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Full text of "Colonial Echo, 1976"

■■rk<imiimix.i 






1976 Colonial Ccho 



1976 by Colonial Echo, 

College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, 
Virginio 23186; published by Hunter Pub 
hing Company, Winston-Salem, North Coro 
I 27103 *■'. '•" -i^» 

\ picture ff^riiTh. Inirl of the WrMttQK 
. ns or whotVOs once ' 
_gect " 



•^•4^^ 



THE 



LEGE CAMPUS 

n t r b u c^TiW ^m 




COMMON GL(1«Y 



C r c a t (tii 
Spiritual 

olitical 

rabuat 
ol/stit 





JInbtbtbual 



^ca-fl^mic 
bmln 




a 




n 




ClagjSefi 



SUJ. 



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1 rr-C orififtlnffr? r 



1. SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN BUILDING 12. 

2. THE BRAFFERTON 13. 

3. THE PRESIDENT'S HOUSE 14. 

4. EWELLHALL 15. 

5. WASHINGTON HALL 16 

6. JAMES BLAIR HALL 17. 

7. ROGERS HALL 18. 

8. MARSHALL-WYTHE SCHOOL OF LAW 19. 

9. MONROE HALL 26. 

10. BLOW GYMNASIUM 21. 

11. OLD DOMINION HALL 



BRYAN HAi: 
CARY FIELD 
FRATERNITY SOILD 
LANDRUM HALL 
CHANDLER HALL 
BARRETT HALL 
JEFFERSON HALL 
TALIAFERRO HALL 
OLD LODGES 
COLLEGE HEALTH 
SERVICE-INFIRMARY 



Sbbe^rtiai^ins 



7f ^ COLLEGE B 
NOSniE^INKLEH 
25. OLDINFIR 



L 

F 



28. 



31. 
32. 



SORORI 
PHL^^A K 
!ERT Ai 

YATES HALLT 







Ar^iR GYMNASIUM 

3 7 5t hall 

WILLIAM AND MARY COMMONS 
J0Hf^rtflL4lNGT0N HALL 
EARL (?REtG SWEM LIBRARY 
WILLIAM SNfLAUL PHYSICAL 
LABOR- 
HUGH JONES HALL 
RICHARD LEE MORTON 
BOTETOURT RE; 
ALUMNI HOUSE 

rrblNG (UNDER CONSTRUCTION) 




A colonial classroom greets visitors as they tour 
the Wren Building. 




f Malfeingintfje 



/f^ne of the first things a stu- 
KP^dent or tourist learned o- 
bout William and Mary was that it was 
the proud possessor of the oldest 
academic building in the nation. Con- 
struction of the building began in 
1695 and by 1697, two wings of the 
proposed rectangle were finished. 
By 1700, the Wren Building had be- 
come the seat of Virginia's govern- 
ment, and was to remain in this 
position until the completion of 
the Capitol in 1704. 

Ten years from the beginning of 
construction, the building, then 
known as "The College", was almost 



completely destroyed by fire. Un- 
fortunately for the school, funds 
were short and the building was 
not completely refinished until 1723. 

In 1732, the Chapel was added 
to the design of the building 
forming the present south wing. 
The fourth side of the quadrangle 
was never finished, leaving the 
bock of the Wren Building open to 
the Sunken Gardens. 

One of the more unique aspects 
of the Wren Building was the pre- 
sence of crypts underneath the 
structure. At various points during 
the history of the college, leading 



4 INTRODUCTION 



\ 



^ 



w 








? 



^ 
^ 



« 





hallotajcti rooms! 



Colonial Virginians such as Peyton 
Randolph and Lord Botetourt have 
been buried there. 

Except for its brief period as 
the assennbly place for the ruling 
leaders of Colonial Virginia, the 
Wren Building served as the edu- 
cational center of the college, 
until the Revolutionary War. For a 
short time in 1781, the French Arnny 
used the building as a hospital. 
During this time, the Wren Building 
was again partially destroyed by 
fire. This was not to be the last 
of the disasters to strike the 
college, as in 1859, fire again 



caused great damage. 

The building had been destroy- 
ed by a fire caused by Federal sol- 
diers in 1862. During the war years 
prior to this, it was used in such 
varied capacities as a Confederate 
barracks and a Union hospital. 
The building was restored in 1928 
and soon thereafter was given the 
name the "Sir Christopher Wren 
Building". Located at the entrance 
to the campus, the Wren Building ser- 
ved during the '76 celebration as 
both a building for classes and as a 
stop for tourists on their visits to 
Williamsburg. 




The Wren Courtyard serves as the background for 
the Yule Log reading by President Groves 



INTRODUCTION 5 



tj^tc^s^cttt; 





This design depicts one of the earliest Phi Beto 

Kappa keys. 

The Raleigh Tovern, where early Phi Beta Kappa 

meetings were held, still stonds in Colonial 

Williamsburg. 




6 PHI BETA KAPPA 




of ^ctolarsi 



Hp ounded on December 5, 1 776, at 
,JI William and Mary, Phi Beta 
Kappa became the first inter-colle- 
giate society in the United States 
with educational objectives. The 
Alpha Chapter numbered among its 
first members Chief Justice John 
Marshall, Continental Congress rep- 
resentative Samuel Hardy, U.S. Sen- 
ators John Brown and Steven Thomson 
Mason and John James Beckley, First 
Clerk of the House of Representatives. 

Their first meeting was held at 
the typical gathering place of many 
of their peers. The Apollo Room of 
the Raleigh Tavern became the site 
of their annual banquets as well as 
special occasion celebrations. 

With the Revolutionary War be- 
ginning, the society lost many of 



its members to the patriot army. On 
Jan. 6, 1781, it was decided that 
the society's papers should be given 
to the college steward "during the 
confusion of the times." 

In 1849, these papers were given 
to the Vo. Historical Society where 
they stayed until returned to the 
Alpha Chapter in 1893. An early mem- 
ber was found in 1850 and it was de- 
cided to revive the chapter. The 
Civil War forced the closing of the 
College and Phi Beta Kappa again 
folded, this time for thirty-two years. 
The society has continued since that 
time, celebrating the initiation of 
new member each December 5th. 

Members often gathered ot the Appollo Room of 
Raleigh Tovern for drinks and conversation. 




PHI BETA KAPPA 7 




THE 

Prefcnt State 

O F 

VIRGINIA, 

AND THE 

college: 



Meljii 



\eurs 



B Y 

rH A R T W E L I., 

c B L A I R, and 

IC H I L r O N. 



To which 15 a'lJ'^'ii 

The CHARTER for Ercaing the 
faid COLLEGE, granccJ by their 
Jatc MaieRies Kinj.^, ',V i L L I A M i.a<\ 
Queen MAR7 of tvti Glorious and 
Pious M'jmory. 



I O N D N 
Printed for John W r a r, ar the Rof^ in 
St. PmiI's hurclyy.Dd, M.ucc vV^ ii. 
(rticc IS. 6d) 

The title page of o book by Rev. Jomes Barii 
depicts the college's charter. Courtesy of Colonial 
Williamsburg Foundation. 



3n toucf) toitf) a 



(^y Ithough not formally established 
/C^until 1693, William and Mary's 
roots date back as far as 1617. The 
primary objective for his newly con- 
ceived school was the education and 
conversion of the Indians. As a re- 
sult of this desire to "save" the In- 
dians, Sir Edwin Sandys together with 
other concerned Englishmen raised 
money for the establishment of an 
Indian college and the "foundation 
of a seminary of learning for the 
English." Unfortunately, the same 
group the school sought to educate, 
destroyed its beginnings during the 
"Great Massacre" of 1622 where over 
340 settlers were killed. 

It wasn't until 1660 that the 
Virginia Assembly voted "that for the 
advance of learning, education of 
youth, supply of the ministry and 
promotion of piety, there be land 
taken upon purchase of a col ledge and 
free schoole." Ideas assumed a more 
concrete footing in 1691, when Rev. 
James Blair was sent to England to 
secure a charter for the college. 

The idea was well received by 
William and Mary but with Seymour, 
the Attorney-General, it was much 
more difficult. At that time, Eng- 
land was engaged in an expensive war 
and could not afford the necessary 
funds for a college in America. 
Rev. Blair explained that the college 
was to train men to become minis- 
ters of the Gospel, and that Virgin- 
ians as well as Englishmen had souls 
to save. Seymour seemed unmoved os 
he exclaimed, "Souls! Damn your souls! 



Make tobacco!" In spite of Seymour's 
obvious opposition, the King and Queen 
adhered to their promise and signed 
the charter on February 19th, 1693. 

The college's charter was based 
on the plan "that the Church of Vir- 
ginia may be furnished with a semin- 
ary of ministers of the Gospel, and 
that the youth may be piously edu- 
cated in good letters and manners, 
and that the Christian religion may 
be propagated among the Western In- 
dians, to the glory of Almighty 
God." The charter further endowed 
the college with "the whole and en- 
tire sum of one thousand nine hundred 
and eighty-five pounds, fourteen 
shillings and tenpence of good and 
lawful money of England, that has 
been raised out of the quit-rents of 
said colony," or a grand total {in 
current standards) of $4,010.19! 
The college was to gain further rev- 
enue by receiving a penny a pound on 
all tobacco exported from Virginia 
and Maryland. 

A grant of twenty thousand acres 
of land lying in the Pamunkey Neck, was 
given to the college, as well as the 
authority for the president and pro- 
fessors to select from among them- 
selves several representatives to the 
House of Burgesses. 

There was only one catch to the 
charter handed to the college. The 
college authorities were to pay "to 
us and our successors two copies of 
Latin verse yearly on the fifth day 
of November at the house of the Gov- 
ernor or Lieutenant-Governor for the 



8 HISTORY 



memorp 

time being." On November 12, 1736, 
nearly 50 years later, the Virginia 
Gazette carried the following ar- 
ticle, "On this day s'en night, being 
the fifth day of November, the presi- 
dent, masters, and scholars of William 
and Mary College went, according to 
their annual custom, in a body to 
present his Honor in obedience to 
their charter. Mr. President delivered 
the verses to his Honor, and two of 
the young gentlemen spoke them." 

The royal endowment of the col- 
lege was strengthened by on act of 
the House of Burgesses. After much 
consideration, they decided that 
"Middle Plantation" (Williamsburg) 
would be the site of the new college. 
The buildings, designed by Sir Chris- 
topher Wren, were built between 1692 
and 1700, when the first graduation 
ceremonies were held. 

In 1691, the college, along with 
Harvard, inherited the estate of 
Hon. Robert Boyle. From this the 
"Brofferton" estate in Yorkshire, 
England was bought and the "Brofferton 
building was built on campus. Its 
purpose was to house Indian youths 
who came for the Revolution. 

Across from the Brofferton was 
the President's house, the founda- 
tions of which were laid in 1732. 
While occupied by French troops 
during the seige of Yorktown, the 
house was accidentally burned. 
Louis XVI rebuilt it and contributed 
six hundred valuable volumes to the 
college library. 



This picture of William and 
Wren Great Hall reminding 
college's namesakes. 




w 



The Capitol serves as a reminder of thfe greot 
amount of political activity that occurn 
Williamsburg during Colonial times. Co 
Colonial Williamsburg. 



^m 







* ''■^t down DOG. Street showb ^ .,Ki>-«" -^ 
nioj, rimes. * i~ ■> 




Bruton Parish coritinues to serve as a place of 
worship for Williamsburg residents. 




Habe times! 

Evcnin?^ Praver. 

Ls from all perils and J.int;crs 1 diy licivcnly <^-acc; protpcr 
Dt'this night, i'ov ilu lo\c ot' tlicni with all happind'-, ; and 
thy only Son our Saviour Jcfus j brinu; them to thine c\ crl.ilUr.^ 
Chrirt. .'Juic-n. , Kingdom, throuoh JclUb Chrift- 

T /;/ Chirs and Phiccs zubcrc ll\y 

fing, here foll'K-^etb the Anthem. 

•: A Prayer for the King's 

' Muiejfy. 

•^ LorcLjQpr hcavcnlv Fa- 



our Lord 



'J/iien. 
Prayer jor the Clergy and 
People. 

Al.m.ighty and cvcrlafting 
(iod, -vUk) itk*H«-v«>fk<.4t 



n f 1 '. -%^ . ""■'^'"> ,' ■■ kfcowwf^v^; Scnddounimon '< 
n^u^ W ther,''ftgh ^"^J?'fe> ;S^^i^;hoc, and^^JS*et»; 
^0^ -^«*» ^ t- > "n .?.^ l; . "'^^" '*^' "'r ^™;^%"ions committed' 



'doftfrom thy throne behold all 
the dwellers upon earth; Moll 



^^/^ thy favour to behold e«^^fj^.^^, J ^h^. i,,^,:,-^ 

/^<^4^/!^~(J*^>*-c-6t and lb replenilhrow 

C4^U4i.y.^iitj with the ^g^ of thy Holy Spi- 1 

l^att0flS*xt rit, thatli^mfy alway incline to 

y^ ^^.kiiriif thy will.^^i^walk in thy way: 

/ Endue -oSBC^lcnteoullvAvirh 

heavenly gjji,^; s^rant -fflSTin 

iri^ijiiri^ health and^Ct^W^long to live ; 

' ' / -U r e ngth e n h i< n t hat he may 



■\ anqu i lh and ove i L'omc al l h i a 
- onomie» ; and finally after this 

life, b e- nf a f attain evcrlalfing 
joy and feiieity, through Jcfus 

Chrilt our Lord. Amen. 



to their ( fjarge, the healthful 
Spirit of thy grace; and that 
they may truly oleale thee, 
continual 
Grant 
this, C) 1-ord, tor tlie honour 
of our Advocate and Media- 
tor, Jefus Chrili Anun. 
« A Prayer of S. Chryfortom. 

ALmighty God, who haft 
given us grace at this 
time \\ itii one accord to make 
our common fupplications unto 
thee ; and dolt promile, that 
when two or three areg.uhered 
together in thy Name, thou w ilt 
grant their rei^ucffs : Fulfil now, 
O I ,ord, the dellrcs and petitions 
of thy Icrvants, as may be moll 



«; . / Prayer for the Royal Family, expedient for tliem ; ' granting 

ALmighty God, tiie foim- 1 us in this world knowledge of 
tain ot all goodnefs, we ' thy truth, and in the world to 
humbly bcfeech thee to blefs j come life everlalfing. Anhn. 
J,.: 'i ineil." *• . . -- j zCnr. xiii. 14. 

... ...the Princffs \ r ■ ■MIF''. r^rice of our F.nrd 



This page from a Bruton Parish Bible shows the 
use to which students put their religion. Courtesy of 
Colonial Williomsburg. 



10 HISTORY 



reallp ttjangcb? 



7 



■Jgrior to the Revolution, the 
'tT^ college consisted of six 
schools, including the Indian one. 
Its attachment to the church re- 
mained until the governorship of 
Thomas Jefferson, who was adamant 
about the separation of church and 
state. 

The average enrollment was 
about sixty men, who were appar- 
ently as typical of college stu- 
dents as the ones today. The fac- 
ulty was often reminded of their 
obligation to control the students 
restlessness. 

It seemed that some of these 
students hod a great affection for 
things such as horse-racing and 
billiards. Consequently at a 
meeting of the faculty in 1752, it 
was ordered that, "no scholar be- 
longing to any school in ye college 
of what age, rank, or quality soever, 
do keep any race-horse at ye college 
or in ye town or anywhere." If a 
student broke the rules, he was to 
be "immediately despatched and sent 
off an never again brought bock un- 
der pain of animadversion and pun- 
ishment. 

Next on the agenda was billiards. 
"No scholar do presume to appear 
playing ye billiards or other gaming 
tables or be in any way concerned in 
keeping fighting-cocks, under ye like 
severe animadversion and punishment," 

But the students were not the 
only ones who needed reprimanding. 
In 1769, the Board of Visitors had 
the unfortunate job of reprimanding 



the Rev. Mr. John Camm and the Rev. 
Mr. Josiah Johnson for having 
"lately married and taken up their 
residence in the city of Williams- 
burg by which great inconvenience 
has arisen to the college, and the 
necessary attention which those 
Professors ought to pay to the con- 
duct and behavior of the students 
has been almost totally interrupted." 
Their "misconduct" brought a new 
rule" that all Professors and Masters 
hereafter to be appointed, be con- 
stantly residents of ye college, and 
upon marriage of such Professor or 
Master that his professorship be 
immediately vacated. 

In 1779, Jefferson was elected 
to the Board of Visitors, where he 
started a new age for W&M. Moving 
enrolled at the college as a student 
earlier in his career, Jefferson had 
a strong understanding of the college. 
It was at W&M that he met Dr. 
William Small, Professor of Natural 
Philosophy and Mathematics, who in- 
troduced him to the important poli- 
tical figures of that time. Jeffer- 
son said that Small, "fixed his des- 
tinies in life." 

William and Mary thus started 
a new segment in its long history, 
along with the country for which she 
was to educate some of its greatest 
leaders. 



Articles like these are typical of those contributed 
by Thomas Jefferson during Colonial times. 
Courtesy of Colonial Williamsburg. 



SUMMARY VIEW 
O F TH E 

RIGHTS 

O F 

BRITISH AMERICA. 
SET FORTH IN SOME 

RESOLUTIONS 

:-. INTENDED FOR THE 

INSPECTION 

OF THE PRESENT 

DELEGATES 

O.F THE 

PEOPLE OF VIRGINIA. 

N O W I N 

CONVENTIO N. 



BtaNATIVE, AMoMEMBERorTHi 
HOUSE^or BURGESSES. 

WILLIAMSBURG: 
PKIMTID BT CLEMENTINA R TNT). 




HISTORY 1 1 




0nt continuousi 
ti'bap celebration 




f'Wr. 



^^ hile much of the country was 
UmT celebrating its 200 years of 
existence, there were those who 
could not wait until 1976 was over. 
Many were tired of America's Bicentennial 
Coverage, almost before it ever began. 

"If only I didn't have to see 
another one of those damn Bicenten- 
nial Minutes," was the feeling of 
one disgruntled student. One did 
not have to travel far to hear a 
smart comment or two about "Spruce 
Up Virginia — Company's Coming." 
But regardless of how William and 
Mary students felt, they hod to face 
the fact that they went to The Col- 
lege of William ond Mary located in 
The Colonial Capitol — Williamsburg, Va. 

William and Mary had a long tradition 
of excellence to uphold during the 
Bicentennial celebration. Combining 
their talents with those of the Co- 
lonial Williamsburg Foundation, Wil- 
liamsburg offered an atmosphere which 
was expected to attract almost 1 V2 
million tourists to the Colonial 
Capitol. An added attraction for 
Williamsburg tourists was Busch Gar- 
dens. Open for its second year, 
Busch offered tourists a diversifi- 
cation from normal Bicentennial fare. 

As plans began to take shape 
during the Spring of 1975, it looked 
as if Williamsburg might once again 
be a hotbed of activity. One of the 
first events to happen at the College 
was a student presentation of ex- 
cerpts from Peter Stone's ploy 1776. 



As a result of Thomas Jefferson's 
reply of "And I attended William and 
Mary" to John Adams' "I happen to be 
a Harvard graduate," the play was es- 
pecially meaningful to W & M students. 

The combination of a Bicenten- 
nial year with the historical impor- 
tance of Williamsburg and William 
and Mary brought many exciting visi- 
tors to the community. One of the 
first of the visiting dignitaries to 
arrive was Emperor Hirohito of Japan. 
His trip marked the first appear- 
ance of a Japanese Emperor in the 
continental United States since W.W. II. 

The early Fall also brought the 
announcement of William and Mary's 
Commencement speaker, the Secretary 
of Health, Education and Welfare, 
Dr. David Matthews. Nationally re- 
knowned defense attorney William 
Kunstler and Ex-policeman David Toma 
highlighted the fall's roster of 
speakers. 

One of the surprise visitors of 
the year was President Gerald Ford. 
Flanked by Secret Service men, the 
President rode down D.O.G. Street in 
an open carriage to the Capitol where 
he addressed the commerative session 
of the Virginia General Assembly. 
Following speeches, the President's 
entourage, including Press Secretary 
Ron Nessen, newscaster David Brinkley, 
Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell 
and Governor Mills Goodwin journeyed 
to the Lodge for a dinner and concert 
by the William and Mary Choir. 





Tl»is sign, recognizitig^Willi 
contributions to Am^jca's hiSto 
OS they enter campus. - . 



Coofe hjfjat 200 
pears totU bo 



^iThe weekend of March 27, 1976, 
^61/ found newscaster Roger Mudd serv- 
ing as a Speaker-in-Residence at the 
college. He spoke to several classes 
on on informal basis and talked to 
publications' members in private 
meetings. His lost official act 
while at the school was to address the 
Society of Collegiate Journalists at 
their annual Spring Banquet. 

Despite the "popular" student 
feeling towards the Bicentennial 
Minutes, the Great Hall of the Wren 
Building was the site of two CBS pro- 
ductions. Governor Mills Godwin and 
President Thomas Graves both filmed 
segments for an early spring airing. 
Television productions were not 
limited to CBS, as ABC filmed a seg- 
ment of their children's shows. Make a 
Wish, in Williamsburg. The week of 
Graduation found NBC's Today show 
on location in the Colonial Capitol 
for one of their shows on the fifty 
states. 

With the help of television 
station WVEC in Norfolk, the Choir 



taped a Christmas Special. Pictured 
on the front steps of the Wren 
Building, the Choir's performance was 
syndicated on television stations 
throughout the country. 

Early April sow the training 
ground for Patrick Henry's troops, 
the Sunken Gardens, turned into a 
dance floor. The Student Association 
sponsored a Bicentennial Boll to give 
the students a break at the end of 
the semester. 

The list of Bicentennial events 
continued to grow as the year drew on. 
As much as many students complained 
about the tourists and the growing 
number of special events, they were 
the ones who were first in line for 
the many new job openings. Everyone 
was hoping for a chance to be in- 
volved in the flurry of octivities 
surrounding the year; it was a once 
in a lifetime opportunity that finally 
overcame even the greatest opposition. 



The Bicentennial Flog flies high over Phi Beta 
Koppo Hoi I. 




■ ■> .-..^.^ .ra«^y^- -s^ 



14 INTRODUCTION 




I 



^itt&tvh& 



LIFESTYLES DIVIDER 15 



mu at itg finesit 



Colonial life concerned itself 
with the fundamentals of basic 
survival. The hardships of the times 
presented constant challenges to 
the ingenuity and inventiveness of 
man. Development and diversification 
of individual skills were a prere- 
quisite to an existence that no one 
could ignore. The individual's full 
utilization of talent was a vehicle 
for the progress of society as a 
whole. 

With the emphasis on individ- 
ual development, Colonial philoso- 
phers enunciated the concepts of 
individual rights and freedoms, to 
guarantee an open pathway to full 
realization of capabilities. Ed- 
ucation, through books and experience, 



was one focus of the many facets of 
this self-realization process. 

Through higher education. 
Colonial man could escape the con- 
fining requirements of basic sur- 
vival and achieve the individual 
status that would produce the pro- 
gress that society demanded. Educ- 
ation of the individual was the key 
to improved lifestyles for future 
generations, and all individuals were 
exposed to the opportunities of such. 

Colonial life offered, through 
the development of personal talents 
and skills, the means, as well as 
the challenge, to improve one's own 
standing and to make continuous im- 
provement easier in the future. 

The design of one of the eorly Wren Buildings 
frames signs of Colonial lifestyles. 



16 LIFESTYLES DIVIDER 



(M<U(dcLuaJi 

xJ^ula JiMaxX )^iMXjl 
/Jul CMJjlojl oi 

\JtLd <X/\ (jrfKjp\tMi(rA^ 

aSui 't (X. Ma (ujL jun- 

>vu^ AjnMyjtA6Jiffv\ aa 
pttt ajr^di JiM.(uUL,^h. 

xA^i ^>it uo-UfJ aJj. 
dAvnx /t6 <i^rYUL indi. 

^ jQajucAju^u) <n xMjl 
J^yiJitsAAixJLu^cUiovx 

curKXiL ^>u\jb jva dUui '^, 
utt affuc/hX, Lla 



An empty dorm rooiO.Stands ready to greet its new 

tenants. 



'Win 




ituuunJLKohJi . Oi ckof^ 

QAv^AJLd ^TiMA /^vU aid 



ukuA, 

XJoji a/xjTAji xAjt^ 



LIFESTYLES 17 



^ LnCfot m<f taotMn(A4k...l 



:^ffu a\a.i tJyi 
aoMAM thji -phjxXo 

qo qcX tkji ^ ^ 

OJn^ uSt'A hziH. 

.rvu^ U tkji s^ff 

Several trips up and down stairs are made difficult 
with armloads of belongings. 
Well packed ears spill out their contents as the 
first step to moving in. 





-^(ro-Uia in . ^ - 

'^A<u>^ ^<yvUX tkini 
LA /aJnjrvJA o^ 

dry[^jdJjA OX tAji 
idajniUL tAjnU. . OM 



18 LIFESTYLES 



"75^ '^ 4^<5t^r^ «^ 






, ui <u^ 



oUvy\^ -JAjO/VJ .liffVVuC- 
CAMltin^ Jin KHM.- 






k)& jLUjUt ^ Jit nikM 

if / • i , 



Cja,/n.p^u^ h^rA^iOAMa ^ 



















V . nJ uxjvwUa. 



v.; -J CA>^ /uit U: 
Ql tilt '"?(o(!AjhA)cL. 

uhJU CJhPAA AA^A 




UiFESTYLES 19 



AtULp -MMA^ aUuYi 'i 

Qjt tMjL col dl dAA 
huJt thjJ\ d '/( ^ 








ttampts *o w»*« M^ mciuae a vigorous i 

brushing confrontation for Mike Urtxinski. 



Ciiw^cuLL c<MteLtaa ccinH/f 




20 LIFESTYLES 





C^4WUL . JkiLAJi uJa^ (X. 

^xj^KcL Jiah hsjbdjuJLtA 

Breakfast at the caf helps start the day for early 

risers 

Early morning coffee helps keep Pat Harkin ond 

Dave Batlan awake while studying before ciosses. 



A morning paper is a familiar sight for regular 
breakfast eaters at the Wig. 



.■^*P* V 



LIFESTYLES 21 



0^ caat4e ct'^ ^uaacf, ^m duck 



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Biology 31 1 students study plant life on a field trip 
to Indian Field Creek 

Crowded for lunch, the Wig attracts faculty 
members and day students because of its 
convenient Campus Center location. 




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P.E. in the afternoon keeps Debbie Johnson busy 
at Adair pool 

Outdoor study is Janet Hamilton's choice before 
her lost class of the day. 



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Concentration is the first step as o Biology 101 student 
begins a lab test. 



LIFESTYLES 23 



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Canoeing on Lake Motooka provides a needed 
study break for Jim Powell. 



24 LIFESTYLES 




Comparison shopper Dave Ballantine buys food 
for another week of cooking for himself. 
Pock on bock, Genny Sharp takes off on her bike 
for an afternoon excursion. 





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News from the "outside world" is a pleasonf 

break for Rich Christenson. 



LIFESTYLES 25 



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26 LIFESTYLES 





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Choices for dinner out are expanded by the new 

Green Leafe Cote 



LIFESTYLES 27 



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aMXJui tor thJL pw.nt 

Note-taking becomes a well-practiced study habit 
when reading reserve material in the library. 
Help is offered by Bill Sharp, as Charlotte Carter 
reviews notes for a test. 



28 LIFESTYLES 




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Bdhteen closse^ a student puts the Campus 
Cent5 study arlo to constructive use. 






libraries in the academic buiroings 
3ce to study for Endio Browne 



tree Decomes tine perfect back support as Pot 
Steele studies on o campus lown. 






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LIFESTYLES 29 






Students gather in Bryan's basement to listen to 

the music of Sundoy evening performers at Uncle 

Morris. 

Sebastian draws a full crowd to the Pub for 

Wednesday night dancing 



30 LIFESTYLES 




Late night hunger pangs compel Jeanne Hill to 
make a "delly run." 



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LIFESTYLES 31 



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Auditions for the Live Shows deportmerit at 
BijsciPGardens offer students a chartfce for 
summer employment. 




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32 LIFESTYLES 





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LIFESTYLES 33 




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34 , S.A. MOVIES 



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\ hat can 
you soy 
about a Friday 
night? If you 
asi<ed that question 
to any student, the an- 
swer would be an almost 
unanimous "S.A. Movies." 
Continuing in their efforts 
to bring recent movies to the college 
community, the Student Association 
offered such favorites as The Sting and 
The Great Gatsby. 

At $5.00 a ticket, the movies were more 
than a bargain. With two movies every 
Friday night, students were given time to 
relax from their week's studies. 

On Halloween, there were two special 
movies to set a ghoulish mood. Students 
lived up to S.A.'s billing as they came 
dressed in all ranges of costumes as well 
as furnishing appropriate sound effects. 
For those who liked the classics there 
were the Charlie Chaplin repeats, and 
tear-jerkers such as Dumbo. For those 
who were more score-oriented there was 
always Psycho. 

Whatever your favorite movie, the film 
series was sure to offer something for 
almost everyone, as the S.A. continued its 
offerings in student services. 




From the motion picture The Sting courtesy of 
Universal Pictures, 



s.a; Movfs 




36 SPECIAL EVENTS 



A very "(SPECIAL" event 




amsburg i 



■ the Arts brings local children info 
1 demonstrote their dancing talents. 



2]rn a college known for its 
/<! academic pressures, there was 
often very little time to relax and 
enjoy the things going on around 
you. When time was found, 
somehow it seemed that it should be 
spent on something special. 

During the year, the Student 
Association did their best to see that 
there was something special for 
students to do. For the first month of 
school, there were no football 
games, so the S.A. scheduled 
special events for each weekend. 
There was a keg party at Lake 
Matoaka and ar\ Oompah band for 
on Oktoberfest party, not to mention 
all the concerts which were 
scheduled. When the games started, 
there were still events which would 
have to be termed special. Besides 
Homecoming, there was Parents' 
Weekend with receptions, 
breakfasts, coffeehouses and 
dances. 

Starting the middle of October, 
those who enjoyed formal affairs 
could attend sorority pledge dances. 
Held in the Campus Center, most of 
these dances were open to students 
who wished to attend. With the 
acceptance of freshmen pledges in 
January, the dances started all over 
again and lasted until the end of the 
year. 

For students interested in privote 
parties, there were alot of 
opportunities — especially around 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. Dorms, 
such as Madison, held potluck 
Thanksgiving dinners with turkeys 
and all the trimmings. Christmas 
was not far behind with parties and 
skits, while Mortar Board and ODK 
sponsored the traditional Yule Log 
ceremony. 

Not to be left out. Colonial 
Williamsburg did its share to help 
students relax. Once in the fall and 
spring, an Occasion for the Arts was 
held on D.O.G. Street. Here students 
and visitors hod a chance to see 
local artistic talent, as well as 
purchase any their pocketbooks 
could afford, and listen to 
outstanding musical talent. 
Christmas saw the annual parade 
with bands and of course Santo 
Clous. With the Bicentennial 
approaching, there was also a 
chance to see visiting dignitaries 
such OS Emperor Hirohito of Japan 
and President Gerald Ford. 

With all these "special" events, it 
was a wonder that anyone hod a 
chance to study at all. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 37 



wj t 4:00 thof Fridoy afternoon, anyone 
i*S?l- -.vGndering through compus couldn't 
heip but notice the rronsfcrmotion taking 
piece. The troffic was unusually heavy, 
and G not too keen observer could 
reodily see it was made up of campers, 
trailers ond well-pocked station wagons. 
The alumni v/ere arriving October 10, for 
Homecoming '75. 

Sorority Court buzzed as the houses 
welcomed visiting alumni. Scraps of 
tissue paper ond extra barbed wire lay 
everywhere, with less than twenty-four 
hours until the big parade. 

Friday evening held a speciol feature 
for the Homecoming crowd. David 
Crosby and Graham Nash performed for 
everyone's enjoyment, as the weekend 
got underway at William and Mary Hall. 

Saturday morning's clouds were a 
little gray, but not menacing. By parade 
time, the weother proved bright and 
promising. Complemented by the 
changing autumn leaves, the world of 
fantasy that unfolded itself along 
Merchant's Square was full of color. As 
if from the pictures of a story book, 
characters like Pinnochio, Puss'n Boots, 
Charlie Brown and his gong, and Alice in 
Wonderland paraded up and down the 



street. 

"A Child's World of Fantasy," as the 
year's parade theme, provided endless 
opportunity for creativity. The trick was 
to inspire the defeat of the Ohio 
University Bobcats at the same time. Chi 
Omega's little people, portraying Dr. 
Seuss's Cot in the Hat, took first place 
in the sorority division. First in the 
fraternity division went to Sigma Chi's 
interpretation of the Pink Panther, while 
Ludwell apartment complex won first 
place in the open division. 



The big weekend hod just begun. A 
fruitless battle against Ohio University 
didn't discourage the party people, and 
party they did. Cocktail parties, 
receptions and band parties were among 
the celebrations. William and Mary Hall 
was the scene of a two bond affair. 
Church and Sebastian both provided 
music for dancing until 1 a.m. The 
weekend was over but the good time it 
provided would stand as undying 
testimony of why William and Mary 
alumni keep coming back. 




Ludwell's "Puss'n Boots" emerges as the winner in 
the open division. 

William and Mary cheerleaders find revenge on 
the sidelines as they bounce the Ohio University 
Bobcot. 



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King's Dominion character, Scooby Doo, odds "is 

own touch of fun to the "World oi Fontasy" or> 

parade. 

A happy-faced Yogr Bear ond friend peer from the 

driver's sect of one of the n-iony trucks puiliog 

floats in the homecoming porode 




Senior princess, Tereso Sato, smiles to the crowd 
lining Duke of Gloucester street Riding in their 
own private train, ottendonts Pot Giermok, Mortfia 
Hughes, and Kothy Lowlor take port in the porode 







Slow music gives porfiers at William and Mary Hall 
a chance for close dancing. 

Beer, liquor and mixers are familiar scenery at a 
weekend party. 



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40 LIFESTYLES 





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That evil weed remains a part of the social scene 
for those who actively seek it. 
Bruton Parrish's steeple is visible from many 
points on Duke of Gloucester Street. 
Roommates post familiar warnings. 







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.lobftr !0, Octo- 
■ qu'e'' foil e/enings 
;-.::, ■.-, v-.'c ^i.i-o^i: yecr. The ccmpus 
wos reiat'veiv qi'iet, with some students 
sturjy!r!f5, %.o>r\i> pQrlying. Yet at 8:00 
p.m. within Wiiiiam and Mary Hall, these 
moods ot totai solemnitude were shut- 
tered when the forces of contemporary 
music invaded; for on each of these 
eveningS; there wos a concert. Those 
students not studying or partying were 
there — enjoying! 

The first of the year's concerts was a 
blue-gross, feoturing the New Morning 
S»^ring Bond, the Vossor Clements Band 
end the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. The mood 
was cleorly evident from the onset: 
stomp your feet, clap your hands and on 
occasional hoot-on'-holler. The New 
Morning String Bond opened the show 
with amazing work on the guitar, mando- 
lin and banjo. The only sour note was 
that this was to be their lost appearance 
together. The Vossar Clements Bond 
was next, featuring the amozing Vassar 
Clements and his fiddle. The crowd went 
crazy, the pace was relentless; it was 
clear that Vossar Clements had stolen 
the show. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band 
finished the show with a good set, com- 
bining old songs with new, and fast with 
slow; however, it was not until two en- 
cores and the return of Vossar Clements 
that the pace again reached fever pitch. 

The Homecoming concert was next, 
featuring David Crosby ond Graham 
Nash. The two were superb on this, the 
first show of their tour. They played 
songs from their new album, "Wind on 
the Water," as well as many of their 
older songs such as "Southbound Train" 
and "Lee Shore." They opened with 
'Irnmigration Man" and closed with 
"Wooden Ships," encoring with "Dejo 
Vu" and "Love Work Out" from their 
new album. The band was sparkling, 
feotufing Russ Kunkei on drums, Dan 
Kootch on guitar, Tim Drummond on 
bass, David Lindley on slide and Craig 
Oeorge on keyboards. Playing frjr over 
iv.o hoLirs, ;he crowd was sorry to see 
Thern go 



H-ihHghting Hc^'scomiraj Weekend is the 

app!:-.;-:.:r!C:- ci G'ah'irr! Noih ond David Oosby. 
T^'t; ^Oi.-if:^c■''t•: ii "nctie t-ven more enjoyable os 
p.-,, .-\ "_"'•.;,'_'. a;:ck o i.-tfsoi'fal (olscH by conversing 




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Electrifying the crowd, Vossar Clements strikes up 
another tune on his magic fiddle. 
Solo spots, like this one with Graham Nash, blend 
with hord rock adding a soft touch to the Crosby 
and Nash concert 



^t\ ounding out Homecoming 
,-l^ Weekend was Jefferson Starship, 
who appeared on Monday, October 13. 
The opening act was Wet Willie who 
played a good set, but it was not until 
Starship hit the stage that the Hall came 
olive. Starship was at W&M to prove 
that they were no dead — and prove it 
they did! With Grace Slick, Paul Kantner, 
Marty Balin and David Freiburg helped 
by Craig Choquico, Pete Sears on bass 
and Johnny Garbato on drums, the show 
was nothing less than perfect. From the 
start, it was clear that they were there to 
rock and roll. Alternating between old 
and new, they thrilled the crowd with 
songs like their latest relaeose, "Miracles" 
and others such as "Wooden Ships," 
"Dragon Fly," and their lost song, 
"Volunteers." The show featured great 
vocal harmony and instrumental work, 
especially solos by Sears and Barbata. 
Starship put on a tremendous shew, and 
no one went home disappointed. 

From the indications of the first three 
concerts alone, it oppeored that WiUlcm 
and Mary was on its way to regaining 
their former distinction as an excellent 
concert school. These v/ere not the- only 
concerts however, the winter wor, tc see 
mony more . . . 



A highlight ot lasf year's concerts, /sffe' son 
Storship returns to VViliiom -ji^.w \'o. •. Hcl! 
In classic form, G:oce Siic> 




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Soft guitar playing by Dave Mason calms down 
the mood at his Fall concert. 
Man of many feces. Cot Stevens entertains the 
crowd with his versotility. 



Cstablishment of a fine concert 
trend in the early months of 
the school year continued throughout 
the entire year. Once again, William 
and Mary Hall attracted top artists, 
reaffirming past traditions that the 
Hall had for being a premiere con- 
cert site. The list of artists who 
performed impressed the William and 
Mary crowd and also drew interest 
from neighboring campuses. 

Sunday, October 26, saw the ar- 
rival of Pure Prairie League and 
Elvin Bishop. Bishop dazzled the 
audience with dextrous guitar work, 
and his own brand of funk-rock. 
Pure Prairie League followed with a 
show of country-rock that merited a 
three time call-back. 

Opening November and polishing 
off Halloween, were Frank Zappa and 
the Mothers of Invention. Their 
performance was as grotesque as one 
might expect from Zappa and in this 
regard no one was disappointed. 
Opening the show was the able Jimmy 
Buffet. 

Little Feat and Dove Mason came 
to the Hall on Monday, November 17. 
Little Feat, hailed by Rolling Stone 
as the best group in America, ral- 
lied the crowd to their feet for the 
entire evening. Dave Mason closed 
the show. 



44 CONCERTS 





Adorned with her cabi hot, Joni Mitchell sings her 
classic Big Yellow Toxi. 

One of Zappa's Mothers puts on on act typical of 
their post-Halloween show. 




Joni Mitchell and the L.A. Ex- 
press sold out the Hall on February 6. 
The L.A. Express opened the show 
with a jazz-rock set. Joni's en- 
trance on stage in a three-piece gray 
suit and felt fedora fit perfectly 
with her rendition of old favorites. 
The two hour set included many new 
songs, most from her latest release 
The Hissing of Summer Lawns. 

The 1976 Maijikat Tour arrived 
at William and Mary on February 22, 
featuring the ever-popular Cat Stevens 
and a group of magicians. The magici- 
ans performed first with some out- 
standing feats. The Cat came on, 
playing old and new songs, especi- 
ally those from his latest album. 
Numbers. He pleased everyone and 
reaffirmed his reputation for being 
a fine performer in-concert. 

Prospects for the Spring did not 
disappoint avid music lovers and con- 
certs continued. With the likes of 
Marshall Tucker, Earl Scruggs, Papa 
John Creach and Jessie Collin Young, 
the Hall's '75-'76 concert schedule 
revived the campus' faith in its 
ability to attract quality entertain- 
ment. 




Lead guitarist of the LA Express, Robben Ford, 
gets down with his phenomanal guitar picking. 



) 



CONCERTS 45 



Master of disguise, Dovid Tomo, responds to 
personal questions about his experiences as a New 
Jersey police detective. 



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A speaker for the Christian Science 
organization highlights a meeting. 



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here but a college campus could 
. on individual be subjected to 
such a smattering of divergent opin- 
ions? In 1975-76, William and Mary 
exposed students to that variety in 
the scheduling of guest speakers 
ranging from ex-cop David Toma to 
Socialist Party candidate Frank P. 
Ziedler. 

Few evenings lacked a lecture 
on a topic of student or community 
interest. Informal gatherings were 
scheduled regularly at individual 
dormitories in order to inform stu- 
dents of career interests, foreign 
study programs, or even apartment 
decorating. Such talks were set up 
by college administrators, resident 
advisors and individual dorm coun- 
cils. 

Within the academic spectrum. 
Language Houses and Project Plus 
each offered evening programs. 
Prose and poetry readings drew 
language concentrators and inter- 
ested listeners to the New Complex. 
Project Plus forums, open to the 
entire college community, featured 
guest speakers on every aspect of 
medieval studies imaginable. Among 
the best attended was a lecture on 
medieval witchcraft and sorcery. 

Delivering on emotionally charged 
talk was New Jersey detective of 
more than 20 years, David Toma. 
The youthful man spoke in a totally 
unstructured off-the-chest manner, re- 
counting police experiences and 
very personal family stories. 
The master of disguises, as the 
television show based on his life 
portrayed, boasted a record of 
over a thousand arrests without 
firing his gun a single time. 

If the audience tried to pin- 
point David Tomo's philosophy it was 
likely they did not succeed. At one 
point he portrayed himself as a law 
enforcer with a conservative bent 
who played by the rules. Drug 
abuse, including marijuana, gambling, 
and prostitution, he put down strong- 
ly. Police corruption he acknow- 
ledged but he claimed innocence in 
that area. The next minute Toma 
conveyed the image of the rebellious 
individual refusing to compromise 
himself to the norm. He recounted 
stories of arguing with the police 
department about his methods of 
arrest, and of arguing with tele- 
vision directors about his accurate 
portrayal as a cop. He would not 
stand for the addition of unneces- 
sary violence just to glamorize 
the show. 

Toma came off as a man of 
strong, base emotions. Much of 
the audience was caught by the mag- 
netism whether there was substance 
behind it or not. 

Specially featured guest 
speaker, Chicago Seven lawyer 
William Kuntsler addressed 900 
people at William and Mary Hall. 
The radical defense attorney made a 
target of the Informers who perjured 
themselves for the prosecution and 
of the government which, for lack of 



evidence, attempted to win trials by 
its choice of locations. Kuntsler, 
making sure none of the 900 listen- 
ers left without a strong opinion, 
cut down the American judicial sys- _ 
tem and the ignorant majority. He l-J^r. 
attacked the doctnne of conspiracy';""' 
and the incessant use of political 
trials OS tools to keep the op- 
pressed in their place. He paral- 
leled U.S. involvement in Vietman 
with that of Hitler. Stopping just 
short of advocating revolution, 
Kuntsler was, nevertheless, conpic- 
uously silent on one point. A 
point which was raised in the first 
question asked, and which Kuntsler 
really could not answer. 

"Mr. Kuntsler, now that you 
hove told us exactly what is wrong 
with America, what do you propose 
we do?" 



Doctor of Philosophy, Daniel E. Callahan 
discusses "Deoth With Dig" a topic of in-depth 
research in his published works. 



■siaffKSs^i 





Abandoned symbols of an old system furnish a 

room in the Wren Building 

Tunneled windows of the Wren Building give a 

limited scope of the v.orld outside 




'^Ae't t(te^ ^ xpcicei. \fn xoUtUcU 



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■■- Oouds disperse ovep the "exponsive voicf of the 

Sunken Gordens ~ ■" - "".' •' ' '■ 



48 LIFESTYLES 



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elf-Cxpresfsiion-' 



SELF-EXPRESSION DIVIDER 49 



®he colonial gtubent 



/W' t the time William and Mary was 
X% founded in 1693, the student body 
was all male with their interests being 
steered in the directions dictated by the 
times. During the first years of the 
College, many of the men were 
instructed in theology for much of their 
academic training. By 1776, the 
academic program had expanded to 
include training in many other areas. 
Among the more practical of these was 
a surveyor's license given by the College 
to students including George 
Washington. 

Recreational activities included 
croquet, a unique type of bowling and 
horseback riding; while social activities 



often ended up at the local taverns, with 
a drink of ale. By 1776, the attention of 
the students was directed towards 
politics. With Williamsburg serving as 
the capitol of Virginia, students were 
able to observe some of the most 
exciting of the revolutionary times. The 
Sunken Gardens served as a practice 
ground for many of this country's future 
soldiers. A plaque may now be found in 
the Wren Building erected to those 
students and faculty who expressed 
themselves in service during the 
Revolutionary War. 



Many students served during the Revolutionary 
Wor, wearing uniforms like these. 



50 SELF-EXPRESSION DIVIDER 




PHYSICnt-J 



PHYSICAL 51 



Caught behind the line by on Ohio player, Tommy 
Rozantz foils to get off fiis first quarter pass. 
After breaking through the Ohio offensive line, 
Steve Dalton stops their fullback for a loss of 
yardage. 



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A strong effort by the offensive line enables Jeff 
Vanderbeek to gain important yardage against 
Furman. 



52 VARSITY FOOTBALL 




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'^iT'he 1975 William and Mary 
^fcK football team, fresh from a victory 
over a proposal to downgrade the 
athletic program and laden with miracle 
freshmen, held their season opener 
against the Tar Heels of the University 
of North Carolina. The game, which was 
supposed to provide the spark for an 
explosive season, proved to be 
something much less; leaving the Indians 
stunned for the remainder of the 
schedule. The opening kickoff typified 
the entire game, as U.N.C. returned it 92 
yards for a touchdown. Statistically the 
game was evenly matched, but 
inexperience and mistakes gave the Tar 
Heels a 33-7 win over the hapless Tribe. 
The only touchdown came from 
freshman quarterback Tommy Rozantz. 

With 14 days to smooth the rough 
spots and ponder his line-up. Head 
Coach Jim Root again sent his 
inexperienced freshmen against the 
opposition. The result was much the 
same as it had been two weeks earlier, 
only this time the victor was Southern 
Conference rival, East Carolina, who 
shut out the Indians 20-0. 

The next two weeks proved as fruitless 
as the first three, as the Pittsburg 
Panthers tried to sooth their painful loss 
to Oklahoma by pounding the Tribe 
47-0. While in the next game, the Green 
and Gold loss to the Citadel 21-6. This 
last loss was even more painful as the 
Indians showed their strongest offensive 
performance to date. Experience 
provided the only touchdown as senior 
quarterback Paul Kruis threw to Keith 
Fimian in the third quarter. 

The Tribe had high hopes for their 
Homecoming game against the Ohio 
University Bobcats, but the home opener 
proved to be a predictable as the 
previous four. The biggest excitement 
seemed to come from many people who 
were confused as to which team the 
Tribe was playing. Cries of "Where's 
Archie?" referring to Ohio State's 
All- American, were often heard in the 
crowd. With less than a minute left in the 
game, Rozantz scored a touchdown with 
freshman Mike Burgess following with 
the conversion. This provided the only 
score, with the Tribe losing to Ohio, 
22-8. 



Quarterback Paul Kruis drops back from the line 
end follows through with a poss. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 53 



COACHING STAFF 

Jim Root, Head Cooch 

Lou Tepper, Ass't Coach 

Bob Sherman, Ass't. Coach 

Ralph Kirchenheiter, Ass't. Coach 

Dave Zimmerman, Ass't. Coach 

Phil Elmassion, Ass't. Coach 

Bill Casto, Ass't. Coach 



A frequent sign of student feelings towards the 
football program is shown by students at the 
Homecoming Gome. 

Head Coach Jim Root watches o J.V. football 
game in the end zone stands. 





. A. pass intended for Mike Corbin is intercepted b^r 
Kenriy Smith during tbe first game of the season .-' 
against U.N. O" ,'i 




uilding a new 




ur© 



(^ fter the Homecoming gome loss to 
(Cf- Ohio, the Tribe continued their 
losing streak by falling to Rutgers and 
Furman in straight order. On November 
1, 1975, the Tribe arrived in Norfolk to 
meet Va. Tech in the Oyster Bow. Down 
10-0 at the end of the 3rd quarter, W&M 
came back with a strong offensive drive 
to match that given by the defense. It 
was a Rozantz run into the end zone 
that put the Indians on the scoreboard; 
but, his performance was not enough to 
spark the Tribe as they lost 24-7. 

The game in Lexington against V.M.I. 
proved to be the turning point for W&M 
as they won 13-7. Six of the Tribe's 
points were scored on field goals by Jim 
Ryan, a substitute for injured Steve 
Dalton. The sole touchdown for the 
team come from a fake field goal 
attempt, which Paul Kruis threw to Keith 
Fimian. It was a big day for others as 
sophomore Jimmy Kruis ran for 152 
yards and sophomore Joe Agee set p 
record with a 77 yard kick. 

The luck did not last as they lost their 
next game to Colgate, entering their last 
game 1-9. By this time, the Tribe was 



ranked as the second worst team in the 
nation by Los Angeles Times' 
sportswriter Steve Harvey. But in the first 
few minutes of the Richmond game, the 
team attempted to moke up for the rest 
of the season. Rozantz threw to fellow 
freshmen Joe Manderfield for the first 
touchdown. Playing an excellent 
defensive gome, the Tribe forced 
Richmond to go into a punt situation 
soon afterW&M's touchdown. 
Unfortunately for the Spiders, Scotty 
Hays returned it for a touchdown. 
Following touchdowns by Rozantz, 
Manderfield and Keith Fimian and a Jim 
Ryan field goal, the Tribe won 31-21. 

The Richmond victory not only helped 
the team salvage a disastrous year, but 
earned Rozantz Southern Conference 
honors. It may have also saved Head 
Coach Jim Root his job. Signs of "Boot 
the Root" in the crowd at every home 
gome expressed the sentiments of many. 

After the Richmond gome, attitudes 
hod begun to mellow; the complaints 
were not as great as many expected 
when Root was rehired. Many felt that if 
Proposal II was to succed, then a 



continuity in coaches would have to exist 
for the team. In the end, the year's work 
showed as William and Mary beat 
Richmond. It as least gave Proposal II a 
chance to get on its feet. 

VARSITY FOOTBALL 



Joe Agee 

Scott Back 

Eric Bohner 

Kevin Barnes 

Chip Botes 

Terry Bennett 

Brett Bettge 

Lou Biondi 

Bob Booth 

Don Bowers 

Mark Braun 

Ken Brown 

Mike Burgess 

Tom Butler 

Rolfe Carawan 

Mickey Carey 

Lou Cose 

Kenneth Cloud 

Craig Cook 

Steve Dalton 

Ron Duman 

Ivan Fears 

Keith Fimian 

Mike Flurie 

Doug Gerek 

Allen Goode 

Scott Goodrich 

Preston Green 

Peter Griffin 

Craig Harrington 



Scott Hays 
Jeff Hosmer 
Tom Huber 
John Kroeger 
Jim Kruis 
Paul Kruis 
Steve Kuhn 
Gary LeCloir 
Evan Lewis 
Joe Manderfield 
Craig McCurdy 
Gory Meenan 
Bill Melrose 
Mark Mullady 
Gray Oliver 
Dave O'Neill 
Sam Potton 
Doug Pearson 
Keith Potts 
Bob Robinson 
Tommy Rozantz 
Jim Ryan 

Bruno Schmolhofer 
Kenny Smith 
Tommy Smith 
Bob Szczpinski 
Jeff Vonderbeek 
Paul Witkovitz 
Ed Yergolonis 
Honk Zimmerman 



54 VARSITY FOOTBALL 




Hard work 



la winnin 




\^|j;4ith many of the freshmen players 
ZA' seeing varsity action, some 
wondered how o depleted J.V. squad 
would do. They did not have to wonder 
for long as the squad opened with a 
victory. Outstanding players helping the 
Tribe through victories were Howard 
Rowling and Andy Banks. The final 
record was 3-1, with their only loss 
coming to Richmond. Until the 
Richmond game, the final of the season, 
the Tribe had only allowed one 
touchdown to be scored against them. 
The good defense combined with the 
offense enabled the team to shut out 
V.M.I., a previously undefeated team. 
With most of the J.V. squad playing 
for the varsity team next year, the 
outlook for the 1976-77 season was 
good. 

J.V. FOOTBALL 



^ One of the many touchdowns during 
gome is scored by Welter Davis. 



Ed Amos 

Eric Bahner 

Keith Baklcrz 

Andy Bonks 

Michael Blackburn 

George Co I las 

Dave Campbell 

Walter Davis 

Don Bowers 

Raymond Greaser 

Steven Gutowski 

Terry Havelka 

Pete Lysher 



Pete Lysher 
Robert McForlin 
Robert Muscolus 
Kevin Odor 
Robert Rash 
Randy Ratliff 
Howard Rowling 
Steve Trembley 
Michael Wagner 
David Walton 
Richard Wells 
Ed Yergalonis 
Marty Zangus 



l^^^^'A 1 *J^ 







J.V. FOOTBALL 55 




oobops 









tonally 
anked 



'^Itfnlike the 1974-75 year, the soccer 
^fctlteam began their season slowly 
but ended strong with a 9-3-2 record, a 
regional ranking of sixth and a berth in 
the Southern Conference championships 
held at William and Mary. 

The big game of the season was 
against Old Dominion University; the 
game that decided the winner of the 
state division. A confused call at the end 
of the game allowed ODU to tie it and 
eventually win in overtime. In an 
expected tough game, the Tribe breezed 
past George Mason 6-0. 

The difference could be explained by 
the fact that this was the first year that a 
pre-season training camp had been held. 
Coach Albert put his team through a 
rigorous training program, leading to 
comments from opposing coaches that 
the William and Mary squad was in 
better shape than most. 

Another big factor in the team's 
improvement was the addition of several 
outstanding freshmen. Kip Germain, a 
first year man from Virginia, set a record 
for the most goals scored by any player 
in a season. Freshmen Billy Watson and 
Brad Eure also mode important 
contributions. 

This year's record should help in a 
successful recruiting year. Add this to 
the experience of the returning team and 
the Tribe should only get better. 

Forward Kip Germain dribbles into position to 
score one of his thirteen goals. 

On his way down the field with the ball, Mork 
Heoly looks to Trevor Smith as the defense 
watches. 





I Jf^^ 



56 SOCCER 



:i<£i'. 








Keeping the ball owoy from Virginia Wesleyan, Joe 

Carlin prepares to kick. 

A VMI scoring attempt is spoiled by Brod Eure's 

tackle. 



SOCCER 



Coach 

Asst. Coach 

Co-Captoin 

Co- Captain 

Manager 

Joe Ahearn 

Glenn Bolas 

Bruce Bender 

Larry Berbert 

Tad Bromtield 

Joe Carlin 

Ridge DeWitt 

David Ellenboqen 

Brad Eure 

John Folan 

James Fox 

Kip Germain 



A I Albert 
Tim O'Conner 
Tod Minkler 
Casey Todd 
Steve Greenlaw 
Mark Heoly 
Charlie Hensel 
Chris Maher 
Scott Sattertield 
Phil Simonpietri 
Storm Simenson 
Rick Smith 
Trevor Smith 
Vins Sutlive 
Christopher Thomas 
Bill Wotson 



SOCCER 57 



1 -r. .-,; 



V ■' i 



i ^"^;< 




^ jSfc-^ 




After a long meet, the William and Mary team 
congratulates the visiting Marines. 



CROSS COUNTRY 



George Baquis 

Chris Bender 

Doug Blackman 

Mac Collins, Capt. 

Fronk Courtney 

Kevin Cropp 

Steve Dye 

Mike Ellington 

Kevin Ellis 

Brendan Gallaher 

John Randolph, Coach 

Baxter Berryhill, Ass't. 



Mike Gilleran 
Mike Hagon 
Steve Huebner 
Tim McGuire 
Jon Michoel 
George Moore 
Steve Nobles 
Rich Rothschild 
Kevin Schrack 
Paul Serro 
Greg Thomas 
Chris Tulou, Capt. 



^ 
t 




58 CROSS COUNTRY 




A hot day makes the meet even more tiring for 
Brendan Gailaher and Mac Collins. 
The Colonial Parkway provides a perfect place for 
the cross country team's practices. 



lUi 



V. 







W^.^\C-VM-^''5i^' 



Tribe tak 






J^Qilliam and Mary has long been a 
U^ school blessed with traditions. 
What one would never have expected 
was that the cross country team was one 
of them. For the tenth consecutive year, 
the harriers brought home the Southern 
Conference championship, and all but 
wiped out the competition as they took 
seven of the top eight positions. 

Meets followed closely for the team so 
that one week after they won the S.C. 



Two William and Mory runners have a runner for 
the Marines blocked in during o meet. 



championship, they journeyed to 
Greenville, S. Carolina for the NCAA 
District 3 meet. Coach John Randolph 
had to have his runners place in the top 
six in order to advance to the NCAA 
finals. The seven men who travelled to 
Furman accomplished this by placing 
fourth, beating such nationally ranked 
teams as Duke and Kentucky. With his 
eleventh-place finish, co-captain Chris 
Tulou was named to the All-Southern 
teem. 

The NCAA cross-country meet in 
State College, Pa., brought the top 32 
teams in the nation into competition. 




[H [H [H 



The first runner to cross the line for the 
Tribe as Mac Collins, who finished 40th. 
He was the 23rd American to cross the 
finish line, qualifying him for 
Ail-American honors. 

Although not finishing in the Top 20 
as had been hoped, the team did 
extremely well. Their finish was even 
more outstanding since three of the 
seven runners who competed at the 
NCAA meet were freshmen, Mike 
Ellington, Kevin Ellis and Jon Michael. 
Hopes for the Top 20 in the 1 976 season 
were good, as Chris Tulou was the only 
one of the national runners to graduate. 



CROSS COUNTRY 59 



Protection for Cheryl Proscino as she drives for o 

goal IS provided by Jo Ousterhout and Ginny 

Ramsey. 

Breaks during the gome give players a chance to 

rest. 








Longwood's attempts to gain control of the ball 
are thwarted by Ginny Ramsey and Sue Morrison. 
Sue Morrison heads for a gool against Longwood. 



60 FIELD HOCKEY 



Heokaw Ml%m 




\:V% ho would have thought at the 
2^S/ beginning of the 1975-76 sea- 
son, that a team made of one senior, 
a handful of juniors and sophomores, 
and plenty of freshmen would end 
the year as the number four team in 
the nation? That is what happened 
to the women's field hockey team 
and those who knew the team were not 
surprised. 

The team started the year with 
a tie against Longwood, a team that 
beat the Indians lost year. From 
there things kept improving, with 
the young team proving to be both 
enthusiastic and highly skilled. 
The crowds were larger than in the 
past adding much to the games. 
Sophomore Kim Buchanan added, 
"There's someone to play for other 
than yourself." 

Much of the improvement could 
be attributed to the new, dynamic 
brand of hockey that the team, with 
the help of Coach Nancy Porter, had 
adopted at the end of 1974. This 
style of play allowed the players 
more freedom of movement producing 
more initiative. All this combined 
to bring about an aggressive forward 
line that worked well together. 
Also adding much to the team's im- 
provement was the outstanding play of 
freshman goalie, Cindy Heldt. 



As a result of this effort, 
William and Mary was able to attend 
the National AIAW-USFHA Tournament 
held during the Thanksgiving holidays 
in Harrisonburg, Virginia. The 
team qualified for the nationals by 
breezing through the Tidewater and 
Regional Tournaments with a 23-1 
Score. 

The Indians entered the semi- 
finals after an exciting 2-1 victory 
over Lockhaven State College. The 
last two teams that W&M played, 
Ursinus and Springfield, proved to 
be too much. But the year was good 
and with only one member graduating 
the future looked even brighter. 

FIELD HOCKEY 

Ellen Faye Abbey 

Debra Bender 

Denise Bourque 

Joyce Buchanan 

Kim Buchanan 

Karen Foye Cory 

Nelda Casper 

Lee Chichester 

Lorene Purcell Cone 

Elizabeth DiNordo 

Margaret Donnelly 

Mary Elliott 

Catherine Goewey 

Cynthia Heldt 

Paula Lompert 

Borbara Logan 

Marge Masterson 

Coach Nancy Porter 



Heather Meldrum 
Sue Morrison 
Lisa Noser 
Jo Ousterhout 
Laurie Pierce 
Diana Powell 
Cheryl Proscino 
Ginny Ramsey 
Catherine Read 
Nancy Read 
Susan Simone 
Lorraine Turgeon 
Lynn Whitlock 
Christine Wood 
Susan Wright 
Hideko Yamaguchi 
Debbie Yaney 
Michelle Zimmer 





\^^@ 





Goal ottempts by Sorb Logon help Williom ond 

Mary tie the score with Longwood. 

A fierce battle helps Sue Morrison regoin the boll 

for William and Mory. 



FIELD HOCKEY 61 



A spike by Margaret Watson, backed by Sue 
Shank, keeps the Indians in the gonne. 
Onlookers Pat Steel and Carolyn McCoy mentally 
help teommote Cathy Baker with her shot. 



II. 




Push for first 



^1 ooking forward to two big home 
>^games this year as opposed to 
none lost year, the volleyball team 
started their early practice in Oct- 
ober. The results of Coach Sylvia 
Shirley's encouragement of enthusiasm 
and hard work showed in the season's 
final record. The team developed 
throughout the year ending with a 
successful second place in Division 
II of the State Tournament. 

Tournaments, especially those 
that were held out of state, turned 
out to be a big learning experience 
for the team. They also planned to 
continue individual practicing during 
the off-season. These factors combined 
with more home games and many return- 
ing underclassmen, fostered the hope 



that next year would be when it 
jelled together and the William and 
Mary volleyball team can come home 
with first place. 



VOLLEYBALL 



Cathy Baker 

Sandy Chambers 

Anne Ferguson 

Kathy Jones 

Carolyn McCoy, Capt. 

Janet AAoscicki 

Susan Reed 

Janice Reter 

Doris Scheffle 



Susan Shank 
Pot Steel 
Sue Strommer 
Pamela Warner 
Lisa Watson 
Margaret Watson 
Mimi Yonemoto 
Roxanno Zamora 
Sylvia Shirley, Coach 



Arms stretched outward, Carolyn McCoy tries to 
block her opponents shot. 




62 VOLLEYBALL 





nif way I© up 



truggling against many problems, 
including lack of money and 
continued status as a club, William and 
Mary's Rugby team faced many 
disappointments during the fall season. 
The team never seemed to get off the 
ground as each game found different 
players turning in good performances. 

Some of the problems during the game 
were attributed to a lack of good 
conditioning. During the semester, the 
team worked especially hard on this area 
and by the end of the season, it began to 



The field behind William and Mary Hall provides a 
place for the ruggers fo practice. 



look as if it might be helping. A month 
after losing to the Norfolk Irish team 
20-0, W&M defeated them 16-12 in the 
Ed Lee tournament. With off-season 
workouts, the club hoped to turn their 
fortunes around in the spring seoson. 



RUGBY 



Chris Ambroggi 

Ray Bledoy 

Jim Booker 

Glen Gillett 

Rob Gulick 

Ken Griffin 

Jamie Hall 

Andy Herzog 

Mitch Huffman 



Bill Lunger 
Mike Mason 
Jim Mitchell, Copt. 
Tim O'Connor 
Jock Russell 
Bill Shorpe 
Kenny Shepherd 
Charlie Smith 
Poul Wilson 



Practice games enable the rugby team to develop 
plans for their next game. 




r^ 



m 



r\\^i\jjiJ t Oj 




hanoes W©rk 



Coming off their best season in 
twenty-five years, pre-seoson 
hopes for the Tribe were high. 
Last year's young team remained 
almost intact. Experienced sopho- 
mores and juniors formed the back- 
bone of the team, with All-Southern 
Conference guard Ron Satterthwaite 
heading the list. Among the other 
stand-outs were two of the All- 
Southern Conference Rookie Team 
members, John Lowenhaupt and Mike 
Enoch. These returning letter- 
men were joined by two promising 
freshmen, a mid-season transfer and 
a stand-out from the 73-74 squad. 
Billed as a sure bet to be in the 
running for the conference cham- 
pionship, many William and Mary 
students awaited the basketball 
season as a welcome change from 



watching the other "revenue" sport 
struggle through its season. 

The squads only real tests 
at the beginning of the schedule 
were gomes with ACC member Woke 
Forest and D.C. powerhouse, George 
Washington. Both, however, proved 
to be disappointments for the Indi- 
ans. Rounding out the line-up 
prior to Christmas were four weaker 
opponents, including two Southern 
Conference match-ups. Extending 
last season's tradition of winning 
at home, while struggling on the 
road, the Tribe entered the Holi- 
days boasting a 4-2 record, with 
all four wins coming at home. 



Pre-seoson practice puts the Tribe in shape 
for its first game of the season against 
Appaiochian State. 








c 



s. 



Another bosket by Dennis Vail gives William and 
Mary the lead against Appalachian State. 
The annual Green and Gold game pits Ronnie 
Satterthwaite against his teammates. 



64 BASKETBALL 





BASKETBALL 65 





Ylfhe second half of the Indian 
^hl/ basketball season proved to be 
as successful as the first. The tra- 
dition of winning at home was spoiled 
by a 20 point loss to U.Va., but the 
Indians were treated to on unfamiliar 
sight that soon became commonplace; 
a crowded William end Mary Hall. Fans 
packed in to see the surging Indians, 
led by second-half star Jack Arbogast. 
Ron Satterthwaite left the team mid 
way through the second half, amidst 
rumors of team disunity; but Coach 
Balanis in his second full-year with 
the Indians, kept the team together, 
and Satterthwaite later asked to re- 
join the team after a close loss to 
V.M.I, at the Keydets' gym. 

On February 1 1, the team returned 
home to face V.P.I.'s nationally 
ranked Gobblers and responded with a 
great game before losing, 50-48. 
Other nationally ranked teams on the 
Indians' schedule included Rutgers 
and Princeton. 

The Indians finished the 75-76 
season number two in the Southern 



A loose boll sends both teams scrambling to 
regain possession. 

In the first round of the Southern Conference 
Tournament, Dennis Vail jumps to block a shot 



Conference, earning a home gome in 
the first round of the Conference 
Tournament. Only an extra conference 
gome for V.M.I.'s Keydets kept the 
Indians from winning the regular sea- 



son championship. But the Tribe 
showed itself as a youthful power in 
the Southern Conference and gave fans 
a "revenue" sport that could win. 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Jack Arbogast 

Rocky Copley 

Mike Enoch 

Billy Harrington 

John Kratzer 

John Lowenhoupt 

Jim McDonough 

George Bolanis 

Bruce Porkhill 

George Spack 



Danny Monckton 
Rod Musseiman 
Doug Myers 
Skip Porneli 
Mark Risinger 
Ron Sotterthwaite 
Dennis Vail 
Head Coach 
Assistant Coach 
Assistant Coach 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 67 



As Koren Taylor drives in for o loyup, Sandy 
ChafTibers and Carolyn McCoy prepare to offer 
support. 




k*_ 



Cs 



WOMENS' BASKETBALL 

Janet Armitoge Karen Toylor 

Elizabeth Butler Carol Thompson 

Sandy Chambers Susan Warr 

Joyce Fronko Mary Ann Wente 

Cory Knight Kothy Wiesemon 
Carolyn McCoy 




^^Jsu^ 



<:^ 




respite being plagued by 
'numerous injuries, the wom- 
en's varsity basketball team 
turned in o satisfying 6-7 record. 
Playing in a division with larger 
colleges, they narrowly missed 
attending the state tournament 
by placing ninth rather than 
within the top eight cutoff. 
The team played well against 
tough opponents, turning in their 
best performances against Long- 
wood and Madison, last year's state 
champion. During the season 
three of the five starting players 
were injured at one time, giving 
them a great disadvantage as 
compared with other teams in the 
division. Some outstanding per- 
formances were turned in by Janet 
Armitoge, Sandy Chambers, the most 
improved player since last year 
and Carolyn McCoy, who was on 
the all-state team. A generally 
young group, the team will face 
the loss of only two starters, 
Carolyn McCoy and guard Joyce 
Frank. "Our potential was high, 
but we had worse breaks than any- 
body in the state." commented a 
member. 



68 WOMENS' BASKETBALL 




^? 





At the foul line, Betsy Butler carefully shoots while 

teommates Sondy Chombers, Carolyn McCoy and 

Janet Armitage watch. 

Demonstrating the concentration required for 

success, Karen Taylor shoots above a defender 

while Carol Thorripson onxiousiy awaits the 

outcome. 



top thallst 





■ 



< « 



Carolyn McCoy leaps high above other players to 
put in a bosket as Janet Armitage repositions 
herself. 



<■ — 



\.v _ 



WOMENS' BASKETBALL 69 



The final match opens with Ken Brown getting 
ready for the take down on his University of 
Richmond opponent. 




.T 




On his back a few seconds later, the Richmond 
wrestler tries to escape Brown's hold. 
Arms raised in the air. Ken Brown exults over his 
30 second pin. 



WRESTLING 



Vera Ando, Mgr. 

Robert Bragg 

Tom Braun 

Tom Burklow 

Craig Cook 

Peter Creedon 

Chip Dempsey 

Tom Dick 

Gary Drewry 

Tom Duffy 

Bob Dunker 

Tom Dursee 

Dove Fischer 

John Friedery 

Mike Gloth 

Allen Goode 

Chip Griffith 

Bill Guernier 

Scott Heon 

Jim Hicks, Capt. 

Chuck Horton 

Malcolm Hunter 

Pot Johnston 



Wayne Keafer 

Rob King 

Ken Leonard 

Andy Lokie 

Max Lorenzo 

Bob Mil lea, Mgr. 

Don Moore 

Henry Neilly 

Bob Pincus, Capt. 

David Puster 

Bill Ranken 

Vicki Roakes, Mgr. 

Steve Salmirs 

Doug Salmon 

John Schmidtke, Capt. 

Anthony Slaughter 

Bryan Spradlin 

Bob Stark 

Mitch Sutterfield 

Rolph Wilson 

Ron Zediker 

Hank Zimmerman 

Ed Steers, Coach 




70 WRESTLING 




winner white rebulldln 





'TTf ast year the William and Mary 
J6^ wrestling team lost six seniors, 
including two time All-American Mark 
Belknap. This left Coach Steers with 
a young team and a year of rebuilding 
ahead of him. Though they hod to 
take some lumps along the way, 
there was always an abundant amount 
of team spirit and a good effort put 
forth by all. 

The highpoints of the season 
were the 18-16 win over a tough 
Princeton team and a narrow defeat 
to ninth ranked Navy. Outstanding 
wrestlers Tom Dursee, Bob Pincus 
Jim Hicks, and Max Lorenzo each had 
over twenty wins for the season. 

The 1976-77 should be even 
better than this one with all of 
the starters returning forming a 
strong nucleus from which to work. 
For a rebuilding year, the 1975-76 
wrestling season turned out well. 



With strong determination, Gary Drewry tries to 
tree himself from his opponents grip. 
Near a pin, Gary Drewry applies the final 
pressures. 




WRESTLING 71 



Youth a 



^^A ith the departure of record 
[jy holders Dodge Havens, Paul 
Vining and Dave Wenzel, and a record 
of only 5-5 during the 1974-75 sea- 
son, things did not look bright for 
the men's swimming team. Another 
factor adding to the difficulty ex- 
pected in competition was that only 
six of the team members were upper- 
classmen, but several of the fresh- 
men from the 1974-75 team grew tre- 
mendously and contributed heavily 
to the team's final showing. 

Capt. Keith Havens continued to 




rival brother Dodge's records and 
added great strength to the team in 
the sprint Freestyle events. Sopho- 
more Jay Friedrich was expected to 
lead the "Mother-ducks" in the 
middle distance Freestyles while 
Mark DeWandel added strength to the 
Breastroking events. The two weak- 
nesses which hurt the team most were 
the distance Freestyle and Diving; 
it was here that the freshmen were 
supposed to help. For the team, the 
attitude remained to work hard and 
wait and see. 




Before being timed in his event, Rob Harlee 

adiusfs his goggles. 

Bockstroker Dave Clark tokes time to perfect his 

specialty. 



Gory Altman 

Keith Angle 

Henry Baker 

Kevin Bruce 

Rex Burkholder 

Dovid Clark 

John Culhone 

Mark DeWandel 

John Ford 

Jay Friedrich 

Hector Garcia 

Doug Hancock 

Robert Harlee 

Jeff Harris 



Keith Havens, Capt 

Mike Hennessey 

John Kennedy 

Greg Moore 

John Norman 

John Phillips 

Brian Piper 

Lynne Powel 

Kyle Sonnenberg 

David Smith 

Charles Stern 

Joe Vaughon 

John Weiner 

Dudley Jensen, Coach 



72 MEN'S SWIMMING 




Timed practices help Missy Farmer prepare for on 

upcoming meet. 

By the end of on ofternoon of practice, Elizabeth 

Wagner needs o chance to relax. 



t 




T©p© In spunk 



WOMEN'S SWIMMING 



« 



^tr hose other teams can do what 
yii^ they will, but we'll all stay 
with Mary and Bill!" or so goes the 
cheer of the women's swimming team. 
Under the leadership of Copt. Kaggy 
Richter, the team looked forward to 
a strong showing in the state meets. 
For the sixth year in a row, W&M 
was expected to travel to Nationals, 
taking several team members 
to the Ft. Lauderdale, Flo., meet. 



Added strength was expected from 
Kathe Kelly who attended 
Nationals during the 1976 season. 

"The Stroking Squaws" were 
pitted against larger schools as 
they met UNC, Duke and Penn State. 
Although opening with losses to 
V.C.U. and U. Va., the freshmen and 
the sophomore team members showed 
great strength and potential, prom- 
ising signs for future meets. 



Rowena Barron 

Carol Corsepius 

Mary Anne Cratsley 

Leslie Drake 

Beth Faber 

Nancy Fohey 

Missy Farmer 

Betty Ferguson 

Joan Gewinner 

Corol Gromer 

Janet Hammond 

Beth Howell 

Dottie Jung 

Kathe Kelly 

Jon Labertoux 

Kathy Lawlor 

Chris Jackson 



Maureen Lawlor 
Sue Naeser 
Morto Nammock 
Cathy Peppiatt 
Terry Pierce 
Lisa Powell 
Jane Richter 
Kaggy Richter, Copt. 
Julio Saunier 
Julie Seowell, Man. 
Ann Stephen 
Karen Stephen 
Kothy Szymanski 
Elizabeth Wagner 
Dorell Wittkomp 
Arlono Young 
Coach 




Diving is one of the important parts of the 
women's swimming team. 



'jkT -^ 



WOMEN'S SWIMMING 73 



Hew to ©tay up on top 



■^T* hree years ago, there was almost 
S^ no mention of gymnastics at 
William and Mary; one alumni termed 
it "one of those marginal sports." 
But three years ago. Cliff Gauthier 
came to W&M as the new gymnastics 
coach and the team's progress has been 
nothing short of a miracle; however, 
to attribute it to luck would be a 
mistake. The gymnastics team practiced 
over two hours a day from the opening 
of school to its closing, often 
missing part of their holidays; the 




team never stopped working. 

Unknown to many of the students, 
this work paid off in the state cham- 
pionship and a third place finish in 
the South during the 1976 season. 
Even more remarkable was that the team 
did it while competing against many 
schools where most of their top gym- 
nasts were on athletic scholarships 
and where ten to fifteen times more 
money was spent on their gymnastics 
programs. 

The 1976 season looked even 
brighter as the team finished 
as one of the top five teams in the 
South. This season was more remark- 
able than the last as the team carried 
one of its youngest squads ever into 
competition; twenty-four of the thirty 
competitive slots went to freshmen and 
sophomores. The toughest competition 
for William and Mary came from the 
number three and four ranked teams in 
the South during 1975, the University 
of West Virginia and Georgia Tech, and 
the number two team in the East, Navy. 

Following its 1975 season. Coach 



Shown against the background of a gymnastic's 
painting, Mark Finley works on the rings. 



Gauthier recruited such outstanding 
gymnasts as Mason Tokarz, who won the 
Virginia State All-Around championship 
two years in o row. Returning stand- 
outs from the 1975 year include 
senior co-captcin Glenn Willsey, state 
champion on the rings, sophomore co- 
captain Mark Finley and sophomore 
Terry Babb, the state side horse 
champion. 

The fall intrasquad meet saw 
two W&M records broken. New records 
were set by Bob Gessner in the floor 
exercise and Mason Tokarz in the 
All-Around. The 1976 season also 
saw for the first time qualitative 
competition for oil of the team's 
events. 

Hard work was complemented by 
several morale boosters. New warm- 
ups were donated by a gymnast's 
parents. Trading in chalk for paint, 
the team painted the walls of the 
gym with seven gymnastic murals. 
Some of the team members, along with 
Coach Gauthier, helped coach children 
in the area and presented assemblies 
to many of the area schools. 



Continuous practice helps Terry Babb as he 
prepares for a meet. 






Balance and precision are very important for Glen 
Wilsey as he practices on the rings. 




MEN'S GYMNASTICS 



Terry Babb 

John Bronfley 

Dave Brown 

Ron Coleman 

Mike De Charme 

Mark Finley 

Bob Gessner 

Steve Hondzel 

James Harbert 

Rich Loewy 



Jeff Mayer 
Phil Oosthaek 
Peter Post 
Mitchell Rothstein 
Ed Rule 
Dan Russell 
David Thomas 
Mason Tokarz 
Glen Willsey 
Cliff Gouthier, Coach 



74 MEN'S GYMNASTICS 



A 




A nervous Noro Tuggle positions herself on the 
balance beam m the meet with UVA. 
In-deep concentration. Sue Naeser executes splits 
9 as a transitional move on the balance beam. 







4 A. 



€ven though at first glance the 
women's gymnastics team record 
might have lool^ed mediocre, the fact 
that they even had a record was exci- 
ting to the team members. For the 
first time, William and Mary's women 
gymnasts had a team and a coach of 
their own, Sylvia Shirley. 

With wins over the University 
of Virginia, Longwood and East 
Carolina, the young team had a good 
foundation from which to build. 
Though graduating senior bar specialist 
Mary Storms had the most first place 
wins, freshman floor specialist 
Potty Thompson received the season 
high score of 8.1 and sophomore Anne 
Weotherly was the only all-arounder. 

A definite improvement could 
be seen in the team throughout the 
season which was expected to help 
with recruitment. The members were 
also trying to enlist support from 
the men's team to give the school a 
good all around gymnastics program. 
The best thing about the season for 
the team was the chance to be in 
competition for the first time as a 
"real team". 



WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS 



Do 



n Fitzgerald 

Linda Kiisk 

Sally MocNeish 

Sue Naeser 

Shelley Rundle 

Sylvio Shirley 



Leslie Stone 

Mary Storms, Co-Capt 

Patty Thompson 

Nora Tuggle 

Anne Weotherly, Co-Capt. 

Coach 







WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS 75 



{7% ^er 6 years at William and Mary, 
(C* the Karate Club became extremely 
well-known, not only on campus but 
also along the East Coast. Led by 
head instructor Hiroshi Hamada and 
including twenty-four black belts in 
their membership, the Karate Club 
sponsored several large matches in 
its short history including one in 
the fall of 1975. The competition 
itself was held in two sections, 
Kumite and Kata. Kumite was that 
with which most people were familiar. 
Kata was less well-known and could be 
described as fighting an imaginary 
opponent with various offensive and 
defensive moves. 

The club had as its goal to 
interest more people in the martial 
arts and to create a fellowship among 
those who have this interest. 



The owner of o third degree block belt, John 
Wren, defends himself during competition at 
William and Mary Hall 




Martia 




rts BMpand 




Fost pace oction, like these two competitors, is 
typical of karate meets 

With a move of his leg. Bill Stockey shows the 
style of a first degree block belt. 



KARATE CLUB 





win 



^r' he 1976 Indian Rifle Team was 
\fci/ plagued by a tight budget 
throughout the year. With funds barely 
covering ammunition and trip, the 
team sometimes found their equip- 
ment inferior to their opponents. 
Still, even with this handicap, the 
Tribe finished in the top half of the 
Southern Conference with a break 
even season. After the loss of two 
team stars through graduation, Sar- 
geant Perez, in his fourth year as 
coach of the team, was expecting the 
worst. But the Indians surprised 
everyone with a big upset win over 
V.P.I, and stuck close to Confer- 
ence chomp Appalachian State in their 
toughest meet of the year. 



RIFLE 



Dave Drummond 

Richard Gorman 

Spencer Hindmon 

Bill Leonard 

Susan Phelps 

Sgf. Jorge Perez 



Rob St Lawrence 
Fred Verry 
Terry Wagner 
Alyce Walling 
Eileen Walling 
Cooch 




With o Winchester 52D, Bill Leonard prepares to 
shoot in a meet against Richmond, VMI and ECU 
In one of their finol meets, Spencer Hyndman, 
Susan Phelps, Alyce Wollings and Eileen Wallings 
take careful aim. 



RIFLE TEAM 77 



MEN'S LACROSSE 



Jordan Adair 

Imrie Bowman 

Jim Cameron 

Nick Conner 

John Cooper 

John Douglas 

Bill Down 

More Fox 

Clarke Franke 

Doug Gerek 

William Gray 

David Gumm 

George Halasz 

Mike Hoy 

Frank Hayes 

David Hubbard 

Jon Jaskiewicz 

Brian Johnson 

Al Albert 



Zondy Kennedy 
Rob King 
Fritz Knapp 
Rick Marquis 
Mike McFadden 
Jackson Metcalf 
Gary Miller 
Bob Mims 
Andy Motsko 
Jon Mueller 
Jon Poole 
Chris Royston 
Doug Salmon 
Mike Santulli 
Joe Schifono 
David Wan Dam 
Keith Whitcombe 
Jim Zavrel 
Cooch 



With the action momentarily down at the other 

end of the field, Kevin Whitcomb pauses to cotch 

his breath. 

As the rest of the team is cutting to get open, 

Zondy Kennedy prepares to fake his opponen*. 




All alone is his port of the field, Zandy Kennedy 
picks up the ball. 



78 MEN'S LACROSSE 






gam© off 





^phe 1976 Indian lacrosse team 
Vt^ faced the formidable task of 
matching their 1974 effort, when 
they earned a ranking among the top 
20 major college teams. Joe 
Schifano, George Halosz and Clarke 
Franke were the tri-captains for 
the Tribe that included 17 re- 
turning lettermen. Schifano, a 
midfielder, was named to the All 
South Atlantic squad last year, and 
was a leader of the season's 
scoring attack, with much help from 
sophomore attackmen Zandy Kennedy. 

Coach Al Albert was blessed 
with a solid defensive unit to com- 
plement his offensive squad. Junior 
Goalie John Cooper and Junior Crease 
Defenseman Jim Cameron combined with 
Seniors Halasz and Franke to give 
the tribe on aggressive and ex- 
perienced defense. 

The abundant talents of the 
team were tested severely by a 
schedule that included U.Va. and 
Washington College, both Top 10 
teams, as well as Duke, N.C. State 
and Va. Tech. During Spring Break, 
the team traveled to Georgia, where 
they played gomes against the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, Georgio Tech. 
and the Atlanta Lacrosse Club. 

The 1976 lacrosse season was a 
challenge for those players who were 
determined to eorn their game the 
status of a major sport. At the 
very least, the 1976 squad proved 
that lacrosse was still a gome for 
Indians. 



Aggressively cleoring the ball from his end, 
defenseman Bill Down takes off in the opposite 
direction. 



MEN'S LACROSSE 79 




v^ 



Practice for passing helps Jan Johnson get in 
shape for the first game- 
Sideline breaks give Jon Johnson o chance to view 
practice. 



r*^ 




"»*1 







Ptiok it to em 



vlr he 1976 women's lacrosse pro- 
^L/gram had a large turnout, good 
enough for 3'/2 teams. Interest in 
lacrosse seemed to be growing each 
year, with enthusiasm high among 
all the players. Captain Patty 
Streets attributed the popularity 
of lacrosse to the excellent prac- 
tice sessions where anyone with 
interest could learn to play. 

Coming off a near perfect 1975 
season, where they were undefeated 
in collegiate action, hopes were 
high for an equally good season, 
with all but three varsity players 



returning and several freshmen look- 
ing especially strong. 

Competition was challenging, 
as the team faced a tough schedule 
of 1 1 games, including the always 
powerful Madison and Piedmont Club 
teams. The spring also promised 
an exciting international match a- 
gainst the British Universities' 
Touring Team. Coach Joy Archer 
saw the season's squad as "one of 
the best we've ever had." 



An over-the-shoulder shot at the goal enables a 
player to practice her aim. 



80 WOMEN'S LACROSSE 





. »• 





An early practice gives Lauren Callahan a chonce 
to practice cradling 



WOMEN'S LACROSSE 



Donna Anderson 

Janet Armitoge 

Trudy Bartel 

Katherine Bell 

Jean Blackwell 

Cynthia Blum 

Denise Bourque 

Joyce Buchanan 

Kim Buchanan 

Lauren Callahan 

Heidi Campbell 

Lee Chichester 

Meg Donnelly 

Suzan Eaton 

Meredith Pauls 

Carol Freedman 

Anne Gochenour 

Peel Hawthorne 

Cindy Heldt 

Jan Johnson 

Paulo Lompert 

Margaret Littlejohn 

Barb Logon 



Laurie Lucker 
Susan Malloy 
Marge Masterson 
Heather Meldrum 
Patte Minnick 
Sue Morrison 
Dianne Oakes 
Lauire Pierce 
Cheryl Proscino 
Ginny Ramsey 
Nancy Read 
Doris Scheffel 
Peggy Schott 
Beth Riddle 
Cindy Shaver 
Patty Streets 
Susan Strommer 
Cissy Wilson 
Heidi Yamoguchi 
Debbie Yaney 
Kofhy Yankovich 
Izzie Young 
Joy Archer, Coach 



WOMEN'S LACROSSE 81 




BBPPlf lelna sp©rt 




'^IT' o the unknowing observer, golf 
\i^ would not seem to be a very hard 
or time consuming sport, but the 
members of the William and Mary men's 
golf team would tell you that golf 
demanded long hours of practice. 
Golfers probably missed more time from 
school because of their sport than 
the members of any other team and 
attending an academically tough school 
like William and Mary did not make it 
any easier. 

However, no complaints were heard 
from this year's team because it was 
on exciting year for them. For the 
first time they had the advantage 
using the Kingsmill golf course, one 
of the finest courses used by any 
college team. The team itself 
consisted of one senior, one junior, 
four sophomores and seven freshmen. 
This extremely young team began their 
first full season in the fell and 



started their mandatory season after 
spring break with the Fifth Annual 
Camp Lejune Intercollegiate Golf 
Tourney in Jacksonville, N.C. High- 
lights of the year were the home 
matches with rivals VPI, UVA, Uni- 
versity of Richmond and Madison 
followed by the State Intercolle- 
giate Tournament, the Southern Con- 
ference Tournament and the University 
of Miami Classic Invitational with most 
of the best teams on the East Coast. 

To pick the golfers for these big 
matches. Coach Agee shuffled his team 
around each week to decide the best 
combination. This lasted until 
April 7th when the final combination 
was selected. These were the gol- 
fers who decided the final outcome 
of the season. 

Stern expressions from Jerry Samford, Richie 
Garrison and John Haos are brought on by John's 
9th hole putt. 




MEN'S GOLF 



Joe Agee 

Scott Cousino 

Dovtd Evans 

Richard Garrison 

John Hoas 

David Kast 

David Mushinski 

Joe Agee 



Todd Richter 
Mark Risinger 
Jerry Samford 
Jim Suihoff 
Scott Summers 
Frank Vecchio 
Curry Worshom 
Cooch 




^f'y. 



82 MEN'S GOLF 




The distance and direction to the cup rs very 
important for Katrina Kipp as she attempts to 
make par. 

Sand traps ore one of the many hazards of the golf 
course for Connie Ritter. 



i^ 







hmmd at last 



ijtr^ he fall season started off well for 
VfcUthe women golfers, with practices 
and home matches being held at the 
new Kingsmill Golf Course. Beginning 
the season with three straight victories, 
the W&M team, under the leadership of 
Coach Ann Lambert, finished the year as 
the Number 1 team in the state. This 
marked the first time the golfers had 
brought home the team trophy. 
Although the top two players on the 
team, Connie Ritter and Katrina Kipp, 
finished fourth in the championship 
flight, three of the first four places in the 

Golfer Connie Ritter watches to see how far the 
ball has travelled. 



first flight went to William and Mary 
golfers. The top four golfers, Ritter, 
Kipp, Beth Lett and Robin Brown finished 
with a score of 763 to beet second place 
Madison. 

Spring found the golfers travelling to 
many more out-of-state matches against, 
extremely talented competition. 
Although the spring season had no state 
tournament, the team continued to do 
well. 

WOMEN'S GOLF 



Cathy Allen 

Robin Brown 

Mary Lou Cumberpotch 

Charlotee Dyer 

Ann Lambert 



Katrina Kipp 
Beth Lett 
Connie Ritter 
Kothy Schmidt 
Cooch 



WOMEN'S GOLF 83 




wear 




powth 



Vir/IH ith five returning lettermen and 
^Mttl-four freshmen, the Tribe tennis 
team once again hod o young line up. 
On top of this, the Indians faced their 
hardest schedule in recent years, 
playing six of their seven Southern 
Conference matches on the rood. 
Though turning out to be a tough 
year, the '76 season helped the 
youthful netmen gain needed exper- 
ience against quality opponents. 

Last year's number one player. 
Marc Abroms, returned along with the 
number two player, Peter Rutledge who 
put up a challenge for the first spot 
on the 1976 team. Number four 
from last year, Rob Galloway returned 
with the best won- lost record for '75 
and moved into the third spot. Nick 
O'Hora was joined by Craige Keith, 
who played only doubles last year, 
but this year returned to the singles 
line up. 



Spring practice gives Mark Abrams a chance to 
get his backhand in shape. 

During a doubles motch. Mob Golioway awaits the 
serve of on opponent. 





Long hours of practice help Pete Rutledge prepare 
for a tough season 



MEN'S TENNIS 



More Abrams 

Rob Gallowoy 

Craige Keith 

Peter Koloski 

John Mann 



Nick O'Hara 
Pete Rutledge 
Doug Sturgess 
Tom Winter 
Steve Hoynie, Coach 




84 MEN'S TENNIS 




Boason 





^::"m - "^ % ■' ■- TY ^^nK 




"Iowa 



^^p|ne of the few sports which has o 
VtC' separate fall and spring season, 
women's tennis, under the leadership of 
Coach Millie West, has progressed a 
great deal in the past few years. With the 
number one and two seeds belonging to 
sophomores, the team was expected to 
grow even stronger. Led by the excellent 
performances of Jane Lennon and Kathy 
Lindsay, the tennis team finished with a 
6-0 record for the fall. 

Finishing the season with on 8-1 
victory over Sweet Briar, the team looked 
forward to an even better and tougher 
spring schedule. Teams scheduled for 
the second half of the year included 
Mary Washington and the University of 
Virginia. One of the toughest matches 
was to come from U.Vo. which was 
expected to determine the state title. 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 



Kim DeWilde 

Libba Galloway 

Jane Lennon 

Kathy Lindsay 

Millie West 



Maria Malerbo 
Amy Moll 
Karen Rose 
Lynn Russell 
Coach 



An ofternoon practice gives Kathy Lindsoy a 

chance to proctice her serving. 






WOMEN'S TENNIS 85 




OM aooraa 




KBT 



JX ribe baseball showed steady im- 
-■v provement in 1976 under second 
year Coach Ed Jones. With twenty 
home games scheduled, Indian fans 
were treated to the fine defensive 
play of outfielders Rick Schwartz- 
man, Dave McElhoney and Jim Carter 
as well as the powerful hitting 
of Gray Oliver, John Rice and Doug 



Melton. The moundwork was carried 
by Chris Davis and Mak Kelliher, 
with some strong games contributed 
by Kevin Greenan. 

The Indians were deeper and 
more experienced than in previous 
years, returning 16 of the '75 
squad to the '76 team. The schedule 
that they faced was considerably 



tougher, opening with powerful N.C. 
State and meeting South Carolina 
twice, as well as facing normal 
competition within the Southern 
Conference. 

The 1976 season was character- 
ized by the pride and determination 
of the Indians, accurately portray- 
ing the ballclub's maturation. 





Just before the ball gets there, an Indian hitter slides into third base. 
On the run, Steve Good quickly scoops up a pop foul. 




86 BASEBALL 




BASEBALL 



Pat Baker 

Daryl Bondurant 

Jim Carter 

Chris Dovis 

Henry Derlander 

Tom Dolan 

Bill Dowd 

Rich Efford 

Steve Good 

Kevin Greener 

Bob Hauser 

Micky Hieling 

Dove Hissy 

Ed Jones 



George Holland 
Mok Kelliher 
Dove McElhaney 
Doug Melton 
Brijon Moore 
Gray Oliver 
Jomol Oweis 
Bob Pedersen 
Mark Rienerth 
John Rise 
Rick Schwartzmon 
John Stanley 
Mike Wore 
Coach 



With the ball In his glove, Doug Melton tags his 

sliding opponent 

An important single is hit by Bill Dowd with Dave 

McElhane watching from the deck. 




^^ - *fc^*^^B^r^^' 



r ^.r 



BASEBALL 87 



I J 



In preporation for an upcoming meet, Orexel 
George practices the shot put. 

A test voult helps Pete Hommond reody his timing 
for the upcoming event. 





I ! I 
I i 1 



-L 



jroack 
^ Leahy 
,'pinski- 
,.;Guire ^. 
chad 
_> Moore 
Mullody 
Natusch 
•Jizoiek , 
Nobles f 
Sthschild ' 
'Samila 



Pete Hammond Greg Thomas i 

Brian Hart Chris Tulou ^ 

eod Cooch :^^^ 
Boxter Berryhill Assistant Coach _^;^L 



(^i Ithough hampered by a rash of 
/t^ injuries, the 1976 Indoor Track 
team put together a fine season around 
consistent efforts by Dave Lipinsi<i in 
the pole vault, John Schilling in the 
high jump and Drexel George in the 
shot put. At the Millrose Games, one 
of the biggest indoor track meets in 
the country, the Indians' two-mile 
relay team finished first while the 
mile relay team finished third. Fin- 
ishing the season strong, the Indians 
won the state championship in a meet 
in which Mac Collins had two firsts, 
completing the preparation of Coach 
Randolph's harriers for the outdoor 
season. 



Track stars Mac Collins and Chris Tulou get in 
shape running at Carey Field. 




88 MEN'S TRACK 




(^ fter a successful indoor season, 
>t^ the Indians of '76 began their 
preparation for the outdoor season 
with a trip to Florida for meets and 
training over Spring Break. Practice 
was intense as Coach Randolph pre- 
pared the Tribe for the Colonial 
Relays, held at Cary Field on April 
2. A home meet against Harvard added 
to the tough schedule for the Indians, 
who lost some great trackmen through 
graduation. The team counted on 
strong performances from their indoor 
stars, such as Drexel George in the 
shot and John Schilling in the high 
jump, as well as extra efforts from 
the freshmen on the squad to make 1976 
a successful year. 



Pacing each other in time, Frank Courtney, Steve 
Huebner and Steve Nobles round the corner. 
Afternoon practices at Corey Field ready the 
trackmen for the spring seoson. 




An afternoon practice at Carey Field gives Nancy 
Jonnik a chance to practice the discus. 





•^ 



\, 



first 



^ 



»^ ~ 





•'/,-*. 




HurdlJp^esent aBhaiienge to Chris Smith during 
on early spring prcBtice. 



TT ooking to their first official 
ji^season with enthusiasm, the 
Women's Varsity Track Team competed 
in five meets, including VPI, Madi- 
son, Maryland, East Carolina and 
Lynchburg College. 

Prospects were good with 
freshman Joy Kelly running a close 
five minute mile and Martha Mears 
attempting over five feet in the 
high jump. Depth was added by Beth 
Lorimer in the 100 yard hurdles as 
well as Eileen Walling and Martha 
Mears in the javelin throw. With 
new coach Sylvia Shirley and severol 
dedicated freshmen, veterans of the 
intramural track team found them- 
selves "really impressed with the en- 
thusiasm and expecting a good season." 



Timing is important for Chris Smith as she preput. 
tn Ipove the stortina block. 




WOMEN'S TRACK 90 



Adair Gym serves as the place for a meet against 
George Mason, VPI and VML 





winnin 





inning eleven of their sixteen 
meets, the Men's Varsity Fenc- 
ing Team became one of the best in 
the Middle Atlantic Conference, plac- 
ing second overall. Powerful per- 
formances were turned in by Dean 
Weinman in Epee and Bill Roberts 
and Bruce Akey in Saber, while Chris 
Fontini dominated Foil fencing com- 
petition. A freshman, Fantini was 
invited to attend the Martini and 
Rossi tournament, the top competition 
in the United States. Enthusiasm, 
characteristic of the team, was shown 



in the defeat of Maryland, 16-11 and 
in the defeat of Duke, a William and 
Mary rival for several years. 

Expanding enormously over lost 
year, the Women's Varsity Fencing 
Team achieved a winning season. With 
several second year fencers and a 
great deal of potential in the Class 
of 1979, the team was enthusiastic 
about the state meet scheduled for 
late March. Team captain, Peggy Por- 
ter, put in strong performances, as 
did Foil fencers Kathy Wagstaff and 
Karen Mulholland. 



FENCING 



Bruce Akey 

Randy Baynton 

Becky Bowman 

Maureen Dunn 

Rick Ferree 

Chris Fantini 

Alan Gayle 

Steve Greenlaw 

John Grossman 

Hillory Hamilton 

Ellen Joseph 



Jud Lively 

Karen Mulholland 

Celeste Paprocki 

Michal Patten 

Steve Perconte 

Peggy Porter 

John Reilly 

Bill Roberts 

Kathy Wagstaff 

Dean Weinman 

Peter Conomikes, Coach 



Defense is an importont port of the fencers' plon of 

action. 




FENCING 91 



Addsd 



3jf or many people, halftimes at the 
J} W&AA football games were for 
getting something to eat or drink. But for 
those who stayed and watched, halftime 
proved to be an enjoyable diversion from 
the game. 

During this time, spectators were able 
to enjoy the routines of the talented 
majorette corps. Led by Captain Anne 
Marie Gill, the corp continued to be one 
of the highlights of the show. There was 
an added bounce to the steps making 
the performances all the more enjoyable. 
By practicing with the band three days a 
week, the corps was able to supplement 
their long hours of practice by them- 
selves. 

Participating in the shows as feature 
twirler, junior Linda Angevine performed 
special numbers, often using knives 
rather than batons. To make the year a 
special one, the majorettes added a 
bicentennial uniform of red, white and 
blue. 



MAJORETTES 

Linda Angevine 
Debbie Dadenas 
Ternin Galloway 
Anne Marie Gill, Capt 
Donno Eccard 
Karen Johnson 



Feature Twirler 
Carrine Klingman 
Michelle Macareg 
Shelly Movroydis 
Carolyn Testa 
Susan Snarr, Alt. 





f^^^-^^.:, 






^^ 



^1^ 






A hOTtiAie show brings O-smile from Michelle JJS' 
Macareg. 



New uniforms add color to the parade for Carolyn 
Testa, Shelly Movroydis and Carrine Klingman. 
High kicks by Ternin Galloway add flash to the 
halftime shows. 





92 CHEERLEADERS 







VARSITY CHEERLEADERS 



Nancy Carter 
Wanda Davis 
Melissa Dozier 
Pafty Gilboy 
Karen Maples 
Jody Patterson 
Beth Sanders, Capt 



Don Dodge 
Rick Ferree 
Mike Hackney 
Ben Smith 
Bill Nogle 
Word Richardson 
Benny Soo, Capt. 



Gymnastic stunts by Patty Gilboy and Don Dodge 

add exciternent to the games. 

Varsity Cheerleaders Nancy Carter, Beth Sanders 

and Karen Maples combine with Ben Smith, Benny 

Soo and Bill Nagle to lead the crowd in a new 

cheer. 



pi'jpij'vai ' '-"-1* (j»^'^» V 





The Homecoming Parade gives J V Cheerleaders 
Sandy Jeter, Patty Pfeifer, Patti Pritchard and Linda 
Bresee a chance to instill enthusiasm. 



J,V CHEERLEADERS 



Linda Bresee 
Jane Clemmer 
Robin Hunter 
Sandy Jeter 



Patty Pfeifer 
Patti Pritchard 
Shebo Steel 
Captain 



Work 





ulids 



Spirit 

jkl ots of hard work and 
Jl^ preparation were put into 
planning for the 1975-76 year. The 
W&M cheerleaders arrived at school 
a week early and held practices 
twice a day. After classes started, 
practice continued to be held once a 
week to keep up with new ideas and 
stunts. In addition to this, the Varsity 
squad became involved in holding 
cheerleading camps and helping 
with tryouts at Radford and 
Christopher Newport colleges. All 
this was in addition to work with 
area high schools that the 
cheerleaders had previously done. 

The cheerleaders followed both 
the football and basketball teams to 
their games at home and away, 
when finances allowed. With the 
Varsity and J.V. squads cheering at 
home football games, both the 
alumni and student sides were kept 
involved. 

To promote spirit, the Varsity 
squad sponsored a banner day for 
the Richmond football game. Fund 
raising activities were used to obtain 
the money to fly to two of the away 
football games. The work often 
seemed fruitless as most students 
continued to go their own way 
during the games. Despite all this, 
their enthusiasm never faltered, as 
they continued to be one of the best 
cheering squads seen. 



CHEERLEADERS 93 





*V|Jp ome ski with us . . . "proved 
KL' to be a catchy motto for the 
United Skiers of Virginia, as over 
500 skiers throughout the state par- 
ticipated in the club's events. Or- 
ganized in 1972 by senior Dan Ellis, 
the club has expanded from a divi- 
sion of the W&M Outing Club to a 
conglomerate of Va. college ski 
clubs. 

The season began with the 4th 
Annual Ski Film Festival in which 
over $1400 in prizes, including ski 
equipment and trips to Sugarloof, 
Maine and Park City, Utah, were 
given away. In addition, the event 
was highlighted by a beer chugging 
contest and cheese fondue for every- 
one. 

It was the January trip how- 
ever, which proved the strength of 
the club. Sugarloof, Maine hosted 
480 skiers, 130 of which were W&M 
students, for a week of skiing and 
funfilled activities. Numerous par- 
ties, a clam and lobster bake, 
races and a tee-shirt contest pro- 
vided entertainment for enthusias- 



Ak.cautious skier attempts the si<ills demonstrate 
by his instructor. 

Both beginners and experts often find themselves 
fu.mbling as does this frustrot 




94 UNITED SKIERS 



tic skiers. Proving to be an anti- 
climax however, was the bus ride 
home which took up to 26 hours due 
to breakdowns. 

For both those beginners not 
certain as to their enjoyment of the 
sport and those "hardcore" skiers 
anxious to ski every opportunity, 
daily trips were offered throughout 
February and March to Wintergreen, 
Virginia. 

Spring break was welcomed by 35 
skiers who flew out to Pork City, 
Utah for eight days of fantastic 
skiing. Extraordinary conditions 
and difficult trails offered the 
eastern-trained skiers a rare chal- 
lenge. 




UNITED SKIERS 95 




elaxlng ^Iti gamos 



'^^^e just step onto the floor 



and play the game for fun. 
Once the game's over, that's it. We 
forget it. It's just something we 
enjoy doing." This comment, by a 
member of the Brothers basketball 
team, was representative of many of 
the participants in Intramurals 
1975-76. For them, the program 
offered a supervised system for exer- 
cise that was enjoyable. A group of 
friends would gather to enjoy a sunny 
afternoon of football or a faculty 
team would play basketball at night. 
Many participants openly catered to 
this party atmosphere, bringing beer 
and other refreshments to the outdoor 
activities, some making the games 
family outings. For them, Intramurals 
offered physical activity that was fun 
and relaxed. 

Still others viewed Intramurals 
in an entirely different status. For 
them, the program offered a chance to 
sharpen skills and reflexes and served 
as a vent for the frustrations of the 
classroom. Team practices, stress on 



individual excellence, and determina- 
tion in pressure games marked Intra- 
murals for this group. The fun was 
still there, but the party atmosphere 
was gone. 

The Men's Intramural season 
offered a few surprises and quite a 
few thrills. The frat league dominated 
football in '75, with several strong 
teams fighting for playoff spots. The 
championship game matched regular 
season winner Pi Lam against runner-up 
PiKa. The game, played in the bit- 
ter cold, was a seesaw struggle with 
Pi Lam winning in overtime 7-6, for 
their first football championship in 
29 years. 

In basketball, perennial power 
Lambda Chi was joined by PiKa and Pi 
Lam and a host of independent teams, 
including Boerwinkle and Black Bull. 
The soccer season scheduled in the 
Fall for the first time, was highly 
competitive, with the MBA team winning 
the All-College Championship and frat 
champ PiKa finishing second. 

Spring sports were equally as 



active, ranging from bowling to soft- 
ball and track. 

Women's Intramurals, received 
more exposure through the coverage 
of the Flat Hat, in 1975-76 than in 
previous years. The Intramural pro- 
gram was expanded to include soft- 
ball, volleyball, badminton, ping 
pong, track and field and swimming. 
In Women's Basketball, Gamma Phi 
Beta took honors, edging out a 
highly competitive field of other 
sororities and independents. 

Intramurals in '75-76 provided 
a necessary outlet for the energies 
of many students and faculty. With 
excellent organization in most de- 
partments, the program offered a di- 
versified format and wide range of 
interests in an attempt to reach all 
who were interested in participating. 
Competitions on the field solidified 
friendships off the field and parti- 
cipation in intramurals proved to be 
a rewarding experience for all those 
involved. 




As part of the winning effort. Pi Lam Steve 
Staples eludes the PlKo secondary and makes a 
successful catch in the All-College Championship 
Football Game. 

Ping Pong intramurals provide a test of skill for 
Jordan Adair, 



96 INTRAMURALS 




•,f,i,jri*^^' 



INTRAMURALS 9/ 



Hangliding ot Nags Heod is one of the many 
activities ovailable to Sigma Chis during their 
Beach Weel<end 

Although it takes two for ping-pong, it con still be 
done with a best friend rather than with a team. 





,^;^ 



M I' 



-ttl 



• •••• t • 

«t«l<l«tll«lt**l'*l*ll<t* 




II Just 




^f or both the students who were 
^•J' and were not athletically in- 
clined, individual sports afforded 
an opportunity by which to spend a 
leisurely or strenuous hour. Wheth- 
er it was a quick game of pool, ping- 
pong or a few tosses of a frisbee, 
these sports made returning to the 
books a little easier. 

When the weather was agreeable, 
one seldom roamed campus without en- 
countering impromptu football, soc- 
cer or baseball games, groups simply 
tossing a ball or a frisbee, bicy- 
clers or even some ambitious skate- 
boarders. Rarely did one walk down 
DOG Street without seeing joggers 
making their way to the Capitol and 
back. 

It was the late evening and 
night when ping-pong and pool games 
were the most popular. Because sev- 
eral dorms contained the necessary 
equipment, students were able to 
drop the studying for a quick game 
end return, relaxed and contented. 




A nice day provides the perfect opportunity for 
frisbee throwing. 



98 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 






9s 



-^teK- 



A 




For those with the time and the money to learn, 
sky diving has become a very popular pasttime. 
One of the favorite fads of the sixties, 
skateboarding has caught on in the seventies os 
well. 



INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 99 




■-CRERTIVE 



100 CREATIVE 




/Jargonized to ploy o supporting 
Vt' role on beholf of campus 
medio, the Publicotions Council 
continued to provide o helping hand 
to the four William and Mary publi- 
cations and the radio station. As 
the body charged with overseeing 
College literary and broadcast 
enterprises, the Council selected 
editors and managers and allowed 
them a free hand once installed. 

That free hand was somewhat 
constrained, however, by budgetary 
problems, and the Council's worries 
were substantially financial. 
Charged with formulating and allo- 
cating publications budget in 
concert with the Board of Student 
Affairs, the Council was faced 
with both BSA sentiment which re- 
sulted in a massive slash of 
William ond Mary Review monies and 
the prospect of tight funding for 
all publications in o year when 
finances in every segment of the 
College community were strained. 

Despite the monetary con- 
straints, the Council aimed at 
maintaining and promoting tradi- 
tional levels of quality in its 
charges. 

Alumnus and journalist Wilford 
Kale provided vocal support arguing 
in the publications' behalf 
throughout the College community, 
and chaired a diverse group of 
representatives from the adminis- 
tration, faculty and student body. 




PUBLICATIONS COUNCIL iOI 




102 FLAT HAT 




<..^!S2'?^ 







^j^ aced with a cutback in money and 
T| unpaid bills from the 1974-75 
year, Editor Paige Eversole struggled to 
produce a Flat Hat equal in quality to 
previous yeors. Most students agreed 
that the 1975 Flat Hat surpassed those 
of recent years. 

With the help of Advertising Manager 
Tom Clark and Business Manager Steve 
Handzel, the Flat Hat did exceedingly 
well in ad sales to help relieve the 



Budget handling is one of Steve Handzel's jobs 



financial pressures. With additional 
money, the staff was able to produce a 
special edition on winter sports. 

Other extra features added to the 
regular issues included "Prospective" 
and "Toasts and Roasts." Student 
opinions were expressed in o new feature 
entitled "Off the Wall," while students 
with a talent for photography were able 
to submit pictures for the "Passing 
Scene." Combined with the articles of 
the staff, these new features provided 
one of the few ways students had of 
receiving news. 








Sports photos are checked before being submitted 
to the printer by Terry Boone, Corl Shapiro and 
Chorles Keiffer. 

A photo for the "Passing Scene" is chosen by 
Photography Editor Charles Keiffer and Editor 
Paige Eversole. 



FLAT HAT 103 



Centerpiece of mock sculpture confronts the 
Review staff as they discuss and compare poetry 
submissions. 



'V^^hile encouraged by an increase 
of In both the quality and quan- 
tity of student contributions, 
William and Mary Review editor 
Tricia Joyce was faced with a lack 
of adequate funding for the Col- 
lege's literary magazine. The Re- 
view, whose financial support came 
from student activity monies distri- 
buted by the BSA, hod its budget 
slashed by that body, with its 1974- 
75 allocation of $7,400 cut to 
$1,300. 

Editor Joyce noted that the 
difficulty in obtaining adquate 
funding for the magainze stemmed from 
student antagonism toward the publi- 
cation OS perceived by the BSA, 
Evidence of such antagonism was seen 
in a survey indicating that a major- 
ity of students disfavored continua- 
tion of financial support for the 
Review. 

The gap between College funding 
and production costs was met with 
surplus funds from previous years, 
but the eventual dissipation of that 
surplus spelled possible doom for 
the publication within two years 
without an increase in financial 
support. 

The embattled magazine quelled 
the criticisms which surrounded it 
in previous years — complaints that 
it published too much material not 
authored by students — by producing a 
fall issue substantially composed of 
student-written pieces. A supply of 
quality student material adequate 
enough to fill the magazine existed, 
however, only because of the 1975-76 
Review's abbreviated size. 

Additionally, "there have often 
been charges of elitism," said 
Tricia, "but we're actually a very 
open group — anyone can participate " 



More interested in his reading than the comments 
being given, Ken Stahl glances through another 
college's magazine. 



104 REVIEW 





REVIEW 105 




106 WCWM 




Weporations include a cnec^onh^equipment os 
Steve Thode starts to recacis, taping ^°' WCWM 




I ower — or the lackof it — was a 
major concern at WCWM, as sta- 
tion manager Dave Oxenford grappled 
with the problems of acquiring 
stereo capacity and extra wattage 
for William and Mary's FM radio 
facility. Bureaucratic tangles and 
technical problems forced the Col- 
lege broadcasters to postpone their 
plans for a more potent signal, 
which had been anticipated for late 
1975. 

An increasingly thorough 
training of the station's announcers 
resulted in greater on-the-air pol- 
ish, resulting in what Oxenford 
termed "a more listenable sound." 

A diversity of programming 
filled the evening hours, bringing 
jazz, folk and "theme" programs as 
well as the usual classics and pro- 
gressive rock to the air. The week- 
ly phone-in program. Feedback, drew 
heavy listener response, and the Top 
40-playing Quiz Kid, Bob Thompson, 
maintained a fanatically devoted 
audience for his Sunday evening 
trivia tournaments. 

The station enhanced its status 
as a source of information on campus 
with periodic news features inserted 
in its musical fare and highly pro- 
fessional reporting on its weekly 
Newsreel of the Airwaves. 

WCWM became more visible as 
well OS audible on compus, staging 
remote record hops at dorm and fra- 
ternity parties. 

On off-duty hours, touch foot- 
ball games and boisterous parties 
promoted camaraderie among a staff 
numbering near ninety. 



WCWM 107 



Composing copy busies administration's editor 
Paulo Stassi as she finishes her lost deadline. 
Pleased with her layouts, government editor Lisa 
Dillich begins to envision what the final page will 
look like 



'^iT'aking into account the Bicenten- 
St^niol craze that swept the notion, 
the 1976 Colonial Echo could hardly 
avoid a red, white and blue tendency 
if it were to accurately report the 
happenings of the year. With Williams- 
burg advertised as a "necessary vaca- 
tion spot" and William and Mary billed 
as the "Alma Mater of a Nation," some 
mention of the school's role in U.S. 
history was bound to appear in the 
theme, copy and style of the book. 

The usual problems of compiling 
an annual of over 400 pages were com- 
plicated by a pre-Christmas exam per- 
iod and subsequent early Spring dis- 
missal. Deadlines were compressed 
into 3 month block around the New 
Year, which necessitated more than 
the usual number of all-nighters and 
spur-of-the-minute picture takings. 

As editor, Peggy Moler imple- 
mented both traditional and unique 
perspectives in the theme and style. 
Special effects, increased amounts of 
artwork, new layout styles and a 
slight divergence from a total "black 
end white" type scheme were features 
that, at times, caused some contro- 
versy. The amount of time spent in 
the second-floor Campus Center office 
resulted not only in headaches and 
over-used typing fingers, but in on 
increased knowledge of publishing. 



Weory from work editor-in-chief Peggy Moler 
relaxes while giving advice to a deadline-ridden 
stoff member. 



108 COLONIAL ECHO 




Football photos occupy sports editor Pom 

Parham and photographer Winston Sheppard as they 

select pictures for a spread. 




Trying to decide which headline to use, lifestyles 
editor Rita Soler asks for the opinions of the rest of 
the stoff. 

Acetate type ond the art of type setting distract 
managing editor Chuck Shimer as he tries to finish 
editing copy. 



COLONIAL ECHO 109 




Opening pages interest Melindo Rose, layout 
design editor as she puzzles over a drawn scroll. • 
Congregation of classes co-editors Donna Szuba 
and Lauren Callahan along with greeks editor 
Debbie Johnson and Laurie Ishee produces new 
ideas for classes' feature articles. 



no COLONIAL ECHO 





10 




^ 




f7^ ppearance made the difference, 
iV%-or so said many members of the 
William and Mary Chorus as they 
received matching blouses for the 
first time. "Now I don't have to 
borrow one," laughed one girl as 
she explained how a gift to the 
college made the purchase pos- 
sible. 

Chorus members tried to get to 
know one another well through a 
series of events at the beginning 
of the year, trying to create a 
group of friends rather than just 
a group who sang together. Though 
many people said that the same type 
of people were interested in 
chorus, the exact opposite seemed 
to be the case as the membership 
encompassed such students as the 
Exeter exchange student, Liz 
Berdiner. One member pointed out 
that all classes were fairly 
equally represented in the 
chorus, many with varying inter- 
ests. 

One of the objectives the chorus 
set for itself, to perform and prac- 
tice more challenging, interesting 
music, was accomplished to a great 
extent with the help of Frank Lendrim 
who headed the chorus for the second 
year. Divided into parts more 
than before, the chorus performed 
at such annual events as the Christ- 
mas and Spring Concerts while also 
venturing out on a short spring 
tour for the first time, exhib- 
iting the loyalty and strength 
that the chorus had been building 
for many years. 



Engaged in a difficult piece, Nancy Smoot tries to 
follow the intricate moves in the music in 
preparation for the upcoming Spring Concert. 
Divided into parts and arranged accordingly, 
Glenna Sadler and Libby Patten practice a newly 
introduced piece to be performed at the Christmas 
Concert. 






CHORUS 1 1 1 




112 CHOIR 





3jff one walked past the Ewel 
/^iBuilding between three and five 
any Monday, Wednesday, or Friday one 
could hove heard the melodious blend 
of the voices of the William and Mary 
Choir. Under Frank Lendrim for only 
the second year, the choir experi- 
mented with itself as it had a 
greater number of Freshmen than usual, 
though no one would have noticed. 

Two special events stood out 
in the appearances of the choir 
according to many members. The 
first occured at Christmastime, 
when the tape that the choir had 
recorded earlier played on national 
television. Against a setting of 
the Wren Building decked with 
wreaths the choir performed and 
the only thing anyone else could 
wish for was show. The second 



event came in late January as 
President Ford made a visit to the 
General Assembly's meeting in Col- 
onial Williamsburg. The performance 
at the Lodge gave the members a 
chance to meet the President and 
for at least one member to get 
pictures to send home to his 
parents. 

Another event which many felt 
highly about was Charter Day as the 
British Ambassador attended the 
ceremonies. Of course there were 
the many other annual events such as 
graduation. Occasion for the Arts, 
and their spring tour, all of which 
showed the many long, strenuous 
hours which had been put into practice. 



Almost six hours each week are what members 
hove to devote to the choir, here as they 
experiment with another number. 




CHOIR 1 13 



Poorly attended though well received, soprano 
Dorothv Russell performs an exerpt from 
Moscaqni's Covtil^ria. jrf 

Rusticono duCWQ^^jqperatic highlights Concert .rf^ 
Series even' 






^J s the years passed, both the 
i%T Sunday Series and the Concert 
Series have reached a level of qual- 
ity unseen before. As evidenced by 
the appearances of such talent as 
the Guarneri String Quartet and 
Eugene Fodor, performances have 
continued to improve as the Concert 
Series entered its 40th season while 
the Sunday Series entered its 7th. 

Opening with the renown Guarn- 
eri String Quartet, elegance poured 
from Phi Beta Kappa Hall as they 
performed such intricate numbers as 
Bartok's Third Symphony. The second 
event showed the progress of the 
Richmond Symphony as they made their 
annual appearance. Of all events 
the worst attended was the operatic 
highlights, which to some seemed like 
a thrown together hodgepodge. The 
next two performances had great 
appeal as the brilliant Paratore 
brothers harmonized extraordinarily 
qnd the violin great Eugene Fodor 
made his mark in his first appear- 
ance in Williamsburg. 

Sunday concerts, performed in 
the afternoon in the Campus Center 
Ballroom received good attendance. 
Drawing from Williamsburg as well as 
the college, the free series presented 
such varied talents as the Wil- 
liamsburg Madrigal Singers to the 
cellist James Kreger who made his 
second appearance having performed 
in the regular Concert Series. 





^m 








114 CONCERT SERIES 





.«**J5 



Intricacies in the music are interpreted with feeling 
as cellist James Kreger performs Brevel's Sonota in 
G Major during his Sunday Series performance 
Resting after having combined to play Bach's 
Sonata for two Pionos, brothers Anthony and 
Joseph Paratore wait before beginning their next 
piece. 



CONCERT SERIES 115 




J^srforming with the band could 
'Tp'be the most enjoyable part of 
your time here at school, yet at 
times it can also get in your way," 
commented one Sophomore who had 
played in the band for both years 
at William and Mary. "The biggest 
problem, I guess was that the prac- 
tice took up so much time; time 
that I really could have used for 
studying or myself." 

On the average band members ag- 
reed that most of their experiences 
with the band had been good, the 
performances which they gave being 
the culmination. One member 
indicated that one perfor- 
mance pleasing the people^ 
at a football game 
made the practice 
seem worth it 
while parades 
held a special 
charisma. 
Parades 



chance to reach a different crowd, 
always which seemed appreciative of 
the hours of work that went into 
the performance. 
Playing with the bond this year 
meant hordwork and a more choreo- 
graphic and flamboyant performance 
that succeeded in making up for the 
Indians football showings. Their 
only away game, Rutgers meant some- 
thing special to each of the members. 
One girl said, "I really didn't want 
to go, I had three midterms, but I'm 
glad I did though I studied the whole 
trip," but another member 
took advantage and 
saw Raisin and 
whatever he 
could catch 
of the 
Big 
Ap- 
pie. 




'."-116 BAND 



' ' t' 



Public relations mix smoothly with work os feature 
twirier Lindo Angevine tolks with o young 
spectator- 




BAND H7 



Arabesques add to Janet Diggs' dance technique. 
Facial expressions of DonZuckerman and Dianne 
Hull contribute to dance interpretation. 









® 



'of rehearsals for Orchesis 
members was found in their three night 
performance at the end of March, where 
the donees used during the 
performances were choreographed by 
the members. Although basically a 
modern dance group, the dances often 
involved classical ballet and jazz. 

Holding tryouts at the beginning of the 
fall and end of the spring semesters, the 
twenty-five member co-ed group spent 
the rest of the year in rehearsals every 
Wednesday night. Rehearsals were led 
by Orchesis members and were 
sometimes enriched by visiting artists 
such as Geoffrey Holder. 

A few weeks before performances 
were given, rehearsals were extended to 
a nightly event. One week-end was set 
aside OS "closed" so that the dancers 
might spend the whole day in rehearsal. 
When the evenings of dance were over, 
the members continued their Wednesday 
evening practices to work on technique. 



Many hours of rehearsal go into the dance which 
Meg Bartenstein performs 





118 ORCHESIS 




Modern dance movements such as the one Lynn 
Allison does are very important to Orchesis 
choreography. 







Orchesis dances ore done in duets as well as 
groups OS shown by Sherrie Manfredi. 




ORCHESIS 119 



Upside down the picture more accurately describes 
the feeling one might hove performing such a move 
like Madonna Moss. 

Great concentration shows on the face of Karen 
Stephan as she tries to remain stationary while 
moving one leg up. 




ll^nly a few years after becoming 
\J^ a charter member in its creation, 
William and Mary in April held the 
national competition for the National 
Institute for Creative Aquatics. 
Their other highlight of the year 
also occured in April as the Mermettes 
presented their annual program for 
the college community, making April 
a busy month. 

Concentrating on individual 
creation and effort, different 
people choreographed and designed 
each number including the sets that 
became on integral part in many per- 
formances. One such program, 
designed by Cindy Holland mode use 
of objects suspended at different 




levels, but possible the most 
innovative was Hatsy Sagon's pre- 
sentation, one of four given at 
Nationals. 

What separated her program 
from all others proved to be a 
combination of two factors. First 
of all, the designs in the performance 
were based on Euclidean geometry and 
secondly the costumes looked like 
colored bags which gave an added 
special dimension to the program. 
Among the other numbers presented 
were a blues number and something 
rather unique, two sisters performing 
together, Karen and Melissa Larson, 
all which combined to make this 
year very successful. 




120 MERMETTES 




MERMETTES 121 




122 50th ANNIVERSARY 







D 



^ 



c 



c 



rama flickered to life in 
Williamsburg as early as 
1702 when a few students of the 
fledgling college set out to try 
their luck at acting. The next 
real attempt appeared in the years 
around 1918 in the form of comedies 
called "town and gown productions," 
but these too died quickly. Then 
President J.A.C. Chandler attempted 
to create an outlet for those who 
aspired to become Thespians and in- 
vited Althea Hunt to come to the 
college where she would mold the 
life of William and Mary Theatre 
for over thirty years. It seemed 
fitting to look at the history of 
WMT, not for what it might have 
become, but for what it became in 
the fifty years it has grown. 

Phi Beta Kappa Hall descended 
from the Wren Chapel and Kitchen, 



those places where early produc- 
tions were staged. Then came the 
big move to old PBK Hall, now the 
Ewell Building which was accomplished 
in 1926, the year of the advent 
of William and Mary Theatre as it 
stands today. No doubt facilities 
limited what could be presented and 
everyone learned to develop within 
the confines of what they had. 
1935 saw a second step for the 
theatre as they assumed a greater 
role in campus activities and were 
then endowed with much better and 
more equipment and even more 
importantly a staff who knew how 
to use the equipment. 

William and Mary Theatre dev- 
eloped into one of the finest col- 
lege companies in the nation and 
has not lost ground. Because they 
lacked some facilities in the begin- 




ning they began to experiment in 
productions and thus built a name 
for themselves. 1957 meant the 
entrance of two of the most impor- 
tant influences on the modern 
theatre. Howard Scammon assumed 
the role Althea Hunt had played; 
Mr. Scammon had acted under Miss 
Hunt and kept much of the old 
theatre in mind while giving his 
own taste end tone to the productions. 
The other event was the opening of 
new Phi Beta Kappa Hall, which 
compared to old PBK seemed immense 
and the actors had to adjust to 
acting "big." Soon the produc- 
tions mode use of the new facilities 
they hod been presented with, but 
the experimentation continued. 

Two productions summed up best 
how the theatre progressed. On 
December 18, 1926 the new era ot 
theatre at William and Mary was 
ushered in, the production: The 
Goose Hongs High. This drama 



received good attendance, something 
which was a necessity if the begin- 
ning theatre was to take any roots. 
March 27, 1957 saw the presentation 
of Romeo and Juliet and now the 
actors hod the freedom and facilities 
to mold their theatre to the new 
Phi Beta Kappa Hall. 

Theatre has always been a per- 
sonal medium. Each production con- 
tained different aspects that the 
actors, directors, and audience each 
could capture only for themselves. 
It was impossible to try to condense 
50 years of the experiences of many 
people at William and Mary to 
a small space, at least one 
book had been published on this 
topic. Reading the chronicles of 
the William and Mary Theatre has 
led to many insights, the kind of 
insights the audience does not 
always see. 



50th ANNIVERSARY 123 




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Wim i 

iniN 

Jill 

niK 



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ne of Broadway's biggest hits, 
Godspell expressed in song the 
Gospel according to Matthew. For 
those who had seen the play done by 
professionals, the quality of the 
performance by the Williann and Mary 
actors was even nnore impressive. 

Slap-stick humor and vaudeville 
routines added new life to well 
known Biblical parables while let- 
ting the actors prove their versa- 
tility. Maggie Kneip added several 
new dimensions to the role as the 
play's sexpot while Larry Conklin's 
rendition of Elton John delighted 
the crowd. The enthusiasm proved 
contagious as the audience partici- 
pated in an intermission dance. 

Most of the songs had a pro- 
fessional touch, but a few lost 
their effect because of the use 
of a wireless mike. The only other 
prominently heard criticism was thot 
sortie of the dances Idirked unity, but 
the enthusiasm of the actors over- 
came this. By the end they had 
succeeded in changing the mood from 
joyous to solenin and induced in the 
audience a feeling that they had not 
seen a pJoy, but dn expression of ;• 
thefeelings of ten people. •; , ; 



R; ;"^> ■ . ,* ;'^"'''"".7T "■,* 




124; wGbDSPElL 




Enacting a parable, Maggie Kniep, Don 
Zuckerman, Nancy Snell and Carole Roig portray 
an altar. 



J 




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Marry costumM set the mood as debtor Nancy 
Snell acts out the "do unto others" parable from 
the Bible. 

Sowhon* kayboard and sunglasses set the mood 
for Lorry Conklin's imitation of Elton John. 



./ 





GODSPELL^^' 




^^ ever have opinions been more 
J^Avaried OS they seemed to be 
over the William and Mary Theatre 
presentation of Hot L Baltimore. 
Some felt that Hot L was the best 
production they had seen yet at PBK 
Hall, others thought that they had 
wasted two hours. Of course there 
were the middle-of-the-roaders who 
maintained that it was enjoyable 
enough for the time it lasted. 

Hot L suffered one major draw- 
back, the script. It was obvious 
Lonford Wilson wrote a mere journal 
of the lives of a dying hotel's in- 
habitants and though the descrip- 
tions appeared very complete, it al- 
lowed the actors little opportunity 
for character development, and 
therefore expression. 

Tastes dictated whether one 
would enjoy the play or not; some 
in the audience found the hooker's 
(Julie Opal) actions verging on the 
obscene, while other died laughing. 
Among the most applauded perfor- 
mances, Rebecca Riley as April stood 
out. She was backed up solidly by 
Robert Justis (Jamie) and L. Kent 
Thompson (Mr. Morse). One could not 
criticize any of the acting, it was 
as good as any recent production, 
even down to the pizza delivery girl 
(Maggie Vincent). They all por- 
trayed their roles well, but all 
were victims of a possibly poor 
choice of play. 





126 HOT L BALTIMORE 




Motherly advice mixes with personal problems as 
Bill Lewis (Robert McBride) confronts Mrs. 
Oxenham (Deborah Harris) after another episode 
has gone wrong in his life. 

Camaraderie and disgust show at the same time as 
Mrs. Bellotti (Ree Stone) is confronted with some 
of the others as she attempts to move. 



Sz'^'nt] 



Trying out her wiles, Suzy the hooker (Julie Opol) 
performs ot one of the gatherings so common in 
the lobby. 



HOT L BALTIMORE 127 








A wedding brings the ladies ot Rudciigore out to 
watch Jeff Mincks and Anne GoresoyjheiewQWS. 






uperb has become a synonym for 
Sinfonicron productions as Delta 
Omicron and Phi Mu Alpha honoraries 
came together to present their annual 
Gilbert and Sullivan musical. This 
year's choice, Ruddigore or The 
Witches' Curse, proved to worthy of 
its reputation, as a rather small 
opening night crowd mushroomed into 
packed houses. 

Among the devices which at- 
tracted people to the play were the 
costumes and scenery as well as the 
choreography. Especially stunning 
were the portraits portrayed by 
live actors while the brightly 
colored costumes added to the mood 
created by the actors. 

Gilbert and Sullivan's ploys 
usually lacked an enrapturing plot, 
with Ruddigore being no exception. 
The actors compensated by giving 
good performances with the singing 
being superb, but one freshman stood 
out. As the wild woman, Beverly 
Tourdo turned in a smashing perfor- 
mance, carrying the mood she created 
while in gaudy costume over to the 
moments when her costume did not re- 
flect her character. Her performance, 
along with others such as Frances 
Hankey as the evil villain, made 
Ruddigore one of the most memorable 
productions Sinfonicron had every 
presented. 



Colorful costumes as well as excellent staging 
Ke'pv coiry a weak plot in this scene from 
Ruddigore. 




128 RUDDIGORE 



^;^*f- 










Ai/ 



!' ^' 



£«^'*^^:^;«8«s»^. 






iliiaiUMMJy 




As the wild woman of Ruddigore, Beverly Tourdo 
Gives one of her rnony convincing performances. 
Perhaps repentant toward his lover Rose (Ann 
Gore), Count of Murgotroyd (Cliff Williams) fells 
her of his woeful troubles in life. 



RUDDIGORE 129 



ppy birthday pours from the mouth of Hortense 
nne Kossabion) as she reminises about her first 
thdoy party while she dies. 




Advances made toward Hortense turn out for the 
better as Zorba (Harvey Creodle) and Hortense 
begin their affair. 
As his assistant carries the sacred censor, the 
Priest (Frederid Reiner) blesses the mine, the most 
recent oquisition of the Boss man. 




130 ZORBA 








'^^hat could pledging a fraternity 
ImU or sorority and seeing a play 
have in common? If the play 
hod been Backdrop Club's presentation 
of Zorba in both cases one would have 
gone Greek. It seemed though, that 
many more people pledged, most of 
the nights Phi Beta Kappa Hall looked 
fairly empty, though this in no way 
reflected on the production in 
general. 

Perhaps problems did come up, 
not due to the excellent job of 
acting, but because of the play's 
length. Long productions such 
as Zorba or last year's Beggar's 
Opera tended to leave a more neg- 
ative impression on some people's 
minds. One student who had acted 
in both Premiere and Directors' 
Workshop said, "Even though Zorba 
was a dynamic, alive ploy, it 
couldn't keep you from falling 
asleep," but at the same time main- 
tained as many others did that there 
were some outstanding acting jobs. 

A mood play, Zorba presented 
the lustful, earthy lives of Grecian 
peasants who lived each moment as 
though it were their lost. Special 
lighting effects, colorful sets, and 
lewd humor added to the impression 
the actors gave, varying from grief 
to rapture. Harvey Creadle as Zorba 
certainly executed his part well, at 
all times convincing and moving. 
One of the most difficult roles went 
to Lynne Kossabion as Hortense, the 
aging French prostitute who handled 
her task masterfully. Other notable 
characters included the Widow, Judy 
Webb who sang many numbers beautifully 
and Susan Blakeslee who as the leader 
of the chorus played a roll as nar- 
rator and introducer. 

Why didn't Zorba come off for 
some? Everyone agreed the acting was 
excellent, the lighting, sets, and 
costumes only added to the production, 
but perhaps these didn't come toget- 
her well. Zorba was not a bad 
play by any means, it was not out- 
standing but definately good. 

Among the other activities that 
Backdrop sponsored throughout the 
year, the Variety Show proved to 
be one of the most popular. Held 
at the Pub two nights, the annual 
show provided Backdrop with its 
major source of revenue next to 
the production of Zorba and gave 
many the chance to perform in a 
less structured atmosphere. 



Town know-it-all and narrator (Susan Blakslee) 

informs the audience of thie inside facts necessary 

f() understand the drama. 

Newly arrived in town, Nico (Steve Culp) is prey to 

the attention grabbing ontics of Zorba (Harvey 

Creadle). 




ZORBA 131 



132 DIRECTOR WORKSHC 




(^ s an outlet for student 
(S^ expression, few organized 
activities rivaled Premiere 
Theatre and Directors Workshop. 
Though Directors used plays of well 
known dramatists, the Premiere board 
chose plays from the scriptwriting 
class and put them on stage to see 
the final result while both series 
used student directors and in the 
case of directors those from the 
directing class. 

Both seemed to be gaining in 
popularity in the number of people 
who tried out and in audience partici- 
pation. Some charged that William and 
Mary Theatre had pre-cast its 
productions, leaving little chance 
for an outsider to make any mark. 
Whether this could be proved or not, 
in each series it was not uncommon 
for a good number of people to appear 
at tryouts for the first time, many 
then to make their first appearance 
on stage. 

Each series proved to be an 
experience no one could forget. 
Trying to cram months of practice 
nto four or five weeks, working with 
people who had no experience in the 
theatre field at all, or giving a 
play for the first time unsure of 
whether it would succeed made Pre- 
miere and Directors a worthy, 
exciting time. Experimentation in 
acting, lighting, blocking, and 
set design combined to create o 
special type of drama that was 
by no means second rate. 



Errors come under close scrutiny as director Tern 
Nickel points out o line error as she directs A Little 
Game. 





DIRECTORS WORKSHOP PREMIERE THEATRE 133 



VSen-Dmim '■ 
Slhling,gli)liitg,lurii aiiilfiiU,; 
Drifts liliesitow upon lliewiiul.. 
If'hilpjlakes above soaring .sprufp; 
Beyond our sliore. Beyond our lime. 
Clixlening spirit come from dream 
Flesli ifnd feather reflected in sail. 

Fisli-brine man steeped in stench; 

Carved by ivind and worn by rain. 

Born ofivoman, slave to sea, 

Lives by her bounty, dies by her grate. 

Speck on miter and speck in sky. 

For a moment — one; then lost forever 




134 INDIVIDUAL EXPRESSION 




II Mam and Mary has often been 
accused of being a stifling 
campus. Everyone it seemed studied 
all the time and no one could express 
the creative part of their personal- 
ity. This wasn't so, people broke 
the bonds long ago and found there 
was much more to school than study- 
ing .one's life away. Whatever 
students dabbled in, they expressed 
the creative instinct in all of us. 

Personality dictated in what 
form one person might express him- 
self. Some who were lucky enough, 
found they could major in an art- 
istic talent they hod, thus com- 
bining two facets of college life. 
Most, though had to seek some 
other means to let others know 
what they could do. Painting, 
sketching, and sculpting of course 
lay in this catagory, but what 
about photography, music, and 
cooking, people could also 
express themselves this way. 
Other ways seemed not so ob- 
vious, like a student journalist 
who put forth in the writing and 
layout of their work. 

William and Mary was labeled 
a stifling campus by those who did 
not hove enough gumption to get up 
and do something. Many organizations 
like the choir, Orchesis, Mermettes, 
Colonial Echo, and innumerable others 
were set up so that people could ex- 
press themselves, something of which 
many people took advontoge. 



INDIVIDUAL EXPRESSION 135 




I— SPIRITURb 



136 SPIRITUAL 




focus on felloupship 




^pellowship was the focal point of 
>J^ the Baptist Student Union this 
year as students grew closer through 
programs of individual and group Bible 
study. Sunday evening supper pro- 
grams included discussion on Chris- 
tian ethics and summer missions. 

The unity and fusion of students 
on campus aided the meaningful re- 
treats at Eagle Eyrie and Eastover. 
Outward missions of the BSU were 
maintained by the handbell choir and 
folk and revival teams. 

From a Welcoming Freshmen Ban- 
quet in the Fall to a Friendship 
Banquet in the Spring, it was a year 
of learning to trust and grow to- 
gether. 



Slide presentations are an important means of 
demonstroting the involvement of members. 



BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 137 



Before beginning their meeting, some L.S A 
members shore fellowship by ploying cords. 
Members try to make the best of on accident 
in whicin the night's dessert was dropped. 



Unity & 
worship 

ifjI1[usic formed an important part 
^jfl'l-of the year for the Lutheran 
Student Association. Sunday after- 
noon meetings opened in song, fol- 
lowed by a dinner and program. Pro- 
grams covered a variety of topics 
ranging from a lecture by a professor 
from the Religion Department to a 
dialogue with Christian Science 
members. 

Various activities kept them in- 
volved with the Lutheran church in 
Williamsburg. The group held a con- 
temporary worship service every other 
month for members of the church. One 
Saturday was devoted to helping re- 
paint the outside of the church. 

Service projects were centered 
around groups at Eastern State. Work- 
ing with different age groups each 
time, the members song and played 
games with the patients. All the 
work and planning combined to help 
the L.S. A. unite in fellowship. 



Easter dinner gives Lisa Williams a chance to 
practice her cooking by hosting the hom. 




138 LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



mmunity action 




^tf^ he Episcopal organization for 
\k^ students, Canterbury, offered 
a variety of activities to its mem- 
bers during the 197S76 school year. 
Weekly meetings in a variety of areas 
helped the group strengthen its bonds 
of friendship. 

Wednesday evenings found Bible 
studies held in the Bruton Parish 
house, while Thursday evenings were 
reserved for Holy Communion in the 
Wren Chapel. The traditional day of 
worship, Sunday, saw some members 
participating in the Evensong choir, 
followed by a dinner with the rest 
of the Canterbury members. 

With a focus on "community" 
through the Church, the group planned 
several retreats including one to 
Camp Allegheny in West Virginia. 
Liturgy also played an important 
part in the services of the Canter- 
bury members. Conducting the Great 
Vigil of Easter, one of the most an- 
cient liturgies in the church, proved 
to be one of the highlights of the 
year for many members. 



By listening to the point of view of others in the 

group, Judy Banks is able to get controsting 

opinions on the scripture. 

Participation by their pastor. Rev. Malcolm 

Turnbull gives members a more "theologicol" 

perspective. 



CANTERBURY 139 



(§ 



iving members a "sounding board 
to express their views and ma- 
ture in their own beliefs," the 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes met 
weekly to discuss topics such as 
evolution, the role of the Chruch 
and the pcrtravol of Jesus in Jesus 
Christ Superstar. An attendance of 
fifteen allowed members a wide range 
of views in their hour discussions, 
though President Jeff Hosmer found 
"that we could have a fellowship 
among five or forty; the numbers 
didn't matter." 

Open to all members of the col- 
lege community, the FCA sponsored 
such presentations as a slide show 
of the Holy Lands and a lecture by 
Brother Bob Harmon on the charis- 
matic movement and the baptism of 
the Holy Spirit, as well as picnics 
to Waller Mill. Playing in the "A" 
League of intramural basketball, the 
FCA's ended with a record of 4-4, 
and hopes were high for the soft- 
boll team, a perennial power. 

"The FCA operates regularly to 
help you keep your priorities in 
order, to keep Christ on the throne 
of your life," stated Hosmer. "I've 
found it very helpful in the col- 
lege atmosphere." 



focus on Christ 



During a discussion of Jesus Christ Superstar, 

Rolfe Carawan looks on as Jeff Hosmer ond Joe 
Agee refer to the songbook 





Football Coach Lou Tepper and Tom Heuber 
attentively listen to Brother Bob Harmon's views on 
the charismatic movement. 

Sharing his views on the role of the Church, FCA 
member Doug Pearson emphasizes a point. 



140 FELLOV^SHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES 






In an effort to explain parts of his lecture, 

Dr Driver talks with members afterwards. 
By listening to discussion, Chris Stousland 
IS better able to understand other members' 
viewpoints. 






} 



V. 






,**WH^ 



^*-^"^ 



4^ z":?"^-'' 




Speaking of liuing 



/l3 pening with hymns, the members 
%P^of the Christian Science Organ- 
ization continued their weekly 
Thursday afternoon services with in- 
dividual readings from the Bible and 
the Christian Science text. Follow- 
ing this, testimonies and discussion 
filled out the remainder of the af- 
ternoon services. 

Some meetings included special 
speakers, such as David Driver, a 
member of the Board of Lectureship 
for the Christian Science church. 
Prior to his speech on "Get Your Life 
in Balance," members made themselves 
available to students for questions 
concerning the speech and Christian 
Science literature at places like 
the Campus Center and the Caf. 

Spring found a retreat to Va. 
Beach a relaxing way to conclude a 
year filled with learning to under- 
stand each other and their religion. 




CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 141 



Fellowship and good music bring Poui Wygal and 

Kathy Smoot to the Wesley coffee house 

The morning sun awakens Bill Hunt, Lindo Allen 

and Be Gates for the Sunday service at Virginia 

Beach. 




Be yourself 

Christian fellowship was the prime 
objective at Wesley. "We want to 
create an atmosphere where students can 
be themselves, have a good time and 
have o certain closeness to God which 
other social outlets at William and Mary 
lack." Whether at a Friday evening 
coffee house sponsored by Wesley, or 
just at the usual Sunday evening 
fellowship supper-programs, there was a 
certain warmth and welcome. 

On a typical Sunday evening, there 
was everything from informal discussions 
on such topics as alcoholism, sex and 
speaking in tongues, to the decorating of 
the annual Christmas tree. Other 
programs included retreats to Va. Beach, 
performing the worship service at the 
Methodist church and preparing a 
banquet for incoming freshmen their first 
Sunday on campus. 

It had been a busy year; but, also a 
year of great reward for both individuals 
and Wesley as a whole. 



The scripture reading by Braxton Allport provides 
the foundation for a Wesley discussion. 





142 WESLEY 



Kingdom's new citizens 

^^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^H^^M^^H^^^^H^^^H^^^BH ** JS^ tudents to be 

^^^^^^^^^H^^H^^BI^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^H S S ' of the was the theme 




*• -^^ tudents learning to be citizens 

of the Kingdom" was the theme 
of the William and Mary Christian Fel- 
lowship this year. Members met in 
core groups across campus for Bible 
Studies and investigation of this 
theme. The regular Friday night 
meetings featured varied speal<ers, 
including Dr. Chewning of the Univer- 
sity of Richmond. 

The chapter of WMCF at W&M was 
one part of the international organ- 
ization known as the Inner- Varsity 
Christian Fellowship. This year the 
chapter had doughnut sales and a con- 
concert which featured "Elan." Opening 
and closing the year with fall and 
spring conferences at Natural Bridge, 
Va., WMCF members found new awareness 
of each other. "Take therefore no 
thought for the morrow: for the mor- 
row shall take thought for the things 
of itself. Sufficient unto the day 
is the evil thereof." Matthew 6:34 



Music provided by Beth Weringo and Trent 
Tschirgi helps spark a WMCF meeting. 
A speaker ot the Friday WMCF meeting draws the 
attention of Beth Bechtold and Tom Seelinger. 



WILLIAM AND MARY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 143 



Personal searches 



** 312 ^^ when thou prayest 

1& enter into thy closet and when 
thou host shut thy door, pray to thy 
Father, which is in secret. And 
thy Father, which seeth in secret, 
shall reward thee openly." Mothew 6:6 

Across campus, the idea of per- 
sonalized religion was a popular 
one. Students sought God in vary- 
ing forms of ritual, acts and exper- 
ience. Some searched through medi- 
tation^hoping to mentally perceive 
and feel the God they knew. Others 
found God in a quiet walk through the 



woods, surrounded by Creation. Still 
others looked while sitting on their 
bed in their rooms, searching for 
God without any movement. 

Students found that true ex- 
periences were personal ones, and 
only the self could find the best 
methods to reach them. As different 
religious groups stressed togetherness 
ond group experience, individuals, 
even as possible members of these 
groups, still found the time to seek 
alone and receive the bessings pro- 
mised for it. 



\\ 



\ 



A 



\ 



V 




144 RELIGIOUS INDIVIDUAL 




POLITICRb 



POLITICAL 145 




Students discover eager crowds and long lines as 

well as significant savings at the semi-annual 

bookfairs. 

Speaker David Toma gestures expressively to a 

receptive audience. 



146 STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




Students browse around the foCTd co-op, a 
successful new venture for the Student 
ociofion. 




Coordination 
brings rosults 

'^Ir' he bookfairs, bike auction, 
\fc^ refrigerator rentals, free Uni- 
versity, and of course the film 
series continued with as much popu- 
larity as ever. New services were 
instituted, like the food co-op, 
which proved successful despite a 
late start caused by stalling from 
the Administration. 

In the areas of social and 
cultural events, a big effort was 
made to arrive at greater coordina- 
tion of various campus activities 
to avoid overlapping and to ensure 
a continuous availability of week- 
end activities. 

The S.A. continued its tradi- 
tion of mixers, free band concerts, 
and keg parties. A greater focus 
on rock concerts resulted in more 
and better. New social activities 
came in the form of a campus-wide 
Oktoberfest, a frisbee day, includ- 
ing demonstration by professional 
frisbee throwers, a formal Spring 
dance in the Sunken Gardens, and an 
afternoon of Colonial Games. Presi- 
dent Strickland summed up the new 
attitude of the Student Association 
well in stating: "The best we can 
do is to have something for the stu- 
dents to do at the end of every 
week," 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 147 



Jim Schworz, Porliomentorion, Gerry Thompson, 
Speaker of the Senate, and Secretary Ami 

Homesley listen attentively to a point being made 

ot one of the weekly Senate meetings. 

Paul Jost tokes o quiet break to enjoy the warm 

afternoon. 





«l5.MSSil5SS 



148 STUDENT ASSOCIATION 







**^S8fi2i 







student activities ore the focus 



^^he year was one of change for 
St^the Student Association. First 
came the resignation of President 
Paul Jost in November for health 
reasons, causing a general reshuf- 
fling of positions among officers. 
Dean Strickland, former vice-presi- 



dent for social and cultural affairs, 
became the new president, with Bill 
Maddox taking his place as social 
and cultural affairs vice-president, 
and John McCutcheon taking over Mad- 
dox's old position as film series 
director. There was a noticeable 



change in policy during the year al- 
so. Less emphasis was placed on in- 
vestigations and administrative pro- 
posals, while greater attention was 
focused on student services and so- 
cial and cultural activities. 



Executive vice-president Peter Garland takes o 
minute to ponder his notes before speaking. 




STUDENT ASSOCIATION i49 



Concern for student needs 



Jt nterhall continued during its 
/«Cf third year to expand its func- 
tion of serving student interests. 
Two areas of concern which seemed to 
weigh heavily on everyone's mind, 
college housing conditions and the 
extent of social and cultural acti- 
vities on campus, were especially 
reflected in the activities of the 
organization, 

Interhall's three main commit- 
tees focused attention on programs, 
residential concerns, and student 
appeals, and dealt with such issues 
as a review of self-determination 
guidelines for each dorm, appeals of 
students concerning unsatisfactory 
housing conditions and housing prob- 
lems requiring compensation, and a 
close examination of the College 
room contract with suggestions to 
the Administration as to what addi- 
tional items the College should pro- 
vide for each dorm. Interhall also 
handled financial matters involving 
dispersal of money from three major 
funds. One fund was allocated to 
each of the dorms for such physical 
improvements as carpets and pots and 
pans. Another fund went to each 
dorm to be used for social affairs 
and programs. A third fund was used 
to sponsor such campus-wide activi- 
ties OS the Language House foreign 
film festival, the Brian Complex 
Valentine's Day Heart Dance, and a 
gala Mayday in conjunction with the 
Language Houses, featuring games, 
exhibits, and a bike race. 



Chairman Ed Walinski and Susan Camden listen 
attentively to some issues concerning student 
housing with which Interhall must deal. 
Special interest housing is represented as Dan 
Hennelly and Rob Wade sit in for the Language 
Houses ot a busy meeting of Interhall. 




150 INTERHALL 




jjf n addition to the regular 
Jj trials and hearings for Honor 
Code violations, activities of the 
Honor Council included orientation 
of incoming students and new facul- 
ty to the philosophy of the Honor 
Code, the issuance of a College- 
wide statement of plagiarism, and 
attempts at improving relations 
with faculty by attending faculty 
meetings. The initiation of a re- 
quest for an investigation into 
the honor system brought about a 
close examination of the system, 
yielding the conclusion that the 
Honor Code was still regarded as 
desirable by the majority of stu- 
dents. 



Preporotion for triols takes time for Liz Sowder, 
Kathy Eason, and Befsy Poge. 




a viaoe sysTem 



HONOR COUNCIL 151 




practice 



(^Js stated by President Debbie 
(H^Wolin, the purpose of the 
William and Mary chapter of the 
American Civil Liberties Union was 
"to preserve and strengthen the free- 
dom of every citizen as guaranteed 
by the Constitution of the United 
States, especially the Bill of Rights 
and those other amendments concerned 
with civil liberties." Founded at 
William and Mary in 1969, the chap- 
ter was first organized to aid stu- 
dents with the draft. With the end 
of the Viet Nam War and its concern 
over the draft, the chapter folded. 
With the help of Debbie Wolin, the 
chapter reorganized during the sum- 
mer of 1 975, submitting a new con- 
stitution to the Student Association 
that fall. 

Growth for the newly organized 
group was rapid. With the interest 
and support of its members, ACLU ex- 
panded their activities into a wide 
variety of areas. Fund raising was 
accomplished by a dance with the Quar- 
terpath Band at the Pub. Through the 
aid of the S.A. Obmudsman's office, 
a referral service was started for 
students needing legal assistance. 
Combined with extra efforts of the 
members, these activities helped the 
ACLU perform a valuable service to 
the campus. 



Prepared materials help ACLU members aid 
students with legal referrals. 

During a spring meeting, members discuss plans 
for an upcoming speaker. 




152 AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION 



A fa 



y 




u 



Mhy bother, one vote won't 
moke any difference." So 
went the typical remark of many peo- 
ple of voting age. The protests of 
the sixties often turned into the 
apathy of the seventies at William 
and Mary as well as other schools a- 
cross the nation. Whether it was a 
feeling of ineffectiveness or just 
an "I don't care attitude," the re- 
sults were obvious during the first 



from the '60's 



port of the seventies. The after- 
math of Watergate left many people 
caring even less for government in- 
volvement, while having the opposite 
effect on others. For these people, 
the 1976 election provided the per- 
fect opportunity to express their 
desire to change the system. Many 
became involved with campaigns, not 
only on the national but the state 
and local levels as well. 



Others channelled their eftorts 
into student elections as they helped 
friends with their campaigns and 
voted in elections. 1976 also seemed 
like a year of petitions, as students 
worked to get aid for the law school 
and dorm rebates. As one student put 
it, "We might not be quite as adamant 
as students used to be; we're a little 
more subtle and maybe a little more 
effective." 



VIRGINIA VOTER REGISTRATION APPLICATION 



PLEASE PRINT or TYPE 


MARRIED WOMAN MUST USE MAIDEN NAME AS MIDDLE NAME 








NAME OF APPLICANT 


SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER | 


LAST NAME 


FIRST NAME MIDDLE / MAIDEN NAME 









DATE OF BIRTH SEX AGE 



PLACE OF BIRTH 



PREVIOUS RFniSTRATION INFORMATION 



PLACE 



MONTH DAY YEAR 



CITY OR COUNTY 



CITY/COUNTY 



\y ^=^ 

SQNT ADDRESS AND PLACE OF ABODI 

-. \ APARTMENT NO. OR ADDITIONAL ADDRESS 



HOUSE NO. OR ROUTE NO. AND STREET NAME OR RURAL SOX 



? 



2 



CITY OR TOWN 



VA. 



DATE OF RESIDENCEMARITAL 
IN PRECINCT STATUS 



OCCUPATION 



6. 



HAVE VOU 
EVER BEEN 
CONVICTED 
OF A FELONY7 



HAVE VOU EVER 
BEEN ADJUDICATED 
TO BE MENTALLY 
INCOMPETENT? 



IF DISABILITIES 
HAVE BEEN 
REMOVED GIVE 
DATE OF 
CERTIFICATE 



MONTH DAY YEAR 



REGISTRATION OATH; l DO SOLEMNLY SWEAR {OR AFFIRM) THAT I AM A CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES, A RESIDENT OF VIRGINIA, 
QUALIFIED AND ENTITLED UNDER THE CONSTITUTION AND LAWS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA TO REGISTER TO VOTE AND 
THAT THE INFORMATION GIVEN ABOVE IS TRUE AND CORRECT TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE. 



SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT 



SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO BEFORE ME THIS. 



_19 . 























SIGNATURE 


OF REGISTRAR 


REGISTRARS USE ONLY 1 


DATE OF REGISTRATION 


TOWN CODE 


PCT CODE 


PRECINCT NAME 


DENIAL IF APPLICABLE | 


MONTH 


DAY 


YEAR 








MONTH 


DAY 


YEAR 


REASON 


VOTEf 

SBE-028- 


VIRGI 
t REGI 
PPLICA 

250M-5/7 


MIA 

5TRAT 

HON 

5 


ON 


LAST NAME 




FIRST NAML 








MIDDLE OR MAIDEN NAMF 






A petition to help place Frank Zeidler on the 
Presidential ballot for the Socialist Party is ploced 
in the Campus Center, 



INDIVIDUAL GOVERNMENT 153 



The graduate student house provides a chance for 
Jerry Johnson to talk with other grad students. 




■— CRRDURTE 



154 GRADUATE 



These informal gotherings provided students and 
faculty an opportunity to get to know each other. 




Thank God It's Friday 




3| n order to remedy o lack of 
'^ uriity among graduate students, 
T.G.I.F. parties were held once a 
month throughout the year. Spon- 
sored by joint effort of the Grad- 
uate Students Committee of the BSA 
and the Graduate Schools of Arts 
and Sciences, Education, Law, Bus- 
iness and Marine Science, these 
parties were open to faculty and 
administration as well as students. 

Held in the Graduate Student 
Center, the T.G.I.F. porties pro- 
vided an opportunity for the stu- 
dents to become better acquainted 
with each other. Perhaps though, it 
was the celebration of the weeks end 
that caused the most enthusiasm. 



Breaking awoy from the crowd. Sue Bornes and 
John Noble review the Flat Hat. 



T.G.I.F. 155 



10- tci ^'"^ 



A magazine entertains Peter Pfiester during a brief 
study break. 

The MBA lounge provides o comfortable 
relaxation spot for Dave Foirchild. 



r^ r«"' 



I 




An empty classroom gives Ray Yoder the solitude 
necessary for intense study. 
Before class begins, Mark Miller and Jim Loeb 
quickly finish last minute calculations. 



LV 



lTi*^ 



156 MBA ASSOCIATION 





Bullish on business 



'^ft' he MBA Association has pro- 
Vfc^gressed immensely since the 
establishment of the MBA degree pro- 
gram in 1966. In addition to the 
primary objectives of orienting new 
members and assisting members in 
obtaining housing, several other 
projects were undertaken in the 
75-76 session. 

Numerous parties were spon- 
sored throughout the year in order 
to enhance personal ties among its 
members. As a service to the Wil- 
liamsburg community, the Colonial 
Business Consultants was estab- 
lished. Under contract with the 
Small Business Administration, 
this organization sent teams of 2 
or 3 MBA students to assist local 
merchants with business problems. 
As a service to its own members, 
the MBA Association published a 



Resume Book. This book consisted 
of resumes of all second year 
students and was sent to about 750 
corporations throughout the country. 

Sponsors Day was held in the 
fall in which the sponsors of the 
School of Business Administration 
were invited to William and Mary 
in appreciation of their donations 
of time, money and guidance. Pre- 
sentations were given by the MBAs, 
small talks were organized and a 
reception and luncheon were held. 

In April, Presidents Day saw 
a group of corporation presidents 
who visited the College and par- 
ticipated in about five small semi- 
nars running concurrently. This 
provided the students an opportun- 
ity to discuss various business 
related problems which were of con- 
cern to most corporations. 




MBA ASSOCIATION 157 



Naturalization papers are displayed by 
Vietnomese children at the SBA's onnual Law Doy. 
Regardless of the extra paperwork involved with 
the job of President of the SBA, Guy Strong never 
loses enthusiasm. 




/ 





SB. .. 
COFFEE BAR 

jC^FFEE .15 

Hot ^ea .15 

Hot 

Chocolate '^^ 

ODA Coke, Sprite, 25 
""^ & Diet Soda '^^ 

ONUTS .15 

IRANGE Juice .2o| 

^Mon.-Thurs.73ai30i 
)PEN:FridayT30^0 




1 58 STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION 



Student Bar against the axe 



"Tf obbying for funds from the Gen- 
J^eral Assembly was the main ac- 
tivity of the Student Bar Associa- 
tion. Letters were sent to each 
Representative urging them to sup- 




11 



port the law school whose existence 
was threatened by the ABA. 

This however, was not the only 
function of the SBA. In addition to 
sponsoring dances, films and beer 
parties, they worked closely with 
the faculty in matters of class 
scheduling, grading and academic 
quality. Law day was held as an 
effort to familiarize laymen with 
law as a profession. This project 
consisted of arranging speakers for 
both the high school and college 
levels, appearing on local talk 
shows and sponsoring spot films. 

Throughout the year, members of 
the SBA worked on a book entitled 
Laymen's Guide to Virginio Low which 
was to be published in the fall of 
1976. With the exception of a pub- 
lication in Oklahoma, it was the on- 
ly work of its kind put out by a law 
school. The purpose of the book was 



Despite a lack of space in the law building, 
students are afforded a space to relax. 



to familiarize the average citizen 
with the facts of the law, particu- 
larly matters of divorce and bank- 
ruptcy, in laymen's terms. 

The annual Libel Night was held 
in the spring. A favorite event a- 
mong the students. Libel Night con- 
sisted of a variety of skits written 
and performed by the law students 
satirizing various professors. It 
was the one chance for students to 
vent their frustrations and for the 
professors to find out what was 
really thought of them. 

An aluminum recycling drive and 
plans drown up for a legal aid pro- 
ject in which law students would of- 
fer inexpensive or free legal advice 
to low income individuals, were 
other functions undertaken. Al- 
though the SBA was active in 1976, 
future plans indicated increased 
activity for 1977. 



What is said behind professors' backs is mocked 
by law students on Libel Night. 





STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION 159 




Business matters are discussed by Editor-in-Chief 
Jim Thomos at a meeting of the entire staff. 
A contribution submitted to the Review is corefully 
edited by Diane O'Donnell. 



160 LAW REVIEW 




Case background 



■43 ubiished in the fall and 

'ir^ spring, the William and Mory 

Law Review played a major role in 
giving the Marshall-Wythe School of 
Law national recognition. The jour- 
nal contained documentary supplements, 
student notes, articles written by 
judges, attorneys and professors and 
provided an outlet for the publi- 
cation of school researched articles. 
In addition, scholarly essays on 
recently published books, case com- 
ments and current opinion on the 



direction a law school should take 
were published. 

The journal was put out by a 
student editorial board and staff 
who were invited to work on the 
Williom and Mary Law Review on the 
basis of academic excellency and 
proficiency in legal writing. The 
quality of the publication was in- 
dicative of the degree of intellec- 
tual and skilled writers at the law 
school 




Careful footnoting is o necessary task of members 
of the Review staff. 



LAW REVIEW 161 



Amicus 



Wi\ 



nlike most law school news- 
. papers, the Amicus Curiae 

avoided quantities of legal arti- 
cles and adhered strictly to news 
articles. It was in this respect 
that the newspaper was popular 
among most law students. 

Published every other week, 
the Amicus Curiae was staffed en- 
tirely by students from Marshall- 
Wythe School of Low. 1976 sig- 
nified the sixth year of publi- 
cation in which the Amicus con- 
tinued to represent a new stream 
of thought for law school news- 
papers, challenging others to fol- 
low. 

Contributing Editor Lou Gonnella searches files 
for suitable pictures. 




With the help of Sue Mognotti, Margaret Askew, 

Editor-in-Chief prepares copy for the upcoming 

issue. 

A humerous picture amuses Pete Georgen and Jim 

Margolin 




162 AMICUS CURIA 







Stoff members Bill Botts, Victor Neubaum, Steve 
Ormond and Rhetta Daniel are briefed on the 
upcoming issue. 

Deadline pressure doesn't appear to affect typist 
Janet Rubin. 



Resting 
their case 



'TfTo provide on outlet for law 
Sti^ students to write in a non- 
treatise way" was the objective of 
the 1976 Colonial Lawyer staff. 
Previously composed of long foot- 
noted articles on a given subject, 
the staff hoped to publish material 
with a less scholarly approach. 

The Colonial Lawyer was com- 
prised of four basic contributing 
groups including the Mary and Wil- 
liam Society, International Law 
group. Environmental Law group and 
the Black American Low School Assoc- 
ciation. However, creative poetry, 
prose and photography were solicited 
and therefore articles were not lim- 
ited to the above areas. 

In the past, the Colonial Low- 
yer was sent gratis to alumni, fa- 
culty and staff. Due to a shortage 
of funds however, circulation was 
limited. Beyond the actual stu- 
dents it was uncertain as to who 
would receive the publication. 

Future publications are discussed by John 
Morehead, Judy Wall and Terry Grinnolds. 



COLONIAL LAWYER 163 




■— SCHOLnSTIC 



164 SCHOLASTIC SUBDIVIDES 




Omicpon 

DoUq 

KoppQ 



A^ micron Delta Kappa served as the 
VCX undergraduate and graduate national 
leadership honor society. Its pur- 
pose was "to recognize students who 
have attained a high standard of ef- 
ficiency in college activities, to 
bring together the most representative 
students in all phases of collegiate 
life and to bring together members 
of the faculty and student body." 
The Eta Circle of Omicron Del- 



ta Kappa co-sponsored the annual 
Yule Log ceremony with Mortar 
Board. Held each year in the Wren 
Courtyard, the ceremony featured 
the burning of the Yule Log, 
Christmas caroling and a Christmas 
story by President Graves. An 
added service aspect was given to 
the 1975 festivities as students 
were asked to donate canned goods. 



John Weiner, Pres. 
Barb Wei 
Paul Abbott 
Cathy Peppiatt 
Jim Klagge 
Craig McCurdy 
Cathy Collins 
Karen Larson 
Jean Blockwell 
Joe Marren 
Gary Gorbsky 
Michelle Lawson 
Martha Lufkin 
Goyle Yamada 
Corby Cochran 
John lurino 
Alan Sykes 
Becky Garrity 
Jim Moore 
Guy Strong 
Jim Thomas 
Sharon Pondak 
Chris Honenberger 
Dan Ozer 
Ellen Pirog 
Wyott Bethel 



Sandra Spooner 
Robin Gulick 
Corl Harden 
Shoron Coles 
John Weber 
Lisa Bolonovich 
George Tsohokis 
Jon Johnson 
Rob Wade 
Jeff Leppo 
Peter Garland 
Keith Havens 
Chris Tulou 
Charlotte Galson 
Tom Driscoll 
Debbie Wolin 
Louise Hicks 
Jeff King 

Glenn Gundersen 
Brian Mahoney 
Corl Miller 
Gilbert Evans 
Sam Sadler 
Alex Kallos 
John Donaldson 
Gary Smith 



Pi DgUq 
Ep/ilon 

3(z evived in 1972, the Society of 
<^t\Collegiate Journalists, for- 
merly Pi Delta Epsilon, worked hard 
to give outstanding junior and 
senior members of the medio an or- 
ganized group for expression. In 
the past few years, they have 
worked to obtain journalism courses 
as well OS sponsoring their annual 
spring publications' banquet. The 
1976 banquet was highlighted by 
guest speaker Roger Mudd. The CBS 
correspondent was at the college 
for two days, visiting classrooms 
as well as talking with the staffs of 
each publication. 



Corby Cochran, Pres. 
Pryor Baird 
Ben Boll 
Cindy Bennett 
Steve Bennett 
Robert Benson 
Kathy Brooks 
Al Buchanan 
Lauren Callahan 
Kevin Christiano 
Mary Cottrill 
Kathy Eason 
Paige Eversole 
Joan Floyd 
Steve Handzel 
Bruce Hothorne 
Clair Hill 

Heather Hollowell 
Beth Hutzler 
Tricio Joyce 
Chuck Kieffer 
Fred McCune 



John McGrath 
Mike McGrath 
Pat McMohon 
Peg Moler 
Tom Otto 
Pom Parhom 
Peg Porter 
Susan Romoine 
Melinda Rose 
Susan Shank 
Cindy Siebels 
David Slavin 
Paula Stossi 
Wayne Studer 
Donna Szubo 
Mike Tang 
Bob Thompson 
Andy Vanderhoof 
Ann Frost Waring 
John Willard 
Wilford Kale, Sponsoi 



Omicpon 

DoUq 

6p/ilon 



^% n International Honor Society, 
^'^^ Omicron Delta Epsilon was 
founded in 1915. During the Spring 
of 1975, a body of concerned stu- 
dents and faculty members initiated 
the chapter at William and Mary 



with 31 charter members. ODE's 
main purpose was to recognize and 
encourage scholastic achievement 
in economics. The Society en- 
deavored to provide for interaction 
between faculty and students thereby 
improving the academic atmosphere. 

The chapter's activities in- 
cluded numerous talks, paper pres- 
entations, and wine and cheese re- 
ceptions. In conjunction with the 
Economics Club, ODE sponsored a 
very successful volleyball tourna- 
ment and a reception for the three 
new economics' faculty members. 



Stephen Allen 

Barry Anderson 

Janet Armitoge 

Gertrude Bortel 

Dovid Berglund 

Jean Blockwell 

Ginny Blain 

Lourel Roe Bond 

George Boyer 

Mork Bundick 

John Burke, Pres, 

Bradley Carlson 

Harry Chernoff 

Molcolm Coots 

Donald Cox 

Bob Cumby 

Potti DeRoso 

Lisa Dillich 

Ruth Edwards 

Brendan Galloher 

Jonet Gonzalez 

Kenneth Gray 

Helen Grieve 

Glenn Gunderson 

Debbie Habel 

Von Hail 

Jonothon Hauser 



Ivan H Henson 
Helen Hoens 
Mino Hoover 
Janis Home 
Tom Huber 
Jan Johnson 
Douglas Jones 
Jeff King 
Steve Kurtz 
Donald Larson 
Michelle Lawson 
John Mothios 
Janet McKinnon 
Todd Morrison 
Shelley Movroydis 
Shoron Peoke 
Rolond Peters 
Virginia Plokitsis 
Esther Redmount 
Paul Stoneski 
Walter Stanton 
Betty Teboult 
Alan Sykes 
Mike Tang 
Susak Wasilewski 
Robert Windie 



HONORARIES 165 



nrioptQp 

Board 



/(obbord 
& Blodo 



^fr'he "K" Company, 8th regiment 
\Moi the Scabbard and Blade So- 
ciety, was founded at William and 
Mary on May 16, 1949. This nation- 
al military honor society recog- 
nized outstanding Junior and Senior 
ROTC Cadets based on leadership and 
academic standing. Service projects 
by Scabbard and Blade centered 
around the military students. One 
of their biggest undertakings was 
the orientation of MS3 Cadets for 
summer camp. They also planned 
field problems for the corps as 
well as helping to organize a field 
day. 



Within the society, new members 
were expected to pass a field prob- 
lem especially for them, being 
treated to a beer bosh and food af- 
terwards. The following Sunday 
found the cadets in full uniform 
ready for formal initiation. The 
five senior members also served on the 
Cadet Batallion Staff. 



Andrew L. Buckingham, Pres. 
Stephen J. Huebner, Vice-Pres. 
Donald F. Cox 
John W, Schmidfke 
Terrence C. Boone 
Kevin Monohan 



Steven G- Pinord 
David Barshis 
Cynthia Castle 
Richard Schwartzmon 
William Crane 



II A 



ussion of initiation brings Scabbard and 
members together. 





Tj'Jeginning as an honor society 
^Km for women, Mortar Board under- 
went a major change during the 
Spring by opening its doors to men 
as well. Members were chosen each 
Spring from Junior class students 
who met the requirements of schol- 
arship (at least 2.0 average), ser- 
vice and leadership. 

Tradition held at Homecoming, 
OS members sold yellow mums to help 
raise money for future projects. 
Christmas found the annual Yule Log 
ceremony with the former men's 
honorary ODK a huge success. A new 
slant was added to the usual cere- 
monies as students were asked to 
donate cans of food which were dis- 
tributed by the Community Action 
Agency. Through these projects and 
others such as the Consumer Research 
Survey, Mortar Board continued to 
live up to its ideals of leadership 
and service. 



Lynn Allison 
Jean Blockwell 
Corby Cochran 
Cathy Collins, Pres. 
Bonnie France 
Lisso Gasparoli 
Andrea Gnatt 
Beth Gregory 
Sherry Hanson 
Louise Hicks 
Laurie Johnston 



Karen Larson 
Michelle Lowson 
Debbie Miller 
Betsy Moore 
Cathy Peppiott 
Patty Streets 
Nancy Turrentine 
Judy Woscher 
Barb Wei 
Gayle Yamada 



F.H.C 



^rtounded November 1 1, 1750, the 
^Jl F.H.C. Society served as a social 
as well as honorary society, recog- 
nizing its members on the basis of 
individual achievement, convivial- 
ity, leadership and diversity of 
interest. Six juniors, six seniors 
and four faculty members made up 
the membership of this society, 
which was the first collegiate 
fraternity in the British colonies. 
The group, unique to William 
and Mary, has survived several per- 
iods of dormancy due to war. The 
present group was revived in 1972 
with the help of Dean Harold L. 
Fowler and Robert W. Storm, Jr. 
The Society met monthly in the Al- 
umni House to hear guest speakers 
as well as meeting at the homes of 
faculty members for socials. 



Lane Chambers, Pres. 
George Duke, Sec. 
Rick Bader 
Dickie Rhyne 
Glenn Gundersen 
Donald Zuckerman 
Chris Felder 
A I Whitley 



Jim Resh 
Pete Holoway 
Chip Mann 
Bob Thompson 
Miles Chappell 
Richard Pros I 
Frank MacDonoid 
Jack Willis 




The Consumef'«Research Sur\ey give?' 
Peppiatt and Karen Larson o chance To raise 
Dney for Mortar Board. 




Phi mu fllphQ 

(^ s a national men's music soci- Larry Allen 

/CI- ety, Phi Mu Alpha worked hard Ed Walinsky 





Ruddigore serves as on outle 
talents of both Phi Mu Alpha 
members. They participate i 
as;in the orchestra and ticki 

! 



s a national men's music soci 
ety, Phi Mu Alpha worked hard 
to promote musical activities on 
campus as well as provide social 
functions for its members. 

One of the biggest undertak- 
ings was the annual Gilbert and Sul- 
livan operetta co-sponsored with 
Delta Omicron. With auditions at 
the beginning of September and pro- 
duction not until the end of Octo- 
ber, Ruddigore took up much of the 
fall semester The Campus Center 
served as the site for another fall 
activity, square dancing and in the 
spring for the annual Ball. 



Lorry Allen 

Ed Walinsky 

Mark Wooiley 

Wolly Brubaker 

Gene LeCouteur 

Mike Craft 

Marc Robertson 

Fred Reiner 

Jim Keena 

Rob Lundquist 

John Mern 

Timothy E. Allmond, Jr. 

Alex Bolian 

Tom Combern 

Jim Catlette 

Mike Cowan 



Steve Dinwiddie 
Daniel Garland 
John Gilstrop 
Jerome Johnson 
Christopher Loftus 
Woyne Moore 
Mitch Osborne 
David Rock 
Bloke Rose 
Clay Senders 
Ion Scott-Felming 
Willie Webb 
Paul Wygai 



DoUq 
Omicpon 



3]f n existence at William and Mary 
j) since 1954, Delta Omicron In- 
ternational Women's Music Fraternity 
recognized students on the basis of 
their activities in music. Combin- 
ing their talents with Phi Mu Alpha, 
they formed the Sinfonicron Opera 
Company which produced on annual 
opera. 

As a separate group. Delta Omi- 
cron used member's individual tal- 



ents to the utmost by providing 
twice monthly recitals 1o residents 
of the Pines Convalescent Center. 
Other service projects provided by 
the group were ushering at concert 
series and recitals. One of the 
highlights of the Spring was the 
music competition which allowed W&M 
students to demonstrate their music- 
al abilities. 



Ann Altman 
Jennifer Bailey 
Potrice Bare 
Eunice Boyse 
Phyllis Britnell 
Betty Browning 
Maureen Cash 
Cynthia Cosson 
Susan Cleghorn 
Beuloh Cox 
Solly Crouch 
Jenny Davison 
Debby Federhen 
Joy Fessenden 
Andrea Forte 
Judy Ceroid 
Anne Gore 
Debby Groves 
Anne Harris 
Molly Hoffman 
Cothy Howard 
Debby Howard 
Julie Jones 



Terri McMohon 
Carol Mollon 
Lynne Matthews 
Kothy Meyers 
Betsy Moore 
Sharon Peake 
Julie Phillips 
Anne Roy 
Jonice Riley 
Jody Roberts 
Louro Roth 
Nancy Seowell 
Lynn Shelton 
Debbie Smelley 
Tereso SuHch 
Bonnie Tschirhort 
Diane Turman 
Gito Vasers 
Vickie Vultee 
Cathy Wadley 
Anne Woinstein 
Trish Wesp 



Phi 
Kappa 



39 hi Beta Kappa, the oldest Greek 
■^f^ letter fraternity in the United 
States was founded by a group of 
William and Mary scholars in 1776. 
Honoring those who have achieved 
academic excellence, PBK selected up 
to ten percent of the senior class 
each year. Distinguished college 
alumni of at least ten years' 
standing were also eligible for se- 
lection. 



Bjrry Anderson 

Gertrude Bortel 

Michol Bloke 

Andres Buckingham 

John Burke 

Cynthia Castle 

Bob Cumby 

Chorlotte Go I son 

Gory Gorbsky 

Beth Gregory 

Helen Grieve 

Lourie Johnston 

Karen Lorson 



Michelle Lowson 
Michael Lee 
Tim McCullough 
Tim Melester 
Scott Merkle 
Debbie Parker 
Julio Phillips 
Thomas Phillips 
Mark Sorensen 
Myro Stephenson 
Linda Teogue 
Lowrence Tucker 



HONORARIES 167 



Tradition i/ OQppiod on 




Commander Steve Huebner leads the Queen's 
Guard after the Sunset Parade. 



^iT'he idea for the Queen's Guard 
\ti/ originated in 1957 when the 
R.O.T.C. formed an Honor Guard for 
Queen Elizabeth's visit to Williamsburg. 
Since its inception in 1961, the Queen's 
Guard has changed from an R.O.T.C. 
unit to one composed of members from 
the college community. The drills are 
patterned from the British Manual of 
Arms and the uniforms are of British 
design. 

From leading the annual Homecoming 
Parade to performances at the Norfolk 
Azalea Festival, the activities of the 
Queen's Guard are varied. On the 
William and Mary campus, they have 
performed at such functions as the 
Sunset Parade as well as simulating the 
Changing of the Guard in front of the 
Wren Building. Before a cutback in 
funding, they competed in festivals as 
far away as the Mardi Gras, winning 
awards wherever they went. 

Under the leadership of Steve Huebner 
and SGM John Cato, the Queen's Guard 
recruited over fifteen freshmen. With the 
increased interest in performances, the 
members hoped that funding would be 
renewed. As money increased, the 
Queen's Guard could again represent the 
college as an organization unique to 
William and Mary, as well as continue 
their tradition of excellence. 




Awaiting the beginning of the Sunset Parade, Bill 
Crone, Don Cox and Nathaniel Folarin stand at 
attention. 

A salute is fired to those Williom and Mary olumni 
who hove died during the previous year. 




168 QUEEN'S GUARD 




Classics Club members listen to one of the mony 
visiting lecturers. 

National news draws the attention of Margoret 
Davis and Serena Plotnik, while they wait for a 
meeting to begin. 




ClQ//ic olo/ono// 



M 




'eeting in the basement of Mer- 
► ton, Classics Club members and 
professors of the department developed 
a close relationship as they exchanged 
ideas in the area of classics. A pot- 
luck supper first semester initially 
brought members together, and Presi- 
dent Serena Plotnik kept the schedule 
full with special programs such as 
club member Margaret Davis' slide show 
and lecture on Italy, Mr. Christopher 
Frost's lecture on teaching classics 
in high school, and a reception for 
President Graves. The reception, held 
in the Classics Department museum, 
afforded Dr. Graves the opportunity 
to view the artifacts for the first 
time. He later sent a gift of rocks 
he had collected from Mt. Vesuvius 
while on a trip to Italy in the 1960's. 
Late spring activities included parti- 
cipation in the Morton volleyball 
games and o spring orgy, on annuo! 
party held at a professor's home. 
Stated Plotnik "it's very encouraging 
to see the professors attending our 
programs. With four professors and 
fourteen members, we've become a 
very close department." 



interest Night gives Serena Plotnik a chonce to 
rneet with prospective members. 



CLASSICS CLUB 169 




Hi/topy oomo/ to light 



^^a ith the role William and Mary 
u£/ served in America's early his- 
tory, it was natural that there 
should be a historical group which 
recognized this heritage. Founded 
in 1966, the Lyon G. Tyler Historical 
Society served such a purpose by 
"promoting a more active interest in 
history and by providing a suitable 
forum for historical discussion and 
debate." 

During the 1975-76 year, the 
Society became active in enlisting 



various speakers to address interested 
students and faculty. Among those 
visiting the college were Admiral 
George Dufek who spoke on his explor- 
ations of the South Pole with Admiral 
Byrd. In the realm of government, 
Antonio Romauldez, nephew of Marcos, 
spoke on "Martial Law in the Philli- 
pines." 

Besides programs offered at the 
school, the group took special field 
trips to expand their historical back- 
ground. Outside trips included tours 



of Agecraft Hall, a Sixteenth Cen- 
tury English Manor, and the Virginia 
Museum of Fine Arts. One of the most 
interesting activities of the Society 
continued to be the annual tour 
of the crypts underneath the Wren Building. 



A reception following the talk by Antonio 
Romauldez gives Historical Society members and 
interested visitors a chance to talk to the speaker. 
As background of each of the crypts is given. 
Historical Society president Debbie Wolin listens. 




170 LYON G. TYLER HISTORICAL SOCIETY 





ivic&socint— ' 



CIVIC AND SOCIAL SUBDIVIDER 171 



Officers Mark Fox, Bob Thomson, Joe Morren and 
Rob Billingsley discuss housing problems at a 
monthly meeting. 




*^/j[ttliciting more involvement from 
VL^the fraternities" was a major 
goal of the Interfraternity Council 
under the direction of President Joe 
Marren. The successful mixer in early 
October was a result of interfrater- 
nity cooperation with Panhel, an event 
with twenty-five kegs of beer. In the 
spring the fraternities competed in 
Greek Games, with events such as a 
chariot race and a jousting contest 
from canoes in Lake Matoaka. Resur- 
rected in 1975 after ten years, the 
weekend also featured the traditional 
dance and open air concert. 

Revising the constitution and 
bylaws occupied IFC members, as they 
improved the voting regulations and 
the structure by abolishing unneces- 
sary committees. A newly established 
bylaw provided for a quorum at IFC 
meetings by fining reps ten dollars 
or a case of beer for missing a 
meeting. Also ratified by the IFC 
was Alpha Phi Alpha's constitution, 
at which time the IFC officially 
welcomed the new fraternity. Pearl 
Harbor Day was declared a fraternity 
holiday in a show of resentment against 
Asia House. 

Faced with the possibility of 
being included in the random elimina- 
tion from the housing lottery, the 
IFC sought to justify their right to 
housing. In an article to the Flat 
Hat Joe Marren replied that "The 
fraternity system provides a student 
with the opportunity to become a part 
of a family of brothers. Fraternities 
afford the opportunity to know and 
become fairly close to a large num.ber 
of people. It helps broaden one's 
perspective by exposing one to a wide 
range of views." The college did not 
subject the fraternities to random 
elimination this year, but neither 
did they guarantee fraternities im- 
munity from the random elimination 
process. 



Joe Morren hands an envelope containing 
froternity bids to an expectant rushee. 




^Ir' his year the Panhellenic council 
%^ encountered several new 
situations and attempted to take an 
innovative approach in coping with 
them. The most controversial question 
concerned a switch from second 
semester rush to fall rush to adjust to 
alterations in the college calendar. 
National representatives were informed 
and a Rush Workshop was held in 
November to discuss the pros and cons 
of the issue. Factors taken into 
consideration included the increased 
revenue fall rush would bring to the 
sororities, the academic benefits for the 
freshmen, possible reluctance of 
freshmen to rush into pledging, and the 
chance of the sororities' losing their 
separate identities. A final vote on the 
proposal revealed six sororities favoring 
early rush and three opposing it; with the 
new program beginning in the autumn of 
1976. 

The entering class of freshmen women 
was the largest ever at W&M. Among 
the activities planned were open houses 
after Interest Night and the 
re-instatement of the Greek Sing, with 
judging by officers of IFC. The Fall 
Fashion Show, an annual event designed 
to raise money for the Panhel 
Scholarship Fund, saw the biggest crowd 
ever in attendance. 

The opportunity for enlarging the 
sorority system came in the fall when a 
new group. Delta Sigma Theta, 
petitioned for recognition. The Panhel 
Council recommended to the Student 
Activities Director and Administration 
that the predominantly black sorority be 
admitted on campus. 

On the whole, despite perennial 
housing problems, President Michelle 
Lawson felt "It was a year characterized 
by a spirit of cooperation rather than 
competition." 



3> 



Q> 




CO 



o 




D> 




CO 





Missy Farmer and Marsho Faison model the latest 
foshions for the Panhel Fashion Show. 



Left to right: Front row — Jan Sanderson, 
Johanna Steinbuchel, Leslie Wright, Kothy 
Sandburg, Melissa Locke, Maureen Lowlor. 
Second row — Joney Kicklighter, Sherry 
Lupton, Donna Szuba, Mary Kate Bresnohon, 
Katrina Kipp, Karen Kreutzinger Third row — 
Leigh Seward, Susan Hamilton, Michelle 
Lawson, Anne Harris. 



PANHELLENIC 173 



f^Pha Chis Chase 




'^f' oncentrating on their open motto 
^^ "seeking the heights together" 
Alpha Chi won the Sigma Chi Derby Day 
Chase, tied for first place in the Bug 
Squash with twenty-three people, and 
came in second in their Homecoming 
float competition with the theme 
"Everybody nose that the bobcats will 
sea deafeat." A retreat to Sondbridge 
and a keg party with Kappa Delta, Theta 
Delta Chi and Pi Lambda Phi highlighted 
October, while November was the month 
for the pledge dance. Celebration of 
Hera's Day in March sow sisters doing 
something thoughtful for each other, 
and events such as the Senior Picnic, 
Senior Banquet and Beach Week gave 
them opportunities to keep the 
sisterhood close. 

On the last night of formal rush, the 
sisters of Alpha Chi leave freshmen with 
the hope that they will "take our cake, 
that your dreams may ever sweeter be," 
a line from their dream cake symphony. 
Served on special occasions such as 
Rush, Founder's Day and the Senior 
Banquet, the white sheet cake decorated 
with red carnations, the flower of the 
sorority, symbolizes "the sharing of their 
goals and desires, through which they 
will achieve their dreams," according to 
Melissa McForlond. 




Left to Right: First row — Diane Arnold, Pixie 
Page, Cathe Reed, Lynn Sloane, Nancy Lloyd, 
Eunice Bayse, Second row — Dottie Drew, Linda 
Palmer, Nancy Schumar, Gail Minter, Sherry Rose, 
Leigh Seward, Vickie White, Stephanie Tyler, 
Gretchen Shaner; Third row — Wendy Young, 
Paulo Solensky, Kothy Myers, Anne Weekly, Jessie 
Roth Frederick, Jennie Estes; Fourth row — Sandy 
Fuller, Brenda Whitesell, Mary Heoley, Beth 
Riddle, Anne Midyette, Melindo Cox, Pot Powell, 



Kothy Durdin, Mary Comer, Chorlene Flonagon, 
Barbara Head; Fifth row — Virginia Carter, Jill 
Slotnick, Jan Tomes, Beth DiPace, Cindy 
Apostolou, Nancy Marker, Tina Lo Prod, Stephanie 
Tsocoumis, Gwen Perkins, Annie Hoppe, Maureen 
Cosh, Cindi Roush, Jennell Piplico, Donna 
Polgiase; Sixth row — Allison Naylor, Melissa 
McForlond, Mary Ann Kerins, Janet Rice, Carolyn 
Herbst, Liso Biordi, Suzi Schilling, Potty Dunn, 
Linden Delaune, Kothy Socco. 



174 ALPHA CHI OMEGA 



the idea of the symphony relates back 
to Alpha Chi's musical and theatrical 
heritage. 

Althea Hunt, founder of the Wil- 
liam and Mary Theater, established the 
Beta Delta chapter in 1927. In honor 
of Althea Hunt the sisters usher at 
all William and Mary theater perfor- 
mances. 

Colonizing a new Alpha Chi chap- 
ter at the University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill was an important 
facet of Alpha Chi's activity schedule. 
In mid-February a third of the soro- 
rity spent the weekend at UNC in 
order to conduct formal rush. A 
preferential party was given the 
last night, which included a dream 
cake ceremony. The sorority plans 
to stay in close touch for a year. 



As the leod in Alpha Chi's formal rush skif "A 
Bleak Night" Gail Minter sews as the chorus 
behind her sings the mood music. 







It's easier to keep up with each other when living 
in the sorority house, as Debbie Limburg and Pat 
Powell would ogree. 

Sisters Janet Rice and Stephanie Tsacoumis find o 
minute to talk to each other during formal rush. 




ALPHA CHI OMEGA 175 



Left to right: Front row — Maryanne Nelson, 
Sharon Zook, Karen Wilson, Robin Engh, Sue 
Morrison, Sheryl Lukosik, Sherry Hanson. Second 
row — Nancy Nugent, Jone Hartsfield, Diana 
Dubel, Donna Schwartz, Mary Ewing, Kay 
Upchurch, Nancy Smith, Kris Wollnicn, Debby 
Mclntyre, Debby Camacho. Third row — Michol 
Patton, Shelly Movroydis, Carol Alcorn, Susan 
Chapman, Ginny Ramsey, Nancy Rodgers, Corolyn 
Jones, Debbie Blonchard, Kathryn Beasley, Fourth 
row — Borboro Comocho, Nancy Severin, Betsy 
Radd, Nancy Turrentine, Janet Dickenson, Ellen 
Moore, Karon Hanson, Melissa Eastman, Jane 
Tylus, Ellie Coloizi, Beth Hutzler, Lydia Spindle, 
Pam Kuchenbuch, Laurie Lucker. Fifth row — Sue 
Page, Anita Hoy, Susan Dunford, Dru Conway, 
Katie Orrick, Karen Prosswimmer Sixth row — 
Stephonie Tollon, Leslie Wright, Michele Grifith, 
Dee Joyce, Paula Stassi. 



In their rush skit "Chi Omega Choo-Choo" Mary 
Ewing, Diana Dubell, Laurie Lucker and Sharon 
Zook declare Chi O is best in the west. 





Camp 
ChiO 
Style 



Chi Omega, founded in 1921, 
was the first sorority estab- 
lished on the William and Mary cam- 
pus. Since that time the Omicron 
Beta chapter has changed and ex- 
panded while retaining an active 
interest in campus and community 
life. 

Evidence of this interest was 
demonstrated when the sisters treat- 
ed patients at Pine Nursing Home to 
Christmas caroling as well as helped 
with a charity project at Mag- 
ruda Elementary School. Spirited 
Chi O's took "Most Enthusiastic" in 
the Greek Sing, and an imaginative 
"Cat in the Hat" float placed first 
in the Homecoming parade. Also 
taking first place was Chi O Sherry 
Hanson, who was voted the 1975 Home- 
coming Queen. The sorority's Supper 



Club fed thirty to thirty-five peo- 
ple, with different members taking 
turns cooking. This year's rush 
again used the theme "Camp Chi O" at 
successful informal and formal rush 
parties. 

Chi O sisters spent a great 
deal of their time enjoying each 
other's company as well as associa- 
ting with other people. There were 
traditional activities, such as a 
Friday night retreat over Halloween, 
a bonfire with Lambda Chi, and a 
Christmas dance, along with the num- 
orous keg parties at the House, with 
the MBA, and with various frats. 
The Chi O's had a banquet before 
their spring dance to honor both the 
pledges and their Founder's Day. 
The year ended with the sorority's 
Beach Weekend. 



176 CHI OMEGA 




^ 




WEVE wT THE. 

CAT th\HAT! 
If 




One of the twenty-six squashed into a Volkswagen 
at Derby Day, Ann Neal is happy to be pulled out. 
Camp Chi O staffers Susan Dunford and Leslie 
Wright sing a welcome to the freshman girls at a 
fall rush party. 




CHI OMEGA 177 



iterto 



Beth Fischer 




Pertaining rushees on skit night during formalX / {, 
h IS tun for Claire MocMilion, karen Tomlinson » 




'Ttf^ he Tri Delt circle of friends 
^fcU rolled through another busy 
year with dances, receptions and 
keg parties as the sisters worked 
and played their way to lasting 
friendships with each other. 

The sorority's serious side was 
especially beneficial to the William 
and Mary campus this year. A five 
hundred dollar grant from Tri Delt 
National funds was awarded to the 
Swem library for the bicentennial 
celebration of Phi Beta Kappa, the 
first fraternity. The sisters sold 
doughnuts to finance the scholar- 
ship they offer to any deserving 
campus coed. Also the William and 
Mary Tri Delts were given the honor 
of installing a new chapter of their 
sorority at the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

The Tri Delt social life was 
lively as ever. This year's Derby 
Day champion, they also captured 
fourth place in the Homecoming 
parade with the theme of "Bobcats 
Aren't worth Peanuts." Receptions 
were given by the sisters for the 
freshman men, grad students, the 
Tri Delt National President, and in 
commemoration of their Founder's Day. 
Numerous beer parties and trips to 
Busch Gardens filled sisters' spare 
moments. 

In 1928 the local sorority Delta 
Chi Delta was oworded a charter as 
the Alpha Mu chapter of Delta Delta 
Delta. Traditions that have grown up 
over the years include the Mother- 
Daughter Pansy Breakfast and several 
initiation rituals, such as the kid- 
napping of pledges for a breakfast 
of cake. 



178 DELTA DELTA DELTA 



It's Three - 
Dimensional 



In the afternoons sisters Susan Eldridge and Susan 
Mariani find they hove the house to themselves. 



H 





Supported by Linda Beezer, Robyn Hilton chugs at 

Derby Day 

A happy Linda Ashwell smiles at the crowd from 

the Tri Delta Homecoming float. 




Left to right; Front row — Michelle Colasurdo, 
Beth Fischer, Barb Hubbard, Joan Hodlock, Lindo 
Ashwell, Debbie Miller, Barb Bagot, Susan Harrow, 
Wanda Davis, Susan Cleghorne, Nancy Carter, 
Wanda Shelton, Anne Smith. Second row — Sue 
Chambless, Betty Gillette, Cecie Johnson, Anne 
Weatherby, Pam Guntherberg, Pom Roller, Claire 
MacMillan, Jody Paterson, Beth Gregory, April 
Wells, Caron Paul, Johanna Steinbuchel, Muffle 
Earl. Third row — Michelle Morgan, Nancy Twardy, 
Margaret Davis, Wendy Webb, Linda Bruce, 
Catherine Bova, Mo Lowlor, Jane Scherer, Sher 
Wilkins, Jennifer Corbat, Connie Berkhart, Maggie 
Rollins, Michelle Lawson, Solly Crouch. Fourth row 
— Sue Eldridge, Helen Grieve, Kathy Frost, Gail 
McGrath, Carolyn Scott, Nan Eggleston, Anne 
Park, Michelle Zimmer, Martho Debord, Sherry 
Poskonzer, Robyn Hilton, Serena Plotnik, Terri 
Cloyd, Biz Flannagon, Koren Claybrook, Beth 
Johnson, Brenda Albert, Marty Ison, Nancy 
Hodlock. 




DELTA DELTA DELTA 1 7Q 



Derby Doy brings support from Nancy Ferguson 
ond Kathi Lentzsch as they cheer their team. 
Left to right: Front row — Leslie Drake, Peggy 
Moler, Pom Parham, Nancy Rasmussen, Molly 
McGhee, Janey Kicklighter, Missy Former, Molly 
Bilodeau. Second row — Deanne Peters, Alice 
Kunec, Solly Brain, Karen Stephon, Kothi Lentzsch, 
Sherrill Jones, Kotrino Kipp, Becky Boyle, Solly 
Wanner. Third row — Debbie Jackson, Sally 
Wheldon, Louise Hicks, Kothy Chambers, Jon 
Johnson, Gay Lee Common, Caroline Kramer, 
Janet Moscicki, Sue Noeser, Kim Buchanan, Coria 
Perkins. Fourth row — Jean Blackwell, Barb 
Roberts, Barbie Bowen, Kathy Boucher, Cissy 
Wilson, Peggy Schotf, Judy Woscher, Alice 
Burlinson, Marge Mosferson, Moryonne Crafslev, 
Koren Sfaha, Sue Harmon, Cathy Peppiott, Kaggy 
Richter, Coleen Fadden. Fifth row — Connie Ritter, 
Betty Fedziuk, Potte Minnick, Suzon Eofon, Karen 
Thomas, Jane Lennon, Cathy Collins, Donna 
Szuba, Nancy Ferguson. 





180 GAMMA PHI BETA 




Open houses give Karen Stephen a 
chance to meet new rushees. 



3 



mproving the physical condition of 
their "House on the corner" was a 
major concern of Gamma Phi Beta as 
they discovered the building slowly 
crumbling around them. The newest 
sorority on campus, the Alpha Chi 
chapter was founded in 1933 by twelve 
charter members who originally occupied 
the Hoke House. Inspection of this 
residence revealed cresent moons on the 
shutters, one of the sorority's symbols. 

Since their establishment on the 
William and Mary campus, new chapter 
traditions have been developed and 
expanded, one of which is the Chinese 
motif that flavors life at Gamma Phi. Ten 
years ago two oriental art students 
designed the Chinese heads and wall 
hangings which have been retained and 
are now used for rush functions. The 
Chinese theme was even carried over to 
include the sorority's informal rush party. 
New Year Party. 

Gamma Phis showed an innovative 
streak in their choice of social activities. 
The sisters started cooking breakfast 
after pledge dances, and every Friday 
was celebrated by a BYOB happy hour. 
A weekend retreat to Virginia Beach, a 
spring picnic, and slumber parties helped 
foster the continuting sisterly closeness. 

In addition to their social events, the 
members were active in civic projects. 
The proceeds from Gamma Phi's Fifties 
Night at the pub were donated to 
charity. Sisters also took charge of 
publicity for the Blood Mobile's visits to 
the community. 



a> on the Corner 




O 

X 





o «• 




<C 




o 

Whars So 8 





The mark of Gamma Phi is placed on o hand by 

Lynn Allison on Fifties Night. 
A foil rush porty finds Nancy Rasmussen 
instructing budding freshman artists in the 
techniques of orientol art. 



GAMMA PHI BETA 181 



A cheerful blessing is given by Dove Nagle as 
Charlie Wolfe, Rex Edwards and David Walk take a 
dose of their own medicine. 




^IT' he South was alive and partying 
^bl/ hearty at Kappa Alpha this year. 
Progression toward a stronger fraternity 
on campus was in evidence as the 
members sought a continuance of their 
close brotherhood while increasing 
membership. 

Founded in 1890, the Alpha Zeta 
chapter has held on to the traditions that 
have always been a powerful force in the 
fraternity. Old South week, the highlight 
of every year, was prepared for months 
in advance as beards flourished and 
toleration levels were raised. The 
festivities began with a distinctive pledge 
parade and Iron Man drinking contest, 
and included a faculty cocktail party and 
formal ball which brought the Southern 
Gentlemen out in their finest style. 

Always alert to a good time, the KA's 
enjoyed a Homecoming reception 
featuring mint juleps and rowdy alumni, 
a Homecoming dance with Slapwater 
and a Christmas party. This year saw an 
increased emphasis on athletics for the 
"Knights of Alcohol; "for the first time in 
several years, the brothers participated 




Left to right: Seated foreground — Gary Buracker. 
Front row — Bob Booth, Kent Gates, Rex Edwards, 
Art Prince, Bill Guernier, Joyce Fronko, Gerry 
White, Greg Blus, Dovid Weick, Jeff Keane, Charlie 
Wolfe. Second row — Dave Nagle, Dave Payne, 
Dave Scott, Doug Koval, Bob Robinson, Jim 
Powell, Bob Baldwin, Don Cox, Dove Tatge, 
Michael Rodis. 



182 KAPPA ALPHA 



Dixie Never Dies . . . 



in most intramural sports. Rush activities 
dominated the first semester as a change 
in policy was effected to give freshmen 
insight into life at KA. A Halloween 
smoker put both members and guests in 
costumes, the best dressed rushee 
receiving a fifth of Rebel Yell, KA's 
favorite beverage. The brothers worked 
to start traditions of their own, such as 
Hat Nights where some sort of headgear 
was required while indulging in various 
intoxicants. Many kegs were drained at 
football games as KA's cheered for their 
own "Sugar Bear" Robinson and Bob 
Booth. KA's irrepressible spirit and small 
membership pulled the already close 
brothers even tighter. 



Disguised as Groucho and Harpo Marx, Art Prince 
and Bill Guernier amuse the Homecoming parade 
audience 




*. 
^ 



> 

.■.■4 



It's hard for Doug Koval to concentrate on Derby 

Day when he hears bod news from the footboll 

game 

An eye out for his receiver, quarterback Mike Rodis 

sets up to poss. 



KAPPA ALPHA 183 




. f^oki Jicin ; dAcr-pen theySpirits of Kafhy Sandburg, 
Peggy kneijtr^ BecKAWoodruff as they talked 
with"a'r(j5hee at Thefg[]ljpnnual Garden Party 
forced JnfJoors 



184 KAPPA ALPHA THETA 





a 


% 






^^^H «<^^" 




r 1 ^ ^ .foi^it^ 

/^ iAb KAB i|;SEi»IKj|B 


^rV 


P 










^^^L.' c^^^^^K' ■miK'Il 



Left To right: Front row — Heather Young, Renee 
Minor, Dora Hansen, Suzi Ache, Charlie Adiis, 
Carrine Klingman, Debbie Roughton, Cathy 
Womack, Sue Haulenbeek Second row — Sue 
Hopkins, Sherry Sanders, Alii Beals, Kathy Funk, 
Kothy Schintzel, Martha Young, Kothy Sondberg, 
Karen Ryer, Sue Hall, Jonet Alexander. Third row 
— Gail Mathews, Debbie Arehart, Sue Gillis, 
Nancy Looney, Zoe Johnson, Peggy Henderson, 
Judy Alexander, Donna Swain, Karen Peacock. 
Fourth row — Joanna Balcorek, Noncy Warden, 
Anne Frost Waring, Sue Germano, Jeanne Lipfert, 
Terri Feldman, Carole Margolis, Suzanne Conway. 
Fifth row — Debbie Dadencs, Sheila Podden, 
Kothy Eason, Karen Johnston, Kristie Sehnert, 
Nancy Singer, Bev Nanney. Sixth row — Kim 
Wilson, Mary Belote, Kathy Auerboch, Peggy 
Jones, Kathy Winklhoffer, Linda Dunton, Sharon 
Suchy, Cathy Butler Seventh row — Maria Janes, 
Becky Woodruff. 



]3jf n keeping with their theme of unity, 
/<! Thetas banded together to serve the 
community. Throwing parties for the 
handicapped kindergarten at the 
Methodist Church was a frequent 
occurence, as were spaghetti dinners 
prepared at the house for the Deirdra 
Gerda scholarship fund. Pledge dances 
and a T.G.I.F. party with Grod students 
gave Thetas a chance to party, as did 
their September Garden Party, although 
rain forced the festivities to be held 
indoors. 

Holding to tradition, the members kept 
close ties to their little and big sisters 
through such activities as the kite fly 
held in March, a national tradition. Each 
family makes or buys a kite to fly 
together on Phi Beta Kappa field. Also 
unique to Theta is the revelation of big 
sisters to pledges at a p.j. party. 

Established in 1922, the sorority once 
resided in what is now Phi Mu's house. 
The Thetas moved into their present 
house when Mr. Max Blitzer, a college 
alum and assistant to the President, sold 
the house to the college. It was built with 
the knowledge that when it was sold, it 
would become a sorority house. 



Sisters Stress 
Family Spirit 




v^^/-^/*'"-^'"^- 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 185 



Living in the sorority house, Jeon Buchanan finds 

studying easier in the ofternoons. 

KD's enjoy wotching their formal rush sl<.it 

"Hades". 






L 



Angels Ann Kling end B.J. Jones look pleased with 
their skit performance, given the third night of 
formal rush. 



3t was a busy year for the Kappa 
Delta's as they directed themselves 
toward making sisterhood more than just 
a label for their sorority. Increased 
emphasis was placed on service projects, 
alumnae participation, and under- 
standing among the sisters. Their ef- 
forts were acknowledged at the Kappa 
Delta National Convention when the 
William and Mary chapter was honored 
with the presentation of a progress 
award. 

The Alpha Phi chapter, founded in 
1 928, was initially a group of five charter 
members whose house, located in 
present-day Colonial Williamsburg, 
has since become Patrick Henry's 
Kitchen. The KD's commemorated their 
Founder's Day with a large celebration 
held in the Wren Building. Attending 
alumnae included Betty Lenier, an 



original member of the chapter and later 
a national Kappa Delta president. 

The KD's national philanthropy was a 
crippled children's hospital located in 
Richmond; they held a party for the 
children in cooperation with the 
Richmond alumnae, as well as sending 
them homemade gifts. Contributions to 
the community included working with 
Circle K and Head Start. 

The social side of KD saw a Diamond 
Ball, Christmas Dance and spring Pledge 
Dance. In addition to these annual 
events, there were several parties for the 
sisters, including a fall bash with Pi Lam, 
Theta Delt and Alpha Chi. Out in full 
force at Derby Day, the KD's took pride 
in their first place status in the chugging 
pyramid. The "KD Circus", their 
homecoming float, was awarded third 
place in the parade. 




Progress Takes 



CO 

Q. 
O 






Alreody sold on the odvontoges of being a KD, 
Barb Scott shares her views at o fall rush party. 

left to right: Front row — Barb Scott, Suzy Blake, 
Valerie Cable Second row — Lynn Shelton, Anne 
Kling, Patty Johnson. Third row — Debbie Davis, 
Mary Wilmoth, Sharon Wotkins, Fourth row — 
Marlene Robinson, Liz Hicks, Lynn Roberts, Fifth 
row — Kathy Owens, Karen Hall, Emily Deaver. 
Sixth row — Maureen Habermon, Margoret 



Hughes, Liso Flexer. Seventh row — Diono Powell, 
Melba Fukudo, Diane Newsom, Janet Schultz, 
Debby Federhen, Ginny Plakitsis, B J. Jones, Sylvia 
Davis, Martha Lufkin, Deborah Waterman. Eighth 
row — Anne Worland, Debby Smith, Sue 
Wittemeir, Margoret Yorrington, Suson Fletcher, 
Sally Kessler, Jo Corol Butler, Koy Wellener, Susan 
Young, Darlene Critchfield, Laurie Johnston, Shari 
Slocum, Carrie Strickle, Maureen Hrehosik, Jane 
Barret 



KAPPA DELTA )87 



A graduate receptian finds Martha Hughes 
spreading Kappo charm. 






potlighting innovation, Kappas 
'approached their social scene 
with an eye to change. Keg parties on 
the porch with Pika and Kappa Sig saw 
the sisters partying informally, with 
dressing up reserved for a costume 
Halloween party at Kappa Sig. A 
Father-Daughter Banquet on Parent's 
Weekend revived post tradition, while a 
Mother-Daughter Reception was left 
until the spring. 

Spreading goodwill among other 
Greeks has always been important to the 
Kappas. Gifts of baked goods to 
fraternities were presented on their 
respective Founder's Days and sororities 
were presented with their flowers. At 
Halloween the Kappas played Great 
Pumpkin and adorned sorority porches 
with jock-o- lanterns. Kappas stole the 
show at Homecoming with princesses 
Martha Hughes, Pat Giermak and Teresa 
Sato representing the upper classes. 

Founded in 1922, the Gamma chapter 
has distinguished itself on the campus as 
well as off; Mrs. Nancy Folk is presently 
on the Board of Visitors, while Mrs. 




Kappas Give a 



Obvious Indion fans Brendo Hart, Jody Roberts and 

Kathy Kent parade down DOG Street at 

Homecoming. 

Rush parlies can be fun, as Cheryl Smith ond Laiia 

Woile laughingly odmit. 




188 KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 



Phyllis Galanti is renowned for her port 
in the P.O.W. progrom. 

The social calendar still included the 
successful "Kappa Kommercial Break" 
rush party for Freshman women, "Kappa 
Kosino" for freshman men, a reception 
for M.B.A. grad students, the Monmouth 
Duo dance with Pi Phi in November, and 
the spring pledge dance. Dinner at the 
house, retreats and intramural games 
kept sisters in close contract. 



Left to right: Front row — Laurie Bond, Ann 
Ruble, Karen Johnson, Dee Dee Deloney, Pom 
Daniels, Debbie Monfort, Cathy Wilson Second 
row — Betsy Butler, Janet Housley, Diane Andaos, 
Patty Streets, Kothy Andaos, Pot Giermok, Phyllis 
Ashley, Mary Sue Hogan, Melito Love Third row 
— Mary Tankard, Mario Ruiz, Gerry Vessely, Sue 
Hedrick, Judy Huffard, Anne Word, Karen 
Kreutzinger. Fourth row — Sara Block, Lailo Wolle, 
Nancy Esper, Betsy Page, Jone Statler, Karen 
Wilson, Debbie Commor, Susie Burton, Cindy 
Bennett, Grace Ruiz. Fifth row — Laurie Flack, 
Brendo Hart, Teresa Soto, Jonella Borbrow, Cindy 
Turner, Kathy Gingerich, Alice Jackson, Carolyn 
Testa Sixth row — Kathy Kent, Cynthia Casson, 
Margie Weber, Pot McMahon, Mary Scott Shell, 
Nancy Weiner, Karen Murphy, Martha Hughes, 
Annie Tisdole, Mimi Pfieffer, Meg Regan, Cheryl 
Smith, Barb Wei. 




New Twist to Tradition 




Left to right: Sitting — Keith Potts, Jon Kay lor, 
Pat Can, Pete Hammond, Sam Patton. Front row 

— Mark Griffith, More Fox, Rolf Williams, Joe 
Schifano, Jack Kroeger, Max Schools. Second row 

— Ken Wharry, Kevin O'Rourke, Billy Gray, Don 
Robbins, Paul Cullum, George Holland. Third row 

— Kevin Barnes, Doug Myers, Tommy Smith, Mike 
Mason, Rick Marquis, Bill Melrose, Jim Kruis, John 
O'Neil, Eric Bahner. Fourth row — Paul Kruis, Jerry 
Varocallo, Gory LeClair, Jim McDonough, Tom 
Morrissey, Nick Connor, Steve Dolton, Don 
Bowers, Keith Fimian, Mike Flurie. Fifth row — Jack 
Arbogast, Jim Rotkus, Mark Blackwell, John 
Lowenhaupt, Mike Enoch, Blair Smith, Dave 
O'Neil, John Friedery, Bob Miller. 




!► 



(?» Kavpu Shmt 




Late night blues vanish quickly as Pete Hammond 
and Jack Kroeger talk about upcoming rush. 
Working diligently as brothers, Eric Bahner and 
Rolf Williams try to decide the right way to work 
the problem. 




190 KAPPA SIGMA 



Combine social stimulation 
with athletic activity, dress 
it in "whites," and the result is 
Kappa Sig, leaders in spirit at 
basketball games as well as at keg 
parties. 

There was much more to Kappa 
Sig than the partying one heard so 
much about. Brothers took part in 
intramural events, and blasted their 
way to fourth place in the Homecom- 
ing parade with their "Cook the Cats" 
float, A benefit dance for the 
Leukemia Society was held in the 
Spring by the Sigs in memory of 
Steve Seward. 

But there were few dull moments 
in the Kappa Sig social life. Unique 
smokers — a barnyard smoker complete 
with hoy and a casino smoker — 
helped bring in another large pledge 
class this year. Seaworthy Sigs 
participated in the WRBQ Raft Race 
in October, and a hearty welcome was 
extended by a contingent of the 
brothers to President Ford when he 
visited Williamsburg. Basketball 
gomes would not have been the same 
without the Kappa Sigs spurring on 
the team in white "Captain Perver- 
sion" overalls and interesting var- 
ieities of headgear. Spring parties 
included toga and western parties, 
o St. Valentine's Day massacre. 



the Sweetheart Dance, and the sem- 
ester was topped off with their 
Beach Weekend. 

The Nu chapter of Kappa Sigma 
was founded at William and Mary in 
1890. Noteworthy alumni include 
past William and Mary president 
Lyon G. Tyler and James G. Driver, 
who in the fall donated his entire 
estate to the 



William and Mary 
athletic department. This year 
brought the return of Arthur Jones, 
Class of 19)3, who not only founded 
the Flat Hat and the Order of the 
White Jacket but is also the oldest 
surviving member of the chapter. 

President Ford's visit brings Kappa Sigs onto Duke 
of Gloucester Street, awaiting the President's 
arrival. 




Kappa Sig Steams On 




Spirit-minded Sigs line the way onto the bosketboll 
court OS they come out in their usual attire. 



^tr' he diversity of our house has 



*4 

been the key to our closeness" 
commented Lambda Chi John 
Coppedge. Under President Jeff Scott, 
the brothers retained their love of 
tradition and ritual while forging ahead 
in their social and service activities. 

Philanthropy played an important role 
as each semester the members held a 
work day where the services of the 
brothers were offered to the community. 
The proceeds went towards supporting 
two foster children in Richmond and to 
the Adolescent Unit at Eastern State. On 
Halloween Eve, the brothers sacrificed 
their stomachs to a starvation banquet 
for UNICEF, the menu including only rice 
and tea. 

Emphasis on the committee system 
was evidenced by a Homecoming float 
based on the story of "How the Bobcat 
Lost Its Tail," as well as the successful 
Homecoming alumni reception and 
various faculty parties. Uniting behind 
an attempt to preserve their high 
standings in both Greek Games and their 
bid for the All-Points Trophy, the 
brothers again stressed intramurals. 

The Epsilon Alpha chapter was 
granted a charter in 1922 and 



immediately adopted the fraternity 
tradition of assigning each member a 
number at initiation. This year's 
Homecoming sow the return of EA 3, 
author of the W&M fight song, who has 
appeared annually for over 50 years. 

Although they tended to emphasize 
friendship over fraternizing, the Lambda 
Chi social life was far from slow. 
Members enjoyed their Sweetheart 
dance, Christmas party. Spring Follies, 
and a beach weekend at Nagshead. As 
an alternative to the pub, the brothers 
stayed home on Wednesday nights with 
kegs of their own, often in celebration of 
a birthday. Another innovation included 
"Lambda Chi Alpha On the Move," 
which consisted of visitations to other 
schools, most notably Longwood, for a 
little extra socializing. Outstanding 
personalities included the many brothers 
who sustained the Order of the White 
Jacket, Busch Gardens juggler Tom 
Pearce, and Fritz's jacked-up Camero 
that averaged on impressive 4'/2 miles 
per gallon. 



To show his loyalty to the Tribe, Robert Bass 
makes the ultimate sacrifice in allowing his tail to 
be chopped off. 





(O 



Chi Counts Unity First 





£ 





Left to right: Front row — Coke Hall, Micheal 
Forodos, Jon Chose, Bob Covoliere, George 
Halasz, Ed Rule, Jimmy Potts, Joe Agee's bike. 
Second row — Rick Rowland, Tom Pearce, David 
Savold, Robert Bass, Debbie Stanley, Mike Hoy, 
Lynn Powell. Third row — Carl Tack, Sam Howard, 



Dove Hubbard, John Metz, Paul Denby, Mak 
Kelliher Fourth row — Chris Davis, Danny 
Thornton, Charles Rowls, Jeff Scott, Tommy 
Hines, Jeff Jeremiah Fifth row — Matt Courage, 
Steve Parker, John Bunker, John Reilly, Bill Dowd, 
Bob French, Bo Poats. 



192 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 




Brother Dick Moon celebrates the arrival of o new 
bar as Robert Boss, Paul Denby and Jim Chase 
await their turn. 






Hoping fo score for Lambda Chi, Carl Tack goes in 

for a lay-up 

A game of pinball occupies brothers ot o porty at 

the house 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 193 



Left to right: Front row — Cheryl Chestney, Susie 
Schmidt, Gail Melonson, Linda Asplund, Sharon 
Peake. Second row — Irene Haas, Karen Anders, 
Lee Jones, Janet Ewing. Third row — Jeannie 



Masten, Mary Kate Bresnahen, Noncy Lambert, 
Suson Brzastele. Fourth row — Betti Pinker, 
Cynthia Smith, Nancy Seawell, Robbie Lee Warren. 




Phi Mu Branches Out 




Even without a float, the Phi Mus get their 
message ocross irt the Homecoming parade 



194 PHI MU 



■4n| hi Mus concentrated on "branching 
Tn out" into all aspects of campus 
life," according to Lee Jones. 
Highlighting the fall activity calendar 
were a freshmen men's reception and a 
fraternity daiquiri party. Other events 
included a Founder's Day celebration 
where area alums were honored, and 
faculty receptions at the house. 
Civic-minded Phi Mus combined work 
with pleasure on Halloween when they 
trick-or-treated for Project Hope. 

The Gamma Alpha chapter received 
its William and Mary charter in 1926 and 
since that time customs have sprung up 
based on the sorority symbols of the 
heart and the lion. Phi Mus make and 
send Valentine cards to each sorority 
and fraternity to celebrate St. 
Valentine's Day. The Order of the Lion 
comprises the house's favorite men, 
dubbed "Phi guys." Sisters consider "our 
house their house" in return for the Phi 
guys services. 



«Tj[ t took a lot of courage on 

^ everybody's part," stressed 
Julie Seawell, Chairman of Phi Mu. 
After a disappointing formal rush, 
the girls of the Phi Mu chapter 
asked their national officials to 
recolonize the chapter. Interviewing 
started on January 18 for girls who 
were interested in joining the so- 
rority. Former members were given 
the choice of becoming alumni or 
going through the interviews and ini- 
tiating. Conducted by Mrs. Williamson 
of National Phi Mu and National Pon- 
hellenic, two field secretaries and 
one alumni from California, the inter- 
viewing resulted in a pledge class of 
fifty freshman and sophomore girls. 

During the pledge period the only 
elected office of the fraternity was 
that of chairman. Helping the chapter 
continue the tradition of writing 
valentines for all the fraternities 
and sororities, planning activities 
such as a fund raiser for the national 
philanthropy Hope and a party for the 
adolescents at Eastern State kept the 
pledges busy. Setting new sorority 
traditions, the girls became carna- 
tion sisters to each other, foregoing 
the tradition of big sisters. The 
sophomores kidnapped the freshman 
for a breakfast of coffee and dough- 
nuts at Project Plus early one morning. 

Initiation was planned for April 
3rd, and a reception for faculty and 
parents was scheduled to follow. A 
dance for the initiates took place 
April 9th. Seawell stated "It's 
going to take a lot of work, but I 
know we'll make it." 



Pledges learn the Phi Mu song "Anything Goes" at 
an eoriy pledge meeting, directed by a national 
Phi Mu. 



New Roots 





Left to right: Front row — Nancy Bortlett, Julie 
Crooks, Cindy Flournoy, Ellen Cassonos, Suson 
Eisenhauer. Second row — Pat Keenoy, Donna 
Ours, Judy Corgill, Sherrie Markwood, Judy 
Worthington, Liz Sowder, Pottye Crocker, Sandra 
Thomas, Carol Parker, Anne Keller. Third row — 
Susan Kelly, Helen Plunkett, Lisa Swickley, Meg 
Lewis, Debbie Clatterbuck, Donna Lombordo, Tino 
Cole, Mary Teabo, Ann Fitzgerald, Dione Dodson, 
Vickie Roakes, Nancy Fitzgerold, Susan Warren. 
Fourth row — Audrey Pinkham, Krista Gillum, 
Mary Glenn Mutter, Becky Shifter, Beth Keen, 
Barbara Jingo, Koren Mitchell, Missie Murdock, 
Susan Arnot, Pom Warner, Ann Makowski, Valerie 
Macko, Liz Rothberg. Fifth row — Linda Davis, 
Vickie Tuason, Julie Seawell, Jane McDormon, 
Lynn Nesbitt. 



PHI MU 195 



Phi Tou's post-lecture reception gives Detective 
Dave Toma the chance to talk with students 
personally about law enforcement. 



Left to right: Front row — Jim Lewis, Joel Berliner, 
Jeff King, Craig Shaffer, Ralph English, Bob Millea, 
Poul Cahill, Doug Jones, Kevin Holmes. Second 
row — Frank Bollinger, Wayne Mitchell, Steve 
Huebner, Mark Colley, Debbie Harsh, Neal Hurley, 
John Underbill, Larry Kunz, Dave Oxenford, 
Robbie Fauber, Rob Stewart, Bill Mottox. 





on Civ/ic Service 



196 PHI KAPPA TAU 



("^ "high level of brother enthusiasm" 
/^•helped the Phi Kcppa Tcus direct 
themselves toward new goals for their 
fraternity, noted President Jeff King. 
Increasing alumni participation and 
working to become more closely 
involved with the campus community 
kept the Phi Taus active this year. 

Beginning with a "fantastically 
successful" freshman women's 
reception, the members continued their 
social year with the usual open parties 
and beach weekend. In accordance with 
chapter tradition, spring brought their 
annual Jamaica Party. 

Phi Taus demonstrated their 
commitment to the community when 
they sponsored a lecture by the famed 
David Toma in November, after which 
they gave the public a chance to speak 



with him on a personal basis at a 
reception held in the lobby of their 
house. Led by station manager Dave 
Oxenford, brothers involved themselves 
with WCWM, as well as participation in 
the Queen's Guard. 

The Alpha Theta Chapter was 
established at William and Mary in 1926 
by 28 men. Although chapter size has 
varied through the years, the current 
members have expressed a desire to 
keep their membership at a moderate 
level to foster a stronger, more tightly 
knit brotherhood. To get more of the 
older brothers concerned with the 
fraternity. Phi Taus launched a new 
alumni contest. Their efforts were 
rewarded by a well attended alumni 
reception at Homecoming. 







Bid acceptance day finds Stork Jett welcomed int 
Phi Tau by President Jeff King. 







A water fight is fun even if you are wearing 
glasses decides Doug Jones. 

Pledge meetings are instructive for Steve Jones and 
Frank Kebler. 




ng foosboll |s (ji foyorille ^it$;N^al Hurley 

' i I 




PHI KAPPA TAU 197 



Left to right: Front row — Tom Gov, Steve Gu^, 
Bob Thompson, Steve Mitchell, Note Adorns, 
Denis Coakiey, Croig Syrop, Ed Roehl, Dove 
Forrest Second row — Peter Birmingham, Chip 
Mann, Bob Benson, Chuck Williams, Kevin 
Greenon, Kevin Garlick, Russ Trovers, John Bornes, 



Paul Clements. Third row — Gene Grubbs, Bill 
Yates, Glenn Johnson, Andy Vonderhoof, Chris 
Jackson, Doug Lombert, Don Davis, Chip Perkins, 
Garry Killimon. Fourth row — Duffy Elliott, Billy 
VonBuren, Mork Williams, Steve Hendricks, John 
Mancini, J, Pat Baker, Stu Blaine, Tom Smith Fifth 



row — Colin Rust, Glenn Bromer, George Riegel, 
Tom Reddy, Dove McElhony, Rich Fruetermon, 
George Tsohakis, Morsholl Goodman, Butch 
Foulconer, Pot McClould, Front Hyre, Bill Barrett, 
Mike Weixel, Bob Teitlemon. 





Cycle Pushes On 




a> 





^^^e're very service oriented," 
tJ^ remarked Pika's PR man Chris 
Jackson, and to prove it the fraternity 
sponsored their third annual Pike Bike 
Marathon. The monetary proceeds from 
this project were donated to the 
Muscular Dystrophy Research 
Foundation while the participants 
themselves were rewarded with a dance 
at Lake Matoaka. 

Events were frequent and varied for 
the Pikos this year. The good times 
began with a freshman woman's 
reception and smokers in the foil. The 
fraternity was represented in all 
intramural sports and won second place 
in football. Brothers showed their spirit 
at Homecoming with an alumni 
reception, dance, and a "Flintstone" 
float proclaiming "Bedrock Pikos soy 
'Bam-bam the Wildcats."' Parents 
weekend brought Pikas parents to a wine 
and cheese party at the house; the next 
weekend put Indian fans on a bus to 



Norfolk for the Oyster Bowl. Brothers 
headed towards the great outdoors in 
February for a fraternity retreat at Lake 
Caroline, Virginia, in March for a picnic 
at Newport News Park and for a beach 
weekend at Nagshead at the end of the 
year. 

Partying Pikos kept their social life 
moving through the semesters. New 
Year's Eve sent the brothers to 
Richmond to celebrate President Tom 
Gay's birthday, and the customary 
Christmas and Sweetheart dances were 
held. And of course the traditional 
"gatoring" was the Pika trademark 
wherever they went. 

The Gamma chapter was founded at 
William and Mary in 1871. Every March 
first Pikas are dressed in suits and red 
carnations to commerate their Founder's 
Day. 

A gome of Thumper entertains brothers Dave 
McElhony, Steve Guy and Steve Hendericks. 





Dove Reddy delivers PKA's homecoming wish. 
John Barnes keeps his eye on the ball as brother 
Fronk Hyre goes up for the jump. 




Brothers clown at a keg party, before which big 
brothers were revealed to pledges. 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 199 



A changed sense of spirit is displayed by 
Homecoming poroders Jay Friedmon and Tom 

Johnston 




Left to right: Front row — David Pawel, Neil 
Hammerstrom, Rhett, Mork Borban. Second row — 
Doug Johnson, Bucky White, Bob Paronett, Buddy 
Warren, Jim Cameron, Steve Zereski, Chuck 
Shimer. Third row — Al Buchannan, Gary Harris, 
Mark Honley, Glen Martin, Lynn Roach, Joy 
Friedman. Fourth row — Rich Bryan, 
Bryan Rogers, Barry Wilhelm, Bill Moffet, George 



Duke, Frank Hayes. Fifth row — Steve Hall, Keith 
Byers, John Deusebio, Tom Johnston, Buddy Codd, 
Alan Goyle, David Soller. Sixth row — Steve 
Sheffield, John Moreheod, Mike Fox, Rick 
Vercellone, Dale Kriebel, Steve Winston, Stu 
Wenzel, Roger Elmore, Dean Cummings, Chip Lex, 
Jim Robertson. 



Pi Lams 




Pi Lam's card section flashes their idea of 
recreational activity. 



200 PI LAMBDA PHI 



^g i Lams once again proved 
tP^ themselves a leader in the 
intramural program as, for the first time 
in 29 years, the team rolled over their 
opponents to become All-College 
Football Champions. Further evidence of 
their intramural strength was 
demonstrated as they attempted to 
retain the William and Mary All Sports 
Trophy for the fourth consecutive year. 

Pinball wizards found a home at Pi 
Lam when the fraternity introduced the 
game on campus, an idea that was 
quickly picked up by other houses. The 
presence of the machines allowed the 
opportunity to hold a pinball smoker, but 
pinballs were exchanged for costumes 
when the brothers organized a 
Halloween smoker and a Wild West 
party. Novelty stayed in the minds of the 
party planners when they initi.oted two 
combination parties, one with Rika and 
one with Theta Delt, although there were 
also the usual wine and cheese party, 




Display 



Sweetheart dance, and beach weekend. 
Pi Lam party life got an extra boost with 
the formation of the P.F.B. keg club. The 
P.F.B. members bought kegs for football 
gomes, Friday nights, and any other 
occasion where they deemed 
free-flowing brew a necessity. 

Chartered in 1929, the Virginia Psi 
chapter has established several unique 
features, such as their custom of 
replacing applause with the snapping of 
fingers at meetings, and open 
end-of-semester groin parties, dubbed 
Blow-out. Traditional rivalry existed 
between pledges and brothers, with 
pledges usually getting the worst end of 
the deal. The pledges are subject to 
possible fates such as "executions," 
where they are secured to chairs and 
pummelled with water balloons. 



Beer and brotherhood ore offered to prospective 
pledges by Steve Holi ot a fall rush party. 



An aspiring pinball wizard, Frank Hayes tries to 
concentrate on his next shot. 




PI LAA/BDA PHI 201 





4< iftlT aintaining internal unity was 
jTlll the most important thing for 
me, " commented Nancy Long, Pi Phi 
President. Activities such as a 
Thanksgiving dinner at the house for all 
the sisters, a wine and cheese party for 
Pi Phis and their dates and various 
service projects pulled the Pi Phis 
together, in keeping with their theme of 
"striving to be ourselves, open to people 
and truly friends." 

Known from Greek sings for their 
spirit, the sisters directed their 
enthusiasm to raising funds for 
philanthropies and entertaining the 
geriatric patients at Eastern State 
Hospital. Trick-or-treating for UNICEF at 
Halloween the sisters earned eighty 
dollars, while Christmas saw each sister 
donating a dollar to charity. Instead of 
the usual gift-giving at their Christmas 
Party, Pi Phis each brought a gift for the 
geriatric patients at Eastern State, giving 
out the gifts and caroling the following 
night. A philanthropic idea unique to Pi 
Phi, the annual Aerocraft sale brought 
$125. The handcrafts sold at the fair 
were made by people in the Appalachian 



area of Tennessee, to whom the 
proceeds were returned. Also traditional 
to Pi Phi was the Easter Egg hunt for the 
children in Williamsburg, held in the 
Sunken Garden. 

Party time at Pi Phi started in 
September with a cocktail party for 
informal rush. A Homecoming reception 
for alumnae and the wine and cheese 
party highlighted October, while 
November featured a keg party with the 
Rugby Team and Sigma Pi, the 
Monmouth Duo dance with Kappa 
Kappa Gamma and annual 
Thanksgiving Dinner, with December 
reserved for a festive Christmas party at 
the house. The spring semester included 
keg parties and a spring Pledge dance, 
with a Mother-Daughter Banquet in May. 

The Virginia Gamma chapter 
celebrated its fiftieth anniversary this 
year. The fourth national sororoity to be 
established on campus. Pi Phi's House 
was originally on Duke of Gloucester 
street, next to the Bruton Parish 
Fellowship Hall. Growing from 
membership of seventeen, the fall 
membership for 1975 was sixty-nine. 



High 




Wirii a friendly smile Noncy Long talks with a 

freshman at a fall rush party. 

Capfuring second place in the Derby Day chugging 

contest, a jubilant Marsha Foison tops the 

pyromid. 




202 PI BETA PHI 



lfc...mv-5 




Smiling broadly Harriet Love and Mary Phillips 
welcome rushees to the Pi Phi house. 
Seniors Sue Honna, Nancy Wonneii and Marsha 
Faison enjoy the dacquiri party as much as the 
pledges for whom it was scheduled. 





Left to right; Front row — Harriet Love, Pom 
Cutler, Debbie Kelley, Marsha Faison, Sue Hanna, 
Beth Sanders, Micky Kensey, Sandy Jeter, Donna 
Smith, Mortho Frechette, Melissa Locke, Michelle 
DuPriest. Second row — Roe Ann Lindberg, Pat 
Shell, Missy Hanretty, Nancy Cavagnaro, Soroh 
Lewis, Clo Phillips, Sarah McCray, Penny Sander, 
Lisso Gosparoli, Bonnie France, Chris McFadden, 
Debbie Schumacher, Lon Griffin, Melissa Dozier. 
Third row — Vonesso Popo, Nancy Wonnel, Cathy 
Howard, Karen Totem, Chris Powers, Jan Pegram, 
Karen Maples, Suson Gray, Aido Fernandez, Poige 



Eversole, Lynn McMichoel, Debbie Thompson, 
Susie Forbes, Sue Foster Fourth row — Emily 
Hunsicker, Suzanne Mahoney, Potty DeRoso, Fran 
Farmer, Debbie Stonley, Molli Dovies, Liz Gessner. 
Fifth row — Sara Bane, Ann Monroe Swoim, Linda 
Mahon, Nancy Long, Robin Womsley, Morty 
Murphy. Sixth row — Robin Marshall, Nancy 
Phillips, Cindy Shaver, Marion Cody. Seventh row 
— Julie Hoyden, Cheryl Bornett, Carol Wells, 
Frances Day. Eight row — Marty Smith, AAorie 
Jocobson, Lou Wompler. 



PI BETA PHI 203 



A pinball mochine at the SAE house provides o 
study break for Borden Austin. 



Left to right; Front row — Jan Koper, Steve 
Douglas, Tom Hooker, Rich Hoisington, Joe 
Hooks, John Benson Second row — Benji Cato, 
Liso Trotter, "Som" Guthrie, Mark Feit, Mork 
Graber, Evan Johnson, Bruce Luongo, Rik Hanley- 
Third row — Jeff Goodrich, Richord Zultner, Rick 
McKay, Dove Merkel, Rick Walket, John Duer, 
Tom Gloncey. 



?iStock 




llomecomJng Parade gives MarlJFeit and Tom 
^r_a chance to get involved with the 





u. 



204 SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 



*<'^^^e still strive to create a 


the donation of one night a week by 


Ui' social organization stressing 


brothers to the Escort service. 


brotherhood," SAE president Tom 


Circle K was another of those 


Hooker declared. Many disciplines 


who benefitted from the fraternity's 


of life were persued by the members 


new attitude when they received the 


of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, with inter- 


profits from the SAE-sponsored 


ests ranging from motorcycles to 


"Glass Moon" concert. Other soc- 


karate-" diversity with a common 


ial events included the freshman 


goal," according to Hooker. 


women's reception, smokers, and the 


Through complete structural re- 


yearly Shipwreck Party, an init- 


organization, the brothers aimed 


iation preparation for the pledges. 


toward insuring a firm foundation 


One of the year's highlights was 


for their fraternity in the future. 


the First Annual Paddy Murphy Party, 


This year SAE mode a positive effort 


a celebration with overtones of an 


to come out of the reticency which 


Irish wake which is a national 


they had been in for the post few 


SAE tradition. 


years. Involvement in various 


SAE was founded at William and 


college activities as a fraternity 


Mary in 1857, only one year after 


was a port of their "coming out" 


its first notional chapter was 


campaign, although their efforts were 


established. The local chapter. 


limited by heavy study loads. A 


Virginia Kappa, is the sixth oldest 


notable example of this new attitude 


member of the largest notional frat- 


of participation could be found in 


ernity in the country. 



On the 7-1 1p.m. shift for Escort, Richard Zeltner 
and Bruce Luongo stand ready with walkie talkies 






During the eorly hours of Escort Joe Hooks con 

tind time to study. 

Motorcycles toke the place os moscofs for SAE. 

Mark Feit's Kowosaki is of porticulor interest to the 

brothers. 



SIGAAA ALPHA EPSILON 205 




"Just one more glass," says Glenn Willsey to an 

ocquiecent freshman at the Sigma Chi Champagne 

Reception 

Derbied Sigma Chis confer with officials at their 

third annual Derby Day. 





-S\,j>" 



206 SIGMA CHI 



.igma Chi's Zeta Upsilon chapter 
'was the youngest housed frater- 
nity on campus, having only been estab- 
lished in 1968. Diversity has remained 
a hallmark of the fraternity as the 
Chis have grown to become one of the 
largest fraternities on campus. 
Derby Day was initiated in 1974 to 
increase inter-greek relations as 
well as to raise money for the Sigma 
Chi national charity, Wallace Village. 
Brothers have high hopes for con- 
tinuing this successful program each 
year to provide the entertainment for 



spectators as well as participants. 
This year Derby Day grossed about 
$700, and the huge quantities of mud 
added an extra dimension to the 
festivities. 

Another traditional event to 
kick-off the Sigma Chi social scene 
in the fall was the invitational 
champagne reception for freshman 
women. It was followed by two wine 
and cheese parties on Parent's 
Weekend, one of the largest alumni 
receptions in years, a Hobo party, 
the Sweetheart Dance, Beach Weekend 



in the Spring, and many informal 
parties. Hard work paid off when 
the brothers took first place in 
the Homecoming parade with their 
"After the Cat" float. 

Improvements to the fraternity 
included the hiring of a cook to 
feed the forty member dinner club 
and the installation of disco 
lighting in their party room. Rush 
was supplemented with two sight and 
sound slide shows describing life 
at Sigma Chi. 



Not Getting Older-Getting 




03 

(0 



(O 




Left to right: Front row — Andy Saueracker, Rich 
Chambers, Wolter Diehl, Forrest Gander, Rob 
Billingsley, John Walk, Croig Weimon, Dave 
Batlan, Larry McEnerny, Steve Fomo, Roger 
Donier. Second row — Marshall Martin, Dean 
Strickland, Larry Luck, Lance Leffler, Scott 
Meardon, Stu Burnett, Gory Choates, Mitch 
Rothstein, Jeff Mayer Third row — Ken McClure, 
Sonny Walters, Charles Eubank, James Crafton, 
Ron Riggins, Jeff Armstrong, Rich Layne, Lenden 
Eokin, Gory Drewery, Chris Thomas, Brady 
Earnhart, Mike Barnes, Mike Perrow, Joe Easley, 
Mike Tang. 



Sigmo Chi shakes proudly present their kidnap 
victim Scott Devries, whom they captured walking 
back from the cofeterio on the last night of rush. 



SIGMA CHI 207 




Dancing is a favorite with Lou Biondi at o Sigmo Nu party. 
IFC rep Mike Davis waits in Room C for rushees to sign 
bids for Sigma Nu. 



*f^^^ e are looking for the kind 

UW of person that will benefit from 
their association with us, is will- 
ing to commit themselves, and shares 
the ideals of the fraternity," stated 
Bruce Hathorne in explaining Sigma 
Nu's goals of growth and reconstruc- 
tion. 

Starting off the year with a 
total membership of only seven, the 
fraternity exploded into action with 
a successful rush that quadrupled 
their size. Smokers, held for con- 
venience in the basement of the Asia 
House, pleased the members with their 
profitably large turnouts. Plans 
to publish a Greek directory contain- 
ing the names and addresses of all 
Greeks were formulated so that they 
could be effected beginning next 
year; brothers displayed an interest 
in turning this money-making project 
into an annual publication. 

The history of Sigma Nu has been 
colorful but turbulent. Established 
on the William and Mary campus in 
1922, the Epsilon Iota chapter lost 
its notional charter in 1949. The 
chapter reorganized as a local frat- 
ernity, Sigma Rho, while they waited 
to regain their standing at the Col- 



Sigma Nu 




208 SIGAAA NU 



lege, which they did three years 
later. In past decades, Sigma Nus 
have kept the campus on its toes 
with antics such as their infamous 
bulldozer kidnapping and the hanging 
of a Confederate flag from a crane 
high above the uncompleted William 
and Mary Hall. The brothers lost 
their House in 1973 due to finan- 
cial difficulties but held onto their 
charter, which made possible a re- 
vival of the chapter in 1974. This 
year Sigma Nu National paid off the 
fraternity's debt to the College, en- 
abling them to concentrate on pro- 
curing housing for their 
members. The twenty-six-member 
pledge class greatly enhanced the 
struggling fraternity's chances to 
succeed in their reestablishment 
efforts. 



Left to right; Front row — Scotty Goodrich, 
Dudley Johnson, Mike Moore, Bruno Schmoihofer, 
Bruce Hothorne, Don Dicl<,en5on, Peggy Moler, 
Second row — Andy Banks, Keith Baklarz, Bill 
Leonard. Third row — Scotty Hays, Lou Biondi, 
Gory Meenon, Bill Melrose, Tommy Butler, Howard 
Cook, Ed Yergalonis- Fourth row — Scott Takone, 
John Grant, Mark Broun, Jimmy Ryan, Fred 
Lindstrom, Terry Havelka, Pete Griffin, Steve 
Sullivan, Evan Lewis, Paul Reilley, Mike Davis, Jeff 
Bowser. 




Back in Force 





At a Sigma Nu party Scott Hays listens with rapt 

attention about fraternity life. 

Assigning pledge lessons means extra reading for 

brother Steve Sullivan 



SIGMA NU 209 



Pool offers a welcome break from studies 
for Hulon Willis. 

Hopes for o Sigma Pi touchdown by George 
Colemon are thwarted by Drexel George. 




\ » ~ 





€0 

Q. 
UJ 

o5 



Sports and Spirits 



210 SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



^phis was the year to bring it 
Stl' together for the Sig Eps. The 
brothers concentrated on uniting the 
members while preserving the diversity 
that has in the past been a strength of 
the fraternity. 

Established in 1904, the Virginia Delta 
chapter has had to overcome temporary 
setbacks in their history, such as their 
removal from William and Mary in 1938 
after brothers embarked on a raid whose 
mission was to steal a train to 
Richmond. In the 1950's, they 
reappeared on campus as the Regis Club 
and have made a strong comeback since 
their rechartering in 1961. Shortly after 
reinstatement, alumnus J.E. Zollinger set 
up the activity calendar sale that has 
become an annual money-raising 
function for their scholarship fund. 

The Sig Eps have been known to 
"occasionally" indulge in a party; their 
wine and cheese social, Christmas 
celebration, Sweetheart dance, Spring 



luau, and several band parties 
highlighted the year. Piling up the 
aluminum cans has become a tradition 
at the house, and the game-loving 
brothers have continued to enjoy the 
benefits of their Miller mania. Sig Eps 
avoided discrimination against larger 
cans, though; kegs made their 
appearance at open parties, all football 
games, and rush functions. 

The party scene was just a part of the 
life at Sig Ep. Their Homecoming float 
featuring "Alice in Wonderland" won 
third place in the parade, and a 
successful Homecoming reception 
improved alumni relations. Led by Drexel 
George, the intramural football team 
once again made a strong showing and 
hopes ran high for powerful teams in the 
other intramural sports. Brothers devoted 
time to the community as they 
sponsored an afternoon of roller skating 
with Circle K. 




A high scorer for Sig Ep, Tom Goyle dribbles past 
Pike's Kevin Greenon to put in two of the twelve 
points he scored during the gome. 
His eye on the corner pocket, Sam Lowe practices 
for on upcoming pool competition. 





Left to right: Front row — Jon Mueller, Dave 
Clork, Glenn Hoyes, Bill Craig, Lee Rettig, Brian 
Torre, Bruce Gilpin Second row — Greg Smith, 
Sam Lowe, Mike Martin, Dove Boor, John Haas, 
Bob Ott, Eric Wilson, Steve Nelson Third row — 
Bob Walker, Jeff Davis, Kevin O'Brien, Matt 
Luoma, Bruce Silverman, Eric Pelonder Fourth row 
— Ronnie Briggs, Paul Abbott, Mark Roush, John 
Schmidtdke, Bill Down, Dave Brosman, Steve 
Burton, Tom Gayle. 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 211 





Left to right: Front row — Greg Anderson, Bill 
Lunger, Ricky Scruggs, Kevin Tunick, Joe Carlton, 
Dovid Pierce. Second row — Sigma Pi Pig, Bill 
Ranken, Calvin Tiller, John Blankenship, Alan Pyle, 
Dennis Liberson, Walter Hogan. Third row — Lee 
Grant, Fred Gampke, Grady Wann, Larry Skolnik, 



George Coleman, Bill Daniel, Duke VolL Fourth 
row — Jimmy Rutledge, Mike Lazar, Steve 
Modofferi, Bruce Means. Fifth row — Scott 
Benefield, Steve Rose, Farley Shinner, Tom Conine, 
Frank Degnan, Randy Blow, Edward Bromfield, 
Mark Thorpe. 



212 SIGMA PI 



.pontaneaous fun was the rule at 
'Sigma Pi this year. The all- 
night pinball tournoments and bridge 
marathons were examples of the good 
times enjoyed by the brothers, as 
they worked and fraternized as a group. 

Sigma Pi's activities began with 
a very successful alumni turnout for 
Homecoming. Other social events in- 
cluded parties with sororities, a 
spaghetti dinner provided by Sweet- 
heart Ann Neal, Beach Weekend, and a 
Fun-A-Thon at the home of an alumnus 
on the Chickahominy River. A Friday 
trip to Mary Washington proved to be 
of interest to the brothers, as was 
the nine keg beer bust after pledging. 
Sigma Pi did their shore to keep the 
beer manufacturers in business; not 
only did they come in second in the 
Miller contest, but they habitually 
consumed four kegs a weekend after 
the movies and basketball games. 

Brothers did more than socialize 
during the year; Eastern State gift 
recipients and donations to the Cancer 
Fund would attest to their ability to 
take life seriously as well. Alumni 
assistance made possible the redeco- 
ration of the house, with new furni- 
ture appearing in the living and 
dining rooms. Booking at Sigma Pi 
was given a boost by the "Pibrary," 
a study area that existed in the 
basement during the week. 

Founded in 1931, the history of 
the Alpha Eta chapter contains several 
interesting stories. One concerns 



all-night simulated battles at James- 
town that were rumored to have hap- 
pened in the 1950's; another tells 
about the car that five years ago a 
brother drove off the cliff in bock 
of the Sigma Pi house. The car is 
still there, and confining foilage 
have mode it a permanent part of the 
environment. 



Bridge marathons start at 1 1:00 p.m. at Sigmo Pi, 
continuing to all hours. 



Pibrary 
Parties 






During the week the downstairs party room 
becomes the "pibrary," a ten-mon study orea, os 
Bill Lunger ond Alan Pyle demonstrote. 
Brother Frank Degnen discusses the ort of 

pinball with Eddie Eddins. 



SIGMA PI 213 



All thot is missing is Miss Muffet when Theta 

Delts park their spider before the Homecoming 

parade. 

Tosty meals reward members who choose the 

house's supper club over cafeteria fare. 





I \\-iCfcim?^|^Bi;j^^_(| ■ 




Left to right: Foreground — Bruce Bender. Front 
row — Bob Corso, Geoff Gregory, Don Torin, Jim 
Herbert, Roy Jacobs, Paul Lagorenne, Dave Noss, 
Tom Russo. Second row — Joy Friedrich, Jerry 



Fitzpatrick, Tad Minkler, Wayne Humphreys, John 
Cooper, Don Nizoiek, Bruce Conger, Gary Gorbsky, 
Glenn Gundersen, Ray Dyer, Jeff Phinisey, Roger 
Crook, Scott Satterfield, Rick Wineland, Tim 



Melester, Jack Phillips. Third row — Mark Healy, 
Charlie Hensel, Steve Smith, Fourth row — Rob 
Roberts, Marty Leclerc, Bill Crane, Shane Smith, 
Rob Sedgwick, Bruce Lovelace, Rob Galloway. 



214 THETA DELTA CHI 




Tense moments at an intramural game bring 
anxiety to the faces of John Cooper and Tom 
Russo. 

^tr' o be a Theta Delt this year was to 
yiy live the good life. Under President 
Rob Roberts the social calendar stayed 
full and the brothers stayed busy. With a 
newly refurbished living room, the rebirth 
of the meal program and the added 
diversions of ping-pong and pinball, the 
house became a home. 

The brothers ordered kegs for almost 
any occasion, from soccer games to 
smokers. The traditional parties proved 
most popular: groin punch at o "Harry 
Buffalo" celebration, a costume party at 
Halloween, brotherly gift-giving at the 
Christmas party, and the Friday night 
keg parties called "Schlitz with Fritz" 
after a brother in the house. A Wild West 
party and a Tequila Sunrise reception for 
the Freshman women brought diversity 
to the Theta Delt weekends. 

Living in Theta Delt meant living 
amidst pre-med students and 
economists, soccer players, a swimmer 
or two and a surprising number of Phi 
Beta Kappas, but as usual the Theta 
Delts were a well-rounded group. 

Theta Delta Chi is the oldest notional 
fraternity, and the Epsilon Charge, 
founded in 1853, was the first social 
fraternity on the William and Mary 
campus. Theta Delt's long history at the 
school includes several proud decades in 
what is now Richmond Road's Sussex 
House as well as the less luxurious days 
in the lodges. 




Theta Delts Live 
the Good Life 




Another of the mony Theta Delt tolents is 
displayed when brothers point eoch other as well 
as their signs. 



THETA DELTA CHI 215 



'^^^e are primarily a public ser- 
RP^vice organization; our social 
functions are geared in a public ser- 
vice manner," explained Christy Harris, 
President of Delta Sigma Theta. A so- 
rority recognized on campus in the 
spring semester, the Deltas initiated 
February seventh. Programs in the 
planning included "Jobberwock," a talent 
show involving the community and a 
tradition among the Deltas, a tutorial 
program and money raisers to help fund 
their civic services. Their main ob- 
jective was to write a constitution 
and bylaws, and to establish themselves 
solidly as on organization on campus. 

Michelle Whitehurst brought the 
idea of forming a Delta chapter to the 
campus last year after attending a 
regional conference and becoming a 
member. After talking with girls on 
campus, Michelle set the wheels in 
gear to gain acceptance from the col- 
lege, which was continued by Debbie 
Locke in the fall of 1975. In Feb- 
ruary the nine charter members of 
the Mu Upsilon chapter initiated were 
Christy Harris, Debbie Locke, Bonita 
Saunders, Renee Thurston, Dorlene 
Ford, Peggy Jones, Marilyn Vaughn, 
Gloria Key and Debbie Parker. 

Delta is an international organi- 
zation which operates on a five point 
program of economic development, edu- 
cational development, community and 
international involvment, urban and 
housing development and mental health. 
The Mu Upsilon chapter will choose one 
or more of these points from which to 
develop their program on campus. 



Once the business port of the meeting is over, 
Deltas can enjoy being with each other. 



I 
I 




Rrm Foundations 




^^^ith the goals of service, scholar- 
uJm/ ship and "the union of all men in 
brotherhood," Alpha Phi Alpha became 
the first predominately black Greek 
letter organization at William and Mary 
in the spring of 1975, and was recog- 
nized on campus in 1976. The forma- 
tion of the chapter culminated work 
which began in 1972 when four students, 
Reggie Moore, Nelson Amis, James Low- 
son, and Willie Webb became interested 
in the organization. Before becoming 
brothers, the members were sphinxmen, 
and wore the sphinx, which symbolized 
the ideals of the fraternity. The 
eight charter members were T.E. Allmond, 
Willie Webb, Jerome Johnson, Ronald 
Smoot, Nathaniel Folorin, Adeyemo Olare- 
waju, William Jackson, and John Little. 
The fraternity sponsored a test for 
sickle cell anemia and an after home- 
coming dance breakfast. During block 
culture week they worked closely with 
the BSO in such functions as block 
shows, in which brothers presented rou- 
tines they hod choreographed them- 
selves. They planned to have a Black 
and Gold Ball in April, black and gold 
significant as their fraternity colors. 
Also in the planning stages was a tu- 
torial program at Lafayette High School. 
The main concern for the brothers this 
year, however, was to firmly establish 
Alpha Phi Alpha on campus. 



216 ISSUES 



« /JTIh ^ °'^^ ° unique organization," 
^fcl%t|, stated Nathaniel Folarin, Presi 
dent of International Circle. A 
club of sixty members, they have ac- 
complished much in 1975-76 that was 
not possible when Folarin started re- 
vitalizing the program in 1973 with 
the help of Assistant Professor Gary 
Smith. 

With the help of Professor Zamora 
of the Anthropology Department, for- 
eign languages were taught to in- 
terested students and members of the 
community. Offered courses included 
Yoruba, Chinese, Korean, Phillipino, 
Portugese and Spanish, as well as 
English for immigrants in the area. 

Other activities included the 
pumpkin sale held at Halloween, which 
helped fund the club's activities; 
a Christmas dinner for the members, 
and an international dinner in the 
spring, to which students could pur- 
chase tickets. Controversial topics 
such as the conflict in Angola were 
discussed in the seminar series. 



Halloween pumpkin soles are high while Cindy 
Castle and Niji Calutola take their shift. 



Blending cultures 




Gourmet for o night, Nathaniel Folarin enjoys a 

dish at the International Dinner. 

Served buffet style, the dinner featured exotic 

dishes such as the key lime pie Dorlene Mock is 

cutting. 




INTERNATIONAL CIRCLE 2 1 7 



Highlighting on evening of the Black Culture 

Series, the Hampton Institute Players perform ' 

Grace." 

Conducting BSO meetings is port of Reggie 

Moore's responsibility as president. 



'Say 




L 





At o reception following Dr. Pouissont's lecture, 

Kim Portlock and Cynthia Taylor meditate on the 

professor's various points. 

Before joining fellow BSO members in a discussion 

of Dr. Pouissont's lecture, John Cittle samples the 

punch. 



218 BLACK STUDENT ORGANIZATION 




Black 

f^ssertion 



fn an attempt to further Black 
awareness at William and Mary, 
the Black Student Organization had 
implemented numerous activities 
which culminated with Block Culture 
Week. February 9-21, formally named 
Block Odyssey, became the extended 
replocement for Black Culture Week. 
Drawing groups such as the Hampton 
Institute Players and the VCU Gospel 
Chorus and speaker Dr. Ivan Pouissant, 
the BSO presented to the college 
community a diversified insight into 
Block culture. Since its origin in 
1969, the BSO has attempted to famil- 
iarize the faculty and student body 
with the block experience. 

Activities such as a Thanksgiv- 
ing service project with Circle K, 
participation in the intramural pro- 
gram, and building o homecoming float 
were sponsored by the organization. 
As one member noted, "The whole pur- 
pose of life is to assert yourself. 
We want to assert ourselves in every 
experience and in every port of life." 




After lecturing. Dr. Pouissont talked with students 
at a BSO reception given in his honor. 



BLACK STUDENT ORGANIZATION 219 



Hand in hand. Circle K tutor Ralph leads his pupil 
to the bus to go home. 




© 










(( 



^9 roviding services for the com- 
^p' munity" was more than just 



an overused phrose when referring to 
Circle K this year. William and 
Mary's chapter of Circle K con- 
centrated its efforts on helping lo- 
wer income groups throughout the 
James City County area. 

During the week, two programs 
kept members busy. The afternoon 
preschool program worked with three, 
four and five year olds in the Cir- 
cle K house and around campus. Piano 
playing and learning to cook were 
among the varied activities pro- 
vided along with the educational 
opportunities. 

Senior citizens were not for- 



ia one to one 




With arms stretched upward, Chris Young 

instructs his students on the art of diving in the 

pool, 

A piggy-back ride supplied by Dave Williams is an 

enjoyoble treat for his young friend. 




220 CIRCLE K 



gotten, as members provided compani- 
onship and aid. Entertainment in the 
form of get-togethers provided 
senior citizens with a chance to see 
lew faces, work on craft projects 
and enjoy a light meal. 

Weekends proved to be the most 
active time for the club. Concen- 
trating on one to one student-child 
relationships, the Saturday morning 
tutoring program focused on acti- 
vities with elementary aged children. 
In addition to the tutoring in aca- 
demic subjects, there were special 
programs for the older children. 
Swimming lessons taught in Blow Gym 
and Home Economics classes in cooking 
and sewing kept the children busy. 



Saturday afternoon recreation in- 
cluded crafts and field trips. 

Babar the King elephant was on 
addition to the William and Mary 
Homecoming parade. The Circle K bus 
was transformed with the help of the 
children. Another highlight for the 
year, the community Christmas show 
in Chickohominy, featured the chil- 
dren tutored by Circle K. 

Fund-raising was limited to 
ushering for athletic events and 
concerts and working in the regis- 
trar's office. The hard work of on 
enterprising group of students pro- 
vided the resources necessary for 
being true to the title "community 
service organization." 





Gazing intently Qt the paper, Debbie 
Dadenas corrects the math assignment. 
As pupil Koren erases the board, Leeso Scott 
prepares to continue her Saturday morning 
lesson. 



CIRCLE K 221 



Changing 
Offerings 



(^f fter receiving their charter 
^ in the Fall of 1974, the Colle- 
giate Civitans worked hard for an 
increased membership as well as of- 
fering a diversified program of ser- 
vice. Through such things as volun- 
teer work at Eastern State Hospital 
and clothing drives, the Civitans 
offered service projects not found in 
other service organizations. 

Even with the momentum from the 
year before, student participation 
seemed to be low for the first semes- 
ter of 1975-76. Activities did not 
falter though, as the Civitans con- 
tinued projects which would offer 
the widest range of service possible. 

One of the projects, which 



served a dual purpose by helping to 
raise funds, was ushering at home 
basketball gomes. Special occasions 
provided another avenue of service 
OS the Civitans held parties for un- 
derpriviledged children on holidays 
such as Halloween. The school year 
was filled with projects which kept 
members busy on a weekly basis. On 
campus projects included reading to 
blind students, while other projects 
included tutoring students at James 
Blair and counseling Juvenile delin- 
quents. With their new projects for 
the 1975-76 year, the Collegiate Civ- 
itans offered a viable alternative 
for people wishing to become involved 
in the service aspects of school. 



Interest night gives Civitans a chance to let 
entering freshmen know about the service 
opportunities offered. 

Ushering at home basketball game is one way in 
which Civitans raise money for their projects. 




222 COLLEGIATE CIVITANS 




For the eleventh straight year, the P.E. Majors' 

float lends an extra air of festivity to the 
Homecomong Parade. This year's "Captain" is 
Jerry Veracollo. 




Service First 



m 



Ihen someone heard the name 
P.E. Majors Club, they probably 
thought that it was typical of most 
clubs for majors. Such was not the 
case for the members of the P.E. 
Majors Club. As Department Chairman 
Howard Smith stated, "Over the last 
decade the student members have 
worked diligently to promote programs 
and to render services to the college 
community and local citizenry." 

There were several yearly events 
in which the Majors had become in- 



volved. Since 1965, they have en- 
tered their "boat float", with the 
names of each of the previous cap- 
tains, into the Homecoming Parade. 
Physical Education Night, which in 
the past had featured such groups as 
Marva Teens Gymnasts and the Phila- 
delphia Atoms Soccer Team, was an- 
other annual event for the Club. 
Other projects included various P.E. 
clinics as well as raising money for 
a summer high school athletic train- 
er's clinic. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS' CLUB 223 



Cold temperatures don't deter Bonita Saunders 
from playing o hard-fought game of tag. 



I- 



During the forty-five minute recreation 
period, kids enjoy bockyord playground 
equipment. 




224 WILLIAMSBURG AREA TUTORIAL SERVICE 



v:-.'^"^*. 






Jif o student ever wanted to work 
Jj with children, the Williamsburg 
Area Tutorial Service gave them the 
perfect opportunity. Thirteen four 
year olds were chosen by the Com- 
munity Action Agency to participate 
in the program run entirely by 
William and Mary Students. 

Three hours every Monday through 
Friday afternoon were reserved for 
teaching the children their alpha- 
bet, colors and shapes. But the 
major concern of the W.A.T.S. tutors 
was how each child functioned in a 



group with a great emphasis on 
sharing between the children. 

The afternoons were divided 
into various activities for the group. 
The first 15 minutes were spent sing- 
ing songs, the next 20 in special 
activities and 45 minutes in outside 
free play. The children learned early 
that school could be "fun." 



Enthusiasm for learning is one of WATS basic 
goals. 





3> 




cn 



WILLIAMSBURG AREA TUTORIAL SERVICE 225 





CO 






^ervice meant involvement of both 
'a student's time end emotion if 
done through many of the service or- 
ganizations; but there were many less 
demanding avenues for those interested. 

One of the projects most often 
offered to the students was a blood- 
mobile. Usually available 3 or 4 times 
a year, student participation was al- 
most always high. Christmas became 
a perfect time for student service as 
there were various cartons in which 
to donate food, old clothing and toys 
for needy families and Eastern State 
patients. 

In memory of a girl who died in 
the 1975 break-out, a memorial fund 
was established. Students who wished 
to help with the fund participated 
in a walk-a-thon or pledged money 
per mile for the length of the 8 mile 
walk. 

Still others volunteered their 
time by working with an Eastern State 
child or tutoring in an area school. 
Whatever each person had to offer, 
they could find a welcome recipient 
if they only looked. 



Hands 



Sale of valentines to President Graves helps Bryan 
Complex raise money for the Heart fund. 
Student blood donations help Red Cross 
accumulate a needed reserve. 




226 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE 




3nbitJibualsH 



INDIVIDUALS DIVIDER 227 



ifatijergofaiSatlon 



'^Ir' he list of William and Mary alumni 
Sii/ during its 283 years of existence 
read like a Who's Who in American 
History. It was no surprise for those 
familiar with the College to hear it 
termed the "Alma Mater of a Nation." 

During the revolutionary years, the 
College was budding with future 
politicians. At present, the College still 
has many leading politicians among its 
alumni, including the Governor and 
Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Among 
the many important figures who were 
associated with W&M during this 
nation's early years were 15 members of 
the Continental Congress, 4 signers of 
the Declaration of Independance and 4 
of the nation's earliest Presidents. John 
Marshall, who served as Chief Justice of 



the U.S. Supreme Court when judicial 
review was established, received his 
formal law background from George 
Wythe at the College. The list continues 
from Thomas Jefferson who was a 
student to George Washington who 
served as Chancellor. 

It is with these people that William 
and Mary began to establish its 
reputation as one of the leading colleges 
in the nation. The tradition continued as 
1976 gave the College a chance to 
honor the people who figured into its rich 
history. 



Among the many people who were ossocioted with 
the College during its early years were (clockwise 
from top): John Tyler, Thomas Jefferson, George 
Washington, James Madison and James Monroe. 



228 INDIVIDUALS DIVIDER 




ncnoEMic 




ACADEMICS SUBDIVIDER 229 



Live demonstrations help Dr. Sutlive explain the 
culture of certain civilizations. 



Outdoor clossrooms give students a more relaxed 
atmosphere in which to learn. 













/VNv" 



A new angle 
on acadeffliCcS 



CTI cgdemics in 1976 varied with dif- 
(V%ferent subject headings and pro- 
fessors, leaving last minute sche- 
dulers the dilemma of filling that 
open slot with a good course; such 
courses were often hard to find. Re- 
freshing and not as rare, was the pro- 
fessor who turned the dull, boring 
classes into lively sessions of 
learning. It was these professors 
who added to the memories of school 
days and who encouraged and stim- 
ulated student growth. Thomas Jef- 
ferson, in reflecting on his days 



at William and Mary, remembered best 
the classes of Dr. William Small, 
who was one of these miracle work- 
ing professors. 

This year the Colonial Echo has 
selected a few of the many qualified 
professors from all departments to 
interview and explain their feel- 
ings on many of the issues that con- 
front students in their academic 
life. These professors are but a 
sampling of the many who, in their 
careers at the College, have earned 
the name "teacher" 



230 ACADEMICS 



B; 



Sutlive, who headed the An- 
'thropology department, was a 
missionary in Sarook for eleven 
years prior to coming to the College 
in 1972. Recognizing the barriers 
of communicating the Old Testament 
to the Southeast Asian people, he re- 
turned to school to pursue his Mas- 
ters and Doctorate in- Anthropology. 
Sutlive cited the interrelation be- 
tween his new field and the minis- 
try: "Both are very interested in 
the human situation, in human values. 
Anthropology is very salient to the 
missionary endeavor." 

As far as academic concerns went. 




ment of a junior year of study in 
the Philippines, and hoped that the 
program would be launched in 1977. 

Mhile he was the chairman of the 
Anthropology Department at the 
University of the Philippines, Dr. Zamora 
was visited by the former head of 
Anthropology at William and Mary; Dr. 
Nathan Altshuler, who was setting up 
a series of personal contacts with 
anthropological specialists throughout 
the developing world. Communi- 
cation between the two de- 
partments continued 



He believed thot these contacts could 
be aided by William and Mary, which 
he felt to be "an ideal place for 
interdepartmental national and 
international contacts," serving as 



Primitive religion is the subject as Dr. 

Sutlive lectures 
in his 308 
class. 




As on Anthropology 307 class lets out. Or Mario 
Zamora is questioned by one of the students as to 
major point in his lecture. 



Sutlive felt that pressure at 
William and Mary had not increased, 
but rather had remained at a con- 
stant level. He believed that 
there had always been both extreme- 
ly grade conscious students and stu- 
dents who didn't worry too much a- 
bout grades. He approved of the re- 
turn of the "D" grade saying, "There 
are times when a good solid 'D' is 
needed to give exactly what it 
stands for: a minimal pass." 

Outside class, Sutlive was a 
member of the all-faculty Foreign 
Studies Committee, which inter- 
viewed students for Rhodes and 
Fulbright scholarships and reviewed 
various junior year abroad programs. 
Sutlive was working on the develop- 



and when Zamora was at the Eastern 
Montana College as a visiting profes- 
sor in 1972, he met Altshuler again 
at a meeting of te American Anthro- 
pological Association after which he 
was offered a position as a visiting 
professor at William and Mary. Asked 
to stay on in a regular position, 
Zamora happily accepted. 

Zamora enjoyed William and Mary 
for a variety of reasons, calling 
his colleagues some of the finest 
people he had ever worked with. He 
felt the atmosphere was "con- 
dusive to academic, scholarly, profes- 
sional exchange." After living many 
other places, he enjoyed the Southern 
politeness and said it was the typical 
Southern student, considerate, open, 
and helpful, who contributed greatly 
to the wholesome climate. The efforts 
started by Dr. Altshuler to develop 
anthropological contacts around the 
world were of great interest to Zamora. 



a headquarters. 

He has been doing research and 
was beginning work on a book dealing 
with the Philippines' history of 
cultural anthropology from 1900 to 
date. Though extensive field work in 
this area has been done, documentation 
has not been made concerning data 
in this area. 

Believing education to be a "full 
commitment to search for knowledge," 
he concentrated on a one to one rela- 
tionship with students. "There 
shouldn't be too many barriers be- 
tween students and faculty," commented 
Zamora, "and respect must be earned, 
not imposed." He felt teaching should 
be a full commitment and thot the 
educational process was one of contin- 
uing innovation. Grading at best was 
only an approximation of what the stu- 
dent deserved, he stressed, and the 
faculty should be ever attempting to 
get a brooder view of the student. 



Typical (Southern 




ANTHROPOLOGY 231 



B 



Arejou inhibits? 



r. Coursen taught at William and 
Mary for two reasons: it was an 
opportunity to work w'th "good under 
graduate student" and it also pro- 
vided the option to participate in 
"good, scholarly research . . . It's an 
in between arrangement." 

He summarized his philosophy on 
teaching in one short question: "What 
can I do to make my students relax?" 
He tried to accomplish this by 
establishing a good rapport 



gratifying working with students, 
especially freshmen." 

As for grading, he emphasized 
that it was more important to know 
how well you did, rather than how 
badly. He found a median point and 
graded from there. 

Dr. Coursen has 
published papers 



gid", and he used an elaborate grading 
iystem involving computers in order 
to equilibrate all factors. 

Dr. Vermeulen was a member of 
the College Library Committee and the 




Mndworking and other- | 

interests characterize Dr. Carl C 
" meulen as he puts the final 
''" a table base. 



with his stu- 
dents, whom he felt" 
should be free with me." He stressed 
that although there should be" 
a common level . . . some facsimile 
must remain between 
professor and student." A biology pro- 
fessor, Coursen saw the degree of his 
success measured by his students' per- 
formance and their willingness to work. 
He didn't view his job as 
strictly that, adding "I find it very 



dealing with cel- 
lular aging, and ex- 
perimented with fungi to help him de- 
termine various data. He also lectured 
to both academic and non-academic 
groups, with talks ranging from cel- 
lular aging to careers in biology. 

^^T s a professor Dr. Vermeulen tried 
ff^ to approach experimental science 
as one would approach real life. He 
used loosely structured labs for this 
reason, since "most advances in 
science are made by groups." 

"William and Mary students ore 
very grade conscious but if given the 
opportunity they will learn by them- 
selves." He saw the grading as "ri- 



Campus Environmental Committee. In 
the community he was very involved in 
land use planning, having just com- 
pleted a grant in this area. During the 
spring, he spoke before the joint 
sessions of the Virginia Academy of 
Science and the Junior Academy of Sci- 
ence. His biological research has 
often been coordinated with such 
schools as the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia and the University of Chicago 
Medical School. Although this re- 
search focused on such complex topics 
as the "molecular basis of bacterial 
infection of kidney tissue," Dr. Ver- 
meulen also found time for creativity. 
During the year he was writing a 
novel of two people stranded on a de- 
serted island in the twentieth century. 



232 BIOLOGY 



B.; 



ir. David Thompson has been a 
'.faculty member here for nine 
years. One reason he chose 
William and Mary was because he 
would hove time for research. Dr. 
Thompson has currently been involved 
in experimenting with organic com- 
pounds, where he used inorganic metal 
compounds to promote synthesis of the 



Thompson has acted as sponsor for the 
Christian Fellowship on campus. 

Sheppard Tyree taught at the 
'University of North Carolina 
for twenty years before he was 
convinced to come to Wi 
liam and Mary, where 
he taught 101-102 



and the special technological pro- 
gram pairs each trainee with a 
skilled laborer. After six 





Chromatograph readings take the attention of Dr 
David Thompson as he checks out a newly 
completed synthesized compound 



organic compounds. 

He believed that the College 
students were "good ones" and because 
of them "William and Mary has high 
quality teaching." Thompson empha- 
sized how much he had enjoyed his 
profession, and one course he par- 
ticularly liked teaching dealt with 
a Cultural Approach to Chemistry. 
This course was designed to give the 
non-science major a different, more 
practical view of the sciences, and 
in particular Chemistry. As for seeing 
his students outside of class, Dr. 



Chemistry 
and enjoyed 
working with small 
groups of students. He 
felt "the quality of the College stu- 
dents is the same as the upper fifty 
percent at North Carolina." He highly 
trusted his students and expected 
more from them, yet he believed 
that standards "hove lowered con- 
siderably since I was in school, and 
I hate to see it happen." 

Tyree has represented William 
and Mary in the Cancil Oakridge 
Association of Universities and has 
also served as chairman of this or- 
ganization, which consists of for- 
ty-three universities who super- 
vise a unique corporation in Oak- 
ridge, Tennessee. The corporation 
was designed to train people whom 
Society has labelled as "losers", 



Light reoding in- 
cludes "Silica and Me" as 
Dr, Sheppard Tyree persues his 
interests in metollic chemistry. 



months the workers 
ore usually employ- 
able, and "the success rote is ninety- 
eight-percent." 

From 1965 to 1966, Dr. Tyree 
worked for the United States Navy 
in metropolitan London, visiting 
science department all over Europe 
and the Middle East and comparing 
them with those in the states. For 
the past twenty years he has often 
been requested by other colleges 
and universities to review their 
chemistry departments, which he 
does on a volunteer basis. 

He has now begun research for 
NASA and hopes to identify the par- 
ticles in the exhaust from space 
shuttle booster rockets so they con 
be eliminated. Tyree has also been 
regular consultant for the Gilette 
Corporation; a job which he found 
helpful in keeping him in contact 
with the "real world". 



High 



quality teaching.... 



CHEMISTRY 233 




Classical Studies depart- 
ment and a desire 
to return to 
Virgin- 
ia. 



Attentative freshmen watch the screen, as Dr. 
Jones gives a slide presentation in Classical Studies 
201. 



'^tt' hey needed somebody who did 
Sk^ what I did when I needed at 
job." 

Although Dr. Linda Reilly first 
accepted a faculty position at the 
College for the above reason, she 
added, "In retrospect, however, I'd 
say that it's the right size to my 
mind, it's not too big and not too 
small." 

A member of the Classical 
Studies department, Dr. Reilly cited 
classical archeology as her special- 
ty, her interest stemming from a trip 
abroad during graduate school where 
she excavated ruins in Athens. 

She neither supported nor cam- 
paigned against the reinstatement of 
the D grade, explaining, "I never 
used it when we had it because I felt 
it was a non-grade — you didn't pass 
and you didn't fail, so I don't have 



any strong feeling whether it comes 
back or stays gone." 

Commenting on faculty-student 
relationships, she said that "William 
and Mary is still small enough for 
faculty members to get to know their 
students," and she also rated the a- 
cademic atmosphere at the College as 
"very strong." 

^f'he most attractive thing 
Vfcb about the college is the stu- 
dents," commented Dr. J. Word 
Jones, who chaired the Classical 
Studies department. "Other ele- 
ments have deteriorated from bod to 
worse, but the quality of the stu- 
dents has gone up. We've always 
had some good students, but now we 
have more. The number of not mere- 
ly intelligent, but diligent and 
conscientious students is rare and 
provides continuing inspiration." 
Jones cited several reasons for 
coming to the College; including 
administrative support behind the 




Preparing 

for her 250 Lit 

erature course, Dr Linda 

Reilly adjusts the lecturn 

Rating the professor-student 
rapport here as "unusually good" 
Dr. 

Jones added, "the relationship would 
be much better if there wasn't evalu- 
ation. He found that William and 
Mary students are "much more realis- 
tic about what they actually do a- 
chieve than elsewhere, where students 
all but attack professors physically." 

Dr. Jones taught the freshman 
colloquium on the buried cities of 
Pompeii and Herculaneum, and in the 
area of classical studies his spe- 
cialty was the Latin poet Virgil. A 
member of the Educational Policy 
Committee which dealt with the issue 
of the D grade. Dr. Jones was a firm 
advocate for its return. "I felt 
very strongly that the D grade should 
be reinstated." 



66 



In teaching...! can really 



234 CLASSICAL STUDIES 



econ professor Allen Sanderson 
thoroughly enjoyed his occupation 
OS a professor. "Most jobs ore quite 
boring. People take them because 
they provide income. If I weren't 
teaching I'd like to form or be a 
builder. I like to see some pro- 
ductive effort. In teaching, farming and 
building, I can see concrete re- 
sults." As for the College 
students, he remarked, 
I'd like to be 



to get students into grad school or 
jobs. That was done for me and I'd 
like to do it for others." He also 
added that "I'd like to see William 
and Mary students loosen up. They 
take things too seriously. The really 
good students don't. Too many stu- 
dents don't. Too many students can't 
look back and see the 
problem as a whole. They just want 
to write down one, two, three and 
put it on a test. They really don't 
see that econ is a science of the 
theory of choice." 

"Intellectuals don't see alter- 
native pressures and costs. Ath- 



letics is a prime example, com- 
mented Sanderson, who was 
involved on the College Wide Ath- 
letic Committee. "They rank tastes 
and soy people should prefer Mozart 
to football. I don't think they 
should decide. They decided that 
football is an inferior good without 
considering what it means to alumni, 
spectators and students. I look at 
sports economically. William and Mary 
Hall is a disaster but it is a sunk 
cost. We ought to upgrade basketball 
and bog football. William and Mary 
is too smell to afford football." 

Children are very important in the life of Econ 
professor Allen Sanderson, 




^3 rofes- 
tP' sor David 
Finifter of the Econ- 
omics Department liked 
William and Mary because "I get 
to teach pretty much what I want . 
I don't have to come out as a Chica 
go-type person or a radical type 
person, I can do what I want. 
There is lots of academic freedom." 
Besides the academic freedom, he 
cited the benefits of living in 
Williamsburg and the prestige of 
being at William and Mary. "One 
of the good things about this place 
is that you get to meet everybody," 



he added. 

"Econ seems to be a good way 
to get a job," he remarked. "If I 
did not teach, I could work for a 
firm OS o forecaster. I chose not 
to do that. I'm in the academic 
profession, able to tell fewer 
lies." However, Finifter asserted, 
"I appreciate the position of not 
having to take a stand. I can cri- 
ticize all sides without having to 
choose one." 



Finifter's current project 
was one dealing with urbanization. 
He has served as a member of the Stu- 
dent Aid and Placement Committee 
and has also participated on the 
Economics Department volleyball 
team, which has resulted in a 
"couple of twisted ankles." 

Continuing his interest in 
sports, he added, "I like sports 
but I'm not very good ... I like 
to play tennis but I'm terrible." 



see concrete results. 



99 



ECONOMICS 235 




have to 
Lhenicselves too thin 



can't make classes smaller." Outside 
of class, he has done research 

for a Hemingway book. 
"The students try 
hard," commented 
Donald- 
son, 




Wenska found time to devote to the 
Publications Council as well. 
One of two faculty represen- 
tatives, he aided 
the Council in 
business as 
well as 



Taking 

Time out from 

groding papers, Waltei 

P. Wenska looks up for a cameraman 



^t s a member of the faculty since 
)%%■ 1966, J. Scott Donaldson, profes- 
sor of English, has noticed many 
changes in students going to William 
and Mary. Over the years they hove 
become "more serious, more vocation- 
oily-oriented." Grades, jobs and grad- 
uate schools hove displaced the en- 
vironment, civil rights and sit-ins 
as major topics of importance. Stu- 
dents seem to have reacted against 
what wus happening on campus in 
previous years. Now they are "more 
oriented towards a career interest," 
noted Donaldson. 

In the English Department, he 
felt it was a mistake to go towards 
larger classes, saying he "wouldn't 
want classes bigger." As Donaldson 
put it, "Ideally I like small class- 
es and seminars, but economically we 



yet he 

added that "I 
don't think there is a 
great deal of pressure here." 
As for Williamsburg, he noted that "it's 
pleasant place and the weather's not 
too bod." William and Mary he described 
as "a good size" and hoped it didn't in- 
crease any more. 

^9lf down-to-earth assistant profes- 
/Cl' sor of English, Walt Wenska gave 
lectures that students found "animated, 
interesting and thought-provoking." 
He found completely understandable 
the pragmatist's attitude: "Melville 
may keep you from suicide, but he 
won't pay the rent," emphasizing the 
former opinion. 

An instructor of English 364, 




Always 

available for 

a conference, J. 

Scott Donaldson turns 
to greet a student, who has 
come to discuss a term pxiper. 



literary concerns. 

Wenska found students "bright and 
interesting," if a little "too pas- 
sive" in accepting on instructor's 
point of view. A familiar William 
and Mary student evaluator, he saw 
students as "too motivated to do well, 
too adept at learning how to ploy the 
game, how to get the best results 
with the least amount of original 
thinking." Agreeing with Whitman when 
he wrote: "He most honors my style who 
learns under it to destroy the 
teacher." Wenska respected the stu- 
dent's ability to learn, but wished 
for more independence of thinking. 



236 ENGLISH 



^^rofessor Henry E. Coleman of 

>|pthe Fine Arts department 

was familiar with the Col 

lege not only because 

he had taught 

there 





twelve 
years, but 
also completed 
his undergraduate 
work at William and Mary. 
After going to graduate 
school at the University of Iowa, 
Coleman taught at Lawrence College in 
Wisconsin for one year. He described 
Lawrence as a "small, excellent li- 
beral arts school" whose student bo- 
dy was "interested and intelligent. 
The students put all their efforts 
into making it an excellent under- 
graduate school." 

Coleman lost his position at 
Lawrence due to a merger with ano- 
ther school, and when he arrived at 
William and Mary he became the fourth 
member of the then small fine arts 
department. Although receiving his 
graduate degree in sculpture, 
Coleman taught art history and two 
dimensional work at the College, and 
these courses stimulated his own per- 
sonal interests in drawing and water 
color. As a result, he equally en- 
joyed the two and three dimensional 
aspects of art. 

Coleman found it difficult to 
compare the College with his own un- 
dergraduate experience because the 
school had grown so immensely. When 
asked if academic pressure had in- 
creased he responded, "I'm not real- 
ly sure. There was pressure when I 



was here as a student." He noted 
that there has been a tendency to 
place more importance on grades, but 
then, "now we have more people." 
He didn't really like the concept 
of five courses as an average work- 
ng load, for he felt that "students 
have to spread themselves too thin." 
He pointed out that studio art was 
very hard for some students because 
"it is developmental you can't cram." 

"I like our students and I en- 
joy working with them," Coleman com- 
mented, adding that the student-pro- 
fessor rapport here was good. Al- 
though feeling that the grading sys- 
tem at the College was fair, he want- 
ed to see the "D" reinstated: "A 
student's self-esteem is undermined 
when he receives what he feels is 
"only a C but what if he has a 
very good C-I-?" 

(^ Ithough Mrs. Patricia Winter 
^<^ teaches only part time at the 
College, she felt a strong sense of 
involvement with her students in 
Basic Design 1 12, an introductory 
Fine Arts course focusing on three- 
dimensional work. She remarked that 
"every year I am surprised at the 
number of students who discover they 
have creative potential," tor one 
aim of 1 12 is to "see the world and 
feel it in ways you never have be- 
fore." Mrs. Winter felt that 1 12 
was an interesting course to teach 
because it was not "cut and dried. 



An instructor of three-dimensional art, Mrs. 
Patricio Winter reviews the basics with o student. 



There are several major areas to 
experiment in." 

A William and Mary faculty mem- 
ber for four years, Mrs. Winter came 
to the College because her husband 
was a professor in the physics de- 
partment. She spent two long days 
a week in her three hour design 
classes, and then worked three full 
days in her studio at home, where 
she vacillated between two and three 
dimensional projects such as enamel- 
ing and working with copper. For 
her recently built home, she has cre- 
ated a free-standing fireplace of 
copper and also designed a front 
door with copper panelling. 

As far as William and Mary in 
general was concerned, "I don't 
think that it's the kind of school 
for everybody." She noted that the 
academic pressure tended to "erode 
creativity" because "many students 
are so busy they lack the time to 
pursue project that interests 
them in depth." When asked if the 
overall image of William and Mary 
students had changed over the years 
she responded, "I think that per- 
haps student were more liberal and 
politically involved a few years a- 
go." Echoing other faculty members' 
sentiments, she added "and grade con- 
sciousness has definitely increased." 



FINE ARTS 237 



and most of the equipment 

anytime, day or night." 

Students were 

given full 

partici- 



from North Carolina to Maryland, a 
three week trip to the Grand Canyon and 
Southern Rockies in the spring repre- 
sented a basic principle of Johnson's 
technique of teaching a tremendous 
outdoor laboratory. 

The student body was clas- 
sified by him as, "Good 
metal to begin with," 
and willing to 
work. 
As 




.temming from an interest in rocks 
'and minerals in grade school. 
Dr. Clements' choice of Geology as a 
field, and his specialization of Miner- 
alogy and Petrology seemed natural. 
He has enjoyed teaching, and liked 
the permanence of a teaching position. 
This enabled him to "have the best of 
two worlds, a permanent lab facility, 
coupled with the opportunity to go on 
field trips." 

Clements came to William and Mary 
because he "happened to be looking 
for a position when there was an 
opening here." He admitted that Wil- 
liamsburg was not exactly the best 
location for finding minerals, yet 
stressed, "the students and academic 
prestige that all of us find here are 
exceptional." The students that he 
dealt with here made it "very worth- 
while." Geology majors, Clement be- 
lieved, had done a good job and 
he has found it extremely satisfying to 
see the results, as to where they we'e 
five to ten years after graduating. 

Due to it's size and close 
faculty-student relations, Clement 
commented that, "We get a lot more 
done than most Geology Departments 
around the nation do, and we can allow 
the students access to all the labs. 



potion 

in deciding 

department policy 

and often came up with 

excellent proposals, 

Clement added. 

. r, Johnson has always enjoyed 
I the land. Though he entered 
college as a chemistry major, he soon 
found that what he really liked was 
Geology. His biggest choice come when 
he had to narrow his interests to one 
concentration. Paleontology 
proved to be the correct area, since 
it could encompass many aspects of 
Geology. After doing some practical 
geologic mapping of Indiana, the first 
in much of the state, he developed his 
other specialty, environmental geology. 

When asked what attracted him to 
Williamsburg, Johnson replied, "Let's 
face it, William and Mary has an in- 
credibly geologic situation. In 
Paleontology, we're sitting on a few 
million year old deposits." Marine 
animals, swamps, bays, marshes, and 
open ocean located nearby mode 
Williamsburg ideal for Paleontology. 
Field trips to varying geological areas 



Machines 

used in his study 

of Petrology require occa- 
sional check-ups from professor 
Stephen C Clement 



a professor, Johnson said this was 
excellent because you "Don't have to 
beat them to get them to work." How- 
ever, to his dismay, he stated that 
compared to a few years ago, apathy 
seemed once again on the rise. Freshman 
seminars, he believed were very re- 
warding, at least from his viewpoint, 
and he was really pleased with them. 
Teaching needed to go beyond aspects 
such as looking for job opportunities 
or to further his education, according 
to Johnson. His only cirticism was 
that now that Geology majors were be- 
coming so numerous, it became harder 
and harder to give the necessary time 
to each student. 



238 GEOLOGY 



J( nterested in interna 
/il tionai politics 
during his un- 
dergradu- 
ate 




New material to be used in his 201 course keeps 
George Grayson busy in his office one nice fall 
afternoon. 



Studies 
in Japan, Dr. 
Chonghan Kim felt 
that his interests 
were strengthened by the 
United States presence in the 
Orient during the late forties. Dr. 
Kim taught at Marquette University be- 
fore working with the South Korean in- 
volvement in the United Nations. A 
counselor at the South Korean mission 
to the U.N. in 1961, he then went to 
work in the South Korean Foreign ser- 
vice and as Charge D'Affairs, opened 
the South Korean Embassy in Uganda 
and fought Uganda's recognition 
to North Korea. In 1964, Dr. Kim came to 
the States, where he accepted a posi- 
tion with the government department 
at William and Mary. He now says of 
the College: "I like it tremendously, 
thoroughly ... I am one hundred percent 
pleased here . . . The students are dili- 
gent, intelligent, and very perceptive." 

Dr. Kim spent the 1968-1969 aca- 
demic year at the University of North 



.^ I 




Carolina, and comparing William and 
Mary students to those at UNC he said, 
"We have a very well behaved student 
body." He believed that the teaching 
caliber at the College was excellent, 
with very high standards, but admit- 
ted that because of its superior 
quality there were tougher grading 
standards here than at other schools. 
He commented that student complaints 
about the strict grading seemed to be 
relatively recent, adding that this 
was probably due to the increased 
grade consciousness. 



*9|P| r. George Grayson came to the 
j^ College in 1968 after teaching 
at Mary Washington; he wanted a larger 
school with a lighter work load, 
where he would hove more opportunities 
to do research. "I just sort of drew 
circles out from the DC. area and 
called schools. William and Mary had 
an opening, so I was hired." 
He described the College as a "school 
with o national reputation; it is a 



very fine University. The faculty 
here is stimulating, and we hove 
good students." 

A member of the Government de- 
partment, Grayson has always been 
concerned about "the uses and abuses 
of power." He feels that during the 
sixties public power was blatantly 
abused: "What was needed were new 
people with fresh ideas." He has al- 
ways urged participation in the 
system, and he ran twice for a seat 
in the House of Delegates, winning the 
election in 1973. Grayson found his 
experience as a delegate very helpful 
in the classroom: "I've acquired a 
different perspective on the role of 
interest groups, the legislative pro- 
cess, and the relationship between the 
legislative and executive bronches." 

Dr. Grayson graduated from Mar- 
shall-Wythe Law School at the end of 
the 1975-76 term. His interest in 
law school was sparked by his involve- 
ment with politics; it served "o defen- 
sive purpose, like Karate," protecting 
him against other lawyers and enabling 
him to learn their vocobulary. 



GOVERNMENT 239 



.pecializing in American intel- 
'lectual history, Dr. Thompson 
has published several articles and is 
currently writing a bock on the South- 
ern Baptists and their effect on 



dents and instruction, Thompson com- 
mented "I don't mean any offense to 
my alma mater, but I feel that 
William and Mary is superior to U.Va. 
in undergraduate education. William 



remarked that "it's a frustrating com- 
mittee." The committee has been purely 
advisory, and therefore "there's only 
so much we can do." Among the issues 
the committee has studied are the con- 



At o meeting of the Board of Student Affairs, 

Dr. James Thompson listens to a point being 
made concerning the early admission of 
scholarship athletes. 



In her American History class, 

Ms Cam Walker prepares 
to answer a 
students 
question. 




history as a religious group. He en- 
joys the intellectual aspect because 
"it brings so many disciplines into 
history — particularly religion, liter- 
ature, and philosophy." 

Thompson is active on both the 
Board of Student Affairs and the Ad- 
missions Committee. In his first year 
working on the BSA, he commented that 
"it's a hard working committee, and 
it's very worthwhile because it 
brings together students, faculty, 
and administrators." A member of the 
BSA graduate and academic affairs 
committees, he spoke in favor of re- 
instating the D grade: "When they 
took the "D" away, professors were 
left with this huge category." He 
spoke of the "vagueness and grayness" 
of the "C", and said that without the 
"D", "it's hard to draw the line be- 
tween passing and failing." Thompson 
is also in favor of the plus and 
minus system of grading: "this should 
definitely be on the transcripts." 

After working as a teaching as- 
sistant at U.Va. while in graduate 
school, Thompson came to the College 
on a one year temporary appointment; 
and this temporary appointment has 
extended into five years at W & M. 

In comparing the quality of stu- 




ond Mary is much tougher." 

Thompson believed that the stu- 
dent-teacher rapport here has been 
"very good from my experience in the 
History department." He emphasized 
that the College is "an ideal school" 
in regard to its size, for it is 
"large enough to offer a varied and 
solid curriculum and small enough to 
maintain a personal atmosphere." 

'/fr he male enrollment in Ms. Cam 
^U/ Walker's Women's History research 
seminar this year consisted of a 
single student, yet Ms. Walker de- 
scribed the course as a "fun and in- 
teresting experience." Ms. Walker 
has written an article for the 
Alumni Gazette on the events that in- 
fluenced the admission of women to 
the College. She has also been in- 
terested in Black History and has 
taught a course in this area. Her 
research has included a biography of a 
Union chaplain who was active with 
Black Americans during the Civil War 
and Reconstruction eras. 

As Chairman of the Affirmative 
Action Committee, dealing primarily 
with equal opportunity for women. 
Blacks, and other minority groups she 



trover- 

siol Title 

IX proposal and 

the question of 

whether College staff 

members should be able to take 

free courses at the College if they 

desired. Ms. Walker also served as a 

member of the experimental advising 

program for freshmen, where professors 

hoped to do less formal adivsing and 

more communicating with students. 

Ms. Walker taught for one year 
as a Woodrow Wilson intern at Knox- 
ville College before arriving at 
William and Mary, where she has been 
on the faculty for seven years. She 
was particularly attracted to the 
College because of its size: "I didn't 
want to teach in a big university." 

The student-teacher rapport at the 
College is "pretty good" but she has 
also observed that "students are be- 
coming too grade conscious — worrying 
obout the sacred average for law or 
med school." This increasing grade 
consciousness hindered students' aca- 
demic interests because "people may 
choose courses for their "A" potential 
or how many papers they require." 



240 HISTORY 



(?)tuclenU,tGD grade cDnscious? 



"S 



t seemed reasonable to go into 
math," commented Peter V. 
O'Neil, "as I found it very inter- 
esting and applicable to almost every 
field." O'Neil, chairman of the 
Mathematics Department, came to Wil- 
liam and Mary in 1967. If he could 
have the power to change things here 
he would first of all stress "stu- 
dent involvement." He would also like 
to see more independence on the part 
of the students, they should 

not hove to be led on by the 
faculty. Along with 
these emphasized 
areas, O'Neil 
would seek 

change 
in 



degree of flexibility should be 
open as an option for the students 
who desired it. Interesting programs 
which stimulated student response 
were incorporated into his classes. 

Outside of class O'Neil served 
on the Admission Policy Committee, 
and the ad hoc Summer School, Evening 
College and speakers program. He also 
was on the Graduate Committee of 
the College. 

r. Richard H. ProsI, a graduate 
of William and Mary, believed that 
good teaching was a serious concern 
n the process of evaluating progres- 
sive teaching. He stressed that we 
should not lose sight of a quality 
education. By serving on many depart- 




personal check on the fear of low- 
ering educational stondards to accomo- 
date good athletes. In addition to 
these committees, he served on the Col- 
lege Discipline Committee and the 
Foreign Studies Committee. 

"The students here remain a 
delight to teach, when you consider 
options. However, perhaps they become 
over-conscious of the ultimate impor- 
tance of grades," noted ProsI, 
adding, "They tend to be bright and 
success oriented, which makes them 
wonderful to teach." 

"I am sorry about the large sec- 
tions of calculus, as I would prefer 

A major portion of Richard Prosl's day is spent 
in his office, where he answers the questions of 
Calculus I 1 1 students. 



As his 
class begins 

copying the equation 
down, Dr. O'Neil steps back 
and indicates the implications 
of his answer. 




existing curriculum, attempting to do 
a great deal in the way of updating 
it and modernizing it. 

"The success of teaching is 
still in the instructor," added 
O'Neil, "this remains or even becomes 
more the case when the number of fa- 
culty remains the same while enroll- 
ment increases." He felt that some 



mental and college wide committees 
ProsI could keep this evaluation in 
mind. He served on the Departmental 
Personnel Committee which could keep 
track of what direction the depart- 
ment is going by reviewing prospect- 
ive personnel. At the college wide level 
membership on the Athletic Policy 
Committee allowed him to keep closer 



cases where the instructor could meet 
the students." However, the only so- 
lution he could see would be to hire 
more faculty, an answer that seems 
quite unlikely due to pressures 
being applied to keep expenses down. 
Believing Project Plus to be o val- 
uable program, ProsI would like very 
much to see it expanded. 



MATHEMATICS 241 



^9Jf n ROTC graduate himself, Captain 
/C% Gerard had enjoyed the program 
and was anxious to make it as enjoy- 
able for others as it had been for 
him. When the chance to take gradu- 
ate study in Government came along, 
followed by an ROTC teaching posi- 
tion, Gerard chose William and Mary. 
He liked the Virginia area and 
wanted a small liberal arts college. 
Believing that it offered a broad 
based education, Gerard thought the 
teaching experience in itself was 
broadening at a liberal arts college. 

Specializing in post-World War 
I Development, Gerard taught Ameri- 
can Military Development, from the 
Civil War to the present. This 



after their junior year. 

He expected his students to 
take courses to gain knowledge and 
to devote time to studying the 
course. By and large, Gerard said 
students he had taught here seemed 
to be very motivated to excel and 
learn what they could. He was also 
impressed by students who had been 
inquiring and taking courses which 
offered no credit, simply to in- 
crease their comprehension of the 
subject matter. 



M 



ojor Zeltner's first contact 
with William and Mary came as a 
grad student. After completion of 



ics as well as military organization 
structures. In conjunction with 
Men's Physical Education, Zeltner 
taught Orienteering. This course 
stressed map reading and land navi- 
gation, including running a timed 
course through woods around Lake 
Matoka, with a co-ed enrollment of 
about fifty. Commenting on the 
girls, Zeltner claimed, "They can 
compete in Orienterring as well as 
my mole students." In addition to 
his teaching duties, he is advisor 
to many cadet organizations includ- 
ing the flight program. Parachute 
Club, and the honorary Scabbard and 
Blade. 

Seeing William and Mary both as 





course 
was open to 
the entire col- 
lege community for credit. In addi- 
tion to this, Gerard taught Mountain- 
eering, Survival Training and Na- 
tional Security Program to co-ed 
classes of Freshman and Sophomore 
ROTC students. During the first two 
years of the ROTC program, basic 
skills were taught and anyone wish- 
ing to go on into advanced ROTC had 
to complete four semesters of these 
or attend a summer training camp 



Times and style 

along with 

endurance interest 

Richard Zeltner as 

he trains men for their program. 

his MBA, his next Army assignment 
was to serve on Rescue Component 
Duty, in which he requested ROTC. 
Of the 290 institutions offering 
ROTC, Zeltner was asked to rank his 
first six choices. Granted his top 
choice, he was allowed to stay on at 
William and Mary, this time as a 
member of the faculty in Military 
Science. 

In the department he taught 
advanced ROTC for juniors and sen- 
iors who have signed a contract to 
be commissioned as Second Lieuten- 
ants upon graduation. These advanced 
courses included leadership and eth- 



Recruiting students for the ROTC program, Copt. 
Williom Gerord tokes down a name for further 
reference. 



o Student and faculty member, Zelt- 
ner felt it was able to attract top 
quality students, and that the stu- 
dent-faculty rapport was "extreme- 
ly good." He liked the size and be- 
lieved it lent itself to good rela- 
tionships between the student and 
faculty. The grading here was hard, 
and he admitted, "Even students who 
received F's ore often potentially 
good academic students." Zeltner 
conceeded he would leave it with 
mixed emotions. On one hand saying 
the Williamsburg atmosphere was his 
type of life, while on the other 
hand there were things he wanted to 
do other places in the Army. 



Attendance , homework, 

and mannefcS 



242 MILITARY SCIENCE 



**i3jr f there's a stereotyped idea 

/<! of a professor, I think I've 
been able to get away from it, "com- 
mented Howard Fraser of the Modern 
Languages department. A professor 
of Spanish, this marl<ed Dr. Fraser's 
second year at the College, having 
previously taught at the University 
of Wisconsin. 

Fraser's impressions of William 
and Mary have been good ones. "Things 
are more easygoing — I feel more at 
ease here, more of a person, I can 
joke around. I do my work, it's not 
that I'm not teaching, but I'm doing 
other things as well . . . you advise, 
you teach — you're training and appre- 
ciating people at the same time." 



motivation. "If you like grades, 
you can get them; if you don't like 
grades, you shouldn't worry about it." 



jX 've been in this business for 



forty years now, so I know what 
I'm talking about." 

Alexander Kallos, who headed the 
German section at William and Mary, 
has been teaching at the College 
for twenty-seven years. 

"If a professor doesn't do more 
than read a book, then of course 
the student feels, "Why 
should I come to class?, 
and escapees ... I 
hove always come 
to class well- 



"I don't believe that the teach- 
er should be a wise-guy. It would 
be very easy to construct a test in 
such a way that everybody flunks . . . 
I believe in asking the optimum 
performance from the students, but 
then rewarding them with grades, and 
not the 
other 
way 




Derby Doy duties overcome Dr Alexonder Kallos 
OS he listens during the pre-game huddle. 



He was concerned, however, that 
the College was straining its small- 
school atmosphere in its attempts to 
compete in prestige with larger state 
universities. "Certain administra- 
tive rigidities and other things that 
seem to emulate the worst in large 
institutions con come right down here 
. . . There's a certain amount of unique- 
ness in a small school that's going 
to be lost if the school in general 
tries to emulate the large universi- 
ties, tries to be on a par, whatever 
that is. I seem to feel that's hap- 
pening very slowly." 

Fraser remarked that he did 
expect a lot from his students, be- 
lieving the academic standards im- 
posed by the College were good in 
that they stiumuloted students' wock. 
"There should be some competitiveness 
built into a course, something that 
gives a sense of energy or purpose — 
a sense of accomplishment." 

At the same time he felt that 
a professor shouldn't destroy his 
students with an impossible grad- 
ing system, or that grades needn't 
necessarily be a student's entire 



prepared," Kallos stated. He was con- 
stantly reading books and going 
to meetings so that "I am not only 
familiar with the subject matter, 
but I also contribute from a large 
background." 

In return for his preparations. 
Dr. Kallos expected his students to 
take his class seriously and to put 
out an earnest effort. Most of all, 
he was concerned with the develop- 
ment of the student as a human be- 
ing in society. 

"I have insisted on attendance. 
This is not "in", but I do believe 
that there is a correlation between 
attending class and doing well. The 
three things which I always insist on 
are: Number one, you must attend 
class . . . there is no compromise 
on that; secondly, you must do the 
homework, and thirdly, and perhaps 
most importantly, I always say that 
unless you leave William and Mary as 
a lady or a gentleman, you have wast- 
ed your time." He added that "William 
and Mary gives you a certain sheen 
OS a human being." 

Despite the high standards of 
work he demanded, Dr. Kallos said 
that he graded "on the easy side", 
and that he has drawn criticism from 
the administration for it. 



around ... to say, "I don't give a damn, 
and then give a lot of C's or F's." 

"I would say that my average 
grade is 'B', and I have no apologies 
for it and I have no intentions to 
change it. I've been in trouble with 
the College for that ever since I can 
remember." 

"They've been denying this ever 
since George Washington, you see . . . 
There is an unwritten thing that 
you've got to have lots and lots of 
C's ... a little dig here, a little 
dig there from the administration . . 
that's the way it works. Some peo- 
ple cave in because they're afraid. 
I am not caving in and I will not 
cave in." 

Dr. Kallos ended with good words 
for the students of the seventies 
OS a whole. 

"In the sixties, I was extreme- 
ly unhappy, "he reflected. "We had 
the Dean being held captive on the 
third floor to dissident students, 
the police were out with mace . . ., 
the library was burned ... It was 
incredible." 

"Your generation is so marve- 
lous. You're just as socially con- 
scious as the other generation, but 
you do it in a smart, practical way. 
. . it's no longer 'burn, baby, burn'." 



MODERN LANGUAGES 243 



B; 



Ir. Lendrim described himself as 
a person who "has always been in- 
terested in music." Musically in- 
clined since childhood, he began 
piano and organ lessons in elementary 
school and has sung in a choir since 
the third grade. With such a back- 
ground, he felt "it was natural to 
continue my studies in the field 
of music." 

He felt that he was actually 
more involved outside the classroom 
than inside, for he was director of 
both the College choir and the female 
chorus. Lendrim also directed the 
Botetourt Chamber Singers, composed 
of fourteen students who sang mad- 
rigals and other pieces suited to a 
small number of voices. 

Lendrim spoke favorably of 
William and Mary students and their 
dedication. "I'm impressed with the 
students here; they are serious about 
their studies, and they work hard 
with fairness and willingness." 



Basics in the theory of music are the 
specialty of Dr. Alan Stewart 
as he explains o new Gre- 
I Chant. 



W 



efore coming to William and Mary 
in 1944, Professor Alan Stewart 
taught in the public schools of New 
York state. When a position opened in 
music, Stewart applied and was accepted 
and has remained here over thirty 
years. This was due in port to the 
academic atmosphere and the setting in 
Williamsburg, which Stewart termed "a 
great place to bring up a family." 
The area also offered many fine play- 
ing opportunities such as the Penin- 
sula Orchestra and the Regency Trio, 
which he has performed in. The 
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's ed- 
ucational branch sponsored the Colon- 
ial Trio and the Governor's Palace 
Ensemble, which performed for tourists 
outfitted in costumes and wigs, and 
were also among the groups with 
which Stewart was associated. 

"Due to high admissions standards, 
the students here are of a very good 
quality," related Stewart. Over his 



years at William and Mary, the level 
of grade consciousness among students 
had, he felt, remained fairly constant. 
Stewart believed that there seemed to 
be a correlation between grades and 
comprehension of work. "If a student 
doesn't work, he won't get the grade, 
and if a student does work, his grade 
will reflect this," he noted, adding 
that "The pass-fail system some peo- 
ple have advocated, simply doesn't 
give you a good enough picture of the 
student's accomplishments." 

"An education is more than merely 
learning facts, and developing the 
ability to express oneself," according 
to Stewart, "It's most important ob- 
jective is to instill a sense of val- 
ues." He believed that though it 
should be the ultimate goal of educa- 
tion, developing a sense of values is 
often the most difficult objective to 
accomplish. 




nan leerning raci^ 



244 MUSIC 



|r. Frank MacDonald, Professor of 
'Philosophy, this year marked his 
last of teaching at the College. A 
graduate of William and Mary, he took 
a semester of philosophy during his 
senior year and after only two lec- 
tures, realized that he had finally 
found his major. Specializing in the 
history of philosophy, MacDonald de- 
scribed himself as "strictly a teach- 
ing professor" who did not worry 
about writing books or research. He 
has been associated with the College 
since the thirties, and because he 
always liked it, never seri- 
ously considered any other 
undergraduate school. 
MacDonald saw many 
students come and 
go during his 
years 
at 



was too much attention paid to 
grades. For MacDonald, an ideal 
grading system would consist of three 
grades: "unsatisfactory, satisfactory, 
and excellent." 

MacDonald was involved with the Disci- 
pline Committee, the Adademic Status 
Committee, and a faculty student com- 
mittee on the judicial review of the 
Honor Council. He found these re- 
warding, and felt that people were 
really concerned about campus issues. 



McLane used in his classes. 

Professor McLane gave up a teach- 
ing post at a Kansos college to come 
to William and Mary, which attracted 
him because of the opportunity to con- 
duct higher level courses without the 
pressure of a graduate school. He also 
like the size of the philosophy de- 
partment at the College, which provid- 
ed a great deal of stimulation be- 
tween faculty members. He saw the 
College as an ideal teaching environ- 





k ' William and 

^ ^^ Mary, comment- 

ing that "today 
students are generally 
smarter than they used to 
be and are of a superior group." 

He felt that, on the average, 
the philosophy department encouraged 
an informal student-professor atmo- 
sphere which established a good rap- 
port. As for the grading system, he 
believed that in courses such as philo- 
sophy it was difficult to estimate a 
letter grade, emphasizing that there 



Tjf thoroughly enjoy exploring ques- 
Jltions that people often ask." 

Henry E. McLane, an Associate 
Professor of Philosophy, was origi- 
nally interested in the field of reli- 
gion. His change to philosophy was 
the result of a suggestion made by 
his advisor while doing undergraduate 
work at George Washington University, 
where he was urged to take a few phil- 
osophy courses to supplement his 
understanding of religion. 

McLane's areas of specialization 
within the field of philosophy in- 
cluded existentialism and logic. He did 
not teach during the spring semester 
so that he could conduct research on 
logic with the aid of a grant he re- 
ceived. The William and Mary press 
published the set of logic notes which 



Fine points require research as Dr. Henry McLone 
looks up a braching diogrom tor a logics student. 



ment; there was a light teaching load 
which allowed time for research into 
specialized areas. 

He found the students to be of 
high ability, and thought it encourag- 
ing to see lots of philosophy in- 
terest, claiming that a "fair number 
of students pursue the subject matter 
after class." In regard to the 
grading system, he adjusted to the "D's' 
absence but felt it had put 
more pressure on the "C". 



PHILOSOPHY 245 



Plans for on upcoming swim meet keep Christina 
Jackson occupied during her free time. 




^ 


^. 


^ 


V ^' 


!>*."•. 


•4- 


J 


, 


«■ 


1 *»' 




^ 




ii' 


^ 


. ' m 




4 ■ 


• - • 


m 






— 


m 



m 






« 



^r'he big attraction to our staff 
Vt^is the diversity in widespread 



and varying interests, offered in the 
woman's program here," according to 
Mrs. Jackson. "Due to fairly good fa- 
cilities, more subjects are offered 
here than at most schools." Many of 
these programs, canoeing in parti- 
cular, were due in a large part to 
her efforts. She felt that the fact 
that they could offer classes through 
higher levels of skills development 
made teaching interesting. For 
instance, in the spring, she conducted 
Canoeing III, in which the class act- 
ually learned how to build their own 
boat. Mrs. Jackson added that the 
whole women's set up is less tradi- 
tional than the men's, which enables 
them to offer, in co-educational clas- 
ses, courses including ski trips, 
winter camping and backpacking. 
Thanks to Title IX, she stressed that 
they now could start new programs in 
almost any field, if enough interest 
was expressed. 

As the Swim team coach, she said 
that William and Mary gets their 
shore of highly skilled girls, espe- 
cially in the individual sports such 
as swimming and tennis. Coach Jackson 
was very pleased with student-faculty 
relations, adding that Physical Edu- 
cation was run on an informal basis 
which landed itself to contact. She 
considered students very nice, but she 
had to get used to it at first, as 
they tended to be un-questioning, 
which irritated her. She wasn't used 
to the "yes-ma'om" relationship that 



often prevailed. 

When you bring up P.E. require- 
ments, Mrs. Jackson asked "How do 
you rationalize P.E. for freshmen and 
sophomores but not for juniors and sen- 
iors, don't they need it?" She suggested 
maybe a one year requirement, and 
one academic credit for each course, 
with a limit of 8 credits. The way 
it worked, she claimed, was that students 
could not afford to take anything 
that did not offer credit. Stating 
that they taught skills and practi- 
cal knowledge, not just playing games 
and having fun, she added that for what 
could be learned, it certainly was 
worth an academic credit. 



ifV¥r. Jones has had a long associ- 
'jjlll.ation with William and Mary, as 
an undergraduate, graduate student, on 
administrator and on the faculty. His 
interest in Physical Education stems 
from an involvement in athletics in 
high school and college, where he 
played baseball and football in 
which he had a scholarship. After 
being Associate Dean of Admissions 
for five years, he was chosen to 
fill a vacancy in the Physical Educa- 
tion Department, teaching classes and 
running the intramural program. At 
first he was rather skeptical of what 
he was getting into in his intramural 
position but Jones said, "It turned 
out to be one of the most rewarding 
jobs a person con hove." He got to 
know the students on a friendly out- 
of-class basis, and felt students 



could be much more open with him 
due to this basis. As he 
saw it, "William and Mary 
]t bunch of 
vhom, I be- 
ieve enjoy the 
of getting 
good edu- 
cation." 



great 



ea 




Hna fM intnunurat 

Ives Slot of running frori}^.on|g; 
another for cooch Ed Jones.-; "- 



Ikt 




His 
main 

reason tor 
going into 
physical educa- 
tion was his in- 
terest in coaching, and 
with the 1974-75 year he 
got a chance to do it when 
he became Baseball coach. He 
he could offer the program a sense 
of continuity as a coach that would 
be available year-round, not just for 
the season. As for drawing athletes 
here, at least in baseball, he felt 
that William and Mary's name and repu- 
tation as a strong academic' school, 
helped athletes looking for a first 
rate education decide to come here. 
This was in spite of the fact that 
baseball was allowed only one full 
scholarship which Jones divided each 
year, on a basis of need as well as 
ability among five players. 

Jones believed that "Education 
is to prepare an individual for life, 
and that physical, skill, mental and 
social development are all important 
aspects of this education." He 
stressed that "Physical and mental 
abilities go hand in hand. The acade- 
mic pressure will build up here and 
it's important to have something to 
do to relieve the tension." Intra- 
murols and physical skills filled 
this need well. Sports also helped 
develop the social aspect, Jones 
noted as the student gained excellent 
experience in dealing with people. 



"We have a good healthy loaf 



246 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



"S 



first saw the campus about 



charmed by it and was very impressed 
at that time with the lovely setting." 

A few years after his first 
view of the William and Mary campus, 
Dr. Jon Soest left the school where 
he taught in Seattle, Washington, to 
join the Physics department here. The 
College impressed him as a small, lib- 
eral arts undergraduate school that 
was high in quality and active in 
research. Although it has been ten 
years since he left Seattle, where 
the students seemed generally pes- 
simistic, he noted that William and 
Mary students still seemed interest- 
ed and motivated. 
The Physics department 
has expanded since Dr. 
Soest's arrival, end the 
graduate program has 
been active in pro- 
jects that re- 
flect the 
continual 
change 



Almost all aspects of 
Physics require the 
use of machinery, 
professor Jon Soest 
here inspects o more 
complex one. 




was expected of the college fa- 
culty. He has served on the ad hoc 
regulations, grading, and nomina- 
tions committees, and has helped 
survey how grades were changed by 
dropping the "D" and any possible 
de-emphasization of grade point 
averages. Dr. Soest regrets the 
reinstatement of the "D", since he 
felt that people concentrated too 
hard on grades instead of how class- 
es were taught and the materail 
was presented. While realizing that 
professional and graduate schools 
largely looked at grades, Dr. Soest 
felt they couldn't focus their at- 
tention on a worse aspect. 

Soest was enthusiastic about 
William and Mary, because it was 
"small enough to focus attention on 
individuals, but no so small as 
to be secluded from outside activi- 
ties ... I am continually im- 
pressed by student behavior. One of 
the best things William and Mary has 
going for it is the quality of its 
students." 



a 



Ithough Dr. Hans von Baeyer 
was chairman of the committee 



science is for everyone," von Baeyer 
stated, and he has been working on 
this through various lectures he has 
given. One series of his talks dealt 
with the colonization of space, and 
he showed several models that prove 
it was now both technically and fi- 
nancially possible to establish a 
self-supporting space colony. NASA 
and the Congressional Sub-committee on 
Space Science and Applications have 
been investigating this idea. 

In regards to the College it- 
self, von Baeyer felt "William and 
Mary is a terrific place which is al- 
most living up to tis potential. We 
have a good faculty, good students, 
and a beautiful campus. I think 
what is missing is on element of 
wildness — both among students and 
the faculty. Not wildness in the 
sense of vandalism or puerility of 
course. What I miss is wildness of 
spirit, the kind of wildness that 
results in innovation, the kind of 
iconoclastic wildness that sweeps all 
convention aside as it drives on, 
powered by its own vision." 

"Perhaps we are a little bit 
too preoccupied with high averages — 
high average SAT's and GRE's and 




in 

physics. 
He empha 
sized the 

strong commitment 
present in the de- 
partment, whose profes 
sors ore both dedicated 
to research as well as clas 
ses. Soest himself has been 
involved in working with solid 
state physics semi-conducting crystals, 
which he described as the "brains of 
calculators." In the basement of 
Small, complex and up-to-date equip- 
ment measured the low levels of de- 
fects present in these crystals, the 
research being financed by departmen- 
tal grants and grants from NASA. 
Concerning faculty involvement. 
Dr. Soest felt that committee work 



Project plus teaching wos found bv Horis von 
Boeyer to be very enjoyable. He'' 
Newton's Law of Grovity in the ( 



that founded Project Plus, this was 
the first year he had taught for 
the Project Plus theme. He enjoyed 
the course he conducted there, Medi- 
eval Mechanics and Astronomy: The 
Roots of Modern Science, for it was 
a course not normally offered. 

"The Physics department as a 
whole wonts people to realize that 



grades end stuff. We have all 
that, and I'm glod that we do. But 
what we also need is a few more ex- 
ceptions — more absolutely brilliant 
people and o few crazy writers and 
painters and musicians and orators 
and physicists. We have a good, 
healthy loaf of bread — we need more 
leavening." 



n 



or Dread 



^9 



PHYSICS 247 



3jf mpress^ with the College's 
/2I small size and its attractive 
oppeorance, Dr. Friedman came to 
William and Mary in 1963 During 
his twelve years here, Friedman has 
seen the quality of both faculty and 
students improve, which has pleased 
him. "The students here seem to be 
bright, and the best are definitely 
excellent," Friedman noted though ad- 
ding that, "sometimes the students 
aren't highly motivated and overem- 
phasize grades rather than the educa- 
tional value of the courses." 

A member of the Psychology de- 
partment, Friedman's outside 
research focuses on the topic of ex- 
perimental learning. This has led 
him to become interested in starting 
new and different courses in the de- 
partment. He has written c bool<, 
Understanding and Improving Human 
Behavior, which developed from mi- 
meographed notes on behavior modi- 
fication that Friedman used for a 

Popular among Freshman, Dr Herbert Friedman 
points out the workings of dendrons during an 
introductory psychology lecture. 



very large introductory lecture 
course. He had been looking for a 
way to reach the better students, 
but when class reaction to the notes 
was favorable, he ended up publish- 
ing it as a supplementary text for 
his introductory course. 

^p or many professors in the Psy- 
/J* chology Department, their posi- 
tions at the school meant holding 
down two jobs — one as a class professor 
and one as a counselor at the Center 
for Psychological Services. As an 
undergraduate and graduate student at 
the University of Tennessee, Dr. 
Larry Ventis developed an interest in 
both teaching and clinical work as a 
profession. For this reason, he 
chose to come to William and Mary 
where he could readily express both 
of these interests. 

Dividing his time between the 
two areas, he spent approximately 
twenty hours a week in the Center 
while also teaching such courses as 
Behavior Modification and Abnormal 
Psychology. His academic interests 



included child and family treatment 
approaches. Using his special skills 
and services. Dr. Ventis has helped 
with Circle K and W.A.T.S. as well 
as serving on the Advisory Board 
of Crossroads, a halfway house 
for delinquents. 

During a Fall faculty meeting, 
he found himself, like many of his col- 
leagues, taking a different stand 
from one professed a few years ear- 
lier. When the D was omitted from the 
grading system, it was hoped by many 
that grades would be deemphosized. 
According to Ventis, it "wasn't ac- 
complishing what it was supposed to." 
In relation to William and Mary stu- 
dents, Ventis regarded them as 
"bright and achievement motivated, 
yet often this motivation exceeded 
interest in the subject." 



Small seminar gatherings give 
Dr. Lorry Ventris a chance to 
explain in more detail behavior 
modification. 





;.:.u.'.i: s».M^k*w«« 



Best definate 




248 RELIGION 




• • 



iving quotes 



99 



((^ff^ eaching and learning are both 

^^hord and rewarding work. I 
can't think of anything I'd rather 
do," stated Dr. Finn of the religion 
department. Before coming to the 
College, Finn taught at Syracuse Uni- 
versity and then edited for a Boston 
publishing firm for four years. He 
then realized he would like an oppor- 
tunity to 
teach 



well enough, he didn't like it as the 
principle means of teaching: "The 
lecture method is the most efficient 
in some ways, but I don't like a 
steady diet of it." 

On Campus, Finn involved himself 
on such committees as the Board of 
Student Affairs and the Library Com- 
mittee. He also served on the 



ligion because of its dominant func- 
tion in all cultural life and its im- 
pact on history's major social and 
intellectual movements. Oriented to- 
wards interdisciplinary studies, he 
saw religion as an encompassing field 
well suited for that purpose. 

Livingston taught only upper 
level courses, as a result most of 



Framed by an Indian design. Dr. 

Thomas Finn casually discusses 
the New Tesfoment. 



llnlMflMl 




Finn has preferred to teach 
by the Socrates method which in- 
cludes discussion, dialogue, end stu- 
dent encounter; however, he realized 
that this method was only applicable 
to smaller classes. He employed the 
straight- lecture method in his large 
classes, and although he felt ir worked 




Ferguson Seminar and Publishing Com- 
mittee of which he chaired. 



■Ji '^ wary of giving quotes, es- 
/<| peciolly to yearbooks, because 
when looking back in a few years I 
might just cringe when I see what I 
had said,'' commented Dean Livingston, 
who doubled both as Dean of Undergrad- 
uate Students and a professor in the 
religion department at William and 
Mary. Committed to the liberal arts 
form of education, Livingston was at- 
tracted to the College because of its 
national reputation. He was parti- 
cularly interested in the area of re- 



Papers and their contents entice Dr James 
Livingston OS he decides whot grade to give the 
student. 

his classes were small. Although he 
viewed the lecture as an important 
means of communication, he believed 
students were more interested when 
they could involve themselves in open 
discussion. Livingston has put this 
theory to work in the actual class- 
room, devoting approximately two 
thirds of the class time to discussion 
and the remainder to lectures. He con- 
ducted many discussion seminars omong 
his upper level courses, and has enjoyed 
having each class out to his 
home at least once a semester. 



PSYCHOLOGY 249 



Problems of society 

ond people inters! Dr Thomas 
Christ OS he explains 
a problem for 
a student. 



Statement of the D would deflate 
the present grading system. 

Besides serving on a departmen- 
tal committee, Dr. Christ was also 
an organizer and discussant for the 
975 Southern Sociological Society. 
He wrote a book that was ten 
tatively entitled Marx, 
Engles: The Sociol- 
ogy of Know- 
ledge, and 
planned 




learning atmosphere. "Encouragement 
is necessary." He also believed 
strongly in constructing c curricu- 
lum that reflected what students 
wanted and needed; for this reason, 
he was excited about preregistration. 

"Today's students are shifting 
away from the idealism of the late 
sixties and early seventies. They 
ore less tolerant of experimental 
classes. Employment is foremost in 
minds." 

"Rigorous," was Guenther's de- 




■3jf enjoy being a professor here 



more than I did being a student,' 
remarked Dr. Christ of the sociology 
department. A William and Mary fa- 
culty member since 1971, he felt 
that "the students here tend to be 
privatized," explaining that this 
was probably the result of heavy 
workloads. In his relations with 
students, Christ found it important 
to be "approachable but not o pal." 
in teaching, he thought that a 
tight outline, "even if it's not 
followed," was essential, and fre- 
quently incorporated examples from 
his own personal experience in his 
lecture material. Concerning grades. 
Dr. Christ predicted that the rein- 



on doing more quantitative writing. 

'MX efore arriving at William and 
^K3 Mary, Dr. Guenther hod taught 
at two other colleges; one was a 
large university whose classes were 
mostly vast lectures — "it was a 
teaching machine, a kind of mass pro- 
duction education" — while at the other 
extreme was a small college, highly 
selective, with only nine hundred 
students. The small school didn't 
provide the stimulation Guenther 
felt he needed, and when offered a 
position at the College, he accepted. 

Dr. Guenther felt that it was 
a professor's obligation to create a 



Sociology popers occupy Dr, Anthony Guenther as 
he checks material before going to class. 

scription of the William and Mary 
grading system. His own grading 
scale, he felt, was typical. He de- 
manded writing experience where "one 
writes creatively on a topic of his 
own choice." 

"Members of the academic com- 
munity ought to be involved in re- 
search," with his own work focus- 
sing on criminal behavior. Dr. 
Guenther also wrote from his reasarch, 
and used one of his books in his 
course. He published The Culture of 
Imprisonment, and future plans in- 
cluded a book on police detectives. 



250 SOCIOLOGY 



"Anoroachable, but not a pa' 



*?!P|r. Louis E. Catron of the 
^i^Theatre department described 
teaching at William and Mary as 
"full of new experiences all the 
time. I like watching students 
being creative, refreshing. Our 
students here are vital and open 
to advancing." 



William and Mary, and also saw the 
need for a sabbatical so that college 
professors "can get back in touch 
with their field." 

Dr. Catron has written and 
produced numerous plays, and his 
work Where Have All the Lighten- 
ing Bugs Gone? was the most fre- 



9^ 



the students at the College; how- 
ever, "I don't treat them any dif- 
ferently." 

Outside of his involvement 
with theatre at the College, Scam- 
mon has directed eighteenth century 
dramas for Colonial Williamsburg. 
He has also 




Fine points of direction and errors of his students 
intrigue Howard Scammon as he lectures in the lab 
theatre. 



Chairman of Orientation, Catron 
felt that "freshmen are more chal- 
lenging than grad students, therefore 
I like them better." 

Catron pointed to the Premiere 
Theatre as exemplifying how excel- 
lent the College has been with the 
student motivation, level of perfor- 
mance, and creativity. He also 
thought that students today"are 
doing much better than when I was 
in school." 

He believed that more reading, 
writing courses should be offered at 




quently 
produced one 
act play in America 
during 1972, 

3(> etiring after teaching for 
.J^ twenty-seven years, Howard 
Scammon of the Theatre and Speech 
department stated that his main in- 
terest was directing plays "here 
and anywhere." His interpretations 
are usually aimed at getting the 
playwright's ideas across in- 
stead of reshaping the play. 

He decided on William and Mary 
in 1948 because "I liked the area 
and the job." He has also liked 



Comfortable 

in his office Louis 

Cotron reloxes offer having 

guided a class in a fake reheorsol 

directed for the Common Glory 
amphitheatre, where he was 
a charter member. 



THEATRE AND SPEECH 251 



"The (Students keeo me here 



^ oug Rendlemen taught at the 
University of Alabama for three 
years before he came to Marshall- 
Wythe in 1973. "I wanted to get out 
of the deep South," stated Rendlemen, 
adding, "my children needed a better 
educational background." Comparing 
the situation here with the one in 
Alabama, he commented, "the stu- 
dxnts here seem more intelligent, and 
generally are more fun to work with." 
However, due to the much publicized 
problems of the law school, Ren- 
dlemen believed that the level of 
morale among the students had not 
been high. 

Realizing the necessity for the 
planned move to a complex adjacent 
to the Courthouse, he did however 
feel it would be healthier to be on 
the same campus, and port of the 
same school. "If we go over by the 
courthouse, we will be isolated." 
One of the disadvantages presented 
by a new building would be that en- 
rollment would swell to 600 stu- 
dents, which Rendlemen felt was too 



Rendlemen claimed he did not 
teach, he helped students learn. He 
felt he encouraged the students to 
examine their own thought process 
and giving them an idea of law as o 
process. "A legal education is a 
series of questions without any real 
answers. Students have to learn to 
live with the uncertainty a changing 
world will bring to them," pointed 
out Rendlemen. 

As a member of the BSA, he was 
very concerned about graduate student 
housing. The fact that there were no 
plans for graduate housing was a 
cause of great alarm to Rendlemen as 
well OS many newer students 
and faculty. 



|hen Richard E. Waick retired 
after 30 years on the Air Force 
Judge Advocates Corps in 1970, he 
had to decide which way his career 
would turn, towards practicing law 
or teaching it. Several things 
helped make up his mind. First he 



telligent, they work hard and want to 
learn. I get great satisfaction 
from working with students." He 
added that he had grown to like 
living in the area and was very 
pleased with his home on the Chicko- 
hominey River. 

As a professor, Waick viewed his 
goals as teaching people how to 
practice low, the approach to take. 
"It's pur obligation to turn out 
the best we can, a skilled practi- 
ctioner," he commented. He believed 
there should be emphasis placed on 
practical knowledge and on application 
of the law. He felt it was the law 
students responsibility to learn 
the law, but also to go beyond it 
and understand it. "We must help 
them see how it's understood by 
the courts and most important, how 
to be successful in using the law." 
He thought that though they taught 
the reasons for the laws and the 
history of low, these were secondary 
approaches. 

Though the facilities at 

Marshall Wythe were admit- 




Though small, Richard E. Walk finds the faculty 
librory adequote for quick reference checks. 



lorge. On the contrary, he believed 
it would be better to have a lower 
student-teacher ratio. 

There was an anonymous grading 
system in use at the law school 
where students put their social se- 
curity number on the paper rather 
than their name, so the professor 
never saw a name on the paper he 
graded. "Some faculty want to do 
away with it, but I like it." 



had always enjoyed working with and 
helping young people, and second, 
his specialty in the military was 
court and criminal law and when he 
retired in the spring from the Air 
Force, the teacher in this area at 
Marshall- Wythe had also just retired. 
Waick accepted this opening in 
the fall and made a rather smooth 
transition from career to career. 

Waick was very pleased with the 
student body, saying, "It's the stu- 
dents that keep me here, I enjoy 
working with them. They're very in- 




must be remembered that the 
ABA praised the quality of the stu- 
dent body, the faculty members and 
our graduates." 



252 MARSHALL-WYTHE SCHOOL OF LAW 




r, John Donaldson of the Marsh- 
loll- Wythe Law school has been 
teaching full time at the College 
since 1966, and his classes include 
those of federal income tax and 
state planning. "I've always liked 
the social sciences," Dr. Donald- 
son commented, "and I've always hod 
my heart set on law." He then added, 
"and I enjoy teaching rather than 
practicing it." 

Concerning the future of Marsh- 
all-Wythe, Donaldson described his 
feelings as "definitely optimis- 
tic." "I feel that the necessary 
funding will be forthcoming . . . Right 
now the inadequate facilities, es- 
pecially the law library, are the 
only hinderances in living up to our 
full potential." 

Donaldson had some strong words 
for the law students at the College. 
"I'm very impressed. The students 
here hove a lot of drive and a lot 
of self discipline. They're out- 
standing. 



ince his college days, Walter 
'L. Williams has had an academic 
bent on him, and it was just a 
question of when in his life he 
would puruse a teaching career. 
Developing a strong interest in 
international law as an International 
Relations major, he went on to law 
school, after being a Marine officer. 
He went into practice specializing 
in private international matters, 
enjoying international law partly 
due to it's being in the early 
developmental stages, with a chance 



Law professors always seem to have piles of 
current articles to read, as John E. Donaldson finds 
out. 



to get in on the ground floor. Af- 
ter receiving his Docterate of Law 
which was later published as a book 
on International Law, he became the 
legal advisor to the US forces in 
NATO at headquarters. Williams 
taught some International Law at 
the college level while oversees, 
and this along with the general 
international United States re- 
trenchment of military forces prompted 
him to go directly to teaching. 

A blend of motives led Williams 
to choose Marshall-Wythe. He had 
been raised in the South and felt 
at home in southern culture, as 
well as enjoying the climate. It's 
proximity to DC and the fact that 
Williamsburg was a good place to 
raise a family also were points 
in it's favor, but the main attract- 
ion Marshall- Wythe offered was the 
opportunity to develop on inter- 
national program of his own. This 
has grown from 3 units, in on 
introductory course when he come here 
in 1972, to 12 units. 

He believed that "a legal edu- 
cation is part of a liberal education 
for everyone." Written and oral 
communication ore two assets Williams 
stresses. His goal as a teacher is 
to develop to the highest extent 
possible his students abilities as 
future lawyers. Both the mode of 
expression and a liberal educator's 
way of thinking are important aspects 
of this. The student must be able 
to think of the role of law in so- 
ciety and the underlying social pol- 
icies, be able to appraise a policy 
then communicate his thoughts clear- 
ly. In Williams' eye, the prospec- 
tive lawyer must be a trend and pol- 
icy thinker — able to evaluate how a 
decision will be made now, not ten 
years ago in a past case. 

Williams found "significant 



student- faculty relations outside of 
class and substantial openness be- 
tween the teacher and the students." 
It was also enjoyable for him to "be 
in a low school that provides an en- 
vironment where one feels free to 
engage in various social activities 
with the students," and he cited a 
"high level of cordiality between 
faculty and students." 

Enjoying student contacts, Wil- 
liams added that he spent much time 
discussing legal subjects with his 
students. He stressed that the only 
thing that set him apart from the 
students in these discussions was 
that he had more time to think about 
the field, which gave him a running 
start on the knowledge of law. "How- 
ever after o student is brought up to 
date on a problem, his level of know- 
ledge goes up to or beyond mine, and 
we become peers." 

Serving as an advisor to the 
International Moot Court program 
here, and crediting the Marshall- 
Wythe Student International Law So- 
ciety, he has been actively involved 
in student activities. Williams also 
hod the pleasure of teaching at Pro- 
ject Plus, where he developed the 
"highest regard and respect for the 
undergraduates" and saw them as 
extremely able. Another student 
oriented activity he engaged in, was 
to help students find entry into em- 
ployment situations and especially 
to facilitate their entry into other 
academic institutions which offer 
more in-depth study in the inter- 
national field at the post-law 
graduate level. 



Impromptu conferences olwoys seem to be found 

with Walter L, Williams toking port in the foculty 
library. 






MARSHALL-WYTHE SCHOOL OF LAW 253 



'yM[nlike other business professors, 
^ttl-Dr. George D. Cole Jr. not only 
had never token a business course, 
but had been in the ministry for 
twelve years. As a minister, he coun- 
seled top business people in the New 
York area. In 1961, he left the min- 
istry for a career in market coun- 
seling and irvdustrial planning. He 
returned to the Tidewater area in 
1963 as a consultant for a Newport 
News shipyard and a part time teacher 
at George Washington University. In 
1968, he started his "second career" 
as a member of the Business School 
faculty at William and Mary in his 



Always glad to help his students out, John S. 
Quinn meets Joe Schiatono during his office hours 
to answer his questions. 



6-10 out overnight to a cottage on 
his property, spending the time 
getting to know each other; talking 
till 2 or 3 in the morning. Students 
have said this has been a valuable ex- 
perience in every instance. He felt 
a major task he had was to combat the 
negative feelings about the college 
experience that surfaced in his open 
type class rooms. A main focus in 
his classes became helping people 
develop a perspective of where 
they were going in life, 
and what their per- 
sonal philosophy 
was. The fo- 
cus come 
down 



public accounting activities. Quinn, 
who served as chairman of the Ac- 
counting Department from I960 
-71, believed that their 
goal was "the prepar- 
ation of a profes- 
sional," 
noting 
that. 




specialization of applied behavioral 
science and organizational develop- 
ment. His cultural ties in the area 
and farm property in York County were 
among his reasons for picking Wil- 
liam and Mary. Cole noted that he 
was quite pleased with his choice, 
adding that he had "never met a Wil- 
liam and Mary student I wouldn't be 
happy to have in my house, and I 
regularly have practically all of my 
120-150 students per semester out 
to my form." 

Cole has stressed this type of 
personal emphasis in his classes. He 
wanted to get to know the students 
and wanted the students to get to 
know eoch other. "My courses are 
very participation oriented, rather 
than lecture or theory oriented. The 
necessary theory can be learned 
through things we do in the class, I 
don't teach your basic open-notebook- 
ond take notes class!" For the past 
three years. Cole has token groups of 



to one 
thing, in- 
teraction. Cole 
cited evidence of 
insight gained through- 
out a course in under- 
standing human behavior. 
Much of the negative feelings 
Cole noted, he blamed on the practice 
of cramming all the time. "That's 
not real learning, what higher educa- 
tion needs is more creativity. Too 
many teachers just go through the 
motions and only succeed in making 
the students cram, not really learn. 
Why I could count on one hand the 
number of classes I took that I could 
honestly remember and coll really 
meaningful learning!" 

^pollowing World War II, Professor 
,Jr John S. Quinn received his MBA 
from Harvard under the Gl Bill. He 
then came directly here in 1949, as 
Williom and Mary seemed to offer the 
best advantages, with a small, estab- 
lished Business Department. When 
Quinn arrived, the accounting program, 
begun in 1919 at the request of the 
Virginia State Society of CPA's, con- 
sisted of two full-time teachers. 
The program had been set up to pro- 
vide graduates qualified to engage in 



our 

students 
have been fantas- 
tically successful 
on the CPA exam and we 
have on excellent place- 
ment program all over the east- 
ern United States, with several of 
our alumni as partners in big firms. 

"However the faculty doesn't de- 
serve all the credit, the fact that 
the students do so well, pass the 
screening and are accepted at William 
and Mary indicates that we have a 
better product to begin with." Quinn 
added that, "1 can be proud of a stu- 
dent graduating as on accounting 
major from here, and employers recog- 
nize that we hove quality students. 

"We must moke the maximum effort 
to give the best education for the 
student's life work, and that's what 
we've been doing. Our graduates ore 
able to compete as well or better 
than, graduates from elsewhere. 
As alumni, they recognize this and 
often return to thank us for 
all the work we mode them do." 

Quinn's only complaint was the 
growth occurring both in the Business 
School and college as a whole. This 
growth has led to increased enroll- 
ment in Accounting and Business, re- 
sulting in larger classes. "We 
can't do the type of work we could 
with a class half the size," he com- 
mented. "A problem facing the Business 
School was that new positions had 
been okayed to alleviate the faculty 
shortage, yet the salaries we could 
offer simply were not high enough to 
attract the sought-after caliber of 
teacher." 



'Stimulate them to learn" 



254 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





/|^riginally looking to enter the 
XJyVteld of foreign trade business. 
Dr. Anthony L. Sancetta never in- 
tended to make teaching his career 
when he accepted o temporary position 
at his alma mater, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, after World War II. Soon, 
however, he discovered that he liked 
teaching, and in 1947, wrote to sev- 
eral colleges inquiring about a 
teaching position. Though on first 
impression he found William and Mary 
to be a pretty dull, "stodgy" place, 
Albion G. Taylor, then head of the 
Economics Department impressed him 
and attracted him into accepting a 
position in the department. In 1966, 
Sancetta helped develop the graduate 
business program and since he thought 
he would enjoy teaching at the 
graduate as well as undergraduate 
level, he started teaching Business 
Economics and Finance in what sub- 
sequently became the School of Bus- 
iness Administration. 

"I don't think you teach anybody 
anything, people learn, and if they 
expect to be taught they won't learn 
anything," Sancetta remarked. "The 
function of teaching is to stimulate 
the student, to open his mind to 
think. You put material before the 
student in different ways than in the 
text, to show them different insights 
and get them to develop insights of 
their own . . . stimulate them to want to 
learn. Good teaching conditions on 
individual to teach himself, if one 
is exposed to this, he will know how 
to learn, and will learn as he goes 
through life." 

Speaking on undergraduates he com- 
mented, "I don't know if they enjoy 
themselves enough here, I hope they 
have fun both in, and especially out- 
side of class. They ought to be able 
to look back and see the good times 
they hod and the things they got away 
with in college; it's port of the 
process of growing up. Sometimes how- 
ever we don't give them enough time 
to think. We take the attitude that 
life is hard, earnest and make a drud- 



Between classes, Anthony L. Sancetta stops by the 
VIP room in the Business School, and here is 
discussing an orticle with Helen Jane Ryan, 



gery out of learning. We pound it 
into the student and pile it on. He 
quickly noted, "I'll be the first to ad- 
mit that I cram too much into them." 

"We have a good institution here, but 
what we have to do is to remember we 
con look so much to the past that the 
future will pass us by. This is a 
danger that any long established 
institution such as William and Mary 
faces," Sancetta continued, "We say 
we're good because we were good, what 
we need to ask is how many Thomas 
Jeffersons hove we produced in the 
Twentieth Century. We ore now in 
the last quarter of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury, not the first, and we must ask 
if we are really giving the kind of 
education we should be providing for 
people who will be leading pro- 
ductive lives for the next fifty years." 



, r, James E. Smith came to Wil- 
liam and Mary in 1970. He came 
here because William and Mary could 
offer a situation which met most of 
the requirements he desired. The 
size alone was a big plus for Smith, 
who wanted the "opportunity to in- 
teract with small classes." His spe- 
cialty was taxation, and most colleges 
only had faculty members teaching 
this in the business school, yet with 
Marshal I- Wythe here. Smith hod the op- 
tion of being able to work with 
others who specialized in taxation 
outside of the business school. The ac- 
counting section, having only five or 
six faculty when Smith came here, was 
fully integrated with the other 
business school areas rather than a 
separate entity as it was in many 
larger universities. With this size 
accounting section, all the faculty, 
including the senior members, were 
able to teach a principles course. 
This added to a good quality program 



As Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 

James E. Smith spends much of his office hours 
ironing out problems on the phone. 



where students could come in contact 
with the senior faculty even at the 
introductory levels. 

Smith, Associate Dean for Under- 
graduate Studies of the School of Bus- 
iness Administration, remained satis- 
fied here yet added that some changes 
could be made. As the program ex- 
panded, additional faculty positions 
were, he believed, needed to reduce 
the class sizes back to 25-30, where 
interaction could readily be achieved. 

He stressed that in an area 
such as accounting, some structure 
was needed, hence lectures were 
important elements in "this plan. In 
this situation, "What the student gets 
out of a course is what they put into 
it. They ore given an opportunity to 
express themselves in the discussion." 

With a school the size of Wil- 
liam and Mary, Smith asserted that, 
"If interaction doesn't take place, 
it's mainly the faculty member's 
fault, OS interaction is an impor- 
tant part of on education. Of course, 
some of the fault is the student's, 
for not requesting the opportunity 
for interaction. You can come up 
with reasons for a lack of interac- 
tion, yet at school this size, they 
are pretty poor excuses. 

"The enrollment policy here pro- 
duces a different input, with the 
average student here much more of a 
quality student than at most univer- 
sities," however Smith added, "This 
must be kept in mind, as you hove to 
tailor the class to the abilities of 
the students. In terms of material 
covered here, the student has a much 
higher possibility of achieving his 
educational objectives." Smith sub- 
stantiated this by pointing out that 
while nationwide, approximately 10% of 
the people taking the CPA test pass 
the first time, almost 70% of the Wil- 
liam and Mory accounting majors ot- 
tempting it pass the first time. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 255 



"W(?^MhasgGodl 

Vjf his year marked Dr. Lavach's are it is an attractive, intelle 

^tt^ ninth year at William and Mary, superior person wh 



are it is an attractive, intellectually 
superior person who may 
have many talents — mu- 
sical, artistic, 
literary." As 
for the no- 
torious 
aca- 




DeDDie 



9? 



schools." Though it sometimes look- 
ed different from within, Messier 
commented that William and Mary is 
"one of the few quality institu- 
tions noted throughout the world 
for not growing." Joining the fac- 
ulty of the School of Education in 
972, his specialty was mental re- 
tardation, concentrating on the 
more severely mentally retarded, 
those that could not be assimilat- 




where he came after teaching high 
school and finishing his graduate 
work in institutional research at 
Duke University. "I looked at 
schools along the East coast that 
were similar to Duke. I wrote here, 
got an interview, and accepted a po- 
sition in the Education Department." 
Lavach taught Education 302, Human 
Growth and Development, and jokingly 
added "nobody else wants it . . . It's a 
really good course, though, and I en- 
joy it." His classes were large, u- 
sually about two hundred and fifty 
students per section, yet Lavach em- 
phasized that the bigness did not stop 
him from trying "to get to know as ma- 
ny people as possible." 

As far as research goes, Lavach 
said, "I usually try to write at least 
one paper a year. You stay current 
if you do research." He is presently 
working on the topic of achievement 
and motivation as related to the 
psychology of women, which focuses 
on how success oriented females re- 
spond to social group pressures. 

"The kids here are really fan- 
tastic," Lavach commented, "I enjoy 
the students a lot. William and Mary 
has good-looking people. If you ran- 
domly select a student here, chances 



demic pressure at the college, he re- 
flected, "The kind of person who 
comes here is under a great deal of 
personal pressure. The students here 
are high achievers, and I think the 
pressure comes from within them- 
selves; it is not necessarily fa- 
culty imposed." 

Education is a more emotional 
type of course than physica or mathe- 
matics, and it's much more difficult 
to determine grades. A student may 
receive an "A", but I won't even 
know if he will apply what he has 
learned, if he will be a better teach- 
er or parent because he did well in 
the course." 



'/J]'/|tf hile he was at the Univer- 
l^l%tt, sity of Wisconsin, Louis P. 
Messier, originally from Vermont, 
missed the East coast. William and 
Mary, in addition to being on the 
East coast, offered time for 
"individual development" for the 
faculty. "It allowed you to ex- 
press yourself as equals, not in a 
rigid heirorchy of authority." 
Messier also liked that it was 
"small and hadn't gotten on a 
super growth kick like so many 



ed into the normal classroom pro- 
cedure. 

In this concentration, you 
run into cross-categorial ex- 
ceptionality, where you could not 
work with just one handicap, but 
must be equipped to deal with ed- 
ucational work, regardless of the 
handicap. Students in this gradu- 
ate program simultaneously taught 
and had normal classroom courses. 

Increasingly, Messier argued, 
he would see the severely handi- 
capped people not going to in- 
stitutions, but in community set- 
tings in public and regional 
schools. However, their treatment 
would remain somewhat different 
with schools extending new services 
to them, not necessarily integra- 
ted into the current classroom set- 
up. The stress would be not so 
much to "mainstream" them, but to 
develop them as individuals. 

As far as the graduate stu- 
dents Messier was acquainted with, 
he pointed out, "we get some super- 
committed people here, most of whom 
know what they want, stay committed, 
and complete the program, a dedi- 
cated group." 



256 SCHOOL OF EUDCATION 



'TUTld ^^'^ asked why he chose to come 
\t[^i^ to William and Mary as a profes- 
sor Doug Prilloman of the Special Ed- 
ucation Department stated that he 
wanted to have an "impact on teachers, 
before they begin teaching." After 
receiving his Masters at William and 
Mary, he went on to George Washing- 
ton where he received his Doctorate 
in Special Education. It was there 
that he helped develop the Diagnostic- 
Prescriptive Teaching model. Upon 



Between classes, Doug Prillamon returns to his 
office to prepore for his next discussion 



realized that he would like to be in- 
volved with teachers during the years 
they were becoming teachers, espe- 
cially in the area of educational 
psychology. Ries came to William and 
Mary in 1968, very impressed with the 
faculty members' concern for students, 
education and developing excellent 
teachers. The big advantage here in 
his eyes, however, was that teaching 
was emphasized, with the opportunity 
available to do research rather than 
the opposite. Coming from the larger 
University of Missouri, a small lib- 
eral arts college intrigued him. 
There were only fourteen faculty in 



classification as a quality under- 
graduate school," commented Ries. 
"The students here seemed to be 
willing to get involved with the com- 
munity in such areas as Circle K and 
WATS. Programs like this offered an 
excellent learning experience." 

Recently opened to college-wide 
enrollment. Educational Psychology 301 
which Ries taught, offered something 
for everyone. It allowed a student 
to become acquainted with the field 
of education, how children developed, 
end what implication this had for 
teachers. It was related to anyone 
going on in life becoming a parent or a 



3** 



>o 



^^^ 



mm^ 



Looking over his notes for 

tomorrow's lecture, Roger Ries 
makes some changes in the subject 
topic. 



returning to William and Mary, he be- 
gan a Masters program for people in- 
terested in DPT, with the program 
having now expanded to many areas 
of the country. 

In conjunction with some of the 
Law School and other Special Edu- 
cation faculty, Prilloman has been 
trying to help establish a center 
concerned with law and special edu- 
cation in the Tidewater area. If ac- 
complished, it would become one of 
o very few such places in the country. 
One of the areas with which it would 
be involved was the proper placement 
of juvenile delinquents. 

Like many of the professors in- 
terviewed, he felt that most William 
and Mary students were "extremely 
bright" but they often seemed "rigid 
and programmed" in their approach to 
academics. After going through the 
DPT program Prilloman stated that 
the students seemed more "humanistic 
and dedicated" and became strong 
"child advocates." 




a 



fter teaching at the high 
school level, Dr Roger R. 



Ries 



the 

School 

of Education 

here, where there 

had been over 1 20 

at Missouri. Ries 

liked the flexibility of 

being able to teach at both 

the undergraduate and graduate 

levels, which allows him to work with 

beginning teachers as well as those 

already in the field. 

One of the things that had kept 
Ries here was the good contacts with 
undergraduates, whom he enjoyed 
teaching, in spite of the class size 
getting too big. He described them 
as "bright, able to achieve, and for 
the most part, motivated", remarking 
that, "they aren't difficult to teach 
if you enjoy teaching, it's a 
rewarding experience." Comparing the 
undergraduates to those he had con- 
tact with at Missouri, he believed 
that students here seemed more recep 
tive to learning and to have a higher 
ability, especially in writing and 
articulation. "We can justify the 



decision maker in public education. 

"I'm not sure in four years of 
courses to what extent the student 
must confront himself outside of the 
cognitive at William and Mary." This, 
he believed, was possibly the 
major weakness here. He felt the cur- 
riculum should be modified somewhot 
to allow more self insight. 

"In my point of view, typically 
Schools of Education always run into 
the problem of attracting exceptional 
individuals, yet here we are very 
fortunate and are able to attract 
quality students and produce good 
teachers," Ries stated, adding that, 
"If I had to pick teachers for my 
children, I'd go right to William 
and Mory graduates and be satisfied 
I would find excellent, highly moti- 
vating teochers." 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 257 




Mhat happened after the "good" 
professors arrived at William 
and Mary? Unfortunately, the events 
were not always good. When ques- 
tioned about academics, the general 
feeling among students was that 
William and Mary had capable faculty 
members and a quality, if at times 
overly difficult, program available 
in most areas of study. 
The belief that William and 
Mary had competent professors was 
coupled, however, with a concern that 
they might prove hard to keep. As 
could easily be seen, faculty pay 
and compensations seemed to be dras- 
tically lacking at William and Mary 
in comparison with comparable colleges. 



How Ion 



With the teacher market as tight as 
it was in 1976, most colleges could 
successfully bid to get the best pro- 
fessors. Unless William and Mary 
offered higher pay along with incen- 
tives such as paid sabaticals, it 
would be hard to maintain the quality 
level of education it had reached. 
The tenure crunch posed another prob- 
lem as it kept many of the young pro- 
fessors from staying more than a few 
years as well as keeping some depart- 



can it 



ments almost stagnant. 

Other things which influenced 
faculty quality included a nation- 
wide trend towards a pressure to 
publish. As a result, the oft heard 
quote was, "publish or perish — that 
seems to be the rule." More unique 
to William and Mary was the widely 
held belief that the faculty was un- 
der pressure from their department 
chairmen and the administration to 



258 ACADEMICS 



Commiffees such as the Publicofions ^ouncil 
enable students, faculty and administration to 
discuss matters of importance to the college. 





last? 



grade stifly. As one undergraduate 
noted, "The faculty is unduly scared 
by the grade inflation that seems 
to have missed William and Mary, but 
hit the nation in general. Because 
of this attitude, students who should 
be getting A's aren't, a factor that 
has hurt many recent William and Mary 
graduates competing with other gra- 



duates for places in professional 
schools." 

.The biggest complaint from stu- 
dents was the lack of student-faculty 
interactions outside the classroom. 
After noting the lack of personal 
contact with faculty members, some 
students added that if practiced more 
widely, such actions as inviting stu- 
dents to faculty homes, having stu- 
dent-faculty social functions, or 
merely joining a professor for 



lunch, would be major plusses in 
the overall educational atmosphere 
at William and Mary. 

With all these factors com- 
bined, many thought it amazing that 
the faculty continued to be as ex- 
cellent as they were. Maybe William 
and Mary's reputation was one of the 
biggest drawing factors for faculty 
as well as students, but how long 
would this be enough.'' 



ACADEMICS 259 




>— RDMINISTRnTIO 



260 ADMINISTRATION 



A VIew Froivi James BUir HaU. 



Tiff it weren't for students we wouldn't 
/<! hove a job," said one administrator 
during a discussion concerning 
student/administrator relations. "Student 
input into administrative decisions 
should be taken into consideration. 
Although among administrators this 
attitude seemed to prevail, after 
controversial decisions students felt their 
input was inappropriately weighted. "If 
we agree all the time, you (the students 

would be considered old-fashioned," 
offered one, "and I ... I might be 
thought of as immature." 

"The institution is longer than you 
are," added another. The student body 
changes from year to year, but the 
administration, equally a part of the 
college, forms a relatively permanent 
component of the institution. In light of 
this fact the ECHO focused on the 
changing elements of the college — the 
students — viewed by the more stable 
aspect, the administrators. Different 
administrators were asked what, in their 
opinions, attracted students to William 
and Mary, trends they sow in the 
"typical" William and Mary student, any 
positive and negative characteristics of 
the students, and how they felt college 
alters student's views. Anonymity of 
their answer was assured so that they 
might be as candid as possible. 

A tenure, promotion, and salary survey is one of 
the facets of the job of George Healy, 
Vice-President for Academic Affairs. 
Dedication of Rogers Holl during Homecoming 
weekend brings Horvey R Chappel, Rector of the 
Board of Visitors to the College. 





AnMINI«;TRATION 9A1 



^ A WilliAivi ANd Mary 



An informal dinner at Brown Hall provides a 
chance for Dean of Students Sam Sadler to discuss 
student problems. 

Inspite of his busy schedule as Dean of the 
Undergraduate Progrom and a Professor of 
Religion, James Livingston tries to find time for 
informal student contoct- 





262 ADMINISTRATION 



deqREE will traveI/^ 




As an assistant to President Graves, Jerry 
VanVoorhis acts as a lioison between student 
leaders and the higher echelons of the 
Administration. 

Tradition plays a vital role in the college. 
This is demonstrated to President's 
Assistant James Kelly at the 
Graduation Rally. 



f 





One of the more well-known faces on campus, 
Colonel Green, Director of the Campus Center, is 
retiring at the end of the 1 976 year. 



id^ any students trying to "pick their 
JiTll v^ay into the best education 
possible" wind up at William and Mary. 
Exactly what makes this college 
particularly desirable to so many 
people? A number of administrators, 
presenting their opinions, may suggest 
some possible answers. 

"William and Mary," says one 
administrator, "is the absolute prototype 
of the ideal liberal arts college. Its basic 
flavor, breadth of program, whole 
environment, and climate symbolize 
what a liberal arts college is." 

Along with its "history and glamour" 
the school has a "prestige that isn't so 
obvious to those of us who are close to 
William and Mary ... A degree from 
William and Mary will travel." Another 
pointed out that any deviance from its 
excellent academic program would be a 
betrayal of the college's outstanding 
reputation. The unique atmosphere 
provided by Colonial Williamsburg 
presents yet another reason why 
students are drawn to William and Mary. 
A social factor is also involved, as one 
administrator noted, "We are 
co-educational and more social than 
most state instututions." 

Size and cost were then cited as two 
major attractions of William and Mary. 
The size of the college suggests a more 
personal atmosphere, one which 
"doesn't suggest you (the student) 
would be treated as a number." "As 
small OS we ore and with as much staff 
as we hove," concluded one, "we can 
deal with the student as a whole 
person." 



A newcomer to the administration, Charles 
Tooma|ian, Director of Registration and 
Student Records, helps implement the new 
process of eorly registration. 



ADMINISTRATION 263 



Bills and checks occupy Treasurer Floyd 
Whitoker's routine day; with over $20 million 
circuloting through his office, Whitoker has little 
time for student contact. 
The implementation of early registration for 
freshmen and sophomores brings instant popularity 
to the new Registrar, Henry Johnson. 



f 






WhAT CAN 



.\i\ *j/y 




Topics such OS enrollment, space, and curriculun 
moke the job of the Director of Institutional 
Research, Donald Herrman, influence students. 



264 ADMINISTRATION 





As a professor of Government and Dean of the 

Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Jack Edwards is 

concerned with ail aspects of tiie college 

community 

The Vice President for College Development, 

Warren Heemon, is responsible for soliciting funds 

and drawing up spending priorities. 



DFFKT Of 
SOREP Pf^ f*^* 







you sAy AbotT a stucIent? 




"® 



he student body," claims one 



heterogeneous group than most people 
think, even though they each have 
different beliefs." Another agreed by 
adding that the student body is more 
"diverse" than in past years due to the 
fact that "there are more foreign, black, 
and graduate students." 

A different conclusion was reached by 
an administrator who has more student 
contacts. He feels that the student body 
has a "lot of homogeneity — the 
extreme right and lefts are so close 
together as compared with large state 
institutions." 

In keeping with this concept of 
homogeneity, another observed that 
"students are a bunch of cattle. They 
dress alike and think alike. They lose 
their individual identities." 

Yet even though ideas varied as much 
as jobs, the administrators ultimately 
conceded that "all students are very 
capable people." 

"We are getting increasingly better 
students," commented one, "better in 
their preparation and in their ability to 
get things done." 

Another believes that "lots of William 



and Mary students did well in high 
school but don't necessarily possess 
natural brilliance." 

After commenting that William and 
Mary students are "mature and capable 
people" one member of the 
administration confided that he 
sometimes "feels insignificant in 
comparison." 

"Every class has its own particular 
enthusiasm," but many administrators 
have observed some changes in the 
student body since the sixties. "Students 
ore more serious today than ten years 
ago. They seem more concerned about 
getting through school . . . they ore 
more competitive. 

The development of a more 
"introspective attitude" among students 
was noted by many administrators. 
"Students seem more individual 
centered," was one opinion. Another 
commented that "students don't speok 
as much. People are absorbed." 

At the same time, still others pointed 
out that students are more outgoing 
than in past years. There is a greater 
sense of community and the students are 
more friendly and open among 
themselves and strangers. 



Placement of over 600 employees sends Irving 
Robitshek, Director of Personnel, to confer with 
Dennis Cogel, Assistant to the Vice President for 
Business Affairs. 



ADMINISTRATION 265 



A transfer from Admissions to the Office of Career 
Counseling brought Harriet Reid more occasion for 
student contacts. 

Director of the Office of Placement, Stan Brown 
helps students find jobs upon their graduation. 






Students qualifying for financial aid find 
assistance from Student Aid Director Leon Looney. 
In spite of the taxing work demands of Dr. Richard 
Cilley, Director of the Student Health Center, 
infirmary hours were extended to include lunch 
hours. 



266 ADMINISTRATION 




Veterans, servicemen, and dependents are the 

primary concerns of John Bright, Director of 

Veteran Affairs. 

Newspapers and catalogs prepared by Ross 

Weetcs, Director of Information Services, are 

instrumental in keeping the college community 

informed. 




Should WE siT ON otR SAT's? 




'VV^illiam and Mary has the best 
Zlsf student body an institution can 
have," states one administrator. This 
seems to be the prevailing attitude 
among the administrators, yet the 
compliments were limited. 

"William and Mary students are very 
bright. I find this frightening at times 
because I don't feel I'm as smart as they 
ore," divulged one administrator. He 
also admires students' capacity to 
"understand the facts of a situotion 
when they are explained them." 

Another administrator said that he 
feels the students are "able, and 
interested in academics and intellectual 



Conflicts between student interests and finoncial 
means of the college occur often for the Vice 
President for Business Affairs, William Corter. 



endeavors." He also likes their view of 
the world. "Students are not particularly 
conceited or arrogant. They are willing 
to get along," he added. "They show a 
genuine concern and sensitivity to other 
people," was another comment. One 
member also noted that there is an 
increasing involvement of the students in 
the community. 

One administrator feels that the 
student body has "all the desirable 
characteristics, all the various kinds of _ 
student expression, ... a spectrum of 
talents from acrobatics to athletics, from 
debate to drunkeness." 

"Why don't we have more Rhodes 
Scholars.'*" another continually asked. 
"We get a real superior student." But he 
concluded with, "This grading system is 
too difficult The academics holds us 
back." 



^ VA 



ADMINISTRATION 267 



The assistance of Black Student Organization 

nnember Reggie Moore is sought by the Director of 

Minority Student Affairs, Leroy Moore. 

An effort to keep day students informed about 

activities brings increased mailing paraphrenalia to 

the office of Carolyn Moseley, Associate Dean of 

Administration. 





**j^t ince we have such a select 

SS' student body, why don't they act 
like it?" complained one administrator. 

Students being only human, are far 
from perfect. Although the general 
attitude towards students was favorable, 
administrators were willing to reveal 
some less desirable traits: 

"Students lock a sense of humor and 
vitality . , . also, they look for the least 
difficult way out of moral imperatives," 
frowned another administrator. "They 
should let their reach exceed their 
grasp." Matters being viewed as 
"extremely difficult or impossible" 
concerned one administrator, while 
another was bothered by "a lack of 
interest and apathy." 

"There is too little complaining — an 
unwillingness to express themselves 
strongly," claimed one administrator. He 
also wishes that "more students would 
take a greater responsibility for their 
actions. Students are too dependent on 



the faculty, the administration, and each 
other." 

"I would like to see them show the 
same responsibility as they express in 
student activism. 

"A concern I have for students is that 
they achieve a greater consistency — 
often they take positions contrary to one 
another . . . but this inconsistency is a 
port of growing up." This same 
administrator would also like to see the 
emphasis channelled away from grade 
consciousness, which he feels is an 
"aberration of what higher education is 
all about." 

"Students are unique among human 
beings," concluded one, "They don't 
want their money's worth. They go out 
of their way to skip a class, not turn in a 
paper or get out of taking a test." 



Most resident students are familiar with Lori 
Cornette, Assistant Dean for Residence Hall Life, 
as she handles the room selection process and 
room change requests. 




^^StucIents are too cIepencIent^^ 



268 ADMINISTRATION 




Homecoming and the Alumni Gazette are two 

ways Gordon Vliet, Director of Alumni, keeps 
William and Mary graduates in close contact with 
their Alma Mater. 

High school "college nights" give Associate Dean 
of Admissions, Rex Tillotson the opportunity to 
meet prospective William and Mary students. 





Traveling with the othletic teems to their oway 
games brings Ben Cornevole, Director of Athletics, 
in constant contoct with students. 
Between screening applications and folking with 
high school seniors and their parents, Juanito 
Wolloce, Associote Deon of Admissions, is 
constantly on the go. 



ADMISSIONS 269 



Academic pressures, adjustment problems, and o 
multitude of tests bring students to the 
Psychological Counseling Center, directed by Joy 
Lee Chambers. 

In screening the 6000 applicants to the College, 
Robert Hunt, Dean of Admissions, helps evaluate 
students' performances in high school, their SAT 
scores, and personal recommendations. 



ii/lp ollege life can alter otie's 

KL' conduct and ultimately change 
one's life." 

According to the philosopher Coons, a 
college student undergoes a number of 
developmental changes, one of which is 
the examination of o values system. The 
administrators have different 
philosophies about how college alters 
students' values. 

"College alters students' values 
because they are exposed to many 
different ideas, lifestyles, and attitudes 
... As they study, live with one 
another, see others around campus . . . 
they realize that part of growing is to 
study values and select the ones they 
wish to stand by." However, citing the 
lack of interest shown in cultural events, 
one administrator declared, "It doesn't 
alter them enough." 

Another thinks that college "tends to 
decompose the stereotypes that hove 
already defined students' outlooks, 
thereby allowing new assumptions to 
take root." 

"The education they receive permits 
them to make choices on reason rather 
than on emotion. They will review all 
considerations of a matter before making 
a decision," proposed another 
administrator. Taking o different stand, 
one member stated that, "college 
clarifies students' values. It serves as the 
testing ground ... It firms their values." 
"They develop more effectively 
articulated values on life," was another 
view. 



Events such as rock concerts, dances, and the 
Fridoy night Film Series attract students to William 
and Mary Hall, under the direction of Lester 
Hooker. 




CoLlEqE iviAkEs you ^VhiNk 



270 ADMINISTRATION 



Often mistaken for o student herself, Susan 
Albert, Associote Dean for Student 
Development, provides counseling for freshmen 
and transfers- 

Nearly 3600 students are enrolled in the 
evening college and summer sessions which are 
directed by Paul Clem. 




One of the youngest odininistrators, Ken Smith 

enjoys his "official" duties as Director of Student 

Activities 

Under the direction of William Pollard, head 

librarian, the facilities of Swem Librory are 

available to members of the community os well os 

students. 



AbouT youR ThiNkJNq^^ 



ADMINISTRATION 27) 




272 CLASSES 




ADAMS, DOUGLAS W., Richmond. 

Psychology. Choir; I.F.C., Vice President; 

Interhall, Vice President; Project Plus; 

Senior Class Graduotion Committee; 

Sigma Pi, Secretary; S.A. Senator. 
ADAMS, KATHY LOUISE, Camp Hill, Pa. 

Biology. Phi Sigma. 
ADAMS, NORMAN D., Providence Forge. 

Economics. Intramurals. 
ADLIS, CHARLYN, Clifton Forge. Business 

Administration — Management. Chorus; 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Rush Chairman, 

President; Sigma Chi, Sweetheart. 



AKERS, SHARON LYNNE, Hopewell. 

Government. Varsity Tennis; O.A. 
ALBERT, BRENDA CHERYL, Falls Church. 

English. College Wide Reading Program; 

Committee for Lectures; Colonial Echo; 

Delta Delta Delta; Interhall; O.A.; R.A. 
ALBERT, PATRICIA, Prince George. 

Anthropology. Anthropology Club, 

President. 
ALEXANDER, DAVID W., Arlington. 

Business Management. 



ALEXANDER, WILMA JOYCE, Hampton. 

Elementary Education. Band. 
ALLEN, LARRY STEVEN, Richmond. 

Music. Band; Outing Club; Phi Mu 

Alpha, President, Sinfonicron Opera Co 

Music Director. 
ALLISON, LYNN RAE, Richmond. 

History Psychology. Dorm Council; 

Gamma Phi Beta; Mortarboard; 

Orchesis; O.A.; R.A. 
ALTMAN, ANN ALISON, Alexandria. 

Music. Delta Omicron; Orchestra. 







In case of rain... 

^9ft ngered by the decision of President 
/C^ Graves to schedule graduation in 
William and Mary Hall instead of the 
Wren Courtyard, students held a rally 
Sunday, September 28. President Graves 
claimed that the Hall would eliminate 
the fear of inclement weather and solve 
the problems of seating and parking. 

However, tradition that had been 
criticized and laughed at in the post, was 
found to be instilled in William and Mary 
students. The majority felt that the 
aesthetics of the Wren yard outweighed 
the advantages of the Hall. As a 
consequence of the rally and requests by 
other committees, it was decided to 
honor tradition. 



The Wren Courtyard is the site for a student 
demonstration protesting the change of graduation 
sites. 



SENIORS 273 



AMIS, NELSON SAMUEL, Baltimore, Md. 

Government B SO., Vice President; 

Debate Team, Internotional Circle; 

intramurals. 
ANDAAS, KATHY ALISON, Eoston, 

Conn. History. Intramurals; Kappa 

Koppo Gamma; WMCF. 
ANDERSON, BARRY M., New Hertford, 

NY. Economics, Circle K; ODE, Vice 

President; Young Democrats, Vice 

President 
ANDERSON, DONALD HENRY, Gardner, 

Mass. History. Interhall; Intramurals; 

Outing Club. 



ANDERSON, GREGORY RAY, 

Waynesboro. History. Intramurals; 

Sigma Pi, Alumni Chairman, House 

Manager, Rush Chairman. 
ANDERSON, JAMES L., Ivyland, Pa. 

Interdisciplinary. Pi Lambda Phi. 
ANDREWS, CLARKE B., Salem. Biology. 

Intramurals; Committee for Security 

Affairs; Wesley Foundation; 

Williamsburg Fire Dept. ond EMS. 
ANGSTADT, PATRICIA ANN, Gibbsboro, 

N.J. Accounting. Beta Gamma Sigma. 



AREHART, DEBORAH ELLEN, 

Charlottesville. History, Kappa Alpha 
Theta, Social Chairman. 

ARNOLD, DIANE ELIZABETH, Elmira, 
NY. Elementary Education. Alpha Chi 
Omega, Assistant Treasurer, Treasurer; 
Kappa Delta Pi, Alumni Chairman. 

ASHWELL, LINDA LEE, Herndon. History. 
Delta Delta Delta, R.A.; J.V. 
Cheerleading; Pi Lambda Phi, 
Sweetheart. 

BAECHTOLD, M. ELIZABETH, Annapolis, 
Md. English. College Symphony; Dorm 
President; Inter-varsity Christian 
Fellowship, Vice President; Volleyball. 



BAILEY, JENNIFER DONNELLE, Hurt, 

Elementary Education. Band; Delta 

Omicron, 
BAIRD, JUNE ELIZABETH, Surry. 

Elementary Education, Chorus, 
BAKER, BARBARA JOYCE, Colorado 

Springs, Col. Business Management, 
BAKER, GARY E., Wheeling, W.Vo. Art 

History. Lyon G. Tyler Historical Society 



BALCAREK, JOANNA MARIA, Cherry 

Hill, N.J. Biology. Koppo Alpha Theto; 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Project Plus, 
BANE, SARAH ANN, Halifax, Business 

Administration, Pi Beta Phi, Secretary, 
BARBAN, MARK DAVID, Cope Charles, 

Biology. Intromurals; O A,; Pi Lambda 

Phi, Vice President, 
BARNES, KEVIN M,, Hopelown, N.J. 

Physical Education. Varsity Football; 

Kappa Sigma. 




274 SENIORS 




They may not be on tinte^ 
but it sure beats wall\inzl 



.goes, but where he stops . . ." 
well, all one needed to do was ask. 
Although the official policy dictated 
stops only at designated points, most of 
the bus drivers were more than willing to 
accomodate the student. 

The "Green Machine" was vital to 
William and Mary students. In addition 
to providing a means of transportation to 
classes for JBT and Ludwell residents, 
the buses were always in great demand 
by on campus students during dinner 
hours. 

Trecks to and from A&P and Food 
Fair were facilitated by those 

Bus driver Ken McClure gets ready to pick up the 
children from Chickahonniny for Circle K tutoring. 



understanding bus drivers who 
acquiesced to various student requests 
such as, "Would you stop at the frats?" 

Some students viewed the bus 
situation from an entirely different angle. 
Circle K's bib blue bus provided much 
needed transportation for their children. 
With the assistance of William and Mary 
student drivers. Circle K was able to use 
their bus for trips for the kids as well as 
their normal tutoring and swimming 
programs. 

Together the buses provided 
transportation for all types of activities 
and became an integral part of the 
students' daily routine. 




BARNETT, CYNTHIA CHERYL, Danville. 
Psychology Sociology. Pi Beta Phi, 
Pledge Secretary. 

BARRET, JANE ELIZABETH, Richmond. 
Business Management, Circle K; College 
Wide Orientotion Committee, Dorm 
Council, Kappo Delta, Assistant Rush 
Chairman, President, O.A,, Assistant 
Orientation Director, Orientation 
Director. 

BARRINGER, HOWARD DOUGLAS, 
Rutsburg English Classics Award; 
Kappo Alpha Pi. 

BARROWS, BONNIE, Sandusky, Ohio. 
Biology. CSA. 



BARSHIS, DARR EDWARD, Alexandria. 

Business Monagement. Intramurals; 

Sigmo Chi, 
BARSHIS, DAVID ALAN, Alexandria. 

Business Manogement Sigma Chi. 
BARTEL, GERTRUDE CATHERINE, 

Kingsville, Md. Economics, Alpha 

Lambda Delta, Dorm President, French 

House; ODE, W.RA Representative. 
BARTENSTEIN, MARGARET ERWIN, 

Worrenton Fine Arts, Canterbury; 

Orchesis, President; WMCF. 



BASILE, MARK NICHOLAS, Baltimore, 
Md Theatre and Speech. Backdrop 
Club; Phi Mu Alpha; Sinfonicron; William 
and Mary Theotre. 

BATLAN, DAVID HENRY, Elmiro, NY. 
Business Accounting. Accounting 
Society, President; Intramurals; Sigmo 
Chi, Treasurer 

BAUER, BARBARA GASTON, Hampton. 
Anthropology 

BAULEY, THOMAS KELLY, Williomsburg. 
English Flot Hot; Intramurols; Sigma 
Chi 



SENIORS 275 



BAXTER, FIONA LOUISE, Richmond. 
BEAN, WILLIAM KIT JR., Roanoke. 

Religion. Baptist Student Union. 
BEASLEY, ALLEN W., Vo, Beach. 

Government. Soccer; Circle K 
BECK, MARY ELIZABETH, Williamsburg. 

Sociology. 



BECKROGE, BONNIE ELLEN. Norfolk, 
Elementary Education. Colonial Echo; 
Gamma Phi Beta; Volleyball; Chorus. 

BELLOR, JAMES R. JR., Falls Church. 
Mathematics. Intramurals; Golf. 

BENNETT, JEAN CLAIRE, Glassboro, N.J, 
Sociology Art History. Sociology 
Student-Faculty Liaison Committee; 
OA 

BENNETT, STEVEN EDGAR, 

Williamsburg. Anthropology. Colonial 
Echo, Photographer, Flat Hot, 
Photographer; Rugby; S.A. Senator; 
Young Democrats. 



BENTON, TANYA LEE, Chesapeake. 
Biology. Biology Club. 



BERGLUND, W. DAVID, Va. Beach. 
Economics. Intramurals; Karate Club; 
O.A.; R.A. 



BERNSTEIN, ROBERT JEFFREY, 
Alexandria. Government. Bond. 




276 SENIORS 




Changing roles 

(^ fter being a student for sixteen 
St\ years, finding one's self on the 
other side of the front desi<. often proved 
to be a shock. However, with a little bit 
of adjustment, student teachers soon 
learned to cope with the classroom 
situation. 

Five weeks of in-class instruction 
marked the beginning of the student 
teaching experience. In conjunction with 
a cooperating teacher, they then began 
to teach the pupils through the 
application of various techniques studied 
at William and Mary. 

Perhaps the most difficult adjustment 
to be made concerned the use of the title 
Mr. or Ms. In addition, giving tests to 
students rather than taking them 
themselves, was new, challenging, and a 
little awkward. The student teachers 
learned that maybe it wasn't quite as 
easy as it appeared! 



Educotionol methods are discussed by Tony 

Wenner and Brenda Albert with their cooperating 

teacher. 

An important point is stressed by Carolyn Brinkley 

to attentive students. 





BERRY, ROBERT MICHAEL, Williomsburg. 

History, Circle K; Lyon G. Tyler 

Historical Society; Queen's Guard. 
BEVERLY, LENDELL L., Richmond. 

Psychology. Chorus. 
BEZDAN, BECKY, Mechanicsville. 

Accounting. 
BIANCHI, RONALD F., Annandale. 

Biology. Dorm Council, President. 



BILLINGSLEY, ROBERT T., Monterey. 

Government. I.F.C., Rush Chairman; 

Intramurals; O.A.; Sigma Chi, Rush 

Chairman, 
BLACKVVELL, JEAN, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Economics. Gamma Phi Beta, Treasurer, 

President; Hockey; Lacrosse;' Mortar 

Board; O.A.; ODE; ODK; WRA, 

Recorder. 



BLAIN, VIRGINIA BARBOUR, Roanoke. 

Economics ODE. 
BLEDAY, RAYMOND, Concord, Mass. 

Chemistry. Rugby. 



BLOW, RANDALL MAHLON, Va. Beach. 

Biology. Dorm Council, President; S.A. 

Senator; Sigma Pi. 
BLYSTONE, WILLIAM P., JR., Hayes. 

Math-Computer Science. 



BOLTON, PAULA LANE, Arlington. 

Psychology Intramurals; WATS. 
BOONE, TERRENCE CHARLES, 

Annandole. Economics. Plot Hat, Sports 

Editor; J.V. Lacrosse; Outing Club, Vice 

President; R.O.T.C; WCWM. 



SENIORS 277 



BOOR, DAVID A., Danville. Accounting, 

Intromurals; OA.; Outing Club; Sigma 

Phi Epsilon, Treasurer. 
BOOTH, ROBERT CHARLES, Northfield, 

N.J Business Administration. F.C.A.; 

Football, Varsity; Kappa Alpha, Vice 

President. 
BOURQUE, DENISE, Newport News. 

Elementary Education. Circle K; Hockey; 

Intromurals; Lacrosse; WATS; WRA 

Representative. 
BOWER, SUSAN ELAINE, Arlington. Fine 

Arts. 



BOWMAN, JAMES GARBER, 

Harrisonburg. Biology. Intromurals; 

Lambda Chi Alpho. 
BOYER, GEORGE ROBERT, Lemoyne, Pa. 

History Economics. History Majors Club; 

Intromurals; S.A. Senator. 
BRAIN, SALLY MARGARET, Springfield. 

Economics. Chorus; Committee on 

Concerts; Gamma Phi Beta; O.A.; Outing 

Club, Vice President. 
BRANCH, PAULA LEE, Ivor. Elementary 

Education. Premier Theatre; WATS. 



BRENNAN, JACQUELYN, Scotia, NY. 

Geology. 
BREU, CHARLOTTE ANN, Rochester, Vt. 

History. Campus Girl Scouts, President; 

Choir, Co-historion; Chorus; United 

Skiers ot Vo. 
BRINKLEY, CAROLYN LEE, Suffolk. 

English. Dorm Council; Junior Year 

Abroad; S.A. Elections Committee. 
6RITNELL, PHYLLIS ANN, 

Montoursville, Po. Chemistry. Band; 

Delta Omicron; Project Plus; WMCF. 





rf^ ^ 




f It rm 



Women emer^ 

J(<~i keeping with the trend of the 
-^ times, William and Mary closed the 
gap somewhat in adjusting to the 
ever-increasing presence of women in 
the "outside" business world. The 60's 
saw a transition in "women's work" 
taking place with a gradual movement 
from essentially housewife or secretary 
to executive positions. Accompanied by 
a Liberation Movement (some subtle, 
others overbearing), effective 
implementation of women's skills 
occurred. 

A series of lectures and discussions by 
experts in the fields of law, science, and 
business attempted to answer questions 
and alleviate anxieties of women on 
campus. It remained to be seen whether 
the impact of their advice was noticed. 



Career counseling series participant T. Vincent 
Leorson discusses business procedures. 



278 SENIORS 




BROWN, CHARLES KEVIN, Richmond. 

Biology. Intramurols; Williamsburg Fire 

Dept., Emergency Med. Service. 
BROWN, JILL BELINDA, Richmond. 

English. Alpho Lambdo Delta; WATS; 

Sigma Delta Pi. 
BROWN, MARK, Annandale. Chemistry. 

Chemistry Club; Intramurols; J.V. 

Football. 
BROWN, SHERRIE Y., Portsmouth. 

Psychology, Sociology. B.S.O.; 

Volunteers in Probation; WATS. 



BROWNING, ELIZABETH MAIA, Natural 

Bridge. History. Choir, Secretary; Chorus; 

Delta Omicron; Delta Phi Alpha, 

President; German House. 
BRUBAKER, H. WALLACE, Roanoke. 

Biology. 
BRUNER, SUSAN CARTER, Alexandria. 

Secondary Educotion, O.A., Sweetheart, 

Phi Kappa Tau. 
BUCHANAN, ALBERT ERNIE, Richmond. 

Business Management. Circle K; Dorm 

Council; Flat Hot; Intramurols; O.A.; Pi 

Lambda Phi. 



BUCHANAN, JEANEEN, Stamford, Conn. 

Government History. Circle K; Flot Hot; 

Kappa Delta, Asst. Treasurer, Treasurer; 

O.A, 
BUCK, EVELYN ANN, Alexandria. 

Sociology. 
BULL, LINDA ANN, Chesapeake. English. 
BUNDICK, MARK BLOXOM, Bloxom. 

Economics Intromurals, ODE, Notional 

Associotion of Rocketry, President, 

Administrative Council. 



BURKE, JOHN WASHINGTON, III, 

Woodford. Economics Philosophy. Circle 
K; Econ Club, Vice President; O.A.; ODE, 
President; Phi Eta Sigma; R.A.; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

BURLAGE, GERALD K., Norfolk. Business. 
Basketball; Intramurols. 

BURNETTE, SUSAN MARIA, Lynchburg. 
Psychology. Honors. 

BURNS, MARY BEA, Powtucket, R.I. 
Mathematics Computer Science. ACM; 
Alpho Lambdo Delto; Circle K; Outing 
Club. 



BURROW, ROBERT WAYNE, Hopewell. 

Geology. Dorm Council, Vice President; 

Intramurols; Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 
BURTON, BEVERLY SUSAN, Richmond. 

History Economics. 
BURTON, ROBERT A., Arlington. 

Government. Foreign Study Program; 

Graduation Committee; Notionol Model 

United Nations; Premiere Theatre. 
BUTT, LOIS JEAN, Abingdon. Chemistry. 



SENIORS 279 



BYAM, PAMELA E., Williamsburg. 

German Pi Delta Phi. 
BYRNE, MARCELLA V., Falls Church. 

Biology WMCF. 
CADDEN, MARIAN O'SHEA, Huntington, 

NY Psychology. Flot Hot; Newman 

Club; Outing Club. 
CAMACHO, BARBARA S., Hampton. 

Elementary Education. Chi Omega; 

Kappa Delto Pi. 



CAMPBELL, EDGAR, Scottsdale, Ariz. 

Geology. 
CAMPBELL, LAURIE JANE. Arlington. 

Americon Studies. Chorus; Kappa Alpha 

Theta. 



CAMPBELL, WILLIAM C, Fincastle. 

Accounting. Circle K; Intramurals; 

Humanities Week, Head. 
CARLO, MARY JO, Falls Church. Biology. 

Transfer. 



CARMINE, FREDERICK THOMAS, JR., 
Newport News. Accounting. O.A.; 
Accounting Club. 



CARSON, CLAUDIA ANNE, Lansing, 
Mich. Anthropology. College 
Republicans. 

CARSON, WENDY ELAINE, New Delhi, 
India. French. French House; German 
House; Jr. Year Abroad, Pi Delta Phi. 

CASE, LOUIS CYRIL, III, Westfield, N.J. 
Business Administration. Varsity 
Football. 

CASH, MAUREEN ELIZABETH, Sandston. 
Music. Alpha Chi Omega, Corresponding 
Secretary, Scholarship Chairman, Rush 
Chairman; Choir; Delta Omicron; O.A. 




280 SENIORS 




The longest line 

September 2, 1975 

ear Mom, 

Today I learned the virtue of 
patience by going through registration 
for the first time. What a bummer! As we 
stood in the rain waiting for our letter to 
be called, o little man in a gray suit kept 
shouting, "Are there any more I's?" Four 
hours later, wet and dripping, my letter 
was called. Now I know why they call it 
arena registration. The long lines, the 
anxiety of getting the classes I wanted, 
and in general the total mass confusion, 
made me feel like Daniel in the Lion's 
Den. 

After scheduling my classes and 
thinking the worst was over, I learned I 
had one more obstacle to overcome — 
the taking of my I.D. picture. Standing in 
line for three hours for a mug shot was 
hardly worth the wait. On the way out, 
we were hit for money by the SA and 
other student organizations. 

Having survived, I now feel ready for 
anything. Off to the caf . . . 






Long lines were typical of traditional registration 
for the Freshmen and Sophomores. 





CASHELL, BRIAN WALLACE, Alexandria. 

French. Band; Orchestra. 
CASTLE, CYNTHIA WIRTZ, Williamsburg. 

Religion. International Circle; Religion 

Club, President, South Asio Society, Vice 

President. 
CASTLE, EDWIN SCOTT, Williamsburg. 

English. 
CAVALIERE, ROBERT S., New Britain, 

Conn. Mathematics. Dorm Council; 

Intramurols, Secretory; Lambda Chi 

Alpha. 



CHAFIN, PAMELA LYNN, Huntington, 
W.Va. History. 

CHAMBERS, WILLIAM LANE, Englewood, 
Fl. Psychology. BSA; Flat Hat; FHC, 
President; S.A., Ombudsman; R.A. 



CHAMBLISS, SUSAN, Birmingham, Mich. 

English. Chorus; Circle K; Delta Delta 

Delta, Activities Chmn. 
CHARLES, GARY, Woodbridge Plot Hot; 

Premiere Theatre; Westminister 

Fellowship, President. 



CHESTNEY, CHERYL ANN, Newport 
News. Elementary Education. Tronsfer; 
Phi Mu. 

CHOGICH, PATRICIA J., Media, Pa. 
French Jr. Year Abroad. 



CHRIST, PATRICIA PLAYER, Toono. 

Anthropology. 
CHRISTESEN, STEVEN DALE, Springfield. 

Chemistry. 
CLARK, LAURA LYNN, Hampton. 

English. 
CLAUD, CHRYSTAL MASON, South 

Boston. Economics. Black Student 

Orgonizotion. 



SENIORS 281 



CLEARY, JAMES J., Massopequa, N.Y. 

Sociology. Asia House; Intromurals; 

Wrestling. 
CLEARY, MICHAEL D., Vienna. Geology. 

Sigma Chi; Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 
CLOUSER, JENNIE DETWEILER, Vienna. 

Math/Computer Science. Alpha Lambda 

Delta; Assoc, for Computing Machinery; 

Pi Delto Phi. 
COCHRAN, CORBY L., Roanoke. 

Renaissance Studies. Colonial Echo, 

Performing Arts Editor, Art Research 

Editor; Mortar Board; ODK, Pi Delta 

Epsilon; Sigma Delta Pi; R.A. 



CODD, WILLIAM T., Baltimore, Md. 

Mathemotics. Intromurals; Pi Lambda 

Phi. 
CODY, MARIAN R, Missouri City, Texas. 

History, J.V. Cheerleader; Pi Beta Phi. 
COLLINS, CATHY ANN, Skaneateles, 

NY. Circle K; Gamma Phi Beta, 

Recording Secretary; Mortar Board, 

President; ODK; R.A.; Swim Team. 
COMSTOCK, JAMES RAYMOND, JR., 

Psychology. Amateur Radio Club; 

WMCF. 



CONE, LORENE P., McLean. Biology. 
Canterbury Club; Colonial Echo; 

Hockey; Science Fiction Club, WMCF. 
CONINE, THOMAS JEFFREY, Phillipsburg, 
N.J. Intromurals; Sigma Pi, Rush 
Chairman, Vice President, President. 



CONNER, ALEXANDER NICHOLSON, 
Charlotte, N.C Economics Kappa 
Sigma; Lacrosse. 

CONWAY, DRURY, Vo. Beach. 

Psychology Cheerleading; Chi Omega, 
President; Colonial Echo; Intromurals; 
O.A. 



CONWAY, SUZANNE MARIE, 

Alexandria Government. Kappa Alpha 

Theta, Activities Chairman. 
COOGAN, KATHLEEN, Manassas. 

Biology. 
COOK, LESLEY ANNE, Arlington. History. 

Intromurals; WATS; WMCF. 
COPPEDGE, JOHN COUNCIL, Charlotte, 

N.C. Biology. Intromurals; Lambda Chi 

Alpha. 







Bi^t^est hits 



. Lyin' 
Dance 



ad Blood . . . Colypso 
Eyes . . . Island Girl . . 
With Me . . . Ain't No Way . . . 
Feelings . . . Mexico . . . Fame . . . 
The Way I Want . . . How Long . . . 
Jaws . . . That's The Way . . . Miracles 
. . Sky High . . . How Sweet It Is . . . 
if I Ever Lose . . . Daisy Jane . . . Third 
Rate Romance . . . One Of These 
Nights . . . Someone Save My Life . . . 
Carolina in the Pines . . . Wasted Days 
and Wasted Nights . . . Pages . . . Jive 
Talkin' . . . Help Me Rhonda . . . The 
Hustle . . . Keep On Tryin' . . . This 
Will Be . . . It Only Takes a Minute . . . 
Knockin' On Heaven's Door . . . Could 
It Be Magic ... At Seventeen . . . 
Rhinestone Cowboy . . . Rocky . . . Get 
Down . . . The Way . . . Gone At Last 
. . . Lady Blue . . . Money . . . There 
Goes Another . . . Holdin' On . . . 
Brand New Love Affair . , . Who Loves 
You . . . Two Fine People. 




282 SENIORS 




GOTTEN, SALLIE REES. Newport News. 

Sociology. Circle K; Sociology 

Student- Faculty Liaison Committee. 
COTTER, DONNA LEE, Mathews. 

Psychology. Circle K; WATS. 
COUGHLIN, TERENCE M., Williamsburg. 

Government Officer Candidate, 

U.S.M.C.R.; Queen's Guord. 
COX, ROSCOE THOMAS, Aiken, S.C. 

History English. History Club; Phi Etc 

Sigma; Project Plus; Public Relations 

Committee; Russian Club. 



COX, ZAHRA E,, Annandale. 

Government. 
COYNER, KAREN ELAINE, Fishersville. 

Elementary Education. Circle K; Delta 

Delta Delta; O.A. 
GRACE, DEBORAH LEE, Marietta, Go. 

Urban Studies, Dorm Council; Interholl. 
CRAFT, MICHAEL, Charlottesville. 

Psychology. Band; French House; Phi 

Mu Alpha; Sinfonicron. 



GREAGER, ROGER T., Berryville English. 
Band; Dorm President; Flat Hat; 
Interholl; Order of the White Jacket; 
Theta Delta Chi 



GRIDER, HENRY G., Chatham. History. 
College Republicians; S.A, Athletic and 
Discipline Committees 



GROTTY, DEBORAH DEIRDRE, 

Springfield Physics. Lacrosse. 
CROUCH, DEBORAH ANNE, 

Williamsburg Biology Biology Club; Phi 

Sigmo. 
CULLINAN, KATHLEEN, Williamsburg. 

Mathematics. 
CULVER, VALERIE, Annandole. 

Chemistry Gamma Phi Beta; 

Intramurals. 



SENIORS 283 



CUMBY, ROBERT E., Springfield, Pa. 

Economics. ODE; Phi Eta Sigma, Theta 

Delta Chi, Rush Chairman. 
CUMMINGS, DEAN JOHN, Newport 

News. Circle K, Intramurals, Pi Lambda 

Phi; Project Plus; Senior Class Publicity 

Chairman; WATS; Wrestling. 
CURLING, MARLENE LOUISE, Richmond. 

Psychology. Asia House 
DALTON, STEPHEN FRANK, Ellicott City, 

Md. Geology; Football. 



DALY, MARY JOAN, Easton, Pa 

Psychology. Alpha Chi Omega; Chorus; 

Newman Club; Republican Club. 
DANIELS, PAMELA JEAN, Indialantic, Fla. 

Elementary Education. Dorm Council; 

Kappa Kappa Gomma, Registrar; 

WMCF 
DAVID, TOM, Williomsburg. 

Interdisciplinory. Backdrop Club; Band; 

Orchesis; Phi Mu Alpha; Premiere 

Theatre; Sinfonicron; Theatre. 
DAVIES, EMILY LANDON, Richmond. 

Biology, Pi Beta Phi, Meal Steward; 

W&M Indian; Volleyball. 



DAVIS, CHRISTOPHER M., Midlothian. 

Geology. Baseball, Captain; Lambda Chi 

Alpha; College Bartenders. 
DAVIS, EDWARD LEE, Richmond. 

Psychology. Flot Hat; Intramurals; 

Spanish House; Theta Delta Chi. 
DAVIS, JEFFREY SHAWN, Winchester. 

Biology. College Wide Committee. 

Intramurals; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
DAVIS, MALLORY ANN. Suffolk. 

Government. Volleyball. 



DAVIS, MARGARET, Richmond. Latin. 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Classics Club; 

O.A.; R.A.; Delta Delta Delta. 
DAVIS, RUTH D., Williamsburg. 

Anthropology. Anthropology Club; 

Kappa Delta. 
DAVIS, SYLVIA ANN, Bel Air, Md. 

Mathematics. Kappa Delta; Majorettes; 

Wesley Foundation. 
DE CARLO, SUZANNE, South Ploinfield, 

N.J. Philosophy. Escort; Intramurals; 

WCWM. 



DE LAP, NANCY CHRISTINE, Narrows. 

Biology. Chorus; Circle K; Phi Sigmo. 
DEMYTTENAERE, NANCY, Alexandria. 

Anthropology. Chorus; Evensong Choir; 

Kappa Delto. 
DENEEN, CHARLES SAMUEL, Orlando, 

Fla. Business Management. Circle K; 

Civitans; College Republicans; Fencing 

Team; Intramurals; Karate Club; Lyon G. 

Tyler Historical Society; R.A.; S.A. 

Committees; Student Lobby. 
DENSLOW, KEITH DAVID, Norfolk. 

Government. 




284 SENIORS 



A glimpse into 
a bygone time 

topping to speak with the 
silversmith while strolling through 
town was a common practice in 18th 
century Williamsburg. Two hundred 
years later, this was still feasible despite 
great industrial expansion and busy 
routines of middle-class America. 
Colonial Williamsburg provided a unique 
representation of 18th century life and 
William and Mary students played an 
integral role in its operation. 

Dressed in colonial costumes, these 
students re-enacted the roles of 
craftsmen, smiths and waitors in a 
setting symbolic of the post. 
Barrelmakers, candlemakers, and 
potterymakers demonstrated their vast 
talents. After a brief orientation period, 
they were able to answer the questions 
of thousands of tourists who roamed 
Duke of Gloucester Street daily. 

This cooperative effort between the 
college and the town became one of 
mutual benefit. Students profited both 
educationally and economically. Due to 
the history of the college. Colonial 
Williamsburg tourism was also 
enhanced. 



King's Arms Tavern provides unique employment 
for Micl<.ey Outten, 





DE ROSA, PATRICIA LUISE, Woyside, N.J. 

Economics. Circle K; Dorm Council; Pi 

Beta Phi. 
DESKINS, DEBORAH KAY, Newport 

News. Elementary Education. 
DEVANNY, EARL HANNUM IV, Foirfax. 

Economics, Theta Delto Chi, 
DE VRIES, SCOTT P., Brooklyn, NY. 

Economics BSA, Finance Committee 

Chairman; Film Series, Assistant 

Director; plot Hot, Advertising Monoger; 

Sigma Chi; Tennis, 



DE WITT, RIDGE, Charlotte, N.C. Biology. 

DICKINSON, JANET, Danville. 
Psychology, BSA, Environment 
Committee; Chi Omega, Secretary, 
Alumni Chairman, Dorm Council, 
Treasurer; Intramurols; O.A.; S.A. 
Committees; Transportation Control 
Boord. 

DICKSON, CAROL A., Syracuse, NY. 
Government, Affirmotive Action 
Advisory Committee; Colonial Echo; 
WRA. 

DIEHL, WALTER JOSEPH III, Nashville, 
Tn. Biology. Intramurols; Outing Club; 
Sigma Chi, Vice President. 



SENIORS 285 



DIGGS, JANET LYNN, West Point. 

Biology. Orchesis. 
DILLICH, LISA SUZANNE, Suffolk. 

Economics Colonial Echo; Economics 

Club; ODE, Secretary, Treosurer; Project 

Plus; Sponish House; WATS. 
Dl PACE, BETH ANN, Vc. Beach. 

Elementary Education. Alpha Chi 

Omega; Circle K; Colonial Echo; Kappa 

Delta Pi. 
Dl RIENZO, MICHAEL P., Vo. Beach. 

Government. 



DOUGLASS, GLORIA ANTOINETTE, 
Richmond. Government. BSO; WATS. 

DOWNING, SAMUEL PATRICK, 
Chesapeake. Chemistry. 

DREYER, LARRY L., Roanoke. Biology. 
Biology Club. Treasurer; Circle K; 
Wesfel, President. 

DRISCOLL, THOMAS L., Mechanicsville. 
Biology. Biology Club, President; College 
Wide Committee; O.A.; Phi Sigma. 



DRUMMOND, DAVID MILTON, Newport 
News. Mathematics. Rifle Team. 

DUDLEY, KRISTA SUSAN, Annandale. 
Business Management. Escort; Kappa 
Delta, Vice President; O.A.; Sigma Delta 
Pi; Sponish House. 

DUKE, GEORGE WESLEY, Little Rock, Ark. 
Accounting. F.H.C., Secretary; 
Intramurals; Pi Lambda Phi; Senior 
Class, Secretary-Treasurer; O.A. 

DUMAN, RONALD S., Ebensburg, Pa. 
Biology. Biology Club; Football; 
Intramurals. 



DUNFORD, SUSAN, Richmond. English. 

Chi Omega, Pledge Trainer; College 

Republicans; Mermettes. 
DU PRIEST, PAMELA J., Arlington. 

Psychology. 
DYE, THOMAS A., Oyster Boy, NY. 

Economics. Cross Country; Intramurals; 

Track. 
EARLEY, MARK LAWRENCE, 

Chesapeake. Religion. Canterbury; R.A.; 

WMCF. 




EASTHAM, ROBERT DABNEY, 

Williamsburg. Physics. Phi Eta Sigma. 

ECKLES, DIANA E., Mechanicsville. 
Biology. Alpha Chi Omega; Chorus. 

EDMUNDSON, JULIE E., Adelphi, Md. 
History. Bicentennial Committee; College 
Republicans; Dorm Council; History 
Majors Organization; Phi Alpha Theto. 

EDWARDS, RUTH ANN, Norfolk. 
Economics. Intramurals. 



\A 



ii MfJ 




286 SENIORS 




Kever a^ain! 

T/magine registration without the 
><| tears, frustrations and heartaches 
well remembered from past years. No 
longer did a student stand in line for two 
hours at William and Mary Hall only to 
find that the person ahead of him 
received the last computer card for 
English 207. This all became a dispelled 
nightmare with the adoption of a new 
registration procedure. Under this 
method, all students pre-registered prior 
to Christmas break. 

Although pre-registration had been 
utilized by juniors and seniors in the 
past, underclassmen experienced this 
method for the first time. All agreed that 
it was a great improvement over the 
mass chaotic system of previous years. 



The absence of long lines makes registration 
simple for ClGrl< Gray. 




iiMk 



y 



A 




EDWARDS, STEVEN S., Telford, Po. 

Biology. Track. 
EIDE, GORDON ALBERT, Williamsburg. 

Elementary Education. Soccer; Theto 

Delta Chi. 
ELDRIDGE, SUSAN JANE, Williamsburg. 

Delta Delta Delta, Assistant Float 

Cfiairman; Tennis, Captain. 
ELINSKY, JEFFREY C, Farmville. College 

Republicans, President; Intramurals. 



ELLIS, DAN, Arlington. 

Business Psychology. Dorm Council; 

O.A , Outing Club; S.A. Senate; United 

Skiers of Va , Coordinator. 
EMORY, CLAIRE MAY, Hyottsville, Md. 

English. Campus Girl Scouts; English 

Club; Pi Delta Phi; Westminster 

Fellowship. 
ENGLISH, RALPH S., Munich, West 

Germany. Government. Collegiate 

Civitans; Dorm Council, Secretary; Band; 

Phi Kappa Tou, Treasurer; S.A., 

Treasurer 
EVANS, SCOTT D., Oakland, N.J. English. 

German House; WATS. 



EVERSOLE, PAIGE, Hampton. English. Flot 

Hot, Editor, News Editor; President's 

Aide; Pi Beta Phi. 
EWING, JANET, Va, Beach. English. Phi 

Mu, WMCF. 
FAISON, MARSHA ANNE, Petersburg. 

Computer Science Alpha Lambdo Delta; 

Pi Beta Phi, Treasurer 
FAMA, STEPHEN CHARLES, Vienna. 

Government History J V Cheerleader, 

O.A.; Sigmo Chi, Ritual Chairmen. 



SENIORS 287 



FAULCONER, HUBERT LLOYD JR., 

Lynchburg. Accounting. Accounting 

Club; Pi Kappa Alpha 
FAUNTLEROY, CARMA CECIL, Altavista. 

History. Intramural Volleyball; Varsity 

Golf; WRA Representative. 
FEDERHEN, DEBORAH ANNE, Kingston, 

New Hampshire. Fine Arts. Backdrop 

Club; Study Abroad; Chorus; Delta 

Omicron; Dorm Council, Evensong Choir; 

Kappa Delta, Activities Chairman; S.A. 

Committees; Sinfonicron; Young 

Republicans. 
FELDMAN, TERRI, Hamilton, Ohio. 

Psychology Alpha Lambda Delta; Hillel, 

President; Kappa Alpha Theta, 

President, R.A. 



FERGUSON, ANDREW MATTHEW, 
Annondole. Elementory Education. 
Intromurais. 






FERGUSON, FRANCIS MARGARET, 
Memphis, Tenn. English. Choir, 
President; Chorus; R.A. 




FERREE, DENISE LYNN, Fredricksburg. 

Biology. Colonial Echo; Dorm Council. 
FERRERI, ROBERT ANTHONY, Parlin, 

N.J. French House; Karate Club; S.A. 

Senate; Sponish House. 
FETZNER, JILL ANN, Alexandria. English. 

Theatre, 



^^Hey, whafs ^oin^ on 



Ti f one ever "accidently" locks 
/<} himself out of his room there was 
always the consolation of knowing a 
resident assistant was available to rescue 
him from his turmoil. Known by most as 
on R.A., this individual was responsible for 
the smooth functioning of dormitory life. 

Keeping students informed on 
registration and other administrative 
matters, holding various student 
government and dorm council elections, 
and accepting work and damage reports 
were some of the many duties of the R.A. 
In addition, counseling students in 
roommate, academic and other 
problems compounded the load of the 
resident assistant. 



R.A.'s welcome freshmen with a familiar childhood 
personality, decorating the dorm halls. 



%^ 






o^ 



P«Lr/itoo 



FINAN, MICHAEL, Vienna. Anthropology. 
FISHER, STEPHEN D., Springfield. 

Chemistry. Wesfel; WMCF. 
FITZPATRICK, GERARD J., Commock, 

NY. Chemistry. Intromurais; O.A.; 

Theta Delta Chi, Rush Choirman; Varsity 

Soccer 
FLETCHER, GREGORY LEE, Vienna. 

English. Dorm Council; Intromurais. 




288 SENIORS 




around her el 



FLORA, JOHN W., Williamsburg. 

Philosophy Government. 
FOSTER, CHARLES, Richmond. 
FOSTER, SUSAN, Alexandria. Business 

Management. Pi Beta Phi. 
FOUSSEKIS, JOHN GEORGE, Norfolk. 

Biology. College Republicans; 

Intramurals. 




FOX, JAMES K., Solano Beach, Co. 
Biology. Golf; Intramurals; Soccer, 
Captain; Theto Delta Chi, Secretory, 
Social Chairman; Winter Soccer Club. 

FRANCE, BONNIE MARILYN, Arlington. 
Sociology. Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Collegiate Civitons, Secretary; Mortar 
Board; Pi Beta Phi; Mermettes. 



FRANCESCHINI, KAREN MARIA, 
Potomac, Md, Elementary Education. 
Christian Fellowship. 

FRANKE, CLARKE RICHARD, 
Williamsburg. English. Lacrosse. 



FRANKLIN, PATRICIA ANN, Lynchburg. 

Psychology Alpha Lombda Delta; 

Project Plus. 
FRANKO, JOYCE ANN, Richmond. 

Mathematics. Basketball; Hockey; KA 

Sweetheart. 



FROST, KATHLEEN DENISE, Athens, Go. 

Business Management. Dorm President; 

Interholl; Delta Delta Delta, Rush 

Chairman, 
FUCHS, NANCY LYNNE, Bridgewoter, 

N.J Art History. Outing Club; S.A. 

Committee; Volleyball; WRA. 
GALLAHER, BRENDAN HAIG, Geneva, 

Switzerland. Economics. Cross Country; 

Economics Club, International Circle 

Club; ODE. 
GALSON, CHARLOTTE MARIE, 

Alexandria. Biology. Alpho Lombda 

Delta; Biology Club; Chemistry Club; 

Lutheron Student Association; Phi 

Sigma. 






SENIORS 289 



f 



They say^ once an Indian^ always an Indian 




Tjf n this bicentennial year, special 
/<l emphasis was placed on the 
relationship between past and present. 
For this reason, the appearance of the 
alumni band at the annual Homecoming 
game was particularly poignant. 

The crowd of young and old alike 
enjoyed the band's performance as a 
whole. In particular, however, the alumni 
drum major, a customary favorite with 
the Homecoming crowd, returned once 
again to entrance the fans with his 
extra-ordinary skills. The William end 
Mary band then played a selection from 
yesteryear, in appreciation of the 
alumni's efforts, thus providing a unique 
and enjoyable means of bridging the 
generation gap. 



Alum drum major Jim Anthony, class of 1952, 

entertains crowd with his performance. 



GAMMON, GAY LEE, Richmond. French. 

Gamma Phi Beta; Study Abroad. 
GARLAND, DANIEL W,, Mechonicsville. 

Biology. Choir; Phi Mu Alpha. 
GARMAN, RICHARD, Roanoke. 

Elementary Education. Dorm Council; 

Intromurols; Rifle team. 
GASPAROLI, FELICITY ANNE, Roanoke. 

Elementary Education. Kappa Delta Pi, 

President; Mortar Board, Treasurer; Pi 

Beto Phi, Pledge Trainer; O.A. 



GAY, THOMAS STEWART, Richmond. 

History. Pi Kappa Alpha. 
GENOVESE, LENORA J., Baltimore, Md. 

English. Circle K; Flot Hot. 
GERALD, JUDY MARIE, Vienna. Music. 

Bond; Circle K; Delta Omicron, 

President. 
GERMANO, SUSAN ANN, Old Hyme, 

Conn. History. Chorus; Kappa Alpha 

Theto; Outing Club. 



GESSNER, ROBERT BRIAN, Massillon, 
Ohio. Business. Gymnastics; Lambda Chi 
Alpha, House Manager, Ritualist. 

GIBSON, ANNE ELIZABETH, Sudbury, 
Mass. History Studio Art. Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Chorus; Escort; Theatre. 

GIGLIO, ALLISON DIANE, Alexandria. 
History. Dorm Council, Sec; PDE; 
Project Plus; Sigma Delta Chi 

GILBERT, LLOYD M., Norfolk. Business 
Management. Circle K; Dorm Council. 




290 SENIORS 




GILLERAN, MICHAEL CROW, 

Birmingham, Mich. Modern Intellectual 

History Cross Country, Phi Beta Kappa; 

Phi Eta Sigma. 
GILLIS, SUSAN, Hollywood, Fla. 

History Anthropology. Kappa Alpha 

Theto 
GIORGINO, MICHAEL S , Bergenfield, N.J. 

History. 
GLOWA, JENNIE, Falls Church. Geology. 



GNATT, ANDREA JANE, Englishtown, 

N.J. Chemistry. Alliance Froncais; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Chemistry Club, Publicity 

Secretary; Circle K; French House; 

Mortar Board; Williom and Mory 

Review; Editorial Board. 
GOLDEN, PATRICK STAFFORD, Toledo, 

Ohio History. Interhall, Treasurer; 

Bicentennial Committee. 
GONZALEZ GONZALEZ, JANET 

ERASER, Williamsburg. Economics. 

Hisponic House; International Circle, 

Chairman; Project Plus; Study Abroad. 
GONZALEZ GONZALEZ, PHILLIPS 

FRANCISCO, Williamsburg. Fine Arts. 

Hispanic House; International Circle, 

President. 

GOODRICH, JEFFREY C, Canton, Go. 

Geology, intramurols; Sigma Alpha 

Epsilon. 
GORBSKY, GARY, Philadelphia, Pa. Circle 

K, Lyon G. Tyler Historical Society; 

ODK; Phi Eta Sigma, President; Phi 

Sigmo, Vice President; Phi Beta Kappa. 
GRAMER, CAROL RANDOLPH, 

Maplewood, N.J. Mathematics. Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Sigma Delta Pi; 

Swimming. 
GRANER, GRETCHEN MARY, Elmiro, 

NY. Anthropology. Chorus; F.C.A., 

Secretary, Treasurer; Footboll Manoger; 

Karate Club. 



GRAVES, DEBORAH, Chesapeake. Music, 
Chi Omega; Choir; Chorus; Delta 
Omicron; Publicotions Council. 

GRAY, JOHN M., Springfield. Government. 
Choir, Historian. 

GRAY, KENNETH F., Kanchohe, Howoii. 
Government. Debate Team; S.A. Senate. 

GRAY, ROGER CLARKE, JR , Falls 
Church. Business Management. Dorm 
Council; Intramurols. 



GRAY, SUSAN HART, Norfolk. 

Mathematics History. Circle K; Pi Beta 

Phi, House President. 
GRAYSON, JANET MARGARET, 

Blocksburg. Mathematics. Alpha 

Lambda Delta; WATS. 
GREENFIELD, LAWRENCE W , Bellefonte, 

Pa History. Debate; DRSTKA, President; 

Lyon G Tyler Historical Society; Young 

Democrats 
GREGORY, BARBARA S., Wrightstown, 

N.J. English. Conterbury; Circle K; Field 

Hockey. 



- - t 



SENIORS 291 



GREGORY, ELIZABETH BANKS, Norwolk, 
Conn. History Alpha Lombdo Delta; 
Chorus; Colonial Echo; Delta Delto 
Delta; Mortar Board; Sigma Delta Pi. 

GRIEVE, HELEN J., Augusta, Ks. 

Economics Alpha Lombdo Delto; Circle 
K; Delto Delto Delta; CSA. 



GRIFFITH, HARRIETT ADINE, Deltoville. 

Psychology. Chorus, Phi Mu, House 

President; WMCF. 
GRIFFITH, MARK CULLEN, Upper St. 

Clair, Pa. Football; Kappa Sigma, 

President; President's Aide; Tyler Club. 



GRUBBS, GENE BOBBIT, Ashland. 
Biology. Intramurals; Karate Club; Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Scuba Club; Swimming. 

GUILD, LYNDA ANNE, Hanover, 

Comparative Literofure. Sigma Delto Pi. 



GUNDERSEN, GLENN A., Point Pleasant, 
N.J. Economics. Admissions Guide; 
Colonial Echo; F.H.C Society; Phi Eta 
Sigma, ODE, Theta Delta Chi; ODK. 

HAAS. JOHN E.. JR., Richmond. Business 
Manoqement. Golf; Sigma Phi Epsilon 

HADLOCK, NANCY LEE, Alexondrio. 
Government. Bicentennial Committee 
Delta Delta Delto; S.A. Senator 

HAHN. PAULA ELAINE, River Edge, N.J. 
Chemistry. Circle K; Chemistry Club. 



HALASZ, GEORGE M., Arlington. 

Psychology. Lacrosse; Lambda Chi 

Alpho; Outing Club, President; Ski Club; 

WATS. 
HALL, SUZANNE L., Newark, De. History. 

Flat Hat; History Club; Pi Delta Phi; 

Koppo Alpha Theta, Vice President. 
HAMILTON, JANET CLARE, Fairfax. 

Psychology. Alpha Lombdo Delta; Dorm 

Council; Circle K; Intramurals; 

Volleyball; WATS. 
HAMILTON, SUSAN RICHARDS, 

Petersburg, Flo. English, History. Alpha 

Chi Omega; Panhelienic Representotive. 




292 SENIORS 



Nil. 



.^ 



y 



Unsuspectingly, Ed Gormley has fallen prey to a 
merciless prankster. 



were a few of the most common pranks 
by which students amused themselves 
and antagonized their roommates. 

How does one react when he returns 
from a mid-term exam with the intention 
of falling in bed, only to find the bed 
filled with crackers? Or, imagine 
answering the telephone only to receive 
Qr\ earful! of shaving cream! Even worse, 
consider waking up fifteen minutes late 
for class being trapped in the bedroom 
by mounds of newspapers! But 
remember, it was all in fun!! 




iiJil h 





HAMMOND, JANET ARLENE, Vienna. 

Biology. Circle K; Swimming. 
HAMMOND, PETER HENRY, Middle 

Granville, N.Y. Business Administration. 

Kappo Sigma; Track; Intramurals. 



HANDZEL, STEVEN J , West Chester, Pa. 

Accounting. Band; BSA; Circle K, 

Comptroller; Flat Hot, Business 

Monoger, Gymnostics. 
HANER, STEPHEN O., Roanoke. Religion. 

Escort; Flat Hat; S.A. Senate 



HANKINS, MARION J., Tazewell. English. 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Circle K. 
HANNA, SUE GORDON, Richmond. 

Elementary Education. Mermettes, 

Co-director; Pi Beta Phi, Social 

Choirman. 



HANSON, SHARON LEE, Arlington. 

English Chi Omega; Choir, Chorus; 

Circle K; Mortor Board, Vice President; 

O A.; R.A. 
HARBERT, JAMES, Heathsville. 

Mathematics Philosophy. Gymnastics; 

Lyon G. Tyler Historical Society; Theto 

Delta Chi. 
HARRIS, ANNE WEBSTER, Richmond. 

Anthropology Canterbury; Choir; 

Chorus, Church Choir; Delta Omicron; 

Kappa Delta; L S.A., Vice President; 

Ponhellenic Representative; Sinfonicron; 

Theatre. 
HARRIS, DEBRA L., Martinsville. 

Moth Computer Science. Band; Bridge 

Club; Campus Girl Scouts; Dorm 

Council; Residence Hoi I Advisory 

Council; Outing Club. 

HARROW, SUSAN ELLETT, Deltoville. 

English Chorus; Delta Delta Delta, 

Historian, Correspondent, Graduotion 

Committee; Pi Lambda Phi Sweetheart 
HATHORNE, BRUCE ALAN, Woshington, 

DC. English Colonial Echo, 

Photographer; Sigma Nu, Commonder, 

Wesley Foundation Council. 
HAUSER, JONATHAN L , Great Neck, 

NY Economics Intromurals; Lacrosse; 

ODE; Phi Eta Sigmo; Rugby. 
HAVENS, KEITH BRUNE, Vienna. 

Psychology Biology Dorm Council; 

Mermettes; Intramurals; Swim Team, 

Co-captain, Trock 



SENIORS 293 



HAY, MICHAEL ROEHL, Newport News. 

Physical Education- Intromurals; 

Lacrosse; Lambda Chi Alpho, House 

Monager; Physical Education Majors 

Club. 
HAYES, GLENN STUART, Chester. 

Government. Golf Team; Government 

Honors; Phi Sigma Society; Sigma Phi 

Epsilon, Social Chairman. 
HAYMES, BETH, Richmond. Biology. 

Biology Club. 
HEALEY, MARY E., Annondole, 

Elementary Education. Alpha Chi 

Omega. 





>....„ 1 



M,:ji 





r: .. 




Time rin^s on 

■V^^hile the chiming of the Wren 
tJmf Building bell was neither as 
precise as that of a ship, nor as 
impressive as the tolling of Big Ben, it 
was nonetheless a necessary and 
expected event of the academic day. 

Secluded in the cupola away from 
the prying eyes of the inescapable 
tourist, this piece of forged metal 
dictated whether the quarter mile 
half-walk/half-jog from Morton to Wren 
was in vain, or whether a professor 
would begin or end his lecture on time. 

Complementing the "reliable" campus 
clock system, where time could vary by 
15 minutes from one side of a hall clock 
to the other, or by hours from building to 
building, the bell and its ringer 
established an approximate system of 
timing all their own. 

Ironically, tradition appeared as the 
only force capable of interrupting this 
routine. On the final day of classes, 
seniors could vent their inquisitive nature 
or assert authority over a mechanism 
that had ruled their lives for four years, 
by giving two well-earned pulls on the 
rope! 



5 year veteran bellringer signals time for another 
class change 



HEDRICK, SUSAN KAYE, Annandale. 

Elementary Education. Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 
HEGYI, BRUCE, Arlington. 

Sociology Philosophy. Circle K; 

Intromurals; Track. 
HEITMAN, JULIA MADELINE, Plymouth 

Meeting, Pa. Interdisciplinary. Chorus; 

Circle K, WMCF, Missions Sec. 
HEMENWAY, DAVID B., Va. Beach. 

Biology. 




294 SENIORS 




HENRITZE, FREDERICK HUGHES, 

Atlanta, Go- Business Administration. 

Sigma Pi, Social Chairman; Intramurals. 
HENRY, KATHY M., Alexandria. English. 
HENSHAW, COURTNEY SCOTT, 

Mechanicsville. Biology. Biology Club, 

President. 
HENSON, IVAN H., Farmville. Economics. 



HERLONG, MADALINE, Saluda, S.C. 
English. Orchesis; Project Plus. 

HEWITT, B. ARLENE, Portsmouth. 
Economics. Dorm Council; Circle K. 

HICKS, LAURA LOUISE, Vienna. Biology. 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Circle K; Gamma 
Phi Beta, Pledge Troiner; Mortar Board, 
Selections Chairman; Phi Sigma. 

HILL, DOUGLASS O. JR., Winchester. 
History. Asia House; Project Plus. 



HOENS, HELEN E , So. Orange, N.J. 
Government Colonial Echo; 

Republicans; Wesley Youth Fellowship; 

ODE, 
HOFFMAN, MOLLY, Chesapeake. Music. 

Band, Canterbury; Delta Omicron; 

Evensong Choir; Orchestra. 
HOGAN, TED MAXTON JR., Lynch Sta. 

Theatre. Backdrop Club, O.A.; 

Sinfonicron; Theatre; WCWM. 
HOLLANDSWORTH, KATHY GAINS, 

Martinsville. Sociology. Circle K; Dorm 

Council; Outing Club. 



HOLLOWELL, HEATHER, Portsmouth. 

English French. Chi Omega; College 

Republicans; Dorm Council; Evensong 

Choir; Flot Hat, Associote Editor; O.A.; 

Pi Delta Epsilon. 
HOPKINS, BENDY, Lexington, Moss. 

Chemistry. Chemistry Club; L'il Sigma; 

S.A.; WMCF. 
HOPKINS, CHARLES R. Ill, Roke. Urban 

Studies Debate; Fencing; Project Plus; 

S.A, 
HOPKINS, GLYNIS ANN, Waynesboro. 

Biology. Biology Club; Chorus; College 

Republicons; S.A. 



HOPPE, ANN CHRISTINE, Williomsburg 

Government. Alpha Chi Omega, Vice 

President; Chorus; O.A.; Panhellenic 

Council. 
HORN, DIANE P., Wawa, Po. History. 

Band, Chorus; S.A., Secretory; WMCF; 

Young Life Leodership. 
H0RN8ERGER, RICHARD, Richmond. 

Economics. Intramurals 
HOUSER, DONNA ELLEN, Keeling. 

English. Band; WMCF. 



SENIORS 295 



HUBBARD, BARBARA ANNE, Woke. 

Mathematics. Delta Delta Delta; 

Colonial Echo; Graduotion Committee. 
HUDNALL, LINDA M , Kilmarnock. 

Psychology. Dorm Council; Escort; 

Intramurals. 
HUEBNER, STEPHEN J , Bernordsville, N.J. 

Government. Cross Country; IFC; 

Queen's Guard, Commander; Phi Kappa 

Tou, Vice President; R.O.T.C; Track. 
HUNDLEY, ELIZABETH PEYTON, Center 

Cross. Fine Arts. 



HUTCHISON, JANIS, Arlington. 

Chemistry. Bruton College Choir; 

Canterbury Association; Chemistry Club; 

Outing Club. 
INGE, MARCIA RYLAND, Blackstone. 

Psychology. Circle K; Wesley 

Foundation 
JACKSON, ALICE, Monokin. History. 

Kappa Koppo Gamma, Membership 

Chairman. 
JACKSON, WILLIAM L. II, Reston. 

Chemistry. Alpha Phi Alpha; Chemistry 

Club; Intramurals; Premiere Theatre. 



JANNIK, NANCY O., Williamsburg. 

Geology. Vorsity Volleyball. 
JARRELL, JAMES MALCOLM, 

Standarsville. Elementary Education. 

Circle K; WATS. 



JEREMIAH, JEFFREY J., Springfield. 

Business Administration. Basketball; 

Intramurals; Lambda Chi Alpha, Alumni 

Correspondent, Pledge Trainer. 
JOHNSON, CAROL TAYLOR, Abingdon. 

Physics. Outing Club; SPS. 



JOHNSON, GLENN GARRETT, Bedford. 

Biology. Biology Club; Pi Kappa Alpha. 
JOHNSON, LYNDA CARTER, Miami, Fla. 

Government, Gymnastics; Tennis; Phi 

Theta Kappa. 





Why not ival\ 

■VVI hoever said that traffic signs were 
iU/ supposed to help the visitor find 
his way around must never have entered 
the town of Williamsburg! Traffic lights 
were non-existent in the restored area; in 
their places wooden monsters dictated 
the direction of travel. They appeared at 
the most inopportune places and 
blocked roads to "add to the aesthetics 
of the area." One was almost tempted to 
believe the rumor that the Historical 
Society considered walling in the entire 
town! 



New One Woy signs surprised returning students. 
"But this is the only place to park!" 



296 SENIORS 




JOHNSON, PAMELA, Saluda. 
JOHNSON, 20EANN, Arlington. Art 

History. Kappa Alpha Theta. 
JOHNSTON, LAURIE ANNE, 

Charlottesville Government. Alpha 

Lambda Delta; College Community 

Orchestra; Kappa Delta, House 

President, Pan Hellenic Representotive; 

Mortar Board; Notional Model U.N.; 

Spanish House. 
JOHNSTON, THOMAS B., Cleveland 

Heights, Ohio. Biology. Biology Club; 

Intramurols; Outing Club; Pi Lambda Phi, 

House Chairman. 



JONES, JENNIE LEE MELSON, Suffolk. 

Psychology. Dorm Council; Phi Mu, 

President, Rush Chairman. 
JOYCE, PATRICIA ANNE, New Corrollton 

Md. 
JUDD, KATHRYN, Arlington. Elementary 

Education. 
KAISER, JENNIFER MARIE, Hampton. 

Biology. Alpha Lambda Delta; Biology 

Club; Dorm Council. 



KALTREIDER, SARA ALICE, Richmond. 
Chemistry. LSA, Treasurer. 



KAPPEL, MICHAEL LEE, Springfield. 
Psychology Phi Eta Sigma. 



KAUFFER, JAMES WILLIAM, 

Williamsburg. Cross Country; Folk 
Group; Phi Eta Sigma; Trock. 



SENIORS 297 



KELLIHER, MAURICE AMBROSE, JR., 

McLean. Government. Baseball; Lambda 

Chi Alpha. 
KENT. KATHY PARKS, Columbia. Fine 

Arts. Dorm Council. Kappa Kappa 

Gamma, Historian; O.A. 
KERSEY, MICHELE A., Roanoke Business 

Management. Orchesis; Pi Beta Phi, 

Social Chairman. 
KERSHNER, PHILLIP D., Newport News. 

Chemistry. 




Ami. • • 



• . . Amifip . . • Freund. . . Amico. . . 




"iW; 



ost of us, in deciding to come to 
■ the U.S., were looking for a 
country which would provide us with a 
better educotion and a deeper 
understanding of one of the biggest 
civilizations in the world. In order to 
reach this goal, we think we need the 
assistance and the friendship of the 
Americans." Two Vietnamese students 
summarized the views of many of the 
foreign students currently studying at 
William and Mary. 

Americans as well benefited from the 
presence of the international students. 
Classes in African, Chinese, Portugese, 
Spanish and Hindi were offered by 
natives of the respective countries and 
were open to all those interested. In 
addition, Americans have come into 
contact with the foreign students 
through the International Circle, an 
active organization for foreign students. 
This group sponsors such things as the 
Halloween Pumpkin sale. 

It is obvious that these are exceptional 
individuals. Imagine the frustrations of 
having to translate as well as 
comprehend reading material amidst 
William and Mary academic pressure! 



A student from Logos, Nigerio, Nathaniel Folarin, 
helps with the International Circle annual pumpkin 
sale. 



KEY, GLORIA DIANE, Charlottesville. 

Business Management. BSO; Circle K; 

Intromurols. 
KIDWELL, SUSAN MARIE, Annondole. 

Geology. 
KIEFER, ELISABETH ANNE, Toms River, 

N.J. Biology. Dorm Council; Intromurols; 

R.A. 
KIEFFER, CHARLES E Fairfax, Urban 

Affairs Colonial Echo; Flot Hot, Photo 

Editor; Band; Project Plus; Review; 

WCWM. 




298 SENIORS 




m^kM 



/^ 





i-Tl'M 




mj ni 




> 




KING, JEFFREY P., Berwyn, Po. Economics. 

ODE; Phi Kappo Tau, President, Rush 

Chairman. 
KINZER, JOHN D., Bedford. Geology. 

WMCF, 
KIPP, KATRINA, Worthington, Ohio. 

Biology. Biology Club; Gamma Phi Beto; 

Golf; Outing Club; Pan Hellenic Council, 

Secretary, Vice President; Tennis. 
KIRKLAND, CLEMENT STOKES JR., 

Suffolk. Chemistry. 



KIRKMAN, LELIA KATHERINE, 

Williamsburg. Biology. Biology Club. 
KLAGGE, JAMES, Brecksville, Ohio. 

Philosophy. College- Wide Committee; 

Debate; ODK; Philosophy Curriculum 

Committee. 
KLEINERT, CAROL ELIZABETH, 

Morristown, N.J. History of Art. 
KRAMER, SARAH H., Wichita Falls, 

Texas. Psychology. Bacon Street; Chi 

Omega; Project Plus. 



KREMPASKY, ELIZABETH ANN, 

Greensboro, Md Biology. Biology Club; 

Project Plus. 
KREUTZINGER, KAREN MARIE, 

Arlington. German. German Honor 

Society; Kappa Koppo Gamma, Senior 

Pan Hellenic Representative. 
KRUGER, PATRICIA REGINA, Teaneck, 

N.J. Economics. Colonial Echo; Pi Beta 

Phi; S.A. Senator. 
KRUIS, PAUL A., Lancaster, Po. Business 

Administration- Accounting. Footboll, 

Co-coptain; IFC; Kappa Sigma, Vice 

President. 



KUCHENBUCH, PAMELA A., Yorktown. 

Geology. Chi Omega; Mermettes; R.A.; 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 
KUHFAHL, INGO, Bernardsville, N.J. 

History. 
KURTZ, STEVEN P., Reomstown, Po. 

Economics. Circle K; IFC; ODE; Outing 

Club; Pi Kappo Alpha. 
KUSTERBECK, WILLIAM A , Springfield. 

Chemistry. Chemistry Club; Circle K. 



LAMBDIN, DEBBI, Bethesdo, Md. English 
LAMBERT, STEPHEN A., Hopewell. 

Business Administration-Management. 

Rugby. 
LANDES, DALENE JOHNSON, Polmyro. 

Geology. 
LANDRUM, MASON, Lexington, Ky. 

Government. Choir; Kappa Kappa 

Gammo; WCWM. 



SENIORS 299 




Rogers, Junior 

^f'he opening of the new Chemistry 
^il/ building caused a unique situation 
on campus. Aside from the fact that 
there were now two buildings on campus 
with the same name, the new Rogers 
building lacked the lecture hall facilities 
needed by the Chemistry Department. 
Delay in construction due to strikes 
and unpredictable Williamsburg weather 
caused completion to be postponed by 
more than half a year of the projected 
deadline, and as construction costs hod 
increased, the size of the facility had to 
be reduced to meet the original, allotted 
cost. Expansion was possible, but in the 
meantime, large group lectures were 
held in Millington, Small and other 
miscellaneous rooms across campus. 



Night view of Rogers offers a totally different 
perspective of its stork, modern style. 



LANE, ROBERT LAWRENCE, Va. Beach. 

French. College Activities Calendar; 

Junior Year Abroad; Sigmo Phi Epsilon, 

Secretory. 
LANG, KAREN JOYCE, Trumbull, Conn. 

Mathematics/Computer Science. ACM; 

Hillel. 
LANNEN, JULIA VIRGINIA, Vienna. 

Chemistry. ACS; Chemistry Club; Outing 

Club. 
LARSON, DON, Leesburg. Economics. 

Intramurals; Pi Eto Sigma. 



LARSON, KAREN, Davenport, Iowa. 
Spanish. Cheerleading; Homecoming 
Court; Intramurals; Mermettes; Mortar 
Board; Pi Beta Phi, Membership 
Chairman; ODK; Sigma Delta Pi. 

LARUE, JAY SCOTT, Poquoson. Biology. 

LATHAM, ROBERT EDWARD, 
Annondole. Mathematics. 

LATSKO, STEPHEN MICHAEL, Norfolk. 
English. WMCF. 



LAWSON, JAMES ROLAND, JR., 

Richmond. Mathematics. BSO; 

Intromurols; WATS. 
LAWSON, MICHELLE L., Silver Spring, Md. 

Economics. Alpha Lambda Delta; Delta 

Delta Delta, Mortar Boord; ODE; ODK; 

Phi Beta Kappa, Panhellenic Council, 

President. 
LAYNE, RICHARD A., Richmond. 

Accounting. Sigmo Chi, President. 
LEARY, JANET ANN, Cronford, N.J. 

Biology. 




300 SENIORS 




LEDERMAN, ANDREW JOSEPH, 

Alexondria. Biology. Phi Sigma, 

Treasurer; Project Plus. 
LEE, MICHAEL H., Falls Church. 

Mathematics. Intramurals. 
LEE, RAY, Williamsburg. Biology. Biology 

Club; BSU 
LEISTER, BERNARD KLEIN, Pocomoke, 

Md Business Administration. Backdrop 

Club; Dorm Council; Soccer. 



LEWIS, JAMES CYRUS III, Columbus, 
Ohio. Economics. Band; Economics 
Club; Fencing; Phi Kappa Tau; Wesley 
Foundation. 

LEWIS, MARILEE ANN, Ludington, Mi. 
Chemistry. Bond; Chemistry Club. 

LEWIS, NANCY FEREBEE, Alexandria. 
Interdisciplinary. Chorus; Junior Yeor 
Abrood, Kappa Alpha Theta; WMCF. 

LEX, GEORGE J. Ill, Springfield. 

Accounting. Intramurals; Pi Lambda Phi. 



LIMBURG, DEBBIE, Newport News. 

Biology Alpha Chi Omega; Outing Club; 

Phi Sigma. 
LINDBERG, RAE ANN, Richmond 

Psychology. Backdrop Club; Orchesis; Pi 

Beta Phi; Sinfonicron. 
LIPFERT, JEANNE FRANCES, Bethesda, 

Md Business Management. French 

House; Kappa Alpha Theta; O.A. 
LOFTUS, CHRISTOPHER EVERETT, 

Hampton. Economics Band; 

Intramurals; Phi Mu Alpha; Sinfonicron. 



LONG, NANCY, Petersburg. Art History. Pi 

Beta Phi, President 
LONGEST, ROGER BRYANT, JR., 

Richmond Fine Arts-Studio. O.A.; 

Project Plus; Student Art Show, 

Chairman; Theatre. 
LOO, LYDIA G L., Honolulu, Hawaii. 

English Flat Hot; Phi Mu; Review. 
LOONEY, NANCY LYNNE, Yorktown. 

Elementary Education. BSU; Chorus; 

Kappa Alpha Theta; O.A., WATS. 



LOWE, ROBERT S., McLean. Biology. 

Circle K; Intramurals. 
LUCEY, MAUREEN J , McLeon. 

Government Chi Omega; College Wide 

Committee, Flat Hat; Honor Council, 

Vice Chairperson; Intramurals; R.A.; 

S.A. Senotor. 
LUCK, LAWRENCE E., Mineral. 

Economics. Intramurals; Lacrosse; Rifle 

Team; Sigma Chi. 
LUFKIN, MARTHA W., Richmond. 

Psychology. Dorm Council; Escort; 

Honor Council; Kappo Delta, ODK. 



SENIORS 301 



LUNSFORD, KATHLEEN E., Foils Church 

Biology, WMCF, 
LUPTON, SHERRY, Severna Pork, Md. 

Biology. Chi Omego; Majorettes; 

Mermettes, Co-direcfor; Ponhellenic 

Council, Secretary. 
LUSE, JAMES D,, JR., Newport Beach, Co. 

English, Backdrop Club; Orchestra; 

Premiere Theatre; Sigma Delta Pi; 

Theatre. 
LYONS, JANICE LISETTE, Danville. 

Economics ACM; Canterbury Assoc; 

Gamma Phi Beta, Outing Club. 



LYONS, LAEL SHERMAN, Alexandria. 

Spanish. Canterbury officer; Chorus; 

Evensong Choir 
MACCUBBIN, CAREN PAIGE, Chester, 

Elementary Education, Alpha Chi 

Omega, Circle K, 
MACKLIN, SHIRLEY ANN, Media, Pa. 

Business Administration-Management. 

Flot Hat; O A,; R.A.; Volleyball; WRA. 
MAC LAREN, SCOTT, Plainfield, N.J. 

Government/Philosophy. Circle K; 

Soccer. 



MAC MILLAN, CLAIRE LEIGH, Lynchburg. 

Fine Arts, Delta Delta Delta, Treasurer. 
MADDEN, RICHARD NOLAN, Falls 

Church, English. Premiere Theatre; 

Theatre. 
MAKIBBIN, LISA MICHELE, Balboa, Canal 

Zone. Elementary Education, Biology 

Club, Circle K; Kappa Delta Pi, 

Membership Chairman; Premiere 

Theatre, 
MALONE, CHRISTOPHER M,, Alexandria, 

Sociology History, CSA, Intramurols, 

Young Democrats, 



MALONE, ELIZABETH B., Mt, Sterling, Ky. 

Sociology. Chi Omega; Intramurols; 

O.A,; Project Plus. 
MANFREDI, SHERRI ANN, Va. Beach. 

English. Alpha Lambda Delta; Orchesis, 

Secretary, Theotre. 
MANSFIELD, BARBARA LOU, Oakland, 

N.J Biology. French House, Graduation 

Committee, Project Plus; WATS, 
MARBLE, LYNN, Fairfax Station, 

Anthropology- Circle K; Dorm Council, 

German House; WMCF, 



MARGOLIS, CAROLE DONNA, Hampton. 

Business Administration/Sociology. 

Kappa Alpha Theta; O.A 
MARIANI, M. SUSAN, Clearwater, Fl, 

Psychology Computer Science. Delta 

Delta Delta, President. 
MARREN, JOSEPH HUGH, White Plains, 

NY. Accounting. IFC, President; ODK; 

S.A. Senotor, 
MARSHALL, JANICE A., Foils Church. 

Fine Arts. Circle K; Intramurols. 



I 




302 SENIORS 




MARTIN, CHET, Franklin. Business 

Administration. 
MASON, WALTER GORDON III, 

Lynchburg. Business 

Administration-Manogement. Sigma Pi. 
MATTHEWS, PAMELA, Arlington. 

Psychology. Alpho Lambda Delta; Circle 

K; Orchestra. 
MC CULLOUGH, TIMOTHY J., Scorsdole, 

N.Y. Biology. Circle K, Interhall, 

Intramurals; Phi Sigma, Queen's Guard; 

Theta Delta Chi. 



L,ool{^ at the way they move t 



im 



'hen the "Hustle" and the 
Touch" made the dancing 
scene, they were an immediate hit. 
Introducing more of a romantic style, 
they allowed partners a feeling of 
sensuality not possible in the "do your 
own thing" dances of the sixties and 
early seventies. Music changed to match 
the dance, evolving from pure rock to 
rhythm and blues. 

These dances posed just one problem; 
they looked great, but where were you 
supposed to learn them? People wanted 
to learn how to dance, and anyone who 
knew how was bribed, begged or cajoled 
for lessons. "I wish I could take dancing 
lessons" became a familiar part of the 
students' vernacular. Once you did learn 
one form of either the "Touch" or the 
"Hustle," you noticed that there were 
maybe fifty or sixty versions of your 
version, and you were back where you 
started from. One student related: "I was 



at the pub when a guy asked me if I 
could do the "Hustle." I said I could, 
even though I'd just learned it the night 
before. He insisted on practicing on the 
porch behind the campus center before 
going on to the dance floor. When he 
found out I didn't know the same version 
he did, he wouldn't dance with me!" 

One of the serious drawbacks to 
dancing the "Hustle" or the "Touch" 
was that everyone stared at you as if you 
were a performer. For the hams in the 
crowd it was the greatest Invention since 
the microphone, but for the easily 
embarrassed trying to do one of the 
"new dances" for the first time was 
extremely painful. Perhaps it was for this 
reason that the pub and the fraternity 
parties weren't packed with "hustlers." 



Bumping to o current tune, a couple at the pub 
display their dancing ability. 
Dancers keep together os they move to the 
increasingly popular hustle. 



a 





MC CURDY, E. CRAIG, Ookmont, Po. 

Chemistry Dorm Council; Football, 

Coptain; Intramurals; ODK. 
MC ENERNEY, LAWRENCE DALE, 

Elmhurst, II. English Dorm Council; 

O A., Sigma Chi, Pledge Trainer. 
MC FADDEN, CHRISTINE ELESA, Oxon 

Hill, Md. Classical Civilizotion 

Government Coloniol Echo; Dorm 

Council; Mermettes; Pi Beta Phi. WMCF 
MC GHEE, MOLLY SHANNON, Foils 

Church. History Gommo Phi Beto; 

Interhall, Intramurals; Spanish House. 



SENIORS 303 



MC GRATH, GAIL CHRISTINE, 

Lynchburg. Theatre/Speech. Delta Delta 

Delta; Intramurals. 
MC GRATH, MICHAEL PAUL, Fairfax. 

History. Junior Year Abroad; WCWM. 
MC KEE, VICKI LYN, Newport News. 

Philosophy. BSA; Azalea Festival 

Representotive; Delta Delta Delta; R.A.; 

Uncle Morris, Co-ordinator 
MC KELLOP, KEITH BRANDON, Tenafly, 

N.J. Chemistry. Chemistry Club; Track. 



MC KINNON, JANET ELAINE, 

Tunkhannock, Po. Economics. Dorm 
Council; Intramurals, Overseas Studies. 

MC LOUD, SHIRLEY DRUSILLA, 
Annandale. Sociology. Bicentennial 
Committee, Sociology Student- Faculty 
Liaison Committee, Chairman; Outing 
Club. 

MC MAHON, PAT, Columbus, Ohio. 
Business Management. Chorus; R.A.; 
Circle K; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Rush 
Chairmon; PDE; Colonial Echo. 

MC MANUS, JAMES KEVIN, Northport, 
NY. Mothemotics. Flot Hot; 
Intramurals. 



MC MICHAEL, LYNNE, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Interdisciplinary. Panhellenic Council; Pi 
Beta Phi. 



MC QUILLEN, DEBRA R., Williamsburg. 
Theatre, Speech. Box Office Manager. 



MEANS, BRUCE, Lancaster, Pa. Biology. 

Sigma Pi. 
MELESTER, TIMOTHY SCOTT, 

Winchester. Biology. Classics Club; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Phi Sigma; Publication 

Council; Theta Delta Chi. 
MELLIS, PETER, McLean. Chemistry. 

WMCF, Young Life. 
MENNELLA, LORI ANN, Springfield. 

History. History Club. 





Food- that's one 
up on the Cafl 

^Ir' he Green Leafe Cafe, specializing 
VfcU in Greek cuisine, was but one of 
the several new restaurants opened near 
the college campus. Other newcomers 
included the immediately popular Mr. 
Donut and the Cellar on the Square with 
its upstairs dining and downstairs pub. 

Catering to the whims of students who 
either forgot (or had no time) to go 
grocery shopping that week or simply 
couldn't eat another hotplate meal, 
these establishments offerred relatively 
inexpensive meals in an atmosphere 
quite different from that of the dorm 



Distinctive atmosphere of the Green Leafe is 
emphosized in its unique decor. 





KlJvnbiMHi 



304 SENIORS 










n 


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MERKLE, SCOTT ARTHUR, Falls Church. 

Biology- Band; Phi Sigma. 
MERSHON, JEANNE MARIE, Springfield. 

Physical Education. Collegiate Civitan; 

Homecoming Committee; Intramurols; 

P.E. Majors Club; WRA, President. 
METZ, JOHN G., JR., Cherry Point, N.C. 

Government. Intramurols; Lambda Chi 

Alpha. 
MEYER, LESLIE LOUIS, Arlington. Biology. 

WMCF. 



MEYER, PATRICIA M., Norfolk. 

Sociology Psychology. 
MILAM, JACQUELINE SUSAN, Fairfax. 

History. 
MILBY, BETTY, West Point. Mathematics. 
MILLER, DEBORAH KAY, Woodbridge. 

Psychology Economics Government. 

BSA; College Wide Committees; Mortar 

Board; O.A.; ODK; R.A ; Project Plus; 

Lioison to Board of Visitors. 



MILLER, GARY LEON, Dayton. Biology. 

Kappa Sigma; Lacrosse; S.A. Executive 

Committees. 
MINGEE, SUSAN CATHERINE, Hampton. 

Elementary Education. 



MOFFET, WILLIAM M., Arlington. 
Government. Intramurols, Pi Lambda 
Phi. 

MOLER, MARGARET RUTH, Dectaur, Ga 
Psychology. Colonial Echo, Editor, 
Managing Editor; Gamma Phi Beta, 
Assistant Rush Chairman, O.A.; R.A.; 
Sigma Nu Sweetheart. 



MONAHAN, KEVIN R., Erie, Pa. 

Accounting. Plot Hat; S.A 
MONFORT, DEBORAH ANN, Port 

Washington, NY Secondary Educotion; 

Kappa Kopjxi Gamma. 
MOON, RICHARD DOUGLAS, 

Charlottesville. Business Administrotion 

— Management. Intramurols; Lombda 

Chi Alpho, Sociol Chairman. 
MOORE, JANET ELIZABETH, Lorchmont, 

NY Philosophy. Choir; O.A.; Delto 

Omicron; Mortar Board; Project Plus. 



SENIORS 305 



MOORE, REGINALD MOLLIS, Biology. 

BSO, President, Block Student 

Recruitment Assistant; President's Aide. 
MORAVITZ, CAROL LYNNE, 

Alexandria. History 
MORRIS, CATHERINE ANNE, 

Chorlottesville. Economics. Biology Club; 

Junior Year Abroad. 
MORRISSETTE, MARSHA KAY, 

Richmond. Biology. Chorus; Circle K; 

Mermettes. 



MORTON, CONSTANCE L., Norfolk. 

Biology Bond; Delta Omicron; Outing 

Club; Phi Sigma 
MOSS, MADONNA LEE, Foyetteville, N.Y. 

Anthropology. Hotline Volunteer; 

Mermettes; Publication Council. 
MOYER, ROSEMARIE, Alexandria. 
MOYER, STEPHEN P., Southampton, Pa. 

Urban Analysis. Pi Lambda Phi, 



MUELLER, JON, Charlottesville. Biology. 

Activities Calendar; Lacrosse; 

Intromurals; Sigma Phi Epsilon, Vice 

President. 
MUROWSKI, ANDREA MARIE, Bayonne, 

N J Accounting Circle K, Intromurals 
MURPHEY, MARTHA MC LAURINE, 

Chester. Sociology. Pi Beta Phi, 

Corresponding Secretary; Swim Team. 
MURPHY, MARY LORETTA. Stamford, 

Conn. English. 



MURPHY, STAN, Falls Church, 
MURPHY, VICKI, Chestertown, NY. 

Spanish CSA, Secretary; Spanish 

Honorary Society. 
MUSICK, DIANA FAYE. Yorktown. 

Sociology. 
MYERS, KATHRYN ANN, Richmond. 

Mathematics Computer Science. ACM, 

Secretary, Treasurer; Alpha Chi Omega; 

Canterbury; Delta Omicron; Evensong. 



NAGLE, DAVID E., Wayland, Mass, 

Government. College Republicans; O.A., 
President's Aide; S.A. Elections 
Chairman, Porliamentarion, Senate; 
Study Abroad. 

NAGLE, WILLIAM FREDERICK, Fairfax. 
Geology. Cheerleader, Sigma Chi, 

NAYLOR, ALISON D., Raleigh, N.C. 
Biology Alpha Chi Omega, Altruistic 
Officer; Chorus; Escort. 

NEAL, ANNE CARTER, Clover. English. 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Chi Omego. 




306 SENIORS 



'l-^t . Ct. T>j%,»-Aw,v. 



COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY 

OrrlCC OF THi; DL\N 01 t»L FACULTY 

WILLIAMSBURG, VIHCI.MA 

EVAfJJATIOW OF TRANSFfR CRCDITS 



'^Ti-it- ^ t^a.. 



'Qr-^»t»-A ^^nW- 



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But u/hyhere? 



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it 



can't believe it! They didn't even 
give me credit for Calculus I or II!" 
This was a typical grievance of a 
transfer student upon enrolling in 
William and Mary; however it was only 
the beginning. 

Due to limited dorm space, transfers 
frantically hunted for housing and, more 
often than not, ended up several miles 
away from campus. This created more 
problems, including transportation and 
opportunities to meet other students. 

After finally settling in suitable 
apartments or rooms, transfers spent 
their first day in Williamsburg trudging 
from department to department (in the 
pouring rain) in order to convince the 
administration that the students really 
deserved more credits than they 
received. Often this proved to be in vain, 
as transfers who thought they were 
juniors were once again sophomores. 





m^^^^ 




NELSON, STEVEN C , Richmond. Business 
Administration, Sigma Phi Epsiion, 
President. 



NEWELL, BECKY, Dunn Loring. Fine 
Arts/Art History. Young Life; Scuba 
Club. 



NOVACK, TOM, Alexandria. Psychology. 
Circle K. 



NOYES, SUSAN JANE, Amherst, Moss. 

Biology. Alpha Lombda Delto; Biology 

Club; Circle K; Dorm Council; 

Intromurals, Phi Sigma. 
O'BRIEN, KEVIN MICHAEL, Garden City, 

NY. Psychology. Intromurals; Sigma Phi 

Epsiion. 
ODOM, MARSHA M., Williamsburg. Music 

Education. 
OMORI, DEBORAH JEAN M., Annondale. 

Biology Biology Club; Chemistry Club; 

Phi Sigma, President, Treasurer. 



OOSTHOEK, PHILLIP H., Arlington. 

Biology Gymnostics; Track. 
OTT, ROBERT BERNARD, Pt. Pleosant, 

N.J. Mathematics, Government. BSA; 

S.A. Executive Vice President; Chairman 

— Parent's Day; Sigma Phi Epsiion. 
OWENS, LINDA C, Severna Park, Md 

Psychology. Chi Omega, Rush 

Chairman; Orchesis. 
PADDEN, SHEILA MARIE, McLean. 

Interdisciplinory. Intromurals; Koppo 

Alpha Theto; Outing Club; R.A. 



SENIORS 307 



PAGE, SUSAN JOHNSTON, Arnold, Md. 
American Studies. Chi Omego; Christian 
Science Organization; Intromurols; R.A.: 
Tennis Teom. 

PAINTER, CONNIE, Waynesboro. English. 

PARHAM, PAMELA. Colonial Heights. 
History. Colonial Echo; Gamma Phi 
Beta, Vice-president; O.A., WRA. 

PARK, ANNE MCLEMORE. Norfolk. 
Physical Education. Delta Delta Delto, 
House President; Physical Educotion 
Majors Club; WRA. 



PARKER, DEBORAH ANNE. Arlington 
Psychology. Alpha Lombda Delta; 
Escort, Project Plus. 

PARKER, PAMELA ANN. Midland. 
Elementory Education. Chorus; Kappa 
Delta; Premiere Theatre; S.A. Senate; 
Theatre. 




DEVILSBURG, VIRGIJSfIA 



jjfn a budgetary presentation in 1968 
-^l to a meeting of the General 
Assembly's House Appropriations and 
Senate Finance Committees, President 
Davis Y. Paschal I refrained from the 
usual statistical enumeration, and made 
an eloquant plea in behalf of what he 
called "The Alma Mater of A Nation" 
(believed to be the first time the College 
was so termed). In concluding the 
address he said: 

"In the late hours of night when the 
campus was asleep and the town quiet 
and still, I strolled the ancient Wren 
Yard, the moon was a ghostly balloon 
floating the fleecy clouds and mist 
settled all about. In reflection on the 
fires and wars that had engulfed this 
place; the anguish and despair as well as 
the rare courage, honor and sacrifice of 



the years, I felt deeply the great spirit 
that here for nearly three centuries has 
knit the generations each to each. And 
then, amid the giant elms, I sensed the 
shadowy presence of Jefferson, Wythe, 
Monroe, Marshall, Washington, The 
Randolphs and others who walked this 
hallowed ground and conceived the 
ideas that wrought the great documents 
of this Republic. 

"With head bowed in humility and 
reverence, I knew that this, indeed, was 
the Alma Mater of a Nation, and I 
prayed that it might today muster the 
strength and devotion to keep faith with 
these Founding Fathers." 



A former student at William and Mary, Thomos 
Jefferson referred to Williamsburg as Devilsburg. 



PARONETT, ROBERT S., Teaneck, N.J. 

Economics. Circle K; Intramurals; Pi 

Lambda Phi; Swim Teom. 
PARSONS, SUSAN EMILY, Foils Church. 

Biology. Band; Biology Club; Orchestra; 

Phi Sigma. 
PATRICK, HOLLY ANN. Columbia, Md 

Mathematics. ACM; Kappa Delta; 

Outing Club. 
PATTON, SAMUEL ERNEST III, Flonders, 

N.J. Business Management. Football; 

Intramurals; Koppo Sigma. 




308 SENIORS 




PAVLOVSKY, WILLIAM S., Perth Amboy, 
N.J Art History. Lyon G. Tyler Historical 
Society, Treasurer; Senior Honors. 

PEPPIATT, CATHERINE MARY, 

Lynchburg. English. Gamma Phi Beta, 
Social Chairman; Mermettes; Mortar 
Board; ODK; R.A.; Swimming. 

PERKINS, CAROL LEE, Williamsburg 
French. 

PETERS, DEANNE KAY, Son Antonio, Tx. 
Interdisciplinary American Studies. 
Gamma Phi Beta; WMCF. 



PETERSON, KAREN JANINE, Richmond. 

Business Management. 
PETERSON, MARTHA JANE, 

Charlottesville. French. O.A.; Pi Delta 

Phi, Study Abroad; WATS. 
PHILLIPS, JULIA MAE, Freeport, III. 

Physics. Alpha Lambda Delta; Concert 

Band; Delta Omicron, Treasurer; 

Marching Band; Pit Orchestra. 
PHILLIPS, KEITH LATIMER, Richmond. 

Biology, Swimming, Theta Delta Chi. 



PHILLIPS, THOMAS L , JR., Rustburg. 

English. Baseball; Exeter Exchange 

Scholarship. 
PIERINGER, PAUL, Lake Alfred, Flo. 

Physics 
PIETROVITO, GUY R., Alexandria. 

History. Intramurols; Pi Lombdo Phi. 
PIPLICO, JANNELL, Waynesboro. 

Psychology. Alpha Chi Omega; Wesfel. 



PLOTNIK, ANNA SERENA, Central, S.C. 

English Classical Civilizotion. Classics 

Club, President; Delta Delta Delta, 

Assistant Reference Chairman, 

Recording Secretary. 
PLUNKETT, BARRY J., Havre de Grace, 

Md History Government. Flat Hat; 

Intramurols, Phi Eta Sigmo; R.A. 
POLING, CRAIG, McLean. Mathematics. 

Theta Delta Chi. 
POMILLA, ANTHONY S., Elmont, NY. 

Government. CSA, Treasurer. 



POPA, VANESSA GALE, Greensburg, Po 

Psychology. Pi Beta Phi. 
POWELL, MARTHA ALLEN, Franklin. 

Anthropology. Alpha Chi Omega, 

Corresponding Secretory; Anthropology 

Club; WRA. 
P0WELL;,PAUL HUNTER, Suffolk English 
Psychology. Conterbury; Colonial Echo; 

Project Plus. 
PROFFITT, CANDIS Y., Newport News. 

French History. Outing Club. 



SENIORS 309 



PULLIAM, E. ANN. Fairfax, Biology. 
PURCELL, KENNETH JOSEPH. Dix Hills, 

N.Y. SociologyHistory. 
PURCELL, WILLIAM VERNON III, Drakes 

Branch. Biology. Amateur Radio Club, 

President; Band; Phi Etc Sigma; Phi 

Sigma. 
PURDY, DAVID C, Richmond. 

Psychology. WATS. 



PUSCH, BRIAN WALTER, Littleton, Co. 

Interdisciplinary. 
RAY, ANNE STERLING, Hompton. Music. 

Band; College Community Orchestra; 

Delta Omicron; Sinfonicron. 
REED, EILEEN CLIFFORD, Poland, Ohio. 

Economics. Delta Delta Delta. 
RENFROW, BRANDEN, Norfolk. 

Elementary Eduction. 



RETTIG, HOLLINS LEE, Williamsburg. 

Business Management. Sigma Phi 

Epsilon, Chaploin. 
RHEINHARDT, RICHARD DAVID, 

Evansville, Ind. Business Management. 

Soccer; Swimming; Theto Delta Chi. 
RHYNE, RICHARD H., JR., Hampton. 

Chemistry, F.H.C. Society; O.A., Project 

Plus; R.A.; S.A. Senote; Wesley 

Foundation. 
RICE, JANET EDDY, Va. Beach. 

Government. Alpha Chi Omega, 

Secretary; O.A., Student Guide. 










r^kl 



Just thin\"tivo for the price of one 

^Q revious years had delt with a 
.^1*1 conflict between the objective of 
the college to foster a broad, liberal arts 
background and the official recognition 
of this goal achieved in the bestowing of 
degrees. In spite of the area and 
sequence requirements, it was possible 
(with some careful manipulation) to 
satisfy requirements for two 
departments. 

This marked the first year of the 
double major at William and Mary. 
Students who hod anticipated its 
appearance in the college program were 
able to take advantage of their extra 
efforts and have two majors entered on 
their transcripts, while the unoptomistic 
lot who "never dreamed it could 
happen" enviously looked on as some 
were a mere six or nine credits short! 

Unique combinations for double majors have been 
the result of the new policy chonge. 




310 SENIORS 




RICE, ROSELYN J., Freeman. 

Interdisciplinary. BSO; Delta Sigma 

Theta; Intramurals. 
RICHESON, NANCY ANNE, Hopewell. 

Biology. Circle K, Dorm Council; WATS; 

WRA Representative. 
RICHTER, KAGGY, Va. Beach. Elementary 

Education. Dorm Council; O.A., Gommo 

Phi Beta, Sales Chairman, Rush 

Chairman; Swim Team, Captain. 
RICKMAN, JOHN BRETT, Richmond. 

Business Management. Circle K; 

Interhall; Sigma Chi, Secretary; Derby 

Day Chairman. 



RIEGEL, GEORGE W., JR , Richmond. 

Business Administration Accounting. 

Intramurals; Pi Kappa Alpha, Treasurer. 
RIINA, DANIEL C , Lonsdale, Pa, Biology. 

Colonial Echo, Photographer; Sigma Chi. 
RILEY, REBECCA SUZANNE, Danville. 

Bond, Bpckdrop Club; Director's 

Workshop; Kappa Delta; Premiere 

Theatre; Sinfonicron; Theatre. 
ROBBINS, DAVID L., Richmond. 

Theotre Speech. Drama; Interhall; 

Intramurals, Dorm President; 

Sinfonicron. 



ROBERTS, BARBARA, Barboursville. 
Business Monagement. Gamma Phi 
Beta, Activities Chairman, House 
President, Intramurals. 

ROBERTS, GEORGE L., Ill, Savannah, Ga, 
Chemistry. Intramurals; R.A., Theta 
Delto Chi, President, Vice President. 

ROBERTSON, JAMES D,, McLean. History. 
Intramurals; Pi Lambda Phi. 

ROBERTSON, MARCUS B., Gadsden, Ala. 
Psychology Canterbury; Choir; Golf 
Team, Phi Mu Alpha; Sinfonicron; 
WMCF. 



ROCKWELL, STAN, JR., Keysville. 

Psychology Philosophy. Director's 

Workshop; Dorm Council; Fencing; 

Intramurols. 
RODMAN, COLLEEN BLANCHE, Newport 

News. Business Administration — 

Accounting, 
ROETHE, ELAINE, Richmond. Psychology. 

Kappa Alpha Theta. 
ROWCALLO, MARC, Mossopequo, N.Y. 

History Fine Arts. 



ROSE, DARLENE ANNE, Alexandria. 

History of Art Project Plus. 
ROSE, MELINDA, Berlin, N J, Business 

Management Colonial Echo, 

Administrative Editor; Art, Design and 

Layout Editor; Phi Delta Epsilon. 
ROUGHTON, DEBORAH LYNNE, 

Chesapeake. Psychology. Kappo Alpha 

Theta, Marshal. 
ROUSH, CYNTHIA, Roonoke. Economics. 

Alpha Chi Omego, Rush Chairmon; 

Dorm Council; O.A. 



SENIORS 311 



ROUTZONG, JAMES GREGORY, Eostville 

History. Intromurols 
RUBENSTONE, JAMES L., Pooli, Pa. 

Geology. WCWM. 
RUDLIN, STEPHEN DURHAM, Richmond. 

Theatre/Speech. Backdrop Club, Choir; 

Director's Workshop, Senior Class Vice 

President; Sinfonicron; Phi Mu Alpha; 

Variety Show Director. 
RUIZ, AAARIA MARTA, Chesapeake. 

Business Management intramurois; 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, Inner Sociol 

Chairman; Pi Delto Phi. 



RUSSELL, DEBI, Manassas. Biology. 
RUSSELL, MARY ALICE COFFROTH, 

Monassas. Biology. Campus Girl Scout; 

Phi Sigma; Swim Team. 



RYAN, HELEN JANE, Oakton. Business 

Administration — Management. 

Co-chairman Women's Equality; Outing 

Club. 
RYAN, MARY BETH, Richmond. 

Elementary Education. Adult Skills 

Program, Teacher. 



RYER, KAREN L., North Brunswick, N.J. 
Mathematics Computer Science. Alpha 
Lambda Delta; ACM; Flat Hat; Kappa 
Alpha Theto, Assistant Treasurer, 
Treasurer; WRA Representative. 

SACCO, KATHERINE ANN, Rockville, Md. 
English. Alpha Chi Omega, President; 
R A. 



SADLER, GLENNA SUSAN, Cobbs Creek. 

Business Management. Chorus. 
ST LAWRENCE, ROBERT F , Mortinsville. 

Business Administrotion — Accounting. 

Rifle Team. 
SAMILA, LEONARD J., Flemington, N.J. 

Biology. Track. 
SANDBERG, KATHLYN, Rock Hill, S.C. 

Sociology/History. Kappa Alpha Theto; 

O.A.; Panheilenic Council, Treasurer. 




More than Just 




312 SENIORS 







a^ame 




■V^^ hat better way to spend a Sunday 
[Jm^ afternoon than outdoors toning 
up muscles that have gone lax during 
lazy hours in Swem library. With this in 
mind, many students, dressed in tennis 
shoes and cutoffs, participated in the 
first annual Volleyball Invitational 
sponsored by Bryan Complex. 

Co-ed teams of six enjoyed the 
afternoon in heated competition with 
their opponents. Afterwards the players 
were greeted with a cookout dinner 
along with the traditional keg of beer 
that accompanied most William and 
Mary events. 

Players all agreed to the success of 
the afternoon and enthusiastically 
endorsed plans for future events, which 
included faculty and student matches. 



A blocked spike is the only thing on Drexel 
George's mind as teammates Nancy Ferguson and 
Bruce Hegyi look on. 





SANDER, PENNY JOAN, McLeon. 
History Fine Arts. Chorus; Pi Beta Phi, 
Music Chairman, Fleet Choirmon. 

SANDERS, BETH, Tullohomo, Tenn. 
Elementary Education. Alpha Lombda 
Delta; Cheerleader, Captain; Kappa 
Delto Pi; Pi Beta Phi, Assistant Rush 
Choirman, Music Choirmon. 

SANDMAN, PAUL H., Williamsburg. 
Biology. Biology Club; Gymnostics; 
Intramurals; Karate Club. 

SATO, TERESA LYNNE, Annandale. 
Elementary Education. Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Historian, Pledge Trainer. 



SATTERFIELD, SCOTT CHRISTIAN, 
Malvern, Pa. History. Soccer; 
Intramurals; Theto Delta Chi. 



SAUERACKER, ANDREW JOHN, 
Madison, N.J. Interdisciplinary. Phi 
Sigma; Sigma Chi. 



SAUNIER, JULIA, Chorlottesville. Geology, 
Circle K, O A.; Outing Club; Swim Team 

SAVAGE, N. ROLAND. Framingham, 
Mass. Government. Intramurols. 

SAVOLD, DAVID WARREN, Williamsburg 
English. Lambda Chi Alpha; WCWM. 



SCANLON, ANN MARIE, LANGHORNE, 

PA Art History. Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Proiect Plus; St. Andrews Exchonge 

Scholar. 
SCHERER, JANE NANETTE, Williomsburg. 

Sociology Delta Delta Delta. 
SCHIFANO, JOSEPH VINCENT, Franklin 

Square, N.Y, Accounting, Intramurols; 

Kapfxi Sigmo Treosurer, Lacrosse; Lyon 

G Tyler Historicol Society. 
SCHILLING, SUZANNE RUTH, 

Annandale Elementary Education. 

Alpha Chi Omega, Chaplain; WMCF 



SENIORS 313 



SCHMIDT, KATHY, Alexandria. 

Government, Plot Hot; Golf; Intramurols, 

Pi Beta Phi. 
SCHOOLS, MAXWELL R. JR., Midlothian. 

Business Administration — Accounting. 

Football; Kappa Sigma, House Manager. 
SCHOTT, SUSAN MARIE, Fanwood, N.J. 

Elementary Education. Band, Circle K; 

Intramurols; Kappa Delta Pi; Outing 

Club; Orchestra. 
SCHROEDER, JENNIFER KAREN, 

Hampton. History. Asia House; Outing 

Club. 



SCHROEDER, SUSAN MARIE, Stamford, 

Conn Computer Science 
SCHULER, CAROLYN LEE, Louisville, Ky. 

Sociology Chorus, Colonial Echo, 

Organizations Editor. 
SCHULTZ, JANET RHODES, Colonial 

Heights, History Psychology. Kappa 

Delta; O.A ; S.A, Senate 
SCLATER, DANIEL W., Newport News. 

Business Management. 



SCONYERS, JEFFREY M., Vienna. History. 

Circle K, WMCF. 
SCOTT, BARBARA ANN, Spring Lake, 

N.J. Elementary Education. Chorus; 

Kappa Delta, Membership Chairman, 

Secretary, Kappa Delta Pi. 



SCOTT, CAROLYN ELIZABETH, 
Charlottesville Biology Delta Delta 
Delta; J V. Cheerleader, 

SEWELL, NANCY J., Charlottesville. Music 
Education. Delta Omicron, Phi Mu, Vice 
President, Secretary; Orchestra; 
Sinfonicron; WMCF. 



SEELINGER, THOMAS F. McLean, 

Psychology. Intramurols; Lambda Chi 

Alpha, WMCF. 
SEGALL, ROBIN REED, Falls Church. 

Biology Bond; Biology Club. 
SEV2RIN, NANCY CAROLYN, Ashland. 

Elementary Education, Chi Omega, Rush 

Chairman; Chorus, 
SHACKELFORD, ROBIN LYNN, 

Richmond, French. 




3)4 SENIORS 




SHAFFER, CRAIG B., Falls Church. 

History Government. Intramurols; 

Lacrosse; Phi Kappa Tau; S.A,; WCWM. 
SHANER, GRETCHEN ELIZABETH, New 

Providence, N.J. Biology. Alpha Chi 

Omega, Social Chairman; Colonial Echo; 

Phi Sigmo; O.A. 
SHAPIRO, CARL DAVID, Alexandria. 

Government. College Republicans; Flat 

Hot, Associote Editor; O.A.; S.A. 

senator. 
SHAW, EDWIN FEREBEE JR., Yorktown. 

Chemistry. 



SHELTON, LYNN CARA, Fairfax. History. 

Chorus; Delta Omicron; Kappa Delta. 
SHERMAN, RICHARD M., Rancho Polos 

Verde, Co. Economics. Bond; Circle K, 

Secretary; College Republicans; S.A. 

senator. 
SHIVERTS, ANNE T., Flushing, N.Y. 

English. 
SHUMAR, NANCY E., Whitacre. History. 

Alpha Chi Omega; History Majors 

Organization. 





SKIBIAK, JOHN PHILLIP, Vienna. 

Anthropology. Junior Year Abroad; Phi 

Eta Sigma. 
SKINNER, ELIZABETH ANN, Pefersberg 

English. 
SLAVIN, DAVID SCOTT, Somerville, N.J. 

Biology Boseboli; Phi Sigma; Sigmo Chi; 

WCWM. 
SMELLEY, DEBORAH ANN, Richmond. 

Music BSU, Chorus; Delta Omicron; 

Sinfonicron. 



SENIORS 315 



SMITH, ANN-JEANNETTE, Montvole. 

German. 
SMITH, CHERYL A., Newport News. 

Anthropology. Anthropology Club; 

Koppo Kappa Garnmo, Social Chairman. 
SMITH, DEBORAH LESLYN, Jacksonville 

Beach, Fl. History. History Majors 

Organization; Kappa Delta. 
SMITH, ELIZABETH D., Colonial Heights. 

Biology. Biology Club. 



SMITH, STEPHEN G., Manassas. 

Education, S.A.; Theto Delta Chi. 
SMITH, TREVOR H.G., Alexandrid. 

English. Publications Council; WMCF; 

Soccer. 



SOLLER, DAVID RUGH, Arlington. 

Geology. Intromurals; Pi Lambda Phi. 
SOO, BENNY, Norfolk, 



SPAIN, SALLY FRANCES, Portsmouth. 

Psychology. 
SPARKS, CAROLINE ANNE, Falls Church. 

Biology. 
STAHL, KEN, Albuquerque, N.M. History. 

Director's Workshop; Junior Year 

Abroad; Phi Eta Sigma; Premiere 

Theater; Review. 
STANLEY, DEBORAH ANNE, Springfield. 

Sociology. Pi Beta Phi, Rush Chairman. 



STANTON, WALTER JOHN III, Verona, 

N.J. Government. IFC, Treasurer, ODE; 

President's Aide; Project Plus; S.A.; 

Sigmo Pi. 
STAPLES, STEVEN RAY, Ettrick. History. 

BSU; Intromurals; Pi Lambda Phi, Rush 

Chairman. 
STARR, EILEEN FLORENCE, Valencia, Pa. 

History. Chorus; Circle K; Outing Club, 

Theater. 
STAVELEY, JANE PATRICIA, Sychoff, 

N.J. Biology. Biology Club; Outing Club; 

Phi Sigmo. 





Here to stay? 

^f' he infamous NC was no longer an 
^i^ escape for those students 
attempting to avoid a low GPA. With the 
reinstatement of the F, failing a course 
was something to be feared. 

In line with past tradition, the William 
and Mary administration saw to it that 
students were not "given" anything. In a 
weak moment, the no-credit status was 
approved. However, after two years of 
existence, the faculty realized they were 
actually helping the student and 
promptly rescinded the decision. Now 
the D, after years in oblivion will be 
reinstated in the Fall of 1976. Many 
students felt the D would "help" them 
pass. Had the administration goofed 
again? 



Return of blue books causes enough anxiety 
without having an F to top it off 



316 SENIORS 







^7^ 






STEELE, JOSEPH H. II, Fredericksburg. 

Economics. Cheerleading; Sigma Chi. 
STEWARD, JOEL SCOTT, Vo. Beach. 

Biology Circle K; Flat Hot; Intramurals. 
STORCH, ROBERTA LEE, New City, N.Y. 

French. Kappa Delta; French House; Pi 

Delto Phi, Treasurer. 
STOUSLAND, MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER, 

Oxford, Ohio. Tennis. 



STOVER, KATHLEEN SCOTT, Falls 

Church, Psychology. 
STREETS, PATRICIA M., Vienna. Geology. 

Basketball; Lacrosse, Captain; Kappa 

Kappa Bomma, Treasurer; Mortar Board; 

Sigma Gammo, President; Wesfel- 

WMCF. 



STRICKLAND, ANNE HARVEY, South 

Boston. Psychology. 
STRICKLAND, DEAN WARD, Blacksburg. 

Government. Col lege- wide Committees; 

S.A. President; Sigma Chi. 



STUMM, KATHRYN ANNE, Williamsburg. 

Sociology. Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Intromurols; Kappo Kappa Gamma, Vice 

President; O.A. 
SULICH, TERESA M., Beechhurst, N.Y. 

Chemistry. Band; Delto Omicron; 

Swimming; WRA. 
SURFACE, LAURA ELEANOR, Tazewell. 

English. BSU, President. 
SWAIM, ANN MONROE, South Boston. 

Fine Arts. Homecoming princess, Pi Beta 

Phi, Vice President. 



SWAIN, DONNA BROWNLEE, 

Chesapeake. Psychology. Dorm Council; 

Kappo Alpha Theta, Pledge Trainer; 

O.A. 
SWARTZ, MARGARET WARREN, 

Williamsburg. English. Outing Club. 
SWINGLE, WILLIAM MARK, Vo. Beoch 

Biology. 
SWORD, PHILIP COUNTS, Soltville. 

Elementary Education. R.A.; WATS. 






SENIORS 317 



SYRETT, DAVID, Mossapequo Park, NY. 

Mathematics Physics. Intramurals; 

Coloniol Echo; O.A. 
SYVRUD, KAREN K., McLean. History. 

Circle K. 
SZAREK, MARGARET ROSE, Springfield. 

Biology. WMCF. 
SZCZYPINSKI, ROBERT S. JR., Gibsonio, 

Pa. Biology. Football; Intramurals. 



TANG, MICHAEL, Winnetka, III. 
Economics Choir; Colonial Echo 

Business Manager, Photography Editor; 

ODE; Pi Delta Epsilon; Sigmo Chi. 
TAYLOR, HELEN VIRGIE, Williamsburg 

German Choir, Evensong Choir; French 

House; German Club, President; German 

House; Sinfonicron. 
TEAGUE, LINDA GAIL, Falls Church. 

Biology. Alpha Lambda Delta, President; 

Biology Club; Phi Sigma. 
TEDARDS, H. RACHAEL, Greenville, SC. 

English. Orchestra, Sinfonicron; WMCF, 

Core Leoder. 



TEITEIMAN, ROBERT P., Wildwood Crest, 

N J. English Government Pi Kappo 

Alpha; Tennis 
THOMPSON, CLYDE G., Toroma, Wo. 

History. Intramurals; Speoker of the 

Senate 
THOMPSON, SUSAN MARIE, Princeton, 

W.Va. Biology. 
TILLER, CALVIN FORREST, Richmond. 

Business Administration — 

Management- 



TORRE, BRIAN ANTHONY, Roanoke. 

Biology. Circle K; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 

Rush Chairman. 
TOWNSEND, LAURA LEE, Williamsburg. 

Psychology- Dorm Council; O.A.; Varsity 

Swimming. 
TRENCH, WILLIAM COREY JR., 

Charlottesville. Biology. Intramurals. 
TRIP!, MARGOT LYNN, Williomsville, 

NY. English. 



TULOU, CHRISTOPHER ALAIN 
GEORGES, Norfolk. Biology. Cross 
country; Phi Etc Sigma; Phi Sigma; 
Track. 

TURMAN, DIANNA MARIE, Radford. 
Biology. Bond; Delta Omicron; Phi 
Sigman, Historian, Sinfonicron, Publicity 
Chairman. 

TURRENTINE, NANCY CARROLL, 
Nashville, Tenn. History. Cho Omega, 
Vice President; Honor Council; Mortar 
Board; President's Aide; Senior Class 
President. 

TUTWILER, THOMAS AUGUSTINE, New 
Market. History. Director's Workshop; 
Premiere Theater. 




318 SENIORS 




TWARDY, NANCY ANNE, Stamford, Cr. 

Elementary Education. Delta Delta 

Delta; Kappa Delta Pi. 
TWEEDY, HARRELL EMMETT, Rustburg. 

Chemistry. BSU; Chemistry Club, 

Intramurals; O.A. 
TYLER, J COLEMAN, Richmond. English. 

Canterbury Association; French Honor 

Society; WMCF. 
VAN DIVENDER, LISA ANNE, Richmond. 

German. Band; Delta Phi Alpha; Junior 

Year Abrood; Kappa Alpha Theta; 

WCWM. 



'Punchbowls & 
old mementos 

^Ipkne of the first formal invitations 
^hP^one received upon their return to 
the college campus was that of a class 
reception. This was not in the form of a 
poster hung in the dorm, or notice on the 
back page of the W&M news, but rather 
each student received on R.A. — 
delivered note requesting his presence at 
the President's reception. Four or five 
Sunday afternoons in the Fall, the Wren 
Building front lawn was transformed 
from its peaceful and quiet atmosphere 
to one of partying on a high-class scale, 
as silver punchbowls and troys of edibles 
appeared on tables in front of the 
President's home. Self-guided tours of 
the house enabled students to view relics 
of past ages and mementos of college 
history. By viewing the house, students 
were able to see a more personal side of 
the President's life. 

Parents and alumni were given the 
same opportunity on other weekends 
with favorable opinions coinciding 
between the generations! 



Two freshmen listen intently as President Graves 
offers advice on coping with academic pressures. 





VAN VLADRICKEN, DIANN MAE, Falls 

Church Fine Arts. 
VANN, SUSAN KAY, Portsmouth, English. 
VEHRS, BEVERLY FORSS, Williamsburg. 

Elementory Educotion Canterbury 

Association. 
VERCELLONE, RICHARD DOMINIC, 

Springfield, Ma. Business Monogement. 

Intramurals; Pi Lombdo Phi. 



SENIORS 319 



VERNON, CHARLES CURTIS, Richmond. 

Business Administration. 
VESLEY, KATHY ELLEN, Richmond. 

History/Sociology Circle K; R A ; 

Lombdo Chi Alpha Sweetheart. 
VILD, JAMES JOSEPH, Newport News. 

Biology, 
VULTEE, VICTORIA JEDITY, Greenville, 

N.C. Theoter/History. Backdrop; Choir; 

Chorus; Delta Omicron; Interhall; 

Sinfonicron. 







I 



/^>iiy>s:j' 




Wr. 




LuMiM Mu k 



fv/A 



Stuc\ in the 
of it 



M 



ou mean to say William Kunsler 
spoke here last night?! I never 
heard about it!" Keeping informed on 
evening and weekend events was one of 
the greatest difficulties that day students 
faced. Though a list of most campus 
activities was printed weekly in the Flat 
Hat and the William and Mary News, 
these publications were not mailed to the 
day student. 

Seven senators were elected by day 
students as a means of helping to keep 
them informed of upcoming events and 
voicing their opinions on Student 
Association issues. Because 25 percent 
of the student body lived off campus, 
these senators were faced with an 
enormous and trying job. 

The social life of the day student was 
hampered by their long distance 
travelling and their limited circle of 
friends. Often, they had to leave a party 
earlier than most because of a lengthy 
ride home. Even worse, they had to stay 
sober while everyone else was having a 
grand old time, unless they planned to 
stay on campus until the next day. 

Another problem commuters faced 
was transportation. Many drove as much 
as 100 miles daily and were forced to 
cope with heavy Williamsburg traffic, 
problems of limited parking spaces on 
campus and high gasoline prices. Those 
not fortunate enough to own a cor were 
usually dependent on bicycles to get to 
and from classes. "I enjoy cycling," 
remarked one day student. "It's great 
exercise and a lot of fun, but when it 
rains, it's a pain in the ess!" 



Because of a long drive home, Debbie Von- 
Bibber finds it easier to spend the night with friends 

in Brown. 




320 SENIORS 




WADLEY, CATHERINE A. Martinsville, 

N.J. Elementary Education. Chorus; 

Delta Omicron; Evensong Choir; O.A.; 

R.A. 
WAGSTAFF, KATHRYN MARSHALL, 

Richmond. Psychology. AFLA; Dorm 

Council; Fencing, Captain; Flat Hot; 

Kappa Alpha Theto, Recording 

Secretary; O.A. 
WAINSTEIN, ANNE P. Alexandria. 

Anthropology. Chorus; Delta Omicron; 

Dorm Council; Sinfonicron, Producer; 

WCMF. 
WALINSKY, EDWARD J. Falls Church. 

Government History. Bockdrop; Band; 

College Republican; Interhall; Phi Mu 

Alpha. 

WALLER, GLORIA L Spring Grove. 

Psychology. Basketball; BSO; Circle K; 

WATS. 
WALSH, ROBERT K. Fair Lawn, N.J. 

Government. Circle K; Intermurols; 

Theto Delta Chi. 

WARD, EARLINE, Newport News. Fine 

Arts. 
WARDEN, ANNA MARY, Waynesboro. 

American Studies. Chorus; Debate; 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Project Plus. 



WARNER, VICKI SHEARY, Colonial 

Beach. Psychology. Chorus. 
WARREN, ELLEN GARRETT, Portsmouth. 

Psychology. Corm Council; WMCF. 
WASCHER, JUDY, Lynchburg. Fine 

Arts Elementary Education. Circle K; 

Gamma Phi Beta; Koppa Delta Pi; Mortar 

Board; O.A.; R.A. 
WATKINS, SHARON GALE, Hampton. 

Business Administration — Accounting. 

Koppa Delta, Membership Chairman; O.A 



WATTERS, STANLEY HARRISON, 

Newberry, S C History Choir; R A.: 

S.A.; Sigma Chi. 
WEATHERLY, SUZANNE ELLEN, Atlanto, 

Go. Fine Arts. Chorus, Westminster 

Fellowship. 
WEBB, JUDY MARIE, Mechonicsvllle. 

Theater Director's Workship; Premiere 

Theater; Theater. 
WEBB, WILLIE G. WALTON JR., Skippers. 

Accounting. Accounting Club; Band; 

BSO, President; Alpha Phi Alpha; Phi Mu 

Alpha; R.A.; Queens's Guard. 



WEBER, SUSAN MARIE, Gombier, Oh. 

Biology. Biology Club; Circle K; 

Mermettes; Outing Club. 
WEI, BARBARA CHEIN-FEN, Silver Spring, 

Md. Biology. Alpha Lambda Delfo; 

Intramurols, Kappo Koppa Gammo, 

President; Delta Omicron; O.A., Phi 

Sigma; R.A ; Omicron Delta Kappa, Vice 

President. 
WEINER, JOHN FRANCIS, Cherry Hill, N.J. 

Biology CSA; Honor Council; 

Mermettes, Historian; Omicron Delta 

Kappa, President; Phi Sigma; Swimming 

Co-coptoin. 
WEINER, NANCY JO, Newport News. 

Business Monogement. Intromurals; 

Koppxi Kappa Gommo; O A.; R.A. 



WEIXEL, MICHAEL JOSEPH, Springfield. 

Government. Intromurals; Pi Kappa 

Alpha, Social Choirman. 
WELLS, GAIL LOUISE, Newport News. 

Mathematics. 
WENNER, MARY ANTOINETTE, 

Alexandria. English. Colonial Echo; 

Dorm President; Delta Delta Delta; 

WATS. 
WENZEL, EDWIN STUART, Florham Park, 

N.J. History. Intromurals; Pi Lambda Phi. 



WESP, PATRICIA MARIE, OIney, Md. 

Theatre/Speech. Backdrop; Delta 

Omicron; Evensong Choir; Premiere 

Theater; Sinfonicron; Theater. 
WEX, JOSEPH H., Toms River, N.J. 

Government. 
WHEELER, ALICE DIXON, Arlington. 

Psychology-Sociology. Choir; Chorus; 

O.A.; R.A.; Sinfonicron; Wesley 

Foundation, Chairperson. 
WHITBACK, WILLIAM G., Norfolk. 

Economics. "Finnegan's Wake." 



WHITE, GERARD J., Richmond. Business 

Administrotion — Management. CSA; 

Intromurals; Kappa Alpha; R.A.; Rugby 

Club. 
WHITE, SANDRA A., Suffolk. 

Mothemotics. Campus Tour Guide; 

Chorus. 



WHITLEY, WILLIAM H., Newport News. 

Government. 
WILHEIM, BARRY CLINTON. Lynchburg. 

Accounting. College Republicons; O A.; 

intromurals; Pi Lambda Phi, President, 

Rush Chairman. 



WILHOIT, PEYTON KIRK, Vo. Beach. 

Biology. Biology Club; Phi Sigma, 

Secretary. 
WILKES, CHARLES A., Bethesda, Md. 

Chemistry. Bond; Chemistry Club, 

President; ACM; LSA; Outing Club. 




This is only a 
rumor, isn^t it? 



B 



id you know that William and 
Mary is the second hardest school 
in the country behind M.I.T.?" This was 
one of the many rumors that was spread 
throughout the college community in 
past years. 

William and Mary, considered by 
many a pressure cooker, had been 
rumored to have the highest suicide rate 
in the country and the greatest number 
of fags. That most students do not 
marry other William and Mary students 
is among the most well spread rumors. 
In addition, Crjm Dell was said to have 
been rated by c "leading" magazine as 
the most romantic spot on any college 
campus. 

The latest rumor to spread throughout 
the campus concerned the supposed 
decision to change the William and Mary 
Indians to the Patritos. Although this 
caused much concern and protest 
among students, it proved to be a fallicy 
and students turned elsewhere for new 
gossip and newsworthy "issues." 



Newly restored, the beauty of Crim Dell odds to 
the charm of William and Mary campus. 



322 SENIORS 




WILLIAMS, ANITA ELAINE, Chesapeake. 

English. BSO; WATS. 
WILLIAMS, ELLEN J., Falls Church. 

German. 
WILLIAMS, JAMES JEHU, Lynchburg. 

Physics Mathematics. German House. 
WILLIAMS, LEIGH SHAREEN, Wilmington 

N.C. English. 



WILLIAMS, ROLF ANDERS, Norfolk. 

Business Administration. Intramurols; 

Lyon G. Tyler Historical Society; Kappa 

Sigma, Social Chairman. 
WILLIAMS, SANDRA LYNN, Yorktown. 

Sociology. 
WILLIS, BRENDA KAYE, Rockville. 

Psychology, 
WILLSEY, GLEN R, Cherry Hill, N.J. 

Accounting. Gymnastics; Sigma Chi, 

Rush Chairman. 



WILMOTH, MARY A., Norfolk. English. 
Chorus; Circle K; Kappa Delta, Historian. 



WILSON, ERIC, Vienna. History. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 



WILSON, KIMBERLY S., Fairfax Station. 
Mathematics Kappa Alpha Theta. 



SENIORS 323 



T^oiv I 1{nou/f I never should have 



/tft y First Night of Duty 
jlvl. by an Area Coordinator 

A boisterous hall party awakened Old 
Dominion men (as did the boo 
constrictor on the loose) so I reasoned 
with the students and things were calm 
for five minutes. 

A cloud of smoke from a fire 
extinguisher filled first floor so I pleaded 
with the guys to vacuum the rug and to 
wipe down the walls and they did and 
things were quiet 

for four minutes. 
A pane of glass crashed so I ran to the 
scene to scream at the friend who I 
charged with the fee of replacing the 
window and things were . . . still there 

for three minutes. 
A dozen residents barged into my 
apartment to complain that they had no 
air-conditioning and I told them that it 
was their punishment (I mean, "negative 
reinforcement") for the noise of the party 
and things were . . . bloody 

for two minutes, 

as I doctored up my nose. 
The fire department made their Keystone 
Cops entrance to answer an emergency 
coll of a fourth floor fire which turned 
out to be a false assessment of the 
carbon dioxide which had traveled three 
floors without the knowledge of the 
students who hod reported a fire and 
things were quiet enough 

for one minute 
in order to fill out a stack of incident 
reports and work orders and to listen to 
how three students thought social life at 
William and Mary stunk. For the 

thirty seconds 
remaining before sunrise, I asked myself 
why I ever said in that interview that, "I 
love people!" 



Forties give Area Coordinator Van Black a chance 
to meet the students in his complex. 




WILSON, PRESTON E, JR., Lynchburg. 
Physics Mathematics. 

WINCKLHOFFER, KATHRYN LEE, 
Richmond. Chemistry AFS Returnees 
Club; Chemistry Club; Kappa Alpha 
Theta 

WINELAND, RICHARD H., Alexandria. 
Biology. Intramurols; Theto Delta Chi 

WINGO, NANCY BRENT, Dillwyn, 
Psychology. Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Secretary; Dorm President; Dorm 
Council; Interhall; WATS; Williamsburg 
Pre-school for Special Children. 




I 










324 SENIORS 




WINSTON, STEPHEN LEE, Portsmouth. 

Chemistry. Chemistry Club; Intromurols; 

Pi Lambda Phi, Treasurer; Wrestling. 
WISLER, GAIL C, Lorton. Biology. Chorus; 

Circle K; O.A. 
WITKOVITZ, PAUL G., Verona, Po. 

Business Management. Football; Sigma 

Nu. 
WITTE, ANN WILSON, Williamsburg. 

Elementary Education. 



WOLIN, DEBORAH ANN, Williamsburg. 
Government/Psychology. American Civil 
Liberties Union, President; Lyon G. Tyler 
Historical Society, President, Vice 
President, Secretary, Historion; 
International Circle; Asia House; Project 
Plus; ODK. 

WONNELL, NANCY SUE, Linwood, N.J. 
Sociology. Hockey; Intromurols; Pi Beto 
Phi, Assistant Membership Social 
Chairman, 

WOODFIN, KAREN ELIZABETH, 
Alexandria. History. 

WOODRUFF, REBEKAH J , Chesterfield. 
Biology. Chorus, Kappa Alpha Theta. 



WOODSON, THOMAS D., Alexandria. 

Economics. 
WORD, CHARLOTTE J., Charlottesville. 

Biology. 
WORTHINGTON, ANNE DALLAM. 

Newport News. Biology. Theoter; 

Wesfel. 
WORTHINGTON, MARY WYATT, 

Newport News. Biology. Circle K; 

Wesfel. 



WUELZER, KENNETH L., Williamsburg. 

Mathematics. 
YATES, JAMES FRANCIS, Richmond. 

Physical Education. Intromurols; Physicol 

Educotion Majors Club. 
YORE, MARY EVELYN, McLean. 

Government Pi Delta Phi. 
YOUNG, KATHLEEN MARIE, Fairfax. 

Philosophy Psychology. Dorm Council; 

Intromurols. 



YOUNG, SUSAN N., Lockport, III. 

Chemistry Alpha Lambda Delto; Band; 

Chemistry Club; Kappa Delta; Lyon G. 

Tyler Historical Society 
ZABLACKAS, MIMI A., Newington. 

History 
ZGUTOWICZ, DONNA, Mineolo, N.Y. 

Government. French House. 
ZOOK, SHARON MARIE, Springfield. 

Elementary Education Chi Omega; 

Dorm Council; Intromurols; Koppo Delta 

Pi, Vice President; Mermettes. 



SENIORS 325 



ABERNATHY, PATTI, Alexandria. 
ACHA, SUSAN MARIE, Alexandria. 
ADAMS, DEMISE MARIE, Springfield. 
ADAMS NATE L., Coral Gables, Fl. 
AGEE, BETH, Richmond. 
AIKIN, LOUISA, Newport News. 



ALEXANDER, JANET PAIGE, 

Mechonicsville. 
ALKALAIS, ELIAS A., 

Athens, Greece. 
ALLEN, JAN, Genoa, Italy. 



ALLEN, STEPHEN, Falls Church. 
ALLISON, DEBRA L., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ANDERS, KAREN CECILE, 

Glenn Dale, Md, 



ANGEVINE, LINDA, McLean. 
ANTHONY, SUSAN BRUCE, 

Williamsburg. 
ASHLEY, PHYLLIS, Va. Beach. 



BAILEY, CYNTHIA V., 

Chorlotte Court House. 
BAILEY, EVELYN, Hopewell. 
BAILEY, LYNN M., Xenia, Ohio. 



BAKER, JOHN PATRICK, Norfolk. 
3AQUIS, GEORGE D,, Chevy Chase, Md. 
3AR0N0FSKY, CAROL, Reading, Ma. 
BARNES, JOHN, Tazeewell, 
3ARNHART, TIM, Rocky Mount. 
BASSLER, DAVID, Baltimore, Md. 



BAYSE, EUNICE, Salem, 
BEAN, J, MITCHELL, Norfolk. 
BECK, JON, Cleveland Heights, Oh. 
BECKER, BILL, Newport News. 
BECKER, LARRY MICHAEL, Va. Beach. 
BELL, JOHN S., Alexander. 



BENNETT, CINDY, Sykesville, Md. 
BENSON, KATHERINE, Va. Beach. 
BENSON, ROBERT SCOTT, 

New City, NY. 
BERTAMINI, LORETTA, Falls Church. 
BEVILL, CAROLYN, McLean. 
BLAKE, SCOTT M., Fredericksburg. 



BLANKENBAKER, SUSAN, 

Charlottesville. 
BOLANOVICH, LISA ANN, 

Pittsburg, Po. 
BOND, LAUREL RAE, 

West Hartford, Ct. 
BONNER, JANET LOLA, Richmond. 
BOWEN BARBARA, Arlington. 
BRAGG, REBECCA, Mechonicsville. 




326 JUNIORS 




BRAITHWAITE, HARRY L., 

Winchester. 
BRASSINGTON, JANE MARIE, 

Bethlehem Pa. 
BRECHNER, ERIC L., 

Los Angeles, Co. 
BREITENBERG, HAL, Springfield. 
BRESNAHAN, MARY KATE, 

Falls Church. 
BRIGGS, ANGELA L., Chesopeake. 




Dial ext. 423 - it could 



save somehody^s life 



• • • 



Cscort Service was instigated on the 
William and Mary campus in 
October, 1973. Due to an alarming 
number of attacks on co-eds, a group of 
concerned students organized a 
protection system to thwart would-be 
muggers and alleviate fears of the 
unsuspecting victims. 

The strictly volunteer group worked 
on two shifts from 7- 1 and 10-1. 
Surprisingly enough, more colls come 
during the earlier hours from people 
stranded in the library and academic 
buildings. The group was originally 
based in the Campus Security Office, but 
later moved to the first floor of Landrum 
for a more centralized location. 

Monday through Thursday nights, 
calls were answered by pairs of escorts 
either on foot or in cars depending on 



the weather. Use of the service waned 
however, as time passed and fears and 
memories of on unsafe campus 
diminished. Whether the lack of use on 
the port of the student body caused a 
decrease in the number of volunteer 
escorts or vice-versa, the result was the 
demise of a much needed service. 

The nights of card playing, story 
swapping, and half-dozing while waiting 
for calls to come in were numerous when 
the escorting service was in its prime. 
However as the calls became few and 
for between, and three hour escorting 
shifts became three hours of watching 
the clock, the enthusiasm on the part of 
the escorts understandably decreased. 
Hopefully the need for this service 
decreased because the campus was a 
safer place. 




BRIGHAM, LEIGH, Williamsburg. 
BRINEMAN, JOHN R., Springfield. 
BROWN, KATHRYN, Dayton, Oh. 
BROWN, PRISCILLA, Arlington. 
BRUCE, LINDA, Norfolk. 
BRYANT, ROBERT EDWARD, Poquoson. 



BURKHARDT, ELLEN, Springfield. 
BURLINSON, ALICE G., 

Larchmont, NY, 
BURNS, CHARLES L., Winchester. 
BUTLER, GEORGE EDWARD, 

Chesapeoke. 
BYRD, SAMUEL D III, Chester. 
CALLAHAN, LAUREN, McLeon. 



CAMERON, JAMES W., 

Huntington Sta., N.Y. 
CAMPBELL, GREGORY SCOTT, 

Newport News. 
CARLSON, BRADLEY F., Williamsburg. 
CARLTON, JOEY, Lynchburg. 
CARLTON, MARCUS SCOTT, 

Alexandria. 
CARROLL, MARY PAT, Roanoke. 

CARTER, NANCY M , Suffolk. 
CARTER, VIRGINIA, Bedford. 
CASSAI, NORA M., Cronford, N.J. 
CASSON, CYNTHIA, Eoston, Md. 
CASTERLINE, PEGGY, Williamsburg 
CHAPMAN, SUSAN, Smithfield. 



JUNIORS 327 



CHASE, JON, Luray. 

CHERNOFF, HARRY, Paramus, N.J. 

CHRISTIANO, KEVIN J., 

West Orange, N.J, 
CLARDY, BENJAMIN W., 

Livermore Foils, Maine. 
CLARK, RON, Winchester. 
CLAYBROOK, KAREN LYNN, Glouster. 



CLEGHORN, SUSAN, Norfolk. 
CLOYD, TERRI, Springfield. 
COATE, MALCOLM B., Clorksville, Md. 
COLAIZZI, ELLIE, Pittsburgh, Po. 
COLE, MATHILDE K., Hopewell. 
COLLEY, MARK, Alexandria. 



COMER, MARY B., Roanoke, 
CONNER, DEBBIE, Newport News. 
CORBAT, JENNIFER, Annandale, 
CORDLE, CHARLA, Williamsburg, 
COTTRILL, MARY MEE, Chesapeake, 
COX, MELINDA RICHARDSON, 
Fredricksburg. 



CRAIG, SUSAN, Alexandria. 
CRAIG, WALTER M., Winchester. 
CRANE. WILLIAM J., Va, Beach. 
CROUCH, SALLY FOSTER, 

Bernordsville, N.J, 
CROXTON, RICHARD WARREN, Warsaw, 
CURD, DONNA V,, Merrifield, 



CUTLER, PAMELA V,, Chesapeake, 
DADENAS, DEBBIE, 

Little Silver, N,J, 
PALSY, TIMOTHY LEIGH, Va, Beach. 
DANILA, RICHARD, Collinsville, Ct, 
DANKERS, LEZLIE JO, Springfield, 
DANIELS, PATRICIA, Wesport, Ct 



DAVIS, DEBBIE, Alexandria. 
DAVIS, DONNA, Arlington. 



DAVISON, JENNIFER D., 

Williamsburg, 
DEAN, DEE, Richmond. 



DEAVER, EMILY, Charlottesville. 
DE FRANCES, JOHN, Pittsburgh, Pa, 



DE GIORGIO, MARY, Lynchburg. 
DELANEY, DEE DEE, Danville. 







328 JUNIORS 




Cartoon art 
decorates u/alls 



W 



I hat a better way to vent your 
frustrations than drawing on 
walls! Ever since age three when crayons 
became an integral port of every child's 
life, the urge to scribble on any surface 
was irresistable. In 1973, the freshmen of 
Yates sponsored o contest between halls 
to determine where the real artistic talent 
was hidden. From their efforts emerged a 
mural of Alice in Wonderland, the 
infamous Hall of Immortal Comics and 
numerous charicatures. Not only did the 
drab walls become unique masterpieces, 
but true friendships developed. After all, 
how could you help but get along with 
someone whose favorite superhero was 
yours too? 



The King from the Wiiord of Id guards the 
residents of Yates. 




DEMANCHE, ROBERT, Fairhoven, Mo. 
DENBY, PAUL, Scottsville. 
DENTON, RICHARD E., Fairfax. 
DICHTEL, CATHERINE, Newport News. 
Dl GIOVANNA, RICHARD, Mossapequo 

Park, N.Y. 
DOUGLASS, JOHN 8., Armonk, N.Y. 



DOYLE, BOB, Falls Church. 

DREW, DOROTHY ANN, Fredericksburg. 

DREWRY, GARY, Fincosfle. 

DUBEL, DIANA JEAN, Lincroft, N.J. 

DUNLEVY, WILLIAM GREGORY, 

Lynbrook, N.Y. 
DUNTON, LINDA MAPP, Exmore. 



DU PRIEST, MICHELE, Arlington. 
DURDIN, KATHY, Lokelond, Fl. 
EASTMAN, MELISSA A., Lawton, Ok. 
EDDINS, WINFRED JR., Culpeper. 
ELIEZER, ELAINE T., 

Fredericksburg. 
ENGLAND, TERRY MAY, Hopewell. 



ENSOR, MARY, Woodbridge. 
EPSTEIN, JERROLD H., Alexandria. 
ESPER, NANCY S., Carlisle 

Barrocks, Pa. 
ETHERIDGE, DANIEL M., Chesapeake. 
EWING, MARY L., Falls Church. 
FADDEN, COLEEN, Willow Grove, Pa. 



FELDER, CHRISTIAN, Arlington. 
FELDER, ROBIN A,, Arlington. 
FERNANDEZ, AIDA FERNANDEZ, 

Columbia, S.C. 
FLAIG, TERESA A., Midlothian. 
FLEXER, LISA, Huntington Valley, 

Pa. 
FLOYD, JOAN L., Elliot City, Md. 



FOLARIN, NATHANIEL ADEOLUWA, 

Williamsburg. 
FORREST, DAVID L , Poquoson. 
FORTE, MARY ALEXANDRIA, Norfolk. 



FOX, KAREN DENISE, Reading, Po. 
FREDERICK, JESSIE ROTH, Baltimore, 

Md, 
FUERST, CARLTON, D., Vienna. 



FULLER, SANDY, Salem. 
GARY, PEGGY, Richmond. 
GATES, KENT, Arlington. 



GEORGE, DREXELL A., Alexandrio 
GEORGE, THOMAS, Titusville, Fl. 
GILLETTE, BETTY E., Norfolk 



JUNIORS 329 



GLOVER, SUSAN, South Boston. 
GOERNOLD, TOM, Reston. 
GORETSKY, SHARON R , 

Springfield 
GORNICKI, MICHAEL DAVID, Glen 

Head, NY. 
GRAVELY, STEVE, Burke. 
GRAY, MORGAN M., Williomsburg. 



GRAY, PETER, Bortlesville, Ok. 
GRAY, WILLIAM JR., Towson, Md. 
GREENBERG, LARRY, Va. Beach. 
GREENLAW, STEVEN A., Vienna. 
GRIFFIN, MICHELE, South Hill. 
GRIFFIN, ROBERT K., Williamsburg. 




It's worth seeing aQain 




/Tj^ ovie going, an old American 
jTlIl- tradition, was reborn resulting in 
a flood of new movies, including Love 
and Death, Funny Lady and Chinatown. 

However, there was considerable talk 
that many of these movies were 
extraordinary and that the viewers were 
unable to relate with the course of 
events. Critics praised highly the work of 
the actors, yet the plots seemed far 
removed from the somewhat settling 
pace of the year. The violent as well as 
the happy-go-lucky scenes were less 
prevalent and replaced with 
action-packed escapes and conniving 
swindling. Nonetheless, with careful 
consideration (and a little imagination) 
one realized that the movies were 
characteristic of various aspects of the 
William and Mary community. 

While sitting in the Wren building 
engrossed in a lecture on Mark Twain, a 



student, who hod the night before 
viewed Earthquake, was somewhat 
jolted by the noise of a bulldozer. He did 
however recover and after class quickly 
made his way to James Blair Hall. Once 
again, he was reminded of another 
movie, Jaws, in that he realized the 
changing academic policies were always 
giving the student the bite. 

However, this individual decided not to 
let this get him down and quickly made 
his way to Morton Hall in order to try to 
con some of his professors by applying 
several of Robert Redford's techniques 
used in The Sting. Seeing that this was 
in vain, he mode his way down the steps 
of Morton while scenes from the 
Towering Inferno flashed through his 
mind. 



A familiar sight to strollers in Merchant's Square 
where moviegoers enjoy popular films. 



tfi 'IS^e'Williamsbi 




HALE, REBECCA LYNN, Hopewell. 
HALENDA, STEVE, Wise. 
HALL, BETTY GRAY, Montross. 
HALL, STEVEN DOUGLAS, 

Westerville, Oh. 
HANRETTY, DIANE P., Williamsburg. 
HANSEN, DAVA LUANNE, 

Gathersburg, Md. 



HARRISON, JOAN E., Annondale, 
HARSCH, DEBORAH A., Falls Church 
HARTSFIELD, JANE, Morrisville, Pa. 
HARTUNG, JEAN L., Alexandria. 
HAULENBEEK, SUE, Martinsville, N.J. 
HEBLER, ELIZABETH MCILWAINE, 
Prince George. 



HEIDER, LAURA, West River, Md. 
HENDRICKS, STEVE, Danville. 
HENNELLY, DANIEL PATRICK, Norfolk. 
HILL, JEANNE MARIE, Hampton. 
HINES, THOMAS G. JR., Suffolk. 
HOFFMAN, HENRY J., Southport, Ct. 





\^.^ fi,> 



<it :^ 



330 JUNIORS 




HOLMES, KEVIN L., Springfield. 
HOLMESLEY, AMY MARIE, Alexondria. 
HOOVER, MINA, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
HOSMER, JEFFREY ARTHUR, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
HOWARD, CATHERINE MARIE, Richmond. 
HOWARD, WALTER S. Ill, Fork Union. 



HOWELL, PARKER D., Suffolk. 
HUBER, THOMAS M., Pitman, N.J. 
HUFFARO, JUDY CLAUDETTE, Crockett. 
HUGHES, MARGARET ANNE, Alexandrio. 
HULL, DIANE, Carmel, Co. 
HUTZLER, BETH, Barrington, R.I. 



ISHEE, LAURIE ANNE, Herndon. 
JACKSON, CHRISTOPHER, Va. Beach. 
JACOBS, RAYMOND A., 

Glens Falls, NY 
JANOSIK, DANIEL II, Hampton. 



JETER, SANDY, Fairfax, 
JEWELL, SANDRA LYNN, Richlands. 
JOHN, RICHARD, Arlington. 
JOHNSON, BETH, Hopewell. 



JOHNSON, BETSY, Surry 
JOHNSON, FLORA FRANCES, 

Gordonsville. 
JOHNSON, JAN LEE, Newsoms. 
JOHNSON, PATRICK HENRY, Bedford, 



JOHNSTON, SHEILA, Luroy. 
JOKL, MARTIN L,, Alexandrio. 
JONES, CAROLYN, Richmond. 
JONES, DOUGLAS S,, Morristown, 
N,J. ' 



JONES, PEGGY LEE, Norfolk 
JONES, REBECCA KATHRYN, 

Greenville, N C 
JORDAN, PAMELA L,, Newport News. 
JOYCE, MARY, Foirfax, 
JUNKIN, PRESTON D., Annondale. 
JUSTIS, JANET, Onancock. 



JUSTIS, ROBERT, Parksley. 
KAMMERER, CINDY, Arlington. 
KAPLAN HOWARD J , Richmond. 
KELLY, CHRISTOPHER ROLFFE, 

Alexandria 
KELLY, DEBBIE, Richmond, 
KELLY, MARCI, Richmond. 



KELLY, ROSEMARY J,, Falls Church. 
KEVORKIAN, JERRY, Richmond. 
KLATT, SHELIA, Richmond, 
KLINE, MARY LOU, Hampton 
KLINGMAN, CARRINE, Williamsburg, 
KOEING, MARIA ROSE, Somerset, N.J. 



JUNIORS 331 



KRAFT, KATIE, Alexandria. 
KNEIP, MARGARET E., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
KURPIT, ROBERTA G., Woodbridge. 
LABERTEAUX, JAN E., Bethlehem, Pa. 
LAKER, MARY ELLEN, Fairfax, 
LAMBERT, MATTHEW. Hopewell. 



LAMPERT, PAULA, Norfolk. 
LARSON, CYNTHIA A., Alexandria. 
LAWLOR, MAUREEN, Paoli, Pa. 
LEACH, BARBARA L., Chesopeake. 
LEARY, BARBARA JEAN, 

Ottawa, Ontario. 
LEE, RHONDA, Vienna. 



LENTZSCH, KATHI, Charlottesville. 
LEONARD, MARGARET, Roanoke. 
LEPPO, JEFFREY, Vienna. 
LETT, ELIZABETH, Williamsburg. 



\' TV^TPfl 



LETT, JAMES W. JR., 

New Providence, N.J. 
LEUCK, FRANCINE E., Greot Falls. 
LEWIS, DANA LYNN, Bloxom. 
LEWIS, SARA, Glouster, 



LEWIS, SUSAN D., Newport News. 
LLOYD, NANCY, Glen Allen. 
LOCKE, DEBBIE ELAINE, 

Williamsburg. 
LOHRENZ, MARY EDNA, 

Golden, Co. 



LOVE, MELITA, Glenn Dale, Md. 
LUGAR, MIKE, Richmond. 
LYON, ROBERT THOMAS, Essex, Ct. 
MAHONEY, SUZANNE, Richmond. 



MALLOW, CAROL ANNE, Warwick, NY. 
MANN, HORACE EDWARD, Richmond. 
MANNING, DONNA, Cobleskill, NY. 
MARTIN, ROGER WAYNE, Bedford. 



MARTIN, SHIRLEY, Smithfield. 
MARTY, ANN M,, Laurenburg, N.C. 
MATTHEWS, GAIL M., Hampton. 
MATTHEWS, LYNNE NELL, Chesapeake. 



MAULLER, DEBRA LYNN, Nokesville. 
MCBRIDE, LYNN, Leesburg. 
MCCLURE, KEN, Arlington. 
MCCUTCHEON, JOHN, Richmond. 
MCGRATH,JOHN, Norfolk 
MCLEOD, JAMES E., Vienno 




9 # mM 








332 JUNIORS 




z^ 



Outer third 

/^\ n a campus where the usual 
\i/^ question among students was not 
"Where are you from?", but rather "In 
what part of Virginia do you live?", the 
out-of-stater became somewhat of a 
rarity. This was evidenced by the fact 
that over 70% of the student body was 
comprised of Virginians. The 30% that 
are "foreigners" came from over forty 
different states and twenty-five foreign 
countries. 

The problems of out-of-state students 
were vast. There was a definite 
frustration at being unable to find rides 
home for the holidays and a feeling of 
confinement at not being able to go 
home anytime except the holidays (if 
even then). Loneliness often resulted 
from absence of familiar faces and 
companions from high school. However, 
the excitement upon finally encountering 
another student who lived near (or had 
even heard of) your hometown often 
counteracted negative feeling. 

It seemed as if the out-of-stater would 
suffer an identity crisis in on atmosphere 
predominantly composed of Virginians, 
however, since the out-of-state 
population was in no way segregated 
from the in-states, most students seldom 
knew where their fellow student was 
from. They were all in the rat-race 
together, and once you were there, it 
was of little importance from where you 
came. 



A long ride from Maryland finally brings Jeff 
Jeremiah and Dave Hubbard to W & M. 





m. Aim t^ ^>- jtH..^ 




MCCANN, MERLE C, Carson. 
MCQUARRY, DAWN ELIZABETH, 

Lynchburg. 
MEARS, MARTHA LEE, Richmond. 
MELANSON, GAIL P., Paramus, N.J. 
MIDYETTE, ANNE, Ashland. 
MILLER, ROBERT C, Dayton. 



MINKLER, EDWARD, Summit, N.J. 
MINOR, MICHAEL, Richmond. 
MINTER, GAIL MARSHALL, Covington. 
MITCHELL, STEVE, Va, Beach. 
MOORE, ELLEN, Richmond. 
MOORE, MICHAEL PATRICK JR., 
Norfolk. 



MORGAN, MARY FAITH, Va. Beach 
MORRISON, TODD A., Westfield, N.Y. 



MOSCICKI, JANET LISA, 

Carteret, N,J, 
MOVROYDIS, SHELLEY, 



Flanders, N.J. 



MULHOLLAND, KAREN, Rockville, Md. 
MULRONEY, WILLIAM P., 
Smithtown, N.Y. 



MURPHY, KAREN JOAN, 

Ringwood, N.J. 
MYERS, WILLIAM GERRY II 

Bon Air. 



NADARA, GLENN S., Solem, 
NAESER, SUE, Arlington. 



N.J. 



NARAMORE, JEANNE MARIE, Vienna. 
NELSON, DONNA VANCE, Kingston, Go. 



NESS, KAREN, Vienno. 
NEWSOM, EDITH DIANE, Madison. 
NICHOLAS, RICK, Winchester. 
NICOLAUS, JEAN HUGHES, 

Portsmouth 
NUGENT, M THERESA, Alexandria. 
NUGENT, NANCY L., Hopewell. 



JUNIORS 333 



OSBORNE, HENRY H. Ill, Alexandria 
OVERSON, JAMES A , Springfield. 
OWENS, KATHY, Orlando, Fl. 
PAGE, ALEXIS, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
PALMER, LINDA ELIZABETH, 

Va. Beach. 
PALMER, MARK DAVID, Ambridge, Pa. 





^iT'he bienially offered Ferguson 
^tl/ Seminar was held at the college 
this fall. To acquaint students with a 
career in publishing, well-known 
journalists and publishing house 
executives designed o program to 
answer questions on "the general nature 
of book publishing and the career 
prospects in book edition, design, 
production, and sales and marketing." 
1976 marked the sixtieth anniversary 
of the graduation of William Cross 
Ferguson from the College of William 
and Mary. The result of his desire that 
the college student become educated in 
the intricacies of publishing and editing, 
his chosen profession, were realized in 
the establishment of this seminar. A 
unique opportunity presented itself to the 
seventy students fortunate enough to 
participate in this first-hand, 
give-and-take session with nationally 
acclaimed experts. The extent to which 
students capitalized on the seminar was 
evident in the large number participating. 



Publishing seminar funded by 




PAPPAS, CHARLES C, Toano, 
PATTEN, MICHAEL, Arlington. 
PATTERSON, JODY, Milford, Del. 
PAWEL, DAVID, Maplewood, N.J. 
PAYNE, DAVE, Hampton. 
PAYNE, SARA AYLETT, Roanoke. 



PEACOCK, KAREN, Chickasaw, Al. 
PEAKE, SHARON KAY, Rochester, NY. 
PFEIFER, MIMI, Newport News. 
PHILLIPS, CLO, Harrisonburg. 
PHILLIPS, MARTIN J., Martinsville, 
PIERCY, ANNA MARIE, Alexandria 



PLAKITSIS, VIRGINIA, 

Baltimore, Md. 
POLGLASE, DONNA LYNN, 

Allendale, N.J. 
POSKANZER, SHERRY, Cortland, NY, 
POTTER, MIKE, Richmond. 
POWELL, DIANA, Rockville, Md. 
POWELL, JAMES LLOYD, Chesopeake. 



PRICE, HELEN, Silver Spnng, Md. 
PRIDGEN, JANET L., Crewe. 
PROSSWIMMER, KAREN, Rockville, Md. 
PRYOR, DEBBIE, Vo. Beach. 
PULLIAM, JANET S., Fairfax. 
RADD, BETSI, Norfolk. 




334 JUNIORS 




RADOLINSKI, JOHN MICHAEL, 

Fredricksburg 
RAWLS, CHARLES H. JR., Suffolk. 
RAY, BRENDA, Richmond. 
REHME, JANE E., Alexondrio. 
REINER, FREDERICK, Alexandrio. 
REINHARD, RICHARD T., 

Syracuse, N.Y. 



RICHARDSON, WARD, Crozier. 
RILEY, JANICE PEYTON, Richmond. 
ROBERTS, JOAN KING, 

Bennington, Vt. 
ROBERTS, LYNN, Williamsburg. 
ROBINSON, MARLENE J., Arlington. 



ROSY, MARION, Newport News. 
ROCK, DAVID B-, Chester. 
ROCKWELL, BROWNING, 

Carmichael, Ca. 
ROGERS, BRYAN, Arlington. 
ROLLER, RAM, Alexandria. 



ROLLINS, MAGGIE, Rockville. 
ROSE, BLAKE G., Falls Church. 
ROTHENBERG, BOBBIE, Vo Beach 
ROWLING, HOWARD, Wynnewood, Pa, 
RUBENKING, SHELLEY, Fairfax. 



RUBLE, ANN, Roanoke. 
RUIZ, ABELARDO A., Chesapeake. 
SAGAN, HATSY, Leesburg. 
SANDERS, SHERY, Newark, Del. 
SANDERSON, JANET ANN, 
Ft. Monmouth, Ws. 



SANDMAN, OLGA, Williamsburg 
SANDO, PAUL E., Foils Church, 
SAUNDERS, BONITA VALERIE, 

Portsmouth. 
SCARDAMI, ELEANOR H,, Hopewell. 
SCHARDT, BRUCE C, McLeon. 
SCHLICHTING, RICHARD D., 

Delaware, Ohio. 



SCHMIDT, SUSAN M,, Rollo, Mo, 
SCHOEPKE, TIMOTHY J,, Norfolk. 
SCHOTT, MARGARET E , Fanwood, N.J. 
SCOTT, DOUGLASS BRYCE, 

Voldez, Alaska, 
SCOTT-FLEMING, IAN C, 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 
SEAVER, SANDRA, Lorton. 



SEGLIN, PATTI, Williamsburg. 
SEHNERT, KRISTIE, Arlington. 
SENSALE, ALIX, Vienna. 
SEWARD, LEIGH WARD, Norfolk. 
SHAVER, CINDY, Va, Beach. 
SHELTON, TERRI LIZABETH, 
Alexandria, 



SHEPPARD, KATHERINE T., 

Buffalo Jet 
SHIRLEY, DARIAN, 

East Greenwich, R,l. 
SIBOLD, LUCY, Alexandria 
SIEVEKA, EDWIN M., Falls Church. 
SINGLETON, LINDA C, 

Ft. Walton Beoch, Fl. 
SINK, LYNN ELLEN, Rocky Mount. 



JUNIORS 335 



SIROTTA, JUDITH, Alexandria. 
SLOANE, LYNN, Pittsburgh, Po. 
SLOTNICK, JILL, Possaic, N.J. 
SMITH, C. WARREN III, York, Pa. 
SMITH, DAVID E., Arlington. 
SMITH, DONNA GAYLE, Richmond. 



SMITH, JEFFREY B., Mechanicsvill 
SMITH, LINDA C, Richmond. 
SMITH, LINDA KAY, Dover, Del. 
SPAHR, DAVID K. JR., Richmond. 
STAHA, KAREN, Chesapeake. 
STALLINGS, ROBERT, McLean. 



STANLEY, JOHN BAINE, Orange. 
STASSI, PAULA, Springfield. 
STEED, JANICE, Alberta. 
STEELE, PAT, Astoria, NY. 
STEIGLEDER, LINDA, Bowling Green. 
STEINBUCHEL, JOHANNA R., Fairfax. 



STEINMULLER, KAREN A,, McLean. 
STEPHAN, KAREN E., McLean. 
STRATTNER, MARK, Va. Beach. 
STUDER, WAYNE M., West Point. 
SULLINS, LINDA, Chester. 
SULLIVAN, STEPHEN M., Briarcliff Manor, 
N.Y. 



SUTTON, GEORGIA KIMMAN, Annandale. 
SZUBA, DONNA MARIE, 

Pottersville, N.J. 
TALLON, STEPHANIE BEST, 

Newport News. 
TATEM, KAREN RAE, Suffolk. 
TAYLOR, DEBORAH S,, Richmond. 
TAYLOR, KATHLEEN, Waynesboro. 



TAYLOR, SUSAN CAROL, Va, Beach. 
TESTA, CAROLYN, Nutley, N.J. 




THOMPSON, ROBERT E., 

Downingtown, Pa. 
THOMSON, DONIPHAN O., Lynchburg. 



TINDALL, L. DIANE, Trenton, N.J. 
TOMLINSON, KAREN LEE, 
Norristown, Po. 



TOLBERT, CAROL, Norfolk. 

TOMS, SHEREE MARIE, Williamsburg. 




Finally lean enjoy 




336 JUNIORS 












the Holidays 



^f^ hanksgiving used to mean fun at 
^i^ home with the family; however, 
this year exams came before Christmas 
and Thanksgiving took on a new 
dimension. What used to be a thirty-two 
day study period was suddenly reduced 
to only four. All those overdue papers 
and that back reading had to be done 
amidst turkey, cranberry sauce and 
pumpkin pie. 

This new policy was instituted after 
many years of conflict between student 
and faculty. The faculty had argued that 
there was not sufficient time to grade 
papers accurately, while students argued 
that exams after Christmas meant their 
"vacation" was virtually non-existant. 
The issue, however, was one of those 
rare cases where the requests of both 
parties could be satisfied; exams were 
taken in December and grade reports 
were not due until January. 



An ominous warning of what was about to occur 
to the campus with early exams. 




TRAN, HUYEN, Arlington. 
TRAPNELL, JON CHARLES, Arlington. 
TRUMBO, MALFOURD, Covington. 
TSAHAKIS, GEORGE JOHN, Roanoke. 
TURNER, STEVE, Franklin. 
TYREE, PATTI L., Roanoke. 



VANDERHOOF, ANDY, Springfield. 
VAUGHAN, MARILYNN, Richmond, 
VAUGHAN, NANCY, Colonial Heights. 
VESSLEY, GERRY, Miami, Flo. 
VORHIS, LINDA, Annondole. 
WADE, ROBERT ALAN, Springfield. 



WALLER, MELANIE, Brentwood, Tenn. 
WALLING, EILEEN MARIE, Gwynn. 
WALK, JOHN, Richmond. 
WARD, ANNE, Richmond. 
WARING, ANNE F., Dunnsville. 
WASHINGTON, HAROLD C, 
Decatur, Ala. 



WA5IELEWSKI, SUSAN, Falls Church. 
WATERS, BARBARA L., Hovertown Pa 
WEAVER, LESLIE, Springfield. 
WEBSTER, BECKY, Winchester. 
WEEKLEY, ANNE, Norfolk. 
WEIRUP, NAN, Richmond. 



WELLS, SUSAN APRIL, Richmond. 
WERINGO, BETH, Danville. 
WHITE, NATHAN S. IV, Annondole. 
WHITLEY, T. ALVA JR., Churchlond. 
WILCOXON, KARAN L., Hampton 
WILLIAMS, LISA A., Pittsburgh, Po. 



WITHAM, LINDA L., Richmond. 
WOOD, PRISCILLA, Arlington. 
WORTHINGTON, LAUREL, Annondole 



YAHLEY, ROBERT, Richmond. 
YANOWSKY, BARBARA, Springfield. 
YARRINGTON, MARGARET L., 
Vero Beach, Fla. 



YATES, WILLIAM H. JR., Roonoke. 
YORE, LUCY A., McLean. 
YORK, ELIZABETH L., 
Rochester, NY. 



YOUNG, HEATHER ELIZABETH, 

Virginia Beoch. 
YOUNGBLOOD, GINNY, Springfield. 
ZULTHER, RICHARD, Westfield, N.J. 



JUNIORS 337 



ADAMS, DONNA, Richmond. 
ANAYA, KAREN, Springfield. 
ANDAAS, DIANE CAROL, Easton, Ct. 
ANDERSON, KAREN M., Springfield. 
ANDO, VERA, Alexandrio. 
APOSTOLOU, CINDY, Salem. 



ASPLUND, LINDA THERESE, Arlington. 
BABB, TERRY, Ivor. 
BAILEY, MICHAEL K., McLean. 
BAKER, HAROLD, St. Paul, Minn. 
BAKER, NILA ANN, Wheeling, W. Vo. 
BANE, DESILOU, Lexington. 



BARBOUR, SARAH VIRGINIA, 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
BARBROW, JANELLA, Racine, Wis. 
BARNETT, LIZ E,, Williston, N.Y. 
BARR, LINDA L., Alexandria. 
BARRANGER, PHILLIP KYLE, Roanoke. 
BASS, ROBERT LEBO, Richmond. 



BAYRUNS, CATHY, Sang, Mich. 
BEALS, ALLISON, Ridgefield, Ct. 
BELL, JEANNE, Alexandria. 
BELT, JANE, Delphos, Ohio. 
BENESH, ROSEMARY ELIZABETH, 

Chesterfield. 
BENNETT, CHRISTIE, Annandale. 



BERGLUND, KATHY, Alexandria. 
BERKIN, JEFFREY JACK, Springfield. 



BERLINER, JOEL K., Falls Church. 
BESWICK, MICHAEL, Williamsburg. 



BILLINGSLEY, MARY, Monterey. 
BILODEAU, MOLLY, McLean. 



BILYEAU, JOHN MATTHEW, Fairfax. 
BIORDI, LISA, Fulton, Md. 








i>^-K^ 



WXi 



BIRMINGHAM, PETER, 

East Norwich, N.J. 
BISHOP, WILLIAM JR., Lawrenceville. 




And what is 
a ^*co1[e date*^? 

* *^f(7^ ^^ °" ^'^^^^ would a girl be 
^fcUfctf. asking me for o dote.-'" This 
was the initial reaction of a freshman girl 
after being asked to go on her first 
"coke-date." Soon, however, after going 
on several coke dates and hearing about 
those of her friends, the phrase 
"coke-date" became as standard a part 
of the freshman's William and Mary 
vocabulary as "caf," "delly-run" and 
"CW." 

A coke date was an informal 
get-together in which a sorority girl 
asked a freshman to go to some campus 
activity or to get a coke or dessert in 
order that they might become better 
acquainted. Although going on a coke 
date was a new and exciting experience 
at the beginning of the school year, it 
became somewhat monotonous and 
wearying as the semester progressed. As 
one freshman put it, "I've been to 
Baskin-Robbins so many times this 
month, I think I've tried each of the 31 
flavors at least once. There's got to be a 
limit on these coke dates!" 



Coke doting strengthens friendships as is seen with 
Rita Soler, Ann Jococks, and Paulo Stossi 



M 



i-« 



338 SOPHOMORES 




BLACK, SARA E., Sea View^ 
BLAIN, STUART, Roanoke. 
BLAKE, SUSAN, Yokosuko, Jopon. 
BLAND, RHODA, Alberta. 
BLANKENSHIP, KIM, Reston. 
BLOUNT, BRIAN K., Smithfield. 



BLUS, GREGORY L., Deerfield, III. 
BOLLINGER, MARK, Blacksburg. 
BOVA, KATHRYN, Roanoke. 
BOWSER, JEFF, Annandale. 
BRADLEY, MARTHA, Richmond. 
BRAMMER, GLENN PAUL, Roanoke. 



BRENNAN, JOSEPH, Monroe, Ct. 
BRIGGS, J- RONALD, Newport News. 
BROWN, DAVID, Arlington. 
BROWN, PEYTON, Alexandria. 
BRUNO, BARBARA, Norfolk. 
BRYANT, LOU ANNE, Capron. 



BUCHANAN, JOYCE, Radnor, Pa. 
BUCHANAN, KIM E., Bethesda, Md 
BURGESS, MICHAEL, Norfolk. 
BURIAK, BEVERLY, Williamsburg. 
BURTON, DENNIS C. Gordonsville. 
BURTON, Don, Fredricksburg. 



BUTLER, CATHY, Atlanta, Ga. 



BUTLER, ELIZABETH, Porkesburg, Pa. 



BUTLER, JO CAROL, Highland Springs. 



BYAM, JOHN T., Williamsburg. 



BYERS, KEITH JOHN, Leesburg. 



SOPHOMORES 339 



BYRNE, ANNE MARIE, Towson, Md. 
CABLE, VALERIE, Freehold, N.J. 
CAMACHO, DEBRA-JEANE, Vo. Beach. 
CAMBERN, NANCY, Springfield. 
CAMDEN, SUSAN, Richmond. 
CAMPBELL, GINGER, Blacksburg. 



CAMPBELL, HEIDI, Va. Beach. 
CARPENTER, CAROL, Bon Air. 
CARPENTER, NORA O., Chesapeake. 
CARR, PATRICK R., Lancaster, Pa. 
CARROLL, DANNY, Hampton. 
CHAPPELL, JULIE, Dinwiddle. 




Boo1{in^ it through Europe 



K \Mi llli IMM.KSin 



/Wn international study experience will 
X%add to the regular academic 
program by facilitating unique insight 
into one's total educational program. 
Besides studying in a different and 
stimulating environment, one "will gain 
an appreciation of the cultural heritage 
of other peoples, and become aware of 
some of the complex forces which are 
shaping the world today." The William 
and Mary Handbook for study abroad 
indicated several reasons students 
elected to spend their junior or senior 
year at a foreign university. 

Whether a student joined a program 
sponsored by the College, enrolled in on 
outside program especially designed for 
American college students, or 
independently enrolled in a foreign 
institution, 34 William and Mary 
students spent the 75-76 session abroad. 
Among the most popular schools with 



the students were St. Andrews University 
and Exeter in England, the University of 
Munster in West Germany, the University 
of Montpellier in France, and University 
of Vienna in Austria. 

In addition to sending students 
abroad, the College, through joint 
programs with foreign schools, hosted 
six international students this year. 
Predominantly from England, these 
individuals received a taste of American 
lifestyles in an area containing many 
remnants of the American historic past. 

The benefits of the exchange 
programs were vast and offered foreign 
and American students a means of 
exploring educational experiences 
beyond the traditional native university. 



Campus maps help foreign students familiorize 
themselves with their new homes. 




4 ttimptAit 



if \ / I 








5^~% 



CHEWNING, BEVERLY POWERS, 

Richmond. 
CLAUDE, ROBERT, Mendham, N.J. 
CLEMENTS, PAUL BRADLEY, 

Charlottesville. 
CLEVINGER, LLOYD C II, Newport News. 
CLIFFORD, JACK N., 

Cockeysville, Md. 
COAKLEY, DENIS, Fairfax. 

COATES, GARY M , Rustburg. 
COBB, HUTTON, Ronceverte, W. Va. 
CODY, STEVEN E , Springfield. 
COLASURDO, MICHELLE S , 

Newport News. 
COLE, TINA, Newport News. 
COMPTON, REID STEWART, Annandale. 



CONGER, BRUCE M , Silver Spring, Md. 
COOK, CRAIG, Anchorage, Alaska, 
COOK, DEBORAH LYNNE, Franklin. 
COOPER, JOHN F , Evanston, III 
CORSEPIUS, CAROL, Springfield. 
COUNCILL, RUTH ANNE, Hompton. 






^SS 






340 SOPHOMORES 



fhwff 



THK DNIVKRSin ()f t 





^, mik 



-ji\f 




COUSINO, SCOTT R., Springfield. 
COWAN, MICHAEL, Hampton. 
CRAFTON, JAMES N. Cinthicum, Nev. 
CRATSLEY, MARY ANNE, Fairfax. 
CRITCHFIELD, DARLENE RAY, 

Purcellville 
CROCKETT, SABRINA LYNN, 

Newport News. 



CROPP, KEVIN W., Buena Vista. 
CROSS, CAROL, Falls Church. 
CRUICKSHANK, DAVID, Vienna. 
CULP, STEVE, Va. Beach. 
D'ANTONIO, ANNA, Newport News. 
DARVAS, ANDREA, Arlington. 



DAVIDSON, JOHN, Williamsburg. 
DAVIN, CLARE, Falls Church. 
DAVIS, ELLEN, South Boston. 
DAVIS, MICHAEL J., Arlington. 



DAVIS, WANDA, HopeweM. 
DAY, FRANCES, Richmond. 

DECUNZO, LUANN, Hawthorne, N.J. 
DEFILIPPO, SUSAN, Vienna. 



DEAN, PATIENCE, Austria. 
DELANO, ROBERT B. JR., Warsaw. 
DEMPSEY, WILLIAM HENRY, III, 

Short Hills, N.J. 
DEWITT, LINDA MARGARET, Arlington 



DICKINSON, JEANIE HOPE, 

Buena Vista. 
DOLAN, THOMAS, Lynchburg. 
DOUGLASS, WILLIAM JEFF, Vienna. 
DRAKE, LESLIE, Wayne, N.J. 



DUFFY, BECKY, Bowling Green. 
DONAVANT, NANCY, Roanoke. 
DUNBAR, MARJORIE, Lithia. 
DUNCAN, DENNIS, Emporio. 
DUNN, PATTY, Manassas. 
EAKIN, LENDEN A., Troufville. 



EDWARDS, MICHAEL, Chester. 
EDWARDS, ROB, Va Beach. 
EGGLESTON, NAN, Wakefield. 
ELLIOT, DUFFY G., Williomsburg. 
ELLIS, DAWN E,, Roanoke. 
ENGH, ROBIN, Annandole. 



ESTES, JENNIE, Falls Church. 
ETHERIDGE, ELLEN W., Chesapeake. 
FARMER, FRAN, Franklin. 
FERREE, RICHARD SCOTT, 

Fredricksburg. 
FILE, JOHN LANIER, Beckley, W VA. 
FISCHER, BETH SUSAN, 

Bernardsville, N J 



SOPHOMORES 341 



FISHER, BETH, Columbus, Ohio. 
FITZGERALD, NANCY, McLeon. 
FLANNAGAN, BIZ, Dorien, Ct. 
FLANNAGAN, CHARLENE R., Clark, 
FLETCHER, SUSAN G., Richmond. 
FORADAS, MICHAEL, Conton, Ohio. 



N.J. 



FORBES, SUSAN NORENE, Chesapeake. 
FORD, DARLE, Madison Heights. 
FORD, LINDA JOYCE, Portsmouth. 



FOREMAN, JONATHAN HALE, 

The Plains. 
FOXWELL, ROBERT SCOTT, Va. Beach. 
FRAWLEY, WESLEE ELLEN, 

Boonton, N J 



FRAZIER, ANNE, Richmond. 

FRECHETTE, MARTHA GEDDY, Richmond. 

FRIEL, EILEEN O., Fairfax. 




Ill, 



FRUCHTRRMAN, RICHARD L 

Annandale. 
FRY, LESLIE A., Somerville, N.J. 
FUKUDA, MELBA N., Alexandria 






SUMMER, 
STUDY i*' 
ABROAD 



, -S^N 



Free 



>i*.— (lAn 






FUNK, KATHLEEN, Vienna. 
GALLOWAY, ROBERT STONE III, 

Greenville, S.C. 
GALLOWAY, TERNON, Suffolk. 
GARLICK, KEVIN JOHN, 

Pittsburg, Pa, 
GARRISON, RICHARD A., Arlington. 
GASTOUKIAN, ELLEN, Springfield. 



GESSNER, ELIZABETH, 

Massillon, Ohio. 
GHENN, L ALLISON, Media, Pa. 
GILBOY, PATTY, Richmond. 
GILLUM, KRISTA, Alexandria. 
GINTER, KIMBERLY ANN, 

Salisbury, Md. 
GLOVER, HOLLIS G. JR., Newport News. 



GOFF, TERRY, Newport News 
GONZALEZ, CONSUELO, Norwalk, Ct. 
GOOD, CAROLYN SUE, South Boston. 
GOODCHILD, PHILLIP EGERTON, 

McLean 
GOODMAN, MARSHALL BROOKS, 

Springfield. 
GORDON, DEBBY, Springfield. 



GORE, ANNE, Williamsburg. 
GORMLEY, EDWARD PAUL, JR., 

Franklin. 
GRAVES, MAY, Williamsburg. 
GRAYSON, MARY, Blacksburg. 
GREGORIE, STEWART P., Alexandria. 
GREGORY, D. ROBIN, Richmond. 




342 SOPHOMORES 




i 



A\AV\N 



UUAUTLHI' 

i 

THURSDAV-C 
HOI POLL 



I 



Every thinsr 
you^d need 

<0L tudent complaints that, "this 
oC school never does anything for 
me," were not totally justified if one 
stopped to consider services offered by 
the college. 

The ever-popular Ride Board was 
often filled to capacity especially when 
break time approached. Both Help 
Unlimited and the Tribe Trader offered 
a means to advertise jobs and 
merchandise. The placement office 
attempted to situate seniors in jobs by 
availing corporate executives of facilities 
to interview prospective graduates. Both 
spiritual and psychological counselling 
services were available to students who 
desired them. 

Bulletin boards similar to this one inform 
William and Mary students of upcoming events 
on and near the college campus. 





U. f 






GREGORY, JOEL, Danville. 
GRIFFIN, LORI, Suffolk. 
GRINNELL, JANE EYRE, 

Charlottesville. 
GRYGIER, MARK J., 

Silver Spring, Md. 
GUNTHERBERG, RAM, Williomsburg. 
HAASE, J. MICHAEL, Petersburg. 



HABERMAN, MAUREEN, Vienna. 



HACKNEY, MIKE, Williamsburg. 



HAGON, MICHAEL, Suffern, N.Y. 



HALL, KAREN, Chatham. 



HANSEN, KAREN, Purceville. 
HARPER, CLAUDIA ANN, Lynchburg. 
HARPER, STEPHANIE, Harrisonburg. 
HART, BRENDA., Melfo. 
HEAD, BARBARA DAVIS, 

Moss Point, Miss. 
HERBST, CAROLYN R., Midlothian. 



HICKMAN, GARY PAUL, Newport News. 
HORAK, SUSAN MARIE, 

St. David's, Po. 
HOSMANEK, DEBBIE LYNN, Waynesboro. 
HOWELL, ELIZABETH D , Hampton. 
HOY, ANITA, Richmond. 
HRECHOCIK, MAUREEN A., Hampton. 



HUGHES, ERIC KENT, Richmond. 
HUMPHREYS, WAYNE, Tucker, Go. 
HUNSICKER, EMILY A., Glenside, Pa. 
HUNT, CYNDIE, Danville. 
HYLTON, ROBYN CARLA, Danville. 
HYRE, FRANK F. Ill, Roanoke. 



INGRAM, GREG, Alexandria. 
JACKSON, DEBI, Lexington, Na. 
JAMES, AUBREY O , Vo. Beach. 
JAMES, STEPHEN P , Richmond. 
JANES, MARY G., Gloucester. 
JANNUZ2I, DANIEL, Arlington 



SOPHOMORES 343 



JEFFERS, LESLIE CAROLYN, 

Monrovia, Md. 
JOHNSON, BRIAN P., Suffern, N.J. 
JOHNSON, CECIE, Arlington. 
JOHNSON, DEBORAH L., Warren, N.J. 
JOHNSON, KAREN, Roanoke. 
JOHNSON, NANCY LEE, 

Goitherburg, Md. 



JOHNSON, S. JEROME, Rocky Mount. 
JOHNSTON, MAUREEN PAGE, 

East Meadow, N.Y 
JONES, BRYAN SCOTT, Va Beach. 
JONES, JAMES E,, Kirkwood, NY. 
JONES, JANET, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
JONES, JENNIFER LYNN, Chester. 



JONES, MARK, Norfolk. 
JORDAN, JANICE L., Oakton. 
JOSEPH, ELLEN, Wilmington, Del. 
KAISER, AMY, Hampton. 
KAMMERLING, KATHRYN J., Richmond 
KASTEN, KERRY, 
St. Petersburg, Fl. 



KAYLOR, JONATHAN LEE, 

Huntington, Po. 
KAYS, KEVIN M., Fincostie. 
KEENA, JAMES P , Whippony, N.J 
KEENOY, PATRICIA J,, 

N. Caldwell, N.J. 
KEITH, CRAIG W., Furlong, Pa. 
KELLAM, BENJAMIN F. Ill, 

Eastville. 

KELLER, HELEN, Doleville. 
KELLEY, CHRISTOPHER DAVID, 

Amogansett, N.Y. 
KELLEY, DEBBIE, Maitland, Flo. 
KELLY, MARY JEAN, Richmond. 



KENNEDY, KEYNE RUTH, Williomsburg 
KENT, NANCY LEE, Newport News. 
KERINS, MARY ANN, Falls Church. 
KING, KAREN ANN, Arlington. 








KLEIMAN, LISA, Va. Beach. 
KNOWLES, PAUL, Springfield. 
KRAMER, CAIJOLINE, Arlington. 
KULP, CHARLES ANDREW, Roanoke. 



LACEY, DEBORAH, Pry Fork. 
LAIBSTAIN, HAROLD, Va. Beach 
LAMBERT, DOUGLAS W., 

Bellbrook, Ohio 
LA BRAD, TINA, Mechanicsville. 



LAWLER, REBECCA K., 

Louisville, Ky 
LAWSON, MELISSA, McLean. 
LEARY, KEVIN, E Williston, NY. 
LE CLERC, MARTIN, Manassas. 




m^ f» 



:- 7^ ^ 




344 SOPHOMORES 











^•nmm 




LE COUTEUR, EUGENE H. II, 

Fredricksburg. 
LEFFLER, LANCE, Hampton. 
LEISTER, WARREN, Odenton, Md. 
LENNON, JANE, 

Upper Saddle River, N.J. 
LEONARD, BILL, Williamsburg. 
LEWIS, ROBERT W. JR., Vienna. 



LIBERSON, DENNIS H., Newport News. 
LITTLE, JOHN, Newport News. 
LIVELY, JUDSON, Alexandria. 
LLOYD, RICHARD, Matawan, N.J. 
LOEWY, RICHARD RANDALL, 

W, Newton, Mass. 
LOVE, HARRIET, Danville. 



LOWE, SAM, Bellvue, Neb. 
LUCKER, LAURIE, Media, Pa. 
LUKASIK, SHERYL MARIE, 

Springfield. 
MACARAEG, MICHELE, Va. Beach. 
/ViADDEN, DODIE, Vienna. 
MANFREDI, TERRI, Va. Beach. 



MARKER, NANCY ANN, Clark, N.J. 
MARKWITH, ROBIN DALE, 

Haddonfield, N.J. 
MARKWOOD, SHERRIE, Chester. 
MARLOWE, MELODY ANNE, Blacksburg. 
MARQUIS, RICHARD W., 

Randellstown, Md. . 
MARTIN, GEORGE KEITH, 

Williomsburg. 




O.A.^s explain 
ins and outs 



Jn °^ ^'" ' ^^^'' begin to find out 

^^ what I need to know?" This 
question become the central matter as 
freshmen tried to adjust to life at William 
and Mary. 

The answer come quickly, almost in 
the first fifteen minutes of college life 
when those entities referred to as OA's 
appeared. The Orientation Aides had 
undergone three days of training before 
they approached the new freshmen with 
smiles and salutations. 

The first week belonged to the OA 
who come equipped with mountains of 
forms, booklets and schedules as well as 
some of their own advice to help the new 
student in coping with registration and 
other emerging problems. The 
orientation period also found OA's 
utilizing a program of encounter sessions 
with their groups to help them get 
acquainted and open new doors to 
friendship. 

The OA's usually mode the difficult 
adjustment to college red tape a less 
bewildering, if not a more 
understandable process to the new 
student. 



Group meeting in OA. Caroline Kramer's room 
sets the mood tor Wllliom and Mory orientotion. 






SOPHOMORES 345 



MARTIN, GLENN, Little Silver, NJ. 
MARTINEZ, BARBARA, Sterling^ 
MAYBURY, PAMELA A., 
E Longmeadow, Mass. 
MCANDREW, KATHRYN F., Arlington. 
MCCAVITT, PATRICK J , MCLean 
MCCRADY, CARL W., Bristol. 



MCCRAY, SARAH, Evansville, In. 
MCDEARMON, MARTHA ANNE, Roanoke. 
MCELAHNEY, DAVID, Lynchburg. 
MCGEHEE, DORIS EDMUND, Palmyra. 
MEISS, MIKE, Alexandria. 
MEREDITH, JANET, Dinwiddle. 




Freedom to 
live & team 



'^tf' he catalogue printed by the 
Vfcb college didn't list courses such as 
silk-screening, beginning guitar, 
photography, sailing skills or 
Williamsburg cookery, yet these courses 
and more were available to the college 
communi^-y through Free University. 
Taught by members of the William and 
Mary student body and faculty as well 
as area residents, these courses reflected 
c give-and-take mode of education 
unheard of on many campuses. The 
typical classroom was a unique aspect, 
with Bryan Basement, Lake Matoka 
shelter, and Millington greenhouse 
among the candidates. 

Volunteering to divulge both 
self-taught and lesson-acquired skills, 
the pseudo teachers worked with groups 
ranging from one or two, to a room full 
of interested observers. Lists of courses 
being offered were posted from time to 
time giving dates, locations, and 
instructors. 

Free University had been in existence 
for three years at William and Mary and 
was run on funds appropriated by the 
SA. The idea was "borrowed" from the 
same type of program that Berkeley 
University began in 1964 as a diversion 
from the typical courses designed for 
vocation or graduate school. 



These W & M co-eds practice sign language being 
tought as a Free University course. 





^^/•v -^;•v• •--.'-;■. -v^^^^^^ 
^^\>'-: :■■■:':'•:■, ■•.■.'• • :\\'.\ • • • —"^^ 

"T/^/.*- '"-•/- '-rlr'J,'- • '. - • "••« 



^^v.'-. ■ •.■.■ • • ••sr;-.. -•• ' . V'"' — '•••.. *•.•••, ••;■•• • : , >: 

.'^•'^^.•'r .• • .•jJt •' >v.«,'V'r"-'.;.,r.r*'''. ••.'•.•••....••■'' •• ^ 

'■•.■.■<<^ vS^' ;;:::.'• ■ •' ■ ■ 'v • • • • *'■•'.•,•,•.• • . ;,• .,'; • ..■,•-.:••/.;; ; ; ; • / •' ' . . • . . . .5 
'' ' ' .lr"v^■'/''•V•V/•--'v/--;*•^'~-'^V,•'/i•''*^♦'*••^^.■:^ 




• •- • • 









;^ 



MERNIN, JOAN MARIE, Williamsburg. 
MIDYETTE, JEB, Ashland. 
MILLS, DEBBIE, Williamsburg. 
MINNICK, PATTE, Arlington. 
MITCHELL, KAREN, Vienna. 
MOORE, DONALD D., Lynchburg. 




346 SOPHOMORES 



P!!I?^^ 




MOORE, LAURIE, Midlothian. 
MORGAN, MICHELE, 
Berkeley Hgts., N.J. 
MORRIS, DEE, Jeffersonton. 
MORRISETT, CINDY, Richmond 
MORRISON, SUSAN A., Foirfield, Ct 
MOULDS, HEATHER, Woynesboro. 



MULLINS, DAVID R., 

Highland Lakes, N.J. 
MULLINS, TERESA ANNE, Fort Lee. 
MUMPOWER, LEE F., Bristol. 
MURDOCK, MISSIE, Chester. 
MUSCH, MARK, Richmond. 
MYERS, JEAN, Moilton, N.J. 



NANNEY, BEVERLY M,, South Hill. 
NASS, DAVID A,, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
NATAL, PEGGY ANN, Richmond. 
NEILLEY, HENRY MC DOUGALL, 

Newton, N J 
NELLIGAN, KIM, Bedford Hills, N.Y. 
NELSON, MARYANNE, 

N Torrytown, N.Y. 



NEWMAN, ROBERT B., Fairfax. 
NICKEL, TERRI, Waterloo, Belgium, 
NICOLL, BARBARA, Boyville, NY. 
NORMAN, JOHN MICHAEL, Alexandria. 
NORWOOD, ERIC P , Annandale. 
O'CONNOR, JONATHAN STORY, 
Portsmouth. 



O'NEIL, COLLEEN, Huntington, 

W Vo 
O'NEILL JOHN F., Potomac, Md. 
O'ROURKE, KEVIN SHAUN, 

Middletown, Ct. 
OSBORNE, MARK, Alexandria. 
OSSOLO CHERYL, Falls Church. 
PAGE, ELIZABETH, Storris, Ct. 



PALMER, PAUL EDWARD, Denton, Md 
PALMER PEG, Youngstown, Pa. 
PAPROCKI, CELESTE M., Erie, Po. 
PAULETTE, FAITH, Charlottesville. 
PAXTON, DONNA, Richmond. 
PEARCE, THOMAS D., Williomsburg. 



PECKARSKY, TODD RICHARD, 

Arlington. 
PEGRAM, JAN, Chesapeake. 
PENE, RALPH, Keorny, N.J. 
PERKINS, CHIP, Roonoke- 
PERKINS, DONNA, Richmond. 
PERKINS, GWEN A., Norfolk. 



PERKINS, MARY CAROL, Danville 
PETERSON, CAMERON BRADLEY, Reston. 
PFITZER, GARY, Ridgewood, N.J. 
PHELPS, SUSAN RANDOLPH, 

Newport News. 
PHILLIPS, MARY, Norfolk. 
PIATT, LEE, Ookmont, Pa. 



PIERCE, DAVID, Norfolk. 
PINKSTON, CATHY, Newport News. 
PITNER BETSY, Venetio, Po 
POST, PETER, Falls Church. 
PRINCE MATTHEW T, Norfolk. 
PULLEY, LOU, Vo. Beach. 



SOPHOMORES 347 



PURCELL, RUTH WARRIE, 

Drakes Branch. 
RADA, DEBORAH, Trenton, N.J. 
RAMSEY, VIRGINIA, 

Pheonixville, Pa. 
RANKEN, WILLIAM B JR., 

Wilmington, Del. 
RAWLS, ROBERT LEE, Hompton. 
READ, CATHERINE DEANE, 

Milwoukee, Wis. 

REDDERSEN, ROBERT SCOTT, 

Potomac, Md. 
REEVES, ROBERT CHRISTOPHER, 

Valley Cottage, N.Y. 
REGAN, MEG, Fairfax. 
REILLY, JOHN, New Canaan, Ct. 
REYNOLDS, JAN, Springfield. 
RICHESON, RUTH MYRA, Amherst. 



RIDDELL, MARK R., Fairfax. 
RIDDLE, BETH, South Boston. 
RIGGINS, RONALD S., Falls Church. 
RITCHER, JANE ANN, Vo. Beach. 
RITTER, BECKY, Norfolk. 
RIVES, WILLIAM FRANCIS, Norfolk. 



ROACH, OSCAR LYNN, McLean. 
ROAKES, VICKIE, Gladys. 
ROBINSON, ANN, Norman, Okla. 
ROBINSON, JOHN, Waynesboro. 



fmmmi 





^k 






ROBUSTO, DONNA MARIE, Va, Beach. 
ROGERS, NANCY, McLean. 
ROGERS, LISA M., Middix, England. 
ROSE, KAREN CHRISTINE, Alexandria. 



ROSE, SHERRY DIANE, Falls Church 
ROSE, STEVEN A., Richmond. 
ROTH, LAURA, Elgin, III. 
ROWLAND, ROBERT B., Va. Beach. 



Name 

(Last) 
Proficiency Requirement 

A. English 101 or ec 

B. Four years of a 1 

Successful compl€ 



C. Has Completed 



Area and Sequence Requi 

Request or a Sequence F 

A. Has completed are 

Area I 

Area II 



RUIZ, GRACIA MARIA, Chesapeake. 
RULE, ED, Arlington. 
RUNDLE, SHELLY, Old Toppan, N.J. 
RUSSO, THOMAS M., Scotch Plains, 
N.J. 



RUTHERFORD, HOLLY A , Lorton. 
SALMON, DICK, Petersburg. 
SAUNDERS, CYNTHIA, Lexington. 
SAWYER, MARY ELLEN, Hampton. 
SCHEFFEL, DORIS JUDITH, 

Fair Lawn, N.J. 
SCHINTZEL, KATHERINE M., 

Falls Church. 



SCHMIDT, RAYMOND, Purcellville 
SCHOUMACHER, ROBERT, Vienna 
SCHRACK, KEVIN, Culpeper 
SCHULTZ, JAMES S , Richmond. 
SCHUMACHER, DEB, Chantilly 
SEA WELL, JULIE L., Freehold N J 




B. Has completed a 1 



348 SOPHOMORES 




SEAWELL, LUCINDA LEE, 

Newton Sq., Pa. 
SEGALL, JAMES, Annandole, 
SEITZ, DAVID J,, Kenrfield, Co. 
SELLERS, CHRISTINE, Va. Beach. 
SENTMAN, CATHERINE, 

Wilmington, Del. 
SERRA, PAUL, Vineiond, N.J. 



SHELL, MARY SCOTT, Crewe. 
SHELL, PAT, Petersburg. 
SHEPPARD, JEFFREY B., Va. Beach. 
SHERWOOD, DAVE, Radford. 
SHILLINGER, AMY, Bath, N.Y. 
SHIMER, CHUCK, Mansfield, Pa. 



SIMENSON, STORM R., 

Helsinki, Finland. 
SIMON, SHARON, Hampton. 
SINGER, NANCY, Richmond. 
SLOCUM, SHARI ANN, Neptune, N.J. 
SMITH, ANNE DUDLEY, Malvern, Pa. 
SMITH, CYNTHIA, Norfolk. 



COURSE SELECTION FORM 
(Please print all information on this form) 



Concentration 

(Middle) Date 



[First) 



Qent? 



Yes 



No 



.gn language in secondary school?_ 



(Language) 
1 of a foreign language (202 level) or eauivalent in college? 



)er 



(Language) 
semesters of physical education. 



;nts:(No course in a student's concentration will satisfy an Area 

:rement. ) 

jquirement in: (List course numbers and titles) 



:al sequence in Area 



~: (List course numbers and titles below) 



( number ) 



'Major pains 

*7|^ eclaring a major, which often 
?"■' represented the end of a constant 
mind changing, was the halfway mark 
for the student's college career. It was 
the junior year in which one was forced 
to reach a decision concerning a field of 
concentration. 

It appeared that William and Mary 
students were aware of the reality of the 
outside world and were concerned with 
future employment prospects. As a 
result, there was a greater number of 
declared majors in the field of Business 
Administration and Management than in 
any other department. 

Biology, always a popular department 
at William and Mary, rated second with 
255 declared majors. English and 
Psychology were third and fourth, 
closely followed by History and 
Government. 



This form wos encountered by rising juniors when 
they reoched their "monumental" decision. 



^^l^i^B'^c^" ~-..\i:...^v^ 




SMITH, JAMES LEE, Alexandria. 
SMITH, LAURIE G., Fairfax. 
SMITH, MARTY, Petersburg 
SMITH, MARY MARGARET, Montvole. 
SMITH, NANCY, Richmond. 
SMITH, THOMAS, Madison. 



SMOOT, RONALD, Baltimore, Md. 
SNIDER, KAREN, Springfield. 
SOLER, RITA M , Hampton. 
SONDHEIMER, WILLIAM, Foils Church. 
SORENSEN, MARYANNE, 

Wildwood Crest, N.J 
SOWDER, ELIZABETH, Roonoke. 



SOPHOMORES 349 



STANLEY, MARK, Seoul, Korea. 
STEMPLE, CYNTHIA LEI, Arlington. 



STINE, KAREN, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
STONE, LESLIE ELLEN, Arlington. 



STRADER, J. KELLY, Danville. 
STRAIN, KAREN, Greenville, S.C. 



STRICKLER, JOHN, Roanoke. 
STROH, DAN, Charlottesville. 





Southern Conference hopeful John Lowenhaupt 
demonstrates his style. -^4», 



I 



Super Injuns 

^p or a school not predominantly 
mJ^ sports oriented, William and Mary 
could boast a long list of outstanding 
athletes. Individual honors were incurred 
in many events including track, football, 
wrestling and swimming. 

Perhaps the college was strongest in 
track. Stars included Southern 
Conference Champions Al Irving, John 
Schilling, Mac Collins, Dave Lipinski, 
Chris Tolou and Drexel George. Chris 
Tolou was also an ail-American 
champion and expected a winning senior 
year. 

For the first time in William and 
Mary's soccer history, three players 
qualified for the All South team. Casey 
Todd, Bill Watson and Kip Germain 
formed the largest representation of any 
other college in Virginia. 

Football and basketball also yielded 
outstanding players. As a result of the 
unforgettable victory against the 
University of Richmond, freshman 
football stars Tom Rozantz and Jim 
Ryan were named Southern Conference 
players of the week. In addition. Ken 
Brown and Scott Hayes earned 
all-Southern Conference honorable 
mentions. Basketball player Ron 
Satterthwaite was named player of the 



week by the Southern Conference after 
the team's victory against Appalachian 
State. As a former all-Southern 
Conference champion, he was joined by 
one of last year's S.C. Rookies, John 
Lowenhaupt, as top contenders for the 
all-Southern Conference team. 

Both men and women's swimming 
boasted outstanding competitors. Keith 
Havens, a returning state freestyle 
champion, was expected to break all 
William and Mary freestyle records as 
well as qualify for the nationals. Former 
notional contenders Koggy Richter and 
Mo Lawlor returned with expectations of 
a winning season. They were joined by 
freshman Kathe Kelley who was capable 
of performing at the national level in the 
breast stroke and the individual medly. 

All American cross country team 
member MacCollins returned for his 
senior year predicting an even finer 
season than previously. He may be 
joined at the All- American ranks by 
Wrestling standout Jim Hicks and 
Lacross midfielder Joe Schifano. 

Obviously, William and Mary was 
brimming with athletic excellence. With 
the support of the rest of the college 
community, team performance was 
unlimited. 



Tommy Rozantz watches as his receiver is tackled 
downfield 



filiM*' 





♦ -s^ 



350 SOPHOMORES 




STROMBERG, JACOB, Portsmouth. 
STUNKLE, SUSAN, Leesburgh. 
SUCHY, SHARON FRANCES, 

Trumbull, Ct. 
SWEENEY, MARY, Rockville, Md. 
SZYMANSKI, KATHERINE ANN, 

Norfolk. 
TAKANE, SCOTT T., Alexandria. 



TANKARD, MARY, Fairfax. 
TARKENTON, JEFFREY L., Portsmouth 
TATE, KAREN H., Big Stone Gap. 
TAYLOR, DOUG, Hollins. 
TAYLOR, KAREN L., Richmond. 
TERRY, KATHRYN ANN, Richmond. 



THOMPSON, DEBORAH RENEE, 

Chesapeake, 
THOMSON, CAROL, San Mateo, Co. 



TITO, WILLIAM JAMES, Ft. Monroe. 
TOGNA, MICHAEL, Chester. 



TOMB, KIMBERLY, Arlington. 
TOMES, JEANETTE, Falls Church. 



TORREGROSA, DAVID FRANCIS, 

Falls Church. 
TRAVERS, RUSS, Conton, NY. 



TREDENNICK, LIZ, Hampton. 
TROWBRIDGE, HOLLY, Yorkfown. 



TUCKER, JANE, Norfolk. 
TURNER, CINDY, Jacksonville, Flo. 



TYLUS, JANE C, Porsippany, N.J. 
UPCHURCH, KAY, Durham, N.C 



SOPHOMORES 351 



URBAN, DAVID W , Kent, Ohio. 
URBANSKI, MICHAEL FRANCIS, 

Newport News. 
VAN BUREN, WILLIAM R., Hompton. 
VAN VALKENBURG, NANCY J., Hompton. 
VECCHIO, FRANK, Danville. 
WADDELL, RON, Williamsburg. 



WAGNER ELIZABETH LEE, Richmond. 
WAHLERS, ROBERT ALAN, Union, N.J. 
WALKER, LYNNE, Vienna. 
WALLING, ALYCE L., Gwynn. 
WARE, MIKE, Newport News. 
WARREN, HANCI, Arvonia. 



WASS, GERRY, Gloucester. 
WATERMAN, DEBORAH, Columbus, Ohio 
WATRY DUNCAN J., Carlsbad, Col. 
WATSON, MARGARET MCCLEERY, 

Piedmont. 
WEBER, MARGIE, Livingston, N.J. 
WEBER, TOM, Chester. 



WEGLARZ, CHRISTOPHER J., 

New Milford, N.J. 
WEINMANN, CRAIG, Whitestone, NY, 



WELLS, BETTY, Indialantic, Fla. 
WHITE, ALLISON, 
Winston-Solem, N.C 



WHITE, MICHAEL J , Bricktown, N.J. 
WHITE, RALPH O., Danville. 



WHITLOCK, LYNN M., Southampton, Pa. 
WHITLOW, ELLEN T., 
Silver Spring, Md. 



WHITTINGTON, SALLY, Marion, Md. 
WILLIAMS, CHUCK, 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 



WILLIAMS, LESLIE ANN, 

Houston, Texas. 
WILLIAMS, MARK A., Roanoke. 
WILLIAMS, MARTHA, Blairs. 
WILLIS, KAREN, Rockville. 
WILSON, CISSY, Atlanta, Ga. 
WILSON, HOLLY JANE, Va. Beach. 




352 SOPHOMORES 














\*}il'/.i 







74ot this as^ain 

v||5knce again, lack of adequate 
KP^ housing for undergraduates had 
necessitated the infamous room lottery. 
March 5 was the day set by the Office of 
Residence Hall Life. A few groups of 
students weren't affected by this 
process: fraternities, sororities, RA's, 
Project Plus members, and a core group 
from every special interest house; but the 
remainder had to rely on the luck of the 
draw for a room 

Despite constant dorm renovation, 
over 200 students were eliminated at the 
onset. With Jefferson dormitory 
construction scheduled for completion in 
January, 1977, all undergraduates that 
remained on the waiting list were 
assured a room for the Spring semester. 

The expiration of leases on Ludwell 
and JBT caused concern as to where the 
overflow would be situated in coming 
years. Fraternity complex was deemed 
one possibility with each chapter finding 
off-campus housing. The old adage: 
"cross the bridge when you come to it," 
applied here, but one could not help but 
expect stormy weather ahead. 




i \ k.. 





WILSON, KAREN LEE, Barwyn, Pa. 
WILSON, THOMAS CABELL, 

Beckley, W, Vo. 
WITTEMEIER, SUSAN, 

Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 
WOLFE, CHARLES C, Reading, Pa. 
WOLLE, LAILA, Washington, DC. 
WOLLMAN, KRISTEN, 

Old Bethpage, NY. 

WORNOM, PATTY, Emporio 
WORTHINGTON, JUDITH GRACE F , 

Annandale. 
WYATT, CATHY L., Seaford. 
WYCKOFF, DEBORAH JEAN, 

Western Springs, III. 
WYGAL, PAUL, Newport News. 
YEAGO, DAVID, Staunton. 



YEATMAN, GARY, Arlington. 
YESKOLSKI, STANLEY, Spring Grove. 
YOUNG, ARLANA, Camp Springs, Md. 
YOUNG, CHRISTOPHER J., Fairfax. 
YOUNG, FRED, Powhotan. 
YOUNG, MARTHA, Beverly, N.J. 



YOUNG, WENDY, Alexandria. 



YOUNGER, DEBBIE JEAN, Natholie. 



ZABAWA, ROBERT, Arlington. 



ZAVREL, JIM, Falls Church. 



ZIMMER, MICHELE DENISE, 
Rosemont, Pa 



AARON, NANCY, Chothom. 
BARRY, JIM, Alexandria 
ENNIS, APRIL, Springfield. 
GOETZ, SALLY, Virginia Beach. 
KELLEY, KATHE, Chesapeake. 
MACNEIL, BRUCE, Newport News. 



SOPHOMORES 353 



ABBEY, ELLEN FAYE, Richmond. 
ABERNATHY, SUE ELLEN, Richmond. 
ACKERMAN, W. KEITH, Hopewell. 
ADAMS, JOHN DICKENSON, Costlewood. 
ADKINS, CARLA FAY, Petersburg. 
AHAMED, KARIM HAIDERALL, 
Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa. 



AILSTOCK, ROBIN, Va. Beach 
ALEXANDER, ALICE, McLean. 
ALLEN, CATHY MICHELE, 

Rocky Mount, N.C. 
ALLEN, GINGER, Manassas. 
ALLEY, JUDY L , Norfolk. 
ALLISON, ELIZABETH HUGER, 

Columbia, S.C. 




Were the late 
hours worth it? 

T^ard work and little sleep 
^S^ characterized the student aspect 
of many of the forgotten activities of the 
college. How often did a student stop 
and think just how many times the band 
had to practice one song before it was 
performed? Or just what did it take to 
put out the last Flat Hat? 

All too often the efforts by the 
students were overlooked. Whether it 
was in drama or publications, the 
products were expected to be 
professional. It was not uncommon to 
hear someone say "So-and-so messed 
up that one line," while neglecting the 
overall performace of the play. 

Looking back, the performers and 
writers would hove done it all over again. 
In the end, it was all worth it because of 
the one person who cried at the end of a 
moving scene, or applauded or simply 
said "Thank you." 



Flat Hot editor, Paige Eversole, labors over an 
article on deadline night. 




ANDERSON, DONNA GREY, 

Lumberton, N.C. 
ANDERSON, GAYA LYNNE, Va. Beach 
ANDERSON, ROBIN BETH, Annandale. 
ANTLE, NANCY, Bay City, Mi. 
APOSTOLOU, MICHAEL PHILLIP, 

Roanoke. 
ARNOLD, CAROL ANN, DeWitt, NY. 



ARNOLD, CHARLES, Chesapeake. 
ARNOT, SUSAN E., Verona, N.J. 
AUSTIN, CHIP, Roanoke. 
AVERETTE, ALICE, Chorlottesville. 
BAGLEY, PATTIE, Kenbridge. 
BAILEY, BARBARA, Carmel, In. 




354 FRESHMEN 




•^» -r^/ ^ .JiJk. 





BAILEY, SUE, Arlington. 

BAIN, NANA, Crozet. 

BAKER, CATHERINE ANNE, Edino, Mn. 

BAKER, KATHRYN, Allendale, N.J. 

BARRON, ANNA, Rock Hill, S.C. 

BARRON, ROWENA, Annondale. 



BARTLETT, KAREN ELAINE, Richmond. 
BARTLETT, NANCY, Foirfox Station. 
BATCH ELOR, JOYCE, Chontily. 
BECK, JONI CARTER, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
BECK, MARJORIE, 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
BELL, ALISON, Fairfax. 



BELL, THOMAS L,, Staunton. 
BENDER, DEBRA, Falls Church. 
BENTLEY, NORA JANE, Annondale. 
BERRY, LESLIE, Norfolk. 



BEVERLY, CAROL, Richmond. 
BINARI, STEVEN, Alexondrio. 
BISHOP, BETH FRANKLIN, Richmond. 
BISHOP, DEBBIE, Yorktown. 



BISHOP, KENT D , Toms River, N.J. 
BLACKBURN, DAVID A., Pulaski. 
BLACKMAN, DOUGLAS EDWARD, 

Pitman, N.J, 
BLAIR, GEM, Hampton. 



BLANKENBAKER, KIM, Chqriottesville. 
BLEDSOE, TERESA JEAN, Springfield. 
BODIE, ELLEN, Hampton. 
BORCHERS, SUSAN JANE, 
Va. Beach. 



BOSWELL, ELLEN T., Norfolk. 
BOWMAN, J. IMRIE III, Vo. Beach. 
BOWMAN, REBECCA, Vienna. 
BOYD, FELICIA, Vo. Beoch. 



BOYLE, DOROTHY, King George. 
BRADLEY, LEIGH, Springfield. 
BRADSHAW, MICHAEL K., Franklin. 
BRESEE, LINDA, Newport News. 
BREWSTER, LYNN, Arlington. 
BROCKWELL, PATTIE JEAN, 
Colonial Heights. 



BROOKS, BRIAN GERARD, 

Foils Church. 
BROWN, CLAIRE, Moorestown, N.J. 
BROWN, JEANIE NICOLETTE, Duffield. 
BROWN, JERRY, Annondole. 
BROWN, ROBERT E. JR., 

South Hackensack, N.J. 
BROWNING, TERI, Aiexondrio. 



FRESHMEN 355 



BRUCE, KEVIN A., Chester. 
BRYAN, RALPH TIMOTHY, Roanoke. 
BUHELLER, TERRY RYAN, Sandston. 
BUHRMAN, MARTHA ANN, Richmond. 
BUMGARDNER, GINNY L., Arlington. 
BUSBIN, SHARON, Yorktown. 



CAMBERN, TOM, Springfield. 

CARR, CARY, Alexondria. 

CARTER, JAMES TALMADGE, Moneta. 

CARTER, MARIE, Tabb. 

CARVER, WANDA J , Charlottesville. 

CASPER, NELDA D., Richmond. 



CASS, EDMUND F. Ill, Lynchburg. 
CHADWELL, ELAINE, Falls Church. 
CHAPMAN, ADRIAN, Foirfax. 
CHICHESTER, LEE, Culpeper. 
CHOI, THOMAS JAY, Alexandria. 
CIAVARELLI, LINDA MARIE, 
Ridgefield, Ct. 



CLARKE, MELISSA, Richmond. 
CLATTERBUCK, DEBORAH ANN, 

Front Royal- 
CLEMENTS, DONNA, Alexandria. 
CLEMMER, JANE B,, Fort Defiance. 
CHRISMAN, DAN A. JR., Roanoke. 
COATES, JO ELLEN, Madison Heights. 



COCHRAN, BOB, Hampton 
COFER, SUSAN D., 

Fort Washington, Po. 
COLE, MARY HILL, Richmond. 
COLEMAN, RONALD B , Rumson, N.J 



CONLON, JAMES J , Alexandria 
CONNELLY, CATHLEEN, Newport, R.I. 
COPAN, BILL, Williamsburg. 
CORRELL, NANCY ELIZABETH, 
Franklin. 



CORUM, ELAINE, Arlington 
CORYDON, LESLIE, Schoten, Belgium. 
COX, PEGGY J , Plantation, Fla. 
CRITTENDON, SCOTT, Hordyville. 



CROCKER, PATRICIA KATHRYN, Gretna. 
CROOKS, JULIE C, WyckoH, N.J. 
CROSS, LISA, Wilmington, Del. 
GROSSMAN, ANN, Vero Beach, Fl. 



CROUCH, BRIAN CALE, Springfield. 
CUMMINS, BECKY, Williamsburg. 
DAHL, DEBBIE, Stounton. 
DAHLMAN, NANCY, Va. Beach. 




^^h^Mit^mJ^. 




lUfFI 




^•'^- 



356 FRESHMEN 












9 




Raiftf rain ^o 
away. . . please! 



m 



eptember 1, 1975 



Today: Chance of rain is 99 99/ 1 00 

percent. Flash flood warnings in 
effect. If you must travel, ovoid 
the paths through the woods — 
slippery mud could be 
hazardous. Due to flooding, Crim 
Dell Bridge is closed. Travelers 
are advised to find an alternate 
route. And to all you little 
kiddies out there, Willie the 
Weatherman soys put on those 
galoshes, wear your bright 
yellow slicker so that others can 
see you, and be sure to carry 
your umbrella like your mommy 
says. 



r 



*" Tonight: More W&M weather — wet and 
muddy. 



Future 

Outlook: Torrential rains continuing 
through May 1 1, 1976. 



Puddles cause a major obstacle tor Bob Lowe as 
he heeds for class. 




DALTON, KATHY, Radford. 
DARLEY, SUSAN, Chesapeake. 
DARNTON, BECKY, Mansfield, Po. 
DASPIT, LINDA, Newport News. 
DAVIS, LINDA ANN, Salem. 
DAWSON, ROBERT NELSON, 
Williamsburg. 



DE JARNETTE, JEANNE, Glodys. 
DEWEY, B, MICHELLE, Hampton. 
DE WILDE, KIM, Falls Church. 
DIGGAN, RENEE, Hughesville, Pa. 
Dl ROSA, TERESA, Norfolk. 
DODSON, SHARON ELAINE, Staunton. 



DONNELLY, MEG, Lynchburg. 
DOWNEY, JOAN, Roanoke. 
DOYLE, MICHAEL J., Deal, N.J. 
DOYLE, PEGGY, McLeon. 
DREYER, DIANE, Roanoke. 
DUFF, SHERI, Richmond. 



DULLAGHAN, MATTHEW P., Waynesboro. 
DUNBAR, MARGARET R., Richmond. 
DUNCAN, DAVID A., Falls Church. 
DUNN, MAUREEN, 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
DYER, CHARLOTTE ANNE, Blacksburg. 
EARLY, LELA KATHERINE, 

Gaffney, S.C. 



EASTON, BRIAN, Oxford, Md. 
EATON, MARY E., Worrenton. 



ECCARD, DONNA, Middletown, Md. 
EDMISTON, KIM DIANNE, 
Martinsville. 



EGGERTON, JOHN SANSOM, 

Springfield. 
ELIUM, SANDRA LEE, Lynchburg. 



ELLINGTON, MICHAEL ROBERT, 

Scott A.F.B., III. 
ENGLERT, LEE ANN, Springfield, 



EURE, FAY ELIZABETH, 

Mt. Lebanon, Po. 
EURE, SAMUEL JR., Springfield. 



FRESHMEN 357 



EVANOW, PETE, Williomsburg. 



FABRIZIO, JOAN MARIE, Bueno Vista. 



FACCHINA, DAWN, Alexandria 



FAHEY, NANCY L., South Bend, Ind. 



FARLEY, PAGE, Martinsville. 



FAULKNER, KEN ALLEN, Danville. 
PAULS, MEREDITH ANNE, Richmond. 
FENTRISS, BEVERLY ANN, Danville. 
FERENTINOS, LISA, Vienna. 
FERGUSON, ANNE ELIZABETH, Roanoke. 
FERGUSON, ELIZABETH M., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



FINERAN, LAWRENCE, Alexandria. 
FINK, LOIS, Oakton. 
FIORAMONTI, WILLIAM, Falls Church. 
FISCH, ROBERTA, Springfield. 
FITZGERALD, ANN, Gretno. 
FITZGERALD, DAWN, Nokesville. 



FLEMING, DOUGLAS L. JR., Hemdon. 
FLEMING, JOHN HOWLAND, Fairfax. 
FLEMING', KELLIE WINGFIELD, 

Richmond. 
FLETCHER, PAUL EDWIN III, 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
FLORINO, MICHAEL JOSEPH, 

Midlothian. 
FLOYD, CYNTHIA, Lynchburg. 

FORD, ALICE CAROLINE, Richmond. 
FORD, JOHN B., Rochester, NY. 
FORD, MICHAEL, Jarratt. 
FORRESTER, SHARON, Blackstone. 
FOUNTAIN, ALEXANDER DIXON, 

Easton, Md. 
FOWKE, JOAN L., Alexandria. 











358 FRESHMEN 



.% 




>, 



n 






c 



Unique housing 
attracts many 

T|f f one desired college housing 
ocl unique from the traditional uni-sex 
or co-ed living, one could participate in 
the special housing programs offered by 
the college. Language houses were 
expanded upon by the addition of the 
Asia House and flyers were distributed 
by the administration to determine where 
student's interests laid and what 
additional facilities would be 
well-received by the college community 
in the coming year. 

Cultural programs were sponsored by 
the various groups. Discussions and 
demonstrations on the marshal I arts and 
oriental crafts, a miniature May Day 
program, and lectures by authorities on 
various topics unique to Spain, France, 
and Germany were held. Students 
actively participated in the programs 
that ranged from German folk dancing 
to medieval jousting. The trend was not 
only to enjoy, but to learn, and these 
students certainly succeeded on both of 
these counts. 



Members of the Society for Creative 
Anachronisms display jousting techniques as 
compliment to Project Plus 




FOY, DONALD QUAN, Vienna. 
FRANZEN, CHARLES RICE, Alexandria. 



FREEDMAN, CAROL, Lorain, Ohio. 
FULLER, NANCY, Salem. 



FULTZ, PAULA GAIL, Newport News. 
GALLOWAY, LIBBA, Greenville, S.C. 



GARNER, VICKEY, Portsmouth. 
GARRETT, PAMELA, Williamsburg. 



GARY, LINDA, Newport News. 
GATES, BENTON III, 
Columbia City, Ind. 



GEDETTIS, JEAN E , 

Bridgewoter, N.J. 
GEORGE, SUE ELLEN, Lovettsville. 
GERMAIN, KIP, Foils Church. 
GIBBS, ELIZABETH, Chester. 
GIORGI, JACKIE, Chesapeake. 
GOEHNER, CAROL, N. Syracuse, N.Y. 



GOEWEY, CATHY, Falls Church. 
GOLDICH, MIKE, Vo. Beoch. 
GOODSON, PATRICIA, Vienna. 
GORGES, KATHRYN A , Glen Mills, ?o. 
GRAY, JOANN COLLIER, Richmond. 
GRAY, MARTHA PHILLIPS, Norfolk. 



GREEN, WALTER, West Point. 
GREIMEL, SYLVIA, 

Goldens Bridge, NY. 
GRESHAM, JANE, Richmond. 
GRIFFIN, HELEN, Wilmington, Del. 
GRIGG, JOHN FRANK, Martinsville. 
GRITTON, KENT, Newport News. 



HABICH, CAROL, Farmingdale, NY. 
HALES, ROSEMARY, Colonial Beach. 
HALL, JENNIFER A., Williamsburg. 
HALLER, KIM, Hampton. 
HALLIWANGER, RAE, Urbona, 111 
HALPERT, ARTHUR, Kensington, Md. 



FRESHMEN 359 



HAMMER, KEITH W., West Orange, N J 
HAMMER, SHERRY, Charlottesville. 
HANEL, JERI ELLEN, Lynchburg. 
HANLON, KATHLEEN, Smithtown, N J 
HANSEN, JANETTE, Manahawkin, N.J. 
HARRIS, DAVID C, Roanoke. 



HARRIS, JEFFREY WILSON, 

Houston, Texas. 
HART, KARL C, Flushing, NY. 
HARVEY, TIM, Lynchburg. 
HAUSE, PAMELA L., Wilmington, Del. 
HAWTHORNE, WOODY, Richmond. 
HAY, MARY, Williamsburg. 



HAYNIE, GAYLE W , Reedville. 
HECKER, JAN, Newport News. 
HENRY, MICHAEL CHIP, Warrenton. 
HERBERT, BRUCE THOMSON, Delaplane 
HERMANSDORFER, SUSAN, 

Charlottesville. 
HEYSER, MARYANN, Richmond. 



HINES, MARC, Suffolk. 

HIRSCHI, KATHY LYNN, Richmond. 




HODGE, DEBBIE, Springfield. 
HOLLAND, BOBBY, Roanoke. 



HOMEWOOD, GEORGE M. Ill, Richmond, 
HOPKINS, DIANE E., Waynesboro. 



HOUGH, JAN, Cherry Hill, N.J. 
HOWELL, MARK H., Winchester. 



HOWES, AUDREY LISA, Newport News 
HUME, DONNA LYNN, Chesapeake. 
HUNTER, ROBIN, Surry 
HUNTSMAN, LAURIE ANN, 

Fredericksburg. 
HURT, SUSAN, Richmond. 
HUX, CHRIS, Fairfax. 



HYDER, MARY COLIN, 

Johnson City, Tenn. 
HYNDMAN, SPENCER, Falls Church 
lANNI, DANIEL J., Youngstown, N.Y. 
JACOBS, SHARON, Oakton. 
JACOCKS, ANNE COVINGTON, 

Chesapeake. 
JENKINS, FRAN, Chester. 




Hou/ safe do 
you feel 



• • 



^ff^e rash of thefts and 
Vti/breaking-and-enterings was on the 
decline, or so said the Campus Security 
Office. One wondered if this was caused 
by an increase in the honesty of campus 
residents, the added precautions taken 
by students, or the expansion of the 
security force to include student police 
officers. 

In spite of the claims of women being 
able to fend for themselves, the Security 
Office cited protection of the William 
and Mary co-ed their major concern. 
Coupled with the Escort Service, police 
offered a round-the-clock 
"accompanying service" for the female. 



Locked bicycles between Chandler and Barrett 
indicate students precautions. 




1^^ 





ii.^ jiiKuH^a^ 



ilH^Wii 




360 FRESHMEN 




JENNINGS, SHERRY, Charlottesville. 
JENNINGS, SUSAN, Richmond. 
JOHNSON, BRENT MITCHELL, Roanoke. 
JOHNSON, CAROL LYNN, 

Harlingen, Texas. 
JOHNSON, LINDA MARIE, Vienna. 
JOHNSON, TREAZURE ROBERTA, 

West Point. 



JONES, BRUCE LEROY, Springfield. 
JONES, CECE, Crozet. 
JONES, D LEE, Alexandria. 
JORGENSEN JANET LYNN, Va. Beach. 
JOYCE, ELLEN, Harrisonburg 
JOYNER, CELESTE, Richmond. 



JUNG, DOTTIE, Randolph, Wis. 
KAIN, PHILIP, Chester. 
KAST, DAVID SHREVE, 
Brooktield Center, Ct. 
KEAFER, WAYNE LLOYD, Yorktown. 
KEATING, NOREEN, Norwalk, Ct. 
KEEN, BETH, Westlake, Ohio. 



KEENER, DALE, Amelia. 

KELLER, ANNE BENNETT, Midlothian. 

KELLY, ALISON, Monossos. 



KELLY, JOY ELLEN, Rumson, N.J. 
KENDALL, DAVID R., Annandole. 
KENDALL, MARGARET ANNE, Arlington. 



KENLEY, GREG, Richmond. 
KINDE, JEANETTE GAYLE, 

Williomsburg. 
KING, DAVID S., Va. Beach. 



KING, DONNA LEE, Amelia. 
KING, SHARON, Vienna. 
KINGSLEY, NEIL R., 
New Canaan, Ct. 



KINNEY, HARRY A. JR., Annandole. 
KIRK, DAVID W., Oklahoma City, Ok. 
KNIGHT, CARY E., Warsaw. 
KOLOSKI, PETER, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 
KOST, MICHAEL, Hampton. 
KRAMER, ALAN CUSTIS, Fairfax. 



KRAMER, WALTER, Garden City, N.Y. 
KUNTZ PATRICIA, Wall, N.J, 
LACY, ROBERT K , Springfield. 
LAKIN, MICHAEL ALAN, Foils Church. 
LAM, DEBBIE, Annandole. 
LAM, PERRY PING SON, Hompton. 



FRESHMEN 361 



LAMBERT, BEATRICE, 

Smifhfield, N.C. 
LAMOND, HEATHER, Albany, NY. 
LANGFORD, DAVID A., Roswell, Go. 
LARK, J. ANDREW, Hackensack, N.J. 
LARSON, MELISSA A., Dav., lo. 
LAUER, KURT ALAN, Lynchburg. 



LAWLOR, KATHY, Pooli, Pu. 
LEAP, TOM, Elkton. 
LEINBERRY, GAYLE A., 
Framinghom, Mass. 



LENHART, CYNTHIA, Clarksville, Md. 
LEONE, LISA, Rumson, N.J. 
LEVINSON, TONY, Hampton 



LEWIS, MEG, Midlothian. 
LIMERICK, LESTER L. JR., Falmouth. 
LITTLEJOHN, MARGARET, McLean. 



LOMBARDO, DONNA LYNN, 

Livingston, N.J. 
LOPEZ, LUISA, Long Island, N.Y. 
LORIMER, BETH, Richmond. 



LORIX, KELLEY R., Alexandria. 
LYON, JAMES V. JR., Newport News. 
MACAULEY, MOLLY KENNA, 
Falls Church. 



MACINTOSH, ELIZABETH BONNIE, 

West Springfield, Moss. 
MACKAY, IAN, Va Beach 
MACKO, VALERIE JEAN, Lynchburg. 
MAHAFFEY, JUDY, Williamsburg. 
MAHER, CHRIS, 

Massopequo Pork, N Y. 
MAKOWSKI, ANN, Va. Beach. 



MARGARD, WERNER LEROY III, 

Worthington, Ohio. 
MARTIELLI, SUSAN FLAIR, 

Ellicott City, Md. 
MARTIN, BETH, Raphine. 
MARTIN, CHRISTOPHER, P., 

Portsmouth 
MARTIN, HAROLD G. JR , Bassett. 
MARTORANA, JEFF, Alexandria. 

MASSEY, BETH, Norfolk. 
MASSEY, DAVIS, Richmond. 
MATTHEWS, TERRI, Arlington. 
MAYBERRY, THOMAS SIDWELL JR., 

Hompton. 
MCCANDLESS, SHERRI DAWN, 

Broomoll, Pa. 
MCCUE, GREGORY, Richmond. 




362 FRESHMEN 



MCCUTCHEON, ROBIN, Richmond^ 
MCDANIEL, CHARLES RUSSELL, JR., 

Rocky Mount 
MCDONALD, SUSAN, Annville, Pa. 
MCDONALD, TOM, Bethesdo, Md. 
MCDORMAN, JANE ELIZABETH, 

Richmond. 
MCFADDEN, MICHAEL PATRICK, 

Lutherville, Md. 




"WashinQton 
slept at ^V&M 

■4geople's opinions do change, or so it 
'TT^appeors from certain letters of 
George Washington. Having received his 
surveyor's license from the College of 
William and Mary in the mid- 1 700's, one 
would expect a prideful attitude tovvard 
the institution that bestowed it. 
Apparently disillusionment with the 
system had taken hold, as from Mount 
Vernon on January 7, 1773 he wrote, 
". . . the Inattention of the Masters, 
added to the number of Hollidays, is the 
Subject of general complaint; and 
affords no pleasing prospect to a youth 
who has a good deal to attain, and but a 
short while to do it in." 

Despite his negative attitude in regard 
to the leniency of the system, Wash- 
ington 1 5 years later accepted the 
office of Chancellor of the College with 
these words: "Influenced by a heart-felt 
desire to promote the cause of Science in 
general, and the prosperity of the 
College of William and Mary in 
particular, I accept the office of 
Chancellor in the same . . ." Thus, 
Washington ended his public service 
career at William and Mary. 

These tools ore typical of those used by men 
such as George Washington when learning the 
fundamentals of surveying. 




MCGOLRICK, BETH, Manassas. 
MCKEOWN, SCOTT DUNCAN, 

Metuchen, N.J. 
MCLEON, PAUL JOSEPH, Holmdel, 

N.J. 
MCMATH, BETH, Onley, 
MCMATH, CHARLES, Annandole. 
MCNEISH, SALLIE, 

Port Washington, N.Y, 

MCQUARRY, FRANK, Lynchburg. 
MEARS, LYNN, Richmond. 
MELDRUM, HEATHER THANE, 

Malvern, Pa 
MENDEZ, CHARLES PAUL, 

Washington, DC 
MEUSCHKE, MARK WILLIAM, Roanoke. 
MICHAEL, JON FREDERICK, 

Charlotte, N.C. 

MILLER, AUTUMN CHERYL, Manassas. 
MILLER, SHARON, Roanoke. 
MIMS, BILL, Harrisonburg. 
MINETREE, LARAINE K., Petersburg. 
MOLL, AMY, Southport, Ct. 
MONIOUDIS, MARIA HELENA, 
A. P.O., NY. 



FRESHMEN 363 



MOOMAW, KATHY, Staunton. 
MOORE, GREGORY B , Arlington. 
MOORE, ROBERT PATRICK, JR., 

Richnnond 
MORGAN, DAVID G , Midlothian. 
MORGAN, TERRELL ALAN, Hampton. 
MORRIS, CRAIG KENNETH, 

Comp Hill, Po 



MORROW, ROBERT, Falls Church. 
MORSE, FREDERICK A., Richmond. 
MOSELEY, ARTHUR MADDOX, JR., 

Richmond. 
MOSTROM, SUSIE, Arlington. 
MOTT, ELENA MEDORA, Falls Church 
MUENCHOW, RICHARD W., 

Silver Spring, Md. 



MULVANEY, KAREN, Son Mateo, Co. 
MURPHY, DIANNE, Ringwood, N.J. 
MUSHINSKI, DAVID W., 

Wyomissing, Pa. 
MUTTER, MARY GLENN, Roanoke. 
NAMINSKI, CONNIE, Va. Beach. 
NAMMACK, MARTA F , Alexandria. 



NASER, LISA J., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NELSO, MARGARET ANGELA, Lynchburg 

NELSON, LORI ANN, 

Bound Brook, N.J. 
NESBITT, LYNN, New Canaan, Ct. 
NEWCOMB, LINDA, Troutville 
NICHOLS, REBECCA L., Roanoke. 










NICHOLS, STEPHEN A., Annondale. 
NORTON, MICHAEL, Sandston 
NUTTALL, BETH, Portsmouth. 
OAKES, DIANNE L , St Charles, III. 
OAKLEY, ELIZABETH L., 

Winnetka, III. 
O'CONNOR, ANNETTE JANE, 

Fredricksburg. 




364 FRESHMEN 




Education plus 

♦ ♦Tjf shouldn't be watching TV. I've 

/<! got test tomorrow and a paper 
due Friday, but I can't miss this episode. 
Today Jennifer finds out that Ann is 
having an affair with her husband!" 

Missing the daily soap opera was a 
rarity among many students, regardless 
of academic pressure. Even during exam 
periods, one was likely to find crowds of 
people engrossed in the continuing 
dramas of "The Young and the 
Restless," "All My Children" and the 
like. Perhaps the fact that the situations 
were for removed from college life added 
to the intrigue and provided an outlet for 
weary minds. Just consider the 
educational rewards if students were as 
interested in classroom lectures as they 
were in the melodramatic relations of 
these TV characters!!! 



Breaks from studying are necessary as Sally Broin 
and Deanne Peters know only too well! 





ODOR, KEVIN, Owosso, Mi. 
OLSEN, KRISTIN, Chester, N.J. 
OLSON, KIP, McLean. 
OSBORN, JOHN, Davenport, lowo. 
OWEIS, JAMAL, McLean. 
PACE, GARY, Silver Spring, Md. 



PALANCA, TERI, Morristown, N.J. 
PARRISH, NANCY L., Norfolk. 
PARSONS, TWYLA, Richmond. 
PASCHAL, JOANN, Norfolk. 
PASCHALL, J. ALAN, 

Mechanicsville. 
PATTEE, DIANE, Morganville, N.J. 



PATTEN, LIBBY, Arlington. 
PATTERSON, DONALD JOSEPH, JR., 

Livingston, N.J. 
PATTON, JEFFREY ROSS, Winchester. 
PAYNE, MARK DAVID, Springfield. 
PEACOCK, BRENDA, Chicksow, Al. 
PERALTA, CHERYL MARIE, 

Jericho, N.Y. 



PETCHUL, CAROL, Springfield. 
PETERSON, CHERYL ANN, Arlington. 
PFEIFER, PATTY, Newport News. 
PHILLIPS, DENISE A., Winchester. 
PHILLIPS, DORI, 

Bernardsville, N.J. 
PIERCE, JIMMY, Grafton. 



PIERCE, TERRY, Staunton. 
PINTO, COLLEEN MARIE, Suffolk. 
PLAAG, GARY KENNETH, Springfield. 



PLACE, KELLY VICTOR, Roanoke. 
PLUMLY, REBECCA A., Alexandria. 
POOL, EDWARD, Portsmouth. 



POPE, RENA BLANCHE, Richmond. 
POTTER, HOLLY ANN, Altavisto. 
POULSON, ELISA JOY, Hallwood. 



POWELL, ANGELA FELICE, Sutherlin. 
PRINCE, EUGENE, JR., 

Washington, DC. 
PRITCHARD, PATTY, Hopewell. 



PUGH, ERNEST, Columbio, S.C. 
QUIGG, KAREN, Annondale. 
RACZENBEK, CYNTHIA, 

Bethlehem, Pa. 
READ, NANCY, Madison, N.J. 
REARDON, KATHY, McLean. 
REED, SUSAN, Vienno. 



FRESHMEN 365 



REILLY, PAUL D., Westfield, N.J. 
RENZ, DAVID WAYNE, Williamsburg. 
RETER, JANINE, Richmond. 
RHYME, MARTHA, Norfolk. 



RICHARDSON, RHONDA, Oberlin, Oh. 
RICHARDSON, ROSALIE, Roanoke. 
RILEY, KARA LEIGH, Vienna. 
RINEHART, PHYLLIS, 
Morristown, N.J. 



RIVELL, ELIZABETH, 

Whifehouse Sta., N.J. 
RIZZO, DAVID PAUL, Armouk, N.Y. 
ROTH, DEBBIE, Fairfax. 
ROTHBERG, LIZ, Richmond. 



ROTHENBUCCHER, GEORGE L., 

Sudbury, Ma. 
ROTHSCHILD, RICHARD, Poramus, N.J. 
ROWE, G. ERIC, Va Beach. 
RUSH, DEBBIE LYNNE, Red House. 



RYAN, JOSEPH, Bethesda, Md. 
RYAN, SUSAN ANN, 

Princeton Junction, N.J. 
SAGE, JEFF, Reno, Nev. 
ST. LOUIS, EILEEN MARIE, McLean. 



SAKATA, JON, Koilua, Howaii. 
SALMON, DOUGLAS, Colts Neck, N.J. 
SAMFORD, PATRICIA, Lawrenceville. 
SATTLER, PHYLLIS A., Arlington. 



SAUNDERS, ED, Mechanicsville. 
SAUNDERS, LUANN, South Boston. 
SAUNDERS, WILLIAM PAUL, 

Springfield. 
SAVAGE, TOM, Exmore 
SCANLAN, SHEILA M,, Alexandria. 
SCHEK, JOYCE L., Timonium, Md. 



SCHIRMER, MARTHA, Weston, Conn. 
SCHOEN, RICHARD, Alexandria. 
SCHWARZ, JAMES, 

Coconut Creek, Fl. 
SCOTT, AMY E , Marion. 
SCOTT, SUSAN E., Gladys. 
SENDELBACH, KAREN LA VINA, 

Dumont, N.J. 



SETTLEMEYER, BECKY, 

Temple Hills, Md. 
SETZER, KATHY LEE, Alexondrio. 
SHAMBAUGH, PATRICIA, Foirfox. 
SHARP, CHARLOTTE G., 

Robersonville, N C 
SHELTON, NANCY, Stamford, Ct 
SHERIDAN, REBECCA, Crozet. 




366 FRESHMEN 



-Ji" "' 

lIllH >" 




\\ 



3 s the limit 



^f' he establishment of the Old 
\i^ Country in conjunction with the 
Anheuser-Busch plant opened up the job 
market for many William and Mary 
students. In spite of hot, humid 
Williamsburg summer weather, 
costumed personalities roamed through 
areas of the pork reminescent of 
Germany, England, and Aquitone. 

Students' jobs encompassed virtually 
anything and everything Busch Gardens 
hod to offer. Keeping tourists happy was 
the job of many, as strolling troubadors, 
jugglers, and musicians entertained both 
young and old. To get visitors really 
involved in the activities, jugglers would 
approach youngsters and encourage 
them to test their skills. 

Grooming the famous Clydesdales 
was an enviable position held by a few 
students. The countless animals that 
either roamed freely in the fenced-in 
refuge or were trained and caged for the 
many shows, required much of the 
workers' attention. 

Wild amusement park rides such as 
the flume and the roller coaster 
ccmoflaged with props and scenery and 
relaxing rides on the train and ferry were 
operated by students too. 

Concession stands tempted visitors 
with delicacies from each of the 
countries represented in the park. 
Regardless of the time of day, student 
vendors were plagued by the famished 
tourists. The hospitality house with its 
free beer posed a problem — how do 
you tell a person the limit's 3.-' 



Mory Anne Bordon operates the tin-type picture 
concession run in New France. 




SHIELDS, JEFF, Richmond. 








T '■ ^ 





r.U L 





SHIELDS, MARY ELLEN, Oak Hall. 



SHIFFER, REBECCA ANNE, 
Brownstown, Pa. 



SILKWORTH, BILL, Greensboro, N.C. 



SIMMONS, TOM, Burke. 



SKOVRAN, NADINE, Trumbull, Ct. 



SMITH, CINDY, Woodbridge. 
SMITH, DAVID H , South Boston 
SMITH, DEBORAH HUDSON, 

Wilmington, Del, 
SMITH, RAM, Basking Ridge, N.J. 
SMITH, RICHARD A., McLeon. 
SMITH, RICHARD M., Arlington. 



SMITH, SHELLEY, Va. Beach. 
SMITH, TUCKER, Staunton. 
SMOOT, CATHERINE, Newport News. 
SNARR, SUSAN E , Rophine. 
SNEDIKER, SUE, Marietta, Ohio. 
SONNENBERG, KYLE RUSSEL, Chester. 



SOUTHARD, ROBIN L , Stanordsville. 
SPICER, PAMELA, Charlottesville. 
SPILLER, MARKEY S , Fredericksburg. 
SPRINGATE, GRACE, Va. Beach. 
SPRINGER, MARIANNE GAIL, 

Garden City, NY 
SPURLING, ANN, 

St. Georges, Bermudo. 



FRESHMEN 367 



STAMPFLI, ELLEN S., Norfolk. 
STARK, ELIZABETH MARY, 

Aquebaque, NY. 
STATON, LESLIE MARIE, 

Fort Smith, Ark. 
STEEL, ELLEN LOUISE, 

Medford Lokes, N.J 
STEELE, JANET, St Petersburg, Fl. 
STEIN, DANIEL, Alexandria. 

STEINBERG, ANDY, Morristown, N,J. 
STELL, JEFF, Alexandria. 
STEMER, SALLY, Ligonier, Pa. 
STEPHAN, ANNE ELIZABETH, McLean. 
STEVENSON, DEBBIE, Fairfax. 
STRONG, SUSAN, Springfield. 



STUART, VALERIE, Chariton, Iowa. 
SULHOFF, JAMES, 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
SUNDQUIST, PAUL D,, Annandale. 
SURFACE, JENNY, Tazewell. 
TANCILL, GRAHAM, Rockville, Md. 
TAYLOR, PAGE DERIEUX, Hanover. 



TEABO, MARY, Richmond. 



TENNANT, DAN, Vienna. 



THODE, STEVEN, 

Port Washington, N.Y. 



THOMAS, M. ANNE, Rustburg. 



THOMAS, SANDRA, Amherst. 
THOMSON, PATRICIA, McLean. 
THORBJORNSEN, JOY, Chesapeake. 
TIMBERLAKE, LINDA, Richmond 
TIMP, PHILLIP JOSEPH, Abingdon 
TIPTON, LEE, Waynesboro. 



TITO, HUGH FRANCIS, Ft. Monroe. 
TODD, CAROL, Richmond. 
TOURDO, BEVERLY, 

Bernardsville, N.J. 
TRBOVICH, NANCY, Mansfield, Oh. 
TRESTER, HOLLIDAY STEELE, Orange. 
TRIBLE, ANNE BROOKE, Dunnsville. 




368 FRESHMEN 




. /> 






^' k 






Seven no trump 



^tf^ wo spades," was a cry that could 
Vti/ be heard at almost any hour of the 
day or night. Finding time for the game 
was not the important port, it was the 
problem of finding a fourth. Usually, 
they weren't too hard to find, but when 
they were, one could find the original 
players trying a three-handed version. If 
one mode the mistake of admitting he 
didn't know how to play, he was 
immediately swamped by willing 
teachers. Soon he too was caught in the 
bridge mania. 

Bridge gomes would last for hours, 
often pre-empting sleep or studying. For 
those who were interested, there was the 
Bridge Club. A bridge tournament was 
provided as an intramural sport for those 
interested in competition. Whether it was 
the challenge or competition that drew 
the fans, interest in bridge continued to 
grow. 



Bridge playing is a favorite study break for Ron 
Riggins, Ken McClure and Andy Scueracker. 





TROUT, ROXANNA ZAMORA, 
El Salvador, Central America. 

TSCHIRGI, TRENT, Vienno. 

TUASON, VICKI, Glen Rock, N.J. 

TUGGLE, NORA ANN, Vienna. 

TURMAN, ANN ELIZABETH, 
Charlottesville. 

TUTHILL, DAVID W., 
Long Island, N.Y. 

TYNDALL, LARRY WILLIAM, 

Newark, Md. 
VAUGHAN, CINDY, Blackstone. 
VERLANDER, RICHARD H. JR., Weems. 
VON OTTINGEN, SUSi, Manassas. 
WAGNER, CARYN, Annondole. 
WALTON, SUSAN, Newport News. 



WAMPLER, RANDY, Blackstone. 
WARD, ANN, Suffolk. 
WARNER, PAMELA, McLean. 
WARREN, SUSAN BRADFORD, 

Va. Beach. 
WASHER, CHERYL E., Roanoke. 
WASHKO, SUSAN, Morrisville, Pa. 



WATKINS, ANNE, South Hill. 
WATSON, SUSAN M., Keswick. 



WEBER, CYNTHIA, Fairfax. 
WEITHANER, KATHY, 
Silver Spring, Md. 



WHEELER, GREGORY ALLEN, Lynchburg. 
WHEELER, JULIE L., Roanoke. 



WHITLICO, GLORIA ANN, Hampton. 
WIESEMAN, KATHERINE C, McLean. 



WILBURN, THOMAS, Grafton. 
WILLIAMS, ARTIS E., 

Okinawa, Japan. 
WILLIAMS, KAY, Midlothian. 
WINTER, THOMAS C, Warrenton. 
WOLFORD, CATHY, Kirkwood, Mo. 
WONG, SUSANNA, Hampton. 



WRIGHT, JEFF, Alexandria. 
WRIGHT, MARY ANN, Stafford. 
YANCEY, JIMMY, Clorksvilie. 
YATES, KATHY, Roanoke. 
YOWELL, EMILY E , Beoleton. 
ZOEBELEIN, DAVID, Front Royol. 



FRESHMEN 369 



BATTS, WILLIAM M., Newport News. 
CANN, J. PARKER, West Chester, Pa. 
DORION, HEATHER LYNNE, Dover, Po, 
MICELLE, JOHNNIE EUGENE, Hampton. 





370 GRADUATE-LAW 




MOOREHEAD, JOHN C, Raleigh, N.C. 
SPENCER, ERIC ROLAND, Norfolk. 
TUCKER, PERRY, Chase City. 
VERGARA, ROSALYN PATRICE, 
Williamsburg. 



WENTZEL, ROBERT FRENCH, Augusta, Me. 
WILCOX, JAMES E., Springfield. 



Old school & neiv traditions 

W 



^^^m 



illiam and Mary became the first 
American shcool to offer 
instruction in law in 1779 when George 
Wythe, a signer of the Declaration of 
Independence, was appointed Professor 
of Law. Obtaining its name from Wythe 
and one of his students who was to 
become Chief Justice of the United 
States, John Marshall, the school has 
expanded to include over 450 students. 
Distinguished graduates included Phillip 
Barbour, John Blair, and Bushrod 
Washington — all former members of 
the U.S. Supreme Court. The 1975-1976 
session however, brought about many 
changes and problems with which the 
school had to contend. 

The major cause of concern for all 
those involved with the law school was 
the American Bar Association's warning 
of accredidotion withdrawal unless 
certain conditions were met. 
Pronouncing Marshall — Wythe as 
"possibly the most inadequate physical 
plant of any ABA approved law school 
in the country," the bar's major 
complaint concerned, not a fault in the 
quality of education, but a lack of 
sufficient space for students. This 
problem was not a new one. From the 
time the school was housed in the 
basement of Bryan Dormitory to the time 
of the ABA's statement, the 
administration was well aware of overly 
cramped rooms. In addition, library 



facilities were cited as being inadequate 
and faculty salaries were said to be 
below the national medium. 

A plea was made by President Graves 
to Governor Mills Godwin for a new law 
school building to be located next to the 
National Center for State Courts. 
Although in 1974 the General Assembly 
approved $218,250 to draw up plans for 
the new school, no funds were provided 
for the actual construction. The 
projected cost of the building was $5.5 
million which was not available due to 
economic conditions. However, because 
Godwin appeared to be in favor of state 
support, and because few legislators 
publicolly opposed the funding, many 
were optomistic about a suitable remedy 
for the situation. 

On November 22, 1975, the Board of 
Visitors appointed former U.S. Senator, 
William B. Spong, Jr., as the new Dean 
of the law school. Due to his vast 
amount of law and political experience, 
including service in the Virginia House of 
Delegates, the Virginia State Senate and 
the U.S. Senate, it was hoped that his 
rare abilities would aid Morshall- Wythe 
in combating its numerous problems and 
preserving the greatness of the third 
oldest law school in the English speaking 
countries. 

One of the oldest buildings on campus, the 
Marshal I- Wythe Low School is the center of 
controversy. 



GRADUATE-LAW 371 



BERDINNER, ELIZABETH MARY 

Plymouth, England. English Literature. 
BRAUN, STEPHANIE. West Germany. 

English/French. 
DANIEL, RANDOLPH CHARLES. 

McDonough, Ga Business. 
FELL, ALISON JEAN. Lancaster, England, 

Georgraphy. 



GRIFFITH-MAIR, MONTY. England. 

Sociology. 
MAC VEIGH, MARY BRETTA. 

Cumberland. Mc. Business. 





Hashers run 
for business ! 



21f f you have half a mind to join the 
J) Hash, that's all you need." That 
motto belonged to a club dedicated to 
promoting a world-famous pasttime 
known as "Hashing". This combination 
of jogging, mountain-climbing, and 
steeplechase hod its home base in 
Korea. The businessmen who constituted 
the majority of members hod more of an 
incentive than that of physical fitness 
however, for at the end of the trail there 
was always drinking and partying to 
work off a well-earned thirst. Routes 
were set weekly through the Malaysian 
countryside as the "Hashers" used the 
runs to escape the business, relax, 
promote comaraderie, or enjoy the 
scenery. 

In 1974 the MBA Harriers added 
another chapter to this elite group. 
Whether they were inspired by the fitness 
craze that swept the country or the two 
or three kegs at the end of the run was 
hard to tell! 

Friday mornings they could be found 
running one to three miles through 
Colonial Williamsburg or Matoaka 
woods in search of clues that would 
pinpoint the trail's end. 



"Hoshcrs" leove Jones one Friday morning in 
search of the trail's end 



MANFRED!, TERR! MC GREGOR. Va. 

Beach. Education. 
MILLER, KEITH, St. Clair Shores, Mi. Math. 
ROBERTS, WILLIAM C. Williamsburg. 

Business. 
YOUNG, LLOYD L. JR. Newport News. 

Business. 




372 GRADUATE 




Commumtj> 



COMMUNITY DIVIDER 373 



Square usieii to tie 
tt)e true botontoton 



^9\( s the capitol of Virginia during 
/C^ Colonial times, Williamsburg was 
buzzing with activity. Businesses catered 
to both the farmer and the statesman, as 
the likes of Patrick Henry, Thomas 
Jefferson and George Washington often 
passed through their doors. 

Among the more popular places for 
social gatherings in the 18th Century 
were the many taverns in the town. 
Places such as Raleigh Tavern, where 
the first meeting of Phi Beta Kappa was 
held, are still available for people to visit 
in Colonial Williamsburg. 

Craftsmen were in their prime during 
this era as everything used by the people 
of Williamsburg had to be handmade. 
Blacksmiths, bootmakers and hoopers 
were among the many people who ran 



their own businesses. Customers became 
well-acquainted with these people on 
whom they had to depend for most of 
their supplies. 

A mixture of past and present 
businesses could be found in Colonial 
Wiliamsburg today. Handcrafted guns 
could be found on the same street with 
factory-made clothes. With a larger 
population, today's businessmen were not 
able to know their customers as well and 
for the residents, there were more 
businesses from which to choose. In 
Williamsburg, the pace was still slow; 
maybe the businesses had a little of this 
uniqueness remaining. 



The barber shop is one of the many colonial stores 
in the Williamsburg tour. 



374 COMMUNITY DIVIDER 




DVERTI5INC— < 



ADVERTISING SUBDIVIDER 375 



Wyrtie's Candy Store, locoted in Merchant's 
Square, provides a place for students to shop for 
gifts OS well as o chance to satisfy o sweet tooth. 







COLLEGE PHARMACY 
DOG. Street 
P.O. Box 337 



376 ADVERTISEMENTS 




SUTTLE JEWELERS 
431 Prince George 



ADVERTISEMENTS 377 




Gettirig in tight with a bank 
may be the farthest thing from your mind. 



Maybe you and money hardly know each other these days. 
So choosing a good bank seems like no big problem 

But it won't be long before you'll be making ani,l 
managing money like everybody else. Maybe a lot more 
money than you imagine now. And what a bank can do to 
help will be pretty important. 

At United Virginia, we know just how important 
you re going to be. So we'd like to be helpful right now 

We'll do our best to help you soK'e any money man- 
aeement problems. 



lust because you're not making a lot of money now, 
don t think we're not interested 

The way we figure it. you're already a part of our 
tuture |ilans. And if we're going to deserve your business 
later, we d like to start c.irning it now. 



Willianisl)iii-u' 

UnitedMi^niaBankQ^ 



The Williamsburg Drug Co., Inc. is 

a convenient place for college stu- 
dents to do their shopping as well 
as eat. 





College Delly 
521 Prince George Street 
Williamsburg, Va. 23185 



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urg Drug Co., Inc. 






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P.O. Box 279 




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229-2811 874-3030 


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1433 Richmond Rd. 


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877-8071 


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391 Denbigh Blvd. 


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YORK COUNTY 


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898-7277 


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2023 Route 17 


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595-2266 


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12284 Warwick Blvd. 


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GLOUCESTER 


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693-4700 — 877-2254 


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Route 17 at the AIRPORT 


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TEAOUE REALTY TEAOLE 















ADVERTISEMENTS 379 




Here in Newport News. 

Here in the hands of the people who 
work here. Because our people are building 
tomorrow with something that started a long 
I time ago. 

'^ A legacy of expertise. 
^^ The teamwork, skills and engineering 

ability that have put together some of 
the world's most complex technical achieve- 
ments. 

Like the Navy's nuclear powered sub- 
marines, aircraft carriers and frigates. The 
world's most sophisticated commercial ships 
— liquefied natural gas earners. And services 
and components for commercial nuclear 
power plants. 

And when the call comes to go to work 
on other ideas for the future, we're ready. Be- 
cause our people are ready. And always 
have been. 

Newport News Shipbuilding Q Where tomorrow is. Now. 

ATennecoCompany Newport News,Vrrgina 23607 An Equal Ooportunity Employer 




SERVING YOU 




GROTTY 
BROS. INC. 



COMMONS HALL 
CATERING 



HOI POLLOI 
WIGWAM 



CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS 



ENJOY THE SEASONS OF WILLIAMSBURG 

IN YOUR OWN HOME AT SEASONS TRACE 

2-3-4 Bedroom Townhouses 

leisure comfort happiness 

FIRST REALTY CO. 

907 Richmond Road 229-3767 



380 ADVERTISEMENTS 



WELL DONE AND GOOD LUCK! 




STEVENS STUDIOS 

A Complete Photographic Service 



^-^m:^ 
$./-'»,. ' ' 



ADVERTISEMENTS 381 



BIKES UNLIMITED 

Rt. 143 
James York Plaza 
■50 Williamsburg, Virginia 




^"""'wmmwi „ 



PERSON FORD 
Box B.G. Second Street 
Williamsburg, Virginia 




The new Musto"n§-H-teok5_grecit to Sally Wheldon 
' — qpd Ken McCJure. ,; — 



382 ADVERTISEMENTS 



SHERWIN WILLIAMS 

457 Merrimac Trail 
Williamsburg, Virgiriia 




NEW YOU SHOPPE 

60 Richmond Rd. 
Williamsburg, Virginia 



ADVERTISEMENTS 383 




F&M 



Your lifetime bank — Anytime 



William & Mary students have found 
a new way to bank — Anytime 



Our Anytime Bank gives you 24-hour 
banking free. With a F&M BankAmeri- 
cord you can do almost all of your 
banking anytime, on Saturdays, 
Sundays, or any day of the week- 
morning, noon, or night. 24 hours 
day — 365 days a year. 



In addition F&M offers Free Personal 
Checking. 



Our Location- 

1801 Richmond Road 
874-1911 



TOWN AND COUNTRY CLEANERS INC. 

459 Merrimac Trail 

Williamsburg, Virginia 

Quality cleaning of Fine Clothes 

For Those Who Care Enough to Want 

The Best . . . You Can See The Difference 

CUSTOM DRY CLEANING 

SHIRT SPECIALISTS 

229-4490 



'Williamsburg T(acquet (§hop 

Stringing Specialists 

TENNIS, SQUASH, HANDBALL, RACQUETBALL 
EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES, SHOES & APPAREL 

605-B Prince George St. — Phono 220-2319 



384 ADVERTISEMENTS 



FRAZIER-GRAVES CO. 

D.O.G. Street 

P.O. Box 240 

Williamsburg, Virginia 




OLD COLONY BANK 
1310 Jamestown Road 

Drawer KA 
Williamsburg, Virginia 



ADVERTISEMENTS 385 



HELIG MEYER 

471 Merrimac Trail 

Williamsburg, Virginia 




(D a o 

< gc 



WILLIAMSBURG SUPER SERVICE 

800 Richmond Road 

Williamsburg, Virginia 



386 ADVERTISEMENTS 





BERKLEY REALTORS 
ISlS'/i Jamestown Rd. 
Williamsburg, Virginia 



Pancakes From 7 

15 Varieties of Pancakes. Breakfast ser>ed an>time. 
Open for lunch and dinner, also. 



7 AM-10 PM 
PHONE 229-962K 




1412 RICHMOND RD. 
(ROITEMWLST) 



Lobster Till 11 




A Refreshinu 

Adventure In Gracious Dining 

Specializing In Seafoods & Prime Steaks 

Open Daily the Year Around 

Mondaj thru Saturday 4:30-1 1:00 p.m. 

.Sunday from Nuon to 1 1 :0U p.m. 

.Member: Williamsburg Chamber of Commerce 

Virginia Travel Council 

Major Credit Cards Honored. 

PHONK 229-7771 



THE 




LOBSmt^USE 



11.-. Rli IIM1IM1 111! 
kdl I I (.11 u I si MM 1(1 1 ( UNO I OIK. I 



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BONHOMME RICHARD 

500 Merrimac Trail 

Williamsburg, Virginia 



ADVERTISEMENTS 387 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 

1076 



need 



Come see Joe Steele for 25 to 30% off 

the top name brands. Don't pay retail 

prices for quality furnishings. No 

to go to Carolina — We're here! 5u 




rvey 



all of Virginia, Maryland and D.C. 
'"'"iam and Mary 



UH ui viiyiiiiu, jvvui y 

Special discounts for Will .... 

students and family 



Joe Steele 
Class of 1976 



Featuring FAMOUS NATIONAL BRANDS OF FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS at North Carolina Prices. 



FEATURING THE BEST 
LINES TO NAME A FEW 

BAKER 

HENREDON 

THOMASVILLE 

FOUNDERS 

STIFFEL 

LA BARGE 

WEIMAN 

SIMMONS 

SEALY 

PLUS 700 OTHERS. 

Williamsburg . . . 

Newport News . . . 
Hampton . . . 
Norfolk . . . 

Virginia Beach . . . 

Fredericksburg . . . 

Washington, D.C. . . . 




ROlilNA 



For Quotations 

Call Us Toll Free 
From Anywhere in the USA 
-703-371-3030 



WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD 



H:»'r',:.ryv?(;i 



388 ADVERTISEMENTS 




Rob Billingsley finds the drive-in windows at Wil- 
liamsburg Nationol convenient. 



WILLIAMSBURG NATIONAL 

P.O. Box N 

Williamsburg, Virginia 



^^ Banl\ofVir3inia 



Over 130 Branches Statewide 




PATRIOT CHEVROLET 

212 2nd Street 
Williamsburg, Virginia 






At Patriot Chevrolet, Steve Fomo and Robyn Hyi 
ton discover the new styles; for vans. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 389 




-Sk 



WILLIAMSBUI 

ASSOCIATfON 
P.Q.Bo^GT- 

Willlarn=htirn Vlrrair 





HOWARD JOHNSONS 

P.O. Box 277 
Williamsburg, Virginia 




Xm-^^ 




390 ADVERTISEMENTS 



The 

Wonderland 

of 

BARGAINS. 

W^AY THE WONDERLANPOF BftRCrAlNS? JUST ONE VlSlT.THEK YOU WlU. 
KNOW. THE WILX\ AMS^Re- POTTERT ^+A5 ACRES AWP A^RES OF MER. 
C»-iANDlSg. TMAT l^ CAReFUU-Y SELECTEP PPDN\ AVJLOVERT>4E W ORlP . 
WMILE INWlU-iAM^BUR<^,5erA5lP£ APAY TDCcME TDTUE-PorrEKY. 
IT WiU-BE ONE OF -THE ^OzT E^ClTJNfrANP Fi;LF»UJKICr PAVTOF YOUR 
SrAV» COME OUT TOPAY, WEKNOW THAT ONCE. YOUVe COME WE WILL NEVER 
BE FORGOTTEN. UXATEP 5 MILES W.OFWlLUA»')^Bt'»fir ON ROUTE^OlN 

WILLIAMSBURG- 

POTTEICf FACTORY 




WE'RE HERE WeVe 

Always Open! 











With 

-Excellent Ice Cream 



mister 

Dorvutf 

W MtcmullOMAt. UMIIfOOOa COUrANT 



WE PROMISE 

-Different Fountain Treats 

• Extra Fresh Donuh 

• Frethly Ground Coffee 
-Unique Porty Desserts , fr\»n6\y Service 




Baskin-Robbins 

Ice (yearn Store 

416 Prince George St. 

229-6385 



2S8 Secood Street 

( Ntxt la twtt€ Car Wtfli ) 

WUlUflMburf. V». -^"^ 

Phone: ttO-tUl ^ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 391 




see€UROP€ 

AHDGCT 
RMDPORIT. 




VMllianvlxjijiVi. 




Located about five miles east of the William 
and Mary Campus is America's only European 
Entertainment Park. And we need help to keep 
it going. Ride Operators. Food and Beverage 
Hosts and Hostesses. Entertainers. Merchan- 
dise Clerks. And a bunch more other positions. 

If you're a guy or gal who likes people, and 
wants an interesting job for the summer or on 
weekends during the spring or fall to pick up 
some extra cash, chances ore we hove a place 
for you at The Old Country- Busch Gardens. 

You'll spend your day in an exciting atmos- 
phere, make a fair wage, and a lot of friends, 
and have a fun job. 

If you're interested, come out to the Personnel 
Office located at Busch Gardens or call 
220-2000. 

"MAKING FRIENDS IS OUR BUSINESS- 
IT COULD BE YOURS 

An Equal Opportunity Employer M F 



Am\y ROTC 



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BOSWELL PRINTING CO. 

607 "Pxittce (^ion^ St. 

22<^-7294 



Typesetting, Layout and Design 
Art Work — Photography 




Special backdrops help frame 
a promotional picture of Glto 
Vasers for Orchesis. 

r\ 



Attract Attention to Your Printing 
With Photographs 



SPECIAL COPYING RATES FOR THESIS PAPERS & MANUSCRIPTS 



•Brochures 

•Letterheads & Envelopes 

•Programs 

•Newsletters 




Long practices help keep Sfeve Huehnef in 
(or the Coloniol Reloys 



ADVERTISEMENTS 393 




INDEX 



394 INDEX SUBDIVIDER 



A 



Aaron, Nancy Groce 353 

Abbey, Ellen Faye 354 

Abbott, Mike Voden 

Abbott, Paul Jerome 21 I 

Abernarhy, Patncia Ann 326 

Abernothy, Sue Ellen 354 

Abrahonn, Morns Morgon 

Abrohom, Patncia Ann 

Abraham, Richard Anthony 

Abrams, More Laurence 

Academics 

Acho, Susan Maria 185, 326 

Ackermon. Warren Keith 354 

Acors, Carroll Leroy 

Adoir, Charles Ottis Jordon 

Adoir, Jordon 78 

Adams, Anne Elizobeth 

Adams, Denise Marie 143, 326 

Adams, Donna Lynne 338 

Adams, Douglas Worren 273, 148 

Adams, John Dickenson 354 

Adams, Kathy Louise 273 

Adams, Michoel Corey 

Adams, Michael Leroy 

Adoms, Nate Lovinder III 198, 326 

Adams, Norman Daniel 273 

Adams, Richard Vonwert III 

Addomiano, Mary Roffoella Dean 

Adkins, Carlo Foy 354 

Adter, Kenneth Joy 

Adlis, Charlyn Kay 185,273 

Administration 

Agee, Elizobeth Clair 1 33, 326 

Agee, Joseph S 82 

Agee. Joseph Schroth Jr 82 

Ahamed, Karim Haideroli 354 

Ahearn, John Michael Jr 

Ahern, Patrick Joseph II 

Aikin, Louisa Ann 326 

Ailor, John Corlton 

A.lstock, Robin Shelley 354 

Akers, Charles Cummmgs Jr, 273 

Akey, Bruce Laverne 

Albany, James Smith III 

Albert, Arnold Steven 

Albert, Brenda Cheryl 273. 277 

Albert, Patricia Ann 273 

Albert, Susan 271 

Albrecht, Robert E Jr 

Alcorn, Corol Jean 176 

Alderfer, Raymond Jay 

Aldrich, Susan Poythress 

Alewynse, Fay T 

Alexander, Alice Anne 354 

Alexander, David Wayne 273 

Alexander, Gregory Creoson 

Alexonder, Jonet Paige 185, 326 

Alexander, Judy Lynn 185 

Alexander, Wilmo Joyce 273 

Algee, Elizabeth 148 

Alkalais, Elias Alexander 326 

Allaun, William Edwin 

Allen, Anton Morkert 

Allen, Barbara Jeon 

Allen, Cothy Michele 354 

Allen, Emily Diane 

Allen, Janet Elizabeth 326 

Allen, Karen Ann 

Allen, Lorry Steven 273 

Allen, Linda 142 

Allen, Mary Jane 

Allen, Roger Harrington 

Allen, Stephen Philip 326 

Allen. Steven Jay 

Allen, Virginia Dawn 

Allen, Virginia Jone 354 

Alley, Judy Leigh 354 

Alley, Neil Rondolph 

Allin, Catherine Ann 

Allison, Allen Hickman Jr 

Allison, Debro Lou 326 

Allison, Elizabeth Huger 354 

Allison, Lynn Rae 1 19, 181. 273 

Allport, Braxton 142 

Allmond, Timothy Ernest Jr 

Aim, Carolyn Joan 

Alpho Chi Omego 174, 175 

Alston, Daisy W 

Altman, Ann Alison 273 

Altman, Gory Neal 

Alvorodo, Potnce Ann 

Alvarez, Victor Luis Jr. 

Ambrogi, Charles Joseph 

Ambrosiono, John J 

Amis, Nelson Samuel 274 

Ammerman, David 

Amos, Edward Lee 

Anaya, Karen Jean 338 

Andoas, Dione Corol 189 

Andoas, Kothy Alison 189, 274, 338 

Andoluz, Loydo 

Anders, Keren Cecite 194, 326, 338 

Anderson, Anthony Vincent 

Anderson, Borry Michael 274 

Anderson, Carlton Bruce 

Anderson, Donotd Henry 274 

Anderson, Donna Grey 354 

Anderson, Gory Michael 

Anderson, Gory Mitchell 

Anderson, Gayo Lynne 354 

Anderson, Gregory Ray 212, 274 

Anderson, James Lavalette 274 

Anderson, Jonice Elaine 

Anderson, Jams Carol 

Anderson, Korcn Morie 

Anderson, Kenneth Ray 

Anderson, Morgorcf Elizabeth 

Anderson, Oscar Lorry 

Anderson, Robert Eorl 

Anderson, Robin Both 354 

Anderson, Ronold Lloyd 



Anderson, Suson Elizabeth 
Anderson, Susan Lee 
Ando, Vera Marie 70, 338 
Andreatta, Charles Edward 
Andrews, Clarke Butler 274 
Andrews, Melissa Ramsdell 
Andrews, Stanley Lee Jr 
Angevine, Linda Sue I 17, 326 
Angle, Keith Matthew 
Angstadt, Patricia Ann 274 
Anstaett, Wendy Lynne 
Anthony, Jim 290 
Anthony, Susan Bruce 326 
Anthropology Department 231 
Antinon, Teresa Ann 
Antle, Nancy Goil 354 
Anzalone, Robert Frank 
Apostolou, Cynthia Dianne 174, 338 
Apostolou, Michael Phillip 354 
Apperson, Rhonda Lee 
Arbogast, Jack Hollis 190 
Arbuckle, R- Douglass 
Arehort, Deborah Ellen 185, 274 
Arledge, Robert Compere Jr 
Armitage, Janet Helen 
Armstrong, Jeffrey Allon 207 
Armstrong, Virginio Richards 
Arnold, Carol Ann 354 
Arnold, Charles Edgar III 355 
Arnold. Diane Elizabeth 174, 274 
Arnold, Scott Kendrick 
Arnot, Susan Eileen 355, 195 
Arredondo, Estela 
Arsenoult, Gary Philip 
Ascunce, Jorge 

Ashley. Phyllis Anne 189, 326 
Ashooh, Peter William 
Ashwell, Linda Lee 179, 274 
Askew, Margaret Ellen 162 
Asplund, Linda Therese 194, 338 
Astlev, Beniamin Russell III 
Au Yeung, Hang Stephen 
Auerbach, Kathryn Ann 185 
Auriti, Don 

Austin, Alvis Gerald Jr 355, 304 
Austin, Carol Colby 
Avent, Steven Foster 
Averetfe, Alice Moree 355 
Aviles, John 
Ayash, Joime Giro 
Ayoub, Richard Anthony 



B 



Babb, Terrence Ell.ctf 338 

Bacos, Hilary G 

Back, William Scott 

Bodger, Craig Dougtos 

Boechtold, Margaret Elizabeth 143. 274 

Baeck, Anne Elizabeth 

Bage, Wilson Seawell Jr 

Bogley, Pottie Hargrove 355 

Bognall, Arthur Mocnomee III 

Bogot, Barbara Ellen 

Bahner, Eric Walter 55, 190 

Boiley, Borboro Ellen 355 

Boiley, Cynthia Vaughan 326 

Boiley, Evelyn Ledora 326 

Boiley, Jennifer Donnelle 274 

Boiley, Lilian 

Bailey, Lynn Marie 326 

Boiley, Mory-Poulo 

Boiley, Michoel Keith 338 

Bailey. Sue 355 

Bain, Nancy Kalherine 355 

Boird, June Elizabeth 274 

Boird, Roger Pry or 

Baker, Borboro Joyce 274 

Baker, Catherine Ann 355 

Baker, Gory Everett 274 

Baker, James Keith 

Boker, Jeon M. 

Boker, John Potrick 198.326 

Baker, Judith Ann 

Boker, Kolhryn Louise 62 355 

Boker, Nilo Ann 338 

Boklorz, Benjamin Keith 209 

Bolas, Glenn Robert 

Bolcorek, Joanna Morio 185. 274 

Bolducci, Deborah Lynn 

Baldwin, Robert Newlond 182 

Balion, Alexander Haig 

Bolt, Benjamin Shields 106 

Bolloniine, David Stephen 25 

Bollard, Susan Elizabeth 

Bollinger, Frank Alexander 

Bond 116, 117 

Bone, Desitou Ann 338 

Bone, Sorah Ann 203, 274 

Banghart, Allan A, 

Banker, Stephen Michoel 

Bonks, Andrew Cy 51. 55, 209 

Bonks, Jane L- 

Bannin, Richard Robert 

Banning, Jomes Molcolm 

Boquis, George Doniel 326 

Boronofsky, Carol Ann 326 

Boranowicz, Michael Anthony 

Borban, Mark Dovid 200, 274 

Barbour, Christopher C 

Barbour, Soroh Virginia 338 

Borbrow, Janello Lynn 189, 338 

Bore, Ketih Robert Jr 

Bare, Potrice Lynn 

Barley, Reginald Moore 

Bornord. John Bloke 

Borncs, Barbara B 

Bornes, John Gillespie 198, 199, 326 

Borncs, Kevin Michael 52, 274, 190 

Bornes, Michael Foy 207 

Bornes, Susan 



Barnett, Cynthia Cheryl 203, 275 

Bornett. Elizobeth S- 338 

Bornhart, Carl Timothy 326 

Bornyak, John Frank III 

Barov, Brian Franklin 

Borr, Linda Louise 338 

Borronger, Gary Alonzo 

Barronger, Phillip Kyle 338 

Borranger, Randolph Dovies 

Barrett, Jane Elizabeth 187, 275 

Barret, Michoel Jeffrey 

Barrett, Williom Edword Jr 198 

Borringer, Howard Douglas 275 

Barron, Anna Fewetl 355 

Borron, Roweno L. 355 

Borrow, Gregory Stephen 

Borrows, Bonnie Ann 275 

Barry, James Potrick 353 

Borry, Patrick Frank 

Barshis, Dorr Edword 275 

Borshis, David Alan 275 

Bortel, Gertrude Catherine 275 

Bartensfein, Margoret Erwin 1 18, 275 

Bortlett, Jocquelyn Louise 

Bartlett. Karen Elaine 355 

Bortlett, Nancy Lee 355. 195 

Bortolotfo, Paul Anthony 

Barton, David Lawrence 

Borton, Douglas Edward 

Borton, R Gregory 

Bortos, John Andrew 

Baseball 86-87 

Basham, Jock Calhoun Jr. 

Bosile. Mark Nicholas 275 

Basketball 64-67 

Boss, Morcio Koye 

Boss, Robert Lebo 192, 338, 193 

Boss, Waylond N 

Bassett, William Lloyd 

Bossford, Christopher 

Bossier, David Lewis 326 

Botchelor, Joyce Lynn 355 

Bates, James Morris 

Botlon, David Henry 21, 275, 207 

Bottermon. Stuart Arthur 

Botts. Williom Molcolm III 163. 370 

Bouer. Borboro Goston 275 

Bauer. Morcio Thompson 

Bouer, Steven Kent 

Bouley, Thomos Kelly 275 



Boumon, Robert Arthur 

Boxter Fionr; L'.juise 276 

Bov- ■■ jrie 

Bo'. CurtiS 

Bo>- '. Ann 338 

Boyse, Eur.iLc .Viane 174, 326 

Bozzont, Phillip Nicolas 

Beoch, Chorles Stephen 

Beole, Joon Turner 

Beols, Allison Ann 185, 338 

Bean, John Mitchell 326 

Bean, Williom Kit Jr. 276 

Beor, Sugor 182 

Bear, Yogi 39 

Beord, Diane Marie 

Beosley, Allen Williamson 276 

Beasley, Carlo Morte 

Beosley, Kothorine Horless 176 

Beoty, Charles Arend 

Beovers, Jomes Lynnord 

Beovers, Noncy Virginio 

Beber, Alon Robert 

Beck, Jonathan Jay 326 

Beck, Joni Carter 355 

Beck, Marjorie Helen 276, 355 

Beck, Mory Elizobeth 

Becker, Colleen G. 

Becker. Lorry Michael 326 

Becker, Mory L. 

Becker, Susan Posner 

Beckef, William J. 326 

Beckes, Lionel Llewellyn 

Beckman, John Dovid 

Beckjoge, Bonnie Ellen 276 

Bedell, Roger Douglas 

Bedno, Jane Higgins 

Beers, Mork Joseph 

Beezer, Linda Sue 179 

Behm, Poulo Ann 

Belkowitz, David F. 

Bell, Alison 355 

Bell, C Jeanne 338 

Bell, Douglas Mortin 

Bell. Johns 326 

Bell, Kotherine V 

Bell, Thomas Lyndon 355 

Bellor, James Richard Jr 276 

Belote, Mory Murphy 185 

Belt, Jone Ann 338 

Belvin, Robert Howard 



Members of Pika proudly display their legs 
scropbook. 




Bemiss, Donno B 

Bender, Bruce Alan 214 

Bender, Chrisiopher Joseph 

Bender, Darrei Woldon 

Bender, Debra Ann 355 

Benefield. Brian Scott 212 

Benesh, Rosenr»ary Elizobe;h 338 

Bennett, Christion Amodeus 

Bennett, Christine Eiizobeth 338 

Bennett, Cynthia Dione 102, 189, 326 

Bennett, Dovid Rowland 

Bennett, Donald Richord 

Bennett, Jean Claire 276 

Dennett, John Bowditch 

Bennett, Judith Anne 

Bennett, Steven Edgor 276 

Benson, Dovid L. 

Benson, John Poui 304 

Benson, Kotherine Forrest 326 

Benson, Robert Scott 198, 326 

Bentley, Nora Jone 355 

Benron, Mork Stuort 276 

Benton, Tanyo Lee 

Berbert, Laurence Holbrook 

Berckort, Connee Jeon 

Berdinner. Elizabeth Mary 

Berger, Glenn Lee 

Berglund, Kothryn Elizobeth 338 

Berglund. Warren Dovid 276 

Berinoto, Peter A 

Berkin, Jeffrey Jack 338 

Berliner. Joel Keith 338 

Bernstein, Jonos Hoym 

Bernstein, Robert Jeffrey 276 

Berry. Leslie Marie 355 

Berry. Peggy Jean 

Berry, Robert Michael 277 

Bertomini, Lillie Loretto 326 

Befthloume, Denise Lord 

Beshore, Patricia Ann 

Beskenis, Nicholas Michoe! 

Beswick, Michoel Allen 338 

Bethel, Douglos Wyott 

Bettge, Bret Clyde 

Beverly, Carol Craig 355 

Beverly, Lendell Leigh 277 

Bevill, Carolyn Sue 326 

Beyer, William Francis 

Bezdon. Rebecca June 277 

Bionchi, Ronald Frank 277 

Bidosona, Hori Bhagwon 

Bieber, Croig Kent 

Biegel, George 198 

Bigney, Russell E, 

Bilinskl. Timothy J 

Bilisoly, Frank Nosh tV 

Billingsley, Mary Anita 338 

Bitlingsley, Robert Thame 17, 277, 209 

BillupS, Henry "Doc" 294 

Bilodeou. Mory Theresa 180, 338 

Bilyeu, John Motthew 338 

Binori, Steven Chorles 355 

Biology 232 

Biondi. Louis B III 208, 209 

Biordi. Lisa 174, 338 

Bird, Betty Jo 

Birkelond, Stephen Paul Jr 

Birmingham, Peter Arthur 198. 338 

Bish, Sharon Marie 

Bishop, Beth Franklin 355 

Bishop, Deboroh Ann 355 

Bishop, Kent Douglas 355 

Bishop, Ronold Addison 

Bishop, William Branch 338 

Bivins, Stephen Winston 

Bizzok. Koren Ann 

Block, Donald Robert 

Black, Pomelo Ann 

Block, Sara El.se 189, 339 

Block, Van 164, 324 

Blackburn, David Allen 355 

Blackburn, Michael Robert 

Blockmon, Douglos Edward 355 

Blockwell, Jomes Mark 190 



Blockwell, Jean Stuort 180, 277 

Blockwell, Roy Borrow 

Bloin, Stuort Wells 198,339 

Bioin, Virginia Barbour 277 

Bloir, Gem Ellen 355 

Bloke, Michael Joon 

Bloke, Scott McDonotd 326, 339 

Blake, Susan Lynn 187 

Blokeslee, Susan Ann 131 

Blonchard, Debro Ann 176 

Blond, Rhodo Leigh 339 

Blokenboker, Suson Wright 326 

Blonkenboker, Kimberly 355 

Blonkenship, Kim Morie 339 

Blonkmship, John Russell 212 

Blonton, Cloy Bennett 

Bledoy, Raymond 277 

Bledsoe, Teresa Jeon 355 

Blessing, Joseph Patrick 

Blevins, Harry Burns Jr, 

Bliler. Beth Ann 

Bliss, Deborah Morcia 

Bliss, Gary Roymond 

Bloom, James R Jr 

Blount, Brian Keith 339 

Blount, Robert Arthur 

Blow, Randoll Mohlon 212, 277 

Blum. Cynthio Elizobeth 

Blunt, Rhonda Smith 

Blus, Gregory Lawrence 182, 339 

BIystone, William Poul Jf 277 

Bobbitt, Turmon Curtis 

Bodie. Ellen 355 

Boe, Jomes Edword 

Bohnoker, James Phillip 

Bolonovich, Liso Ann 326, 151 

Bollinger, Mork Jeffrey 339 

Bolton, Poulo Lane 277 

Bond, Laurel Roe 189, 326 

Bondurant, Doryl Wade 86 

Bonetli. Chorlotte Rebecca 

Bonner, Jonet Lolo 326 

Bonner, June Sue 

Bonner, Morjone Ann 

Booker, James Foster 

Boone, Blair Warren 

Boone, Terrence Charles 103, 277 

Boor, Dovid Andrew 211, 278 

Booth, Charles E 

Booth, Robert Charles 182, 278 

Borchers, Susan Jane 355 

Borden, Mory Ann 367 

Borgotti, Go'l Dorothy 

Boros, William John Jr 

Bortner, Peter Ernest 

Bosco. Cynthia Louise 

Boston, Pomelo Gail 

Boswell. Ellen Torrey 355 

Boucher, Francis Thompson 

Boucher, Kathleen 180 

Bouldin, Cioiborne 

Boule, Mark E 

Bourque, Borbora 

Bourque, Denise 278 

Bovo, Kothryn Ann 339 

Bowen. Borboro 180, 326 

Bowen, Lu Annelle 

Bowen, Margaret Anne 

Bowen, Margaret Corole 

Bowen, Melbo Elizobeth 

Bower, Susan Eloine 278 

Bowers, Donold Addison 190 

Bowers, Janice Maureen 

Bowers, Williom Kent 

Bowler, Susan Juonito 

Bowles, Potricio Koy 

Bowman, Deborah Ann 

Bowman, Jomes Gorber Jr, 278 

Bowmon, John Imne 355, 78 

Bowmon, Rebecca Anne 355 

Bowman, Sollie Wirt 

Bowser, Jeffrey Lee 339, 209 

Bowyer, David Mitchell 

Boyd, Felicio Michelle 355 



Boyd, Robert Friend Jr, 

Boyer, George Robert Jr 278 

Boyer, Kothorine Elizobeth 

Beyer, Peter Jacob 

Boyer, Williom John 

Soyett, Tanyo 

Boykin, Timothy Wilson 

Boylo, Dorothy Jeon 355 

Boyle, Joseph Vincent III 

Boyle, Kothleen Thompson 

Boyle. Rebecca Jone 180 

Bozik, Margaret Joanne 

Bradley. Monon Leigh 355 

Brodley, Mortho Elisobeth 339 

Bradshow, Mark Thomos 

Brodshow, Michael Keith 355 

Brodshow. Thomos Jomes 

Brodshaw. Thomas Michoel 

Brodt, Gory Harold 

Brody, Bradford Jomes 

Brogonzo. Agnes L 

Bragg. Rondy L 70 

Bragg, Rebecca Goil 326 

Broin, Solly 180, 278. 365 

Braithwaite, Horry Lee III 327 

Brom, Christopher 

Brommer, Glenn Paul 198, 339 

Brommer, Williom Milton 

Branch, Poulo Leo 278 

Brondt, Richard Scott 

Bronnon, Suzonne Stone 

Branscom, Georgia Koy 

Brantley, John Davis 

Broshers, Volenfino Louise 

Brossington, Jane Marie 327 

Broun, Mark E 209 

Broun, Stephome 

Broun, Thomas Gerard 70 

Brechner, Enc Lonell 327 

Breit, William Dovid 

Breitenberg, Eugene Harold Jr 327 

Breitenberg, Mark Edword 

Brennan, Jocquelyn Ann 278 

Brennon, Joseph Jomes 339 

Brennan, Kenneth Michael 

Bresee, Lmdo Ann 93, 355 

Bresnohon, Mory Kote 194, 327 

Brett. Susan Kent 

Bretthouer, Robert W 

Breu, Charlotte Ann 278 

Brewster, Georgiono Lynn 355 

Brewster, Kotherine Rose 

Brice, Paulo Ellen 

Bridges, Catherine Susan 

Briggs, Angelo Louise 327 

Briggs. Donno Morie 

Br.ggs, John Ronald 339, 211 

Brigham, Brenda Adele 

Brigham, Leigh Frances 327 

Bright. John 267 

Bright, Wayne Edward 

Brimmer, Stephen Douglos 

Brinemon, John Richard 327 

Brink, Robert H. Jr 

Bnnkley, Corolyn Leigh 277, 278 

Bntnell, Phyllis Ann 278 

Brrtt, Herbert Wode 

Broccoletti, Jomes Orlando 

Brockwell, Pott.e Jeon 355 

Brokow, John Gorretson III 

Bromfield, Edward Thomos III 212 

Bromiel, Jerome Joseph 

Brook, John Poul 

Brooke-Devlin, Morgon Dione 

Brooks. Bonme Leo 

Brooks, Brian Gerard 355 

Brooks, Kotherine Mone 

Brooks, Sue Gardner 

Brosman, David Alon 21 I 

Brough, Rondy Mitchell 

Brown, A. Mork 

Brown, Carolyn Rudd 

Brown, Chorles Kevin 279 

Brown, Cloire Ann 355 



Brown. Dovid McDowell 339 

Brown, Geoffrey Stephen 

Brown, Gerald Jomes 355 

Brown, J Nicolette355 

Brown, Jomes Gregory 

Brown, James Robert 

Brown, Jill Belindo 279 

Brown, John Stewart 

Brown, John Walter 

Brown, Joseph Hamilton 

Brown, Kothryn Alyson 327 

Brown, Kenneth Everts 

Brown, Kenneth Lee 

Brown. Kenneth Okeffe 

Brown, Kent Richord 

Brown. Lucy TrurrtbuH 

Brown, AAork 279 

Brown, Mary Ellen 

Brown, Milton Kenneth Jr. 

Brown, Peyton Randolph 339 

Brown. PnsciHo Morgoret 327 

Brown, Robert Evers Jr 355 

Brown, Robert Moson Jr. 

Brown, Robin Elizabeth 

Brown, Sherida Beth 

Brown, Sherne Yvonne 33, 279 

Brown, Ston 266 

Brown, Stephen Christopher 

Brown, Susonah Bronch 

Browne, Endio Ellen 29 

Browning, Elizabeth Moio 279 

Browning, Michael Poul 

Browning, Ten Leonne 355 

Brubaker, Hermon Wallace Jr 279 

Bruce, Kevin Andrew 356 

Bruce. Lindo Jeon 327 

Bruner, Suson Corter 279 

Bruno, Borboro Ann 339 

Bruno, Virginio R 

Brush, Morgoret 

Bryan, Ralph Timothy 356 

Bryan. Richord William 200 

Bryan. Stephen Colwoy 

Bryont, Lou Anne 339 

Bryant, Robert Edword 327 

Bryant, Robert Harrison 

Brzostele, Susan 194 

Brzostek, Suson Mary 

Buchanan, Albert Ernie 200, 279 

Buchanan, Jeaneen Marie 186, 279 

Buchanon, Joyce Cose 339 

Buchanan. Kim Ellen 180. 339 

Buchanan. Leo Lynn 

Buchwolter. Suzonne Louise 

Buck, Enc Christion 

Buck, Evelyn Ann 279 

Buck, John Gregory 

Buck, Roger Allen 

Buck, Walter Roger IV 

Buck, Worren Wesley III 

Buckinghom, Andrew Lowden 

Buell, Sandra 

Buffon, Kathleen Ann 

Buheller, Terry Ryan 356 

Buhrman, Martho Ann 356 

Bukowy, Stephen Joseph 

Buldom, Louis Stocy 

Bulifonl, Henry Fletcher IV 

Bull, Lindo Anne 279 

Bullock, Stephen Williom 

Bulynko, Juonito Jean 

Bumgordner, Ginny Li 356 

Bund'Ck, Mork BIOKOm 279 

Bunker. John Joseph 192 

Buracker. Gory Keith 182 

Burch, Bonnie Roy 

Burchom, Jocqueline B, 

Burdon, Lourie Ann 

Burdick, Rick Lymon 

Burford, Williom Owen Jr. 

Burger, Goil K 

Burgeson, Bruce Arthur 

Burgess, Jomes Michael 

Burgess. Michoel Steven 339 




Buriak, Beverly Ann 339 

Burke. John Connolly 

Burke, John Washtngton III 279 

Burkhardt, Ellen Marie 327 

Burkholder, Rex Bruce 

Bufklow, Miles Thomas 70 

Burlage, Gerald Kevm 279 

Burlinson, Alice Gertrude 180,327 

Burnett, Stuart Rutledge 207 

Burnette, Ralph Edwin Jr. 

Burnerte, Rolen Irvin 

Burnette, Susan Mario 279 

Burns, Chorles Lloyd 327 

Burns, Martho Ann 

Burns, Mary Bea 279 

Burns, Michoel Joseph 

Burns, Thomos Edgar 

Burrow, Robert Wayne 279 

Burrows, Michael Anthony 

Burt, Michael Norman 

Burton, Beverly Suson 279 

Burton, Debro Kay 

Burton, Dennis Cleat 339 

Burton, Don Glen 339 

Burton, Linda Fay 

Burton, Robert Arnold 279 

Burton, Stephen Angel I 21 1 

Burton, Susan Margaret 189 

Busbin, Shoron Kay 356 

Bush, Holly OIney 

Butler, Catherine Mane 185, 339 

Butler, Colleen Ellen 

Butler, Elizabeth Galloway 189, 339 

Butler, George Edward 327 

Butler, James Johnson 

Butler, James Ormonde 

Butler, Jo Corol 187. 339 

Butler, Paul Edward 

Butler, Thomas Richard 209 

Butler, William Paul 

Butt, Karen Elizabeth 

Butt, Lois Jean 279 

Butts, George Spottswood 

Butts, Hodossah Beverly 

Buurma, Elisabeth Anne 

Byam, John Terrell 339 

Byom, Pomelo E 280 

Byers, James Clifford 

Byers, Keith John 339 

Byrd, Joni Susan 327 

Byrd, Lloyd Donold 

Byrd, Samuel Davis III 

Byrne, Anne Morie 340 

Byrne, Donold Michael 

Byrne, John Pofrick 

Byrne, Morcella Yvonne 280 



c 



Cobell, Chorles Lorrome 

Cable, VolerieJean 187, 340 

Codden, Kerry Anne 

Codden, Marion Rose 280 

Coddy, John Arnold 

Cahill, Dovid Austin 

Cohill, Paul Dovid 

Cohill, William Edword 

Callahan, Daniel E 47 

Callahan, Elizabeth Lauren 1 10, 327 

Callander, John 

Callos, George Deon 

Calutolo. Niji 217 

Calvin, Lynn Gornetl 

Colvo, Philip Sidney III 

Camocho, Barbara Suson I 76, 280 



Camocho, Debro-Jeone 176, 340 

Camocho, Yvonne Mono 

Combern, Noncy Elizobeth 340 

Cambern, Thomas Moynard 356 

Camden, Motoh Lynn 

Corrxlen, Suson Eileen 150, 340 

Cameron, Jomes Wilfred 78, 200, 327 

Camp)beli, Edgar Anthony 280 

Campbell, Gregory Scon 

Compbell, Heidi Lou 340 

Campbell, Hugh Gregory Jr. 327 

Compbell, Kenneth Poul Jr 

Campbell. Laurie Jane 280 

Campbell, Oddette Louise 

Campbell. Sarah Jean 

Campbell, Shirley Anne 

Campbell, Tave Richard 

Campbell, Virgmio Loy 340 

Campbell, William Cellars 280 

Canfield, David Charles 

Conn, John Porker 370 

Conton, Cathy Louise 

Copelli, Judith F 

Cappel, Philip James 

Corobollo, Luis Benito 

Corawan, Rolfe Ledrew 

Carbough, Vincent Eugene 

Carder. Elizabeth Byrd 

Corey. Mark Gordon 

Corey, Michael Scott 

Cargill. Judith Ann 195 

Carl, Marcia Kate 13 

Carlin, Joseph Charles 57 

Carlo, Jeannette Vanessa 280 

Carlson, Bradley Fronklin 327 

Carlson. John P 

Carlson. Lucy Sprout 

Corlton. Jo Anne 

Carlton, Joe 212, 327 

Carlton, Marcus Scott 327 

Carmon, Louro Lynne 

Cormine, Frederick Thomas Jr 280 

Carnes. Thomas Scott 

Cornevole, Ben 269 

Carney. Heath Joseph 

Corney, Robert W 

Carpenter, Carol 340 

Corpenter, Noro Olivia 340 

Carper. William Barclay 

Corr, Cory Suson 356 

Corr, Patrick Robert 340, 190 

Corrick, Shoun Francis 

Carroll, Cothleen 

Carroll, Donny Lee 340 

Carroll, Mary Patricia 327 

Carroll, Stephen Lewis 

Corsia, Rocco Louis 

Corson, Cloudio Anne 280 

Carson, Cloudio Anne 280 

Corson, Thomas Frost 

Corson, Wendy Elaine 280 

Carter, CoWin Lewis 

Carter, Charlotte Anne 28 

Corter, James Talmadge 356 

Carter, Jennifer Grahom 

Corter, Mane Beth 356 

Carter, Nancy McBride 93, 327 

Carter, Virginia Ella 174, 327 

Carter, William 267 

Cartwright, David Wayne 

Carvalho, Joseph 

Carver, John Lawrence 

Corver, Wondo Jeon 356 

Corwile, Nancy Lynn 

Cory, Karen Faye 

Cose. Louis Cyrill III 280 

Cosh, Moureen Elizabeth 174. 280 

Coshell, Brian Wallace 281 

Coshmon. George Donold 

Casper. Nelda Diane 356 

Cass, Edmund Froncis III 356 

Cassai, Noro Margaret 3''7 

Cossanos, Ellen 195 

Casson. Cynthia Rebecco 189, 327 

Cosson, Donald Davis Jr. 

Costerline, Margaret Barry 327 

Costertine, Williom Hale Jr. 












z^ <^w 



Majorette, Donna Eccart, concentrates on a two 
baton routine. 



Cosrle, Cynthia Wirtz 217. 281 

Castle, Edwin Scott 281 

Cat, Cheshire 185 

Catlette, James Robert 

Cato, Dr, Benjamin 304 

Cotron, Louis 251 

Cotsonis, William Thomas 

Coufield. Mono Poige 

Covognoro. Mary Catherine 203 

Cavaliere, Robert Salvotore 192, 281 

Cowthron, Steven Wayne 

Coyton, Thomos Eorl 

Ceeley, Philip W Jr 

Cewe, John 

Chadwell. Elaine 356 

Chofin, Pomelo Lynn 

Chofin, Soro Suson 281 

Choikin, Diane D 

Cholkley, Thereso Ann 

Chambers, Joy Lee 270 

Chambers, Kothorine Ellen 180 

Chombers, Richard Thomos 207 

Chambers, Sondra Helen 

Chambers, Walter Mourice 111 

Chambers. Williom Lone 281 

Chombliss, Suson 281 

Chomplin, Nancy 

Chondler, Chnstophi^r Done 

Choo. Labbish Nirig 

Chaplin, Chorlie 35 

Chapman, Adrian Philip 356 

Chapmon. Anne West 

Chapman, Suson Antoinette 176, 327 

Choppel, Harvey 261 

Choppell, Julie Moore 340 

Chorles, Gory Wayne 281 

Chose, Jonothon Chorles 192, 328, 193 

Chose, Michael Bertram 

Cheefleoders 93 

Chemistry 233 

Chernoff, Horry Lewis 328 

Cherry, Terrence Woyne 

Chesson, Mark Comeron 

Chesson, Mork Winborne 

Chestney, Cheryl Ann 194, 281 

Chewning, Beverly Powers 

Chichester A Lee 356 

Child, ClaroL 

Child, E- Rushmore 

Childers, David Henebry 

Chiles, William Carrigon 

Chi Omega 176, 177 

Chis, Morionne Lorroine 

Chogich. PotriciO Jone 281 

Choi, Thomos Jov 356 

Chou. 5ue-Yu 

Chrismon, Dan Alvln Jr. 356 

Christ, PotriciO Ployer 281 
Christ. Thomas 250 
Christensen. Gorth Alan 
Chrtstesen, Steven Dole 281 
Christenson, Rich 25 
Chnstion, John Benton 
Chrisfiano, Kevm Jomes 328 

Christionson, Ann Morie 
Christmon, Bruce Lee 
Christmon, Douglas Lee 
Christmon, Luuro Jean 
Christoffersen, Betle Ann 
Chudobo. Kothefine Morie 
CtOvoreHi. Lindo Morte 356 
Cilley. Richard 266 
Circle K 220. 221,275 
Ciste»ino, Poul J 
Clordy, Benjamin Woyne 328 
Clork, Dovid Alon2Il 
Clork. Deborah Leonoro 
Clork, Jonathan 
Clork, Laura Lynn 281 
Clork, Robert Amory 
Clork, Ronald Keith 328 
Clork, Rosemory E 
Clork, Thorryjs Richard 
Clork, William Dovd 
Clork, William Sigtey 

Clorke. Joel Gorlarvd 
Clarke, Melissa Lou 356 
Clorson, John CorroU 

Clatterbuck, Deborah Ann 356. 195 



Ckiud, Chrystol Moson 281 

Claude, Robert Woodward 340 

Clowson. Thomas Worren 

Cloy, Mollis Anne 

Cloy, Susanna Jeone 

Cloybrook, Koren Lynn 328 

Cleory, Jomes Joseph 282 

Cleory, Michoel Duone 282 

Cleory, Robert James 

Cleghorn, Suson Louise 328 

Clem. Poul 271 

Clement. Stephen C. 238 

Clements. Donna Lynn 356 

Clements, Poul Brodley 198. 340 

Clements, Susan Kemp 

Clements. Vossor 43 

Clemmer, Jone Brown 356 

Clemmons, Morvin Clinton 

Clevinger, Lloyd Clark II 340 

CliHord, John Nicholas 340 

Cline, Kenneth Wolter 

Cloud, Kenneth Donald 

Clouser, Jennie Detweiler 282 

Cloyd, Tereso-Anne Mone 328 

Cookley, Den« 198. 341 

Coate, Malcolm Bucklond 328 

Cootes, Gory Mrtchelt 206, 340 

Cootes, Jo Ellen 356 

Cobb, James Mutton 340 

Cobbs, Jeon Rowlett 

Cochron, Corby Lynne 282 

Cochran, Don R. 

Cochran, Mark A, 

Cochron, Robert Jomes 356 

Cockerill, Jomes Dovis 

Codd, William Thomos 200, 282 

Cody, Marian Philomeno 203, 282 

Cody, Steven Eorl 340 

Coe, Terrell Martin 

Cofer. Susan D 356 

Cogdell, Cynthio L&gh 

Cogel, Oennts 265 

Coggin, Williom Menry 

Cohen. Ronnie 

Coloizzi, Elviro Ann 176, 328 

Colongelo, Mork Sonford 

Colosurdo, Michelle Suson 340 

Cole. Chrst.no Morsholl 340. 195 

Cole, George D 254 

Cole, Menr. Roger 

Cole, Mary Mill 356 

Cole, Mothilde Koroline 328 

Cole. Pomelo Morte 

Cole, Patricio Mond 

Colemon. Bkjine Morcel 

Colemon. George Conneron 206, 212 

Colemon, Henry 237 

Colenvin, John Lutr 

Colemon, Rorxjld Bruce 74. 356 

Colley, Mork Douglas 328 

Collins, Cathy Ann 32. 180. 282 

Collins, Christopher i. 

Collins. Murroy Alvin III 59, 350 

Collins, Rohtorvj Dewitt 

Collins. Soroh Elizobeth 

Coloniol Echo 1 10 

Colopy, Motthcw Michoel 

Coltronc, Potricto Brgnch 

Cotvocoresses, Jomes A. 
Combs. Morgon Robert 
Comer, Mary Borboro 174, 328 
Commor. Debbie 189 
Compton, Reid Stewo't 34 1 
Comstock. James Raymond Jr 282 
Condon. Robert Bortos 
Cone, Lorene Purcetl 282 
Conger. Bruce Michoel 214. 341 
Conme, Thomos Jeffrey 212, 282 
Conklin, Lorry Lce 125 
Conlon. Jomes John 356 
Connelly, Cothleen 356 

Connelly, Chorles F'OnciS Jr. 

Connetl>'. Jomes Paul k 

Conner. Alexonjcf Nicholson 78, 282, 190 

Conner, Debro Suson 328 

Conncrton, M»chcle Roberto 

Conrod, Richard Mortin 

Co"te Jo^fT*h Rnhfv-T 



INDEX 397 



i- Chories SalvatofC 

C>^r,.vuv, Jone Dfurv 176, 282 
Conway, Suzonne Morie 185, 282 
Conwell, Lindo Dionne 
Coogan, Kathleen Goil 282 
Cook, Craig Austin 70 
Cook, Deboroh Lynne 341 
Cook, Howord Motthew 209 
Cook, Lesley Anne 282 
Cooke, A. CartCf 
Cooke, Eugenia 
Cooley, Dovid Crowell 
Coolf'v, David Mark 

" Ivn I Allen 
'uh Lynn 

frednc 78, 2 U. 340 
Luup.j', jo^vi Thomas 
Cooper, William Scott 
Capon, Williorn David Jr 356 
Copley, Poul Andrew 
Copley, Rocky Kent 
Copp, John Robeff 
Coppedge, John Council 282 
Coppes. John Charles Jr 
Corbal, Jennifer Lee 328 
Corbin. Mike 55 
Corcoron, Celeste Maureen 
Cordle, Charia Sisk 328 
Corn, David Alan 
Cornellier, Joseph Roger 
Cornette, Lori 268 
Cornwall, Pattie Hargrove 
Corr, William Ellis IV 
Correll, James Allen 
Correll, Nancy Elizabeth 356 
Corsepius, Carol Ann 340 
Corso, Robert Vincent 214 
Cofum. Elame 356 
Corydon, Leslie Ann 356 
Cosgrove, Robert Howard 
Cossette, Michael Vernie 
Cossey, Ellen Moy 
Costner, Christopher Mork 
Conen, Sol lie Rees 283 
Cotter, Donno Lee 283 
Cottrill, Mary Esther 328 
Coughlan, Victoria Ruth 
Coughlin, Terence Michael 283 
Councill, Ruth Anne 340 
Courage, Motthew Abel I 192 
Coursen. Dr. Bradner 232 
Courtney, Francis Xovier 
Cousino. Scott Richard 82. 34) 
Cowan, Michael Lee 341 
Cowell, Joseph Roscoe 
Cox. Beulah Elizabeth 
Cox, Donold Franklin 168, 182 
Cox, Elizabeth S 
Cox, Jomes Phillip 
Cox, James R. 
Cox, Mary Teresa 
Cox. Melinda Richardson 174, 328 
CoK. Peggy Jo 356 
Cox, Roscoe Thomas III 283 
Cox, Terry Bradford 
Cox, William D. 
Cox, Zahra Elizabeth 283 
Coya, Stephen James 
Coyner, Karen Elaine 283 
Crace, Deborah Leigh 283 
Crafford, Glenn Waller 
Croft, Michael Louis 283 
Crafton, James Bryan 341, 207 
Croig, John Hanssen 
Craig, Penny Lynn 
Craig, Susan Elisabeth 328 
Craig. Wolter Myers 328 
Croig, William Dean 
Cramer, Harlan Corl 
Crone, Gregg Dovid 
Crone, Louella Jane 
Crone, William Joseph 168. 214, 328 
Ootsley, Moryanne 180, 34) 
Craven, John Curne 
Crave*", Mark Woyne 
Crawford, Lorna Margaret 
Crowley, Joyce Elizabeth 
Oeodle, Harvey )30, )3) 
Creoger, Roger Thomas 283 
Creedon, Peter Joseph 70 
Cress, Deboro Lynn 
Crick enberger, Gary Ewing 
Crrder, Henry Grove 283 
Crisp, Georgette Marie 
Crist, John Nelson 
Crifchfield, Dorlene Roe 187, 341 
Crittenden. Ronald Scott 356 
Croall, Dovid Thomson 
Crocker, Potricia Kathryn 356. 195 
Crockett, Sobrino Lynn 341 
Oockett, Thomas Walter 
Cromie, Judith Lynne 20 
Cromwell, James Robert 
Crook, Roger Lowrence 2 14 
Crooks, Julie Cloir 356, 195 
Cropp, Kevin Williom 341 
Crosby, Dovid 42 
Oosley, Lynn Lorene 
Cross, Corol 341 
Cross Country 58-59 
Cross, Mono Lisa 356 
Grossman, Ann Heather 356 
Crosric, John Bernard Jr, 

Crotty, Deboroh Deirdre 283 
Crouch, Brian Dole 356 
Crouch, Calvin Ellis 
Crouch, Deborah Anne 283 
Crouch, Sally Foster 328 
Cfoxton. Richard Worren 328 
Ouickshank, David Andrew 34) 
Cruikshank, George Irving 
Culbeftson, Joseph Whitney 
Culhone, John Gerard 
Cullen, Chorles T. 
Cullin, Brian Price 
Cullinon, Kothleen Ann 283 
CuMum, Pout Frank 190 
Culp, Randoll Wilhom 
Gulp, Steven Bradford 131. 341 




Culver, Valerie Ann 283 
Cumby, Robert Edward 284 
Cumiskey, Charles Joseph 
Cumming, Lowrence Gordon 
Cummings, Deon John 200, 284 
Cummmgs, Michael Jomes 
Cummins, Rebecca Lynn 356 
Cummins, Wes Lowell 
Cunningham, Latricia J. 
Cunningham, Samuel I. 
Curcio, Helen Giselle 
Curd, Donna Virginia 328 
Curling, Marlene Louise 284 
Curry, Albert G Jr 
Curry, Donald Richard 
Curry, Ruthonn 
Curry, Thomos Lee 
Custer, Scott Meredith 
Cutchins, William Donovan 
Cutler, Pamela Vivo 203, 328 
Cutter, Deborah Lynn 
Cutting, Nigel A R 124 



D 



Dacates, Craig Spero 

Dadenos, Deboroh Ann 185. 221, 328 

Dahl, Debra Marie 356 

Oahlmon, Nancy V.itchell 356 

Doiley, Princess Anne 

Dainer, Roger Daniel 

Dokin, Dovid John 

Dolby, Timothy Leigh 328 

Dolfon, Katherine Scott 357 

Dolton, Stephen Frank 52, 284, 190 



Daly, Mary Joon 284 

Damico, Angela M. 

Domon, Richord E 

Damron, Emory Warner 

Dandridge, Paula Maria 

Doniel, Paul Stephen 

Daniel, Randolph Charles 

Daniel, Rhetto Moore 163 

Daniel. William Lee 212 

Daniels, Pamela Jean 189, 284 

Daniels, Potncio Stone 328 

Donila, Richard Norman 328 

Donkers, Lezlie Jo 328 

Donley, Aretie Gallins 

Danner, Roger 207 

Dantonio, Anna Mario Rosaria 341 

Darby, John Randolph 

Dare, Robert Alan 

Darley, Susan Elaine 357 

Darling, Mary Oliver 

Darnton, Rebecca Ann 357 

Dorone, Thomas G 

Dart, Andrew Norman 

Darvas, Andrea Agnes 341 

Daskoloff, Thomos Michael 

Daspit. Linda Anne 357 

Dautrich, Robert Joseph Jr 

Dovenport, Aubrey Sherman 

David, Thomas Edward 284 

Davidson, Harley Arthur 

Dovidson, John Wilbur 341 

Dovies, Emily London 203, 284 

Dovin, Clare Moighreod 341 

Davis, Christopher Matthews 192, 284 

Davis, Deborah Ann 187, 328 

Dovis, Donna Jeanne 328 

Davis, Edward Lee 284 

Davis. Ellen Tune 341 

Dovis, Everett Biery Jr 

Dovis, Jeffrey Shown 2 1 1 , 284 

Davis, John D Jr 198 

Davis, Joseph R 

Davis, Lindo Ann 357, 195 

Dovis, Mallory Ann 284 

Dovis. Margaret Cullen 284 

Dovis, Michoel Joseph 208, 341, 209 

Davis. Pomelo Harris 

Dovis, Poul Wayne 



Dovis, Randall 38 

Davis. Robert Albert 

Davis, Ruth Drew 284 

Davis, Sylvia Ann 187, 284 

Davis, Walter Lee 55 

Davis, Wando Chorlene 341 

Davison, Jennifer Dorothy 328 

Dawson, Robert Nelson 357 

Doy, Frances Bain 203. 341 

Deodmare, Jono Lyn 

Deadrick, Kevin Scott 

Deal, John Lockley 

Deolteris, Joseph Thomas 

Dean, Patience 143, 341 

Dean, Suson Lynnetfe 328 

Deas, Lynn D 

Deos, Moriquito Doronde 

Deover, Emily 187, 328 

Debord, Martha Henderson 

Decorlo, Suzanne 284 

Decunzo, Luann 341 

Deery, William Charles 

Defilippo, Susan Ann 341 

Defronces, John Alfred 328 

Defur, Peter Lee 

Degi, Keith Joseph 

Degiorgio, Mary Thereso 328 

Degnan, Francis J Jr 212 

Degnon, Maureen 

Degrow, Fronces Lee 

Dejornette, Jeanne Leigh 357 

Delacroix, Etienne Amedee 

Deloney, Doris Elizabeth 189, 328 

Delano, George Kristin 

Delano, Robert Barnes Jr 341 

Delap, Nancy Christine 284 

Deloune, Linden 174 

Delavego, Anno Teresa 

Delcastillo, Angel Martin 

DelcastiHo, Rebecca Ann 

Delongo, Mark Scott 

Delpire, Lynn Ann 

Delta Delto Delta 178, 179 

Demonche, Robert 329 

Dembinski, Tom John 

Demmg, Willoughby Howard 

Dempsey, Carole Ann 

Dempsey, Douglas Alon 

Dempsey, Mark Francis 

Dempsey, Thomas Campbell 

Dempsey, William Henry III 206, 341, 70 

Demyttenoere, Nancy 284 

Denordi, Eugene Joseph 

Denby, Paul Joseph 192, 329, 193 

Deneen, Charles Samuel 284 

Denning, Jackie Ray 

Dennis, Croig S 

Dennis, John Sissener 

Denslow, Keith Dovid 284 

Denton, Richard Eugene 329 

Deroso, Patricia Luise 203, 285 

Derrick, Joseph Porker Jr 

Desoulniers, Ann Nix 

Desktns, Deborah Kay 285 

Detterbeck, Nancy Elisabeth 

Detwiler. Jeffrey Brian 

Deusebio, John Louis Jr 

Devoney, Michael William 

Devanny, Edrl Hannum IV 285 

Devries, Scott Phillip 207, 285 

Dewondel, Mark Steven 

Dewey, Barbara Michelle 357 

Dewilde, Mory Kim 357 

Dewitt, Linda Margaret 341 

Dewift, William Ridgeiy 285 

Dewlin. Cynthia Irene 

Deyoung, Michael Wdliom 

Diakun, Alan Nicholas Jr. 

Diamond, Leslie Keith 

Dios, Robert K 

Dibrell, Louise Cobb 

Dichtel, Catherine Frederico 329 

Dicicco, James Patrick 

Dick, Jomes Bowman 

Dick, Stephen Lawrence 

Dick, Thomas Aaron 70 

Dickenson, Doniel David III 209 

Dickinson, Jomes Lockhort 

Dickinson, Janet Julio 176, 285 

Dickinson, Jeanie Hope 341 

Dickson, Carol Arlene 285 

Diehl, Wolter Joseph III 207, 285 

Dierks. Kenneth A. 

Diggon, Ann Renee 357 

Diggs, George M 

Diggs, Jonet Lynn 286 

Digiovanna, David Charles 

Digiovanna, Richard Edword 329 

Diltich. Lisa Suzanne 286 

Dillon, Brian Joseph 

Dinardo, Mary Elizabeth 

Dingman, Paul Charles 

Dinwiddie, Stephen Hunt 

Dipace. Beth Ann 174, 286 

Dirende, Susan 

Dinenzo, Michael P 286 

Diroso, Teresa Josephine 357 

Dixon, David Brian 

Dobey, John Dorrell 

Dobson, Julie Ann 

Dodge, Donald Done 93 

Dodson, George W 

Dodson, Mory Lytle 

Dodson, Shoron Diane 

Dodson, Sharon Elaine 357 

Doggett, Everett Henry III 

Dolon, Thomas Lee 341 

Dolph, Cyrus Abde IV 

Dolph, Mary Postore 

Domboski, Cynthia Ann 

Donoldson, Deborah Lee 

Donaldson, John E 253 

Donaldson, Scott 237 

Donoldson, Sue Sheldon 

Donegon, Jacquelyn K. 

Donnelly, Morgoret Wetherbee 357 

Donnelly, Victoria Elizabeth 

Donoghue, Moiro Kotherine 

Donovan, William Edward 



398 INDEX 




Doo, Scooby, 39 

Dooley, David E 

Donon, Heather Lynne 370 

Dorn, Susan Elizabeth 

Dornan, John R. 

Dotson, Curtis Neol 

Dougherty, Jack Richard 

Douglas, John Brewster 78, 329 

Douglos, Stephen Harold 304 

Douglas, Gloria Antoinette 286 

Dougloss, William Jef+ 341 

Doumlele, Damon G 

Douze, Joseph 

Dover, Robert Vanhorn 

Dover, Thomas Michael 

Doverspike, Mortee E, 

Doverspike, Montee A, 

Dowd, Willrom Michael 87, 192 

Down, William Frederick 21 1, 78, 79 

Downey, Joan Danaher 357 

Downey, Joyce Marie 

Downing, Samuel Patrick 286 

Downs, L. McCarthy III 

Doyol, Charles Thomos 

Doyle, Margaret Mary 

Doyle, Martha Stacey 

Doyle, Michael Joseph 357 

Doyle, Michael Thomas 

Doyle, Robert Francis 329 

Dozier, Melissa Mason 203 

Dozier, William Mortin 

Droke, Gloria Paige 

Drake, Leslie Lynne 180, 341 

Drake, Margaret Lamb 

Droke, Wilfred Francis 

Drew, Dorothy Ann 174, 329 

Drewry, Gary Lynn 71, 207, 206, 329, 70 

Drews, Karl L 

Dreybus, George Newell Jr. 

Dreyer, Diane Marie 357 

Dreyer, Lorrv Lee 286 

Driscoll, Thomas Lee 286 

Driskill, Jock E 

Drozda, Irene Sofie 

Drummond, David Milton 286 

Dubel, Diano Jean 176, 329 

Dubin, Richard Scott 

Duchorme, Michael Edward 

Dudley, Krista Susan 286 

Dudley, Suson D, 

Dudley, William Scott 

Duer, John Henry IV 304 

Duff, David Leo 

DuH, Sheryl Linn 357 

Duffy, Rebecca Elizabeth 341 

Duffy, Thomas Niels 70, 206 

Dufour, Ronold Paul 

Dugon, Carol F 

Duggan, Linda Jean 

Duke, George Wesley 200, 286 

Duke, John Martindale 

Dukes, David Jefferson 

Duloney, Richard Alvin 

Oulloghon, Matthew Peter 357 

Dumon, Ronold 286 

Dumos, Kotherine Ann 

Dumville, Samuel Lawrence 

Dunavant, Noncy 341 

Dunbor, Margaret Randolph 357 

Dunbar, Morjorie Ann 341 

Duncan, Dovid Arend 357 

Duncan, Debra Jean 

Duncan, Dennis Harrell 341 

Dunford, Susan 176, 286 

Dunker, Robert Frey 70 

Dunlap, Lora Antionette 

Dunlevy, Willliom Gregory 329 

Dunlop, Douglas Dixon 

Dunn, Kevin Francis 

Dunn, Maureen Ann 357 

Dunn, Patricio Karen 174, 341 

Dunn, Sandro Sue 

Dunning, David Alon 

Dunton, Lindo Mapp 185. 329 



Dupriest, Michele Colette 203 
Dupnest, Pamela Jean 286, 329 
Dupuy, Monica M 
Durdin, Kathleen Diane 174, 329 
Dursee, Thomas Froncis 70 
Dye, Steve Edword 
Dye. Thomas Alfred 286 
Dyer, Charlotte Anne 357 
Oyer, Raymond Douglas III 214 



E 



Eade, Jonathan Kenric 
Eakin, Lenden Alan 207, 341 
Eaksisomboon, Elizabeth King 
Earl, Martha Ann 
Earley, Mark Lowrence 286 
Early, Leia Kotherine 357 
Earnhart, Don Brady 207 
Eorp, Samuel Leon 
Eosley, Joseph Hyde III 207 
Eason, Kotherine Kelly 151. 185 
Eoson, Richord Mansfield 
Easterling. Barbara Ashley 
Eosthom, Robert Dobney 286 
Eastman, Leon Russell 
Eastman, Melissa Anne 176, 329 
Boston. Brian 357 
Eastwood, Frances L 
Eoton, Mary Elizabeth 357 
Eaton, Suzan Gay 180 
Eoves, Dione Lossiter 
Ebenfield, Wendy 
Eccard, Donna Lee 357 
Eck, Lindsey Douglas 
Eckles, David Franklin 
Eckles, Diona Elaine 286 
Eddins, W.nfred Jr 329 
Edgar, Thomas Pitcairn 
Edmiston, Kim Dianne 357 
Edmundson, Julio Ellen 286 
Education, School of 256, 257 
Edwords, Jock 265 
Edwords, Linda Cheryl 
Edwords, Melonie Gray 
Edwards, Michael Allen 341 
Edwards, Rex Joseph 182 
Edwards, Ruth Ann 286 
Edwards, Steven Scott 287 
Edwards, William Robert III 341 
Efford, Richard Edwin 
Efird, Aaron Hardwick 
Eggerton, John Sonsom 357 
Eggteston, Noncy Roe 341 
Eide, Gordon Albert 287 
Eisenhouer, Susan Marie 195 
Eldridge, Susan Jane 287, 170 
Eley, Robert Frederick 
Eliezer, Elaine Teresa 329 
Elinsky, Jeffrey Charles 287 
Ehum, Sandra Lee 357 
Ellcnbogen, David Joel 
Ellenson, James Stephen 
Ellington, Michael Robert 357 
Elliot, DuHy G. 
Elliott, Elizobcth S 
Elliott, Henri Yvonne 
Elliott, Mary Eleanor 
Elliott, Robert Glenn 
Elliott, Sandra Lee 
Ellis. Doniel Horwood 287 
Ellis, Down Elizobcth 1 10, 341 
Ellis, Kenneth Leo Jr 
Ellis, Kevin Michael 
Ellison, Warren Jock 



Long paper assignments and late study hours 
prove to be too much for this diligent student. 



Ellmore, Roger Franklin 200 

EIrod, Boyer 200 

Emden, Karen Anne Gollucci 

Emerson, Ralph Woodword 

Emmert, Bruce Franklin 

Emmett, Robert W. Ill 

Emory, Claire May 287 

Emmett. Robert W III 

Emory, Cloire May 287 

Engel, David Woyne 

Engh, Dorothy Robin 176, 341 

England, Terry May 329 

Englert, Lee Ann 357 

English, Evan Allen 

English, Ralph Steven I 17, 220, 287 

Ennis, April Down 353 

Enoch, Michael Joseph 190 

Ensor, Mary Jone 329 

Epstein, Jerrold Hart 329 

Epstein, Joseph Konter 

Enckson, Kenneth Ralph Jr 

Erickson, Mark St John 

Escorsego, Daniel Yves 

Eshelmon, Morgoret Louise Miller 

Esper, Noncy Suzanne 189. 329 

Essmon, Phillip Corlton 

Estes, Debra Lee 

Estes, Jennie Cheoirs 174. 341 

Estes, Jesse Michael 

Estes, Mary Sue 

Etheridge, Doniel Mortin 329 

Etheridge, Ellen Wise 341 

Eubank, Charles Ronald 207 

Eure, Fay Elizabeth 357 

Eure, Samuel Lee Jr 357 

Eure, Williom Bradford 57 

Evonow, Peter Stocey 358 

Evons, Allon Wheotley 

Evons, Dovid William 82 

Evons, Douglos Bowmon 

Evans, Gilbert Glenn 

Evans, Glorio Jeanne 

Evans. John Stanton Jr, 

Evans, Mary Jone 

Evons. Robert August Jr, 

Evons, Scott Derr 287 

Evonsond, Bob 102 

Eversole, Mary Paige 103, 287, 354, 203 

Ewort, George Daniel 

Ewort, Judith Choney 

Ewing. Janet Ruth 194, 287 

Ewing, Mary Louise 176, 329 



F 



Faber, Beth Lynn 

Fobrizio. Joon Morie 358 

Focchino, Down Morie 358 

Fodden, Coleen Mane 180, 329 

Fohey, Nancy Lee 358 

Foio, Christine Leo 

Foirboirn, Donald Boycc 

Fairchild, David 156 

Foirfox, Nathoniel Eugene 

Poison, Marsha Anne 173, 202, 203, 287 

Foick, Lowrte Jeanne 189 

Folcon, Douglas i. 

Folk, David Albert 

Famo, Stephen Chorles 287, 207 

Fonio, Robert Modhcw 

Fontini, Christian 

Foriel, Peter T 

Farley, Irene Morio 

Farley, Pogc Allison 358 

Farmer, Frances Anne 203, 341 

Farmer, Johnny Mack 

Former. Melisso Ann 73, 173. 180 



Fouber, Robert Lee 

Foulconer, Hubert Lloyd Jr, 198, 288 

Faulconer, AAory-Woite Meredith 

Faulkner, Barbara Jeon 

Faulkner, Ken Allon 358 

Fouls, Meredith Anne 358 

Fountleroy, Carma Cecil 288 

Feors, Ivan Eric 

Fedder, Kirk Stanley 

Federhen, Craig Povson 

Federhen, Deborah Anne 187. 288 

Fedziuk, Elizabeth Marshall 31. 180 

Feinstein, Lawrence Bernard 

Feit, Mark James 304 

Felder, Christion Chambers 329 

Felder, Robm Allen 329 

Feldman, Teri 185, 288 

Fell, Alison Jean 

Fetton, J Derwood 

Fentriss, Beverly Ann 358 

Ferentinos, Liso Simonet 358 

Ferguson, Andrew Matthew 288 

Ferguson, Anne Elizabeth 358 

Ferguson, Edwin Grier 

Ferguson, Elizabeth Marie 358 

Ferguson, Fronces Morgoret 288 

Ferguson, Francis Sneod 

Ferguson, Noncy Jeon 180, 313 

Ferguson, Thomos Williom 

Fergusson, Kimberly Lewis 

Fernandez, Atdo Morcio 203, 329 

Ferree, Denise Lynn 288 

Ferree, Richard Scott 341 

Ferrell, Joyce Anne 

Ferreri, Eugene Albert Jr, 288 

Ferreri, Linda Barlow 

Fessenden, Joyce Stirling 

Fetzner, Jill Ann 288 

Field Hockey 60-61 

Fielding, Korl Timothy 

File, John Lanier 341 

Fimion, Keith Shown 190 

Finon, Michoel Charles 288 

Finch, Thomas Harlan Jr. 

Fineron, Lowrence Alan 358 

Fink, LoisH. 358 

Finifter, David 235 

Finley, Mork Honford 

Finn, Dr Thomas 248 

Fioromonli, Williom Edward 358 

Fisch. Robertto Leo 358 

Fischer, Beth Suson 341, 342. 178 

Fischer, Dovid Charles 

Fischer. Poula Denise 

Fischler, Edward Bryon 

Fisher, Chester Lionel Jr. 

Fisher, Dovid George 70 

Fisher, Elizobcth Ann 

Fisher, Gregory Lester 

Fisher, Richard Bruce 

Fisher, Stephen David 288 

Fiske, Eric Korl Gould 

Fitzgerold, Ann Elizabeth 358, 195 

Fitzgerold, Down Marie 75, 358 

Fitzgerold, Deboroh Carol 

Fitzgerold, Noncy Nell 342 

Fitzgerold. Ronold Clement 

Fitzmauricc, John Edward 

Filzpotrick, Denise E 

Fitzpotrick, Gerofd Joseph 214, 288 

Floig, Teresa Ann 329 

Flonogon, Chorlcnc Rcqino 174. 342 

Flonnogon, Bizi Oonen 342 

Flonnogon, Elizobcth Combs 

Flat Hot 102- 103 

Flottn, Heidi Kothryn 

Flattery, Donold Dormott 

Fleming, Douglas Lcc Jr 358 

Fleming, John Howlond 358 

Flem^g, KcMic Wingficld 358 

Fletcher, Gregory Leo 288 

Fletcher, Laura tucker 

Fletcher. Poul Edwin III 358 

Fletcher, Suso^i Goyle 187, 342 

Flexor, Lrso Rcnec 187, 329 

Flint. Bcttv Goil 

Flora, Poul Richc»rd 289 

Florino, Michael Joseph 358 

Flournoy, Cynlhio Ann 195 

Flowers, Cheryl Joan 



INDEX 399 



Flower*. .■. 

Floyd, C> ; :;-o 

Floyd, Jooh Louise 329 

Flurie, Michoel Eugene 190 

Flynn, WiHiom Michael 

Foord, Richofd Moreheod 

Foell, Eric James 

Folon, John Francis 

Fotofln, Nothoniel Adeotuwo 168, 217, 298, 

329 
Foley, Williom R 
Folsom, Cynthia Etizobeth 
Foolboll, Junior Varsity 55 
Football, Varsity 52, 53, 54 
Forodos, Michael Peter 192, 342 
Forbes, Dovid Richard 
Forbes, Stephen Foster 
Forbes, Susan Norene 203, 342 
Forcier, Marie Louise 
Ford, Alice Caroline 358 
Ford, Beverly Jeon 
Ford Dorlene Molindo 342 
Ford, Gerald 12. 1 13 
Ford, John Bullard 358 
Ford, Linda Joyce 342 
Ford, Michael 358 
Ford, Robbin 79 
Foreman, Jonathan Hale 342 
Forrest, David Lowson 198, 329 
Forrest, Elizabeth Anne 
Forrester, Shoron Anne 358 
Fort, Thomas Samuel 
Forte, Mary Alexandrio 329 
Fortner, Steve William 
Foftney, Robert Peter 
Foster, Charles Warren Jr 289 
Foster, James Julius 
Foster, Richard Edv^ard B. 
Foster, Susan Mary 203, 289 
Fountain, Alexander Dixon III 358 
Foussekis. John George 289 
Fowke, Joan Lynn 358 
Fowler, Dorothy McShone 
Fowley, Douglos Gregg 
Fox, Daniel Paul 
Fox, James Kenney 56, 289 
Fox, Karen Denise 329 
Fox, Marc Alan 78, 172, 190 
Fox, Michael Peter 200 
Fox, Soul Aoron 
Fox, Vilma Pesciallo 
Foxwell, Robert Scott 342 
Foy, Donald Quan 359 
France, Bonnie Marilyn 203, 289 
Franceschini, Koren Mono 289 
Francis. Noncy Anne 
Franco, Eduardo 
Frank, Janet Levinson 
Frank, Jonathan Edward 
Fronk, Pomelo Atkins 
Frank, Pamela Sue 
Fronke, Clarke Richard 289, 78 
Franklin, Arthur Lanson III 
Franklin, Patricia Ann 289 
Franklin, Peter Henry 
Fronko, Joyce Ann 182, 289 
Franzen. Charles Rice 359 
Frasof, Dr Howard 243 
Frowley, Weslee Ellen 342 
Frozier, Anne Weldon 342 
Frechette, Martha Geddy 203, 342 
Fredo. Diane Marie 
Frederick, Jennifer Lee 
Frederick. Jessie Roth 174, 329 
Fredericks, Doniel Edward 
Freedman, Carol Ann 359 
Freeman, Peter Adrion 
French, Robert Stronge 192 
Frenk, Donald Bruce 
Frias, Moxime Austrio 
Fricke, Morjorie V 
Frtedberg. Elizabeth Brest 
Fnedery. John Robert 70 
Fnedery. William Charles 
Fnedmon, Dr Herbert 249 
Fnedmon. Jay MorshoN 200 
Friedrich, Joy Barton 214 
Friel, Eileen Dolores 342 
Fnsch, Adorn A 



Froqole, Constonce Horriet 

Frohring, Poulo Christine 

Frost. Kathleen Denise 289 

Fruchtermon, Richord Louis III 198, 342 

Fry, Leslie Alice 342 

Fuchs, Nancy Lynne 289 

Fuerst, Corlfon Dwight 329 

Fukudo, Melbo Naomi 187, 342 

Fulcher, Mary Beth 

Fulchor, Robert Allison Jr 

Fulford, Debro Shawn 

Fuller. Noncy Lynn 359 

Fuller, Pamela Dorr 

Fuller, Sandra Lee 174, 329 

Fulton, F, Dudley 

Fultz, Paulo Goil 359 

Funk, Kothleen Ann 185, 342 

Furiness, Michael James 

Furjonic, Corol Ann Marie 



G 



Gage, Traci Loyne 

Gallagher, Patricia Izora 

Golloher, Brendan Hoig 59, 289 

Gollo. Thomos Joseph 

Galloway, Elizabeth Agnew 359 

Galloway, Robert Stone III 214, 342 

Galloway, Ternon Tucker 92, 342 

Galson, Charlotte Marie 289 

Galumbeck. Robert Maurice 

Gomber, Carolyn Elizobeth 

Gombke, Frederick Chorles 212 

Gomblin, Noriko Eva 

Gome. David Earl 

Gammo Phi Beto 180, 181 

Gommon, Gay Lee 180, 290 

Gander, James Forrest 207 

Gonderson, Samuel Brian 

Gonley. James Edmund 

Gopcynski, Paul Vincent 

Garber, Donald Payne 

Garcia, Hector Froncisco 

Gardner. Brent Byron 

Gardner. Levi Ervin 

Gorland, Doniel Wayne 290 

Garlond, Peter Howard 149 

Gorlond, Suson V 

Gorlick, Kevin John 198, 342 

Garmon. Richord Warren 290 

Garner, Anito S 

Garner, Geroldine Mane ODonnell 

Garner, Vickey Lee 359 

Garnett, Stanford Care 

Gorrett, Douglas Randolph 

Garrett. Lee Vernon 

Garrett, Pamela 359 

Garrett, Randy Michael 

Gorrison, Richard Arthur 82. 342 

Gorrity, Rebecco Frith 

Garrity, Robert Stephen 

Garvin, David L 

Gary, Linda Goy 359 

Gary, Morgoret Marshall 329 

Gosparoli. Felrcrty Anne 203. 290 

Gostoukion. Ellen Astrid 342 

Gates, Benton Earl III 359, 142 

Gotes, Kent Barry 182, 329 

Gotling. James Edward Jr. 

Gouthier. Laureen J 

Govaras. George William 

Gavula Linda Patrice 

Gay, Thomas Stewart 198, 290 

Gayle, Alan Mojor 200 

Gayle, Thomas Mark 21 1 

Gedettis, Jean Ellen 359 



Geiger, Williom Keller 

Geookos, Anthony George 

Genovese, Lenora J. 290 

Genzler, Patrick Alan 

Geology Department 238 

George, Brinda Purvis 

George, Drexell Arleose Jr 31, 206, 313, 329, 

350 
George, Sue Ellen 359 
George, Thomas Edward III 329 
Georgen, Peter 162 
Ceroid, Judy Mane 290 
Gerber, Noncy Jeon 
Gerdes, Poul Douglas 
Gerek, Douglas Williom 78 
Germoin, Everett Grant III 359, 56, 350 
Germono, Suson Ann 185, 290 
Geroe, Gobrielle 
Gersema, George Horold 
Gessner, Elizabeth Ann 203, 342 
Gessner, Robert Brion 290 
Gettens, James Francis 
Gewinner, Joan Elaine 
Ghenn, Lurlei Allison 342 
Ghent, Potricia Ann 
Gibbs, Elizabeth Alexander 359 
Gibbs, Mary Deborah 
Gibson, Anne Elizabeth 290 
Gibson, David M 
Gibson, Michael Allen 
Gibson, Patricia Kathleen 
Giermak, Patricia Anne 39, 189 
Gieseke, Thomas Frederick 
Gift, Jeffrey Scott 
Giglio, Allison Diane 290 
Gil, Antony Francis 
Gilbert, Lloyd Martin Jr 290 
Gilboy, Patricia Ann 93. 342 
Gllden, Ronald Wayne 
Gilfoil. Dovid M 
Gill, Anne Mane 
Gilleron, Michael Crow 291 
Gillespie, Robert Maxwell II 
Gillett, Glenn Douglas 
Gillette. Betty Eley 329 
Gilley, Glenn Roy 
Gillian, Ronnie Eugene 
Gillis, Susan Jeannette 185, 291 
Gills. Page Elizabeth 
Gillum. Kristo Lynn 342, 195 
Gilmer, John Wolker 
Gilpin, Allen Bruce 211 
Gilstrap, James Clifford 
Gilstrap, John Thomas 
Gingerich, Kothryn Jean 189 
Ginivan, Williom J 
Ginfer, Kimberly Ann 342 
Giorgj, Jocqueline Ann 359 
Giorgind, Michael S 291 
Giorno, Anthony P 
Giorno, Denise Thereso 
Giovanetti, Kevin L 
Giroux. Dennis Edword 
Githens, Jay Leslie 
Glancy, Thomas Xavier 304 
Glonzer, Lowrence Hoyt 
Gloscock, Susan Mildred 
Glozer, Deborah Rose 
Gleoson, Michael Paul 
Gleeson, Richard A. 
Glock, Potricio Ann 
Gloth, Fred Michael 70 
Glover, Hollis Gordon Jr 342 
Glover, Susan Lynn 330 
Glowo, Jeannette Ellen 291 
Gluckman, Arthur Wayne 
Gnott, Andrea Jane 291, 376 
Good. Steven Michoel 
Gochenour, Anne Stewart 
Godspell 124, 125 
Goehner, Corol Jean 359 
Goergen, Peter John 
Goerold, Williom Thomas 330 
Goetz, Sally Ann 353 
Goewey, Catherine Cecile 359 
Goff, Kenneth Byron 
Goff. Teresa Elizabeth 341 
Golden, Potrick Stafford 291 
Goldich, Michael Steven 359 



Goldman, Robert Bochroch 

Golf, Men 82 

Golf, Women 83 

Gonnello, Louis G 162 

Gonzalez Gonzalez, Janet D 29! 

Gonzalez Gonzolez, Phillips F. 291 

Gonzalez, Consuelo 342 

Good, Corolyn Sue 342 

Goodoll, Paul B, 

Goodchild, Phillip Egerton 342 

Goode, Alten Hilary III 70 

Goodloe, Robin Breckenridge 

Goodman, Marshall Brooks 342 

Goodman, Morsholl Scott 198 

Goodrich, Jeffery Chose 291, 304 

Goodrich, Scott Lance 209 

Goodson, Patricio Caroline 359 

Gopolokrishnon, Nolini 

Gorbsky, Gary James 214, 291 

Gordley, Larry Lee 

Gordon, Caroline Courtenoy 

Gordon, Deborah Kathleen 342 

Gordon, Niki Wood 

Gordon. Scott Ashton 

Gore. Anne Rodgers 128, 342 

Gore, Frederick Sosscer 

Goretsky, Sharon Ruth 330 

Gorges. Kathryn Anne 359 

Gorman. Maureen John 

Gormley. Edword Paul 293, 342 

Gornicki, Michael David 330 

Goss, John Osborne 

Gould. Borboro Lynn 

Government Department 239 

Govoni, John J 

Gowanlock. William Bryont 

Grober, Mark Alan 304 

Grace, John Philip 

Grohom, Frances D. 

Grahom, Mark Andrew 

Grohom, Mono Jo 

Grainer, Michoel Scott 

Gromer, Carol Rondolph 

Grammer, Elisa Joan 291 

Grandle, Robert E 

Graner, Gretchen Mary 291 

Grant. Barry Dole 

Grant, Corol Ann 

Gront, John Bruce 209 

Gront, Lee 212 

Grotton Adelaide Moxwell 212 

Groul, Steven Kirby 

Gravely Steven Douglas 330 

Graves, Alido McArthur 

Graves, Deborah Karen 291 

Groves, Laura Meriwether 

Graves, May Margaret 342 

Graves. Rebecco B. 

Groves, Reid H 

Graves, Thomas R Jr 38, 260, 319 

Gray, Joonn Collier 359 

Gray. John Mitchell 291 

Gray, Kenneth Fairbanks 291 

Gray. Martha Phillips 359 

Gray, Morgan Mathews 330 

Groy, Peter Gordon 330 

Gray, Roger Clarke Jr 287. 291 

Groy, Suson Hort 203, 291 

Groy, William Anthony 330, 78, 190 

Grayson, George Wallace 239 

Groyson, Janet Margaret 291 

Grayson. Mary Ellen 342 

Greaser, Raymond Dale 

Grebenstein, Kenneth E 

Greeks 

Green. Colonel 263 

Green. Jeffrey Robert 

Green, Leroy Allen Jr 

Green, Margaret Smith 

Green. Preston Tobb 

Green, Walter Taylor 359 

Greenon, Kevin Patrick 198 

Greenberg, Lorry Allan 330 

Greene. Michael Williom 

Greene. Potncio Lynn 

Greene. Shelley Lynn 

Greenfeld, Stephen S 

Greenfield. Lawrence Ross 291 

Greenlow, Steven Addison 330 



Honor Council members meet to discuss an 
upcoming trial. 



400 INDEX 




Greer, Borbora Ellen 

Greever, Anne Gordon 

Greggs, Pamela Ann 

Gregoire-Simpson, Lindo 

Gregone. Siewarr Price 342 

Gregory, Barbara Susan 291 

Gregory, Dona Robin 342 

Gregory, Elizabeth Bonks 292 

Gregory, GeoHrey Glenn 214 

Gregory, Joel Patrick 343 

Gregory. Mark Stephen 

Gregory, William Carson 

Greif, Steven Roland 

Greimel, Sylvia 359 

Grenadier, Robm Leslie 

Greshom, Lindo Jane 359 

Grieve, Helen Judith 292 

Grit+.n, Helen Lawless 359 

Gritfm, Lori Ann 203, 343 

Griffin, Peter Charles 209 

Gnffin, Robert Kenneth 111 330 

Griffin, Sue Michele 176, 330 

Griffith- Mo ir Montgomery 

Griffith, Charles Kellogg 70 

Griffith, Harriet Adine 292 

Griffith, Mark Cullen 292, 190 

Griffith, Richard Lynn 

Grigg, John Frank 359 

Griggs. Boyd Gordon 

Grimes, David Von 

Grinnolds, Terry N 163 

Grinnell, Jone Eyre 343 

Gritton, J M Kent 359 

Grosedose, Bernard Snovely Jr 

Gross, Annette Fosque 

Grossman, Ira Matthew 

Grossmon, John Michael 

Grove, Philip H M 

Grubbs. Gene Bobb.tt 198, 292 

Grygier, Mork Joseph 343 

Guordino, Richard Vincent 

Guenther. Anthony 250 

Guern.er, William Daniel 182, 183. 70 

Guerrant, Alice Hepbourne 

Guild, Lvnda Anne 292 

Guion, Annette Louise 

Gulick, Robin Coskie 

Gumienny, Theodore John Jr 

Gumm, Dovid Barrett 78 

Gundersen, Glenn Arnold 214, 272, 292 

Gundrum, Jody Jack 

Gunter, Ronald Baxter 

Guntherberg, Pomelo Ann 343 

Gunzburger, Barbora Jone 

Gustafson, Paul Sfuort 

Guthrie, Charles W 304 

Guthrie, Susan Elizobeth 

Gutmon, Andrew L 

Gutowski, Steven Paul 

Gutowsky, Anne Mone 

Guy, Morie Elizabeth 

Guy, Stephen Richord 198 

Gwoltney, Doris Home 

Gymnastics, Men 74 

Gymnostics, Women 75 



H 



Mass, Cindy L 

Hoos, Irene Delores 1 94 

Hoas, John Edword Jr 82, 292 

Hoase, Borboro Ellen 

Haase, James Michael 21 ), 343 

Hoase, Michael Nosh 

Hobel, Deboroh Elizabeth 

Hober, Stuart Scott 

Habermon, Maureen Therese 187, 343 

Hobich, Corol Elizabeth 359 

Hobich, Charles Aud 

Hockett, Roger William 

Hackney, Mike 343 

Hocskoylo, Michael Stephen 

Hodlock, Joan Carolyn 

Hodlock, Lorna Jone 

Hodlock, Nancy Lee 292 

Hogon, Michael Douglos 343 

Hogue, Bishop Flood Jr 

Hohn, Michoel P 

Hahn, Poulo E loin e 292 

Hailer, Frederick Clement 

Hoiley, Beverly Boyd 

Hoirston, Birdie Ann 

Holosz, George Mortin 192, 292, 78, 79 

Holbert, Ellen Carol 

Holbohn, Deboroh Ellen 

Hale, Anne Juonito 

Hale, Gregory Alan 

Hale, Rebecca Lynn 330 

Holendo, Stephen Peter 330 

Holes, Rosemary Ann 359 

Haley, Paul Froncis 

Hall, Alexonder Coke 192 

HoH, Chorles Andrew 

Hall, Cuervo Amaiio Giselo 

Hall, Dennis Bloir 

Holl, Jennifer Amoeno 359 

Hall, John Chorles 

Holl. John Martin 

Hall, Karen Lynne 187, 343 

Holl, Ronce Wayne 

Holl, Robert Vernon Jr 

Holl, Ruth Elizabeth Groy 330 

Holl, Steve 201,330 

Holl, Suzonne Lynn 185, 292 

Hall, Timothy Andrew 

Holl, Von Milton 



Holler, Kimberiy Jean 359 

Halliwonger, Rae 359 

Holpert, Arthur Lee 359 

Haltiwonger, Roe Ann 

Homonn, Ardath Ann 

Homann, Helen Joyce 

Hombrick, Harry Francis 

Homburg, Oovid Wilson 

Homel, Willem A 

Hamilton, Alo Marilyn 

Homilton, Dovid Edgor 

Homilton, Deborah Anne 

Hamilton, Hillory Jeon 

Homilton, Jonet Clare 23, 292 

Homrlton, Suson Richards 292 

Homm, Douglos Strother 

Hommoker, Charles Aldine III 

Hommoker, Jeffrey Beckh 

Hammer, Keith Wilbur 360 

Hammer, Sherry 360 

Hommersley, Jomes Wolter 

Hommerstrom, William Neil Jr 200 

Hommond, Georgia Ann 

Hammond, Janet Arlene 293 

Hammond, Peter Henry 293, 190 

Hommond, Richord Owen 104 

Homner, William Douglas 

Honogon, James J 

Hondford, Robin Anne 

Hondzel. Steven JeHrey 103, 293 

Honel, Jen Ellen 360 

Haner, Stephen Dudley 293 

Honkey, Francis Weston 

Hankins, Morion Jerri Ruth 293 

Hanley, Mork Thomas 200 

Hanley, Richard Joesph 304 

Hanlon, Kothleen Ann 360 

Honna, Sue Gordon 203, 293 

Honretty, Drone Patterson 203, 330 

Hansen, Colvin Forrest 

Hansen, Dovo Luanne 185, 330 

Hansen, Jonette Elizabeth 360 

Hansen, Jeffrey Kurt 

Hansen, Koran Mone 176, 343 

Hanson, Sharon Lee 38, 176, 293 

Harosek, Mory Kothryn 

Horbert, James Doniel 214, 293 

Hordee, Mory Carol 

Hordin, Corolyn Sue 

Harding, Morion Cormel 

Hording, Williom Emerson 

Hordisty, John Thomas 

Hargrage, Mork Cromwell III 

Horkin. Pot 21 

Harilee. Robert William 

Horman, Suson Corol 180 

Harper, Claudia Ann 343 

Harper, Stephanie Carol 343 

Horpine, Leoro Goyle 

Horrel, Douglas Leon 

Horngon, Richard Allen 

Harrington, Craig Jerome 

Horrington, Gregory Philip 

Harrington, William Patrick 

Horris, Anne Webster 293 

Horns, Christy Elizobeth 

Horns, David Coven 360 

Horns, DebraL 127, 293 

Harris, Gory Alan 200 

Horns, Jomes Robert 

Horns, Jeffrey Wilson 360 

Horns, Virginia Louise 

Harrison, Ann Corter 

Horrison, Beverly Lynn 

Horrison, George Anderson 

Harrison, Joan Ellen 330 

Horrison, Koy Antoniewicz 

Horrison, Michael Gregory 

Harrison, William Wnght 

Harrow, Suson Elleft 293 

Horsch, Deborah Ann 330 

Hort, Brendo Ayres 188, 189, 343 

Hort, Brion Kennedy 

Hort, Karl Christopher 360 

Hort, Richord Dennis 

Hort, Soroh Frances 

Horl, Shoron L 

Horton, Gory Linwood 

Hortsfield, Jone Elizobeth 176. 330 

Hortson, Mitchell James 

Hortung, Jean Louise 330 

Hortzell, Dennis Jomes 

Hortzler, Bruce Richards 

Horvey, Timothy Roy 360 

Horville, Wilbur Thurston 

Hossett, Doniel Potrick 

Hastings, Steven J 

Hatcher, Pernie Carol 

Hothorne, Bruce Aton 293, 209 

Houde, Kothryn Rese 

Houlenbeek, Suson Bollard 185, 330 

House, Pomelo Lynn 360 

Houser, Jonothon Leigh 293 

Houser, Robert Mark 

Hoveiko, Terry Lee 209 

Hovens, Keith Brune 293 

Howes, Daniel Lewis 

Howkes, Williom Sydnor Jr. 

Hawrylak, John James 

Hawthorne, Peel Stopleton 

Howthorne, Rondoll S 

Howthorne, Woodrow Tupper 360 

Howver, Borboro Jone 

Hay, Mary Avello 360 

Hoy, Michoel Roehl 192, 294, 78 

Hoycroft, Don Keller 

Hoyden, William Patrick 

Hoydon, Julie Mory 203 

Hoycs, Froncis Xovier Jr 200, 201, 78 

Hoyes, Glenn Stuort 21 1, 294 

Hayes, Michelle Suson 3 1 

Hoymes, Ann Elizobeth 294 

Hoynic, Goyle Winters 360 

Hoys, Scott Thomas 209 

Hozelwood, Sherry Lynn 

Heod, Borboro Dovis 174, 343 

Heod, Bnon Herbert 

Heoley, Mory Evelyn 174, 294 

Heoly, George 26) 




l^Ji 



Heoly, Mork Chorles 56, 214 
Heorne, Chorlene Susan 
Heath, Borboro Schroeder 
Heoth, Pamela Down 
Hebler, Elizabeth Mcllwoine330 
Heck, Koren Elizobeth 
Meeker, Jonene 360 
Hedges, Lewis Kyle 
Hedrick, Suson Ka-.e 189. 294 
Heemon, Warren 265 
Hegemon, Peter Ridgowoy 
Hegyi, Bruce Robin 294, 313 
Heider, Laura Elaine 330 
Heileman, Dennis Wayne 
Heinen, Bridget Goyle 
Heitmon, Julio Madeline 294 
Heldt, Cynthio Ann 
Helfand, Lindo Coradi 
Heller, Steven Mork 
Hellmon, John Robert 
Helms, Jeffrey C 
Helseth, Glenn Olson 
Hemenwoy, David Burton 294 
Henderson, Diono Elizobeth 
Henderson, Donold Grey 
Henderson, Margaret E 185 
Henderson, Mark Joseph 
Henderson, Michael Curtis 
Henderson, Sharon Ann 
Hendrick, Keith David 
Hendricks, Steven William 198, 330 
Henley, Robert Edward 111 
Henn, Russell Norman 
Hennelly, Daniel Patrick 150, 330 
Hennelly, Kevin Joseph 
Hennessy, Michael Potnck 
Hennigor, Harold Fronk 
Henritze, Frederick Hughes 295 
Henry, Kothy Mae 295 
Henry, Michael Chip 360 
Henry, Raymond Petef 
Hensel, Chorles J 214 
Henshow, Courtney Scott 295 
Henson, Ivan Hendrix 295 
Heon, Robert Scott 70 
Hepworth, Doniel Ary 
Herbert, Bruce Thomson 360 



Herbst, Carolyn Rito 174, 343 

Herlong. Glodys Madoline 295 

Hermonsdorfer, Suson Elizobeth 360 

Herndon, David Lyie 

Herndon, Poul Linton 

Herman, Donold 264 

Hershner, Susan Yaude 

Herwig, Russell P. 

Herzog, Andrew Scott 

Hester, Helen Eugenia 

Hettinger. Bettsy Hewitt 

Hewin, Lorry M, 

Hewitt, Betsy Arlene 295 

Heyser, Moryann 360 

Hioft, Brendo Down 

Hickcox, Joonne Beckett 

Hickey, David Joseph 

Hickey, Jone Dean 

Hickey, Kothleen Ann 

Hickman, Gory Poul 343 

Hicks, Elizobeth Groce 187 

Hicks, Glenn Thomos 

Hicks, Jomes Hermann 70 

Hicks, Louro Louise 180, 295 

Hight, Janice Elaine 

Hildreth, Ann McKeown 

Hite. Debro Jeon 

Hill, Charles Dennis 

Hill, Dovid Alan 

Hill, Douglass Orville Jr. 295 

Hill, Howard Homner 

Hill, Jeanne Mone 30. 330 

Hill, Lois Sinclair 

Hill, Peter Arnold 

Hilt, Suson Gardiner 

Hilling, Michael Lex 

Hiilinger, Ingrid Michetsen 

Hilton, Patricio Lynn 

Hinde, Priscillo 

Hines. Marc Combridge 360 

Mines, Thomas Gordner Jr 192, 330 

Hintz, Steven Jeffrey 

Mirohito, Emperor 36 

Mirschi, Kothy Lynn 360 

Hirschmann. Noncy Joon 

Hissey, Dove Scott 

Hissmon, Howard Joyho 

Ho, Ming Shan 




INDEX 401 



f-'cogmon. June Carol 
Hij^ire, Debfo Jones 
Hi>Ji.:irt. Kothleen Louise 
H,:.t_^^,on, Robert Eugene Jr. 
'-'..■ J J.. ^ Soenccf T. 

s Lee 360 
1 Yoncev Jr. 
■ (.'th Ann 
Hijvi^it.-,, PotriC'O Ann Miller 
Hoens, Helen ELzobeth 295 
HoHmon, Croig Ward 
Hoffmon. Henry Jonalhon 330 
HoHmon, Mory Huddleson 295 
HoHrT>on, Mitchell Wode 
Hoffmon, Robert Paul Jr. 
HoHmon, Susan Morie 
HoHmann, William Edward Jr 
Hogon, Mary Sue 189 
Hogan, Ted Moxlon Jr 295 
Hogon, Walter Clorenjon 212 
Hogge, Edwar>i * 
Hoisir>gton, Rk ■ -34 

Hottsmo, Ellen L 
Holbrook, Chork-i Chilton Jr. 
Holland, Cynthia Grey 
Holtond, Deborah Askew 
Holland, George Froncis 190 
Hollond, Jorwthan Gregg 
Holtond, Williom Robert Jr 360 
Ho I lands worth, Kaihy Gaines 295 
Hollberg, Steven Scott 
Hollidoy, Jessico Jane 
Holloway, Peter Nelson 
Hollowell, Heather 295 
HolloweH, Jay Stanley Jr. 
Holm, Lynn Ann 
Holmberg, William Eric 
Holmes, Kevin Lee 331 
Holmes, Lucrndo Goil 
Hoipe, Mark 

Homesley, Amy Marie 331, 148 
HomewQod. George M. 360 
Honenberger, Christopher Jay 
Hooker, Lester 270 
Hooker, Richord 
Hooker. Thomas Rockwell 304 
Hooks, Joseph William 205, 304 
Hoover, Mino Louise 33 I 
Hopkins, Brendo Suzanne 295 
Hopkins, Bruce Clayton 
Hopkins. Chorles Rowlond III 295 
Hopkins, David Emerson 
Hopkins, Dione Elizabeth 360 
Hopkins, Edward Allman 

Hopkins, Glynis Ann 295 
Hopkins, Muriel Elizabeth 
Hopkins, Susan Elaine 185 
Hoppe, Ann Christine 174, 295 
Horak, Susan Marie 343 
Horn, Dione Potncio 295 
Hornberger, Richard Albert 295 
Home, Janis Mayo 
Home, Richard Carter III 
Hornsby. Douglos Lee 

Hornstein, Betty Anne 
Horoschok, Mark Joseph 
HoroviTz. Jortathan Somuel 
Horton, Chorles Edwin Jr. 70 
Hosford, Guy Lyndole III 
Hosmonek, Debbie Lynn 343 
Hosmer, JeHrey Arthur 33 1 
Hough, Jan Elizabeth 360 
Houser, Donna Ellen 295 
Housley, Janet Kay 189 
Howard, Cother.ne Morie 203, 331 
Howord, Deborah Fronces 
Howard, Gory Alan 
Howard, Jomes A, II 
Howard, Sherylyn 

Howord, Welter Sommons 192, 331 
Howell, Elizobeth Dovid 343 
Howell, Jomes Wright 
Howell, Mark Hunter 360 
Howell, Parker Doughtrey 331 
Howes, Audrey Lisa 360 
Howes, Richord Arthur Jr. 
Hoy, Mory Anito 1 76, 343 
Hrehocik, Maureen Anito 187, 343 
Huong, Chuping 
Hubbard, Borbora Anne 296 
Hubbord, John Dav.d 192, 333. 78 
Hubbard. Mory Ann 
Huber, Thomas Melvin 331 
Huck, Antje Elske 
Huddleston, Martha C. 
Hudgins, Derondo Eloine 
Hudnoll, Lindo Marlene 296 
Hudson, Dovid Spencer 
Hudson, Susan Dart 
Huebner, Peter John 168 
Huebner, Stephen Jude 296 
Huri, V.rcneil 

^'inudette 189, 331 
■ James 
• tnt 343 

Huyhti, Joseph Alphonso 

Hughes, LirvJo Sue 

Hughes. Margaret Anne 187, 331 

Hughes, Mortho Jocquelin 39, 138, 189 

Hughes. Michael Dennis 

Hull, Diane Terese 33 1 

Hume, Donna Lynn 360 

Humphreys, Stanley Wovne 2 14, 343 

Humphries, Judy Lynn 

Hundley, Elizobeth Peyton 296 

Hunsicker, Emily Ann 203, 343 

Hunt, Brendo Go'e 

Hunt, Cynthia Anne 343 

Hunt, Robert 270 

Hunt. Wiltl(jm 142 

Huntc* -1 

Huntf" 

Huntrn,- 

Huntsm'.;r^ Ljvj'.._- A--^. 360 

Hurley, Dontel Irwin 197 

Hurley. Rebecco Anne 

Hurt, Rebecca Susan 360 

Hutchinson, Jonis 296 

Hutzler, Elizobeth Ann 176, 33 1 



402 INDEX 



Hux. Chrislophw Williom 124, 360 
Hyder, Mofy Colin 360 
Hyllon, Robyn Carlo 343, 179 
Hyndmon, Gerald Spencer 360 
Hyre. Fronklin Floyd III 193. 198, 343 



I 



lanni, Daniel Joseph 360 
lllowsky, Jerome E 
Impink, Albert Joseph III 
Inge, Morcio Rylond 296 
Ingrom, Gregory Wayne 343 
Inmon, Lyie Jeffrey 
(nternotionol Circle 217 
Intner, Jomes Nothon 
Iraneta, Pomelo Carmen 
Irving, Alphonso Leon 350 
Ishee, Laurie Anne 1 10, 331 
Isley, Elwood Cephus Jr 
turino, John Noble 
Ivey, Jomes Murphy 
Ivy, Williom Leslie 
Izzo, Daniel Wayne 



Joblinski, Larry Erlond 

Jacks, Maston Thompson 

Jackson, Alice Hamilton 189, 296 

Jackson, Christina 246 

Jackson, Christopher Browning 198, 331 

Jockson. Deborah Anne 180, 343 

Jockson, Emily Louise 

Jockson, John G 

Jockson. Melissa Ann 

Jackson, Ronold Craig 

Jackson, Sharon Louise 

Jockson, William Dickson 

Jackson, William Lorenzo Jr 296 

Jacobs, Roymond Andrew 214, 331 

Jocobs, Sharon Lee 360 

Jocobsen, Judith Evo 

Jocobson, Mane Ann 203 

Jacoby, Joellen Seloro 

Jococks, Anne Covington 339, 360 

Jomes, Aubrey Overstreef 343 

James Barbara Bartlett 

Jomes, Stephen Paul 343 

Jones, Louise Q 

Janes, Maria Lynann 184. 185 

Janes, Mary Celio 343 

Jonnik, Nancy Olga 296 

Jonnuzzi, Doniel More 

Janosik, Doniel John 331, 343 

Jonowski, Regma Cashmon 

Jarema. Mary Ann 

Jorrell, James Malcolm 296 

Jorrett, Dennis Ray 

Joskiewicz, Jon Michael 78 

Jay, Bruce Walter 

JeHers, Leslie Carolyn 344 

Jefferson, Brendo Latonia 

Jeffords, Cynthia Ann 

Jeffrey, Allison 

Jenkins, Fronces Lynn 360 

Jenkins, Michael Dovid 

Jennings, Carol A Brooks 

Jennings, Patncio Suson 361 

Jennings. Sharon Thelma 

Jennings, Sheryll Louise 361 

Jepsen, Somuel Burl III 

Jeremiah, Jeffrey Jon 192, 296, 333 

Jester, Curtis Allen 

Jeter, Sandy Lee 93, 203, 331 

Jen, Storke 197 

Jewell, Sondro Lynn 33 1 

Jingo, Barbara Jean 195 

John, Richord Stephen 331 

Johnson, Brodley Wallace 

Johnson, Brent Mitchell 361 

Johnson, Brian Philip 344, 78 

Johnson, Carol Lin 361 

Johnson. Carol Taylor 296 

Johnson, Cecelia Lynn 344 

Johnson, Dovid Dudley 209 

Johnson, Deborah Lynn 23. 344. I 10 

Johnson, Douglas Paul 

Johnson, Douglas Roy 200 

Johnson, Early Bloir III 

Johnson, Elizabeth Ann 331 

Johnson. Eric Mark 

Johnson. Evan Walter 304 

Johnson, Flora Frances 331 

Johnson, Gail McPherson 

Johnson, Gerald H 238 

Johnson, Glenn Gorrett 198, 296 

Johnson, Gregory Thomas 1 16 

Johnson, Gwen Pyle 

Johnson, Henry 264 

Johnson, Jomes Henry III 

Johnson, James Michoel 

Johnson, Jane Lee 180, 331 

Johnson. Jerome Mortin 154 

Johnson, Joanne Lee 



Johnson, John Michael 

Johnson, Karen Sue 189, 344 

Johnson, Lino Ann 

Johnson, Linda Marie 361 

Johnson. Lindo Sue 

Johnson, Lynda Carter 296 

Johnson, Mory Lee 

Johnson, Michael Joseph 

Johnson, Noncy Elizabeth 331 

Johnson, Nancy Lee 344 

Johnson, Pomelo Donita 

Johnson, Pamela Gene 296 

Johnson, Patricio Lynn 187 

Johnson, Peter Fronklin 

Johnson, Reverdy 

Johnson, Richord A 

Johnson, Richard Boiley 

Johnson, Scott Michael 

Johnson, Sheldon Jerome 344 

Johnson, Suzanne Dorothy 

Johnson, Thomas 

Johnson, Thomos Piland 

Johnson, Treazure Roberto 361 

Johnson, Wayne Francis 

Johnson, William Mccroig 

Johnson, Zoeonn Elizobeth 185, 297 

Johnston, Koren Lynn 185 

Johnston, Laurie Anne 187, 297 

Johnston, Maureen Rose 344 

Johnston, PotrJck Henry 331, 70 

Johnston, Pout Joseph 

Johnston, Sheila Dorice 331 

Johnston, Thomas Brown 200, 297 

Jokl, Mortin Louis 33 1 

Jonas, Spencer Reed 

Jones, Barbara Tessin 

Jones, Barbara Willard 187, 186 

Jones, Bruce Leroy 361 

Jones, Bryan Scott 344 

Jones, Carl Edward 

Jones, Carolyn 

Jones, Carolyn Frances 176, 331 

Jones, Cecilia Corr 361 

Jones, Charles Lomor Jr 

Jones. David Lee 361 

Jones, Douglas Stewart 331. 197 

Jones, Dwight Franchester 

Jones. Edward 246 

Jones. Harriett H 

Jones, Howord Woyne 

Jones, Jomes Allen 

Jones, James Edward 344 

Jones. Janet Duncan 344 

Jones. Jennie Lee Melson 297 

Jones, Jennifer Lynn 344 

Jones, John Carter 

Jones, John Claiborne 

Jones, Julie Reynolds 

Jones, Karen Chance 

Jones, Kathleen Frances 

Jones, Larry Eugene 

Jones, Lisa Dole 194 

Jones, Mae Mitchell 

Jones, Nancy Hozen 

Jones, Peggy Lee 184, 185, 331 

Jones, Peggy Lynn 

Jones, R Mark 344 

Jones, Rebecca Kothryn 331 

Jones, Sherrill Chopman 180 

Jones, Susan Mane 

Jones, Dr Ward 234 

Jordon, Janice Lynn 344 

Jordan, Jessico 

Jordan, Kenneth Nathan 

Jordan, Pomelo Louise 331 

Jordon, Thomas Williom 

Jorgensen, Janet Lynn 361 

Jospeh, Ellen 344 



Jost, Pout Chevies 148 

Joyce, Ellen Mory 331.361 

Joyce, Marie Dovara 176 

Joyce, Mory Elizabeth 

Joyce, Potncio Anne 105, 297 

Joyner. Nancy Birdsong 

Joyner, Soroh Celeste 361 

Judd, Kothryn 297 

Judge, Joseph Mitchell 

Jung, Dorothy Mino 361 

Junkin, Preston Davis 331 

Justis, Jonet Lee 33 1 

Justis, Robert Wayne 126, 133, 33 1 



K 



Kohle, Douglas Eugene 
Kahn, Lawrence Michael 
Kain. Peter Michael 
Kain. F>hilip Jomes 361 
Koiser, Amy Elizabeth 344 
Kaiser, Jennifer Mane 297 
Koltreider, Sora Alice 297 
Kallos, Dr Alexonder 243 
Koltreider, Sara Alice 297 
Kamleiter, Mark S. 
Kommer, Lewis Charles 
Kammerer, Cynthio Merrill 331 
Kommerting. Kothryn June 344 
Kama, Michael Vincent 
Konnan, Robert Froncis 
Konner, Selmo 
Kaper, Joseph Thomas 
Kaplan, Howord Jerome 331 
Koplon, Sarah Rachel 
Kappa Alpha 182, 183 
Kappa Alpho Theto 184, 185 
Kappa Delta 186, 187 
Kappo Kappo Gamma 188, 189 
Kappo Sigma 190, 191 
Koppel, Michoel Lee 297 
Korate Club 76 
Korow, Alice Louise 
Karr, Russell D, 
Kosdorf, Amy Pollard 
Kossobian. Lynne Aznif 130 
Kost, Dovid Shreve 361, 82 
Kosten, Kerry 344 
Koufer, James William 297 
Kaufman, Neil Howe 
Kay lor, Jonathan Lee 344, 190 
Kays, Kevin Michael 344 
Keafer, Wayne Lloyd 361, 70 
Keone, JeHrey Alan 182 
Kearney, Patricio 
Keating, Moreen 361 
Keator. Constance Lynn 
Keel, Florence Patricio 
Keen, Mory Elizobeth 361, 195 
Keeno, James Potrick 344 
Keene, Catherine Ann 
Keener. Dale Wiley 361 
Keenoy, Potncio Jeonne 344, 195 
Keils, Walter Anthony 
Keimig, John Talbott 



Foozboll attracts four concentrated pioyers. 




Keiser, Sandra Ann 

Keith. Croige Worren 344 

Kellam. Beniomin Franklin III 344 

Keller, Anne Bennett 361, 195 

Keller, Helen Mae 344 

Kelley, Alan Pingree 

Kelley, Chnsropher Donold 344 

Kelley, Deborah Ann 344 

Kelley, Deboroh Ann 203, 331 

Kelley, Kathenne Mane 353 

Kelley, Kathleen Mane 

Kelley, Morcia Jane 33 1 

Kelliher, Maurice Ambrose Jr 192, 298 

Kelly, Alison Yvonne 36t 

Kelly, Christopher Rolfe 331 

Kelly, Herbert Valentine Jr. 

Kelly, James Sr 263 

Kelly, James Sands Jr. 

Kelly, Joy Ellen 361 

Kelly, Laura Ann Wheeler 

Kelly, Morgaret McKeever 

Kelly. Mary Jean Theresa 344 

Kelly Rosemary Joan 331 

Kelly, Susan Elizabeth 195 

Kemps, Karen Koy 

Kempsell, Bonnie Jane 

Kempski, John Bruce 

Kenogy, Robert Thornton 

Kenan, Michael William 

Kendoll, DovKJ Reid 361 

Kendall, Deborah Lee 

Kendall, Margaret Anne 361 

Kenley, Gregory Grant 361 

Kennedy, Alexander Kirklond 78 

Kennedy, Christopher Neal 

Kennedy, James Clellan 

Kennedy, John Martin 

Kennedy, Keyne Ruth 344 

Kensey, Micky 203 

Kent, Karen Lee 

Kent, Kathy Parks 188. 189, 298 

Kent, Nancy Lee 344 

Kent, William A Jr 

Kerins, Mary Ann 174, 344 

Kerlin, Timothy Rensler 

Keroock, Robert Henry 

Kersey, Jessica Margaret 

Kersey, Michele Andre 298 

Kershner, Phillip Dole 298 

Kessler, Sally Ann 187 

Kevorkian, Gerald Craig 331 

Key, Gloria Diane 298 

Kibler, Frank Walker 

Kicklighler, Elizabeth Jane 180 

Kidv^ell, Susan Mone 298 

Kiefer, Elisabeth Anne 298 

Kieffer, Charles Edward 103, 105, 298 

Kielblock, Karen June 

Klisk, Linda Mae 75 

KilduH, Walter L 

Kiley, Kevin P 

Killmon, Gorry Howard 198 

Kim, Chonghom 239 

Kimber, Anne Girard 

Kimble, Barbara Lynn 

Kinde, Jeonnette Goyle 361 

Kindrick, Kothryn Marie 

King, David Scott 361 
King, Donno Lee 361 

King, Gory Gillette 

King, George Robert 78, 70 

King, Irmalee S, 

King, Jeffrey Patterson 299, 197 

King, John Kevin 

King, Julia Ann 

King, Karen Ann 344 

King, Kothleen Marie 

King, Sharon Lynne 361 



King, Thomos A 

Kingsbury, Theodore Bryant IV 

Kingsley. Neil Robert 361 

Kingston, Douglas Jeffrey 

Kinney, Harry Adrian Jr 361 

Kinton, Larry Hozie 29 

Kintzer, Brian Herbert Jr 

Kinzer John Donold 299 

Kipp, Katnno Vantossel 83, 180. 299 

Kirby, Delia Ruth 

Kirk, David Woodson 361 

Kirklond, Clement Stokes Jr 299 

Kirklond, Lorry Eugene 

Kirkmon, Leiia Kothenne 299 

Kirkpotrick, Ann Barboro 

KirkpQtnck, Ann Lynn 

Kitch, Russell Dovid 

Kitchen, John Howard 

Kivlighan, Mary Peeler 

Klagge, James Carl 299 

Klapper, Elva Elizabeth 

Klatt, Keith Anthony 331 

Klatt, Sheila Roe 

Klein, Gorry Wade 

Klein, John Harlow 

Kleindienst, Wallace Heoth 

Kleiman, Liso 344 

Kleinert, Carol E 299 

Kleinrock, Daniel John 

Klemstine. Robert Owens 

Kline, Mary Lou 331 

Kling, Anne Paxton 106, 187 

Klingmon, Carrine Rae 92, 185, 331 

Knapp, Frederick Alanson 78 

Knopp, Richard John II 

Knoub, Jomes Rndolph Jr 

Kneip, Margaret Ellen 125, 332 

Knight, Cory Elizabeth 361 

Knight, Gary Randolph 

Knight, Patrick Hamilton 

Knight, Timothy Benton 

Knollmann, Thomas Carl 

Knowles, Poul Douglos 344 

Kochord, Lawrence Edward 

Koenig, Mono Rose 331 

Koloski. Peter Maximilion 361 

Komarek, Dana Jo 

Kondark, Charles 

Kopelove, Bernard Gory 

Koper, Jon Walter 304 

Kost, Michoel Perry 361 

Kovol, Douglas Chorles 182, 183 

Kowolski, Mork S 

Kozior, William Joseph 

Krache, Elizabeth Mary 

Kraft, Kate Suzanne 332 

Kroftson, Daniel John 

Kramer, Alan Custis 361 

Kramer Caroline Mary 180,344,345 

Kramer, Soroh HoU 299 

Kramer, Walter Frederick 361 

Kromke, Craig Allen 

Krantz, Dovid Eugene 

Krantz, Kenneth Allan 

Kratzer, John Thomas 

Krause, Karen Mane 

Kreger, Jomes 1 15 

Krempasky, Elizabeth Ann 299 

Kretzer, Sherry Lynn 

Kretzer, Terry Lee 

Kreutzinger, Karen Mane 189, 299 

Kriebel, Dole Alan 200 

Kroeger, John Francis 190 

Kruger, Potrlcio Regino 299 

Kruis, Jomes David 190 

Kruis, Paul Allen 53, 299, 190 

Kuc, David Allen 

Kuchenbuch, Pomelo Ann 176, 299 




Pinball ploying becomes a popular diversioH 
several fraternity comj^i basements, 



Kuhfohl, Ingo 299 
Kuhn, David Richards 
Kuhn, Jeffrey Blo.r 
Kuhn^, Steven Dole 
Kulp, Charles Andrew 344 
Kunec, Alice Mane 180 
Kuntsler, William 47 
Kuntz, Potncia Ann 361 
Kunz, Lowrence Douglos 
Kuperstock, Jeffery Steven 
Kurpit, Roberto Goyle 332 
Kurtz. Steven Peter 299 
Kusterbeck. Will.am Albert 299 
Kuykendall, Becky Letise 
Kyrus, Diane Jeon 



L 




Laoger, John Christian 
Laberteoux, Jan Elizabeth 332 
Lacey, Deborah Koye 344 
Lacey, Richard Ellis 
Locrosse, Men's 78-79 
Lacey, Robert Kimbrough 36t 
Lofave, Laura McGowon 
Loferriere, Glenn Allen 
Logorenne, Poul Richard 214 
Laggon, Mary Sheila 
Lohs, Laura Ann 
Loi, Bastion Kom-Hung 
Loibstain, Horold Irvin 344 
Laird, Choe Edward 
Lake, Carol Ann Morgan 
Lake, James Lister 
Loker, Mory Ellen 332 
Lakin, Michoel Alan 361 
Lom, Deborah Elizobeth 361 
Lam, Perry Ping Son 361 
Lamor, Williom Lewis 
Lamorra, Michoel Albert 
Lombdo CHT Alpha 192, 193 
Lambdin, Deboroh Lynnc 299 
Lomberi, Beotrice Scott 362 
Lambert, Douglas Will.om 198. 344 
Lambert, Leonard Robert 
Lambert, Matthew Paul 332 
Lambert, Nancy Ann 194 
Lomberi, Stephen Andre 299 
Lamkin, Stanley L. 
Lomm, Williom Albert 
Lomond, Heaihef Jean 362 
Lompert, Paulo Barnes 332 
Lompmon, Lillian Lee 
Lompman, Richard Lee 
Lomson, Norman Hunter 
Lander, Elliott Pete* 
Londes, Dalcnc Johnson 299 
Londrum, Roso Moson 107, 299 
Landsmen, Mork Eric 
Lone, Rtchord Francis 
Lone, Robefi Lawrence 300 
Lone, Sluort Cro»g 
Lantofd, Charlotte Nolcs 
Long, Gory Morsholl 
Long, Korcn Joyce 300 
Longford, David Allen 362 
Longley, Jo Ann 
Lonncn, Julio Virginia 300 
Loprod, Tino Morie 174, 344 



Lorgen, Joyce Leigh 

Lark, Joseph Andrew 362 

Larrobee, SoMy^Ann Oneill 

Lorson, Cynthia Ann 332 

Larson, Doryl Anne 

Larson, Donald Frederick 300 

Lorson, Karen Elizabeth 300 

Larson, Melisso Anne 129, 362 

Lorue, Joy Scott 300 

Lossen, Thor John 

Lossiter, Joseph R Jr. 

Lostouckos, Jomes Edmund 

Lothom, Robert Edword 300 

Lotsko, Stephen Michael 300 

Loub, Curtis A. 

Loude, Michael Ernst Herbert 

Louer, Kurt Alon 362 

Lourence, Kirk Addts 

Laushey, Clyde Show III 

Lautenschloger, Edward Worner 

Lovoch, John 256 

Loverty, Thomas Kent 

Lawler, Edword F Jr 

Lowler, Rebecco Koy 344 

Lowless, John Martin 

Lawlor, Kothleen Ann 39, 362 

Lowloc, Maureen Etizobelh 332 

Lowrence, Brian Akiro 

Lawrence, Hordy Vanzile 

Lowrence, James Dovid 

Lowson, Jomes Rofarvd Jr 300 

Lowson, Melissa Voil 344 

Lowson, Michelle Louise 300 

Lowton, Jomes Patrick 

Lax, Aridrew Wayne 

Loyne, Linda Corot 

Loyne, Richard Alon 300. 207 

Lozor, Mike B. 212 

Lozorsky, Joseph Stuort 

Leoch, Borbaro Lorroine 332 

Leaf, Mory Beth 

League, Terry K. 

Leahy, Richard Edward 

Leap, Thomas Edwin 362 

Leop. Victoria Lee 

Leornord, Cothy Jone 

Leorson, T, Vincent 278 

Leory. Borbaro Jeon 332 

Leory, Jonet Ann 300 

Leory, Joseph Clorence III 

Leary, Kevin Joseph 344 

Leory, Morgoretto Minges 

Leoth. Cotherinc Stocey 

Leovitt, Timothy Howlorid 

Lcbourveou, Louonne M 

Leclair, Gory Dovid 190 

Lccler c, Martin Gerord 2 1 4, 344 

Lecouteur, Eugene Homilton II 345 

Ledermcn, AryJrew Joseph 301 

Ledwith, James Joseph Jr 

Lee, Dole Saunders 

Lee, Jennifer Eshton 

Lee, Michael Hoskms 301 

Lee, NuTKj Ray 301 

Lee, Rhondo Mcwie 332 

Lcc, Steven Michael 

Lcemon, Paul Kevin 

Lcepcr, Elizabeth Ann 

Lecpcr. Rebecca Suson 

Lcfflcr, John Joseph 207 

Leffler, Loncc Lord 345 

Lchf, Williom Edword Ml 

Leigh, Bcnfamin Wat *t ins 

Lcighty. Brion Dovtd 

Lctnberry, Goyle A 362 

Leisch. Juonilo Mary 

Lctster. Bernard Klein 301 

Lcisicr. Worren Senjomm 345 

Leite. Mory 

LembcWe. Elizobeth Ann 

Lcmire. Robert Charles Jr 



INDEX 403 




TGIF parties attract grad students to their newly 
established recreation center. 



Lemons, Don Stephen 

Lempo, Robert 

Lendrim, Frank 244 

Lendrim, Nancy Louise 

Lenhan, Cynthia 362 

Lenk, Kann 

Lennon, Jane Elizabeth 85, 180, 345 

Lenoir, B, Jean 

Lentz, Robert Hutron 

Lentzsch, Kothi Parkinson 180, 332 

Leonard, Kenneth Andrew 

Leonard, Kenneth Carl 70 

Leonard, Margaret Miles 332 

Leonard, Thomas Edwards Sr 

Leonard, William Ralph 345, 209 

Leone, Lisa H 362 

Leontire, Andrea 

Leppo, Jeffrey Wayne 332 

Letchworth, Kenneth Albert 

Lett, Eltzobeth Westbrook 332 

Lett, James William Jr. 332 

Leu, E-Ding 

Leuck, Francine Elizabeth 332 

Levin, Mouro Lynne 

Levinson, Tony Eugene 362 

Levinstein Janna 

Levy, Wendy Judith 

Lewis, Anne Gref 

Lewis, Dona Lynn 332 

Lewis, Elizabeth G 

Lewis, Elizobeth Nicholson 

Lewis, Evan Greely 209 

Lewis, James Cyrus III 301 

Lewis, Janice Diane 

Lewis, Jean Hoppe 

Lewis, Margaret 362, 195 

Lewis, Marilee Ann 301 

Lewis, Nancy Ferebee 301 

Lewis, Patricia Ann 

Lewis, Raymond Harlan 

Lewis, Rita Horolyn 

Lewis, Robert Wells Jr 345 

Lewis. Scro Elizobeth 203, 332 

Lewis, Susan Deone 332 

Lewis, Todd Nicholls 

Lewis, Williom Lofane 

Lex, George Jomes III 200, 300 

Liberson, Dennis Horold 212, 345 

Lieber, Ronold James 

Ltghtner, Jon Tracy 

Ltmburg, Debro Lynne 301, 175 

Limerick, Lester Lee Jr 362 

Lin, Kothryn Rita 

Ltn, Ming-Chien Jomes 

Lin, Yeou-Chen Kellvin 

Lina, Michael Jomes 

Lindberg, Rae Ann 203, 301 

Lindemuth, Barbara W 

Lindemuth, Jeffrey Robert 

Lindsay, Katherme Dorden 

Lindsay, Paulo Glodys 

Lindsey, Charles Burgess 

Lindstrom, Frederick Jomes 209 

Lincbergee, Steven Rankin 

Ling, Yih 

Lipfert, Jsonne Frances 185, 301 

Lipinski, David M 

Lipstem, Kenneth Neil 

Lister, Dorbie Anne 

Listrom, David Charles 

Little, John Oscor 345 

Little, Michoel William 

Litllejohn, Margaret Lindsay 362 

Littleton, Chrvs 

Liu, Pei-Shen 

Lively, Judson C 345 

Livengood, John Russell 

Lrvmqston, James 262, 248 

Lloyd, Lisa Anderson 

Lloyd, Morsboil Davies 

Lloyd, Nancy Coral 174, 332 



Lloyd, Richard Arthur 345 

Lo, Hsi-Kuong Henry 

Lobb, James Sergius 

Locke, Debbie Elaine 332 

Locke, Melissa Antoinette 203 

Lodge, Thomas Scott Jr 

Loeb, James 156 

Loewy, Richard Randall 345 

Loftus, Christopher Everett 301 

Logon, Barbara Goy 61 

Logan, Patncio Anne 

Lohrenz. Mary Edna 332 

Lokie, Andrew Paul 70 

Lombaerde, John Charles 

Lombardo, Donna Lynn 362, 195 

Long, David Frederick 

Long, Glendo Ann 

Long, Michoel Preston 

Long, Nancy Clayton 202, 203, 301 

Longest, Roger Bryant Jr 301 

Loo, LydioG.L 301 

Looney, Leon 266 

Looney, Nancy Lynne 185, 301 

Lopez. Luisa 362 

Lorenzo, Maximo 70 

Lorimer, Elizobeth Christina 362 

Lorix, Kelley Robert 362 

Love, Ernest Ford 

Love, Harriet Newman 203, 343 

Love, Mehta Whitney 189, 332 

Love, Normon Grady 

Lovelace, Bruce Lancoster 214 

Loveland, Lon Kay 

Lovin, James R 

Lowder, Stephanie Paige 

Lowe, Robert Sanford 301, 357 

Lowe, Samuel Ronald 211, 345 

Lowe, Scott Cameron 

Lowenhaupt, John Peter 65, 350, 190 

Lowery, David Lee 

Lowman, David St Cloir Jr, 

Lowy, Robert J, 

Loyd, William Thomos 

Lubow, Leo Howard 

Lucas, William Clark 

Luce, George Wilson 

Lucey. Maureen Judith 301 

Luck, Lawrence Edward 207, 30t 

Lucker, Laurie Susan 176, 345 

Lucy, Jon Allen 

Ludtke, Leslie J 

Lufkin, Mortha Wotters 187, 301 

Lugar, John Michael 332 

Luk, Hing Wina 

Lukasik, SherylMarie 176, 345 

Luker, Christopher Joy 

Lumsden, Suson Lynn 

Lund, Volerie Koy 

Lundegord, Paul Dovid 

Lundquist, Robert Oliver 

Lundquist. Sylvia Ann 

Lunger, Williom Reed 212 

Lunsford. Kolhleen Elizabeth 302 

Luomo, Matthew Richard 2 1 1 

Luongo. John Bruce 205, 304 

Lupoid, Ray Palmer III 

Lupton, Sherry Ann 302 

Luse, James David Jr 302 

Lulheron Student Associotion 136 

Luzor, Noncy Lee 

Lynch, Katherine Viann 

Lynch, Mark John 

Lynn, Jeffrey V 

Lyon, Elizabeth Rives 

Lyon, James Vernon 362 

Lyon, Robert Leslie 

Lyon. Robert Thomas 332 

Lyon G Tyler Histoncol Society 170 

Lyons, Janice Lisette 302 

Lyons, Loel Sherman 302 

Lysher, Peter Leon 



M 



Mocoli, William Matthew 
Mocoroeg, Michele Gay 92, 345 
Macouley, Molly Kenna 362 
MocConnell, John Gilmore 
MacCubbin, Alexonder E 302 
MacCubbin, Coren Paige 
MocDonold, Carolyn 
Mocedo, Stephen Joseph 
Mochatton, Douglas Alan 
Machelski, Jeffrey Steven 
Moclntosh, Colin 
Macintosh, Elizabeth Bonnie 362 
Mock, Darlene217 
Mock, Michoel Muir 
Mackannon, Jomes Eric 
Mockoy, Ion Allister 362 
Macklin, Paul Robert 302 
Macko, Volerie Jean 362, 195 
Mocloren, Scott Foster 302 
Moclure, Suson Mary 
Mocmillon, Claire Leigh 302, 178 
Macneil. Bruce Reed 353 
MacVeigh, Mary Bretio 
MocNeil, Bruce Reed 353 
MacVeigh, Mary Bretto 
Modoro, Glenn Stanger 
Modden, Dorothy Elizabeth 345 
Madden, Michael Edward 
Madden, Richard Nolan 302 
Maddock, Herbert John III 
Maddox, William 148 
Mognotti, Susan Elizabeth 162 
Mahoffey, Julia Lynn 362 
Maher, Christopher Alan 362 
Moher, Irene C 
Mahon, Linda Anne 203 
Mohon, Paro Rodenhizer 
Mahone, Patricia Milner 
Mahoney, Brian Edword 
Mahoney, Suzanne Gnce 203, 332 
Major, Robena Margaret 
Majorettes 92 

Mokibbin, Lisa Michele 302 
Makowski, Ann 362, 195 
Malonson, Gail 194 
Moleody. Jone Alison 
Molerba, Mario Ann 
Malinowski, Thomos Joseph 
Mallow, Carol Anne 332 
Malloy, Neil Joseph 
Molloy, Susan Eileen 
Molone, Christopher Matthew 302 
Molone, Elizobeth Bruce 302 
Mancini, John Francis 198 
Monderfield, Joseph Brian 
Mandulok. John P 
Manfredi. Shern Ann 1 19, 302 
Monfredi, Tern Lee 345 
Manfredi, Theresa McGregor 
Mangelsdorf, Louiso Ann 
Manix, Susan Patricio 
Mann, Horace Edward 198. 332 
Mann, John Davidson 
Manning, Donno 332 
Mansfield, Barbara Lou 302 
Mantooth, Michael William 
Monwheiler, Gregory Dean 
Maples, Karen Lorroine 203, 93 
Marble, Lynn Mane 302 
March, Louis Tutlle 
Mordovich, Fronk Edword 
Mores, Michael Edward 
Morgord, Werner Leroy 362 
Margolin, James Sherman 162 
Margolin, Lynne Allison K. 
Morgolis, Carole Donna 185, 302 
Morioni. Mary Susan 302, 178 
Morinoro, Joseph Ciro 
Mark, Jomes Coylor 
Markel, Ann S 
Morken, Kenneth Ralph Jr 
Marker, Noncy Ann 174, 345 
Markle, Douglas Fronk 
Marks, Daniel 



Morkwith, Robin Dole 345 

Morkwood, Sherrie Lynn 345, 195 

Morlowe, Melody Anne 345 

Morotto, Frank V 

Morquess, Borboro Dole 

Marquis, Rrchord Wendell 345, 78, 190 

Morren, Joseph Hugh 172, 302 

Marsh, Karen Denise 

MorshoU, Dovid Jorrell 

Marshall, James B. Jr. 

Marshall, Janice Ann 302 

Marsholl, Robin Lynn 203 

Marshol Wythe School of Low 252-253 

Martetii, Suson Flair 362 

Martin, Chet 303 

Mortin, Christopher Patrick 362 

Mortin, Gory Robert 

Mortin, George Keith 345 

Mortin. George Richard 

Martin, Glenn John 200, 346 

Martin, Harold Greene Jr 362 

Martin, John Marsholl III 207 

Mortin, Lindo Shell 

Martin, Mary Elizobeth 362 

Martin, Melvin Darnell 

Martin, Michelle Anne 

Martin, Neil Beverly 

Martin, Roger Wayne 332 

Martin, Shirley Elaine 332 

Martin, William Dobney IV 

Mortin. Williom Pope 

Martinez, Borboro Louise 346 

Martinez, Rudolph 

Mortinko, Richard Grohom 

Morforano, Jeffrey Thomas 362 

Marty, Anne MilhoHond 332 

Moson, Christina Marie 

Mason, Dave 44 

Mason, Judson Philip Jr. 

Moson, Linda Faye 

Mason, Melonie 

Mason, Michael Richard 190 

Moson, Walter Gordon II 303 

Mosser, Charles Edword 

Mossey, Elizabeth Rives 362 

Mossey, Hugh Davis 362 

Masten, Jean Ann 194 

Mosterson. Joseph Henry 

Masterson. Margaret 180 

Mostrobottisto. Mary Patricio 

Moteyka, William James 

Motheny, Charles Sterne 

Motheson, Richord Edmond Jr. 

Mothews, Rachel Thomos 

Mothios, John Williom 

Mathis, Keith Edmond 

Matson, Bruce H 

Matthews, Gail Morgaret 185, 332 

Matthews, Lynne Nell 332 

Matthews. Pomelo Ann 303 

Matthews. Robert John 

Matthews. Teresa Lynn 362 

Mottix, Larry 

Mottox, Tereso Gale 

Mottox, William Henry 

Mottson, Janice Ann 

Mottson. Monica Cecilia 

Mottson. Tom Brent 

Mauldin, Jess Allen 

Mauller, Debra Lynn 332 

Mouro, Nicholas Anthony 

Maxwell, Cynthia Sue 

Moyberry, Thomas Sidwell Jr 362 

Moybury, Pomelo Agnes 346 

Mayer. Deborah Lynn 

Moyer, Jeffrey Philip 207 

McAndrew, Kothryn Fronces 346 

Mcotomney, James Albert 

McBride, Lynn 332 

McBride, Jenness Elizobeth 

McBride, Robert Kerr 1 27 

McCoffree, Elizabeth Anne 

McColl, Shannon Koy 

McCondless, Shern Down 362 

McConn, Merle Clements 333 

McCarron, Phyllis Edwards 

McCarthy, Janet Eloine 

McCarthy, Paul Douglas 

McCoskey, Davidlrving 

McCauley, Lisa Goy 

McCavitt. Potrick Joseph 346 

McClenney, Earl Hampton Jr 

McCloud, John Patrick 198 

McClure, Donna L 

McClure, Kenneth R 369, 275, 332, 207 

McCluskey. William Kingdon 




Low students suffer the trials of long lines ' 

roqistrotion 



404 INDEX 




An institution of Morsholl Wythe, Festus receives 
constant attention from students on the steps of 
the low school. 



McCoy, Carolyn Foster 62 

McCrocken, Deborah Sue 

McCrady, Carl Will.om 346 

McCroy, John Paul 

McCrcy. Sarah Jane 203 

McCue, Gregory Davis 362 

McCulla. John Kennedy 

McCulley, Antoinette 

McCuHough, Timothy J 303 

McCune, Frederick John 

McCurdy, Edgor Craig 303 

McCutcheon, John Rhea Jr 332 

McCutcheon, Robin 363 

McDoniel, Charles Russell Jr 363 

McDaniel, Dovid Malcolm 

McOearmon, Martha Anne 346 

McDermott, Potrick BoreiHe 

McDermott, Timothy Granville 

McDonald, Dr Frank 245 

McDonald, James Angus 

McDonold, John Craig 

McDonold, Suson Morie 363 

McDonald, Thomas Reynolds 363 

McDonnell, Scott Alan 

McDonough, James Francis 190 

McDormon, Jane Elizabeth 363, 195 

McDougol, Scott J 

McElhoney, David Leonard 86, 87, 198. 346 

McElroy, Debra Lynn 

McElyeo, William Delbert 

McEnerney, Lawrence Dole 303, 20) 

McFodden, Christine Eleso 203. 303 

McFadden. Michoel Patrick 363, 78 

McForlond, Melissa Ann 174 

McFarlin, Robert Bruce 

McGehee. Doris Edmund 346 

McGehee, Robert Stuart 

McGhee, Mary Shannon 180. 303 
McGinty, Cecilia Ann 
McGlothlin, Michael Gordon 
McGolrick, Elizabeth Anne 363 
McGovern, Terrence Eugene 

McGowon, Gory Eddy 

McGrath, Gail Christine 304 

McGroth, John Lemuel 332 

McGroth, Michael Paul 304 

McGuire, Shirlee Alcindo 

McGuire, Timothy Kevin 

McHugh, Colleen Harrie 

Mclntyre, Debra Jean 176 

McKay, Richord Gregory 304 

McKee, Vicki Lynn 304 

McKee, William Mogruder 

McKeithen, Edno Modge 

McKellop, Keith Brandon 304 

McKenno, Dennis Potrick 

McKenna, Willofoy Hopkins 

McKenney, Hubert F Jr, 

McKeown, Scott Duncan 363 

McKinnon, Janet Elaine 304 

McLone. Dr Henry 245 

McLarney, Mary Lynn 

McLoughlin, Donold Joseph 

McLaughlin. Elizobeth Anne 

McLoughlin, Sheila M 

McLoughlin, Stephen Arthur 

McLeod, James Edward 332 

McLeod, Poul Joseph 363 

McLoud, Shirley Drusillo 304 

McMohon, Leslie Elizobeth 304 

McMohon. Patricia 189 

McMonus. Greg Michael 

McMonus, James Kevin 304 

McMoster, Steven Charles 

McMoth, Chorles Froncis 363 

McMath, Elizobeth Clarke 363 

McMichoel. Lynne 203, 304 

McNeish, Sallie Campbell 363, 75 

McQuorry, Down Elizabeth 333 

McQuorry, Frank Arthur III 363 

McQuillen, Debra Rodden 304 

McReynolds, Jomes Orie 



Mead, Michael Lee 

Meade, Elizobeth Grant 

Mead, John Dovid Jr 

Meodor, Jomes Lewis 

Meodor, Joonne StoHord 

Meadows, Robert Burwell 

Meagher, Anne Noel 

Means, Bruce Kevin 212, 304 

Meordon, Scott Ernest 207 

Mears, Christopher Lynn 363 

Meors, Martha Lee 333 

Meeks, Miles Jansen 

Meenon, Gory Floyd 209 

Meigs, Simeon Willis 

MeissI, Mike 346 

Melamed, Dennis Aton 

Melonson, Gail P 333 

Melchor, Bruce E 

Meldrum, HeotherhThone 363 

Melesfer, Timothy Scott 214, 304 

Melichor, Loune Kay 

Mellis, Peter Thomas 304 

Melrose, William Bruce 209. 190 

Melton, Chorles Douglas 87 

Mendez, Charles Paul 363 

Mennella, Lori Ann 304 

Mercer, David Gordon 

Mercer, George John 

Mercer. Lindo Pushee 

Merchant, Stanley H, 

Meredith, Jonet Hope 346 

Merkel, David Crispin 304 

Merkle. Scott Arthur 305 

Mernin, Joan Mane 346 

Merritt, Maury Lynne 

Merritt, Suson Lee 

Merry, Edward Hamilton 

Mershon, Jeanne Marie 305 

Messier, Louis 256 

Messitt, Peter Robert 

Metcalf, Jackson Howison 78 

Metz, John Grafton Jr 192. 305 

Meuschke, Mark William 363 

Meyer, Leslie Louis 305 

Meyer, Patricio M 305 

Meyer, Woyne Lewis 

Meyers, Sheila Ann 

Micelle, Holnnie Eugene 370 

Michoel, Jon Frederick 363 

Michelitch, Robin Anne 

MicheMond, Jeffrey Francois 

Middleberg, Sharon 

Mtddleton, Robert W 

Midyette, Anne Reid 174, 333 

Midyette, Jomes Webb til 346 

Migneault, Jean Ruddle 

Mignogno, Gory Michael 

Milom, Jacqueline Suson 305 

Milbourne, Bernord Bryan 

Mitburn, Dovid H 

Milby, Betty Thomos 305 

Miles, Stephen Duonc 

Military Science 242 

Milteo, Robert Charles 

Miller, Autumn Cheryl 363 

Miller, Corl Theodore 

Miller, Deboroh Koy 305 

Miller, Emily P. 

Miller, Froncis Robert 

Miller, Gory Leon 78, 305 

Miller, Jean Louise 

Miller, Kathleen Anne 

Miller, Keith Williom 

Miller, Mork Allen 156 

Miller, Mortho Ann 

Mil er, Potricio Louise 

Miller, Robert Charles 333, 190, 70 

Miller, Sharon Annette 363 

Miller, Wolter Kent 

Milliner, Wolter Thomas 

Mills, Debra Roc 346 

Mills, Julie Morie 



Mills, Kenneth Done 

Mims, William Cleveland 363. 78 

Mincks, JeHrey Lee 128 

Mincks, John Charles 

Minehort, Peter James 

Mineo, Susan Moryonn 

Miner, Dovid Baker 

Minetree, Lorome Koy 363 

Mingee, Susan Catherine 305 

Minkler, Edward Richords 214, 333 

Minnick, Potte Carroll 24, ISO, 346, 377 

Minor, Renee Colette 185 

Minor, Williom Michael 333 

Minter, Gail Marshall 174, 333 175 

Misiozek, John C 

Mitchell, Blair David 

Mitchell, James Porter 

Mitchell, Joni 45 

Mitchell, Karen Lorraine 346 

Mitchell, Normo L 

Mitchell, Steve 19 , 333 

Mitchell, Wayne Howard 

Mitsdorffer, Alan Roy 

Mizell. Dovid Paul 

Mizelle, Johnnie Eugene 

Mjoseth, Morcio Jone 

Modaferri, Steve 212 

Modern Longuoges 243 

Modr, Frances Antoinette 

MoeschI, Mary Jo V 

MoHet, William Morris 200, 305 

Mojdehi, All Mohammad Moghtoder 

Moler, Margaret Ruth 180, 305, 376, 209 

Moll. Amy Elizobeth 363 

Monoco, Ralph Michael 

Monohon, Kevin Robert 305 

Monckton, Daniel William 

Monfort, Debbie 189, 305 

Monioudis, Morio Helena 363 

Moniz, Fronk Thomas 

Monk, Anita Elaine 
Montague, Dorthy L 

Montonye, Elizabeth Anne 
Monts, Woyne D 
Moomow, Kathleen Jo 364 

Moon, Peter 

Moom, Richord Douglas 192, 305, 193 

Mooney, John Robert 

Moore, Borboro Marie 

Moore, Brian Thomas 

Moore, Dona Lee 

Moore, Donald Woyne 346. 70 

Moore, George Lee 

Moore, Gregory Bordin 364 

Moore, Gwenovere Rene 

Moore, Janet Elizabeth 305 

Moore, Loune Dole 347 

Moore, Leroy 268 

Moore, Michael Potnck 333, 209 

Moore, Regmold Hollis 268, 306 

Moore, Robert Patrick Jr 364 

Moore, RoKie Anne 

Moore, Sarah Ellen 173, 333 

Moore, Williom Jordon 

Moorheod, Williom David Jr. 371 

Moron, Marion Holt 

Moron, Potricio Louiso 

Morovitz, Corollynne 306 

Moreheod, John Charles 163, 200 

Morgon, David Gerold 364 

Morgan, Kevin Richord 

Morgan, Mary Faith 333 

Morgan, Michael William 

Morgon, Micheic Foilh 347 

Morgon, SomucI E 

Morgon, Terrell Alon 364 

Morino, Michael Joseph 

Morley-Mowcr, Stephen Joseph 

Morn, John Thompson 

Morrell, Charles Edword 

Morris, Ann Potgc 

Morris, Cothertne Anne 306 



Morris, Cheryl Anne 

Morris, Croig Kenneth 364 

Morns, Diono Lynn 347 

Morris, Jon Willord 

Morris, Mary Francis Ann 

Morrisett, Cynthia Down 306, 347 

Morrison, Ellen M 

Morrison, Jonet Lee 

Morrison, Richard D 

Morrison, Suson Anne 60, 61, 176, 347 

Morrison, Todd Andrew 333 

Morrissette, Morsho Koy 

Morrissey, Thomos Froncis 190 

Morrow, Kathleen Goil 

Morrow, Robert Jeffrey 364 

Morse, Frederick Anderson 364 

Morse, Stacey Woles 

Morton, Constonce Lee 306 

Morton, James Brodley 

Morton, Richord White 

Moscicki, Janet Liso ISO, 333 

Moseley, Arthur Moddox Jr 364 

Moseley, Corolyn 268 

Moss, Madonna Lee 120, 306 

Moss, Thomos Frederick 

Mostrom, Susie 364 

Motsko, Williom Andrew 78 

Motf, Elena Medoro 364 

Motyko, Robert Eugene 

Moulds, Heather Moxine 347 

Mouring, Brodford Keith 

Movroydis, Shelley 92, 176, 333 

Mowery, Jomes Herman III 

Moyer, Corol Bolom 

AAoyer, Rosemorie 306 

Moyer, Stephen Philip 306 

Meyers, Deonna Lynn 

Mozley, Doris Neill 

Mozley, Poul David Jr. 

Mueller, Jon Alon 211, 306, 78 

Muenchow, Richord Williom 364 

Muir, Herman Stonley 

MulhoMond, Koren Ann 333 

Mullody, Mark Stephen 

Mullen, Bruce Putnom 

Mullen, Dennis M, 

MuMer, Jonine M 

Mullins, David Roy 347 

Mullins, Teresa Anne 347 

Mulroney, William Pierce 314, 333 

Mutvoney, Domien Atexorxler 

Mulvoncy, Koren 364 

Mulvony. Nino Dunbor 

Mumpower, Lcc Froncis 347 

Mundoy, Potricio Erin 

Munjcl, Rom Lol 

Murdoch, Michelle Anne 

Murdoch, Scott Orlo 

Murdock, Mory Coroline 347 

Murowski, Andrea Marie 306 

Murphcy, Mortho Mclourinc 306 

Murphy, Dionne Ruth 333. 364 

Murphy. Eorl Stonley 306 
Murphy, Gco»ge Mac Net I 
Murphy, Karen E 
Murphy, Koren Joon 189 
Murphy, Mary Lorctto 203, 306 
Murphy, Michael Joseph 
Murphy, Seon Christopher 
Murphy, Terrence V. 
Murphy, VictOfio Ann 306 
Murphy, Williom Joseph 
Mutrell, Dooisc Pccte 
Muscolus, RobOfI Stewort 
Musch, Mork Williom 1 10, 347 
Muschkin. Cloro Grociolo 
Mushrnski. DovkJ William 364, 82 
Musick, Diono Fove 306 
Musiko. Nancy Shcmon 
Musselmon, Rodney 
Mustord. Ellen M 
Mutter. Ma«-y Glenn 364, 195 



INDEX 405 



Myefs, Douglas James 190 
Mye*s, Jeon Morie 347 
MyCfs, Kothryn Ann 174, 306 
Myers. William Gerry HI 333 



N 



Nodofo, Glenn S 333 

Naeser, Susan Elizabeth 333, 75 

Nogie, Berenice Kothryn 

Nagle, Dovid E 306 

Nogle, Williom Freder.ck 93, 182, 306 

Nominsky, Connie Goi' 364 

Nammock, Morta Frimonn 364 

Nance, Edv%ard Wesley 

Nonney, Beverly Morie 185, 347 

Noromore, Jeanne Morie 333 

Noser, Lisa Jolene 364 

Nash, Graham 42, 43 

Noss, Dovid Aton Jr. 214, 347 

Notol, Peggy Ann 347 

Natusch, Stephen Poul 3 1 

Navio, Dovid Keith 

Naylor, Alison Diana 174, 306 

Neol, Anne Corter 176, 306 

Neal, Stephen Allen 

Neel, Kothryn Ann 

Neely, John Grosvenor 

Neely, Robert Wolter 

Nehro, Ajay 

Neilley, Henry McDougall 347, 70 

Nejfelt, James Thoddeus 

Nelligon, Ktm Marie 347 

Nelsen, Chorles Laroche MorshoH 

Nelson, Donno Vonce 333 

Nelson, Douglas Lea 

Nelson, John Conley 

Nelson, Lori Ann 364 

Nelson, Margaret Angela 364 

Nelson, Moryonne Bernadette 176, 347 

Nelson, Roger Michoel 

Nelson, Steven Conrad 211, 307 

Nesbitt, Patricia Lynn 364 

Ness, Karen Doty 333 

Nester, Forest Anthony 

Neuboum, Victor Alfred Jr. 163 

Neuberger, George Leonard 

Newcomb, Deboroh Ludwell 

NewCOmb, Holly Herrmonn 

Newcomb, Linda Sue 364 

Newell, Rebecco Rogan 307 

Newell, William Talmon III 

Newman, Jomes Austin 

Newmon, Robert Brent 347 

Newsom, Edith Diane 187, 333 

Nguyen, Hoong Lon T 

Nguyen, Thod Le 

Nicholas, Richard Wolloce Jr. 333 

Nichols, Rebecca Lynn 364 

Nichols, Stephen Andrew 364 

Nicholson, Jeanne Ann 

Nicholson, Judith NorrJs 

Nickel, Terri Jeon 132, 347 

Nicolous, Jeon Hughes 333 

Nicoll, Borbora Irene 347 

Nicolo, Anthony Joseph 

Nielsen, Money Teresa 

Ntssen, Walter Eric 

Nixon, Kothleen Ann 

Nizoiek, Donald Croig 214 

Noble, Dovid Frederick II 

Noble, Kenneth Roy 

Nobles, Thomos Steven 

Nolan, John Thomos 

Nolan, Shelley Jane 

Nolde. Jomes Christian 

Noone, John Stephen 

Nooney, Noncy Lammers 

Nooney, Patrick Joseph 

Nordstrom, Karen Lee 

Norford, Lisa Ann 

Noflonder, Todd Alan 

Normon. John Michoel 347 

Norrisey, Mary bllen 

Norton, Michael John 364 

Norton, William George 

Nofwrr.^ F.,- Pnul 347 

Nc. ' Andrew 307 

N.I,'. .ne 

Nc.', ..■ , - .„ 

Noyes, Suson Jone 307 

Noziglio, Terrence Edword 

NuCkols, Terry Lynn 

Nugent, Margaret Theresa 

Nugent, Noncy Leigh 176, 333 

Null, Dovid Gerord 

Numon, Muhommed Zillulhoq 

Nusbaum, Laura Ellen 

Nuttall, Elizabeth Tucker 364 



o 



Oodes, Stephen Martyn 
Ookes, Dionne Louise 364 
Ookiey, Elizabeth Louise 364 



Oboyle, Potricia Suzonne 

Obrien, Jim 206 

Obfien. Kevin Michael 211, 307 

Oconnetl, Jonet Shields 

Oconnor, Annette Jone 364 

Oconnor, Carol Romon 

Oconnor, Jonathan Story 347 

Oconnor, Suson Mary 

Oconnor, Timothy 

Odom, Morsho McClelland 307 

O'Donnell, Dionne Elizabeth 160 

O'Donnell, Mark Douglas 

Odor, Kevin Coroll 365 

OduToto, Adelojo Oluwogbeminiyi 

Odutola, Adeniji Adegboyego 

Ogren, Kenneth Michael 

O'Hara, Jane Alice 

O'Horo. Nicholos Vincent Jr. 

O'Keele, Monica Elizabeth 

Oksner. Phyllis White 

Olonrewaju, Adeyemo Folusho 

O'Leory, Deborah 

Oliphont, Williom Robb 

Oliver, Daniel Middleton 

Oliver, Gray Nelson 

OIney, John Edward 

Olsen, Kristin Just 365 

Olsen. Susan Elizobeth 

Olson, Grant Clifford 365 

Olverson, Thomas Price 

Omon, Deborah Jean Moriko 307 

O'Neil, Colleen Marie 347 

O'Neil, Dr Peter 241 

O'Neill, Cynthia Lamb 

O'Neill, David George 190 

O'Neill, John Francis 190, 347 

Oosthoek, Phillip Henry 307 

Opel, Julio Ann 127 

Ofchesis 1 18, 119 

Opheim, Glen I 

One, Carrie Ingram 

Ormond, Stephen Philip 163 

O'Rourke, Kevin Shoun 347, 190 

Orrick, Kotherine Stuart 176 

Orton, Williom R II 

Osborn, David Holland 

Osborn. John Edword 365 

Osborn, Vicki Susan 

Osborne, Henry Harrison III 334 

Osborne, Mark Allen 347 

Osborne, Melita Pleosonts 

Osenberg, Thomos E 

Ossola, Cheryl Ann 347 

Otero, Sharon Dole 

Ott, Robert Bernord 211, 307, 148 

Otto, Richord Thomos 

Ourednik, Theodore G 

Ours. Donna Koy 195 

Ousterhout, Jo 60 

Outten, Mickey 285 

Overson. James Andrew 334 

Overstreet, Belinda Goyle 

Ovide. Chnstopher R 

Oweis, Jomal Nathan 365 

Owen, Stephen Lee 

Owens. Kotherine Elizobeth 187, 334 

Owens, Linda Carole 307 

Oxenford, David Duncan 394 

Ozer, Doniel Jeremy 



P 



Poce, Gory James 365 

Packard, R Chorlene 

Podden, Sheilo Morie 185, 307 

Podulo, Shoron Lucille 

Page. Alexis Mary 174, 334 

Page, Elizabeth Lotimer 189, 347, 151 

Poge, Suson Johnston 176, 308 



Poige, Edword Atcono 

Pointer, Connie Jane 308 

Pointer, Dennis Woyne 

Pois, Lucy Morgoret 

Polonco. Terilyn 365 

Palmer, Linda Elizobeth 174, 334 

Palmer, Morgoret Anne 347 

Palmer, Mork Dovid 334 

Polmer, Poul Edward 347 

Palmer, Paul Romsden Jr, 

Poncoost, Dovid Jomes 

Pondak, Sharon Elizobeth 13 

Ponheltenic Council 173 

Poppas, Byron Nicholos 

Popcros, Chorles Christopher 334 

Paprocki. Celeste Morie 347 

Poquin, Daine Helen 

Porodise, Rita Kaio-Mone 

Porotore, Anthony 115 

Parotore, Joseph 1 15 

Parent, Pomelo L, 

Porham, Pomelo Hope 180, 308, 377 

Pork, Anne Mclemore 308 

Parker, Brian Charles 

Porker, Coral Reese 195 

Porker, David Anderson 

Parker, Deborah Lynn 308 

Porker, Dennis Winston 

Porker, James Wallace 

Porker, Jeffrey Scott 

Porker, Luro Gollowoy 

Porker, Pomelo Ann 308 

Porker, Robert Colemon 

Porker, Steven Kent 192 

Pornell, Isiah Lenort 

Paronett, Robert S, 200, 308 

Parr, Morion Cole 

Parr, Woylond H. 

Porrish, Nancy Louise 365 

Porsons, Susan Emily 308 

Porsons, Twylo Lynn 365 

Porthemos. Slylian Poul 

Pascole, Linda Louise 

Poschol, Denise Lee 

Poschol, Jo Ann 365 

Poscholl, John Alan 365 

Possorelli, Edword Jomes 

Possios, Thomos Constontine Jr. 

Patrick, Holly Ann 308 

Pattee, Diane Marie 365 

Potten, Elizabeth Ann 365 

Patten, Michol Anne 176, 334 

Patterson, Donold Joseph 365 

Patterson, Hilary Ann 

Patterson, Joonno Bloir 334 

Potterson, John Richard H 

Patton, Jeffrey Ross 365 

Patton, Samuel Ernest 190, 308 

Paul, Coron 

Poule-Carres, Glenn N 

Pouletle, Lydio Foith 1 12. 347 

Povlovsky, Williom Stephen 309 

Powel, David John 200, 334 

Poxton, Donno Roe 347 

Payne, David Lee 182, 334 

Poyne, Mark Dovid 365 

Poyne, Philip Steven 

Poyne, Sarah Aytett 334 

Peocock, Brendo Shoron 365 

Peacock, Koren Leigh 185. 334 

Peoke. Shoron Koy 194, 334 

Peorce, Barbara Provecek 

Peorce, Johnny R 

Peorce. Thomas Dole 1 92, 347 

Peorson, Douglos Levon 

Peckorsky, Todd Richard 347 

Pedersen, Robert John 

Peglow, Richord Dole 

Pegrom, Jon Sheree 203, 347 

Pehrsson, Pehr Eric 

Peixotto, Ernest Clifford 

Pelonder, Eric Rupert 211 

Pembrook, Donold Otto 

Peno, Robert R 

Pene, Rolph Chorles 347 

Penman, Gordon Reese 

Pennow, Lorraine Fisher 

Peppiatt, Catherine Mary 180, 209 

Perolto, Cheryl Mane 365 

Perconte, Stephen Thomos 

Perkins, Carlo Jeon 180, 309 

Perkins, Corol Foster 



Perkins. Chip 198, 347 

Perkins, Donno J 347 

Perkins, Gwendolyn Anne 174, 347 

Perkins, Isaac Otey V 

Perkins, Mary Corol 347 

Perrine, William Chodv^ck 

Perrow, Michoel Gray 207 

Perry, Dono Leslie 

Perry, Jomes Earl 

Perry, John Edward Jr. 

Perry, Judith Lynne 

Perry, Lenore W 

Perry, Timothy Weldon 

Perry, Virginia Donte 

Petchul, Corol Ann 365 

Peters, Deonne Koy 365, 309 

Peters, Jeanne Michele 

Peters, John Vincent 

Peters, Philip Borton 

Peters, Rolond Kyle Jr 

Peters, Scott Tonner 

Petersen, Koren Jonine 309 

Peterson, Cameron Brodley 347 

Peterson, Cheryl Ann 365 

Peterson, Kenneth Dean Jr 

Peterson, Mortho Jone 309 

Peterson, SorKiro L- 

Peterson, Thomos Dotan Jr. 

Petrequin, Corey Louise 

Petrovich, Lindo Jeon 

Petryl, Robert Nolon 

Petty, Robert T, 

Pfeifer, Mary Margaret 189, 334 

Pfeifer, Patricia Lee 93, 365 

Pfister, Peter L 156 

Pfitzer, Gory Poul 347 

Phelps, Suson Rondolph 347 

Phi KappoTou 196, 197 

Phillimore, Prudence A. 

Phillips, Cheryl Louise 

Phillips, Denise Audrey 365 

Phillips, Dori Ann 365 

Phillips, Evo Cloriso 203, 334 

Phillips, Joan Elizabeth 

Phillips, John Froncts 72, 214 

Phillips, John Wayne 

Phillips, Julio Mae309 

Phillips, Keith Lotimer 309 

Phillips, Kevin Jomes 

Phillips, Moribeth Dolson 

Phillips, Mortin Jennings 334 

Phillips, Mary Copeohover 203, 347 

Phillips, Michael Doniel 

Phillips, Nancy 203 

Phillips, Roy Franklin It 

Phillips, Thomos Longhorne 

Phillips, Williom Clarke 309 

Phi Mu 194. 195 

Phinisey, Jeffrey Dovid 214 

Physical Educotion Deportment 246 

Physics Deportment 247 

Phoel, William C. 

Piatt, Lee Sherman 347 

Pi Beta Phi 

Pickus, Joy Lowrence 

Picou. Robbi Ann 

Pielocik, Stephen Christopher 

Piepenhogen, Fronk Motthios 

Pierce, April Lee 

Pierce, Dovid Michoel 212, 347 

Pierce, Jomes Harold II 365 

Pierce, Joseph Trotmon Jr. 

Pierce, Laurie Jo 

Pierce, Lynn Kieth 

Pierce, Terry Lynn 365 

Piercy, Anno Marie 334 

Pieringer, Paul Arthur 309 

Pierro, Vincent Anthony 

Pietrovito, Guy Roy 309 

Pigulski. Paul Michael 

Pi Kappo Alpho 198, 199 

Pilond, Suson 

Pi Lombdo Phi 200, 201 

Pilloi, Seetho K 

Pincus, Robert Benjomin 70 

Pinker, Helen Elizabeth 194 

Pinkhom, Audrey Lynn 195 

Pinkston, Louro Catherine 347 

Pinter, Douglos F 

Pinto, Colleen Morie 365 

Piper, Brion Douglas 

Piplico, Jennetl Elizobeth 174, 309 




Wrestlers receive pre-match encouragement. 



406 INDEX 



Pirog, Ellen Kotherine 

Pitner, EIrzobeth Harvey 347 

Pitsilides, Jerry Costas 

Pitt, Susan 

Pittman. Andrew Pinchot 

Pitts, Karen Colleen 

Ploog, Gory Kenneth 365 

Place, Kelly Victor 365 

Plakitsis, Virginia Lucille 187, 334 

Plonk, Douglas Craig 

Plornik, Anno Serena 309. 377 

Plumly, Rebecca Anne 365 

Plunkett. Barry Joseph 309 

Plunkett, Laura Helen 195 

Poots, Rutherford Smith 192 

Polglose, Donna Lynn 174. 334 

Polhemus, Jennifer Louise 

Poling, Theodore Croig 309 

Poliny, Valiant Roger W 

Polites, Gregory 

Polbck, Jonothon B 

Pollard, Williom 271 

Polloro, John Michoel 

Polston, Mary L 

Pomdio, Anthony Sovino 309 

Ponko, Ted Adrian 

Pool, Edword Fuller 365, 78 

Popa. Vanessa Gole 203, 309 

Pope, Chorles Lorry 

Pope. James Mothews 

Pope, Rena Blanche 365 

Poplowski, Michoel David 

Popman, Etome Morie 

Pocasky, Joseph Michael 

Porter, Barry Thomas 

Porter, Joy Paul 

Porter, Morgoret Fox 

Porter, Morgoret Owen 

Porter, Williom Dovid 

Portlock, Kim Annette 

pQskanzer, Sherry Mrm 334 

Post. Peter Bentley 74, 347 

Potter, Holly Ann 365 

Potter, William Michael 334 

Potts, Jomes Woodward 192 

Potts, Keirh Joseph 190 

Poutos, Anthony Derry 

Poulsen, Peter Edvard 365 

Poulson, Elisa Joy 

Powell, Angela Felice 365 

Powell, Charles Edwin 

Powell, Diana Barbara 187, 334 

Powell, Jomes Earl Jr 182 

Powell, Jomes Lloyd 24, 334 

Powell, Lisa Belle 

Powell, Lynn Eley 72, 192 

Powell, Martha Allen 309 

Powell, Martha Benton 

Powell. Pot 174, 175 

Powell, Paul Hunter 309 

Powell, Raymond Leon Jr 

Powell, Robert Hume 

Powell, Stephen Tauer 

Powers, Catherine Riley 

Powers, David 

Powers, Goyle Lynn 

Powers, Kristin Lynne 203 

Powers, Richard Elliott 

Prater, Oscor L 

Presado, William Andrew 

Price, Helen Elizabeth 334 

Pridgen. Jonet Lynn 334 

Prilloman, Debra Jeon 

Prillaman, Douglas 257 

Prince, Eugene 365 

Prince, Matthew Taliaferro 347 

Prince. WiHiom Alton 182, 183 

Prior, John Charles 

Pritchord, Patricio Lenie 93, 365 

Prof+itt, Condis Yvonne 309 

Proscino, Cheryl Lynn 60 

ProsI, Dr Richard 241 

Prosswimmer, Koren Elise 176 334 

Prow, J Wolf 

Pruitt, Paul M Jr 

Pryor, Bradley Joseph 

Pryor. Deboroh Carol 334 

Puckett. James Ernest Jr 

Puckett. Sherry Ann 

Puff. Jeffrey Van Voorhis 

Pugh, Ernest Olm 365 

Pugh. Mork Chesley 

Pulley, Louise Bradshow 347 

Pulley, Stephen McDonald 

Pulliom, Elizabeth Ann 310 

Pulliom, Jonet Sue 334 

Purcell, Kenneth Joseph 310 

Purcell, Ruth Worrre 348 

Purcell, Thomas M 

Purcell, Wlliom Vernon III 310 

Purdy, David Cornngton 310 

Purser, Margaret Sermons 

Pusch. Brion Walter 310 

Puster. Dovid Wolden 70 

Pyle, Alan Maxwell Ml 212 



R 




Queens Guord 168 
Quigg, Koren Etizobeth 365 
Quinn, John's 254 
Quinlon, Kevin Thomas 



Roczenbek, Cynthio Margaret 365 

Roczkowski, Gory George 

Roda, Deborah R 348 

Rodcliffe, Mary Kotherine 

Radd, Sarah Elizobeth 176, 334 

Radoiinski, Johm Michael 335 

Ragozzo, Moryann 

Roiney, Nan 

Ramey, Thomos Orlondo 

Ralston, Peter Noel 

Romsoy, Christopher Bryan 

Romsey, Constance Browning 

Ramsey, Kelvin Wheeler 

Ramsey, Virginia Beth 60, 176, 348 

Roney, Christopher William Perm 

Roney, John P 

Ronken, William Bonnord Jr 212, 348, 70 

Rosh, Robert Mitchell 

Rosmussen, Erik Hartz 

Rasmussen, Nancy Leanne 180, 181 

Rostetter, Thomas James 

Ratcliffe, Donold Ross 

Rathbone, John Poul 

Ratkus, James Vincent 190 

Rau, Kenneth Vaughn 

Rouschenberger, Steven James 

Rowl, Edgar Holtiwonger III 

Rawls, Charles Holland Jr 192.335 

Rawls, Robert Lee 348 

Rowson, Devon Marie 

Roy, Anne Sterling 310 

Ray, Brendo Julia 335 

Reo, Patricia Jordan 

Reod, Cotherine Deone 174, 348 

Reod, Nancy Oliver 365 

Reoding, Pomelo Lee 

Reogon, Jonothon Dovid 

Reordon Kathleen Sheilo 365 

Rector, Robert Elliot 

Reddersen, Robert Scott 348 

Redding. John Carl 

Reddy, Thomas Francis Jr 198,193 

Redington, Jomes Franklin 

Redmount. Esther Rachel 

Reece, Marilyn 

Reed, Beniomin Thomos 

Reed, E.leen Clifford 3 10 

Reed. John Williom 

Reed, Sheilo Kay 

Reed, Susan Anita 365 

Reeves, Robert Christopher 348 

Refo. Judith Matthews 

Regan, Morgoret Janice 189. 348 

Rehme, Jane Ellen 335 

Rehme, Joseph Leo 

Reid, Hornet 266 

Reid, Miiton Alphonso 

Reilly, John Sheridan 192, 348 

Reilty, Kevin Poul 209 

Reilly, Dr Undo 

Reilly, Poul David 366 

Reiner. Frederic Meyer 1 12. 130, 335 

Remhofd. Richord Theodore 335 

Reisner, Mark Douglas 

Reiss, Pamela Abbott 

Reisweber. Kurt Robert 

Reitz. John H Jr 

Remler, Helgo Friederike 

Remy, William Emmett III 

Rendleman, Douglas 252 

Renfrew, Branden Michoel 

Renfrow, John Michoel 310 

Renirie, Terry Lynn 

Rennolds, Deborah Sue 

Renz. David Wayne 366 

Replogle, Bruce Robert 

Resh, James Milton 136 

Reter. Jonine Louise 366 

Rettig, HoMins Lee 21 1,310 

Review 104-105 

Reynolds, Borboro Jane 

Reynolds, Jon Allison 348 

Reynolds, Mark Anthony 

Reynolds, Stephen West 

Rheinhardt. Richard David 310 

Rhett 200 

Rhodes, Annette Wotkins 

Rhodes, Todd McAllister 

Rhyne, Martho Ann 366 

Rhyne, Richard Henry Jr 3 10 

Riccordo. Vickie Honn 

Ricciordi, Jeffrey B 

Rice, Jonet Eddy 174, 310, 175 

Rice, John Reiley 

Rice, Roselyn Joonn 3 1 1 

Rice, Thomos Jomes 

Richard, Robert Henry Jr 

Richords, Leslee Tuck 

Richordson, Dovid Word 335 

Richordsoo, John Watt 

Richo'dson, RhorxJo Anne 366 

Richordson, Rosalie 366 

Richordson, Russell Todd 

Richordson, Sofoh Carter 

Richordson, Stephen Emery 

Richordson, Williom S. 

Richcson, Nancy Anne 3 1 1 

Richeson, Ruth Myro 348 

Richter, Jone Ann 

Richter, Kothonne Ookes ISO, 31 1 

Richter, Todd Bcniomm 82 

Rickmon, John Brett 31 1 

Ricks, William Timothy 

Rtddell. Mark RoymorKl 348 



Riddle, Elizobeth Louise 174. 348 

Riefler, George Salim 

Riegel, GeorgeWoyne Jr 3 1 1 

Riehl, Rolph Raymond III 

Riendeou, Ceroid Louis Jr 

Rienerth, Mark Edword 

Ries, Dr. Roger 256, 257 

Rigou, Felipe Alberto 

Riggins, Ronald Stewart 348. 369, 264 

Rigrish, Robert Ernest 

Riino, Daniel Charles 31 1 

Riley, Gayle Kothleen 

Rtley. Jonice Peyton 335 

Riley. Kara Le^h 366 

Ritey, Mark Preston 

Riley, Rebecco Suzanne 1 26, 3 1 1 

Riley, Steven Archer 

Rind, Edythe K 

Rinehort. Phyllis Moore 366 

Ringel, Mark Robert 

Riser, Martha 

Risinger, Mark Wayne 82 

Riicher, Jone Ann 398 

Ritchie, Ann Morie 

Ritter, Constance Susan 83, 180 

Ritter, Rebecca Ellen 348 

RiveM, Elizabeth Ann 366 

Rivero, William McLeod 

Rives, Corol Jean 

Rives, William Francis 348 

Rixey, Presley Moreheod IV 

Rizzo, Dovid Paul 366 

Rizzo, Williom M 

Roach. Fronk Wemuss 

Rooch, Oscar Lynn Jr 200, 348 

RoQch, The 26 

Rookes, Vickie Mane 348, 195. 70 

Roone, Corol V 

Robbins, Dovid Leo 3 1 1 

Robbins, John Domel III 

Robbins, Paulo Lynn 

Robert, Paul Norman 

Roberts, Barbara Jeon 180, 31 1 

Roberts, Esther Borboro 

Roberts, George Leothwhite III 214, 311 

Roberts, Joon King 188, 335 

Roberts, John Stephen 

Roberts, Lynn Fay 187, 335 

Roberts, RaymorxJ D 

Roberts, Roscoe Connell 

Roberts, Williom Cecil 

Roberts, William Leonard 

Robertson, Earl L 

Robertson, Goil W 

Robertson, Ion Thomas 

Robertson, Jomes David 200, 3 1 1 

Robertson, Linda J 

Robertson, Marcus Bowen 3 1 i 

Robinson, Ann Henley 348 

Robinson, Elizobeth Lee Hohn 

Robinson, John Harold 348 

Robinson, Morlene 187, 335 

Robinson, Poul Croig 

Robinson, Robert Gront 182 

Robitsher, Irving 265 

Robusto, Donno Marie 348 

Roby, Morion Evelyn 335 

Rock, David Burgess 335 

Rockwell, John Browning 335 

Rockwell, Stonley Baldwin Jr 31 1 

Rodgers, Nancy Lynn 176, 348 

Rodis, Michoel Joseph 182, 183 

Rodman, Colleen Blonche 31 1 

Roe, Corol R. 

Roehl, Edwin Arden 198 

Roethe, Elaine 31 1 

Rogers, Bryan Stuart 200. 335 

Rogers, Kenno Louise 

Rogers, Liso Mane 348 

Rogers. Luther Chilton 

Rogers, Patricia Dione 

Rogers, Thomas David 

Roig. Corol Anne 125 

Roller, Pilcherno Darlene 335 

Rollins, Morgoret Louise 335 

Romaine. Susan Morie Beth 

Romono, James John 

Ronco, James Alexander 

RoncoMo, More Anthony 3 1 1 

Root, Jim 54 

Rose, Amy Suson 

Rose. Bloke Gerard 335 

Rose. Dorlene Anne 3 1 1 

Rose, Howord Kogon 

Rose, Karen Christine 

Rose, Melindo 110,311 

Rose, Sherry Diane 174. 348 

Rose, Steven Arthur 212. 348 

Rose, Williom Lysle 

Rosen, Peter S 

Rosenberg, Christine Lelortd 

RoseAberg, Edwin Miller 

Roskovich, Robert John 

Ross, Calvert G Jr 

Ross, Jockson Houchins 

Ross, Jeffrey L. 

Ross, Rebecco S 

Rossiter, Kevin Allan 

Roth, Debra Lynn 366 

Roth, Louro Lee 348 

Roth, Mory Christtrto 

Rothocker, Robert Donald Jr 

Rothberg. Elizobeth Cel.o 366, 335, 195 

Rothcnberg, Bobb-e Jeon 

Rothenbuccher, George L 366 

Rothfuss, Henry L 

Rothmon, Elizobeth Ann 

Rothschild, Richord Alan 366 

Rorhstein, Mitchell Scott 207 

Rotter, Abbie Lizbeth 

Rooghton, Deborah Lynnc 185, 31 1 

Rouse, Kay Colemon 

Roush, CynthK) 1 74. 3 1 1 

Roush. Mork Dovid 211 

Routten, Mork W 

Routzor^, Jomes Gregory 3 12 



Row, Michoel Chesley 

Rowe, George Eric 366 

Rowe, Walter Emerson 

Rowlorni. Robert Richard 192 348 

Rowtng, Howard Joy 55, 335 

Royston, Chris Michael 78 

Rozanfz. Thomas Edward 52. 350 

Rubenking, Shelley Roe 335 

Rubenstone, Jomes L 312 

Rubin. Jonet Beth 163 

Ruble, Ann Taylor 335 

Rudder, Sheilo Saundro 

Ruddigore 128. 129 

Rudisill, Potricio Jecn 

Rudfin, Stephen Durham 312 

Rudolph, Ellen Keon 

Ruebens, Simon Howord 

Rugby 63 

Ruiz, Abelordo Antonio 335 

Ruiz. Garcio Morio 189, 342 

Ruiz, Mono Morta 189. 312 

Ruiz, Morto Mario 

Rule. Godsden Edward 192. 348 

Rundle, Rochelle Leigh 348 

Rundte, Shelley 75 

Runkle, Jennifer Jone 

Rupp. Jeff Douglos 

Rusczyk, Eloine Ann 

Rush, Deborah Lynne 366 

Rush, Howard Michael 

Russell, Daniel Owen 

Russell. Deboroh 312 

Russell. Dorothy 114 

Russell, John Eugene 

Russell, Lynn Toylor 

Russell, Mary Alice Coffroth 312 

Russell. Robert Fronk III 

Russo, Thomos Mark 214, 348 

Rust, Collin Corl 198 

Rutgers, Lizobeth Ann 

Rutherford, Holly Ann 348 

Rutland, Nancy Allen 

Rutledge, Gregory Kosson 

Rutledge. Jomes Leonard HI 212 

Rutledge, Luro Margaret 

Rutledge. Pete Lloyd 

Ryan, Helen Jane 255. 312 

Ryon, James Joseph Jr 209 

Ryan, Joseph Michael F 

Ryon. Loo Ann 

Ryan, Mory Elizabeth 312 

Ryon, Susan Ann 366 

Ryder, Mary Evelyn 

Rye, Kenneth Thomson 

Ryer, Koren Lee 185, 312 



s 



Soolboch, Christine 
Socco, Kotherine Ann 174. 312 
Soccone, Stephanie Ann 
Socks, Stewart Jonothon 
Sodter, Glenno Suson 312 
Sodler, Sam 262 
Sogon, Horriet Cody 335 
Soge, Jefferson Duncon 366 
Soger, Kothryn Anne 
Soger, Phillip M 
Soger. Susan Blonche 
Sokoto, Jon Matsuo 366 
Sobsky. Michael Bollen 
Salmirs, Steven Alan 70 
Solmon, Douglos Reid 366, 78. 70 
Solmoo, Richord Henry Jr 348 
Salnoske, Teresa Ann 
Solunek, Rebecco-Jo 
Somford. PotriCio Merte 366 
Somford, WilUom Jerro!d82 
Somilo, Leonord John 3 12 
Sommons, Dtonc Elizobeth 
Samuels, Dovtd Atan 
Somuels. Kenneth Bruce 
Samuels, Steven Glenn 




! A lote sleeper discovers thot recovering from the 

night before is on all doy process. 




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Sancetta, Anthony L, 255 

Sanchez, Laura Luiso 

Sandberg, Kothlyn Ann 184, 185, 3)2 

Sondefur, Chorlotte Anne 

Sander, Penny Joon 203, 313 

Sanders, Clayton Robert Jr 

Sanders. Jean Elizabeth 93, 203, 313 

Sanders, Scherer Preston 185, 335 

Sonderson, Allen 235 

Sonderson, Janet Ann 335 

Sondiund, Lydio Anne 

Sondnnan, Olga Boez 335 

Sandmon, Poul Harvey 313 

Sonde, Paul Edward 335 

Sontulli, Michael Edward 78 

Sopp, Teresa Ann 

Sorgent, Jonothon Meiklem 

Satem, Karen 

Soto, Tereso Lynne 39, 189, 3 13 

SatteHield. Scott Christion 214, 313 

Sotterthwoite, Ronald Alan 64, 65 

Settler. Phyllis Ann 366 

Souerocker, Andrew John 207. 313, 369 

Sounders, Bill Ooniel 

Sounders, Bonito Volerie 335 

Sounders, Cynthia Lynne 348 

Sounders, Debra Luonn 366 

Sounders, Fleming V 

Sounders, Gordon Fitzgerold 

Sounders, Lisa Faye 

Sounders, Potricio Lynn 

Sounders, Richord Alan 

Sounders, Spencer 

Sounders, William Edward III 366 

Sounders, Williom Paul 366 

Sounier, Julio 3 13 

Sovoge, Barbara Lynn 

Savage, John Thomas 366 

Sovoge. Molcolm Brooks Jr 

Sovoge, N Rolond 

Sovoge, Patricio A 

Sovoge, N. Roland 313 

Sovoge, Ronald 

Sovitle, Poul Charles 

Sovold, Dovrd Warren 192. 313 

Sowotzki, Susan Jone 

Sowyer, Mory Ellen 348 

Soyer, Dorell Lee 

Soylor, Keith Eugene 

Scolise, Eric Terence 

Scommon, Howord 251 

Scon Ion, Sheilo Moree 366 

Sconlon, Ann Marie 3 1 3 

Scordomi, Eleonor Henmg 335 

Scorr, Mork Stanley 

Schofer, Henry Thomas 

Schordt. Bruce Curtis 335 

Schoy, Williom Michoel 

Scheffel, Doris Judith 348 

Schek, Joyce Lynn 366 

Schenker, Nathan Moyc 

Scher, Susan Joan 

Scherer, Jone Nonetle 313 

Schertz, Lois Rebecca 

Schifono, Joseph V 313, 190,254 

Schillerstrom, Koren Ann 

Schilling, John Michael 313, 350 
Schilling, Suzonne Ruth 174 
Schintzel, Kofherine Moe 185, 348 
Schirmer, Mortho 
Schlichting, Richard Dole 335 
Schn%alhofer. Bruno Stephen 209 
Schmidt. Kenneth Raymond 348 
Schmwjt, Mo'Cio Marie 
Schmidt, Mary Kotherine 314 
Schmidt, Michael John 
Schmidt, Noncy Claire 
Schm»di, Paul Rudolph 
Schmkit, Suson Mane 194. 335 
Schmidtke. John Witliom Jr 2 11 , 70 
Schmitz, Mortino 
Schmotzer, Michael Stephen 
Schmutz. Anne Efizobeth 
Schneider, R Russell Jr, 
Schneiders, Donald Stephen 
SchneM, Alan Leslie 
Schoen, Richo'd Fredrtc 366 
Schoepke, Timothy John 335 
Scholley, Peggy Lynn 



School Of Business Admimsfrotion 254-255 

Schools. Maxwell Rock 314, 190 

Schornstein, Kothleen 

Schomo, Janet 97 

Schott, Margaret Elizabeth 180, 335 

Schott, Susan Mane 314 

Schoumacher, Robert Alan 348 

Schrock, Kevin Paul 348 

Schrom, Jeanne Marie 

Schrec, Joseph Gerard 

Schreiber, Jeffrey Lee 

Schroeder, Jennifer Koren 314 

Schroeder, Susan Marie 314 

Schuler, Carolyn Lee 3 14 

Schultz, James Sorsfield 348 

Schultz, Janet Rhodes 187, 314 

Schultz, Mory Florence 

Schumocher, Deborah Lynn 203, 348 

Schumann, Paul D 

Schumor, Nancy 174 

Schuster, Daniel James 

Schutz, Jomes Minor 

Schwartz, Donna Morie 176 

Schwartz, Richard Lee 

Schwortzman, Richard Allen 

Schworz, Jomes P 366, 148 

Schwietz, Leigh Anne 

Sciorro. Leslie Ann 

Sciscoe, Christy Lynne 

Scloter, Don.el Wmn 314 

Sconyers, Jeffrey Matthew 314 

Scott-Fleming Ion Crerar 335 

Scott, Amy Eltzobeth 366 

Scott, Barbara Ann 187, 314 

Scott. Carolyn Elizabeth 314 

Scott, Catherine Anne 

Scott. Charles Granville 

Scott. David Bennett 182 

Scott, Douglass Bryce 335 

Scott. Gory Robert 

Scott, George W Jr 

Scott, Jeffrey Ross 192 

Scott, Lesa Paulette 221 

Scott, Susan Elizabeth 366 

Scruggs, Frederick Thornton Jr 212 

Seaford, Rodney Woyne 

Seaman. Henry W 

Seomon, Richard Norman 

Seaver, Sondro Jean 335 

Seovo, Carmine P F 

Seowell, Julie Jorvis 348, 195 

Seowell, Lucindo Lee 349 

Seowell, Noncy Jean 194, 314 

Sebocher. Kim Susan 

Sedberry, George Reece 

Sedgwick, Robert Howord 214 

Sedgwick, William Stewart III 

Seeber, Brian Richard 

Seelinger, Thomos Frederick 143, 314 

Segoll, Jomes Arnold 339 

Segall, Robin Reed 314 

Seglin, Patti 335 

Sehnert, Kristie Ruth 185, 335 

Seibels, Cynthia 

Seidel, Horry Edword 

Seitel, Kothleen Ruth 

Seitz, David James 349 

Sellers, Christine Sharon 349 

Selmon, Rupert Lorry 

Semmens, Thomos P. Jr 

Sendelboch, Karen Lovino 366 

Seningen. Terry Curtis 

Sensole, Alix Diane 335 

Sentmon, Catherine Sue 349 

Serio, Louis Ernest Jr 

Serro, Paul Anthony 349 

Settlemeyer, Rebecca Fern 366 

Setzer, Kothy Lee 366 

Sevener, Timothy John 

Severin, Noncy Corolyn 176, 314 

Seward, Janet Tynes 

Seward, Leigh Word 174, 335 

Shofer, Scott Michoel 

Shackelford, Robin Lynn 314 

Shoffer, Croig Boskerville 3 15 

Shoffron, Jomes Stephen 

Shombaugh, Patricia Louise 366 

Shoner, Gretchen Elizobeth 174, 315 

Shank, Suson Carol 62 



Shapiro, Carl Dovid 103, 315 
Shorp, Charlotte Gray 366 
Sharp, Ginny 25 
Sharp, Nugent Malcolm 
Shorp, William Lightle28 
Sharp, William Wiltoughby 
Shoughnessy, Christopher Horrell 
Shaver, Cindy Jone 143, 203, 335 
Show, Edwin Ferebee Jr 315 
Show, Ginny H 
Sheo, Eileen Lovonne 
Sheehon, Denise Esther 
Sheehy, Brian Daley 
Sheehy, Daniel Patrick 
Sheffield, Steve 200 
Shell, Mory Scott 189, 349 
Shell, Patricio Ann 203, 347 
Shelton, Ellen Ann 
Shelton, Lynn Coro 187, 315 
Shelton, Money Beatrice 366 
Shelton, Tern Lizobeth 335 
Shelton, Wanda Lee 
Shepord. Cindy Roe 
Shepherd, Kenneth Eorl 
Shepherd. Winston 377 
Sheppord, Jeffrey Brion 349 
Shepfxird, Jerome A. 
Sheppord, Joel Steven III 
Sheppord, Julyn E 
Sheppard. Kotherine Taylor 335 
Sheridan, Rebecco Lee 366 
Sherman, Bruce Edward 
Sherman. Hazel Burgett 
Sherman, Richard Morey 315 
Sherwood. David Virgil 349 
Shields. Jeff C 367 
Shields. John Kempton III 
Shields, Karen Jeonne 
Shields, Mory Ellen 367 
Shields, Suonne Patricio 
Shiffer. Rebecca Anne 367, 195 
Shilon, Stephen Burridge 
Shiilinger. Amy Beth 349 
Shillinger. Anne Morie 
Shimer, Chorles Purinton 200, 349 
Shine, Frances Elizobeth 
Shiner, Forley Corr 212 
Shirey, Richard Terry 
Shirk, Holly C 
Shirley, Donei 335 
Shirley, Sylvio 75 
Shiverts, Anne Theresa 315 
Shoemaker, Pomelo Ann 
Short, Nancy Jone 
Short, Phillip Aden 
Short, Richord T. 
Short, Russell A 
Shumor, Noncy Elizabeth 315 
Sibold, Lucy Porter 335 
Sichol, Adorn Bernard Jr 
Sides, Stephen Richord 
Siebentntt. Carl Robert 
Siefnng, Pouline Anthony 
Siegel, Richord Raymond 
Siegmund, Leslie Ellen 
Siegner, Gregory Boxter 
Siener. William Harold 
Sieveko, Edwin Merrell 335 
Sigmo Chi 196, 197 
Sigma Nu 208, 209 
Sikes, Mory Montague 
Silkworth, William Ryon 367 
Sills, Charles Wayne 
Silverman, Bruce Alton 21 1 
Simenson. Storm Rolond 349 
Simkins, Kathleen L 
Simmons, ERik Paul 
Simmons, Jeon Leslie 
Simmons, Karen Laurie 
Simmons, Kothryn Ann 
Simmons. Thomas Newton Jr 367 
Simon, Sharon Lynn 349 
Simon, Suson Elizobeth 
Simonelli, Frank Michael Jr. 
Simonpietri, Paul Philippe 
Simpson, Dovid Michael 
Sims, Sheridon Alexander 
Sinclair, Robert Lewis 
Singer, Noncy Louise 185, 349 



Singleton, Lindo Christine 335 

Sink, Lynn Ellen 335 

Sirotto, Judith Suson 336 

Sisisky, Richard Lee 

Sisson, Gomble McCoflister 

Sitler, Edward Paul 

Sizemore, Charles Edward Jr, 

Sizemore, Marsha Ellen 

Skalak, Robert Steven 

Skeen, Martha Garrison 

Skelly, Daniel Howard 

Skelly. Potricio Dorothy 

Skeppstrom, Joon Croun 

Skibiok, John Philip 3 15 

Skinner, Elizabeth Ann 315 

Skinner, Laurence Eugene 

Skinner, Raymond Tip 

Skolnik, Laurence Dovid 212 

Skovron, Nodine 367 

Skowronski, Stephen 

Skydell, Paul Evenson 

Slaughter, Douglos Anthony 70 

Slaughter, Lloyd Walter 

Slaughter, Mark Edword 

Slov.n, David Scott 184, 315 

Sloydon, Susan Dent 

Sloyton, Jomes Dovid 

Slesinger, Sarah Ellen 

Slick, Grace 43 

Sli|epcevic. Gordano 

Sloone, Lynn Christine 174, 336 

Slocum, Shori Ann 187, 349 

Slotnick, Jill Ellen 174, 336 

Slusser, Jomes Hamilton Jr 

Smortschon, Robert Elmer 

Smedley, Leslie Clyde Jr, 

Smetley, Deborah Ann 3 1 5 

Smiley, Stephen Perry 

Smith, Aine Peterson 

Smith, Alvin Nathan 

Smith, Ann-Jeonnette 3 16 

Smith, Anne Dudley 349 

Smith, Anne Martin 349 

Smith, Barry Thomos 

Smith, Benjomin Bobb 93 

Smith, Blair Mitchell 190 

Smith, C Worren III 336 

Smith, Cheryl Anne 188, 189, 316 

Smith, Christine Leigh 

Smith, Cynthia Elaine 349 

Smith, Cynthia Linn 367 

Smith, Dorlene Lercher 

Smith. David Elwin 336 

Smith, David Harper 72, 367 

Smith, David Shone 2 14 

Smith, Deborah Hudson 367 

Smith, Deborah Leslyn 187, 316 

Smith, Debra Anne 

Smith, Donno Goyle 203, 336 

Smith, Duncan CompbeH 

Smith, Edmund Reed 

Smith, Elizabeth Dalton 316 

Smith, Emory Herbert III 

Smith, Frederick Somuel Jr 

Smith, G Kenneth 211 

Smith, Howard Tolmon Jr 

Smith, Jomes E, 255 

Smith, James Lee 349 

Smith, Jeffrey Bootwright 336 

Smith, John Randolph 

Smith, Joseph W 

Smith. Kotherine Tucker 367 

Smith, Ken 271 

Smith, Kenneth L 55 

Smith, Kimberly Anne 

Smith, Lourie Grey 349 

Smith. Lawrence George 

Smith, Leigh 

Smith, Linda Corot 336 

Smith, Linda Koy 336 

Smith. Mory Morgoret 203, 349 

Smith, Michael Mansfield 

Smith, Michele Gelabert 

Smith, Nancy Linn 176. 194, 349 

Smith, Pom Ruth 367 

Smith, Patricio Poiro 

Smith, Peggy Ruth 

Smith, Roy Gregory 

Smith. Richard Alan 367 



408 INDEX 



Smith, Richord HoMaday III 

Smith, Richard Murray 367 

Smith, Richard Randolph 

Smith, Solly Hamilton 

Smith, Shelley Lynn 367 

Smith, Stephen Gills 214, 316 

Smith, Stephen Meode 

Smith, Theresa Suzonne 

Smith, Thomas Kent 190 

Smith, Thomas Pnce 198 

Smith, Tony William 

Smith, Trevor Hugh Graham 56, 3 16 

Smoot, Catherine Anne 142, 367 

Smoot, Ronald Harvey 349 

Smyth, Peter Ogden 

Smythers, Helen 

Smythers, Michael Ray 

Snarr, Susan Elizabeth 367 

Sneod, Ellett Graham 

Snead, James Given Jr 

Snediker, Suson Joyne 367 

Snell. Nancy 125 

Snider, Karen Elaine 349 

Snider, Sanford D 

Snow, Doniel Gerard 

Snow, Thomas G 

Snowdon, Gory Michoel 

Snyder, Edward Courrlond 

Snyder, Potricia Ellen 

Soccer 56-57 

Sociology Deportment 250 

Snyder, Richard E- 

Soden, Jonet Mae 

Soest, Jon 247 

Solok, John Michael 

Solensky, Poulo Joan 174 

Soler, Rita Marie 339, 349, 377 

Solis, Michael Taylor 

Soller. David Rugh 200, 316 

Somervell, Douglos Poole 

Sondheimer, Williom Hennessy 349 

Sonnenberg, Kyle Russell 367 

Soo, Benny Koon 93, 316 

Sorelle, Carol A 

Sorensen, Mark Robert 

Sorensen, Moryonne 349 

Sourwine, Dorrel Albert 

Southard, Robin Lynn 367 

Souza, Roymond Manuel 

Sowder, Elizabeth Anne 349, 195, 151 

Sowers, James Russell 

Spahr, Dovid Kyle Jr 336 

Spain, Sally Frances 316 

Sparks, Coroline Anne 3 16 

Sparrow, Charles Kovonough 

Spencer, Eric Roland 371 

Spencer, Hardwick Roy 

Spencer, Stephen Craig 

Spicer, Pamela Sue 367 

Spillone, Daniel F. 

Spiller, Margery Scott 367 

Spindle, Lydio Buckner 176 

Spinelio, Michael Philip 

Spinuzza, Thomas John 

Spooner, Sandra Jo Peavler 

Spratley, Marvin G. 

Springote, Groce Ellen 367 

Springer, Marianne Gail 367 

Spurgeon, Emily 

Spurling, Frances Ann 367 

St. Lawrence, Robert Fletcher 312 

St, Louis Eileen M 366 

St. Thomos, Mary Lorefto 

Stacy, John Threde 

Staho, Karen Ann 180, 336 

Stahl, Kenneth Mark 104, 316 

Stollings, Robert George 336 

Stollman, Steven Ty 

Stompelos, Charles Anstides 

Stampfli, Ellen Stebler 368 

Standridge, Mark Curtis 

Stoneski, Paul Gerard 

Stankiewicz, Stephen Aloysius 

Stanley, Deborah Anne 203, 192, 3)6 

Stonley Everett Michael 

Stanley, John Baine 336 

Stanley, Mark Warren 350 

Stanley, Martha Ruth 



Stanley, Robm Elinor 

Stanton, Walter John 111 316 

Staples, Steven Roy 201. 316 

Stork, Elizabeth Mory 368 

Stork, Pomelo Ann 

Starr, Eileen Florence 

Slorr, Judith Roxanne 316 

Stossi, Poulo Josephine 176, 336. 339 

Statler, Jane Elizobeth 189 

Stotion, Leslie Mane 368 

Staton, Roy 

Stovely, Jone Patricio 316 

Steed, Janice Evelyn 336 

Steel, Ellen Louise 368 

Steele, Avron L 

Steele, Jonet Ellen 368 

Steele Joseph Howard II 317 

Steele, Pat Ann 29, 62. 336 

Steele, Thomos Patrick 

Steelmon, Robert Eugene 

Steigleder, Lmdo Mone 336 

Stein, Daniel Joshua 368 

Stein, Philip Gordon 

Stein, Sandra Smith 

Steinberg, Andrew David 368 

Steinbuchel, Johanna Rohn 336 

Steiner, Soroh Ann 368 

Steinmuller, Karen Anne 336 

Stell, Jeffery Alan 368 

Steltoh, Reynold Frederick III 

Stemple, Cynthia Lei 350 

Stemweil, Williom Ignotius 

Stephen, Anne Elizabeth 368 

Stephan, John 

Stephan, Karen Elise 120, 180, 336 

Stephens, Raphael Weller III 

Stephenson, Myro Lynn 

Stern, Charles Joy 

Stern, Ronald William 

Stevens. Cot 44 

Stevens, Richard Lee 

Stevenson, Deborah Jon 368 

Stevenson, Leroy P 

Stevick, Susan R 

Steward, Joel Scott 317 

Stewart, Dr Alan 

Stewart, Mark 

Stewort, Robert Wright Jr. 

Stewart, Suson Jeanette 

Stickney, Zephornen Lee 

Stiff, Alice Anne 

Stiffler, George Williom 

Still, Mary Jane Eleanor 

Still, William John Peter 

Stine, Koren Elizabeth 350 

Stinson, Christopher Hall 

Stock, Bette Suson 

Stockey, William 76 

Stone, Jamie Faith 

Stone, John Michael 

Stone, Judith Ruziskey 

Stone, Julio Hope 

Stone, Leslie Ellen 350, 75 

Stone, Ree 127 

Storch, Roberta Lee 317 

Storms, Mary Louise 75 

Stouder, Stephen Brodley 

Stousland, Michael Christopher 317 

Stover, Joseph McNair 

Stover, Kathleen Scott 317 

Stroder. John Kelly 350 

Straight, Barbara Ellen 

Strain, Karen Jeanette 350 

Strong, Jeffrey Arnold 

Strattner, Mark William 336 

Streets. Patricia Marie 189, 317 

Strello, Paul Vovrek 

Strickland, Anne Harvey 317 

Strickland, Dean Word 207, 317, 148 

Stricklond, Wando Gail 

Strickle, Carrie Susan 187 

Stnckler, John Glenwood Jr. 350 

Strider, David Valentine Jr. 

Stroh, Don Michael 350 

Strohkorb. Gregg Arnold 

Stromberg, Jacob 351 

Strommer, Susan Pauline 

Strong, Deborah Suson 368 



Strong. Ellen Kathleen 
Strong, Guice George III 158 
Strong. Valerie Regina 
Strother, Russell Tennont 
Stroud. Delia White 
Struckell, William Thompson 
Stuart, Richard Leonard 
Stuort, Valerie Jo 368 
Stubbtefield, Jomes Fontaine 
Studer, Wayne Malcolm 336 
Stumb, Andrew Word 
Stumm, Kothryn Anne 317 
Stumm, Sharon Mone 
Stunkle, Susan Lee 351 
Sturgess, Douglos Compbell 
Sturgill, Lowell Vernon Jr 
Su, Pin 

Suchy, Sharon Frances 185. 351 
SulhoH, Jomes David 368, 82 
Sulich, Teresa Mario 317 
Sullins, Lindo Susan 336 
Sullivan, Ann Kolherine 
Sullivan, David Francis 
Sullivan, Dennis Joseph 
Sullivan, Jon Greer 105 

SuHivon, John Peter 
Sullivan, Kathleen Ann 
Sullivan, Sarah Louise 

Sullivan, Stephen Michael 336. 209 
Summers, Scott Andrew 82 

Sundberg, Kns J 
Sundquist, Paul Deon 268 
Supplee, Karen Carter 

Surface, Jennifer Lynn 368 

Surface, Louro Eleanor 317 

Sushok, Melanie 

Sutlive, Vinson Hutchins III 231 

Sutterfield. Mitchell Allan 70 

Sutton, Georgia Kimmon 336 

Sutton, Peter Alexonder 

Suydom, Ervin Lynn 

Swoim, Ann Monroe 203. 317 

Swoin. Donno Brownlee 185, 317 

Swonson, Eric Robert 

Swortz. Gertrude L 

Swartz. Margaret Warren 3 17 

Sweeney, Mary Frances 351 

Swickley. Lisa 195 

Swimm, Randall Thomos 

Swimming, Men 72 

Swimming. Women 73 

Swingle, William Mark 317 

Swingly. Rondy J 

Switzer. Cindy Mcloin 

Swope. Bradley Hunter 

Sword, Philip Counts 317 

Sykes, Alan Onetl 

Sykes, John D Jr 

Symons, Don Poul 

Syrett, David Mark 318 

Syrop, Croig Henry 198 

Syvrud, Karen Kothenne 318 

Szarek, Margaret Rose 3 18 

Szczypinski, Robert S 318 

Szubo, Donno Marie 1 10, 180, 336 

Szymanski, Katherine Ann 351 



T 



Tabocco. Bonnie Lynn 

Taber, Allen Horold 

Tober, Deborah Jordan 

Tack, Carl E 192 

Toil, Frank Andrew 

Tokone, Scott Toshimi 351, 209 

Talbot, Alfred Kenneth Jr, 



Tallon, Stephanie Best 176. 336 

Talton, Jerry Oscor Jr. 

Talty, Williom Burton 

Toncill, Graham John 368 

Tang, Michoel 318, 207 

Tonkard. Frederick Wright 

Tonkord, Mary Virginio 189, 351 

Tanner, Deborah Griffin 

Tonner, Jomes Michael 

Toormina, Angelo Celeste 

Torin, Assorodon 214 

Tarkenton, Jeffrey Leroy 351 

Tote, koren Hope 351 

Totem. Karen Roe 336 

Tatge, David Bruce 182 

Totro, Wanda Jean 

Taylor, Barbara 

Toylor, Cynthia Morion 

Toylor, Dovid Coxon 

Taylor, Deboroh Show 36, 336 

Toylor, Douglas Rosser 351 

Toylor, Duane Miles 

Taylor, Eleanor Leslie 

Taylor, Helen Virgie 318 

Taylor, Howord T. 

Taylor, Karen Lynn 351 

Taylor, Kathleen Louise 336 

Taylor, Poge Derieux 368 

Taylor, Ronald David 

Toylor, Sharon Ruth 

Toylor, Susan Carol 336 

Taylor, Susan Jean 

Taylor, Wilford 

Teabo, Mory Kothryn 368, 195 

Teogue, Linda Goil 318 

Teoss, Jefferson Kirklond 

Tebouli. Betty Jean 

Tedords, Helen Rochel 318 

Teel, Terry Word 

Teeter, George Geoffrey 

Teitelboum, Robert David 318 

Teitelmon. Robert Dovid 198 

Teller, Croig Edward 

Teller, Linda Dickerson 

Tenczo. Zenon Charles 

Tennont, Doniel Roy 368 

Tennis, Women 85 

Terrell, Nancy Elizobeth 

Terry, Kothryn Anne 351 

Terry, Normon Seon 

Testo, Carolyn Rose 92, 189. 336 

Tezok, Mork Robert 

Theatre and Speech Deportment 251 

Theisen, Thomas George 

Thibeoult, W.lliom R Jr 

Thode, Steven Robert 368, 107, 105 

Thomos. Christopher Joy 207 

Thomas, David Earl 

Thomos, Delia Oldfietd 

Thomas, Gregory P. 

Thomos, James Joseph II 160 

Thomas, Koren Morie 180 

Thomas, Morcelto Anne 368 

Thomas, Sandra Goyle 368, 195 

Thomas, Stephen Dorryll 

Thomas, Twylo Blostine 

Thompson, Alan Gory 

Thompson, Bloke Dendrick 

Thompson, Clyde Gerord 318 

Thompson, Dr David 233 

Thompson, Deborah Renee 203, 351 

Thompson, Edword Jay 

Thompson, Gerard 148 

Thompson, Dr James 240 

Thompson, Luther Kent 126 

Thompson, Mory Ann 

Thompson, Mory MocDonald 

Thompson, Michael Kevin 

Thompson, Robert Ellis III 172, 198, 3 

Thompson, Steven Edward 

Thompson, Susan Marie 318 

Thompson, Suzanne Schutts 

Thomsen, Jeffrey Town 

Thomson, Corol Lynn 351 

Thomson, Dontphon Owen 336 

Thomson, Patricio Ann 368, 75 

Thorbjorsen, Joy Ann 368 

Thornton, Daniel McCorthy 192 



After a long day of classes, the couch is a favorite 

piece to relax at Gamma Phi, 




INDEX 409 



Thorpe, Mork Anthony 212 

ThroHs, William Henry 111 

Thurmon, James Amery 

Thurston, Renee Beth 

Tiemeni, Koren Marie 

Tilhou, John Artdrew 

Tiller, Calvin Forrest 212, 318 

TiMer, Michael Scot 

Tillotsoo, Rex 269 

Timberloke, Lindo Leigh 368 

Timp, Phillip Joseph 368 

Timponoro, Potricia Lynn 

Tinciall. Lirido Dione 336 

Tipton. Cofol Lee 368 

Tisdole, Annie 189 

Tito, Hugh Froncts 368 

Tito, Will.om Jomei III 351 

Titus, CliHofd Gordon 

Tobias, John Roger 

Tobias, Leslie 

Todd, Carol RL.'h 366 

Todd, Cost^ 

Togno, Ml. 

Tokorz. Per,- ; 

Tolbert, Carol Lynn 336 

Tolley, Julio Hoden 

Totov, Chris 350 

Toma, Dovid 46, 147 

Tomb, Kimberly Anne 351 

Tomes, Helen Jeonette 174, 351 

Tomlin. Louonn 

Tomlinson, Karen Lee 336, 178 

Toms, Sheree Marie 336 

Toomo|ian, Charles 263 

Topping, Robert G 

Torre, Brian Anthony 214, 318 

Torregrosa, David Francis 351 

Torres, Humberto, Oe Souzo 

Tourdo, Beverly Comtlle 129, 368 

Townes, A Jane 

Townsend, James Edward 

Townsend, Louro Lee 318 

Trodef, Timothy Otis 

Trohon, Augustus P. 

Train, Etizobeth Longdon 

Troinor, Mory Frances 

Tran, Huyen Dinh 337 

Transue, Patrick Alon 

Tropnell. Jon Charles 337 

Trover, Michael Dewitt 

Trovers, RussellEdward 198, 351 

Trbovich, Noncy Lynn 368 

Tredennick, Elizabeth Anne 351, 377 

Treichler, Andrew M 

Trembley, Steven Leo 

Trench, Wilhom Corey Jr 318 

Trester, Hollidoy Steele 368 

Trible, Anne Brooke 368 

Trible, Charles Kent 

Trjpi, Morgot Lynn 3 18 

Tripicion, Peter Horrison 

Trotman, Christy Caroline 

Trotter, Liso 304 

Trout, Roxanna Zamora 369 

Trowbridge, Robert Hubbard III 

Trowbridge, Holly 351 

Trumbo, Molfourd Whitney 337 

Tsocoumis, Stephanie 174, 175 

Tsahokis, George John 198, 337 

Tschihort, Bonne Morie 

Tschirgi, Trent Alan 369, 143 

Tuoson, Vicforio, Valerie 369, 195 

Tucker, Jone Dandridge 351 

Tucker, Lawrence Ashley 

Tucker, Patricio Leigh 

Tucker, Perry F. Jr 371 

Tudder, Davison Lewis 

Tuggle, Nora Ann 75, 369 

Tulou, Christophe Alain George 3 18 

Tunick, Kevin John 212 

Turberville, Randolph C 

Turgeon, Lorraine Marie 

Turmon, Ann Elizabeth 369 

Turmon, Dianna Marie 3 18 

Turner, Cynthio Ann 189. 351 

Turner, Stephen Barry 337 

Turrentine, Nancy Corroll 176 318 

Tuthill, David Wilson 369 

Tutwiler, Thomas Augustine 3 18 

Twordy, Nancy Anne 319 

Tweedy, Horrell Emmett 319 

Twitche'l, Fronsoise Odile 

Tyler, J Coleman 319 

Tyler, Stephanie Gay 174 

Tylus, Jane Cecilia 176, 351 

Tymond, Walter Gleason 

Tyndoll, Lorr^ Wiiliom 369 

Tynes, Ann Wagner 

Tyree, Patti Lynn 337 

Tyree, Dr. Sheppord 233 

Tyson, William E. 



u 




V 



Uhrjg, Richord Anton Jr 
Unger, Dennis Froncts 
Unkefer. John Forrest 
Untiedt. Michael Everett 
Upchurch, Koy Horword 176. 351 
Updike, James Wilson Jr 
Uptfike. Kenneth R 
Upson, D'one Elaine 
Urban, David Woyne 352 
Urbonski, M.choel Francis 20, 352 



Voccoro, John J 

Vohala, Lmda L. 

Vail, Dennis Gordon 64 

Valconte, Gregory 

Valentine, Cynthio Birdsoll 

Vail, Duke 212 

Volois, Michael Paul 

Van Buren, William Ralph III 198. 352 

Van Divender, Lisa Anne 319 

Van Vladricken Diann Mae 319 

Vanbibber, Debro Ann 

Vandal, Gilles 

Von Dam, David 78 

Vonderbeek, Jeffrey Augustus 52 

Vanderhoof. Andrew Mark 198, 332 

Vandervennet, Thomos Arthur 

Voneeckhout, Catherine Jeanne 

Vonn, Suson Kay 319 

Vonvalkenburg, Nancy Jean 352 

Vonvoorhis, Jerry 263 

Voracollo, Jerome Michael 190 

Vorrone, Jerrie Sue 

Vosapoli, Joseph Vincent 

Vosers, Gito 

Voughon. Cynthio Reoms 369 

Voughon, Joseph Lee 

Vaughan, Morilynn Betty 337 

Voughon, Noncy Ann 337 

Vecchio. Fronk Anthony Jr, 82, 352 

Veditz, Paula Angelo 

Vehrs, Beverly Forss 319 

Vener, Neil Somuel 

Ventrist, Dr Lorry 249 

Vercellone, Richard Domimc 200, 319 

Vergoro, Rosalyn Patrice M. 371 

Verlander, Richard Henry Jr 369 

Vermeulen, Dr Carl 232 

Vernoll, Roymond E 

Vernick, Andy Edword 

Vernon, Charles Curtis 320 

Vernon, Christopher 

Verry, Frederick, Charles II 

Vesley, Kothy Ellen 320 

Vessely, Geroldine Frances 189,337 

Vio, Gory Allen 



Viehweg, Ken Sue 

Vild. Jomes Joseph 320 

Vild, Joonn Eiizobeth 

Vincent, Morgaret Louise 

Vinsh, Fred Tony 

Virnstein. Robert W 

Visloy, Mary Elisabeth 

Vliet, Gordon 269 

Voegelin, Stephen Peter 

Vogel, Rosalie M 

Vogel, Suson A 

Volleyball 62 

Vollinger, Mark Lawrence 

Vollrath, Robert Edward 

Von Boeyer 247 

Vonoettingen, Susanna Lisalotte 369 

Vorhis, Linda Rishton 337 

Vose, Vivian Blin 

Vosper, Stanley R, Jr 

Vultee, Victorio Judith 320 



w 



Waddell, Ronald Morion 352 
Wode. Robert Alon 150, 337 
Wodley, Catherine Anne 321 
Wodsworth, Douglas Hayes 
Wagner, Coryn Anne 369 
Wagner, Elizabeth Lee 73, 352 
Wogner, Lawrence Donold 
Wagner, Michoel Joseph 
Wagner, Sally J 
Wagner, Terry Dovid 
Wogstaff, Kothryn Morsholl 321 
Wah, Boo 200 
Wahl, George Worren 
Wahlers, Robert Alon 352 
Womstein, Anne P 321 
Wakefield, Mark Andrew 
Waldo, Joseph Thomos 
Wolinsky, Edward Joseph 321 150 
Walk, John Reel 207, 337 
Walk. Richard E 252 
Walker, Comm 240 
Walker, Lynne 352 



Walker, Richord John 

Walker, Robert Joseph 2 1 1 

Walker, W.lliom W Jr 

Wolket, Rick 304 

Wolkley, Kenneth Bolond 

Wolkup, Donno Jone 

Walkup, Joyce Dorleen 

Woll, Judith Miriom 163 

Wolloce, Beverly Anita 

Wallace, Goil Marie 

Wallace, Juanito 269 

Waller, Gloria Lou.se 321 

Waller, Melonie 337 

WoUin, Leonard Arthur II 

Wolltng, Alyce Louise 352 

Walling, Eileen Marie 337 

Wolser, Douglas A 

Walsh, Robert Kevin 321 

Walsh, Sorah Windham 

Walter, John Michoel 

Walter, Thomas J, 

Walters, Sondro Morie 

Wolters, Suson Elaine 369 

Walton, David Andrew 

Walton. Suson Andreo 

Wompler, Louise Garland 203 

Wompler, William Randall 369 

Womsley. Robin 203 

Wonn, Grody Spurgeon III 212 

Wonnel, Nancy 203 

Wanner, Sorah Louise 180 

Word. Ann Cutchin 369 

Word, Anne Windsor 189, 337 

Word. EorlineCorol 321 

Word, Edward William 

Word, Elizabeth Corol 

Word, Helene Stotfeld 

Word, Karen Lowson 

Word, Lourence Richord 

Word, Steven Joel 

Warden, Anna Mary 321 

Warden, Noncy 185 

Wore, ReK Davis 

Wore, Robert Michoel 352 

Waring, Anne Frost 185, 337 

Warley, Thomos Bornwell 

Worner. Dovid Stephen 

Warner, Gregg Leiond 

Warner, Pomelo Sue 369, 195 

Warner, Vicki Sheory 321 

Wornock, Gerald Allen Jr. 

Warns, Jomes Thomos Jr. 

Worr, Linda Suson 

Worren, Borboro Suson 

Warren. Ellen Garrett 321 

Worren. HonceUo Mane 352 

Warren, Roberta Lee 194 

Worren. Susan Bradford 369, 195 

Worren, William Edward 200 

Worthon, Debro Gail 

Woscher. Judith Helen 180, 321 

Washer, Cheryl Edno 369 

Washington. Horold Cox 337 

Woshko, Susan 369 

Wosilewski, Suson Ellen 337 

Woss, Gerald Clorke 352 

Wassail, James Wright 

Waterman, Avery Tillinghost Jr. 

Wotermon, DeborohAnn 187,352 

Waters, Borboro Louise 337 

Waters, Mikell Shown 

Watkins, Anne Clarke 369 

Wotkins, Sharon Gole 187, 321 

Watkins. Thomas Linnone 

Wotkins, Thomos Rollins 

Wofry. Duncon Jomes 352 

Watson, Deborah 

Watson, Froncis Daniel 

Wotson, George Herbert III 

Watson, John Mark 

Watson. Lisa Koy 

Wotson, Margret McCleery 63, 352 

Wotson, Susan Morie 369 

Wotson, William George 350 

Watt, Suson Lynn 

Wotters, Stonley Harrison 321, 207 

Waylond, Scott Prosser 

Woyne, Cynthio Louise 

WCWM 106. 107 

Weotherly Barbora Anne 75 

Weotherly, Suzanne Ellen 321 

Weothersbee, Lisa Morie 

Weaver, Jody Joye 

Weaver, Leslie Ann 337 

Weaver, Scott Cameron 

Weover, Tomeo Phillips 

Webb, Judy Morie 32 1 

Webb, Martha A, 

Webb. Steven Kent 

Webb, Wendy Beth 

Webb. Willie George 321 

Weber, Cynthio Joan 369 

Weber, Morgoret Ann 189, 352 

Weber, Susan Morie 321 

Weber, Thomas Nelson 352 

Webster, Rebecca Jone 337 

Weckstein, Daniel Richard 

Weekley, Elizabeth Anne 174. 337 

Weeks, Lmdell Marshall 

Weeks, Ross 267 

Wegtarz, Christopher Joseph 352 

Wehle, Terence Joseph 

Wehrle, Howord Franklin III 

Wei. Barbara Chien Fen 189 321 

Weick, Dovid Robert 182 

Weinberger, Monte Brion 

Weiner. John Francis 321 151 

We.ner. Nancy Jo 189, 321 

Weinman, Dean Phillip 

Weinmonn, Croig Francis 352, 207 

Weinstein, Borry Evan 

Weinstein, Mark Lewis 

Weirup, Noncy Lynn 337 

Weiser, Neil E 

Weishor, Lee L. 

Weissmon, More S. 



410 INDEX 



Weithoner, Kafherine Sue 369 
Weixel, M.chael Joseph 198, 322 
Welch, Benjamin Lowrence 
Weldon, Jomes Thomas 
Weldon, Katherine Sue 
Welk, Louis Robert II 
Wellen, Paul Anthony 
Wellener, Katharine 187 
Weller. Matthew Randolph 
Welling, Peter T 
Wells, Betty Nell 352 
Wells, Ga.l Louise 322 
Wells. Richard Curtis 
Wells, Susan April 337 
Wenger, Helen Hope 
Wenner, Charles Anthony 
Wenner, Mary Antoinette 277, 322 
Wenska, Wally 237 
Wente, Mary Angela 
Wentzel, Robert French 371 
Wenzel, Edwin Stuort III 200, 322 
Wenzel, Robert Morshall 
Weringo, Mary Elizabeth 143, 337 
Wesley, Cheryl Yvonne 
Wesley Foundotion 142 
Wesp, Patricia Marie 322 
Wessells, Rexford Grover Jr. 
Wessles, Margaret Marie 
Wesson, Michael Dorwry 
West, John Lawton 
Westberg, Christine Alice 
Westlake, Kathleen Casey 
Weston, Donald Paul 
Wex, Joseph Harold 322 
Wholen, Bernard Lee Jr. 
Wharry, Ken 190 
Wheeler, Alice Dixon 322 
Wheeler, Gregory Allen 369 
Wheeler, Gregory Lee 
Wheeler, Joseph Scott 
Wheeler. Julie Lee 369 
Wheeler, Kotherme Ann 
Whelden, Sara Kafherine 180 
Whibley, Henrietta 
Whitaker, Floyd 264 
Whitbeck, William Granbery 322 
Whitcombe, Kevin Niles 78 
White, Albert Sidney III 200 
White, Betty Joyce 
White, Debro Elizabeth 
White, Gerard Joseph 182, 322 
White, Godwin Thomas 
White, Harry Coleman 
White, Howard Jonathan 
White, James Poterson 
White. Mernll Allison 352 
White, Michael Jomes 352 
White, Nancy Hopkins 
White, Nathan Smith IV 337 
White. pQtncio Clifton 
White, Ralph Odean Jr. 352 
White, Robert Peter 
White, Sandra Anita 322 
White, Victorio Louise 174 
Whitener, Michael Lee 
Whitesell, Brendo Faye 174 
Whitfield, R, Bryan 
Whitley, Thomos Alva 337 
Whrtley, William Horry 322 
Whitlock, Lynn Marie 352 
Whitlow, Ellen Terry 352 
Whitmire, Anne Corley 
Whitmire, Jomes Mortin 
Whitmore, Ruth Elizabeth 
Whittico, Gloria Ann 369 
Whittington, Solly Ann 352 
Whitworth, Horace Pritchord 
Wicklund, Erie John 
Wiener. Sidney Irwin 
Wieseman, Katherine Claire 369 
Wiggins, Bobby G Jr. 
Wilbur, Kevin Brodford 
Wilbur, Thomas Joseph 369 
Wilck, Joseph Hubert III 
Wilcox, Alfred Thomas 
Wilcox. Daniel Gordon 
Wilcox, James Edward 371 
Wricaxon, Koran Lynn 337 
Wildasin, George Michoel 
Wildermuth, John Lawrence 
Wilhelm, Borry Clinton 200, 322 
Wilhoit, Peyton Kirk 322 
Wilke, Thomos Zander 
Wilkerson, Stephen Lee 
Wilkes, Charles A 322 
Wilkins, Sarah Gay 
Wilkins, Sharon Eldridge 
Wilkinson, Annemorie 
Wilkinson, Rosemary Watson 
Willard, Fronk Lester 
Willett, Steven Bradley 
Willhelm, Keith Boyd 
Williams, Anita Elaine 323 
Williams, Artis Eori 369 
Williams, AvrilG, 

Williams, Chorles Franklin 198, 352 
Williams. Cherry Dawn 
Williams, David 220 
Williams, Ellen Janis 323 
Williams, Capt, Gerard 242 
Willioms, James Jehu Jr 323 
Williams, James Lee 
Williams, James Poge 
Williams, Julie Elizabeth 
Williams, Karen Anita 
Willioms, Kay 369 
Williams, Leigh Shoreen 323 
Williams, Leslie Ann 352 
Williams, Lisa Ann 337 
Williams, Mork Allan 198, 352 
Williams, Martha Nell 352 
Williams, Richard Scott 
Williams, Robert L Terrell 
Willioms, Robert Charles III 
Willioms, Rolf Anders 323, 190 
Williams, Sandra Lynn 323 



Williams, Stuort Lee Jr 

Williams, Welter L 253 

Williamson, Keith Eugene 

Williamson, Paul Gregory 

Willis, Brendo Koye 323 

Willis, Hulon, Lovaughan Jr 

Willis, Lona Karen 352 

Willis, Michael Dean 

Willis, Samuel C. 

Wills, Eleonor Carol 203 

Willsey, Glen Parker 206, 323 

Wilmoth, Mary Alyce 187, 323 

Wilson, Barbara Upton 

Wilson, Catherine Deldee 189 

Wilson, Dean Ensor 

Wilson, Donald G Jr 

Wilson, Eric Bruce 21 I, 323 

Wilson, Holly Jane 352 

Wilson, John Froncis 

Wilson, Karen Lee 176, 352 

Wilson, Koren Lee 189 

Wilson, Kimberly Sue 185, 323 

Wilson, Monterey 180, 352 

Wilson, Norman Donold 

Wilson, Pomelo Hunt 

Wilson, Paul Lowell 

Wilson, Preston Edward Jr. 324 

Wilson, Ralph Welton 70 

Wilson, Thomas Cabell Jr. 352 

Wilson. Walter Blair 

Wilson, Willie Theodore Jr 

Wincklhofer, Kothryn Lee 185, 324 

Windle, Robert John 

Windsor, John Goloy Jr 

Windsor, Nancy Troneck 

Windt, Gerard Richord 

Wine, John Edgar 

Winelond, Richard Hunter 214, 324 

Winfree, W.lliom P. 

Wing, John Derwin 

Wingo. Noncy Brent 324 

Wingo, Robert Houser 

Winston, Stephen Lee 200, 325 

Winter, Potncia 237 

Winter, Thomas Carlyle 369 

Wise, John Allen 

Wise, Robert Kenneth 

Wisler. Gail Clara 325 

Withom, Linda Louise 337 

Witkovitz, Paul Greg 325 

Witt, Pout Jeffrey 

Witte, Ann Wilson 325 

Wittemeier, Susan Corol 187, 352 

Wittkamp, Darrell Ann 

Witty, Richard Alan 

Wolf, Clinton Leroy 

Wolf, Mary Linn 

Wolfe, Charles Corbit 182, 352 

Wolford, Catherine 369 

Wolin, Deborah Ann 239. 325, 170 

Wolle, Loila Jean 188, 189, 352 

Wollman, Kristen Jane 176, 352 

Wolpert, Stewart U 

Womock, Cotherine Elizobeth 185 

Wong, Michael Wing-On 

Wong, Susono 369 

Wonnell, Noncy Sue 203, 325 

Wood, Debro Jean 

Wood, Elwyn Dewoyne 

Wood, James Allison 

Wood, Kathe 126 

Wood, Pia Christino 

Wood. Priscillo Ann 337 

Woodfin, Karen Elizabeth 325 

Woodruff, Rebekoh Jane 184, 185 



Woodrum, Morged Griffith 

Woodson, Thomas Daniel 325 

Woodword Albert 

WooHey, Mark Steven 

Word, Charlotte Jo 325 

Worland, Anne Cotherine 187 

Wornom, Patricio Carmines 352 

Wornom, Wesley Dean 

Worshom, LuCien Curry 82 

Worthington, Anne Dallam 325 

Worthingron. Judith Grace F 352, 195 

Worthington, Laurel Lynn 337 

Worthington, Mary Wyatt 325 

Wren, Deborah Ford 

Wren, John V 76 

Wright, Christopher Grant 

Wright, Deborah Kay 

Wright, Douglas Jomes 

Wright, JeH Cornell 369 

Wright, Koren Sue 

Wright, Lenord J 

Wright, Leslie Claire 176 

Wright, Mary Ann 369 

Wright, Robert Milfred Jr 

Wright, Susan Katherine 

Wubbels, Wendy Schultz 

Wuelzer, Kenneth L 325 

Wulf, Walter Jesse 

Wyatt, Cathy Lou 352 

Wyott, Herbert Groy Jr 

Wyckoff, Deborah Jean 352 

Wygol, Poul Culley 142.352 



Y 



Yacenda, Douglas James 

Yohley, Robert Frank 337 

Yomado, Goyle Kim 

Yamaguchi, Hideko 

Yamazoki, Hideko 

Yoncy. Jimmy 369 

Yoney, Deborah Lynn 

Yonity, Koren Adele 

Yonkovich, Kathy Lynn 

Yanowsky, Borbora Mane 337 

Yornoff, William Charles 

Yorrington, Margaret Lynn 187, 337 

Yates, Deborah Helwen 

Yates, Jomes Francis 325 

Yates, Kathleen Elizabeth 369 

Yates, Susan Cloire 

Yates, William Hudson Jr 1 16, 198, 337 

Yeogo, David Stuart 353 

Yeatman, Gory M 353 

Yeatts, Horry Andrew 

Yergalonis, Edward L 209 

Yergin, Jomes A. Jr 

Yerkes, H Lawrence Jr 

Yeskolski, Stanley Jr, 353 

Yoder, Roy Andrew 156 

Yonemoto, Naomi Tomiye 

Yore, Mory Evelyn 325, 337 



York, Elizobeth Lone 337 
Young, Arlono Frances 353 
Young, Bonito Dudas 
Young, Christopher Joseph 220, 353 
Young, Elizabeth Henderson 
Young. Frederick William 353 
Young, Heather Elizobeth 185, 337 
Young, James L. 
Young, John Latimer 
Young, Joseph Michael 
Young, Kathleen Marie 325 
Young, Martha Elizabeth 185, 353 
Young, Mason James Jr 
Young, Sidney Macon Jr 
Young, Susan Nancy 187, 325 
Young, Wendy Lynn 174, 353 
Young. WiMiom Nothan 
Youngb'ood, Anco Virginio 337 
Youngblood, MarsTon E. Jr. 
Youngblood, Russell A 
Younger, Debbie Jean 353 
Youngs, Steven Wilcox 
Yount, Mork Robert 
Yowon, David Linn 
Yowell, Emily Elizobeth 369 
Yuiile, Rebecco Julienne 



z 



Zobowo, Robert Eugene 353 

Zob'ockos, Meridith Ann 325 

Zomer, William E 

Zomora, Mario 231 

Zomoro, Roxanno Emelia 

Zorembo, Barbara A 

Zoreski, Steven 200 

Zavrel, James Michoel 353, 78 

Zeccordi, Terese Marie 

Zediker, Ronold Eugene 70 

Zeidler, Jeonnette F 

Zeigler, Anne Elizabeth 

Zeigler, Judith Mora 

Zeigler. Marilyn A. 

Zeller, Brent Chad 

Zeller, Steven L. 

Zelmer, Becky Linda 

Zettler, John Fehse 

Zgutowicz, Donna Elaine 325 

Ziedler, Frank P 46 

Ziems, Judith Lea 

Zimm, Melvin Reginald 

Zimmer, Michele Denise 353 

Zimmerman, Henry John 70 

Zimmerman, Louro Beth 

Zimmerman, Roy Walter 

Zoebelein, Dovid Andrew 369 

Zook. Sharon Marie 176, 325 

Zorich, Pomelo Tereso 

Zorumski, OlivfO Deonno 

Zuckerman, Anita Lynne 

Zuckerman. Donold Louis 125 

Zultner, Richord Ernst 206, 304, 337, 242 

Zumbro, Betty D 




i)i 



INDEX 411 



m* 






:t 



Editor Peggy Moler 

Managing Editor Chuck Shimer 

Art 

Design Layout Editor Meiinda Rose 

Business Manager Mike Tang 

Lifestyles Rita Soler 

Academics Dee Joyce, Chuck Shimer 

Sports Pam Porhom 

Performing Arts Mark Musch 

Greeks Debbie Johnson 

Administration Paula Stassi 

Classes Lauren Callahan, Donna Szubo 

Advertisements Andy Morse 

Media Glenn Gunderson 

Government Lisa Dillich 

Typing Coordinator Bonnie Beckroge 

Greeks Copy Editor Dawn Ellis 

Sports Copy Editor Steve Staples 



Varied opinions form as 
Greeks editor Debbie John- 
son asks Classes editor 
Lauren Callahan and Steve 
Staples for advice 



Relaxing after having 
washed and waxed his truck 
photographer Bruce Hath- 
orne gloats over the final 
product. 



412 SPECIFICATIONS 



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•••• 22 • 2! 

••• 25$ 22 

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e«« •• 
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:: 



••••• 

•• ^ 
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tesign for endsheets and theme 
pages by Melindc Rose. Intro- 
duction copy and design by Peggy 
Moler. Design for cover by Peggy 
Moier, photo by Mil<e Tang & Bruce 
Hathorne.Black and white photography by 
Bruce Hathorne, Mike Tang, John Walk, 
John Adams, Rich Walker, Starke Jett, 
John Rousso, Winston Sheppard, Harry 
Baithwaite, Steve Lineberger, Maryanne 
Borden, Harry Kiney, Dan Rina, Peggy 
Moler, Mike Mack, Chip DeLano, and 
Chuck Shimer. Student portraits by 
Steven Studios of Bangor, Maine. 
Special thanks to John Perry, 



Hunter representative. Ken Smith, 
Director of Student Activities, Col. 
Warren, Green, Director of the Campus 
Center, and the office of the Registrar. 

For their hard work and sleepless 
nights of ossistantce; Lifestyles 
staff — Steve Thode, Michelle Dewey. 
Academics staff — Kathy Gorges. 



With his ever-present camera, photographer Rich 
Walker clowns around for the people in l-Hunt Hall. 
As if four of him existed, photographer Chuck 
Kieffer mokes use of mirrors as well as printing 
tricks as he produces a multi-faceted image of 
himself. 




^^jjgggj^ 






SPECIFICATIONS 4i3 



'}\ 


1 ^ 




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ih I 




%l 








^ 



"j^Tolume 78 of the Colonial Echo 

\y was printed by Hunter Printing 
Company, Winston-Salem, North Car- 
olina. Three thousand nine hundred 
copies were printed, each consisting 
of 422 pages, dimensions 9X12 inches. 
Cover litho embossed on base material 
of shoe-grain black #500, all printed 
material being silk-screened on. All 
printed material in introduction 
pages printed with special ink 
#PMS 470. 

COPY: All body copy — 10 pt. 
Metrolite. All captions, rosters, 
and page identifications — 8 pt. 
Metrolite. Index — 6 pt. Metrolite. 
. Poem, pg 134 — 10 pt. Bodoni Italic. 



HEADLINE STYLES: Cover: Pala- 
tino. Dividers: Old English, Sub- 
Dividers: Bolt Bold, Lifestyles: 
Brush Script, Sports: Eurostile 
Bold Rimmed, Media and Performing 
Arts: Windsor Outline, Religion: 
Honda, Government: Avant-Garde X- 
Light, Honoraries: Bubble Light, 
Greeks: Hobo, Academics: University 
Roman, Classes: Goudy Italic, Index: 
Buster, Graduate: City Compact Bold, 
First Letter of Copy: Old English. 
All headlines were handset by the 
Echo staff. Transfer types for 
headlines are Chartpak and Formott. 
Total editorial and production bud- 
get — $42,826. 



414 SPECIFICATIONS 







ill 



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ttt 



^jf ndividual page specifications 
<3I follow: Further questions may be 
addressed to the Editor, Colonial 
Echo, College of William and Mary, 
Williamsburg, Virginia, 23185^ 
Page 19: Backround is 100% black. 
Outline of girl in 20% black screen. 
Pages 34-35: Background is 100% black. 
Pages 38-39: Background is 100% process 
blue plus 100% process yellow. Page 
42: Background is 100% process red. 
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band process blue 
half-tone. Page 43: Background is 
100% red. Page 56: Headline and copy 
100% process red. Page 60: Hockey 



player 100% yellow duotone over hor- 
izontal blue straight line half- 
tone. Page 61: Headline 100% pro- 
cess blue plus 100% process yellow. 
Page 63: Rugby player direct line 
black-white. Page 64: Headline 
100% process blue. Page 1 16: Drum 
major 100% green dutone, tube art 
work 100% process blue plus 100% 
process yellow. Pages 122-123: 
All pictures are posterized 100%. 
Pages 124-125: Background is 100% 
black. Page 129: Actress in block 
tone line over 20% black screen 
tone. 



SPECIFICATIONS 415 



' national panorama of 1 975 
,. found issues varying from 
political to religious, moral, economic 
and environmental. Due to the inde- 
pendence and individualism charac- 
teristic of Americans in the 1970's, 
these issues brought forth conflict 
and contrasting ideologies. 

A cause of national as well as 
international concern was the revolu- 
tion in Angola. Because of a conflict 
of interest between Congress and the 
Secretary of State, the keynote ques- 
tion moved from that of whether the 
U.S. should have a role to one of 
who should control the role. It was 
a fight between the executive and 
legislative branches of government 
as to who should determine U.S. foreign 
policy. 

A major shake-up of internation- 
al rulers took place the latter half 
of 1975 and the beginning of 1976. 
England's Prime Minister Harold Wil- 
son announced his resignation while 
speculation arose as to who would 
succeed him. The deaths of Spanish 
Dictator Franco and Chinese Premier 
Chou En Lai caused unstable condi- 
tions in those governments. 

It was the presidential election 
which generated the greatest amount 
of activism and concern. With the 
Democratic party producing over ten 
potential nominees and Ronald Regc 
hoping to grab the Republican nom-j 
ination away from President Ford, ^ 
political campaigning started early. ' 



Press Secretary Ron Nessen disploys a tie 
honoring his boss, President Gerald Ford. 
At the door of the Colonial Copitol, President Ford 
prepares to review the fife and drum corps. 



Early primaries found Jimmy Carter, 
leading the list of Democratic con- 
tenders, with George Wallace and 
"Scoop" Jackson distant seconds. 
After poor showings in the first few 
primaries, many of the original con- 
tenders such as Sargent Shriver, 
Milton Schapp and Birch Bayh dropped 
out only to be replaced by others 
like Sen. Frank Church and California 
Gov. Jerry Brown. 

Conflict among government ex- 
ecutives led to President Ford's de- 
cision to fire Defense Secretary 
James Schlesigner and CIA Director 
William Colby as well as relieving 
Henry Kissinger of his duties as head 
of the National Security Council. 
They were replaced by Donald Rumsfeld, 
George Bush and Brent Scowcroft re- 
spectively. Apparently consulting 
no one, his actions came as a sur- 
prise to the victims and the public 
alike. 

After a bizarre kidnapping, bonk 
robbery and nationally televised 



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, in six deaths, 
search was brought 
to an end when Patty Hearst was cap- 
tured by FBI agents in San Francisco. 
Powerful Defense Attorney F. Lee 
Bailey took the case and suggested 
to the jury that Patty was brain- 
washed by her captors. Experts on 
mind control described the impact 
that isolation and constant threats 
had on Patty's decision to succumb 
to her kidnapper's demands. The 
major point was to determine whether 
one should be responsible for his 
actions regardless if under threat 
of death. 

Violence again reached the head- 
lines with the twin assination at- 



! anu 
Sara Jane' Moore were apprehended by 
secret servicemen after aiming guns 
at the President. 

The case of death with dignity 
was brought to the spotlight when the 
parents of Karen Quinlan felt she 
was being kept alive by extraordinary 
methods. Religious and social groups 
vigorously campaigned against terminat- 





^ 



i. i 



ing her life while many others felt 
it was a necessary, humane act. Al- 
though the court ruled that Quinlan i 
must stay on the respirator, the 
case was to be appealed and several 
years could pass before the final out- 
come was determined. 

Again ecology aroused many when 
it was found that the harmful effects 
or Kepone were spreading at an enor- 
mous rate. In addition to polluting 
the water, the chemical dust on the 
workmen's clothes was carried to 
their homes, threatening other mem- 
bers of the family. 

Cooperative efforts in tech- 
nology were pursued as the U.S. and 
Russia docked two spacecraft for 
two and a half days. It became one 



Soviet space station. 

The year 1 975 did not prove to 
be a successful year economically. 
Although authorities claimed the re- 
cession had come to an end, the job 
market was still uncertain and the 
average consumer continued to feel 
the effect of high prices. 

For the nation's 200th birthday, 



At a time when the country was to 
commemorate a revolution which brought 
about dramatic changes in the course 
■■ ' ' istory, most people were worried 
Lit stability. It was a quiet year, 
laps giving everyone a chance to 
jct on what direction was to be 



Ee reception for President Ford, Governor Mills 
uuuWin oddresses the visitors. 
After dinner and speeches, guests folk with 
'^■-"«me Court Justice William Powell, President 
Bias Graves and President Gerald Ford. 





Jt was 1976, the bicentennial 
year and everything was sup- 
posed to be a red, white and blue 
celebration. But fireworks were 
only going off for the nation's 
birthday, it seemed that the excite- 
ment couldn't spread to the other 
sides of American life. 

From movies to sports, it was 
the established people who continued 
to reign over entertainment. Base- 
ball was different, as they ended 
with a bang. The World Series was 
a hard fought contest between the 
Cincinatti Reds and the Boston Red 
Sox with the Reds coming out on top. 
The Red Sox' Fred Lynn provided alot 
of excitement in the game, becoming 
the first American League player to 
receive the Rookie of the Year and 
MVP awards in the same year. 

In football, the Pittsburgh 
Steelers continued their reign over 
the Super Bowl for the 2nd straight 
year while the Philadelphia Flyers 
monopolized the world of hockey. 
Basketball had some sparks arising 
as the Golden State Warriors appeared 
out of nowhere to help set the pace 
with the aid of perennial powerhouses, 
Washington Bullets and Boston Celtics. 

College basketball found Indiana, 
UCLA and Michigan at the top as usual 
but they were not the ones attracting 
the attention. Rutgers entered the 
NCAA semi-finals undefeated while 
VMI advanced to the Eastern Regional 
finals by defeating Tennesse and 
DePaul, only to lose to Rutgers. 
College football finished the season 
as expected with Oklahoma, Ohio State 
and Michigan on top. 

The world of entertainment found 
the retirement of one of their most 
renowned artists and the return of 
another "old-timer". Pearl Bailey 
closed out her entertainment career 
with an appearance at the Kennedy 
Center. This did not mean she disap- 
peared from the public eye as she 



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began her new career as a special 
aide to the U.N. The return of George 
Burns in The Sunshine Boys won him 
Best Supporting Actor as well as pro- 
viding one of the highlights of the 
movie year. Barry Lyndon saw the 
return of the romantic extravaganza 



418 ENTERTAINMENT 



while Al Pacino and Liza Mineili con- 
tinued their exciting careers with 
Dog Day Afternoon and Lucky Lady re- 
spectively. It was veteran Jack 
Nicholson in the movie One Flew Over 
The Cuckoo's Nest who, along with 
the movie, won all the awards during 
the 1975 movie season. 

A new husband and wife music 
team. Captain and Tennille, helped 
Neil Sedaka make a big comeback with 
Love Will Keep Us Together, while 
Elton John continued as one of music's 
leading money-makers. Paul Simon's 
Still Crazy After All These Years 
proved to be one of the biggest record 
albums of the year, but the biggest 
thing to hit music was the Disco 
sound. With the Disco sound came new 
nightclubs and the latest dance craze. 
The Hustle. 

There was still another craze 
for those interested in entertainment. 
Only this time it was a person, En- 
tertainer of the Year, Ben Vereen. 
As a star of Hair, Jesus Christ Super- 
star and Pippin, he astounded audi- 
ences with his singing and dancing 
abilities. 

Television was sparked by the 
appearance of the Summer and Winter 
Olympics. At William and Mary, as 
elsewhere, people packed t.v. rooms 
to watch America's 19 year old figure 
skater Dorothy Hamil and veteran 
speed skater Sheila Young capture 
gold medals for the U.S.A. in their 
respective events. 

Television's 1975-76 season saw 
a new innovation in movies. Moses, 
Rich Man, Poor Man, and The Family 
were made-for-t.v. movies which were 
spread in one hour installments over 
a period of weeks. Action-packed 
series such as Bionic Woman and 
Starsky and Hutch seemed to top the 
list of new t.v, hits. While the 
Mary Tyler Moore show continued to 
do well, its spin-offs Rhoda and 
Phyllis proved equally as capable. 




Like the political realm, even 
the lighter side of life seemed slow. 
The past few years had prepared peo- 
ple for a faster moving pace. Whether 
the ideas were not coming or whether 
they were just stale, viewers were 
forced to slow down. 




ENTERTAINMENT 419 










^=^4^ 



With the upgrade in the athletic policy, the Tribe 
wos ploying such powerful teoms as Ohio 
University, 



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-'^-*-'^;?4^, 







Who should control the publication's purse strings 
is the question confronted by Review editor, Tricio 
Joyce and Flat Hat editor Paige Eversole. 
One of the first dorms to be renovated, Barrett 
continues to serve as a reminder of part of William 
and Mary's post. 



< 



420 EPILOGUE 




1693-1976, two hundred and 
eighty-three years of exis- 
tence and progress for the College 
of William and Mary. William and 
Mary has always prided itself on 
its "firsts". The college was the 
first in the nation in its antece- 
dents, first to hove a full faculty, 
first to establish an inter-colle- 
giate fraternity, first to have the 
elective system of study, first to 
have an Honor System, first to be- 
come a university . . . W&M provided 
the nation with some of its finest 
leaders Jefferson, Marshall, Ran- 




dolph . . . The list could go on and 
on; we have been indoctrinated with 
it since we first enrolled. 

But that is all past, what of 
the present and the future? 

William and Mary led the way 
for many schools when it established 
a policy of self-determination. 
Allowing each dorm to determine their 
visitation policies and having each 
student responsible for the state of 
his room through the use of room con- 
tracts, made each student face up to 
his responsibilities as an adult. 
The establishment of co-educational 
and special interest housing also 
added to W&M's progressive way of 
treating its students. 

Another policy which set an 
example (good or bad depending upon 
one's viewpoint) was the decision to 
"upgrade" athletics. At a time when 
the athletic programs at many schools 
were faltering, W&M mode a decision 
to try and salvage theirs. Through 
a four-year plan combining student 
athletic fees and alumni support, the 
school tried to develop football and 
basketball programs which would pay 
for themselves as well as provide 
money for the "non-revenue" sports. 

Even with these two policies, 
the school seemed slow at being in- 
novative. It took years of student 
lobbying to obtain permissions for 
double majors, an aspect of aca- 
demic life that had been in existence 
for a long time at many major uni- 
versities. Pre-registration for all 

A combination of talent, cooching and facilities 
moke William and Mary's play productions among 
of the best 



classes was another "not-so-new" 
change that did not hit the William 
and Mary Campus until spring semester 
1976. 

Staring in the foil of 1972, 
the school took a new approach to 
grading with a policy of A,B,C, or 
NC. The no credit, or NC, was given 
for courses failed or withdrawn from 
under any circumstances and was not 
figured into a student's GPA. With- 
in two years, the NC was chonged to 
an F, because it was hard to under- 
stand and many graduate schools com- 
puted it as an F, hurting those stu- 
dents who hod not actually failed 
the course. Another year passed and 
the D was reinstated. The odd thing 
was that some faculty members voted 
for it because they felt that the 
average GPA at William and Mary 
was rising, while others felt that 
the absence of the D was not lessen- 
ing academic pressure as originally 
hoped. 

There remained some policies, 
which if passed in 1976, would help 
put W&M back on a road to firsts. 
There was still no academic re- 
view board, no students allowed into 
faculty meetings, an obvious lack of 
funding for non-revenue sports (many 
of whom by good coaching and a lot 
of determination made up for some- 
things money could not buy — a 
national ranking), and faculty mem- 
bers who were not paid enough. But 
these were faults of the past, 
what of the future. . . 




EPILOGUE 421 




. ,- ■?. ■•^'v-<iylc,tey>B>''^"'J^"''''' » ■ 



'/if/Jn '^°' °^ *^^ future Jeffersons and 
^Wfctl Marshal Is? For many the aca- 
demic "rut" at William and Mary was 
an endless circle; students expected 
it to be hard, so it was hard. The 
other side was that this was "William 
and Mary" with an academic reputation 
to uphold, so the students had to 
live up to it. If one couldn't, well . . . 

The Jeffersons and the Marsholls 
were living in the center of history. 
There was a place to get involved, 
a cause to champion, something in 
which everyone hod to come in contact. 

Somehow the situation no longer 
seemed the same. Many professors, 
administrators and students agreed 
that the typical William and Mary 
student was just not "creative". 



Whether the school stifled the cre- 
otiveness as some thought, or 
whether the student was so "academic" 
he hid it himself, it did not seem 
to matter. 

One member of the college 
community stated what many felt in 
regards to the differences, even with- 
in the last decade. "We were The 
Now Generation, paranoid about The 
War and The Establishment, into 
dope and acid rock and hippieness . . . 
It was Us against Them. But now 
it's simply them and Them. The job 
market is on everybody s mind; this 
in turn turns students'into infor- 
mation-gathering machines, less in- 
terested in life or living than in 
a livelihood. The fault lies . . .?"