McGilvary, A.M., English. 

Levi Frederick Chesebrough, Mechanic 
Arts, Machine Shops. 

Ernest H. Simonds, B.S., Assaying. 

John J. Rivers, Curator of Museum. 

Joseph W. Flinn, University Printer. 

Joseph Dieffenbach Layman, B.L., 
Assistant Librarian. 

John G. G. Hansen, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

Julius Forrer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Frederick T. Bioletti, B.S., Agricul- 
tural Station Cellar. 

James Sutton, Ph.B., Recorder of the 
Faculties. 

Charles H. Shinn, A.B., Inspector of 
Agricultural Stations. 

Emil Kellner, Gardner Coll. of Agri. 

William G. W. Harford, University 
Museum. 

Willis L. Jepson, Ph.B., Botany. 

Mary B. Ritter, M.D., Woman physi- 
cian. 

Walter C. Blasdale, B.S., Chemistry. 

Samuel J. Holmes, M.S., Biological 
Laboratory. 

Joseph Nisbet Le Conte, M.M.E., 
Mechanics. 

Robert S. Norris, B.S., Chemistry. 

Charles L. Gillman, Chemistry. 

Arnold V. Stubenrauch, Clerk in Ag- 
ricultural Stations. 



324 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Henry E. J. Ongerth, German. 
Oscar Schober, Mechanics. 
William H. Tyson, Foreman of Agri- 
cultural Station. 
Ivar Tidestrom, Botany. 
Loren E. Hunt, B.S., Civil Eng. 
Arthur P. Hayne, Ph.B,, Viticulture. 
Cecil K, Jones, Assistant Librarian. 
Victor Lenher, Chemistry. 
James W. Mills, Foreman Agricultural 

Station. 
William J. Strachan, Foreman Agri- 
cultural Station. 
Sanford A. Moss, Mechanics. 
Fred H. Seares, Students' Observa- 
tory. 
Ralph W. Putnam, Patron Agricul- 
tural Station. 
Robert F. Pennell, A.B., Patron 

Agricultural Station. 
Anthony B. Boland, Forestry Station. 
Silas E. Coleman, Physics. 
Augustus V. Saph, B.S., Math. 
William H. Wright, B.S., Math. 
Sarah I. Shuey, Ph.B., M.D., Woman 

Physician. 
George Gibbs, Asst. Physical Culture. 
Walter H. Graves, Reader in Greek. 
Annie W. Brewer, Pedagogy. 
Allen L. Colton, Ph.B., A.B., Astron. 
Charles D. Perrine, Secretary. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Winslow Anderson, A.M., M.D., 
Principle and Practice. 

John H. Barbat, Ph.G., M.D., S. J. 
Eraser, John M. Sims, Samuel P. 
Tuggle, M.D., Anatomy. 

Thomas Bowhill, Bacteriology. 

Philip Collischonn, M.D., Albert K. 
Hapersberg, A.B., M.D., Hugh 
Lagen, George H. Powers, A.M., 
M.D., John M.Williamson, Dispen- 
sary Staff, 

Henry B. A. Kugeler, Pathology and 
Histology. 

Edward von Adelung, Physiology. 

Henry N. Winton, M.D., Therapeut. 

GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Joseph E. Artigues, M.D., Assistant 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
James A. Black, M.D., Assistant 

Rhinology, etc. 
Philip K. Brown, M.D., Neurology, 
Clark J. Burnham, M.D. Diseases of 

Heart and Kidneys. 



Henry G. Burton, M.D., Opths* 

mology. 
Philip Collischonn, M.D., Pediatrics. 
Tenison Deane, M.D., Dermatology, 

Richard M. H. Berndt, M.D., Medi- 
cine. 
Campbell Ford, M.D., Genito-Uri- 
nary Surgery, 
William F. Friedhofer, M.D. Gyne- 
cology. 
Samuel J. Hunkin, M.D., Orthopedic 

Surgery. 
Philip M. Jones, M.D., Otology. 
William L. Knudler, M.D., Opthal- 

mology. 
Lucia M. Lane, M.D., Gynecology. 
George C. Macdonald, M.D., Surgery 
John M. Macdonald, M.D., Gyne- 
cology. 
James F. McCone, M.D., Gynecology. 
John R. McMurdo, M.D., Ophthal- 
mology. 
George W. Merritt, M.D., Ophthal- 
mology. 
Theorilda C. Park, M.D., Gynecology. 
Frank B. Petrie, M.D., Rhinology, etc. 
Ernest Pring, M.D., Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
Virginia W. Smiley,M.D., Orthop. Sur. 
Weston O. Smith, M.D., Dermatology, 

etc. 
William B. Stephens, M.D., Otology. 
Walter M. Thorne, M.D., Surgery. 
Samuel P. Tuggle, M.D., Opthal- 

mology. 
Charles C. Wadsvvorth, M.D., Rhin- 
ology, etc. 
John F. P. Wetzel, M.D., Surgery. 
Frank P. Wilson, M.D., Orthopedic 

Surgery. 
Henry N. Winton, M.D., Medicine. 

COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY. 

J. L. Asay, M.D., Clinical Instructor. 

John H. Barbat, Ph.G., M.D., Anat- 
omy. 

Frank W. Bliss, D.D.S., Clinical 
Instructor. 

Charles Boxton, D.D.S., Lecturer. 

Harry P. Carlton, D.D.S., Operative 
Technic. 

George H. Chance, D.D.S., Clinical 
Instructor. 

Henry C. Davis, L.D.S., Clinical 
Instructor. 

Warren De Crow, Clinical Instructor. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



325 



Albert T. Derby, D.D.S., Mechanical 

Dentistry. 
Paul C. Erhardt, D.D.S., Operative 

Dentistry. 
S. J. Fraser, Anatomy. 
Jos. D. Hodgen, D.D.S., Chem., etc. 
Albert 0. Hooker, Clinical Instructor. 
Ottiwell W. Jones, M.D., Anatomy. 
Henry E. Knox, D.D.S., Clinical 

Instructor. 
Walter F. Lewis, D.D.S., Clinical 

Instructor. 
James W. Likens, D.D.S., Operative 

Dentistry. 
Charles A. Litton, D.D.S., Supt. 

Infirmary. 
Fred H. Metcalf, D.D.S., Clinical 

Instructor. 
Howard D. Noble, D.D.S., Mechanical 

Dentistry, etc. 
James P. Parker, D.D.S., Clinical 

Instructor. 



William E. Price, D.D.S., Clinical 
Instructor. 

Harold L. Seager, D.D.S., Mechani- 
cal Dentistr}'. 

William F. Sharp, D.D.S., D.M.D., 
Operative Dentistry. 

J. G. Sharp, Physiology, etc. 

William B. Sherman, i3.D.S., Clinical 
Instructor. 

Max Sichel, Clinical Instructor. 

Emory L. Townsend, D.D.S., Clini- 
cal Instructor. 

Leander Van Orden, M.D., Clinical 
Instructor. 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

Josephine E. Barbat, Botany. 

H. E. Besthorn, Pharmacy. 

M. R. Gibson, Microscopy, Histology. 

Robert A. Leet, Ph.G., Chemistry. 

OttoA.Weihe, Ph.G., Materia Medica. 



UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 

Chicago^ III, Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
) 1,860,000 



Students, 
1850 



Instructors, 
i«7 



Buildings, 
23 



Books, 
325,000 



History: The first University of Chicago was founded in 1857 by 
the Baptist Society of Chicago, and was presided over for many years 
by the Rev. Dr. Burroughs. In 1886, its doors were closed owing to 
lack of funds. Its successor, the present University of Chicago, was 
founded by John D. Rockefeller, who subscribed $600,000 of its 
original endowment fund of one million dollars to which he 
afterward added three and a half million dollars in bonds. The 
original site, valued at $125,000 was given by Marshall Field, who 
also gave $100,000 in money. More than one million dollars for new 
schools and buildings have since been donated or bequeathed to the 
university. A president for the university was elected in the spring 
of 1 891. Work on the new buildings began in the autumn of the 
same year. On October ist, 1892, the new school opened its doors to 
some 600 students. Cobb Lecture Hall and two dormitories for 
graduates were the only buildings then ready for use. Since that 
time fourteen of the projected number of forty-two buildings have 
been erected, while the number of students has risen to 1850. 

Organization: According to its charter the aims of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago are to give facilities for higher education to both 
sexes; to erect and maintain schools of literature, science, law, medi- 
cine, technolog)', music and the fine arts; and to confer degrees. 
The university is governed by a self-electing body of twenty-one 



326 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



trustees, by the president, a university council and the university 
senate. The trustees elect the president and all members of the 
faculty. The president is the executive head of the university in all 
its departments, is responsible for the discipline of the university, 
presides at the meetings of the faculties, and is the official medium 
of communication between the faculties and the Board of Trustees, 
and between the students and the trustees; he recommends all 
appointments to the several faculties, and must submit an annual 
report of the work and condition of the university in al4 its depart- 
ments. 

The University Senate consists of the president, the recorder, 
the head professors of the departments of instruction, and the 
university librarian. It considers all questions of education. The 
University Council consists of the president, the examiner, the 
recorder, the registrar, the chaplain, the deans of all schools, 
colleges and academies, the director of the university extension 
division, the director of the university libraries, laboratories and 
museums, the director of the university press, the director of the 
university affiliations, and the principals or deans of affiliated 
institutions. The Council considers and decides on matters of 
administration. The university includes five divisions : the univer- 
sity proper ; the university extension ; the university libraries, 
laboratories and museums ; the university press ; the university 
affiliations. The university proper includes : the Graduate School of 
Arts and Literature, the Ogden (Graduate) School of Science; the 
Divinity School, already organized; the School of Law, the School 
of Medicine, the School of Technology, the School of Fine Arts, and 
the School of Music, to be established when the funds of the 
university permit ; the Colleges of Arts, Literature, and Science. 

Admission, histriiction, Examiitatiojis, Degrees: The university 
requires examinations for admission in : Latin, Greek, Mathematics, 
English, History, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, German and French. 
Of these all but Greek, Chemistry, Biology and one modern language 
are indispensable. Courses of instruction in the university are 
classified as majors and minors. The major calls for eight to ten 
hours of class-room work, or its equivalent, each week; the minor, 
for four to five hours of class-room work, or its equivalent, each week. 
A major continuing through twelve weeks is called a double major; a 
minor continuing through twelve weeks is a double minor. I'he 
regular work of a student during each term of a quarter is one major 
and one minor or three minors. Non-resident work is accepted for 
only one third of the work required for a degree. Degrees of A.B., 
Ph.B., and S.B., according to the courses of instruction pursued, are 
given after a satisfactory completion of twenty-four majors and twenty- 
four minors or thirty-six majors. The degree of A.M. is given after 
a post-graduate course of one year and an examination ; the degree 
of Ph.D. is given after three years of post-graduate study at the 
university, an examination, and the submission of a printed thesis. 
No honorary degrees are conferred. 

Dues and Scholarships : Tuition per annum is $140 in the grad- 
uate schools. The matriculation fee is ^5, and is paid but once. 
The fee for instruction is ^40 a quarter. Students in chemistry or 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



3^7 



biology pay a laboratory fee of $io a quarter for a major cour.^e, $5 
for a minor course. The fee for a diploma is $10. A bond of ;52oo 
is required of all students. Of eighty existing scholarships and 
fellowships, forty yield $120 a. year, twenty $320, and twenty $520 a 
year. Five are special fellowships. 

T/ie Academic year: The year is divided into four quarters, 
beginning respectively on the first day of July, October, January, and 
April, and continuing twelve weeks each, with a recess of one week 
between the close of one quarter and the beginning of the next. 
Each quarter is divided into two equal terms of six weeks. Attendance 
at chapel is voluntary. 

A large number of social, literary, religious, and athletic societies are 
maintained by the students, who also publish several college journals. 



Factdty, 



William R. Harper, Ph.D., D.D., 

LL.D., President, Semitic. 
Henry P. Judson, A.M., LL.D., 

Dean, Political Science. 
George D. Boardman, D.D., LL.D., 

Ethics. 
William C. Wilkinson, A.M., D.D., 

Poetry and Criticism. 
Hermann E. von Hoist, Ph.D., 

History. 
Thomas C. Chamberlin, Ph.D., 

LL.D., Geology. 
John H. IBarrows, D.D., Comparative 

Religion. 
Charles O. Whitman, Ph.D., Zoology. 
John M. Coulter, Ph.D., Botany. 
William G. Hale, A.B., Latin. 
Sherburne W. Burnham, A.M., 

Astronomy. 
Charles Chandler, A.M., Latin. 
William H. Holmes, A.B., Geology. 
Emil G. Hirsch, Ph.D., Rabinical 

Literature and Philosophy. 
J. L. Laughlin, Ph.D., Political 

Economy. 
Albert A. Michelson, Ph.D., Physics. 
Frank B. Tarbell, Ph.D., Archaeology. 
Daniel G. Elliot, F.R.S.E., Zoology. 
Charles F. Millspaugh, Botany. 
Oskar Bolza, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Ernest D. Burton, A.B., New 

Testament. 
Albion W. Small, Ph.D., Sociology. 
Joseph P. Iddings, Ph.B., Petrology. 
Paul Shorey, Ph.D., Greek. 
Benjamin S. Terry, Ph.D., Mediaeval 

and English History. 
John Dewey, Ph.D., Philosophy. 
Henry H. Donaldson, Ph.D., Neu- 

roiogv. 
Rollin D. Salisbury, A.M. 



Oliver C. Farrington, Ph.D., 
Mineralogy. 

E. R. L. Gould, Ph.D., Statistics. 

Frank F. Abbott, Ph.D. 

Eliakim H, Moore, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics. 

John U. Nef., Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Richard A. F. Penrose, Jr., Ph.D., 
Geology. 

Adolph C. Miller, A.M., Political 
Economy. 

Edward E. Barnard, A.M., Sc.D., 
Astronomy. 

C. R. Van Hise, Ph.D., Pre- 
Cambrian Geology. 

Charles D. Walcott, Paleontology. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 

Julia E. Bulkley, Pedagogy. 

Charles R. Henderson, A.M., D.D., 
Sociology. 

William D. McClintock, A.M., 
English Literature. 

George Baur, Ph.D., Paleontology. 

Ira M. Price, D.B., Ph.D., Semitic. 

Jacques Loeb, M.D., Physiology. 

Clarence F. Castle, Ph.D., Greek. 

Marion Talbot, A.M., Sanitary 
Science. 

George S. Goodspeed, Ph.D., Com- 
parative Religions. 

Starr W. Cutting. Ph.D., German. 

Frederick Starr, Ph.D., Anthropology. 

Robert F. Harper, Ph.D., Semitic. 

Charles A. Strong, A.B., Psychology. 

Samuel W. Stratton, S.B., Physics. 

James H. Tufts, Ph.D., Philosophy. 

Carl D. Buck, Ph.D., Sanskrit and 
Philology. 

A. A. Stagg, A.B., Culture. 

George E. Hale, S.B., Astro-Physics. 



328 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

Francis A. Blackburn, Ph.D., Eng- 
lish. 
Eugene Bergeron, A.B., French. 
Heinrich Maschke, Ph.D., Mathemat- 
ics and Physics. 
Martha F. Crow, Ph.D., English. 
Howard B. Grose, Ph.D., Registrar. 
Albert H. Tolman, Ph.D., English. 
Frank J. Miller, Ph.D., Latin. 
Felix Lengfeld, Ph.D., Inorganic 

Chemistry. 
U. S. Wartenberg, Ph.D., German. 
Ernst Freund, J.U.D., Jurisprudence 

and Roman Law. 
Geo. Herbert Mead, A.B., Philosophy. 
William Morton Wheeler, Ph.D., 

Em. bryology. 
Sho VVatase, Ph.D., Cellular Biology. 
George C. Howland, A.M., Romance 

Literature. 
Alexander Smith, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Edward Capps, Ph.D., Greek. 
Edwin O. Jordan, Ph.D., Anatomy. 
F. L. O. Wadsworth, S.B., E.M., 

M.E., Physics. 
James D. Bruner, Ph.D., Romance 

Literature. 
Clifford H Moore, A.B., Latin. 
James Rowland Angell, A.M., Ex- 
perimental Psychology. 
Robert Herrick, A.B., Rhetoric. 
Rene DePoyen-Bellisle, Ph.D., Ro- 
mance Philology. 
W. Muss-Arnolt, Ph.D., Biblical and 

Patristic Greek. 
Myra Reynolds, A.M., English. 
Massuo Ikuta, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
William Isaac Thomas, Ph.D., Ethnic 

Psychology. 
David J. Lingle. Ph.D., Physiology. 
George E. Vincent, A.B., Sociology. 
Camillo Von Klenze, Ph.D., German. 
S. H. Clark, Elocution. 
Jas. Harrington Boyd, Sc.D., Math. 
Jacob William Albert Young, Ph.D., 

Mathematics. 
Edwin H. Lewis, Ph.D., Rhetoric. 
William Bishop Owen, A.B., D.B., 

Greek. 
Julius Stieglitz, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Thomas J. J. See, Ph.D., Astronomy. 
Ferdinand Schwill, Ph.D., Modern 

History. 
Wm. Hill, A.M., Political Economy. 
Robert Morss Lovett, A.B., Rhetoric. 
Carlos C. Closson, A.M., Polit. Econ. 



Paul Oskar Kern, German. 
Thorstein B. Veblen, Ph.D., Political 

Economy. 
Arthur T. Walker, A.M., Latin. 
Clyde Weber Votaw, A.M., D.B., 

Biblical Literature. 
Alexander M. Morrison, A.M., Physics. 
Harris Hancock, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Albert C. Eycleshymer, Ph.D., Anat. 
Kate Anderson, Physical Culture. 
Glen M. Hobbs, S.B., Physics. 
Ralph C. H. Catterall, A.B., Modem 

History. 
Wardner Williams, Mus.B., Ph.D., 

Music. 
Herbert E. Slaught, A.M., Math. 
Hurt Laves, Ph.D., Astronomy. 
Jas. H. Breasted, Ph.D., Egyptology. 
Charles T. Conger, A.B., Political 

Geography. 
Addison Webster Moore, A.M., Psy- 
chology. 
Jas. Westfall Thompson, A.B., Hist. 
Bradley M. Davis, Ph.D., Botany. 
Simon Fraser McLennan, A.B., Ex- 
perimental Psychology. 
George A. Mulfinger, A.B., German. 
Elizabeth Wallace, S.B., American 

Institutions. 
Hermann B. Almstedt, A,B., German. 
Wilmer Cave France, Ph.D., Greek 

and Latin. 
Edmund C. Buckley, Ph.D., Com- 
parative Religion. 
Olaus Dahl, Ph.D., Scandinavian Lit. 
Fred. Ives Carpenter, Ph.D., English. 
Geo. B. Hussey, A.M., Ph.D., Greek. 
Albrecht Wirth, Ph.D., Ancient Hist. 
Richard S. Curtiss, Ph.D.. Chem. 
John Campbell Merriam, Ph.D., Pale- 
ontology. 
Gerald M. West, Ph.D., Anthropology. 
Louis A. Baur, Ph.D., Physics. 
Adolph Meyer, M.D., Neurology. 
Max West, Ph.D., Municipal Insti- 
tutions. 
Norman Wyld, Zoology. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL. 

Franklin Johnson, D.D., Church His- 
tory and Homiletics. 

Eri Baker Hulburt, A.M., D.D., 
Church History. 

Shailer Mathews, A.M., New Testa- 
ment. 

John W. Moncrief, A.M., Church 
History. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



329 



Richard Green Moulton, Ph.D., Eng- 

hsh Literature. 
Nathaniel Butler, A.M., English Lit. 
Oliver Joseph Thatcher, Ph.D., Hist. 
Edward W. Bemis, Ph.D., Pol. Econ. 
William Hoover, Ph.D., Math. 



Chas. Zeublin, Ph.B,, D.B., Sociologv. 
Clark Eugene Crandall, D.B., Ph.D., 

Semitic. 
Francis Wayland Shepardson, Ph.D., 

History. 
John M. Coulter, Ph.S., M.S., Botany. 



Summer Lecturers. 



E. Benjamin Andrews, Social Ethics. 
E. A. Ross, Sociology. 
George T. Ladd, Philosophy. 
Bernard C. Moses, History. 
Earl Barnes, Pedagogy. 
Rush Rhees, New Testament Lit. 
Rev. W. H. P. Faunce, Homiletics. 
Ewald Fliigel, English Literature. 



Joseph Ager Belt, New Testament 

Theology. 
John A. Miller, Mathematics. 
Gustav E. Karsten, German. 
George Adam Smith, Old Testament 

Theology. 
W. B. Chamberlain, Elocution. 
Maffeo Pantaleoni, Banking, Finance. 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI. 

Cincinnati, O. Co-Educational. Non- Sectarian. 



Income, 
^85,853 



Students, 



Instructors, 
23 



Buildings, 
4 



Books, 
10,000 



History aitd Organization: In 1858, Charles McMicken bequeathed 
$1,000,000 to the city for a school in which students should 
" receive the benefit of a sound, thorough, and practical English edu- 
cation," as well as instruction in the higher branches of knowledge, 
" except in denominational theology." Inasmuch as a large part of 
this bequest consisted of land in Louisiana, valued at $500,000, it 
was lost to the city, for the State of Louisiana took possession of it, 
refusing to recognize the validity of bequests of real estate to 
institutions not situated in its borders. In 1870, the Ohio Legislature 
passed an act " to enable cities of the first class to promote education," 
under which the city of Cincinnati accepted w'hat was left of the 
McMicken bequest. Pending the erection of college buildings, in- 
struction was given in the Woodward High School, and later after 
the formal organization of the university in 1875 ^^ another school 
on Franklin Street. From 1875 ^^ ^895, the university occupied the 
buildings erected for it on the grounds of the McMicken homestead 
on McMicken Avenue. Latterly the University has been established 
on a tract of forty-three acres at the southern end of Burnet Woods 
Park. The directors, who are appointed by the Superior Court of 
Cincinnati, number nineteen, including the mayor of the city, an ex- 
officio member. 

Admission, Instrnction, Degrees: Admission is by certificate and 
by examination. Persons who are at least twenty years old may 
be admitted without examination to lectures and laboratory courses 
at the will of the individual lecturer or professor, but recitation courses 
are for matriculated students only. The university offers nine groups 



330 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



of studies, each extending over four years, leading to bachelors' de- 
grees in Arts, Letters, Science, Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Civil 
Engineering, Mathematics, and Physics. A large part of the work in- 
cluded in these courses is elective. Master's degrees and the degree 
of civil engineer are conferred after graduate work, whether in absentia 
or otherwise, except in case of graduates from other colleges, of whom 
resident study is required. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic exer- 
cise is voluntary. Instruction is free to bona fide residents of Cincin- 
nati, and to the alumni of the university. Non-residents pay $75 for 
the year, lasting from September 27 to June 15, while special students 
p y %'}^ or a fee of $5 a year for a course of one hour a week, with pro- 
rata increase of charges for every additional hour. Further fees are 
charged for registration, supplemental examinations, and for labora- 
tory work. 

Equipme7it : The University buildings are McMicken and Hanna 
Halls, erected in 1895 ^'^^ 1S96 on Burnet Woods Park; and the old 
college building on McMicken Avenue, in which the scientific labo- 
ratories are still maintained. The general library, containing the 
collections of E. F. Bliss and others, is in McMicken Hall, as is the 
gymnasium, which has a floor space of 3,600 square feet. The observ- 
atory, erected in 1873, crowns the summit of Mt. Lookout, six miles 
from the smoky city. In addition to these facilities, all the libraries, 
museums, and collections owned by the city and other public institu- 
tions are available for students. 

Societies: Besides many social, literary, and religious organiza- 
tions, the students maintain an athletic association, v^ith foot ball, 
base ball, and other teams. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized : 5 X, 1882 ; K K r, 1885 ; B n, and 2 A E, 1890. 
The graduates number 250. 



Faculty. 



Philip V. Myers, A.M., LL.B., 
L.H.D., Dean, History and Politi- 
cal Economy. 

Wayland R. Benedict, A.M., Phi- 
losophy. 

Edward W.Hyde, C.E., Mathematics. 

Wm. O. Sproull, A.M., Ph.D., Latin, 
and Arabic. 

Thos. French, Jr., A.M., Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Thos. H. Norton, A.M., Ph.D., Sc.D., 
Chemistry. 

Jermain G. Porter, A.M., Ph.D., 
Astronomy. 

E. M. Brown, A.M., Ph.D., English. 

Ward Baldwin, C.E., M.S., Civil 
Engineering, and Registrar. 

Charles F. Seybold, A.B., LL.B., 
French and German. 



Frederick L. Schoenle, A.M., Ph.D., 
Greek and Comparative Philology. 

Chas. L. Edwards, B.S., A.M., Ph.D., 
Biology. 

Paul F. Walker, LL.B., Spanish and 
Italian. 

Louis E. Bogen, C.E., Physics. 

Philo A. Orton, C.E., Civ. Engineering. 

Harry W. Curth, B.L., German and 
English 

Mary L, DeLuce, B.L., History. 

Everett I. Yowell, C.E., M.S., Math. 

John McCrae, A.M., Ph.D., Chem. 

Robert B. Spicer, A.B., Latin. 

George M. Holfertv, B.S., Biology. 

Ellis G. Kinkead, M.A., LL.B., Eng- 
lish, and Roman Law. 

James M. Chapman, Elocution. 

Walter D. Berry, Gymnastics. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-EOOK. 33 1 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO. 

Boulder^ Col. Co-Educational. N^on-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$70,000 



Students, 
600 



Instructors, 
70 



Buildings, 

9 



Books, 
12,000 



History: The university was incorporated by the territorial legis- 
lature in 1861. Ten years later, fifty-two acres covering the present 
site were given by three citizens of Boulder. By the state constitu- 
tion of 1876, the school was made a State University, and land was 
appropriated to it that had been provided by Congress in 1875. 
Instruction was begun in 1877, with two teachers and forty-four 
pupils. In the succeeding years some $150,000 was appropriated by 
the General Assembly, besides the proceeds of a special tax levy of 
one-fifth of a mill on the assessed valuation of all state property. 
The university is governed by a board of six regents. 

Admission^ Instruction and Degrees : Admission is by examination 
or on certificate of the State Preparatory School, or of eighteen high 
schools and academies. In addition to the collegiate course and 
scientific courses leadmg to degrees of A.B., B.L., B.Ph., and B.S., 
four graduate courses are offered as well as scientific and professional 
instruction leading to degrees in Engineering, Medicine, Law and 
Music. Master's and Doctor's degrees are conferred after six and 
twelve graduate courses respectively. The expenses for the year, 
lasting from September 8 to June 4, are estimated at $300, of which 
$30 is for matriculation, library and other fees. Non-residents pay 
$20 for tuition. 

Equipment: The university is situated at Boulder and overlooks 
the City of Denver in the distance. Westward, rising above the 
adjoining foot-hills are the Rocky Mountains, showing the snowy 
summit of Arapahoe Peak. Of the ten buildings, three are dormi- 
tories, two of which are for women, while the others are used for 
purposes of instruction with the sole exception of the President's 
house. All buildings are lighted by electricity. Four laboratories 
have been equipped in the scientific and chemical buildings, and the 
new gymnasium has been put into the engineering building. The 
library, containing 12,000 volumes, is soon to be placed in a separate 
building. 

Societies and Puhlicatio7ts : The students publish the "Silver and 
Gold," a weekly, and the " Portfolio," a monthly, and maintain the 
Bell Literary Society, University Debating Club, and Homerian 
Society, besides two Christian Associations, and an athletic associa- 
tion. Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized: 
ATA. 1883; AT, 1885; and n B *, 1885. The graduates number 
350, of whom the Hon. Richard H. Whiteley, 1882, of Boulder, is the 

oldest. T? J. 

I^aculty. 

James H. Baker, M.A., LL.D., Presi- 
dent, Ethics. 
Mary Rippon, German. 



J. Raymond Brackett, Ph.D., Com- 
parative and English Literature. 



Herbert W. McLauthlin, M.A., M.D., 
Principles and Practice of Medicine 
and Clinical Medicine. 

William J. Waggener, M.A., Natural 
Philosophy. 



30^ 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Luman M. GiflEin, M.D., Anatomy and 

Physiology. 
Charles S. Palmer, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Ira M. DeLong, M.A., Mathematics. 
John Gardiner, B.Sc, Biology and 

Histology. 
Maurice E. Dunham, M.A., Greek. 
Jeremiah T. Eskridge, M.D., Mental 

Diseases and Medical Jurisprudence. 
A. Stewart Lobingier, B.A., M.D., 

Pathology and Clinical Surgery. 
G. Melville Black, M.D., Laryngology 

and Rhinology. 
Moses Hallett, LL.D., American Con- 
stitutional Law and Federal Juris- 
prudence. 
Clayton Parkhill, M.D., Surgery and 

Clinical Surgery. 
John Chase, B.A., M.D., Ophthal- 
mology and Otology. 
John W. O'Connor, M.D., Railway 

and Clinical Surgery. 
Carl W. Belser, Ph.D., Latin. 
Charles M. Campbell, P.B., B.C.L., 

Professor of Law. 
Henry Fulton, M.S., Civil Eng. 
Oscar F. A. Greene, M.A., Roman 

Law. 
Herbert B. Whitney, B.A., M.D., 

Diseases of Children. 
Lewis E. Lemen, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 
George E. Packard, M.D., Foot Surg. 
Thomas E. Taylor, B.A., M.D., 

Obstetrics. 
Josiah N. Hall, B.S., M.D., Materia 

Medica and Clinics. 
James A. MacLean, Ph.D., History. 
James E. Russell, Ph.D., Philosophy 

and Pedagogy. 
George H. Rowe, B.S., Electrical 

Engineering. 
William L. Murfree, LL.B., Law. 
Walter A. Jayne, M D., Gynecology. 
Joseph B. Kinley, M.D., Medicine 

and Therapeutics. 
Frank E. Gove, B. A., LL.B., Law. 
Albert A. Reed, LL.B., Law. 
Calvin E. Reed, LL.B., Law. 
William M. Maguire, Constitutional 

Law. 
Ebenezer T, Wells, Real Estate Law. 
Willard Teller, B.A., Equity Pleading 

and Practice. 



LECTURERS. 

Hugh Butler, Common Law and Colo- 
rado Law. 

Luther M. Goddard, LL.B., Law of 
Patents and Copyrights. 

Robert S. Morrison, Mining Law. 

John Campbell, M.A., LL.B., Cor- 
poration Law. 

Charles S. Thomas, LL.B., Evidence 
and Bailments. 

William C. Kingsley, Law of Domes- 
tic Relations. 

Henry T. Rogers, M.A., Law of Wills. 

Thomas Ward, Jr., B.A., Crim. Law. 

Cass E. Herrington, LL.B., Medical 
Jurisprudence. 

John D. Fleming, B.A., LL.B., Law 
of Insurance. 

Samuel D. Hopkins, M.D., Toxi- 
cology, Urinary Analysis. 

Lucius M. Cuthbert, A.M., LL.B., 
Conflict of Laws. 

Henry C. Crouch, M.A., M.D., Bac- 
teriology and Hygiene. 

Robert Given, B.A., Irrigation Law. 

Horace G. Lunt, B.A., Corporation 
Law. 

William H. Bryant, B.S., LL.B., 
Bailments and Evidence. 

George Z. Dimmitt, M.A., LL.B., 
Criminal Law. 

John H. Denison, B.A., Equity, 
Pleading and Practice. 

Hubert Work,M.D.,NervousDiseases. 

Frank E. Waxham, M.D., Diphtheria, 
Croup and Intubation. 

Edward Jackson, M.D., Physiological 
Optics. 

Pembroke R. Thombs, M.D., Mental 
Diseases. 

Alfred A. Woodhull, M.D. (U.S.A.), 
Preventive Medicine. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Charles H. Farnsworth, Music. 
Delphine Bell, French, 
Emley B. Queal, M.D., Anatomy. 
Frederick F. Kramer, Ph.D., Semitic. 
Frank Y. Moselev. B.S.. Biology. 
Earl H. Fish, M.D., Surgery. 
Charles Hall Cook, B.A , Oratory. 
W. J. Baird, M.D., Physiology. 
Alfred E. Whitaker, M.A., Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 333 

UNIVERSITY OF DENVER. 

Denver, Col. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
$25,000 



Students, 
554 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 



Books, 
6,000 



History and Organization: In 1864 Gov. Evans of the Territory 
helped incorporate Colorado Seminary, and assumed the presidency 
of the Board of Trustees, which he has now held for thirty-three years. 
In 1880 the school was made a university. 

The university is under the control of the Colorado Conference of 
Methodists, is governed by twenty-eight trustees, a board of visitors, 
and by a university senate composed of the chancellor, and of 
student representatives elected by the different classes. It comprises 
the following departments : College of Liberal Arts, School of Medi- 
cine, Iliff School of Theology, School of Law, School of Music and 
Fine Arts, School of Dentistry, School of Pharmacy, Preparatory 
School, Haish Manual Training School. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Music, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and 
Manual Training are all in the centre of Denver, within two blocks of 
the postoffice. The College of Liberal Arts, Iliff School of Theology, 
and the Preparatory School are located at University Park, within 
the city limits, but distant from the other buildings. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degrees : Admission is on high school 
and other certificates, and by examination on subjects not mentioned 
in such certificates. Three collegiate courses lead to degrees of B.A., 
B.L., and B.S., and diplomas are also conferred in medicine, theology, 
law, music, dentistry, and pharmacy, besides masters' and doctors' 
degrees. The expenses for the year, lasting from September 8 to 
June 9, are $215. Tuition is charged at the rate of fifty cents a week 
for each study, and additional fees are charged for matriculation, use 
of laboratory and library, and for incidentals. A few scholarships 
equivalent to the charges for incidentals are offered, besides several 
prizes. Attendance at chapel is compulsory. 

Eqnipmettt : The university buildings at the Park are University 
Hall, the Iliff School of Theology, the Chamberlin Observatory, 
Wycliffe Cottage for Women, and University Commons. University 
Hall, which cost $80,000, is devoted exclusively to purposes of 
instruction and is the home of the College of Liberal Arts. The Iliff 
School cost $60,000, and is the gift of Mr. William S. Iliff, an alum- 
nus of the College of Liberal Arts. The Chamberlin Observatory is 
housed in two buildings costing $30,000. It contains a twenty-inch 
equatorial reflector with other subsidiary instruments. In addition to 
the university library, students have access to the public library of 
Denver, each containing more than 25,000 volumes. 

Societies: The students maintain the Phi Alpha and the Evans 
Literary Societies, two Christian Associations, and an Athletic Asso- 
ciation, with a baseball team. Chapters have been organized of; 
ne*, 1S85 ; and BOn, 1888. 

The graduates number 250, of whom the oldest is P. V. Carlin, 
M.D., 1882, of Denver, Col. 



334 



THE COLLEGE VEAR-EOOK. 



Faculty. 



William F. McDowell, S.T.D., Ph.D., 
Chancellor, Philosophy. 

Ralph Arnold, Piano and Organ 
Tuning. 

Edwin R. Axtell, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

F. J, Bancroft, M. D., Fractures. 

M. A. Bartleson, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

J. B. Brown, A.M., Municipal Law. 

H. C. Charpicot, S.B., LL.D., Law. 

J. W. Chipley, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

J. W. Collins, M.D., Gynecology. 

Charles Denison, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of the Chest. 

Mary Lowe Dickinson, English. 

John R. Donaldson, D.D.S., Pathol- 
ogy and Oral Surgery. 

Wilber D. Engle, A.M., Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Anna A. Fisher, A.M., English. 

David E. Fisher, Violin and Viola. 

Samuel A. Fisk, A.M., M.D., Prac- 
tice of Medicine. 

Charles M. Ford, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

John M. Foster, M.D., Otology. 

M. S. Eraser, D.D.S., Dentistry. 

H. A. Fynn, D.D.S., Regional Anat. 

Louis A. La Garde, M.D., U.S.A., 
Hygiene. 

Herbert A. Gift, Clarinet and Saxo- 
phone. 

A. C. Godfrey, M.D., Surgery. 

J. C. Graham, M.D., Embryology and 
Histology. 

John W. Graham, M.D., Medicine. 

Mary L. Gray, Voice Culture. 

William L. Gray, Piano and Organ. 

Herbert (iriggs, Sight Reading. 

W. E. Griswold, D.D.S., Bridge and 
Crown Work. 

Edouard Hesselberg, Piano Depart. 

William P. Hillhouse, LL.B., Law. 

Henry O. Houseley, F.C.O., Har- 
mony. 

Herbert A. Howe, A.M., Sc.D., 
Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Oliver B. Howell, History of Music. 

Mrs. Oliver B. Howell, Singing. 

Roy C. Howell, OrchestrarMusic. 

H. H. Howeland, M.D., Laryngology. 

L. W. Hoyt, S.B., LL.B., Law. 

C. J. Huches, Jr., A.M., Mining Law. 

A. B. Hyde, A.M., D.D., Greek. 

A. L. Jones, Piano. 

Carl Johnson, M.D., Gynecology. 

B. B. Keyes, Cornet. 



J. Kochan, Ph.G., Botany. 
W.J. Lee, Ph.B., Biology. 
H. A. Lewes, M.D., Medicine. 
C. B. Lyman, M.D., Treatises. 
Alfred Mann, M.D., Medicine. 
George C. Manly, A.M., LL.B., Law. 
William C. Mitchell, M.D., Bacteri. 

ology. 
Wm. A. Moore, A.B., LL.B., Law. 
William P. Munn, M.D., Surgery. 
F. H. McNaught, M.D., Obstetrics. 
C. D. Nelson, M.D., Medicine. 
John M. Norman, D.D.S., Operative 

Dentistry. 
John Parsons, D.D.S., Dentistry. 
Albert E. Pattison, A.B., Dean of 

Law Faculty. 
Oscar J. Pfeiffer, M.D., Surgery. 
Robert J. Pitkin, A.B., LL.B., Law. 
Frederick H. Randall, LL.B., Law. 
Rena Belle Reed, Asst. Piano. 
Oscar Renter, J.U.D., Law. 
Arnold Stedman, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Wilbur F. Steele, A.M., S.T.D., Exe- 

getical Theology. 
Paul Stoeving, Stringed Instruments. 
Emil Titerro, Singing. 
John R. Van Pelt, A.M., S.T.B., 

Ph.D., Theology. 
M. A. Walker, M.D., Embryology, 

Histology and Anatomy. 

F. E. Warren, M.D., Anatomy. 

Rt. Rev. Henry White Warren, D.D., 
English Bible. 

Arthur Wehl, Flute. 

Reuben B. Weiser, D.D.S., Pros- 
thetic Dentistry and Metallurgy. 

John W. Wetzel, A.M., Elocution 
and Gymnastics. 

Horace G. Wetherill, Gjmecology. 

Elmer E. Whitted, A.M., Law. 

S. G. Williams, S.B., LL.B., Insur- 
ance Law. 

W. G. Wilson, M.D., Materia Medica. 

Anne G. Wirt, A.M., German and 
French. 

A. R. Worthington, M.D., Anatomy. 

G. C. Rivers, M.D., Ophthalmology. 
E. J. S. Rogers, M.D., Surgery. 

J. C. Le Rossmgall, A.M., Ph.D., 

Historv. 
H. W. Brown, M.D., Therapeutics. 
Carl Ruedi, M.D., Pathology. 
H. E. Russell, A.M., Mathematics. 
A. E. R. Luboss, M.D., Ph.G., 

Materia Medica. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



335 



Henry Sewall, M.D., Ph.D., Physi- 
ology. 
J. A. Sewall, M.D., LL.D., Chem. 
Wni. Smalley, D.D.S., Dentistry. 



L. S. Smith, D.D.S., Dentistry. 
P. J. Smith, D.D.S., Dentistry. 
E. B. J. Spencer, A. M., Latin. 
C. D. Spicha, M.D., Dis. of Stomach. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA. 

Athens, Ga. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$56>347 



Students, 
237 



Instructors, 
20 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
27,000 



History : The university was chartered in 1785, but was not opened 
until 1801, when the present site was selected. In 1872 after the 
proceeds of the Federal Land Grant of 1862 had become available, 
the Colleges of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts were added, to be 
followed by schools of law, medicine, and technology. In 1890 in- 
struction was provided for negroes. 

Organizatiofi : The government of the university, by an act of the 
general assembly, of 1889, is vested in a board of trustees, appointed 
by the governor and confirmed by the senate. The board consists of 
one member from each congressional district of the state, four from 
the state at large, and two from the city of Athens. The governor 
and the chairman of the board of directors of the Technological 
School, the Girls' Normal and Industrial College, and the Colored 
Industrial College are ex officio members of the board. 

The university organization consists of several distinct but co- 
ordinate departments, each under the direction of its own faculty, 
and subject to its own regulations, but all are under the general over- 
sight of the board of trustees. These departments are the Literary 
Department, or Franklin College; the Scientific Department, or the 
State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts; the Depart- 
ment of Law; and the Department of Medicine. To these should be 
added the School of Technology ; the Georgia Normal and Industrial 
College; the College for Colored Youths; and the Georgia State 
Normal School. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees: Admission is on certificate and 
by examination. No students are admitted under fifteen years of 
age. Undergraduate students are received either as candidates for 
the degree of A.B., or as elective students. Degrees in science, 
agriculture, and engineering are conferred by the State College, 
while the graduate and professional schools confer degrees of A.M., 
M.S., B.LL., M.D., and M.E. No tuition fee is charged, but other 
expenses aggregate $\ 50. Three fellowships, for amounts not stated, 
can be competed for, as well as eight gold medals ; and a loan fund 
has been established on the income of $50,000. Attendance at 
chapel and military drill are compulsory. Students are forbidden to 
leave town, or to change their domicile without previous permission. 
Attendance at conventions, fairs, or any public assembly is forbidden. 



33^ 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Equipment: The university grounds are in the heart of the city 
of Athens, and cover an area of thirty-seven acres. They furnish 
sites for the college chapel, the library building, the Moore College, — 
a gift of the city to the college, — the Ivy building, the halls of the 
Demosthenian and Phi Kappa literary societies, the new college 
building, the gymnasium and Y. M. C. A. building, the dormitory, 
the chancellor's residence, and the houses occupied by several of the 
professors. In addition, they contain the parade ground of the 
university battalion and the ball grounds of the Athletic Associa- 
tion, which have recently been improved. Laboratories have been 
equipped by each of the scientific departments. The museum con- 
tains general alcoholic collections of vertebrates and invertebrates. 
Two miles from the college is the university farm, consisting of 
sixty-five acres, and of a building known as Rock College. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Pandora," 
an annual ; and maintain two literary societies : the Demosthenian, 
dating from 1801, and the Phi Kappa, dating from 1820, besides a 
Christian Association, an Alumni Society, and Athletic Association, 
with football and baseball teams. Chapters of the following frater- 
nities have been organized : Mystical Seven, 1844-1861 ; 2 A E, 1866; 
X *, 1867; K A, 1868; * A 0, 1871 ; 2 X, 1872-1874; * T A, 1871 ; 
A T fi, 1878 ; A T A, 1882 ; * K ^, 1883 ; 2 N, 1873 ; and X Y, 1890. 

The graduates number more than 2,000, the oldest of whom is 
A. H. Mitchell, D.D., 1828, of Somerville, Ala. 



Faculty. 



William Ellison Boggs, D.D., LL.D., 
Chancellor, Metaphysics and Ethics. 

Williams Rutherford, A.M., Emeritus. 

Joseph Eve Allen, M.D., Obstetrics 
and Pediatrics. 

David C. Barrow, C.E., M.E., Math. 

Samuel Caldwell Benedict, M.D., 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

Willis Henry Bocock, A.M., Ancient 
Languages. 

John P. Campbell, A.B., Ph.D., Biol. 

L. H. Charbonnier, A.M., Ph.D., 
Physics and Astronomy. 

Howell Cobb, A.B., B.L., Law. 

Thomas Davis Coleman, A.B., M.D., 
Physiology and Pathology. 

Henry C. Doughty, M.D., Anatomy. 

Wm. Henry Doughty, A.B., M.D., 
Anatomy and Clinical Surgery. 

DeSaussure Ford, A.M., M.D., Sur- 
gery. 

Eugene Foster, M.D., State Medicine. 

Wm. D. Hooper, A.B., Classics. 



Charles Holmes Herty, B.Ph., Ph.D., 
Chemistry and Physical Culture. 

Jas. Meriwether Hull, M.D., Diseases 
of Eye, Ear, and Throat. 

Jas. B. Hunnicutt, A.M., Agriculture. 

Theodore Lamb, M.D., Medicine. 

J. H. T. McPherson, A.B., Ph.D., 
History. 

John Morris, A.M., English. 

Sylvanus Morris, A.M., B.L., Law. 

A. H. Patterson, BE., A.M., Physics. 
G. W. Rains, M.D., Chemistry. 

B. F. Riley, A.B., D.D., English. 
O. H. Sheffield, C.E., Engineering. 

C. M. Snelling, A.M., Tactics. 
L. C. Spence, M.D., Anatomy. 

C. M. Strahan, C.E., M.E., Engin. 
H. C. White, Ph.D., F.C.S., Chem. 
G. A. Wilcox, M.D., Materia Medica. 
C. P. Wilcox, A.M., LL.D., Modern 

Languages. 
J. E. Willet, M.D., LL.D., Pharmacy. 
J. R. Wright, M.D., Surgery. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



337 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 
Moscow, Idaho. Co-Educaiional. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$45,000 



Students, 
232 



Instructors, 
13 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
3.500 



The university was organized in 1892, and is governed by nine 
regents. Admission is by examination and on certificate. Courses 
in arts, philosophy, science, and engineering lead to degrees of A.Ii., 
B S., B.Ph., B.E., M.E., and B.Agr. Degrees of A.M., C.E., and 
E.Min. are conferred after three years of graduate study and practice. 
Tuition is free. The expenses for the year, from September 23 to 
June II, are' $125. The college grounds cover twenty acres, on an 
elevation of 2,600 feet above the sea. The students maintain the 
Amphyction, Websterian, two Christian Associations, Philharmonic, 
CeciUan Chorus, and an Athletic Association, with football, baseball, 
and track teams, besides a Tennis Club. 



Faculty. 



Franklin B. Gault, M.S., President, 
Sociology. 

John E. Ostrander, A.M., C.E., En- 
gineering and Mechanics. 

C. W. McCurdy, M.Sc, Ph.D., Chem. 

W. K. Clement, Ph.D., Languages. 

Louis F. Henderson, Ph.B., Botany. 

John M. Aldrich, M.S., Zoology. 

Chas. P. Fox, M.Agr., Agriculture. 

Lieut. Edward R. Chrisman, U.S.A., 
Military Tactics and Mathematics. 



Edward Goodwin, E.M,, Mining. 

Harriett E. Cushman, A.M., Precep- 
tress, Literature. 

S. Annette Bowman, Drawing. 

Sara E. Poe, B.L., English. 

John E. Bonebright, B.S., Physics and 
Mathematics, and Librarian. 

I. J. Cogswell, Music. 

J.J. Anthony, Wood Work. 

C. W. Kays, Penmanship. 

J. M. Aldrich, Curator of Museum. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. 

Urbana and Champaign, III. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
55140,000 



Students, 



Instructors, 
114 



Buildings, 
17 



Books, 
36,000 



History : Under the Act of Congress of 1862 the State of Illinois 
received scrip for 480,000 acres. Of this land 25,000 acres was 
located in Nebraska and Minnesota, while the balance of the scrip 
was sold for what it could bring. After much agitation Champaign 
County, in 1866, secured the university by contributing a building, 
with eleven hundred acres for a campus and farm, and $100,000, 
while the Illinois Central Railroad added $50,000 in transportation. 
The legislature since that time has given $1,300,000. In 1867 the 
Illinois Industrial University was incorporated, and was opened in 
1868. In 1870 the first shop instruction given at any American uni- 



338 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



versity was begun. In 1877 authority to confer degrees was given 
and in 1885 the present name was adopted. 

Organization : The university is governed by nine trustees, with 
three ex officio. It embraces colleges of literature and the arts, of 
engineering, of science and agriculture, a graduate school, and that 
of pharmacy, each of which offers special courses. Admission is by 
examination, and on the certificates of 134 accredited schools. All 
of the first year's work and part of the second is prescribed. That 
of the two remaining years is largely elective. Military drill is com- 
2)ulsory for all able-bodied men through six university teams. 
Attendance at chapel is voluntary. The degrees are A.B., and B.S., in 
architecture ; civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering; agriculture ; 
chemistry ; and pharmacy. The master's degrees, conferred after 
graduate study, correspond to these. The doctor's degree is con- 
ferred after three years, one of which must be resident. 

Dices, Scholarships, and Prizes: Tuition is free. Other expenses 
for the year, lasting from September 3 to June 9, are $157. Six 
fellowships of $400 are offered for the promotion of original research. 
In 1895 the legislature provided one scholarship, equivalent to 
annual expenses, for each county of the state. A special scholarship 
is also ottered in the military department, with a prize medal for 
drill. Many other prizes, ranging from ^20 to $100, are available for 
excellence in specified studies. A loan fund has also recently been 
established. 

Equipment : The university grounds, including the university farm, 
arboretum, and the drill ground, cover 210 acres. Among the build- 
ings a Natural History Hall, containing several good museums, is 
worthy of note ; together with University Hall, containing the library, 
art gallery, and museum of antiquities. Machinery Hall, erected in 
1895, is equipped with all modern appliances for shop work and 
laboratory study. A gymnasium and armory, with a separate gym- 
nasium and athletic grounds for vi'^omen, provide for physical exercise. 

Societies: The students maintain the Adelphic and Philomathean 
societies (for men), Alethenai (for women), Agricultural, Architects', 
Engineers', English, French, Medical, and Zoological clubs, the Uni- 
versity, and Young Ladies' Latin Club, Military Band, University 
Chorus, Mandolin Club, two Christian Associations, and an Athletic 
Association, embracing football, baseball, and track teams. Chapters 
have been organized of ATA, 1872-1879, and 2 X, iSSi. Of the 900 
graduates, 875 are alive. The oldest of these is J. M. Matthews, 
M.D., 1872, of Mason, 111. 



Faculty. 



Andrew Sloan Draper, LL.D., Presi- 
dent. 

John M. Gregory, LL.D., Emeritus. 

Thomas J. Burrill, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Botany. 

Samuel W. Shattuck, C.E., Math. 

Edward Snyder, A.M., German. 

N. C. Ricker, M.Arch., Architecture. 

Ira O. Baker, C.E., Civ. Engineering. 

Stephen A. Forbes, Ph.D., Zoology, 



Chas. W. Rolfe, M.S., Chemistry. 
Donald Mcintosh, V.S., Vet. Science. 
Arthur N. Talbot, C.E., Sanitary 

Engineering. 
Arthur W. Palmer, Sc.D., Chemistry. 
Frank F. Frederick, Design. 
Samuel W. Parr, M.S., Applied Chem. 
Herbert J. Barton, A.M., Latin. 
Charles M. Moss, Ph.D., Greek. 
Daniel K. Dodge, Ph.D., English. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



339 



L. P. Breckinridge, Ph.B., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
David Kinley, Ph.D., Civics. 
Daniel H. Thrusli, U.S.A., Tactics. 
Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., Animal 

Husbandry. 
Arnold Tompkins, M.A., Pedagogy. 
George W. Meyers, M.L., Math. 
Henry E. Summers, B.S., Physiology. 
Edgar J. Tovvnsend, Ph.M., Math. 
Evarts B. Green, Ph.D., History. 
Catherine Merrill, A.B., English. 
Wrn. O. Kroen, Ph.D., Psychology. 
J. M. White, B.S., Architecture. 
W. H. Vandervoort, M.E., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
W. D. Pence, C.E., Civ. Engineering. 
H. S. Grindley, Sc.D., Chemistry. 
Thomas A. Clark, B.L., Rhetoric. 
HIerman S. Piatt, M.A., Romance 

Languages. 

B. B. Swenson, B.S., Electric. Engin. 
A. H. Donalds, Ph.D., Philosophy. 
Percy F. Bicknell, A.M., Librarian. 
George D. Fairfield, A.M., Romance 

Languages. 
Chas. W. Tooke, A.M., Public Law. 
Walter H. Jones, Music. 
H. H. Everett, Gymnastics. 
G. D. Hamond, Ph.D., History. 
F. A. Sager, B.S., Physics. 
W. Estey, B.S., A.M., Electric. Engin. 

C. D. McLane, B.S., Architecture. 
Wm. E. Sandford, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 
James D. Phillips, B.S., Drawing. 
Frank Smith, A.M., Zoology. 
Ralph P. Smith, Ph.B., German. 
Helen E. Butterfield, M.L., Rhetoric. 
Alton C. Burnham, B.S., Math. 



Robert A. Wood, M.E., Mech. Engin. 
George A. Goodenough, B.S., Mech. 

Engin. 
Oscar Quick, A.B., Burton E. Moore, 

A.M., Physics. 
Arthur L. Almy, M.E., Electric. Engin. 
George P. Clinton, M.S., Botany. 
Cyril B. Clark, Machine Shops. 
Charles A. Gunn, B.S., Architecture. 
Alfred H. White, A.B., Chemistry. 
Albert R. Curtiss, W'ood Shops. 
Geo. W. McCluer, M.S., Horticulture. 
Henry Jones, Blacksmith Shop. 
Jeremiah G. Mosier, B.S., Geology. 
R. C. Vial, B.S., Eng. Drawing. 
C. F. Hottes, M.S., Botany. 
E. J. Lake, B.S., Art and Design. 
L. H. Morrison, Women's Gymnastics. 
G. A. Huff, Jr., Gymnastics. 
M. S. Ketchum, B.S., Civ. Engin. 
C. V. Millar, M.S., Chemistry. 
Paul Chipman, B.S., Mechanics. 
Adeline W. Rawley, B.M., Singing. 
Marion Thompson, B.L., French. 
Wm. L. Steele, Music. 
R. K. Porter, Tactics. 
Chas. A. Hart, Curator of Collections. 
Willis G. Johnson, A.M., Entomology. 
Chas. A. Kofoid, Ph.D., Biol. Station. 
Benjamin M. Duggar, A.M., Botany. 
Adolph Hempel, B.S., Zoology. 
Mary J. Snyder, Secretary Laboratory. 
Henry C. Forbes, Librarian. 
Lydia M. Hart, Art. 
Wm. L. Pillsbury, A.M., Secretary 

Experiment Station. 
Cyril G. Hopkins, M.S., W. A. 

Powers, b.S., Chemistry. 
W. G. Eraser, B.S., Agriculture. 



UNIVERSITY OF INDIANA. 

{See Indiana University^ p. 152.) 



UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

{See Butler College, p. 46.) 



340 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS. 

Law)'ence, Kan. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$100,000 



Students, 

875 



Instructors, 
54 



Buildings, 
7 



Books, 
23,148 



History and Organization : In 1864 the State of Kansas accepted 
the Federal Land Grant of 1862, and established the university on 
its present site. Departments of literature, science, and art were at 
the same time created. At that time there were but four teachers in 
the faculty. The university is governed by a board of six regents. 
The chancellors have been: R. W. Oliver, 1866-1867; John Frazier, 
1867-1874; James Marvin, 1874-1883; John A. Lippincott, 1883- 
1889; Regent Spangler, 1889-1890; and Francis Huntington Snow, 
the present incumbent. 

Admissioji, Instruction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination, 
and on certificates from any public high school in the state. The 
regular college curriculum leads to degrees of B.A. and B.S., and the 
degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. are given after independent graduate 
study as well as degrees in law, pharmacy, and music after study in 
those departments. Attendance at chapel is voluntary. Physical 
culture is compulsory in the freshmen and sophomore years. Negroes 
are not excluded. Tuition is free to residents of the state. Others 
pay from $10 to $25 a year. Living expenses are estimated at from 
$140 to $300, including incidental fees in special studies. A prize of 
$25 is annually awarded for the best essay on English literature and 
a loan fund has been provided by the alumni of 1894. 

Equipment : The college grounds cover forty acres. The seven 
buildings include North College (the oldest hall), Main Building, 
Chemistry Hall, Snow Hall, Music Hall, the Physics and Engineer- 
ing Buildings, and the Spooner Library. The Museum of Natural 
History contains collections of zoology, paleontology, entomology, 
mineralogy, osteology, conchology, and ornithology, besides an her- 
barium of five thousand species. 

Societies and Publicatio7is : The university publishes the " Univer- 
sity Quarterly," while the students publish the "Courier" and 
"Journal," two weeklies; the "University Review" a monthly; 
" Kansas University Lawyer," and the " Kikalee," an annual. Among 
the societies are the Literary Society, Moot Senate, German Club, 
French Conversation Club, Science Club, Language Conference, 
Pharmaceutical Club, Greek Symposium, Electrical Seminary, 
Woman's League, two Christian Associations, and an Athletic 
Association, with football and baseball teams. Chapters of the fol- 
lowing fraternities have been organized : B n, 1872; * K % 1876; 
K A 0, 1881 ; * A 0, * r A, 1882; n B *, 1883; K K T, 1883; ^ N, 
2 X, 1884 ; and N E. 

The graduates number 1,000, of whom L. D. L. Tosh, 1873, ^^ 
Argentine, Kan., is the oldest. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



341 



Facjilty. 



Francis Huntington Snow. Ph.D., 

LL.D., President, Botany, Entomol. 
David Haniilton Robinson, Pli.D., 

Latin. 
Ephraim Miller, A.M., Math., Astron. 
James W. Green, A.M., Dean of Law 

bchool. 
William H. Carruth, A.M., Ph.D., 

German. 
Frank O. Marvin, A.M., Civ. Engin. 
Edgar H. S. Bailey, Ph.D., Chenubtry 

and Metallurgy. 
James W. Gleed, A.M., Real Estate 

Law. 
Alexander M. Wilcox, Ph.D., Greek. 
Lucius E. Sayre, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 
Arthur G. Canfield, A.M., French. 
Lucien L Blake, Ph.D., Physics and 

Electricity. 
Lewis L. Dyche, A.M., M.S., Zoology. 
Frank W. Blackmar, Ph.D., History 

and Sociology. 
Charles G. Dunlap, A.B., Litt.D., 

English. 
George B. Penny, B.S., Music. 
Samuel W. Williston, A.M., M.D., 

Ph.D., Geology and Physiology. 
Carl A. Preyer, Piano. 
Oiin Templin, A.M., M.S., Philosophy. 
Frank H. Hodder, Ph.M., American 

History. 
Edwin M. Hopkins, Ph.D., English. 
Joseph A. Farrell, Violin. 
Alfred H. Clark, Drawing, Painting. 
Erasmus Haworth, M.S., Ph.D., 

Physical Geology. 



Henry B. Newson, Ph.D., Math. 
William C. Stevens, M.S., Botany. 
Ephraim D. Adams, Ph.D., History. 
Arvin S. Olin, A.M., Pedagogy. 
Rev. Hector W. Cowan, A.M., Physi- 
cal Culture. 
E. C. Franklin, M.S., Ph.D.. Chem. 
M. W. Sterling, A.M., Greek. 

E. C. Murphy, M.S., C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

F. E. Ward, Electrical Shop. 
Hannah Oliver, A.M., Latin. 
S. R. Boyce, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 
H. F. Jones, A.B., English. 
E. F. Lngel, A.B., German. 
Eugenie Galloo, B.L., A.M., French 

and Spanish. 
W. A. Snow, B.E., Entomology. 
A. St.C. Dunstan, C.E., Physics. 
M. E. Rice, M.S., Physics. 
M. A. Barber, A.M., Botany. 
S. O. Thacher, LL.D., Equity. 
A. W. Benson, Pleading. 
S. A. Riggs, A.M., Torts. 

D. M. Valentine, Wills, etc. 
C. L. Dobson, Corporations. 
James Humphrev, Evidence. 

Wm. B. Browneil, A.B., LL.B., Do- 
mestic Relations, etc. 
May M. Pierce-Clark, Phys. Culture. 
Virgil L. Leighton, A.B., Chemistry. 

E. Geneve Lichtenwalter, Mus.B., 
Piano. 

Arnold Emch M.S., Mechanical 

Drawing. 
Carrie M. Watson, A.B., Librarian. 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



iNroME, 

$445,805 



Students, 
3,000 



Instructors, 
183 



Buildings, 
20 



Books, 
100,000 



H'story and Organization: The university was established by a 
legislative act of 1821, repealing a previous act of 1S17, by which a 
" university or catholepistemiad " had been created by the ipse dixit 
o( Judge C. B. Woodward. The university was not organized until 
March of 1837, when the regents obtained a loan of ^loo.coo from 
the state, and erected five buildings at Ann Arbor. In the fall of 
the same year instruction was begun with a faculty of two, and an 



342 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

entering class of six. Until 1853 the school remained in a state of 
partial development, owing to incessant interferences from the 
lep-islature, and internal dissensions among the faculty. In 1852 a 
ne\v board of regents was constituted, with a president to whom 
independence of action was guaranteed. Ur. Henry P. Tappan was 
elected, and continued in office until 1S63, when he was summarily 
removed. This action was protested against by the faculty, as well 
as by the students and alumni, and was twice made a subject of 
censure by subsequent boards of regents. During Dr. Tappan's presi- 
dency the university more than quadrupled in numbers, and made 
itself recognized as a school of liberal learning on both sides of the 
Atlantic. Since that time the presidents have been: Erastus Otis 
Haven, 1863-1869; Henry S. Frieze, 1869-1S71 ; and James Burrill 
Angell, from 187 1 until the present time. 

Li 1870 the university, under pressure from the legislature, opened 
its doors to women. The first to enter was Madelon A. Stockwell. 
Since 1867, the university has received from the State $1,800,000. 
The School of Mines was established in 1S75, the Homoeopathic 
College and School of Pharmacy in 1876, and the first hospital and 
museum in 1879. The semi-centennial of the university was cele- 
brated in 1887. 

Organization : The university is a part of the public educational 
system of the State. The governing body is a board of eight regents, 
elected by popular vote for eight years. The university comprises 
the department of literature, science, and arts, including the gradu- 
ate and summer school, the departments of engineering, of medi- 
cine and surgery, of law, the school of pharmacy, the homoeopathic 
medical college, and that of dental surgery. Each department, school, 
and college, has its special faculty. The university senate is com- 
posed of all the faculties, and considers questions of common interest 
and importance. 

Admission^ Degrees, etc. : Candidates for admission must be at least 
sixteen years old, and must pass the prescribed entrance examina- 
tions. In the department of literature, science, and arts, different 
lines of study lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, of Philosophy, 
of Science, and of Letters, and to the corresponding masters' degrees ; 
as well as to doctor of philosophy, of science, of letters and to civil, 
mechanical, mining and electrical engineer. The degree of Bachelor of 
Science is given for the course in general science, and for the courses in 
engineering, in chemistry, and in biology. In the professional schools 
the degrees are as follows : In departments of medicine and surgery, 
Doctor of Medicine ; in law. Bachelor and Master of Laws ; in phar- 
macy, Pharmaceutical Chemist and Master of Pharmacy ; in the 
Homoeopathic College, Doctor of Medicine ; in dental surgery, Doc- 
tor of Dental Surgery and of Dental Science. 

Students in any department may enter the classes in any other, 
upon permission from the faculties of the respective departments. 

Dues and Scholarships : The matriculation fee is $10. The annual 
fees for the different departments are as follows: In the literary 
department for all residents of the State $25, for others $35 ; in the 
departments of law, medicine, surgery, pharmacy, homoeopathy and 
dentistry, $30 for residents, and ^40 for others. P'urther fees are 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



343 



also charged for incidental expenses and for laboratory work, and a 
fee of $io for every diploma. 

Two fellowships yielding $500 are offered, and nine scholarships for 
graduates of the high schools of Detroit, Saginaw, and Grand Rapids. 
The late H, S. Phillips, Jr., established six scholarships, and funds 
aggregating $30,000 have been contributed for the same purpose by 
Mrs. C. H. Stranahan and by the class of 1894. Attendance at chapel 
has not been required for nearly twenty years. 

Equipnioit: Of the college buildings five are museums, containing 
collections of objects of natural history, a Chinese exhibit and 
anthropological specimens, and an art gallery costing more than 
$200,000. Seven laboratories and an astronomical observatory have 
been equipped by the different departments. The libraries are the 
General, the Medical, the Law Library and that of Dental Surgery, 
They contained September 30, 1895, 9^»707 volumes, 17,241 unbound 
pamphlets, and 1,151 maps. There are two hospitals, and a new 
gymnasium costing $70,000, with an athletic field covering ten acres. 

Societies and PiMications : The societies are the Choral Union, 
the * * A, the Students' Lecture Course, Oratorical Association, 
Moot Court, engineering, philological and philosophical societies, 
the Mathematical Club and the Political Science Association, with 
many other kindred organizations, besides an Athletic Association 
with football, baseball, lacrosse, and other teams, all under the 
control of the faculty. The Christian Association hold meetings 
for social and religious improvement. There are five church guilds 
for religious culture and social entertainment. The students pub- 
lish a daily, weekly and monthly journal, besides the "Palladium," 
an annual. 

Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : B IT, 
X^, 1845; A A *, 1846; A K E. 1S55; A *, 1855-1S78; Z ^I', 2 *, 
1858 ; * A 0, 1864 ; ^ T, 1865 ; * A *, 1869 ; A T A, 187 c; ; * K ^F, A T, 
1876; 2 X, 1873; K A 0, 1879-1886; r* B, 1881 ; N 2 N, 1882; X *, 

1882-1885; * r A, A r, 1885; n B *, A T n, M 2 A, 1888; 2 a e, 

1889; A X, 1S88 and A E I, 1890. 

The graduates number 13,700, of whom 12,600 are living. Among 
2,874 students during the last year 576 were women. 



Facility. 



James B. An,2;ell. LL.D.. President. 
Albert B. Prescott, Ph.D., M.D., 

Chemistry. 
Rev. Martin L. D'Ooge, LL.D., 

Dean, Greek. 
Chas. E. Greene, A.M., C.E.. Civil 

Ensjineerincr. 
Jonathan TaK M.D., D.D.S., Oral 

PatholoE^y and Surgery. 
William H. Pettee, A.M., Mineralogy 

and Mining. 
John A. Watling, D.D.S., Dentistry. 
Edward L. Walter, Ph.D., Romance 

Languages and Literatures. 
Isaac N. Deramon, A.M., English. 



Wm. H. Dorrance. D.D.S., Dentistry. 

Albert H. Pattengill, A.M., Greek. 

Mortimer E. Cooley, M.E., Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

William J. Herdman, Ph.D., M.D., 
Electrotherapeutics. 

Wooster W. Beman, A.M., Math. 

Victor C. Vaughan, Ph.D., M.D., 
Hygiene and Chemistry. 

Thornas M. Cooley, LL.D., American 
History and Law. 

Charles S. Denison, _ M.S., C.E., 
Geometry and Drawing. 

Henrv S. Carhart, LL.D., Physics. 

Levi T. Griffin, A.M., Law. 



344 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Raymond C. Davis, A.M., Librarian. 
Volney M. Spalding, Ph.D., Botany. 
Henry C. Adams, Th.D., Polit. Econ. 
Calvin Thomas, A.M., Germanic 

Languages. 
Burke A. Hinsdale, LL.D., Teaching. 
Richard Hudson, A.M., History. 
Bradley M. Thompson, M.S., LL.B., 

Law. 
Albert A. Stanley, A.M., Music. 
Francis W. Kelsey, Ph.D., Latin. 
Jerome C. Knowlton, A.B., Law. 
Charles B. ISancrede, A.M., M.D., 

Surgery. 
Charles S. Mack, A.B., M.D., Materia 

Medica and Therapeutics. 
Flemming Carrow, M.D., Ophthalmic 

and Aural Surgery. 
Otis C. Johnson, Ph.C, A.M., Applied 

Chemistry. 
Paul C. Freer, Ph.D., M.D , General 

Chemistry. 
Jas. N. Martin, Ph.M., M.D., Obstet. 
Nelville S. Hoff, D.D.S., Dental Ma- 
teria Medica. 
George Dock, M.D.. Theory and 

Practice and Clinical Medicine. 
John W. Champlin, LL.D., Law. 
Andrew C. McLaughlin, A.B., LL.B., 

American History. 
Joseph B. Davis, C.E., Geodesy and 

Surveying. 
Asaph Hall, Jr., Ph.D., Astronomy. 
Israel C. Russell, M.S., C.E., Geology. 
Warren P. Lombard, A.B., M.D., 

Physiology and Histology. 
Floyd R. Mechem, A.M., Law. 
Jacob E. Reighard, Ph.B., Animal 

Morphology. 
Thos. C. Trueblood, A.M., Elocution 

and Oratory. 



James A. Craig, Ph.D., Semitic Lan- 
guages and Hellenistic Greek. 

Alexis C. Angell, A.B., LL.B., Law. 

John C. Rolfe, Ph.D., Latin. 

J. Playfair McMuriich, Ph.D., Anat. 

Harry B. Hutchins, Ph.B., Law, and 
Dean of Law School. 

Thomas A. Bogle, LL.B., Law. 

Wilbert B. Hmsdale, A.M., M.D., 
Materia Medica and Homoeopathy. 

Oscar Le Seure, M.D., Surgery. 

Roy S. Copeland, M.D., Ophthalmol- 
ogy, Otology, and Paedcjlogv. 

Fred. G. Novy, Sc.D., M.D.,' Hygiene. 

George Hempl, Ph.D., English. 

Edw. D. Campbell, B.S., Metallurgy, 

Fred M. Taylor, Ph.D., Pol. Econ." 

James B. Fitzgerald, M.D., Director 
Gymnasium. 

Paul R. dePont, A.B., B.S., French. 

Clarence G. Taylor, B.S., Supt. Shops. 

Joseph H. Drake, A.B., Latin. 

Fred N. Scott, Ph.D., Rhetoric. 

Alexander Ziwet, C.E., Mathematics. 

Geo. W. Patterson, Jr., A.M., S.B., 
Physics, 

F.C. Warner, A.M., B.S., Mech. Eng. 

G. Carl Huber, M.D., Histology. 

Alviso B. Stevens, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

John O. Reed, Ph.M., Physics. 

Wm. A. Campbell, B.S., M.D., Anat. 

Wm. F. Break ey, M.D., Dermatology. 

Joseph L. Markley, Ph.D., Math. 

Moritz Levi, A.B., French. 

Elmer A. Lyman, A.B., Math. 

George O. Higley, M.S., David M. 
Lichty, M.S., General Chemistry. 

Max Winkler, Ph.D., German. 

Jos. H. Vance, LL.B., Law Librarian. 

Joseph Clark, Supt. of Hospitals. 

Hamilton Reeve, Supt. of Buildings. 



UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^250,000 



Students, 
2,575 



Instructors, 
144 



Buildings, 
22 



Books, 
40,000 



History and Organization : The university was first organized in 
185T, but was reorganized in i860, 1864, and in 1868, when college 
work was at last begun. The university comprises the following col- 
leges and departments : Graduate Department, College of Science, 
Literature and Arts, College of Engineering, Metallurgy and the 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 345 

Mechanic Arts, College of Agriculture, College of Law, the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, composed of the Colleges of Medicine and Surgery, 
of Homoeopathic Medicine and Surgery, of Dentistry, and of Phar- 
macy ; the Experiment Station, and the Geological and Natural His- 
tory Survey. The government of the university is vested in a board 
of twelve regents ; nine of these members are appointed by the 
governor of the state and confirmed by the senate, and hold office for 
six years. The other three members are ex-officio, the governor of 
the state, the state superintendent of public instruction, and the presi- 
dent of the university. 

Adtnission, Instruction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination 
and on the certificates of the high schools of Minneapolis and twenty- 
one other schools. Negroes are not excluded. Courses of two, 
three and four years in the various departments lead to degrees of A.B., 
B.S., B.L., C.E., M.E., E.E., B.Agr., B.LL., M.D., D.D.M., and Ph.G. 
Degrees of A.M., and Ph.D. are conferred only after prescribed gradu- 
ate studies. Attendance at military drill is compulsory for men 
during the first two years, but attendance at chapel is voluntary. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes: Tuition is free in all studies but 
those of the professional schools with incidental fees ranging from $5 
to $20. Nine prizes of from $20 to $100 are offered in history and 
English, two in engineering ; one fellowship of $280 ; five scholar- 
ships and honors in various courses and departments. The college 
year lasts from the first week in September to the first week in June. 

Equipment : The campus covers fifty acres and commands a view 
of the Falls of St. Anthony. Among the twenty-two college buildings 
are a gymnasium, library, and many museums with collections of 
minerals, casts, fossils, fac-similes of manuscripts, birds, and a herba- 
rium of 175,000 specimens. An astronomical observatory and agri- 
cultural experiment station have been established with a farm and 
orchards covering 366 acres. 

Societies and Publicattons: The students publish the "Quarterly 
Bulletin," the "Ariel," "Junior Annual," *' Engineering Year-Book" 
and " Y. M. C. A. Hand-book." Among the societies are the Her- 
mian. Delta Sigma, Shakespearean, Forum, Minerva, Law, Literary, 
University Congress, Society for Psychical Research, Knights of 
English Learning, Philological Society, Fortnightly Scientific Club, 
Societas Latina, Political-Historical Union, Graduate Club, two 
Christian Associations and an Athletic Association, with football, 
baseball, track and other teams and clubs. Chapters have been 
organized of : K ^, 1874 ; *, 1874 ; * A 0, 1881-1S89 ; K K T, 1880 ; 
AT, 1882; ATA, 18S3; 2 X, 1888; *K^, 1888; K A 0, 1889; 
B n, 1890 ; n B *, 1890 ; * r A, 1890; A T, 1890 ; and others mak- 
ing twenty-two in all. 

The graduates number some 1600, of whom the oldest are Warren 
C. Heustis of Owatana, Minn., and Henry M. Williamson, of Port- 
land, Oregon, of the class of 1873. 

Faculty. 
Cyrus Northrop, LL.D., President. 
William W. Folwell, LL.D., Political 
Science, Internat'l Law, Librarian. 



Jabez Brooks, D.D.. Greek. 



Newton H. Winchell, M.A,, Geology 

and Mineralogy. 
Charles N. Hewitt, M.D., Sanitary 

Science. 



346 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



John G. Moore, B.A., German. 

Christopher W. Hall, M.A., Geology 
and Mineralogy. 

John C. Hutchinson, B.A., Greek. 

John S. Clark, B.A., Latin. 

Matilda J. Wilkin, M.L., German. 

John F. Downey, M.A., C.E., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Maria L. Sanford, English. 

Charles W. Benton, B.A., French. 

Olaus J. Breda, Scandinavian. 

Charles F. Sidener, B.S., Chemistry. 

Henry F. Nachtrieb, B.S., Zoology. 

Frederick S. Jones, B.A., Physics. 

"William R. Hoag, C.E., Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Conway MacMillan, M.A., Botany. 

Joseph B. Pike, M.A., Latin. 

E. Eugene McDermott,M.S., English. 

Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, B.A., 
Philosophy. 

Harry E. Smith, M.E., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

George D. Shepardson, A.M., M.E., 
Electrical Engineering. 

Harry A. Leonhaeuser, Lieut. U.S.A., 
Military Tactics. 

William R. Appleby, M.A., Mining 
and Metallurgy. 

Willis M. West, M.A., History. 

David L. Kiehle, LL.D., Pedagogy. 

Samuel G, Smith, D.D., Sociology. 

Francis P. Leavenworth, M. A. ,Astron. 

Arthur E. Haynes, M.S., M.Ph., 
Mathematics. 

D. T. MacDougall, M.S., M.A., 
Botany. 

George B. Frankforter, M.A., Ph.D., 
Chemistry. 

William H. Kirchner, B.S., Drawing. 

Frederick Klaeber, Ph.D., English 
Philology. 

Henry T. Eddy, Ph.D., Engineering 
and Mechanics. 

Charles L. Wells, Ph.D., History. 

James Richard Jewett, Ph.D., Sem- 
itic. 

Charles F. McClumpha, M.A., Ph.D., 
English. 

Frederick W. Denton, C.E., Min- 
ing. 

Frank H. Constant, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

H. Wade Hibbard. B.A., M.E., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Warren Upham, M.A., Glacial 
Geology. 



Samuel B. Green, B.S., Horticul- 
ture. 

Otto Lugger, Ph.D., Entomology. 

Henry W. Brewster, Ph.D., Agri- 
culture. 

Harry Snyder, B.S., Agricult. Chem. 

T. L. Haecker, Dairy Husbandry. 

Willet M. Hays, B.Agr., Exp. Sta. 

Thomas Shaw, Animal Husbandry. 

M. H. Reynolds, M.D., V.M., Veteri- 
nary Medicine and Surgery. 

William S. Pattee, LL.D., Law of 
Contracts. 

Charles A Willard, LL.B., Law of 
Bailments. 

Judge James O. Pierce, Jurisprudence 
and "History. 

Hon. C. D. O'Brien, Criminal Law. 

Charles W^. Bunn, LL.B., Suretyship 
and Mortgages. 

George B. Young, A.M., LL.B., 
Conflict of Laws. 

A. C. Hickman, A.M., LL.B., Plead- 
ing and Practice. 

Charles B. Elliott, Ph.D., Corpora- 
tions. 

John D. Smith, American Constitu- 
tional Law. 

H. F. Stevens, Law of Real Property. 

T. Dwight Merwin, A.B., Patent Law. 

James Paige, M.A., LL.M., Domestic 
Relations. 

Edwin A. Jaggard, Torts and Crimi- 
nal Law. 

A. D. Keyes, Minnesota Practice. 

Arthur P. Will, LL.B., Circumstan- 
tial Evidence. 

Herbert R. Spencer, Admiralty Law. 

Francis B. Tiffany, LL.B., Criminal 
Law. 

Henry J. Fletcher, Property. 

Perry H. Millard, M.D., Surgery. 

Thomas G. Lee, B.S., M.D., Histol- 
ogy and Embryology. 

George A. Hendricks, M.S., M.D., 
Anatomy. 

Richard O. Beard, M.D., Physiology. 

Charies J. Bell, A.B., Chemistry. 

Henry M. Bracken, M.D., L.R.C.S., 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Charles H. Hunter, A.M., M.D., 
Medicine. 

Everton J. Abbott, A.B., M.D., Clin- 
ical Medicine. 

Albert E. Senkler, M.D., Clinical 
Medicine. 

J. W. Bell, M.D., Physical Diagnosis. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



347 



C. A. Wheaton, M.D., Clinical Surg. 
Frederick A. Dunsmoor, M.D., Opera- 
tive Surgery. 
Parks Ritchie, M.D., Obstetrics. 
A. B. Gates, A.M., M.D., Obstetrics. 

J. Clark Stewart, B.S.,M.D., Pathol. 

Frank F. VVesbrook, M.A., M.D., 
CM., Bacteriology. 

Alex. J. Stone, M,D.,LL.D., Diseases 
of Xv'omen. 

Amos W. Abbott, M.D., Diseases of 
Women. 

A. McLaren, A.B., M.D., Diseases 
of Women. 

John F. Fulton, Ph.D., M.D., Oph- 
thalmolog)^ 

Frank Allport, M.D., Ophthalmology. 

C. Eugene Riggs, A.M., M.D., Ner- 
vous and Mental Diseases. 

W. A. Jones, M.D., Mental and Ner- 
vous Diseases. 

James H. Dunn, M.D,, Genito-Uri- 
nary Diseases. 

Charles L. Wells, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Children. 

Tames E. Moore, M.D., Orthopedia. 

Max P. Vanderhorck, M.D., Diseases 
of the Skin. 

W. S. Laton, M.D., Diseases of the 
Nose and Throat. 

Charles A. Erdman, M.D., Anatomy. 

Charles L. Green, M.D., CHn. Med. 

H. L. Staples, M.D., Latin. 

Robert A. W'heaton, M.D., Surgery. 

Herbert W. Davis, M.D., Obstetrics. 

George L. Coon, M.D., Genito-Uri- 
nary Diseases. 

John T. Rogers, M.D., Diseases of 
Children. 

Arthur J. Gillette, M.D., Orthopedia. 

Burnside Foster, M.D., Diseases of 
the Skin. 

John L. Rothrock, M.D., Pathology. 

iGeo. D. Head, B.S., M.D., Pathol. 

J. E. Schadle, M.D., Diseases of the 
Nose and Throat. 

H. C. Carel, B.S., Chemistry. 

Francis Ramaley. B.S. 

Alonzo P. Williamson, A.M., LL.B., 
M.D., Professor of Mental and Ner- 
vous Diseases. 

William E. Leonard, A.B., M.D., 
Materia Medica. 

George E. Ricker, A.B., M.D., Clin- 
ical Medicme. 

Robert D. Matchan, M.D., ) c: 

Marshall P. Austin, M.D., i ^"''Sery. 



Warren S. Briggs, B.S., M.D., Clini- 
cal and Orthopaedic Surgery. 

B. Harvey Ogden, A.M., M.D., 
Obstetrics. 

Eugene L. Mann, A.B., M.D., Dis- 
eases of the Nose. 

Frederick M. Gibson, M.D., O. et A. 
Chiv., Ophthalmology. 

George E. Clark, Ph.D., M.D., Medi- 
cine. 

George F. Roberts, M.D., Diseases 
of Women. 

Edward E. Austin, M.D., Diseases of 
Women. 

Henry H. Leavitt, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Children. 

Thomas J. Gray, M.D., History and 
Methodology of Medicine. 

Robert R. Rome, M.D., CHnical 
Obstetrics. 

Thomas E. Weeks, D.D.S., Opera- 
tive Dentistry. 

Charles M. Bailey, D.M.D., Ortho- 
dontia. 

William P. Dickinson, D.D.S., Ther- 
apeutics. 

Frederick B. Kremer, D.D.S., Crown 
and Bridge W'ork. 

Frederick J. Wulling, Ph.G., Phar- 
macy. 

INSTRUCTORS. 

Charles R. Aldrich, Drawing School. 

Frank M. Anderson, B.A., History. 

Charles M. Andrist, B.L., French 
and German. 

Charles P.Berkey, M.S., Mineralogy. 

Emma Bertin, French. 

Andrew Boss, Dressing and Curing 
Meats. 

William Boss, Carpentry and En- 
gineering. 

Amelia L. Burgess, Freehand Draw- 
ing. 

Albert L Calais, B.-es-L., French. 

Peter Christiansen, B.S., B.MJn.E., 
Mining Engineering. 

Fred E. Cobb, D.M.D., Clin. Instr. 

Nellie M. Cross, B.L., Physical Cul- 
ture. 

Willard W. Dakin, Instrument Maker. 

J. M. Drew, Blacksmithing. 

Oscar W. Firkins, B.A., Rhetoric. 

Alvin D. Gaines, M.A., Language. 

Harlow S. Gale. B.A., Psychology. 

James H. Gill, B.M.E., Iron Work. 

Charles Graves, Military Tactics. 



;48 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Edward Haas, D.M.D., Clin. Instr. 
Everhart P. Harding, M.S., Chem. 
Mary V. Hartzell, D.M.D., Clinical 

Instructor. 
Thomas B. Hartzell, D.M.D., M.D., 

Pathology. 
Arthur L. Helliwell, B.A., Rhetoric. 
W. F. Jewett, D.M.D., Clin. Instr. 
Louise Kiehle, Physical Culture. 
Frank M. Manson, B.S., Animal 

Biology. 
George S. Monson, D.M.D., Pros- 
thetic Technics. 
Edward E, Nicholson. B.S., Chem. 
Mark O. Nelson, D.M.D., Prosthetic 

Dentistry. 
Oscar W. Oestlund, M.A., Animal 

Biology. 
Alfred Owre, D.M.D., M.D., Clinical 

Instructor. 
William Robertson, B.S., Physics 

and Botany. 
Marie Schon, German. 
Winnifred Schureman, Rhetoric. 
Hannah R. Sewall, M.A., Poht. Sci. 
James M. Tate, Wood Work. 
Nellie Trufant, Freehand Drawing. 
J. A. Vye, Penmanship and Accounts. 
James M. Walls, D.M.D., Clinical 

Instructor. 
Nathan L. Watson, D.M.D., Clinical 

Instructor. 
Oscar A. Weiss, D.M.D., Operative 

Technics. 



Frank R. Wright, D.D.S., M.D., 

Anaesthesia. 
Alice Young, English. 
John Zeleny, B.S., Physics. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS. 

Giving Instniction and Assisting in 
Laboratories. 

Charles W. Hack, J. Frank Corbett, 
Anatomy. 

L. E. Griffin, Animal Biology. 

George G. Balcom, Bacteriology and 
Pathology. 

Josephine E. Tilden, B.S., Botany. 

William F. Kunze, Paul M. Glasoe, 
Chemistry. 

Charles H. Kendall, C.E., Civil En- 
gineering. 

Gentz Perry, Dispensary. 

Arthur L. Abbott, Drawing. 

Frank W. Springer, B.E.E., Electri- 
cal Engineering. 

Arthur H. Elftman, M.S., Geology. 

Soren P. Rees, B.S., Carl Huhn, B.A., 
Histology. 

James S. Gilfillan, Materia Medica. 

Ralph K. Keene, Frank E. Burch, 
Medical Chemistry. 

B. O. Leubner, Pharmacy. 

Anthony Zeleny, M.S., C. Edward 
Magnusson, Physics. 

Harvey Ritchie, Jr., Mortimer R. 
Wilcox, Physiology. 



UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Oxford, Miss. Co-Educational. Non- Sectarian. 



Income, 
$36,243 



Students, 
252 



Instructors, 
16 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
15,500 



History and Ors^anization : The university was chartered in 1848. 
Women were admitted in 1882. The school is governed by a board 
of nine trustees. It is divided into two departments of literature and 
art and of professional education, including twenty-one minor schools. 
Schools of medicine, pharmacy and engineering are to be added in 
the near future. Admission is on certificate and by examination. 
Students must be at least sixteen years old. The curriculum is 
partly prescribed and partly elective. All students are required by 
law to attend chapel and religious service, and are forbidden by law 
to carry or bring deadly weapons within two miles of the college 
campus. The degrees are A.B., B.S., Ph.B., with A.M. and Ph.D. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



349 



after graduate study. Matriculation costs $io, and tuition in the 
law school ^50. In the other departments tuition is free. The 
expenses for the year, from September 12 to the first Wednesday 
in June, are $160. Four gold medals for oratory are annually 
awarded by the trustees and officers of the two literary societies. 
A scholarship fund, yielding $1,400 a year, has been established, and 
there are four fellowships for professors, yielding $400 each. 

Societies: The literary societies are the Phi Sigma and Hermean. 
The law students maintain a Blackstone Club and Moot Court. Two 
Christian Associations have been organized, as have been chapters of : 
Rainbow, AT A, 1848: A K E, 1851 ; A % 1855 ; Mvstical Seven, B n, 
2 X, * K % 1857 ; X ^, 1858 ; * K 2, 1859-1861 ; 2 A E, l856 ; * T A, 
1868-1879; * A 0, 1877; A B T, 1882; K A, 1883; and A T, 1872- 
1889. 

Of 1,170 graduates, 860 are living. The oldest is Thomas E. Brigg, 

1851, of Starke, Fla. 

•^ Faculty. 

Robert Burwell Fulton, M.A., Chan- Alexander L. Bondurant, A.M., Latin 



cellor, Physics and Astronomy. 
Richard W. Jones, LL.D., Chemistry. 
Alfred Hume, C.E., D.Sc, Secretary, 

Mathematics. 
Richard M. Leavell, M.A., LL.D., 

Philosophy. 
Chiles C. Ferrell, Ph.D., Mod. Lang. 
Jas. U. Barnard, A.M., P.T., Pedagogy. 
j. W. Johnson, M.A., Ph.D., Physics. 



and Greek. 
Sallie M. Isom, Elocution. 
Thomas O. Mabry, M.A., Nat. Hist. 
Paul H. Saunders, M.A., Ph.D., 

Latin and Greek. 
G. D. Shands, LL.B., Law. 
Horatio F. Simrall, LL.D., Robert A. 

Hill, Jehu A. Orr, A.M., Hugh A. 

Barr, Lecturers on Law. 



UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI. 

Columbia and Rolla, Mo. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
^145,000 



Studrnts, 
6c6 



Instructors, 
59 



BUILDTNGS, 
16 



Books, 
23,000 



History and Organization : The universitv was chartered in 1839 and 
academic instruction began two years later. The normal department 
dates from 1867. Agricultural and metallurgical departments were 
established in 1870, a Law School in 1872, Medical College in 1873, 
School of Engineering in 1877, Experiment Station in 1888, and the 
State Military School in 1890. In 1892 the main building was burned 
and the state legislature gave $273,000 to repair the loss, adding 
$264,000 in 1893, ■"'i^^ $25,000 for a new building at Rolla. The uni- 
versity is governed by nine curators, and besides its faculty of arts 
and letters comprises seven professional schools. The presidents 
have been: John H. Lathrop, six years; James Shamon, six years; 
N. N. Hudson, three years ; B. B. Minor, four years ; Daniel Read, 
nine years ; S. S. Laros, thirteen years; and R. H. Jesse, 1890, now in 
office. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees: Admission is on certificate and 
by examination. The cuniculum leads to degrees of A.B., B.S., B.L., 



350 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



B.Pe., B.Agr., B.LL., B.S., and the three engineering degrees. De- 
grees of M.D., A.M., and Ph.D., are conferred only after one or three 
years of resident graduate study. Attendance at chapel and mili- 
tary drill is voluntary, except for state cadets. 

Dues, Scholarships and Prizes : Tuition is from $I0 to $50. Other 
expenses aggregate $175. Free scholarships have been established 
for one student from every county of the state. Teaching fellow- 
ships, yielding $200, are also offered to graduates. Prizes are offered 
for oratory. The college year at Columbia lasts from September 8 
to June 2, and at RoUa from September 14 to June 10. 

Equipment : The university proper is at Columbia with grounds 
of thirty-two acres. The School of Mines and Metallurgy is at 
Rolla. The agricultural farm embraces 768 acres, including thirty 
acres of horticultural grounds. The new auditorium, which was 
recently dedicated by President Angell of Michigan, seats fifteen 
hundred persons. The Academic Hall, which was erected after the 
fire, is declared to be the finest educational building in the state. 
All the principal buildings at Columbia are grouped around a uni- 
versity quadrangle. Besides the general library, special law and 
medical libraries have been provided, together with special reference 
libraries for each department. Among the latest additions to the 
university are a new gymnasium and new athletic grounds. A sepa- 
rate gymnasium and athletic grounds have been provided for women. 

Societies and Publicatio7is : Of periodicals published by the stu- 
dents there are : the " Independent," a bi-weekly ; the " Argus," a 
monthly ; and the " Savitar," an annual. The societies are : the 
Athenaeum, Union Literary, Bliss Lyceum, the Medical, Agricultural, 
and Engineers' societies. University Debating club, Philalethean (for 
women), two Christian Associations, Glee, Mandolin, Guitar, and 
Banjo clubs, and an Athletic Association, with football, baseball, and 
other teams. A Scientific and Literary Club, Journal Club, and the 
Alpha (a women's literary society), are maintained at Rolla. 
Chapters of the following fraternities have been organized : * K % 
1869-1876; * A 0, 1S70; ATA, 1S72; K K T, 1875; 2 A E, 1884 ; 
5 N, 1886; and B n, 1890. 

Faculty. 



Richard H. Jesse, LL.D., President. 
Paul Schweitzer. Ph.D., Chemistry. 
Andrew VV. McAlester, A.M., M.D., 

Surgery. 
Woodson Moss, D.D., Anatomy. 
W. C. Tindall, A.M.,M.S., Math. 
Edward A. Allen, Litt.D., English. 
Henry C. Penn, A.M., English. 
Garland C. Broadhead, M.S., Geology. 
James A. Yantis, LL.B., Law. 
Millard Lipscomb, A.M., Physics. 
Walter B. Richards, M.A., School of 

Mines. 
Alexander Martin, A.M., LL.D., Law. 
William G. Manly, A.M., Greek. 
Milton Updegraff, M.S., B.C.E., 

Astronomy. 



Joseph P. Blanton, A.M., Teaching. 
John M. Biirnam, Ph.D., Latin. 
Christian W. Marx, B.E., Mechanical 

Engineering. 
John W. Connaway, M.D.C., M.D., 

Physiology. 
Wm. Shrader, B.S., Ph.D., Electrical 

Engineering. 
Elmo G. Harris, C.E., Civ. Engin. 
John D. Lawson, B.C.L., LL.D., Law. 
Fred. C. Hicks, B.A., Ph.D., History. 
John Pickard, A.M., Ph.D., Classical 

Archaeology. 
Frank Thiljy, B.A., Ph.D., Philosophy. 
Harry Thomas Cory, M.E., M.C.E., 

Civil Engineering. 
Luther M. Defoe, A.B., Mathematics. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



351 



Howard Ayers, B.S., Ph.D., Biology. 
John C. Whitten, B.S., Horticulture. 
Coiinney Dekalb, Mining. 
Arthur H. Timuiernian, B.S., M.M.E., 

Physics. 
Walter A. Thurston, U.S.A., Military 

Science 
Sidney Calvert, B.Sc, A.M., Chem. 
Henry J. Waters, B.A.S., Agi-iculture 

and Mechanic Arts. 
Isidor Loeb, M.S., LL B., Ph.D., Hist. 
Benj. F. Hoffman, M.L., Germanic 

Languages. 
Fred. B. Mumford, M.S., Agriculture. 
H. M. Belden, B..4., Ph.D., English. 
John M. Stedman, B.Sc, Entomol. 
Geo. W. Cutler, M.D., Phys. Culture. 
Eugene T. Allen, A.B., Ph.D., Chem. 
Raymond Weeks, A.M., Romance 

Languages. 
Joseph F. Paxton, A.M., Latin. 
Matthew B. Hammond, Ph.B., M.L., 

Political Economy. 
Paul J. Wilkins, B.S., Academic Dept. 



Silas Dinsmoor, A.B., Chemistry'. 
Thomas L. Rubey, A.M., Librarian. 
Howell Van Blarcom, Mech. Arts. 
Arthur H. Place, C.E., Drawing. 
Edward B. Cauthorn, B.S., Math. 
William W^ Griffith, B.S., Physics. 
Robt. E. Graham, M.D., Bacteriology 

and Pathology. 
Curtis F. Marbut, B.S., A.M., Geology 

and Mineralogy. 
Mary E. Porter, B.L., Commercial 

Studies. 
George E. Miller, B.S., Shop Work. 
Irving Hardesty, A.B., Biology. 
Eva Johnston, A.B., Jennie Adams, 

A.B., Latin. 
Minna A. Kidwell, A.B., Romance 

Languages. 
Thomas J. Taylor, A.B., Germanic 

Languages. 
John W. Monser, Librarian. 
Irving Switzler, Secretary Agricultural 

College. 
Gen. J. B. Douglass, College Lands. 



UNIVERSITY OF NASHVILLE. 

Nashville, Tenn. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian, 



Income, 
^63,500 



Students, 
1,439 



Instructors, 

52 



Buildings, 



Books, 

12,000 



Histojy : In 1785, eleven years before Tennessee became a State, 
Davidson Academy, the predecessor of this university, was incorpo- 
rated by the Legislature of North Carolina, and 250 acres of land at 
Nashville was given to it. In 1806 the academy was re-organized as 
Cumberland University. In 1825 the university assumed its present 
name. Prominent among the trustees of that time was Andrew Jack- 
son. The Medical College was established in 1850, and in the same 
year the literary department was closed. In 1855 the college proper 
was re-opened as a Military College, but was closed again in 1861 at 
the opening of the Civil War. The medical college, however, con- 
tinued throughout the war. In 1867 Bell Academy was opened as a 
preparatory school to the college, which shortly afterward resumed 
instruction. In 1875 the Peabody Fund for a State Normal College 
was accepted. In 1889 the literary department was merged into this 
college. New buildings were provided in 1890 and in the three fol- 
lowing years. The legislative appropriation in 1895 ^^^ increased 
to $420,000 leading to the establishment of a musical conservatory 
in 1896. The chancellors and presidents have been: Dr. Craig- 
head, 1806-1809; Rev. Dr. James Priestley, 1809-1821 ; Rev. Dr. 
Philip Lindsley, 1821-1850; Felix Robertson, 1852-1855 ; Gen. Bush- 



352 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



rod R.Johnson, 1S55-1861 ; Gen. E. Kirby, 1870-1875 ; Rev. Eben 
S. Stearns, 1875-18^)7; and William H. Payne, A.M., from 1887 
until the present. 

Organizatioi : The university is governed by nine trustees, and con- 
sists of the Peabody Normal College, Medical School, and College 
of Music with the associated Bell Academy, and Winthrop Model 
School. Admission is by examination or on certificate. Degrees 
of B.A., B.S., B.L., are conferred, with corresponding masters' 
degrees after two years of resident graduate study. The degree of 
M.D. is conferred by the Medical School while the other non-col- 
legiate departments confer licentiate's diplomas and degrees in 
music. At commencement all recipients of degrees must appear 
in academic costume. Tuition is free. Fees are charged for matric- 
ulation, incidentals and diplomas making the total expenses for the 
year, lasting from September i to June 2, $150. The Peabody 
scholarships for $100 a year now number 104, and are distributed 
among the students of twelve southern states. In the Bell Academy 
twenty-five tuition scholarships are offered. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Peabody 
Record," a weekly, and the " Historical Magazine," a quarterly. The 
societies are the Agatheridon and Erosophian, dating from 1825; 
with the Girls' Chapter, Adelphic, Peabody and Alpha Phi, all lit- 
erary societies; two Christian Associations, a Lecture Association, 
an Athletic Association with football and baseball teams, tennis and 
golf clubs, and other athletic organizations. Chapters of the fol- 
lowing fraternities have been organized : A K E, 1848-1861 ; * r A, 
1848-1850; 5 A E, 1857-1875; X *, 1860-1861; A T n, 1871-1874; 
T r% 1871-1875. 

Of the 4,oco graduates the Hon. E. H. Ewing, 1827, of Murfrees- 
boro, Tenn., is the oldest. 

Faculty. 



William H. Payne, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Chancellor, History. 
Julian A. Sears, A.M., Mathematics. 
Lizzie L. Bhimstein, A.M., History. 
John L. Lampson, A.M., Latin. 

B. B. Penfield, A.M., Ph.D.. Biology. 
Julia A Doak, A.M., Phys. Geography. 
A. L.-Puronton, M.D., Ph.D., Chem- 
istry 

H. A. Vance, Ph.D., English. 
E. C. Huntington, A.B., Greek. 
Mary E. Cheney, Singing. 
A. P. Bourland, A.M., English. 
Wickliffe Rose, A.M., Philosophy. 
Elizabeth R. Clark, A.B., Librarian. 

C. E. Little, A.B., Mathematics. 
Lura Tozer, A.B., Mod. Languages. 
W. R. Garrett, A.M., Ph.D., Ameri- 
can History. 

P. H. Manning, A.M., Geology. 
Venie J. Lee, A.B., Phys. Training. 
Lula O. Andrews, L.L, Vocal Music. 



Aristine G. Glover, A.B., Mollie 
Arthur. A.M,, Minnie Holman, Ellen 
S. Ogden, A.B., Virginia Johns, 
A.B., Winthrop School. 

May Payne, Librarian. 

Lassie Jones, Art. 

J. M. King, B.S., M.D., Chemistry. 

Alice Oney, Art. 

H. M. Andrews, A.B., English. 

J. B. MacRae, Gymnastics. 

MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

T. L. Maudin, M.D., Medicine. 
W. L. Nichol, M.D., Obstetrics. 
J. H. Callender, M. D., Ph.D., Insanity. 
J. M. Safford, Ph.D., M.D., Chem. 
C. S. Briggs, A.M., M.D. , Surgery. 
W. G. Ewing, M.D., Ph.G., Materia 

Medica. 
C. R. Atchinson, M.D., Dermatology. 
S. S. Crocket, M.D., Anatomy. 
A. Morrison, M.D., Physiology. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



353 



J. S. Cain, M.D., Practice. 

M. C. McGannon, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Women. 

L. B. Graddy, M.D., Eye Diseases, 

J. M. Anderson, Med. Jurisprudence. 

S. S. Briggs, M.D., Anatomy. 

Laikin Smitli, M.D., Histology. 

J. C. Pryor, M.D., Anatomy. 

J. R. Siiapard, M.D., Obstetrics. 

G. B. Proctor, Jr., M.D , Anatomy. 

C. L. Lewis, Jr., M.D., Brain Diseases. 

A. B. Cook, M.D., Dermatology. 

R. B. Neil, M.D., Anatomy. 

P. H. Woodall, M.D., Practice. 

S. M. Bloomstein, Ph.G., M.D., 
Pharmacy. 

P. Clements, M.D., Anatomy. 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

August Schemmel, Mus.D., President 
Organ. ' 

X. Scharwenka, Director, Piano. 

Mrs. M. A. Manning, Principal. 

G. W. Gifford, Business Director. 

Mrs. A. Schemmel, Piano. 

Mrs. J. W. Blair, Theory of Music. 

Addie Campbell, Piano and Organ. 

Elsie Schemmel, Piano. 

William Bellack, Theory. 

Carrie Smith, Voice. 

Mrs. P. R. Bailey, Violoncello. 

Mrs. G. D. Clements, Stringed Instru- 
ments. 

Mrs. A. S. Ransom, Elocution. 



• UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA. 

Lincoln, Neb. Co-Eihicational. N'on-Sectarian. 



Income, 

M 65,000 



Students, 
1,506 



Instructors, 



Buildings, 
10 



Books, 
32,000 



History: The State Legislature in 1869 founded the university, and 
provided for its organization by the legislative acts of 1875 ^'^^ 1877. 
Students were received in 187 1. The regents originally numbered 
twelve. Dissensions between members of the faculty and Chancellor 
Fairfield concerning the voluntary or compulsory attendance at 
chapel, and other matters of discipline, were made the subject of 
legislative inquiry in 1880, leading to the dismissal of three pro- 
fessors, and the final dismissal of the chancellor in 1882. Since that 
time attendance at chapel has been voluntary. The twenty-fifth 
anniversary was celebrated in 1894. The chancellors have been: 
Allen R. Benton, LL.D , 1867-1S76; Edmund B. Fairfield, LL.D., 
1876-1882; Henry E. Hitchcock, Ph.D. (Acting), 1882-1884; Irving 
J. Manatt, LL D., 1884-1888; Charles E. Bessey, Ph.D. (Acting), 
1888-T891; James H. Canfield, LL.D., 1891-1895; George E. Mac- 
Lean, LL.D., Ph.D., 1895 to the present. 

Organization : The regents now number six. The university com- 
prises nine schools: the graduate, literary, industrial, law, agricul- 
tural, mechanical, sugar, professional, and summer school. The 
faculties of all these schools are represented in the university senate. 
The natural history survey of the State is under the charge of the 
university. 

Admission is by examination and on the certificates of seventy-two 
high schools of the State. The degrees are A.B., B.S., B.LL., C.E., 
M.E., E.E., M.A., M.D., and Ph.D. The last two degrees can be 
attained in absentia. 

Tuition is free, except in the professional and special courses, where 
from $10 to ^50 is charged. Matriculation in any department costs 

23 



154 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



$5. The college year is from September 15 to June 10. A fellow- 
ship yielding $300 is offered, together with several scholarships for 
^150, which are awarded only for exceptional merit. Six prizes of from 
^5 to $20 are offered for oratory and composition, and a silver medal 
for the best essay on the American Revolution is annually awarded. 

Equipment : The university has a campus in the centre of the city 
of nearly twelve acres, and owns farm lands covering 320 acres. 
Among the ten buildings the most prominent are the Chemical 
Laboratory; Grant Memorial Hall, containing an armory and gymna- 
sium ; Nebraska Hall, containing the museums of natural and phys- 
ical science ; and the Library Building completed in 1896. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Literary 
Magazine," " Botanical vSeminar," " Hesperian " (a fortnightly), 
the "Nebraskan" (a weekly), and the students' " Handbook " and 
"Sombrero" (annuals). The societies are : Graduate Club, Classical, 
and Engineering societies, English, Law, Economy, and Zoological 
clubs. Palladium, Union, EdeUan, Alumni Association, two Christian 
Associations, two debating clubs, four musical and art organizations, 
and an Athletic Association, with football, baseball, and other teams, 
all under the control of a committee consisting of students and 
professors. Chapters have been organized of: * A 0, 1875; 2 X, 
1883; K K r, 1884; B n, 1886, K A 0, 1S89; and A T, 1888. 

Of the 560 graduates the oldest are James S. Dales, of Lincoln, 
Neb., and William H. Snell, of Tacoma, Wash., of the class of 1873. 



Facnlty. 



George E. MacLeau. A.M., B.D., 
Ph.D., LL.D., Chancellor. 

Grove E. Barber, A.M., Latin. 

Hudson H. Nicholson, A.M., Chem. 

Lucius A. Sherman, A.B., Ph.D., 
English Literature. 

Howard W. Caldwell, Ph.B., Ameri- 
can History, etc. 

Chas. E. Bessey, M.Sc, Ph.D., Bot. 

Thomas M. Hodgman, A.M., Math. 

August H. Edgren, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages, etc. 

De Witt B. Brace, A.M., Ph.D., 
Physics. 

Lawrence Bruner, Entomology, etc. 

Harold N. Allen, B.Sc, Physics. 

Laurence Fossler, B.Sc, A.M., Ger- 
manic Languages. 

James T. Lees, A.M., Ph.D., Greek. 

Harry K. Wolfe, A.M., Ph.D., Phi- 
losophy. 

Erwin H. Barbour, A.B., Ph.D., 
Geology. 

Fred M. Fling, A.M., Ph.D., Euro- 
pean History. 

T. Lyttleton Lyon, B.S.A., Agricult. 

Robert B. Owens, E.E., Electrical 
and Steam Engineering, 

Oscar V. P. Stout, B.C.E., Civ. Eng. 

James W. Adams, B.L., English. 



Clara Conklin, A.M., Romance Lang. 

Charles R. Richards, B.M.E., M.E., 
Practical Mechanics. 

Percy B. Burnet, A.M., Germanic 
Languages. 

Fred W. Card, M.S. in Agr., Horti- 
culture. 

EUery W. Davis, B.S., Mathematics. 

Judge Manoah B. Reese, Dean of Law 
School, Real Property. 

W. G. Langworthy Taylor, A.B., 
LL.B., Political Economy. 

Henry B. Ward, A.M., Ph.D., Z06I. 

Alfred M. Wilson, A.M., B.D., Ph.D., 
Latin and Hebrew. 

Robert A. Clark, A.B., M.D., Physi- 
ology and Hygiene, Gymnasium. 

William F. Dann, A.B., Greek Lang. 

Goodwin D. Swezey, A.M., Meteorol- 
ogy and Astronomy. 

John F. Guilfoyle, Captain Ninth U.S. 
Cavalry, Military Science, Tactics. 

Geo. W. A. Luckey, A.B., Pedagogy. 

Henry H. Wilson, Ph.B., A.M., 
LL.M., Evidence. 

Judge Samuel Maxwell, Code Pleading. 

Joseph R. Webster, A.M., Equity 
Jurisprudence. 

Charles A. Robbins, Ph.B., Ph.M., 
LL.B., Law. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



355 



W. H. Munger, Mimicip. Corporations. 

John C. Watson, A.B., LL.B,, Crim- 
inal Law. 

Frank Irvine, B.S., LL.B., Law of 
Damages. 

W. W. Giffen, LL.B., Wills. 

Judge Jacob Fawcett, Insurance. 

Williamson S. Summers, B.Sc.,LL.B., 
Statutory Construction. 

B. F. Good, LL.B., Limitation of 
Actions. 

David F. Easterday, University Band. 

Rosa Bouton, B.Sc, Chemistry. 

Samuel Avery, B.Sc, A.M., Chem. 

Mary A. Tremain, B.Sc, M.A., 
English History. 

Josephine Tremain, A.M., Latin and 
Greek. 

Albert Luther Candy, A.M., Math. 

Wm. B. Hampsen, B.M.E., Graphics. 

Cora Parker, Graphic Arts. 

John White, A.B., Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Clark F. Ansley, A.B., English. 

Anne L. Barr, Physical Training. 

George R. Chatburn, B.C.E., Mathe- 
matics and Engineering. 

August Hagenow, Orchestra. 

Amanda H. Heppner, A.B., German. 

Will O, Jones, B.L., Journalism. 

Willard Kimball, Music. 

Mary D. Manning, Elocution. 

Albert T. Peters, D.V.M., Animal 
Diseases. 

Mrs. P. V. M. Raymond, Sight Read. 

Robert H. Wolcott, B.L., B.S., M.D., 
A.M., Zoology. 

Frederick J. MacLeod, B.A., A.M., 
English. 

John M. Chowins, Physics. 

Carrie A. Barbour, Assistant Curator. 

Ellen H. Bentley, Philosophical Lab. 

Robert S. Hiltner, B.Sc. Chemistry. 

Juergen Albers, B.Sc, Mathematics. 

John E. Almy, Physics, Laboratory. 

Rufiis C. Bentley, A.B., Philosophy. 

Jesse Perry Rowe, Geol. Laboratory. 

Clarence A. Skinner, B.Sc, Physics. 

Bert Spencer, Physics Laboratory. 

Jesse B. Becher, B.Sc, Chemistry. 

Wm. E. Brook, B.C.E., Mathematics, 

Eugene W. Brown, Chem. Laboratory. 

Frederic E. Clements, B.Sc, Botani- 
cal Laboratory. 

Fred C. Cooley, Chemical Laboratory. 

Elbert N. Corbin, Elect, Laboratory. 

Rachael Corr, Phvsics Laboratory. 

Edward C. Elliott, B.Sc, Chemistry. 

Martin E. Hiltner, Phys. Laboratory. 



Edna L. Hyatt, Botanical Artist. 
Mary F. Jackson, Physics, Laboratory. 

Franklin L. Meyer, Elect. Laboratory. 

Edith L. Patterson, Philosoph. Lab. 

Frank S. Philbrick, Phys. Laboratory. 

Louise Pound, B.L., A.M., English 
Literature. 

Cornelius L. Shear, Bot. Laboratory. 

Lon C. Walker, Ph.B., Mathematics. 

William L. Westermann, A.B., Latin. 

Nelly A, Zehrung, Entomolog. Artist. 

Luther J. Abbott, Reader in Euro- 
pean History. 

Lena Anderson, Museum. 

Harris M. Benedict, B.Sc, Zool. Lab. 

James W. Crabtree, B.Sc, Math. 

Fred S. Culver, Chemical Laboratory, 

Benton Dales, Chemical Laboratory. 

Thomas E, Doubt, B.Sc, Physics. 

Clarence J, Elmore, A.B., Bot. Lab. 

Rollins A. Emerson, Horticulturist. 

Burt E. Forbes, A.B., Philosoph. Lab. 

Anna Fossler, B.Sc, Zool. Laboratory. 

Marietta Gray, B.Sc, Chemical Lab. 

Michael F, Guyer, B.Sc, Zool, Lab. 

Fred G. Hall, Museum. 

Chas, N, Hinds, A,B , American Hist. 

Alice C, Hunter, A.B,, Latin. 

W^alter D. Hunter, A,B., Entomolog- 
ical Laboratory, 

Derrick N, Lehmer, A,B,, Math. 

Katharine M. Melick, A,B,, Reader 
in English. 

Katharine V, Morrissey, A,B,, Reader 
in English. 

Laura B, Pfeiffer, Reader in English 
and European History. 

Adeline M, Quaintance, Chem. Lab. 

Karl C. Randall, Electric. Laboratory. 

W^alter H, Rhodes, Reader in Euro- 
pean History, 

Anne E, Seacrest, A.B., Philosoph- 
ical Lab. 

James W, Searson, Reader in Euro- 
pean History. 

H.G, Shedd, Reader in European Hist. 

Chancy D. Warner, Electricity. 

Julia M. Wort, English. 

Cassius A. Fisher, Geol. Laboratory. 

Harvey C. Heald, Agriculturist. 

Mary L, Jones, B,L., Librarian. 

Mary E. Robbins, Cataloguer. 

Florence S. Smith, A.B., Phoebe M. 
Hopper, Nellie J. Compton, Anna 
Fossler, B.Sc, Mary A. Home, 
Flora Bullock, Mary H. Ames, 
May Prentiss, Leo C. Smith, As- 
sistants. 



356 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO. 

Albuquerque, N. M. Co-Educational. A'on- Sectarian. 



Income, 
$14,000 



Students, 
93 



Instructors, 
12 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
500 



The university was established in 1892, and incorporated in 1889, 
but the building was not completed until 1892, when instruction in 
the normal and preparatory departments was begun. A department 
of pharmacy was added in 1894. The government is vested in five 
regents. The university is supported by taxation representing three 
tenths of a mill of the annual revenues of the Territory. 

Admission is on certificate. Two courses, the Latin-Scientific and 
English, are offered, but no degrees are conferred. Special attention 
is given to Spanish. Tuition is free, but matriculation at the be- 
ginning of each year costs three dollars. Other expenses aggregate 
^^130 for the year. 

FacttltV' 



Elias S. Stover, President. 

Hiram Hadley, A.M., Vice-President, 

in charge, Mathematics. - 
M. R. Gaines, A.M., Latin, Greek. 
Alcinda L. Morrow, A.M., Normal 

Department and Spanish. 
Martha L. Taylor, A'.M., English and 

Historv. 



Josephine S. Parsons, Mathematics. 
Wm. A. Zimmer, Ph.C, Nat. Hist. 
J. P. Raster, M.D., Anatomy. 
G. S. Easterday, M.D., Therapeutics. 
W. G. Hope, M.D., Materia Medica. 
B. Ruppe, Pharmacy. 
J. P. Dupuy, Vocal Music. 
I M. Casters, Librarian. 



UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. 



Albany, A', Y. 



Non-Sectarian . 



History: This university, which, like the University of France, is 
purely administrative in character, was founded in 1784, shortly after 
peace had been concluded with England. Its organization as a 
State institution by the Legislature of New York, in 1787, is sup- 
posed to have furnished Napoleon L with a model for his organiza- 
tion of the Universite de France. 

The State Library, founded in 18 18, and the State Museum, founded 
in 1843, came under the control of the university in 18S9. In 1S90 
the university assumed control of all medical examinations and the 
conferring of medical degrees. Its most distinguished chancellor 
was George W. Curtis. 

Organization: The university consists of all incoiporated institu- 
tions of academic and higher education, — with the State Library, 
State Museum and such other libraries, museums, and scientific or 
educational institutions of the state as may be admitted by the 
regents of the university for the purpose of governmental super- 
vision and encouragement. Thus the university comprises some 
450 institutions, no academies, 275 high schools, and more than 
100 degree-conferring and professional schools. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 357 

The ^:overnment of the university is vested in a board of twenty- 
three regents, of v/hich the Governor of the State, the Lieut-Gov- 
ernor, the Secretary of State, and the State Superintendent of 
Education are ex-ojjicio members. The regents are elected by the 
legislature in the same manner as the United States senators, and 
serve without salary. 

The regents have power to incorporate or to alter or repeal the 
charters of colleges, academies, libraries, museums, or other educa- 
tional institutions belonging to the university ; to distribute to them 
all funds granted by the State for their use ; to inspect their workings 
and require annual reports under oath of their presiding officers ; to 
establish examinations as to attainments in learning and to confer suit- 
able certificates, diplomas, and degrees, as well as honorary degrees. 

The work of the university is divided into five departments : Execu- 
tive, Examination, University Extension, State Library and State 
Museum. A fund of |5io6,ooo is annually apportioned by the regents, 
whose various budgets aggregate $230,600. 

The regular meetings of the regents are held the second Wednesday 
in December, the second Thursday in February, and Thursday of 
Convocation week. Special meetings are held as called by the 
chancellor or on request of five regents. 

The annual University Convocation of the Regents and the officers 
of colleges and academies belonging to the university, is held on 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday following July 4. 

Regents. 

Anson J. Upson, Chancellor; William Croswell Doane, Vice-Chan- 
cellar, Albany ; Governor, ex-officio ; Lieutenant-Governor, ex-afficio ; 
Secretary of State, ex-officio ; Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
ex-officio; Francis Kernan, Utica; Martin L Townsend, Troy; Anson 
J. Upson, Glens Falls; William L. Bostwick, Ithaca; Chauncey M. 
Depew, New York City; Charles E. Fitch, Rochester: Orris H. 
Warren, Syracuse; Whitelaw Reid, New York City; William H. 
Watson, Utica; Henry E. Turner, Lowville ; St. Clair McKelway, 
Brooklyn; Hamilton Harris, Albany; Daniel Beach, Watkins; Car- 
roll E. Smith, Syracuse; Pliny T. Sexton, Palmyra; T. Guilford 
Smith, Buffalo; Lewis A. Stimson, New York; Sylvester Malone, 
Brooklyn ; Albert Vander Veer, Albany. 

Officers: Melvil Dewey, Secretary ; May Seymour, Asst. Scc7-etary. 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. Men. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$41,000 



Students, 
534 



Instructors, 
35 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
36,000 



History : The charter for this school was granted in 17S9. Gen. Ben- 
jamin Smith gave 20,000 acres of land, afterwards sold for $14,000. 
The cornerstone of the old East Building was laid in 1793. After the 
citizens of Chapel Hill had given 1,300 acres of land for a site, the 



358 THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 

college was opened in 1795. The chief promoter of the new school 
was Governor Davie. No president was appointed until 1804. The 
presidents have been: Joseph Caldwell, D.D., 1804-1812; Robert H. 
Chapman, D.D., 1812-1816; Joseph Caldwell, D.D., 1816-1835; 
David Lowrey Swain, LL.D., 1835-1868; Solomon Pool, D.D., 1868- 
1875; Charles Phillips, D.D., LL.D., 187 5-1876; Kemp Plummer 
Battle, LL.D., 1876-1S91 ; George Tayloe Wniston, LL.D., 1891 to 
the present time. Instruction was suspended from 1S70-1875, owing 
to lack of funds. Three years after the re-opening a medical school 
was added to the university, a law school having been inaugurated in 
1845. The centennial of the university was celebrated in 1895, and 
the date of the laying of the cornerstone, October 12, is celebrated 
each year as " University Day." 

Organization : The university is governed by eighty-one trustees, 
and consists of the college, a law school, medical school and a summer 
school. Students are admitted without examination on the certifi- 
cates of State schools. Negroes are excluded. Courses in arts, phi- 
losophy, and the sciences lead to degrees of A.B., B.S., and B.Ph. 
The degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. are conferred after graduate study of 
one and two years respectively. Professional degrees are given by the 
schools of medicine and law. Attendance at chapel and gymnastic 
drill is compulsory. Tuition for the year, from the first Thursday 
in September until the first Thursday in June, is $81.50. Other ex- 
penses aggregate $200. Thirteen scholarships, equivalent to tuition, 
and eight prizes together with the interest on $62,000 are annually 
distributed for excellence in study. 

Equipment: The college campus covers forty-nine acres surrounded 
by a rock wall. Among the eleven college buildings the most notable 
are the old East and West Buildings, dating back to the last century, 
and the new East and West Buildings containing the museum and 
laboratories as well as the society rooms. A gymnasium was built in 
1885, and an Lifirmary in 1894. In Memorial Hall, which is used for 
commencements, the illustrious former alumni of the university are 
commemorated. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the "Tarheel," a 
weekly ; an Athletic Journal ; the " Hellenian," a fraternity annual ; 
and a Y. M. C. A. handbook. Among the societies are the Dialectic 
and Philanthropic literary societies, which date from 1795 and own 
halls. Besides these the students maintain a Philological, Philo- 
sophical and Shakespeare club, Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 
North Carolina Historical and Scientific Societies, the Gimghouls, 
German and Dramatic and Century Clubs, St. George's Nursery, a 
Christian Association, Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs, and an 
Athletic Association with foot-ball, baseball and track teams, be- 
sides tennis and golf clubs. Chapters have been organized of : A K E, 
i8(;i ; B n, 1852; Mystical Seven, 1834 united 1S89; N E, 1848; 
* r A, 1851 ; 5 A E, 1852-1861 ; A ^, 1854-1862; A *, X y. l8s5- 
i86t ; * K 2, 1856; A X, 1857-1862; Z ^F, 1858; X *, 1858-1868; 
K 2, 1875-1S76; A T n, 1879; K A, 1881-1888;* A 0, 1885; 2 N, 
1888 and 2 X, 1889. 

The oldest living graduate is George F. Davidson, 1823, of Old 
Fort, N. C. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



359 



Faculty. 



Geo, T. Winston, LL.D., President, 

Political Science. 
Kemp P. Battle, LL.D., History. 
Francis P. Venable, Ph.D., Cliem. 
Joseph A. Holmes, S.B,, Geology. 
Joshua W. Gore, C.E., Sec, Physics. 
John Manning, LL.D., Law. 
Thos. Hume, D.D., LL.D., English. 
Walter D. Toy, M.A., Mod. Langs. 
Eben Alexander, Ph.D., LL.D., Greek. 
William Cain, C.E., Mathematics. 
Richard H. Whitehead, M.D., Anat. 
Henry H. Williams, A.M., B.D., 

Philosophy. 
Henry van P. Wilson, Ph.D., Biology. 
Karl P. Harrington, A.M., Latin, 
Collier Cobb, A.M., GeoL, Mineralogy. 
Edw. A. Alderman, Ph.B., Pedagogy. 
Francis K. Ball, Ph.D., Greek. 
Charles Baskerville, Ph.D., Chem. 
Herman H. Home, A.M., Modern 

Languages. 



George G. Stephens, Phys. Culture. 

George P. Butler, B.E., Math. 

Frederick L. Carr, Ph.B., Latin. 

Philander P. Claxton, A.M., Educa- 
tional Psychology, etc. 

Marcus C. S. Noble, Methods in Arith- 
metic and Algebra. 

Alexander Graham, A.M., English 
and Psychology. 

Logan D. Howell, A.B., Latin. 

Elisha B. Lewis, Geography. 

Thomas J. Wilson, Jr., A.B., Greek. 

Mathilde Coffin, Primary Work. 

Minnie Redford, Primary Reading and 
Language Work. 

Benjamin Wyche, Litt.B., Librarian. 

Wm. C. Smith, Richard G. Allsbrook, 
Assistant Librarians. 

Thomas Clarke, Chemistry. 

George H. Kirby, Biology, 

Wm, R. Kenan, Jr., S.B., Physics. 

Robert E. Coker, Biology. 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. 

Grand Fork, N'^ D. Co- Educational. N^on-Sectarian. 



Income, 

$37,000 



Students, 
170 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
5oOO 



History and Organization: The university was organized in 1883 
under a special legislative act, and was opened in 18S4 with thirty stu- 
dents. By the division of the Territory of Dakota, and the admission 
of North Dakota as a State, in 1890, the university became the State 
University of the new State. Subsequently a grant of forty thou- 
sand acres of public lands was appropriated to the school. The 
government is vested in a board of five State trustees. Besides 
the college of arts and sciences, a normal college, school of mines, 
military department, and professional schools are included in the 
university. 

Admission, Instruction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination, 
and on certificates. Three courses : the classical, Latin-scientific, 
and the scientific, lead to degrees of B.A., and a post-graduate course 
leads to that of M.A. Special students are admitted free into all 
classes. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, though the charter of 
the university declares that no instruction either sectarian in religion 
or protestant in politics shall be allowed, Negroes are admitted. 

Equipment : The university grounds are on the line of the Great 
Northern Railway, within a mile of Grand Forks. All the %vork of 
instruction is carred on in the main building, which contains an 
assembly hall, library, museum, three laboratories, a gymnasium, 



36o 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-EOOK. 



armory, and a post-office. Dormitories have been erected for both 
men and women. 

Societies atid Publications: The students maintain two literary 
societies, the Adelphi, and Per Gratis, two religious associations, an 
Athletic Association, and publish the " Student." The graduates 
number sixty. 

F.cCtilty. 
Webster Merrifield, M.A., President, Earle J. Babcock, B.S., Chemistry. 



Social Science. 

Horace B. VVoodworth, B.A., Mental 
and Moral Science. 

John Macnie, M.A., French, German. 

Ludovic Estes, A.M., Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

Adolph F. Bechdolt, M.A., Ph.D., 
English. 

Joseph Kennedy, B.S., Pedagogy. 

Geo. S. Thomas, M.A., Ph.D., Greek 
and Latin. 

C. S. Farnsworth, U.S.A., Military 
Science. 

George Taylor Rj^gh, B.A., Scandina- 
vian Languages. 



M. A. Brannon, B.A., Biol., Museum. 

Hannah E. Davis, English Literature. 

George St. John Perrott, B.A., Latin 
and Greek. 

Josepli H. Root, B.S., Mathematics. 

Cora E. Smith-Eaton, B.S., M.D., 
Calisthenics. 

A. L. Silvernail, Commercial Depart. 

Hannah E. Davis, Preceptress. 

H. B. VVoodworth, Librarian. 

G. A. Brennan, B. G. Skulason, as- 
sistants in Library. 

Carl Engebretson, Biol. Laboratory. 

W. C. Hawthorne, Chem. Laboratory. 

E. B. Robbins, Physical Laboratory. 



UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME. 

JVoire Daffie, hid. Men. Catholic. 



Income, 



Students, 
635 



Instructors, 
63 



Buildings, 
II 



Books, 
70,000 



History and Organization: The school was founded in 1842, and 
was chartered two years later. In 1879 the college buildings were 
destroyed by fire. The golden jubilee of the university was cele- 
brated in 1895. The presidents have been: Bishop Edward 
Sorin, 1842-1S65; Patrick Dillon, 1865-1866; Wilham Cosby, 1866- 
1872; Augustus Lemonnier, 1872-1874; Patrick Colovin, 1874-1877 ; 
William Cosby (second term), 1877-1881 ; Thomas E. Walsh, 1881- 
1893 ; and Andrew Morrissey, the present incumbent. 

Adinission, Instruction, and Degrees: Admission is by examination 
only. Classical, scientific, and English courses lead to degrees of 
B.A., B.L., B.S., C.E., and in biology. The Institute of Technology 
embraces departments of engineering, practical mechanics, and 
machine drawings. Attendance at chapel, mass, confession, etc., is 
compulsory. Students are forbidden to leave the university grounds 
without permission, to use tobacco without the expressed sanction of 
their parents, or to indulge in "clandestine and improper corre- 
spondence." All students must rise at 6.30, and retire not later 
than 10 P.M. Attendance at military drill is voluntary. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 36 1 

Dues and Prizes: The expenses are $300 for the year, lasting from 
September 20 to June 13. Five special prize medals are annually 
distributed for excellence in English and Christian doctrine, with 
fifteen gold and silver medals for excellence in general study, other 
gold medals for honors, and thirty gold and silver medals for good 
deportment. 

Equipment : The university is situated one mile and a half from 
South Bend, Ind., eighty miles east of Chicago. North and west of 
the university are St. Joseph's and St. Mary's lakes, the latter cover- 
ing some twenty-three acres, while St. Joseph's River sweeps past the 
university grounds on the west. Among the new buildings rebuilt 
after the fire are a richly decorated church, containing chimes, and 
what is claimed to be the largest bell in the country. Sorin Hall, 
the main building, contains a chapel, recitation rooms, court room, 
law library, and society rooms. Carroll and Bronson Halls are dor- 
mitories; St. Edward's Hall is for academic pupils, and two halls 
are devoted to scientific instruction alone. In addition to these 
there is a students' play hall, a music hall, with billiard, athletic, and 
bicycle rooms, and an exhibition hall seating twelve hundred persons ; 
an infirmary, astronomical observatory, and post-office. Near the 
university is St. Mary's Academy, a college for women under the 
same administration. 

Societies and Fublicatiojis : The students publish " The Scholastic " 
(a weekly), and maintain five religious societies, a Total Abstinence 
Union, the St. Aloysius Philodemic Society, the Thespian Associa- 
tion, Columbian Literary and Dramatic Association, St. Cecelia 
Philomathean Society, St. Stanislaus Philopatrian Society, Sorin 
Literary and Dramatic Association, the University Stock Company, 
choir, orchestra, Orpheus Club, glee and mandolin clubs, university 
quartettes, cornet band, Law Debating Society, with a moot court, 
court of chancery, probate court, justices' court, supreme court, with 
district and commissioners' courts. The athletic clubs are the 
Athletic Association, with two branches ; the Lemonnier Boat Club, 
embracing seven six-oar crews; the university cycling clubs, tennis 
club, hand-ball association, Hoynes' Light Guards, and the Sorin 
Cadets. The graduates number 500, the oldest of whom is the Rev. 
E. B. Kilroy, 1852, of Stratford, Ont. 

Eaeutty. 



Rev. Andrew Morrissey, C.S.C., Evi- 
dences of Religion. 

Rev. James J. French, C.S.C., Latin 
and Ensjlish. 

Rev. Daniel J. Spillard C.S.C, Ec- 
clesiastical History. 

Rev. John A. Zahm, C.S.C, Physi- 
cal Sciences. 

Rev. P. J. Franciscus, C.S.C, Latin. 

Rev. Nicholas Stoffel, C.S.C, Greek. 

Rev. Alexander M. Kirsch, C.S.C, 
Biolocry. 

Rev. Stanislaus Fitte, C.S.C, Phi- 
losophy. 

Rev. Peter Klein, C.S.C, French. 



Rev. Joseph Kirsch, C.S.C, Natxiral 

Sciences. 
Rev. J. A. Burns, C.S.C, Chem. 
Rev. J. W. Cavanaugh, C.S.C, Rhet. 
J. F. Edwards, A.M., LL.B., History. 
William Haynes, AM., LL.B., Law. 
Michael O'Dea, M.S., E.E., Applied 

ElGctricitv* 
J. G. Ewing,'A.M., M.S., Polit. Econ. 
M. J. McCue, M.S., CE., Astronomy. 
M. F. Egan, A.M., LL.D., English 

Literature. 
J. B. Berteling, M.D., Anatomy. 
G. E. Clarke, A.M., LL.M., Elocution. 
L. McGriskin, A.M.. Greek, Math. 



3^2 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Rev. William Maloney, C.S.C, Com- 
mercial Law. 

Rev. Bernard 111, C.S.C, Book-keeping. 

Rev. Joseph Just, C.S.C, Greek and 
French. 

Rev. Michael Donahue, C.S.C, Latin. 

Rev. Thomas H. Corbett, C.S.C, 
English. 

Rev. Joseph Maguire, C.S.C, English. 

Bro. Boniface, C.S.C, German. 

Bro. Alexander, C.S.C, Mathematics. 

Bro. Philip Neri, C.S.C, German. 

Bro. Celestine, C.S.C, Telegraphy. 

E. J. Maurus, Mathematics. 

J. D. McGee, A.B., Latin and Greek. 

C C Fitzgerald, C.E., English and 
Mathematics. 

Frank Powers, B.S., Biology. 

J. H. Kivlan, Machine Shop. 

Brothers Emmanuel, Cajetan, Jerome, 
Alphonsus, Leander, Joseph, Albeus, 
Hugh, and Louis, Prep. Dept. 

Bro. Basil, C.S.C, Musical Director. 

Bro Leopold, C.S.C, Bro. Girard, 
C.S.C, Instrumental Music. 

Damis Paul, Piano and Violin. 

Newton A. Preston, Vocal Music, etc. 



Francis Xavier Ackermann, Drawing. 
Paul Beyer, Gymnastics. 

LAVl^ DEPARTMENT. 

William Hoynes, LL.D., Dean, In- 
ternational Law, etc. 

Hon. Lucius Hubbard, LL.D., In- 
surance and Code Pleadings. 

Abraham L. Brick, LL.D., Criminal 
Law, etc. 

Hon. Timothy E. Howard, LL.D., 
Appellate Jurisdiction. 

Hon. Frank Scales, LL.D, Assess- 
ments and Taxation. 

Hon. R. Prendergast, Assignments. 

Hon. John Gibbons, LL.D., Consti- 
tutional Law. 

Hon. Lucius G. Tong, A.M., LL.B., 
Banks and Banking. 

William P. Breen, A.M., LL.B., 
Statutory Law. 

John G. Ewing, A.M., M.S., Political 
Economy. 

George E. Clarke, A.M., LL.M., 
Advocacy. 

Rev. Alexander M. Kirsch, C.S.C, 
Toxicology and Medical Law. 



UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA. 

Norman, Okla. Co-Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 

;?i6,3oo 



Students, 
148 



Instructors, 

7 



Buildings, 
I 



Books, 
i,8co 



Shortly after the opening of the Territory, the university was 
located at Norman on condition of a grant of ^10,000 and forty 
acres of ground. Instruction was begun in 1892. The university is 
governed by six regents, and is supported by a territorial tax of a half 
mill on the annual pro rata revenues of the Territoiy. Tuition is 
free to all residents of the Territory. Admission is on high school 
certificates. Degrees of A.B., B.S., B.L., and B.Ph. are conferred. 
The societies are the Pierian, the Athena (for women), a Historical 
Society and an Oratorical Society, which annually awards a gold 
medal for debate. The Presbyterians and Methodists have erected 
halls for students of those denominations adjoining the campus. 



Faculty. 



David R. Boyd, A.M., President, 

Philosophy. 
Edwin DeBarr, Ph.B., Chemistry. 
James N. Anderson, Ph.D., Greek 

and Latin. 



James S. Buchanan, B.S., History and 

Civics. 
Frederick S. Elder, A.B., Math. 
Mary J. Overstreet, English. 
Maude DeCou, Librarian. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



363 



UNIVERSITY OF OMAHA. 

Bellevue and Omaha, Neb. Co-Educational. 



Presbyterian. 



Income, 

$6,000 



Students, 
205 



Instructors, 
6-. 



Buildings, 



Books, 
5,000 



Bellevue College was opened in 18S0 on grounds overlooking the 
Missouri River, eight miles from the city. In 1S91 the name was 
changed to University of Omaha, when the law school, medical and 
dental college were consolidated with the older institution. The 
presidents of Bellevue College have been: W. W. Harsha, D.D., 
LL.D., 1SS3-1888; Francis Blainey, D.D., 1888-1890, and first Chan- 
cellor of the University of Omaha; and David R. Kerr, D.D., Ph.D., 
1890 to the present. 

The university as a whole is governed by forty trustees. Graduates 
of high schools and academies are admitted without examination. 
Instruction is given in the classics, sciences, literature and normal 
branches leading to degrees of A.B., B.S., B.L. and A.M. while pro- 
fessional degrees are conferred by the other departments of the 
university. Attendance at chapel is compulsory, but not so gym- 
nastic exercise. The expenses for the year, from September 15 to 
June 8 are $175. The students publish the " Star," and maintain the 
Philomathean and Adelphia literary societies, two Christian Asso- 
ciations with a baseball team and tennis club. 



Faculty. 



Rev. David R. Kerr, Ph.D., D.D., 

President, Philosophy. 

Mrs. Martha S. Kerr, Lady Principal, 
History. 

Mary L. Lawrence, A.M., English and 
Modern Languages. 

Charles A. Mitchell, A.M., Greek. 

Frank N. Notestein, Ph.D., Math. 

Lizzie Connor, A.B., Latin, Book- 
keeping. 

Rev. Ernest A. Bell, A.M., Philos- 
ophy. 

Lee G. Kratz, Mus.B., Vocal Culture. 

E. M. Jones, Piano and Harmony. 

Miss M. L. Lawrence, Elocution. 

Mary M. Kerr, Preceptress. 

A. C. Ong, lL.B., Penmanship. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Harold Gifford, M.D.. Ophthalmology. 
J. C. Denice, A.M., M.D., Otologv. 
W. S. Gibbs, M.D., Medicine. 
J. E. Summers, Jr., M.D., Surgery. 
E. W, Chase, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Ewing Brown, M.D., Anatomy. 



W. S. Christie, M.D., Therapeutics. 
C. C. Allison, Physiology. 
F. M. MUller, A. A., M.D., Chemistry. 
H. H. McClanahan, M.D., Children's 

Diseases. 
Sherman VanNess, M.D., Gynecology. 
O. S. Hoffman, M.D., Dermatology. 
W. R. Lavender, M.D., Pathology 

and Histology. 
W. O. Bridges, M.D., Medicine. 
W. N. Dorward, D.D.S., Therapeut. 
H. L King, D.D.S., Oral Surgery. 
A. Detweiler, M.D., Physiology. 
J. J. McMullen, Orthodontia. 
L. P. Davis, D.D.S., Dental Cham. 
W. B. Ten Eyck, LL.D., Dental 

Jurisprudence. 
Donald Macrae, M.D., Surgery. 
R. C. Moore, M.D., Insanity. 
W. F. Milroy, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 
A. F. Jonas, M,D,, Clinical Surgery. 
F. S. Owen, M.D,, Electro-Therapeut. 
W. W. Keysor, Med. Jurisprudence. 
H. B. Lowry, M.D,, Nerv. Diseases. 
E. E. Wormersley, Anatomy. 



3^4 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



B. F. West, M.D., Histology. 

J. C. Whinnery, D.D.S., Dean, Oper- 
ative Technics. 

W. H.Sherraden,D.D.S.,Dent. Anat. 

H. A. Woodbury, D.D.S., Operative 
Dentistry. 



H. W. All wine, D.D.S., Prosthetic 

Dentistry. 
H. W. Shriver, D.D.S., Prosthetic 

Technics. 
D. Macrae, Jr., M.D., Anatomy. 
W. H. Christie, M.D., Materia Med. 



UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. 

Eugene, Ore. Co-Ediicaiional. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$45,000 



Students, 
500 



Instructors, 
54 



Buildings, 
2 



Books, 
6,000 



The university was established in 1878. The school is governed 
by a board of regents. Admission is on certificates mainly. Courses 
in the classics, sciences and letters, music, and engineering and 
pedagogy as well as hygiene lead to degrees of A.B., B.S., B.L , B.Pe., 
C.E., and B.Mus. Attendance at chapel is voluntary. Tuition is free. 
Other expenses for the year ending June 18, aggregate less than 
$100. The students maintain two Christian Associations and an 
Athletic Association. 

Faculty. 

Luella C. Carson, Rhetoric. 



C. H. Chapman, President. 
J. W. Johnson, Latin. 
Thomas Condon, Geology. 
Edgar McClure, Chemistry. 
Charles Friedel, Physics. 
John Straub, Greek. 
B. J. Hawthorne, Mental Science 
E. B. McElroy, Ethics. 



F. G. Young, History. 

F. L. Washburne, Biology. 

John D. Letcher, Mathematics. 

N. L. Narregan, Preparatory. 

J. R. Wetherbee, Phys. Education. 

E. H. McAlister, Mathematics. 

Philura E. Murch, Modern Languages. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

Philadelphia, Fa. Co- Educational. N'on-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$300,000 



Students, 
2,752 



Instructors, 
240 



Buildings, 
22 



Books, 
125,000 



Through the efforts of Benjamin Franklin a fund was raised in 
1749 to change Penn's Charity vSchool. begun in 1720, into an acad- 
emy. It WHS opened in 1751, and four years later received a college 
charter. The first commencement was in 1757. The school lan- 
guished for several years, so that Provost Smith had to be sent to 
Enc^land to raise funds. He there met the commissioner of King's 
College, now Columbia University, and thev both agreed to share 
the proceeds of their joint efforts, some ;i^6,ooo. After his return 
Provost Smith sided with the "war party," and was cast into prison 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 365 

for publishing an alleged libellous pamphlet against the assembly. 
While in jail he continued to give lectures to his classes, but in 1759 
was compelled to flee to England, where he was received with great 
honor, and made a doctor by Oxford University. He returned after 
a peaceful settlement cf his differences with the assembly, with 
;[^20,ooo funds for the college. In 1791 the college was amalga- 
mated with the new school, which was the first to be called a uni- 
versity in this country. The Medical School, likewise the first in 
this country, dates from 1765. A German school was added in 
1785, and a Law School in 1790. 

In 1810 the university was reorganized, and the classes were 
reduced to three : freshmen, juniors, and seniors. The college thence- 
forth continued as an old-fashioned classical college till 1868, when 
the elective system was introduced. In 1872 the department of arts 
was reorganized, and the department of science, known as the 
Towne Scientific School, was established. In 1877 a department of 
music, and in 1878 that of dentistry were added. The provosts and 
presidents have been: Benjamin Franklin, 1749-1756; Richard 
Peters, D'.D., 1756-1764; James Hamilton, 1764; John Penn, 1764- 
1771 ; James Hamilton, 1771-1773; Richard Penn, 1773-1774; John 
Penn, 1774-1779; Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., 1789-1790; William 
White, D.I)., 1790-1791. University of the State of Pennsylvania: 
Joseph Reed, 1779-1781; William Moore, 1781-1782; John Dickin- 
son, 1782-1785; Thomas McKean. LL.D., 1788-1 791. University of 
Pennsylvania: Dr. John E\%ing, 1791-1802 ; Dr. John McDowell, 
1802-1810; Dr. Andrews, 1810-1813; Rev. Frederick Beaseley, 
1813-1828; Dr. William H. DeLancey, 182S-1833; Dr. John Lud- 
low, 1833-1S53; Henry Vethake, 1853-1860; Dr. Daniel R. Goodwin, 
1860-1868; Dr. Charles J. Stille, 1868-1880; Charles C. Harrison, 
A.M., the present incumbent. 

Organization : The corporation consists of twenty-eight trustees, 
with the Governor of the State as tx officio president. The uni- 
versity comprehends the following departments : The college, in 
which are given the courses in arts, finance, and economy, biol- 
ogy, music, architecture, science, and technology, chemistry, me- 
chanical, electrical, civil, and chemical engineering; the departments 
of philosophy, law, medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine; 
university hospital ; auxiliary department of medicine ; Wistar Insti- 
tute ; hygiene laboratory ; veterinary hospital ; library, museum of 
archaeology and paleontology ; observatory, and gymnasium. 

Admission, Instruction, Degrees: Candidates for the freshman class 
are admitted by examination, or. under certain conditions, on high 
school diplomas. During the first two years at the college, four 
elective courses are open, among which are Greek, Latin, and the 
modern languages. In the two following years thirteen groups of 
elective studies are open. The degrees are A.B., B.S., B.S. in Biol., 
B.Mus., B.Archt., and B.Eng. Masters' degrees in arts and science, 
as well as those of C.E., M.E., and Min.E. are conferred after one 
year of graduate study, while those of Ph.D., Mus.Doct., and LL.D. 
are conferred after two years. Professional degrees are conferred by 
the Law School. Dental College, and School of Medicine and other 
professional departments. 



2,66 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Dues, Scholai'sJiips, and Prizes: Tuition is $i6o for the year, lasting 
from September 27 to June ii. A graduation fee of ^20 is charged, 
with special fees in the professional departments. The total ex- 
penses, it is claimed, need not exceed $350. Two scholarships, estab- 
lished by Thomas Penn, are conferred by the Governor of the State. 
Besides these fifty-five Philadelphia scholarships, equivalent to tui- 
tion, and one in American history, are annually available. From a 
fund of $50,000 further scholarships and thirty-seven prizes of from 
$40 to $75 have been established. Six fellowships, equivalent to 
tuition and living expenses, and $25 extra, are offered in philosophy, 
besides two in hygiene and physics; fifteen scholarships and a ^100 
prize in veterinary medicine ; and ten law scholarships with four law 
prizes of from $40 to $75. 

Equipment: The university buildings, twenty-two in number, are 
situated on forty-eight acres of ground in West Philadelphia. The 
general library, containing 135,000 volumes and 50,000 pamphlets, 
contains sixteen private collections. The most notable of these are 
the Colwell collection, one of the most complete finance libraries in 
the world, and the Bechstein Library, containing 15,000 books on 
German philology and literature. The museum of archaeology and 
paleontology contains collections of American, Asiatic, and Egyptian 
antiquities of great value. Its Babylonian collection is declared 
to rank equal with those of the British Museum and the Louvre. 
The observatory consists of three buildings situated on the Flower 
Farm, two miles from the university. Houston Hall, a clubhouse 
for students, was finished in 1896. 

Societies and Publications: The students publish the " Pennsylva- 
nian" (daily), the "Red and Blue" (monthly), the "University 
Courier" (weekly), "Ben Franklin" (comic fortnightly), and the 
"Class Record" (an annual). Among the societies are the Philoma- 
thean (dating from 1813), Telosophic (dating from 1829), Field Club, 
Camera Club, Library Club, two Christian Associations, and an 
Athletic Association, with football, baseball, and track teams, 'var- 
sity and class crews, golf and tennis clubs, and other athletic organi- 
zations. Chapters have been organized of: A *, 1849; Z ■*", ^'k 2, 
1850; AY, 1854; 2X, 1875-1878; * K ^F, 1877; B n, 1880; ATn, 
1881-1884; * r A, 1881-1887; X *, 1883-1885; * A 0, 1883, * A *, 
T K, 1886; N 2 N, K K r, 1890; M«l>A;2N;*A2;YT;rA; 
AT; A*; K2; AMnH; A2A, and * B K. 

The number of graduates is 15,500, of whom 10,000 are alive. The 
oldest is Robert B. Davidson, A.M., 1826, of Philadelphia. 



Facultv. 



Charles C. Harrison, A.M., Provost. 
Rev. George S. Fullerton, Ph.D., 

Vice-Provost. 
Francis A. Jackson, A.M., Latin. 
E. Otis Kendall, LL.D., Math. 
J. Peter Lesley, LL.D., Gaol., Mining. 
Richard A. F. Penrose, M.D., LL.D., 

Obstetrics. 
Alfred Stille, M.D., LL.D., Theory 

and Practice and Clinical Medicine. 



Harrison Allen, M.D., Compar. Anat. 

Horatio C. Wood, M.D., LL.D., 
Materia Medica. 

Charles J. Stille, LL.D., History and 
English Literature. 

Hon. J. L Clark Hare, LL.D,, Insti- 
tutes of Law. 

Geo. F. Barker, Ph.B., M.D., Phvsics. 

Wm. Pepper, M.D., LL.D., Theory 
and Practice 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



367 



Wm. F. Norris, M.D., Ophthalmol. 

Jas. Parsons, A.M., Commercial Law. 

Jas. Tyson, M.D., Clinical Medicine. 

Louis A. Duhring, M.D., Skin Dis. 

Hugh A. Clarke, Mas. Doc, Science 
of Music. 

Jos. T. Kothrock, B.S., M.D., Botany. 

Theodore G. Wormley, M.D., LL.D., 
Chemistry and Toxicology. 

John Ashhurst, Jr., M.D., Surgery. 

Charles J. Essig, M.D., D.D.S., Me- 
chanical Dentistry. 

Edwin T. Darby, M.D., D.D.S., 
Operative Dentistry. 

Morton W. Easton, Ph.D., Ethnology. 

Jas. Truman, D.D.S., Dental Pathol. 

John B. McMaster, A.M., Litt.D., 
American History. 

Horace Jayne, M.D., Ph.D., Director 
Wistar lostitute. 

George T. Bispham, A.M., Equity 
Jurisprudence. 

Rev. George S. Fullerton, Ph.D., Phi- 
losophy. 

Edw. T. Reichert, M.D., Physiology. 

J. Wm. White, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 

Dan.G. Brinton, M.D., Sc.D., Ameri- 
can Archaeology and Linguistics. 

Rev. Hermann V. Hilprecht, D.D., 
Ph.D., Assyrian and Semitic. 

Morris Jastrow, Jr., Ph.D., Semitic, 
and Assist. Librarian. 

William P. Wilson, Sc.D., Botany. 

Gregory B. Keen, A.M., Librarian. 

C. Stuart Patterson, A.M., Constitu- 
tional Law. 

Henry W. Spangler, Dynamical Engi- 
neering, etc. 

Barton C. Hirst, M.D., Obstetrics. 

Wm. A. Lamberton, A.M., Litt.D., 
Greek. 

Simon N, Patten, Ph.D., Polit. Econ. 

Edgar F. Smith, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

Felix E. Schelling, A.M., History and 
English Literature. 

John Guiteras, M.D., Gen. Pathology. 

DeForest Willard, M.D., Orthopedic 
Surgery. 

George A. Piersol, M.D., Anatomy. 

John H. Musser, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 

Geo. S. Graham, LL.D.. Criminal Law. 

Arthur W. Goodspeed, Ph.D., Physics. 

Edwin S. Crawley, Ph.D., Math. 

John Marshall, M.D., Nat.Sc.D., Chem. 

George E. Fisher, A.M., Ph.D., Math. 

Simon J. J. Harger, V.M.D., Veteri- 
nary Anatomy. ' 



Edward D. Cope, Ph.D., Zoology. 

Geo. H. Horn, M.D., Entomology. 

J. S. Billings, M.D., LL.D., Hygiene. 

Randolph Faries, A.M., M.D., Physi- 
cal Education. 

Charles E. Dana, Art. 

Edward P. Cheyney, A.M., History. 

Roland P. Falkner, Ph.D., Statistics. 

Francis N. Thorpe, Ph.D., American 
Constitutional History. 

Warren P. Laird, Architecture. 

B. A. Randall, M.D., Diseases of Ear. 

Hon. Geo. M. Dallas, LL.D., Torts. 

J. P. C. Griffith, M.D., Children's 
Diseases. 

John B. Deaver, M.D., Applied Anat. 

Edward Martin, M.D., Genito-Urinary 
Diseases. 

Leonard Pearson, B.S., V.M.D., Vet- 
erinary Medicine. 

Hugo A. Rennert, Ph.D., Romance 
Languages. 

Edgar Marburg, C.E., Civ. Engin. 

John M. Macfarlane, D.Sc, Botany. 

Joseph F.Johnson, A.B., Journalism. 

Charles K. Mills, M.D., Insanity. 

Geo. W. Pepper, A.M., LL.B., Law. 

Walter L. Webb, C.E., Civ. Engin. 

Alfred Gudeman, LL.D., Classical 
Philology. 

Charles B. Penrose, M.D., Ph.D., 
Gynecology. 

John W. Adams, A.B., V.M.D., Vet- 
erinary Surgery. 

Edgar V. Seeler, Design. 

William S.' Carter, M.D., Comparative 
Physiology. 

Martin G. Brumbaugh, A.M., Ph.D., 
Pedagogy. 

Maxwell Sommerville, Glyptology. 

Amos P. Brown, Ph.D., Mineralogy 
and Geology. 

Chas. C. Townsend, A.B., LL.B., Law. 

Geo. S. Patterson, A.B., LL.B., Law. 

H. E, Everett, Interior Architecture. 

Lightner Witmer, Ph.D., Psychology. 

Wm. R. Newbold, Ph.D., Philosophy. 

John Q. Adams, Ph.D., Polit. Science. 

Henry^Gibbons, Ph.D., Latin. 

H. L. Carson, A.M., LL.B., Law. 

Chas. L, Doohttle, C.E., Mathematics, 
and Director of Observatory. 

Marion D. Learned, Ph.D., German. 

Edwin G. Conklin, Ph.D., Compara- 
tive Embryology. 

Edw. C. Kirk, D.D.S., Clin. Dentistry. 

Adolph W.Miller, M.D., Materia Med. 



[6S 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



Albert L. A. Toboldt, M.D., Practi- 
cal Pharmacy, 

Henry R. Wharton, M.D,, Surgery, etc. 

Richard H. Harte, M.D., Osteology. 

Robt. Huey, D.D.S., Oper. Dentistry. 

Wm. Diehl, D.D.S., Oper. Dentistry. 

Thomas R. Neilson, M.D., Surgery. 

Edmund W. Holmes, M.D., Anatomy. 

Judson Daland, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 

Alexander Glass, V.S., Canine Med. 

Gwilym G. Davis, M.D., M.R.C.S., 
Surgery. 

John K. Mitchell, M.D., Symptoma- 
tology. 

James E. Loder, D.D.S., Operative 
Dentistry. 

George H. Chambers, M.D., Normal 
Histology. 

Harry B. McFadden, D.D.S., Me- 
clianical Dentistry. 

James K. Young, M.D., Orthopedic 
Surgery. 

Ambler Tees, D.D.S., Mechanical 
Dentistry. 

Joseph W. White, D.D.S., Operative 
Dentistry. 

Henry W. Cattell, M.D., Morbid Anat. 

Milton J. Greenman, Ph.B., M.D., 
Assist. Director Wistar Institute. 

C. S. Potts, M.D.,Electro-Therapeut. 
J. M. Brovi^n, M.D., Otology. 

A. S. Bolles, Ph.D., Banking Law 
and Practice. 

Frank M. Day, B.S., Architecture. 

John Stewardson, Architecture. 

E. S. Muir, Ph.G., V.M.D., Veteri- 
nary Materia Medica. 

John J. Morris, Mechan. Engineering. 

J. G. Lane, D.D.S., Crown and Bridge 
Work. 

A. C. Abbott, M.D., Hygiene. 
W. L Pennock, M.D., Anatomy. 

H. B. Allyn, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 
Julian Millard, Architecture. 
Julius Ohly, Ph.D., Chemistry. 

D. L. Wallace, Chemistry. 
William Schleif, Ph.G., Pharmacy. 

B. F. Senseman, V.M.D., Vet. Anat. 
M. H. Fussell, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 
S. W. Morton, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 
A. C. Wood, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 

E. R. Kirby, M.D., Clinical Surgery. 
R. H. D. Swing, D.D.S., Oper. Dent. 

F. W. Amend, Jr., D.D.S., Mechani- 
cal Dentistry. 

Artluir A. Stevens, M.D., Medical 
Terminology. 



Robert Formad, M.D., V.M.D., Vet- 
erinary Sanitary Science. 

J. E. Dunwoody, D.D.S., Oper. Dent. 

Milton N. Keim, Jr., D.D.S., Me- 
chanical Dentistry. 

B. F. Stahl, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 
Charles M. Burk, M.D., Zoology. 
John C. Heisler, M.D., Anatomy. 
Frederick A. Packard, M.D., Physical 

Diagnosis. 
Daniel B. Shumway, B.S., Ph.D., 

Germanic Languages. 
Frederic A. Peeso, D.D.S., Crown 

and Bridge Work. 
John D. Thomas, D.D.S., Nitrous 

Oxide. 
Richard C. Norris, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Milton B. Hartzell, M.D., Dermatol. 
W. C, Goodell, M.D., Clin. Gynecol. 
J. P. Moore, Zoology. 
John Harshberger, Ph.D., Botany. 

C. L. Leonard, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 
Jos. McFarland, M.D., Pathological 

Histology. 

G. C. Stout, M.D., Normal Histology. 

A. J. Boyden, S.B., Building Con- 
struction. 

Homer Smith, Ph.D., English. 

J. H. Penniman, Ph.D., English. 

A. W. Schramm, B.S., M.E., Electri- 
cal Engineering. 

L. E. Picolet, Mechanical Engineering. 

R. S. J. Mitcheson, M.D., Anatomy. 

D. B. Birney, M.D., Surgery. 

J. P. Tunis, M.D., Surgery, Anatomy. 

Edward Wesselhoeft, German. 

P. P. Calvert, Ph.D., Zoology. 

A. T. Clay, Ph.D., Assyrian. 

Henry Plasschaert, Modelling. 

L. E. Ranch, D.D.S., Oper. Dentistry. 

J. T. Lippincott, D.D.S., Oper. Dent. 

Walter Cope, Architecture. 

Alfred Stengel, M.D., Chn. Medicine. 

T. M. Tyson, M.D., Clin. Medicine. 

J. A. Scott, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 

C. W. Dulles, M.D., Hist, of Medicine. 

D. C. Munro, A.M., Roman and 
Mediaeval History. 

L J. Schwatt, Ph.D., Mathematics. 
Theodore Lorenz, French. 
G. W. Dawson, Drawing. 
Hermann Fleck, Ph.D., Chemistry. 
O. L. Shinn, B.S., Chemistry. 
J. B. Moyer, B.S., Chemistry. 
C. W. Scribner, A.B., M.E., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 
H. W. McConnell, Mech. Engineering. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



369 



H. C. Richards, Ph.D., Physics. 

W. D. Lewis, Ph.D., Institutional Law. 

E. R. Johnson, Ph.D., Transportation. 
A. H. Wintersteen, A.M., Business 

Law and Practice. 
Franz Enge, Forging, Horseshoeing. 
D. W. Fetterolf, M.D., Chemistry. 
S. M. Hamill, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 
Henry Toulmin, M.D., Phys. Diagnos. 
T. H. Dougherty, Zoology. 
R. J. Seymour, D.D.S., Mech. Dent. 
N S. Essig, D.D.S., Mech. Dentistry. 
M. L. Rhein, M.D., D.D.S., Dental 

Pathology. 
David Riesman, M.D., Pathological 

Histology. 

F. A. Hays, Pen and Ink Rendering. 
L. S. Rowe, Ph.D., Municipal Gov- 
ernment. 

H. R. Seager, Ph.D., Pol. Economy. 
S. McC. Lindsay, Ph D., Soc. Science. 
Edw. H. Waldo, Mech. Engineering. 
William Easby, Jr., B.S., C.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

G. H. Hallett, A.M., Mathematics. 
F. P. Witmer, A.B., B.S., C.E., Civil 

Engineering. 
A. H. Qumn. B.S., English. 
H. C. Porter, Ph.D., Botany. 
R. H. Bradbury, Ph.D., Phys., Chem. 
H. D. Beyea, j\LD., Clin. Gynecology. 
W. A. N. Dorland, M.D., Obstetrics. 
W. S. Wadsworth, Physiology. 
M. E. Conard, V.M.D., Veterinary 

Obstetrics. 



C. P. Grayson, M.D., Laryngology. 
C. E. Fouse, V.M.D., Vet. Anatomy. 
C. W. Lincoln, M.D., Pathological 

Histology. 
J. H. Girvin. M.D., Obstetrics. 
\V. F. Sprenkel, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Arthur SaUnger, V.M.D., Vet. Surgery. 
M. P. Ravenel, M.D., Bacteriology. 
A. F. Witmer, M.D., Physiology. 

C. F. Nassau, M.D., Bacteriology. 

D. H. Bergey, M.D., Chemistry. 

G. G. Millikin, D.D.S., Oper. Dent. 

J. M. Hill, D.D.S., Crown and Bridge 
Work. 

W. N. Bates, Ph.D., Greek. 

Merrick Whitcomb, A.B., European 
History. 

H. B. Evans, M.E., Astronomy. 

A. M. Greene, Jr., B.S., M.E., Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

T. H. P. Sailer, Ph.D , Hebrew. 

A. C. Fleckenstein, B.S., Mechanical 
Engineermg. 

R. R. Tatnall, Ph.D., Physics. 

L. F. Pilcher, Ph.B. in Arch., Archi- 
tecture. 

F. M. Mann, M.S., Design. 

G. C. McKee, Physics. 

L. S. Smith, M.D., Clin. Gynecology. 
J. M. Swan, M.D., Anatomy. 
C. H. Frazier, M.D., Clin. Surgery. 
W. R. Hoch, M.D., Laryngology. 
J. P. Hutchinson, M.D., Surgery. 
C.J. Marshall, V.M.D., Vet. Medicine. 
J. D. Steele, M.D., ]\Iorbid Anatomy. 



UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER. 

Rochester, N. Y. Men. Baptist. 



Income, 
$44457 



Students, 
230 



Instructors, 
17 



Buildings, 



Books, 
30,000 



History and Organization: A charter similar to that of Columbia 
College was granted in 1851. Plans for establishing this university 
had been under consideration since 1847. After contributions had 
been pledged by the various religious denotninations of Rochester, 
the university v^-as organized and instruction begun in 1850 with a 
board of twenty-seven trustees, of whom twenty are Baptists and 
seven alumni. The presidents have been : Hon. Tra Harris, LL.D., 
1850-T85-!; Martin Brewer Anderson, LL.D., L.H.D., 1853-1888; and 
David J. Hill, LL.D., 1888 to the present. 

lusfrnction. Scholarships, Decrees: Admission is by certificate for 
definitely stated subjects. The studies for the first two years are 

24 



Z70 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



strictly prescribed. After that elective studies can be pursued under 
definite restrictions. The degrees are A.B., B.S., and B.Ph., with 
that of A.M. after a prescribed course of study. A university ex- 
tension course has recently been established. Attendance at chapel 
is compulsory. Tuition is $75 for the year, lasting from September, 
16 to June 18. Forty scholarships, equivalent to tuition, are annually 
available. Two graduate scholarships on the interest of ;^5,ooo each 
are offered in political history and economy. A scholastic prize of 
$60, thirty-nine prizes of $75, and fifteen undergraduate prizes of 
from I30 to I90 are further offered. The college grounds cover 
twenty-four acres. 

Societies and Publications : The students publish " Interpres " and 
maintain several literary, social, religious, and athletic societies, with 
chapters of the following fraternities : * B K, A A *, A Y, 1851 ; A T, 
1852; AKE, 1856; ^T, 1S58; Z AX,i866-i879; and X % 1884- 1889. 

Of 1 160 graduates, 1,000 are living. The oldest is the Rev. 
Robert Telford, 1851, of Philadelphia. 



Faculty. 



Samuel A. Lattimore, Ph.D., LL.D., 
Acting Chairman, Chemistry. 

Albert H. Mixer, A.M., Mod. Lan- 
guages. 

Joseph H. Gilmore, Ph.D., English. 

Otis H. Robinson, Ph.D., Natural 
Philosophy. 

William C. Morey, Ph.D., History. 

Henry F. Burton, A.M., Latin. 

George M. Forbes, A.M., Philosophy 
and Pedagogy. 



Herman L. Fairchild, B.S., Sec, Geol. 

Arthur L. Baker, C.E., Ph.D., Li- 
brarian, Mathematics. 

Charles VV. Dodge, M.S., Biology. 

Kendrick P. Shedd, A.B., Modern 
Languages. 

Henry E. Lawrence, A.M., Physics. 

Adelbert Hamilton, A.M., Classics. 

Roland P. Gray, A.B., English. 

Herman K. Phinney, A.M., Assistant 
Librarian. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Vermillion, S. D. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 



Students, 
•;oo 



Instructors, 
14 



Buildings, 

3 



Books, 
3,000 



The university was chartered in 1882, and is now sustained by 
legislative appropriation, until the income from the sale of 86,000 
acres of land becomes available. The government of the school is 
vested in nine regents and five trustees. The university comprises 
colleges of sciences, literature, arts, music and business, and pre- 
paratory courses. Admission is by examination and on certificate. 
The degrees are A.B., B.S., and B.L. Attendance at chapel is vol- 
untary. The expenses for the year are ^160. Tuition is free for 
residents of the state. Non-residents pay $ro a year. 

The student associations publish the "Volant" a fortnightlv- 
Among the associations are several literary, social. Christian, athletic 
and other organizations. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



371 



Faculty. 



Joseph W. Mauck, LL.D., President, 

Philosophy. 
Lewis E. Akeley, M.A., Physics and 

Chemistry. 
James E. Todd, M.A., Geology and 

Mineralogy. 
John S. Frazee, M.A., Mathematics 

and Astronomy. 
Christian P. Lommen, B.S., Biology. 
F. I. Merchant, M.A., Ph.D., Latin. 
O. E. Hagen, M.A., M.L., Ph.D., 

Modern Languages. 



Kernan Robson, M.A., English. 
George M, Smith, M.A., Greek and 

Pedagogy. 
Clark M. Young, Ph.D., History and 

Political Science. 
Susan Whitcomb Hassell, M.A., Lady 

Principal. 
Lieut. William C. Neary, U. S. A., 

Tactics. 
Thomas J. Sloan, Business Branches. 
Mrs. L. VV. Bell, Matron. 
Isaac W. Price, Assistant Librarian. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Co-Educational. Methodist. 



Income, 
^25,CX)0 



Students, 
400 



Instructors, 
54 



Buildings, 



Books, 
4,000 



This university, whose aim is declared to be "aggressively Chris- 
tian," was founded in 1S80. It is governed by twenty-one trustees, 
and comprises colleges of Liberal Arts, Medicine and Music, with 
schools of Commerce, Oratory and Arts, besides a Preparatory 
School and University Academy. A Normal Department with 
schools of Law and Dentistry are about to be added. 

Admission is by examination or on the certificates of twelve high 
schools. Elective courses are offered besides the curriculum to 
enable students to prepare for technical and professional studies 
while taking the college course. The degrees are A.B., B.L., B.Ph., 
B.S., B.D., and M.D. The expenses for the year lasting from Sep- 
tember 17 to June 18, are $160. Eight scholarships of $150 are 
offered in history, the classics, modern languages, sciences and 
civics. 

Societies: The students maintain three literary societies : the Aris- 
totelian for men, and Athena for women, and the Philophronian, 
besides two Christian Associations, and an Athletic Association with 
a baseball team and tennis club. 



Faculty 



Rev. George W. White, A.M 

dent. 
Milton E. Phillips, Ph.M., 

Dean, Mathematics. 
Tamar Gray, A.M., Greek. 
Rev. George Cochran, D.D., 

ophv and Hebrew. 
Rev. A. Hardie, A.M., Hist., 
Orville P. Phillips, Ph.M., 

Science. 



Presi- 



D.D. 



Laird J. Stabler, M.S., Ph.C, Reg- 
istrar, Physical Science. 
A. W. Bannister, A.M.. Latin, Math. 
Fortune De Conte, A.M., Art. 
I Joseph H. Cole, A.B., Latin. 
Phil OS- I Mary E. Plimpton, A.M., English. 

Rose Wiesecke, German and French. 
Ethics. I Lowell L. PvOgers, A.M., Math. 
Natural } Minerva Cook, A.M., Spanish. 
. Martha G. Parsons, Librarian. 



372 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



J. P. Widney. A.M., M.D., LL.D., 

Dean of Med. College, Emeritus. 
H. H. Maynard, M.D., Emeritus. 
J. H. Utley, M.D., Medicine. 
Horace B. Wing, M.D., Clinical Med. 
G. W. Lasher, M.D., Surgery. 
Joseph Kurtz, M.U., Clinical Surgery. 
William L. Wills, M.D., Anatomy. 
W. L. Wade, M.D., Therapeutics. 
M. L. Moore, M.D., Obstetrics. 
Walter Lindley, M.D., Gynecology. 
Carl Kurtz, M.D., Gynecology. 
H. Burt Ellis, B.A., M.D., Physiol. 
T. J, McCarty, M.D., Chemistry. 

D. G. MacGowan, M.D., Genital and 
Skin Diseases, etc. 

H. G. Brainard, A.B., M.D., Insan- 
ity, etc. 

E. A. Follansbee, M.D., Children's 
Diseases. 

H. S. Orme, A.B., M.D., Hygiene. 
D. C. Barber, A.M., M.D., Histol. 
A. F. Darling, M.D., Ophthalmology. 
N. P. Conrey, A.M., Medical. 
Wm. D. Babcock, A.M., M.D., Dis- 
eases of Throat and Nose. 

F. D. BuUard, A.M., M.D., Latin. 
Claire W. Murphy, M.D., Anatomy. 
Geo. L. Cole, M.D., Phys. Diagnosis. 
Rev. R. S. Maclay, D.D., Dean of 

Theological College, Emeritus. 
Tamar Gray, A.M., Greek. 



Rev. George Cochran, D.D., Hebrew 

and Exegesis. 
Rev. A. Hardie, A.M., Hist., Ethics. 
F. A. Bacon, Dean of Mus. College. 
W. F. Skeele, A.M., Piano, Organ. 
Edwin H. Clark, Violin. 
C. A. DeLano, Mandolin. 
Mrs. G. B. Phillips, Theory of Music. 
W. H. Mead, Flute. 
Prof. M. Stockton, Clarionet. 
William T. Randall, M.A., Math. 
Margaret G. Borthwick, French. 
Jefferson Taylor, M.A., English. 
Frederick G. Axtell, M.A., Latin and 

Greek. 
William L. Piutti, Piano. 
Charles O. Nichols, Vocal Music. 
George W. Gooch, M.A., Chemistry. 
Frank J. Meer, Commerce. 
Rev. Ezra A. Healy, B.A., Bible. 
Grace C. Morran, Mathematics. 
Leslie C. Marsh, Piano. 
Mary J. Lamb, English. 
Marian G. Hards, Drawing, Elocution. 
Charles J. Sholander, Ph3'siolo(?y. 
Eliza J. Perley, Normal Department. 
Fortune De Conte, A.M., Painting 

and Drawing. 
Grace Casement, B.L,, Wood Carv. 
Jesse G. Cross, A.M., Commercial 

Branches. 
Maude Willis, Elocution. 



UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE. 

KnoxvillCy Tenn. Co- Educational. Non-Sectarian. 



Income, 
$67,500 



Students, 



Instructors, 
49 



Buildings, 
6 



Books, 
10,000 



History: The parent school of this university was Blount College, 
which was founded in 1794 by the General Assembly of the territory 
south of the River Ohio, receiving its name from William Blount, 
the first governor of the territory. In 1S07 the school became the 
East Tennessee College, after a transfer to Poplar Hills, and in 1840 
the Tennessee University. The present name was assumed in 1879. 
The hill on which the present university stands was purchased for 
$600 in 1826. The old chapel, or Centre College, was then erected 
together with three one-story dormitories. The college has been 
co-educational from the very beginning, when Barbara Blount, one 
of the first women students, caused college hill, the present site of 
the university, to be named after her. Corporal punishment was in 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 373 

vogue as late as 1840. During the ante bellum period the college was 
involved in a long controversy with the University of North Carolina, 
concerning certain lands located in Tennessee, twenty thousand acres 
of which were finally assigned to East Tennessee College Owing to 
the difficulties arising from this controversy two of the presidents, 
Dr. Coffin and Mr. Piper, had to resign. In the spring of 1S61, when 
war was declared, the students and teachers of the university enlisted 
in such numbers that instruction had to be suspended. Confederate 
troops occupied the college from January, 1862, to September, 1863, 
when Knoxville was taken by the Union troops, who in their turn 
occupied the college buildings. The two armies left little of the 
college property except bare walls and fortifications. When instruc- 
tion was resumed only twenty students attended. In 1869, the 
Federal land grant of 1862 became available, and the proceeds of the 
three hundred thousand acres that had been assigned to Tennessee, 
were appropriated to the State University. Free scholarships were 
at the same time established. In 1877 the entire faculty was re- 
organized, and in 1879, ^'^ university was inaugurated as a State 
University, with a medical and dental school at Nashville. In 1888 
the university was again completely re-organized, and a law depart- 
ment was established. The centennial of the school was celebrated 
in 1894. The presidents have been: Rev. Samuel Carrick, A.M., 
1794-1809; Rev. David Sherman, A.M., 1820-1825; Rev. Charles 
Coffin, D.D., 1827-1832; Rev. James H. Piper, A.M., 1833-1834; 
Joseph Estabrook, A.M., 1834-1850; Hon. W. B. Reese, LL.D., 
1850-1853; Rev. George Cook, A.M., 1853-1857 ; Rev. William D. 
Carnes, A.M., 1858-1860; Rev. J. J. Ridley, D.D., 1860-1862; Rev. 
Thomas W. Humes, A.M., S.T.D., 1865-1883; Charles W. Dabney, 
Ph.D., 1887 to the present. 

Organization: The board of trustees of the university holds a 
charter from the State dating from 1807. It is limited to thirty mem- 
bers, chosen from the different congressional districts of the state, 
who serve for life or until removal from the state, or resignation. 
The governor, the secretary of state, and the superintendent of 
public instruction are members ex-offi.cio. Seven members form a 
quorum. The president of the university is also president of the 
board of trustees ; the other officers are a treasurer and a secretary. 
A separate faculty has charge of the instruction in each department. 
The faculties consist of a dean and professors, aided by lecturers, 
instructors, fellows, and assistants. The departments are the Aca- 
demic Department; the College of Agriculture, Mechanic Arts, and 
Sciences ; Teachers' School ; University Department ; Law School ; 
Medical School, and School of Dentistry. 

Admission, Instrnction, and Degrees : Admission is by examination, 
and on certificate. Examinations can be taken in almost any part 
of the state. Six college courses, one of which must be taken by 
every student, lead to degrees of B.A., and B.S., or B.S. in Agr,, Mech. 
Eng., etc. These courses are the literary, scientific, agricultural, 
civil engineering, mechanical engineering, and the mining course. 
Degrees of A.M., S.M.S., Ph.D., C.E., Min.E., and M.E., are con- 
ferred after graduate studies. Degrees of B.L., M.D., and D.D.S., 
are attained after courses in law, medicine, or dentistry. Attendance 



374 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



at chapel is compulsory. Military drill is required of freshmen and 
sophomores, but is optional to juniors, seniors, and graduates. All 
those who do not take military instruction are required to attend 
gymnastic exercise. Negroes are excluded, instruction for them 
being provided at Knoxville College. 

Dues, Scholarships, and Prizes : Tuition since 1869 ^"^^ been free. 
Other expenses, including an incidental fee of $10, aggregate $100. 
Four fellowships, yielding $200 each, are available for graduates. 
One free scholarship is given to each of the university accredited 
high schools, making 275 in all. Twelve agricultural and mechanical 
apprenticeships, yielding from ^50 to $100, are annually awarded to 
under-graduates. At the close of each year three free scholarships 
are awarded to the best regular students of the freshman, sophomore, 
and junior classes. A gold medal is annually awarded for excellence 
in mathematics. 

Eqjapment: The college grounds cover thirty -six acres, not in- 
cluding the college farm. Among the fourteen college buildings are : 
Old College, erected in 1826; East College, West College, North 
College, and Janney Building (now Woman's Building), in 1840; 
South College, in 1872; Steward's Hall, in 1873; Agricultural Build- 
ing, in 1880; and the more recent Science Building, Mechanical Hall, 
Experiment Station, Y. M. C. A. Hall, and the farm home. The uni- 
versity's resources are : State certificates (balance of old East Ten- 
nessee University fund), $9,000 at five per cent; Congressional 
Land Grant fund, 1862, $396,000 at six per cent ; United States Ex- 
periment Station fund, $15,000 per annum; Morrill Act fund, 1890, 
for present session, $21,000; college fees, about $5,000 to $6,000 per 
annum; college farm, valued at $175,000; university grounds, about 
thirty-six acres, estimated value, $245,000 ; fifteen buildings, estimated 
value, $152,000; Library fund (given by city of Knoxville), $20,000 
at six per cent. 

Societies and Ptiblications : The students publish the " University 
Magazine" (a monthly), the "Scientific Magazine," published annually 
by the Engineering Society, and the Y. M. C. A. "Handbook" (an 
annual). The chief student organizations are the Philomathesian 
and Chi-Delta (for men), Barbara Blount (for women); Engineering 
Society, Glee Club, Orchestra, Athletic Association, with subordinate 
clubs for tennis, baseball, football, etc., besides class, social, relig- 
ious, and other organizations. Chapters of the following fraternities 
have been organized : 11 K A, 1874-1875 ; A T H, 1S72-1873 ; 2 A E, 
K 2, 1879; K A, 1884-1888; Rainbow, 1885-1886; * T A, 1890; and 
Alpha Beta Democrata. 

The graduates number more than 500, the oldest of whom is 
William Park, 1825, of Columbia, Tenn. 



Facility. 



Chas. W. Dabnev, Jr.., Ph.D.. Pres. 

William W. Carson, C.E., M.E., Civil 
Engineering. 

Thomas W. Jordan, A.M., Latin. 

Charles E. Wait, C.E., M.E., Chem- 
istry and Metallurgy. 

Charles F. Vanderford, Agriculture. 



George F. Mellen, A.M., Ph.D., Reg- 
istrar, Greek and French. 

John B. Henneman, M.A., English 
and German. 

Thomas C. Karns, A.M., Philosophy 
and Pedagogics. 

Cooper D. Schmitt, M.A., Math. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR-BOOK. 



375 



Charles A. Perkins, Ph.D., Physics 
and Electricity. 

George Le Roy Brown, Captain, U. 
S. A., Military Tactics. 

Charles \V. Turner, A.M., Hist., Law. 

Jay Robert McColl, B.S., Supt. of 
Shops. 

Ralph L. Watts, B. Agr., Horticul. 

Charles Ferris, B.S., Drawing. 

S. iM. Bain, A.B., Botany. 

Howell T. Livingston, B.A., Latin 
and Greek. 

Joseph M. Black, B.A., B.L., English. 

Charles E. Chambliss, M.S., Zoology, 
Entomology.