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Full text of "Colonial Echo, 1954"

The Students of the College 

of William and Mary 

present the 




ECHO 



... a journey 
through time in retrospect . . . nine 
months of briming Life in 1954 . . . 

JOHN A. WE5TBERG, EDITOR 
WAYNE S. JONES, BUS. MGR. 




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p^iri^pfthfi adolescent era in the new 



A year that witnessed a world of exotic names and faces: 





. . . the omens of a future world of neighbors 



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.C,; Pandit 



. . .Churchill 







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And a country of spirited, anxious people 



who were becoming more and more familiar 



witli the exotic names . . . 



. but who were still firmly engrossed ini' 



The American Way of Life 












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Within this country, 

a state moved forward . . . Virginia . . 

... it was election year . . . 

and within this state our campus lies . . . 

. . . thriving on what ^e call 

The William and Mary Way of Life 



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DEDICATION 



DR. S. DONALD SOUTHWORTH 

Professor of Economics 



For the privilege 

... of attending class under an economist in the true American tradition, 

... of knowing a person of genuine accomplishment, successful in retaining the 
virtue of human understanding 

... of experiencing the encouragement of sincere interest, 

... of sharing an immeasurable contribution of wisdom and service to the College 
of William and Mary, 

we respectfuly dedicate this book to Dr. S. Donald Southworth. 





a 




ADMINISTRATION 
AND FACULTY 



BOARD OF VISITORS 

The Board of Visitors, governing body of the college, experienced an 
unusually busy year in 1953-54. Listed annong the accomplishments were 
the establishment of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law and the innova- 
tion of a concentration in education. 

The Board is made up of ten members plus an ex officio member, the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. They are appointed by the Governor 
of Virginia and confirmed by the General Assembly. At least six members 
must be alumni of the college and each member holds office for a term 
of four years with five new members being appointed every two years. 

The group elects a chairman or rector who presides over the three 
regular meetings for the year and any additional meetings deemed neces- 
sary. In 1953-54, James M. Robertson served as rector and Harold W. 
Ramsey served as vice-rector. 



The Board met with the Virginia Advisory Legislative Council to discuss a crucial topic of -he year, the Eastern States Hospital situation. 

Fl' 





PRESIDENT 







ALVIN DUKE CHANDLER 

The scholastic year of 1953-54 found William and 
Mary's twenty-second president asserting the hand of 
an experienced administrator. Confronted with the 
many problems of a college community, President 
Chandler met successfully every situation that threat- 
ened the continued progress of the college and in 
doing so inspired the confidence of the students, 
alumni, and all connected with our beloved school. 



13 



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WILLIAM G. HARKINS 

Librarian 



VERNON L. NUNN 

Auditor 



DUDLEY W. WOODBRIDGE 

Dean of the Department of Jurisprudence 



J. WILFRED LAMBERT 

Dean of Students and Registrar 



DOROTHEA WYATT 

Dean of Women 



H. H. SISSON, JR. 

Bursar 




14 




JOE D. FARRAR 

Dean of Men 



F. JAMES BARNES, II 
Director of Alumni and Information 



H. WESCOTT CUNNINGHAM 

Director of Admissions 



CHARLES F. MARSH 

Dean of the Faculty 



JACK S. STURGILL 
Assistant Dean of t^en 



GEORGE J. OLIVER 



Coordinator of Brancli Activities and Director of 
Extension 




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ABOVE 

Firsf Row: 

WILLIAM WRIGHT ABBOT, III; Assistant Professor of History; A.B.. University 
of Georgia; M.A. and Ph.D., Duke University. 

DOUGLAS G. ADAIR; Associate Professor of History; A.B., University of 
the South; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

CHARLES HARPER ANDERSON; Associate Professor of Jurisprudence; A.B. 
and 8.C.L., William and Mary; L.L.M., University of Virginia. 

ALFRED R. ARMSTRONG; Associate Professor of Chemistry; M.A. and B.S., 
William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

JOANNA ARMSTRONG; Instructor of Modern Language; Certiticat d'etudes, 
Sorbonne, Paris; M.A., University of Utah. 

POLK S. ATKINSON; Professor of Military Science and Tactics; A.B., South- 
western Presbyterian University. 



Education; A.B.. Maryville 



Second Row; 

BOYDSON, H. BAIRD; Instructor in Physical 
College; M.S., Indiana University, 

JOHN T. BALDWIN. JR.; Professor of Biology; Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Biology; A.B., William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

J. WORTH BANNER; Associate Professor of Modern Languages; Acting 
Chairman of the Department of Modern Languages; B.S., Roanoke College 
M.A. and Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

JOHN K. BARE; Associate Professor of Psychology; A.B., Oberlln College 
M.Sc. and Ph.D., Brown University. 

MARTHA E. BARKSDALE; Associate Professor of Physical Education; A.B 
and M.A., William and Mary; O.D., Gymnastic Peoples College, Ollerup 
Denmark. 

DONNA KEITH BARRAND; Instructor of Physical Education; A.B., Lake Erie 
College; M.S., Smith College. 



BELOW 
First Row: 

WHITFIELD J. BELL, JR.; Visiting Professor of History; A.B., Dickinson Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

GRACE J. BLANK; Associate Professor of Biology; A.B., Maryville College: 
M.S. University of Michigan. 

JOHN BRIGHT; Assistant Professor of History; A.B. and M.A. University of 
Alabama. 

RICHARD B. BROOKS; Associate Professor of Psychology: Director of Coun- 
seling; B.P.E., Springfield College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 
ELEANOR CALKINS; Assistant Professor of Mathematics: A.B., William and 
Mary; M.A., University of Michigan, 

LESTER J. CAPPON; Lecturer In History: B.A., M.A.. University of Wiscon- 
sin; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

JAMES D. CARTER, JR.; Associate Professor of Modern Languages; Docteur 
de rUniversite de Toulouse; A.B.. William and Mary. 

I-KUA CHOU; Assistant Professor of Government; M.A. and Ph.D.. Fletcher 
School of Law and Diplomacy; L.L.B., National Fuh-Tan University. 



Second Row: 

G. GLENWOOD CLARK; Associate Professor of English; A.B., University of 
Richmond; L.L.B., Richmond College; M.A., Columbia University. 
KENNETH CLEETON; Professor of Education; B.S. and M.A., University of 
Missouri; Ed.D., University of Colorado. 

HIBBERT D. COREY; Professor of Economics and Business Administration: 
A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., Ohio State University. 
JOSEPH M. CORMACK; Professor of Jurisprudence; A.B.. Northwestern Uni- 
versity: LL.B. and J.S.D. Yale University. 

H. WESTCOTT CUNNINGHAM; Dean of Admissions: William and Mary: 
University of Michigan. 

JOSEPH CURTIS; Associate Professor of Jurisprudence; B.S., L.L.B., and 
LL.M. New York University. 

CHARLES E. DAVIDSON; Instructor of English; A.B., Princeton University: 
M.A., Yale University. 

MERLE DAVIS; Associate Professor of Education; B.S., Longwood College: 
M.A., William and Mary, 




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FACULTY 



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ABOVE 
First Row: 

HOWARD DEARSTYNE; Lecturer in Fine Arts; Columbia College; Bauhaus, 
School of Design Germany. 

FRANK B. EVANS. Ill; Associate Professor of English; A.B., Amherst College; 
M.A. and Ph.D., Princeton University. 

JOE D. FARRAR; Associate Professor of Education; Dean of Men; B.S., Daniel 
Baker College; M.Ed., University of Missouri. 

HERMAN SILVA FOREST; Acting Assistant Professor of Biology; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
CARL A. FEHR; Associate Professor of Fine Arts; A.B. and M.A.. University 
of Te-sai- M.Mus. University of Michigan; Ed.D. Columbia University. 
DONALD M. FOERSTER; Associate Professor of English; A.B., University of 
Iowa; Ph.D., Yale University. 

WAYNE F. GIBBS; Professor of Accounting; B.S. M.S., University of Illinois; 
C.P.A. (Virginia). 

WILLIAM GEORGE GUY; Chancellor Professor of Chemistry; Chairman of 
the Department of Chemistry; B.SC, A.B.. Mt. Allison University, Canada; 
A.B., Oxford University. England; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



Second Row: 

ALBERT E. HAAK; Assistant Professor of Fine Arts; A.B. Lawrence College; 
A.B., M.A. William and Mary. 

ANDREW C. HAIGH; Associate Professor of Fine Arts; A.B., University of 
Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

ROBERT J. HART; Assistant Professor of Physics; A.B., M.A., Syracuse Uni 
versify. 

DONALD J. HERRMANN; Assistant Professor of Education; B.Ed.. Northern 
Illinois State Teachers College; M.A., Michigan State College; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State College. 

ABRAHAM HIRSCH,; Assistant Professor of Economics; B.B.A., City College 
of New York; M.A.. Columbia University. 

EVA HIRSCH; Lecturer in Economics; B.A.. University of Michigan; M.A., 
Columbia University. 

THOMAS V. HIRSCHBERG; Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics; B.S., United States Military Academy. 

HOWARD KINGSBURY HOLLAND; Associate Professor of Education; A.B., 
University of Michigan; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 



BELOW 
First Row: 

ALTHEA HUNT; Associate Professor of Fine Arts; Director of the William and 
Mary Theater; A.B., Allegheny College; M.A., Radcliffe College. 

JESS H. JACKSON; Professor of English; Chairman of the Department of 
English; A.B. and M.A., University of Alabama; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard 

University. 

DUDLEY M. JENSEN; Instructor of Physical Education; B.S., Springfield Col- 
lege; M.A., Teacher's College, Columbia University. 

W. MELVILLE JONES; Associate Professor of English; A.B., Allegheny Col- 
lege; M.A.. Ohio State University; Ph.D.. Harvard University. 

ALEXANDER KALLOS; Instructor of Modern Languages; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania; S.C.L., Vienna Commercial Academy. 

PAUL R. KAUFMANN; Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics- 
Major, U.S. Army. 



Second Row: 

R. WAYNE KERNODLE; Associate Professor of Sociology; Chairman of the 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology; A.B., M.A., and Ph.D.. University 
of North Carolina. 

A. LAWRENCE KOCHER; Lecturer in Fine Arts; B.A., Stanford University; 
M.A., Pennsylvania State College. 

REINO KORPI; Associate Professor of Modern Language; A.B., Clark Uni- 
versity; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 

J. WILFRED LAMBERT; Associate Professor of Psychology: A.B., William and 

Mary; Dean of Students. 

JOSEPH R. LEE; Associate Professor of Mathematics; B.A., M.A.. Ph-0.. Yale 

University. 

EDRIL LOTT; Instructor of Secretarial Science; Chairman of Secretarial 
Science; A.B., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., Mississippi 

Southern. 




T H E 



COLLEGE 



17 





ABOVE 

First Row: 

WILLIAM H. McBURNEY; Associate Professor of English; A.B.. Southwestern 

at Memphis: M.A., and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

BEN C. McCARY; Associate Professor of Modern Languages; A.B.. University 

of Richmond; Docteur de L'Universite de Toulouse. 

CECIL M. McCUlLEY; Assistant Professor of English; A.B., M.A.. and Ph.D., 

Southern Methodist University. 

BRUCE T. McCULLY; Associate Professor of History; A. 6., Rutgers Univer- 

'Jty; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 

JOHN M. McGREGOR; Acting Assistant Professor of Education; A.B.. Central 

College of Iowa; M.Ed, William and Mary, 

CHARLES f. MARSH; Chancellor Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration; Chairman of the Department of Business Administration; Dean 
of Faculty; A.B., Lawrence College; M.A. and Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 

Second Row: 

CAROL G. MEEKS; Assistant Professor of Physical Education; B.S.. East Ten- 
nessee State College; M.A., University of Mississippi, Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 

JAMES W. MILLER; Chancellor Professor of Philosophy; Chairman of the 
Department of Philosophy; A.B., University of Michigan; M.A. and Ph.D., 
Harvard University. 

ROBERT LEE MOONEY; Professor of Physics; Chairman of Department of 
Physics; B.S., Furman University; M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Brown Uni- 
versity. 

JOHN A. MOORE; Instructor of Modern Languages; B.S.. Davidson College; 
M.A., University of North Carolina. 

RICHARD L. MORTON; Professor of History; Chairman of the Department 
of History; A,B., Litt.D., Hampden- Sydney College; M.A.. Harvard Uni- 
versity and University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
WARNER MOSS, JR.; John Marshall Professor of Government and Citizen- 
ship; Chairman of the Department of Government; A.B.. University of Rich- 
mond; M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 



BELOW 
First Row: 

ERASER NEIMAN; Associate Professor of Englisti; A.B., Amherst College; 
M.A, and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

GEORGE J. OLIVER; Professor of Education; Chairman of the Department 

of Education; A.B.. William and Mary; M.A.. and Ph.D., Columbia University. 
GUY L. PACE; Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 8.S.. Colorado 

A. and M. College; Colonel. U.S. Army. 

JAMES E. PATE; Professor of Political Science; A.B.. Louisiana College; M-A_. 

University of Virginia and Wake Forest College; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

HAROLD R. PHALEN; Professor of Mathematics; B.S.. Tufts; M.S. and Ph.D.. 

University of Chicago. 

ARTHUR W. PHELPS; Professor of Jurisprudence; A.B.. Washington and Lee 
University; M.A., Ohio State University; LLB., University of Cincinnati; LLM.. 

Columbia University. 

Second Row: 

JOHN S. pUlNN; Assistant Professor of Business Administration; MBA. Har- 
vard University; MCS., Boston University; BsED., State Teachers' College, 
Salem. Massachusetts. 

CHARLES L. pUITTMEYER; Assistant Professor of Business Administration; 
A.B.. William and Mary; M.B., Harvard Business School. 
RAYMOND L. RAWLS; Instructor In Business Administration; BSME. Tulane 
University: MBA. Whartan School of Finance and Commerce, University 
of Pennsylvania. 

MARCEL REBOUSSIN; Associate Professor of French! Agrege des lettres, 
Sorbonne; M.A., Columbia University; Professorat de francals. Ecole Normale 
Superleure de St. Cloud. 

MARION REEDER; Associate Professor of Physical Education; Chairman of 
the Women's Physical Education Department; B.S. and M.S.. University of 
Illinois. 

GEORGE K. REID. JR.; Assistant Professor of Biology; B.S., Presbyterian Col- 
lege; M.S. and Ph.D.. University of Florida. 




K^i^ 




FACULTY 



F 



18 





ABOVE 

First Row: 

BEATRICE K. ROME; Instructor of Philosophy; A. 8. and M.A.. Radcliffe CoU 

lege; Ph.D., Radcliffe College; Harvard University. 

CARL ANDERSON ROSEBERG; Assistant Professor of Fine Arts; BFA and 
MFA, State University of Iowa. 

GEORGE J. RYAN; Professor of Ancient Languages; A.B., A.M. St. Louis 
University; Ph.D. University of Michigan. 

ANTHONY L. SANCETTA; Assistant Professor of Economics; A.B. Western 

Reserve Univerblty; M.S. and Ph.D. Columbia University. 

GEORGE D. SANDS; Associate Professor of Chemistry; B.S.. William and 
Mary; M.S., University of Richmond; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

HOWARD SCAMMON; Instructor of Fine Arts; A.B., William and Mary; 
M.A., Northwestern University, 

Second Row: 

ROGER SHERMAN,; Instructor of Fine Arts; Vesper George School of Arts; 
Yale Graduate School, Department of Drama, 

HOWARD M. SMITH. JR.; Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Acting 
Chairman of Men's Physical Education Department; B.S., William and Mary; 
M.S., Syracuse University. 

ROBERT E. SMITH; Associate Professor of Mathematics; A.B.. Allegheny Col- 
lege; M.A.. University of North Carolina. 

S. DONALD SOUTHWORTH; Professor of Economics; A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D., 
Princeton University, 

JOHN M. STETSON; Professor of Mathematics; Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics; A.B,, Yale University; Ph,D,, Princeton University. 

ALAN C. STEWART; Associatte Professor of Fine Arts; A.B,, Union College; 

Professional Certificate. Yale School of Music; M.A,, Columbia University. 



BELOW 
First Row: 

HOWARD STONE; Associate Professor of Modern Languages; A.B, Pomona 
College; M.A., Claremont College; Ph.D., University of California. 

TRAVIS L. SUMMERSGILL; Associate Professor of English; A.B., Bucknelt 

University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. 

ALBION G. TAYLOR; Chancellor Professor of Political Economy; Chairman 
of the Department of Economics; A.B., DesMoines University; M.A,, University 
of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

THOMAS THORNE; Associate Professor of Fine Arts; Chairman of the De- 
partment of Fine Arts; B.F.A,, Yale University. 

C. R, VARNER; Assistant Professor of Music; Band Director; B.M.E., M.M,. 

Northwestern University, 

A. PELZER WAGENER; Professor of Ancient Languages; Chairman of the 
Department of Ancient Languages; A.B., College of Charleston; Ph,D.. Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Second Row: 

LINVILL WATSON; Acting Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology; 
A.B., Ph.D,, University of Pennsylvania. 

ALMA WILKIN; Assistant Professor of Home Economics; B.S.. Kansas State 
Agricultural College; M.A,, Columbia University Teachers' College, 

STANLEY WILLIAMS; Professor of Psychology; Chairman of the Department 
of Psychology; A.B. and M.A., University of California at Los Angeles: Ph,D., 

Yale University. 

BURTON R. WOLIN; Assistant Professor of Psychology; A.B. University of 
Akon; M.A., Indiana University, 

DUDLEY W. WOODBRIDGE; Chancellor Professor of Jurisprudence; Dean of 
the Department of Jurisprudence; A.B., J.D,, University of Illinois. 

DOROTHEA WYATT; Professor of History; Dean of Women; A.B.. M.A.. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 




T H E 



COLLEGE 



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STUDENT ASSEMBLY 
Standing: Barber. Kepley. MacWilliams, Pendleton, Tiqnor. G. Wilde, Shaffer. Fisher, Drake, Hall, Butler, Fichtenger, Ferrell. Grant. Crossetf. High. Clark. 
Seated; Armbruster, Frye, Jay, Scates. Sprague. Bowen, Grubbs. Gardner. LeHew. M. Lewis, Montgomery. 



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T H E 

STUDENT 

GOVERNMENT 




GARY SCATES 

President of the Student Body 



The 1953-54 record of extra-curricular activities 
showed signs of increasing interest and a desire for 
responsibility and recognition on the part of the students. 
Speaking through their government and publications, 
the students attempted to present their problems and 
solutions to the administration. 

Within the student body there was a wider aware- 
ness of he necessity for responsible self-government. 
President Cary Scates kept their problems and aims 
before the college community with fiery speeches and 
published reports. 

Certainly there were plenty of problems for the stu- 
dents, through their Student Assembly, to consider. The 
drinking regulations had not been cleared up; the social 
program was not amply diversified or coordinated; 
alumni relations needed improvement, and the constitu- 
tion needed to be simplified and clarified. Student Gov- 
ernment had to be an effective spokesman for the 
students. 

And behind the conferences between Cary and Presi- 
dent Chandler, the reports, the recommendations, the 
charges and counter-charges, the requests and refusals. 



THE SENATE 

standing: Brink. High, LeHew. Scates, Ferrell, Jay. Clark, Grant. Seated: Ash, 
Mines, Lewis, Blanchard. 



the Assembly committees continued to carry through 
projects for the College's amusement and benefit. The 
four outstanding social events of the college year were 
all sponsored by the Student Government — hHomecom- 
ing, Mid-Winters, the May Dances and the Colonial 
Festival. Assembly committees continued to work for the 
betterment of the buildings and grounds, the laundry 
and the cafeteria. 

The Student Senate, presided over by Mel HHines, 
Vice-President of the student body, acted as an execu- 
tive council to the Assembly, concentrating particularly 
on studying and recommending changes in the Student 
Government constitution. 

The final group to discuss these mutual problems of 
the College, make recommendations, and act on the 
recommendations of the Assembly was the General Co- 
operative Committee. This committee, at the top of the 
Student Government system, was composed of repre- 
sentatives from the students, administration, and faculty. 
The chairman of the General Cooperative Committee 
was President Alvin D. Chandler. 

THE GENERAL CO-OPERATIVE COMMIHEE 

First Row: Mr. Lambert, Ash, Ferrell, Ivtiss Wyatt, t^iss Wynne-Roberts Lehew. 

Second Row: M. Lewis, Todhunter, Nines, Blanchard, Scates, Mr. McBurney, 

Jay. Third Row: Mr. Anderson, Dr. Kernodle, Mr. Farrar, Dr. Oliver. Grant, 

Mr. Barnes. 





JIM GRANT 

Chairman of the Mens Honor Council 



The Men's Honor Council, elected each Spring by the male stu- 
dent body, tries infractions of the Honor Code. This Honor Code, 
based on the Honor System, which the College claims as a priority. 
includes four infractions: lying, stealing, cheating, and failure to 
report an Infraction. 

But the council did not just function as a court; it engaged in 
activities such as sitting at the polls during various student elections. 
counting ballots and announcing results. In the Fall, they conducted 
discussions for entering students. They also continued the codifica- 
tion of the rules of procedure which had been started the year 
before. 

Members for 1953-54 were James Grant, chairman; Thomas 
Kenyon, vice-chairman; Warren Weiss, senior representative; John 
Marsh, secretary; Otto Lowe and Michael Jordan, junior represent- 
atives, and Ming Chang, sophomore representative. 



EN'S HONOR COUNCIL 



Grant, Kenyon, tv'arsh, Weiss, Lowe, Jordan, Chang 




,24 



The Women's Honor Council, which Is one of the branches of the 
Women's Student Cooperative Government Association, has the 
responsibility of investigating and trying any cases violating the 
Honor Code, and imposing penalties. 

The Men's and Women's Honor Councils held meetings during 
orientation week to explain the principles and function of the Honor 
Code to the freshmen. Before semester examinations, the members 
gave informal talks in the women's dormitories, reminding the stu- 
dents of the importance of keeping their pledges to the Honor 
System. Throughout the year, the Women's Honor Council also 
helped in conducting elections on the campus. 

Members for 1953-54 were Libby Lewis, chairman; Shirley Haab- 
estad, vice-chairman; Mary Lou Riggan, secretary; Sarah Dean 
Spangler, senior representative; Marguerite McLaughlin and Barbara 
Brown Junior representatives, and Virginia Naab, sophomore repre- 
sentative. 




LIBBY LEWIS 

Chairman of the Women's Honor Council 



OMEN'S HONOR COUNCIL 



Naab, Haabestad, Spangler, B. Brown, Riggan, McLaughlin. M. Lewis 




25 



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ANN LEHEW 
President of WSCGA 



•i^ 



WOMEN 

S T U D E N T S' 

COOPERATIVE 

GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 



"WSCGA meeting again tonight?" Yes, WSCGA 
was clearly one of the best known organizations on campus. 

Divided into the HHonor Council, the Executive Council, 
and the Judicial Committee, the Women Students' Co- 
operative Government Association continued to work 
toward their aims of promoting self-government, respon- 
sibility, and the best interest of the women students. 

The Judicial Committee formulated and maintained 
the social rules of the women students at William and 
Mary. This committee consisted of a chairman, secre- 
tary, representatives of each class, a representative-at- 
large, and all the house presidents. Also part of this 
group were the house committees from each dormitory. 

In 1953-54 this committee, under the capable leader- 
ship of Chairman Janice Ferrell, worked out the admin- 
istration of the revised social rules, using a merit system. 
Meetings were held to discuss the new rules with the 
women students, house mothers, and fraternity repre- 
sentatives. 

The Judicial Committee held two suppers for their 
faculty advisors and the deans, to discuss informally any 
business pertaining to the social rules. They also gave a 
tea for the house mothers and members of the adminis- 
tration of the College. 



uji 





JUDICIAL COUNCIL 

First Row: Collins, HoUaday. Springer, Thurau, Verra, Wildrnan. 

Staubs. Second Row: Male, Topping, Zaiser, Suber, Clague, Crovo, 

Ferrell. 



HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

First Row: Springer. Second Row; Topping. Clague, Thurau, Male. 
Holladay. Suber. 





EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

First Row: Broaddus. Eqger, LeHew, Kesler. Second Row: T. Lewis, Korns. M. Ives. 



Those never-to-be-forgot+en business meetings, which all women were required to 
attend, were held on the first Monday of each month. Social rules, projects and 
campus announcements were presented at such times. 

Handling all the official business of the Association, the Executive Council conducted 
these monthly meetings. This branch of WSCGA was composed of a president, 
vice-president, secretary, treasurer, senior and freshmen representatives and a 
representative-at-large. In 1953-54, President Anne Lehew conducted several success- 
ful projects. Informal meetings were held for new students during orlentatlon_ week; 
the student directory sale was conducted, and a one hundred dollar scholarship was 
awarded to a sophomore woman. A reception was given following the first concert 
presented in the College Concert Series. Since WSCGA is part of the campus-wide 
Student Government, an effort was made for closer support of all Student Govern- 
ment plans. I I I r I r^ \A/-II- LJ 

Advising WSCGA during the past year were Dr. hiarold L. Fowler, Dr. William H. 
McBurney, and Dr. Travis L. Summersgill. 

The wit of the inhabitants of the WSCGA suite in Barrett and the committee 
meetings conducted by "Pew" In the Williamsburg Restaurant combined to make 
Women Students' Government Increasingly popular! 



JANICE FERRELL 
Chairman of the Judicial Council 




<^Ls 4^ 



i27 



PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE 

If the Student Body were to have wise leadership, it was important that they have 
good editors of their publications. They must be well qualified before being allowed 
to voice the sentiments of the group. 

The problem of selection lay in the hands of a standing committee of the Student 
Government, the Publications Committee. Every year this important group must 
select from the nominations made by the staffs of the student publications, their 
future editors and business managers. The committee carrying this responsibility in 
1953-54 was composed of COLONIAL EChHO Editor, John Westberg; "Flat Hat" 
Editor, Arnold Lubasch; "Royalist" Editor, Carol Butters; Student Government Presi- 
dent Cary Scates: Mr. Charles H. Anderson; Mr. Alexander Kallos, and Chairman Bar- 
bara Crosset, who was elected to that position by the Student Assembly. 

The Publications Committee reviewed the qualifications and grades of the candi- 
dates for "Flat hiat" positions in December, as these positions are effective from 
February to February. The committee then was Introduced to each candidate and 
afterwards selected the staff. This procedure was repeated for the COLONIAL 
ECHO and "Royalist" in the Spring. Editors and business managers of the publica- 
tions had to have a quality point average of not less than 1.4 to be considered by 
the Publications Committee. 

Such problems were considered by this committee as the salaries paid by the 
College to the chief editors and business managers, and the lowering of the scholastic 
requirements. 

In the past year, the Publications Committee maintained the traditional policy of 
guiding the activities of the three students publications. However, the principle of 
individual freedom in editorial policy was observed, leaving this strictly to the indi- 
vidual publications and the feelings and opinions of the editors. 

Mr. Kallos. Lubasch. Scates, Butters, Westberg, Mr. Anderson, Crosset 




28 



STUDENT 




PUBLICATIONS 



29 




Top: Editor-in-Chief Arnold Lubasch, Associate Editor Jim Todhunter, Man- 
aging Editor Madge Gushing. 

JUNIOR EDITORS 

Bottom: Hyde. Knight, Andrews, Carb, M. Ives. Hurst, Pugh. 



THE FLAT 



"The freedom of the press is a flaming sword." and 
this year's "Flat Hat" staff kept the William and Mary 
sword burning more brightly than ever. Here the signs 
of increasing student desire for responsibility and self- 
government were made visible. Here too, other students 
were chided when they failed to show signs of that de- 
sired responsibility. Apathy, interest, freedom, and coer- 
cion were words used freely by the editors, students, and 
faculty who voiced their opinions. And this was good. 
for perhaps the keynote word of the whole year was 
"awareness." 

Consistent excellence throughout the year on the part 
of Editor-in-Chief Arnie Lubasch, Managing Editor Madge 
Cushing and Associate Editor Jim Todhunter brought the 
paper first-place honors at the Virginia Intercollegiate 
Press Association meeting in December. At the same 
time, star-reporter Will Molineux was elected vice-presi- 
dent of the Association. 

Jeanie Andrews, News Editor, and her staff kept a 
listening ear open and faithfully reported campus events. 
Sports Editor Nate Carb, with his ability and experience, 
turned out superior sports pages each week, and Jo 
Hyde's timely features gave "Flat Hat" readers the in- 
side scope on "who's who" at William and Mary. 

Headlines, in the capable hands of Alice Knight, rolled 
in at a fast pace on Sundays. Competent Peggy Ives 
calmly pulled loose ends together and always managed to 
stretch the budget that last little bit. 

Sally Hurst made it "pay to advertise," while Circu- 
lation Manager Al Roby saw to it that the paper was 
addressed, sorted and sent to its readers each week. 

The staff as a whole tried to make this year a step for- 
ward in the paper's history. Arnle's stinging editorials 



FEATURES STAFF 

First Row: Van Bergen. B, Lynn, Hyde, Black. Second Row: Redmond, Baker, 
Walker, Robinson, Grant. 



SPORTS STAFF 

Kdlison, D. Harris. D. Smith, McDaniel, Rowlett, Zebine. Carb 




30 



H A T 



often made his readers stop short and think objectively 
about pertinent campus Issues. 

The Student Voice was kept well-modulated so that it 
became truly representative of the Student Body. Pro- 
tests were logically presented Instead of bandied about 
aimlessly. 

The Editorial Mirror, newest addition to page two and 
Madge's personal property, made students realize that 
our problems, doubts and decisions were subjects of de- 
bate at other schools, too. 

The Faculty Voice column was also a new feature this 
year and gave readers more reason to believe that "teach- 
ers are people." 

The lighter side of the paper was an Integral part of 
the job too, as the year is viewed in retrospect. The pam- 
pered darling of the male editors. Coed of the Week; 
Madge, with that desperate look, saying, "Eleven inches 
of 'Words' this week?" and Arnle's pseudo-sarcastic com- 
ment, "Cush, ain't you happy here?"; Jim's 100 yard dash 
to the bus station on Sunday with the pictures and his 
ever-Increasing coffee breaks; Nate's impromptu lectures 
on punctuation to the staff at large; Alice vainly trying 
to write headlines without the copy; Jeanie screaming, 
"If there Isn't any news, there just Isn't any, and that s 
final"; the long grind at the Gazette with ice cream and 
coffee to shorten the wait until the paper bursts forth 
with Its firey message; the telephone ringing crazlly and 
the operators sympathetically supplying the correct spell- 
ing of a name or a place; the "Flat Hat" date bureau; 
and the Sunday night bridge games all added up to an 
unforgettable year. 

There were laughter and tears and a crisis every week, 
but the end result was a newspaper the College was proud 
to call its own. 



CIRCULATION STAFF 

First Row: Moiel. Muni, Hurley, Raybold, J. Lewis. Second Row: Melnick. 
Wright, Speitz. Barber, Magruder. 




MAKE-UP STAFF 

Seated: Knight. Left to Right: Thompson, Smith. Kimbrough, Jordan, Tully, 

Pratt, Mannion, Dougherty, Quarton, Merrill. 

NEWS STAFF 

Bottom: First Row: Wortman. Fooks, Molineaux, Andrews. Anderson. Heifer. 

Darling. Second Row; Leffel. Water, Muller, Beck, Archer, S. Ives. Chapman, 

A. Mercer, lott. Rund, Dallas, Morgan, Carlson. 

BUSINESS STAFF 
DeSamper, Feldman. Hurst. Matson. Everltt, Page, Saxe, Joachim 




31 




Joe Bell posting V.I. P. A. award 



Another area of interest for a portion of the student 
body was in creative writing. The student publication 
which provided an opportunity for these would-be au- 
thors to see their work in print, and to receive critical 
comments from other students was the "Royalist." Here 
students with a knack or interest in writing and the Eng- 
lish language found a publication which did not call 
for a journalistic style. Unfortunately, the student body 
as a whole did not show the enthusiasm in this field that 
it did in most of the student activities. Since William and 
Mary Is a liberal arts school, it was hoped that this ap- 
parent apathy was due to shyness, and not a general lack 
of student literary ability and interest. 

The keynote for the Royalist in 1953-54 was more in- 
formality, a characteristic which appeared in all phases of 



the publication. Glossy pages and different covers for 
each edition made the "Royalist" progressive in form as 

well as content. 

Fervent pleas, prayers and threats brought forth con- 
tributions from shy campus writers. A comment by Editor 
Carol Butters that one need not be a literary genius ex- 
pounding upon those things no one understands, Increased 
in number contributions in the light vein, poetry as well 
as prose. 

A section of articles on such topics as drama and music 
was continued in the two Issues of the past year. Various 
members prominent In these fields at William and Mary 
answered the call with articles worthy of note. Faculty 
contributions to the "Royalist" were another innovation. 
Humorous anecdotes were collected from various faculty 
members. These were well received and thoroughly en- 
joyed by both those who had known all the time and also 
those who were just discovering that professors, after all, 
are only human. 

The art staff working under the inspired direction of 
Rev Michael created illustrations for all items in the 
magazine. Photographic work was also continued in con- 
nection with the art staff. These served to enhance the 
appearance of the magazine and to carry out the theme 
of informality. 

In 1953-54, it was decided to publish two Issues, of 
about 50 pages each, of the "Royalist" in order that the 
magazine might maintain the standards which it had set 
for the publication. The fine standard achieved in the 
past was evidenced by a second place award from the 
Virginia Intercollegiate Press Association In November, 
1953. 

The staff was headed by Carol Butters as editor, Bobbie 



CRITICAL STAFF 

Seated: Gilman, Conrad. Standing: Pontius, R. Lewis, Rund, Beach, Little. 
Evans, Burke, Eriksen. 



Phi! Snead en route to deliver Royalists 





'32 



Wadley as associate editor, Kay Binns as exchange editor, 
and Rev Michael as art editor. The "Royalist" staff con- 
tained an editorial board, a critical staff, an art staff, 
and a small circulation staff. The editorial board consisted 
of Joe Bell, Shiela Day, Jane Taylor, Arnie Lubasch and 
Cynthia Frye. This group assisted the editors in policy 
formation, and helped in setting the deadlines and hand- 
ling the budget. They also had to make the final decis- 
ions concerning which entries were to be printed, which 
to be returned, and which rewritten. The editorial board 
was considered a training position for possible future 
editors of the "Royalist." The critical staff was composed 
of about I 5 students who were chosen by the editors from 
criticisms written by the applicants. These criticisms were 
of a poem and a short story from a past "Royalist," and 
criticism of the magazine as a whole. The art staff con- 
sisted of about five members who handled all of the il- 
lustrations, photography, and cover designs for the "Roy- 
alist." Dr. W. Melville Jones of the English department 
was the consultant for the staff. 

The editorial and critical staffs met with the editors to 
consider entries for the "Royalist." All entries were num- 
bered and circulated among the staff members without 
the name of the contributor. The members decided 
whether they thought the entry should be used, and also 
put their criticism on an attached paper which was given 
to the contributor if the manuscript was returned. This 
process sometimes involved some violent arguments, some 
good laughs, and once in a while an awkward moment, 
when it turned out that the manuscript being opposed 
had been entered by another member of the staff! 

The "Royalist" was highly successful in the innovations 
which it made, and in the fine caliber of work which it 
presented. 




BOBBIE WADLEY 
Associate Editor 



CAROL BUTTERS 

Editor-in-Chief 



T H E 
ROYALIST 



ART STAFF 

Mortasfied, Cunninqhdm, Michael, Beggs, Huff 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

Wadley, Binns, Butters, Frye, Day, Bell 




THE 

COLONIAL ECHO 

1954 










Business Manager 



JOHN WESTBERG 
Editor-in-Chief 



Top: JUNIOR EDITORS, Seated: Ash, Vliet. H 
Knight, Pontius, Schoener, Love, W. White 



aycox. Standing: 
Bottom: Business 



Your editors schemed ■for something new and different 
in the way of yearbooks but found the same old raw ma- 
terials at every turn. We settled for the modernistic intro- 
duction and the venturesome theme that begins with the 
cover. The sole aim was to create a stimulant for those 
worthy memories that promise to grow dim in the years to 
come. 

Our policy was to use student talent whenever possible 
with the hope that we would come as close to a totally stu- 
dent-published annual as is possible. Bill White provided 
the photographs that tell the story but not without the help 
of non-related, Jack White, and Alice Knight added the 
copy that is significant of her capabilities. Gordie Vliet 
contributed the art work while Claire Schoener was the in- 
dustrious one who compiled the facts and figures for the 
class sections. Mardie Pontius' efficiency and artful stag- 
ings for the orginration section must go down as being un- 
equaled and see if you don't think Bill Humbert's and Evie 
Love's sports and fraternity sections, respectively, are not 
the best yet. With all of her other activities, Carolyn Ash 



FRATERNITY STAFF 

Maples, Love. Howser, Duis 



FEATURES STAFF 

First Row Pratt, Page Second Row: Dorer, Ash. Thaden. S. Ives. 



^!Vjjfm^ 




£.^ 




: -^^.A, 








Top Left: MAKE-UP STAFF, Haymaker, Brit+on. Leffel, Hutton, Behymer. 
Kniqht, Wortman, Andrews, Glover. Top Right: CLASS STAFF, First Row: 
Ctiristian, McGruder, Schoener, J. Brown, Jordan; Second Row: Gideon, C. 
Smitti, Zaiser, Naab, Rook; Third Row: Sandford, Nelson, Scott, Wills, Regier, 
Lawson, Stoker, Donnelly, McCoy. Center Left: PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF, J. 



White, Call, Weller, W. White. Center Right: ART STAFF, Sandlass, Beck, 
Vliet, Johnson, Tisdale. Bottom Left: ORGANIZATIONS STAFF, Diggs, Chap- 
man, Lynn, J. Bell, Pontius, Solomon. Bottom Right: SPORTS STAFF, Seated: 
Humbert; Standing: Burke. Male, Jordan, Jett, McKenna, Lemos, Asals, L. 
Shield, Wilson. 



found enough time to produce the largest feature section 
every found In a COLONIAL ECHO and where technical 
knowledge was painfully lacking, George Haycox provided 
the know how. Also remember the respectable manner in 
which Wayne Jones got you to pay your bills. 



To these individuals, their staffs, and all of you other 
people who contributed In your particular way, the 1954 
COLONIAL ECHO owes the traditional debt of grati- 
tude. We hope that the pleasure you find within Its pages 
will be enough to repay you in full. 



35 





a 







fst^fi 



5w 






-VJ 



SENIORS AND 
GRADUATES 




) 



&n^LxriA 




Skmker. Kiqer, Jay, HuH 



OFFICER 




UD JAY . 



'^Ory 



LUTHER KIGFR 



W^'^ ^ 



BETSY SKINKFR 

MARGE HUFF 

38 




resident 



. . VIce-Presiden\ 

.-^\ \ 

Secretary-Treasurer 
. . . Historian 




First Row: 

BARBARA NELSON ALLEN; Richmond; A.B.; Business Administra- 
tion; Accounting Club; Bridge Club. 

MARY MARGARET ANDERSON; Arlington; B.S.; Chemistry; Gam- 
ma Phi Beta, Treasurer; Merit Scholar; Chemistry Club; Music Club, 
President; Canterbury Club; Student Survey Committee. 

Second Row; 

CAROLYN VIRGINIA ASH; Petersburg; B.A.; Fine Arts; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma; Aide to President; General Cooperative Commit- 
tee; Barrett House Committee, Vice President; Flat Hat; COLONIAL 
ECHO, Organizations and Features Editor; Pan Hellenic Council, 
President. 

FRED PHILLIP AUCAMP, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; B.S.; Mathe- 
matics; Pi Kappa Alpha; Varsity Club; Golf. 

Third Row: 

PETER STEWART AUSTIN; Morrlstown, New Jersey; A. 8.; Business 
Administration; Phi Kappa Tau; S.A.M. 

JAMES BAYNOR BARHAM, JR.; Marion, South Carolina; B.S.; 
Biology; Sigma Pi, Secretary and President; Clayton-Grimes Biol- 
ogical Club; Pre-Med Club; Pep Club; Interfraternity Council; Stu- 
dent Religious Union; Wesley Foundation, Vice President and Presi- 
dent. 



Fourth Row; 

BARBARA LEE BARKER; Norfollc; B.A.; French; Norfolli Divlsi 

Beta Phi; House Committee. Treasurer; French Clu 

Secretary. 

JOHN RICHARD BARRY; Bradford, Massa 

dence; Stanford University; Football. 




Fifth Row: 

WILLIAM CAROPE3kSK£TT,Ki?^^o!ni; B/X:r*aris^deffce;Xai^b'^v] 
da Chi Alpha, President; Wythe Law Club; ,W#r-Fraternity^Council; 
Football. 

MARJORIE FAY BEAM; Marlon. North Carolina; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Marshall College; Psychology Club; S.A.M.; Baptist 
Student Union, Vice President. ._ . 

W & M. hardest college under the sun 










First Row: 

ANDREW BECOUVARAKIS; Hampton; A.B.; Government; House 

President, Old Dominion; Basketball. 

WAYNE EDWARD BESOR; Hampton; B.S.; Physical Education; 

Randolph Macon College. 

Second Row: 

BERNE IRA BENNETT; Hampton; B.S.; Chemistry; Norfolk Division; 
Kappa Sigma Kappa, Secretary; Band; Orchestra, 

ALEXANDRA BETTIGER; New York, New York; B.A.; Fine Arts; Kap- 
pa Alpha Theta; Flat Hat; COLONIAL ECHO; Red Cross. 

Third Row: 

MARY KATHERINE BINNS; Richmond; A.B.; Fine Arts; Kappa 
Alpha Theta, Vice President; Ch! Delta Phi, President; "Royalist," Ex- 
change Editor; Chorus. 

JAY SPENCER BIRNBRAUER; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; B.S.; Psy- 
chology; Sigma Pi; House President, Monroe; Psychology Club; 
Scabbard & Blade Society; Choir. 

Fourth Row: 

JAIME JOEL BLENDEN; Bradley Beach, New Jersey; B.A.; Business 

Administration; Pi Lambda Phi; S.A.M.; Balfour-Hillel Club; Track. 

"BETTE TANET~B0DLEY; Bethesda, Maryland; B.A.; Business Admin- 
istration; PI Beta Phi, Secretary; Freshman Class, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Women's Executive Council, Freshman Representative; Women's 
Judicial Council; Flat Hat; COLONIAL ECHO; Backdrop Club; Pep 
Club; Cheerleader; Westminster Fellowship. 



9^^^^"^^-/^- 



HORACE ROY BOURNE.JR.; Richmond; B.A.; History; Grove City 
Lambda Chi Alphal 

viLLIAM EKRON BOWMAN, JR.; Blrmlngfiajflr'w^ti^a; A.B.; 
usiness' Administration; Lambda Chi Alpha; Acco\jntIng Club; Var- 
litv Club; Scabbard & Blade Society; Football; Baseball. 

. . . they just shine away 





£XrhU3^ 





IV 



■9 



^: 







st Row: 

T 

NCY McDonald BRINDEL; Roanoke; B.A.; Sociology; Alpha 
hi Omega; Backdrop Club; Pep Club; Wesley Foundation. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR BRINK; Newark. Delaware; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Vice President; Student Assembly; 
General Cooperative Committee; Senate; Inter-Fraternity Council, 
Secretary, President; Football; Track. ^ 

MARY LEWIS BROWN; Williamsburg: B.A.; History; Pi Beta Phi; 
Kappa Chi Kappa; French Club; Chorus; Westminster Fellowship. 

PHILIP THOMAS BROWN; Westfield, New Jersey; B.A.; History; Pi 
Kappa Alpha. Vice President, President; Omlcron Delta Kappa; Stu- 
dent Assembly; Scabbard &_BladeSociety, President; Choir; Inter- 
Fraternity CounciK 



BEVERLY LOUISE BUCHANAN; Norfolk; B.A.; Sociology; Norfolk 

_^: Division; Gamma Phi Beta; Music Club; Wesley Foundation. 

r 



Second Row: 

CAROL JEAN BUTTERS; Clayton, Missouri; B.A,; Fine Arts; Kappa 
Delta, Vice President, President; "Royalist," Editor; Backdrop Club; 
Spanish Club; Choir; Chorus: Westminster Fellowship; Religious Enri- 
phasis Weelc. 

ANN FRANCIS CALLAHAN; Fredericksburg; B.A.; Mathematics; 
Mary Washington College; Alpha Chi Omega; Kappa Chi Kappa; 
French Club; Orchesis; Newman Club. 

BEVERLY BARNES CAMPBELL; Roanoke; B.A.; History; PI Beta Phi; 
Backdrop Club; Pep Club; Philosophy Club; Cheerleader. 

ALAN DAYTON CANFIELD; Eatontown, New Jersey; A.B.; Eco- 
nomics; Sigma Nu; Basketball; Baseball. 

NATHEN ROBERT EDWARD CARB, JR.; Brooklyn, New York: B.A.; 

English; Phi Alpha, President; "Flat Hat," Sports Editor; COLONIAL 
ECHO; Backdrop Club; International Relations Club; Literature Club; 
Inter-Fraternity Council; Wesley Foundation. 



41 





First Row: 



JOSEPH McLENDON CARDACI; College Park, Maryland; B.S.; Phy' 
leal Education; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Vice President, President; Var- 
sity Club; Inter-Fraternity Council; Newman Club; Football. 



DOROTHY JEAN CARLSON; Arlington; B.A.; Government; Dalta 
Delta Detia; Pep Club; Bridge Club; Philosophy Club; Choir; Chorus. 



MARILYN LOUISE CARR; Portsmouth; B.A.; History; Alpha Chi 
Omega, Recording Secretary; Westminster Fellowship. 



PATRICIA DORSAY CHRISTINE; Maysville, Kentucky; B.A.; English; 
University of Kentucky; Delta Delta Delta. 



EDWIN FRANCIS CLICK; Williamsburg; B.A.; Jurisprudence; Theta 
Alpha Phi; Backdrop Club; Wythe Law Club. 

42 



Second Row: 

JAMES k COCKERILLE.^R.; >?^;ngfon: B.A.: Governmenf: Shepard 
College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

A AM Vt^ f^ 

CHARLES WATSON COPELAND; HamptoiK B.A.?«usiness Ad 
is+rafion; Sigma Nu; Varsi+yCtub; Football, ^\ s. 

^ CHARLES HARRY CORNELL; New Rochelle, RB»X;m^V; Busi- 
ness Administration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Accou nting Chtb < Va^^ty, 
Club, Vice President; Basketball. ^"' "*" ' /^-; 




CHARCES LEONARD COTTRELi;; Lawn 
Economics; Phi Kappa Tau; S.A.M. 




ANN MATERSON CRABILL; Galax; B.A.; &ovcrrment--Umv«tsH 
of Washington; Kappa Alpha Theta; "Flat Hat,"; COLONIAL ECHO; 
Chorus; Newman Club. ^ v ,, ' 




First Row: 

PETER BENNERS CRENIER; Darien, Connecticut; B.A.; Economics; 
Theta Delta Chi; Inter-Fraternity Council. 

ELEANOR BARBARA CROSSET; Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; B.A.; 
Education; Ohio Wesleyan; Kappa Alpha Theta; Student Assembly; 
Red Cross; Majorette: W.A.A.; Pan Hellenic Council; Hockey: La- 
crosse; Publications' Committtee. Chairman. 

Second Row: 

BARBARA JANE CROVO; Bethesda, Maryland; B.A.; Sociology; 

Delta Delta Delta, President; Mortar Board, Secretary; Kappa Delta 

Pi. Treasurer; Women's Judicial Council; House President, Barrett; 

COLONIAL ECHO, Class Editor; Red Cross. 

MADGE CHARLTON CUSHING; Roanoke; B.A.; History; Kappa 

Alpha Theta: Mortar Board; Chi Delta Phi; Orientation Sponsor; 

"Flat Hat," News Editor, Managing Editor; COLONIAL ECHO; Red 

Cross, President; Westminster Fellowship; Student Survey Committee, 

Secretary. 

Third Row: 

DAVID FISK DAUGHERTY, IV; Williamsport, Pennsylvania; B.A.; Mu- 
sic: Lycoming College; Theta Alpha Phi; Backdrop Club; Dramatic 
Club; Orchesis; Choir; Canterbury Club. 

MILDRED ANN DAVIS; Petersburg: B.S.; Psychology: Pi Beta Phi; 
House Committtee: Psychology Club; Pep Club; Pan Hellenic Coun- 
cil, Vice President: Basketball. 

Fourth Row; 

SHEILA SHELDON DAY; Rockville Centre, New York; B.A.; English; 
Chi Omega; Chi Delta Phi; Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat"; "Royal- 
ist"; Backdrop Club; French Club; Pep Club; Literature Club; Can- 
terbury Club: Tennis. 

OSCAR DUNWREATH DERR; Norfolk; B.S.; Chemistry; Canterbury 
Club. 

Fifth Row: 

HARRY HOYT GOODE DeSAMPER; Hampton; B.A.; Business Ad 
ministration; Sigma Alpha Epsjloti; "Flat Hat"; Newman Club 
President; Swimming. ^^E> ff^^ 

^\. '^ T' 

HARRY AUGUSTUS DeWALT; Pottstown, Pennsylvania; B.A.; G 
ernment; PI Kappa Alpha; Sophomore Class, Vice President; Men's 
Honor Council; Orientation Sponsor; Scabbard and Blade Society; 
Inter-Fraternity Council. , „^ ^ ^ ,^ , ^ .^ 




Outside reading 




^ 






7 ^ 



First Row: 

ANN DIETRICH; River Forest, Illinois: B.A.: Spanish: University of 

Seville; Phi Mu, Secretary; Phi Beta Kappa, Merit Scholar: Sigma 

Delta Pi, President: Backdrop Club; Spanish Club; Band; Orchestra; 

Canterbury Club. 

LEWIS ALLEN DIXON, JR.; Norfolk; B.A.; Business Administration; 

Washington and Lee University; Randolph Macon College; Sigma 

Alpha Epsilon. 

Second Row: 

NANCY ANN DIXON; Norfolk; B.A.; Economics; Norfolk Division; 
Pi Beta Phi; Backdrop Club; French Club; Pep Club; Tidewater 
Alumni Association. 

JAMES BRYER DUFF, JR.; Hamden, Connecticut; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Pi Kappa Alpha, Treasurer, Secretary; Inter-Fraternity 
Council: Swimming. 

Third Row: 

MARY CARLOTTA DUNCAN; Norfolk; B.A.; Music; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Delta Delta Delta; Delta Omicron; Tidewater Alumni Associa- 
ttion; Choir: Wesley Foundation. 

DAVID BERTRAM DUNKLE; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; B.S.; Chem- 
istry; Sigma Pi, Treasurer; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Pre-Med 
Club; Inter-Fraternity Council; Student Religious Union, Treasurer; 
Wesley Foundation, Vice President, President; Religious Emphasis 
Week. 

Fourth Row: 

PHYLLIS JEAN EASLER; Norfolk; B.A.; English; Mary Washington 

College; Norfolk Division; Phi Mu; Tidewater Alumni Association; 

Wesley Foundation. 

CHARLOTTE FREY EGSLER; Alexandria; B.A.; History; Chi Omega; 

House Committee; "Flat Hat"; Pep Club; Chorus. 




A. 



Fifth Row: "> \/'-^ 

RONALD RICHARD EISNER; Brooklyn, New York; B.S.; Chemistry; 
Pi Lambda Phi; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Pre-Med Club; 
Chemistry Club; Balfour-Hillel Club; American Chemical Society. 
JOAN ANTONIA ERO; B.A.; Spanish; Norfolk Division; Gamma Phi 
Beta; Sigma Delta Pi, Secretary-Treasurer; Music Club; Spanish Club; 
Choir; Chorus; Newman Club. 



%^.^^ '^ 



He'll tfiint i made them myself 



T 

















First Row: 

HARRIET JOANNE EVERSOLE; Mamaroneck, New Yoric; B.A.; Fine 
Arts; Phi Mu, Treasurer. Secre+ary; Psychology Club; Chorus; West- 
minster Fellowship. 

JOAN ELIZABETH FARINHOLT; Arlington; B.A.; Government; Kap- 
al*OeU^; &dCk<Jrop Club; Orchesis; Pep Club; Canterbury Club. 

JANICE EILEEN FERRELL; Clarksburg, West Virginia; B.A.; Govern- 
ment; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Recording Secretary; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Mortar Board; Aide to the President; Merit Scholar; Eta Sigma Phi, 
President; Women's Executive Council. Secretary; Women's Judicial 
Council, Chairman; Student Assembly; General Cooperative Com- 
mittee; Senate; "Flat Hat"; Chorus. 

ANN FRANKLIN FICHTENGER; Roanoke; B.S.; Psychology; Pi Beta 
Phi, Vice-President; Kappa Delta Pi. Vice-President; Student As- 
sembly; Backdrop Club; French Club; Psychology Club; Pep Club. 

WILLIAM FRANK FITZHUGH, JR.; Ridgefield Park. New Jersey; 
B.S.; Biology; Lambda Chi Alpha; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; 
Pre-Med Club; Newman Club. 



Second Row: 

CLAREN BURRSE FORE; Hampton; B.A.; Business Administration; 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Accounting Club. President. 



RICHARD HALL FOWLER; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; B.A.; Fine 
Arts; Kappa Sigma; Pep Club; Treasurer; Arts Club; Student Relig- 
ious Union, Vice-President; Canterbury Club, President. 



MARY ELIZABETH FRALIN; Roanoke; B.A.; Sociology: Kappa Delta; 
House Committee; Choir; Chorus; Baptist Student Union. 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH FRANKLIN; Alexandria; B.A.; Fine Arts; Phi 
Mu; Canterbury Club. 



JOAN FRANCES FRENCH; Washington. D. C; B.S.: Psychology: 
Rutgers University; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Orientation Sponsor; 
Psychology Club. Secretary; Chorus; Student Religious Union; WesS 
minster Fellowship. Secretary; Swimming Club. 



45 




S^TLUyiA 






\ 



^- 






Ami 







First Row: 



Second Row: 



MARY ANN GARTH; Alexandria; B.S.; Biology; Clayton Grimes KATHERINE CROWE GILMAN; Norfolk; B.A.: History; Smi»h_Col- 

Biological Club, Treasurer, President; Backdrop Club. lege; Pi Beta Phi; Chi De+la Phi; House Com/niftee; "Roya]is4' 

SHIRLEY GEDDES; Newton, Massachusetts: B.S.; Mathematics; Gam- GERALD CHARLES GORDON: |iSS<Iok?J^.A.; Xoveml^ent^-«ri j 

Alpha, Vice President; Radio Club'; Baptist'StudenJ Union. 



ma Phi Beta; Music Club; Pep Club; Choir; Chorus; Wesley Founda 
fion. 



MARGARET CHARLOTTE GERKEN; Lovettsville; B.A.; History: 
American University; Phi Mu; Women's Judicial Council; House Com- 
mittee; Chorus: Westminster Fellowship; Hockey, 



"\ ^ \) \ I JAMES DENEALE GRANT; Arlington; B.S.; Chemistry; Sigma W; \ 

Omicron Delta Kappa; Aide to the President; Men's Honor Coontft; T ^ 
Chairman; Student Assembly: General Cooperative Committee; Se- \ F^ 
nate; Chemistry Club; Baptist Student Union, President. \ I 



,/l HI* 



1 



JANE GREENBERGER; Morristown, New Jersey; B.S.; Psychologyr 
JOHN HOEFT GETREU; Brooldyn, New York; B.A.; Jurisprudence; Mary Washington College; Alpha Ch| Omega; House Commit 

Jacksonville Junior College; Wythe Law Club. Psychology Club; Red Cross. 




RUSSELL AUBREY GILLS; Richmond; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa Sigma; KATHERINE RANDOLPH GRESHAM; CKSnce; B>.; French; Bacli 

Pep Club; Canterbury Club; Rifle. drop Club; Theater Box Office, Chairman. 



46 



'^=zr 






First Row: 

PETER PHILIP GRIFFIN; Lock Haven. Pennsylvania; B.A.; Economics; 
Phi Kappa Tau; S.A.M.; Nev/man Club. 

WILLIAM RAPHAEL GRIFFIN; Orangeburg, South Carolina; B.A.; 
Economics: Pi Kappa Alpha, Treasurer. 
Second Row: 

RODGER WILLIAM GROETTUM; Arlington; 8.A.; Business Admin- 
istration; Sigma Nu, President. 

CONRAD MAYO GUTHRIE; Waynesboro; B.S.; Mathematics; 
Bridgewater College; Pi Kappa Alpha, Secretary. 

Third Row: 

THOMAS NELSON GUTHRIE; Waynesboro; B.A.; History; Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Pi Kappa Alpha; French Club; Scabbard and 
Blade Society. 

SHIRLEY ANNE HAABESTAD; Drexel Hill. Pennsylvania; B.S.; Mathe- 
matics; Alpha Chi Omega; Phi Beta Kappa; Mortar Board, Treasurer; 
Merit Scholar; Women's Honor Council, Secretary, Vice Chairman; 
Pep Club; Chorus; W.A.A., Secretary, President; Wesley Founda- 
tion; Basketball; Hockey; Tennis; Swimming Club. 

Fourth Row: 

MARGARET BOWDOIN HALL; Richmond; B.A.; English; Richmond 
Professional Institute; House Committee; Backdrop Club; Fren' 
Club; Orchesis; Pep Club; Literature Club, President; GKoi 
terbury Club; Fencing. 



ELIZABETH TERRY HAMILTON; Arllngtonr-TO^.^Spc^. 

Fifth Row: ^J ^J ^ _ r^-^^J^^^ M / 

THOMAS HOWARDMHANi^LT^N; Wnilamin.'^irrV^ 
Physical Education; Lambda Chi Alpha; Student Assembly; Footba 

KATHERINE LANIEZ HANCOCK; Union. West Virginia; B.A.; Go 
ernment; Kappa Alpha Theta, President; Canterbury Club. 




But, Sir 



. I had an A at mid-semes+er 





First Row: 

JAMES WILLIAM HARDING; Wllliarr.sburg; B.S.: Biology; Univer- 
sity of California: Pre-Med Club; Westminster Fellowship. 
ALICE COKER HARRIS; Norfolk; B.A.; English: Norfolk Division. 



Second Row: 

VIRGINIA CARTER HARRISON; Fredericksburg; B.A.; History: Mu- 
sic Club; Pep Club; Bridge Club; Chorus; Canterbury Club. 
GEORGE BANKS HAYCOX; Norfolk; B.A.; Econonnics; Kappa Alpha, 
Secretary; "Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO. Associa:e Editor; Inter- 
Fraternity Council. 



Third Row: 

HOSEY HUSH HEARN; Arcadia, California; B.A.; Jurisprudence; 
Theta Delta Chi; "Flat Hat"; Varsity Club; Scabbard and Blade So- 
ciety, Vice-President; Bridge Club; Wesley Foundation; Tennis, Cap- 
tain. 
GEORGE DOYLE HEATH; Norfolk; B.A.; Philosophy. 



Fourth Row: 
-: JAMES RUFUS HEATHERINGTON, JR.; Norfolk; B.A.; Accounting; 

Norfolk Division; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Accounting Club. 
\ SHEILA HE3RONY; Portsmouth; B.A.; Sociology; Norfolk Division; 

French Club; Balfour-Hillel Club, President. 




DAVID MARTIN HEINRICH; Brooklyn, New York; B.S.; Chemistry: 
Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat"; Pre-Med Club; Bridge Club; Bal- 
four-Hillel C'-bv^jJ _/j^ ■^^^^'^'^^\\ 

; CHARLOTTE LOUISE HENDERSON; Alexan^i^a; B.S.; Mathematics; 
Chi Omega, President; Phi Beta Kappa; Merit Scholar; COLONIAL 
ECHO; Psychology Club^; Choir; Chorus; Pan Hellenic Council. 



Morris House, home for young mothers 





48 



£^n%uj\4. 



*iil(te:L_-^,fc 





i 




Fir 







J ^ BETTY BONES HENLEY; Tappahannocl; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa 
'^ Delta, Secretary; Backdrop Club; Pep Club; Bridge Club; Canterbury 



Club. 



^■ 



OaM 



RENE ARTHUR HENRY; Virginia Beach; B.A.; Economi(-r:^Sie|ma' 
Nu, Recorder; "Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO; Tidewater Alumni 
Association; S.A.M.: Track; Athletic Press Secretary. ' ~" 1^ • 

WALTER W. HERKNESS; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; B.S.; Biology; 
Kappa Sigma; Biology Club, President. 

PAUL KEVIN HICKEY; New York, New York; B.A.; History; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Phi Kappa Tau; Varsity Club; Inter-Fraternity 
Council; Gotf. 

\< 

GLORIA GWENDOLYN HILL; Atlanta. Georgia: B.S.; Psychology: 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Secretary; Backdrop Club; Psychology Club; 
Red Cross, Secretary; Pep Club. 



WILLIAM DONALD MILLIARD; Appolo. Pennsylvania: B.5.; Psychol- 
ogy; Sigma Nu; Accounting Club; Psychology Club; Choir; Wesley 
Foundation. 

LLOYD QUINBY MINES. JR.; Suffolk; B.A.; Business Administration; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Student Assembly; Varsity Club. Secretary; 
Infer-Fraternity Council; Football. 

MILBURN LINWOOD MINES; Norfolk; B.A.; Business Administra- 
tion; Sigma PI; Student Body, Vice-President; Student Assembly; 
General Cooperative Committee; Senate; Backdrop Club; Scabbard 
and Blade Society; Choir; Wesley Foundation; Football; Track. 

OTTI5 VANCE MOLLOMAN. JR.; Norfolk; B.S.; Psychology; Psych- 
ology Club: Westminster Fellowship. 

BONNIE JEANNE HOLMAN; Alexandria; B.A.; Business Administra- 
tion; Phi Mu; COLONIAL ECHO; Bridge Club; S.A.M.; Chorus; 
Baptist Student Union. 



49 




First Row: 




Second Ro 



•ye 



JULIE RUTLEDGE HOLMES; Richmond; B.A.; Government; Alpha 
Chi Omega; House Committee; Political Science Club; Canterbury 
Club; Basketball; Tennis; Hockey; Swimming Club. ^sBI 

ANNE DUDLEY HOWARD; Arlington; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa Chi 
Kappa, President; Philosophy Club, Treasurer; Chorus; Westminster 
Fellowship. 



MILDRED MARGUERITE HUFF; Arlington; B.A.; Fine Arts; Pi Beta 
Phi; Kappa Delta PI, President; Theta Alpha Phi; Senior Class, His- 
torian; "Royalist"; Dramatic Club; Orchesis; Arts Club; Chorus. 

STANLEY WILLIAM HUMPHREYS; Norfolk; B.A.; Business Adminis- 
tration; Norfolk Division; Accounting Club. 

EDWARD WARE HURLEY; Richmond; B.A.; Business Administration; 
Accounting Club; Wythe Law Club; Baptist Student Union. 



■1 



A 



SARAH JANE HURST; South Weymouth, Massachusetts; B.A.; Eng 
llsh; Alpha Chi Omega, Treasurer; Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat,' 
Advertising Manager; French Club; Chorus: Westminster Fellowshi 



PENELOPE LUCILLE HUTCHINSON; Orleans.' France; B.A.; Soc 
ogy; Pi Beta Ph 



ALTHEA MARGARET ILIFF; New York, New York; B.SVsScI 
D^ebate Cpuncil^Secretary; Psychology Club. 





et\nn- 



RET ^NhTlVES; Western Springs, llllnots; B.A.; Engfi; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, President; Phi Beta Kappa; Morta 
Vice President; Merit Scholar; Chi Delta Phi; Kappa Delta 
torian; Women's Executive Councii; Women's Judicial 
Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat," Business Manager; CO 
ECHO; Chorus; Westminster Fellowship. 

\ 
ALLAN DENNY IVIE, III; Leakesville, North CarolmenTA.; Fl. 
Music Club; Arts Club; Bridge Club; Choir; Westminster Fellow 




50 




First Row: 

JOSEPH EDWARD JAY, JR.; Arlington; B.A.; Economics; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, Treasurer; Aide to the President; Junior Class, Vice 
President: Senior Class, President; Student Assembly: General Co- 
operative Committee; Senate; Orientation Sponsor; Pep Club, Vice 
President; Scabbard and Balde Society; Bridge Club; S.A.M., Vice 
President; Cheerleader; Interclub Council, Chairman. 

HERNDON JENKINS; Yorktown; B.S.; Chemistry: Kappa Sigma; 
Chemistry Club, Secretary-Treasurer; Canterbury Club. 

Second Row: 

BEVERLY GREY JEWETT; Richmond; B.A.; History: Richmond Profes- 
sional Institute: Philosophy Club; Spanish Club. 

SUZANNE ELIZABETH JOERNDT; Cranford, New Jersey; B.A.; Fine 
Arts; Kappa Delta, Vice President; Theta Alpha Phi, President; Back- 
drop Club, Historian: Dramatic Club, Secretary; Chorus; Newman 
Club. 

Third Row; 

HELEN SUE JOHNSON; Arlington; B.A.; English; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma: Orientation Sponsor; House Committee; "Flat Hat"; CO- 
LONIAL ECHO; Literature Club; Spanish Club; Chorus; Canterbury 
Club. 

JOHN RILEY JOHNSON; Norfolk; B.S.; Psychology: Psychology 
Club; Pep Club: Choir. 

Fourth Row: 

ROSALEE MAE JONES; Lisbon, Portugal: B.S.; Psychology; Alpha 
Chi Omega; Kappa Chi Kappa; "Flat Hat"; Psychology Club; Can- 
terbury Club. f^"^ f 
WAYNE SUMMERS JONES; McLean; B.A.; 'B^ne« A^'-'-'- 
Phi Kappa Tau; COLONIAL ECHO, Business Manage 



Fifth Row 



rw 



BRENDA JEAN KANE; Hampton; B.S.; Sociology; Mary Washington 
College; Kappa Chi Kappa; COLONIAL ECHO; Philosophy Club; 
Wesley Foundation. 

ELEANOR SUE KANTER: Portsmouth; B.A.; English; Richmond Pro- 
fessional Institute; Music Club; Literature Club; Balfour-Hillel Club. 




Impressionistic? 






First Row: 

THOMAS LINDLEY KENYON: Glenside, Pennsylvania; B.A.: Business 
Administration: Kappa Sigma; Men's Honor Council. Secretary, Vice 
Chairman: Pep Club; S.A.M. 

PEARLE RAY KEY; Arlington; B.A.; Philosophy; Kappa Alpha Theta; 
Kappa Chi Kappa, Secretary-Treasurer, President; Kappa Delta Pi, 
Secretary; COLONIAL ECHO; Red Cross; Pep Club; Philosophy 
Club; Baptist Student Union. 

Second Row: 

LUTHER WILSON KIGER; Norfollt; B.A.; Economics; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Kappa Alpha; Senior Class, Vice President; Choir; Inter-fra- 
ternity Council. 

GEORGE ENDICOTT KILPATRICK, III; Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania; 
B.A.; Philosophy; Phi Kappa Tau; Philosophy Club; Track. 

Third Row: 

JOSEPH GRIBBEL KINDER; Providence, Rhode Island; B.A.; Juris- 
prudence; Kappa Sigma; House President, Bryan. 

ELIZABETH CATHERINE KING; Hampton; B.S.; Psychology; Phi Mu, 
President; Orientation Sponsor; COLONIAL ECHO; Backdrop Club; 
Psychology Club; Spanish Club; Chorus; Pan Hellenic, Secretary; 
Newman Club, Treasurer. 

Fourth Row: 

KATHERINE ANNE KINNEAR; Alexandria; B.A.; English; Pomona 

College; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Westminster Fellowship. 

VkENT AIKEN KIRWIN; Alexandria; B.A.; Government; Theta Delta 
<Chi, TreasurS?) "Flat Jrjat"; COLONIAL ECHO; Baptist Student 
- Union; Track. } 

,l^Nfth Row: ^, ^~\ ;f 

MARY KNABB; Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; B.A.; Philosophy; Pi Beta 
Phi, Treasurer; Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO; 
Backdrop Club; Philosophy; Chorus; Hockey; Lacrosse. 

ONTGOMERY KNIGHT, JR.; Norfolk; B.A.; Business Administra- 
)n; Norfolk Division; Kappa Alpha; Backdrop Club; Varsity Club; 
panish Club; Inter-fraternity Council, Treasurer; Basketball; Base- 

Polishing up for rush week 



fc: 





52 



,-( 




-Q 



&m.a^^ 




V 



-PiK+-Rowi 



MELVIN KURZER; Newport News; B.A.; Sociology. 




EARL CHRISTMAN LASSITER; Norfolk; B.S.; Psychology; Norfollc 
vision; 



^... -.-nia Alpha Epsilon. 



A m 



HN DAVIS LAUGHLIN; Arlington; B.S.; Psychology; Cornell Unl- 
v'ersity: Kappa Sigma, President; Omrcron De'ta Kappa, President; 
Aide to the President; Merit Scholar; Orientation Sponsor; Psychology 
Club, Vice President; Choir; Inter-Fraternity Council; Baptist Student 



-r-iiii^-/ 



ROBERT NATHANIEL LAWRENCE; Norfoll; B.A.; Government; 
Norfolk Division; Phi Kappa Tau; "Flat Hat"; Tidewater-Alumni As- 
sociation, Secretary; S.A.M., Secretary: Westminster Fellowship. 



/ 



/ 



RHEA PRICE LAZARUS; Bowling Green, Kentucky; B.A.; Economics; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Basketball; Baseball. 



Second Row: 

HOWARD GARRETT LEATHERWOOD, JR.; Virginia Beach; B.A.; 
History; George Washington University; Norfolk Division; Tennis. 

ANNE ROWENA LEHEW; Clifton Forge; B.A.; English; Alpha Chi 
Omega; Phi Beta Kappa; Mortar Board; Aide to the President; Merit 
Scholar; Chi Delta Phi; Eta Sigma Phi; Kappa Delta Pi; Class Of- 
ficer; Women's Executive Council, President, Vice President. Treas- 
urer; Student Assembly; General Cooperative Committee; Senate; 
Choir; Chorus; Westminster Fellowship. 

ANNE ELIZABETH LIEBER; Fort Belvoir; B.S.; Psychology; Holton- 
Arms College; Backdrop Club; Psychology Club. 

ANNIE LEE LEWIS; Highland Springs; B.A.; History; House Com- 
mittee; COLONIAL ECHO. 

MARY ELIZABETH LEWIS; Bethesda, Maryland: B.S.; Mathematics; 
Delta Delta Delta, Treasurer; Phi Beta Kappa; Mortar Board, His- 
torian; Aide to the President; Merit Scholar; Junior Class, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer; Women's Honor Council, Chairman; Student Assem- 
bly: Genera! Cooperative Committee: Senate; Orientation Sponsor; 
Backdrop Club; Canterbury Club. 



53 




&nn^(jy^ 




First Row: 



OREN RITTER LEWIS, JR.; Arlington; B.A.; Government; Phi Kappa 
Tau; "Royalist"; Backdrop Club; Psychology Club; Philosophy pl(jb; 
Westnninster Fellowship. ^■^ 1 ^^ 



Second Row: 



/ 



/• 



GORDON LITTLEPAGE LINK; Richmond; B.S.; Chemistry; Xappa 
Sigma; Chemistry Club, President. 

MARGERY LLOYD; Petersburg; B.A.; Government; Kappa Alpha 
Theta. ^j^ 

ANN POPE LOCKWOOD; Hampton; B.A.; English; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Red Cross; W.A.A., Managers* Board; Tennis, Manager. 



JOYCE ANN LOUDERBACK; Elkton; A.B.; History; Marion College; 
Gamma Phi Beta; International Relations Club, Secretary; Music 
Club; Red Cross; Westminster Fellowship. 



h 



EVELYN CLAIRE LOVE; Alexandria; A.B.; Modern Languages: Delta 
Delta Delta, Recording Secretary; "Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO , 
Fraternity-Sorority Junior Editor; Pep Club; ChorOs. / 

WARREN NILES LOW; Befhesda, Maryland: B.A.; Jurisprudence: 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Secretary; Bridge Club, President; Chemistry 
Club; Canterbury Club. 

ARNOLD H. LUBASCH: Newark, New Jersey; B.A.; Government^ 
University of Oxford. England; Phi Alpha; Aide to the President; Tau\ 
Kappa Alpha. President, Secretary-Treasurer; General Cooperative 
Committee; Orientattion Sponsor; "Flat Hat," Editor-in-Chief. Sport: 
Editor; "Royalist"; COLONIAL ECHO; Debate Council. President; 
International Relations Club; Pep Club; Literature Club: Philosophy 
Club; Balfour-HIIIel Club; Track; House Committee; Publica' 
Commitee. 

FRANK MOSES McCANN; Spout Spring; B.A.; Jurisprudence; Sigma 

Nu; Pep Club; Inter-Fraternity Council. 

JOAN CAROL McCarthy; Osslning, New Yorlc; B.A.; Government; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; "Flat Hat"; Backdrop Club; International 
Relations Club: W.A.A. 




54 




First Row: 

FRANCIS JOSEPH MacCOY, III; Maplewood, New Jersey; B.A.; 
Accounting; Kappa Sigma, Vice President; Omicron Delta Kappa; 
Student Assembly; Orientation Sponsor; Accounting Club, Treasurer; 
Pep Club, President; Head Cheerleader; May Day Committee. 

MARGARET ANN McCOY; Norfolk; B.A.; Sociology; Gamma Phi 
Beta; COLONIAL ECHO; Music Club; Tidewater-Alumni Associa- 
tion; Pan Hellenic Council. 

Second Row: 

IDUS BAILEY McCURRY, JR.; Norfolk; A.B.; Economics; William & 
Mary-V.P.I. (Norfolk); Basketball. 

MARY ELIZABETH McDOW; Norfolk; B.A.; Fine Arts; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Theta Alpha Phi, Treasurer; Backdrop Club; Dramatic Club; 
W.A.A.; Hockey. 

Third Row: 

SHIRLEY ANNE McGINNIS; Norfolk; A.B.; French; Chi Omega; Chi 
Delta Phi; French Club; Pep Club; Chorus; Canterbury Club. 

DOROTHY ANN MADISON; Fort Monroe; B.A.; English; University 
of Alabama; Chi Omega; Literature Club; Chorus; Philosophy Club. 

Fourth Row: 

VIRGINIA BLAIR MAPP; Virginia Beach; B.A.; English; Delta Delta 
Delta; Eta Sigma Phi; "Hat Hat"; Red Cross; Pep Club; Bridge Club; 
Literature Club; Philosophy Club; Chorus; Pan Hellenic Council; 
Canterbury Club. 

GROVER THOMAS MARTIN; Roanoke; B.S.; Physical Education; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Varsity Club; Spanish Club; Football,JCiOiC 
tain; Baseball. (^^"'OU 
^ ,-,fW 



Fifth Row: 

JOSEPH MARK MAURIZI; East McKeesport, PennsylvanIa;^pA./6co- 
nomics; Mount Union College; Sigma Nu; S.A.M."^ -- 

WILLIAM ALLEN MAY; Falls Church; A.B.; Busin^ss^mfnis'tration 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Vice President; Accounting Club; Clayton-Grimes 
Biological Club; Varsity Club; S.A.M.; Band; Canterbury Club; 
Track; Cross Country. 

Convocation formation 







First Row: 

ELEANORE BONNIE MEYER; Roanoke: B.S.; Psychology; Gamma Phi 

Beta; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Psychology Club; Canterbury 

Club. 

DAVID LOUIS METZ; St. Louis, Missouri: A.B.; Economics; Phi Kappa 
Tau; House Committee; Scabbard and Blade Society; S.A.M.; Band. 



Second Row: 

GEORGE REVELL MICHAEL: Parksley; B.A.; Fine Arts; Theta Alpha 
Phi, Vice President; "Royalist," Art Editor; Backdrop Club; Dramatic 
Club; Orchesis; Arts Club; Westminster Fellowship. 

STEVE MILKOVICH; Johnstown. Pennsylvania; B.A.; Accounting; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Treasurer: Accounting Club; Varsiiy Club; Inter- 
Fraternity Council, Treasurer; Football, Co-captain. 

Third Row: 

MERCEDES DeSOTO MILLER; Norfolk; B.A.; French; Norfolk Di- 
vision. 

STANLEY WADE MITCHEM; Gwynn's Island: A.B.; Government; 
"Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO; Backdrop Club; French Club; 
Debate Council, Secretary-Treasurer; International Relations Club; 
Tidewater-Alumni Association; Philosophy Club; Baptist Student 
Union, Treasurer. 

Fourth Rowr 

MARGARET BROWING MORGAN; South Hill; A.B.; Government; 
Mars Hill Junior College; Alpha Chi Omega; "Flat Hat"; Red Cross; 
Pep Club; Baptist Student Union. 

LAWRENCE MORRISON; Winthrop, Massachusetts; B.A.; Eco- 
k'liomics; French Club. 



AWQ^.- 



Firth Row: 

CAROL ANN MYERS; Alexandria; B.A.; English; Delta Delta Delta; 
Kappa Delta Pi; Sophomore Class Secretary; Orientation Sponsor: 
"Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO; Backdrop Club; Clayton-Grimes 
Biological Ciub; French Club. 

MARILYN NELSON; Greenville, South Carolina; B.A.; History; Kap- 
pa Delta; Literature Club; Spanish Club; Baptist Student Union. 



But mine was last month 






56 




..^-^"^ 



&^rLU3^ 





A 




_Eirsi Row: 



Second Row: 



r 



\ 



/^■^ 



ROLAND PAUL NEMETH; Queens Village, New York; B.A.; Ancie 
Languages; Pi Lambda Phi; Eta Sigma Phi. President. 



DONALD LYN NEUSTADT; Westbury, New York; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Iowa Wesleyan College; Phi Delta Theta. Treasurer; 
COLONIAL ECHO; Inter-Fraternity Council; Blue Key. 




V 



ROBERT WILLIAM NEUVILLE; Brooklyn, New Yoric; B.A.; Business 
Adminlstrdflon; Pi Lambda Phi, Vice President; "Flat Hat"; Bacltdrop 
Club, Treasurer: Bridge Club; Inter-Fraternity Council; Balfour-Hillel 
Club; "Smoke Signals," Editor-in-Chief. 



DOLORES ANN ONIFER; Maybeury, West Virginia; B.A.; English; 
Pep Club; Literature Club: W.A.A.; Newman Club, Secretary, 



MARGARET ELIZABETH ORR; Forest Hills, New York; B.S.: Psychol- 
ogy; Alpha Chi Omega. Vice President; Psychology Club; W.A.A. 



ARGARET OWENS; Arlington; B.A.; English; University of Cali- 
'ornia; Gamma Phi Beta; Phi Beta Kappa; House Committee; "Flat 
Hat"; Backdrop Club, Vice President; Fencing Club; Literature Club; 
Chorus; Wesley Foundation; Fencing. 



SARAH GERTRUDE PAGE; Virginia Beach; 8.A.; French; Women's 
College of the University of North Carolina; University of Miami; 
Alpha Delta PI; French Club; Chorus; Westminster Fellowship. 

JOHN HENRY PARKER, III; Richmond; B.A.; Economics; Kappa 
Alpha; Freshman Class, Vice President; General Cooperative Com- 
mittee; Pep Club; S.A.M.; Cheerleader; Canterbury Club. 

GILBERT PARMELE; Staten Island, New York; B.A.; History; Sigma 
Nu; "Flat Hat"; Basketball Manager. 

MARILYN LOUISE PARR; Washington. Pennsylvania; B.S.; Mathe- 
matics; Chi Omega, Secretary; Kappa Delta Pi; House Committee; 
Psychology Club; Choir; Chorus; Band; Wesley Foundation. 



57 



-^ 





s>nx(jy2A 






First Row: 



^^ 



Second Row: 



/ 



ROBERTA ANNE PARRISH; Elk Hill; B.A.; Sociology; Gamma Phi 
Beta; Music Club; Spanish Club; Westminster Fellowship. - __. - , 

GRANVILLE ROBERT PATRICK; Williamsburg; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Phi Kappa Tau; Accounting Club; Scabbard and Blade 
Society. 



WILLIAM EUGENE PATTON; Short Hills. New Jersey; B.S.; Biology 
Sigma Alpha Epsllon; Pre-Med Club; Basketball; Track. 



RICHARD LEE PENDLETON; Willow Grove, Pennsylvania; B.A.; Eco- 
nomics; Sigma PI, Herald; Omicron Delta Kappa; Student Assembly; 
House Committee; Varsity Club, President; Westminster Fellowship; 
Baseball; Colonial Festival Committee, Chairman. 



EDWARD FINLEY PHILLIPS; New York. New York; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Kappa Sigma. 

58 



^ 



JANE CARNEY PILLOW; Williamsburg; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa 
Delta; Bacltdrop Club; Chorus: Student Religious Union, Secretary; 
Baptist Student Union; Religious Emphasis Week. 




'/ 



CHARLES JOSEPH PILUSO; Brooklyn. New York; B.A.; Jurl^ 
dence; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Pep Club; Philosophy Club; %J 
Spanish Club; Wythe Law Club: Newman Club. ^ 

JACK VICTOR PLACE; Williamsburg; B.A.; Business Admlm^frafionf 
Phi Kappa Tau, President; Accounting Club; Varsity Club: Football; ./ 

LOUIS JOSE^fTpbMPONlO, JR.: X^Tin^onpB^'jurisprudence: '"^ 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Red Cross; Pep Club; Philosophy Club: S.A.M.; 
Spanish Club; Wythe Law Club; Newman Club. \ ^ i ^i 

NATHAN SHERMAN POPKIN; New Orleans, Louisiana: B.A.; Hi. 
tory: Tau Kappa Alpha; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Deb«te\ 
Council, President; Pre-Med Club; Literaturs Club; Balfour-Hillel" 
Club; Tennis. ^ \\ } ^—i 




First Row: 

HAROLD ARNOLD POSEY; Virginia Beach; B.A.; Jurisprudence; 
Wabash College; Norfolk Division; Lambda Chi Alpha; Baclcdrop 
Club; Wythe Law Club. 



VIRGINIA LEE POSTLES; Arlington; B.A.; Fine Arts; Kappa Chi 
Kappa; "Royalist": COLONIAL EChHO; Arts Club, Vice President; 
Philosophy Club; Canterbury Club. 

Second Row: 

GILES WILLIAMS QUARLES; Roanoke; B.A.; Economics; Sigma Pi; 
Baclcdrop Club; Red Cross; Choir; Wesley Foundation. 



HARRIET LUCILLE RASMU5SEN; Sandston; B.S.; Mathematics; Uni- 
versity of Virginia; Gamma Phi Beta, President; House Committee; 
Baclcdrop Club; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Music Club; Pep 
Club; Spanish Club; Pan Hellenic Council. 



Third Row: 

JEAN ANNE RICHMOND; Arlington; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; "Flat Hat"; Pan Hellenic Council; Student Religious Union; 
Westminster Fellowship. 



MARSHALL AMES RIES, JR.; Braintree, Massachusetts; B.A.; Busi- 
ness Administration; Sigma Nu, Treasurer; "Flat Hat"; S.A.M.; Inter- 
Fraternity Council; Wesley Foundation. 



Fourth Row: 

RALPH PHILLIPS RIGBY; Falrhaven, Massachusetts; B.A.; Economics; 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Vice President; Inter-Fraternity Council. 

ROBERT STANLEY RIPLEY; Portsmouth; B.A.; English; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Merit Scholar; French Club; PI Delta Phi, Treasurer; Literature 
Club; Canterbury Club. 

Fifth Row: 

TREAZURE YVONNE RISSINGER; Lebanon, Pennsylvania; B.S.; Biol- 
ogy; Chi Onnega; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club, Vice Presideiv 
Pre-Med Club; Band. WL^ I 

JOHN WESLEY ROBBINS, JR.; Bayside; B.S.; Mathematics; Norfolk 
Division. _^^ , ^v- ,. / X, 

Not even able to quack 






First Row: 

DEAN E. ROBERTS; York, Maine; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa Sigma, 
Secretary; Eta Sigma Phi, Treasurer; "Flat Hat"; Student Religious 
Union; Canterbury Club; Student Survey Committee; Cross Country. 
LYNANNE REBEKAH ROBINSON; Norfolk; B.A.; Music; University 
of Pennsylvania; Norfolk Division; Phi Theta Kappa; Delta Omicron; 
Tidewater-Alumni Association. 

Second Row: 

ISABELLA FLOCKHART RUBERT; Yorktown; B.A.; Spanish; Academia 

Internacional; Phi Mu, Vice President; Eta Sigma Phi; Pep Club; 

Literature Club; Spanish Club; Canterbury Club. 

ERNEST OSCAR RUDIN; Williamsburg; B.A.; French; Sigma Nu, 

Assistant Treasurer; Pi Delta Phi, Treasurer. 

Third Row: 

HAROLD EVAN RUMBEL; Richmond; B.S.; Biology; Hampden-Syd- 

ney College; Kappa Alpha; Pre-Med Club. 

ROBERT DEWEY SADLER, JR.; Norfolk; B.S.; Chemistry; Norfolk 



Fourth Row: 

JULIA BRECKINRIDGE ST. JOHN; Salem; B.A.; English; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma; "Flat Hat"; Chorus; Canterbury Club. 

CARY MALCOLM SCATES; Washington, D. C; B.A.; Jurisprudence; 

Universiiy of Maryland; Kappa Alpha, Historian, Vice President; 

Chie; Aide to the President; Junior Class, President; President of the 

Student Body; Student Assembly, Chairman; General Cooperative 

Committee;; Senajki Qrientation Sponor; Publications Committee; 

PsychologyClub.x: ^; 



\(. 




Fifth Ro» 

BURTON ROBERTSON SCHOOLS; Portsmouth; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; Accounting Club; Backdrop Club; Wesley Foundation. 
' — MARJORIE LOUISE SCHROEDER; West Englewood, New Jersey; 
B.S.; Psychology; Women's College of the University of North Caro- 
lina; Chi Omega, Treasurer; Psychology Club; Literature Club. 



The Great White Way 





60 




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First Row: 



MARGEL LIND SETTLE; Arlington: B.S.; Psychology; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Vice P[;esident; Psychology., Club, Treasurer; Red Cross; 

CATHERINE MAE SHEILD; Warwic/k;|B.A.; English; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Chi Delta Phi. Vice President; House Committee: Orienta- 
tion Sponsor: French Club; Bridge Club; W.A.A.; Canterbury Club; 



TenmS; 



;*i\lli 




JAMES NORVEL SHRADER; Glendale. California; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration: Phi Kappa Tau; Scabbard and Blade Socie+y; S.A.M.; 
Band. 

BARBARA LEE SHRIVER; Norfolk; B.S.: Psychology; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Gamma Phi Be+a; Kappa Delta PI; COLONIAL ECHO; Music 
Club; Psychology Club; Pep Club. 

BEtSY BURR SKINKER; Roanoke; B.5.; Psychology; Pi Beta Phi; 
Senior Class. Secretary; Women's Judicial Council; Psychology Club; 
Student Religious Union; Baptist Student Union. 



ond Ro 



BARBARA JEAN SMITH; East Cleveland, Ohio; B.S.; Mathematics; 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Treasurer; Kappa Chi Kappa; House Committee; 
Fencing Club; Spanish Club; W.A.A.; Fencing. 

GLORIA DRU SMITH; Norfolk; B.A.; English; Norfolk Division; 
Kappa Delta, Historian; Women's Honor Council; Backdrop Club; 
Orchesis; Tidewater Alumni Association; Literature Club; Chorus; 
Cheerleader; W.A.A ; Pan Hellenic Council; Westminster Fellowship. 

KATHRYN CAROLINE SMITH; Arlington; B.A.; Philosophy; Alpha 
Chi Omega, President; House Committee; Philosophy Club; Choir. 

ANNE MARIE SOBERS; Kingston, Pennsylvania; B.A.; Sociology; 
Kappa Alpha Theta. Secretary; French Club; Kappa Chi Kappa, Sec- 
retary; Psychology Club; Red Cross; Philosophy Club; Newman Club. 

EDWARD LEONARD SOULE; Chicago. Illinois; B.A.; Business Ad- 
ministration; University of South Carolina; Accounting Club; Baptist 
Student Union, 



61 




U3^ 




First Row: 

SARAH DEAN SPANGLER; Norfolk; B.A.; Modern Languages; 
Alpha Chi Omega, Corresponding Secretary; Phi Beta Kappa; Mortar 
Board, President; Aide to the President; Merit Scholar; Chi Delta Phi, 
Treasurer; Pi Delta Phi, President; Women's Honor Council; Orienta- 
tion Sponsor; House Committee; COLONIAL ECHO, Malce-up Edi- 
tor; Backdrop Club; French Club, Secretary. 



r 



HORACE SPEED, III; Alexandria; B.A. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Philosophy Club. 



Histor 



Cornell University; 
ogy; Kappa 9lgmap-~" 



Second Rowf~^ 

JOHN LEONARD STANLEY; Norfolk; B.A.; Economics 
vision; Kappa Alpha. 

GRACE ELEANOI^^STONE; Forest HiHsTf^Yort; B.^.; 
Alpha Chi Omega; Psychology Club; Pan He 
urer; Tennis; Basketball; Hockey. . 



CARL JOSEPH SPIES; Arlington; B.S.; Psychol 
Psychology Club; Inter-Fraternity Council; Tennis. 



JOYCE ANN SPRINGER; Arlington; B.S.; Mathematics; Alpha Chi 
Omega; Women's Judicial Council; House President, Jefferson; 
House Committee; Choir, Secretary; Student Religious Union, Presi- 
dent; Westminster Fellowship. 



ROBERT BEAR SPROUSE; Staunton; B.A.; History; 
Pep Club; Westminster Fellowship. 



Kappa Alpha; 



WALLACE BEDFORD STUBBS; Williamsburg: 
Alpha; Pre-Med Club; Basketball. 

CALVIN CABELL TENNIS; Hampton; B.A.; Ju 
Sigma, Vice President; Sophomore Class, Presid' 
biy; General Cooperative Committee; Senate: 
Bryan; Orientation Sponsor; Choir; l&tudent R^ili^ 
terbury Club, President. H; ~Zj — 

MARVIN THOMksfwIWff^^.A.: ©overiAne 
New York University; International Relations Cf 
chology Club; Philosophy Club. Vice President; Balfo* 



62 






First Row: 

ARTHUR CORNELIUS THOMPSON. JR.; Hampton; B.A; Business 

Administration; Hampden-Sydney College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 

Vice President; Accounting Club; S.A.M.; Distinguished Military 
Student. 

J. LEROY THOMPSON. JR.; Tarrytown. New York; B.A.; Economics; 
Williams College; Phi Gamma Delta; S.A.M.; Choir. 

Second Row: 

MARILYN JEAN THOMPSON; Hampton; B.S.; Mathematics; Phi 
Beta Kappa; House Committee; Pep Culb; Chemistry Club; Ameri- 
can Chemical Society; Baptist Student Union. 

BARBARA JOAN TIGNOR; Richmond; B.A.; Sociology; Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma; Student Assembly, Secretary; Senate, Secretary; Back- 
drop Club; Pep Club. 

Third Row: 

MELVIN J. TILLETT; Williamsburg; B.A.; Business Administration; 
Norfolk Division; Accounting Club. 

BARBARA ANN TORRENCE; Danville; B.S.; Mathematics; Averett 
College; Delta Delta Delta, Corresponding Secretary; Westminster 
Fellowship. 

Fourth Row: 

HENRETTA ANN TRENT; Danville; B.S.; Biology; University College. 
Exeter; Delta Delta Delta; Phi Beta Kappa; Merit Scholar; COLO 
lAL ECHO; Backdrop Club; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club, Seci 
tary; Orchesls; Baptist Student Union. 

WALTER EDWIN TRENT; New York, New York; B.S 
Pi Lambda Phi, Secretary; Debate Counc 



FItth Row: 




Balfour-HIIIel Club. 



JOHN HENDERSON TUCKER. JR.; Fentress; B.A.; History; Nortoli 
Division; Kappa Sigma Kappa; House Committee; Tidewater Alumni 
Association; Student Religious Union; Baptist Student Union; Tennis, 

WILLIAM FRED TWOMEY; Gloucester, MassachjseHs; B.S.; Physical 
Education; Theta Delta Chi; Baclcdrop, Club; Varsity Club; Newman 
Club, President: Basketball; Baseball. 



t> 



The good ol' days of original containers are gone 




First Row: 

GORDON CHEESMAN VLIET; Alma. Michigan; B.A.; Economics; 
Alma College; Phi Kappa Tau; Orientation Sponsor; "Flat Hat"; 
"Royalist"; COLONIAL ECHO. Art Editor; Smolie Signals, Art 
Editor; S.A.M.. President; Band; Student Religious Union; Westmin- 
ster Fellowship. President; Tennis Manager. 

JEAN MARSHALL VONSCHILLING; Hampton; B.S.; Psychology; 
Sweet Briar College; Gamma Phi Beta. Recording Secretary, His- 
torian; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Psychology Club; Chorus; 
Canterbury Club. 

Second Row: 

ROBERTA ELIZABETH WADLEY; Arlington; B.A.; Philosophy; Chi 
Omega, Vice-President; Chi Delta Phi; "Royalist." Associate Editor; 
Philosophy Club. President; Spanish Club; Chorus; Westminster Fel- 
lowship. 

WILLIAM WAGMAN; New York. New York; B.S. Psychology; Pi 
Lambda Phi; Orientation Sponsor; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; 
Debate Council, Secretary; Pre-Med Club; Psychology Club. Presi- 
dent; Balfour-Hi'llel Club. 



Williamsburg; B.S.; Mathematics; Pi 
"Flat Hat"; COLONIAL ECHO; 




Third Row: 

BETTY ANN WILLS WALLACE; 
Beta Phi; Orientation Sponsor 
French Club. 

ROBERT PERRY WALLACE, JR.; Williamsburg; B.A.; Business Ad- 
minitration; Theta Delta Chi; Student Assembly; Orientation Sponsor; 
Scabbard & Blade Society. 

Fourth Row: 

STANLEY DUSTIN WARD; Norfolk; B.A.; Business Administration; 

Kappa Alpha. President; Scabbard & Blade Society; Inter-Fraternity 

Council. 

WINFRED O'NEIL WARD; Exmore; B.S.; Chemistry; Backdrop Club; 
Clayton-Grimes Biological Club; Pre-Med Club. President; Red Cross; 
Pep Club; Chemistry Club; Student Religious Union; Baptist Student 
Union, Vice-President, Treasurer. 



Business 
S.A.M.; 



B.A.; Economics; 
Westminster Fel- 



ROBERT WALKER TYSON, JR.; Delray Beach, Florida; B.A. 
Administration; Pi Kappa Alpha; Pep Club; Bridge Club 
Spanish Club; Wesley Foundation. 

JOHN LEONARD ULRICH; Towanda. New York 
Kappa Sigma; "Flat Hat"; Backdrop Club; S.A.M. 
lowship; Track. 
fCellZABETH ANNE UZZELL; Norfolk; B.A.; French; Norfolk Division 
Pi Delta Phi. Vice-President; French Club; Baptist Student Union. 

PAUL ALLEN WEINSTEIN; Great Neck, New York; B.A.; Economics 
Phi Alpha, Vice-President: Tau Kappa Alpha, Secretary-Treasurer 
"Flat Hat"; Accounting Club; Debate Council, Vice-President; In 
ternatlonal Relations Club, Treasurer, President; Philosophy Club 
S.A.M.; Balfour-HIIIel Club. "SSA 

ric; B.A. ; 'Business 



WARREN ALLAN WEISS; New York, New Yorl 



Ad- 



sppa 



ministration; Pi Lambda Phi, President; Omlcron Delta Ka 
President; Men's Honor Council; Accounting Club, Vice-President; 
Jjjter-Fraternity ^oui\cil; Balfour-Hillel Club, Vice-President. 

I 





1 i 




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JU' 





WILLIAM TUNSTALL WELLS; Altavista; B.S.: Physics; Lambda Chi 



ta ; Varsitv Club; Track, Manager. 




JJOHN AUGUSTAN WESTBERG; Longmeadow, Massachusetts; A.B.; 
Jurisprudence; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Vice-President, Secretary; Aide 
To the President; Student Assembly; COLONIAL ECHO, Sports 
. Editor, Editor-in-Chief; Scabbard and Blade Society; Football. 

, •(' \ 

RAIFORD LINWOOD WHITFIELD, JR.; Norfolk; B.A.; Economics; 
Norfolk Division; Kappa Alpha. 



:ELDA CLAIR WILDMAN; Arlington; B.A.; English; Alpha Chi 
.,^Omega: Women's Judicial Council; Literature Club; Westminster 
ItBllowship; Theater Box Office Staff. 



Second Row: 

CARY WARREN WILLIAMS; Norfolk; B.A.; Sociology; Norfolk Di- 
vision; Gamma Phi Beta; Music Club; Wesley Foundation. 



NANCY RAY WILLIAMS; Salzburg, Austria; B.A.; Fine Arts; Theta 
Alpha Phi; Backdrop Club; Dramatic Club; Chorus. 



HOWARD WALTER WISEMAN; Williamsburg; B.A.; Economics; 
Political Science Club; Golf. 



SARAH ANN WRIGHT; Roanoke; B.A.; Fine Arts; Pi Beta Phi; "Flat 
Hat"; French Club; Red Cross; Arts Club; Choir; Chorus. 



ROBERT HOLDEN WILKINSON, JR.; Guantanomo Bay, Cuba; B.S.; DORIS JEAN ZUIDEMA; Norfolk; B.A.; Mathematics; Phi Mu; Phi 

Biology; Theta Delta Chi; Clayton-Grimes Biological Club, President; Beta Kappa; Eta Sigma Phi; COLONIAL ECHO; Psychology Club; 

Pre-Medicine Club, President; Choir. Tidewater-Alumni Association; Bridge Club. 

65 





Mrkd*M 



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First Row: 

ROBERT FRISTOE BANKS; Norfolk: Jurisprudence; Kappa 

Aipra. 

ELIZABETH BICKFORD; Cornwall, England. 

JACK RICHARD BUCHEIT; Willianisburg; Jurisprudence- 

Pi Lambda Phi; Phi Alpha Delta. 



Second Row; 

JAMES DAVID CARTER. Ill; Williamsburg: Jurisprudence. 

FRANCIS CURTIS DUVAL; Gloucester; Jurisprudence; 

Lambda Chi Alpha. 

WILLIAM LEE FORBES; South Norfolk; Jurisprudence; Sig- 
ma Pi. 

Third Row: 

CHANNING M. HALL, JR.; Williamsburg: B.S.: Univer- 

ity ci Virginia; Jurisprudence; Kappa Alpha. 

DONALD A. LAWRENCE; Warwick; Jurisprudence; Phi 

Alpha. 

NANCY COLEMAN MESSICK; Williamsburg; Jurisprud- 
ence; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Fourth Row: 

CECIL G. MOORE; Williamsburg; Jurisprudence; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon; Phi Alpha Delta. 

DAVID E. MOREWITZ; Newport News: Jurisprudence. 

HENRY G. MULLINS, III; Warwick- Jurisprudence- Phi 
Alpha Delta. 



Fifth Row: 

SAMUEL WATTS PHILLIPS; Richmond; Jurisprudence; Phi 
Kappa Tau; Phi Alpha Delta. 

ROBERT H. REVEILLE; Norfolk; Jurisprudence; Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. 

PETER SHEBELL, JR.; Asbury Park, New Jersey; Jurisprud- 
ence; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta. 



S «th Row: 

DAVID OSCAR WILLIAMS. JR.; North Tazewell; B.S.. Uni- 
versity of Richmond: Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta. 



66 



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Back in the Spring of 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited William and Mary to be present at the inauguration of the college's 22nd 

president. Besides paying tribute to Alvin Duke Chandler, Eisenhower made a short speech and accepted an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. 

Above, both Chandler and Eisenhower waited while James M. Robertson, Rector of the Board of Visitors, addressed the gathering. 



BIG NAMES VISITED 



Each year, the far reaching historical and aca- 
demic appeal of William and Mary draws thous- 
ands of visitors to its campus. They come from all 
walks of life and from the far corners of the earth 
to see the second oldest college in the United 
States. They come to view the alma mater of Thom- 
as Jefferson and walk through the oldest academic 
building still in use in this country. They come to 
make speeches, receive honorary degrees and hold 
conventions. They came to see the school where 
Phi Beta Kappa scholarship fraternity was founded 
and where the honor system got its start in Ameri- 



can colleges. They come for the rich heritage that 
is William and Mary. 

1953-54 was an especially proud year with re- 
spect to distinguished visitors for among those who 
came to call were the president of the United States 
and royalty from two foreign nations. President 
Eisenhower came in the Spring of 1953 for Alvin 
Duke Chandler's inauguration as the colleges twen- 
ty-second president. Crown Prince Akihito Tsug- 
unomiya of Japan and King Paul and Queen Fred- 
erika of Greece visited the campus in the Fall cf 
1954. 



Crown Prince Akihito Tsugunomiya of Japan visited the college in September on his tour of the Uniled States. He chatted 
with co-eds, June Rickard, Margo Rand, and Barbara Brown, and with President Chandler. 






Grinning proudly (top), while Docfors McCary and Guy o^ the 

faculty added the new honor to his gown, President Elsenhower 

then sat back and explored his program. 



In his briet address, Eisenhower defined an Institution of higher learning as, 
place where young minds are exposed to great mind;." 



THE COLLEGE IN 1953-54 



In late November, King Paul and Queen Frederilta of Greece visited William 

and Mary during their tour of the U. S. They were presented wl+h a sc"o!l 

signed by the students studying the Greek language and entertained at tea b/ 

President Chandler. 







a 




ORGANIZATIONS 



P H I 



BETA KAPPA 




OFFICERS 

THOMAS G. PULLEN. JR President 

RICHARD L. MORTON Vice-President 

DONALD M. FOERSTER Recording Secretary (acting) 

ERASER NEIMAN Corresponding Secretary 

VERNON L. NUNN Treasurer 

ALTHEA HUNT Historian 

JOHN T. BALDWIN Marshal 



Ann Dietrich 
Janice Ferrell 
Shirley Haabesfad 
Charlotte Henderson 



INITIATES— FALL 1954 

Margaret Ives 
Anne LeHew 
John Laughlln 
Mary Elizabeth Lewis 
Margaret Owens 



Sarah Spangler 
Henretta Trent 
Jean Thonnpson 
Doris Zuidema 



The first chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was founded at William and 
Mary on December 5, 1776, and since that time the Society has come 
to be recognized as the foremost among existing honor societies. Its 
student members were tapped from among the outstanding scholars 
on the William and Mary campus at the Honors Convocation In No- 
vember and again in the Spring, 

On December 5, 1953, Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa marked 
its 177th anniversary with initiation ceremonies, a dinner, and 
speeches by eminent guests. Dr. Anne Gary Pannell, president of 



Sweet Briar College and a member of the Society, spolce on "The De- 
cline of Disbelief," and John Ciardi of Rutgers University read an 
original poem. 

During the College's Christmas vacation, when Phi Beta Kappa 
Hall, headquarters of the national organization, burned, several 
eminent Phi Beta Kappa's braved the heat and smolte to rescue the 
archives and documents housed in the office adjoining the audi- 
torium. 



First Row: M. Ives, Owens. Second Row: Spangler, Mr. Bucklin, Henderson, Thompson, Mr. Grant, LeHew, Dr. Baldwin, Lewis. Third Row: Haabestad Df South- 
worth, Miss Hunt, Ferrell. Dr. Morton. Trent, Mr. Nunn. Dietrich Laughlin. Dr. Foerster. 




94 








-•'" 



First Row: Ferrell, Scates LeHew. Second Row: Westberg, Ash, Spangler, Laughlin. Third Row: Grant, Clark, Lewis, Lubasch, Jay. 



Cary Malcolm Scates 



Joseph Edward Jay 



Richard Franklin Clark 



James Deneale Grant 



Mary Elizabeth Lewis 



Anne Rowena Lehew 



Janice Eileen Ferreil 



John Davis Laughlin 



Sarah Dean Spangler 
Arnold Lubasch 
John Augustan Westberg 
Carolyn Virginia Ash 




Here was another tie between the President of William 
and Mary and our student leaders — the President's 
aides. 

These outstanding students on the William and Mary 
campus were appointed by President and Mrs. Chandler 
to act as their personal aides throughout the college year. 
At convocations, they could be found marching behind 
the President, wearing the College colors and the presi- 
dential seal. The president of the student body, Cary 
Scates, was Chief Aide, carrying the College Mace in 
convocations. 

Ten of the twelve Aides were selected by virtue of the 
office they held in the student body. Included in the 
group were Student Government President, Senior and 



Junior Class Presidents, Chairmen of the Men's and 
Women's Honor Councils, President of the Executive 
Council of WSCGA, Chairman of the Judicial Council, 
Presidents of Omicron Delta Kappa and Mortar Board, 
"Flat Hat" Editor, and two members at large, one boy 
and one giri. 

In 1953-54, the Aides were called upon to help enter- 
tain the King and Queen of Greece when they visited 
the College. At the special convocation given in honor 
of the "Iron Indians" of the William and Mary football 
team, the President's Aides acted as ushers. The duties 
of the twelve Aides centered around assisting the Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Chandler entertain friends and guests of 
the College. 



PRESIDENT'S AIDES 



95 




"ODK" — a coveted title of honor among college men everywhere. 

Formally stated, the purposes of this National Leadership Honor Society for Men 
are to acknowledge high achievement and efficiency in collegiate activities; to bring 
together representative men from all phases of college life for cooperation in worth- 
while endeavor; and to unite members of the faculty and the student body on the 
basis of mutual interests and understanding. 

ODK chose for a special project of the year the establishment of a leadership school 
to develop more and better undergraduate leaders. Through this, the experience of 
recognized leaders could be used to benefit the entire college community. Also, 
ODK contributed $25.00 each semester to the library for the purchase of American 
History books. On the lighter side, they planned to play the Faculty in basketball, 
which would consist of more fun than skill! 




First Row: P. Brown. McCoy, Marsh. Second Row: DcSamper, Weiss. Standing: Place, Laughlin. Dr. Miller, Pendleton, Dr. Jones, Grant. Clark 



JOHN LAUGHLIN 



OFFICERS 

President WARREN WEISS Vice-President 

S. D. SOUTHWORTH . - . . Secretary-Treasurer 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Faculty and Administration 
J. Wilfred Lambert W. Melville Jones James W. Miller 

STUDENTS 

Phillip Brown James Grant Francis MacCoy Richard Pendleton 



Richard Clark 



John Laughlin 



John Marsh 



Jack Place 
Warren Weiss 



M I C R N DELTA KAPPA 



96 



Mortar Board — the women's equivalent of ODK. 

Here again was an active group chosen from the leaders among the women stu- 
dents. The members of Mortar Board, the national senior honor society for women, 
were tapped at the spring convocation of their junior year on the basis of leadership, 
scholarship and service. 

The past year saw the organization engage in many activities to promote the ideals 
for which it stands. The orientation booklet, "hiere's hlow at William and Mary," was 
revised and enlarged; a "Smarty Party" was held for girls with outstanding scholar- 
ship; and the dusty recesses of Barrett attic were braved by courageous members 
for the annual furniture sale. Magazines for the large dormitories, a reception for 
Hans Hotter after his concert, a luncheon with the members of ODK, and a sectional 
conference at George Washington University rounded out the year's program. 





First Row: Ferrell. Spangler, Gushing, M. Ives. Second Row: Crovo, M. Lewis, Haabestad. LeHew. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SARAH DEAN SPANGLER President MADGE GUSHING Editor 

MARGARET IVES Vice-President MARY ELIZABETH LEWIS Historian 

BARBARA CROVO Secretary ANN LEHEW Member-at-Large 

SHIRLEY HAABESTAD Treasurer JANICE FERRELL Member-at-Large 



Mrs. James Miller 



ADVISORS 

Mrs. T. S. Cox 



Miss Althea Hunt 



T H E 



R T A R BOARD 



97 




First Row: Dr. Fehr. Second Row: Huber, Butters, Springer, Young. LeHew, Vassos, Ero, Smith. Owens. Rosar, Green, Stone. Third Row: Blakemore, Carlson. 
North, Thurau, Pharo, Armstrong, Laux, Ramsay, Parr, Butler, Duncan. Lowe, Geddes. Bally. Fourth Row: Myers, Eddy, Petrie, Preti, Gatling, Marsh Negaard, 
Brockett, KIger. Stern, Dougherty, Golwan, Forrest, Cote, Gardner. Wat kins. Fifth Row: Luhring, Nettles, Doyle, Mathes, Hamilton, Piland, Rapier. M. HInes. 
Rowe. Hillird, Johns, Jabaut, Quarles, Seller, Roberts, Davis. Sixth Row: Anderson, Neal, Birnbrauer, Bryden, Fay. 



T H E 



I L L I A 



A N D 



A R Y 



DR. CARL A. FEHR 




In 1953-54, the choral groups of William and Mary continued to be a 
tribute to the ability and talent of members of the college community. Dr. 
Carl A. Fehr, the director of the choir and chorus, came to William and Mary 
in 1946, and in seven years had produced singing groups capable of presenting 
inspiring and difficult selections. 

The William and Mary Choir opened its concert season in October with a 
performance at the Mosque Theater in Richmond. In December, the sixty 
members gave their annual Christmas concert, which included Benjamin Britten s 
"A Ceremony of Carols," the singing of traditional Christmas carols and the 
one-act opera by Gian-Carlo Menotti, "Amahl and the Night Visitors." The 
featured singers in the opera were Lavinia Pretz, Barbara Pharo and Freddy 
Miller. Throughout the year, Barbara Green was accompanist, and Carol Butters 
was student director. 

The choir was by no means resting in between their concerts. Three practices 
per week, singing for chapel services on Wednesday evenings and performing 
at convocations kept the group busy. The annual spring concert and a spring trip 
were projects anticipated with much enthusiasm. Plans were made for making 
a third album of records. 

Under the direction of Dr. Fehr, better known as "Pappy," the William and 
Mary Chorus, composed of one hundred fifty women students, sang In many 
of the weekly chapel services and presented two concerts. The first concert was 
the Christmas carol service in Phi Beta Kappa Auditorium on December 16. At 
this concert, the chorus and choir together gave a magnificent rendition of the 
"htallelujah Chorus" from the "Messiah" by hiandel. The second concert was 
held on the fourth of May. 

Besides furnishing music for entertainment at various functions of the College 
during the year, the chorus placed emphasis on working together and finding 
enjoyment in singing. For this reason, membership In the chorus was considered 
a privilege and also one of the most enjoyable extra-curricular activities at 
William and Mary. 

The College was justly proud of Dr. Fehr and his two choral groups — the 
William and Mary Choir and Chorus. 



98 




First Row: Ruffin, Baird. Florence. Clayson, Page, Mortashed. Campbell. Cromwell, Crooker, Whaley. Pickett Second Row: Fooks. VanVolkenburgh, Wannan, 
Harcum, Schoener. Savage, Coddington, Baker. Hailman, Evans, Best, Dehart Lunas. Third Row: Barry, McKenzie. Allen, Stevenson, Schlappriizi, Rustad. Hult- 

quist, Madison. Anderson, }A cClure Holladay, Hamilton. 



CHOIR AND CHORUS 



First Row: Oouchkess. Blnney, Riddle, Mitchell. S. Smith, Gilbert. Canoles. Sat lin. Second Row: Garrison, S. Ives, Copenhavcr, Meyer, Beck. Andrews. Sylvia, 
Richardson. Korns Decker, lott. Fisheri Tine, E. Lewis, Hunt. Third Row: Miller Ha mmer, McLearen, Dallas, Cox, Lipps, Marsh. Mayfield, Johnson. Short, Gerkin, 
Craig. Allen. Curlis, Ripple, Raleigh. Laurent, Fourth Row: Pugh, Dunn, Pollard, Portney. Hughes, Wescott. Tyree. Muller. Johnson, Gibb. Taliaferro, Tal- 

madge, Jacobs, Murphy, LIngenfelter. Patterson, Marshall, Warren, Hobble. 





George Burns and President Ginny Hungerford 



THE BACK 

OFFICERS 

VIRGINIA HUNGERFORD President 

MARGARET OWENS Business Manager 

JEAN SHEPHARD Secretary 

JEREMY CLULOW Treasurer 

SUZANNE JOERNDT Historian 



Each Spring around Williamsburg, there is a series of 
nights echoing with laughter and applause. Where does it 
all come from? The Varsity Show, sponsored by the Back- 
drop Club of the College of William and Mary, of course. 
The Spring of I 954 was no exception. 

The Backdrop Club began these productions in 1938, 
and since has become one of the most outstanding organ- 
izations on the campus. The club has a membership open 



First Row; Haynes. Beeton. Rankin, Joernt, Beach, Henley. Second Row: Hamft. Stone, Owens, Bailey, Allen. Quarles. Mayfield, Portney. Owens. Michael. Brecher. 
Third Row: Shepard. Neuville. Burns. Watkins, Marshall. Fourth Row: Thomas, Williams, Oakley, Fensterer, Fifth Row: Dougherty. Pyott, Jabault, Hungerford. 




100 



DROP CLUB 

to all students interested in and attracted by the stage, its 
lights or its sets, its dance and music, or its business and 
publicity. These students conduct meetings all year, hold 
open houses for new students, and have their fantastic 
annual picnic every Spring. But the big project is their one 
production each year — the Varsity Show. Completely stu- 
dent written, directed, acted and managed, the show 
seems always to produce the best of student imagination 
and responsibility. 

Even the burning of its home. Phi Beta Kappa hiall, 
didn't stop the 1954 Varsity Show from "getting on the 
road." The campus was waiting eagerly, for the show seems 
to gain popularity like a rolling snowball and the campus 
is very proud of the work the club does. 

Here's hHow," produced this year as the seventeenth 
Varsity Show at the College of William and Mary, proved 
a little deviation from the usual variety type show that has 
been presented in the past. V/ritten by co-authors George 
Burns and Dick Fensterer, "hiere's How" was based on the 
"roarin' 20's" with a plausible plot worked in, making the 
1954 Varsity Show more like a musical comedy than ever 
before. Jazz-babies, bootleggers, and gangsters filled the 
stage for the settting, and even the inevitable flapper was 
found, with her short skirts, long pearls and, of course, the 
Charleston. 

The plot centered around a gang of bootleggers led by 
the Big Boss " who posed as a society leader named Clyde 
Van Van. Such characters as Al Cohol, the Lovable Lush, 
Mrs. T. Totaller and even Clyde Van Van's near-sighted 
wife, Ultra Van Van, helped to make the show "one of the 
best ever." 

The guiding personalities behind "Here's How" were 
outstandingly creative and capable students. Besides col- 
laborating with Dick Fensterer on writing the show, George 
Burns acted as the director. Giles Quarles was musical 
director, providing great musical talent. Mickey Mighell 
wrote the wonderfully original choreography seen through- 
out the performance. Also extremely Important in such a 
production was the excellent technical work directed by 
Bill Abelow. The work of Business Manager Margaret 
Owens was essential. And of course, guiding this whole 
student enterprise was the Backdrop Club president. Ging- 
er Hungerford. 

A round of applause reechoes for the 1954 directors, 
actors, musicians and all the members of the Backdrop Club 
that showed us all how with "Here's How." 




The William and Mary Players 




With the burning of Phi Beta Kappa Auditorium on the 
night of Decennber 29, 1953, went the scene of nnany sea- 
sons of fine theatrical productions. But the loss of the Col- 
lege's auditorium did not halt the presentations by the 
William and Mary Theatre. 

Before the fire, two plays had been presented in the 
Fall of 1953 under the direction of Miss Althea Hunt. On 
October 21 and 22, George Bernard Shaw's "You Never 
Can Tell, " a comedy in four acts, kept the student body 
well amused, thanks to the consistent good acting of such 
faithfuls to the theatre group as Len Schneider, Jeannie 
Shepard, George Burns, "Lulu" McDow, Rev Michael, 
Nancy Williams, Dick Fensterer, Jerry Clulow and Bill 
Thomas. The class in stage craft, under Al Haak, construct- 
ed the Victorian sets. 

The Theatre's second production on December 9 and 10 
brought even more applause from the college community. 



I LLI A M AND MARY THEATRE 



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Much ado about nothing 
April. 1953 



This time the audience was offered a twin bill — Strindberg's 
"The Stronger Woman," and William Soroyan's "The Beau- 
tiful People." The cast for Strindberg's somber one-act 
play consisted of Suzanne Joerndt, Marya Bednerik, and 
Florence Staples. Soroyan's irrespressibly joyful fantasy 
featured the fine performances of Martin Reymert, Clarissa 
Mayfleld, Marjorie Mighell, Leonard Schneider, Michael 
hianft. Gray Bromleigh, David Daugherty, George Burns 
and William Abelow. Mr. Sherman's scene design class de- 
signed the set, "a skeletonized version of a late Victorian 
gone-shabby house." 

The originally scheduled play, "The Circle," was can- 
celled after the fire, and replaced by "Highland Reel," a 
comic opera written by John O'Keeffe. The play was di- 
rected by Mr. hioward Scammon, and, following the two 
performances for the students on March 10 and I I, was 
presented as a regular 18th century Restoration play, run- 
ning through the Spring and Fall of 1954. The cast included 
Jeremy Clulow, William Thomas, Michael hianft, George 
Burns, Ronald Jabaut, Gray Bromleigh, William Abelow, 



Dr. Faustus 
August. 1953 



Richard Fensterer, Martin Reymert, Marjorie Mighell and 
Jean Shepard. 

The Theatre, under the direction of Miss Hunt, presented 
"Hamlet" on March 31, and April I and 2, in Blow Gym- 
nasium. The Shakespearian production featured George 
Burns as Hamlet, Howard Scammon as the King, and Diane 
Eckel as Ophelia. Also contributing to a fine cast were 
Richard Fensterer, William Thomas, Gray Bromleigh, Mary 
Elizabeth McDow, William Abelow, Ronald Jabaut, Billie 
Pyott, Dean Roberts, Lewis Saunders, Martin Reymert, Rob- 
ert Stern, Jeremy Clulow, Robert Mackey, Thornton Crox- 
ton, Michael Hanft, Ronald Nemeth, Edward Watkins, 
David Daugherty, and Virginia Hungerford. 

In 1953-54, despite the loss of stage, sets and costumes 
in the Phi Beta Kappa fire, the legendary spirit of the 
theatre shone forth in excellent dramatic work at William 
and Mary. The actors, directors, and technical staffs, stu- 
dents and faculty alike, combined to utilize all of their 
talent, imagination and energy for the entertainment and 
renown of the College. 



You never can tell 
October, 1953 



The playboy of the western world 
December, 1952 







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'^. -^ 




RESERVE 



The function of this organization throughout the year 
was to produce men capable of holding positions as com- 
missioned officers in the Field Artillery. 

The course of study followed by the Military Science 
and Tactics Department consists of two phases; each one 
is two years in length. The basic course presented to fresh- 
men and sophomores develops from an introduction to the 
basic elements of Field Artillery. The advanced course for 
juniors and seniors presents a more thorough and technical 
study of the fundamentals of Field Artillery. Juniors and 
seniors who have been selected for their scholastic ability 
are enrolled in the advanced program. 

Classes during the year were held twice weekly, with a 
two hour drill period on Wednesday afternoon supervised 
by the cadet officers under Milburn Mines, Battalion Com- 
mander. Regulation uniforms were worn both for classes 
and drills. Each Wednesday the cadets acquired the rudi- 
ments of drill and the cadet officers gained experience in 
directing men. 

Under the direction of Colonel Guy L. Pace and his staff 
officer, the Corps was organized into an Artillery Battalion 
which consised of a Headquarters Battery of drum and 
bugle corps and drill corps and three other Batteries. "A." 

"B," and "C." 

An annual six week priod of summer camp at Fort Sill, 
Oklahoma was attended by members in the advanced pro- 
gram of the Corps as a prerequisite for a reserve commis- 
sion upon graduation. This camp, which is generally at- 
tended between the third and fourth year in the military 
program, served as a highly concentrated review of tech- 
niques to be mastered in the final year of training at Wil- 
liam and Mary. It also served as a source of many hu- 
morous stories and experiences which circulated around the 
campus in the early Fall! 

Seven students enrolled in the Reserve Officers Training 
Corps were honored for their high scholastic achievements 
at the fall Honors Convocation, each receiving a citation 
for their scholastic achievement. Students thus honored 
were Milburn L. Hines, Arthur C. Thompson, Jr., Stanley 
D. Ward, J. Leroy Thompson, Paul K. Hickey, and William 
A. Wray. 

This year certain of these Distinguished Military Students 
were designated Distinguished Military Graduates, and 
from these the Department of the Army was to select those 
to receive the honor of a regular commission. 

Plans for the college session of 1954-55 indicated that 
this artillery course would be converted into a general mili- 
tary science program, the graduates receiving either Certi- 
ficates of Completion or commissions in one of the 
branches of the Army. The determination of which would 
be based on the Army's need for officers, but primarily 
on the desire of the student. It was hoped in planning this 
change that the student would benefit from a more liberal 
program and that this particular program would be more 
adaptable to the students' desires. 



Top: Summer Camp Trainees. Top Center: Chow Line at Fort Sill. 
Bottom Center: Observing Fires. Bottom: Nealey Thompson fires the 

guns. 



OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS 




Top Left: The Drill Platoon. Top Right: The Drum and Bugle Corps, Bottom Left: The Staff and Sergeants. Bottom Right: Cadet Officers 




mil 




SCABBARD AND BLADE 



The local chapter of Scabbard and Blade, a national hon- 
orary military society, was active during the year in arous- 
ing student interest in military affairs. This chapter. Com- 
pany K of the Eighth Regiment, was organized at the Col- 
lege of William and Mary in 1949, replacing the Centurion 
Club, which was established by earlier members of the Re- 
serve Officers' Training Corps. It represented on this cam- 
pus, as did one hundred other local chapters on campuses 
throughout the nation, a sincere attempt to coordinate 
student activities with the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps. 

Members were drawn this year, as they are every year, 
from the outstanding junior and senior students in the Re- 
serve Officers' Training Program, and before its elections, 
the organization boasted twelve members. 

Phil Brown, Captain for 1953-54, stated that Scabbard 
and Blade trys to increase interest among the students in 
military affairs on the national level. It also sought a 
greater understanding between civilian and military groups 
for cooperation toward military preparedness in time of na- 
tional emergencies. 



Although the group was essentially known as an honorary 
organization, social events and activities claimed some of 
the society's time. The group planned to sponsor the an- 
nual Military Ball, which in recent years has been spon- 
sored by the ROTC Department. Traditionally, it has been 
attended by the members of the Corps in full dress uni- 
form with their dates dressed in formal evening dresses. 
Certain girls were chosen by the Corps as sponsors and 
were, with their escorts, the honored guests at the gala so- 
cial event. A private banquet, Immediately preceding the 
Ball, was held by members of the society. 

Honors came to Scabbard and Blade when they won first 

prize in the first division of the float competition in the 
hlomecoming Day Parade. George Washington was sym- 
bolically chopping down a cherry tree on the gridiron and 
the caption on the sides proudly announced, 'To George 
Washington the Cherry Tree did yield, but not the Iron 
Indians on Cary Field. " 

Elections were held In the middle of the year. Officers 
of Scabbard and Blade for 1953-54 were Phil Brown, Cap- 
tain; Milburn hllnes. First Lieutenant; Joe Weller, Second 
Lieutenant; and Bud Jay, First Sergeant. 



First Row: Westberq, Ward, Metz, DeWdIt, Shrader. Second Row: Wray, M. Mines, P. Brown, Weller, Jay. Patrick. 




106 




The spirited music and precision marching of the William and Mary Band appeared at 
pep rallies, football games and the Homecoming Parade in the Fall. 

Under the baton of Mr. Varner, who came to William and Mary from Michigan State, 
the forty members of the band practiced diligently every afternoon in the Fall. Mr. 
Varner instigated double time marching and many new trick formations and song ar- 
rangements which highlighted the half-time performances of the band. 

The band, along with the drum majorettes, led by Barbara Crosset, also had the op- 
portunity to perform at the away games played at Annapolis, Maryland; Richmond, 
Virginia; and Raleigh, North Carolina. 

This year the custom was established by the band of marching off the football field in 
formation with their hats on backward after every victorious game. 

After football season, the band had as its project the formation of a concert band, 
with hopes of traveling to Richmond for a performance. 

The college applauded as Mr. Varner led a handfull of untrained students to becoming 
a larger and better band than had been seen at William and Mary for many years. 




MR. CHARLES R. VARNER 

Director 



I L L I A M AND MARY BAND 



107 



OFFICERS 

DICK BLANCHARD President 

STEVE HAMILTON Vice-President 

BERNICE MAGRUDER Secretary 

JOEL HURLEY Treasurer 

The spirited group occupying section GG in Gary Field 
Stadium at home football games was of course the William 
and Mary Pep Club. 



games were shown. The club sponsored a dance in the 
Fall, using the popular "Dragnet" theme for decorations. 

The Pep Club joined all of the campus organizations in 
helping the Student Government produce a colorful and 
exciting Homecoming Weekend, October 23, 1953. The 
club built the float for queen Barbara Crossett and her 
court. This float, which won second prize in its division, 
used as a central motif a tremendous red heart. The home- 
coming game itself was made more colorful by the Pep 
Club, armed with a knowledge of the cheers, bright pen- 




,3m&?SB^,L^^i^::^^^^^^< 



First Row. Holloddy, McCoy, Mdgfudei, jo, Ije^ond Row: Tully, Hedrick, Tyree, Johnston, t.;t,.t:.i, ^i:^,, ; .-.^,1,,. „,, _.: ::_.Mton, Lewis. D. Smith. 
Sprague, Hewson, Y. Grant, Kent, Engleburt. Wiftgate, Hurley. Third Row; J. Brown, Morgan, Best, Coogan, Griffin, VanVotkenburgli, B. Johnson. Brook. Bar- 
tholomew, Bomar, Carlson, D. Smith, Marshall, Bullock, Moiel, Kendall, Blanchard, W. Wilde, Barham, Kelalas, Kiergan, Johnson, Malvin, Orr, Jester, Johnson. 



Throughout 1953-54, the club conducted projects for the 
benefit of the student body, and held meetings where such 
plans as the use of flash cards in the bleachers were con- 
sidered. Arrangements were made for busses to take stu- 
dents to the football games in Richmond and Annapolis. 
Movies of the North Carolina State and Wake Forest 



nants, and enthusiasm to cheer the Indians on to their 
victory. 

Although less active during the basketball season, the 
club planned the entertainment for the intermissions at 
basketball games. Plans were made for an even more 
active program in 1954-55. 



T H E 



P E P 



CLUB 



108 



OFFICERS 

HENRY KAPLAN President 

RICHARD RAYBOLD Vice-President 

STANLEY MITCHEM Secretary-Treasurer 



"To encourage students to think about current prob- 
lems" is the purpose of the William and Mary Debate 
Council. The continuance and growth of this organization 



sion on social regulations concerning drinking, faculty mem- 
bers Robert J. hHart and John K. Bare, Dean of Men Joe 
D. Farrar and Student Body President Cary Scates talked 
about this problem among themselves and with members 
of the audience. Although no conclusions could definitely 
be stated, the discussion provided an opportunity for ex- 
change of ideas, and Dean Farrar was quoted as saying 
that he had "picked up a number of helpful bits of in- 
formation." 

The Council made four radio broadcasts on Richmond's 
station WRVA. In addition to debating with George Wash- 




Trent, Roper, Papkin, Kreidl, Bennett, Kaplan, Raybold, Bickford. Fisher. Riley, Lubasch. Standing: Goiwen. 



supports the record of increasing student interest in na- 
tional and campus issues. 

During 1953-54, with the wholehearted support of the 
Student Government, the Council sponsored debates on 
such issues as the regulations imposed on the students' so- 
cial life, and the purpose of the WSCGA. At the discus- 



ington University, Georgetown University and the Univer- 
sity of Richmond, the Council participated in the Grand 
National Debate Tournament held at Mary Washington 
College in Fredericksburg in the Spring. The Council also 
made plans to sponsor the Marshall-Wythe Debating 
Tournament in the Fall of I 954. 



DEBATE COUNCIL 



109 



CHI DELTA PH 



ETA SIGMA PH 



The Theta Chapter of Chi Delta Phi, national honorary 
literary society for women, had an active nriembership of 
over twenty women during the past year. Tryouts for mem- 
bership and initiations were held in the Spring and Fall. 

A highlight of the activities for the year was a recep- 
tion for John Ciardi, well-known poet, who spoke at the Phi 
Beta Kappa initiation in December. 

The members also published literary manuscripts in the 
fraternity's national magazine, The Litterateur. 



The members of Eta Sigma Phi, a national classical hon- 
orary fraternity, met once a month at which time speakers 
presented lectures of general interest to the group. 

The fraternity sponsored an open house for all ancient 
language students, and plans for the Spring included the 
presentation of excerpts from a Latin drama. Eta Sigma 
Phi attemped to foster the study of Greek and Latin and 
further the study of classical literature and the apprecia- 
tion of classical culture. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

CHI DELTA PHI 

KAY BINNS 
President 

KAY SHEILD 
Vice-President 

PAULA BLACK 

Secretary 

KAY GILMAN 
Treasurer 



First Row: Hyde, McDow Black. Binns, 
Gilman, K. Shield. Second Row: Grant, 
Grubbs, Nettles, Petitt. LeHew. Butters, 
Kent. Third Row: Spangler, M. Ives, 
Frye, Gushing. 



Seated: Marsh, Nemeth, Ewell, Mc- 

Gean. Standing: Snead, Roberts, Dr. 

Wagner, Dr. Ryan, Didlalie, Goldnnan, 

Ripley. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

ETA SIGMA PHI 

ROLAND NEMETH 
President 

MARIANNE MARSH 
Vice-President 

DEAN ROBERTS 

Treasurer 

PHILIP SNEAD 

Recording Secretary 

ISABELLA RUBERT 
Corresponding Secretary 

DR. GEORGE RYAN 

Advisor 





OFFICERS 

OF 

KAPPA CHI KAPPA 

PEARLE RAY KEY 
President 

MARGIE THOMAS 

Vice-President 

ANN SOBERS 
Secretary 

BETSY JAMES 

Treasurer 

ANNE HOWARD 
Girl Scout Chairman 

CAROL DAVIS 
Program Chairman 



First Row: Howard, Key, M. Thomas. 
Second Row: Grlnnan, Outten. Kane, 
Third Row: Donnelly. J. Thompson, 
Higby, James. Callahan. Fourth Row: 
Elias. Sobers. B. Smith. 



First Row: Meyers, Huff, Fichtenger. 
Second Row: Springer. Henderson. 
Shriver, Carr. Third Row: Torrence, 
Ivie. BInns. Parr, Crovo. Gilman, M. 
Ives. LeHew, Key. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

KAPPA DELTA PI 

MARGUERITE HUFF 
President 

ANN FICHTENGER 

Vice-President 

PEARLE RAY KEY 

Secretary 

BARBARA CROVO 
Treasurer 



Kappa Chi Kappa, which is a national fraternity, worked 
toward the goals of serving the College, the community, 
and the Girl Scouts. All women students interested in such 
service could belong, each member becoming a co-leader 
of a Girl Scout troop in Williamsburg. Other services to 
the community which Kappa Chi Kappa contributed in- 
cluded making trays at Thanksgiving and Christmas for the 
Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, and making Christ- 
mas favors for children's hospitals in Richmond. 



Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary fraternity in educa- 
tion, chose its members for outstanding work in education. 
The activities of Kappa Delta Pi during the past year in- 
cluded a banquet at the Williamsburg Lodge and a recep- 
tion for Matthew Whaley teachers. During the year mem- 
bers spoke in their home town high schools on education as 
a career. The members also conducted a survey of the 
freshman and sophomore classes to find how many students 
were interested in a career in education. 



KAPPA CHI KAPPA KAPPA DELTA PI 



111 



p I 



DELTA 



P H I 



First Row: Mrs, Armstrong, Mr, Morfit Uzzle Spanqler, Second Row: Mr, McCary M'. Reboussin. 
Rudin, 'K. Shield, B, Barker, Rip'^^ 



OFFICERS 

SARAH DEAN SPANGLER 
President 

ANNE UZZELL 

Vice-President 

BARBARA BARKER 

Secretary 

ROBERT RIPLEY 
Treasurer 



With the purpose to present a 
wider knowledge of and a greater 
love for the contributions of 
France to world culture, the French 
honor society, Pi Delta Phi, spon- 
sored several projects this year. In 
the Fall, the project was to read 
a modern French novel for inter- 
pretation by group discussion. A 
banquet was held at Thieme's us- 
ing French manners, food, and con- 
versation. New members were initi- 
ated in the Spring, honoring stu- 
dents who have excelled In French. 



OFFICERS 

ANN DIETRICH 
President 

DIANA MARSH 
Vice-President 

JOAN ERO 
Secretary-Treasurer 

MR. JOHN MOORE 
Advisor 



Sigma Delta Pi, national honor- 
ary Spanish fraternity, claimed 
seven active and eight honorary 
members on campus. Included in 
the organization were faculty rep- 
resentatives of the department of 
modern languages. 

The purpose of the fraternity 
Is to reward excellence In Spanish 
scholarship and to further knowl- 
edge of Hispanic culture. Two Initi- 
ations were held. All formal meet- 
ings and inltatlons were conducted 
In Spanish. 

In December, Ann Dietrich rep- 
reseted the fraternity at the Na- 
tional Triennial Convention in Chi- 
cago. 




First Row; Handy. Second Row: Dietrich, Mrs. Armstrong, D. Marsh. Puqh. Standing: Mr. 
Hoftman, Arrow, Pool. Mr. Moore. 



S I G 



A 



DELTA 



P I 



112 



PHI ALPHA DELTA 



Seated: Lester, Shebell, Bucheit, Phillips, Athey. Standing: Carter. Hall, Moore, Williams, 

Menus. Banks. 




Seated: Abelow, Fensterer, Miss Hunt, W. Thomas Joerndt Burns, N. Williams, Hungerford. 
Standing: Clulow, Shepard, Mr. Scammon, McDow, Michael, Huff. 



OFFICERS 

PETER SHEBELL 
Justice 

RICHARD JACK BUCHHEIT 
vice-Justice 

THOMAS ATHEY 
Clerk 

SAM PHILLIPS 

Treasurer 

BILL FORBES 
Marshal 



the Spring of 1953, the 
George Wythe Chapter of Phi 
Alpha Delta, one of the largest of 
the law fraternities, was chartered 
at William and Mary. Only law stu- 
dents with a 1.2 scholastic average 
are eligible for membership. 

Phi Alpha Delta tries to help its 
members obtain jobs, and keeps up 
a law student directory for the 
alumnae membership. 

In the Spring, in conjunction with 
the Wythe Law Club, Phi Alpha 
Delta held a moot court. 



OFFICERS 

SUE JOERNDT 

President 

REV MICHAEL 
Vice-President 

BILL THOMAS 

Secretary 

MARY ELIZABETH McDOW 
Treasurer 

Sunday afternoons found Susie 
Joerndt, president of Theta Alpha 
Phi, presiding over the fifteen 
members of this national honor- 
ary dramatic fraternity. Either a 
leading role in two plays, or an 
assistant directorship and being 
head of any of the technical staffs 
made one eligible for membership. 

During the past year, Theta 
Alpha Phi took over the redecora- 
tion of the Green Room In Phi 
Beta Kappa Hall. Their annual 
Christmas fireside party was held 
In Wren kitchen. 



THETA ALPHA PHI 



113 



RED CROSS UNIT 



On Floor: Little, Peyton. Seated: Lockwood. Parker, Gushing, Woodfield. Bettiger, Wright, 
Standing: Frye, Hill, Meschutt, Pugh, J. Johnson Gibb, Crosset, Morgan. Topping. 




Knight, Gdtth, Dc Forrest, Herkness, Dr. Baldwin. Dr, Bucklln, Wilkinson. Eanes, Derr, Novak, 
Rudolph, Stubbs, E. Coco. Rissinger, Gove. 

BIOLOGY 



OFFICERS 

MADGE GUSHING 

President 

GLORIA HILL 

Secretary 

ANN PARKER 

Treasurer 



The Red Cross proved to be an active 
organization on the campus and in the 
community. In December, the Red Cross 
sponsored the visit of the Blood Mobile 
to Williamsburg. The members also helped 
w/ith supplies at Eastern State and this 
year made place mats for the Thanlcsgiv- 
ing meal at the institution. 

Club members also participated in the 
courses In Grey Lady work offered at East- 
ern State. The club sponsored the Nation- 
al Red Cross fund drive on campus. 



OFFICERS 

WALTER HERKNESS 
President 

TREAZURE RISSINGER 

Vice-President 

HENRETTA TRENT 
Secretary 

MARY ANN GARTH 
Treasurer 



Biology Club members met throughouf 
the year for lectures and movies on vari- 
ous phases of the study of biology. They 
planned field trips to Yorlctown and to 
Dismal Swamp for the spring semester. In 
November. Dr. Herman Forest spoke on 
his graduate work on algae. 

Although the activities were of interest 
chiefly to biology majors, the meetings 
were open to any students interested in 
hearing a particular lecture or seeing a 
particular movie, 

CLUB 



114 



FRENCH 



CLUB 



OFFICERS 

BEV CLASON 
President 

ANNE UZZELL 

Vice-President 

PHIL THORP 

Secretary-Treasurer 

ALICE LUCAS 

Program Chairman 



The French Club functioned to help 
students taking French become better ac- 
quainted with the French language and 
customs. Meetings were held monthly 
throughout the year for which a variety 
of speakers, movies, parties, and other 
entertainment was planned. Any students, 
whether they took French or not, were 
Invited to these meetings, where they 
could hear about French plays, art, and 
ways of life. Featured at the Christmas 
party was the singing of French carols. 



OFFICERS 

DIANA MARSH 
President 

PAM POOL 
Vice-President 

CAROLE PUSH 

Secretary-Treasurer 

JERRY KORNBLUM 

Publicity Chairman 

DR. JAMES D.CARTER, JR. 

Advisor 

Spanish festivals seems to be the excuse 
■for parties throughout the year for Span- 
ish Club members. During December they 
held a Christmas banquet at Thieme's 
which was designed to be typical of those 
held in Spain and South America. 
Thieme's must have taken on a foreign 
atmosphere that night! 

Meetings each month included con- 
structive and entertaining programs. The 
club was open to all students interested 
In Spanish and Spanish culture. 



First Row: Cljyson. Lucas. Wood, Second Row: Moody, B. Miller, Oakley Gatlin Croxton 

Third Row: Paqe, D. Miller, Mott, Somervllle, Wells, Heck. Fourtti Row: Garwood' Edwards 

Mrs. Armstrong, Mr. Reboussin, Beery, Simmons. Daniel, Fairbanks, Luhring. Fifth Row:' Swearlnq- 

ton. Raybold, Bell, MItchem. Boenitsch. Lemos. Walker. Mitchell Frayser 




Seated: Rubert. DeHart. Dietrich, Crews, Kornblum, Oakley. Puqh. Hancock. Hardy. Engleburl 
Edwards, Kctcham, Portney, Burkett, E. Smith, B. Marsh. Standing: D. Marsh, Dr. Carter. 



SPANISH 



CLUB 



115 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 



PRE-MED CLUB 



The future chemists and atomic scientists composed this 
group known as the Chemistry Club, which is affiliated with 
the American Chemical Society. At their meetings, they 
gained experience in presenting technical subjects to a 
technical audience. 

The members supervised and coordinated the displays 
of the chemistry department in the Science Open hlouse 
and presented a magic show at that time. Also socially 
minded, they went on a picnic and held a banquet at 
Chowning's. 



To be a future doctor or dentist of America! That has 
been the aim of the members of the Pre-Med Club. Under 
the sponsorship of Dr. Baldwin, the student members learn- 
ed to acquaint themselves with the difficulties and bene- 
fits of their future profession. 

Members of the medical and dental profession were in- 
vited to speak at the club meetings. A field trip to the 
Medical College of Virginia was also on the agenda. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

GORDON LINK 
President 

DON JENKINS 

Secretary-Treasurer 

JOHN MARSH 
Member-at-Large 

DR. GEORGE D. SANDS 

Sponsor 



First Row: Link. Mathes, Dr. Sands, Dr. 
Armstrong, Warner, Mr. Kati. Dr. 
Guy. Second Row; Marsh Bernhardt, 
Bain, Halbrook, Grant. Sadler. Jenkins. 
Noble. Lyon, Anderson. Jamison, 
Robinson, Boberg. 



First Row: Bernhardt, Wingate, Scheer, 
Kesler. Glasser. Thiele, Wood. Moon. 
Second Row: A. Clark Ward Bain, 
Hoff. M. Miller. Warner, B. Lynn, 
Grubbs, Wilkinson, Popkin. Feldman. 
Dunkle, Eisenberg. Third Row: Bullock. 
Hoi brook, J, Marsh. Rumble. Gold- 
berg. Fisher, Kontopanos, Damsky, 
Saxe, Joachim Mullen. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

PRE-MED CLUB 

BOB WILKINSON 
President 

TIM MOON 
Vice-President 

GARY JOACHIM 

Secretar-Treasurer 

DR. JOHN T. BALDWIN, JR. 
Advisor 





OFFICERS 

OF 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

CLUB 

EARL PALMER 

President 

BILL WILLIAMS 
Vice-President 

SHIRLEY STAUBS 

Secretary 

NANCY GARWOOD 
Treasurer 



First Row: McLearen Mauro. Sappinq- 
ton. Second Row: [ 
Denon, Bickford, B 
Third Row: Garwood, 
Hill, Stephenson, 
Fourth Row: Seiler, 
Crdbili M. Broaddui, D. Smith. Grin- 
nan. Fifth Rdw: Goodwin, Melion, Ray- 
mond, VanVol ken burgh, Alexander, 
Douchkess. Sixth Row: Barry, Crowther, 
Fooks. 



Jonei, Pontius, 
Diggs, Taliaferro. 
Dr. Chou. Staubs, 
Baroffio, Hurst, 
Gibbons, Wells, 



Hall Kanter, Ormerod, Owens, Tall, 
ferro, Carb. Topping. Glover, Onlfe 



OFFICERS 

OF 

LITERATURE CLUB 

PEGGY HALL 

President 

JEAN ANDREWS 
Vice-President 

JANE TOPPING 
Secretary-Treasurer 



The year saw the organization of a new club on campus 
in the formation of an active group for the discussion and 
study of political science. Speakers, often state and na- 
tional political leaders, presented their experiences and 
theories on the subject at the meetings of the club. 

President Earl Palmer stated the major aim of the Polit- 
ical Science Club as being an effort to create an atmos- 
phere for intellectual discussion and to help bring faculty 
and students closer together. 



The first Tuesday of every month found members of the 
Literature Club engaged in discussions dealing with the 
entire field of writing, including the adventures of "Pogo." 

Members of this club were people interested in the 
great writings of the past and present. The guest speaker 
at each meeting was a member of the college faculty. The 
club also rented films, such as 'Henry V," to be shown in 
the early afternoon free of charge at the Williamsburg 
Theater. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB LITERATURE CLUB 



117 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



OFFICERS 



ROBERTA WADLEY 

President 



MARVIN THOMAS 
Vice-President 

ANNE HOWARD 

Treasurer 

DR. JAMES W. MILLER 

Advisor 



The informal atmosphere of Dr. 
James W. Miller's home was the 
setting for the meetings of the 
Philosophy Club. 

Speakers for these meetings 
were obtained from the philosophy 
department and other departments 
of the College, as well as from 
out-of-town institutions and organ- 
izations. The decline of modern 
political theory and the beliefs of 
ancient philosophers were typical 
topics of discussion. After the 
speaker had presented his views, 
the members contributed their 
thoughts and opinions. 



OFFICERS 



WILLIAM WAGMAN 

President 

'JOHN LAUGHLIN 
Vice-President 

JOAN FRENCH 
Secretary 

MARSEL SETTLE 

Treasurer 

DR. STANLEY WILLIAMS 
Advisor 

The psychology club was open to 
psychology majors interested In 
gaining more information on topics 
not covered in their classes. At 
meetings, members of the psychol- 
ogy department presented talks, 
usually followed by lively discus- 
sions and demonstrations,. 

Meetings were held once a 
month; between meetings the club 
visited Eastern State to help the 
institution wherever possible. Here 
they were able to observe ex- 
amples of abnormal psychology in 
connection with the problems they 
had been studying. 



First Row: Dr. Frisch, Dr. Miller, Dr. B. Rome, Dr. S. Rome. Second Row: Lubasch, Wadley. Hyde, 
Molzer, McCalla, Black, Kane. Howard. Key. Third Row; Andrews, Chapman, Salinger, Day, 
Mitch urn O. Lewis R. Lewis, Williams, Pierce. Palmer, Bergson Goldman, Weinitein Zalser, 

Jewett. 




First Row: Nettles. Von Schilling, Shrtver, Meschutf, Giden. M. Thomas. G, Stone, Greenberger, 

Parr. Second Row: McCall, Zuidema, Dr. Williams. Wagnian, llifl, W. Marshall, J. Mercer. R. 

Johnson, Jenkins, McLaughlin, Orr, R. Lewis, French. Clulow, Settle. R. Jones. 



PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 



IIS 



ACCOUNTING CLUB 





Seated: Vliet, Jay, Lawrence. Beam. Standing: Mr. Rawls, DeWalt, Blendon, White, Kepley. 
MaurizI, Gresham, Thompson. Klein. Butler, Tyson. McGeeln, Drake. Shrader. 



OFFICERS 



CLAREN FORE 
President 

WARREN WEISS 
Vice-President 

BARBARA ALLEN 

Secretary 

MICKEY MAC COY 
Treasurer 

MR. WAYNE F, GIBBS 

Advisor 



At the meetings of the Account- 
ing Club, accoun+ants and repre- 
sentatives from business firnns pre- 
sented various aspects of the pro- 
fession and technical problems in- 
volved. Through their talks and dis- 
cussions, students In this pre-pro- 
fessional course learned about the 
salaries and opportunities that they 
could expect. Thus they were bet- 
ter able to decide if this were 
the career in which they were in- 
terested. 

In the Fall, the club enjoyed a 
party af the home of Mr. Gibbs. 
their advisor. 



This national professional society 
for students in business, economics, 
and government presented valu- 
able experiences for our future 
businessmen. The activities includ- 
ed field trips, outside speakers, and 
dinner meetings wilh businessmen 
of the area. The year's high point 
was an all day meeting and supper 
program with the Richmond par- 
ent chapter. This trip to Richmond 
also included a tour of two plants. 

OFFICERS 



GORDON VLIET 
President 

BUD JAY 

Vice-President 

ROBERT LAWRENCE 
Secretary 

JAMES SHRADER 

Treasurer 

MR. RAYMOND RAWLS 
Advisor 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT 



119 



Y T H E 



L A 



CLUB 




OFFICERS 

JACK BUCHHEIT 
Chancellor 

HENRY MULLINS 

Vice-Chancello'' 

JULIA WILLIS 

Clerk 

SAM PHILLIPS 
Bailiff 

PETE SHEBELL 
Reporter 

The Wythe Law Club constitutes the 
student government of the graduate law 

students. This group not only serves as 
the representative body, but also as a 
social club. 

The Wythe Law Club entered a team 
in the National Moot Court Competition, 
and also sponsored a Moot Trial for the 
class in Introductory Law. Regional con- 
ferences were attended by representatives 
of the group, and It Is affiliated with a 
national group giving It national standing. 



First Row: Messick, Dr. Cormack, Willis. Tru- 

don, AtheY. Second Row; Reveille. Irooks. 

Morewtti. Matsey. Laurence. Phillips. Dr. 

Woodbridge. Buchheit, MuMins. 



First Row: Segal. Marih Springer, Dunkle. 
Pillow. Second Row: Montgomery. Hebrony, 
Richmond, Zalser, Jordan, Marsh, Williams. 
Reynolds. Third Row: Vllet, Molineux, Hillman, 
Ward. Pfelfer, Tucker Twomey. 

OFFICERS 
JOYCE SPRINGER 

President 

JOHN MARSH 
Vice-President 

EILEEN SEGAL 

Recording Secretary 

JANE PILLOW 
Corresponding Secretary 

DAVE DUNKLE 

Treasurer 

Religious Emphasis Week, Union Sup- 
pers, and weekly chapel services for the 
students were a few of the activities of 
the Student Religious Union, the inter- 
denominational organization of William 
and Mary. The S.R.U.. composed of rep- 
resentatives of various campus religious 
youth groups, attempted to promote un- 
derstanding among religious faiths and 
denominations and coordinate religious 
activities on campus. This group has in- 
creased the Importance of religion in 
campus life by bringing together college 
leaders for this purpose. 



STUDENT RELIGIOUS UNION 



120 



B A L F U R - H I L L E L CLUB 



OFFICERS 

SHEILA HEBRONY 
President 

BARRY LEVY 
Vice-President 

WILLA SIEGEL 
Secretar/ 

JOEL HURLEY 
Treasurer 

RABBI JESSE FINKLE 
Treasurer 



Balfour-Hillel continued to fulfill their 
alms of providing a cultural and religious 
program for Jewish students at William 
and Mary and of encouraging a social 
program in which all Jewish students 
could get to know each other better. The 
club, sponsored by National Hillel. held 
Sunday morning breakfasts in the Dodge 
Room and conducted Friday evening serv- 
ices in Wren Chapel. 



OFFICERS 

JOHN TUCKER 
President 

DIANE HALL 

Secretary 

MING CHANG 
Treasurer 

MRS. W. P. BARCHELDER 

Advisor 

HARLAN REYNOLDS 
S.R.U. Representative 



In the furtherance of its purpose of 
making Christianity a functional part of 
college life, the Baptist Student Union 
sponsored many and varied activities. 
B.S.U. met weekly for Sunday night sup- 
pers followed by programs which included 
speakers, movies, discussions, devotionals 
and slngsplratlons. The following students 
held the vice-president positions: Jo Ann 
Spltler, Winifred Ward. Mary Lou Pardue, 
Marjorle Benson. Becky Corbitt. Mary 
North. 




BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 



121 



CANTERBURY CLUB NEWMAN CLUB 



Episcopal students met every Sunday night at Bruton 
Parish hlouse for supper. After the meal, there were busi- 
ness meetings, followed by a social gathering. The religious 
program of the group included opportunities for lay read- 
ing and choral singing. 

The group enjoyed several picnics, a retreat, and their 
annual Mardi Gras party, which was held just before the 
Lenten season. Before Christmas vacation, Canterbury Club 
held their annual Christmas banquet and party. 



The Newman Club, the youth fellowship of the Roman 
Catholic Church, sponsored numerous worthwhile activ- 
ities during the past year. 

On Sundays, discussions of interest to everyone were 
held. These were followed later in the evening by refresh- 
ments and games. 

Early in December, the Pre-Cana Conference was held. 
This was a pre-marriage course, which was led by Dr. 
Michael. Also in December, Dr. Burns of Richmond spoke 
on marriage. 



OFFICERS 

OF 

CANTERBURY CLUB 

CALVIN TENNIS 
Senior Warden 

PHIL THORP 

Junior Warden 

JOHN HUMMEL 

Treasurer 

DAPHNA SMITH 

Secretary 

MR. HERBERT TUCKER 

Advisor 



OFFICERS 

OF 

NEWMAN CLUB 

6ILL TWOMEY 
President 

HARRY DESAMPER 
Vice-President 

CHRIS MONTGOMERY 

Secretary 

JUDY BUCKERT 

Treasurer 





OFFICERS 

OF 

WESLEY FOUNDATION 

STAN BAIN 
President 

DOLORES DIGGS 

vice-President 

FLORENCE DEHART 
Secretary 

JOHN MARSH 

Treasurer 




OFFICERS 

OF 

WESTMINSTER 

FELLOWSHIP 

GORDON VLIET 
President 

SAM MITCHELL 

Vice-President 

MARILYN ZAISER 
Secretary 

CAROL PETRIE 

Treasurer 



The Wesley Foundation's activities for Methodist stu- 
dents in 1953-54 were many and varied. They included a 
Coffee Discussion Hour on Sunday mornings, Sunday night 
programs of worship followed by informal fellowship, and 
Friday night open houses. Monthly suppers were also held 
by the group. 

Their pagent at Christmas, "Thine Is The Power," con- 
sisted of drama, music, and a speaking choir. 

Movies were also shown. Including one on the Bible, en- 
titled "Book of the World for Tomorrow." 



Food, fun and fellowship highlighted the Presbyterian 
Supper Clubber's year. The group, divided Into commis- 
sions, took turns at preparing the Sunday night meals, put- 
ting out the newspaper, "The Prattler,"" and conducting the 
worship service. 

Following the meals, there were movies and discussions 
on such topics as marriage and divorce. A song period was 
generally Included, as well as talks by out-of-town guests. 

The group made a Christmas visit to Dunbar, and held a 
dinner at Thieme's afterward. 



WESLEY FOUNDATION WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP 



123 



FRATERNITIES 





OFFICERS 
Crenier. Krrwin, Jameson, Lowe. Wallace. Hearn, Hillman 

THETA DELTA CH 

Theta Delta Chi the oldest fraternity on the William 
and Mary campus . . . Epsilon Charge established in 
1853 . . . First Fraternity to use a pledge pin, have an 
official flag, issue an official publication, and adopt an 
official flower and colors . . . Chapter active in publi- 
cations . . . Claimed Jim Todhunter, new editor of the 
"Flat h^at" . . . On the calendar of social events was 
the Founders Day Banquet in the fall . . . Faculty and 
administration joined brothers and their dates at the 
annual Egg Nog Party before Christmas . . . Costume 
Dance was held in the fall and Dinner Dance was held 
In the Spring. 




EPSILON CHAPTER 








First Row: Jules Bacal, Ralph Belford, Edward Coco, Robert Coco. 

Peter Crenler, Carl Gleg. 

Second Row: Randolph Hall, Hosey Hearn, Thomas Hillman, William 

Howser, Joel Jamison, Kent Kirwan, 

Third Row: Brad Lesher, Otto Lowe. James Mclnnes, John Mitchell. 

Martin Mountain, Allan Roby, 



Fourth Row: Paul Ruttowski. George Seller. Dennis Smith, Jerry 
Sparks, Josh Thompson, Jim Todhunter. 

Fifth Row: William Twomey, Robert Wallace, Robert Wilkinson, 
Stewart Wood. 



127 




VIRGINIA KAPPA CHAPTER 









ikl^M 





D P 








^t-. 



xt / M 




First Row: Guy Allen, George Becouvaralcis. John Becouvarakis. 
Thomas Boberg, Ralph Brlghtwell, William Brink, Douq Brockman, 
Tom Burke. 

Second Row; Joseph Cardaci, James Cockerille, Charles Cornell, 
James Daigle, Dan Dechert, Harry De Samper, Tad Dixon, Paul Du- 
vail. 

Third Row: Pete Freeaut, James Heatherinqton, Lloyd Mines, William 
Humbert, Ralph James, Edward Jay, Mike Jordan, Kermit Land. 



Fourth Row: Mickey Lassiter, Rhea Lazarus, James Mark, Thomas Mar- 
tin, Cecil Moore, Read Morton, Gerald Murchison, Frank Paskert. 

Fifth Row: William Patton, Charles Piluso, Louis Pomponio, Robert 
Reveille, Tom Rink, James Robertson, Wilson Sweeney, Arthur Thomp- 
son. 

Sixth Row: Joseph Weiler, Tony Werner. John Westbera, Fred Wil- 
son, Donald Wood, Tony Yurko. 



128 




OFFICERS 

Cardaci. Thompson, Weller, Bobetq 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

The Virginia Kappa Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
was established at William and Mary in 1857, one year 
after its founding at the University of Alabama . . . 
Brothers take an active part in athletics . . . Tommy Mar- 
tin football team co-captain . . . Outstanding members 
Bud Jay, president of the senior class, John Westberg, 
editor of the COLONIAL ECHO and Bill Brink, presi- 
dent of the Interfraternity Council . . . Social season in- 
cluded the Founders Day Banquet in March at the 
Williamsburg Lodge, a formal Spring Dance in April 
and a picnic at Jamestown in May. 







OFFICERS 

Spivey. Howard, Brown, Griffin 

PI KAPPA ALPHA 

PI Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded on March I, 
I 868, at the University ot Virginia . . . Gamma Chapter 
was established on the William and Mary campus three 
years later in 1871 ... Pi Kappa Alpha was confined 
to the South for the first forty-one years of its history 
. . . Members active in campus life . . . Brothers active 
in intramural sports and varsity sports . . . Omicron 
Delta Kappa claimed Phil Brown . . . Founders Day, 
March I , was celebrated with a dinner and dance . . . 
Social events also included the annual fall Shipwreck 
Dance and the Christmas Dance. 




r 



GAMMA CHAPTER 




»■ 



L^. 




First Row: Vernon Arvin. Fred Aucamp, Grey Bronnleigh, Philip 

Brown. James Carter, Harry De Walt. 

Second Row: Jannes Duff. William Griffin. Charles Gutherie. Tom 

Guthrie. Roland Howard, Bert Levy. 

Third Row: Mark McCormack, Wayne Marshall, Otis Odell, Tom 

Rardln. Russ Redmond. Joseph Reynolds. 



Fourth Row: Frank Riley. John Risjord, Richard Rowlett, Stewart 

Sell, Edward Snider, Donald Splvey. 

Fifth Row: James Surratt, James Thomson, Robert Tyson, William 

Wray. 



131 




ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER 




First Row: Wayne Adams, Gerald Angermann, Robert Banks, Robert 

Crandall, Curtis Dozier, Tom Eley, Robert Forrest. 

Second Row: John Fuller, Rufus Gordon, Robert Grlgsby, Harry 

Hager, Channing Hall, George Hall, Steve Hamilton. 

Third Row: George Haycox, Raymond Kell, Luther Kiger, Montgomery 

Knight, Adolphus Lunsford, William Mathes, William Neal. 



Fourth Row: John Parker, Doug Proffitt, Bruce Rumage, Harold Rum- 
bel, William Rundio, Cary Scates, Robert Sprouse. 
Fifth Row: John Stanley, Scott Stone, Wallace Stubbs, Stanley Ward, 
R. L. Whitfield. John Williams, Larry Young. 



132 




OFFICERS 
Haycox, Stone, Ward, Neal 



KAPPA ALPHA ORDER 

First Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order was founded at 
Washington and Lee University with the aid of Generaf 
Robert E. Lee, then president of the College . . . Alpha 
Zeta Chapter founded at William and Mary in 1890 
. . . Members active in intramural sports and In student 
government . . . Outstanding member was Cary Scates 
as president of the student body . . . Social events in- 
cluded the Black and White Ball, and the Christmas 
Serenade when Santa Claus presented candy canes to 
the girls . . . also on the social calendar were the annual 
Southern Ball and Confederate Parade in May. 








j^U...,tiHt 






OFFICERS 

Reagan. Tennis. Kinder, Mac Coy. Phillips. Laughlin, Marsh 



KAPPA SIGMA 

Nu Chapter of Kappa Sigma was established at Wll- 
iam and Mary in 1890 . . . Kappa Sigma was founded 
at the University of Virginia in 1869 . . . Chapter led 
in fraternity scholastic honors . . . Outstanding In lead- 
ership, Kappa Sigma claimed members active in all 
classes of student government and in athletics . . . 
Mickey McCoy as head cheerleader . . . Omicron 
Delta Kappa claimed John Laughlin as president, John 
Marsh, Mickey McCoy and Dick Clark ... Phi Beta 
Kappa claimed John Laughlin . . . Prominent among 
social events were the Sweetheart Ball at which Sarah 
Fann Deibert was crowned Chapter Sweetheart, and 
the Kappa Sigma week-end in April. 



NU CHAPTER 












X, 



P ?r' P P* {--" fi-' 

V*J I'^-' jCT^' O J!J| (-J /f>r-> C^ 






First Row: Richard Blanchard. Richard Clark, Vernon Clatterbaugh, 
Floyd Craig, Dino Costas, Charles Dix, John Fay, Richard Fowler. 
Second Row: Russell Gills, Robert Hallett, Alex Harper, Walter Herk- 
ns'ss, Walter Herrmann, Lome Hiclcs, Richard Holzbach, Herndon 
Jenkins. 

Third Row: Thomas Kenyon, John Kepley, Joseph Kinder, John 
Laughlin, Gordon Link, Mickey MacCoy, Earl McNeal, John Mahoney. 



Fourth Row: John Marsh. Martin Miler. William Moiineux, Norman 
Moomjian, John Ottaway, Ed Phillips, Jack Reagan, Dean Roberts. 
Fifth Row: Don Smith, Phillip Snead, Carl Spies, Mason Swann, Calvin 
Tennis, John Ulrich, Edward Watkins, Jack White. 
Sixth Row: Carlton Wilde, William Wilde. 



135 




ALPHA THETA CHAPTER 









Mk#ifii 




First Row: Thomas Athey, Peter Austin, James Brown, William Butler, 
Earl Call, Howard Cline, Jerry Clulow. 

Second Row: Charles Cottrell, Ronald Drake, Ross Fillon, Peter 
Griffin, Paul Hickey, Wayne Jones, Donald Kendall. 



Third Row: Robert Lawrence, Oren Lewis, Ackley Melson, David 

Metj, Earl Palmer, Robert Patrick, Carl Pearl. 

Fourth Row: Sam Phillips, Tony Pierson, Jack Place. William Ragland, 

Edward Ray, Charles Sewall, James Shrader. 

Fifth Row: Gordon Vliet, James White, William White. 



136 




OFFICERS 

Drake, Place, Butler. Berfyman 



PHI KAPPA TAU 

Alpha Theta Chapter of Phi Kappa Tau was estab- 
lished on the William and Mary campus in 1926 . . . 
The fraternity was founded at the University of Miami 
in Ohio . . . The Chapter float took first place in the 
hlomecoming Parade . . . Members represented in stu- 
dent publications, in campus activities and in student 
government . . . Omicron Delta Kappa claimed Jack 
Place . . . Social calendar included the annual Winter 
and Spring Formal Dances . . . Founders Day was 
celebrated with a banquet at the Williamsburg Lodge 
. . . Joan Danskin was chosen as chapter sweetheart. 




OFFICERS 

M!lkovich, May, Basket, Lowe 




LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 

Epsilon Alpha Chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha was es- 
stablished at William and Mary in 1927 . . . Was the 
73rd chapter of one of the largest national fraternities 
. . . Members outstanding in athletics . . . Steve Mil- 
kovich co-captain of the football team . . . Social events 
included a hialloween Costume Party, a Christmas 
Formal in the Great Hall, and a Spring Formal in the 
Pagoda Room . . . Founders Day, in November, was 
celebrated with a State Ball In Richmond . . . Betty 
Edwards was chosen Chapter Sweetheart. 




EPSILON ALPHA CHAPTER 












^^ 








First Row: Glenn Bailey. Gene Barham, Carol Basketf, Roy Bourne, 

William Bownnan, James Bryden, David Carico. 

Second Row: Lee Caswell, John Cayward, Ming Chang, George 

Cicala, George Dail, Henry Dressel. Francis Duval. 

Third Row: William Fitzhugh, Claren Fore, William Franklin, Robert 

Gibbons. Howard Golwen, Gill Granger, Thomas Hamilton. 



Fourth Row: Edward Hill, Kent Jacqmein, Beverly Johnson, Warren 

Low, Doug Mason, William May, Steve Milkovich. 

Fifth Row: William Moseley, Hal Posey, Ralph RIgby, Leo Schutte, 

Donald Seiler, Peter Shebell, Robert Smith. 

Sixth Row: Horace Speed, Leroy Thompson, Edward Trice William 

Wells. 



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ALPHA CHAPTER 




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First Row: Ira Breeder, Nathan Carb, William Dick, Clifford Eriksen, 
Richard Fensterer, Milton Glasser. 

Second Row: Minton Goldman, Gerald Gordon, Ralph Goulston, 
John Hannold, Roger Hill, Fredrick La Croix. 



Third Row: Donald Lawrence, Tonnas Meadow, Alvin Moses. Roger 
Ormerod, David Rubenstein. David Scheer. 

Fourth Row: Gerald Schneider, John Scozzari, Lewis Young, Ronald 
Zuckerman, 



140 




Lawrence Young Goldman, Hirsch. Scoiiari Rubenstein Glasser 

PI DELTA KAPPA 

Alpha Chapter of Pi Delta Kappa Fraternity was 
founded at William and Mary on February 26, 1954 
by a group of fraternity men who believed that the 
true meaning of brotherhood could best be established 
by means of a local organization . . . Among other 
advantages, they felt that it enabled them to promote 
a truly nonsectarian brotherhood, unencumbered by 
national rules and regulations as regards race and re- 
ligion ... Pi Deak top scholastic fraternity on campus 
. . . Brothers active in campus publications, including 
"Flat hHat" sports editor Nate Carb . . . Members active 
in student organizations including the W&M Theater 
and Debate Council . . . Social events included a 
Winter Formal, Spring Formal, senior banquet, a hay- 
ride to Yorktown and a pledge-brother party. 






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OFFICERS 

Trent, Weiss. Neuville. Abelow, Stern, Goldberg. Silver 



PI LAMBDA PH 



Virginia PsI Chapter of Pi Lambda Phi was established 
at William and Mary in 1929 . . . Fraternity was found- 
ed at Yale University in 1865 ... A brotherhood which 
recognizes men on the basis of their ablity, ideals, and 
forward looking attitude . . . Members represented in 
campus activities and student government . . . Warren 
Weiss claimed by Omicron Delta Kappa . . . Founders 
Day was celebrated in March . . . Social events in- 
cluded formal dances in the fall and in the spring . . . 
also held two picnics . . . Brothers chose Suzanne 
Joerndt as the Chapter Sweetheart. 




VIRGINIA PSI CHAPTER 











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First Row: William Abelow, Joseph Bell. Richard Bennett, Herbert 
Blstrong, Joel Blenden. Jack Buchheit. Donald Comiter. 
Second Row: Stephen Diamond, Eugene Dietrich, Simon Eisenberg, 
Ronald Eisener, Robert Feldman, Dante Fiorini, Allen Garfield. 
Third Row: Herbert Goldberg, Herbert Goldstein, Edward Gray, 
Michael Hanft, Gary Joachim, Henry Kaplan, John Kontopanos. 



i^ftl^f^ 



Fourth Row: Harvey Lasty, Morton Lembecit, Ira Levine, William 
Levine, Herbert Masnil(, Arthur Meyers. Edward Miller. 
Fifth Row: Roland Nemeth. Robert Neuville, Gene Newman. Bruce 
Saxe, Leonard Silver. Robert Stern. Peter Stromberg. 
Sixth Row: Barton Tayer, Walter Trent, Howard Turner. William Wag- 
man, Warren Weiss. 




143 




ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 



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First Row: Carl Anderson, Frederlcl; Asals, Stanley Bain, James Bar- 
ham, Richard Bell, Lester Birchall, Jay BIrnbrauer. 

Second Row: George Burns, Richard Calvert, Allan Clark, Tom 
Crowley, David Dunkle, Tom Ehrhardt, Louis Fisher. 
Third Row: William Forbes, Allen Gardner, Harry Gibson, Don 
Glover, James Grant, Milburn HInss, Jerry Humpheys. 



Fourth Row; Payson Jones, Bud Leeds, Hugh MacMahon, Frea Mal- 
vin. Robert McClintock, George McDaniel, Virgil McKenna. 
Fifth Row: David Peckins, Richard Pendleton, William Pfelfer. Giles 
Quarles, Tom Reel, Lewis Saunders, Richard Shlvely, Al Stringer. 



144 




S I G 



Alpha Eta Chapter of Sigma Pi was established at 
William and Mary in 1931 ... Sigma Pi Fraternity was 
founded at Vincennes University in 1897 . . . Sigma Pi 
especially noted for singing talent . . . Outstanding 
member Jim Grant as chairman of Men's h^o^or Coun- 
cil .. . Members active in campus organizations . . . 
Dick Pendleton as president of varsity club . . . Omicron 
Delta Kappa claimed Jim Grant and Dick Pendleton 
. . . Founders Day celebrated with the Orchid Ball . . . 
Important on the social calendar was the Christmas 

Dance. 






OFFICERS 

Groettum, RIes, Henry. Bobbin 



SIGMA N U 

Sigma Nu Fraternify returned to the William and Mary 
campus with the reactivation of Epsilon lota Chapter 
on February 23, 1952 . . . Sigma Nu was founded at 
the Virginia Military Institute . . . The fraternity's in 
stallation marked the 30th Anniversary of the estab 
lishment of Sigma Nu at William and Mary . . . Mem- 
bers quite active in varsity and intramural sports . . . 
Social events Included the White Star Formal in the 
Spring and the Founders Day Banquet . . . Also sched- 
uled were the Winter Formal held in January in Great 
FHall and the annual Christmas Party. 




EPSILON IOTA CHAPTER 








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First Row: James Abdella, David Beaver, James Bernhardt, Laurence 
Bobbin, Alan Canfield, Charles Copeland. 

Second Row: Peter Ellenbogen, Roger Groettum. Rene Henry, Wil- 
liam Hiliiard, James Hubbard, Charles Johnson. 



Third Row: Robert Kaldenbach. James Kaplan, Frank McCann, Wil- 
liam Marfizo, Joseph K/laurizi, Richard Moiel. 

Fourth Row: Bruce Muni, Gilbert Parmele, Kenneth Piland. Marshall 
Ries, Joseph Rossi, Ernest Rudin. 
Fifth Row; Rodney Soholt, Lawrence Verbif. 



147 




standing: Lowe. Todhunter. Surratt, Doiier. Ward. Brown, Cardaci. Reis, Hannold, Place, Weiss. Hickey, Brink. Sitting: McDaniel, Barham, Laughlln, Reagan, 

Mines, Scozzari, Crenier, Groettum. 



I N T E R- F R AT E R N I T Y COUNCIL 




WILLIAM BRINK 

President 



The Interfraternity Council is composed of the president and a sec- 
ond representative from each of the eleven fraternities on campus. Of- 
ficers of the Council are elected from these second representatives 
for a term of one year. 

The purposes of the Council are to encourage interest in scholarship, 
athletics, and intellectual attainment; to promote cordial relationships 
among the member fraternities by providing a common medium 
through which to act; and to provide an organized means for integrat- 
ing fraternity life with the general program of student life on the cam- 
pus. The Council establishes rules governing both general fraternity 
activities and rushing, including pledging and initiation. The rushing 
rules cover the dates of rushing, formal rushing regulations, eligibility, 
and initiation. 

In order to aid all entering students in understanding and observing 
rushing rules, a general meeting was held during orientation week of 
the fall semester to explain the fraternity system. 

This year, the Council sponsored a blood drive for the fraternities. 
For 1953-54 the president of the Interfraternity Council was Bill Brink. 



148 



P A N - H E L L E N I C COUNCIL 



The Pan-Hellenic Council consists of two delegates from each of the 
nine sororities on campus and, as a representative body, is a forum for 
the discussion of questions of interest to the college and fraternity 
community. It cooperates with the National Pan-hHellenic Congress in 
maintaining high ideals of scholarship and promoting inter-sorority 
relations with the college. 

The Council governs and regulates rushing, pledging, and initiation 
for the sorority women on campus. This year it continued the improve- 
ment instigated last year on the quota-limit system of restricting the 
system to freshmen only. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council awards a scholarship each year to a fresh- 
man woman to be used during her sophomore year. To raise money for 
this scholarship, the Council sponsored a blazer sale and sold Christ- 
mas cards. It also sponsored during the second semester a talent show 
in which the pledges of the fraternities and sororities presented skits. 
This year, the Council was in charge of the booth for food for the Co- 
lonial festival. 

The officers for 1953-54 were Carolyn Ash, president; Ann Davis, 
vice president; Elizabeth King, secretary; and Grace Stone, treasurer. 




CAROLYN ASH 
President 



Clockwise: Raymond, Mapp, Danskin. McCoy, Woodfleld, Richmond. Parker, King. Wright, Ash, Davis. Stone, Smith. Broaddus, Crosset. Barber. 




149 




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OFFICERS 
Henderson, Parr. Schroeder. Wadley 



OMEGA 



Omicron Beta Chapter of Chi Omega was the first 
national sorority to be established at William and 
Mary in 1921 ... Founded at the University of Arkan- 
sas on April 5, 1895 . . . The Chapter contributes to 
the support of a German orphan as a special charity 
project . . . Chapter claimed outstanding members 
. . . Ann Zimmerman as Exeter Exchange Student . . . 
Roberta Wadley as president of the Philosophy Club 
and assistant editor of the Royalist ... Phi Beta Kappa 
claimed Charlotte hHenderson . . . Highlighting the 
social events of the year were "The Cocktail Dance" 
and the Coronation Ball. 



OMICRON BETA CHAPTER 





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First Row: Shirley Archer. Fahy Baiter. Carolyn Barber. Mary Broaddus, 

Nancy Crowther. Sheila Day. Charlotte Eggler, Elaine Elias. 

Second Row: Dorothy Guthrie, Patricia Hall. Charlotte Henderson, 

Suzanne Hunter. Shirley Jacobson, Martha Jordan, Luise Klingel- 

hofer, Barbara McCall. 

Third Row: Joanne McLearen, Shirley McGinnls, Dolly Madison, Joan 

Mattson, Marlene Mauro, Carolyn Meachum, Alice Mott, Anne 

Myers. 



Fourth Row: Mary Myers, Marilyn Parr, Patricia Perkins, Barbara 

Petty, Mary Lou Riggan, Treazure Rissinger, Alison Sandlass, Marilyn 

Scheie. 

Fifth Row: Margery Schroeder, Marcia Sefrin, Patricia Smith, Patricia 

Sperb. Carolyn Suber, Carolyn Thompson, Marcy Van Deusen, Ann 

Vaughan. 

Sixth Row: Roberta Wadley, Susan Whaley. Margery Willard, Marian 

Winn, Jean Woodfleld. 



151 




BETA LAMBDA CHAPTER 




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Fir:t Row: Peggy Adams, Joanna Allen, Jean Andrews, Shirley Bazzie, 
Alexandra Bettinger, Mary Binns, Virginia Broaddus, Anne Callis. 
Second Row: Ann Crabill, Patricia Crews, Sandra Cromwell, Barbara 
Crosset, Madge Cushing, Nelia Daggett, Margaret Donnelly, Sylvia 
Evans. 

Third Row: Helen Grinnan, Katherine Hancock, Barbara Higbee, 
Willafay Hopkins, Betty James, Mae Jernigan, Pearle Key, Cynthia 
Kimbrough. 



Fourth Row: Sally Little, Margery Lloyd, Mary Moncure, Betsy 
Neale. Nancy Oakes, Marlon Peltier. Lavlnia Pretz, Anne Riddle. 
Fifth Row: Judy Robinson, Patricia Rustad. Jo Ann Shipp, Barbara 
Smith, Fay Smith, Anne Sobers, Sarah Tarvln, Patricia Thaden. 
Sixth Row: Margie Thomas, Jane Thompson, Joyce Tlsdale, Eugenia 
Turner, Patricia Wall, Helen Walsh, Catharine Washburne, Karin 
Waters. 



152 




OFFICERS 

Lloyd. Turner. Hancock. Binns 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 

Kappa Alpha Theta, the first women's fraternity, was 
founded at DePauw University In Indiana on January 
27, 1870 . . . Beta Lambda was established as second 
sorority on campus . . . Theta projects are the educa- 
tional program and a Christmas project at Eastern 
State . . . Members active in student publications . . . 
Mortar Board claimed Madge Gushing . . . Homecom- 
ing Queen was Barbara Crosset . . . Kay BInns as 
president of Chi Delta Phi . . . Main social activities of 
the year included the annual Dinner Dance at the 
Williamsburg Lodge and Presentation Dance honoring 
the new pledges. 






OFFICERS 

Ferfcll, Settle, Silfen. Ives 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Gamma Kappa Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma was 
established at William and Mary on February 16, 1923, 
being the third sorority on campus . . . Kappa Kappa 
Gamma was founded at Monmouth College in 1870 
. . . Chapter outstanding scholastically, winning the 
scholarship cup for the second consecutive semester 
. . . Members outstanding in student government, with 
Jan Ferrell as chairman of the Judicial Council . . . 
Represented in hHomecoming Court by Bobbie Tignor 
and Dot Chapman . . . Active in student publications 
. . . Mortar Board and Phi Beta Kappa claimed Peggy 
Ives and Jan Ferrell . . . Social events celebrated in- 
cluded the Hawaiian Party and the Spring Formal. 




GAMMA KAPPA CHAPTER 



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First Row: Susan Allen, Carolyn Ash. Ann Baird, Lenore Boss, Sue Britten, Ann 
Callihan, Carolyn Canoles, Dorothy Chapman, Jan Charbonnet. 
Second Row: Suzanne Colciough, Debbie Collins, Sally Dahm, Barbara DIggs, 
Jane Dougherty, Joan Eamshaw, Barbara Edwards. Lee Everltt, Jan Ferretl. 
Third Row: Meta Foolcs, Joan French, Cynthia Frye, Ann Gilbert. Barbara 
Ha'-ding, Mary Haymalcer, Gloria Hill, Margaret Ives, Sarah Ives. 
Fourth Row: Sue Johnson, Katheryn King, Anne Kinnear, Ann Lockwood, Bar- 
bara Luhring, Eleanor Lund berg. Joan McCarthy, Marguerltte McLaughlin, 
Alice Matthews. 



Fifth Row: Nancy Messlck, Christine Montgomery, Joanne Napolino. Elaine 

Pratt, Mary Alice Regier, Jean Richmond, Ann Sappenfield Marge) Settle 

Betty Sheild. 

Sixth Row: Catherine Sheild. Elizabeth Shell, Marcla Srifen. Patty Speltz. Julia 

St. John. Sally Stoker. Jane Taylor, Sue Thurau. Barbara Tignor. 

Seventh Row: Joan Watson. Patricia Wells, Mary Wortman. Betty Wright. 

Jean Wycoff. 



155 





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VIRGINIA GAMMA CHAPTER 




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Firsf Row: Dee Alexander, Tammy Allen, Barbara Barker. Elva Beclcham, Patti 
Beggs, Judy Bell, Julie Bleick, Bette Bodley. Martha Broclcenbrouqh. 
Second Row: Mary Brown, Bay Campbell. Beverly Campbell, Barbara Coogan. 
Sally Cronk, Betsy Davis, Ann Davis. Diana Dibble, Nancy Dixon. 
Third Row: Beverly Dodson. Sandra Doyle. Diane Eckel. Ann Fichtenger, Pa- 
tricia Florence, Charlene Foster. Katherine Gllman, Anne Hannegan. Mar- 
guerite Huff. 

Fourth Row: Pen.iy Hutchinson, Jane Hutton, Sally Jett. Arline Johnson, 
Bonnie Johnson Suzanne Journee, Jane Kesler. Jane Kirtley, Mary Knabb. 



Fifth Row: Alice Knight. Kay Lakey. Patricia McClure, Joan MacWilliams, 
Allison Mercer, Nancy Mfnk^ Barbara Mitchell, Sharon Montgomery Ann 
Parker. 

Sixth Row: Joanne Payer. Patricia Petit*. Barbara Pharo. Mary Pickett. Mar- 
garet Pontius, Mary Ramsay, Roberta Shaw. Betsy Skinker, Donna Smith. 
Seventh Row: Helen Sprague, Shirley Staubs. Elizabeth Swaine, Lois Vill. 

Betty Ann Wallace. Kay WIrth, Sarah Ann Wright. 



156 




PI BETA PHI 

Pi Beta Phi was founded at Monmouth College, Mon- 
mouth, Illinois in 1867 . . . Virginia Gamma Chapter 
established in 1925 . . . Chapter holds a sale each year 
to aid in the Settlement School ... Pi Phi members 
are active in student government and in campus publ 
cations . . . Marge hluff as president of Kappa Delta 
Phi . . . Chapter is active in women's athletics . . . 
Four members hold class offices . . . Featured social 
functions were the Formal Dance at the Williamsburg 
Lodge and the Spring Costume Dance . . . Patti Beggs 
was chosen sweetheart of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and 
Betty Ann Wallace was chosen sweetheart of Theta 

Delta Chi. 







Phi Mu was founded on March 4, 1852 at Wesleyan 
College in Macon, Georgia . . . Gamma Alpha Chapter 
was installed at the College of William and Mary in 
1926 . . . Members are active in women's athletics . . . 
Phi Beta Kappa claimed Ann Dietrich and Doris Zuid- 
ema . . . Members are active in student government, 
religious organizations, student publications . . . Ann 
Dietrich as president of Sigma Delta Pi . . . Major 
social events were the Christmas Party and the Spring 
Dance at Great hHall . . . Also included on the social 
calendar were the senior breakfast and the senior 

banquet. 




GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER 




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First Row: Sara Blakemore, Patricia Chenowith, Jean Cromwell. Flor- Third Row: Barbara Huber, Elizabeth King, Joanne Nelson, Ann Pope, 

ence DeHart, Ann Dietrich, Phyllis Easier. Isabella Rubert, Judith Suber. 

Second Row: Joanne Eversole, Dorothy Franklin, Margaret Gerlcen, Fourth Row: Virginia Von Breitenfeld. Roselyn Ward. Doris Zuidema. 

Phebe Hoff, Bonnie Holnnan, Grace Hoyle. 

159 






BETA DELTA CHAPTER 



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First Row: Joanne Abbott, Sally Ackerman, Jean Armstronq, Glenna Bailey, 
Ann Bornev, Dolores Baroffio, Betty Bennett, Betty Bloxsom, Nina Bowman. 
Second Row: Nancy Brlndel, Judy Brown, Judy Buckert, Willie Burkes. Nancy 
Butler. Ann Callahan, Marilyn Carr. Pamela Cartin, Marie Comley. 
Third Row: Sarah Deibert, Sheila Eddy. Betty Edwards. Rita Engleburt, Zona 
Fairbanks, Jan Fisher. Jane Greenberger, Shirley Haabestad. Peggy Hedrick. 
Fourth Row: Julie Holmes, Doralie Hultquist. Sarah Hurst. Jackie Johnson. 
Rosalie Jones, Betty Jones, Faye Jones, Pat Kizzzia, Brenda Korns. 



Fifth Row; Nancy Laux, Laura Lawson, Ann LeHew. Anne Leone. Ba''bara 
Limont, Boo Luck, Diane Marsh. Barbara Massle, Donna Melnlctc. 
Sixth Row: Joanne Miller. Margaret Morgan. Barbara Newberry. Helen No- 
ble, Margaret Orr, Jane Ottaway. Belinda Owens. Sally Patterson, Joan 
Pearce. 

Seventh Row: Nancy Ramsay. Ricky Reed. Elaine Richmond. Joanne Saunders. 
June Shearer. Anne Shortt, Kathryn Smith. Sara-Dean Spangler. Jovce Springer. 
Eighth Row: Joanne Stephenson. Grace Stone, Victoria Stone Beatrice Verra 
Pa+tv Weatherly. Betty Whitten. Zelda Wildman. Mary Wood. 



160 




OFFICERS 

Standing: Robinson, Hurst. Spangler, Carr. Sitting: Orr, Smith 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA 



Beta Delta Chapter of Alpha Chi Omega was estab- 
lished at William and Mary in 1927 . . . Sorority found- 
ed at DePauw University in 1885 . . . Members very out- 
standing in student government, with Ann Lehew as 
president of the Executive Council . . . Shirley hHaab- 
estad as president of WAA ... Phi Beta Kappa and 
Mortar Board members Ann Lehew, Shirley Haabestad 
and Sarah Dean Spangler . . . Sarah Fann Deibert was 
chosen sweetheart of Kappa Sigma and Betty Edwards 
was chosen sweetheart of Lambda Chi Alpha . . . 
Social events included a dinner dance at the Williams- 
burg Lodge and annual bridge party with the alums in 
the Spring. 






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OFFICERS 

Joerndt, Nettles. Henley, Clason, Butters 

KAPPA DELTA 

Kappa Delta was founded at Longwood College, Farm- 
ville, Virginia, in 1897 . . . Alpha Pi Chapter was found- 
ed on the William and Mary campus in 1928 . . . Kappa 
Delta special project is the Crippled Children's Hos- 
pital in Richmond . . . Chapter claims outstanding 
members on campus . . . Suzanne Joerndt as president 
of Theta Alpha Phi . . . Carol Butters as editor of the 
Royalist . . . On the social calendar were Included the 
Winter Formal at which the Kappa Delta pledges were 
presented and the Kappa Delta weekend in May . . . 
Suzanne Joerndt was chosen as the sweetheart of Pi 
Lambda Phi. 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 











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First Row: Nancy Beach. Carol Butters, Barbara Campbell, Beverly 
Clascn, Lois Doyle, Joan Farinholt. 

Second Row: Mary Fralin, Chloe Gardner, Nancy Harshbarger, Betty 
Henley, Marian Hobecit, Suzanne Joerndt. 



Third Row: Vivian Krick, Rebecca Lynn, Janat Mason, Carolyn Mitch- 
ell, Marilyn Nelson, Elizabeth Nettles. 

Fourth Row: Jane Pillow, Letty Raleigh, Virginia Savage, Gloria 

Smith. Mary Tine, Constance Wait, Ann Walker. 



163 




ALPHA MU CHAPTER 



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First Row: Alice Anderson, Nancy Andrews, Sylvia Beck, Diana Beeton, Judith 
Brown, Jean Carlson, Deborah Carver. Katherine Christian, Constance Clague. 
Second Row: Mary jame Compe. Martha Copenhaver. Barbara Crovo, Sally 
Darner, Barbara Daniel. Joan Danskin. Suzanne Duis, Carlotta Duncan, Carol 
Dunn. 

Third Row: Agnes Eqger, Jacqueline Evans, Suzanne Farno. Julia Ferguson. 
Kathryn Fisher, Sharon Garrison, Nancy Gibb, Elsie Goodman. Nancy Griffin. 
Fourth Row: Rinda Grubbs, Katherlne Hamilton, Phyllis Heck, Betty Holladay. 
Marcia Johnston. Jean Klrsch, Helen Lewis, Mary Lewis, Evelyn Love. 



Fifth Row: Alice Lucas. Bernice Magruder, Mary Maples, Virginia Mapo. 

Laurena Matson^ Joan Mercer, Lois Mortashed, Marjorie MuMer Carol Myers. 

Sixth Row: Virginia Naab Mar ■-»■'■ - .. ~ . 

Ri, ■ ■ ■■ ^- ■ 

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Gail wannen. 

Eighth Row: Cecelia Westcott. Deborah Young. Marilyn Zaiser. 




164 




OFFICERS 

Lewis, Love, Crovo, Maples, Torrence 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Alpha Mu Chapter of Delta Delta Delta was established 
at William and Mary in 1927 . . . Tri Delt was founded 
in 1888 at Boston University . . . Chapter outstanding 
scholastically, including Phi Beta Kappa's Retta Trent 
and Libby Lewis . . . Mortar Board claimed Boots 
Crovo and Libby Lewis . . . Chapter active in student 
publications and campus organizations . . . Represented 
In hHomecoming Court by Lollie Egger . . . Members 
active in student government, including Libby Lewis as 
chairman of Women's hlonor Council . . . Social events 
included the annual Winter Formal, Founders Day 
Banquet and Pansy Breakfast. 





The first chapter of Gamma Phi Beta was established 
at Syracuse University in 1874 . . . Alpha Chi Chapter 
as established at William and Mary in 1933 . . . 
Special project is to provide summer camps for under- 
privileged children . . . hlomecoming float "George 
Washington Slipped hiere" won first prize in October 
. . . Chapter is active in theater work and student gov- 
ernment ... Phi Beta Kappa claimed Margaret Owens 
. . . Members represented in campus activities . . . 
Major social events of the year Included the Kiddy 
Party, the Spring Formal and the Senior Banquet. 



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ALPHA CHI CHAPTER 



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First Row: Mary Anderson, Nancy Beery, Patricia Best. Beverly Buchanan, 
Shirley Burke, Joyce Butt. Margaret Camp, Ann Carlson. Anne Carver, 
Second Row: Armita Collins, Harriet Collins, Drue Cox, Elizabeth Craig. 
Nancy Doushkess. Nancylee Dunn, Joan Ero. Sara Gallamore, Nancy Garwood. 

Third Row: Mary Gastineau. Shirley Geddes. Harriette Harcum, Mary Hunt, 
Carol Jacobs, Llla Kimble, Natalie Lane, Joan Laurent. Nancy Llngenfelter. 

Fourth Row: Joyce Louderback, Anne Lunas, Diane McCarrlck. Ann McCoy. 
Mary Makovslcy, Dolores Mannion, Joan Marsh, Eleanor Mayer, Nancy Norton. 



Fifth Row: Margaret Owens, Marcia Page. Mary Pardue, Roberta Parrish. 

Eleanor Patterson, Pamela Pool, Virginia Portney, Sally Quarton, Hariett 

Rasmussen. 

Sixth Row: Lois Raymond, Martha Robey, Maclovia Rodriguez, Patricia Ruffin. 

Sophia Scandalios, Joyce Schlapprlzzi, Barbara Shriver, Tonita Thompson. 

Suzanne, TuMy. 

Seventh Row: Nina Van Bergen, Jean Von Schilling, Jan Walker. Sonya Warner 

Mary Warden, Cathy Welch. Judith Welton, Margaret Wilder. Cary Williams! 

Eighth Row: Jane WMIs Jane Wood. 



167 





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ATHLETICS 




Blow Gymnasium 



Cary Field 



ATHLETICS, 1953-54 



Although affected by the lack of depth in re- 
serve power, athletic fortunes at William and 
Mary improved considerably over the previous 
year. Rebuilding with an eye to the future, most 
sports experienced marginal winning seasons. 
hHopes for this future were strengthened with the 
arrival of a freshman class filled with outstanding 
potential. 

Under the Director of Athletics, John Freeman, 
the coaching staff became stabilized for the first 
time in recent years. While Freeman guided the 
Tribe's pigskin powers. Bob Lawson coached cross- 
country. In the absence of a varsity sguad Dudley 
Jensen held together a freshman swimming squad. 
Boydson Baird began his second season as basket- 
ball coach with a team characteristic of other 



sports; a strong first team but weak in experienced 
reserves. 

Spring sports also benefitted by capable 
coaching with baseball coming under the leader- 
ship of Eric Tipton. Wayne Kernodle undertook 
the task of shaping e formidable tennis squad 



WILLIAM S. GOOCH 
Business Manager 



RENE HENRY 

PublicitY Director 




170 



while Gil Joyner handled track. Al Stewart en- 
joyed success: with an experienced golf team of 
seven veterans, all lettermen. 

Dudley Jensen, as Intramural Director, coor- 
dinated a successful program that was enthusias- 
tically supported by independent, faculty, and 
fraternity participants. The year's activity saw 
Theta Delta Chi emerge as a powerful competitor. 
Climaxing the ascent among traditional frater- 
nity powers, Theta Delta challenged Sigma Nu for 
the Intramural trophy. Intramurals also enjoyed an 
increase in participation showing revived student 
interest in the program. 




i 



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JOHN J. FREEMAN 
Director of Athletics 



COACHES OF VARSITY ATHLETICS 

Left to Riglit: Jacl< Freeman. Football; Boyd Baird, Basketball; Gil Joyner, Track; Wayne Kernodle, Tennis; Eric Tipton, Baseball; Bob Lawson, Cross Country. 




171 




First Row: Blanchard, WcWilliams. Bodley, Egger. Compe, Jay. Second Row: MacCoy. 



CHEERLEADERS 



Hedrick, Arvin, Melnick 




William and Mary athletic teams were given an added 
impetus to fight for victory with strong support from the 
cheerleaders. The squad, led by Mickey MacCoy, was 
present at all home football and basketball games to en- 
liven student spirit and lead the Pep club members in 
cheers. To bolster spirit of the Big Green on the road, 
cheerleaders travelled to the Navy, N. C. State, Richmond, 
and Wake Forest football games. 

Combining with the William and Mary band, the 
squad organized pre-game pep rallies during football sea- 
son. Parades, bonfires, and speeches were featured to 
rouse spirit for the occasion. Supplementing the rallies, 
the squad sponsored send-offs when the "Iron Indians" 
took to the road. 

Also In combination with the band the cheerleaders 
furnished pre-game and halftime entertainment, adding 
color to home football and basketball games. 

Members of the squad included MacCoy. Dick Blanch- 
ard, Lolly Egger, Bud Jay, Woosie Compe, Winkie Wilde, 
Joanie McWilliams, Jack Parker, and Betty Bodley. Adding 
color to the group were Donna Melnick, Peggy Hedrick, 
and Vern Arvin dressing in Indian style. 

Tryouts for squad were held early in the year and Kay 
Wirth, Bill Armbruster, Gordo Wilde, Jane Hutton, and 
Vern Arvin were selected to fill vacated positions. 



172 



Primarily for the purpose of increasing interest in Inter- 
collegiate athletics, the Varsity Club was founded at Wil- 
liam and Mary In 1914. Supplementing this purpose, the 
club has developed an athletic creed stressing character, 
scholarship, leadership, perseverance, and cooperation In 
athletic contests. 

Numerous activities were sponsored by the club through- 
out the year. Members offered their services as ushers at 
home basketball games and the Mermettes' show, "Fanta- 
sia." Combining with the Pep Club, football movies of the 
road games were shown by the club. The group also han- 
dled the election of the Basketball Queen. Margot Ketch- 
am was crowned during the half-time of the Richmond 
game after a week of close voting. The annual Varsity 
Club Dance after the Richmond game concluded the eve- 
ning's entertainment. The group also enjoyed a success- 
ful picnic at Yorktown early in the Spring. 

Under the leadership of Dick Pendleton as President, the 
club also nourished some ideas in the form of long-range 
projects. Negotiations to secure a club room were carried 
on with the Administration. The room would be utilized 
for business meetings and Informal gatherings. The possi- 
bilities of erecting new score boards in Blow Gymnasium 
for basketball games were also discussed. 

Other officers of the club included Walt hierrmann, 
Quinby htlnes, and Chick Cornell. 

VARSITY 




OFFICERS 

Cornell, Herrman. L. Q. Mines, Pendleton 

CLUB 



First Row: Place, Wilde. Blanchard, Werner. L. Q, Hines, Herrman, Pendleton, Clark. Second Row: Mark, Burke, Sell, Fisher. Martin. Cox, Bowman. Third Row: Dr. 

Sands. Rumage, Knight. Mitchell, Milkovich. Fourth Row: Bollerman, Cornell. 




173 




FOOTBALL ASSISTANTS 

Top: Joyner and Mitchell. Bottom: First Row: Miller, Mark, Tipton. Second 
Row: Tabor, Baird. Third Row; Cowling. 



How did they do it? The Saturday afternoon sports writers and 
the Monday morning quarterbacks tried to figure the upsets, the 
goal line stands, and the marginal victories made secure in the wan* 
ing seconds of play. They all agreed the 24-man football squad of 
William and Mary made up for its lack of depth with ability, courage. 
and a strong will to win. 

But it didn't stop there; Jackie Freeman was enjoying his second 
year as head football coach. After spending the 195! season as 
backfleld coach under Marvin Bass, Freeman took over in 1952 to 
pilot the Tribe through a rough-and-tumble, up and down season. 
Learning the problems of rugged opposition in 1952. Freeman real- 
ized the necessity of experienced leadership. 

And he had assistants, including Eric Tipton as baclfield coach for 
the Indians. The 1953 campaign marked Tipton's 14th year on the 
William and Mary coaching staff. A former major league star with 
Cincinnati and Philadelphia. Tipton became head baseball coach in 
1952. 

While "Tip" Inspired the backs. Herb Miller coached the line with 
able assistance from Joe Mark. Herb, a former star at Washington 
ar^d Lee University, came to William and Mary as line coach in 1951. 
"Neepie " held this chore alone until this year when Mark returned to 
the Reservation after serving in the Army. The newest addition -lo 
file coaching staff, he was Co-captain of the Tribe with Vito Ragazzo. 
In 1950, Mark was elected All-Southern blocking back when the In- 
dians employed the single wing formation. 

Behind the scenes, Guilford Joyner kept the "Iron Indians" in fight- 
ing trim from week to week. Always on the lookout for injuries, it 
was through Joyner's ability that the Tribe sick list was held to a 
minimum. Gil, in his second year at William and Mary, began coach- 
ing the cross-country. Indoor, and outdoor track teams last year. 

For the freshmen, Boydson BaIrd and Frank Cowling guided the 
first-year squad. Like their varsity counterparts, the "Papooses" ex- 
perienced a winning season through the efforts of able coaches. 
Baird came to the Reservation after three years as head coach at 



CO-CAPTAINS 

Tommy Martin and Steve Milkovich 











19 5 3 



FOOTBALL 



Davidson College. "Sonny" Cowling, a senior at William and Mary 
this year, saw gridiron action for the Big Green In past seasons. 

The Monday morning quarterbacks may not have figured it out 
yet, but the Old Dominion sports writers gave credit to Freeman for 
his outstanding job and unanimously elected him Big Six Coach of the 
Year. 

Things looked bad In September. Pre-season forecasters generously 
predicted two wins, four at the most, for the William and Mary foot- 
bdll team. With only 24 men, Coach Jackie Freeman faced a rugged 
ten-game schedule that would seem to put the Big Green In the 
under-dog role every week. The ranks had been sadly depleted by 
Ine loss of such stars as Ed MIoduszewski, Bruce Sturqess, Tom Kel- 
ler, Dick Ivanhoe, Sonny Cowling, and John Kreamcheck. 

But all the Indians needed was a chance to meet their opponents 
on somewhat even terms. The National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion had decided +o return to the limited substitution rule. This ended 
the era of specialized, two platoon football. This also meant the 
chance for William and Mary. 

While the sports world discussed the pros and cons of the NCAA 
decision. Freeman girded his small squad for 60-minute games with 
tcugh pre-season conditioning. As the season progressed, one upset 
followed another, and the Big Green became known as the "Iron In- 
dians" and the "Fighting Two Dozen" to football fandom. 

While lauded by the press and other schools, the "Iron Indians" 
received special recognition In December for their gridiron exploits. 
In a convocation honoring the achievements of the football team, 
representatives of the entire William and Mary family, the Adminis- 
tration, the Faculty, the Alumni, the Friends of the College, and the 
Students, expressed praise and pride in the 1953 "Iron Indians." 




JOHN J. FREEMAN 
Head Football Coach 



1953 FOOTBALL TEAM 

First Row: Parozzo. Bednarik, T. Martin, Milkovich, Bowman, Place, Hlnes. Second Row; Grieco, Hamilton, Copeland, Fitzgerald, Cox, Elzey. Sazio. Third Row: 
Waksmunski, Karschner, Herrman, Marfizo, Riley, Risjord. Fourth Row: Naqy, Sumner, Scott, Henley, W. Martin. 




•^ — 



THE TRIBE UPSET WAKE FOREST 



William and Mary 16; Wake Forest 14 

Highlighting +he Tobacco Bowl festivities, the Indians 
opened the season in typical fashion by upsetting a strong 
Wake Forest team. 

Fullback Bill Bowman set the Tribe's offensive pace with 
spectacular ground gains through the line. Charlie Sum- 
ner, on the optional "keep play" constantly swept the 
ends for substantial yardage. Sumner's 33-yard run in the 
fourth quarter, combined with "Bullet" Bowman's 7 I -yard 
second period jaunt accounted for the Indian touchdowns. 

Quinby hiines, in a repeat performance of the 1951 To- 
bacco Bowl game, was instrumental in defeating the Dea- 
cons, hiines booted one extra point but provided the mar- 
gin of victory with a 20-yard field goal in the final quarter. 

The Big Green staged a fine defensive show by repeat- 
edly halting the vaunted Wake Forest offense. Deacon 
triple-threat Sonny George vainly tried the Indian line, 
but to no avail. 

William and Mary 6; Navy 6 

Leaving Richmond, the "Upset Express" rolled into 
Annapolis and over Navy. Again rated a two touchdown 
underdog, the "Iron Indians" held the Middies to a tie 
for the season's second upset. 

Navy, with a high pre-season national rating, gave the 
Big Green defense its toughest test of the year. The first 
half found the Middies constantly deep in scoring terri- 
tory only to falter because of the hard charging Indian 



Coach Freeman provided a study in contrasting emotions after Walce 
Forest and Navy upsets. 





Flashing that victory smile after beating Wake Forest in the Tobacco 
Bowl, the Indians set the precedent. 



line. Co-captain Steve Milkovlch, John Bednarik and Bill 
Marflzo were the outstanding defensive stalwarts. 

Early in the second half, the deadlock was broken when 
Navy tallied but missed the extra point attempt. Al 
Griece relieved Sumner at quarterback and the "Fighting 
Two-Dozen " began to roll. Climaxing his fine passing 
game, Grieco hit Co-captain Tommy Martin with a 23- 
yard touchdown pass for the all-important score. 

Still playing away from home, the Tribe flew to Cincin- 
nati to face the rugged Bearcats. 

University of Cincinnati 57; William and 
Mary 7 

njury-riddled and tired, the "Iron Indians " were out- 
classed by a Cincinnati powerhouse. The Tribe had not 
fully recovered from the bruising Navy battle when the 



Bowman lateraled off to Herrman against Walce Forest and Grieco 
picked up yardage in the Navy battle. 




AND NAVY . . . 



^ 



''Bullet Bill" Bowman exploded tf;rough Demon Deac defense for 71 yards and second period touchdown 



night game in Ohio proved to be a football nightmare. 

Playing without the services of George Parai70, Lin- 
wood Cox, Tommy Martin, Doug Henley, Jack Place and 
Jerry Sazio, the Indians were completely outplayed in 
every department. Limping men and costly fumbles al- 
lowed the powerful Bearcats to score by every possible 
means. 

But even against the Cincinnati aggregation the Big 
Green managed to score. The lone tally came in the fourth 
quarter when Sumner broke away on his second long run 
of the game. Eluding the tight Bearcat defense, Sumner 
ran 48 yards for the touchdown. 

The "Iron Indians" needed a rest, and the vital breather 
came in the form of an open weekend before the V.P.I. 
game. Facing Tech at Cary Field, the Tribe made its first 
home appearance for the seemingly decisive Big Six clash. 




HERRMAN 



JOHN BEDNARIK 



I 

7 



4 



DOUG HENLEY 




Stunned Midshipmen ran Info a stubborn Tribe de- 
fense at Farragut Field in Annapolis. 





BILL RILEY 



AND BECAME THE IRON 



TOUCHDOWN 




Bowman IW&M) 



Bowman dives through VPI line for final six points and what eventually 
meant the margin of vTctory. 



William and Mary 13; V.P.I. 7 

Playing before a capacity crowd of 13,000 in a press 
rated toss-up the "Fighting Two-Dozen" outfought V.P.I. 
and the clock to win. Defeating the University of Virginia 
earlier in the season, the spirited Gobblers were seeking 
victory over William and Mary. The I I previous gridiron 
meetings of the two schools resulted in Tribe victories, 
and Tech felt vengeful. 

Again it was the outstanding defensive play that proved 
to be the determining factor in the defeat of an appar- 
ently deeper and stronger opposition. With Parorzo and 
Sazio still suffering leg injuries, Freeman substituted Chet 
Waksmunski and Marfizo in the line. After repeated scor- 
ing attempts faltering within a few yards of the goal, time 
finally ran out on the Gobblers and the "Iron Indians" had 
held again. 

Sumner, completing eight out of I 3 passes for I 1 2 yards, 
gave the crowd a glimpse of a superb quarterback playing 
under the 'T ' formation. He stole the show from Johnny 
Dean and Jackie Williams, the highly touted field generals 
for Coach Frank Moseley's Gobblers. With Bowman, Bed- 
narik, and "Shorty" Herrman as targets, Sumner unleased 
his best air attack of the year. 

With Sumner as engineer, the Big Green again took 
over ownership of the "Upset Express" and looked ahead 
to the George Washington game. 



ON THE LOOSE 
Charlie Sumner cuts back to pick up downfield blocking of Scott 
(56), Bednarik (17), and Milkovich (47) in second period against 

Tech 



BOWMAN AGAIN 

This time it was for the first quarter touchdown in the Tech encounter 

on a hand-off from Grieco (71) 




" '.i* 1^.ii^-* 






178 



INDIANS... 

William and Mary 12; George Washington 7 

The Indian Express, with steam up and highballing, rolled 
over the visiting Colonials and beat them at their ov/n 
game. Becoming used to the underdog role the Tribe out- 
passed the third best passing team In the nation for the 
victory. Passing for I 15 yards, the Big Green held George 
Washington to 97, forcing them to stay on the ground. 

William and Mary had only two chances to score, and 
capitalized on both opportunities. Exploding with an Im- 
pressive show of offensive strength, the Tribe marched 79 
yards downfleld to score in the first half. Sumner's passing 
play and Bowman's off-tackle line gains spearheaded the 
attack. 

With the Colonials Inside the Tribe five-yard line, the 
breath-taking victory wasn't secured until Sumner inter- 
cepted a pass in the last minute of play. Again the "Iron 
Indians" fought off strong opposition and relentless fa- 
tigue for the victory. Highlighting the Indomlnable line 
play, Bednarik and Marfizo constantly held the stunned 
Colonials to short gains. 

By midway In the season, upsets, goal line stands, and 
marginal victories had become "Standard Operating Pro- 
cedure" on the Reservation. Facing N. C. State, the Big 
Green climbed out of the usual underdog role. 

William and Mary 7; N. C. State 6 

Travelling to Raleigh for the N. C. State Homecoming, 
the favored Tribe spoiled festivities by edging the Wolf- 
pack. State, looking for its first win over William and 
Mary since 1945, made a fierce bid for victory by holding 
the Indians scoreless until the third period. 

However the offense picked up steam and marched 70 
yards for the touchdown, Bowman slamming over from the 



WE MADE IT 

The George Washington line failed +o stop Shorty Herrman on a two-yard burst off tackle. Sumner (21 ) 

and Srieco (71) both agreed wholeheartedly with the referee. 




a 




TACK PLACE ""W 



^ 



\ 



ERRYSAZIO 




SAM SCOTT 






CHARLIE COPELAND 



GOAL LINE STANDS PRESERVED 





^^^^==W 







^Ml pass defenders climbed all over Bob Eliey in Victory Stadium at 
Roanoke. Although Eliey went high into the air in two all out at- 
tempts, Keydet Nick Servidio knocked one down and teammate Dave 
Woolwine intercepted the other. 



eight-yard line to score. Mines came in to convert and pro- 
vide the winning margin tor the Tribe's third consecutive 
victory. 

State recovered to score, but lineman Marfizo and Au- 
brey Fitzgerald teamed up to save the game by blocking 
the extra point attempt. Goal line stands being the tashion 
of the season, the Tribe stayed in style by holding the 
Wolfpack on the nine-yard line and breaking up a de- 
cisive scoring drive. "Jeep" Bednarik, the defensive stand- 
out, was mainly responsible for keeping the hungry Wolf- 
pack at bay. On defense, "Jeep" spent most of the after- 
noon in the State backfield breaking up plays. 

Clearly favored, ihe Indian defense was to experience ,i 
bewildering surprise against V.M.I. 

V.M.I. 20; William and Mary 19 

Meeting for the second consecutive year at Roanoke in 
a charity game, the Keydets were out to avenge the 34- 1 3 
beating inflicted by William and Mary last year. Although 
the Tribe dominated first period play so completely it 
looked like a rout, the Keydets rebounded in the second 
and took the lead at half-time, 14-7 

A contributing factor to the V.M.I, upset was Dave 
Woolwine, triple-threat star, who overshadowed his press 
praised teammate Johnny Mapp. Exploiting the Tribe's 
weak pass defense, Woolwine connected with Mapp in 

180 



the last 56 seconds of play for a touchdown pass to clinch 
the victory. 

Sparking the Indian offense, Bowman gained 127 yards 
in 15 tries for one of his best showings of the season. In 
the up-and-down game, Sumner and Bob Elzey helped car- 
ry the brunt of the Tribe attack. Rallying for two quick 
touchdowns in the second half, the Big Green defense 
fought desperately but vainly against both V.M.I, and 
the clock. 

While Old Dominion football fans wondered If time and 
injuries had caught up with William and Mary, Freeman 
girded his team for the tough Richmond game. 

William and Mary 21; University of Richmond 

However the Big Green staged its most impressive of- 
fensive show of the year against the jittery Spiders. Rich- 
mond, with the best heralded team in many years, suffered 
a severe case of fumblitis before its Homecoming crowd 
of 18,000. 

Although Coach Merrick expected his Spiders to fumble, 
the offensively-minded Indians forced him to change his 
mind about the outcome. This victory extended the Tribe'' 
winning streak to 14 games over the Richmond club. 

Bowman was leading ground gainer for the Big Green 
with Herrman and Billy Martin providing the "follow- 
through" of the offensive punch. Martin made his best 



VICTORY . . . 



AL GRIECO 






JOHN RI5J0RD 

W 




Bowman knifes through Richmond defense for first quarter score. 



showing of the season against the tame Spiders. Jerry Sa- 
zio seeing action for the first tinne since the Navy game, 
made his first score of his collegiate career with an extra 
point after the first touchdown. Tommy Martin and hiines 
converted on the other two occasions. 

Fumbling the opening kick-off, Richmond immediately 
went on the defense, but to no avail. Minutes later Bow- 
man smashed across for the first of two touchdowns. Grieco 
scored the final tally in the last minute of fourth period 
play. Defensively, Sam Scott and Marfizo played well on 
the line and Waksmunski was particularly outstanding as 
line-backer. 

The "Fighting Two-Dozen" were coming home tired 
but victorious to face a fired up Washington and Lee 
team. 

Washington and Lee 33; William and Mary 7 

Realizing the loss of Sumner at quarterback, the Big 
Green couldn't spark an offensive. Improvising, Bowman 
called the plays in the huddle and Elzey handled the ball 
as quarterback. However both men were new at their jobs 
and the spirited Generals seemed in no mood for mercy. 

Bottling up Bowman for short gains, the Washington and 
Lee defense took advantage of the situation and contin- 
ually forced the Tribe to kick. FHowever "Bullet" did man- 
age to capture the lead in total rushing in the Southern 
Conference against the Generals. 

Sumner did get in the game in the third period to com- 
plete five out of six passes. One aerial was a 27-yard pass 
to FHerrmann who sidestepped the Washington and Lee 
safety for the touchdown. 



BILLMARFIZ^ 



f ^ 

'»! / BILL f 






i 



QUINBY HINE5 




BUT WEARINESS PREVAILED IN 










Moving downfield, Bowman and Bill Martin spearheaded potent offensive attacks against the Spiders. 



Boston University 41; William and Mary 14 

A band of battle-weary Indians took the field against 
Boston University for the season's finale. Deep in reserve 
power, Coach Buff Donelli utilized all his resources for the 
Tribe defeat. The charging Boston line and explosive back- 
field left the Big Green trailing by 14 points at the half- 
time. 



The only two deep penetrations by the Indians resulted 
in touchdowns. With Grieco carrying 18 yards on the 
"optional keep" play, the Tribe broke into the scoring col- 
umn in the fourth quarter. Later in the period Sumner 
passed to Bowman who eluded the Terrier safeties and 
ran 25 yards for the second touchdown. Tommy Martin 
converted the first tally and hlines booted the extra point 
after the second score. 



W&L's Carl Bolt on start of 90-yard touch- 
down gallop. 



A determined Washington and Lee defense stopped the Tribe offense 

short. 




THE END 



BOB ELZEY 




Bob Elzey almost cut loose on nn off tackle play but was tripped up by a stretching General lineman 



Outstanding players for the "Iron Indians" received 
credit from sports writers over the nation. Bill Bowman 
reaped In the laurels ranging from Honorable Mention All- 
America with "Jeep" Bednarik to Captain of the All Big 
Six team, In Virginia, including All-Southern Conference. 
Sumner, Bednarik, and Parozzo were also elected to the 
All-Big Six team as well as receiving Southern Conference 
honors. 



Shorty Herrman turned the left end for a substantial gain in the 
Boston University game. 








B 




BILL MARTIN 




GEORGE KAR5CHNER 




GEORGE PAR02ZO 



UBR EY FITZGERALD 





Terrier fullback Lou Pefroka carried to +he Indian's nine-yard line in fhe first pe- ca ce-'ore Marfizo and 

Waltsmunslcf pulled him down. 



To the Happy Hunting Ground 

Co-captains Steve Milkovich and Tommy tvlartin led the 
band of seven seniors hanging up uniforms for the last 
time at William and Mary. Freeman's perennial problem 
of replacements returned with the graduation of Bill Bow- 
man, John Bednarik, Jack Place, and George Parozzo. The 
last great specialist at William and Mary, Quinby Mines, 
left the Indians without the most reliable extra-point and 
field goal kicker in many seasons. 



The iron Indians were honored at a special convocation after the close of the 1953 football campaign. 
Coach Freeman suffered a loss of words to express his pride and appreciation. 



'^-Ui.e.. 







CHARLIE SlXmiR 



'A^ 





6F^^19f*48's3l*;^65lsS^ *38^,40«^49 %os; 




First Row: Nodkes, W. Tucker, Duff, C. Tucker, Vauqhan. Miller, Cayward, Pryor. Sprock. Smerczynskl, Simpson. Second Row: Sewall, Jordan, High. Traylor, Col- 
claugh, Abel, Elliot, Nelson, Schlatzer, McKee. Third Row: Langham, Fakadej, Yohe, Cardamone, Chiesa, Lesher, Sydnor, Hammock, Jones. Fourth Row: Granger, 

Baird, Cowling. 

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



Freshmen being ineligible to participate in varsity 
sports, the new arrivals to William and Mary marked the 
revival of the "Papoose" squad. Boydson Baird, assisted 
by "Sonny" Cowling and Bob Taber, took over the job of 
whipping the freshmen into shape. 

Although the Papoose were to face five of the area's 
toughest teams, the outlook was good and the squad was 
highly rated by coaches and sports writers. Living up to 
expectations, the team enjoyed a winning season and 
provided the Big Green with rugged but vital scrimmage 
sessions. Winding up with a won-lost record of 3-2, the 
freshmen gained valuable experience to apply against 
stronger opposition in varsity play. 

University of Richmond 14; William and Mary 

The inexperienced Papoose squad received its first taste 
of collegiate competition against the Baby Spiders. Scor- 
ing in the first and third quarters, the Richmond club was 
never in serious trouble. 

hlowever the Papoose defense proved its worth by halt- 
ing the Spider rallies short of scoring. Bill Tucker and Mike 
Miller led the hard-charging freshman line. 

The game wasn't the only William and Mary loss; quar- 
terback Jim Smerczynski was injured and remained out for 
the season. 

William and Mary 14; Apprentice School 

Determined to make amends for the previous week, the 
team travelled to Newport News and sunk the Shipbuild- 
ers. The Papoose showed improvements in the night en- 
counter when the offense displayed its strength v/ith two 



first-half touchdowns. Mickey Simpson and Woody Traylor 
did the scoring while Jack Yohe provided the excitement 
with a 45-yard dash downfield. 

Wake Forest 13; William and Mary 6 

Fighting a strong Wake Forest team, the Papoose 
dropped its second and last game of the season. Facing 
the Baby Deacs, the freshmen had to fight two equally 
heavy lines and a reserve of speedy backs. 

William and Mary scored in the second period when 
Alex Fakadej eluded ten little Deacs to race 56 yards 
before being tackled on the three-yard line. Although he 
fumbled, Brantley recovered in the end rone for the score. 

William and Mary 13; V.M.I. 7 

Playing at Cary Field, the Papoose outfought a spirited 
bunch of Keydets to equalize the season's record. Behind 
7-0 at half-time, the freshmen bounced back in the second 
half to secure the victory. 

Moving behind a hard-charging line, Jim Pryor and Yohe 
tallied for the needed touchdowns. Both scores came after 
sustained drives against the first-year Keydets. Good team 
coordination accounted for the deserved victory. 

William and Mary 14; George Washington 

in the season's finale, favored George Washington fell 
in muddy game played at Cary Field. Scores by Yohe with 
Nelson converting twice accounted for the 14 points. 

Papooses defense were up to the occasion and repeat- 
edly held the freshmen Colonials to no gain. Goal line 
stands characteristic of varsity play highlighted the game. 



185 




Fisher, Schutte, Lawson, Tarver, McMahon, Bromleigh. Rosst 



CROSS COUNTRY 



Under the coaching of Bob Lawson, fhe cross-country 
harriers of William and Mary opened a rugged eight-meet 
schedule against V.M.l. Captained by Bud Fisher, the un- 
der-manned but highly spirited squad of seven never once 
enjoyed victory. In the course of competition Tribe har- 
riers faced runners from West Virginia, Washington and 
Lee, Bridgewater, Davidson, N. C. State, Maryland, Rich- 
mond, and North Carolina. 

The core of the team, Fisher, Lawson, and Leo Schutte, 
were bolstered by the efforts of FHugh McMahon, Joe 
Rossi, Walt Tarver, and Gray Bromleigh. "Bullet," with a 



season's eligibility remaining, sparked the team with fine 
running and able coaching. 

Brighter spots of the season's record included upsetting 
Richmond out of second place in a triangular meet with 
Maryland. William and Mary climbed out of the cellar 
in the Southern Conference meet by finishing fifth. Law- 
son, Schutte, and Fisher captured three awards of the day 
to climax a season of spirited competition. 

Hopes for next year are bolstered with the support of 
freshmen Ed Schaefer, Bob McCIIntock, Dick Calvert, 
and Pete Kullavanijaya. 



Southern Conference Meet 



Coach Lawson with Captain Fisher 





First Row: Sell, Bair. Masnick, Case, Jensen. Second Row: Harris, Heffelfinger, Andrews, Roszeil, Brook. 



s 



N 



G 



Varsity swimming was dropped at William and Mary 
due to a lack of material and interest in the sport. Another 
contributing factor was the Southern Conference ruling 
prohibiting freshmen from varsity sports. 

With the hope of rebuilding the team for future years, 
Dudley Jensen, varsity swimming coach, assumed the task 
of guiding a freshmen squad. Although they failed to 
muster a victory, the spirited squad exhibited constant 
improvement throughout the three-meet season. V.M.I., 
Granby, and the Norfolk Division all captured victories 
over the Papoose. 



Captain Stu Sell, the only veteran from last year's team, 
led the squad in the first semester and assisted Jensen in 
coaching duties for the remainder of the season. Joco 
Bair and Fritz Trinler, the mainstays of the tankmen, sparked 
competition in the free style and breast stroke events. 
Representing the team in medley events were Mark An- 
drews, Neil hHeffilfinger, and Gordo Wilde. Reserve 
strength in the various events was provided by Bill Brook, 
Thornton Croxton, Don hHarris, Dave Rossel, and Rosser 
Rudolph. 



Stu Sell with Coach Jensen 



Swimmers falce ;heir m.irlc In season's first meet. 












First Row: Kern, A. BecouvaraK^s, Kniqht, Mahoney. Stubbs. Patton. Cornell. Second Row: Manager Zachs. Lasky, Harper. Bollerman. G. Becouvarakis. Mountain. 



Coach Baird. 



SEASON'S RECORD 



William 


and 


Mary . 


. 78 


William 


and 


Mary . 


. 54 


William 


and 


Mary . 


. 61 


William 


and 


Mary . 


. 44 


William 


and 


Mary . 


. 53 



Hampden-Sydney ... 58 

Maryland 69 

North Carolina . . . .71 

Duke 109 

George Washington . . 65 



Coach Baird with Captain Mahoney 




William and Mary . . 77; Seton Hall 75 

William and Mary . . 72; Clemson 75 

William and Mary . . 74; hHampden-Sydney ... 64 

William and Mary . . 78; West Virginia 76 

William and Mary. .71; V.M.I. 67 

William and Mary . . 73; Richmond 85 

. . 73; V.P.I 58 

70; N. estate 80 

73; W&L 58 

66; V.P.I 52 

62; V.M.I. 81 

48; N. estate 65 

58; George Washington . . 69 

William and Mary . . 68; W&L 54 

William and Mary . . 56; Wake Forest 57 

William and Mary . . 55; Maryland 74 

William and Mary . . 63; Richmond 68 



With Captain Johnny Mahoney returning as the only 
letterman from the 1952-53 season. Coach Boydson Baird 
faced the problem of rebuilding for William and Mary's 
1953-54 basketball fortunes. The return of Howie Boller- 
man and Chick Cornell from the 1951-52 team helped to 



William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 

William and Mary . 



188 



R L L E R C A S T E R SEASON 



brighten the prospects at the outset but the inexperience 
that was to beconne the keynote of the season was ap- 
parent fronn the start. Tam Stubbs and Alex hHarper moved 
up fronn the junior varsity to add much in aggressive play- 
making but injuries plagued their effectiveness. Bill Kern 
and Bill Patton supplied added height at the forward posi- 
tions while Monty Knight and Marty Mountain filled in 
effectively at the guard positions. Over the course of the 
season, the combination of Bollerman, Mahoney and Cor- 
nell playing the fore court with Stubbs and Harper in the 
back court most often carried the William and Mary colors 
on to the basketball floor. 

The season's opener with hIampden-Sydney netted the 
Tribe a 78-58 victory but the next four games were a 
closer indication of what was to come. Maryland, U.N.C., 
Duke and George Washington sent the Tribe down to four 
consecutive defeats. Success was to come less than often 
but when it did come, it came spectacularly. The next 
time out, Baird used a new possession type offense to 
stun nationally ranked Seton hiall with a 77-75 New Year's 
Day upset. Mahoney and Cornell led the scoring with 20 
and 13 points respectively, but the victory was a product 
of real team play. 

Returning to the Reservation, the Indians opened the 
1954 campaign at Blow Gym by going down to defeat at 
the hands of lightly regarded Clemson, 75-72. A three- 
game winning streak followed with hIampden-Sydney, 
West Virginia, and V.M.I, being the victims. The West 
Virginia victory was another of the sporadic successes of 
the Seton hHall proportion. Taking the court in the roll of 
the decided underdog, the Indians upset the Moun- 
taineers with a careful and deliberate style of play. The 



final score read 78-76 with the deciding marker coming 
in the last 58 seconds of play. 

Baird and Company then moved on to Benedictine Gym 
to play the University of Richmond Spiders. Caught in 
the web of a fast breaking Spider attack. The Tribe was 
unable to set up an effective defense and ended up ab- 
sorbing their sixth defeat of the campaign, 85-73. A 73-58 
victory over V.P.I, then preceded the annual thriller with 
N. C. State at Norfolk. For the previous three out of four 
seasons the Tribe had upended the touted Wolfpack and 
hopes ran high for another such victory. Tam Stubbs and 
Chick Cornell threw in 19 points apiece but the Staters 
methodically wore down the outclassed Indians and carried 
Dff an 80-70 victory. 

In the next outing, Mahoney reached his scoring peak 
tallying 30 points against W&L in leading the Tribe to 
another win. During the game, Alex Harper suffered a 
sprained ankle and as a result was lost for the remainder of 
the season. Baird replaced Harper with Knight in the fol- 
lowing contest against V.P.i'. Knight performed favorably 
and the Tribe racked up a 66-52 win. The home forces then 
tasted the bitterness of defeat three times running at the 
hands of V.M.I., N. C. State and George Washington but 
moved back on to the winning side of the ledger by dump- 
ing W&L, 68-54. Next on the schedule for the Tribe came 
the Demon Deacons of Wake Forest. In a low scoring but 
exciting overtime contest, the Deacs managed to eke out 
a 57-56 victory. 

Going on the road for the final trip of the season, the 
Tribe traveled to College Park, Maryland where they suf- 
fered another defeat before the classy play of the talented 
Terrapins. The Indians then returned to Blow Gym and the 



MARTY MOUNTAIN 



HARVEY LASKY 



TAM STUBBS 



HOWIE BOLLERMAN 




SETON HALL AND 




Howie Bollerman stretches to tap one In against W & L 



Mahoney. Bollerman, and Cornell played rebound in G, W. game 



season's finale with the successful Spiders from the Uni- 
versity of Richmond. For three quarters, the home forces 
played sparkling basketball but collapsed under the pres- 
sure of a Spider full court press and failed to the tune of 
68-65. 

hfaving won six of their eleven conference games, the 
Tribe qualified for the Southern Conference Tournament 



being held at Morgantown, West Virginia. The Indians 
drew the host team, the West Virginia Mountaineers, for 
the opening night and went down to a disheartening 84- 
69 defeat, despite the individual heroics of Chick Cor- 
nell who bucketed 28 points. 

The overall season's record could show only nine wins as 
against thirteen losses and the campaign yielded little in 



BILL PATTON 



MONTY KNIGHT 



GEORGE BECOUVARAKIS 



ANDY BECOUVARAKIS 




.V ^ 






WEST VIRGINIA VICTORIES STAND OUT 




Mahoney gets the tap over Maryland 



FRESHMAN TEAM 
First Row: Ouseley. Kaplan, Morrow, Enqelken. Second Row: Bain. Knick. Wil- 
son, Manager Robbins. 



the way of immediate success. Inexperience proved to be 
too much in the face of the stiff competition scheduled. 
On the brighter side, the squad had gained the expe- 
rience that had been lacking and this would return in the 
persons of Mahoney, Bollerman, Mountain, and Kern for 
the coming season. Though Cornell, Patton, Knight and 
Stubbs had hung up their gear for the last time, an abun- 



dance of freshman talent promised to fill in the gaps pro- 
vided by the seniors exit. The frosh, under the tutelage 
of Jerry hiarris and Rhea Lazarus, had chalked up nine 
wins as against two losses and Charlie Morrow, Ed Shefer, 
Jim Kaplan, Willie Ousley and Don Englekin all displayed 
ability that made William and Mary's basketball destinies 
loom brilliantly on the horizon. 



CHICK CORNELL 



ALEX HARPER 



BILL KERN 



JOHN MAHONEY 





BASEBALL 




f f ^ ^ f >^# f t 



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Jv^'li^.ail.M: 






((neelinrr Abdplld, Groettum, Hopkins, Beqor, T Mdrtin, Grieco, Stromberg, Rumbel, Bowman. Standing: Kalison, 
Cockerllle. Forbes. Hdmilton, Hubbard. Ciark. Knight. Lask/, Twomey, Watts. Pendleton. Wall. Tipton. 




Coach Eric lipton 



Baseball season, I 953, found William and Mary experiencing 
another disappointing year in Its baseball history. Despite the 
seasoned leadership of Co-Captains Al Kersey and Hardy 
Cofer, the Tribe was able to win only five games out of nine- 
teen. Eric Tipton, in his first year as head coach, fielded a 
potentially strong team that had trouble finding itself. Pitchers 
Jimmy Carter and Bill Twomey showed flashes of brilliance 
on the mound and offensive power was provided by hard hit- 
ting Bill Bowman and Don Jeffrey. Monty Knight and Dick 
Pendleton looked good at their infield positions but the coilec- 

Pepper game in pre-season practice 



9 



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five efforts of these players was not enough to 
bring about a favorable won-lost record at the 
end of the year. 

When March of I 954 rolled around, Coach Tip- 
ton sent out a call for candidates for his second 
William and Mary baseball team. With the five 
won and fourteen lost season behind him, he was 
looking ahead to better things for I 954. 

Twomey was still around to anchor the mound 
corps and add hitting strength too. Jim Cockerill, 
a transfer from Sheppard College in West Vir- 
ginia, and left-handed Tom Hamilton showed up 
to help Twomey with the pitching chores. Tipton 
converted utility players, Jim hlubbard, Gene 
Hopkins and Dick Wall into hurlers to bolster the 
prospects in that department. 

Knight and Pendleton returned to resume their 
infield duties and found much spirited competition 
in the persons of Al Grieco and Wayne Begor. In 
pre-season practice sessions, Grieco and Begor 
were displaying much ability both in the field and 



left a big gap to be filled behind the plate. Hot- 
test prospect there was Doug Henley, who 
doubled as a fullback on the football team. 

In the outfield, Tipton had only one returning 
letterman to rely on. Bill Bowman was back in the 
fold for his last, and what he hoped would be, his 
best year. Roger Groettum became a starter in 
left field but a lack of personnel forced Tipton to 
move Tommy Martin off first base to patrol the 
right field pastures. Hike Abdella, Sam Mitchell, 
Harvey Lasky and Al Clark provided the reserve 
strength. 

At the start of the regular season. Coach Tip- 
ton could not anticipate with optimism the fate 
of his new team, for as in many of the other varsity 
sports on the Reservation, inexperience and a 
shortage of athletes threatened to take their toll. 
The freshman rule, back in effect, postponed the 
use of many first year performers who could have 
provided the optimism. A heavy schedule of 
Southern Conference, Atlantic Coast Confer- 







■■■at 







Illlllill 






^. 








>*A 



The Mound Corps 



Tipton instructs the outfielders 



at the bat. First base, third base and catcher po- 
sitions were guestion marks at the start of the 
regular season. Larry Forbes and Tommy Martin 
looked like best bets around the first sack and 
Tipton tried Knight at third, keeping Grieco at 
shortstop. The graduation of husky Don Jeffrey 



ence, Big Six and Little Seven foes added to Tip- 
ton's woes. They included Hampden-Sydney, 
George Washington, Maryland, V.P.I., Washing- 
ton and Lee, West Virginia, Randolph-Macon, 
V.M.I, and Richmond. 



193 




Coach Kernodle with Captain Spies 



TENNIS 



Bright weather and bright prospects greeted Wayne 
Kernodle as he began his second year coaching tennis 
on the Reservation. Experienced lettermen and enthuisias- 



tic aspirants bolstered hopes for a successful season. Losses 
from the '53 sguad included number-one man Garner An- 
thony and Asghar Ali. hlowever prospects were good for 
improvement over the 7-7 record of the previous seasor). 

Led by Captain Carl Spies, the team opened practice 
early in March, striving for favored positions in the player 
rankings. Returning netmen Spies, Hosey Hearn, Carl 



TOM REEL 



HOSEY HEARN 



JOE REYNOLDS 



CARL SPIES 




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TT.ser 








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I^E^lHBEffi? 



Kneeling; Humphreys, Reynolds, Hecjrn, Wells. Stdndinq: Coach Kernodle, Tucker, BdCdl, Reel, Spies. Bennett, Gieg. 



Gieg. and Tom Reel provided the nucleus of the squad. 
John Tucker, Joe Reynolds, Bob Lawson, Buddy Leather- 
wood, and Willie Wells filled out the remaining posi- 
tions and also formed the reserve strength of the team. 
The Tribe enjoyed a successful start of the season by 
defeating Rutgers, 7-2. Other opponents of the year in- 

Doubles team, Tuclcer and Gieg 



eluded Cornell, hHampden-Sydney, West Virginia, Col- 
gate, Upsala, George Washington, Richmond, Davidson, 
V.M.I., V.P.I., Washington and Lee, North Carolina, N. C. 
State, and Wake Forest. Captain Spies also expressed 
hopes of a high finish in the Southern Conference meet 
early in May. 




195 




Golf at William and Mary was definitely on the up- 
grade as the '54 season opened on the Reservation. Coach 
Al Stewart, in his third year as mentor, welcomed a squad 
of seven veterans. Sustaining only one loss through gradua- 
tion, Captain Paul hHickey led the returning team. Experi- 
ence and ability supported hopes for a successful season 
and victory in the Southern Conference meet. 

Bob Mitchell, last year's captain, graduated leaving 
hiickey to fill the number one spot on the team. Returning 
lettermen Included Fred Aucamp, Pete Freehauf, Jim Mark, 
Jerry Murchlson, Bruce Rumage, and Bill Wray. Participa- 
tion in the annual Virginia Open and other outside tour- 
naments increased the experience of various members. 

With eight of the scheduled twelve meets played on 
home links, the Tribe gained an additional advantage. 
Bolstered by good pre-season practice, the team defeated 
Boston University 7-2 In the opening match. Other op- 
ponents included Dartmouth, West Virginia, V.P.I., Georgo 
Washington, Maryland, Randolph-Macon, Washington 
and Lee, and V.M.I. Competition for both the Big Six 
title and the Southern Conference crown took place in 
May. 

In 1953 an unimpressive 4-5 record was posted by the 
linksmen. Under the leadership of Mitchell, the Tribe en- 
joyed victory over Dartmouth, 7-2, in the first match. Con- 
tinuing In their winnnig ways, the team subdued the Moun- 
taineers of West Virginia 7-2 and the Colonials of George 



Washington 5I/2-3I/2. Maryland, as usual, proved to be a 
rugged opponent and the Tribe bowed, 6-3 in the crucial 
match. Following their initial defeat, the William and Mary 
linksmen overwhelmed V.P.I., 7-2. V.M.I, set the team back 
in a close 5I/2-3I/2 match after which Washington and Lee, 
Wake Forest, and Virginia triumphed over the collapsing 
Tribe. The squad concluded the season with an unimpres- 
sive fifth-place finish In the Virginia Intercollegiate Golf 
Open at Hot Springs. 



Coach Stewart with Captain Hickey 



GOLF 




196 




■.-*.">■ 



'^>Mt'>*'-' 



First Row: Schutte. Blanchdrd, Vdughan. Cox, Althans, Fillman. Second Row; Singletarry, Stone, Fisher, Herrman, 

Martin, Stringer, Maita, McClintock. 



With the return of a high percentage of the 1953 let- 
termen, the William and Mary tracknnen looked ahead 
to a better than average season. The only nnajor loss from 
the '53 team was middle distance man, John Munger. 

Coached by Gil Joyner, the trackmen pinned much of 
their optimism on some returning squad members. Bud 
Fisher carried the hopes of the squad in the mile and two 
mile run. Leo Schutte displayed excellent form In the mile, 
and LInwood Cox added balance in the shorter distances. 



Coach Joyner with Bud Fisher 




John Mahoney was back, showing his outstanding prow- 
ess at the javelin throw, high jump and broad jump, while 
Dick Blanchard was always ready to turn In his best efforts 
In the middle distance events. 

In the field events, George Karshner appeared to be a 
very capable performer In the shot put, as Dave Ferriday 
added to the outlook with his pole vaulting. Newcomer 
Jim Singletary, displaying great ability In the hurdles, high 
jump and broad jump, plus his winning the Five Star Meet, 
lifted the team's fortunes tremendously. 

These men were bolstered in their efforts by Larry Young 
at the pole vault position, Chet WaxmunskI and Bill Tucker 
in the shot put and "Shorty" Herrman In the broad jump. 

The outstanding problem of the team was a lack of ade- 
quate reserve power, but an experienced first squad 
boosted chances for a winning season. "Neeple" Miller as- 
sisted Joyner with the coaching duties In the field events. 
Co-captains of the squad were Leo Schutte and Dick 
Blanchard. 

The 1954 schedule pitted the Tribe against Hampden- 
Sydney, V.M.I., Randolph-Macon, Richmond, George 
Washington, Washington and Lee, V.P.I., and the annual 
Southern Conference meet. A favored V.M.I, team proved 
to be the Indians' most formidable encounter. 

A strong freshman turnout headed by sprinter Jack Yohe 
promised experience and ability for future teams. Al Strin- 
ger and Walt Fillman supported Yohe In the sprints. Bob 
McClintock displayed excellent running in the 440 and 880, 
while Mike Miller mastered the hurdles. 



TRACK 



197 




Intramural Coordinator Jensen with trophy 



their competitors for an undefeated season. In the cham- 
pionship game with the independent champs, the O.D. 
Underdogs, the Pi KA powerhouse triumphed to the tune 
of 26-6. Lambda Chi surprised the forecasters by finishing 
a strong second in the league. 

Meanwhile, Theta Delta Chi jumped into the Intramural 
race early when Bob Wallace captured the placekiclcing 
contest. Wallace's victory came after a special play-off 
with Bill Patton of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The Theta Delts 
then tool; an early lead in the race with victory in the 
swimming meet. 

While Pi KA captured honors in bowling, the Theta 
Delts went on to pad their lead with the volleyball cham- 
pionship. Again the O.D. Underdogs, representing the 
independent league victors, fell, as the Theta Delts won 
the play-offs. 

Bob Wallace continued to dominate the realm of Indi- 
vidual contests by winning the horseshoes tournament. 




Tennis Champion Fred Weinman 

Under the direction of Dudley Jensen, the William and 
Mary intramural program enjoyed enthusiastic support 
throughout the year. The program included a variety of 
sports to satisfy the majority of athletic interests. Keen 
competition was provided by the faculty as well as student 
participants, and awards were presented to the winner of 
a match between the fraternity and independent victors. 

Fall activities included six-man touch football, tennis, 
place kicking, horseshoes, bowling and a swimming meet. 
I'n the winter months, basketball, volleyball, handball, foul 
shooting and ping-pong filled the intramural schedule. 
Softball, badminton and track rounded out the various 
contests on the program. Although plans for a round- 
robin golf tournament were discussed, the meet did not 
materiallre. 

With strong representation in most sports, Theta Delta 
Chi and Pi Kappa Alpha battled to the wire for the intra- 
mural trophy. Sigma Nu provided consistently powerful 
competition and fought off the other fraternities for their 
traditionally high ranking. 

Opening the intramural wars, Pi KA waltzed away with 
the touch football championship, after sweeping awa/ 



Pi Kappa Alpha, Football Champs 




Pires buckets one tor Pi Lamb 



198 



EN'S I N T R A M U R A L S 



Little Freddy Weinman battled his way to the tennis cham- 
pionship, carrying on the tradition that independents gen- 
erally win the tournament. Herb Goldberg of Pi Lambda 
Phi swished enough baskets to capture the foul shooting 
contest. Bob Tyson, for the second consecutive year, won 
the ping-pong tournament to bolster Pi KA in the intra- 
murals race. 

Reflecting some of their traditional intramural power, 
Sigma Nu emerged undefeated to win the fraternity bas- 
ketball league. Theta Delt, Pi KA and Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
offered keen competition and finished close behind the 
leader. In the independent league, the Ting-A Lings and 
the O.D. Underdogs dominated the race. 

Pi KA was well represented on the fraternity all-star 
team when Dick Rowlett, high scorer in the fraternity 



league, and Bruce Rhea were named to the squad. Theta 
Delt's Bill Twomey, Kappa Alpha's Charlie Carter and Pi 
Lambda Chi's Johnny Pires rounded out the all-star roster. 
In the scoring race, Rowlett finished first with 194 points 
in ten games, and Pires came in second with 158 points in 
eight games. 

Concluding the intramural basketball season, the frater- 
nity league all-stars met the Independent All-Stars in a 
battle of hardwood talent. Dud Jensen, Boyd Baird, Dick 
Leftwich, Joe Jordan and Ed Phillips represented the 
cream of the independent league. 

An encouraging note in intramurals was the increased 
interest in the program throughout the year. Students and 
faculty alike provided strong support for this activity at 
William and Mary. 




On your marlt! 



The Alleys 




Horseshoe champ, Bob Wallace 



Worltout on the handball court 



199 



WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 




The Athletic Field 



Jefferson Gymnasium 



A FULL YEAR OF FUN AND EXERCISE 



Throughout the year, a majority of the women at Wil- 
liam and Mary pushed aside their books for a few hours 
every week to participate in women's athletics. Aching 
muscles marked the novice and often the experienced ones 
as well, but being a member of an intramural or varsity 
team was well worth the aches and pains. 

Although the coaches worked unceasingly on the de- 
velopment of skills, they also taught their team members 
a far greater lesson — that of good sportsmanship. This, 
perhaps, has been the outstanding characteristic of the 
women on all the intramural and varsity teams during the 
entire year. Even when thhe won-loss record was unfavor- 
able, a quick smile and hearty word of congratulations 
was offered. 

Working together with the girls from other classes, 
from other dormitories and sororities, new friendships 
were formed and new ideas and abilities were observed. 
Varsity squad members had chances to meet girls from sev- 
eral schools in Virginia, as well as those from other states 
such as New York and Pennsylvania. 

Besides the development of skills, good sportsmanship 
and friendships, there was another purpose to the system 
of women's sports. That was fun. During the past year, 
there was an abundance of fun had by all Squaws. For the 
intramural teams, there were laughs in every game, regard- 
less of the sport. The occasional spills, popped buttons 
and outlandish outfits always provided relief from tension. 
Varsity players looked forward to away games with their 
receptions, hen sessions and sometimes even movies when 
the snow was too deep to play the game. 



Beginning with the Freshman Orientation picnic and end- 
ing with the annual Spring Awards Banquet, the women 
were busy working together in fields other than actual 
sports, although an equal amount of teamwork and coop- 
eration was prevalent, hlostesses for receptions, crew 
members working backstage in the Mermette's water show 
and publicity committee members were but a few of the 
women who, although not necessarily proficient in athlet- 
ics, performed valuable services to the maintenance of the 
strength and the smooth running of the Women's Athletic 
Association. 

Early In the Spring, elections were held for new officers 
of the WAA. After hours of counting ballots, impartial 
"counters " emerged with the winning slate. Everyone was 
pleased with the results which listed Mary Lou Riggan as 
president, Brenda Korns as point recorder and Bobby 
Limont as secretary. 

The Joint Committee, composed of the officers of the 
WAA and several faculty members, handled the business 



MARION REEDER 
Director of Women's Athletics 



MARGUERITE WYNNE-ROBERTS 

Chairman of the Joint Committee 




V 



of the Association. With Miss Marguerite Wynne-Roberts 
as chairman, and Miss Lowndes Scott as executive secre- 
tary, the Joint Committee made the financial allotments 
to the various teams, approved nominations for student 
managers and attended to numerous other administrative 
matters. 

Among its many accomplishments, the Committee out- 
lined a new system for next year's intramural program. 
Only three teams will be allowed to participate in each 
sport from each sorority and dormitory; separate trophies 
will be awarded to winners on the three-team levels, and 
two small dorms or sororities will be permitted to combine 
their talents and work for points together for the entire 
year. 

With the exception of the Joint Committee, students 
carried out most of the work of the WAA. President Shir- 
ley hiaabestad spent a great deal of time running from 
meeting to meeting, organizing schedules and, in general, 
supervising all the work of the organization. The other of- 
ficers were not idle, however, as Sally Dahm kept accurate 




SHIRLEY HAABESTAD 
President of W.A.A. 



JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE W.A.A, 

Left to Rlgtit: tHaabestdd, Reeder, Brown, Wynne-Roberts, Datim. Orr, Korns, 

Scott. Bdrksdale. 



MANAGERS BOARD 

First Row: Cronk, IvIcClure, Crossct, Collins, Willard. James, Haabcstad. Sec- 
ond Row: Harshbarger. Male. Laurent. Rodriguez. Showaler. Brown. _ Ttiird 
Row: Perkins, Rosar. J. Brown. Wyckoff, Wtialey. Mannion. Kiziia, Orr. Riggan. 
Barksdale. 




count of the points accumulated by each girl during the 
year, and Brenda Korns was occupied with the duty of 
taking the minutes of meetings and other secretarial work. 

These girls, together with Peggy Orr, student head of in- 
tramurasl, and Barbara Brown, secretary of the manager's 
board, comprised the student leaders of the WAA. Each 
and every girl who was a member of the Association, how- 
ever, played an important role in its structure. One girl was 
elected from each of the sororities and dormitories to 
serve on the Intramural Representatives Board, the group 
that organized and supervised all intramural sports. 

A thankless job was that of the intramural representa- 
tives, for they were constantly plaguing girls in their dorms 
or sororities to form teams to compete in the many intra- 



mural tournaments. Once the teams were formed, there 
were schedules to adhere to, practice sessions to arrange, 
and the responsibility of keeping the squad members in- 
formed of games which they were to play. 

The Manager's Board included girls selected by the 
Joint Committee to manage the varsity and intramural 
sports. Their job was to plan the schedules for their sport 
as well as to take charge of the games while they were 
being played. Oranges had to be sliced, towels provided 
and scores recorded. 

All in all, it was a very successful year from every stand- 
point. Fewer intramural games were forfeited than ever 
before, more girls participated in extra-curricular sports 
and — a good time was had by all. 



201 



VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 
First Row: Korns, Matthews. Ddhm, Haabestad, Charbonnet, Lipps. Second Row: 
Wood. Gibb. Hall. Harcum. Laurent. Beck. Kent. Third Row; Bryant. Barksdale. 
Oakes. Ackerman. Simmerman, Riggan, Limont, Meachem, Fazon, Wyckoff, Brown, 




The old saying, "the sport for the sport itself," certainly 
held true for the varsity hockey team this year. Although 
their victories were few, this was an outstanding season 
because of the enjoyment the members derived from play- 
ing, under the guidance of Miss Reeder and Miss Bryant. 
The squad was defeated by the Richmond Club, 5-0; 
Westhampton College, 3-1; the Williamsburg Club, 3-1, 
and Madison College, 5-2. In the last game of the season, 
however, they rose to triumph over Notre Dame of Mary- 
land, 4-1. 

The junior varsity team had a very successful season 
from the won-loss standpoint. With the expert coaching of 
Miss Barrand, the girls won five out of six games. Losing 
the first contest to Westhampton J.V., by a score of 5-0, 
the team forged ahead to victory over the rest of their 
opponents. They defeated Madison College, J. V., 3-2; 
St. Catherine's School, 4-1 ; the intramural hockey winners, 
4-0, and the Norfolk Division, 7-0 and 3- 1 , in two games. 

William and Mary's big Spring sport for women was 
tennis. The courts were filled daily with many of the 



NTERCOLLEGIATE 



fourteen members of the varsity squad practicing for 
the matches with Longwood, Westhampton, Sweet Briar 
and the Middle States Tournament. Miss Barksdale 
acting as coach and Marge Willard as manager, the girls 
worked diligently in preparation for the matches. In hopes 
of equaling the 3-1 won-loss record set by their predeces- 
sors of the previous year. 

Having lost only two members of the varsity line-up from 
last year, the team was well represented by several veter- 
ans as well as enthusiastic newcomers. 

Under the capable leadership of co-captains Sally Dahm 
and Shirley hHaabestad, the basketball squad had a full 
and eventful season. Ten games were scheduled by the 
managers, and, with most of them being home games, the 
girls seemed anxious to be on their best behavior for their 
college fans. 



Varsity Tennis 



Lacrosse Action 




Action in Goucher match 



FENCING TEAM 
Laft to Right: Smith, Mduro. McL«dren. Recder. Sdlinqer, Waite, Oweni. 




COMPETITION 



Of the forwards, who proved to be the mainstays of the 
team, perhaps the most outstanding were Shirley Haabe- 
stad, Bobbie Limont, Ro Fazon and Sylvia Beck. Shirley and 
Bobbie were high scorers for the season with totals of I 85 
and 105 points respectively. 

Due credit must also be given the guards without whose 
excellent work the forwards could never have made their 
great achievements. Sally Dahm, Mary Lou Riggan and 
Carol Simmerman held the positions for most of the 
season. 

The skilled varsity fencers were chosen this year from 
the Fencing Club by careful and extracting competition. 
In their intercollegiate meets, the girls showed a great 
deal of enthusiasm, and a high spirit of good sportsman- 
ship prevailed. 



VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM 

First Row: Dahm, Haabestad, Brown, Jacobs. Second Row: Kent. Gilbert, 

Rodriguez. Gibb. Rippel, Pitman, Luce. Klzzia. 



With Miss Reeder instructing them in the fine points 
of the art of fencing, the girls took on several colleges from 
the Virginia area, besides attending meets in Baltimore 
and other tri-meets. Outstanding in all the matches were 
Margaret Owens, Barbara Jean Smith, Mab Salinger, Mar- 
leen Lauro and Connie Waite. 

For the second year. Lacrosse was one of the major 
varsity sports. One of the most exciting events of the sea- 
son was the visit made by the Great Britain-Ireland La- 
crosse Team, against whom the Squaws pitted their talents. 
Squad members included Sally Dahm, captain, Grace 
Stone, Mary Knabb, June Shearer, Maclovia Rodriguez, 
Brenda Korns, Carol Kent, Barbara Brown and Sally Baker. 




Squaws scrimmage 




R C H E S I S 

Under new leadership, the Orchesis, or modern dance 
group of the College, met early In the first semester. Even 
then, plans for the annual Spring concert were beginning 
to form in the girls' minds. On March 26, in Matthew 
Whaley Auditorium, these ideas became a reality as the 
Spring Concert was presented to an extremely receptive 
audience. 

The concert was made up of suites based on various 
plots. One, the Newspaper Suite, depicted sections of a 
newspaper. It consisted of the headlines, which were dem- 
onstrated by an escaped prisoner, and the Foreign Affairs 
Section, interpreted by an Spanish dance. There was also 
the Bargain Sale from the advertisement angle of the 
paper, and the Comic Section, which was one of the 
highlights of the concert. The Theater Section completed 
the picture of the paper and was the final touch to an in- 
teresting display of talent. 

The entire concert did not consist of the Newspaper 
Suite, however, hfelen Walsh was the choreographer of a 
suite showing scenes of New Orleans, while Dottie Guthrie 
choreographed a dance based on a scene from Alice in 
Wonderland" and Mickey Mighell planned a composition 
to the recording of Gordon Jenkins' "Manhattan Tower." 

The whole Spring Concert seemed to exemplify the will- 
ingness and the talent of the girls participating in Orchesis. 



OFFICERS 

Vice-President Joan Pearce, Secretary Helen Walsti, President Mickey t^Ighell, 
Director Kathy Edmondson. 



First Row: Walsh, O.-- , :^ovis. Swaine, C. Dav!s, Bennett, Somerville. 

BIOKsom. Haynes, Pearce, Florence, Mercer, Mighell. Second Row: Oakerson, 

Schindler, tarvin, Trent. Holmes, Hedrick, Mitchell. Myers. Kline. 



After long hours of exhausting rehearsals, they were able 
and capable to express their own interpretations through 
dance. Orchesis was not all hard work, but proved to be re- 
laxing and a good outlet for emotions and original ideas. 

The Spring Concert was not the only activity in which 
Orchesis took part. At Christmas time, Helen Walsh and 
Pat Florence danced at a Christmas program at the Meth- 



odist Church, depicting the story of the creation in dance. 
Mickey Mighell danced the part of a peasant girl in 
"Amahl and the Night Visitors." 

In February, the group journeyed to the Women's Col- 
lege of North Carolina to participate in a Fine Arts Forum. 
They presented a dance as part of the student program 
and later witnessed a concert by two famous dance artists. 



204 



E R M E T T E S 



The lights were dimmed, the audience was hushed, anx- 
iously waiting for the mysterious silence to be broken. 
Suddenly, to the strains of light, happy music, eight pixies 
crept out from behind the trees to the edge of the swim- 
ming pool. Gaily, they dived into the water and frolicked 
about, doing somersaults and back dolphins. 

"Fantasia in Fairyland," produced by Mermettes, the 
synchronized swimming club, was being put on for the first 
night of its three-night stand. With the addition of scen- 
ery, costumes and expert lightning, the show was a great 
improvement over last year's and the audience appre- 
ciated every bit of the exciting performance. 

Following the scenes with the pixies came other scenes 
from fairy tales. Outstanding were the "Ugly Duckling," 
a comedy number, and "Vespers," a poem enacted with 
aquatic movements. "Alice in Wonderland," with the col- 
orful pages, hoop-skirted maidens and cards, completed 
the first act. 

For the second act of the Mermette's Water Show, va- 
rious traditional rituals were portrayed. There were Indians 
with their war paint intensely doing a "Campfire Ritual" 
and daring gladiators in sparkling costumes recreating a 
Roman March. The skillful "Dance of the Greek Nymphs" 
demonstrated all of the feats open to synchronized swim- 
mers, while the natives and witch doctor in their "Primitive 









OFFICERS 

Vice-President Cynthia Kimbrough. Director Donnie Barrand, President Sally 

Cronk, Secretary Eloise Gideon. 



girls met on Tuesday nights and either received instruc- 
tion, practiced for the show or just swam for enjoyment. 
Each member of the Mermettes had a part in the water 








I t-.?'.^^-%f^^"^-^- 




Rehearsal for "Fantasia" 



Ritual" added a mystic touch to the show. Climaxing the 
aquacade was the Finale, which was a colorful parade in- 
cluding representative characters from the previous 
scenes. 

The water show was the outstanding achievement of the 
Mermettes, the swimming club which broke from the swim- 
ming team to concentrate on synchronized swimming. The 



In Water: Mitchell, Perkins, Patterson. Laurent, Pope, Davis, Johnson, Collins. 
Daniel. First Row: Simmons, Rosar, Hurst, Noble, Foster. Ackerman. Stables, 
Ketcham, Whaley. Dorer. Second Row: Cronk, Mackenzie, Gideon, Sandford, 
Limont, Chapman, McGinnis, Crooker. Third Row: Kinbrough, JeH, Moyer, 
Thompson, Humphreys. Carlson, Brown, Daugherty. 



show, either swimming in it, helping with its production or 
both. There were several non-swimming members who 
were concerned with the staging, costuming, lighting and 
publicity. Under the able direction of Miss Donna Bar- 
rand, the faculty advisor of Marmettes, and Sally Cronk, 
president of the club who choreographed most of the 
show, all rehearsals were run smoothly and efficiently. 



205 




INTRAMURAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Clockwise: Rodriguez, Korns, Outten, Florence. Scott, Limont. Dahm. Bell, Shaw, Brown, Noble, Orr. 



INTRA 



URALS 



An active and exciting intramural program was carried out this year by the women 
students under the leadership of Peggy Orr, student head of the intramurals. Intramural 
points were awarded to individuals and groups competing in tennis, swimming, basket- 
ball, volleyball and Softball tournaments. Teams were entered according to their ability, 
each sorority and dormitory having a first, second, third and fourth team. 

The hockey tournament was won by the Ludwell Red and Blue teams. This was one of 
the open tournaments in which points were awarded to Individual athletes. Top pointers 
were Nancy Oakes, Ann Carlson, Alice Matthews, Caria hHubbard, Vanessa Darling and 
Wendy Ulrlch. 

Alpha Chi Omega had the winning team in \he tennis tournament, topping Kappa 
Kappa Gamma and Brown in the final round-robin tournament. Among the second 
teams there were two leagues. Pi Beta Phi won in League A and Kappa Alpha Theta 
was first in League B. Ludwell's and Pi Phi's third teams tied for first place, and Ludwell's 
fourth team was top In that category. 

In the swimming tournament, PI Phi captured top honors, followed by Tri Delt In 
second place. Theta came in third, with Alpha Chi fourth. Tri Delt won in the second 



The Trophy 




206 




ALPHA CHI, TENNIS CHAMPS 
Stone, Holmes, Haabestad, Hurst 



PI PHI, SWIMMING CHAMPS 
McWilliams. Wallace. Cronk, Bleick. Bodley. Jett 



team competition, and Pi Phi in third and fourth team lev- 
els. Outstanding swimmers participating in the tourna- 
ment were Lois VIII, Judy Bell, Alice Anderson and Bar- 
bara Mitchell. 

In basketball, Sally Ackerman, hHelen Noble, Julie 
Holmes, Zona Mae Fairbanks, Dolores Baroffio, Peggy 
Hedrick and Pat Culpepper did much for their teams 
with individual ability and the spirit of teamwork. 



High scorers and point winners in the bowling tourna- 
ment were Carol Butters and Joan Welch. Margot Ketch- 
am and Sally Jett received the greatest number of points 
in the badminton tournament, while volleyball stars were 
"Mac" Rodriguez and Joyce Outten. High scorers among 
the participants in the Softball competition were Barbara 
Campbell, Margaret Graves, Barbara Diggs and Brenda 
Korns. 



Get that ball! 



Up and over! 




207 








W^StB' 















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a 




UNDERCLASSES 




eggs. Clark, Guess, E. Coco 



JUNIOR CLASS 



DICK CLARK President 



GENE GUESS Vice President 

PATTI BEGGS Secretary-Treasurer 

EDWARD COCO Historian 



CLASS 



OFFICERS 



210 




Montgomery. Blanchard, Ketchum, Clark 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



DICK BLANCHARD President SHARON MONTGOMERY 

BOB CLARK Vice-President MARGOT KETCHUM . . 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Historian 



Ottaway, Wlrth. High, Johnson 







FRESHMAN CLASS 

PETE HIGH President 

JOHN OTTAWAY Vice-President 

KAY WIRTH Secretary-Treasurer 

BONNIE JOHNSON Historian 



unafu^ 





My feet aren'l THAT big 



First Row: 

WILLIAM JOSHUA ABELOW; Roctaway Park, New York; Fine Arts; Pi 

Lamda Phi. 

JOANN ALFANO; Arlington; Fine Arts. 

RUEL JEAN ALFORD; Williamsburg; Business Administration, 

SUSAN HOUSTON ALLEN; Bradford, Pennsylvania; English; Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 

CARL W. ANDERSON, JR.; Portland, Connecticut; History; Sigma Pi. 

JEAN DEON ANDREWS; Detroit, Michigan; Spanish; Kappa Alpha Theta. 



Third Row: 

GENE LLOYD BARHAM; RIcnmona; History; Lamoaa Cnl Aipna. 
DOLORES E BAROFFIO; Falls Church; Jurisprudence; Alpa Chi Omega. 
GRACE BEACH; Morrlstown. New Jersey; English; Kappa Delta. 
GEORGE BECOUVARAKIS; Hampton; Education; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
PATRICIA L. BEGGS; McLean; Psychology: Pi Beta Phi. 
JOSEPH HUXLEY BELL; Alexandria; English; Pi Gamma Phi. 



Second Row: 

JULES MICHAEL BACAL; New York, New York; Government; Theta Delta Chi. 

CAROL MAE BACKMAN; Hingham, Massachusetts: Spanish. 

PERCY GLENN BAILEY; Kenbridge; Economics; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

MILTON STANLEY BAIN; Dinwiddle; Chemistry; Sigma Pi. 

SALLY PATRICIA BAKER; Alexandria; Psychology. 

CAROLYN C, BARBER; Vero Beach, Florida; Sociology; Chi Omega. 



Fourth Row: 

RICHARD DAVID BENNETT; Bayonne. New Jersey: Jurisprudence; Pi Lambda 

Phi. 

JAMES IRWIN BERNHARDT; Arlington; Chemistry; Sigma Nu. 
SARA JANE BLAKEMORE; Shelbyville. Kentucky; History; Phi Mu. 
THOMAS COX BOBERG; Falls Church; Physics: Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 
NINA BROADDUS BOWMAN; Richmond; Psychology; Alpha Chi Omega. 
MARTHA WREN BRIGGS; Port Washington, New York; History. 




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On your Mark! 



Gef set! 



Go! 



First Row; 

VIRGINIA ALLEN BROADDUS; Richmond; Fine Arts; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

LELAND BROOKS, JR.; Balboa Canal Zone; Psychology. 

BARBARA CHASE BROWN; Springfield, Pennsylvania; Mathematics. 

JUDITH DOROTHY BROWN; Nutley. New Jersey; Education; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

JAIvlES DAVENPORT BRYDEN; Alexandria; Sociology; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

GEORGE WILLIAM BURNS, JR.; Portsmouth; English; Sigma Pi. 

Second Row: 

NANCY JEWELL BUTLER; Portsmouth; Fine Arts; Alpha Chi Omega. 

WILLIAM ROBERT BUTLER; Saratoga Springs. New York; Econor^ics; Phi 
Kappa Tau. 

ANN CAMBRIDGE CALLIHAN; Ashland, Kentucky; Education; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

BAYNHAM CAMPBELL; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Biology; Pi Beta Phi. 

DAVID BOND CARICO; Warwick; Business Administration; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

LILLIAN MADISON CARTER; Richmond; English. 



Third Row: 

ELIZABETH ANNE CARVER; Arlington; English; Gamma Phi Beta. 
PATRICIA CHENOWITH; Baltimore, Maryland; Fine Arts; Phi Mu. 
CAROLINE E. CHRISTIAN; Hampton; Mathematics. 
CONSTANCE CLAGUE; Annandale; Education; Delta Delta Delta. 
RICHARD FRANKLIN CLARK; Hampton; Biology; Kappa Sigma. 

BEVERLEY TROH CLASON; West Hartford, Connecticut; Sociology; Kappa 

Delta. 

Fourth Row: 

HOWARD DALLAS CLINE; Grand Blanc. Michigan; Economics; Phi Kappa 

Tau. 

JEREMY DAVID CLULOW; Greenwich, Connecticut; Psychology; Phi Kappa 

Tap. 

EDWARD COCO; Riverdale, New York; Biology; Theta Delta Chi. 

ROBERT COCO; Riverdale, New York; Business Administration; Theta Delta 

Chi. 

HARRIET ANN COLLINS: Arlington; Spanish; Gamma Phi Beta. 
PATRICIA MARIAN COLLINS; Arlington; Psychology. 



#^ ^ 1^ 




ocnoyiyL 




Dulte o^ Gloucesters rny beat 



First Row: 

DONALD COMITER; Brooklyn. New York; Biology; Pi Lambda Phi. 

MARIE ANN COMLEY; Arlington; Business Administration; Alpha Chi Omega. 

MARY JANE COMPE; Alexandria; English; Delta Delta Delta. 

BARBARA ANN COOGAN; Norfolk; History; Pi Beta Phi. 

FLOYD CRAIS; Norfolk; Psychology; Kappa Sigma. 

PATRICIA ANN CREWS; Tarrytown, New York; Spanish; Kappa Alpha Theta. 



Third Row: 

BARBARA JOAN DANSKIN; Houston. Texas; Psychology; Delta Delta Delta. 

CAROL FAUST DAVIS; New York. New York; Sociology. 

FLORENCE LYDIA DEHART; Thoroiare. New Jersey; French; Phi Mu. 

SARAH FANN DEIBERT; Clifton Forge; English; Alpha Chi Omega. 

DOROTHY JOAN DENON; Norfolk; Biology. 

STEPHEN L. DIAMOND; New York. New York; Chemistry: Pi Lambda Phi. 



Second Row: 

SARA ELVERA CRONK; San Francisco, California; Fine Arts; Pi Beta Phi. 

CAROLYN ANN CROUCH; Portsmouth; English. 

PATRICIA CULPEPPER; Norfolk; Chemistry. 

SALLY JANE DAHM; St. Davids, Pennsylvania; Sociology; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

JAMES L. DAIGLE, III; Norwich, Connecticut; Biology. 

GEORGE E. DAIL; Norfolk; Jurisprudence. 



Fourth Row; 

BARBARA ANN DIGG5; Teaneck. New Jersey; Governmenv Kacoa Kaopa 
Gamma. 

SHIRLEY C. DODRILL; Clay. West Virginia; French. 

MARGARET C, DONNELLY; Alexandria; Fine Arts; Kappa Alpha Theta. 



SANDRA GERALD DOYLE; Norfolk; Education; Pi Beta Phi. 
CURTIS LENWOOD DOZIER; Richmond; Economics; Kappa Alpha. 

RONALD I. DRAKE, JR.; Hamilton. Ohio; Business Administration; Phi Kappa 

Tau. 





Sport of kings 



Birdland? 



First Row: 

SUZANNE DUIS; Portsmouth, Ohio; Sociology; Delta Delta Delta. 

PAUL E- DUVALL; Arlington; Physical Education; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

OONY EUGENE EARMAN; Harrisonburg; Jurisprudence. 

JOAN EARNSHAW; Arlington; Fine Arts; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

BARBARA ANNE EDWARDS; Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania; Psychology. 

AGNES LA FLEUR EGGER; Washington, D.C.; Business Administration; Delta 
Delta Delta. 



Second Row: 

ELAINE M, ELIAS; Allison Park, Pennsylvania; Fine Arts; Chi Omega. 

ELIZABETH ENGRAM; Portsmouth; French. 

JACQUELINE ROSE EVANS; Fort Monroe; English; Delta Delta Delta. 

LAURA E. EVERITT; Alexandria; Sociology; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

BERNARD ROBERT FELDMAN; Brooklyn, New York; Pre-Med; Pi Lambda Phi. 

ROBERT G, FORREST; Norfolk; Math; Kappa Alpha. 



Third Row: 

PEARL A. FRAYSER; Richmond; French. 

R. PETER FREEAUF; Short Hills, New Jersey; Economics; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

CYNTHIA FRYE; St. Petersburg, Florida; English; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

MARY ANN GASTINEAU; Alexandria; Sociology; Gamma Phi Beta. 

CARL P. GIEG. Poughkeepsle, New York; Philosophy; Theta Delta Chi. 

MILTON J. GLASSER; New York, New York; Biology; Phi Alpha. 



Fourth Row: 

DONALD E. GLOVER; Fairfax; English; Sigma Pi. 

HERBERT GOLDBERG; New York, New York; Biology; PI Lambda Phi. 

MINTON FORMAN GOLDMAN; New York, New York; History; Phi Alpha. 

HERBERT A. GOLDSTEIN; Boston, Massuchusetts; Business Administration; 

PI Lambda Phi, 

RUFUS H. GORDON, JR,; Norfolk; Chemistry; Kappa Alpha. 

RALPH N. GOULSTON; New Bedford, Massachusetts; Pre-Med; Phi Alpha. 





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Hairl 



First Row: 

YOLANDA GRANT; Norfolk; History. 

ELEANOR RUTH GREENE; Waynesboro; Sociology. 

CARL GREENSTEIN; Norfolk; Business Administration. 

NANCY LOUISE GRIFFIN; Norfolk; Matherratics; Delta Delta Delta. 

HELEN THOMAS GRINNAN; Garden City, New York; Government; Kappa 
Alpha Theta. 

KALMAN J. GRUNWALD; Hampton; Mathematics. 



Third Row: 

PEGGY JOYCE HEDRICK; Richmond; Mathematics; Alpha Chi Omega. 

WALTER JOHN HERRMANN. JR.; Warwick; Business Administrafion; Kappa 

Sigma. 

BARBARA M. HIGBEE; Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Business Administration; 

Kappa Alpna Theta. 

ROGER WEBB HILL. JR.; Union New Jersey; Economics; Phi Alpha. 
THOMAS PETER HILLMAN; Arlington; Business Administration; Ttieta Delta 

CH-. 

DUANE ALTON HOCKENSMITH; Washington. D.C.; Physics. 



Second Row: 

STEPHEN BANCROFT HAMILTON, JR.; Norfolk; Chemistry; Kappa Alpha. 

CAROLINE HANDY; Appalachia; Modern Languages. 

J. ANTHONY HANNOLD; Hatfield, Pennsylvania; Business Administration. 

HARRIEHE HARCUM; Franklin; Psychology; Gamma Phi Beta. 

ELEANOR S. HAYNES; Broomall, Pennsylvania; Fine Arts. 

PHYLLIS JOAN HECK; Detroit, Michigan; French; Delta Delta Delta. 



Fourth Row: 

BEHY ANN HOLLADAY; Carrollton; Sociology; Delta Delta Delta. 
R LYNN HOLZBACH; Newport News; Chemistry; Kappa Sigma. 
BARBARA HUBER; Princeton, New Jersey; English; Phi Mu. 
WILLIAM P. HULL; Virginia Beach; Sociology; Kappa Alpha. 

WILLIAM SHEPARD HUMBERT III; Newport News; Jurisprudence; Sigma 

Alpha Epsllon. 

NAN HUMES; Milford. Delaware; Chemistry; Delta Delta Delta. 




Hair! 



What's going on . 



Hair! 



First Row: 

VIRGINIA LEE HUNGERFORD; Jackson. Michigan; Psychology. 

LEONORE HUNTER; AHlngton; Mathematics. 

RONALD CHAPIN JABAUT; Pittsford, New York; Fine Arts; Alpha Delta Phi. 

BETTY HENLY JAMES; Saluoa; Mathemattics; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

E. RALPH JAMES. JR.; Hampton; Mathematics; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

JOEL D. JAMISON. JR.- Roanoke; Chemistry; Theta Delta Chi. 



Third Row: 

CAROL ANN KENT; Norfolk; Biology. 

JOHN KEPLEY; Roanoke; Business Administration; Kappa Sigma. 

JANE COURTNEY KE5LER; Virginia Beach; Biology: Pi Beta Phi. 

CYNTHIA BEVERLY TUCKER KIMBROUGH; Williamsburg; English; Kappa 

Alpha Theta. 

ALICE W, KNIGHT; Falls Church; Biology; Pi Beta Phi. 
VIVIAN KRICK; Wayne. Pennsylvania; Sociology; Kappa Delta. 



Second Row: 

MAE JERNEGAN; Norfolk; Biology; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

CHARLES JOHNSON; New Baltimore, New York; Physics; Sigma Nu. 

JACQUELINE L. JOHNSON; West Point; English; Alpha Chi Omega. 

MARTHA FRANCES JORDAN; Alexandria; History; Chi Omega. 

THOMAS MICHAEL JORDAN; Manila, Philippines; Chemical Engineering; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

ROBERT KALDENBACH; Falls Church; Economics; Sigma Nu. 



Fourth Row: 

FREDERIC SKELTON LA CROIX; Milwaukee. Wisconsin; History; Phi Alpha. 

IRA GILBERT LEVINE; East Rockaway, New York; Accounting; Pi Lambda Phi. 

NANCY LEWEY; Flncastle; History. 

SALLY VAN ARSDELL LITTLE; Zanesville. Ohio; English; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

BETTY ANN LOWE; Portsmouth; Education. 

OTTO LOWE, JR.; Cape Charles; Jurisprudence; Theta Delta Chi. 










k 




umb^ 



First Row: 

ANNE ELIZABETH LUNAS: Cedar Grove, New Jersey; English; Gamma Phi 
Belt). 

ERWIN DALE LUTON; Williamsburg; Accounting; Alpha Sigma Phi. 

BETTE ANN LYMAN; Longmeadow. Massachusetts; Fine Arts. 

RICHARD KENNETH LYON; Arlington; Chemistry. 

JANE EVELYN McCLURE; North Braddock, Pennsylvania; Sociology; Pi Beta 

Phi. 

PATRICIA KATE McCLURE; Norfolk; Fine Arts. 




The sound 

Third Row: 

JAMES CAYLOR MARK; Hampton; Psychology; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

DIANA KENT MARSH; Caracas. Venezuela; Spanish; Alpha Chi Omega. 

JOHN CHARLES MARSH; Williamsburg; Chemistry; Kappa Sigma. 

WAYNE C. MARSHALL; Freeport, New York; Psychology: Pi Kappa Alpha. 

WILLIAM CLYDE MATHES; Virginia Beach; Chemistry; Kappa Alpha. 

JOAN FRANCES MATTSON; Paulsboro. New Jersey; English; Ch; Ofnega. 



Second Row; 

MARK McCORMACK; New Hope, Pennsylvania; Government; Pi Kappa Alpha. 

MARGUERITE McLAUGHLIN; Englewood, New Jersey; Chemistry; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma . 

EARL VERNON McNEAL; Hampton; Jurisprudence; Kappa Sigma. 

BERNICE FRANCES MAGRUDER; Bladensburg, Maryland; Sociology; Delta 

Delta Delta. 

JOHN ANTHONY MAHONEY; East Orange. New Jersey; Economics; Kappa 
Sigma. 

FREDERICK B. MALVIN; Norfolk; Economics. 



Fourth Row: 

THOMAS ALAN MEADOR; Warwick; Fine Arts; Phi Alpha. 

DONNA BETH MELNICK; Chestnut Hill. Massachusetts; Sociology; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 

LEAMON ACKLEY MELSON, JR.; Williamsburg; Government; Phi Kappa 

Tau. 

DOROTHY ANNE MESCHUTT; Hampton Bays, New York; Psychology. 

ARTHUR LEWIS MEYERS; New York. New York; Business Administration; Pi 

Lambda Pni. 

MARJORIE IRENE MIGHELL; Washington. D.C; Fine Arts. 





omen . . . 



And song! 



First Row: 

DABNEY NEVELLE MILLER; Regent; Chemistry. 

JOHN CHARLES MITCHELL- Vero Beach, Florida; Economics; Theta Delta 

Chi. 

NORMAN NOUBAR MOOMJIAN; Aitoria, New York; Business; Kappa Sigma. 
RALPH M. MORRISON: Portsmouth. Biology. 

CHARLES READ MORTON. JR.; Hampton; Business Administration; Sigma 

Alpha Epsllon. 

MARTIN HUGH MOUNTAIN; Schenectady. New York; Government; Theta 

Delta Chi. 



Third Row: 

BARBARA JANE NEWBERRY; Rochester, New York; History; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 

HELEN FRANCES NOBLE; Glastonbury, Connecticut; Chemistry; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 

MARY LOUISE NORTH; Greenwich, Connecticut; French. 
OTIS ODELL III; Williamsburg; Physics; Pi Kappa Alpha. 
ROGER O. ORMEROD; Hartsdale, New York; Business Administration. 

JANE ANN OTTAWAY; Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Fine Arts; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 



Second Row: 

BRUCE MICHAEL MUNI; Hampton; History; Sigma Nu. 

GERALD MURCHISON. JR.; Springfield. New Jersey; Business Administra- 

toion; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

ANNE CADWALLADER MYERS; Huntington, West Virginia; Mathematics; 
Chi Omeaa. 

WILLIAM KIRK NEAL II; Charlotte North Carolina; Business; Kappa Alpha 

Orde'. 

BETSY LEE NEALE; Richmond; Business Administration; Kappa Alpha Theta. 
ELIZABETH JANE NETTLES; Wakefield; Psychology; Kappa Delta. 



Fourth Row: 

ROBERT ALLEN OWENS; Norfolk; Business Management. 

EARL EDWARD PALMER; Guelph, Ontario. Canada; Government; Phi 

Kappa Tau. 

MARY LOU PARDUE; Blacksburg; Biology; Gamma Phi Beta. 

ANN EVANS PARKER; Maysville. Kentucky; Sociology; Pi Beta Phi. 

EULA ELAINE PATTIE; Triangle; Sociology. 

JOANN PAYEZ; Scarsdale, New York; English; Pi Beta Phi. 

GLENN A. PEARCE; Portsmouth, Virginia; Philosophy; Theta Delta Chi. 




unlbhA, 



First Row: 

JOAN ADELE PEARCE; Roslyn, Pennsylvania; English; Alpha Ch! Omega. 

PATRICIA ANN PERKINS,; Hamden, Connecticut; Fine Arts; Chi Omega. 

JUDITH ELAINE PETERS; Calverton; Sociology. 

PATRICIA E. PETITT; Amburg; Education; Pi Beta Phi. 

CAROL DEE PETRIE; Alexandria; Physics. 

RUTH MARGARET PEYTON; Fort Sheridan, Illinois; History; Delta Delta 
Delta. 



Second Row: 

LARRY O. PHILLIPS; Norfolk; Business Administration. 

MARY SUE PITMAN; Williamsburg; Music. 

MARGARET CAROLYN PONTIUS; Chicago, Illinois; English; Pi Beta Phi. 

PAMELA EUNICE POOL; Summit, New Jersey; Spanish; Gamma Phi Beta. 

DOUGLAS W, PROFFITT; Norfolk; Economics; Kappa Alpha. 

FRANCES CAROL PUGH; Richmond; Spanish. 




Movie munehles 

Third Row: 

MARY WOOLFOLK RAMSAY; Richmond; Fine Arts; Pi Beta Phi. 

LOIS MARIE RAYMOND; t.1ilton. MassachuseHs; Government; Gamma Phi 

Beta. 

JOHN ROBERT REAGAN; Great Neck, New York; Accountancy: Kappa SIgnna. 
RUSSELL J. REDMOND; Chicago, Illinois; Jurisprudence. 
MARY ALICE REGIER; Hampton; Mathematics; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
MARY LOUISE RIGGAN; Norfolk; English; Chi Omega. 

Fourth Row: 

FRANK WILLIAM RILEY; Valhalla, New York; History; Pi Kappa Alpha. 
JOHN COLBY RISJORD; Kansas City, Missouri; History: Pi Kappa Alpha. 
MARTHA EVELYN ROBEY; Lynchburg; Sociology; Gamma Phi Beta. 
ALLAN BARKHURST ROBY, JR.; Alexandria; Economics; Theta Delta Chi. 
MACLOVIA S, RODRIGUEZ; Alexandria; Economics; Gamma Phi Beta. 
SUSAN ELLEN ROSAR; Bronxville, New York; History; Delta Delta Delta. 
BILL H, ROSS; Ferrum; Chemistry. 




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Food 



Feeding 



Well fed 



First Row: 

PATRICIA LEE RUSTAD; Falls Church; Education; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

PAUL A. RUTKOWSKI; Forty Fort. Pennsylvania; Economics; Theta Delta Chi, 

ALISON BETH SANDLA5S; Baltimore, Maryland; History; Chi Omega. 

OUIDA A. SAPPINGTON; Chevy Chase, Maryland; Physics. 

LEWIS S. SAUNDERS; Suffolk; Economics; Sigma Pi. 

VIRGINIA LEE SAVAGE; Fort Eustis; History; Kappa Delta. 



Third Row: 

JOHN PAUL SCOZZARI; Trenton, New Jersey; Biology; Phi Alpha. 

MARCIA LOUISE SEFRIN; Trenton, New Jersey; Sociology; Chi Omega. 

EILEEN SEGAL; Washington. D.C.; Mathematics. 

MARY JUNE SHEARER; Swarthmore. Pennsylvania; Business Administration; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

JEAN GRAHAM SHEPARD; Norfollt; Fine Arts; Delta Delta Delta. 

JOAN FRANCES SHOWALTER; Roanoke; Psychology. 



Second Row: 

BRUCE IRA SAXE; Brooklyn, New York; Chemistry; Pi Lambda Phi. 

MARILYN ANN SCHEIE; Belleville, New Jersey; Sociology; Chi Omega. 

DONALD HERMAN SCHEY; Hilton Village; English. 

MAX SCHLOS3; Norfolk; Jurisprudence. 

CLAIRE ILENE SCHOENER; Garden City. New York; Education; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

LEO EDWARD SCHUTTE; New Haven, Connecticut; History; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 



Fourth Row: 

MARCIA CAROLE 5ILFEN; Brooklyn, New York; Mathematics; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

LEONARD IRWIN SILVER; New York, New York; Accounting; Pi Lambda Phi. 

JAMES D. 5INGLETARY. JR.; Norfolk; Education. 

BARBARA ANNE SKINNELL; Rocky Mount Sociology. 

ROBERT DONALD SMITH; Hampton; Chemistry; Kappa Sigma. 

PHILLIP H, SNEAD; Lynchburg; Business Administration; Kappa Sigma. 

EDWARD B, SNIDER; Glasgow; Physical Education; Pi Kappa Alpha. 




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First Row: 

RODNEY LEONARD SOHOLT; Seattle. Washington; Pre-Medicine; Sigma Nu. 

BARBARA M. SOLOMON; Staten Island. New York; Economics; Delta Delta 

Delta. 

JANICE JUNE SOMERVILLE; Plymouth. North Carolina; French. 
PATRICIA SYLVIA SPERB; Westwood. New Jersey; Fine Arts; Chi Omega. 
JOANN SPITLER; Luray; Business Administration. 
DONALD ROBERT SPIVEY; Richmond; Physical Education; PI Kappa Alpha. 

Second Row: 

SHIRLEY LEE STAUBS; Chicago, Illinois; History; Pi Beta Phi. 
JO ANN STEPHENSON; Chicago. Illinois; History; Alpha Chi Omega. 
ROBERT WILLIAM STERN; New York, New York;. Music; Pi Lambda Phi. 
SALLY LEE STOKER; Evanston, Illinois; Sociology; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

PATRICK SCOTT STONE; Hartselle, Alabama; Business Administration; Kappa 

Alpha. 

PETER EVAN STROMBERG, Brookline. Massachusetts; History; Pi Lambda 
Phi. 




Ah-h-h! Pojr mol? 



Third Row: 

JAMES MEREDITH 5URRATT; Westminster, Mar/land; Government; Pi Kappa 

Alpha. 

MARY ANN TALIAFERRO; Green River, Wyoming; History. 

JANE CAROL TAYLOR; Chicago. Illinois; English; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

PATRICIA VON THADEN; Roanoke; Government; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

MARGIE THOMAS; Orange. New Jersey: Business Administration; Kappa 

Alpha Ttieta. 

WILLIAM O. THOMAS. JR.; Hampton; Fine Arts. 

Fourth Row: 

JOSHUA CLAYTON THOMPSON; Merion. Pennsylvania; Philosophy: Theta 

Delta Chi. 

PHILIP ALAN THORP; Cheshire. Connecticut; French. 

SUE CAROL THURAU; Batavla New York; Sociology; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

HAROLD JAMESON TODHUNTER, JR.; Oiai, California; Economics; Theta 

Delta Chi. 

JANE GARDNER TOPPING; West Point; English. 

EDWARD JACKSON TRICE. JR.; Vernon Hill; Accounting; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

EUGENIA GOODWIN TURNER; Richmond; Education; Kappa Alpha Theta. 




r m9k 




Obviously posed 



Obviously not posed 



Obviously 



First Row: 

IFIGHENIA VASSOS; Norfolk; Education. 

BEATRICE ELLEN VERRA; Madison. New Jersey; Fine Arts; Alpha Chi Omega. 

CONSTANCE WAIT; Walpole, Massachusetts; Fine Arts; Kappa Delta. 

ANN DOUGLAS WALKER; Richmond; History; Kappa Delta. 

PATRICIA ANN WALL; Mount Vernon; English; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

GAIL ANITA WANNAN; Baltimore. Maryland; Business Administration; Delta 
Delta Delta. 

Second Row: 

ROSELYN WARD; New York; English; Phi Mu. 

JOSEPH L. WELLER. JR.; Grundy; Mathematics; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

WILLIAM E. WHITE, JR.; Scranton. Pennsylvania; Economics; Phi Kappa Tau. 

WILLIAM KEY WILDE; Houston. Texas; History; Kappa Sigma. 

MARY JOYCE WILKINSON; Alexandria; Junior. 

MARJORIE V. WILLARD; Harborton; Fine Arts; Chi Omega. 



Third Row: 

JOHN RUSSELL WILLIAMS; Lemoyne, Pennsylvania; History; Kappa Alpha. 

JANE SUBLETT WILLS; Highland Springs; Mathematics; Gamma Phi Beta. 

FRED EMERY WILSON, JR.; Falls Church; History; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

MARION BEVERLY WINN; Richmond; Sociology; Chi Omega. 

JEAN E. WOODFIELD; Washington, D.C.; Spanish; Chi Omega. 

MARY ALICE WOODS; Salem; Sociology; Alpha Chi Omega. 

MARY ELLEN WORTMAN; Arlington; History; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Fourth Row: 

WILLIAM WRAY; Staunton, Virginia; Jurisprudence; Pi Kappa Alpha. 

BETTY JEAN WRIGHT; Arlington; Fine Arts; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

DEBORAH A. YOUNG; Columbia. Connecticut; English; Delta Delta Delta. 

LAWRENCE E. YOUNG. JR.; Richmond; Mathematics; Kappa Alpha. 

WILLIAM LEE YOUNGER. JR.; Blacksburg; History. 

MARILYN RUTH ZAISER; Philadelphia. Pennsylvania; Philosophy; Delta Delta 

Delta. 

RONALD S. ZUCKERMAN; Brooklyn. New York; Pre-Medical; Phi Alpha. 





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Firsf Row: 

H. JAMES ABDELLA; Gloversvllle. New York; Account- 
ing; Sigma Nu. 

SALLY CATHERINE ACKERMAN; Ancon. Canal Zone; 
Spanish; Alpha Chi Omega. 

JOANNA CARRAWAY ALLEN; Warwick; Business Admin- 

istra+ion; Kappa Alpha Theta, 

ALICE ANDERSON; York, Pennslvania; Philosophy; Delta 
Delta Delta. 

NANCY ELLEN ANDREWS; Scarsdale, New York; Fine 

Arts; Delta Delta Delta. 

GERHARD ANGERMANN; Elklns Park, Pennsylvania; Busi- 
ness Administration; Kappa Alpha Order. 

SHIRLEY ANNE ARCHER; Richmond; Sociology; Chi 
Omega. 



Second Row: 

JEANNE MAFFITT ARMSTRONG; Hopewell; Chemistry; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

VERNON EDWARD ARVIN; Hopev/ell; Business Adminis- 
tration; Pi Kappa Alpha. 

GLENNA CAROLYN BAILEY; Richmond; Music Education; 

Alpha Chi Omega, 

FAHY ANNEHE BAKER; Hampton; English; Chi Omega. 

ANN BARNEY; Warwick; Economics; Alpha Chi Omega. 

CYNTHIA BARRY; Essex Fells, New Jersey; Government. 

DAVID BEAVER, JR.; Mt. Jackson; Mathematics; Sigma 
Nu. 




Campus cop 




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Efficiency expert 




Third Row: 

JOHNNY BECOUVARAKIS; Hampton; Jurisprudence; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

DIANA BEETON; Lynbrook, New York; Fine Arts- Delta 
Delta Delta, 

RALPH LESHER BELFORD, III; Silver Spring, Maryland; 

Psychology; Theta Delta Chi. 

JUDITH ANNE BELL; Chester; Education; Pi Beta Phi. 

BETTY LOUISE BENNETT; Norfolk; Sociology; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 

PATRICIA ANN BEST; Cincinnati, Ohio; Mathematics: 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

LESTER H. BIRCHALL, JR.; Totowa Borough, New Jersey; 

French; Sigma Pi, 



Fourth Row: 

CHARLES ROBERT BISHOP; Keno-,oge Virgna; Business 
Administration. 

HERBERT WALTER BISTRONG; Baldwin, Long Island New 

York; Biology; PI Lambda Phi. 

RICHARD EUGENE BLANCHARD; Hampton; Biology; 
Kappa Siorr^a, 

JULIE ANN BLEICK; Shaker Heights, Ohio; Business Ad- 
ministration; PI Beta Phi. 

NANCY ELIZABETH BLOXSOM; Richmond; Biology; Alpha 

Cbi Omega. 

LAURENCE DE WALD BOBBIN; Montclair, New Jersey: 
Sio-a Nu, 

JOAN BARBARA BOENITSCH; Arlington; Sociology. 




Che 



First Row: 

IRA BRECHER; Rockvllle Centre, New York; Chemistry; 
Phi Alpha. 

RALPH L. BRIGHTWELL; Richmond; Business Administra- 
tion; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

SUE BRITTON, South Norfolk; Chemistry; Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 

MARY SCOTT BROADDUS; Sparta; Education; Chi Omega. 

MARTHA BROCKENBROUGH; Baltimore, Maryland; Bi- 
ology; Pi Beta Phi. 

GRAY LEWIS BROMLEIGH; Williamsburg; Government; 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

JAMES MARSHALL BROWN; Waterbury, Connecticut; 
Business Administration; Phi Kappa Tau. 



Second Row: 

JUDETH ANN BUCKERT; Rochester, New York; Fine Arts; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

SHIRLEY LOUISE BURKE; Ft. McPherson, Georgia; Soci- 
ology; Gamma Phi Beta. 

THOMAS SUY BURKE, JR.; Cleveland. Ohio; Business 
Administration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

WILLIE ANN BURKES; Grundy; English; Alpha Chi 
Omega. 

JOYCE WOODS BUTT; Williamsburg; Education; Gamma 

Phi Beta. 

EARL WAYNE CALL; Milwaukee. Wisconsin; Jurispru- 
dence; Phi Kappa Tau. 

MARGARET ESTELLE CAMP; Norfolk; Education; Gamma 

Phi Beta. 







Third Row: 

BARBARA ANN CAMPBELL; Swartswood, New Jersey; 
History; Kappa Delta. 

JOE LAWERENCE CANNADAY; Roanoke; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

DEBORAH JANE CARVER; Rahns, Pennsylvania; English; 
Delta Delta Delta. 

MING ERH CHANG; Fairfax; M. I. T. Student; Lambda 

Chi Alpha. 

DOROTHY JANE CHAPMAN; Welch, West Virginia; Gov- 
ernment; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

MARGARET BLYTHE CHAPMAN; Memphis, Tennessee; 
English. 

GEORGE ANTHONY CICALA; New York. New York; 
Psychology; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Fourth Row: 

THOMAS MICHAEL CIFELLI, JR.; Beach; Chemistry. 

MAHHEW ALLAN CLARK; Trenton, New Jersey; Chem- 
istry; Sigma PI. 

VERNON THOMAS CLAHERBAUGH; Lebanon; Juris 

prudence; Kappa Sigma. 

BETTY RUTH CODDINGTON; Williamsburg; Music. 

SUZANNE COLCLOUGH; Atlanta, Georgia; Psychology 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

SAMUEL DAVID COLE; Chatham; Economics. 

EDITH ARMITA COLLINS; Locust Grove; Business Ad 

ministration; Gamma Phi Beta. 




225 






First Row: 

JULIA ANNE CONRAD; Arlington; English. 

HARLAN C, COOPER; Parris Island, South Carolina; 
Psycholoqv. 

MARTHA PEARL COPENHAVER; Baltimore, Maryland; 
Education; Delta Delta Delta. 

JOYCE ANNE CORBETT; Front Royal; Jurisprudence. 

BECKY LOU CORBITT; Poquoson; Mathematics. 

GEORGE BEVAN COUSINS; Williamsburg; Accounting. 

HUGH RICHARD COVINGTON; New York. New York; 
Chemistry. 



Second Row: 

JEAN LILLIAN CORNWELL; Malverne, New York- French- 

Phi Mu. 

NANCY MACLIN CROWTHER; Petersburg: English; Chi 

Omega, 

NELIA UPSHAW DAGGEH; Marianna, Arkansas; French- 
Kappa Alpha Thet'-). 

MARTIN WILLIAM DAMSKY; Hampton; Chemistry. 

BARBARA ANN DANIEL; Prince Frederick, Maryland; Edu- 
cation; Delta Delta Delta. 

BETSEY DURLAND DAVIS; High Point North Carolina: 

Education; PI Beta Phi. 

ELIZABETH JOAN DAWSON; Williamsburg; History. 




Going 




Going 




Third Row: 

DANIEL DECHERT; Warwick; Government; Sigma Alpha 
Epsllon. 

CAROL ANN DECKER; Red Bank New Jersey Sociology- 
Delta Delta Delta. 

MARY DELORES DIGGS; Williamsburg; English. 

MARY BEVERLY DODSON; Dayton, Ohio- Sociology Pi 
Beta Phi. ^'' 

HELEN JANE DOUGHERTY; Harrisburg. Pennsylvania; 
Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

NANCY MILLER DOUSHKESS; Mountain Lakes, New 
Jersey; Psychology: Gamma Phi Beta. 

LOIS ELLA DOYLE; Culpeper; English; Kappa Delta, 



Fourth Row: 

HENRY RUDOLPH DRESSEL; New York, New York; Psy- 
chology; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

JAMES N. DROEGE; Chicago, Illinois; Modern Languages. 

CHARLOnE DIANE ECKEL; Falls Church; Sociology; Pi 

Beta P'- 

SHEILA DENT EDDY; Staunton; Economics; Alpha Chi 

Omeg.i. 

BARBARA RHEA EDWARDS; Norfolk; Psychology; Kappa 

Kapca Ga-T^-^a. 

BETTY BYRD EDWARDS; Hampton; Business Administra- 
tion; Alpha Chi O-neoa, 

THOMAS COLBY EHRHAROT; Bethesda. Maryland- Ps^ 
chology; Sigma PI. 



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First Row: 

SIMON JEROME EISENBERG; Dover, New Jersey; Chem- 
istry; Pi Lambda Ph;. 

PETER ELLENBOGEN; Beckley, West Virginia; Physics; 
Stqma Nu. 

RITA ANN ENGLEBURT; Phoebus; Mathematics- Alpha 
Chi Omega. 

LOIS MARY ERDMAN; Dayton; Education. 

SYLVIA SUE EVANS; Virginia Beach; Chemistry; Kappa 

Alpha Theta. 

NORAH PATRICIA EV/ELL; Richmond; Fine Arts. 
SUZANNE E. FARNO; Ridgewood. New Jersey; Sociology; 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Second Row: 

JOHN HAMILTON FAY; Roanoke; Government; Kappa 
Sigma. 

RICHARD L. FENSTERER; Monclalr New Jersey; Fine 

Art-,; Phi Alpha. 

JULIA ANDREWS FERGUSON; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Government; Delta Delta Delta. 

ROSS DENIS FILION; Swampscott. Massachusetts; Philoso 

phy: Phi Kappa Tau. 

DANTE MICHAEL FIORINI; Norfolk; Business Administra 

tJon; P; Lambda Phi. 

LOUIS FISHER JR.; Arlington; Jurisprudence; Sigma Pi 

PATRICIA ANN FLORENCE; Scarsdale, New York- Psy 

chology; Pi Beta Phi. 




Third Row: 

META STUART FOOKS; Fort Monroe; French; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 

CHARLENE RAYE FOSTER; Lynchburg- Sociology- Pi 
Beta Phi. 

WILLIAM RAYMON FRANKLIN; Cheverly, Maryland; 

Jurisprudence; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

JOHN CURTIS FULLER, JR.; Warwick; Government; Kappa 

Alpna. 

ALLEN STILES GARDNER; Silver Spring, Maryland; Chem- 
istry; Sigma Pi. 

MARGARET ANNE GARWOOD; Riverton, New Jersey; 
Biology: Gamma Phi Beta. 

RICHARD A. GATEHOUSE; Forest Hills. New York; Busi- 
ness Adm.inistration. 



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Fourth Row: 

NANCY JEAN GIBB; Arlington; Psychology; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

ROBERT DAVEY GIBBONS; Sarasota. Florida; Government; 

Lambda Chi Alpha. 

HARRY B. GIBSON; Yorktown; Jurisprudence; Sigma Pi. 

ELOISE GIDEON; Arlington; Psychology. 

ALICE MAE GLOVER; Winchester; English. 

HOWARD LEE GOLWEN; Bayonne. New Jersey; Juris- 
prudence; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

ELSIE JACQUELINE GOODMAN; Norfolk; Business Ad- 
ministration; Delta Delta Delta. 




227 



First Row: 

MARGARET ANNE GRAVES; Richmond; History. 

BEVERLY BRYAN GREENE; Whitalers, North Carolina; 
Sociology. 

ROBERT W. GRIGSBY; Arlington; Accounting; Kappa 

Alpha. 

HOWARD EUGENE GRUBB; Beach; Chemistry. 

RINDA LU GRUBBS; Norfolk; Biology; Delta Delta Delta. 

DOROTHY V. GUTHRIE; Newport News; Fire Arts; Chi 
Omega. 

RANDOLPH LEE HALL. JR.; Danville; Business; Theta 

Delta Chi. 



Second Row: 

ROBERT B. HALLETT; Upper Montclair, New Jersey: 

Government; Kappa Sigma. 

MOLLIE PATRICIA HANCOCK; Beaverdam; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

MICHAEL RICHARD HANFT; New Yorl. New York; Eco- 
nomics; Pi Lambda Phi. 

HENRY A. HARPER, JR.; Midway, Kentucky; Business 
Administration: Kappa Sigma. 

NANCY ALICE HARSHBARGER; Norton; English; Kappa 

Delta. 

LORNE WILLIAM HICKS; Jackson Heights, New York; 

Business Administration; Kappa Sigma. 

EDWARD ERNEST HILL; West Orange, New Jersey; Eco- 
nomics; Lambda Chi Alpha. 




Od P.O. 







I say. Dean, come down out of there! 




Third Row: 

NANCY ANN HILTON; Woodstock; Fine Arts. 

MARIAN ELIZABETH HOBECK; Virginia Beach; History; 
Kappa Delta. 

WALTER D. HOFFMAN, JR.; Hampton; Business Admin- 
istration. 

NAOMI SHIRLEY HOLLIS; Charlotte, North Carolina; 
Education. 

CHARLOTTE CUSHMAN HORCHNER; Waterville, New 
York; Education. 

ROLAND MEADOWS HOWARD. JR.; Portsmouth; Physics; 
PI Kappa Alpha, 

WILLIAM K. HOWSER, JR.; Arlington- Psychology Theta 
Delta Chi. 



Fourth Row: 

GRACE ANN HOYLE; Norfolk; History; Phi Mu. 

JAMES NIMMO HUBBARD III; Somervllle. Massachusetts; 

Business Admlnist-aticn; Sigma Nu. 

RENA BUFORD HUDGINS; Mathews; Business Admimstra- 

tion. 

DORALIE ANN HULTQUIST; Arlington; Philosophy; Alpha 
Chi Omega. 

JOHN OLAF HUMMEL; Gatlinburg, Tennessee; Govern- 
ment. 

WILLIAM JARED HUMPHREYS; West Englewood, New 

Jersey; Business Administration; Sigma Pi. 

SUZANNE G. HUNTER; Alexandria; English; Chi Omega. 




Water we doing? 



Firs* Row: 

JOEL THEODORE HURLEY; Brooklyn, New York; Business 
Administration. 

JOHANNA AUGUSTA HYDE; Easton. Maryland; English. 

SARAH LOUISE IVES; Western Springs, Illinois; English; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

CAROL LOUISE JACOBS; Jomesport, L. I., New York; 
History; Gamma Phi Beta. 

KENT ALAN JACpMEIN; Monroe, New York; Business 
Administration; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

GARY AMORY JAMES; Chatham; Physics. 

SAVILLE JETT; Baltimore, Maryland; Government; Pi Beta 
Phi. 



Second Row: 

GARY RICHARD JOACHIM; Rockvllle Centre, New York; 

Chemistry; Pi Lambda Phi. 

ARLINE HEDWIG JOHNSON; Pittsburgh, Pennsylania; 
German; Pi Beta Phi. 

BARBARA MARIE JONES; Petersburg; English. 

LIDA JOYNES; Hampton; Education. 

HENRY PAUL KAPLAN; Brooklyn, New York; Economics; 

Pi Lambda Phi. 

MARGOT KETCHEM; Coronado. California; Mathematics. 

LILA MAE KIMBLE; Alexandria; Fine Arts; Gamma Phi 

Beta. 



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Third Row: 

KATHERYN TIBLE KING; Richmond; English; Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 

JEAN CAROL KIRSCH; Arlington; English; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

JANE P. KIRTLEY; Rahway New Jersey; English; Pi Beta 

Phi. 

PATRICIA KIZZIA; Katonah, New York; English; Alpha 

Chi Omeqa. 

LUISE ERNA KLINGELHOFER; Westfield, New Jersey; 

Business Administration: Chi Omega. 

HILARY GAILLARD KNAPP; Lynchburg; English. 

JOHN A. KONTOPANOS JR.; Norfolk; Chemistry; Pi 

Lambda Phi. 



Fourth Row: 

GERALD B. KORNBLUM; Brooklyn, New York; Govern 

ment. 

BRENDA KORNS; Chevy Chase, Maryland; Psychology 

Alpha Chi Omega. 

KERMIT SIMMONS LAND, JR.; Pungo; Business Adminis 

tration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

NATALIE MAUREEN LANE; Union, New Jersey; English; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 

STEWART R. LANE; Gate City; Chemistry. 

HARVEY LASKY; Brooklyn, New York; Business Adminis- 
tration; Pi Lambda Phi. 

JOAN RUTH LAURENT; Rahway. New Jersey; French; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 




229 



First Row: 

NANCY HELEN LAUX; Alexandria; French; Alpha Chi 

Omega. 

LAURA LOU LAWSON; Charleston, West Virginia; Soci- 

oloqy: Alpha Chi Omega. 

C. WILLIAM LEEDS, III; Pleasantvllle, New Jersey; Chem- 
istry; Sigma Pi. 

RICHARD S, LEFTWICH; Roanoke; Jurisprudence. 

DONA SYLVIA LEITH; Norfolk; Biology. 

MORTON B. LEMBECK; Belle Harbor, New York; Business 
Administration; Pi Lambda Phi. 

BEATRICE BATCHELDER LEMOS; Warrenton; Sociology. 



Second Row; 

ALVIN S. LEVENSON; Newport News; tconomics. 

WILLIAM N. LEVINE; Miami Beach. Florida; Economicj; 

Pi Lambda Phi. 

HELEN CLAXTON LEWIS; Bethesda, Maryland; Spanish; 

Delta Delta Delta. 

ALICE RUSSELL LUCAS; Norfolk; History; Delta Delta 

Delta. 

ERLA LOIS LUDWIG; West Lawn, Pennsylvania; Govern- 
ment. 

BARBARA ANNE LUHRING; Norfolk; Philosophy; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma. 

ELEANOR MAY LUNDBERS; Arlington; Mathematics; 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 




Winner 








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Just jockeying 




Third Row: 

ADOLPHUS LOWE LUNSFORD, III; Brookneal; Economics; 
Kappa Alpha, 

BARBARA M, LYNN; Kew Gardens. New York; Chemistry. 

REBECCA R. LYNN; Occoquan; Mathematics; Kappa 

Delta. 

BARBARA LEE McCALL; Enterprise, Alabama; French; 

Chi Omega. 

CYNTHIA ANNE McCALLA; Glen Rock. New Jersey; Gov- 

ernment. 

GEORGE A, McDANIEL; Fedcralsburq. Maryland; English; 

Sigma Pi. 

JAMES L. MclNNES; Rocktord, Illinois; Chemistry; Theta 
Delta Chi. 



Fourth Row: 

JOANN McLEAREN; 'Vrlington; Sociology; Cni Omega. 

HUGH R. MacMAHON; Falls Church; Chemistry; Sigma 

Pi. 

LOIS ANNE MacKENZIE; Interlaken, New Jersey; History. 

JOAN RUTH MacWILLIAMS; Philadelphia. Pennsylvania; 

Psychology; Pi Beta Phi, 

MARY ANN MAKOVSKY; Boonton, New Jersey; Spanish; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

DELORES JOAN MANNION; Haddonfield, New Je'sev: 

English; Gamma Phi Beta. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS MARFIZO; W ndber Pennsylvania: 
Government; Sigma Nu. 



.■'^' *•'* 




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Loser 



First Row: 

JOAN KATHLYN MARSH; Oak Pork, Illinois; Business Ad- 
ministration; Gamma Phi Beta. 

JOHN HARTMAN MARSTELLER; Roanoke; Physics. 

JANET MASON; Schenectady, New York; Psychology; 
Kappa Delta. 

BARBARA ANN MASSIE; Tyro; English; Alpha Chi Omega. 

MARLENE DEE MAURO; Hampton; Sociology; Chi 

Omeqa, 

ALLISON MARY MERCER; Bayside New York; Psychology- 
Pi Beta Phi. 

JOANN MILLER; Roanoke; Mathematics; Alpha Chi 
Omega. 



Second Row: 

MILLS T. CROWLEY; Smithfield; Business Administration; 
Sigma Pi. 

NANCY LOU MINK; Toms River, New Jersey Education- 
Pi Beta Phi. 

WILLIAM DAVID MIRANDA; Brookline, Massachusetts; 

History. 

BARBARA MARIE MITCHELL; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania- 
Sociology; Pi Beta Ph". 

CAROLYN LOUISE MITCHELL; Jackson Heights. New 

York; English; Kappa Delta. 

WILLIAM AYERS MOLINEUX; Metuchen. New Jersey; 

English; Kappa Sigma. 

VIRGINIA LOUISE MOLZER; Washington. D. C, History. 





ii^tik 




Third Row: 

MARY AMBLER MONCURE; Alexandria; History; Kappa 

Alpha Theta. 

ANNE MONROE; Louisville, Kentucky; French; Gamma 

Phi Beta. 

CHRISTINE A. MONTGOMERY; Arlington; French; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 

SHARON EVELYN MONTGOMERY; Baltimore Maryland- 
History; P; Beta Phi. 

HELEN JOSEPHINE MOODY; Roanoke; Music. 

CHARLES D. MORRIS; Washington, North Carolina; 

F^enc^. 

JOHN MICHEAL M0RRI5SEY; Woodbridge; Chemistry. 



Fourth Row; 

LOIS ANN MORTASHED; Portsmouth; Education; Delta 
Delta Delta. 

WILLIAM R. MOSELEY; Blackridge; Biology; Lambda Ch 
Alpha. 

ALICE MARTIN MOTT; Washington, D.C.; French; Chi 
Omega. 

GAIL MULCAHY; Staten Island. New York; English. 

MARY MAOELIN MYERS; Falls Church; Fine Arts; Chi 
Omega. 

VIRGINIA THERESA NAAB; Easfon. Pennsylvania; Soc 

ology; Delta Delta Delta. 

JOSEPHINE ANN NAPOLINO; Flushing, New York; Bus 
ness Administration; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 




231 



First Row: 

MARY JANE NELSON; Danville; Philosophy; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

BARBARA JOYCE NEWMAN; Portsmouth; Fine Arts. 

EUGENE M. NEWMAN; Richmond; Psychology; Pi Lannb- 
da Phi. 

NANCY MARGARET NORTON; Richmond; Education; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 

BELINDA BEACH OWENS; Ridgewood, New Jersey; His- 
tory; Alpha Chi Omega. 

HORACE MELVIN PADGETT; Roanoke; Chemistry. 

MARCIA NADINE PAGE; Baltimore, Maryland; Educa- 
tion; Gamma Phi Beta. 



Second Row: 

FRANK CHARLES PASKERT, JR.; Bloomfleld. New Jersey; 

History; Sigma Alph-j Epsilon. 

BETTY ANNE PASSAMANECK; Richmond; Music. 

ELEANOR N. PATTERSON; Greensboro. North Carolina; 

Fine Arts; Gamma Phi Beta. 

SARA W. PATTERSON; Falls Church; Sociology; Alpha 

Chi Omega. 

CARL PHILIP PEARL; Miami Beach, Florida; Economics; 
Phi Kappa Tau. 

DAVID F. PECKENS; Arlington; Physics; Sigma Pi. 

PHILLIS CARMEN PERRINI; Queens Village, New York; 
French. 




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9:55 A.M. 




Third Row: 

BARBARA JOAN PETERS; Arlington; History. 

WILLIAM BURN PFEIFER; Bloomfield, New Jersey; Eng- 
lish; Sigma Pi. 

MARY ANNE PICKETT; Roanoke; Psychology; Pi Beta Phi. 

RICHARD ANTHONY PIERSON; Oak Bluffs, Massachu- 
setts; Business Administration; Phi Kappa Tau. 

KENNETH L. PILAND; Warwick; Chemistry; Sigma Nu. 

SARA ANNE POPE; Drewryville; Education; Phi Mu. 

SUE HARPER POPE; Ottawa Lake, Michigan; Education: 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Fourth Row: 

MARY VIRGINIA PORTNEY; Valley Stream, New York: 

Mathematics; Gamma Phi Beta. 

ELAINE ELIZABETH PRATT; Bernardston. Massachusetts: 

Psychology; Kappa Kapca Gamma. 

WILLIAM L. RAGLAND, III; Richmond; Biology: f^^^■ 
Kappa Tau. 

LETITIA DIANE RALEIGH; Oak Park, Illinois; Spanish; 

Kapoa Delta. 

THOMAS JOHN RARDIN; Laramie. Wyoming; Account 

inq : Pi Kappa Aloha. 

CASSANDRA F. RAWN; Norristown, Pennsylvania; Chem 

Istrv. 

EDWARD JOSEPH RAY; Yorktown; Pre-Engineering; Phi 

Kappa Tau. 



tjflffei 




I remember Mamie 



First Row; 

RICHARD LESLIE RAYBOLD; Mitchell Air Force Base. 

New York; Physici. 

DAVID THOMAS REEL; Bethesda, Maryland; English; 
Signna Pi. 

HARLAN J. REYNOLDS; Endlcott, New York; Govern 

ment. 

JOSEPH W. REYNOLDS; Danville; History; PI Kappa 

Alpha. 

THOMAS HILLERY RINK; Danville; Business Administra- 
tion; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

MARGARET ANNE ROOK; Richmond; Accounting. Delta 
Delta Delta. 

JOSEPH JAMES ROSSI; Gloversville, New York; Chem- 
istry; Sigma Nu. 



Second Row: 

RICHARD B. ROWLETT; Laramlne. Wyoming; Business 
Administration; PI Kappa Alpha. 

DAVID A. RUBENSTEIN; Long Beach. New York; Eco 

nomics; Phi Alpha. 

PATRICIA S, RUFFIN; Vi'illiamsburq; Education; Gamma 
Phi Beta. 

BRUCE C. RUMAGE; Bayside. New York; Jurisprudence: 

Kappa Alpha, 

PATRICIA ANN RUND; Fort Bennlng. Georgia; English. 

WILLIAM THOMAS RUNDIO; Suffolk; Pre Medicine; 
Kappa Alpha. 

EDITH MAB SALINGER; Hastlngs-on-Hudson. New York; 
English. 




Third Row: 

JOAN MARIE SANDFORD; Wynnewood. Pennsylvania; 
English. 

SOPHIE M. SCANDALIOS; Long island City. New York; 
Modern Languages; Gamma Phi Beta. 

DAVID ALLEN SCHEER; Mamaroneck. New York; Chem- 
istry; Phi Alpha. 

BETTY HALL SCHINDLER; Arlington; Mathematics. 

JOY SCHLAPPRIZZI; Mamaroneck. New York; Spanish; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

GERALD A. SCHEIDER; New York. New York; Biology; 
Phi Alpha. 

SANDRA SCOTT; Tallahassee. Florida; Fine Arts. 



Fourth Row: 

MURIEL ELEANOR SEEKAMP; West Palm Beach, Florida; 
Government. 

DONALD W. SEILER, JR.; Portsmouth; Jurisprudence: 

Lambda Chi Alpha. 

GEORGE ROBERTS SEILER; Oakland, California- Chem- 
istry; Theta Delta Chi. 

STEWART SELL; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Biology; PI 

Kappa Alpha. 

ANNE RANDOLPH SHORH; Richmond; Business Adminis- 
tration; Alpha Chi Omega. 

WILLA MINDEL SIEGEL; Richmond; Psychology. 

ALICE LUCILE SMITH; Alexandria- Government; Delta 
Delta Delta. 




First Row: 

CAROLYN GERRY SMITH; Arlington; Education. 

DAPHNA R. SMITH; Tallahassee. Florida; Spanish. 

DENIS ALAN SMITH; Chicago Illinois; Jurisprudence; 
Theta Delta Chi. 

MARGARET ELIZABETH SMITH; Williamsburg; Business 
Administration. 

HELEN FAY SMITH; Riverhead, New York; French; Kappa 
Alpha Theta, 

ROBERT DONALD SMITH; Hampton; Business Administra- 
tion; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

SHIRLEY CORRINE SMITH; Schenectady, New Yorl<; 
Psychologv- 



Second Row: 

RUTH ELIZABETH SNAPP; //inchester; Government. 



ANNE CAMPBELL SNYDER; Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; 

Fine Arts. 

J. WALTER SPARKS; Rockford, Illinois; Mathematics; 

Theta Delta Chi. 

PATRICIA JUNE SPELTZ; Memphis, Tennessee; History; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

FLORENCE MARIE STABLES; Portsmouth; Psychology. 

VICTORIA CLAYTON STONE; Chicago, Illinois; Chem- 
istry; Alpha Chi Omega. 

MARY JANE STONEBURG; Wallklll. New York; Govern- 
ment. 




The Stamp Act 




Judgment day 




Third Row: 

CAROLYN BAILEY SUBER; Darien. Connecticut; Govern- 
ment; Chi Omega. 

HELEN ELIZABETH SWAINE; Ivlanhasset New York- Edu- 
cation; Pi Beta Phi. 

MASON SWANN; Hopewell; Business Administration; 
Kappa Sigma. 

ROBERT D. SWEARINGEN; Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania; 

Psychology. 

WILSON FREDERICK SWEENEY; Mahden. Connecticut; 

History; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 

LESTER ANNE SYKES; Williamsburg; French. 

BARTON HARVEY TAYEH; Brooklvn New York- Govern- 

i.ient; Pi Lambda Phi. 



Fourth Row: 

JANE ELIZABETH THOMPSON; Mundelein, Illinois: Ger- 
man; Kapoa Alpha Ttieta. 

JAMES CARLETON THOMSON, JR.; Portsmouth; Chem- 
istry; p; Kao-^a Aloha. 

MARY JOANNE TINE; Ridgewood, New Jersey; Psy- 
chologv; Kappa Delta. 

JOYCE DOROTHY TISDALE; Merlon, Pennsylvania; Fine 

Arts; Kappa Alptia Theta. 

HOWARD TURNER; New York New York- Pre-Medicine; 

Pi Lambda Pl-I. 

ELIZABETH M,- TUHLE; Richmond; Chemistry. 

MARY MARCELLA VAN DEUSEN; Schenectady. New York; 

Mathemat'cs; C^i Omega. 




Ex P. O. 



First Row: 

SUSAN VAN VOLKENBURGH; Delmor, New York; Gov 
ernmen); Delta Delta Delta. 

LOIS ANNE VILL; Weit Orange. New Jersey History: Pi 

B.-tG Pn,, 

RONALD CLAIR VLIET; Alma, Mictiigan; Economics. 

VIRGINIA VON BREITENFELD: Staten Island, New York: 

Socioloav: Phi Mu. 

JANELLE E. WALKER; Smithfield; English; Gamma Phi 
Beta. 

HELEN LYDIA WALSH; Williamsburg; Jurisprudence; 

Kdppa Alpha Thet.T. 

SONYA ELIZABETH WARNER; Houston, Texas; Chem- 
try; Gamma Ptii Beta. 



Second Row: 

MARY WORTH WARREN; White Slone; Fine Arts- Gamma 

Phi Beta. 

CATHERINE WASH8URNE; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
English: Kappa Alpha Thcta. 

EDWARD A. WATKINS, JR.; Williamsburg; Government; 
Kappa Sigma. 

JOAN DAVIS WATSON; Moffet Field, California; Spanish; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

PATTY LYNN WEATHERLY; Big Stone Gap; Education; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

CATHERINE ELLEN WELCH; Nashua, New Hampshire; 

Psvchology; Gamma Phi Beta. 

PATRICIA ANN WELLS; Falls Church; Psychology; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 





>= 



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Third Row: 

N. ANTHONY WERNER; Sarasota, Florida; Economics: 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

SUSAN G. WHALEY; Westfield, New Jersey; Psychology; 
Chi Omega. 

JAMES IRVIN WHITE; Fremont. Ohio; Chemistry; Phi 
Kappa Tau. 

MARGARET LOUISE WILDER; Marietta, Georgia; Psy- 
chology: Gamma Phi Beta. 

MARY ARCHER WILLIS; Bayside, New York; English. 

MARTHA BOND WOLFE; Coeburn; English. 

GEORGE D. WOOD; Newport News; Business Adminis- 
tration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



Fourth Row: 



JEAN CARYL WYCKOFF; Summit, New Jersey; English 
Kapoa Kappa Gamma. 



PAULEHE MARIE YATES; Alexandria; Spanish. 



CECILIA DORSEY YOUNG; Angler. North Carolina 

Music. 



W. LEWIS YOUNG, JR.; Roanoke; Physics; Phi Alpha. 



ANTHONY A. YURKO. JR.; Weirton West Virginia; Pre 
Medicine; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 




235 



First Row: 

JO ANN ABBOTT; Clifton Forge; Mathematics; Alptia 
Chi Omega. 

PEGGY ELIZABETH ADAMS; Winston Salem North Caro- 
lina: French; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

JAMES WAYNE ADAMS, JR.; South Boston; Chemistry; 
Kappa Alpha Order. 

CARLEW DEE ALEXANDER; Arlington; History Pi Beta 

Phi. 

GUY FLETCHER ALLEN; Arlington; Biology; Sigma Alpha 
Epsllon. 

TAMZEN DEE ALLEN; Libertyville Illinois; Fine Arts; Pi 
Beta Phi. 

MALCOLM McKAY ANDERSON; Cresskill, New Jersey; 
Education. 



Second Row: 

WILLIAM A ARMBUSTER; Arlington; History. 

FREDERICK J. ASALS. JR.; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 
Psychology; Sigma Pi. 

JOHN SINCLAIR BAIN; West Orange, New Jersey; Bl: 
ness Adminitratlon. 

JOHN WILLIAM BAIR; Pleasantville. New York; Business 

Administration. 

ELEANOR ANN BAIRD; Louisville. Kentucky: History: 

Kappa Kappa Gar^rr.a. 

SHIRLEY ANN BAZZLE; Winchester; History; Kappa Alpha 

Theta. 

SARAH MYRNA BEALL; Richlands; Spanish. 




Thanksaiving in the cafe 





Third Row; 

SYLVIA LEWIS BECK; Thomasville North Carolina; Fine 
Arts; Delta Delta Delta. 

ELVA BARROW BECKHAM; Danville- Psychology Pi Beta 

Phi. 

NANCY LITTLETON BEERY; Norfolk- Education- Gamma 
Phi Beta. 

JUDITH LLOYD BEHYMER; Baltimore, Marylano; Modern 
Languages. 

RICHARD STUART BELL; Bedford, Pennsylvania; Business 
Administration; Sigma Pi. 

MADELYN V, BENNETT; Washington, D.C.; Psychology. 

MARY JOSEPHINE BENNETT; Miami, Florida; Fine Arts. 



Fourth Row: 

NANCY CAROLYN BERRY; Vienna; Jurisprudence. 

NANCY LORING BINNEY; Toledo, Ohio: Education. 

SAMUEL SHEARER BISESE; Portsmouth, Biology. 

JOAN HOLLAND BOMAR; Newport News; English. 

NANCY ELLEN BONNEY; Creeds; Business Administration. 

BARBARA LEE BOOTH; Richmond; Education. 

BEVERLEY ANNE BORUM; Blackstone; Education. 




Traditions 



First Row: 

HARRIET LENORE BOSS; E«more: History: Kappa Kappa 



GAIL ELIZABETH BOWEN; Coronado. California; Educa- 



HELEN SUE BRIEL; Richmond: Sociology. 

BERNARD DOUGLAS BROCKMAN; Amherst; Business 
A-iminlstratlon; Sigma Alpha Epsllon, 

HENRIETTA ERMA BROOKS; Norfolk; History, 

BARBARA LOU BROWN; Paterson. New Jersey; Psy- 
chology. 

JUDITH WATSON BROWN; Augusta, Georgia; Biology; 
Alpha Chi Omega, 



Second Row: 

JANE REYNOLDS BRUMMITT; Plllsford New York- Enq. 

Ilsh, 



ALAN JOSEPH BUCHSBAUM; Savannah Georgia; Fine 
Arts. 

MARCIA ANN BUEHLER; Hagerstown. Maryland; His- 
tory, 

JAMES L. BULLOCK. JR.; Smithfield; Biology. 

ERVA LYNETTE BURKETT; Storardsville; Psychology. 

GEORGIA MAE BURKS; Alexandria; Sociology. 

MARQUIS B, BURNETT; Staunton; Business Administra- 
tion. 




Third Row: 

MARY KAY BUSH; Arlington; Government. 

ANNE ELIZABETH CALLIS; Williamsburg; Fine Arts; 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

RICHARD WALTON CALVERT; Arlington; Physics; Sigma 



CAROLYN MAY CANOLES; Norfolk; English; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 

ANN BROCKINGTON CARLSON; Ramsey. New Jersey; 
Mathematics; Gamma Phi Beta. 

CONSTANCE ANN CARLSON; Norfolk; Education. 

PAMELA DOREEN CARTIN; Falls Church; Education; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 



Fourth Row: 

LEAMAN H. CASWELL, JR.; Oannemora. New York; 

Chemistry; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

JOHN CARLOS CAYWARD; New Ipswich. New Hamp. 
shire; Blologv: Lambda Chi Alpha. 

JAN CHARBONNET; Jacksonville. Florida; Biology; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 

KATHERINE BRANCH CHRISTIAN; Richmond; Biology; 

Delta Delta De'ta. 

RONALD STANLEY CLARK; Harmans, Maryland; Soci- 
ology. 

DEBORAH COLLINS; Indianapolis. Indiana; English; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

DINO ANGELO COSTAS; Williamsburg: Jurisprudence; 
Kappa Sigma. 



Our Tobacco Bowl Princess 




First Row: 



RICARD THOMAS COUTURE; Portsmouth; History. 

NEDDA DRUE COX; West Palm Beach, Florida; English; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

ELIZABETH CRAIG; Philadelphia. Pennsylvania; Biology; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

ROBERT LLOYD CRANDALL; Barrington, Rhode Island; 
Business Administration; Kappa Alpha Order. 

BARBARA SUE CRIDLIN; Warwick; French. 

SANDRA JEAN CROMWELL; Warwick; Sociology; Kappa 

Alpha Theta. 

SYLVIA CROOKER; Purcevllle; Fine Arts. 



Second Row: 

THORNTON CROXTON; Silver Spring, Maryland; Govern- 
ment. 

PATRICIA ANNE CURLIS; Richmond: Spanish. 

MARY FRANCES CURRO; Jackson Heights, New York; 

Education. 

NORMA LOUISE CURTIS; Falls Church; Education. 

SARAH ANNE DALLAS; Springfield, Pennsylvania; Psy- 
chology. 

CHARLES RAYMOND DANIEL, JR.; Naruna; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

DIANA MAE DANIELS; Middletown. Connecticut; Modern 
Languages. 









Third Row: 

VANESSA DARLING; Northport, New York; Sociology. 

SALLY ANN DARNER; Washington, D.C.; Philosophy; 
Delta Delta Delta. 

MARCIA RUTH DAY; Pittsford, New York; History. 

DIANA JO DIBBLE; Danville; Sociology; Pi Beta Phi. 

WILLIAM EDWIN DICK. JR.; Afton; Business Adminis- 
tration; Phi Alpha. 

EUGENE DIETRICH; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Biology; 
Pi Lambda Phi. 

JAMES HARDY DILLARD; Williamsburg; Business Ad- 
ministration. 



Fourth Row: 

DENNIS CHARLES DIX; Arlington; Government; Kappa 

Sia":a. 

ANN MARIE DODDS; Flint, Michigan; Hglish. 
DONNA LEIGH DORER; Norfolk; Fine Arts. 

CAROL VIRGINIA DUNN; Arlington; English; Delta Delta 

Delta. 

NANCY LEE DUNN; Bristol, Connecticut; Business Ad 
ministration; Gamma Phi Beta. 

WILLIAM THOMAS ELEY; Alexandria; Physics; Kappa 

Alpha Order. 

DONALD HOWARD ENGELKEN; Paterson, New Jersey; 
Economics. 




Freshman fracas 



First Row: 

CLIFFORD KAPPS ERIKSON; Brooklyn, New York; Busi- 
ness Administration; Ptii Alptia. 

ANN EVANS; Prenter, West Virginia; Education. 

ZONA MAE FAIRBANKS; Richmond; Jurisprudence; Alpha 

Chi Omega. 

ROSEANNE MARIE FAZON; Perth Amboy. New Jersey; 

Bioloqv. 

MARGARET VANESSA FENTRESS; Princess Anne; Chem- 

i.try. 

BENSLEY FIELD; Far Hills, New Jersey; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

SHARON FIELEKE; Momence, Illinois; English. 



Second Row: 

ARTHUR KING FISHER; Parkslcy; Education. 

JANET CLAIRE FISHER; Colllngswood New Jersey; Fine 

Arts; Alpha Chi Omega. 

KATHRYN FISHER; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Chemistry; 
Delta Delta Delta. 

JANE EMBREY FLOURNOY; Richmond; Education. 

WHITNEY ANN FOLEY; Baltimore, Maryland; Psychology. 

SUE ELLEANORE FRYER; Chantilly; Government. 

SARA FRANCES GALLAMORE; Norfolk; Fine Arts; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 




Third Row: 

GEORGIA CLAUDIA GARDNER; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
English; Kappa Delta. 

ALAN DAVID GARFIELD; Woodmere, New York; Juris- 
prudence; PI Lambda Phi. 

NELDA LOUISE GARRETT; Portsmouth; French. 

SHARON GARRISON; Arlington; Chemistry; Delta Delta 
Delta. 

JOAN HAGER GATLIN; Arlington; Psychology. 

ESTHER SUSAN GERSTEN; New York, New York; Soci- 
ology. 

ELIZABETH ANNE GILBERT; Drexel Hill. Pennsylvania; 

Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Fourth Row: 



GILBERT LOFTIN GRANGER; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
Business Adinlstration; Lambda Chi Alpha. 

EDWARD MARTIN GRAY; Long Beach, New York; Busi- 
ness Administration; PI Lambda Phi. 

BARBARA ASHLEY GREENE; Portland, Oregon; Eng- 
lish. 

HARRY GRIFFIN HAGER, JR.; Herndon; Physics; Kappa 
Alpha Order. 

DIANA SUNDQUIST HALL; Williamsburg; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

GEORGE TAYLOR HALL; Norfolk; Business Administra- 
tion; Kappa Alpha Order. 

PATRICIA JOAN HALL; Arlington; Spanish; Chi Omega. 



Forsooth, nothing to it 




First Row: 

KATHERINE HAMILTON; Shreveport, Louisiana: History; 

Delta Delta Delta. 

VIRGINIA LEE HAMMER; Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; Enq. 
lish, 

ANNE CARROLL HANNEGAN; Arlington; English; Pi Beta 

Phi. 

BARBARA LEIGH HARDING; Halifax; Chemistry; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, 

THOMAS HARRINGTON; Falls Church; Physics. 

HELEN ANN HARRIS; Mt. Pleasant, Michigan; Chemistry; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

HELEN JOAN HARTWIS; Lake Wales, Florida; Fine 
Arts. 



Second Row: 

MARY JANE HAYMAKER; Arlington; Sociology; Kappa 

Koppa Gamr^a, 

MAJORY MARY HELTER; Arlington; Government. 

GAIL HEWSON; Derry Village, New Hampshire: Busi- 
ness Adn-iinistratior. 



BARBARA HAWLEY HOBBIE; 
Jersey; Education. 



Montclair. New 



PHEBE MAY HOFF; Richmond; Chemistry; Phi Mu. 

WILLAFAY HOPKINS; Summit, New Jersey; Psychology: 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

MARGARET CARTER HOWELL; New Glasgow; History. 




Passing parade 



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Third Row: 

CARLA JUSTINE HUBBARD; Oyster Bay, New York; Eng- 
lish. 

MAYBELLE LEE HUGHES; Warwick; Fine Arts. 

MARY LOU HUNT; Falls Church; History; Gamma Phi 
Beta. 

MARY JANE HUTTON; Charlottesville; Sociology; Pi Beta 

Phi. 

JANE RIDDELL lOTT; Petersham. Massachusetts; English. 
ANNE LOLITA JABAUT; Pittsford, New York; Education. 

SHIRLEY LEE JACOBSON; Williamsburg; Education; Chi 

Omega. 



Fourth Row: 

PATRICIA MAVIS JENKINS; Hyattsville, Maryland; Psy 

choloq>. 

ROBERT EDWARD JESTER; Mappsvllle; Chemistry. 

DAVID GORDON JOHNS; Laurel, Delaware; History. 

BEVERLY JOHNSON, JR.; Phoebus; Business Administra- 
tion; Lambda Ch" Alpha. 

BONNIE CAROL JOHNSON; Arlington; Psychology; PI 

Beta Ph:. 

CAROLYN CARVER JOHNSON; Franklin; Fine Arts. 

MARCIA ALICE JOHNSON; Washington, D.C.; Modern 

Languages; Delta Delta Delta. 




The Kafz meow 



First Row: 

BETTY ANNE JONES; Arlington; Sociology; Alpha Chi 

Omeq J, 

FATE JONES; Bedford; French; Alpha Chi Orrega. 

JOHN JOSEPH JONES, JR.; Franklin; Business Adminis- 
tration, 

PAYSON I, JONES; Madison, New Jersey; Business Ad- 
ministration; Sigma Pi. 

J, DEAN JORDAN; South Hill; Education. 

KAY JORDAN; Roanoke; Mathematics. 

SUZANNE JOURNEE; Portsmouth; Sociology; Pi Beta Phi. 



Second Row: 

MARY ANN JOYCE; Bassett; Fine Arts. 

JAMES KAPLAN; Windber, Pennsylvania; Government; 

Sigma Nu. 

THOMAS KEFALAS; Long Island. New York; English. 

RAYMOND C. KELL; West Chester. Pennsylvania; Busi- 
ness Administration; Kappa Alpha Order. 

DONALD KENDALL; Southampton. New York; English; 

Phi KapDa Tau. 

NANCY scon KIDD; Arlington. History. 

NOVA B. KIERGAN, III; Wethersfield, Connecticut; 

Mathematics. 




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Third Row: 

HELYN M. KING; Falls Church; Psychology. 

PATRICIA JO KLINE; Miami, Florida; French; Gamma 
Phi Beta. 

WALTER A. KNICK; Covington; Business Administration. 

LILLIAN MARCELLA KOCHER; Tarrytown. New York; 

French. 

PATRICIA A. KOENING; West Allenhurst. New Jersey; 

Chemistry. 

JON KOLB; Basking Ridge. New Jersey; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

KAY LAKEY; Rl:hmond; Chemistry: Pi Beta Phi. 



Fourth Row: 

JUDITH LANDER; Farmingham, Massachuetts; English. 

GAIL FRANCES LAUGHON; Portsmouth; Psychology. 

CAROLE ANN LAWLER; Clifton Forge, History. 

PEGGY LAWSON; Phoebus; Economics. 

JUNE LEFFEL; Roanoke; English. 

ANNE LEONE; Falls Church; Alpha Chi Omega. 

BRADLEY LESHER; Ephrata. Pennsylvania; Business Ad- 
ministration; Theta Delta Chi. 



Registered 




.^Bi'.i.*. W 



First Row: 

KEITH A. LETTIERE; Onancock; Business Administration. 

BERT LEVY; Sunnyside, New York; Economics; Pi Kappa 
Alph.5, 

THELMA RUNYON LEWIS; Fredericksburg; English. 

BARBARA LIMONT; Beckel, Massachusetts; Business Ad- 
ministration; Alpha Chi Omega. 

NANCY LINGENFELTER; Cape Charles; Chemistry; 
Gamma Phi Beta. 

VIRGINIA LIPPS; Aldie; Biology. 

NANCY F. LONARDELLI; Sterling; Business Administra- 
tion. 



Second Row: 

JO ANN LOVE; Portsmouth; Education. 

MARY BUFORD LUCK; Bedford, Psychology; Alpha Chi 

Omeg'3. 

MILTON LUMSDEN. JR.; Mineral; Music. 

DIANE McCARRICK; Branchville. New Jersey; Mathe- 
mat'Cs; Gamma Phi Beta, 

ROBERT McCLINTOCK; Cranford. New Jersey; Mathe- 
matics; Sigma Pi, 

VIRGIL McKENNA; V/estbury, New York; Psychology; 
Sigma Pi, 

ROBERT J. MCLAUGHLIN; Portsmouth; Biology. 




The last mile 





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Third Row: 

VINCENT D. McMANUS, JR.; Williamsburg; Mathematics. 

BENJAMIN V. MADISON, JR.; Partlow; Music, 
ELIZABETH GRAHAM MARSH; Caracas, Venzuela; French. 
NORMA J. MARSHALL; Arlington; History. 



RONALD MASNIK; Forest Mills, New York; Chemistry; 
Pi Lambda Phi. 



RALPH DOUGLAS MASON, JR.; Burkeville; Chemistry; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, 

LAURENA MATSON; Chevy Chase. Maryland; Education; 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Fourth Row: 

ALICE MATTHEWS; Harnpton; History; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

CLARISSA MAYFIELD; Petersburg; English. 

CAROLYN MEACHUM; Virginia Beach; Education; CM 

Omeaa. 



JEANE MARELYN MENEFEE; Roanoke; English. 

JOAN C. MERCER; Baltimore, Maryland; Psychology: 

Delta Delta Delta. 

ELLEN MERRILL; Cincinnati. Ohio; Education, 
MARY JO MILAM; Sutheriin; Chemistrv. 




Info the air . . . 



First Row; 

EDWARD MORRIS MILLER; Bronx, New York; Sociology; 

P; Lombda Phi. 

ELIZABETH ANN MILLER; Redford; Psychology. 

MARILYN MARET MILLER; Strasburg; Sociology. 

MARTIN CONRY MILER; Mt. Vernon. New York; Eco- 
nomic;; Kappa Siqma, 

MARILYNN WALKER MILLER; River Forest, Illinois; 
Biology, 

JOYCE MITCHELL; Grosse Pointe, Michigan; Spanish. 

RICHARD HERBERT MOIEL; Roslyn Heights, New York; 
Biology; Sigma Nu. 



Second Row: 

ALVIN STUART MOSES; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Juris- 
prudence; Phi Alpha. 

PATRICIA LEE MOYER; Toano; English. 

MARJORIE RUTH MULLER; Winston Salem North Caro- 
lina; Fine Arts; Delta Delta Delta. 

JOSEPHINE ANN NELSON; Larchmont. New York; Mod- 
ern Languages; Phi Mu. 

CAROLYN ELIZABETH NORFLEET; Norfolk; English. 

DIANE MARIE OAKERSON; Red Bank. New Jersey; 

Chemistry, 

NANCY LEE OAKES; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Govern- 
rnent; Kappa Alpha Theta. 



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Third Row: 

JOHN HERMAN OELLERMANN; Ridgefield Park, New 
Jersey; Physics. 

SANDRA ERNESTINE ORR; Garden City, New York; Edu- 
cation, 

JOHN PALMER OTTAWAY, JR.; Grosse Pointe Farms, 
Michigan; Biology; Kappa Sigma. 

JILLIAN KATHRYN PEARCE; Seattle, Washington; Psy- 
chologv- 

MARION JOYCE PELTIER; Arlington; Business Administra- 
tion; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

MIRIAM LOIS PETERSON; Annapolis, Maryland; Educa- 
tion. 

BARBARA ROSE PETTY; Alexandria; History; Chi Omega. 



Fourth Row: 

BARBARA ANN PHARO; Nortolk; Fine Arts; Pi Beta Phi. 

EDWARD HUME PHILLIPS; Richmond; Business Admin- 
istration. 

DARRIE ANN PIATT; Riverside, Rhode Island; Psychology. 

AUGUSTA RICHARDS POLLARD; Winchester; Fine Arts. 

LAVINIA PRETZ; Atlanta. Georgia; Fine Arts; Kappa 
Alpha Theta. 

SALLY ANNE QUARTON; Woodbury, New Jersey; Govern- 
ment; Gamma Phi Beta. 

NANCY CLARICE RAMSAY; Pelham, New York; Chemis- 
try; Alpha Chi Omega. 



Bull 




First Row: 

MARGHARITA C. RAND; LaJolla. California; Modern 
Languages. 

BOBBIE LEE RANKIN; Marion; Business Administration. 

ROSEMARY DENTON REED; Fairfax; Biology; Alpha Chi 
Omeqa. 

CARLTON F. REZENDES; Aisonet, Massachusetts; Business 
Administration. 

SHIRLEY P. RICHARDSON; Suffolk; English; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

ELAINE ANN RICHMOND; Wayland. New York; Chemis- 
try; Alpha Chi Omega. 

JUNE CAROL RICKARD; Little Neck. New York; Fine 
Arts; Delta Delta Delta. 



Second Row; 

FRANCES LOUISE RICKS; Mount Oliver. North Ca'olir; 

Education. 

ANNE PHENELLE RIDDLE; Fort Lauderdale. Florida; 
Modern Languages: Kappa Alpha Theta. 

FRANCIS J. RILEY, JR.; Portsmouth; Government. 

MARY FRANCES RIPLEY; Mays Landing. New Jerse, 

Psychology: Delta Delta Delta, 

HARRIET MARIE RIPPEL; Falls Church; Sociology. 

PHILIP ROBBINS; Springfield, Massachusetts; English. 

JAMES ELLIS ROBERTSON; Keene, New Hampshire: Busi- 
ness Administration; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 




Group study 




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Third Row: 

JUDITH ELLEN ROBINSON; Dalton. Ohio; English; Kappa 
Alpha Theta. 

SHIRLEY CATHERINE ROSS; Alexandria; Education; Delta 
Delta Delta. 

S. JACQUELINE RYAN; Upper Montclalr, New Jersey; 
Psychology. 

PHYLLIS ANN SAPPENFIELD; Miami Florida: hiistory; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

JOANNE SAUNDERS; Norfolk; History; Alpha Chi Omega. 

ROGER KENNETH SCHAUF; Garden City. N.Y.; Biology. 

NANCY SCHMIDT; New York, New York; Business Ad 

ministration. 



Fourth Row: 

CHARLES SUMMERS SEWALL; Providence. Rhode Island: 

Business Agministratlon; Phi Kappa Tau. 

FREDERICK NIEL SHAFFER; Morristown New Jersey: Eco 
nomics. 

JANET ELIZABETH SHAW; Arllnalon; Spanish; Pi 8e«a 

Ph;. 

ROBERTA SHAW; Falls Church; Sociology; Pi Beta Phi. 

ELIZABETH SUSAN SHIELD; Warwick; Education; Kappa 

Kappa Gamr'a. 

LETTY HOWARD SHIELD; Warwick; Sociology. 

ELIZABETH REID SHELL; Quantico; Frpnch; Kappa Kappa 

Gam "'.I 




Blue Ribbon Dogpatchers 



First Row: 

JO ANN SHIPP; Norfolk; Chemistry; Kappa Alpha Theta. 

RICHARD PAUL SHIVELY; Arlington; Chemistry; Slqma 

f . 

OLEN HERMAN SIKES. JR.; West Point; Chemistry. 
CAROL HANSON SIMMERMAN; Wytheville; History. 
THELMA ELIZABETH SIMMONS; Washington, D.C.; Fine 

Arti. 

MILTON CLARKE SIMPSON, JR.; Norfolk; Business Ad- 
ministration. 

DONNA KAY SMITH; Syracuse, New York; English; Pi 

Beta Phi. 



Second Row: 

ELAINE JOY SMITH; Falls Church; History. 

PATRICIA WOOD SMITH; Bowling Green; Psychology; 

Chi Omega. 

JOANNE SNYDER; Harrlsburg. Pennsylvania; Sociology. 

LILLIAN SOLENBERGER; Winchester; English. 

HELEN EMMA SPRAGUE; Beach Haven. New Jersey; Pi 
Beta Phi. 

SHIRLEY JEAN STEPHENSON; Denver. Colorado; Psy- 
chology; Pi Beta Phi. 

JACQUELINE STILL; Arlington; Sociology. 



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Third Row: 

ALAN CASE STRINGER; Richmond; Pnysics; Sigma PI. 

JUDITH ALEXANDRA SUBER; North Wales Pennsylvania; 

English; Phi Mu. 

JEAN HARVEY SULLENDER; Strasburg; English. 

BARBARA JEAN SYLVIA; Richmond; Spanish. 

MARY CAROLINE TALMAGE; Petersburg; Biology. 

SARAH BELL ALLPORT TARVIN; Ridgewood. New Jersey; 
Chemistry; Kappa Alpha Tneta. 

SUSAN DUKES THACKSTON; Arlington; French; Delta 
Delta Delta. 



Fourth Row; 

ROBERT WILLIAM THIELE; Marcell, Minnesota; Chemistry. 

CAROLYN DALTON THOMPSON; Suffolk; English; Chi 

Omega. 

JO ANN THOMPSON; Norfolk; Education. 

TONITA ANNE THOMPSON; Williamsburg; Fine Arts; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

CONSTANCE TRAYLOR; Colonial Heights; Chemistry. 
SUZANNE TULLY; Richmond; Psychology; Gamma Phi Beta. 
FRANCES ANN TYREE; Ridgeway; History. 



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First- Row: 

WENDY ULRICH; Mas'.apequa, New York; Mathematics. 

NINA ADRIENNE VAN BERGEN; Miami, ?lor,ua: cngii.n; 

Gamma Phi Beta. 

RICHARD CARLTON VAN WAGONER; McLean; Biology. 



ANN WASHINGTON VAUGHAN; Bowling Green; Educa- 
tion; Chi Omega. 



LAWRENCE PHILIP VERBIT; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 

Bustnes'^ Administration; Sigma Nu. 

STERLING KENNETH WALLACE; Bedford; Chemistry. 
LAURA FRANCES WARD; Marion; Mathematics. 



Second Row; 

KARIN MERLIE WATERS; Norfolk- English; Kappa Alpha 
Theta. 

;-ReD JOSEPH WEINMAN; fiamifton, Ohio; Jurisprudence. 

JUDITH PAGE WELTON; Moorefield, West Virginia: 

Education; Gamma Phi Beta, 

CECILIA LYNN WESCOTT; Shields; English; Delta Delta 

Delta. 

JACKSON STUART WHITE, JR.; Richmond; Government; 
Kappa Sigma. 

BETTY JO WHIHEN; Arlington; Fine Arts; Alpha Chi 
Omega. 

CARLTON DALBEY WILDE; Houston, Texas; History; 




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Third Row: 

ANN WILSON; Arlington; Mathematics; Pi Beta Phi. 
BARBARA ELLIOTT WILSON; Richmond; English. 
WILLIAM DOUGLAS WINGATE; Avon, Ohio; Chemistry. 
KAY RUTH WIRTH; Arllnoton; Education; PI Beta Phi. 

PETER WILLIAM WOLCOTT; Rahway, New Jersey Chemis- 
try. 

JANE HADEN WOOD; Richmond; Mathematics; Gamma 
Phi Beta. 



ROBERT COLLINS WOOD; North Tonawanda, New York; 

Chemistry; Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Fourth Row: 



STUART ALD6N WOOD; Fairfax; Physics; Theta Delta 



MARGARET LOUISE WYATT; Greenville. South Carolina; 
Biologv. 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



CLEMENT R. ALDERFER, 1225 W. Main Street. Smithport, Penn- 
sylvania. 

IVA HOOMAW ALLEN, 6020 Ludwell Apts., Williamsburg Virginia. 

MARY MARGARET ANDERSON, 2525 N. Buchanan Street, Arling- 
ton, Virginia. 

CAROLYN VIRGINIA ASH, 1819 Mataox Avenue, Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

FRED PHILIP AUCAMP, 1826 Ashley Road, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

PETER STEWART AUSTIN, 34 Pine Street, Morristov/n, New Jersey. 

JAMES RAYNOR BARHAM, JR., 825 Evans Road, Marion, South 
Carolina. 

BARBARA LEE BARKER, 6400 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia. 

WILLIAM CAROL BASKETT, 1703 N. 20th Street, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. 

MARJORIE FAY BEAM, Box 56, Marlon, North Carolina. 

ANDREW BECOUVARAKIS, 306 Pear Avenue, Hampton, Virginia. 

WAYNE EDWARD BEGOR, 49 C Elizabeth Road, Hampton, Virginia. 

BERNE IRA BENNETT, 340 Lasalle Avenue, Hampton, Virginia. 

DONALD JOHN BERRYMAN, 1495 E. 58th Street, Brooklyn 34, New 
York. 

ALEXANDRA BETTIGER, 206! St. Raymond Avenue, New York 62, 
New York. 

MARY KATHERINE BINNS, 3905 W. Franklin Street, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. 

JAY SPENCER BIRNBRAUER, 1652 W. Mentor Street, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

JOEL JAMIE BLENDEN, 108 Second Avenue, Bradley Beach, New 
Jersey. 

BETTE JANET BODLEY, 8603 Irvington Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland. 

HORACE ROY BOURNE, JR., 1609 National Street, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. 

WILLIAM EKRON BOWMAN, JR., Box 1027, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

NANCY McDonald BRINDEL, I8O2 Maiden Lane, Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR BRINK, 19 Indian Road, Newark, Delaware. 

EPHRAIM HUNTINGTON BROWN, 551 Woodland Road, Mansfield, 
Ohio. 

MARY LEWIS BROWN, 512 Scotland Street, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

PHILIP THOMAS BROWN, 614 Boulevard, Westfield, New Jersey. 

BEVERLEY L. BUCHANAN, 1311 Lafayette Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia. 

CAROL JEAN BUTTERS, 6 Highgate Road, Clayton, Missouri. 

ANN FRANCES CALLAHAN, 1304 Littlepage Street, Fredericks- 
burg, Virginia. 

ALAN DAYTON CANFIELD, Box 169, Wayside Road, Eatontown, 
New Jersey. 

NATHAN ROBERT CARB, JR., 631 Second Street, Brooklyn, New 
York. 

JOSEPH McLENDON CARDACI, 4309 Hartwick Road, College Park, 
Maryland. 

FRANCIS GERALD CAREY 11,11 Davis Avenue, Rockville, Connecti- 
cut. 

DOROTHY JEAN CARLSON, 4054 35th Street, N., Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 

JANE CARNEY PILLOW, 315 59th Street, Newport News, Virginia. 

MARILYN LOUISE CARR, 300 Douglas Avenue, Portsmouth, Virginia. 

PATRICIA D. CHRISTINE, Court Street, Maysville, Kentucky. 

EDWIN FRANCIS CLICK, Fort Defiance, Virginia. 

JESSIE ROBERT COLE, JR., 6003 Roanoke Avenue, Warwick, Virginia. 

CHARLES HARRY CORNELL, 61 St. Paul's Place, New Rochelle, 
New York. 

CHARLES LEONARD COTTRELL, Grandvlew Avenue, Lawrencevllle, 
New Jersey. 

FRANK HOUSTON COWLING, 361 Chesapeake Avenue, Newport 
News, Virginia, 

ANN MASTERSON CRABILL, Galax, Virginia. 

PETER CRENIER, SO Stony Brook Road, Darlen, Connecticut, 



ELEANOR BARBARA CROSSET, 439 Riverview Road. Swarfhmore. 
Pennsylvania, 

BARBARA JANE CROVO, 5328 Goldsboro Road. Bethesda, Mary- 
land. 

MARY CATHARINE CURTIS, 12 Cedar Lane, Warwick, Virginia. 

MADGE CHARLTON GUSHING, 2502 Livingston Road. S.W., Roan- 
oke, Virginia, 

DAVID F. DAUGHERTY, IV, 715 N. Market Street, Williamsport. 
Pennsylvania. 

MILDRED ANN DAVIS, 1929 Matoax Avenue, Petersburg, Virginia. 

SHEILA SHELDON DAY, 165 Morris Avenue, Rockville Centre. New 
York. 

OSCAR DUNWREATH DERR, 527 Pennsylvania Avenue. Norfolk. 
Virginia. 

ANN DIETRICH, 1220 William Street, River Forest, Illinois. 

LEWIS ALLEN DIXON, JR., 406 Norvlew Avenue. Norfolk, Virginia. 

ARTHUR LUKE DRECHNEY, 2103 N. 76th Avenue. Elmwood Park. 
Illinois. 

MARY CARLOTTA DUNCAN. 6010 Eastwood Terrace. Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

DAVID BERTRAM DUNKLE, 6240 N. Lawrence Street. Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania. 

PHYLLIS JEAN EASLER, 8506 Chapin Street, Norfolk. Virginia. 
RONALD RICHARD EISNER, 45 Linden Blvd., Brooklyn. New York. 
JOAN ANTONIA ERO, 4119 Hacienda Street, Norfolk. Virginia. 
HARRIET JOANNE EVERSOLE, 710 The Parkway, Mamaroneck, New 

York. 

JOAN ELIZABETH FARINHOLT, 4407 North 19th Street, Arlington. 
Virginia. 

JANICE EILEEN FERRELL, Route I, Mount Clare. West Virginia. 

ANN FRANKLIN FICHTENGER, 2912 Rosalind Avenue. S.W., Roan- 
oke, Virginia. 

WILLIAM FRANK FITZHUGH, JR., 190 Euclid Avenue, Ridgefield 
Park, New Jersey. 

CLAREN BURRSE FORE, 2802 Rosalee Drive, Hampton, Virginia. 

RICHARD PAUL FOWLER, 6140 N. 17th Street, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

MARY ELIZABETH FRALIN, 2212 Richelieu Avenue, S.W., Roanoke. 
Virginia. 

DOROTHY B. FRANKLIN, 212 West Alexandria Avenue, Alexandria. 
Virginia. 

JOAN FRANCES FRENCH, 663 Maryland Avenue, N.E., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

CHARLOTTE FREY EGGLER, 1412 Woodbine Street, Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

MARY ANN GARTH. 6 West Luray Avenue. Alexandria, Virginia. 

SHIRLEY GEDDES, 272 Quinobequin Road. Waban, Massachusetts. 

MARGARET C. GERKEN, Star Route, Lovettsvllle, Virginia. 

JOHN HOEFT GETREU, 4016 Avenue J, Brooklyn, New York. 

ALICE LOUISE GIDEN, 1945 McGraw Avenue, New York, New York. 

KATHARINE CROWE GILMAN, 1130 Boiling Avenue, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 

JAMES DENEALE GRANT, 626 North Oakland Street, Arlington, 
Virginia. 

JANE GREENBERGER. 51 Center Avenue, Morristown, New Jersey. 

KATHERINE R. GRESHAM, Box 653, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

PETER PHILIP GRIFFIN, 30 West Water Street, Lock Haven, Penn- 
sylvania. 

WILLIAM RAPHAEL GRIFFIN, 302 Granada Street, Fort Pierce 
Beach, Florida. 

ROGER WILLIAM GROETTUM, 1704 North Troy Street, Arlington. 
Virginia. 

CONRAD MAYO GUTHRIE, 428 Florence Avenue, Waynesboro, 
Virginia. 

THOMAS NELSON GUTHRIE. 428 Florence Avenue, Waynesboro, 
Virginia. 



248 



SHIRLEY ANNE HAABESTAD, 4304 State Road, Drexel Hill, Penn- 
sylvania. 

MARGARET BOWDOIN HALL, 2707 Grove Avenue, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. 

KATHERINE LANIER HANCOCK, Union, West Virqlnla. 

JAMES WILLIAM HARDING, 259 C. Cheatham Annex, Williams- 
burg. Virginia. 

ALICE COKER HARRIS, 1609 Debree Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

CLAUDE GERALD HARRIS, 601 Greenwood Drive, Portsmouth, Vir- 
ginia. 

VIRGINIA CARTER HARRISON, 312 A William Street, Fredericlcs- 
burg, Virginia. 

BERNARD FAULCON HARTWIG, 412 Warren Crescent. Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

GEORGE BANKS HAYCOX, 919 West Ocean View Avenue, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

HOSEY HUGH HEARN. 1162 Larosa Road, Arcadia. California. 

JAMES R. HEATHERINGTON. JR., 1224 Magnolia Avenue, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

SHEILA HEBRONY, 717 Court Street, Portsmouth, Virginia. 

DAVID MARTIN HEINRICH, 1459 47th Street, Brooklyn, New York. 

CHARLOTTE LOUISE HENDERSON. 310 North View Terrace, Alex- 
andria, Virginia. 

BEHY BONES HENLEY, Box 246, Tappahanock Virginia. 

RENE ARTHUR HENRY, JR., 156 Pinewood Road. Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

PAUL KEVIN HICKEY, 130 East 67th Street, New York, New York. 

GLORIA GWENDOLYN HILL, 221 West Benson Street, Decatur, 
Georgia. 

MILBURN LINWOOD HINES, 1535 Rodgers Street, South Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

OTTIS VANCE HOLLOMAN, JR., 1432 Bainbridge Blvd., Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

BONNIE JEANNE HOLMAN, 67 Commonwealth Avenue, Alexan- 
dria, Virginia. 

JULIE RUTLEDGE HOLMES, 3029 Monument Avenue, Richmond, 
Virginia. 

ANNE DUDLEY HOWARD, 3835 Larcom Lane, Arlington, Virginia. 

MILDRED MARGUERITE HUFF, 2158 North Brandywine Street, Ar- 
lington. Virginia. 

STANLEY W. HUMPHREYS, 9506 Granby Street, Norfolk, Virqlnla. 

POSIE JAMES HUNDLEY. JR.. Box 7, Chatham, Virginia. 

EDWARD WARE HURLEY, Route 12, Box 208, Richmond, Virginia. 

SARAH JANE HURST, 33 Blanchard Road, South Weymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. 

MARGARET ANN IVES, 4130 Lawn Avenue, Western Springs, Illinois. 
ALLAN DENNY IVIE, III, 500 North Hamilton Street, Leaksvllle, 
North Carolina. 

JOSEPH EDWARD JAY, JR., 4604 South 34th Street, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 

HERNDON JENKINS, Box 355, York+own, Virginia. 

BEVERLEY G. JEWETT, 1500 West 41st Street, Richmond, Virginia. 

SUZANNE ELIZABETH JOERNDT, 23 Elmora Avenue. Cranford. 
New Jersey. 

HELEN SUE JOHNSON, 3239 North Albemarle Street, Arlington, 

Virginia. 
JOHN R. JOHNSON. JR.. 125 Virginia Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 
ROSALEE MAE JONES, 2107 North 18th Street, Arlington, Virginia. 
WAYNE SUMMERS JONES, McLean, Virginia. 

BRENDA JEAN KANE, 3807 Kecoughton Road, Hampton, Virginia. 
ELEANOR SUE KANTER, 403 Grayson Street, Portsmouth, Virginia. 

THOMAS LINDLEY KENYON, JR., 149 Edge Hill Road, Cheverley, 
Maryland. 

PEARLE RAY KEY, 5807 North Four Mile Drive, Arlington, Virginia. 

GEORGE E. KILPATRICK, Box 2621, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

JOSEPH GRIBBEL KINDER, 317 Hope Street, Bristol, Rhode Island. 

ELIZABETH CATHERINE KING, 104 Manteo Avenue, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. 

KATHERINE A. KINNEAR, 3390 Martha Custis Drive, Alexandria, 

Virginia. 
KENT AIKEN KIRWAN, 1616 Crestwood Drive, Alexandria, Virginia. 



PETER WILLIAM KLINGER, High School. Fort Eustis, Virginia. 
MARY KNABB. 104 South Princeton Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

MONTGOMERY KNIGHT. JR.. 218 East 42nd Street, Norfolk. Vir- 
ginia. 

GEORGE LARKIN, 280 Prospect Street, Elmhursl, Illinois. 
EARL CHRISTMAN LASSITER, 8215 Mercer Drive, Norfolk, Virginia. 
JOHN DAVIS LAUGHLIN, 1502 N. Ivanhoe Street, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 

ROBERT N. LAWRENCE. 301 Hardy Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 
RHEA PRICE LAZARUS, Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

ANNE ROWENA LEHEW. 76 Alleghany Street, Clifton Forge. Vir- 
ginia. 

h/IARY ELIZABETH LEWIS. 5007 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, Maryland. 

OREN RITTER LEWIS, 3409 Albemarle Street, Arlington, Virginia. 

ANNE ELIZABETH LIEBER, Apt. S 5, Mackenzin Hall, Fort Belvolr. 
Virginia. 

GORDON LITTLEPAGE LINK, 6606 Van Buren Avenue, Richmond. 
Virginia. 

MARGERY LLOYD. 20 Apollo Street, Petersburg, Virginia. 

ANN POPE LOCKWOOD, 4034 Chesapeake Avenue, Hampton VIr 
ginia. 

JOYCE ANN LOUDERBACK, Elkton. Virginia. 

EVELYN CLAIRE LOVE, 2607 Central Avenue, Alexandria. Virginia. 

WARREN NILES LOW, 109 Southbrook Lane, Bethesda, Maryland. 

ARNOLD LUBASCH, 65 Shephard Avenue. Newark, New Jersey. 

FRANCIS JOSEPH MACCOY, III, 32 Clinton Avenue. Maplewood. 

New Jersey. 
DOROTHY ANN MADISON, 63 Ingalls Road, Fort Monroe, Virginia. 
MARY MAPLES, 1410 4th Avenue, Fort Knox, Kentucky. 
VIRGINIA BLAIR MAPP, 207 84th Street, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
MARIANNE MARSH. 1404 22nd Street. S., Arlington, Virginia. 
GROVER THOMAS MARTIN. Matoaka Court 208, Willlamsburq. 

Virginia. 
WILLIAM ALLEN MAY, 204 E. Cameron Road, Falls Church, VIr- 

ginla. 
FRANK MOSES McCANN, Spout Spring, Virginia. 
JOAN CAROL McCarthy, Route I, PInesbridge Road, Ossinina. 

New York. 
MARGARET ANN McCOY, 6307 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia. 
IDUS B. McCURRY, JR., 4814 Colonial Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 
MARY ELIZABETH McDOW, 113 Beckley Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

SHIRLEY ANNE McGINNIS, 3011 Lorraine Avenue. Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

RICHARD STERLING McKEE, 411 Fairview Road, Springfield, Penn- 
sylvania. 

DAVID LOUIS METZ, 1115 Forest Avenue, St. Louis. Missouri. 

ELEANORE BONNIE MEYER. 3931 Richland Avenue. Roanoke. Vir- 
ginia. 

GEORGE REVELL MICHAEL. JR., Box 38, Parksley, Virginia. 

STEVE MILKOVICH, 519 Edward Street, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

MERCEDES DESOTO MILLER. 1140 Rockbridge Avenue, Norfolk. 
Virginia. 

SAMUEL BENJAMIN MITCHELL, Millboro, Virginia. 

STANLEY WADE MITCHEM, Gwynn, Virginia. 

JOHN MILLARD MOORE, Mathews, Virginia. 

MARGARET B. MORGAN, Box 397, South Hill, Virginia. 

WALTER CENTENNIAL MOYER. Toano, Virginia. 

CAROL ANN MYERS. 906 lOth Street. Apt. 82, Alexandria. Virginia. 

MARILYN NELSON, 205 Tindal Avenue, Greenville, South Carolina. 

POLAND PAUL NEMETH, 9328 212th Street, Queens Village, New 
York. 

DONALD LYN NEUSTADT, Box 482, Westbury, New York. 

ROBERT WILLIAM NEUVILLE. 798 East 21st Street, Brooklyn, New 
York. 

JOHN LEO NORTON, II Broadway, Bayonne, New Jersey. 

EDWARD FRANCIS NOVAK, 630 Prince George Street, Williams- 
burg, Virginia. 



249 



DOLORES ANN ONIFER, Box 221, Maybeury, West Virginia. 
MARGARET ELIZABETH ORR, 9951 74th Street, Forest Hills, New 

York. 
MARGARET OWENS, 3113 Key Blvd., Arlington, Virginia. 

SARAH GERTRUDE PAGE, 607 Mayflower Apts., Virginia Beach, 

Virginia. 
GEORGE DONALD PAROZZO, 136 Telford Street, Newark, New 

Jersey. 
GILBERT PARMELE, Circle Road, Staten Island, New York. 
MARILYN LOUISE PARR, 223 East Beau Street, Washington, Penn- 

sylvania. 
ROBERTA ANNE PARRISH, Elk Hill, Virginia. 
GRANVILLE ROBERT PATRICK, Route I, Williamsburg, Virginia. 
WILLIAM EUGENE PATTON, 99 Wellington Avenue, Short Hills, 

New Jersey. 
RICHARD LEE PENDLETON 1603 South York Road, Willow Grove, 

Pennsylvania. 
EDWARD FINLEY PHILLIPS, 439 West 123rd Street, New York, New 

York. 
ELIJAH GRAHAM PILLOW, 1821 Avon Road, Roanoke, Virginia. 
CHARLES JOSEPH PILUSO, 3619 Avenue J., Brooklyn, New York. 
JACK VICTOR PLACE, Route I, Spencervllle, Ohio. 
LOUIS JOSEPH POMPONIO, 4621 North 35th Street, Arlington, 

Virginia. 
NATHAN S. POPKIN, 4509 South Tonti Street, New Orleans, 

Louisiana. 
HAROLD ARNOLD POSEY, 1510 Mayflower Apts., Virginia Beach, 

Virginia. 
VIRGINIA LEE POSTLES, 4807 N. Washington Blvd., Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 
BILLIE FRANK PYOTT, 1634 Tennessee Street, Lawrence, Kansas. 

GILES WILLIAMS QUARLES, 2912 Oak Crest Avenue, Roanoke, 
Virginia. 

HARRIETT L. RASMUSSEN, Box 187, Route I, Sandston, Virginia. 

JEAN ANNE RICHMOND, 902 N. Fillmore Street, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 

MARSHALL ANES RIES, JR., 114 Middle Street, Braintree, Massa- 
chusetts. 

RALPH PHILLIPS RIGBY, II Fort Street, Falrhaven, Massachusetts. 

ROBERT STANLEY RIPLEY, 1043 North Street, Portsmouth, Virginia. 

TREAZURE YVONNE RISSINGER, 42 North 9th Street, Lebanon, 
Pennsylvania. 

JOHN WESLEY ROBBINS, JR., Route I, Box 326, Bayslde, Virginia. 

DEAN EDGAR ROBERTS, York, Maine. 

LYNANNE R. ROBINSON, 5311 Argall Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

BARBARA SCHWARTZ ROSE, Jamestown Road, c/o Mr. Max RIeg, 
Williamsburg, Virginia. 

WALTER WALLACE ROWELL, III, 331 43rd Street, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

SAMUEL FONTAINE ROYALL, 5820 Ellen Road, Warwick, Virginia. 

ISABELLA FLOCKHART RUBERT, Box 715, Yorktown, Virginia. 

ERNEST O. RUDIN, 1003 Randolph Street, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

HAROLD EVAN RUMBEL, 3818 Faquler Avenue, Richmond, Virginia. 

ROBERT DEWEY SADLER, JR., 169 Swanson Road, Norfolk, Virginia. 

JULIA B. ST. JOHN, Box 253, Salem, Virginia. 

GARY MALCOLM SCATES, 3810 Argyle Terrace, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

LEONARD SCHNEIDER, 27 Rose Hill Gardens, New Rochelle, New 
York. 

BURTON ROBERTSON SCHOOLS, 216 N. Elm Avenue, Portsmouth, 
Virginia. 

MARJORIE L. SCHROEDER, 454 Ogden Avenue, West Englewood, 
New Jersey. 

MARGEL LIND SETTLE, 1228 S. Frederick Street, Arlington, Virginia. 

CATHERINE MAE SHEILD, 262 James River Drive, Warwick, Vir- 
ginia. 

JAMES NORVELL SHRADER, 3832 Hillway Drive, Glendale 8, Cali- 
fornia. 

BARBARA LEE SHRIVER, 914 Raleigh Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

EETSY BURR SKINKER, 1823 Westover Avenue, Roanoke, Virginia. 



BARBARA JEAN SMITH, 1884 Hastings Avenue, E. Cleveland. Ohio. 

GLORIA DRU SMITH. 115 Delaware Avenue. Norfolk. Virginia. 

KATHRYN CAROLINE SMITH, 4714 N. 25th Street, Arlington. Vir- 
ginia. 

LESLIE CHARLES SMITH, 318 45th Street. Newport News. Virginia. 

NANCY A. SNYDER DIXON, 314 Cedar Lane. Norfolk. Virginia. 

ANNE MARIE SOBERS, 96 N. Atherton Avenue, Kingston. Pennsyl- 
vania. 

EDWARD LEONARD SOULE. 7358 South Shore Drive, Chicago. Illi- 
nois. 

SARAH DEAN SPANGLER, 831 Little Bay Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

HORACE SPEED, III, 19 Fort Hunt Road, Alexandria, Virginia. 

CARL JOSEPH SPIES, 507 N. Monroe Street, Arlington, Virginia. 

JOYCE ANN SPRINGER, 3912 14th Street North, Arlington. Vir- 
ginia. 

ROBERT BEAR SPROUSE, 747 Selma Blvd., Staunton, Virginia. 

JOHN L. STANLEY, JR., 264! Keller Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 

GRACE ELEANOR STONE, 6810 108th Street, Forest Hills, New 
York. 

CALVIN CABELL TENNIS, 320 Marshall Street, Hampton, Virginia. 

MARVIN THOMAS, 329-331 West 35th Street, Norfolk, Virginia. 

ARTHUR C. THOMPSON, JR., 120 Linden Avenue, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. 

J. LEROY THOMPSON, JR., 76 Falrview Avenue, Tarrytown, New 
York. 

MARILYN JEAN THOMPSON, 224 Pear Avenue, Hampton, Virginia. 

BARBARA JOAN TIGNOR, 3202 Condle Street, Richmond, Virginia. 

MELVIN JOSEPH TILLEH, 209 Matoaka Court, Williamsburg. Vir- 
ginia. 

BARBARA ANN TORRENCE, 285 Mt. View Avenue, Danville, Vir- 
ginia. 

HENRETTA ANN TRENT, 134 Kenllworth Avenue, Danville, Virginia. 

WALTER EDWIN TRENT, 767 Fifth Avenue, New York 22, New York. 

JOHN HENDERSON TUCKER, Fentress, Virginia. 

JOHN VERNON TUTTLE, A6 Harborview Apts., Portsmouth, Virginia. 

JOHN LEONARD ULRICH, 78 Elmwood Park, Tonawanda, New 

York. 
ELIZABETH ANNE UZZELL, 2921 Tait Terrace, Norfolk, Virginia. 

GORDON CHEESMAN VLIET, 418 Wright Avenue, Alma, Michigan. 

HENRY HEINZ VOLZ, Camp Peary, Virginia. 

JEAN M. VON SCHILLING, 142 Chesterfield Road, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. 

ROBERTA ELIZABETH WADLEY, 3215 N. Albemarle Street, Arling- 
ton, Virginia. 

WILLIAM WAGMAN, 515 Park Avenue, New York 22, New York. 
ROBERT PERRY WALLACE, JR., 130 A Chandler Court, Williams- 
burg, Virginia. 
STANLEY DUSTIN WARD, 207 Kempsvllle Road, Norfolk, Virginia. 
WINFRED ONEIL WARD, Box 269, Exmore, Virginia. 
PAUL ALLEN WEINSTEIN, 17 Oakley Place, Great Neck, New York. 

WARREN ALLAN WEISS, 144 17 Rockaway Beach Blvd., Rockaway 
Beach, New York. 

WILLIAM TUNSTALL WELLS, Box 335, Altavista, Virginia. 

JOHN AUGUSTAN WESTBERG, 104 Laurel Street, Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts. 

RAIFORD L. WHITFIELD, 828 West 36th Street, Norfolk, Virginia. 

ZELDA CLAIR WILDMAN, 3414 8th Street South, Arlington, Virginia. 

ROBERT HOLDEN WILKINSON, 7720 Newport Avenue, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

CARY WARREN WILLIAMS, 1045 Buckingham Avenue, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

BETSY WILLS WALLACE, 130 A Chandler Court, Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

SARAH ANN WRIGHT, 706 Twelfth Street, S.W., Roanoke, Virginia. 
ROBERT PORTER WYE, 17 Castlewood Road, W. Hartford, Con- 
necticut. 

DORIS JEAN ZUIDEMA, 1607 Lasalle Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 



250 



^n iJienicNant 



DR. ROY P. ASH 

DR. A. G. RYLAND 

MR. CHARLES J. DUKE, JR. 



PATRONS 



BENSON PRINTING COMPANY 

E. L. BOOTH, REFRIGERATION SUPPLY COMPANY 

COLONY MOTORS 

DANNY CAMPUS 

CAPITAL RESTAURANT 

CASEY'S 

COCA-COLA COMPANY 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 

COLLEGE SHOP 

COLLINS CLEANERS 

COLONNA STUDIOS 

FERGUSON-WHITE PRINT SHOP 

FRAZIER-CALLIS COMPANY, INC. 

HORNSBY DISTRIBUTORS 

HOWARD JOHNSONS 

THE LAFAYETTE, CHARCOAL STEAK AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 

LYNCHBURG ENGRAVING COMPANY 

LOREN MURCHISON & COMPANY, INC. 

MESSICK OLDSMOBILE CORPORATION 

MILLER'S CAMERA SHOP 

NEESE ELECTRIC COMPANY 

NICK'S SEAFOOD PAVILION 

THE PASTRY SHOP 

PENINSULA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 

PENINSULA HARDWARE CORPORATION 

PERRY'S STEAK HOUSE 

POCAHONTAS MOTOR LODGE 

W. L. RAGLAND 

RODGER'S CLEANERS 

SAGER'S JEWELERS 

SCHMIDT MUSIC AND APPLIANCE SHOP 

J. M. STACKHOUSE CO., PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT, RICHMOND 

THEIME'S INN AND DINING ROOM 

VIRGINIA GAZETTE 

WEST END VALET SHOP 

WILLIAMSBURG DRUG COMPANY, THE REXALL STORE 

WILLIAMSBURG INN AND LODGE 

WILLIAMSBURG RESTAURANT 

WILLIAMSBURG SHOP 

WILLIAMSBURG THEATRE 

WHITE'S RADIO SHOP 

THE WIGWAM