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Full text of "Colonial Echo, 1985"

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1976 



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PRESENTATION OF THE 
JO MUNDRED AND POfiTY-PIFTM YEAIi AT 

COLLECC OpWiLLIAM AND MaHY 

IN WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA 

. 1693 . 
1938 

BLI5HED BY THE STUDENT BODY 



OR 



JOMN CUY DRITTON, JR, MANAC; 



THE 

COLONIAL ECHO 



VOLUME XIX 
MCMXXl 



INSIDE: 



OPENING 



LIFESTYLES 



EVENTS 



SPORTS 



ORGANIZATIONS 



GREEKS 



FACES 



INDEX/ADS 



ECHO 



CLOSING 



1-17 
18-85 
86-109 
110-189 
190-215 
216-263 
264-359 
360-381 
382-385 
386-400 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/colonialecho198587coll 





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"The spirit of William and Mary is a rich 
inheritance from the past and a creative and 
transforming force in the present, for it manifests 
a spiritual kinship between the students of today 
and those who have dwelt and developed at this 
College during the two hundred and forty-three 
years of its life and service. . .The aims, the 
obligations, the courage, and the will of 1693 
animate the William and Mary of 1936." 

John Stewart Bryan's sentiments, quoted from 
the dedication of the 1936 Colonial Echo, were 
expressed at a time when Earl Gregg Swem was 
the librarian, not the library and when Richard 
Lee Morton was a professor of history, not the 
history department's building. In the face of the 
rapidly changing William and Mary of 1985, such 
sentimentalism seemed trite. Many people saw 
William and Mary in a state of transition, one 
which promised to be painful at times. Money 
was tight. Ask any member of last year's six cut 
sports. Ask any faculty member who struggled 

< One of the biggest changes in campus this year 
was the completion of Trinkle Hall. Although 
delayed, the wait seemed worth it for students who 
took advantage of the new game room and craft 
shop as well as the Colony room and student offices 
The atrium, pictured here, provided a good place to 
study or talk with friends 



^The post office got a slightly new look this year 
also New boxes were added, the desk was moved 
and the mailbox was replaced after its disappear- 
ance this spring Diane Inderlied checks her box 
before going to class 



All photos, MiKe NiKoiich 



for a pay raise. Meanwhile, as certain depart- 
ments increased enrollment, available funds 
were allocated to accommodate the changes, 
undermining our liberal arts tradition in the eyes 
of many. Still, to quote a Flat Hat editorial from 
early February, there was no avoiding that 
change: "The rise of the business school, the 
growing prestige of the law school and the 
development of graduate programs in many dis- 
ciplines all have inexorably drawn William and 
Mary out of the realm of the liberal arts college 
and into the world of the university." Technically, 
William and Mary is a university, but in 1984-85, 
we began to see its first attempts to grow into its 
university status. President-elect Paul R. Verkuil, 
in an interview with the Flat Hat, set as a priority 
heightening W & M's university status: "My 
theme will be to bring together the under- 
graduate and graduate schools as much as 
possible." 

Without a doubt, expansion of the College's 
graduate programs was necessary to the en- 
hancement of William and Mary's reputation as a 
university. Like it or not, such a reputation 
became increasingly important in the fierce 
competition for first-rate students and state 
funds. Said Ken Smith, Associate Dean of Stu- 
dents for Student Activities and Organizations, 
"Strengthening the graduate programs can only 
help us. I think the no growth posture has hurt us. 
Those schools that grew were rewarded with 
money. . .On this university question, I think it's 
time to move in this direction, but we can't lose 
the liberal arts thrust." 

Still, to go back to John Stewart Bryan's ideals, a 
strong liberal arts tradition and heightened uni- 
versity image were not mutually exclusive. The 
College, despite its growth and its shifting priori- 
ties, was undeniably linked with its past. Tradition 





■< Second semester brought the long awaited 
opening of Jefferson. Although some former 
Commonwealth students who were used to private 
baths, large color TV's, and carpeting in each room 
weren't as excited as expected about the move, 
everyone eventually got caught up in the prestige of 
living in W & M's newest and most modern dorm. 



▼ These students look over their lottery numbers, 
delivered late this year because of foul-ups 



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MrkeNikolich 



Miko Nikolich 







Homecoming went as usual. Linda Lavin was the 
Grand Marshal; she and her daughter greeted 
cheering fans and judged numerous Mel's Diner 
floats as the parade moved through CW and down 
Richmond Road. 



► President and Mrs. Graves presided over their last 
homecoming at W & M. They left shortly after 
Christmas and returned briefly for graduation in 
May. 

▼The football game was well attended even though 
we lost again. 

kMajorette Leigh Lawson performs her routine 
during halttime at the game. 





Leslie Barry 



pervaded the place. As corny as Bryan's praise of 
William and Mary seemed at times to the more 
competitive, practical — yes, even cynical — stu- 
dent of 1985, these ideals and traditions die hard 
The much maligned liberal arts tradition was, 
nonetheless, the reason v^e all came here anyway, 
wasn't it? We somewhat self-righteously de- 
fended the tradition in the guise of our Honor 
Code by disparaging the University of Virginia's 
code during the Olden Polynice flap and the 
W&M-UVA basketball game. 

So, with all this change, this transition from 
William and Mary the College to William and 
Mary the University, a new president was sel- 
ected. The selection process was long, arduous, 
and, at times, mysterious. The search committee, 
headed by Anne Dobie Peebles, began screening 





Maryanne Kondracki 



Leslie Barry 




► Everyone got covered in mud at Derby Day this 
year. Kim Colonna and lier big sister Glenna Phillips 
vi/ere two of the many people who hit the mud. which 
seemed to attract more people than the games. 

►► Dorms were, as usual, the site of an accumula- 
tion of trash, especially over the weekends. The 
frats were always a mess as this pile of trash 
outside Pi Lam indicates. 





..:..-^. — y,',. Leslie Broadhead. 
Martha Drodge and Kelly Metcalf carry the banner 
before their MASH float at homecoming. 

the over two hundred applicants in mid-August. 
Faculty and students participated in the search to 
a certain extent. A questionnaire, distributed to 
students by the search committee during fall 
semester, received little response. Said junior 
Kathy Curtis of the questionnaire: "I remember 
filling it out but I think most people didn't 
bother." By November 30, the search committee 
had narrowed the field to six candidates, in- 
cluding Hamden-Sydney's President Josiah Bunt- 
ing III, Virginia Beach Schools' Superintendent 
Edward E. Brickell, and Tulane Law School's Dean 
Paul R. Verkuil. Verkull was chosen from the 
search committee's list of recommended appli- 
cants by the Board of Visitors. The BOV an- 
nounced its choice just before Christmas, after 
the fall session had recessed for winter break. 

Paul Verkuil, a 1961 graduate of William and 
Mary, declared his desire to enhance W&M's 
image as a university early. At a February press 
conference, Verkuil stated that he wanted to see 
William and Mary "really gain that national 
recognition that it deserves and realize its poten- 
tial as a university" and that he planned to 
emphasize the graduate and professional pro- 
grams and faculty research. Acting president 
George Healy agreed with Verkuil's assessment, 
but he stated that he hoped that Verkuil would 



ryanne Kondracki 




10 



irylida 




TT Attendance at basketball games was good this 
year; Steve Coniglio and Dave Braun prepare for 
another Sig Ep frat cheer. The Increase of annoying 
cheers prompted Barry Parkhlll to write a letter to 
students urging them to watch but not jeer. 

T Speidel. Goodrich and Goggin, a group of three 
guys who sound more like a law firm than a band, 
became very popular this year as they traveled from 
Charlottesville to W & fvl three times. 



< Eddie Murphy and Billy Idol both came to the hall 
this year; not many people were excited about Idol's 
appearance, but Murphy evoked the usual rash of 
concert preparations. 




proceed cautiously in the early months of his 
administration, saying, "The trick will be to 
develop that soundly and expand into areas of 
strength." Healy also stated that three new 
doctoral programs will be offered in the fall, 
including one in computer science. The new 
programs will involve about thirty students. 

Expansion and renovation affected the campus 
as well as the academic programs. Trinkle Hall, 
built between 1919 and 1926, reopened its doors, 
offering a new cafeteria, a roomier — if more 
sterile— replacement for the old Pub, and new 
student activities offices. The renovation took 
longer than expected. Said James Connolly, 
director of facilities planning and construction, 
"There were pipes [in Trinkle] nobody even 
knew about. A lot of that detail wasn't even 
recorded on the old plans." Connolly also 
handled the reconstruction of Jefferson Hall. The 
College was able to save $800,000 in the renova- 
tion because the dorm's outer walls were saved. 
"I've had experience with heavy fire damage 
before, but every other time, it was so hopeless. I 
told President Graves we could save those walls," 
stated Connolly. After the renovation, Jefferson 
became one of the most sought-after dorms on 
campus. In fact, almost an entire hall of transfer 
freshmen exercised squatting rights, creating 
considerable controversy. 

The unrest concerning the six sports which 
were cut from the College's budget last fall con- 
tinued. A phone-a-thon, coordinated by the S.A. 

Second semester was unusually cold with 
temperatures dropping below zero for several days 
and what normally would have been cold rain came 
down as snow and ice. Despite problems of getting 
to class and heating dorms, the snow provided an 
extended look at the campus In white. 




and senior Richard Powell, raised $20,911 to aid 
the affected sports. Still, most of the sports — 
including men's lacrosse, men's swimming, and 
women's golf — relied on their team fund raisers. 
Senior Margie Johnson, a member of the 
women's track team, was appalled by the budget 
cuts: "It's a pretty sad thing that an administration 
that is so big on the liberal arts education is so 
condemning of sports. The money could have 
been found." 

The cut sports were not the only sports stories 
this year. Jim Copeland announced his resigna- 
tion as the men's athletic director on April 10 in 
order to take the position of director of athletics 
at the University of Utah in July. Copeland's often 
stormy tenure included the now infamous 
stadium expansion controversy, the six cut sports, 
and two consecutive winning football seasons for 
the first time in years. The Tribe's new-found 
winning ways brought William and Mary's usually 
subdued football fans to Gary Stadium. The quest 
for the spirit keg, sponsored by the cheerleaders, 
encouraged fraternities, sororities, and entire 
dorm halls to outdo one another in supporting 
the Tribe. The homecoming parade, led by 
alumna Linda Lavin, was also well attended. Team 
spirit has never been a problem at Tribe basket- 
ball games. This season, basketball fans were a bit 
too zealous in the opinion of many. Prompted by 
;he derogatory cheers directed towards Olden 
Poiynice at the UVA game, coach Barry Parkhill 





All photos, Mike Nikolich 



^Graves appeared as Santa Claus for the last time ** Jennifer Quartana and Gin Parsons weren't 

at Yule Log first semester. Students and faculty stopped by the cold. The lingenng snow brought out 

crammed into Wren courtyard to hear about the the children in all of us as snowball fights and 

grinch from Blacksburg. snowmen showed up around campus. 



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sent letters through the campus mail encouraging 
student participation in the games, but con- 
demning the obscene cheers which had become 
popular. 

One of the year's most memorable events, the 
"Tucker Death threat" startled an exam-ridden 
campus in mid-December. A threatening mes- 
sage scrawled on a wall in Tucker prompted a 
wave of anxiety which was characterized by 
twenty-four hour card-key and extensive patrol- 
ling by the campus police. A sense of security was 
lost, at least temporarily, when quiet Williams- 
burg discovered that it was not necessarily safe to 
be out alone at night. 

In January, Williamsburg's usually temperate 
climate dumped around eight inches of snow on 
us. On the blustery day following the snow, the 
wind chill factor plunged well below zero. Icy 
roads and sharp winds made travelling and going 
to class miserable. Said senior Liz Besio, "I was up 
early that morning. I listened to the radio. U of R 
was closed. Hampton Institute was closed. 
ODU— closed. And then the deejay said that he 
guessed William and Mary was still open. Then 
three of my professors didn't show up. I guess 
only the students have to show up on blizzard 
days." 

In many ways, 1984-85 was a memorable year 
filled with controversy, change, and growth. A 
major controversy surrounded the imminent 




All ptiotQS. Mike NIkolich 



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' Out atter one of the frequent Idil siiovvecb tins year, 
vmanda Wilson and Kris Rombaugh waited for 
nings to dry out before going running. 



change in the Virginia drinking age. In the spring, 
the General Assembly approved a gradual eleva- 
tion of the drinking age over the next three years. 
Although actual changes did not affect this year's 
student body. Associated Dean of Students Ken 
Smith cited the need for student attitude changes 
toward alcohol and social activities. Smith stated, 
"[Although] the level of drinking is dovi'n. . .we 
have to re-educate people." In other words, this 
was the last year that we could drink without 
guilt. 

On a more superficial level, subtle changes in 
the nature of the student body became in- 
creasingly apparent to those of us who had been 
here for four years. Although William and Mary 
was still a fairly homogeneous campus, the 
acceleration of minority recruitment, the rise of 
"anti-fashion," and the mushrooming of campus 
bands changed the appearance and, perhaps, 
challenged the underlying traditions of the place. 
The pressures to grow and to enhance the 
College's reputation as a university definitely 
shook the College's values. The direction the 
College will take for the next decade was begin- 
ning to be chartered this year. The College of 
William and Mary was becoming William and 
Mary University. 

* With the warm days of spnng came the constant 
pleas of students to have classes outside: every now 
and then a professor agreed 



17 



DIRECTORY: 

Introduction 18 

Review of Lisa Birnbach 24 

Alumni 28 

Seniors 30 

5 Year Grads 32 

Transfers and Squatting 34 

Admissions 36 

The LGU Controversy 38 

Apathy 40 

Eating 42 

Spring Fever 44 

Beauxs Arts 46 

Spare Time 48 

Intramurals 50 

Dating 52 

Spring Break 54 

Supper Clubs 56 

Eating Out 58 

Delly Review 60 

Using CW 62 

Visitors 64 

Christmas 66 

Ice 'Burg 70 

Beautiful Campus 72 

Dorm Review 74 

New Things 80 

Drinking Age 82 

Curriculum 84 








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19 



SCHOOL WAS TIMELESS 



A REFLECTION ON THE STUDENT OF 1985 



W^ 



hen we sit down and look back at 4. 
1985, we will wonder what distinguished 
this year from the rest. Maybe in the 5. 
Almanac it will only mention irrelevant 
things like Government aid to South Africa 
and junk about tax reform and silly ram- 6. 
blings about the strong dollar and foreign 
travel. There were other things about this 7. 
year that are comparably unimportant. 
The 'Yuppies' (Young Urban Profes- 
sionals) were certainly a fixture which 
need to be forgotten. We may want to 8. 
forget the Bruce Springsteen Tour, be- 
cause by 1995 none of us will admit that we 9. 
ever liked anything other than elevator 
music and selected hits from Barry Mani- 
low. We probably will neglect to mention 
the wide spread abuse of cocaine by 10. 
youngsters playing Little League. The His- 
tory books may even forget to mention 
the Roman-like fad that occured primarily 
in The South in which many honey- 11- 
mooners tying live cats to their vehicles 
instead of the standard cans used to make 
noise as the couples leave the wedding. 

However, despite the lack of memor- 
able occurences in the lives of upper- 12. 
middle class Americans. There were a few 
attributes that distinguished the man of 
1985 from the men of other years. They 
ran as follows: 13. 

1. He was more concerned about 
Oxen and the preservation of all 
other creatures than ever before. 14. 
This year was the Chinese year of the 

ox and Americans showed a new 15. 
appreciation for farm animals along 
with their allies from Asia. 

2. He did not like to be called "he", 16. 
"he" liked to be called an equal 
individual. The "she'"s have length- 17. 
ened many a job title to generify our 
formerly masculine language, (i.e. 
waitron, Vice-Presitron Candidate 18. 
Geraidine Ferraro, etc.). 

3. He was conservative, conscientious, 19. 
and career minded. Probably real- 
izing that he will need to have a job 20. 
when he gets old since there won't 

be any social security. 21. 



20 



He was not as promiscious as in the 
late 1970's. She might still be? 
He travelled in Europe, since it was 
trendy. But we all know that Ameri- 
cans are not ones to follow trends. 
He did not drug the winner of the 
Kentucky Derby, like last year. 
He did not join a fraternity because 
he prefers not to affiliate himself 
with the actions of others. Unless, 
one was to look at his resume. 
He ate less chocolate, while replac- 
ing it with jogging and eating tofu. 
He had his lacrosse program cut 
because the students would prefer 
to see Bryan Complex opposed to 
Penn State. 

He is wearing less make-up and 
spending more money on plastic 
surgery, unless one were to see "La 
Cage Aux Falles." 

He attempts to pay homage to the 
year of the ox by attempting to 
resemble this docile creature by 
attending classes with varied levels 
of "hat" or "bed" head. 
His foreign competition became 
stiffer than ever with Japanese im- 
porters cornering the market on 
imported ox and yack fur. 
Vigilantees were heralded by his 
private sector while scorned by his 
government. 

NORTH DAKOTA WAS STILL THE 
SAME. 

He also started moving into urban 
areas again, after a 20 year opposite 
trend. 

He bought a BMW to go along with 
his Subaru Wagon. 
He got mad about being too young 
to drink while wearing a soldier's 
uniform. 

He renewed his health club 
membership. 

He turned gay if he saw no obliga- 
tion to perpetuate his species. 
He played for the New Jersey Gener- 
als if he won the Heisman Trophy. 
He bombed his girlfriend's abortion 
clinic. 





F/a(Har photo 



Dan Weber 



21 



1985 cont. 



I 



If 






...IT WAS THE 
YEAR OF THE OX 



22. 



23 



24. 



25 



26 



27. 



28. 



He changed his opinion again of Bo 
Derek. 

He laughed at the people who said 
that the Sports Illustrated Bathing 
suit issue was sexist as he wiped the 
drool from his lip. 

He talked about David Letterman 
when all else failed. 
He never really thought about the 
fact that Eddy Murphy really was not 
timeless. 

He went to a zoo (sometimes called 
Ft. Lauderdale or Daytona Beach) 
with many wild animals for Spring 
Break... 

He resented conservatives for trying 
to force their morality on the rest of 
the nation. 

He heralded in the birth of a new 
generation with the Prime Minister 
of Lithuania giving Ronald Reagan 
the first Presidential 'wedgie' in pub- 
lic. This was of course after the U.S. 
refused to buy 60 million tons of 
Lithuanian cat food. 
He stopped drinking mineral water, 
and began to pursue other useless 
ways to spend his money. 
He killed the first ox he saw and sent 
it to the starving children of Ethiopia. 
He did, however, have time for a serious 
note. 

He never acknowledged that the Col- 
lege of William and Mary was the home of 
many of the best times and best friends of 
his life. School was a blast. And if there was 
one thing that did truly characterize the 
man of 1985, it was his zeal for the future. I 
hope he never forgets that school was 
short, special, and very formative. 

— Martin McClanan 



29. 



30. 



*Crim Dell was timeless. 

* A resident of the frat complex finds an innovative 
nay to store his bike. 



lA Well, maybe we aren't all yuppie Republicans, 
'he front porch of 406 Jamestown Road often 
eemed to be the last bastion of student liberalism. 



23 



Religion, Sex, Drugs, Politics 

From the Outside Looking In . . . 



Lisa Birnbach claims to "tell it like it is" 
on the explosive issues of religion, sex, 
drugs and politics, according to her obser- 
vations of student trends on her state-by- 
state trek to 186 American colleges and 
universities. 

The College Handbook (published by 
Ballatine, of the First Official Preppy 
Handbook) is a "How-to" guide to student 
living in the 1980s. The pages of the 
handbook are filled with editorials on 
down-to-earth subjects such as how to 
peacefully co-exist with an undesirable 
roommate, co-ed virginity, and the status 
of Greek life on campuses. The criteria of 
her analysises of almost two hundred 
colleges and universities ranges from the 
practical, such as location, size, and cost of 
tuition, to the subjunctive — college politi- 
cal persuasion, best/worst professors, 
dorms, classes, and favorite drugs. 

Ms. Birnbach's entry on "The College 
of William and Mary in Williamsburg" 
raises serious questions about her credibil- 
ity. In fact, one wonders if she has ever 
been to William and Mary, and if so, who 
in the world did she interview? (They must 
be given credit for "snowballing" Ms. 
Birnbach.) 

While Birnbach is accurate in her por- 
trayal of the college as being considered 
"very competitive" academically (most 
agree that W & M's reputation gets better 
the farther the distance from Williams- 
burg), she fails to capture the essence of 
the student body at the college. 

William and Mary is filled with home- 
coming queens, and country club ath- 
letes, who are arch-conservative in view, 
"not unlike a prep school", she wrote. 
Birnbach emphasized the school's 70% in- 
state population and the popularity of 
Creek life to back up her findings that 
W & M is a very "homogenous" crowd. 

Despite occasional frustration with Wil- 
liamsburg's limited nightlife scene, (It took 
no amazing insight for Birnbach to name 
Paul's, The Creen Leaf, Second Street, and 
the Blue Rose as off-campus favorites), 
most students are aware of the powerful 
sense of history and the beauty of the 

► The growth of campus bands — from folksy 
acoustic groups to the Irreverent Skum — refutes 
Birnbach's assessment of W&M as conservative. 
Here, members of Scum pose with their very own 
groupie. 

24 



campus. 

While students occasionally romp 
around in the 'Burg, most would not 
agree that DOG street is "the ultimate in 
trendiness." Colonial Williamsburg is 
America's "ultimate in antiquity", says 
History major Peggy Carroll, but few at the 
college are "so appreciate of their environ- 
ment that they take part-time jobs in C.W. 
although they don't need the money", as 
Birnbach claims. 

Birnbach named the drinking age con- 
troversy as the "1984 Big Issue" and 
probably hit it on the nose nation-wide — 
at least in Virginia. Budget cuts in 1984 
were also a hot spot of debate. 

Lacrosse, swimming and golf (Birn- 
bach's "college favorite sports") were 
originally axed by the college administra- 
tion, but have been reinstated on a tem- 
porary basis. Birnbach claimed that basket- 
ball and football are "not spectacular" 
sports at William and Mary. Let's get 
serious! 

"In terms of athletic participation, the 
student body is very much athletically 
minded", said Director of Mens Athletics, 



Jim Copeland. "Out of twenty-seven 
sports at the college, the two sports which 
draw the most crowds are basketball and 
football, which have followings from the 
town of Williamsburg and the college." 
Copeland said that an average home 
game for Tribe football draws a crowd of 
about 14,000 fans, to fill its 15,000-seat 
capacity stadium. Tribe basketball, this 
year a participant in the ECAC Southern 
Conference, usually attracts a crowd of 
about 3,700 per game, although some- 
times the crowd is as large as 7,000. 

Students complain about grade defla- 
tion at William and Mary, citing History 
and Geology courses as a "tough A." Birn- 
bach repeats this rumor in her handbook. 
However, Dorothy Bryant, Registrar of the 
college, says "It is dangerous to speculate 
on the easiest majors to attain a high 
grade. No one in the administration would 
take such a chance because it is all rela- 
tive." Bryant and Birnbach agree that 
Biology and Government are two of the 
most popular majors at W & M, although 
the registrar says that other popular majors 
include Economics, English, and Business. 




iim 




A Junior Charlie Arlinghaus. the president of 
1 Bryan's Dorm Council, sports the practical preppy 
attire that Birnbach found to be so typical of W&M 
during her visit here four years ago. 



25 



REVIEW cont. 



This year's big name entertainment in- 
cluded Eddie Murphy, the Kinks and Billy 
Idol. However, an undercurrent of reac- 
tion against the generally accepted view 
of W & M as "conservative" and "tradi- 
tion" whiplashed across the college social 
scene. Groups such as "Bootleg", a five- 
man band who specialized in older rock 
and roll tunes, such as music by The 
Grateful Dead, Beatles and Clapton, made 
itsdebutafterthefirstof the year. Among 
other appearances. Bootleg performed at 
the Crab Feast at Lake Matoka on April 14, 
and at the End-of-Classes jam in front of 
Cabell dorm. 

Another band which has shook William 
and Mary and raged through the Tide- 
water area is "Skum". Bass player Todd 
Middlebrook capsulated the mood of the 
group: "Skum is representative of the 
nouveaux attitude that prevails on cam- 
pus. We live our lives on the border of 
insanity: our musicand philosophy reflect 
that. The present social situation at W & M 
is just what we want. A lot of people say 
'We'll worry about that tomorrow' when 
they are having a good time. Well, every 
day of our lives is tomorrow." 

Guitarist, lead-singer for Skum, Hart 
Baur agreed with Middlebrook, "W & M 
has been an ideal atmosphere for Skum to 
emerge as the area's most provacative 
band . . . I've been kicked off more stages 
than I can remember for things that are 
applauded here. Most schools are too 
concerned about the conservative trend 
that is sweeping the nation and too wor- 
ried about looking ugly in case someone 
is watching." 

Birnbach names the Beaux Arts Ball as 
the "Best Party on Campus". Indeed, the 
Beaux Arts Ball is the most outrageous 
"tradition" on campus. Kelly Lawlor, the 
President of the Fine Arts Society which 
hosts the party, said that this year's mas- 
querade party, held on March 23, was 
constructed around the "Dada" move- 
ment. The Dadaists created a movement 
which went from Zurich to Paris before 
WWI.; they had a "revolutionary state of 
mind in reaction against the traditional 
values of art, such as the natural render- 
ings of apples (still-life)", she said. Al- 
though last year's theme was "Come 
As You Aren't", Lawlor said the party 
will always be a good time "where the 
underground people feel comfortable." 



26 



The Fine Arts Society donates the money 
they raise to buy a painting for students to 
use for study, she explained. 

Perhaps college life at William and 
Mary resembles the mood expressed by 
Lawlor's "Dadaists", whose movement 
flourished until their artwork was ac- 
cepted. The Dadaists didn't like accep- 
tance. College students, so emersed in a 
tradition of which they are proud, are 
trying to reach for their own individuality. 
The Beaux Arts Ball, representative of the 
undercurrent of rebellion at William and 
Mary, shows that despite Birnbach's label 
of "conservativism", students here can get 
pretty crazy. 

— Kirsten Fedewa 




Jennifer Veley 



U i^ife^:j^H>&giE:gS-^T 




Beth Henry 



A As Birnbach said, CW is a major sourceof stud 
employment. 

► There is certainly nothing conservative about 
Dernick Riddle's attire. 




i^AThis banner and ice sculpture, which graced 
, he lawn at 406 Jamestown Road during the 
JIanuary freeze, proves that despite Birnbachs label 
of conservatism, there are signs ot politically liberal 



MiheNikolicn 



11 



lileatw&lwl. 



I 

Profile of a student 



RETURN OF THE GRADUATE 



Homecoming: the most festive, "col- 
legiate", tradition-laden weekend of the 
year at William and Mary. This year was no 
exception. As if on cue, the crisp, dry 
weather rolled in on Friday afternoon, 
perfectly suited for the fall regalia the 
alumni would undoubtedly be sporting. 
The tolling of the Wren bells at the sunset 
ceremony signalled the official beginning 
of weekend and served to remind all 
listeners of their fleeting role in the history 
of William and Mary. 



green and gold clad children. They did all 
the things that alumni are supposed to do: 
ate Cheese Shop sandwiches, saluted Lord 
Botetourt and toured CW. 

The Olde Guarde maintained tradition 
by lunching on the Alumni house lawn 
before the game. Dr. John R.St. George, 
class of 1925, had rented a suite at the Inn, 
the same suite he had rented for the last 50 
years. He has always looked forward to 
Homecoming as a time to see old friends, 
remember his years here and marvel at 



''Dresses in green and gold widewale, 

this was the group that 

arrived in station wagons 

full of green and gold clad children/' 



The old guard, the new guard and 
everyone in between arrived in droves. 
The more recent graduates had that pol- 
ished, professional air about them. The 
women looked trim and chic while many 
of the men had gained weight. They were 
all eager to talk about what they'd been 
doing out in the "real world", yet they 
seemed to envy us for still being in school. 
Advice such as "you'll never have it this 
good again" and "enjoy it while you can" 
abounded. When asked how he planned 
to celebrate, Dave Lucas '80 said, "I go 
straight to the Sig Ep house, have a beer 
and watch them build the float. Then I get 
up early to watch the Viking float and go 
to the game." Laura Masters '82 said she 
comes back to go to the parties and see 
the people. 

The older alums celebrated in a similar 
manner. Cocktail parties and tailgates 
were at the heart of their weekend. They 
provided an opportunity to meet with old 
friends and catch up. Dressed in green 
and gold widewale, this was the group 
that arrived in station wagons full of small 
28 



the continuing growth of W & M. 

Why do they all come back? Bud Phillips 
'82 partially explained it: "My friends at 
work can't believe that I get so excited 
about going to homecoming. It sounds 
boring but it isn't. It's a chance to see old 
friends and relive that vacation type feel- 
ing that four years in Williamsburg was." 
Naturally, all those who flock back to their 
alma mater have positive feelings. But 
there is something deeper — a pride and 
sense of tradition that are derived from 
four years at William and Mary. A recent 
graduate summed it up this way: "Once 
you get out, you realize that the bond 
between William and Mary alums is 
stronger than just friendship. After what 
we've been through together, we're more 
like war buddies. There were a lot of good 
times here and a lot of bad times, but I 
love this place and I always will". Home- 
coming gives alums of all ages a chance to 
remember their experiences here and 
share it with the people who made those 
experiences so special. 

—Mary Mitchell 




ATypical alum: This alum exemplifies the typical 
joked-about alumnus with his bright preppy 
patchwork slacks. 

► Renewing old friendships: This group of alumni 
take time from their tailgate party to pose for a 
reunion shot. 




29 



I 

Profile of a Student 



IN Ml 



SENIOR SENTIMENTS 



Senior year? It meant different things to 
different people. For some it meant count- 
ing the days until they could drive away 
for the last time — a final reprieve from 
four unhappy years. For others, it signified 
the end of the best four years of their lives. 
For all seniors, it was a time of mixed 
emotions, a time when fear and anticipa- 
tion were feelings that existed side by side. 
Senior Martha Feathers echoed these sen- 
timents when she said, "There are mo- 
ments when you pray graduation will 
never get here and there are other 
moments when it can't come soon 
enough. Most of the time in between you 



don't think about it you just try and make 
the most of what's left." 

Work took on a decidedly secondary 
role during senior year. By the time 
second semester rolled around, the days 
were spent packing in all the things that 
we had never done — like touring CW — 
and all those things that we probably did 
too often — like hitting Busch in the after- 
noon for two free beers. Happy hour 
became an institution and 85 days til 
graduation meant 85 days left to party. We 
stopped taking our friends for granted 
and became conscious of how little time 
we had left with them. We anxiously 








30 



< The Wren bell tower is a landmark that wil 
in the minds of W&M graduates 



A Graduation remains Spent champagne corks 
outside Andrews are evidence of the exuberance c 
new graduates. 





awaited letters from prospective em- 
ployers and graduate schools and won- 
dered what we'd be doing a year from 
now. 

Nostalgia was pervasive. Walking across 
campus took on great significance and, as 
graduation approached, every action was 
sentimentally proclaimed "the last." There 
were a plethora of freshman hall reunions 
and reminiscent slide shows. Looking 
through memorabilia reminded us that 
although the times were not always good, 
they were packed with growth. We dis- 
covered ourselves as much through the 
accomplishments as through the disap- 
pointments, as much through the laughter 
as through the tears. Looking back af- 
forded us the opportunity to see where 
we'd been and realize how very far we'd 
come. One very sentimental senior. Scott 
Ukrop summed it up when he said," 
Senior year you realize time is running out 
and you tend to reminisce too much. You 
remember all the fun times and want to 
do them all again, plus everything else. 
There are so many memories and unfor- 
tunately you only realize what you haven't 
done when there is no time left to do it. I'll 
miss this place." 

— Mary Mitchell 



▲ Precious commodity; Senior Barbie 
Trybul picks up her six allotted graduation 
tickets in James Blair. 



■< A The partying began long before the 
Commencement exercises ended, much 
to the annoyance of many parents. Here, 
candidates celebrate after being conferred 
their degrees. 



31 



'rofile of a student 



ON THE FIFTH TIME AROUND 

Alternatives to the traditional eight semester plan 



As the requirements placed on indi- 
viduals in the working world increase, so 
must the requirements placed on students 
at The College of William and Mary. 
Because of the increasing demands 
placed on students, many have been 
forced to find alternatives to the tradi- 
tional eight-semester, or "four-year plan, " 
approach to college graduation. In fact, 
attitudes toward taking summer school 
courses, or extending the traditional pro- 
gram to nine or ten semesters, have 
changed drastically over the last ten years. 



Andy Fones responded to these questions 
by saying, "Academically, I never thought 
I'd attend so many classes. As for fun, it's 
better than being at home picking up golf 
balls." Jeff Hughes claimed, "I enjoyed 
having the opportunity to concentrate so 
closely on such limited subject matter. 
That in itself made my experience at 
summer school more than just fun." It 
seems evident that as long as parents are 
willing to finance attendance at William 
and Mary's summer school, it shall con- 
tinue to be a growing source of obtaining 



a 



It's better than picking up golf balls/' 



Today we find these alterations to the 
typical plan to be extremely well received 
and often even recommended by parents 
and staff. 

The first, and most commonly used 
deviation to the traditional plan, is at- 
tendance at summer school sessions. This 
is not a new phenomenon at William and 
Mary; however, it has been used progres- 
sively more and more during recent years. 
Statistics show that over 25% of William 
and Mary seniors attended summer school 
in Williamsburg this past summer. This 
does not even account for the near 300 
undergraduates who attended summer 
school at other colleges. Overall, last 
summer 686 presently enrolled students 
attended a summer session at William and 
Mary. Quite obviously summer school 
seems like a highly used technique for 
picking up a few extra credits. But is it 
effective academically? And, is it fun? 

32 



graduation credits. 

The second deviation from the tradi- 
tional graduation scheme is that of stretch- 
ing out the typical eight semesters of 
attendance to nine or ten semesters. Al- 
though this is much less common than 
summer school, it, too, is becoming much 
more common now than in the past. The 
most recent data shows that 7.2% of the 
entering class was still enrolled in the fall 
semester five years later. Although there 
are no current data to substantiate this, it is 
felt by many college officials that this 7.2% 
figure has been steadily increasing. What 
are the attitudes toward this trend? Tad 
Ceshickter explains, "To do all the things I 
really want to accomplish, I feel I need 
much more than four years." As a varsity 
baseball player he claims, "In order to 
dedicate myself to both my academics 
and my athletics I needed to make more 
time available to myself. " The common 






< Fitth-year senior Dan Best and Bruce BIber enjoy 
an impromptu party in a friend's dorm room. 

▼ Ginger Basket, as a fifth-year senior, will have 
another season to enjoy Tribe football. 




X . 




< Fifth-year senior Mark Butler has attended 
Virginia Tech and U-Va. as well as William and 
Mary. Says Butler, "I just like college. I don't want to 
graduate." 

< < Although not at W & M for five years, Jim Gavin, 
a former transfer student managed to make the 

W & M experience last longer than usual. 

complaint by most continuing students 
parallels that of Tad's, who said, "My one 
regret is that I will not be graduating with 
my contemporaries, the ones I met as a 
freshman." 

Although it may cost a bit more to 
attend a summer school session or con- 
tinue an extra semester or year, for those 
who are provided with the opportunity 
there seem to be few complaints. Because 
these alternatives to the typical eight- 
semester plan provide the opportunity to 
reduce the daily demands placed on the 
student each semester, attendance at 
these types of activities is sure to continue 
to increase. The increasing enrollment in 
summer school and ninth and tenth 
semesters demonstrates well the manner 
in which William and Mary students are 
successfully keeping up with the growing 
demands being placed on them by today's 
society. 

— Kevin Jones 



33 



PROFILE OF A STUDENT 



TO SQUAT... 

OR NOT TO SQUAT 




The College of William and Mary ac- 
cepted eighty-eight transfer students to 
begin in the spring semester of the 1984-85 
academic year. Of the eighty-eight stu- 
dents, forty "January freshmen" were 
placed on the first floor of the newly 
rebuilt Jefferson. The Office of Admissions 
knowing that space would be available 
had accepted forty extra freshmen to 
begin at William and Mary in January 
rather than September. 



would be extended to all those living in 
Jefferson, including the freshmen. There 
was controversy over this decision be- 
cause Jefferson was the newest dorm on 
campus and therefore very appealing. 
Students, especially upperclassmen who 
would have had access to the dorm, 
objected on the basis that freshmen had 
never previously had the privilege of 
squatting. The residents of Jefferson first 
argued that since they had only been at 



'The Residents of Jefferson first 
argued that since they had only 
been at William and Mary for one 
semester they should be able to 
stay together/' 



All the transfers arrived on January 8th 
for an orientation period. Less than a 
week later students began to return from 
Christmas break for the spring semester. 
Pam Cetchell, a transfer on Jefferson 
second said, of her halimates "The people 
on the hall made coming in January much 
less difficult than it could have been. They 
all made an effort to welcome us." 

The freshmen on Jefferson first had 
little trouble adjusting to their January 
admission. "We were all in the same 
situation which made us closer," said 
Hallet Murphy, "it was great that the forty 
of us were together." This was not the 
only advantage that the residents of Jeffer- 
son were given. The Office of Residence 
Life announced that squatting privileges 



William and Mary for one semester they 
should be able to stay together. "We just 
happened to be here at the right time and 
people are mad. We did not make the 
decision to let us squat. Anybody else in 
our position would do the same," said 
Jamie Allison who was happy with Resi- 
dence Hall Life's decision. 

In spite of all the controversy over 
squatting, the freshman and the transfers 
found the people at William and Mary 
very friendly. "It is scary to be in a situation 
where everyone knows what is going on 
except you," said Amy England reflecting 
on her first weeks at William and Mary, 
"but everyone made an effort to help if 
you asked questions." 

— Kathleen Durkin 




After reopening. Jefferson became one of tfie most 
popular dorms on campus because of its air 
conditioning, location, and co-ed status. Here, 
fresfiman transfer students. Jack Kayton and Sel 
Kardan. wfio were |ust two of the many wfio 
exercised tfieir squatter's nghits in Jefferson, relax 
to some music. 



34 




35 



PROFILE OF A STUDENT 



REPRESENTING THE DIVERSITY 



"Liberal Education requires not only a 
curriculum but also a community in 
which students. . .practice the dis- 
ciplines of learning. The life of the 
community depends upon all of its 
elements: .. ., a selected, full time, 
largely resident study body . . .fully rep- 
resenting the diversity of society. . . " 

— The liberal Education as a 
Curriculum and a Community 
Objective of the College 
(1984-1985 W&M Catalog) 

This Objective, not to mention federal 
pressure in the form of numerical goals, 
has prompted the increase in the college's 
effort toward minority recruitment. Al- 
freda James, Assistant to the Dean of 
Admissions, explains that "to fulfill our 
mission as a liberal arts college" and "to 
encounter diversity, both culturally and 
socioeconomically" the number of black 
students must increase. 



But, when the college systematically 
admits a student just because he is a 
member of some racial category, does it 
lower its standards? According to Alfredo 
James, William and Mary has several cate- 
gories of what are called "special admits." 
These categories include "students that 
have special artistic talent," "students that 
have superior athletic ability," "students 
that are out-of-state," "students that are 
black," and even "students that are from 
Northern Virginia." The best of these 
categories are selected to be students at 
the college. 

It's not as if the college can just pick 
black students to come here after they 
graduate from high school," explains 
James. This is still a selective and competi- 
tive institution and to admit any student 
because of mere color defeats the purpose 
of education. The bottom line in recruit- 
ing is whether or not the student can do 
the work at William and Mary. 

In 1984 William and Mary hoped to 



enroll 73 black students. This goal was set 
to reflect the size and scope of curriculum 
at the college. Only 55 black students 
were enrolled. Although the college did 
not reach its numerical goal, it did not 
jeopardize any state or federal funding 
because it displayed what is called a 
"good faith effort." 

As a bright black student, "you have the 
choice of where you want to go," ex- 
plained Tony McNeal, Sr. Class President 
and a black student. All the state schools, 
under the same federal pressures, recruit 
and compete for adroit black students. 
William and Mary recruiters realize that 
this college is not as attractive to black 
students as other schools, such as JMU, 
UVA, or even the Ivy League. James has to 
point out the "advantages" of attending 
William and Mary to perspective black 
students. 

What are these advantages? Black stu- 
dents at the college have to think hard to 
list ANY. Black freshmen come here under 




36 



a misconception that this school is con- 
siderably integrated. Of course, when 
they move into their dormitories, over- 
whelmingly occupied by whites, it is what 
Tony recalls as a "shocking reality." 

William and Mary's biggest drawback 
for black students is the utter absence of a 
social life. Angela Fogel explains that "to 
do any socializing, black students have to 
leave campus." The Greek System for 
blacks has a service orientation and is not 
an avenue for socializing. The system also 
lacks participation. 

Regardless of the misconceptions, most 
black students come to William and Mary 
because it is considered a prestigious 
school. Many have to deal with the pres- 
sures of parents. Angela Fogel discovered 
these reasons for selecting William and 
Mary in her survey of black students. The 
survey further revealed that few black 
students come here because of friends. 

It is also felt among black students that 
there should be more staff to help them 
and more information provided to them 
about the college. They feel that admis- 
sions counselors misrepresent the num- 
ber and type of problems that black 
students encounter. But there's always 
Dean Carroll Hardy, Associate Dean of 
Students, Minority Affairs. Her office and 
this school piloted the Virginia Student 
Transition Program which offers admitted 



▼ Ewell Hall, the admissions and music building, 
houses the offices of the Dean and Assistant Dean 
of Admissions, Gary Ripple and Alfreda James. 





black high school graduates the oppor- 
tunity to "matriculate with minimum dif- 
ficulty" into the college, according to 
Hardy, through an intensive six week 
program to strengthen their writing, math, 
and general study skills. "In a microcosm 
(they) know the lay of the territory," 
explains the Dean. And once into the 
regular academic year, Hardy's door is 
forever open, but the "freshmen get 
priority," she said. 

The most compelling revelation of the 
survey is that ninety percent of the black 
students at William and Mary would never 
recommend that their friends come here. 
The situation might get better as the 
number of black students on campus 
increases; students might be "inclined to 
do more things," forecasted Fogel. 

— Donna Porter 



< < Students attending a BSO meeting; "not an 
avenue for socializing." 

< Graduation at last. Man Budd and Ed Jackson 
celebrate their last moments at W&fvl. 



37 



PROFILE OF A STUDENT 



THE LGU 



THE LESBIAN AND GAY UNION 



"I want people to know we are not just 
for gays but for people interested in gay 
issues," the president of the recently 
formed William and Mary Lesbian and 
Gay Union (LGU) said. "We have mem- 
bers who are straights and are looking for 
anything liberal. People sometimes show 
up at our dances and meetings just be- 
cause they are not mainstream events," 
she added. 

The LGU began meeting in September 
of 1984. The Student Association Council 
approved the LGU's constitution (22-3-4) 
on February 1, 1985, making it an official 
campus organization. The group now has 
the right to apply for college funding but 
has not received any thus far. 

"Studies of the population at large 
indicate that ten percent of the popula- 
tion is gay. At William and Mary, so no one 
thinks I'm exaggerating, I would conser- 
vatively estimate that there are 300-500 gay 
students on campus," Professor George 
Greenia, faculty advisor for the LGU, said. 
Greenia, who had been involved in 
campus ministry programs at both the 
University of Michigan and Marquette 
University before coming to William and 
Mary, feels that his leadership of the 
group "needs to be public knowledge so 
that students know that a faculty member 
supports this effort and so they have a 
contact in case they need to talk to 
someone privately." 

He added, "I am not a professional 
counselor or pastoral minister and refer 
students to professional help whenever 
indicated." 

Greenia said, "The first semester of 
operation in the union was heartening. 
Organizational meetings early in the term 
brought out about 40 students." 

Meeting every Wednesday night in the 
Little Theatre in the Campus Center, the 
LGU has twenty dues-paying members 
who attend regularly. 

The Union has five student officers, 
both gay and straight. The purpose of the 
LGU as stated in its constitution is "to 
provide education for faculty and stu- 
dents about gay issues and to establish a 
community of those concerned with these 
issues." 

The constitution also states, "Member- 
ship in this organization is not to be taken 
as an indication of sexual orientation. 
Membership rosters will remain con- 
fidential." 

Joining the ranks of other colleges such 
as VCU, Mary Washington, Va. Tech, 



U Va., and jMU which have gay student 
organizations, the W & M LGU sponsored 
three functions first semester. The group 
showed "La Cage aux Folles" in October. 
About 75 came to the movie. In Novem- 
ber, professor Ruth Mulliken of the School 
of Education gave a public lecture entitled 
"Growing Up and Coming Out." The 
lecture attracted a crowd of 40. Also, the 
LGU sponsored a dance at the end of the 
semester. WCWM provided the music. 

Spring semester the LGU sponsored a 
showing of the television film, "Consent- 
ing Adult," a movie about a gay college 
student and his family, in February at the 
Spanish House. The group has also given 
two dances and on March 14th sponsored 
a public lecture entitled "Homosexuality 
and the Judeo-Christian Tradition" given 
by Professor Greenia. 

LGU vice-president said, "The lectures 
have gone really well. There was a large 
public turnout at Professor Greenia's lec- 
ture. A few campus Christian groups at- 
tended. We heard they were going to be 
there. They were very friendly. They had 
their views and expressed them. After the 
lecture broke up, people stayed and 
talked casually." 

The group did stir some controversy on 
campus, but Greenia commented, "I 
should mention, in light of the media 
attention given gay students and myself 
this fall, that our current increase in visi- 
bility, has had almost universally positive 
results. I have heard no negative com- 
ments from any member of the administra- 
tion, faculty, or community." 

"Everyone I know personally is positive 
about the organization. I never have heard 
anything negative about the LGU, but I 
have never heard 'Hey, let's go to a LGU 
meeting tonight'," the LGU vice-presi- 
dent said. Headded,"l would like toseea 
larger membership. I would also like to 
see more support from the straight com- 
munity, but I do not know how realistic 
that is." 

The president commented that she 
would like to see more educational events 
planned. "I would like to see big-name 
speakers like Ginny Apuzzo, Director of 
the National Gay Task Force, brought to 
campus. I would also like to see a help- 
line relating to gay issues set up and 
staffed by trained members," she said. 

"We are not for gays only. We deal with 
gay issues, and these issues affect straights 
as well as gays," LGU vice-president 

added. 

—Susan Winiecki 



38 



Profile of a Student 



WILLIAM & MARY vs STUDENT APATHY 



It's crowded. It's hot. The music is loud. 
It's Saturday night. Yep, you guessed it, a 
trat party. Give me a buck for every party 
animal that walked into the door to a frat 
party on a Saturday night and I'd make 
over $3000 by the end of second semester. 
Why was it that frat parties attracted up to 
250 people on a Saturday night, but 
the organizers of Creek Week could not 
find more than 200 people to set a 
Guiness Book World record in Twister 
competition? 

Student apathy was a problem that not 
only the Greek Week's organizers have 
had to deal with. The SAC, sports, BSA, 
and even fraternities and sororities have 
dealt with it throughout the year. Several 
factors contributed to the lack of student 
enthusiasm at the College of William and 
Mary. For one, many activities were not 
well publicized. Those that were well- 
publicized often lacked the support and 
enthusiasm necessary to attract people. 
Alicia Locheed, from a freshman's point of 



STUDENT APATP y_ 

WHO CARES?? 



em 



FOR 



REAGAN 



▲ These bumper stickers say It all. 



► Student apathy plagued the troubled Greek Week 
festivities. 



view, commented, "Activities can be well- 
organized by the officers, but you need 
enthusiasm, support, and communication 
to get people involved." 

The Greek Games, the concluding part 
of Greek Week , served as an example. The 
Inter-Sorority Council and the Inter- 
Fraternity Council, hoping for 1200 
people to break the Guiness Book of 
World Records' Twister record, settled for 
a mere 200 people. That alone illustrated 
student apathy. Coupled with the indif- 
ference of students toward non-money- 
making sports on campus, non-alcoholic 
activities, and voting in campus elections, 
apathy posed a threat to campus life. 

Sports such as fencing, lacrosse, and 
rugby were no longer acknowledged as 
William and Mary varsity sports which 
receive support from the college. As the 
college did not support these sports in 
terms of dollars, students failed to support 
them as spectators. It was no wonder they 
have been discontinued as collegiate, var- 



sity sports. 

The only home track meet of the spring 
season was the Colonial Relays, held on 
the first weekend in April. The fans were 
so few that no one could determine a fan 
from a competitor. The Colonial Relays 
was a major track meet, which hosted 
over twenty-nine teams, included runners 
from the Olympic track team. 

What accounted for the fact that less 
than one fourth of the campus population 
voted in the Student Association Council 
election in February? Sure, some students 
off campus found it difficult to vote and 
later commented on the lack of voting 
accommodations made for off-campus 
students. Many, still, never made the 
effort. 

SAC-sponsored activities such as pre- 
game tailgate parties and Pub nights have 
been discontinued owing to the lack of 
student interest. However, the problem 
here was no-longer student apathy, but 
the new drinking age restrictions. SAC 




40 



vice-chairperson for next year, Lisa Price 
remarked, "We have had problems this 
year because of the drinking age. We 
don't want to exclude anyone under 
nineteen, so we've made arrangements 
with all of our activities. Unfortunately, 
with Pub night, those able to drink gath- 
ered in the Wig where the beer was 
served and those under nineteen watched 
the band upstairs. I don't know what 
happened with the tailgate parties; they 
never were successful." Lisa also noted 
that Change of Pace was the only non- 
alcoholic activity that the SAC sponsored 
which was well-attended. 

Many weekends, students found it diffi- 
cult to choose between various campus 
activities, it would not be unusual for four 
parties, a play, a band concert, and a 
dance to take place all in one night. 
"Many times there are so many activities 
competing for people's attention in one 
night," observed Alicia Locheed. "If you 
spread people out that much, none of the 
events will be well-attended." 



Nevertheless, as much as students and 
faculty complained about students' ap- 
parent lack of interest, the problem of 
student apathy was not unique to William 
and Mary. In fact, the students at W & M 
were generally concerned about their 
school and many take an active interest in 
it. We heard about the lack of participa- 
tion in the Greek Games, but did anyone 
mention the fact the Greek Week was just 
started this year? We all know how diffi- 
cult it is to get a tradition started on any 
campus. Inter-Sorority Council President, 
Terry Lancaster started, "Greek Week it- 
self was a success, but the Greek Games 
were disappointing. Letter day, the Spei- 
del, Goodrich, and Goggin concert, and 
the faculty wine and cheese were all 
successful. This is the first time we've tried 
Greek Week. Other campus' have had it 
for years and it's been a big success. We 
made about $800 for our philanthropy; so, 
I would definitely consider that a success. 
At the faculty wine and cheese, it was the 
faculty members that didn't attend." 







Faculty apathy? Michael Hecht, who 
organized the Pi Kappa Alpha annual Pike 
Marathon noted, "1 typed 500 letters ad- 
dressed to the faculty and distributed 
them to the faculty and I can't recall one 
that participated in the run, walk, or bike 
ride. Several sponsored people partici- 
pating, but none came out to watch or 
participate." The Pike Marathon was a 
success this year in raising money for 
Muscular Dystrophy. Michael added, "Par- 
ticipation had been down in the past, but 
this year we had 550 people at the party 
the Saturday before the marathon. About 
125 people actually participated. Com- 
bined, 175 people either participated or 
helped out in some way." 

Although many activities suffered from 
student apathy, activities that did not 
involve alcohol did exist, offering the free 
food or free music which attracted W & M 
students who wanted to help a good 
cause, take a study break, or just plain 
have fun. We just needed to take the time 
to notice. 

— Kaky Spruill 



i ^ i 






AOnly 1,480 of 4.500 undergrads voted in the SA 
presidential election Here. SA president-elect 
Kathryn Potter does some last-minute 
campaigning. 

■< Poor turnout: Although many Greek Week events, 
especially the Speidel, Goodrich, and Goggin show, 
were well -attended, the attempt to break the worlds 
record in Twister-playing fell prey to student 
apathy Milton Bradley Company provided enough 
Twister mats to cover the floor of the Hall to no avail 
Here, the one hundred or so participants play 
Twister to their hearts' content. 



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41 



Profile of a student 



► Oblivious to the evils of caffeine. Leticia Van 
Doren and Joan Hopkins fiit the Coke special at the 
Safeway before a long night of studying. 




A Experiments in cooking: Jon Ewing checks on 
the contents of his pot. 

► Wig leftovers: You are f/hat you eat. 



42 



YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT 



ARE COLLEGE STUDENTS REALLY JUNK-FOOD JUNKIES? 



Every freshman soon encounters Sham- 
rock Food Service at the College of Wil- 
liam & Mary — an encounter that begins 4 
years of unusual eating habits. Safe from 
our parents' protective eyes, our eating 
habits degenerate as quickly as other 
habits. Shamrock attempts to replace our 
parents as dietary influences. How success- 
fully does Shamrock provide a well-bal- 
anced, good-tasting diet like Mom's? Rob 
Mayhew, a senior who is supervisor at the 
Caf, says, "Well, we haven't had any food 
poisoning this year. The food is better 
than it used to be." Unfortunately (or 



maybe fortunately), any improvement 
came too late to entice upperclassmen 
back into the Shamrock fold. Senior Al- 
lison Stringer is one of many of us who 
has not had a meal plan since freshman 
year. Even as a freshman, she did not get 
her money's worth; Allison remembers 
that, "I only used my meal plan 4 times 
spring semester freshman year. Once it 
was to get orange juice." 

Dr. Karow at the Student Health Service 
feels that the negative attitude towards 
Shamrock is unwarranted. Although stu- 
dents complain about the selection and 




the preponderance of "starchy foods," 
Dr. Karow explains that, "Starchy is a bad 
term. People need B complex vitamins 
found in 'starchy' food." Dr. Karow main- 
tains that the meal plan is actually better 
for students than trying to cook on their 
own, "because of over-emphasis on junk 
foods, lack of equipment, and lack of 
nutritional information. Nobody knows 
what a well-balanced diet is." She hopes 
that more students will take advantage of 
the College's Wellness Center at the Stu- 
dent Health Service, pointing out that, 
"Eighty-five percent of disease could be 
prevented by adjusting lifestyles — nutri- 
tional, exercise, rest, and stress factors." 
With 2,000 patients a month passing 
through the Health Service's doors, it 
seems that many of us have other things 
on our minds besides nutrition. 

Cooking takes more time than many 
students are able to devote to it. Jennifer 
Alcantara, a senior, comments. "I don't 
cook. I either eat at the Cheese Shop or 
get a Chandler at the deli." Even those of 
us who cook don't like to do so every 
night, like senior Margie Johnson: "My 
coach really keeps on us about our weight. 
But living in Sorority Court is the triple 
threat— the Cheese Shop, BR, and 
Mama's." Others of us have favorite meals 
that are quick and easy. Beth Butler, a 
junior, remarks that, "One of my sorority 
sisters eats a hot dog on white bread every 
single day." 

Other students, though, like to be more 
creative in their cooking. Senior Kim 
Moosha has a novel approach that takes 
full advantage of the microwaves we are 
beginning to see on campus. She laughs. 
"I ea! a lot of baked potatoes. I like them 
nuked, i just pretend they're little Com- 
mie Russians."That'soneway to deal with 
stress. Or try senior Don Hultman's innova- 
tive approach as a creative release, "You 
can make oatmeal just from the hot water 
spigot, it's so hot. And there you go, 
dinner for two." 

Don't worry Mom, We're eating OK. 

— Sherry Hamby 



43 



Profile of a student 



HINTS OF SPRING 



'It's that first sunny day after the February blahs/' 



Spring is probably the most desirable 
and long-awaited season in the college 
student's year. Spring break obviously 
occurs in the spring, so does graduation; 
two events that make the season that 
much more desirable. Although spring 
doesn't officially begin until March 21st, in 
Williamsburg one may have thought 
spring was here in mid-February when 
temperatures rose to the high 70's. But 
that was just Mother Nature's way of 
toying with the college student since 
freezing temperatures followed warm 
spells time and time again. 

In anticipation of warm weather, Wil- 
liam and Mary students used different 
methods of noting the "first hints of 
Spring." Several students stuck to the old 
standards. Hunter Milligan said, "You 
know it's Spring when the trees get little 
pink and white things on them," (com- 
monly referred to as buds). "Crocuses and 
Robins mean Spring has sprung," claimed 
Michelle Barnes. Alfred Lord Tennyson 
once said, "Spring is when a young man's 
fancy turns to thoughts of love." Ginger 
Baskett was of the same opinion. "When 
you see lots of couples walking hand-in- 



hand down DOG Street, signs of love, 
that's Spring." 

Other students had more unconven- 
tional, college-oriented ideas that marked 
the first of Spring. Sherry Leigh Gill said, 
"It's when girls start laying-out in the sun 
despite freezing temperatures." "Con- 
vertible tops come down on that first 
sunny day in the Spring," remarked Kevin 
Jones. Virginia Prasch summed up the 
feeling, "It's that first sunny day after the 
February blahs." "Apathy," stated senior 
Lindsey Willis, "Apathy sets in with the 
first signs of Spring." And, along with that, 
"Happy hours become a lot more impor- 
tant," commented Mike Arnold. 

Obviously there is no one way to mark 
the coming of Spring. At William and 
Mary almost anything was heralded as a 
hint that Spring, synonomous with the 
end of classes and beach week, was well 
on its way. On March 29th Williamsburg 
had its first thunderstorm of the season. 
Jeff Hughes marked the occasion by say- 
ing, "Thunderstorms! Now that's when 
you really know that Spring is here." 

— Beth Henry 




A Rites of spring: Junior IVIike Johnson breaks out 
the hibachi to grill burgers with some of his 
hallmates in Stith. 



44 




< At the first hint of spring, we dig out our shorts 
and head for any location outside to study and nap 
in the sun. Here. Kellie Jones takes advantage of an 
unseasonably warm March afternoon to read in the 
sun. 



TThe Barksdale Field sprinklers prove to be 
irresistible on a muggy Williamsburg day. Leticia 
Van Doom leaps into the spray. 





^ 



45 



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s> 



BIZARRE BEAUX ARTS 



Absurd, Outrageous, Shocking, Bizarre. . . 



It is like a scene out of a surrealistic 
movie: men in drag dancing with famous 
rock stars, characters from Rocky Horror 
dancing with characters from Alice in 
Wonderland. It is a chance for alter-egos 
to emerge with a vengeance. It is bizarre, 
funny, artsy, unique and according to Lisa 
Birnbach, "the best party on campus." It is 
the Beaux Arts Ball. 

Sponsored by the Fine Arts Society, the 
Beaux Arts Ball is a relatively new tradition 
at William and Mary. It is a costume ball 
held in Andrews Hall and this year's 
theme, Dada, encouraged participants to 
stretch their imaginations to limit in cre- 
ating original and iconoclastic costumes. 
Kelly Lawler, president of the Fine Arts 
Society said , "despite hassles by the police, 
this year's ball was the best ever — we had 
a great time doing the decorations, the 
tunes were great, and everyone danced 
hard. That's what it's all about." Lawler 
said that even though Beaux Arts was 
more closely supervised this year, the ball 
lived up to its reputation for craziness. 
Most people there agreed. Cindy Bud- 
inger, a.k.a. Cindy Lauper, stated, "It's a 



great change of pace from the William 
and Mary social scene." 

The decorations added to the "anything 
goes" ambience. Student artwork was 
interspersed with flashing lights and big 
screen video. The music played was as 
eclectic as the tastes of those who at- 
tended. The Dada theme was perfectly 
suited to the spirit of Beaux Arts. Early 
Dadaists described the movement as the 
"abolition of logic. . .memory. . .and 
tradition" and "absolute and unquestion- 
able faith in every god that is the product 
of spontaneity." Dada, which was closely 
related to Cubism and Futurism, ad- 
vocated a "revolution of consciousness." 
Their artwork was the product of kind-of 
anarchic energy. 

If all this does not sound like a typical 
night out on the town in Williamsburg, 
then the organizers of this years Beaux 
Arts Ball did what they set out to do. Like 
Dada, they created a radical alternative to 
established norms. Beaux Arts provided 
the chance to "come as you aren't." It was 
absurd, outrageous, shocking, bizarre and 

a great party. 

—Kelly Lawler 










l^ 



/•• 



■< Party-goers celebrate the Beaux Arts Ball's Dada 
theme in Andrews Foyer. 

▼ Julie Baroody takes a rest from the mobs on the 
dance floor upstairs amid the colorful decorations. 




< < Dress at the Beaux Arts Ball ranges from simple 
black and white to celebrity costumes 

A Junior Kelly Barron is a clear ringer for Prince as 
she prepares to leave for the Beaux Arts Ball 



47 



JV 



▼ ▼ Ivan Goldstein takes advantage of his free tin 
by reading The Washington Post 



l<lry 



GOT A MINUTE? 



'SO THIS IS WHAT EVERYONE CALLS SPARE TIME" 



T Scott Ukrop spends some of his spare time 
contributing to the community by coaching one ( 
the Williamsburg Youth Soccer League teams. 



What spare time? Who ever has any 
spare time? You're up at 8:00 am to 
shower and get to class by 9:00 am. You 
have classes straight through until your lab 
ends at 4:00 pm. Back at the dorm, there's 
a message on the memo-board that your 
Philosophy discussion meeting has been 
changed to 4:30 pm. Finally, by 5:30 pm 
you amble back to your room as your 
roommate is headed out the door to the 
Wig. Would you like to join her? Consider- 
ing that you haven't eaten anything except 
a bagel on the way to your 9:00 am class, 
you grab your mealcard and go. Eating — 
now is that spare time? Actually, it's one of 
those things you cram into your schedule 
because you have to; it's a necessity to 
maintain your health, right? So, you chow 
down and then waddle back to the dorm. 
You write that English paper you've been 
putting off all week, practice speaking 
your Francais, attend the hall meeting, 
and at last, with frustration, you slam your 
Economics book shut. Done! But, it's only 
10:30 pm and you never hit the sack 
before 1:00 am. 

So, this is what everyone calls spare 
time!! Much to the surprise of many 
Hokies and Wahoos, William and Mary 
students do have free time. Although 
many of us sleep in our spare time, there 
are those of us who have no trouble 
amusing ourselves. 

"I enjoy visiting friends or just going to 
William and Mary Hall to watch a movie in 
my spare time," commented sophomore 
Tony Kanakry. "You can call spare time 
sleeping in the afternoon, but free time is 
something you have to plan for. You have 
to make free time. I make time to partici- 
pate in intramurals and refereeing for 
various sports. I don't see my friends 
enough so I visit them or take a walk in 
Colonial Williamsburg." 

"My favorite thing to do is anything that 
doesn't involve mental processes," said 
Adam Anthony. "After I've been studying 
a long time, I need to take a break and do 
something that involves no real thinking, 
like watching MTV. That's a great, mind- 



less thing to do!" 

Freshman Elaine Pierce remarked, "I 
like to crochet and read stupid maga- 
zines; magazines that aren't serious. I also 
enjoy the plays on campus. If I have free 
time, I'll go see a play." 

Kevin Davis, an R.A. in Monroe said, "I 
sleepor takecare of R.A. things on the hall. 
Thursday nights, anyone that doesn't have 
a class before 12:00 pm on Friday goes to 
Paul's or the Delly!" 

"I enjoy taking walks in CW to watch 
the tourists," commented David Ransom, 
a freshman in Monroe. 

"I ride my bike, exercise, or lay out in 
the sun with a good book," responded 
Lauren Ellis. "I also enjoy spending time 
alone, just taking a walk or riding my 
bike." 

Chris Booker remarked, "I have a week- 
ly routine of lifting weights four times a 
week. If you can't find me in my room 
during the day, I'll either be at Blow Gym 
or in the Sunken Gardens throwing the 
frisbee. At night, well, I just enjoy goofing 
off!" 

"What do I do in my spare time?" 
laughed freshman Andy Falck. "Sleep!! If 
I don't get at least twelve hours of sleep a 
day, I'm useless!" 

— Kaky Spruill 





48 







MikeNikohch 





Bill Honaker 
AAThe MTV room at the Campus Center offers 
W & M students the best In the latest videos, good 
times and complete boredom. 

A Taking a break from studying. Bill Brennen 
pauses to read the Post 

< A glimpse tfirough the window grate at late night 
activity in Blow Gym's weight room. 



MrkeNikolicb 



49 



K<S 



Jh). 



THE LIGHTER SIDE OF 
COLLEGIATE SPORTS 



The campus of William and Mary is no 
different from that of any other college or 
university. Indeed, we do stress academ- 
ics, but athletics are also a major part of 
campus life at William and Mary. Many 
young men and women that enter col- 
legiate life have participated in one or 
more high school varsity sports. However, 
when they enter college, they realize that 
collegiate athletics not only require excel- 
lence in a chosen sport, but also a tremen- 
dous time commitment. As a result, the 
majority of the students interested in 
athletics at W & M choose not to partici- 
pate in a varsity sport. 

Close to seventy percent of non-varsity 
athletes at William and Mary take ad- 
vantage of the intramural program of- 
fered on campus. The campus provides 



Neary, expressed the opinion that. "Intra- 
murals are very important to campus life. 
The majority of the males here were 
athletes of some sort in high school and 
intramurals provide them with an oppor- 
tunity to continue to compete." 

Scott Murphy, the captain of the Express 
Four a men's basketball team, com- 
mented, "I've always participated in 
sports, and although I may not excel 
enough to participate on a collegiate 
level, intramurals still allow me the oppor- 
tunity of competition." Scott participates 
in at least five intramural sports including 
bowling and soccer. "I'm like everyone 
else, I have an interest in sports and I take 
advantage of the programs offered here. I 
wish everyone would participate in intra- 
murals; we'd have more teams and more 



Close to seventy percent of non-varsity 

athletes at William and Mary take 
advantage of the intramural program. 



twenty-five different intramural sports, 
involving team as well as individual 
competition. In addition to the many 
male-oriented sports, there are also a 
number of co-ed and female only activi- 
ties offered. 

Intramural sports are extremely impor- 
tant on a resident campus such as William 
and Mary because of the lack of activities 
exclusive of campus life. Outside of the 
campus, Williamsburg has very little to 
offer athletes as far as competition is 
concerned. Intramurals provide an op- 
portunity for athletes to express them- 
selves. Sophomore, Tony Kanakry, re- 
marked, "Intramurals allow me to let out 
my aggression and frustration. Athletics 
are important to me and intramurals allow 
me to compete with a relaxed attitude." 

Participation in an intramural sport does 
not require the amount of time that varsity 
athletics do, nor do intramurals require a 
rigid commitment. 

Pi Kappa Alpha team captain, j. D. 



competition." 

There are different levels of intensity 
within an intramural game. Some players 
take the competition more seriously than 
others. For example, a football game 
between two rival fraternities is generally 
more intense than a game between two 
male dorms. 

"Everyone wants to win," stated Scott 
Murphy. "It doesn't feel good to lose no 
matter what level you're on." 

The intramural program extends past 
the undergraduate level. There exists a 
graduate league composed mainly of law 
students. In fact, the graduate league has 
at least nine or ten teams which allow the 
graduates to remain a part of campus life. 

The intramural department has been 
working diligently this year to offer a 
greater variety of team sports appealing to 
the male and female population on 
campus. 

Sophomore, Doug Phillips, comment- 
ed, "Although I enjoy my participation in 



intramural football and other sports, I 
would like the program to include rugby!" 
Doug, no less, is a rugby player. 

Dan Scerbo, a student at the college 
who not only works with the intramural 
office, but also serves as head referee for 
intramurals, stated, "We offer a varied 
program and it takes a lot of work. I think 
the students appreciate it. We have a good 
turnout on campus. Some sports such as 
football or softball have fifty to sixty teams. 
We definitely offer one of the best intra- 
mural programs. 

— Kaky Spruiil 




50 




< Intramural soccer has gained popularity the past 
several years. Football, basketball and Softball have 
traditionally been the three big sports with each 
having several leagues including a frat league. 

* Andy Fones. a Lambo. signals some of his 
teammates in the game against Pika. 

▼ Ultimate fnsbee has gained interest recently. This 
year an ultimate club. Wizards, was formed; a 
member of Wizards takes a break after a match. 




; 



/ 







mSi 




51 



^" 



DATING!?! 



The social life at William and Mary was, 
well, questionable at best. The rigorous 
competitive academic atmosphere served 
to successfully quell a lot of student plans 
and college-like riotous activities. Atop of 
the pressure to make grades, there were 
only twelve billion or so college and state 
laws which also effectively impeded stu- 
dent fun and helped contribute to the 
standing-room-only situation at Swem on 
every night of the week except Saturday, 
but then again it was closed on Saturday 
nights. 



down DOG Street at night to set the stage 
for the rest of the evening or a Cheese 
Shop lunch to relax and talk over lunch. 
The frat parties were good for meeting 
people but not necessarily a great place to 
take a date. Most times the parties were 
over-crowded and aside from dancing 
and drinking, the best you could do is 
sweat. You were better off going to a 
movie first, then hitting the frats as a 
nightcap or taking that famous walk down 
to Chowning's with another couple or 
two. 



'To date is merely a matter of 
having a lot of confidence or simply 
not caring. 



;; 



what can be done? Student action here 
at the college is practically non-existent, 
so things in general probably won't 
change a great deal in the near future. 
However, how many times have you heard 
both girls and guys complain about the 
lack of "dating"? Both sexes blame the 
other — neither ever suggesting or pro- 
viding alternatives. Perhaps, people are 
happier complaining here at the College 
of Knowledge rather than doing some- 
thing about it. Despite the apparent prob- 
lems, there are ways for those mavericks 
out there to have fun here in what seems 
to be the Capital of Inertia at Rest. 

Admittedly, the socially active percen- 
tage of the student body was small, but 
this could be circumvented. To date a girl 
or guy who was a Greek also complicated 
things, since it earned immediate rumors 
or recognition of the "taken" status. This 
too could be minimized. 

Williamsburg, believe it or not, did 
provide numerous places to take a mem- 
ber of the opposite sex to have fun, talk or 
whatever. Never underestimate a walk 



52 



The best suggestion than can be made 
to improve dating possibilities was to buy, 
borrow, rent or steal a car or other motor- 
ized transportation. Once you had se- 
cured mobility, you had improved your 
social life immensely. Richmond, Norfolk, 
Virginia Beach, and even Washington be- 
came easy places to take a "friend." The 
drive gave a chance for talking and once 
out of the 'burg, life took on a new 
perspective. Having left the academic 
arena, venturing into the real world in 
itself was enough to have made a great 
date, not to mention the fact that it 
increased your opportunities for "fun" 
incredibly. 

To date is merely a matter of either 
having a lot of confidence or simply not 
caring. We all leave here eventually, so big 
deal if he or she says "no" to a date. It's 
their loss — move on, don't care, and real- 
ize you're only in college ONCE, nothing 
else needs to be said to improve your 
social life. 

— Thomas Caffrey 




< Here's an interesting date. Tom Meyers took 
Susan Benefieid to the Beaux Arts Ball. 




AA If you don't mind barbaric behavior and 
uncooked food, Sig Ep's annual Viking Party or 
Theta Delts Hairy Buffalo Party can be a good lime. 
Kim IVloosha and date Sam Hines with Fred Amico 
pose for a picture before being covered with food. 
A The senior ISC Dance livened up the February 
Blues. Here Peter Wilcox and l\^argarette Leite take 
advantage of a slow song. 



v<> 



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O 



vV 



SPRING BREAK 



Students always look forward to that 
week in March when they can forget 
about classes and everything else that has 
to do with W&M, otherwise known as 
Spring Break. Each person has a different 
place they enjoy, it seems. Debbie Fetter- 
man found herself in Pennsylvania, where 
she enjoyed shopping. "But," she said, 
"I'd rather have been in Florida!" Other 
people who went home included John 
Armstrong, who "painted and did car- 
pentry — it was /oad5 of fun!"; Clark Crad- 
dock, who "studied every day to catch up 
in ail my classes. It was a marvelous time"; 
and Kathy MacGregor, who "had the time 



of Florida. "I took off to the University of 
Florida," she said, "and it seemed like the 
whole University was out enjoying the 
sun. I discovered the delight of 'Frat Row'. 
It was many, many fraternities long and 
the guys had a unique way of attracting 
girls. They were filling up paddling pools 
and making their own beaches and truck- 
loads of sand on their front lawns. We 
appreciated it." Anita visited her sorority. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, and found out how 
the girls there got dates. "They went out in 
truckloads and formally kidnapped 
them!" 
Staying in Williamsburg was also an 




"It was loads of fun. . .a marvelous time! 



n 



of my life catching up on sleep, eating, 
and watching my soap operas." 

Florida seemed to be the place to go, as 
usual. Don Mosier went to Fort Lauder- 
dale, "which was fun for a while, but it got 
old." Jeanne Kelly enjoyed Key West. "It 
was great," she said. "It wasn't too 
crowded, but it was so much fun! There 
were lots of gorgeous men! The weather 
was perfect, too. I'm going back next year 
if money permits." Also in Key West were 
Sherri Dorsheimerand Cheryl Long. "We 
went camping," Sherri said, "at Boyd's 
campground, and it was only $18 a night. 
During the day we laid out and drank 
beers on the beach. A couple of times we 
went to happy hours with all-you-can-eat 
hors d'oeuvres to cut down on food costs. 
At night we'd go back and forth between 
two bars in Key West, Sloppy Joe's and 
Rick's. Sometimes before going out, some- 
one from another campsight would have 
a party and invite us over. We met some 
really cute guys from UNC. We were 
supposed to go scuba diving one day, but 
it was too windy, and we were too 
hungover." 

Anita Rutkowski, from the Layman 
Islands, went home, but not before a tour 



option. Kent Schaum stayed and worked 
at the Trellis. "It gave me a chance to clean 
up and get away from my roommate. I 
could relax. All the people get away from 
you, so you have time to study. Kent got a 
little tired of the studying, however, and 
traversed up to Brown University. "That 
place is extremely progressive," he noted. 
"If your hair is only one color, you're out 
of place. If you hair isn't shaved on the 
sides, you're out of place. If you talk in 
normal English, you're out of place. It's 
not a very friendly place, very artsy-fartsy." 

Terri Dale also toured other college 
campuses. "I went to Texas and visited my 
friends at Baylor University and the Univer- 
sity of Texas," she said. "It was a lot of fun 
just to compare William & Mary to them, 
from the way people talked to the way 
they dressed." 

Mardi Gras attracted a few William & 
Mary students. Heather Hearn travelled to 
New Orleans, after relaxing at home in 
Memphis, Tennessee, and found Mardi 
Gras to be over. "I didn't care, though," 
she said. "Bourbon Street is always fun!" 

Casey Sponski also split her Spring 
Break. First, she went home "to help my 
mother spring clean. Then I visited my 





54 



A Many W&M students caught one last week of 
skiing before the season ended over spring bre£ 





AA This student finds water skiing to be the 
preferred pastime over spring break 



4A Getting there is half of the fun Here, a busload 
of W&M skiers engage in a game of Trivial Pursuit 
on the ride to the Great White North. 



A A group of tired, but exuberant, skiers prepare for 

a night on the town in Canada. 

< Senior Bart Edmunds opted for the more tropical 
clime of the Bahamas for his spring break. 



boyfriend, in thrilling, downtown Dothan, 
Alabama." 

One most interesting Spring Break was 
had by Joe Uncewicz: "I stole a horse, so 
they shipped me off to my grandmother's 
in Northern Virginia to sleep and eat." 

A few Tribe Basketball fans returned 
early to Williamsburg to catch the ECAC 
South Championship Tournament. Kathy 
MacGregor was one such devoted Indian. 
"It was a great time! I got to watch some 
great hoops, and then it was off to the 
Blue Rose for two-fisted happy hours and 
some awesome whiskey sours! " 

If Spring Break was fun for some, it was a 
revelation for others. Said Cara Newman, 
"I did an East Coast tour of graduate 
schools, from Boston to Philadelphia and 
on to New York. The happy part was that I 
was axed by all of them. Now I know I'm 
going to be happy in my life as a Burger- 
King croissant maker." 

— Amy Campbell 



55 



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SUPPER CLUBS: 



An Alternative to Shamrock 



The first thing any freshman misses 
about home is mom's cooking. The caf 
just can't hold a candle to mom, and to 
make matters worse, a freshman is re- 
quired to have a nineteen meal plan. 
However, there was a viable alternative to 
the caf: fraternity, sorority, and dorm 
dinner clubs. 



He claimed that the dinner club really 
promoted camaraderie on the hall. The 
ten people in the club got together every 
Friday at five o'clock. Mitch said, "The 
time may seem weird but it gave us a 
chance to sit down and chat." 

In choosing between a meal plan and a 
dinner club, the most important consid- 



the advantages of intimacy and selectivity 
that could be attained through dinner 
clubs. "After the first night, everyone 
knew who they would be eating with for 
the rest of the semester. "You really get to 
know a lot of people better," said Mitch 
Sladowitz. Realistically, what male 
wouldn't want to have dinner with twenty 



''Eating at a dinner club meant no standing in li 
waited on hand and foot. . .A dinner club was I 
restaurant not a cafeteria/' 



ne. Customers were 
like eating at a 



Dinner clubs are offered by most soror- 
ities Monday through Thursday beginning 
approximately two weeks into the semes- 
ter. In addition, some fraternities offered a 
Sunday dinner club. The price for one 
semester, one meal a week, was generally 
between thirty-five and forty dollars. On 
the average, the price of one meal was 
either equivalent to or less than one meal 
at the caf. 

Another kind of dinner club offered 
was a hall dinner club. Mitch Cohen, an 
R. A. in Jefferson, set up a club on his hall. 
Students signed up to join the club in pairs 
and each pair was obligated to cook twice 
during the semester. According to Cohen, 
"Our dinner club is different because of 
an ideaof honor. When it's your turn, you 
cook. You can cook anything you want." 



eration was the food. The caf just couldn't 
compete with the quality of the food, the 
atmosphere, or the service offered by 
dinner clubs. Menus were varied in each 
club. Entrees could range from ham- 
burgers to crab imperial, from enchiladas 
to chicken cordon bleu! And since a 
dinner club didn't serve the masses, the 
food was excellent. "I eat at two different 
sororities for three nights a week. I really 
like being able to sit down with my friends 
and have a delicious meal served to me," 
claimed Augie Ribeiro. 

Another of the added benefits about 
dinner clubs is the atmosphere. Having 
dinner at a club meant dining among 
friends and socializing. Some students 
may have liked to "scope" at the caf and 
that's adequate, however, it didn't offer 



sorority girls? And girls could use frater- 
nity dinner clubs to help find that special 
dance date. 

Of course, dinner clubs didn't just offer 
high quality food and good company, but 
they also provided the diner with excel- 
lent service. Eating at a dinner club meant 
no standing in line. Customers were 
waited on hand and foot — but no tipping 
allowed! A dinner club was like eating at a 
restaurant and not at a cafeteria. 

However, a fraternity or sorority club 
wasn't restricted to Greeks. Anyone could 
join any of these clubs. Hall Clubs were 
open as well. In evaluating where to dine 
on campus, dinner clubs rose to the top of 
the list! 

— Kellie Larson 



56 




^a^illiamsburg 
virginia 




▲ Most sororities opened up their clubs to 
outsiders, especially fraternity members. Kappa 
Sigs Augie Ribeiro and Mike Olson enjoy a good 
meal atChi-0. 

< If you can't find a convenient supper club, 
Georges is the next best and next cheapest thing. 
Law students Mike Holleran and John Huddleston 
enjoy one of George's home cooked meals. 



57 



PASSING SCENES 




Photos by Mike Nikoiich 



IN THE BURG... 




.\ 



,^ 



» 



<? 



DELI 
REVIEW 



Mama Mias 

Located conveniently behind sorority 
court, Mama Mias offers its patrons the 
atmosphere of a neighborhood pub. 
Louie, the owner, welcomes the regulars 
while making it clear to strangers that he 
doesn't put up with anything in his place. 
Louie and his employees are all Greek. 
Their speech is difficult to understand 
unless you are used to it. Their sandwiches 
are all named after Greek women and the 
specialties of the house are gyros and 
baclava. 

Being a regular engenders certain privi- 
leges. Louie lets the regulars slide if they 
don't have enough money and donates a 
free pitcher for every couple consumed. 



Very special customers are sometimes 
invited to stay past closing and sample 
uzzo from Louie's private stock. Uzzo is a 
Greek wine that packs a wallop more 
powerful than any American liquor. 

Louie proudly displays composites of 
those fraternities and sororities who have 
patronized Mama's faithfully. As Mary St. 
George, a Mama's veteran put it, "If you 
take care of Louie, he takes care of you. 
You can always be assured of seeing 
familiar faces and a regular crowd. I like 
that feeling." 

Terry Rosenbaum summed it up when 
she said, "Louie's is a great alternative to 
the Blue Rose or the Leafe. Whether it's 
for dinner or a few beers, I feel at home 
there." 

— Mary Mitchell 





RESTAURANTS 



when one thinks restaurants, he may 
not think of Williamsburg as the culinary , 
capitol of the universe, but on second ' 
thought Williamsburg is loaded with great 
places to dine. 

Probably everyone enjoyed Trellis at 
one point in their college careers. Mel- 
anie Perper especially liked the "house t 
specialty, chocolate mousse cake." Other ' 
happy Trellis-goers were Kathy Mac 
Gregor "the chicken is the best entree," 
and Kent Schaum, who said "I have no 
choice but to like it — I work there." 

Another big favorite was a restaurant 
more fitting to the college budget, 
McDonald's. Don Mosier stated "the Big 
Macs are worth the trip." Sue Palese, an 
avid McDonald's consumer, commented 
on the bargains: "When they have a 99- 
cent special, I'm there. I can eat a meal for 
$1.50, and on my limited budget, that 
really helps." 

For cocktails and appetizers John Arm- 
strong said that Second Street is the place 
to go. Kathy MacGregor, on the other 
hand, preferred the Blue Rose. "I really 
enjoy their two-fisted happy hour," she 
said. "They make pretty good whiskey 
sours, and the potato skins taste great, 
too!" 

Pizza was a Williamsburg specialty, it 



60 




seemed. Don Mosier and John Armstrong 
enjoyed Sal's, whereas, Sue Palese could 
be found munching happily on pizza at 
the College Delly. For a nice change, 
Kathy MacGregor suggested Pierce's for 
barbecue. "Sometimes you get tired of 
pizza, and Pierce's has just the thing: a 
jumbo barbecue and fries." 

Rocky's, a gourmet ice cream parlor, 
quickly surpassed Baskin-Robbins as the 
place to go. Wei-Ming Hsu urged trying 
the cheesecake flavor. Jenny Holt agreed. 
Both suggested "adding the Heath bars, 
Oreos, and M&Ms to make a great ice 
cream." Sue Palese recommended that 
you should "always add at least two top- 
pings. One just doesn't do the trick!" 

When it came to the cheese shop (a 
W&M favorite), students always had that 
one favorite sandwich in mind. Grace 
Bolana like roast beef and Swiss, Lisa 
Hylton enjoyed smoked turkey and Provo- 
lone, and Adam Campbell suggested the 
salami and Edam. But he was quick to 
recommend going on Wednesday for a 
10% student discount. Cara Newman par- 
ticularly enjoyed the cheese shop: "Living 
at the Kappa Kappa Gamma house, where 
i the refrigerator houses lots of mold and 
; insects, I have put up a pup tent outside 
the Cheese Shop. I'm first in line every 
morning, and my veins flow with House 
; Dressing." 



Most often the choice eating spot de- 
pended on one's budget but there was 
always a restaurant in Williamsburg wait- 
ing to fill that craving. 

— Amy Campbell 



PAUL'S DELI 



"Hot Holly!" "Small fry!" It was the 
most popular eating place in Colonial 
Williamsburg in the opinion of many. It's 
Paul's Deli and it was always jam-packed 
with William and Mary students. But why 
is Paul's Deli preferred over any of the 
other eating places around campus? 

"It's larger than the other dellies," com- 
mented Pi Kappa Alpha Peter Winebren- 
ner. When asked why Pika's tend to con- 
gregate at Paul's Peter said, "It's easier for 
us to get a table together because it's 
bigger." Junior Paul Babey replied "Paul is 
polite to us and we know him. He comes 
to most of our Pika dances too!" 

Tradition or no tradition, Paul's is def- 
initely the popular eatery. Maybe it's 
tradition or maybe it's larger, but maybe 
it's just the way Paul says, "Hot Holly! " and 
"small fry!" 

— Kaky Spruill 



THE COLLEGE DELLY 

The Delly, spelled with two L's and a Y, 
serves food similar to Paul's and Mama 
Mia's, but Dino and the family make 
eating (or drinking) there more fun with 
their special treatment to loyal Delly- 
goers. Once known as the place to go 
when Paul's was crowded, the Delly has a 
loyal following who swear that the over 
flowing pitchers of Michelob taste better 
when served by Dino or Kiki. Not only 
does the menu include the usual Jeffer- 
son, Holly, and Chandler but also Strom- 
bolls (the best in town) pizza and seafood. 

The word "deli" to anyone but a student 
at W&M denotes delicatessan. Normally 
delis serve sandwiches with fresh, thinly 
cut meat and big kosher dill pickles. At 
W&M, however, the Delly, or rather Col- 
lege Delly, is a far cry from the delis back 
home. The College Delly is 30% delicates- 
san, 10%. Italian restaurant, 40%. bar and the 
rest friendly service. Jimmy, Dino, Kiki and 
the rest of the family who run the Delly 
after the friendly down home service that 
one doesn't get very often these days. 
Most regulars are greeted at the door, and 
on slow nights Dino stops by the tables of 
people he knows to discuss the finer 
points of bouncing a quarter or tell about 
the latest antics of his son George. The 
Deily is not only a place to eat and drink, 
but a place to belong. 




61 



Life 
in the 
'Burg 



HOW TO USE CW 



"So, what are you doing now?" 
"I'm going to college." 
"Really? Where do you go to 

school?" 
"The College of William and 

Mary. " 

"Oh, isn't that in Williamsburg?" 
"That's right—the good old 'Burg." 
"You're so lucky to go there. 

It's so beautiful. " 

It's not hard to believe that as W & M 
students, everyone had experienced simi- 
lar conversations. Sometimes the situation 
may even have caused one to stop and 
think that he was pretty lucky to have the 
Colonial Williamsburg surroundings. 
However, for the most part the W & M 
student took for granted the accessibility 
of "CW" and "DOG" street. Alumni of all 
ages agreed. They admitted that they 
began to appreciate Williamsburg as more 
than just a college town only after gradu- 
ation and that they wished they had "used 
CW" more as students. Did the W & M 
students use CW? Almost every student 
had some contact with CW during his four 
years here, even it he didn't figure out 
why it was called DOG Street until his 
senior year. But did he appreciate the 
opportunity that CW offers? Probably not. 
To the student, CW was merely an exten- 
sion of the college, and he used it 
accordingly. 

To the astonishment of the tourists, 
joggers flocked to CW. "It's so pretty, it 
makes running more enjoyable, in spite of 
the unavoidable stones in my sneakers," 
claimed Tracy Brownlee. Some used a 
Walkman, some ran at midnight, some 
didn't make it, some went twice, but they 
were all joggers on the DOG Street trail. 

On a midnight stroll, another popular 
past-time among students as well as tour- 
ists. One passes joggers, couples finding 
romance in the mystic of DOG Street, and 
students standing in line at Chownings, 



waiting for a taste of peanuts and ale. 
Occasionally, one happened upon other 
more solid activities, students sneaking 
into the Governor's Palace Gardens, lovers 
getting caught by security guards, or stu- 
dents stealing, "borrowing," a horse for a 
scavenger hunt. 

Fortunately, for many students CW 
offered a variety of employment. W & M 
students could be found in CW working 
as clerks, cashiers, waiters and even as tour 
guides dressed in colonial garb. College 
students provided approximately four to 
five percent of the work force in Colonial 
Williamsburg. "Most of them work in 
restaurants, taverns or as colonial tour 
guides," she added. 

But just as CW giveth, it taketh away. 
While CW offered employment, it also 
proved to be a powerful draw for students 
hard-earned funds. Browsing through 
Binn's Beecroft and Bull too often re- 
sulted in a sizeable shopping bag. Or, a 
favorite past-time of most students was 
eating, and Williamsburg was not lacking 
in its tempting cuisine. Christiana Camp- 
bell's, The King's Arms and the Trellis 
hosted many pre-dance couples for din- 
ner as well as families during Parents' 
Weekend and graduation. Baskin Rob- 
bins was a favorite sorority court and 
Brown Hall, even in January. But the most 
popular attraction seemed to be the 
cheese shop for those famous sandwiches 
which didn't taste quite right unless eaten 
while sitting on a bench along DOG 
Street. 

In the fall, sorority big sisters clues 
inspired some of the more original ways 
of experiencing CW. Pledges stood on the 
island of confusion corner, yelling ridi- 
culous rhymes until her clue rescued her 
or until some tourist called Eastern State. A 
more romantic touch included a carriage 
ride or dessert at the Trellis. Of course, 
there were the ever-popular cheese shops 
and late-night Palace Garden rendevous. 

At Christmastime, as well as attracting 




tourists, CW believed students took 
breaks from final exams to enjoy the 
Christmas spirit and decorations on DOG 
Street. Most students found the time to 
discover Grand illuminator at least once 
during their college careers. "It's some- 
thing I can tell my children about." "We 
have the opportunity to actually live 
Christmas in Williamsburg. Others can 
only dream about it," commented Beth 
Henry. 

Perhaps the greatest aspect of having 
CW as part of the college environment 
was that it was difficult to enjoy, at night or 
day, in any season, by one's self or with 
others, with or without a walkman, on 
foot, on bike or back. It was an original, 
which made it that much more enjoyable. 
At times it was quaint, and at times, when 
mobbed by tourists asking directions, it 
was a nuisance, but every day W & M 
students used CW, even if they didn't 
learn to appreciate it until after 
graduation. 

—Jeff Hughes 



62 



< Relaxing; Just hanging out and enjoying the 
simple, elegant beauty of Colonial Williamsburg in 
the spring is a favorite pastime. 



▼ This student uses CW to entertain her young 
friends from the day-care center. 




,.>.?..■■ ■•»• ■ i-'i^ff-^-- -- ■- >• ■ •■ !"-.-i^\\^Tr^-'-' x»* 




■4 Sorority clues: Donna Desaulniers. Joe Mateo. 
Lynnleigh Smith, and Kevin Jones enjoy a few ales 
and bawdy eighteenth century tunes of Chownings. 



63 



••<?: 



.^^ 



>^ 



X 



9r 



^^: 



VISITORS: 



.<o 



,^ 



When They Come and 
Expect to be Entertained 



Williamsburg is a city perpetually filled 
to the brim with tourists. So why is it that 
so many freshmen panic the first time they 
are called on to entertain their parents or 
out-of-town friends here? Immediately 
the mind goes blank and Colonial Wil- 
liamsburg seems a blur. But by the time 
they become upperclassmen they become 
experts on the subject of hot spots in 
Williamsburg. 

As far as restaurants go, The Trellis was 
continually suggested as a "must do." 
Susan Bowe says "My parents live in 
Williamsburg and when they go out to 
dinner, they go to The Trellis." This sug- 
gestion was eloquently seconded by Wil- 
liam Phenix when he said "Quand mes 
parents me resident — visite a Williams- 
burg nous tourjours dinons a ce res- 
taurant Le Trellis." Other suggestions for 
dinner included King's Arm Tavern, the 
Inn, and of course Pauls, depending on 
who was treating. For brunch the Lodge, 
Cascades, and Adams rated tops. A perfect 
lunchwassuggested by Katherine Stewart, 
"Cheese Shop sandwiches on DOG Street 
are a must!" This is especially true for 
those who enjoy people watching. 

However, Williamsburg is not just a 
place to go out to eat. There are many 
things to do and see. As Virginia Prasch 
comments, "Taking a drive along the 
parkway is one of my favorite things to do, 
especially when the dogwoods are in 
bloom." Crim Dell was another beautiful 
highlightof the campus tour, especially in 
the fall when the leaves had changed 
colors. Spending an afternoon lounging 
around the Governor's Palace grounds 
was very peaceful and restful. Or, as 



64 



Martha Feathers suggested, "The best 
would be going over the wall of the 
Governor's Palace at midnight," but that 
really isn't a place to take one's parents. 

Besides admiring the scenic wonders, 
Williamsburg has fun to offer. "When my 
parents come to Williamsburg we always 
make a stop at The Pottery to broswe." 
commented Dinane LaRosa. Although 
shopping is limited here, the Outlet Mall 
and Merchant's Square can offer some 
unique buys, jim Pratt suggested, "If you 
get tired of the colonial atmosphere, 
there's always Busch Gardens." Many 
people added that just heading to Busch 



for two free beers can make an afternoon 
very enjoyable. Burt Lacks mentioned, "If 
you're in the mood for dancing and 
drinks, the Hilton is a nice place to go." 
Other places to dance were The Blue 
Rose, especially on lady's night, or Adams. 

On a sunny day the best idea was to 
grab a bike and head out to Carter's 
Grove. It's a long ride but well worth the 
trip. 

So next time you're called on to play 
host, look at the 'Burg objectively and 
you'll find that maybe it's not as bad as you 
think. 

— Michelle Barnes 




3 -4£m^ > 




\ 






^ry 



r 



..// 





A The Cheese Shop is a good place to take a 
visiting friend. Mike Bracken and Lee Glenn take a 
lunch break in the new outside dining area at the 
Cheese Shop. 

■* The Trellis is the place to take visiting parents 
and grandparents as long as they're paying. 

< < 1 he Kings Arms is anotner gooa piaue lo laKtr 
friends. You may even see a few classmates there, 
most likely they'll be working as Dave Webster 
(right) greets guests. 



65 



Life 
in the 
'Burg 




CHRISTMAS: A COLONIAL TRADITION 



White Candlelight and Big Red Bows 



Williamsburg is a place of all seasons, 
but if it had to be said Christmas is 
probably the most wonderful of all. Big 
red bows wrap around pungent sprigs of 
pine that adorn every window, doorway 
and lamppost in Merchant Square. Fur- 
ther down DOG Street wreaths and gar- 
lands of pine and pinecones, with clusters 
of rich, ripe fruit, bedeck colonial shops 
and residences alike; all a sfiow of yule- 
tide Sfllendnr in thf> <;pirit of colonial 
hospitality. While lights twinkle along 
DOG Street, illuminescent of the Christ- 
mas spirit that presides there. And perhaps 
the best part of ail is that Christmas in 
Williamsburg is natural and real. Kevin 
Jones described it as "homey and heart- 
warming, far from the hustle and bustle of 
commercialism." 

Mary Pearse, an employee of Colonial 
Williamsburg believes that this is the most 
attractive and unique aspect of Christmas 
here. "It's traditional, not commercial. It's 
nice to see that even outside of Wil- 
liamsburg people use white lights and 
greenery. It always reminds you of 
Williamsburg." 

Decorating CW is almost a celebration 
in itself. This year the "hanging of the 
green" began on December 12th, marking 



the beginning of the Christmas season in 
Williamsburg. 

College students have a great oppor- 
tunity to take advantage of all that goes on 
in CWduringtheholiday.lt is easy to walk 
down to the Governor's Palace and watch 
the fireworks at Grand Illumination with- 
out having to worry about parking or 
hotel accommodations, but what most 
students don't realize is the host of other 

activities that take place after evams srp 
over. On Christmas Eve a great Christmas 
tree is lit at the magazine while various 
schools choruses sing carols. Several times 
throughout the week of Christmas colo- 
nials and tourists play colonial games on 
the courthouse green. Various restaurants 
offer colonial holiday billsof fare at various 
times throughout the season. All these 
tempt the student to become one of those 
ominous tourists somewhere down the 
road in life. "It's impossible to enjoy 
everything that goes on here unless you 
have lived here," reasoned Sherry Leigh 
Gill, "It's too harrowing with all the 
tourists." 

Ms. Pearse echoed this sentiment say- 
ing that Christmas can be a bit over- 
whelming in Williamsburg due to the 
great influx of tourists. "But," she added. 



"that contributes to the feeling of Christ- 
mas spirit. Everyone is friendly and with 
more people that feeling is heightened. 
People enjoy spending the holidays with 
their friends. Williamsburg is an especially 
good place for people without families 
because for a short time we become their 
family." Obviously tourists aren't too put 
off by their number. "They boast of how 
many times they return to Christmas 
hprp." rnntini ipd Pearse. Colonial lodging- 
books reservations for the season up to 
three years in advance. 

On a negative note, on campus exams 
ran concurrent to the beginning of the 
holiday season. "Exams sadly over- 
shadowed the beginning of the Christmas 
season in Williamsburg," exclaimed 
Hunter Milligan. But on the other hand, 
Jan Burgess claimed that "Grand Illumina- 
tion, the Yule Log Ceremony and general 
sightseeing of Christmas decorations and 
shopping provided good and necessary 
study breaks." 

I n spite of the pressures of finals and last 
papers, students do manage to find some 
Christmas spirit. Christmas albums invade 
stereos following Thanksgiving Break and 
don't stop until the last student is gone. 
Dorm rooms become the epitomy of the 



66 



\ 



\ 



->v- ... 









*::: \ 





A The Cheese Shop is a good place to take a 
visiting friend. Mike Bracken and Lee Glenn take a 
lunch break in the new outside dining area at the 
Cheese Shop. 

< The Trellis is the place to take visiting parents 
and grandparents as long as they're paying. 

< < The Kings Arms is another good place to take 
friends. You may even see a few classmates there, 
most likely they'll be vi^orking as Dave Webster 
(right) greets guests. 



65 



Life 
in the 
'Burg 




CHRISTMAS: A COLONIAL TRADITION 



White Candlelight and Big Red Bows 



Williamsburg is a place of all seasons, 
but if it had to be said Christmas is 
probably the most wonderful of all. Big 
red bows wrap around pungent sprigs of 
pine that adorn every window, doorway 
and lamppost in Merchant Square. Fur- 
ther down DOG Street wreaths and gar- 
lands of pine and pinecones, with clusters 
of rich, ripe fruit, bedeck colonial shops 
and residences alike; all a show of yule- 
tide splendor in the spirit of colonial 
hospitality. While lights twinkle along 
DOG Street, illuminescent of the Christ- 
mas spirit that presides there. And perhaps 
the best part of all is that Christmas in 
Williamsburg is natural and real. Kevin 
Jones described it as "homey and heart- 
warming, far from the hustle and bustle of 
commercialism." 

Mary Pearse, an employee of Colonial 
Williamsburg believes that this is the most 
attractive and unique aspect of Christmas 
here. "It's traditional, not commercial. It's 
nice to see that even outside of Wil- 
liamsburg people use white lights and 
greenery. It always reminds you of 
Williamsburg." 

Decorating CW is almost a celebration 
in itself. This year the "hanging of the 
green" began on December 12th, marking 



the beginning of the Christmas season in 
Williamsburg. 

College students have a great oppor- 
tunity to take advantage of all that goes on 
in CW during the holiday. It is easy to walk 
down to the Governor's Palace and watch 
the fireworks at Grand Illumination with- 
out having to worry about parking or 
hotel accommodations, but what most 
students don't realize is the host of other 
activities that take place after exams are 
over. On Christmas Eve a great Christmas 
tree is lit at the magazine while various 
schools choruses sing carols. Several times 
throughout the week of Christmas colo- 
nials and tourists play colonial games on 
the courthouse green. Various restaurants 
offer colonial holiday bills of fare at various 
times throughout the season. All these 
tempt the student to become one of those 
ominous tourists somewhere down the 
road in life. "It's impossible to enjoy 
everything that goes on here unless you 
have lived here," reasoned Sherry Leigh 
Gill, "It's too harrowing with all the 
tourists." 

Ms. Pearse echoed this sentiment say- 
ing that Christmas can be a bit over- 
whelming in Williamsburg due to the 
great influx of tourists. "But," she added. 



"that contributes to the feeling of Christ- 
mas spirit. Everyone is friendly and with 
more people that feeling is heightened. 
People enjoy spending the holidays with 
their friends. Williamsburg is an especially 
good place for people without families 
because for a short time we become their 
family." Obviously tourists aren't too put 
off by their number. "They boast of how 
many times they return to Christmas 
here," continued Pearse. Colonial lodging 
books reservations for the season up to 
three years in advance. 

On a negative note, on campus exams 
ran concurrent to the beginning of the 
holiday season. "Exams sadly over- 
shadowed the beginning of the Christmas 
season in Williamsburg," exclaimed 
Hunter Milligan. But on the other hand, 
Jan Burgess claimed that "Grand Illumina- 
tion, the Yule Log Ceremony and general 
sightseeing of Christmas decorations and 
shopping provided good and necessary 
study breaks." 

I n spite of the pressures of finals and last 
papers, students do manage to find some 
Christmas spirit. Christmas albums invade 
stereos following Thanksgiving Break and 
don't stop until the last student is gone. 
Dorm rooms become the epitomy of the 



66 





4 Accompanied by his wife Zoe and a stuffed t\/lax, 
President Graves, also known as the "Gnnch." 
delivers his final reading of "How the Gnnch Stole 
Christmas" at Yule Log before leaving the College 
in January. 

"tacky house next door." Colored twinkle 
lights and tinsel rim windows and doors 
and every decoration Mom hid in the attic 
found a place on dorm room wall. Cam- 
pus housing definitely offered an alterna- 
tive to colonial Williamsburg. 

Residence halls participated in games 
of secret Santa. Fraternities and sororities 
all held Christmas parties. Several students 
hosted the annual Green and Gold Christ- 
mas for underprivileged children in the 
area. President Graves was Santa and 
other administrators were his elves, dis- 
tributing gifts, bought by the students, 
and surprises to all the children. And on 
December 15th students again broke 
themselves away from their books to 
watch President Graves give his last rendi- 
tion of How the Grinch Stole Christmas. 
Following the story Graves was lavished 
with "farewell and Merry Christmas" gifts 
by most of the student body organizations. 

Christmas in Williamsburg may be over- 
shadowed by the exam schedule but 
it definitely isn't lost in it. As Nancy Taylor 
put it, "Exams aside, Williamsburg is a 
beautiful and inspirational place to spend 
the holiday season and my best friends are 
here to share it with me." 

— Beth Henry 



67 



Christmas (Cont.) 



TKaky Spruill and Susan Doyle inspect the 
contents of a Christmas stocking with a young 
participant in the annual Green and Gold 
Christmas The Christmas party, sponsored by 
Alpha Phi Omega, was a service provided to 
Williamsburg's underprivileged children. 



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68 



"tacky house next door." Colored twinkle 
lights and tinsel rim windows and doors 
and every decoration Mom hid in the attic 
found a place on dorm room wall. Cam- 
pus housing definitely offered an alterna- 
tive to colonial Williamsburg. 

Residence halls participated in games 
of secret Santa. Fraternities and sororities 
all held Christmas parties. Several students 
hosted the annual Green and Gold Christ- 
mas for underprivileged children in the 
area. President Graves was Santa and 
other administrators were his elves, dis- 
tributing gifts, bought by the students, 
and surprises to all the children. And on 
December 15th students again broke 
themselves away from their books to 
watch President Graves give his last rendi- 
tion of How the Crinch Stole Christmas. 
Following the story Graves was lavished 
with "farewell and Merry Christmas" gifts 
by most of the student body organizations. 

Christmas in Williamsburg may be over- 
shadowed by the exam schedule but it 
definitely isn't lost in it. As Nancy Taylor 
put it, "Exams aside, Williamsburg is a 
beautiful and inspirational place to spend 
the holiday season and my best friends are 
here to share it with me." 

— Beth FHenry 






< Accompanied by his wife Zoe and a stuffed Max, 
President Graves, also known as the "Grinch," 
delivers his final reading of "How the Grinch Stole 
Christmas" at Yule Log before leaving the College 
in January. 

"tacky house next door." Colored twinkle 
lights and tinsel rim windows and doors 
and every decoration Mom hid in the attic 
found a place on dorm room wall. Cam- 
pus housing definitely offered an alterna- 
tive to colonial Williamsburg. 

Residence halls participated in games 
of secret Santa. Fraternities and sororities 
all held Christmas parties. Several students 
hosted the annual Green and Gold Christ- 
mas for underprivileged children in the 
area. President Graves was Santa and 
other administrators were his elves, dis- 
tributing gifts, bought by the students, 
and surprises to all the children. And on 
December 15th students again broke 
themselves away from their books to 
watch President Graves give his last rendi- 
tion of How the Grinch Stole Christmas. 
Following the story Graves was lavished 
with "farewell and Merry Christmas" gifts 
by most of the student body organizations. 

Christmas in Williamsburg may be over- 
shadowed by the exam schedule but 
it definitely isn't lost in it. As Nancy Taylor 
put it, "Exams aside, Williamsburg is a 
beautiful and inspirational place to spend 
the holiday season and my best friends are 
here to share it with me. " 

— Beth Henry 



67 



I 



Christmas (Cont.) 



TKaky Spruill and Susan Doyle inspect the 
contents of a Christmas stocking with a young 
participant in the annual Green and Gold 
Christmas The Christmas party, sponsored by 
Alpha Phi Omega, was a service provided to 
Williamsburg's underprivileged children. 




68 



"tacky house next door." Colored twinkle 
lights and tinsel rim windows and doors 
and every decoration Mom hid in the attic 
found a place on dorm room wall. Cam- 
pus housing definitely offered an alterna- 
tive to colonial Williamsburg. 

Residence halls participated in games 
of secret Santa. Fraternities and sororities 
all held Christmas parties. Several students 
hosted the annual Green and Gold Christ- 
mas for underprivileged children in the 
area. President Graves was Santa and 
other administrators were his elves, dis- 
tributing gifts, bought by the students, 
and surprises to all the children. And on 
December 15th students again broke 
themselves away from their books to 
watch President Graves give his last rendi- 
tion of How the Grinch Stole Christmas. 
Following the story Graves was lavished 
with "farewell and Merry Christmas" gifts 
by most of the student body organizations. 

Christmas in Williamsburg may be over- 
shadowed by the exam schedule but it 
definitely isn't lost in it. As Nancy Taylor 
put it, "Exams aside, Williamsburg is a 
beautiful and inspirational place to spend 
the holiday season and my best friends are 
here to share it with me." 

— Beth Henry 






A Doug Hawkins, Keith Cieplicki, and Steve 
Johnson carry the Yule Log to the Great Hall after 
President Graves' Grinch story. 

< Choir members Martha Feathers. Kord Basnight. 
and Joy Dibble lead the Christmas carols at Yule 
Log. 



69 



Life 
in the 
'Burg 



ICE^BURG 



WHITE WINTER '85 



If there is one thing we all remember 
about our time in the Burg, it's the weath- 
er. In late fall and early summer, we 
laboured over our books beneath a cruel 
sun and longed for the mercy of air 
conditioning, while the ever-tacky tour- 
ists provided us entertainment. But in 
winter, the days grew shorter, the flow of 
tourists trickled off, and the nights became 
long and dull, leaving us much too much 
time to do what we tried to avoid — study. 

And "study" is what we did as we 
eagerly awaited the arrival of Christmas 
which brought several good excuses to 
abandon all pretenses. We cheerfully and 
scrupulously followed tradition. We had 
to go to Grand Illumination, we had to go 
to Yule Log ceremony, we had to go 
caroling, and we had to do our shopping. 
Many a book was sacrificed for the sake of 
extra Christmas shopping. How many of 
us spent our last $10 on a "College of 
Knowledge" T-shirt for our third-cousin 
twice-removed just to ease a guilty 
conscience? 

We didn't mind singing "White Christ- 
mas" in a snowless Burg because we 
hoped it would be different at home. But 
after Christmas we returned to the same 
wet dreariness that is Williamsburg in 
winter. Though the weather hadn't 
changed while we were gone, it now 
seemed much worse. The word "winter" 
conjured up images of cold, wet, and grey 
people, buildings, and streets. "It sucks" 
became winter's epitaph. 




Then in the last days of January, we 
might all have been surprised to awaken 
to a frozen Crim Dell and a campus 
blanketed in the purest white snow. See- 
ing the snow as an excuse for good old- 
fashioned fun, we rushed out like little 
children to make snowballs, snow angels, 
and (if we had enough time) a snowman 
or two. Still, many of us, having had prior 
experience with "real" snow, felt obli- 
gated to attend classes. Said Meredith 
Wilcox, a junior from Vermont, "I'm a 
New Englander, so I have a reputation to 
protect." 

The few times it snowed also gave us an 
excuse to complain. We complained 
about the roads that weren't salted, the 
paths that weren't cleared, the heaters 
that made our rooms unbearable, and 
most of all, about our classes. Senior Mia 
Shapiro recalls one particularly difficult 



day, "My car didn't start. My professors 
didn't come in. It was a day that would 
have been better spent in the Bahamas." 
One student also complained that the 
weather made it difficult to get to class, 
"The problem is the cold and wet and the 
knee-deep puddles of slush. How can you 
get to class and in what shape will you be 
when you get there?" Yet for some of us, 
the little snow that fell on Williamsburg 
was not enough. Said Senior Kathy Covert, 
"I wanted more snow, so I'm going up 
North for grad school." 

But whether we complained or not 
about the snow it came as a relief from the 
monotony of Williamsburg winter while 
we anticipated the joy of the first bright 
day of Spring when the birds and the 
tourists would flock South and things 
would be "normal" once again. 

—Rachel Munthali 





A Doug Hawkins. Keith Clepllcki, and Steve 
Johnson carry the Yule Log to the Great Hall after 
President Graves' Grinch story. 

< Choir members Martha Feathers, Kord Basnight, 
and Joy Dibble lead the Christmas carols at Yule 
Log. 



69 



Life 
in the 
'Burg 



ICE 'BURG 



WHITE WINTER '85 



If there is one thing we all remember 
about our time in the Burg, it's the weath- 
er. In late fall and early summer, we 
laboured over our books beneath a cruel 
sun and longed for the mercy of air 
conditioning, while the ever-tacky tour- 
ists provided us entertainment. But in 
winter, the days grew shorter, the flow of 
tourists trickled off, and the nights became 
long and dull, leaving us much too much 
time to do what we tried to avoid — study. 

And "study" is what we did as we 
eagerly awaited the arrival of Christmas 
which brought several good excuses to 
abandon all pretenses. We cheerfully and 
scrupulously followed tradition. We had 
to go to Grand Illumination, we had to go 
to Yule Log ceremony, we had to go 
caroling, and we had to do our shopping. 
Many a book was sacrificed for the sake of 
extra Christmas shopping. How many of 
us spent our last $10 on a "College of 
Knowledge" T-shirt for our third-cousin 
twice-removed just to ease a guilty 
conscience? 

We didn't mind singing "White Christ- 
mas" in a snowless Burg because we 
hoped it would be different at home. But 
after Christmas we returned to the same 
wet dreariness that is Williamsburg in 
winter. Though the weather hadn't 
changed while we were gone, it now 
seemed much worse. The word "winter" 
conjured up images of cold, wet, and grey 
people, buildings, and streets. "It sucks" 
became winter's epitaph. 




Then in the last days of January, we 
might all have been surprised to awaken 
to a frozen Crim Dell and a campus 
blanketed in the purest white snow. See- 
ing the snow as an excuse for good old- 
fashioned fun, we rushed out like little 
children to make snowballs, snow angels, 
and (if we had enough time) a snowman 
or two. Still, many of us, having had prior 
experience with "real" snow, felt obli- 
gated to attend classes. Said Meredith 
Wilcox, a junior from Vermont, "I'm a 
New Englander, so I have a reputation to 
protect." 

The few times it snowed also gave us an 
excuse to complain. We complained 
about the roads that weren't salted, the 
paths that weren't cleared, the heaters 
that made our rooms unbearable, and 
most of all, about our classes. Senior Mia 
Shapiro recalls one particularly difficult 



day, "My car didn't start. My professors 
didn't come in. It was a day that would 
have been better spent in the Bahamas." 
One student also complained that the 
weather made it difficult to get to class, 
"The problem is the cold and wet and the 
knee-deep puddles of slush. How can you 
get to class and in what shape will you be 
when you get there?" Yet for some of us, 
the little snow that fell on Williamsburg 
was not enough. Said Senior Kathy Covert, 
"1 wanted more snow, so I'm going up 
North for grad school." 

But whether we complained or not 
about the snow it came as a relief from the 
monotony of Williamsburg winter while 
we anticipated the joy of the first bright 
day of Spring when the birds and the 
tourists would flock South and things 
would be "normal" once again. 

— Rachel Munthali 




< Sharp winds plunged the wind chill factor well 
below zero degrees during the January snow. Here, 
students bundle up to brave the blustery winds on 
Barksdale field. 




JIH 



^ 



^ r-> 






-•^••i 




A Slip slidin' away. Ice made the path between 
t^orton and the Muscarelle treacherous. A student 
carefully picks her way through the patches of ice. 

< The January snow makes the Wren postcard 
picturesque. 



71 



:URRENTS ON CAMPUS 





^ 



BEAUTIFYING THE CAMPUS 



As you approached the library on your 
way to study a fresh, sweet scent tickled 
your nose as the spring breeze brushed 
your hair. Immediately, you knew that it 
was not Shamrock's dinner from the Caf 
wafting down to greet your nose. A glance 
to your right revealed the source — Daf- 
fodils! About one-hundred daffodils 
planted by the sun dial! Looking about, 
you noticed the trimmed shrubs and the 
plants aligned beside various academic 
buildings. So much color and beauty that 
seemed to go unnoticed. 

The man responsible for bringing so 
much beauty to the campus is Roy Wil- 
liams. Williams has only been with the 
college since 1981 and already he has 
helped William and Mary blossom into a 
beautiful campus. Chrysanthemums 
during the fall, ornamental cabbages and 
kale in the winter, bulbs in the spring, and 
begonias and ageratum in the summer 
provide color and beauty to the campus 
throughout the seasons. 

It was impossible to take a walk around 
campus this year without noticing the 
portable gardens of various blossoming 
plants in half-barrels. Williams' clever 
planning of these "portable gardens" 



72 



facilitates adding a touch of beauty to any 
spot on campus with a quick transfer of a 
barrel. 

Williams' accomplishments do not stop 
here. Not only has he added beauty to the 
campus with flowers and plants, but trees 
have been pruned and treated for diseas- 
es, the shrubs have been shaped and 
fertilized, and the grassy areas were re- 
seeded and fertilized this year for the first 
time in ten years. 

Working within a limited budget, Wil- 
liams has managed to make the campus 
more appealing to students and visitors as 
well. Sophomore Jewell Lim captured the 
sentiments of almost every student on 
campus when she said, "To a prospective 
student, when things look nice on the 
outside it makes you think that things are 
nice on the inside also. At times when you 
feel rundown, the flowers and landscap- 
ing are a retreat into something aesthetic 
and not just a building. The flowers make 
the school so much more appealing and 
the weather tends to complement the 
work Williams had done." 

What seems to remain a mystery is 
where the funds came from to make up 
the budget for this landscaping. "I have 

A Although usually a hardy winter plant, the 
ornamental cabbages looked a bit limp when the 
snow came in January. These limp leaves greatly 
resembled the "lettuce" served on Shamrock salad 
bars. 




A ▲ Part of a beautiful campus is clean buildings. 
Keeping the dorms clean is no easy task, especially 
in the frat complex. 




< Sharp winds plunged the wind chill factor well 
below zero degrees during the January snow. Here, 
students bundle up to brave the blustery winds on 
Barksdale field. 





V-i 



.'^V*^ 



V. -» 



^ ' 1»>. 





1 



A Slip slidin' away. Ice made the path between 
Morton and the Muscarelle treacherous. A student 
carefully picks her way through the patches of ice. 

< The January snow makes the Wren postcard 
picturesque. 



71 



URRENTS ON CAMPUS 





<l 



BEAUTIFYING THE CAMPUS 



As you approached the library on your 
way to study a fresh, sweet scent tickled 
your nose as the spring breeze brushed 
your hair. Immediately, you knew that it 
was not Shamrock's dinner from the Caf 
wafting down to greet your nose. A glance 
to your right revealed the source — Daf- 
fodils! About one-hundred daffodils 
planted by the sun dial! Looking about, 
you noticed the trimmed shrubs and the 
plants aligned beside various academic 
buildings. So much color and beauty that 
seemed to go unnoticed. 

The man responsible for bringing so 
much beauty to the campus is Roy Wil- 
liams. Williams has only been with the 
college since 1981 and already he has 
helped William and Mary blossom into a 
beautiful campus. Chrysanthemums 
during the fall, ornamental cabbages and 
kale in the winter, bulbs in the spring, and 
begonias and ageratum in the summer 
provide color and beauty to the campus 
throughout the seasons. 

It was impossible to take a walk around 
campus this year without noticing the 
portable gardens of various blossoming 
plants in half-barrels. Williams' clever 
planning of these "portable gardens" 



72 



facilitates adding a touch of beauty to any 
spot on campus with a quick transfer of a 
barrel. 

Williams' accomplishments do not stop 
here. Not only has he added beauty to the 
campus with flowers and plants, but trees 
have been pruned and treated for diseas- 
es, the shrubs have been shaped and 
fertilized, and the grassy areas were re- 
seeded and fertilized this year for the first 
time in ten years. 

Working within a limited budget, Wil- 
liams has managed to make the campus 
more appealing to students and visitors as 
well. Sophomore Jewell Lim captured the 
sentiments of almost every student on 
campus when she said, "To a prospective 
student, when things look nice on the 
outside it makes you think that things are 
nice on the inside also. At times when you 
feel rundown, the flowers and landscap- 
ing are a retreat into something aesthetic 
and not just a building. The flowers make 
the school so much more appealing and 
the weather tends to complement the 
work Williams had done." 

What seems to remain a mystery is 
where the funds came from to make up 
the budget for this landscaping. "I have 

A Although usually a hardy winter plant, the 
ornamental cabbages looked a bit limp when the 
snow came in January. These limp leaves greatly 
resembled the "lettuce" served on Shamrock salad 
bars. 





A APartof a beautiful campus is clean buildings. 
Keeping the dorms clean is no easy task, especially 
in the frat complex 



^-'^d^ 





lot of credit for the landscaping on campus 
> to ttie maintenance men who work daily in the 
iens. 



this funny feeling the money comes from 
one of our fees," concluded Jewell. "I 
realize that it has to because other areas 
are lacking, such as sports." Some stu- 
dents were bothered by the idea that 
student funds might be used to keep up 
the grounds and plant pretty flowers yet 
they enjoyed the fresh surroundings. 

Nevertheless, Williams is not complete- 
ly dependent upon college funds for the 
upkeep of our campus. Pleased by the 
beauty Williams has bestowed upon Wil- 
liam and Mary and caught up in the new 
sense of pride embedded in the college, 
the Williamsburg Council of Garden Clubs 
and the Civic Beautification Committee 
have initiated a Mary-Roy Williams Land- 
scaping Fund. This fund will be used to 
purchase plants to furnish the college 
with even mo:e color. 

It was certainly more enjoyable to study 
outside and more appealing to take a walk 
on campus when the college looked so 
bright. Whether it was the picket fence by 
sorority court or the tulips at College 
Corner, Williams definitely added a touch 
of class to William and Mary. As one 
student cleverly put it, "It's always fun to 
wait and see what's coming up next!" 

— Kaky Spruill 



A In both the spring and fall, flowers 
brighten spots on campus such as the 
parking lot across from James Blair and 
the front of the Cat. 



73 



DORM REVIEW 



Brown 

Brown is an all girls dorm which is a 
main source of contention for its inhabi- 
tants. That and the fact that it is situated on 
the other end of the earth from new 
campus, or worse the fraternities and 
W & M hall, always result in Brown being 
one of the last choices at room selection. 

But aside from these common griev- 
ances. Brown is conveniently a hop, skip, 
and a jump from BR, the cheese shop, 
George's, and CW, thereby making it easy 
to frequent those establishments and to 
receive visits from those who do also. 
Since it is a single-sex dorm, it allows a 
special camaraderie among women to 
develop, which cannot always be found in 
co-ed dorms. 

Brown isn't one of the nicest looking 
dorms from the interior. Rooms are ex- 
tremely small and old-looking. There is 
only one washer and dryer to service the 
entire dorm. But it has a huge study 
lounge with an attached TV room and 
breezy screened-in front porch. Ceilings 
are high to accommodate lofts and bunk 
beds which allow more space in the room. 
The corner rooms in Brown are suites and 
much larger than the others. And the bus 
system stops right out front, alleviating the 
ominous trek across campus. After all is 
said and done, it's not such a bad deal 
after all. 

— Beth Henry 



Bryan 

"Everyone lives here..." So observes 
Maureen Dubus of life in conveniently 
located Bryan Complex. Its strategic locus 
at the crux where old and new campus 
meet makes it easily one of the most 
popular co-ed dorms on campus; its ac- 
cessibility to such hot spots as Paul's, Tinee 
Giant and the sororities make it popular 
not only to residents but also to passers-by 
who use it as a meeting point to pick 
friends up on the way to the delis. Bryan 
resident Sasha Mobley notes also of the 
Complex's prominent position that "it's 
easy to hose ice from the Ho House." 

Perhaps it is the fact that it is a co-ed 
dormitory complex that makes Bryan what 
satellite Stith residents term "a social 
mecca." For those who were lucky enough 
to experience the freshman co-ed dorm, 
life in the Complex is reminiscent of 



freshman year. Senior resident Heather 
MacDonald claims that her third floor 
Bryan hall is "the best hall I've had since 
freshman year. There's sort of an 'open- 
door' policy; everything is very casual and 
you know you can just walk into any 
hallmate's room without knocking." 
Mobley, a sophomore, declares the Com- 
plex to have "camaraderie. . .it's not a 
snobby dorm like Chandler." Nowhere 
else but Bryan Complex will you hear a 
male resident shout to a co-ed "Put your 
clothes on!" 

The highlights of life in Bryan Complex 
are without a doubt the popular courtyard 
parties. This year's parade of parties began 
with an "I Wear My Sunglasses at Night" 
theme to wind down after the summer; 
election season was the inspiration of the 
"Political Party" for which residents and 
guests were to dress as politicians. The 
parties, which run a gamut of other 
themes, offer a refreshing alternative to 
fraternity parties. The biggest party of the 
year, the Bryan Heart Dance (proceeds 
from which go to the American Heart 
Association) is as popular as any Greek 
dance, and tickets are gone well before 
the date of the dance. 

Life in Bryan Complex is not always a 
bed of roses. There were minor complica- 
tions, for instance, as Robbie Laney points 
out, "the big ant problem." Such prob- 
lems are easily forgotten, however, in light 
of the memories. Sasha Mobley says, "You 
know what I like about Bryan? jane 
(Mobley's roommate) lives here." It is the 
daily things — the great roommate, shout- 
ing across the courtyard to a friend in a 
satellite building, sunbathing in the "cir- 
cle" between Bryan and Blow, awaking to 
firedrills in the middle of the night during 
reading period — that make the life of 
Bryan one of the most sought after life- 
styles on campus. Senior Bridget Kealey 
says its best and most succinctly: "Can't 
think of a better place to live." 

— Susan Doyle 



Chandler 

chandler Hall. As freshmen, either we 
ignored it as one of the "other" halls 
squeezed into the string of four, or we 
looked upon it with awe as the exclusive 
domain of inscrutable upperclassmen. As 
sophomores, exiled at Brown, Ludwell.or 
JBT, miles of depressed sighs from our 
pampered first year, we longed for the 




day when it would be ours. We peekt 
out from under our academic burde 
junior year to see the glow surroundine 
getting brighter and brighter. Next yedi, 
we might live there. . . . 

Then, it happened. Room selection 
came and went without the dreaded 
bump. The summer passed and we found 
ourselves walking up the hallowed steps 
and into our final year. None of us knew 
what to expect from this new dorm. No 
one ever does. We all knew about Chand- 
ler's obvious advantages, especially its 
perfect location facing New Campus with 
Old Campus and the Sunken Gardens 
nestled in its backyard, temptingly close to 
the delis and Baskin Robbins, to the 
inviting prospect of Dog Street and to 
whatever "night life" Williamsburg had to 
offer. 

There were disadvantages, too. The 
closets could barely hold a suitcase full of 
clothes. No one could stand the sinks 
jutting out of the wall. The room seemed 



74 






11 





this funny feeling the money comes from 
one of our fees," concluded Jewell. "I 
realize that it has to because other areas 
are lacking, such as sports." Some stu- 
dents were bothered by the idea that 
student funds might be used to keep up 
the grounds and plant pretty flowers yet 
they enjoyed the fresh surroundings. 

Nevertheless, Williams is not complete- 
ly dependent upon college funds for the 
upkeep of our campus. Pleased by the 
beauty Williams has bestowed upon Wil- 
liam and Mary and caught up in the new 
sense of pride embedded in the college, 
the Williamsburg Council of Garden Clubs 
and the Civic Beautification Committee 
have initiated a Mary-Roy Williams Land- 
scaping Fund. This fund will be used to 
purchase plants to furnish the college 
with even more color. 

It was certainly more enjoyable to study 
outside and more appealing to take a walk 
on campus when the college looked so 
bright. Whether it was the picket fence by 
sorority court or the tulips at College 
Corner, Williams definitely added a touch 
of class to William and Mary. As one 
student cleverly put it, "It's always fun to 
wait and see what's coming up next!" 

— Kaky Spruill 



A lot of credit for the landscaping on campus 
■es to the maintenance men who work daily in the 
rdens. 



▲ In both the spring and fall, flowers 
brighten spots on campus such as the 
parking lot across from James Blair and 
the front of the Caf 



73 



DORM REVIEW 



Brown 

Brown is an all girls dorm which is a 
main source of contention for its inhabi- 
tants. That and the fact that it is situated on 
the other end of the earth from new 
campus, or worse the fraternities and 
W & M hall, always result in Brown being 
one of the last choices at room selection. 

But aside from these common griev- 
ances, Brown is conveniently a hop, skip, 
and a jump from BR, the cheese shop, 
George's, and CW, thereby making it easy 
to frequent those establishments and to 
receive visits from those who do also. 
Since it is a single-sex dorm, it allows a 
special camaraderie among women to 
develop, which cannot always be found in 
co-ed dorms. 

Brown isn't one of the nicest looking 
dorms from the interior. Rooms are ex- 
tremely small and old-looking. There is 
only one washer and dryer to service the 
entire dorm. But it has a huge study 
lounge with an attached TV room and 
breezy screened-in front porch. Ceilings 
are high to accommodate lofts and bunk 
beds which allow more space in the room. 
The corner rooms in Brown are suites and 
much larger than the others. And the bus 
system stops right out front, alleviating the 
ominous trek across campus. After all is 
said and done, it's not such a bad deal 
after all. 

— Beth Henry 



Bryan 

"Everyone lives here..." So observes 
Maureen Dubus of life in conveniently 
located Bryan Complex. Its strategic locus 
at the crux where old and new campus 
meet makes it easily one of the most 
popular co-ed dorms on campus; its ac- 
cessibility to such hot spots as Paul's, Tinee 
Giant and the sororities make it popular 
not only to residents but also to passers-by 
who use it as a meeting point to pick 
friends up on the way to the delis. Bryan 
resident Sasha Mobley notes also of the 
Complex's prominent position that "it's 
easy to hose ice from the Ho House." 

Perhaps it is the fact that it is a co-ed 
dormitory complex that makes Bryan what 
satellite Stith residents term "a social 
mecca." For those who were lucky enough 
to experience the freshman co-ed dorm, 
life in the Complex is reminiscent of 

74 



freshman year. Senior resident Heather 
MacDonald claims that her third floor 
Bryan hall is "the best hall I've had since 
freshman year. There's sort of an 'open- 
door' policy; everything is very casual and 
you know you can just walk into any 
hallmate's room without knocking." 
Mobley, a sophomore, declares the Com- 
plex to have "camaraderie. . .it's not a 
snobby dorm like Chandler." Nowhere 
else but Bryan Complex will you hear a 
male resident shout to a co-ed "Put your 
clothes on!" 

The highlights of life in Bryan Complex 
are without a doubt the popular courtyard 
parties. This year's parade of parties began 
with an "I Wear My Sunglasses at Night" 
theme to wind down after the summer: 
election season was the inspiration of the 
"Political Party" for which residents and 
guests were to dress as politicians. The 
parties, which run a gamut of other 
themes, offer a refreshing alternative to 
fraternity parties. The biggest party of the 
year, the Bryan Heart Dance (proceeds 
from which go to the American Heart 
Association) is as popular as any Greek 
dance, and tickets are gone well before 
the date of the dance. 

Life in Bryan Complex is not always a 
bed of roses. There were minor complica- 
tions, for instance, as Robbie Laney points 
out, "the big ant problem." Such prob- 
lems are easily forgotten, however, in light 
of the memories. Sasha Mobley says, "You 
know what I like about Bryan? Jane 
(Mobley 's roommate) lives here." It is the 
daily things — the great roommate, shout- 
ing across the courtyard to a friend in a 
satellite building, sunbathing in the "cir- 
cle" between Bryan and Blow, awaking to 
firedrills in the middle of the night during 
reading period — that make the life of 
Bryan one of the most sought after life- 
styles on campus. Senior Bridget Kealey 
says its best and most succinctly; "Can't 
think of a better place to live." 

— Susan Doyle 

Chandler 

chandler Hall. As freshmen, either we 
ignored it as one of the "other" halls 
squeezed into the string of four, or we 
looked upon it with awe as the exclusive 
domain of inscrutable upperclassmen. As 
sophomores, exiled at Brown, Ludwell,or 
JBT, miles of depressed sighs from our 
pampered first year, we longed for the 



day when it would be ours. We peeked ■ 
out from under our academic burdens ,j 
junior year to see the glow surrounding it i 
getting brighter and brighter. Next year, 
we might live there. . . . 

Then, it happened. Room selection 
came and went without the dreaded 
bump. The summer passed and we found 
ourselves walking up the hallowed steps 
and into our final year. None of us knew 
what to expect from this new dorm. No 
one ever does. We all knew about Chand- 
ler's obvious advantages, especially its 
perfect location facing New Campus with 
Old Campus and the Sunken Gardens 
nestled in its backyard, temptingly close to 
the delis and Baskin Robbins, to the 
inviting prospect of Dog Street and to 
whatever "night life" Williamsburg had to 
offer. 

There were disadvantages, too. The ] 
closets could barely hold a suitcase full of I 
clothes. No one could stand the sinks \ 
jutting out of the wall. The room seemed 




full of doors and treacherous angles that 
made most of us turn into carpenters 
assembling lofts to fit our room's unique 
bends. Finding a parking spot in front of 
the dorm required daring, sharp eyes, 
cool nerves, and infinite patience. Pulling 
out of the niche we'd found often de- 
pended on a prayer and, sometimes, on 
teamwork. One first floor resident re- 
membered squeezing her Chevette so 
snugly into its parking place one night that 
three Chandler guys had to pick it up and 
move it out for her the next day. 

Hall life didn't die the way people had 
predicted it would after freshman year. In 
Chandler Hall, it was very much alive, full 
of memorable events, dinners, and new 
friends. Much of it centered around the 
kitchen where hall members exchanged 
gossip and recipes and, at times, left to run 
outside to the deafening wail of the fire 
alarm, hoping no one found out they'd 
burned their dinner. 

Looking back we realize the secret that 



had lain hidden in Chandler Hall all the 
years before we lived there. There was a 
brightness and a dignity about it, yes, but 
underneath it all was a zest for college life, 
and a feeling of unity. As Margaret Farrell, 
a sophomore who'd been lucky enough 
to slip in ahead of time put it, everyone in 
Chandler sensed that "we were all going 
through this together." 

— Michele Jerome 

Fraternities 

when going about looking at prospec- 
tive options for lodging at William and 
Mary, one should make certain not to 
overlook the fraternity complex. Just as 
any housing offers both positive and nega- 
tive aspects of living conditions, the fra- 
ternity complex is faced with this problem 
also. In making any important decision it is 
wise to look at the situation as a whole. 
This is where the fraternity option comes 



out on top. 

First, we must look at the major com- 
plaints against fraternity living. It is obvious 
that the noise level within the complex is 
generally a bit higher than most other 
areas on campus. Also, because the fra- 
ternities act as a social outlet at the college, 
the amount of damage and trash is con- 
siderably greater within this area, it should 
be noted that the college has not made a 
very diligent attempt, in the way of quick 
repairs or efficient maid service, to com- 
pensate the fraternities for the service 
which they provide to the college. This 
contributes to the overall feeling that the 
facility is in rather poor shape and needs a 
great deal of attention. Finally, we find 
that the small rooms, and the numbers of 
people who pass through the complex, 
offer little privacy to the residents. 

Fortunately, the negative aspects of fra- 
ternity living are greatly outweighed by 
the positive aspects. The location is superb 
for availability of parking, proximity to 
cafeteria facilities, and sits directly across 
from William and Mary Hall. Also within a 
few moments walk are the classrooms to 
one side, and intramural fields to the 
other. Along with this, in recent years 
many of the fraternities have furnished 
their houses with clothes washing facili- 
ties, improved kitchen facilities, such as 
microwaves, and newly decorated party 
rooms. But what seems universally more 
important than the material benefits of 
living in the complex is the feeling of 
camaraderie that develops within each of 
the houses. The complex provides an 
unsurpassed opportunity for spontaneous 
fun and the ability to develop extremely 
close friendships with large numbers of 
people who share similar, yet diverse, 
interests. Although there may be some 
drawbacks to living in the fraternity com- 
plex, overall the opportunity is one which 
should not be missed. 

— Kevin Jones 



75 



DORMS Cont. 



Jefferson 

After Christmas Break a handful of 
students returned to school early to "get it 
together" before classes started again. 
These were the residents of the new 
Jefferson. Back in December each one of 
us had not-so-carefully packed our be- 
longings into boxes and bags and hauled 
it to the new Jefferson. The time alloted to 
the residents for this task was reading and 
exam periods. Most people just 
"dumped" their stuff in their new room 
and left for Christmas. When they re- 
turned from the break the collective 
thought was "how am I going to get all of 
this in HERE?!" For most of the residents 
getting all of their belongings inside meant 
sending a lot of it home with mom and 
dad. After several hours, much rearrang- 
ing and lots of cursing the much smaller 
room now looked like home. 

Getting used to a smaller room was not 
the only new hurdle facing the new 
residents. Another was the hall bathroom. 
Some residents were used to this set-up, 
but after one semester of sharing a bath- 
room with only one other person, it was 
difficult to get used to sharing it with 
twenty-three. The basement "babes" as 
they call themselves were also afforded 
with another new bathroom "toy." The 
basement, being fully equipped for handi- 
capped students, has a handicapped 
shower which consists of two seats and a 
movable shower head. Ingenious W & M 
students soon recognized the potential 
this shower had. So once the weather got 
warm girls raced to the bathroom to see 
who would get the handicapped shower 
so she could shave her legs. 

The new Jefferson also came equipped 
with its own set of new freshmen. After 
wary glances and a few parties the resi- 
dents got used to their new dormmates. 
One basement resident said, "They 
weren't so bad, except the guys were 
awfully loud. I think they moved furniture 
at 4 A.M. 

— Anne Towe 

Landrum 

Landrum Hall is the largest all-female 
upper-class dorm, complete with suite 
bathrooms, and five floors of residents, 
from the basement to the attic. Rooms are 
large and airy, facing either romantic Crim 
Dell or a stunning view of the back of 



Rogers (always a welcome sight for chem 
majors). 

The girls who choose to live in Landrum 
appreciate the quiet atmosphere, yet have 
the knowledge that things can break loose 
at any time. Landrum and Chandler have 
frequent joint happy hours, parties, and 
even a spring dance. Whether an Econ 
major or an English major, Landrum pro- 
vides the quickest access to Morton or 
Tucker. 



Perhaps the nicest advantage in living in 
Landrum is being near the Crim Dell 
ducks. Those of us who lived in the 
basement can testify to the delights of 
having the ducks quack and gabble out- 
side our windows at 6:00 in the morning. 
Other joys are coming back from a late- 
night out and almost breaking a neck 
avoiding these fine feathered fowls. 

One plus of living in Landrum is being 
so near Crim Dell. What could be more 



I 




Sophomore Carylin Miazga takes advantage of the new and clean kitchen facilities in Jefferson. 



76 




full of doors and treacherous angles that 
made most of us turn into carpenters 
assembling lofts to fit our room's unique 
bends. Finding a parking spot in front of 
the dorm required daring, sharp eyes, 
cool nerves, and infinite patience. Pulling 
out of the niche we'd found often de- 
pended on a prayer and, sometimes, on 
teamwork. One first floor resident re- 
membered squeezing her Chevette so 
snugly into its parking place one night that 
three Chandler guys had to pick it up and 
move it out for her the next day. 

Hall life didn't die the way people had 
predicted it would after freshman year. In 
Chandler Hall, it was very much alive, full 
of memorable events, dinners, and new 
friends. Much of it centered around the 
kitchen where hall members exchanged 
gossip and recipes and, at times, left to run 
outside to the deafening wail of the fire 
alarm, hoping no one found out they'd 
burned their dinner. 

Looking back we realize the secret that 



had lain hidden in Chandler Hall all the 
years before we lived there. There was a 
brightness and a dignity about it, yes, but 
underneath it all was a zest for college life, 
and a feeling of unity. As Margaret Farrell, 
a sophomore who'd been lucky enough 
to slip in ahead of time put it, everyone in 
Chandler sensed that "we were all going 
through this together." 

— Michele Jerome 

Fraternities 

when going about looking at prospec- 
tive options for lodging at William and 
Mary, one should make certain not to 
overlook the fraternity complex. Just as 
any housing offers both positive and nega- 
tive aspects of living conditions, the fra- 
ternity complex is faced with this problem 
also. In making any important decision it is 
wise to look at the situation as a whole. 
This is where the fraternity option comes 



out on top. 

First, we must look at the major com- 
plaints against fraternity living. It is obvious 
that the noise level within the complex is 
generally a bit higher than most other 
areas on campus. Also, because the fra- 
ternities act as a social outlet at the college, 
the amount of damage and trash is con- 
siderably greater within this area. It should 
be noted that the college has not made a 
very diligent attempt, in the way of quick 
repairs or efficient maid service, to com- 
pensate the fraternities for the service 
which they provide to the college. This 
contributes to the overall feeling that the 
facility is in rather poor shape and needs a 
great deal of attention. Finally, we find 
that the small rooms, and the numbers of 
people who pass through the complex, 
offer little privacy to the residents. 

Fortunately, the negative aspects of fra- 
ternity living are greatly outweighed by 
the positive aspects. The location is superb 
for availability of parking, proximity to 
cafeteria facilities, and sits directly across 
from William and Mary Hall. Also within a 
few moments walk are the classrooms to 
one side, and intramural fields to the 
other. Along with this, in recent years 
many of the fraternities have furnished 
their houses with clothes washing facili- 
ties, improved kitchen facilities, such as 
microwaves, and newly decorated party 
rooms. But what seems universally more 
important than the material benefits of 
living in the complex is the feeling of 
camaraderie that develops within each of 
the houses. The complex provides an 
unsurpassed opportunity for spontaneous 
fun and the ability to develop extremely 
close friendships with large numbers of 
people who share similar, yet diverse, 
interests. Although there may be some 
drawbacks to living in the fraternity com- 
plex, overall the opportunity is one which 
should not be missed. 

— Kevin Jones 



75 



DORMS Cont. 



Jefferson 

After Christmas Break a handful of 
students returned to school early to "get it 
together" before classes started again. 
These were the residents of the new 
Jefferson. Back in December each one of 
us had not-so-carefully packed our be- 
longings into boxes and bags and hauled 
it to the new Jefferson. The time alloted to 
the residents for this task was reading and 
exam periods. Most people just 
"dumped" their stuff in their new room 
and left for Christmas. When they re- 
turned from the break the collective 
thought was "how am I going to get all of 
this in HERE?!" For most of the residents 
getting all of their belongings inside meant 
sending a lot of it home with mom and 
dad. After several hours, much rearrang- 
ing and lots of cursing the much smaller 
room now looked like home. 

Getting used to a smaller room was not 
the only new hurdle facing the new 
residents. Another was the hall bathroom. 
Some residents were used to this set-up, 
but after one semester of sharing a bath- 
room with only one other person, it was 
difficult to get used to sharing it with 
twenty-three. The basement "babes" as 
they call themselves were also afforded 
with another new bathroom "toy." The 
basement, being fully equipped for handi- 
capped students, has a handicapped 
shower which consists of two seats and a 
movable shower head. Ingenious W & M 
students soon recognized the potential 
this shower had. So once the weather got 
warm girls raced to the bathroom to see 
who would get the handicapped shower 
so she could shave her legs. 

The new Jefferson also came equipped 
with its own set of new freshmen. After 
wary glances and a few parties the resi- 
dents got used to their new dormmates. 
One basement resident said, "They 
weren't so bad, except the guys were 
awfully loud. 1 think they moved furniture 
at 4 A.M. 

— AnneTowe 



Landrum 

Landrum Hall is the largest all-female 
upper-class dorm, complete with suite 
bathrooms, and five floors of residents, 
from the basement to the attic. Rooms are 
large and airy, facing either romantic Crim 
Dell or a stunning view of the back of 



Rogers (always a welcome sight for chem 
majors). 

The girls who choose to live in Landrum 
appreciate the quiet atmosphere, yet have 
the knowledge that things can break loose 
at any time. Landrum and Chandler have 
frequent joint happy hours, parties, and 
even a spring dance. Whether an Econ 
major or an English major, Landrum pro- 
vides the quickest access to Morton or 
Tucker. 



Perhaps the nicest advantage in living in 
Landrum is being near the Crim Dell 
ducks. Those of us who lived in the 
basement can testify to the delights of 
having the ducks quack and gabble out- 
side our windows at 6:00 in the morning. 
Other joys are coming back from a late- 
night out and almost breaking a neck 
avoiding these fine feathered fowls. 

One plus of living in Landrum is being 
so near Crim Dell. What could be more 



1. 



i 




Sophomore Carylin Miazga takes advantage of the new and clean kitchen facilities in Jefferson. 



76 




fun than watching sorority pledges crawl 
across the bridge, growling like lions, 
oinking like pigs, or crying out plaintively, 
"Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, 
Romeo?" We Landrum residents get first- 
row seats to all the excitement. 

Landrum provides a nice, quiet atmos- 
phere away from the din of Bryan Com- 
plex or the frats. It is a refuge for studying 
if you can't stand the frantic nervousness 
permeating Chancellors or Swem. With 
numerous lounges and a big laundry 
room, Landrum provides all the comforts 
of home. And besides, it calms nervous 
fathers when they know daddy's little girl 
is in an all-female dorm and not subject to 
the amorous advances of boys in the co- 
ed dorms. 

— Amy Campbell 

Lodges 

"The lodges are just like small apart- 
ments or townhouses on campus," said 
senior Bill Bennett. "They have a kitchen, 
living room, bedroom and bathroom, 
although only one for seven people. That 
can be a problem in the mornings. They 
have a great backyard for cookouts and 
parties. But the best thing is that they are 
considered to be private residences. 
Parties don't have to be registered be- 
cause they're private." 



"Actually," chimed in Doug Mercato, 
"the best thing about a lodge is that you 
can pick the right people whom you want 
to live with. You don't have to deal with a 
hall." But Bennett reasoned that this could 
be a disadvantage too. "Sometimes they 
are too secluded. But that's about the only 
disadvantage." 

— Beth Henry 

Ludwell 

According to Chris Moakley, Ludwell is 
"the best of campus housing." "It has all 
the conveniences of dorm life. It is just like 
living on a hall with an RA plus there is a 
full efficiency with a living room for each 
four people, provided one couple of the 
quad is compatible with the other," he 
added. There are social functions and 
camaraderie in Ludwell equal to any other 
dorm on campus. 

"The only negative thing about Ludwell 
is its distance from campus," Moakley 
said. "It really is a pain if you don't have a 
car. The bus comes out to Ludwell but 
doesn't go to the shopping center. That is 
its major drawback. Aside from that it's 
perfect. You have a cooking and eating 
area that you don't have to share with a 
hall. But the people are there just the 
same." 

— Beth Henry 



Mindless pasttime: When the academic 
pressures built, we often parked ourselves in 
front of the idiot box for an evening of bad 
sitcoms. Here, two residents of Bryan watch 
the news. 



77 



30RMSCont. 



Old Dominion 



I was in England when I secured my 
single on the first floor of Old Dominion. 
Fortunately, I had not been alone in my 
endeavors to procure a meaningful place 
of existence on the campus of this vener- 
able institution. Even though he was 
graduating, my stalwart proxy went 
through room selection one more time. I 
can just imagine the eyebrows he must 
have raised as he approached the table to 
request a female single in Old Dominion. 
("Yes, I'm SURE you'd like a single 
female. . .") 

But I got it. And since my metaphorical 
embarkation on a veritable vessel of dorm- 
life high adventure, O.D. has definitely 



taken on a personality of its own. Offering 
self-adjusted thermostats for air-condi- 
tioning and a prime Old Campus location, 
the time-honored structure of O.D. can 
almost seem luxurious. 

So what is it like to live at Old Dominion, 
the self-prescribed Definitive Place For 
Seniors? Well, from all accounts, it is 
certainly different, jon Ewing spoke fond- 
ly of "roach heaven," praising the adapta- 
bility of the rooms (and the people in 
them). 

Cockroaches are "big as tanks," RA Rob 
Coble and Ken Rogich will verify. 

Mark Koschmeder liked sleeping under 
blankets in ninety-degree weather, and 
roommate Rich Ambler said, yeah, it was 
nice having condensation dripping on the 
windows in September. 

Tranquility can be another plus for 



O.D.: as another senior mentioned, the 
squirrels in the holly tree outside his room 
gave him a sense of ultimate purpose. 

Socializing on the first floor is made 
somewhat difficult by the large lounge 
dividing it, but, as Jim Hunter pointed out, 
you do get to know the out-going people. 

It can be nice, as Janet Stotts noted, 
having your boyfriend in the same dorm 
right below you. She also said that hall 
supper clubs, featuring such meals as 
chicken cordon bleu and beef Burgundy, 
were a "blast." ("No noodle or canned 
crud, of course.") 

An unexpected advantage to living in 
Old Dominion, Woody Waters averred, is 
that it isashort run over to James Blair in a 
towel if you have locked yourself out of 
your room while taking what was a nice 
shower. 



^ 







. i= 



D ' 



V. 




78 




fun than watching sorority pledges crawl 
across the bridge, growling like lions, 
oinking like pigs, or crying out plaintively, 
"Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, 
Romeo?" We Landrum residents get first- 
row seats to all the excitement. 

Landrum provides a nice, quiet atmos- 
phere away from the din of Bryan Com- 
plex or the frats. It is a refuge for studying 
if you can't stand the frantic nervousness 
permeating Chancellors or Swem. With 
numerous lounges and a big laundry 
room, Landrum provides all the comforts 
of home. And besides, it calms nervous 
fathers when they know daddy's little girl 
is in an all-female dorm and not subject to 
the amorous advances of boys in the co- 
ed dorms. 

— Amy Campbell 

Lodges 

I "The lodges are just like small apart- 
'ments or townhouses on campus," said 
senior Bill Bennett. "They have a kitchen, 
living room, bedroom and bathroom, 
although only one for seven people. That 
can be a problem in the mornings. They 
have a great backyard for cookouts and 
jparties. But the best thing is that they are 
'considered to be private residences. 
Parties don't have to be registered be- 
cause they're private." 



"Actually," chimed in Doug Mercato, 
"the best thing about a lodge is that you 
can pick the right people whom you want 
to live with. You don't have to deal with a 
hall." But Bennett reasoned that this could 
be a disadvantage too. "Sometimes they 
are too secluded. But that's about the only 
disadvantage." 

— Beth Henry 

Ludwell 

According to Chris Moakley, Ludwell is 
"the best of campus housing." "It has all 
the conveniences of dorm life. It is just like 
living on a hall with an RA plus there is a 
full efficiency with a living room for each 
four people, provided one couple of the 
quad is compatible with the other," he 
added. There are social functions and 
camaraderie in Ludwell equal to any other 
dorm on campus. 

"The only negative thing about Ludwell 
is its distance from campus," Moakley 
said. "It really is a pain if you don't have a 
car. The bus comes out to Ludwell but 
doesn't go to the shopping center. That is 
its major drawback. Aside from that it's 
perfect. You have a cooking and eating 
area that you don't have to share with a 
hall. But the people are there just the 
same." 

— Beth Henry 



Mindless pasttime; When the academic 
pressures built, we often parked ourselves in 
front of the idiot box for an evening of bad 
sitcoms- Here, two residents of Bryan watch 
the news. 



77 



DORMS Cont. 



Old Dominion 



I was in England when I secured my 
single on the first floor of Old Dominion. 
Fortunately, I had not been alone in my 
endeavors to procure a meaningful place 
of existence on the campus of this vener- 
able institution. Even though he was 
graduating, my stalwart proxy went 
through room selection one more time. I 
can just imagine the eyebrows he must 
have raised as he approached the table to 
request a female single in Old Dominion. 
("Yes, I'm SURE you'd like a single 
female. . .") 

But 1 got it. And since my metaphorical 
embarkation on a veritable vessel of dorm- 
life high adventure, O.D. has definitely 



taken on a personality of its own. Offering 
self-adjusted thermostats for air-condi- 
tioning and a prime Old Campus location, 
the time-honored structure of O.D. can 
almost seem luxurious. 

So what is it like to live at Old Dominion, 
the self-prescribed Definitive Place For 
Seniors? Well, from all accounts, it is 
certainly different, jon Ewing spoke fond- 
ly of "roach heaven," praising the adapta- 
bility of the rooms (and the people in 
them). 

Cockroaches are "big as tanks," RA Rob 
Coble and Ken Rogich will verify. 

Mark Koschmeder liked sleeping under 
blankets in ninety-degree weather, and 
roommate Rich Ambler said, yeah, it was 
nice having condensation dripping on the 
windows in September. 

Tranquility can be another plus for 



O.D.: as another senior mentioned, the 
squirrels in the holly tree outside his room 
gave him a sense of ultimate purpose. 

Socializing on the first floor is made 
somewhat difficult by the large lounge 
dividing it, but, as Jim Hunter pointed out, 
you do get to know the out-going people. 

It can be nice, as Janet Stotts noted, 
having your boyfriend in the same dorm 
right below you. She also said that hall 
supper clubs, featuring such meals as 
chicken cordon bleu and beef Burgundy, 
were a "blast." ("No noodle or canned 
crud, of course.") 

An unexpected advantage to living in 
Old Dominion, Woody Waters averred, is 
that it is a short run over to James Blair in a 
towel if you have locked yourself out of 
your room while taking what was a nice 
shower. 



r- -K 






• < 1 




SESSS 



^ 



mMMMMM- ' ^ ' ^ ^'V^ ' ^.^ ^ J 




78 



The all-around physical qualities of the 
building, as chem-major John Quagliano 
put it, are superb, as is the proximity to the 
delis. Blow Gym, Old Campus, and Colo- 
nial Williamsburg. 

So, in senior retrospect, I would say that 
living at Old Dominion has definitely 
been unique. I mean, where else can you 
get "crenshaw-ed" in the hall, trip on a 
huge stone step leading up to the bottom- 
floor girls' bathroom, or come across a 
refrigerator on someone's door? Some 
persons have even had ants that clean up 
the toothpaste that they left in the sink. 

Yeah, watch me miss it all. 

— Barbie J. Trybul 

Randolph Complex 

Mark Osier insightfully described the 
Randolph Complex as "the only dorms on 
campus designed along functional lines 
...designed more for human use than 
economic gain." There seems to have 
been no attempt to house the maximum 
number of students in the Complex's 
buildings (which consist of Page and 
Harrison — singles, Giles and Pleasants — 
predominantly doubles, and Cabell — 
apartments for 4). For instance, the large 
central kitchens of Giles and Pleasants 
could easily house about eight more resi- 
dents. Instead, the hall shares the spacious 
living and cooking area, which offers 
students culinary facilities that are more 
than adequate. (All this and AC too!) 

Randolph residents also have the added 
luxury of the Tazewell building, offering 
them the opportunity to play pool, ping- 
pong, pin-ball, Pac-Man, and the piano 
even. Tazewell isalsowherethose living in 
the complex do their laundry, satiate 
those moon-pie cravings, watch TV on the 
large screen, or just study. 

Randolph Complex, named after the 
distinguished Randolph family of Virginia 
who attended the college, is also stra- 
tegically located. It is within convenient 
walking distance from W&M Hall, the 
Commons, and the fraternities. Academic 
buildings are also easily found. 

Thequality of lifeat Randolph Complex, 
its individual halls named after Virginia 
Governors who attended William and 
Mary, is far superior to that offered by 
most other William and Mary residence 
halls, as one can plainly see. 

— Donna Porter 



Sororities 

As with the fraternities, or any campus 
housing, life in sorority court has its pluses 
and minuses. Isolated across Richmond 
Road, the sororities make the walk to class 
(with the possible exceptions of Wren, 
Tucker and Chancellors) worth a full PE 
credit. Parking, what little there is, seems 
always to result in parking tickets. And 
stray tourists can often be found looking 
confused on the front porch. 

Yet, the positive side of the location far 
outweighs the negative. Neighboring 
Colonial Williamsburg makes lunch from 
the Cheese Shop, or a jog on "DOG" a 
convenient diversion, and the old campus 
setting is postcard picturesque. 

The peace and quiet remains outside 
the houses; however, since, inside, some- 
thing is always happening. It's amazing 
how much noise 16 college women, most- 
ly seniors, can make. . .or how much fun 
they can have. With a community kitchen, 
living room, and dining area, a real feeling 
of "family" is easy to find. Someone's 
always around to watch a soap or catch up 
on the latest gossip. The rooms are small 
and close with four doubles on the second 
floor, two triples on the third, and one 
double downstairs, but the closeness of 
the rooms seems directly proportional to 
the closeness of the girls. .. .Sororities 
may not be a place for studying, but 
they're perfect for sisterhood. 

— Lindsey Willis 



Special Interest Housing 

"It allows for people with a common 
interest to get together," claimed Bill 
Bennett, dweller of the Spanish House for 
two years. "The people tend to be a lot 
closer than in a regular dorm because of 
that common interest. It blends together 
people who want to learn Spanish, for 
example, and Spanish culture. We took 
field trips, watched Spanish movies and in 
general learned a lot while having a good 
time. Yet it still has the benefit of a regular 
dorm social life as well. Botetourt is es- 
pecially conducive to having parties or 
planned functions since it has a large, air- 
conditioned lobby." 

Of course there were the regular prob- 
lems, shortage of bathrooms and small 
rooms in Botetourt but the one thing 



Bennett noted was, "Just as a common 
interest can be unifying it, can also be- 
come exclusive. We tended to become 
cliquish. And toward the end of the year 
the interest in learning Spanish tended to 
wane. But I made some of my best friends 
there. I'm still living with them now." 

— Beth Henry 

Units 



Living in the units at the Fraternity 
Complex was usually the on-campus 
equivalent of Dillard. They were the last 
rooms to go in the lottery and they often 
outlasted Dillard. But being on campus 
was far better than possible social anony- 
mity resulting from life off campus. Resi- 
dents in A, B, K & L were not subject to 
having their life run by a green machine. 
The units were more convenient because 
of their location reasonably near new 
campus. 

Living in an old fraternity house in the 
complex was not mother's idea of ideal 
housing, but by downplaying the party 
noises and smell of stale beer, the resi- 
dents could make their parents under- 
stand that it was inevitable. There was no 
need to even tell them about the 5:1 ratio 
of boys to girls. 

An air conditioner (for medical pur- 
poses) and a cleverly built loft made the 
room in Unit K quite comfortable. The loft 
doubled the closet space, gave a "kitchen" 
area, and room for a chair underneath it. 
The problem of space was solved. Life in 
the Fraternity Complex was life in the 
center of social activity. Social life 
abounded and was welcomed. 

Of course one of the first rules learned 
was that studying could not be accom- 
plished in the room. Library habits that 
should have been develolped freshman 
year finally were. Another plus was that 
living in the units made for easy access and 
therefore visits were plentiful. 

Many people dreaded living in the 
units, but it was a fun way to spend 
sophomore year. I would not want to live 
there as a senior because now I value my 
sleep. But it was a "people" year. Fellow 
unit residents became close and valued 
friends. 

— Hunter Milligan 



79 



CURRENTS ON CAMPUS 




Change: Where? Who? How? When? 



* A new causeway links recently opened Trinkle 
Hall with the campus center. 

^ James Connoly, director of Facilities. Planning 
and Construction is the man responsible for most of 
our new things on campus. 



Making changes at William and Mary 
isn't an easy task, whether it's trying a new 
validation procedure or adding a techni- 
color neon mural to new campus. William 
and Mary students always seem to notice 
the differences — and they always speak 
up about them! 

When long lines snaked out of Trinkle 
Hall on January 14th shortly after the crack 
of dawn — about quarter to eight — the 
usual validation day grumbling began. By 
8:45, though, grumbling turned to panic 
as seniors realized there was no way that 
they were going to drop, add , and make it 
to their 9:00. Juniors, already and craning 
their necks through the double doors, 
watched as the Class of '85 validated for 
the last time. 

What they saw looked like a three-ring 
circus. The first ring consisted of the 
familiar lines in front of tables with box 
after box of pink drop cards and yellow 
add cards. Ring Two, though, was a line of 
computer terminals where confused, 
frustrated students and equally unhappy 
operators peered into the green-glowing 



screens. The third ring was a sprawl of 
student bodies on the Hall floor, faces 
buried in the newspapers. 

"I liked the computers because that 
way I could see that my schedule was 
right, but why did they move it back to 
James Blair so soon?" said Megan (Class of 
'85). That sentiment was echoed by many 
students as they incredulously watched 
the mob scene at James Blair the following 
day. 

"I never even got inside Trinkle before 
everything moved!" said Melissa (Class of 
'88). 

Another new controversial item was the 
Muscarelle Museum. "Well, to tell you 
the truth, I've never been inside," ad- 
mitted Sterling (Class of '86). If the truth 
were known, surprisingly few students 
have been inside the newest building on 
campus. Apparently, most of them never 
got past the "Sun Sonata" which domi- 
nates the Jamestown Road Wall. "I think 
the appearance is incongruous with the 
rest of campus, and the colors are gaudy," 
said Thom (Class of '85). "Yes," agrees 




80 



The all-around physical qualities of the 
building, as chem-major John Quagliano 
put it, are superb, as is the proximity to the 
delis. Blow Gym, Old Campus, and Colo- 
nial Williamsburg. 

So, in senior retrospect, I would say that 
living at Old Dominion has definitely 
been unique. I mean, where else can you 
get "crenshaw-ed" in the hall, trip on a 
huge stone step leading up to the bottom- 
floor girls' bathroom, or come across a 
refrigerator on someone's door? Some 
persons have even had ants that clean up 
the toothpaste that they left in the sink. 

Yeah, watch me miss it all. 

— Barbie J. Trybul 

Randolph Complex 

Mark Osier insightfully described the 
Randolph Complex as "the only dorms on 
campus designed along functional lines 
...designed more for human use than 
economic gain." There seems to have 
been no attempt to house the maximum 
number of students in the Complex's 
buildings (which consist of Page and 
Harrison — singles, Giles and Pleasants — 
predominantly doubles, and Cabell — 
apartments for 4). For instance, the large 
central kitchens of Giles and Pleasants 
could easily house about eight more resi- 
dents. Instead, the hall shares the spacious 
living and cooking area, which offers 
students culinary facilities that are more 
than adequate. (All this and AC too!) 

Randolph residents also have the added 
luxury of the Tazewell building, offering 
them the opportunity to play pool, ping- 
Dong, pin-ball, Pac-Man, and the piano 
2ven. Tazewell isalso where those livingin 
j:he complex do their laundry, satiate 
I hose moon-pie cravings, watch TV on the 
arge screen, or just study. 
^ Randolph Complex, named after the 
distinguished Randolph family of Virginia 
vho attended the college, is also stra- 
egically located. It is within convenient 
valking distance from W&M Hall, the 
Zommons, and the fraternities. Academic 
Juildings are also easily found. 

The quality of life at Randolph Complex, 
ts individual halls named after Virginia 
Governors who attended William and 
vlary, is far superior to that offered by 
nost other William and Mary residence 
lalls, as one can plainly see. 

— Donna Porter 



Sororities 

As with the fraternities, or any campus 
housing, life in sorority court has its pluses 
and minuses. Isolated across Richmond 
Road, the sororities make the walk to class 
(with the possible exceptions of Wren, 
Tucker and Chancellors) worth a full PE 
credit. Parking, what little there is, seems 
always to result in parking tickets. And 
stray tourists can often be found looking 
confused on the front porch. 

Yet, the positive side of the location far 
outweighs the negative. Neighboring 
Colonial Williamsburg makes lunch from 
the Cheese Shop, or a jog on "DOG" a 
convenient diversion, and the old campus 
setting is postcard picturesque. 

The peace and quiet remains outside 
the houses; however, since, inside, some- 
thing is always happening. It's amazing 
how much noise 16 college women, most- 
ly seniors, can make. . .or how much fun 
they can have. With a community kitchen, 
living room, and dining area, a real feeling 
of "family" is easy to find. Someone's 
always around to watch a soap or catch up 
on the latest gossip. The rooms are small 
and close with four doubles on the second 
floor, two triples on the third, and one 
double downstairs, but the closeness of 
the rooms seems directly proportional to 
the closeness of the girls. .. .Sororities 
may not be a place for studying, but 
they're perfect for sisterhood. 

— Lindsey Willis 



Special Interest Housing 

"It allows for people with a common 
interest to get together," claimed Bill 
Bennett, dweller of the Spanish House for 
two years. "The people tend to be a lot 
closer than in a regular dorm because of 
that common interest. It blends together 
people who want to learn Spanish, for 
example, and Spanish culture. We took 
field trips, watched Spanish movies and in 
general learned a lot while having a good 
time. Yet it still has the benefit of a regular 
dorm social life as well. Botetourt is es- 
pecially conducive to having parties or 
planned functions since it has a large, air- 
conditioned lobby." 

Of course there were the regular prob- 
lems, shortage of bathrooms and small 
rooms in Botetourt but the one thing 



Bennett noted was, "just as a common 
interest can be unifying it, can also be- 
come exclusive. We tended to become 
cliquish. And toward the end of the year 
the interest in learning Spanish tended to 
wane. But I made some of my best friends 
there. I'm still living with them now." 

— Beth Henry 

Units 



Living in the units at the Fraternity 
Complex was usually the on-campus 
equivalent of Dillard. They were the last 
rooms to go in the lottery and they often 
outlasted Dillard. But being on campus 
was far better than possible social anony- 
mity resulting from life off campus. Resi- 
dents in A, B, K & L were not subject to 
having their life run by a green machine. 
The units were more convenient because 
of their location reasonably near new 
campus. 

Living in an old fraternity house in the 
complex was not mother's idea of ideal 
housing, but by downplaying the party 
noises and smell of stale beer, the resi- 
dents could make their parents under- 
stand that it was inevitable. There was no 
need to even tell them about the 5:1 ratio 
of boys to girls. 

An air conditioner (for medical pur- 
poses) and a cleverly built loft made the 
room in Unit K quite comfortable. The loft 
doubled the closet space, gave a "kitchen" 
area, and room for a chair underneath it. 
The problem of space was solved. Life in 
the Fraternity Complex was life in the 
center of social activity. Social life 
abounded and was welcomed. 

Of course one of the first rules learned 
was that studying could not be accom- 
plished in the room. Library habits that 
should have been develolped freshman 
year finally were. Another plus was that 
living in the units made for easy access and 
therefore visits were plentiful. 

Many people dreaded living in the 
units, but it was a fun way to spend 
sophomore year. I would not want to live 
there as a senior because now I value my 
sleep. But it was a "people" year. Fellow 
unit residents became close and valued 
friends. 

— Hunter Milligan 



79 



CURRENTS ON CAMPUS 




Change: Where? Who? How? When? 



* A new causeway links recently opened Trinkle 
Hall with the campus center. 

A James Connoly. director of Facilities. Planning 
and Construction is the man responsible for mostof,! 
our new things on campus. 



Making changes at William and Mary 
isn't an easy task, whether it's trying a new 
validation procedure or adding a techni- 
color neon mural to new campus. William 
and Mary students always seem to notice 
the differences— and they always speak 
up about them! 

When long lines snaked out of Trinkle 
Hall on January 14th shortly after the crack 
of dawn — about quarter to eight — the 
usual validation day grumbling began. By 
8:45, though, grumbling turned to panic 
as seniors realized there was no way that 
they were going to drop, add, and make it 
to their 9:00. Juniors, already and craning 
their necks through the double doors, 
watched as the Class of '85 validated for 
the last time. 

What they saw looked like a three-ring 
circus. The first ring consisted of the 
familiar lines in front of tables with box 
after box of pink drop cards and yellow 
add cards. RingTwo, though, wasa lineof 
computer terminals where confused, 
frustrated students and equally unhappy 
operators peered into the green-glowing 



screens. The third ring was a sprawl of 
student bodies on the Hall floor, faces 
buried in the newspapers. 

"I liked the computers because that 
way I could see that my schedule was 
right, but why did they move it back to 
James Blair so soon?" said Megan (Class of 
'85). That sentiment was echoed by many 
students as they incredulously watched 
the mob scene at James Blair the following 
day. 

"I never even got inside Trinkle before 
everything moved!" said Melissa (Class of 
'88). 

Another new controversial item was the 
Muscarelle Museum. "Well, to tell you 
the truth, I've never been inside," ad- 
mitted Sterling (Class of '86). If the truth 
were known, surprisingly few students 
have been inside the newest building on 
campus. Apparently, most of them never 
got past the "Sun Sonata" which domi- 
nates the Jamestown Road Wall. "I think 
the appearance is incongruous with the 
rest of campus, and the colors are gaudy," 
said Thorn (Class of '85). "Yes," agrees 




80 



i 



i 



m' 



f 







< Jefferson, under reconstruction since ttie fire in 
January 1983, opened for student occupation in 
January 1985 A passing scene sfiows the new fiall 
showers which are. in many cases, nicer than the 
ones we have at home. 



Keith (also Class of '85) as he states their 
opinion more simply, "It's cool, but out of 
place." 

Are William and Mary students ever 
receptive to change? An informal poll 
came up vi'ith a fev^ (anonymous) sugges- 
tions — if only the administration would 
listen: 
"Optional finals" 

(C.R.— Classof'87). 
"Free champagne at commencement" 

(R.E.— Classof'85). 
"Beer on tap at the Commons" 

(K.C.— Class of '88). 
"Beer, period!" 
(K.R.— Class of '88). 

—Ruth McCuIlers 





A Another renovated area on campus was the P.O. 
Two more walls of boxes were added and the 
window was moved, now if we could only gel the 
mail delivered properly' 

< The f^^uscarelle presented several new art 
exhibitions over the course of the year Here, 
students pause between classes to explore an 
artist's work. 



81 



CURRENTS ON CAMPUS 



RESTRICTING THE 
GOLDEN BEVERAGE 



O.K., so I was bored in my business 
class. I didn't mean to encourage a scene; 
I just wanted to meet the cute guy whom I 
had been admiring since the first day of 
classes. I certainly didn't expect him to 
hyperventilate. Well, here's what 
happened! 

I was bored, as I said, so leaned over 
towards the guy sitting next to me, and in 
an attempt to start a friendly conversation, 
I asked, "Can you image what it would be 
like around here if we couldn't drink 
alcohol at any social functions?" I waited a 
second for a reaction, then I noticed he 
was trembling. He turned to me with a 
glazed look in his eye, his face streaming 
with sweat. He asked me to repeat the 



'1 spent more at the 
Green Leafe on beer 
in one semester than I 
did on out-of-state 
tuition/' 



question, but I knew he had heard me the 
first time; I had obviously struck a nerve 
with this guy. At this point the professor 
had sensed a disturbance: but before I 
could say LITE BEER FROM MILLER, he 
was up on the table shouting, "What will 
we do? How will I meet girls? What will 
become of Midnight Madness and Blow- 
out? Will 'Wine and Cheese' suddenly 
become a dairy festival featuring milk and 
cheese? Will Happy Hours center around 
tanks of nitrous oxide at 25<t a hit???" He 
had worked himself into a frenzy. I knew 
the professor had never witnessed any- 
thing like it. Gasping for his words, he 
tipped backwards and fell off the table. 
Someone rushed out to call the rescue 
squad. 

In case you, as this guy in my business 
class, hadn't heard about plans to raise the 

▼ These students may be enjoying a dying tradition. 
Enjoying a couple of pitchers at the Wig may not be 
possible in the future as the percentage of students 
eligible to drink decreases. 

82 





drinking age to 21 across the country, you 
are in for a surprise. Yet, you will be proud 
of our usually painfully conservative state 
because it has designed a phase-in plan. 
Effective July 1, 1985, you must be 20 to 
purchase and drink beer, and 21 to drink 
alcohol. Then, effective July 1, 1987, the 
law will change to 21 for everything. The 
idea is to eliminate confusion of a "grand- 
father clause". 



I had a chat with Dean Smith who is 
constantly thrown these curve balls. He's 
the big guy whose gonna have to deal 
with the policy on campus. He says that 
the school being a state institution, has no 
choice but to abide by and to enforce 
state regulations. He believes that the new 
laws are a "knee-jerk reaction" in a des- 
perate attempt to reduce alcohol-related 
traffic fatalities, and that as soon as they 





see that there is no significant decline in 
the number of accidents, they will lower 
the age once again. The whole issue is 
"cyclical". 

I asked Dean Smith if he believed that 
drug use would increase. He said that he 
doesn't believe that when denied alcohol 
that kids will automatically turn to drugs, 
but hedoesthink that there will bealotof 
drinking going on behind closed doors, 
with possibly more people drinking 
alone — which is not a very healthy habit. 

He added that students will just have to 
be more creative in planning their social 
functions. (Can you picture sock hops and 
Twister parties?!?!?!) 

My classmate awoke from his sedative to 
find himself strapped in the hospital bed 
with the bars up. He could vaguely remem- 
ber the scene from Stats class, thank 
goodness. I wasn't going to remind him. 
He is a junior, anyway, and really won't 
ever encounter the effects of the new 
laws. 

Taking full advantage of the oppor- 
tunity at hand, I asked, "Hey, when you 
get out of here. Do you want to swing by 
Busch? ' His eyes lit up in agreement. 

— Virginia Grace 

< Jameson Riser enjoys a beer at the Beaux Arts 
Ball in the spnng Parties such as the ball had to be 
closed to underaged students or provide separate 

areas for drinking. 

A Fraternities continued to sponsor "alcohol 
related activities" this year Pikas Chns Craig and 
John Golwen precisely mix a batch o( garbage can 



punch before a party. 



83 



Currents on Campus 



Liberal Arts Tradition 



Many people have questioned whether 
William and Mary is losing its liberal arts 
tradition. With more and more students 
majoring in "practical" majors such as 
Business Administration and Computer 
Science, there is some concern that Wil- 
liam and Mary is losing sight of its original 
goals. 

Much of this concern relates to the 
expanding Business School. Business pro- 
fessors are paid more than liberal arts 
professors on average and the Business 
School is located in the finest academic 
building on campus. Chancellors Hail. 
Chancellors is currently undergoing fur- 
ther renovation while other academic 
buildingssuch as Washington Hall deterio- 
rate. Some people are concerned over the 
Administrations priorities. 

Why all this concern over the Business 
School? Why are more and more students 
majoring in Business? Joan Palmer, a 
senior accounting major feels that "being 
practical has become more important to 
students as society's and parental pres- 



sures to get a high paying job have in- 
creased." Tom lannocone, a junior 
accounting major states that "the college 
is in the business of educating students 
and must be receptive to current trends 
and values. If William and Mary doesn't 
offer what today's students want, such as a 
quality Business School, students will go 
elsewhere. It's a matter of survival." 

Sheila Diggs, a senior English major 
feels it's a matter of practicality. She feels 
that "students don't seem to be as idealis- 
tic as they once were, the emphasis is on 
getting a job. Paying as much as students 
do for an education, they want to make 
sure that they will have a good job after 
graduation." 

Professor Marlene Jack, chairman of 
the Fine Arts Department has noticed the 
change in student attitude. She feels "it's 
lamentable that more and more students 

► As part of a class on teaching the gitted and 
talented, Mentor Johnna Richard works with her 
student, Eileen Pennington. 





84 



Part of the curriculum for Biology majors is four 
semesters of Chemistry and labs; Bob Tormey and 
Julie Wallace display their love of lab while TA Chris 
Centos "helps" with calculations. 






are not fully exploring all the many op- 
tions a liberal arts major offers. There are 
many types of jobs out there that students 
have no idea about. It seems that more 
students are coming to college with their 
career and major already planned out and 
never completely investigate a liberal 
education." 

Is William and Mary losing its liberal arts 
tradition? Probably not. To remain com- 
petitive as an educator however William 
and Mary must adapt to changing student 
needs and wants. If for some reason 
philosophy became a lucrative field and 
the demand for a good philosophy depart- 
ment went up, William and Mary would 
expand this department no doubt. Like 
each of us, William and Mary is a product 
of the society in which we live. Through 
the area-sequence and other academic 
requirements, along with increased aware- 
ness of the advantages of a liberal arts 
education, William and Mary will stay a 
liberal arts institution. 

— Don Hultman 



< Senior Bart Edmunds consults his partner about 
a lab write-up. 

▲ Marcie Harrison fights to hold the overwhelming 
amount of material she has compiled in her handy- 
dandy notebook. Swem Library fills the 
background, home of academic dedication and 
destroyed minds at the College. 



85 



DIRECTORY: 

Triathlon 88 

Eddie Murphy 92 

Major Barbara 96 

Serious Business 98 

Michael Morganstern 100 

Events 102 

Bands on Campus 104 



WT 




u^ 



.,*?' 



/'oTe'C'OA^.v^ *., 



^ 




f^- 






-JjL 






86 




87 



KAREN DUDLEY 
Becoming An Event 



Statistics: 



DATE: April 20, 1985 

NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS: 
1984— Approximately 85 
1985—130 

PROCEEDS: Income is used to support a 
rising senior who displays "high academic 
achievement, campus leadership and 
character epitomized by those students 
who are chosen for membership in Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa." 

RECIPIENT: 
1984 Lee Anne Washington Bush 

TRIATHLON ROUTES: 'A mile swim at 
Adair pool; 12 mile bike ride on Colonial 
Parkway; 3.2 mile run through Matoaka 
Woods. 

AMOUNT RAISED: 
1984— $800 
1985— $1,200 

WINNERS 1985: 

MEN'S DIV— Glenn Eyler 

(Naval Weapons Station) 
WOMEN'S DIV— Jennifer Jone 

(W&M freshman) 
FRAT DIV— Pi Lambda Phi 

(Chris Hagin, Greg DiNoia, 

Jim McCarthy) 
SORORITY DIV— Chi Omega 

(Cathleen Caputo, Michelle Duffy, 

Christine Kelton) 
TEAM EVENT— Bikesmith, sponsor 

(Tom Sobel, Erich Smith, Tom Moriarity) 

CO-SPONSORS: United Virginia Bank, 
Bikesmith, McDonald's 



The triathlon has increased dramatically 
in popularity and should continue to 
increase in size. People have a good time 
and donate some money to a worthwhile 
cause. 




A The end is in sight. A participant in the triathlon 
approaches the finish line in front of Adair. Photo by 
Alison Krufka 



► The Karen Dudley Memorial Triathlon was 
started last year to honor the memory of the former 
Tribe tennis star and senior physical education 
major. Here, a participant begins the cycling leg of | 
the triathlon. Photo by Alsion Krufka 



88 



MEMORIAL TRIATHLON 




89 



KAREN DUDLEY 




* After completing the cycling leg of the Karen 
Dudley Triathlon, a participant pauses to change 
into running shoes before beginning the running 
leg. 



90 



MEMORIAL TRIATHLON 




^M 


r^l 


g 


9^ 


^^^^ft^ 


1 XI 


F 


wB 




■BiK 


A- 


V J M 




9t 4 i 




' fl 




/ 4 




^H 


,>^ / 






1 





< Straining to make those last few steps, an entrant 
crosses the finish line. 

^ Karen Dudley's parents watch the triathlon 
events with Dean of Students. Sam Sadler. The 
triathlon has grown considerably since it began a 
year ago. The 1985 event attracted 45 more entries 
and raised $400 more than the 1984 triathlon. 
Photos by Alison Krufka 



91 



MAJOR BARBARA 



► Bill Walker (Matt Ryan) threatens to hit 
Jenny Hill (Colleen Costello) in a scene from 
Ma|or Barbara. 

►► Stephen played by Tinn Magner greets 
Lady Britomart played by Lisa Middleton. 
▼ Barbara and Cusins (Carol Penola. Kurt 
Halow) face Andrew Undershaft (Alexander 
Iden). 





T Andrew Undershaft played by Alexander Iden listens to a 
conversation at the West Ham shelter of the Salvation Army, 
TT Barbara. Bill Walker, Cusins, Mrs. Baines (Deborah 
Niezgoda), Jenny Hall, Alexander Undershaft and Peter Shirley 
'Bryan Tunnell) gather together In scene 2 of Act III. 




93 



Backdrop Presents 



.Serious 
buslnes<^ 

The Natureline Experience 



A Musical Comedy 
of the Cosmetics Industry 

by Dan Halberstein and Julianne Fanning 




Thursday, Dec 6 at 8:15 pm 

Friday, Dec 7 at 8:15 pm 

Saturday, Dec 8 at 6:00 and 9:00 pnn 

Sunday, Dec 9 at 1 :00 pnn 

The Studio Theatre of Phi Beta Kappa Hall 
The College of Willionn and Mary 



► The Veeps' or the vice-presidents and the 
president of the cosmetic company practice the 
Veep dance. 



95 




> 



1 



< Bruce Biber (left) and another model discuss the 
company's ad campaign for black make-up. 

► Dennis DIMauro, another Veep, contemplates the 
company's options after the head chemist has 
mixed all of their cosmetics together. 




94 




EDDIE 



96 




IVIURPHY 




< < Snorting the rmke'' No. but Eddie did have 
original ways of creating unique sounds during the 
show. All photos by Mary lida. 

A Murphy holding his cherished cone from the 
neighborhood icecream man 



< Murphy get serious for a short sketch. 



97 



EDDIE MURPHY 



cont. 




▲ Murphy reenacts his childhood experiences with 
the icecream man and homestyle hamburgers. Ail 
photos by Mike Nickolich 

► Halfway through the show, Murphy brought out 
his stage crew and introduced them having each 
describe his part in Murphy's movies. 



98 





< The best part of Murphy's show was the way he 
relived common experiences we've all been 
through. 





Airs 



^ 



RETURN TO ROMANCE:*lrjrM^,ge„s,ern 



i( 



SEX WITHOUT 
ROMANCE 
IS JUST 
SEX'' 



100 



A congenial atmosphere filled Phi Beta 
Kappa Hall on October 16, as an anxious 
audience awaited the appearance of 
Michael Morgenstern, author of the best 
seller How to Make Love to a Woman. 
There was anticipation in the air as W & M 
students and Williamsburg citizens quietly 
conversed about the subject of romance 
and wondered what they might learn 
from Mr. Morgenstern. The auditorium 
was packed and a round of applause 
sounded when Morgenstern walked out 
on stage. Using hiswry sense of humor he 
soon had the audience relaxed as well as 
attentive. 

In his lecture, Morgenstern discussed 
the fact that the topic of sex has become 
exhausted over the last decade; and that 
both men and women long for a return to 
romance. He suggested that if the only 
time spent with your lover was in bed, the 
relationship would soon become tiring 
and lose its vitality. He continued by 
saying that the number one desire of most 
of today's adult population is "to find a 
one-on-one special romance and keep it 
going." When questioning members of 
the audience, Morgenstern was able to 
prove that men appreciated romantic ges- 
tures as well as women, but women were 
forced to come up with more creative 
ideas because they can't make use of 
traditionally feminine gifts and gestures 



such as sending flowers, opening doors 
and holding chairs. 

Morgenstern discussed long distance 
relationships and the fact that they rarely 
survive. In order to have the best chance 
of making such a relationship work, he 
suggested writing letters, and making an 
effort to spend time with one another. He 
also insisted that you should not run away 
from a relationship when it hits a snag. 
"Try to work things out, the relationship 
could become deeper and more meaning- 
ful," he advised. 

The audience enjoyed his speech, how- 
ever, there were a few disappointed lis- 
teners. "1 was disappointed," Butch Atkin- 
son said. He seemed unprepared. He only 
talked for ten minutes, then bulled his 
way through the rest of it. He discussed 
common sense ideas. Jewell Lim added "it 
was strictly common sense. Not everyone 
was disappointed though; some were 
relieved to find out that the ideas they had 
were either good ones or the right ones." 
Krista Wiechmann commented. "I found 
it interesting. I was surprised to find that 
guys really enjoyed getting gifts." 

Regardless of how many walked away 
with feelings of disappointment or feel- 
ings of enlightenment; it was a pleasant 
waytobreak the monatony of studying, to 
listen to a lecture on a now very popular 
topic — a return to romance. 

—Melissa D. Orndorff 




4 < Morgenstern discusses his philosophy of 
Romance with students after the lecture. Many felt 
that his lecture was all common sense. Photo by 
Liz Radday 



< After the lecture Ivlorgenstern pauses to listen to 
a question Some listeners were reassured by the 
advice he gave. SA photo 



► With book in hand, tVlorgenstern leaves the stage. 
The lecture tour was used to promote the bestseller. 
How to Make Love to a Woman. 
SA photo 




101 




102 










ilie Barry 



103 



[BAN DS 




ON 




104 




CAMPUS a 






< SGG entertains at the Campus Center. Photo by 

Maryanne Kondracki 

A The Dads were always a hit on campus. 

SA picture 



105 



BANDS ON CAMPUS 



cont. 




► students from Unit L listen to the progressive 
music of Harns Huckelby and Mike Willis. Photo by 
IVIike Nikolich 

A Throngs turned out to hear The Wake. Flat 
Hat photo 





< These contestants liven up the Superdance as 
they bop to music by the WCWM DJ's. Flat Hat 
photo 

A Greg Lind flips discs at the Superdance. Photo by 
Maryanne Kondracki 



107 



BANDS ON CAMPUS 



Cont. 



► The beginnings of Bootleg, Neil, Geoff Kraus, 

John Marsh, John Trindle and Tad practice for the 
play Serious Business where they were so popular 
they formed Bootleg a classic rock band that played 
for parties in the spring. 

A Skum members Scott Bill, Todd Middlebrook, 
Hart Bauer, and Jon Tarrant at their best Photo by 
Mike Nikolich 




108 




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▲ Hart Bauer strikes a sexy pose for the spring 
issue of Jump' whicti ran a feature article on Skum. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 

< Speidel. Goodrich, and Goggin attracted big 
crowds this year. At the Greek Week concert, herds 
of college women ran to the stage to see the three 
singers from C-ville. Gail Johnson and Sharon 
Philpott openly lust after lead singer Tom Goodrich. 
Photo by r\/laryanne Kondracki 



109 



DIRECTORY: 

Football 112 

Ex-Jocks 118 

Field Hockey 122 

W Soccer 124 

M Soccer 126 

W Cross Country 130 

M Cross Country 132 

W Volleyball 134 

Fall Scores 136 

M Basketball 138 

W Basketball 142 

M Gymnastics 144 

W Gynnnastics 146 

Wrestling 148 

M Swimming 150 

W Swimming 152 

Winter Scores 154 

W Tennis 156 

M Tennis 158 

W Golf 160 

M Fencing 162 

W Fencing 164 

M Track 166 

W Track 168 

M Golf 170 

W LaCrosse 172 

M LaCrosse 174 

Baseball 178 

Spring Scores 182 

Cheerleaders 184 

Rugby, M Volleyball 186 

Riding 188 




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< A Tribesman attempts to pull down a 
Boston U. foe. Photo by Mary lida 



^ Stan Yaglello gets ready to pass to a 
waiting teammate. Photo by Dan 
Weber. 





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▲ The team captains meet at the center 
of the field to shake hands. Photo by 
Mary lida 

► Senior Jim McHeffey tries to keep 
Temple's quarterback from passing the 
ball. Photo by Mark lida 



112 




Another Winning Season 



For William & Mary football, 
change has come in the form of 
progress. In 1984, this progress 
brought the Tribe long sought- 
after recognition and support. 
Milestones reached in '84 in- 
cluded rankings as high as 
number eight in the NCAA lAA 
poll, a winning 6-5 season for 
the second year in a row, and 
the breaking of fifteen personal 
and team records. Team mem- 
bers attributed the recent im- 
provement in Tribe football to 
many factors. Senior defensive 
tackle Bob Crane said, "It's all a 
matter of confidence." Senior 
free safety and Academic Ail- 
American Mark Kelso com- 
mented that the team had "new 
and higher goals to work for." 



Much credit was also given to 
the Tribe coaching staff led by 
Coach Jimmy Laycock. 

The new force behind the 
Indians was present from the 
first kick-off of the season. On 
September eighth William & 
Mary began its season against 
an old rival, VMI. Tribe defense 
played an important role in the 
24-13 victory. They held VMI to 
seventeen yards in total offense 
in the second half. Mark Kelso 
made a third quarter intercep- 
tion that led William & Mary to 
the touchdown that gave them 
the lead. 

Going into game two against 
NCAA lAA power Delaware, 
Coach Laycock commented 
that he would need a "more 



consistent overall perfor- 
mance" from the Tribe. The 
Indian offense came through. 
With 63 seconds left in the 
game, the Tribe, trailing Dela- 
ware 21-17, moved the ball 
seventy yards in eight plays. 
Then, on fourth down and one 
on the Blue Hen eighteen-yard 
line, quarterback Stan Yagiello 
connected with Jeff Sanders to 
score the touchdown that 
ended the game. William and 
Mary claimed victory over Dela- 
ware for the first time since 
1923. This victory brought Wil- 
liam and Mary a number eight 
ranking in the NCAA lAA polls, 
but a giant waited down the 
road. 
In September the team trav- 



elled to University Park, Penn- 
sylvania and its 80,000 seat 
Beaver Stadium to compete 
against long-time lA football 
power, Penn State. The 56-18 
final score was not a reflection 
of the Tribe's excellent perfor- 
mance on the playing field. 
Many critics claimed that it was 
not right for the school to face 
Penn State; that Wjlliam and 
Mary only played for the 
money, players disagreed. They 
felt that playing at Beaver Stadi- 
um in front of 80,000 spectators 
had been the experience of a 
life time. The loss to Penn State 
did cause the Indians to lose 
their lAA ranking, but the sea- 
son's winning momentum 
continued. 




■?l%^'-'»«»**'lJ 



ft 



A Bobby Wright (30) and teammates attempt to block Boston University players so that a fellow teammate with the ball can get pasl Photo by Mary lida 



On September twenty-ninth 
the Tribe successfully overcame 
a four point half-time deficit to 
the James Madison Dukes to 
win 20-10. Said Coach Laycock, 
"We overcame some things and 
that's what a good team will 
do." Even good teams have 
insurmountable barriers, 
though. This season the Tribe, 
in spite of progress, could not 
overcome any division lA 
teams. Despite a "tremendous 
effort" in the words of Laycock, 
the Tribe lost to Temple Univer- 
sity in October. The score... 
14-28 Temple. 

Then the upset of the season 
arrived. On Burgesses Day, 
when attention was to be di- 
rected at Virginia's state of- 
ficials, the Indians stole the 
limelight by upsetting 5th 
ranked, undefeated Boston 
University 24-3. Everything 
clicked that day for the team, as 
a whole and individually. Mark 
Kelso earned honors as ECAC 
Defensive Player of the Week 
for his part in the upset. Jeff 
Sanders, a senior wide receiver, 
broke William & Mary's re- 
ceiving record as he caught five 
passes during the Tribe's ninth 
straight victory over a lAA 
opponent. The Tribe attained a 
much deserved 12th ranking in 
the week's lAA polls. 

The next two weeks were 



disappointing for the Tribe. 
Two away games against lA 
opponents Virginia Tech and 
Wake Forrest left the Indians 
with a 4-4 record. 

The two losses placed Wil- 
liam & Mary in a "must win" 
situation as they entered Nov- 
ember third's game against 
Lehigh. A record 17,000 fans 
came to Homecoming at Carey 
Field, and none were let down. 
Senior quarterback, Stan Yagiel- 
lo, broke five Tribe records he 
led the team to a 24-10 win over 
Lehigh. Tight end Glenn Bod- 
nar caught seven of Yagiello's 
passes for a career high of 111 
yards. Students and Alumni 
were ecstatic as hope for Tribe 
post season play remained alive. 

The season finale was tense. 
The Spiders and the Indians, 
traditionally fierce rivals, both 
wanted to win a play-off berth. 
The teams kept the score close 
throughout the game. But, de- 
spite great efforts on the part of 
the Tribe the game ended as a 
33-31 Richmond victory. 

Despite the losses, the Tribe's 
season was a successful one. 
Their performance as a team on 
and off the field was com- 
mendable. Indian football fans 
have a lot to look forward to for 
the 1985-86 football season. 

— Marcie Oberndorf 



▼ Seniors Mark Kelso (23) and Mims Hackett (18) go over what is happening on the 
field. Photo by Mary lida 






A Number 40, Merritt Gibson scores a 
touchdown for the William and Mary 
Tribe against Lehigh. Photo by Dan 
Weber 



► Number 68 litis up his fellow team- 
mate as the group gathers to "high 
five" after a touchdown. Photo 
by Mary lida 



▼ Senior Fullback, Bobby Wright tries to get a hold on the ball before being tackled. 
Photo by Mary lida 










i 





4* 



i'^' 





* William and Mary gets oH a successful punt despite the attempted block by Boston University players. 
Photo by Mary lida. 



▼ Tribe members attempt to pull down a 
Spider from Rictimond's team. 




A Not sure which way to turn, Number 9, Jeff Sanders looks for a way to get past 
the Rutgers. Photo by Rodney Willett 



ANumber 21, Ron Glllam is embraced by Mark Kelso (23) and greeted by QB Stan 

Yagiello after a successful play. 



► With a face full of triumph, Glenn 
Bodnar hails the ball. 




A Number 23, Senior Mark Kelso takes a breather from a rough game. After the 
game Glen Bodnar is accosted by young fans for an autograph. 



* While Merntt Gibson attempts lo get past VIVII toes. Glenn Bodnar tries to help by 
blocking. 



The Transition: 

from Indian Summer 
to Cold Reality 



▼Author of the article, Wayne MacMasters found pride playing for the Tribe. Now 
Wayne Is a graduate from Duke with a M.S. in Physical Therapy. 



This May, a small group of 
graduating seniors will make 
their way out the doors of Wil- 
liam and Mary Hall and into the 
real world. This group, only 
twenty or so in number, will be 
a little different than the rest of 
their class, for they will have 
survived a four year regimen as 
the W&M student-athlete. And, 
as each graduating senior must 
face a major change in their 
lifestyle, this small group will 
make an added, unsuspected 
transition to becoming ex- 
jocks. 

For me, the transition began 
two years ago and it was not 
merely a change in my lifestyle, 
but a change in my self concept 
and in other's perception sof 
me. It was as if I had undergone 
a major amputation. A part of 
me was gone. For eight years I 
was Wayne MacMasters, the 
football player. People recog- 
nized me in restaurants and 
read about me in papers. Kids 
asked for my autograph and 
dreamed that someday their 
name would be called on the 
stadium loudspeaker. 

And the transition came 
abruptly, and unexpectedly. I 
can remember sitting at my 
locker before the last practice 
of summer camp during my 
senior year. It was early evening 
but the temperature had 
dropped to only the mid 80's, 
the humidity so bad that sweat 
could be seen trickling down 
the lockerroom walls. While 
securing athletic tape to al- 
ready battered wrists, I turned 
to a nearby teammate and said, 
with conviction, "I won't miss 
any of this." How little truth 
that statement held. 

Because, for the W&M play- 
er, it was the practice time that 
defined a source of sanity, a 
chance to escape from the pres- 
sures of full-load academia 
topped with thirty-eight hour- 
a-week jobs called intercol- 
legiate athletics; a chance to 
burn off steam, to release 
anxieties. 



As I came to find out in 
graduate school, this release, 
and my identity, had been lost. 
I still had a full load academia 
but without the release or even 
the self assurance that someone 
on campus would say with sin- 
cerity, "Good luck on Saturday." 

But the transition IS made. 
Your ego substitutes. You rely 
less on your past and more on 
the present. And so it is that I 
now feel comfortable with 
Wayne MacMasters, the physi- 
cal therapist. I see myself now 
in a white lab coat, a far cry 
from the white jersey of days 
gone by. 

I still think often of my former 
teammates, and even keep in 
touch with a few. Most have 
made successful transitions and 
those who haven't ever got 
much out of William and Mary 
anyhow. It always seemed that 
the guys who gave so much to 
college, got so much in return. 

I never knew a player as dedi- 
cated to the game as Lonnie 
Moore. A 6'1", 210 lb. lineback- 
er whose knees and shoulders 
were marred with the fleshy 
remnants of five surgeries in as 
many years, Lonnie continued 
to take the field, and the pun- 
ishment, against the advice and 
better judgements of many a 
doctor. It wasn't until the sev- 
enth game of a stellar senior 
season when the pop of his 
ankle could be heard as the 
symbol of the end of an uncele- 
brated but distinguished career. 
For him, the transition came 
early, and perhaps, as a blessing 
in disguise. 

Since graduating, he moved 
home and married his high 
school sweetheart. He now sells 
farm equipment and works the 
tobacco fields in the heat of the 
south-west Virginia summer. 
Even he misses the W&M ex- 
perience, saying "I don't regret 
what I did. I just tried to get the 
most out of everything there. I 
just enjoyed it." 

I also never knew a more 




C 




dedicated student-athlete than 
John Mitrovic. A man of quiet 
intensity, "Metro" always did 
thing full speed, whether in the 
classroom or on the playing 
field. During the spare hours 
when neither practice or class 
time filled his schedule, Metro 
could be seen frequenting the 
desk of a third floor carroll at 
Swem, his nose in a book, reli- 
giously, once again. He's used 
his education to become the 



head strength and conditioning 
coach at VMI, the youngest to 
attain such a position in the 
country. For him, the transition 
was simply the flip of a coin, 
from star player to star coach. 
His loyalty is questioned each 
fall when W&M and VMI meet 
on the gridiron. "My loyalty 
will always be in the 'burg," he 
explains, "hey, blood is thicker 
than water." So be it. 




A While the offense is on the field, defensive linemen Paul Tyner, John Cannon, 
and Bo Short rest up for the next time they must take the field John now plays for 
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. 



119 



► Former holder of many school records, 
Kurt Wrigley hits the ground with ball In 
hand. 



► John Mitrovic seems to have been 
looking toward the future, as well as at 
the present game. 



▼ John Lisella, who averaged 36.4 
yards per punt, puts his foot into it 
against VMI Uncle Sam nabbed him 

and his skills. 








#'^^,V> 



Fifty-one, Wayne MacMasters aids 
Steve Shull-in bringing down a JMU -^ 
foe. \X 



For a very few players, the 
transition is not from jock to 
ex-jock but from college to 
professional jock. Such is the 
case for '82 grad John Cannon. 
A huge man blessed with amaz- 
ing speed and agility, John 
never lived up to other's expec- 
tations for him as a collegian. 
But as a pro, he now earns raves 
and a six figure salary as a 
defensive end for the Tampa 
Bay Buccaneers. Many ques- 
tioned John's decision as a high 
school senior to bypass the lures 
of big time meatball football 
factories to come to the seren- 
ity of Cary Field, but it paid off 
for him. John explains, "My 
move from college to the pros 
was easier than most. Not only 



can I earn this kind of money 
doing what I enjoy, but W&M 
has taught me how to manage 
it." Indeed, life long financial 
security is a sweet thing to 
twenty-five year old. 

Many former Tribe gridders 
have gone on to make it in the 
hustel-bustle world of selling, 
marketing and business. Re- 
member Kurt Wrigley? "Wrigs", 
the former holder of many 
W&M receiving records, now 
hustles photocopiers for Minol- 
ta in the D.C. area. For him, the 
transition was perhaps more 
difficult than most. A solid bet 
to break into the pros, Wrigs 
was cut by the Giants and forced 
to become and ex-jock because 
of what's known as "white 



man's disease", "no wheels", 
or in layman's terms, lack of 
foot speed. It seemed that the 
best players relied on the game 
for identity more than anyone 
and Wrigs was no exception. 
Though he admits that he oc- 
casionally longs for the return 
of yesteryear, when being a 
W&M B.M.O.C. was a part of 
his scenario, Wrigs has made 
the transition. 

Only one of my former team- 
mates went on to serve for this 
country. Uncle Sam nabbed 
John Lisella upon graduation 
from The College, and 1 haven't 
heard from him since. Flying 
jets in the Air Force was always 
his dream, and a W&M educa- 
tion in Math and Physics helped 



him attain it. For him, the transi- 
tion was probably easy. Officer 
bootcamp has a way of making 
you forget about past glory days 
and long hours behind a Jones 
building computer terminal. 

Like the classes before them, 
the class of 1985 will experience 
good times ahead: times of 
wealth, success and happiness. 
But there will also be a time of 
transition when feelings of lone- 
liness and sadness fill the heart, 
and an emptiness reminds you 
that you've lost something 
you'll never recapture. Ah... 
the college years. You can tell 
your kids, "They'll be the best 
years of your life." 

— Wayne MacMasters 
Class of 1983 



120 



ead strength and 
conditioning coach at VMI, John 
Mitrovic works with a student 





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A The cover of the '81 Yorktown 
program features Wayne Macf^asters 
expressing his feelings about his team 

and their capabilities. 

A John Cannon's face expressed pain 
as he is carried off the field with a knee 
injury. Even after all the pain involved 
in College football he continues to play 
pro. 



121 



▼ Senior Halfback, Maryellen Farmer seeks guidance from Assistant Coach Feffle 
Barnfiill as Nancy Scott, women's athletic trainer rushed to help someone else. 




Ten years from now we won't 
remember what teams we 
played what season. We proba- 
bly won't remember records, 
or scores, or state standings. 
Statistics blur, four years melt 
together — images stand out 
instead. 

The "last practice before our 
last Tuesday home game" is 
over. Images of beaming mo- 
ments: Kim for once blushing 
as she announced her engage- 
ment; her kid-out-of-nowhere 
saves, Maryellen, after four 
years on defense, absolutely 
charging through to score her 
first goal. . .images of frustra- 
tion: Toni-Jean's knee crum- 
bling, time and time again; our 
shots missing by inches, hitting 
the post, but trickling in against 
us. Eyes meet, "Is it over?" 

With ail the changes, W&M 
has been caught between two 
reputations: as a traditional 
power, and becoming more 



and more incompatible in 
women's sports, but we've 
maintained. We're as good as 
the top twenty teams on our 
schedule, and we're different 
than ourcompetition: More in- 
telligent, more marketable — 
and more feminine. We stand 
out. It's hard to predict the 
years ahead for schools gen- 
uinely committed to the ideals 
of academics and athletics, but 
despite the frustration, W&M is 
holding the line. 

But that is all it takes. Two or 
three months of sweat and 
sometimes tears can mean more 
than blood mingled in an Indian 
ritual. 

The team is family — so, sure, 
there are family fights — and 
friends — and there are jeal- 
ousies, cliques. But the essence 
of "team" as we've felt it here is 
a bond of shared experience 
and emotions — that I know will 
remain ten years from now. 

— Sheila Cunneen 







A Junior Suzie Creigh does what a goalie should do , . . saves. She was the winner 
of the Barksdale Award and has been a starter for three years. 



■< Inner Sue Scott tries to get the ball away from an opponent as fellow teammates 

rush up to help her. Photos by Lawrence I'Anson 




■< Janet Aldrlch spots where she wants a MIdfield. Mary Pat Kurtz lunges 
the ball to go. forward to get the ball. 



^3^ 










• '..am 
^ ,■* mar 

' ^lia I 







^ Front (L to R) Marnie Christian, 
Georgia Flampons. Kim Stewart. 
Maryellen Farmer, Heather Grant, 
Sheila Cunneen, Mary Pat Kurtz, 
Mary Kneisley. Middle (L to R) Sue 
Creigh, Amy Cohen, Sue Scott, 
Jewell Lim, Sheri Adams, Tracy 
Jolles, Amy Thompson, Sue Shaf- 
ritz. Back (L to R) Blair Koehler. 
Toni-Jean Lisa. Kelly Kutzer, Lisa 
Miller, Sally Burry, Bonnie Bishop. 
Missy Barlow, Sue Pijawka, Janet 
Aldrich 



123 



-*■ "■■ _^- :!,'■' •■- -»^ 



Reaching Higher Goals 



Looking to improve on three 
winning varsity seasons, the 
women's soccer team sur- 
passed the achievements of last 
year's outstanding team. Final 
round play in the Washington 
Area Girls Soccer League 
Tournament, an NCAA Cham- 
pionship bid, and improved na- 
tional ranking secured the 
team's reputation as a strong 
top 20 contender. 

Senior Kelly Jackson and 
junior Jennifer Finn co-cap- 
tained a young team of 12 
sophomores and 8 freshmen. 
Coach John Charles credited 
the two with "providing lead- 
ership and giving some cement 
to the team." He also felt the 
sophomores showed "a great 
deal of maturity and leadership 
qualities." The freshmen, too, 
played an important role during 
the season. Sophomore goal- 
keeper Liz Gonda commented 
that they "saw a good amount 



of playing time and helped out 
a lot." 

The Lady Indians played their 
toughest schedule yet, facing 6 
of last year's NCAA top 20 
teams: Cincinnati, Cortland 
State, Massachusetts, Central 
Florida, George Mason, and 
top-ranked North Carolina. 
The team fared well against its 
formidable opponents with an 
incredible early season ranking 
of fifth in the nation and a final 
Division I poll ranking of thir- 
teenth, an overall record of 
10-7-4. 

According to Coach Charles, 
the team's 3-0 defeat of Cin- 
cinnati "set the team off on the 
right note." A 2-2 tie with Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts a week 
later showed that "we belonged 
up near the top." 

The standout game of the 
season proved to be memo- 
rable for two reasons: it was a 
defeat of number 2 ranked 



George Mason and it enabled 
the team to advance to final 
round play in WAGS against 
North Carolina. Defeated by 
George Mason in both confron- 
tations last year, the Lady 
Indians avenged themselves 
with a two penalty kick win that 
Coach Charles termed "su- 
perb." The team came "as close 
to reaching its potential in that 
game as anything." 

Improved ranking and suc- 
cessful completion of a tough 
schedule against top-ranked 
teams (coupled with last sea- 
son's accomplishments) won 
the team a bid for the NCAA 
Championship. Coach Charles 
profoundly labeled this achieve- 
ment "the new pinnacle for the 
program." Although defeated 
by Central Florida 3-1 in the first 
round, the team showed just by 
making it into tournament play 
that it could play competently 
against the nation's best. 



Coach Charles' outlook for 
next year is "very good to excel- 
lent." This year's team "should 
be coming back relatively in- 
tact" (only one graduate) with 
the potential for "strong junior 
leadership." In comparison to 
this season's challenging sched- 
ule, next year's schedule will be 
more enjoyable. Coach Charles 
cautions that the team "cannot 
rest on its laurels but can ease 
back on the throttle and play a 
more reasonable schedule." 

More of next year's games 
will be played at home where 
the team can be, according to 
Coach Charles, "showcased in 
its own environment." The 
move from the field at JBT to 
Barksdale will mean that the 
team can enjoy more playing 
time at home "where people 
can see us and the team can be 
proud to play." 

— Laura Walsh 




A A William and Mary player rushes for the ball to try and score a goal for the green 
and gold. 



▼ Fancy footwork is shown by Linda 
Selden. Photos by Lawrence lAnson 




< Front (L to R) John Daly (Asst 
Coach). Laurie Guarino, Jennifer Finn, 
Kelly Jackson, Beth Stanford, Sue 
Romano, Nancy Relnlsch, Liz Gonda, 
John Charles (Coach). Middle (L to R) 
Carrie Taylor, Linda Seiden. Diane 
Szczypinski, Megan McCarthy. Karen 
Sheehan, Jeanne Sutphin, Liz Hunter. 
Back (L to R) Pam Moreau, Jill Ellis. 
Julie Cunningham, Marsha Fishburne, 
Holly Barrett, Kathleen McCarthy, 
Janet Thomas 



T Number 20, Marsha Fishburne tries 
to take the ball downfield. 




A I J , , I n bar 1 1 , Elizabeth Stanfi 

trying to gel the ball to go where they want it to 

■4 Jillian Ellis keeps the ball away from her foe from Virginia Tech 



ids with an opponent 



► Number 4, Richard Wong connects 
with an ODU player. Photo by Mike 
Nikolich 



► Richard Wong exhibits his 
frustration after a lost shot. Photo by 
N/like Nikolich 



T Number 24 shows off his footwork 
skills during a game against ODU. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 




A Finish With A Flourish 



Although the William and 
Mary men's soccer team clean- 
ly clinched its 1984 season with 
a three-game sweep of East 
Carolina, James Madison, and 
UNC-Wilmington, the whole 
season was marked with con- 
sistently strong performances. 
Crucial losses precluded the 
team from engaging in post- 
season action for the first time 
in ten years (George Mason, 
ODU, and American were spe- 
cifically cited as key games), but 
team members assert that in 
some respects they actually out- 
played these opponents. 

At the beginning of the sea- 



son, William and Mary pre- 
vailed over the Alderson-Broad- 
dus Tournament, defeating 
Alderson-Broaddus 2-1 and 
West Virginia 3-0. With the tri- 
angular competition all players 
got involved; as senior Keith Ex- 
ton noted, "everybody put some- 
thing into the tournament." 

Another particularly satisfy- 
ing win was that of the Navy 
game, a Parent's Day blitz on 
the field that proved memor- 
able to all who were affiliated 
with the day's exhibition. At 
halftime. Navy had produced a 
2-0 hold over the Tribe, but in 
the second half William and 



Mary swept past their adversary 
to prove triumphant with a 3-2 
victory. 

An unfortunate consequence 
of the match with Navy was 
losing striker Andy Smolin to a 
foot injury. Teammate Ian 
Peter, echoed in sentiments by 
other players, described Smol- 
in as an "intimidating" and "in- 
fluential" asset to the team. 
Peter went on to say that the 
unsettled nature of the player 
population kept the Tribe from 
capitalizing on the season. Part- 
ly due to the many injuries, 
there was a different starting 
line-up for ten of the eighteen 



games. Smolin, a senior, com- 
mented that a consistent start- 
ing line-up is a key to securing a 
"rhythm" throughout the 
season. 

Coach Alan Albert said that it 
took a while to adjust after 
having such a powerful season 
last year, but credited the play- 
ers with "handling the frustrat- 
ing points of the season very 
well." Thirteen of the soccer 
participants this year had not 
played varsity the year before, 
so most of the time the Tribe 
played catch-up. But with 
strong recruits for next year, 
freshman Eddie Perry definitely 



126 



▼ Todd MIddlebrook heads the ball 
away. Photo by Rich Larson 



▼ Before going on to the field W & M 
ties his shoes. Photo Mike Nikolich 



< William and Mary celebrates over a 
win against Navy. Photo by John Maisto 

▼ A clean score is made by the William 
and Mary team. Photo by John Maisto 




* A clash occurs between William and Mary players and opponents from ODD as 
ihey attempt to gam control of the ball. Photo by Mike Nikolich 



* Number 17 to get the ball past a 
Virginia Wesleyan foe to get a goal for 
the Tribe. Photo by John Maisto 



127 






A,5erfect shot Jrombehina this picHire lboke<J riggedAAfliliara^^ 




► Taking the ball past an ODU player 
W & M continues downfield. Photo by 
MikeNikolich 



l>^v^> . , 



- I ? y^ 



ujhp team sits on the sideline waiting to be called into the game. Photo by Mik< 




sees the team "moving in the 
right direction." Calling it a 
"transitional season," Ian Peter 
sees "the attitude" coming 
back. 

Succeeding Mike Flood's 
title, captain Todd Middle- 
brook was named Most Valu- 
able Player, and Scott Bell, a 
sophomore from Ontario, Can- 
ada, led the domain of scoring 
with a tally of eight goals for the 
season. Concluding the year 
with a record of 11-6-1, the 
Tribe has made it almost a dec- 
ade that it has captuned ten or 
more games a season. 

Hence, with graduating sen- 
iors expressing no regrets and 
with underclassmen predicting 
'85 to be "the Year of the Tribe," 
William and Mary finished its 
'84 soccer season very nicely 
indeed. 

Oh, yes, and Benni Bourki 
had another fine season. 

— Barbie J. Trybul 



1 iniurecl player delays the game for-a-itttle while. Photot>y Mike Nikoiich ji 




< A Tribe member rushes to get 
control of the ball. Photo by John 
Maisto 



^ A little team rivalry can go a long 
way. William and Mary and Navy 
exchange a few choice words. Photo 
by John Maisto 



< Coach Albert gazes intensely at the 
game In progress. Photo by Mike 

Nikoiich 



129 



Dedicated Endurance 



▼ Cathy Caputo feels hot and sticky after 
a run. Photo by Dan Weber 



Three miles stretch forever. 

Every foot beats the ground 
as if your body was made of 
lead. The air is either too heavy 
to breathe or too cold to swal- 
low. But the feet fall in steady 
pace prodded onward by the 
mind's glimpse of a finish. 
Winning a cross country race is 
an excrutiating effort, but these 
runners must rely on their train- 
ing and hard hoursjust to finish 
the course. The women's team 
ended the season with a 5-4-1 
record, endured the rigors of 
intense training, and managed 
not only to finish, but to finish 
on top. 



Nine veterans and ten new- 
comers made up this year's 
club, and experience played a 
key element in the team's suc- 
cess. Senior co-captain 
Maureen Hinnebusch led her 
teammates during the season 
clocking several home and 
career best scores and repre- 
senting the team in the NCAA 
Division I District III Champion- 
ships. The teams ten new mem- 
bers contributed enormously 
to the club's effort, rounding 
out the season's winning scores. 
Coach jenny Utz had referred 
to the ten as her group of 
"gutty" freshmen who went 



stride for stride with the team's 
nine returning lettermen. 

The women began this sea- 
son with a strong start, defeat- 
ing Delaware, Mt. St. Mary's, 
LaSalle and American in the 
season's opener at Delaware. 
They later went on to place 
fourth in the third VIL Cham- 
pionships as well as in the first 
Eastern Coast Athlete Confer- 
ence Town Championships, 
highlighting the team's season. 
Though the team loses two 
strong runners, this young club 
is sure to be a power hitter next 
year with all of its returning 
members. 

— Elisha Brownfield 








^ Valerie Roeder follows in Susan 
Haynie during practice. Photo by 
Dan Weber 

► Front (L to R) Susan Haynie, Anne 
Riddle, fvlaureen Hinnebusch, Martha 
Forsyth. Eileen Grissmer. Cathy 
Caputo. Valerie Roeder. Sabina 
Brinkley, Back (L to R) Jenny UU 
(Coach). Carolyn Peel, Betsy 
MclVlorrow, Chns fulcKallip, Pam 
Anderson. Jennie Jones. Debbie 
Catelle. Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



130 



► Lone runner, Courtney French 
concentrates on her running. Photo by 
Lawrence I'Anson 




.fJj-Ha 





lUllii 






-^^'s 











*^1 



Daepite the good showing by William and Mary>unner& the Richrnbn<j Spiders won this meet Maureen Hinnebusch hada career best for th&home course 
of.18:47 7. Ph^O by Lawrence I'Anson **"*..■«-: ' "" ' " , 




%' 







^^^'TSP 







* Starting off in a mob. William and 
Mary runners try to have a good 
showing against Richmond. Photo by 
Dan Weber. 



< Can you find the missing runner? 
Really though, once a competition is 
started distance is made between 
runners Here. Valerie Roeder tries to 
keep ahead of who is behind her and 
catch up to those ahead of her Photo 
by Lawrence I'Anson 



* Valerie Roeder tries to get ahead of 
Richmond. Photo by Dan Weber 



131 



\- - 



Nrt>., 



f 



^ 



9^"^ 



fHi . ^ 



/■^v 







Todd Beach-does l^sbest during a Cross Country meet Photo by Dan Weber 



▼ This Tribesman looks near 
exhaustion. Photo by Dan Weber 




Success On The Run 




change is a way of life on 
most collegiate athletic teams. 
Seniors go their own ways to 
new lives and freshmen try to 
fill in where the senior's left off. 
But, change is not merely a 
matter of replacing athletic tal- 
ent, but also a reshaping of the 
attitudes that contribute to a 
team's eventual success or fail- 
ure. In dealing with these 
changes, this year's men's cross 
country team found itself very 
successful. 

Despite the loss of team cap- 
tain Fraser Hudgins and num- 
ber two man John Kellogg to 
graduation, the team re- 
grouped and completed the 
season with a 4-1 record and 
the addition of an Ali-Ameri- 
can. Junior Ken Haifa became 
William and Mary's first Ail- 
American since 1975 as he 
finished up a strong season by 
placing 32nd in the NCAA Divi- 
sion I cross country champion- 
ships. Aside from this outstand- 
ing individual achievement and 



the atmosphere that went along 
with it, the team also received a 
great deal of strength from 
team captain Todd Lindsley. 
According to sophomore An- 
drew Horrocks, "Todd's en- 
thusiasm and motivation were 
contagious and the whole team 
felt it." Coach Roy Chernock 
agreed that "Todd was a moti- 
vator for us this year. He def- 
initely helped some of our 
younger runners mature during 
the season." Lendsley himself 
noted that "this was the closest 
team in four years; alot more 
relaxed and definitely more 
supportive of each other than 
in the past." 

The support of the team 
made it that much easier for 
Halla to excel. Despite the fact 
that cross country is essentially 
an individual sport. But, having 
one outstanding individual did 
have its pitfalls for the rest of 
the team. 

"The one big disappoint- 
ment of the season was not 



being allowed to run in the 
IC4A Regional Meet after we 
had qualified," said senior 
Danny Usher. Coach Cher- 
nock's decision to take only 
Halla was reportedly due to 
financial reasons, but the team 
was still very disappointed. 

But, as seniors Usher and 
Lindsley looked back over their 
final cross country season, 
neither felt a great deal of re- 
gret. Both seemed very pleased 
with the changes that the "less 
competitive and more suppor- 
tive" attitude had brought 
about, as well as, with the im- 
provement seen in some of the 
team's younger members. Lind- 
sley's final note on the issue 
seemed to summarize every- 
one's sentiments: "What the 
season didn't reward in team 
wins it was made up for by 
knowing that we all helped 
produce an All-American and 
some awesome friendships." 
— Margie Johnson 




rkf<^v^ij3^;^^*^ 



< Coach Chernock encourages team 
captain Todd Lindsley 



A Pumping towards the finish. Ken 
Halla looks tired. Photo by J. Springer 



▼As Jane Fanestll (8) serves, Elizabeth Overstreet (7) is ready for any action which 
may come her way Photo by Chris Boget 



► Pam Turia (3) and Judy Cochrane (1 6) 
)lock while Kate Jensen (14) gives 
;overage. Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 

f Teammates Jane Fanestil, (8), Judy 
Cochrane (16). and Sasha Mobley (6) 
vatch as Kate Jensen (14) hits the ball 
)ver the net. Photo by Chris Boget 




Volley, Set, Spike 



The best thing about this 
year's women's volleyball team 
was its closeness and unity 
combined with a strong dedica- 
tion to the sport. Not only did 
these girls share their sport but 
they were friends off the court 
as well. It was their closeness 
and their dedication that de- 
fined this team better than any 
record or statistics. 

This year's team was young. 
With six freshmen, 4 sopho- 
mores of which only 2 played 
last year, 1 junior and 1 senior, 
the team will not be hurt by 
graduation this year as they 
were in the 1983-84 season 
when they lost 4 seniors. Their 
youth was evident when you 
compare their record for the 
first half with their record for 
the second half. The first half 
showed a 6-16 win/loss record 
while the second half showed a 
12-6 record. Coach Debra Hill 
attributes this sluggish start to 
"inexperience and jitters." But, 
on the other hand. Coach Hill 
does not project this weakness 
forward to next year, feeling 
that the team will be really 

134 



strong in the 1985-86 season. 

The women played in the 
ECAC-South and showed a 6-4 
record (in conference play) 
with a second place conference 
finish to James Madison in a 
tough 5-15, 15-8, 1-15, 14-16 
final. The team's overall record 
was 18-22 which possibly fell a 
little short of expectations fol- 
lowing their first place state 
finish last year. Despite this. 
Coach Hill described this year 
as "the best ever" of her nine 
years of coaching. 

Some season highlights in- 
cluded the naming of junior 
Jane Fanestil and senior Lisa 
Bobst to the all-conference 
team. Jane, a two-time all-state 
player from Lajolla, California, 
is the quarterback of the team. 
She also had the highest hitting 
percentage, highest number of 
service aces and highest num- 
ber of digs. Lisa, 1983 VIL all- 
tournament team member from 
Mount Kisco, New York, had 
the second highest hitting per- 
centage along with the highest 
number of total blocks (solo 
and with assists). 



Other returning players in- 
-cluded sophomore Sasha Mob- 
ley, a second year player who, 
along with Jane, played setter 
for the team's 6-2 formation. 
Another returning player, soph- 
omore Judy Cochrane was a 
strong offensive player in the 
middle blocker/hitter position 
with a steady performance all 
season long. Other team mem- 
bers include Kate Jensen, a 
freshman from Baltimore, 
Maryland and a highly-skilled 
power hitter who also had the 
second highest number of ser- 
vice aces and digs. Amy Pabst, 
another freshman, from Des 
Plaines, Illinois played in the 
hitter position. 

For next year. Coach Hill 
hopes to add three or four 
players to her squad. This year 
she only carried ten players and 
she hopes recruiting goes well 
enough to allow her to carry 
twelve next season. 

The talent of this team was 
unmistakable but even more 
evident was the closeness and 
dedication they brought to 
their sport. The girls enjoyed 



their sport immensely which 
was immediately evident to all 
who came and watched them 
play. One example of this close- 
ness is an award the girls began 
sometime into the season 
which they appropriately 
named the "gourd award," 
considering that that was exact- 
ly what it was, a gourd. The 
award was given weekly to the 
player who showed the most 
team spirit or was the most self- 
sacrificing. At the end of the 
season, the gourd was distrib- 
uted piece by piece among all 
the team members. 

To sum up the volleyball sea- 
son one must admit that the 
team was talented, exciting to 
watch and, above all, they had 
fun while doing so. Their 18-22 
record does not come close to 
telling the tale of this unique 
team with its overriding major- 
ity of underclassmen who hap- 
pened to get off to a slow start. 
The mix of talent, diversity 
among the girls and their ability 
to learn and grow together 
make them a most unique team 
to watch and enjoy. 

— Debbie Schwager 



vneeling, Jane Fanesbl watches as 
teammates block VCU's attempt 
Photos by Lawrence I'Anson 




f 



'MA 



^^ify* -^_- 





^' ^^ Hitting the ball, Pam TurtB-is watched by 
5 ^B teammates ready for the return. 




1 '(viJ^ 



A Number 1 2. Amy Pabst is ready as 
Lisa Bobst (1 5) and Jane Fanestil 
block VCU's attempt 

< Front (L to R) Jane Fanstil. Cathy 
Ashley, Kelly Thompson. Kate Jensen, 
Judy Cochrane. Lisa Bobst Back (L to 
R) Debra Hill (Coach). Amy Pabst 
Jackie Genovese (Mngr). Pam Turia, 
Elizabeth Overstreet Sasha Mobley 



135 



Football 6-5 




VMI 




Delaware 


m^-^ ^' ' 


Penn State 
Jnmes MadisoR 




Boston UnivV^*' 


Virginia Techr 




Wake Fot-est <' 
Lehigh ^ 
Colgate 
Richmond 






«•'■' 





W Soccer 7-7^'!' 






Virginia 


1 





Cincinnati 


3 


2 


Boston College 


\l 





Cortland 


2 


^^^ Massachusetts 
^ Central Florida 


2 


2 





1 


Adelphi 


2 





George Washington 


2 


5 


North Carolina 





1 


Rutgers 


2 





Army 


5 





George Mason 





3 


North Carolina 








George Washington 


3 





Virginia Tech 


3 


1 


North Carolina 


1 





N. Carolina Wes. 


5 





Methodist 


2 


5 


North Carolina 





4 


George Mason 


1 


3 


Central Florida 


1 



FALL 



Volleyball 18-22 

Edinboro 
Suny-Cortland 
James Madison 

Howard 

Southampton 

West Chester 

Virginia Commonwealth 

Catonsville C.C. 

Mansfield 

Virginia 

Loyola 

Wake Forrest 

Maryland 

Temple 

Howard 

North Carolina State 

Chowan 

Virginia 

George Mason 

LaSalle 

Princeton 

Massachusetts 

Liberty Baptist 

James Madison 

Temple 

Loyola 

Providence 

Princeton 

Clemson 

Fairleigh-Dickinson 

Hofstra 

Virginia Commonwealth 

James Madison 

East Carolina 

UNC-Wilmington 

George Mason 

James Madison 

East Carolina 

UNC-Wilmington 

James Madison 

ECAC Conference 




Field Hockey 18-30 



\j^-' 



pw^ 



% 



y 



M Cross Country 0-1 



1 


Ohio State 


2 





^.^ Drexel "^ 


4 





Davis &Elskins\ 





5 


i ODU * V 
V. Stanford 

.vcu 





2 





1 


3 
1 


W^t Chester 
/rftehigh 


2 



2 


Maryland 


1 


ij^'^' 


JMU ,^ , 

Connecticut'*^' 


1 



4 


Ursinus 


2 


1 


North Carolina 





3 


Duke 





4 


Richmond 


4 


2 


JMU 


1 




ODU Invit. 
VMI&ODU 
UNCInvit. 
Duke 
->Riclw)ond 
vtL 
IC4A 
ECAC South 
NCAA Region III 
Va. Tac Champ? ♦ 
Regional Jr. Olympics ~. 
NCAA 



^J 



Note: Due to a misunderstanding no scores were received for the men's sports. 




W Cross Country 4-5-1 




36 


Delaware 


23 , 




32 


Mt. St. Mary's 


23 




50 


LaSalle _^^ 


26 -, 




50 


American fl? 


iffi^ 




21 


St. Joseph 


35 




28 


St. Joseph 


28 




45 


Towson State 


18 




20 


Navy 


39 






GMU Invit. 


7th 




23 


Georgetown 


36 


s 

3r 


23 


Richmond 


23 


Z 




VIL 


4th 


1 




ECAC-South 


_^ 4th 


3- 



M Soccer 11-6-1 

Hartwick 

Liberty Baptist 

West Virginia 

Anderson-Broaddus 

,^ American 

Christopher Newport 

Howard, 

Virginia Wesleyan 

Navy 

VCU 

ODU 

Richmond 

Loyola 

Univ. of Pennsylvania 

George Washington 

George Mason 

ECU 

James Madison 

UNC-Wilmington 





/ 



SCORES 




Tough Schedule — Big Wins 



After last year's basketball 
record of 14-14, people were 
optimistic for improvement 
with the 1984-85 squad— Coach 
Parkhill's hopes were high at 
the start with hopes for clinch- 
ing the ECAC championship: 
"We have an experienced 
squad returning and with their 
hard work in the off season, we 
should improve." The squad's 
eleven veterans were the strong 
points of the team. 

The season was a predeter- 
mined tough one. The thirteen 
home games included UVA, 
ODU, and other state rivals. 
The season began on a sour 
note with the loss to the fifth- 
ranked ACC power Duke but 
gained momentum with two 
consecutive wins at W&M Hall. 
The 81-65 victory over Drexel 
has won the description of the 
best-played game of the season 
with Senior Keith Cieplicki's 
career high 34 points and the 
great all-around play of Tony 
Traver. Then came the Tribe 
fan's favorite: the Big Win over 



UVA. The Tribe's strength was 
clearly visible against the Wa- 
hoo's shooting percentage of 
20%. But the fans had their 
doubts with 30 seconds to go as 
UVA led 53-52. After a last ef- 
fort by Herb Harris came off the 
rim, it was Scott Coval's 15-ft. 
jumper that sealed the morale- 
boosting victory. 

Soon after the Tribe's strength 
waned with losses to ODU, 
lona, and ACC power Wake 
Forest. Intermitten with the two 
victories over Christopher New- 
port and New Hampshire, we 
fought back to a greatly needed 
and well-deserved win over 
ECAC stronghold ECU at Green- 
ville. The win seemed inevit- 
able with W&M making 53.6% 
of its shots and Coval's career 
high 14 points. At that point, 
W&M stood 1-0 in conference 
action and things looked noth- 
ing but up for the Indians. 

The pace continued with a 
second ECAC victory over 
UNC-W. Two days later Park- 
hill's squad fell unbeaten Navy, 



losing still-disappointed squad 
barely squeezed past a weaker 
Lafayette club winning, 58-57 
after a halftime lead by the 
Leopards. It was a victory led by 
Cieplicki's 17 and Ken Richard- 
son's 14 points. 

As the Tribe progressed to 
their 6th game in 4 days, Scott 
Coval's consistent shooting 
upped our conference record 
to 3-1 as we moved side by side 
with Navy and Richmond inthe 
ECAC standings. The Tribe now 
stood 8-6 overall and had to 
face the Spiders of Richmond to 
decide which of the two teams 
could catch up to first place 
Navy. The game was tight and 
Coval pulled off another last 
minute stunt with a 3 point play 
to send the game into overtime. 
Richmond took control and de- 
feated the Tribe by 6. 

American University added a 
second consecutive loss despite 
the strong rebounding of the 
Tribe. The pacequickened with 
two consecutive wins against 
Delaware, with Herb Harris' 



outstanding rebound perfor- 
mances, and a strong win over 
JMU. The JMU victory owed a 
lot to Matt Brook's crucial shots 
to open the game up for the 
Indians. Brooks added that "this 
was our first total game. We 
should've been able to do this 
all year. Tonight was the first 
night we didn't lose our com- 
posure." The Tribe's compo- 
sure upped them to fourth in 
conference standings. 

The Tribe then accomplished 
two wins out of the next five 
games. We moved into third 
place beating GMU in overtime 
largely due to Richardson's 
career high 26 points, 10 re- 
bounds, and a shot in the last 
five seconds to win it all. Richard- 
son again led us to a UNC-W 
win. Another key conference 
game was won against JMU 
with a strong 62.2% shooting 
percentage. The 84-85 season 
came to a close with a closely- 
fought match versus University 
of Richmond that ended with a 
disappointing 68-58 victory for 
the Spiders. 




A Senior Keith Ciepllcki makes a lone 
foul shot as Coach Parkhill and 
teammates look on expectedly. Photo 
by Mary lida 

► Herb Hams goes up for a clean 
basket against UVA opponents. Photo 
by Mary lida 



► William and Mary's #30 Tony Traver 
looks determined against Lafayette. 
Photo by Rodney Willett 



▼With his tongue hanging out Keith 
Ciepiicki tries to get around Navy's 
Dave Robinson. 




> Matt Brooks 
made by Duke 



looks determined to get the ball Into the basket despite the attempts 
players to prevent him. 



> William and Mary tries to get a shot 
against Richmond. 



► Number 44, Scott Coval leaps to 
make a shot over UVA's Johnson. 
Photo by Mary lida 

▼ Shooting the ball over the head of a 
Richmond opponent William and 
Mary's number 32. leaps high off the 
ground. Photo by Maryanne 
Kondracki 




▼ Number 52, Matt Brooks tries to block a pass between Lafayette foes. Herb 
Harris (45) does his part by guarding his side. Photo by Mary lida 



N^ 




i«f 






^ 



k Number 30. takes a foul shot against Richmond. Photo by Mary lida 



▼ The William and Mary Tribe players celebrate their victory over the much talked 
about uVa team. . .or should I say player? Photo by Mary lida 




The team fared well consid- 
ering a tough schedule includ- 
ing a lot of travelling. The team 
could never really get the mo- 
mentum up. Parkhillsawthisas 
one of the downfalls of the 
season, "We never really had 4 
or 5 wins in a row — it was sort of 
a roller coaster." 

Cieplicki agreed, "When we 
get ahead, we have a tendency 
to jack it up too quickly and all 
of the sudden, we're not up." 
Definitely the last months of 
the season were the peak. 

The squad was led by co- 
captain and lead scorer Keith 
Cieplicki. He led the Tribe in all 
four seasons of play and is the 
second player at W&M to have 
his jersey retired. Named to the 
1st team COSIDA Academic All- 




^ Keith Cieplicki holds his shirt that 

will be retired. 



* Up against a tough UVA squad. Matt ► Keith Cieplicki shows what makes 

Brooks puts one in Photo by Mary lida his playing so great Photo by Rich 




American in 1984, Cieplicki's 
honors also include the two- 
time 3rd team Academic All- 
American and three time All- 
ECAC South. 

Aggressive playing by co- 
captain Tony Traver helped get 
the ball inside for the Tribe. The 
forward position filled by Kevin 
Richardson added to the strong 
starting team. Richardson was 
called by Coach Parkhill "the 
most underrated player in the 
ECAC-South" and proved to fit 
this description with a great 
game against George Mason 
with a career high 26 points to 
exhibit strength the last half of 
the season. 

Senior Matt Brooks added a 
pleasant surprise for the Tribe. 
After hardwork, he landed his 
starting position at center after 
a great performance against 
Duke. Senior forward. Herb 
Harris, saw what many agreed 
was his best season ever at 
W&M. Regardless of his mid- 
season injury, he managed to 
hit over 50% of his shots. 

The free-throw consisting of 
Junior guard, Scott Covall 
added to the well rounded tal- 
ent of the '84-'85 Tribe squad. 
Covall finished second in the 
nation in free-throw shooting, 
led the ECAC South, and added 
lots of last-minute lifesavers for 
the team. 

The underclassmen teamed 
up as strong back-ups this sea- 
son. Led by '83 co-rookies Scott 
Trimble and Mark Boddy, they 
gained valuable playing time. 
Trimble, an aggressive point 
guard played in all but one 
game this season. Boddy, who 
at 6-10, gained starting status 
after Herb Harris' injury was 
looked to for strength. Signifi- 
cant playing action was also 
seen by David Bond and Bobby 
Dail. The team certainly had 
depth with the talents of Mike 
Bracken, Mark Batzel and first- 
year players Tim Trout and Alex 
Rocke. 

After all the high hopes for 
this season, Coach Parkhill ad- 
mitted that he was well-pleased 
with the outcome. The team 
must put forth effort for next- 
year's rebuilding year. The 
1985-86 team will start out with 
two-thirds a returning team and 
one starter. 

— Lisa Fraim 



Growing and Maturing 



A young, relatively inexperi- 
enced squad made the move 
up to Division I this year. Al- 
though several players had 
standout seasons, it was not 
enough to pull the Tribe ahead 
against the much more experi- 
enced and powerful Division I 
teams. 

After two harsh defeats to 
ACC powerhouses Duke and 
Wake Forest, the Indians found 
the first win against Virginia 
Wesleyan. Standouts Karen 
Gordon, Beth Hairfield and 
Bridget Kealey made them- 
selves known quickly during 
these early matches. Gordon 
and Kealey proved offensive 
punch and fantastic shooting 



while Hairfield excelled at re- 
bounding, along with Debbie 
Wade. 

The Tribe fell into a two 
month losing streak after the 
win over Virginia Wesleyan. 
Losses came to strong teams, 
and two were lost by only two 
points. The women showed im- 
provement, however, in spite 
of the losses. Players became 
much more consistent the num- 
ber of fouls decreased and the 
team began playing as more of 
a unit. But the loss of Debbie 
Wade, the team's second lead- 
ing rebounder, hampered their 
efforts at winning. 

Improvement continued and 
the caliber of play increased. 



but wins were slow to come. 
The losing streak was broken 
early in February by a win over 
Longwood College. Two weeks 
later, the Tribe defeated con- 
ference for George Mason to 
break their winless streak in 
conference play. A loss to JMU 
in the first round of the con- 
ference tournament closed the 
season. 

Coach Barbara Wetters noted 
that the season was not as bad 
as it could have been. She com- 
mented that the team dealt 
with defense much better 
during the second half of the 
season, although they were still 
plagued by numerous fouls and 
mental errors. But on the whole 



she was pleased with the year, 
"We had some really bright 
spots, especially at the end of 
the year. We had games where 
we showed great team play and 
I think that was the biggest 
improvement for us. It helped 
us gain a little confidence. I 
think this year's team built a 
good base from which we can 
continue growing. We were a 
very young team at the begin- 
ning of the year; we matured a 
little though." 

— Traci Edler 




A Front Row (L to R); Lisa Koehl. Maureen Evans, Debbie Taylor, Bridget Kealey. 
Fonda Gray. Kate McCarthy; Back Row: Laura Donohue (mgr ). Debbie Wade, 
Jennie Adams, Beth Hairfield, Sue Koester, Karen Jordan. Photo by Lawrence 
I'Anson 




▲ Coach Barbara Wetters shows the girls a new strategy during a time out Photo 
by Dan Weber 




^ Senior Bridget Kealey makes a shot ▼ Four on one doesn't seem fair but 

past her foes as they try to block her. Debbie Wade breaks through to take a 

Photo by Dan Weber shot Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 




m^ts. 



Beth Hartfield gets seSb make aWjl shot as Debbie Taylor awaits any 
action which may occ'ijr in the b^ck court late. Photo by 







*" ^1 



4 Karen Jordan shoots for a score. 
Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



A Debbie Taylor dribbles past an opponent as she makes her way down court 
Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



► The pommel horse is made to look 
easy with the skill of Scott McCrae. 
Photo by John Maisto 

▼Front (L to R) Noah Pierson (co- 
captain). Julien McKinney (mngr). Bob 
Ross (co-captain). Back (L to R) Gary 
Bruening (asst. coach), James 
Flannagan, Stuart Schitfman, Scotty 
Bew, Mike Ryan, Bill Klunk, Scott 
McCrae, Jay Daugherty. Greg 
Franchina, Jack Crane. Mike Gaydos, 
Tim Morton, Dave Norehad, Coach 
Cliff Gauthier. Photo by Mike Nikolich 




Eleven Years of Excellence 



There is an incredible phe- 
nomenon working within the 
domain of gymnastics here at 
William and Mary. A breed of 
dedicated, industrious, and 
definitely unpampered indi- 
viduals has one again arisen 
from the ashes of the previous 
year's memory to clinch an- 
other state title. Moreover, in 
addition to claiming state-level 
distinction at the meet, a new 
all-time team record of 255.60 
was written into the books, as 
were a number of new personal 
bests for individual members. 

Sophomore Tim Morton, the 
only team member to place in 
all six events, earned State- 
Champion status for all-around 
and established a personal high 
of 51.60. Junior Noah Pierson, 
who turned in particularly ace 
performances on the high bar, 
floor, and rings, also dominated 
the all-around category. A 
strong Tribe competitor, Pier- 
son was described as having 
"carried" the whole season, 
despite spending most of it 
"banged up." 

Junior Bill Klunk, whose pres- 
ence Coach Gauthier says 



"buoys the team's confidence," 
reigned in the number-three 
throne for all-around. 

Co-captain Bob Ross, a 
"power-tumbler" sophomore, 
landed killer executions in the 
vaulting, rings, and floor-exer- 
cise arenas. 

Dave Norehad, whom Coach 
Gauthier considers 'that stabi- 
lizing competitor that every 
good team needs,' contributed 
quality maneuvers all-around, 
but especially on floor and 
vault. 

Freshman Mike Ryan, true to 
form, exuded what Coach 
Gauthier called "the perfect 
prescription to help the Tribe 
continue its standard of domi- 
nance in pommel horse." 

On the pommel horse and 
parallel bars, junior Jay Daugh- 
erty exhibited clean contender- 
form, ranking in both events. 

Scott McCrae, another state- 
ranking Williamand Mary com- 
petitor, pulled into the final 
stretch on the horizontal bar. 

Actually, the whole team is 
amazing. The Virginia Intercol- 
legiate ranking unfortunately 
cannot showcase every Tribe 



talent, nor can it reflect the 
odds that William and Mary 
gymnasts must work against. 
Operating on a budget that 
allows for the equivalent of one 
scholarship, William and Mary 
must compete with schools that 
attract recruits with numerous 
scholarship offers, but, as Mike 
Ryan put it, "Considering the 
amount of money we have, we 
do a lot." 

Ranking with the University 
of Georgia, NC State, and Jack- 
sonville as the top teams for 
the entire south, W&M gym- 
nasts continue to emerge each 
year as capable technicians of 
their craft, so in what, exactly, 
rests this decided formula for 
success? 

Well, this tendency toward 
the exceptional is not acci- 
dental. Team members offered 
a unique tribute to their coach, 
whom they regard as an edu- 
cator above all else. Noah Pier- 
son emphasized Cliff Gauthier's 
ability to spot someone with 
potential, no matter how medi- 
ocre they might otherwise ap- 
pear, and then bring that talent 
out of its dormancy. Hard work 



becomes its own reward. 

As teammate Dave Norehad 
extolled, "An important aspect 
about the team is that we have a 
coach who is completely dedi- 
cated, as well as a firm believer 
in the scholar-athlete. Respect 
for his opinions and guidance 
comes naturally." 

The fact that gymnast-alum 
Gary Bruening returned to help 
coach William and Mary's team, 
Norehad continued, was in it- 
self a reflection of Gauthier's 
legacy to the sport. Bruening, 
who sees the level of gymnastics 
rising each year, has been in- 
strumental in devising a ring 
strength program for the Tribe, 
but, less tangibly, he has also 
had a "singular impact" on 
creating one of the best gym 
atmospheres Coach Gauthier 
has ever seen. 

Reviewing a season where 
the men's gymnastics team had 
its 100th win, this year will stand 
out in Coach Gauthier's mem- 
ory while the Tribe's eleventh 
state victory looms [overhead] 
as a [proper and] much-de- 
served cumulus of recognition. 
— Barbie J. Trybul 



144 



Start of the Kurt Thomas flair' 
Photos by John Malsto 





Franchlna's shoulder's tell thi 
strength needed. 



?<h' 



Against Kent State and Radford. 
Klunk^oes an Iron Cross. 



% 



cs 




% 



% 




i 



/ 







Ml 



^ Strength, balance and determination 
all (it into Tim Morton's floor routine. 



* With perfect form. Dave Norehad 
shows skill on the parallel bars. 



► Front (L to R) Leann Crocker, Kim Read, Lori Pepple, Shannon Lucas. Back (L to 
R) Greg Frew (ass. coach). Carol Stubin, Deneen Milberry. Sue Kapp, Janet 
Lawson, Sherri Fink, Sylvia Shirley (coach). Photos by Lawrence lAnson 



Balance is the key to Julie 
Stefaniw's routine. Photo by 
John Malsto 





\,Jifi 




Ballet grace is important to Leann 
Crocker's floor routine 




A Performing on the uneven bars. 
Julie Stefaniw has the crowd in awe. 

► With a look of serious concentration 
on her face. Kim Read performs a 
show of strength on the balance beam. 




146 




A Collaboration Of Efforts 



Sue Kapp performs an excellent 
mat routine as Asst Coach Frew 
looks on. Photo by Lawrence 
I'Anson 





► » ^ / 



^^. kM 




Despite the individual nature 
of competition in gymnastics, 
William and Mary gymnasts 
cited a great deal of cohesive- 
ness and community spirit this 
year. In fact, when junior Lori 
Pepple was eleaed to partici- 
pate in the 1985 NCAA Divi- 
sion I! Championships held in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, she 
said that it was difficult to leave 
the rest of the team behind in 
Williamsburg. 

Solo or not, though, All- 
American Pepple capably ad- 
vanced to the finals in the bars 
and floor exercise and staked a 
ninth-place finish in the all- 
around. 

"Everyone has something to 
offer, whether it be physical 
talents, moral support, or a 
good gym-attitude," stated 
junior Janet Lawson. "When 
someone is up on a piece of 
equipment, the rest of the team 
never fails to be up there with 
that person." 

Co-captain Julie Stefaniw, a 
junior and crucial all-around 
contender, emphasized the 
concern the team members 
developed for one another. 
When freshman LeAnn Crocker 
injured her neck in a dismount 
from the balance beam just 
prior to the George Washing- 
ton Invitational, the team suf- 
fered a lapse of concentration 
for the first couple of events. 
The tournament is commonly 
mentioned as a seasonal low- 
point, but an "attitude-recy- 
cling experience" nonetheless. 

"We did poorly," comment- 
ed Coach Sylvia Shirley, "But 
the invitational actually nur- 
tured subsequent growth and 
became a major turning point." 

Momentum describes the es- 



^ In a meet against GWU and Towson 
State. Carol Stubin does a 
dangerous move on the beam. 
Photo by John Maisto 



sence of the season. Following 
its meet with George Washing- 
ton, the Tribe started increasing 
in power and strength, the col- 
lective group attitude growing 
"very positive and dedicated." 
What characterized the year. 
Coach Shirley observed, was a 
maximizing of potential, and 
the team did indeed gain na- 
tional standing among NCAA 
Division II and III top-scorers 
due to its season-high of 170.65 
against Longwood. 

Though Division I Radford 
proved to be a formidable foe 
at the state meet, William and 
Mary's tumblers had an im- 
mensely enjoyable time being 
able to compete in the spacious 
upstairs portion of the Hall. For 
several home meets they have 
had to divide the women's 
events between two smaller 
gyms downstairs. 

The excitement at the state- 
level exhibition was enhanced 
by having the men's competi- 
tion running parallel. As LeAnn 
Crocker put it, the two teams 
worked together, and a defi- 
nite bonus was having a strong 
vocal crowd. Co-captain Lori 
Pepple found it hard but she 
nevertheless iced performances 
on the unevens. floor, and bal- 
ance beam. 

In direct proportion to its 
success, the team's new assistant 
coach, Greg Frew, helped Sylvia 
Shirley in lending valuable 
guidance. 

From a dismal display at the 
George Washington Invitation- 
al to a positive peaking at the 
end of the season, the 1984-85 
women's gymnastics team has 
knitted into a contented nu- 
cleus of energy which should 
emerge full-form again in 1986. 
— Barbie J. Trybul 



147 



▼ His arm raised to acknowledge 
another victory, Mark McLaughlin 
leaves the mat. 



> Mike Hoess, Most Valuable 
Wrestler, works for control over his 
Lycoming opponent 




Scoring two points. Tripp Davis takes down his opponent Pete Yozzo of 
Lehigh, who went on to place third in the nationals. 




Performing a newly acquired move, Dan Hill executes a headstand to turn his opponent to his back. 



Twenty-three to Fifty-eight 



"W-R-E-S-T-L-l-N-G!!" 

It was a loud cry that often rang 
through the corridors of Wil- 
liam and Mary Hall as Bill Pin- 
cus, '81 alum, returned to the 
W&M wrestling team as a first 
year coach, bringing with him, 
as a two-time national qualifier, 
an extensive repetoire of win- 
ning skills and unlimited 
enthusiasm! 

The new coach faced a tough, 
rebuildingyear,due in parttoa 
season plagued with injuries, as 
well as, a more demanding 
schedule that matched the 
Tribe with higher quality com- 
petition than last year. Deter- 
mined to focus on coaching. 
Coach Pincus called on Glenn 
Gormley '84 alum and a former 
wrestler, to fill the role of As- 
sistant Coach and supervise 
strength training, and left all 
other details to managers Pam 
Germain, Tammy Jones, and 
Kendra Morgan. Leading the 
team were captains Tripp Davis 
and Chris Aragona with the 
help of Mark McLaughlin. 

They began the season in 
September with a rigorous pro- 



gram of conditioning practices 
that included running, lifting, 
and swimming. Coach Pincus 
explained, "I wanted to ensure 
that my team would be in better 
overall shape than every other 
team they would meet." His 
success was evident when he 
found thatduring matches,and 
especially in over-time, W&M 
wrestlers never tired. 

"My other concern was 
making sure that everyone on 
the team had an opportunity to 
gain competitive mat experi- 
ence," added Coach Pincus. 
This goal was accomplished by 
rotating the line-up, entering 
the maximum number of wrest- 
lers in open tournaments and 
scheduling exhibition matches. 

Setting more goals Coach Pin- 
cus recalls, "I looked at last 
year's statistics and found only 
23 pins, this year, as a result of 
drilling pinning combinations, 
we increased that number to 
58. Next year we'll shoot for 
80!" 

Mark McLaughlin contribu- 
ted 13 pins, scoring the most 
pins for the second straight 



year. There were also notable 
performances by Tripp Davis, 
who added up 28 wins to finish 
the year with the most winning 
season, and Mike Hoess, voted 
the Most Valuable Wrestler, 
who earned the most dual meet 
points for the Tribe. 

The fall highlight was an invi- 
tation to the prestigious Mat 
Town Tournament in Lock- 
haven, PA where W&M battled 
powerhouses like Penn State, 
Lehigh and Tennessee. The 
Indians succeeded in placing 
ahead of Old Dominion, the 
1984 State champions, with 
advancement points earned by 
Chris Aragona taking fourth at 
158 lbs. Important points were 
also scored by Tripp Davis at 
142 lbs and Mark McLaughlin at 
150 lbs; they both advanced six 
rounds to take seventh places. 

The Virginia State Champion- 
ship tourney, held at ODU, 
marked another important 
event. At 134 lbs unseeded 
sophomore, Andy Furnas, 
wrestling an impressive tourna- 
ment took first place as W&M's 
first state champion since Bill 



Pincus in 1980. Awards were 
also brought home by Tripp 
Davis taking second at 142, 
Mike Hoess placing third at 126, 
and a fourth place earned by 
heavyweight, Paul Cann. 

The Tribe finished the season 
at the oldest, most prestigious 
Hasten Intercollegiate Wrestling 
Association's national qualify- 
ing tournament where Mike 
Hoess and Tripp Davis both 
won two matches. "Next year 
we expect to have three All- 
Americans at Nationals," 
predicted Assistant Coach 
Gormley. 

The team is also looking for- 
ward to the return of Ted Lewis, 
who was kept away due to ill- 
ness, and Kevin Looney, pre- 
vented from competing be- 
cause of knee surgery. 

"Although a rebuilding year, 
the season was marked by great 
individual performances. This 
year we learned what is takes to 
win; we knocked on the door, 
next year we're going to storm 
right in," concluded Coach 
Pincus, enthusiastic as always. 
— Pam Germain 




< In the corner, coaches Gormley and Pincus give advice to Mark McLaughlin 
while his Princeton opponent takes injury time. 



Creating A Future 



"Cut sport" was the label the 
men's swim team started with 
this season. Within the team, 
the loss of Carl Brown and the 
potential transfer by Shawn 
McLane held little light for the 
upcoming year. But with 
Shawn's decision to stay at Wil- 
liam and Mary; the small, but 
strong, recruit class, and the 
determination of the entire 
team led the 1984-1985 varsity 
squad to a winning season of 
6-4-1. 

The single tie tells the story of 
a frustrating meet against Wash- 
ington and Lee, William and 
Mary's big swimming rival. The 
lead flipped from team to team 
and the meet came down to 
the last event, the 400 freestyle 
relay. The Tribe has to win the 
race just to tie the meet. Thus 
concluded the competition that 
the swimmers had focused on 
and worked towards for most 
of the season. 



The team finished off the 
year at the Seahawk's Invita- 
tional where Kent Sahaum was 
the only swimmer to qualify for 
an individual event at the NCAA 
Eastern Championships. Chris 
Hagin, Scott Graham, Eric 
Mowatt-Larson, and Tim As- 
laner joined Sahaum to make 
their presence known in the 
relay events. 

Shawn McLane was a stellar 
performer the entire season. 
He placed second in both the 3 
and 5 meter diving at Easterns 
and earned I3th place at the 
NCAA National Champion- 
ships. Later in the spring he 
qualified for the U.S. Indoor 
Nationals, but injuries kept him 
from participating. 

Coach jenson, advisor to the 
team, believes that "Shawn's 
outstanding performances this 
season had a positive effect on 
the entire team." Jenson also 



feels that the team's unity was 
strengthened through "the ad- 
versity of the action that had 
been taken" to cut men's var- 
sity swimming. 

Co-captain Doug Bergen 
added that "we maintained our 
spirit through the support we 
received from the parents, stu- 
dents, and alumni which show- 
ed that the men's team is 
wanted, but was just a victim of 
budget cuts." The team sur- 
vived on a skeleton budget with 
this support and rallied to have 
a successful season. 

The 185-1986 season should 
bring with it a strong senior 
class, including the return of 
distance star Pat McGrath, as 
well as, a solid underclass squad. 
The team created their own 
future this year and next year's 
light is brighter than anyone 
could have expected. 

— Liddy Allee 






i 





iff 






A Listening (or the gun, swimmers get 
set (or an exciting race. 



► Taking a breatlner, Bob Tormey waits 
for his fellow teammate. 



< In lane 4 Chris Hagin is psyched for 
a close race against W & L's Taber 
Smith in the 100 freestyle. 



▼ John Vahradian backstrokes to a sure win. 




^V 



4^^:2i^f^c:, 



'i.«a 



A^ 



.^\^ 



«»> 



«»1 




T Heather Sell comes up for a breath of air during her fantastic performance doing the butterfly 
stroke. Photos by Lawrence I'Anson 





^■^';..':. 




Team co-captain [vieg Lanchantin a senior from Virginia Beach propels herself down the Igne with her strong strokes. 




EH 


5.' 


* 4 * J ^.- , -, 


i^ ir ^iii-- jt s.^4.u^ik 




A A clear shot of Diane Alleva taking a quick "breather" during her long trek down 
the lane against tough competitors. 



▲ Front Row (L to R): Kelly Steinmetz. Heather Sell. Chnssie Olson, Meg 
Lanchantin, Lynne Alleva, Sarah Wilson. Maryellen Walsh, Anne Stevenson, Kathy 
Redmond, Tara f^artin. Back; John Crooks, Nancy McMahon, Tiffany Jeisel, Pat 
Olivo, Melanie Laz, Kathy Welch. Diane Drewyer. Amy Flint. Diane Alleva. Coach 
Sarah Bingham. 



▼ An unidentifiable diver shows her 
perfect diving style. Photos by 
Lawrence TAnson 




f 




Records and Fun 



This year's women's swim 
team, led by senior co-captains 
Meg Lanchantin and Heather 
Sell, swam faster than ever be- 
fore to achieve many personal 
bests. The team finished the 
season with a ("why is the team 
yelling so loud while the record 
is being announced?!") 2-10 
win/loss record. In the words 
of Meg Lanchantin, "We swam 
really fast — we just didn't win." 

Depth was the major weak- 
ness. Injuries kept some out a 
major part or all of the season. 
Six swimmers chose not to re- 
turn or left at the beginning of 
the season. Mid-season, the 
Indians' star freshman recruit 



transfered. Despite setbacks, 
hard work paid off in 29 indi- 
vidual career-best times and 
three new school records, 
junior Kathy Welch set new 
standards in 200 yard butterfly 
(2:12.44) and 100 yard freestyle 
(53.19). Tiffany Jeisel achieved 
new records in diving with a 
combined point score of 423.76. 
Harvard University hosted 23 
teams at the EWSL Champion- 
ships. Six Indians competed: 
Diane and Lynn Alleva, Sarah 
Wilson, Kathy Welch and divers 
Tiffany Jeisel and Tara Martin. 
Tiffany went on to compete at 
the NCAA Zone B 1-meter 
Championships, placing 19th. 



Old and new traditions were 
a special part of the season and 
helped to keep the team uni- 
fied despite setbacks. From 
O'Brienstein's and Brooks the 
waiter and the T-R-l-B-E cheer 
to Christmas training, the New- 
lywed Game, and crashing the 
Pan-Hel Dance, spirits were 
high and the legacy will carry 
over for seasons to come. 

The team thanks head coach- 
es Sarah Bingham and jeannie 
Dahnk, assistant swim coach 
John Crooks, and Dr. Earl 
McClain whose work and help 
we all greatly appreciated. 

—Kathy Welch 





Melanie Laz creates a big "splash as she pulls through the water. 




i.r'-'i.-^ 



^vV -, 'i,*. 



< Pat Olivo kicks and pulls with her 
arms to get down the lane Photo by 
John Malsto 



A A close up shot ol Kathy Redmond 
shows her intent on stroking to victory. 



M Gymnastics 10-4 



M Swimming 6-4 



Metro Open 

Eagle Classic 

Navy 

Jacksonville State 

Shenandoah Classic 

Kent State and Radford 

James Madison & Slippery Rock 

North Carolina State 

Georgia Tech, Jacksonville St. & Radford 

State Championships 

Champ, of the South 

NCAA Champ. 



Annual Green and Gold Meet 

James Madison & VMI 

Richmond State Invit. 

Swimming Champ. 

UNC- Wilmington 

College of Charleston 

Georgia Southern Univ. 

VCU 

Georgetown Univ. 

George Washington Univ. 

Mary Washington 

Washington & Lee 

Seahawk Invit. Championship 

ECAC (EISL) Championships 



WINTER 




\ 



iiS« 



*.*^J_'«<P«.-^- 






"#l 



W Gymnastics 3-3 



Wrestling 7-8 

Monarch Tournament 

Pembroke Invit. 

Hiram 

Liberty Duals 

Salisbury State, Coppin State 

Longwood 

Harvard, New Hampshire, WIPI 

American 

Salisbury Invit. 

Franklin & Marshall 

Virginia Intercollegiate 

VMI 

UVA 

Brown 

Princeton, Lycoming 

James Madison 

ODU 

Eastern Intercollegiate Champ. 

1985 NCAA Nat. Champ. 



4 





162.2 


Clarion State 


159.3 




158.7 


Slippery Rock State 


158.65 




George Washington Invit. 


4th 




Towson, George Washington 


3rd 


166.4 


Lonsiwood 


167.2 


176.45 


North Carolina-Chapel Hill 


167 


160.4 


Longw/ood 


170.6 


161.4 


N.C. State 


169.3 




Virginia Collegiate 


2nd 


^ 
s 




NCAA Southeast Regional 


3rd 




I 



-m 



W Swimming 2-10 



67 


Richmond 


73 


89 


Brown 


50 


89 


Virginia Tech 


51 


54 


VCU 


85 


76 


ODU 


64 


89 


Drexel 


51 


88 


Maryland 


50 


71.5 


G. Washington 


67.5 


86 


Boston 


54 


84 


JMU 


56 


77 


Navy 


63 


78 


ECU 


62 




EWSL 


20 



SCORES 



K 



W 



W Basketball 4-26 







84 


Wake Forest 






86 


Duke 






65 


Virginia Wesleyan 






75 


Liberty Baptist 






83 


Richmond 






T7 


American 






78 


Appalachian State 




56 


Loyola 




68 


Montciair 




79 


Lafayette 


1 


fc 


; 86 


ECU 


k 


92 


UNC-Wilmington 


■■ 


85 


Richmond 


p 


65 


Navy i ^ 


Ib~ 


89 


Hampton Univ. 


*i 


70 


George Mason 


1 


73 


JMU ;1 


r 


69 
70 


Long wood i' 

JMU V. 


72 


Norfolk State 




80 


VCU 






56 


George Mason 




74 


ECU 






76 


UNC-Wilmington 






83 


Radford 


\ 


56 


American 




- 


68 


JMU 



St 



43 

48 

72 

59 

51 

45 

39 

55 

66 

41 

57 

62 

52 

64 

58 

53 

47 

72 

46 

50 

62 

61 

57 

55_*:*M 

32 




^H» 




M Basketball 16-12 



Duke 
Drexel 
UVA 
ODU 
Christopher Newport 
Connecticut Tourn 
lona 
Wake Forest 
ECU 
UNC-Wilmington 
Navy 
Lafayette 
George Mason 
Richmond \ 

American ^ 
Delaware ; 
James Madison ^ 
VMI ^ 

y Navy ^ y 

American 

ODU 

George Mason 

UNC-Wilmington 

ames Madison 

Richmond 

ECAC 



\ 



\ 



fiV 




Note: Due to a misunderstanding no scores were provided for the 
mens' sports. 



II 




With International Flair 



"I'd like to see us continue to 
improve as individuals as well 
as, a team." These words spoken 
by Ray Reppert, the coach of 
the women's tennis team, clear- 
ly illustrated his goals and ex- 
pectations. The W&M team en- 
joyed another successful season 
in their long standing winning 
tradition. The addition of a new 
coach, some key players, and 
the development of other play- 
ers helped to spark the Tribe. 
With these changes, a new chal- 
lenge also emerged. Growing 
and learning were two new 
tasks the squad faced in addi- 
tion to winning. 

Coach Reppert's first year 
here could best be described as 
a learning experience. Coming 
to the college after working 
with the Federation Cup and 
the Continental Cup in Yugo- 
slavia, Reppert admitted he had 
a lot to learn about coaching on 
the college level. "There are 
many different things to be 
aware of on this level: personal 
relationships, studies and their 
responsibility to the team. These 
differ from tennis on the cir- 
cuit." He felt this first year gave 
him a better understanding that 
will definitely benefit the team 
next year. 



Entering the season, the Tribe 
had many things in its favor. 
Paramount among these was 
youth. The top six were made 
up of a senior, 2 juniors, 1 
sophomore and 2 freshmen. 
The major question was how 
would this young team be able 
to handle itself in regards to 
experience? Would the ab- 
sence of a veteran team affect 
the squad? This was answered 
by senior captain, Tracy Ruoff , 
supplying leadership and a 
steadying influence. It was also 
apparent that the talent of the 
team and the results achieved 
have shown that the questions 
were amply answered. 

While the combined fall- 
spring record of 12 wins — 8 
losses may not have been as 
high as anticipated, as the 
season progressed the team 
played better and better. The 
ECAC tournament proved just 
how talented the team was. 
Despite more matches than 
champion Richmond, theTribe 
barely lost the team title on 
points and finished second. The 
team as a whole played very 
well, taking doubles titles at 
number one with Heather Clark 
and Mimi Roche and number 
two with Ruoff and Debbie 



MacColl. In addition to the 
success enjoyed in doubles, 
Ruoff, MacColl and Roche also 
took single titles, with fresh- 
man, Eva Bengtison taking sec- 
ond at number four singles. 
Roche won number three sin- 
gles, MacColl won at number 
five singles, and Ruoff won at 
number six singles. 

The spring teams final record, 
not counting the ECAC tourna- 
ment, was 7 wins — 4 losses. This 
included impressive wins over 
Virginia Tech, NC State and 
ODU. Adding to these victories, 
the Tribe closed the season 
with hard fought, close victories 
over jMU and University of 
Richmond. After losing a heart- 
breaking 4-5 match to UVA, the 
team rebounded and won their 
final four matches going into 
the tournament. This was fol- 
lowed by the squad's impressive 
showing in the tournament. 

This year's team had a certain 
international flair to go along 
with their new coach. Three of 
this year's players, Bengtison, 
number one singles, Namratha 
Appa Rao, and number three 
doubles player Carol Lye, all 
came to the Tribe from over- 
seas. Bengtison came from 
Sweden; Appa Rao from India; 



and Lye from New Zealand. 
The addition of these three 
players truly brought interna- 
tional caliber to the team along 
with a wealth of potential. 
Combining this with the play 
and talent of the rest of the 
team, it is no wonder the squad 
enjoyed the success it did. The 
doubles duo of Clark and Roche 
is considered to be one of the 
best in the east. All of this 
provided Reppert the nucleus 
around which to build a domi- 
nant team. 

As far as the 1985-86 season 
goes, Reppert is expecting a 
"better year than this year." 
With five of the top six seeds 
returning along with a good 
recruiting effort, the Tribe is 
expected to take top spot in the 
ECAC South next year. Building 
team unity and improving on 
the immense talent already 
present will be Reppert's main 
tasks. One added element that 
will be apparent next year is the 
effect of a new physical pro- 
gram of weights and running. 
This is hoped to keep the team 
fresher and fight illness better. 
This season was great and next 
will be better. 

— Pat Schembri 




A Coach Ray Reppert gathers the 
girls for a little pep talk. Photos by 
Lawrence I'Anson 

► Florida native, Tracy Ruotf lunges 
for the ball. 



Front Row (L to R): Jill Hungerford, Carol Lye. Tracy Ruoff. Heather Clark, Back, 
Debbie MacColl (Capt.), Namratha Appa Rao. Mimi Roche. Peggy Brown, Coach 
Ray Reppert. 



■4 The team practices playing doubles. 
Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 
T Carol Lye follows through with her 
swing. Photo by I'Anson 




< Sophomore Heather Sell gnmaces 
as she hits the ball. Photo by Lawrence 
I'Anson 



A 1984 VII state champion at fifth 
singles Debbie MacColl goes all out at 
practices. Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



As a match goes on those on the sidelines uwatch intently. Photo by Dan Weber 




(( 



Scrappy 



;; 



"Independent, but scrappy" 
was how men's tennis coach 
Steve Haynie described the team 
before the start of the season. 
And their record went on to 
prove both true. Although the 
inexperience showed at times, 
it was obvious that the team 
was working hard to overcome 
this. 

Thefirst match of the season, 
against an extremely powerful 
and experienced Wake Forest 
team, ended in defeat, but the 
team bounced right back to 
soundly defeat Christopher 
Newport College. After this, 
the Tribe played well, but the 
competition became tougher. 
Although individual members 
played well and strongly, the 
competition was too strong for 
the team, made up solely of 
freshmen and sophomores. 
Tim Ruotolo, Mike Stanczak, 



and Will Harvie all had excel- 
lent seasons and provided 
much needed momentum for 
the team. They played impres- 
sive matches even against such 
tennis powerhouses as ODU, 
UVA, UNC, and Navy. "We 
knew at the beginning of the 
season that we would have a 
chore on our hands to better 
last year's accomplishments," 
commented Haynie. But even 
with the disappointing final 
record, the caliber of play was 
impressive and took the sting 
out of the losses. 

The team is looking forward 
to next year with plans to im- 
prove and with so many veter- 
ans on theteam it should not be 
hard. Also, a new coach will be 
on the scene, bringing in new 
ideas, hopes, and surprises. 

— Traci Edier 



A Mike Ruotolo moves in to meet the 
ball- Photo by F/at Hat 



► This W&M tennis player eyes the 
ball as he awaits its approach. Photo 
by Dan Weber 




^ JodyCarreiro bends over to be sure T Sighting where she wants the ball to 
her ball is set. Photos by Lawrence go. Pam Cunningham gets ready to tee 

I'Anson off. 






\ 




Lisa Dooling attempts to get hefeelf«Jt of a sand trap. 




;-'r> ■^,»3X^jeif-^K. 



^ 



»■*"! - 



n 







YV^^ 





|iii!;pi!|iif 





A Kelly Hughes gets a better t 

perspective of how her ball has to be ,- 

hit from a lower angle. .i 

► Practice time kept the girls in key i^ 

shape. f]^ 



160 




h 



h 




'^: y 








. A", ^ 



^«4. 



The women's golf team 
opened their season with a 
third place finish in the Long- 
wood Invitational, and the rest 
of the year mimicked the 83-84 
season with its ups and downs. 
Ann Davidson stepped in as the 
third coach in three years to 
steer the women in their five 
tournament season. Senior 
Anne Bierman led the team at 
the beginning of the season 
bringing home an individual 
fifth place from Longwood and 
second place overall in the 
ECAC Invitational followed 



# 



.^4^ 







Sticking It Out 



closely by sophomore Lisa 
Dooling who became top play- 
er for the tribe after Beirman 
left the team. 

According to Dooling, each 
member improved her game 
and thus the team as a whole 
improved. Dooling brought in 
the team-low-score from the 
Yale and Duke Invitationals in 
which the squad finished fourth 
and ninth respectively. "Our 
new coach was really super," 
said Dooling, also commenting 
on a fresh sense of comraderie 
in the squad. And team im- 




provement showed as the 
women captured second place 
in the ECAC Invitational. 

And still everyone wonders 
how long will the women's golf 
team survive? As one of the cut 
sports teams, its members must 
struggle for funding while im- 
proving their games. "I'm sure 
it (the funding problem) was in 
the back of the minds of the 
others (younger players)," com- 
mented Anne Bierman. Parents 
and team members spent many 
long hours trying to revive their 
cut financial supply. "It means 




.1 



alot to us and we've tried to 
show that," said Dooling. 

The women closed their fall- 
slate with a last place finish in a 
strong field of players, includ- 
ing 1984 NCAA titlest Miami, at 
the Lady Tarheel Invitational. 
Yet the team improved over last 
year's score by more than ten 
strokes. Next year's season is 
already being lined up and 
hopes to build on this year by 
the addition of many promising 
recruits. According to Dooling, 
"Everything is looking up." 

— Elisha Brownfield 





(Lett and Right Top Pictures) Alison 
Seyier demonstrates how to follow 
through with her swing. Photos by 
Lawrence I'Anson 

< (L to R): Coach Ann Davidson, Terri 
Carneal. Jody Carreiro, Lisa Dooling. 
Pam Cunningham, Alison Seyier, Kelly 
Hughes 



161 



▼ Foil fencer JonathonSoulen battles ▼ Epee fencer Troy Peple (left) mixes 

Navy. Photos by John f^/taisto up with Va. Tech opponent 





Building Year 



/ 



J 



The men's fencing team, in a 
building year, managed to pull 
even with where they stood last 
year, and do better than they 
expected at the Mid-Atlantic 
Collegiate Fencing Tourna- 
ment. With several fencers gone 
and others out with injuries, 
the team was working hard to 
improve the skills of the begin- 
ners to keep the team strong 
for next year. 

Despite a series of strong 



defeats, the team maintained 
good morale and continued to 
work hard. The work paid off 
for the epeeist Troy Peple, who 
qualified for the NCAA Cham- 
pionships, held this year at 
Notre Dame. Although he did 
not do as well as he hoped 
coach Pete Conomikes noted 
that Peple had missed a month 
of practice due to severe shin 
splints. "This just goes to show 
that you can't go into NCAAs 



having been out of practice a 
month or more and expect to 
do well," he commented. 

So in spite of the fact that this 
year was not quite as satisfying 
as last year, Conomikes hopes 
that next year's team will con- 
tinue the improvement seen 
this year. With two of last year's 
starters returning next year, 
things look good for a success- 
ful season. 

— Traci Edier 




Navy receives a lunge (rom toil lencer 
Matt Dalby 



(( 



STATE^Iy 



▼ Four time individual winner Gretchen Schmidt leaves the Tribe this year but 
leaves behind her inspiration for the rest of the team. Photo by Laviirence I'Anson 



"I expected things to im- 
prove and they did," noted 
Shirley Robinson, coach of the 
women's fencing team. After a 
slow start, the team battled 
back to close their season with 
a 12-7 record and an eighth 
place finish at the National 
Women's Fencing Association 
Tournament. Highlights of the 
season included a fifth straight 
state championship for the 
team and a fourth straight indi- 
vidual championship for senior 
Gretchen Schmidt. Coach 
Robinson noted that "Gret- 



chen's victory maintained her 
state dominance in women's 
fencing and winning state was 
a great way to end my coaching 
career at W&M." She also main- 
tained that, although it was not 
as successful a season as in past 
years, the members had im- 
proved tremendously during 
the course of the season. Al- 
though the year ended with 
next year's status still in ques- 
tion, the lady fencers are confi- 
dent of another successful 
season if given a chance. 

— Traci Edier 





-;^__JW&M teammates watch as a match goes on. PhT5Toby 
Lawrence I'Anson 



Getting to the point these fencers tag each other. Photo by 
Lawrence I'Anson ~ 



-^^ 




Front Row (T to B): Shirley Robinson (Coach), Lisbeth Young, Doreen Ferree, Elizabeth Turgman, Lori Piper, Katharine Eklund, 
Laura Draegert; Back: Linda Crick. Cathi Schultz, Gretchen Schmidt, Maria Stamoulas. Kim tVlcCauley, Cindy Storer, Arther 
Robinson (asst coach). Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



■* Face covered to protect herself during a match, this W&M fencer gets set for a 
battle. Photo by Maryanne Kondracki 

▼ The gjrls gather for a little break and morale support from fellow teammates. 
Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 






< The center of all activity. Photo by 
Maryanne Kondracki 



^ Fancy footwork is demonstrated in 
this roust Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



▼ William and Mary faced tough 
competition this year. Relays brought 
runners from all different areas to 
compete against the Tribe. 




On Foot 



Lap after lap and mile after 
mile, the mens' track team stuck 
together and had an excellent 
season. 

Stating that last year's success- 
ful season would be tough to 
follow, Coach Chernock should 
be quite pleased with this year's 
outcome. Led by team co-cap- 
tains— Seniors Marlon Mattis 
and Ed Gibbons— the team 
came in first often and broke 
many school records. 

On a cold, rainy day in March 
the team traveled to Hampton 
for the Hampton Relays. Out of 
nine events W&M placed first 
in five. The distance medley 
relay of Ed Gibbons, Emi! Davis, 
Phil Wiggins, and David Ryan 
came in first in their event set- 
ting a new meet record with 
the time 10:11.5. 

Back at home for the Colonial 
Relays an outstanding second 
place finish was made, despite 
the dropping of a baton, by the 
3200m relay team consisting of 
Phil Peck, Tom Noble, Ed Gib- 
bons and Phil Wiggins. Ken 
Halla continued to break the 

166 



tape first with a first in the 
10,000m run with a time of 
29:53.7. 

He later went on to get a 
second place in the Penn Relays 
in the 10,000m. Breaking a 
school record with 28:44.3 (old 
time 29:51) he also qualified for 
IC4A, NCAA, and TCA. 

Other team members who 
qualified for IC4A participation 
were— the 1600m relay (Phil 
Wiggins, Emi! Davis, Phil Peck, 
and Ed Jackson) with a school 
record time 3:12.78; the 400m 
relay (Mitch Cooper, Emil 
Davis, Alex Willacey, and Pat 
Cousins) with a school record 
47:17; Emil Davis in the 200m 
(21.35); Ed Gibbons, Phil Wig- 
gins, and Phil Peck in the 800m; 
Pat Cousins and Alex Willacey 
in the 100m and in field events- 
long jumper Emil Davis and last 
but not least Marlon Mattis in 
the hammer throw. 

Performance was up for the 
squad this past season. Al- 
though losing several good 
men to graduation, next year 
promises to be just as successful. 




A Marlon Mattis makes a successful hammer throw. He broke his own record 
several times this season. Photo by John Maisto 




4 Phil Wiggins and Phil Peck go around the bend up against competition like 
Virginia State. Photo by John Maisto 



Front Row: Coach Chernock, Ed Jackson, Todd Lindsley. Marlon Mattis, Ed 
Gibbons. Phil Wiggins, Jeff Hughes, f^ilt Johnson; Row 2; Phil Peck, Scott Douglas, 
Ken Halla, Brendan McCarthy, Tom Noble, Pat Cousins, Scott Gleason, Lee Corvin, 
Coach Derrick; Row 3: Randy Hawthorne, Alex Willacey, Tom Kennedy, John 
Logsdon, Dave Ryan, James Vick. Andrew Horrocks, Mike Jonas, Coach Goggins; 
Row 4; Joe McReynolds, Todd Beach, Andy Jacob, Stuart Harvey, Rich Lipsky, Jay 
Rush, Steve Adderly, Ed Gregg, Chris Hill. 




: MitctLCooper ma Kes as uccessfisi 



^nofo by JohrrMaisto ■ 




< Andrew Horrocks, James Vick, Scott 
Gleason, Scott Douglas and Tom 
Kennedy dominate this race. Photo by 
John Maisto 



A William and Mary Co-captains; 
Marlon Mattis and Ed Gibbons 



Running Memories. 



This year the women's track 
team was very different from 
the one I found when I got here 
four years ago. I suppose that 
one of the biggest differences is 
in its youth. Only four of us are 
graduating and we are followed 
by a pack of very talented fresh- 
men and sophomores that have 
helped create a feeling of team 
unity that had been missing 
until now. 

Leading the pack is sopho- 
more Uchenwas Uwah, who 
has become the team's pre- 
miere quarter miler as well as 
half miler. Her sixth place finish 
in the 400n meters at the ECAC 
indoor meet in March was the 
team's best finish to date. 

The enthusiasm of the young 
group was contagious and the 
4-1 record proves it. And so 
does the quality of the many 
broken school records. For ex- 
ample, I've watched the 4x400 
relay record go from 4:14 (a 
time worse than the 4 x 400 relay 
I ran on in high school) down to 



3:49 (a time that won the sec- 
tion at the prestigious Penn 
Relays). This is quite an ac- 
complishment for a team that 
has only been in existence for 7 
years! 

But, I think the real strength 
of this team lies not in its athletic 
ability but in its personality — 
something I know I'll never 
forget. Thousands of miles of 
late night van rides full of the 
many talks about Angie and her 
many men, Uche and I giving 
up on men totally. Coach Utz 
and her passion for croutons, 
the dreaded body fat analyzer, 
Ann and the buffalo farm on 
the way to Madison, and so 
many more. Each of these little 
things brought us closer to- 
gether and helped us win a 
little more. 

And I guess I can't resist a bit 
of sage advice as I sit here in 
retirement from the track 
competition world. Keep smil- 
ing and learn to love 600s... 
you're going to do a lot of 



them! Keep up the good work 
because Charlottesville isn't 
that far away and I'll return to 
haunt each and every one of 
you. 

One last thing— to the rest of 
W&M — take a good look at this 
team next year at the Colonial 
Relays because you've got an 
awesome group of athletes 
representing your Alma Mater! 
— Margie Johnson 




▼ A good start out of the blocks Is 
important for a good race. Photos by 
[.awrence I'Anson 




■n;XSHi^^ 




▲ Throwing her discus, Wendy Warren excelled in her field event. Photo by 
Lawrence I'Anson 



< Front Row (L to R): Karen Griffith. Margret 
Harned. Elaine Fry. Susan Haynie. Anne 
Riddle. Tfieresa Jacoby. Sheila Arnes. 
Coach Jenny Utz: Back Row: Wendy 
Qarren. Uchenwa Uwah. Pam Anderson. 
Valerie Roeder. Angle Fogle. Kirsten 
Teschauer. Margie Johnson. Linda Burke, 
Betsy McMorrow. Photos by Lawrence 
"Anson 

▼ Valerie Roeder leads her opponents from 
Bucknell and Richmond in her running 
event Photo by Flat Hat 




A Kirslen Teschauer pulls her arm back to be able to put a lot of strength into her 
javelin throw The grimace on her face shows she truly puts herself into the throw. 



A During a tough practice Valerie Roeder leads her fellow teammates Theresa 
Jacoby and Anne Riddle Rough practices kept all the girls in tiptop shape. 



HERE'STOALLTHE 



WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Feffie Barnhill 


LaCrosse 


Sarah Bingham 


Swimming 


John Charles 


Soccer 


Vikki Crane 


Asst. Soccer 


Ann Davidson 


Golf 


David Dye 


Riding 


Debra Hill 


Volleyball 


Earl McLane 


Diving 


Ray Reppert 


Tennis 


Sylvia Shirley 


Gymnastics 


Greg Frew 


Asst. Gymnastics 


Jean Stettler 


Field Hockey 


Jenny Utz 


Track/X-Country 


Barbara Wetters 


Basketball 


Pat Negel 


Asst. Basketball 






170 




MEN'S ATHLETICS 



Joe Agee 


Golf 


Al Albert 


Soccer 


John Daly 


Asst. Soccer 


Roy Chernock 


Track/X-Country 


Dave Derrick 


Track/X-Country 


Pete Conomikes 


Fencing 


Bill Devine 


LaCrosse 


Cliff Gauthier 


Gymnastics 


Steve Haynie 


Tennis 


Keith Havens 


Swimming 


Dudley Jensen 


Swimming 


Ed Jones 


Baseball 


Jimmye Laycock 


Football 


Tom Brattan 


Asst. 


Gene Epiey 


Asst. 


Mike Faragalli 


Asst. 


Matt Kelchner 


Asst. 


Sean Kelly 


Asst. 


Zbig Kepa 


Asst. 


Mike Kolakowski 


Asst. 


Don McCaulley 


Asst. 


Barry Parkhill 


Basketball 


Dan Barner 


Asst. 


Bernie McGregor 


Asst. 


Sal Mentesana 


Asst. 


BillPincus 


Wrestling 




/ 




W & M COACHES 



171 



Off To A Good Start 



The Tribe women's lacrosse 
team came out of the blocks 
fast this past year. After winning 
four out of their first five games, 
the casual observer may have 
been ready to give W&M any 
kind of undisputed title. After 
this season opening streak, the 
Tribe ran into some of the finest 
lacrosse teams in the nation. In 
spite of losing their next five in 
a row, there was cause for op- 
timism. These five losses just 
happened to be to Penn State 
(ranked #3), Northwestern 
(ranked #8) and Loyola (ranked 
#6). All of these losses were 
hard fought, close battles de- 
spite the scores. In spite of 
these losses, this young team 
did not get down. They had 
found out they could play with 



the best in the nation. With 
eleven sophomores and fresh- 
men on the team, the future 
looks nothing but bright. 

The offense this year was led 
by sophomores Tracey Jolles, 
Lisa Miller and Junior Debbie 
Taylor. These three accounted 
for 80 of the teams 125 goals 
with Jolles scoring 23, Miller 29 
(team high) and Taylor with 28. 
All three provided consistency 
to a young attack team also 
composed of sophomores Lisa 
Wood and Janet Aldrich and 
Freshman Karen Acosta. Mid- 
fielder Mary Pat Kurtz once 
again made the US Reserve 
team and brought leadership to 
her position as co-captain. She 
also added ten goals and seven 
assists. Helping Kurtz out at 



midfield were standouts— Sue 
Shafirtz and Blair Kochler. As 
the season progressed, the play 
of the midfield became more 
important and there three play- 
ers provided stability and con- 
tinued improved play. 

Leading the defense for her 
fourth year was senior co-cap- 
tain Kim Stewart. As the season 
entered its later stages, the play 
of the defense played a key role 
especially against a schedule of 
nationally ranked teams. The 
defense proved to be one of 
the stronger parts of the team 
and often looked to Stewart to 
play stopper against the oppo- 
nents high scorer, a job which 
she performed admirably. 

Looking ahead to next year, 
one can not escape from a 



feeling of optimism. With the 
prospect of looking toward 
greater national recognition, 
W&M is truly emerging as one 
of the top teams in the east and 
the country. With everyone but 
Stewart from an already good 
team returning, the tide is high 
for the Tribe. This young team 
will benefit from this tough 
season and will all return a year 
older and with a year's more 
experience. Adding to this the 
prospects and expectations for 
a very strong recruiting year 
and it is safe to say that this hard 
working team will be at the top 
of its game next year. 

— Pat Schembri 




▲ Front Row (L to R); Lisa Wood. Karen Acosta. IVIary Pat Kurtz. Kim Stewart, Sue 
Stiafritz. Georgia Flamporis; Back Row: Mary Parke. Sue Pljawka, Tom-Jean Lisa, 
Jennifer Gifford. Tracy Jolles, Stiaun Anderson, IVIelissa Barlow, Janet Aldrich, Blair 
Koetiler, Kathy Coyle, Debbie Taylor. Lisa Miller, Sue Scott. Photos by Lawrence 
I'Anson 



172 





< Sophomore Tracy Jolles intercepts a 
pass. Photo by Lawrence I'Anson 



J»> 



y 









< Keeping in front of her opponent 
Lisa fvliiier makes her way down the 
field. 

▼ Georgia Flampons makes a 
successful and beautiful goal. Photos 
by Lawrence I'Anson 




r 
r 



■l^fr- - '^- 



/— 



..•y..<-;^ -'^*^ 'fe- 




4 William and Mary's goalie sets 
herself ready to make a save 



A Accosted by two opponents. Mary 
Pat Kurtz's face shows the umph' she 
puts into pass them. 




Lacrosse Players 



r,x/— -a-"^*. «--^ 



"Our team of sixteen return- 
ing and six new (fortunately) 
players came out strong this 
year, not only with a tougher 
goal to strive for but something 
to prove as well, said Defense 
Captain of the Men's Varsity 
Lacrosse team (1984-1985), Jamie 
Williams. 

Coming back with a 6-5 
record from last year's season, 
the mens' lacrosse team, one of 
six teams cut from last year's 
budget plan, faced many stag- 
gering difficulties. Due to stu- 
dent outrage of the elimination 
of this team from the College 
sports program last year, the 
team was partially reinstated for 
the 1984-85 season, but was 
forced to run on one-third of 
last year's operating budget. 



Thus, at the new season's 
open on January 14, this band 
of lacrosse players had little 
besides their sticks, talent, de- 
termination, and love of the 
game... and "comraderie in 
the tradition of lacrosse," added 
senior midfielder Tom Jensen. 

The team faced the absence 
of enough money to pay for a 
professional coach, fall practice, 
recruiting efforts, and even 
necessities such as adequate 
food money on road trips (al- 
though even travelling was re- 
duced, making players road- 
weary before games). Perhaps 
the final blow was that the team 
was not allowed to play their 
home game at Cary Stadium, 
where it has hosted games in 
the past. 



Despite these odds, "we kept 
the patient alive," said Bill 
Devine, new Head Coach of 
the team, as well as, full-time 
law student at Marshall-Wythe. 
"We showed that lacrosse has a 
good future at this school, and 
with another year like this one, 
and good funding, we can get 
the program healthy again." 

Devine, undoubtedly one of 
the youngest head coaches in 
the league, was aided by sec- 
ond-year business school stu- 
dent and close friend, Ben 
Willis. (Willis and Devine have 
been friends since first grade.) 

Devine, who has known the 
game for "between twelve and 
fifteen years," spent his under- 
graduate years at Washington 
and Lee. 



Devine has been called the 
"perfect coach for our team" 
by some players. "Bill was al- 
most one of the players. . .he 
worked out in the scrimmages 
when we were short of men 
and related to the players," said 
a teammate. 

Many agreed with Williams 
when he'd said, during the 
Awards Banquet at the season's 
close, that "the lacrosse team 
has gained it's self-respect" this 
year. Indeed, the dedication to 
the program, exhibited by 
coaches, players, and "even that 
one fan on the lonely field," 
kept the program alive, said 
Devine. 

The team was never more 
spirited and alive — full of out- 
standing individuals who pulled 




< Defenseman Paul McMahon tries to 
get the ball from an opponent Photo 
by Maryanne Kondracki 

4 A W&M player keeps his foe 

covered. Photos by Maryanne 

Kondracki 

▼ Front Row: (L to R) T. Jensen, Glenn Brooks. Jim Gray, Craig Oliver Row 2: Chip 

Biggs, Tom Hoeg, Eric Gorman. Alex Dusek; Row 3: Tom Spong. Kelly Keller, Jim 

Ervin. Lars Okeson: Row 4: Tom Tierney (capt,), Dave Roth, Jack fvlcDonald. Jamie 

Williams (capt): Row 5: Pat Burke, Tim Carroll. Rigg Mohler, Mike Olsen, Paul 

McMahon; Row 6: Sandy Wall (mgr.). Kris Fedewa (mgr.), Brian Campbell (trainer), 

Scott Driscoll, Bill Devine (Head Coach). Ben Willis (Asst Coach). Photo by Bill 

Honaker 




Play ^'DEVINriy 



together to work together. "I 
felt a part of something in my 
efforts to save something at this 
school," said co-manager Sandy 
Wall. 

"Tom and Jamie were the 
best captains we have had since 
my years on the lacrosse team 
at W&M," said goalie and de- 
fenseman, Glenn Brooks. 

Indeed, at the close of 
W&M's lacrosse season. Of- 
fense Captain Tom Tierney, has 
been named to havethe highest 
goal-assist record, and involve- 
ment with points, in the nation 
(Division I). His record stands at 
involvement with 76 points, in- 
cluding 29 goals and 47 assists. 

Williams, the Defense Cap- 
tain and an outstanding athlete, 
was named this year's "Most 



Valuable Defensemen," particu- 
larly because of the consistency 
of his performance and good 
coverage. 

Veteran players this year in- 
cluded Tom Jensen (who had 
14 goals and 18 assists) and 
Craig Oliver. Jensen, who is the 
only one of the team to play 47 
straight games, was "the most 
unappreciated player on the 
field," said Tierney. "He was 
involved in as many assists as I 
was, but due to the rules of the 
game, only one man is ac- 
credited with assists." 

Junior Jake McDonald and 
Mike Olsen (tying for 13 goals 
each) also had good seasons 
(Olsen with 16 assists and 
McDonald with three). 

The "sophomore pack" of 



David Roth (7 goals, 4 assists), 
Jimmy Gray (6 goals, 1 assist), 
and Rigg Mohler (5 goals, 1 
assist) contributed significantly 
to the teams' overall scoring 
record of 151 goals and 101 
assists. (The average number of 
goals per game was 16.78). 
Sophomore goalie Eric Gor- 
man had an average of about 14 
saves per game. 

Scott Driscoll, one of this 
year's star players, began his 
lacrosse career in the starting 
lineup (and finished) with Tier- 
ney and Jensen. Driscoll, who 
leads the nation in goal-scoring 
with a total of 45 shots and 21 
assists, returned this year after 
an absence during the 1983-84 
season. 

Less dramatic perhaps but 



equally vital to the team were 
the defensemen led by Wil- 
liams, including junior Paul 
McMahon, senior Craig Oliver, 
and sophomore Tim Carroll, 
whoallowed only ninegoalson 
the average per game. "He took 
chances and cleared the ball 
successfully after taking it 
away," said assistant coach 
Willis. 

Junior goalie and defense- 
men Glenn Brooks was the 
recipient of the Coaches' 
Award this year, for "hustlers 
who want to contribute," ex- 
plained Tierney. Brooks, origi- 
nally the starting goalie, 
changed positions because he 
realized he "could help the 
team better as a defenseman." 
175 



"I've always wondered what 
teams like North Carolina 
thought of us — similar to the 
way we feel about VMI per- 
haps — but now I see that they 
love the game as much as we 
do. I didn't realize until this 
year how much I love lacrosse," 
Brooks said. Others on the 
team, including newcomer 
from Club lacrosse, junior Lars 
Okeson, confirm the spirit of 
unity on the team this year and 
real dedication. 

It was the ability of the team 
to anticipate each other's ac- 
tions that allowed them to work 
well together, explained Willis. 
Thus, the Attack was able to 
score 99/151 goals. 

The season opened with the 
defeat of the Richmond Mens' 
Club. 14-3. The next win was 
against Wooster, 21-13, the be- 
ginning of a winning streak that 



ended in the North Carolina 
tournament against Gilles and 
Duke. 

The tournament marked the 
end of the Tribe's all-win sea- 
son, but also made the players 
realize what they were doing, 
said Tierney. "When we played 
Duke, we had just lost the first 
game of the season (to Gilles). 
We had initially scored, but 
they came out with 7 or 8 goals 
straight. . .they were steam- 
rolling over us... it was 
embarrassing." 

"During the goalie-change 
in the second half, I knew it was 
time to say something. We 
couldn't lose because we were 
giving up ... It got me mad see- 
ing people moping outside of 
the huddle." 

I said, 'If you don't want to 
play lacrosse, put your sticks 
down and walk away. Get your 



pride back or get out of here. I 
don't know if it is what I said, 
but we outscored them during 
the second half of the game," 
Tierney said. 

The team ended their 6-3 
record with the powerful stomp 
on St. Mary's defeating them 
27-12. The once-dim picture of 
the future of the College La- 
crosse now seems brighter. 

At the Lacrosse Banquet in 
April, former Head Lacrosse 
Coach Clarke Franke unveiled 
a plan on behalf of the Alumni 
Association, in conjunction 
with the athletic department, 
to agree to mutually raise 
$16,000 for next year. While this 
news is better than no news, 
some such as Williams are skep- 
tical about whether the money 
can be raised. 

With a dwindling number of 
players and continued funding 



problems, each game next year 
will "be a dogfight," said 
Brooks, who intends on playing 
next year. 

However, Willis commented 
that during the season, 'people 
sacrificed themselves and the 
trainer (Brian Campbell) got 
everyone to play by game day." 
(There were many injuries this 
year, including jim Cray, Tim 
Carroll, and Craig Oliver to 
name a few.) 

In the face of mounting ob- 
stacles, lacrosse persevered at 
W&M. "I was impressed that no 
one gave up," said Willis, "but 
morale remains high." 

Varsity athletic teams do not 
live on morale alone. But the 
lacrosse team at W&M did 
"strive for something," and 
they proved something as well. 
— Kirsten Fedewa 




At a nappy hour sponsored by the lacrosse club David Roth.Seth MMer.fttjf, Fedewa, 
Sandy Wall and Tom Jenson gather to show their lacrosse spirit. Photo oy^aryanne 
. _ , „ , Kondracki / 

> WjT ^ — -en 





A The team rallys around Coach Devine for a little spirit booster. Coach Devine 
likes to think of himself as "one of the guys." 



A Co-captain Jamie Williams, defenseman. concentrates on getting the ball away 
from his opponent. He keeps his eye on the ball. 



. ^' '<'. . 




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A A double sided life. Coach Devine is 

a friend as well as coach. Photo by Bill 

Honaker 

► W&M atlempts to pass down the 

field with the ball Photo by Maryanne 

Kondracki 



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Pitching and batting are obviously 
important skills to l<now when playing 
baseball. The Tribe men displayed 
their talent in both areas game after 
game. Photos by Maryanne Kondracki 





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^^^'^^^^ 



DIAMONDMEN 



Despite having the talent and 
the enthusiasm to win this sea- 
son, the Tribe diamondmen 
were disappointed with the 
final record . . . and understand- 
ably so. 

Starting with a healthy crew, 
the team slowly lost its pizazz as 
injury-after-injury occurred 
throughout the season. Captain 
and number one pitcher John 
Volpi had an elbow injury and 
had to sit out for the season. 
Teammate Matt Seu suffered a 
similar injury and was out of 
play for awhile. Back problems 



kept second baseman Stan 
Yagielio out and shortstop John 
Rotando suffered from arm in- 
juries that prevented him from 
playing. 

However, the Tribe diamond- 
men can look ahead to next 
season with optimism. A young 
pitching staff returns every 
pitcher next season, and with 
an extra year of experience, 
improvement should be rapid. 
Also returning is the entire in- 
field which includes the two 
leading hitters and 1986 co- 
captains John O'Keefe and Stan 



Yagielio. 

O'Keefe, a junior third base- 
man, led the 1985 campaign 
with team-highs in hits (52), 
runs batted in (52), and home 
runs (6). The Yorktown, NY, 
native batted a very consistent 
.374 and boasted a hefty .626 
slugging percentage. His con- 
sistency is reflected by striking 
out only once in every 20 at 
bats. Yagielio still managed to 
play in 21 games despite his 
injuries. Those game were pro- 
ductive as he led the team in 
hitting with a .437 mark and 



slugging percentage with .690. 
Hopefully these two can solidify 
a strong returning contingent 
and bring the Tribe back to the 
20-victory plateau. 

So be sure to be on the 
lookout next year for a young, 
but practiced, team. You might 
be surprised. 



178 



▼ After a home run against Maryland, Trey Harris (19) is greeted with high fives from fellow 
teammates. Photo by Rich Larson 




^ Pitcher, catcher and coach confer 
on the pitcher's mound for a game 
plan. Photo by Maryanne Kondracki 



T This tribesman makes a short putt look easy due to his concentrated effort in his 
precision. Photos by Dan Weber 



▼ Making a long shot and following through, keeping your eye on the sight is 
essential in aiding one's aim. 




'^Bf?*^0j^- 







4 




A William and Mary golfers confer over their scorecards dunng a lapse in play 

time. 



MakingThe Rounds 




The eye must be good to keep the ball in sight after making a long shot 
Photos by Dan Weber 



T 



T-" 




"Realistically, we did what 
we were capable of doing," 
reflected Coach Agee on the 
1984-1985 men's Golf team. 
Citing a lack of depth as a 
crucial restriction on the team's 
capability, Agee went on to say, 
without disappointment, "We 
got about what we expected." 
In fact, the season was rather 
routine, characterized by a 
number of ups and downs, with 
the ups concentrated at the 
end of the season. 

After a lackluster showing in 
the fall, the Tribe opened 
March with a victory over a 
nine team field at the Greens- 
boro Collegiate Tourney in San- 
ford, N.C. They followed that 
victory later in the same week 
with a ninth place finish in a 
much stronger field at the Pal- 
metto Classic in Santee, S.C. 
Three disappointing tourna- 
ments followed, including an 
uncharacteristically poor show- 
ing as the host team at the 
Kingsmill Spring Invitational. 
Undaunted the Tribe came 
back to finish a strong fourth at 
the State tournament at Hot 
Springs and followed up with 
an unprecedented victory the 
following week at the ECAC- 
South Tournament in Greens- 
boro, N.C. 

At the EGA, Senior Mike 
Gregor and Junior John 
McHenry finished 1st and 2nd, 
respectively, by firing a pair of 



Ill's. McHenry, the top return- 
ing letterman for next season, 
lost a playoff to Gregor to de- 
cide the outcome. Neverthe- 
less, McHenry, who had earlier 
finished first at the Campbell 
University Classic, finished the 
season with an astonishingly 
low stroke average of 74.4. This 
earned the Cork, Ireland Native 
a tie with 1983 W&M graduate 
Bill Musto for the lowest sea- 
sonal stroke average in Tribe 
history. 

With all the glory that ac- 
companied the ECAC South 
triumph, the team's brightest 
memory may have been a last 
place finish in the much re- 
garded Chris Schenkel Golf 
Invitational in Statesboro, GA. 
It marked the second straight 
year the Tribe has participated 
in the event, which receives 
nationwide notoriety for the 
first rate field it draws. "It's an 
honor just to play there," 
beamed Agee. 

Despite the loss of Mike 
Gregor and Larry Larsen to 
graduation, next year brings 
much promise in the return of 
McHenry, Juniors Chip Brewer 
and Gregg Swartz, and Fresh- 
man Dan Sullivan, who all 
earned letters this year. Hope- 
fully, they will reap many vic- 
tories for Coach Agee, who will 
be in his 20th season as Mens' 
Golf Coach. 

— Michael Davis 



This tribesman gets a better idea of what kind of shot he will have to 
make. 




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^ On the green a clear shot is made to 

sink the golf ball 



A Following the ball with his eyes this 
golfer attempts a birdie 



1^^\ 



MGolf 

Richmond Spider Classic 

Palmetto Classic 

Camp Lejeune 

Duke 

KM-W&M Spring Tourney 

Virginia State Tourney 

ECAC South 



r^,^^ M Track 

''^cirH CNCOpen 

Hampton Relays 

Appalachian State Relays 

W&M Invitiational 

Colonial Relays 

JMU Relays 

ECAC South at GMU 

Penn Relays 

JMU Invitational 

Terrapin at Maryland 

Cavalier at UVA 

Captains at ChjjC 

IC4A 

NCAA *•;, 





s 

00 

•3 



Baseball 10-24 

VCU 

UVA 

Christopher Newport 

ECU 

UNC-Wilmington 

UNC-Wilmington 

Virginia Tech 

VCU 

Christopher Newport 

Maryland 

Lehigh 

St. John's ^ ( 

Norfolk State 

Coast Guard 

Providence 

Vermont Univ 

ODU 

George Mason Univ. 

George Mason Univ. 



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M Fencing 5-4^ 

Navy ^ - 

North Carolina 

\VPI 
Dukey 
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VMI 
Ohio State f 
lfr4orthwestern ^ 
Penn State 
NorthCarolina State 
State Championships 
Johns Hopkins 
Mid-Atlantic Championships 
NCAA Championships ^ 
•A. 




y 





WGolf 


3rd 


Longwood 


2nd 


ECAC 


4th 


Yale 


9th 


Duke 


14th 


North Carolina 





W Tennis 7-4 




8 


Virginia Tech 


1 


3 


Maryland 


6 


1 


TN-Chattanooga 


5 


9 


Col. Charleston 





2 


South Carolina 


7 


7 


N. estate 


2 


4 


Virginia 


5 


8 


ODU 


1 


5 


JMU 


4 


5 


Penn State 


1 


9 


George Washington 





8 


Richmond 


4 



5 


Penn State 


1 


9 


George Washington 





8 


Richmond 


4 




8 
4 
13 
14 
16 
12 
17 
9 



W Lacrosse 5- 

Drexel 

Harvard 

Richmond 

ODU 

Lynchburg 

Penn State 

Virginia 

Maryland 

Northwestern 

Loyola 

JMU 




^l 





WFencingi2-7 




13 


Temple 


3 


10 


Rutgers 


6 


10 


NYU 


6 


6 


St. Mary's 


9 


9 


Pennsylvania 





8 


Ohio State 


8 


9 


Notre Dame 


2 


4 


.Virginia Tech 

* UNC 
'l^ Navy 


12 


6 


10 


6 


10 


3 


A^"*^ 


13 


4 


n?Mwc 1 


12 


9 


^^^uke A 


7 


5 


^jngsuvA m 


11 


8 


^Ohio State »^ 


8 


3 


NC State 


13 


10 


Northwestern 


6 


3 


Hoflins 


13 


4 


JMU ' 


»' 



SCORES 



k 




M Lacrosse 6-3 




Richmond Lacrosse Club 




Richmond 




Va. Beach Lacrosse Club 




' *• Randolph-Macon 




%r: "^ Wooster 




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Lynchburg j^JBlCT 


Is 


McDonald's Lacrosse Cfj^F 


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M Tennis 6-10 

Wake Forest 

Citadel 

College of Charleston 

Atlantic Christian 

UNC-Charlotte 

Edinboro State 

Christopher Newport 

Lehigh 

Bloomsburg State 

ODU 

Temple 

Harvard 

Massachusetts Inst 

Washington & Lee 

Virginia Tech 

VCU 

Lynchburg 

UVA 

Navy 

UNC-Wilmington 

James Madison 

Richmond 
George Mason 



Teo^^^^ 



W^Mh 



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W Track -^ 

JMU invitationa 

Towson Invitation 

Colonial Relays 

James Madison Relays 

Appalachian State Invitational 

Penn Relays ^^^ 

James Madison All-Comers Meet 

Eastern Championships 
NCAA Division 1 Championships 




Note: Due to a misunderstanding no scores were received 
for the mens' sports 



183 



-J 



CHEERfuI Faces 



Front (L to R): Jim Skapers, Karen Colmie, Linda Falk, Jason Taule, Ellen Jaffa, Jim 
Blackwell; Back (L to R): Richard Carter, Beth Hobbs, Jennifer Quartana, John 
Kammeir (Capt.), Whitney Monger, f\/latthew Towner, Susan Marfino, Jim Palumbo. 



The Varsity cheerleaders 
started their year in August — 
attending a national cheerlead- 
ing camp. It was there that the 
squad learned new cheers, 
stunts, pyramids, and dances, as 
well as, competing with some 
of the top squads in the nation. 
At the UCA camp, the William 
and Mary cheerleaders re- 
ceived superior and excellent 
ratings. 

When the school year started, 
the Tribe cheerleaders began 
getting used to a time consum- 
ing praaice schedule — at least 
4 hours of squad practice per 
week, and 2 or 3 hours of 
individual and partner practice 
per week. The cheerleaders at- 
tended all football games, in- 
cluding flying out to cheer at 
Penn State and Colgate Univer- 
sity. The cheerleaders also at- 
tended all home basketball 
games and some away games. 

Beside practicing and cheer- 
ing at games, the squad taught 
cheerleading clinics, attended 
fund raising banquets, helped 
in the recruitment of athletes, 
and judged cheerleading 
competitions. 

Due to the time commitment 
and devotion cheerleading re- 
quires, the cheerleaders were 
given Varsity status last year. 
This year ten Varsity letters were 
awarded to those who had 
cheered a minimum of two 
seasons. 

Special recognition deserves 
to go to the two senior mem- 
bers of the squad, Linda Falk 
and Jim Palumbo. This year 
Linda received the Cheerleader 
of the Year Award. 

— Karen Colmie 




■ 'tiK r> 



^2j»/ 



A Whitney Ivlonger and Ellen Jaffe 
watch the homecoming action Photo 
by Liz Radday 




► Different forms of pyramids keep the 
crowd happy. Photo by Mary llda 



Mary lida r^ . v 




airengin ana oaiance is demonstr; 
Hobbs. Photo by Mary lida 



chard Carter and Beth 












^ Matthew Towner looks a little uncomfortable in his tux. Photo by Chris Boget 

< Dance routines to the band's music were a common sight at all sporting events. 
Photo by Liz Radday 



< Chris Boget (#2) and Kevin Bullock 
(#5) make a great block. Photos by 
Gerry Mann 



▼ William and Mary battle viciously 
with the Richmond team. Photo by 
Maryanne Kondrackl 




ATom Clark (#22) blocks an oncoming ball as teammates Chris Coney (#13) and 
Jim Steinman (#9) are set to give any assistance. 



A Men's Volleyball team: Rovi? 1 : Chris Caney. Ben Langmaid, Gerry Mann. Kevin 
Ward; Rov*^ 2; John Derrick, Kevin Bullock. Tom Clark. Donnie Lascara: Rovj 3; Jim 
Steinman, Tony Kramer, Tom Powers, Dave Mann; Row 5: Chris Boget. Mike 
Bailey, Coach Stuart Spirn. 



▼ Gerry Mann patiently waits for a 
chance to show his talent. Photo by 
Chris Boget 



► Sometimes so much shoving and 
pushing is going on in the beginning 
the rugby players forget the ball. PHoto 
by Maryanne Kondracki 




Folly to Volley 



The W&M Men's Rugby club 
could best be described as 
"awesome" after enjoying their 
best regular season in twelve 
years, the club took a 10-2 
record into the prestigious 25th 
Mary Washington Tourney in 
Fredricksburg. No team was 
strong enough to stop the Tribe 
from a complete sweep. Com- 
bine this with the incredible 
success of their Spring Break 
tour in Florida, and the season 
can be looked at as nothing but 
a great year. 

The Ruggers were led this 
year by senior brothers Daeman 
and Mark Butler and the devas- 
tating combination of the 
Brothers Flynn (Steve and Ken). 
Also contributing to the efforts 
of the Tribe this year was Dave 
"the rave" Webster and the 
Calt brothers Nick Huth and 
Ron Weber. It was teamwork 



employed by these ruggers and 
the whole team that led to their 
most inspiring win in years. This 
was a last minute upset of an 
undefeated Navy squad in the 
last game of the season. 

Looking forward to next year, 
coach par excellence Cary Ken- 
nedy has reason to be pleased. 
A Spring Break Carribean tour 
is a real possibility and a tour of 
the British Isles in 1987 a goal to 
shoot for. The fruitful recruiting 
season this spring should also 
contribute to the fall teams 
anticipated winning season. All 
in all, the W&M Men's Rugby 
Club is in terms with the fastest 
growing sport in the civilized 
and uncivilized Western World. 
It is alive and kicking. 

Men's volleyball is on the 
upswing in popularity. Starting 
on the West Coast, it has gradu- 
ally spread fast and picked up 



momentum all the way. W&M 
is no exception, the sport has 
definitely reached a peak here. 
The men's volleyball club has in 
fact arrived. 

Although in existence for six 
years, this was the year the club 
finally hit the big time. It won 
it's first tournament, the Rich- 
mond Invitational, this past Feb- 
ruary. It is a determined collec- 
tion of players who make up 
this team. The squad is not 
recognized as a varsity sport, 
yet the time put into the pro- 
gram is incredible. The season 
started with practice in October 
and ran through April. During 
this time, the team usually prac- 
ticed two nights a week and 
played outside the area three 
times a month. 

The team was split up into 
two squads this year, the Green 
team and the Gold team. This 



was to separate the more ex- 
perienced players from the 
newer ones. By and large it is a 
team where experience does 
not play a large part. Hard work 
and a willingness to learn are 
important. Most of the players 
did not play in high school or 
have any prior experience, yet 
the team was a success. 

The team played USVBA B 
League this season and met 
with success. Fourth year coach 
Stewart Spiru feels this league 
was beneficial to the squads. 
"We weren't dominant, yet we 
were competitive at this level." 
Despite the loss of three starters 
next year, Coach Spirn is opti- 
mistic about his young teams 
prospects for next year. 

— Pat Schembri 



Ribbons Galore. 



Coach David Dye's first full 
year as coach of the W&M 
Riding Club couldn't have gone 
better. The club enjoyed their 
most successful season ever, 
finishing second in the nine 
school Reserve High Point Col- 
lege Region. In addition to this 
accomplishment, 13 riders 
qualified to compete at region- 
als. Carmen Grafton, Gaynor 
Ibbotson, Judy Dickato, and 
Donna Striekler all rode at na- 
tionals in Lexington, Kentucky. 
Gaynor Ibbotson won her divi- 
sion, Intermediate Equitation 
over fences. Gaynor's national 
championship is the first in the 
history of the college. 

In addition, the club hosted a 
horse show. It was so well re- 
ceived that two are planned for 



next year. 

The season usually runs from 
September to April. Shows start 
the first of October after tryout 
selections have been made. 
After that, the club travels 
across Virginia competing at 
Intercollegiate Horse Show As- 
sociation horse shows. In the 
relatively short span of six years, 
the club has gone nowhere but 
up and is now considered one 
of the better collegiate clubs in 
the state. With a national cham- 
pionship to their credit and an 
overall 2nd place team standing 
in their region, coach David 
Dye is looking for big things out 
of next year's group. Hopefully 
a first place finish ahead of 
UVA? Not unrealistic at all. 

— Pat Schembri 





▲ Suzy Kimball talks with trainer 
(coach) David Dye. 



^ President of the riding team, Carmen 
Grafton looks comfortable atop her 
horse. 




▼ Senior Alyse Ravinsky leads her horse to make a successful jump. Photo by 
Maryanne Kondrackl 





e» . I i I L . > - " it 

ai'«rHiirKlSilliaiPVB^ SJ 



A Showing intense concentration on 
her face, Judy Cicatko has her horse 
make a jump. 



A Gaynor Ibbotson seems to take a 
break while still on her horse. 



DIRECTORY: 



Black Student Organization 192 

New Testament Association 192 

Band 194 

College Republicans 194 

Orchesis 196 

Debate Team 198 

Sinfonicron 198 

Biology Club 200 

Queens Guard 200 

Collegiate Management Association 200 

Baptist Student Union 202 

Canterbury Association 202 

Westminster Association 204 

Hillel 204 

Christian Science Organization 204 

Student Association 206 

Alpha Phi Omega 208 

Ultimate Wizards 208 

Intervarsity Fellowship 210 

Circle K 210 

Media 212 







iFfK'tKS 






C^ 





190 




191 



B.S.O., NEW TESTAMENT 



"The one aspect of N.T.S.A. 
that meant the most to me was 
everyone's love for God and 
support for each other," com- 
mented Michelle (Rainbo) Mar- 
tin. Titus 3:5 explains the foun- 
dation for the relationships: 
"He saved us, not because of 
righteous things we had done, 
but because of His mercy." As 
members understood their rela- 
tionships with God, relation- 
ships with each other became 
more meaningful. 

The New Testament Student 
Association is an inter-denomi- 
national group affiliated with 
Williamsburg New Testament 
Church. Many of the students 
in N.T.S.A. participated in the 
life of the church through home 
Bible study/prayer groups. The 
church provided the group a 
means of support and direction. 

Apart from the church, the 



campus group held weekly 
meetings for worship, teaching, 
and fellowship. Through these, 
members began to seek ways to 
share God's love with fellow 
students. Some members led 
dorm Bible studies, and others 
sponsored campus-wide talks. 
Billy Mayo, a former disc jockey 
from Florida, spoke about rock 
music and how he came to 
follow Jesus Christ. Other mem- 
bers learned mime under the 
direction of Amy Welty as a 
means to communicate God's 
love. An Easter sunrise service 
attracted over 250 students, 
faculty, tourists, and community 
members. 

Members found rest in Jesus 
Christ and a knowledge of His 
faithfulness. 

Karen Close 

New Testament members Larette 
Chaney and Marilee Faass have good 
times at a N T S.A spring retreat. 
Ptioto by Andy Cronan 





A member o( the Black Student 
Organization listens intently to the 
speaker at the B.S.O. senior reception 
Photo by M. Kondracki 




192 NEW TESTAMENT 




iEE^f"^ 



BLACK STUDENT ORGANIZATION: Row 1; Monique 
Morton. Rodney Thompson, Laverne Randall, Reneen 
Dewlett Row 2; Ken Barrows, Lawrence Griffith. Jr., 
Sharron (vIcPherson. Tony McNeal, Dan Aldridge, Robyn 
Simmons, Godfrey Simmons. Debbie Wade. Howard 



Brooks, Adrienne Marshall, Ariel Jones. Joan Redd. 
Charlene Jackson, Vanessa Hicks; Row 3: John Bouldin, 
John Smith. Brian Blackwell. Gordon Ward. Kevin 
McNeill. Hiawatha Johnson. Jr Photo by Dan Weber 




Members of the Black Student 
Organization welcome prospective 
freshmen to the A.P.O. open house in 
W&M Hall. Photo by M. NIcollch 




Senior Howard Brooks stands before 
his fellow B.S.O. members at the 
April senior receptjon. 
Photo by M. Kondrackl 




NEW TESTAf\/IENT STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Row 1: 
Alan Gillie, Ohmin Kwon, Rebecca Marsh, Any Cronan; 
Row 2: Tammy Douglas, Margaret Thompson, Marllee 
Faass, Aline Richardson, Karen Close, Larrette Chaney, 
Michelle Martin, Patty Soraghan, Mary Menefee; Row 3: 




Roommates Ohmin Kwan and Scott 
Armistead "hang around" at a New 
Testament spring retreat. A theme of 
the retreat was the power of prayer. 
Photo by Andy Cronan 




Mime actors Amy Welty and Danny 
Michaels act out one of Jesus' 
parables. The mime performance was 
followed by a gospel presentation by 
Pastor Bob Harmon Photo by 
J. Mai.<;to 



B.S.O. 193 



BAND, COLLEGE REPUBLICANS 



Winning elections. That's 
what political organizations try 
to do, and the largest political 
organization on campus was 
quite successful. 

The College Republicans 
started early in the year, sur- 
veying almost every student at 
the College about their views 
on the fall elections. With this 
information, the club helped 
voters get absentee ballots and 
campaign information while 
simultaneously) increasing 
group membership to 700. 
Later, in October, the CR's and 
Shamrock co-sponsored a 
mock election in which every 
Republican candidate won. 

In addition to campus activi- 
ties, the club engaged in out- 
side political activities. Prior to 
the November 6 election , mem- 



bers went door-to-door on I itera- 
ture drops and voter registra- 
tion drives and worked phone 
banks and polls. For the State 
College Republican convention 
in Roanoke. William and Mary 
sent the largest delegation and 
Kevin Gentry, the W & M chair- 
man, was elected state chair- 
man. Over a dozen W & M 
students were chosen to serve 
as delegates to the Virginia 
Republican Party convention. 

Finally, the CR's sponsored 
the "Rites-of-Spring," a party 
for students and area Republi- 
cans. Despite torrential rains, a 
large crowd gathered to witness 
former Governor Mills E. God- 
win receive the Colgate Darden 
Award for Conservation. 

—Bill Hatchett 



Former Virginia Governor Mills 
Godwin addresses a crowd at the 
College Republicans "Rites of Spring,' 
an annual Republican fundraiser. 



Congressman Bill Whitehurst speaks 
to an assembled group of College 
Republicans. Pfioto by Lawrence 
I'Anson 



I I 



Ml 



lliam& Mary Cok^s Republicans 




Laura Martin. William Runnebaum. 
Betfi Loudy. Senator Paul Trible. Kathy 
Patten, Congressman Herb Bateman, 
Kevin Gentry. 

194 COLLEGE REPUBLICANS 



Hands held aloft, a drum major directs 
the marching band during a football 
game. The band was a regular feature 
at home games. 





Give 'em hell. Tribe: An Integral part of 
the Tribe boosters, members of the 
band play the fight song after a 
touchdown. Photo by Mike NIkolich 




The stability of thirty years of 
band direction by Mr. Charles 
Varner was disrupted this year. 
With the retirement of Mr. 
Varner earlier than anticipated, 
a full-time band director could 
not be found. However, John 
Lindberg and former drum 
major Steven Panoff stepped in 
to lead the marching band in its 
football performances. Dennis 
Ziesler, a visiting professor from 
Old Dominion University, 
whipped the band into shape 
to merit a performance at New 
York University, the highlight 
of the year. 

The search for a full-time 
band director culminated in the 
selection of Mr. George Eth- 
eridge, former director at Fort 
Hunt High School. 

— Suzanne Pattee 




CONCERT BAND: Piccolo: Phyllis Goodwin; Flutes: Virginia Ruiz, Susan Lin, 
Randy Low, Beverly Manderville, Susan Easton, Karen Thierfelder, Mary Beth 
Wittekind, Susan Scharf, Colleen Hogan, Kathy McCloud, Marie Damour, 
Jenny Blum, Chris Buckle; Oboes: Andy Newel, Suzanne Pattee; Bassoons; 
Lisa Struthers, Betty Steffens; Clarinets: Monica Taylor, MIchele Heaphy, 
Colleen Cooke, Rachel Edelstein, Brian Kane, Mike Williams, Kathleen 
Wilson. Dan Aldride, Noel Perry, Joyce Burson, David Roberts, Paul Dodge; 
Saxophones: Buddy White, Denise Brogan, Beth Glover, Roger Coomer, 



Willie Nabors, Dan Arents; Cornets: David Brown, Amy Heth, Robert Weaver, 
Tom Zavilla, Kay-Margaret Cronk-West; Trumpets: John Aris, Craig Welsh: 
French Horns: Janet Whaley, Audrey Edwards, Kathy Egan, Dianne Kemp, 
Bob Greiner, Terri Ann Stokes; Trombones: Kenneth Duesing, Daniel 
Gianturco, Michelle Grigg, Dave Davis, John Bouldin, Russell Youmans, Bill 
Woodrull; Euphoniums: Diana Berg, Aldis Lusis: Tubas: Andy Kahl, Eugene 
Aquino; String Bass: Gari Melchers; Percussion: Amy Hartman, Tom 
Neuhauser, Andy Salita, Julie Smith. Photo courtesy of Concert Band 




The trumpet section of the marching 
band practices in the Sunken 
Gardens. 



BAND 195 



Orchesis president Joan Gavaler 
dances to her own choreography in 
"After Hours Dialogue." Gavaler was 
accompanied by Eric Mowatt-Larsen 
on the sax. Photo courtesy of 
Orchesis. 



Orchesis members Rachel Walker, 
Sara Parrott, and Susan Bozorth float 
and turn to the dance "Stages", which 
was designed by Lynne Balliette. The 
performance was part of Orchesis' 
show "An Evening of Dance " Photo 
courtesy of Orchesis 





Director Frank Lendrum leads a choir 
rehearsal The choir practiced every 
Tuesday and Thursday for several 
hours Photo by Dave Fulford. 



Brett Charbeneau, Craig Smith, and 
Jeff Spoeri man the choir's "Family 
Feud" homecoming float. 



4 cfAri 



ORCHESIS: Row 1; Lynn Balliette, 
Kari Pincus, Marna Ashburn, Susan 
Bozorth, Vicki Sorongon: Row 2: 
Joan Gavaler, Julie Woodring, 
Merry Whearty, Janice Capone, 
Linda Fuchs, Stephanie Leyland: 
Row 3: Caroline Hooper, Karia 



Finger, Rachel Walker, Desiree 
DiMauro, Ellen Sullivan, Sara 
Parrott; Row 4: Julie Bonham, 
Suzanne Storer, Caroline Trost 
David Johnston. Heather Douse, 
Karen Elizey. Photo courtesy of 
W& M News 



AN EVENING OF DANCE 

Patlts. - -Croising and loining Winston Choreography: Karen Ulzey 

Choreography Linda fuc/is Dancers; Andrea Lynne Baltiette. loan Gavaler, 

Dancers: Marna Ashburn. lulia Banbam. jenniter Sarbacber. f //en Su//ivan, 

Kan Pincui, lenniter Sarbacber, Vicki Caroline TrosI 

Sorongon, Caroline Iron Lighting Design: Marlba I Mountain 

Lighting Design: C, Kennetb Cole DREAMS 

DARK EXIT Prokofiev Choreography: Sara Parroll 

Choreography: Desiree DiMauro Dancers: Desiree DiMauro. 

Dancers: Andrea Lynne Balliette, Suzanne Heatber Douse, KarIa Finger 

Storer, Racbel Walker Composer/Guitarist: Sharon Clarke 

Lighting Design: Lighting Design: C Kenneth Cole 

Martha I. Mountain ^,^j5 ^^^^^^ 

i Curi OS ity Vangelis Choreography: lulie Woodring 

Choreography: Stephanie Leyland Dancers: Cbriitopher Barrett. 

Dancers: Marna Ashburn. lanice Capone. Alicia Blanchard. Susan Bozorth, Janice 

Heaiher Douse. Kari Pincui, Ellen Sullivan. Capone. loan Gavaler, David fohmton. 

Merry Whearty Merry Whearty 

Lighting Design: C Kennefh Co/e Lighting Design Martha I MourUdin 

STAGES SIX OF A PERFECT SQUARE King Crimson 

Choreography: Choreography: loan Gavaler 

Andrea Lynne Balliette Dancers: Desiree DiMauro. Karen Elizey. KarIa 

Dancers: finger. Linda fuchs. Caroline Hooper, 

Fearless Discovery Stephanie Leyland, lulie Woodring 

Rachel Walker Lighting Design: Martha j Mountain 

Cautious Sensuality ^^^^ ^^^j^^ DIALOGUE 

c » /" f Choreographed and Danced by: 

Self -Assuredness t ,- < 

- p loan Gavaler 

bara rarrott Composer/Saxophonist: 

Com poser/ Performer: t ., ,. , 

, o ^'■"^ Mokvaft-tarrsen 

, , . _ Lighting Design: C, Kenneth Co/e 

Lighting Design: o t. o 

C Kenneth Cole and SPEAKEASY Roberts. Albright, flokom 

Martha I Mountain Clioreography: KarIa Finger and Rachel Walker 

AMVTHfOR ?Z"'^"''"r,. ,. r . 

THIS /V10MENT M.Mork '■'^^"."L X^" 5 T 

and Martha I. Mountain 

ORCHESIS 



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CHOIR, ORCHESIS 




"C'mon you guys! It's gonna 
be so much fun!" With that 
exhortation from social chair- 
man Ed Holt, the choir set 
off for its annual Spring Tour. 
The trip included overnight 
stops in Bowie, MD, Strasburg, 
PA, Sao Harbor, NY, and 
Vienna, VA. The highlight was 
the day and a half spent in New 
York City without performance 
obligation. 

Next to New York City, the 
highlight of the trip was the 
afternoon spent in Intercourse, 
PA. The recent release of "Wit- 
ness" immortalized the phone 
booth used by Harrison Ford at 
Zimmerman's, where half the 



choir had their picture taken. 

On the local level, the choir 
sang for annual functions com- 
memorating the school year. 
These included Parent's Week- 
end, Homecoming Day, Bur- 
gesses Day, and Commence- 
ment. At Homecoming, the 
choir marched proudly behind 
its Family Feud float, which won 
third place. The Christmas con- 
certs, performed four nights in 
December, merrily rang in the 
Yuletide season. Special events 
included an opening picnic at 
Wallermill Park and an end-of- 
the-year banquet cruise on the 
New Spirit in Norfolk. 

— Nancy Hildreth 



Dancers Lynne Balliette, Suzie Storer. 
and Desiree DiMauro perform "Dark 
Exit," choreographed by Desiree 
DiMauro. Photo courtesy of Orchesis 



Choir members J J. Holland, Barbara 
Walters, Barbara Daniels, Kelvin Raid, 
Mike Donahue, and Karen Wilson 
enjoy NYC. 



Caroline Frost, Ellen Sullivan, and 
Lynne Balliette perform "A Myth for 
this Moment," choreographed by 
Karen Ellzeg Photo courtesy of 
Orchesis 

In their concert attire, the choir seniors 
pose in front of Phi Beta Kappa hall 



CHOIR 



Beth Clancey looks on incredulous- 
ly after being offered a rose by 
Bunthorne. played by Brad Staubes. 
Pfioto by W&M News staff 

Cletus Weber of the Debate Team 
makes a point during a practice 
session Photo by Bill Honaker 






DEBATE TEAIWt: Row 1 : Larrette Cheney, Jill 

Pryor. Harry Austin. Laura Dillard; Row 2: 



Scott Ward. Scot Stawski. Cletus Weber, fwlicheile 
Mancini. Photo by Bill Honaker 



"Patience," the popular Gil- 
bert and Sullivan operetta, was 
presented January 24, 25, and 
26 by Sinfonicron. 

The production, run entirely 
by students, marks the 20th 
anniversary of the organization. 
It began in the fall of 1965 under 
the instigation of Bill Hinz. Phi 
Mu Alpha, a musical honorary 
fraternity, was looking for a 
project and decided on a Gil- 
bert and Sullivan revue. The 
idea soon expanded to include 



an entire production of one of 
the Gilbert and Sullivan operas. 
The Delta Omicron women's 
musical fraternity joined Phi Mu 
Alpha, and the name Sinfoni- 
cron was forged from the words 
Sinfonia and Omicron. In busi- 
nesslike fashion, the group sold 
shares in the Sinfonicron Light 
Opera Company and priced 
them at $5 each. 

Sinfonicron is recognized by 
the original chapter of Phi Mu 
Alpha and is the only organiza- 



tion of its kind in the country. 
Sinfonicron is alight opera com- 
pany, not limited to Gilbert and 
Sullivan, although they are the 
favorites. 

Elizabeth Clancy had the title 
role for "Patience," and other 
principal cast members in- 
cluded Brad Staubes, Mark 
Aldrich, and Elizabeth Moliter. 
The director was Zoe Trollope. 

— reprinted with permission 
from the W&M News 




198 SINFONICRON 



DEBATE TEAM, SINFONICRON 




"Resolved: that the 80's as a 
decade can be summed up in 

three words: , , 

" An unruly crowd 



packed Late-Night Wig to find 
out how the visiting debaters 
from Princeton would choose 
to fill in those blanks. Inspired 
by their most famous classmate, 
they chose "Brooke E. Shields." 
"Brooke represents the domi- 
nant trends of the 80's," the first 
speaker began. "She represents 
a return of students to conserva- 
tive values. She's a virgin, and 
she still listens to her mother." 
Debate Council President Jill 
Pryor and Vice President Harry 
Austin laid Princeton's sophistry 
to rest by a final audience vote 

Members of Sinfonicron rehearse a 

production. 

Civilized debate degenerates to 

physical combat. Debate council 

members Harry Austin and Jill Pryor 

settle a dispute by arm wrestling. 




of 49-43, a vote made closer by 
chairman Scott Ward's promise 
that in case of a tie, the debate 
would be decided by a bout of 
mud-wrestling. . . 

The Debate Council was most 
known, however, for its series 
of serious public debates, and 
as the sponsor of the popular 
clash between the officers of 
the College Republicans and 
the Young Democrats on the 
issue of Reagan's reelection. 

William and Mary was also 
represented on the intercol- 
legiate level by two competitive 
debate teams who turned in con- 
sistently fine performances this 
year. The NDT team, coached 
by Cathy Hennan, attended 
eleven tournaments and 
brought home a total of 19 
first-through tenth-place speak- 
er awards. Highlights included 
reaching semifinals in both 
novice and junior varsity at 
jMU, winning the jr. division of 
the DSR-TKA Region III Tour- 
ney, and placing a novice team 
in semifinals at WVU. The team 
qualified for quarterfinals in 
three varsity tournaments, and 
the varsity team of Rob Johnson 
and Andrea Pierce finished the 
season as fourth alternate to 
the 1985 National Debate 
Tournament. 

The CEDA team, coached by 
Patrick Micken, also attended 
11 tournaments. For starters, 
Andy Shilling and Scott Stawski 
won UNC-Wilmington,and Lar- 
rette Chaney and Jon Wilson 
won the U. of Richmond Tourna- 
ment, in addition to teams 
making finals at the U. of S. 
Carolina, placing third overall 
at Shippensburg, PA, and quali- 
fying for semis at Richmond. 
The CEDA squad achieved an 
additional four quarterfinaiist 
spots, plus four first- through 
sixth-place individual speaker 
awards. 

—Jill Pryor 



DEBATE TEAM 199 



Emory Intercollegiate Business games 
participants: Row 1: E. Lewis. 
A. Detterer. A. Thompson. S. Gill. 
P. Stratta; Row 2: M. Barnes. T. Norris. 
T. Koontz, S. MacGregor, L Bell. 
C. Webber, Prot. Jesse Tarlefon. 



Bearing the flags of the United States 
and Great Britain, the Queen's Guard 
rounds a corner in one of its uniformed 
practices. Photo by M. Nikolich 




Dr. Brooks and Heather Fabry share a 
joke and a beer at the Biology Club 
student-faculty get-together. Photo by 
B. Honaker 

Ready to March, the captain of the 
Queen's Guard inspects the as- 
sembled troops before giving the order 
to proceed. Photo by M. Nikolich 

"The Collegiate Manage- 
ment Association is a maturing 
three-year old organization that 
has doubled its membership 
and participation every year," 
explained CMA president Paul 
Stratta. 

The CMA had a busy year 
organizing workshops, speak- 
ers and parties for its members. 
The year opened with a Lake 
Matoka faculty-student picnic. 
Throughout the year, the group 
hosted speakers from Proctor 
and Gamble, Xerox, Arthur 
Anderson and Co. Consulting, 
and Miller Brewery. A major 
workshop topic was writing 
resumes, an important skill 
needed by all students. One of 
the highlights of the year was 
the annual student-faculty 
Dean's reception, which en- 
abled business school students 
to develop more informal rela- 
tionships with the business 
school faculty. 

— Renee Morgan 





BIOLOGY CLUB: Vicki IVIoore. Debra Turner, Tom Chin, Susan Scharpf, Waller Thompson. Claudia fvlader. Karen 
Weiler Photo by Alison Krufka 



BIOLOGY CLUB, QUEENS GUARD, COLLEGIATE MANAGEMENT 




The Clayton-Grimes Biology 
Club plans activities which ap- 
peal to the "outdoorsy" mem- 
bers as well as to the "pre- 
meds". The emphasis this year 
fell upon showing what the 
department had to offer to its 
students. Biology professors 
were invited to speak about 
their research and activities in- 
cluding their trips to the Na- 
tional Parks of Southern Utah 
and to Siberia. Headed by club 
sponsor Dr. Gus Hall, a back- 
packing trip for students and 
facultv headed for Virginia's 



mountains during the fall se- 
mester. The club sponsored a 
group's attendance to a cancer- 
research seminar at Eastern 
Virginia Medical School in Nor- 
folk. In order to show prospec- 
tive biology majors the re- 
sources available to them and 
the possibilities for future ca- 
reers, current research students 
and Career Planning's Stan 
Brown were invited to speak. 
Speakers from the community 
included a plastic surgeon dis- 
cussing the history of immu- 
nologv and a representative of 



Norfolk's hydroponic "Food 
Factory". The Biology Club 
sponsored its annual events 
such as the Halloween showing 
of "The Autopsy Film" and the 
spring plant sale. These fund- 
raising activities support the 
Mary Ferguson Research Grants 
presented each spring to help 
fund projects of students doing 
research within the depart- 
ment. Happy Hours allowed 
students and faculty members 
to meet and talk in an informal 
atmosphere. 

— Susan Scharp 




COLLEGIATE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION: Row 1: Phil Temo, Sue Cass. 
Amy Martsolf, Valerie Jacobson, Scott Craig, Monte Koch; Row 2: Debbie 
Perry, Julie Miller, Angela Campbell. Cathy Walsh, Maureen Dubus, Dave 



Maxwell, Jennifer Gross; Row 3: Mona Zuch, Paul Stratta, Marcia 
Youngblood. Brandon Owen, Kim Ferris, Kevin Clark, Jason Taul. Sean 
Prosser, Will Lanier, John Darke, Mary Ida, Laura Fanning. Photo by D. Weber 





The Queen's Guard kneels in 
formation. The Guard performed at 
Burgesses Day. Homecoming, the 
Sunset Ceremony, and the Christmas 
Parade. Photo by M. Nikoiich 

Senior Claudia Mader peeps through 
a tangle of cactus in the Millington 
attic greenhouse at a Biology Club 
meeting. Photo by B. Honaker 



BIO CLUB. QUEENS GUARD 201 



BSU, WESLEY, CANTERBURY 



"This group sure can eat," 
commented Elizabeth Camp- 
bell of the Wesley Foundation. 
Every Sunday evening, the 
group members devoured a 
fellowship supper prepared by 
a fellow member. Some meals 
were extraordinary, such as a 
Christmas banquet of turkey 
and all the trimmings. After 
every Sunday dinner, various 
important student issues were 
addressed. Examples of topics 
covered include "suicide on 
campus," "women in the 
ministry," "student alcohol- 
ism," and "the passion narra- 
tive in Mark's Gospel." 

In addition to the regular 
Sunday evening fellowship sup- 
pers and programs, the group 
conducted a square dance and 
went to Big Meadows for a 
weekend of hiking. The year 
ended with a senior banquet at 
the Surrey House. 

— Braxton Allport 

Although the Baptist Student 
Union was sponsored by the 
Southern Baptist Convention, 
its members represented a vast 
array of denominations — Prot- 
estant and Catholic. Since mem- 
bership totaled somewhere 
near one hundred, the entire 
group was broken into Family 
Groups. Each group met weekly 
to discuss the Bible, Christian 
doctrine, current issues, and 
what they had for dinner that 
night. The BSU as a whole met 
together on Sunday nights at 
5:00 for a 25c dinner and a 6:00 
weekly program. The organiza- 
tion sponsored a handbell 
choir, a drama group, and a 
vocal choir which performed 
on-campus and for area 
churches. Other groups in- 
volved themselves in com- 
munity missions, such as visiting 
the Pines Nursing Home and 
building or repairing homes. 
The BSU was a strong support 
group where Christians could 
grow in their understanding of 
the love made possible by Jesus 
Christ. 

BSU social chairman Diahann Mears 
dances with her date while others mill 
around at the Baptist Student Union's 
spring formal. Photo by B. Honaker 



202 B.S.U., WESLEY 




BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Row 1: Tom Douglas, Robin 
Craig, Lydia Bailey, Steve Flowers, Toni Chaos, Allison 
Stnnger, Janet Stotts, Bart Lacks. Mark Koshmeder, Jetf 
Doyon, Tom Summerville; Row 2: Laura Ingram, Gay Irey, 
Janet Stotts, Wanda Graybeal, Gari Melchers, Julie Lopp, 
Cindy Bray, Revonda Bowers, Ted Taylor, Row 3: Lori 
Blankenship, Charlie Christian, Alex Martin, Janet 



Whaley, Joel Collien: Row 4: Laura Belcher, John 
Monhollon, Rebecca Gendron, Scott Ward. Kirby Knight 
Russ Andrews, Row 5: Tim Davis, Tom West, Leah 
Bennett, Angle Cakes, Carolyn Baker, Paul Berkley, 
Melinda Bond, Dianna Roberts, Martha Newton, Ramona 
Baliles, Steve Dunn, Jeanette Parker, Pete Parks, 
Cheryl Keenan. 





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Richard Ambler and Andy Salita lam to 
the tunes at the BSU's spring formal. 
Photo by Bill Honaker 




WESLEY FOUNDATION; Diane Roberson. Jon Graft 
Camilla Jimmy Whitney. Carol Rich. Kent Diduch, 



Braxton Allport, Tanya Trescott Grace Aquino. Lorac 
Hintz. Susan Millon. Elizabeth Campbell. 



The Canterbury Association 
offered inany activities to the 
campus community. Weekly 
liturgies brought students to- 
gether for prayer and fellow- 
ship. The Canterbury Choir, 
which led Sunday Evensong at 
Bruton Parish Church, attracted 
students w^ho enjoy singing. 
Retreats presented opportuni- 
ties for fellowship with students 
from other colleges. A Home- 



coming weekend brunch aideci 
two former Canterburians. John 
Rebstock and Joe Sanlei, cur- 
rently missionaries in Honduras. 
The offering from the weekly 
Holy Eucharist was used to 
support Carlos, a Guatemalen 
teenager, through the Christian 
Children's Fund. 

Through a covenant with the 
Catholic Student Association, 
Canterbury worked to promote 



awareness of then telalionship 
as sister branches of the Church. 
The most visible result of this 
covenant was the Covenant 
Players company which pro- 
duced plays with a religious 
theme or message, including 
Clark Gesner's "You're a Good 
Man. Charlie Brown" Novem- 
ber 1-11. 

— James Pratt 



CANTERBURY 203 



WESTMINSTER, HILLEL, C.S.O. 



"Westfel has given me a 
home away from campus; 
something besides a dorm. It's 
been a lot of fun," commented 
Amy Bell, co-president of West- 
minster Fellowship. 

Westminster centered on 
friendship and Christian fellow- 
ship. The year commenced with 
an ice cream social for incoming 
freshmen and transfer students. 
These newcomers were also 
welcomed into the homes of 
members of the Presbyterian 
Church through the "adopt-a- 
student" program. Weekly 
meetings featured interesting 
speakers thought-provoking 
films, and rousing games of 
Jammaquacks. 

Throughout the year, group 
members helped in service 
projects for the college and 
community. The highlight for 
the year was a spring retreat to 
Nag's Head with the Lutheran 
Student Association. 

— Brent Armistead 



Junior Steve Lewis as his companions 
eat the Passover meal. Photo by Dan 
Weber 









WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Row; 1: Leigh McDaniel, Karen Branham, Ashley Dryden. Noel Perry: Row 2: Susan 
Walker, Marg Harrison, Heather Sanderson, Jennifer King. Jennifer Tanner; Row 3: Bob Pontz, Amy Bell. Katherine 
Owen, Cathy Patterson; Row 4: Jim McCleskey, Brian Shull, Susan Maybury, Eileen Scheihter, Dave Hillon, Susan 
Maynard. Photo by Dan Weber 





Lisa Woodbury, Kelly Kutzer and 
Patricia Gibbs greet Mrs. Jean 
Hebenstreit, who gave the main C.S.O. 
lecture of the year. Photo by Brent 
Armistead 

Hillel was an active, growing 
religious organization which 
provided social and religious 
events and services for Jewish 
students on campus. Some of 
the activities in which Hillel 
participated included bagel 
brunches, Shabbat dinners, and 
pizza outings. Members were 
also involved in intramural 
sports, charity work for Jewish 
members of the community, 
and a lecture series dealing with 
such topics as "Who is a Jew?" 
and "Judaism and Intermar- 
riage." The Passover seder was 
the highlight of the year, with 
many students enjoying the 
traditional Hagada reading and 
customary Jewish foods. 

— Julie Janson 




v4f 




Professor Robert Scholnick recites the 
traditional story of the Passover and 
exodus of the children of Israel from 
the land of Egypt. Photo by Dan Weber 





Jim McCleskey and Brian Shull roast 
weenies at the Westminster spring 
picnic at Waliermill Park. Photo by M. 
Kondracki 




C.S.O.: Row 1: Kelly Kutzer, Lisa Woodbury, Lois Hornsby; Row 2: Robert 
Hornsby, Jean Hetjenstreit, Patricia Gibbs. Photo by Brent Armistead 





Junior Karen Branham and friend chat 
after a fun-filled day at the West- 
minster spring picnic. Photo by 
M. Kondracki 

Professor Scholnick and friends eat 
the Passover dinner at the Hillel- 
sponsored Seder celebration Photo 
by Dan Weber 



"The Christian Works of 
Christian Science," a lecture 
given by Jean S. Hebenstreit, 
was the main event sponsored 
by the Christian Science Or- 
ganization. The lecture, to the 
college community, clearly 
summed up the concepts dis- 
cussed at weekly C.S.O. meet- 
ings. These meetings, prepared 
by student members, were 
based on readings from the 
Bible and Mary Baker Eddy's 
Science and Health with Key to 
Scriptures. After the readings, 
members shared thoughts on 
testimonies of healing. 

The club shared a close rela- 
tionship with its Williamsburg 
Church. Church members wel- 
comed students into their 
homes for dinner and main- 
tained a reading room on 
Boundary Street for studying. 
— Lisa Woodbury 



205 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



The Student Association, Wil- 
liam and Mary'sstudent govern- 
ment, had a busy and produc- 
tive '84-85 year. The SA, under 
the leadership of SA President 
Lee Ann Bush, the Executive 
Council, and the Student As- 
sociation Council, successfully 
implemented a number of stu- 
dent programs and activities. 
Through liaisons to the College 
Board of Visitors and the Vir- 
ginia General Assembly, the SA 
also voiced student concerns. 



Most students encountered 
the SA through its many service 
programs: the Bookfair, refrig- 
erator rentals, bike auction, and 
airport and concert shuttles. 
Perhaps the greatest improve- 
ment has been with the film 
series. While it had many ups 
and downs through the year, 
the purchase of new projectors 
and a new sound system prom- 
ise that next year's Film Series 
will be better than ever. 

Social events included a very 



successful Beginning of Classes 
Mixer, Band Nights at Trinkle 
and the Ballroom, the Home- 
coming Dance, and the Skip 
Castro Mixer. The Speaker 
Series presented G. Gordon 
Liddy, an Abbie Hoffman/Jerry 
Rubin debate, and Michael 
Morgenstern, author of A Re- 
turn to Romance. Perhaps the 
Student Association's greatest 
achievement was the opening 
of the Tutorial Center in Land- 
rum basement. 





A Ariel Jones, flanked by Brian 
Poftenburger and Diane Kemp, speaks 
up at an SAC meeting. Miss Jones had 
the difficult |ob of overseeing the 
problem-plaqued film series. Photo 
courtesy of SA 

► Student Association President Lee 
Ann Bush makes a point as Steve 
Furman looks on and Shawn Meyers 
takes notes. Photo courtesy of SA 




206 STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



SAC reps Dave Mallory, Elisha 

Brownfleld, Mary Jo Door, Heidi Carr. 
Chris Payne, and Mike Herman plan 
events in the SA office in the Campus 
Center basement. Photo courtesy of 
SA 

Student Association Council chairman 
Jim Fahey poses for a picture. Photo 
courtesy of SA 




SAC Reps Kevin Kelly and Lisa Price 
hug after a long meeting. The SAC met 
weekly for long meetings. 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 207 



APO, WIZARDS 



"There are a lot of people 
out there who need help," com- 
mented Dwayne Therriault of 
APO. "It's nice being able to 
meet that need." 

Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed 
service fraternity, engaged in 
an enormous number of proj- 
ects throughout the year. The 
year started with a twenty-four 
hour ping-pong-a-thon to raise 
money for Jerry's kids. Mem- 
bers also road-tripped to Camp 
Chickahominy to help the Boy 
Scouts build a dock. A similar 
project with the Girl Scouts 
involved putting up thirty-five 
platform tents. At the APO 
blood drive, 128 pints of blood 
were donated. The club also 



painted murals at Eastern State 
and played Bingo at the Pines 
Convalescent Center. 

The membership of APO has 
balooned over the last two 
years. Each semester, almost 
forty people pledged, making 
APO the largest Greek organi- 
zation on campus. In spite of 
it's large size, APO's members 
still emphasize individual 
friendships. "I like helping 
people and meeting people," 
added Dwayne Therriault, 
"APO is good for both." 

— Sharon McEliwee 

A student gives a piggyback ride 
to an ecstatic area youngster at 
Green and Gold Christmas. Photo by 
M. Kondracki 





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ALPHA PHI OMEGA; Row 1: Jim Brubaker, Christy Jarvis, Cathy Easter. 
Debbie Banas. Rita Reinsel. Allyson Brown. Cherry Brown, Chris Meilly, Joan 
Doerfiinger; Row 2: Cathy Moon, Polly Gladding, Diana Street, Patty 
Anderson, Sharon Doherly, Carolyn Bond: Row 3: Jenny Phillips, Phil Tremo, 
Jeff Savino, Susan Maynard, Sandra Parham, Theresa Whelan, Dwayne 
Therriault. Kevin Cullather, Paul Braier. Grace Lee, Uri Arkin, Rick Larrick, 
Tom Zavilla: Row 4: Cindy Paolillo, Denise Kruelle, Lee McCraw, Ray Thomas, 
Linda Weber. LaVonne Burger, Meredith Wilcox, Lisa Rice; Row 5: Sherry 
Dunn, David Gallagher, Pat Walker, Mark Koschmeder, Lorac Hintz, Patty 



Elliott. Regina Gough, Mary Pettitt, Steve Culberson, Joyce Burson, Grant 
Sackin, Jo Raffaele, Anja Bergman, Scott Armistead, Linda Kirby. Dan 
Aldridge. Cara McCarthy. David Benton. Andrew Brandt Jeff Palmer, Mike 
Dailey, Brian Kane. Mark McMahon; Row 6: Janet Stotts, Jimmy Young. Jim 
Erskine, Jenny Brock, Annette Kearns, Sue Howe, Jackie Boston, Tim 
Gribben, Dorothy Davidson. Doug Updegrove, Lisa Ingrassia, David Callahan. 
Kendal-Leigh O'Rourke. Debbie Glasgow. Mariellen Soltys, Nathan Ellis. 
Jimmy Whitney, Lori Anderson, Melissa Connor. Kim Scata. 
Photo by M. Kondracki 



APO members Tim Davis, Margaret 
Halstead. and others register a 
prospective freshman for W & M open 
house. APO provided much of the 
manpower needed to carry off open 
house. Photo by M. Nikolich 



208 APO 





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ULTIMATE WIZARDS: Row 1 : Rusty Bergener, Patrick 
O'Day, Charlie Stirk, Eric Mason; Row 2: Mike Brady. 



Jimmy Graphery. Wayne Collins. Rooster Branch. D.J.. 
Marco Odiago. Photo by M. Kondracki 




The Wizards, W&M's Frisbee 
Disc Club, have been at the 
College since 1979. Although 
they engaged in a variety of 
disc events such as freestyle 
and disc golf, their focus was 
Ultimate Frisbee, a non-contact 
team sport in which seven play- 
ers cooperate to advance the 
disc down the field. The rules 
of the game focus upon sports- 
manship and individualistic 
play, and the game is self- 
officiated. 

Activities included four 
major tournaments, several in- 
formal games, with local clubs, 
and a skills and freestyle 
demonstration at halftime of a 
W&M basketball game. The 
group also conducted a similar 
demo at York Academy, a pri- 
vate high school in the area. 
Wizards have been among the 
members of the International 
Frisbee Association demo team 
"Disc Conception," and several 
were chosen as instructors at 
the National Frisbee Festival in 
Washington. Also their team 
Frisbee was selected as one of 
the top club disc designs in the 
country. 

— Mike Branch 

Team members of the Wizards (right) 
and their opponents huddle to rest and 
plot strategy before beginning a game 
of Ultimate Frisbee. Photo by 
M Kondracki 




Under guard by an adversary. D J. ot 
the Ultimate Wizards hesitates on 
where to throw the frisbee next. Photo 
by M. Kondracki 



An APO member puts up decorations 
for the Green and Gold Christmas 
celebration A collection of presents 
given by William and Mary students 
were distributed by Santa to area 
youngsters. Photo by M. Kondracki 



Break Dance! Inter-Varsity member 
Mike Moses break dances while 
Bobby Booze and Lowe Bibby look on. 
Photo bv Dan Weber 



John Meyers leads singing at an Inter- 
Varsity chapter meeting. Each meeting 
included worship by way of singing 
and prayer, as well as teaching from 
the Bible. Photo by Brent Armistead 

A Circle K volunteer reads stories to an 
area youngster as part of the WATS 
program. Preschoolers were taught 
basic ABC's, counting, shapes, and 
colors. Photo by Bill Honaker 




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"We have seven standing 
projects which run throughout 
the school year," explained 
Ted Shin, president of Circle K. 
Indeed, club members served 
the community with activities 
ranging from tutoring middle 
school children to walking 
dogs, and promoting the wear- 
ing of seat belts. 

Most Circle K activities were 
aimed at helping people in the 
community. An individual tutor- 
ing program paired William and 
Mary students with students 
from James Blair Middle School 
for weekly help sessions. A 
similar program at Norge Pri- 
mary School carried the added 
excitement and responsibility 
of actually teaching in the class- 
room. The WATS program, 
which was run entirely by Cir- 
cle K had volunteers teaching 
three and four year-olds the 
basic ABC's, numbers and col- 
ors.- On Saturdays, Circle K 
members took underprivi- 
ledged children to museums, 



parks, skating rinks and other 
fun places in Williamsburg. 

On the other end of the age 
spectrum, senior citizens at the 
Pines Convalescent Center en- 
joyed weekly visits from Circle 
K helpers. Visits consisted of 
just a chat or a drive often with 
a shopping spree or stop for 
lunch. Finally, volunteers stop- 
ped by the SPCA every week- 
day to walk the dogs. "I think 
we all share common goals for 
serving the community," com- 
mented Ted Shin. "It takes a 
special kind of person to be a 
Circle Ker." 
— Brent Armistead 

Senior Roger Emory stoops to pet a 
dog from the SPCA that he is taking for 
a walk. Different Circle K members 
went out to walk the dogs for an hour a 
day, five days a week. Photo by Dan 
Weber 




210 CIRCLE K 



INTER-VARSITY, CIRCLE K 



The schedule was a full one 
for Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- 
ship. Weekly, the entire chapter 
gathered to hear outside speak- 
ers address topics such as "The 
Holiness of God" and "Evangel- 
ism — what is the Message?" 
During the week, members met 
in dorms throughout the cam- 
pus to study scripture and, 
hopefully, to reach out in some 
way. Two groups prayed to- 
gether daily, one weekly, and 
one monthly in a three-hour 
extravaganza. The year's activi- 
ties were capped off by several 
dances, parties, picnics, and 
retreats. 

Beneath these activities, how- 



ever, lay people earnestly seek- 
ing to know and follow jesus 
Christ. At the prayer meetings, 
individuals came to Cod in 
repentance for their sins and 
prayed for different peoples of 
the world to accept the Gospel. 
Beneath Bible studies were 
friends getting together to pray 
as well as to share good times. 
Finally, underlying chapter 
meetings were members trying 
to study the Scriptures and ap- 
ply them to their own lives. 
Commented Scott Armistead, 
"In Inter-Varsity, I've found a 
home with like-minded people 
who want to follow Christ." 

— Brent Armistead 



Inter- Varsity members jam to 
Jamaican tunes at the Spring "Love 
3oat" party. Photo by Dan Weber 




INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Row 1 : Brent Armistead, Julie Janson, Beth Ballenger. Claire Wills, Karen 
Branham, Kathy Misleh, Steve Hall; Row 2: Tim McEvoy, Ashley Dryden. Heather Sanderson. Nancy Killien, Michelle 
Martin, Jennie Cornish. Marilee Faass, Lauri Hinton. Anita Van Timmeren; Row 3: Beth Shapiro. Cindy Bray, Joanne 
Coppola, John Dennis, Susan Walker, Tricia Geralds. Laura Beth Wilson. Brian Wilson, Landon Taylor; Row 4: Cas Stroik, 
Cary Fishburne. Phil Protz, Richard Carter, Tom Inslee. Lisa Fann, Tony Newman. John Wack, John Tomko, Suzy Duff; 
Row 5: Kathy Dunnington, Debbie Blackistone, Debbie Givan. Caria Johnson; Row 6: John Wilson. David Chauncey. Eva 
Lopdrup. Jeff Dodd, Scott Armistead, Brent Nelson. Jim Miller Row 7: Angle Encinias. Jen Hovde. John Meyers. Michele 
Golembiewski. Rochelle Harris. Bobby Booze. Chad Gunnoe, Bruce Whitehurst Photo by Dan Weber 



Richard Bridges spins away from 
Michele Golembiewski at the "Love 
Boat" party of Inter-Varsity Christian 
Fellowship. Photo by Dan Weber 



INTER-VARSITY 211 



MEDIA: FLAT HAT JUMP. 




FLAT HAT: A YEAR TO REMEMBER 



Reflecting upon his work with The Flat 
Hat. Chuck Wall, Sports Editor, said. "I 
gained a lot of friends and a sense of 
accomplishment ... I realized many times 
that if it has to be done, then somehow it 
can be done." 

And done it was — for that matter, done 
extremely well week after week. The Flat 
Hat staff worked together to meet dead- 
lines and often did without sleep so that 
the paper would reach dorm doorsteps 
every Friday afternoon. 

Joe Barrett, production manager, said, 
"there's something about being up in the 
morning on a Thursday night. We walked 
home when crazy early risers were just 
getting up. Greg, the editor, always looked 
green. It made you think." 

The Flat Hat's quality was so fine this 
year that the paper was named the best 
weekly student newspaper by the Society 
of Collegiate Journalists (SCJ) a national 
journalism honor society, and received 
eighteen awards, more than any other 
paper, in the Virginia Collegiate Press 
Association Contest. 



Bill O'Brien, newspaper judge in the 
SCJ contest and an editorial writer for The 
Rochester Chronicle, said, "The Flat Hat 
by far showed the most diversity. Its 
weekly job of seeming fresh is done well. 
That, mixed with a consistent blend of 
analysis pieces, thoughtful both at the 
campus and national levels, made reading 
it my pleasure." 

Flat Hat editor-in-chief Greg Schneider 
attributed a large part of the paper's 
success to managing editor Norman John- 
son's advocacy of the idea of moving from 
a tabloid to a full-size format. 

"The changes made The Flat Hat look 
more like a real newspaper, not just a 
slapped-together weekly," Wall said. 

Barrett said, "I think seeing The Flat Hat 
looking like a real paper for the first time 
inspired the staff. It made us take our- 
selves a little more seriously." 

Looking back on her year as news 
editor, Katherine Leupold said emphati- 
cally, "The most important thing about 
The Flat Hat this year was the staff. Each 
person did his best, and we all pulled 



together to put out The Flat Hat every 
week." 

Leupold added, "The friends I made 
were the best thing I gained this year. So 
many of us probably never would have 
met without The Flat Hat. We became 
good friends while working together — 
inside and outside the office." 

'The Flat Hat this year has been a true 
group effort. The staff has worked togeth- 
er better and at a consistently higher level 
than any other... I've been associated 
with,' Schneider said. 

To the 84-85 Flat Hat staff— Hats off for a 
job well done. 

— Susan Winiecki 



212 



WCWM, W&M REVIEW, Colonial Echo 




< Joe Barrett, editor of the 1984-85 Jump!, succeeded Greg Schneider as editor of the Flat 
Hat in February. Here, Barrett and Schneider discuss a decision to be made about an issue 
of the award winning newspaper. 

< < Long and odd hours went into the production of the Flat Hat A staffer works against the 
ever-present deadline. 

<■<■* Sara Trexler was selected in February to be WCWM's station manager for 1985-86. 
WCWM's move from PBK was originally scheduled to occur fall semester; because of 
complications, it has been delayed indefinitely. 



/ 




< Ann Salisbury, index editor for the Colonial Echo 
worked after exams to get her job done. 

< Photographer and F/a(Hafphoto editor Rodney 
Willet covers the Tribe vs. U of R basketball game. 



213 



MEDIA cont. 



► Because the Echo included both graduation and 
Beach Week, photographers were needed to work 
after school was out. Alison Krufka chose to go 
home to her darkroom In New Jersey to finish up 
the Beach Week photos. Thanks, Alison! 

► ► Laura Belcher, Echo Greeks editor, also went 
home to New Jersey to finish her section. Working 
on layouts was no fun when friends were out in the 
sun. Thanks, Laura! 

► (opposite page) Mike Nikolich. the Echo's chief 
photographer, stayed in hot and humid 
Williamsburg for two weeks after everyone had left, 
to finish all of the unfinished photography business. 
Although conditions in the campus center 
basement were not the best, with ram coming in 
through the windows, beer getting warm in the 
fridge and editors trying to kill each other with a 
bouncing clown, fwlike endured all and kept 

sane by singing to himself (very loudly) in the 
darkroom. Thanks for the entertainment Mike! 



William and Mary Review 






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214 



▲ Because the W&M Review switched to a new 
publishing schedule this year, only one issue was 
printed for the 1984-85 academic year. 
Submissions collected in the spring of '83 will be 



published in the fall of '86. The new schedule 
provided the Review staff more time to solicit and to 
select material 





Sump! 



the undergraduate 
feature magazine 






WVf#W'»'S'<^ — 




A JUMP' has faced an uncertain future since its 
inception JUMP! has not been able to produce as 
many issues as originally planned, but JUMP' staff 



members bought some more time by convincing a 
reluctant Pub Council to fund the magazine under a 
probationary status. Despite its difficulties, JUMP'S 



"Fashionably l^te" and "Life Somewhere Under the 
Rainbow" issues were well received by the college 
community 



DIRECTORY: 

Introduction 218 

Alpha Chi Omega 220 

Chi Omega 222 

Delta Delta Delta 224 

Delta Gamma 226 

Delta Sigma Theta 228 

Gamma Phi Beta 230 

Kappa Alpha Theta 232 

Kappa Delta 234 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 236 

Phi Mu 238 

Pi Beta Phi 240 

Kappa Alpha 242 

Kappa Sigma 244 

Lambda Chi Alpha 246 

Pi Kappa Alpha 248 

Pi Lambda Phi 250 

Psi Upsilon 252 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 254 

Sigma Chi 256 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 258 

Sigma Nu 260 

Theta Delta Chi 262 










p»l 




216 




217 




► ► A partial hall reunion from DuPont 
First East (84-85) including: Aimee 
Bellaria, Donna Ozolins, Jennifer 
Parker. Samantha Drennen, Lynda 
Brown. Laura Belcher, Lisa Hall, Alison 
Krufka, Debbie Zanfagna, Sarah 
Andrews, Jeanne Kelly, Chele Taylor, 
Becky Brawley, Deanne Buschmeyer, 
and Caria Thomas at Derby Day. 

► Pika Tom Simpson shares some 
refreshments with friends Donna 
DeSavlniers and Gregg Crump at a 
football game. 

^ The Senior ISC Dance allows all 
senior sorority women to mix at a dance 
Here two couples enjoy the company of 
their friends and their drinks. 




218 



Greeks: a Cyclical Tradition 



Picture this: you were an 
entering freshman in 1923 want- 
ing to join one of the Greek 
organizations on campus. The 
student body consisted of 
about 500 people, so your 
choice was limited to five sorori- 
ties and ten fraternities. Rather 
than registering for a formal 
rush you went to informal par- 
ties throughout the year, most 
of which were at the beginning 
of the fall quarter. The present 
Alumni House served as a frater- 
nity house, as did houses on 
Jamestown and Richmond 
Roads. According to Nancy 
Bozarth, a 1926 graduate and a 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, sorori- 
ties did not have housing and 
therefore had to meet "in 
town." Fraternities and the col- 



lege itself provided dances. 
Sororities did not have pledge 
dances. Rather than having keg 
parties, they had get-togethers 
with sandwiches and cookies. 
Student leaders were predomi- 
nantly Greek, according to Mrs. 
Bozarth, for Greeks were "the 
pick of the crop." Being a Greek 
may have also helped a wom- 
an's dating prospects because 
"boys liked the girls who wore 
the little badges." Despite the 
competition among the Greek 
organizations, however, there 
was no serious rivalry; different 
groups had activities together 
and remained friends. 

Mary Tessman, a 1934 gradu- 
ate, said that when she entered 
William and Mary it was pos- 
sible to join a fraternity or a 



sorority as an upperclassman, 
but it was difficult to get in after 
freshman year. A student did 
not just go to all the houses, but 
had to be specifically invited to 
their parties. By 1934 the num- 
ber of sororities had grown to 
nine, and the number of fra- 
ternities to eleven. Most Greek 
organizations were founded 
locally under a different name, 
then affiliated with a national 
fraternity or sorority. One rule 
which affected the social life of 
Greeks and non-Greeks alike 
according to Mrs. Tessman was 
that women had to be in their 
dorms by 10:00, whereas men 
had no curfew. This discrep- 
ancy may be one of the reasons 
why "girls said fraternity guys 
got drunk," but this opinion 



may not have changed with the 
times. 

When Dean of Students, 
Samuel W. Sadler, a Pi Lambda 
Phi and a 1964 graduate, was in 
college "virtually all social activ- 
ity focused on the Greeks," 
who comprised approximately 
two-thirds of the campus, and if 
anything, there was "prejudice 
towards the independents." 
The fraternities were in the 
lodges, and the sororities had 
long been in sorority court. 
Rush was then formal and took 
place during mid-year for both 
fraternities and sororities. Since 
the college had grown too big 
to provide weekly dances, the 
more formal fraternity and 
pledge dances had evolved. 
Because of the combined ef- 




219 



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ARow 1: Christine Gergley. Betty Moore, Laura Avis, Kim Moosha, Margie 
Johnson, Allison Stringer, Ann Matson, Mary St. George, Jennifer Aleantara, 
Sharon Phllpott, Sylvia Otto; Row 2: Laura Belcher. Donna Ozollns, Susan 
Umscheld, Becky Bally, Gall Johnson. Kathy Starr, Trad Edier, Lorl Connally. 
Jennifer Lareau. Carrie Omps. Beth Butler, Jennifer Reldenbach, Karen 
Nelson, Kelly Jones; Row 3: Laura Head, Karen Whitaker, Tammy Maddrey, 
Rachel Edelstein, Marcle Obendorf, Anna Grimsley, Gabrlelle McDonald, 
Angela Sansone, Kathy Nichols, Connie Bane, Jill Skanky, Lisa Kelly, Debra 
ChinI, Karin Brignati; Row 4: Susan Barco, Laura Draegert, SusI Allen, 
Samanth Drennen, Karen Prentis, Debbie Schwager. Janet Sever, Marsha 
Domzalski, Pat McParland. Jody Keenan, Kathy Curtis, Chris Bauman, Alison 
Krufka, Diann Szczypinskl. 

▼ Dressed In boxer shorts and sunglasses, Kathy Starr and Sharon Philpott 
enjoy an AX party. 

► AX spirit shows through at football games. 




fects of larger enrollment and 
anti-establishment feeling in 
the late 1960s, however, par- 
ticipation dropped to about 
40%. A few fraternities which 
could neither fill all their al- 
lotted places in the new fra- 
ternity complex nor afford to 
pay for the vacancies had to 
leave campus, causing participa- 
tion in fraternities to fall to 25% 
of the male students in the early 
1970s. 

Since the 1970s participation 
in Greek organizations has 
risen, but not as dramatically as 
that seen in the late '50s and 
early '60s. About one-third of 
the students are Greek, and the 
Student Association and resi- 
dential halls have worked to 
provide social activities so that 
being Greek is not a prerequi- 
site for a social life. There have 




been many recent changes 
within the Greek system. Phi 
Tau has officially left campus 
(although its members remain) 
while Sigma Nu and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon have returned. 
Psi Upsilon and Delta Gamma 
have joined the William and 
Mary Greek System. Delta 
Gamma's Anchorsplash has 
become an annual event. Fol- 
lowing the Jefferson Fire, Sigma 
Chi decided to donate its pro- 
ceeds from Derby Day to the 
Red Cross. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
acquired Unit A, and Kappa 
Delta temporarily left the 
campus to reorganize in 1986. 
In the fail of 1984, the campus 
Panhellenic Council voted to 
break with the National Pan- 
hellenic Conference in order 
to include William and Mary's 
three black sororities — Alpha 



9/8 


Back-to-School Party 


10/6 


Party with Sig Ep 


10/26 


Fall Retreat to Virginia Beach 


11/2 


Black Magic Halloween Party 


11/17 


Pledge Dance 


12/7 


End-of-classes Happy Hour 


12/9 


Christnnas Party 


1/25 


Initiation 


1/26 


Bowl-a-thon for Cystic Fibrosis 


2/22 


Bon Voyage Party 


3/15 


Happy Hour for Greek Week 


3/30 


Senior/Spring Dance 


4/19 


Boxers and Sunglasses Party 


4/24 


Last Day of Classes Cookout 


^4/25 


Senior Banquet 




AA 



Alpha Chi s porch routine. 



■< Allison Stringer. Jennifer Reidenbach. and Alison Krufka enjoy a 
red carnation in a post-Initiation celebration. 

A Paula Warrick frolics In Derby Day's mud. 



Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma 
Theta, and Zeta Phi Beta in the 
new intersorority council. Since 
the decline of Greek participa- 
tion in the 1970s student in- 
volvement in extracurricular 
activities has not been domi- 
nated by Creeks, and joining a 
fraternity or a sorority had be- 
come more of an option rather 
than a necessity for an active 
social life. Laura Tanner, a Delta 
Gamma, felt that the Greek 
system provided "a large social 
outlet as far as dances" and that 
it was positive in that through 
its philanthropies it "got stu- 
dents involved in something 
done for someone else". It does 
have some negative aspects 
when people judge a whole 
fraternity or sorority from the 
impressions they receive from 
one or two of its members. 




Roommates Terri Dispenziere and Kathy Ireland enjoy the Greek Games 
together. 



Karen Jordan decided not to 
join a sorority because she did 
not like "being jumbled into a 
big group". She believed that 
the Greek system served its 
function as a social outlet well, 
but wished that more emphasis 
was placed on the service 
aspect. She observed no ten- 
sion between Greeks and 
independents. 

What does all this mean? 
Over time William and Mary's 
Greek system has been cyclical, 
and it has hopefully reached a 
point where it is important to 
the campus without dominat- 
ing the social scene or extra- 
curricular activities. But is this 
really where we are now? May- 
be when we look back in a few 
years we'll know. 

— Susan Maxson 



CkC Oftve/fcu 




ARow 1: Kelly Lawler. Michelle Barnes. Laurie Dobbins, Ginger Baskett. Kellie 
Larson, Virginia Prasch. Hunter Milligan, Lindsey Willis, Anne Sorenson. Ann 
Searle, Beth Henry, Sherry Leigh Gill; Row 2: Susan Doyle, Melanie Newfield, 
Lezlie Farrell, Glenna Phillips, Kim Colonna, Rabbit Stewart, Ellen Jaffe, 
Heather Lloyd, Paula McMillen, Jameson Riser, Holly Coors, Karen Johnson; 
Row 3: Donna Desaulniers, Maggie Margiotta, Carol Sirota, Chris Kelton, Pat 
Net, Jenny Koleda, Darby Drew, Margaret Collins, Lisa Matick, Annie 
Schwartz, Terri Dispenziere; Row 4: Kelly Jackson, Linda Seiden, Lisa Reeves, 
Raelene Canvel, Diane LaRosa, Amanda McCombs, Laura Baumhoffer, Kelley 
Panczyk, Wendy Jones. 

* Chi O's practice their chugging pyramid strategies for the Derby Day 
competition. 

► Glenna Phillips paints Leslie Farrell's face before Derby Day. 

► ► Ginger Baskett quenches her thirst at a home football game. 




ISC: Goals Met 






The Inter Sorority Council 
was established as an unbiased 
governing body over the 13 
National Sororities at William 
and Mary. ISC was composed 
of two elected representatives 
from each house — the Senior 
Representative and the Junior 
Representative. There was also 
a pledge ISC made up of one 
representative from each 
pledge class. The pledge ISC 
worked independently of the 
regular organization and was 
only active during the fall 
semester. 

The main purpose of ISC was 
the organize inner greek activi- 



ties, such as rush, and to pro- 
mote participation in greek/ 
non-greek events both on 
campus and in the community. 
To give the group direction, 
specific goals were set, accord- 
ing to ISC President Terry Lan- 
caster. These goals included 
improving rush, expanding 
Greek Week, and increasing 
greek/non-greek activities. 
"The ISC has had a very strong 
year. We have met or surpassed 
all of our goals", remarked 
Terry Lancaster, "A lot of this 
has to do with the quality of 
girls that the sororities are elect- 
ing to the positions. I think they 




w& 



Colleen McKee oversees Fall Formal Rush registration. 




10/7 


Alumni Tea 


11/3 


Homecoming Reception 


11/7 


Faculty Reception 


11/10 


Fall Retreat 


11/16 


Pledge Dance 


11/18 


Thanksgiving Dinner 


12/8 


Christmas Party and Caroling 


1/28 


Initiation 


3/24 


Parent's Banquet 


4/6 


Four-Way Party 


4/11 


Cookout with Theta Delta 


4/13 


Spring Dance 


4/14 


White Carnation Banquet 


4/22 


Senior Banquet 








are a fun and hard working 
group this year". 

ISC sponsored several cam- 
pus wide events during the 
1984-85 school year. The first 
was their annual court party, 
the last night of formal sorority 
rush. Admission was open to all 
students, greek and non-greek 
alike. In October, Halloween 
Trick-or-Treating was organized 
by ISC reps for the children of 
the Williamsburg Community 
Day Care Center. ISC continued 
to support the Day Care Center 
by working at a pancake break- 
fast fundraiser for the kids and 
their parents in November. 
Community support continued 
in February when the Red Cross 
blood drive came to campus 
and was organized and run by 
ISC representatives. February 
also held the Senior ISC dance 



▼ Row 1 : Becky Ward. Laura Luder. Kris Roby. Tracy Krauthelm, Lori Kerns, 
Leigh Crummer, Kelly LIndes, Robin Renwick, Sandy Brubaker. Koald Bear, 
Cynthia Smith. Colleen McKee. Susie Gruner; Row 2: Kathy Redmond. Karen 
Griffith. Jennifer Jones. Sue Beilly. Jane Butler. Sulton Stephens. Donna Korff, 
Jan Brown, Anne Maclnerny, Debbie Perry. Kim Pike. Jodi Ceballas. Teresa 
Jacoby; Row 3: Maria Manos. Vaughan Gibson. Caria Montague. Diane Inderlied. 
Kristen White. Toni-Jean Lisa. Jane Church. Kitty Penney. Lauri White, Ellen 
Thompson. Liese Cochran. Nancy Pagen. Linda Habgood. Terry Lawler. Karyn 
Barlow. Anne-Darby Simpson; Row 4: Lisa Wood. Liz Finger. Michelle Rogers. 
Lynn Reilly. Lisa Friam. Jeannie Cherundolo. Mary Johnston. Mary Hazinski, Lisa 
O'Brien. Meg Williams. Anne Paper. Susan Marfizo. Sandy Heezen, Trisha 
Mitchell, Lane Nelson. 

»» Tri Delt spirit marches down DOG Street. 

► Theresa Jacoby. Lisa O'Brien and Colleen McKee gather on Jockey's Ridge 
for sunset. 




in Trinkle Hall for all senior 
sorority women and their dates. 
Greek Week was the coun- 
cil's main focus for the spring 
semester. "We wanted to im- 
prove Greek Week and solidly 
establish it as a tradition on 
campus", commented former 
Greek Week chairperson Terry 
Lancaster. Greek Week, which 
ran from March 13 through 
March 17, was kicked off 
Wednesday night by Speidel, 
Goodrich, and Goggin, and 
culminated Sunday afternoon 
with the Greek Games. All pro- 
ceeds from the week went to 
the Young Carpenters organiza- 
tion to help repair homes in the 
Williamsburg area. The purpose 
of Greek Week was to promote 
campus unity. In an effort to 
continue that, an idea was 




raised to change the title of the 
week to Spring Fling in 1986. It 
was hoped that the change 
would spark more participation 
from non-greek organizations. 
ISC's main goal for the year 
was to improve rush roles. This 
was accomplished by changing 
the rush dates and clarifying 
rush violations and penalties. 
Lancaster commented, "Our 
goal was to make rush more 
humane and enjoyable". The 
change in dates included split- 
ting the first day of rush over 
two nights, moving the second 
night back to Saturday night, 
and having three nights of in- 
formal parties. The changes 
were to be implemented in the 
1985 Fall Formal Rush. Rush 
infractions and their penalties 
were also reviewed and clari- 



9/26 


Pajama Party with Lambda Chi 


9/29 


Parent's Reception 


10/5 


Invite Party 


10/13 


Pre-Game Cookout with 




Theta Delta 


11/9 


Fall Pledge Dance 


12/1 


Deserted Island Party 


12/5 


Party with Pika 


12/7 


End of Classes Happy Hour 


12/12 


Sleighbell Day Blood Drive 


2/15 


Valentine's Day Date Party 


2/22 


Sisters Only Happy Hour 


3/16 


Spring Dance 


4/7 


Pansy Breakfast with Mothers 


4/14 


Senior Banquet 


4/24 


End of Classes Happy Hour 



Oe£ta. OcJ^ Od;t(i 





V 



^1 •< A Tn-Delt pledge races to get into the Ice bucket first. 

% A Jodi Ceballas and Linda Hadgood enjoy a Pika happy hour together. 



fled by the council. 

One change occuring in 1985 
which was to have a great in- 
fluence upon ISC was Kappa 
Delta's decision to become in- 
active for the 1985-86 school 
year. All Kappa Deltas that did 
not graduate in 1985 were put 
upon alumnae status. Since the 
KDs would consequently not 
be living in their house, the 
administration had to decide 
who would fill the house. Feel- 
ing that it was important to 
maintain the greek nature of 
the court. Dean Ken Smith sug- 
gested that ISC representatives 
be given first opportunity to fill 
the house. By doing so, the 
house would be filled with a 
group representative of all the 
greeks rather than becoming 
an extension of any one house. 




Todd Bowden, Mary St. George, and Trey Resolute at the ISC Dance. 



Following the suggestion, ISC 
representatives filled 10 of the 
spots, and other greek women 
filled the remaining six spots. 

The Inter Sorority Council 
played an important part in the 
strengthening and unifying of 
the sororities on campus. Alpha 
Chi Omega Junior Representa- 
tives, Donna Ozolins said, "ISC 
is an essential part of the greek 
life, it helps to keep things 
standardized and fair, and elimi- 
nates unnecessary competition 
among the sororities". 

— Laura Belcher 



Ocj^GcUHMOy 



► Row 1 : Pam Tiffany. Maria Hanahoe, Coralin Glerum, Betsy Ehrman, Pam 
Witherspoon, Lynn Leonard. Lisa Robertson. Ansley Calhoun. Myung Park. 
Allison Belsches; Row 2: Ann Toewe. T. Leftwich. Martha Meade. Gail Wright, 
Hilary Beaver, Michele Johnson. Jennifer Gross. Heather Hinkamp. Tern 
Lancaster. Ann Cooper; Row 3: Antonia Powell. Karen Berg, Sue Kapp. Suan 
Maxon. Sarah Andrews. Rebecca Hambright. Ann Drake. Lianne Radell, Susan 
Maynard. Kim Hugney, Lisa Hall; Row 4: Kim Zieske. Jackie Fryer. Daphne 
McMurrer. Dee Gerkin. Laune Cogswell. Kathy Hart. Janet Hinkley, Becca 
Samuel; Row 5: Ginna Groseclose. Kathy Kuhn. Beth Duncan. Julie Garrett. 
Nancy Young. Mary Gibson. Adrianna Ercokino, Debbie Marsen; Row 6: 
Christine Kubacki. Liz Tobin, Laura Martin, Kimber McCawley. 

▼DGs march in the Homecoming parade with their float that "Blinds" Lehigh "by 
Science." 







ANCHOR SPLASH! 



Water, relays, contests, 
music, and fun all went into 
Delta Gamma's annual Anchor 
Splash on April 14. Anchor 
Splash was a two day event to 
raise money for Delta Gamma's 
national philanthropy— Aid to 
the Blind. 

The fun started Saturday 
night at the pre-Anchor Splash 
Bash at the hall. Theta Delta 
Chi co-threw the bash with 
Delta Gamma. A small entrance 
fee was charged and the beer 
was donated by Miller. The 
band for the evening was D.C. 
Star from Washington. The 
highlight of the party came 



during the first band break 
when the Mr. Anchor Splash 
'85 Contest was held. Each fra- 
ternity entered a contestant to 
be voted on by six women 
from different sororities. The 
contestants were judged ac- 
cording to their poise, "macho 
studliness," and responses to 
the questions asked by the 
judges. Pi Lam's Jim McCarthy, 
alias the "Whaler," appeared 
to be the crowd's favorite (or at 
least evoked the loudest re- 
sponse from the audience 
Kappa Alpha's entry was Tom 
Crapps. Crapps' enthusiasm 
was evident when he mooned 




10/5 Octoberfest with Sigma Chi 

10/12 Pledge Dance 

11/7 Make Your Own Sundae and 3-D 

Coloring Book with Phi Mu 

11/16 Tourist Party in C.C. Ballroom 

11/30 Nagshead Party with Pika 

12/7 Holiday Party 

1/18 Happy Hour with Sigma Chi 

1/27 Initiation 

2/8 Date Bowling Party 

3/16 Founder's Day Luncheon 

4/6 Waller Mill Cookout for Parents 

4/12 Spring Senior Dance 

4/13 Anchor Splash Bash 

4/14 Anchor Splash Events 

4/22 Senior Banquet 

4/24 Last Day of Classes Happy Hour 





A With front row seats, the Delta 
Gamma's enjoy the sunset from 
Jockey's Ridge. 

< After a beer fight, the DG's with 
Sigma Chi coach, Ed Holt, dry off in 
the Derby Day sun. 




Delta Gamma Coaches cheer on their teams from pool side during the Brew-Thru relay. 



Oe£t6b Scfma TkeXxu 





the audience and showed off 
tattoos of all the sorority names. 
His actions won the judges over 
and Tom Crapps was named 
the 1985 Mr. Anchor Splash. 

The water events were held 
Sunday afternoon at Adair Pool. 
Each fraternity team was led by 
two Delta Gamma coaches. 
They were instrumental in or- 
ganizing and encouraging their 
teams. Preparation for the 
water relays was minima! on 
the parts of the fraternities, 
which added the elements of 
confusion and unexperience 
to the afternoon's events. The 
competition included six relay 
events and the Surf 'n Turf 
routines. Winners of the first 
three events were varied with 
Sigma Nu, Sigma Chi. and KA 
each taking a first place. The 
last three events; 20,000 legs 



8/31 


Back-to-School Party 


9/12 


Study Break 


9/28 


Carnation Sale for Parent's 




Weekend 


10/1 


Voter Registration 


10/28 


Rush Party 


10/31 


Halloween Party for Head Start 


11/10 


"Time For Another Great Party" 




Party 


11/15 


Informal Rush Party 


2/14 


Valentine's Day Party for 




Head Start 


2/19 


Study Break 


4/11 


Jabberwock 





< < Lisa Ferguson, Caria Tademy and Adrienne Marshall twist together during Greek Week's twister 

game. 
4 Delta Sigma Theta President Angela Cody, M.C. their annual Jabberwock. 

▲ Row 1 : Edith LaVerne Randall, Lisa Ferguson. Angela Cody, Caria Tademy, Janice Allen; Row 2: 
Adrienne Marshall, Anel Jones. Reneen Hewlett, Monique Morton, Veronica Mance. 



under the sea, Brew-Thru, and 
Push-me, Pull-me were domi- 
nated by Rika. 

The last and favorite Anchor 
Splash event was the Surf 'n 
Turf competition. Each team 
must choreograph a dance 
routine that requires work on 
both the pool deck and in the 
water. Music was used to aid in 
the overall effect. The routines 
varied from Sigma Chi's um- 
brella chorus line kick to "New 
York, New York" and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon's highly coor- 
dinated dance and synchro- 
nized swimming to "Let's Hear 
It For The Boy" to KA's routine 
of trained worms that were 
rewarded with shots of Jack 
Daniels after each act. The Surf 
'n Turf competition was always 
a crowd pleaser, evoking 
shouts, whistles, and cheers 




GcufUH/i PkC Beta ^, 




f^ (T n 




A Row 1 : Lisa Schmidt, Debbie Taylor, Carrie Allison, Geri Douglas, 
Christine Villa: Row 2: Sandy Lewis. Mary Ruth Uhrig, Ruth Cove, 
Cathy Ondis, Shannon Fitzgerald, Susie Creigh, Tees Breidenbach. 
Tern Watson, Becca Spragens, Ann Leigh Henley; Row 3; Ann Meyers, 
Sue Scott, Kay-Margaret Cronk, Irene Kelly, Kathy Healy, Mary 
Sutherland: Row 4: Margaret Halstead, Suzy Duff, Laura Balcer. 
Debbie Frost: Row 5: Ann Salsbury, Debra Creasy, Kathy Fitzgerald, 
Pattie Coulter: Row 6: Willeke Hoeke, Kim Villa, Maureen Hinnebusch, 
Kris Deyerle, Jennifer Bond, Ten Lattanze, Rhonda Jett. 

» Jennifer Bond's crutches keep her out of the Derby Day mud. 

^> Suzy Duff receives some advice from Lisa Koehl. 

► Jill Hungertord, Anne Whitworth, Shannon Fitzgerald, and Christine 
Villa show off the Gamma Phi house. 

► ► Six sisters goofing off in the living room. 




'^^$^^fm^ 



from those who watched on 
the side. The top three routine 
winners were Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon, Sigma Chi, and Kappa 
Alpha. 

Despite Pika's low showing 
in Surf 'n Turf (the event that 
caused their disqualification 
the previous year), Pika re- 
gained their title of overall 
champions that they had first 
earned at the 1983 Anchor 
Splash. Sigma Chi placed sec- 
ond and KA third in the overall 
rankings. Judges voted Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon the most spirited 
team participating and Sig Ep 
the least. Sig Ep's goal for An- 
chor Splash was to place last in 
all events and to be disqualified 
from as many events as pos- 
sible; they were successful in 
both areas. 





9/9 Alumnae Brunch 

10/25 Four-Way Party with Lambda Chi, 
Theta Delta, and Delta Gamma 

11/10 Fall Pledge Dance 

11/11 Founder's Day Reception 

11/30 Party with KA 

12/10 Christmas Party 

1/20 Initiation 

2/2 Retreat at Sangraal 

3/23 Mother-Daughter Banquet 

3/29 Cookout with KA 

4/11 Faculty Reception 

4/20 Spring Pledge Dance 

4/21 Senior Banquet 





Near the end of competition, 
the Sigma Nu team presented 
the Delta Gammas with a large 
anchor for all of the hard worl< 
and dedication they had put 
into the games. Coincidentally, 
the anchor presented looked 
identical to the anchor that had 
been stolen from the Delta 
Gamma front yard two days 
earlier. With the competition 
over and the anchor returned 
safely, Anchor Splash '85 ended 
very successfully. Chairman Val 
Krowe said, "It was a lot of fun 
and a lot of work. Overall it was 
a great success and the en- 
thusiasm was definitely high in 
the part of the fraternities." 
The 1985 Anchor Splash netted 
close to $2,500 for the Delta 
Gamma's philanthropy— Aid to 
the Blind. 



9/29 Parent's Weekend Reception 
10/6 Boxer Shorts Party with Sigma Chi 
10/13 United Way Party with Pika,KA, 

Lambda Chi, Chi-O, and Phi Mu 
10/26 Pledge Dance 
11/3 Homecoming Reception for 

Alumnae 
11/9 Cinderella Party 
11/16 Overnight Retreat 
12/7 Red and Green Christmas Party 
1/27 Initiation Banquet 
2/2 Speidei, Goodrich, and Goggin 

Band Party 
4/3 Spaghetti Dinner for Logopedics 
4/19 Spring Formal 



▼ Row 1; Ellen Lewis. Pam Howard, Heather MacDonald, 
Tanya Hranowsky. Kendra Morgan. Robin Masci. Susan 
Gordan. Liz O'Brien; Row 2: Julie Rosche, Tracy Brownlee. 
Jill Bobbin. Simonne Valenti. Amy Thompson. Lauren 
Cunningham. Betsy Danbury; Row 3: Vicki Moore. Kathy 
Hecker, Kathy Monarty. Marty Armel. Nina Ranadive. Debbie 
Demend, Sally Andrews. Lydia Bergman. Betsy Tinsley, Mary 
Lynn Bowles. Mary Morgan. Mia Amaya, Jennifer Boone, 
Karen Weiler. Katherine Ennis: Row 4: Heidi Carr. Donna 
Fox. Elizabeth Bell. Anne Mane Belair. Ann Bowling, Pam 
Dawson, Susan Philipp. Lisa Marnca. Carrie Stewart. Sally 
Rice. Kelly Metcalf. Michele Lewis. Ann Brosnahan. Melinda 
Speer. Karen Luparello. Amy Kidd. Ann Herbert. Laurie 
Grant. Tabb Osborne, Carroll Moses, Susan Gasper; Row 5; 
Anoush Kerorkian, Melissa Funk, Julia Scarborough. 
Pamela Bitto. 



► Thetas dine at their annual spaghetti dinner. 




RUSH. 



Rush 1984-1985. For every 
girl and guy going through 
rush it meant something dif- 
ferent. For some, it was the 
opportunity to meet people 
and make acquaintances. For 
others, it was a time filled with 
tension and nervousness 
where one had to put their 
best foot forward and smile 
for long periods of time. For 
the girls, it meant a week of 
exhaustion plus many hours 
of preparation in the late sum- 
mer heat. 

For the guys, it was a relaxed 
semester of casual smokers 
with five days of intense rush 




Colleen Cooke. Mary St. George, and Angela Sansone lead the Alpha Chi's porch routine. 




KappOy ^^ka TkeXzi 




< Tracy Brownlee. Chele Taylor, and Deanne Buschmeyer take a break from 

the Derby Day mud. 

▲ Pam Dawson and a friend enjoy the Theta Spring dance. 




. . . a Comparison 



Sig Ep Ward Thomas socializes with Jennifer Reidenbach 



parties in the cold and drab 
part of mid-winter. 

Although sorority and fra- 
ternity rush differ in time, in- 
tensity, and season, they both 
try to project the same ideas. 
Rush, as defined at William 
and Mary, is a time for the 
Greeks to present themselves 
to potential Creeks, choosing 
those whom they believe will 
best enhance their organiza- 
tion and contribute to the 
solidarity of the sorority or 
fraternity. Both rushees and 
Creeks choose and pick among 
the many faces and personali- 
ties presented to them, hoping 



to make the correct choice of 
where they will be happiest. 
Sorority rush included 470 
rushees at the beginning of 
the week, with 380 given a bid 
by one of the ten sororities on 
campus. In contrast, fraternity 
rush ended with an averageof 
20 members per pledge class, 
distributed among the twelve 
frats. 

The desire for Creek affilia- 
tion has risen in the past few 
years, as evidenced by the in- 
creasing number of rushees 
going through rush each year. 
Despite this increase, the num- 
ber of withdrawals and girls 




A Row 1 : Ann Brown. Bonnie Burnette, Elizabeth 
Moiiter, Mary Kay Gorman, Martha Thomas, Becky 
Harvey, Imelda Serrano, Chris Galloway, Lynn 
Newton; Row 2: Susan Cousins, Michelle Nix, 
Karen Wilson, Joan Palmer, Brend Roesch, Sue 



Mongrain, Alicia Barn, Liz McCulla, Katherine 

Owen, Christine Moulton, Krista Gustafson, Liz Utz. 

Melissa Brooks, 

A Ann Brown races into the bucket of ice on Derby 

Day. 



given ISC cuts (receiving no 
bids or invitations back to 
sororities) has remained con- 
stant. Because of this increase 
in numnbers, rush has changed 
a lot over the last few years. 

One of the first changes was 
the increased role of the Rush 
Counselors (Rho Chis). Rho 
Chis have become much more 
involved in counseling the 
girls going through rush. Rath- 
er than just handing out invita- 
tions, Rho Chis now provide a 
strong link between the girl, 
the sororities, and the Inter- 
sorority Council. This im- 
proved communication led to 
better understanding of the 
problems that came up and 
aided in a better resolution of 
these problems. 

But some parts of sorority 
rush have not changed at all. 




Acceptance Day begins with the run across Richmond Road with as little interlerence trom fraternity men 



KofipOyOdtou 



Karen Wilson. Allx Francis, and Bonnie Burnetle enjoy a sunset together. 




The formality, rigid schedules, 
and strict themes are here to 
stay. In spite of the changes in 
rush to be implemented next 
year, the serious tone and 
formal atmosphere will 
remain. 

In contrast to the formality 
of sorority rush, fraternity rush 
is quite casual. Informal 
smokers held throughout the 
semester allow the brothers to 
meet freshmen and independ- 
ent upperclassmen in a re- 
laxed, party-type atmosphere. 
Houses are open, and rushees 
are free to wander from party 
to party. The informal atmos- 
phere helps both rushees and 
brothers to get to know each 
other well, and in a more nat- 
ural setting than is found at 
the formal sorority rush par- 
ties. Also, the opportunity to 




Mary Jo Dorr visits with Eric Williams at KA. 



rush for an entire semester 
allows all involved to focus on 
the people as individuals. Selec- 
tion, then, is based on impres- 
sions received during four 
months, rather than one week. 

Fraternity parties are also an 
integral part of the entire 
social system at William and 
Mary. If it wasn't for frats, and 
to a lesser extent, sororities, 
the social life here would be 
much less diverse. Therefore, 
rush is an extremely important 
part of life because if rush isn't 
successful, frats and sororities 
will become weak. 

Rush may be a tension- 
filled, disappointing time for 
both brothers, sisters, and 
rushees, but once it isall over, 
it all seems worthwhile. 

— Debbie Schwager 
and Traci Edier 



Kappcu Kappa GctMntcu 



31 




A Cathy Walsh, escorted by Priest Howard Bos socialize at Kappa's Black and 
White Party. 



► Jeanne Kelly, Kim Dority, and Debbie Zanfagna are tied in knots at the ' - 

twister competition during Greek Week. ^ I, W 




GREEK WEEK 



A keg roll around campus. 
Twister mats covering the floor 
of William and Mary Hall, a 
happy hour at Lake Matoaka, 
jerseys with letters. What does 
all this mean? The second an- 
nual Greek Week at William 
and Mary. The primary goals of 
Greek Week, according to 
Inter-sorority Council Presi- 
dent Terry Lancaster, were to 
involve the Greeks in planning 
something to benefit the Wil- 
liamsburg community and to 
involve the entire campus in 
the Greek week events. 

Greek Week commenced on 
Wednesday, March 13 with 



Spiedel, Goodrich & Goggin 
performing at Trinkle Hall, 
Many students attended the 
concert, and it became one of 
the most obvious successes of 
Greek week. Thursday, jerseys 
with names of both Greek and 
non-Greek organizations ap- 
peared around campus, and on 
Friday the weekend was kicked 
off by a Faculty/Student Wine 
and Cheese reception in An- 
drews foyer. Although the 
reception was well-attended by 
students the participation by 
the faculty was not as strong as 
had been hoped for by those 
organizing Greek Week. The 





10/6 


"Melt the Ice" Party 


11/17 


Pledge Dance 


11/31 


Four Way Party w/Chi-O, 




Lambda Chi, ThetaDelt 


12/7 


Christmas Party 


2/2 


Initiation 


2/8 


Black and White Party 


2/22 


Golf Party with Theta Delta 


3/15 


Happy Hour with KA for 




Greek Week 


3/29 


Black Tie, Leather, or Toga Party 


4/4 


Easter Egg Hunt at Easter State 


4/5 


Spring Dance 


4/12 


Boat Dance Party 


4/18 


Senior Banquet 



< Betsy Burr, Lynda Brown, Aimie Bellaria, Kelly Doyle. 
Jeanne Kelly, Jennifer Blount, Kim Dorlty, Jackie Delia, Heidi 
Reihansperger. Anita Rotkowski, Julie Lopp, Katy 
Chapman, Alice Bengtson, Heather Douse, Catherine 
Policastro; Row 2: Debbie Fetterman, Regina Rieger, Debbie 
Zanfagna, Lisa Hylton, Christine Ferguson. Cheryl Long, 
Caroline Trost, Laurie Bunkelman, Holly Henderson. Kim 
Greogory, Lynne Giermak. Kelly Stone, Karen Eccli, Sue 
Valinski, Jennifer Campbell, June Harmon, Heather Hearn, 
Wei-Ming Hsu, Jenny Holt, Cara Newman, Cathy Hart; Row 
3: Carol Stubin, Shawn Meyer, Monica Taylor, Leslie 
McCormack, Ten Dale, Dana McMullin, Cathy Ireland, Amy 
Ross. Lydia Pulley. Catherine Harmony, Jennifer Jones, 
Clark Craddock; Row 4; Emily Powell, Ann Scott Obenshain, 
Cindy Taylor. 

^Katy Chapman, Julie Lopp, Rusty Andrews, Jeanne Kelly 
and Caria Thomas enjoy the Derby Day activities. 




ISC awarded four scholarships 
at the reception to sorority 
women who maintained scho- 
lastic achievement while being 
involved in their sorority and 
on campus. The recepients 
were Laura Balcer of Gamma 
Phi Beta, Kathy Moriarty of 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Kim 
Moosha of Alpha Chi Omega, 
and Colleen Cooke also of 
Alpha Chi Omega. The Happy 
Hour at Lake Matoaka on Satur- 
day was planned to be small but 
was well attended, and the 
week closed with the Greek 
games on Sunday. Although 
the games were not well at- 




< Row 1 ; Steph Leyland. Susan Hudgens. Wendy Thomas. Jennifer Lewis, 
Marsha Youngblood; Row 2; Margaret McGovern, Kathy Fowler, Emily Early, 
Katie Hoffman, Molly Harris, Kathy MacGregor; Row 3; Cheryl Rata, Barbara 
Walters. Cara Smith, Laura Chase, Lee Anne Humphrey, Cheryl Toth; Row 4; 
Joy Hague, Judo Corcillo, Lisa Von Eschen, Anne Fallon, Christy Hagar, Karia 
Beyer, Jill Sanner, Liz Hutcheson, Juli Winkler, Sue Bowen, Margot 
Engelmann, Colleen Hogan, Artemis Spanoulis, Charlene Reese, 

► Emily Early and friend enjoy Phi Mu's Animal House party. 





Greek Week began with Spiedel. Goodrich, and Goggin sponsored by Kappa, 




Pkc Mu. 



9/15 


Benefit Walk for Project Hope 


10/5 


W.W. II Party 


10/26 


Fall Pledge Dance 


11/10 


Father-Daughter Banquet 


12/3 


Alumni Christmas Party 


12/5 


Christmas Party at Eastern State 


1/26 


Spy Party— "For Your Eyes Only" 


1/28 


OM Action for Project FHope 


2/26 


Chinese New Year Party 


3/29 


Stranded Islander Party 


4/12 


Spring Formal 


4/18 


Family Night 


4/19 


Animal House Party 


4/21 


Senior Banquet 



^ This Phi Mu pledge relaxes In a bucket of Ice on Derby 
Day. 



< < Kathy King Is rescued by her new sisters as she runs 
across the street on Acceptance Day. 




ISC's Faculty Wine n Cheese Reception was popular with the students, but few professors attended 



tended, those who participated 
were enthusiastic. The events 
consisted of a keg roll, in which 
each team rolled a keg it had 
painted around campus: the 
mummy wrap, in which each 
team wrapped a teammate in 
toilet paper; potato thud, a 
race involving carrying a potato 
between your knees; and water 
toss, a relay race in which cups 
of water were tossed to team- 
mates and then emptied into a 
pitcher. Kay-Margaret Cronk's 
favorite event was the keg roll; 
she believed that since people 
really enjoyed this event, the 
course should be made longer 
next year. One hundred and 
seventy people showed up to 
play Twister, which did not 
break the world's record for 
the most people playing the 
game at the same time, a goal 



10/31 


Halloween Party 


11/10 


Fall Pledge Dance 


11/16 


Angel Auction 


12/1 


New Year's Eve Party 


2/16 


Secret Admirer's Party 


3/15 


Spring Dance 


3/22 


Hawaiin Luau Party 


4/6 


Annual Cut-a-thon 


4/13 


Parent's Banquet 


4/17 


Senior Banquet 


4/19 


Boxer Rebellion Party 




▼ Row 1 : Laura De Porter. Kate Parks, Debbie Packman, MIkkl Hubbard, Diane Limm, Tracy Sinnott, 
Mary Hallahan, Jen Cox. Susan Davis. Alison Sellln, Demetra Yeapanis, Kim Eckert. Shannon Berry. 
Janice Harrup; Row 2: Elizabeth Martinez. Jennifer Lear. Joy Gibbins. Penney Anderson. Susie 
Brlnkley. Courtney Joyner. Eline Bosma. Cheryl Allen, Cheryl Ross. Jennifer Gross. Patty Gorski, 
Suzanne McDuffee. Carrie Harrison: Row 3: Stephanie Gehris, Susan Zanetti. Maureen Dubus. 
Mary Gallagher. Sam Planicka. Helen Dunnigan. Emily Sanderson. Pris Moore, Jeanne G'Grody, 
Kim Welch: Row 4: Christy Checkel. Patty Hanson, Karen Jordan. Heather Brown, Mary Kosko. Kay 
Fanestil. Julie Wallace, Julee Warren. 



■ • if- 





These two Delta Gammas twist together to try and break the world record 



set for Greek Week. Those who 
attended, however, had fun. 
Milton Bradley donated the 
numerous Twister mats which 
completely covered the floor 
of William and Mary Hall. The 
mats were later bought by stu- 
dents to be used as table-cloths 

and shower curtains. 

Inter-sorority council repre- 
sentative Amy Parker stated 
that next year Greek Week will 
have a chairperson appointed 
to organize it, which will facili- 
tate the coordination of events 
and the publicity. This factor 
will eliminate the problem of 
"too many people trying to run 
things", which happened this 
year with each fraternity and 
sorority team being responsible 
for running and publicizing an 
event. The name will also be 
changed to Spring Fling in 



Pc Betou Pko 




► Porch Routine puts a smile on 
these Pi Phi faces. 

AA Mary Gallagher gives Sam 
Planicka a lift during the Derby Day 

fun. 

% •< Not falling is the challenge when 
I playing twister as Mikki Hubbard and 
5 Kathy Parkinson discovered. 



order to attract more campus- 
wide organizations. The money 
raised by the various events 
during Greek Week was do- 
nated to some Young Carpen- 
ters, a Williamsburg organiza- 
tion which builds and fixes up 
houses for area residents who 
do not have fit living conditions. 
Overall Greek Week was a suc- 
cess, and according to Terry 
Lancaster problems arose pri- 
marily from the difficulty in 
starting a tradition. But the 1986 
chairperson has been appoint- 
ed, and the tradition of sociali- 
zing and having fun for area 
philanthropies has begun. 

— Susan Maxon 



Kofipcb ^^kcb ;^^ 



10/20 


Party with Pi Phi 


10/21 


South of the Border Party 


11/7 


Homecoming Dance 


12/10 


Christmas Party 


2/23 


Jungle Party 


3/23 


Band Party for M.D. 


4/13 


Tom Crapps — Mr. Anchor Splash 




Bar-B-Que 


4/18 


Southern Ball March 


4/19 


The Southern Ball 



► Eric Morrison and Dennis Thacker prepare to serenade 
their dates before the Southern Ball. 



► ► Mr. Anchor Splash '85, Tom Crapps, keeps track of his 
team's points during the Anchor Splash relays. 




"*T^ 



Philanthropies: 

Our Original Purpose 



Although most people don't 
realize it, sororities and fraterni- 
ties are not strictly social organi- 
zations. Each is dedicated to 
community service, as well as 
having a good time. Philan- 
thropic events this year were 
many and varied. They included 
the Kappa Kappa Gamma-Theta 
Chi Easter Egg Hunt for the kids 
at Eastern State, Kappa Delta's 
book drive for the Williamsburg 
Public Library, Delta Sigma 
Theta's tutoring for the Adult 
Skills Program, Phi Mu's trick- 
or-treat for Project Hope, and 
Alpha Chi Omega's bowl-a- 
thon for Cystic Fibrosis. Cam- 



pus-wide events included 
Derby Day, Green and Gold 
Christmas, Pike Bike, Anchor 
Splash, and Jabberwock. 

Derby Day is an annual event 
sponsored by Sigma Chi which 
pits sorority against sorority in 
fun competition. Events this 
year included the poster con- 
test, musical ice buckets, the 
zip strip, "egg on your face," 
and, of course, the chugging 
pyramid. But the most impor- 
tant event, and the one worth 
the most points, is the fund- 
raising contest. Phi Mu won this 
year by raising over $400 selling 
doughnuts around campus. 





■* Row 1; Rob Stravitz, Rob Kraus, Charles Rogers, Dave Dickerson. 
Andrew McRoberts, Bill Drake. Azhar Mlah, Melvin Stone, John Nicotra, 
Kevin Clark: Row 2: Tom Crapps. Mike Schneider, Sean Sell, Tom Inge, Jeff 
Kushan. Sean Prosser, Alex Dusek, Scott Lunsford: Row 3: Tim Hamilton, 
Tom Dunn, Stu Nabors, Dave Warren, Sam White, Tom Schoedel, Paul 
Dommel, Chris Thorne, Pat Martin, James Lewis, Tony Newman, Jim Brady; 
Row 4: Dan Bilderback, Eric Mendelsohn, Eric Morrison, Steve Dunn. Pete 
Janss, Barry Ota, Glen Fahey, Eric Williams, Mike Moses: Row 5: Ted 
Zoeller, Dan Aldridge, Mike Crowder, Tim Denby, Fred Ablondi, Rob Clark, 
John Chamberlayne, Bobby Mines, Dennis Thacker, Bob Miller. 



' Rob Kraus and his date enjoy KA's Jungle party in February 





These students enjoy their dinner in the front yard at Theta's annual spaghetti dinner 



Derby Day, however, is not 
unique to William and Mary; it 
is sponsored by Sigma Chi's 
national fraternity to benefit 
the Wallace Village for Chil- 
dren. The proceeds of W&M's 
Derby Day, however, went to 
the Williamsburg chapter of the 
American Red Cross. Their help 
to the students affected by the 
Jefferson fire drained most of 
their funds. Last October, Sigma 
Chi decided to donate the pro- 
ceeds from Derby Day to the 
local chapter. According to 
Derby Day chairman Steve Fur- 
man, the fraternity felt that the 
students would be more willing 
to raise money if the funds 
were donated to a local group. 
In addition, they hoped that it 
would spark more interest from 
the administration and the Wil- 
liamsburg community. With the 



Basketball Season — White Section 




Sold Tribe towels for Cancer 


11/3 


Homecoming Toro Lawnmower 




Drill Team 


12/7 


Christmas Party and Caroling 


3/16 


St. Patrick's Day Party 


3/29 


Drinking Games with Tri Delt 


4/4 


Sweetheart Dance 


4/6 


4-Way Party 


4/13 


Spring Game Reception 


4/16 


Pledge Talent Party 


4/17 


Beach Weekend 


4/27 


Initiation and Pig Party 



► Row 1 : Lee Glenn, Rick Jones, Mike Brachen, 
David Rosdol. Augle Ribeiro, Eddie Robinson, 
Jon Levi; Row 2; Rodney Lawrence, Lumpy. 
Brian Brackins. John Netties, Doug Massey, 
John Giggs, Craig Cox, Pete Hughes, Larry 
McEntee. Vint Myers; Row 3: Pete Hoehn, Ken 
Goldberg. Mike Walsh, Chris Lester, Ronny 
Moore, Paul Caan, Bob Crane, Ronny Barden, 
Scott McLester, Jeff Sanders, David Bond; Row 
4: Bob Solderich, Eric Pichens, Kent Farber. 
David Michelow, Chris Beale. Calvin Trivers, 
Mark Loche; Row 5: Bob Simons, Jimmy Hylind. 
Todd Stottlemeyer, George Calvert, Russ Daniel, 
Graeme Miller, Mike Echevaria. 

► Lumpy helps spirit at a basketball game. 

► ► Kappa Sig's pledge action is a favorite fund 

raiser. 




r 



help of the eleven participating 
sororities, Sigma Chi raised over 
$2,400 for the Red Cross. 

Another event that benefited 
the local community was Green 
and Gold Christmas, sponsored 
by Alpha Phi Omega. Started 
three years ago by Kirk Payne, 
Green and Gold Christmas is a 
huge Christmas party for the 
underprivileged children of 
Williamsburg. This year's party 
was held on December 1 and 
was a great success, with 135 
children and over 300 students 
participating. The administra- 
tion also got involved, with 
President Graves playing Santa 
Claus and deans Amy Jarmon, 
Melvin Schavelli, Ken Smith, 
and Sam Sadler assisting as 




I 

J 



KofipCb SuftftOy 




elves. 

Before the day of the party, 
each child was matched with a 
group of two or more students, 
who bought the child several 
presents. At the party they 
played games, made decora- 
tions for Eastern State hospital, 
and opened presents. Many of 
these children would not have 
received any Christmas presents 
had it not been for Green and 
Gold Christmas, and at the end 
of the day, they left with new 
friends as well as new toys. 

The next big event of the 
year was Pi Kappa Alpha's 12th 
annual Pike Bike. Participants 
chose either a ten-mile walk, a 
ten-kilometer run, or a thirty- 
mile bike. They got sponsors to 




donate money for their efforts. 
This year's marathon grossed 
dlmost $13,000 with $9,000 of 
that coming from pledges raised 
by the participants. The re- 
mainder of the money was 
raised from the marathon party 
held a week before Pike Bike 
and from the advertising book. 
All proceeds were given to the 
Muscular Dystrophy Associa- 
tion to further research into 
nervous, muscular, and meta- 
bolic disorders. The runners, 
bikers, and walkers included 
not only brothers and pledges, 
but also other students and 
members of the Williamsburg 
community. Marathon chair- 
man Mike Hecht was pleased 
with the large turnout, which 



UmAcCcuOU ^pkcb 



A Paul Kinley and Anthony James play pool at a happy hour to raise funds for the 
lacrosse team. 

► Lambda Chi's relay team prepare for the Push-me Pull-me race. 

► Kevin Byers and Tom Gallo socialize at Lambda Chi's crab feast. 




was a huge improvement over 
the 1984 Pike Bike. Future plans 
include turning the marathon 
into a race. "We feel that 
making Pike Bike competitive 
will further increase interest 
and participation," said Pika 
brother Jim Harenchar. 

Delta Sigma Theta held their 
first annual Jabberwock on 
April 4. Jabberwock is a talent 
competition sponsored by their 
national sorority. The sisters in- 
vited campus organizations, as 
well as the student body at 
large, to show their talents and 
compete for prizes. This year's 
winner was "Three Blind Boys," 
who sang a medley of songs 
from the fifties. Delta Sigma 
Theta's president Angela Cody 
said, "We had lots of en- 
thusiasm with this year's event. 
We hope next year that more 




Karin BrignatI bowls with Alpha Chi Omega for their national philantropy. Cystic Fibrosis. 



9/15 Crab Feast 

9/21 Kegs for Kids Party 

10/5 Toga Party 

10/31 Halloween Party 

12/6 Wine and Cheese Reception 

12/12 Winter Formal 



2/14 


Progressive Drinking Party 


3/12 


White Shirt Party 


3/28 


A-Team Party 


4/24 


Spring Formal 


4/25 


J. B. Fishing Trip 





A Jon Thomas and his father share 

some crabs and oysters at the crab 

feast. 

< A beer and some crabs can be a 

relaxing dinner. 




Derby Day is Sigma Chi's campus- wide philantropy full of fun, beer and lots of mud. 



Students will come out. partici- 
pate, and have a good time." 
The proceeds from the event 
went to several local groups. In 
addition to Jabberwock. Delta 
Sigma Theta helped with the 
First Baptist Church day care 
center, the American Cancer 
Society, voter registration, and 
a variety of other charities. 

Wrapping up the philan- 
thropic events of the year was 
Delta Gamma's Anchor Splash. 
As a sort of fraternity Derby 
Day, Anchor Splash is a series of 
competitions between all the 
frats. Greek men compete in 
swimming events, talent shows, 
and the Mr. Anchor Splash con- 
test. Each sorority enters a 
member in the "Most Beautiful 
Eyes" contest and elects a judge 
to the Mr. Anchor Splash part 
of the competition. Delta 



PC KofipOy /4^kcb 



► Row 1 : Kurt Witzgall. Mike Dutton, Rodney Willett, Rob Welsmann, Greg 
Krump. Bill Garvey, J. D. Neary, Tom Simpson. John Boyd. John Harmon, Bob 
Owens. John Morton; Row 2: Matt Williams. John Klar. Dave Gaston. Todd 
Cunfer, Kevin Davis. Nate Thompson. Scott Ukrop. Bob Tormey. Mark Cole. 
Dave Branch, Dave Michels; Row 3: Doug Nell, Adam Anthony, Andy Falk, 
Pete Weinbrenner, Jeff Murray, Parker Chamberlain, Jim McAvoy, Sterling 
Ransome, Bill Sykes, Paul Babby, Dave Redman, John Galwin, Mike Lynch: 
Row 4: Matt Dalby. Henry Plaster, Bill Atkinson, Robbie Robinson, Bryan 
Grisso, Rob Barnes, George Martin, Chris Craig, Brian Letzkus, Dickie 
McMillan, Marty Cross, Mark Constantlne, John PaluzzI; Row 5: Robbie Laney, 
Dave Padgett; Row 6: Mike Hecht 

► J. D. Neary. John Boyd. Scott Ukrop. and Tom Simpson enjoy a beer at a hall 
mixer 

(Opposite page) ► Matt Williams 
shows off as Pika's Mr. Anchor 
Splash contestant. 

► ► Bob Tormey tells Santa J. D. 
Neary what he wants for Christmas 







Football Party with Chi Omega 
Six House Party for United Way 
Homecoming Formal 
Regional Convention at W & M 
Blood Drive 
Midnight Madness 
Heaven and Hell Party 
Founder's Day Weekend 
St. Patrick's Day Party at Midnight 
Pike Bike Party 

Beer Olympics with Chi Omega 
Pike Bike 

Intramural Victory Party 
Sweetheart Dance 
HAPPY HOUR EVERY FRIDAY 




▼ Dave Roth takes a roll In the mud with the help of his friend Tim Carroll. 

► Tom Noble and friends watch a football game. Row 1 : The Whaler— Jim McCarthy; Row 2: Brian 
White. Tom Noble, Tim Connor. John Doyle, Paul Parrash, Larry Larsen. Tom Tierney; Row 2: Chip 
Brewer, Bob Shong, Greg Teal. Tom Barham, Mike Lang, Glen Tofil, Glenn Moore, Jon Kumnick, 
Jim McCarthy. Josh Hudson, Scott Richter: Row 4: Griff Fernandez, Bernard McGuire, Alan Reed, 
Dave Lau, Dave Roth. Chuck McQuillan, Ernie Burke, Allan Reeves. Seth Miller. Mike Hunt, Brock 
Beasly. Tony Waldron. Jack Crane. Chris Hagin, Rich Walter. Tom Jensen, Frank Geoly. Beau 
Noonan. Steve Hogg. Jack McDonald. 

► This brother helps serve beer at Anchor Splash Bash. 

► ► Jack Crane talks with Liz Hutchenson at a Pi Lam Midnight Madness. 



10/7 


6 at 9 


10/13 


Progressive Drinking Party 


10/21 


6 at 9 


10/31 


Halloween Party 


11/3 


Homecoming Band Party 


11/13 


Tequila Night 


12/7 


Blowout Party 


2/28 


Wine and Cheese 


4/21 


Sweetheart Dance 


4/24 


Blowout Party 




Derby Day: An 
Ongoing Tradition 



Change is a way of life at 
William and Mary. We change 
rootns, classes, professors, 
views, and sometimes our 
sheets. But some things seem to 
never change. Sigma Chi's 
Derby Day is one of those 
things. Forthepasttwelve years, 
October has meant beer, 
games, and a roll in the mud to 
the Greeks on campus. 

Planning began in April, 
when Derby Day chairman 
Steve Furman began reserving 
and ordering everything. With 
all this done, preparation in the 
fall meant only filling in details. 
Coaches were assigned, judges 



were chosen, events were 
scheduled. Sororities began 
their part by planning fund- 
raisers and practicing for the 
events, especially the chugging 
pyramid. 

As usual, the competition 
started off with the poster con- 
test, won this year by Kappa 
Delta. A problem arose because 
two of the posters were torn 
down before the judging be- 
gan. Unfortunately, the Sigma 
Chi's found out about it too late 
to change the judging time. 
Another problem came toward 
the end of the day when the 
beer truck ran out of beer, 




PC LcunActOy PkC 





A day of Derby Day fun mandates a little mud be brought fiome as Ctiele Taylor discovered with a little help from her friends. 



PscUfi$c^(^ 



9/14 


Dangerously Fashionable Party 


10/13 


Feed and Breed Party 


10/26 


Halloween Party 


11/3 


Homecoming Cookout 


12/7 


Pearl Harbor Beach Party 


12/8 


Alumni Christmas Reception 


1/30 


Band Party 


2/14 


Valentine's Day Dance 


4/6 


Spring Formal 


4/12 


Suitcase Party 


4/24 


End of Classes Blowout 



■-"*^; 



► Drew Gordon naps in between Anchor 
Splash relays. 

► ► With the walls covered with New York 
graffiti. Anne Harrison and Mark Hurly talk 
at Psi Us suitcase party. 






ran out of beer, delaying the 
chugging pyramid contest by 
a half hour. According to 
Steve Furman, the beer truck 
was supposed to reserve a keg 
for the contest, but used it up 
when the beer began to run 
low. The truck had gone to 
get more when the pyramid 
contest was scheduled to 
start. Most people took ad- 
vantage of this time to go for 
another roll in the mud. 
"That's what everyone goes 
for anyway," commented ju- 
nior Paula Warrick. "I'd be 
disappointed if no one pulled 
me through the mud at least 
once." 

Two major changes made 
last year remained this year. 
The first was the roped-off 
beer area. Because of the 
change in the drinking age. 




Tim Hundenberg. Tom Savas. Kevin Vogan, Bill Hefele, Drew Gordon. Doug Mudd, and Drew Gordon. 
' Gregg Haneklam checks i.U.s with his friends at the suitcase party. 







this will be here to stay. Only 
those of legal drinking age 
were permitted in the beer 
area and allowed to buy beer. 
The other change that re- 
mained was the recipient of 
the day's proceeds. Once 
again, the money was donat- 
ed to Williamsburg Red Cross, 
in appreciation for all they did 
for the students affected by 
the Jefferson fire. "Sigma Chi 
National would like us to 
continue to donate to our 
national philanthropy, Wal- 
lace Village," said Steve Fur- 
man. "But we feel it means 
more to the students here if 
we donate the funds to a 
cause that touched their lives. 
An addition this year was 
the band party. It was so 
successful this year that plans 
are to make it a permanent 




Colorful face-painting is an important preparation (or the day as Chad Gano receives his letters. 



w2VB^ 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon— Front: T. Nichols. B. Fisher. 

Row 1: S. Kagey. D. Gleason. R. Edwards, 

E, Gustaffson. W Welhan. T. Biggs. P. Moore. 

8. Norris. J. Kayton. Row 2: K, Johnson. 

D, Glanturco. T. Johnson. T. Norris. M. Snediker. 

J. Kammeier. M. Towner. J, Blackwell. E. Cook. 

S. Schiffman. V. Marquardt. Row 3: B. Clinton. 

J. Gomez. W. DeVan. K. Kelly. K. Wiggins. A, Werker. 

G. Buckley. T. Holland. Row 4. K. McDonald. 

M. Ragland. B. Logson. B. Benn. B. McCarthy. 

P, Frakes. N. Nikolic. T, O'Conner. J. Pitts, 

T. Armstrong. D. Riggan. 



▼ Anchor Splash coach Pam Witherspoon advises 
Todd Norris before the next race, 

►► SAE's cheered the spirit keg at every football 
game and won it at least once. 





Si^tui /^^ka^ £pSi£oK 





fixture of the event. Next year 
promises to be even better 
since the juniors on this year's 
planning committee will be 
around next year to lend 
advice and a helping hand. 

At the end of the day, Phi 
Mu was crowned Derby Day 
Champ. They had also won 
the Fund-raising portion by 
raising over $400 selling 
doughnuts on campus. Delta 
Gamma was second and 
Kappa Delta, third. Total pro- 
ceeds from the entire week- 
end came to over $2,400, and 
$500 of which was raised and 
donated by individual Sigma 
Chi brothers. "It was challen- 
ing, satisfying, and exhaust- 
ing," noted Furman, "but we 
are proud of our efforts and 
what we have accomplished." 
— Traci Edier 



SconvaCkC 





'Iki r 



■^^■ 










BEACH WEEK! 



Perhaps the strongest motiva- 
tion for most William and Mary 
students to finish finals was 
Beach Week. The main ques- 
tions heard during reading 
period and finals were, "When 
are you going down?" and 
"Where are you staying?" Ap- 
proximately 1100 Greek and 
non-Greek students undertook 
the three hour drive down to 
Nags Head, North Carolina for 
three or four days of beach fun. 
They stayed in hotels and cot- 
tages, with a few close friends, 
with sororities, fraternities, or 
other organizations. 

Before taking off, however. 



some essentials had to be gath- 
ered and loaded into the beach- 
bound vehicles. The necessary 
items included: beer, bathing 
suits, towels, liquor, sunscreen, 
money (or lack of), Poptarts 
(the breakfast food), sunglasses, 
beer, frisbees, a radio, and some 
trashy beach reading. 

Two o'clock was check-in 
time. "What? We can't have 10 
keys?" The rule of thumb was 
to cover every square inch of 
the floor with extra bodies to 
minimize the expenses, and the 
challenge to do it without the 
hotel owners finding out. Not 
an easy task, but it could be 




10/6 


Boxer Short Party with Theta 


10/13 


Boat Party 


10/26 


Derby Day Band Party 


10/27 


Derby Day 


12/1 


Insane Asylum Party 


12/8 


Christmas Party with Kappa for 




Underprivileged Children 


2/1 


Pink and Green Party 


3/16 


Sloe Gin Fizz/Ice Tea Party 


3/22 


Roadtrip Party with Theta 


3/24 


Jog-a-thon for Big Brothers of 




Williamsburg 


4/6 


Spring Semiformal 


4/24 


Sweetheart Dance 




HAPPY HOUR EVERY FRIDAY 





■< Row 1: Rick Baldwin, Greg Herceg, Laurie 
Pepple, Rodney Glasser, Carrie Stewart. Jeff 
Nelms, Mark Decker, Bob Winetraub; Row 2: 
Bob Rhoad. Ctiris Hartwigger, Alex Murptiy, 
Paul Calamlta, Steve Furman, Tom Lange, Chris 
Miller, Jim Lamb; Row 3: Tom Noble, Bill 
Sullivan, Terry Blackwood; Row 4; Steve 
Bommer, Dave Warner, Andy McCulla, Jimmy 
Skaporo, Derrick Koolman, Rusty Andrews, 
Larry Hanbeck, Jim Franklin; Row 5; Eric 
Jowett, Chris Fincher, Bobby Fothergill, Bill 
Hickman. Dave Maxwell, Roger Coomer, Steve 
Richards. Keith Palms. Wally Dryden. 

A Julie Lopp and Rusty Andrews enjoy the 
sunset together atop Jockey's Ridge. 

► (Opposite page): Mike Johnson has fun at 
Derby Day. even with a little egg on his head. 

< AX coach Corey Richardson cheers on his 
team. 



done. 

If you were lucky, you ar- 
rived early enough to catch the 
rays on Tuesday. Everything 
thrown in the room, except 
suit, towel, cooler, and lotion, 
you immediately hit the beach. 
The goal was to get as much sun 
as possible without getting 
burnt (especially the first day). 
The beach was good for many 
things besides sunning. To pass 
the time, activities included 
sleeping, walking, swimming, 
playing frisbee or paddle ball, 
reading, and more sleeping. 
The laws said there was to be no 
alcohol on the beach, but rules 
were made to be broken, or at 
least bent. 

After a full day on the beach, 
or in the stores if the cloud 
cover was thick, it was time to 
get ready for dinner. Getting 



9/8 
9/13 

9/29 

10/8 

10/13 

11/3 

12/7 

12/10 



12/10 

2/14 

4/6 

4/13 

4/24 



Barbecue with Little Sisters 
"Don't Look in the Basement" 

Party 
Orphans Only Party 
FacultyLESS Reception 
Golf Party 

Homecoming Alumni Reception 
Liquid Lunch 
Christmas Party/Magic Show for 

the Williamsburg Day Care 

Children 
Tree Trimming Party 
Valentine Pink Punch Party 
Baseball Party 
White Rose Formal 
Liquid Lunch 



< Row 1 ; Any Yacos, Greg Brooksher. Susan Mariner. David White. Teddy Lewis, Dave Calabrese. 
Tripp Davis. Mark McLanghlin. Pat Suart, Andy Furnas. Richard Wong. Jeff Baggish: Row 2: Allen 
Hall. Chris Kaczmarek, Ton Dungan. Brian Allera. Ken Blackwell. Earl Wise. Mark Jenkins. Bill 
Bateson. Bern Puc. Ben Weaver; Row 3; Bill Stokes. John Dalton. Mike Hoess. Dave Koman. Mike 
Dollard; Roof: Ben Langemaid, Kevin Goff. 

* Outdoor happy hours are popular outside in the spring as Tripp Davis and friends discovered 





ScfMZi A/U/ 




< Sigma Nu representative. Andy Furnas, returns DCs 
anchor at the closing of Anchor Splashes events. 

A Little Sister Colleen Cooke watches the sunset with 
Richard Wong at Nags Head. NC. 




Alpha Chis soak up the sunshine and Improve their tans in tront ot their hotel the Tanglewood. 



ready meant getting ten people 
in and out of one shower in five 
minutes flat. Dinners at the 
beach were always top-notch; 
McDonalds, peanut butter and 
jelly, cheese and crackers, and 
for the truly gourmet there was 
Pizza Hut. 

Dinner had to be done by 
7:30 p.m. so that everyone 
could make it to the top of 
Jockey's Ridge by sunset. The 
top of the sand dune was the 
social place to be and the great- 
est tradition surrounding Beach 
Week. Atop Jockey's Ridge you 
could talk to everyone about 
the festivities for the evening. 
Most party plans were made 
during sunset. Leaving Jockey's 
Ridge could be done several 
ways. Some people casually 
walked down, others ran, and 
the more adventuresome roiled 



▼ Row 1 ; Randy Revekert, Mark Sweeney; Row 2: Fred Amico. Steve Coniglio. Jim Hunter, Tom 
Look; Row 3: Burton Musiime. Ed Scherer, Ward Thomas, Rich Ohnmacht, Tom Peabody, Tom 
Trotter, Dave Klapp, Jon Mengenhauser, Mike Bachmann, Tracy Melton, Andrew Mangels; Row 4: 
Paul Harder. Chris Ensley. Carl Kumpf, Chris Taylor, Tom Bennert, Joe Devaney, Mark Rein, Tom 
Farrell. John Derrick, Bill Roesser, Marc Butler, Steve Baker, Joe Valentio. Terry Reiley; Row 5: 
John McCutcheon, Dave Braun, Chris Cox, Dave McCutcheon, Wayne Moe, Eddy Perry, Dan 
Walker, Derrick Riddle. Sam Hines, Greg Holmes; Row 6: Hans Erikson. Andy Lake, Frank 
Wallmeyer. Dana Gibboney, Gary Graizzaro. Anthony Royer. 

(Below) ► Dan Fitzgerald and Sig Ep Sweetheart Suzi Schaeffer eniov the sunset together from 
Jockey's Ridge, 
basketball team. 

> > Sig Eps Mark Butler and Fred Caprio lead the frat cheers at a basketball game. 



9/31 


Easter Egg Hunt for Blind Kids 


10/6 


"The Bitch is Toast" Party 


10/12 


Bullfrog Party 




Calendar Sale Proceeds 




for American Heart Fund 


11/12 


Viking Party 


2/16 


Valentine's Party 


4/2 


Cheap Wine Party 


4/15 


Movie Poster Sale 


4/25 


Sweetheart Dance 





Laura Head enjoys her last evening with her brother Dan Head 



a 



Sccfffvcu PkC £psc£0H^ 









♦- ■•''^<:; .^r*" -.- -.^C ■:• 






J^' 



The beach is not only for sunning. Many, like these Theta Delts, enjoyed frisbee and paddle ball too. 



down the side. 

Nightlight at Nags Head was 
varied and exciting. Many 
visited the Carolinian's lounge 
on Tuesday and Wednesday 
nights to hear Speidel, Good- 
rich, and Goggin. For others 
there were parties of all kinds. 
Nags Head parties ranged from 
large sorority or fraternity bash- 
es to quiet private parties on 
the beach, often with a bonfire. 
The most unique party was a 
ride on John Monhollon's party 
bus. The bus was equipped with 
two couches, a loud radio, and 
a keg. The party bus rocked up 
and down the island dropping 
off and picking up passengers 
as she went. 

Almost 1,100 students went 
to Beach Week '85. All went for 
different reasons and with dif- 
ferent expectations. Some, like 



Tketa Odta CAC 



tP X. 




AScott Gleason and two of his friends race down DOG Street. Right: Theta Delts. 
with the help of the Kappas, prepare Easter eggs for an egg roll at Eastern State 




Gamma kicked off the weekend 
with their Pre-Splash Bash 
where KA Tom Crapps was 
named Mr. Anchor Splash. The 
following day, Adair pool was 
the site of the final battle in 
which the frats competed in 
such events as "Brew-Thru" and 
the "Hangover Relay." At the 
end of the day . the tally showed 
that Delta Gamma had netted 
close to $2,500 for their national 
philanthropy, Aid to the Blind. 
Philanthropies are a major 
part of the Greek system. Many 
hours are spent in planning so 
that a major fundraiser will go 
off without a hitch. Laura Bel- 
cher, of Alpha Chi Omega, 
stated "It's important that peo- 
ple outside the Greek system 
know that philanthropies are a 
large part of Greek life. We do 
more than just party." 
— Kathy Starr 





10/27 Polynesian Party 

10/31 Trick or Treat for Unicef 

12/7 Christmas Dance 

12/9 Santa Party 

2/14 Valentines Day Party 

3/23 Hairy Buffalo 

3/31 Big Brother Banquet 

4/6 Pledge Project 

4/5-7 Initiation 



► Row 1 : Alex Bowman, Walter Stone. Todd Eddons, Mark 
Osher. Pete Huntress. Gabe Gugliemo. Bill Crawford. Jeff Fish. 
Chip Puskar. Shawn McClaIn: Row 2: Pitt Tomlinson. Doug 
Brinkley. Scott Flynn. Kevin Ward. Ross Spicer. Mark 
Ghorayeb. Mike Zwicklbauer. Tom Brooks. Kiki. Pete Ferre. 
Chris Megale. Roy Chns Roak. Clem Chang. Mike Lorch. 
Chris Kontos; Row 3: Mike Fetters, Bob Baterhorsl Chad 
Peterson. Chris Amerello. Steve Smith. Greg Tepper: Row 4; 
Micah Yarbrough, Matt Dowdy. Todd Runkle. Pat O'Day. John 
Hendnckson. John Reynolds. Jim Lovegren. Charles Miscio. 
Alex Kallen; Row 5: Jeff Williams. Doug Pierson. Scott Sloan, 
Jay Sailer. Jeff Matiyka. Steve Silverberg. Chris Neikirk. Kevin 
Conner. Mark Sweet George Kunsky. Damon Butler. Garrick 
Memch. Jim Chappell. Doug Boone. Paul Libassi; Row 6: 
Chns Sailer, Jamie Young. John Field. Bob Ross. Alan 
Ashworlh. Clay Dye. Dan Hill. John Peluso. Sujit Moharty. 
Mike Cook. Dennis Whelan, Henry Spaulding, Mike Sapner, 
Mike Powell. 

A This Theta Delt directs his float down DOG Street in the 
homecoming parade. 



» •«».^» Wfc". 



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tr 





Every day at sunset, as many as 1 ,200 students climb the sandy sides of Jockey's Ridge to socialize and to bid the day farewell 



DIRECTORY: 

New President 266 

Publish or Perish 272 

Seniors 274 

Juniors 316 

Sophomores 330 

Freshmen 334 

Graduates 359 




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THE COLONIAL ECHO 




265 



TIME FOR CHANGE 

President Thomas Graves Resigns After 13 Years 
AtW & M; George Healy Serves As Interim President; 
Paul Verkuil Takes Over in Fall 1985 



Much had been made over 
the year about the transition 
between William and Mary, the 
College, and William and Mary, 
the University. Perhaps we have 
made the dichotomy a bit too 
sharp, but there had been 
changes in philosophy and per- 
sonnel which led one to see a 
concerted effort on the part of 
the College's administration to 
pursue a more heightened uni- 
versity status. To many. Presi- 
dent Thomas A. Graves' resigna- 
tion marked the end of an era. 
Said Provost and acting presi- 
dent George Healy of Graves' 
resignation, "Thirteen and a 
half years is a long time at an 
institution, and every institution 
need to grow. . .1 think it made 
sense [for Graves] to go." By 
stepping down at this turning 
point in the College's history. 
Graves made way for a new 
generation to move the College 
in a new direction, according to 
Healy. 

Graves' resignation was met 
with mixed emotions. Many 
faculty members, who felt that 
Graves had distanced himself 
from their concerns, felt the 
College needed a new presi- 
dent. Disputes about faculty 



salaries over the past few years 
strained relations between fac- 
ulty and administration. Many 
students, however, regarded 
Graves with affection, shower- 
ing him with gifts and goodwill 
at his last Yule Log Ceremony. 
The senior class invited Graves 
and his wife, Zoe, to attend the 
Commencement Exercises. 

In retrospect. Graves' tenure 
at William and Mary produced 
significant accomplishments. 
One of Graves' most lasting 
contributionstostudent life was 
his support of the policy of self- 
determination. Prior to Graves' 
appointment in 1971, no co-ed 
dorms existed, and students had 
no say in determining dorm 
visitation policies. Graves also 
gave fund raising a much- 
needed shot in the arm. Ac- 
cording to Healy. "When we 
came here, there was no fund 
raising effort organized at all." 
Since 1971, endowments have 
increased from $10 million to 
$32 million, according to an 
article in the February 8, 1985 
issue of the Flat Hat. Healy also 
credited much of the Mus- 
carelle's success to Graves, who 
"pushed it from the first." 
Under Graves, the physical 



dimensions of William and 
Mary also grew, as $15 million 
was spent on student housing, 
in 1984-85, the Administration 
began to believe that the Col- 
lege needed to expand aca- 
demically in order to compete 
with larger state universities for 
Virginia's best students. At this 
point. Graves felt it was wisest 
for him to move, and the search 
for a new president began. 

The seventeen-member 
search committee, headed by 
Rector Anne Dobie Peebles, 
screened over 230 applicants 
for the position. On November 
30, the Flat Hat announced the 
six candidates remaining. In late 
December the committee recom- 
mended three applicants to the 
Board of Visitors. The BOV an- 
nounced its choice, Paul R. 
Verkuil, the day after first semes- 
ter exams ended. Verkuil, 45, 
received his bachelors degree 
in English from William and 
Mary in 1961. After graduating 
from the University of Virginia's 
law school, he practiced law in 
his native New York before 
accepting a teaching position at 
the University of North Caro- 
lina's law school. Verkuil came 
to William and Mary from 



266 




< Thomas Graves, in his last Yule Log 
address, presents the grinche's 
abused dog. Max. to the delight of the 
crowd. Photo by Mike Nikolich 



▼ Moving out. March 13. 1985. The 
long process of moving begins for the 
Graves family. Photo by Adam Avel 




267 



NEW PRESIDENT, con't. 



Tulane University, where he 
served as dean of the law 
school. 

In February, Verkuil told Flat 
HcH editor Greg Schneider that 
he hoped to heighten William 
and Mary's university status. 
Said Verkuil in the interview, 
"My theme will be to bring 
together the undergraduate 
and graduate schools as much 
as possible." Verkuil reiterated 
this theme in the March 1985 
issue of the Alumni Gazette, 
saying that "we will emphasize 
that aspect of the college and 
university life, the graduate and 
professional programs and the 
research potential of the fac- 
ulty." Verkuil also told the 
Gazette that he would work to 
see William and Mary "really 
gain that national recognition 
that it deserves and realize its 
potential as a university." Other 
priorities Verkuil mentioned 
throughout the early months of 
1985 included a possible, 
reorganization of W & M's 
administration, fund raising, 
faculty salaries, and minority 
recruitment. 





f V ^■ 



% 



r-i^ 





268 




Provost George Healy served 
as the acting president from the 
time of Graves' resignation until 
Verkuil's inauguration during 
the summer. As arting presi- 
dent, Healy tried to ease the 
transition between administra- 
tions. Healy helped to prepare 
Verkuil for his new job "pretty 
much over the phone." Accord- 
ing to Healy, Verkuil handled 
the transition well, realizing 
that "we certainly don't need 
two presidents at the same 
time." As president Healy had a 
more direct involvement with 
the Board of Visitors and with 
athletics. In addition to his new 
duties as president, Healy still 
retained his old responsibilities 
as provost. Said Healy, "I seem 
to sign my name on a lot more 
things." 



< A "I seem to sign my name on a bit 
more things'" Acting president George 
Healy attends to the mounds of paper- 
work that accompany his titles. Photo 
by Maryanne Kondracki 
A As acting president Healy presided 
over the commencement ceremonies. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 
4 Members o( the faculty t)egin the 
recessional at commencement Photo 
by Mike Nikolich 



269 




President-elect Paul Verkuil discusses editor Greg Schneider, Photo by 
his plans for the College with Flat Hat Rodney Willett 



270 



President, con't. 



when asked what he thought 
of Verkuil's "heightened uni- 
versity image" philosophy, 
Healy responded cautiously. 
Healy said that over the past 
twenty years, William and Mary 
had grown from a liberal arts 
college into a university struc- 
ture. Although he agreed with 
Verkuil's desire for growth, he 
expressed a wish that the under- 
graduate experience remain 
central to William and Mary. 
According to Healy, at the best 
universities, which concern 
themselves with grants and re- 
search and are more graduate 
and vocationally oriented, the 
undergraduate experience is 
lacking. Healy was confident 
that Verkuil would pursue the 
College's goal to remain a small, 
but high-quality research insti- 
tution. As for enhancing the 
graduate programs in the pur- 
suit of a heightened university 
status, Healy said that the grad- 
uate programs would not 
develop rapidly because of 
funding difficulties, but that 
"solidly based" departments 
might get doctoral programs in 
a few years. He forsaw no 
danger of an irresponsible 
growth that would abandon 
W&M's ideals. Furthermore, 
Healy claimed that there will be 
no real growth potential in the 
next ten years, concluding, 
"Even if we wanted to be UVa, 
no one would fund it." Thus, 
while William and Mary began 
to improve its reputation as a 
university in 1984-85, the Col- 
lege seemed just as determined 
to maintain its emphasis on the 
undergraduate experience. 

— Kim Moosha 



271 



PUBLISH 



OR 



PERISH 



"As a member of the academic pro- 
fession and of the faculty of William 
and Mary, the faculty member should 
seek to be an effective teacher and 
scholar at all times. Specific criteria for 
awarding salary increases to a faculty 
member are the same as those for 
promotion and include: possession of 
the professional education, experience, 
and degrees necessary for his or her 
duties; conscientious and effective 
teaching with proper command of the 
material of his or her field, and help- 
fulness to students; significant contribu- 
tions to his or her field through research 
and scholarly or artistic activity, and 
through professional service; and re- 
sponsible participation in departmen- 
tal, faculty, and college governance." 

A number of William and Mary faculty 
members were interviewed by the Col- 
onial Echo on the basis of the above 
selection from the faculty handbook. One 
government professor said three basic 
elements will effect a professor's chance 
of attaining tenure or promotion, and 
they are teaching, research, and service 
with the emphasis ratio being 2:2:1 
respectively. The Colonial Echo delved 
deeper into the research aspect of this 
criteria. 

The first question asked of professors 
was, "Do publication requirements vary 
among the different departments at Wil- 
liam and Mary? The answer was over- 
whelmingly affirmative. Publication means 
different things in different departments. 
A professor in the Art department might 
exhibit a painting or sculpture, a biologist 
might publish a magazine article, and a 
history professor might publish a book. 
All of these works would be defined as 
scholarly activity for their respeaive de- 
partments. The term 'scholarly activity' is 
not applied only to publishing a work, 



many professors write book reviews, edit 
books or articles, participate on confer- 
ence papers and speak for scholarly 
groups. 

The next question asked of the faculty 
was, "Do you feel that your class load is 
light enough so that you have sufficient 
time to devote to your research and 
writing? Most of the teachers questioned 
answered "not really". The number of 
students and the variety of classes during a 
semester seem to take up most of their 
time. They say that the only time they can 
really devote to research is during vaca- 
tion or leave. William and Mary began a 
program about eight years ago to help 
facilitate research through summer re- 
search money and availability of semester 
leaves. Such leaves relieve professors of 
teaching and allow them to concentrate 
on research. 





Mike Nikolich 



272 




< Most professors of science at W & M have the 
facilities to do research but very little time or money. 
Professor of Chemistry Robert Orvioll shov\(S off his 
computer. 

▼ Robert W. Smith, professor of government 
participated in our poll of the faculty. 





To apply for time off, one must submit 
his or her proposal to the Faculty Research 
Committee, these leaves are very competi- 
tive. Depending on the merit of the pro- 
posal and the availability of leaves, a 
professor can expect to attain a sabatical 
about every five to six years. Also, many 
private foundations such as the National 
Endowment of Humanities, as well as, 
private contributions will provide neces- 
sary funding for various research projects. 
When asked if William and Mary provided 
any distinct advantages for research, sev- 
eral professors commented on the fine 
reputation that William and Mary had 
outside of the college community. 

In conclusion, the final question asked 
was about the old adage about publish or 
perish. Is this a factor at William and Mary? 
Perhaps the answer given by Government 
Professor, R. W. Smith summarizes the 

< Many faculty members no longer attend 
graduation for lack of interest or lack of time. The 
faculty that did attend commencement withheld 
their excitement at the ceremony. 



attitude, "people know that they are ex- 
pected to do this... it is not a ruthless 
atmosphere". 

Many feel thatthe emphasis on publica- 
tion has been elevated over the last decade 
to the point that one must publish to 
attain tenure. As recently as eight years 
ago, it was still possible to attain tenure 
(but not probable) without publishing; 
now this is not possible. Publishing also 
has a bearing on promotion and annual 
salary. The Retention, Promotion, and 
Tenure Committee makes such decisions, 
and the quality and quantity of publica- 
tions are equally important. So, while 
there are no specific requirements handed 
out to each professor, ail are aware that it 
is important, both to the students and to 
themselves to pursue 'scholarly activity' to 
prevent stagnation and stimulate intellec- 
tual interests. 

— Melanie McDaniel 



273 



E N I O R S 



Jill O. Acree 



J: 



Douiy ■ 



l\^K^I -Jl_/I 



Eileen Anderson 

Karen Anderson 

Lori Anderson 

Maribeth Anderson 

Patricia Anderson 



Lisa Antonelli 

Virginia Arata 

Sharon Archer 

Arlene Marie Armilla 

Todd Armstrong 



MargretAshburn 

Harry A. Austin 

Victoria Avery 

Laura Avis 

Olufemi Awotesu 




Qmf) 



Louise Quinn Babara 

Douglas Badeau 

Jeff Baggish 

Benton Bailey 

David Bailey 



274 





SENIORS 




Belvin Baum 
Ana Beardsley 
Mark Beasley 
Donna Becker 
Karen Beckwith 



Lydia Bailey 
Bonnie Bakeman 
John Ball 

Andrea Lynn Balliette 
Leann Banke 



JOHN p. ABBOT (Cha^'ottesville) 

English— Interdisciplinary Honors Program 

82-3. Flat Hat. JUMP! 

JILL O. AGREE (McLean) 

Accounting— Kappa Delta, BSA, CSA, Phi 

Alpha Theta. 

AILEEN H. ADERTON (Lynchburg) 

Accounting— Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 

Society. Little Sister Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 

Commencement Committee (chairman), Jr. 

Board, Soph. Steering. 

JENNIFER A. ALACANTARA (Nashville. TN) 

Management— Alpha Chi Omega (rec. sec). 

College Republicans (public relations 

director). Phi Eta Sigma. 

JANICE M. ALLEN (Augusta, GA) 

Public Policy— Delta Sigma Theta (pres. v.p.), 

BSO (sec). Young Democrats, President's 

Aide, Omicron Delta Kappa, Pi Sigma Alpha. 

BRIAN ALLEVA (Fairfax) 

Computer Science. 

CARRIE M. ALLISON (Nokesville) 

Education— Gamma Phi Beta. VSEA 

CHARLES ALM (Dix Hills, NY) 

Elementary Education— New Testament. 

Chnstian Fellowship. 

HEATHER AMES (Herndon) 

History/ Fine Arts— Phi Alpha Theta, JUMP! 

DOUG ANDERSON (Alexandria) 

Economics 

EILEEN ANDERSON (Broadalbin, NY) 

English— Creative Arts House, Science Fiction 

Club. 

KAREN A. ANDERSON (Springfield) 
Math— Youth Soccer Coach, Delta Phi Alpha. 



LORI L. ANDERSON (Manassas) 

Psychology— Alpha Phi Omega, Choir 

(Historian), Chorus, Psi Chi. 

MARIBETH ANDERSON (Janesville, NJ) 

History— Collegiate Aerobics, Bryan Dorm 

Council. 

PATRICIA M. ANDERSON (Springfield) 

Economics/ Math— Alpha Phi Omega, Econ 

Club, Omicron Delta Epsilon. 

LISA A. ANTONELLI (Alexandria) 

History. 

VIRGINIA ARATA (Williamsburg) 

Anthropology. 

SHARON ARCHER (Amherst, MA) 

Chemistry. 

ARLENE M. ARMILLA (Vienna) 

Government/Spanish— Office of Career 

Planning (intern). Young Democrats, 

International Circle (tres.), Sigma Delta Pi. 

TODD R. ARMSTRONG (Newport, Rl) 

English/History— Sigma Alpha Epsilon (vp, 

pledge trainer, sec), W&M Review, 

Publications Council, R.A. 

MARGARET ASHBURN (Indianapolis, IN) 

English. 

HARRY A. AUSTIN (Earlysville) 

Philosophy— Debate Council (v.p.). 

VICTORIA AVERY (Alexandria) 

Geology. 

LAURA J. AVIS (Arlington) 

Computer Science— Alpha Chi Omega, 

Chorus. O A.. Tour Guide, Delta Omicron. 

OLUFEMI B. AWOTESU (Lagos, Nigeria) 

Economics— President's Aide, Economics 

Club (pres.). International Circle (v p.) 



Ronald Barden 
Michelle Barnes 
Julie Baroody 
Monica Baroody 
Allan Bartolich 



LOUISE Q. BABARA (Old Brookville, NY) 

Management. 

DOUGLAS BADEAU (Oldsmar. FL) 

Computer Science/Economics— ACM. 

JEFF BAGGISH (Va. Beach)— Chemistry. 

BENTON BAILEY (Williamsburg) History. 

DAVID BAILEY (Nokesville)— History. 

LYDIA BAILEY (Carrollton)— Fine Arts. 

BONNIE A. BAKEMAN (Lewisburg. PA) 

Government/Economics— Delta Gamma, Pi 

Sigma Alpha. 

JOHN BALL (Annandale)— Government 

ANDREA L. BALLIETTE (Cape May Court, NJ) 

Computer Science. 

LEANN BANKE (Emmaus, PA). 

RONALD L. BARDEN (Powhatan) 

Accounting— Kappa Sigma, Varsity Baseball. 

MICHELLE BARNES (Sioux City, lA) 

Economics- Chi Omega, Tour Guide, CSA. 

Economics Club, Emory Business, Sigma Chi 

Little Sister. 

JULIE H. BAROODY (Richmond)— 

French. 

MONICA BAROODY (Annandale) 

Government. 

ALLEN G. BARTOLICH (Prii 

Economics— Lambda Chi Ai, , 

Football. P.E. Majors Club. 



275 



SENIORS 



nett 



Karen Berg 

Lee Bergen 

Ronald Bergman 

Margaret Berry 

Shannon C. Berry 





ven lit up at 
night, Oliver, the large metal 
statue outside Andrews 
doesn't catch one's eye the 
way the controversial sun 
sonata at the Muscarelli 
lights up Jamestown Road. 
Photo by John Maisto 









276 



SENIORS 



1 


JERRY BEGLEY (Vienna, VA) Government 


DANIEL W. BEST (Charlottesville) 


MATTHEW C. BLUM (Silver Springs. MD) 


AMY BELL(Mechanicsville) Religion. 


Greek/ Biology — Chi Phi Tau, Biology Club, 


Economics— Phi Mu Alpha (sec). Choir, 


LAURIE A. BELL (Pittsburg) 
Accounting— Beta Gamma Sigma, Mortar 


(v.p., sec). Health Careers Club (sec, pres), 


Economics Club. Pre-Law Club, WCWM, 


Classics Club, Phi Sigma. 


Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Beta Kappa. 


Board, Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society, 


KARLA E. BEYER (Huntington, NY) 


JILL E. BOBBIN (Convent Sta., NJ) 


(v.p.). Circle K. 


Business— Phi Mu, CMA. 


French— Kappa Alpha Theta, Tour Guide. 


LYNN BENNETT (Millville, NJ) Accounting. 


ERIC BEYMA (Gaithersburg. MD) Psychology. 


French Drill. 


WILLIAM J. BENNbl 1 (Springfield) 


BRUCE BIBER (Miller River, MA) 


ELIZABETH BOBST (Mt Kisco, NY) 


Accounting — Pi Kappa Alpha, Circle K, Dorm 


History /French. 


English. 


Council, Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society. 


MARGARET BICKLEY (Arlington) Psychology. 


DAVID BOGARDUS (Va Beach) History. 


KAREN BERG (Arlington) Government 


ANNE BIERMAN (Chagrin Falls, OH) 


HOWARD BOS (Williamsburg) Geology. 


L DOUGLAS BERGEN (Northfield, NJ) 


Accounting— Gamma Phi Beta, Womens Golf 




English. 


(capt). 




RONALD W. BERGMAN (New Castle, DE) 


GREG BIRSINGER (Acton, MA) Accounting. 




History/Government— BSU, CHET. 


DAVID BISESE (Va. Beach) 




MARGARET J. BERRY (Wayne. IL) 


Computer Science. 




International Relations— Phi Beta Kappa, Phi 


JENNIFER BLACKWELL (Roanoke) 




Alpha Theta 


Elementary Education. 




SHANNON C. BERRY (Richmond) 


SUSAN BLAKE Bena) 




Human Relations— Pi Beta Phi, Pres. Fresh 


Accounting— SA (treas.), Wayne F. Gibbs 




Class, Campus Crusade for Christ 


Accounting Society, SAC. 






▲ 1 





Ml MM 





Dan Best 
Karia Elena Beyer 
Eric Beynna 
Bruce Biber 
Margaret Bickley 



Anne Bierman 
Gregory Birsinger 
David Bisese 
Jennifer Blackwell 
Susan Blake 



Matthew Blum 
Jill Elizabeth Bobbin 
Elizabeth Bobst 
David Bogardus 
Howard Bos 



SENIORS 



.'ling 



Jeff Bradshaw 

Michael P. Branch 

Andrew Brandt 

Terri Brannon 

Frederic Braxton 



Terrence Scott Brazil 
Terese Breidenbach 

Vance Briceland 
Jennifer Broad 

Jennifer L Brock 



Jeffrey Brockman 

Gordon Brooks 

Howard Brooks 

Matthew Brooks 

Nancy Brooks 



Thomas W. Brooks 

Heather Brown 

James Brown 

Tracy Brownlee 

Sandra Brubaker 



Gary Bryant 

Janet Buckner 

Laura Buechner 

Penelope S. Buell 

Lavonne Burger 




^ 




r. o 








SENIORS 



DENISE BOSCOE (Amber. PA) 

Government — Delta Gannma, Va. Pirg. 

JACKIE BOSTON (Fredrick. MD) 

Classical Studies. 

SUSAN BOWE (Williamsburg) 

Human Relations — Mermettes (co-capt.), 

Psychology Club, Montpellier Program. 

MELISSA L. BOWLING (Hopewell) 

Elementary Education— Kappa Delta, Choir. 

JOHN BOYD (Richmond) 

Philosophy/Anthropology—Pi Kappa Alpha. 

JEFF BRADSHAW (Colonial Heights) Biology. 

MIKE BRANCH (Arlington) 

English /Psychology— English Honors. Psi 

Chi, Psychology Club. Ultimate Wizards, 

Diving Team. F.H.C. Society. 

ANDREW BRANDT (Richmond) 

Physics/Economics— Theater Orchestra. 

Alpha Phi Omega. Physics Club, Economics 

Club. Phi Beta Kappa. 

TERRI L BRANNON (Sterling) 

History— Phi Mu, SEA. 

FREDRICK BRAXTON (Ashland) 

English/Anthroplogy—BSO, Anthropology 

Club. Pre-Law Club. 

TERRENCE S. BRAZIL (Chesapeake) 

Psychology. 

TERESE BREIDENBACH (D.C.) Spanish. 

W. VANCE BRICELAND (Richmond) 

Psychology— Psychology Club, Theater, 

Premier Theater, Sinfonicron, WCWM. Dorm 

Council. 

JENNIFER BROAD (Chagrin Falls, OH) 

JENNIFER BROCK (Wilmington, DE) 

Chemistry— Alpha Phi Omega, Facts and 

Referrals, Chemistry Club. Phi Alpha Theta. 

JEFFREY BROCKMAN (Lynchburg) 



Accounting— Lambda Chi Alpha, Rugby Club, 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes. 
GORDON BROOKS (Adelphi. MD) 
Economics/Computer Science— Pi Kappa 
Alpha. RA. Head Resident SAC, JV Soccer. 
HOWVARD BROOKS Richmond) 
Sociology— Tour Guide. Phi Mu Alpha, 
Theater, Circle K. Sinfonicron. 
MATTHEW BROOKS (Bernardsville. NJ) 
Government— Varsity Basketball. 
NANCY BROOKS (Richmond, ID) 
Economics— Delta Delta Delta. BSA. 
THOMAS W. BROOKS (Fairfax) Economics. 
HEATHER BROWN (Greenville. SC) 
Economics— Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Chi Little 
Sister. Tennis Team, Campus Crusade. 
JAMES B. BROWN (Richmond) 
Biology— SA, RA, Spirit Council. 
TRACY BROWNLEE (Fairfax) 
Accounting— Kappa Alpha Theta. (pres., 
activities chair.). Junior Board, WMCF, Wayne 
F. Gibbs Accounting Club. 
SANDRA BRUBAKER (Philadelphia) 
Psychology. 

GARY M. BRYANT (N. Grafton, MA) 
Economics — Circle K. 

JANET BUCKNER (Williamsburg) Psychology. 
LAURA BUECHNER (Hampton) 
Business— CSA, Dorm Council. 
PENELOPE S. BUELL (Arlilngton) 
Psychology/Sociology— Psi Chi, Ultimate 
Wizards, Psychology Club, Sociology Club. 
LAVONNE BURGER (Hampton) 
Elementary Education— Alpha Chi Omega. 
SEA, Young Democrats, Dorm Council. Spirit 
Club. 

JANE BURGESS (Capron) 



Economics— Kappa Alpha Theta (chaplain), 

Circle K (social chair.). Dorm Council Rep., Phi 

Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Alpha. 

KRISTI BURGESS (Vienna) Accounting. 

COLLEEN BURKE (Scituate, MA) Business. 

LESLIE BURKE (Newport News) Math. 

THORNTON G. BURNETTE (Lynchburg) 

Business— Sigma Phi Epsilon. CMA. 

WILLIAM BURRUS (Linville) History. 

LEE ANNE BUSCH (White Stone) 

English— Mortar Board. President's Aide, SA 

(pres.). BSA. College Republicans. Resident 

Director Off-Campus Student House. 

DAVID F. BUTLER (Stuttgart. W. Ger.) 

Chemistry/ Economics— Mortar Board. Alpha 

Phi Omega, (rp), BSA, Career Speaker Series 

(dir.). 

DAVID M. BUTLER (Atlanta, GA) 

Biology— Lambda Chi Alpha, Varsity 

Basketball. 

KEVIN BYARS (Arlington) 

Accounting— Lambda Chi Alpha, Wayne F. 

Gibbs Accounting Society, SA. 

ANNE BYNUM (Fairfax) Accounting. 

SUSAN CAMERON-POLESNAK (Richmond) 

Business. 

ROBERT R. CAMP (E. Williston, NY) 

Biology/ Physics— Phi Sigma (v.p ), WCWM. 

JENNIFER B. CAMPBELL (Berwyn. PA) 

Acounting— Kappa Kappa Gamma. Mortar 

Board. Honor Council (v.p.). CSA (treas.). OA, 

Dorm Council. 

FRED B. CAPRIO (Hampton) 

Government— Sigma Phi Epsilon (Rush chair. 

Social chair.), IFC, Asst to Director W&M Hall. 




James Burgess 
Kristi Burgess 
Colleen Burke 
Leslie Burke 
Thornton G. Burnette 



^^ife 




William Burruss 
Lee Anne Bush 
David F. Butler 
David M. Butler 
Kevin Byars 



Anne Bynum 

Susan Cameron-Paoesnak 

Robert Camp 

Jennifer Campbell 

Fred B. Caprio 



SENIORS 



Amy Cdramanicu 

Julie Carlson 

)onathon R. Casev 

James Cason 

Michael T. Caughev 



Trudy E. Caughey 

Toni Chaos 

Paul H. Chapman 

Jim Chappell 

Alison Chappli 



Keith Lieplicki 

David Clark 

Emily Clark 

Keith Clark 

David Clarke 




AMY R. CARAMANICA (W- ^t^ .h.-^, 

Philosophy— Philosophy C b. 

JULIE CARLSON (Va Bea 

JONATHONR. CASEY (D. y 

JAMES CASON (Malvern. NY) Engiisn. 

MICHAEL T. CAUGHEY (Williamsburg) 

Biology 

TRUDY F. CAUGHEY (Willi--" Fine Arts 

TONI CHAOS (Lynchburg :— BSU 

ader). Kappa Alj, 
3ns. 
PAL 
Cor 

Backorop Clijb. VvC 
JAMES E.CHAPPEL^ 
Biology— Theta Delt:^ 
ALLISON CHAPPLE,„.^,_.__^ cs. 



KEITH CIEPLICKI (Burlington. VT) 

Religion— Varsity Basketball. 

DAVID A. CLARK (Princeton. NJ) 

History/ English— Rat Haf. Phi Alpha Theta. 

EMILY A. CLARK (Richmond) 

Music— Canterbury, Choir. Kappa Delta. Delta 

Omicron. 

KEITH CLARK (Chesapeake) English. 
DAVID E. CLARKE (Alexandria) 
History— Pre-Law Club. Phi Alpha Theta. 
Amnesty International. 

AMANDA CLEMENTS (Livermore. CA) 
Biology. 

FRANKIE CLEMENTS (Richmond) 

Economics. 

KAREN A. CLOSE (Vienna) 

Biology— Sinfonicron. New Testament 



Association. Health Careers Club, Phi Beta 

Kappa. Phi Sigma, Pi Delta Phi. Phi Eta Sigma. 

MARY B. COATES (Richmond) 

English— RA, JV LcCrosse. Pi Beta Phi (social 

chair). SAC. 

ROB COBLE (Va. Beach) 

Accounting— Sigma Chi. Wayne F. Gibbs 

Accounting Society. RA. 

CHRISTOPHER P. COCHRAN 

(Clarksville. MD)— Economics. 

LAURIE A. COGSWELL (Arlington) 

Math— Delta Gamma. Marching Band. 

Concert Band. 

MITCHELL E. COHEN (Springfield) 

Business— SA (sec). RA. 

CHRIS COLE (Richmond) Psychology. 
JULIA COLLINS (Va. Beach) Psychology. 



280 



SENIORS 



3 autumn sun setting, Mary Coates 
relaxes in the Sunken Gardens and enjoys 
momentary escape from the viscious cycle of 
never-ending wretchedness surrounding her. 
Buckwheat, an inhabitant of the Lodge Area 
Zoo. shares the moment with her. frolicking 
through fallen leaves. Photo (and caption) by 
Mike Nikolich 





Amanda Clements 
Frankie Clements 
Karen Close 
Mary Coates 
Rob Coble 



Christopher Cochran 
Laurie Cogswell 
Mitchell E.Cohen 
Chris Cole 
Julia Collins 



SENIORS 



Susan Cousins 

Katherine Covert 

Caroline Cox 

Martin Cox 

Virginia Cox 




SCOTT C. COMMANDER (Va. Beach) 

Economics— RA, SAC. Economics Club. 

MARILYN COMPTON (Pearl River, NY) 

Business. 

MICHAEL S. COMPTON (Alexandria) 

Government— Varsity Football, BSU. Dorm 

Council. 

MELISSA D. COMPTON (Silver Springs, MD) 

Anthropology— Alpha Phi Omega. 

Anthropology Club, Riding Club, 

Fine Arts Society. 

THOMAS COOK (Annandale) 

Biology— Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

MARY J. COONEY (F 

Biology— Ciicle Kfr 

TOMCOPENHAGEP 

JOANNE C0PP0L;5 



/^ernment. 
son Sta., NY) 
Choir. CSA. 
lation, Delta 



Omicron 

niawA rORDOVANA (Chesapeake) 

-Alpha Phi Omega, Navigators. 



CHRISTOPHER B. COSTL 

History— Lambda Cti: ' ' 
SUSAN L. COUSINS 



KATHARINE COVER 
Chemistry — Chemis' 
Epsilon 

CAROLINE COX ( = 
MARTIN COX 



virikairviip 
French- 



le, MD) 



■^y. OA. Dorm 



Council, 

MARY COYLE (Christiansburg) Math. 

J. SCOTT CRAIG (Cincinnati. OH) 

Accounting— Pi Kappa Alpha. WCWM, Flat 

Hat Direct-Marketing. Campus Crusade. RA, 

OA, Tour Guide, SCJ. 

THOMAS P. CRAPPS (Live Oak, PL) 

Psychology— Kappa Alpha. 

LAWRENCE CRONIN (Norwell. MA) 

COLLEEN M. CROWLEY (Vienna) 

Biology — Orienteering Club. 

LEIGH CRUMMER (Fairfax) 

Accounting — Sigma Nu, Wayne F. Gibbs 

Accounting Society. Delta Delta Delta (pres.). 

GREG A. CRUMP (Blue Bell, PA) 
Business Management— Phi Kappa Alpha. 
Direct Marketing of Williamsburg, Inc.. 
Collegiate Management Association, Men's 

Swimming (co-captain). 

JULIA CRUTCHFIELD (New York, NY) English, 

KEVIN K. CULLATHER (Valley Forge. PA) 

Government— Alpha Phi Omega, Senior Class 

Gift Chairman. SAC. Off-Campus Student 

Council. 

SHEILA CUNEEN (Cinnaminson. NJ) English. 

LAUREN CUNNINGHAM (Richmond) History. 

LAURA CUSHMAN (Boston. MA) 

Human Relations— Rifle Team. Rifle Club. HBA 

(pres.). Adult Skills Program. LADS. 

DINAH DALEY (Nashville. TN) History. 

HORACE L. DANIEL (Chester) 

Business Management. 

LISA LEE DANIELS (Arlington) English. 

WILLIAM H. DARKE (Groveland. MA) 

Business Management— Sigma Chi. 

PHIL DAVI (Masapequi. NY) Economics. 



DOROTHY DAVIDSON (Arlington) 
Business Administration— National 
Advertising Honor Society. Alpha Phi Omega. 
Collegiate Management Association. 
Advertising Society. 
SUSAN DAVIS (Richmond) 
Biology— Phi Beta Phi (ass't treas.. treas.). 
O.A.. dorm council. 
STUART DEATON (Manakin) 
Economics/ Biology— Kappa Sigma (treas., 
housemanager). Economics Club. 

RICHARD DECKER (Roanoke) Economics. 

KEITH DELONG (Virginia Beach) Geology. 

JOHN U. DENNIS (Norfolk) 

Biology — Alpha Phi Omega. Young Life 

Leadership. WMCF. Choir, BSU. Wesley 

Foundation. Men's Intramurals. 

DIANE DESMOND (Warrenton) 

International Relations — O.A., Women's Swim 

Team, Semester in France, Pi Lambda Phi 

Little Sister. Sophomore Steering Committee. 

Junior Board, Circle K. 

VINCENT J. DICINDIO (South Plainfield, NJ) 

Business Management— Pre-Law Club, 

Collegiate Management Association, 

Wrestling. 

SHEILA DIGGS (Lawrenceville) 

English— Black Student Organization. 

DESIREE DIMAURO (Lima. Peru) Biology. 
ANNEMARIE DINARDO (Haymarket) 
Economics— Varsity and Intramural Volleyball. 
MARTHA DIXON (Lynchburg) English. 
LAURIE DOBBINS (Virginia Beach) 
Biology— Chi Omega. Rugby. 



S E N I 







\^ /f 










Mary Coyle 
Scott J. Craig 
Thomas Crapps 
Laurence Cronin 
Colleen Crowley 



Leigh Crummer 
Gregg Crump 
Julia Crutchfield 
Kevin Cullather 
Sheila Cuneen 



Lauren Cunningham 
Laura C. Cushman 
Dinah Daley 
Horace Daniel 
Lisa Lee Daniels 



William Darke 
Phil Davi 

Dorothy Davidson 
Susan Davis 
Stuart A. Deaton 



Richard Decker 
Keith Delong 
John Dennis 
Diane Desmond 
Vincent J. Dicindio 




Sheila Diggs 
Desiree Dimauro 
Annemane Dinardo 
Martha Dixon 
Laurie Dobbins 



SENIORS 



Mvjcti I I >^i 



Sherri Dorsheimer 

Tom Douglas 

Megan Dowd 

Kevin P. Doyle 

Jeffrey M. Doyon 




eniors Bob 
Middleton and Bill Darke 
head for a strenuous 
session of football in the 
Sunken Gardens. Photo by 
Mike Nikolich 





I ^^'J 




d^M^t^^^ 



Mark Doyon 
William B. Drake, III 
Ellen Duffy 
Marie Dullagham 
Lucretia Heston Durrett 



Rhonda K. Dye 
Karen Dziedzic 
Michele Anne Ebe 
Kim Eckert 
Bart Edmunds 



Karen L Edwards 
S. Franklin Edwards 
Carol Epiing 
Kathryn Marie Erdahl 
James Ervin 



KATHLEEN ANN DOHERTY 

(Massapequa Park, NY) Economics. 

SHARON LINDA DOHERTY (Prince George) 

Mathematics— Alpha Phi Omega (exec, v.p., 

secretary). Dorm Council. 

DAVID A. DOLDE (Palmyra, NJ) Chemistry. 

JOHN J. DONOHUE (Fairfax) Latin— 

Intramurals, Senior Classical League, 

Classics Club. 

ADAM CHUN DOOLEY (Newport News) 

Government. 

SHERRI DORSCHEIMER (West Chester, PA) 

Accounting. 

THOMAS H. DOUGLAS (Catlett) 

Biology— Phi Sigma, Phi Alpha Theta, Alpha 

Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Baptist Student 

Union. 

MEGAN P. DOWD (Severna Park, MD) 

Computer Science— Pi Beta Phi, ACM, 

Racquetball Club. 

KEVIN P. DOYLE (Garden City. NJ) 

International Relations— Cross Country, Track, 

Pi Lambda Phi, CSA. 

JEFFREY M. DOYON (Seaford) Economics. 



MARK DOYON (Fairfax) English— WCWM 

(features director), Flat Hat, Review. 

WILLIAM 8. DRAKE, III (South Berwick, ME) 

Chemistry. 

ELLEN DUFFY (Annapolis, MD) English. 

MARIE DULLAGHAN (Chesapeake) 

Mathematics— Dorm Council, Junior Board, 

CSA. 

LUCRETIA HESTON DURRETT (Atlanta. GA) 

Theater— Phi Mu, TSA. 

RHONDA K. DYE (Upton, KY) 

Government — Pre-Law Club (junior rep.). 

College Republicans, International Relations 

Club. 

KAREN DZIEDZIC (Woodbridge) Psychology. 

MICHELE-ANNE EBE (Arlington) Government. 

KIM ECKERT (Virginia Beach) 

English— Pi Beta Phi (rush assistant), KA 

Daughter of Lee, Admissions Intern, O.A. 

BART EDMUNDS (Roanoke) 

Accounting— Pi Kappa Alpha. 

KARIN L. EDWARDS (Hampton) 

Geology— Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Phi Alpha 

Theta, Geology Club. 



S. FRANKLIN EDWARDS, JR. (Yorktown) 
Business Management— Direct Marketing of 
Williamsburg, Inc., CMA, WMAS, Alpha Phi 
Omega. 

CAROL ANN EPLING (Salem) 
Biology/ Religion — Mortar Board, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Sigma, 
Mermettes, RA. Wesley Foundation. Circle K. 
KATHRYN MARIE ERDAHL (Midlothian) 
History— Phi Mu, Women's Golf, Athletic 
Advisory Committee. International Circle. 
JAMES B. ERVIN (Williamsburg) 
Economics— Sigma Chi (rush chrm.). Club 
Lacrosse. Economics Club. 



285 



SENIORS 



-tory. 

J) 
anagement. 

, JEFALK (Virginia R°^'~*i' 
! ministration— C 

f Ku , ..K-a Theta. Direct M„. ... ^ 

lliamsburg. Inc. 

"VELLENFAR"^" " "" 

■ Relation> 



Phi.V, 
P 

ALUS 

L3tir 



MART 

Busi! 



art. 



KIRSTEN FEDEWA (S; 

DAVID J. FERRIS (Sterling) 

Computer Science— Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

KIMBERLEYFER n) 

Business Mannc legiate 

rect Marketing of 
:;iub. 
KIMBf 3 (Arlington) 

EcoiiL .- _ -,ta Delta Delta, College 
Republicans. 
JEFFREY FISH (Fairfax) 
Philosophy/Religion— Theta Delta Chi. 
VIRGINIA NANTZ FITZGERALD 



-RTY(SevernaPark, MD) 
ons. 
RONNIE FOSSUN (Colonial Heights) 
Business. 
ROBIN LYNN FOSTER ( 



:n) 



MARKh 

MARAFRiEOMAt<J 

Psychology. 

LINDA FUCHS (Vienna, 

LORABETHFUQUA(Vh_ 

Business Administration. 

THOMAS A. GALLO (Hoboken, NJ) 

Economics— Lambda Chi Alpha. 

JAMES G. GARDINER (Yonkers. NY) 

Biology— Health Careers Club, Track, Cross 

Country, Intramurals. 

DAVID A. GARDNER (Springfield) 

Geology— Sigma Gamma Epsilon (pres.), Delta 

Phi Alpha, Geology Club. 

JULIA GARRETT (Alexandria) Government 

JOAN GAVALER (Pittsburgh, PA) Psychology. 

JAMES GAVAN (Williamsburg) Government 

JULIE ANN GEDRO (Newport News) 

Economics/ English — Chorus, Women's 

Tennis. 

LISA GEORGE (New Castle, PA) 

Government— Junior Board, Dorm Council, 

Co-Chair. Senior Class Gift Committee. 



STEVEN C. GERARD (Monroe, CT) 

English— SA Film Series Director. WCWM 

Music Director, Band. 

TAD GESCHICKTER (Lorton) 

Physical Education. 

RADHA R. GHATAK (Richmond) 

Biology— Circle K. 

EDWARD P. GIBBONS (East Meadow, NY) 

Business Management— Collegiate 

Management Association, Track (capt), 

Cross Country. 

GEORGANN GIBSON (Newport News). 

SARA N. GILL (Petersburg) English. 

SHERRY-LEIGH GILL (Hopewell) Accounting. 

ALAN GILLIE (Richmond) Chemistry. 

SUSAN LYNN GINGER (Virginia Beach) 

Business Administration— Delta Gamma 

(social chrmn.). Collegiate Management 

Association. 

KAREN GLAGOLA (Richmond) Economics. 

ROBERT M. GOEBELBECKER (Valhalla, NY) 

Economics— Baseball, CSA (treas.), Lambda 

Chi Alpha. 

HAROLD GOLDSTON (Richmond) 

Mathematics. 

MICHELLE GOLEMBIEWSKI (Norfolk) 

Government/ Religion. 

PHYLLIS GOODWIN (Sterling) 

Mathematics— Intramurals, Band. 

SUSAN GORDON (Bristol) 

Accounting— Kappa Alpha Theta. 

MARY KAY GORMAN (Richmond) Geology. 



John Ewing 

Keith Exton 

Linda Falk 

Maryellen Farmer 

Peter G. Farre 



Allison Farweli 

Martha Feathers 

Kirsten Fedewa 

David J. Ferris 



Kimberley Ferris 

Kimberly Ann Fiers 

Jeffrey Fish 

Virginia Fitzgerald 

Jean Flaherty 





s 



sf9^ 



\ 




fSB^ 








A\\ /^ 



4»' f '♦ 




^M^h 





Ronnie Fossun 
Robin Lynn Foster 
Mark Franko 
IVlara Friedman 
Linda Fuciis 



Laura Beth Fuqua 
Thomas Gallo 
James G. Gardiner 
David Gardner 
Julia Garrett 



Joan Gavaler 
James Gavan 
Julie Ann Gedro 
Lisa George 
Steven C. Gerard 



Tad Geschickter 
Radha Ghataka 
Edv\/ard Gibbons 
Georgann Gibson 
Sara N. Gill 



Sherry-Leigh Gill 
Alan Gillie 
Susan Ginger 
Karen Glagola 
Robert Goebelbecker 



Harold Goldston 
Michell Golembiewski 
Phyllis Goodwin 
Susan Gordon 
Mary Kay Gorman 



SENIORS 



Jun Green 
Patricia Greenwood 



Julie Greer 

Kimberly Gregg 

Michelle Grigg 

Jennifer Gross 

Karen Gross 



Jeff Grossman 

Janet Grubber 

Tracy Gruis 

Laura L Guthrie 

Mims Hackett 




REGINA GOUGH (Hauppauge. NY) 
Psychology— Alpha Phi Omega, Dorm 
Council, Emmaus Group. Psychology Club, 
Intramurals, Orientation Aide. 
JOHN P. GRAHAM (Hampton) 
Art History 

HEATHER YATES GRANT (Ephrata, PA) 
Philosophy— Pi Beta Phi, President's Aide. 
Field Hockey. Lacrosse. Volunteers for Youth, 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Women's 
Athletic Advisory Council. PE Majors Club, 
Dorm Council. 

JAMES F. GREEN (Wilmington, DE) 
Accounting— Admissions Tour Guide, 
Wayne F Gibbs Accounting Society. 
PATRICIA GREENWOOD (Doswell. PA) 
History/English. 

JULIE GREER (Salem) Computer Science. 
KIMBERLY RENE GREGG (Rockville. MD) 
Sociology— Alpha Kappa Alpha. Sociology 
Club, Black Student Organization. Intervarsity 



Christian Fellowship. SAC Representative. 
Affirmative Action Committee. 
MICHELLE GRIGG (Virginia Beach) Biology. 
JENNIFER GROSS (Fairfax) Government. 
KAREN L. GROSS (Pembroke. NH) Biology. 
JEFFREY GROSSMAN (Lincroft. NJ) 
Accounting— Senior Class Treasurer, Alpha 
Phi Omega, Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 
Society, Intramurals. Tour Guide, Junior Board. 
JANET GRUBBER (Great Mills, MD) 
Biology— Mortar Board. Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Phi Eta Sigma, Phi Sigma, Navigators, CSA. 
TRACY GRUIS (Lancaster) History. 
LAURA L. GUTHRIE (Sprii ,gfield) 
English/History — Delta Gamma. 
MIMS HACKETT (Orange, NJ) 
Business Management. 
JENNIFER HADJIN (Huntington, NJ) English. 
A. HAEOUSLEIN (Oakridge, TN) Biology. 
JOY MARIE HAGUE (McLean) English. 



SARAH HALE (Alexandria) 
Biology— Dorm Council. Band. Riding Club. 
KEVIN D. HALL (Midlothian) 
Government— 1982 Rex Smith Journalism 
Award, Society for Collegiate Journalists, 
WCWM (News Director, Business Director, 
Station Manager). 

TERRI HALL (Abilene, TX) English. 
TERRY RAE HALL (Indian Head, MD) 
English — R.A., Phi Mu (vice pres., pledge 
dfrector), Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha Lambda Delta. 
MARY HALLAHAN (Vienna) 
Biology— Pi Beta Phi. 
SHERRY LYNNE HAMBY (Fairfax) 
Psychology— Psi Chi, Ludwell Dorm Council 
(treas). Psychology Club, Student Advisory 
Council. Colonial Echo. Alpha Phi Omega. 



SENIORS 




Jennifer Hadjin 
A. Haeouslein- 
Joy Marie Hague 



Sarah Hale 
Kevin Hall 
Terri Hall 



Terry Hall 
Mary Hallahan 
Sherry Hamby 





ngineeringa 
Tribal Production: 
Residents of the Lodges 
demonstrate their prowess 
by accompanying their TV- 
inspired homecoming float 
down DOG Street. Photo by 
Maryanne Kondracki 



289 



SENIORS 



Jennifer Hartm 



Carta Haynes 

Gregory Haynes 

Jennifer Heath 



Cynthia Dianne Hednck 

Eric Heise 

Beth Henry 

Patricia Henry 

Kathleen Hess 



Nancy Hildreth 

Karin Hillenbrand 

AnneHilier 

=en Hinnebusch 

Lorac Hint? 



Bradford D. Hirschy 

David A. Hoag 

Wilhelmina Hoeke 

Katie Hoffman 

Jennifer H : 




SENIORS 




A: 

Wiuia: :-r 

Grace 

Robert E. Horn 
Robert M. Horowitz 



Susar 



Cathe 



busar. K. r 
Jeff Hughe 
Joseph A 
Peter Hughs 



STEVEN M. HANCOCK (Piney River) 

Business Management— Lambda Chi Alpha, 

Dorm Council, Band 1982 Sound of America 

Honor Band and Chorus, Advertising Society, 

Collegiate Management Association. 

GREG HANEKLAU (Dumfries) Sociology. 

JANET M. HANRAHAN (Rockville, MD) 

Biology— Women's Basketball (tri-capt). 

Gamma Phi Beta (pledge trainer, pres.). 

JOHN KENNETH HANSEN (Arlington) 

History/Government— Pi Sigman Alpha, 

Student .Association Council, Canterbury, 

Dorm Council, Flat Hat. 

ELIZABETH A. HARRIS (Waynesboro) 

Accounting — Mortar Board, Senior Class Vice 

President Junior Board, Sophomore Steering. 

Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society, Chorus, 

Alumni/Student Liaison Committee. 

JAMES G. HARRISON (Fredericksburg) 

Anthropology 

MARGIE BETH HARRISON (Plainsboro, NJ) 

Government— Hillel (vice pres., pres.) 

Sophomore Steering. 

JANICE MARIE HARRUP (Courtland) 

Human Relations— Pi Beta Phi (house mgr.). 

Cheerleader (ass't capt) 

CATHERINE HART (Richmond) 

English— Delta Omicron, Kappa Kappa 

Gamma (marshal), Canterbury, Cambridge 

Program. 

JENNIFER HARTMANN (Swampscott MA) 

Psychology. 

CATHERINE ANNE HAUER 

(Mount Laurel. NJ) Mathematics — 

CSA, Emmaus Group, Circle K. 

RONNIE P, HAWKS (Williamsburg) English. 

CARLA HAYNES (Midlothian) 



Fine Arts — Circle K, Advertising Society, Fine 
Arts Society, Flat Haf (graphic arts ed). Jump 
(art director). Transfer Orientation Aide, 
GREGORY L, HAYNES (Glade Spring) 
Philosophy— Philosophy Club. 

JENNIFER HEATH (Vestal, NY) Psychology. 

CYNTHIA DIANNE HEDRICK (Lynchburg) 

Business Management. 

ERIC HEISE (Frostburg, MD) French. 

BETH HENRY (Chanlilly) 

Economics— F/a( Hat Colonial Echo, Dorm 

Council, Chi Omega. 

PATRICIA HENRY (Virginia Beach) 

Government 

KATHLEEN HESS (Virginia Beach) 

Biology— Delta Delta Delta. 

NANCY HILDRETH (Vienna) Anthropology. 

KARIN HILLENBRAND (Virginia Beach) 

Biology— Omicron Delta Kappa. Phi Sigma. 

R A., CSA, Orientation Aide. 

ANNE HILLER (Rehoboth Beach, DE) 

Geology/ History — Circle K, Geology C'ub, 

CSA 

MAUREEN A. HINNEBUSCH 

Anthropology— Scabbard and Biaa- 

Women's Track and Cross Courti , 

Gamma Phi Beta. Queen's Gu -lub, 

Intramurals 

LORAC CELVA HINT2 (Stanford, C 

Psychology/ Econonnics-Psi Chi, fv',^,1.... 

Board. Dorm Council, Sophomore Steenng, 

Alpha Phi Omega (vice pres,, pres,). Wesley 

Foundation, Circle K. 

BRADFORD D. HIRSCHY (Alexandria) 

Business Manaaement— Lambda Chi Alpha, 

S/i" - •■ • ■ "-■ ■ ,. 

M 



DAVID A. HOAG (Beverly, MA) 
WILHELMINA HOEKE A/irq.ma Beach) 



Government— Gamn 


Circle K 


katherineelizab: 

(Cartersville) En 
ass't rush), Cha- _ 


MAN 


JENNIFER HOLT (U 
ANASTASIAHOMATID.c 

Fine Arts— Fine Arts Socie- 


jf 


WILLIAM HONAKER 




GRACE HONICH (Nc 




ROBERT E. HORN (Hazlet 




ROBERT M. HOROWITZ (Do, 

Economics. 


uu-.y. v.. i ' 


DAVID HOWARD (Be ' 


... 


SUSAN G HOWE 'V 





■d) 

;a, Pika Little Sister, 
elor. ISC 



..^ ■ Jl 

East Asian Studies. 

CATHERINE MICHELE HUBBARD 

(Winchester) English— Admissions Tour 

Guide, Greek Life, Pi Beta Phi. 

CHRYSA HUBERT (Williamsburg) Geology. 

SUSAN K. HUD'" imsburg) 

Government— I ^C. 

JEFF HUGHES (Arlington) Accc, 

JOSEPH A, HUGHES (Charlotteb.. . , 

Business. 

PETER HUGHES (WilliamsburgI 

Computer Science. 



291 



S E N I O 



Alexander Iden 

Mary I. lida 

Laura Ingram 

Lisa Ingrassia 

Donna Jablonski 



Edward Jackson 

Kelly Jackson 

Lynne Jackson 

James Jacobs 

Tom Jenson 



Carey Johnson 

Hiawatha Johnson 

Kerke A. Johnson 

Kimberly Johnson 

Marjorie Johnson 



Michelle Johnson 

Tom Johnson 

Anthony F. Jones 

Kevin Jones 

Mary Willis Jones 



Paul Michael Jones 

Mary Kach 

Peter Kalaris 

Anny Kamayana 

Ann Marie Karch 





dikdik 



mitim^u 




SENIORS 



DON HULTMAN (Pittsburgh, PA) 

International Relations. 

KAREN HUNT (Virginia Beach) English. 

JAMES HUNTER (Arlington) Accounting. 

WINSTON HURST (Richmond) 

Economics— Men's Track and Cross Country, 

Pi Lambda Phi. 

ELIZABETH ANN HUTCHESON (Annandale) 

French— Pi Delta Phi, Phi Mu. 

ALEXANDER IDEN (Berryville) 

History— William and Mary Theater, Martin 

Jurow Award. 

MARY I. IIDA (Sterling) 

Business Administration— Advertising Society, 

Collegiate Management Association. Direct 

Marketing of Williamsburg, Inc.. Colonial Echo, 

Flat Hat. William and Mary News. 

LAURA ELLEN INGRAM (Nashville. TN) 

Economics— Delta Omicron, Baptist Student 

Union. Choir, (sec/librarian). Chorus, 

Botetourt Chamber Singers. Board of 

Sinfonicron Opera. 

LISA C. INGRASSIA (Arlington) 

Computer Science— Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha 

Lambda Delta. Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha Phi 

Omega (vice pres). Choir, CSA. 

DONNA JABLONSKI (Richmond) Biology. 

EDWARD JACKSON (Alexandria) 

Classical Civilization. 

KELLY ANN JACKSON (Alexandria) 

English— Society for Collegiate Journalists, 

Chi Omega, Flat Hat Women's Soccer (capt). 

Athlete's Advisory Committee. 

LYNNE M. JACKSON (Bay Shore. NY) 

History— Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma. 

WCWM. International Relations Club. 

Women's Forum. CSA. 

JAMES JACOBS (Chicago, IL) History. 

THOMAS F. JENSEN (Greenwich. CT) 



Government—Pi Lambda Phi, Men's 

Lacrosse. 

CAREY SUELLEN JOHNSON (Reading. PA) 

English— Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta. 

Student Director of Alumni Career Advisory 

Service, LADS. 

HIAWATHA JOHNSON (Waverly) Economics. 

KERKE JOHNSON (Lynchburg) 

English— Pi Kappa Alpha, Rifle Team, ROTC. 

KIMBERLY R. JOHNSON (Williamsburg) 

Psychology — Psi Chi 

MARJORIE ALICE JOHNSON (Chesterfield) 

Biology—Women's Track. Women's Athletics 

Advisory Council. R.A.. Alpha Chi Omega. 

MICHELLE JOHNSON (Alexandria). 

TOM JOHNSON (Suffolk) Government. 

ANTHONY F. JONES (Fairfax Station) 

Latin American Studtes/ 

International Relations— Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Senior Classical League. 

C. KEVIN JONES (Arlington) 

Economics— Lambda Chi Alpha (pres., treas.). 

MARY WILLIS JONES (Cumberland. MD) 

Psychology —Phi Mu (pres.. rush chrmn.. ISC 

rep.) Sigma Chi Little Sister. Psychology Club. 

Dorm Council. 

PAUL MICHAEL JONES (Nashville. TN) 

Economics — Sigma Chi. Fencing Team. 

Economics Club. 

MARY KACH (Sarasota. FL) 

Business Management— Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. Collegiate Management Association. 

Advertising Society, CSA, Dorm Council. Rush 

Counselor. 

PETER KALARIS (Great Falls) 

SRI A. KAMAYANA (Bali, Indonesia) 

Accounting— Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 

Society, International Circle. 

JAMIE KATER (Boulder, CO) 



Business Management — Sigma Nu Little 

Sister, SAC Representative. SA Liaison to the 

Board of Visitors. 

JOY CELINA KAULFERS (Midlothian) 

Art History— Kappa Alpha Theta (hist). Fine 

Arts Society. 

MATTHEW KAY (University Heights. OH) 

Greek/English— Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha 

Lambda Delta. Flat Hat, Colonial Echo, 

Review. 

BRIDGET RICE KEALY (Succasunna. NJ) 

Human Relations— Chi Omega. Women's 

Basketball. CSA. 

ANNETTE MARIE KEARNS (Williamsburg) 

Sociology— Alpha Phi Omega. Dorm Council, 

(pres.). Onentation Aide. Circle K. CSA. Junior 

Board. Sociology Club. 

LAURIE KERNS (Blacksburg) 

Economics/ Government — Delta Delta Delta. 

JOHN KEATING (Falls Church) Philosophy. 

BARBARA ELLEN KEIHN (Harrisonburg) 

Chemistry— Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha Lambda 

Delta, Gamma Sigma Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa, 

Chemistry Club. 

EDWIN KELLIHER (McLean) Economics. 

CATHERINE M. KELLY (Somerset. NJ) 

Chemistry— Chemistry Club. CSA. ICS. Dorm 

Council. 

DAVID R. KELLY (Arlington) 

Biology— Phi Beta Kappa. Biology Club, 

Health Careers Club. 

MARK A. KELSO (Pittsburgh, PA) 

Business Management— Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Football. FCA. CSA. 

SHELLEY KENDRED (Alexandria) French. 

CHANG-SOO KIM (Fairfax) Business 

Management 

SUSANNAH KIMBALL (New York. NY) 
Fine Arts 




Jamie Kater 
Joy Kaulfers 
Matthew Kay 
Bridget Kealey 
Annette Kearns 



Laurie Kearns 
John Keating 
Ellen Keihn 
Edwin Kelliher 
Catherine Kelly 



David R. Kelly 
Mark A. Kelso 
Shelley Kendred 
Chang-Soo Kim 
Susannah Kimball 



293 



SENIORS 



Tracey Krautheim 



Rachel Kraynak 

Margaret Krebs 

Susan Kren 

Lisa Krizan 

Valerie Krowe 




RANDAL KING (Arlington) 
Biology— Lambda Chi Alpha. 
DOROTHY BROOKE KIRK 

(Longmeadow, MA) International Relations- 
Pi Delta Phi, Delta Gamma. Wizards. 
PAMELA KLINE (Wilmington. DE) Fine Arts 
Review. Dorm Council (pres.). 
JANE KNOTT (Fairfax) 
Business Management, 
EDWARD GRAEME KOCH II (Arlington) 
Accounting— Wayne F Gibbs Accounting 
Society. Dorm Council. SEA. Choir (irp3«; V 
Botetourt Chamber Singers. BS: 
TERENCE KOO"-" •■-- ^ 
Computer Sen 
MARKKC: 
Account^ 



rr.gri 

RANDALL KRAEMER (Stephe- 

ANTHRONY W. KRAMER 

Government — Volleyball i 
TRACEY KRAUTHEIM (A 

CI J. 

RACMtL ^^-lAYiNHK I V.' 

MARGARET R. KREBS ' 

Economics— Pi Bet ■ 
SUSAN M. KREN i'. 



!or 
.EA, 



294 



LIE 

SA, Pre-Law Club 

' I VI.II.IC VDrWA/C I'. If., mi U".. 

ALISON KUCZG 'r 



GEORGE A. KURISKY, JR. (Phoenix. MD) 

Sociology— Theta Delta Chi. WCWM. Pre-Law 

Club, Sociology. Club. 

JEFF KUSHAN (Vienna) Chemistry. 

OH KWON (Vienna) Computer Science ACM. 

BART M. LACKS (Randolph) Economics BSU. 

KAREN LACY (McGuire AFB. NJ) 

Mathematics— BSU. 

MEG LANCHANTIN (Virginia Beach) 

Economics — Swim Team (co-capl). 

ROBERT C.E. LANEY (Chesapeake) 

English— Pi Kappa Alpha (initiation chrmn.), 

Intramurals. 

THOMAS LANG (Norfolk) Biology. 

BENJAMIN H. LANGMAID (Falls Church) 

Studio Fine Arts— J. Binford Walford 

Scholarship. Sigma Nu, Men's Volleyball Club. 

Fine Arts Society, Intramurals. 

WILLIAM GLENN LANHAM (Boston) 

Sociology. 

LIZ LARIE (Garden City, NY) 

Business Management— Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Advertising Society. Direct Marketing of 

Williamsburg, Inc. 

LESLIE LAUTENSLAGER (Alexandria) 

Psychology. 

KELLY S. LAWLER (Midlothian) 

Fine Arts— Studio — Fine Arts Society (pres.). 

Wizards. Sigma Phi Epsiion Golden Heart. Chi 

Omega. 

MIRIAM LAWRENCE (Winchester) 

Anthropology— Delta Gamma. Presbyterian 

Youth Fellowship 

KIMBERLY E. LEBO (Alexandria) 

Accounting— Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 

Society 

WILLIAM ROBERT LEE (Fairfax) 

C Classical Studies— American 

C iciety Student Affiliate. Intramurals, 



Delta Gamma Anchorman. Sigma Chi, 

Chemistry Club. Virginia Senior Classical 

League, Classics Club. 

KENDRA LYN LEEDY (Newport News) History. 

MARGARETTE LEITE (East Providence. Rl) 

Biology. 

ELLEN LOUISE LEWIS (Hampton) 

Business Management — Kappa Alpha Theta, 

Alumni-Student Liaison Committee Chairman. 

Direct Marketing of Williamsburg. 

JAMES LEWIS (Tampa, FL). 

KATHY LEWIS (Vienna) Psychology. 

SANDY K. LEWIS (Virginia Beach) 

Government/Religion— Gamma Phi Beta. 

STEPHANIE L. LEYLAND 

(Washington Crossing, PA) 

Biology— Phi Mu. Dorm Council, Dancetera, 

Orchesis. Indoor Soccer, R.A. 

HYUN K. LIM (Fairfax) 

Business Management— Phi Mu (doorkeeper, 

ritual chrmn). Adult Skills Program. 

DIANE R. LIMM (Lancaster. PA) 

Economics— Pi Beta Phi (pres,, vice pres.). 

Sigma Phi Epsiion Goldenheart, Flat Hat 0.A,. 

Intramurals. 

JEANNE LINDNER (Charlottesville) 

Computer Science/Spanish— Delta Omicron 

Sigma Delta Pi. Navigators, ACM. Chorus. 

Choir. Baptist Student Union. O.A., Dorm 

Council, 

TODD T. LINDSLEY (Penn Yan, NY) 

Government— Men's Track, Cross Country, 

Facts and Referrals. Sociology Club, Theater 

Student Association. 

KATHERINE LIPINSKI (Catonsville. MD) 

Business. 

GREGORY T. LOCASALE (Doylestown. PA) 

Business Administration— Lambda Chi Alpha 

(treas.), NCAA Volunteer for Youth. WATS. R.A. 




Alison Kuczo 
George Kurisky 
Jeff Kushan 
Oh Kwon 
Bart Lacks 



Karen Lacy 
Meg Lanchantin 
Robert Laney 
Thomas Lang 
Ben Langmaid 



William Glenn Lanham 

Liz Larie 

Leslie Lautenslager 

Kelly Lawler 

Miriam Conway Lawrence 



Kim Lebo 

William Robert Lee 
Kendra Lyn Leedy 
Margarette Leite 
Ellen Lewis 



James Lewis 
Kathy Lewis 
Sandy Lewis 
Stephanie Leyland 
Hyun K. Lim 



Diane Limm 
Jean Under 
Todd T. Lindsley 
Katherine Lipnski 
Gregg Locasale 



295 



SENIORS 



c- 



Susan Luebehusen 

Deanna Lusko 

Arthur Lyons 

Heather A. MacDonald 

Kathleen Mackin 




^ikf W i 



.L^/'ir .j#^ 




yeing the clucks 
in thoughts of his next meal, 
Control, one of the illegal 
dogs on campus, made many 
•"g from dorm 
_:meone found 
e lived and had him 
■' ' ' — " Maisto 



SENIORS 





CHERYL LONG (Arlington) History. 


English— Kappa Delta, Student Education 


DAVID MANTUS (Dix Hills. NY) 


JILL LONGMIRE (Cherry Hill. NJ) Business. 


Association. 


Chemistry— Gamma Sigma Epsilon. Chemistry 


EVA J. LOPDRUP (Florence. SC) 


CLAUDIA t^ADER (Mechanlcsville, PA) 


Club. 


Physics— Alpha Delta Lambda. Phi Eta Sigma, 


Biology. 


CAROL MARPLE (Fairfax) Education. 


Alpha Phi Omega. Christian Fellowship. New 


rWARTHA HELENA MADERO (Riverside. CT) 


AMY MARSCHEAN (Syosset NY) 


Testament Student Association. 


Latin American Studies/Anthropology- Phi 


History— Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Alpha Theta 


MICHAEL J. LORCH (Clifton Park. NY) 


Alpha Theta. Sigma Delta Pi, International 


(pres.). St. Andrews Exchange Scholar, Alpha 


Accounting — Theta Delta Chi. Men's Volleyball 


Circle. 


Lambda Delta. Phi Eta Sigma. 


Club. 


MARC MAGNUS-SHARPE (Newsport News) 


GABRIELA MARTIN (Williamsburg) 


ALBERT LUCAS (Stafford) Biology. 


Physical Education. 


French /Economics— Pi Delta Phi. Junior Year 


SUSAN LUEBEHUSEN (Colonial Heights) 


SCOTT A. MAGUIRE (Akron. OH) 


in France. International Circle. Dorm Council 


Government. 


Economics— Dorm Council, Economics Club. 


MARY F. MARTIN (Huddleston) 


DEANNA LUSKO (Franklin Lakes. NJ) 


JERUSALEM MAKONNEN (Ethiopia) 


Psychology— Alpha Chi Omega. 


Business Management. 


International Relations — Residence Halls Staff. 


TERENCE P. MARTIN (Virginia Beach) 


ARTHUR GILBERT LYONS (Atsugi. Japan) 


East Asian Studies. 


Government— Theta Delta Chi. International 


Chemistry— Chemistry Club. Health Careers 


TRACEY MALLION (Lockport, NY) 


Relations Club. 


Club. Karate Club. Intramurals. CSA. 


Business Administration. 


ROBIN CARA MASCI (Vienna) 


HEATHER A. MACOONALD (Melville. NY) 


E. MICHELLE MANCINI (Doswell) 


Psychology— Kappa Alpha Theta. 


Economics— Kappa Alpha Theta (historian. 


Government— Debate Council, College 




rush chrmn.). Junior Board. SA. Advertising 


Republicans. 




Society. Direct Marketing of Williamsburg. 


GERALD L. MANN (Springfield) 




Senior Class Secretary. 


Biology— Men's Volleyball Club. 




KATHLEEN ANN MACKIN (Sandwich. MA) 








Claudia Mader 
Maiiha Madero 
Marc Magnus-Sharpe 
Scott Maguire 
Jerusalum Makonnen 



Tracey Mallion 
Michelle Mancini 
Gerald Mann 
David Mantus 
Carol Marple Dugan 



Amy Marschean 
Gabriela Martin 
Mary Martin 
Terrence P. Martin 
Robin Masci 



SENIORS 



Y (Richmond! 



u 



-durg) 
I Scholar. 



.ity) 



30. MD) 

na, Alpha 
^>, Health 

Careers Cluo. 

SUSAN MAYBUHY (Tampa, FL) 

—Field Hockey Club Team, 
5. Chemistry Club, Westminster 

(-eiiowsnip. 

JEFFBEY T. MAYER (Wallingford, PA) 

Chemistry — CSA Emmaus Group, Chemistry 

Club, Dorm Council. 

ROBERT T.M. MAYHEW (Herndon) 

Psychology. 

JAMES M. MAZINGO (Mechanicsville) 

Accounting. 

MICHAEL MAZZUCCHELLI (Leesburg) 

Economics. 

HERBERT S. MACARTHUR (Abidjan, Ivory 

Coast) 

Economics/French — Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha 

Lambda Delta, Pi Delta Phi (pres.). Economics 

Club, Men's Lacrosse, Intramurals. 

DIANNE LYNN MCCALL (Havertown, PA) 

Computer Science/Mathematics — Alpha Phi 

Omega. Delta Omicron (sec), Intervarsity 

Christian Fellowship, Lutheran Student 

Association (historian). Queen's Guard, 

Orchestra, Association for Computing 

Machinery. 

CARA SUZANNE MCCARTHY (Rockville, MD) 

Geology — Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Alpha Phi 

Omega. 

RUTH MC CULLERS (Smithfield, NC) 

Business Management. 

REBECCA LEIGH MC DANIEL (Hendersonville, 

NC) 

International Relations — Delta Omicron. Chorus, 

Choir, Westminister Fellowship, International 

Relations Club, Dorm Council. 



DAVE MCDOWELL (Pittsburgh, PA) 

Economics — Volunteers for Youth, Fellowship 

of Christian Athletes, Football, Lambda Chi 

Alpha. 

LAWRENCE J. MCENTEE, JR. (Flanders, N,J.) 

Business Management — Kappa Sigma, 

Collegiate Management Association, CSA, 

Football. 

BRIAN JOSEPH MCGAHREN (Yonkers. NY) 

English. 

DOUGLAS P, MCGEE (Alexandria) 

Environmental Science and Public 

Policy — Truman Scholar Semi-finalist, VAPIRG 

(chrmn). Circle K, ROTC. 

JOHN DIVINE MCGEE III 

(Lookout Mountain, TN) 

English — Colonial Echo. Canterbury (senior 

warden), Interfalth Council. 

MARGARET MCGOVERN (Yonkers, NY) 

Economics/Spanish — Sigma Delta Pi (pres.). Phi 

Mu (social chrmn.). Sophomore Steering 

Committee. 

JOY MCGRATH (Dayton, OH) 

Business Management — Pi Beta Phi, American 

Advertising Federation (vice pres.). 

SARAH P. MCGREGOR (Columbia, SC) 

Accounting — Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta 

Sigma. Baptist Student Union, Wayne F. Gibbs 

Accounting Society. Intercollegiate Business 

Games, Chorus, Choir. 

MICHAEL G. MCMANUS (Alexandria) 

Biology — Lambda Chi Alpha, Biology Club. 

DAVID ASHLEY MCMENAMIN (Fredericksburg) 

Biology — Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta 

Kappa, Phi Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 

Eta Sigma (pres.). Choir, Sinfonicron. 

DAPHNE L. MCMURRER (Williamsburg) 

Economics — Omicron Delta Epsilon, Delta 

Gamma, R.A. 

ANTHONY MCNEAL (Hampton) 

Business Management — Senior Class President, 

SAC Chairman, Superdance Chairman, 

President's Aide, Junior Board, Alpha Phi 

Omega, Black Student Organization, Affirmative 

Action Advisory Committee, Sophomore 

Steering, Tour Guide. 

JANET MCNULTY (Chalfont, PA) 

Economics — Society for Collegiate Journalists, 



Colonial Echo. Residence Hall Life Staff, Phi 

Beta Phi. 

CORNELIUS MICHAEL MC SHANE 

(Montuale, NJ) Philosophy — Sigma Alpha 

Epsilon. 

CHRISTOPHER MEGALE (Freeport, NY) 

English, 

MICHAEL BENEDICT MEINHARDT (Annandale) 

Chemistry — Debate Council, Chemistry Club 

(pres) 

MARY MENEFEE (Louray) Government. 

DOUGLAS E. MERCADO (Springfield) History. 

KEVIN MEYER (Mechanicsville) 

Business Management. 

DANIEL L. MICHAEL (Arlington) 

Government — Carl A. Fehr Music Award, New 

Testament Student Association, Intervarsity, 

Choir. 

TODD MIDDLEBROOK (East Northport. NY) 

Business Management. 

ROBERT MIDDLETON (Leesburg) 

Government. 

STEVEN W. MILKEY (Kensington, CT) 

Economics — Omicron Delta Epsilon. Pi Delta 

Phi, Men's Fencing, Nuclear Disarmament 

Study Group. 

BELINDA MILLER (Round Hill) 

Mathematics/Fine Arts. 

GRAEME MILLER (Lynchburg) 

Economics — Football, Kappa Sigma, Volunteers 

for Youth, Delta Tau Chi, Brothers of the Kite. 

JAMES E. MILLER, JR, (Arlington) 

Economics— F/af Hat, WCWM. 

MARY HUNTER MILLIQAN (Roanoke) 

Biology— Chi Omega. Pike Little Sister. SAC. 

THOMAS M. MISTELE (Hollins) 

Biology — Mortar Board, Phi Sigma, R.A., CSA. 

SA Tutor. 

MARY A. MITCHELL (Fair Haven, NJ) 

History — Honor Council, Chorus, Tour Guide, 

Club Lacrosse, Flat Hat, Chi Omega (rush 

chrmn.). 

MASATOKI JAMES MITSUMATA (Fairfax) 

Economics/Biology — International Circle, 

Economics Club, Biology Club, CSA. 



Doug Massey 

Joe Matteo 

Jay Rosser Matthews, Jr. 

Perry Matthews 

Ann Louise Mattson 



Susan Maybury 

Jeffrey T. Mayer 

Robert T.M. Mayhew 

James M. Mazingo 

Michael Mazzuccheili 



Herberts. McArthur 

Dianne Lynn McCall 

Cara McArthy 

Ruth McCullers 

Rebecca McDaniel 



298 




SENIORS 










Dave McDowell 
Lawrence McEntee 
Brian McGahren 
Doug McGee 
John McGee 



Margaret McGovern 
Joy McGrath 
Sarah McGregor 
Mike McManus 
David McMenamin 



Daphne L McMurrer 
Anthony McNeal 
Janet McNulty 
Cornelius McShane 
Mary Menefee 



Christopher Megale 
Michael Meinhardt 
Douglas E. Mercado 
Kevin Meyer 
Daniel Michaels 



Todd Middlebrooke 
Robert Middleton 
Steven W. Milkey 
Belinda Miller 
Graeme Miller 



James r ' ' " 

Mary h 

Thomas M Mistele 



299 



SENIORS 



Eric Morrison 

Jane Morrow 

Robert Scott Morrow 

John Morton 

Jeffrey J. Mosher 



Douglas Mudd 

SandieMuller 

Alisa Mullins 

Rachel Munthali 

Doug Murphy 




JOHN P. MONHOLLON (Richmond) 

Chemistry 

DAVID A. MONTUORI (Allenfown, PA) 

Computer Science — Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta 

Sigma. Alpha Lambda Delta. Phi Mu Alpha 

Sinfonia, Choir. Science Fiction Club, ACM. 

CSA. 

BETTY A. MOORE (Suffolk) 

Elementary Education. 

KIMBERLY BARNES MOOSHA 

(Virginia Beach) English— Society for 

Collegiate Journalists. Alpha Chi Omega (ass't. 

rush chrmn.. second vice pres.). Colonial Echo 

(copy ed., co-editor). 

KENDRA MORGAN (Wilmington, DE) 

Accounting—Kappa Alpha Theta (fraternity ed. 

chrmn.. Social chrmn.) Tour Guide, Wrestling 

Team Ivtanager. Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 

Society. Dorm Council (pres.). 

ERIC KENNETH MORRISON (Potomac. MD) 

Biology— Kappa Alpha, Rifle Team (capL). 

JANE MORROW (Falls Church) Sociology 

ROBERT SCOTT MORROW (Uniontown. PA) 

History— Phi Alpha Theta. Navigators. College 

Republicans, Pre-Law Club. 



JOHN F. MORTON, IV (New Orleans, LA) 
Business Management — Pi Kappa Alpha (vice 
pres., alumni relations chrmn.), Alumni- 
Student Liaison Committee, Collegiate 
Management Association. 
JEFFREY J. MOSHER (Norfolk) 
Chemistry — Theta Delta Chi. 
DOUGLAS MUDD (Williamsburg) 
International Relations. 
SANDIE MULLER (Thornton. PA) 
English /Psychology. 
ALISA MULLINS (Herndon) History. 
RACHEL MUNTHALI (Virginia Beach) 
Chemistry— BSO, Chemistry Club. Badminton 
Club, Health Careers Club. Adult Skills Tutor. 
DOUGLAS MURPHY (Hillsborough, NC) 
Biology. 

J. SCOTT MURPHY (Annandale) 
Government — Pi Sigma Alpha. R.A.. 
Intramurals. College Republicans. 
HEATHER MURRAY (Falls Church) 
Government. 

MELANEY MURRAY (Ramsley, NJ) 
Business Management 



CHRISTOPHER ROBERT MYERS 

(Moultonborough. NH) 

Geology/Anthropology — Sigma Gamma 

Epsilon. Wizards. 

ELIZABETH TANKARD NEAL (Williamsburg) 

Fine Arts Review. Fine Arts Society. 

J.D. NEARY (Stony Point. NY) 

Government Pi Kappa Alpha (rush chrmn., 

intramurals chrmn.. corresponding sec), 

O A.. CSA 

KARIN JEAN NEIDER (Gaeta. Italy) 

Business Management — Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Collegiate Management Association, 

Advertising Society, Intramurals. 

ANNE B. NEVLUD (Fairfax) 

Biology— Phi Alpha Theta. Circle K, Women's 

Track, Intramurals. 

BAMBI LYNN NEWTON (New Canton) 

Government. 

JODY NORRIS (Virginia Beach) English. 



SENIORS 






enior 

Horace Daniel contem- 
plates yet another list of 
things to do before 
graduation. Photo by Bill 
Honaker 




J. Scott Murphy 
Heather fi/lurray 
Melaney Murray 
Christopher Robert Myers 
Elizabeth Tankard Neal 



John Neary 
Karin Neider 
Anne Neviud 
Bambi Lynn Newton 
Jody Norris 



Mark Osier 

David Osl in 

Barry Ov 

Silvia Otto 

Brandon Owen 



Robert G. Ow/ens 

Deborah Packman 

Jeff Palmer 

Joan Palmer 

Guy Palmes 



Thomas Palozzi 

Cynthia Paolillo 

Lee Ann Parker 

Pam Parsalo 

Susan Pasteris 



Joseph G. Pastore 

Sandra Pastrick 

fvlichael Patrick 

Suzanne Pattee 

Thomas W Peabody 





Michael Pemberton 
Linwood H. Pendleton 
PennI O. Pennington 
Donna Perry 
Monica Perry 



James Peterson 
David L Petree 
Eric Petterson 
Dwayne Petty 
Harris Pezzella 



Sharon Kay Philpott 
Chris Pierce 
Ellyn Page Piland 
Stephen Policastro 
Jessica Pollard 



WHITNEY LEE NORWOOD 

(Kennett Square, PA) Psychology — 

Psi Chi. R.A. 

ELIZABETH O'BRIEN (Ridgefield, CT) 

Accounting. 

KAREN O'BRIEN (Westport, CT) 

International Relations, 

NANCY JEAN O'BRIEN (St. Petersburg. FL) 

Government— O.A.. Governn^ent Majors Club. 

MARCO 0' DIAGA (McLean) Urban Studies 

Wizards. 

CAROL OGDEN (Hampton) 

Accoi:nting— Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting 

Society. College Republicans. SAC. Day 

Student Council. 

FRED OGLINE (Williamsburg) Mathematics. 

KEVIN O'KEEFE (Rockville, MD) 

Mathematics/Spanish. 

LAUREN ONKEY (Bndgeport. CT) 

English/Government — Jump, SA. Dorm 

Council. 

TIMOTHY O'REILLY (Manassas) 

Physical Education, 

MARK OSLER (Grosse Pointe, Ml) 
History— FHC, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Theta Delta Chi, 
WCWM (production mgr., program director, 
station mgr). R,A., Head Resident. 
DAVID OSLIN (Sandston). 
BARRY OTA (South Windsor. CT) 
Government. 

SILVIA CRISTINA OTTO 

(Port Washington, NY) 

International Relations— Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha 

Lambda Delta, Sigma Delta Pi, Alpha Chi 

Omega, Munster Summer Proaram 

Intramurals. 



BRANDON GERALD OWEN (Midlothian) 
Business Management— Sigma Chi (house 
mgr), O.A.. R.A., Direct Marketing of 
Williamsburg (pres.). Collegiate Management 
Association. 

ROBERT G. OWENS (Hampton) Accounting. 
DEBORAH PACKMAN (Rockville Centre, NY) 
Psychology/Economics— Psi Chi, Pi Beta Phi 
(social chrmn), Co/onia/ Echo (photographer). 
JEFFREY PALMER (Woodbridge) 
Mathematics — Alpha Phi Omega. 
JOAN PALMER (McLean) Accounting. 
GUY K. PALMES (Arlington) 
Psychology/ Biology — Psi Chi, Psychology 
Club. Biology Club. Intramurals. Youth Soccer 
Coach, 

THOMAS F. PA0L0Z2I III (Paris. France) 

Mathematics / German— Intramurals. 

CYNTHIA PAOLILLO (Nokomis. FL) 

Accounting— Alpha Phi Omega. CSA, 

Accounting Society, Dorm Council (tres.), 

Colonial Echo (business mgr.). 

LEE ANN PARKER (Virginia Beach) 

Business Management— CMA. 

PAM PARSALO (Virginia Beach) German 

SUSAN PASTERIS (Pittsburgh, PA) 

Economics 

JOSEPH G. PASTORE (Reston) Ps;. 

SANDRA PASTRICK (Lexington, KY) 

Government 

MICHAEL PATRICK (Dallas. TX) Lir 

SUZANNE RUTH PATTEE (Fa ' - 

Biology— Phi Sigma. Alpha C> 

THOMAS W.PEABODY 

Government— Sigma PI 

(brother "ir\. 

social c 



MICHAEL ARTHUR PEMBERTON 

(Richmond) Accounting— Phi Eta Sigma, 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Circle K (histohan, sec . 

district sec). Dorm Council (treas.). 

LINWOOD H. PENDLETON (Will---" - 

Biology— Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha L,. 

Phi Sigma. 

PENNI O. PENNINGTON r. 

DONNA PERRY 

MONICA PERRY , J> 

JAMES HOWARD PETERSON 

sClub. 

DAVID L. PETREL HI 

Psychology, 
ERIC PETERSOf 



DWAYNE PETTY (Highland Springs) 

Business Management. 

HARRIS PEZZELLA (Virginia Beach) 

Mathematics- 

SHARON KAY PHILPOTT (Salem) 

Accounting— Alpha Chi Omega. Wayne F, 

Gibbs Accounting Society, 

CHRIS PIERCE (Columbia. MD) History 
ELLYN PAGE PILAND (Nev^port News) 
History/ Fine Arts -Fine Arts Society. 
STEPHEN POLICASTRO (Vienna) Business 
JESSICA POLLARD (Portland. ME) English 



303 



SENIORS 



■a Prasch 

Lisa Price 

Tracie Prillaman 

Jill Anne Pryor 

Melanie Pugh 




304 



JOSEPH GERARD 
PASTORE 



October 26, 1362 




lMovem6er4, 1384 



The [^ given us by nature is 
sfiort) but the memory of a well- 
spent [ifc is etcmoT. 



Cicero 



I 



SENIORS 




Lydia F 

John C 

Collee; 

Liz Radday 

Moira Anne Rafferty 



J;.':. . 

Kenne 
Janet F 
Cvnth/ 



Janice Reuben 
KimberleyAnn Rhodes 
Cheryl Ribar 
Johnna C. Richard 
Karen Renee Richardson 



AMY POOR (Alexandria) 

Business Management— Alpha Lambda Delta. 

Pre-Law Club (pres.). Advertising Society. 

CMA. 

LISA PORTER (Springfield) Biology. 

VIRGINIA PORTER (Vienna) 

Sociology— Wizards. Flat Hat 

ELIZABETH L. POWELL (Newport News) 

Government/English— Pi Beta Phi, Club 

Lacrosse. Circle K, LADS. 

LAURIE A. POWELL (Falls Church) 

English— Rewew. Kappa Delta. 

VIRGINIA MARY PRASCH (Westlake, OH) 

Accounting— Chi Omega (pres.), O.A.. Wayne 

F. Gibbs Accounting Society, College 

Republicans. 

LISA PRICE (Midlothian) Psychology. 

TRACIE S. PRILLAMAN (Collinsville) 

Business Administration— Baptist Student 

Union. Collegiate Management Association, 

Dorm Council. 

JILL ANNE PRYOR (Etters. PA) 

Government— Alpha Lambda Delta. Phi Eta 

Sigma, DSR-TKA Forensic, Mortar Board. 

Debate Council (pres.). Theater, Adult Skills 

Tutor 

MELANIE PUGH (Washington. D.C.) 

English— Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta. 

Circle K, International Circle. 



LYDIA PULLEY (Greenville. SC) 

Mathematics— Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta 

Kappa, Mortar Board (vice pres.), Kappa 

Kappa Gamma (pres), Liaison to Board of 

Visitors 

JOHN ROMOLO QUAGLIANO (Richmond) 

Chemistry— Lambda Chi Alpha, Chemistry 

Club (treas). College Republicans, Summer in 

Florence Program. Intramurals. 

COLLEEN M. QUINN (Lorton) 

English /Philosophy — Mortar Board (treas.). 

Delta Gamma (charter member, activities 

chrmn., ass't. rush chrmn). Career Speaker 

Series (director), ISC. representative. O.A., 

Pika Little Sister. Pre-Law Club, CSA. 

LIZ RADDAY (New York, NY) Studio Art. 

MOIRA RAFFERTY (Great Falls) 

Chemistry— CSA (board member). Adult Skills. 

Tutor, Alpha Phi Omega, Club Lacrosse. 

Chemistry Club, Health Careers Club, 

Intramurals. 

JIM RAMSAY (Alexandria) 

Business Management 

KENNETH FRANCESCO RAPUANO (Lorton) 

Chemistry— Phi Eta Sign " ^ :m 

Club. Historical Simulati 

JANET REED (Rustbjrg, 

Business Managemeo! 



CYNTHIA C 

Governnu 

Educ 

Stude: ,„ 

Council. D 

LYNNROBlWnL:M..i^ i) 

English/Religion — De -c). 

Cheerleader. 

JANICE S. REUBEhJ (Sumter SC) 

Biology— Senio' ~ 

KIMBERLY ANN 



CHERYL RIBAR (Sler 
JOHNNA C Di'^uAor 
French — F 

AAF. Phi rv".^ ■..=..,, ^..,, ...v,,... 

KAREN RENEE RICHARDSON (Richmond) 



•?ering 



305 



SENIORS 



Va._. 



C-. _ 



Mark K, Rozzi 

Wendy Rudolph 

Isabel Ruedig 

Teresa Lynn Russo 

Linda Ruszler 




II Alpha. 

JULIE ANN RILEY I 
KAREN K. RIZ? 

Business Mar 



DARRYLROB! 

Theater— Rifle _ ... 
COLLEEN ROCHE 
Government— Pi Bt 
VALERIE JEAN ROE 



l.'-ack. 

KELLY RONAV 
Economics. 
JULIA M.ROSCHE 
Ar- 
ch I 
CAROL ROUSSEAU 



MARKK. ROZ^ 
WENDY SUSAN RL 

Chemistry— DeItT ^ . 
Outdoor Club 
ISABEL RUED! . 
TERESA LYNN RUSSO ( 

Psv-"" -" ■'■■ -'•'■'- 

P? 

LINDA M. Ku: 

Theater— W&' 



jncil, 



IViATTHPW RYAN (Menou. PA) 
L jrtar Board. Omicron : 



.J. SABIN jFairhaven. NJ) Mathematics. 
aNNE R. SCHAEFFER (Cornwall. PA) 
Phi Eta Sigma. Alpha Lambda 
ion Delta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa, 
in Fraternities and Sororities. 
^1 mega (vice pres.). Sigma Phi 
Epsiion Sweetheart. Sociology Club, Women's 
Rugby, Chorus. 
SUSAN SCHARP (Portsmouth) Biology. 

JOHN B. SCHISA (Syracuse. NY) 

Geology/Anthropology— Sigma Gamma 

Epsiion. Theta Delta Chi. Geology Club. 

GRETCHEN SCHMIDT (Concord. MA) 

Latin American Studies. 

LISA SCHMITT (Dumfries) 

Elementary Education. 

MICHAEL SCHONFELD (Chesapeake) 

Economics. 

MONIQUE SCHOONMAKER (Norfolk) 

Economics. 

JO-ANNE SCHUELLER (Gaithersburg. MD) 

Government— R.A.. Head Resident, Facts and 

Referrals. 

JULIE A. SCOTT (Warsaw) 

Economics— Sigma Phi Epsiion Goldenheart. 

Economics Club. Dorm Council. 

ROBERT SCOTT (Palican Island. NJ) 

Chemistry. 

ANN B.SEARLE (Bath, tvIE) 

French— Pi Delta Phi. Chi Omega. 

HEATHER SELL (Annandale) 

Physical Education. 

ALISON SELLIN (New York. NY) 



History— Pi Beta Phi (VIP Social Ass't), Theta 

Delta Chi Sweetheart. 

IMELDA SERRANO (Virginia Beach) History. 

JANELL AGNES SEWELL (San Antonio, TX) 

Government— Circle K. 

MEHUL S. SHAH (Hampton) 

Chemistry/ Biology— Theta Delta Chi. 

Chemistry Club. Biology Club, Health Careers 

Club. Rugby Team. 

ARTHUR V. SHAHEEN (Richmond) 

Philosophy. 

W. RANDALL SHANGRAW (Catonsville, MD) 

Chemistry— Gamma Sigma Epsiion. Chemistry 

Club, Dorm Council. 

LUCINDA SHAY (Hampton) 

Accounting— National Dean's List Circle K 

(treas.), Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society 

SANDRA SHEFFIELD (Waverly) Chemistry. 

MELINDA SHELOR (Stuart) 

Human Relations— R.A., BEFU Society. 

TONYA SHIREY (Richmond) 

Elementary Education. 

KAREN SHOOP (West Chester, PA) 

Accounting. 

JONATHAN SIEGEL (Williamsburg) 

Government. 

VINCENT MARTIN SIGNORELLI (Richmond) 

Business Administration— Sigma Chi (social 

chrmn.). Pre-Law Club. Karate Club, 

Advertising Society, Collegiate Management 

Association. 

THOMAS H. SIMPSON (Paoli, PA) 

Chemistry— Phi Eta Sigma, Lambda Delta, Pi 

Kappa Alpha. 

TRACY M. SINNOTT (Richmond) 

Government— Pi Beta Phi (sec, vice pres.). 

Honor Council (chrmn). President's Aide, 

CSA. Pika Little Sister. 



T 




^1 km^M^m 



Matt Ryan 
Keith Ryder 
Linda Sabin 
Suzanne Schaeffer 
Susan Sharp 



John Schisa 
Gretchen Schmidt 
Lisa Schmitt 
Michael Schonfeld 
Monique Schoonmaker 



Joanne Schueller 
Julie A. Scott 
Robert Scott 
Ann B. Searle 
Heather Sell 



Alison Seilin 
Imelda Serrano 
Janell Sewell 
Mehul Shah 
Arthur Shaheen 



W. Randall Shangraw 
LucindaShay 
Sandra Sheffield 
MelindaD. Sheior 
Tonya Shirey 



Karen Shoop 
Jonathan Siegel 
Vincent M. Signorelli 
Thomas H. Simpson 
Tracy M. Sinnott 




307 



SENIORS 



Dwight E. Smith 

Jenny Smith 

Stephen Smith 

Susan P. Smith 

Andrew Smolin 



IVlarjorie Snipes 

Kym Snyder 

Patricia Soraghan 

AnneSorensen 

Vickie Sorongon 




DARREN SLEDJESKI (Centreville) 

Biology — Intramurals. 

MITCHELL SLODOWITZ (Englewood. NJ) 

Accounting — Kappa Sigma. Wrestling. 

CRAIG T. SMITH (Ann Arbor. Ml) 

CYNTHIA G. SMITH (Gary. NO) 

Accounting— Delta Delta Delta. Junior Board, 

Wayne R Gibbs Accounting Society, Dorm 

Council 

DANIEL E. SMITH (Vienna) 

Government— Pi Sigma Alpha, WOWM. 

Pre-Law Club, Committee for Special 

Interest Houses. 

DWIGHT EVERETT SMITH (Leesburg) 

Accounting— SA Council. Band. Dorm 

Council, Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society. 

Student Committees— Finance, Student 

Services, Residential Concerns. 

JENNY SMITH (Rocky Mount) English. 

STEPHEN SMITH (Williamsburg) French. 

SUSAN P. SMITH (Scottsville) 

Business Administration. 



ANDREW SMOLIN (Rockville, NY) 

Accounting — Men's Soccer. 

MARJORIE SNIPES (Williamsburg) Spanish. 

KYM SNYDER (Williamsburg) Religion. 

PATRICIA CAHILL SORAGHAN (Springfield) 

English — New Testament Student Association. 

ANNE SORENSEN (Saddle River, NJ) 

Business Management 

VICKI SORONGON (Ellicott City, MD) 

Psychology— Chi Omega, FCA, Orchesis. 

JOHN SPARCO (Wilmington, DE) 

Computer Science. 

DOROTHY SPEARS (Williamsburg) History. 

DIANNA J. SPENCE (Hampton) 

Mathematics— Student Education Association, 

Circle K, Chorus. 

MICHAEL SPENCER (Midlothian) 

Physics— Latter-Day Saint Student 

Association. 

KATHY SPOLLEN (Northport, NY) Economics. 
REBECCA SPRAGONS (Lebanon. KY) 



Anthropology. 

MARY E. ST. GEORGE (Portsmouth) 

Biology — Alpha Chi Omega (chapter relations. 

chapter functions chrmn., pres.). O.A., Junior 

Board. 

MARIA A. STAMOULAS (Fairfax Station) 

Economics/ French— Phi Beta Kappa. French 

Honor Society, Economics Honor Society, 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Phi Omega, 

International Circle, Women's Fencing, 

HOWARD SURTON STANTON 

(Christiansburg). 

SHEILA STARK (Great Falls) English. 



308 



SENIORS 




John Sparco 
Dorothy Spears 
Dianna Spence 
Michael Spencer 
Kathy Spollen 



Rebecca Spragons 
Mary E. St. George 
Maria Stamoulas 
Howard Surton Stanton 
Sheila Stark 




tudying: It 
is a way of life here. Just a 
cup of caffeine, a large 
book filled with letters and 
numbers, and you're on 
your way to a world of 
adventure. Take it from 
Linda Ruszler, pictured 
here in the Academic 
Dimension. Photo by 
Bill Honaker 



309 



SENIORS 



u 



ounting- ■ 
KlETTAC""^ 

Biology 



SUZANNE M.STORERc 

Biology 

TODD A. STOTTLEMEYE 

Government— Pi Sigma A 
Football, 

.lANFT I YNN STOTTS iRirhm-nrii 



ROBERT STRAEIT2 

Chemistry, 

PAUL ANDREW STRATTA (Nf 



ANITA L. STRAUPE 

Accounting— Worn 
Gibbs Accour ' 
DIANA LYNN r 
So. 

Or 



SI 

•ead 



MELISSA STURGIS(V 
BRIAN STURM (Virgini 

DEAN A. SULLIVAN (Fairfax) 
History/English— WCWM, 
THOMAS SUMMERVILLE ( 

G— ■"■ -'• c,-,,,s,.,n checca 

t t Union. 

T 

r 

Pt rvi..l|Ct:S UiUD, Bapi 

CHERYL SUTTERFIEL 

Biology. 
BILLSYBERSfP 



L 



LAURA ALUS 

Pr,'^iijh__Air,. 



ERICSTRUBIf 



Angela Stephanos 

Jennifer Stewart 

Kathy Stewart 

Melvin Stone 

Rietta C. Stoneman 



Suzanne M. Storer 

Todd Stottlemeyer 

Janet Lynn Stotts 

Robert Straeitz 

Paul Stratta 



Anita L Straupenieks 

Diana Street 

Allison Stringer 

Eric Strubinger 

Melissa Sturgis 



\tlanta, GA) 
-ipter relations 
Evensong 

1 Accounting. 



CARLA ELAINE TADEMY (Fairfax) 

Ernt^iiimir'^,' ^orinlnnv — nt^ll.'i ?linma Thpta 



KARYNTANCREC 

Accounting — Kappd rvapiJ-n ^jmuiMa, 

LAURA E. TANNER (Bowie, MD) 

i! :> Relations— Alpha Lambda Delta. 

r la, Delta Omicron, Delta Gamma, 

Choir, cnorus. Orchestra, Westminster 

Fellowship. 

NANCY TAYLOR (Virginia Beach) 

Elementary Education— Delta Delta Delta, 

Circle K. 

JOHN TEGERIS (Bethesda, MD) Biology. 

JOYCE CATHERINE TERHUNE 

(West (\/lilford, NJ) Biology— 

Sigma Nu Sweetheart, Biology Club, Dorm 

Council (sec). 

MARK THALHIMER (Alexandria) Accounting. 

DWAYNE THERRIAULT (North Pole, AL) 

History— Phi Alpha Theta, Alpha Phi Omega, 

International Relations Club, East-Asian 

Studies Association. 



JACQUELINE P. THOMAS (Fredericksburg) 
Biology/ Psychology— Phi Sigma, Kappa 
Alpha Theta, Sigma Chi Little Sister. 
JONATHAN THOMAS (Austin, TX) English. 
MARTHA THOMAS (Corona del Mar. CA) 
English— Kappa Delta. 
TIMOTHY A, THOMAS (Sterling) 
'- - • - ' iead Resident, Dorm Council 
II Omega, Circle K. Wayne F. 
juiiiing Society, Pre-Law Club, 
epublicans, Rugby, Intramurals. 
WARD THOMAS (West Point, NY) 
Government. 

WENDY THOMAS (Pittsburgh, PA) 
Economics. 

MARY THOMASSON (Arlington). 
AMY THOMPSON (Southampton, NY) 
Accounting— Beta Gamma Sigma, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Kappa Alpha 
Theta, Wayne F. Gibbs Accounting Society, 
Tour Guide, Sigma Chi Little Sister. 
MARGARET HOLLAND THOMPSON 
(Richmond) Elementary Education- 
New Testament Student Association. 
PAMELA M, THOMPSON (Fairfax) 
Psychology Dorm Council, LADS, Circle K. 
RAIFORD HALL THOMPSON (Quinton) 
Biology. 

ZANDRA THOMPSON (Chesapeake) 
Sociology— BlacK Student Organization (vice 
pres.), Forensics, R.A., Ebony Expressions. 
SCOTT TICKNOR (Washington, DC) 
International Relations. 

TARYN G. TORRE (Williamsburg) Psychology. 
HOPE ELIZABETH TOTTEN (Belle Haven) 
Biology. 

DAVID TOWNSEND (Hampton) Computer 
Science. 



310 




SENIORS 




Brian Sturm 
Dean Sullivan 
Thomas Summc, - 
Thorn Sutlive 
Cheryl Sutterfield 



Bill Sybers 
Caria Tademy 
Karyn Tancredi 
Laura Tanner 
Nancy Taylor 



John Tegeris 
Joyce Terhune 
MarkThalhimer 
DwayneTherriault 
Jacqueline P. Thomas 



Jonathon Thomas 
Martha Thomas 
Timothy Thomas 
Ward Thomas 
Wendy Thomas 



Mary Thomasson 
Amy E.Thompson 
Margaret Thompson 
Pamela Thompson 
Raiford Hall Thompson 



Scott 



311 



SENIORS 



urner 



M'^tw Piifh I Ihnri 



u... 



''S 



•vamp 
Hyde 




t^,._.i 1** _ ._.J-J 



BARBIE TRYBUL (Lorton) 

Sociology — Colonial Echo. 

OEBRA PAIGE TURNER (Richmond) 

Biology — Biology Club, Intramurals. 

RAYNA LEE TURNER (Richmond) 

Sociology — Alpha Kappa Alpha (vice pres., 

treas.. dean of pledges), Orchestra (vice pres., 

concertmaster), Sociology Club, Black Student 

Organization. 

ANN LESLIE TUTTLE (Irvington) 

History/English — Phi Alpha Theta, Society for 

Collegiate Journalists. Delta Gamma, Futures 

(ed.). Review, Institute of Early American 

History and Culture Intern. 

ROBERT W. TUTTLE (Bayonne, NJ) 

Religion/English — Soccer. Change of Pace. 

MARY RUTH UHRIG (Chester) 

Mathematics — Gamma Phi Beta. 

SCOTT UKROP (Richmond) 

Business — f*/1ortar Board, Pi Kappa Alpha 

(pres., regional vice pres., vice pres., sec, 

pledge trainer). President's Aide, SAC, Tour 

Guide, O.A., C.M.A. 

DOUGLAS R. UPDEGROVE (Richmond) 

Government/Religion — Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha 

Lambda Delta, Pi Sigma Alpha, College 

Republicans, Senior Class Fundraising 

Chairman, Historical Simulations Society. 

DANIEL KEVIN USHER (Richmond) 

Business Management — Pi Lambda Phi, Mens 

Cross Country and Track, CSA, Collegiate 

Management Association. 

ELIZABETH UT2 (Vienna) 

Business Management — Kappa Delta, 

Canterbury, CSA, CMA. 

CHARLES J. VAKOS (Virginia Beach) 

Accounting — Intramurals. 

SIMONNE VALENTI (Falls Church) 

>g — Kappa Alpha Theta, Wayne F. 
•ounting Society. 

VALINSKl (Westborough. MA) 
opa Kappa Gamma (first vice 
" Summer 



DIANA VAN DE KAMP (Old Greenwich, CT) 

Philosophy/Government — Dorm Council. Sierra 

Club. 

JOHN FREDERICK VAN DER HYDE 

(Chatham) Biology— Biology Club, Medical 

Careers Club, Dorm Council. 

AMELIE LUCY VAN LUDWIG (Front Royal) 

English/Secondary Education— Pi Delta Phi. 

Canterbury. Covenant Players. Circle K (social 

chrmn.). Director's Theater, Vi/&M Theater. 

Dorm Council (social chrmn.), Student 

Education Association. 

LISA VAUGHAN (Pulaski) Government. 

CHRISTINE VILLA (Stoney Point, NY). 

JODY VITALE (Lynchburg) Sociology. 

KRISTEN E. WAGNER (Seattle, WA) 

Business Management Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

Advertising Society. 

REBECCA K. WAJDA (New York, NY) 

Biology — Canterbury, Health Careers Club, 

Sierra Club. 

CHRISTOPH WALKER (Reston) 

Government — Alpha Phi Omega (historian), 

LADS Chairman, International Relations Club. 

RACHEL WALKER (Staunton) 

Government — Alpha Lambda Delta. Phi Eta 

Sigma, Phi Beta Phi, Orchesis (vice pres.). 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes. 

RICHARD WALKER (Hampton, PA) Biology. 

DIANE ROSE WALLACE (Haddonfield. NJ) 

Accounting — Phi Mu. Field Hockey, Accounting 

Society. 

JONATHAN WALLACE (Springfield) 

Accounting. 

COLLEEN WALSH (Audubon, PA) Accounting. 

MARYELLEN WALSH (McLean) 

Government — Kappa Alpha Theta. Women's 

Swimming. Adult Skills Tutor. 

MARTHA FRANCES WEAVER (Suffolk) 
Art History— Phi Mu. 

ELIZABETH A. WELSH (Hampton) 
Economics — Phi Mu (sec). Economics Majors 
Club. O.A.. Orientation Assistant Director. 



AMY THOMPSON WELTY (St. Petersburg, FL) 

French — Pi Delta Phi, New Testament Student 

Association. Navigators, WCWM, Montpellier 

Program, Backdrop Theater. 

LISA MARIE WENNESHEIMER (Woodbridge) 

Spanish— Sigma Delta Pi, Internation Relations 

Club. National Model U.N. 

ELLEN WENTE (Bedford) English. 

PAUL WERME (Dahlgren) Computer Science. 

EVELYN LORRAINE WESTBROOK 

(Richmond) Computer Science — Phi Eta 

Sigma. Alpha Lambda Delta. 

ANNE WEYBRIGHT (Nokesville) 

Anthropology — Gamma Phi Beta, Band, 

Anthropology Club, Dorm Council. 

JANET WHALEY (Herndon) 

French— Pi Delta Phi (sec), Inter-Collegiate 

Band, Band, Orchestra, BSU, CSA. 

BRIAN WHITE (Blue Bell, PA) 

History— Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Lambda Phi. 

International Relations Club, Club Lacrosse. 

WCWM. Adult Skills Tutor. 

ROY WHITEHURST (Vienna) 

International Relations — Dorm Council (pres.). 

Circle K. 

JEFFREY E. WHITMORE (Wakefield) 

Computer Science — Badminton Club. WCWM 

(production mgr.). 

JAMES MARSHALL WHITNEY, JR. (Arlington) 

Accounting Alpha Phi Omega, Wesley 

Foundation. 

SANDY WHITWORTH (Charlottesville) 

Mathematics/Computer Science. 

FRONTIS B. WIGGINS (Arlington) 

History — Phi Kappa Tau (vice pres.), SAC, 

Dorms Council (pres.). Senior Class Social 

Co-Chairman, Men's Fencing, Intramurals, 

Florence Program, VFY Volunteer. 

PHILLIP H. WIGGINS, JR. (Morristown, NJ) 

Psychology — PI Lambda Phi, Men's Track. 

Collegiate Management Association. 

PETER E. WILCOX (Newport News) 

Biology — Off-Campus Student Council (treas). 

Resident Director of Off-Campus Student House. 





^Ee£ 





iitfi i J i 



Amelia 
Lisa Vauydan 
Cinristine Villa 
Jody Vitale 
Kristen Wagner 



Rebecca Wajda 
Christoph Walker 
Rachel Wallker 
Richard Walker 
Diane Wallace 



Jonathon Wallace 
Colleen Walsh 
Maryellen Walsh 
Martha Frances Weaver 
Elizabeth Welsh 



Amy Welty 

Lisa Marie Wennesheimer 

Ellen Wente 

Paul Werme 

Lori Westbrook 



Anne Weybright 
Janet Whaley 
Brian White 
Roy Whitehurst 
Jeffrey Whitmore 



Jame? 

Phillip i 

Peter E. Wilcox 



313 



SENIORS 



TiL 




Willis 
/ilson 
yilson 



Sharon Patricia Winn 

Rhonda Winstead 

Elizabeth Wiseman 

Travis Witt 

Maryellen Woglom 



Tracy Wolf 

James Wolfe 

Jennifer Wong 

Greg Wood 

Kathryn Woodcock 



Julie Woodring 

Anastasia Wright 

Christina Wright 

Gail Wright 

Rachel A. Wright 




314 



SENIORS 




Tracey 
Stan Yf 
Demet; 
Guy S. Yeatts 
Eun Carol Yi 



James 
Robert 



;r 



RODNEY WILLETT (Virginia Beach) 

Government— F/at Ha((photographer),Pika. 

BARRY NEAL WILLIAMS (Williamsburg) 

Economics, 

GARY J. WILLIAMS (Vienna) 

Business Management — Direct Marketing of 

Williamsburg, Collegiate Management 

Association. Pre-Law Club, Ski Club, 

Advertising Society. Literary Review. 

JAMES C. WILLIAMS (Richmond) 

Computer Science/ Psychology— Lambda Chi 

Alpha (social chrmn.). Men's Lacrosse (co- 

capL), S.A. 

MELANIE WILLIAMS (Schenectady, NY) 

Economics. 

STEVEN R. WILLIAMS (Winter Springs, FL) 

History— Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 

Phi Alpha Theta (pres.), Scabbard and Blade, 

ROTC. ROTC Cadet Ciub (pres.). College 

Republicans, Dorm Council. 

LINDSEY WILLIS (Atlanta. GA) Government 

KAREN ANN WILSON (Clearwater, FL) 

Human Relations. 

LAURA BETH WILSON (Chester, NJ) 

Elementary Education — W&M Christian 

Fellowship. 

WENDY WILSON (Hampton) French. 

SHARON PATRICIA WINN (Vienna) Biology. 

RHONDA WINSTEAD (Richmond) Chemistry. 

MARY ELIZABETH WISEMAN (Danville) 

Latin— Classics Club. 



TRAVIS H. WITT (Huddleston) 

Government 

MARYELLEN WOGLOM (Reston) 

Elementary Education — Kappa Alpha Theta, 

Student Education Association. Field Hockey. 

TRACY L. WOLF (Tampa, FL) 

Religion /Classical Studies— Kappa Delta, 

I.S.C, Canterbury, Sinfonicron. Classical 

Studies Club. 

JAMES R. WOLFE (Olivesburg, OH) 

Biology— Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, 

Tau Kappa Epsilon, Dorm Council, Latter Day 

Saints Student Association, College 

Republicans. Health Careers Club, WCWM. 

JENNIFER WONG (Falls Church) 

Biology— French Honor Society, Biology 

Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta 

Sigma. Sigma Nu Sweetheart Health Careers 

Club, Biology Club, Circle K. 

GREG WOOD (Boyd Tavern) Economics. 

KATHRYN H. WOODCOCK (W 

Biology— Pi Beta Phi, Biology C 

JULIE BETH WOODRING (Granvnle. OH,, 

Psychology— Psi Chi (pres.), W&M Mainstage 

Theater, Orchesis. 

ANASTASIA WRIGHT (Hood) B'Ology 

CHRISTINA D. WRIGHT C 

Government /Frerch—G 

Society, Cover- ;L 

International Re anal 

Programs Council. Circle K. 

GAIL WRIGHT (Endicott NY) 



Computer Science— D- 
RACHEL A. WRIGHT I £ 
Psychology — Phi Sign- 
Delta, Psi Chi. Ph- ■"-•- 
Club. Baptist Stu'j 
TRACEY WRIGHT 
STAN YAGIELLO 
Human Relp- 
Chi Alpha, F 
DEMETRAYEAPANIS 
Government 
GUY S. YEATTS 
Business Manage., c. . 
EUN CAROL YI (Springfield) 

c- 

Ir 

JAME 

Gove: 

ROBERT N.ZA2A 

German — Range' 
Commander. 

KAREN 7FRPFNNFR 

Accol 

Gibbs,-,. 

MARIA ZWICKiT HI) 

Sociology— Phi fviu •^ ; e i-.iub(pres.),WCv 
Sociology Club. Field Hockey. 

MICHAEL FF CKLBAUER 

(Altamont r , 

r.' ■ "" - -^ 



315 



JUNIORS 



ridge 
naya 



Janet Artman 
Adam Auel 

Theresa Ayotte 
Jeanette Baer 
Patricia Baker 

Ramona Baliles 

Margaret Bambrey 

Connie Bane 

Karen Barclay 

Susan Barco 

Charles Barnes 

Rebecca Barnes 

Kim Barrigar 

Robert Bavis 

Elizabeth Bell 

Allison Belsches 

Leah Bennet 

David Benton 

Ramona Biliunas 

Jane Marie Birchbach 

Grace Boland 

Revonda Bowers 

Lynn Bowles 

Terry Boyle 

Jacobs Bradley 

Elizabeth Bradsher 

Anne Bregman 

Richard Bridges 

Una Brian 

Douglas Brinkley 

Sabrina Brinkley 

Kris Britton 

Ann Brosnahan 

Ann C. Brown 

Cheryl Brown 

L. Allyson Brown 

Rebecca Browning 

Jim Brubaker 

Simon Buckley 

Bonnie Burnette 

Elizabeth Burr 

Jan Butler 



316 




JUNIORS 





bove the 
crowd, Jeannie Cherundolo 
tries to spot friends among 
the masses watching foot- 
ball in Gary Stadium. Photo 
by Mike Nikolich 




Priscilla Butler 
John Byrum 
Ansley Calhoun 
David B.Callahan 
Sharon Callahan 
Cathleen Capin 

Cathleen Caputo 
Gian Carlo Caratini 
Heidi Carr 
Peggy Carroll 
Bill Carver 
Susan fvlarie Cass 

John Chamberlayne 
Margaret Chandler 
Laura Chase 
Jean Cherundolo 
Jennifer Christen 
Michelle G. Christie 



317 



U N I O R S 



Paul Coakley 

Angela Cody 

Robert C.Coghill 

Mark Cole 

Chris Comey 

Andrea Connell 

Edward J.T.Cook 

Colleen Cooke 

Ann Cooper 

Monica Cord 

Scott Coval 

Craig Cox 








njoying a couple 
of glasses of beer, Jack Crane 
and Bill Darke drink for a good 
cause at one of the happy hours 
sponsored by the LaCrosse team 
to raise money for the team. 
Photo by Bill Honaker 



318 





K. Margaret Cronk 
Robb Cruser 
Pam Cunningham 
Joseph Davis 
Eric Dean 
Michael Deeds 

Steven W. Dennis 
Anne Detterer 
William Arthur Devan 
Kris Deyerle 
Joy Dibble 
Michael Dingman 

Debra Dixon 
Joan Doerflinger 
Gretchen Doner 
Laura Donohoe 
James Joseph Duran, Jr. 
Michael Douchette 

Christopher Doyle 
Kelly Doyle 
Ann Drake 
Linda Drews 
Martha Droge 
Maureen Dubus 

Suzy Duff 
Beth Duncan 
Kathy Duvall 
Alison Dvi^ier 
Todd Eddins 
Vince Eddins 



Traci Edier 
Linda Egenter 
Anne Fallon 
Jane Fanestil 
Laura Fanning 
Lisa Ferguson 

Debbie Fetterman 
Jennifer M. Finn 
Lynn Fitzgerald 
Georgia Flamporls 
Martha Forsyth 
Kistine Fryer 

Elizabeth H. Fulghum 
Tamara Funk 
Stephen B. Furman 
MaryC. Gair 
Laurie Gardiner 
Robert Gardiner 



319 



JUNIORS 




ost of the 
coaches in the Youth Soccer 
League of Williamsburg were 
W & M students. Andy Salita and 
his team the Strikers play on 
Saturday mornings at Dillard. 
Students could recieve PE credit 
for coaching but many did it for fun. 
Photo by Dan Weber 




Kevin Gentry 

David Gerlitz 

LilaGhatak 

Mary Gibson 

Lynne Giermak 

Celeste Gilbertie 

Sherri Givens 

Polly Gladding 

Scott R. Gleason 

John Golwen 
Andrew Gordon 

Drew Gordon 

Virginia Greseclose 

Timothy Gribben 

Lawrence A. Griffith, Jr. 

Anna Grimsley 

Jennifer Gross 

Lorraine Groves 



320 




JUNIORS 




Darryl Gugig 
Chad Guneau 
Mary Guzzo 
Christina Hagar 
Christopher Hagin 
Donna E. Hagstrand 

Deborah Haley 
Ian Hall 
Kenneth Haila 
Kristin Hallenberg 
Rebecca Hambright 
David Han 

Dana Hancock 
Anne Leigh Hanley 
Ronald K. Hann 
Maria Hannahoe 
James Harenchar 
June Harmon 

Margaret Harned 

Paul Harriil 

Heather Lisabeth Hearn 

Jan Hearth 

Bill Hefele 

Laurel Heneghan 

Jeff Henley 
Anne M. Herbst 
Amy Heth 
James Hevener 
Andrea Hill 
Colleen Hogan 

Adam Hogge 
Carol Holmes 
Stephen Hubbard 
Timothy Hudenburg 
Yolanda Huey 
Kimberly Hugney 

Timothy D. Hugo 
Richard Hulme 
Mark Hurley 
James P. Hylind 
Thomas A. lannacons 
Dorthea Jackson 



Valerie Jacobson 
Patti James 
Pete James 
Julia Jans 
Christy Jarvis 
Michele Jerome 



321 



JUNIORS 



Kcl LI I ICCI I l\cntj:i )c-i 

Kimberly J. Kellum 
Irene Kelly 



Joseph Kelly 

Christine Kelton 

Stephen Kern 

Anoush Kevorkian 

Rhanna Kidwell 

Jennifer King 





iding Club mem- 
ber, Gaynor Ibbotson watches the 
competition before she rides. 
Photo by Maryanne Kondracki. 



322 




JUNIORS 











^^^^«^^B 



Paul Kinley 
Magon Kinzie 
Elizabeth Kling 
Andrew Kohl 

Maryanne Kor_ 

Robert Kraus 

uenise Kruelle 
Jeffrey Krugman 
Pam Krulitz 
Kathryn Kuhn 
Andrew Lake 
Peter Lang 

Willis Powell Lanier 
Richard Larrick 
Elizabeth Law 
Andrea Leftwich 
Lynn Leonard 
Katherine Leupold 

Jonathon Levi 
Heidi Lewis 
Michelle Lewis 
Lesin Liskey 
Gail Littleton 
Beth Loudy 



Drew Lovell 
Janine Lowery 
Nathan Jacob Lucas 
Lisa Lutz 
Donald MacKay 
Arthur Madonain 

Linda A. Malone 
Mary Manous 
Joseph Marfy 
George Martin 
Robin Mattson 
Susan Maxson 

Melinda May 
Brendan McCarthy 
Deborah McDaniels 
Dennis McEleney 
Katherine McGregor 
Paula McMillen 



Janet McMinn 
Charles McMullin 
Martha Meade 
Mary Meade 
Diahann Meats 
Christine Meily 



323 



JUNIORS 



Gari Melchers 

Matthew K. Melkin 

Kraig A. Melville 

Elizabeth Menicke 

Rebecca Merck 

Van Meredith 

Gwendolyn Messer 

Susan Meyer 

Janine Michaiek 

Chad Miller 

Diane L. Mitchell 

Denise Mitchell 

Elizabeth Moliter 

Susanne Mongrain 

Catherine Moon 

Vicki Moore 

Mary Morgan 

Robin Morris 

Katherine Moser 

Elizabeth Mulnar 

Thomas W. Myers 

Caria Nagel 

Criag Naring 

Norma Nedroe 

Doug Neil 

Jeff Nelms 

Debbi Nelson 

Jane Neste 

Lynn Newbury 

Anthony Newman 

Shonra Newman 

WillNicklin 

Nikola A. Nikolic 

Richard D. Nixon 

Todd Norris 

SueO'Brine 

Timothy O'Conner 

Lisa Ohier 

KrisO'Keefe 

Richard O'Keefe 

N. Sedef Onder 

Karen O'Neal 

Joanne Orr 

Cheryl Owen 

Matima F. Papodopoulos 

Sandra Ellen Parham 

Jeanette Parker 

Larry Patish 



324 




JUNIORS 





enior Bruce Biber and 
sophomore Jennifer Veley relax in the 
Sunken Gardens on an early spring 
day. Photo by Mike Nikolich 




Kathleen Patten 
Catherine Patterson 
Matthew Paulides 
Anne Penney 
Lori Pepple 
Frances Petres 

Cameron D. Pforr 
Mary Catherine Phelps 
Abigails. Phillips 
Jennifer Phillips 
Susan Pinkleton 
Gary L Polk 

John Poma 
Keith Poms 
Robert Pontz 
Emma Pope 
Antonia Powell 
James Pratt 



325 



eRadell 

,..^.., Ragland 

Edith Laverne Randall 

Sterling N. Ransone, Jr. 

Anne-Jarrell Rapier 

Michael Rausch 

Jennifer Reidenbach 

Heidi Reihansperger 

J. H. Revere 

Maria Reyher 

Agostinho J. Ribeiro 

Sabrina Richman 

Douglas Riggan 

Diane Roberson 

Susan Roberts 

Karen Robertson 

Lisa Robertson 

Prudence Robinson 

Suzanne Robinson 

Ken Rogich 

Bryan Roslund 

Leonard Rozamus 

Andrew Rozycki 

Rochelle Rubin 



William Runnebaum 

Adrian Saiita 

Karen Salmon 

MikeSaltzman 

Angela Sansone 

Ann Santilli 



Kristina Satkunas 

Roy Sauberman 

Jeff Savino 

Daniel Scerbo 

KristineScharf 

Eileen Schechter 

Michael Schneider 

Linda Schooley 

Catherine G. Schultz 

Anne Schwartz 

James Seeiey 

Jeff Seeley 




' V ^F J 



JUNIORS 



WW 





Steven M. Servidio 
MattSeu 
Nan Shanley 
Heather Louise Shaw 
Theodore J. Shin 
Ann Shufflebarger 

Brian Shull 
John Siegel 
Andria Silver 
Lesilee Simpson 
David Siren 
William Scott Slattery 

Lynnleigh Smith 
Lucinda Snyder 
Bill Sodeman 
JooSong 
Elizabeth Sowers 
Kathy Starr 





have always been 
prevalent on campus, 
along with the bikes 
this year were some 
thieves who over the 
course of the year 
snatched most of the 
bikes that weren't 
locked. Although the 
campus police 
recovered several of 
the stolen bikes most 
were never recovered. 
All of the bikes had 
been left unlocked. 
Photo by Dan Weber 






327 



JUNIORS 



t V I o I 1 a o I C V c; r 1 o 

Anne Stevenson 

Carrie Stewart 

Jacqueline Ann Stoate 

Cynthia L. Storer 

Mary Elizabeth Sweatman 

Lynn Taber 

James Taylor 



Karen Thierfelder 

Jeanette Thompson 

Chris Thorns 

Pam Tiffany 

Pamela Tolbert 

John Tomko 

Robert Tormey 

Phil Tremo 

Lisa Ellen Trimboli 

Martha Tweedie 

Aurelio R. Valeriano 

Leticia Van Doom 

Anita Van Timmeren 

Margaret J. Vankick 

Heidi Vann 

Lisa Von Eschen 

Steven Waldman 

Chuck Wall 

Julia Wallace 

Edgar Venson Wallin, Jr. 

Barbara J. Walters 

Scott Ward 

William Waters 

Craig Watt 

Julie Weaver 
Kathryn M.Webb 
Cletus Weber 
Daniel Weber 
Linda Weber 
Karen Weiler 




.^^^^^y/^ 



328 



JUNIORS 










Kathleen Welch 
Laura Wheeler 
Caroline White 
Bruce Whitehurst 
Elizabeth Whitham 



Anne Whitworth 
Daryl Wiggins 
Meredith C. Wilcox 
Elizabeth Williams 
Brian Wimberly 



Deborah Woodland 
James Lee Wright 
Stephanie Wright 
Mark Wychulis 
Maria T. Yencha 



Nancy Young 
Tom Zabiila 
Susan Zanetti 
Debbie Zanfagna 
Kimberly Zieske 





uriosity: 



Sophomores Nathan Ellis 
and Mariellen Soltys and 
senior Susan Hudgins 
inspect an inhabitant of Crim 
Dell. Photo by Mike Nikolich 



329 



SOPHOMORES 



Eileen Aquino 
Martha Lee Armel 



Scott Armstead 

Brian Atkinson 

Suzanne Aucella 

Jeffrey August 

Michael Bailey 

Carolyn Rustin Baker 






warm autumn afternoon 
finds sophomores Jeff August Sharon 
Clarke and Jennifer Beckett intensely in- 
volved in Tribe football action at Cary Field. 
Fun is had by all. Photo by Mike Nikolich 



330 



SOPHOMORES 




F 






.^ki 





Laura Balcer 
Joe Ball 
Deborah Banas 
Joe Barrett 
Amy Barta 
Mark Batzel 



Chris Bauman 
Laura Baumhofer 
Amy Beauchamp 
Hilary Beaver 
Adam R. Beck 
Jennifer Beckett 



Anne Marie Belair 
Laura Belcher 
Diane Berg 
Anja Bergman 
Lydia Bergman 
Mark E. Bishop 

John Black 
Mary C. Blake 
Elizabeth Claire Bley 
Chris Blinco 
Carolyn Bond 
Jennifer Boone 

Ryan Boone 
James Borys 
Arnold Bosserman 
Keith Boswell 
James Box 
Joe Boyd 

Karen Branham 
Jennifer Brawley 
Christopher Bright 
Robert Brinkerhoff 
Lynda K. Brown 
Elisha Brownfield 

Susan E. Bruch 
George A. Buckley III 
Brendan Bunn 
Sandra Burgess 
Jennifer Burmester 
Deanne Buschmeyer 

Elizabeth Buzzard 
Laura Cairncross 
F, Paul Calamita 
Joseph Callicott 
Lisa Helen Calos 
Raelene Canuel 



ii;>..'*^ 



331 



SOPHOMORES 



Robert Carr 

Jody Carreiro 

Patricia Carroll 

Carolyn Carter 

Laura Champe 

Katherine Chapman 

Mary Churchill 

Cyndi Clark 

Judy Cochran 

Karen Colmie 

Roger Coomer 

Christina Cornejo 

Jennie Cornish 

Elaine Corriero 

Patricia Coulter 

Tanya Cowan 

Kathleen Cox 

Susan Cruser 

Laurie Ann Culpepper 

Michael Dailey 

Matthew Dalby 

Barbara Daniel 

John Darke 

Kevin Davis 

Nancy Davis 

Tim Davis 

Pamela Dawson 

Wayne Decker 

Mary Renee Deering 

Jerome Degnan 

Jackie Delia 

Palmer C. Demeo, Jr. 

Ann Demuth 

John Derrick 

Barry Diduch 

Kimmeriy Dillard 

George Dippoid 

Mary Jo Dorr 

Kim Dorty 

James Dougherty 

A. Thomas Downey IV 

Samantha Drennan 

Scott Dreyer 
Colleen Dugan 

Sherry Dunn 

Stephen Dunn 

Alfred R. Dupont 

Cynthia Dupuy 




Ci^p^^iif^ 







332 




>/ \ 



SOPHOMORES 





cho photographer 
Leslie Barry gets her camera ready as 
the second half of the football game 
she is assigned to shoot begins. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 




Mike Dutton 
Catherine Ann Easter 
Susan Easton 
Elizabeth Eastwood 
Mary Eaves 
Kathy Echols 

Anne Edgerton 
Audrey Edwards 
David Edwards 
Robert Edwards 
Elizabeth Ehrman 
Patricia!. Elliott 



Nathan Ellis 
Angela Encinias 
Michele Engel 
Katherine Anne Ennis 
Maria Esten 
Paul Eversole 



333 



SOPHOMORES 



John Field 

Ricardo Figueiras 

Chris Fincher 

Elizabeth Finger 

Marsha Fishburne 

Barry Fisher 

Ellen Flaherty 

Marilyn Flaherty 

Dana Fleitas 

Jan Flemming 

Ann Fletcher 

Jody Brice Fletcher 

Tracy Flora 

Donna K. Fox 

Lisa Fraim 

Sara Friedell 

Elaine Fry 

Sabine Frye 

John Fukuda 

Amy Furr 

David Gallagher 

Matthew Gelvan 

Frank Geoly 

Joseph George 

Pam Germain 

John Geschickter 

Amy Ghaemmaghami 

Mark Ghorayeb 

Daniel Paul Gianturco 

Debbie Giban 

Joy J. Gibbons 
Karin Gillies 

Coralin Glerum 
Jim Gomez 

Charles Goode 
Patty Gorski 

Laurie Grant 

Robert Grassi 

Heidi Greenfield 

Amy Grimm 

Bryan Grisso 

Suzanne Gruner 






^f W 



334 




SOPHOMORES 




Lisa M. Gutzenstein 
Liz Haddad 
Melanie Hall 
Jacqueline Lee Haney 
Patricia Hanson 
Laura Harris 
Rochelle L. Harris 

Carrie Harrison 
Kathryn Hart 
Jon A. Hartman 
Carol Hartsfieid 
Christopher Hartwiger 
Laura Head 

Kathy Healy 
Ann Hebert 
Karia Henthorn 
Kim A. Herd 
Amy Hersom 
Dave Hillon 





my Furr and fellow sun goddesses "catch 
some rays" in the Frat Complex court- 
yard. Photo by Mike Nikolich 



335 



SOPHOMORES 




Iways trying to 



avoid hitting the books, these 
students from Unit L enjoy a few 
slices of watermelon and a few 
hours of TV before turning in. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 



Janet Hinkley 

Mark Hoerrner 

C. Edmond Hohmann 

Holly Holland 

T.J.Holland 

Helen Holman 

Caroline Hooper 

Laurie Hosie 

Gregory S. Hospodor 

Kevin Hudgins 

Jill Hungerford 

David Hunt 

Gigi Hyland 

Christine lezzi 

Melinda Ivey 

Marianne Jacks 

Karen M. Janson 

Stephanie Jayne 




336 




SOPHOMORES 




T Mi^M 



Caria K.Johnson 

Christopr 
Erika Joh, ,,,. 
Kelly Jones 
Karen Jordan 
Karen Jordan 

Eric Josett 
Anthony ^ 
Anita Kap^ 
Jeanne Kelly 
Lisa Kelly 
Christopher Kidder 



3y 
Page Kistler 
Karen L Kloster 
Elizabeth Knightly 
Lisa Koeho 
Jenny Koleda 

David Koman 
Laurie Koth 
Tami Krein 
Alison Krufka 
Christine Kubacki 
Margaret Kurisky 

Kelly Kutzer 
Ohmin Kwon 
Lester Lain 
Louis M. Lambert 
Nancy Lane 
Jennifer Lareau 

Diane Larosa 
Holly A. Lavoie 
Diane Legg 
Tracey A. Leigh 
Bobby Leighty 
Jessica Li 

Karen Libucha 
Barry W. Light 
Jewell Lim 
Toni Lisa 
Heather Lloyd 
Patricia Long 

David Lopez 
Julie Lopp 
Lisa Luxton 
Mary Macinnis 
Elizabeth Mack 
Karen Magera 



337 



SOPHOMORES 



Alex Martin 

Alton Martin 

Patrick Martin 

Lisa Maruca 

Bill Matlach 

Cynthia Matthews 

Anne Mayfield 

Susan Maynard 

James McAlvoy 

Lee McCraw 

Thomas McDonagh 

Suzanne McGolerick 




asting time is 



integral to the W & M experience. 
Here Karen Prentiss rushes to 
rescue Kellie Jones as she is 
attacked by Danny Malks with his 
light sabre. Kellie bears the Crown 
of Thorns, a rplic. of the ancient 
Organic Ch( ^hotoby 

MikeNikolich 







SOPHOMORES 








Donna Mc --s 

Pamela K.„. -^. 
Kelly Metcalf 
Elizabeth Meyer 
Amanda Meyers 
John Meyers 

Sharon Meyers 
Carylin Miazga 
Susan Millan 
Brad Miller 
Brian Miller 
Suzanne Miller 

Amand Mines 
Susanne Moeller 
W. Rigg Mohler, Jr. 
Whitney Ann Monger 
Lisa Montgomery 
Paul C. Moore 



Sonmi Moore 
Kathy Moriarty 
Jean Moroney 
Jennifer Morsch 
Mary D. Mulquin 
Tia Murchie 

Ann Marie Murphy 
Elizabeth Murphy 
Ann Myers 
Richard Namath 
John Ness 
Tim Nichols 

Mikeljon Nikolich 
Michelle Nix 
Geraldine Nc 
James Nouse 
Thomas Nuhauser 
Angela Oakes 

Patrick O'Day 

Chris Ode 

Richard ' 

Kendal-L Ke 

TabbHc 

Chn :)ling 



339 



SOPHOMORES 



T rhael 

.M .J Park 

er Parker 

Shannon Pastorino 

Jennifer L. Patton 

Joseph Penello 

Noel Perry 

Mary Pettit 

Terri Pfeiffer 

William Phenix 

Daniel Pieper 

Ann Pierce 

Doug Pierson 

David Pisanc 

Jennifer M. Pleier 

Katrina Plumpis 

Sylvia Pond 

Philip Portz 

Bonnie L. Powell 

Elaine Powell 

Linda Powell 

Karen Prentiss 

Diane Preston 

Nancy Prutzman 

Patricia Pugh 

Valerie Pugh 

John Pulizzi 

Michael Rackett 

Nina Ranadive 

Christopher Rau 

Raymond Rector 

Kathleen Redmond 

Charlene Reese 

Lisa Reeves 

Kathryn Renick 

John Reynolds 

Curt A. Richter 

Dean W. Ricks 

H. Jameson Riser 

Dianna Roberts 

Robbie Robinson 

Herve Rodriguez 




f-^ ^ O 




340 



SOPHOMORES 




Amy Rohrig 
Andrew L. Romig 
Steven Rosenberg 
Cheryl Ross 
David Roth 
Eric Rothberg 

Thomas Rov>/an 
Leah Row/e 
Anita Rutkowski 
Jennifer Ryan 
Grant Sackin 
AnneSaisbury 

Camilla Sandberg 
Maria Monica Santos 
Sara Sawyer 
Peter Schafer 
Patrick Schembri 
Karen Schoemer 





ome 

people "hang out" 
Others "hang loose.' 
Still others "hang 
ten" and a few even 
"hang up." Karen 
Schoemer certainly 
can hang and 
demonstrates this 
commendable skill 
on a Unit L railing. 
Photo by Mike 
Nikolich 



341 



SOPHOMORES 



Christine Smith 

Christy Soffee 

Marieilen Soltys 

Jonathan Soulen 

RossSpicer 

Jeffrey Spoeri 

Casey Sponski 

Elizabeth Stanford 

Katherine Stewart 

Debbie E. Stout 

Mary Elizabeth Straight 

Beth Strickland 

ChasimirStroik 

Bernice Sullivan 

Bill Sullivan 

Ellen Sullivan 

Mary S.Sutherland 

Patrick Swart 

Karen Szymczak 

Lucy Talbot 

Michelle Talken 

Cheie Taylor 

Cindy Taylor 

Kirsten Teschauer 

Caria Thomas 

Stephanie Thompson 

Annie Tiesenga 

Ann Toewe 

Thomas L Toler 

J. PittTomlinson, IV 




■r 




d. 
(% 









342 



SOPHOMORES 







^iIl t 







^ T/. rMfe 



Troy A. Toth 
Bryan Tunnel 
Jon Tysinger 
Mary G. Ukurait 
KimberlyVakos 
Joseph Valentino 

Sharon Varallo 
Kathleen Varley 
Kelly L Varner 
James Vick 
Renee Viers 
Donna Wade 

Douglas Wagoner 
Suzanne Walker 
Frank J. Wallmeyer 
Laura Walsh 
Mike Walsh 
Tim Walsh 

Margaret Ware 
Lynne Warner 
Liz Watson 

Margaret Weathersby 
Lee Weber 
Steven Weeks 

Harrison Gill Wehner 
Kimberly Welch 
Brian West 
Stuart C. West 
William Lee Wheeler, III 
Theresa Whelan 

Karen Whitaker 
CM. Jeffrey White 
Samuel W.White 
Wendy Willard 
Eric Williams 
Diana Wilson 

Kathleen Wilson 
Susan Winiecki 
Karen Wintermute 
Phyllis Wolfteith 
Richard Woods 
Garret Wu 

Tom Wultf 
Christiane Wurth 
Karen Yablonski 
Lana Van 
Lisbeth Young 
Ted Zoller 



343 



F 



Karen Adams 

Steven Adderly 



E S H M E N 

I 1 



J44 




C nley 

Ruth Atchison 

Geoff Ayers 

Ellen Bailey 

Rebecca Jane M. Bailey 

Mark C.Baker 

Tracey Ba 

Alicia Barem 

Karyn Barlow 

Melissa Barlow 

Mary Barnes 

Norman Barr 
Colette Batts 
Brent Baxter 

Lydia Bayfield 
Todd Beach 

Glenn Beamer 

Emily Beck 

Natali Beltran 

Paul Berkle\ 

Walter Bev. 

Tim Biddic 

Daniel Bilderback 

Linnea Billingsley 

Bryan Binkley 

Bonnie Bishop 

Ken Blackwei! 

Kathleen Blake 

Evan Bloc 

Jennifer Blount 
Jenny Blum 
Lisa Boccir 
Timo Bp'^" ■ 
Chris F 
r 



E N 





ri Delts sat together 



at football games as did many 
groups. Many competed for the 
spirit keg sponsored by the cheer- 
ieaders. Renee McLaughlin 
stands in front of the Tri Delt 
section at the Richmond game. 
Photo by Mike Nikolich 




Chris Booker 
Laura Bosch 
John Bouldin 
Anne Bowling 
Dawn Boyce 
Mike Braxton 

Edward Bray 
Steven Bretchel 
Susan Brinkley 
Tom Britt 
Denise Brogan 
Joseph Bronaugh 

Melissa Brooks 
Kathryn Brown 
Kim Brown 
Margaret Brown 
Constance Leigh Bruce 
Diana Bulman 



345 



u 



FRESHMEN 



W^ii f f 



Sally Burry 

Laura Burtle 

Michael Bynum 

•d Calabrese 

eth Campbell 

Karia Campbell 

Melissa Campbell 

Susan Campbell 

Kim Carpenter 

John Carroll 

Dianne Carter 

Bruce Carton 





I othing has ever 
brought W & M sports fans 
together like the UVA basketball 
game in '84. Not only did we play 
and defeat our biggest rival, but we 
also showed them how we felt 
about their esteemed honor code 
which had just acquitted Olden 
Polynice of a crime he admitted 
doing. Normally mild, W & M 
students and fans reacted violently 
to the verdict. Signs and chants 
filled the stadium throughout the 
game and the Tribe won the game 
and won a little more respect from 
the Cavaliers. Photo by Maryanne 
Kondracki 



V. V:^,^ 




FRESHMEN 




Laura Cavaleri 
Jodi Cebalios 
Cindy Chain 
Christina Checkc 
Suzanne Amy Che 
Bobby Chong 



2ifSi^^ 



Margaret Christian 
Chuck Clark 
Rob Clark 
Matt Clarke 
Jane Classen 
W. Weedon Cloe 

Kristin Coffin 
Michael Coira 

Margaret Collins 
Kim Colonna 
Judy Conner 
William Connolly 

Edward Cooke 
Holly Coors 
Katie Coyle 
Robert Craft 
Craig Crawford 
Eric Crawford 

Amy Creech 
Leann Crocker 
Michael Crowder 
Robert Crowder 
Michelle Crown 
Marina Cuadra 



John Cudzik 
Rebecca Cunningham 
Molly Curtin 
Karen Czarnecki 
Teri Dale 
Andrea Danese 

Kerry Danisavage 
Fiona Darius 
Jeffrey Michael Date 
Brooke Davis 
Christine Davis 
David Davis 

Michael Davis 
Emily Deck 
Michelii Deligiannis 
Paul Delvecchio 
Darius Desai 
Elizabeth Devita 



347 



FRESHMEN 



Brenda Dobson 

Kevin Dockeray 

J Lee Doggett, Jr. 

Tom Dolan 

Eric Doninger 

Jennifer Donofrio 

Alicia Ruth Donzalsk 

Laura Dougherty 

Laura Draegert 

Lynne Draper 

Robin Drucker 

Ashley Elizabeth Dryden 

Louis Dudney 

Thomas Dungan 

Clare Dunn 

Helen Dunnigan 

Nell Durrett 

Alex Dusek 

Todd Duval 

Paul T. Edwards 

Kathryn Egan 

Michael Egge 

Katherine Ekiund 

Craig Elander 

Marc Elim 

Bernard D. Ellis 

Lauren Ellis 

Tom Embry 

Margo Engelmann 

Christopher Enright 

Jon Esposito 

Theresa Esterlund 

Howard Estes 

Katherine Evans 

Maureen Evans 

Brian Exton 

Glen Fahey 

Andrew Faick 

Fred Federici 

Jill T. Feeney 

Sherri Fink 

Cary Fishburne 









m^TT 



FRESHMEN 




Joseph Fisher 
Shannon Fitzgerald 
John Fleming 
Terry Forbes 
Denise Foster 
Pam Foster 

Jim Franklin 

Arthur R. Friedricnsen, Jr. 
Charles David Frohman 
Elizabeth Anne Gallagher 
Mary B. Gallagher 
Julia Gamble 

DaphaneGamell 
David W. Gaston 
MauritiaGauvin 
Michael Carter Gaydos 
Jackie Genovese 
Darby Gibbs 

Vaughan Gibson 
Jennifers. Gifford 
Robert Gilbert 
Michael Gingras 
Ann Godwin 
Geoff Goodale 

Shari Gordon 
Rebecca Graninger 
Wanda Graybeal 
Edward Gregg 
WaltGrudi 
Laurie Ann Guarino 

Cynthia Gurnee 
Tariq Hafiz 
Elizabeth Hairfield 
Anne M. Hakes 
Vincent Haley 
Gabriel Halka 

Allan Hall 
Jennifer Han 
Sarah Handley 
Corri Hansen 
Jon Harden 
Catherine N. Harmony 

Michael Harris 
Denise Hart 
Amy Hartman 
Christine L. Hartwell 
Rebecca Harvey 
William Hatchett 

349 



FRESHMEN 



Leslie - 

Eric Ho 
Amy C. Hoyt 
Brenda Hudgins 
Lee Ann Humphrey 

Roberta Hunter 

Laura Hurley 

Victoria Hurley 

Catherine Ireland 

Andrew Jacob 

Ann Jansen 

Tiffany Jeisel 

Mark Jenkins 

Marilyn Jentzen 

Doug Jethro 

Andrew Johnson 

Christopher Johnson 

Karen Johnson 

Larry Johnson 

Stephanie A. Johnson 

Jennifer Jones 

Wendy Jones 

Steven Kagey 

Alex Kallen 

Kevin Kearns 

Anne Keith 

Dana Keiley 

Diane Kemp 

Kristin Kemper 

Amy Kidd 

Nancy Killien 

Lori Kimbrough 

jsa Klinke 

- Klonster 



^ fV ^^ ^^ 





FRESHMEN 




John Knebel 
Kirby Kpi"'"' 
Karin Kc 
Mark Kotzer 
GinaKro-" 
Carol Kv, 

Alisa La Gamma 
Audrey Ladner 
Trisha Ladwig 
Christina Langelier 
Lawrence Lanson 
Mark Lawali 

Terry Lawler 
Leslies. Layne 
Jennifer Lear 
Grace Y. S. Lee 
Jeff Lenser 
John 0. Leonard 




the Sunken Gardens 
sunbathersand frisbe. ^ .,. _ -.,'30 
tries to block a frisbee thrown to Nick 
Sherbir ~ to 



FRESHMEN 



t wasn't a bad year weather 
wise. One nice difference was the 
lack of rain in both winter and spring. 
The clear days allowed for a lot more 
outdoor activity even if it's just a short 
stop on the benches. Freshman Jean 
Pommerening enjoys the weather. 
Photo by Maryanne Kondracki 




Elizabeth Caitlin Lewis 

Steve Lewis 

Paula Liggins 

Susan Lilly 

Susan Lin 

Tyler Lincks 

Nancy Lindblad 

Cynthia Little 

Cindy Lloyd 

Alicia Locheed 

Mary-Jane Lombardo 

Donna Lotz 

Diana Low 

Priscilla Lubbers 

Aldis Lusis 

f\/lichael Lynch 

Karen Lynn 

Debbie Mackler 



352 




FRESHMEN 





'|W ^ B f\ # 




mfi 



f^g^~[t 



nm 




Tara 

San-: 

EllZa- 

M a r ' 



Shav, 
Kell'. 



Chris Mc' 
Julie Mch 
Amy McLeskey 
Nancy McMa' 
Elizabeth Mc; 
Kevin McNair 

Elizabeth McNeil 
Steve McTeague 
Theresa Mead 
Bryan Meals 
Marliss Melton 
Eric Mendelsohn 



Kirstin Merfeld 
Jeffrey Mhatyka 
Ginger F. Miller 
Marybeth Miller 
Wendy Miller 
Emily Minnigerode 



DebL 
Edv.' 



Paul Moser 
Brett • • 

Jam 



353 



FRESHMEN 



ichol 



r 



Bradford Norris 

Kristin North 

Lee Ann O'Conner 

Michelle Oglin 

Rebecca Okonkwo 

Ann Oliver 

Patricia Olivo 

Melissa Orndorff 

Jay Owen 

Amy Pabst 

Nancy Pageau 

James Palermo 

Andrew Pang 

Kate Parks 

Pamela Parton 

Kelvin Pearce 

Barbara Pederson 

Carolyn Peel 

Elaine Peirce 

David Perotti 

Catherine Perrin 

Eddie Perry 

Elizabeth Philpott 

Andrea Lynn Pierce 

Kim Pike 

Frances Pilaro 

Melody Pitts 

Eric Plaag 

Amy L. Pogue 

Joseph Policarpic 

Catherine Policastro 

Emily Powell 

Miles Powell 

Laura Preston 

Thomas C. Prettyman 

Bill Prezioso 

Bernard Puc 

Joseph Puleo 

Jill Purdy 








M. ^ ^^ 



354 



^ RKfl 




FRESHMEN 





W 







Jennifer Quartanan 
Cindy Raab 
Jeanne Radday 
Karen Ranhorn 
David Ransom 
Jill Rathke 

Elizabeth Rearwin 
Susan Rees 
Amy Reid 
Julia Reid 
Lynne Reilly 
Amy Rejent 

Theresa Rhyne 
Elisa Richmond 
Karoline Richter 
Anne Riddle 
Heather Riegel 
Catharine Rigby 

Cathleen Riley 
Mary Riley 
Anne Risgin 
Deborah Ritchie 
Patricia Ritenour 
Cyle Rives 

Kristin Robertson 
Pamela Robertson 
Britton Robins 
Brenda L Roesch 
Charles Rogers 
Arthur B. Rosaria 

Daniel Rosenberg 
Mark Rubick 
Virginia Ruiz 
Stephen Runkle 
Andy Rusciolelli 
Daniel Sachs 

Jay Sailer 

Heather Ann Sanderson 
Rodney Allen Satterwhite 
Charles W.Sauter IV 
William Savage 
Kimberly Scata 

Amie L. Schaufler 
Arthur E. Schmalz 
Kirsten Schmidt 
Leiane E. Schmidtt 
James Scofield 
Maria Scott 

355 



FRESHMEN 



Paul F.Scott 

Artmios Selbessis 

Sandy Self 

Susan Seliars 

David Setchel 

Laura Seu 

Jay Shah 

Tal Shamgar 

LisaShanzer 

Mark H. Sherfy 

Tobi Shiers 

Andy Shilling 

Caroline Shrum 

Godfry L. Simmons, Jr. 

Evan Sisson 

LynneSisson 

Julie Slade 

Deborah Smith 

Susan Smith 

Melissa Snachez 

Renee Snyder 

Susan Soaper 

Thomas Sodeman 

MikeSouders 

KakySpruill 

Birgit Starmanns 

Betty Steffens 

S. Coakley Steiner 

Kelly Steinmetz 

Shawn Stickler 

Terri Ann Stokes 

C. Lynn Stone 

Donna Strickler 

Robert Sulzberger 

Pamela Sutton 

AnneSwagler 

Marcy Swilley 

Margaret Swoboda 

Jennifer Tanner 

Beth Taplin 

Julie Tate 

Monica Taylor 

Mary Teates 

Susan Thacker 

Jan Marie Theisen 

Kelly Thompson 

Tamara Thompson 

Margaret Leigh Tillman 




356 



FRESHMEN 







It's a lot harder than it 
looks. The object of Hackey 
Sack, a game played alone 
or in a group, is to keep a 
small ball in the air by using 
your feet, legs, shoulders, 
chest, and head. Kevin 
Hudgins practices on the 
Sunken Gardens. Photo by 
John ivlaisto 




Karen Tisdel 
Courtney Tood 
Cheryl Suzanne Toth 
Tanya Trescott 
Sarah AnneTrott 
DanaTsakanikis 

Elizabeth Turqman 
Barbara Tyler 
Karen Tymann 
Suvinne Vanichkachorn 
Christa Vernarelli 
John Wack 

Charles Wade 
Sally Walborn 
Lewis Walker 
Susan L. Walker 
Karen Wallace 
Pam Ward 

Jennifer Wargo 
Robin Warvari 
Shelley Watrows 
Patrick Webber 
Robert R. Weintraub 
Christina Lee Wells 



357 



FRESHMEN 



Marcia Wetsel 

Sheryl White 

Jennifer Whiting 

Jennifer Whitley 



Jenny Whittaker 

Krista L Wiechman 

Kim Wilcox 

Annette Williams 



Lara Williams 

Matthew Williams 

Jennifer Wilson 

Mary Beth Witterkind 



Douglas Wolf 

Mark Woodford 

Johanna Wyborski 

Greg Yakaboski 



Ruth Yates 

Anna Yoo 

Naomi Zauderer 

Gregg Zengo 





tudents 
yelling "Go to UVA" often 
interrupt tours as this one 
led by Howard Brooks. 
Prospective students, their 
parents and a few tourists 
make up the ever present 
tour groups that wander 
around campus. Photo by 
MikeNikolich 




358 



NU t'AHMNG- 



GRADUATES 




Simon Banks 



Darby A. Dickerson 



Kristine Erin Faria 




Martin Lopez 




Elizabeth Parker 






Gordon W. Sinkez 



\ 




Joseph D. Smith 



^ 1 




jjy 




'^ic^ 



11 1 







LOW 



)LSE 




(Taiiinj^i, 3ur. 



Oriturlinnil ^liirr 
lllilliiai-hntii 1ltr«inU 



tir;i.irliiirill slurr liiirn 




Wf<:T FNO MARKET 



WILUAMS6URG THtMW 

CHlDNOFF STUDO 

'.YNCHSURS ENGKAVING CO. 

etNSON PRINTING CO 




Tht EJllor and Bnwito M'-'" 
"Echo" »i(/' 10 nfreo nfK.- 
far their gracwui «»f<Tjt>i ■ 



DIRECTORY: 

Index and Ads 262 

Closing Statement 382 

Spring 384 

Beach Week 390 

Moving Out 392 

Graduation 394 



360 




Abal, James F 

Abbady, Sharon 

Abbey. Robin Elizabeth. 316 

Abbot, John Pearre 

Abbott, Michael Randolph 

Abbott. Terence Scott 

Abdella. Stephen Martin 

Abdo, Robert John 

Abercrombie, Dorothy Ranes 

Ablondi. Frederick Richard, 330. 243 

Abraham, Brian Cyrus 

Abraham, Lisa Jane 

Abuzzahab, Mary Jennifer. 330 

Acedo. Maria Louisa, 316 

Achaval, Mane E 

Acosta-Lewis. Elizabeth Anne 

Acosla-Lewis, Robert Alexander 

Acosta, Karen Garcia, 1 72 

Acree.JillOgden. 142 

Adams. Jennifer Leslie 

Adams. Jennifer Lynn 

Adams, Karen Michelle, 344 

Adams, Linda Fnend 

Adams, Shenlyn Jane, 123 

Adams. Susan Miller 

Adams, Yvonne Armistead 

Addedy. Steven Gerard. 344, 167 

Addleman, Monica Anne 

Aderton, Aileen Hasbrouck 

Adkins, Wanda Gail 

Agard, Martin Dean 

Agard. Martin Dean 

Ageloff, Robert Scott 

Ahern, Julia Sullivan 

Ahmed, Nahleen 

Aiamni, Aseem Eric 

Ake, Jorn R. 

Akers, Mary Lorraine 

Akwei. AdoteJ 

Albert, Laura Elizabeth 

Albiston, Alfred Barlow/ 

Albright. Naomi Martha 

Alcantara, Jennifer Ann. 220 

Alderman. John Owen 

Aldnch, Janet Baker. 1 23, 1 72 

Aldnch, Mark Elliot 

Aldnch. Susan Poythress 

Aldndge, Daniel Milton. 3l6, 243 

Alejandro. Rodney Andrew. 344 

Alesso, Manelien Patnce 

Alexander, Hershel Julius 

Alexander, Steven Richard 

AKord. Annette Maria 

All. Duad Robert 

Ailee, Elizabeth Ann, 393 

Allen, Albert Giilis 

Allen, Charlita Lambert 

Allen, Cheryl Elisabeth. 330. 240 

Allen. Donald Mark 

Allen. Eustace Manon 

Allen, Janice Michelle, 229 

Allen, Jeffrey Conner, 330 

Allen, Margaret Rose. 344 

Allen, Mark Armstrong 

Allen. Suzanne Jo. 220 

Alleva. Brian John. 258 

Alleva, Diane Florence. 330. 1 52 

Alleva, Lynn Margaret. 330. 152 

Allm, Susan Frances 

Allison. Carne Mane. 230 

Allison, Clifford Kent 

Allison, David Campbell 

Allison, Mead Ashton 

Allison, Nancy Etta 

Allison, William C. 

Allport, Braxton. 203 

Aim. Charles Arvid 

Almeida, Todd Stuart 

Almsledl. Kirsten Anne 

Almy, Kenneth James 

Allschuler, Alan D 

Amann. Gerard Francis 

Amaya, Michelle Irene. 3i5. 232 

Ambady, Nalini 

Ambler, John Mark 

Ambler, Richard Antony. 203 

Ames, Heather Rennee 

Amico. Frederick F , 260. 53 

Ammuddin, Ah Kuli 

Ammons. Ryland Cornelius 

Amorello. Chnstopher. Byrnes. 263 

Amyuni. Tarek Michel 

Anderson. Claude Wood 

Anderson, Cynthia Diane. 330 

Anderson, Cynthia Frances, 330 

Anderson. David Charles 

Anderson. Donald Craig 

Anderson, Douglas Allen 

Anderson. Eileen Clare 

Anderson, Gerald B 

Anderson, Jeffrey Michael 

Anderson, Julia Allen 

Anderson, Karen Anne 

Anderson, Lon Lynn 

Anderson. Mary Elizabeth 



Anderson. Noel John, 344 

Anderson. Pamela Lynn. 344, 130 

Anderson, Patricia Mary 

Anderson. Penelope June, 240 

Anderson, R Brian 

Anderson, Robert Sean 

Anderson, Roy F 

Anderson. Sandra Hobbs 

Anderson. Shaun Irene, 330, 172 

Anderson, Susan Joyce. 316 

Andresen, Annette Laurel Bunker 

Andresky. Judith Tripp 

Andrews, John Russell. 257 

Andrews, Robert Louis, 344. 237. 257 

Andrews. Sally Jean. 344, 232 

Andrews, Sarah Calhenne, 226 

Annakin. Douglas Woody, 344 

Annaloro. Lila L 

Anstine. Timothy Mark 

Ansly, Hugh Sutherland 

Anthony, Adam D , 330, 248 

Anthony. Manka E 

Antonelli. Lisa Ann 

Apollo, Anne Mane Elizabeth 

Appa Rao, Namratha, 156, 157 

Aquino. Angela Mane. 344 

Aquino, Eileen Canlas. 330 

Aquino, Eugene Canlas. 344 

Aquino, Grace, 203 

Aragona, Christopher 

Aragona, Christopher 

Arata, Virginia Anne 

Arbogast, Kimberly Ann 

Arcano. Peter Adams 

Archer. Sharon Jean 

Arents. Donald Nicholas 

Argentine, Mark David, 344 

Ans. John Lynnwood, 344 

Arkm. Uri 

Arlinghaus, Charles Michael 

Armel. Martha Lee, 330, 237 

Armilla, Arlene Mane 

Armistead, David Brent, 316 

Armistead. Scott Thomas. 330, 193 

Armitage, Thomas M 

Armstrong, John Franklin 

Armstrong, Kathleen H, 

Armstrong, Madge M 

Armstrong, Mary W, 

Armstrong. Michael P. 

Armstrong, Susilee R 

Armstrong, Terence William 

Armstrong, Todd Robert 

Arneson, Scott Edward 

Arnes, Sheila Ann 

Arnngton, Harriette J 

Arsenauli. Cathi Mane 

Ariman, Janet Michele. 316 

Asburry, Lora Lee 

Asbury, Robert Mann 

Ascione, Michele Mane 

Ashburn, Margaret Edwards 

Ashby. Franklyn Henry 

Ashley, Anna Leigh 

Ashley. Catherine Anne, 344. 135 

Ashwonh, Alan Clark, 263 

Asimos, George 

Aslaner. Timur Mustafa 

Asplundh. Susan Leslie 

Aslruc. Salud 

Atchison. Ruth Perry, 344 

Atherlon, Michael David 

Atkinson, Bnan Neal, 330 

Atkinson, Linnea Johnson 

Atkinson. Ronald Earl 

Arkinson, William Gatling, 248, 220, 262 

Atlee, Joanne Mane 

Atran, Steven Michael 

Attlesey, Mark Graham 

Atwood, Ruth R 

Aubrey, Angehque Mane 

Aucella. Suzanne Mane. 330 

Auel. Adam Benkert. 316 

Auerbach, Andrew Sterling 

August. Jeffrey H . 330 

Ausberry, Robyn Duke 

Austen. Barbara Ellen 

Austin, Harry Antrim, 199 

Avery. Daniel Thomas 

Avery, Guy Robert 

Avery, Victoria Frances. 

Avis, Laura Jo. 220 

Awotesu, Olufemi Babayomi 

Aydletl, Valerie Anne 

Ayers, Geoffrey James, 344 

Ayers, Kann Appleton 

Ayling. Bnan William 

Ayotte, Theresa Mane. 316 




Baader, Michael Joseph 
Babey. Paul Andrew, 248 
Bachmann, Mike, 260 
Badeau, Douglas Dauphmct 
Bader, Mark Steven 
Badura, Lon Lynn 
Baer, Jeanetle Mane, 316 



Baffer. Bonna Louise Loudenslager 

Baggish, Jeffrey Steven, 258 

Baggs, David Hale 

Baicker. Steven Fies 

Bailey, David Scott 

Bailey. Ellen Carlwnght. 344 

Bailey, Lydia Lee 

Bailey. Mark Eaton 

Bailey, Michael Bryan. 330, 186 

Bailey, Rebecca Jane-Mana. 344, 220 

Bailey, Robin Rue 

Bailey, Thomas E 

Bailey, Virginia Benton 

Bailey, William Louis 

Bam. Paul David 

Bakeman. Bonnie Allen 

Baker. Carolyn Rustin, 330 

Baker. Emerson Woods 

Baker. Kelly Mane 

Baker, Kyle Derrick 

Baker. Mark Clifton, 344 

Baker. Patricia Maria. 316 

Baker. Richard Ball 

Baker. Steven Howard, 260 

Baker, Tracey Ann, 344 

Balcer. Laura Joan, 331 . 230 

Baldwin, Dana Beth 

Baldwin, Elizabelh Dianne 

Baldwin, Lisa Mane 

Baldwin, Peter Lane 

Baldwin, Richard Stanley. 257 

Bailies. Ramona Leigh. 316 

Ball. John Allen 

Ball.Joseph Austin, 331 

Ball. Lon Austin 

Ball. Tracey Lynn 

Ballenger, Kathenne Beth 

Balliette, Andrea Lynne 

Balut. Michelle Renee 

Bambery, Margaret Mane. 316 

Banas, Debra Joan. 331 

Bandy, John Earl 

Bane, Constance Mane, 316, 220 

Banister, Fred E 

Banke, Leanne Kay 

Banks, Clarissa Jackson 

Banks, Patricia Lyn 

Banks, Pauline Boyd 

Banks, Simon Charles, 359 

Bansleben, Erik Peter 

Baranak, Matthew M 

Barclay. Karen E 316 

Barco. Susan Gwynn, 316, 220 

Barden. Ronald Lewis, 244 

Baren, Alicia Marguerite. 344 

Bargamm, Paul Nelson 

Barham, William Thomas, 250 

Barinka. Karen Diane 

Barker, Anne D 

Barker, George Ed 

Barley, Melissa Ann. 123 

Barlow, David Simpson 

Barlow, Karyn Alicia, 344, 224 

Barlow. Kimberly Kea 

Barlow, Melissa Mane. 344, 1 72 

Barner, Darnel Paul 

Barnes, Charles Lynn. 316 

Barnes, Lavora Rowena 

Barnes, Mary Blackwell. 344 

Barnes, Michelle Mane. 200. 222 

Barnes, Rebecca Louise. 316 

Barnes, Rob, 248 

Barnes, William J G. 

Barnett. Larry V 

Barnett. Mark Preston 

Barney. Dale Edward 

Barnhardl Marianne Davi 

Barnickel, Francis Joseph 

Baroman, Samuel 

Baroody. Julia Hooper 

Baroody, Monica Jean 

Barr. Kennth Robert 

Barr, Norman Lee, 344 

Barr. Thomas James 

Barrett. Christopher Roy 

Barrett. Holly Scdtt. 125 

Barrett. Joseph Patrick, 331 , 21 3 

Barrett, Mary Enn 

Barrett. Shawn Adrian 

Barrick, Brett Ramsey 

Barrigar, Kimberlei Ann. 316 

Barron, Kelly Ellen 

Barrosse, Colombia De Los Angele 

Barrows. Kenneth Richard 

Barry. Leslie Ann 

Sana. Amy Sue, 331 

Barth, Dana Lynn 

Banhle, M Patncia 

Bartlett, Lisa Hope 

Bartletl, Polly S 

Bartolich. Allan Garretl 

Barton. Ian Locheil 

Barton. Roberta S 

Bartsch, Michelle Mane 

Baskett. Virginia Grace, 33. 222 

Baskett. William Carol 

Basntght, Kord H . 69 

Bass, Robert Woods 

Baienhorst. Robert James. 263 

Bales, Carl Martin 

Bateson, William Moffat. 258 

Balkins. William Wayne 

Battaglta. Knsten Mane 

Batts, Colene Sheree. 344 

Batzef, Mark Stephen. 331 



Bauer. Harriet E 

Bauer, Han. 109. 108 

Bauer. Kent Pardoe 

Bauer, Mary Cathenne 

Baugh, Sandra F. 

Baule, John Frederick 

Baum. Belvin Scott 

Bauman, Chnstine Louise 331 , 220 

Baumhofer, Laura Lee. 331, 222 

Baur, Michael N. 

Baur. Raymond Hartman 

Bavis, Robert Charles, 316 

Baxter. Brent Eugene, 344 

Bayfield, Lydia Caroline. 344 

Bazin. Michel Francois 

Beach. Todd Alan. 344. 132, 167 

Beale. Chnstopher Gordon, 244 

Beale. Sam Tall 

Beamer Glenn Douglas. 344 

Beane, Richard Hunter 

Beard. Rodney Allen 

Beardsley, Ana Marie 

Beasley, John Brockington, 250 

Beasley. Mark Brannon 

Beauchamp, Amy Carole. 331 

Beaver, Hilary Alexandra, 331. 226 

Beavers. Mark Carolhers 

Beck, Anne Theresa 

Beck, Emily Jean, 344 

Beck. Richard Adam. 331 

Becker. Charles Evan 

Becker, Donna Caroline 

Beckett. Jennifer Manner, 331 

Beckles. Claude Cyril 

Becknell. Claudia B. 

Beckwith, Karen Ann 

Bedlack, Richard S. 

Beeson. William Bradford 

Begley, Jennifer Ann 

Begley, Jerry Dawson 

Behrens, Todd Jeffrey 

Belair. Anne Mane 331 , 232 

Belanger, Elizabeth Ann 

Belcher, Laura Diane. 331 . 220. 214 

Belden, Dane Adams 

Bell, Adnan Scott. 108 

Bell. Amy Victoria 

Bell. Bertha R 

Bell, Chnstopher Jackson 

Bell, Craig Dennis 

Bell. Edward Janes 

Bell. Elizabeth Franke, 31 6. 232 

Bell.Laun Ann. 200 

Bellais, Leslie Anne 

Bellamy, Angela Beth 

Bellanti, Christina Joan 

Bellana. Aimee J 237 

Bellefleur, Karen Mane 

Bellmund, Sarah Anne 

Belovuss. George John 

Belsches. Allison Paige, 31 6, 226 

Beltran, Natalie Carmen, 344 

Benbrook, Kevin Patrick 

Bender, John Anthony 

Bender, Peter D. 

Bendush, David Cecil 

Benefieid, Susan West 

Bengston, Mark Steven 

Bengston, Alice Miner. 287 

Benitez, Lansa Vargas 

Benitez. Olivia 

Bennardmi. Charles John 

Bennen. Thomas Chnstopher, 260 

Bennett, John Faber 

Bennett, Leah Elizabeth, 31 6 

Bennett. Lynn P 

Bennett, William A, 

Bennett. William Joseph 

Bennsky, Matthew Maness 

Benson, Robert Donald 

Benton, David Reginald, 316 

Berg, David Michael 

Berg. Diana, 331 

Berg, Karen E, 226 

Bergen, Lee Douglas 

Bergh, Brian Routson 

Bergholde. Eric James 

Bergman. Anja Buchanan. 331 

Bergman. Lydia Joyce. 331, 232 

Bergman, Ronald Warren 

Bergoffen, Jodi Susan 

Bennstein. Benjamin Morns 

Berkey. Meredith Alison 

Berkley, Mark Edward 

Berkley. Paul Rockefeliow. 344 

Berkowilz, Jack Philip 

Berman. Mark Edward, 1 88 

Bernart. Donald Christopher 

Bernhardt. Kalhryn Ann 

Berquist, Carl Richard 

Berry, Margaret Joanne 

Berry, Shannon Chnstme. 240 

Berlini, Lisa Ann 

Bertram, Conme Nora 

Besio, Elizabeth Anne 

Bessler. John Edward. 257 

Best, Daniel Wynn, 33 

Beverly. Chnsla Lynn 

Bevins, Pamela Lynne 

Bew. Waller ScoIl 344. 144 

Beyer Kar la Elena. 238 

Beyma, Enc Stephen 

Btanco, Thomas Michael 

Biber, Bruce Lorenz, 33 

Bibles, Camiile Deanne 



Bickert. Dale John 

Bickley. Margaret A. 

BJbble. Timothy Mark. 344 

Bierenbaum, Joann M. 

Bierman. Anne Marie 

Biggs. Charles Edwin, 175 

Biggs, John Theodore 

Bilas, Colleen Yvette 

Bilderback, Daniel Robert. 344. 243 

Biliunas. Ramona Mane, 316 

Billingsiey. Unnea Carol. 344 

Billy, Marcelyn Mines 

Binkley. Bryan Wilmot BinkI 344 

Bireley, Catherine Anne 

Birschbach, Jane Marie. 316 

Birsinger. Gregory Todd 

Bisese. David Lawrence 

Bishop, Bonme Gale. 344. 123 

Bishop, Elizanne Jessica 

Bishop. Mark Edward. 331 

Bishop. Rebekah Loker 

Bishop. Ronald Addison 

Bisignam. Bnan William 

Bitto. Pamela Ann, 232 

Bizot, Ruth Minam 

Bierke, Alan A. 

Bjerke, Gene 

BJack. Jennifer Lynn 

Black, John Avis 

Black. John Thomas 

Blackistone, Deborah Lee 

Blackman, Annette Kay 

Blackwell, Bnan Keith 

Blackwell. James Elbert, 184 

Blackwell, Jennifer A. 

Blackwell, Kenneth Wayne. 344. 258 

Blackwood. Terence Goodwin. 257 

Blackwood. Thomas James 

Blam, Stuart Wells 

Blake, Joyce H. 

Blake. Kathleen Patricia. 344 

Blake, Mary C. 331 

Blake, Susan Gayle 

Blanchard. Anne Elizabeth 

Bianchard. Chnsiianna Marie 

Blanchard. Mary Alicia 

Blankenship. Lon Rae 

Blankingship. Alexander Hugo 

Blayiock, Robert Atvie 

Bley, Elizabeth Claire. 331 

Blincoe. Chnstme Elaine, 331 

Bloch, Evan Amdur. 344 

Block. Andrew Ralph 

Blomster, Jeffrey Paul 

Bloss. John Francis 

Blount, Jennifer Barclay. 344, 237 

Blugel. Stefan 

Blum, Jennifer Kristen, 344 

Blum, Mathew Corey 

Blumwesl, Dma Lubar 

Bobbin. Jill Elizabeth, 232 

Bobst. Elizabeth Anne. 135 

Boccia. Lisa Marganla. 344 

Bochel. James 

Bochenek. Eleanor Ann 

Boddy, Mark Edward 

Boden. David Michael 

Bodnar, Glenn Douglas. 1 1 7 

Bodow, Tim. 344 

Boeck, James Michael 

Boerth, Robert John 

Bogan, Jhana Rakelle 

Bogardus. David Porter 

Bogart, Jeffry Russell 

Bogart, Susan K, 

BogeL Chns Johannes. 344. 186 

Bog ley. Beverly 

Bohlin, Cheryl Loutse, 344 

Boilnott. Vonme Angell 

Boland Grace Ellen. 316 

Bolmg. Tammy 

Boll. Pamela G 

Boll Gary Paul 

Bommer. Stephen Kent. 257 

Bond, Carolyn Mane. 331 

Bond. David Fredenck, 244 

Bond, Jennifer Jane, 230 

Bond. Melinda Jean 

Bond. Tom 

Bonham. Julia Warren 

Bonk, Charlyn Tucker 

Bonney. Mary Elizabeth 

Bonney. Roger Eart 

Booker. Chnstopher Willtams. 345 

Boone, Charles Ryan. 331 

Boone, James Douglas. 263 

Boone, Jennifer Kathryn, 331. 232 

Booth, Paul Milton 

Booze, Robert Lawrence, 210 

Borden. Randall John 

Borden, Robert Scott 

Botge. Richard Peler 

Born, Kalhryn Ann 

Boroughs. David Troy 

Borsuk. Esther Atara 

Borum. Jennifer Penrose 

Bofys. James Alexander. 331 

Bos. Howard Kyger 

Bosch. Kim Michelle 

Bosc^ L.ioT. Vpp 345 

So' 

Br -.A.. 240 

B< :jny.331 

Be ^ 

B( ■ mley 



Boston. Catherine Jean 

Boston, Jacqueline Ann 

Boswell. David Andrew 

Boswell, James Ellon 

Boswetl. Keilh Anthony, 331 

Bosworth, Deborah Ann 

Bosworth. Lynne Elizabeth 

Bosworth. Susan Lovegren. 196 

Bottoms Sarah Frances 

&^ V M,am.345 

B'^ ten 

B'> 

Bowaur,. Slepnen Todd. 225 

Bowe. Susan Elizabeth 

Bowen, Brian William 

Bowen. Connie Collins 

Bowen. Susan Morrow, 238 

Bowers, Cynthia Ann 

Bowers, Revonda Faye. 316 

Bowles. Juiiietie Harris 

Bowles. Mary Lynn. 316. 232 

Bowling. Anne Deidre. 345. 232 

Bowling. Melissa Lynn 

Bowman. Alexander Wallace. 263 

Bowser. Georqe William 

Box. James Richard. 331 

Boyce, Dawn, Elizabeth. 345 

Boyd. David Miller 

Boyd. James Malheson 

Boyd. Joe, 331 

Boyd. John Flournoy. 248 

Boyd, Mary Ann 

Boyer. Joseph Nelson 

Boyer. Paul William 

Boyes. Mary Christine 

Boyktn. Barbara Jane Jan 

Boyle. Terry Lee. 316 

Boyle. Timothy John 

Bozorth, Susan Lynn 

Bracaienie. Carole C 

Bracken. Michael Reaves. 244. 65 

Bracken. Sara Lesley 

Brackin, Cheryl Leigh 

Brackms. Brian Joseph, 244 

Bradford, Robert Dale 

Bradley. Jacobs, 316 

Bradley. Janet Susan 

Bradley. Kenneth Ward 

Bradley, W Worlh 

Bradner. Alison Marie 

Bradshaw. Dana Seward 

Bradshaw. JeH Channmg 

Bradshaw. Richard Whitfield 

Bradshaw. Sandra McClaren 

Bradsher. Elizabeth Mane, 316 

Brady, Amanda Burdette 

Brady, David Allan 

Brady, James Homer Roberts. 243 

Braganza. Agnes Logan 

Braier, Paul Andrew 

Brake. Francis B 

Branch, David Christie. 248 

Branch. Michael Paul 

Brand. Susan Howland 

Brandt. Andrew Gerharl 

Branham, Karen Lynn, 331. 205 

Brannon. Tern Lynn 

Branscom, Joel Robert 

Bratton. Kathiee Agnes 

Brauer. Michele C 

Braun, David Michael. 260 

Braun. Joanne 

Brawley. Jennifer Boyce. 331 

Bfawiey. Rebecca Gay 

Braxton, Gregory Barnett 

Braxton, Michael Alan, 345 

Bray, Cynthia Mane 

Bfay. Edward Mark. 345 

Brayboy. Frederick Edward 

Brazil, Terence Scott 

Brechtet. Steven Robert, 345 

Breeding, Robert Franklin, Jr. 

Bregman, Anne Jane. 316 

Breidenbach. Therese Eileen. 236 

Brennan. Erin Patricia 

Brennan, William James. 49 

Brenner. Matthew Gary 

Bresnahan. Joseph Michael 

Brewer. Laurence Neil 

Brewer, Oliver Gordon, 250 

Brewster. Mary Ann Baumann 

Bnceland. Waller Vance 

Bndenstine. William Ashton. Jr 

Bridges, Richard Blake. Jr 316. 2i 1 

Bnen. Una Frances, 316 

Briganlic, Robert Mark 

Briggs. SueH. 

Bright. Christopher John. 331 

Bright. Joyce J 

Bright. Susan Elaine 

Brtglia, Anne 

Brignati. Kann Ann. 220, 262. 246 

Brilie. Maureen Ann 

Bnnkerhofl. Robert Richmond. 331 

Bnnkley. Douglas Wnght, 3l6, 263 

Bnrkley.Sabnna Elizabeth. 316. 130 

Bnnkley. Susan Lynn, 345, 240 

Bristow. Leila Mane 

Brttt. Thomas Watson, 345. 391 

Britton. Ronnie Kris. 316 

Broad. David Wmfield 

Broad. Jennifer Susan 

Broas. Matthew Joseph 

Brock. Jennifer Leigh 

Brock. Kara Sue 



Brocki. Mark Christopher 

Brockman. Jeffrey Clarke 

Brockman, Lauren Tilghman 

Brodenck. Robert Charles. Jr. 

Brodhead. Leslie Gamble 

BfOdnax. Pleasant Sanford. II 

Brogan, Denise Frances. 345 

Brogan. Patrick Michael 

Brogden. Jennifer Loutse 

Broich. Marc Udo 

Bronaugh, Joseph Taylor, Jr.. 345 

Brooks, Arthur Eugene 

Brooks, Betty Grace 

Brooks. Glenn Robert, 175 

Brooks, Gordon Patrick 

Brooks, Howvard David. 193 

Brooks, Hugh Anthony 

Brooks, Margaret Helen 

Brooks, Matthew John. 139. 140, 141 

Brooks, Melissa Leigh. 345. 234 

Brooks. Nancy Elizabeth 

Brooks, Thomas Ward, 263 

Brooks, William Edgar. Jr 

Brooksher. Gregory Edward. 258 

Brosnahan. Ann Mane, 316. 232 

Bfosnahan, John Arthur 

Broughion, John Brooks 

Brown, Alison M 

Brown. Ann Caroline. 316, 234 

Brown. Boyd Henderson 

Brown. Cheryl Ann. 316 

Brown. Cynthia Gayle 

Brown. Darryl Keilh 

Brown, David Creighlon 

Brown. Elizabeth Fletcher 

Brown. Elizabeth Kim. 345 

Brown. Francis Wilson. Jr. 

Brown. Gloria V 

Brown. Heather Anne. 240 

Brown. James Barton. Jr, 

Brown. Janice Mane. 224 

Brown. Karen Marie 

Brown. Kalherine Phillips, 345 

Brown. Kevin Stewart 

Brown. Leslie Allyson. 316 

Bronw, Lynda Kay. 331. 237 

Brown. Margaret Ellen, 345, 156 

Brown. Mary Kathryn 

Brown, Michael Christopher 

Brown, Rebecca Anne 

Brown, Robert Edward 

Brown. Timothy 

Browne, Carl C 

Brownfield, Elisha Lynn. 331. 207 

Browning, Rebecca Lee. 316 

Brownlee. Tracy Ann, 232. 233 

Brubaker, James Graham. 316 

Brubaker, Sandra Celestine, 224 

Bruce, Constance Leigh, 345 

Bruce, Mildred Davis 

Bruch, Susan Elizabeth. 331 

Brumback, Terry Ray 

Brungraber. Molly McDamel 

Bruno. Christopher Allen 

Bruno. Maryanne 

Bruno. Michael Harns 

Bfunskole, Kay Jeanine 

Brunson, Ernest Burns 

Bryan, Joy Marlene 

Bryan, Samuel Wade 

Bryant, David Keith 

Bryant. Douglas Stuart 

Bryant, Gary M 

Bryant. James Randall 

Bryant, Raymond Keith 

Bryant, Sandra Brown 

Buckingham, Hazel Elizabeth 

Buckle, Christopher Kent 

Buckley. Colin Hugh 

Buckley. George Aloysius, II. 331 

Buckley, John Smallpage 

Buckley, Matthew Reily 

Buckley. Simon T, 316 

Bucknam. James Richard 

Buckner. Janet Elizabeth 

Buckstad. Robert Douglas 

Sudd. William Matthew. 394. 391 

Budinger, Cynthia Gay 

Budow. Timo Lawrence 

Budrionis. Margarita 

Bueche. Bradford Graham 

Buechner, Laura Anne 

Buell, Penelope Selene 

Buff. Judith H 

Bugg, Anne Churchill Foster 

Buldam. Louis Stacy 

Bullock, Kevin Andrew. 186 

Bulman. Diana Christine. 345 

Bumbrey, Jewell Faye, 346 

Bunkelman. Lauren Kristen. 346. 237 

Bunn, Brendan Patrick. 331 

Burch, Mary 

Burchfteld. Rolaert Daniel 

Burden, Frances Yates. 346 

Burel, Servane T 

Burgener, Amanda Page 

Burger, Lavonne Jane 

Burgess, Christopher Richard 

Burgess. Donald 

Burgess. Jan Edith 

Burgess, Knsti Dawn 

Burgess. Merle Estelle 

Burgess. Sandra Kay, 331 

Burhans. Ann McClain 

Bunion. Barry Netl. 346 



Burke. Anne Wyatt 

Burke. Colleen Paincia 

Burke. David Eugene, 346 

Burke. Joseph Michael 

Burke. Kevin John 

Burke. Kevin Thomas 

Burke. Leslie Susan 

Burke. Linda Jean 

Burke. Patrick Joseph. 1 75. 250 

Burke. Patrick Ronald 

Burks, Sharon Browning 

Bufley, Melissa 

Burlingame, Lynn Judith 

Burmester, Jennifer Leigh, 331 

Burnette. Bonnie Atdine. 316. 235 

Burnette, Thornton Graves 

Burniston, Michael Andrew 

Burns. Jonathan Bnan 

Burns, Richard Edmond 

Burns. Stephen Darr 

Burr. Elizabeth Ann. 316. 237 

Burns. David R. 

Burns. Jennifer Lynn. 346 

Burrus, Laura Wilson 

Burruss, William Terrell. II 

Burry. Sally Elizabeth. 346. 1 23 

Burson, Joyce Elizabeth 

Burt. David Henderson 

Burtle. Laura Genevieve. 346 

Burton. John Clifton 

Burzyk. Andrea M 

Buschmeyer, Deanne Lynn, 331. 233 

Bush, Deborah Jane, 238 

Bush, M Lee Anne Washington, 206 

Bushmann. Paul Jeffrey 

Bushong, Sherry Lynn 

Buller, Anita Lynn 

Butler. Beth Ann. 220 

Buller. Damon Gasque. 263 

Butler, David Ferrell 

Butler. David Mather 

Buller. Harry Scott 

Butler. Jane Langford. 316. 224 

Buller. Marc Hausch, 260, 33 

Buller, Pnscilla McLean. 31 7 

Butler. Sally Bntt 

Butler, Sandra M 

Butt. Farooq Mahmood 

Butts, Cheryl Brunson 

Butts. Duncan Roger 

Butts. Elsie Nina M, 

Buxton, Linda B, 

Buxton, Michael Joy 

Buyer. Terry Don 

Buyer. Trisha Dawn 

Buzzerd, Elizabeth Ann, 331 

Byers. Kevin Patrick, 246 

Byles, Richard Allan 

Bynum, Elizabeth Anne 

Bynum, Maryann Ott 

Bynum, William Michael. 346 

Byrd, Barbara Dunlop 

Byrd, Ethel Larnell 

Byrer. Robert Glenn 

Byrum. Christine Annette 

Byrum. John Kenneth, 31 7 




Caan. Paul Werner, 244 
Cabell. Elizabeth Bell 
Cabral, Neal John 
Caccavan. Rita Denise 
Cafferky. Michael Anthony 
Caffrey. Thomas Arthur 
Cahn. David Howard 
Cairncross. Laura Jean. 331 
Calabrese, David Charles, 346. 258 
Calamita. Frank Paul. 331. 257 
Calhoun. Ansley Carol, 317. 226 
Callahan, David Boswell. 3i 7 
Callahan. Sharon Mane, 317 
Callicott, Joseph Handel, 331 
Calos. Lisa Helen, 331 
Calpin, James Andrew 
Calpm. Kathleen Mary 
Calvert, George David, 244 
Camp. Robert Richard 
Campbell, Adam Eric 
Campbell. Amy Elizabeth. 203 
Campbell, Angela Kay 
Campbell, Brenda Sue 
Campbell, Brent Nial 
Campbell, Brian Sharp. 175 
Campbell, Bruce Dunbar 
Campbell, Carol Ann 
Campbell, Elizbeth Irene. 346 
Campbell. Helen Frances 
Campbell. Jennifer Beth. 237 
Campbell, John Christian 
Campbell, John Evan 
Campbell, John Wade 
Campbell, Karia Jane. 346 
Campbell, Laurel Catherine 
Campbell. Marianne J. 



Campbell. Melissa Woodward, 346 

Campbell. Norma K 

Campbell. Phyllis Kathleen 

Campbell. Susan Turner, 346 

Campbell. Todd Williams 

Campos. Bernardila Maia 

Caney, Chns. 186 

Cannon. PatnckG 

Canuel, Raelene Ann, 331, 222 

Capalaces, Mane Therese 

Capin. Cathleen. 317 

Capen. Scott Richard 

Capers, Melissa Mary 

Caplan. William Maxie 

Caplinger, Paula Sue 

Capone, Angela Mane 

Capone, Janice Mane 

Caprio. Fred Blackledge 

Capron. Sandra Wason 

Caputo. Cathleen Ann. 317. 130. 254 

Caramamca. Amy Roxanne. 250 

Carattini. Gian Carlo. 317 

Cardasis. Peler Michael 

Carden. Kimberty Anne 

Garden. Randal Allen 

Carey. Barbara Jean 

Carl. Myra A. 

Carleton. Jeffrey Randolph 

Cariey. Daniel Joseph 

Carlin, Rebecca Inez 

Cartisle. Steven James 

Carloni. Caria Jean 

Cartson, Greta Laurel 

Carlson. Julie Mane, 280 

Carneal. Tern Lynn, 161 

Caron. Robert Raymond 

Carpenter. Albert Pinson, Jr 

Carpenter. Kimberly Ann, 346 

Carper, Lillie M. 

Carr. Oebra Ingnd 

Carr. Edward Waller 

Can, Heidi Mane Beatnce, 317, 207, 232 

Carr. Kamala Michell 

Carr, Robert Earl. Jr, 332 

Carreiro.Jody Anne. 332, 161. 162 

Carrington, Teresa Hash 

Carroll. John Joseph. 346 

Carroll. Margaret Mary 

Carroll. Patncia Ann, 332 

Carroll, Peggy. 317 

Carroll. Timothy John, 175 

Carson, Barrett 

Carson, Charles Robert 

Carson. Laura Jane 

Carson, Michael Brook 

Carswell, Andrew Thomas 

Carter, Carolyn Ann. 322 

Carter. Dianne Theresa, 346 

Carter, Gretchen Eugenia 

Carter. Kathleen S 

Carter. Richard, 184, 185 

Carter. Roger Richard 

Carton. Bruce Todd, 346 

Cartwnght. Charles Edward 

Caruso, Andrea Louise 

Carver. Jennifer Kaiser 

Carver. William Franklin. Jr. 317 

Gary, Karen Faye 

Casavecchia, Nadine Mireille 

Case, Sara Mane 

Casey, Jonathan Ralph. 280 

Cason. James Bartels, 280 

Cass, Susan Mane, 31 7 

Casselman, Susan Elizabeth 

Castle. Angela Elizabeth 

Castonguay. Nora Gail 

Callett, John Baldwin 

Catlett. Mary C 

Cattell, Debra Louise. 130 

Caudery, Victoria Susannah Maria 

Caughey, Michael Thomas, 280 

Caughey, Trudy Elizabeth, 280 

Causey, Mary Hednck 

Cavalen. Laura Ann, 347 

Ceballos. Jodi Ann, 347. 224. 225 

Cerveny. John Xavier 

Cesar. Aicha 

Chadwick, Pamela Sue 

Chain, Cynthia Moore, 347 

ChakravorTy, Agnis Chandra 

Chamberlayne, John Hampden. 317. 243 

Chamberlin, Guy Parker, 248 

Chambers, Floyd Allen 

Chambers, Meredith Ann 

Chamlee. Susan Lynn 

Champe, Laura Lou. 332 

Chan, Jim Kee 

Chandler, David William 

Chandler. Margaret Delores. 31 7 

Chaney. Ann Larrette. 192 

Chang. Betty Hshueh-Chuang 

Chang. Clem, 263 

Chaos, Tom Suzane. 280 

Chapin, Scott Thacker 

Chapman. John Edward 

Chapman. Kathenne Anne, 332. 237, 257 

Chapman, Michael A 

Chapman. Michael David 

Chapman, Paul Harold. 280 

Chapman, Sharon Eugenia 

Chappell, James Edward 233. 280 

Chappie, Alison L,280 

Charbeneau. Brett Watson. 196 

Charlton, David Holland 

Chaswe, Bruce David 



Chase, Christopher Douglas 

Chase, Laura Jean. 31 7. 238 

Chases, Andrea Lauren 

Chauncey, David Hentz 

Checkel. Christina Laird, 347. 240 

Chen, Jing 

Chen, Shu-Ching 

Chenautt, Suzanne Amy, 347 

Cheng. Clement Justin 

Cherundolo, Jean Mane. 317. 224 

Chesen. John Patrick 

Chesney. James Arthur 

CheslnuH. Mark David 

Cheung, Mana L 

Chewning, John Mercer 

Chia. Felipe H. j 

Chia, Shihiong I 

Childs. Christopher Oonnell 

Chin, Thomas Matt 

Chin. Wee Eng 

Chim, Oebra Ann, 220 

Chisholm, Jennifer Anne 

Chishoim, Thomas R 

Cho. Sungae 

Chong, Bobby, 347 

Chong, Sung Sim 

Chou, Shya-Li Alice 

Chnscoe, Herbert Franklin, Jr. 

Christen, Jennifer Mary, 317 

Chnstian. Charlisa Carole 

Chnstian, Margaret Elizabeth. 347, 1 23 

Christiansen, Stephen Geryld 

Christie. Michelle Georgia, 3l 7 

Chnstner. Wallace Ernest 

Christolorou, James M 

Chu. Robert Yao-Hwa 

Church. Jane Mane. 224 

Churchill. Mary Margaret Anne. 332 

Cicala. Toni Anne 

Cicatko.Judy Ellen, 189 

Cieplicki, Keith Brian. 1 38. 1 39, 1 41 . 69. 2fi 

Cilley, Bernice Herrmann 

Cimmo, Angela Mane 

Clone, Anthony Louis 

Ctair. Ronald L 

Clancy. Elizabeth Hope. 198 

Clancy. Timothy G 

Clark. Anita G. 318 

Clark, Brooks Sandeman 

Clark, Charles Edward. 347 

Clark, Christopher Phelan 

Clark, Cynthia Mane. 332 

Clark, David Allan 

Clark, David Evans. 280 

Clark, Emily Alexandra. 280 

Clark. Heather Anne. 156 

Clark, Kathy Renee 

Clark, Keith Spencer, 280 

Clark, Kennedy Helm 

Clark. Kevin Patnck, 243 

Clark, Stephen Barry 

Clark, Suzanne Mallison 

Clark. Thomas Mahlon, 186 

Clark. William Robinson Hayes. 347. 243 

Clarke. B.Stanley. 318 

Clarke, Constance R 

Clarke. Gladys Fortune 

Clarke, Matthew Lee, 347 

Clarke, Sharon 

Clary, BetsieJean 

Classen, Jane Elizabeth. 347 

Clayton. Daniel George. II 

Clayton, Gail Patncia 

Clearwater. Scott William 

Clegg. Michelle Lynn 

Clement, Lisa Lorraine 

Clements. Amanda Ruth. 281 

Clements. Frame Leon. 281 

Clemo. George John 

Clemons, Michael Lutrell. 1 17 

Clemson, Michael Gardner 

Clemson, Richard Conrad 

Clinton, William Joseph. 3i8 

Clippmger, Michael Lloyd 

Cloe. Wiiham Weedon. 347 

Clopton, Vivian 

Clore, Kirby Alan 

Close. Gary Lee 

Close, Karen Ann 

Cloud, David Stanley 

Clouser. Mark Edgar. 318 

Clouser. Michael Allen. 318 

Clugston, Elizabeth Anne. 318 

Coakley. Paul Roman. 318 

Coates. Mary Beale. 281 

Cobbledick, Cory Lynne 

Cobert. Rebecca Louise 

Cobey, Alice Eleanor 

Coble, Robert Joseph. 280 

Cochran. Alexander Smith. It 

Cochran, Anne Liese. 224 

Cochran, Chnstopher Paul. 280 

Cochrane, Judith Barbara. 332. 135. 134 

Cockrell. Patrice Claudeen 

Cockrell. Tracey Shereen 

Cody, Angela Bonita, 31 8, 224 

CoHelt. Tristan. Patrick 

Coffey, Donna Lee 

Coffey, Ellen Eileen 

Coffey, Timothy P 

Coffin. Kirstm Ballard. 347 

Coffman. David Allen 

Coffman, Julianne Mane 

Coghill, Robert Calvm. 318 

Cogswell. Laune Ann. 226. 281 



Cohen, Amy Rhona. 1 23. 1 22 

Cohen, Marcie Ann 

Cohen. Mitchell Eric. 281 

Cohen. Richard CraH 

Cohen, Terry 

Coiro, Michael Joseph, 347 

ColavJlo, Elizabeth Ann 

Cole, Mark Leonard. 31 8. 248 

Cole. Michael Alvah 

Cole. Scon Allan 

Cole. William Christopher, 281 

Cole. William Dallon 

Coleman. Russell Vaughn 

Coleman. Wendy Jane 

Coleson, Carey Ann 

Coleton, Peter L 

Collier, Joel Wesley 

Collins. Joseph Matthew 

Collinss. Julia Lynn. 281 

Collins. Margaret Ann. 222 

Collins, Margaret. 347 

Collins. Thomas Stephen. IV 

Collison. Ann Mane 

Colmie. Karen Elame, 332. 184 

Colonna, Kimberly Ann, 347, 222. 254 

Coiosi. Patricia Ann 

Cotvocoresses, James A 

Comey. Chnstopher Herald. 318 

Commander, Scott Christopher 

Compton, Marilyn Jean 

Compton, Michael Scott 

Comyns. Bruce H, 

Conard. Deborah Jane 

Conde. Juan Fernando 

Conde. Juan Mario 

Condon, John Gleason 

Condron, Peler Charles 

Conigho. Steven Joseph. 260 

Conklin. George Hazelton 

Conlon. Kevin John 

Conn. David Lee 

Connally, Lorraine Carry. 220 

Connell. Andrea Robin, 318 

Connell, Derek Ian 

Connell. Judith Seigler 

Connell, Martha Lucille 

Conner, Donme Gray 

Conner. Judith Carol, 347 

Conner, Melissa Dorothy 

Connolly. Thomas G 

Connolly, William Gerard. II. 347 

Connor, James Lee 

Connor, Kevin John. 263 

Connors, Mary Anne E. 

Conrad. Mary Kathleen 

Conrad. StuarlP 

Consiglio. Stephen Jerome 

Constantine, Mark Damron, 248 

Conte, Nicholas 

Cook. Albert George 

Cook. Edward James. 318 

Cook. Michael Patrick. 263 

Cook. Nancy 

Cook, Thomas Humphrey, Jr. 

Cook. Thomas Peter 

Cook, Tina Mane 

Cook. Virginia Kaye 

Cooke, Colleen Dorns. 318. 259 

Cooke, Edwin Donald. II. 347 

Cooke. Scott Fitzgerald 

Coomer. Roger William, Jr.. 332. 247 

Cooney, Mary Jean 

Cooper, Ann Cameron. 318, 226 

Cooper. Eric Bnan 

Cooper. Enc Gordon 

Cooper, Mitchell Eben 

Coors. Catherine Holland. 347 

Copa. Kymberly Kyle 

Copeland. Elizabeth Ellen 

Copenhaver. Thomas Lewelling 

Coppock, Sharon Dawn 

Coppola. Joanne 

Corbett Francis J 

Corcillo. Judith Mana. 238 

Corcillo, Margaret Rulh 

Cord. Monica Louise. 318 

Cordle, Charla S 

Cordovana, Diana Lynn 

Cornejo, Chnstma Maha. 332 

Cornelius, Steven Scott 

Cornell, Christopher Scott 

Cornell, Michelle Lori 

Cornett, Dana Jean 

Cornish, Alice Jennie, 332 

Correll. James Allan 

Cornero. Elame Mane. 332 

Corry. Daniel Richard 

Corvin. Norris Lee. 166 

Coryell, Janet Lee 

Coski, John Matthew 

Cossette, Michael Verme 

Costello. Colleen Wmn 

Costello, Terrence Joseph 

Costley. Christopher Bemis 

Costolo. William Terry 

Cothern. Harold Louis 

Coulter. Diane Marie 

Coulter, Palncia Mane, 332. 230 

Coundouriotis, George 

Cousins. Patrick Saint George 

Cousins. Susan Lindsey. 234 

Coutiakis, Peter James 

Coval. Scott Alfred, 31 8. 1 40 

Cove. Ruth Lynn 230 

Covert. Alan S. 



Covert. Kathanne Jane 

Covington, James B 

Cowan. Tanya Dentse. 332 

Cowardin, Connie M. 

Cox. Caroline Elizabeth 

Cox. Carrollyn 

Cox. Craig Allen. 318, 149. 244 

Cox, Helen Hart 

Cox. Kathleen A., 332 

Cox, Martin 

Cox. Steven Carlos 

Cox. Thomas Chnstopher. 260 

Cox. Virginia. 240 

Coyle. Kathleen Margaret 

Coyle, Mary Kathleen. 347 

Coyle, Richard John 

Coyne. Nora Ann 

Crabtree. Diana Harman 

Craddock. Clark 

Craft. Robert Overstreet. Jr.. 237 

Craig. Cathenne Mary. 347 

Craig. Chnstopher MacLane. 248 

Craig. John Scott 

Craig, Robin Alyce 

Craig, William Dean 

Cramer. Susan Elizabeth 

Crane. John Joseph 

Crane. Robert Joseph. 1 44, 250 

Crane, Robert Louis. 244 

Cranms, Martha Lorelei 

Crapol. Heidi Ann 

Crapps, Thomas Porter. 243 

Cravens. Joe Thompson 

Crawford. Bill Enc. 347. 263 

Crawford. Chandel Naomi 

Cravi^ord. Craig Leonard. 347 

Crawford, Lon Ann 

Crawford. William HW. IV 

Creane, Anthony Joseph 

Creasy. Debra Lynn. 230 

Creavalle. Cheryl Denise 

Creech. Amy Rebecca. 347 

Creeden. Paul T. 

Creekmore. Mary Cathenne 

Creigh. Susan Lynn. 1 23. 1 22. 230. 250 

Cress. Debora Lynn 

Crews. Margaret Elizabeth 

Cnck. Linda Biaisdell. 164 

Cnmi. Jacqueline Elizabeth 

Crisman. Laurence Michael 

Criste. Debra Sue 

Crocco, Gary T 

Crocker. Leanne Carol, 347. 146 

Crockett. Joanna Gay 

Crockett Tracey Krause 

Crompton, Corey Kyle 

Cromwell, Richard Joshua 

Cronin. Kim Lorrell 

Cronm. Laurence Vincent 

Cronm, Tracey Diane 

Cronk, Kay-Margaret. 319 

Crook. Jonathan Barrett 

Crooks. John Gregory. 1 52 

Crookshanks. Virginia Anne 

CrooL Patricia Dale 

Cropper. Hugh.tV 

Crosley. Lynn Lorene 

Cross. Martin Kiel, 248 

Crossett. Becky Forbes 

Croswhiie. Cathenne Leslie 

Crotty, Kathleen Elizabeth 

Crow, Jeffrey Francis 

Crowder. Michael Wade. 347. 243 

Crowder. Robert Maxey. 347 

Crowe. John Randolph 

Crown. Michelle Heidi. 347 

Croxson, Ann Matthews 

Cruikshank. Nannetle W 

Crummer. Margaret Leigh. 224 

Crump. Gregg Alan 

Cruser, Joseph Robb 

Cruser. Susan Elizabeth. 319 

Crutchfield. Julia L, 332 

Cseh. Carol Lynn 

Cuadra. Manna Alejandra 

Cucuzzella. Christopher Lee. 347 

Cudzik. John Daniel 

Culberson. Stephen Denny. 347 

Cullather. Kevin Kessler 

Culpepper. Laurie Ann. 332 

Culver. AlanaS 

Cumbia, Gilbert Garner 

Cumbo, David Paige. Jr. 

Cundift, Gary William 

Cunfer. Todd Edwin, 248 

Cunneen. Sheila Mane. 123 

Cunningham, Frances W 

Cunningham, Julie Ann. 125 

Cunningham, Mark Joseph 

Cunningham, Martha Lauren. 232 

Cunningham. Pamela Paige. 319. 161. 162 

Cunningham, Rebecca Jean, 347 

Curcio. James 

Curie. Michele S 

Curling, Cynthia Bernadette 

Curling. David Gregory 

Curran. Darcy James 

Curry, Laune Fortson 

Curtin. Molly Kathleen. 347 

Curtis. Kathleen Ann. 220 

Cushman. Laura Chnstme 

Cusmano. William Michael 

Culler. Sharon Renae 

Czarnecki, Karen Elizabeth. 347 

Czuch, Mona Beile 




Dahl. Alien Payne 

Dahlburg. Jill Potkalilsky 

Dahlburg. Russell Blackadore 

Dahnk. Jeannie Patncia 

Dail. Edward Benjamin 

Dail. Robert Bourne 

Oailey. Michael Lawrence. 332 

Dalbey. Matthew. 332. 162. 163. 248 

Dale. Ten Mayes, 347. 237 

Daley, Dinah Gay 

Daley. Henry William 

Dallon. John Ryan. Jr.. 258 

Dalton. Roger Lee 

Daly, Christopher Thomas 

Daly. Jacqueline Ann 

Darner. Diana Elame 

Damour. Mane Chnstine 

Danbury. Elizabeth Rosemary. 232 

Danese. Andrea Jill. 347 

Daniel, Barbara Jean. 332 

Daniel. Horace Lee 

Daniel. Larry Russell. Jr , 244 

Daniele. Drew Francis 

Daniels, Lisa Lee 

Danisavage. Kerry Andrews. 347 

Danner. Sandra Kaye 

Danus. Fiona. 347 

Darke. John Davide. 332 

Darke. William Hugh. 287 

Darling, JoA 

Darnell. Andrew V 

Dastoor. Tehnaz Jehangir 

Dato. Jeffrey Michael. 347 

Daugherty. Cathy Philttps 

Daugherty. Holly E. 

Daugherty. Jay William. 144 

Daugherty. Silas Clark 

Daughtry. Vivian F 

Davi, Philip Anthony 

Davidson. Dorothy Marie 

Davidson, John Jacob 

Davis. Alan Gregory 

Davis. Barbara Lee 

Davis. Barbara Sewell 

Davis, Barbara W 

Davis. Brooke Michelle. 347 

Davis. Christine Lee. 347 

Davis. David Leonard. 347 

Davis. Elizabeth Carpenter 

Davis. Emil Vincent 

Davis, Fiona June 

Davis, Gregory Reid 

Davis. Jeffrey Mead 

Davis, Joseph F, 319 

Davis. Kathenne Mary 

Davis. Kevin Michael. 332. 248 

Davis. Kimberly Susan 

Davis. Lena Ann 

Davis. Usa Annette 

Davis. Louis Detnck 

Davts. Mark Lawrence 

Davis, Mark Robert 

Davis. Mary Kathleen 

Davis, Michael Rowe. 347 

Davis. Nancy E 

Davis, Nancy Ellen. 332 

Davis. Russell Martin 

Davis. Shern Lynn 

Davis. Sherwm L 

Davis. Stephen Rotiert 

Davis. Summer Lea 

Davis, Susan Oianne 

Davis. Susan Lynn, 240 

Davis, Timothy Alan, 332. 148. 208 

Davison, Daniel Carson. 248 

Davison, Jon Peter 

Dawson. Amy Lynn 

Dawson. Pamela, 332. 232. 233 

Dawson, Valene Mitten 

Day, Henry Fenton 

De Leeuw, Michael John 

Deagle. Michael Campbell, 150 

Dealessandnm. Enrico Alberto 

Dealtens. Joseph Thomas 

Dean. Enc McEwen. 3l9 

Dean. Randy Lewis 

Dean. William Kenneth 

Dearborn. Phihp Murray 

Oealon. Sluart Armour 

Deblank. Guy James 

Deck, Emily Sanlord. 347 

Decker, Edward Parker 

Decker. JarettBlane 

Decker. Kathryn Lee 

Decker. Mark C . 257 

Decker. Rtchard Henry. II 

Decker. Wayne Lowry. 332 

Decoster. Mark Allen 

Deenng. Mary Renee. 332 

Deets. Michael Joseph. 3i9 

Degnan. Jerome Dommtc. 332 

Degrofl. Aaron Herbert 

Deminger. Els 

Delia. Jacqueline, 332. 237 

Deligianms. Michelle. 347 



Deliman. Thomas John 

Delisle. Peter Francis 

Delk. Metta Hulcher 

Delong. Keith Alan 

Deloria. Richard Anthony. 384 

Delos. Gregory R. 

Oelos. Peter Udd 

Deluca. Jeffrey Lee 

Deluca. Matthew Ignatius. II 

Delvecchio. Paul Edward. 347 

Demaio. Jamie Elizabeth 

Demaret Todd Alan 

Dement. Deborah Lynn. 232 

Demeo. Palmer Christopher. Jr.. 332 

Oemetropoiis. Nancy Allison 

Demoss. Douglas Paul 

Dempsey. Nellie Kathleen 

Demuth. Ann Mary. 332 

Denby. Timothy Davis. 243 

Denme. Joseph Edward 

Dennis, Harry Adnan. II 

Dennis. John Upshur 

Dennis. Stephen Wayne. 319 

Dennis. Todd Elliott 

Dent. Joseph Franklin 

Depaoia, Bruce Simon 

Deporter, Laura Jean. 240 

Derflinger. Richard Thomas 

Derrick. John Afan, 332. 186. 260 

Desai. Darius Cawas. 347 

Desaulmers, Donna Mane. 63. 222 

Desfosse. Joseph Charles 

Deshazo. Dtane R 

Deshazo. George Newton 

Desimone. James Michael 

Desmond. Diane Jeannette 

Detterer. Anne Mane. 319. 200 

Devan. William Arthur, 319 

Devaney, Joseph Gerald, 260 

Devincentis. Margaret C. 

Devine. Patnck C. Jr. 

Devine. William Franklin 

Devila. Elizabeth Anne. 347 

Deweese. Bill C 

Dewey. Mark Robert 

Dewhirst. Kalhy Lynn 

Dewinkler. John Timothy 

Deyerle, Kristie Ann. 319, 230 

Diamonstein. Richard G, 

Dtbble.Joy.319.69 

Dibona. Jaymel Elizabeth. 348 

Dichiara. Donald Bnan 

Dicindio. Vincent James 

Dickerson. Darby A . 359 

Dickerson, David Darden. Jr. 348, 243 

Dickerson. Robert Bruce 
Dickmson, John Kent 
Dicosimo. Jane 
Diduch. Barry Kent 332. 203 
Dieffenbach, Ann Frances. 348 
Dier, Cary Langhorne 
Diggs. Sheila R 
Dilalla. Deborah 
Dillard, Anne Garrett 
Diilard. Ktmmerly Dell. 332 
Dillard. Laura Florence 
Dillard. Niki Rene 
Dillon. Jeanne Cathenne 
Dilouie. Chnstopher Jon 
Dimauro. Dennis Robert 
Dimauro. Desiree Kay 
Dinardo, Annemarie 
Dinardo. Paul Gerard 
Dingleberry. Karen Lee. 348 
Dtngman. Clayton Jay 
Dingman. Michael Sterling. 319 
Dmoia. Gregory Thomas 
Dipippa.Ka thy Lynn 
Dippoid. George John. Jr . 332 
Dirgms. Timothy Cullen 
Dispenziere. Tern J , 348. 222. 221 
Dixon. Christine Yuki. 348 
Dixon. Debra Kay. 319 
Dixon. Martha Ann 
Dixon. Norman E 
Dixon. Sarah Williams 
Dmilrasmovic. Veljko 
Doane. Venecia Leigh 
Dobbin. John Francis 
Dobbin. Sarah Jean 
Dobbins. Laune Jane. 222 
Dobson. Brenda Joyce. 348 
Dockery, Kevin Patrick, 348 
Oodd. Jeffrey Douglas 
Dodge. Paul Edmondson 
Dodson. William Clarence. Jr. 
Doerilinger. Joan Taylor. 319 
Doggeft. Raymond Lee. Jr . 348 
Doherty. Kathleen Ann. 284 
Doherty, Sharon Lmda. 284 
Dolan. Thomas William. 348 
Dolde, David Andrew. 284 
Dollard. Michael. 258 
Domm. Bill Murne 
Domzalski. Alicia Ruth 
Domzalski. Marsha Lynn. 230 
Donachy. Jennifer Mane 
Doner. Gretchen Kunzler. 319 
Donmger. Ertc Karl. 348 
Donley. Dean F 
Donley. Greta Lauren 
Donnelly. Edward James Stephen 
Donner. Ffe<}enc Maxwell 
Donotno. Jennifer Michelle. 348 
Oonohoe. Laura Ehzabelti. 319. 142 



Donohue. Chnstopher 

Donohue. John Joseph, 284 

Donohue. Melanie Ann 

Donohue. Michael Warren 

Donzalsk. Alicia Ruth. 348 

Dooley. Adam Chun 

Dooley, Adam Chun. 284 

Dooley. Anne Helen 

Dooley. Bryan Earle 

Dooling. Lisa Anne. I6l, 160 

Doran, James Joseph. Jr. 319 

Dore. Pamela Mane SandWoom 

Dorgan. Karen 

Donty. Kim Noefle. 332. 237. 236 

Dorner. Albert Eugene 

Dorr. Mary Joanne. 332. 207. 235 

Dorsey. Scott Boston 

Dorsheimer, Shern Sue. 284 

Doucette. f/ichaei Joseph. 319 

Dougherty. James Clyde. 332 

Dougherty. Laura Jean. 348 

Dougherty. Michael John 

Dougherty. Michael Paul 

Douglas. Gen Lea, 230 

Douglas, Scott Merhll 

Douglas, Thomas Henry. 284 

Doumar. Thomas Henry 

Douse, Heather Claire. 237 

Doverspike. MonieeA. 

Dow. Donald Wendell. II 

Dowd. Marc C. 

Dowd, Megan Patricia. 284 

Dowdy. Matthew Clark. 263 

Downer. Kenneth Everett 

Downey. Arthur Thomas. IV. 332 

Downing, John Gregory 

Downing. Ronald John 

Doyte. Chnstopher Robert 319 

Doyle. Jonathan Jay. 250 

Doyle. Kelly Anne. 3l9. 233 

Doyle. Kevin Patnck. 284 

Doyle. Susan Claire. 68. 222 

Doyon, Jeffrey Mayer. 284 

Doyon. MarK William. 285 

Drabenstott Jill Nadme 

Draegert Laura Elizabeth. 384. 164. 220 

Drake. Ann Mane. 3i 9. 226 

Drake. William Baker. 285. 243 

Drapeau. Nicole Ann 

Draper. Brenda Lynne. 348 

Drees. Paul Fredenck 

Drennan. Samantha Lynn. 332. 220 

Drew. Laura Darby, 222 

Drewry. George William 

Drews, Lmda Mane. 3i9 

Drewyer. Diane Elaine. 152 

Dreyer. Scott Gregory. 332 

Dnscoll. Robert Courtney 

Dnscoll. Scott T. 175 

Droge. Martha Jane, 3l9 

Droppleman. Susan Rebecca 

Drown, Debra 

Drucker. Robin Marcy. 348 

Drum. Joan McFariand 

Dryden. Ashley Elizabeth. 346 

Dryden. Warren Edward. 257 

Du. Mengli 

Dubay. Charles Irvmg 

Dubus. Maureen Helen. 319. 240 

Dudley, Winifred Rebecca 

Dudney. Louis Gerard. 348 

Duesmg. Kenneth Paul 

Duesmg, Mane Suzanne 

Duff. Suzanne Melton. 319. 230 

Duffy. Ellen Eileen. 285 

Duffy. Kathryn Ann 

Duffy. Kevin James 

Duffy. Michelle J 

Duffy. Robin M. 

Dugan. Coiteen Heather. 332 

Dugas. James Robert 

Dugan. John Brady 

Dullaghan. Mane, 285 

Dunbar. Thomas William 

Duncan. Beth Ellen. 3l9, 226 

Duncan, Jane Elizabeth 

Dungan. Thomas Francts. II. 348. 258 

Dunn. Mary Clare. 346 

Dunn. Sherry Michelle. 332 

Dunn. Stephen Martc. 332, 243 

Dunn. Thomas Eugene. 243 

Dunnigan. Helen Kathleen. 348, 240 

Dunnmgton. Kathleen Elizabeth 

Dupont Alfred Rhelt. II. 332 

Dupuis. Robert Thomsen, Jr 

Dupuy. Cynthia Susan. 332 

Duquette. Paul A 

Durling. Michael Clifford 

Durrer. Michael 

Durretl Lucrelia Heston. 285 

Durrett. Nell Wmship. 348 

Durrette. Bart>ara Jean 

Durso. Stephen 

Dusek Alexander Calvert. 348 175.243 

DuHon. Michael James. 333 246 

Dullon. Thomas Cary 

Duval. James To<M. 346 

Duvall. Kathleen, 319 

Duvall, Saliv Ann 

Duvall. Timothy Joseph 

Dwier. Atison Ann, 3l9 

Dydak. Sara Mathews 

Dye, James Clayton 

Dye. Rhonda K . 263 

Oyer. Joseph Step»>en. 265 



WILLIAMSBURG SHOPPING CENTER 

Located at the corner of Richmond Road and Monticello Avenue 



Featured Events 
at Williamsburg Shopping Center 




Shopping 
Center 



October 1985 
3 0th Anniversary Celebration 
October 11 and 12 



Home of Santa Claus 
Christinas Season 1985 



Directory of stores 

A & N Store 

Adams Shoe Store, Inc. 

Richard Bartley & Assoc. 

Best Jewelry 

Black Forest Bakery & Cafe 

Capitol Loan Company, Inc. 

Carr Realty Management & Sales 

Colony Lanes 

Doctor's Quick Weight Loss Clinic 

Electrolysis 

Food Lion 

Friedel's Fashions 

First Virginia Bank 



Modern Beauty Salon 

Nautilus 

Nottingham Hallmark 

Peebles Department Store 

Peninsula Hardware 

Peoples Service Drug 

Radio Shack 

Roses 

Sal's Italian Restaurant 

Sam's Camera Shop 

Sidney's 

Seasons Color Salon 

So Fro Fabrics 



First Virginia Bank Admin. Offices stitches 



Health Shelf 
High' s Ice Cream 
John' s Hairstylists 
Juvenile Bootery 
Kyu Tailoring 
Laundri -Center 
Mays 



& Barber Shop 



Subway Station 

Video Unlimited 

Virginia A. B.C. Store 

Virginia Federal Savings & Loan 

Walls Alive 

VJilliamsburg Fine Art Studio 

Woolworth 

Vford Processing Center 



Dziedzic, Karen Etizabelh, 285 




Eacker. Suzanne Bailey 

Eads. ChrislinaV 

Eagle, Kevin Sean 

Banes. Tracy Lee 

Eardley. Jon Jay 

Earl, Archie William, Sr 

Earl, DorislineG 

Early, Darren Todd 

Early, Emily Bryant, 238 

Easley, Jayne H 

Easter. Catherine Ann, 333 

Easton, Susan, 333 

Eastwood. Elizabeth Ann, 333 

Eaves. Mary Helen, 333 

Ebe, Michele Anne Allegra. 285 

Ebel. James A 

Ebner, Elizabeth 

Eccli, Karen Theresa. 237 

Echevarria. Michae! Joseph. 244 

Echevarria. Sean Mariano 

Echols. Katherine Rulh. 333 

Echols. Rulh Carter 

Eckert. Joan Kimberly. 285. 240 

Eckert. Nicholas Joseph 

Eddins. Todd Weldon. 319. 263 

Eddms. Vince, 319 

Eddy. David Lee 

Edelsiem, Rachel Alice, 220 

Edge. Kathleen Mane 

Edgerton. Anne Cathenne. 333 

Edgren, Timothy James 

Edier. Tracy Camille. 319. 220 

Edmonds. Amy Catherine 

Edmunds. John Barton. 55. 285. 85 

Edmunds. Wayne 

Edwards. Alan Francis, Jr. 

Edwards. Audrey Ann. 333 

Edwards. Bradley Phillip 

Edwards. Chnstopher Sebastian 

Edwards. Cynthia Lynn 

Edwards, David Blame. 333 

Edwards. David Norman 

Edwards, Elizabeth Ann 

Edwards, Kann Leslie. 285 

Edwards, Michael Brandon 

Edwards, Paul Thomas. 348 

Edwards. Raymond Wesley 

Edwards. Rebecca Brooks 

Edwards. Robert William. 333 



Edwards. S. Beth Jennings 

Edwards, Stan Robert 

Edwards, Steven Wayne 

Edwards, Siraughan Franklin, Jr.. 285 

Egan. Kathryn D. 348 

Egerter. Linda Mane, 319 

Egge, Michael George. 348 

Ehnch. Victoria Madelyn 

Ehrman, Elizabeth Lynn. 333, 226 

Eichinger, David Arthur 

Eike, Elizabeth L 

Eimer. Ronald William 

Einseln, Hillevi Ann 

Eisinger, Enc James 

Eisner, William Humberto 

Eitler, Mary Ann Theresa 

Ekbladh, Annahsa Mane 

Ekiind, Margaret Anne 

Ekiund, Kathenne Helene. 348, 164 

Elander, Robert Craig, 348 

Elder. Cathenne Arrowood 

Elder, Dennis Samuel 

Elder, Steven Fred 

Eldred, David John 

Eldridge. Melvm R. 

Eley. Pamela M 

Elim, Marc Kevin, 348 

Ellen. Andrew Charles 

Ellett Robert Obie.Jr 

Ellington. David Laine 

Elliott. Larry James 

Elliott. Maurice Scott 

Elliott. Patricia Irene. 333 

Elliott Susan Noelle 

Ellis, Bernard Delaney. 348 

Elhs. Gloria S 

Ellis, Holland Dunston. Jr. 

Ellis.Jillian Anne. 125 

Ellis. Lauren Anne, 348 

Ellis. Nathan Stewart. 333 

Ellis. Rex Marshall 

Ellis. Vicki Lynn 

Ellzey. Karen 

Elmore. John Duncan 

Elwell, Robert Miles 

Ely, Linda Merrill 

Ely, Richard Albert 

Emanuel, Judith Ellen 

Embry. Thomas Lloyd, 348 

Emerson, Chantal Gabnelle 

Emmett. John Morehead 

Emory, Roger Earl. Jr.. 210 

Encinias, Angela Helen. 333 

Engel, Michele Elizabeth. 333 

Engel, Willa Lyon 

Engelmann, Margot Renee. 348. 238 

England. Vera A. 

English, Charles Douglas 

Enko. Peter J. 

Ennis. Katherine Anne. 333, 232 



Enms, Patrick John 

Ennght Christopher Michael, 348 

Ensley, Christopher Holland, 260 

Epiing. Carol Ann, 285 

Eppes. Cynthia Annette 

Eppes. Sharon Laurie 

Erb. Patricia Ann 

Erdahl, Kathryn Mane. 285 

Erdly, Sharon A 

Erdmann, i homas Karl 

Erie. Elizabeth Fangonilo 

Erie. Jose F, 

Erickson. James Robert, 260 

Erskine, James Michael 

Ervin, James Bnan, 285, 175 

Erwin, Tern Ann 

Espejo, Pierre Mark 

Espitia. Deborah W 

Espitia, Victor A 

Esposito. Jon Patrick, 348 

Espourieille, Francois Andre 

Esten, Maria Christine. 333 

Esterlund. Theresa Anne. 348 

Estes, Howard Pettit. Jr . 348 

Etchberger, Melissa Anne 

Ettel, Jeff Charles 

Evans, Ann Burruss 

Evans, David Eugene 

Evans. Haley Sylvia 

Evans. Jan Elliott 

Evans. Karen G 

Evans. Katherine Elizabeth, 348 

Evans. Laura Lee 

Evans, M Dwight 

Evans, Mark Stanley 

Evans, Maureen Ann, 348, 142 

Evans. Michael Ray 

Evans. Rosemary Helen Rees 

Evans. William 

Eversole, Paul Madison. 333 

Ewing, Elizabeth. Ellen 

Ewing, John, 286 

Ewing, Jon Gregory, 42 

Exton, Brian John, 348 

Exton. Keith John, 286 

Eye. Susan Kimberly. 334 

Eyke, Susan Mane, 334 




Faass, Manlee Joy. 192 
Fabiani. Joseph Justin 



Fabnzio. Michael Dean 

Fabry, Heather Anne. 200 

Facchma. Diane Clare 

Fadoul. Christine Mary 

Fadoui. Odette Mary 

Fahey, Glenn Alva, 348. 243 

Fahey, James Patrick. 207 

Fahey. Jennifer Lynn 

Faircloth, John William 

Fairweather. Elizabeth Catharine 

Falck, Andrew Bichsel, 348. 248 

Falk, Linda Anne. 184.286 

Fallon. Anne L. 319. 238 

Fait. Karen Elizabeth. 334 

Fanestil. Jane Elizabeth. 3i9. 134, 135. 240 

Fanestil, Katherine Smith 

Fann. Lisa Karen. 334 

Fannin, Colleen Elisabeth 

Fanning. Julianne 

Fanning. Laura Ellen. 319 

Farber, Kenneth G, 244 

Faria, Kristine Enn. 359 

Farina, Marc Roger 

Farina. Marc Thomas 

Farmer, Marion Seyer 

Farmer. Maryellen. 123. 122, 286. 397 

Farquharson, Janet I, 

Farr. Evan Harris 

Farre, Peter G, 286 

Farrell. John David 

Farrell, Kathleen Sue 

Farrell, Lezlie Lane, 222 

Farrell. Margaret Mary 

Farrell, Thomas Layne. 260 

Farnngton. Thomas Wilson 

Farwell. Allison Vail, 266 

Fatalas Papadopoulos, Stamatma 

Faulk. Thomas Hugh, Jr 

Pauls, Thomas Emerson Dubois 

Fay. Michelle Lynn 

Feathers. Martha Lynn. 69, 286. 254 

Fedele. Laura Jeanne 

Federici, Fred Joseph III, 348 

Federici, Tara Mana 

Fedewa. Eric Christian. 334 

Fedewa, Kirsten Ann. 1 77, 1 75. 286 

Feeley, Edmund John 

Feeney, Jill Therese, 348 

Feggans, Glelsa Varleria 

Feinstein. Jason Elliot 

Feltman, Dons R 

Felty. Caryl Shannon 

Fennell, Dale John 

Fenlon, Georgiana E. H. 

Ferebee. Melvm James. Jr. 

Ferentinos, Paul Arthur 

Ferguson, Barbara H, 

Ferguson. Catherine Lowne 

Ferguson. Charles Gariield 

Ferguson. Christine M., 237 



Ferguson, Linda Ann 

Ferguson. Lisa Kay, 319. 229 

Ferguson. Margaret Haley 

Fernandez. Gnffin Willoughby, 250 

Ferre, Peter Gerard, 263 

Ferree. Doreen Lorraine. 334. 164 

Ferns, David James. 286 

Ferns. Kimberley Rose. 286 

Fetter. David Richard 

Fenerman. Ruth Deborah. 319. 237 

Fetters. James Michael. 263 

Fickten. Carter B. 

Field, Christie Lang 

Field, David Benson 

Field. John Douglas. 334. 263 

Field, Kimberly D 

Fielding, John Patrick 

Fields. Deborah Lee 

Fiers, Kimberly Ann. 286 

File, Gregory Norman 

Figueiras. Ricardo Ernesto. 334 

Filippone. Katherine Marie 

Finan, Ann Siprelle 

Fincher. Chnstopher Lynn, 334, 257 

Findley. Jan 

Finger. Elizabeth A- Bernadette. 334. 224 ' 

Fmger, Karla Wilen 

Fink. Bruce Colburn 

Fink, Kevin Alan Hill 

Fink, Shern Lynne, 348. 146 

Finkelstein. Kenneth 

Finley. Christine A 

Finn, Jennifer Mane, 319, 125 

Fischer. Daniel Edward 

Fischer. Thomas Francis 

Fischer. Toni Anne 

Fish, Jeffrey James, 286. 263 

Fishburne. Cary Nelson Davis. Jr.. 348 

Fishburne, Harnette Browning 

Fishburne, Marsha Lee. 334, 125 

Fisher. Barry Lynn. 334 

Fisher, Jeffrey L 

Fisher. Joseph Claris. 349 

Fisher, Keith Shawn 

Fisher, Michael 

Fisher, Susan Aileen 

Fisher. William Wright, II 

Fitterer, Deborah Edith 

Fitzgerald, Daniel Robert 

Fitzgerald, Kathleen, 230 

Fitzgerald, Lynn Page, 319 

Fitzgerald, Raymond Peler. II 

Fitzgerald, Shannon, E., 349, 230 

Fitzgerald. Virginia Nantz, 286 

Fitzpatnck, Mary Kathleen 

Fitzpatrick, Michael Jon 

Flaherty, Ellen. 334 

Flaherty, Jean Elizabeth, 286 

Flaherty, Manlyn Joan. 334 

Flamm. Elizabeth Jason 



iFlampons. Georgia, 319, 123. 173 
' Flanagan, Maureen Ann 
Flannagan, James Alonzo, 144 
Flatin, Heidi Kathryn 
Fleenor. Jonathan Todd 
Fleischer, Stephen T 
Fleitas. Dana Alise, 334 
Fleming, John William. 349. 391 
Fleming, Kathryn Anne 
Flemmmg. Jams Lea, 334 
Fletcher, Ann W 334 
Fletcher, David Bruce 
Fletcher, Debra Lynn 
Fletcher, James Christopher 
Fletcher, JodyBnce. 334 
Fletcher, Peter F 
Fletcher. Timothy Farrell 
Fleury, Ellen Margaret 
Flmn, Donna Paige 
Flint. Amy Beth, 152 
Flood, Regina M 
Flora, Tracy Elizabeth, 334 
Flowe, Ronald M 
Flowers, Stephen Lee 
Ftynn, Curtis Fellows 
Flynn. Kenneth Leo, Jr. 
Flynn, Robert Laurence 
Flynn. Scott Basil, 263 
Flynn, Stephen Joseph 
Fogg, Steven Walter 
Fogle, Angela Renita 
Foley, Richard Douglas 
Foltz, Jonathan Lee 
Folzenlogen, Joan Carol 
Fones, Andrew William. 51 
Foote, Christopher Lee 
Foran, David Martin 
Forbes, Terry Scott 349 
Forehand, Michelle G. 
Forester, Laura Ellen 
Forrest Alan W. 
Forsyth, Martha Jean. 319, 130 
Forte, Robert Victor. Jr 
Fortun. Maria 

Fossum, Ronald Dean. 287 
Foster. Demse Ann. 349 
Foster, Dons Lee 
Foster, John Andrew 
Foster, Pamela Mimmette. 349 
Foster, Robin Lynn. 287 
Fothergill. Robert Nevins, 257 
Fowie, Christopher Doehler 
Fowler, Brian Francis 
Fowler, Bryan Keith 
Fowler, Kathleen Marie, 238 
Fowler. Paul Leighton 
Fox. Carol Beth 
Fox. Daniel Fitzgerald 
Fox. David Marc 
Fox. Donna Kathryn, 334 
Fox. Renee Elizabeth 



Fox, Wendy Tanner 

Foxwell. Patricia 

Fraim. Lisa Palncra 334, 224 

Frakes, Juire Chnstine 

Frakes, Patnck Francis 

Fraley. Edward Scott 

France. Amanda Renee 

Franchina. Gregory Jon, 144, 145 

Francis, Pamela Lane 

Frank, Christina E 

Franklin, Gregory William 

Franklin, James Harold. 349, 257 

Franklin. William David 

Franko, George Frederic 

Franko, Mark Damian. 287 

Franko. Patrick Burke 

Franzen, David Brian 

Franzyshen, Stephen Keith 

Frazier. Patricia Hunter 

Frednckson, Tara Chnstine 

Freedman, Jon Bruce 

Freeley, Robert Francis 

Freeman. Nelson Bernard. Jr, 

Freeman. Robert, Jr. 

Freeman. Thomas Derek 

French, Courtney Larzelere 

Frey. Steven William 

Fnedell. Sarah Jane, 334 

Fnedland. Kevm David 

Friedman, Daniel Alan 

Friedman, Mara Ruth. 287 

Friedman, Mark Kevin 

Friedrichsen, Arthur Richard, Jr., 349 

Frierson, Irene Edel 

Fripp, Jon Brooks 

Fnsch. Adam A 

Fritz, Alyce Thomson 

Fnzzell, Linda J. 

Froehlich, Kristin Mane 

Frohman. Charles David. 349 

Frost Deborah Love, 230 

Frost Nicole Marcia 

Fry, Elaine Chnstine. 334 

Frye, Sabme Ann, 334 

Fryer. Jacqueline Catherine, 226 

Fryer, Knstme Leigh, 31 9 

Fuchs. Linda Ann. 287 

Fukuda. John Steven, 334 

Fukuda. Mark Minobu 

Fulghum. Elizabeth Harris, 319 

Fulton. Jean Mane 

Fulton. Junius Phillip, II 

Fulton. Marylouise Anderson 

Fumagalli. Joseph M, 

Funk, Melissa Lenore, 232 

Funk. Tamara Helen, 319 

Funkhouser, Trenton Lee 

Fuqua. Laura Beth. 287 

Furman. Carol 

Furman. Stephen Bruce. 319. 206, 257 

Furnas, David Andrew. 258. 259 



Furr. Amy Mane. 334 




Gada. William Preston 

Gaile. Flossie 

Gair, Mary Catherine. 319 

Galan, Cnstina Mane 

Gale. Diana Plott 

Galfo, Kathleen J 

Gallagher, Daniel Keith 

Gallagher. David Robert. Jr , 334 

Gallagher, Dean Lloyd 

Gallagher, Elizabeth Anne, 349 

Gallagher, James Francis 

Gallagher, Lynn 

Gallagher, Mane Elizabeth 

Gallagher. Mary Bridget 349, 240, 241 

Gallagher, Marykate 

Gallo. Adam Andrew 

Gallo, Thomas Anthony 

Galloway, Chnstine Pettit 287. 246 

Gallup, Andrew John, 234 

Gamble, Julia Crawford 

Gamell. Daphane Monique, 349 

Gammisch. Robert Allen, 349 

Gander. Sarah Elizabeth 

Ganderson, Stephen Carl 

Gannon. Jane Ann 

Gano, Chad. 253 

Gantz. Susan Beth 

Garcha. Harinder Singh 

Garde. John Charles. Jr 

Gardiner, James G . 287 

Gardiner, Laurie Jeanne. 319 

Gardiner, Robert. 319 

Gardner, David Anthony. 287 

Gardner, Kevin Jay 

Gardner. Michael John 

Gargani, N Adam 

Garland, Barbara R 

Garner, Travis Elizabeth 

Garnett. Lisa Dawn 

Gamier, Robert Leonard 

Garrett, Elizabeth Evans 

Garrett, Julia Tisdale. 226, 287 

Garrison, Roger Carl 

Gartner. Mark Gorham 

Garvey, William Bernard, II. 248 

Gasper, Nancy Anne 

Gasper, Susan, 232 

Gaston. David William. 349, 248 

Gaston. Donald Malcolm 



Gatje, Michael ALten 

Gaudette. Timothy Patrick 

Gavaler. Joan Susan, 287. 196 

Gavan. James Paul, 287. 33 

Gaydos. Michael Carter. 349, 144 

Gaynor. Kevm Thomas 

Gedro, Julie Ann. 287 

Gehns. Stephanie. 240 

Geia. Barry Marshall 

Geiger. Joseph Roy, II 

Geiger, Wendy Meadors 

Geiven, Matthew Joseph. 334 

Gendron, Rebecca Sue 

Genereux. Jeffrey Allen 

GTenge. Beth 

Genovese. Jacqueline Marie. 349. 135 

Gentry, Kevin Lerue. 320, 194 

Geoflroy. Shirley Jo 

Geoly. Frank Joseph. 334. 250 

George. Joseph Edward. 334 

George. Lisa. 287 

George. Manon Artemis 

George, Michael James 

George. Robert Hagopian, Jr 

Georges. Angela 

Georgeson, Dean E. 

Geralds. Patricia Ann 

Gerard, Steven Clinton. 287 

Gerbino, John Paul 

Gergely. Christine Elizabeth, 220 

Gerken, Deirdre Ellen, 226 

Gerlilz. David Thomas. 320 

Germain, Pamela Dorothy, 334 

German, Jeffrey Andrew 

Gernon, Thomas Edward 

Geschickter. Charles Freeman, 287. 1 79 

Geschickter, John Christopher, 334 

Ghaemmaghami, Amy Carol, 334 

Graphery, James Scott 

Ghatak. Lila Ram, 320 

Ghatak, Radha Ram. 287 

Ghenn. Lurlei Allison 

Ghorayeb, Mark Ibrahim, 334, 263 

Giampetro, Andrea Maria 

Gianturco, Darnel Paul, 334 

Gianturco, Mark Delio 

Giban, Debbie. 334 

Gibbtns. Joy Jeannette. 334, 240 

Gibboney. Dana Joel, 260 

Gibbons, Edward Patrick. 287. 166 

Gibbons, Richard Francis. Jr. 

Gibbs, Barbara Elaine 

Gibbs, Darby, 349 

Gibbs. Patncia.204 

Gibbs, Susan Eileen 

Gibson, Bruce Edward 

Gibson, Charlotte Vaughan, 349. 224 

Gibson. Georgann Mane. 287 

Gibson. Mary Jean. 320, 226 

Gibson, Merntt Richard, Jr. 114, 116. 117 

Gideon. Megan Elizabeth 



Giedd. Abigail Mary 

Giermak, Lynne Ellen. 320. 237 

Gieseler. Philip Barton 

Giffen. Sarah Louise 

Giftord. Jennifer Snow, 349. 173 

Gil, Geraldme McDonagh 

Gilbert. EnkOmlie 

Gilbert, Robert Willie. 349 

Gilbertie. Celeste Mane. 320 

Giles. Kathleen M. 

Gilfillan, Andrew G. 

Gill. Elizabeth Key 

Gill. Joe Gordon 

Gill. John L 

Gill. Kevin Monroe 

Gill. Sara Newman, 287 

Gill. Sherry Leigh, 200. 287. 272 

Gillam. Ronald E. Jr. 116 

Gillespie. Rhonda Michelle 

Gillette. Howard Thomas 

Gilley. Sharon Kay 

Gillie. Alan Stephen. 287 

Gillies. Karin Jean, 334 

Giltigan. Elizabeth Rose 

Gimler, Jennifer G. 

Ginger. Susan Lynn. 287 

Gingras. Michael Lee, 349 

Ginkel.JohnF. 

Giorgi. Deborah L 

Girard. Gregory 

Giunti. Donna Mane 

Givan, Deborah Jane 

Givens. Shern Annette. 320 

Gladding. Polly Lynn. 320 

Glagola. Karen Jeanne. 287 

Glasgow. Debra Dentse 

Glasser. Gregory Nelson 

Glasser, Rodney. 257 

Glaysher. Constance Ann 

Gleason. David R. 

Gteason, Robert Chnstopher 

Gleason. Scott Robert 320. 166. 262 

Glendmmng. Stewart Fraser 

Glenn, Paul Lee. 244, 65 

Glen Shaw, Peter 

Glerum. Coralin Elizabeth. 334. 226 

Gliizenstem. Lisa Marlene 

Glotzhober, Paula Jane 

Glover, Beth Faulk 

Glover, Donald Christian 

Glover, Marilyn Kingston 

Glover, William Ethan 

Goble, Sharon Ann 

Godschall, MelanieAnn 

Godwin. Ann Weaver. 349 

Godwin, Patricia M 

Goebeibecker, Robert M , 287 

Goedecker. Stefan Alexander C. 

Goewey. David William 

Goff, Kevin David. 229. 258 

Gold. Edward 



THE POTTERY 



The Williamsburg Pottery & Pottery Factory Outlets 

Thousands of items from all over 
the world. 





Rt. 60, 5 Miles West of Williamsburg in Lightfoot, Va. 



Indoor GanJen Dining ^ M 
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765 Scotland St. 



. V. M. - : A . .••1 , 
220-3405 



Gruendel. Lauren Elizabeth 
Gruis. Tracy Nottingham. 288 
Grundef. Henry Dale 
Gruner, Suzanne Lee. 334. 224 
Grusso. Judy 
Guardtpee, Stephen Jude 
Goldberg. Kenneth Robert. 244 
Golden. Patrick Stafford 
Goldstein. Lon Bailey 
Goldstein. Richard Scott 
Goldston, Harold Maxwell. Jr . 287 
Golembiewski, Michele Rae. 211 . 287 
Gollomp. Jeffrey Andrew 
Golosow. Lorraine M, 
Golwen. John Stone. 320. 248 
Gomez, James Norman. 334 
Gonda. Elizabeth 
Gonzales. Edward 
Gooch, Arnold Ivan 
Goodale, Geolfrey Wyies. 349 
Goodchild. Richard Wayne 
Goode, Charles Joseph. II. 334 
Gooden. Jennifer Yvette 
Goodhart. Sally Turner 
Goodlmg. Rob Allee 
Goodman. Cathryn Beebe 
Goodman, Tyreese Bene 
Goodson. Mark Edward 
Goodwin, Phyllis Ellen, 287 
Goodwyn. Tyrone Sidney 
Gorby. Mary 

Gordineer. Brian Edward 
Gordon, Andrew Wiebye. 320 
Gordon, Drew Thomas, 320. 253. 257 
Gordon, Lesley Jill 
Gordon. Peter Jegj 
Gordon. Shan Maria. 349 
Gordon. Susan Irene. 287. 232 
Gorham, Robert Lee 
Gorman. Eric Kellett. 175 
Gorman, Kieran Mane 
Gorman. Mary Kathleen, 287. 234 



Grassi. Robert Atan. 334 
Gratz. Michelle Renee 
Graves. Lillian Archer 
Graves. Margaret Morgan 
Gray. Belinda Parnsh 
Gray. Fonda Alihea. 142 
Gray. Gate Rene 
Gray. James Willard. 1 76, 1 75 
Gray, Joel Russwyn 
Gray. Lisa 

Gray, Robert Charfes 
Gray. Scott David 
Gray, Travis A. 
Graybeal, Wanda Mane. 349 
Green. James Frederick. 288 
Green, M, Desiree 
Green, Malcolm Omand 
Green, Shirley Jeanette 
Greenawalt. Robin L 
Greene. Ada R 
Greene. Fara Dubreanne 
Greene. James Robert 
Greene, Raymond Lawrence 
Greenfield, Heidi Hetene. 334 
Greenisen. Julie B, 
Greenleaf. Jennifer Hope 
Greenman. Johns. 
Greenough, Mark Kenneth 
Greenwood, Patricia Carol, 288 
Greer. Julte Lynn. 288 
Gregg. Edward Wendel. 349 
Gregg. Kimberly Rene. 288, 167 
Gregor, Michael Paul 
Gregory, Kimberly Lynn. 237 
Gregson. Jim Howard 
Grehan, James Paul 
Greiner. Robert Dwighl 
Greseclose, Virginia. 320 
Gresham, Kenneth Leander 
Gribben. Timothy Edmund. 320 
Grider, Sarah Hawkins 
Grier, Rebecca Lynn 



Groseclose, Virginia Litton. 226 
Grosfils. Enc Berthout 
Gross. Jennifer Jeanne, 288 
Gross, Jennifer Lynne. 320 
Gross. Karen Lee. 288 
Grossman, Jeffrey William. 288 
Groves, Lorraine Anita. 320 
Groves, Virginia Susan 
Grubber, Janet Mane. 288 
Gruca, Judith Anne 
Grudi. Walter Douglas. 349 
Guanno. Laurie Ann. 349, 125 
Guanery. Peter David 
Guavin. Mauntia. 349 
Guernsey. Elizabeth B 
Gugig. Darryl Everett. 321 
Gugtielmo. Gabnel Anthony. 263 
Guidry. Lawrence Joseph, Jr. 
Gutnee. GatI 
Gulesian, Ann Elizabeth 
Gullion. Terry William 
Gundersen, Jennifer Lisa 
Gunderson, Richard Kent 
Guneau, Chad, 321 
Gunning. Thomas Steuart 
Gunnoe, Charles Dewey. Jr 
Gupta. Su)ata Carroll 
Gupton, Kimberly Lee 
Gur, Michael Eugene 
Gurley. Linda D 
Gurnee. Cynthia Hamilton, 349 
Gussman, David Solomon 
Gustafson. Charles Enk 
Gustafson. Knsta Leslie. 234 
Guthne. Laura Lynn, 288 
Gutzenstem. Lisa M., 335 
Guynn, Elizabeth Curnn 
Guzzo. Mary Carol, 321 
Gwaltney. Katherine Darden 
Gwathmey, Henrietta 
Gyuk, Aranka Maria 



Hahn. Carl Travis 

Hahn, Gerald Anthony. Jr. 

Hahn. Suzanne Milege, 389 

Hailey. Christopher Blair 

Haines. Kimberly Ann 

Hainley. Bruce Thomas. Jr 

Hairtield, Elizabeth Kay. 349, 142. 143 

Hairlield. GlynAlv.n 

Haislip, Robert Tilley 

Hajus. Kimberlee Ann 

Hakes, Anne Mane, 349 

Hale. Mary Lynn 

Hale. Sarah Louise, 289 

Hale, Thomas W 

Haley, Deborah Lynn, 321 

Haley, Vincent Martin, 349 

Haley, William Charles 

Haiko, Gabrielle Atwood. 349 

Hall, Bertha Palmer 

Hall. Channing Moore. II 

Hall. Oavtd Alvin 

Hall. Howard Alien. Jr„ 349. 258 

Hall. Ian Michael, 321 

Hatl. Jennifer Amoena 

Halt, KathrynA 

Hall. Kathryn Jane Edmunds 

Hall. Kevin Dale. 289 

Hall. Lisa Dale, 226 

Hall. Melame Lynn, 335 

Hall, Stephen Michael 

Hall, Susan Eilaine 

Hall. Tern Alison. 289 

Hall. Terry Eugene 

Hall. Terry Rae, 289 

Hall. William Breckenndge. Jr. 

Halla. Kenneth Paul. 321 , 133. 166 

Hallahan, Kathleen Mane 

Hallahan, Mary Elizabeth. 240. 289 

Hallenberg. Knstin Helene, 321 

Haller, Alison Leona 

Haller. Robert Fredenck 

Halow. KurtM, 







NO 4 wjapcbqaS-jCCJv cqP gentlemen 



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Gorman, Thomas Patrick 
Gorski. Patricia Ann. 334. 240 
Gossman, William Joseph 
Gossweiler. Richard Carl 
Gottesman. Marcia Ellen 
Gough, Regma Rosemargarei 
Gough, Regma Rosemargarei, 288 
Gould, Constance Elizabeth 
Govindan, Swammathan 
Grabe. Eckhard 
Grachan. William Richard 
Grady, Patricia Anne 
Grady, Sarah Rose 
Graft. Jon. 203 
Grafton. Carmen Gail. 188 
Gragnani. Laurie Ann 
Graham. Amanda Dair 
Graham. John Paul, 288 
Graham, Mary Douglass 
Graham. Robert Scon 
Grainer. Michael Scott 
Graizzaro. Gary Louis. 260 
Grane, Kimberly Ann 
Granmger. Rebecca Lee. 349 
Gram, Heather Yates. 1 23. 288 
Grant. Laune Page. 334. 232 



Griesser. Arthur Francis 

Grilfin, Chnstopher Pathck 

Griffin, David Edward 

Griffin, John Roger. Jr 

Griffin, Lynn Figel 

Griffin, Martin K 

Gnffin. Monica Denise 

Gritfin. Richard Baldwin, Jr 

Griffith. Karen Ann. 224 

Griffith. Lawrence Alphonso, Jr , 320 

Grigg. Michele Yvonne. 288 

Gngg. Natalee Decoursey 

Griggs, John Neumann 

Grimes, Lisa Mane 

Grimes, Timothy Burton 

Grimm, Amy Mane, 334 

Grimsley, Anna Neblett. 320. 220 

Gnmstead. Dolores W 

Gnssmer. Eileen Mane. 132 

Grisso. Bryan Allers. 334. 248 

Grissom, Charles Michael 

Gnssom. Edward Preston. Jr 

Gnst. Jennifer Ann 

Gronlund. Mary 

Groome, Kathryn Clark 

Groot. Michael Andrew 




Habgood, Linda Sue, 224, 225 

Hackett, Michael Alexander 

HackeH.Mims, II, 288 

Hackett, Stephen Rex 

Haddad, Elizabeth Jo. 335 

Hadfield, Robert Steven 

Hadjin, Jennifer Louise. 289 

Haeuslein. Antie Ursula. 289 

Hafiz,TanqRafro.349 

Hagar, Christina Lee, 321. 238 

Hage. John Christopher 

Hagedorn, Nancy Lee 

Hager, Barbara Harding 

Hagin. Chnstopher Joseph, 321. 151. 250 

Hagsfrand, Donna E , 321 

Hague. Joy Mane. 289, 238 



Halstead. Margaret Ann, 208. 230 
Halverson. Jack Michael 
Hambrick. Summers Ralph 
Hambnght, Rebecca Ann. 321. 226 
Hamby, Sherry Lynne. 289 
Hamel. James Rainey 
Hamilton. David F 
Hamilton. Linda Wolfe 
Hamilton. Phillip Andrew 
Hamilton. Thomas. II 
Hamilton. Timothy George, 243 
Hammett, Sherelyn Davis 
Hamner. James Wingfield 
Han. David. 321 
Han. Jennifer. 349 
Han, Kyu Hyun 
Han, Ml Kyoung 
Hanahoe, Mana Helene, 226 
Hanback. Lawrence Donald. II, 257 
Hanchey, Linda Ellis 
Hancock. Dana Mane, 321 
Hancock. Steven Mallory, 290 
Handley, Sara Margaret. 349 
Handley, Gail B 

Haneklau. Gregg William, 290. 253 
Haney. Jacqueline Lee, 335 



Haney. William Charles 

Hanley. Thomas Lloyd 

Hann, Ronald Koy, Jr . 321 

Hannahoe. Maria. 321 

Hannaman, Albert Otto 

Hannan, Matthew Burns 

Hanrahan, Janet Mane, 290 

Hanerchar, James. 321 

Hansen, Cornne Beth. 349 

Hansen, Damian Joseph 

Hansen, Gwendolyn 

Hansen. John Kenneth, 290 

Hansen, Karen Margo 

Hansen. Terry Lynn 

Hanson, Patncia Thelma, 335, 240 

Hanson, Ray Arthur 

Hardee. Wary Ellen 

Harden, Jon David. 349 

Harder. John Frederick 

Harder. Paul Xavier, 260 

Hardie, Deborah Louise 

Hardin. Phillip Neal 

Hardy. David Neal 

Hardy. David Alan 

Harenchar, James Joseph 

Hargesl Lauren Christine 

Hargrove, Roy B,. II 

Harhan, Eileen Mary 

Harhan, Timothy Martm 

Harlow. Ronald Monroe 

Harman, Herbert Dellon 

Harman, John Whittemore. 246 

Harman, Ronald Eugene 

Harmon. Elizabeth 

Harmon, June Ellen. 321 . 237 

Harmony, Catherine Noel, 349, 237 

Harned, Margret Ann. 321 

Harnish. Lynda Jean 

Harper, John Michael 

Harper. Lisa Dawn 

Harnck, Barbara 

Harrigan. Donna Mane 

Harnll. Paul Daniel. 321 

Harnngton, Lance M, 

Harris, Archie Lee. Jr 

Harris. Brenda Cantrell 

Harris, Brian Lagan 

Harris. Deborah Mane 

Harris. Elizabeth Anne. 290 

Hams. Herbert C. 1 38. 1 39 

Harris, James Franklin, II 

Hams. Kimberly Kay 

Harris. Laura Beth 

Harris. Leon Nathaniel 

Hams. Michael Scott. 349 

Harns. Molly Louise. 238 

Harris. Rochelle Lynne. 335 

Harrison. Aleta Edge 

Harrison. Ann Ross. 257 

Harrison. Came Randolph. 335. 240 

Harrison. James G., 290 

Harrison. Lawrence Fenwick 

Harrison, Marcie Beth, 290 

Harnson. Mary Olivia 

Harrison, Matthew Philip 

Harrup. Janice Mane. 240. 290 

Harsh. Deborah Armitage 

Hart. Brenda Guth 

Hart. Calhenne Margaret, 290. 237 

Hart, Denise Marlene. 349 

Hart, Kathryn Lynne. 335. 226 

Hart, Mary Ann 

Hartman, Amelia Elizabeth. 349 

Hartman, Debra Ann 

Hartman. Jon Allen, 335 

Hartman. Walter Scott 

Hartmann, Jennifer Ann, 290 

Hartnett, Matthew John 

Hartsfield. Carole Elizabeth. 335 

Hartwell, Christine Louise. 349 

Hartwiger, Christopher Edward. 335. 257 

Harvey, Ellen 

Harvey, Rebecca Lynn. 349. 234 

Harvey, Stuart Douglas. 167 

Harvie. William Jefferson 

Harwood. Margaret Scott 

Hassel, SkyeWalhs 

Hastey, Lisa Beth 

Hatch, Shawn Richard 

Hatchen. William Cecil, 349 

Hauer. Cathenne Anne. 290 

Haufe. Randolph Giftord Skelton 

Haugh. John Francis 

Haunz. Leah Margaret 

Hausch, Scott Tyler. 350 

Havens. Timothy John 

Haverty. Patricia Deane 

Hawkins. Anita Mane 

Hawkins. Douglas Scott, 69 

Hawkins, Susan Cngler 

Hawks, Ronnie Perry. 290 

Hay. Frances Werner 

Hay. George Augustus 

Haygood, Donna Gail 

Haynes. Caria Elena. 290 

Haynes, Gregory Lee. 290 

Haynes, Jennifer Lynne 

Haynie. Susan Lynn. 350. 1 30 

Hays, Murrell Jerome 

Hayward, Donald M . Jr 

Hayward. Linda Ann. 350 

Hazel, Sylvia Yvonne 

Hazinski, Mary Angela, 224 

Head. Daniel Martin, Jr 

Head, Laura Jane. 335, 220 



Headley. Diana Lynn 

Healy, Kathryn Judith. 335. 230 

Healy. Terence William 

Heaphy, Michele Robm Young 

Hearn, Heather Usabeth. 321. 237 

Hearlh, Anne H 

Hearth. Janet Hall. 321 

Heath, Jennifer Lynn. 290 

Heath. Leonard Clare. Jr. 

Heath, Leslie Cathryn 

Hebenstreit. Karl Francis. Jr. 

Hebert,AnnM,335 

Heberi Christine Anne 

Hecht. Gary Michael, 248 

Hecht Herbert William. II 

Hecht. Michael Lawrence 

Hecker, Kathryn Lee, 232 

Hedgepeth. Pamela G 

Hedley, Mark 

Hedly. Mark Margaret 

Hedrick, Bnley Anne 

Hednck. Cynthia Dianne. 290 

Heede. Mark Leif 

Heezen. Sandra Jeanne. 350. 224 

Hefeie, William John, 321. 253 

Hefler. Michael Evan 

Hegner, Robin Lawrence 

Herdt Deborah 

Heil, Elizabeth Marie 

Heilman. Elizabeth Ellen 

Hememan. Jeffrey Alan 

Heise. Enc. 290 

Heisner. Deborah Lynne 

Heitiand, Janme Elame. 350 

Hektner, Susan Lynne 

Held, Gary Phihp 

Hellauer, Kurt Macleod 

Helterbran, Valerie Russell 

Helton. Annamane Renee 

Hemphill.RalphHayes.il 

Henderson. Gordon Scott 

Henderson. Holly Ann. 237 

Henderson, James David 

Henderson, Marcia K, 

Hendnckson, John Laun. 350. 263 

Hendnx. Robert Alan 

Heneghan. Laurel Ann. 321 

Heniey. Anne Leigh, 321 , 230 

Henley. Jeffrey Scott. 321 

Henmgar, Harold F 

Henry. Elizabeth Anne, 290. 222. 395 

Henry. Glen Arthur 

Henry, Patncia Ann. 290 

Henry. Sharon Denise 

Henshaw. Cynthia Evans 

Henshaw. Pamela Lynne 

Hensley. Robert 

Henthorn. Karia Sue, 335 

Herbert. Ann. 232 

Herbert. Thomas Pollard 

Herbst. Anne Mary. 321 

Herbsl Carl Albert 

Herceg, Gregory K . 257 

Herd. Kim Arlene, 335 

Herlihy, Scott C 

Herman. Michael Lance. 207 

Hernandez, Glonda 

Hernandez, Silvia Margaret 

Herndon, Robert Granville, Jr., 350 

Hersom, Amy Hope, 335 

Herstrom. Cathenne Lynn 

Hertz, William Joseph 

Hertzler. Amy Michele 

Heslop. Jeffrey Lynn 

Hess. Jean S 

Hess, Kathleen Mane. 290 

Hetfield. Katherine Burke 

Heth.AmyJ.32i 

Hevener, James Jordan. 321 

Hewitt James Barton 

Hewlett. Diana Anne 

Hewlett Renee Evat. 229 

Hickey. Christine B 

Hickey. Kathleen Ann 

Hickman. Danna Lynne 

Hickman. John David 

Hickman. William Paul. 257 

Hicks. Randi Sue 

Hicks, Robert James 

Hicks, Vanessa Ernette 

Higgins, Diane Maureen 

Higgs. Erie Joseph 

Hildreth. BilheA 

Hildre'h, Nancy Ahson. 290 

Hill. Andrea Mane. 321 

Hill, Beverly Forrest 

Hill. Chnstopher Michael 

Hill. Daniel Allen. 146.263 

Hill, Gary Lee 

Hill. LaverneS 

Hill. Shirley Milhcent 

Hillenbrand. Kann Mane. 290 

Hiller, Anne Victoria. 290 

Hillery, Pamela Ann 

Hillon. Charles David. 335 

Hilton. Elizabeth Ann 

Mines. Bobby Dean. Jr 

Hines. Clara McCrae 

Mines. Enc Wayne 

Hines, Gretchen Clair 

Hines. Julius Holman. 260 

Hines, Phyllis D 

Hinkamp, Heather Chnstma, 226 

Hinkley, Janet Louise. 336. 226 

Hinks. Stephen Jay 



Hinnebusch. Maureen Ann. 130. 131 290 

230 
Hinton, Laun Lynn 
Hinton. Rebecca Rocelia 
Mintz. Lorac Celva. 203. 290 
Hirschy, Bradford Dudley. 290 
Hissong, Mark Todd 
Hitti. Bassam S. 
Hnatyszak. Gabriel Mary 
Ho. Soon Rong 
Hoag. David Andrew. 290 
Hobbs. Cynthia Elizabeth 
Hobbs, Elizabeth Caye Brown. 184, 185 
Hodges. Lydia Gail 
Hodgkinson. Pamela Kay, 350 
Hodnett. Reginald Charles 
Hoeg. Thomas Xavier. 175 
Hoehn. Peter Charles. 244 
Hoeke. Wilhelmina N . 290, 230 
Hoerrner. Mark Damian. 336 
Hoess. Michael Joseph. 148. 258 
Hoft. James G. 
Hoffman. Frederick Alan 
Hoffman, James Allen, II 
Hoffman, Kathenne Elizabeth, 290, 238. 

398 
Hoffman. Paul Joseph 
Hofler, Chartene Marion Virginia 
Hogan. Colleen Mary. 321. 238 
Hogge. Adam David. 321 
Hogge, Frederick Neal 
Hohmann. C. Edmund. Jr.. 336 
Holbrook. Maria D. 
Holder. Haywood 
Holland. Holly Ann. 336 
Hoflard.Hudson.il. 350 
Holland. Jeffrey Lee 
Holland. Lance Connor 
Holland. T J. 336 
Holleman. Lois E 
Hollen, Deborah Anne 
Holler. Edward W. 
Holleran. Michael Joseph. 57 
Holley, Charles Craig 
Holley.Jill Denise 
Holley, PJancy Lynn 
HoHoway. Alexis Cantnce 
Hoiloway, John Hoyt 350 
Holloway. Lisa Ann 
Holm-Olsen, Erik Anders 
Holman, Helen Rowland. 336 
Holman, Shen Elizabeth 
Holman. William Hillary 
Holmberg. Anne Knsten 
Holmes. Carol Suzanne, 321 
Holmes. David Andrew 
Holmes. Elizabeth Ann 
Holmes. Gregory Arthur. 260 
Holmes, Jack Spam 
Holmes. Kenneth R 
Holsinger. Tracey Beth. 350 
Holt Amy Tredway 
Holt Edwin Wright 226 
Holt Jennifer Mary. 290. 237 
Holt MarjorieG. 
Holtzman, Tegan May 
Holubek. Michele Ann 
Holzmann, Gwetheldene Louise 
Homatidis. Anastasia Kerasia, 291 
Homatidis. Philip John, 350 
Honaker. William Emil. 291 
Honick, Grace Mane, 291 
Hooker. Stephanie Evetta 
Hooper. Caroline Mae. 336 
Hoopes. Scott Martin 
Hope, Robert Meredith 
Hopkins. James Edward. Jr, 
Hopkins. Joan Mane. 42 
Hopkins. Susan Lynn 
Hopper. John Neville 
Hopping, Brian Laurn 
Hopping, Holly Lorraine 
Horeth, Ernest Michael 
Horn. Robert Emery. 291 
Horn. Todd James 
Hornaday. Leslie Ann, 350 
Home. Damtan Traian 
Horowitz. Robert Michael. 291 
Horrocks. Andrew Winston, 166 
Horsley. Stuart Waller 
Horton. Tonia Lanette 
Horwitz, Sharon H. 
Hosie. Laurie Lowenne. 336 
Hospodor, Gregory Scott, 336 
Hostinsky. Valone Walker 
Hotalen. Merry Evelyn 
Hoube, Suzanne Louise. 350 
Hough. Douglas Freeman 
House, James Louis 
House, John Liam 
Houston. Steven Lee 
Hovanic, Constance Ruth 
Hovanic. William John 
Hovde, Jennifer Valentine 
Hoven. Morns Chnstian. 11 
Howard-Smith. Richard Hugh 
Howard. David Patrick. 291 
Howard, James Arthur. II 
Howard, Janet 
Howard. Lynne Mane 
Howard, Mary McKean 
Howard. Pamela Ruth. 232 
Howe, Christopher Edward 
Mowe. Susan Gail. 291 
Howell. Ralph Leroy. Jr. 



Howell. Stephanie Lynn 

Hoy. Enc Michael. 350 

Hoye. Daniel Brent 

Hoyt. Amy Cathenne. 350 

Hoyt Thomas Michael 

Hranowsky. Tanya. 291 . 232 

Hsu. Wei-Ming, 291.237 

Hsu. Ya-Ke 

Hubbard. Cathenne Michele, 240. 241. 291 

Hubbard. Leslie Elizabeth 

Hubbard, Stephen George. 321. 2i 1 

Huber. Jeffrey Alan 

Hubea Chrysa Mane. 291 

Hubner-Straube, Hella Erika 

Huckabee, Carmon Harris 

Hudak. Debra Ann 

Muddteston, Jon David, 57 

Mudenburg. Timothy Michael. 321 

Mudgins. Audrey Dale, 385 

Hudgms. Brenda Gartand. 350 

Hudgins, Judy Scott 

Hudgms. Kevin Michael. 336 

Hudgins, Richard Scott 

Hudgins, Susan Kent 291. 238. 398 

Hudson, Henry Mark 

Hudson, Kristine Marie 

Hudson. Martin Neuvilte 

Hudson. Tyler McLane 

Huey, Melinda Iness 

Huey. Yolanda Iness. 321 

Huffman, Kelly Victoria 



Hunt Robert Arthur 

Hunt Sherry Lee 

Hunter. Elizabeth Ann. 124. 125 

Hunter. James Andrew 

Hunter. James Douglas. 292. 260 

Hunter. Mark Steven 

Hunter. Roberta Eaton. 350 

Hunter. Thomas Lee 

Huntress. Peter William. 263 

Hurdle. Hazel K. 

Hurlbert. Richard L. Jr 

Hurley. Laura M. 350 

Huriey. Mark (ra 

Hurley. Mark Michael. 321. 257 

Hurley. Roberta A. 

Hurley. Sarah Mane 

Hurley. Thomas Arthur 

Huriey. Victona Ellen, 350 

Hurrell. Susan Joan 

Hurst Winston Seton. 292 

Hussey. Angela Mane 

Huszt). Douglas Allen. 389 

Huichens. Anne Elizabeth 

Hutcheson. Elizabeth Ann. 292. 238 

Hutcheson. Robert F 

Hutchinson, Jack Ross. Jr 

Huth. Nicholas Daniel 

Hutson. Joshua Eyare 

Hutton. Cindy Hart 

Huzzey. Linda M 

Hyatt. David Edward 



Ingram. Usa Clare. 292 

Inslee. Thorr»as Charles 

Ireland. Cathenne Lynn. 350. 237. 221 

Irvin. Allison Annette 

Isaac. Katherine Elizabeth 

Isaacs. Jack Drew 

Iskendenan. Alex Gerard 

Isler. Edward Lee 

Issavi-Babroudi. Eva 

Ivey. Melinda Gay. 336 




Jablon^i. Donna Sue. 292 

Jablonsky. Mary Susan 

Jacks. Mananne P.. 336 

Jackson. Chariene Renee 

Jackson, Darrell Duane 

Jackson. Dorothea Gisella. 321 

Jackson, Dwayne Anthony 

Jackson. Edward Woodrow. Jr.. 292. 24; 

Jackson. John Louis. Jr 

Jackson, Joseph Fowler. 

Jackson. Kelly Ann. 125. 292. 222 



The Village Shops 



N G 



M 



L L 








WILLIAMSBURG , VIRGINIA 

Route 60, East, Williamsburg, Virginia 



Hufnell. Mary 

Huge. Christopher Scott 

Huggett Douglas Vernon 

Huggins, Harold Andy 

Hughes. Carolyn Faye 

Hughes. Elizabeth Buchanan 

Hughes. James Francis 

Hughes.JeHreyS. 291 

Hughes, Joseph Alphonso. 291 

Hughes. Kelly Lynn. 161, 160 

Hughes, Peter Manhew. 29i. 244 

Hughes. Ratonya Latnce 

Hughes. Sara Lou 

Hugney. Kimberly Ann. 321, 227 

Hugo, Timothy Douglas. 321 

Hull, Doyle Edwin, Jr 

Hulley. Paincia Anne 

Hulme, Richard Leon. 321 

Hultman, Donald Scott. 292 

Humes. Kimberly 

Humphrey, Keren M 

Humphrey, Lee Ann, 350. 238 

Hund. Barbara Maurer 

Hungertord, Jill Eckman. 336. 156. 230 

Hunnius, Howard Ray 

Hunt David Utchael. 336, 250 

Hunt Delores Dabney 

Hunt James Andrew. 250 

Hunt. Karen M , 292 



Hyatt, Nancy Quits 

Hydon. Rebekah 

Hyland. Chnstine Gigi. 336 

Hylind. James Patrick, 321 , 244 

Hylton. Elizabeth EHenor, 237 

Hyman. Jennifer Anne 

Hyman. John Allen 



lannacone. Thomas Anthony, 321 

lannuzzi. Mark Phihp 

lanson, Lawrence Warren. III. 393 

Ibbotson. Gaynor Louise. 189 

Iden. Alexander Riddtck. 292 

lezzi. Chnstme, 336 

lida. Mary Ichi, 292 

inderiied, Diane Theodora. 224 

Infantmo. Philip J 

Inge. Thomas Harrts Jr . 243 

Ingeman, Steven Jeffrey 

Ingram, Laura Ellen. 292 



Jackson. Lance Arlington 
Jackson. Lynne M 292 
Jackson. Paul Vernon 
Jackson, Susan Ward 
Jacob Andrew Wylie. 350. 250 
Jacobs Bradley Anson 
Jacobs James Stephens, 292 
Jacobson. Valerie Lynn. 321 
Jacoby. Theresa Carteen. 224 
Jacques. Nancy Jean 
Jafle. Ellen Beth. 1 84. 185. 222 
Jagasich. Dtana Eva 
Jam. Indu 

James, Jennifer Connne 
James. Palti Lynn, 321 
James. Pete. 321 
James. Stephen Daniel 
James. Virgmia G 
Jankowskt. LouiS William 
Jans. Julia Jane, 321 
Jansen. Emiiy Anne. 350 
Janson. JuiieJ 
Janson Karen. 336 
Janss. Peter Martm, 243 
Jarosak. John James. Jr 
JarvTS Christina Lynne. 321 
Jayne, Stephanie Angela, 336 
Jeisd Tiffany Ann. 350. 152 
Jenkms. Carnlice S 







S8UR0 



* Silversmiths 

SiImt • Giild • IViviir 
Haiidcraflcd in our \vrirk-.l>ii|i 

HOZ.JEFFERSOXdP 

I-xpcrt EngrBxinR 7.50 

iJ09 \. Boundary Street 

2.S3-iJ9f)3 



Jones. Paul Michae), 292 

Jones. Richard Graham. Jr.. 244 

Jones. Ruth Carolyn 

Jones. Shirley L 

Jones, Tammy Luanne 

Jones, Wendy Kathryn. 350. 222 

Jones. Karen Joanne, 337. 142, 143 

Jordan, Karen Tracy, 337 

Joseph. Charles Edward. II 

Joseph. Molly Boyd 

Jotisalikorn. Chareonsook 

Joseth. Erie. 337 

Jowett. Eric Scon. 257 

Jowett. Keilh Douglas 

Jowen. Courtney Elizabeth. 242 

Joyner, Patsy R, 

Joynes.LouisN.il 

Judy, James Alan 

Juliano. Robert Thomas 

Junod. Louis L 

Justice. Tanya Yvonne 




Kabeiseman. William Karl 
Kach, Mary Kay, 292 
Kachmarik. Lucanne Mane 
Kaczmarek. Christopher Edward. 258 




BASKIN-ROBBINS ICC CREAM STORE 

IN MERCHANTS SQUARE/ WILLIAMSBURG, VA 23185 
(804) 229-6385 Open 364 days a year 10 am —10 pm 




Jenkins. Courtenay Faye 

Jenkins. Deborah Arleen 

Jenkins. Mark Leath. 350, 258 

Jenkins. Rotm Douglas 

Jenkins. Thomas Keith 

Jenkins, Timothy West 

Jensen. Katharine Drummond. 135. 134 

Jensen. Thomas F . 240. 177. 292 

Jentzen. Marilyn Elizabeth. 350 

Jerome. Damele Marie 

Jerome. Michele Mane, 321 

Jethro. Phttltp Douglas. 350 

Jen. Rhonda Lynne, 230 

Jewell. ANdrew Vincent 

Jewell. Lisa Michele 

Jiranek. Andrew Lynwood 

John, Sarah 

Johnedis. Daniel Joseph. Jr 

Johns, Harold Oswald 

Johnsen, Donald Peder 

Johnson, Andrew Ellis, 350 

Johnson. Ann 

Johnson, Annette Jean 

Johnson. Bobbi Jodel 

Johnson. Bradley Mark 

Johnson, Brian A, 

Johnson, Brook Randall 

Johnson. Carey Suellen. 292 

Johnson. Carla Kay. 337 

Johnson. Carol S. 

Johnson. Carolyn Ham 

Johnson, Cassandra Renee 

Johnson. Chnstopher Douglas. 337 

Johnson. Christopher Lane. 350 

Johnson. Dayna Kecia 

Johnson. Eric Gates 

Johnson. Erika Diane, 337 

Johnson. Harry D,. Jr, 

Johnson. Hiawatha. Jr.. 292 

Johnson. Janice Annette 

Johnson. Joan Maloney 

Johnson, John Gary 

Johnson. Karen Mane. 350. 222 

Johnson. Keith Avery 

Johnson. Kerke Alan. 292 

Johnson, Kimberly Rene, 292 

Johnson, Larry Edward. 350 

Johnson. Lauren Dale 

Johnson, LauneAnn 

Johnson. Marjone Alice. 292. 220. 257 

Johnson. Mark Wendell 

Johnson. Melanie Anne 



Johnson. Michael William, 44, 257 
Johnson. Michele Leslie. 226. 292 
Johnson, Norman Anthony 
Johnson. Norman Douglas 
Johnson. Pamela Sue. 322 
Johnson, Phillemon Levi 
Johnson. Robert Paul 
Johnson. Stephanie Aileen, 350 
Johnson, Stephen Gerard 
Johnson. Steven Grove. 69 
Johnson. Susan Marie 
Johnson. Tammy Selene 
Johnson. Thomas Palmer. II, 292 
Johnson. Timothy A 
Johnston, Betty Fitzhugh 
Johnston. David Holland. 322 
Johnston. Dawn Elizabeth 
Johnston, Mary Louise, 224 
Johnston. Milton Lynn 
Johnston, Roy Neil 
Jolles. Tracy Ellen. 1 23, 1 73 
Jonas, Michael. 243 
Jones. Anthony F.. 292. 246 
Jones. Ariel Lynette. 206, 229 
Jones. Carlyle Robin 

Jones. Cassandra Ruth 

Jones. Charles Kevin 

Jones. Chnstopher Henry 

Jones. Deborah Squires 

Jones. Derrick Carl 

Jones. E, Joanne 

Jones. Gladys E 

Jones. Gordon Bradford 

Jones. Irma O 

Jones, James Harrmgton 

Jones. Jeffery Charles 

Jones. Jennifer Carol. 130 

Jones, Jennifer Elise. 350 

Jones, Jessica Morgan 

Jones. John Bailey 

Jones. John Bennett. Jr 

Jones. John R . 322 

Jones, Judy B 

Jones. Julte Ann 

Jones. Karen Dawn. 322 

Jones, Kellie Lynn, 337. 45. 220 

Jones, Kevin, 63, 292. 63. 395 

Jones. Kimberly Cheryl Smith 

Jones. Laura Elizabeth 

Jones. Leonard Jefferson. Jr. 

Jones. Mark Spencer 

Jones, Mary Willis, 292 



Kaczynski. Mary Anne 

Kagey. Stephen Paul, 350 

Kahl. Andrew Hayes 

Kaiser, Genevieve, 322 

Kalans. Michael Andrew 

Kalaris. Peter Evan. 292 

Kallen, Alexander Jennings, 350. 263 

Kalman, Kim A. 

Kamayana, Sn Anggreni, 292 

Kammeier. John Paul. 184 

Kampmeier, Jennifer Page 

Kanady, Dustin Jay 

Kanakry, Anthony Joseph, Jr . 337 

Kandle, Patricia L, 

Kane. Brian Douglas. 322 

Kannarr, Tina Lynn 

Kaplan. Leslies 

Kaplan. Philip Samuel 

Kapp. Susan Ruth. 146, 147. 226 

Kapur. Anita. 337 

Kerch. Anne Mane, 292 

Kardan, Sel,34 

Kater. Jamie Lynn. 293 

Katman, Eileen C. 

Kattwinkel. Susan Ellen 

Katz. Lawrence Robert 

Katz. Ruth Anita, 322 

Katzner, James Scott 

Kauffman. Lizbeth L 

Kaulfers. Joy Celina, 293 

Kavanagh. Sean Patrick 

Kay. Matthew William, 293 

Kaylon, John. 34 

Kealey. Bndget Rice, 142. 143, 293. 397 

Kearney, Margaret Anne 

Kearney. Richard Vincent. Jr. 

Kearns, Annette Mane. 293 

Kearns, Colleen Patricia 

Kearns. Kevin Smith. 350 

Keat. Preston Sterner 

Keating, Elizabeth Ann 

Keating, John David. 293 

Keck. Martin Douglas 

Keefe. Sandra Read 

Keenan. Cheryl Ellen. 322 

Keenan. Josephine Anne, 322. 220 

Keene. Helen J 

Kengel. Mary Louise 

Kehres. Jennifer Louise 

Keihn. Barbara Ellen. 293 

Keililz. Susan Lee 

Keith. Anne D, 350 



Keith. Clyde Robert 

Keliher. Kathleen Lots 

Kelleher. Kathleen Anne. 322 

Keller. Henry C. 

Keller. Michael Robert 

Kelley. Dana Krisien. 350 

Kelley. Mary Teresa 

Kelley. Rosemarie Anaslasia 

Kelliher. Edwin Patrick. 293 

Kellison. Dennis W 

Kellum. Kimberly Jane. 322 

Kelly. Catherine Maureen. 293 

Kelly. David Robert. 293 

Kelly. Irene E, 322. 230 

Kelly. Jeanne Mane, 337. 237, 236 

Kelly. Joseph Tierney. 322 

Kelly. Kevin Michael. 207 

Kelly. Lisa Ann, 337. 220 

Kelsey. Denham Arthur 

Kelso. Mark Alan. 1 1 4, 1 1 6. 1 1 7. 293 

Kelso, William Martin. II 

Kellon. Christine M,. 322, 222 

Kemp, Dianne Lynette, 350. 206 

Kemper, Knslin Mane, 350 

Kempner. Walter Richard 

Kempton, James Russell 

Kendred, Shelley. 293 

Kennedy. Thomas Patrick 

Kenney. Christopher John 

Kenyon. Gregory Lee 

Keon, Nancy 

Kern. Stephen Edward. 322 

Kerns. Laurie Leigh, 224. 293 

Kerr. Lynn Ellen 

Kerrigan. Kathleen Ann 

Kessler. Christa Dawn 

Kessler, Harry W, II 

Kessler, Kerne Ruth 

Kevorkian, Elyse Anoush, 322. 232 

Keyes, Elizabeth Marie 

Keyes, Patricia Ann 

Kidd. Amy Robin. 350, 232 

Kidder. Christopher Howard. 337 

Kidder, Josephine R, 

Kidwell. Rhanna,322 

Kiernan. Vincent Joseph, II 

Kilgore. Jerry Walter 

Kilgore, Jerry Walter 

Killien, Nancy Lynn, 350 

Killpatnck, Amy Ruth 

Kim, Chang Soo. 293 

Kim. Sung-Chan 

Kimball, Susannah Wetherbee, 188. 293 

Kimble, Vicky Lynn 

Kimbrough. Lori Lynn. 350 

Kimbrough, Lucy Anne 

Kimmel, Tracy 

Kimoto. Naotaka 

Kimsey, f^ichael Patrick 

Kincaid. Lauren K 

Kindred. Shelley Elizabeth 

Kindregan. Dale Warner 

King, Jennifer Ann. 322 

King. John Kevin 

King. Kathenne Ann, 238 

King. Mary Alice 

King, Randal William, 294 

Kingsbury. Kevin Bruce 

Kinkead. Timothy Patnck 

Kinley. Paul Gregory. 323, 246 

Kinney, Jennifer 

Kinzie, Magon, 323 

Kirby, Linda Hahn, 337 

Kirby. Richard Edward 

Kirk, Dorothy Brooke, 294 

Kirwan. Joanne R 

Kiser, Jerry Douglas 

Kistler, Kathenne Page. 337 

Kivett. Mitzi M. 
Klages. Patncia Lee 
Klapp. David Learning. 260 
Klar. John Lowell. 248 
Klear. John Erie 
Klearman, Jeffrey David 
Klein, Jon Douglas 
Klepacki. Karel Joan Anne 
Kline. Hilary Ellis 
Kline, Pamela Ann, 294 
Kling. Elizabeth Babcock. 323 
Klinger. Ruthellen Clara 
Klinke, Elizabeth Shaw, 350 
Khpple, Bramble Christine 
Klocke. Sandra Lee 
Klooster. Jacqueline Ann. 350 
Kloster, Karen Lise. 337 
Klunk. William Joseph. 144. 145 
Kmetz. William 
Knachel. Kurt Lee 
Knapp. Michael James. 350 
Knauer. Thomas Edward 
Knebel. John Albert. II. 350 
Kneisley. Mary Elizabeth, 123 
Knerr. Jeffrey Matthew 
Knight. Kirby Ray. 351 
Knighlly, ELizabeth Hodges, 337 
Knott, Jane Ellen, 294 
Knowles, John Frank 
Knowlton. Lmda Leavitt Ann 
Knutson, Paul Louis 
Ko. Pia J. 

Koch. Edward Graeme. II, 294 
Koch. Monte Merrttt 
Koegler. Michael Howard 
Koehl. Lisa Ann, 337, 230 
Koehler. Blair Ann, 123.173 



Koepfler, Enc T 

Koesler, Susan Joanna. 142 

Kohl. Andrew, 323 

Koleda, Jennifer Blake. 337. 222 

Kolet. Karen P 

Kolet. Terrence Edwin 

Kolslrom, Kann Anne. 351 

Koman, David Lawrence. 337, 258 

Kondracki, Maryanne, 323 

Kontos. Christopher Dale. 263 

Koontz, Terence Wade. 200, 294 

Korff. Allan Lee 

Kortf. Donna Lee. 224 

Korjus, Chnstopher Nelson 

Kornher. Kristin Lee 

Koschmeder. Mark Andrew. 294 

Koser. Marilyn L 

Kosko. Mary Elizabeth 

Koth. Laurie Jane. 240 

Kotzer, Mark Andrew. 337 

Koumanelis, Artemis S, 

Kovarik. Michael W 

Kowalski. Keith Thomas 

Koziar, Margaret Rose 

Kraemer. Randal Paul, 294 

Krafft, Nancy Ellen 

Kraiman, James B 

Krakauer, Sarah Yael 

Kramer. Anthony William. 186. 294 

Kramer. Steven Peter 

Kramer. Susan Wendy 

Kraus, Geoffrey Peter. 108 

Kraus. Robert William, 323. 243 

Krause, Karen E 

Krautheim. Mark David 

Krautheim. Tracey Leigh. 224. 294 

Kraynak. Rachel Ann, 294 

Krebs. Margaret Rees. 294 

Krehbiel, Chnstian 

Krem. Tami Konn. 337 

Kren, Susan Mary, 294 

Krewson. Kenneth Richard 

Kneger, Knsten 

Krizan. Lisa Mane, 294 

Kroll. Samuel Michael 

Kropff.Gina Paige. 351 

Krotseng. Marsha Vandyke 

Krowe, Valerie Lynne. 294 

Kruelle, Denise Ann. 323 

Krufka. Alison, 337. 221 , 220. 262. 214 

Krugman, Jeffrey Jon. 323 

Krulitz, Pamela Ristau. 323. 374 

Krump. Greg. 248 

Krupa. Stephen Joseph 

Kubacki. Chnstine Victona. 337. 226 

Kubitz, Walter Eduard 

Kuczo, Alison Anne, 295 

Kuhlkin, George Francis, IV 

Kuhn. Kathryn Elizabeth, 323. 226 

Kuhn. Timothy John 

Kulesa, Chester John 

Kulisch, Raymond Otto 

Kumnick. Jon F.250 

Kump, Christopher Brooks 

Kumpf, Carl Malcolm, Jr . 260 

Kunkle. Terry Lynn. II 

Kurata. Deborah Jean 

Kurata, Gerald J. 

Kunsky, George Anthony. 295. 263 

Kurisky, Margaret Anne. 337 

Kurtz, Mary Patncia, 123. 173 

Kurup. Ramesh Kanjuli 

Kushan, Jeffrey Paul. 295. 243 

Kutz. Robin Karl 

Kutzer, Kelly A . 337. 123. 204 

Kwandt, Joanne 

Kwiatkowski, Carol Faith. 351 

Kwon.OhMm,337. 193 

Kwon, Oh S„ 295 

Kynos. Christian Lewis 




Laboyteaux. Michelle Mane 
Lacks, Bart Monroe. 295 
Lacy. Karen Frances. 295 
Ladner, Audrey. 351 
Ladwig, Trisha Ann. 351 
Lafalce. Jacqueline Claire 
Lafountam. Rebecca Mane 
Lagamma. Alisa Theresa. 351 
Lahneman. William James 
Lam, John Michael 
Lam, Lester Taylor, II. 337 
Laird. Davtd William 
Laioie. John Edwin, 323. 260 
Lake, Andrew James 
Lake, Kevin Allan 
Lamarca, Mary Helen 
Lamb. James Gerard. 257 
Lambert. Clauduist Oral. II 
Lambert. Louis Michael, 337 
Lambiotte, Kenneth Gray 
Lamphere. Renee Ann 
Lancaster, Alan Alford 
Lancaster, Theresa Lynne. 226, 238 
Lanchantin. G. Richard. Ill 
Lanchantm. Margaret Mary. 152. 295 



Land. Susan Ann 

Landen. Jill Arnetl 

Landon, Tracy A 

Lane. Nancy Theresa, 337 

Laneharl. Wendy Lorene 

Laney. Roberl Carl Ertc. 295. 248, 394 

Lang, Michael Joseph 

Lang, Peter Wilson, 323 

Lang, Thomas Irvm, 295, 257. 250 

Langan. Helen M, 

Langan. John Edgar 

Langelrer, Christina Mane. 351 

Langley, Robin Michelle 

Langmaid. Benjamin Houghton, 186, 295. 

Lanham, William Glenn, 295 

Lamer. Wilhs Powell. 11.323 

Lanman, Ann Louise 

Lansing, Craig David 

Lanson. Lawrence, 351 

Lansky, Alexandra Jane 

Larance, Richard Jahaue 

Lareau. Jennifer Anne, 337. 220 

Lane, Elizabeth Bennett. 295 

Larkin, Athena Miriam 

Larkin, Joel Larry 

Larkin, Silvia Maria 

Larkin, Timothy James 

Larkin, Todd Larry 

Larosa, Diane Lucia. 337, 222 

Larrick. Richard Paul, 323 

Larnmore, Zanette Borum 

Larsen. Donna Louise 

Larsen. Kellie Marie, 222 

Larsen. Larry S. 250 

Larson, Jay Walter 

Larson, Kathryn Page 

Larson, Richard Jon 

Larson, Stephen Richard 

Lascara, Donnie Paul. 186 

Lascara, William Anthony 

Lassiter. Mark Timothy 

Lassiter. Virginia Lynne 

Latham. Crystol Jean 

Lattanze. Teresa Sharon, 230 

Lau. David Peter. 250 

Lautenslager, Leslie, 295 

Lavach. Patricia Wessel 

Lavelle. Martin Paul 

Lavoie, Holly Anne. 337 

Law, Elizabeth Ann. 323 

Lawall. Mark Lewis. 351 

Lawler. Kelly Summers, 295. 222 

Lawler. Ronald Vaughn 

Lawler. Terry Kathryn, 351. 224 

Lawrence, Minam Conway. 295 

Lawrence, Rodney Allan, 244 

Lawson, Janet Elaine. 146 

Lawson, Leigh Berry 

Layne. Leslie Suzanne, 351 

Layne, Ruth Bingham 

Laylon. OrvilleWesJ. 

Laz. Melanie Camille, 1 52 

Leach, Caren MacCubbin 

Leach, Michael Keith 

League. Michael Sloan 

Lear. Jennifer Mary, 351 , 240 



Leigh. Tracey Aileen. 337 

Leighty, Roberl Scott, 337 

Leitch. Patricia Dunn 

Leite, Margarette Valente. 295, 53 

Lemerich. Leanne 

Lemmon, Angela Mane 

Lencewicz, Joseph Francis, II 

Lengyel, Michelle 

Lenhart, JeHrey Grant 

Lenox. Bradford Richard 

Lenser, Jeffrey Marc. 351 

Lent, Norman F , II 

Lentz, David Dixon 

Lentz, Sydney Kemper 

Leonard, John Charles. 351 

Leonard. Lynn Ann, 323, 226 

Lerch, Joseph Robinson 

Lerner. Jordan 

Lerner, Matthew Robert 

Leshine, Bruce H 

Lesniak. Timothy Owen 

Lester, Chnstopher Raymond, 244 

Lester. Mary Elizabeth 

Letzkus. Bnan, Arthur. 248 

Leupold, Katherine Ann, 323 

Leuthold, Marc Daniel 

Levi, Jonathan Spnnt. 323, 244 

Levme, Jan Cheryl 

Levy, Lawrence Scott 

Lewis, Barbara Anne 

Lewis, Beverly Page 

Lewis, Elizabeth Caillm, 352 

Lewis, Elizabeth Michelle. 323, 232 

Lewis, Ellen Louise, 295. 232 

Lewis, Heidi Mane. 323 

Lewis. James Etdon. Jr., 295. 243 

Lewis. Jennifer Lou, 238 

Lewis, John Dale 

Lewis, Jonathan Leopold 

Lewis. Kathleen Grace, 295 

Lewis. Kevin Kendall 

Lewis. Kim A, 

Lewis. Mark Benjamin 

Lewis. Michael 

Lewis. Sandy K , 295. 230 

Lewis. Sara Elizabeth 

Lewis, Stephen Burton, 204 

Lewis. Stephen Haynes. 352 

Lewis. Thomas Smith 

Leyland. Stephanie Louise, 295 

Li. Jessica Minjian. 337 

Li. Marion Minquin 

Li. Yong 

Lia. Sheila E 

Liang. Jackie Yuan-Chen 

Libassi, Paul Matthew. 263 

Libucha, Karen Elizabeth, 337 

Liddle, Melanie Ann 

Liebenow. Martha Joan 

Liebler, Linda L 

Liggins. Paula Deneen, 352 

Light. Barry Ward. 337. 262 

Lightfoot, Mark Raleigh 

Lilleleht, Erica 

Lilley, Robert Dexter 

Lilly. Kimberly Shannon 



Little. Cynthia Jean, 352 

Little. Elizabeth Louise 

Little, John Joseph. Jr. 

Uniefield, Elizabeth Scott 

Littleton, Gail Feast. 323 

Liu. Shang-Bin 

Livingstone, Glenn Alexander 

Llanso. Roberto Javier 

Llewellyn, Jeanie Ann 

Lloyd. Cynthia Sterling, 352 

Lloyd. Heather Blair. 337, 222 

Lloyd, Gregory Thomas. 295 

Locasale, Gregory Thomas. 352 

Locheed, Alicia Lynn. 244 

Locke, MarkG 

Lockman. Anne Bourdon 

Lockwood, William A 

Logan. George Chamberlain 

Logan, William Andrew Penick. II 

Logsdon, Barry Glyndon 

Logsdon. John Bennett 

Lomax, Antoinette Carmella 

Lombardo. Anthony Gerard 

Lombardo. Mary Jane, 352 

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Long. Cheryl Anne. 296. 237 

Long. James Simester 

Long. Keeley Robin 

Long, Margaret Comes 

Long. Patricia Ann. 337 

Long, Sarah Hereford 

Long. Tern Leigh 

Longford, Charles P Desmond 

Longlord. Nicola 

Longmire. Jill Elizabeth. 296 

Lonick, James Gerard 

Looney. Kevin Francis 

Lodrup. Eva Jane, 296 

Lopez. David Anton. 337 

Lopez. Martin L 359 

Lopez, Sandra Louise 

Lopp. Julie Malpass, 337. 237. 257 

Lorch. Michael John. 296. 263 

Lonno. Mary Porzelius 

Lotkowictz, Justine Rachel 

Lotz, Donna Sue. 352 

Lotze, Conrad Dieter 

Loudy, Elizabeth Ann, 323, 194 

Louthian. Robert Clinton, II 

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Lovegren. James Andrew, 263 

Lovell. Richard Andrew, 323 

Lovett. Manly P 

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Lucas, Nathan Jacob. 323 

Lucas. Shannon Dale. 146 

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Mack, Elizabeth Ann. 337 

Mack. Harold Mtlton 

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MacKay. Donald Gordon. 323 

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Mackm. Kathleen Ann. 296 

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Mader, Claudia Chnstme. 201. 297 

Madero. Martha Helena, 297 

Madison. Benjamin Verbin, II 

Madonian, Arthur Michael. 323 

Magiera, Karen Lynn. 337 

Magner, Timothy Joseph 

Magnus-Sharpe, Marc Steven. 297, 398 

Maguire. Bernard Augustine 

Maguire, Scott Alan, 297 

Maher. Daniel Joseph 

Mahlbacher, Daniel Thomas, 338 

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Maislo. John Joseph. 338 

Majka, Sheila B 

Majtyka, Jeffrey Ronald 

Makonnen. Jerusalem, 297 

Malks. Daniel Brandt, 338 

Mallion, Tracey Ann. 297 

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Malloy, Martin Stephan 

Malone, Lmda Ann. 323 

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Maloney. John Thomas. Jr 



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Mariner. Susan Lynn. 258 
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Markham, Charlie Walter. II 
Markham, Jonathan Andrew. 353 
Markham, Manon Sheeran 
Marks, Bryant Mayes. Jr. 
Marks. Christopher Alan 
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Marple, Carole Lynn, 297 
Marquardt. Vincent 
Marriott. Catherine Millious 
Marrow, Karen Lee. 338 
Marschalko. Andre Stephen C 
Marschean, Amy Lynn, 297 
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Marshall. Adrienne Patrice. 229 
Marshall. Claude H 
Marshall. Deborah Hudgins 
Marshall, Lawrence Eugene. II 
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Marshall, Susan Elizabeth. 338 
Martens, Jeffrey D 
Marthinsen. Hugh Hunt 
Martin, Alexander Lambert. IV. 338 
Martin, Alison Louise, 353 
Martin, Alton Andrew. 338 
Martin, Gabriela. 297 
Martin. George Daniel. 323. 248 
Martin. Laura Ann, 194.226 
Martin, Mary Frances. 297 
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Martin, Michelle Holley. 353 
Martin, Patrick. 338,243 
Martin, Paul David 
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Martin, Tara Mane, 353. 1 52 
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Martineau, Sheila Maureen. 353 
Martinez. Elizabeth Anne, 353. 240 
Martinez, Samuel Armand. 353 
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Maruca, Lisa Mane. 338. 232 
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Masci. Robin Cara. 297, 232 
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Lebo, Kimberly Elizabeth. 295 
Leckrone. Marian Elizabeth 
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Manzo, Renata M 

Mapp, Mark Hanson 

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Mlily, Christine Mane, 323 
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Memicke, Elizabeth Anne 
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Mitchell, Patncia Ellen, 224 

Mitchell, Willie Herman 

Mitsumata. Masatoki James 

Mittiga, Mary Adele 

Mixson. Jennifer Ann 

Mo, Cheol 

Moakley. Christopher John 

Mobley, Alexandra Mana, 134, 135 

Modrak. Lawrence Edward 

Moe. Donald Wayne. Jr . 353, 260 

Moeller, Susanne Elizabeth, 339 

Moffett.Jody Elizabeth 

Mohanty, Sujit Kumar, 263 

Mohler, Debra Lee 

Mohler. Walter Rigg, Jr , 339. 175 

Mohney. Sharon Eileen 

Mohr, Samuel A. 

Moliter, Elizabeth Anne. 324, 234 

Molnar. Elizabeth Ann 

Moloney, Joann Mary 

Molseed, Stephen Basil 

Mclyneux. Irene Mane 

Monaco. Joseph, 353 

Moncol. Sallie Morton Hutchms 

Monger. Whitney Ann, 339, 1 84 

Mongrain. Suzanne Elizabeth, 324. 234 

Monhollon. John Pylant 

Monroe. Jacqueline Elaine 

Monson, Christine Anne 

Monson, Deborah Lynn. 353 

Montague, Carla Mana, 224 

Montague, Robert Samuel. Jr. 

Montalto. Mane Daneen 

Montgomery. Edward Eugene. 353 

Montgomery, Elizabeth Jean. 339 

Monti. David Francis 

Montuon. David Alan 

Moodey. Meredith Campbell 

Moon, Catherine Avery. 324 

Moon. Hong Ki 

Moore. Betty Ann, 220 




Fhints • Custom Framing • Originals 



437 Prince George Street 

Wlliamsburg.VA 23185 

229-7644 



Moore. Carol Ann 

Moore. Ellen Spnng. 353 

Moore. Glenn Tyler, 243 

Moore. K- Steven 

Moore, Margaret Anne 

Moore, Michael Lee 

Moore, Mignon S 

Moore, Nancy Jean 

Moore. Natalie Sue 

Moore. Paul C, 339 

Moore. Philip Winsor. 353 

Moore. Priscilla McMurray. 240 

Moore, Regina Karen 

Moore, Ronnie Fisher. 244 

Moore, Sonmi Jenmal. 339 

Moore, Vicki Lou, 324, 232 

Moore. William T P 

Moosha. Kimberly Barnes, 53, 220 

Moran. Kenneth OdeN 

Moran, Stacey Lynn 

Moravitz. Michael Lewis 

Moreau. Pamela Ann, 125 

Moreci. Laura Anne 

Morelli, Filippo M. 

Moretlo. Rita Jeanne 

Morgan, Arthur Vance. IV 

Morgan. Barbara Gayle 

Morgan. John Albert 

Morgan, Kathryn Renee, 353 

Morgan. Kendra. 232 

Morgan, Marion Anne 

Morgan, Mary Kalhanne, 324. 232 

Morgan, Randall Lee 

Monarty, Kathleen Elizabeth. 339. 232 

Monarly. Thomas William 

Moroney. Jean Stuart, 339 

Moroney, Michael Anthony 

Morrill, Mary Beth 

Morns. Bnan Nelson 

Morris. Jacqueline Webb 

Morris. Robin Rae. 324 

Morns, Stephen Keith 

Morrison, Andrea Jean 

Mornson. Elizabeth Shaw 

Mornson, Eric Kenneth, 243 



Mornson. Heath Eugene 
Morrison. James Scott 
Mornson. Jeffrey Alan 
Mornss. Anthony Douglas 
Morrow, Jane Elizabeth 
Morrow. Robert Scott 
Morsch, Jennifer Lynn, 339 
Morse. William Edward 
Mortensen. Sarah 
Mortimer, Charles Edgar. Jr. 
Mortimer, Melissa Anne 
Morton, John Flood, IV 
Morton, Monique A., 229 
Morton, Timothy Boynton. 144. 145 
Moser. Donald Keats 
Moser. Katherine.324 
Moser, Paul. 353 
Moses. Kimberly Ann 
Moses. Luci Carroll 
Moses, Michael Van. 232 
Mosher, Jeffrey John, 210. 243 
Mosher, Richard Bret 
Moshin, Mehnn G , 353 
Mosier. Donald Francis 
Moskowilz. James Nelson 
Moss. Eugene Harold. Jr. 353 
Motoyama, Yukan 
Moulton. CHnstine Marie 
Mounts, Roy Darrell, 234 
Moustafa. Mohamed Zaki 
Mouzon, Adele Chasteau 
Mowatt-Larssen. Enc 
Mowbray, Stuart C. 
Mowry, Lynn 
Mozingo. James Milton 
Mudd, Douglas A.. 243 
Mueller. David John 
Mueller, Loretta A 
Muench, Garnck Eldred 
MuHarkey. Geraldine Theresa 
Mullen, John Patrick 
Mullen. Ursula Hohi 
Muller, Deena Jean 
Muller. Frederick Reynolds 
Muller. Sandra Lynn 



Mullett. Conor Timothy 
Mulligan, Ann Elizabeth, 353 
Mulligan. Cynthia Ellen 
Mulligan. Michael Mark 
Mullins, Alisa Mane 
Mullins. Lisa Cathenne 
Mullins, Mark Lee 
Mullins. Melissa Ann 
Mutnar. Elizabeth. 324 
Mulquin, Mary Donna. 339 
Mumford. Robert Eari 
Mundy.SybilA. 
Munford, Morgan Alex 
Munroe. Thomas A 
Munsey, Michael Reid 
Munthali, Rachel 
Murchie.TiaAnn,339 
Murdock. Susan Ann 
Murphy, Ann Mane, 339 
Murphy, Brennan Aileen 
Murphy. Douglas Andrew 
Murphy. Elizabeth Anne, 339 
Murphy, John Alec 
Murphy. John Scott 
Murphy. Kathleen Anne 
Murphy, Patnce. 395 
Murphy, Rita Warren 
Murphy, Thomas Howard 
Murphy, Timothy Scott 
Murray. Heather Maureen 
Murray, Jeffrey Aaron 
Murray, Melaney Lynne 
Murray, Michael Robert 
Musick, Robert Lawrence, Jr 
Musiime, Burton. Clay. 260 
Musser. Jan Christina 
Myers. Ann Hull. 339 
Myers. Arthur Vmton 
Myers, Charles Darryl 
Myers, Chnstopher Eric 
Myers, Christopher Robert 
Myers. Douglas Encsson 
Myers. Enc Tipton 
Myers. Peter Ross 
Myers. Thomas Wayne. 324 







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Nabors, Stuart Alexander. 243 

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Nachman, Brad Joseph Ethan 

Nagel, Caria Lynne. 324 

Nagel. Lisa Ellen 

Nahra. Ana Mana Demse. 354 

Namalh. Richard. 339 

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Nevin. Thomas Francis 
Nevlud, Anne Barbara 
Newbury. Lynn, 324 
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Newcome. Douglas Steward 
Newell. Andrew Bachelder 
Newell. Brooke 

Newfield, Melanie Faith, 354. 222 
Newlon, Anne Howard. 354 
Newman. Connie Yvonne 
Newman. Robert Anthony. 324. 243 
Newman. Shonra Clare. 324, 237 
Newman. Vicky Williams 
Newton, Bambi Lynn. 234 
Newton, Martha Elizabeth, 354 
Ng, Allen Jongying 
Nguyen. Cathenne Tam 
Nguyen. Tuan Tri. 354 
Nichol. Kelly Ann, 354 
Nicholls. Ronald Gray 
Nichols. Katherine Jean, 220 
Nichols. Timothy Paul. 339 
Nickim, William Sonner, 324 
Nicotra. John Joseph 
Nies. David Scott. 354. 243 



Nye, Robert Mark 
Nygaard. David Eric 




O'Brien. Charles Joseph 
O'Brien. John Joseph 
OOay. Patrick Thomas. 263 
O'Grady.John Brad 
O'Hara, Neat Francis 
Oakes, Angela Faye, 339 
Oakley, Mary Chnstine 
Obenshain. Anne Scott. 237 
Oberndorl. Marcie Debra 
Obnen, Elizabeth 
Obrien, Karen Linda 
Obnen. Knstine Joan 
Obnen. Lisa Ann. 224 



Oliver. Ann Selden, 354 
Oliver, Cratg Thomas. 175 
Oliver. Rodney Wayne 
Oliver. Susan G 

Olivo. Palncia Anne, 354, 1 52, 1 53 
Olsen. Michael Jon, 1 75, 57 
Olsen. Paul M, 
Olshansky, Karen 
Olson. Chnstina Lee. 152 
Olson. Christopher Michael 
Olson. Jonathan William 
Omalley, Keane Gerard 
Omeara, Eleanor A 
Omeara. Gerard J 
Ommundsen. Mary Elizabeth 
Omohundro. James Peers 
Omps. Carrie Leigh. 220 
Onder. Mehmel Hami 
Onder, Necmtye Sedel, 324 
Ondis. Catherine Berwind 
Oneal. Karen Elaine, 324 
Oneil. Steven Patrick 
Oneill. Edward Hart 
Onkey, Lauren Elizabeth 
Ord, John Ellwood 
Orders. John Drury 



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Owen, Donna Pugh 

Owen. Jay. 354 

Owen Jerry Pomdexter 

Owen, Kaihenne Lewis, 340. 234 

Owen. Rodenc Lewis 

Owens, Robert Gerard, 248 

Oxiey, Kay L 

Ozolins, Donna Lynn. 340. 220 




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Pace. Vrckie Lynn 
Pack. Daniel Arthur 
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10:30ani-2:00am 

521 Prince George St. 
Williamsburg, VA 

804) 220-3565 



Nassiri. Shireen Joyce 

Navarrete, Andres Luis 

Neal. Bonnie Lynne 

Neal. David Douglas 

Neal. Elizabeth Tankard 

Neale. Pamela Harrison 

Neary. John David, 248 

Neckles. Hilary A. 

Nedrow. Norma Jane, 324 

Neel. Chnstopher C. 

Net. Palncia Ann. 222 

Neider, Kann Jean 

Neikirk. Chnslopher Rex. 263 

Neikirk. Robert Charles 

Neil. Douglas Gordon. 324, 248 

Nelms. Jeffrey Neal. 324. 257 

Nelson. Brent Alan 

Nelson, Debbi Gaye. 324 

Nelson. Hetane Mane 

Nelson. Jan Hillary 

Nelson. Karen Lynn. 220 

Nelson. Lewis Porter 

Nelson. Nancy Faye 

Nelson. Steven Conrad 

Nemeth. Richard Desider 

Nemiih. Brenda Gould 

Ness. John Courtland Ranvig. 339 

Neste. Jane Elizabeth. 324 

Nettles. David Wayne 

Nettles. Evangeline B. 

Nettles, John Gregory, 244 



Niezgoda. Deborah Anne 

Ntkolic, Nikola Andrew. 324 

Nikolich, Mikeljon Peter. 339, 214 

Nimo. John Alexis 

Nimo, Natasha Ana, 354 

Nissly. Nedric Lee 

Nix. Michelle Mane, 339. 234 

Nixon. Richard Dean. 324 

Noble. Thomas George. 243. 167, 257 

Nobles. Lenoir Low 

Nojadera. Geraldme D., 339 

Noonan, Bryan Boland 

Noonan, James Patrick 

Norcross. Janet Lynn 

Norcross. Nancy Ann 

Nordstrom, Wendy Lynn 

Norehad, David Chnstopher. 144, 145 

Norlleet. Sherry L 

Norris, Bradford James. 354 

Norns, Jody 

Norris, Lee Ann 

Norris. Todd William. 324, 254 

North. Kristin Mane, 354 

Norwood. Whitney Lee 

Nottingham, Jessie L 

Nottingham, Troy Walker 

Nouse, James. 339 

Noyes, Lynne Ellen 

Nuckles, William Kevin 

Nugent. Raymond Charles 

Nubauser. Timothy, 339 



':«*'st^ 


r;.ir-v- ■ --_— / r^-fi.' 1 


i 


Obnen, Nancy Jean 


Oreilly, Timothy Patnck 


Page. Dinah Tara 


Obnen, Nancy Margarett 


Orenstein, Judith Ellen 


Pageau. Nancy Allison, 354, 224 


Obrien. Susan Mary. 324 


Orndorff. Melissa Dawn, 354 


Pagotto. Julie Amarie 


Oconner, Lee Ann. 354 


Orourke, Kendal Leigh Godfrey. 339 


Painter. Julia Ann 


Oconner. Timothy Michael, 324 


Orr, Joanne Mane, 324 


Pasiley, Beaumante 


Oconnor. John E, 


Orr, Lynne Hamilton 


Pak, Chang Uk, 340 


Oconnor. Rory Michael 


Orrell, Barbara Reynolds 


Palermo, James Darryl, 354 


Oday, Patrick, 339 


Ortelere. Brian Thomas 


Patese. Suzanne Alice, 340 


Oday. Susan Perry 


Ortiz. Carmina Mane 


Palmer, Jeffrey Neil 


Oddo, David Paul 


Orton. Audrey Howes 


Palmer. Joan Mane. 234 


Odell. Christopher Leroy. 339, 385 


Osborne. Eleanor Esther 


Palmer, Karia Lynn, 340 


Odiaga. Marco Fernando 


Osborne, Elizabeth Tabb. 339, 232 


Palmer, Kaihenne Ellyson 


Ogden, Carol Patricia 


Oshaughnessy, Kevin John 


Palmer. Steven Zachary 


Ogden. Patricia 


Osier, Mark William. 263 


Palmes, Guy Kevin 


Ogg. Clifton Floyd 


Oslin, David Wayne 


Palms. SylvaiaTobin 


Ogline, Fred Leiand 


Osoling, Chnstina Anne, 339 


Paloski, Paul Stanley. Jr. 


Ogline. Michelle Alice, 354 


Oslensoe, Edward Janson 


Palumbo. James John. 184 


Ogrody, Jeannine Alexandra 


Osullivan. Andrew John 


Panchision. David Mark 


Ohler. Lisa Alison, 324 


Ota. Barry J, 243 


Panczyk. Kelley Margaret 222 


Ohnmacht. Richard Holmes, 339, 260 


Othoson. Enc G 


Pang, Andrew. 354 


Okeefe. Kevin Cornelius 


Ott. Judith Alison 


Panner, Enc John 


Okeefe, Knsline Maura. 324 


Ottaway, John Palmer, II 


Panoff. Stephen Edward 


Okeefe. Richard George. 324 


Otto, Silvia Crislina. 220 


Paolillo. Cynthia Ann 


Okeele. John Patnck 


Outlaw. Allen Christopher 


Paolozzi, Thomas Franklin 


Okeson, Lars Gunnar. 1 75 


Overacre. Debroah Danielle 


Papamichaet. Angela Athena, 340 


Okonkwo. Rebecca Chinye. 354 


Overlander, Susan Elizabeth 


Papodopoulos, Maturna F . 324 


Olenick. Peter Joseph 


Overstreet, Elizabeth Sue. 340. 134. 135 


Parash.W Paul. 243 


Oles. Daniel Conrad 


Overton. Martha Debord 


Parham. Sandra Ellen, 324 


Olesh, Stanley Douglass 


Overwater, Teunis Jacob 


Pansh, Maureen Elizabeth 


Olinger. Eleanor Kay 


Owen, Andrea R 


Park. Hee Jeoung 


Oliveira. Stephen Michael 


Owen, Brandon Gerald 


Park. Linda Suzanne 



Park, Myung Hee, 340. 226 

Parke. Mary A. 

Parker. Amy Watson, 223 

Parker. Came Gail 

Parker. David 

Parker, Elizabeth. 359 

Parker, Elizabeth Heath. 359 

Parker. Jeannette Elaine, 324 

Parker. Jennifer Hopkins, 340 

Parker, Lee Ann 

Parker. Tonya Dawn 

Parker. Verne Hall 

Parkinson, Katherine Jean 

Parks. Katharine Michele, 241 

Parks. Marie Morton 

Parmele, Richard Everett 

Parnigoni. Cara Lynn 

Parr, Amy Elizabeth 

Parrott. Sara Lynn. 196 

Parsons, Cynthia E 

Parsons, Virginia Lee 

Partin. Pamela Denise. 354 

Paschall. Elizabeth Winn 

Fastens. Susan Louise 

Pastorino, Shannon Francesca. 340 

Paslnck. Sandra Lynn 

Patane. Ann M. 

Patel. Nomita Harikrishna 

Patish, Lawrence A . 324 

Patrick. Michael Harns 

Pattee. Suzanne Ruth 

Patten. Kathleen Alva, 325. 194 

Patterson, Archie Jay. II 

Patterson. Catherine Frances, 325 

Pattis. Janice A 

Patton, Jennifer Lynne, 340 

Paulson, Louis G 

Pavlides. Matthew John. 325 

Pavlik, Elizabeth Jane 

Payne. Charles Nelson. Jr 

Payne. Christopher Desseau. 207 

Payne. Janet Ann 

Payne. Melissa 

Payne. Portia Lynn 

Payne. Samuel Kirk 

Peabody, Thomas William 

Pearce. Kelvm Don. 260 

Pearl. David Russell, 354 

Pearre, Melissa Alden 

Pearsall. Pamela E 

Pearson, Lorraine 

Pearson. Tina Kathleen 

Pearson, William Tabb 

Peay. Mason Andrew 

Pechan. Spring Erica 

Peck, Phillip Agustus. 167 

Pedersen. Barbara Lynn, 354 

Pedigo, Candace M 

Peel, Carolyn Ann, 354. 130 

Peery. Austin Page 

Peery, Bryan Franklin 

Pei. Fanyu 

Pelton, Kevin Jay 

Pelton, Louise Dekoven 

Peluso. John Gabnel, Jr , 263 

Pemberton, Michael Arthur 

Pendleton, Edmund Stuarl 

Pendleton, Lmwood Hagan 

Pendse. Aniali Achyut 

Penello. Joseph Francis, 340 

Penick, Michael Coby 

Penney. Ann S. 

Penney. Anne Elizabeth. 325 

Penney, Kathryn Jeanne. 224 

Pennington. Penny Oakley 

Penola. Carol Ann 

Peoples. Carl Edward 

Peple, Edward Cronm, II 

Peple, Troy, 162 

Peple, Jane Mallory 

Pepper, S Kathleen 

Pepple. Lorayne Michelle. 325, 146, 257 

Perez-Reyes. Eduardo Emilio 

Perhac. Evelyn Compton 

Penman, David Alan 

Perkins, Cynlhia Ann 

Perkins. Harvey William 

Perkins, Joe Lewis 

Perkins. Jon Scott 

Perotli, David Lawrence, 354 

Perper, Melanie Rose 

Perrin, Cathenne Elizabeth, 354 

Perrow, Anne Tillman 

Perry, Debra Fayre, 224 

Perry. Donna Lynne 

Perry. Edmund K . 354, 260 

Perry. Gregory Thomas 

Perry. Lenore W. 

Perry, Monica Leah 

Perry. Noel Jeanne. 340 

Peter. Ian 

Petersen. John F , Jr 

Peterson, Chad William. 263 

Peterson, Charles Michael 

Peterson, Christopher Thomas 

Peterson, David Allen, II 

Peterson. Douglas H , Jr. 

Peterson. Eric David 

Peterson. Francine K. 

Peterson. James Howard 

Peterson, Jill Mane 

Peterson. Lynda J 

Peterson. Paul Eric 

Petree. David Larcomb 

Petres. Frances Ann, 325 



Petrie, Douglas John 

Petroongrad, Patra 

Peltis. Thelma Young 

Pettm, Mary Kathryn. 340 

Petty, Dwayne Kevin 

Pezzella, Hams Joseph 

Pteifler. Tern Lynn, 340 

Pflugrath. Peter Kirk 

Pforr. Cameron Dean, 325 

Phan. Huevan 

Phetan, Patncia L 

Phelps. Mary Catherine. 325 

Phenix, William Eugene. 340 

Philip. Chen Anne 

Philipp, Susan Blair, 232 

Phillips, Abigail S.. 325 

Phillips, Daniel Paul 

Phillips, Douglas Winston 

Phillips. Glenna Jean. 8, 222 

Phillips. Jennifer Mane, 325 

Phillips. Melinda Womble 

Phillips, Michael Edward 

Phillips. Sheryl Diann 

Phillips. Stephen Ward 

Phillips, Susan Rebecca 

Phillips, William Clarke 

Philpotl, Elizabeth Mane, 354 

Philpott, Sharon Kay, 109. 220 

Phipps. Jonathan Everett 

Phoel. William Conrad 

Picca. Dominic Joseph 

Picken, Scott Lisle 

Pickens, Eric Lee 

Pickett, Regan Christie 

Pieper. Andrea Lynn 

Pieper. Daniel Roy. 340 

Pierce, Andrea Lynn. 354 

Pierce, Ann E . 340 

Pierce, Christine Louise 

Pierce, Elaine Gay. 354 

Pierson. Brian Douglas 

Pierson. Douglas Van, 340. 263 

Pierson. Frances Laura 

Pierson. Myra M . 389 

Pierson. Noah Ross. 144, 145 

Pietrasanta. Robert Louis 

Piiawka. Susan Elizabeth. 1 23, 1 72 

Pike. Kimberly.m 354. 224 

Piland, Ellyn Page 

Piland. Robert Stanley, II 

Pilaro, Frances Mana. 254 

Pillow. Kann Elaine 

Pincus, Kan Esther 

Pinkleton, Susan Frances, 325 

Pinzon. Marvin F. 

Piper, Amy L. 

Piper. LonChnstine. 164 

Pisano. David Jon. 340 

Pittman, William E. 

Pitts. Jonathan Harrell 

Pitts. Melody Pauline. 354 

Pizzani. Edibell Mana 

Plaag. Eric William. 354 

Placke, Stephen Michael 

Planas, Rita Mana 

Planicka, Carole Leigh. 240. 241 

Planty, Donald James. Jr 

Plaster, Henry Garnett. 248 

Pleier, Jennifer Mary. 340 

Plumpis, Katnna Ellen, 340 

Plunkett, Gregory Michael 

Pocta. David Francis 

Poe, Christine E, 

Poff. Richard Harding, Jr. 

Pofienberger, Brien James, 206 

Pogue, Amy Louise, 354 

Point, Thomas Wendell 

Poirier. Jean-Marc 

Poland, Mark Wayne 

Polesnak, Susan Cameron 

Policarpio, Joseph Anthony. 354 

Policastro. Catherine Ann. 354, 237 

Policastro, Stephen John 

Polk, Gary Loraine, 325 

Pollard. Jessica L 

Poma. John Michael, 325 

Pommerening, Jean Martha 

Pommerening. Philip Andrew 

Pomponio. Carol Patricia 

Poms, Keith Bryan 

Pond, Christopher Russell, 325 

Pond, Mary Jane 

Pond. Sylvia Williams, 340 

Pontz. Robert William. 325 

Poole. Cynthia Ann 

Poole, Lucmda Jane 

Poor, Amy Jo 

Poor, Jennifer Lee 

Pope, Emma Jane. 325 

Pope, James Brian 

Porter, Donna Lynne 

Porter, James Edward 

Porter. Lisa Ellen 

Porter, Virginia Louise 

Polee, Charles Samuel 

Potter, Kathryn Brew, 41 

Potter. Sue Evelyn 

Potts, C. Sherry 

Pougher, Richard David 

Poulsen. Donna Rebecca 

Poulsen, Susan Lynn 

Powell, Antoma Maria, 325, 226 

Powell, Bonnie Lee, 340 

Powell, Elaine Cathenne, 340 

Powell. Elizabeth Lee 



Powell, Emily Claire. 354, 237 

Powell, James Spaulding 

Powell, Johanna 

Powell. Kathenne Elizabeth 

Powell. Kimberly Lynn 

Powell. Laurie Anne 

Powell. Linda Margaret, 340 

Powell. Michael Kevin, 263 

Powell. Miles Sloan, 354 

Powell. Patncia A. 

Powell. Richard Edward, Jr. 

Power. Raymond C 

Powers. Emma Lou 

Powers. Thomas Michael. 186 

Powers, William 

Poynter, Judy F. 

Prasch. Virginia Mary. 222 

Pratt James Boggs, 325 

Prentiss, Karen. 340. 338, 220 

Press, Sandra Kaye. 326 

Preston, Diane Mane. 340 

Preston. Laura Michelle. 354 

Prettyman. Thomas Clifton. 354 

Prezioso. William Mario, 354 

Price, Charles Edward, II 

Price, James Edward 

Price, Jo Anna Saegusa 

Pnce, Lisa Michelle, 207 

Priesman, Phillip Sherman 

Pnllaman, Phillip Miles 

Prillaman, Tracie Simone 

Pringle, Carol Adair 

Prior, Barbara Ann 

Pntchard. Elizabeths 

Pntchard, Wilson Cannoy 

Pritchett, Danysu Francis 

Proctor, William Erik 

Prosl. Carol L 

Prosser, Sean. 243 

Protz. Philip Ray, Jr. 340 

Prutzman, Nancy Ann. 340 

Pryor, Jill Anne, 199 

Ptachick, Kevin F 

Puc, Bernard Peter, 354, 258 

Puckett. Jean Lambert 

Pugh. Kendra Lynn 

Pugh, Melanie 

Pugh. Patricia Louise. 340 

Pugh, Valerie. 340 

Puglisi, Michael Joseph 

Puglisi. Regina Marie. 326 

Puleo. Joseph A, 354 

Pulizzi, John Sebastian, 340 

Pulley. Jenny Lee 

Pulley. Lydia Rose. 237 

Punjabi, Vina Alkesh 

Purdy.Jill Mane. 354 

Purrington. Elizabeth Whitaker. 326 

Puskar, Charles Esten, II. 243. 263 

Putaro, Sharon Lynn 

Putnam. Lynn Colby, 326 

Pyne, Teresa Long 




Oayyum, Imran 
Quagliano. John Romolo 
Ouagliano. Peter Vincent, 326 
Quartana, Jennifer. 355. 184 
Ouattlebaum, Alexander McQueen 
Quick. William Bryan 
Ouickley, Shirley Green 
Quigley, Joseph John. 326 
Quinlan. Timothy Michael 
Ouinn. Barbara Louise 
Quinn. Colleen Marea 
Quinn, Karan Ann 
Quitko, Karen Kathleen 
Quittmeyer, Andrew R 




Ra. James 

Raab. Cynthia Thorsen. 355 

Raby. Shelly Ann. 

Rackett, Michael Reynolds. 340 

Racktitfe, Dianne Louise 

RadcliHe, Elizabeth Ann 

Radday, Elizabeth 

Radday, Jeanne Marie, 355 

Radday, Michael 

Radell, Lianne Renee, 326. 226 

Radford, Emily Anne 

Rata. Cheryl Ann. 238 

Raffaele. Kimberly Jo 

Rafterty, Moira Anne 

Ragland, Mark Bryan, 326 

Rainer, Julia 

Rainey, Lola Whitley 

Rainey, Saundra S. 



Rambow. Stephen Frederick 

Ramsay, James Streeter 

Ramsey. Ann Kendall 

Ramsey, Harry Edward, II 

Ramsey, Matthew Andrew 

Ranadive, Nina Manmohan. 340 

Rand. Hugh A 

Randall, Edith Laverne, 326. 229 

Randall, Yvonne Kathenne Simon 

Raney, David Alan 

Ranhorn, Karen Marie, 355 

Ransom, David Gordon, 355 

Ransone. Sterling Neblett Jr , 326 

Raper, Anne Jarrell. 326. 224 

Rapuano. Kenneth Francesco 

Rapuano. Mana 

Rasheed, Karima 

Rathke. Jill Kathleen. 355 

Rau. Chnstopher Russell. 340 

Rauen, James Andrew 

Rausch, Michael Patrick, 326 

Ravinsky, Alyse Ann, 189 

Rawson, Katherne Wales 

Ray. Robert Tnau 

Ray. Ronald Alan 

Read. Kimberly Anne. 146 

Reagan. Mark Andrew 

Rearwin. Elizabeth Louise, 355 

Reay. William G. 

Rebollo, Anthony Ernest 

Rector. Raymond Alan, 340 

Redd. Joan Louise 

Redmond. David Scott 

Redmond. Kathleen Ann. 340. 152. 153. 224 

Redweik, Anita Meta Jo 

Reed. Alan J, 250 

Reed, Janet Lynn 

Reed. Kathleen Mary 

Reed. Norma Lee 

Rees. Susan Jeanette. 355 

Reese, Charlene Ann. 340. 238 

Reeves. Alan Joseph. 250 

Reeves. Lisa Wesley. 340. 222 

Regan. Cynthia Cathenne 

Regan, Michael J 

Regensburg, Cynthia Raye 

Reicher, Tern Lee 

Reid. Amy MacPherson, 355 

Reid. Carter Burwetl 

Reid. Cowan Ervin 

Reid. Julia Annette, 355 

Reid. Kelvin Henry 

Reid. Mary Courtney 

Reid, Scott Elwood 

Reidenbach, Jennifer Ann. 326. 220 

Reihansperger. Heidi Ann, 326 

Reiley. Robert Werner 

Reiley. Terence Thomas 

Reilly. Donald John 

Reilly, Jane Pindar 

Reilly. Joseph Vincent 

Reilly. Lynne Elizabeth. 355. 224 

Reilly, Susan Anne, 224 

Rem, Mark Doyle 

Reinisch, Nancy Laura, 125 

Reinsel. Rita Christine 

Rejent, Amy Michele. 355 

Remy, Eric David 

Rendleman. Charles Robert 

Rendleman, John Raymond 

Renick. Kathryn Ann. 340 

Renne, Manon Kizer 

Renshaw. Kari Lynn 

Renwick. Lynn Robin. 224 

Repke, Scott William 

Repke. Thomas Evans 

Resolute, Albert Joseph, II, 224 

Respess, Laura Taylor 

Reuben. Janice Samuelle 

Revell. Robin S 

Revere.JamesHall.il. 326 

Reyher. Maria 

Reyn, Paula A 

Reynolds. Darrlyn Koch 

Reynolds. Elizabeth Cabel 

Reynolds, John Forrest. 340. 263 

Reynolds, Mary Wheeler 

Reynolds, Randolph Nicklas. Jr 

Rhoad, Robert Darnel. 257 

Rhoads. David Turner 

Rhodes, Jon David 

Rhodes, Kimberley Ann 

Rhody. Kathryn Haynes 

Rhyne. Theresa Ann, 355 

Ribar. Cheryl L 

Ribble, Benjamin Leigh 

Ribeiro, Agostinho Joseph, 326. 57. 244 

Ricctardelli. Laura T 

Rice, Dana Lynne 

Rice, Lesa Mary 

Rice. Sally Cromwell 

Rich, Carol Ruth, 203 

Richard. JohnnaC 

Richards, Michael Gregory 

Richards, Stephen Anthony. 257 

Richardson. Aline 

Richardson, Claiborne Turner 

Richardson, Eric John 

Richardson, Karen Renee 

Richardson. Kathryn Joyce 

Richardson, Kevm Wayne. 139 

Richardson. Robert F . Jr 

Richardson, Vincent Corey 

Richberg, Edwin Hiram 

Richman, Sabnna, 326 



Richmond. Elisa Caryn. 355 

Richmond. Phscilla C. 

Richter. Curt Andrew. 340 

Richter. Karoline Mary, 355 

Richter. Scott Hayes. 250 

Ricker. Judith D. 

Rickman, Oscar Smith, Jr. 

Ricks. Dean Wester. 340 

Riddle. Anne Dudley. 355 

Riddle. Derek Douglas 

Rideout, Catherine Michelle 

Ridley, Frank Wayne 

Riedet. Christine W. 

Rieder. Stephanie E. 

Riegel. Heather Sadira, 355 

Rieger, Regina 

Rieth, Margaret Ann 

Rigby. Catharine Keyes. 355 

Riggan. Douglas Allen. 326 

Riggins, Mary Hunter 

Riggs. Cheryl Lee 

Riggs. Natasha Maria 

Riley. Cathleen Ann. 355 

Riley. Julie Ann 

Riley. Mary McHale 

Rinaldi. MarkGunnar 

Riser. Harnett Jameson. 340. 222 

Risgin. Anne Elizabeth. 355 

Rita. Patnck M, 

Ritchie, Deborah Sue. 355 

Ritchie. Margaret Ann 

Ritenour. Patricia Michele. 355 

Ritter, Karen Lynne 

Rilz. Michael Joseph 

Ritzenthaler. Joseph P. 

Rives. Courtney Cycle. 355 

Rizzo, Karen Kay 

Rizzo. Wiltiam M 

Roak, Christopher Dale, 263 

Roane. Joy Hughes 

Roark, Colleen Renee 

Roaseau, Mary Lou 

Robbins. Donald Mills 

Roberson, Amy Alise 

Roberson, Charles Scott 

Roberson. Diane Leigh, 326. 203 

Roberson, Makaila Darlene 

Roberts, Amy Renee 

Roberts. David Joseph 

Roberts. Dianna Louise. 340 

Roljerts, Douglas Lee. Jr. 

Roberts. Joseph Murray 

Roberts, Kenneth Anthony 

Roberts. Kimberly Paige 

Roberts. Susan Chandler. 326 

Robertson. Emily Gillespie 

Robertson. Karen Elizabeth. 326 

Robertson. Knsten Louise. 355 

Robertson. Lisa Ann. 326, 226 

Robertson, Louise Lilley 

Robertson, Nancy Lynn 

Robertson. Pamela Carol. 355 

Robertson, Stephen Clawson 

Robida. James Randolph 

Robiiotto, Philip Joseph 

Robins. Bntton Gwyn. 355 

Robinson-Cobb, Kns Lynn 

Robinson, Charles Arthur. II 

Robinson, Darryl 

Robinson. David Wayne 

Robinson. Edward Barnes. 244 

Robinson. Prudence Ophelia C . 326 

Robinson. Robbie, 340 

Robinson, Suzanne Elizabeth, 326 

Robinson. William Bryan, Jr 

Roby. Knsten Patncia. 224 

Roche. Colleen Mane 

Roche, Mary Ann, 146,157 

Rochelle. Joy Hough 

Rocke, Stanley Alexander 

Rodgers. Catherine Ann 

Rodgers. John Hunter 

Rodgers. Karen Ann 

Rodriguez, Herve Robert, 340 

Roeder, ValeneJean, 130. 131 

Roehng, Amy Dtane 

Roesch, Betsy Taylor 

Roesch Brenda Lisette. 355. 234 

Roesser, David Stewart 

Rogers, Charles Kenneth, 355, 250 

Rogers, Michelle Mane. 244 

Rogich, Kenneth Blair. 326 

Rohen. Barbara Jean 

Rohrbacher. James 

Rohng, Amy. 341 

Roias. Barbara Lynn 

Roller. Frank Coiner 

Rollins. Ruth 

Romance. Joseph 

Romankow. Donna Karen 

Romano. Sophia P 

Romano. Suzanne Jeanette. 125* 

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Romig. Andrea Lynn. 341 

Romine, Richard Allen 

Ronayne. Kelly Peter 

Hooney. Joseph Lawrence. Jr 

Rosana. Arthur Balthasar. 355 

Rosche. Julia Margaret 

Rosdol. David Scott. 244 

Rose. Jean S 

Rose. Karen Maxine 

Rosenbaum, Amy Lynn 

Rosenbaum. Terry Louise 

Rosenberg, Daniel Crown, 355 



Rosenberg. Jon 

Rosenberg, Steven Lee. 341 

Rosen oerry, Amy Elizabeth 

RosenDurg, Charles P. 

Roslund, Bryan David. 326. 207 

Ross. Amy Ann. 250 

Ross. Cheryl Diane. 341 

Ross, Deborah A. 

Ross, Ralph Parker 

Ross, Robert Carl, 144. 263 

Rosselio William Craig 

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Rolella. Marshall Wayne 

Roth David Stuart. 341. 177, 175, 250 

Roth, Howard William 

Rothberg. Eric Jonathan. 341 

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Rousseau. Darren Alfred 

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Rowan. Thomas Patrick. 341 

Rowe. Leah Baker, 341 

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Rowe. Mary C. 

Rowe. Richard Alan 

Rowland. Charlene McKee 

Rowland. Hugh Carnngton 

Rowland, Rachael Andrea 

Rowtson-Hall, John H 

Roy. Roger Charles. Jr, 

Roy. William Arthur 

Royal). Frederick Louis. Jr, 

Royer. Anthony Michael 

Royer, Christopher William 

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Rozycki. Andrew George. 326 

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Rubick, Mark Alan, 355 

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Rubin, Rochelle Elizabeth. 326 

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Ruhr, Charles Eric 

Ruiz. Virginia Elizabeth. 355 

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Ryan. Jennifer Anne. 341 

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Sachs Daniel Howard. 355 
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Schmidt. Kirsten Alexa. 355 
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Schmm. Leiane Elizabeth. 355 
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Schneider. Gregory Scott. 213 
Schneider. Michael Paul. 326. 243 
Schneppat. Gigi Desiree 
Schoch. Bruce Paul 
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Scott David Mark 
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Semones, Thomas Lee 

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Sheets. Scott Kevin 
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Swilley, Marcy Caroline, 356 
Switzer, Rose A 

Swoboda. Margaret Hayward, 356 
Sybers, William Anthony, Jr 
Sydnor, Thomas Emmett 
Sykes, William Usher 
Szczypmski. Diann Man. 125. 220 
Szedlmayer, Margaret M. 
Szedlmayer. Stephen T. 
Szele. Francis George 
Szydhk. David J. 
Szymczak, Karen EUzabeth. 342 




Taber, Gail Sandra 
Taber. Lynn Elizabeth. 328 
Tackett Pamela Moon 
Tademy. Carla Elaine. 229 
Talbot Luci Ann. 342 
Talken, Michelle Renee, 342 
Tancredi. Karyn Annella 
Tanner. Jennifer Mane, 356 
Tanner. Laura Elizabeth 
Taplin, Mary Elizabeth, 356 
Tarteton, Lavonne Olson 
Tarrant Jonathan Edward 
Tarter, Kathenne Dawn 
Tate. James Lee. Jr, 
Tate, Julia Allison. 356 
Taule. Jason 
Taves. Kathy Louise 
Taylor- Keyser. Jacquelyn 
Taylor. Came Ann. 125 
Taylor, Christopher Thomas 
Taylor. Cindy Lou. 342 



Taylor. Clauderte Hundley 
Taylor, Debra Lynn, 142. 143 
Taylor, Heather Ann 
Taylor, James W. 328 
Taylor. Jaqueljn Harrison 
Taylor. Jeremy Young 
Taylor. Judith Michele. 342. 251 
Taylor, Julian Mark 
Taylor. Landon Raymond 
Taylor. Marc Andre 
Taylor. Michelle Z. 
Taylor. Monica Leigh, 356 
Taylor. Nancy Joy 
Taylor. Shelly Wray 
Taylor. Tedford James 
Taylor. Vickie K- 
Teal. Walters. Jr. 
Teass. Sara Vanderberry 
Teates, David Bruce 
Teates, Mary Catherine, 356 
Tee. Hendnk 
Tegens. John Steven 
Templeman. Stephen Clark 
Tennani, Donna Lynne 
Tepper. Gregory Michael. 263 
Terango, Ivana 
Terhune, Joyce Catherine 
Terry. Charles L 
Terry. Gail Sue 
Terz. Jose Juan 
Teschauer, Kirsten Birgil, 342 
Tetzlaff, Monica Mana 
Teulel. Lynn Ashbacher 
Thacker, Dennis Wilson. 242 
Thacker. Lisa Suzanne 
Thacker, Susan Frances, 356 
Thalhimer, Mark Alfred 
Theisen, Jan Mane. 356 
Thernault. Dwayne Leo 
Theuer, Stephen Richard 
ThJerfelder, Karen Elizabeth. 328 
Thomas. Caria Haynes, 342 
Thomas. Cheryl S. 
Thomas. Craig Nicholas 
Thomas. Dorothy Dean 
Thomas, Jacqueline Paige 
Thomas. Janet Ellen. 125 
Thomas. Jeffrey L 
Thomas, Jonathan Jay 
Thomas, Jonathon Scott, 247 
Thomas, Knsti Anne 
Thomas. Lynn Hedy 
Thomas, Martha Coyner. 234 
Thomas, Mitchel E. 
Thomas. Raymond Warren 
Thomas. Timothy Arnott 
Thomas. Ward J- 
Thomas, Wendy Lee, 238 
Thomasson. Mary Elizabeth 
Thompson, Amy Eldndge, 123, 200 
Thompson, Amy Frances, 123 
Thompson, Brenda Carol 
Thompson. Bnjce E 
Thompson. Ellen Treacy, 224 
Thompson, Jeanette Louise, 328 
Thompson. John McLaney 
Thompson. K, Michelle 
Thompson. Kelly Jean, 356. 135 
Thompson, Kevin Douglas 
Thompson, Margaret Holland 
Thompson, Nathan Tobias 
Thompson, Pamela Mana 
Thompson, Patricia Sclater 
Thompson. Raiford Hall 
Thompson. Roberta Waller 
Thompson. Rodney Richardson 
Thompson, Rosemary Ayres 
Thompson. Stephanie Kay, 342 
Thompson, Tamara Dawn. 356 



Thompson. Zandra 

Thoney. Dennis A. 

Thome. Cheryle Lynne 

Thorne, Christopher Edward. 328 

ThornhiH. Kathenne Joanna 

Thornton, Ruffin Glenn 

Thornton. Sandra C 

Thornton, Todd Thorup 

Thorvaldson. Alan Lee 

Thrash, Mark Steven 

Thurby Hay. Linda Eileen 

Tice. Ellen Elizabeth 

Ticknor. Scott Brian 

Tierney, Michael John 

Tierney, Thomas Michael, 176, 175 

Tiesenga, Anne Louise, 342 

Tiffany, Pamela Jane, 328. 226 

Tilhou. John A. 

Tilley, Linda Denise 

Tilley, Lisa Roberta 

Tillman. Margaret Leigh, 356 

Tillman, Edward Lee 

Tiloton. Susan Hanley 

Timberlake, Daniel Scott 

Tingley. Clement. IV 

Tinnell. Jeffrey Scott 

Tinsley, Elizabeth Ann 

Tisdel, Karen Alison, 357 

Ttttle, Vera L 

Tobin, Mary Elizabeth, 226 

Todaro. Donald Goodrich 

Todaro. Pathcia Anne 

Todd, Cecilia AT 

Todd. Courtney Lynne, 357 

Todd. Jenni Harrison 

Todd. Robert John 

Toepke. Teresma Sue 

Toewe, Anne Margaret. 342, 226 

Tolbert Pamela Sue, 328 

Toler, Thomas Lee. 342 

Tolson, Edna 

Tomko, John Mark, 328 

Tomlinson. John Pitt IV. 342. 263 

Tomlmson, Theresa Beth 

Tompkins. Karen Leigh 

Tondrowski, Theodore Norman Irvi 

Toomer. Kevin Michael 

Topalian.Teny 

Topps. Audrea Renee 

Tom. Kazuo 

Tormey. Robert Emmett. 328. 150 

Torre, Taryn Gayle Mane 

Torrey, Michael David 

Tolh. Cheryl Susanne, 357. 238 

Toth. Troy Allen. 343 

Totten, Hope Elizabeth 

Totura, John William 

Toven. Stephen James 

Towery, Mark Andrew 

Towner, Matthew Gregory. 184. 185 

Townsend. David Philip 

Townsend, Deborah Susan 

Townsend. James C 

Toyama, Tsuguo 

Tracy. Alexander Standish 

Tramor. William A, 

Trask, Kathleen Ann 

Travelstead. Monique Mane 

Traver, Anthony John, 1 38 

Traver. Dawn Allison 

Traver. Kan Noemi 

Traylor, John Howard 

Trebour. David Alan, Jr. 

Tremo. Philip D., 328 

Trenholm, Christopher Allen 

Trescott. Tanya Lynne. 357. 203 

Trethewey. William Scott 

Trexler, Sara Ellen. 213 

Trice. Ashton Pleasants 



Trimble. Scott William 
Tnmboli, Gregory Joseph 
Tnmboli. Lisa Ellen. 328 
Trindle. John Michael. 108 
Tnvers. Calvin Leroy, 244 
Trojanowski. Ronald Edward 
Trollope. Zoe Anne 
Trosl Caroline Thomas 
Trott. Sarah Anne. 357 
Trotter. Thomas Scott 
Trout. Timothy William 
Trybul. Barbara Jane 
Tsakanikas. James Dana. 357 
Tuan. Helen Lm 
Tucker, Jane Dandndge 
Tulloh, Robert Fleming 
Tully, Keith Andrew 
Tummmello, Sandra B. Folse 
Tunnell. Bryan Paul, 343 
Turk, William Alexander 
Turia, Pamela. 134. 135 
Turner. CathenneWomack 
Turner. Debra Paige 
Turner. Joan H. 
Turner. Karen K 
Turner. Rayna Lee 
Turner, Tracey Elizabeth 
Turotsy. Barbara 



Turqman. Elizabeth Suzan. 357. 164 

Tuthill. Bartley F, IV 

Tuttle. Ann Leslie 

Tuttle. Robert William 

Tutton. Robert J, 

Tweedie, Martha Conrad, 328 

Tyler, Barbara Marcine. 357 

Tyler. Kenneth Duval 

Tyler. Robert Lewis 

Tymann, Karen Bernadette. 357 

Tysinger. Jonathan Undsey. 343 




Ughetto. Richard Aurelio 
Ugincius, Vida Marie 
Uhng. Mary Ruth 
Ukrop. Robert Scon 
Ulm. Irene 

Umscheid. Susan Margaret 
Underwood. Carolyn Madden 
Underwood. Sandra W. 
Underwood. Scott Brower 
Unger. Michael Allen 
Untiedl Kathryn Ball 
Upadhyaya. Alok K. 
Updegrove, Douglas Ralph 
Usher. Daniel Kevin 
UskuraiL Mary Tucker, 343 
Utz. Elizabeth Erne. 234 
Uwah. Uchenwa. 388 
Uzzo. Lynn Marie 



Uckert. Colin William 
Uehlinger. David Douglas 




: Mn 3UFLK : 



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Compliments 

of Colony 

Travel 

424 Duke of 
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Vadnais, Alison Joan 

Vahradiar. John Lee. 151 
Vakos, Charles James 
Vakos. Kimberly Anna. 343 
Valenti. Simonne 
Valentine. Cathleen Marie 
Valentino. Joseph Peter. 343 
Valeriano. Aurelio Rafael. 328 
Vatinski. Susan Tracy 
Vaikenburg, Christine Ann 
Valldejull, Vanessa Theresa 
Vallianl. Kevin Charles 
Van Bergen. Peter Joseph 
Van Dine. Howard Arthur. II 
Van Wagner. David Paul 
Van. Heidi Mane. 328 
Vance. Manan L 
Vancleave. Sharyl Anne 
Vandegritt. Donald M. 
Vandekamp, Diana K 
Vanderhyde. John Frederick 
Vanderveen. Marike Lies 
Vanderwiele. Sandra Elaine 
Vandewaler. Virginia L. 
Vandoorn. Leiicia Natalie. 328, 45 
Vanhousen, Garret 
Vanhouten, Rudoll Dirk 
Vanichkachorn, Suvmee. 357 
Vankirk, Margaret Jean. 328 
Vantandmgham. Cynthia E, 
Van loan. Nancy Louise 



Vaughn. Linda C 
Vazquez Catherine Sarber 
Veley, Jennifer Diane 
Venable. David Brian 
Venabte. Nancy Carol Nixon 
Verano. Michael Joseph 
Vernarelli, Christa Joy. 357 
Vest. William Thomas. Jr. 
Viar. Elisabeth Anne 
Vick. James Arthur. Jr . 343 
Vick. Norman Dwighl 
Vickery, George Kendall 
Vierling. Waller Christian 
Viers. Helen Renee. 343 
Vik. Frank Charles. Jr 
Villa. Christine Mane, 230 
Vtlla. Kimberly Jean 
Vinson. Irma Lucille 
Vttale. Jody Lynn 
Vitetlt. George Carl 
Vitelli, James Thomas 
Viviano. Lisa Joyce 
Vogt. Jane Ellen 
Volpi, John Michael 
Voneschen, Lisa Anne, 328, 238 
Vonludwig, Ametie Lucy 
Vonludwig. Ophelia Lorelei 
Vonioal, Dagmar Louise 
Vorisek. Richard Dennis. Jr . 207 
Vessel, Richard Alan 
Vrooman. Rona J. 



Wagner. Catherine Lynn 

Wagner. Kristen E 
Wagner. Richard Harlen 
Wagner, Richard Ogden 
Wagner, Rita S 
Wagner. Robert Clayton 
Wagner. Susan Lynn 
Wagner, William Palnck 
Wagner. William Robert 
Wagoner, Douglas Martin. Jr . 343 
Wailzer. Edwin Stuart 
Waida, Rebecca Kay 
Wakedeld. Waller William, It 
Wakelyn, Joann HuHstetler 
Walberg, Jo Ann 
Walborn, Sally, 357 
Waldman, Steven Michael. 328 
Waldron, William Anthony 
Walker, Beulah Butfington 
Walker. Christoph 
Walker, Dan McMurray, Jr 
Walker. Kathrine Lindsay 
Walker, Laura Anne 
Walker, Lewis Douglas. 357 
Walker, Lynn Benson 
Walker. Patrick Fitzgerald 
Walker, Patrick Joseph 
Walker. Rachel Suzanne, 196 
Walker, Richard Andrew 
Walker, Scott Alan 
Walker, Susan Lee Anne. 357 



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FOOD SERMCE 



Vannort. David N 
Vannuys. Susan Ann 
Vantimmeren. Anita Louise. 328 
Vantine, Robin Francis 
Vantol. Juliana Karol 
Vanwinkle. Barbara Marie 
Varallo. Sharon Mane. 343 
Varley. Kathleen Anne. 343 
Varner, David Allen 
Varner, Kelly Lynn, 343 
Vascott. AnnaL 
Vaseleck, James Michael. Jr 
Vaughan. Kevin Leigh 
Vaughan. Lisa Renee 
Vaughan. Merlin C 
Vaughan, Patncia Page 
Vaughan. Ryan Chnstopher 
Vaughan. Thomas Leonard 
Vaughn. Donald R, 
Vaughn, Harry Lorenzo 




Wachsman, Gordon MacDonald 
Wack. John Philip. 357 
Waddell. Robm Alene 
Wade. Chariene Michelle 
Wade, Charles. 357 
Wade. Dana Renee 
Wade. Deborah Ann. 142. 143 
Wade. Donna Rae. 343 
Waegerle. Dawn Colleen 



Walker. Suzanne Lesley. 343 

Walker. Virgil B. 

Walker, William McKenzie. Jr, 

Wall. Charles Edward. 328 

Wall. James David 

Wall. Marilyn Martin 

Wall. Sandra Margaret, 177. 1 76 

Wallace. Barbara King 

Wallace, Daisy Virginia 

Wallace, Diane Rose 

Wallace. Jonathan Carl 

Wallace, Julia Ann, 328 

Wallace, Karen Jeanne, 357 

Wallace, Lewis Joseph. Jr 

Wallace, Mary K 

Wallace, Rochelle Lynne 

Wallen. Rex Alan 

Waller. William Washington. II 

Wallin. Candice Lee 

Wallin. Edgar Venson. Jr. 328 



Wallmeyer, Frank Joseph, Jr . 343 

Walls. Mary Margaret B 

Walpole. Andrew Robert Nicholas 

Walsh, Cathenne Jean 

Walsh. Colleen Anne 

Walsh, David Ignatius 

Walsh, Laura Mane. 343 

Walsh. Maryellen. 152 

Walsh, Michael Edward. 343, 244 

Walsh. Michael John 

Walsh, NannetteS 

Walsh. Timothy Gerard, 343 

Walter, Ellen Mane 

Walter, Lynn Rankin 

Walter. Richard Ian 

Walters. Barbara Josephine. 328. 238 

Walters. Bobbie H 

Walthall, Denton Earl, Jr 

Walton, Christopher John 

Walton, DeniseAnn 

Walton, Jeffrey Howard 

Waltrip. DulcieY 

Wang, George Shuenn 

Wang, Yang 

Wang, Yi-Cheng 

Wanner, Brooke Virginia 

Ward, Amy Ashley 

Ward. Henry Clay 

Ward. Janet Michele 

Ward, Kevin James, 1 86. 263 

Ward, Pamela Elizabeth. 357 

Ward, Rebecca Jeanne, 224 

Ward. Renee Louise 

Ward. Scott John, 328 

Ware. Elizabeth Latane 

Ware, Margaret Laverne. 343 

Wargo, Jennifer Elizabeth, 357 

Warner, Lynne Mane. 343 

Warner, Valerie Amelia 

Warren. David Lee 

Warren, Julee Carroll 

Warrick. Carolyn B 

Warrick, Paula Jean 

Warthen, George A . II 

Wan/an, Robin Yvonne, 357 

Washburn. George Fred. II 

Wasson, Sharon Steeves 

Walerland, Laura Jones 

Walerland, Robert Leonard 

Waters. Hugh Richard 

Waters, Iveanne T 

Waters. Twanda Louise 

Waters, Wiley M.,Jr 

Waters. William F, 328 

Walkins, Christopher Penn 

Watkins. David Leo 

Watrous. Shelley Davison, 357 

Watson. Elizabeth Boyd, 343 

Watson, Tern Lynn 

Watt. Craig James, 328 

Watts. Shawna Rene 

Waymack, Jacqueline Rene 

Waynick, Gary Lewis 

Weathersbee, Margaret Helen. 343 

Weaver. Bennett Lewis, 257 

Weaver. Bradden Robert 

Weaver, Julie Hope, 328 

Weaver, Mark Alan 

Weaver, Martha Frances 

Weaver. Robert Scott 

Weaver. Sharon Lynne 

Weaver, Thaddeus James 

Weaving. David James 

Webb. Byron Scott 

Webb. Jason Elliott 

Webb, Jayne Dorethea 

Webb. Kathryn Mane, 328 

Webber. Charles Reid. II, 200 

Webber, James Patrick, 357 

Weber, Cletus Martin. 328. 198 

Weber, Daniel Max. 328 

Weber, Lawrence Lee, 343 

Weber, Linda Leigh, 328 

Weber, Richard Newton 

Weber, Rochelle Brander 

Weber, Ronald Jay 

Weber. Thomas Mark 

Webster. Barbita De Joi, 391 

Webster, James Joseph 

Wedding, Jeannette A. 

Weeks. Kiyoko T 

Weeks. Stephen Paul. 343 

Wehner. Harrison Gill. II. 343 

Wei. Su Huai 

Weidner, Thomas Bert 

Weiler. Karen Sue, 328 

Wein, Nancy Jane 

Weinman. Deborah Ann 

Weinslein, Jason Wayne 

Weintraub. Robert Richard. 357 

Weiss, Elizabeth Marade 

Weiss. Paul Christopher 

Weiss, Rhett Louis 

Weissman, Ellen Judith 

Weissman, Robert Thomas 

Welber, Kevin A 

Welch, Kathleen, 329. 152 

Welch, Kimberly Ann, 343 

Welch, Mark Douglas 

Welham, Walter Fredenck. II 

Weiler, Lawrence W , III 

Wells. Ann Camille 

Wells, Chnstina Lee. 357 

Wells. Elizabeth C 

Wells, Jonathan Ray 



Wells. Margaret Hume 
Welsh, Cathleen Patncia 
Welsh, Craig Randall 
Welsh. Elizabeth Ann 
Welsh. Elizabeth King 
Welts. Jeremy George 
Welts, Loretta Persing 
Welty, Amy Thomson 
Wennesheimer. Lisa Mane 
Wente, Allen Maura 
Wenzel, KnsZane 
Werme, Paul Victor 
Wernecke, Karl Richard 
Werner. Kathryn Elaine 
Wesley, John William 
Wessonga. Cassmir Joey 
West. Brian Joe. 343 
West, Karen E, 
West. Patricia Lee 
West, Stuart Christopher. 343 
Westbrook, Evelyn Lorraine 
Weston, Mary Kay 
Westwater, Kathryn Mary 
Westwaler, Patncia Ann 
Wetsel, Marcia Paige. 358 
Wever, Lucinda Dawn 
Weybnghl. Anne Carol 
Weybnght, David Hooker 
Whaley. Janet Patricia 
Wharton. Gregory David 
Whearty. Meredith Austin 
Wheeler. Barbara A 
Wheeler, Laura Elizabeth. 329 
Wheeler, Victoria Louise 
Wheeler. William Lee, ». 343 
Whelan, Dennis Joseph. 263 
Whelan. Theresa Marie. 343 
Whilaker, David John 
Whitaker, Gloria Jean 
Whitaker, Jessie H. 
Whitaker, Karen Elizabeth, 343 
Whitaker. Russell Evenette. Jr, 
Whitcomb. John Harold 
Whitcomb. Yvonne Riegler 
White, Brian Steven 
White, Carolyn Ann. 329 
White, Charles Michael JeHrey, 343 
White. David Carr. 258 
White, David Lawrence. 258 
White. Elizatjeth Lester 
White. Elizabeth Lynn 
While. Eric Robert 
White. Glenda Elizabeth 
White. James Hope 
White, Kristen Mane, 224 
White, Lebretia Andrea 
White, Linda Laurie. 224 
White. Marjone Ellen 
White. Richard Jerehmy 
White, Richard Louis 
White, Samuel Wiley. 343 
White, Sheryl Elizabeth, 358 
White. Susan Teresa 
White. Tania Katanna 
Whitehead, Robert Grubb 
Whitehurst. Bradley Scott 
Whitehursl. Bruce Tracy. 329 
Whitehurst. Roy Stuart 
Whitenack. Bruce George. Jr 
Whiienack. Ronald A 
Whiteside. Margaret India, 254 
Whitfield, Kermit Eugene, Jr 
Whitham. Elizabeth Ann, 329 
Whiting, George C 
Whiting. Jennifer Rene, 358 
Whitley, Jennifer Lynn. 358 
Whitmore. Jeffrey Ellis 
Whitney. James Marshall. Jr . 203 
Whitt, Patricia Boylston 
Whitlaker. Jennifer Sue. 358 
Whittaker. Sarah Leigh 
Whitworth, Anne Brooks, 329 
Whitworth. Sandra Lee 
Whyte, James J 
Wichems. Joan 
Wick wire, Ann J, 
Wiechmann. Knsta Lynn, 358 
Wiese, Robert 
Wiesner. Kevin charles 
Wiggins, Daryl Kevin. 329 
Wiggins, Frontis Eurbank. II 
Wiggins. Phillip Hiram 
Wilber- Jones. Anne C 
Wilborn. Sally Elizabeth 
Wilcox. Geoffrey Lynn 
Wilcox. Julia Kay 
Wilcox, Kimberly Anne, 358 
Wilcox. Meredith Chase, 329 
Wilcox, Peter Edward, 53 
Wildes. Michael Bryan 
Wilding, Joanne Carol 
Wiley, David Scott 
Wilgenbusch, Pamela Ann 
Wilkinson, Nancy Lee 
Willard, Palricia Lynn 
Willard. Wenifred Lewis. 343 
Willett. Rodney Turner. 21 3 
Williams, Andrew Morris 
Williams. Ann Laurens 
Williams. Barry Neal 
Williams.BenA.il 
Williams. Brenda Lee 
Williams, Bnan Lee 
Williams, Carol Ann 
Williams, David James 



Wriliams. Douglas Wiley 

Willrams. Edith Annette. 358 

Wrilrams. Elizabeth Anne. 329 

Williams, Enc Stuart. 343 

Williams. Gary John 

Williams. Gino Warren 

Williams. Helen Clayton 

Williams. Henrietta F, 

Williams. Ian Thomas 

Williams, James Clark. 1 76. 175 

Williams. Jeflrey Barton. 263 

Williams, Kathryn Mane 

Williams, Kirk Randall 

Williams, Lara Caroline. 358 

Williams, LoretteH. 

Williams. Margaret Ellen, 224 

Williams, Martin Braxton 

Williams. Matthew David. 358 

Williams, McKim. Jr. 

Williams. Melanie Leigh 

Williams. Michael Douglas 

Williams. Nancy Love 

Williams. Reginald Jean 

Williams. Rolf Peter Jeffrey 

Williams. RondaJ- 

Wilhams. Ruth L 

Williams. Scott Thomas 

Williams. Sharon Walton 

Williams. Sheila Lynne 

Williams. Steven Robert 

Williams. Thomas Matthew 

Williams. Timothy Joe 

Williams. Warwick Vincent 

Williamson, John David 

Williamson. Kimt>erly Ann 

Williamson. Mary Ann Frances 

Williford. Mary Ellen 

Willis. Anne R. 

Willis. Benjamin Johnson. II 

Willis. Frederick Michael 

Wilhs. Gregory Scott 

Willis. Lindsey 

Wilhs. Lisa Lind. 222 

Willis. Robert Alexander. Jr, 

Willis. Tyrone Lanier 

WiHison. Andrew Baker 

Wills, Claire Isobel 

Wills, Rachel Dunton 

Wilmot Edwin Norris 

Wilson. Amanda Lee 

Wilson. Angela S. 

Wilson, AnneL 

Wilson, Bnan Scott 

Wilson. Diana Elizabeth. 343 

Wilson. Jeffrey S- 

Witson, Jenifer Ann 

Wilson, Jennifer Catherine. 358 

Wilson, Jonathan Blair 

Wilson, Karen Anne. 235 

Wilson, Kathleen Ann 

Wilson. Laura Beth 

Wilson. Marcy Beth 

Wilson, Richard Joseph 

Wilson. Robert Vaughan 

Wilson, Sarah Jean, 152 

Wilson, Susan A. 

Wilson. Susan Lynn 

Wilson. Thomas Henry 

Wilson. Wendy Paige 

Wilson, William Arthur 

Wimberly. Brian T, 329 

Winchester. Neil Kenneth 

Windle. Lisa Anne 

Winebrenner, Wirt Shnver, II 

Winfieid. Denise Young 

Wingerd. Edmund C, II 

Wingfield. Stephanie Louise 

Winiecki. Susan Jean. 343 

Winkler, Gary Lee 

Winkler, Julianne. 238 

Winkworth. AnneT 

Winn, Oyane 

Winn, Sharon Patricia 

Winstead, Brenda M- 

Winstead. Rhonda Carol 

Winstead. Susan Elaine 

Wintermute. Karen Cecilia. 343 

Winters. Mary Stewart 

Winthrop, James Peppier 

Winzerlmg. Mary Angela 

Wise. Earl Edward, II, 258 

Wise, Fred Hobart 

Wise, Robert Martin 

Wise, Susan J 

Wiseman, Mary Elizabeth 

Witherspoon, Pamela Gay. 226. 254 

Withrow, Julie Ann 

Witmer, Susan Le 

Witt, Travis Harry 

Will Valda Maria 

Wittekind, Mary Beth, 358 

Wittkofski. John Mark 

Wilzgall. Kurt Edward 

Wixson. Carolyn Lee 

Wlodarczak, Elizabeth Denise 

Woglom. Maryel'en 

Wolf, Douglas A. 358 

Wolf. Tracy Lynne 

Wolfe, James R 

Wolfteich, Phyllis Mane. 343 

Wong-You-Cheong, Jennifer 

Wong. Richard Mark. 126. 258 

Woo, Karen Kmg-Fong 

Wood, Brock Richard 



Wood, Fred Glover. Ill 
Wood, Kelley Brown 
Wood, Lisa Reelhorn. 224 
Wood, Thomas Garland 
Wood, Wilham Gregory 
Woodard, Linda Svadeba 
Woodbury. Lisa Ann, 204 
Woodcock. Kathryn Holmes 
Woodford, Mark Stephen. 358 
Woodland, Deborah Anne. 329 
Woodbridge, Julie 
Woodnng. Julie Beth 
Woodring. Steven Keith 
Woodruff. William Schuyler 
Woods. Richard Thomas. 343 
Woods, Robert Louis 
Woods, Thomasena Harns 
Woodson, Pamela Jo 
Woodward. Donna Dene 
Woodward. Nancy 
Wootten, Thomas Mitchell 
Wornom. Ethelwyn Jeanne 
Worst. Jeremy Alan 
Worthen. Kevin Darrell 
Wray. Cynthia Marian 
Wray, Jennifer Susan 
Wray, Kevin Mark 
Wren. John Thomas 
Wright, Anaslasia Kirsten 
Wright. Christina Dawn 
Wright, Gail Elizabeth. 226 
Wright James Lee. 329 
Wnght.JohnC. 
Wright Kelly F. 
Wnght Lisa Mane 
Wright, Mable Ann 
Wnght Marc Allan 
Wright Pamela Clark Gale 



Wright Rachel Ann 

Wright Robert Darryelle. 1 13. 1 1 5. 1 1 6 

Wnght Stephanie Doss. 329 

Wnght Theodore Christopher S. 

Wright Thomas W. 

Wnght Tracey Chapman 

Wnght William Howell. Jr. 

Wnghtson, Jane Btackwell 

Wu, Garret Robert. 343. 384 

Wu. Meng Chou 

Wutff. Thomas M. 343 

Wundertich, Linda Anne 

Wurth. Chnstiane. 343 

Wyatt. Michael Keith 

Wyborski. Johanna Marie, 358 

Wychulis. martt Bnan, 329 




Yates, Ruth Ann. 358 
Yi, Eun Carol 
Yoo. Anna Y.. 358 
Youmans. Russet) Craig 
Young. Alice Orne 
Young. Amanda Gail 
Young, James Douglas. 263 
Young, James Otis. Jr 
Young. Kumi Mananne 
Young. Lisbeth Nell. 343. 164 
Young. Nancy N . 329. 226 
Young, Robyn Lynnette 
Young, Sharon Ruth 
Young. Susan 
Young. Suzanne Clair 
Young, Virginia Kathenne 
Youngblood. Gary Robert 
Youngblood, Marsha Ann. 238 
Yustein. Robyn Mara 
Yeamans. Douglas Ivanhoe 
Yeapanis. Demetra Mike 
Yeatts. Guy Steven 
Yeaw. Maria Teresa, 329 
Yenkowski. Gary Francis 
Yerly. Raymond Alan 



Yablonski. Karen Marie. 343 
Yacobi. John ANdrew 
Yacos, Andrew John. 258 
Yagiello. Stan J., 1 1 2. 1 1 5. n 6 
Yakaboski, Gregory F.. 358 
Yan. Lana Jean, 343 
Yannis. Elaine Dora 
Yarbrough. Micah Joel. 263 
YarneM. Maunce Richard 




Zaccagnino. Robert Joseph 
Zadareky. Kathleen Ann 
Zaienski. Ellen Lenz 
Zammetti, John P 
Zanetti. Susan Lynn, 329 
Zanfagna. Deborah Carol. 329 
Zanfagna, Gary Philip 
Zaremba. Barbara Anne 
Zauderer. Naomi Beth. 358 
Zavilla. Thomas Paul. 329 
Zawodnik. Carta M. 
Zaza. Roljert Noone 
Zeeman. Laura Jill 
Zehnle, Thomas Edward 
Zett Wayne Martin 
Zeitt Jeffrey 

Zengo. Gregory Pandy. 358 
Zerrenner, Karen Ann 
Zhou. Ye 

Zieske. Kimberly Jane. 329. 226 
Zimbeck. Walter Robert 
Zimmerman. Caryn Lisa 
Zingaro. James Charles 
Zirk. Helen Louise 
Zinman. Daniel Charles 
Zinsner. Charles. II 
Zitzelberger. Joan P. 
Ziu. Andrew Michael 
Zobnst Erik Christian 
Zoldork, Alan Joseph 
Zoller. Ted Douglas. 343 
Zopff. Ellen Louise 
Zumbro, Steven Branson 
Zweifel. Evan Rudolph 
Zwick. Maria Milagros 
Zwicklbauer. Michael Franz. 263 



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Copies • Reductions • Enlargements • Color • Self Service • Collating 

• Folding & Drilling • Binding • Business Cards • Letterheads 

• Brochures & Flyers • Tt-ansparencies • Passport Photos 

• And Much More! 

513 PRINCE GEORGE ST. 253-5676 
(across st. from sorority ct.) 



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The Botetourr Boutique, located in the Alumni House 

(adjacent to Gary Field) offers a distinct line of William 

and Mary items which are ideal gifts and souvenirs for 

alumni, students, and friends of the college. 

Open weekdays from 8-5. Phone (804) 229-1693 




^ HOLIDAY INN WEST 

Located just 4 blocks teKin^tlre'iceilege^ ■Holt-''The Inn is even a member of the Kingsmill Golf 



day Inn West has provided a comfortable place to 
stay in Williamsburg for over 23 years. Owned 
and operated by Inez Cushard, Holiday Inn West 
strives to become "number one in people pleas- 
ing." Its convenient location, outdoor pool, and 
its latest addition, cable T. V., are just some of the 
attractions that make the Holiday Inn a favorite 
hotel of William and Mary Alumni and tourists. 



Club. According to Shelly Wager at the front 
desk. "We don't charge for children nineteen 
years or younger who are traveling with their par- 
ents." Open all year round, Holiday Inn West 
accepts tours and gives special group rates for 
tours reserving 20 or more rooms. With such ser- 
vice, the Holiday Inn West really does seem num- 
ber one in making its customers satisfied. 



A Full Service 
Camera Shop 

Film Developing- Repairs 




MERCHANTS SQUARE 

Massey's 
Camera Shop 

PHONE 229-3181 
447 PRINCE GEORGE STREET 

WIUIAMSeURG. VIRGINIA 




||r'||||lll""'"'"',4K GOLD •••••""lllirill 

!^ ' STERLING SILVER ^ 

gemstone rings, pendants & earrings 




FRATERNITY AND SORORITY JEWELRY 



Ihiii;.. 



WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIR 
43! PRINCE GEORGE ST 



Ili.^Jillllii.. 



..iilllilil..ii 



Uofn/x///?iait& 






OUR REALCREAM AND FRESH EGGS 

WOfTMAKE AUaOF DIffERENa 

IFTMS ISKT TW BET O CREAM 

YOUVE EVER EATEMIN YOUR LIFE. 




The fact is, Rocky's costs more than any other ice 
cream in town. So it has to taste better if you're soing to 
come back for more. That's why we use all-natural ingre- 
dients like pure vanilla, thick cream, and chocolate from 
the richest imported cocoa beans. It's also why we bake 
the city's most delectable, homemade confections every 
day So, while Rocky's charges more, ft^N^^V^ 
we hope you'll agree: We deserve to. KI^I^IV I O 

ROCKY'S GOURMCT ICE CREAM 4 SWEET SHOP 

ONE MILE EAST OF HISTORIC AREA ON ROUTE 60E 




381 



EDITORS: 



LIFESTYLES— Belh Henry 
EVENTS— Elizabeth Heil 
SPORTS— Mary Beth Straight 
ORGANIZATIONS— Brent Armistead 
MEDIA — Godfrey Simmons 
ADMINISTRATION— Karen Tisdale 
FACES — Margaret Weathersby 
INDEX— Anne Salisbury 
ADS— Janet Stotts 
BUSINESS— Mark Koshmeder 

Cindy Paolillo 
PHOTOGRAPHY— (major contributors) 
Mike Nikolich John Maisto 

Maryanne Kondracki Dan Weber 

Lawrence I'Anson Alison Krufka 

Bill Honaker 



*Note: We regret that a complete staff listing was not printed. 
At the time of submission such a list was not available. We would 
like to personally thank ail those who helped with the book but 
were not acknowledged. 

— K.M. &S.B. 



CLOSING STATEMENT 



Under the best of circumstances, com- 
piling a yearbook is difficult. Add to these 
"normal" circumstances, an office move, 
a new and "improved" state-approved 
procedure for soliciting publishers' bids, a 
fall book mailing — well, you get the idea. 
After an agonizing struggle with more red 
tape than any human being should be 
exposed to, we secured a publishing con- 
tract in late March. Great. This left us 
approximately a month and a half to finish 
the book, which, actually, might have 
been reasonable if everyone had been 
writing articles and assigning pictures and 
designing layouts all year long, but this 
was impossible because we had to mail 
last year's book and because we had a 
word processor which did not process. 
Weil, even the best made plans go astray, 
as they say. That last month before gradua- 
tion was hell, and more than one staff 
member cracked under the pressure and 
left us holding the bag. A good part of our 
summer (all of it, actually) was spent laying 
out about half the book while wrestling 
with four summer jobs between us. As we 
sit here now at Susan's house in a room 
which overlooks a golf course on a beauti- 
ful Sunday morning, we wistfully fantasize 



382 



about being at the beach laughing at 
beet-red tourists and downing a few 
brews. Still, we are almost finished, and 
there are many people without whom we 
could not have completed this thing in 
four summers. 

First of ail, many, many thanks to the 
indispensable, preterhuman Mike Niko- 
lich. Mike logged more hours in the 
darkroom than we thought was healthy. 
Thanks for bailing us out, Mike. Special 
thanks go to the following photographers 
for their invaluable services: Lawrence 
I'Anson, Bill Honaker, Mary lida, John 
Maisto, and Dan Weber. Thanks also to 
our photography editor, Maryanne 
Kondracki. 

For finishing their sections entirely on 
their own, we would like to thank Laura 
Belcher, Mary Beth Straight, Brent Armis- 
tead, and Beth Henry. Their diligence 
when the going got tough saved us much 
anxiety. Thanks also go to Anne Salsbury 
for doing a great job on the index with the 
limited resources available to her. Our 
copy editor, Traci Edler, was a goddess 
among women. We can't even count the 
number of articles she wrote for us when 
we were desperate. 

Our business managers, Mark Kosch- 
meder and Cindy Paolillo, also deserve 
our hearty thanks for their long hours and 
guidance, not to mention their special 
ability to listen to our complaining. Janet 
Stotts, saleswoman extraordinaire, also has 
earned our eternal gratitude for single- 
handedly getting us out of the red. Very 
special thanks to Alison Krufka for picking 
up those abandoned photo assignments. 
Thank you, Jennifer Veley, for volunteer- 
ing to do all those layouts. We would like 
to thank Liddy Allee and Kaky Spruill for 
writing clutch articles and for going above 
and beyond the call of duty. Thanks also 
to Kathy Starr and Mary St. George for an 
evening of caption-writing. 

We would also like to thank Ken Smith 
for listening to us gripe, for standing up 
for us, and for just being there whenever 
we needed him. Thanks also to Betty Kelly 
for her helpful, cheery disposition. Special 
thanks also to Marty Keck for enduring all 
those ulcers we must have given him with 
our appalling lack of business sense. 
Thanks also to Bev and the Campus Center 
desk crew for the keys and for identifying 
unidentifiable people. 

We would also like to sincerely thank 
the Flat Hat staff for their support, their 
information, and, above all, their photo 
file. Thank you Greg Schneider and Joe 



Barrett. Very special thanks go to Flat Flat 
big-wig Susan Winiecki for her writing 
skills. 

We would like to show our apprecia- 
tion to the Campus Police for rescuing our 
senior stats box from Crim Dell and for 
letting us in and out of the Campus Center 
after hours. Thanks also to the Campus 
Center staff for trying to fix everything 
that broke in our office. 

Finally, we would like to thank those 
poor souls who lived with us. To Gienna 
Phillips and all of Pleasants Third, many, 
many thanks for handling Susan's calls and 
for taking her out for a beer when the 
crises came too hard and too fast. Very 
special thanks to Margie Johnson for 




The editors hard at work on the faces section — 
looking quite absurd which is why the picture is so 
small (editorial privilege is great). Photo by Mikeljon 
P. Nikolich 

being drafted onto the sports staff. Thanks 
to Allison Stringer just for being there. 
Huge thanks go to the residents of the 
Alpha Chi house for taking too many 
messages and for enduring Kim's ram- 
pages. Also, thank you, Tim and Sherry 
Boyle for your help and hospitality. 

Well, that just about covers it. If we have 
neglected to thank anyone, we apologize. 
Call us. We will take you out for a beer. 
Oh, yes, one last expression of gratitude 
goes to Barry Brown of Walsworth Pub- 
lishing. Nobody should have to endure 
what Barry did with such graciousness and 
good humor. We hope that all the hard 
work that went into this book will be 
appreciated. To all the 1985 graduates who 
will get this book a bit later than they (or 
we) had anticipated, we apologize. It has 
been a rough year. Good luck to Mary 
Beth, Mike, Lawrence and the rest of the 
returning staff. You will need it. 

—Susan Barco 
Kim Moosha 



383 



► JBT and Ludwell residents spend a lot of their 
spare time at the mercy of the Green Machine. 
Richie DeLona and Garret Wu compare notes while 
waiting for the bus 






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386 






► The first warm days of spring lure 
canoeing enthusiasts to Lake 
Matoaka. 





► Uchenwa Uwah attempts to make studying more 
enjoyable by taking tier books to ttie library lawn. 



▼ ▼ Doug Huszti breaks the monotony of studying 
by taking his books to a shady spot under a tree, 

▼ A unique approach to studying: Myra Pierson and 
Sue Hahn review their notes on the warm bricks of 
a Sunken Gardens path 




All photos by Dan Weber 






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Lawrence yfiMoo.' 






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A Beach Week Countdown, Freshmen John 
Fleming and Tom Bntt work on their base tans 
before heading for Nags Head 

< Matt Budd and Barbita Webster share a quiet 
moment on Jockey's Ridge before the W & fVI 
hordes arrive to watch the sunset. 



391 



392 




^ A pensive Matt Budd participates in the 
Candlelight Ceremony on the night before 
graduation. 

▼ Robbie Laney and his girlfriend Allison come 
prepared to party at the senior dance. 

▼ ▼ Tracy f^elton and Pam Krulitz pop the cork at 

the senior dance 






A Senior Class President. Tony McNeal, addresses 
his classmates one last time before the graduation 
walk to the hall, 

< Party Murphy and Susan Frier sing the Alma 
Mater at the Candlelight Ceremony. 

< < Zan Pattee. Beth Henry and Kevin Jones enter 
the senior graduation dance at Trinkle HalL 



395 




T\ r. 



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85 



lADY 




^illiamsbuig. Va. 



' LaCrosse games were well attended this year. 
The Tribe put up a fight against Hamden-Sydney 
but the Saints slipped by. 



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EXPIRES AUG. 31, 1985 



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? 397 



•4 Bridget Kealey s parents help adjust her stole 
before the procession to W&M Hall. 



44 Maryellen Farmer and a young relative relax at the 
Wren Building before graduation 



< Graduation speaker Grace Murray Hopper 
advised us that "its better to apologize later than to 
ask permission first." 



r Katie Hoffmann, Doug (Vlassey, and Susan 
Hudglns are all smiles after graduation. 




1 tviarc f\/laghus-Sharpe decorates his cap so he can be recognized among all the graduates. 



▼ Joe Matteo celebrates being conferred his 

degree. 

TT Faculty members applaud politely as awards 

are presented. 

► At the invitation of the Senior Class, former 

president Thomas A. Graves and his wife Zoe. 

attended the Commencement exercises. 












WALSWORTH PtBLISHINC COMPANY / MAKCELINEL MISSOURI I 



iwe would like to extend special thanks^^ 
/\ to the following people: *;■>. 

' Lifestyles Editor, Beth Henry/SportsV-^: :;- 
Editor and future editor-in-chief^ >-?^ 
Mary Beth Straight/Organizations 
1^ Editor, Brent Arnnistead/Greeks 
I Editor, Laura Belcher/Index Editor, 
Anne Salsbury/Copy Editor, Traci 
Edier/Chief Photographer, Mike 
Nikolich/Kenneth E. Smith, Asso-| 
ciate Dean of Students/Barry Brown , 
Walsworth Representative. 
We would also like to thank the F/af Haf 
•.■' staff for giving us access to their photo and 
article files in our nnost desperate hours of 
need. Special thanks go to Greg Schneider, |j 

Joe Barrett, and Susan Winiecki. Si ^ 

I Special thanks go to Betty and Kayo lr» rk 

Barco for feeding us and storing piles of I 

yearbook paraphernalia all summer long, 
I while we gave up many hours at the beach ^' 

to finish the book. Thanks also go to Judy |^ 

and Bill Moosha for their encouragement " ' 

throughout the summer. •j^ ._ 

—Susan Barco ' '^^ ■ 

I Kim Moosha 



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